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Sample records for aeroacoustic model tram

  1. Technology Investigations With the Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Booth, Earl; Johnson, Jeff L.; Derby, Michael R.; Sullivan, Ken; Ralston, Scott; Shockey, Gerald; Dawson, Seth; Warmbrodt, William (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This paper introduces the Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM) project. The TRAM project is a key infrastructure investment for NASA tiltrotor research. The TRAM project consists of the development and testing of two modular, hardware-compatible, test stands: an isolated rotor configuration and a fullspan model (dual rotors with a complete airframe representation). These two test stands are inclusively called the Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM). The baseline proprotors and airframe of the TRAM test stands are nominally 1/4-scale representative of the V-22 Osprey aircraft. The research objectives of the project, the TRAM hardware design features and capabilities, illustrative examples of the type and quality of data that can be acquired with the TRAM, and the current status of the overall project will be discussed in this paper.

  2. Calculation of the Aerodynamic Behavior of the Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM) in the DNW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2001-01-01

    Comparisons of measured and calculated aerodynamic behavior of a tiltrotor model are presented. The test of the Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM) with a single, 1/4-scale V- 22 rotor in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW) provides an extensive set of aeroacoustic, performance, and structural loads data. The calculations were performed using the rotorcraft comprehensive analysis CAMRAD II. Presented are comparisons of measured and calculated performance and airloads for helicopter mode operation, as well as calculated induced and profile power. An aerodynamic and wake model and calculation procedure that reflects the unique geometry and phenomena of tiltrotors has been developed. There are major differences between this model and the corresponding aerodynamic and wake model that has been established for helicopter rotors. In general, good correlation between measured and calculated performance and airloads behavior has been shown. Two aspects of the analysis that clearly need improvement are the stall delay model and the trailed vortex formation model.

  3. Open Rotor Aeroacoustic Modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2012-01-01

    Owing to their inherent fuel efficiency, there is renewed interest in developing open rotor propulsion systems that are both efficient and quiet. The major contributor to the overall noise of an open rotor system is the propulsor noise, which is produced as a result of the interaction of the airstream with the counter-rotating blades. As such, robust aeroacoustic prediction methods are an essential ingredient in any approach to designing low-noise open rotor systems. To that end, an effort has been underway at NASA to assess current open rotor noise prediction tools and develop new capabilities. Under this effort, high-fidelity aerodynamic simulations of a benchmark open rotor blade set were carried out and used to make noise predictions via existing NASA open rotor noise prediction codes. The results have been compared with the aerodynamic and acoustic data that were acquired for this benchmark open rotor blade set. The emphasis of this paper is on providing a summary of recent results from a NASA Glenn effort to validate an in-house open noise prediction code called LINPROP which is based on a high-blade-count asymptotic approximation to the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings Equation. The results suggest that while predicting the absolute levels may be difficult, the noise trends are reasonably well predicted by this approach.

  4. Open Rotor Aeroacoustic Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2012-01-01

    Owing to their inherent fuel efficiency, there is renewed interest in developing open rotor propulsion systems that are both efficient and quiet. The major contributor to the overall noise of an open rotor system is the propulsor noise, which is produced as a result of the interaction of the airstream with the counter-rotating blades. As such, robust aeroacoustic prediction methods are an essential ingredient in any approach to designing low-noise open rotor systems. To that end, an effort has been underway at NASA to assess current open rotor noise prediction tools and develop new capabilities. Under this effort, high-fidelity aerodynamic simulations of a benchmark open rotor blade set were carried out and used to make noise predictions via existing NASA open rotor noise prediction codes. The results have been compared with the aerodynamic and acoustic data that were acquired for this benchmark open rotor blade set. The emphasis of this paper is on providing a summary of recent results from a NASA Glenn effort to validate an in-house open noise prediction code called LINPROP which is based on a high-blade-count asymptotic approximation to the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings Equation. The results suggest that while predicting the absolute levels may be difficult, the noise trends are reasonably well predicted by this approach.

  5. Aeroacoustic measurements in a human airway model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhail, Michael; Campo, Elizabeth; Krane, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Flow and acoustic measurements are presented for a vocal tract-like geometry with a rigid constriction as a prelude to a study of a compliant constriction that models the vocal folds. Optical flow measurements were taken at the inlet of the constriction and downstream in the jet region. Pressure and acoustic measures were taken on either side of the constriction. Volume flow, two-dimensional flow fields, and radiated sound will be presented for a range of driving pressures. Measurements are used to assess the resistance of the constriction and the measures of the aeroacoustic source. The measurements serve as a validation case for computational aeroacoustic simulations. Acknowledge support from NIH and PSU-ARL E&F program.

  6. Aeroacoustic simulation for phonation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, Jeffrey; Hanford, Amanda; Craven, Brent; Krane, Michael

    2011-11-01

    The phonation process occurs as air expelled from the lungs creates a pressure drop and a subsequent air flow across the larynx. The fluid-structure interaction between the turbulent air flow and oscillating vocal folds, combined with additional resonance in the oral and nasal cavities, creates much of what we hear in the human voice. As many voice-related disorders can be traced to irregular vocal tract shape or motion, it is important to understand in detail the physics involved in the phonation process. To numerically compute the physics of phonation, a solver must be able to accurately model acoustic airflow through a moving domain. The open-source CFD package OpenFOAM is currently being used to evaluate existing solvers against simple acoustic test cases, including an open-ended resonator and an expansion chamber, both of which utilize boundary conditions simulating acoustic sources as well as anechoic termination. Results of these test cases will be presented and compared with theory, and the future development of a three-dimensional vocal tract model and custom-mode acoustic solver will be discussed. Acknowledge support of NIH grant 5R01DC005642 and ARL E&F program.

  7. Application of a random effects negative binomial model to examine tram-involved crash frequency on route sections in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Naznin, Farhana; Currie, Graham; Logan, David; Sarvi, Majid

    2016-07-01

    Safety is a key concern in the design, operation and development of light rail systems including trams or streetcars as they impose crash risks on road users in terms of crash frequency and severity. The aim of this study is to identify key traffic, transit and route factors that influence tram-involved crash frequencies along tram route sections in Melbourne. A random effects negative binomial (RENB) regression model was developed to analyze crash frequency data obtained from Yarra Trams, the tram operator in Melbourne. The RENB modelling approach can account for spatial and temporal variations within observation groups in panel count data structures by assuming that group specific effects are randomly distributed across locations. The results identify many significant factors effecting tram-involved crash frequency including tram service frequency (2.71), tram stop spacing (-0.42), tram route section length (0.31), tram signal priority (-0.25), general traffic volume (0.18), tram lane priority (-0.15) and ratio of platform tram stops (-0.09). Findings provide useful insights on route section level tram-involved crashes in an urban tram or streetcar operating environment. The method described represents a useful planning tool for transit agencies hoping to improve safety performance. PMID:27035395

  8. Exploring the impacts of factors contributing to tram-involved serious injury crashes on Melbourne tram routes.

    PubMed

    Naznin, Farhana; Currie, Graham; Logan, David

    2016-09-01

    Previous research is limited regarding factors influencing tram-involved serious injury crashes. The aim of this study is to identify key vehicle, road, environment and driver related factors associated with tram-involved serious injury crashes. Using a binary logistic regression modelling approach, the following factors were identified to be significant in influencing tram-involved fatal crashes in Melbourne: tram floor height, tram age, season, traffic volume, tram lane priority and tram travel speed. Low floor trams, older trams, tram priority lanes and higher tram travelling speeds are more likely to increase tram-involved fatal crashes. Higher traffic volume decreases the likelihood of serious crashes. Fatal crashes are more likely to occur during spring and summer. Findings from this study may offer ideas for future research in the area of tram safety and help to develop countermeasures to prevent specific fatality types from occurring. PMID:27352035

  9. Modeling the aeroacoustics of axial fans from CFD calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salesky, Alexandre; Hennemand, Vincent; Kouidri, Smaine; Berthelot, Yves

    2002-11-01

    The main source of aeroacoustic noise in axial fans is the distribution of the fluctuating, unsteady, aerodynamic forces on the blades. Numerical simulations were carried out with the CFD code (NUMECA), first with steady flow conditions to validate the aerolic performances (pressure drop as a function of flow rate) of the simulated six-bladed axial fans. Simulations were then made with unsteady flows to compute the fluctuating force distributions on the blades. The turbulence was modeled either with the Baldwin-Lomax model or with the K-epsilon model (extended wall function). The numerical results were satisfactory both in terms of numerical convergence and in terms of the physical characteristic of the forces acting on the blades. The numerical results were then coupled into an in-house aeroacoustics code that computes the farfield radiated noise spectrum and directivity, based on the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings formulation, or alternatively, on the simpler Lowson model. Results compared favorably with data obtained under nonanechoic conditions, based upon ISO 5801 and ISO 5136 standards.

  10. Multi-model Simulation for Optimal Control of Aeroacoustics.

    SciTech Connect

    Collis, Samuel Scott; Chen, Guoquan

    2005-05-01

    Flow-generated noise, especially rotorcraft noise has been a serious concern for bothcommercial and military applications. A particular important noise source for rotor-craft is Blade-Vortex-Interaction (BVI)noise, a high amplitude, impulsive sound thatoften dominates other rotorcraft noise sources. Usually BVI noise is caused by theunsteady flow changes around various rotor blades due to interactions with vorticespreviously shed by the blades. A promising approach for reducing the BVI noise isto use on-blade controls, such as suction/blowing, micro-flaps/jets, and smart struc-tures. Because the design and implementation of such experiments to evaluate suchsystems are very expensive, efficient computational tools coupled with optimal con-trol systems are required to explore the relevant physics and evaluate the feasibilityof using various micro-fluidic devices before committing to hardware.In this thesis the research is to formulate and implement efficient computationaltools for the development and study of optimal control and design strategies for com-plex flow and acoustic systems with emphasis on rotorcraft applications, especiallyBVI noise control problem. The main purpose of aeroacoustic computations is todetermine the sound intensity and directivity far away from the noise source. How-ever, the computational cost of using a high-fidelity flow-physics model across thefull domain is usually prohibitive and itmight also be less accurate because of thenumerical diffusion and other problems. Taking advantage of the multi-physics andmulti-scale structure of this aeroacoustic problem, we develop a multi-model, multi-domain (near-field/far-field) method based on a discontinuous Galerkin discretiza-tion. In this approach the coupling of multi-domains and multi-models is achievedby weakly enforcing continuity of normal fluxes across a coupling surface. For ourinterested aeroacoustics control problem, the adjoint equations that determine thesensitivity of the cost

  11. Aeroacoustic Measurements of a Wing/Slat Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Jeff M.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.

    2002-01-01

    Aeroacoustic evaluations of high-lift devices have been carried out in the Quiet Flow Facility of the NASA Langley Research Center. The present paper deals with detailed flow and acoustic measurements that have been made to understand, and to possibly predict and reduce, the noise from a wing leading edge slat configuration. The acoustic database is obtained by a moveable Small Aperture Directional Array (SADA) of microphones designed to electronically steer to different portions of models under study. The slat is shown to be a uniform distributed noise source. The data was processed such that spectra and directivity were determined with respect to a one-foot span of slat. The spectra are normalized in various fashions to demonstrate slat noise character. In order to equate portions of the spectra to different slat noise components, trailing edge noise predictions using measured slat boundary layer parameters as inputs are compared to the measured slat noise spectra.

  12. Measurements of phonatory aeroacoustic source strengths in a physical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krane, Michael; McPhail, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Aeroacoustic sources due to flow-induced vibration of a compliant constriction in a duct were characterized experimentally. The principal goal of this study is to estimate the character and level of the various sources of sound in human voice production. Measurements were performed in a model of the human airway, constructed to human dimensions, but with an idealized geometry. The airway duct models the passage from the trachea to the mouth, as a constant-area (7.64 cm2) square cross-section, interrupted only by the model vocal folds. These were fabricated in two layers of soft silicone rubber. Time-resolved measurements included subglottal and supraglottal absolute pressure, sound pressure at the model vocal tract ``mouth,'' and high-speed video of the model vocal folds. These were sampled synchronously at 22 kHz. Steady-state measurements included subglottal pressure and volume flow rate. Measurements were conducted over a subglottal pressures range of 2.25--2.80 kPa. Source strengths were estimated by theoretical expressions, using the measured pressures and glottal area as inputs. Results show that the dipole source typically associated with vocal fold drag is the dominant source. Furthermore, for the vibration pattern observed in these experiments, glottal jet turbulence dominates the dipole source above approximately 1 kHz.

  13. Unsteady Aerodynamic Models for Turbomachinery Aeroelastic and Aeroacoustic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.; Barnett, Mark; Ayer, Timothy C.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical analyses and computer codes are being developed for predicting compressible unsteady inviscid and viscous flows through blade rows of axial-flow turbomachines. Such analyses are needed to determine the impact of unsteady flow phenomena on the structural durability and noise generation characteristics of the blading. The emphasis has been placed on developing analyses based on asymptotic representations of unsteady flow phenomena. Thus, high Reynolds number flows driven by small amplitude unsteady excitations have been considered. The resulting analyses should apply in many practical situations and lead to a better understanding of the relevant flow physics. In addition, they will be efficient computationally, and therefore, appropriate for use in aeroelastic and aeroacoustic design studies. Under the present effort, inviscid interaction and linearized inviscid unsteady flow models have been formulated, and inviscid and viscid prediction capabilities for subsonic steady and unsteady cascade flows have been developed. In this report, we describe the linearized inviscid unsteady analysis, LINFLO, the steady inviscid/viscid interaction analysis, SFLOW-IVI, and the unsteady viscous layer analysis, UNSVIS. These analyses are demonstrated via application to unsteady flows through compressor and turbine cascades that are excited by prescribed vortical and acoustic excitations and by prescribed blade vibrations. Recommendations are also given for the future research needed for extending and improving the foregoing asymptotic analyses, and to meet the goal of providing efficient inviscid/viscid interaction capabilities for subsonic and transonic unsteady cascade flows.

  14. Advanced Model for Extreme Lift and Improved Aeroacoustics (AMELIA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtwardt, Jonathan; Paciano, Eric; Jameson, Tina; Fong, Robert; Marshall, David

    2012-01-01

    tunnel model design would be completed, manufactured, and calibrated. During the fifth year the large scale wind tunnel test was conducted. This technical memo will describe all phases of the Advanced Model for Extreme Lift and Improved Aeroacoustics (AMELIA) project and provide a brief summary of the background and modeling efforts involved in the NRA. The conceptual designs considered for this project and the decision process for the selected configuration adapted for a wind tunnel model will be briefly discussed. The internal configuration of AMELIA, and the internal measurements chosen in order to satisfy the requirements of obtaining a database of experimental data to be used for future computational model validations. The external experimental techniques that were employed during the test, along with the large-scale wind tunnel test facility are covered in great detail. Experimental measurements in the database include forces and moments, and surface pressure distributions, local skin friction measurements, boundary and shear layer velocity profiles, far-field acoustic data and noise signatures from turbofan propulsion simulators. Results and discussion of the circulation control performance, over-the-wing mounted engines, and the combined performance are also discussed in great detail.

  15. An Overview of Computational Aeroacoustic Modeling at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.

    2001-01-01

    The use of computational techniques in the area of acoustics is known as computational aeroacoustics and has shown great promise in recent years. Although an ultimate goal is to use computational simulations as a virtual wind tunnel, the problem is so complex that blind applications of traditional algorithms are typically unable to produce acceptable results. The phenomena of interest are inherently unsteady and cover a wide range of frequencies and amplitudes. Nonetheless, with appropriate simplifications and special care to resolve specific phenomena, currently available methods can be used to solve important acoustic problems. These simulations can be used to complement experiments, and often give much more detailed information than can be obtained in a wind tunnel. The use of acoustic analogy methods to inexpensively determine far-field acoustics from near-field unsteadiness has greatly reduced the computational requirements. A few examples of current applications of computational aeroacoustics at NASA Langley are given. There remains a large class of problems that require more accurate and efficient methods. Research to develop more advanced methods that are able to handle the geometric complexity of realistic problems using block-structured and unstructured grids are highlighted.

  16. Full Scale Rotor Aeroacoustic Predictions and the Link to Model Scale Rotor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Burley, Casey L.; Conner, David A.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Aeroacoustic Prediction System (NAPS) is used to establish a link between model-scale and full-scale rotor predictions and is partially validated against measured wind tunnel and flight aeroacoustic data. The prediction approach of NAPS couples a comprehensive rotorcraft analysis with acoustic source noise and propagation codes. The comprehensive analysis selected for this study is CAMRAD-II, which provides the performance/trim/wake solution for a given rotor or flight condition. The post-trim capabilities of CAMRAD-II are used to compute high-resolution sectional airloads for the acoustic tone noise analysis, WOPMOD. The tone noise is propagated to observers on the ground with the propagation code, RNM (Rotor Noise Model). Aeroacoustic predictions are made with NAPS for an isolated rotor and compared to results of the second Harmonic Aeroacoustic Rotor Test (HART-II) program, which tested a 40% dynamically and Mach-scaled BO-105 main rotor at the DNW. The NAPS is validated with comparisons for three rotor conditions: a baseline condition and two Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) conditions. To establish a link between model and full-scale rotor predictions, a full-scale BO-105 main rotor input deck for NAPS is created from the 40% scale rotor input deck. The full-scale isolated rotor predictions are then compared to the model predictions. The comparisons include aerodynamic loading, acoustic levels, and acoustic pressure time histories for each of the three conditions. With this link established, full-scale predictions are made for a range of descent flight conditions and compared with measured trends from the recent Rotorcraft Operational Noise Abatement Procedures (RONAP) flight test conducted by DLR and ONERA. Additionally, the effectiveness of two HHC conditions from the HART-II program is demonstrated for the full-scale rotor in flight.

  17. Insights into Airframe Aerodynamics and Rotor-on-Wing Interactions from a 0.25-Scale Tiltrotor Wind Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, L. A.; Lillie, D.; McCluer, M.; Yamauchi, G. K.; Derby, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    A recent experimental investigation into tiltrotor aerodynamics and acoustics has resulted in the acquisition of a set of data related to tiltrotor airframe aerodynamics and rotor and wing interactional aerodynamics. This work was conducted in the National Full-scale Aerodynamics Complex's (NFAC) 40-by-80 Foot Wind Tunnel, at NASA Ames Research Center, on the Full-Span Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM). The full-span TRAM wind tunnel test stand is nominally based on a quarter-scale representation of the V-22 aircraft. The data acquired will enable the refinement of analytical tools for the prediction of tiltrotor aeromechanics and aeroacoustics.

  18. Etanercept protects myocutaneous flaps from ischaemia reperfusion injury: An experimental study in a rat tram flap model.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, Burak; Çevik, Özge; Çilingir, Özlem Tuğçe

    2016-08-01

    Background Being an inevitable component of free tissue transfer, ischemia-reperfusion injury tends to contribute to flap failure. TNF-α is an important proinflammatory cytokine and a prominent mediator of the ischemia-reperfusion injury. Etanercept, a soluble TNF-α binding protein, has shown anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects in animal models of renal and myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. We have designed an experimental study to investigate the effect of etanercept on myocutaneous ischemia-reperfusion injury on transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap model in rats. Methods Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups: In group 1 (sham), the TRAM flap was raised and sutured back without further intervention. In group 2 (control), the flap was raised and the ischemia-reperfusion protocol was followed. In group 3, etanercept (10 mg/kg, i.v.) was administered 10 minutes before reperfusion. At the end of the reperfusion period, biochemical and histolopathological evaluations were performed on serum and tissue samples. Results In the etanercept group the IMA and 8-OHdG levels (p = 0.005 and p = 0.004, respectively) were found significantly lower, and the GSH and SOD levels (p = 0.01 and p < 0.001, respectively) significantly higher in comparison to the control group. The histopathological analysis has revealed a lower degree of hyalinization, degenerated muscle fibers and nuclear change in the etanercept group compared to the control group. Conclusion The results of our experimental study indicate that etanercept offers protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury in skeletal muscle tissue, enhancing the TRAM flap viability. The ability of etanercept to induce ischemic tolerance suggests that it may be applicable in free-flap surgery. PMID:26950289

  19. 31. LOOKING SOUTHEAST. AS THE TRAM ENTERED THE GRAVITY TRAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. LOOKING SOUTHEAST. AS THE TRAM ENTERED THE GRAVITY TRAM LINE, IT CROSSED THIS CUT-STONE BRIDGE AND WAS CONTROLLED BY THE SWITCHING PLATFORM IN THE BACKGROUND - Independent Coal & Coke Company, Kenilworth, Carbon County, UT

  20. OVERVIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, TRAM TRESTLE, AND PRIMARY ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, TRAM TRESTLE, AND PRIMARY ORE BIN, LOOKING NORTHEAST. REMAINS OF A PRIVY ARE LOCATED IN BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  1. Comparison of measured aeroacoustic source spectra to predictions using a jet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Daniel; Krane, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Sound radiated from a turbulent jet-wall interaction in a duct is measured for several jet-wall interaction geometries, for which the acoustic response of the duct was identical at low frequencies. This sound production mechanism is identical to that of unvoiced speech sounds. Traditionally in these cases, the speech science community has stressed the acoustic filter's role in determining the radiated sound, and has neglected the importance of the aeroacoustic source. When the local source region aerodynamics, such as the mean jet path relative to the wall and the jet speed are varied, but the acoustic filter held constant, distinct differences due to the aeroacoustic source are observable in the radiated sound. The source spectra are determined and qualitatively compared to an analytical model, and the distinct differences in the source spectra are described theoretically, whereas the classical approach would not have been able to theoretically describe these results. It is concluded that the turbulent jet's path makes a crucial contribution to the `shape' of the source spectrum and that unvoiced speech sound production depends as much on the local details of the source region aerodynamics and geometry as it does on the acoustic filter.

  2. Aeroacoustic flowmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakkottai, Parthasarathy (Inventor); Kwack, Eug Y. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The flowmeter is based on a measurement of phase difference between two points on the circumference of a pipe separated axially by an integral multiple of sound wavelength. Plane sound waves are generated aeroacoustically by a non-protruding ring cavity energized either directly by the flow or by a subsidiary flow of the same medium. The frequency of the aeroacoustic source varies with temperature and therefore the temperature can be obtained. In the case of steam flow, temperature can be measured independently and therefore from the measured frequency (or speed of sound), the quality of wet steam can be measured. The flowmeter is linear in velocity and no calibrations are required.

  3. Development and validation of a 3D Lattice Boltzmann model for volcano aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogi, Federico; Bonadonna, Costanza; Ripepe, Maurizio; Chopard, Bastien; Malaspinas, Orestis; Latt, Jonas; Falcone, Jean-Luc

    2015-04-01

    Infrasound measurements have a great potential for the real time characterization of volcanic plume source parameters [Ripepe et al., 2013]. Nonetheless many shortcomings have been highlighted in the understanding of the infrasound monitoring. In particular, the application of the classical acoustic source models to volcanic explosive eruptions has shown to be challenging and a better knowledge of the link between the acoustic radiation and actual volcanic fluid dynamics processes is required. New insights into this subject could be given by the study of realistic aeroacoustic numerical simulations of a volcanic jet. Our work mainly focuses on developing and validating such numerical model to determine when and if classical model source theory can be applied to explain volcanic infrasound data. Lattice Boltzmann strategies (LB) provide the opportunity to develop an accurate, computationally fast, 3D physical model for a volcanic jet and wave propagation. In the field of aeroacoustic applications, dedicated LB schemes has been proven to have the low dispersion and dissipative properties needed for capturing the weak acoustic pressure fluctuations. However, when dealing with simulations of realistic flows, artificial boundaries are defined around the flow region. The reflected waves from these boundaries can have significant influence on the flow field and overwhelm the acoustic field of interest. A special absorbing boundary layer has been implemented in our model to suppress the reflected waves [Xu et al., 2013]. In addition, for highly multi-scale turbulent flows, such as volcanic plumes, the number of grid points needed to represent the smallest scales might become intractable and the most complicated physics happen only in small portions of the computational domain. The implementation of the grid refinement, in our model allow us to insert local finer grids only where is actually needed [Lagrava et al., 2012] and to increase the size of the computational domain

  4. Experimental study of the aeroacoustic-aeroelastic behavior of model vocal folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Elizabeth; Camarena, Ernesto; Krane, Michael

    2010-11-01

    The effect of vocal fold body stiffness and bilateral asymmetry was studied using a life-size physical model of the human airway using interchangeable silicone rubber models of the human vocal folds. The two layer vocal fold models are comprised of an inner body layer and an outside cover layer. The following measures were used to assess the effect of body stiffness and asymmetry: radiated sound power, phonation threshold pressure and aeroacoustic source strengths. Results obtained from the human airway model compared favorably with behavior observed in human subjects. Furthermore, the results reveal that the asymmetric cases required a higher subglottal pressure to initiate phonation and radiated less intense sound, in comparison to the symmetrical configuration.

  5. Aeroacoustic Characteristics of Model Jet Test Facility Flow Conditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinzie, Kevin W.; Henderson, Brenda S.; Haskin, Harry H.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental investigation of flow conditioning devices used to suppress internal rig noise in high speed, high temperature experimental jet facilities is discussed. The aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics of a number of devices including pressure loss and extraneous noise generation are measured. Both aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics are strongly dependent on the porosity of the flow conditioner and the closure ratio of the duct system. For unchoked flow conditioners, the pressure loss follows conventional incompressible flow models. However, for choked flow conditioners, a compressible flow model where the duct and flow conditioner system is modeled as a convergent-divergent nozzle can be used to estimate pressure loss. Choked flow conditioners generate significantly more noise than unchoked conditioners. In addition, flow conditioners with small hole diameters or sintered metal felt material generate less self-noise noise compared to flow conditioners with larger holes.

  6. Aeroacoustic Study of a High-Fidelity Aircraft Model: Part 1- Steady Aerodynamic Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Hannon, Judith A.; Neuhart, Danny H.; Markowski, Gregory A.; VandeVen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present steady aerodynamic measurements for an 18% scale model of a Gulfstream air-craft. The high fidelity and highly-instrumented semi-span model was developed to perform detailed aeroacoustic studies of airframe noise associated with main landing gear/flap components and gear-flap interaction noise, as well as to evaluate novel noise reduction concepts. The aeroacoustic tests, being conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel, are split into two entries. The first entry, completed November 2010, was entirely devoted to the detailed mapping of the aerodynamic characteristics of the fabricated model. Flap deflections of 39?, 20?, and 0? with the main landing gear on and off were tested at Mach numbers of 0.16, 0.20, and 0.24. Additionally, for each flap deflection, the model was tested with the tunnel both in the closed-wall and open-wall (jet) modes. During this first entry, global forces (lift and drag) and extensive steady and unsteady surface pressure measurements were obtained. Preliminary analysis of the measured forces indicates that lift, drag, and stall characteristics compare favorably with Gulfstream?s high Reynolds number flight data. The favorable comparison between wind-tunnel and flight data allows the semi-span model to be used as a test bed for developing/evaluating airframe noise reduction concepts under a relevant environment. Moreover, initial comparison of the aerodynamic measurements obtained with the tunnel in the closed- and open-wall configurations shows similar aerodynamic behavior. This permits the acoustic and off-surface flow measurements, planned for the second entry, to be conducted with the tunnel in the open-jet mode.

  7. Subsonic jet aeroacoustics: associating experiment, modelling and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Peter; Gervais, Yves

    2008-01-01

    An overview of jet noise research is presented wherein the principal movements in the field are traced since its beginnings. Particular attention is paid to the evolution of our understanding of what we call a “source mechanism” in free shear flows; to the theoretical, experimental and numerical studies which have nurtured this understanding; and to the currently unresolved conceptual difficulties which render analysis of experimental and numerical data so difficult. As it is clear that accelerated progress in this field of research can be made possible by a more effective synergy between the theoretical, experimental and numerical disciplines—one which draws in particular on the impressive recent progress in experimental and numerical techniques—we endeavour to elucidate the various “source” characteristics identified by these different means of study; the points on which the studies agree or disagree, and the significance of such accord or discord; and, the new analysis possibilities which can now be realised by effectively associating experiment, modelling and simulation.

  8. Assessment of Hybrid RANS/LES Turbulence Models for Aeroacoustics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Lockhard, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Predicting the noise from aircraft with exposed landing gear remains a challenging problem for the aeroacoustics community. Although computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has shown promise as a technique that could produce high-fidelity flow solutions, generating grids that can resolve the pertinent physics around complex configurations can be very challenging. Structured grids are often impractical for such configurations. Unstructured grids offer a path forward for simulating complex configurations. However, few unstructured grid codes have been thoroughly tested for unsteady flow problems in the manner needed for aeroacoustic prediction. A widely used unstructured grid code, FUN3D, is examined for resolving the near field in unsteady flow problems. Although the ultimate goal is to compute the flow around complex geometries such as the landing gear, simpler problems that include some of the relevant physics, and are easily amenable to the structured grid approaches are used for testing the unstructured grid approach. The test cases chosen for this study correspond to the experimental work on single and tandem cylinders conducted in the Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel (BART) and the Quiet Flow Facility (QFF) at NASA Langley Research Center. These configurations offer an excellent opportunity to assess the performance of hybrid RANS/LES turbulence models that transition from RANS in unresolved regions near solid bodies to LES in the outer flow field. Several of these models have been implemented and tested in both structured and unstructured grid codes to evaluate their dependence on the solver and mesh type. Comparison of FUN3D solutions with experimental data and numerical solutions from a structured grid flow solver are found to be encouraging.

  9. Acoustic Performance of an Advanced Model Turbofan in Three Aeroacoustic Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Hughes, Christopher E.

    2012-01-01

    A model advanced turbofan was acoustically tested in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot-Low-Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT), and in two other aeroacoustic facilities. The Universal Propulsion Simulator (UPS) fan was designed and manufactured by the General Electric Aircraft Engines (GEAE) Company, and featured active core, as well as bypass, flow paths. The reference test configurations were with the metal, M4, rotor with hardwall and treated bypass flow ducts. The UPS fan was tested within an airflow at a Mach number of 0.20 (limited flow data were also acquired at a Mach number of 0.25) which is representative of aircraft takeoff and approach conditions. Comparisons were made between data acquired within the airflow (9x15 LSWT and German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW)) and outside of a free jet (Boeing Low Speed Aero acoustic Facility (LSAF) and DNW). Sideline data were acquired on an 89-in. (nominal 4 fan diameters) sideline using the same microphone assembly and holder in the 9x15 LSWT and DNW facilities. These data showed good agreement for similar UPS operating conditions and configurations. Distortion of fan spectra tonal content through a free jet shear layer was documented, suggesting that in-flow acoustic measurements are required for comprehensive fan noise diagnostics. However, there was good agreement for overall sound power level (PWL) fan noise measurements made both within and outside of the test facility airflow.

  10. Aeroacoustic Duster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Chen, Di (Inventor); Vachon, Nicholas Mario (Inventor); Hitt, Darren (Inventor); Wu, Junru (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The aero-acoustic duster invention disclosed herein provides for high particle removal rate from surfaces with low energy expenditure relative to competing vacuum-based devices. The device removes particulate matter from a surface using a two-step process: 1. Acoustic radiation is used to break the adhesive bonds between dust and the surface, forcing particles into a mode where they continuously bounce up and down on the surface; and, 2. A bounded vortex is generated over the surface, with suction in the vortex center and jets for blowing air along the periphery. The jets are tilted in the tangential direction to induce vortex motion within the suction region. The vortex is said to be bounded because streamlines originating in the downward jets are entrained back into the central vortex.

  11. KSC VAB Aeroacoustic Hazard Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliveira, Justin M.; Yedo, Sabrina; Campbell, Michael D.; Atkinson, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) carried out an analysis of the effects of aeroacoustics produced by stationary solid rocket motors in processing areas at KSC. In the current paper, attention is directed toward the acoustic effects of a motor burning within the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The analysis was carried out with support from ASRC Aerospace who modeled transmission effects into surrounding facilities. Calculations were done using semi-analytical models for both aeroacoustics and transmission. From the results it was concluded that acoustic hazards in proximity to the source of ignition and plume can be severe; acoustic hazards in the far-field are significantly lower.

  12. OVERVIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, TRAM TRESTLE, AND PRIMARY ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, TRAM TRESTLE, AND PRIMARY ORE BIN, LOOKING NORTHEAST. REMAINS OF A BLACKSMITH'S FORGE AND WORK CAN BE SEEN JUST BELOW THE ORE BIN (SEE CA-291-32 FOR DETAIL). ROCK FOUNDATIONS LOCATED JUST ABOVE THE ORE BIN AND ALONG THE FIRST RIDGELINE ARE TENT PADS. SEE CA-291-49 (CT) FOR IDENTICAL COLOR TRANSPARENCY. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  13. OVERVIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, TRAM TRESTLE, AND PRIMARY ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, TRAM TRESTLE, AND PRIMARY ORE BIN, LOOKING NORTHEAST. REMAINS OF A BLACKSMITH'S FORGE AND WORK CAN BE SEEN JUST BELOW THE ORE BIN (SEE CA-291-32 FOR DETAIL). ROCK FOUNDATIONS LOCATED JUST ABOVE THE ORE BIN AND ALONG THE FIRST RIDGELINE ARE TENT PADS. SEE CA-291-24 FOR IDENTICAL B&W NEGATIVE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  14. EAST ELEVATION OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL, LOOKING NORTHWEST. TRAM CARS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST ELEVATION OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL, LOOKING NORTHWEST. TRAM CARS ENTERED AND EXITED FROM RIGHT,AND DUMPED INTO THE ORE BIN SEEN AT LOWER LEFT. BELOW THE ORE BIN IS A JAW CRUSHER FOUNDATION. THE WOODEN BOX AT CENTER IS FILLED WITH ROCKS, PROVIDING THE COUNTERWEIGHT TO THE TRAMWAY CABLE, WHICH KEEPS IT TAUGHT. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  15. Arctic Climate Forcing Observations to Improve Earth System Models: Measurements at High Frequency, Fine Spatial Resolution, and Climatically Relevant Spatial Scales with the use of the Recently Deployed NGEE-Arctic Tram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, J. B.; Serbin, S.; Dafflon, B.; Raz Yaseef, N.; Torn, M. S.; Cook, P. J.; Lewin, K. F.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    In order to improve the representation of the land surface and subsurface properties and their associated feedbacks with climate forcings, climate change, and drivers in Earth System Models (ESMs), detailed observations need to be made at climatically relevant spatial and temporal scales. Pan-Arctic spatial heterogeneity and temporal variation present major challenges to the current generation of ESMs. To enable highly spatially resolved and high temporal frequency measurements for the independent validation of modeled energy and greenhouse gas surface fluxes at core to intermediate scales, we have developed, tested, and deployed an automated observational platform, the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE)-Arctic Tram. The NGEE-Arctic Tram, installed on the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO) near Barrow, AK in mid May 2014, consists of 65 meters of elevated track and a fully automated cart carrying a suite of radiation and remote sensing instrumentation. The tram transect is located within the NGEE eddy covariance tower footprint to help better understand the relative contribution of different landforms (e.g. low center vs high center polygonal tundra and associated vegetation) to the overall energy budget of the footprint. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), soil moisture, and soil temperature sensors are acquired autonomously and co-located with the tram to link subsurface properties with surface observations. To complement the high frequency and fine spatial resolution of the tram, during the summer field seasons of 2013 and 2014 a portable version of the NGEE-Arctic Tram (also know as the portable energy pole or PEP); was used to characterize surface albedo, NDVI, surface temperature, and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) across two ~500 m BEO transects co-located with subsurface ERT and ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements. In addition, a ~ 3 Km transect across three drained thaw-lake basins (DTLB) of different climate

  16. Aeroacoustics of advanced propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.

    1990-01-01

    The aeroacoustics of advanced, high speed propellers (propfans) are reviewed from the perspective of NASA research conducted in support of the Advanced Turboprop Program. Aerodynamic and acoustic components of prediction methods for near and far field noise are summarized for both single and counterrotation propellers in uninstalled and configurations. Experimental results from tests at both takeoff/approach and cruise conditions are reviewed with emphasis on: (1) single and counterrotation model tests in the NASA Lewis 9 by 15 (low speed) and 8 by 6 (high speed) wind tunnels, and (2) full scale flight tests of a 9 ft (2.74 m) diameter single rotation wing mounted tractor and a 11.7 ft (3.57 m) diameter counterrotation aft mounted pusher propeller. Comparisons of model data projected to flight with full scale flight data show good agreement validating the scale model wind tunnel approach. Likewise, comparisons of measured and predicted noise level show excellent agreement for both single and counterrotation propellers. Progress in describing angle of attack and installation effects is also summarized. Finally, the aeroacoustic issues associated with ducted propellers (very high bypass fans) are discussed.

  17. Aeroacoustics of advanced propellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeneweg, John F.

    The aeroacoustics of advanced, high speed propellers (propfans) are reviewed from the perspective of NASA research conducted in support of the Advanced Turboprop Program. Aerodynamic and acoustic components of prediction methods for near and far field noise are summarized for both single and counterrotation propellers in uninstalled and configurations. Experimental results from tests at both takeoff/approach and cruise conditions are reviewed with emphasis on: (1) single and counterrotation model tests in the NASA Lewis 9 by 15 (low speed) and 8 by 6 (high speed) wind tunnels, and (2) full scale flight tests of a 9 ft (2.74 m) diameter single rotation wing mounted tractor and a 11.7 ft (3.57 m) diameter counterrotation aft mounted pusher propeller. Comparisons of model data projected to flight with full scale flight data show good agreement validating the scale model wind tunnel approach. Likewise, comparisons of measured and predicted noise level show excellent agreement for both single and counterrotation propellers. Progress in describing angle of attack and installation effects is also summarized. Finally, the aeroacoustic issues associated with ducted propellers (very high bypass fans) are discussed.

  18. Tilt rotor hover aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffen, Charles David

    1992-01-01

    The methodology, results, and conclusions of a study of tilt rotor hover aeroacoustics and aerodynamics are presented. Flow visualization and hot wire velocity measurement were performed on a 1/12-scale model of the XV-15 Tilt Rotor Aircraft in hover. The wing and fuselage below the rotor cause a complex recirculating flow. Results indicate the physical dimensions and details of the flow including the relative unsteadiness and turbulence characteristics of the flow. Discrete frequency harmonic thickness and the loading noise mechanism were predicted using WOPWOP for the standard metal blades and the Advanced Technology Blades. The recirculating flow created by the wing below the rotor is a primary sound mechanism for a hovering tilt rotor. The effects of dynamic blade response should be included for fountain flow conditions which produce impulsive blade loading. Broadband noise mechanisms were studied using Amiet's method with azimuthally varying turbulence characteristics derived from the measurements. The recirculating fountain flow with high turbulence levels in the recirculating zone is the dominant source of broadband noise for a hovering rotor. It is shown that tilt rotor hover aeroacoustic noise mechanisms are now understood. Noise predictions can be made based on reasonably accurate aerodynamic models developed here.

  19. Rocket motor aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, U. G.; Strahle, W. C.

    1983-10-01

    Vibration problems in solid propellant rocket motors are investigated. A class of interior flows modelled to simulate flow conditions inside rocket motor cavities is considered. Turbulence generated pressure fluctuations are shown to consist of two components - acoustic and hydrodynamics. The Bernoulli enthalpy theory of aeroacoustics is employed to extract acoustic pressure spectra from experimentally obtained turbulence data and acoustic impedance values at flow boundaries. The effects of turbulence intensities, sidewall acoustic impedance, axial mass blowing distribution, length to diameter ratio of the cavity and different mass flux on the acoustic pressure level are investigated. Typical pressure levels, under rocket motor conditions, are calculated using the A/B model of propellant response. Estimates of the hydrodynamic component of the pressure fluctuation are provided for the case of fully developed turbulent pipe flow terminated by a choked nozzle.

  20. Report on the final panel discussion on computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lighthill, James

    1992-01-01

    Some important conclusions about future prospects for aeroacoustics in general, and for computational aeroacoustics in particular, that were reached in the course of the Final Panel Discussion of the Workshop on Computational Aeroacoustics held from 6 to 9 April 1992 by ICASE and NASA Langley Research Center are summarized by the panel chairman. Aeroacoustics must now be involved in interactions with computational fluid dynamics (as applied not only to deterministic flows but also to the statistical characteristics of turbulence), while additionally incorporating rigorous comparisons with experiment. The new Computational Aeroacoustics will press forward in two parallel ways. In one of them, CFD will be used to determine aeroacoustic source strengths, the associated radiation being derived by the Acoustic Analogy approach in one of its forms. In the other, a direct Computational Aeroacoustics will apply CFD techniques over a region extending beyond the flow field so as to include at least the beginnings of the acoustic far field. There are some particularly important areas of study, including rotor noise, boundary-layer noise, and the noise of supersonic jets, where it is strongly recommended that use of both methods is continued. On the other hand, important problems of the diffraction of radiation from aeroacoustic sources around complicated aircraft shapes will require the use of comprehensively Computational Aeroacoustics, while Acoustic Analogy methods seem better suited to estimating subsonic jet noise. The study of model problems to allow comparisons with experiment will be valuable in both lines of attack.

  1. BEO Tram Spectral Data 2014

    DOE Data Explorer

    Torn, Margaret; Serbin, Shawn

    2015-06-10

    Visible to near-infrared (350-1100nm) vegetation spectral reflectance data collected on the BEO automated tram measurement platform during the 2014 growing season. The spectra were collected using a PP Systems UniSpec-DC instrument and was processed to at-surface reflectance and interpolated to 1nm.

  2. Aeroacoustics of Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta

    2014-01-01

    While for airplanes the subject of aeroacoustics is associated with community noise, for space vehicles it is associated with vibro-acoustics and structural dynamics. Surface pressure fluctuations encountered during launch and travel through lower part of the atmosphere create intense vibro-acoustics environment for the payload, electronics, navigational equipment, and a large number of subsystems. All of these components have to be designed and tested for flight-certification. This presentation will cover all three major sources encountered in manned and unmanned space vehicles: launch acoustics, ascent acoustics and abort acoustics. Launch pads employ elaborate acoustic suppression systems to mitigate the ignition pressure waves and rocket plume generated noise during the early part of the liftoff. Recently we have used large microphone arrays to identify the noise sources during liftoff and found that the standard model by Eldred and Jones (NASA SP-8072) to be grossly inadequate. As the vehicle speeds up and reaches transonic speed in relatively denser part of the atmosphere, various shock waves and flow separation events create unsteady pressure fluctuations that can lead to high vibration environment, and occasional coupling with the structural modes, which may lead to buffet. Examples of wind tunnel tests and computational simulations to optimize the outer mold line to quantify and reduce the surface pressure fluctuations will be presented. Finally, a manned space vehicle needs to be designed for crew safety during malfunctioning of the primary rocket vehicle. This brings the subject of acoustic environment during abort. For NASAs Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), abort will be performed by lighting rocket motors atop the crew module. The severe aeroacoustics environments during various abort scenarios were measured for the first time by using hot helium to simulate rocket plumes in the Ames unitary plan wind tunnels. Various considerations used for the

  3. Aeroacoustic qualification of HERMES shingles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petiau, C.; Paret, A.

    1994-09-01

    General problems of aeroacoustic analysis are presented, taking as an example shingle studies of the HERMES space shuttle. Analysis of shingle behavior meets this problem in a particularly difficult way (very hard environment, specific difficulties due to design of shingles). Available analysis tools include: (1) calculation means, which are mainly those of aeroelasticity, and (2) ground test means (wind tunnel, progressive wave tubes, shaker,...). None of these means can alone satisfy the needs of structural dimensioning and qualification; in particular the calculation of turbulent sources is not possible today, and they are very difficult to simulate with ground testing of actual structural parts. In spite of these difficulties, and referring to the preliminary tests and calculations of HERMES shingles, a rational strategy is proposed for aeroacoustic dimensioning and qualification of structural parts. This leads to a succession of tests, the conditions of which are determined by calculations, calculation models being themselves validated by comparison with test results.

  4. Tilt Rotor Aircraft Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Albert R.

    1996-01-01

    A fleet of civil tilt rotor transports offers a means of reducing airport congestion and point-to-point travel time. The speed, range, and fuel economy of these aircraft, along with their efficient use of vertiport area, make them good candidates for short-to-medium range civil transport. However, to be successfully integrated into the civilian community, the tilt rotor must be perceived as a quiet, safe, and economical mode of transportation that does not harm the environment. In particular, noise impact has been identified as a possible barrier to the civil tilt rotor. Along with rotor conversion-mode flight, and blade-vortex interaction noise during descent, hover mode is a noise problem for tilt rotor operations. In the present research, tilt rotor hover aeroacoustics have been studied analytically, experimentally, and computationally. Various papers on the subject were published as noted in the list of publications. More recently, experimental measurements were made on a 1/12.5 scale model of the XV-15 in hover and analyses of this data and extrapolations to full scale were also carried out. A dimensional analysis showed that the model was a good aeroacoustic approximation to the full-scale aircraft, and scale factors were derived to extrapolate the model measurements to the full-scale XV-15. The experimental measurements included helium bubble flow visualization, silk tuft flow visualization, 2-component hot wire anemometry, 7-hole pressure probe measurements, vorticity measurements, and outdoor far field acoustic measurements. The hot wire measurements were used to estimate the turbulence statistics of the flow field into the rotors, such as length scales, velocity scales, dissipation, and turbulence intermittency. Several different configurations of the model were tested: (1) standard configurations (single isolated rotor, two rotors without the aircraft, standard tilt rotor configuration); (2) flow control devices (the 'plate', the 'diagonal fences'); (3

  5. Model-Scale Aerodynamic Performance Testing of Proposed Modifications to the NASA Langley Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Coston, Calvin W., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Tests were performed on a 1/20th-scale model of the Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel to determine the performance effects of insertion of acoustic baffles in the tunnel inlet, replacement of the existing collector with a new collector design in the open jet test section, and addition of flow splitters to the acoustic baffle section downstream of the test section. As expected, the inlet baffles caused a reduction in facility performance. About half of the performance loss was recovered by addition the flow splitters to the downstream baffles. All collectors tested reduced facility performance. However, test chamber recirculation flow was reduced by the new collector designs and shielding of some of the microphones was reduced owing to the smaller size of the new collector. Overall performance loss in the facility is expected to be a 5 percent top flow speed reduction, but the facility will meet OSHA limits for external noise levels and recirculation in the test section will be reduced.

  6. TRAM1 Promotes Microglia M1 Polarization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanxiang; Liu, Chun; Han, Ming; Cheng, Chun; Zhang, Dongmei

    2016-02-01

    Microglia, the major immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS), can be driven to adopt M1 and M2 phenotypes. Recently, the distinct functions of M1 and M2 microglia have been intensively studied. M1-activation microglia are pro-inflammatory and may contribute to the development of several CSN disorders, while M2-activation microglia are anti-inflammatory and may promote tissue reconstruction. TRAM1 is a protein involved in translocation of nascent polypeptides and functions as a sorting adaptor of TLR4. Here, we found that TRAM1 plays an important role in microglia M1 polarization. Our results showed that the expression of TRAM1 is highly induced in LPS/interferon (IFN)-γ-stimulated BV2 cells and primary microglia cells. Flag-TRAM1 transfection, but not Flag-GFP used as a control, significantly enhanced M1 polarization by strongly increasing expression of M1 makers, such as IL-6, IL-1β, iNOS, and so on. Silence of TRAM1 effectively inhibited LPS/IFN-γ-induced expression of M1-related genes in BV2 cells. In addition, TRAM1 was found to cooperate with TLR4 to induce an M1 genetic program in Flag-TRAM1-transfected and LPS/IFN-γ-induced BV2 cells. TRAM1 is essential for LPS/IFN-γ induced expressions of adapter molecule (IRAK1, phosphorylation of TBK1, and IRF3) of TLR4. TRAM1 is also essential for phosphorylation of IκB and P65 and for P65-NF-kB translocation to nucleus. Overall, our findings showed that TRAM1 could promote microglia M1 polarization. PMID:26563450

  7. EAST ELEVATION OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, PRIMARY ORE BIN,AND TRAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST ELEVATION OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, PRIMARY ORE BIN,AND TRAM TRESTLE, LOOKING NORTHEAST. WINCHING ENGINE AND ITS FOUNDATION IS AT TOP CENTER. SEE CA-291-50 (CT) FOR IDENTICAL COLOR TRANSPARENCY. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  8. OVERVIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, TRAM TRESTLE, PRIMARY ORE BIN,OVERBURDEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, TRAM TRESTLE, PRIMARY ORE BIN,OVERBURDEN PILE, AND DEBRIS SCATTER,LOOKING NORTH NORTHWEST. THE MAIN ACCESS TRAIL BETWEEN THE LOWER MILL AREA GOES ACROSS THE CENTER LEFT TO RIGHT. WINCHING ENGINE AND FOUNDATION IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER (SEE CA-291-37). - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  9. OVERVIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, TRAM TRESTLE, PRIMARY ORE BIN,OVERBURDEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, TRAM TRESTLE, PRIMARY ORE BIN,OVERBURDEN PILE, AND DEBRIS SCATTER,LOOKING EAST. THE MAIN ACCESS TRAIL BETWEEN THE LOWER MILL AREA IS IN THE FOREGROUND. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  10. Aeroacoustics Research Program in JIAFS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Michael K.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a final report on Aeroacoustics Research Program in JIAFS (Joint Institute For Advancement of Flight Sciences). The objectives of the program were to conduct research at the NASA Langley Research Center and to provide a comprehensive education program at the Center leading to advanced degrees in aeroacoustics.

  11. Aeroelastic-aeroacoustic measurements in a self-oscillating physical model of the human vocal folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krane, Michael; Cates, Zachary

    2009-11-01

    Measurements are presented characterizing the relationship between the structure of physical models of the human vocal folds and the sound produced by their vibration by airflow from the lungs. The model vocal folds are fabricated by molding two layers of silicone rubber of specified stiffness, approximating the body/cover structure. These are mounted in a model vocal tract, where the prephonatory gap adjusted using micropositioners. Measurements conducted in an anechoic chamber include radiated sound pressure, and high-speed video of the vibrating model vocal folds, using prephonatory separation, body stiffness, and subglottal pressure as input parameters.. Essential behavior of the vocal fold models is presented. Vibration fundamental frequency and radiated sound pressure level outside the model vocal tract as a function of subglottal pressure and prephonatory gap are presented for the cases of two identical vocal folds and one vocal fold with lower stiffness, approximating vocal fold paralysis.

  12. High speed turboprop aeroacoustic study (single rotation). Volume 1: Model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitfield, C. E.; Gliebe, P. R.; Mani, R.; Mungur, P.

    1989-01-01

    A frequency-domain noncompact-source theory for the steady loading and volume-displacement (thickness) noise of high speed propellers has been developed and programmed. Both near field and far field effects have been considered. The code utilizes blade surface pressure distributions obtained from three-dimensional nonlinear aerodynamic flow field analysis programs as input for evaluating the steady loading noise. Simplified mathematical models of the velocity fields induced at the propeller disk by nearby wing and fuselage surfaces and by angle-of-attack operation have been developed to provide estimates of the unsteady loading imposed on the propeller by these potential field type interactions. These unsteady blade loadings have been coupled to a chordwise compact propeller unsteady loading noise model to provide predictions of unsteady loading noise caused by these installation effects. Finally, an analysis to estimate the corrections to be applied to the free-field noise predictions in order to arrive at the measurable fuselage sound pressure levels has been formulated and programmed. This analysis considers the effects of fuselage surface reflection and diffraction together with surface boundary layer refraction. The steady loading and thickness model and the unsteady loading model have been verified using NASA-supplied data for the SR-2 and SR-3 model propfans. In addition, the steady loading and thickness model has been compared with data from the SR-6 model propfan. These theoretical models have been employed in the evaluation of the SR-7 powered Gulfstream aircraft in terms of noise characteristics at representative takeoff, cruise, and approach operating conditions. In all cases, agreement between theory and experiment is encouraging.

  13. Simple Scaling of Multi-Stream Jet Plumes for Aeroacoustic Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2015-01-01

    When creating simplified, semi-empirical models for the noise of simple single-stream jets near surfaces it has proven useful to be able to generalize the geometry of the jet plume. Having a model that collapses the mean and turbulent velocity fields for a range of flows allows the problem to become one of relating the normalized jet field and the surface. However, most jet flows of practical interest involve jets of two or more co-annular flows for which standard models for the plume geometry do not exist. The present paper describes one attempt to relate the mean and turbulent velocity fields of multi-stream jets to that of an equivalent single-stream jet. The normalization of single-stream jets is briefly reviewed, from the functional form of the flow model to the results of the modeling. Next, PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) data from a number of multi-stream jets is analyzed in a similar fashion. The results of several single-stream approximations of the multi-stream jet plume are demonstrated, with a 'best' approximation determined and the shortcomings of the model highlighted.

  14. Aeroacoustic Study of a High-Fidelity Aircraft Model. Part 2; Unsteady Surface Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Neuhart, Danny H.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present unsteady surface pressure measurements for an 18%-scale, semi-span Gulfstream aircraft model. This high-fidelity model is being used to perform detailed studies of airframe noise associated with main landing gear, flap components, and gear-flap interaction noise, as well as to evaluate novel noise reduction concepts. The aerodynamic segment of the tests, conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel, was completed in November 2010. To discern the characteristics of the surface pressure fluctuations in the vicinity of the prominent noise sources, unsteady sensors were installed on the inboard and outboard flap edges, and on the main gear wheels, struts, and door. Various configurations were tested, including flap deflections of 0?, 20?, and 39?, with and without the main landing gear. The majority of unsteady surface pressure measurements were acquired for the nominal landing configuration where the main gear was deployed and the flap was deflected 39?. To assess the Mach number variation of the surface pressure amplitudes, measurements were obtained at Mach numbers of 0.16, 0.20, and 0.24. Comparison of the unsteady surface pressures with the main gear on and off shows significant interaction between the gear wake and the inboard flap edge, resulting in higher amplitude fluctuations when the gear is present.

  15. TRAM HOUSE INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTH. NOTE HORIZONTAL, IDLER, BULL WHEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRAM HOUSE INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTH. NOTE HORIZONTAL, IDLER, BULL WHEEL TO REVERSE DIRECTION OF TRACTION CABLE. TRAM CABLE DRIVE MOTOR (NO LONGER EXTANT) WAS AT MINE END OF TRAM. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  16. Aeroacoustic flowfield and acoustics of a model helicopter tail rotor at high advance ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shenoy, Rajarama K.

    1989-01-01

    Some results, relevant to rotorcraft noise generation process at high advance ratio, are presented in this paper from schlieren flow visualization and acoustic tests of a model tail rotor. The measured in-plane noise trends are consistent with the growth of the tip supersonic region seen in the schlieren visuals. Schlieren flow visuals reveal a propagating pressure wave in the second quadrant. Simultaneously measured acoustic data and the results of two-dimensional transonic Blade-Vortex Interaction analysis code ATRAN-2 indicate that this pressure wave is attributable to BVI activity in the first quadrant. This paper establishes that the transonic Blade-Vortex Interactions contribute to noise at high advance ratio level flight conditions.

  17. Aeroacoustic Measurements of a Wing/Slat Model. [Research conducted at the Quiet Flow Facility of the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza, Jeff M.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.

    2002-01-01

    Aeroacoustic evaluations of high-lift devices have been carried out in the Quiet Flow Facility of the NASA Langley Research Center. The present paper deals with detailed flow and acoustic measurements that have been made to understand, and to possibly predict and reduce, the noise from a wing leading edge slat configuration. The acoustic database is obtained by a moveable Small Aperture Directional Array (SADA) of microphones designed to electronically steer to different portions of models under study. The slat is shown to be a uniform distributed noise source. The data was processed such that spectra and directivity were determined with respect to a one-foot span of slat. The spectra are normalized in various fashions to demonstrate slat noise character. In order to equate portions of the spectra to different slat noise components, trailing edge noise predictions using measured slat boundary layer parameters as inputs are compared to the measured slat noise spectra.

  18. Free TRAM breast reconstruction and ipsilateral interval pedicled TRAM reconstruction for second breast in one patient.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, Rebecca L E; Caminer, David M

    2014-06-01

    Autologous breast reconstruction can give excellent cosmetic results and is preferred by some women. Donor tissue can be scarce however, especially for bilateral reconstructions and/or when a large breast is needed. In addition, the decision of which donor tissue to use in unilateral reconstruction may have an impact on a subsequent reconstruction if needed. We present a case of a patient who required a large volume unilateral reconstruction, performed using a free TRAM flap, who then re-presented 10 years later with disease in the contralateral breast. For her second reconstruction, a pedicled TRAM was used from the same side as the previous free TRAM. We believe that this sequence of reconstructions using the TRAM twice on the same side has not been previously reported. PMID:24462740

  19. Comparing Volcano Infrasound and Aeroacoustics Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, D. E.; Matoza, R. S.; Fee, D.

    2012-12-01

    The production of acoustic noise by fluid flows has been studied experimentally within engineering aeroacoustics for over 50 years. These works aim to correlate flow properties and dynamics with the produced acoustic spectra (i.e., patterns of frequencies and amplitude). These correlations are used to design flow fields in man-made jet engines and other machines to reduce the production of harmful acoustic signals and resulting hearing loss. Many of the flow fields in these man-made systems are analogous to those in volcanic eruptions. We postulate that the acoustic signals generated by these flows are also analogous and the aeroacoustics experimental results provide a starting point for modeling the noise generated by volcanic flow fields. Application of empirical results from these experiments to volcanic flow fields is non-trivial. Volcanic eruptions involve complexities not present in man-made experiments including but not limited to multiphase flow, buoyancy forces, and non-uniform atmosphere. This work explores methods by which some of the empirical results from aeroacoustics experiments can be modified for application to volcanic eruptions. Results are compared with observations of volcano infrasound. Preliminary comparison to numerical simulations of volcano infrasound may also be presented.

  20. Three-dimensional CFD simulation and aeroacoustics analysis of wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, Fardin

    Wind turbines release aerodynamic noise that is one of the most barriers in wind energy development and public acceptance. Aeroacoustics is the noise generated by the interaction of blades, specifically the tip and trailing edge, with inflow turbulence structures and subsequent boundary layer separation and vortex shedding in the wake region. The objective of this study is to analyze the effects of different aerodynamic conditions on the performance and the aeroacoustic issue of wind turbines. Aerodynamic and aeroacoustic operation of a wind turbine is analyzed using a three-dimensional CFD and aeroacoustics model and using a commercial CFD Software, STAR-CCM+. Blades are modeled based on NREL S825 airfoil shape due to its high maximum lift and low profile drag. Wind turbine aerodynamic performance as well as broadband aeroacoustic noise with a focus on the trailing end, tip, inflow turbulence and boundary layer separation is investigated over a range of operating conditions.

  1. Computational Aeroacoustics: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.

    2003-01-01

    An overview of recent advances in computational aeroacoustics (CAA) is presented. CAA algorithms must not be dispersive and dissipative. It should propagate waves supported by the Euler equations with the correct group velocities. Computation domains are inevitably finite in size. To avoid the reflection of acoustic and other outgoing waves at the boundaries of the computation domain, it is required that special boundary conditions be imposed at the boundary region. These boundary conditions either absorb all the outgoing waves without reflection or allow the waves to exit smoothly. High-order schemes, invariably, supports spurious short waves. These spurious waves tend to pollute the numerical solution. They must be selectively damped or filtered out. All these issues and relevant computation methods are briefly reviewed. Jet screech tones are known to have caused structural fatigue in military combat aircrafts. Numerical simulation of the jet screech phenomenon is presented as an example of a successful application of CAA.

  2. Aeroacoustic source spectrum for fricative consonant speech sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Daniel; Krane, Michael

    2008-11-01

    The aeroacoustic source spectrum is experimentally determined for flow within an open-ended duct. The source region comprises a jet, formed at a constriction within the duct, which then interacts with an obstacle placed further downstream. The physical model dimensions are commensurate with a life-size vocal tract to enable study of the physics of human speech sound production. Two methods are used to estimate the aeroacoustic source spectrum. The first estimate results from inverse-filtering radiated sound measured outside the duct. The transfer function between the source and microphone locations is constructed from two-microphone-method measurements of the acoustic field inside the duct. The second estimate uses measurements of the jet flow near the obstacle as input to aeroacoustic theory. Comparison of the two estimates is presented.

  3. Characterizing phonatory aeroacoustic sources using Lagrangian Coherent Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhail, Michael; Krane, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Voice disorders that lead to changes in vocal fold geometry, or posturing, are known to substantially affect phonatory airflow topology. How these topology changes affect aeroacoustic sound sources is not well understood, however. This talk presents modelling aeroacoustic sources with Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS). Here we use the motion of dynamically distinct fluid regions, identified by the LCS, to predict sound. This approach provides a means to connect phonatory airflow topology changes to resulting changes in sound production. Simple validation cases of this approach will be shown. The application of LCS analysis to phonatory flows will be also presented.

  4. 3. Elevation, tram deck, bonanza "A" frame and crushers level ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Elevation, tram deck, bonanza "A" frame and crushers level 11. - Kennecott Copper Corporation, Concentration Mill, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  5. Lightweight Ceramics for Aeroacoustic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwan, H. W.; Spamer, G. T.; Yu, J.; Yasukawa, B.

    1997-01-01

    The use of a HTP (High Temperature Performance) ceramic foam for aeroacoustic applications is investigated. HTP ceramic foam is a composition of silica and alumina fibers developed by LMMS. This foam is a lightweight high-temperature fibrous bulk material with small pore size, ultra high porosity, and good strength. It can be used as a broadband noise absorber at both room and high temperature (up to 1800 F). The investigation included an acoustic assessment as well as material development, and environmental and structural evaluations. The results show that the HTP ceramic foam provides good broadband noise absorbing capability and adequate strength when incorporating the HTP ceramic foam system into a honeycomb sandwich structure. On the other hand, the material is sensitive to Skydrol and requires further improvements. Good progress has been made in the impedance model development. A relationship between HTP foam density, flow resistance, and tortuosity will be established in the near future. Additional effort is needed to investigate the coupling effects between face sheet and HTP foam material.

  6. Aeroacoustics of unvoiced human speech sound production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Daniel; Krane, Michael

    2007-11-01

    Measurements of airflow and sound were performed in an idealized model of the human vocal tract in order to determine the aeroacoustic sources which give rise to unvoiced consonant speech sounds. The turbulent jet formed at a narrow constriction interacts with another constriction further downstream. The unsteady aerodynamic forces on these constrictions produce broadband sound, which is modulated by the acoustic response of the vocal tract. Sound source characteristics are determined by estimating the force on the constrictions, and how the temporal behavior of these forces correlates to the spatial and temporal structure of the jet. (Supported by NIH grant 5R01 DC00564245.)

  7. Aeroacoustics of hot jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, K.

    2004-10-01

    A systematic study has been undertaken to quantify the effect of jet temperature on the noise radiated by subsonic jets. Nozzles of different diameters were tested to uncover the effects of Reynolds number. All the tests were carried out at Boeing's Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility, with simultaneous measurement of thrust and noise. It is concluded that the change in spectral shape at high jet temperatures, normally attributed to the contribution from dipoles, is due to Reynolds number effects and not dipoles. This effect has not been identified before. A critical value of the Reynolds number that would need to be maintained to avoid the effects associated with low Reynolds number has been estimated to be {˜}400 000. It is well-known that large-scale structures are the dominant generators of noise in the peak radiation direction for high-speed jets. Experimental evidence is presented that shows the spectral shape at angles close to the jet axis from unheated low subsonic jets to be the same as from heated supersonic jets. A possible mechanism for the observed trend is proposed. When a subsonic jet is heated with the Mach number held constant, there is a broadening of the angular sector in which peak radiation occurs. Furthermore, there is a broadening of the spectral peak. Similar trends have been observed at supersonic Mach numbers. The spectral shapes in the forward quadrant and in the near-normal angles from unheated and heated subsonic jets also conform to the universal shape obtained from supersonic jet data. Just as for unheated jets, the peak frequency at angles close to the jet axis is independent of jet velocity as long as the acoustic Mach number is less than unity. The extensive database generated in the current test programme is intended to provide test cases with high-quality data that could be used for the evaluation of theoretical/semi-theoretical jet noise prediction methodologies.

