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Sample records for aeroassisted flight experiment

  1. Aeroassist flight experiment guidance, navigation and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, Timothy J.; Engel, Albert G.

    1986-01-01

    The Aeroassist Flight Experiment scheduled for the early 1990's will demonstrate the use of a low L/D lifting brake using aerodynamic drag to return a spacecraft from a high energy to a low earth orbit. The experimental vehicle will be deployed and retrieved by the Shuttle Orbiter. This paper reviews some of the challenges, problems, and solutions encountered to date during guidance system development, with emphasis on technology advances which will benefit an operational Orbit Transfer Vehicle (OTV). Key factors to be discussed include guidance alternatives, aerodynamic modeling, navigation requirements, the impact of atmospheric uncertainties, and flight profile alternatives considered during initial planning.

  2. Optimal trajectories for the aeroassisted flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miele, A.; Wang, T.; Lee, W. Y.; Zhao, Z. G.

    1989-01-01

    The determination of optimal trajectories for the aeroassisted flight experiment (AFE) is discussed. The intent of this experiment is to simulate a GEO-to-LEO transfer, where GEO denotes a geosynchronous earth orbit and LEO denotes a low earth orbit. The trajectories of an AFE spacecraft are analyzed in a 3D-space, employing the full system of 6 ordinary differential equations (ODEs) describing the atmospheric pass. The atmospheric entry conditions are given, and the atmospheric exit conditions are adjusted. Two possible transfers are considered: (1) indirect ascent to a 178 NM perigee via a 197 NM apogee; and (2) direct ascent to a 178 NM apogee.

  3. Wall catalysis experiment on AFE. [Aeroassist Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the wall catalysis experiment which is planned as part of the Aeroassist Flight experiments (AFE) that will be flown from the Space Shuttle Orbiter in late 1993. Research on candidate high-catalytic efficiency overcoats for the experiment conducted in an arc-jet air stream are discussed. The temperature distribution over the AFE heat shield is also predicted using a reacting boundary layer solution that includes surface kinetics and optical properties determined from these tests.

  4. Optimal trajectories for the aeroassisted flight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miele, A.; Wang, T.; Lee, W. Y.; Zhao, Z. G.

    This paper deals with the determination of optimal trajectories for the aeroassisted flight experiment (AFE). The intent of this experiment is to simulate a GEO-to-LEO transfer, where GEO denotes a geosynchronous Earth orbit and LEO denotes a low Earth orbit. Specifically, the AFE spacecraft is released from the Space Shuttle and is accelerated by means of a solid rocket motor toward Earth, so as to achieve atmospheric entry conditions identical with those of a spacecraft returning from GEO. During the atmospheric pass, the angle of attack is kept constant, and the angle of bank is controlled in such a way that the following conditions are satisfied: (a) the atmospheric velocity depletion is such that, after exiting, the AFE spacecraft first ascends to a specified apogee and then descends to a specified perigee; and (b) the exit orbital plane is identical with the entry orbital plane. The final maneuver, not analyzed here, includes the rendezvous with and the capture by the Space Shuttle. In this paper, the trajectories of an AFE spacecraft are analyzed in a 3D space, employing the full system of 6 ODEs describing the atmospheric pass. The atmospheric entry conditions are given, and the atmospheric exit conditions are adjusted in such a way that requirements (a) and (b) are met, while simultaneously minimizing the total characteristic velocity, hence the propellant consumption required for orbital transfer. Two possible transfers are considered: indirect ascent (IA) to a 178 NM perigee via a 197 NM apogee; and direct ascent (DA) to a 178 NM apogee. For both transfers, two cases are investigated: (i) the bank angle is continuously variable; and (ii) the trajectory is divided into segments along which the bank angle is constant. For case (ii), the following subcases are studied; 2, 3, 4 and 5 segments; because the time duration of each segment is optimized, the above subcases involve 4, 6, 8 and 10 parameters, respectively. It is shown that the optimal trajectories

  5. Radiometer experiment for the aeroassist flight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davy, W. C.; Park, C.; Arnold, J. O.; Balakrishnan, A.

    1985-06-01

    A forthcoming NASA flight experiment is described that provides an opportunity to obtain a large base of radiometric data for high-altitude, high-velocity thermochemically nonequilibrated-flow conditions. As a preliminary to the design of a radiometer for this experiment, an approximate method for predicting both equilibrium and nonequilibrium radiative surface fluxes is described. Spectral results for one trajectory state, a velocity of 10 km/sec at an altitude of 85 km, are presented. These results are then used to develop some of the instrument parameters that will be needed for designing of the three genre of radiometers that are proposed for this experiment.

  6. Decomposition technique and optimal trajectories for the aeroassisted flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miele, A.; Wang, T.; Deaton, A. W.

    1990-01-01

    An actual geosynchronous Earth orbit-to-low Earth orbit (GEO-to-LEO) transfer is considered with reference to the aeroassisted flight experiment (AFE) spacecraft, and optimal trajectories are determined by minimizing the total characteristic velocity. The optimization is performed with respect to the time history of the controls (angle of attack and angle of bank), the entry path inclination and the flight time being free. Two transfer maneuvers are considered: direct ascent (DA) to LEO and indirect ascent (IA) to LEO via parking Earth orbit (PEO). By taking into account certain assumptions, the complete system can be decoupled into two subsystems: one describing the longitudinal motion and one describing the lateral motion. The angle of attack history, the entry path inclination, and the flight time are determined via the longitudinal motion subsystem. In this subsystem, the difference between the instantaneous bank angle and a constant bank angle is minimized in the least square sense subject to the specified orbital inclination requirement. Both the angles of attack and the angle of bank are shown to be constant. This result has considerable importance in the design of nominal trajectories to be used in the guidance of AFE and aeroassisted orbital transfer (AOT) vehicles.

  7. Measured and predicted aerodynamic coefficients and shock shapes for Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, William L.

    1989-01-01

    Two scaled models of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle were tested in two air wind tunnels and one CF4 tunnel. The tests were to determine the static longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics, and shock shapes for the configuration in hypersonic continuum flow. The tests were conducted with a range of angle of attack to evaluate the effects of Mach number, Reynolds numbers, and normal shock density ratio.

  8. Simulation of the AFE mission heating in an arc-jet wind tunnel. [Aeroassist Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrazas-Salinas, Imelda; Craig, Roger A.

    1989-01-01

    A technique is presented for simulating a time-varying heating profile in an arc-jet wind tunnel and its application to the testing of a sapphire radiometer window assembly for the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE). The AFE is an experimental mission designed to obtain as much data as possible relative to the aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic phenomena associated with aeroassisted maneuvering. The developed test procedure ensures satisfactory simulation by avoiding the thermal gradients of a step-function heat exposure by matching the heating/time values and by matching the integrated heat load. Furthermore, this is accomplished in a plasma stream in which enthalpy and pressure ensure a close approximation to the real flight environment.

  9. Optimal trajectories for the Aeroassisted Flight Experiment. Part 2: Equations of motion in an inertial system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miele, A.; Zhao, Z. G.; Lee, W. Y.

    1989-01-01

    The determination of optimal trajectories for the aeroassisted flight experiment (AFE) is discussed. The AFE refers to the study of the free flight of an autonomous spacecraft, shuttle-launched and shuttle-recovered. Its purpose is to gather atmospheric entry environmental data for use in designing aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles (AOTV). It is assumed that: (1) the spacecraft is a particle of constant mass; (2) the Earth is rotating with constant angular velocity; (3) the Earth is an oblate planet, and the gravitational potential depends on both the radial distance and the latitude (harmonics of order higher than four are ignored); and (4) the atmosphere is at rest with respect to the Earth. Under these assumptions, the equations of motion for hypervelocity atmospheric flight (which can be used not only for AFE problems, but also for AOT problems and space shuttle problems) are derived in an inertial system. Transformation relations are supplied which allow one to pass from quantities computed in an inertial system to quantities computed in an Earth-fixed system and vice versa.

  10. A computational study of the flowfield surrounding the Aeroassist Flight Experiment vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Greene, Francis A.

    1987-01-01

    A symmetric total variation diminishing (STVD) algorithm has been applied to the solution of the three-dimensional hypersonic flowfield surrounding the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle. Both perfect-gas and chemical nonequilibrium models have been used. The perfect-gas flows were computed at two different Reynolds numbers, including a flight trajectory point at maximum dynamic pressure, and on two different grids. Procedures for coupling the solution of the species continuity equations with the Navier-Stokes equations in the presence of chemical nonequilibrium are reviewed and tested on the forebody of the AFE and on the complete flowfield assuming noncatalytic wall and no species diffusion. Problems with the STVD algorithm unique to flows with variable thermodynamic properties (real gas) are identified and algorithm modifications are suggested. A potential heating problem caused by strong flow impingement on the nozzle lip in the near wake at 0-deg angle of attack has been identified.

  11. Conservation equations and physical models for hypersonic air flows over the aeroassist flight experiment vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    1989-01-01

    The code development and application program for the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA), with emphasis directed toward support of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) in the near term and Aeroassisted Space Transfer Vehicle (ASTV) design in the long term is reviewed. LAURA is an upwind-biased, point-implicit relaxation algorithm for obtaining the numerical solution to the governing equations for 3-D, viscous, hypersonic flows in chemical and thermal nonequilibrium. The algorithm is derived using a finite volume formulation in which the inviscid components of flux across cell walls are described with Roe's averaging and Harten's entropy fix with second-order corrections based on Yee's Symmetric Total Variation Diminishing scheme. Because of the point-implicit relaxation strategy, the algorithm remains stable at large Courant numbers without the necessity of solving large, block tri-diagonal systems. A single relaxation step depends only on information from nearest neighbors. Predictions for pressure distributions, surface heating, and aerodynamic coefficients compare well with experimental data for Mach 10 flow over an AFE wind tunnel model. Predictions for the hypersonic flow of air in chemical and thermal nonequilibrium over the full scale AFE configuration obtained on a multi-domain grid are discussed.

  12. Optimal trajectories for the aeroassisted flight experiment. Part 3: Formulation, results, and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miele, A.; Wang, T.; Lee, W. Y.; Zhao, Z. G.

    1989-01-01

    The determination of optimal trajectories for the aero-assisted flight experiment (AFE) is investigated. The intent of this experiment is to simulate a GEO-to-LEO transfer, where GEO denotes a geosynchronous Earth orbit and LEO denotes a low Earth orbit. The trajectories of an AFE spacecraft are analyzed in a 3D-space, employing the full system of 6 ODEs describing the atmospheric pass. The atmospheric entry conditions are given, and the atmospheric exit conditions are adjusted in such a way that the following conditions are satisfied: (1) the atmospheric velocity depletion is such that, after exiting, the AFE spacecraft first ascends to a specified apogee and then descends to a specified perigee; and (2) the exit orbital plane is identical with the entry orbital plane. The final maneuver, not analyzed here, includes the rendezvous with and the capture by the space shuttle.

  13. Optimal trajectories for the aeroassisted flight experiment. Part 3: Formulation, results, and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miele, A.; Wang, T.; Lee, W. Y.; Zhao, Z. G.

    1989-10-01

    The determination of optimal trajectories for the aero-assisted flight experiment (AFE) is investigated. The intent of this experiment is to simulate a GEO-to-LEO transfer, where GEO denotes a geosynchronous Earth orbit and LEO denotes a low Earth orbit. The trajectories of an AFE spacecraft are analyzed in a 3D-space, employing the full system of 6 ODEs describing the atmospheric pass. The atmospheric entry conditions are given, and the atmospheric exit conditions are adjusted in such a way that the following conditions are satisfied: (1) the atmospheric velocity depletion is such that, after exiting, the AFE spacecraft first ascends to a specified apogee and then descends to a specified perigee; and (2) the exit orbital plane is identical with the entry orbital plane. The final maneuver, not analyzed here, includes the rendezvous with and the capture by the space shuttle.

  14. Free-molecule-flow force and moment coefficients of the aeroassist flight experiment vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Hinson, Edwin W.

    1989-01-01

    Calculated results for the aerodynamic coefficients over the range of + or - 90 deg in both pitch and yaw attitude angles for the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle in free molecule flow are presented. The AFE body is described by a large number of small flat plate surface elements whose orientations are established in a wind axes coordinate system through the pitch and yaw attitude angles. Lift force, drag force, and three components of aerodynamic moment about a specified point are computed for each element. The elemental forces and moments are integrated over the entire body, and total force and moment coefficients are computed. The coefficients are calculated for the two limiting gas-surface molecular collision conditions, namely, specular and diffuse, which assume zero and full thermal accommodation of the incoming gas molecules with the surface, respectively. The individual contribution of the shear stress and pressure terms are calculated and also presented.

  15. Simulation and analyses of the aeroassist flight experiment attitude update method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    A method which will be used to update the alignment of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment's Inertial Measuring Unit is simulated and analyzed. This method, the Star Line Maneuver, uses measurements from the Space Shuttle Orbiter star trackers along with an extended Kalman filter to estimate a correction to the attitude quaternion maintained by an Inertial Measuring Unit in the Orbiter's payload bay. This quaternion is corrupted by on-orbit bending of the Orbiter payload bay with respect to the Orbiter navigation base, which is incorporated into the payload quaternion when it is initialized via a direct transfer of the Orbiter attitude state. The method of updating this quaternion is examined through verification of baseline cases and Monte Carlo analysis using a simplified simulation, The simulation uses nominal state dynamics and measurement models from the Kalman filter as its real world models, and is programmed on Microvax minicomputer using Matlab, and interactive matrix analysis tool. Results are presented which confirm and augment previous performance studies, thereby enhancing confidence in the Star Line Maneuver design methodology.

  16. Simulation and analyses of the aeroassist flight experiment attitude update method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, J. R.

    1991-06-01

    A method which will be used to update the alignment of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment's Inertial Measuring Unit is simulated and analyzed. This method, the Star Line Maneuver, uses measurements from the Space Shuttle Orbiter star trackers along with an extended Kalman filter to estimate a correction to the attitude quaternion maintained by an Inertial Measuring Unit in the Orbiter's payload bay. This quaternion is corrupted by on-orbit bending of the Orbiter payload bay with respect to the Orbiter navigation base, which is incorporated into the payload quaternion when it is initialized via a direct transfer of the Orbiter attitude state. The method of updating this quaternion is examined through verification of baseline cases and Monte Carlo analysis using a simplified simulation, The simulation uses nominal state dynamics and measurement models from the Kalman filter as its real world models, and is programmed on Microvax minicomputer using Matlab, and interactive matrix analysis tool. Results are presented which confirm and augment previous performance studies, thereby enhancing confidence in the Star Line Maneuver design methodology.

  17. Optimal trajectories for the Aeroassisted Flight Experiment. Part 1: Equations of motion in an Earth-fixed system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miele, A.; Zhao, Z. G.; Lee, W. Y.

    1989-01-01

    The determination of optimal trajectories for the aeroassisted flight experiment (AFE) is discussed. The AFE refers to the study of the free flight of an autonomous spacecraft, shuttle-launched and shuttle-recovered. Its purpose is to gather atmospheric entry environmental data for use in designing aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles (AOTV). It is assumed that: (1) the spacecraft is a particle of constant mass; (2) the Earth is rotating with constant angular velocity; (3) the Earth is an oblate planet, and the gravitational potential depends on both the radial distance and the latitude (harmonics of order higher than four are ignored); and (4) the atmosphere is at rest with respect to the Earth. Under these assumptions, the equations of motion for hypervelocity atmospheric flight (which can be used not only for AFE problems, but also for AOT problems and space shuttle problems) are derived in an Earth-fixed system. Transformation relations are supplied which allow one to pass from quantities computed in an Earth-fixed system to quantities computed in an inertial system, and vice versa.

  18. Upgrade of PARC2D to include real gas effects. [computer program for flowfield surrounding aeroassist flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saladino, Anthony; Praharaj, Sarat C.; Collins, Frank G.; Seaford, C. Mark

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a description of the changes and additions to the perfect gas PARC2D code to include chemical equilibrium effects, resulting in a code called PARCEQ2D. The work developed out of a need to have the capability of more accurately representing the flowfield surrounding the aeroassist flight experiment (AFE) vehicle. Use is made of the partition function of statistical mechanics in the evaluation of the thermochemical properties. This approach will allow the PARC code to be extended to thermal nonequilibrium when this task is undertaken in the future. The transport properties follow from formulae from the kinetic theory of gases. Results are presented for a two-dimensional AFE that compare perfect gas and real gas solutions at flight conditions, showing vast differences between the two cases.

  19. Conjugating binary systems for spacecraft thermal control. Appendix C: Aeroassist Flight Experiment Carrier Vehicle preliminary stress analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, J. E.; Murray, T. O.

    1989-01-01

    An assessment of the static strength of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) Carrier Vehicle is presented. The Carrier Vehicle is the structural component which provides the mounting platform for the experiments, on-board computers, batteries, and other black boxes. In addition, the Solid Rocket Motor (SRM), the Thrusters, and the Aerobrake are all attached directly to the Carrier Vehicle. The basic approach in this analysis was to develop a NASTRAN Finite Element Model as a parallel effort to the preliminary design, and to use the internal loads from this model to perform the stress analysis. The NASTRAN method of Inertial Relief was employed. This method involves either specifying a set of CG (center of gravity) accelerations or applying forces at the CG and representing the Carrier Vehicle and all its mounted devices with the proper stiffness and mass properties.

  20. Heat flux and shock shape measurements on an Aeroassist Flight Experiment model in a high enthalpy free piston shock tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gai, S. L.; Mudford, N. R.; Hackett, C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of heat flux and shock shapes made on a 2.08 percent scale model of the proposed Aeroassist Flight Experiment model in a high enthalpy free piston shock tunnel T3 at the Australian National University in Canberra, Australia. The enthalpy and Reynolds number range covered were 7.5 MJ/kg to 20 MJ/kg and 150,000 to 270,000 per meter respectively. The test Mach number varied between 7.5 and 8. Two test gases, air and nitrogen, were used and the model angle of attack varied from -10 deg to +10 deg to the free stream. The results are discussed and compared to the Mach 10 cold hypersonic air data as obtained in the Langley 31 inch Mach 10 Facility as well as the perfect gas CFD calculations of NASA LaRC.

  1. Radiometer experiment for the aeroassist flight experiment. [Thermal protection data for Orbital Transfer Vehicle design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davy, W. C.; Park, C.; Arnold, J. O.; Balakrishnan, A.

    1985-01-01

    A forthcoming NASA flight experiment is described that provides an opportunity to obtain a large base of radiometric data for high-altitude, high-velocity thermochemically nonequilibrated-flow conditions. As a preliminary to the design of a radiometer for this experiment, an approximate method for predicting both equilibrium and nonequilibrium radiative surface fluxes is described. Spectral results for one trajectory state, a velocity of 10 km/sec at an altitude of 85 km, are presented. These results are then used to develop some of the instrument parameters that will be needed for designing of the three genre of radiometers that are proposed for this experiment.

  2. The Importance of the Measurement of the Unsteady Wake of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment Vehicle: A White Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, A. W.; Park, C.; Deiwert, G. S.; Feiereisen, W.; Arnold, J. O.; Davy, W. C.; Craig, R. A.; Venkatapathy, E.

    1990-01-01

    The High Frequency Radiometer (HFR) is the only instrument on the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) with sufficient temporal resolution to discern the frequency of unsteady wake oscillations. Determining both the frequency and amplitude of wake unsteadiness during AFE atmospheric entry is essential for reliably predicting the geometry and motion of the wake of future Aeroassisted Space Transfer Vehicles (ASTV). These parameters directly affect the location and size of the pay- load and the weight of the required afterbody heat protection. The purpose of the AFE is to validate the technologies required for the design of ASTVs, which will be used to exploit Earth-lunar space. This validation will be conducted at a combination of vehicle size, altitude, and velocity not obtainable in ground-based facilities. The AFE will provide the experimental flight data needed to improve our understanding of hypersonic-wake physics and to validate computational predictions of the aerodynamic and heating loads, including afterbody radiative heating loads, on an ASTV. Reliable prediction of ASTV wake flows will ensure that payloads are located within the shear-layer envelope and will determine the amount of thermal protection the payloads require. Specifically, understanding the temporal nature of the wake unsteadiness is important for two reasons. Most importantly, analysis of ground-based experiments suggests that wake unsteadiness results in a variation of as much as +/- 5 deg in the shear-flow turning angle. This angle must be reliably predicted to avoid shear-layer impingement on the vehicle afterbody, which would result in heating rates of about 10 W/sq cm, of the same order as on the forebody stagnation point. Secondly, the energy associated with wake unsteadiness will reduce the static enthalpy of the wake fluid and cause an error of as much as 30% in the amount of predicted wake radiative heating. Therefore, the HFR flight data, which will quantify the frequency and

  3. A hypersonic shock tunnel test of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle at high altitude test conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittliff, C. E.; O'Connor, A. C.; Sweet, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    The Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle is a 4.26 m-diameter raked and blunted elliptic cone that is intended to obtain aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic data on blunt bodies at velocities near 10 km/s and altitudes above 75 km. Previous wind tunnel tests of this configuration have been at Mach numbers of 10 or lower. The present test program consisted of five test conditions at Mach numbers between 15 and 20 and simulated altitudes from 75 km to 97 km. Static longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients, the lift-to-drag ratio, and the trim angle-of-attack were obtained for angles-of-attack between 7 deg and 27 deg. The effects of angle-of-attack and shock Reynolds number, Re2, have been studied. These results indicate the AFE configuration is longitudinally stable. The variation of normal force slope, CNalpha and lift-to-drag slope, (L/D)alpha as well as the trim angle-of-attack with Re2 are documented. The trim angle-of-attack increases with decreasing values of shock Reynolds number (increasing altitude) while the lift-to-drag ratio at the trimmed conditions is relatively constant.

  4. Surface flow and heating distributions on a cylinder in near wake of Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) configuration at incidence in Mach 10 Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, William L.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental heat transfer distributions and surface streamline directions are presented for a cylinder in the near wake of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment forebody configuration. Tests were conducted in air at a nominal free stream Mach number of 10, with post shock Reynolds numbers based on model base height of 6,450 to 50,770, and angles of attack of 5, 0, -5, and -10 degrees. Heat transfer data were obtained with thin film resistance gage and surface streamline directions by the oil flow technique. Comparisons between measured values and predicted values were made by using a Navier-Stokes computer code.

  5. Estimates of thermochemical relaxation lengths behind normal shock waves relevant to manned lunar and Mars return missions, the aeroassist flight experiment, and Mars entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, John T.

    1991-01-01

    Thermochemical relaxation distances behind the strong normal shock waves associated with vehicles that enter the Earth atmosphere upon returning from a manned lunar or Mars mission are estimated. The relaxation distances for a Mars entry are estimated as well, in order to highlight the extent of the relaxation phenomena early in currently envisioned space exploration studies. The thermochemical relaxation length for the Aeroassist Flight Experiment is also considered. These estimates provide an indication as to whether finite relaxation needs to be considered in subsequent detailed analyses. For the Mars entry, relaxation phenomena that are fully coupled to the flow field equations are used. The relaxation-distance estimates can be scaled to flight conditions other than those discussed.

  6. Guidance trajectories for aeroassisted orbital transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miele, A.

    1990-01-01

    Research on aerobraking guidance schemes is presented. The intent is to produce aerobraking guidance trajectories exhibiting many of the desirable characteristics of optimal aerobraking trajectories. Both one-control schemes and two-control schemes are studied. The research is in the interest of aeroassisted flight experiment vehicles (AFE) and aeroassisted orbital transfer (AOT) vehicles.

  7. Stagnation-point heat-transfer rate predictions at aeroassist flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Roop N.; Jones, Jim J.; Rochelle, William C.

    1992-01-01

    The results are presented for the stagnation-point heat-transfer rates used in the design process of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle over its entire aeropass trajectory. The prediction methods used in this investigation demonstrate the application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques to a wide range of flight conditions and their usefulness in a design process. The heating rates were computed by a viscous-shock-layer (VSL) code at the lower altitudes and by a Navier-Stokes (N-S) code for the higher altitude cases. For both methods, finite-rate chemically reacting gas was considered, and a temperature-dependent wall-catalysis model was used. The wall temperature for each case was assumed to be radiative equilibrium temperature, based on total heating. The radiative heating was estimated by using a correlation equation. Wall slip was included in the N-S calculation method, and this method implicitly accounts for shock slip. The N-S/VSL combination of projection methods was established by comparison with the published benchmark flow-field code LAURA results at lower altitudes, and the direct simulation Monte Carlo results at higher altitude cases. To obtain the design heating rate over the entire forward face of the vehicle, a boundary-layer method (BLIMP code) that employs reacting chemistry and surface catalysis was used. The ratio of the VSL or N-S method prediction to that obtained from the boundary-layer method code at the stagnation point is used to define an adjustment factor, which accounts for the errors involved in using the boundary-layer method.

  8. Aeroassist Technology Planning for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munk, Michelle M.; Powell, Richard W.

    2000-01-01

    Now that the International Space Station is undergoing assembly, NASA is strategizing about the next logical exploration strategy for robotic missions and the next destination for humans. NASA's current efforts are in developing technologies that will both aid the robotic exploration strategy and make human flight to other celestial bodies both safe and affordable. One of these enabling technologies for future robotic and human exploration missions is aeroassist. This paper will (1) define aeroassist, (2) explain the benefits and uses of aeroassist, and (3) describe a method, currently used by the NASA Aeroassist Working Group, by which widely geographically distributed teams can assemble, present, use, and archive technology information.

  9. A flight experiment to measure rarefied-flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    A flight experiment to measure rarefied-flow aerodynamics of a blunt lifting body is being developed by NASA. This experiment, called the Rarefied-Flow Aerodynamic Measurement Experiment (RAME), is part of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) mission, which is a Pathfinder design tool for aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles. The RAME will use flight measurements from accelerometers, rate gyros, and pressure transducers, combined with knowledge of AFE in-flight mass properties and trajectory, to infer aerodynamic forces and moments in the rarefied-flow environment, including transition into the hypersonic continuum regime. Preflight estimates of the aerodynamic measurements are based upon environment models, existing computer simulations, and ground test results. Planned maneuvers at several altitudes will provide a first-time opportunity to examine gas-surface accommondation effects on aerodynamic coefficients in an environment of changing atmospheric composition. A description is given of the RAME equipment design.

  10. Basic Governing Equations for the Flight Regimes of Aeroassisted Orbital Transfer Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jong-Hun

    1985-01-01

    The basic governing equations for the low-density, high-enthalpy flow regimes expected in the shock layers over the heat shields of the proposed aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles are derived by combining and extending existing theories. The conservation equations are derived from gas kinetic principles for a four-component ionized gas consisting of neutral molecules, neutral atoms, singly ionized ions, and electrons, assuming a continuum flow. The differences among translational-rotational, vibrational, and electron temperatures are accounted for, as well as chemical nonequilibrium and electric-charge separation. Expressions for convective and viscous fluxes, transport properties, and the terms representing interactions among various energy modes are explicitly given. The expressions for the rate of electron-vibration energy transfer, which violates the Landau-Teller conditions, are derived by solving the system of master equations accounting for the multiple-level transitions.

  11. Basic governing equations for the flight regimes of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J.-H.

    1984-01-01

    The basic governing equations for the low-density, high-enthalpy flow regimes expected in the shock layers over the heat shields of the proposed aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles are derived by combining and extending existing theories. The conservation equations are derived from gas kinetic principles for a four-component ionized gas consisting of neutral molecules, neutral atoms, singly ionized ions, and electrons, assuming a continuum flow. The differences among translational-rotational, vibrational, and electron temperatures are accounted for, as well as chemical nonequilibrium and electric-charge separation. Expressions for convective and viscous fluxes, transport properties, and the terms representing interactions among various energy modes are given explicitly. The expressions for the rate of electron-vibration energy transfer, which violates the Landau-Teller conditions, is derived by solving the system of master equations accounting for the multiple-level transitions.

  12. GLOBAL REFERENCE ATMOSPHERIC MODELS FOR AEROASSIST APPLICATIONS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Aleta; Justus, C. G.; Keller, Vernon W.

    2005-01-01

    Aeroassist is a broad category of advanced transportation technology encompassing aerocapture, aerobraking, aeroentry, precision landing, hazard detection and avoidance, and aerogravity assist. The eight destinations in the Solar System with sufficient atmosphere to enable aeroassist technology are Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Saturn's moon Titan. Engineering-level atmospheric models for five of these targets - Earth, Mars, Titan, Neptune, and Venus - have been developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. These models are useful as tools in mission planning and systems analysis studies associated with aeroassist applications. The series of models is collectively named the Global Reference Atmospheric Model or GRAM series. An important capability of all the models in the GRAM series is their ability to simulate quasi-random perturbations for Monte Carlo analysis in developing guidance, navigation and control algorithms, for aerothermal design, and for other applications sensitive to atmospheric variability. Recent example applications are discussed.

  13. Flight projects overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Jack

    1988-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form on the activities of the Flight Projects Division of NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology. Information is given on space research and technology strategy, current space flight experiments, the Long Duration Exposure Facility, the Orbiter Experiment Program, the Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment, the Ion Auxiliary Propulsion System, the Arcjet Flight Experiment, the Telerobotic Intelligent Interface Flight Experiment, the Cryogenic Fluid Management Flight Experiment, the Industry/University In-Space Flight Experiments, and the Aeroassist Flight Experiment.

  14. HyperPASS, a New Aeroassist Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Kristin; McRonald, Angus; Nock, Kerry

    2005-01-01

    A new software tool designed to perform aeroassist studies has been developed by Global Aerospace Corporation (GAC). The Hypersonic Planetary Aeroassist Simulation System (HyperPASS) [1] enables users to perform guided aerocapture, guided ballute aerocapture, aerobraking, orbit decay, or unguided entry simulations at any of six target bodies (Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Titan, or Neptune). HyperPASS is currently being used for trade studies to investigate (1) aerocapture performance with alternate aeroshell types, varying flight path angle and entry velocity, different gload and heating limits, and angle of attack and angle of bank variations; (2) variable, attached ballute geometry; (3) railgun launched projectile trajectories, and (4) preliminary orbit decay evolution. After completing a simulation, there are numerous visualization options in which data can be plotted, saved, or exported to various formats. Several analysis examples will be described.

  15. Solar array flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Emerging satellite designs require increasing amounts of electrical power to operate spacecraft instruments and to provide environments suitable for human habitation. In the past, electrical power was generated by covering rigid honeycomb panels with solar cells. This technology results in unacceptable weight and volume penalties when large amounts of power are required. To fill the need for large-area, lightweight solar arrays, a fabrication technique in which solar cells are attached to a copper printed circuit laminated to a plastic sheet was developed. The result is a flexible solar array with one-tenth the stowed volume and one-third the weight of comparably sized rigid arrays. An automated welding process developed to attack the cells to the printed circuit guarantees repeatable welds that are more tolerant of severe environments than conventional soldered connections. To demonstrate the flight readiness of this technology, the Solar Array Flight Experiment (SAFE) was developed and flown on the space shuttle Discovery in September 1984. The tests showed the modes and frequencies of the array to be very close to preflight predictions. Structural damping, however, was higher than anticipated. Electrical performance of the active solar panel was also tested. The flight performance and postflight data evaluation are described.

  16. Cibola flight experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, D.; Caffrey, M. P.

    2004-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is building the Cibola Flight Experiment (CFE), a reconfigurable processor payload intended for a Low Earth Orbit system. It will survey portions of the VHF and UHF radio spectra. The experiment uses networks of reprogrammable, Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) to process the received signals for ionospheric and lightning studies. The objective is to validate the on-orbit use of commercial, reconfigurable FPGA technology utilizing several different single-event upset mitigation schemes. It will also detect and measure impulsive events that occur in a complex background. Surrey Satellite Technology, Ltd (SSTL) is building the small host satellite, CFESat, based upon SSTL's disaster monitoring constellation (DMC) and Topsat mission satellite designs. The CFESat satellite will be launched by the Space Test Program in September 2006 on the US Air Force Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) using the EELV's Secondary Payload Adapter (ESPA) that allows up to six small satellites to be launched as 'piggyback' passengers with larger spacecraft.

  17. The Cibola flight experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Caffrey, Michael Paul; Nelson, Anthony; Salazar, Anthony; Roussel - Dupre, Diane; Katko, Kim; Palmer, Joseph; Robinson, Scott; Wirthlin, Michael; Howes, William; Richins, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The Cibola Flight Experiment (CFE) is an experimental small satellite carrying a reconfigurable processing instrument developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory that demonstrates the feasibility of using FPGA-based high-performance computing for sensor processing in the space environment. The CFE satellite was launched on March 8, 2007 in low-earth orbit and has operated extremely well since its deployment. The nine Xilinx Virtex FPGAs used in the payload have been used for several high-throughput sensor processing applications and for single-event upset (SEU) monitoring and mitigation. This paper will describe the CFE system and summarize its operational results. In addition, this paper will describe the results from several SEU detection circuits that were performed on the spacecraft.