  8. DETAIL VIEW OF TRAM BUCKET AUTOMATIC LOCKING MECHANISM ON LOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF TRAM BUCKET AUTOMATIC LOCKING MECHANISM ON LOWER TRAM TERMINAL, LOOKING WEST. AS EMPTY BUCKETS PASSED THROUGH THIS MECHANISM, A LEVER ON THE BUCKET WAS ACTIVATED THAT LOCKED THE BUCKET TO THE MOVING CABLE, CARRYING IT ALONG BACK UP TO THE MINES. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  9. EAST ELEVATION OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, PRIMARY ORE BIN, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST ELEVATION OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, PRIMARY ORE BIN, AND TRAM TRESTLE, LOOKING NORTHEAST. WINCHING ENGINE AND ITS FOUNDATION IS AT TOP CENTER. SEE CA-291-28 FOR IDENTICAL B&W NEGATIVE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  10. DETAIL VIEW OF AERIAL TRAM CABLE COUNTERWEIGHT SYSTEM, LOOKING DOWN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF AERIAL TRAM CABLE COUNTERWEIGHT SYSTEM, LOOKING DOWN THROUGH THE LOWER TERMINAL FLOOR. TWO SUSPENDED ROCK FILLED WOODEN BOXES CAN BE SEEN AT BOTTOM. THE METAL FRAMEWORK WAS INSTALLED BY THE PARK SERVICE DURING THE AERIAL TRAM'S STABILIZATION IN THE 1983. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  11. A second golden age of aeroacoustics?

    PubMed

    Lele, Sanjiva K; Nichols, Joseph W

    2014-08-13

    In 1992, Sir James Lighthill foresaw the dawn of a second golden age in aeroacoustics enabled by computer simulations (Hardin JC, Hussaini MY (eds) 1993 Computational aeroacoustics, New York, NY: Springer (doi:10.1007/978-1-4613-8342-0)). This review traces the progress in large-scale computations to resolve the noise-source processes and the methods devised to predict the far-field radiated sound using this information. Keeping focus on aviation-related noise sources a brief account of the progress in simulations of jet noise, fan noise and airframe noise is given highlighting the key technical issues and challenges. The complex geometry of nozzle elements and airframe components as well as the high Reynolds number of target applications require careful assessment of the discretization algorithms on unstructured grids and modelling compromises. High-fidelity simulations with 200-500 million points are not uncommon today and are used to improve scientific understanding of the noise generation process in specific situations. We attempt to discern where the future might take us, especially if exascale computing becomes a reality in 10 years. A pressing question in this context concerns the role of modelling in the coming era. While the sheer scale of the data generated by large-scale simulations will require new methods for data analysis and data visualization, it is our view that suitable theoretical formulations and reduced models will be even more important in future. PMID:25024417

  12. xTRAM: Estimating Equilibrium Expectations from Time-Correlated Simulation Data at Multiple Thermodynamic States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mey, Antonia S. J. S.; Wu, Hao; Noé, Frank

    2014-10-01

    Computing the equilibrium properties of complex systems, such as free energy differences, is often hampered by rare events in the dynamics. Enhanced sampling methods may be used in order to speed up sampling by, for example, using high temperatures, as in parallel tempering, or simulating with a biasing potential such as in the case of umbrella sampling. The equilibrium properties of the thermodynamic state of interest (e.g., lowest temperature or unbiased potential) can be computed using reweighting estimators such as the weighted histogram analysis method or the multistate Bennett acceptance ratio (MBAR). weighted histogram analysis method and MBAR produce unbiased estimates, the simulation samples from the global equilibria at their respective thermodynamic states—a requirement that can be prohibitively expensive for some simulations such as a large parallel tempering ensemble of an explicitly solvated biomolecule. Here, we introduce the transition-based reweighting analysis method (TRAM)—a class of estimators that exploit ideas from Markov modeling and only require the simulation data to be in local equilibrium within subsets of the configuration space. We formulate the expanded TRAM (xTRAM) estimator that is shown to be asymptotically unbiased and a generalization of MBAR. Using four exemplary systems of varying complexity, we demonstrate the improved convergence (ranging from a twofold improvement to several orders of magnitude) of xTRAM in comparison to a direct counting estimator and MBAR, with respect to the invested simulation effort. Lastly, we introduce a random-swapping simulation protocol that can be used with xTRAM, gaining orders-of-magnitude advantages over simulation protocols that require the constraint of sampling from a global equilibrium.

  13. Large-Eddy Simulation of Aeroacoustic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, C. David; Sochacki, James S.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes work accomplished under a one-year NASA grant from NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The effort culminates three years of NASA-supported research under three consecutive one-year grants. The period of support was April 6, 1998, through April 5, 1999. By request, the grant period was extended at no-cost until October 6, 1999. Its predecessors have been directed toward adapting the numerical tool of large-eddy simulation (LES) to aeroacoustic applications, with particular focus on noise suppression in subsonic round jets. In LES, the filtered Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically on a relatively coarse computational grid. Residual stresses, generated by scales of motion too small to be resolved on the coarse grid, are modeled. Although most LES incorporate spatial filtering, time-domain filtering affords certain conceptual and computational advantages, particularly for aeroacoustic applications. Consequently, this work has focused on the development of subgrid-scale (SGS) models that incorporate time-domain filters.

  14. Computational aeroacoustic simulations of leading-edge slat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, K.; Zhang, X.; Nelson, P. A.

    2004-02-01

    High-lift devices on modern airliners are a major contributor to overall airframe noise. In this paper the aeroacoustics of leading-edge slat devices in a high-lift configuration are investigated computationally. A hierarchical methodology is used to enable the rapid evaluation of different slat configurations. The overall goal is to gain a deeper understanding of the noise generation and amplification mechanisms in and around the slat, and the effects of slat system geometry. In order to perform parametric studies of the aeroacoustics, a simplified 2-D model of the slat is used. The flow and aeroacoustics are computed using a compressible, unsteady, Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes code. A robust buffer zone boundary condition is used to prevent the reflection of outgoing acoustic waves from contaminating the long-time solution. A Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings solver is used to compute the far field acoustic field from the unsteady flow solution and determine the directivity. The spanwise correlation length used is derived from experimental data of this high-lift configuration. The effect of spanwise correlation length on the acoustic far field is examined. The aeroacoustics of the slat system are largely governed by the geometry, especially in terms of slat overlap. We perform a study of the effects of trailing edge thickness, horizontal and vertical overlap settings for the slat on near field wave propagation and far field directivity. The implications for low-noise leading edge slat design are discussed.

  15. Aeroacoustic response of coaxial wall-mounted Helmholtz resonators in a low-speed wind tunnel.

    PubMed

    Slaton, William V; Nishikawa, Asami

    2015-01-01

    The aeroacoustic response of coaxial wall-mounted Helmholtz resonators with different neck geometries in a low-speed wind tunnel has been investigated. Experimental test results of this system reveal a strong aeroacoustic response over a Strouhal number range of 0.25 to 0.1 for both increasing and decreasing the flow rate in the wind tunnel. Aeroacoustic response in the low-amplitude range O(10(-3)) < Vac/Vflow < O(10(-1)) has been successfully modeled by describing-function analysis. This analysis, coupled with a turbulent flow velocity distribution model, gives reasonable values for the location in the flow of the undulating stream velocity that drives vortex shedding at the resonator mouth. Having an estimate for the stream velocity that drives the flow-excited resonance is crucial when employing the describing-function analysis to predict aeroacoustic response of resonators. PMID:25618056

  16. Aeroacoustics of T-junction merging flow.

    PubMed

    Lam, G C Y; Leung, R C K; Tang, S K

    2013-02-01

    This paper reports a numerical study of the aeroacoustics of merging flow at T-junction. The primary focus is to elucidate the acoustic generation by the flow unsteadiness. The study is conducted by performing direct aeroacoustic simulation approach, which solves the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations and the perfect gas equation of state simultaneously using the conservation element and solution element method. For practical flows, the Reynolds number based on duct width is usually quite high (>10(5)). In order to properly account for the effects of flow turbulence, a large eddy simulation methodology together with a wall modeling derived from the classical logarithm wall law is adopted. The numerical simulations are performed in two dimensions and the acoustic generation physics at different ratios of side-branch to main duct flow velocities VR (=0.5,0.67,1.0,2.0) are studied. Both the levels of unsteady interactions of merging flow structures and the efficiency of acoustic generation are observed to increase with VR. Based on Curle's analogy, the major acoustic source is found to be the fluctuating wall pressure induced by the flow unsteadiness occurred in the downstream branch. A scaling between the wall fluctuating force and the efficiency of the acoustic generation is also derived. PMID:23363089

  17. Summary of HEAT 1 Aeroacoustics Installation Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Brian E.; Zuniga, Fanny A.; Soderman, Paul T.

    1999-01-01

    changes in the ratio of ejector-duct-to-jet-area over a wide range range of nozzle pressure ratios and freestream Mach numbers. The test also measured the thrust performance, ambient-flow aspiration ratio, and internal and external static pressures on the nozzles. The isolated aeroacoustic performance data has been compared with results obtained with this nozzle installed on a 13.5% Boeing Reference H HSCT configuration, semi-span model. The semi-span, aeroacoustics integration test documented the first-order effects of the airframe flowfield on the acoustic performance of the nozzle and the effect of the nozzle secondary inlet flows on the aerodynamic performance of the wing high-lift systems. This investigation is critical to understanding the mutual installation effects of mixer/ejector nozzles and wing high-lift systems.

  18. OVERVIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL AND STAMP MILL SITE, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL AND STAMP MILL SITE, LOOKING NORTHWEST. THE AERIAL TRAMWAY BEGINS AT THE TERMINAL AND CONTINUES NORTH TO THE UPPER RIGHT. THE FIRST SUPPORT TOWER CAN BE SEEN. JUST BELOW THE WATER TANK IS A LOADING PLATFORM AND TRAM TRESTLE USED FOR THE TRANSPORT OF SUPPLIES THAT LEAD UP TO THE TRAM TERMINAL. ALL THREE LEVELS OF THE FORMER 20 STAMP MILL CAN BE SEEN AT CENTER. SEE CA-291-02 FOR IDENTICAL B&W NEGATIVE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  19. OVERVIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL AND STAMP MILL SITE, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL AND STAMP MILL SITE, LOOKING NORTHWEST. THE AERIAL TRAMWAY BEGINS AT THE TERMINAL AND CONTINUES NORTH TO THE UPPER RIGHT. THE FIRST SUPPORT TOWER CAN BE SEEN. JUST BELOW THE WATER TANK IS A LOADING PLATFORM AND TRAM TRESTLE USED FOR THE TRANSPORT OF SUPPLIES THAT LEAD UP TO THE TRAM TERMINAL. ALL THREE LEVELS OF THE FORMER 20 STAMP MILL CAN BE SEEN AT CENTER. SEE CA-291-46( CT) FOR IDENTICAL COLOR TRANSPARENCY. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  20. DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL STRUCTURE, LOOKING NORTHEAST TOWARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL STRUCTURE, LOOKING NORTHEAST TOWARD THE REAR OF THE STRUCTURE. THE WHEELS AT THE TOP OF THE TRAM BUCKETS RODE OFF THE STATIONARY CABLES ONTO THE TRACK SUPPORTED BY THE "C" IRONS SUSPENDED FROM THE TOP TIMBERS, CLEARLY SEEN AT THE TOP OF THE FRAME. THE ANCHOR POINTS FOR THE TWO STATIONARY CABLES ARE AT BOTTOM CENTER, JUST BELOW THE CABLE WHEEL. THE MAIN CABLE WHEEL IS IN THE DISTANCE AT CENTER LEFT. THE ORE CHUTES COMING FROM THE ORE BIN ARE AT LEFT CENTER EDGE. TRAM BUCKETS WERE CHARGED HERE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  1. Validating LES for Jet Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2011-01-01

    Engineers charged with making jet aircraft quieter have long dreamed of being able to see exactly how turbulent eddies produce sound and this dream is now coming true with the advent of large eddy simulation (LES). Two obvious challenges remain: validating the LES codes at the resolution required to see the fluid-acoustic coupling, and the interpretation of the massive datasets that result in having dreams come true. This paper primarily addresses the former, the use of advanced experimental techniques such as particle image velocimetry (PIV) and Raman and Rayleigh scattering, to validate the computer codes and procedures used to create LES solutions. It also addresses the latter problem in discussing what are relevant measures critical for aeroacoustics that should be used in validating LES codes. These new diagnostic techniques deliver measurements and flow statistics of increasing sophistication and capability, but what of their accuracy? And what are the measures to be used in validation? This paper argues that the issue of accuracy be addressed by cross-facility and cross-disciplinary examination of modern datasets along with increased reporting of internal quality checks in PIV analysis. Further, it is argued that the appropriate validation metrics for aeroacoustic applications are increasingly complicated statistics that have been shown in aeroacoustic theory to be critical to flow-generated sound.

  2. Aeroacoustics and aerodynamic performance of a rotor with flatback airfoils.

    SciTech Connect

    Paquette, Joshua A.; Barone, Matthew Franklin; Christiansen, Monica; Simley, Eric

    2010-06-01

    The aerodynamic performance and aeroacoustic noise sources of a rotor employing flatback airfoils have been studied in field test campaign and companion modeling effort. The field test measurements of a sub-scale rotor employing nine meter blades include both performance measurements and acoustic measurements. The acoustic measurements are obtained using a 45 microphone beamforming array, enabling identification of both noise source amplitude and position. Semi-empirical models of flatback airfoil blunt trailing edge noise are developed and calibrated using available aeroacoustic wind tunnel test data. The model results and measurements indicate that flatback airfoil noise is less than drive train noise for the current test turbine. It is also demonstrated that the commonly used Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini model for blunt trailing edge noise may be over-conservative in predicting flatback airfoil noise for wind turbine applications.

  3. Aeroacoustic interaction in a corrugated duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kop'ev, V. F.; Mironov, M. A.; Solntseva, V. S.

    2008-03-01

    The sound generation by an air flow in a corrugated tube is studied experimentally for different values of the corrugation pitch and different tube lengths. The Strouhal numbers of sound generated in different tubes with different flow velocities lie within 0.4-0.6. As the flow velocity increases, the Strouhal number decreases. The effect of sound absorption by an air flow in a corrugated duct is described: in a corrugated tube with a flow, at frequencies below the generation frequency, the absorption of sound produced by an external source is observed. A semiempirical model of aeroacoustic interaction in a corrugated tube is proposed. The model provides a qualitative agreement with the experiment.

  4. GENERAL VIEW OF MILL, LOOKING WEST NORTHWEST, WITH TRAM HOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF MILL, LOOKING WEST NORTHWEST, WITH TRAM HOUSE AND OFFICE BUILDING IN CENTER. COAL BIN AND BOILER HOUSE ARE AT FAR LEFT. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  5. DETAIL VIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWER TWO, WITH TOWERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWER TWO, WITH TOWERS THREE,FOUR, FIVE AND SIX IN DISTANCE, LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  6. TRAM HOUSE INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. NOTE TRACTION CABLE BULL WHEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRAM HOUSE INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. NOTE TRACTION CABLE BULL WHEEL AND DEPARTING BUCKET "12," STILL ON RAIL AND JUST PRIOR TO ENGAGING TRACTION CABLE. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  7. Translation Microscopy (TRAM) for super-resolution imaging

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhen; Wilson, Rhodri S; Liu, Yuewei; R Dun, Alison; Saleeb, Rebecca S; Liu, Dongsheng; Rickman, Colin; Frame, Margaret; Duncan, Rory R; Lu, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Super-resolution microscopy is transforming our understanding of biology but accessibility is limited by its technical complexity, high costs and the requirement for bespoke sample preparation. We present a novel, simple and multi-color super-resolution microscopy technique, called translation microscopy (TRAM), in which a super-resolution image is restored from multiple diffraction-limited resolution observations using a conventional microscope whilst translating the sample in the image plane. TRAM can be implemented using any microscope, delivering up to 7-fold resolution improvement. We compare TRAM with other super-resolution imaging modalities, including gated stimulated emission deletion (gSTED) microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We further developed novel ‘ground-truth’ DNA origami nano-structures to characterize TRAM, as well as applying it to a multi-color dye-stained cellular sample to demonstrate its fidelity, ease of use and utility for cell biology. PMID:26822455

  8. DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL STRUCTURE, LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL STRUCTURE, LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD THE FRONT OF THE STRUCTURE. THE WHEELS AT THE TOP OF THE TRAM BUCKETS RODE OFF THE STATIONARY CABLES ONTO THE TRACK SUPPORTED BY THE "C" IRONS SUSPENDED FROM THE TOP TIMBERS ON THE LEFT AND RIGHT. THE BUCKET OPENING MECHANISM IS ON THE LEFT, AND PART OF THE CLOSING MECHANISM ON THE RIGHT EDGE OF THE FRAME. THE TWO CABLES AT CENTER ARE THE STATIONARY TRAM CABLES THAT RUN ALONG THE TOP OF THE SUPPORT TOWERS ON WHICH THE WHEELS OF THE TRAM BUCKETS RODE. THEY ARE ANCHORED AT GROUND LEVEL JUST OFF FRAME TO THE LOWER LEFT. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  9. OVERVIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL AND STAMP MILL SITE, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL AND STAMP MILL SITE, LOOKING NORTHWEST. A WATER SHAFT IS COVERED WITH A PROTECTIVE NET IN THE LOWER RIGHT. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  10. TOP VIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, PRIMARY ORE BIN, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TOP VIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, PRIMARY ORE BIN, AND ORE CHUTE,LOOKING SOUTHWEST. TRAM MACHINERY AND GEARS ARE AT LOWER CENTER. A SMALL ELECTRIC MOTOR AT THE REAR LEFT OF THE TERMINAL PROBABLY WAS ADDED AFTER THE ORIGINAL CONSTRUCTION. THE MOVING CABLE OF THE TRAM WAS DRIVEN BY THESE GEARS AND THE LARGE WHEEL UNDERNEATH (SEE CA-291-31 FOR DETAIL). EMPTY TRAM BUCKETS CAME IN FROM THE LEFT, SWINGING AROUND TO THE CHUTES FROM THE ORE BIN TO BE LOADED FOR THE TRIP DOWN TO THE MILL (SEE CA-291-35 FOR DETAIL). THE BREAK OVER TOWER CAN BE SEEN IN THE DISTANCE AT TOP LEFT. THE SUPPORT TOWER BETWEEN THE UPPER TERMINAL AND THE BREAK OVER TOWER IS COLLAPSED. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  11. Multimodel methods for optimal control of aeroacoustics.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Guoquan; Collis, Samuel Scott

    2005-01-01

    A new multidomain/multiphysics computational framework for optimal control of aeroacoustic noise has been developed based on a near-field compressible Navier-Stokes solver coupled with a far-field linearized Euler solver both based on a discontinuous Galerkin formulation. In this approach, the coupling of near- and far-field domains is achieved by weakly enforcing continuity of normal fluxes across a coupling surface that encloses all nonlinearities and noise sources. For optimal control, gradient information is obtained by the solution of an appropriate adjoint problem that involves the propagation of adjoint information from the far-field to the near-field. This computational framework has been successfully applied to study optimal boundary-control of blade-vortex interaction, which is a significant noise source for helicopters on approach to landing. In the model-problem presented here, the noise propagated toward the ground is reduced by 12dB.

  12. Fluid-dynamic and aeroacoustic investigations of shrouded jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veerasamy, V.

    1980-08-01

    The fluid dynamic and aeroacoustic characteristics of a high subsonic jet discharging from a shrouded nozzle were investigated theoretically and experimentally to explore the possibility of jet noise reduction and thrust augmentation for STOL/VTOL aircraft. The preliminary design calculations of an adiabatic shrouded nozzle were performed by solving iteratively the one dimensional fluid dynamic equations governing the compressible flow. A two dimensional flow model, consisting of second order partial differential equations of a parabolic type, was used to find the effect of shroud length on the ejector performance. This model consists of the conservation laws with thin shear layer assumptions incorporating the Prandtl's mixing length hypothesis for turbulence closure. A numerical integration method was used to solve the governing fluid dynamic equations of motion. The aeroacoustic characteristics of the shrouded jet were analyzed based on the Lighthill's V(8) law.

  13. Constrained Aeroacoustic Shape Optimization Using the Surrogate Management Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsden, Alison L.; Wang, Meng; Dennis, John E., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Reduction of noise generated by turbulent flow past the trailing-edge of a lifting surface is a challenge in many aeronautical and naval applications. Numerical predictions of trailing-edge noise necessitate the use of advanced simulation techniques such as large-eddy simulation (LES) in order to capture a wide range of turbulence scales which are the source of broadband noise. Aeroacoustic calculations of the flow over a model airfoil trailing edge using LES and aeroacoustic theory have been presented in Wang and Moin and were shown to agree favorably with experiments. The goal of the present work is to apply shape optimization to the trailing edge flow previously studied, in order to control aerodynamic noise.

  14. Advances in Numerical Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.

    1997-01-01

    Advances in Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) depend critically on the availability of accurate, nondispersive, least dissipative computation algorithm as well as high quality numerical boundary treatments. This paper focuses on the recent developments of numerical boundary conditions. In a typical CAA problem, one often encounters two types of boundaries. Because a finite computation domain is used, there are external boundaries. On the external boundaries, boundary conditions simulating the solution outside the computation domain are to be imposed. Inside the computation domain, there may be internal boundaries. On these internal boundaries, boundary conditions simulating the presence of an object or surface with specific acoustic characteristics are to be applied. Numerical boundary conditions, both external or internal, developed for simple model problems are reviewed and examined. Numerical boundary conditions for real aeroacoustic problems are also discussed through specific examples. The paper concludes with a description of some much needed research in numerical boundary conditions for CAA.

  15. Validating LES for Jet Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James; Wernet, Mark P.

    2011-01-01

    Engineers charged with making jet aircraft quieter have long dreamed of being able to see exactly how turbulent eddies produce sound and this dream is now coming true with the advent of large eddy simulation (LES). Two obvious challenges remain: validating the LES codes at the resolution required to see the fluid-acoustic coupling, and the interpretation of the massive datasets that are produced. This paper addresses the former, the use of advanced experimental techniques such as particle image velocimetry (PIV) and Raman and Rayleigh scattering, to validate the computer codes and procedures used to create LES solutions. This paper argues that the issue of accuracy of the experimental measurements be addressed by cross-facility and cross-disciplinary examination of modern datasets along with increased reporting of internal quality checks in PIV analysis. Further, it argues that the appropriate validation metrics for aeroacoustic applications are increasingly complicated statistics that have been shown in aeroacoustic theory to be critical to flow-generated sound, such as two-point space-time velocity correlations. A brief review of data sources available is presented along with examples illustrating cross-facility and internal quality checks required of the data before it should be accepted for validation of LES.

  16. Aeroacoustic Prediction Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P; Mani, R.; Shin, H.; Mitchell, B.; Ashford, G.; Salamah, S.; Connell, S.; Huff, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report describes work performed on Contract NAS3-27720AoI 13 as part of the NASA Advanced Subsonic Transport (AST) Noise Reduction Technology effort. Computer codes were developed to provide quantitative prediction, design, and analysis capability for several aircraft engine noise sources. The objective was to provide improved, physics-based tools for exploration of noise-reduction concepts and understanding of experimental results. Methods and codes focused on fan broadband and 'buzz saw' noise and on low-emissions combustor noise and compliment work done by other contractors under the NASA AST program to develop methods and codes for fan harmonic tone noise and jet noise. The methods and codes developed and reported herein employ a wide range of approaches, from the strictly empirical to the completely computational, with some being semiempirical analytical, and/or analytical/computational. Emphasis was on capturing the essential physics while still considering method or code utility as a practical design and analysis tool for everyday engineering use. Codes and prediction models were developed for: (1) an improved empirical correlation model for fan rotor exit flow mean and turbulence properties, for use in predicting broadband noise generated by rotor exit flow turbulence interaction with downstream stator vanes: (2) fan broadband noise models for rotor and stator/turbulence interaction sources including 3D effects, noncompact-source effects. directivity modeling, and extensions to the rotor supersonic tip-speed regime; (3) fan multiple-pure-tone in-duct sound pressure prediction methodology based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis; and (4) low-emissions combustor prediction methodology and computer code based on CFD and actuator disk theory. In addition. the relative importance of dipole and quadrupole source mechanisms was studied using direct CFD source computation for a simple cascadeigust interaction problem, and an empirical combustor

  17. DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL, SECONDARY ORE BIN, CRUSHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL, SECONDARY ORE BIN, CRUSHER FOUNDATION, AND BALL MILL FOUNDATIONS, LOOKING NORTH NORTHWEST. ORE FROM THE MINES WAS DUMPED FROM THE TRAM BUCKETS INTO THE PRIMARY ORE BIN UNDER THE TRAM TERMINAL. A SLIDING CONTROL DOOR INTRODUCED THE INTO THE JAW CRUSHER (FOUNDATIONS,CENTER). THE CRUSHED ORE WAS THEN CONVEYED INTO THE SECONDARY ORE BIN AT CENTER LEFT. A HOLE IN THE FLOOR OF THE ORE BIN PASSED ORE ONTO ANOTHER CONVEYOR THAT BROUGHT IT OUT TO THE BALL MILL(FOUNDATIONS,CENTER BOTTOM). THIS SYSTEM IS MOST LIKELY NOT THE ORIGINAL SET UP, PROBABLY INSTALLED IN THE MINE'S LAST OCCUPATION IN THE EARLY 1940s. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  18. The aeroacoustic behavior of a cylindrical surface with a small cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homeyer, Tim; Kirrkamm, Nils; Peinke, Joachim; Schultz-von Glahn, Manfred; Mellert, Volker; Gülker, Gerd

    2014-04-01

    The aeroacoustic effects of the flow around a cylinder with a small rectangular cavity in its surface are investigated in an acoustic wind tunnel. In different positions, the overflown cavity produces loud tonal whistling noise. In large part, the noise can be explained with the Rossiter model. At a certain position of the cavity, a different aeroacoustic phenomenon occurs, which is in focus of this investigation. Tonal frequencies appear in a narrow band region, which do not scale with different cavities. A sudden onset and a sudden stop of the acoustic radiation are accompanied with a transition of the circulating flow. A strong hysteresis is observable. The separating boundary layer plays a major role in the characterization of the flow in the vicinity of the cavity. Acoustical and various flow measurements at velocities up to 47 m/s as well as a CFD simulation are presented. Consistent results reveal Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities as the reason for the aeroacoustic phenomenon.

  19. User's manual for UCAP: Unified Counter-Rotation Aero-Acoustics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culver, E. M.; Mccolgan, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    This is the user's manual for the Unified Counter-rotation Aeroacoustics Program (UCAP), the counter-rotation derivative of the UAAP (Unified Aero-Acoustic Program). The purpose of this program is to predict steady and unsteady air loading on the blades and the noise produced by a counter-rotation Prop-Fan. The aerodynamic method is based on linear potential theory with corrections for nonlinearity associated with axial flux induction, vortex lift on the blades, and rotor-to-rotor interference. The theory for acoustics and the theory for individual blade loading and wakes are derived in Unified Aeroacoustics Analysis for High Speed Turboprop Aerodynamics and Noise, Volume 1 (NASA CR-4329). This user's manual also includes a brief explanation of the theory used for the modelling of counter-rotation.

  20. DETAIL VIEW OF TRAM SUSPENSION CABLE OILING CAR. NOTE CIRCULAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF TRAM SUSPENSION CABLE OILING CAR. NOTE CIRCULAR TRACTION CABLE CLAMP IN CENTER AND OIL FEED TO CABLE BETWEEN TWO RIGHT-HAND WHEELS. OIL REDUCED FRICTION AND RUST. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  1. OVERVIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWERS NINE, TEN, AND DEEP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWERS NINE, TEN, AND DEEP RAVINE,LOOKING SOUTH FROM BREAK OVER TOWER LOCATION. A SINGLE ORE BUCKET HANGS FROM THE CABLE AT CENTER. DEATH VALLEY'S FLOOR IS IN THE DISTANCE (TOP). - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  2. DETAIL VIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWERS THREE AND FOUR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWERS THREE AND FOUR WITH TOWERS FIVE AND SIX IN THE DISTANCE, LOOKING NORTHEAST. THE TWO INTACT CABLES RUNNING ALONG TOP OF THE TOWERS ARE FIXED. WHILE THE MOVING CABLE IS LYING SLACK ON THE GROUND. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  3. EAST ELEVATION OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL WITH SIX FOOT SCALE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST ELEVATION OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL WITH SIX FOOT SCALE, LOOKING NORTHWEST. THE SCALE IS LOCATED AT CENTER RIGHT, AGAINST THE SECOND SUPPORT TIMBER FROM THE RIGHT. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  4. ENTERING SIDE OF TRAM HOUSE, LOOKING SOUTH SOUTHEAST UP ARRASTRA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ENTERING SIDE OF TRAM HOUSE, LOOKING SOUTH SOUTHEAST UP ARRASTRA GULCH. ENTERING ORE BUCKETS ROLLED OF SUSPENSION CABLE ONTO UPPER STEEL RAIL, WHERE THEY WERE DISCONNECTED FROM TRACTION (LOWER) CABLE. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  5. ORE BUCKET ON TRAM. NOTE THAT BUCKET ROLLS ALONG UPPER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ORE BUCKET ON TRAM. NOTE THAT BUCKET ROLLS ALONG UPPER, STATIONARY SUSPENSION CABLE, PULLED BY LOWER, MOVING TRACTION CABLE. FOREGROUND CABLES ARE FOR BUCKET'S TRIP FROM MINE TO MILL. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  6. TRAM HOUSE INTERIOR, LOOKING WEST. NOTE ARRIVING BUCKET ON RAIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRAM HOUSE INTERIOR, LOOKING WEST. NOTE ARRIVING BUCKET ON RAIL IN CENTER, DEPARTING BUCKET IN LEFT BACKGROUND, TRACTION CABLE IN PULLEYS, AND SUSPENSION CABLE ANGLING DOWN THROUGH FLOOR. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  7. DETAIL OVERHEAD VIEW OF SECONDARY ORE BIN, CONVEYOR PLATFORM TRAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OVERHEAD VIEW OF SECONDARY ORE BIN, CONVEYOR PLATFORM TRAM TRESTLE, AND LOADING PLATFORM, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. THE HOLE IN THE ORE BIN FLOOR CAN BE SEEN, AND BALL MILL FOUNDATION AT LOWER LEFT CORNER. SEE CA-291-13 FOR IDENTICAL B&W NEGATIVE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  8. OBLIQUE DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL, LOOKING NORTHWEST. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL, LOOKING NORTHWEST. THE JAW CRUSHER FOUNDATION CAN BE CLEARLY SEEN AT CENTER LEFT WITH A CONVEYOR TO CARRY CRUSHED ORE UP TO THE SECONDARY ORE BIN,LEFT. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  9. TRAM HOUSE INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. NOTE DEPARTING ORE BUCKET "12" ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRAM HOUSE INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. NOTE DEPARTING ORE BUCKET "12" AND SUSPENSION CABLE ANGLING DOWN THROUGH FLOOR AT LOWER LEFT. LARGE LEVER ON SIDE OF BUCKET ALLOWS IT TO BE ROTATED FOR DUMPING ORE. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  10. Direct measurement of aeroacoustic source spectrum due to a jet/wall interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lani, Shane; Krane, Michael

    2009-11-01

    The aeroacoustic source spectrum due to a turbulent jet passing over an obstruction is found experimentally. The model consists of a constriction and planar obstacle in a duct with dimensions commensurate with the those of a human vocal tract. An unsteady jet formed at a constriction interacts with a planar obstruction downstream with the jet normal to the planar surface. The aeroacoustic source spectrum is found both by measuring the unsteady force imparted on the planar obstruction as well as measuring radiated sound outside the duct. A comparison of the force spectrum to the inverse-filtered radiated sound measurements will be presented.

  11. CAA broadband noise prediction for aeroacoustic design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewert, R.; Dierke, J.; Siebert, J.; Neifeld, A.; Appel, C.; Siefert, M.; Kornow, O.

    2011-08-01

    The current status of a computational aeroacoustics (CAA) approach to simulate broadband noise is reviewed. The method rests on the use of steady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation to describe the time-averaged motion of turbulent flow. By means of synthetic turbulence the steady one-point statistics (e.g. turbulence kinetic energy) and turbulent length- and time-scales of RANS are translated into fluctuations having statistics that very accurately reproduce the initial RANS target-setting. The synthetic fluctuations are used to prescribe sound sources which drive linear perturbation equations. The whole approach represents a methodology to solve statistical noise theory with state-of-the-art CAA tools in the time-domain. A brief overview of the synthetic turbulence model and its numerical discretization in terms of the random particle-mesh (RPM) and fast random particle-mesh (FRPM) method is given. Results are presented for trailing-edge noise, slat noise, and jet noise. Some problems related to the formulation of vortex sound sources are discussed.

  12. Benchmark problems in computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter-Locklear, Freda

    1994-01-01

    A recent directive at NASA Langley is aimed at numerically predicting principal noise sources. During my summer stay, I worked with high-order ENO code, developed by Dr. Harold Atkins, for solving the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations, as it applies to computational aeroacoustics (CAA). A CAA workshop, composed of six categories of benchmark problems, has been organized to test various numerical properties of code. My task was to determine the robustness of Atkins' code for these test problems. In one category, we tested the nonlinear wave propagation of the code for the one-dimensional Euler equations, with initial pressure, density, and velocity conditions. Using freestream boundary conditions, our results were plausible. In another category, we solved the linearized two-dimensional Euler equations to test the effectiveness of radiation boundary conditions. Here we utilized MAPLE to compute eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Jacobian given variable and flux vectors. We experienced a minor problem with inflow and outflow boundary conditions. Next, we solved the quasi one dimensional unsteady flow equations with an incoming acoustic wave of amplitude 10(exp -6). The small amplitude sound wave was incident on a convergent-divergent nozzle. After finding a steady-state solution and then marching forward, our solution indicated that after 30 periods the acoustic wave had dissipated (a period is time required for sound wave to traverse one end of nozzle to other end).

  13. Time-Domain Impedance Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Auriault, Laurent

    1996-01-01

    It is an accepted practice in aeroacoustics to characterize the properties of an acoustically treated surface by a quantity known as impedance. Impedance is a complex quantity. As such, it is designed primarily for frequency-domain analysis. Time-domain boundary conditions that are the equivalent of the frequency-domain impedance boundary condition are proposed. Both single frequency and model broadband time-domain impedance boundary conditions are provided. It is shown that the proposed boundary conditions, together with the linearized Euler equations, form well-posed initial boundary value problems. Unlike ill-posed problems, they are free from spurious instabilities that would render time-marching computational solutions impossible.

  14. Airloads and Wake Geometry Calculations for an Isolated Tiltrotor Model in a Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2001-01-01

    Comparisons of measured and calculated aerodynamic behavior of a tiltrotor model are presented. The test of the Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM) with a single, 0.25-scale V-22 rotor in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW) provides an extensive set of aeroacoustic, performance, and structural loads data. The calculations were performed using the rotorcraft comprehensive analysis CAMRAD II. Presented are comparisons of measured and calculated performance for hover and helicopter mode operation, and airloads for helicopter mode. Calculated induced power, profile power, and wake geometry provide additional information about the aerodynamic behavior. An aerodynamic and wake model and calculation procedure that reflects the unique geometry and phenomena of tiltrotors has been developed. There are major differences between this model and the corresponding aerodynamic and wake model that has been established for helicopter rotors. In general, good correlation between measured and calculated performance and airloads behavior has been shown. Two aspects of the analysis that clearly need improvement are the stall delay model and the trailed vortex formation model.

  15. NASA's Aeroacoustic Tools and Methods for Analysis of Aircraft Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Lopes, Leonard V.; Burley, Casey L.

    2015-01-01

    Aircraft community noise is a significant concern due to continued growth in air traffic, increasingly stringent environmental goals, and operational limitations imposed by airport authorities. The ability to quantify aircraft noise at the source and ultimately at observers is required to develop low noise aircraft designs and flight procedures. Predicting noise at the source, accounting for scattering and propagation through the atmosphere to the observer, and assessing the perception and impact on a community requires physics-based aeroacoustics tools. Along with the analyses for aero-performance, weights and fuel burn, these tools can provide the acoustic component for aircraft MDAO (Multidisciplinary Design Analysis and Optimization). Over the last decade significant progress has been made in advancing the aeroacoustic tools such that acoustic analyses can now be performed during the design process. One major and enabling advance has been the development of the system noise framework known as Aircraft NOise Prediction Program2 (ANOPP2). ANOPP2 is NASA's aeroacoustic toolset and is designed to facilitate the combination of acoustic approaches of varying fidelity for the analysis of noise from conventional and unconventional aircraft. The toolset includes a framework that integrates noise prediction and propagation methods into a unified system for use within general aircraft analysis software. This includes acoustic analyses, signal processing and interfaces that allow for the assessment of perception of noise on a community. ANOPP2's capability to incorporate medium fidelity shielding predictions and wind tunnel experiments into a design environment is presented. An assessment of noise from a conventional and Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft using medium fidelity scattering methods combined with noise measurements from a model-scale HWB recently placed in NASA's 14x22 wind tunnel are presented. The results are in the form of community noise metrics and

  16. Mean Flow Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, R.; Nallasamy, M.; Sawyer, S.; Dyson, R.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, a new type of boundary condition for time-accurate Computational Aeroacoustics solvers is described. This boundary condition is designed to complement the existing nonreflective boundary conditions while ensuring that the correct mean flow conditions are maintained throughout the flow calculation. Results are shown for a loaded 2D cascade, started with various initial conditions.

  17. Aeroacoustics analysis and community noise overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Robert A.; Soderman, Paul T.

    1992-01-01

    The goals of the High Speed Research Program are focused on three major environmental issues: atmospheric effect, airport community noise, and sonic booms. The issues are basic concerns that require better understanding before further HSRP endeavors can be addresses. This paper discusses airport community noise and aeroacoustic analysis.

  18. Evaluation of Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, R.; Shih, S.-H.; Mankbadi, Reda R.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of three boundary conditions for aeroacoustics were investigated, namely, (1) Giles-1990; (2) Tam and Webb-1993, and (3) Thompson-1987. For each boundary condition, various implementations were tested to study the sensitivity of their performance to the implementation procedure. Details of all implementations are given. Results are shown for the acoustic field of a monopole in a uniform freestream.

  19. Comparison of Theory and Experiment on Aeroacoustic Loads and Deflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, L. M. B. C.; Bourgine, A.; Bonomi, B.

    1999-01-01

    The correlation of acoustic pressure loads induced by a turbulent wake on a nearby structural panel is considered: this problem is relevant to the acoustic fatigue of aircraft, rocket and satellite structures. Both the correlation of acoustic pressure loads and the panel deflections, were measured in an 8-m diameter transonic wind tunnel. Using the measured correlation of acoustic pressures, as an input to a finite-element aeroelastic code, the panel response was reproduced. The latter was also satisfactorily reproduced, using again the aeroelastic code, with input given by a theoretical formula for the correlation of acoustic pressures; the derivation of this formula, and the semi-empirical parameters which appear in it, are included in this paper. The comparison of acoustic responses in aeroacoustic wind tunnels (AWT) and progressive wave tubes (PWT) shows that much work needs to be done to bridge that gap; this is important since the PWT is the standard test means, whereas the AWT is more representative of real flight conditions but also more demanding in resources. Since this may be the first instance of successful modelling of acoustic fatigue, it may be appropriate to list briefly the essential ``positive'' features and associated physical phenomena: (i) a standard aeroelastic structural code can predict acoustic fatigue, provided that the correlation of pressure loads be adequately specified; (ii) the correlation of pressure loads is determined by the interference of acoustic waves, which depends on the exact evaluation of multiple scattering integrals, involving the statistics of random phase shifts; (iii) for the relatively low frequencies (one to a few hundred Hz) of aeroacoustic fatigue, the main cause of random phase effects is scattering by irregular wakes, which are thin on wavelength scale, and appear as partially reflecting rough interfaces. It may also be appropriate to mention some of the ``negative'' features, to which may be attached illusory

  20. Aeroacoustic sensitivity analysis and optimal aeroacoustic design of turbomachinery blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Kenneth C.

    1994-01-01

    During the first year of the project, we have developed a theoretical analysis - and wrote a computer code based on this analysis - to compute the sensitivity of unsteady aerodynamic loads acting on airfoils in cascades due to small changes in airfoil geometry. The steady and unsteady flow though a cascade of airfoils is computed using the full potential equation. Once the nominal solutions have been computed, one computes the sensitivity. The analysis takes advantage of the fact that LU decomposition is used to compute the nominal steady and unsteady flow fields. If the LU factors are saved, then the computer time required to compute the sensitivity of both the steady and unsteady flows to changes in airfoil geometry is quite small. The results to date are quite encouraging, and may be summarized as follows: (1) The sensitivity procedure has been validated by comparing the results obtained by 'finite difference' techniques, that is, computing the flow using the nominal flow solver for two slightly different airfoils and differencing the results. The 'analytic' solution computed using the method developed under this grant and the finite difference results are found to be in almost perfect agreement. (2) The present sensitivity analysis is computationally much more efficient than finite difference techniques. We found that using a 129 by 33 node computational grid, the present sensitivity analysis can compute the steady flow sensitivity about ten times more efficiently that the finite difference approach. For the unsteady flow problem, the present sensitivity analysis is about two and one-half times as fast as the finite difference approach. We expect that the relative efficiencies will be even larger for the finer grids which will be used to compute high frequency aeroacoustic solutions. Computational results show that the sensitivity analysis is valid for small to moderate sized design perturbations. (3) We found that the sensitivity analysis provided important

  1. DETAIL VIEW OF WINCHING ENGINE LOCATED AT THE UPPER TRAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF WINCHING ENGINE LOCATED AT THE UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, LOOKING NORTHEAST. THE CABLE FROM THIS ENGINE LEADS DOWN INTO THE DEEP RAVINE IN FRONT OF THE UPPER TRAM TERMINAL. IT WAS PROBABLY USED TO DRAG MATERIALS UP TOWARD THE TERMINAL WHEN THE TERMINAL WAS BEING CONSTRUCTED, OR IN TIMES OF TRAMWAY BREAKDOWN. THE DRIVE ENGINE IS IN THE BACKGROUND. TWO LONG OPERATING LEVERS FOR THE ENGINE ARE IN THE CENTER FOREGROUND. AN EXTRA SPOOL OF CABLE IS ON THE GROUND TO THE RIGHT OF THE ENGINE. A WATER PIPELINE STRETCHES ACROSS THE SLOPE IN THE BACKGROUND, CARRYING WATER TO THE UPPER MINES. SEE CA-291-37 FOR IDENTICAL B&W NEGATIVE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  2. DETAIL VIEW OF WINCHING ENGINE LOCATED AT THE UPPER TRAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF WINCHING ENGINE LOCATED AT THE UPPER TRAM TERMINAL LOOKING NORTHEAST. THE CABLE FROM THIS ENGINE LEADS DOWN INTO THE DEEP RAVINE IN FRONT OF THE UPPER TRAM TERMINAL. IT WAS PROBABLY USED TO DRAG MATERIALS UP TOWARD THE TERMINAL WHEN THE TERMINAL WAS BEING CONSTRUCTED, OR IN TIMES OF TRAMWAY BREAK DOWN. THE DRIVE ENGINE IS IN THE BACKGROUND. TWO LONG OPERATING LEVERS FOR THE ENGINE ARE IN THE CENTER FOREGROUND. AN EXTRA SPOOL OF CABLE IS ON THE GROUND TO THE RIGHT OF THE ENGINE. A WATER PIPELINE STRETCHES ACROSS THE SLOPE IN THE BACKGROUND, CARRYING WATER TO THE UPPER MINES. SEE CA-291-52 (CT) FOR IDENTICAL COLOR TRANSPARENCY. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  3. DETAIL VIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWER SIX WITH TOWERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWER SIX WITH TOWERS SEVEN,EIGHT, NINE, TEN, AND BREAK OVER TOWER IN DISTANCE, LOOKING NORTH. TOWER SIX IS THE LAST BEFORE A DEEP CHASM, AS IS SEEN BY THE DISTANCE BETWEEN TOWERS SIX AND SEVEN. SEE CA-291-48 (CT) FOR IDENTICAL COLOR TRANSPARENCY. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  4. DETAIL VIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWER SIX WITH TOWERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWER SIX WITH TOWERS SEVEN, EIGHT, NINE, TEN, AND BREAK OVER TOWER IN DISTANCE, LOOKING NORTH. TOWER SIX IS THE LAST BEFORE A DEEP CHASM, AS IS SEEN BY THE DISTANCE BETWEEN TOWERS SIX AND SEVEN. SEE CA-291-21 FOR IDENTICAL B&W NEGATIVE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  5. 110. MILL APPROACH FROM EAST. THE TRAM LINE RANT TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    110. MILL APPROACH FROM EAST. THE TRAM LINE RANT TO THE RIGHT (NORTH) OF THE ROAD AND REACHED THE CRUDE ORE BINS AROUND THE FAR BEND. BUILDINGS FROM FRONT TO BACK ARE, ON RIGHT, OIL WAREHOUSE AND GASOLINE SHED, AND ON LEFT, GARAGE, CARPENTER'S SHOP, OIL SHED, AND MACHINE SHOP. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  6. The TLR signaling adaptor TRAM interacts with TRAF6 to mediate activation of the inflammatory response by TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Verstak, Brett; Stack, Julianne; Ve, Thomas; Mangan, Matthew; Hjerrild, Kathryn; Jeon, Jannah; Stahl, Rainer; Latz, Eicke; Gay, Nick; Kobe, Bostjan; Bowie, Andrew G.; Mansell, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    TLRs act as sentinels in professional immune cells to detect and initiate the innate immune response to pathogen challenge. TLR4 is a widely expressed TLR, responsible for initiating potent immune responses to LPS. TRAM acts to bridge TLR4 with TRIF, orchestrating the inflammatory response to pathogen challenge. We have identified a putative TRAF6-binding motif in TRAM that could mediate a novel signaling function for TRAM in TLR4 signaling. TRAM and TRAF6 association was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of endogenous, ectopically expressed and recombinant proteins, which was ablated upon mutation of a key Glu residue in TRAM (TRAM E183A). TRAF6 and TRAM were observed colocalizing using confocal microscopy following ectopic expression in cells and the ability of TRAM and TRAM E183A to activate luciferase-linked reporter assays was determined in HEK293 and TRAF6-deficient cells. Importantly, TRAM-deficient macrophages reconstituted with TRAM E183A display significantly reduced inflammatory TNF-α, IL-6, and RANTES protein production compared with WT TRAM. These results demonstrate a novel role for TRAM in TLR4-mediated signaling in regulating inflammatory responses via its interaction with TRAF6, distinct from its role as a bridging adaptor between TLR4 and TRIF. PMID:24812060

  7. Computational aeroacoustics of turbulent high-speed jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Joseph W.

    2014-11-01

    Despite significant scientific investigation, jet noise remains a large component of the overall noise generated by supersonic aircraft. Experiments show that alterations to nozzle geometry, such as the addition of chevrons to the nozzle lip, can significantly reduce jet noise. In this talk, we assess unstructured large eddy simulation as a tool for predicting and understanding the aeroacoustic effects of complex geometry upon supersonic jets. Body-fitted, adaptive meshes are used to simulate the flow inside, around and through complicated nozzles, and results are validated against experimental measurements. High-fidelity simulations utilizing as many as one million processors simultaneously will be discussed, allowing for a detailed description of interactions between turbulence, shocks, and acoustics. This includes observations of the phenomenon of ``crackle'' noise in heated supersonic jets. We will briefly discuss challenges met and overcome along this frontier of com putational science, and describe how information extracted from the high-fidelity simulations can be used to construct accurate reduced-order models useful for aeroacoustic design. Computational resources were provided by the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility at Argonne National Laboratory and the ERDC and AFRL supercomputing centers.

  8. 49 CFR 38.179 - Trams, and similar vehicles, and systems

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... purposes of determining applicability of 49 CFR 37.101, 37.103, or 37.105 the capacity of such a vehicle or... Trams, and similar vehicles, and systems (a) New and used trams consisting of a tractor unit, with or... modification for accessibility. (b) Each tractor unit which accommodates passengers and each trailer unit...

  9. DETAIL VIEW OF ENTRY/EXIT POINT OF TRAM BUCKETS ON THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF ENTRY/EXIT POINT OF TRAM BUCKETS ON THE LOWER TRAM TERMINAL, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. THE CABLE CARRYING EMPTY BUCKETS AT TOP RIGHT IS THINNER IN DIAMETER THAN THE CABLE CARRYING LOADED BUCKETS ON THE TOP CENTER. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  10. Flap Edge Aeroacoustic Measurements and Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An aeroacoustic model test has been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation on high-lift wing configurations. This paper presents an analysis of flap side-edge noise, which is often the most dominant source. A model of a main element wing section with a half-span flap was tested at low speeds of up to a Mach number of 0.17, corresponding to a wing chord Reynolds number of approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for flat (or blunt), flanged, and round flap-edge geometries, with and without boundary-layer tripping, deployed at both moderate and high flap angles. The acoustic database is obtained from a Small Aperture Directional Array (SADA) of microphones, which was constructed to electronically steer to different regions of the model and to obtain farfield noise spectra and directivity from these regions. The basic flap-edge aerodynamics is established by static surface pressure data, as well as by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations and simplified edge flow analyses. Distributions of unsteady pressure sensors over the flap allow the noise source regions to be defined and quantified via cross-spectral diagnostics using the SADA output. It is found that shear layer instability and related pressure scatter is the primary noise mechanism. For the flat edge flap, two noise prediction methods based on unsteady surface pressure measurements are evaluated and compared to measured noise. One is a new causality spectral approach developed here. The other is a new application of an edge-noise scatter prediction method. The good comparisons for both approaches suggest that much of the physics is captured by the prediction models. Areas of disagreement appear to reveal when the assumed edge noise mechanism does not fully define the noise production. For the different edge conditions, extensive spectra and directivity are presented. Significantly, for each edge configuration, the spectra for different flow speeds, flap angles, and

  11. Flap-edge aeroacoustic measurements and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.

    2003-03-01

    An aeroacoustic model test has been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation on high-lift wing configurations. This paper presents an analysis of flap side-edge noise, which is often the most dominant source. A model of a main element wing section with a half-span flap was tested at low speeds of up to a Mach number of 0.17, corresponding to a wing chord Reynolds number of approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for flat (or blunt), flanged, and round flap-edge geometries, with and without boundary-layer tripping, deployed at both moderate and high flap angles. The acoustic database is obtained from a small aperture directional array (SADA) of microphones, which was constructed to electronically steer to different regions of the model and to obtain farfield noise spectra and directivity from these regions. The basic flap-edge aerodynamics is established by static surface pressure data, as well as by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations and simplified edge flow analyses. Distributions of unsteady pressure sensors over the flap allow the noise source regions to be defined and quantified via cross-spectral diagnostics using the SADA output. It is found that shear layer instability and related pressure scatter is the primary noise mechanism. For the flat edge flap, two noise prediction methods based on unsteady-surface-pressure measurements are evaluated and compared to measured noise. One is a new causality spectral approach developed here. The other is a new application of an edge-noise scatter prediction method. The good comparisons for both approaches suggest that the prediction models capture much of the physics. Areas of disagreement appear to reveal when the assumed edge noise mechanism does not fully define the noise production. For the different edge conditions, extensive spectra and directivity are presented. The complexity of the directivity results demonstrate the strong role of edge source geometry and frequency in

  12. Flap Edge Aeroacoustic Measurements and Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An aeroacoustic model test has been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation on high-lift wing configurations. This paper presents an analysis of flap side-edge noise, which is often the most dominant source. A model of a main element wing section with a half-span flap was tested at low speeds of up to a Mach number of 0.17, corresponding to a wing chord Reynolds number of approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for flat (or blunt), flanged, and round flap-edge geometries, with and without boundary-layer tripping, deployed at both moderate and high flap angles. The acoustic database is obtained from a Small Aperture Directional Array (SADA) of microphones, which was constructed to electronically steer to different regions of the model and to obtain farfield noise spectra and directivity from these regions. The basic flap-edge aerodynamics is established by static surface pressure data, as well as by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations and simplified edge flow analyses. Distributions of unsteady pressure sensors over the flap allow the noise source regions to be defined and quantified via cross-spectral diagnostics using the SADA output. It is found that shear layer instability and related pressure scatter is the primary noise mechanism. For the flat edge flap, two noise prediction methods based on unsteady-surface-pressure measurements are evaluated and compared to measured noise. One is a new causality spectral approach developed here. The other is a new application of an edge-noise scatter prediction method. The good comparisons for both approaches suggest that much of the physics is captured by the prediction models. Areas of disagreement appear to reveal when the assumed edge noise mechanism does not fully define, the noise production. For the different edge conditions, extensive spectra and directivity are presented. Significantly, for each edge configuration, the spectra for different flow speeds, flap angles, and

  13. Ground-borne vibrations caused by trams, and control measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, J.

    1988-01-01

    Ground-borne vibrations caused by trams in streets within cities are a special problem. The vibrations propagating to the buildings close to the track and within these buildings may be felt by the inhabitants and may be heard via the structure-borne sound radiated to the rooms. In quiet sites during night-time the relevant limits are often exceeded, if the tracks are laid in the normal manner. Experiments with tracks on floating concrete slabs on mineral wool and with "barriers" in the ground alongside the track show that the vibrations reaching buildings near the track may be reduced considerably.

  14. DETAIL VIEW OF ORE CHARGING CHUTES OF THE UPPER TRAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF ORE CHARGING CHUTES OF THE UPPER TRAM TERMINAL,LOOKING NORTHWEST TOWARD THE REAR OF THE STRUCTURE. THE ELECTRIC DRIVE MOTOR IS IN THE BACKGROUND AT UPPER RIGHT JUST BEHIND THE DRIVE GEAR. THE BELT FROM THIS MOTOR CONNECTED TO THE WHEEL AT TOP CENTER,WHICH DROVE THE SMALLER GEAR MESHED WITH THE LARGER ONE. THERE ARE NO CONTROL DOORS FOR THESE CHUTES OTHER THAN THE METAL ONES IN THE FOREGROUND. SEE CA-291-51 (CT) FOR IDENTICAL COLOR TRANSPARENCY. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  15. DETAIL VIEW OF ORE CHARGING CHUTES OF THE UPPER TRAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF ORE CHARGING CHUTES OF THE UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, LOOKING NORTHWEST TOWARD THE REAR OF THE STRUCTURE. THE ELECTRIC DRIVE MOTOR IS IN THE BACKGROUND AT UPPER RIGHT JUST BEHIND THE DRIVE GEAR. THE BELT FROM THIS MOTOR CONNECTED TO THE WHEEL AT TOP CENTER, WHICH DROVE THE SMALLER GEAR MESHED WITH THE LARGER ONE. THERE ARE NO CONTROL DOORS FOR THESE CHUTES OTHER THAN THE METAL ONES IN THE FOREGROUND. SEE CA-291-35 FOR IDENTICAL B&W NEGATIVE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  16. TRAM (Transcriptome Mapper): database-driven creation and analysis of transcriptome maps from multiple sources

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several tools have been developed to perform global gene expression profile data analysis, to search for specific chromosomal regions whose features meet defined criteria as well as to study neighbouring gene expression. However, most of these tools are tailored for a specific use in a particular context (e.g. they are species-specific, or limited to a particular data format) and they typically accept only gene lists as input. Results TRAM (Transcriptome Mapper) is a new general tool that allows the simple generation and analysis of quantitative transcriptome maps, starting from any source listing gene expression values for a given gene set (e.g. expression microarrays), implemented as a relational database. It includes a parser able to assign univocal and updated gene symbols to gene identifiers from different data sources. Moreover, TRAM is able to perform intra-sample and inter-sample data normalization, including an original variant of quantile normalization (scaled quantile), useful to normalize data from platforms with highly different numbers of investigated genes. When in 'Map' mode, the software generates a quantitative representation of the transcriptome of a sample (or of a pool of samples) and identifies if segments of defined lengths are over/under-expressed compared to the desired threshold. When in 'Cluster' mode, the software searches for a set of over/under-expressed consecutive genes. Statistical significance for all results is calculated with respect to genes localized on the same chromosome or to all genome genes. Transcriptome maps, showing differential expression between two sample groups, relative to two different biological conditions, may be easily generated. We present the results of a biological model test, based on a meta-analysis comparison between a sample pool of human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells and a sample pool of megakaryocytic cells. Biologically relevant chromosomal segments and gene clusters with

  17. Aeroacoustic Measurements of a Wing-Flap Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, Kristine R.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.; Hunter, William H.; Gerhold, Carl H.

    1997-01-01

    Aeroacoustic measurements are being conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation in high-lift wing configurations, and initial results are presented. The model is approximately 6 percent of a full scale configuration, and consists of a main element NACA 63(sub 2) - 215 wing section and a 30 percent chord half-span flap. Flow speeds up to Mach 0.17 are tested at Reynolds number up to approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for a main element at a 16 degree angle of attack, and flap deflection angles of 29 and 39 degrees. The measurement systems developed for this test include two directional arrays used to localize and characterize the noise sources, and an array of unsteady surface pressure transducers used to characterize wave number spectra and correlate with acoustic measurements. Sound source localization maps show that locally dominant noise sources exist on the flap-side edge. The spectral distribution of the noise sources along the flap-side edge shows a decrease in frequency of the locally dominant noise source with increasing distance downstream of the flap leading edge. Spectra are presented which show general spectral characteristics of Strouhal dependent flow-surface interaction noise. However, the appearance of multiple broadband tonal features at high frequency indicates the presence of aeroacoustic phenomenon following different scaling characteristics. The scaling of the high frequency aeroacoustic phenomenon is found to be different for the two flap deflection angles tested. Unsteady surface pressure measurements in the vicinity of the flap edge show high coherence levels between adjacent sensors on the flap-side edge and on the flap edge upper surface in a region which corresponds closely to where the flap-side edge vortex begins to spill over to the flap upper surface. The frequency ranges where these high levels of coherence occur on the flap surface are consistent with the frequency ranges in which dominant features

  18. Development of a micromachined piezoelectric microphone for aeroacoustics applications.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Stephen; Nishida, Toshikazu; Cattafesta, Louis; Sheplak, Mark

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, and characterization of a bulk-micromachined piezoelectric microphone for aeroacoustic applications. Microphone design was accomplished through a combination of piezoelectric composite plate theory and lumped element modeling. The device consists of a 1.80-mm-diam, 3-microm-thick, silicon diaphragm with a 267-nm-thick ring of piezoelectric material placed near the boundary of the diaphragm to maximize sensitivity. The microphone was fabricated by combining a sol-gel lead zirconate-titanate deposition process on a silicon-on-insulator wafer with deep-reactive ion etching for the diaphragm release. Experimental characterization indicates a sensitivity of 1.66 microVPa, dynamic range greater than six orders of magnitude (35.7-169 dB, re 20 microPa), a capacitance of 10.8 nF, and a resonant frequency of 59.0 kHz. PMID:18247752

  19. An Aeroacoustic Study of a Leading Edge Slat Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza, J. M.; Brooks, T. F.; Humphreys, W. M., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Aeroacoustic evaluations of high-lift devices have been carried out in the Quiet Flow Facility of the NASA Langley Research Center. The present paper describes detailed flow and acoustic measurements that have been made in order to better understand the noise generated from airflow over a wing leading edge slat configuration, and to possibly predict and reduce this noise source. The acoustic database is obtained by a moveable Small Aperture Directional Array of microphones designed to electronically steer to different portions of models under study. The slat is shown to be a uniform distributed noise source. The data was processed such that spectra and directivity were determined with respect to a one-foot span of slat. The spectra are normalized in various fashions to demonstrate slat noise character. In order to equate portions of the spectra to different slat noise components, trailing edge noise predictions using measured slat boundary layer parameters as inputs are compared to the measured slat noise spectra.

  20. Cholecystectomy after breast reconstruction with a pedicled autologous tram flap. Types of surgical access.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, Magdalena; Kostro, Justyna; Jankau, Jerzy; Bigda, Justyna; Skorek, Andrzej

    2014-09-01

    The number of breast reconstruction procedures has been increasing in recent years. One of the suggested treatment methods is breast reconstruction with a pedicled skin and muscle TRAM flap (transverse rectus abdominis muscle - TRAM). Surgical incisions performed during a cholecystectomy procedure may be located in the areas significant for flap survival. The aim of this paper is to present anatomical changes in abdominal walls secondary to pedicled skin and muscle (TRAM) flap breast reconstruction, which influence the planned access in cholecystectomy procedures. The authors present 2 cases of cholecystectomy performed due to cholelithiasis in female patients with a history of TRAM flap breast reconstruction procedures. The first patient underwent a traditional method of surgery 14 days after the reconstruction due to acute cholecystitis. The second patient underwent a laparoscopy due to cholelithiasis 7 years after the TRAM procedure. In both cases an abdominal ultrasound scan was performed prior to the operation, and surgical access was determined following consultation with a plastic surgeon. The patient who had undergone traditional cholecystectomy developed an infection of the postoperative wound. The wound was treated with antibiotics, vacuum therapy and skin grafting. After 7 weeks complete postoperative wound healing and correct healing of the TRAM flap were achieved. The patient who had undergone laparoscopy was discharged home on the second postoperative day without any complications. In order to plan a safe surgical access, it is necessary to know the changes in the anatomy of abdominal walls following a pedicled TRAM flap breast reconstruction procedure. PMID:25337177

  1. Structural safety of trams in case of misguidance in a switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Christian; Schwickert, Martin; Simonis, Andreas

    2010-08-01

    Tram vehicles mainly operate on street tracks where sometimes misguidance in switches occurs due to unfavourable conditions. Generally, in this situation, the first running gear of the vehicle follows the bend track while the next running gears continue straight ahead. This leads to a constraint that can only be solved if the vehicle's articulation is damaged or the wheel derails. The last-mentioned situation is less critical in terms of safety and costs. Five different tram types, one of them high floor, the rest low floor, were examined analytically. Numerical simulation was used to determine which wheel would be the first to derail and what level of force is needed in the articulation area between two carbodies to make a tram derail. It was shown that with pure analytical simulation, only an idea of which tram type behaves better or worse in such a situation can be gained, while a three-dimensional computational simulation gives more realistic values for the forces that arise. Three of the four low-floor tram types need much higher articulation forces to make a wheel derail in a switch misguidance situation. One particular three-car type with two single-axle running gears underneath the centre car must be designed to withstand nearly three times higher articulation forces than a conventional high-floor articulated tram. Tram designers must be aware of that and should design the carbody accordingly.