  18. Analysis and design of aeroassisted interplanetary missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Wyatt R.

    An aeroassisted mission uses atmospheric forces to effect a spacecraft delta-V, which could allow for substantial propellant savings. This research focuses on aero-maneuvers useful for interplanetary flight. The aerogravity assist maneuver uses aerodynamic lift to achieve a greater delta-V than with gravity alone. Aerobraking and aerocapture both use aerodynamic drag to supplement or replace propulsive planetary captures. Optimal aerogravity assist trajectories are found, using a combination of analytic and graphical techniques. Simple control schemes are developed to manage angular momentum during aerobraking and to guide a spacecraft to a desired final orbit during aerocapture.

  19. Hypersonic lateral and directional stability characteristics of aeroassist flight experiment configuration in air and CF4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micol, John R.; Wells, William L.

    1993-01-01

    Hypersonic lateral and directional stability characteristics measured on a 60 deg half-angle elliptical cone, which was raked at an angle of 73 deg from the cone centerline and with an ellipsoid nose (ellipticity equal to 2.0 in the symmetry plane), are presented for angles of attack from -10 to 10 deg. The high normal-shock density ratio of a real gas was simulated by tests at a Mach number of 6 in air and CF4 (density ratio equal to 5.25 and 12.0, respectively). Tests were conducted in air at Mach 6 and 10 and in CF4 at Mach 6 to examine the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and normal-shock density ratio. Changes in Mach number from 6 to 10 in air or in Reynolds number by a factor of 4 at Mach 6 had a negligible effect on lateral and directional stability characteristics. Variations in normal-shock density ratio had a measurable effect on lateral and directional aerodynamic coefficients, but no significant effect on lateral and directional stability characteristics. Tests in air and CF4 indicated that the configuration was laterally and directionally stable through the test range of angle of attack.

  20. Aero-Assisted Pre-Stage for Ballistic and Aero-Assisted Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ustinov, Eugene A.

    2012-01-01

    A concept of an aero-assisted pre-stage is proposed, which enables launch of both ballistic and aero-assisted launch vehicles from conventional runways. The pre-stage can be implemented as a delta-wing with a suitable undercarriage, which is mated with the launch vehicle, so that their flight directions are coaligned. The ample wing area of the pre-stage combined with the thrust of the launch vehicle ensure prompt roll-out and take-off of the stack at airspeeds typical for a conventional jet airliner. The launch vehicle is separated from the pre-stage as soon as safe altitude is achieved, and the desired ascent trajectory is reached. Nominally, the pre-stage is non-powered. As an option, to save the propellant of the launch vehicle, the pre-stage may have its own short-burn propulsion system, whereas the propulsion system of the launch vehicle is activated at the separation point. A general non-dimensional analysis of performance of the pre-stage from roll-out to separation is carried out and applications to existing ballistic launch vehicle and hypothetical aero-assisted vehicles (spaceplanes) are considered.

  1. Beta experiment flight report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A focused laser Doppler velocimeter system was developed for the measurement of atmospheric backscatter (beta) from aerosols at infrared wavelengths. The system was flight tested at several different locations and the results of these tests are summarized.

  2. Solar Array Experiment (SAE) Flight Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, H. C.; Young, L. E.; Turner, G. F.

    1985-01-01

    The space flight testing of a large, flat, flexible panel solar array is examined. The experiment objectives are: to demonstrate the functional operational of the wind deployment and packaging system; Electrical performance; Thermal performance; and dynamic performance. A complete description of the experiment and the flight results are given.

  3. Laminar-flow flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Richard D.; Maddalon, Dal V.; Bartlett, D. W.; Collier, F. S., Jr.; Braslow, A. L.

    1989-01-01

    The flight testing conducted over the past 10 years in the NASA laminar-flow control (LFC) will be reviewed. The LFC program was directed towards the most challenging technology application, the high supersonic speed transport. To place these recent experiences in perspective, earlier important flight tests will first be reviewed to recall the lessons learned at that time.

  4. Bisphosphonate ISS Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBlanc, Adrian; Matsumoto, Toshio; Jones, Jeffrey; Shapiro, Jay; Lang, Thomas; Shackleford, Linda; Smith, Scott M.; Evans, Harlan; Spector, Elizabeth; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Sibonga, Jean; Keyak, Joyce; Nakamura, Toshitaka; Kohri, Kenjiro; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Moralez, Gilbert

    2014-01-01

    The bisphosphonate study is a collaborative effort between the NASA and JAXA space agencies to investigate the potential for antiresorptive drugs to mitigate bone changes associated with long-duration spaceflight. Elevated bone resorption is a hallmark of human spaceflight and bed rest (common zero-G analog). We tested whether an antiresorptive drug in combination with in-flight exercise would ameliorate bone loss and hypercalcuria during longduration spaceflight. Measurements include DXA, QCT, pQCT, and urine and blood biomarkers. We have completed analysis of 7 crewmembers treated with alendronate during flight and the immediate postflight (R+<2 week) data collection in 5 of 10 controls without treatment. Both groups used the advanced resistive exercise device (ARED) during their missions. We previously reported the pre/postflight results of crew taking alendronate during flight (Osteoporosis Int. 24:2105-2114, 2013). The purpose of this report is to present the 12-month follow-up data in the treated astronauts and to compare these results with preliminary data from untreated crewmembers exercising with ARED (ARED control) or without ARED (Pre-ARED control). Results: the table presents DXA and QCT BMD expressed as percentage change from preflight in the control astronauts (18 Pre-ARED and the current 5 ARED-1-year data not yet available) and the 7 treated subjects. As shown previously the combination of exercise plus antiresorptive is effective in preventing bone loss during flight. Bone measures for treated subjects, 1 year after return from space remain at or near baseline values. Except in one region, the treated group maintained or gained bone 1 year after flight. Biomarker data are not currently available for either control group and therefore not presented. However, data from other studies with or without ARED show elevated bone resorption and urinary Ca excretion while bisphosphonate treated subjects show decreases during flight. Comparing the two control

  5. Vapor Compression Distillation Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchens, Cindy F.

    2002-01-01

    One of the major requirements associated with operating the International Space Station is the transportation -- space shuttle and Russian Progress spacecraft launches - necessary to re-supply station crews with food and water. The Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) Flight Experiment, managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., is a full-scale demonstration of technology being developed to recycle crewmember urine and wastewater aboard the International Space Station and thereby reduce the amount of water that must be re-supplied. Based on results of the VCD Flight Experiment, an operational urine processor will be installed in Node 3 of the space station in 2005.

  6. Solar array flight dynamic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schock, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the Solar Array Flight Dynamic Experiment (SAFDE) is to demonstrate the feasibility of on-orbit measurement and ground processing of large space structures dynamic characteristics. Test definition or verification provides the dynamic characteristic accuracy required for control systems use. An illumination/measurement system was developed to fly on space shuttle flight STS-31D. The system was designed to dynamically evaluate a large solar array called the Solar Array Flight Experiment (SAFE) that had been scheduled for this flight. The SAFDE system consisted of a set of laser diode illuminators, retroreflective targets, an intelligent star tracker receiver and the associated equipment to power, condition, and record the results. In six tests on STS-41D, data was successfully acquired from 18 retroreflector targets and ground processed, post flight, to define the solar array's dynamic characteristic. The flight experiment proved the viability of on-orbit test definition of large space structures dynamic characteristics. Future large space structures controllability should be greatly enhanced by this capability.

  7. Solar array flight dynamic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schock, Richard W.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the Solar Array Flight Dynamic Experiment (SAFDE) is to demonstrate the feasibility of on-orbit measurement and ground processing of large space structures' dynamic characteristics. Test definition or verification provides the dynamic characteristic accuracy required for control systems use. An illumination/measurement system was developed to fly on space shuttle flight STS-41D. The system was designed to dynamically evaluate a large solar array called the Solar Array Flight Experiment (SAFE) that had been scheduled for this flight. The SAFDE system consisted of a set of laser diode illuminators, retroreflective targets, an intelligent star tracker receiver and the associated equipment to power, condition, and record the results. In six tests on STS-41D, data was successfully acquired from 18 retroreflector targets and ground processed, post flight, to define the solar array's dynamic characteristic. The flight experiment proved the viability of on-orbit test definition of large space structures dynamic characteristics. Future large space structures controllability should be greatly enhanced by this capability.

  8. Solar array flight dynamic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schock, Richard W.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the Solar Array Flight Dynamic Experiment (SAFDE) is to demonstrate the feasibility of on-orbit measurement and ground processing of large space structures dynamic characteristics. Test definition or verification provides the dynamic characteristic accuracy required for control systems use. An illumination/measurement system was developed to fly on Space Shuttle flight STS-31D. The system was designed to dynamically evaluate a large solar array called the Solar Array Flight Experiment (SAFE) that had been scheduled for this flight. The SAFDE system consisted of a set of laser diode illuminators, retroreflective targets, an intelligent star tracker receiver and the associated equipment to power, condition, and record the results. In six tests on STS-41D, data was successfully acquired from 18 retroreflector targets and ground processed, post flight, to define the solar array's dynamic characteristic. The flight experiment proved the viability of on-orbit test definition of large space structures dynamic characteristics. Future large space structures controllability should be greatly enhanced by this capability.

  9. Dynamic performance of an aero-assist spacecraft - AFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Ho-Pen; French, Raymond A.

    1992-01-01

    Dynamic performance of the Aero-assist Flight Experiment (AFE) spacecraft was investigated using a high-fidelity 6-DOF simulation model. Baseline guidance logic, control logic, and a strapdown navigation system to be used on the AFE spacecraft are also modeled in the 6-DOF simulation. During the AFE mission, uncertainties in the environment and the spacecraft are described by an error space which includes both correlated and uncorrelated error sources. The principal error sources modeled in this study include navigation errors, initial state vector errors, atmospheric variations, aerodynamic uncertainties, center-of-gravity off-sets, and weight uncertainties. The impact of the perturbations on the spacecraft performance is investigated using Monte Carlo repetitive statistical techniques. During the Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) deorbit phase, a target flight path angle of -4.76 deg at entry interface (EI) offers very high probability of avoiding SRM casing skip-out from the atmosphere. Generally speaking, the baseline designs of the guidance, navigation, and control systems satisfy most of the science and mission requirements.

  10. ADEPT SR-1 Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wercinski, Paul F.

    2017-01-01

    The ADEPT architecture represents a completely new approach for entry vehicle design using a high-performance carbon fabric to serve as the primary drag surface of the mechanically deployed decelerator and to protect the payload from hypersonic aerothermal heating during entry. The initial system-level development of the nano-ADEPT architecture will culminate in the launch of a 0.7-m deployed diameter ADEPT sounding rocket flight experiment. The SR-1 sounding rocket flight experiment is a critical milestone in the technology maturation plan for ADEPT and will generate performance data on in-space deployment and aerodynamic stability.

  11. Adaptive guidance for an aero-assisted boost vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamadi, Bandu N.; Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.; Price, Douglas B.

    1988-01-01

    An adaptive guidance system incorporating dynamic pressure constraint is studied for a single stage to low earth orbit (LEO) aero-assist booster with thrust gimbal angle as the control variable. To derive an adaptive guidance law, cubic spline functions are used to represent the ascent profile. The booster flight to LEO is divided into initial and terminal phases. In the initial phase, the ascent profile is continuously updated to maximize the performance of the boost vehicle enroute. A linear feedback control is used in the terminal phase to guide the aero-assisted booster onto the desired LEO. The computer simulation of the vehicle dynamics considers a rotating spherical earth, inverse square (Newtonian) gravity field and an exponential model for the earth's atmospheric density. This adaptive guidance algorithm is capable of handling large deviations in both atmospheric conditions and modeling uncertainties, while ensuring maximum booster performance.

  12. Thermal energy storage flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkoong, D.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the development of an experimental program to study heat transfer, energy storage, fluid movement, and void location under microgravity. Plans for experimental flight packages containing Thermal Energy Storage (TES) material applicable for advanced solar heat receivers are discussed. Candidate materials for TES include fluoride salts, salt eutectics, silicides, and metals. The development of a three-dimensional computer program to describe TES material behavior undergoing melting and freezing under microgravity is also discussed. The TES experiment concept and plans for ground and flight tests are outlined.

  13. Aerothermodynamic Reentry Flight Experiments - EXPERT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    today’s capabilities for measuring time-dependent 3D phenomena using non- intrusive techniques, an infrared camera (Figure 40) will be mounted inside the...material ContainerSeals Vapour exhaust Cover plate TUD Passenger Experiment : Enhanced Radiation Cooling Hypersonic Flight Measurement Technique...AEROCAPTURING PHYSICS • ADVANCED INSTRUMENTATION; NON INTRUSIVE MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES • MHD , RCS INTERACTION, • SHARP LEADING EDGE OR SHARP NOSE ADVANCED

  14. Coarsening Experiment Prepared for Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, J. Mark

    2003-01-01

    The Coarsening in Solid-Liquid Mixtures-2 (CSLM-2) experiment is a materials science spaceflight experiment whose purpose is to investigate the kinetics of competitive particle growth within a liquid matrix. During coarsening, small particles shrink by losing atoms to larger particles, causing the larger particles to grow. In this experiment, solid particles of tin will grow (coarsen) within a liquid lead-tin eutectic matrix. The following figures show the coarsening of tin particles in a lead-tin (Pb-Sn) eutectic as a function of time. By conducting this experiment in a microgravity environment, we can study a greater range of solid volume fractions, and the effects of sedimentation present in terrestrial experiments will be negligible. The CSLM-2 experiment flew November 2002 on space shuttle flight STS-113 for operation on the International Space Station, but it could not be run because of problems with the Microgravity Science Glovebox in the U.S. Laboratory module. Additional samples will be sent to ISS on subsequent shuttle flights.

  15. Sojourner The Mars Pathfinder Microrover Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matijevic, J.

    1997-01-01

    The Microrover Flight Experiment (MFEX) is a NASA Office of Space Access and Technology flight experiment of mobile vehicle technologies, whose primary mission is to determine microrover performance in the poorly understood planetary terrain of Mars.

  16. Sojourner: The Mars Pathfinder Microrover Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matijevic, J.

    1997-01-01

    The Microrover Flight Experiment (FEX) is a NASA Office of Space Access and Technology flight experiment of mobile vehicle technologies, whose primary mission is to determine microrover performance in the poorly understood planetary terrain of Mars.

  17. Natural Laminar Flow Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steers, L. L.

    1981-01-01

    A supercritical airfoil section was designed with favorable pressure gradients on both the upper and lower surfaces. Wind tunnel tests were conducted in the Langley 8 Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel. The outer wing panels of the F-111 TACT airplane were modified to incorporate partial span test gloves having the natural laminar, flow profile. Instrumentation was installed to provide surface pressure data as well as to determine transition location and boundary layer characteristics. The flight experiment encompassed 19 flights conducted with and without transition fixed at several locations for wing leading edge sweep angles which varied from 10 to 26 at Mach numbers from 0.80 to 0.85 and altitudes of 7620 meters and 9144 meters. Preliminary results indicate that a large portion of the test chord experienced laminar flow.

  18. Laser docking system flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erwin, Harry O.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments necessary in the development of the Laser Docking System (LDS) are described. The LDS would be mounted in the Orbiter payload bay, along with a grid connected by fiber optic link to a computer in the cabin. The tests would be performed to aid in the design of an operational sensor which could track a passive target accurately enough to permit soft docking. Additional data would be gained regarding the LDS performance in space, the effects of Orbiter RCS plume impingement on the target, and refinements needed for the flight hardware. A working model which includes an IR laser steered by galvanometer-driven motors for bouncing beams off retroreflectors mounted on targets is described, together with a 300 ft long indoor test facility. Tests on Orbiter flights would first be in a wholly automatic mode and then in a man-in-the-loop mode.

  19. Upper-Stage Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. E.; Boxwell, R.; Crockett, D. V.; Ross, R.; Lewis, T.; McNeal, C.; Verdarame, K.

    1999-01-01

    For propulsion applications that require that the propellants are storable for long periods, have a high density impulse, and are environmentally clean and non-toxic, the best choice is a combination of high-concentration hydrogen peroxide (High Test Peroxide, or HTP) and a liquid hydrocarbon (LHC) fuel. The HTP/LHC combination is suitable for low-cost launch vehicles, space taxi and space maneuvering vehicles, and kick stages. Orbital Sciences Corporation is under contract with the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in cooperation with the Air Force Research Lab to design, develop and demonstrate a new low-cost liquid upper stage based on HTP and JP-8. The Upper Stage Flight Experiment (USFE) focuses on key technologies necessary to demonstrate the operation of an inherently simple propulsion system with an innovative, state-of-the-art structure. Two key low-cost vehicle elements will be demonstrated - a 10,000 lbf thrust engine and an integrated composite tank structure. The suborbital flight test of the USFE is scheduled for 2001. Preceding the flight tests are two major series of ground tests at NASA Stennis Space Center and a subscale tank development program to identify compatible composite materials and to verify their compatibility over long periods of time. The ground tests include a thrust chamber development test series and an integrated stage test. This paper summarizes the results from the first phase of the thrust chamber development tests and the results to date from the tank material compatibility tests. Engine and tank configurations that meet the goals of the program are described.

  20. Optimization and guidance of trajectories for coplanar, aeroassisted orbital transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miele, A.; Wang, T.; Lee, W. Y.

    1990-09-01

    Guidance trajectories for coplanar aeroassisted orbital transfer (AOT) from high earth orbit to LEO are presently optimized under the assumption of trajectory control during its endoatmospheric phase by alpha-dependent lift coefficient. Optimal trajectories are first computed by minimizing the total velocity impulse required for AOT; attention is then given to guidance trajectories capable of approximating such key properties of the optimal trajectories as minimum altitude, exit velocity, and exit path inclination, in real time. A switch is made from target-altitude guidance to target path inclination-guidance according to the velocity depletion required for optimum flight.

  1. Flight testing of the Capillary Pumped Loop Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Dan; Ottenstein, Laura; Ku, Jentung

    1995-01-01

    The Capillary Pumped Loop Flight Experiment (CAPL) employs a passive two-phase thermal control system that uses the latent heat of vaporization of ammonia to transfer heat over long distances. CAPL was designed as a prototype of the Earth Observing System (EOS) instrument thermal control systems. The purpose of the mission was to provide validation of the system performance in micro-gravity, prior to implementation on EOS. CAPL was flown on STS-60 in February, 1994, with some unexpected results related to gravitational effects on two-phase systems. Flight test results and post flight investigations will be addressed, along with a brief description of the experiment design.

  2. Infrared Sensing Aeroheating Flight Experiment: STS-96 Flight Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Wilmoth, Richard G.; Glass, Christopher E.; Merski, N. Ronald, Jr.; Berry, Scott A.; Bozung, Timothy J.; Tietjen, Alan; Wendt, Jodean; Dawson, Don

    2001-01-01

    Major elements of an experiment called the Infrared Sensing Aeroheating Flight Experiment are discussed. The primary experiment goal is to provide reentry global temperature images from infrared measurements to define the characteristics of hypersonic boundary-layer transition during flight. Specifically, the experiment is to identify, monitor, and quantity hypersonic boundary layer windward surface transition of the X-33 vehicle during flight. In addition, the flight data will serve as a calibration and validation of current boundary layer transition prediction techniques, provide benchmark laminar, transitional, and fully turbulent global aeroheating data in order to validate existing wind tunnel and computational results, and to advance aeroheating technology. Shuttle Orbiter data from STS-96 used to validate the data acquisition and data reduction to global temperatures, in order to mitigate the experiment risks prior to the maiden flight of the X-33, is discussed. STS-96 reentry midwave (3-5 micron) infrared data were collected at the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization/Innovative Sciences and Technology Experimentation Facility site at NASA-Kennedy Space Center and subsequently mapped into global temperature contours using ground calibrations only. A series of image mapping techniques have been developed in order to compare each frame of infrared data with thermocouple data collected during the flight. Comparisons of the ground calibrated global temperature images with the corresponding thermocouple data are discussed. The differences are shown to be generally less than about 5%, which is comparable to the expected accuracy of both types of aeroheating measurements.

  3. Computational Aerothermodynamics in Aeroassist Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    Aeroassisted planetary entry uses atmospheric drag to decelerate spacecraft from super-orbital to orbital or suborbital velocities. Numerical simulation of flow fields surrounding these spacecraft during hypersonic atmospheric entry is required to define aerothermal loads. The severe compression in the shock layer in front of the vehicle and subsequent, rapid expansion into the wake are characterized by high temperature, thermo-chemical nonequilibrium processes. Implicit algorithms required for efficient, stable computation of the governing equations involving disparate time scales of convection, diffusion, chemical reactions, and thermal relaxation are discussed. Robust point-implicit strategies are utilized in the initialization phase; less robust but more efficient line-implicit strategies are applied in the endgame. Applications to ballutes (balloon-like decelerators) in the atmospheres of Venus, Mars, Titan, Saturn, and Neptune and a Mars Sample Return Orbiter (MSRO) are featured. Examples are discussed where time-accurate simulation is required to achieve a steady-state solution.

  4. Strategy in space flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, Dean; Severns, James

    1991-01-01

    The main topics of the workshop were the evaluation of both the need for flight testing of solar array hardware and the opportunities for such testing. Spacecraft charging effects, array dynamics, cost-effectiveness, and methods of flight planning were also discussed.

  5. Simulation of real-gas effects on pressure distributions for aeroassist flight experiment vehicle and comparison with prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micol, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Pressure distributions measured on a 60 degree half-angle elliptic cone, raked off at an angle of 73 degrees from the cone centerline and having an ellipsoid nose (ellipticity equal to 2.0 in the symmetry plane) are presented for angles of attack from -10 degrees to 10 degrees. The high normal shock density ratio aspect of a real gas was simulated by testing in Mach 6 air and CF sub 4 (density ratio equal to 5.25 and 12.0, respectively). The effects of Reynolds number, angle of attack, and normal shock density ratio on these measurements are examined, and comparisons with a three dimensional Euler code known as HALIS are made. A significant effect of density ratio on pressure distributions on the cone section of the configuration was observed; the magnitude of this effect decreased with increasing angle of attack. The effect of Reynolds number on pressure distributions was negligible for forebody pressure distributions, but a measurable effect was noted on base pressures. In general, the HALIS code accurately predicted the measured pressure distributions in air and CF sub 4.

  6. Design and Evaluation of Candidate Pressure Distribution and Air Data System Tile Penetration for the Aeroassist Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vontheumer, Alfred E.

    1990-01-01

    This program objectives were to produce a pressure measurements system that penetrates the thermal protection system of a spacecraft and is able to obtain accurate pressure data. The design was tested vibro-acoustically, aerothermally, and structurally and found to be adequate. This design is a possible replacement of the current pressure system on the orbiter.

  7. HyBoLT Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Fang-Jeng (Frank); Berry, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    HyBoLT was a Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition flight experiment funded by the Hypersonics Project of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program in NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate. The HyBoLT test article mounted on the top of the ALV X-1 rocket was launched from Virginia's Wallops Island on August 22, 2008. Unfortunately a problem in the rocket's flight control system caused the vehicle to veer off the designed flight course. Launch officials activated a self-destruct mechanism in the rocket's nose cone after 20 seconds into flight. This report is a closeout document about the HyBoLT flight experiment. Details are provided of the objectives and approach associated with this experimental program as well as the 20 seconds flight data acquired before the vehicle was destroyed.

  8. Flight research experiments on ride quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, I. D.; Kuhlthau, A. R.

    1975-01-01

    The results and analysis of several flight research experiments in ride quality are described. These tests were carried out aboard the NASA Flight Research Center, JetStar Aircraft equipped with the General Purpose Airborne Simulator; and aboard a specially instrumented Boeing 747 flown in actual commercial flight. The data was analyzed to determine appropriate models for subjective reaction to the motion environment. Specifically, vertical and transverse acceleration inputs and aircraft bank angle were studied along with duration of exposure.

  9. The NASA Sharp Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasky, Daniel J.; Salute, Joan; Kolodziej, Paul; Bull, Jeffrey

    1998-01-01

    The Slender Hypersonic Aerothermodynamic Research Program (SHARP) was initiated by NASA Ames, and executed in partnership with Sandia National Laboratory and the US Air Force, to demonstrate sharp, passive leading edge designs for hypersonic vehicles, incorporating new ultra-high temperature ceramics (UHTC's). These new ceramic composites have been undergoing development, characterization and ground testing at NASA Ames for the last nine years. This paper will describe the background, flight objectives, design and pertinent flight results of SHARP, and some of the potential implications for future hypersonic vehicle designs.

  10. Update of Bisphosphonate Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBlanc, A.; Matsumoto, T.; Jones, J.; Shapiro, J.; Lang, T.; Shackelford, L.; Smith, S. M.; Evans, H.; Spector, E.; Snyder, R. P.; Sibonga, J.; Keyak, J.; Nakamura, T.; Kohri, K.; Ohshima, H.; Moralez, G.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated bone resorption is a hallmark of human spaceflight and bed rest indicating that elevated remodeling is a major factor in the etiology of space flight bone loss. In a collaborative effort between the NASA and JAXA space agencies, we are testing whether an antiresorptive drug would provide additional benefit to in-flight exercise to ameliorate bone loss and hypercalciuria during long-duration spaceflight. Measurements of bone loss include DXA, QCT, pQCT, urinary and blood biomarkers. We have completed analysis of R+1year data from 7 crewmembers treated with alendronate during flight, as well as immediate post flight (R+<2wks) data from 6 of 10 concurrent controls without treatment. The treated astronauts used the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) during their missions. The purpose of this report is twofold: 1) to report the results of inflight, post flight and one year post flight bone measures compared with available controls with and without the use of ARED; and 2) to discuss preliminary data on concurrent controls. The figure below compares the BMD changes in ISS crewmembers exercising with and without the current ARED protocol and the alendronate treated crewmembers also using the ARED. This shows that the use of ARED prevents about half the bone loss seen in early ISS crewmembers and that the addition of an antiresorptive provides additional benefit. Resorption markers and urinary Ca excretion are not impacted by exercise alone but are significantly reduced with antiresorptive treatment. Bone measures for treated subjects, 1 year after return from space remain at or near baseline. DXA data for the 6 concurrent controls using the ARED device are similar to DXA data shown in the figure below. QCT data for these six indicate that the integral data are consistent with the DXA data, i.e., comparing the two control groups suggests significant but incomplete improvement in maintaining BMD using the ARED protocol. Biochemical data of the concurrent

  11. Laser Docking System Radar flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erwin, Harry O.

    1986-01-01

    Flight experiments to verify the Laser Docking System Radar are discussed. The docking requirements are summarized, and the breadboarded hardware is described, emphasizing the two major scanning concepts being utilized: a mechanical scanning technique employing galvanometer beamsteerers and an electronic scanning technique using an image dissector. The software simulations used to apply hardware solutions to the docking requirements are briefly discussed, the tracking test bed is described, and the objectives of the flight experiment are reviewed.

  12. Aero-Assisted Spacecraft Missions Using Hypersonic Waverider Aeroshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knittel, Jeremy

    This work examines the use of high-lift, low drag vehicles which perform orbital transfers within a planet's atmosphere to reduce propulsive requirements. For the foreseeable future, spacecraft mission design will include the objective of limiting the mass of fuel required. One means of accomplishing this is using aerodynamics as a supplemental force, with what is termed an aero-assist maneuver. Further, the use of a lifting body enables a mission designer to explore candidate trajectory types wholly unavailable to non-lifting analogs. Examples include missions to outer planets by way of an aero-gravity assist, aero-assisted plane change, aero-capture, and steady atmospheric periapsis probing missions. Engineering level models are created in order to simulate both atmospheric and extra-atmospheric space flight. Each mission is parameterized using discrete variables which control multiple areas of design. This work combines the areas of hypersonic aerodynamics, re-entry aerothermodynamics, spacecraft orbital mechanics, and vehicle shape optimization. In particular, emphasis is given to the parametric design of vehicles known as "waveriders" which are inversely designed from known shock flowfields. An entirely novel means of generating a class of waveriders known as "starbodies" is presented. A complete analysis is performed of asymmetric starbody forms and compared to a better understood parameterization, "osculating cone" waveriders. This analysis includes characterization of stability behavior, a critical discipline within hypersonic flight. It is shown that asymmetric starbodies have significant stability improvement with only a 10% reduction in the lift-to-drag ratio. By combining the optimization of both the shape of the vehicle and the trajectory it flies, much is learned about the benefit that can be expected from lifting aero-assist missions. While previous studies have conceptually proven the viability, this work provides thorough quantification of the

  13. Extending a Flight Management Computer for Simulation and Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, Michael M.; Sugden, Paul C.

    2005-01-01

    In modern transport aircraft, the flight management computer (FMC) has evolved from a flight planning aid to an important hub for pilot information and origin-to-destination optimization of flight performance. Current trends indicate increasing roles of the FMC in aviation safety, aviation security, increasing airport capacity, and improving environmental impact from aircraft. Related research conducted at the Langley Research Center (LaRC) often requires functional extension of a modern, full-featured FMC. Ideally, transport simulations would include an FMC simulation that could be tailored and extended for experiments. However, due to the complexity of a modern FMC, a large investment (millions of dollars over several years) and scarce domain knowledge are needed to create such a simulation for transport aircraft. As an intermediate alternative, the Flight Research Services Directorate (FRSD) at LaRC created a set of reusable software products to extend flight management functionality upstream of a Boeing-757 FMC, transparently simulating or sharing its operator interfaces. The paper details the design of these products and highlights their use on NASA projects.

  14. Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Karen T.; Anderson, Brian P.; Campbell, Charles H.; Garske, Michael T.; Saucedo, Luis A.; Kinder, Gerald R.; Micklos, Ann M.

    2011-01-01

    In support of the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment (BLT FE) Project, a manufactured protuberance tile was installed on the port wing of Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery for STS-119, STS-128, STS-131 and STS-133 as well as Space Shuttle Endeavour for STS-134. Additional instrumentation was installed in order to obtain more spatially resolved measurements downstream of the protuberance. This paper provides an overview of the BLT FE Project with emphasis on the STS-131 and STS-133 results. A high-level overview of the in-situ flight data is presented, along with a summary of the comparisons between pre- and post-flight analysis predictions and flight data. Comparisons show that empirically correlated predictions for boundary layer transition onset time closely match the flight data, while predicted surface temperatures were significantly higher than observed flight temperatures. A thermocouple anomaly observed on a number of the missions is discussed as are a number of the mitigation actions that will be taken on the final flight, STS-134, including potential alterations of the flight trajectory and changes to the flight instrumentation.

  15. Mobile communications satellite antenna flight experiment definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeland, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    Results of a NASA-sponsored study to determine the technical feasibility and cost of a Shuttle-based flight experiment specifically intended for the MSAT commercial user community are presented. The experiment will include demonstrations of technology in the areas of radio frequency, sensing and control, and structures. The results of the structural subsystem study summarized here include experiment objective and technical approach, experiment structural description, structure/environment interactions, structural characterization, thermal characterization, structural measurement system, and experiment functional description.

  16. A review of shock waves around aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.

    1986-01-01

    Aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles (AOTVs) are a proposed type of reusable spacecraft that would be used to transport cargoes from one earth-bound orbit to another. Such vehicles could be based on the proposed space station and used to transport commercial satellites from the space station to geostationary orbits or to polar orbits and return. During a mission, AOTVs would fly through earth's atmosphere, thus generating aerodynamic forces that could be used for decelerating the vehicles or changing their direction. AOTV research findings were concerned with the shock-wave-induced, high-temperature airflows that would be produced around these vehicles during atmospheric flight. Special emphasis was placed on the problems of: (1) the chemical physics of multitemperature, ionizing, nonequilibrium air flows, and (2) the dynamics of the flows in the base region of a blunt body with complex afterbody geometry.

  17. Optimal control of aeroassisted plane change maneuver using feedback expansions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishne, D.; Speyer, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    A guidance law for an aeroassisted plane change maneuver is developed by an asymptotic expansion technique using a small parameter which essentially represents the ratio of the inertial forces to the atmospheric forces. This guidance law minimizes the energy loss while meeting terminal constraints on the altitude, flight path angle, and heading angle. By neglecting the inertial forces, the resulting optimization problem is integrable and can be determined in closed form. This zeroth-order solution is the first term in an asymptotic series solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation. The remaining terms are determined from the solution of a first-order, linear partial differential equation whose solution requires only quadrature integration. Our initial results in using this guidance scheme are encouraging.

  18. A review of shock waves around aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.

    1985-01-01

    Aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles (AOTVs) are a proposed type of reusable spacecraft that would be used to transport cargoes from one Earth-bound orbit to another. Such vehicles could be based on the proposed space station and used to transport commercial satellites from the space station to geostationary orbits or to polar orbits and return. During a mission, AOTVs would fly through Earth's atmosphere, thus generating aerodynamic forces that could be used for decelerating the vehicles or changing their direction. AOTV research findings were concerned with the shock-wave-induced, high-temperature airflows that would be produced around these vehicles during atmospheric flight. Special emphasis was placed on the problems of: (1) the chemical physics of multitemperature, ionizing, nonequilibrium air flows, and (2) the dynamics of the flows in the base region of a blunt body with complex afterbody geometry.

  19. Biostack experiment. [Apollo 17 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buecker, H.; Horneck, G.; Reinholz, E.; Ruether, W.; Graul, E. H.; Planel, H.; Soleilhavoup, J. P.; Cueer, P.; Kaiser, R.; Massue, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    The Apollo 17 biostack experiment to establish the biological efficiency of individual heavy nuclei particles of galactic cosmic radiation are reported. The experiment theory, interaction of heavy nuclei particles with biologic matter, and the total dose of cosmic ionizing radiation are discussed along with the radiation effects of heavy nuclei on Artemia salina eggs, and Bacillus subtilis.

  20. Laser data transfer flight experiment definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    A set of laser communication flight experiments to be performed between a relay satellite, ground terminals, and space shuttles were synthesized and evaluated. Results include a definition of the space terminals, NASA ground terminals, test methods, and test schedules required to perform the experiments.

  1. Thermal Energy Storage Flight Experiment in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkoong, David

    1992-01-01

    The Thermal Energy Storage Flight Experiment was designed to characterize void shape and location in LiF-based phase change materials in different energy storage configurations representative of advanced solar dynamic systems. Experiment goals and payload design are described in outline and graphic form.

  2. Optimization and closed loop guidance of drag modulated aeroassisted orbital transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kechichian, J. A.; Cruz, M. I.; Rinderle, E. A.; Vinh, N. X.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of optimal and near optimal atmospheric flight trajectories for drag modulated aeroassisted orbital transfer is presented. An explicit and adaptive closed loop guidance approach for this mode of orbit transfer is also presented with performance near the optimal nominal trajectories. The orbital transfer of interest is for return from high earth orbit to low earth orbit. Most of what is discussed in this paper concerns the aeroassisted or atmospheric segment which lowers the apogee of the high earth orbit to the apogee of the low earth orbit. Minimization of the total impulsive delta-V at this low earth orbit apogee is the optimization criterion. Control about this impulse due to a number of potential error sources in atmospheric braking is the requirement imposed on closed loop guidance.

  3. Proposed Space Flight Experiment Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The primary thrust for this plan is to develop design tools and fundamental understanding that are timely and consistent with the goal of the various exploration initiatives. The plan will utilize ISS facilities, such as the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) and the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG). A preliminary flow schematic of Two-Phase Flow Facility (T(phi)FFy) which would utilize FIR is shown in Figure 3. MSG can be utilized to use the Boiling eXperiment Facility (BXF) and Contact Line Dynamics Experiment (CLiDE) Facility. The T(phi)FFy system would have multiple test sections whereby different configurations of heat exchangers could be used to study boiling and condensation phenomena. The test sections would be instrumented for pressure drop, void fraction, heat fluxes, temperatures, high-speed imaging and other diagnostics. Besides a high-speed data acquisition system with a large data storage capability, telemetry could be used to update control and test parameters and download limited amounts of data. In addition, there would be multiple accumulators that could be used to investigate system stability and fluid management issues. The system could accommodate adiabatic tests through either the space station nitrogen supply or have an experiment-specific compressor to pressurize a sufficient amount of air or other non-condensable gas for reuse as the supply bottle is depleted.

  4. Flight Experiment Demonstration System (FEDS) analysis report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shank, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the Flight Experiment Demonstration System (FEDS) was to show, in a simulated spacecraft environment, the feasibility of using a microprocessor to automate the onboard orbit determination functions. The software and hardware configuration used to support FEDS during the demonstration and the results of the demonstration are discussed.

  5. Flight Test Experiments Foreseen for USV

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    RTO-EN-AVT-130 Russo, G. (2007) Flight Test Experiments Foreseen for USV. In Flig Educational Notes RTO-EN-AVT-130, Paper 12 . Neuilly-sur-Seine...Manager CH Project Manager 12 - 1 ht Experiments for Hypersonic Vehicle Development (pp. 12 -1 – 12 -38). France: RTO. Available from: http... 12 . DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release, distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES See also ADM002057., The

  6. A high temperature superconductivity communications flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, P.; Krishen, K.; Arndt, D.; Raffoul, G.; Karasack, V.; Bhasin, K.; Leonard, R.

    1992-01-01

    The proposed high temperature superconductivity (HTSC) millimeter-wave communications flight experiment from the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Orbiter to the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) in geosynchronous orbit is described. The experiment will use a Ka-band HTSC phased array antenna and front-end electronics to receive a downlink communications signal from the ACTS. The discussion covers the system configuration, a description of the ground equipment, the spacecraft receiver, link performance, thermal loading, and the superconducting antenna array.

  7. Coarsening Experiment Being Prepared for Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, J. Mark

    2001-01-01

    The Coarsening in Solid-Liquid Mixtures-2 (CSLM-2) experiment is a materials science space flight experiment whose purpose is to investigate the kinetics of competitive particle growth within a liquid matrix. During coarsening, small particles shrink by losing atoms to larger particles, causing the larger particles to grow. In this experiment, solid particles of tin will grow (coarsen) within a liquid lead-tin eutectic matrix. The preceding figures show the coarsening of tin particles in a lead-tin eutectic as a function of time. By conducting this experiment in a microgravity environment, we can study a greater range of solid volume fractions, and the effects of sedimentation present in terrestrial experiments will be negligible. The CSLM-2 experiment is slated to fly onboard the International Space Station. The experiment will be run in the Microgravity Science Glovebox installed in the U.S. Laboratory module.

  8. SLS-1 flight experiments preliminary significant results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-01-01

    Spacelab Life Sciences-1 (SLS-1) is the first of a series of dedicated life sciences Spacelab missions designed to investigate the mechanisms involved in the physiological adaptation to weightlessness and the subsequent readaptation to 1 gravity (1 G). Hypotheses generated from the physiological effects observed during earlier missions led to the formulation of several integrated experiments to determine the underlying mechanisms responsible for the observed phenomena. The 18 experiments selected for flight on SLS-1 investigated the cardiovascular, cardiopulmonary, regulatory physiology, musculoskeletal, and neuroscience disciplines in both human and rodent subjects. The SLS-1 preliminary results gave insight to the mechanisms involved in the adaptation to the microgravity environment and readaptation when returning to Earth. The experimental results will be used to promote health and safety for future long duration space flights and, as in the past, will be applied to many biomedical problems encountered here on Earth.

  9. A review of animal flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandler, H.

    1977-01-01

    Extensive experience with biologic systems was obtained with a variety of vertebrate species over the past 18 years. Subhuman primates were precursors to man in the American space flight program; dogs and mice were animals of choice for the Soviet program. Recent attempts to use heavily instrumented animals for observations of long-term physiological effects indicate problems which must be corrected in future experiments for monitoring the effects of environmental stresses over the longer periods required for accomplishing meaningful habitation in near-Earth orbit or for travel to nearby planets.

  10. Douglas Experience in Flight Flutter Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philbrick, J.

    1975-01-01

    Douglas Aircraft Company experience in flight flutter testing is reviewed briefly, with comments on state-of-the-art excitation and instrumentation techniques used up to the present time. The limitations of previous techniques are discussed with emphasis on the problem of: (1) establishing a flutter margin of safety for predicted marginal flutter modes; (2) resolving instances of flutter not predicted by theoretical calculations in advance; and (3) delaying the airplane demonstration by time consumed in acquisition and reduction of flutter data. Current Douglas philosophy in flight flutter testing is presented and a description given of steady-state vane excitation system development, automatic data handling system, and the potential application of automatic computing methods for increasing flutter data yield.

  11. Electric propulsion flight experience and technology readiness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, J. E.; Jackson, D. E.; Marvin, D. C.; Jenkin, A. B.; Janson, S. W.

    1993-06-01

    Spacecraft electric propulsion technology is reviewed here to provide mission planners and potential users with a better appreciation of its capabilities and limitations. Flight experience provides the best measure of EP technology readiness. We describe and document the flight history and development status of EP in domestic, foreign, and commercial programs. Low-power resistojets, arcjets, ion engines, and plasma thrusters are applicable today for stationkeeping and drag compensation. Future high-power systems would enable large velocity-change maneuvers. The trade-space of EP encompasses significant performance benefits (reduced propellant mass, enhanced payload, system-level synergism), along with challenges (hardware development, system operations, non-technical issues). The choice of design parameters (thrust, specific impulse, input power) depends on how much of a change from traditional spacecraft operations is acceptable for a given mission - greater change will yield a greater payoff.

  12. Aerobrake for the Centaur Aerobrake Flight Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, John

    A retractable aerobrake using only current technology was predesigned. It would be flown on the Centaur rocket in 1992 as the principal part of the Centaur Aerobrake Flight Experiment (CAFE). A triple pass, constant dynamic pressure (TCP) trajectory was chosen to limit peak temperature to 2 260 F, and heating to 22 Btu/s-sq ft. The brake would fly at a 12-degree nominal angle of attack (AOA). Given a + or - 2-degree uncertainty, a worst case AOA of 10 degrees, producing a lift to drag (L/D) of 0.139 for trajectory correction, was used in the analysis. A new flexible Thermal Protection System was developed and crudely tested. An 8-inch diameter wind tunnel model and a 1/20th scale functional model were built. Flyable solutions were conceived for all technical challenges. It is concluded that with a 1988 start, there are no major technical roadblocks to a 1992 CAFE flight.

  13. Thermal control surfaces experiment flight system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Donald R.; Hummer, Leigh L.; Zwiener, James M.

    1991-01-01

    The Thermal Control Surfaces Experiment (TCSE) is the most complex system, other than the LDEF, retrieved after long term space exposure. The TCSE is a microcosm of complex electro-optical payloads being developed and flow by NASA and the DoD including SDI. The objective of TCSE was to determine the effects of the near-Earth orbital environment and the LDEF induced environment on spacecraft thermal control surfaces. The TCSE was a comprehensive experiment that combined in-space measurements with extensive post flight analyses of thermal control surfaces to determine the effects of exposure to the low earth orbit space environment. The TCSE was the first space experiment to measure the optical properties of thermal control surfaces the way they are routinely measured in a lab. The performance of the TCSE confirms that low cost, complex experiment packages can be developed that perform well in space.

  14. OTV aeroassist with low L/D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willcockson, W. H.

    1986-10-01

    In an attempt to make the OTV efficient and cost-effective, consideration is given to the aerobraking portion of the mission. It is proposed that the best method for controlling the trajectory in this phase is through the use of a lifting brake. Entry error analysis is used to derive an L/D requirement of 0.12; in addition, a predictor-corrector guidance scheme is developed to control exit apogee and orbital plane geometry in the aeroassist. The guidance includes density feedback functions to compensate for the large atmospheric fluctuations observed in Shuttle entries.

  15. Computational chemistry and aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. M.; Jaffe, R. L.; Arnold, J. O.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of the radiative heating phenomena encountered during a typical aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle (AOTV) trajectory was made to determine the potential impact of computational chemistry on AOTV design technology. Both equilibrium and nonequilibrium radiation mechanisms were considered. This analysis showed that computational chemistry can be used to predict (1) radiative intensity factors and spectroscopic data; (2) the excitation rates of both atoms and molecules; (3) high-temperature reaction rate constants for metathesis and charge exchange reactions; (4) particle ionization and neutralization rates and cross sections; and (5) spectral line widths.

  16. Gamma guidance of trajectories for coplanar, aeroassisted orbital transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miele, A.; Wang, T.

    1990-01-01

    The optimization and guidance of trajectories for coplaner, aeroassisted orbital transfer (AOT) from high Earth orbit (HEO) to low Earth orbit (LEO) are examined. In particular, HEO can be a geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). It is assumed that the initial and final orbits are circular, that the gravitational field is central and is governed by the inverse square law, and that at most three impulses are employed: one at HEO exit, one at atmospheric exit, and one at LEO entry. It is also assumed that, during the atmospheric pass, the trajectory is controlled via the lift coefficient. The presence of upper and lower bounds on the lift coefficient is considered. First, optimal trajectories are computed by minimizing the total velocity impulse (hence, the propellant consumption) required for AOT transfer. The sequential gradient-restoration algorithm (SGRA) is used for optimal control problems. The optimal trajectory is shown to include two branches: a relatively short descending flight branch (branch 1) and a long ascending flight branch (branch 2). Next, attention is focused on guidance trajectories capable of approximating the optimal trajectories in real time, while retaining the essential characteristics of simplicity, ease of implementation, and reliability. For the atmospheric pass, a feedback control scheme is employed and the lift coefficient is adjusted according to a two-stage gamma guidance law. Further improvements are possible via a modified gamma guidance which is more stable with respect to dispersion effects arising from navigation errors, variations of the atmospheric density, and uncertainties in the aerodynamic coefficients than gamma guidance trajectory. A byproduct of the studies on dispersion effects is the following design concept. For coplaner aeroassisted orbital transfer, the lift-range-to-weight ratio appears to play a more important role than the lift-to-drag ratio. This is because the lift-range-to-weight ratio controls mainly the minimum

  17. Gamma guidance of trajectories for coplanar, aeroassisted orbital transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miele, A.; Wang, T.

    The optimization and guidance of trajectories for coplaner, aeroassisted orbital transfer (AOT) from high Earth orbit (HEO) to low Earth orbit (LEO) are examined. In particular, HEO can be a geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). It is assumed that the initial and final orbits are circular, that the gravitational field is central and is governed by the inverse square law, and that at most three impulses are employed: one at HEO exit, one at atmospheric exit, and one at LEO entry. It is also assumed that, during the atmospheric pass, the trajectory is controlled via the lift coefficient. The presence of upper and lower bounds on the lift coefficient is considered. First, optimal trajectories are computed by minimizing the total velocity impulse (hence, the propellant consumption) required for AOT transfer. The sequential gradient-restoration algorithm (SGRA) is used for optimal control problems. The optimal trajectory is shown to include two branches: a relatively short descending flight branch (branch 1) and a long ascending flight branch (branch 2). Next, attention is focused on guidance trajectories capable of approximating the optimal trajectories in real time, while retaining the essential characteristics of simplicity, ease of implementation, and reliability. For the atmospheric pass, a feedback control scheme is employed and the lift coefficient is adjusted according to a two-stage gamma guidance law. Further improvements are possible via a modified gamma guidance which is more stable with respect to dispersion effects arising from navigation errors, variations of the atmospheric density, and uncertainties in the aerodynamic coefficients than gamma guidance trajectory. A byproduct of the studies on dispersion effects is the following design concept. For coplaner aeroassisted orbital transfer, the lift-range-to-weight ratio appears to play a more important role than the lift-to-drag ratio. This is because the lift-range-to-weight ratio controls mainly the minimum

  18. Shuttle derived atmospheric density model. Part 1: Comparisons of the various ambient atmospheric source data with derived parameters from the first twelve STS entry flights, a data package for AOTV atmospheric development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Findlay, J. T.; Kelly, G. M.; Troutman, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    The ambient atmospheric parameter comparisons versus derived values from the first twelve Space Shuttle Orbiter entry flights are presented. Available flights, flight data products, and data sources utilized are reviewed. Comparisons are presented based on remote meteorological measurements as well as two comprehensive models which incorporate latitudinal and seasonal effects. These are the Air Force 1978 Reference Atmosphere and the Marshall Space Flight Center Global Reference Model (GRAM). Atmospheric structure sensible in the Shuttle flight data is shown and discussed. A model for consideration in Aero-assisted Orbital Transfer Vehicle (AOTV) trajectory analysis, proposed to modify the GRAM data to emulate Shuttle experiments.

  19. Nonequilibrium radiative heating prediction method for aeroassist flowfields with coupling to flowfield solvers. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartung, Lin C.

    1991-01-01

    A method for predicting radiation adsorption and emission coefficients in thermochemical nonequilibrium flows is developed. The method is called the Langley optimized radiative nonequilibrium code (LORAN). It applies the smeared band approximation for molecular radiation to produce moderately detailed results and is intended to fill the gap between detailed but costly prediction methods and very fast but highly approximate methods. The optimization of the method to provide efficient solutions allowing coupling to flowfield solvers is discussed. Representative results are obtained and compared to previous nonequilibrium radiation methods, as well as to ground- and flight-measured data. Reasonable agreement is found in all cases. A multidimensional radiative transport method is also developed for axisymmetric flows. Its predictions for wall radiative flux are 20 to 25 percent lower than those of the tangent slab transport method, as expected, though additional investigation of the symmetry and outflow boundary conditions is indicated. The method was applied to the peak heating condition of the aeroassist flight experiment (AFE) trajectory, with results comparable to predictions from other methods. The LORAN method was also applied in conjunction with the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code LAURA to study the sensitivity of the radiative heating prediction to various models used in nonequilibrium CFD. This study suggests that radiation measurements can provide diagnostic information about the detailed processes occurring in a nonequilibrium flowfield because radiation phenomena are very sensitive to these processes.

  20. Preliminary Results of Bisphosphonate ISS Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBlanc, Adrian; Jones, Jeff; Shapiro, Jay; Lang, Tom; Shackelford, Linda C.; Smith, Scott M.; Evans, Harlan J.; Spector, Elisabeth R.; Sibonga, Jean; Matsumoti, Toshio; Nakamura, Toshitaka; Kohri, Kenjiro; Ohshima, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Bone loss has been recognized as a potential problem from the beginning of human spaceflight. With the spaceflight missions lasting 6 months to potentially 3 years or longer this issue has assumed increased significance. Detailed measurements from the Mir and ISS long duration missions have documented losses in bone mineral density (BMD) from the total skeleton and critical sub-regions. The most important losses are from the femoral hip averaging about -1.6%/mo integral to -2.3%/mo trabecular BMD. Importantly these studies have documented the wide range in individual response from -0.5 to -5%/mo in BMD. Given the small size of any expedition crew, the wide range of responses has to be considered in the implementation of any countermeasure. Assuming that it is unlikely that the susceptibility for bone loss in any given crewmember will be known, a suite of bone loss countermeasures will likely be needed to insure protection of all crewmembers. The hypothesis for this experiment is that the combined effect of anti-resorptive drugs plus the standard in-flight exercise regimen will have a measurable effect on preventing space flight induced bone loss and strength and will reduce renal stone risk. To date, 4 crewmembers have completed the flight portion of the protocol in which crewmembers take a 70-mg alendronate tablet once a week before and during flight, starting 17 days before launch. Compared to previous ISS crewmembers (n=14) not taking alendronate, DXA measurements of the total hip BMD were significantly changed from -1.1 0.5%/mo to 0.04 0.3%/mo (p<0.01); QCT-determined trabecular BMD of the total hip was significantly changed from -2.3 1.0%/mo to -0.3 1.6%/mo (p<0.01). Significance was calculated from a one-tailed t test. While these results are encouraging, the current n (4) is small, and the large SDs indicate that while the means are improved there is still high variability in individual response. Four additional crewmembers have been recruited to participate

  1. Flight experience with the Novacor LVAS.

    PubMed

    Pristas, J M; Lee, J; Wheeldon, D R; Portner, P M

    2001-01-01

    As Novacor LVAS recipients continue to be discharged from the hospital to await cardiac transplantation, an increasing number of patients either need or desire to use air transportation. To date, two test experiences have been reported with the Novacor LVAS operating in a mock circulatory loop during air travel. One involved the transport of a mock loop on a medical helicopter, and another preceded an international flight of an LVAS recipient from Japan to the United States. In each situation, the LVAS, connected to a water-filled mock circulatory loop, was placed on the aircraft and instrumentation was checked to verify that there was no adverse effect on the Novacor equipment, or on aircraft systems, during flight. Novacor LVAS recipients have also been reported to have flown more than 37 commercial air transports throughout Europe, in both rotary and fixed wing aircraft, without incident. Laboratory testing of electromagnetic emissions were also conducted to include specific frequencies utilized by aircraft instrumentation. These tests show that the Novacor LVAS is well below the International Special Committee on Radio Interference (CISPR 11) emissions limits; these data can be provided to an air carrier anticipating transport of a Novacor recipient. Details of the results from the mock loop field testing, as well as the laboratory testing of electromagnetic emissions pertinent to air travel, are presented. This experience suggests that that there has been no impact on aircraft electronics from the LVAS, nor has the aircraft instrumentation generated any interference with the components of the Novacor LVAS.

  2. Free-Flight Experiments in LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, J. I.; Cutler, C. J.; Hewitson, M.; Jennrich, O.; Maghami, P.; Paczkowski, S.; Russano, G.; Vitale, S.; Weber, W. J.

    2014-01-01

    The LISA Pathfinder mission will demonstrate the technology of drag-free test masses for use as inertial references in future space-based gravitational wave detectors. To accomplish this, the Pathfinder spacecraft will perform drag-free flight about a test mass while measuring the acceleration of this primary test mass relative to a second reference test mass. Because the reference test mass is contained within the same spacecraft, it is necessary to apply forces on it to maintain its position and attitude relative to the spacecraft. These forces are a potential source of acceleration noise in the LISA Pathfinder system that are not present in the full LISA configuration. While LISA Pathfinder has been designed to meet it's primary mission requirements in the presence of this noise, recent estimates suggest that the on-orbit performance may be limited by this 'suspension noise'. The drift-mode or free-flight experiments provide an opportunity to mitigate this noise source and further characterize the underlying disturbances that are of interest to the designers of LISA-like instruments. This article provides a high-level overview of these experiments and the methods under development to analyze the resulting data.

  3. Free-flight experiments in LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Cutler, C.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; Gallegos, J.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, LI; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Maghami, P.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Moroni, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2015-05-01

    The LISA Pathfinder mission will demonstrate the technology of drag-free test masses for use as inertial references in future space-based gravitational wave detectors. To accomplish this, the Pathfinder spacecraft will perform drag-free flight about a test mass while measuring the acceleration of this primary test mass relative to a second reference test mass. Because the reference test mass is contained within the same spacecraft, it is necessary to apply forces on it to maintain its position and attitude relative to the spacecraft. These forces are a potential source of acceleration noise in the LISA Pathfinder system that are not present in the full LISA configuration. While LISA Pathfinder has been designed to meet it's primary mission requirements in the presence of this noise, recent estimates suggest that the on-orbit performance may be limited by this ‘suspension noise’. The drift-mode or free-flight experiments provide an opportunity to mitigate this noise source and further characterize the underlying disturbances that are of interest to the designers of LISA-like instruments. This article provides a high-level overview of these experiments and the methods under development to analyze the resulting data.

  4. Gas Chromatographic Detectors for Exobiology Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Humphry, Donald E.; Takeuchi, Nori; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Exobiology flight experiments require highly sensitive instrumentation for in situ chemical analysis of the volatile chemical species that occur in the atmospheres and surfaces of various bodies within the solar system. The complex mixtures encountered place a heavy burden on the analytical instrumentation to detect and identify all species present. Future missions to Mars', comets, or planetary moons such as Europa, will perform experiments with complex analyses. In addition, instrumentation for such missions must perform under severely restricted conditions with limited resources. To meet these analytical requirements, improved methods and highly sensitive yet smaller instruments must continually be developed with increasingly greater capabilities. We describe here efforts to achieve this objective, for past and future missions, through the development of new or the improvement of existing sensitive, miniaturized gas chromatographic detectors.

  5. Design of a water electrolysis flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. Gene; Grigger, David J.; Thompson, C. Dean; Cusick, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    Supply of oxygen (O2) and hydrogen (H2) by electolyzing water in space will play an important role in meeting the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) needs and goals for future space missios. Both O2 and H2 are envisioned to be used in a variety of processes including crew life support, spacecraft propulsion, extravehicular activity, electrical power generation/storage as well as in scientific experiment and manufacturing processes. The Electrolysis Performance Improvement Concept Study (EPICS) flight experiment described herein is sponsored by NASA Headquarters as a part of the In-Space Technology Experiment Program (IN-STEP). The objective of the EPICS is to further contribute to the improvement of the SEF technology, specifially by demonstrating and validating the SFE electromechanical process in microgravity as well as investigating perrformance improvements projected possible in a microgravity environment. This paper defines the experiment objective and presents the results of the preliminary design of the EPICS. The experiment will include testing three subscale self-contained SFE units: one containing baseline components, and two units having variations in key component materials. Tests will be conducted at varying current and thermal condition.

  6. Johnson Space Center Flight Medicine Clinic Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landry, Trela

    2006-01-01

    Being a member of the Flight Medicine Clinic (FMC) Staff is a great experience. I joined the FMC staff 2 years ago when I became part of the Kelsey-Seybold team. The FMC staff consists of Flight Surgeons, Family Clinic Physician, Nursing staff, Wellness Coordinator and Support staff. We serve as the Primary Care Physicians for the astronauts and their families and provide annual physicals for the retired astronauts. We have approximately 800 patients in the FMC. As the Family Clinic Physician, I care for the astronaut spouses and children and provide annual physicals for the retired astronauts. Since we have a small patient population, we have the opportunity to spend increased personal time with our patients, which I enjoy. We have a pretty healthy patient population, who are very interested in their overall health and preventive care. In preparation for a shuttle launch, our nursing staff assists the flight surgeons with the astronaut physical exams, which occur 10 days prior to launch and again 3 days after their return. We also provide Primary Contact physicals for the families and guests, who will be in close contact with shuttle crew members. During these physicals, we provide education, emphasizing the importance of preventing the spread of communicable diseases to shuttle crew members. Being a part of the Space Medicine Program is an honor. To know that you contribute in some way to our nation s Space Program is very special. (This article was prepared by Dr. Trela Landry, M.D. for inclusion in a Kelsey-Seybold newsletter on 25 OCT 2006.)

  7. The Cryogenic Test Bed experiments: Cryogenic heat pipe flight experiment CRYOHP (STS-53). Cryogenic two phase flight experiment CRYOTP (STS-62). Cryogenic flexible diode flight experiment CRYOFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thienel, Lee; Stouffer, Chuck

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Cryogenic Test Bed (CTB) experiments including experiment results, integration techniques used, and lessons learned during integration, test and flight phases of the Cryogenic Heat Pipe Flight Experiment (STS-53) and the Cryogenic Two Phase Flight Experiment (OAST-2, STS-62). We will also discuss the Cryogenic Flexible Diode Heat Pipe (CRYOFD) experiment which will fly in the 1996/97 time frame and the fourth flight of the CTB which will fly in the 1997/98 time frame. The two missions tested two oxygen axially grooved heat pipes, a nitrogen fibrous wick heat pipe and a 2-methylpentane phase change material thermal storage unit. Techniques were found for solving problems with vibration from the cryo-collers transmitted through the compressors and the cold heads, and mounting the heat pipe without introducing parasitic heat leaks. A thermally conductive interface material was selected that would meet the requirements and perform over the temperature range of 55 to 300 K. Problems are discussed with the bi-metallic thermostats used for heater circuit protection and the S-Glass suspension straps originally used to secure the BETSU PCM in the CRYOTP mission. Flight results will be compared to 1-g test results and differences will be discussed.

  8. Cryogenic Fluid Management Flight Experiment (CFMFE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defelice, David M.

    1987-01-01

    Since its foundation, NASA has excelled in the study and development of microgravity fluid management technology. With the advent of space-based vehicles and systems, the use of and the ability to efficiently manage subcritical cryogens in the space environment has become necessary to our growing space program. The NASA Lewis Research Center is responsible for the planning and execution of a program which will provide advanced in-space cryogenic fluid management technology. A number of future space missions have been identified that will require or could benefit from this technology. These technology needs have been prioritized and the Cryogenic Fluid Management Flight Experiment (CFMFE) is being designed to provide the experimental data necessary for the technological development effort.

  9. Sample Acquisition Techniques for Exobiology Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Carle, Glenn C.; Stratton, David M.; Valentin, Jose R.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Exobiology Flight Experiments involve complex analyses conducted in environments far different than those encountered in terrestrial applications. A major part of the analytical challenge is often the selection, acquisition, delivery and, in some cases, processing of a sample suitable for the analytical requirements of the mission. The added complications of severely limited resources and sometimes rigid time constraints combine to make sample acquisition potentially a major obstacle for successful analyses. Potential samples come in a wide range including planetary atmospheric gas and aerosols (from a wide variety of pressures), planetary soil or rocks, dust and ice particles streaming off of a comet, and cemetery surface ice and rocks. Methods to collect and process sample are often mission specific, requiring continual development of innovative concepts and mechanisms. These methods must also maintain the integrity of the sample for the experimental results to be meaningful. We present here sample acquisition systems employed from past missions and proposed for future missions.

  10. Sodium sulfur battery flight experiment definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Rebecca R.; Minck, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Sodium-sulfur batteries were identified as the most likely successor to nickel-hydrogen batteries for space applications. One advantage of the Na/S battery system is that the usable specific energy is two to three times that of nickel-hydrogen batteries. This represents a significant launch cost savings or increased payload mass capabilities. Sodium-sulfur batteries support NASA OAST's proposed Civil Space Technology Initiative goal of a factor of two improvement in spacecraft power system performance, as well as the proposed Spacecraft 2000 initiative. The sodium-sulfur battery operates at between 300 and 400 C, using liquid sodium and sulfur/polysulfide electrodes and solid ceramic electrolyte. The transport of the electrode materials to the surface of the electrolyte is through wicking/capillary forces. These critical transport functions must be demonstrated under actual microgravity conditions before sodium-sulfur batteries can be confidently utilized in space. Ford Aerospace Corporation, under contract to NASA Lewis Research Center, is currently working on the sodium-sulfur battery space flight experiment definition study. The objective is to design the experiment that will demonstrate operation of the sodium-sulfur battery/cell in the space environment with particular emphasis on evaluation of microgravity effects. Experimental payload definitions were completed and preliminary designs of the experiment were defined.

  11. Atmospheric Models for Aeroentry and Aeroassist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Duvall, Aleta; Keller, Vernon W.

    2004-01-01

    Eight destinations in the Solar System have sufficient atmosphere for aeroentry, aeroassist, or aerobraking/aerocapture: Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, plus Saturn's moon Titan. Engineering-level atmospheric models for Earth, Mars, Titan, and Neptune have been developed for use in NASA s systems analysis studies of aerocapture applications. Development has begun on a similar atmospheric model for Venus. An important capability of these models is simulation of quasi-random perturbations for Monte Carlo analyses in developing guidance, navigation and control algorithms, and for thermal systems design. Characteristics of these atmospheric models are compared, and example applications for aerocapture are presented. Recent Titan atmospheric model updates are discussed, in anticipation of applications for trajectory and atmospheric reconstruct of Huygens Probe entry at Titan. Recent and planned updates to the Mars atmospheric model, in support of future Mars aerocapture systems analysis studies, are also presented.

  12. Atmospheric Models for Aeroentry and Aeroassist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Duvall, Aleta; Keller, Vernon W.

    2005-01-01

    Eight destinations in the Solar System have sufficient atmosphere for aeroentry, aeroassist, or aerobraking/aerocapture: Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, plus Saturn's moon Titan. Engineering-level atmospheric models for Earth, Mars, Titan, and Neptune have been developed for use in NASA's systems analysis studies of aerocapture applications. Development has begun on a similar atmospheric model for Venus. An important capability of these models is simulation of quasi-random perturbations for Monte Carlo analyses in developing guidance, navigation and control algorithms, and for thermal systems design. Characteristics of these atmospheric models are compared, and example applications for aerocapture are presented. Recent Titan atmospheric model updates are discussed, in anticipation of applications for trajectory and atmospheric reconstruct of Huygens Probe entry at Titan. Recent and planned updates to the Mars atmospheric model, in support of future Mars aerocapture systems analysis studies, are also presented.