  2. Experimental studies on annoyance caused by noises from trams and buses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrock, Stephan; Griefahn, Barbara; Kaczmarek, Tomasz; Hafke, Honorata; Preis, Anna; Gjestland, Truls

    2008-06-01

    Acute annoyance due to noise from trams and buses was ascertained and compared in two experimental studies. First, 22 healthy young persons (19-22 years) using a standardised scale, rated their annoyance caused by noise from trams, buses and trucks, which were each presented at seven sound levels. The noise of a tram was judged to be equally annoying as the noise of a bus with a 3 dB lower level, which corresponds to the calculated loudness difference. The noises of a tram and of a bus were superimposed onto a 2-h realistic road traffic scenario in the second study. This study was conducted with 60 healthy young persons (18-31 years). Twenty participants were each exposed either to the scenario with the tram or the bus ( LAeqT=55 dBA) or to a control condition ( LAeqT=43.6 dBA) while working on different mental tasks. Performance data did not differentiate between the noise conditions, but the participants were again less annoyed by the scenario with the tram, suggesting a possible bonus for the tram. This assumption has to be verified in future studies. The fact that calculated loudness could predict annoyance in the psychoacoustic tests and this annoyance due to the same noises presented in complex scenarios might indicate the possibility of a more economical approach, at least to noises between which loudness differs greatly.

  3. Aeroacoustic diffraction and dissipation by a short propeller cowl in subsonic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Rudolph

    1993-01-01

    This report develops and applies an aeroacoustic diffraction theory for a duct, or cowl, placed around modelled sources of propeller noise. The regime of flight speed is high subsonic. The modelled cowl's inner wall contains a liner with axially variable properties. Its exterior is rigid. The analysis replaces both sides with an unsteady lifting surface coupled to a dynamic thickness problem. The resulting pair of aeroacoustic governing equations for a lined 'ring wing' is valid both for a passive and for an active liner. Their numerical solution yields the effective dipole and monopole distributions of the shrouding system and thereby determines the cowl-diffracted component of the total radiated field. The sample calculations here include a preliminary parametric search for that liner layout which maximizes the cowl's shielding effectiveness. The main conclusion of the study is that a short cowl, passively lined, should provide moderate reductions in propeller noise.

  4. Investigation of computational aeroacoustic tools for noise predictions of wind turbine aerofoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humpf, A.; Ferrer, E.; Munduate, X.

    2007-07-01

    In this work trailing edge noise levels of a research aerofoil have been computed and compared to aeroacoustic measurements using two different approaches. On the other hand, aerodynamic and aeroacoustic calculations were performed with the full Navier-Stokes CFD code Fluent [Fluent Inc 2005 Fluent 6.2 Users Guide, Lebanon, NH, USA] on the basis of a steady RANS simulation. Aerodynamic characteristics were computed by the aid of various turbulence models. By the combined usage of implemented broadband noise source models, it was tried to isolate and determine the trailing edge noise level. Throughout this work two methods of different computational cost have been tested and quantitative and qualitative results obtained. On the one hand, the semi-empirical noise prediction tool NAFNoise [Moriarty P 2005 NAFNoise User's Guide. Golden, Colorado, July. http://wind.nrel.gov/designcodes/ simulators/NAFNoise] was used to directly predict trailing edge noise by taking into consideration the nature of the experiments.

  5. UPTF-TRAM experiments for SBLOCA: Evaluation of condensation processes in TRAM tests A6 and A7

    SciTech Connect

    Sonneburg, H.G.; Tuunanen, J.; Palazov, V.V.

    1995-09-01

    The investigation of thermal-hydraulic phenomena related to reactor transients with accident management measures is the goal of the TRansient and accident Management (TRAM) experimental programme being carried out at the Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF) at Mannheim (Germany). These experimental investigations and test analyses are funded by the German Federal Minister for Research and Technology (BMFT). The UPTF simulates these phenomena in a 1:1 such relative to the dimension of a PWR. Condensation of steam during Emergency Core Cooling (ECC) water injection from accumulators into the primary system is one of the phenomena studied within the accumulators into the primary system is one of the phenomena studied within the TRAM programme. This phenomenon partly controls the efficiency of accumulator injection if the high pressure safety systems fail. Beside this, the condensation within the nitrogen inside the accumulator for a certain period controls the pressure development inside the accumulator. Thus, both condensation phenomena determine the ECC flow rate delivered to the primary system. Concerning the condensation inside the primary system, this is also of safety relevance in the case of Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) during cold leg injection.

  6. A Novel Tram Stent Method in the Treatment of Coronary Bifurcation Lesions – Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Arokiaraj, Mark C.; De Santis, Gianluca; De Beule, Matthieu; Palacios, Igor F.

    2016-01-01

    A novel stent was designed for the treatment of coronary bifurcation lesion, and it was investigated for its performance by finite element analysis. This study was performed in search of a novel method of treatment of bifurcation lesion with provisional stenting. A bifurcation model was created with the proximal vessel of 3.2 mm diameter, and the distal vessel after the side branch (2.3 mm) was 2.7 mm. A novel stent was designed with connection links that had a profile of a tram. Laser cutting and shape setting of the stent was performed, and thereafter it was crimped and deployed over a balloon. The contact pressure, stresses on the arterial wall, stresses on the stent, the maximal principal log strain of the main artery and the side-branch were studied. The study was performed in Abaqus, Simulia. The stresses on the main branch and the distal branch were minimally increased after deployment of this novel stent. The side branch was preserved, and the stresses on the side branch were lesser; and at the confluence of bifurcation on either side of the side branch origin the von-Mises stress was marginally increased. The stresses and strain at the bifurcation were significantly lesser than the stresses and strain of the currently existing techniques used in the treatment of bifurcation lesions though the study was primarily focused only on the utility of the new technology. There is a potential for a novel Tram-stent method in the treatment of coronary bifurcation lesions. PMID:26937643

  7. The role of unsteady aerodynamics in aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul

    1988-01-01

    The role of acoustics and unsteady aerodynamics research in understanding the fundamental physics of time-dependent fluid phenomena is reviewed. The key issues are illustrated by considering the sound radiation of turbulent jets and the aeroacoustics of rotating bodies such as helicopter rotors. The importance of computational methods as a link between aerodynamics and acoustics is also discussed. It is noted that where acoustic analogy techniques are sufficiently accurate, unsteady aerodynamics can be used for acoustic prediction. In supersonic problems where acoustics and aerodynamics are coupled, an integrated nonlinear analysis can provide an accurate problem solution.

  8. Aero-acoustics of Drag Generating Swirling Exhaust Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, P. N.; Mobed, D.; Spakovszky, Z. S.; Brooks, T. F.; Humphreys, W. M. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Aircraft on approach in high-drag and high-lift configuration create unsteady flow structures which inherently generate noise. For devices such as flaps, spoilers and the undercarriage there is a strong correlation between overall noise and drag such that, in the quest for quieter aircraft, one challenge is to generate drag at low noise levels. This paper presents a rigorous aero-acoustic assessment of a novel drag concept. The idea is that a swirling exhaust flow can yield a steady, and thus relatively quiet, streamwise vortex which is supported by a radial pressure gradient responsible for pressure drag. Flows with swirl are naturally limited by instabilities such as vortex breakdown. The paper presents a first aero-acoustic assessment of ram pressure driven swirling exhaust flows and their associated instabilities. The technical approach combines an in-depth aerodynamic analysis, plausibility arguments to qualitatively describe the nature of acoustic sources, and detailed, quantitative acoustic measurements using a medium aperture directional microphone array in combination with a previously established Deconvolution Approach for Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS). A model scale engine nacelle with stationary swirl vanes was designed and tested in the NASA Langley Quiet Flow Facility at a full-scale approach Mach number of 0.17. The analysis shows that the acoustic signature is comprised of quadrupole-type turbulent mixing noise of the swirling core flow and scattering noise from vane boundary layers and turbulent eddies of the burst vortex structure near sharp edges. The exposed edges are the nacelle and pylon trailing edge and the centerbody supporting the vanes. For the highest stable swirl angle setting a nacelle area based drag coefficient of 0.8 was achieved with a full-scale Overall Sound Pressure Level (OASPL) of about 40dBA at the ICAO approach certification point.

  9. Theoretical Aeroacoustics: Compiled Mathematical Derivations of Fereidoun 'Feri' Farassat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Dr. Fereidoun 'Feri' Farassat was a theoretical aero-acoustician at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. This book contains technical derivations, notes, and classes that Dr. Farassat produced during his professional career. The layout of the book has been carefully crafted so that foundational ideas through advanced theories, which altered the technical discipline of aeroacoustics, build upon one another. The book can be used to understand the theories of acoustics and learn one contemporary aeroacoustic prediction approach made popular by Dr. Farassat. Most importantly, this book gives the general reader insight into how one of NASA's best aeroacoustics theoreticians thought, constructed, and solved problems throughout his career.

  10. Some benchmark problems for computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, C. J.

    2004-02-01

    This paper presents analytical results for high-speed leading-edge noise which may be useful for benchmark testing of computational aeroacoustics codes. The source of the noise is a convected gust striking the leading edge of a wing or fan blade at arbitrary subsonic Mach number; the streamwise shape of the gust is top-hat, Gaussian, or sinusoidal, and the cross-stream shape is top-hat, Gaussian, or uniform. Detailed results are given for all nine combinations of shapes; six combinations give three-dimensional sound fields, and three give two-dimensional fields. The gust shapes depend on numerical parameters, such as frequency, rise time, and width, which may be varied arbitrarily in relation to aeroacoustic code parameters, such as time-step, grid size, and artificial viscosity. Hence it is possible to determine values of code parameters suitable for accurate calculation of a given acoustic feature, e.g., the impulsive sound field produced by a gust with sharp edges, or a full three-dimensional acoustic directivity pattern, or a complicated multi-lobed directivity. Another possibility is to check how accurately a code can determine the far acoustic field from nearfield data; a parameter here would be the distance from the leading edge at which the data are taken.

  11. Output characteristics of high power cryogenic Yb:YAG TRAM laser oscillator.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Hiroaki; Kawanaka, Junji; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Chosrowjan, Haik; Fujita, Masayuki; Takeshita, Kenji; Izawa, Yasukazu

    2012-09-10

    We analyzed the output power characteristics of a cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG total-reflection active-mirror (TRAM) laser oscillator including the temperature dependence of the emission cross section and the reabsorption loss of the Yb:YAG TRAM. A CW multi-transverse mode oscillation of a 9.8 at.% doped 0.6 mm thick Yb:YAG ceramic TRAM was investigated for various pump spot sizes and compared with theoretical results. The Yb:YAG temperatures were inferred from the ratio between fluorescence intensities at 1022 nm and 1027 nm which varied significantly with temperature below 200 K. Output power calculations using evaluated temperatures were in good agreement with the experimental data measured between 77 and 200 K, and the output power suppression due to the temperature rise observed above ~140 K. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first evaluation of output power for a cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG TRAM laser. PMID:23037293

  12. DETAIL OVERHEAD VIEW OF SECONDARY ORE BIN, CONVEYOR PLATFORM,TRAM TRESTLE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OVERHEAD VIEW OF SECONDARY ORE BIN, CONVEYOR PLATFORM,TRAM TRESTLE, LOADING PLATFORM, AND BOILER, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  13. A hybrid approach to the computational aeroacoustics of human voice production.

    PubMed

    Šidlof, P; Zörner, S; Hüppe, A

    2015-06-01

    The aeroacoustic mechanisms in human voice production are complex coupled processes that are still not fully understood. In this article, a hybrid numerical approach to analyzing sound generation in human voice production is presented. First, the fluid flow problem is solved using a parallel finite-volume computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver on a fine computational mesh covering the larynx. The CFD simulations are run for four geometrical configurations: both with and without false vocal folds, and with fixed convergent or convergent-divergent motion of the medial vocal fold surface. Then the aeroacoustic sources and propagation of sound waves are calculated using Lighthill's analogy or acoustic perturbation equations on a coarse mesh covering the larynx, vocal tract, and radiation region near the mouth. Aeroacoustic sound sources are investigated in the time and frequency domains to determine their precise origin and correlation with the flow field. The problem of acoustic wave propagation from the larynx and vocal tract into the free field is solved using the finite-element method. Two different vocal-tract shapes are considered and modeled according to MRI vocal-tract data of the vowels /i/ and /u/. The spectra of the radiated sound evaluated from acoustic simulations show good agreement with formant frequencies known from human subjects. PMID:25288479

  14. Injuries Due to Wedging of Bicycle Wheels in On-road Tram Tracks

    PubMed Central

    Deunk, Jaap; Harmsen, Annelieke M. K.; Schonhuth, Casper P.; Bloemers, Frank W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In cities with trams as public transportation, tram tracks are often on public roads, creating a shared road situation with other road participants like cyclists. Beside the risk of direct collisions, this situation can also lead to bicycle wheels getting wedged in tram tracks, causing cyclists to fall. Objectives: The aim of this study was to gain more insight in the injury pattern of this trauma mechanism and to draw attention to the risks of the infrastructural situation with on-road tram tracks. Patients and Methods: A one-year, prospective, observational cohort study was conducted. All patients admitted after presentation to the emergency department of a level 1 trauma center, who got injured because their bicycle wheels got wedged in tram tracks, were included. Data were collected on patient demographics, type of injury and treatment. Results: Ten patients were included. Six were male. The mean age was 38 years. Six patients required surgery, mostly because of extremity injuries. Mean duration of admission was 4 days. Mean injury severity score was 13. One patient died as a result of the injuries sustained in the accident. Conclusions: Tram tracks on public roads are potentially dangerous and can lead to serious injuries and even mortality amongst cyclist. Operative intervention is frequently needed. PMID:25685751

  15. Obesity Should Not Prevent from TRAM Flap Breast Reconstruction in Developing Countries.

    PubMed

    Alipour, Sadaf; Omranipour, Ramesh; Akrami, Rahim

    2015-12-01

    Transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap is the most common procedure performed for breast reconstruction after mastectomy for breast cancer. Obesity is a relative contraindication, and complex modifications have been proposed in the pedicled technique for obese patients. We studied ischemic complications in our patients to investigate the effect of body weight on the outcome of TRAM flap breast reconstruction. Pertinent data from medical records of patients receiving a TRAM flap surgery from 1986 to 2011 were extracted. Patients were divided into three groups based on the body mass index (BMI): normal (<25 kg/m(2)), overweight (25-29.9 kg/m(2)), and obese (>30 kg/m(2)). Flap necrosis is defined as any visible nonviable tissue in the reconstructed breast. It was observed that 117 patients had received TRAM flap reconstruction. Fifty-eight patients were excluded. Of the remaining 59 cases, 24 had normal BMI, 21 were overweight, and 14 were obese. No patient was found to develop flap necrosis. Outcome of TRAM flap breast reconstruction in obese patients is similar to nonobese patients. No major necrosis in need of reoperation was identified in the studied obese patients. It was concluded that categorizing obesity as a relative contraindication to TRAM flap breast reconstruction should be revisited based on larger cohort studies. PMID:26730022

  16. Pedicled TRAM Flap in Presence of Desmoid Tumor of the Rectus Sheath; a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Khater, Ashraf

    2015-12-01

    Creating TRAM flap in obese patient is a challenging issue with a hazard of flap ischemia and breast envelope loss or sepsis. In this case we show our experience in doing an interval TRAM flap in markedly obese patient (BMI index 39) in the presence of Desmoid tumor of the anterior abdominal wall on top of previous mesh hernioplasty in the contralateral side of the tumor. Interval TRAM was decided with achieving of a complete vascular delay in the same sitting with skin sparing mastectomy. On doing abdominal ultrasonography for perforator mapping a desmoid tumor was encountered in the contralateral side. The decision was to elevate the flap together with excision of the desmoid tumor with the flap to be sutured in situ at the end of operation and after 5 days to transfer the flap to the mastectomy site. There was no major complications apart from mild wound sepsis of the breast pocket that was controlled medically. According to our proposed aesthetical score, our patient expressed the outcome as good (8/10 points). Pedicled TRAM flap creation in markedly obese patients is hazardous and we recommend this new concept of interval TRAM for this situation. Moreover the presence of desmoid tumor in the rectus sheath is not a contraindication to this flap elevation. The presence of abdominal desmoid tumor is not a contraindication for TRAM flap provided that it can be resected with sparing of perforators on one side of the rectus sheath. PMID:27065672

  17. Aeroacoustics of a porous plug supersonic jet noise suppressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dosanjh, D. S.; Matambo, T. J.; Das, I. S.

    1983-01-01

    The aeroacoustics of a porous plug supersonic jet noise suppressor was investigated. The needed modifications of the existing multistream coaxial jet rig; the compressed air facility and pressure controls; the design, the fabrication, and the installation of the plenum chamber for the plug nozzle, and the design and the machining of the first contoured plug nozzle were completed. The optical and the aeroacoustic data of the contoured plug nozzles and of the conical convergent nozzle alone were discussed.

  18. Highlights of Aeroacoustics Research in the U.S. 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, Ganesh; McLaughlin, Dennis K.

    1999-01-01

    Highlights of aeroacoustics research in the United States of America during 1998 are reported in a summary compiled from information provided by members of the Aeroacoustics Technical Committee of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and other leading research groups in industry, national laboratories, and academia. The past few years have seen significant progress in aeroacoustics. Research has steadily progressed toward enhanced safety, noise benefits, and lower costs. Since industrial progress is generally not published in the archival literature, it is particularly important to highlight these accomplishments. This year we chose to report on five topics of great interest to the aerospace industry including a synopsis of fundamental research at universities and national laboratories. The topics chosen are: (1) Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST), (2) High Speed Research (HSR), (3) Rotorcraft, (4) Weapons bay aeroacoustics control and (5) Academic research including Computational AeroAcoustics (CAA). Although the information presented in this review is not all encompassing we hope that the topics covered will provide some insights into aeroacoustics activity in the U.S.

  19. The aeroacoustics of supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Philip J.; McLaughlin, Dennis K.

    1995-01-01

    This research project was a joint experimental/computational study of noise in supersonic jets. The experiments were performed in a low to moderate Reynolds number anechoic supersonic jet facility. Computations have focused on the modeling of the effect of an external shroud on the generation and radiation of jet noise. This report summarizes the results of the research program in the form of the Masters and Doctoral theses of those students who obtained their degrees with the assistance of this research grant. In addition, the presentations and publications made by the principal investigators and the research students is appended.

  20. Investigating Aeroacoustic Sources in a Subsonic Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachtor, Adam J.; Jordan, Peter; George, William K.

    2007-11-01

    George, W"anstr"om, and Jordan (2007) suggested an alternative approach to identifying aeroacoustic sources. Through this method, contributions to the pressure field are effectively separated into three separate terms. One term is unique in that it present only in compressible flows. This compressible term has been argued to be the only term that can radiate acoustically. An investigation into this approach is presented in the specific case of a subsonic jet. Particular attention is paid to the compressible term and its interaction with the mechanism that is responsible for the hydrodynamic pressure in an incompressible flow. We extend our thanks to Jonathan B. Freund for access to data from his DNS jet simulation.

  1. Vortex particle methods in aeroacoustic calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huberson, Serge; Rivoalen, Elie; Voutsinas, Spyros

    2008-11-01

    The connection between vortex particle methods and aeroacoustics is considered within the framework of Lighthill's acoustic analogy which allows to decouple the flow from noise propagation. For the flow, techniques such as tree-algorithms and the particle-mesh method are brought together with the aim to achieve the best possible performance in view of analyzing complex problems. The flow results are then input to the acoustic wave equation which is solved in integral form. It will involve monopole, dipole and quadrupole terms which can be successively integrated. The significance of such an approach is first demonstrated in two problems, both related to vortex-solid interactions. The first is a generic one and considers the interaction of a vortex filament interacting with a sphere while the second considers helicopter noise as an example of a complex engineering set-up.

  2. The Aeroacoustics of Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.

    2008-01-01

    Aerodynamic noise prediction has been an important and challenging research area since James Lighthill first introduced his Acoustic Analogy Approach over fifty years ago. This talk attempts to provide a unified framework for the subsequent theoretical developments in this field. It assumes that there is no single approach that is optimal in all situations and uses the framework as a basis for discussing the strengths weaknesses of the various approaches to this topic. But the emphasis here will be on the important problem of predicting the noise from high speed air jets. Specific results will presented for round jets in the 0.5 to 1.4 Mach number range and compared with experimental data taken on the Glenn SHAR rig. It is demonstrated that nonparallel mean flow effects play an important role in predicting the noise at the supersonic Mach numbers. The results explain the failure of previous attempts based on the parallel flow Lilley model (which has served as the foundation for most jet noise analyses during past two decades).

  3. Energy considerations in computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.

    A finite-volume multistage time-stepping Euler code is used to investigate the use of CFD algorithms for the direct calculation of acoustics. The 2D compressible inviscid flow about an accelerating or decelerating circular cylinder is used as a model problem. The time evolution of the energy transfer from the cylinder to the fluid, as the cylinder is moved from rest to some nonnegligible velocity, is clearly seen. By examining the temporal and spatial characteristics of the numerical solution, a distinction can be made between the propagating acoustic energy, the convecting energy associated with the entropy change in the fluid, and the energy contained in the local aerodynamic field. Systematic variation of the cylinder acceleration shows that the radiated acoustic energy depends strongly upon the rate of acceleration or deceleration. The computational grid has a large effect on the ratio of acoustic energy to nonphysical entropy associated energy, while the role of the explicit artificial viscosity seems to be of second order. The entropy term was nearly negligible in all cases the cylinder was started slowly.

  4. Energy considerations in computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.

    1993-01-01

    A finite-volume multistage time-stepping Euler code is used to investigate the use of CFD algorithms for the direct calculation of acoustics. The 2D compressible inviscid flow about an accelerating or decelerating circular cylinder is used as a model problem. The time evolution of the energy transfer from the cylinder to the fluid, as the cylinder is moved from rest to some nonnegligible velocity, is clearly seen. By examining the temporal and spatial characteristics of the numerical solution, a distinction can be made between the propagating acoustic energy, the convecting energy associated with the entropy change in the fluid, and the energy contained in the local aerodynamic field. Systematic variation of the cylinder acceleration shows that the radiated acoustic energy depends strongly upon the rate of acceleration or deceleration. The computational grid has a large effect on the ratio of acoustic energy to nonphysical entropy associated energy, while the role of the explicit artificial viscosity seems to be of second order. The entropy term was nearly negligible in all cases the cylinder was started slowly.

  5. The TIR-Domain Containing Adaptor TRAM Is Required for TLR7 Mediated RANTES Production

    PubMed Central

    Shevlin, Enda; Miggin, Sinéad M.

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) plays a vital role in the immune response to ssRNA viruses such as human rhinovirus (HRV) and Influenza, against which there are currently no treatments or vaccines with long term efficacy available. Clearly, a more comprehensive understanding of the TLR7 signaling axis will contribute to its molecular targeting. TRIF related adaptor molecule (TRAM) plays a vital role in TLR4 signaling by recruiting TRIF to TLR4, followed by endosomal trafficking of the complex and initiation of IRF3 dependent type I interferon production as well as NF-κB dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Towards understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate TLR7 functionality, we found that TRAM−/− murine macrophages exhibited a transcriptional and translational impairment in TLR7 mediated RANTES, but not TNFα, production. Suppression of TRAM expression in human macrophages also resulted in an impairment in TLR7 mediated CCL5 and IFN-β, but not TNFα, gene induction. Furthermore, suppression of endogenous human TRAM expression in human macrophages significantly impaired RV16 induced CCL5 and IFNβ, but not TNFα gene induction. Additionally, TRAM-G2A dose-dependently inhibited TLR7 mediated activation of CCL5, IFNβ and IFNα reporter genes. TLR7-mediated phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 was impaired in TRAM−/− cells. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation studies indicated that TRAM physically interacts with MyD88 upon TLR7 stimulation, but not under basal conditions. Our results clearly demonstrate that TRAM plays a, hitherto unappreciated, role in TLR7 signaling through a novel signaling axis containing, but not limited to, MyD88, TRAM and IRF3 towards the activation of anti-viral immunity. PMID:25211222

  6. Aeroacoustic Evaluation of Flap and Landing Gear Noise Reduction Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Lockard, David P.; Ravetta, Patricio A.

    2014-01-01

    Aeroacoustic measurements for a semi-span, 18% scale, high-fidelity Gulfstream aircraft model are presented. The model was used as a test bed to conduct detailed studies of flap and main landing gear noise sources and to determine the effectiveness of numerous noise mitigation concepts. Using a traversing microphone array in the flyover direction, an extensive set of acoustic data was obtained in the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel with the facility in the acoustically treated open-wall (jet) mode. Most of the information was acquired with the model in a landing configuration with the flap deflected 39 deg and the main landing gear alternately installed and removed. Data were obtained at Mach numbers of 0.16, 0.20, and 0.24 over directivity angles between 56 deg and 116 deg, with 90 deg representing the overhead direction. Measured acoustic spectra showed that several of the tested flap noise reduction concepts decrease the sound pressure levels by 2 - 4 dB over the entire frequency range at all directivity angles. Slightly lower levels of noise reduction from the main landing gear were obtained through the simultaneous application of various gear devices. Measured aerodynamic forces indicated that the tested gear/flap noise abatement technologies have a negligible impact on the aerodynamic performance of the aircraft model.

  7. Design and Use of Microphone Directional Arrays for Aeroacoustic Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Hunter, William W., Jr.; Meadows, Kristine R.

    1998-01-01

    An overview of the development of two microphone directional arrays for aeroacoustic testing is presented. These arrays were specifically developed to measure airframe noise in the NASA Langley Quiet Flow Facility. A large aperture directional array using 35 flush-mounted microphones was constructed to obtain high resolution noise localization maps around airframe models. This array possesses a maximum diagonal aperture size of 34 inches. A unique logarithmic spiral layout design was chosen for the targeted frequency range of 2-30 kHz. Complementing the large array is a small aperture directional array, constructed to obtain spectra and directivity information from regions on the model. This array, possessing 33 microphones with a maximum diagonal aperture size of 7.76 inches, is easily moved about the model in elevation and azimuth. Custom microphone shading algorithms have been developed to provide a frequency- and position-invariant sensing area from 10-40 kHz with an overall targeted frequency range for the array of 5-60 kHz. Both arrays are employed in acoustic measurements of a 6 percent of full scale airframe model consisting of a main element NACA 632-215 wing section with a 30 percent chord half-span flap. Representative data obtained from these measurements is presented, along with details of the array calibration and data post-processing procedures.

  8. Aeroacoustic Study of a 26%-Scale Semispan Model of a Boeing 777 Wing in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. Clifton; Burnside, Nathan J.; Soderman, Paul T.; Jaeger, Stephen M.; Reinero, Bryan R.; James, Kevin D.; Arledge, Thomas K.

    2004-01-01

    An acoustic and aerodynamic study was made of a 26%-scale unpowered Boeing 777 aircraft semispan model in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel for the purpose of identifying and attenuating airframe noise sources. Simulated approach and landing configurations were evaluated at Mach numbers between 0.12 and 0.24. Cruise configurations were evaluated at Mach numbers between 0.24 and 0.33. The research team used two Ames phased-microphone arrays, a large fixed array and a small traversing array, mounted under the wing to locate and compare various noise sources in the wing high-lift system and landing gear. Numerous model modifications and noise alleviation devices were evaluated. Simultaneous with acoustic measurements, aerodynamic forces were recorded to document aircraft conditions and any performance changes caused by the geometric modifications. Numerous airframe noise sources were identified that might be important factors in the approach and landing noise of the full-scale aircraft. Several noise-control devices were applied to each noise source. The devices were chosen to manipulate and control, if possible, the flow around the various tips and through the various gaps of the high-lift system so as to minimize the noise generation. Fences, fairings, tip extensions, cove fillers, vortex generators, hole coverings, and boundary-layer trips were tested. In many cases, the noise-control devices eliminated noise from some sources at specific frequencies. When scaled to full-scale third-octave bands, typical noise reductions ranged from 1 to 10 dB without significant aerodynamic performance loss.

  9. High-Lift Engine Aeroacoustics Technology (HEAT) Test Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuniga, Fanny A.; Smith, Brian E.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA High-Speed Research program developed the High-Lift Engine Aeroacoustics Technology (HEAT) program to demonstrate satisfactory interaction between the jet noise suppressor and high-lift system of a High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration at takeoff, climb, approach and landing conditions. One scheme for reducing jet exhaust noise generated by an HSCT is the use of a mixer-ejector system which would entrain large quantities of ambient air into the nozzle exhaust flow through secondary inlets in order to cool and slow the jet exhaust before it exits the nozzle. The effectiveness of such a noise suppression device must be evaluated in the presence of an HSCT wing high-lift system before definitive assessments can be made concerning its acoustic performance. In addition, these noise suppressors must provide the required acoustic attenuation while not degrading the thrust efficiency of the propulsion system or the aerodynamic performance of the high-lift devices on the wing. Therefore, the main objective of the HEAT program is to demonstrate these technologies and understand their interactions on a large-scale HSCT model. The HEAT program is a collaborative effort between NASA-Ames, Boeing Commercial Airplane Group, Douglas Aircraft Corp., Lockheed-Georgia, General Electric and NASA - Lewis. The suppressor nozzles used in the tests were Generation 1 2-D mixer-ejector nozzles made by General Electric. The model used was a 13.5%-scale semi-span model of a Boeing Reference H configuration.

  10. Computational analysis of high resolution unsteady airloads for rotor aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quackenbush, Todd R.; Lam, C.-M. Gordon; Wachspress, Daniel A.; Bliss, Donald B.

    1994-01-01

    The study of helicopter aerodynamic loading for acoustics applications requires the application of efficient yet accurate simulations of the velocity field induced by the rotor's vortex wake. This report summarizes work to date on the development of such an analysis, which builds on the Constant Vorticity Contour (CVC) free wake model, previously implemented for the study of vibratory loading in the RotorCRAFT computer code. The present effort has focused on implementation of an airload reconstruction approach that computes high resolution airload solutions of rotor/rotor-wake interactions required for acoustics computations. Supplementary efforts on the development of improved vortex core modeling, unsteady aerodynamic effects, higher spatial resolution of rotor loading, and fast vortex wake implementations have substantially enhanced the capabilities of the resulting software, denoted RotorCRAFT/AA (AeroAcoustics). Results of validation calculations using recently acquired model rotor data show that by employing airload reconstruction it is possible to apply the CVC wake analysis with temporal and spatial resolution suitable for acoustics applications while reducing the computation time required by one to two orders of magnitude relative to that required by direct calculations. Promising correlation with this body of airload and noise data has been obtained for a variety of rotor configurations and operating conditions.

  11. Aeroacoustic theory for noncompact wing-gust interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, R.; Widnall, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    Three aeroacoustic models for noncompact wing-gust interaction were developed for subsonic flow. The first is that for a two dimensional (infinite span) wing passing through an oblique gust. The unsteady pressure field was obtained by the Wiener-Hopf technique; the airfoil loading and the associated acoustic field were calculated, respectively, by allowing the field point down on the airfoil surface, or by letting it go to infinity. The second model is a simple spanwise superposition of two dimensional solutions to account for three dimensional acoustic effects of wing rotation (for a helicopter blade, or some other rotating planform) and of finiteness of wing span. A three dimensional theory for a single gust was applied to calculate the acoustic signature in closed form due to blade vortex interaction in helicopters. The third model is that of a quarter infinite plate with side edge through a gust at high subsonic speed. An approximate solution for the three dimensional loading and the associated three dimensional acoustic field in closed form was obtained. The results reflected the acoustic effect of satisfying the correct loading condition at the side edge.

  12. A Role for the Adaptor Proteins TRAM and TRIF in Toll-like Receptor 2 Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Nilsen, Nadra J.; Vladimer, Gregory I.; Stenvik, Jørgen; Orning, M. Pontus A.; Zeid-Kilani, Maria V.; Bugge, Marit; Bergstroem, Bjarte; Conlon, Joseph; Husebye, Harald; Hise, Amy G.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Espevik, Terje; Lien, Egil

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in sensing invading microbes by host innate immunity. TLR2 recognizes bacterial lipoproteins/lipopeptides, and lipopolysaccharide activates TLR4. TLR2 and TLR4 signal via the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor adaptors MyD88 and MAL, leading to NF-κB activation. TLR4 also utilizes the adaptors TRAM and TRIF, resulting in activation of interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3. Here, we report a new role for TRAM and TRIF in TLR2 regulation and signaling. Interestingly, we observed that TLR2-mediated induction of the chemokine Ccl5 was impaired in TRAM or TRIF deficient macrophages. Inhibition of endocytosis reduced Ccl5 release, and the data also suggested that TRAM and TLR2 co-localize in early endosomes, supporting the hypothesis that signaling may occur from an intracellular compartment. Ccl5 release following lipoprotein challenge additionally involved the kinase Tbk-1 and Irf3, as well as MyD88 and Irf1. Induction of Interferon-β and Ccl4 by lipoproteins was also partially impaired in cells lacking TRIF cells. Our results show a novel function of TRAM and TRIF in TLR2-mediated signal transduction, and the findings broaden our understanding of how Toll/interleukin-1 receptor adaptor proteins may participate in signaling downstream from TLR2. PMID:25505250

  13. Computational AeroAcoustics for Fan Noise Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Ed; Hixon, Ray; Dyson, Rodger; Huff, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An overview of the current state-of-the-art in computational aeroacoustics as applied to fan noise prediction at NASA Glenn is presented. Results from recent modeling efforts using three dimensional inviscid formulations in both frequency and time domains are summarized. In particular, the application of a frequency domain method, called LINFLUX, to the computation of rotor-stator interaction tone noise is reviewed and the influence of the background inviscid flow on the acoustic results is analyzed. It has been shown that the noise levels are very sensitive to the gradients of the mean flow near the surface and that the correct computation of these gradients for highly loaded airfoils is especially problematic using an inviscid formulation. The ongoing development of a finite difference time marching code that is based on a sixth order compact scheme is also reviewed. Preliminary results from the nonlinear computation of a gust-airfoil interaction model problem demonstrate the fidelity and accuracy of this approach. Spatial and temporal features of the code as well as its multi-block nature are discussed. Finally, latest results from an ongoing effort in the area of arbitrarily high order methods are reviewed and technical challenges associated with implementing correct high order boundary conditions are discussed and possible strategies for addressing these challenges ore outlined.

  14. NASA Hybrid Wing Aircraft Aeroacoustic Test Documentation Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Stephanie L.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Doty, Michael J.; Bahr, Christopher J.; Hoad, Danny; Becker, Lawrence; Humphreys, William M.; Burley, Casey L.; Stead, Dan; Pope, Dennis S.; Spalt, Taylor B.; Kuchta, Dennis H.; Plassman, Gerald E.; Moen, Jaye A.

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes results of the Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) N2A-EXTE model aeroacoustic test. The N2A-EXTE model was tested in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel (14x22 Tunnel) from September 12, 2012 until January 28, 2013 and was designated as test T598. This document contains the following main sections: Section 1 - Introduction, Section 2 - Main Personnel, Section 3 - Test Equipment, Section 4 - Data Acquisition Systems, Section 5 - Instrumentation and Calibration, Section 6 - Test Matrix, Section 7 - Data Processing, and Section 8 - Summary. Due to the amount of material to be documented, this HWB test documentation report does not cover analysis of acquired data, which is to be presented separately by the principal investigators. Also, no attempt was made to include preliminary risk reduction tests (such as Broadband Engine Noise Simulator and Compact Jet Engine Simulator characterization tests, shielding measurement technique studies, and speaker calibration method studies), which were performed in support of this HWB test. Separate reports containing these preliminary tests are referenced where applicable.

  15. Unstructured CFD and Noise Prediction Methods for Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Campbell, Richard L.; Hunter, Craig A.; Massey, Steven J.; Elmiligui, Alaa A.

    2006-01-01

    Using unstructured mesh CFD methods for Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustics (PAA) analysis has the distinct advantage of precise and fast computational mesh generation for complex propulsion and airframe integration arrangements that include engine inlet, exhaust nozzles, pylon, wing, flaps, and flap deployment mechanical parts. However, accurate solution values of shear layer velocity, temperature and turbulence are extremely important for evaluating the usually small noise differentials of potential applications to commercial transport aircraft propulsion integration. This paper describes a set of calibration computations for an isolated separate flow bypass ratio five engine nozzle model and the same nozzle system with a pylon. These configurations have measured data along with prior CFD solutions and noise predictions using a proven structured mesh method, which can be used for comparison to the unstructured mesh solutions obtained in this investigation. This numerical investigation utilized the TetrUSS system that includes a Navier-Stokes solver, the associated unstructured mesh generation tools, post-processing utilities, plus some recently added enhancements to the system. New features necessary for this study include the addition of two equation turbulence models to the USM3D code, an h-refinement utility to enhance mesh density in the shear mixing region, and a flow adaptive mesh redistribution method. In addition, a computational procedure was developed to optimize both solution accuracy and mesh economy. Noise predictions were completed using an unstructured mesh version of the JeT3D code.

  16. Numerical methods for problems in computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Jodi Lorraine

    1998-12-01

    A goal of computational aeroacoustics is the accurate calculation of noise from a jet in the far field. This work concerns the numerical aspects of accurately calculating acoustic waves over large distances and long time. More specifically, the stability, efficiency, accuracy, dispersion and dissipation in spatial discretizations, time stepping schemes, and absorbing boundaries for the direct solution of wave propagation problems are determined. Efficient finite difference methods developed by Tam and Webb, which minimize dispersion and dissipation, are commonly used for the spatial and temporal discretization. Alternatively, high order pseudospectral methods can be made more efficient by using the grid transformation introduced by Kosloff and Tal-Ezer. Work in this dissertation confirms that the grid transformation introduced by Kosloff and Tal-Ezer is not spectrally accurate because, in the limit, the grid transformation forces zero derivatives at the boundaries. If a small number of grid points are used, it is shown that approximations with the Chebyshev pseudospectral method with the Kosloff and Tal-Ezer grid transformation are as accurate as with the Chebyshev pseudospectral method. This result is based on the analysis of the phase and amplitude errors of these methods, and their use for the solution of a benchmark problem in computational aeroacoustics. For the grid transformed Chebyshev method with a small number of grid points it is, however, more appropriate to compare its accuracy with that of high- order finite difference methods. This comparison, for an order of accuracy 10-3 for a benchmark problem in computational aeroacoustics, is performed for the grid transformed Chebyshev method and the fourth order finite difference method of Tam. Solutions with the finite difference method are as accurate. and the finite difference method is more efficient than, the Chebyshev pseudospectral method with the grid transformation. The efficiency of the Chebyshev

  17. ADAM: An Axisymmetric Duct Aeroacoustic Modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamson, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    An interconnected system of computer programs for analyzing the propagation and attenuation of sound in aeroengine ducts containing realistic compressible subsonic mean flows, ADAM was developed primarily for research directed towards the reduction of noise emitted from turbofan aircraft engines. The two basic components are a streamtube curvature program for determination of the mean flow, and a finite element code for solution of the acoustic propagation problem. The system, which has been specifically tailored for ease of use, is presently installed at NASA Langley Reseach Center on a Control Data Cyber 175 Computer under the NOS Operating system employing a Tektronix terminal for interactive graphics. The scope and organization of the ADAM system is described. A users guide, examples of input data, and results for selected cases are included.

  18. Towards a Numerical Description of Volcano Aeroacoustic Source Processes using Lattice Boltzmann Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogi, F.; Malaspinas, O.; Bonadonna, C.; Chopard, B.; Ripepe, M.

    2015-12-01

    Low frequency (< 20Hz) acoustic measurements have a great potential for the real time characterization of volcanic plume source parameters. Using the classical source theory, acoustic data can be related to the exit velocity of the volcanic jet and to mass eruption rate, based on the geometric constrain of the vent and the mixture density. However, the application of the classical acoustic source models to volcanic explosive eruptions has shown to be challenging and a better knowledge of the link between the acoustic radiation and actual volcanic fluid dynamics processes is required. New insights into this subject could be given by the study of realistic aeroacoustic numerical simulations of a volcanic jet. Lattice Boltzmann strategies (LBS) provide the opportunity to develop an accurate, computationally fast, 3D physical model for a volcanic jet. In the field of aeroacoustic applications, dedicated LBS has been proven to have the low dissipative properties needed for capturing the weak acoustic pressure fluctuations. However, due to the big disparity in magnitude between the flow and the acoustic disturbances, even weak spurious noise sources in simulations can ruin the accuracy of the acoustic predictions. Reflected waves from artificial boundaries defined around the flow region can have significant influence on the flow field and overwhelm the acoustic field of interest. In addition, for highly multiscale turbulent flows, such as volcanic plumes, the number of grid points needed to represent the smallest scales might become intractable and the most complicated physics happen only in small portions of the computational domain. The implementation of the grid refinement, in our model allow us to insert local finer grids only where is actually needed and to increase the size of the computational domain for running more realistic simulations. 3D LBS model simulations for turbulent jet aeroacoustics have been accurately validated. Both mean flow and acoustic results

  19. OVERVIEW OF STAMP MILL SITE,LOOKING SOUTHWEST. THE LOWER TRAM TERMINAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF STAMP MILL SITE,LOOKING SOUTHWEST. THE LOWER TRAM TERMINAL IS OUT OF FRAME, JUST TO THE RIGHT. WATER TANK, LOADING PLATFORM, AND TRAM TRESTLE LEADING UP TO THE TRAM TERMINAL ARE AT RIGHT. THE STRUCTURE AT EXTREME RIGHT BELOW THE TRESTLE, ARE REMAINS OF A SECONDARY ORE BIN, WITH BALL MILL FOUNDATIONS AND WOOD DEBRIS JUST BELOW ON THE SECOND LEVEL. AT CENTER IS A BOILER AND THE FRAME WORK OF A FILTER PRESS. THE SMALL STRUCTURE AT CENTER LEFT IS AN INTERPRETIVE SIGN PLACED BY THE PARK SERVICE. AT LOWER LEFT, THIRD LEVEL OF THE MILL, ARE THE REMAINS OF A BLACKSMITH'S FORGE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  20. Satisfaction following Unilateral Breast Reconstruction: A Comparison of Pedicled TRAM and Free Abdominal Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Schwitzer, Jonathan A.; Miller, H. Catherine; Pusic, Andrea L.; Matros, Evan; Mehrara, Babak J.; McCarthy, Colleen M.; Lennox, Peter A.; Van Laeken, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to compare patient satisfaction following unilateral pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) and free abdominal flap reconstruction. Methods: Patients who underwent unilateral breast reconstruction using pedicled TRAM or free abdominal flaps (muscle-sparing TRAM or deep inferior epigastric perforator flap) and completed the BREAST-Q were identified from 2 prospectively maintained databases. BREAST-Q scores were assessed and compared for Satisfaction with Breasts, Outcome, and Physical Well-being Chest/Abdomen. Results: Of the 138 patients who completed the BREAST-Q, 84 underwent pedicled TRAM flap reconstruction and 54 underwent free abdominal flap reconstruction. Overall, pedicled TRAM flap patients scored higher than free abdominal flap patients on all 4 BREAST-Q scales. This difference reached statistical significance in Satisfaction with Breasts (+7.74; P = 0.02). Similar results were found among patients who completed the BREAST-Q at <3 years postoperation. However, among patients at ≥3 years postoperation, there were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups, with the pedicled flap cohort scoring higher in Satisfaction with Breasts and Physical Well-being Chest and the free abdominal flap cohort scoring higher in Satisfaction with Outcome and Physical Well-being Abdomen scores. Conclusions: Patients who underwent unilateral pedicled TRAM flap reconstruction experienced greater initial breast satisfaction than patients who underwent unilateral free abdominal flap reconstruction, but satisfaction equalized between the two over time, suggesting that long-term satisfaction may be equivalent between the 2 methods of reconstruction. PMID:26495195

  1. Aeroacoustical Study of the Tgv Pantograph Recess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NOGER, C.; PATRAT, J. C.; PEUBE, J.; PEUBE, J. L.

    2000-03-01

    The general focus of this aerodynamic noise research, induced by turbulent incompressible flow, is to improve our knowledge of acoustic production mechanisms in the TGV pantograph recess in order to be able to reduce the radiated noise. This work is performed under contract with SNCF as a part of the German-French Cooperation DEUFRAKO K2, and is supported by French Ministries for Transport and Research. Previous studies on TGV noise source locations (DEUFRAKO K) have identified the pantograph recess as one of the important aerodynamic noise sources, for speeds higher than 300 km/h, due to flow separation. The pantograph recess is a very complex rectangular cavity, located both on the power car and the first coach roofs of the TGV, and has not been studied before due to the complex shapes. Its aeroacoustic features are investigated experimentally in a low-subsonic wind tunnel, on a realistic 1/7th scale mock-up both with and without pantographs. Flow velocities, estimated with hot-wire anemometry, and parietal visualizations show the flow to reattach on the recess bottom wall and to separate again at the downstream face. Wall pressure fluctuations and “acoustic” measurements using 14 and 12 in microphones respectively are also measured to qualify the flow: no aerodynamic or acoustic oscillations are observed. The study indicates that the pantograph recess has a different behaviour compared to the usual cavity grazing flows.

  2. Aeroacoustic and Performance Simulations of a Test Scale Open Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, Russell W.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores a comparison between experimental data and numerical simulations of the historical baseline F31/A31 open rotor geometry. The experimental data were obtained at the NASA Glenn Research Center s Aeroacoustic facility and include performance and noise information for a variety of flow speeds (matching take-off and cruise). The numerical simulations provide both performance and aeroacoustic results using the NUMECA s Fine-Turbo analysis code. A non-linear harmonic method is used to capture the rotor/rotor interaction.

  3. A decade of aeroacoustic research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Frederic H.; Mosher, M.; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; Cross, J.; Chang, I.

    1988-01-01

    The rotorcraft aeroacoustic research accomplishments of the past decade at Ames Research Center are reviewed. These include an extensive sequence of flight, ground, and wind tunnel tests that have utilized the facilities to guide and pioneer theoretical research. Many of these experiments were of benchmark quality. The experiments were used to isolate the inadequacies of linear theory in high-speed impulsive noise research, have led to the development of theoretical approaches, and have guided the emerging discipline of computational fluid dynamics to rotorcraft aeroacoustic problems.

  4. DETAIL VIEW OF TRAM BUCKET FRAME, SHOWING CLAMPING MECHANISM,WITHOUT ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF TRAM BUCKET FRAME, SHOWING CLAMPING MECHANISM,WITHOUT ORE BUCKET AND WHEELS. THE FRAME IS LYING ON ITS SIDE. THE ORE BUCKET WAS ATTACHED TO THE LEFT SIDE, AND TWO WHEELS WERE ATTACHED TO THE SPINDLE ON THE RIGHT. THE FRAME AND BUCKET ARE SUSPENDED FROM THE STATIONARY CABLE BY THE TWO WHEELS, WITH THE ORE BUCKET HANGING BELOW. THE WHEEL AND LEVER AT CENTER WERE ACTIVATED BY THE OPENING AND CLOSING MECHANISMS ON THE TRAM TERMINALS TO LOCK OR RELEASE THE BUCKET ONTO THE MOVING CABLE THAT RAN THROUGH THE SQUARE BLOCK AT CENTER. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  5. Unified aeroacoustics analysis for high speed turboprop aerodynamics and noise. Volume 4: Computer user's manual for UAAP turboprop aeroacoustic code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menthe, R. W.; Mccolgan, C. J.; Ladden, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    The Unified AeroAcoustic Program (UAAP) code calculates the airloads on a single rotation prop-fan, or propeller, and couples these airloads with an acoustic radiation theory, to provide estimates of near-field or far-field noise levels. The steady airloads can also be used to calculate the nonuniform velocity components in the propeller wake. The airloads are calculated using a three dimensional compressible panel method which considers the effects of thin, cambered, multiple blades which may be highly swept. These airloads may be either steady or unsteady. The acoustic model uses the blade thickness distribution and the steady or unsteady aerodynamic loads to calculate the acoustic radiation. The users manual for the UAAP code is divided into five sections: general code description; input description; output description; system description; and error codes. The user must have access to IMSL10 libraries (MATH and SFUN) for numerous calls made for Bessel functions and matrix inversion. For plotted output users must modify the dummy calls to plotting routines included in the code to system-specific calls appropriate to the user's installation.

  6. Unified aeroacoustics analysis for high speed turboprop aerodynamics and noise. Volume 4: Computer user's manual for UAAP turboprop aeroacoustic code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menthe, R. W.; McColgan, C. J.; Ladden, R. M.

    1991-05-01

    The Unified AeroAcoustic Program (UAAP) code calculates the airloads on a single rotation prop-fan, or propeller, and couples these airloads with an acoustic radiation theory, to provide estimates of near-field or far-field noise levels. The steady airloads can also be used to calculate the nonuniform velocity components in the propeller wake. The airloads are calculated using a three dimensional compressible panel method which considers the effects of thin, cambered, multiple blades which may be highly swept. These airloads may be either steady or unsteady. The acoustic model uses the blade thickness distribution and the steady or unsteady aerodynamic loads to calculate the acoustic radiation. The users manual for the UAAP code is divided into five sections: general code description; input description; output description; system description; and error codes. The user must have access to IMSL10 libraries (MATH and SFUN) for numerous calls made for Bessel functions and matrix inversion. For plotted output users must modify the dummy calls to plotting routines included in the code to system-specific calls appropriate to the user's installation.

  7. Large-Scale Simulations and Detailed Flow Field Measurements for Turbomachinery Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale

    2008-01-01

    The presentation is a review of recent work in highly loaded compressors, turbine aeroacoustics and cooling fan noise. The specific topics are: the importance of correct numerical modeling to capture blade row interactions in the Ultra Efficient Engine Technology Proof-of-Concept Compressor, the attenuation of a detonation pressure wave by an aircraft axial turbine stage, current work on noise sources and acoustic attenuation in turbines, and technology development work on cooling fans for spaceflight applications. The topic areas were related to each other by certain themes such as the advantage of an experimentalist s viewpoint when analyzing numerical simulations and the need to improve analysis methods for very large numerical datasets.

  8. Analysis of SRB reentry acoustic environments. [aeroacoustic spectra determined from wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffin, T.; Dandridge, R. E.; Haddock, U. W.

    1979-01-01

    Space shuttle solid rocket booster reentry aeroacoustic environments were estimated. Particular emphasis was given to the aft skirt/exit plane region for the Mach number regime 0.6 = or greater than M infinity = or less than 3.5. The analysis is based on the evaluation of wind tunnel model results in conjunction with Monte Carlo simulation of trajectory parameters. The experimental approach is described as well as the evaluation process utilized. Predicted environments are presented in terms of one-third octave band spectra representing space averaged values for critical regions on the solid rocket booster.

  9. Computational Analysis of a Chevron Nozzle Uniquely Tailored for Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, Steven J.; Elmiligui, Alaa A.; Hunter, Craig A.; Thomas, Russell H.; Pao, S. Paul; Mengle, Vinod G.

    2006-01-01

    A computational flow field and predicted jet noise source analysis is presented for asymmetrical fan chevrons on a modern separate flow nozzle at take off conditions. The propulsion airframe aeroacoustic asymmetric fan nozzle is designed with an azimuthally varying chevron pattern with longer chevrons close to the pylon. A baseline round nozzle without chevrons and a reference nozzle with azimuthally uniform chevrons are also studied. The intent of the asymmetric fan chevron nozzle was to improve the noise reduction potential by creating a favorable propulsion airframe aeroacoustic interaction effect between the pylon and chevron nozzle. This favorable interaction and improved noise reduction was observed in model scale tests and flight test data and has been reported in other studies. The goal of this study was to identify the fundamental flow and noise source mechanisms. The flow simulation uses the asymptotically steady, compressible Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations on a structured grid. Flow computations are performed using the parallel, multi-block, structured grid code PAB3D. Local noise sources were mapped and integrated computationally using the Jet3D code based upon the Lighthill Acoustic Analogy with anisotropic Reynolds stress modeling. In this study, trends of noise reduction were correctly predicted. Jet3D was also utilized to produce noise source maps that were then correlated to local flow features. The flow studies show that asymmetry of the longer fan chevrons near the pylon work to reduce the strength of the secondary flow induced by the pylon itself, such that the asymmetric merging of the fan and core shear layers is significantly delayed. The effect is to reduce the peak turbulence kinetic energy and shift it downstream, reducing overall noise production. This combined flow and noise prediction approach has yielded considerable understanding of the physics of a fan chevron nozzle designed to include propulsion airframe aeroacoustic

  10. Impact of turbulence on the prediction of linear aeroacoustic interactions: Acoustic response of a turbulent shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gikadi, Jannis; Föller, Stephan; Sattelmayer, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    A powerful model to predict aeroacoustic interactions in the linear regime is the perturbed compressible linearized Navier-Stokes equations. Thus far, the frequently employed derivation suggests that the effect of turbulence and its associated Reynolds stresses is neglected and a quasi-laminar model is employed. In this paper, dynamic perturbation equations are derived incorporating the effect of turbulence and its interaction with perturbation quantities. This is done by employing a triple decomposition of the instantaneous variables. The procedure results in a closure problem for the Reynolds stresses for which a linear eddy-viscosity model is proposed. The resulting perturbation equations are applied to a grazing flow in a T-joint for which strong shear layer instabilities at certain frequencies are experimentally observed. Passive scattering properties of the grazing flow are validated against the experiments performed by Karlsson and Åbom and perturbation equations being quasi-laminar. We find that prediction models must include the effect of Reynolds stresses to capture the aeroacoustic interaction effects correctly. Neglecting its effect naturally results in the over prediction of vortex growth at the frequencies of shear layer instability and therewith in an over prediction of aeroacoustic interactions.

  11. Exploratory investigation of aeroacoustic optimization of the variable impedance edge concept applied to upper surface blown configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of using porous surfaces on lift augmentation flaps to reduce the noise at the source, without adversely affecting aerodynamic performance was investigated. Numerous flap configurations were tested on a USB (upper surface blowing) type powered lift model (approximately 1/5 full scale). Significant reductions of far field noise and aeroacoustic pressures were found, and many configurations exhibited aerodynamic characteristics comparable to unmodified configurations of the nozzle/flap system.

  12. Activity of the Agrobacterium Ti plasmid conjugal transfer regulator TraR is inhibited by the product of the traM gene.

    PubMed Central

    Fuqua, C; Burbea, M; Winans, S C

    1995-01-01

    The Agrobacterium Ti plasmid tra regulon was previously found to be positively regulated by the TraR protein in the presence of a diffusible N-acyl homoserine lactone designated Agrobacterium autoinducer (AAI). TraR and AAI are similar to LuxR from Vibrio fischeri and the Vibrio autoinducer (VAI), which regulate target bioluminescence (lux) genes in a cell density-dependent manner. We now show that tra genes are also regulated by a second protein, designated TraM, which acts to antagonize TraR-dependent activation. The traM gene is closely linked to traR, and the two genes are transcribed convergently. The predicted TraM proteins of two different Ti plasmids are 77% identical but are not significantly similar to other protein sequences in the database, and thus TraM may represent a novel regulatory protein. Null mutations in traM cause strongly increased conjugation, tra gene transcription, and AAI production. A functional copy of traM introduced into traM mutants decreased conjugation, tra gene transcription, and AAI synthesis. TraM inhibits transcription of traA, traI, and traM. Although traM was first identified by its octopine-inducible promoter, we now show that induction by octopine requires traR, strongly suggesting that TraR is the direct traM activator. PMID:7868612

  13. Aeroacoustics of Turbulent High-Speed Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Ram Mohan; Lundgren, Thomas S.

    1996-01-01

    Aeroacoustic noise generation in a supersonic round jet is studied to understand in particular the effect of turbulence structure on the noise without numerically compromising the turbulence itself. This means that direct numerical simulations (DNS's) are needed. In order to use DNS at high enough Reynolds numbers to get sufficient turbulence structure we have decided to solve the temporal jet problem, using periodicity in the direction of the jet axis. Physically this means that turbulent structures in the jet are repeated in successive downstream cells instead of being gradually modified downstream into a jet plume. Therefore in order to answer some questions about the turbulence we will partially compromise the overall structure of the jet. The first section of chapter 1 describes some work on the linear stability of a supersonic round jet and the implications of this for the jet noise problem. In the second section we present preliminary work done using a TVD numerical scheme on a CM5. This work is only two-dimensional (plane) but shows very interesting results, including weak shock waves. However this is a nonviscous computation and the method resolves the shocks by adding extra numerical dissipation where the gradients are large. One wonders whether the extra dissipation would influence small turbulent structures like small intense vortices. The second chapter is an extensive discussion of preliminary numerical work using the spectral method to solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations to study turbulent jet flows. The method uses Fourier expansions in the azimuthal and streamwise direction and a 1-D B-spline basis representation in the radial direction. The B-spline basis is locally supported and this ensures block diagonal matrix equations which are solved in O(N) steps. A very accurate highly resolved DNS of a turbulent jet flow is expected.

  14. Overview of the Space Launch System Ascent Aeroacoustic Environment Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, Andrew J.; Crosby, William A.; Reed, Darren K.

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of accurate flight vehicle unsteady aerodynamics is critical for component and secondary structure vibroacoustic design. The Aerosciences Branch at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted a test at the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels (UPWT) to determine such ascent aeroacoustic environments for the Space Launch System (SLS). Surface static pressure measurements were also collected to aid in determination of local environments for venting, CFD substantiation, and calibration of the flush air data system located on the launch abort system. Additionally, this test supported a NASA Engineering and Safety Center study of alternate booster nose caps. Testing occurred during two test campaigns: August - September 2013 and December 2013 - January 2014. Four primary model configurations were tested for ascent aeroacoustic environment definition. The SLS Block 1 vehicle was represented by a 2.5% full stack model and a 4% truncated model. Preliminary Block 1B payload and manned configurations were also tested, using 2.5% full stack and 4% truncated models respectively. This test utilized the 11 x 11 foot transonic and 9 x 7 foot supersonic tunnel sections at the ARC UPWT to collect data from Mach 0.7 through 2.5 at various total angles of attack. SLS Block 1 design environments were developed primarily using these data. SLS Block 1B preliminary environments have also been prepared using these data. This paper discusses the test and analysis methodology utilized, with a focus on the unsteady data collection and processing.

  15. Second Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) Workshop on Benchmark Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, C. K. W. (Editor); Hardin, J. C. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The proceedings of the Second Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) Workshop on Benchmark Problems held at Florida State University are the subject of this report. For this workshop, problems arising in typical industrial applications of CAA were chosen. Comparisons between numerical solutions and exact solutions are presented where possible.

  16. On least-order flow decompositions for aerodynamics and aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, Michael; Noack, Bernd R.; Jordan, Peter

    2012-11-01

    A generalisation of proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) for optimal flow resolution of linearly related observables is presented, as proposed in the identically named publication of Schlegel, Noack, Jordan, Dillmann, Groeschel, Schroeder, Wei, Freund, Lehmann and Tadmor (Journal of Fluid Mechanics 2012, vol. 697, pp. 367-398). This Galerkin expansion, termed ``observable inferred decomposition'' (OID), addresses a need in aerodynamic and aeroacoustic applications by identifying the modes contributing most to these observables. Thus, OID constitutes a building block for physical understanding, least-biased conditional sampling, state estimation and control design. From a continuum of OID versions, two variants are tailored for purposes of observer and control design, respectively. Three aerodynamic and aeroacoustic observables are studied: (1) lift and drag fluctuation of a two-dimensional cylinder wake flow, (2) aeroacoustic density fluctuations measured by a sensor array and emitted from a two-dimensional compressible mixing layer, and (3) aeroacoustic pressure monitored by a sensor array and emitted from a three-dimensional compressible jet. The most ``drag-related,'' ``lift-related'' and ``loud'' structures are distilled and interpreted in terms of known physical processes. This work was partially funded by the DFG under grants SCHL 586/2-1 and ANR, Chair of Excellence, TUCOROM.

  17. Highly Accurate Schemes for Wave Propagation Systems: Application in Aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoli, Nathalie; Mazet, Pierre-Alain; Mouysset, Vincent; Rogier, François

    2010-09-01

    The Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method is considered for computational aeroacoustic. A software has been developed to make it possible to test a large variety of configurations (non-conform grid, variable polynomial order). To deal with instationary phenomena involved by some shear flows, a compromise between time computation and accuracy is deduced from some numerical experiments.

  18. Tram-Track Suture Technique for Pupillary Capture of a Scleral Fixated Intraocular Lens

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung In; Kim, Kiseok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report a new technique using tram-track suture for pupillary capture of a scleral fixated posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC-IOL) to reposition the tilted IOL. Methods In this prospective interventional case series, we describe a tram-track suture for pupillary capture of a scleral fixated PC-IOL. A long straight needle with double-armed 10-0 polypropylene is passed behind the iris and just above the optic portion (tilted forward) of the IOL. The other straight needle with double-armed 10-0 polypropylene is passed just below the optic portion (tilted backward) of the IOL. After the IOL is repositioned properly, the polypropylene sutures are gently pulled and tied. Results Four eyes of 4 patients underwent tram-track suture for pupillary capture of a scleral fixated PC-IOL. No intra- or postoperative complications were noted, and no pupillary captures were detected during the follow-up period. Conclusions The tram-track suture technique provides good centration and stability of a PC-IOL. This technique is an easy and effective way to reposition pupillary capture of an IOL. Further, it is also minimally invasive as it maintains a closed system. PMID:27462257

  19. DETAIL OVERHEAD VIEW OF SECONDARY ORE BIN. CONVEYOR PLATFORM,TRAM TRESTLE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OVERHEAD VIEW OF SECONDARY ORE BIN. CONVEYOR PLATFORM,TRAM TRESTLE, AND LOADING PLATFORM. LOOKING SOUTHWEST. THE HOLE IN THE ORE BIN FLOOR CAN BE SEEN, AND BALL MILL FOUNDATION AT LOWER LEFT CORNER. SEE CA-291-47(CT) FOR IDENTICAL COLOR TRANSPARENCY. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  20. Development of Improved Surface Integral Methods for Jet Aeroacoustic Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilon, Anthony R.; Lyrintzis, Anastasios S.

    1997-01-01

    The accurate prediction of aerodynamically generated noise has become an important goal over the past decade. Aeroacoustics must now be an integral part of the aircraft design process. The direct calculation of aerodynamically generated noise with CFD-like algorithms is plausible. However, large computer time and memory requirements often make these predictions impractical. It is therefore necessary to separate the aeroacoustics problem into two parts, one in which aerodynamic sound sources are determined, and another in which the propagating sound is calculated. This idea is applied in acoustic analogy methods. However, in the acoustic analogy, the determination of far-field sound requires the solution of a volume integral. This volume integration again leads to impractical computer requirements. An alternative to the volume integrations can be found in the Kirchhoff method. In this method, Green's theorem for the linear wave equation is used to determine sound propagation based on quantities on a surface surrounding the source region. The change from volume to surface integrals represents a tremendous savings in the computer resources required for an accurate prediction. This work is concerned with the development of enhancements of the Kirchhoff method for use in a wide variety of aeroacoustics problems. This enhanced method, the modified Kirchhoff method, is shown to be a Green's function solution of Lighthill's equation. It is also shown rigorously to be identical to the methods of Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings. This allows for development of versatile computer codes which can easily alternate between the different Kirchhoff and Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings formulations, using the most appropriate method for the problem at hand. The modified Kirchhoff method is developed primarily for use in jet aeroacoustics predictions. Applications of the method are shown for two dimensional and three dimensional jet flows. Additionally, the enhancements are generalized so that

  1. Aeroacoustic characterization of scaled canonical nose landing gear configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawodny, Nikolas S.