  13. First Middle East Aircraft Parabolic Flights for ISU Participant Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletser, Vladimir; Frischauf, Norbert; Cohen, Dan; Foster, Matthew; Spannagel, Ruven; Szeszko, Adam; Laufer, Rene

    2017-02-01

    Aircraft parabolic flights are widely used throughout the world to create microgravity environment for scientific and technology research, experiment rehearsal for space missions, and for astronaut training before space flights. As part of the Space Studies Program 2016 of the International Space University summer session at the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel, a series of aircraft parabolic flights were organized with a glider in support of departmental activities on `Artificial and Micro-gravity' within the Space Sciences Department. Five flights were organized with manoeuvres including several parabolas with 5 to 6 s of weightlessness, bank turns with acceleration up to 2 g and disorientation inducing manoeuvres. Four demonstration experiments and two experiments proposed by SSP16 participants were performed during the flights by on board operators. This paper reports on the microgravity experiments conducted during these parabolic flights, the first conducted in the Middle East for science and pedagogical experiments.

  14. Sounding Rockets as a Real Flight Platform for Aerothermodynamic Cfd Validation of Hypersonic Flight Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamminger, A.; Turner, J.; Hörschgen, M.; Jung, W.

    2005-02-01

    This paper describes the possibilities of sounding rockets to provide a platform for flight experiments in hypersonic conditions as a supplement to wind tunnel tests. Real flight data from measurement durations longer than 30 seconds can be compared with predictions from CFD calculations. This paper will regard projects flown on sounding rockets, but mainly describe the current efforts at Mobile Rocket Base, DLR on the SHarp Edge Flight EXperiment SHEFEX.

  15. Space construction results: The EASE/ACCESS flight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekey, Ivan

    This paper describes NASA ground and flight test activities in the development of in-space construction techniques for the assembly of Space-Station-sized structures. In November 1985, the first experiments on space construction using EVA astronauts were flown aboard the Space Shuttle, with spectacular and highly visible results. The EASE and ACCESS flight experiments are described and the ground and water tank test program and operations in-flight including instrumentation are presented, together with illustrations of assembly and disassembly of both the EASE and ACCESS experiments. The flight test results are presented and learning and productivity curves are discussed, with differences between free EVA vs EVA using foot restraints compared. Two weeks after the flights, the Space Station structural assembly technique was selected to be EVA astronaut assembly of the truss, based on the flight experiment results.

  16. Flight Technical Error Analysis of the SATS Higher Volume Operations Simulation and Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Daniel M.; Consiglio, Maria C.; Murdoch, Jennifer L.; Adams, Catherine H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of Flight Technical Error (FTE) from recent SATS experiments, called the Higher Volume Operations (HVO) Simulation and Flight experiments, which NASA conducted to determine pilot acceptability of the HVO concept for normal operating conditions. Reported are FTE results from simulation and flight experiment data indicating the SATS HVO concept is viable and acceptable to low-time instrument rated pilots when compared with today s system (baseline). Described is the comparative FTE analysis of lateral, vertical, and airspeed deviations from the baseline and SATS HVO experimental flight procedures. Based on FTE analysis, all evaluation subjects, low-time instrument-rated pilots, flew the HVO procedures safely and proficiently in comparison to today s system. In all cases, the results of the flight experiment validated the results of the simulation experiment and confirm the utility of the simulation platform for comparative Human in the Loop (HITL) studies of SATS HVO and Baseline operations.

  17. Spacelab 1 and the Life Sciences Flight Experiments Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, W. H.; Clark, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    The Life Sciences Flight Experiments Program (LSFEP) was established by NASA in 1978 to plan and direct efforts necessary to conduct a continuing program of in-flight life science investigations throughout the Space Shuttle era. The Spacelab 1 (SL-1) mission, conducted from November 28 to December 8, 1983, was to verify Spacelab performance through a variety of scientific experiments including life science. A description is given of the seven NASA life sciences experiments, which consisted of four human experiments, a fungus experiment, a plant experiment, and radiation experiments. Ten life sciences experiments from the European Space Agency were also flown. The experiments include studies of the circadian rhythms in Neurospora crassa, the nutation of Helianthus annus, the vestibular function during weightlessness, the influence of space flight on erythrokinetics in man, and the adaptation of vestibulo-spinal reflex mechanisms during space flight.

  18. Update of the Bisphosphonate ISS Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBlanc, Adrian; Matsumoto, Toshio; Jones, Jeffrey; Shapiro, Jay; Lang, Thomas; Shackelford, Linda; Smith, Scott M.; Evans, Harlan; Spector, Elisabeth; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Sibonga, Jean; Keyak, Joyce; Nakamura, Toshitaka; Kohri, Kenjiro; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Moralez, Gilbert

    2014-01-01

    The bisphosphonate study is an international collaboration between the NASA and JAXA space agencies to investigate the potential value of antiresorptive drugs to mitigate the well-established bone changes associated with long-duration spaceflight. Our hypothesis is that an antiresorptive drug in combination with in-flight exercise will ameliorate bone loss and hypercalcuria during long-duration spaceflight. We have completed data analysis for 7 crewmembers treated with alendronate during flight and 3 of 10 controls without treatment. We previously reported the pre/postflight changes in bone density and the pre versus in-flight changes in various biomarkers in crewmembers taking alendronate during flight. The purpose of this report is to compare these results with the 12- month follow-up data. The table below presents these data as a percentage change from baseline either immediately postflight or in-flight (biochemical markers) with a 1-year follow-up.

  19. Solar array flight experiment/dynamic augmentation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Leighton E.; Pack, Homer C., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    This report presents the objectives, design, testing, and data analyses of the Solar Array Flight Experiment/Dynamic Augmentation Experiment (SAFE/DAE) that was tested aboard Shuttle in September 1984. The SAFE was a lightweight, flat-fold array that employed a thin polyimide film (Kapton) as a substrate for the solar cells. Extension/retraction, dynamics, electrical and thermal tests, were performed. Of particular interest is the dynamic behavior of such a large lightweight structure in space. Three techniques for measuring and analyzing this behavior were employed. The methodology for performing these tests, gathering data, and data analyses are presented. The report shows that the SAFE solar array technology is ready for application and that new methods are available to assess the dynamics of large structures in space.

  20. Liquid Motion Experiment Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato David J.; Dalton, Penni J.; Dodge, Franklin T.; Green, Steve

    1998-01-01

    The Liquid Motion Experiment (LME), designed to study the effects of liquid motion in rotating tanks, was flown on STS 84. LME was essentially a spin table that created a realistic nutation motion of scale-model tanks containing liquid. TWo spherical and two cylindrical transparent tanks were tested simultaneously, and three sets of such tanks were employed to vary liquid viscosity, fill level, and propellant management device (PMD) design. All the tanks were approximately 4.5 inches diameter. The primary test measurements were the radial and tangential torques exerted on the tanks by the liquid. Resonant frequencies and damping of the liquid oscillations were determined by sine sweep tests. For a given tank shape, the resonant frequency depended on fill level. For the cylindrical tanks, the resonances had somewhat different frequencies for the tangential axis (0.55 to 0.75 times spin rate) and the radial axis (0.73 to 0.78 times spin rate), and the tangential axis resonance agreed more closely with available analytical models. For the spherical tanks, the resonant frequencies were between 0.74 to 0.77 times the spin rate and were the same for the tangential and radial axes. The damping coefficients varied from about I% to 3% of critical, depending on tank shape, fill level, and liquid viscosity. 'Me viscous energy dissipation rates of the liquid oscillations were determined from sine dwell tests. The LME energy dissipation rates varied from 0.3 to 0.5 times the estimates obtained from scaling previous ground tests and spacecraft flight data. The PNDs sometimes enhanced the resonances and energy dissipation rates and sometimes decreased them, which points out the need to understand better the effects of PMD on liquid motion as a function of PMD and tank design.

  1. Explicit guidance of drag modulated aeroassisted transfer between elliptical orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinh, N. X.; Mease, K. D.; Hanson, J. M.; Johannesen, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents the complete analysis of the problem of minimum-fuel aeroassisted transfer between coplanar elliptical orbits in the case where the orientation of the final orbit is free for selection in the optimization process. The comparison between the optimal pure propulsive transfer and the idealized aeroassisted transfer, by several passages through the atmosphere, is made. In the case where aeroassisted transfer provides fuel saving, a practical scheme for its realization by one passage is proposed. The maneuver consists of three phases: a deorbit phase for nonzero entry angle, followed by an atmospheric fly-through with variable drag control and completed by a postatmospheric phase. An explicit guidance formula for drag control is derived and it is shown that the required exit speed for ascent to the final orbit can be obtained with a very high degree of accuracy.

  2. Properties of the optimal trajectories for coplanar, aeroassisted orbital transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miele, A.; Wang, T.; Deaton, A. W.

    1990-01-01

    The optimization of trajectories for coplaner, aeroassisted orbital transfer (AOT) from a high Earth orbit (HEO) to a low Earth orbit (LEO) is examined. In particular, HEO can be a geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). It is assumed that the initial and final orbits are circular, that the gravitational field is central and is governed by the inverse square law, and that two impulses are employed, one at HEO exit and one at LEO entry. During the atmospheric pass, the trajectory is controlled via the lift coefficient in such a way that the total characteristic velocity is minimized. First, an ideal optimal trajectory is determined analytically for lift coefficient unbounded. This trajectory is called grazing trajectory, because the atmospheric pass is made by flying at constant altitude along the edge of the atmosphere until the excess velocity is depleted. For the grazing trajectory, the lift coefficient varies in such a way that the lift, the centrifugal force due to the Earth's curvature, the weight, and the Coriolis force due to the Earth's rotation are in static balance. Also, the grazing trajectory minimizes the total characteristic velocity and simultaneously nearly minimizes the peak values of the altitude drop, dynamic pressure, and heating rate. Next, starting from the grazing trajectory results, a real optimal trajectory is determined numerically for the lift coefficient bounded from both below and above. This trajectory is characterized by atmospheric penetration with the smallest possible entry angle, followed by flight at the lift coefficient lower bound. Consistently with the grazing trajectory behavior, the real optimal trajectory minimizes the total characteristic velocity and simultaneously nearly minimizes the peak values of the altitude drop, the dynamic pressure, and the heating rate.

  3. Properties of the optimal trajectories for coplanar, aeroassisted orbital transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miele, A.; Wang, T.; Deaton, A. W.

    The optimization of trajectories for coplaner, aeroassisted orbital transfer (AOT) from a high Earth orbit (HEO) to a low Earth orbit (LEO) is examined. In particular, HEO can be a geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). It is assumed that the initial and final orbits are circular, that the gravitational field is central and is governed by the inverse square law, and that two impulses are employed, one at HEO exit and one at LEO entry. During the atmospheric pass, the trajectory is controlled via the lift coefficient in such a way that the total characteristic velocity is minimized. First, an ideal optimal trajectory is determined analytically for lift coefficient unbounded. This trajectory is called grazing trajectory, because the atmospheric pass is made by flying at constant altitude along the edge of the atmosphere until the excess velocity is depleted. For the grazing trajectory, the lift coefficient varies in such a way that the lift, the centrifugal force due to the Earth's curvature, the weight, and the Coriolis force due to the Earth's rotation are in static balance. Also, the grazing trajectory minimizes the total characteristic velocity and simultaneously nearly minimizes the peak values of the altitude drop, dynamic pressure, and heating rate. Next, starting from the grazing trajectory results, a real optimal trajectory is determined numerically for the lift coefficient bounded from both below and above. This trajectory is characterized by atmospheric penetration with the smallest possible entry angle, followed by flight at the lift coefficient lower bound. Consistently with the grazing trajectory behavior, the real optimal trajectory minimizes the total characteristic velocity and simultaneously nearly minimizes the peak values of the altitude drop, the dynamic pressure, and the heating rate.

  4. Experiment 305: Pathophysiology of Mineral Loss During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Claude D.; Cann, Christopher E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this SLS-2 experiment was to determine the pathophysiology of mineral loss during space flight. This was to be accomplished by (1) determining the concentrations of blood minerals and of calciotropic hormones (parathyroid hormone-PTH, vitamin D metabolites) before, during, and after a 14 day shuttle flight, and (2) determining, by calcium kinetic analysis (using stable calcium isotopes), the influence of space flight on intestinal calcium absorption .

  5. A feasibility study of orbiter flight control experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geissler, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    The results of a feasibility study of orbiter flight control experiments performed are summarized. Feasibility studies were performed on a group of 14 experiments selected from a candidate list of 35 submitted to the study contractor by the flight control community. Concepts and requirements were developed for the 14 selected experiments and they were ranked on a basis of technical value, feasibility, and cost. It was concluded that all the selected experiments can be considered as potential candidates for the Orbiter Experiment program, which is being formulated for the Orbiter Flight Tests and subsequent operational flights, regardless of the relative ranking established during the study. None of the selected experiments has significant safety implications and the cost of most was estimated to be less than $200K.

  6. Manned Space-Flight Experiments: Gemini V Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    This compilation of papers constitutes an interim report on the results of experiments conducted during the Gemini V manned space flight. The results of experiments conducted on Gemini III and IV manned space flights have been published previously in a similar interim report, "Manned Space Flight Experiments Symposium, Gemini Missions III and IV," which is available upon request from MSC Experiments Program Office, Houston, Texas (Code EX, Attention of R. Kinard). The Gemini V mission provided the greatest opportunity to date for conducting experiments; the increased mission duration of eight days provided this added capability. The total mission experiment complement was seventeen. Five experiments were designed to obtain basic scientific knowledge, five were medical, and seven were technological and engineering in nature. Six of the experiments had flown previously on Gemini IV, and eleven were new. The results of the experiments, including real-time modification to preflight plans made necessary by abnormal spacecraft system operation, are presented.

  7. Flight experiences on board Space Station Mir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viehboeck, Franz

    1992-07-01

    A survey of the training in the cosmonaut center 'Yuri Gagarin' near Moscow (U.S.S.R.) and of the preparation for the joint Soviet-Austrian space flight from 2-10 Oct. 1991 is given. The flight in Soyuz-TM 13 with the most important systems, as well as a short description of the Space Station Mir, the life on board the Station with the basic systems, like energy supply, life support, radio, and television are described. The possibilities of exploitation of the Space Station Mir and an outlook to the future is given.

  8. Overview of International Space Station orbital environments exposure flight experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Carlos E.; Mikatarian, Ronald R.; Schmidl, Danny; Finckenor, Miria; Neish, Michael; Imagawa, Kichiro; Dinguirard, Magdeleine; van Eesbeek, Marc; Naumov, S. F.; Krylov, A. N.; Mishina, L. V.; Gerasimov, Y. I.; Sokolova, S. P.; Kurilyonok, A. O.; Alexandrov, N. G.; Smirnova, T. N.

    2004-10-01

    This paper presents an overview of International Space Station (ISS) on-orbit environments exposure flight experiments. International teams are flying, or preparing to fly, externally mounted materials exposure trays and sensor packages. The samples in these trays are exposed to a combination of induced molecular contamination, ultraviolet radiation, atomic oxygen, ionizing radiation, micrometeoroids and orbital debris. Exposed materials samples are analyzed upon return. Typical analyses performed on these samples include optical property measurements, X-ray photo spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiles, scanning electron microscope (SEM) surface morphology and materials properties measurements. The objective of these studies is to characterize the long-term effects of the natural and induced environments on spacecraft materials. Ongoing flight experiments include the U.S. Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) program, the Japanese Micro-Particles Capturer and Space Environment Exposure Device (SM/MPAC&SEED) experiment, the Russian SKK and Kromka experiments from RSC-Energia, and the Komplast flight experiment. Flight experiments being prepared for flight, or in development stage, include the Japanese Space Environment Data Acquisition Attached Payload (SEDA-AP), the Russian BKDO monitoring package from RSC-Energia, and the European Materials Exposure and Degradation Experiment (MEDET). Results from these ISS flight experiments will be crucial to extending the performance and life of long-duration space systems such as Space Station, Space Transportation System, and other missions for Moon and Mars exploration.

  9. In-Flight Body Negative Pressure - Skylab Experiment M092

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    This 1970 photograph shows Skylab's In-Flight Lower Body Negative Pressure experiment facility, a medical evaluation designed to monitor changes in astronauts' cardiovascular systems during long-duration space missions. This experiment collected in-flight data for predicting the impairment of physical capacity and the degree of orthostatic intolerance to be expected upon return to Earth. Data to be collected were blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature, vectorcardiogram, lower body negative pressure, leg volume changes, and body mass. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  10. Columbia carries astronomy experiments on third test flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Space Transportation System 3 flight is discussed. The objectives of the test flight are given as well as an account of launch preparations, in liftoff, reentry; and landing. Numerous astronomy and space science experiments carried in the cargo bay are described.

  11. Flight Testing the Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corda, Stephen; Neal, Bradford A.; Moes, Timothy R.; Cox, Timothy H.; Monaghan, Richard C.; Voelker, Leonard S.; Corpening, Griffin P.; Larson, Richard R.; Powers, Bruce G.

    1998-01-01

    The design of the next generation of space access vehicles has led to a unique flight test that blends the space and flight research worlds. The new space vehicle designs, such as the X-33 vehicle and Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), are powered by linear aerospike rocket engines. Conceived of in the 1960's, these aerospike engines have yet to be flown, and many questions remain regarding aerospike engine performance and efficiency in flight. To provide some of these data before flying on the X-33 vehicle and the RLV, a spacecraft rocket engine has been flight-tested atop the NASA SR-71 aircraft as the Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE). A 20 percent-scale, semispan model of the X-33 vehicle, the aerospike engine, and all the required fuel and oxidizer tanks and propellant feed systems have been mounted atop the SR-71 airplane for this experiment. A major technical objective of the LASRE flight test is to obtain installed-engine performance flight data for comparison to wind-tunnel results and for the development of computational fluid dynamics-based design methodologies. The ultimate goal of firing the aerospike rocket engine in flight is still forthcoming. An extensive design and development phase of the experiment hardware has been completed, including approximately 40 ground tests. Five flights of the LASRE and firing the rocket engine using inert liquid nitrogen and helium in place of liquid oxygen and hydrogen have been successfully completed.

  12. ALEXIS - THE 6 YEAR TELESCOPE FLIGHT EXPERIENCE

    SciTech Connect

    D. ROUSSEL-DUPRE; J. BLOCH; ET AL

    1999-07-01

    The Array of Low Energy X-ray Imaging Sensors (ALEXIS) satellite was launched from the 4th flight of the Pegasus booster on 25 April, 1993 into an 800 km, 70 degree inclination orbit. After an initial launch difficulty, the satellite was successfully recovered and is still producing 100 MB of mission data per day. ALEXIS, still going strong in its sixth year, was originally designed to be a high risk, single string, Smaller-Faster-Cheaper satellite, with a 1-year nominal and a 3-year design limit. This paper will discuss the on-orbit detector performance including microchannel plate operation, pre- and post-flight calibration efforts, observed backgrounds and impacts of flying in a high radiation environment.

  13. Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment Implementation on OV-103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanos, Theodoros A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the boundary layer transition experiment flown on Discovery. The purpose of the boundary layer transition flight experiment was to obtain hypersonic aero-thermodynamic data for the purpose of better understanding the flow transition from a laminar to turbulent boundary layer using a known height protuberance. The preparation of the shuttle is described, with the various groups responsibilities outlined. Views of the shuttle in flight with the experimental results are shown.

  14. MUZO flight experience with the programmable multizone furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockowandt, Christian; Loth, Kenneth

    1993-01-01

    The Multi-Zone (MUZO) furnace has been developed for growing germanium (Ge) crystals under microgravity in a Get Away Special (GAS) payload. The MUZO furnace was launched with STS-47 Endeavour in September 1992. The payload worked as planned during the flight and a Ge sample was successfully processed. The experiment has given valuable scientific information. The design and functionality of the payload together with flight experience is reported.

  15. LEO Flight Experience On MPS Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reulier, D.; Remy, S.; Mosset, E.; Carre, A.

    2011-10-01

    5 years after the qualification of the MPS176065 Li-ion battery for microsatellite, achieved with CNES Toulouse support, the module has been embedded on board several spacecrafts. The qualified module in 8S3P arrangement has been also derived in similar 7S3P, 6S1P and 8S6P flight configurations. The different battery configurations and associated missions will be presented, at the same time as flight status. Some missions are already finished and completed with success, whereas some others are running, or are to be launched. The proven sustainable levels and associated margins will be remembered with also a status of the life tests results (more than 63000 cycles achieved today in LEO typical mission conditions). Taking into account that more than 50 battery modules have been manufactured at the present time, the paper will describe main lessons learnt on the technical, process and industrial point of view. On orbit available and disclosable data will be shown to confirm the real performances and reliability of the MPS batteries. A specific chapter will present the comparison of some telemetry flight data correlated with SLIM software model predictions during LEO orbits. At the end of this presentation, a logical transition will emphasize the reasons for VES16 Li-ion cells development. It will include the main benefits given by the VES16 Li-ion cell compared to the current MPS cell especially aiming to extend the mission duration up to more than 12 years.

  16. Space construction results - The EASE/ACCESS flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, I.

    1986-01-01

    NASA ground and flight test activities aimed at the development of in-space construction techniques for the assembly of Space-Station-sized structures are described. In particular, attention is given to the EASE and ACCESS flight experiments, the ground and water tank program, and operations in-flight including instrumentations. The baseline experiments demonstrate that erectable structures can be assembled effectively by astronauts in EVA. The average assembly time for a 45-foot truss was 25.5 minutes; the assembly rate was 3.6 struts per minute.

  17. Digital Fly-By-Wire Flight Control Validation Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szalai, K. J.; Jarvis, C. R.; Krier, G. E.; Megna, V. A.; Brock, L. D.; Odonnell, R. N.

    1978-01-01

    The experience gained in digital fly-by-wire technology through a flight test program being conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in an F-8C aircraft is described. The system requirements are outlined, along with the requirements for flight qualification. The system is described, including the hardware components, the aircraft installation, and the system operation. The flight qualification experience is emphasized. The qualification process included the theoretical validation of the basic design, laboratory testing of the hardware and software elements, systems level testing, and flight testing. The most productive testing was performed on an iron bird aircraft, which used the actual electronic and hydraulic hardware and a simulation of the F-8 characteristics to provide the flight environment. The iron bird was used for sensor and system redundancy management testing, failure modes and effects testing, and stress testing in many cases with the pilot in the loop. The flight test program confirmed the quality of the validation process by achieving 50 flights without a known undetected failure and with no false alarms.

  18. A guidance-motivated sensitivity analysis of an aero-assisted boost vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, L. W.; Gracey, C.; Armstrong, C. D.

    1986-01-01

    A simple model of an aero-assisted booster is used to examine the contributions of propulsion system type, aerodynamic lift and flight trajectory to the efficiency with which payloads can be placed into low earth orbit. The higher propulsive efficiency of ramjet and scramjet propulsion has the potential of increasing the payload mass ratio significantly. The contributions of turbojet propulsion and aerodynamic lift are less significant. The additional complexity involved in using aerodynamic propulsion and lift requires dealing with a more comprehensive set of design variables than for rocket boosters. The approach taken is to derive a set of sensitivity functions which relate booster performance to the design variables. The problems of optimum mixing of aerodynamic lift with thrust and determining the optimal boost trajectory is treated. The potential payload capacity of a horizontal take-off air-breathing boost vehicle is examined. The optimization problem which considers propulsive efficiency, aerodynamic configuration, and control and guidance issues is discussed.

  19. Fuel-optimal trajectories of aeroassisted orbital transfer with plane change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naidu, Desineni Subbaramaiah; Hibey, Joseph L.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of minimization of fuel consumption during the atmospheric portion of an aeroassisted, orbital transfer with plane change is addressed. The complete mission has required three characteristic velocities, a deorbit impulse at high earth orbit (HEO), a boost impulse at the atmospheric exit, and a reorbit impulse at low earth orbit (LEO). A performance index has been formulated as the sum of these three impulses. Application of optimal control principles has led to a nonlinear, two-point, boundary value problem which was solved by using a multiple shooting algorithm. The strategy for the atmospheric portion of the minimum-fuel transfer is to start initially with the maximum positive lift in order to recover from the downward plunge, and then to fly with a gradually decreasing lift such that the vehicle skips out of the atmosphere with a flight path angle near zero degrees.

  20. Fuel-optimal trajectories of aeroassisted orbital transfer with plane change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidu, Desineni Subbaramaiah; Hibey, Joseph L.

    1989-06-01

    The problem of minimization of fuel consumption during the atmospheric portion of an aeroassisted, orbital transfer with plane change is addressed. The complete mission has required three characteristic velocities, a deorbit impulse at high earth orbit (HEO), a boost impulse at the atmospheric exit, and a reorbit impulse at low earth orbit (LEO). A performance index has been formulated as the sum of these three impulses. Application of optimal control principles has led to a nonlinear, two-point, boundary value problem which was solved by using a multiple shooting algorithm. The strategy for the atmospheric portion of the minimum-fuel transfer is to start initially with the maximum positive lift in order to recover from the downward plunge, and then to fly with a gradually decreasing lift such that the vehicle skips out of the atmosphere with a flight path angle near zero degrees.

  1. Fuel-optimal trajectories of aeroassisted orbital transfer with plane change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidu, D. S.

    The problem of minimization of fuel consumption during the atmospheric portion of an aeroassisted, orbital transfer with plane change is addressed. The complete mission has required three characteristic velocities, a deorbit impulse at high earth orbit (HEO), a boost impulse at the atmospheric exit, and a reorbit impulse at low earth orbit (LEO). A performance index has been formulated as the sum of these three impulses. Application of optimal control principles has led to a nonlinear, two-point, boundary value problem which was solved by using a multiple shooting algorithm. The strategy for the atmospheric portion of the minimum-fuel transfer is to start initially with the maximum positive lift in order to recover from the downward plunge, and then to fly with a gradually decreasing lift such that the vehicle skips out of the atmosphere with a flight path angle near zero degrees.

  2. Flight experiment of thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkoong, David

    1989-01-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) enables a solar dynamic system to deliver constant electric power through periods of sun and shade. Brayton and Stirling power systems under current considerations for missions in the near future require working fluid temperatures in the 1100 to 1300+ K range. TES materials that meet these requirements fall into the fluoride family of salts. These salts store energy as a heat of fusion, thereby transferring heat to the fluid at constant temperature during shade. The principal feature of fluorides that must be taken into account is the change in volume that occurs with melting and freezing. Salts shrink as they solidify, a change reaching 30 percent for some salts. The location of voids that form as result of the shrinkage is critical when the solar dynamic system reemerges into the sun. Hot spots can develop in the TES container or the container can become distorted if the melting salt cannot expand elsewhere. Analysis of the transient, two-phase phenomenon is being incorporated into a three-dimensional computer code. The code is capable of analysis under microgravity as well as 1 g. The objective of the flight program is to verify the predictions of the code, particularly of the void location and its effect on containment temperature. The four experimental packages comprising the program will be the first tests of melting and freezing conducted under microgravity. Each test package will be installed in a Getaway Special container to be carried by the shuttle. The package will be self-contained and independent of shuttle operations other than the initial opening of the container lid and the final closing of the lid. Upon the return of the test package from flight, the TES container will be radiographed and finally partitioned to examine the exact location and shape of the void. Visual inspection of the void and the temperature data during flight will constitute the bases for code verification.

  3. Biotechnological experiments in space flights on board of space stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechitailo, Galina S.

    2012-07-01

    Space flight conditions are stressful for any plant and cause structural-functional transition due to mobiliation of adaptivity. In space flight experiments with pea tissue, wheat and arabidopsis we found anatomical-morphological transformations and biochemistry of plants. In following experiments, tissue of stevia (Stevia rebaudiana), potato (Solanum tuberosum), callus culture and culture and bulbs of suffron (Crocus sativus), callus culture of ginseng (Panax ginseng) were investigated. Experiments with stevia carried out in special chambers. The duration of experiment was 8-14 days. Board lamp was used for illumination of the plants. After experiment the plants grew in the same chamber and after 50 days the plants were moved into artificial ionexchange soil. The biochemical analysis of plants was done. The total concentration of glycozides and ratio of stevioside and rebauside were found different in space and ground plants. In following generations of stevia after flight the total concentration of stevioside and rebauside remains higher than in ground plants. Experiments with callus culture of suffron carried out in tubes. Duration of space flight experiment was 8-167 days. Board lamp was used for illumination of the plants. We found picrocitina pigment in the space plants but not in ground plants. Tissue culture of ginseng was grown in special container in thermostate under stable temperature of 22 ± 0,5 C. Duration of space experiment was from 8 to 167 days. Biological activity of space flight culutre was in 5 times higher than the ground culture. This difference was observed after recultivation of space flight samples on Earth during year after flight. Callus tissue of potato was grown in tubes in thermostate under stable temperature of 22 ± 0,5 C. Duration of space experiment was from 8 to 14 days. Concentration of regenerates in flight samples was in 5 times higher than in ground samples. The space flight experiments show, that microgravity and other

  4. ATS-6 - Flight performance of the Advanced Thermal Control Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, J. P.; Brennan, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    The Advanced Thermal Control Flight Experiment on ATS-6 was designed to demonstrate the thermal control capability of a thermal diode (one-way) heat pipe, a phase-change material for thermal storage, and a feedback-controlled heat pipe. Flight data for the different operational modes are compared to ground test data, and the performance of the components is evaluated on an individual basis and as an integrated temperature-control system.

  5. The Physics of Bird Flight: An Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihail, Michael D.; George, Thomas F.; Feldman, Bernard J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an experiment that measures the forces acting on a flying bird during takeoff. The experiment uses a minimum of equipment and only an elementary knowledge of kinematics and Newton's second law. The experiment involves first digitally videotaping a bird during takeoff, analyzing the video to determine the bird's position as a…

  6. NASA Bioculture System: From Experiment Definition to Flight Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Kevin Y.; Almeida, Eduardo; Austin, Edward M.

    2014-01-01

    Starting in 2015, the NASA Bioculture System will be available to the science community to conduct cell biology and microbiology experiments on ISS. The Bioculture System carries ten environmentally independent Cassettes, which house the experiments. The closed loop fluids flow path subsystem in each Cassette provides a perfusion-based method for maintain specimen cultures in a shear-free environment by using a biochamber based on porous hollow fiber bioreactor technology. Each Cassette contains an incubator and separate insulated refrigerator compartment for storage of media, samples, nutrients and additives. The hardware is capable of fully automated or manual specimen culturing and processing, including in-flight experiment initiation, sampling and fixation, up to BSL-2 specimen culturing, and the ability to up to 10 independent cultures in parallel for statistical analysis. The incubation and culturing of specimens in the Bioculture System is a departure from standard laboratory culturing methods. Therefore, it is critical that the PI has an understanding the pre-flight test required for successfully using the Bioculture System to conduct an on-orbit experiment. Overall, the PI will conduct a series of ground tests to define flight experiment and on-orbit implementation requirements, verify biocompatibility, and determine base bioreactor conditions. The ground test processes for the utilization of the Bioculture System, from experiment selection to flight, will be reviewed. Also, pre-flight test schedules and use of COTS ground test equipment (CellMax and FiberCell systems) and the Bioculture System will be discussed.

  7. Aerodynamic and Aerothermodynamic Layout of the Hypersonic Flight Experiment Shefex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggers, Th.

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of the SHarp Edge Flight EXperiment SHEFEX is the investigation of possible new shapes for future launcher or reentry vehicles [1]. The main focus is the improvement of common space vehicle shapes by application of facetted surfaces and sharp edges. The experiment will enable the time accurate investigation of the flow effects and their structural answer during the hypersonic flight from 90 km down to an altitude of 20 km. The project, being performed under responsibility of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) is scheduled to fly on top of a two-stage solid propellant sounding rocket for the first half of 2005. The paper contains a survey of the aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic layout of the experimental vehicle. The results are inputs for the definition of the structural layout, the TPS and the flight instrumentation as well as for the preparation of the flight test performed by the Mobile Rocket Base of DLR.

  8. Flight Experiment Verification of Shuttle Boundary Layer Transition Prediction Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Berger, Karen T.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Wood, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Boundary layer transition at hypersonic conditions is critical to the design of future high-speed aircraft and spacecraft. Accurate methods to predict transition would directly impact the aerothermodynamic environments used to size a hypersonic vehicle's thermal protection system. A transition prediction tool, based on wind tunnel derived discrete roughness correlations, was developed and implemented for the Space Shuttle return-to-flight program. This tool was also used to design a boundary layer transition flight experiment in order to assess correlation uncertainties, particularly with regard to high Mach-number transition and tunnel-to-flight scaling. A review is provided of the results obtained from the flight experiment in order to evaluate the transition prediction tool implemented for the Shuttle program.