    Aircraft noise is a critical issue in the commercial airline industry. Airframe noise is a subcomponent of aircraft noise and is generally dominant over jet engine noise during approach conditions, which can lead to high community impact. Landing gears have been identified as major components of airframe noise during landing configurations for commercial aircraft. They are perhaps the least understood contributors to airframe noise due to complex flow patterns associated with intricate gear component geometries. Nose landing gear in particular have received much attention in recent years, exhibiting acoustic signatures on the order of the main landing gear assembly of an aircraft, while simultaneously being more amenable to scaled wind tunnel testing. In order to characterize the acoustic signature of a complex geometry such as a nose landing gear, it is important to isolate, study, and understand the acoustic contributions of individual component geometries. The purpose of this dissertation is to develop a correlation between the complex flow field nature and far-field acoustic signature of a nose landing gear sub-system. The model under investigation is a 1/2-scale shock-strut cylinder coupled with an adjustable torque link apparatus. This geometry was chosen due to its fundamental importance and implementation across a wide span of commercial aircraft. The fluid dynamic (surface pressure and stereoscopic particle image velocimety) and aeroacoustic (far-field microphone and phased array) experiments were performed in the University of Florida Aeroacoustic Flow Facility. The experimental data compare favorably with the results of a numerical simulation using PowerFLOW, a lattice-Boltzmann solver developed by the Exa Corporation. The far-field acoustic results of this dissertation have shown non-uniform scaling behavior as a function of frequency for the different model configurations tested. For frequencies that appropriately satisfied the condition of acoustic

  2. Cloning, mapping, and sequencing of plasmid R100 traM and finP genes.

    PubMed Central

    Fee, B E; Dempsey, W B

    1986-01-01

    The fertility control gene finP, the transfer gene traM, and the transfer origin, oriT, of plasmid R100 were isolated on a single 1.2-kilobase EcoRV fragment and were then subcloned as HaeIII fragments. The sequence of the 754-base-pair finP-containing fragment is reported here. In addition to the finP gene, the sequence includes all but two bases of the R100 traM open reading frame and apparently all of the leader mRNA sequence and amino end of the traJ gene of R100. The sequence contains two open reading frames which encode small proteins on the opposite strand from the traM and traJ genes. It also shows two sets of inverted repeats that have the characteristics of transcription terminators. One set is positioned as if it was the traM terminator, and the other set, which is downstream from the first, sits in the middle of the leader mRNA sequence for traJ. On the bottom strand, this inverted repeat has the structure of a rho-independent terminator. Other less-stable inverted repeats overlap this second terminator in the same way as is seen in attenuation sequences, and the two separate small open reading frames on the bottom strand also totally overlap the stem of the rho-independent terminator, suggesting that their translation would cause shifting of termination to the bottom strand homolog of the putative traM terminator. The finP gene product was not identified, but the gene was mapped to the sequence which contains the traJ gene. It either overlaps traJ or is antisense to it. PMID:3522549

  3. Upper cervicothoracic sympathetic block increases blood supply of unipedicled TRAM flap.

    PubMed

    Tsoutsos, Dimosthenis; Kakagia, Despoina; Gravvanis, Andreas; Iconomou, Thomais; Tsagkarakis, Myron; Zogogiannis, Ioannis; Dimitriou, Vassilios

    2008-09-01

    A prospective clinical study was conducted to evaluate the impact of upper cervicothoracic sympathetic block (CTGB) on blood supply of the unipedicled transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap. The use of the technique is first reported herein, as a manipulation improving arterial blood flow within the flap in high-risk patients, thus reducing postoperative morbidity. From March 2003 to September 2006, 28 heavy smokers, who underwent delayed breast reconstruction with unipedicled TRAM flap, were included in the study. Intraoperative upper cervicothoracic block (ganglia C5,6,7 and T1,2) was performed in 16 patients (group A), while 12 patients, who did not consent to have the blockade (group B), were the control. Clinical evaluation and thermographic monitoring of skin temperature, using the Thermacam A40 (FLIR systems, Wilsonville, OR), was used in all patients and determined the blood flow within the flap. All patients were monitored for early and late complications. In all group A patients, CTGB resulted in TRAM flap temperature increase within 9.5 to 16 min. Flap temperature elevation was found to be significantly higher (P < 0.001) and hospital stay was significantly shorter (P = 0.004) in group A patients. No CTGB or TRAM flap complications were recorded in group A patients. However, in group B, major fat necrosis occurred in 2 patients and partial (1/3) flap necrosis in 1 patient. Upper cervicothoracic sympathetic block is a reliable, safe, and useful technique for increasing blood flow within TRAM flaps in high-risk patients, like heavy smokers, and it minimizes postoperative morbidity. PMID:18724121

  4. An experimental application of aeroacoustic time-reversal to the Aeolian tone.

    PubMed

    Mimani, A; Prime, Z; Moreau, D J; Doolan, C J

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an experimental application of the aeroacoustic time-reversal (TR) source localization technique for studying flow-induced noise problems and compares the TR results with those obtained using conventional beamforming (CB). Experiments were conducted in an anechoic wind tunnel for the benchmark test-case of a full-span circular cylinder located in subsonic cross-flow wherein the far-field acoustic pressure was sampled using two line arrays (LAs) of microphones located above and below the cylinder. The source map obtained using the signals recorded at the two LAs without modeling the reflective surfaces of the contraction-outlet and cylinder during TR simulations revealed the lift-dipole nature of aeroacoustic source generated at the Aeolian tone; however, it indicates an error of 3/20 of Aeolian tone wavelength in the predicted location. Modeling the reflective contraction-outlet during TR was shown to improve the focal-resolution of the source and reduce side-lobe levels, especially in the low-frequency range. The experimental TR results were shown to be comparable to (a) the simulation results of an idealized dipole at the cylinder location in wind-tunnel flow and (b) that obtained by monopole and dipole CB, thereby demonstrating the suitability of TR method as a diagnostic tool to analyze flow-induced noise generation mechanism. PMID:26936557

  5. Towards aeroacoustic sound generation by flow through porous media.

    PubMed

    Hasert, Manuel; Bernsdorf, Joerg; Roller, Sabine

    2011-06-28

    In this work, we present single-step aeroacoustic calculations using the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). Our application case consists of the prediction of an acoustic field radiating from the outlet of a porous media silencer. It has been proved that the LBM is able to simulate acoustic wave generation and propagation. Our particular aim is to validate the LBM for aeroacoustics in porous media. As a validation case, we consider a spinning vortex pair emitting sound waves as the vortices rotate around a common centre. Non-reflective boundary conditions based on characteristics have been adopted from Navier-Stokes methods and are validated using the time evolution of a Gaussian pulse. We show preliminary results of the flow through the porous medium. PMID:21576161

  6. The Use of Kirchhoff's Method in Jet Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyrintzis, Anastasios S.

    1995-01-01

    Supersonic jet aeroacoustics will be studied using computational techniques. In the study, a Kirchhoff method is used to predict flow generated noise in the mid- and far-fields. This type of method shows promise because it is based on surface integrals and not the volume integrals found in traditional acoustic prediction methods. The Kirchhoff method is dependent on accurate prediction of flow variables in the near-field. Here, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) programs are used for these predictions. Specifically, an existing large eddy simulation (LES) code will be modified for aeroacoustic applications. Issues involved in the implementation of the Kirchhoff method as well as the coupling with the CFD code will be discussed. Important physical noise parameters will be identified and investigated in the study.

  7. Domain decomposition for aerodynamic and aeroacoustic analyses, and optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay

    1995-01-01

    The overarching theme was the domain decomposition, which intended to improve the numerical solution technique for the partial differential equations at hand; in the present study, those that governed either the fluid flow, or the aeroacoustic wave propagation, or the sensitivity analysis for a gradient-based optimization. The role of the domain decomposition extended beyond the original impetus of discretizing geometrical complex regions or writing modular software for distributed-hardware computers. It induced function-space decompositions and operator decompositions that offered the valuable property of near independence of operator evaluation tasks. The objectives have gravitated about the extensions and implementations of either the previously developed or concurrently being developed methodologies: (1) aerodynamic sensitivity analysis with domain decomposition (SADD); (2) computational aeroacoustics of cavities; and (3) dynamic, multibody computational fluid dynamics using unstructured meshes.

  8. Application of traditional CFD methods to nonlinear computational aeroacoustics problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyczewski, Thomas S.; Long, Lyle N.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes an implementation of a high order finite difference technique and its application to the category 2 problems of the ICASE/LaRC Workshop on Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA). Essentially, a popular Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach (central differencing, Runge-Kutta time integration and artificial dissipation) is modified to handle aeroacoustic problems. The changes include increasing the order of the spatial differencing to sixth order and modifying the artificial dissipation so that it does not significantly contaminate the wave solution. All of the results were obtained from the CM5 located at the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Laboratory. lt was coded in CMFortran (very similar to HPF), using programming techniques developed for communication intensive large stencils, and ran very efficiently.

  9. Third Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) Workshop on Benchmark Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The proceedings of the Third Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) Workshop on Benchmark Problems cosponsored by the Ohio Aerospace Institute and the NASA Glenn Research Center are the subject of this report. Fan noise was the chosen theme for this workshop with representative problems encompassing four of the six benchmark problem categories. The other two categories were related to jet noise and cavity noise. For the first time in this series of workshops, the computational results for the cavity noise problem were compared to experimental data. All the other problems had exact solutions, which are included in this report. The Workshop included a panel discussion by representatives of industry. The participants gave their views on the status of applying computational aeroacoustics to solve practical industry related problems and what issues need to be addressed to make CAA a robust design tool.

  10. Aeroacoustics of a porous plug jet noise suppressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dosanjh, D. S.

    1981-01-01

    The aeroacoustics of a porous plug jet noise suppressor was investigated. The predicted flow features of isentropic plug nozzles for different pressure ratios or exit flow Mach numbers, throat areas, ratios of the plug to annular nozzle radii, mass flow rates and the available run times possible with the existing compressed air supply system, are compiled. The dimensions and the coordinates of the contour of typical isentropic external expansion plugs with different exit flow Mach numbers are listed. Design details of the experimental facility and the plug nozzle selected for experimental aeroacoustic studies are reported. The analytical flow prediction by method of characteristics of a conical porous plug nozzles is initiated. The role of the shape, size, and porosity of the plug surface in achieving over a perforated conical plug a nearly isentropic shockfree supersonic flow field which is closely similar to the flow field of a contoured isentropic plug nozzle is examined.

  11. Arrays of Miniature Microphones for Aeroacoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Humphreys, William M.; Sealey, Bradley S.; Bartram, Scott M.; Zuckewar, Allan J.; Comeaux, Toby; Adams, James K.

    2007-01-01

    A phased-array system comprised of custom-made and commercially available microelectromechanical system (MEMS) silicon microphones and custom ancillary hardware has been developed for use in aeroacoustic testing in hard-walled and acoustically treated wind tunnels. Recent advances in the areas of multi-channel signal processing and beam forming have driven the construction of phased arrays containing ever-greater numbers of microphones. Traditional obstacles to this trend have been posed by (1) the high costs of conventional condenser microphones, associated cabling, and support electronics and (2) the difficulty of mounting conventional microphones in the precise locations required for high-density arrays. The present development overcomes these obstacles. One of the hallmarks of the new system is a series of fabricated platforms on which multiple microphones can be mounted. These mounting platforms, consisting of flexible polyimide circuit-board material (see left side of figure), include all the necessary microphone power and signal interconnects. A single bus line connects all microphones to a common power supply, while the signal lines terminate in one or more data buses on the sides of the circuit board. To minimize cross talk between array channels, ground lines are interposed as shields between all the data bus signal lines. The MEMS microphones are electrically connected to the boards via solder pads that are built into the printed wiring. These flexible circuit boards share many characteristics with their traditional rigid counterparts, but can be manufactured much thinner, as small as 0.1 millimeter, and much lighter with boards weighing as much as 75 percent less than traditional rigid ones. For a typical hard-walled wind-tunnel installation, the flexible printed-circuit board is bonded to the tunnel wall and covered with a face sheet that contains precise cutouts for the microphones. Once the face sheet is mounted, a smooth surface is established over

  12. Aeroacoustic computation of gust-blade interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James E.

    1994-01-01

    To better understand and address the challenges faced in computing the acoustics of flow fields, test problems must be considered. In the present study, the sound radiated by the interaction of a flat plate with an oncoming gust containing a two component, mean velocity is computed. The gust has a uniform mean flow in x with Mach number M(infinity) equal to 0.5. The gust's mean velocity in y is of smaller amplitude and is given by: v = 0.1 sin(pi/8(x/M(sub infinity) - t)). This problem has been posed for an upcoming ICASE/LaRC workshop on benchmark problems in computational aeroacoustics. A plate with a length of 30 units in x is used. The plate is assumed to be infinitesimally thin and is centered at the origin. All variables are made dimensionless using the scales specified. Acoustic quantities are obtained by numerically integrating the linearized Euler equations. Integration is performed on the computational domain -100.0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 100.0, -100.0 less than or equal to y less than or equal to 100.0, using unit length grid spacing in x and in y. An integration scheme is sought which will provide accurate solution to the small quantities of interest at a minimal computational expense. Results indicate that with the given discretization a scheme of minimal fourth order accuracy might be adequate to approximate the waves within the given flow. Thus, a variation of the MacCormack scheme with fourth order accuracy in space and second order accuracy in time was chosen. A scheme with sixth order accuracy in space has also been implemented and results compared with those of the fourth order accurate scheme. To ensure no mass flux, zero normal velocity is assigned at the plate. This condition will induce a discontinuity in the pressure across the plate location. Values for the perturbation pressure p' along the surface of the plate are obtained using a one-sided, third order Taylor expansion, such that p'(sub y) = O. In accordance with

  13. Aeroacoustic production of low-frequency unvoiced speech sounds.

    PubMed

    Krane, Michael H

    2005-07-01

    A theoretical approach to describing unvoiced speech sound production is outlined using the essentials of aerodynamics and aeroacoustics. The focus is on the character and role of nonacoustic air motion in the vocal tract. An idealized picture of speech sound production is presented showing that speech sound production involves the dynamics of a jet flow, characterized by vorticity. A formal expression is developed for the sound production by unsteady airflow in terms of jet vorticity and vocal-tract shape, and a scaling law for the aeroacoustic source power is derived. The generic features of internal jet flows such as those exhibited in speech sound production are discussed, particularly in terms of the vorticity field, and the relevant scales of motion are identified. An approximate description of a jet as a train of vortex rings, useful for sound-field prediction, is described using the scales both of motion and of vocal-tract geometry. It is shown that the aeroacoustic source may be expressed as the convolution of (1) the acoustic source time series due to a single vortex ring with (2) a function describing the arrival of vortex rings in the source region. It is shown that, in general, the characteristics of the aeroacoustic source are determined not only by the strength, spatial distribution, and convection speed of the jet vorticity field, but also the shape of the vocal tract through which the jet flow passes. For turbulent jets, such as those which occur in unvoiced sound production, however, vocal-tract shape is the dominant factor in determining the spectral content of the source. PMID:16119362

  14. Use of synthetic mesh for the entire abdominal wall after TRAM flap transfer.

    PubMed

    Moscona, R A; Ramon, Y; Toledano, H; Barzilay, G

    1998-03-01

    Abdominal wall competence is a major concern of all plastic surgeons using the TRAM flap for breast reconstruction. Low hernia rates and adequate abdominal stability are standard expectations in abdominal wall closure. Described here is this institution's experience with the use of a large piece of synthetic mesh as a supplementary reinforcement for the entire abdominal wall in an attempt to stabilize it and achieve a superior abdominal aesthetic result. Twenty-five consecutive patients had routine reinforcement with the extended mesh technique. Mean patient follow-up was 24 months with a minimum of 1 year. No hernia or mesh-related infection were encountered and only one patient had a lower abdominal bulge. We recommend the use of a large synthetic mesh for improved strength and aesthetic quality of the abdominal wall after TRAM flap breast reconstruction. PMID:9500387

  15. Aeroacoustics of duct junction flows merging at different angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, G. C. Y.; Leung, R. C. K.; Tang, S. K.

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports an exploratory study of the aeroacoustics of a merging flow at a duct junction with the same width in all branches and different merging angles. The focus is put on the acoustic generation due to the flow unsteadiness. The study is carried out by the direct aeroacoustic simulation (DAS) approach, which solves the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations and the perfect gas equation of state simultaneously using the conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method. The Mach number based on the maximum inlet velocity of side branch is 0.1 and the Reynolds number of the flow based on duct width and this velocity is 2.3×105. The numerical simulations are performed in two dimensions and the aeroacoustics at different merging angles (30°, 45°, 60° and 90°) are studied. Both the levels of unsteady interactions of merging flow structures and the efficiency of the acoustic generation are observed to increase with the merging angles, where the increase in acoustic efficiency can be up to three orders of magnitude. The major acoustic source is found to be the fluctuating wall pressure induced by the flow unsteadiness in the downstream branch. A scaling law between the wall fluctuating force and the acoustic efficiency is also derived.

  16. Aeroacoustic near-field measurements with microscale resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haufe, D.; Pietzonka, S.; Schulz, A.; Bake, F.; Enghardt, L.; Czarske, J. W.; Fischer, A.

    2014-10-01

    In order to analyse aeroacoustic phenomena at near-fields, e.g. the sound-flow interaction at aircraft engine liners, measurements of the flow velocity and the acoustic particle velocity (APV) with microscale resolution are required. To this end, the APV measurement with a high spatial resolution of 10 µm was conducted by means of a laser Doppler velocity profile sensor. For validation of the APV measurements using the profile sensor in a superposed flow, a good agreement with indirect microphone measurements as a reference was achieved, up to a maximum Mach number of 0.25. Aeroacoustic measurements at a minimum distance of 350 µm to the perforation of a bias flow liner were performed using the profile sensor. As a result, acoustically induced velocity oscillations near the rim of the orifice were detected with microscale resolution. The phase-resolved oscillation field indicates vortex shedding from the perforation, which is initiated by the sound-flow interaction. Thus, it is demonstrated that the profile sensor is a valuable tool for analysing aeroacoustic phenomena at near-fields, down to the Kolmogorov scale.

  17. Aeroacoustics of Propulsion Airframe Integration: Overview of NASA's Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.

    2003-01-01

    The integration of propulsion and airframe is fundamental to the design of an aircraft system. Many considerations influence the integration, such as structural, aerodynamic, and maintenance factors. In regard to the acoustics of an aircraft, the integration can have significant effects on the net radiated noise. Whether an engine is mounted above a wing or below can have a significant effect on noise that reaches communities below because of shielding or reflection of engine noise. This is an obvious example of the acoustic effects of propulsion airframe installation. Another example could be the effect of the pylon on the development of the exhaust plume and on the resulting jet noise. In addition, for effective system noise reduction the impact that installation has on noise reduction devices developed on isolated components must be understood. In the future, a focus on the aerodynamic and acoustic interaction effects of installation, propulsion airframe aeroacoustics, will become more important as noise reduction targets become more difficult to achieve. In addition to continued fundamental component reduction efforts, a system level approach that includes propulsion airframe aeroacoustics will be required in order to achieve the 20 dB of perceived noise reduction envisioned by the long-range NASA goals. This emphasis on the aeroacoustics of propulsion airframe integration is a new part of NASA s noise research. The following paper will review current efforts and highlight technical challenges and approaches.

  18. Open Rotor Computational Aeroacoustic Analysis with an Immersed Boundary Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brehm, Christoph; Barad, Michael F.; Kiris, Cetin C.

    2016-01-01

    Reliable noise prediction capabilities are essential to enable novel fuel efficient open rotor designs that can meet the community and cabin noise standards. Toward this end, immersed boundary methods have reached a level of maturity where more and more complex flow problems can be tackled with this approach. This paper demonstrates that our higher-order immersed boundary method provides the ability for aeroacoustic analysis of wake-dominated flow fields generated by a contra-rotating open rotor. This is the first of a kind aeroacoustic simulation of an open rotor propulsion system employing an immersed boundary method. In addition to discussing the methodologies of how to apply the immersed boundary method to this moving boundary problem, we will provide a detailed validation of the aeroacoustic analysis approach employing the Launch Ascent and Vehicle Aerodynamics (LAVA) solver. Two free-stream Mach numbers with M=0.2 and M=0.78 are considered in this analysis that are based on the nominally take-off and cruise flow conditions. The simulation data is compared to available experimental data and other computational results employing more conventional CFD methods. Spectral analysis is used to determine the dominant wave propagation pattern in the acoustic near-field.

  19. Open Rotor Computational Aeroacoustic Analysis with an Immersed Boundary Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brehm, Christoph; Barad, Michael F.; Kiris, Cetin C.

    2016-01-01

    Reliable noise prediction capabilities are essential to enable novel fuel efficient open rotor designs that can meet the community and cabin noise standards. Toward this end, immersed boundary methods have reached a level of maturity so that they are being frequently employed for specific real world applications within NASA. This paper demonstrates that our higher-order immersed boundary method provides the ability for aeroacoustic analysis of wake-dominated flow fields generated by highly complex geometries. This is the first of a kind aeroacoustic simulation of an open rotor propulsion system employing an immersed boundary method. In addition to discussing the peculiarities of applying the immersed boundary method to this moving boundary problem, we will provide a detailed aeroacoustic analysis of the noise generation mechanisms encountered in the open rotor flow. The simulation data is compared to available experimental data and other computational results employing more conventional CFD methods. The noise generation mechanisms are analyzed employing spectral analysis, proper orthogonal decomposition and the causality method.

  20. Urban air quality comparison for bus, tram, subway and pedestrian commutes in Barcelona.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Teresa; Reche, Cristina; Rivas, Ioar; Cruz Minguillón, Maria; Martins, Vânia; Vargas, Concepción; Buonanno, Giorgio; Parga, Jesus; Pandolfi, Marco; Brines, Mariola; Ealo, Marina; Sofia Fonseca, Ana; Amato, Fulvio; Sosa, Garay; Capdevila, Marta; de Miguel, Eladio; Querol, Xavier; Gibbons, Wes

    2015-10-01

    Access to detailed comparisons in air quality variations encountered when commuting through a city offers the urban traveller more informed choice on how to minimise personal exposure to inhalable pollutants. In this study we report on an experiment designed to compare atmospheric contaminants inhaled during bus, subway train, tram and walking journeys through the city of Barcelona. Average number concentrations of particles 10-300 nm in size, N, are lowest in the commute using subway trains (N<2.5×10(4) part. cm(-3)), higher during tram travel and suburban walking (2.5×10(4) cm(-3)5.0×10(4) cm(-3)), with extreme transient peaks at busy traffic crossings commonly exceeding 1.0×10(5) cm(-3) and accompanied by peaks in Black Carbon and CO. Subway particles are coarser (mode 90 nm) than in buses, trams or outdoors (<70 nm), and concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and Black Carbon are lower in the tram when compared to both bus and subway. CO2 levels in public transport reflect passenger numbers, more than tripling from outdoor levels to >1200 ppm in crowded buses and trains. There are also striking differences in inhalable particle chemistry depending on the route chosen, ranging from aluminosiliceous at roadsides and near pavement works, ferruginous with enhanced Mn, Co, Zn, Sr and Ba in the subway environment, and higher levels of Sb and Cu inside the bus. We graphically display such chemical variations using a ternary diagram to emphasise how "air quality" in the city involves a consideration of both physical and chemical parameters, and is not simply a question of measuring particle number or mass. PMID:26277386

  1. OVERVIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL AND RELATIONSHIP TO WATER TANK,LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL AND RELATIONSHIP TO WATER TANK,LOOKING NORTH FROM MAIN ACCESS ROAD. THIS IS HOW THE TERMINAL AND MILL SITE FIRST APPEAR TO VISITORS WHEN APPROACHING FROM THE ROAD FROM THE SITE'S PARKING LOT. THIS IS CONSIDERED THE FRONT END OF THE TERMINAL. ORIGINALLY THERE WAS A SECOND WATER TANK NEAR THE ONE IN UPPER LEFT. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  2. Experimental aeroacoustic study of a landing gear in the unsteady flow induced by a propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekiri, Rafik

    An aeroacoustic study of a two-strut, two-wheel, nacelle-mounted landing gear was conducted to investigate the effects of an upstream propeller on the radiated noise. The development of a 1:10.8 scale model based on a Bombardier Q400 aircraft, consisting of a propeller, motor, nacelle, and landing gear assembly is discussed. Comparisons are made between cases with and without an actuated upstream propeller. Far-field microphone measurements out of the airstream are presented to characterize the acoustic effects of each model component. The main strut and wheels of the model were equipped with surface-mounted microphones to measure unsteady pressures. It is shown that the noise signature of the landing gear cannot be observed over the tunnel background noise in the far-field. Unsteady surface pressures on the main strut show dominant peaks related to vortex shedding from the drag strut for both steady and unsteady upstream conditions.

  3. Recombinant production of functional full-length and truncated human TRAM/TICAM-2 adaptor protein involved in Toll-like receptor and interferon signaling.

    PubMed

    Ullah, M Obayed; Valkov, Eugene; Ve, Thomas; Williams, Simon; Mas, Caroline; Mansell, Ashley; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-02-01

    TRAM/TICAM-2 is used by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) as a bridging adaptor during the mammalian innate immune response. It recruits TRIF, another TIR domain-containing adaptor protein, to TLR4 via TIR domain interactions, which leads to the activation of transcription factors responsible for the production of type-1 interferon and cytokines. The molecular mechanisms of these dual interactions mediated by the TRAM TIR domain are not clear. To understand the molecular basis of TIR:TIR domain interactions, structural and biochemical studies of TRAM TIR domain are necessary, and require a functional soluble protein. In this paper, we report a successful purification and characterization of full-length TRAM. Because full-length TRAM likely contains unstructured regions that may be disadvantageous for structural studies, we also carried out a systematic construct design to determine the boundaries of the TRAM TIR domain. The truncated TRAM constructs were designed based on secondary structure predictions and screened by small-scale expression. Selected constructs were subjected to biophysical analyses. We show that the expressed TRAM TIR domain is functional using in vitro GST pull-down assays that demonstrate a physical interaction with the TLR4 TIR domain. We further show, by site-directed mutagenesis, that the "BB loop" regions of both the TRAM TIR domain and the TLR4 TIR domain are crucial for this physical interaction. PMID:25306876

  4. Aeroacoustics research in Europe: The CEAS-ASC report on 2013 highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, G. J.; Kennedy, J.; Meskell, C.; Carley, M.; Jordan, P.; Rice, H.

    2015-03-01

    The Council of European Aerospace Societies (CEAS) Aeroacoustics Specialists Committee (ASC) supports and promotes the interests of the scientific and industrial aeroacoustics community on an European scale and European aeronautics activities internationally. In this context, "aeroacoustics" encompasses all aerospace acoustics and related areas. Each year the committee highlights some of the research and development projects in Europe. This paper is a report on highlights of aeroacoustics research in Europe in 2013, compiled from information provided to the ASC of the CEAS. During 2013, a number of research programmes involving aeroacoustics were funded by the European Commission. Some of the highlights from these programmes are summarised in this paper, as well as highlights from other programmes funded by national programmes or by industry. Furthermore, a concise summary of the CEAS-ASC workshop "Atmospheric and Ground Effects on Aircraft Noise" held in Seville, Spain in September 2013 is included in this report. Enquiries concerning all contributions should be addressed to the authors who are given at the end of each subsection. This issue of the "highlights" paper is dedicated to the memory of Prof. John A. Fitzpatrick, Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Trinity College Dublin, and a valued member of the Aeroacoustics Specialists Committee. John passed away in September 2012 and is fondly missed across the globe by the friends he made in the Aeroacoustics Community. This paper is edited by PhD graduates and colleagues of John's who conduct research in aeroacoustics, inspired by his thirst for knowledge.

  5. Open Rotor Aeroacoustic Installation Effects for Conventional and Unconventional Airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czech, Michael J.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2013-01-01

    As extensive experimental campaign was performed to study the aeroacoustic installation effects of an open rotor with respect to both a conventional tube and wing type airframe and an unconventional hybrid wing body airframe. The open rotor rig had two counter rotating rows of blades each with eight blades of a design originally flight tested in the 1980s. The aeroacoustic installation effects measured in an aeroacoustic wind tunnel included those from flow effects due to inflow distortion or wake interaction and acoustic propagation effects such as shielding and reflection. The objective of the test campaign was to quantify the installation effects for a wide range of parameters and configurations derived from the two airframe types. For the conventional airframe, the open rotor was positioned in increments in front of and then over the main wing and then in positions representative of tail mounted aircraft with a conventional tail, a T-tail and a U-tail. The interaction of the wake of the open rotor as well as acoustic scattering results in an increase of about 10 dB when the rotor is positioned in front of the main wing. When positioned over the main wing a substantial amount of noise reduction is obtained and this is also observed for tail-mounted installations with a large U-tail. For the hybrid wing body airframe, the open rotor was positioned over the airframe along the centerline as well as off-center representing a twin engine location. A primary result was the documentation of the noise reduction from shielding as a function of the location of the open rotor upstream of the trailing edge of the hybrid wing body. The effects from vertical surfaces and elevon deflection were also measured. Acoustic lining was specially designed and inserted flush with the elevon and airframe surface, the result was an additional reduction in open rotor noise propagating to the far field microphones. Even with the older blade design used, the experiment provided

  6. Aeroacoustic research programs at the Army Aviation Research and Technology Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Yung H.; Schmitz, Fredric H.; Morse, H. Andrew

    1988-01-01

    The Army rotorcraft aeroacoustic programs are reviewed, highlighting the theoretical and experimental progress made by Army researchers in the physical understanding of helicopter impulsive noise. The two impulsive noise sources addressed over this past decade are high-speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction noise, both of which have had and will continue to have an increasing influence on Army rotorcraft design and operations. The advancements discussed are in the areas of in-flight data acquisition techniques, small-scale-model tests in wind tunnels, holographic interferometry/tomographic techniques, and the expanding capabilities of computational fluid dynamics in rotorcraft acoustic problems. Current theoretical prediction methods are compared with experimental data, and parameters that govern model scaling are established. The very successful cooperative efforts between the Army, NASA, and industry are also addressed

  7. StarTram: An Ultra Low Cost Launch System to Enable Large Scale Exploration of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, James; Maise, George; Paniagua, John

    2006-01-01

    StarTram is a new approach for low launch to space using Maglev technology. Spacecraft are magnetically levitated and accelerated without propellants to orbital speeds in an evacuated tunnel at ground level using only electrical energy. The cost of the electric energy for acceleration to 8 kilometers per second is only 60 cents per kilogram of payload. After reaching orbital speed, the StarTram spacecraft coast upwards inside an evacuated levitated launch tube to an altitude, of 10 kilometers or more, where they enter the low-pressure ambient atmosphere. The launch tube is magnetically levitated by the repulsive force between a set of high current superconducting cables on it and oppositely directed currents in a set of superconducting cables on the ground beneath. High strength Kevlar tethers anchor the launch tube against crosswinds and prevent it from moving laterally or vertically. A Magneto Hydro Dynamic (MHD) pump at the exit of the evacuated launch tube prevents air from entering the tube. Two StarTram systems are described, a high G (30G) system for cargo only launch and a moderate G (2.5 G) system for passenger/cargo spacecraft. StarTram's projected unit cost is $30 per kilogram of payload launched, including operating and amortization costs. A single StarTram facility could launch more than 100,000 tons of cargo per year and many thousands of passengers. StarTram would use existing superconductors and materials, together with Maglev technology similar to that now operating. The StarTram cargo launch system could be implemented by 2020 AD and the passenger system by 2030 AD.

  8. Fourth Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) Workshop on Benchmark Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    This publication contains the proceedings of the Fourth Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) Workshop on Benchmark Problems. In this workshop, as in previous workshops, the problems were devised to gauge the technological advancement of computational techniques to calculate all aspects of sound generation and propagation in air directly from the fundamental governing equations. A variety of benchmark problems have been previously solved ranging from simple geometries with idealized acoustic conditions to test the accuracy and effectiveness of computational algorithms and numerical boundary conditions; to sound radiation from a duct; to gust interaction with a cascade of airfoils; to the sound generated by a separating, turbulent viscous flow. By solving these and similar problems, workshop participants have shown the technical progress from the basic challenges to accurate CAA calculations to the solution of CAA problems of increasing complexity and difficulty. The fourth CAA workshop emphasized the application of CAA methods to the solution of realistic problems. The workshop was held at the Ohio Aerospace Institute in Cleveland, Ohio, on October 20 to 22, 2003. At that time, workshop participants presented their solutions to problems in one or more of five categories. Their solutions are presented in this proceedings along with the comparisons of their solutions to the benchmark solutions or experimental data. The five categories for the benchmark problems were as follows: Category 1:Basic Methods. The numerical computation of sound is affected by, among other issues, the choice of grid used and by the boundary conditions. Category 2:Complex Geometry. The ability to compute the sound in the presence of complex geometric surfaces is important in practical applications of CAA. Category 3:Sound Generation by Interacting With a Gust. The practical application of CAA for computing noise generated by turbomachinery involves the modeling of the noise source mechanism as a

  9. Aerodynamic, aeroacoustic, and aeroelastic investigations of airfoil-vortex interaction using large-eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Marcel

    In helicopters, vortices (generated at the tip of the rotor blades) interact with the next advancing blades during certain flight and manoeuvring conditions, generating undesirable levels of acoustic noise and vibration. These Blade-Vortex Interactions (BVIs), which may cause the most disturbing acoustic noise, normally occur in descent or high-speed forward flight. Acoustic noise characterization (and potential reduction) is one the areas generating intensive research interest to the rotorcraft industry. Since experimental investigations of BVI are extremely costly, some insights into the BVI or AVI (2-D Airfoil-Vortex Interaction) can be gained using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) numerical simulations. Numerical simulation of BVI or AVI has been of interest to CFD for many years. There are still difficulties concerning an accurate numerical prediction of BVI. One of the main issues is the inherent dissipation of CFD turbulence models, which severely affects the preservation of the vortex characteristics. Moreover this is not an issue only for aerodynamic and aeroacoustic analysis but also for aeroelastic investigations as well, especially when the strong (two-way) aeroelastic coupling is of interest. The present investigation concentrates mainly on AVI simulations. The simulations are performed for Mach number, Ma = 0.3, resulting in a Reynolds number, Re = 1.3 x 106, which is based on the chord, c, of the airfoil (NACA0012). Extensive literature search has indicated that the present work represents the first comprehensive investigation of AVI using the LES numerical approach, in the rotorcraft research community. The major factor affecting the aerodynamic coefficients and aeroacoustic field as a result of airfoil-vortex interaction is observed to be the unsteady pressure generated at the location of the interaction. The present numerical results show that the aerodynamic coefficients (lift, moment, and drag) and aeroacoustic field are strongly dependent on

  10. Aeroacoustic sound radiated from a flow past an oscillating and a fixed cylinder in tandem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Yuji; Komatsu, Ryu

    2013-11-01

    The aeroacoustic sound generated in a two-dimensional flow past two circular cylinders in tandem is studied. The upstream cylinder is forced to oscillate transversely, while the downstream cylinder is fixed. This flow is a simplified model of the sound generation due to the interaction of rotating wings and a strut. The sound is captured by direct numerical simulation of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations using the volume penalization method. The amplitude of the sound increases in general with the amplitude and the frequency of the oscillation of the upstream cylinder. However, large reduction of the sound occurs for particular choices of parameter values as the forces acting on the two cylinders are in anti-phase.

  11. Breast reconstruction with single-pedicle TRAM flap in breast cancer patients with low midline abdominal scar

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun-Dong; Huang, Wen-He; Qiu, Si-Qi; He, Li-Fang; Guo, Cui-Ping; Zhang, Yong-Qu; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Breast reconstruction with transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap is challenging in patients with low midline abdominal scar. In this study, we aimed to investigate the clinical feasibility of immediate breast reconstruction using single-pedicle TRAM (SP-TRAM) flaps in patients with low midline abdominal scar. There were 4 strict selection criteria: 1) presence at least 3 perforators on the pedicle side; 2) perforators with regional average flow velocity of >20 cm/s; 3) upper edge of the abdominal scar at least 4 cm from the umbilicus; and 4) scar age >1 year. Eight breast cancer patients with low midline abdominal scar (scar group) and 20 without (control group) underwent immediate breast reconstruction with SP-TRAM flaps consisting of zone I and III and zone II tissues. Flap complications, donor-site complications, and cosmetic results were compared between the two groups. All flaps survived and both groups presented similar flap and donor site complications, including fat necrosis, seroma, hematoma, infection, delayed wound healing, and abdominal hernia, and patients in both groups had similar aesthetic results (p > 0.05). Thus, the study demonstrated that breast reconstruction using SP-TRAM flap was a safe approach in carefully selected patients with low midline abdominal scar. PMID:27406872

  12. Perfectly Matched Layer for Galbrun's aeroacoustic equation in a cylindrical coordinates system with an axial and a swirling steady mean flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccouche, Ryan; Tahar, Mabrouk Ben; Moreau, Solène

    2016-09-01

    A Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) for aeroacoustic problems using Galbrun's equation in the presence of an axial and a swirling steady mean flow is investigated in a cylindrical coordinates system. This equation is based on an Eulerian-Lagrangian description and leads to a wave equation written only in terms of the Lagrangian perturbation of the displacement. Galbrun's equation is solved by a mixed pressure-displacement Finite Element Method (FEM). To avoid instabilities in the presence of mean flow, a geometric transformation is presented. The validity and efficiency of the proposed PML formulation are established through comparisons with analytical, semi-analytical model based on Pridmore-Brown equation (extended to an axial and a swirling mean flow) and with multiple-scale models. The interest of the formulation is shown through an example of aeroacoustic radiation.

  13. Benchmark Problems Used to Assess Computational Aeroacoustics Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Envia, Edmane

    2005-01-01

    The field of computational aeroacoustics (CAA) encompasses numerical techniques for calculating all aspects of sound generation and propagation in air directly from fundamental governing equations. Aeroacoustic problems typically involve flow-generated noise, with and without the presence of a solid surface, and the propagation of the sound to a receiver far away from the noise source. It is a challenge to obtain accurate numerical solutions to these problems. The NASA Glenn Research Center has been at the forefront in developing and promoting the development of CAA techniques and methodologies for computing the noise generated by aircraft propulsion systems. To assess the technological advancement of CAA, Glenn, in cooperation with the Ohio Aerospace Institute and the AeroAcoustics Research Consortium, organized and hosted the Fourth CAA Workshop on Benchmark Problems. Participants from industry and academia from both the United States and abroad joined to present and discuss solutions to benchmark problems. These demonstrated technical progress ranging from the basic challenges to accurate CAA calculations to the solution of CAA problems of increasing complexity and difficulty. The results are documented in the proceedings of the workshop. Problems were solved in five categories. In three of the five categories, exact solutions were available for comparison with CAA results. A fourth category of problems representing sound generation from either a single airfoil or a blade row interacting with a gust (i.e., problems relevant to fan noise) had approximate analytical or completely numerical solutions. The fifth category of problems involved sound generation in a viscous flow. In this case, the CAA results were compared with experimental data.

  14. Aero-acoustic experimental verification of optimum configuration of variable-pitch fans for 40 x 80 foot subsonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lown, H.

    1977-01-01

    The aerodynamic and acoustic performance of two drive fan configurations (low-speed and high-speed variable pitch design) for a 40 x 80 foot wind tunnel were monitored. A 1/7-scale model was utilized. The necessary aero-acoustic data reduction computer program logic was supplied. Test results were evaluated, and the optimum configuration to be employed in the 40 foot full scale fan was recommended.

  15. Towards Numerical Simulations of Trailing-Edge Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Meng

    1996-01-01

    The aeroacoustics of flow-hydrofoil interactions exhibits distinct characteristics depending on the physical length scales involved. In the small-foil (relative to acoustic wavelength) limit characteristic of the noise generated by large-scale vortex shedding at low flow Mach number, the noise calculation is facilitated by the use of the Lighthill analogy in conjunction with a free-space Green's function, in the sense of Curle's formulation. A methodology for computing the vortex-shedding noise using the Curle formulation, including both surface-induced dipole sources and volume quadrupole sources, has been developed.

  16. Exhaust System Experiments at NASA's AeroAcoustic Propulsion Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2011-01-01

    This presentation gives an overview of the planned testing in the AeroAcoustic Propulsion Lab (AAPL) in the coming 15 months. It was stressed in the presentation that these are plans that are subject to change due to changes in funding and/or programmatic direction. The first chart shows a simplified schedule of test entries with funding sponsor and dates for each. In subsequent charts are pages devoted to the Objectives and Issues with each test entry, along with a graphic intended to represent the test activity. The chart for each test entry also indicates sponsorship of the activity, and a contact person.!

  17. Workshop report for the AIAA 5th Aeroacoustics Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    Summaries of current understandings, technological tools and remaining controversies in the field of aeroacoustics are presented, with attention also given to developments in means of noise suppression to comply with proposed and projected regulations. Topics include jet noise mechanisms and their suppression; turbomachinery noise, including noise sources, noise prediction by the modal approach and experimental methods; duct acoustics, with discussion of sound attenuation and propagation, the application of finite element methods, and the radiation of sound from inlets; helicopter rotor, airplane propeller and V/STOL noise; aircraft interior noise; and general acoustics, atmospheric propagation and the sonic boom.

  18. Program in acoustics. [aeroacoustics, aircraft noise, and noise suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Relevant research projects conducted by faculty and graduate students in the general area of aeroacoustics to further the understanding of noise generation by aircraft and to aid in the development of practical methods for noise suppression are listed. Special activities summarized relate to the nonlinear acoustic wave theory and its application to several cases including that of the acoustic source located at the throat of a near-sonic duct, a computer program developed to compute the nonlinear wave theory, and a parabolic approximation for propagation of sounding in moving stratified media.

  19. The effects of botulinum toxin A on survival of rat TRAM flap with vertical midline scar.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae Hwan; Rah, Dong Kyun; Chong, Yosep; Kim, June-kyu

    2015-01-01

    The transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap has been widely used in various reconstructive surgeries. Recently, there have been reports regarding the positive effect of botulinum toxin A (BoTA) on flap survival. We hypothesized that pretreatment with BoTA could augment the survival of pedicled TRAM flaps with a vertical midline scar. Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 2 groups, namely, control group and BoTA group. Five days after a vertical midline incision, the BoTA group was pretreated with BoTA, whereas the control group was pretreated with normal saline. Ten days after the initial incision, the TRAM flap was harvested. We evaluated the gross flap survival and analyzed the overall histologic change, lumen area of pedicle, and microvessel density with immunohistochemistry. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed for the evaluation of angiogenesis-related factors. In the BoTA group, the gross flap survival rate was significantly higher than that in the control group on both ipsilateral and contralateral sides (P < 0.001). In the BoTA group, a significant increase in pedicle lumen area was observed (P < 0.001). In the control group, mild to moderate epidermal necrosis was seen; microvessels were relatively small compared with those of the BoTA group. According to immunohistochemistry, the number of CD31 positively stained vessels was significantly higher on the contralateral side in the control group compared to that in the BoTA group (P < 0.001). The relative messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of CD31 was significantly lower in the BoTA group than that in the control group on both ipsilateral and contralateral sides (P < 0.001). Meanwhile, the relative mRNA expression of VEGF was significantly higher in the BoTA group than in the control group on both ipsilateral and contralateral sides (P < 0.001).We believe that preoperative BoTA therapy is a feasible method to improve circulation of the rat TRAM flap

  20. Three-dimensional beamforming of dipolar aeroacoustic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porteous, Ric; Prime, Zebb; Doolan, Con. J.; Moreau, Danielle. J.; Valeau, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    This paper outlines and compares four beamforming algorithms for accurately localising acoustic dipole sources in a three-dimensional domain, such as noise sources produced by flow-body interaction. These algorithms include conventional cross-spectral beamforming, conventional beamforming with deconvolution via CLEAN-SC, 'multiplicative' cross-spectral beamforming and multiplicative beamforming with CLEAN-SC. The latter two algorithms are novel to the field of aeroacoustics and rely on the mutual cancellation of spatially incoherent sources between orthogonally aligned microphone arrays to improve the quality of the source map. The algorithms were used on both synthetic and experimental data. By comparing the performance of each algorithm in terms of source localisation accuracy, source strength estimation and resolution, it was found that conventional beamforming with CLEAN-SC is the preferred method for beamforming aeroacoustic sources in three dimensions, albeit at a higher computational cost than the other three. The results also showed that multiplicative beamforming methods give source maps that are more interpretable than conventional cross-spectral beamforming methods at no extra computational expense.

  1. Some aspects of the aeroacoustics of high-speed jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lighthill, James

    1993-01-01

    Some of the background to contemporary jet aeroacoustics is addressed. Then scaling laws for noise generation by low-Mach-number airflows and by turbulence convected at 'not so low' Mach number is reviewed. These laws take into account the influence of Doppler effects associated with the convection of aeroacoustic sources. Next, a uniformly valid Doppler-effect approximation exhibits the transition, with increasing Mach number of convection, from compact-source radiation at low Mach numbers to a statistical assemblage of conical shock waves radiated by eddies convected at supersonic speed. In jets, for example, supersonic eddy convection is typically found for jet exit speeds exceeding twice the atmospheric speed of sound. The Lecture continues by describing a new dynamical theory of the nonlinear propagation of such statistically random assemblages of conical shock waves. It is shown, both by a general theoretical analysis and by an illustrative computational study, how their propagation is dominated by a characteristic 'bunching' process. That process associated with a tendency for shock waves that have already formed unions with other shock waves to acquire an increased proneness to form further unions - acts so as to enhance the high-frequency part of the spectrum of noise emission from jets at these high exit speeds.

  2. Covariance-based approaches to aeroacoustic noise source analysis.

    PubMed

    Du, Lin; Xu, Luzhou; Li, Jian; Guo, Bin; Stoica, Petre; Bahr, Chris; Cattafesta, Louis N

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, several covariance-based approaches are proposed for aeroacoustic noise source analysis under the assumptions of a single dominant source and all observers contaminated solely by uncorrelated noise. The Cramér-Rao Bounds (CRB) of the unbiased source power estimates are also derived. The proposed methods are evaluated using both simulated data as well as data acquired from an airfoil trailing edge noise experiment in an open-jet aeroacoustic facility. The numerical examples show that the covariance-based algorithms significantly outperform an existing least-squares approach and provide accurate power estimates even under low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions. Furthermore, the mean-squared-errors (MSEs) of the so-obtained estimates are close to the corresponding CRB especially for a large number of data samples. The experimental results show that the power estimates of the proposed approaches are consistent with one another as long as the core analysis assumptions are obeyed. PMID:21110583

  3. Aeroacoustic and aerodynamic applications of the theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. Clifton; Smith, Charles A.; Karamcheti, Krishnamurty

    1991-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of nonequilibrium thermodynamics associated with viscous flows are examined and related to developments to the understanding of specific phenomena in aerodynamics and aeroacoustics. A key element of the nonequilibrium theory is the principle of minimum entropy production rate for steady dissipative processes near equilibrium, and variational calculus is used to apply this principle to several examples of viscous flow. A review of nonequilibrium thermodynamics and its role in fluid motion are presented. Several formulations are presented of the local entropy production rate and the local energy dissipation rate, two quantities that are of central importance to the theory. These expressions and the principle of minimum entropy production rate for steady viscous flows are used to identify parallel-wall channel flow and irrotational flow as having minimally dissipative velocity distributions. Features of irrotational, steady, viscous flow near an airfoil, such as the effect of trailing-edge radius on circulation, are also found to be compatible with the minimum principle. Finally, the minimum principle is used to interpret the stability of infinitesimal and finite amplitude disturbances in an initially laminar, parallel shear flow, with results that are consistent with experiment and linearized hydrodynamic stability theory. These results suggest that a thermodynamic approach may be useful in unifying the understanding of many diverse phenomena in aerodynamics and aeroacoustics.

  4. An acoustic intensity-based method and its aeroacoustic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chao

    of elliptic equations. Hence the AIBM is more stable and the reconstructed acoustic pressure is less dependent on the locations of the input acoustic data. The solution of the modified Helmholtz equation in the frequency domain is approximated by finite linear combination of basis functions. The coefficients associated with the basis functions are obtained by matching the assumed general solution to the given input data over an open control surface. The details on the optimization method, the instability issue and the numerical implementation of the AIBM have been discussed in the dissertation. To verify the AIBM model, several acoustic radiation examples are solved, e.g. multiple sources radiation. The analytical acoustic pressure and its normal derivative on a partial spherical control surface are used as the input for the AIBM. The reconstructed acoustic field is obtained then compared with the analytical acoustic field. Excellent agreement is achieved and demonstrated. Some affecting factors on the AIBM, e.g. input locations and the signal-to-noise ratio, are also investigated. In addition, the potential of AIBM in broad-band noise prediction is examined in vortex/trailing edge interaction problem. Furthermore, a series of real world model problems are chosen to demonstrate the capability and potential of AIBM in CAA applications. Two important aircraft noises: turbofan noise and airframe noise, are studied in detail. Both the permeable surface FW-H equation method and the AIBM are used to evaluate the radiated field. The prediction results obtained from the AIBM and the FW-H integral method are compared with the solution from the CFD/CAA method. The accuracy and efficiency of both the AIBM and the FW-H integral method are analyzed. In summary, the "open surface" AIBM makes up the drawbacks of traditional "closed surface" approaches. It provides an effective alternative for the far-field acoustic prediction of practical aeroacoustic problems.

  5. ICASE/LaRC Workshop on Benchmark Problems in Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Jay C. (Editor); Ristorcelli, J. Ray (Editor); Tam, Christopher K. W. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The proceedings of the Benchmark Problems in Computational Aeroacoustics Workshop held at NASA Langley Research Center are the subject of this report. The purpose of the Workshop was to assess the utility of a number of numerical schemes in the context of the unusual requirements of aeroacoustical calculations. The schemes were assessed from the viewpoint of dispersion and dissipation -- issues important to long time integration and long distance propagation in aeroacoustics. Also investigated were the effect of implementation of different boundary conditions. The Workshop included a forum in which practical engineering problems related to computational aeroacoustics were discussed. This discussion took the form of a dialogue between an industrial panel and the workshop participants and was an effort to suggest the direction of evolution of this field in the context of current engineering needs.

  6. Predicting vibratory stresses from aero-acoustic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Matthew D.

    Sonic fatigue has been a concern of jet aircraft engineers for many years. As engines become more powerful, structures become more lightly damped and complex, and materials become lighter, stiffer, and more complicated, the need to understand and predict structural response to aeroacoustic loads becomes more important. Despite decades of research, vibration in panels caused by random pressure loads, such as those found in a supersonic jet, is still difficult to predict. The work in this research improves on current prediction methods in several ways, in particular for the structural response due to wall pressures induced by supersonic turbulent flows. First, solutions are calculated using time-domain input pressure loads that include shock cells and their interaction with turbulent flow. The solutions include both mean (static) and oscillatory components. Second, the time series of stresses are required for many fatigue assessment counting algorithms. To do this, a method is developed to compute time-dependent solutions in the frequency domain. The method is first applied to a single-degree-of-freedom system. The equations of motion are derived and solved in both the frequency domain and the time domain. The pressure input is a random (broadband) signal representative of jet flow. The method is then applied to a simply-supported beam vibrating in flexure using a line of pressure inputs computed with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). A modal summation approach is used to compute structural response. The coupling between the pressure field and the structure, through the joint acceptance, is reviewed and discussed for its application to more complicated structures. Results from the new method and from a direct time domain method are compared for method verification. Because the match is good and the new frequency domain method is faster computationally, it is chosen for use in a more complicated structure. The vibration of a two-dimensional panel loaded by jet

  7. Validation of CATHARE 3D Code Against UPTF TRAM C3 Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glantz, Tony; Freitas, Roberto

    Within the nuclear reactor safety analysis, one of the events that could potentially lead to a re-criticality accident in case of a Small Break Loss of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is a boron dilution scenario followed by a coolant mixing transient. Some UPTF experiments can be interpreted as generic boron dilution experiments. In fact, the UPTF experiments were originally designed to conduct separate effects studies focused on multi-dimensional thermal hydraulic phenomena. However, in the case of experimental program TRAM, some studies are realized on the boron mixing: tests C3. Some of these tests have been used for the validation and assessment of the 3D module of CATHARE code. Results are very satisfying; CATHARE 3D code is able to reproduce correctly the main features of the UPTF TRAM C3 tests, the temperature mixing in the cold leg, the formation of a strong stratification in the upper downcomer, the perfect mixing temperature in the lower downcomer and the strong stratification in the lower plenum. These results are also compared with the CFX5 and TRIO-U codes results on these tests.

  8. Concurrent identification of aero-acoustic scattering and noise sources at a flow duct singularity in low Mach number flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovardi, Carlo; Jaensch, Stefan; Polifke, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    A numerical method to concurrently characterize both aeroacoustic scattering and noise sources at a duct singularity is presented. This approach combines Large Eddy Simulation (LES) with techniques of System Identification (SI): In a first step, a highly resolved LES with external broadband acoustic excitation is carried out. Subsequently, time series data extracted from the LES are post-processed by means of SI to model both acoustic propagation and noise generation. The present work studies the aero-acoustic characteristics of an orifice placed in a duct at low flow Mach numbers with the "LES-SI" method. Parametric SI based on the Box-Jenkins mathematical structure is employed, with a prediction error approach that utilizes correlation analysis of the output residuals to avoid overfitting. Uncertainties of model parameters due to the finite length of times series are quantified in terms of confidence intervals. Numerical results for acoustic scattering matrices and power spectral densities of broad-band noise are validated against experimental measurements over a wide range of frequencies below the cut-off frequency of the duct.

  9. Powering a Commercial Datalogger by Energy Harvesting from Generated Aeroacoustic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monthéard, R.; Airiau, C.; Bafleur, M.; Boitier, V.; Dilhac, J.-M.; Dollat, X.; Nolhier, N.; Piot, E.

    2014-11-01

    This paper reports the experimental demonstration of a wireless sensor node only powered by an aeroacoustic energy harvesting device, meant to be installed on an aircraft outside skin. New results related to the physical characterization of the energy conversion process are presented. Optimized interface electronics has been designed, which allows demonstrating aeroacoustic power generation by supplying a commercial wireless datalogger in conditions representative of an actual flight.

  10. A Superior Kirchhoff Method for Aeroacoustic Noise Prediction: The Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.

    1997-01-01

    The prediction of aeroacoustic noise is important; all new aircraft must meet noise certification requirements. Local noise standards can be even more stringent. The NASA noise reduction goal is to reduce perceived noise levels by a factor of two in 10 years. The objective of this viewgraph presentation is to demonstrate the superiority of the FW-H approach over the Kirchoff method for aeroacoustics, both analytically and numerically.

  11. Estimation of aeroacoustic source strengths in phonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krane, Michael; Campo, Elizabeth; McPhail, Michael

    2011-11-01

    The underlying mechanisms of phonatory sound production are studied by quantifying the strength of the aerocoustic sources. The sources include a volume source due to vocal fold displacement, and a dipole related to the transglottal pressure difference. The challenges involved with estimating these sources in a resonator are addressed. Measurements of flow-induced vibration and sound produced by life-scale, 2-layer silicone rubber model vocal folds were conducted in a physical model of the human airway. Measurements, including transglottal pressure, radiated sound, and high-speed imaging of the model glottis, were used to produce estimates of the strengths of volume and dipole sources. Acknowledge support of NIH grant 5R01DC005642 and ARL E&F program.

  12. Aeroacoustics research in Europe: The CEAS-ASC report on 2014 highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detandt, Yves

    2015-11-01

    The Council of European Aerospace Societies (CEAS) Aeroacoustics Specialists Committee (ASC) supports and promotes the interests of the scientific and industrial aeroacoustics community on an European scale and European aeronautics activities internationally. Each year the committee highlights some of the research and development projects in Europe. This paper is the 2014 issue of this collection of Aeroacoustic Highlights, compiled from informations submitted to the CEAS-ASC. The contributions are classified in different topics; the first categories being related to specific aeroacoustic challenges (airframe noise, fan and jet noise, helicopter noise, aircraft interior noise) and two last sections are respectively devoted to recent improvements and emerging techniques and to general advances in aeroacoustics. For each section, the present paper focus on accomplished projects, providing the state of the art in each research category in 2014. A number of research programmes involving aeroacoustics were funded by the European Commission. Some of the highlights from these programmes are summarised in this paper, as well as highlights funded by national programmes or by industry.

  13. 30 CFR 75.829 - Tramming continuous mining machines in and out of the mine and from section to section.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Meet all applicable requirements for medium-voltage circuits in 30 CFR 75. ER06AP10.002 (2) Step-up... supplying low or medium voltage to the step-up transformer must meet the applicable requirements of 30 CFR... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tramming continuous mining machines in and...

  14. 30 CFR 75.829 - Tramming continuous mining machines in and out of the mine and from section to section.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Meet all applicable requirements for medium-voltage circuits in 30 CFR 75. ER06AP10.002 (2) Step-up... supplying low or medium voltage to the step-up transformer must meet the applicable requirements of 30 CFR... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tramming continuous mining machines in and...

  15. 30 CFR 75.829 - Tramming continuous mining machines in and out of the mine and from section to section.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Meet all applicable requirements for medium-voltage circuits in 30 CFR 75. ER06AP10.002 (2) Step-up... supplying low or medium voltage to the step-up transformer must meet the applicable requirements of 30 CFR... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tramming continuous mining machines in and...

  16. 30 CFR 75.829 - Tramming continuous mining machines in and out of the mine and from section to section.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Meet all applicable requirements for medium-voltage circuits in 30 CFR 75. ER06AP10.002 (2) Step-up... supplying low or medium voltage to the step-up transformer must meet the applicable requirements of 30 CFR... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tramming continuous mining machines in and...

  17. 30 CFR 75.829 - Tramming continuous mining machines in and out of the mine and from section to section.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Meet all applicable requirements for medium-voltage circuits in 30 CFR 75. ER06AP10.002 (2) Step-up... supplying low or medium voltage to the step-up transformer must meet the applicable requirements of 30 CFR... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tramming continuous mining machines in and...

  18. Aeroacoustic Analysis of a Simplified Landing Gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi, R.; Li, Fei

    2004-01-01

    A hybrid approach is used to investigate the noise generated by a simplified landing gear without small scale parts such as hydraulic lines and fasteners. The Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation is used to predict the noise at far-field observer locations from flow data provided by an unsteady computational fluid dynamics calculation. A simulation with 13 million grid points has been completed, and comparisons are made between calculations with different turbulence models. Results indicate that the turbulence model has a profound effect on the levels and character of the unsteadiness. Flow data on solid surfaces and a set of permeable surfaces surrounding the gear have been collected. Noise predictions using the porous surfaces appear to be contaminated by errors caused by large wake fluctuations passing through the surfaces. However, comparisons between predictions using the solid surfaces with the near-field CFD solution are in good agreement giving confidence in the far-field results.

  19. The aeroacoustics of slowly diverging supersonic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Leib, S. J.

    This paper is concerned with utilizing the acoustic analogy approach to predict the sound from unheated supersonic jets. Previous attempts have been unsuccessful at making such predictions over the Mach number range of practical interest. The present paper, therefore, focuses on implementing the refinements needed to accomplish this objective. The important effects influencing peak supersonic noise are found to be source convection, mean flow refraction, mean flow amplification, and source non-compactness. It appears that the last two effects have not been adequately dealt with in the literature. For the first of these this is because the usual parallel flow models produce most of the amplification in the so-called critical layer where the solution becomes singular and, therefore, causes the predicted sound field to become infinite. We deal with this by introducing a new weakly non-parallel flow analysis that eliminates the critical layer singularity. This has a strong effect on the shape of the peak noise spectrum. The last effect places severe demands on the source models at the higher Mach numbers because the retarded-time variations significantly increase the sensitivity of the radiated sound to the source structure in this case. A highly refined (non-separable) source model is, therefore, introduced in this paper.

  20. The Aeroacoustics of Turbulent Coanda Wall Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubert, Caroline; Fox, Jason

    2007-11-01

    Turbulent Coanda wall jets have become increasingly widely used in a variety of industrial applications in recent years, due to the substantial flow deflection that they afford. A related characteristic is the enhanced turbulence levels and entrainment they offer, compared with conventional jet flows. This characteristic is, however, generally accompanied by a significant increase in the noise levels associated with devices employing this effect. As a consequence, the potential offered by Coanda devices is yet to be fully realized. This problem provides the impetus for the research detailed in this poster. To date, some work has been done on developing a mathematical model of the Turbulent Mixing Noise emitted by such a device, assuming that the surface adjoining the turbulent flow was essentially 2-D. This poster extends this fundamental model, through a combination of mathematical modeling and acoustical and optical experiments. The effect of a variety of parameters, including nozzle configuration and jet exit velocity will be discussed, and ways of reducing or attenuating the noise generated by such flow, whilst still maintaining the crucial flow characteristics, will be presented.

  1. The Aeroacoustics of Slowly Diverging Supersonic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Leib, S. J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with utilizing the acoustic analogy approach to predict the sound from unheated supersonic jets. Previous attempts have been unsuccessful at making such predictions over the Mach number range of practical interest. The present paper, therefore, focuses on implementing the necessary refinements needed to accomplish this objective. The important effects influencing peak supersonic noise turn out to be source convection, mean flow refraction, mean flow amplification, and source non-compactness. It appears that the last two effects have not been adequately dealt with in the literature. The first of these because the usual parallel flow models produce most of the amplification in the so called critical layer where the solution becomes singular and, therefore, causes the predicted sound field to become infinite as well. We deal with this by introducing a new weakly non parallel flow analysis that eliminates the critical layer singularity. This has a strong effect on the shape of the peak noise spectrum. The last effect places severe demands on the source models at the higher Mach numbers because the retarded time variations significantly increase the sensitivity of the radiated sound to the source structure in this case. A highly refined (non-separable) source model is, therefore, introduced in this paper.

  2. Jet Aeroacoustics: Noise Generation Mechanism and Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    This report covers the third year research effort of the project. The research work focussed on the fine scale mixing noise of both subsonic and supersonic jets and the effects of nozzle geometry and tabs on subsonic jet noise. In publication 1, a new semi-empirical theory of jet mixing noise from fine scale turbulence is developed. By an analogy to gas kinetic theory, it is shown that the source of noise is related to the time fluctuations of the turbulence kinetic theory. On starting with the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations, a formula for the radiated noise is derived. An empirical model of the space-time correlation function of the turbulence kinetic energy is adopted. The form of the model is in good agreement with the space-time two-point velocity correlation function measured by Davies and coworkers. The parameters of the correlation are related to the parameters of the k-epsilon turbulence model. Thus the theory is self-contained. Extensive comparisons between the computed noise spectrum of the theory and experimental measured have been carried out. The parameters include jet Mach number from 0.3 to 2.0 and temperature ratio from 1.0 to 4.8. Excellent agreements are found in the spectrum shape, noise intensity and directivity. It is envisaged that the theory would supercede all semi-empirical and totally empirical jet noise prediction methods in current use.

  3. The aeroacoustics of a steam kettle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrywood, R. H.; Agarwal, A.

    2013-10-01

    The whistle in a steam kettle provides a near-perfect example of a hole tone system, in which two orifice plates are held a short distance apart in a cylindrical duct. This setup leads to distinct audible tones for a large range of flow rates. The main objective of the current paper is to understand the physical mechanism behind the generation of hole tones (whistling of steam kettles). A variety of experiments were undertaken, primarily focusing on how the acoustics of the hole tone system varied depending on the flow rate, whistle geometry, and upstream duct length. These were supplemented by flow visualisation experiments using water. The results show that the whistle's behaviour is divided into two regions of operation. The first, occurring at Reynolds numbers (based on orifice diameter and jet velocity) below Reδ ≈ 2000, exhibits a near-constant frequency behaviour. A mathematical model based on a Helmholtz resonator has been developed for this part of the mechanism. The second, for Reynolds numbers greater than Reδ ≈ 2000, the whistle exhibits a constant Strouhal number behaviour. A physical model has been developed to describe this part of the mechanism where the resonant modes of the upstream duct are coupled with the vortex shedding at the jet exit.

  4. Safety impacts of platform tram stops on pedestrians in mixed traffic operation: A comparison group before-after crash study.

    PubMed

    Naznin, Farhana; Currie, Graham; Logan, David; Sarvi, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Tram stops in mixed traffic environments present a variety of safety, accessibility and transport efficiency challenges. In Melbourne, Australia the hundred year-old electric tram system is progressively being modernized to improve passenger accessibility. Platform stops, incorporating raised platforms for level entry into low floor trams, are being retro-fitted system-wide to replace older design stops. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety impacts of platform stops over older design stops (i.e. Melbourne safety zone tram stops) on pedestrians in the context of mixed traffic tram operation in Melbourne, using an advanced before-after crash analysis approach, the comparison group (CG) method. The CG method evaluates safety impacts by taking into account the general trends in safety and the unobserved factors at treatment and comparison sites that can alter the outcomes of a simple before-after analysis. The results showed that pedestrian-involved all injury crashes reduced by 43% after platform stop installation. This paper also explores a concern that the conventional CG method might underestimate safety impacts as a result of large differences in passenger stop use between treatment and comparison sites, suggesting differences in crash risk exposure. To adjust for this, a modified analysis explored crash rates (crash counts per 10,000 stop passengers) for each site. The adjusted results suggested greater reductions in pedestrian-involved crashes after platform stop installation: an 81% reduction in pedestrian-involved all injury crashes and 86% reduction in pedestrian-involved FSI crashes, both are significant at the 95% level. Overall, the results suggest that platform stops have considerable safety benefits for pedestrians. Implications for policy and areas for future research are explored. PMID:26476596

  5. Benchmark Solutions for Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) Code Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, James R.

    2004-01-01

    NASA has conducted a series of Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) Workshops on Benchmark Problems to develop a set of realistic CAA problems that can be used for code validation. In the Third (1999) and Fourth (2003) Workshops, the single airfoil gust response problem, with real geometry effects, was included as one of the benchmark problems. Respondents were asked to calculate the airfoil RMS pressure and far-field acoustic intensity for different airfoil geometries and a wide range of gust frequencies. This paper presents the validated that have been obtained to the benchmark problem, and in addition, compares them with classical flat plate results. It is seen that airfoil geometry has a strong effect on the airfoil unsteady pressure, and a significant effect on the far-field acoustic intensity. Those parts of the benchmark problem that have not yet been adequately solved are identified and presented as a challenge to the CAA research community.

  6. On applications of high-frequency asymptotics in aeroacoustics.

    PubMed

    Peake, N

    2004-03-15

    The aim of this paper is to survey a range of applications of high-frequency asymptotic methods in aeroacoustics. Specifically, we are concerned with problems associated with noise generation, propagation and scattering as found in large modern aeroengines. With regard to noise generation, we consider the interaction between high-frequency vortical waves and thin aerofoils, with particular emphasis being placed on the way in which the vortical waves act on the non-uniform mean flow around the aerofoil. A ray-theoretic description of the resulting sound as it propagates along the engine intake is then presented, followed by consideration of the diffraction of these rays by the (possibly asymmetric) intake lip to produce sound in the far field. A range of more detailed possible extensions is also presented. PMID:15306513

  7. Computational aeroacoustics and numerical simulation of supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Philip J.; Long, Lyle N.

    1996-01-01

    The research project has been a computational study of computational aeroacoustics algorithms and numerical simulations of the flow and noise of supersonic jets. During this study a new method for the implementation of solid wall boundary conditions for complex geometries in three dimensions has been developed. In addition, a detailed study of the simulation of the flow in and noise from supersonic circular and rectangular jets has been conducted. Extensive comparisons have been made with experimental measurements. A summary of the results of the research program are attached as the main body of this report in the form of two publications. Also, the report lists the names of the students who were supported by this grant, their degrees, and the titles of their dissertations. In addition, a list of presentations and publications made by the Principal Investigators and the research students is also included.

  8. A general introduction to aeroacoustics and atmospheric sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lighthill, James

    1992-01-01

    A single unifying principle (based upon the nonlinear 'momentum-flux' effects produced when different components of a motion transport different components of its momentum) is used to give a broad scientific background to several aspects of the interaction between airflows and atmospheric sound. First, it treats the generation of sound by airflows of many different types. These include, for example, jet-like flows involving convected turbulent motions (with the resulting aeroacoustic radiation sensitively dependent on the Mach number of convection) and they include, as an extreme case, the supersonic 'boom' (shock waves generated by a supersonically convected flow pattern). Next, an analysis is given of sound propagation through nonuniformly moving airflows, and the exchange is quantified of energy between flow and sound; while, finally, problems are examined of how sound waves 'on their own' may generate the airflows known as acoustic streaming.

  9. A general introduction to aeroacoustics and atmospheric sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lighthill, James

    A single unifying principle (based upon the nonlinear 'momentum-flux' effects produced when different components of a motion transport different components of its momentum) is used to give a broad scientific background to several aspects of the interaction between airflows and atmospheric sound. First, it treats the generation of sound by airflows of many different types. These include, for example, jet-like flows involving convected turbulent motions (with the resulting aeroacoustic radiation sensitively dependent on the Mach number of convection) and they include, as an extreme case, the supersonic 'boom' (shock waves generated by a supersonically convected flow pattern). Next, an analysis is given of sound propagation through nonuniformly moving airflows, and the exchange is quantified of energy between flow and sound; while, finally, problems are examined of how sound waves 'on their own' may generate the airflows known as acoustic streaming.

  10. A general introduction to aeroacoustics and atmospheric sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lighthill, James

    1992-10-01

    A single unifying principle (based upon the nonlinear 'momentum-flux' effects produced when different components of a motion transport different components of its momentum) is used to give a broad scientific background to several aspects of the interaction between airflows and atmospheric sound. First, it treats the generation of sound by airflows of many different types. These include, for example, jet-like flows involving convected turbulent motions (with the resulting aeroacoustic radiation sensitively dependent on the Mach number of convection) and they include, as an extreme case, the supersonic 'boom' (shock waves generated by a supersonically convected flow pattern). Next, an analysis is given of sound propagation through nonuniformly moving airflows, and the exchange is quantified of energy between flow and sound; while, finally, problems are examined of how sound waves 'on their own' may generate the airflows known as acoustic streaming.

  11. Fluid Dynamics Prize Otto Laporte Lecture:Turbulence and Aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comte-Bellot, Genevieve

    2014-11-01

    Some significant advances obtained over the years for two closely related fields, Turbulence and Aeroacoustics, are presented. Particular focus is placed on experimental results and on physical mechanisms. For example, for a 2D channel flow, skewness factors of velocity fluctuations are discussed. The study of isotropic turbulence generated by grids in the «Velvet wind tunnel» of Stanley Corrsin, constitutes a masterpiece. Of particular note are the Eulerian memory times, analysed for all wavenumbers. Concerning hot-wire anemometry, the potential of the new constant voltage technique is presented. Some results obtained with Particule Image Velocimetry are also reported. Two flow control examples are illustrated: lift generation for a circular cylinder, and noise reduction for a high speed jet. Finally, the propagation of acoustic waves through turbulence is considered. Experimental data are here completed by numerical simulations showing the possible occurrence of caustics.

  12. Application of a new finite difference algorithm for computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic problems have become extremely important in recent years because of research efforts such as the High Speed Civil Transport program. Computational aeroacoustics (CAA) requires a faithful representation of wave propagation over long distances, and needs algorithms that are accurate and boundary conditions that are unobtrusive. This paper applies a new finite difference method and boundary algorithm to the Linearized Euler Equations (LEE). The results demonstrate the ability of a new fourth order propagation algorithm to accurately simulate the genuinely multidimensional wave dynamics of acoustic propagation in two space dimensions with the LEE. The results also show the ability of a new outflow boundary condition and fourth order algorithm to pass the evolving solution from the computational domain with no perceptible degradation of the solution remaining within the domain.

  13. High Order Difference Method for Low Mach Number Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, B.; Yee, H. C.; Mansour, Nagi (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A high order finite difference method with improved accuracy and stability properties for computational aeroacoustics (CAA) at low Mach numbers is proposed. The Euler equations are split into a conservative and a symmetric non- conservative portion to allow the derivation of a generalized energy estimate. Since the symmetrization is based on entropy variables, that splitting of the flux derivatives is referred to as entropy splitting. Its discretization by high order central differences was found to need less numerical dissipation than conventional conservative schemes. Owing to the large disparity of acoustic and stagnation quantities in low Mach number aeroacoustics, the split Euler equations are formulated in perturbation form. The unknowns are the small changes of the conservative variables with respect to their large stagnation values. All nonlinearities and the conservation form of the conservative portion of the split flux derivatives can be retained, while cancellation errors are avoided with its discretization opposed to the conventional conservative form. The finite difference method is third-order accurate at the boundary and the conventional central sixth-order accurate stencil in the interior. The difference operator satisfies the summation by parts property analogous to the integration by parts in the continuous energy estimate. Thus, strict stability of the difference method follows automatically. Spurious high frequency oscillations are suppressed by a characteristic-based filter similar to but without limiter. The time derivative is approximated by a 4-stage low-storage second-order explicit Runge-Kutta method. The method has been applied to simulate vortex sound at low Mach numbers. We consider the Kirchhoff vortex, which is an elliptical patch of constant vorticity rotating with constant angular frequency in irrotational flow. The acoustic pressure generated by the Kirchhoff vortex is governed by the 2D Helmholtz equation, which can be solved

  14. Aeroacoustic Analysis of Turbofan Noise Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Harold D.; Envia, Edmane

    1996-01-01

    This report provides an updated version of analytical documentation for the V072 Rotor Wake/Stator Interaction Code. It presents the theoretical derivation of the equations used in the code and, where necessary, it documents the enhancements and changes made to the original code since its first release. V072 is a package of FORTRAN computer programs which calculate the in-duct acoustic modes excited by a fan/stator stage operating in a subsonic mean flow. Sound is generated by the stator vanes interacting with the mean wakes of the rotor blades. In this updated version, only the tonal noise produced at the blade passing frequency and its harmonics, is described. The broadband noise component analysis, which was part of the original report, is not included here. The code provides outputs of modal pressure and power amplitudes generated by the rotor-wake/stator interaction. The rotor/stator stage is modeled as an ensemble of blades and vanes of zero camber and thickness enclosed within an infinite hard-walled annular duct. The amplitude of each propagating mode is computed and summed to obtain the harmonics of sound power flux within the duct for both upstream and downstream propagating modes.

  15. The Aeroacoustics of Supersonic Coaxial Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.

    1994-01-01

    Instability waves have been established as the dominant source of mixing noise radiating into the downstream arc of a supersonic jet when the waves have phase velocities that are supersonic relative to ambient conditions. Recent theories for supersonic jet noise have used the concepts of growing and decaying linear instability waves for predicting radiated noise. This analysis is extended to the prediction of noise radiation from supersonic coaxial jets. Since the analysis requires a known mean flow and the coaxial jet mean flow is not described easily in terms of analytic functions, a numerical prediction is made for its development. The Reynolds averaged, compressible, boundary layer equations are solved using a mixing length turbulence model. Empirical correlations are developed for the effects of velocity and temperature ratios and Mach number. Both normal and inverted velocity profile coaxial jets are considered. Comparisons with measurements for both single and coaxial jets show good agreement. The results from mean flow and stability calculations are used to predict the noise radiation from coaxial jets with different operating conditions. Comparisons are made between different coaxial jets and a single equivalent jet with the same total thrust, mass flow, and exit area. Results indicate that normal velocity profile jets can have noise reductions compared to the single equivalent jet. No noise reductions are found for inverted velocity profile jets operated at the minimum noise condition compared to the single equivalent jet. However, it is inferred that changes in area ratio may provide noise reduction benefits for inverted velocity profile jets.

  16. Aeroacoustic Improvements to Fluidic Chevron Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Kinzie, Kevin; Whitmire, Julia; Abeysinghe, Amal

    2006-01-01

    Fluidic chevrons use injected air near the trailing edge of a nozzle to emulate mixing and jet noise reduction characteristics of mechanical chevrons. While previous investigations of "first generation" fluidic chevron nozzles showed only marginal improvements in effective perceived noise levels when compared to nozzles without injection, significant improvements in noise reduction characteristics were achieved through redesigned "second generation" nozzles on a bypass ratio 5 model system. The second-generation core nozzles had improved injection passage contours, external nozzle contour lines, and nozzle trailing edges. The new fluidic chevrons resulted in reduced overall sound pressure levels over that of the baseline nozzle for all observation angles. Injection ports with steep injection angles produced lower overall sound pressure levels than those produced by shallow injection angles. The reductions in overall sound pressure levels were the result of noise reductions at low frequencies. In contrast to the first-generation nozzles, only marginal increases in high frequency noise over that of the baseline nozzle were observed for the second-generation nozzles. The effective perceived noise levels of the new fluidic chevrons are shown to approach those of the core mechanical chevrons.

  17. Aeroacoustic Resonance with Convergent-Divergent Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Dahl, M. D.

    1999-01-01

    Convergent-divergent nozzles, when run at off-design conditions, often undergo flow resonance accompanied by the emission of a tone. Apart from screech occurring at higher operating pressures, resonance is also common at lower Mach numbers near transonic as well as subsonic conditions. With data from six nozzles of different size and design Mach number, the present paper documents the characteristics of the latter phenomenon that is morphologically quite different from conventional screech. The resonance is due to a feedback loop internal to the nozzle and is apparently driven by unsteady laminar boundary layer separation near the throat of the nozzle. Appropriate boundary layer tripping prior to the throat is found to eliminate or alter most of the tones. The Helmholtz number of the resonance, based on the throat-to-exit length, is found to attain a value of approximately 0.15 at M(sub j)=1 for all nozzles. However, its variation with M(sub j) may be different and depend on the nozzle geometry. With nozzles having larger throat-to-exit angle of divergence, the frequency is found to increase, in some cases having stage jumps to lower frequencies, with increasing operating pressure. With nozzles having smaller angle of divergence, the frequency variation exhibits an increase followed by a decrease involving one prominent stage occurring around transonic (M(sub j)= 1) condition. While the mechanisms remain far from completely clear, a model involving downstream propagating aerodynamic disturbance together with acoustic feedback explains the overall frequency characteristics for most cases.

  18. Aeroacoustic Codes For Rotor Harmonic and BVI Noise--CAMRAD.Mod1/HIRES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Burley, Casey L.; Jolly, J. Ralph, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a status of non-CFD aeroacoustic codes at NASA Langley Research Center for the prediction of helicopter harmonic and Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise. The prediction approach incorporates three primary components: CAMRAD.Mod1 - a substantially modified version of the performance/trim/wake code CAMRAD; HIRES - a high resolution blade loads post-processor; and WOPWOP - an acoustic code. The functional capabilities and physical modeling in CAMRAD.Mod1/HIRES will be summarized and illustrated. A new multi-core roll-up wake modeling approach is introduced and validated. Predictions of rotor wake and radiated noise are compared with to the results of the HART program, a model BO-105 windtunnel test at the DNW in Europe. Additional comparisons are made to results from a DNW test of a contemporary design four-bladed rotor, as well as from a Langley test of a single proprotor (tiltrotor) three-bladed model configuration. Because the method is shown to help eliminate the necessity of guesswork in setting code parameters between different rotor configurations, it should prove useful as a rotor noise design tool.

  19. Measurement and analysis of electromagnetic fields from trams, trains and hybrid cars.

    PubMed

    Halgamuge, Malka N; Abeyrathne, Chathurika D; Mendis, Priyan

    2010-10-01

    Electricity is used substantially and sources of electric and magnetic fields are, unavoidably, everywhere. The transportation system is a source of these fields, to which a large proportion of the population is exposed. Hence, investigation of the effects of long-term exposure of the general public to low-frequency electromagnetic fields caused by the transportation system is critically important. In this study, measurements of electric and magnetic fields emitted from Australian trams, trains and hybrid cars were investigated. These measurements were carried out under different conditions, locations, and are summarised in this article. A few of the measured electric and magnetic field strengths were significantly lower than those found in prior studies. These results seem to be compatible with the evidence of the laboratory studies on the biological effects that are found in the literature, although they are far lower than international levels, such as those set up in the International Commission on Non-Ionising Radiation Protection guidelines. PMID:20554578

  20. A sponge-layer damping technique for aeroacoustic Time-Reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimani, A.; Prime, Z.; Doolan, C. J.; Medwell, P. R.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the underlying theory, associated mathematical modelling and analysis of a sponge-layer damping technique, termed the Time-Reversal-Sponge-Layer (TRSL), that significantly improves the performance of aeroacoustic Time-Reversal (TR). The TR technique requires the use of multiple Line Arrays (LAs) in a Time-Reversal Mirror (TRM) to accurately predict the source location and its characteristics. However, it is shown that when using multiple LAs, the interference between the opposite propagating fluxes near the LA boundaries results in the formation of spurious local maxima regions throughout the computational domain, thereby reducing the capacity of TR to resolve acoustic sources. The novel TRSL technique proposed in this work minimises this unwanted interference by damping the flux normally incident on a LA boundary and is implemented using the Pseudo-Characteristic Formulation (PCF) of the two-dimensional Linearised Euler Equations (LEE). The performance of TRSL is assessed by simulating a number of test cases such as an idealised time-harmonic monopole, dipole and lateral quadrupole sources as well as multiple (two) dipole sources of different strengths located in a nonuniform mean shear flow. The use of TRSL suppresses the formation of spurious maxima and significantly improves the source map, thereby demonstrating the effectiveness of this damping technique. The performance of TRSL is compared with two other methods: a TR superposition technique and Conventional Beamforming (CB). The TR superposition technique prevents the flux interference problem near the LA boundaries by superposing the instantaneous time-reversed acoustic pressure fields computed from individual LAs. The source map obtained using the superposition technique was found to be identical to that obtained using the TRSL damping technique, however, the computational cost was much higher. A comparison with CB indicated that although CB accurately predicts the aeroacoustic source

  1. Aeroacoustics research in Europe: The CEAS-ASC report on 2010 highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balázs Nagy, Attila

    2011-10-01

    The Council of European Aerospace Societies (CEAS) Aeroacoustics Specialists Committee (ASC) supports and promotes the interests of the scientific and industrial aeroacoustics community on an European scale and European aeronautics activities internationally. In this context, "aeroacoustics" encompasses all aerospace acoustics and related areas. Each year the committee highlights some of the research and development projects in Europe. This paper is a report on highlights of aeroacoustics research in Europe in 2010, compiled from information provided to the ASC of the CEAS. At the end of 2010, project X-NOISE EV of the Seventh Framework Programme of the European Commission has been launched as a continuation of the X-Noise series, with objectives of reducing aircraft noise and reaching the goal set by the ACARE 2020 Vision. Some contributions submitted to the editor summarizes selected findings from European projects launched before or concluded in 2010, while other articles cover issues supported by national associations or by industries. Furthermore, a concise summary of the workshop on "Aeroacoustics of High-Speed Aircraft Propellers and Open Rotors" held in Warsaw in October is included in this report. Enquiries concerning all contributions should be addressed to the authors who are given at the end of each subsection.

  2. Detailed mineralogical characterization of the Bullfrog and Tram members USW-G1, with emphasis on clay mineralogy

    SciTech Connect

    Bish, D.L.

    1981-10-01

    The detailed mineralogy of the Bullfrog and Tram Members of the Crater Flat Tuff from drill hole USW-G1 has been examined, primarily to characterize fully the amounts and types of clay minerals in the tuffs and the possible effects clay minerals have on rock properties. Results of bulk sample x-ray diffraction analyses agree closely with previous determinations, although slightly higher clay mineral contents were found in this study. X-ray diffraction analysis of fine fractions revealed that the clay minerals in the tuffs are sodium-saturated montmorillonite-beidellites with typical layer charges and no high-charge layers. These smectites are found in virtually all samples of the Bullfrog and Tram, and there is no correlation between the amounts of smectites and the amounts of zeolite, quartz, and feldspar. Smectites are present in both welded and nonwelded horizons and are scarce in some zones with slight-to-absent welding.

  3. Large-Eddy Simulation of Trailing-Edge Turbulence and Aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meng; Moin, Parviz

    1997-11-01

    Turbulent boundary layers near the trailing-edge of a lifting surface are known to generate intense, broadband scattering noise as well as surface pressure fluctuations. To numerically predict the trailing-edge noise requires that the noise-generating eddies over a wide range of length scales be adequately represented. Large-eddy simulation (LES) techniques provide a promising tool for obtaining the unsteady wall-pressure fields and the near-field turbulence quantities. The latter serve as acoustic source functions in a Lighthill-analogy based aeroacoustic formulation. In the present work, LES is carried out for a flow past a flat strut with an asymmetrically beveled trailing edge, at a chord Reynolds number of 2.15 × 10^6, in a computational domain containing the aft section of the strut and the near-wake. The asymmetric edge shape produces a separated boundary layer on the upper side and an attached boundary layer on the lower side. The simulation is based on the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and employs the dynamic subgrid-scale model. The general methodology for the near-field LES and acoustic calculation will be discussed and preliminary results presented.

  4. Aeroacoustic Flow Phenomena Accurately Captured by New Computational Fluid Dynamics Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blech, Richard A.

    2002-01-01

    One of the challenges in the computational fluid dynamics area is the accurate calculation of aeroacoustic phenomena, especially in the presence of shock waves. One such phenomenon is "transonic resonance," where an unsteady shock wave at the throat of a convergent-divergent nozzle results in the emission of acoustic tones. The space-time Conservation-Element and Solution-Element (CE/SE) method developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center can faithfully capture the shock waves, their unsteady motion, and the generated acoustic tones. The CE/SE method is a revolutionary new approach to the numerical modeling of physical phenomena where features with steep gradients (e.g., shock waves, phase transition, etc.) must coexist with those having weaker variations. The CE/SE method does not require the complex interpolation procedures (that allow for the possibility of a shock between grid cells) used by many other methods to transfer information between grid cells. These interpolation procedures can add too much numerical dissipation to the solution process. Thus, while shocks are resolved, weaker waves, such as acoustic waves, are washed out.

  5. Investigation of Twin Jet Aeroacoustic Properties in the Presence of a Hybrid Wing Body Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    In preparation for upcoming wind tunnel acoustic experiments of a Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) vehicle with two jet engine simulator units, a series of twin jet aeroacoustic investigations were conducted leading to increased understanding and risk mitigation. A previously existing twin jet nozzle system and a fabricated HWB aft deck fuselage are combined for a 1.9% model scale study of jet nozzle spacing and jet cant angle effects, elevon deflection into the jet plume, and acoustic shielding by the fuselage body. Linear and phased array microphone measurements are made, and data processing includes the use of DAMAS (Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources). Closely-spaced twin jets with a 5 inward cant angle exhibit reduced noise levels compared to their parallel flow counterparts at similar and larger nozzle spacings. A 40 elevon deflection into the twin jet plume, which is required for HWB ground rotation, can significantly increase upstream noise levels (more than 5 dB OASPL) with only minimal increases in the downstream direction. Lastly, DAMAS processing can successfully measure the noise source distribution of multiple shielded jet sources.

  6. Parallelization of an Object-Oriented Unstructured Aeroacoustics Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baggag, Abdelkader; Atkins, Harold; Oezturan, Can; Keyes, David

    1999-01-01

    A computational aeroacoustics code based on the discontinuous Galerkin method is ported to several parallel platforms using MPI. The discontinuous Galerkin method is a compact high-order method that retains its accuracy and robustness on non-smooth unstructured meshes. In its semi-discrete form, the discontinuous Galerkin method can be combined with explicit time marching methods making it well suited to time accurate computations. The compact nature of the discontinuous Galerkin method also makes it well suited for distributed memory parallel platforms. The original serial code was written using an object-oriented approach and was previously optimized for cache-based machines. The port to parallel platforms was achieved simply by treating partition boundaries as a type of boundary condition. Code modifications were minimal because boundary conditions were abstractions in the original program. Scalability results are presented for the SCI Origin, IBM SP2, and clusters of SGI and Sun workstations. Slightly superlinear speedup is achieved on a fixed-size problem on the Origin, due to cache effects.

  7. Measurements of the Aeroacoustic Sound Source in Hot Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James; Wernet, Mark

    2004-01-01

    We have succeeded in measuring a substantial portion of the two-point space-time velocity correlation in hot, high speed turbulent jets. This measurement, crucial in aeroacoustic theory and the prediction of jet noise, has been sought for a long time, but has not been made due to the limitations of anemometry. Particle Image Velocimetry has reached a stage of maturity where sufficient measurement density in both time and space allow the computation of space-time correlations. This paper documents these measurements along with lower-order statistics to document the adherence of the jet rig and instrumentation to conventional measures of the turbulence of jets. These measures have been made for a simple round convergent nozzle at acoustic Mach numbers of 0.5, 0.9, both cold and at a static temperature ratio of 2.7, allowing some estimation of the changes in turbulence that take place with changes in jet temperature. Since the dataset described in this paper is very extensive, attention will be focused on validation of the rig and of the measurement systems, and on some of the interesting observations made from studying the statistics, especially as they relate to jet noise. Of note is the effort to study the acoustically relevant part of the space-time correlation by addressing that part of the turbulence kinetic energy that has sonic phase speed.

  8. Automated Approach to Very High-Order Aeroacoustic Computations. Revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.; Goodrich, John W.

    2001-01-01

    Computational aeroacoustics requires efficient, high-resolution simulation tools. For smooth problems, this is best accomplished with very high-order in space and time methods on small stencils. However, the complexity of highly accurate numerical methods can inhibit their practical application, especially in irregular geometries. This complexity is reduced by using a special form of Hermite divided-difference spatial interpolation on Cartesian grids, and a Cauchy-Kowalewski recursion procedure for time advancement. In addition, a stencil constraint tree reduces the complexity of interpolating grid points that am located near wall boundaries. These procedures are used to develop automatically and to implement very high-order methods (> 15) for solving the linearized Euler equations that can achieve less than one grid point per wavelength resolution away from boundaries by including spatial derivatives of the primitive variables at each grid point. The accuracy of stable surface treatments is currently limited to 11th order for grid aligned boundaries and to 2nd order for irregular boundaries.

  9. A Very High Order, Adaptable MESA Implementation for Aeroacoustic Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dydson, Roger W.; Goodrich, John W.

    2000-01-01

    Since computational efficiency and wave resolution scale with accuracy, the ideal would be infinitely high accuracy for problems with widely varying wavelength scales. Currently, many of the computational aeroacoustics methods are limited to 4th order accurate Runge-Kutta methods in time which limits their resolution and efficiency. However, a new procedure for implementing the Modified Expansion Solution Approximation (MESA) schemes, based upon Hermitian divided differences, is presented which extends the effective accuracy of the MESA schemes to 57th order in space and time when using 128 bit floating point precision. This new approach has the advantages of reducing round-off error, being easy to program. and is more computationally efficient when compared to previous approaches. Its accuracy is limited only by the floating point hardware. The advantages of this new approach are demonstrated by solving the linearized Euler equations in an open bi-periodic domain. A 500th order MESA scheme can now be created in seconds, making these schemes ideally suited for the next generation of high performance 256-bit (double quadruple) or higher precision computers. This ease of creation makes it possible to adapt the algorithm to the mesh in time instead of its converse: this is ideal for resolving varying wavelength scales which occur in noise generation simulations. And finally, the sources of round-off error which effect the very high order methods are examined and remedies provided that effectively increase the accuracy of the MESA schemes while using current computer technology.

  10. Introduction to Generalized Functions with Applications in Aerodynamics and Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.

    1994-01-01

    Generalized functions have many applications in science and engineering. One useful aspect is that discontinuous functions can be handled as easily as continuous or differentiable functions and provide a powerful tool in formulating and solving many problems of aerodynamics and acoustics. Furthermore, generalized function theory elucidates and unifies many ad hoc mathematical approaches used by engineers and scientists. We define generalized functions as continuous linear functionals on the space of infinitely differentiable functions with compact support, then introduce the concept of generalized differentiation. Generalized differentiation is the most important concept in generalized function theory and the applications we present utilize mainly this concept. First, some results of classical analysis, are derived with the generalized function theory. Other applications of the generalized function theory in aerodynamics discussed here are the derivations of general transport theorems for deriving governing equations of fluid mechanics, the interpretation of the finite part of divergent integrals, the derivation of the Oswatitsch integral equation of transonic flow, and the analysis of velocity field discontinuities as sources of vorticity. Applications in aeroacoustics include the derivation of the Kirchhoff formula for moving surfaces, the noise from moving surfaces, and shock noise source strength based on the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation.

  11. Advanced Background Subtraction Applied to Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahr, Christopher J.; Horne, William C.

    2015-01-01

    An advanced form of background subtraction is presented and applied to aeroacoustic wind tunnel data. A variant of this method has seen use in other fields such as climatology and medical imaging. The technique, based on an eigenvalue decomposition of the background noise cross-spectral matrix, is robust against situations where isolated background auto-spectral levels are measured to be higher than levels of combined source and background signals. It also provides an alternate estimate of the cross-spectrum, which previously might have poor definition for low signal-to-noise ratio measurements. Simulated results indicate similar performance to conventional background subtraction when the subtracted spectra are weaker than the true contaminating background levels. Superior performance is observed when the subtracted spectra are stronger than the true contaminating background levels. Experimental results show limited success in recovering signal behavior for data where conventional background subtraction fails. They also demonstrate the new subtraction technique's ability to maintain a proper coherence relationship in the modified cross-spectral matrix. Beam-forming and de-convolution results indicate the method can successfully separate sources. Results also show a reduced need for the use of diagonal removal in phased array processing, at least for the limited data sets considered.

  12. General flow field analysis methods for helicopter rotor aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quackenbush, Todd R.; Lam, C. Gordon; Bliss, Donald B.

    1991-01-01

    Previous work in the analysis of rotor flow fields for aeroacoustic applications involved the preliminary development of an efficient and accurate Lagrangian simulation of the unsteady vorticity field in the vicinity of helicopter main rotor that could analyze a limited class of rotor/wake interactions. The capabilities of this analysis have subsequently been considerably enhanced to allow it to serve as the foundation for a general analysis of the rotor/wake interaction noise. This paper presents the details of these enhancements, which focus on the expansion of the reconstruction approach developed previously to handle arbitrary vortex wake interactions within three-dimensional regions located near or within the rotor disk. Also, the development of nearfield velocity corrections appropriate for the analysis of such interactions is described, as is a preliminary study of methods for using the new high-resolution flow field analysis for noise predictions. The results show that by employing this novel flow field reconstruction technique it is possible to employ full-span free wake analyses with temporal and spatial resolution suitable for acoustic applications while reducing the computation time required by one to two orders of magnitude relative to traditional methods.

  13. Aerodynamic and Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel Testing of the Orion Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, James C.

    2011-01-01

    The Orion aerodynamic testing team has completed more than 40 tests as part of developing the aerodynamic and loads databases for the vehicle. These databases are key to achieving good mechanical design for the vehicle and to ensure controllable flight during all potential atmospheric phases of a mission, including launch aborts. A wide variety of wind tunnels have been used by the team to document not only the aerodynamics but the aeroacoustic environment that the Orion might experience both during nominal ascents and launch aborts. During potential abort scenarios the effects of the various rocket motor plumes on the vehicle must be accurately understood. The Abort Motor (AM) is a high-thrust, short duration motor that rapidly separates Orion from its launch vehicle. The Attitude Control Motor (ACM), located in the nose of the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle, is used for control during a potential abort. The 8 plumes from the ACM interact in a nonlinear manner with the four AM plumes which required a carefully controlled test to define the interactions and their effect on the control authority provided by the ACM. Techniques for measuring dynamic stability and for simulating rocket plume aerodynamics and acoustics were improved or developed in the course of building the aerodynamic and loads databases for Orion.

  14. Multiensemble Markov models of molecular thermodynamics and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Paul, Fabian; Wehmeyer, Christoph; Noé, Frank

    2016-06-01

    We introduce the general transition-based reweighting analysis method (TRAM), a statistically optimal approach to integrate both unbiased and biased molecular dynamics simulations, such as umbrella sampling or replica exchange. TRAM estimates a multiensemble Markov model (MEMM) with full thermodynamic and kinetic information at all ensembles. The approach combines the benefits of Markov state models-clustering of high-dimensional spaces and modeling of complex many-state systems-with those of the multistate Bennett acceptance ratio of exploiting biased or high-temperature ensembles to accelerate rare-event sampling. TRAM does not depend on any rate model in addition to the widely used Markov state model approximation, but uses only fundamental relations such as detailed balance and binless reweighting of configurations between ensembles. Previous methods, including the multistate Bennett acceptance ratio, discrete TRAM, and Markov state models are special cases and can be derived from the TRAM equations. TRAM is demonstrated by efficiently computing MEMMs in cases where other estimators break down, including the full thermodynamics and rare-event kinetics from high-dimensional simulation data of an all-atom protein-ligand binding model. PMID:27226302

  15. Multiensemble Markov models of molecular thermodynamics and kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Paul, Fabian; Noé, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the general transition-based reweighting analysis method (TRAM), a statistically optimal approach to integrate both unbiased and biased molecular dynamics simulations, such as umbrella sampling or replica exchange. TRAM estimates a multiensemble Markov model (MEMM) with full thermodynamic and kinetic information at all ensembles. The approach combines the benefits of Markov state models—clustering of high-dimensional spaces and modeling of complex many-state systems—with those of the multistate Bennett acceptance ratio of exploiting biased or high-temperature ensembles to accelerate rare-event sampling. TRAM does not depend on any rate model in addition to the widely used Markov state model approximation, but uses only fundamental relations such as detailed balance and binless reweighting of configurations between ensembles. Previous methods, including the multistate Bennett acceptance ratio, discrete TRAM, and Markov state models are special cases and can be derived from the TRAM equations. TRAM is demonstrated by efficiently computing MEMMs in cases where other estimators break down, including the full thermodynamics and rare-event kinetics from high-dimensional simulation data of an all-atom protein–ligand binding model. PMID:27226302

  16. ADAM: An Axisymmetric Duct Aeroacoustic Modeling system. [aircraft turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrahamson, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    An interconnected system of computer programs for analyzing the propagation and attenuation of sound in aeroengine ducts containing realistic compressible subsonic mean flows, ADAM was developed primarily for research directed towards the reduction of noise emitted from turbofan aircraft engines. The two basic components are a streamtube curvature program for determination of the mean flow, and a finite element code for solution of the acoustic propagation problem. The system, which has been specifically tailored for ease of use, is presently installed at NASA Langley Reseach Center on a Control Data Cyber 175 Computer under the NOS Operating system employing a Tektronix terminal for interactive graphics. The scope and organization of the ADAM system is described. A users guide, examples of input data, and results for selected cases are included.

  17. Efficient Helicopter Aerodynamic and Aeroacoustic Predictions on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wissink, Andrew M.; Lyrintzis, Anastasios S.; Strawn, Roger C.; Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents parallel implementations of two codes used in a combined CFD/Kirchhoff methodology to predict the aerodynamics and aeroacoustics properties of helicopters. The rotorcraft Navier-Stokes code, TURNS, computes the aerodynamic flowfield near the helicopter blades and the Kirchhoff acoustics code computes the noise in the far field, using the TURNS solution as input. The overall parallel strategy adds MPI message passing calls to the existing serial codes to allow for communication between processors. As a result, the total code modifications required for parallel execution are relatively small. The biggest bottleneck in running the TURNS code in parallel comes from the LU-SGS algorithm that solves the implicit system of equations. We use a new hybrid domain decomposition implementation of LU-SGS to obtain good parallel performance on the SP-2. TURNS demonstrates excellent parallel speedups for quasi-steady and unsteady three-dimensional calculations of a helicopter blade in forward flight. The execution rate attained by the code on 114 processors is six times faster than the same cases run on one processor of the Cray C-90. The parallel Kirchhoff code also shows excellent parallel speedups and fast execution rates. As a performance demonstration, unsteady acoustic pressures are computed at 1886 far-field observer locations for a sample acoustics problem. The calculation requires over two hundred hours of CPU time on one C-90 processor but takes only a few hours on 80 processors of the SP2. The resultant far-field acoustic field is analyzed with state of-the-art audio and video rendering of the propagating acoustic signals.

  18. The use of staggered scheme and an absorbing buffer zone for computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.

    1995-01-01

    Various problems from those proposed for the Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) workshop were studied using second and fourth order staggered spatial discretizations in conjunction with fourth order Runge-Kutta time integration. In addition, an absorbing buffer zone was used at the outflow boundaries. Promising results were obtained and provide a basis for application of these techniques to a wider variety of problems.

  19. Application of NASA General-Purpose Solver to Large-Scale Computations in Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Storaasli, Olaf O.

    2004-01-01

    Of several iterative and direct equation solvers evaluated previously for computations in aeroacoustics, the most promising was the NASA-developed General-Purpose Solver (winner of NASA's 1999 software of the year award). This paper presents detailed, single-processor statistics of the performance of this solver, which has been tailored and optimized for large-scale aeroacoustic computations. The statistics, compiled using an SGI ORIGIN 2000 computer with 12 Gb available memory (RAM) and eight available processors, are the central processing unit time, RAM requirements, and solution error. The equation solver is capable of solving 10 thousand complex unknowns in as little as 0.01 sec using 0.02 Gb RAM, and 8.4 million complex unknowns in slightly less than 3 hours using all 12 Gb. This latter solution is the largest aeroacoustics problem solved to date with this technique. The study was unable to detect any noticeable error in the solution, since noise levels predicted from these solution vectors are in excellent agreement with the noise levels computed from the exact solution. The equation solver provides a means for obtaining numerical solutions to aeroacoustics problems in three dimensions.

  20. FJ44 Turbofan Engine Test at NASA Glenn Research Center's Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, Joel T.; McAllister, Joseph; Loew, Raymond A.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Harley, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    A Williams International FJ44-3A 3000-lb thrust class turbofan engine was tested in the NASA Glenn Research Center s Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory. This report presents the test set-up and documents the test conditions. Farfield directivity, in-duct unsteady pressures, duct mode data, and phased-array data were taken and are reported separately.

  1. Flight Test Results for Uniquely Tailored Propulsion-Airframe Aeroacoustic Chevrons: Shockcell Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G.; Ganz, Ulrich W.; Nesbitt, Eric; Bultemeier, Eric J.; Thomas, Russell H.; Nesbitt, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Azimuthally varying chevrons (AVC) which have been uniquely tailored to account for the asymmetric propulsion-airframe aeroacoustic interactions have recently shown significant reductions in jet-related community noise at low-speed take-off conditions in scale model tests of coaxial nozzles with high bypass ratio. There were indications that such AVCs may also provide shockcell noise reductions at high cruise speeds. This paper describes the flight test results when one such AVC concept, namely, the T-fan chevrons with enhanced mixing near the pylon, was tested at full-scale on a modern large twin-jet aircraft (777-300ER) with focus on shockcell noise at mid-cruise conditions. Shockcell noise is part of the interior cabin noise at cruise conditions and its reduction is useful from the viewpoint of passenger comfort. Noise reduction at the source, in the exhaust jet, especially, at low frequencies, is beneficial from the perspective of reduced fuselage sidewall acoustic lining. Results are shown in terms of unsteady pressure spectra both on the exterior surface of the fuselage at several axial stations and also microphone arrays placed inside the fuselage aft of the engine. The benefits of T-fan chevrons, with and without conventional chevrons on the core nozzle, are shown for several engine operating conditions at cruise involving supersonic fan stream and subsonic or supersonic core stream. The T-fan AVC alone provides up to 5 dB low-frequency noise reduction on the fuselage exterior skin and up to 2 dB reduction inside the cabin. Addition of core chevrons appears to increase the higher frequency noise. This flight test result with the previous model test observation that the T-fan AVCs have hardly any cruise thrust coefficient loss (< 0.05%) make them viable candidates for reducing interior cabin noise in high bypass ratio engines.

  2. Flight Test Results for Uniquely Tailored Propulsion-Airframe Aeroacoustic Chevrons: Community Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, Eric; Mengle, Vinod; Czech, Michael; Callendar, Bryan; Thomas, Russ

    2006-01-01

    The flow/acoustic environment around the jet exhaust of an engine when installed on an airplane, say, under the wing, is highly asymmetric due to the pylon, the wing and the high-lift devices. Recent scale model tests have shown that such Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustic (PAA) interactions and the jet mixing noise can be reduced more than with conventional azimuthally uniform chevrons by uniquely tailoring the chevrons to produce enhanced mixing near the pylon. This paper describes the community noise results from a flight test on a large twin-engine airplane using this concept of azimuthally varying chevrons for engines installed under the wing. Results for two different nozzle configurations are described: azimuthally varying "PAA T-fan" chevrons on the fan nozzle with a baseline no-chevron core nozzle and a second with PAA T-fan chevrons with conventional azimuthally uniform chevrons on the core nozzle. We analyze these test results in comparison to the baseline no-chevron nozzle on both spectral and integrated power level bases. The study focuses on the peak jet noise reduction and the effects at high frequencies for typical take-off power settings. The noise reduction and the absolute noise levels are then compared to model scale results. The flight test results verify that the PAA T-fan nozzles in combination with standard core chevron nozzles can, indeed, give a reasonable amount of noise reduction at low frequencies without high-frequency lift during take-off conditions and hardly any impact on the cruise thrust coefficient.

  3. An Assessment of Ares I-X Aeroacoustic Measurements with Comparisons to Pre-Flight Wind Tunnel Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Donald K.; Reed, Darren K.

    2011-01-01

    During the recent successful launch of the Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle, aeroacoustic data was gathered at fifty-seven locations along the vehicle as part of the Developmental Flight Instrumentation. Several of the Ares I-X aeroacoustic measurements were placed to duplicate measurement locations prescribed in pre-flight, sub-scale wind tunnel tests. For these duplicated measurement locations, comparisons have been made between aeroacoustic data gathered during the ascent phase of the Ares I-X flight test and wind tunnel test data. These comparisons have been made at closely matching flight conditions (Mach number and vehicle attitude) in order to preserve a one-to-one relationship between the flight and wind tunnel data. These comparisons and the current wind tunnel to flight scaling methodology are presented and discussed. The implications of using wind tunnel test data scaled under the current methodology to predict conceptual launch vehicle aeroacoustic environments are also discussed.

  4. Monitoring ecosystem dynamics in an Arctic tundra ecosystem using hyperspectral reflectance and a robotic tram system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Santonu

    ) Is NDVI a good predictor for aboveground biomass and leaf area index (LAI) for plant species that are common in an arctic landscape? (4) How can cyberinfrastructure tools be developed to optimize ground-based remote sensing data collection, management and processing associated with a large scale experimental infrastructure? The Biocomplexity project experimentally manipulated the water table (drained, flooded, and control treatments) of a vegetated thaw lake basin to investigate the effects of altered hydrology on land-atmosphere carbon balance. In each experimental treatment, hyperspectral reflectance data were collected in the visible and near IR range of the spectrum using a robotic tram system that operated along a 300m tramline during the snow free growing period between June and August 2005-09. Water table depths (WTD) and soil volumetric water content were also collected along these transects. During 2005-2007, measurements were made without experimental treatments. Experimental treatments were run in 2008 and 2009, which involved water table being raised (+10cm) and lowered (-10cm) in flooding and draining treatments respectively. A new spectral index, the normalized difference surface water index (NDSWI) was developed and tested at multiple spatial and temporal scales. NDSWI uses the 460nm (blue) and 1000nm (IR) bands and was to capture surface hydrological dynamics in the study area using the robotic tram system. When applied to high spatial resolution satellite imagery, NDSWI was also able to capture changes in surface hydrology at the landscape scale. Interannual patterns of land-surface phenology (measured with the normalized difference vegetation index - NDVI) unexpectedly lacked marked differences under experimental conditions. Measurement of NDVI was, however, compromised when WTD was above ground level. NDVI and NDSWI were negatively correlated when WTD was above ground level, which held when scaled to MODIS imagery collected from satellite

  5. Reducing the Effect of Transducer Mount Induced Noise on Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel Testing Data with a New Transducer Mount Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, A. J.; Reed, D. K.; Nance, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of launch vehicle unsteady aerodynamics is a field best studied through experimentation, which is often carried out in the form of large scale wind tunnel testing. Measurement of the fluctuating pressures induced by the boundary layer noise is customarily made with miniature pressure transducers installed into a model of the vehicle of interest. Literature shows that noise level increases between two to five decibels (dB referenced to 20 micropascal) can be induced when the transducer surface is not mounted perfectly flush with the model outer surface. To reduce this artificially induced noise, special transducer holders have been used for aeroacoustic wind tunnel testing by NASA. This holder is a sleeve into which the transducer fits, with a cap that allows it to be mounted in a recessed hole in the model. A single hole in the holder allows the transport of the tunnel medium so the transducer can discriminate the fluctuating pressure due to the turbulent boundary layer noise. The holder is first dry fitted into the model and any difference in height between the holder and the model surface can be sanded flush. The holder is then removed from the model, the transducer glued inside the holder, and the holder replaced in the model, secured also with glue, thus eliminating the problem of noise level increases due to lack of flushness. In order to work with this holder design, special transducers have been ordered with their standard screen removed and the diaphragm moved as close to the top of the casing as possible to minimize any cavity volume. Although this greatly reduces induced noise due to the transducers being out of flush, the holders can also induce a cavity resonance that is usually at a very high frequency. This noise is termed transducer mount induced noise (XMIN). The peak of the mode can vary with the cavity depth, boundary layer noise that can excite the mode, tunnel flow medium, and the build of the transducers. Because the boundary

  6. Three-Dimensional Application of DAMAS Methodology for Aeroacoustic Noise Source Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    At the 2004 AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustic Conference, a breakthrough in acoustic microphone array technology was reported by the authors. A Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS) was developed which decouples the array design and processing influence from the noise being measured, using a simple and robust algorithm. For several prior airframe noise studies, it was shown to permit an unambiguous and accurate determination of acoustic source position and strength. As a follow-on effort, this paper examines the technique for three-dimensional (3D) applications. First, the beamforming ability for arrays, of different size and design, to focus longitudinally and laterally is examined for a range of source positions and frequency. Advantage is found for larger array designs with higher density microphone distributions towards the center. After defining a 3D grid generalized with respect to the array s beamforming characteristics, DAMAS is employed in simulated and experimental noise test cases. It is found that spatial resolution is much less sharp in the longitudinal direction in front of the array compared to side-to-side lateral resolution. 3D DAMAS becomes useful for sufficiently large arrays at sufficiently high frequency. But, such can be a challenge to computational capabilities, with regard to the required expanse and number of grid points. Also, larger arrays can strain basic physical modeling assumptions that DAMAS and all traditional array methodologies use. An important experimental result is that turbulent shear layers can negatively impact attainable beamforming resolution. Still, the usefulness of 3D DAMAS is demonstrated by the measurement of landing gear noise source distributions in a difficult hard-wall wind tunnel environment.

  7. Reducing Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustic Interactions With Uniquely Tailored Chevrons: 3. Jet-Flap Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russ H.; Mengle, Vinod G.; Brunsniak, Leon; Elkoby, Ronen

    2006-01-01

    Propulsion airframe aeroacoustic (PAA) interactions, resulting from the integration of engine and airframe, lead to azimuthal asymmetries in the flow/acoustic field, e.g., due to the interaction between the exhaust jet flow and the pylon, the wing and its high-lift devices, such as, flaps and flaperons. In the first two parts of this series we have presented experimental results which show that isolated and installed nozzles with azimuthally varying chevrons (AVCs) can reduce noise more than conventional chevrons when integrated with a pylon and a wing with flaps at take-off conditions. In this paper, we present model-scale experimental results for the reduction of jet-flap interaction noise source due to these AVCs and document the PAA installation effects (difference in noise between installed and isolated nozzle configurations) at both approach and take-off conditions. It is found that the installation effects of both types of chevron nozzles, AVCs and conventional, are reversed at approach and take-off, in that there is more installed noise reduction at approach and less at take-off compared to that of the isolated nozzles. Moreover, certain AVCs give larger total installed noise benefits at both conditions compared to conventional chevrons. Phased microphone array results show that at approach conditions (large flap deflection, low jet speed and low ambient Mach number), chevrons gain more noise benefit from reducing jetflap interaction noise than they do from quieting the jet plume noise source which is already weak at these low jet speeds. In contrast, at take-off (small flap deflection, high jet speed and high ambient Mach number) chevrons reduce the dominant jet plume noise better than the reduction they create in jet-flap interaction noise source. In addition, fan AVCs with enhanced mixing near the pylon are found to reduce jet-flap interaction noise better than conventional chevrons at take-off.

  8. Comparison of the Aeroacoustics of Two Small-Scale Supersonic Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Wing

    1996-01-01

    An aerodynamic and acoustic investigation was performed on two small-scale supersonic inlets to determine which inlet would be more suitable for a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft during approach and takeoff flight conditions. The comparison was made between an axisymmetric supersonic P inlet and a bifurcated two-dimensional supersonic inlet. The 1/14 scale model supersonic inlets were used in conjunction with a 4.1 in (10.4 cm) turbofan engine simulator. A bellmouth was utilized on each inlet to eliminate lip separation commonly associated with airplane engine inlets that are tested under static conditions. Steady state measurements of the aerodynamic flowfield and acoustic farfield were made in order to evaluate the aeroacoustic performance of the inlets. The aerodynamic results show the total pressure recovery of the two inlets to be nearly identical, 99% at the approach condition and 98% at the takeoff condition. At the approach fan speed (60% design speed), there was no appreciable difference in the acoustic performance of either inlet over the entire 0 deg to 110 deg farfield measurement sector. The inlet flow field results at the takeoff fan speed (88% design speed), show the average inlet throat Mach number for the P inlet (Mach 0.52) to be approximately 2 times that of the 2D inlet (Mach 0.26). The difference in the throat Mach number is a result of the smaller throughflow area of the P inlet. This reduced area resulted in a 'soft choking' of the P inlet which lowered the tone and overall sound pressure levels of the simulator in the forward sector by an average of 9 dB and 3 dB, respectively, when compared to the 2D inlet.

  9. Reducing Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustic Interactions with Uniquely Tailored Chevrons. 1.; Isolated Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G.; Elkroby, Ronen; Brunsniak, Leon; Thomas, Russ H.

    2006-01-01

    The flow/acoustic environment surrounding an engine nozzle installed on an airplane, say, under the wing, is asymmetric due to the pylon, the wing and the interaction of the exhaust jet with flaps on the wing. However, the conventional chevrons, which are azimuthally uniform serrations on the nozzle lip, do not exploit the asymmetry due to these propulsion airframe aeroacoustic interactions to reduce jet noise. In this pioneering study we use this non-axisymmetry to our advantage and examine if the total jet-related noise radiated to the ground can be reduced by using different types of azimuthally varying chevrons (AVC) which vary the mixing around the nozzle periphery. Several scale models of the isolated nozzle, representative of high bypass ratio engine nozzles, were made with a pylon and azimuthally varying chevrons on both fan and core nozzles to enhance mixing at the top (near the pylon) with less mixing at the bottom (away from the pylon) or vice versa. Various combinations of fan and core AVC nozzles were systematically tested at typical take-off conditions inside a free jet wind-tunnel and, here, in Part 1 we analyze the acoustics results for the isolated nozzle with a pylon, with installation effects reported in Parts 2 and 3. Several interesting results are discovered: amongst the fan AVCs the top-enhanced mixing T-fan chevron nozzle is quieter in combination with any core AVC nozzle when compared to conventional chevrons; however, the bottom-mixing B-fan chevrons, as well as the core AVC nozzles, by themselves, are noisier. Further, the low-frequency source strengths in the jet plume, obtained via phased microphone arrays, also corroborate the far field sound, and for the T-fan chevrons such sources move further downstream than those for baseline or conventional chevron nozzles.

  10. Sensitivity analysis for aeroacoustic and aeroelastic design of turbomachinery blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorence, Christopher B.; Hall, Kenneth C.

    1995-01-01

    A new method for computing the effect that small changes in the airfoil shape and cascade geometry have on the aeroacoustic and aeroelastic behavior of turbomachinery cascades is presented. The nonlinear unsteady flow is assumed to be composed of a nonlinear steady flow plus a small perturbation unsteady flow that is harmonic in time. First, the full potential equation is used to describe the behavior of the nonlinear mean (steady) flow through a two-dimensional cascade. The small disturbance unsteady flow through the cascade is described by the linearized Euler equations. Using rapid distortion theory, the unsteady velocity is split into a rotational part that contains the vorticity and an irrotational part described by a scalar potential. The unsteady vorticity transport is described analytically in terms of the drift and stream functions computed from the steady flow. Hence, the solution of the linearized Euler equations may be reduced to a single inhomogeneous equation for the unsteady potential. The steady flow and small disturbance unsteady flow equations are discretized using bilinear quadrilateral isoparametric finite elements. The nonlinear mean flow solution and streamline computational grid are computed simultaneously using Newton iteration. At each step of the Newton iteration, LU decomposition is used to solve the resulting set of linear equations. The unsteady flow problem is linear, and is also solved using LU decomposition. Next, a sensitivity analysis is performed to determine the effect small changes in cascade and airfoil geometry have on the mean and unsteady flow fields. The sensitivity analysis makes use of the nominal steady and unsteady flow LU decompositions so that no additional matrices need to be factored. Hence, the present method is computationally very efficient. To demonstrate how the sensitivity analysis may be used to redesign cascades, a compressor is redesigned for improved aeroelastic stability and two different fan exit guide

  11. 1-J operation of monolithic composite ceramics with Yb:YAG thin layers: multi-TRAM at 10-Hz repetition rate and prospects for 100-Hz operation.

    PubMed

    Divoky, Martin; Tokita, Shigeki; Hwang, Sungin; Kawashima, Toshiyuki; Kan, Hirofumi; Lucianetti, Antonio; Mocek, Tomas; Kawanaka, Junji

    2015-03-15

    Experimental amplification of 10-ns pulses to energy of 1 J at repetition rate of 10-100 Hz in cryogenic multipass total-reflection active-mirror (TRAM) amplifier is reported for the first time. By using a monolithic multi-TRAM, which is a YAG ceramic composite with three thin Yb:YAG active layers, efficient energy extraction was achieved without parasitic lasing. A detailed measurement of output characteristics of the laser amplifier is presented; results are discussed and compared with numerical calculations. PMID:25768130

  12. Annexin A2 binds to endosomes and negatively regulates TLR4-triggered inflammatory responses via the TRAM-TRIF pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuang; Yu, Min; Guo, Qiang; Li, Rongpeng; Li, Guobo; Tan, Shirui; Li, Xuefeng; Wei, Yuquan; Wu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from Gram-negative bacteria activates plasma membrane signaling via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on host cells and triggers innate inflammatory responses, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. Here we reveal a role for annexin A2 (AnxA2) in host defense against infection as anxa2−/− mice were highly susceptible to Gram-negative bacteria-induced sepsis with enhanced inflammatory responses. Computing analysis and biochemical experiments identified that constitutive AnxA2 expression facilitated TLR4 internalization and its subsequent translocation into early endosomal membranes. It activated the TRAM-dependent endosomal signaling, leading to the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Importantly, AnxA2 deficiency prolonged TLR4-mediated signaling from the plasma membrane, which was attributable to pro-inflammatory cytokine production (IL-6, TNFα and IL-1β). Thus, AnxA2 directly exerted negative regulation of inflammatory responses through TLR4-initiated TRAM-TRIF pathway occurring on endosomes. This study reveals AnxA2 as a critical regulator in infection-initiated inflammation, which protects the host from excessive inflammatory damage. PMID:26527544

  13. An Investigation of High-Order Shock-Capturing Methods for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, Jay; Baysal, Oktay

    1997-01-01

    This project is motivated by the desire to develop numerical methods that will be useful in the study of compressible flows that exhibit aeroacoustic phenomena. Solutions to linear problems have been investigated through the development of a computer code based on the recent dispersion-relation-preserving (DRP) methodology. In regard to nonlinear problems, the class of essentially nonoscillatory (ENO) schemes have been considered as the primary candidates for solving aeroacoustic problems in which discontinuities are involved. Discontinuities in the solution itself (e.g. shocks) as well as in the geometry on which the problem is defined have been studied. Two-dimensional nonlinear problems were considered in order to determine if the one-dimensional results obtained in the first phase of this project were extendable to more realistic problems. Conclusions have been drawn in regard to the ability to numerically predict solutions of nonlinear problems with shocks to high-order accuracy.

  14. Aeroacoustic Testing of Wind Turbine Airfoils: February 20, 2004 - February 19, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Devenport, W.; Burdisso, R. A.; Camargo, H.; Crede, E.; Remillieux, M.; Rasnick, M.; Van Seeters, P.

    2010-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), working through its National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is engaged in a comprehensive research effort to improve the understanding of wind turbine aeroacoustics. The motivation for this effort is the desire to exploit the large expanse of low wind speed sites that tend to be close to U.S. load centers. Quiet wind turbines are an inducement to widespread deployment, so the goal of NREL's aeroacoustic research is to develop tools that the U.S. wind industry can use in developing and deploying highly efficient, quiet wind turbines at low wind speed sites. NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is implementing a multifaceted approach that includes wind tunnel tests, field tests, and theoretical analyses in direct support of low wind speed turbine development by its industry partners. NWTC researchers are working hand in hand with engineers in industry to ensure that research findings are available to support ongoing design decisions.

  15. On the effective accuracy of spectral-like optimized finite-difference schemes for computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, G.; Redonnet, S.

    2014-04-01

    The present article aims at highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of the so-called spectral-like optimized (explicit central) finite-difference schemes, when the latter are used for numerically approximating spatial derivatives in aeroacoustics evolution problems. With that view, we first remind how differential operators can be approximated using explicit central finite-difference schemes. The possible spectral-like optimization of the latter is then discussed, the advantages and drawbacks of such an optimization being theoretically studied, before they are numerically quantified. For doing so, two popular spectral-like optimized schemes are assessed via a direct comparison against their standard counterparts, such a comparative exercise being conducted for several academic test cases. At the end, general conclusions are drawn, which allows us discussing the way spectral-like optimized schemes shall be preferred (or not) to standard ones, when it comes to simulate real-life aeroacoustics problems.

  16. The aero-acoustic Galbrun equation in the time domain with perfectly matched layer boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xue; Ben Tahar, Mabrouk; Baccouche, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a solution for aero-acoustic problems using the Galbrun equation in the time domain with a non-uniform steady mean flow in a two-dimensional coordinate system and the perfectly matched layer technique as the boundary conditions corresponding to an unbounded domain. This approach is based on an Eulerian-Lagrangian description corresponding to a wave equation written only in terms of the Lagrangian perturbation of the displacement. It is an alternative to the Linearized Euler Equations for solving aero-acoustic problems. The Galbrun equation is solved using a mixed pressure-displacement Finite Element Method. A complex Laplace transform scheme is used to study the time dependent variables. Several numerical examples are presented to validate and illustrate the efficiency of the proposed approach. PMID:26827028

  17. Inhomogeneous Radiation Boundary Conditions Simulating Incoming Acoustic Waves for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Fang, Jun; Kurbatskii, Konstantin A.

    1996-01-01

    A set of nonhomogeneous radiation and outflow conditions which automatically generate prescribed incoming acoustic or vorticity waves and, at the same time, are transparent to outgoing sound waves produced internally in a finite computation domain is proposed. This type of boundary condition is needed for the numerical solution of many exterior aeroacoustics problems. In computational aeroacoustics, the computation scheme must be as nondispersive ans nondissipative as possible. It must also support waves with wave speeds which are nearly the same as those of the original linearized Euler equations. To meet these requirements, a high-order/large-stencil scheme is necessary The proposed nonhomogeneous radiation and outflow boundary conditions are designed primarily for use in conjunction with such high-order/large-stencil finite difference schemes.

  18. Computational Aero-acoustics As a Tool For Turbo-machinery Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.

    2003-01-01

    This talk will provide an overview of the field of computational aero-acoustics and its use in fan noise prediction. After a brief history of computational fluid dynamics, some of the recent developments in computational aero-acoustics will be explored. Computational issues concerning sound wave production, propagation, and reflection in practical turbo-machinery applications will be discussed including: (a) High order/High Resolution Numerical Techniques. (b) High Resolution Boundary Conditions. [c] MIMD Parallel Computing. [d] Form of Governing Equations Useful for Simulations. In addition, the basic design of our Broadband Analysis Stator Simulator (BASS) code and its application to a 2 D rotor wake-stator interaction will be shown. An example of the noise produced by the wakes from a rotor impinging upon a stator cascade will be shown.

  19. Computational Aeroacoustics by the Space-Time CE/SE Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Jorgenson, Phil C. E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element Method, or CE/SE Method for short, is a newly developed numerical method for conservation laws. Despite its second order accuracy, it possesses low dispersion errors and low dissipation. The method is robust enough to cover a wide spectrum of compressible flows: from weak linear acoustic waves to strong discontinuous waves (shocks). An outstanding feature of the CE/SE scheme is its novel, simple but effective non-reflecting boundary condition (NRBC), which is particularly valuable for CAA (computational aeroacoustics). In this seminar, the 1-D and 2-D unstructured version of the CE/SE schemes are first briefly described. Secondly, some discussions on the NRBC are given. Then, various examples for linear, nonlinear aeroacoustics are presented.

  20. One-Step Direct Aeroacoustic Simulation Using Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, C. Y.; Leung, R. C. K.; Zhou, K.; Lam, G. C. Y.; Jiang, Z.

    2011-09-01

    One-step direct aeroacoustic simulation (DAS) has received attention from aerospace and mechanical high-pressure fluid-moving system manufacturers for quite some time. They aim to simulate the unsteady flow and acoustic field in the duct simultaneously in order to investigate the aeroacoustic generation mechanisms. Because of the large length and energy scale disparities between the acoustic far field and the aerodynamic near field, highly accurate and high-resolution simulation scheme is required. This involves the use of high order compact finite difference and time advancement schemes in simulation. However, in this situation, large buffer zones are always needed to suppress the spurious numerical waves emanating from computational boundaries. This further increases the computational resources to yield accurate results. On the other hand, for such problem as supersonic jet noise, the numerical scheme should be able to resolve both strong shock waves and weak acoustic waves simultaneously. Usually numerical aeroa-coustic scheme that is good for low Mach number flow is not able to give satisfactory simulation results for shock wave. Therefore, the aeroacoustic research community has been looking for a more efficient one-step DAS scheme that has the comparable accuracy to the finite-difference approach with smaller buffer regions, yet is able to give accurate solutions from subsonic to supersonic flows. The conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) scheme is one of the possible schemes satisfying the above requirements. This paper aims to report the development of a CE/SE scheme for one-step DAS and illustrate its robustness and effectiveness with two selected benchmark problems.

  1. Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft System Noise Assessment with Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustic Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Burley, Casey L.; Olson, Erik D.