  9. Spaceflight payload design flight experience G-408

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durgin, William W.; Looft, Fred J.; Sacco, Albert, Jr.; Thompson, Robert; Dixon, Anthony G.; Roberti, Dino; Labonte, Robert; Moschini, Larry

    1992-01-01

    Worcester Polytechnic Institute's first payload of spaceflight experiments flew aboard Columbia, STS-40, during June of 1991 and culminated eight years of work by students and faculty. The Get Away Special (GAS) payload was installed on the GAS bridge assembly at the aft end of the cargo bay behind the Spacelab Life Sciences (SLS-1) laboratory. The Experiments were turned on by astronaut signal after reaching orbit and then functioned for 72 hours. Environmental and experimental measurements were recorded on three cassette tapes which, together with zeolite crystals grown on orbit, formed the basis of subsequent analyses. The experiments were developed over a number of years by undergraduate students meeting their project requirements for graduation. The experiments included zeolite crystal growth, fluid behavior, and microgravity acceleration measurement in addition to environmental data acquisition. Preparation also included structural design, thermal design, payload integration, and experiment control. All of the experiments functioned on orbit and the payload system performed within design estimates.

  10. Thermal control surfaces experiment: Initial flight data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Donald R.; Hummer, Leigh L.

    1991-01-01

    The behavior of materials in the space environment continues to be a limiting technology for spacecraft and experiments. The thermal control surfaces experiment (TCSE) aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is the most comprehensive experiment flown to study the effects of the space environment on thermal control surfaces. Selected thermal control surfaces were exposed to the LDEF orbital environment and the effects of this exposure were measured. The TCSE combined in-space orbital measurements with pre and post-flight analyses of flight materials to determine the effects of long term space exposure. The TCSE experiment objective, method, and measurements are described along with the results of the initial materials analysis. The TCSE flight system and its excellent performance on the LDEF mission is described. A few operational anomalies were encountered and are discussed.

  11. STS-26 infrared communications flight experiment (IRCFE) developer J. Prather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Aerospace communications technologist Joseph L. Prather is pictured with the infrared communications flight experiment (IRCFE) which will fly aboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, on STS-26. Prather has worked on communications using infrared light, rather than radio waves, since he started at JSC as a cooperative education student in 1981. His work and research led to the development of the experiment.

  12. Marshall Amateur Radio Club experiment (MARCE) post flight data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rupp, Charles C.

    1987-01-01

    The Marshall Amateur Radio Club Experiment (MARCE) data system, the data recorded during the flight of STS-61C, the manner in which the data was reduced to engineering units, and the performance of the student experiments determined from the data are briefly described.

  13. Phonesat In-flight Experience Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attai, Watson; Guillen, Salas Alberto; Oyadomari, Ken Yuji; Priscal, Cedric; Shimmin, Rogan Stuart; Gazulla, Oriol Tintore; Wolfe, Jasper Lewis

    2014-01-01

    Consumer technology, over the last decade, has begun to encompass devices that enable us to figure out where we are, which way we are pointing, observe the world around us, and store and transmit this information to wherever we want. Once separate consumer products such as GPS units, digital cameras and mobile phones are now combined into the modern day Smartphone. Since these capabilities are remarkably similar to those required for the multi-million dollar satellites - so why not use a multihundred dollar Smartphone instead? The PhoneSat project of NASA Ames Research Center is developing technology demonstrations utilizing these extraordinary advances to show just how simple and cheap Space can be. The style of development revolves around the "release early, release often" Silicon Valley mentality. PhoneSat is a series of 1U CubeSat size spacecrafts that use an off-the-shelf Smartphone as their onboard computer. By doing so, PhoneSat takes advantage of the high computational capability, large memory as well as ultra-tiny sensors like high-resolution cameras and navigation devices that Smartphones offer. Along with a Smartphone, PhoneSat is equipped with other commercially available technology products, such as medical brushless motors that are used as reaction wheels. Over the four years that NASA Ames Research Center has been developing the PhoneSat project, different suborbital and orbital flight activities have proven the validity of this revolutionary approach. In early 2013, the PhoneSat project launched the first triage of PhoneSats into LEO. In the five day orbital life time, the nano-satellites flew the first functioning Smartphone based satellites (using the Nexus One and Nexus S phones), the cheapest satellite (a total parts cost below $3,500) and one of the fastest on-board processors (CPU speed of 1GHz). In late 2013, the PhoneSat project launched an improved version of its bus to a higher altitude orbit which provided data about the overall system

  14. Development and Testing of the CRYOTSU Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugby, David C.; Stouffer, Charles J.; Hagood, Robert M.; Rich, Michael; Tomlinson, B. J.; Davis, Thomas M.; Ku, Jentung; Swanson, Theodore D.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the development and ground testing of the CRYOTSU thermal management flight experiment. CRYOTSU incorporates three cryogenic temperature experiments and one ambient temperature experiment into a Hitchhiker (HH) Get Away Special (GAS) Canister that is currently scheduled to fly on STS-95 in October 1998. The cryogenic experiments consist of a nitrogen triple-point cryogenic thermal storage unit (CTSU), a nitrogen cryogenic capillary pumped loop (CCPL), and a hydrogen gas-gap cryogenic thermal switch (CTSW). The ambient experiment is a carbon-fiber core, paraffin-filled thermal storage unit. Test results of integrated flight canister testing are provided herein for the CTSU and CCPL experiments. Pre-integration laboratory test results are provided for the CTSW. Design information and test results for the ambient experiment are not included.

  15. Development flight tests of JetStar LFC leading-edge flight test experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Fischer, Michael C.

    1987-01-01

    The overall objective of the flight tests on the JetStar aircraft was to demonstrate the effectiveness and reliability of laminar flow control under representative flight conditions. One specific objective was to obtain laminar flow on the JetStar leading-edge test articles for the design and off-design conditions. Another specific objective was to obtain operational experience on a Laminar Flow Control (LFC) leading-edge system in a simulated airline service. This included operational experience with cleaning requirements, the effect of clogging, possible foreign object damage, erosion, and the effects of ice particle and cloud encounters. Results are summarized.

  16. Preparations for CELSS flight experiments with wheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salisbury, F.; Gillespie, L.; Bingham, G.

    1994-11-01

    We are planning a short-term experiment with Superdwarf wheat on the U.S. Space Shuttle and a seed-to-seed experiment on the Russian Space Station Mir. The goals of both experiments are to observe effects of microgravity on developmental steps in the life cycle and to measure photosynthesis, respiration, and transpiration by monitoring gas exchange. This requires somewhat different hardware development for the two experiments. Ground-based research aims to understand plant responses to the environments in the space growth chambers that we will use (after some modification): the Plant Growth Unit (PGU) on the shuttle and units called Svet, Svetoblock 2, or Oasis on Mir. Low irradiance levels (100 to 250 μmol m-2 s-1 at best) pose a particular problem. Water and nutrient supply are also potentially limiting factors, especially in the long-term experiment. Our ground-based studies emphasize responses to low light levels (50 to 400 μmol m-2 s-1) results show that all developmental steps are delayed by low light compared with plants at 400 μmol m-2 s-1. We are also testing various rooting substrates for the shuttle experiment. A 1:1:1 mixture of peat:perlite:vermiculite appears to be the best choice.

  17. Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) refueling during first flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A NASA SR-71 refuels with an Edwards Air Force Base KC-135 during the first flight of the NASA/Rocketdyne/ Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE). The flight took place Oct. 31 at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The SR-71 took off at 8:31 a.m. PST. The aircraft flew for one hour and fifty minutes, reaching a maximum speed of Mach 1.2 before landing at Edwards at 10:21 a.m. PST, successfully validating the SR-71/linear aerospike experiment configuration. The goal of the first flight was to evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and the handling of the SR-71/linear aerospike experiment configuration. The engine was not fired during the flight. The LASRE experiment was designed to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and the handling of the SR-71 linear aerospike experiment configuration. The goal of the project was to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin validate the computational predictive tools it was using to determine the aerodynamic performance of a future reusable launch vehicle. The joint NASA, Rocketdyne (now part of Boeing), and Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) completed seven initial research flights at Dryden Flight Research Center. Two initial flights were used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the LASRE apparatus (pod) on the back of the SR-71. Five later flights focused on the experiment itself. Two were used to cycle gaseous helium and liquid nitrogen through the experiment to check its plumbing system for leaks and to test engine operational characteristics. During the other three flights, liquid oxygen was cycled through the engine. Two engine hot-firings were also completed on the ground. A final hot-fire test flight was canceled because of liquid oxygen leaks in the test apparatus. The LASRE experiment itself was a 20-percent-scale, half-span model of a lifting body shape (X-33) without the fins. It

  18. Functional design to support CDTI/DABS flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goka, T.

    1982-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to: (1) provide a generalized functional design of CDTI avionics using the FAA developd DABS/ATARS ground system as the 'traffic sensor', (2) specify software modifications and/or additions to the existing DABS/ATARS ground system to support CDTI avionics, (3) assess the existing avionics of a NASA research aircraft in terms of CDTI applications, and (4) apply the generalized functional design to provide research flight experiment capability. DABS Data Link Formats are first specified for CDTI flight experiments. The set of CDTI/DABS Format specifications becomes a vehicle to coordinate the CDTI avionics and ground system designs, and hence, to develop overall system requirements. The report is the first iteration of a system design and development effort to support eventual CDTI flight test experiments.

  19. Orion EFT-1 Catalytic Tile Experiment Overview and Flight Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Giovanni; Amar, Adam; Hyatt, Andrew; Rezin, Marc D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design and results of a surface catalysis flight experiment flown on the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle during Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT1). Similar to previous Space Shuttle catalytic tile experiments, the present test consisted of a highly catalytic coating applied to an instrumented TPS tile. However, the present catalytic tile experiment contained significantly more instrumentation in order to better resolve the heating overshoot caused by the change in surface catalytic efficiency at the interface between two distinct materials. In addition to collecting data with unprecedented spatial resolution of the "overshoot" phenomenon, the experiment was also designed to prove if such a catalytic overshoot would be seen in turbulent flow in high enthalpy regimes. A detailed discussion of the results obtained during EFT1 is presented, as well as the challenges associated with data interpretation of this experiment. Results of material testing carried out in support of this flight experiment are also shown. Finally, an inverse heat conduction technique is employed to reconstruct the flight environments at locations upstream and along the catalytic coating. The data and analysis presented in this work will greatly contribute to our understanding of the catalytic "overshoot" phenomenon, and have a significant impact on the design of future spacecraft.

  20. Pool Boiling Experiment Has Successful Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Pool Boiling Experiment (PBE) is designed to improve understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that constitute nucleate pool boiling. Nucleate pool boiling is a process wherein a stagnant pool of liquid is in contact with a surface that can supply heat to the liquid. If the liquid absorbs enough heat, a vapor bubble can be formed. This process occurs when a pot of water boils. On Earth, gravity tends to remove the vapor bubble from the heating surface because it is dominated by buoyant convection. In the orbiting space shuttle, however, buoyant convection has much less of an effect because the forces of gravity are very small. The Pool Boiling Experiment was initiated to provide insight into this nucleate boiling process, which has many Earthbound applications, such as steam-generation power plants, petroleum, and other chemical plants. Also, by using the test fluid R-113, the Pool Boiling Experiment can provide some basic understanding of the boiling behavior of cryogenic fluids without the large cost of an experiment using an actual cryogen.

  1. Pool Boiling Experiment Has Five Successful Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaramonte, Fran

    1997-01-01

    The Pool Boiling Experiment (PBE) is designed to improve understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that constitute nucleate pool boiling. Nucleate pool boiling is a process wherein a stagnant pool of liquid is in contact with a surface that can supply heat to the liquid. If the liquid absorbs enough heat, a vapor bubble can be formed. This process occurs when a pot of water boils. On Earth, gravity tends to remove the vapor bubble from the heating surface because it is dominated by buoyant convection. In the orbiting space shuttle, however, buoyant convection has much less of an effect because the forces of gravity are very small. The Pool Boiling Experiment was initiated to provide insight into this nucleate boiling process, which has many earthbound applications in steamgeneration power plants, petroleum plants, and other chemical plants. In addition, by using the test fluid R-113, the Pool Boiling Experiment can provide some basic understanding of the boiling behavior of cryogenic fluids without the large cost of an experiment using an actual cryogen.

  2. Instrumentation for space flight experiments. [using nonhuman primates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccutcheon, E. P.

    1977-01-01

    The selection of measurement systems for experiments conducted in the context of a space flight must be guided by the criteria applicable to any scientific study requiring objective measurements of physiological variables. Steps fundamental to the process of choosing the best instrumentation system are identified and the key factors in matching the operational characteristics of the instrumentation to its intended use are discussed. Special problems in obtaining data from nonhuman primates, whether restrained or unrestrained, are explored. Choices for data processing are evaluated as well as the use of prototype flight tests and simulations to assess future life science experiments for spacelab or payloads for the space shuttle biomedical scientific satellite.

  3. Preliminary Design Program: Vapor Compression Distillation Flight Experiment Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Boyda, R. B.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides a description of the results of a program to prepare a preliminary design of a flight experiment to demonstrate the function of a Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) Wastewater Processor (WWP) in microgravity. This report describes the test sequence to be performed and the hardware, control/monitor instrumentation and software designs prepared to perform the defined tests. the purpose of the flight experiment is to significantly reduce the technical and programmatic risks associated with implementing a VCD-based WWP on board the International Space Station Alpha.

  4. Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) first flight takeoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A NASA SR-71 takes off Oct. 31, making its first flight as part of the NASA/Rocketdyne/Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The SR-71 took off at 8:31 a.m. PST. The aircraft flew for one hour and fifty minutes, reaching a maximum speed of Mach 1.2 before landing at Edwards at 10:21 a.m. PST, successfully validating the SR-71/linear aerospike experiment configuration. The goal of the first flight was to evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and the handling of the SR-71/linear aerospike experiment configuration. The engine was not fired during the flight. The LASRE experiment was designed to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and the handling of the SR-71 linear aerospike experiment configuration. The goal of the project was to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin validate the computational predictive tools it was using to determine the aerodynamic performance of a future reusable launch vehicle. The joint NASA, Rocketdyne (now part of Boeing), and Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) completed seven initial research flights at Dryden Flight Research Center. Two initial flights were used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the LASRE apparatus (pod) on the back of the SR-71. Five later flights focused on the experiment itself. Two were used to cycle gaseous helium and liquid nitrogen through the experiment to check its plumbing system for leaks and to test engine operational characteristics. During the other three flights, liquid oxygen was cycled through the engine. Two engine hot-firings were also completed on the ground. A final hot-fire test flight was canceled because of liquid oxygen leaks in the test apparatus. The LASRE experiment itself was a 20-percent-scale, half-span model of a lifting body shape (X-33) without the fins. It was rotated 90 degrees and equipped with eight thrust

  5. Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) first flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A NASA SR-71 successfully completed its first flight 31 October 1997 as part of the NASA/Rocketdyne/Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The SR-71 took off at 8:31 a.m. PST. The aircraft flew for one hour and fifty minutes, reaching a maximum speed of Mach 1.2 before landing at Edwards at 10:21 a.m. PST, successfully validating the SR-71/linear aerospike experiment configuration. The goal of the first flight was to evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and the handling of the SR-71/linear aerospike experiment configuration. The engine was not fired during the flight. The LASRE experiment was designed to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and the handling of the SR-71 linear aerospike experiment configuration. The goal of the project was to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin validate the computational predictive tools it was using to determine the aerodynamic performance of a future reusable launch vehicle. The joint NASA, Rocketdyne (now part of Boeing), and Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) completed seven initial research flights at Dryden Flight Research Center. Two initial flights were used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the LASRE apparatus (pod) on the back of the SR-71. Five later flights focused on the experiment itself. Two were used to cycle gaseous helium and liquid nitrogen through the experiment to check its plumbing system for leaks and to test engine operational characteristics. During the other three flights, liquid oxygen was cycled through the engine. Two engine hot-firings were also completed on the ground. A final hot-fire test flight was canceled because of liquid oxygen leaks in the test apparatus. The LASRE experiment itself was a 20-percent-scale, half-span model of a lifting body shape (X-33) without the fins. It was rotated 90 degrees and equipped with

  6. Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) first flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A NASA SR-71 made its successful first flight Oct. 31 as part of the NASA/Rocketdyne/ Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The SR-71 took off at 8:31 a.m. PST. The aircraft flew for one hour and fifty minutes, reaching a maximum speed of Mach 1.2 before landing at Edwards at 10:21 a.m. PST, successfully validating the SR-71/linear aerospike experiment configuration. The goal of the first flight was to evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and the handling of the SR-71/linear aerospike experiment configuration. The engine was not fired during the flight. The LASRE experiment was designed to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and the handling of the SR-71 linear aerospike experiment configuration. The goal of the project was to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin validate the computational predictive tools it was using to determine the aerodynamic performance of a future reusable launch vehicle. The joint NASA, Rocketdyne (now part of Boeing), and Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) completed seven initial research flights at Dryden Flight Research Center. Two initial flights were used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the LASRE apparatus (pod) on the back of the SR-71. Five later flights focused on the experiment itself. Two were used to cycle gaseous helium and liquid nitrogen through the experiment to check its plumbing system for leaks and to test engine operational characteristics. During the other three flights, liquid oxygen was cycled through the engine. Two engine hot-firings were also completed on the ground. A final hot-fire test flight was canceled because of liquid oxygen leaks in the test apparatus. The LASRE experiment itself was a 20-percent-scale, half-span model of a lifting body shape (X-33) without the fins. It was rotated 90 degrees and equipped with eight thrust

  7. Infrared Imaging of Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J., Jr.; Schwartz, Richard; Ross, Martin; Anderson, Brian; Campbell, Charles H.

    2008-01-01

    The Hypersonic Thermodynamic Infrared Measurement (HYTHIRM) project is presently focused on near term support to the Shuttle program through the development of an infrared imaging capability of sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to augment existing on-board Orbiter instrumentation. Significant progress has been made with the identification and inventory of relevant existing optical imaging assets and the development, maturation, and validation of simulation and modeling tools for assessment and mission planning purposes, which were intended to lead to the best strategies and assets for successful acquisition of quantitative global surface temperature data on the Shuttle during entry. However, there are longer-term goals of providing global infrared imaging support to other flight projects as well. A status of HYTHIRM from the perspective of how two NASA-sponsored boundary layer transition flight experiments could benefit by infrared measurements is provided. Those two flight projects are the Hypersonic Boundary layer Transition (HyBoLT) flight experiment and the Shuttle Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment (BLT FE), which are both intended for reducing uncertainties associated with the extrapolation of wind tunnel derived transition correlations for flight application. Thus, the criticality of obtaining high quality flight data along with the impact it would provide to the Shuttle program damage assessment process are discussed. Two recent wind tunnel efforts that were intended as risk mitigation in terms of quantifying the transition process and resulting turbulent wedge locations are briefly reviewed. Progress is being made towards finalizing an imaging strategy in support of the Shuttle BLT FE, however there are no plans currently to image HyBoLT.

  8. Optimal aeroassisted return from high earth orbit with plane change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winh, N. X.; Hanson, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical treatment of the problem of aeroassisted return from a high earth orbit to LEO is presented. The approach taken is that of the minimum fuel aeroassisted return from the higher to the lower orbit with occasional maneuvers within the atmosphere while performing a plane change. The plane changes are calculated for different angular alterations, and a model is developed for optimized atmospheric turning. It is found that larger plane changers demand deeper penetration into the denser regions of the atmosphere, where greater velocity depletion will also occur. Attention is given to lift effects and their optimized solution, and an atmospheric exit condition is characterized which will require one post atmospheric impulse to achieve a LEO of 380 km. Finally, it is shown that application of an impulse will always result in a plane change.

  9. Optimal aeroassisted return from high earth orbit with plane change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winh, N. X.; Hanson, J. M.

    1983-10-01

    An analytical treatment of the problem of aeroassisted return from a high earth orbit to LEO is presented. The approach taken is that of the minimum fuel aeroassisted return from the higher to the lower orbit with occasional maneuvers within the atmosphere while performing a plane change. The plane changes are calculated for different angular alterations, and a model is developed for optimized atmospheric turning. It is found that larger plane changers demand deeper penetration into the denser regions of the atmosphere, where greater velocity depletion will also occur. Attention is given to lift effects and their optimized solution, and an atmospheric exit condition is characterized which will require one post atmospheric impulse to achieve a LEO of 380 km. Finally, it is shown that application of an impulse will always result in a plane change.

  10. 78 FR 56822 - Certified Flight Instructor Flight Reviews; Recent Pilot in Command Experience; Airmen Online...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ... commuter or on-demand operator if the pilot in command is in compliance with the specific pilot in command qualifications and recent experience requirements for that commuter or on-demand operator. Finally, this rule... Training Branch, Flight Standards Service, AFS-810, Federal Aviation Administration, 800...

  11. Review of Low Earth Orbital (LEO) flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, L.; Santosmason, B.; Visentine, J.; Kuminecz, J.

    1987-01-01

    The atomic oxygen flux exposure experiments flown on Space Shuttle flights STS-5 and STS-8 are described along with the results of measurements made on hardware returned from the Solar Maximum repair mission (Space Shuttle flight 41-C). In general, these experiments have essentially provided for passive exposure of samples to oxygen fluences of approximately 1 to 3.5 x 10(20) atoms/sq cm. Atmospheric density is used to derive fluence and is dependent on solar activity, which has been on the decline side of the 11-year cycle. Thus, relatively low flight altitudes of less than 300 km were used to acquire these exposures. After exposure, the samples were analyzed using various methods ranging from mass loss to extensive scanning electron microscopy and surface analysis techniques. Results are summarized and implications for the space station are discussed.

  12. Flight experience with lightweight, low-power miniaturized instrumentation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamory, Philip J.; Murray, James E.

    1992-01-01

    Engineers at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility (NASA-Dryden) have conducted two flight research programs with lightweight, low-power miniaturized instrumentation systems built around commercial data loggers. One program quantified the performance of a radio-controlled model airplane. The other program was a laminar boundary-layer transition experiment on a manned sailplane. The purpose of this paper is to report NASA-Dryden personnel's flight experience with the miniaturized instrumentation systems used on these two programs. The paper will describe the data loggers, the sensors, and the hardware and software developed to complete the systems. The paper also describes how the systems were used and covers the challenges encountered to make them work. Examples of raw data and derived results will be shown as well. Finally, future plans for these systems will be discussed.

  13. Thermal protection systems manned spacecraft flight experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Donald M.

    1992-10-01

    Since the first U.S. manned entry, Mercury (May 5, 1961), seventy-five manned entries have been made resulting in significant progress in the understanding and development of Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) for manned rated spacecraft. The TPS materials and systems installed on these spacecraft are compared. The first three vehicles (Mercury, Gemini, Apollo) used ablative (single-use) systems while the Space Shuttle Orbiter TPS is a multimission system. A TPS figure of merit, unit weight lb/sq ft, illustrates the advances in TPS material performance from Mercury (10.2 lb/sq ft) to the Space Shuttle (1.7 lb/sq ft). Significant advances have been made in the design, fabrication, and certification of TPS on manned entry vehicles (Mercury through Shuttle Orbiter). Shuttle experience has identified some key design and operational issues. State-of-the-art ceramic insulation materials developed in the 1970's for the Space Shuttle Orbiter have been used in the initial designs of aerobrakes. This TPS material experience has identified the need to develop a technology base from which a new class of higher temperature materials will emerge for advanced space transportation vehicles.

  14. SEP solar array Shuttle flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elms, R. V., Jr.; Young, L. E.; Hill, H. C.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment to verify the operational performance of a full-scale Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) solar array is described. Scheduled to fly on the Shuttle in 1983, the array will be deployed from the bay for ten orbits, with dynamic excitation to test the structural integrity being furnished by the Orbiter verniers; thermal, electrical, and sun orientation characteristics will be monitored, in addition to safety, reliability, and cost effective performance. The blanket, with aluminum and glass as solar cell mass simulators, is 4 by 32 m, with panels (each 0.38 by 4 m) hinged together; two live Si cell panels will be included. The panels are bonded to stiffened graphite-epoxy ribs and are storable in a box in the bay. The wing support structure is detailed, noting the option of releasing the wing into space by use of the Remote Manipulator System if the wing cannot be refolded. Procedures and equipment for monitoring the array behavior are outlined, and comprise both analog data and TV recording for later playback and analysis. The array wing experiment will also aid in developing measurement techniques for large structure dynamics in space.

  15. TDRSS Onboard Navigation System (TONS) flight qualification experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramling, C. J.; Hart, R. C.; Folta, D. C.; Long, A. C.

    1994-05-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is currently developing an operational Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) System (TDRSS) Onboard Navigation System (TONS) to provide realtime, autonomous, high-accuracy navigation products to users of TDRSS. A TONS experiment was implemented on the Explorer Platform/Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EP/EUVE) spacecraft, launched June 7, 1992, to flight qualify the TONS operational system using TDRSS forward-link communications services. This paper provides a detailed evaluation of the flight hardware, an ultrastable oscillator (USO) and Doppler extractor (DE) card in one of the TDRSS user transponders and the ground-based prototype flight software performance, based on the 1 year of TONS experiment operation. The TONS experiment results are used to project the expected performance of the TONS 1 operational system. TONS 1 processes Doppler data derived from scheduled forward-link S-band services using a sequential estimation algorithm enhanced by a sophisticated process noise model to provide onboard orbit and frequency determination and time maintenance. TONS 1 will be the prime navigation system on the Earth Observing System (EOS)-AM1 spacecraft, currently scheduled for launch in 1998. Inflight evaluation of the USO and DE short-term and long-term stability indicates that the performance is excellent. Analysis of the TONS prototype flight software performance indicates that realtime onboard position accuracies of better than 25 meters root-mean-square are achievable with one tracking contact every one to two orbits for the EP/EUVE 525-kilometer altitude, 28.5 degree inclination orbit. The success of the TONS experiment demonstrates the flight readiness of TONS to support the EOS-AM1 mission.

  16. Establishing laboratory standards for biological flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B.; Moriarity, Debra M.

    1989-01-01

    The general objective of this research was to assess the effects of exposure to simulated microgravity on ultrastructural aspects of the contractile system in chicken skeletal muscle cells. This general objective had two specific experimental components: (1) the progression of changes in cell morphology, fusion, and patterns of contractile filament organization in muscle cell cultures grown in hollow fibers in the Clinostat were evaluated, with appropriate controls; (2) to initiate experiments in which muscle cells were grown on the surface of microcarrier beads. The ultimate objective of this second portion of the work is to determine if these beads can be rotated in a bioreactor and thereby obtain a more accurate approximation of the effects of simulated microgravity on differentiated muscle cells.

  17. ADEPT Sounding Rocket One (SR-1)Flight Experiment Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wercinski, Paul; Smith, B.; Yount, B.; Cassell, A.; Kruger, C.; Brivkalns, C.; Makino, A.; Duttta, S.; Ghassemieh, S.; Wu, S.; Battazzo, S.; Nishioka, O.; Venkatapathy, E.

    2017-01-01

    The SR-1 flight experiment will demonstrate most of the primary end-to-end mission stages including: launch in a stowed configuration, separation and deployment in exo-atmospheric conditions, and passive ballistic re-entry of a 70-degree half-angle faceted cone geometry.

  18. NASA/DOD Flight Experiments Technical Interchange Meeting Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the Flight Experiments Technical Interchange Meeting held in Monterey California, October 5-9, 1992. Technical sessions 4 through 8 addressing space structures, propulsion, space power systems, space environments and effects, and space operations are covered. Many of the papers are presented in outline and viewgraph form.

  19. The telescience experiment progamme TELEX for the Columbus Precursor Flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungius, C. B.; Limbourg, M. C.; Wittmann, K.; Bennett, E.

    1992-08-01

    The paper overviews the telescience experiment program TELEX developed by the Microgravity User Support Centre (MUSC) and the Belgium User Support and Operation Centre for missions such as Columbus Precursor Flights. TELEX will be used to develop, test, and demonstrate in a stepwise manner the Columbus laboratory operations concept. Special attention is given to the TELEX operations and implementation.

  20. Design, development, and fabrication of a prototype ice pack heat sink subsystem. Flight experiment physical phenomena experiment chest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.; Dean, W. C., II

    1975-01-01

    The concept of a flight experiment physical phenomena experiment chest, to be used eventually for investigating and demonstrating ice pack heat sink subsystem physical phenomena during a zero gravity flight experiment, is described.

  1. Protes Electrical Functional Chain: Flight Return Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresp, Jean-Michel; Boutelet, Eric; Massot, Jean; Tastet, Pierre

    2011-10-01

    November 11th. SMOS is a cooperative project between CNES, ESA and CDTI whose mission is to provide global maps of Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity. After a brief recall of the Proteus electrical chain presentation (already presented during ESPC 2005 in Stresa, Italy and ESPC 2008 in Konstanz, Germany), this paper will focus on the in-orbit return of experience performed for Jason1, Calipso, Corot, Jason2 and SMOS. The in-orbit EPS behavior, Solar Array & Battery ageing effect, the lessons learnt and potential evolutions for future missions will be approached.

  2. Development of flight experiments for remote measurement of pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keafer, L. S., Jr.; Kopia, L. P.

    1973-01-01

    The status as of February 1973 of several NASA-sponsored development projects is reported concerning flight experiments for remote measurement of pollution. Eight passive multispectral instruments for remotely sensing air and water pollutants are described, as well as two active (laser radar) measuring techniques. These techniques are expected to add some new dimensions to the remote sensing of water quality, oceanographic parameters, and earth resources. Multiple applications in these fields are generally possible. Successful completion of the flight demonstration tests and comparisons with simultaneously obtained surface truth measurements may establish these techniques as valid water quality monitoring tools.

  3. Transition Flight Experiments on a Swept Wing with Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.; Collier, F. S., Jr.; Montoya, L. C.; Putnam, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Flight boundary-layer transition experiments were conducted on a 30 degree swept wing with a perforated leading-edge suction panel. The transition location on the panel was changed by systematically varying the location and amount of suction. Transition from laminar to turbulent flow was due to leading-edge turbulence contamination or crossflow disturbance growth and/or Tollmien-Schlichting disturbance growth, depending on flight condition and suction variation. Amplification factor correlations with transition location were made for various suction configurations using a state-of-the-art linear stability theory which accounts for body and streamline curvature and compressibility.

  4. Transition flight experiments on a swept wing with suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.; Collier, F. S., Jr.; Montoya, L. C.; Putnam, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Flight boundary-layer transition experiments were conducted on a 30-degree swept wing with a perforated leading-edge suction panel. The transition location on the panel was changed by systematically varying the location and amount of suction. Transition from laminar to turbulent flow was due to leading-edge turbulence contamination or crossflow disturbance growth and/or Tollmien-Schlichting disturbance growth, depending on flight condition and suction variation. Amplification factor correlations with transition location were made for various suction configurations using a state-of-the-art linear stability theory which accounts for body and streamline curvature and compressibility.

  5. LDEF (Flight), AO038 : Interstellar Gas Experiment, Tray H09

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO038 : Interstellar Gas Experiment, Tray H09 The flight photograph of the Interstellar Gas Experiment was taken from the Orbiter aft flight deck during the LDEF retrieval. A very light contamination stain is present on the experiment tray flanges and on the most of the visible LDEF structure. The exception being a darker stain on the structure adjacent to thermal covers that provide venting for the LDEF interior. Both paint dots appear to be heavily coated with the brown contamination stain. The color of the white thermal control paint on the IGE has changed and now varies from off-white to a dark brown. The darker brown areas on the experiment baseplate, around the grid voltage cable connectors, appear to have come from contaminants flowing from inside the LDEF. A dark stain area can be seen on the lower half of the tray's right sidewall but a shadow hides most of the dark stain in the upper left corner of the tray. A lighter stain coats portions of the experiment baseplate and the outside of the canister housing. A beryllium copper collector foil is clearly visible in the lower left canister housing as are the baffles and reflected light from the fine wire mesh grid near the top of the canister housing. Due to an experi- ment system malfunction, the canister collector foils that are visible were exposed for the total mission.

  6. Space Shuttle Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment Ground Testing Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Karen T.; Anderson, Brian P.; Campbell, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    In support of the Boundary Layer Transition (BLT) Flight Experiment (FE) Project in which a manufactured protuberance tile was installed on the port wing of Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery for STS-119, STS- 128, STS-131 and STS-133 as well as Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour for STS-134, a significant ground test campaign was completed. The primary goals of the test campaign were to provide ground test data to support the planning and safety certification efforts required to fly the flight experiment as well as validation for the collected flight data. These test included Arcjet testing of the tile protuberance, aerothermal testing to determine the boundary layer transition behavior and resultant surface heating and planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) testing in order to gain a better understanding of the flow field characteristics associated with the flight experiment. This paper provides an overview of the BLT FE Project ground testing. High-level overviews of the facilities, models, test techniques and data are presented, along with a summary of the insights gained from each test.

  7. The Long Duration Flight of the TopHat Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, R.; Aguirre, J.; Bezaire, J.; Cheng, E.; Cordone, S.; Christensen, P. R.; Cottingham, D.; Crawford, T.; Fixsen, D.; Meyer, S. S.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    TopHat is a balloon-borne instrument designed to operate on the top of a balloon. From this location, the experiment could efficiently observe using a clean beam with extremely low sidelobes. The experiment was designed to scan a large portion of the sky directly above it and to map the anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMBR) and thermal emission from galactic dust. The instrument used a one meter class telescope with a five band single pixel radiometer spanning the frequency range from 150-600 GHz. The radiometer used bolometric detectors operating at approx. 250 mK. Here, we will report on the flight of the TopHat experiment over Antarctica in January, 2001 and describe the scientific goals, the operation, and in-flight performance.

  8. Canadian medical experiments on Shuttle Flight 41-G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watt, D. G. D.; Money, K. E.; Bondar, R. L.; Thirsk, R. B.; Garneau, M.

    1985-01-01

    During the 41-G mission, two payload specialist astronauts took part in six Canadian medical experiments designed to measure how the human nervous system adapts to weightlessness, and how this might contribute to space motion sickness. Similar tests conducted pre-flight provided base-line data, and post-flight experiments examined re-adaptation to the ground. No changes were detected in the vestibulo-ocular reflex during this 8-day mission. Pronounced proprioceptive illusions were experienced, especially immediately post-flight. Tactile acuity was normal in the fingers and toes, but the ability to judge limb position was degraded. Estimates of the locations of familiar targets were grossly distorted in the absence of vision. There were no differences in taste thresholds or olfaction. Despite pre-flight tests showing unusual susceptibility to motion sickness, the Canadian payload specialist turned out to be less susceptible than normal on-orbit. Re-adaptation to the normal gravity environment occurred within the first day after landing.

  9. Cryogenic Two-Phase Flight Experiment: Results overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, T.; Buchko, M.; Brennan, P.; Bello, M.; Stoyanof, M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper focuses on the flight results of the Cryogenic Two-Phase Flight Experiment (CRYOTP), which was a Hitchhiker based experiment that flew on the space shuttle Columbia in March of 1994 (STS-62). CRYOTP tested two new technologies for advanced cryogenic thermal control; the Space Heat Pipe (SHP), which was a constant conductance cryogenic heat pipe, and the Brilliant Eyes Thermal Storage Unit (BETSU), which was a cryogenic phase-change thermal storage device. These two devices were tested independently during the mission. Analysis of the flight data indicated that the SHP was unable to start in either of two attempts, for reasons related to the fluid charge, parasitic heat leaks, and cryocooler capacity. The BETSU test article was successfully operated with more than 250 hours of on-orbit testing including several cooldown cycles and 56 freeze/thaw cycles. Some degradation was observed with the five tactical cryocoolers used as thermal sinks, and one of the cryocoolers failed completely after 331 hours of operation. Post-flight analysis indicated that this problem was most likely due to failure of an electrical controller internal to the unit.

  10. Flight experience with lightweight, low-power miniaturized instrumentation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamory, Philip J.; Murray, James E.

    1993-01-01

    Engineers at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility (NASA-Dryden) have conducted two flight research programs with lightweight, low-power miniaturized instrumentation systems built around commercial data loggers. One program quantified the performance of a radio-controlled model airplane. The other program was a laminar boundary-layer transition experiment on a manned sailplane. NASA-Dryden personnel's flight experience with the miniaturized instrumentation systems used on these two programs is reported. The data loggers, the sensors, and the hardware and software developed to complete the systems are described. How the systems were used is described and the challenges encountered to make them work are covered. Examples of raw data and derived results are shown as well. Finally, future plans for these systems are discussed. For some flight research applications where miniaturized instrumentation is a requirement, the authors conclude that commercially available data loggers and sensors are viable alternatives. In fact, the data loggers and sensors make it possible to gather research-quality data in a timely and cost-effective manner.

  11. Flight experience with lightweight, low-power miniaturized instrumentation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamory, Philip J.; Murray, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Engineers at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility (NASA-Dryden) have conducted two flight research programs with lightweight, low-power miniaturized instrumentation systems built around commercial data loggers. One program quantified the performance of a radio-controlled model airplane. The other program was a laminar boundary-layer transition experiment on a manned sailplane. The purpose of this article is to report NASA-Dryden personnel's flight experience with the miniaturized instrumentation systems used on these two programs. This article will describe the data loggers, the sensors, and the hardware and software developed to complete the systems. It also describes how the systems were used and covers the challenges encountered to make them work. Examples of raw data and derived results will be shown as well. For some flight research applications where miniaturized instrumentation is a requirement, the authors conclude that commercially available data loggers and sensors are viable alternatives. In fact, the data loggers and sensors make it possible to gather research-quality data in a timely and cost-effective manner.

  12. Capillary pumped loop GAS and Hitchhiker flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, J.; Kroliczek, E. J.; Butler, D.; Schweickart, R. B.; Mcintosh, R.

    1986-01-01

    Flight experiments of a capillary pumped loop (CPL) aboard the Space Shuttle on both the Get Away Special (GAS) and Hitchhiker-G (H/H-G) carriers are described. These tests have shown that a two-phase heat transfer loop utilizing a wicking material as the system pumping mechanism can operate successfully in a zero-g environment. The CPL operating modes demonstrated were start-up, heat load sharing/natural priming, liquid inventory and temperature control via the reservoir, dryout recovery, and isolation of a single pump deprime. Also investigated were high and low power limits, and inlet subcooling requirements. In these CPL flight experiments, successful system operation was demonstrated at input power levels up to 560 watts and inlet subcooling below 2 C.

  13. Flight equipment supporting metabolic experiments on SLS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, Carolyn S.; Inners, L. D.

    1991-01-01

    Five experiments in different aspects of human metabolism will be performed on Spacelab Life Sciences-1. Nine items of equipment from the Life Sciences Laboratory Equipment inventory will be used: the rack-mounted centrifuge, the hematocrit centrifuge, the low-gravity centrifuge, a body-mass measurement device, a urine monitoring system, the Spacelab refrigerator/freezer, the Orbiter refrigerator, an in-flight blood collection system, and a pocket voice recorder. In addition, each experiment will require some specialized equipment such as incubators and culture blocks for an immunology experiment, and tracers for a fluid and electrolyte experiment and a hematology experiment. The equipment for these experiments has been developed over many years, in some cases since the Skylab program in the early 1970s, and has been certified for use on the Space Shuttle.

  14. LDEF (Flight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray G10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray G10 The flight/on-orbit photograph of the G10 experi ment tray was taken from the Orbiter aft flight deck during the LDEF retrieval. A light brown stain can be seen on the experiment tray flanges and to a lesser degree on the IDE Chemglaze Z tained their integrity. A light tan stain on the solar sensor base plate, located in the center of the tray, is more easily seen than that on the IDE mounting plate. Surface defects are highly visible due to the lighting conditions existing at the time the photograph was taken. The lighting angle is such that many impact craters can be seen. Two (2) detectors, located in the twenty (20) detector layout in the lower left corner of the tray, seem to have defects. A triangular shaped discoloration appears on the second detector from the left and in the second row from the bottom. Another irregular shaped discoloration can be seen on the fourth detector from the left and in the third row from the bottom. These discolorations appear to be due to material and/or fabrication defects and not reflected light. The blue colors on the detector's mirror like surface are caused by reflections of the LDEF surroundings.

  15. Electrolysis Performance Improvement Concept Study (EPICS) Flight Experiment-Reflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.

    1997-01-01

    The Electrolysis Performance Improvement Concept Study (EPICS) is a flight experiment to demonstrate and validate in a microgravity environment the Static Feed Electrolyzer (SFE) concept which was selected for the use aboard the International Space Station (ISS) for oxygen (O2) generation. It also is to investigate the impact of microgravity on electrochemical cell performance. Electrochemical cells are important to the space program because they provide an efficient means of generating O2 and hydrogen (H2) in space. Oxygen and H2 are essential not only for the survival of humans in space but also for the efficient and economical operation of various space systems. Electrochemical cells can reduce the mass, volume and logistical penalties associated with resupply and storage by generating and/or consuming these gases in space. An initial flight of the EPICS was conducted aboard STS-69 from September 7 to 8, 1995. A temperature sensor characteristics shift and a missing line of software code resulted in only partial success of this initial flight. Based on the review and recommendations of a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) review team a reflight activity was initiated to obtain the remaining desired results, not achieved during the initial flight.

  16. ITEL Experiment Module and its Flight on MASER9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löth, K.; Schneider, H.; Larsson, B.; Jansson, O.; Houltz, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The ITEL (Interfacial Turbulence in Evaporating Liquid) module is built under contract from the European Space Agency (ESA) and is scheduled to fly onboard a Sounding Rocket (MASER 9) in March 2002. The project is conducted by Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) with Lambda-X as a subcontractor responsible for the optical system. The Principle Investigator is Pierre Colinet from Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB). The experiment in ITEL on Maser 9 is part of a research program, which will make use of the International Space Station. The purpose of the flight on Maser 9 is to observe the cellular convection (Marangoni-Bénard instability) which arise when the surface tension varies with temperature yielding thermocapillary instabilities. During the 6 minutes of microgravity of the ITEL experiment, a highly volatile liquid layer (ethyl alcohol) will be evaporated, and the convection phenomena generated by the evaporation process will be visualized. Due to the cooling by latent heat consumption at the level of the evaporating free surface, a temperature gradient is induced perpendicularly to it. The flight experiment module contains one experiment cell, including a gas system for regulation of nitrogen flow over the evaporating surface and an injection unit that is used for injection of liquid into the cell both initially and during surface regulation. The experiment cell is equipped with pressure and flow sensors as well as thermocouples both inside the liquid and at different positions in the cell. Two optical diagnostic systems have been developed around the experiment cell. An interferometric optical tomograph measures the 3-dimensional distribution of temperature in the evaporating liquid and a Schlieren system visualizes the temperature gradients inside the liquid together with the liquid surface deformation. A PC/104 based electronic system is used for management and control of the experiment. The electronic system handles measurements, housekeeping, image

  17. Flight control system development and flight test experience with the F-111 mission adaptive wing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. R.

    1986-01-01

    The wing on the NASA F-111 transonic aircraft technology airplane was modified to provide flexible leading and trailing edge flaps. This wing is known as the mission adaptive wing (MAW) because aerodynamic efficiency can be maintained at all speeds. Unlike a conventional wing, the MAW has no spoilers, external flap hinges, or fairings to break the smooth contour. The leading edge flaps and three-segment trailing edge flaps are controlled by a redundant fly-by-wire control system that features a dual digital primary system architecture providing roll and symmetric commands to the MAW control surfaces. A segregated analog backup system is provided in the event of a primary system failure. This paper discusses the design, development, testing, qualification, and flight test experience of the MAW primary and backup flight control systems.

  18. Second Flight of the Zeno Experiment on USMP-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammon, Robert W.; Shaumeyer, J. N.; Briggs, Matthew E.; Boukari, Hacene; Gent, David; Wilkinson, R. Allen

    1998-01-01

    The second flight of the Zeno experiment in the USMP-3 flight has shown successful control of density perturbations near the window surfaces. These density changes were demonstrated to be arising from the rate of temperature change in the sample cell during the flight. These effects could be controlled by using decreasing ramp rates as Tc was approached. The cell window interference was carefully recorded to provide data about the phase of the interference close to the critical point and the effective window reflectivity. Correlograms were recorded from 500 mili K down to 2 mili K at 24 temperatures, 383 correlograms in all. The efforts to get closer were prevented by a long (greater than two week time constant) decay of a 1.3% density error caused by local heating from the 17 micro W laser beam. The phase boundary was located with unprecedented precision of +/- 2O micro K. The complete experiment sequence was done with ground commanding and uploaded script files, bypassing the original autonomous-mode program sequence.

  19. Flight Performance of the Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillman, Robert; DiNonno, John; Bodkin, Richard; Gsell, Valerie; Miller, Nathanael; Olds, Aaron; Bruce, Walter

    2013-01-01

    The Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment 3 (IRVE-3) launched July 23, 2012, from NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) on a Black Brant XI suborbital sounding rocket and successfully performed its mission, demonstrating the survivability of a hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerator (HIAD) in the reentry heating environment and also illustrating the effect of an offset center of gravity on the HIAD's lift-to-drag ratio. IRVE-3 was a follow-on to 2009's IRVE-II mission, which demonstrated exo-atmospheric inflation, reentry survivability - without significant heating - and the aerodynamic stability of a HIAD down to subsonic flight conditions. NASA Langley Research Center is leading the development of HIAD technology for use on future interplanetary and Earth reentry missions.

  20. Transition Flight Experiments on a Swept Wing With Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.; Collier, F. S., Jr.; Montoya, L. C.; Land, C. K.

    1989-01-01

    Flight experiments were conducted on a 30 degree swept wing with a perforated leading edge by systematically varying the location and amount of suction over a range of Mach number and Reynolds number. Suction was varied chordwise ahead of the front spar from either the front or rear direction by sealing spanwise perforated strips. Transition from laminar to turbulent flow was due to leading edge turbulence contamination or crossflow disturbance growth and/or Tollmien-Schlichting disturbance growth-depending on the test configuration, flight condition, and suction location. A state-of-the-art linear stability theory which accounts for body and streamline curvature and compressibility was used to study the boundary layer stability as suction location and magnitude varied. N-factor correlations with transition location were made for various suction configurations.

  1. Transition flight experiments on a swept wing with suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.; Land, C. K.; Collier, F. S.; Montoya, L. C.

    1989-01-01

    Flight experiments were conducted on a 30 degree swept wing with a perforated leading edge by systematically varying the location and amount of suction over a range of Mach number and Reynolds number. Suction was varied chordwise ahead of the front spar from either the front or rear direction by sealing spanwise perforated strips. Transition from laminar to turbulent flow was due to leading edge turbulence contamination or crossflow disturbance growth and/or Tollmien-Schlichting disturbance growth, depending on the test configuration, flight condition, and suction location. A state-of-the-art linear stability theory which accounts for body and streamline curvature and compressibility was used to study the boundary layer stability as suction location and magnitude varied. N-factor correlations with transition location were made for various suction configurations.

  2. Shuttle Orbiter Environmental Control and Life Support System - Flight experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, H. E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the overall design of the Shuttle Orbiter Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS). The Orbiter ECLSS consists of six major subsystems which accomplish the functions of providing a habitable pressurized cabin atmosphere and removing gaseous contaminants, controlling the temperature of the cabin and vehicle components within acceptable ranges, providing fire detection and suppression capability, maintaining a supply of potable water, collecting and removing metabolic waste materials, and providing utilities and access for extravehicular activity. The operational experience is summarized for the 45 space flights accomplished to date during which the Orbiter ECLSS has been demonstrated to perform reliably, and has proved to have the flexibility to meet a variety of mission needs. Significant flight problems are described, along with the design or procedure changes which were implemented to resolve the problems.

  3. Sodium-sulfur battery flight experiment definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Rebecca; Minck, Robert

    1989-01-01

    NaS batteries have been identified as the most likely successor to space Ni-H2 or Ni-Cd batteries, primarily due to a mass reduction by a factor 2 to 3 over Ni-H2 and by a factor of 4 over Ni-Cd. This yields major launch cost reductions or payload mass improvements. NaS batteries support NASA OAST's proposed Civil Space Technology Initiative goal of a factor of two improvement in spacecraft 2000 initiative. Since Ni-H2 and Ni-Cd batteries have been space flight proven, it is essential to have the flight experiment to establish a national space technology base to demonstrate the operation of the NaS battery for space applications.

  4. Disruption Tolerant Networking Flight Validation Experiment on NASA's EPOXI Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Jay; Burleigh, Scott; Jones, Ross; Torgerson, Leigh; Wissler, Steve

    2009-01-01

    In October and November of 2008, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory installed and tested essential elements of Delay/Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN) technology on the Deep Impact spacecraft. This experiment, called Deep Impact Network Experiment (DINET), was performed in close cooperation with the EPOXI project which has responsibility for the spacecraft. During DINET some 300 images were transmitted from the JPL nodes to the spacecraft. Then they were automatically forwarded from the spacecraft back to the JPL nodes, exercising DTN's bundle origination, transmission, acquisition, dynamic route computation, congestion control, prioritization, custody transfer, and automatic retransmission procedures, both on the spacecraft and on the ground, over a period of 27 days. All transmitted bundles were successfully received, without corruption. The DINET experiment demonstrated DTN readiness for operational use in space missions. This activity was part of a larger NASA space DTN development program to mature DTN to flight readiness for a wide variety of mission types by the end of 2011. This paper describes the DTN protocols, the flight demo implementation, validation metrics which were created for the experiment, and validation results.

  5. HIAD on ULA (HULA) Orbital Reentry Flight Experiment Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinonno, J. M.; Cheatwood, F. M.; Hughes, S. J.; Ragab, M. M.; Dillman, R. A.; Bodkin, R. J.; Zumwalt, C. H.; Johnson, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    heritage design compressed gas system to minimize development costs. The data will be captured to both an onboard recorder and a recorder that is jettisoned and recovered separately from the reentry vehicle to mitigate risk. This paper provides an overview, including the architecture and flight concept of operations, for the proposed HULA flight experiment.

  6. Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-8 mission flight experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noonan, C. H.; Mcintosh, R. J.; Rowe, J. N.; Defazio, R. L.; Galal, K. F.

    1995-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-8 spacecraft was launched on April 13, 1994, at 06:04:02 coordinated universal time (UTC), with separation from the Atlas-Centaur launch vehicle occurring at 06:33:05 UTC. The launch was followed by a series of complex, intense operations to maneuver the spacecraft into its geosynchronous mission orbit. The Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) of the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) was responsible for GOES-8 attitude, orbit maneuver, orbit determination, and station acquisition support during the ascent phase. This paper summarizes the efforts of the FDF support teams and highlights some of the unique challenges the launch team faced during critical GOES-8 mission support. FDF operations experience discussed includes: (1) The abort of apogee maneuver firing-1 (AMF-1), cancellation of AMF-3, and the subsequent replans of the maneuver profile; (2) The unexpectedly large temperature dependence of the digital integrating rate assembly (DIRA) and its effect on GOES-8 attitude targeting in support of perigee raising maneuvers; (3) The significant effect of attitude control thrusting on GOES-8 orbit determination solutions; (4) Adjustment of the trim tab to minimize torque due to solar radiation pressure; and (5) Postlaunch analysis performed to estimate the GOES-8 separation attitude. The paper also discusses some key FDF GOES-8 lessons learned to be considered for the GOES-J launch which is currently scheduled for May 19, 1995.

  7. Transition Analysis for the HIFiRE-1 Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Kimmel, Roger; Adamczak, David; Smith, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    The HIFiRE-1 flight experiment provided a valuable database pertaining to boundary layer transition over a 7-degree half-angle, circular cone model from supersonic to hypersonic Mach numbers, and a range of Reynolds numbers and angles of incidence. This paper reports the initial findings from the ongoing computational analysis pertaining to the measured in-flight transition behavior. Transition during the ascent phase at nearly zero degree angle of attack is dominated by second mode instabilities except in the vicinity of the cone meridian where a roughness element was placed midway along the length of the cone. The first mode instabilities were found to be weak at all trajectory points analyzed from the ascent phase. For times less than approximately 18.5 seconds into the flight, the peak amplification ratio for second mode disturbances is sufficiently small because of the lower Mach numbers at earlier times, so that the transition behavior inferred from the measurements is attributed to an unknown physical mechanism, potentially related to step discontinuities in surface height near the locations of a change in the surface material. Based on the time histories of temperature and/or heat flux at transducer locations within the aft portion of the cone, the onset of transition correlated with a linear PSE N-factor of approximately 14.

  8. 78 FR 66261 - Certified Flight Instructor Flight Reviews; Recent Pilot in Command Experience; Airmen Online...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... a practical test for issuance of a flight instructor certificate, a practical test for the addition of a rating to a flight instructor certificate, a practical test for renewal of a flight instructor certificate, or a practical test for the reinstatement of a flight instructor certificate to meet the...

  9. Aerodynamics of ski jumping flight and its control: I. Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Daehan; Bang, Kyeongtae; Kim, Heesu; Ahn, Eunhye; Choi, Haecheon

    2015-11-01

    In a ski jumping competition, it is essential to analyze the effect of various posture parameters of a ski jumper to achieve a longer flight distance. For this purpose, we construct a model of a ski jumper by using three-dimensional surface data obtained by scanning a ski jumper's body (Mr. Chil-Ku Kang, member of the Korean national team). An experiment on this model is conducted in a wind tunnel. We consider four posture parameters (forward leaning angle, ski opening angle, ski rolling angle, and ski spacing) and measure the drag and lift forces for various flight postures at various angles of attack (α = 0° - 40°) and Reynolds numbers (Re = 5.4 × 105 - 1.6 × 106) based on the length of the jump ski. Then, we derive optimum values of posture parameters for maximum lift-to-drag ratio using a response surface method. We also conduct a full-scale wind tunnel experiment with members of the Korean national team and confirm the results obtained from the experiment on the model. Supported by the NRF program (2014M3C1B1033848).

  10. Flight Experiment Demonstration System (FEDS) functional description and interface document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, R. C.; Shank, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    This document presents a functional description of the Flight Experiment Demonstration System (FEDS) and of interfaces between FEDS and external hardware and software. FEDS is a modification of the Automated Orbit Determination System (AODS). FEDS has been developed to support a ground demonstration of microprocessor-based onboard orbit determination. This document provides an overview of the structure and logic of FEDS and details the various operational procedures to build and execute FEDS. It also documents a microprocessor interface between FEDS and a TDRSS user transponder and describes a software simulator of the interface used in the development and system testing of FEDS.

  11. Minimum fuel coplanar aeroassisted orbital transfer using collocation and nonlinear programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Yun Yuan; Young, D. H.

    1991-01-01

    The fuel optimal control problem arising in coplanar orbital transfer employing aeroassisted technology is addressed. The mission involves the transfer from high energy orbit (HEO) to low energy orbit (LEO) without plane change. The basic approach here is to employ a combination of propulsive maneuvers in space and aerodynamic maneuvers in the atmosphere. The basic sequence of events for the coplanar aeroassisted HEO to LEO orbit transfer consists of three phases. In the first phase, the transfer begins with a deorbit impulse at HEO which injects the vehicle into a elliptic transfer orbit with perigee inside the atmosphere. In the second phase, the vehicle is optimally controlled by lift and drag modulation to satisfy heating constraints and to exit the atmosphere with the desired flight path angle and velocity so that the apogee of the exit orbit is the altitude of the desired LEO. Finally, the second impulse is required to circularize the orbit at LEO. The performance index is maximum final mass. Simulation results show that the coplanar aerocapture is quite different from the case where orbital plane changes are made inside the atmosphere. In the latter case, the vehicle has to penetrate deeper into the atmosphere to perform the desired orbital plane change. For the coplanar case, the vehicle needs only to penetrate the atmosphere deep enough to reduce the exit velocity so the vehicle can be captured at the desired LEO. The peak heating rates are lower and the entry corridor is wider. From the thermal protection point of view, the coplanar transfer may be desirable. Parametric studies also show the maximum peak heating rates and the entry corridor width are functions of maximum lift coefficient. The problem is solved using a direct optimization technique which uses piecewise polynomial representation for the states and controls and collocation to represent the differential equations. This converts the optimal control problem into a nonlinear programming problem

  12. Performance of active vibration control technology: the ACTEX flight experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nye, T. W.; Manning, R. A.; Qassim, K.

    1999-12-01

    This paper discusses the development and results of two intelligent structures space-flight experiments, each of which could affect architecture designs of future spacecraft. The first, the advanced controls technology experiment I (ACTEX I), is a variable stiffness tripod structure riding as a secondary payload on a classified spacecraft. It has been operating well past its expected life since becoming operational in 1996. Over 60 on-orbit experiments have been run on the ACTEX I flight experiment. These experiments form the basis for in-space controller design problems and for concluding lifetime/reliability data on the active control components. Transfer functions taken during the life of ACTEX I have shown consistent predictability and stability in structural behavior, including consistency with those measurements taken on the ground prior to a three year storage period and the launch event. ACTEX I can change its modal characteristics by employing its dynamic change mechanism that varies preloads in portions of its structure. Active control experiments have demonstrated maximum vibration reductions of 29 dB and 16 dB in the first two variable modes of the system, while operating over a remarkable on-orbit temperature range of -80 °C to 129 °C. The second experiment, ACTEX II, was successfully designed, ground-tested, and integrated on an experimental Department of Defense satellite prior to its loss during a launch vehicle failure in 1995. ACTEX II also had variable modal behavior by virtue of a two-axis gimbal and added challenges of structural flexibility by being a large deployable appendage. Although the loss of ACTEX II did not provide space environment experience, ground testing resulted in space qualifying the hardware and demonstrated 21 dB, 14 dB, and 8 dB reductions in amplitude of the first three primary structural modes. ACTEX II could use either active and/or passive techniques to affect vibration suppression. Both experiments trailblazed

  13. Planetary/DOD entry technology flight experiments. Volume 2: Planetary entry flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, H. E.; Krieger, R. J.; Mcneilly, W. R.; Vetter, H. C.

    1976-01-01

    The technical feasibility of launching a high speed, earth entry vehicle from the space shuttle to advance technology for the exploration of the outer planets' atmospheres was established. Disciplines of thermodynamics, orbital mechanics, aerodynamics propulsion, structures, design, electronics and system integration focused on the goal of producing outer planet environments on a probe shaped vehicle during an earth entry. Major aspects of analysis and vehicle design studied include: planetary environments, earth entry environment capability, mission maneuvers, capabilities of shuttle upper stages, a comparison of earth entry planetary environments, experiment design and vehicle design.

  14. Flight test experience with pilot-induced-oscillation suppression filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, M. F.; Smith, R. E.; Stewart, J. F.; Bailey, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Digital flight control systems are popular for their flexibility, reliability, and power; however, their use sometimes results in deficient handling qualities, including pilot-induced oscillation (PIO), which can require extensive redesign of the control system. When redesign is not immediately possible, temporary solutions, such as the PIO suppression (PIOS) filter developed for the Space Shuttle, have been proposed. To determine the effectiveness of such PIOS filters on more conventional, high-performance aircraft, three experiments were performed using the NASA F-8 digital fly-by-wire and USAF/Calspan NT-33 variable-stability aircraft. Two types of PIOS filters were evaluated, using high-gain, precision tasks (close formation, probe-and-drogue refueling, and precision touch-and-go landing) with a time delay or a first-order lag added to make the aircraft prone to PIO. Various configurations of the PIOS filter were evaluated in the flight programs, and most of the PIOS filter configurations reduced the occurrence of PIOs and improved the handling qualities of the PIO-prone aircraft. These experiments also confirmed the influence of high-gain tasks and excessive control system time delay in evoking pilot-induced oscillations.

  15. Preparing normal tissue cells for space flight experiments.

    PubMed

    Koch, Claudia; Kohn, Florian P M; Bauer, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Deterioration of health is a problem in modern space flight business. In order to develop countermeasures, research has been done on human bodies and also on single cells. Relevant experiments on human cells in vitro are feasible when microgravity is simulated by devices such as the Random Positioning Machine or generated for a short time during parabolic flights. However, they become difficult in regard to performance and interpretation when long-term experiments are designed that need a prolonged stay on the International Space Station (ISS). One huge problem is the transport of living cells from a laboratory on Earth to the ISS. For this reason, mainly rapidly growing, rather robust human cells such as cancer cells, embryonic cells, or progenitor cells have been investigated on the ISS up to now. Moreover, better knowledge on the behavior of normal mature cells, which mimic the in vivo situation, is strongly desirable. One solution to the problem could be the use of redifferentiable cells, which grow rapidly and behave like cancer cells in plain medium, but are reprogrammed to normal cells when substances like retinoic acid are added. A list of cells capable of redifferentiation is provided, together with names of suitable drugs, in this review.

  16. Bacterial plasmid transfer under space flight conditions: The Mobilisatsia experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boever, P.; Ilyin, V.; Mahillon, J.; Mergeay, M.

    Background Microorganisms are subject to a genetic evolution which may lead to the capacity to colonize new environments and to cause infections Central players in this evolutionary process are mobile genetic elements phages plasmids and transposons The latter help to mobilize and reorganize genes be it within a given genome intragenomic mobility or between bacterial cells intercellular mobility Confined environment and space flight related factors such as microgravity and cosmic radiation may influence the frequency with which mobile genetic elements are exchanged between microorganisms Aim Within the frame of the Mobilisatsia experiment a triparental microbial plasmid transfer was promoted aboard the International Space Station ISS The efficiency of the plasmid exchange process was compared with a synchronously performed ground control experiment An experiment was carried out with well-characterized Gram-negative test strains and one experiment was done with Gram-positive test strains Results The experiment took place during the Soyouz Mission 8 to the ISS from April 19th until April 30th 2004 Liquid cultures of the bacterial strains Cupriavidus metallidurans AE815 final recipient Escherichia coli CM1962 carrying a mobilisable vector with a nickel-resistance marker and E coli CM140 carrying the Broad Host Range plasmid RP4 for the Gram-negative experiment and Bacillus thuringiensis Bti AND931 carrying the conjugative plasmid pXO16 Bti 4Q7 with mobilisable vector pC194 carrying a resistance to chloramphenicol and Bti GBJ002

  17. Ion beam plume and efflux characterization flight experiment study. [space shuttle payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.; Zafran, S.; Cole, A.; Rosiak, G.; Komatsu, G. K.

    1977-01-01

    A flight experiment and flight experiment package for a shuttle-borne flight test of an 8-cm mercury ion thruster was designed to obtain charged particle and neutral particle material transport data that cannot be obtained in conventional ground based laboratory testing facilities. By the use of both ground and space testing of ion thrusters, the flight worthiness of these ion thrusters, for other spacecraft applications, may be demonstrated. The flight experiment definition for the ion thruster initially defined a broadly ranging series of flight experiments and flight test sensors. From this larger test series and sensor list, an initial flight test configuration was selected with measurements in charged particle material transport, condensible neutral material transport, thruster internal erosion, ion beam neutralization, and ion thrust beam/space plasma electrical equilibration. These measurement areas may all be examined for a seven day shuttle sortie mission and for available test time in the 50 - 100 hour period.

  18. A flight experiment to determine GPS photochemical contamination accumulation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tribble, A. C.; Haffner, J. W.

    1990-01-01

    It was recently suggested that photochemically deposited contamination, originating from volatiles outgassed by a spacecraft, may be responsible for the anomalous degradation in power seen on the GPS Block 1 vehicles. In an attempt to confirm, or deny, the photochemical deposition rates predicted, a study was undertaken to design a flight experiment to be incorporated on the GPS vehicles currently in production. The objective was to develop an inexpensive, light weight instrument package that would give information on the contamination levels within a few months of launch. Three types of apparatus were studied, Quartz Crystal Microbalances, (QCM's), modified solar cells, and calorimeters. A calorimeter was selected due primarily to its impact on the production schedule of the GPS vehicles. An analysis of the sensitivity of the final design is compared to the predicted contamination accumulation rates in order to determine how long after launch it will take the experiment to show the effects of photochemical contamination.

  19. Results of the REFLEX (Return Flux Experiment) Flight Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, R. O. (Compiler); Mauersberger, Konrad; Johnson, Bradford W.; Manning, Heidi K.

    1997-01-01

    The numerous problems occurring in this first flight of the REFLEX experiment, both in the spacecraft and with the instrument package, seriously constrained the acquisition and analysis of data and severely limited the interpretation of the data that were obtained. Of these, the ambient helium measurements appear to be the most promising. They are summarized and discussed in Appendix A. Further analyses could be attempted to establish the correct values for the energy centers as they varied during the mission. In addition, an extensive laboratory recalibration on a high-speed beam system could in principle provide corrections to be used in analyzing and interpreting the returned data set. The unknown malfunction which generated the energy drift needs to be understood and corrected before the REFLEX experiment is reflown; some hardware modification, or at least retuning, is likely to be required.