    2010-01-01

    A system noise assessment of a hybrid wing body configuration was performed using NASA s best available aircraft models, engine model, and system noise assessment method. A propulsion airframe aeroacoustic effects experimental database for key noise sources and interaction effects was used to provide data directly in the noise assessment where prediction methods are inadequate. NASA engine and aircraft system models were created to define the hybrid wing body aircraft concept as a twin engine aircraft with a 7500 nautical mile mission. The engines were modeled as existing technology high bypass ratio turbofans. The baseline hybrid wing body aircraft was assessed at 22 dB cumulative below the FAA Stage 4 certification level. To determine the potential for noise reduction with relatively near term technologies, seven other configurations were assessed beginning with moving the engines two fan nozzle diameters upstream of the trailing edge and then adding technologies for reduction of the highest noise sources. Aft radiated noise was expected to be the most challenging to reduce and, therefore, the experimental database focused on jet nozzle and pylon configurations that could reduce jet noise through a combination of source reduction and shielding effectiveness. The best configuration for reduction of jet noise used state-of-the-art technology chevrons with a pylon above the engine in the crown position. This configuration resulted in jet source noise reduction, favorable azimuthal directivity, and noise source relocation upstream where it is more effectively shielded by the limited airframe surface, and additional fan noise attenuation from acoustic liner on the crown pylon internal surfaces. Vertical and elevon surfaces were also assessed to add shielding area. The elevon deflection above the trailing edge showed some small additional noise reduction whereas vertical surfaces resulted in a slight noise increase. With the effects of the configurations from the

  2. Numerical analysis of aeroacoustic-structural interaction of a flexible panel in uniform duct flow.

    PubMed

    Fan, Harris K H; Leung, Randolph C K; Lam, Garret C Y

    2015-06-01

    Accurate prediction of the acoustics of fluid-structure interaction is important in devising quieting designs for engineering systems equipped with extensive flow duct networks where the thin duct wall panels are in contact with the flowing fluid. The flow unsteadiness generates acoustic waves that propagate back to the source region to modify the flow process generating them. Meanwhile the unsteady flow pressure excites the thin panels to vibrate, which in turn modifies the flow processes. Evidently a strong coupling between the fluid aeroacoustics and the panel structural dynamics exists. Such coupled physical processes have to be thoroughly understood; otherwise, effective quieting design is never achieved. This paper reports an analysis, using a time-domain numerical methodology the authors have recently developed, of the nonlinear aeroacoustic-structural interaction experienced by a flexible panel in a duct carrying a uniform mean flow. With no mean flow, the numerical results agree well with existing theories and reveal the physics of duct transmission loss. Four regimes of aeroacoustic-structural interaction are identified when the duct flow velocity increases from low subsonic to low supersonic values. Insight in the underlying physics of duct transmission loss at different velocities are highlighted and discussed. PMID:26093403

  3. A Large Hemi-Anechoic Enclosure for Community-Compatible Aeroacoustic Testing of Aircraft Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Beth A.

    1993-01-01

    A large hemi-anechoic (absorptive walls and acoustically hard floor) noise control enclosure has been erected around a complex of test stands at the NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. This new state-of-the-art Aeroacoustic Propulsion Laboratory (APL) provides an all-weather, semisecure test environment while limiting noise to acceptable levels in surrounding residential neighborhoods. The 39.6 m (130 ft) diameter geodesic dome structure houses the new Nozzle Aeroacoustic Test Rig (NATR), an ejector-powered M = 0.3 free jet facility for acoustic testing of supersonic aircraft exhaust nozzles and turbomachinery. A multi-axis, force-measuring Powered Lift Facility (PLF) stand for testing of Short Takeoff Vertical Landing (STOVL) vehicles is also located within the dome. The design of the Aeroacoustic Propulsion Laboratory efficiently accomodates the research functions of two separate test rigs, one of which (NATR) requires a specialized environment for taking acoustic measurements. Absorptive fiberglass wedge treatment on the interior surface of the dome provides a hemi-anechoic interior environment for obtaining the accurate acoustic measurements required to meet research program goals. The APL is the first known geodesic dome structure to incorporate transmission-loss properties as well as interior absorption into a free-standing, community-compatible, hemi-anechoic test facility.

  4. An Experimental Investigation of the Aeroacoustics of a Two-Dimensional Bifurcated Supersonic Inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LI, S.-M.; HANUSKA, C. A.; NG, W. F.

    2001-11-01

    An experiment was conducted on a two-dimensional bifurcated, supersonic inlet to investigate the aeroacoustics at take-off and landing conditions. A 104·1 mm (4·1 in) diameter turbofan simulator was coupled to the inlet to generate the noise typical of a turbofan engine. Aerodynamic and acoustic data were obtained in an anechoic chamber under ground-static conditions (i.e., no forward flight effect). Results showed that varying the distance between the trailing edge of the bifurcated ramp of the inlet and the fan face had negligible effect on the total noise level. Thus, one can have a large freedom to design the bifurcated ramp mechanically and aerodynamically, with minimum impact on the aeroacoustics. However, the effect of inlet guide vanes' (IGV) axial spacing to the fan face has a first order effect on the aeroacoustics for the bifurcated 2-D inlet. As much as 5 dB reduction in the overall sound pressure level and as much as 15 dB reduction in the blade passing frequency tone were observed when the IGV was moved from 0·8 chord of rotor blade upstream of the fan face to 2·0 chord of the blade upstream. The wake profile similarity of the IGV was also found in the flow environment of the 2-D bifurcated inlet, i.e., the IGV wakes followed the usual Gauss' function.

  5. Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustic Integration Effects for a Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czech, Michael J.; Thomas, Russell H; Elkoby, Ronen

    2012-01-01

    An extensive experimental investigation was performed to study the propulsion airframe aeroacoustic effects of a high bypass ratio engine for a hybrid wing body aircraft configuration where the engine is installed above the wing. The objective was to provide an understanding of the jet noise shielding effectiveness as a function of engine gas condition and location as well as nozzle configuration. A 4.7% scale nozzle of a bypass ratio seven engine was run at characteristic cycle points under static and forward flight conditions. The effect of the pylon and its orientation on jet noise was also studied as a function of bypass ratio and cycle condition. The addition of a pylon yielded significant spectral changes lowering jet noise by up to 4 dB at high polar angles and increasing it by 2 to 3 dB at forward angles. In order to assess jet noise shielding, a planform representation of the airframe model, also at 4.7% scale was traversed such that the jet nozzle was positioned from downstream of to several diameters upstream of the airframe model trailing edge. Installations at two fan diameters upstream of the wing trailing edge provided only limited shielding in the forward arc at high frequencies for both the axisymmetric and a conventional round nozzle with pylon. This was consistent with phased array measurements suggesting that the high frequency sources are predominantly located near the nozzle exit and, consequently, are amenable to shielding. The mid to low frequency sources were observed further downstream and shielding was insignificant. Chevrons were designed and used to impact the distribution of sources with the more aggressive design showing a significant upstream migration of the sources in the mid frequency range. Furthermore, the chevrons reduced the low frequency source levels and the typical high frequency increase due to the application of chevron nozzles was successfully shielded. The pylon was further modified with a technology that injects air

  6. Reducing the Effect of Transducer Mount Induced Noise on Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel Testing Data with a New Transducer Mount Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, Andrew J.; Reed, Darren K.; Nance, Donald K.

    2015-01-01

    Flight vehicle aeroacoustic environments induced during transonic and supersonic flight are usually predicted by subscale wind tunnel testing utilizing high frequency miniature pressure transducers. In order to minimize noise induced by the measurement itself, transducer flush mounting with the model surface is very important. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has accomplished flushness in recent testing campaigns via use of a transducer holder that can be machined and sanded. A single hole in the holder allows the flow medium to interact with the transducer diaphragm. Noise is induced by the resulting cavity however, and is a challenge to remove in post-processing. A new holder design has been developed that minimizes the effects of this transducer mount induced noise (XMIN) by reducing the resonance amplitude or increasing its resonance frequency beyond the range of interest. This paper describes a test conducted at the NASA/George C. Marshall Space Flight Center Trisonic Wind Tunnel intended to verify the effectiveness of this design. The results from this test show that this new transducer holder design does significantly reduce the influence of XMIN on measured fluctuating pressure levels without degrading a transducer's ability to accurately measure the noise external to the model.

  7. Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustic Integration Effects for a Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czech, Michael J.; Thomas, Russell H.; Elkoby, Ronen

    2010-01-01

    An extensive experimental investigation was performed to study the propulsion airframe aeroacoustic effects of a high bypass ratio engine for a hybrid wing body aircraft configuration where the engine is installed above the wing. The objective was to provide an understanding of the jet noise shielding effectiveness as a function of engine gas condition and location as well as nozzle configuration. A 4.7% scale nozzle of a bypass ratio seven engine was run at characteristic cycle points under static and forward flight conditions. The effect of the pylon and its orientation on jet noise was also studied as a function of bypass ratio and cycle condition. The addition of a pylon yielded significant spectral changes lowering jet noise by up to 4dB at high polar angles and increasing it by 2 to 3dB at forward angles. In order to assess jet noise shielding, a planform representation of the airframe model, also at 4.7% scale was traversed relative to the jet nozzle from downstream to several diameters upstream of the wing trailing edge. Installations at two fan diameters upstream of the wing trailing edge provided only limited shielding in the forward arc at high frequencies for both the axisymmetric and a conventional round nozzle with pylon. This was consistent with phased array measurements suggesting that the high frequency sources are predominantly located near the nozzle exit and, consequently, are amenable to shielding. The mid to low frequencies sources were observed further downstream and shielding was insignificant. Chevrons were designed and used to impact the distribution of sources with the more aggressive design showing a significant upstream migration of the sources in the mid frequency range. Furthermore, the chevrons reduced the low frequency source levels and the typical high frequency increase due to the application of chevron nozzles was successfully shielded. The pylon was further modified with a technology that injects air through the shelf of the

  8. The design of test-section inserts for higher speed aeroacoustic testing in the Ames 80- by 120-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Olson, Larry E.

    1992-01-01

    An engineering feasibility study was made of aeroacoustic inserts designed for large-scale acoustic research on aircraft models in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The goal was to find test-section modifications that would allow improved aeroacoustic testing at airspeeds equal to and above the current 100 knots limit. Results indicate that the required maximum airspeed drives the design of a particular insert. Using goals of 200, 150, and 100 knots airspeed, the analysis led to a 30 x 60 ft open-jet test section, a 40 x 80 ft open-jet test section, and a 70 x 110 ft closed test section with enhanced wall lining respectively. The open-jet inserts would be composed of a nozzle, collector, diffuser, and acoustic wedges incorporated in the existing 80 x 120 ft test section. The closed test section would be composed of approximately 5-ft acoustic wedges covered by a porous plate attached to the test-section walls of the existing 80 x 120. All designs would require a double row of acoustic vanes between the test section and fan drive to attenuate fan noise and, in the case of the open-jet designs, to control flow separation at the diffuser downstream end. The inserts would allow virtually anechoic acoustics studies of large helicopter models, jets, and V/STOL aircraft models in simulated flight. Model scale studies would be necessary to optimize the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of any of the designs. Successful development of acoustically transparent walls, though not strictly necessary to the project, would lead to a porous-wall test section that could be substituted for any of the open-jet designs, and thereby eliminate many aerodynamic and acoustic problems characteristic of open-jet shear layers.

  9. NASA Langley Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel: Background Noise and Flow Survey Results Prior to FY05 Construction of Facilities Modifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Henderson, Brenda S.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel is a premier facility for model-scale testing of jet noise reduction concepts at realistic flow conditions. However, flow inside the open jet test section is less than optimum. A Construction of Facilities project, scheduled for FY 05, will replace the flow collector with a new design intended to reduce recirculation in the open jet test section. The reduction of recirculation will reduce background noise levels measured by a microphone array impinged by the recirculation flow and will improve flow characteristics in the open jet tunnel flow. In order to assess the degree to which this modification is successful, background noise levels and tunnel flow are documented, in order to establish a baseline, in this report.

  10. Aero-acoustic performance characteristics of duct burning turbofan exhaust nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Packman, A. B.; Gutierrez, O.

    1976-01-01

    A recent experimental investigation has identified the aero/acoustic characteristics of exhaust nozzles for duct heating turbofan engines over a range of simulated flow conditions. Jet noise and performance levels are summarized for a series of coannular nozzles representing both acoustically suppressed and unsuppressed designs operating in a static environment. The basic coannular nozzles were found to provide inherent noise suppression. Multi-element suppressor nozzles provided additional noise suppression, but with appreciable thrust loss. The impact of these results on the advanced supersonic transport studies is also presented, indicating potentially large reductions in take-off gross weight or community noise footprints.

  11. Multiple line arrays for the characterization of aeroacoustic sources using a time-reversal method.

    PubMed

    Mimani, A; Doolan, C J; Medwell, P R

    2013-10-01

    This letter investigates the use of multiple line arrays (LAs) in a Time-Reversal Mirror for localizing and characterizing multipole aeroacoustic sources in a uniform subsonic mean flow using a numerical Time-Reversal (TR) method. Regardless of the original source characteristics, accuracy of predicting the source location can be significantly improved using at least two LAs. Furthermore, it is impossible to determine the source characteristics using a single LA, rather a minimum of two are required to establish either the monopole or dipole source nature, while four LAs (fully surrounding the source) are required for characterizing a lateral quadrupole source. PMID:24116538

  12. Flow aeroacoustic damping using coupled mechanical-electrical impedance in lined pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong; Huang, Yi-Yong; Chen, Xiao-Qian; Bai, Yu-Zhu; Tan, Xiao-Dong

    2015-05-01

    We report a new noise-damping concept which utilizes a coupled mechanical-electrical acoustic impedance to attenuate an aeroacoustic wave propagating in a moving gas confined by a cylindrical pipeline. An electrical damper is incorporated to the mechanical impedance, either through the piezoelectric, electrostatic, or electro-magnetic principles. Our numerical study shows the advantage of the proposed methodology on wave attenuation. With the development of the micro-electro-mechanical system and material engineering, the proposed configuration may be promising for noise reduction. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11404405, 91216201, 51205403, and 11302253).

  13. Aeroacoustics of Flight Vehicles: Theory and Practice. Volume 1: Noise Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, Harvey H. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Methodology recommended to evaluate aeroacoustic related problems is provided, and approaches to their solutions are suggested without extensive tables, nomographs, and derivations. Orientation is toward flight vehicles and emphasis is on underlying physical concepts. Theoretical, experimental, and applied aspects are covered, including the main formulations and comparisons of theory and experiment. The topics covered include: propeller and propfan noise, rotor noise, turbomachinery noise, jet noise classical theory and experiments, noise from turbulent shear flows, jet noise generated by large-scale coherent motion, airframe noise, propulsive lift noise, combustion and core noise, and sonic booms.

  14. Elastically Deformable Side-Edge Link for Trailing-Edge Flap Aeroacoustic Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor); Lockard, David P. (Inventor); Moore, James B. (Inventor); Su, Ji (Inventor); Turner, Travis L. (Inventor); Lin, John C. (Inventor); Taminger, Karen M. (Inventor); Kahng, Seun K. (Inventor); Verden, Scott A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system is provided for reducing aeroacoustic noise generated by an aircraft having wings equipped with trailing-edge flaps. The system includes a plurality of elastically deformable structures. Each structure is coupled to and along one of the side edges of one of the trailing-edge flaps, and is coupled to a portion of one of the wings that is adjacent to the one of the side edges. The structures elastically deform when the trailing-edge flaps are deployed away from the wings.

  15. Analysis of Conservative Tracer Tests in the Bullfrog, Tram, and Prow Pass Tuffs, 1996 to 1998, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Umari, Amjad; Fahy, Michael F.; Earle, John D.; Tucci, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the potential for transport of radionuclides in ground water from the proposed high-level nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, conservative (nonsorbing) tracer tests were conducted among three boreholes, known as the C-hole Complex, and values for transport (or flow) porosity, storage (or matrix) porosity, longitudinal dispersivity, and the extent of matrix diffusion were obtained. The C-holes are completed in a sequence of Miocene tuffaceous rock, consisting of nonwelded to densely welded ash-flow tuff with intervals of ash-fall tuff and volcaniclastic rocks, covered by Quaternary alluvium. The lower part of the tuffaceous-rock sequence includes the Prow Pass, Bullfrog, and Tram Tuffs of the Crater Flat Group. The rocks are pervaded by tectonic and cooling fractures. Paleozoic limestone and dolomite underlie the tuffaceous rocks. Four radially convergent and one partially recirculating conservative (nonsorbing) tracer tests were conducted at the C-hole Complex from 1996 to 1998 to establish values for flow porosity, storage porosity, longitudinal dispersivity, and extent of matrix diffusion in the Bullfrog and Tram Tuffs and the Prow Pass Tuff. Tracer tests included (1) injection of iodide into the combined Bullfrog-Tram interval; (2) injection of 2,6 difluorobenzoic acid into the Lower Bullfrog interval; (3) injection of 3-carbamoyl-2-pyridone into the Lower Bullfrog interval; and (4) injection of iodide and 2,4,5 trifluorobenzoic acid, followed by 2,3,4,5 tetrafluorobenzoic acid, into the Prow Pass Tuff. All tracer tests were analyzed by the Moench single- and dual-porosity analytical solutions to the advection-dispersion equation or by superposition of these solutions. Nonlinear regression techniques were used to corroborate tracer solution results, to obtain optimal parameter values from the solutions, and to quantify parameter uncertainty resulting from analyzing two of the three radially convergent conservative tracer tests

  16. The Kirchhoff Formulas for Moving Surfaces in Aeroacoustics - The Subsonic and Supersonic Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.

    1996-01-01

    One of the active areas of computational aeroacoustics is the application of the Kirchhoff formulas to the problems of the rotating machinery noise predictions. The original Kirchhoff formula was derived for a stationary surface. In 1988, Farassat and Myers derived a Kirchhoff Formula obtained originally by Morgans using modem mathematics. These authors gave a formula particularly useful for applications in aeroacoustics. This formula is for a surface moving at subsonic speed. Later in 1995 these authors derived the Kirchhoff formula for a super-sonically moving surface. This technical memorandum presents the viewgraphs of a day long workshop by the author on the derivation of the Kirchhoff formulas. All necessary background mathematics such as differential geometry and multidimensional generalized function theory are discussed in these viewgraphs. Abstraction is kept at minimum level here. These viewgraphs are also suitable for understanding the derivation and obtaining the solutions of the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation. In the first part of this memorandum, some introductory remarks are made on generalized functions, the derivation of the Kirchhoff formulas and the development and validation of Kirchhoff codes. Separate lists of references by Lyrintzis, Long, Strawn and their co-workers are given in this memorandum. This publication is aimed at graduate students, physicists and engineers who are in need of the understanding and applications of the Kirchhoff formulas in acoustics and electromagnetics.

  17. Multidimensional Generalized Functions in Aeroacoustics and Fluid Mechanics. Part 1; Basic Concepts and Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, Fereidoun; Myers, Michael K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is the first part of a three part tutorial on multidimensional generalized functions (GFs) and their applications in aeroacoustics and fluid mechanics. The subject is highly fascinating and essential in many areas of science and, in particular, wave propagation problems. In this tutorial, we strive to present rigorously and clearly the basic concepts and the tools that are needed to use GFs in applications effectively and with ease. We give many examples to help the readers in understanding the mathematical ideas presented here. The first part of the tutorial is on the basic concepts of GFs. Here we define GFs, their properties and some common operations on them. We define the important concept of generalized differentiation and then give some interesting elementary and advanced examples on Green's functions and wave propagation problems. Here, the analytic power of GFs in applications is demonstrated with ease and elegance. Part 2 of this tutorial is on the diverse applications of generalized derivatives (GDs). Part 3 is on generalized Fourier transformations and some more advanced topics. One goal of writing this tutorial is to convince readers that, because of their powerful operational properties, GFs are absolutely essential and useful in engineering and physics, particularly in aeroacoustics and fluid mechanics.

  18. Nonlinear Aeroacoustics Computations by the Space-Time CE/SE Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.

    2003-01-01

    The Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element Method, or CE/SE Method for short, is a recently developed numerical method for conservation laws. Despite its second order accuracy in space and time, it possesses low dispersion errors and low dissipation. The method is robust enough to cover a wide range of compressible flows: from weak linear acoustic waves to strong discontinuous waves (shocks). An outstanding feature of the CE/SE scheme is its truly multi-dimensional, simple but effective non-reflecting boundary condition (NRBC), which is particularly valuable for computational aeroacoustics (CAA). In nature, the method may be categorized as a finite volume method, where the conservation element (CE) is equivalent to a finite control volume (or cell) and the solution element (SE) can be understood as the cell interface. However, due to its careful treatment of the surface fluxes and geometry, it is different from the existing schemes. Currently, the CE/SE scheme has been developed to a matured stage that a 3-D unstructured CE/SE Navier-Stokes solver is already available. However, in the present review paper, as a general introduction to the CE/SE method, only the 2-D unstructured Euler CE/SE solver is chosen and sketched in section 2. Then applications of the 2-D and 3-D CE/SE schemes to linear, and in particular, nonlinear aeroacoustics are depicted in sections 3, 4, and 5 to demonstrate its robustness and capability.

  19. Working With the Wave Equation in Aeroacoustics: The Pleasures of Generalized Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Brentner, Kenneth S.; Dunn, mark H.

    2007-01-01

    The theme of this paper is the applications of generalized function (GF) theory to the wave equation in aeroacoustics. We start with a tutorial on GFs with particular emphasis on viewing functions as continuous linear functionals. We next define operations on GFs. The operation of interest to us in this paper is generalized differentiation. We give many applications of generalized differentiation, particularly for the wave equation. We discuss the use of GFs in finding Green s function and some subtleties that only GF theory can clarify without ambiguities. We show how the knowledge of the Green s function of an operator L in a given domain D can allow us to solve a whole range of problems with operator L for domains situated within D by the imbedding method. We will show how we can use the imbedding method to find the Kirchhoff formulas for stationary and moving surfaces with ease and elegance without the use of the four-dimensional Green s theorem, which is commonly done. Other subjects covered are why the derivatives in conservation laws should be viewed as generalized derivatives and what are the consequences of doing this. In particular we show how we can imbed a problem in a larger domain for the identical differential equation for which the Green s function is known. The primary purpose of this paper is to convince the readers that GF theory is absolutely essential in aeroacoustics because of its powerful operational properties. Furthermore, learning the subject and using it can be fun.

  20. Development of Computational Aeroacoustics Code for Jet Noise and Flow Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Hixon, Duane R.

    2002-07-01

    Accurate prediction of jet fan and exhaust plume flow and noise generation and propagation is very important in developing advanced aircraft engines that will pass current and future noise regulations. In jet fan flows as well as exhaust plumes, two major sources of noise are present: large-scale, coherent instabilities and small-scale turbulent eddies. In previous work for the NASA Glenn Research Center, three strategies have been explored in an effort to computationally predict the noise radiation from supersonic jet exhaust plumes. In order from the least expensive computationally to the most expensive computationally, these are: 1) Linearized Euler equations (LEE). 2) Very Large Eddy Simulations (VLES). 3) Large Eddy Simulations (LES). The first method solves the linearized Euler equations (LEE). These equations are obtained by linearizing about a given mean flow and the neglecting viscous effects. In this way, the noise from large-scale instabilities can be found for a given mean flow. The linearized Euler equations are computationally inexpensive, and have produced good noise results for supersonic jets where the large-scale instability noise dominates, as well as for the tone noise from a jet engine blade row. However, these linear equations do not predict the absolute magnitude of the noise; instead, only the relative magnitude is predicted. Also, the predicted disturbances do not modify the mean flow, removing a physical mechanism by which the amplitude of the disturbance may be controlled. Recent research for isolated airfoils' indicates that this may not affect the solution greatly at low frequencies. The second method addresses some of the concerns raised by the LEE method. In this approach, called Very Large Eddy Simulation (VLES), the unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved directly using a high-accuracy computational aeroacoustics numerical scheme. With the addition of a two-equation turbulence model and the use of a relatively

  1. Development of Computational Aeroacoustics Code for Jet Noise and Flow Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Hixon, Duane R.

    2002-01-01

    Accurate prediction of jet fan and exhaust plume flow and noise generation and propagation is very important in developing advanced aircraft engines that will pass current and future noise regulations. In jet fan flows as well as exhaust plumes, two major sources of noise are present: large-scale, coherent instabilities and small-scale turbulent eddies. In previous work for the NASA Glenn Research Center, three strategies have been explored in an effort to computationally predict the noise radiation from supersonic jet exhaust plumes. In order from the least expensive computationally to the most expensive computationally, these are: 1) Linearized Euler equations (LEE). 2) Very Large Eddy Simulations (VLES). 3) Large Eddy Simulations (LES). The first method solves the linearized Euler equations (LEE). These equations are obtained by linearizing about a given mean flow and the neglecting viscous effects. In this way, the noise from large-scale instabilities can be found for a given mean flow. The linearized Euler equations are computationally inexpensive, and have produced good noise results for supersonic jets where the large-scale instability noise dominates, as well as for the tone noise from a jet engine blade row. However, these linear equations do not predict the absolute magnitude of the noise; instead, only the relative magnitude is predicted. Also, the predicted disturbances do not modify the mean flow, removing a physical mechanism by which the amplitude of the disturbance may be controlled. Recent research for isolated airfoils' indicates that this may not affect the solution greatly at low frequencies. The second method addresses some of the concerns raised by the LEE method. In this approach, called Very Large Eddy Simulation (VLES), the unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved directly using a high-accuracy computational aeroacoustics numerical scheme. With the addition of a two-equation turbulence model and the use of a relatively

  2. Phonation aeroacoustic source strength estimation from sound pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krane, Michael; Campo, Elizabeth; McPhail, Michael

    2013-11-01

    An experimental characterization of monopole and dipole source spectra in a model of the human upper airway is presented. The airway model is a life-scale, vertical, straight duct of square cross section, into which two model vocal folds are placed. Five microphones are positioned in the duct, two below and two above the vocal folds, with a fifth microphone placed at the ``mouth.'' Time-mean subglottal pressure and volume flow rate are measured using a micromanometer and ball-element meter, respectively. In addition, pressure on either side of the model vocal folds are measured using Kulite XCS-093 pressure transducers, and the motion of the model vocal folds is captured using high-speed video. Cross-correlations between the microphone pairs are used to estimate the right- and left-running acoustic wave amplitude spectra above and below the model vocal folds. From these spectra and theoretical matching conditions at the inlet and outlet of the vocal fold constriction, source spectra are constructed. These are compared to independent estimates of source spectra obtained from the difference of the Kulite transducer pressures and the motion of the model vocal folds. Acknowledge support from NIH R01 DC005642 (MK, MM) and ARL E&F program (EC).

  3. Using Visualized Matrix Effects to Develop and Improve LC-MS/MS Bioanalytical Methods, Taking TRAM-34 as an Example

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jia-Hung; Pao, Li-Heng

    2015-01-01

    Matrix effects (MEs) continue to be an obstacle in the development of the LC-MS/MS method, with phospholipids being the major cause of MEs. Changing the mobile phase has been a common strategy to reduce MEs; however, the underlying mechanism is unclear. "In-source multiple-reaction monitoring" (IS-MRM) for glycerophosphocholines (PCs) has been commonly applied in many bioanalytical methods. "Visualized MEs" is a suitable term to describe the application of IS-MRM to visualize the elution pattern of phospholipids. We selected a real case to discuss the relationship of MEs and phospholipids in different mobile phases by quantitative, qualitative, and visualized MEs in LC-MS/MS bioanalysis. The application of visualized MEs not only predicts the ion-suppression zone but also helps in selecting an appropriate (1) mobile phase, (2) column, (3) needle wash solvent for the residue of analyte and phospholipids, and (4) evaluates the clean-up efficiency of sample preparation. The TRAM-34 LC-MS/MS method, improved by using visualized MEs, was shown to be a precise and accurate analytical method. All data indicated that the use of visualized MEs indeed provided useful information about the LC-MS/MS method development and improvement. In this study, an integrative approach for the qualitative, quantitative, and visualized MEs was used to decipher the complexity of MEs. PMID:25909956

  4. High speed turboprop aeroacoustic study (counterrotation). Volume 2: Computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitfield, C. E.; Mani, R.; Gliebe, P. R.

    1990-01-01

    The isolated counterrotating high speed turboprop noise prediction program developed and funded by GE Aircraft Engines was compared with model data taken in the GE Aircraft Engines Cell 41 anechoic facility, the Boeing Transonic Wind Tunnel, and in the NASA-Lewis 8 x 6 and 9 x 15 wind tunnels. The predictions show good agreement with measured data under both low and high speed simulated flight conditions. The installation effect model developed for single rotation, high speed turboprops was extended to include counter rotation. The additional effect of mounting a pylon upstream of the forward rotor was included in the flow field modeling. A nontraditional mechanism concerning the acoustic radiation from a propeller at angle of attack was investigated. Predictions made using this approach show results that are in much closer agreement with measurement over a range of operating conditions than those obtained via traditional fluctuating force methods. The isolated rotors and installation effects models were combined into a single prediction program. The results were compared with data taken during the flight test of the B727/UDF (trademark) engine demonstrator aircraft.

  5. Investigation of computational and spectral analysis methods for aeroacoustic wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanel, Florence O.

    1995-01-01

    Most computational fluid dynamics (CFD) schemes are not adequately accurate for solving aeroacoustics problems, which have wave amplitudes several orders of magnitude smaller yet with frequencies larger than the flow field variations generating the sound. Hence, a computational aeroacoustics (CAA) algorithm should have minimal dispersion and dissipation features. A dispersion relation preserving (DRP) scheme is, therefore, applied to solve the linearized Euler equations in order to simulate the propagation of three types of waves, namely: acoustic, vorticity, and entropy waves. The scheme is derived using an optimization procedure to ensure that the numerical derivatives preserve the wave number and angular frequency of the partial differential equations being discretized. Consequently, simulated waves propagate with the correct wave speeds and exhibit their appropriate properties. A set of radiation and outflow boundary conditions, compatible with the DRP scheme and derived from the asymptotic solutions of the governing equations, are also implemented. Numerical simulations are performed to test the effectiveness of the DRP scheme and its boundary conditions. The computed solutions are shown to agree favorably with the exact solutions. The major restriction appears to be that the dispersion relations can be preserved only for waves with wave lengths longer than four or five spacings. The boundary conditions are found to be transparent to the outgoing disturbances. However, when the disturbance source is placed closer to a boundary, small acoustic reflections start appearing. CAA generates enormous amounts of temporal data which needs to be reduced to understand the physical problem being simulated. Spectral analysis is one approach that helps us in extracting information which often can not be easily interpreted in the time domain. Thus, three different methods for the spectral analysis of numerically generated aeroacoustic data are studied. First, the

  6. In-flight aeroacoustic environments on prospective space shuttle vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dods, J. B., Jr.; Hanly, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of in-flight aerodynamic noise has been studied by reliable estimates of full scale surface-pressure fluctuations from scale model tests in wind tunnels. Scaling relationships have been verified, and many details of the fluctuating pressure characteristics such as spatial correlation and convection velocities are understood. The effects of the wind tunnel environmental turbulence and noise have also been investigated sufficiently so that threshold levels of usable data are known.

  7. Aeroacoustics of the swinging corrugated tube: voice of the Dragon.

    PubMed

    Nakiboğlu, Güneş; Rudenko, Oleksii; Hirschberg, Avraham

    2012-01-01

    When one swings a short corrugated pipe segment around one's head, it produces a musically interesting whistling sound. As a musical toy it is called a "Hummer" and as a musical instrument, the "Voice of the Dragon." The fluid dynamics aspects of the instrument are addressed, corresponding to the sound generation mechanism. Velocity profile measurements reveal that the turbulent velocity profile developed in a corrugated pipe differs notably from the one of a smooth pipe. This velocity profile appears to have a crucial effect both on the non-dimensional whistling frequency (Strouhal number) and on the amplitude of the pressure fluctuations. Using a numerical model based on incompressible flow simulations and vortex sound theory, excellent predictions of the whistling Strouhal numbers are achieved. The model does not provide an accurate prediction of the amplitude. In the second part of the paper the sound radiation from a Hummer is discussed. The acoustic measurements obtained in a semi-anechoic chamber are compared with a theoretical radiation model. Globally the instrument behaves as a rotating (Leslie) horn. The effects of Doppler shift, wall reflections, bending of the tube, non-constant rotational speed on the observed frequency, and amplitude are discussed. PMID:22280698

  8. Aeroacoustics. [analysis of properties of sound generated by aerodynamic forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M., E.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis was conducted to determine the properties of sound generated by aerodynamic forces or motions originating in a flow, such as the unsteady aerodynamic forces on propellers or by turbulent flows around an aircraft. The acoustics of moving media are reviewed and mathematical models are developed. Lighthill's acoustic analogy and the application to turbulent flows are analyzed. The effects of solid boundaries are calculated. Theories based on the solution of linearized vorticity and acoustic field equations are explained. The effects of nonuniform mean flow on the generation of sound are reported.

  9. Aeroacoustic Simulations of Tandem Cylinders with Subcritical Spacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Neuhart, Dan H.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Tandem cylinders are being studied because they model a variety of component level interactions of landing gear. The present effort is directed at the case of two identical cylinders with their centroids separated in the streamwise direction by 1.435 diameters. Experiments in the Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel and Quiet Flow Facility at NASA Langley Research Center have provided an extensive experimental database of the nearfield flow and radiated noise. The measurements were conducted at a Mach number of 0.1285 and Reynolds number of 1.66x10(exp 5) based on the cylinder diameter. A trip was used on the upstream cylinder to insure a fully turbulent flow separation and, hence, to simulate a major aspect of high Reynolds number flow. The parallel computational effort uses the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver CFL3D with a hybrid, zonal turbulence model that turns off the turbulence production term everywhere except in a narrow ring surrounding solid surfaces. The experiments exhibited an asymmetry in the surface pressure that was persistent despite attempts to eliminate it through small changes in the configuration. To model the asymmetry, the simulations were run with the cylinder configuration at a nonzero but small angle of attack. The computed results and experiments are in general agreement that vortex shedding for the spacing studied herein is weak relative to that observed at supercritical spacings. Although the shedding was subdued in the simulations, it was still more prominent than in the experiments. Overall, the simulation comparisons with measured near-field data and the radiated acoustics are reasonable, especially if one is concerned with capturing the trends relative to larger cylinder spacings. However, the flow details of the 1.435 diameter spacing have not been captured in full even though very fine grid computations have been performed. Some of the discrepancy may be associated with the simulation s inexact representation of the

  10. Overview of the Testing of a Small-Scale Proprotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Botha, Gavin; Dawson, Seth

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of results from the wind tunnel test of a 1/4-scale V-22 proprotor in the Duits-Nederlandse Windtunnel (DNW) in The Netherlands. The small-scale proprotor was tested on the isolated rotor configuration of the Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM). The test was conducted by a joint team from NASA Ames, NASA Langley, U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate, and The Boeing Company. The objective of the test was to acquire a benchmark database for validating aeroacoustic analyses. Representative examples of airloads, acoustics, structural loads, and performance data are provided and discussed.

  11. The Low Frequency Aeroacoustics of Buried Nozzle Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. V.; Crighton, D. G.; Cargill, A. M.

    1993-05-01

    A simplified model of a "buried nozzle" aeroengine system is considered. The primary flow issues into a co-annular flow within a mixing chamber, and then the co-annular flow issues into the ambient medium from a secondary nozzle. Within the mixing chamber only fine scale mixing takes place, and shear layers within the mixing chamber and downstream of the secondary nozzle are assumed to sustain large scale instability waves. Excitation of this system is provided by low frequency plane waves, incident from upstream on the primary nozzle (and emanating from combustion processes in the hot core of an aeroengine). The response of this system, in the acoustic far field and in the mixing chamber, is obtained analytically from the asymptotic solution, at low frequency, of model sub-problems the solutions of which determine the wave reflection and transmission processes at the primary and secondary nozzles. In these sub-problems the shear layers are represented by vortex sheets and the nozzle walls by semi-infinite circular ducts, with Kutta conditions imposed on the unsteady flow at the primary and secondary nozzle lips. Analytical descriptions are given of the various wave modes (quasi-plane acoustic waves, and instability waves localized on the primary and secondary shear layers), of the acoustic field strength and directivity (essentially monopole, dipole and quadrupole fields), and of the conditions under which near-resonant response may occur, with large amplitudes of the perturbations in the mixing chamber and in the acoustic field.

  12. Efficient numerical simulation of aeroacoustics for low Mach number flows interacting with structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornhaas, Michael; Schäfer, Michael; Sternel, Dörte C.

    2015-06-01

    An integrated hybrid approach for the numerical simulation of aeroacoustics at low Mach numbers is presented. The method is based on a viscous/acoustic splitting. The turbulent incompressible background flow is computed with large eddy simulation, based on the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, whereas the acoustics are computed from linearized Euler equations with a high-resolution scheme. The focus is on the numerical efficiency of the approach. To accelerate the computations, hierarchical grids and a frozen fluid approach for the acoustics are employed and investigated. For validation and the investigation of the numerical efficiency and accuracy the sound emission of a plate in the turbulent wake of a circular cylinder is employed as a test case.

  13. Direct aeroacoustic simulation of acoustic feedback phenomena on a side-view mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Hannes M.; Munz, Claus-Dieter

    2016-06-01

    The flow around a side-view mirror and its noise generation are investigated using large eddy simulation and direct acoustic simulation. To this end, we use the high order discontinuous Galerkin spectral element method on non-conforming curved elements. Tonal noise is observed, which originates at the trailing edge downstream of laminar separation, coinciding with experimental results. In order to determine the nature of the tonal noise generation mechanism, we perform a linear stability analysis and employ a global perturbation approach in combination with dynamic mode decomposition. The perturbation analysis based on the whole flow field demonstrates the existence of a global instability involving convective disturbance growth, acoustic scattering at the trailing edge and acoustic receptivity at a rounded edge slightly upstream of separation. The results clearly show the tonal noise to be caused by the so-called acoustic feedback loop known from airfoil aeroacoustics. This phenomenon has been simulated here for the first time for a complex geometry.

  14. Aeromechanics and Aeroacoustics Predictions of the Boeing-SMART Rotor Using Coupled-CFD/CSD Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, Jeremy; Sim, Ben W.; Sankar, Lakshmi; Brentner, Ken

    2010-01-01

    This paper will highlight helicopter aeromechanics and aeroacoustics prediction capabilities developed by Georgia Institute of Technology, the Pennsylvania State University, and Northern Arizona University under the Helicopter Quieting Program (HQP) sponsored by the Tactical Technology Office of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). First initiated in 2004, the goal of the HQP was to develop high fidelity, state-of-the-art computational tools for designing advanced helicopter rotors with reduced acoustic perceptibility and enhanced performance. A critical step towards achieving this objective is the development of rotorcraft prediction codes capable of assessing a wide range of helicopter configurations and operations for future rotorcraft designs. This includes novel next-generation rotor systems that incorporate innovative passive and/or active elements to meet future challenging military performance and survivability goals.

  15. Verification of a Viscous Computational Aeroacoustics Code Using External Verification Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingraham, Daniel; Hixon, Ray

    2015-01-01

    The External Verification Analysis approach to code verification is extended to solve the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations with constant properties, and is used to verify a high-order computational aeroacoustics (CAA) code. After a brief review of the relevant literature, the details of the EVA approach are presented and compared to the similar Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS). Pseudocode representations of EVA's algorithms are included, along with the recurrence relations needed to construct the EVA solution. The code verification results show that EVA was able to convincingly verify a high-order, viscous CAA code without the addition of MMS-style source terms, or any other modifications to the code.

  16. Method to Produce Flexible Ceramic Thermal Protection System Resistant to High Aeroacoustic Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, Paul M. (Inventor); Calamito, Dominic P. (Inventor); Jong, Anthony (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method of producing a three dimensional angle interlock ceramic fiber which is stable to high aeroacoustic noise of about 170 decibels and to high temperatures of about 2500 F is disclosed. The method uses multiple separate strands of a ceramic fiber or ceramic tow suitable for weaving having multiple warp fibers and multiple fill fibers woven with a modified fly-shuttle loom or rapier shuttleless loom which has nip rolls, a modified fabric advancement mechanism and at least eight harnesses in connection with a Dobby pattern chain utilizing sufficient heddles for each warp fiber and a reed which accommodates at least 168 ends per inch. The method produces a multilayered top fabric, rib fabric and single-layered bottom fabric.

  17. Development of unsteady aerodynamic analyses for turbomachinery aeroelastic and aeroacoustic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.; Barnett, Mark; Hall, Kenneth C.; Ayer, Timothy C.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical analyses and computer codes are being developed for predicting compressible unsteady inviscid and viscous flows through blade rows. Such analyses are needed to determine the impact of unsteady flow phenomena on the structural durability and noise generation characteristics of turbomachinery blading. Emphasis is being placed on developing analyses based on asymptotic representations of unsteady flow phenomena. Thus, flow driven by small-amplitude unsteady excitations in which viscous effects are concentrated in thin layers are being considered. The resulting analyses should apply in many practical situations, lead to a better understanding of the relevent physics, and they will be efficient computationally, and therefore, appropriate for aeroelastic and aeroacoustic design applications. Under the present phase (Task 3), the effort was focused on providing inviscid and viscid prediction capabilities for subsonic unsteady cascade flows.

  18. David crighton, 1942-2000: a commentary on his career and his influence on aeroacoustic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ffowcs Williams, John E.

    David Crighton, a greatly admired figure in fluid mechanics, Head of the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics at Cambridge, and Master of Jesus College, Cambridge, died at the peak of his career. He had made important contributions to the theory of waves generated by unsteady flow. Crighton's work was always characterized by the application of rigorous mathematical approximations to fluid mechanical idealizations of practically relevant problems. At the time of his death, he was certainly the most influential British applied mathematical figure, and his former collaborators and students form a strong school that continues his special style of mathematical application. Rigorous analysis of well-posed aeroacoustical problems was transformed by David Crighton.

  19. Enhanced focal-resolution of dipole sources using aeroacoustic time-reversal in a wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimani, A.; Moreau, D. J.; Prime, Z.; Doolan, C. J.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the first application of the Point-Time-Reversal-Sponge-Layer (PTRSL) damping technique to enhance the focal-resolution of experimental flow-induced dipole sources obtained using the Time-Reversal (TR) source localization method. Experiments were conducted in an Anechoic Wind Tunnel for the case of a full-span cylinder located in a low Mach number cross-flow. The far-field acoustic pressure sampled using two line arrays of microphones located above and below the cylinder exhibited a dominant Aeolian tone. The aeroacoustic TR simulations were implemented using the time-reversed signals whereby the source map revealed the lift-dipole nature at the Aeolian tone frequency. A PTRSL (centred at the predicted dipole location) was shown to reduce the size of dipole focal spots to 7/20th of a wavelength as compared to one wavelength without its use, thereby dramatically enhancing the focal-resolution of the TR technique.

  20. Aero-acoustic performance comparison of core engine noise suppressors on NASA quiet engine C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomer, H. E.; Schaefer, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    The relative aero-acoustic effectiveness of two core engine suppressors, a contractor-designed suppressor delivered with the Quiet Engine, and a NASA-designed suppressor was evaluated. The NASA suppressor was tested with and without a splitter making a total of three configurations being reported in addition to the baseline hardwall case. The aerodynamic results are presented in terms of tailpipe pressure loss, corrected net thrust, and corrected specific fuel consumption as functions of engine power setting. The acoustic results are divided into duct and far-field acoustic data. The NASA-designed core suppressor did the better job of suppressing aft end noise, but the splitter associated with it caused a significant engine performance penality. The NASA core suppressor without the spltter suppressed most of the core noise without any engine performance penalty.

  1. Aero-acoustic performance comparison of core engine noise suppressors on NASA quiet engine 'C'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomer, H. E.; Schaefer, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the experimental program reported herein was to evaluate and compare the relative aero-acoustic effectiveness of two core engine suppressors, a contractor-designed suppressor delivered with the Quiet Engine, and a NASA-designed suppressor, designed and built subsequently. The NASA suppressor was tested with and without a splitter making a total of three configurations being reported in addition to the baseline hardwall case. The aerodynamic results are presented in terms of tailpipe pressure loss, corrected net thrust, and corrected specific fuel consumption as functions of engine power setting. The acoustic results are divided into duct and far-field acoustic data. The NASA-designed core suppressor did the better job of suppressing aft end noise, but the splitter associated with it caused a significant engine performance penalty. The NASA core suppressor without the splitter suppressed most of the core noise without any engine performance penalty.

  2. Verification of a Viscous Computational Aeroacoustics Code using External Verification Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingraham, Daniel; Hixon, Ray

    2015-01-01

    The External Verification Analysis approach to code verification is extended to solve the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations with constant properties, and is used to verify a high-order computational aeroacoustics (CAA) code. After a brief review of the relevant literature, the details of the EVA approach are presented and compared to the similar Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS). Pseudocode representations of EVA's algorithms are included, along with the recurrence relations needed to construct the EVA solution. The code verification results show that EVA was able to convincingly verify a high-order, viscous CAA code without the addition of MMS-style source terms, or any other modifications to the code.

  3. Aeroacoustic power generated by multiple compact axisymmetric cavities: Effect of hydrodynamic interference on the sound production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakiboǧlu, G.; Hirschberg, A.

    2012-06-01

    Aeroacoustic sound generation due to self-sustained oscillations by a series of compact axisymmetric cavities exposed to a grazing flow is studied both experimentally and numerically. The driving feedback is produced by the velocity fluctuations resulting from a coupling of vortex sheddings at the upstream cavity edges with acoustic standing waves in the coaxial pipe. When the cavities are separated sufficiently from each other, the whistling behavior of the complete system can be determined from the individual contribution of each cavity. When the cavities are placed close to each other there is a strong hydrodynamic interference between the cavities which affects both the peak amplitude attained during whistling and the corresponding Strouhal number. This hydrodynamic interference is captured successfully by the proposed numerical method.

  4. Finite element analysis of aeroacoustic jet-flap flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Manhardt, P. D.

    1977-01-01

    A computational analysis was performed on the steady, turbulent aerodynamic flowfields associated with a jet-blown flap. For regions devoid of flow separation, a parabolic approximation to the governing time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations was applied. Numerical results are presented for the symmetry plane flow of a slot-nozzle planar jet flap geometry, including prediction of flowfield evolution within the secondary mixing region immediately downstream of the trailing edge. Using a two equation turbulence kinetic energy closure model, rapid generation and decay of large spatial gradients in mean and correlated fluctuating velocity components within the immediate wake region were predicted. Modifications to the turbulent flow structure, as induced by porous surface treatment of the flap, were evaluated. The recirculating flow within a representative discrete slot in the surface was evaluated, using the two dimensional, time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations.

  5. Computational Aeroacoustics by the Space-time CE/SE Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, a new numerical methodology for conservation laws-the Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element Method (CE/SE), was developed by Dr. Chang of NASA Glenn Research Center and collaborators. In nature, the new method may be categorized as a finite volume method, where the conservation element (CE) is equivalent to a finite control volume (or cell) and the solution element (SE) can be understood as the cell interface. However, due to its rigorous treatment of the fluxes and geometry, it is different from the existing schemes. The CE/SE scheme features: (1) space and time treated on the same footing, the integral equations of conservation laws are solve( for with second order accuracy, (2) high resolution, low dispersion and low dissipation, (3) novel, truly multi-dimensional, simple but effective non-reflecting boundary condition, (4) effortless implementation of computation, no numerical fix or parameter choice is needed, an( (5) robust enough to cover a wide spectrum of compressible flow: from weak linear acoustic waves to strong, discontinuous waves (shocks) appropriate for linear and nonlinear aeroacoustics. Currently, the CE/SE scheme has been developed to such a stage that a 3-13 unstructured CE/SE Navier-Stokes solver is already available. However, in the present paper, as a general introduction to the CE/SE method, only the 2-D unstructured Euler CE/SE solver is chosen as a prototype and is sketched in Section 2. Then applications of the CE/SE scheme to linear, nonlinear aeroacoustics and airframe noise are depicted in Sections 3, 4, and 5 respectively to demonstrate its robustness and capability.

  6. Automated Development of Accurate Algorithms and Efficient Codes for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.; Dyson, Rodger W.

    1999-01-01

    The simulation of sound generation and propagation in three space dimensions with realistic aircraft components is a very large time dependent computation with fine details. Simulations in open domains with embedded objects require accurate and robust algorithms for propagation, for artificial inflow and outflow boundaries, and for the definition of geometrically complex objects. The development, implementation, and validation of methods for solving these demanding problems is being done to support the NASA pillar goals for reducing aircraft noise levels. Our goal is to provide algorithms which are sufficiently accurate and efficient to produce usable results rapidly enough to allow design engineers to study the effects on sound levels of design changes in propulsion systems, and in the integration of propulsion systems with airframes. There is a lack of design tools for these purposes at this time. Our technical approach to this problem combines the development of new, algorithms with the use of Mathematica and Unix utilities to automate the algorithm development, code implementation, and validation. We use explicit methods to ensure effective implementation by domain decomposition for SPMD parallel computing. There are several orders of magnitude difference in the computational efficiencies of the algorithms which we have considered. We currently have new artificial inflow and outflow boundary conditions that are stable, accurate, and unobtrusive, with implementations that match the accuracy and efficiency of the propagation methods. The artificial numerical boundary treatments have been proven to have solutions which converge to the full open domain problems, so that the error from the boundary treatments can be driven as low as is required. The purpose of this paper is to briefly present a method for developing highly accurate algorithms for computational aeroacoustics, the use of computer automation in this process, and a brief survey of the algorithms that

  7. The Role of Analytic Methods in Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Posey, J. W.

    2003-01-01

    As air traffic grows, annoyance produced by aircraft noise will grow unless new aircraft produce no objectionable noise outside airport boundaries. Such ultra-quiet aircraft must be of revolutionary design, having unconventional planforms and most likely with propulsion systems highly integrated with the airframe. Sophisticated source and propagation modeling will be required to properly account for effects of the airframe on noise generation, reflection, scattering, and radiation. It is tempting to say that since all the effects are included in the Navier-Stokes equations, time-accurate CFD can provide all the answers. Unfortunately, the computational time required to solve a full aircraft noise problem will be prohibitive for many years to come. On the other hand, closed form solutions are not available for such complicated problems. Therefore, a hybrid approach is recommended in which analysis is taken as far as possible without omitting relevant physics or geometry. Three examples are given of recently reported work in broadband noise prediction, ducted fan noise propagation and radiation, and noise prediction for complex three-dimensional jets.

  8. Optimal aeroacoustic shape design using the surrogate management framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Alison; Wang, Meng; Dennis, John E., Jr.; Moin, Parviz

    2003-11-01

    Shape optimization is applied in conjunction with time-dependent Navier-Stokes simulations to minimize airfoil trailing-edge noise. Optimization is performed using the surrogate management framework (SMF) (Booker phet al., J. Struct. Opt. 1999), a non-gradient based pattern search method chosen for its efficiency and rigorous convergence properties. Using SMF, optimization is performed not on the expensive actual function but on an inexpensive surrogate function. The use of a polling step in the SMF guarantees convergence to a local minimum of the cost function on a mesh. Results are presented for cases with several shape parameters, using a model problem with unsteady laminar flow past an acoustically compact airfoil. Constraints on lift and drag are applied using a penalty function within the framework of the filtering method of Audet and Dennis (Rice Univ. TR 00-09), an extension of the SMF method. Significant reduction (as much as much as 80%) in acoustic power has been demonstrated in all cases with reasonable computational cost.

  9. Design and characterization of an anechoic aeroacoustic facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Jose; Bahr, Chris; Carroll, Bruce; Sheplak, Mark; Cattafesta, Lou

    2005-09-01

    The design and characterization of an anechoic wind tunnel facility at the University of Florida are presented. A previously existing and ISO 3745 validated 100-Hz anechoic chamber is upgraded to incorporate an open-jet anechoic wind tunnel facility suitable for airframe noise studies, including swept-wing trailing edge studies. For suitable modeling of landing conditions, a chord-based Reynolds number of 3 to 4 million is required. The wind tunnel is driven by a 224-kW centrifugal fan controlled by a variable frequency drive. The test section measures 0.74 m (29) by 1.12 m (44) by 1.83 m (6 ft). The estimated maximum velocity attainable in the test section is ~ 76 m/s (250 ft/s). Preliminary measurements at 17 m/s indicate excellent flow uniformity and a turbulence intensity of 0.11%. Background noise level measurements with an empty test section reveal an overall SPL from 100 Hz 20 kHz of 49.9 dB, with a peak 1/3 octave-band level of 46 dB at 100 Hz that decreases to 29.9 dB at 1 kHz. Facility characterization experiments over a range of test section speeds are also reported, along with the results of preliminary trailing edge noise experiments.

  10. Prediction of the Aero-Acoustic Performance of Open Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale; Envia, Edmane

    2014-01-01

    The rising cost of jet fuel has renewed interest in contrarotating open rotor propulsion systems. Contemporary design methods offer the potential to maintain the inherently high aerodynamic efficiency of open rotors while greatly reducing their noise output, something that was not feasible in the 1980's designs. The primary source mechanisms of open rotor noise generation are thought to be the front rotor wake and tip vortex interacting with the aft rotor. In this paper, advanced measurement techniques and high-fidelity prediction tools are used to gain insight into the relative importance of the contributions to the open rotor noise signature of the front rotor wake and rotor tip vortex. The measurements include three-dimensional particle image velocimetry of the intra-rotor flowfield and the acoustic field of a model-scale open rotor. The predictions provide the unsteady flowfield and the associated acoustic field. The results suggest that while the front rotor tip vortex can have a significant influence on the blade passing tone noise produced by the aft rotor, the front rotor wake plays the decisive role in the generation of the interaction noise produced as a result of the unsteady aerodynamic interaction of the two rotors. At operating conditions typical of takeoff and landing operations, the interaction noise level is easily on par with that generated by the individual rotors, and in some cases is even higher. This suggests that a comprehensive approach to reducing open rotor noise should include techniques for mitigating the wake of the front rotor as well as eliminating the interaction of the front rotor tip vortex with the aft rotor blade tip.

  11. Flow and noise predictions for the tandem cylinder aeroacoustic benchmarka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brès, Guillaume A.; Freed, David; Wessels, Michael; Noelting, Swen; Pérot, Franck

    2012-03-01

    Flow and noise predictions for the tandem cylinder benchmark are performed using lattice Boltzmann and Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings methods. The numerical results are compared to experimental measurements from the Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel and Quiet Flow Facility (QFF) at NASA Langley Research Center. The present study focuses on two configurations: the first configuration corresponds to the typical setup with uniform inflow and spanwise periodic boundary condition. To investigate installation effects, the second configuration matches the QFF setup and geometry, including the rectangular open jet nozzle, and the two vertical side plates mounted in the span to support the test models. For both simulations, the full span of 16 cylinder diameters is simulated, matching the experimental dimensions. Overall, good agreement is obtained with the experimental surface data, flow field, and radiated noise measurements. In particular, the presence of the side plates significantly reduces the excessive spanwise coherence observed with periodic boundary conditions and improves the predictions of the tonal peak amplitude in the far-field noise spectra. Inclusion of the contributions from the side plates in the calculation of the radiated noise shows an overall increase in the predicted spectra and directivity, leading to a better match with the experimental measurements. The measured increase is about 1 to 2 dB at the main shedding frequency and harmonics, and is likely caused by reflections on the spanwise side plates. The broadband levels are also slightly higher by about 2 to 3 dB, likely due to the shear layers from the nozzle exit impacting the side plates.

  12. The Aeroacoustics and Aerodynamics of High-Speed Coanda Devices, Part 1: Conventional Arrangement of Exit Nozzle and Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, P. W.; Green, P. N.

    1997-12-01

    The literature on high-speed Coanda flows and its applications is reviewed. The lack of basic information for design engineers is noted. The present paper is based on an investigation of the aeroacoustics and aerodynamics of the high-speed Coanda flow that is formed when a supersonic jet issues from a radial nozzle and adheres to a tulip-shaped body of revolution. Schlieren and other flow visualization techniques together with theoretical methods are used to reveal the various features of this complex flow field. The acoustic characteristics were obtained from measurements with an array of microphones in an anechoic chamber. The emphasis is placed on those features of the aerodynamics and aeroacoustics which may be of general interest.

  13. Meta-Analysis of Parkinson's Disease Transcriptome Data Using TRAM Software: Whole Substantia Nigra Tissue and Single Dopamine Neuron Differential Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Elisa; Frabetti, Flavia; Tarozzi, Andrea; Pelleri, Maria Chiara; Pizzetti, Fabrizio; Casadei, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the genetic basis of the Parkinson's disease (PD) and the correlation between genotype and phenotype has revolutionized our knowledge about the pathogenetic mechanisms of neurodegeneration, opening up exciting new therapeutic and neuroprotective perspectives. Genomic knowledge of PD is still in its early stages and can provide a good start for studies of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the gene expression variations and the epigenetic mechanisms that may contribute to the complex and characteristic phenotype of PD. In this study we used the software TRAM (Transcriptome Mapper) to analyse publicly available microarray data of a total of 151 PD patients and 130 healthy controls substantia nigra (SN) samples, to identify chromosomal segments and gene loci differential expression. In particular, we separately analyzed PD patients and controls data from post-mortem snap-frozen SN whole tissue and from laser microdissected midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons, to better characterize the specific DA neuronal expression profile associated with the late-stage Parkinson's condition. The default "Map" mode analysis resulted in 10 significantly over/under-expressed segments, mapping on 8 different chromosomes for SN whole tissue and in 4 segments mapping on 4 different chromosomes for DA neurons. In conclusion, TRAM software allowed us to confirm the deregulation of some genomic regions and loci involved in key molecular pathways related to neurodegeneration, as well as to provide new insights about genes and non-coding RNA transcripts not yet associated with the disease. PMID:27611585

  14. Simulations of the loading and radiated sound of airfoils and wings in unsteady flow using computational aeroacoustics and parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockard, David Patrick

    This thesis makes contributions towards the use of computational aeroacoustics (CAA) as a tool for noise analysis. CAA uses numerical methods to simulate acoustic phenomena. CAA algorithms have been shown to reproduce wave propagation much better than traditional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods. In the current approach, a finite-difference, time-domain algorithm is used to simulate unsteady, compressible flows. Dispersion-relation-preserving methodology is used to extend the range of frequencies that can be represented properly by the scheme. Since CAA algorithms are relatively inefficient at obtaining a steady-state solution, multigrid methods are applied to accelerate the convergence. All of the calculations are performed on parallel computers. Excellent speedup ratios are obtained for the explicit, time-stepping algorithm used in this research. A common problem in the area of broadband noise is the prediction of the acoustic field generated by a vortical gust impinging on a solid body. The problem is modeled initially in two-dimensions by a flat plate experiencing a uniform mean flow with a sinusoidal, vertical velocity perturbation. Good agreement is obtained with results from semi-analytic methods for several gust frequencies. Then, a cascade of plates is used to simulate a turbomachinery blade row. A new approach is used to impose the vortical disturbance inside the computational domain rather than imposing it at the computational boundary. The influence of the mean flow on the radiated noise is examined by considering NACA0012 and RAE2822 airfoils. After a steady-state is obtained from the multigrid method, the un-steady simulation is used to model the vortical gust's interaction with the airfoil. The mean loading on the airfoil is shown to have a significant effect on the directivity of the sound with the strongest influence observed for high frequencies. Camber is shown to have a similar effect as the angle of attack. A three-dimensional problem

  15. Effects of cavity dimensions, boundary layer, and temperature on cavity noise with emphasis on benchmark data to validate computational aeroacoustic codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Mendoza, J.

    1995-01-01

    This report documents the results of an experimental investigation on the response of a cavity to external flowfields. The primary objective of this research was to acquire benchmark of data on the effects of cavity length, width, depth, upstream boundary layer, and flow temperature on cavity noise. These data were to be used for validation of computational aeroacoustic (CAA) codes on cavity noise. To achieve this objective, a systematic set of acoustic and flow measurements were made for subsonic turbulent flows approaching a cavity. These measurements were conducted in the research facilities of the Georgia Tech research institute. Two cavity models were designed, one for heated flow and another for unheated flow studies. Both models were designed such that the cavity length (L) could easily be varied while holding fixed the depth (D) and width (W) dimensions of the cavity. Depth and width blocks were manufactured so that these dimensions could be varied as well. A wall jet issuing from a rectangular nozzle was used to simulate flows over the cavity.

  16. Wind Tunnel Aeroacoustic Tests of Six Airfoils for Use on Small Wind Turbines; Period of Performance: August 23, 2002 through March 31, 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Oerlemans, S.

    2004-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, working through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, is engaged in a comprehensive research effort to improve our understanding of wind turbine aeroacoustics. Quiet wind turbines are an inducement to widespread deployment, so the goal of NREL's aeroacoustic research is to develop tools that the U.S. wind industry can use in developing and deploying highly efficient, quiet wind turbines at low wind speed sites. NREL's National Wind Technology Center is implementing a multifaceted approach that includes wind tunnel tests, field tests, and theoretical analyses in direct support of low wind speed turbine development by its industry partners. To that end, wind tunnel aerodynamic tests and aeroacoustic tests have been performed on six airfoils that are candidates for use on small wind turbines. Results are documented in this report.

  17. The Aeroacoustics and Aerodynamics of High-Speed Coanda Devices, Part 2: Effects of Modifications for Flow Control and Noise Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, P. W.; Smith, C.

    1997-12-01

    The paper describes two studies of the effects of flow control devices on the aerodynamics and aeroacoustics of a high-speed Coanda flow that is formed when a supersonic jet issues from a radial nozzle and adheres to a tulip-shaped body of revolution. Shadowgraphy and other flow-visualization techniques are used to reveal the various features of the complex flow fields. The acoustic characteristics are obtained from far- and near-field measurements with an array of microphones in an anechoic chamber. First the effects of incorporating a step between the annular exit slot and the Coanda surface are investigated. The step is incorporated to ensure that the breakaway pressure is raised to a level well above the maximum operating pressure. It substantially increases the complexity of the flow field and acoustic characteristics. In particular, it promotes the generation of two groups of discrete tones. A theoretical model based on a self-generated feedback loop is proposed to explain how these tones are generated. The second study investigates the effects of replacing the annular exit slot with a saw-toothed one with the aim of eliminating the discrete tones and thereby substantially reducing the level of noise generated.

  18. Three-dimensional vortex analysis and aeroacoustic source characterization of jet core breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violato, Daniele; Scarano, Fulvio

    2012-11-01

    The 3D patterns of jet core breakdown are investigated in a jet at Re=5,000 by time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry in the range between 0 and 10 jet diameters. The characteristic pulsatile motion of vortex ring shedding and pairing culminates with the growth of primary in-plane and out-of-plane azimuthal waves and leads to the formation of streamwise vortices. Vortex ring humps are tilted and ejected along the axial direction as they are subjected to higher axial velocities. By the end of the potential core, this process causes the breakdown of the vortex ring regime and the onset of streamwise filaments oriented at 30-45 degrees to the jet axis. A three dimensional modal analysis of velocity and vorticity fields is conducted by proper orthogonal decomposition within the first 10 modes. The decomposed velocity fluctuations describe helical motion in the region of the jet core-breakdown and, further downstream, jet axis flapping and precession motions. By the end of the potential core, vorticity modes show travelling waves of radial and axial vorticity with a characteristic 40 degree inclination to the jet axis. Following Powell's aeroacoustic analogy, the instantaneous spatial distribution of the acoustic source term is mapped. Far-field acoustic predictions are given based on the direct evaluation of Powell's analogy with the tomographic data.

  19. Application of low dissipation and dispersion Runge-Kutta schemes to benchmark problems in computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, F. Q.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Manthey, J.