  20. MISSE Thermal Control Materials with Comparison to Previous Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, Miria; Pippin, H. Gary; Frey, George

    2008-01-01

    Many different passive thermal control materials were flown as part of the Materials on International Space Station Experiment (MISSE), including inorganic coatings, anodized aluminum, and multi-layer insulation materials. These and other material samples were exposed to the low Earth orbital environment of atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, and hard vacuum, though atomic oxygen exposure was limited for some samples. Materials flown on MISSE-1 and MISSE-2 were exposed to the space environment for nearly four years. Materials flown on MISSE-3, MISSE-4, and MISSE-5 were exposed to the space environment for one year. Solar absorptance, infrared emittance, and mass measurements indicate the durability of these materials to withstand the space environment. Effects of short duration versus long duration exposure on ISS are explored, as well as comparable data from previous flight experiments, such as the Passive Optical Sample Assembly (POSA), Optical Properties Monitor (OPM), and Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF).

  1. Data link air traffic control and flight deck environments: Experiment in flight crew performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lozito, Sandy; Mcgann, Alison; Corker, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    This report describes an experiment undertaken in a full mission simulation environment to investigate the performance impact of, and human/system response to, data-linked Air Traffic Control (ATC) and automated flight deck operations. Subjects were twenty pilots (ten crews) from a major United States air carrier. Crews flew the Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator (ACFS), a generic 'glass cockpit' simulator at NASA Ames. The method of data link used was similar to the data link implementation plans for a next-generation aircraft, and included the capability to review ATC messages and directly enter ATC clearance information into the aircraft systems. Each crew flew experimental scenarios, in which data reflecting communication timing, errors and clarifications, and procedures were collected. Results for errors and clarifications revealed an interaction between communication modality (voice v. data link) and communication type (air/ground v. intracrew). Results also revealed that voice crews initiated ATC contact significantly more than data link crews. It was also found that data link crews performed significantly more extraneous activities during the communication task than voice crews. Descriptive data from the use of the review menu indicate the pilot-not-flying accessing the review menu most often, and also suggest diffulty in accessing the target message within the review menu structure. The overall impact of communication modality upon air/ground communication and crew procedures is discussed.

  2. Science objectives and performance of a radiometer and window design for atmospheric entry experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roger A.; Davy, William C.; Whiting, Ellis E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the techniques developed for measuring stagnation-point radiation in NASA's cancelled Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE). It specifies the need for such a measurement; the types and requirements for the needed instruments; the Radiative Heating Experiment (RHE) developed for the AFE; the requirements, design parameters, and performance of the window developed for the RHE; the procedures and summary of the technique; and results of the arc-jet wind tunnel experiment conducted to demonstrate the overall concept. Subjects emphasized are the commercial implications of the knowledge to be gained by this experiment in connection with the Aeroassisted Space Transfer Vehicle (ASTV), the nonequilibrium nature of the radiation, concerns over the contribution of vacuum-ultraviolet radiation to the overall radiation, and the limit on the flight environment of the vehicle imposed by the limitations on the window material. Results show that a technique exists with which the stagnation-point radiation can be measured in flight in an environment of interest to commercial ASTV applications.

  3. United States Airline Transport Pilot International Flight Language Experiences, Report 2: Word Meaning and Pronunciation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Europe everything above 5,000 or 6,000 or whatever is reported in flight level, for example, “flight level five zero.” In a romance language ...United States Airline Transport Pilot International Flight Language Experiences Report 2: Word Meaning and Pronunciation DOT/FAA/AM-10/7 Office of...International Flight Language Experiences Report 2: Word Meaning and Pronunciation 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s) 8. Performing

  4. On-orbit flight results from the reconfigurable cibola flight experiment satellite (CFEsat)

    SciTech Connect

    Caffrey, Michael; Morgan, Keith; Roussel-dupre, Diane; Robinson, Scott; Nelson, Anthony; Salazar, Anthony; Wirthlin, Michael; Howes, William; Richins, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The Cibola Flight Experiment (CFE) is an experimental small satellite developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to demonstrate the feasibility of using FPGA-based reconfigurable computing for sensor processing in a space environment. The CFE satellite was launched on March 8, 2007 in low-earth orbit and has operated extremely well since its deployment. The nine Xilinx Virtex FPGAs used in the payload have been used for several high-throughput sensor processing applications and for single-event upset (SEU) monitoring and mitigation. This paper will describe the CFE system and summarize its operational results. In addition, this paper will describe the results from several SEU detection circuits that were performed on the spacecraft.

  5. Apollo experience report: Development flight instrumentation. [telemetry equipment for space flight test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, N. B.

    1974-01-01

    Development flight instrumentation was delivered for 25 Apollo vehicles as Government-furnished equipment. The problems and philosophies of an activity that was concerned with supplying telemetry equipment to a space-flight test program are discussed. Equipment delivery dates, system-design details, and flight-performance information for each mission also are included.

  6. Avoiding Human Error in Mission Operations: Cassini Flight Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burk, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Operating spacecraft is a never-ending challenge and the risk of human error is ever- present. Many missions have been significantly affected by human error on the part of ground controllers. The Cassini mission at Saturn has not been immune to human error, but Cassini operations engineers use tools and follow processes that find and correct most human errors before they reach the spacecraft. What is needed are skilled engineers with good technical knowledge, good interpersonal communications, quality ground software, regular peer reviews, up-to-date procedures, as well as careful attention to detail and the discipline to test and verify all commands that will be sent to the spacecraft. Two areas of special concern are changes to flight software and response to in-flight anomalies. The Cassini team has a lot of practical experience in all these areas and they have found that well-trained engineers with good tools who follow clear procedures can catch most errors before they get into command sequences to be sent to the spacecraft. Finally, having a robust and fault-tolerant spacecraft that allows ground controllers excellent visibility of its condition is the most important way to ensure human error does not compromise the mission.

  7. Fundamental Mixing and Combustion Experiments for Propelled Hypersonic Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, A. D.; Diskin, G. S.; Danehy, P. M.; Drummond, J. P.

    2002-01-01

    Two experiments have been conducted to acquire data for the validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes used in the design of supersonic combustors. The first experiment is a study of a supersonic coaxial jet into stagnant air in which the center jet is of a light gas, the coflow jet is of air, and the mixing layer between them is compressible. The jet flow field is characterized using schlieren imaging, surveys with Pitot, total temperature and gas sampling probes, and RELIEF velocimetry. VULCAN, a structured grid CFD code, is used to solve for the nozzle and jet flow. The second experiment is a study of a supersonic combustor consisting of a diverging duct with single downstream-angled wall injector. Entrance Mach number is 2 and enthalpy is nominally that of Mach 7 flight. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) has been used to obtain nitrogen temperature in planes of the flow, and surface pressures and temperatures have also been acquired. Modern-design-of-experiment techniques have been used to maximize the quality of the data set.

  8. The Dynamics of Miscible Fluids: A Space Flight Experiment (MIDAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxworthy, T.; Meiburg, E.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Rashidnia, N.; Lauver, R.

    2001-01-01

    We propose a space flight experiment to study the dynamics of miscible interfaces. A less viscous fluid displaces one of higher viscosity within a tube. The two fluids are miscible in all proportions. An intruding "finger" forms that occupies a fraction of the tube. As time progresses diffusion at the interface combined with flow induced straining between the two fluids modifies the concentration and velocity distributions within the whole tube. Also, under such circumstances it has been proposed that the interfacial stresses could depend on the local concentration gradients (Korteweg stresses) and that the divergence of the velocity need not be zero, even though the flow is incompressible. We have obtained reasonable agreement for the tip velocity between numerical simulations (that ignored the Korteweg stress and divergence effects) and physical experiments only at high Peelet Numbers. However at moderate to low Pe agreement was poor. As one possibility we attributed this lack of agreement to the disregard of these effects. We propose a space experiment to measure the finger shape, tip velocity, and the velocity and concentration fields. From intercomparisons between the experiment and the calculations we can then extract values for the coefficients of the Korteweg stress terms and confirm or deny the importance of these stresses.

  9. Flight software development for the isothermal dendritic growth experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinson, Laurie H.; Winsa, Edward A.; Glicksman, Martin E.

    1989-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is a microgravity materials science experiment scheduled to fly in the cargo bay of the shuttle on the United States Microgravity Payload (USMP) carrier. The experiment will be operated by real-time control software which will not only monitor and control onboard experiment hardware, but will also communicate, via downlink data and uplink commands, with the Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The software development approach being used to implement this system began with software functional requirements specification. This was accomplished using the Yourdon/DeMarco methodology as supplemented by the Ward/Mellor real-time extensions. The requirements specification in combination with software prototyping was then used to generate a detailed design consisting of structure charts, module prologues, and Program Design Language (PDL) specifications. This detailed design will next be used to code the software, followed finally by testing against the functional requirements. The result will be a modular real-time control software system with traceability through every phase of the development process.

  10. The Dynamics of Miscible Fluids: A Space Flight Experiment (MIDAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxworthy, T.; Meiburg, E.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Rashidnia, N.; Lauver, R.

    2001-01-01

    We propose a space flight experiment to study the dynamics of miscible interfaces. A less viscous fluid displaces one of higher viscosity within a tube. The two fluids are miscible in all proportions. An intruding "finger" forms that occupies a fraction of the tube. As time progresses diffusion at the interface combined with flow induced straining between the two fluids modifies the concentration and velocity distributions within the whole tube. Also, under such circumstances it has been proposed that the interfacial stresses could depend on the local concentration gradients (Korteweg stresses) and that the divergence of the velocity need not be zero, even though the flow is incompressible. We have obtained reasonable agreement for the tip velocity between numerical simulations (that ignored the Korteweg stress and divergence effects) and physical experiments only at high Peclet Numbers. However at moderate to low Pe agreement was poor. As one possibility we attributed this lack of agreement to the disregard of these effects. We propose a space experiment to measure the finger shape, tip velocity, and the velocity and concentration fields. From intercomparisons between the experiment and the calculations we can then extract values for the coefficients of the Korteweg stress terms and confirm or deny the importance of these stresses.

  11. Pulmonary Function in Flight (PuFF) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In this International Space Station (ISS) onboard photo, Expedition Six Science Officer Donald R. Pettit works to set up the Pulmonary Function in Flight (PuFF) experiment hardware in the Destiny Laboratory. Expedition Six is the fourth and final crew to perform the PuFF experiment. The PuFF experiment was developed to better understand what effects long term exposure to microgravity may have on the lungs. The focus is on measuring changes in the everness of gas exchange in the lungs, and on detecting changes in respiratory muscle strength. It allows astronauts to measure blood flow through the lungs, the ability of the lung to take up oxygen, and lung volumes. Each PuFF session includes five lung function tests, which involve breathing only cabin air. For each planned extravehicular (EVA) activity, a crew member performs a PuFF test within one week prior to the EVA. Following the EVA, those crew members perform another test to document the effect of exposure of the lungs to the low-pressure environment of the space suits. This experiment utilizes the Gas Analyzer System for Metabolic Analysis Physiology, or GASMAP, located in the Human Research Facility (HRF), along with a variety of other Puff equipment including a manual breathing valve, flow meter, pressure-flow module, pressure and volume calibration syringes, and disposable mouth pieces.

  12. Surface, Water, and Air Biocharacterization (SWAB) Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, V. A.; Ott, C. M.; Pierson, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    The determination of risk from infectious disease during spaceflight missions is composed of several factors including both the concentration and characteristics of the microorganisms to which the crew are exposed. Thus, having a good understanding of the microbial ecology aboard spacecraft provides the necessary information to mitigate health risks to the crew. While preventive measures are taken to minimize the presence of pathogens on spacecraft, medically significant organisms have been isolated from both the Mir and International Space Station (ISS). Historically, the method for isolation and identification of microorganisms from spacecraft environmental samples depended upon their growth on culture media. Unfortunately, only a fraction of the organisms may grow on a specific culture medium, potentially omitting those microorganisms whose nutritional and physical requirements for growth are not met. To address this bias in our understanding of the ISS environment, the Surface, Water, and Air Biocharacterization (SWAB) Flight Experiment was designed to investigate and develop monitoring technology to provide better microbial characterization. For the SWAB flight experiment, we hypothesized that environmental analysis using non-culture-based technologies would reveal microorganisms, allergens, and microbial toxins not previously reported in spacecraft, allowing for a more complete health assessment. Key findings during this experiment included: a) Generally, advanced molecular techniques were able to reveal a few organisms not recovered using culture-based methods; however, there is no indication that current monitoring is "missing" any medically significant bacteria or fungi. b) Molecular techniques have tremendous potential for microbial monitoring, however, sample preparation and data analysis present challenges for spaceflight hardware. c) Analytical results indicate that some molecular techniques, such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), can

  13. Apollo experience report: Flight planning for manned space operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneill, J. W.; Cotter, J. B.; Holloway, T. W.

    1972-01-01

    The history of flight planning for manned space missions is outlined, and descriptions and examples of the various evolutionary phases of flight data documents from Project Mercury to the Apollo Program are included. Emphasis is given to the Apollo flight plan. Time line format and content are discussed in relationship to the manner in which they are affected by the types of flight plans and various constraints.

  14. Spacecraft and mission design for the SP-100 flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deininger, William D.; Vondra, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    The design and performance of a spacecraft employing arcjet nuclear electric propulsion, suitable for use in the SP-100 Space Reactor Power System (SRPS) Flight Experiment, are outlined. The vehicle design is based on a 93 kW(e) ammonia arcjet system operating at an experimentally measured specific impulse of 1031 s and an efficiency of 42.3 percent. The arcjet/gimbal assemblies, power conditioning subsystem, propellant feed system, propulsion system thermal control, spacecraft diagnostic instrumentation, and the telemetry requirements are described. A 100 kW(e) SRPS is assumed. The spacecraft mass is baselined at 5675 kg excluding the propellant and propellant feed system. Four mission scenarios are described which are capable of demonstrating the full capability of the SRPS. The missions considered include spacecraft deployment to possible surveillance platform orbits, a spacecraft storage mission, and an orbit raising round trip corresponding to possible orbit transfer vehicle (OTV) missions.

  15. Sodium-sulfur battery flight experiment definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Rebecca; Minck, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Sodium-sulfur batteries are considered to be one of the most likely battery systems for space applications. Compared with the Ni-H2 or Ni-Co battery systems, Na-S batteries offer a mass reduction by a factor of 2 to 4, representing significant launch cost savings or increased payload mass capabilities. The Na-S battery operates at between 300 and 400 C, using liquid sodium and sulfur/polysulfide electrodes and solid ceramic electrolyte; the transport of the electrode materials to the surface of the electrolyte is through wicking/capillary forces. This paper describes five tests identified for the Na-S battery flight experiment definition study, which include the cell characterization test, the reactant distribution test, the current/temperature distribution test, the freeze/thaw test, and the multicell LEO test. A schematic diagram of Na-S cell is included.

  16. Photovoltaic Array Space Power flight experiment plus diagnostics (PASP+) modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooley, William T.; Adams, Steven F.; Reinhardt, Kitt C.; Piszczor, Michael F.

    1992-01-01

    The Photovoltaic Array Space Power Plus Diagnostics flight experiment (PASP+) subsumes twelve solar array modules which represent the state of the art in the space photovoltaic array industry. Each of the twelve modules individually feature specific photovoltaic technologies such as advanced semiconductor materials, multi-bandgap structures, lightweight array designs, advanced interconnect technologies, or concentrator array designs. This paper will describe each module in detail including the configuration, components, materials, anticipated on orbit performance, and some of the aspects of each array technology. The layout of each module and the photovoltaic cells or array cross section will be presented graphically. A discussion on the environmental constraints and materials selection will be included as well as a delineation of the differences between the modules and the baseline array configuration in its intended application.

  17. Planetary entry aerothermodynamics. II - Computational analyses and flight experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olstad, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    Limitations concerning the possibility to simulate all the significant flow and thermal phenomena occurring during the entry of a space vehicle into a planetary atmosphere make it necessary to rely on computational analyses to obtain the required data for the design of the spacecraft needed for the NASA missions planned for the next two decades. 'Benchmark' computer programs concerned with complete, detailed, and accurate computational solutions of entry problems are considered along with programs representing engineering approximations for cases in which the accuracy provided by the benchmark programs is not needed. The information obtainable by computational analysis has to be supplemented by actual flight experience in order to meet the goals of the NASA entry-technology program. The individual space missions planned for the coming years are examined together with the possibilities for obtaining the data needed to satisfy the entry requirements in each case.

  18. Enhanced reduction of velocity data obtained during CETA flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Tom D.; Wong, Douglas T.; Tripp, John S.

    1993-01-01

    A newly developed technique for enhanced data reduction provides an improved procedure that allows least squares minimization to become possible between data sets with an unequal number of data points. This technique was applied in the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) experiment on the STS-37 Shuttle flight in April 1991 to obtain the velocity profile from the acceleration data. The new technique uses a least-squares method to estimate the initial conditions and calibration constants. These initial conditions are estimated by least-squares fitting the displacements indicated by the Hall-effect sensor data to the corresponding displacements obtained from integrating the acceleration data. The velocity and displacement profiles can then be recalculated from the corresponding acceleration data using the estimated parameters. This technique, which enables instantaneous velocities to be obtained from the test data instead of only average velocities at varying discrete times, offers more detailed velocity information, particularly during periods of large acceleration or deceleration.

  19. Examining the Effect of Instructor Experience on Flight Training Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polstra, Philip A., Sr.

    2012-01-01

    Maximizing training efficiency is desirable in many areas of business. The ever increasing costs of flight training combined with a predicted shortage of pilots have resulted in steps being taken to improve flight training efficiency. In the past, the majority of airline pilots received their flight training in the military. Over time a growing…

  20. The 30/20 GHz flight experiment system, phase 2. Volume 2: Experiment system description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronstein, L.; Kawamoto, Y.; Ribarich, J. J.; Scope, J. R.; Forman, B. J.; Bergman, S. G.; Reisenfeld, S.

    1981-01-01

    A detailed technical description of the 30/20 GHz flight experiment system is presented. The overall communication system is described with performance analyses, communication operations, and experiment plans. Hardware descriptions of the payload are given with the tradeoff studies that led to the final design. The spacecraft bus which carries the payload is discussed and its interface with the launch vehicle system is described. Finally, the hardwares and the operations of the terrestrial segment are presented.

  1. 14 CFR 135.97 - Aircraft and facilities for recent flight experience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aircraft and facilities for recent flight... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 135.97 Aircraft and facilities for recent flight experience. Each certificate...

  2. 14 CFR 135.97 - Aircraft and facilities for recent flight experience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aircraft and facilities for recent flight... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 135.97 Aircraft and facilities for recent flight experience. Each certificate...

  3. 14 CFR 135.97 - Aircraft and facilities for recent flight experience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aircraft and facilities for recent flight... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 135.97 Aircraft and facilities for recent flight experience. Each certificate...

  4. 14 CFR 135.97 - Aircraft and facilities for recent flight experience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aircraft and facilities for recent flight... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 135.97 Aircraft and facilities for recent flight experience. Each certificate...

  5. 14 CFR 135.97 - Aircraft and facilities for recent flight experience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aircraft and facilities for recent flight... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 135.97 Aircraft and facilities for recent flight experience. Each certificate...

  6. Flight control systems development and flight test experience with the HiMAT research vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Robert W.; Earls, Michael R.

    1988-01-01

    Two highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) remotely piloted vehicles were flown a total of 26 flights. These subscale vehicles were of advanced aerodynamic configuration with advanced technology concepts such as composite and metallic structures, digital integrated propulsion control, and ground (primary) and airborne (backup) relaxed static stability, digital fly-by-wire control systems. Extensive systems development, checkout, and flight qualification were required to conduct the flight test program. The design maneuver goal was to achieve a sustained 8-g turn at Mach 0.9 at an altitude of 25,000 feet. This goal was achieved, along with the acquisition of high-quality flight data at subsonic and supersonic Mach numbers. Control systems were modified in a variety of ways using the flight-determined aerodynamic characteristics. The HiMAT program was successfully completed with approximately 11 hours of total flight time.

  7. Development and flight test experiences with a flight-crucial digital control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackall, Dale A.

    1988-01-01

    Engineers and scientists in the advanced fighter technology integration (AFTI) F-16 program investigated the integration of emerging technologies into an advanced fighter aircraft. AFTI's three major technologies included: flight-crucial digital control, decoupled aircraft flight control, and integration of avionics, flight control, and pilot displays. In addition to investigating improvements in fighter performance, researchers studied the generic problems confronting the designers of highly integrated flight-crucial digital control. An overview is provided of both the advantages and problems of integration digital control systems. Also, an examination of the specification, design, qualification, and flight test life-cycle phase is provided. An overview is given of the fault-tolerant design, multimoded decoupled flight control laws, and integrated avionics design. The approach to qualifying the software and system designs is discussed, and the effects of design choices on system qualification are highlighted.

  8. Phase Change Material Heat Sink for an ISS Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Gregory; Stieber, Jesse; Sheth, Rubik; Ahlstrom, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A flight experiment is being constructed to utilize the persistent microgravity environment of the International Space Station (ISS) to prove out operation of a microgravity compatible phase change material (PCM) heat sink. A PCM heat sink can help to reduce the overall mass and volume of future exploration spacecraft thermal control systems (TCS). The program is characterizing a new PCM heat sink that incorporates a novel phase management approach to prevent high pressures and structural deformation that often occur with PCM heat sinks undergoing cyclic operation in microgravity. The PCM unit was made using brazed aluminum construction with paraffin wax as the fusible material. It is designed to be installed into a propylene glycol and water cooling loop, with scaling consistent with the conceptual designs for the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle. This paper reports on the construction of the PCM heat sink and on initial ground test results conducted at UTC Aerospace Systems prior to delivery to NASA. The prototype will be tested later on the ground and in orbit via a self-contained experiment package developed by NASA Johnson Space Center to operate in an ISS EXPRESS rack.

  9. Temperature prediction of space flight experiments by computer thermal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birdsong, M. B.; Luttges, M. W.

    1994-01-01

    Life sciences experiments are especially sensitive to temperature. A small temperature difference between otherwise identical samples can cause various differences in biological reaction rates. Knowledge of experimental temperatures and temperature histories help to distinguish the effects of microgravity and temperature on spaceflight experiments compared to ground based studies, and allow appropriate controls and sensitivity tests. Up to the present time, the Orbiter (Space Shuttle) has not generally provided temperature measurement instrumentation inside ambient lockers located in the Mid-deck of the Orbiter, or inside similar facilities such as Spacehab and Spacelab, but many pieces of hardware do have temperature recording capability. Most of these temperatures, however, have only been roughly measured or estimated. Such reported experimental temperatures, while accurate within a range of several degrees Celsius, are of limited utility to biological researchers. The temperature controlled lockers used in spaceflight, such as Commerical-Refrigeration Incubation Modules (C-R/IMs), severely reduce the mass and volume available for test samples and do not necessarily provide uniform thermal environments. While these test carriers avoid some of the experimental temperature variations of the ambient lockers, the number of samples which can be accommodated in these temperature controlled units is limited. In the present work, improved models of thermal prediction and control were sought. Temperatures are predicted by thermal analysis software using empirical temperatures recorded during STS-57. These temperatures are compared to data recorded throughout the mission using Ambient Temperature Recorders (ATRs) located within several payload lockers. Additional test cases are undertaken using controlled ground experiments to more precisely determine the reliability of the thermal model. The approach presented should increase the utility of various spaceflight carriers in

  10. Temperature prediction of space flight experiments by computer thermal analysis.

    PubMed

    Birdsong, M B; Luttges, M W

    1995-02-01

    Life sciences experiments are especially sensitive to temperature. A small temperature difference between otherwise identical samples can cause various differences in biological reaction rates. Knowledge of experimental temperatures and temperature histories help to distinguish the effects of microgravity and temperature on spaceflight experiments compared to ground based studies, and allow appropriate controls and sensitivity tests. Up to the present time, the Orbiter (Space Shuttle) has not generally provided temperature measurement instrumentation inside ambient lockers located in the Mid-deck of the Orbiter, or inside similar facilities such as Spacehab and Spacelab, but many pieces of hardware do have temperature recording capability. Most of these temperatures, however, have only been roughly measured or estimated. Such reported experimental temperatures, while accurate within a range of several degrees Celsius, are of limited utility to biological researchers. The temperature controlled lockers used in spaceflight, such as Commercial-Refrigeration Incubation Modules (C-R/IMs), severely reduce the mass and volume available for test samples and do not necessarily provide uniform thermal environments. While these test carriers avoid some of the experimental temperature variations of the ambient lockers, the number of samples which can be accommodated in these temperature controlled units is limited. In the present work, improved models of thermal prediction and control were sought. Temperatures are predicted by thermal analysis software using empirical temperatures recorded during STS-57. These temperatures are compared to data recorded throughout the mission using Ambient Temperature Recorders (ATRs) located within several payload lockers. Additional test cases are undertaken using controlled ground experiments to more precisely determine the reliability of the thermal model. The approach presented should increase the utility of various spaceflight carriers in

  11. Development of the Packed Bed Reactor ISS Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patton, Martin O.; Bruzas, Anthony E.; Rame, Enrique; Motil, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    Packed bed reactors are compact, require minimum power and maintenance to operate, and are highly reliable. These features make this technology a leading candidate as a potential unit operation in support of long duration human space exploration. On earth, this type of reactor accounts for approximately 80% of all the reactors used in the chemical process industry today. Development of this technology for space exploration is truly crosscutting with many other potential applications (e.g., in-situ chemical processing of planetary materials and transport of nutrients through soil). NASA is developing an ISS experiment to address this technology with particular focus on water reclamation and air revitalization. Earlier research and development efforts funded by NASA have resulted in two hydrodynamic models which require validation with appropriate instrumentation in an extended microgravity environment. The first model developed by Motil et al., (2003) is based on a modified Ergun equation. This model was demonstrated at moderate gas and liquid flow rates, but extension to the lower flow rates expected in many advanced life support systems must be validated. The other model, developed by Guo et al., (2004) is based on Darcy s (1856) law for two-phase flow. This model has been validated for a narrow range of flow parameters indirectly (without full instrumentation) and included test points where the flow was not fully developed. The flight experiment presented will be designed with removable test sections to test the hydrodynamic models. The experiment will provide flexibility to test additional beds with different types of packing in the future. One initial test bed is based on the VRA (Volatile Removal Assembly), a packed bed reactor currently on ISS whose behavior in micro-gravity is not fully understood. Improving the performance of this system through an accurate model will increase our ability to purify water in the space environment.

  12. Life science experiments during parabolic flight: The McGill experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watt, D. G. D.

    1988-01-01

    Over the past twelve years, members of the Aerospace Medical Research Unit of McGill University have carried out a wide variety of tests and experiments in the weightless condition created by parabolic flight. This paper discusses the pros and cons of that environment for the life scientist, and uses examples from the McGill program of the types of activities which can be carried out in a transport aircraft such as the NASA KC-135.

  13. The 30/20 GHz flight experiment system, phase 2. Volume 4: Experiment system development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronstein, L.; Kawamoto, Y.; Riberich, J. J.; Scope, J. R.; Forman, B. J.; Bergman, S. G.; Reisenfeld, S.

    1981-01-01

    The development plan for the 30/20 GHz flight experiment system is presented. A master program schedule with detailed development plans for each subsystem is planned with careful attention given to how technology items to ensure a minimal risk. The work breakdown structure shows the organization of the program management with detailed task definitions. The ROM costs based on the development plan are also given.

  14. Space Shuttle Orbiter thermal protection system design and flight experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Donald M.

    1993-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter Thermal Protection System materials, design approaches associated with each material, and the operational performance experienced during fifty-five successful flights are described. The flights to date indicate that the thermal and structural design requirements were met and that the overall performance was outstanding.

  15. Space Shuttle Orbiter thermal protection system design and flight experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Donald M.

    1993-07-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter Thermal Protection System materials, design approaches associated with each material, and the operational performance experienced during fifty-five successful flights are described. The flights to date indicate that the thermal and structural design requirements were met and that the overall performance was outstanding.

  16. Results of the Stable Microgravity Vibration Isolation Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edberg, Donald; Boucher, Robert; Schenck, David; Nurre, Gerald; Whorton, Mark; Kim, Young; Alhorn, Dean

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the STABLE microgravity isolation system developed and successfully flight tested in October 1995. A description of the hardware design and operational principles is given. A sample of the measured flight data is presented, including an evaluation of attenuation performance provided by the actively controlled electromagnetic isolation system. Preliminary analyses of flight data show that the acceleration environment aboard STABLE's isolated platform was attenuated by a factor of more than 25 between 0.1 and 100 Hz. STABLE was developed under a cooperative agreement between National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Marshall Space Flight Center, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. The flight hardware was designed, fabricated, integrated, tested, and delivered to the Cape during a five month period.

  17. The diamond time of flight detector of the TOTEM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berretti, Mirko

    2017-02-01

    This contribution describes the design and the performance of a novel timing detector developed by the TOTEM Collaboration. The detector will be installed inside the TOTEM Roman Pots (RPs) and will measure the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) of the protons produced in the central diffractive (CD) interactions at the LHC. In particular, the measurement of the proton TOF allows the determination of the vertex longitudinal position where the protons are produced, thus allowing the protons association with one of the vertices reconstructed by the CMS detectors. The TOF detector is based on single crystal CVD (scCVD) diamond plates and it is designed in order to measure the protons TOF with 50 ps time resolution. To achieve this performance, a dedicated fast and low noise electronics for the signal amplification has been developed. Indeed, while diamond sensors have lower noise and faster signals than silicon sensors, the amount of charge released in the medium is lower. The digitization of the diamond signal is performed sampling the waveform at 10 GSa/s with the SAMPIC chip. The performance of the first TOF detector installed in the LHC in November 2015 will be reported. An overview of the clock distribution system and of the control system which interfaces the timing detectors to the experiment DAQ is finally given.

  18. Chemical Detection and Identification Techniques for Exobiology Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Sheverev, Valery A.; Khromov, Nikolai A.

    2002-01-01

    Exobiology flight experiments require highly sensitive instrumentation for in situ analysis of the volatile chemical species that occur in the atmospheres and surfaces of various bodies within the solar system. The complex mixtures encountered place a heavy burden on the analytical Instrumentation to detect and identify all species present. The minimal resources available onboard for such missions mandate that the instruments provide maximum analytical capabilities with minimal requirements of volume, weight and consumables. Advances in technology may be achieved by increasing the amount of information acquired by a given technique with greater analytical capabilities and miniaturization of proven terrestrial technology. We describe here methods to develop analytical instruments for the detection and identification of a wide range of chemical species using Gas Chromatography. These efforts to expand the analytical capabilities of GC technology are focused on the development of detectors for the GC which provide sample identification independent of the GC retention time data. A novel new approach employs Penning Ionization Electron Spectroscopy (PIES).

  19. Early Results and Spaceflight Implications of the SWAB Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. Mark; Pierson, Duane L.

    2007-01-01

    Microbial monitoring of spacecraft environments provides key information in the assessment of infectious disease risk to the crew. Monitoring aboard the Mir space station and International Space Station (ISS) has provided a tremendous informational baseline to aid in determining the types and concentrations of microorganisms during a mission. Still, current microbial monitoring hardware utilizes culture-based methodology which may not detect many medically significant organisms, such as Legionella pneumophila. We hypothesize that evaluation of the ISS environment using non-culture-based technologies would reveal microorganisms not previously reported in spacecraft, allowing for a more complete health assessment. To achieve this goal, a spaceflight experiment, operationally designated as SWAB, was designed to evaluate the DNA from environmental samples collected from ISS and vehicles destined for ISS. Results from initial samples indicate that the sample collection and return procedures were successful. Analysis of these samples using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and targeted PCR primers for fungal contaminants is underway. The current results of SWAB and their implication for in-flight molecular analysis of environmental samples will be discussed.

  20. Gliding Experiments of the Wright Brothers: The Wrights and Flight Research 1899-1908

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.; Hansen, Jennifer; Martin, Cam

    2007-01-01

    Viewgraphs showing glider experiments of the Wright Brothers from 1899-1908 are presented. The slides review the experiments that the Wright Brothers conducted prior to their first powered flight in 1903 to developing the first practical aircraft in 1905. Many pictures of the gliders and other devices are used to illustrate the gradual development and experimentation that preceeded the first powered flight.

  1. Gliding Experiments of the Wright Brothers: Flight Research 1899-1908

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.; Cole, Jennifer Hansen; Martin, John Campbell

    2011-01-01

    Presentation showing glider experiments of the Wright Brothers from 1899-1908 are presented. The slides review the experiments that the Wright Brothers conducted prior to their first powered flight in 1903 to developing the first practical aircraft in 1905, Many pictures of the gliders and other devices are used to illustrate the gradual development and experimentation that preceeded the first powered flight.