    1995-01-01

    We investigate accurate and efficient time advancing methods for computational aeroacoustics, where non-dissipative and non-dispersive properties are of critical importance. Our analysis pertains to the application of Runge-Kutta methods to high-order finite difference discretization. In many CFD applications, multi-stage Runge-Kutta schemes have often been favored for their low storage requirements and relatively large stability limits. For computing acoustic waves, however, the stability consideration alone is not sufficient, since the Runge-Kutta schemes entail both dissipation and dispersion errors. The time step is now limited by the tolerable dissipation and dispersion errors in the computation. In the present paper, it is shown that if the traditional Runge-Kutta schemes are used for time advancing in acoustic problems, time steps greatly smaller than that allowed by the stability limit are necessary. Low Dissipation and Dispersion Runge-Kutta (LDDRK) schemes are proposed, based on an optimization that minimizes the dissipation and dispersion errors for wave propagation. Optimizations of both single-step and two-step alternating schemes are considered. The proposed LDDRK schemes are remarkably more efficient than the classical Runge-Kutta schemes for acoustic computations. Numerical results of each Category of the Benchmark Problems are presented. Moreover, low storage implementations of the optimized schemes are discussed. Special issues of implementing numerical boundary conditions in the LDDRK schemes are also addressed.

  20. Algorithms and Application of Sparse Matrix Assembly and Equation Solvers for Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, W. R.; Nguyen, D. T.; Reddy, C. J.; Vatsa, V. N.; Tang, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    An algorithm for symmetric sparse equation solutions on an unstructured grid is described. Efficient, sequential sparse algorithms for degree-of-freedom reordering, supernodes, symbolic/numerical factorization, and forward backward solution phases are reviewed. Three sparse algorithms for the generation and assembly of symmetric systems of matrix equations are presented. The accuracy and numerical performance of the sequential version of the sparse algorithms are evaluated over the frequency range of interest in a three-dimensional aeroacoustics application. Results show that the solver solutions are accurate using a discretization of 12 points per wavelength. Results also show that the first assembly algorithm is impractical for high-frequency noise calculations. The second and third assembly algorithms have nearly equal performance at low values of source frequencies, but at higher values of source frequencies the third algorithm saves CPU time and RAM. The CPU time and the RAM required by the second and third assembly algorithms are two orders of magnitude smaller than that required by the sparse equation solver. A sequential version of these sparse algorithms can, therefore, be conveniently incorporated into a substructuring for domain decomposition formulation to achieve parallel computation, where different substructures are handles by different parallel processors.

  1. An Automated Approach to Very High Order Aeroacoustic Computations in Complex Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.; Goodrich, John W.

    2000-01-01

    Computational aeroacoustics requires efficient, high-resolution simulation tools. And for smooth problems, this is best accomplished with very high order in space and time methods on small stencils. But the complexity of highly accurate numerical methods can inhibit their practical application, especially in irregular geometries. This complexity is reduced by using a special form of Hermite divided-difference spatial interpolation on Cartesian grids, and a Cauchy-Kowalewslci recursion procedure for time advancement. In addition, a stencil constraint tree reduces the complexity of interpolating grid points that are located near wall boundaries. These procedures are used to automatically develop and implement very high order methods (>15) for solving the linearized Euler equations that can achieve less than one grid point per wavelength resolution away from boundaries by including spatial derivatives of the primitive variables at each grid point. The accuracy of stable surface treatments is currently limited to 11th order for grid aligned boundaries and to 2nd order for irregular boundaries.

  2. Development of Experimental and Computational Aeroacoustic Tools for Advanced Liner Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R.; Nark, Douglas N.; Parrott, Tony L.; Gerhold, Carl H.; Brown, Martha C.

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic liners in aircraft engine nacelles suppress radiated noise. Therefore, as air travel increases, increasingly sophisticated tools are needed to maximize noise suppression. During the last 30 years, NASA has invested significant effort in development of experimental and computational acoustic liner evaluation tools. The Curved Duct Test Rig is a 152-mm by 381- mm curved duct that supports liner evaluation at Mach numbers up to 0.3 and source SPLs up to 140 dB, in the presence of user-selected modes. The Grazing Flow Impedance Tube is a 51- mm by 63-mm duct currently being fabricated to operate at Mach numbers up to 0.6 with source SPLs up to at least 140 dB, and will replace the existing 51-mm by 51-mm duct. Together, these test rigs allow evaluation of advanced acoustic liners over a range of conditions representative of those observed in aircraft engine nacelles. Data acquired with these test ducts are processed using three aeroacoustic propagation codes. Two are based on finite element solutions to convected Helmholtz and linearized Euler equations. The third is based on a parabolic approximation to the convected Helmholtz equation. The current status of these computational tools and their associated usage with the Langley test rigs is provided.

  3. A new method for the estimation of high temperature radiant heat emittance by means of aero-acoustic levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greffrath, Fabian; Prieler, Robert; Telle, Rainer

    2014-11-01

    A new method for the experimental estimation of radiant heat emittance at high temperatures has been developed which involves aero-acoustic levitation of samples, laser heating and contactless temperature measurement. Radiant heat emittance values are determined from the time dependent development of the sample temperature which requires analysis of both the radiant and convective heat transfer towards the surroundings by means of fluid dynamics calculations. First results for the emittance of a corundum sample obtained with this method are presented in this article and found in good agreement with literature values.

  4. Aeroacoustics of volcanic jets: Acoustic power estimation and jet velocity dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoza, Robin S.; Fee, David; Neilsen, Tracianne B.; Gee, Kent L.; Ogden, Darcy E.

    2013-12-01

    A fundamental goal of volcano acoustics is to relate observed infrasonic signals to the eruptive processes generating them. A link between acoustic power Πaeroacoustics framework will lead to a more accurate relationship between volcanic infrasound and eruption parameters.

  5. An introduction to generalized functions with some applications in aerodynamics and aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we start with the definition of generalized functions as continuous linear functionals on the space of infinitely differentiable functions with compact support. The concept of generalization differentiation is introduced next. This is the most important concept in generalized function theory and the applications we present utilize mainly this concept. First, some of the results of classical analysis, such as Leibniz rule of differentiation under the integral sign and the divergence theorem, are derived using the generalized function theory. It is shown that the divergence theorem remains valid for discontinuous vector fields provided that the derivatives are all viewed as generalized derivatives. This implies that all conservation laws of fluid mechanics are valid as they stand for discontinuous fields with all derivatives treated as generalized deriatives. Once these derivatives are written as ordinary derivatives and jumps in the field parameters across discontinuities, the jump conditions can be easily found. For example, the unsteady shock jump conditions can be derived from mass and momentum conservation laws. By using a generalized function theory, this derivative becomes trivial. Other applications of the generalized function theory in aerodynamics discussed in this paper are derivation of general transport theorems for deriving governing equations of fluid mechanics, the interpretation of finite part of divergent integrals, derivation of Oswatiitsch integral equation of transonic flow, and analysis of velocity field discontinuities as sources of vorticity. Applications in aeroacoustics presented here include the derivation of the Kirchoff formula for moving surfaces,the noise from moving surfaces, and shock noise source strength based on the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation.

  6. Reducing Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustic Interactions with Uniquely Tailored Chevrons. 2; Installed Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G.; Elkoby, Ronen; Brusniak, Leon; Thomas, Russ H.

    2006-01-01

    Propulsion airframe aeroacoustic (PAA) interactions arise due to the manner in which an engine is installed on the airframe and lead to an asymmetry in the flow/acoustic environment, for example, for under-the-wing installations due to the pylon, the wing and the high-lift devices. In this work we study how we can affect these PAA interactions to reduce the overall jet-related installed noise by tailoring the chevron shapes on fan and core nozzles in a unique fashion to take advantage of this asymmetry. In part 1 of this trio of papers we introduced the concept of azimuthally varying chevrons (AVC) and showed how some types of AVCs can be more beneficial than the conventional chevrons when tested on "isolated" scaled nozzles inclusive of the pylon effect. In this paper, we continue to study the effect of installing these AVC nozzles under a typical scaled modern wing with high-lift devices placed in a free jet. The noise benefits of these installed nozzles, as well as their installation effects are systematically studied for several fan/core AVC combinations at typical take-off conditions with high bypass ratio. We show, for example, that the top-enhanced mixing T-fan AVC nozzle (with enhanced mixing near the pylon and less mixing away from it) when combined with conventional chevrons on the core nozzle is quieter than conventional chevrons on both nozzles, and hardly produces any high-frequency lift, just as in the isolated case; however, its installed nozzle benefit is less than its isolated nozzle benefit. This suppression of take-off noise benefit under installed conditions, compared to its isolated nozzle benefit, is seen for all other chevron nozzles. We show how these relative noise benefits are related to the relative installation effects of AVCs and baseline nozzles.

  7. Aeroacoustic source analysis using time-resolved PIV in a free jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breakey, David E. S.; Fitzpatrick, John A.; Meskell, Craig

    2013-05-01

    Time-resolved particle image velocimetry (TR-PIV) has become a valuable tool for spatio-temporally resolved flow measurements. Current camera and laser technology has advanced such that time-domain events leading to sound generation can now be resolved over a reasonable spatial extent. This paper reports on the application of TR-PIV for the analysis of aeroacoustic sources in a free jet using the direct correlation between in-flow velocity fluctuations on the jet center-line and near-field pressure fluctuations. This correlation is considered both in the time domain and in the frequency domain (coherence), and the effect of TR-PIV errors on these estimates is considered by comparison to hot-wire anemometer measurements. In addition, a recently developed wavelet filtering technique is used to separate the acoustic and hydrodynamic components of recorded near-field pressure signals, enabling a gain in the signal-to-noise ratio. The results show that TR-PIV can recover the same time-domain correlation available from hot-wire and traditional PIV measurements, but that the frequency-domain estimates are corrupted by error, particularly at high frequencies. This result negates the principal benefit of using TR-PIV over PIV (the availability of coherence estimates). Despite this result, an analysis of the correlation signature gives evidence that large-scale, convecting, wave-like structures are associated with sound production, a result consistent with observations by many recent investigators. The analysis shows that in the presence of such large-scale structures, noise source localization based on the traditional correlation technique is ambiguous.

  8. Design and aero-acoustic analysis of a counter-rotating wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Vineesh V.

    Wind turbines have become an integral part of the energy business because they are one of the most economical and reliable sources of renewable energy. Conventional wind turbines are capable of capturing less than half of the energy present in the wind. Hence, to make the wind turbines more efficient, it is important to increase their performance. A horizontal axis wind turbine with multiple rotors is one concept that can achieve a higher power conversion rate. Also, a concern for wind energy is the noise generated by wind turbines. Hence, an investigation into the acoustic behavior of a multi-rotor horizontal axis wind turbine is required. In response to the need of a wind turbine design with higher power coefficient, a unique design of a counter-rotating horizontal axis wind turbine (CR-HAWT) is proposed. The Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory is used to aerodynamically design the blades of the two rotors. Modifications are made to the BEM theory to accommodate the interaction of the two rotors. The tower effect on the noise generation of the downwind rotor is investigated. Predictions are made for the total noise generated by the wind turbine at its design operating conditions. A total power coefficient of 65.2% is predicted for the proposed CR-HAWT design. A low tip speed ratio is chosen to minimize the noise generation. The aeroacoustic analysis of the CR-HAWT shows that the noise generated at its design operating conditions is within an acceptable range. Thus, the CR-HAWT is predicted to be a quiet wind turbine with a high power coefficient, making it highly desirable for small wind turbine applications.

  9. Traversing Microphone Track Installed in NASA Lewis' Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory Dome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, Steven W.; Perusek, Gail P.

    1999-01-01

    The Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory is an acoustically treated, 65-ft-tall dome located at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Inside this laboratory is the Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig (NATR), which is used in support of Advanced Subsonics Technology (AST) and High Speed Research (HSR) to test engine exhaust nozzles for thrust and acoustic performance under simulated takeoff conditions. Acoustic measurements had been gathered by a far-field array of microphones located along the dome wall and 10-ft above the floor. Recently, it became desirable to collect acoustic data for engine certifications (as specified by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)) that would simulate the noise of an aircraft taking off as heard from an offset ground location. Since nozzles for the High-Speed Civil Transport have straight sides that cause their noise signature to vary radially, an additional plane of acoustic measurement was required. Desired was an arched array of 24 microphones, equally spaced from the nozzle and each other, in a 25 off-vertical plane. The various research requirements made this a challenging task. The microphones needed to be aimed at the nozzle accurately and held firmly in place during testing, but it was also essential that they be easily and routinely lowered to the floor for calibration and servicing. Once serviced, the microphones would have to be returned to their previous location near the ceiling. In addition, there could be no structure could between the microphones and the nozzle, and any structure near the microphones would have to be designed to minimize noise reflections. After many concepts were considered, a single arched truss structure was selected that would be permanently affixed to the dome ceiling and to one end of the dome floor.

  10. Forward velocity effects on fan noise and the influence of inlet aeroacoustic design as measured in the NASA Ames 40 x 80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, R. G.; Langenbrunner, L. E.; Mccann, E. O.

    1981-01-01

    The inlet radiated noise of a turbofan engine was studied. The principal research objectives were to characterize or suppress such noise with particular regard to its tonal characteristics. The major portion of this research was conducted by using ground-based static testing without simulation of aircraft forward speed or aircraft installation-related aeroacoustic effects.

  11. Experimental analysis of the aero-acoustic coupling in a plane impinging jet on a slotted plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assoum, Hassan H.; El Hassan, Mouhammad; Abed-Meraïm, Kamel; Martinuzzi, Robert; Sakout, Anas

    2013-08-01

    Impinging jets are encountered in many industrial applications and suppression of the noise generated by these jets is of great fundamental and practical interest. The vortex dynamics and the interaction between the vortical structures and the impinging wall should be understood in order to control the aero-acoustic coupling between shear layer oscillation and the acoustic modes (self-sustained tones). In this study, a plane jet issuing from a rectangular nozzle and impinging on a plate is considered for Re = 3900. The sound pressure, the vibration of the impinged plate and the spatial velocity field are obtained simultaneously using a microphone, an accelerometer and the time-resolved particle image velocimetry technique, respectively. Spectra and cross-correlations are used to educe the role of different vortical structures leading to the aero-acoustic coupling. The results show the evolution of the correlation between acoustic and transverse velocity fields in the longitudinal direction. A pre-whitening technique is used to investigate the coupling between the acoustic and the velocity signals. This method shows that the correlation between the two signals has a centred peak that is not directly related to the passage of the dominant Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices.

  12. Results of Aero/Acoustic Tests and Analytical Studies of a Two-Dimensional Eight-Lobe Mixer-Ejector Exhaust Nozzle at Takeoff Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Douglas (Technical Monitor); Schweiger, P.; Stern, A.; Gamble, E.; Barber, T.; Chiappetta, L.; LaBarre, R.; Salikuddin, M.; Shin, H.; Majjigi, R.

    2005-01-01

    Hot flow aero-acoustic tests were conducted with Pratt & Whitney's High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Mixer-Ejector Exhaust Nozzles by General Electric Aircraft Engines (GEAE) in the GEAE Anechoic Freejet Noise Facility (Cell 41) located in Evendale, Ohio. The tests evaluated the impact of various geometric and design parameters on the noise generated by a two-dimensional (2-D) shrouded, 8-lobed, mixer-ejector exhaust nozzle. The shrouded mixer-ejector provides noise suppression by mixing relatively low energy ambient air with the hot, high-speed primary exhaust jet. Additional attenuation was obtained by lining the shroud internal walls with acoustic panels, which absorb acoustic energy generated during the mixing process. Two mixer designs were investigated, the high mixing "vortical" and aligned flow "axial", along with variations in the shroud internal mixing area ratios and shroud length. The shrouds were tested as hardwall or lined with acoustic panels packed with a bulk absorber. A total of 21 model configurations at 1:11.47 scale were tested. The models were tested over a range of primary nozzle pressure ratios and primary exhaust temperatures representative of typical HSCT aero thermodynamic cycles. Static as well as flight simulated data were acquired during testing. A round convergent unshrouded nozzle was tested to provide an acoustic baseline for comparison to the test configurations. Comparisons were made to previous test results obtained with this hardware at NASA Glenn's 9- by 15-foot low-speed wind tunnel (LSWT). Laser velocimetry was used to investigate external as well as ejector internal velocity profiles for comparison to computational predictions. Ejector interior wall static pressure data were also obtained. A significant reduction in exhaust system noise was demonstrated with the 2-D shrouded nozzle designs.

  13. Three-dimensional vortex analysis and aeroacoustic source characterization of jet core breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violato, Daniele; Scarano, Fulvio

    2013-01-01

    The three-dimensional behavior of jet core breakdown is investigated with experiments conducted on a free water jet at Re = 5000 by time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry (TR-TOMO PIV). The investigated domain encompasses the range between 0 and 10 jet diameters. The characteristic pulsatile motion of vortex ring shedding and pairing culminates with the growth of four primary in-plane and out-of-plane azimuthal waves and leads to the formation of streamwise vortices. Vortex ring humps are tilted and ejected along the axial direction as they are subjected to higher axial velocities. By the end of the potential core, this process causes the breakdown of the vortex ring regime and the onset of streamwise filaments oriented at 30°-45° to the jet axis and "C" shaped peripheral structures. The latter re-organize further downstream in filaments oriented along the azimuthal direction at the jet periphery. Instead, in the vicinity of the jet axis the filaments do not exhibit any preferential direction resembling the isotropic turbulent regime. Following Powell's aeroacoustic analogy, the instantaneous spatial distribution of the acoustic source term is mapped by the second time derivative of the Lamb vector, revealing the highest activity during vortex ring breakdown. A three-dimensional modal analysis of velocity, vorticity, Lamb vector, and Lamb vector second time derivative fields is conducted by proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) within the first 10 modes. The decomposed velocity fluctuations describe a helical organization in the region of the jet core-breakdown and, further downstream, jet axis flapping and precession motions. By the end of the potential core, vorticity modes show that vortex rings are dominated by travelling waves of radial and axial vorticity with a characteristic 40°-45° inclination to the jet axis. The Lamb vector and the Lamb vector second time derivative modes exhibit similar patterns for the azimuthal component, whereas the

  14. Sound Radiation from Ducted Fans Using Computational Aeroacoustics on Parallel Computers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozyoruk, Yusuf

    1995-01-01

    As a component of a more advanced, new generation fan noise prediction technology, a computational aeroacoustics algorithm has been developed using an entirely new approach. Unlike previous approaches, the current method accounts for the nonuniform background flow and aerodynamic-acoustic coupling issues by solving the 3-D, time-dependent, full nonlinear Euler equations (although the developed computer program is a Navier-Stokes solver). The equations are solved on a 3-D body fitted curvilinear coordinate system using temporally and spatially 4th-order accurate finite difference, Runge -Kutta time integration. The time-accurate flow field is determined only in a relatively small physical domain using nonreflecting boundary conditions on its outer boundaries. A moving surface Kirchhoff method using the formulation of Farassat and Myers has been developed and coupled to the flow solver for far-field noise predictions. The acoustic field is obtained by subtracting the mean field from the total field. To establish the mean flow field, steady state solutions are required and Jameson's full approximation storage multigrid method has been extended to make use of the current high resolution algorithm for obtaining such solutions fast. Formulations in cylindrical coordinates together with cell-centered finite differencing are used to effectively treat the grid singularity along the centerline. Well designed grids aid this treatment. A 3-D grid generator has been developed using the conformal mappings of Ives and Menor to provide the hybrid radiation code with capabilities for very rapid and good quality mesh generation. The hybrid radiation code has been written in CM-Fortran, which is essentially High Performance Fortran. Some novel optimization procedures have been developed and implemented in the code, which runs efficiently on the CM-200 and CM-5 parallel computers. The code has been tested solving a large variety of problems, ranging from an oscillating piston problem

  15. Statistical modelling of particle number concentration in Zurich at high spatio-temporal resolution utilizing data from a mobile sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, M. D.; Hasenfratz, David; Saukh, Olga; Fierz, Martin; Hueglin, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Highly resolved pollution maps are a valuable resource for many issues related to air quality including exposure modelling and urban planning. We present an approach for their generation based on data from a mobile sensor network and statistical modelling. An extensive record of particle number concentrations (PNCs) spanning more than 1.5 years was compiled by the tram-based OpenSense mobile sensor network in the City of Zurich. The sensor network consists of 10 sensor nodes installed on the roof of trams operating on different services according to their regular operation schedules. We developed a statistical modelling approach based on Generalized Additive models (GAMs) utilizing the PNC data obtained along the tram tracks as well as georeferenced information as predictor variables. Our approach includes a variable selection algorithm to ensure that individual models rely on the optimal set of predictor variables. Our models have high temporal and spatial resolutions of 30 min and 10 m by 10 m, respectively, and allow the spatial prediction of PNC in the municipal area of Zurich. We applied our approach to PNC data from two dedicated time periods: July-Sept. 2013 and Dec. 2013-Feb. 2014. The models strongly rely on traffic related predictor variables (vehicle counts) and, due to the hilly topography of Zurich, on elevation. We assessed the model performance by leave-one-out cross-validation and by comparing PNC predictions to measurements at fixed reference sites and to PNC measurements obtained by pedestrians. Model predictions reproduce well the main features of the PNC field in environment types similar to those passed by individual trams. Model performance is worse at elevated background locations probably due to the weak coverage of similar spots by the tram network. We end the paper by outlining a route finding algorithm which utilizes the highly resolved PNC maps providing the exposure minimal route for cyclists.

  16. A comparison of data reduction techniques for the aeroacoustic analysis of flow over a blunt flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debesse, Ph.; Pastur, L.; Lusseyran, F.; Fraigneau, Y.; Tenaud, C.; Bonamy, C.; Cavalieri, A. V. G.; Jordan, P.

    2016-06-01

    A large eddy simulation of flow over a forward-facing plate is performed and the resulting database analyzed with respect to sound radiation. Aeroacoustic analysis motivates an initial data compression comprising eduction of the zeroth-order spanwise Fourier mode. The space-time structure of this component of the flow is then analyzed using POD and DMD in order to probe both the energetics and dynamics of the sound-producing flow skeleton. Both data processing techniques educe flapping and shedding modes and identify a nonlinear interaction between the two. POD shows the flapping mode to be energetically unimportant, while DMD highlights its dynamic importance. The difference mode—vortex shedding modulated by flapping of the separation bubble—is found to be the most acoustically important feature of the flow.

  17. Enhancing the focal-resolution of aeroacoustic time-reversal using a point sponge-layer damping technique.

    PubMed

    Mimani, A; Doolan, C J; Medwell, P R

    2014-09-01

    This letter presents the Point-Time-Reversal-Sponge-Layer (PTRSL) technique to enhance the focal-resolution of aeroacoustic Time-Reversal (TR). A PTRSL is implemented on a square domain centered at the predicted source location and is based on damping the radial components of the incoming and outgoing fluxes propagating toward and away from the source, respectively. A PTRSL is shown to overcome the conventional half-wavelength diffraction-limit; its implementation significantly reduces the focal spot size to one-fifth of a wavelength for a monopole source. Furthermore, PTRSL reduces the focal spots of a dipole source to three-tenths of a wavelength, as compared to three-fifths without its implementation. PMID:25190421

  18. A comparison of data reduction techniques for the aeroacoustic analysis of flow over a blunt flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debesse, Ph.; Pastur, L.; Lusseyran, F.; Fraigneau, Y.; Tenaud, C.; Bonamy, C.; Cavalieri, A. V. G.; Jordan, P.

    2015-12-01

    A large eddy simulation of flow over a forward-facing plate is performed and the resulting database analyzed with respect to sound radiation. Aeroacoustic analysis motivates an initial data compression comprising eduction of the zeroth-order spanwise Fourier mode. The space-time structure of this component of the flow is then analyzed using POD and DMD in order to probe both the energetics and dynamics of the sound-producing flow skeleton. Both data processing techniques educe flapping and shedding modes and identify a nonlinear interaction between the two. POD shows the flapping mode to be energetically unimportant, while DMD highlights its dynamic importance. The difference mode—vortex shedding modulated by flapping of the separation bubble—is found to be the most acoustically important feature of the flow.

  19. Spatial variability of particle number concentrations and NOx in the Karlsruhe (Germany) area obtained with the mobile laboratory ‘AERO-TRAM'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemann, Rowell; Corsmeier, Ulrich; Kottmeier, Christoph; Rinke, Rayk; Wieser, Andreas; Vogel, Bernhard

    2014-09-01

    For the first time in Germany, we obtained high-resolution spatial distributions of particle numbers and nitrogen oxides in an urban agglomeration using a tram system. In comparison to particle numbers the NOx concentration decreased much faster with a significantly steeper gradient when going from the inner city to the surrounding area. In case of NOx the decrease was 70% while for particle number concentration it was only 50%. We found an area in the rural surrounding with a second increase of particle numbers without simultaneous enhanced NOx levels. The source of the high particle numbers could be ascribed to industry emissions about 5-10 km away. The mean spatial distribution of particle number concentration depended on wind direction, wind velocity and boundary layer stability. The dependency was particularly strong in the rural area affected by industrial emissions, where individual wind directions led to concentration differences of up to 25%. The particulate concentration was 40% higher during low wind velocities (1-5 m s-1) than during high wind velocities (>5 m s-1). We observed similar findings for the impact of boundary layer stability on particle numbers concentration. Particle pollution was 40% higher for stable stratification compared to neutral or unstable cases.

  20. High Order Discontinuous Gelerkin Methods for Convection Dominated Problems with Application to Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Chi-Wang

    2000-01-01

    This project is about the investigation of the development of the discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods, for general geometry and triangulations, for solving convection dominated problems, with applications to aeroacoustics. On the analysis side, we have studied the efficient and stable discontinuous Galerkin framework for small second derivative terms, for example in Navier-Stokes equations, and also for related equations such as the Hamilton-Jacobi equations. This is a truly local discontinuous formulation where derivatives are considered as new variables. On the applied side, we have implemented and tested the efficiency of different approaches numerically. Related issues in high order ENO and WENO finite difference methods and spectral methods have also been investigated. Jointly with Hu, we have presented a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for solving the nonlinear Hamilton-Jacobi equations. This method is based on the RungeKutta discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for solving conservation laws. The method has the flexibility of treating complicated geometry by using arbitrary triangulation, can achieve high order accuracy with a local, compact stencil, and are suited for efficient parallel implementation. One and two dimensional numerical examples are given to illustrate the capability of the method. Jointly with Hu, we have constructed third and fourth order WENO schemes on two dimensional unstructured meshes (triangles) in the finite volume formulation. The third order schemes are based on a combination of linear polynomials with nonlinear weights, and the fourth order schemes are based on combination of quadratic polynomials with nonlinear weights. We have addressed several difficult issues associated with high order WENO schemes on unstructured mesh, including the choice of linear and nonlinear weights, what to do with negative weights, etc. Numerical examples are shown to demonstrate the accuracies and robustness of the

  1. Large-scale aeroacoustic research feasibility and conceptual design of test-section inserts for the Ames 80- by 120-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Olsen, Larry E.

    1990-01-01

    An engineering feasibility study was made of aeroacoustic inserts designed for large-scale acoustic research on aircraft models in the 80 by 120 foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The advantages and disadvantages of likely designs were analyzed. Results indicate that the required maximum airspeed leads to the design of a particular insert. Using goals of 200, 150, and 100 knots airspeed, the analysis indicated a 30 x 60 ft open-jet test section, a 40 x 80 ft open jet test section, and a 70 x 100 ft closed test section with enhanced wall lining, respectively. The open-jet inserts would be composed of a nozzle, collector, diffuser, and acoutic wedges incorporated in the existing 80 x 120 test section. The closed test section would be composed of approximately 5 ft acoustic wedges covered by a porous plate attached to the test section walls of the existing 80 x 120. All designs would require a double row of acoustic vanes between the test section and fan drive to attenuate fan noise and, in the case of the open-jet designs, to control flow separation at the diffuser downstream end. The inserts would allow virtually anechoic acoustic studies of large helicopter models, jets, and V/STOL aircraft models in simulated flight. Model scale studies would be necessary to optimize the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of any of the designs. In all designs studied, the existing structure would have to be reinforced. Successful development of acoustically transparent walls, though not strictly necessary to the project, would lead to a porous-wall test section that could be substituted for any of the open-jet designs, and thereby eliminate many aerodynamic and acoustic problems characteristic of open-jet shear layers. The larger size of the facility would make installation and removal of the insert components difficult. Consequently, scheduling of the existing 80 x 120 aerodynamic test section and scheduling of the open-jet test section would likely be made on an

  2. Unified aeroacoustics analysis for high speed turboprop aerodynamics and noise. Volume 3: Application of theory for blade loading, wakes, noise, and wing shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D. B.; Mccolgan, C. J.; Ladden, R. M.; Klatte, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    Results of the program for the generation of a computer prediction code for noise of advanced single rotation, turboprops (prop-fans) such as the SR3 model are presented. The code is based on a linearized theory developed at Hamilton Standard in which aerodynamics and acoustics are treated as a unified process. Both steady and unsteady blade loading are treated. Capabilities include prediction of steady airload distributions and associated aerodynamic performance, unsteady blade pressure response to gust interaction or blade vibration, noise fields associated with thickness and steady and unsteady loading, and wake velocity fields associated with steady loading. The code was developed on the Hamilton Standard IBM computer and has now been installed on the Cray XMP at NASA-Lewis. The work had its genesis in the frequency domain acoustic theory developed at Hamilton Standard in the late 1970s. It was found that the method used for near field noise predictions could be adapted as a lifting surface theory for aerodynamic work via the pressure potential technique that was used for both wings and ducted turbomachinery. In the first realization of the theory for propellers, the blade loading was represented in a quasi-vortex lattice form. This was upgraded to true lifting surface loading. Originally, it was believed that a purely linear approach for both aerodynamics and noise would be adequate. However, two sources of nonlinearity in the steady aerodynamics became apparent and were found to be a significant factor at takeoff conditions. The first is related to the fact that the steady axial induced velocity may be of the same order of magnitude as the flight speed and the second is the formation of leading edge vortices which increases lift and redistribute loading. Discovery and properties of prop-fan leading edge vortices were reported in two papers. The Unified AeroAcoustic Program (UAAP) capabilites are demonstrated and the theory verified by comparison with the

  3. Unified aeroacoustics analysis for high speed turboprop aerodynamics and noise. Volume 3: Application of theory for blade loading, wakes, noise, and wing shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, D. B.; McColgan, C. J.; Ladden, R. M.; Klatte, R. J.

    1991-05-01

    Results of the program for the generation of a computer prediction code for noise of advanced single rotation, turboprops (prop-fans) such as the SR3 model are presented. The code is based on a linearized theory developed at Hamilton Standard in which aerodynamics and acoustics are treated as a unified process. Both steady and unsteady blade loading are treated. Capabilities include prediction of steady airload distributions and associated aerodynamic performance, unsteady blade pressure response to gust interaction or blade vibration, noise fields associated with thickness and steady and unsteady loading, and wake velocity fields associated with steady loading. The code was developed on the Hamilton Standard IBM computer and has now been installed on the Cray XMP at NASA-Lewis. The work had its genesis in the frequency domain acoustic theory developed at Hamilton Standard in the late 1970s. It was found that the method used for near field noise predictions could be adapted as a lifting surface theory for aerodynamic work via the pressure potential technique that was used for both wings and ducted turbomachinery. In the first realization of the theory for propellers, the blade loading was represented in a quasi-vortex lattice form. This was upgraded to true lifting surface loading. Originally, it was believed that a purely linear approach for both aerodynamics and noise would be adequate. However, two sources of nonlinearity in the steady aerodynamics became apparent and were found to be a significant factor at takeoff conditions. The first is related to the fact that the steady axial induced velocity may be of the same order of magnitude as the flight speed and the second is the formation of leading edge vortices which increases lift and redistribute loading. Discovery and properties of prop-fan leading edge vortices were reported in two papers. The Unified AeroAcoustic Program (UAAP) capabilites are demonstrated and the theory verified by comparison with the

  4. Formation of Y(x)Nd(1-x) Ba2Cu3O(7-delta) (0 = or < x < or = 0.7) Superconductors from an Undercooled Melt Via Aero-Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustafson, D. E.; Hofmeister, W. H.; Bayuzick, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Melt processing of RE123 superconductors has gained importance in recent years. While the first high temperature superconductors (HTSCs) were made using traditional ceramic press and sinter technology, recent fabrication efforts have employed alternate processing techniques including laser ablation and ion beam assisted deposition for thin film fabrication of tapes and wires and melt growth for bulk materials. To optimize these techniques and identify other potential processing strategies, phase relation studies on HTSCs have been conducted on a wide variety of superconducting compounds using numerous processing strategies. This data has enhanced the understanding of these complex systems and allowed more accurate modeling of phase interactions. All of this research has proved useful in identifying processing capabilities for HTSCs but has failed to achieve a breakthrough for wide spread application of these materials. This study examines the role of full to partial substitution of Nd in the Y123 structure under rapid solidification conditions. Aero-acoustic levitation (AAL) was used to levitate and undercool RE123 in pure oxygen binary alloys with RE = Nd an Y along a range of compositions corresponding to Y(x)Nd(1-x) Ba2Cu3O(7-delta) (0 = or < x < or = 0.7) which were melted by a CO2 laser. Higher Y content spheres could not be melted in the AAL and were excluded from this report. Solidification structures were examined using scanning electron microscopy, electron dispersive spectroscopy, and powder x-ray diffraction to characterize microstructures and identify phases.

  5. On sound scattering by rigid edges and wedges in a flow, with applications to high-lift device aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roger, Michel; Moreau, Stéphane; Kucukcoskun, Korcan

    2016-02-01

    Exact analytical solutions for the scattering of sound by the edge of a rigid half-plane and by a rigid corner in the presence of a uniform flow are considered in this work, for arbitrary source and observer locations. Exact Green's functions for the Helmholtz equation are first reviewed and implemented in a quiescent propagation space from reference expressions of the literature. The effect of uniform fluid motion is introduced in a second step and the properties of the field are discussed for point dipoles and quadrupoles. The asymptotic regime of a source close to the scattering edge/wedge and of an observer far from it in terms of acoustic wavelengths is derived in both cases. Its validity limits are assessed by comparing with the exact solutions. Typically the asymptotic directivity is imposed by Green's function but not by the source itself. This behaviour is associated with a strong enhancement of the radiation with respect to what the source would produce in free field. The amplification depends on the geometry, on the source type and on the source distance to the edge/wedge. Various applications in aeroacoustics of wall-bounded flows are addressed, more specifically dealing with high-lift device noise mechanisms, such as trailing-edge or flap side-edge noise. The asymptotic developments are used to highlight trends that are believed to play a role in airframe noise.

  6. An Assessment of NASA Glenn's Aeroacoustic Experimental and Predictive Capabilities for Installed Cooling Fans. Part 1; Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale E.; Koch, L. Danielle; Wernet, Mark P.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2006-01-01

    Driven by the need for low production costs, electronics cooling fans have evolved differently than the bladed components of gas turbine engines which incorporate multiple technologies to enhance performance and durability while reducing noise emissions. Drawing upon NASA Glenn's experience in the measurement and prediction of gas turbine engine aeroacoustic performance, tests have been conducted to determine if these tools and techniques can be extended for application to the aerodynamics and acoustics of electronics cooling fans. An automated fan plenum installed in NASA Glenn's Acoustical Testing Laboratory was used to map the overall aerodynamic and acoustic performance of a spaceflight qualified 80 mm diameter axial cooling fan. In order to more accurately identify noise sources, diagnose performance limiting aerodynamic deficiencies, and validate noise prediction codes, additional aerodynamic measurements were recorded for two operating points: free delivery and a mild stall condition. Non-uniformities in the fan s inlet and exhaust regions captured by Particle Image Velocimetry measurements, and rotor blade wakes characterized by hot wire anemometry measurements provide some assessment of the fan aerodynamic performance. The data can be used to identify fan installation/design changes which could enlarge the stable operating region for the fan and improve its aerodynamic performance and reduce noise emissions.

  7. Laser doppler velocimeter system for subsonic jet mixer nozzle testing at the NASA Lewis Aeroacoustic Propulsion Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary G.; Bridges, James E.; Saiyed, Naseem H.; Krupar, Martin J.

    1995-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) system developed for the Aeroacoustic Propulsion Laboratory (APL) at the NASA Lewis Research Center is described. This system was developed to acquire detailed flow field data which could be used to quantify the effectiveness of internal exhaust gas mixers (IEGM's) and to verify and calibrate computational codes. The LDV was used as an orthogonal, three component system to measure the flow field downstream of the exit of a series of IEGM's and a reference axisymmetric splitter configuration. The LDV system was also used as a one component system to measure the internal axial flow within the nozzle tailpipe downstream of the mixers. These IEGM's were designed for low-bypass ratio turbofan engines. The data were obtained at a simulated low flight speed, high-power operating condition. The optical, seeding, and data acquisition systems of the LDV are described in detail. Sample flow field measurements are provided to illustrate the capabilities of the system at the time of this test, which represented the first use of LDV at the APL. A discussion of planned improvements to the LDV is also included.

  8. Applications of the Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element (CE/SE) Method to Computational Aeroacoustic Benchmark Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Himansu, Ananda; Chang, Sin-Chung; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2000-01-01

    The Internal Propagation problems, Fan Noise problem, and Turbomachinery Noise problems are solved using the space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method. The problems in internal propagation problems address the propagation of sound waves through a nozzle. Both the nonlinear and linear quasi 1D Euler equations are solved. Numerical solutions are presented and compared with the analytical solution. The fan noise problem concerns the effect of the sweep angle on the acoustic field generated by the interaction of a convected gust with a cascade of 3D flat plates. A parallel version of the 3D CE/SE Euler solver is developed and employed to obtain numerical solutions for a family of swept flat plates. Numerical solutions for sweep angles of 0, 5, 10, and 15 deg are presented. The turbomachinery problems describe the interaction of a 2D vortical gust with a cascade of flat-plate airfoils with/without a downstream moving grid. The 2D nonlinear Euler Equations are solved and the converged numerical solutions are presented and compared with the corresponding analytical solution. All the comparisons demonstrate that the CE/SE method is capable of solving aeroacoustic problems with/without shock waves in a simple and efficient manner. Furthermore, the simple non-reflecting boundary condition used in the CE/SE method which is not based on the characteristic theory works very well in 1D, 2D and 3D problems.

  9. Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustics Technology Evaluation and Selection Using a Multi-Attribute Decision Making Process and Non-Deterministic Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burg, Cecile M.; Hill, Geoffrey A.; Brown, Sherilyn A.; Geiselhart, Karl A.

    2004-01-01

    The Systems Analysis Branch at NASA Langley Research Center has investigated revolutionary Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustics (PAA) technologies and configurations for a Blended-Wing-Body (BWB) type aircraft as part of its research for NASA s Quiet Aircraft Technology (QAT) Project. Within the context of the long-term NASA goal of reducing the perceived aircraft noise level by a factor of 4 relative to 1997 state of the art, major configuration changes in the propulsion airframe integration system were explored with noise as a primary design consideration. An initial down-select and assessment of candidate PAA technologies for the BWB was performed using a Multi-Attribute Decision Making (MADM) process consisting of organized brainstorming and decision-making tools. The assessments focused on what effect the PAA technologies had on both the overall noise level of the BWB and what effect they had on other major design considerations such as weight, performance and cost. A probabilistic systems analysis of the PAA configurations that presented the best noise reductions with the least negative impact on the system was then performed. Detailed results from the MADM study and the probabilistic systems analysis will be published in the near future.

  10. Estimating Blade Section Airloads from Blade Leading-Edge Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanAken, Johannes M.

    2003-01-01

    The Tilt-Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM) test in the Duitse-Nederlandse Wind (DNW) Tunnel acquired blade pressure data for forward flight test conditions of a tiltrotor in helicopter mode. Chordwise pressure data at seven radial locations were integrated to obtain the blade section normal force. The present investigation evaluates the use of linear regression analysis and of neural networks in estimating the blade section normal force coefficient from a limited number of blade leading-edge pressure measurements and representative operating conditions. These network models are subsequently used to estimate the airloads at intermediate radial locations where only blade pressure measurements at the 3.5% chordwise stations are available.

  11. Relaxation and Preconditioning for High Order Discontinuous Galerkin Methods with Applications to Aeroacoustics and High Speed Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Chi-Wang

    2004-01-01

    This project is about the investigation of the development of the discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods, for general geometry and triangulations, for solving convection dominated problems, with applications to aeroacoustics. Other related issues in high order WENO finite difference and finite volume methods have also been investigated. methods are two classes of high order, high resolution methods suitable for convection dominated simulations with possible discontinuous or sharp gradient solutions. In [18], we first review these two classes of methods, pointing out their similarities and differences in algorithm formulation, theoretical properties, implementation issues, applicability, and relative advantages. We then present some quantitative comparisons of the third order finite volume WENO methods and discontinuous Galerkin methods for a series of test problems to assess their relative merits in accuracy and CPU timing. In [3], we review the development of the Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin (RKDG) methods for non-linear convection-dominated problems. These robust and accurate methods have made their way into the main stream of computational fluid dynamics and are quickly finding use in a wide variety of applications. They combine a special class of Runge-Kutta time discretizations, that allows the method to be non-linearly stable regardless of its accuracy, with a finite element space discretization by discontinuous approximations, that incorporates the ideas of numerical fluxes and slope limiters coined during the remarkable development of the high-resolution finite difference and finite volume schemes. The resulting RKDG methods are stable, high-order accurate, and highly parallelizable schemes that can easily handle complicated geometries and boundary conditions. We review the theoretical and algorithmic aspects of these methods and show several applications including nonlinear conservation laws, the compressible and incompressible Navier

  12. Tracer airflow measurement system (TRAMS)

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Duo

    2007-04-24

    A method and apparatus for measuring fluid flow in a duct is disclosed. The invention uses a novel high velocity tracer injector system, an optional insertable folding mixing fan for homogenizing the tracer within the duct bulk fluid flow, and a perforated hose sampling system. A preferred embodiment uses CO.sub.2 as a tracer gas for measuring air flow in commercial and/or residential ducts. In extant commercial buildings, ducts not readily accessible by hanging ceilings may be drilled with readily plugged small diameter holes to allow for injection, optional mixing where desired using a novel insertable foldable mixing fan, and sampling hose.

  13. Is there a Rationale for Autologous Breast Reconstruction in Older Patients? A Retrospective Single Center Analysis of Quality of life, Complications and Comorbidities after DIEP or ms-TRAM Flap Using the BREAST-Q.

    PubMed

    Ludolph, Ingo; Horch, Raymund E; Harlander, Marina; Arkudas, Andreas; Bach, Alexander D; Kneser, Ulrich; Schmitz, Marweh; Taeger, Christian D; Beier, Justus P

    2015-01-01

    Autologous breast reconstruction with the deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) or muscle-sparing transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (ms-TRAM) flap is a common method in the majority of patients after mastectomy. Because of an increased perioperative risk profile the benefit in older patients is questionable. To assess the postoperative quality of life and peri- and post-operative complications of older compared to younger patients is the aim of this retrospective study. In a retrospective analysis 39 older (i.e. >60 years) and 140 younger patients (i.e. <60 years) with autologous breast reconstruction in the Department of Plastic Surgery at the University Hospital of Erlangen-Nuernberg were surveyed at least 6 month postoperative using the BREAST-Q questionnaire. Correlations were generated between comorbidities and complications. Significant differences were observed regarding hospitalization, pre-existing diseases and the choice of DIEP versus ms-TRAM flaps. Parameters such as major and minor complications, bulging or hernia and risk factors (e.g. smoking or obesity) showed no significant differences. The results of the questionnaire parameters showed no significant difference between both groups, revealing high satisfaction with the aesthetic result and an improvement in quality of life independent of age. Autologous breast reconstruction after mastectomy generates a gain in quality of life and shows a good to excellent overall satisfaction in older as well as younger patients. Despite a longer hospitalization and a different risk profile there were no significant differences regarding minor and major complications in the postoperative course. Hence autologous breast reconstruction for older patients is justified and should be taken into consideration. PMID:26400037

  14. Prediction of XV-15 tilt rotor discrete frequency aeroacoustic noise with WOPWOP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffen, Charles D.; George, Albert R.

    1990-01-01

    The results, methodology, and conclusions of noise prediction calculations carried out to study several possible discrete frequency harmonic noise mechanisms of the XV-15 Tilt Rotor Aircraft in hover and helicopter mode forward flight are presented. The mechanisms studied were thickness and loading noise. In particular, the loading noise caused by flow separation and the fountain/ground plane effect were predicted with calculations made using WOPWOP, a noise prediction program developed by NASA Langley. The methodology was to model the geometry and aerodynamics of the XV-15 rotor blades in hover and steady level flight and then create corresponding FORTRAN subroutines which were used an input for WOPWOP. The models are described and the simplifying assumptions made in creating them are evaluated, and the results of the computations are presented. The computations lead to the following conclusions: The fountain/ground plane effect is an important source of aerodynamic noise for the XV-15 in hover. Unsteady flow separation from the airfoil passing through the fountain at high angles of attack significantly affects the predicted sound spectra and may be an important noise mechanism for the XV-15 in hover mode. The various models developed did not predict the sound spectra in helicopter forward flight. The experimental spectra indicate the presence of blade vortex interactions which were not modeled in these calculations. A need for further study and development of more accurate aerodynamic models, including unsteady stall in hover and blade vortex interactions in forward flight.

  15. Integration of Propulsion-Airframe-Aeroacoustic Technologies and Design Concepts for a Quiet Blended-Wing-Body Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, G. A.; Brown, S. A.; Geiselhart, K. A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of studies undertaken to investigate revolutionary propulsion-airframe configurations that have the potential to achieve significant noise reductions over present-day commercial transport aircraft. Using a 300 passenger Blended-Wing-Body (BWB) as a baseline, several alternative low-noise propulsion-airframe-aeroacoustic (PAA) technologies and design concepts were investigated both for their potential to reduce the overall BWB noise levels, and for their impact on the weight, performance, and cost of the vehicle. Two evaluation frameworks were implemented for the assessments. The first was a Multi-Attribute Decision Making (MADM) process that used a Pugh Evaluation Matrix coupled with the Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS). This process provided a qualitative evaluation of the PAA technologies and design concepts and ranked them based on how well they satisfied chosen design requirements. From the results of the evaluation, it was observed that almost all of the PAA concepts gave the BWB a noise benefit, but degraded its performance. The second evaluation framework involved both deterministic and probabilistic systems analyses that were performed on a down-selected number of BWB propulsion configurations incorporating the PAA technologies and design concepts. These configurations included embedded engines with Boundary Layer Ingesting Inlets, Distributed Exhaust Nozzles installed on podded engines, a High Aspect Ratio Rectangular Nozzle, Distributed Propulsion, and a fixed and retractable aft airframe extension. The systems analyses focused on the BWB performance impacts of each concept using the mission range as a measure of merit. Noise effects were also investigated when enough information was available for a tractable analysis. Some tentative conclusions were drawn from the results. One was that the Boundary Layer Ingesting Inlets provided improvements to the BWB's mission range, by

  16. Aero-acoustic tests of duct-burning turbofan exhaust nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Packman, A. B.

    1976-01-01

    The acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of several exhaust systems suitable for duct burning turbofan engines are evaluated. Scale models representing unsuppressed coannular exhaust systems are examined statically under varying exhaust conditions. Ejectors with both hardwall and acoustically treated inserts are investigated.

  17. Large-Eddy Simulation of a High Reynolds Number Flow Around a Cylinder Including Aeroacoustic Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spyropoulos, Evangelos T.; Holmes, Bayard S.

    1997-01-01

    The dynamic subgrid-scale model is employed in large-eddy simulations of flow over a cylinder at a Reynolds number, based on the diameter of the cylinder, of 90,000. The Centric SPECTRUM(trademark) finite element solver is used for the analysis. The far field sound pressure is calculated from Lighthill-Curle's equation using the computed fluctuating pressure at the surface of the cylinder. The sound pressure level at a location 35 diameters away from the cylinder and at an angle of 90 deg with respect to the wake's downstream axis was found to have a peak value of approximately 110 db. Slightly smaller peak values were predicted at the 60 deg and 120 deg locations. A grid refinement study suggests that the dynamic model demands mesh refinement beyond that used here.

  18. An Investigation of High-Order Shock-Capturing Methods for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, Jay; Baysal, Oktay

    1997-01-01

    Topics covered include: Low-dispersion scheme for nonlinear acoustic waves in nonuniform flow; Computation of acoustic scattering by a low-dispersion scheme; Algorithmic extension of low-dispersion scheme and modeling effects for acoustic wave simulation; The accuracy of shock capturing in two spatial dimensions; Using high-order methods on lower-order geometries; and Computational considerations for the simulation of discontinuous flows.

  19. Aeroacoustics of Flight Vehicles: Theory and Practice. Volume 2: Noise Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, Harvey H. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Flight vehicles and the underlying concepts of noise generation, noise propagation, noise prediction, and noise control are studied. This volume includes those chapters that relate to flight vehicle noise control and operations: human response to aircraft noise; atmospheric propagation; theoretical models for duct acoustic propagation and radiation; design and performance of duct acoustic treatment; jet noise suppression; interior noise; flyover noise measurement and prediction; and quiet aircraft design and operational characteristics.

  20. The Acoustic Analogy: A Powerful Tool in Aeroacoustics with Emphasis on Jet Noise Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Doty, Michael J.; Hunter, Craig A.

    2004-01-01

    The acoustic analogy introduced by Lighthill to study jet noise is now over 50 years old. In the present paper, Lighthill s Acoustic Analogy is revisited together with a brief evaluation of the state-of-the-art of the subject and an exploration of the possibility of further improvements in jet noise prediction from analytical methods, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions, and measurement techniques. Experimental Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) data is used both to evaluate turbulent statistics from Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) CFD and to propose correlation models for the Lighthill stress tensor. The NASA Langley Jet3D code is used to study the effect of these models on jet noise prediction. From the analytical investigation, a retarded time correction is shown that improves, by approximately 8 dB, the over-prediction of aft-arc jet noise by Jet3D. In experimental investigation, the PIV data agree well with the CFD mean flow predictions, with room for improvement in Reynolds stress predictions. Initial modifications, suggested by the PIV data, to the form of the Jet3D correlation model showed no noticeable improvements in jet noise prediction.

  1. Aeroacoustic Simulations of a Nose Landing Gear Using FUN3D on Pointwise Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Rhoads, John; Lockard, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been performed for a partially-dressed, cavity-closed (PDCC) nose landing gear configuration that was tested in the University of Florida's open-jet acoustic facility known as the UFAFF. The unstructured-grid flow solver FUN3D is used to compute the unsteady flow field for this configuration. Mixed-element grids generated using the Pointwise(TradeMark) grid generation software are used for these simulations. Particular care is taken to ensure quality cells and proper resolution in critical areas of interest in an effort to minimize errors introduced by numerical artifacts. A hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes/large eddy simulation (RANS/LES) turbulence model is used for these simulations. Solutions are also presented for a wall function model coupled to the standard turbulence model. Time-averaged and instantaneous solutions obtained on these Pointwise grids are compared with the measured data and previous numerical solutions. The resulting CFD solutions are used as input to a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings noise propagation code to compute the farfield noise levels in the flyover and sideline directions. The computed noise levels compare well with previous CFD solutions and experimental data.

  2. Computational Analyses of Propulsion Aeroacoustics for Mixed Flow Nozzle Pylon Installation at Takeoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, Steven J.; Waithe, Kenrich A.

    2001-01-01

    A CFD analyses is presented for a set of baseline and noise suppression mixed flow nozzles with and without a pylon installation. The five model configurations are as follows; a baselinecore/fan dual-stream nozzle with an external plug, a chevron mixer nozzle with a peak on the symmetry plane with external plug, both of the above nozzles with an installed bifurcatingpylon and lastly a clocked chevron mixer nozzle such that a trough is aligned with the center of the pylon. The fluid flow is simulated by solving the asymptotically steady, compressible, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations using an implicit, up-wind, flux-difference splitting finite volume scheme and standard two equation k-epsilon turbulence model with a linear stress representation. All computations are performed using the multiblock, parallel, structuredcode PAB3D. Results indicate that the clocked chevron with pylon case achieves the most optimal levels of average and peak turbulence kinetic energy and vorticity and therefore is expected to be the quietest of the five configurations tested. Further study is required to refine expressions which are indicative of noise and mate these with rigorous noise prediction models.

  3. Rotor performance characteristics from an aeroacoustic helicopter wind-tunnel test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoad, D. R.; Elliott, J. W.; Orie, N. M.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation of helicopter rotor noise at model scale was conducted in the Langley 4 by 7 meter tunnel. The program described was the first of a planned three-phase project whose purpose was to examine the characteristic noise mechanism involved in main rotor/tail rotor interaction noise. This first phase was conducted with a main rotor only, in order to identify the characteristic noise generated by only the main rotor. The aerodynamic operating conditions of the rotor system were defined during the test. The acoustic data were properly referenced.

  4. Unified Aeroacoustics Analysis for High Speed Turboprop Aerodynamics and Noise. Volume 1; Development of Theory for Blade Loading, Wakes, and Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D. B.

    1991-01-01

    A unified theory for the aerodynamics and noise of advanced turboprops are presented. Aerodynamic topics include calculation of performance, blade load distribution, and non-uniform wake flow fields. Blade loading can be steady or unsteady due to fixed distortion, counter-rotating wakes, or blade vibration. The aerodynamic theory is based on the pressure potential method and is therefore basically linear. However, nonlinear effects associated with finite axial induction and blade vortex flow are included via approximate methods. Acoustic topics include radiation of noise caused by blade thickness, steady loading (including vortex lift), and unsteady loading. Shielding of the fuselage by its boundary layer and the wing are treated in separate analyses that are compatible but not integrated with the aeroacoustic theory for rotating blades.

  5. Computational aeroacoustics of phonation, part II: Effects of flow parameters and ventricular folds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Zhao, Wei; Frankel, Steven H; Mongeau, Luc

    2002-11-01

    The results are described of the second part of an ongoing study aimed at performing direct numerical simulations of translaryngeal flows during phonation. The use of accurate numerical schemes allows the radiated sound to be calculated directly, without the need for acoustic analogy models. The goal is to develop a better understanding of this class of flow, and of the basic sound generation mechanisms involved in phonation. In the present study, the effects of subglottal pressure and of glottal oscillation frequency on the near-field flow and farfield sound were investigated. The effects of the presence of the ventricular folds downstream of the oscillating glottal region were also examined. The results highlighted the effects of subglottal pressure and oscillation frequency on the jet vortical structure, wall pressure and shear stress, and sound radiation. Jet impingement on the ventricular folds introduced additional dipole sources similar to those observed in problems involving grazing flows over cavities. PMID:12430826

  6. Application of FUN3D Solver for Aeroacoustics Simulation of a Nose Landing Gear Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Lockard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been performed for a nose landing gear configuration corresponding to the experimental tests conducted in the Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. A widely used unstructured grid code, FUN3D, is examined for solving the unsteady flow field associated with this configuration. A series of successively finer unstructured grids has been generated to assess the effect of grid refinement. Solutions have been obtained on purely tetrahedral grids as well as mixed element grids using hybrid RANS/LES turbulence models. The agreement of FUN3D solutions with experimental data on the same size mesh is better on mixed element grids compared to pure tetrahedral grids, and in general improves with grid refinement.

  7. Computational aeroacoustics of phonation, part I: Computational methods and sound generation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Cheng; Frankel, Steven H; Mongeau, Luc

    2002-11-01

    The aerodynamic generation of sound during phonation was studied using direct numerical simulations of the airflow and the sound field in a rigid pipe with a modulated orifice. Forced oscillations with an imposed wall motion were considered, neglecting fluid-structure interactions. The compressible, two-dimensional, axisymmetric form of the Navier-Stokes equations were numerically integrated using highly accurate finite difference methods. A moving grid was used to model the effects of the moving walls. The geometry and flow conditions were selected to approximate the flow within an idealized human glottis and vocal tract during phonation. Direct simulations of the flow and farfield sound were performed for several wall motion programs, and flow conditions. An acoustic analogy based on the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation was then used to decompose the acoustic source into its monopole, dipole, and quadrupole contributions for analysis. The predictions of the farfield acoustic pressure using the acoustic analogy were in excellent agreement with results from the direct numerical simulations. It was found that the dominant sound production mechanism was a dipole induced by the net force exerted by the surfaces of the glottis walls on the fluid along the direction of sound wave propagation. A monopole mechanism, specifically sound from the volume of fluid displaced by the wall motion, was found to be comparatively weak at the frequency considered (125 Hz). The orifice geometry was found to have only a weak influence on the amplitude of the radiated sound. PMID:12430825

  8. Aeroacoustic performance of an externally blown flap configuration with several flap noise suppression devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinzie, D. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Small scale model acoustic experiments were conducted to measure the noise produced in the flyover and sideline planes by an engine under the wing externally blown flap configuration in its approach attitude. Broadband low frequency noise reductions as large as 9 dB were produced by reducing the separation distance between the nozzle exhaust plane and the flaps. Experiments were also conducted to determine the noise suppression effectiveness in comparison with a reference configuration of three passive types of devices that were located on the jet impingement surfaces of the reference configuration. These devices produced noise reductions that varied up to 10 dB at reduced separation distances. In addition, a qualitative estimate of the noise suppression characteristics of the separate devices was made. Finally static aerodynamic performance data were obtained to evaluate the penalties incurred by these suppression devices. The test results suggest that further parametric studies are required in order to understand more fully the noise mechanisms that are affected by the suppression devices used.

  9. Aeroacoustic Simulation of a Nose Landing Gear in an Open Jet Facility Using FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Lockhard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Carlson, Jan-Renee

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been performed for a partially-dressed, cavity-closed nose landing gear configuration that was tested in NASA Langley s closed-wall Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel (BART) and in the University of Florida s open-jet acoustic facility known as UFAFF. The unstructured-grid flow solver, FUN3D, developed at NASA Langley Research center is used to compute the unsteady flow field for this configuration. A hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes/large eddy simulation (RANS/LES) turbulence model is used for these computations. Time-averaged and instantaneous solutions compare favorably with the measured data. Unsteady flowfield data obtained from the FUN3D code are used as input to a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings noise propagation code to compute the sound pressure levels at microphones placed in the farfield. Significant improvement in predicted noise levels is obtained when the flowfield data from the open jet UFAFF simulations is used as compared to the case using flowfield data from the closed-wall BART configuration.

  10. Aeroacoustic Simulation of Nose Landing Gear on Adaptive Unstructured Grids With FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Park, Michael A.; Lockhard, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been performed for a partially-dressed, cavity-closed nose landing gear configuration that was tested in NASA Langley s closed-wall Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel (BART) and in the University of Florida's open-jet acoustic facility known as the UFAFF. The unstructured-grid flow solver FUN3D, developed at NASA Langley Research center, is used to compute the unsteady flow field for this configuration. Starting with a coarse grid, a series of successively finer grids were generated using the adaptive gridding methodology available in the FUN3D code. A hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes/large eddy simulation (RANS/LES) turbulence model is used for these computations. Time-averaged and instantaneous solutions obtained on these grids are compared with the measured data. In general, the correlation with the experimental data improves with grid refinement. A similar trend is observed for sound pressure levels obtained by using these CFD solutions as input to a FfowcsWilliams-Hawkings noise propagation code to compute the farfield noise levels. In general, the numerical solutions obtained on adapted grids compare well with the hand-tuned enriched fine grid solutions and experimental data. In addition, the grid adaption strategy discussed here simplifies the grid generation process, and results in improved computational efficiency of CFD simulations.

  11. Characterization of Sound Radiation by Unresolved Scales of Motion in Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Zhou, Ye

    1999-01-01

    Evaluation of the sound sources in a high Reynolds number turbulent flow requires time-accurate resolution of an extremely large number of scales of motion. Direct numerical simulations will therefore remain infeasible for the forseeable future: although current large eddy simulation methods can resolve the largest scales of motion accurately the, they must leave some scales of motion unresolved. A priori studies show that acoustic power can be underestimated significantly if the contribution of these unresolved scales is simply neglected. In this paper, the problem of evaluating the sound radiation properties of the unresolved, subgrid-scale motions is approached in the spirit of the simplest subgrid stress models: the unresolved velocity field is treated as isotropic turbulence with statistical descriptors, evaluated from the resolved field. The theory of isotropic turbulence is applied to derive formulas for the total power and the power spectral density of the sound radiated by a filtered velocity field. These quantities are compared with the corresponding quantities for the unfiltered field for a range of filter widths and Reynolds numbers.

  12. Aeroacoustic performance of an externally blown flap configuration with several flap noise suppression devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinzie, D. J., Jr.

    1982-05-01

    Small scale model acoustic experiments were conducted to measure the noise produced in the flyover and sideline planes by an engine under the wing externally blown flap configuration in its approach attitude. Broadband low frequency noise reductions as large as 9 dB were produced by reducing the separation distance between the nozzle exhaust plane and the flaps. Experiments were also conducted to determine the noise suppression effectiveness in comparison with a reference configuration of three passive types of devices that were located on the jet impingement surfaces of the reference configuration. These devices produced noise reductions that varied up to 10 dB at reduced separation distances. In addition, a qualitative estimate of the noise suppression characteristics of the separate devices was made. Finally static aerodynamic performance data were obtained to evaluate the penalties incurred by these suppression devices. The test results suggest that further parametric studies are required in order to understand more fully the noise mechanisms that are affected by the suppression devices used.

  13. A controllable canonical form implementation of time domain impedance boundary conditions for broadband aeroacoustic computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Siyang; Zhang, Xin; Huang, Xun

    2016-05-01

    A new method, which can be effectively and efficiently applied in the simulations of broadband noise problems, is proposed for time domain impedance boundary condition implementations by using the so-called controllable canonical form that is well known in linear system. Usually, the impedance boundary condition can be defined in frequency domain as a rational polynomial function with poles in the negative half of the complex plane to guarantee stability; otherwise, causality might be violated in the corresponding time domain implementation. To address this issue, various methodologies have been proposed previously that usually lead to complicated polynomials, whose numerical implementations are often indirect and intricate. The proposed method with a controllable canonical form, on the other hand, directly transforms the frequency domain transfer function (a quotient of rational polynomials) to an equivalent state space model, which consists of a series of first-order ordinary differential equations that can be numerically implemented in a straightforward way. The proposed method is demonstrated by using two benchmark problems: a two-dimensional Gaussian pulse propagating in a uniform flow with a lined wall and the test cases from the NASA Langley grazing incidence tube experiments. Good agreements demonstrate the potential of the proposed computational method.

  14. Effects of Choking on the Aeroacoustics of AN Axisymmetric Supersonic Inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K. C.; Ng, W. F.

    1997-05-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine the effect of choking on the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of a supersonic inlet. The investigated inlet was a prototype model of a mixed compression, axisymmetric supersonic inlet designed for the high speed civil transport aircraft. A 10·4 cm (4·1 in) turbofan engine simulator was used in conjunction with the inlet. The inlet was tested with the centerbody in the fully extended position at different fan speeds. Results show that “soft choking”, as characterized by a reduction in forward propagating fan noise, can occur when the Mach number at the inlet throat exceeds 0·5. In the forward sector (0°-60° from the inlet axis), the overall sound pressure level was reduced by about 7 dB as the fan speed increased from 50,000 to 70,000 rpm, due to the increase in the Mach number at the inlet throat. Additional comparison was made between the inlet configurations with the centerbody fully extended and fully retracted at a fan speed of 50,000 rpm. The results show that the higher Mach number at the inlet throat for the full retracted centerbody configuration was successful in reducing the overall sound pressure level by about 4 dB between 0° and 30° angular sector. While there is no measurable difference in the total pressure recovery for the two inlet configurations, there is, however, a significant increase in the circumferential flow distortion at the fan face for the higher throat Mach number test case.

  15. An aeroacoustic study of micro-tab on airframe noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chiawei B.

    Aircraft high-lift devices such as leading-edge slats and trailing-edge flaps generate noise when extended, causing significant contributions to overall aircraft sound pressure levels, in particular in approach to land phase. It is shown by previous research efforts that noise generated by the high-lift devices increases with their deployment angles. Hence it is possible to mitigate such high-lift noise by using reduced settings without sacrificing the aerodynamic performance, particularly lift. In this dissertation research, micro-tab device attached at the pressure side of the flap surface near its trailing-edge is envisioned as the way to compensate the lift loss due to reduced high-lift device settings. Hybrid numerical method, which combines computational fluid dynamics and acoustics analogy, was adopted to predict the farfield noise spectrum. It is the goal of this research project to illustrate that noise level increase due to micro-tab deployment is smaller than that from the prescribed slat and flap setting increases, so that an overall airframe noise reduction can be achieved. Two-dimensional computational simulations and three-dimensional computational simulations were performed progressively. Results indicated that the proposed reduced high-lift settings with micro-tab application achieved noise reduction, particularly in the mid-frequency range where human hearing is most sensitive to. Parametric studies involving geometry and size effects of the micro-tab configurations were conducted using two-dimensional and three-dimensional models. Results showed that considerable noise reduction was obtained if slit micro-tab was used. An airworthiness study regarding applying micro-tab device onto existing commercial airliners as retrofit to lower noise emission in approach was also investigated and compliance strategy was provided. In the last part of this research, a different approach from aviation policy was taken as the airport noise compatibility planning

  16. Aeroacoustics Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Michael K.; Posey, Joe W. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Since its inception in January 2003, the program has provided support for 1 faculty and 1 graduate student researcher. One Graduate Research Scholar Assistant was partially supported by this award. One student has completed his M.S. degree program and 1 has nearly completed the D.Sc. degree program (expected completion Fall 2005). The program has generated 1 D.Sc. dissertation. 1 M.S. theses and 2 publications.

  17. A comparison of the acoustic and aerodynamic measurements of a model rotor tested in two anechoic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.; Lewy, S.

    1986-01-01

    Two aeroacoustic facilities - the CEPRA 19 in France and the DNW in the Netherlands - are compared. The two facilities have unique acoustic characteristics that make them appropriate for acoustic testing of model-scale helicopter rotors. An identical pressure-instrumented model-scale rotor was tested in each facility and acoustic test results are compared with full-scale-rotor test results. Blade surface pressures measured in both tunnels were used to correlated nominal rotor operating conditions in each tunnel, and also used to assess the steadiness of the rotor in each tunnel's flow. In-the-flow rotor acoustic signatures at moderate forward speeds (35-50 m/sec) are presented for each facility and discussed in relation to the differences in tunnel geometries and aeroacoustic characteristics. Both reports are presented in appendices to this paper.

  18. A comparison of the acoustic and aerodynamic measurements of a model rotor tested in two anechoic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.; Lewy, S.; Caplot, M.

    1986-01-01

    Two aeroacoustic facilities--the CEPRA 19 in France and the DNW in the Netherlands--are compared. The two facilities have unique acoustic characteristics that make them appropriate for acoustic testing of model-scale helicopter rotors. An identical pressure-instrumented model-scale rotor was tested in each facility and acoustic test results are compared with full-scale-rotor test results. Blade surface pressures measured in both tunnels were used to correlated nominal rotor operating conditions in each tunnel, and also used to assess the steadiness of the rotor in each tunnel's flow. In-the-flow rotor acoustic signatures at moderate forward speeds (35-50 m/sec) are presented for each facility and discussed in relation to the differences in tunnel geometries and aeroacoustic characteristics. Both reports are presented in appendices to this paper. ;.);

  19. A Comparative Study of a 1/4-Scale Gulfstream G550 Aircraft Nose Gear Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Neuhart, Dan H.; Zawodny, Nikolas S.; Liu, Fei; Yardibi, Tarik; Cattafesta, Louis; Van de Ven, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    A series of fluid dynamic and aeroacoustic wind tunnel experiments are performed at the University of Florida Aeroacoustic Flow Facility and the NASA-Langley Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel Facility on a high-fidelity -scale model of Gulfstream G550 aircraft nose gear. The primary objectives of this study are to obtain a comprehensive aeroacoustic dataset for a nose landing gear and to provide a clearer understanding of landing gear contributions to overall airframe noise of commercial aircraft during landing configurations. Data measurement and analysis consist of mean and fluctuating model surface pressure, noise source localization maps using a large-aperture microphone directional array, and the determination of far field noise level spectra using a linear array of free field microphones. A total of 24 test runs are performed, consisting of four model assembly configurations, each of which is subjected to three test section speeds, in two different test section orientations. The different model assembly configurations vary in complexity from a fully-dressed to a partially-dressed geometry. The two model orientations provide flyover and sideline views from the perspective of a phased acoustic array for noise source localization via beamforming. Results show that the torque arm section of the model exhibits the highest rms pressures for all model configurations, which is also evidenced in the sideline view noise source maps for the partially-dressed model geometries. Analysis of acoustic spectra data from the linear array microphones shows a slight decrease in sound pressure levels at mid to high frequencies for the partially-dressed cavity open model configuration. In addition, far field sound pressure level spectra scale approximately with the 6th power of velocity and do not exhibit traditional Strouhal number scaling behavior.

  20. Research of a Tram Headstock from Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkovsky, Zdenek; Kovandova, Hedvika

    2014-08-01

    The requirements for crashworthiness of railway vehicles are defined by the Railroad crashworthiness standard EN 15227. This standard is based on the findings of the characteristics of steel structures of front parts of railway vehicles. In the Czech Republic an extensive research was carried out within the project TIP FR-TI1/113 on application of composite sandwich structure elements in the design of the front cabins of a railway vehicle. The aim of the research work was to determine real possibilities of the composite sandwich structures for use in the construction of railway vehicles while considering the validity of the above-mentioned standard.

  1. Analysis-Driven Design Optimization of a SMA-Based Slat-Cove Filler for Aeroacoustic Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholten, William; Hartl, Darren; Turner, Travis

    2013-01-01

    Airframe noise is a significant component of environmental noise in the vicinity of airports. The noise associated with the leading-edge slat of typical transport aircraft is a prominent source of airframe noise. Previous work suggests that a slat-cove filler (SCF) may be an effective noise treatment. Hence, development and optimization of a practical slat-cove-filler structure is a priority. The objectives of this work are to optimize the design of a functioning SCF which incorporates superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) materials as flexures that permit the deformations involved in the configuration change. The goal of the optimization is to minimize the actuation force needed to retract the slat-SCF assembly while satisfying constraints on the maximum SMA stress and on the SCF deflection under static aerodynamic pressure loads, while also satisfying the condition that the SCF self-deploy during slat extension. A finite element analysis model based on a physical bench-top model is created in Abaqus such that automated iterative analysis of the design could be performed. In order to achieve an optimized design, several design variables associated with the current SCF configuration are considered, such as the thicknesses of SMA flexures and the dimensions of various components, SMA and conventional. Designs of experiment (DOE) are performed to investigate structural response to an aerodynamic pressure load and to slat retraction and deployment. DOE results are then used to inform the optimization process, which determines a design minimizing actuator forces while satisfying the required constraints.

  2. Aeroacoustic Codes for Rotor Harmonic and BVI Noise. CAMRAD.Mod1/HIRES: Methodology and Users' Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Burley, Casey L.; Jolly, J. Ralph, Jr.

    1998-01-01

    This document details the methodology and use of the CAMRAD.Mod1/HIRES codes, which were developed at NASA Langley Research Center for the prediction of helicopter harmonic and Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise. CANMAD.Mod1 is a substantially modified version of the performance/trim/wake code CANMAD. High resolution blade loading is determined in post-processing by HIRES and an associated indicial aerodynamics code. Extensive capabilities of importance to noise prediction accuracy are documented, including a new multi-core tip vortex roll-up wake model, higher harmonic and individual blade control, tunnel and fuselage correction input, diagnostic blade motion input, and interfaces for acoustic and CFD aerodynamics codes. Modifications and new code capabilities are documented with examples. A users' job preparation guide and listings of variables and namelists are given.

  3. On vortex-airfoil interaction noise including span-end effects, with application to open-rotor aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roger, Michel; Schram, Christophe; Moreau, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    A linear analytical model is developed for the chopping of a cylindrical vortex by a flat-plate airfoil, with or without a span-end effect. The major interest is the contribution of the tip-vortex produced by an upstream rotating blade in the rotor-rotor interaction noise mechanism of counter-rotating open rotors. Therefore the interaction is primarily addressed in an annular strip of limited spanwise extent bounding the impinged blade segment, and the unwrapped strip is described in Cartesian coordinates. The study also addresses the interaction of a propeller wake with a downstream wing or empennage. Cylindrical vortices are considered, for which the velocity field is expanded in two-dimensional gusts in the reference frame of the airfoil. For each gust the response of the airfoil is derived, first ignoring the effect of the span end, assimilating the airfoil to a rigid flat plate, with or without sweep. The corresponding unsteady lift acts as a distribution of acoustic dipoles, and the radiated sound is obtained from a radiation integral over the actual extent of the airfoil. In the case of tip-vortex interaction noise in CRORs the acoustic signature is determined for vortex trajectories passing beyond, exactly at and below the tip radius of the impinged blade segment, in a reference frame attached to the segment. In a second step the same problem is readdressed accounting for the effect of span end on the aerodynamic response of a blade tip. This is achieved through a composite two-directional Schwarzschild's technique. The modifications of the distributed unsteady lift and of the radiated sound are discussed. The chained source and radiation models provide physical insight into the mechanism of vortex chopping by a blade tip in free field. They allow assessing the acoustic benefit of clipping the rear rotor in a counter-rotating open-rotor architecture.

  4. Assessment at full scale of nozzle/wing geometry effects on OTW aeroacoustic characteristics. [Over The Wing STOL engine configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groesbeck, D.; Von Glahn, U.

    1979-01-01

    The effects on acoustic characteristics of nozzle type and location on a wing for STOL engine over-the-wing configurations are assessed at full scale on the basis of model-scale data. Three types of nozzle configurations are evaluated: a circular nozzle with external deflector mounted above the wing, a slot nozzle with external deflector mounted on the wing and a slot nozzle mounted on the wing. Nozzle exhaust plane locations with respect to the wing leading edge are varied from 10 to 46 percent chord (flaps retracted) with flap angles of 20 deg (take-off attitude) and 60 deg (approach attitude). Perceived noise levels (PNL) are calculated as a function of flyover distance at 152 m altitude. From these plots, static EPNL values, defined as flyover relative noise levels, are calculated and plotted as a function of lift and thrust ratios. From such plots the acoustic benefits attributable to variations in nozzle/deflector/wing geometry at full scale are assessed for equal aerodynamic performance.

  5. Assessment at full scale of nozzle/wing geometry effects on OTW aero-acoustic characteristics. [short takeoff aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groesbeck, D.; Vonglahn, U.

    1979-01-01

    The effects on acoustic characteristics of nozzle type and location on a wing for STOL engine over-the-wing configurations are assessed at full scale on the basis of model-scale data. Three types of nozzle configurations are evaluated: a circular nozzle with external deflector mounted above the wing, a slot nozzle with external deflector mounted on the wing and a slot nozzle mounted on the wing. Nozzle exhaust plane locations with respect to the wing leading edge are varied from 10 to 46 percent chord (flaps retracted) with flap angles of 20 (takeoff altitude) and 60 (approach attitude). Perceived noise levels (PNL) are calculated as a function of flyover distance at 152 m altitude. From these plots, static EPNL values, defined as flyover relative noise levels, are calculated and plotted as a function of lift and thrust ratios. From such plots the acoustic benefits attributable to variations in nozzle/deflector/wing geometry at full scale are assessed for equal aerodynamic performance.

  6. Accuracy Study of the Space-Time CE/SE Method for Computational Aeroacoustics Problems Involving Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao Yen; Chang, Sin-Chung; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    1999-01-01

    The space-time conservation element and solution element(CE/SE) method is used to study the sound-shock interaction problem. The order of accuracy of numerical schemes is investigated. The linear model problem.govemed by the 1-D scalar convection equation, sound-shock interaction problem governed by the 1-D Euler equations, and the 1-D shock-tube problem which involves moving shock waves and contact surfaces are solved to investigate the order of accuracy of numerical schemes. It is concluded that the accuracy of the CE/SE numerical scheme with designed 2nd-order accuracy becomes 1st order when a moving shock wave exists. However, the absolute error in the CE/SE solution downstream of the shock wave is on the same order as that obtained using a fourth-order accurate essentially nonoscillatory (ENO) scheme. No special techniques are used for either high-frequency low-amplitude waves or shock waves.

  7. Analysis and modeling of infrasound from a four-stage rocket launch.

    PubMed

    Blom, Philip; Marcillo, Omar; Arrowsmith, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    Infrasound from a four-stage sounding rocket was recorded by several arrays within 100 km of the launch pad. Propagation modeling methods have been applied to the known trajectory to predict infrasonic signals at the ground in order to identify what information might be obtained from such observations. There is good agreement between modeled and observed back azimuths, and predicted arrival times for motor ignition signals match those observed. The signal due to the high-altitude stage ignition is found to be low amplitude, despite predictions of weak attenuation. This lack of signal is possibly due to inefficient aeroacoustic coupling in the rarefied upper atmosphere. PMID:27369137

  8. Aeroacoustic Experiments with Twin Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Richard F.; Henderson, Brenda S.

    2012-01-01

    While the noise produced by a single jet is azimuthally symmetric, multiple jets produce azimuthally varying far-field noise. The ability of one jet to shield another reduces the noise radiated in the plane of the jets, while often increasing the noise radiated out of the plane containing the jets. The present study investigates the shielding potential of twin jet configurations over subsonic and over-expanded supersonic jet conditions with simulated forward flight. The experiments were conducted with 2 in. throat diameter nozzles at four jet spacings from 2.6d to 5.5d in center-to-center distance, where d is the nozzle throat diameter. The current study found a maximum of 3 dB reduction in overall sound pressure level relative to two incoherent jets in the peak jet noise direction in the plane containing the jets. However, an increase of 3 dB was found perpendicular to the plane containing the jets. In the sideline direction, shielding is observed for all jet spacings in this study.

  9. Aeroacoustics of viscous vortex reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, Pedro; Nichols, Joseph W.; Duraisamy, Karthik; Hussain, Fazle

    2011-11-01

    Reconnection of two anti-parallel vortex tubes is studied by direct numerical simulations and large-eddy simulations of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations over a wide range (2000-50,000) of the vortex Reynolds number (Re). A detailed investigation of the flow dynamics is performed and at high Re, multiple reconnections are observed as the newly formed ``bridges'' interact by self and mutual induction. To investigate acoustics produced by the recoil action of the vortex threads, Möhring's theory of vortex sound is applied to the flow field and evaluated at varying far-field locations. The acoustic solver is verified against calculations of laminar vortex ring collision. For anti-parallel vortex reconnection, the resulting far-field spectra are shown to be grid converged at low-to-mid frequencies. To assess the relevance to fully turbulent jet noise, the dependence of reconnection upon Reynolds number is investigated.

  10. Spectral variance of aeroacoustic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, K. V.; Preisser, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    An asymptotic technique for estimating the variance of power spectra is applied to aircraft flyover noise data. The results are compared with directly estimated variances and they are in reasonable agreement. The basic time series need not be Gaussian for asymptotic theory to apply. The asymptotic variance formulae can be useful tools both in the design and analysis phase of experiments of this type.

  11. Active twist rotor blade modelling using particle-wake aerodynamics and geometrically exact beam structural dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesnik, C. E. S.; Opoku, D. G.; Nitzsche, F.; Cheng, T.

    2004-06-01

    An active aeroelastic and aeroacoustic analysis of helicopter rotor systems is presented in this paper. It is a tightly coupled computational aeroelastic code that interfaces a particle-wake panel method code with an active nonlinear mixed variational intrinsic beam element code. In addition, a Ffowcs-Williams-Hawkings equation-based acoustic component is incorporated to complete the numerical implementation. The theory behind each component is summarized here as well as the method for coupling the aerodynamic and structural components. Sample acoustic and aeroelastic results are given for different model-scale rotors. Comparisons with available (passive) results show very good agreement. Preliminary study with an active twist rotor is also shown.

  12. Turbofan Noise Studied in Unique Model Research Program in NASA Glenn's 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive aeroacoustic research program called the Source Diagnostic Test was recently concluded in NASA Glenn Research Center's 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel. The testing involved representatives from Glenn, NASA Langley Research Center, GE Aircraft Engines, and the Boeing Company. The technical objectives of this research were to identify the different source mechanisms of noise in a modern, high-bypass turbofan aircraft engine through scale-model testing and to make detailed acoustic and aerodynamic measurements to more fully understand the physics of how turbofan noise is generated.

  13. Airframe Noise Prediction of a Full Aircraft in Model and Full Scale Using a Lattice Boltzmann Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fares, Ehab; Duda, Benjamin; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2016-01-01

    Unsteady flow computations are presented for a Gulfstream aircraft model in landing configuration, i.e., flap deflected 39deg and main landing gear deployed. The simulations employ the lattice Boltzmann solver PowerFLOW(Trademark) to simultaneously capture the flow physics and acoustics in the near field. Sound propagation to the far field is obtained using a Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings acoustic analogy approach. Two geometry representations of the same aircraft are analyzed: an 18% scale, high-fidelity, semi-span model at wind tunnel Reynolds number and a full-scale, full-span model at half-flight Reynolds number. Previously published and newly generated model-scale results are presented; all full-scale data are disclosed here for the first time. Reynolds number and geometrical fidelity effects are carefully examined to discern aerodynamic and aeroacoustic trends with a special focus on the scaling of surface pressure fluctuations and farfield noise. An additional study of the effects of geometrical detail on farfield noise is also documented. The present investigation reveals that, overall, the model-scale and full-scale aeroacoustic results compare rather well. Nevertheless, the study also highlights that finer geometrical details that are typically not captured at model scales can have a non-negligible contribution to the farfield noise signature.

  14. Presurgical Botulinum Toxin A Treatment Increases Angiogenesis by Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α/Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Subsequent Superiorly Based Transverse Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous Flap Survival in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae Hwan; Lee, Song Hyun; Park, Yun Joo; Lee, Young Seok; Rah, Dong Kyun; Kim, Sung Young

    2016-06-01

    To date, there have been several experimental studies to assess tissue viability of transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flaps. Botulinum toxin A (BoTA) has gained popularity in many clinical fields, for a variety of therapeutic and aesthetic purposes. In addition, there have been reports regarding the positive effect of BoTA on flap survival by various mechanisms. In this study, we hypothesized that pretreatment with BoTA could augment the survival of TRAM flaps via increased hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1α/vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-dependent angiogenesis.Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: a control group and a BoTA group. Five days before superiorly based TRAM flap elevation, the BoTA group was pretreated with BoTA, whereas the control group was pretreated with normal saline. Gross flap survival rates were assessed, and quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting were performed for the evaluation of angiogenesis-related factors (CD34, HIF-1α, and VEGF).In the BoTA group, the gross flap survival rate was significantly higher than that in the control group on both ipsilateral (92.78.3 ± 5.05% vs 86.8 ± 3.88%, P = 0.009) and contralateral (91.57 ± 5.79% vs 74.28 ± 11.83%, P < 0.001) sides.The relative mRNA expression of CD34 and VEGF was significantly higher in the BoTA group than that in the control group in every zone, whereas the relative mRNA expression of HIF-1α was significantly higher in the BoTA group than that in the control group on contralateral sides. The relative protein expression of CD34, VEGF, and HIF-1α was significantly higher in the BoTA group than that in the control group in every zone.In conclusion, we demonstrate that presurgical BoTA treatment might increase angiogenesis by HIF-1α/VEGF, subsequently increase superiorly based TRAM flap survival in a rat model. PMID:25695458

  15. Reducing the Effect of Transducer Mount Induced Noise (XMIN) on Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel Testing Data with a New Transducer Mount Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, Andrew J.; Reed, Darren K.; Nance, Donald K.

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of flight vehicle unsteady aerodynamics is often studied via large scale wind tunnel testing. Boundary layer noise is measured by miniature pressure transducers installed in a model. Noise levels (2-5 dB ref. 20 µPa) can be induced when transducer is mounted out of flush with model outer surface. This effect must be minimized to accurately determine aerodynamically induced acoustic environments.

  16. Modelling Aerodynamically Generated Sound: Recent Advances in Rotor Noise Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.

    2000-01-01

    A great deal of progress has been made in the modeling of aerodynamically generated sound for rotors over the past decade. The Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H ) equation has been the foundation for much of the development. Both subsonic and supersonic quadrupole noise formulations have been developed for the prediction of high-speed impulsive noise. In an effort to eliminate the need to compute the quadrupole contribution, the FW-H has also been utilized on permeable surfaces surrounding all physical noise sources. Comparison of the Kirchhoff formulation for moving surfaces with the FW-H equation have shown that the Kirchhoff formulation for moving surfaces can give erroneous results for aeroacoustic problems.

  17. Development of a SMA-Based Slat-Cove Filler for Reduction of Aeroacoustic Noise Associated With Transport-Class Aircraft Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Kidd, Reggie T.; Hartl, Darren J.; Scholten, William D.

    2013-01-01

    Airframe noise is a significant part of the overall noise produced by typical, transport-class aircraft during the approach and landing phases of flight. Leading-edge slat noise is a prominent source of airframe noise. The concept of a slat-cove filler was proposed in previous work as an effective means of mitigating slat noise. Bench-top models were deployed at 75% scale to study the feasibility of producing a functioning slat-cove filler. Initial results from several concepts led to a more-focused effort investigating a deformable structure based upon pseudoelastic SMA materials. The structure stows in the cavity between the slat and main wing during cruise and deploys simultaneously with the slat to guide the aerodynamic flow suitably for low noise. A qualitative parametric study of SMA-enabled, slat-cove filler designs was performed on the bench-top. Computational models were developed and analyses were performed to assess the displacement response under representative aerodynamic load. The bench-top and computational results provide significant insight into design trades and an optimal design.

  18. Unified aeroacoustics analysis for high speed turboprop aerodynamics and noise. Volume 5: Propagation of propeller tone noise through a fuselage boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magliozzi, B.; Hanson, D. B.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of tone noise propagation through a boundary layer and fuselage scattering effects was derived. This analysis is a three dimensional and the complete wave field is solved by matching analytical expressions for the incident and scattered waves in the outer flow to a numerical solution in the boundary layer flow. The outer wave field is constructed analytically from an incident wave appropriate to the source and a scattered wave in the standard Hankel function form. For the incident wave, an existing function - domain propeller noise radiation theory is used. In the boundary layer region, the wave equation is solved by numerical methods. The theoretical analysis is embodied in a computer program which allows the calculation of correction factors for the fuselage scattering and boundary layer refraction effects. The effects are dependent on boundary layer profile, flight speed, and frequency. Corrections can be derived for any point on the fuselage, including those on the opposite side from the source. The theory was verified using limited cases and by comparing calculations with available measurements from JetStar tests of model prop-fans. For the JetStar model scale, the boundary layer refraction effects produce moderate fuselage pressure reinforcements aft of and near the plane of rotation and significant attenuation forward of the plane of rotation at high flight speeds. At lower flight speeds, the calculated boundary layer effects result in moderate amplification over the fuselage area of interest. Apparent amplification forward of the plane of rotation is a result of effective changes in the source directivity due to boundary layer refraction effects. Full scale effects are calculated to be moderate, providing fuselage pressure amplification of about 5 dB at the peak noise location. Evaluation using available noise measurements was made under high-speed, high-altitude flight conditions. Comparisons of calculations made of free field noise, using a

  19. Aerodynamic Measurements of a Gulfstream Aircraft Model With and Without Noise Reduction Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhart, Dan H.; Hannon, Judith A.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2014-01-01

    Steady and unsteady aerodynamic measurements of a high-fidelity, semi-span 18% scale Gulfstream aircraft model are presented. The aerodynamic data were collected concurrently with acoustic measurements as part of a larger aeroacoustic study targeting airframe noise associated with main landing gear/flap components, gear-flap interaction noise, and the viability of related noise mitigation technologies. The aeroacoustic tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel with the facility in the acoustically treated open-wall (jet) mode. Most of the measurements were obtained with the model in landing configuration with the flap deflected at 39º and the main landing gear on and off. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0.16, 0.20, and 0.24. Global forces (lift and drag) and extensive steady and unsteady surface pressure measurements were obtained. Comparison of the present results with those acquired during a previous test shows a significant reduction in the lift experienced by the model. The underlying cause was traced to the likely presence of a much thicker boundary layer on the tunnel floor, which was acoustically treated for the present test. The steady and unsteady pressure fields on the flap, particularly in the regions of predominant noise sources such as the inboard and outboard tips, remained unaffected. It is shown that the changes in lift and drag coefficients for model configurations fitted with gear/flap noise abatement technologies fall within the repeatability of the baseline configuration. Therefore, the noise abatement technologies evaluated in this experiment have no detrimental impact on the aerodynamic performance of the aircraft model.

  20. Computational Analyses in Support of Sub-scale Diffuser Testing for the A-3 Facility. Part 3; Aero-Acoustic Analyses and Experimental Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel C.; Graham, Jason S.; McVay, Greg P.; Langford, Lester L.

    2008-01-01

    A unique assessment of acoustic similarity scaling laws and acoustic analogy methodologies in predicting the far-field acoustic signature from a sub-scale altitude rocket test facility at the NASA Stennis Space Center was performed. A directional, point-source similarity analysis was implemented for predicting the acoustic far-field. In this approach, experimental acoustic data obtained from "similar" rocket engine tests were appropriately scaled using key geometric and dynamic parameters. The accuracy of this engineering-level method is discussed by comparing the predictions with acoustic far-field measurements obtained. In addition, a CFD solver was coupled with a Lilley's acoustic analogy formulation to determine the improvement of using a physics-based methodology over an experimental correlation approach. In the current work, steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes calculations were used to model the internal flow of the rocket engine and altitude diffuser. These internal flow simulations provided the necessary realistic input conditions for external plume simulations. The CFD plume simulations were then used to provide the spatial turbulent noise source distributions in the acoustic analogy calculations. Preliminary findings of these studies will be discussed.

  1. Single velocity-component modeling of leading edge turbulence interaction noise.

    PubMed

    Gill, J; Zhang, X; Joseph, P

    2015-06-01

    A computational aeroacoustics approach is used to predict leading edge turbulence interaction noise for real airfoils. One-component (transverse), two-component (transverse and streamwise), and three-component (transverse, streamwise, and spanwise) synthesized turbulence disturbances are modeled instead of harmonic transverse gusts, to which previous computational studies of leading edge noise have often been confined. The effects of the inclusion of streamwise and spanwise disturbances on the noise are assessed. It is shown that accurate noise predictions can be made by modeling only transverse disturbances which reduces the computational expense of simulations. The accuracy of using only transverse disturbances is assessed for symmetric and cambered airfoils, and also for airfoils at non-zero angle of attack. PMID:26093411

  2. Review and analysis of the DNW/Model 360 rotor acoustic data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinner, R. A.; Boxwell, D. A.; Spencer, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    A comprehensive model rotor aeroacoustic data base was collected in a large anechoic wind tunnel in 1986. Twenty-six microphones were positioned around the azimuth to collect acoustic data for approximately 150 different test conditions. A dynamically scaled, blade-pressure-instrumented model of the forward rotor of the BH360 helicopter simultaneously provided blade pressures for correlation with the acoustic data. High-speed impulsive noise, blade-vortex interaction noise, low-frequency noise, and broadband noise were all captured in this extensive data base. Trends are presentes for each noise source, with important parametric variations. The purpose of this paper is to introduce this data base and illustrate its potential for predictive code validation.

  3. Acoustical modeling study of the open test section of the NASA Langley V/STOL wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ver, I. L.; Andersen, D. W.; Bliss, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    An acoustic model study was carried out to identify effective sound absorbing treatment of strategically located surfaces in an open wind tunnel test section. Also an aerodynamic study done concurrently, sought to find measures to control low frequency jet pulsations which occur when the tunnel is operated in its open test section configuration. The acoustical modeling study indicated that lining of the raised ceiling and the test section floor immediately below it, results in a substantial improvement. The aerodynamic model study indicated that: (1) the low frequency jet pulsations are most likely caused or maintained by coupling of aerodynamic and aeroacoustic phenomena in the closed tunnel circuit, (2) replacing the hard collector cowl with a geometrically identical but porous fiber metal surface of 100 mks rayls flow resistance does not result in any noticable reduction of the test section noise caused by the impingement of the turbulent flow on the cowl.

  4. 36 CFR 1192.179 - Trams, similar vehicles and systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hotels and other public accommodations, and between and within amusement parks and other recreation areas, shall comply with this section. For purposes of determining applicability of 49 CFR 37.101, 37.103,...

  5. 36 CFR 1192.179 - Trams, similar vehicles and systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hotels and other public accommodations, and between and within amusement parks and other recreation areas, shall comply with this section. For purposes of determining applicability of 49 CFR 37.101, 37.103,...

  6. 36 CFR 1192.179 - Trams, similar vehicles and systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hotels and other public accommodations, and between and within amusement parks and other recreation areas, shall comply with this section. For purposes of determining applicability of 49 CFR 37.101, 37.103,...

  7. 36 CFR 1192.179 - Trams, similar vehicles and systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hotels and other public accommodations, and between and within amusement parks and other recreation areas, shall comply with this section. For purposes of determining applicability of 49 CFR 37.101, 37.103,...

  8. 36 CFR 1192.179 - Trams, similar vehicles and systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., shall comply with this section. For purposes of determining applicability of 49 CFR 37.101, 37.103, or... units, including but not limited to vehicles providing shuttle service to remote parking areas, between... addition, each such unit shall comply with § 1192.23 (b) or (c) and shall provide at least one space...

  9. Aeroacoustic mechanisms of voiced sound production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krane, Michael

    2002-05-01

    The focus of this study is to quantify the order of magnitude of the direct effects of (1) vocal-fold wall motion and (2) glottal flow separation point movement on the production of voiced speech sounds. A solution for the sound-pressure field shows three source mechanisms: (1) a volume source due to unsteady glottal air flow; (2) a quadrupole source representing interaction of the glottal jet with the pharynx walls; and (3) an octupole due to direct sound radiation by the glottal jet itself. A relation is derived expressing glottal volume flow in terms of transglottal pressure difference, vocal-fold wall motion, and separation point motion. Using scaling analysis, the transglottal pressure difference is shown to be the dominant effect on glottal volume flow, while vocal-fold wall motion is shown to have a negligible effect. However, separation point motion is shown to have a measurable effect during the closure phase of the vibration cycle. Using these results, the acoustic effect of separation point motion is shown to be measurable, while the effect of vocal-fold wall vibration is shown to be negligible. Relative contributions of these effects across age, gender, and degree of glottal closure are discussed.

  10. Aeroacoustics of Three-Stream Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.

    2012-01-01

    Results from acoustic measurements of noise radiated from a heated, three-stream, co-annular exhaust system operated at subsonic conditions are presented. The experiments were conducted for a range of core, bypass, and tertiary stream temperatures and pressures. The nozzle system had a fan-to-core area ratio of 2.92 and a tertiary-to-core area ratio of 0.96. The impact of introducing a third stream on the radiated noise for third-stream velocities below that of the bypass stream was to reduce high frequency noise levels at broadside and peak jet-noise angles. Mid-frequency noise radiation at aft observation angles was impacted by the conditions of the third stream. The core velocity had the greatest impact on peak noise levels and the bypass-to-core mass flow ratio had a slight impact on levels in the peak jet-noise direction. The third-stream jet conditions had no impact on peak noise levels. Introduction of a third jet stream in the presence of a simulated forward-flight stream limits the impact of the third stream on radiated noise. For equivalent ideal thrust conditions, two-stream and three-stream jets can produce similar acoustic spectra although high-frequency noise levels tend to be lower for the three-stream jet.

  11. Aerodynamic and aeroacoustic for wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, Maizi; Rabah, Dizene

    2015-03-10

    This paper describes a hybrid approach forpredicting noise radiated from the rotating Wind Turbine (HAWT) blades, where the sources are extracted from an unsteady Reynolds-Averaged-Navier Stocks (URANS) simulation, ANSYS CFX 11.0, was used to calculate The near-field flow parameters around the blade surface that are necessary for FW-H codes. Comparisons with NREL Phase II experimental results are presented with respect to the pressure distributions for validating a capacity of the solver to calculate the near-field flow on and around the wind turbine blades, The results show that numerical data have a good agreement with experimental. The acoustic pressure, presented as a sum of thickness and loading noise components, is analyzed by means of a discrete fast Fourier transformation for the presentation of the time acoustic time histories in the frequency domain. The results convincingly show that dipole source noise is the dominant noise source for this wind turbine.

  12. Advances in high speed jet aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    This paper provides an assessment from an experimental point of view of the present understanding of high speed jet noise primarily as it pertains to shock containing supersonic jet plumes. The nature of this assessment involves an examination of the complex flow and related acoustic field associated with this problem. A certain emphasis is placed on prediction of the near acoustic field to satisfy a motivation driven by a new set of guiding principles, namely the high performance tactical fighter and second generation space transportation vehicles. The review concludes that after weighing all the experimental evidence, only after consideration of the role of large scale coherent structure is adopted can a consistent unifying theme be achieved to physically interpret and properly predict noise generation by the fundamental mechanisms.

  13. Computing unsteady shock waves for aeroacoustic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, Kristine R.; Caughey, David A.; Casper, Jay

    1994-01-01

    The computation of unsteady shock waves, which contribute significantly to noise generation in supersonic jet flows, is investigated. The paper focuses on the difficulties of computing slowly moving shock waves. Numerical error is found to manifest itself principally as a spurious entropy wave. Calculations presented are performed using a third-order essentially nonoscillatory scheme. The effect of stencil biasing parameters and of two versions of numerical flux formulas on the magnitude of spurious entropy are investigated. The level of numerical error introduced in the calculation is quantified as a function of shock pressure ratio, shock speed, Courant number, and mesh density. The spurious entropy relative to the entropy jump across a static shock decreases with increasing shock strength and shock velocity relative to the grid, but is insensitive to Courant number. The structure of the spurious entropy wave is affected by the choice of flux formulas and algorithm biasing parameters. The effect of the spurious numerical waves on the calculation of sound amplification by a shock wave is investigated. For this class of problem, the acoustic pressure waves are relatively unaffected by the spurious numerical phenomena.

  14. Computing unsteady shock waves for aeroacoustic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows,, Kristine r.; Caughey, David A.; Casper, Jay

    1994-01-01

    The computation of unsteady shock waves, which contribute significantly to noise generation in supersonic jet flows, is investigated. This paper focuses on the difficulties of computing slowly moving shock waves. Numerical error is found to manifest itself principally as a spurious entropy wave. Calculations presented are performed using a third order essentially nonoscillatory scheme. The effect of stencil biasing parameters and of two versions of numerical flux formulas on the magnitude of spurious entropy are investigated. The level of numerical error introduced in the calculation in quantified as a function of shock pressure ratio, shock speed, Courant number, and mesh density. The spurious entropy relative to the entropy jump across a static shock decreases with increasing shock strength and shock velocity relative to the grid, but is insensitive to Courant number. The structure of the spurious entropy wave is affected by the choice of flux formulas and algorithm biasing parameters. The effect of the spurious numerical waves on the calculation of sound amplification by a shock wave is investigated. For this class of problem, the acoustic pressure waves are relatively unaffected by the spurious numerical phenomena.

  15. Ultra-High Bypass Engine Aeroacoustic Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, Philip R.; Janardan, Bangalore A.

    2003-01-01

    A system study was carried out to identify potential advanced aircraft engine concepts and cycles which could be capable of achieving a 5 to 10 EPNdB reduction in community noise level relative to current FAR36 Stage 3 limits for a typical large-capacity commercial transport aircraft. The study was directed toward large twin-engine aircraft applications in the 400,000 to 500,000 pound take-off gross weight class. Four single rotation fan engine designs with fan pressure ratios from 1.3 to 1.75, and two counter-rotating fan engine configurations were studied. Several engine configurations were identified which, with further technology development, could achieve the objective of 5 to 10 EPNdB noise reduction. Optimum design fan pressure ratio is concluded to be in the range of 1.4 to 1.55 for best noise reduction with acceptable weight and Direct Operating Cost (DOC) penalties.

  16. Aero-acoustic performance of Fractal Spoilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedic, J.; Ganapathisubramani, B.; Vassilicos, C.; Boree, J.; Brizzi, L.; Spohn, A.

    2010-11-01

    One of the major environmental problems facing the aviation industry is that of aircraft noise. The work presented in this paper, done as part of the OPENAIR Project, looks at reducing spoiler noise through means of large-scale fractal porosity. It is hypothesised that the highly turbulent flow generated by these grids, which have multi-length-scales, would remove the re-circulation region and with it, the low frequency noise it generates. In its place, a higher frequency noise is introduced which is susceptible to atmospheric attenuation, and would be deemed less offensive to the human ear. A total of nine laboratory scaled spoilers were looked at, seven of which had a fractal design, one conventionally porous and one solid for reference. All of the spoilers were mounted on a flat plate and inclined at 30^o to the horizontal. Far-field, microphone array and PIV measurements were taken in an anechoic chamber to determine the acoustic performance and to study the flow coming through the spoilers. A significant reduction in sound pressure level is recorded and is found to be very sensitive to small changes in fractal grid parameters. Wake and drag force measurements indicated that the spoilers increase the drag whilst having minimal effect on the lift.

  17. Takeoff/approach noise for a model counterrotation propeller with a forward-swept upstream rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Hall, David G.; Podboy, Gary G.; Jeracki, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    A scale model of a counterrotating propeller with forward-swept blades in the forward rotor and aft-swept blades in the aft rotor (designated F39/A31) has been tested in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-Foot Anechoic Wind Tunnel. This paper presents aeroacoustic results at a takeoff/approach condition of Mach 0.20. Laser Doppler Velocimeter results taken in a plane between the two rotors are also included to quantify the interaction flow field. The intention of the forward-swept design is to reduce the magnitude of the forward rotor tip vortex and/or wakes which impinge on the aft rotor, thus lowering the interaction tone levels.

  18. Modeling Aerodynamically Generated Sound of Helicopter Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.; Farassat, F.

    2002-01-01

    A great deal of progress has been made in the modeling of aerodynamically generated sound of rotors over the past decade. Although the modeling effort has focused on helicopter main rotors, the theory is generally valid for a wide range of rotor configurations. The Ffowcs Williams Hawkings (FW-H) equation has been the foundation for much of the development. The monopole and dipole source terms of the FW-H equation account for the thickness and loading noise, respectively. Bladevortex-interaction noise and broadband noise are important types of loading noise, hence much research has been directed toward the accurate modeling of these noise mechanisms. Both subsonic and supersonic quadrupole noise formulations have been developed for the prediction of high-speed impulsive noise. In an effort to eliminate the need to compute the quadrupole contribution, the FW-H equation has also been utilized on permeable surfaces surrounding all physical noise sources. Comparisons of the Kirchhoff formulation for moving surfaces with the FW-H equation have shown that the Kirchhoff formulation for moving surfaces can give erroneous results for aeroacoustic problems. Finally, significant progress has been made incorporating the rotor noise models into full vehicle noise prediction tools.

  19. Results of the AFRSI detailed-environment test of the 0.035-scale SSV pressure-loads model 84-0 in the Ames 11x11 ft. TWT and the Lewis 8x6 ft. and 10x10 ft. SWT (OA-310A, B, C), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, B. A.; Marroquin, J.

    1984-01-01

    Detailed orbiter aerodynamic and aeroacoustic pressure data were obtained in a three-part experimental investigation (OA-310A, B and C). The tests were conducted in three NASA facilities: OA-310A in the Ames 11x11-foot Transonic Wind Tunnel; OA-310B in the Lewis 8x6-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel; and OA-310C in the Lewis 10x10-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. Test data were obtained to support analysis of the Space Transportation System (STS)-6 advanced flexible reusable surface insulation (AFRSI) anomaly using the 0.035-scale space shuttle vehicle pressure-loads Model 84-0. Data were obtained in the areas of the orbiter where AFRSI is to be applied to OV-099 and OV-103. Emphasis was placed on acquiring detailed aeroacoustic data and time-averaged pressure distributions on five affected areas: (1) canopy; (2) side of fuselage; (3) upper surface of wing; (4) OMS pods; and (5) vertical tail. Data were obtained at nominal ascent and entry atmospheric flight trajectory conditions between M=0.6 through M-3.5. Sample plotted data are given. aba M.G.

  20. Modeling for Airframe Noise Prediction Using Vortex Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Z. Charlie

    2002-12-01

    Various components of the airframe are known to be a significant source of noise. With the advent of technology in quieting modern engines, airframe generated noise competes and, in certain instances, surpasses the engine noise. Airframe noise is most pronounced during aircraft approach when the engines are operating at reduced thrust, and airframe components such as high-lift devices and landing gears are in deployed conditions. Recent experimental studies have reaffirmed that the most significant sources of high-lift noise are from the leading-edge slat and the side edges of flaps. Studies of flow field around these structures have consistently shown that there are complicated unsteady vortical flows such as vortex shedding, secondary vortices and vortex breakdown, which are susceptible to far-field radiated sound. The near-field CFD computational data have been used to calculate the far-field acoustics by employing Ffowcs-Williams/Hawkings equation using Lighthill's analogy. However, because of the limit of current computing capacity, it is very time consuming to generate unsteady Navier-Stokes (N-S) computational data for aeroacoustics. Although the N-S simulations are probably necessary to reveal many complex flow phenomena that are unsteady and fully nonlinear, these simulations are not feasible to be used for parametric design. purposes. The objective of this study is thus to develop theoretical models for airframe noise predictions which have quick turn-around computing time. Since it is known that vorticity is a major mechanism responsible for noise generation on high-lift devices, vortex methods have been chosen as modeling tools. Vortex methods are much faster in comparison with other numerical methods, yet they are able to incorporate nonlinear interactions between vortices. Obviously, as with any theoretical model, assumptions have to be made and justified when such models are used in complex flow. The merit and applicability of the models for

  1. LES with wall models for trailing-edge flow prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meng; Cabot, William; Moin, Parviz

    1999-11-01

    Large-eddy simulation of wall-bounded turbulent flows becomes formidably expensive at high Reynolds numbers, unless the severe near-wall resolution requirement is removed though the use of a suitable wall model. The applicability of this approach to complex turbulent flows with separation is assessed by considering turbulent boundary layer flows past an asymmetric trailing-edge and the associated aeroacoustics. A simple stress balance model coupled with a mixing-length eddy viscosity, with or without pressure gradient imposed from the outer LES solution, is found to predict velocity statistics fairly well compared with those from the resolved LES, at less than 10 % of the original computational cost. In particular, the separation point near the trailing-edge is predicted correctly. The pressure gradient term is found necessary for the model to capture the correct behavior of the wall shear-stress in the favorable pressure gradient region. Numerical experiments using more elaborate wall models based on approximate boundary layer equations are underway. The effect of wall-modeling on the prediction of surface pressure fluctuations and noise radiation is investigated, and the results will be discussed.

  2. A simple-source model of military jet aircraft noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Jessica; Gee, Kent L.; Neilsen, Tracianne; Wall, Alan T.

    2010-10-01

    The jet plumes produced by military jet aircraft radiate significant amounts of noise. A need to better understand the characteristics of the turbulence-induced aeroacoustic sources has motivated the present study. The purpose of the study is to develop a simple-source model of jet noise that can be compared to the measured data. The study is based off of acoustic data collected near a tied-down F-22 Raptor. The simplest model consisted of adjusting the origin of a monopole above a rigid planar reflector until the locations of the predicted and measured interference nulls matched. The model has developed into an extended Rayleigh distribution of partially correlated monopoles which fits the measured data from the F-22 significantly better. The results and basis for the model match the current prevailing theory that jet noise consists of both correlated and uncorrelated sources. In addition, this simple-source model conforms to the theory that the peak source location moves upstream with increasing frequency and lower engine conditions.

  3. Progress Towards an LES Wall Model Including Unresolved Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craft, Kyle; Redman, Andrew; Aikens, Kurt

    2015-11-01

    Wall models used in large eddy simulations (LES) are often based on theories for hydraulically smooth walls. While this is reasonable for many applications, there are also many where the impact of surface roughness is important. A previously developed wall model has been used primarily for jet engine aeroacoustics. However, jet simulations have not accurately captured thick initial shear layers found in some experimental data. This may partly be due to nozzle wall roughness used in the experiments to promote turbulent boundary layers. As a result, the wall model is extended to include the effects of unresolved wall roughness through appropriate alterations to the log-law. The methodology is tested for incompressible flat plate boundary layers with different surface roughness. Correct trends are noted for the impact of surface roughness on the velocity profile. However, velocity deficit profiles and the Reynolds stresses do not collapse as well as expected. Possible reasons for the discrepancies as well as future work will be presented. This work used the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), which is supported by National Science Foundation grant number ACI-1053575. Computational resources on TACC Stampede were provided under XSEDE allocation ENG150001.

  4. Hybrid CFD/CAA Modeling for Liftoff Acoustic Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strutzenberg, Louise L.; Liever, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents development efforts at the NASA Marshall Space flight Center to establish a hybrid Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Aero-Acoustics (CFD/CAA) simulation system for launch vehicle liftoff acoustics environment analysis. Acoustic prediction engineering tools based on empirical jet acoustic strength and directivity models or scaled historical measurements are of limited value in efforts to proactively design and optimize launch vehicles and launch facility configurations for liftoff acoustics. CFD based modeling approaches are now able to capture the important details of vehicle specific plume flow environment, identifY the noise generation sources, and allow assessment of the influence of launch pad geometric details and sound mitigation measures such as water injection. However, CFD methodologies are numerically too dissipative to accurately capture the propagation of the acoustic waves in the large CFD models. The hybrid CFD/CAA approach combines the high-fidelity CFD analysis capable of identifYing the acoustic sources with a fast and efficient Boundary Element Method (BEM) that accurately propagates the acoustic field from the source locations. The BEM approach was chosen for its ability to properly account for reflections and scattering of acoustic waves from launch pad structures. The paper will present an overview of the technology components of the CFD/CAA framework and discuss plans for demonstration and validation against test data.

  5. Glottal aerodynamics in compliant, life-sized vocal fold models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhail, Michael; Dowell, Grant; Krane, Michael

    2013-11-01

    This talk presents high-speed PIV measurements in compliant, life-sized models of the vocal folds. A clearer understanding of the fluid-structure interaction of voiced speech, how it produces sound, and how it varies with pathology is required to improve clinical diagnosis and treatment of vocal disorders. Physical models of the vocal folds can answer questions regarding the fundamental physics of speech, as well as the ability of clinical measures to detect the presence and extent of disorder. Flow fields were recorded in the supraglottal region of the models to estimate terms in the equations of fluid motion, and their relative importance. Experiments were conducted over a range of driving pressures with flow rates, given by a ball flowmeter, and subglottal pressures, given by a micro-manometer, reported for each case. Imaging of vocal fold motion, vector fields showing glottal jet behavior, and terms estimated by control volume analysis will be presented. The use of these results for a comparison with clinical measures, and for the estimation of aeroacoustic source strengths will be discussed. Acknowledge support from NIH R01 DC005642.

  6. Acoustic Characteristics of a Model Isolated Tiltrotor in DNW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Earl R., Jr.; McCluer, Megan; Tadghighi, Hormoz

    1999-01-01

    An aeroacoustic wind tunnel test was conducted using a scaled isolated tiltrotor model. Acoustic data were acquired using an in-flow microphone wing traversed beneath the model to map the directivity of the near-field acoustic radiation of the rotor for a parametric variation of rotor angle-of-attack, tunnel speed, and rotor thrust. Acoustic metric data were examined to show trends of impulsive noise for the parametric variations. BVISPL maximum noise levels were found to increase with mu for constant alpha and C(sub T), although the maximum BVI levels were found at much higher cc than for a typical helicopter. BVISPL levels were found to increase with mu for constant alpha and C(sub T). BVISPL was found to decrease with increasing C(sub T) for constant alpha and mu, although BVISPL increased with thrust for a constant wake geometry. Metric data were also scaled for M,i, to evaluate how well simple power law scaling could be used to correct metric data for M(sub tip) effects.

  7. Acoustic Characteristics of a Model Isolated Tiltrotor in DNW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Earl R., Jr.; McCluer, Megan; Tadghighi, Hormoz

    1999-01-01

    An aeroacoustic wind tunnel test was conducted using a scaled isolated tiltrotor model. Acoustic data were acquired using an in-flow microphone wing traversed beneath the model to map the directivity of the near-field acoustic radiation of the rotor for a parametric variation of rotor angle-of-attack, tunnel speed, and rotor thrust. Acoustic metric data were examined to show trends of impulsive noise for the parametric variations. BVISPL maximum noise levels were found to increase with alpha for constant mu and C(sub T), although the maximum BVI levels were found at much higher a than for a typical helicopter. BVISPL levels were found to increase with mu for constant alpha and C(sub T. BVISPL was found to decrease with increasing CT for constant a and m, although BVISPL increased with thrust for a constant wake geometry. Metric data were also scaled for M(sub up) to evaluate how well simple power law scaling could be used to correct metric data for M(sub up) effects.

  8. An Analysis of Model Scale Data Transformation to Full Scale Flight Using Chevron Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford; Bridges, James

    2003-01-01

    Ground-based model scale aeroacoustic data is frequently used to predict the results of flight tests while saving time and money. The value of a model scale test is therefore dependent on how well the data can be transformed to the full scale conditions. In the spring of 2000, a model scale test was conducted to prove the value of chevron nozzles as a noise reduction device for turbojet applications. The chevron nozzle reduced noise by 2 EPNdB at an engine pressure ratio of 2.3 compared to that of the standard conic nozzle. This result led to a full scale flyover test in the spring of 2001 to verify these results. The flyover test confirmed the 2 EPNdB reduction predicted by the model scale test one year earlier. However, further analysis of the data revealed that the spectra and directivity, both on an OASPL and PNL basis, do not agree in either shape or absolute level. This paper explores these differences in an effort to improve the data transformation from model scale to full scale.

  9. The Importance of a Detailed Vehicle Modelling in the Numerical Prediction of Railway Ground Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouroussis, G.; Bergeret, E.; Conti, C.; Verlinden, O.

    With the development of continuous technological innovation, the railway transport is presented as an interesting alternative to the road traffic. Some drawbacks exist, one of the most problematic being certainly the vibrations induced by the railway traffic. The presented research wants to establish a reliable methodology in order to evaluate, from the design stage of a vehicle or of a track, the efforts transmitted by the vehicle to the track/soil system and consequently the level of vibrations in the surroundings. An analysis of the interaction between the track and the soil has been performed in order to show when the track/soil uncoupling can be assumed, with the aim of working in two stages. The first step is based on the vertical dynamic behaviour of the vehicle/track subsystem, taking into account any irregularity in the rail surface. For the soil subsystem (second step), recent publications showed that the finite/infinite element method can be an interesting alternative to boundary element method. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the real benefit of the vehicle modelling in this kind of problem. Typical railway applications (Brussels tram, Thalys HST) are proposed, showing among others that significant reduction of ground vibration level can be obtained by modifying the dynamic characteristics of the vehicle.

  10. SOFIA telescope modal survey test and test-model correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keas, Paul; Brewster, Rick; Guerra, Jorge; Lampater, Ulrich; Kärcher, Hans; Teufel, Stefan; Wagner, Jörg

    2010-07-01

    The NASA/DLR Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) employs a 2.5-meter reflector telescope in a Boeing 747SP. The telescope is housed in an open cavity and will be subjected to aeroacoustic and inertial disturbances. The image stability goal for SOFIA is 0.2 arc-seconds (RMS). Throughout the development phase of the project, analytical models were employed to predict the image stability performance of the telescope, and to evaluate pointing performance improvement measures. These analyses clearly demonstrated that key aspects which determined performance were: 1) Disturbance environment and relevant load-paths 2) Telescope modal behavior 3) Sensor and actuator placement 4) Control algorithm design The SOFIA program is now entering an exciting phase in which the characteristics of the telescope and the cavity environment are being verified through ground and airborne testing. A modal survey test (MST) was conducted in early 2008 to quantify the telescope modal behavior. We will give a brief overview of analytical methods which have been employed to assess/improve the pointing stability performance of the SOFIA telescope. In this context, we will describe the motivation for the MST, and the pre-test analysis which determined the modes of interest and the required MST sensor/shaker placement. A summary will then be given of the FEM-test correlation effort, updated end-to-end simulation results, and actual data coming from telescope activation test flights.

  11. Flow-Structure-Acoustic Interaction Computational Modeling of Voice Production inside an Entire Airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Weili; Zheng, Xudong; Xue, Qian

    2015-11-01

    Human voice quality is directly determined by the interplay of dynamic behavior of glottal flow, vibratory characteristics of VFs and acoustic characteristics of upper airway. These multiphysics constituents are tightly coupled together and precisely coordinate to produce understandable sound. Despite many years' research effort, the direct relationships among the detailed flow features, VF vibration and aeroacoustics still remains elusive. This study utilizes a first-principle based, flow-structure-acoustics interaction computational modeling approach to study the process of voice production inside an entire human airway. In the current approach, a sharp interface immersed boundary method based incompressible flow solver is utilized to model the glottal flow; A finite element based solid mechanics solver is utilized to model the vocal vibration; A high-order immersed boundary method based acoustics solver is utilized to directly compute sound. These three solvers are fully coupled to mimic the complex flow-structure-acoustic interaction during voice production. The geometry of airway is reconstructed based on the in-vivo MRI measurement reported by Story et al. (1995) and a three-layer continuum based vocal fold model is taken from Titze and Talkin (1979). Results from these simulations will be presented and further analyzed to get new insight into the complex flow-structure-acoustic interaction during voice production. This study is expected to improve the understanding of fundamental physical mechanism of voice production and to help to build direct cause-effect relationship between biomechanics and voice sound.

  12. Finite difference elastic wave modeling with an irregular free surface using ADER scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almuhaidib, Abdulaziz M.; Nafi Toksöz, M.

    2015-06-01

    In numerical modeling of seismic wave propagation in the earth, we encounter two important issues: the free surface and the topography of the surface (i.e. irregularities). In this study, we develop a 2D finite difference solver for the elastic wave equation that combines a 4th- order ADER scheme (Arbitrary high-order accuracy using DERivatives), which is widely used in aeroacoustics, with the characteristic variable method at the free surface boundary. The idea is to treat the free surface boundary explicitly by using ghost values of the solution for points beyond the free surface to impose the physical boundary condition. The method is based on the velocity-stress formulation. The ultimate goal is to develop a numerical solver for the elastic wave equation that is stable, accurate and computationally efficient. The solver treats smooth arbitrary-shaped boundaries as simple plane boundaries. The computational cost added by treating the topography is negligible compared to flat free surface because only a small number of grid points near the boundary need to be computed. In the presence of topography, using 10 grid points per shortest shear-wavelength, the solver yields accurate results. Benchmark numerical tests using several complex models that are solved by our method and other independent accurate methods show an excellent agreement, confirming the validity of the method for modeling elastic waves with an irregular free surface.

  13. Simplified models of flue instruments: Influence of mouth geometry on the sound source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dequand, S.; Willems, J. F. H.; Leroux, M.; Vullings, R.; van Weert, M.; Thieulot, C.; Hirschberg, A.

    2003-03-01

    Flue instruments such as the recorder flute and the transverse flute have different mouth geometries and acoustical response. The effect of the mouth geometry is studied by considering the aeroacoustical response of a simple whistle. The labium of a transverse flute has a large edge angle (60°) compared to that of a recorder flute (15°). Furthermore, the ratio W/h of the mouth width W to the jet thickness h can be varied in the transverse flute (lips of the musician) while it is fixed to a value W/h~4 in a recorder flute. A systematic experimental study of the steady oscillation behavior has been carried out. Results of acoustical pressure measurements and flow visualization are presented. The sharp edge of the recorder provides a sound source which is rich in harmonics at the cost of stability. The larger angle of the labium of the flute seems to be motivated by a better stability of the oscillations for thick jets but could also be motivated by a reduction of broadband turbulence noise. We propose two simplified sound source models which could be used for sound synthesis: a jet-drive model for W/h>2 and a discrete-vortex model for W/h<2.

  14. Acoustic Surveys of a Scaled-Model CESTOL Transport Aircraft in Static and Forward Speed Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnside, Nathan; Horne, Clifton

    2012-01-01

    An 11% scale-model of a Cruise-Efficient Short Take-off and Landing (CESTOL) scalemodel test was recently completed. The test was conducted in the AEDC National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The model included two over-wing pod-mounted turbine propulsion simulators (TPS). The hybrid blended wing-body used a circulation control wing (CCW) with leadingand trailing-edge blowing. The bulk of the test matrix included three forward velocities (40 kts, 60 kts, and 100kts), angle-of-attack variation between -5 and 25 , and CCW mass flow variation. Seven strut-mounted microphones outboard of the left wing provided source directivity. A phased microphone array was mounted outboard of the right wing for source location. The goal of this paper is to provide a preliminary look at the acoustic data acquired during the Advanced Model for Extreme Lift and Improved Aeroacoustics (AMELIA) test for 0 angle-of-attack and 0 sideslip conditions. Data presented provides a good overview of the test conditions and the signal-to-noise quality of the data. TPS height variation showed a difference of 2 dB to 3 dB due to wing shielding. Variation of slot mass flow showed increases of 12 dB to 26 dB above the airframe noise and the TPS increased the overall levels an additional 5 dB to 10 dB.

  15. Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Loth, E.; Tryggvason, G.; Tsuji, Y.; Elghobashi, S. E.; Crowe, Clayton T.; Berlemont, A.; Reeks, M.; Simonin, O.; Frank, Th; Onishi, Yasuo; Van Wachem, B.

    2005-09-01

    Slurry flows occur in many circumstances, including chemical manufacturing processes, pipeline transfer of coal, sand, and minerals; mud flows; and disposal of dredged materials. In this section we discuss slurry flow applications related to radioactive waste management. The Hanford tank waste solids and interstitial liquids will be mixed to form a slurry so it can be pumped out for retrieval and treatment. The waste is very complex chemically and physically. The ARIEL code is used to model the chemical interactions and fluid dynamics of the waste.

  16. Statistically optimal analysis of state-discretized trajectory data from multiple thermodynamic states.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Mey, Antonia S J S; Rosta, Edina; Noé, Frank

    2014-12-01

    We propose a discrete transition-based reweighting analysis method (dTRAM) for analyzing configuration-space-discretized simulation trajectories produced at different thermodynamic states (temperatures, Hamiltonians, etc.) dTRAM provides maximum-likelihood estimates of stationary quantities (probabilities, free energies, expectation values) at any thermodynamic state. In contrast to the weighted histogram analysis method (WHAM), dTRAM does not require data to be sampled from global equilibrium, and can thus produce superior estimates for enhanced sampling data such as parallel/simulated tempering, replica exchange, umbrella sampling, or metadynamics. In addition, dTRAM provides optimal estimates of Markov state models (MSMs) from the discretized state-space trajectories at all thermodynamic states. Under suitable conditions, these MSMs can be used to calculate kinetic quantities (e.g., rates, timescales). In the limit of a single thermodynamic state, dTRAM estimates a maximum likelihood reversible MSM, while in the limit of uncorrelated sampling data, dTRAM is identical to WHAM. dTRAM is thus a generalization to both estimators. PMID:25481128

  17. Statistically optimal analysis of state-discretized trajectory data from multiple thermodynamic states

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hao; Mey, Antonia S. J. S.; Noé, Frank; Rosta, Edina

    2014-12-07

    We propose a discrete transition-based reweighting analysis method (dTRAM) for analyzing configuration-space-discretized simulation trajectories produced at different thermodynamic states (temperatures, Hamiltonians, etc.) dTRAM provides maximum-likelihood estimates of stationary quantities (probabilities, free energies, expectation values) at any thermodynamic state. In contrast to the weighted histogram analysis method (WHAM), dTRAM does not require data to be sampled from global equilibrium, and can thus produce superior estimates for enhanced sampling data such as parallel/simulated tempering, replica exchange, umbrella sampling, or metadynamics. In addition, dTRAM provides optimal estimates of Markov state models (MSMs) from the discretized state-space trajectories at all thermodynamic states. Under suitable conditions, these MSMs can be used to calculate kinetic quantities (e.g., rates, timescales). In the limit of a single thermodynamic state, dTRAM estimates a maximum likelihood reversible MSM, while in the limit of uncorrelated sampling data, dTRAM is identical to WHAM. dTRAM is thus a generalization to both estimators.

  18. Numerical simulation of turbulence transition and sound radiation for flow through a rigid glottal model.

    PubMed

    Suh, Jungsoo; Frankel, Steven H

    2007-06-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES)-based computational aeroacoustics techniques were applied to a static model of the human glottis, idealized here as a planar channel with an orifice, to study flow-acoustic interactions related to speech. Rigid models of both converging and diverging glottal passages, each featuring a 20 deg included angle and a minimal glottal diameter of 0.04 cm, with an imposed transglottal pressure of 15 cm H2O, were studied. The Favre-filtered compressible Navier-Stokes equations were integrated for this low-Mach-number flow using an additive semi-implicit Runge-Kutta method and a high-order compact finite-difference scheme with characteristic-based nonreflecting boundary conditions and a multiblock approach. Flow asymmetries related to the Coanda effect and transition to turbulence, as well as the far-field sound, were captured. Acoustic-analogy-based far-field sound predictions were compared with direct simulations and showed that dipole sources, arising from unsteady flow forces exerted on the glottal walls, are primarily responsible for the tonal sound observed in the divergent glottis case. PMID:17552723

  19. Slat Cove Noise Modeling: A Posteriori Analysis of Unsteady RANS Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Lockard, David P.; Atkins, Harold L.; Lilley, Geoffrey M.

    2002-01-01

    A companion paper by Khorrami et al demonstrates the feasibility of simulating the (nominally) self-sustained, large-scale unsteadiness within the leading-edge slat-cove region of multi-element airfoils using unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations, provided that the turbulence production term in the underlying two-equation turbulence model is switched off within the cove region. In conjunction with a FfowesWilliams-Hawkings solver, the URANS computations were shown to capture the dominant portion of the acoustic spectrum attributed to slat noise, as well as reproducing the increased intensity of slat cove motions (and, correspondingly, far-field noise as well) at the lower angles of attack. This paper examines that simulation database, augmented by additional simulations, with the objective of transitioning this apparent success to aeroacoustic predictions in an engineering context. As a first step towards this goal, the simulated flow and acoustic fields are compared with experiment and simplified analytical model. Rather intense near-field fluctuations in the simulated flow are found to be associated with unsteady separation along the slat bottom surface, relatively close to the slat cusp. Accuracy of the laminar-cove simulations in this near-wall region is raised to be an open issue. The adjoint Green's function approach is also explored in an attempt to identify the most efficient noise source locations.

  20. Numerical and Physical Modeling of the Response of Resonator Liners to Intense Sound and Grazing Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, Alan S.; Tam, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Two significant advances have been made in the application of computational aeroacoustics methodology to acoustic liner technology. The first is that temperature effects for discrete sound are not the same as for broadband noise. For discrete sound, the normalized resistance appears to be insensitive to temperature except at high SPL. However, reactance is lower, significantly lower in absolute value, at high temperature. The second is the numerical investigation the acoustic performance of a liner by direct numerical simulation. Liner impedance is affected by the non-uniformity of the incident sound waves. This identifies the importance of pressure gradient. Preliminary design one and two-dimensional impedance models were developed to design sound absorbing liners in the presence of intense sound and grazing flow. The two-dimensional model offers the potential to empirically determine incident sound pressure face-plate distance from resonator orifices. This represents an important initial step in improving our understanding of how to effectively use the Dean Two-Microphone impedance measurement method.