  2. High-Temperature Adhesives for Thermally Stable Aero-Assist Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberts, Kenneth; Ou, Runqing

    2013-01-01

    Aero-assist technologies are used to control the velocity of exploration vehicles (EVs) when entering Earth or other planetary atmospheres. Since entry of EVs in planetary atmospheres results in significant heating, thermally stable aero-assist technologies are required to avoid the high heating rates while maintaining low mass. Polymer adhesives are used in aero-assist structures because of the need for high flexibility and good bonding between layers of polymer films or fabrics. However, current polymer adhesives cannot withstand temperatures above 400 C. This innovation utilizes nanotechnology capabilities to address this need, leading to the development of high-temperature adhesives that exhibit high thermal conductivity in addition to increased thermal decomposition temperature. Enhanced thermal conductivity will help to dissipate heat quickly and effectively to avoid temperature rising to harmful levels. This, together with increased thermal decomposition temperature, will enable the adhesives to sustain transient high-temperature conditions.

  3. Musing over Microbes in Microgravity: Microbial Physiology Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweickart, Randolph; McGinnis, Michael; Bloomberg, Jacob; Lee, Angie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    New York City, the most populated city in the United States, is home to over 8 million humans. This means over 26,000 people per square mile! Imagine, though, what the view would be if you peeked into the world of microscopic organisms. Scientists estimate that a gram of soil may contain up to 1 billion of these microbes, which is as much as the entire human population of China! Scientists also know that the world of microbes is incredibly diverse-possibly 10,000 different species in one gram of soil - more than all the different types of mammals in the world. Microbes fill every niche in the world - from 20 miles below the Earth's surface to 20 miles above, and at temperatures from less than -20 C to hotter than water's boiling point. These organisms are ubiquitous because they can adapt quickly to changing environments, an effective strategy for survival. Although we may not realize it, microbes impact every aspect of our lives. Bacteria and fungi help us break down the food in our bodies, and they help clean the air and water around us. They can also cause the dark, filmy buildup on the shower curtain as well as, more seriously, illness and disease. Since humans and microbes share space on Earth, we can benefit tremendously from a better understanding of the workings and physiology of the microbes. This insight can help prevent any harmful effects on humans, on Earth and in space, as well as reap the benefits they provide. Space flight is a unique environment to study how microbes adapt to changing environmental conditions. To advance ground-based research in the field of microbiology, this STS-107 experiment will investigate how microgravity affects bacteria and fungi. Of particular interest are the growth rates and how they respond to certain antimicrobial substances that will be tested; the same tests will be conducted on Earth at the same times. Comparing the results obtained in flight to those on Earth, we will be able to examine how microgravity induces

  4. Supporting flight data analysis for Space Shuttle Orbiter experiments at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. J.; Budnick, M. P.; Yang, L.; Chiasson, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    The space shuttle orbiter experiments program is responsible for collecting flight data to extend the research and technology base for future aerospace vehicle design. The infrared imagery of shuttle (IRIS), catalytic surface effects, and tile gap heating experiments sponsored by Ames Research Center are part of this program. The software required to process the flight data which support these experiments is described. In addition, data analysis techniques, developed in support of the IRIS experiment, are discussed. Using the flight data base, the techniques provide information useful in analyzing and correcting problems with the experiment, and in interpreting the IRIS image obtained during the entry of the third shuttle mission.

  5. Thruster-plume-induced contamination measurements from the PIC and SPIFEX flight experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Carlos E.; Barsamian, Hagop; Rauer, Scott

    2002-09-01

    This paper documents thruster plume induced contamination measurements from the PIC (Plume Impingement Contamination) and SPIFEX (Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment) flight experiments. The SPIFEX flight experiment was flown on Space Shuttle mission STS-64 in 1994. Contamination measurements of molecular deposition were made by XPS (X-ray Photo Spectroscopy). Droplet impact features were also recorded with SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope) scans on Kapton and aluminum foil substrates. The PIC flight experiment was conducted during STS-74 in 1996. Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCMs) measured contaminant deposition from U.S. and Russian thruster firings. Droplet impact observations were made with SEM scans of the Shuttle RMS (Remote Manipulator System) camera lens. These flight experiments were successful in providing measurements of plume induced contamination as well as droplet impact damage. These measurements were the basis of the plume contamination models developed for the International Space Station (ISS).

  6. Thruster plume induced contamination measurements from the PIC and SPIFEX flight experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Carlos; Barsamian, Hagop; Rauer, Scott

    2003-09-01

    This paper documents thruster plume induced contamination measurements from the PIC (Plume Impingement Contamination) and SPIFEX (Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment) flight experiments. The SPIFEX flight experiment was flown on Space Shuttle mission STS-64 in 1994. Contamination measurements of molecular deposition were made by XPS (X-ray Photo Spectroscopy). Droplet impact features were also recorded with SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope) scans on Kapton and aluminum foil substrates. The PIC flight experiment was conducted during STS-74 in 1996. Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCMs) measured contaminant deposition from U.S. and Russian thruster firings. Droplet impact observations were made with SEM scans of the Shuttle RMS (Remote Manipulator System) camera lens. These flight experiments were successful in providing measurements of plume induced contamination as well as droplet impact damage. These measurements were the basis of the plume contamination models developed for the International Space Station (ISS).

  7. Flight Experiments for Living With a Star Space Environment Testbed (LWS-SET): Relationship to Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Barth, Janet L.; Brewer, Dana A.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on flight validation experiments for technologies to determine solar effects. The experiments are intended to demonstrate tolerance to a solar variant environment. The technologies tested are microelectronics, photonics, materials, and sensors.

  8. Mars Pathfinder Microrover Flight Experiment - A New Paradigm for Very Low-Cost Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirley, Donna L.

    1994-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Microrover Flight Experiment (MFEX) will be carried by the Mars Pathfinder mission to the surface of Mars, where it will perform technology, science and Mars mission engineeering experiments in July, 1997.

  9. Volatile Removal Assembly Flight Experiment and KC-135 Packed Bed Experiment: Results and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holder, Donald W.; Parker, David

    2000-01-01

    The Volatile Removal Assembly (VRA) is a high temperature catalytic oxidation process that will be used as the final treatment for recycled water aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The multiphase nature of the process had raised concerns as to the performance of the VRA in a microgravity environment. To address these concerns, two experiments were designed. The VRA Flight Experiment (VRAFE) was designed to test a full size VRA under controlled conditions in microgravity aboard the SPACEHAB module and in a 1 -g environment and compare the performance results. The second experiment relied on visualization of two-phase flow through small column packed beds and was designed to fly aboard NASA's microgravity test bed plane (KC-135). The objective of the KC-135 experiment was to understand the two-phase fluid flow distribution in a packed bed in microgravity. On Space Transportation System (STS) flight 96 (May 1999), the VRA FE was successfully operated and in June 1999 the KC-135 packed bed testing was completed. This paper provides an overview of the experiments and a summary of the results and findings.

  10. Flight Test Results from the Rake Airflow Gage Experiment on the F-15B Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Michael A.; Ratnayake, Nalin A.

    2010-01-01

    The Rake Airflow Gage Experiment involves a flow-field survey rake that was flown on the Propulsion Flight Test Fixture at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center using the Dryden F-15B research test bed airplane. The objective of this flight test was to ascertain the flow-field angularity, local Mach number profile, total pressure distortion, and dynamic pressure at the aerodynamic interface plane of the Channeled Centerbody Inlet Experiment. This new mixed-compression, supersonic inlet is planned for flight test in the near term. Knowledge of the flow-field characteristics at this location underneath the airplane is essential to flight test planning and computational modeling of the new inlet, and it is also applicable for future propulsion systems research that may use the Propulsion Flight Test Fixture. This report describes the flight test preparation and execution, and the local flowfield properties calculated from pressure measurements of the rake. Data from the two Rake Airflow Gage Experiment research flights demonstrate that the F-15B airplane, flying at a free-stream Mach number of 1.65 and a pressure altitude of 40,000 ft, would achieve the desired local Mach number for the future inlet flight test. Interface plane distortion levels of 2 percent and a local angle of attack of 2 were observed at this condition. Alternative flight conditions for future testing and an exploration of certain anomalous data also are provided.

  11. Flight Test Results from the Rake Airflow Gage Experiment on the F-15B Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Michael A.; Ratnayake, Nalin A.

    2011-01-01

    The Rake Airflow Gage Experiment involves a flow-field survey rake that was flown on the Propulsion Flight Test Fixture at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center using the Dryden F-15B research test bed airplane. The objective of this flight test was to ascertain the flow-field angularity, local Mach number profile, total pressure distortion, and dynamic pressure at the aerodynamic interface plane of the Channeled Centerbody Inlet Experiment. This new mixed-compression, supersonic inlet is planned for flight test in the near term. Knowledge of the flow-field characteristics at this location underneath the airplane is essential to flight test planning and computational modeling of the new inlet, an< it is also applicable for future propulsion systems research that may use the Propulsion Flight Test Fixture. This report describes the flight test preparation and execution, and the local flow-field properties calculated from pressure measurements of the rake. Data from the two Rake Airflow Gage Experiment research flights demonstrate that the F-15B airplane, flying at a free-stream Mach number of 1.65 and a pressure altitude of 40,000 ft, would achieve the desired local Mach number for the future inlet flight test. Interface plane distortion levels of 2 percent and a local angle of attack of -2 deg were observed at this condition. Alternative flight conditions for future testing and an exploration of certain anomalous data also are provided.

  12. Optimal aeroassisted coplanar orbital transfer using an energy model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, Nesim; Taylor, Deborah B.

    1989-01-01

    The atmospheric portion of the trajectories for the aeroassisted coplanar orbit transfer was investigated. The equations of motion for the problem are expressed using reduced order model and total vehicle energy, kinetic plus potential, as the independent variable rather than time. The order reduction is achieved analytically without an approximation of the vehicle dynamics. In this model, the problem of coplanar orbit transfer is seen as one in which a given amount of energy must be transferred from the vehicle to the atmosphere during the trajectory without overheating the vehicle. An optimal control problem is posed where a linear combination of the integrated square of the heating rate and the vehicle drag is the cost function to be minimized. The necessary conditions for optimality are obtained. These result in a 4th order two-point-boundary-value problem. A parametric study of the optimal guidance trajectory in which the proportion of the heating rate term versus the drag varies is made. Simulations of the guidance trajectories are presented.

  13. Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment Overview and In-Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Karen T.; Anderson, Brian P.; Campbell, Charles H.; Garske, Michael T.; Saucedo, Luis A.; Kinder, Gerald R.

    2010-01-01

    In support of the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment (BLT FE) Project, a manufactured protuberance tile was installed on the port wing of Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery for the flights of STS-119, STS-128 and STS-131. Additional instrumentation was installed in order to obtain more spatially resolved measurements downstream of the protuberance. This paper provides an overview of the BLT FE Project. Significant efforts were made to place the protuberance at an appropriate location on the Orbiter and to design the protuberance to withstand the expected environments. A high-level overview of the in-situ flight data is presented, along with a summary of the comparisons between pre- and post-flight analysis predictions and flight data. Comparisons show that predictions for boundary layer transition onset time closely match the flight data, while predicted temperatures were significantly higher than observed flight temperatures.

  14. Precooled turbojet engine flight experiment using balloon-based operation vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, K.; Sawai, S.; Kobayashi, H.; Tsuboi, N.; Taguchi, H.; Kojima, T.; Okai, K.; Sato, T.; Miyaji, Koji

    2006-07-01

    Development of the Balloon-based Operation Vehicle (BOV) is currently in progress for the first flight scheduled in 2006. In a series of BOV experiments, a vehicle in a wing-body configuration is lifted by a high-altitude balloon and dropped, after which the microgravity experiments will be performed onboard the vehicle under favor of the quasi-free-fall environments. Although the BOV is originally designed for the microgravity experiments, various types of experiments can also be performed in a hypersonic flight at lower altitudes. One candidate currently under review is a flight experiment of a precooled turbojet engine in reduced dimension. In this article, an overview of the BOV experiment is introduced, and the current development status of the BOV and a flight model of the precooled turbojet engine is presented. The aerodynamic load and the aerodynamic characteristics of the BOV are obtained by computational fluid-dynamic analyses and wind-tunnel experiments.

  15. Instrumentation and Performance Analysis Plans for the HIFiRE Flight 2 Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, Mark; Barhorst, Todd; Jackson, Kevin; Eklund, Dean; Hass, Neal; Storch, Andrea M.; Liu, Jiwen

    2009-01-01

    Supersonic combustion performance of a bi-component gaseous hydrocarbon fuel mixture is one of the primary aspects under investigation in the HIFiRE Flight 2 experiment. In-flight instrumentation and post-test analyses will be two key elements used to determine the combustion performance. Pre-flight computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses provide valuable information that can be used to optimize the placement of a constrained set of wall pressure instrumentation in the experiment. The simulations also allow pre-flight assessments of performance sensitivities leading to estimates of overall uncertainty in the determination of combustion efficiency. Based on the pre-flight CFD results, 128 wall pressure sensors have been located throughout the isolator/combustor flowpath to minimize the error in determining the wall pressure force at Mach 8 flight conditions. Also, sensitivity analyses show that mass capture and combustor exit stream thrust are the two primary contributors to uncertainty in combustion efficiency.

  16. Apollo experience report: Simulation of manned space flight for crew training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodling, C. H.; Faber, S.; Vanbockel, J. J.; Olasky, C. C.; Williams, W. K.; Mire, J. L. C.; Homer, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Through space-flight experience and the development of simulators to meet the associated training requirements, several factors have been established as fundamental for providing adequate flight simulators for crew training. The development of flight simulators from Project Mercury through the Apollo 15 mission is described. The functional uses, characteristics, and development problems of the various simulators are discussed for the benefit of future programs.

  17. Scientific experiments in the flight of the 1977 biological satellite (draft plan)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The physiological, biological, radiobiological and radiophysical experiments planned for the 1977 biological satellite are described. The biological experiments will involve rats, higher and lower plants, insects and other biological specimens carried on the biosatellite. The responses of these organisms to weightlessness, artificial gravity, cosmic radiation particles and general flight factors will be studied. The radiophysical experiments will investigate certain properties of cosmic radiation as well as the possibility of creating electrostatic and dielectric radiation shields under actual space-flight conditions.

  18. Limited flight test experience with a laser transit velocimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Limited flight testing of a laser transit velocimeter provided insight into the problems associated with the use of such instruments for flight research. Although the device tested was not designed for flight application, it had certain features such as fiber optics and low laser power which are attractive in the airborne environment. During these tests, operation of the velocimeter was limited by insufficient concentrations of light-scattering particles and background light interference. Normal operation was observed when these conditions were corrected by utilizing cloud particles and flying at night. A comparison between the laser flow velocity measurements and corresponding pressure measurements is presented and shows a coarse correlation. Statistical bias due to turbulence in the flow is suspected to have affected the laser measurements.

  19. Ground-based experiments complement microgravity flight opportunities in the investigation of the effects of space flight on the immune response: is protein kinase C gravity sensitive?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Woods, K. M.; Armstrong, J. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    This manuscript briefly reviews ground-based and flight experiments, discusses how those experiments complement each other, and details how those experiments lead us to speculate about the gravity-sensitive nature of protein kinase C.

  20. Launch, flight, and recovery. [Apollo 17 Biological Cosmic Ray Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Look, B. C.; Tremor, J. W.; Barrows, W. F.; Zabower, H. R.; Winter, D. L.; Shillinger, G. H.; Harrison, G. A.; Philpott, D. E.; Suri, K.; Platt, W. T.

    1975-01-01

    The final phase to fly five pocket mice in the Apollo XVII command module was carried out at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. Upon completion of the 13-d space flight, the package was removed from the spacecraft and, after having been purged with an oxygen-helium gas mixture, was flown to American Samoa. Four of the five mice were recovered alive from the package. Analysis of the mouse that died during the flight revealed several factors that could have contributed to its death, the chief of which was massive hemorrhage in its middle ear cavities.

  1. Apollo experience report: Systems and flight procedures development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, P. C.

    1973-01-01

    This report describes the process of crew procedures development used in the Apollo Program. The two major categories, Systems Procedures and Flight Procedures, are defined, as are the forms of documentation required. A description is provided of the operation of the procedures change control process, which includes the roles of man-in-the-loop simulations and the Crew Procedures Change Board. Brief discussions of significant aspects of the attitude control, computer, electrical power, environmental control, and propulsion subsystems procedures development are presented. Flight procedures are subdivided by mission phase: launch and translunar injection, rendezvous, lunar descent and ascent, and entry. Procedures used for each mission phase are summarized.

  2. Flight experience with manually controlled unconventional aircraft motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barfield, A. F.

    1978-01-01

    A modified YF-16 aircraft was used to flight demonstrate decoupled modes under the USAF Fighter Control Configured Vehicle (CCV) Program. The direct force capabilities were used to implement seven manually controlled unconventional modes on the aircraft, allowing flat turns, decoupled normal acceleration control, independent longitudinal and lateral translations, uncoupled elevation and azimuth aiming, and blended direct lift. This paper describes the design, development, and flight testing of these control modes. The need for task-tailored mode authorities, gain-scheduling and selected closed-loop design is discussed.

  3. In-Flight Lower Body Negative Pressure - Skylab Experiment M092

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This chart details Skylab's In-Flight Lower Body Negative Pressure experiment facility, a medical evaluation designed to monitor changes in astronauts' cardiovascular systems during long-duration space missions. This experiment collected in-flight data for predicting the impairment of physical capacity and the degree of orthostatic intolerance to be expected upon return to Earth. Data to be collected were blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature, vectorcardiogram, lower body negative pressure, leg volume changes, and body mass. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  4. MSFC Doppler Lidar Science experiments and operations plans for 1981 airborne test flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtl, G. H.; Bilbro, J. W.; Kaufman, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The flight experiment and operations plans for the Doppler Lidar System (DLS) are provided. Application of DLS to the study of severe storms and local weather penomena is addressed. Test plans involve 66 hours of flight time. Plans also include ground based severe storm and local weather data acquisition.

  5. Gliding Experiments of the Wright Brothers: The Wrights and Flight Research 1899-1908

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Al; Cole, Jennifer Hansen; Martin, Cam

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the experiments that the Wright Brothers conducted prior to their first powered flight in 1903 to developing the first practical aircraft in 1905. Many pictures of the gliders and other devices are used to illustrate the gradual development and experimentation that preceeded the first powered flight.

  6. JACEE long duration balloon flights. [Japanese-American Cooperative Emulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T.; Iwai, J.; Dake, S.; Derrickson, J.; Fountain, W.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Jones, W. V.

    1989-01-01

    JACEE balloon-borne emulsion chamber detectors are used to observe the spectra and interactions of cosmic ray protons and nuclei in the energy range 1 to 100A TeV. Experiments with long duration mid-latitude balloon flights and characteristics of the detector system that make it ideal for planned Antarctic balloon flights are discussed.

  7. Flight Behavior of an Asymmetric Body through Spark Range Experiments Using Roll-Yaw Resonance for Yaw Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    asymmetric mass was placed within the body. This internal asymmetry creates a trim moment and angle of attack that is amplified during free -flight as...attack amplitude in this manner enables analysis of a rich set of flight behaviors. Free -flight experiments were conducted on this flight body in the...8 Fig. 6 Shadowgraph of model during free -flight experiment .........................11 Fig. 7 Angular motion for TRN39362

  8. A free-flight experiment of projectiles ranging from high subsonic to high supersonic Mach numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguchi, H.; Funabiki, K.; Sato, S.; Hatakeyama, M.

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports a preliminary experiment with a free-flight range which was designed to be able to be driven by means of a sort of fast-acting valve. The notable characteristics pertinent to this type of range is the pliancy of operation and also the wide coverage of flight speed from the high subsonic to the high supersonic range. For both spherical and vehicle models, flight tests were conducted with shadowgraph observations and flight speed measurements in order to examine the capability of this type of facility.

  9. Coupled Simulations, Ground-Based Experiments and Flight Experiments for Astrodynamics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, R.; Brown, M.; Lorrain, P.; Capon, C.; Lambert, A.; Benson, C.; Tuttle, S.; Griffin, D.

    Near-Earth satellites undergo complex and poorly understood interactions with their environment, leading to large uncertainties in predicting orbits and an associated risk of collision with other satellites and with space debris. The nature, evolution and behaviour of the growing cloud of space debris in that environment is even less well understood. Significant effort and expenditure is currently being made by governments in Australia, UK, USA, Europe and elsewhere in space surveillance and tracking, in order to mitigate the risk. However, a major gap exists with respect to the science of in-orbit behaviour. Research is underway in Australia to enable the prediction of the orbits of near-Earth space objects with order(s) of magnitude greater fidelity than currently possible. This is being achieved by coupling together the necessary parts of the puzzle - the physics of rarefied space object “aerodynamics” and the space physics and space weather that affects it - and employing our capabilities in ground-based and in-orbit experiments, ground-based observations and high performance computing to do so. As part of the effort, UNSW Canberra is investing $10M to develop a sustainable university-led program to develop and fly affordable in-orbit missions for space research. In the coming 6 years, we will fly a minimum of four cubesat missions, some in partnership with DSTO, which will include flight experiments for validating Space Situational Awareness astrodynamics simulation and observation capabilities. The flights are underpinned by ground-based experimental research employing space test chambers, advanced diagnostics, and supercomputer simulations that couple DSMC and Particle-in-Cell methods for modelling space object interactions with the ionosphere. This paper will describe the research both underway and planned, with particular emphasis on the coupled numerical/experimental/flight approach.

  10. Project SPARC: Space-Based Aeroassisted Reusable Craft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Future United States' space facilities include a Space Station in low Earth orbit (LEO) and a Geosynchronous Operations Support Center, or GeoShack, in geosynchronous orbit (GEO). One possible mode of transfer between the two orbits is an aerobraking vehicle. When traveling from GEO to LEO, the Earth's atmosphere can be used to aerodynamically reduce the velocity of the vehicle, which reduces the amount of propulsive change in velocity required for the mission. An aerobrake is added to the vehicle for this purpose, but the additional mass increases propellant requirements. This increase must not exceed the amount of propellant saved during the aeropass. The design and development of an aerobraking vehicle that will transfer crew and cargo between the Space Station and GeoShack is examined. The vehicle is referred to as Project SPARC, a SPace-based Aeroassisted Reusable Craft. SPARC consists of a removable 45 ft diameter aerobrake, two modified Pratt and Whitney Advanced Expander Engines with a liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen propellant, a removable crew module with a maximum capacity of five, and standard sized payload bays providing a maximum payload capacity of 28,000 lbm. The aerobrake, a rigid, ellipsoidally blunted elliptical cone, provides lift at zero angle-of-attack due to a 73 deg rake angle, and is covered with a flexible multi-layer thermal protection system. Maximum dry mass of the vehicle without payload is 20,535 lbm, and the maximum propellant requirement is 79,753 lbm at an oxidizer to fuel ratio of 6/1. Key advantages of SPARC include its capability to meet mission changes, and its removable aerobrake and crew module.

  11. Introduction to Flight: An Experiment in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviation/Space, 1979

    1979-01-01

    This is a three-day refresher course. Its intended audience is composed of personnel active in aerospace related fields, but who may not have a degree in aerospace engineering, and aerospace engineers who want to review the fundamentals of flight and gain a historical perspective. (BB)

  12. Flight experiments with a slender cone at angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peake, D. J.; Fisher, D. F.; Mcrae, D. S.

    1981-01-01

    The three-dimensional leeward separation about a 5 deg semi-angle cone at an 11 deg angle of attack was investigated in flight, in the wind tunnel, and by numerical computations. The test conditions were Mach numbers of 0.6, 1.5, and 1.8 at Reynolds numbers between 7 and 10 million based on free-stream conditions and a 30-inch wetted length or surface. The surface conditions measured included mean static and fluctuating pressures; skin friction magnitudes and separation line positions were obtained using obstacle blocks. The mean static pressures from flight and wind tunnel were in good agreement. The computed results gave the same distributions, but were slightly more positive in magnitude. The experimentally measured primary and secondary separation line locations compared closely with computed results. There were substantial differences in level and in trend between the surface root-mean-square pressure fluctuations obtained in flight and in the wind tunnel, due, it is thought, to a relatively high acoustic disturbance level in the tunnel compared with the quiescent conditions in flight.

  13. Adaptive Augmenting Control Flight Characterization Experiment on an F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Gilligan, Eric T.; Wall, John H.; Orr, Jeb S.; Miller, Christopher J.; Hanson, Curtis E.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Flight Mechanics and Analysis Division developed an Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) algorithm for launch vehicles that improves robustness and performance by adapting an otherwise welltuned classical control algorithm to unexpected environments or variations in vehicle dynamics. This AAC algorithm is currently part of the baseline design for the SLS Flight Control System (FCS), but prior to this series of research flights it was the only component of the autopilot design that had not been flight tested. The Space Launch System (SLS) flight software prototype, including the adaptive component, was recently tested on a piloted aircraft at Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) which has the capability to achieve a high level of dynamic similarity to a launch vehicle. Scenarios for the flight test campaign were designed specifically to evaluate the AAC algorithm to ensure that it is able to achieve the expected performance improvements with no adverse impacts in nominal or nearnominal scenarios. Having completed the recent series of flight characterization experiments on DFRC's F/A-18, the AAC algorithm's capability, robustness, and reproducibility, have been successfully demonstrated. Thus, the entire SLS control architecture has been successfully flight tested in a relevant environment. This has increased NASA's confidence that the autopilot design is ready to fly on the SLS Block I vehicle and will exceed the performance of previous architectures.

  14. NSTA-NASA Shuttle Student Involvement Project. Experiment Results: Insect Flight Observation at Zero Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, T. E.; Peterson, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    The flight responses of common houseflies, velvetbean caterpillar moths, and worker honeybees were observed and filmed for a period of about 25 minutes in a zero-g environment during the third flight of the Space Shuttle Vehicle (flight number STS-3; March 22-30, 1982). Twelve fly puparia, 24 adult moths, 24 moth pupae, and 14 adult bees were loaded into an insect flight box, which was then stowed aboard the Shuttle Orbiter, the night before the STS-3 launch at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The main purpose of the experiment was to observe and compare the flight responses of the three species of insects, which have somewhat different flight control mechanisms, under zero-g conditions.

  15. A study of Mariner 10 flight experiences and some flight piece part failure rate computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, F. A.

    1976-01-01

    The problems and failures encountered in Mariner flight are discussed and the data available through a quantitative accounting of all electronic piece parts on the spacecraft are summarized. It also shows computed failure rates for electronic piece parts. It is intended that these computed data be used in the continued updating of the failure rate base used for trade-off studies and predictions for future JPL space missions.

  16. Physiological Anatomical Rodent Experiment (PARE): 04 Flight Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burden, Hubert W.

    1997-01-01

    Rats were shipped to Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, on day 2 of gestation [(G2) (day 1 = morning on which spermatozoa are present in the vagina)] and laparotomized on G7 to determine the number of implantation sites in each uterine horn. On G8, ten pregnant rats meeting flight criteria (at least five implantation sites each horn) were placed into NASA flight cages (animal enclosure modules, AEMS, five rats per cage), loaded onto the mid-deck of the space shuttle Atlantis, and on G9 (November 3, 1994) they were launched into orbit. On gestation day 20, (November 14, 1994) the shuttle returned to Edwards Air Force Base, California and the flight animals were recovered from the shuttle and subjected to unilateral hysterectomy to provide fetal material from one horn to investigators identified by NASA to study selected fetal parameters. After unilateral hysterectomy, the animals were allowed to recover and deliver vaginally. There were three groups (n = 10 each group) of control animals housed at KSC in the study. A synchronous control group, delayed 24 hours with reference to the flight group, received the same surgeries and was housed five rats per AEM and exposed to all flight conditions (identical temperatures, lighting and humidity) except microgravity. Vivarium control group I did not receive any surgery and was housed in the vivarium in clear polycarbonate cages. Vivarium control group 2 received only a unilateral hysterectomy on day 20 of gestation but otherwise was housed like the vivarium control group 1. Control groups were allowed to complete their pregnancy and deliver fetuses from the remaining horn (Synchronous control and vivarium control group 2) or horns (Vivarium control group 1). After surgery, the dams were euthanized and tissues recovered, and the neonates were assigned to foster dams.

  17. The High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP) flight experiment summary for the first 10 flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Larman, K. T.; Barrett, M.

    1992-01-01

    The High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP) instrument is a triaxial, orthogonal system of gas damped accelerometers with a resolution of 1 x 10(exp -6) g (1 micro-g). The purpose of HiRAP is to measure the low frequency component of the total acceleration along the orbiter vehicle (OV) body axes while the OV descends through the rarefied flow flight regime. Two HiRAP instruments have flown on a total of 10 Space Transport System (STS) missions. The aerodynamic component of the acceleration measurements was separated from the total acceleration. Instrument bias and orbiter mechanical system acceleration effects were incorporated into one bulk bias. The bulk bias was subtracted from the acceleration measurements to produce aerodynamic descent data sets for all 10 flights. The aerodynamic acceleration data sets were input to an aerodynamic coefficient model. The aerodynamic acceleration data and coefficient model were used to estimate the atmospheric density for the altitude range of 140 to 60 km and a downrange distance of 600 km. For 8 of 10 flights results from this model agree with expected results. For the results that do not agree with expected results, a variety of error sources have been explored.

  18. A concept of a hypersonic flight experiment of a winged vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirouzu, Masao; Watanabe, Shigeya

    A concept of a flight experiment using a winged hypersonic research vehicle is proposed by the National Aerospace Laboratory (NAL) as one of the flight experiment series preceding to the development of HOPE (H-II Orbiting Plane). The present paper describes the purpose of the experiment, the outline of the flight, the configuration and aerodynamic characteristics of the vehicle, and items of experiment and measurement. The present experiment is to acquire experience on the development and the flight of a hypersonic winged vehicle, in contrast to the ballistic flight of the OREX (Orbital Reentry Experiment) and to collect flight data for validation of tests and simulations on the ground. The vehicle of about 1.5 tons will be launched by a two-stage version of the J-I. The vehicle will be separated at an altitude of 70-80 km at a velocity of Mach 18-20, and inserted to the reentry trajectory of HOPE. The vehicle will be decelerated by parachutes and splash into the ocean south of Japan, where it will be recovered.

  19. MoonRIDERS: NASA and Hawaii's Lunar Surface Flight Experiment for Late 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, R. M.

    2015-10-01

    This briefing will update the MoonRIDERS lunar surface flight experiment project between NASA-KSC, PISCES, and two Hawaii high schools investigating critical lunar dust-removal technologies. Launch planned in early 2017 on GLXP mission.

  20. NASA Langley's AirSTAR Testbed: A Subscale Flight Test Capability for Flight Dynamics and Control System Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Thomas L.; Bailey, Roger M.

    2008-01-01

    As part of the Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) project, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has developed a subscaled flying testbed in order to conduct research experiments in support of the goals of NASA s Aviation Safety Program. This research capability consists of three distinct components. The first of these is the research aircraft, of which there are several in the AirSTAR stable. These aircraft range from a dynamically-scaled, twin turbine vehicle to a propeller driven, off-the-shelf airframe. Each of these airframes carves out its own niche in the research test program. All of the airplanes have sophisticated on-board data acquisition and actuation systems, recording, telemetering, processing, and/or receiving data from research control systems. The second piece of the testbed is the ground facilities, which encompass the hardware and software infrastructure necessary to provide comprehensive support services for conducting flight research using the subscale aircraft, including: subsystem development, integrated testing, remote piloting of the subscale aircraft, telemetry processing, experimental flight control law implementation and evaluation, flight simulation, data recording/archiving, and communications. The ground facilities are comprised of two major components: (1) The Base Research Station (BRS), a LaRC laboratory facility for system development, testing and data analysis, and (2) The Mobile Operations Station (MOS), a self-contained, motorized vehicle serving as a mobile research command/operations center, functionally equivalent to the BRS, capable of deployment to remote sites for supporting flight tests. The third piece of the testbed is the test facility itself. Research flights carried out by the AirSTAR team are conducted at NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. The UAV Island runway is a 50 x 1500 paved runway that lies within restricted airspace at Wallops Flight Facility. The

  1. Shuttle flight pressure instrumentation: Experience and lessons for the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siemers, P. M., III; Bradley, P. F.; Wolf, H.; Flanagan, P. F.; Weilmuenster, K. J.; Kern, F. A.

    1983-01-01

    Flight data obtained from the Space Transportation System orbiter entries are processed and analyzed to assess the accuracy and performance of the Development Flight Instrumentation (DFI) pressure measurement system. Selected pressure measurements are compared with available wind tunnel and computational data and are further used to perform air data analyses using the Shuttle Entry Air Data System (SEADS) computation technique. The results are compared to air data from other sources. These comparisons isolate and demonstrate the effects of the various limitations of the DFI pressure measurement system. The effects of these limitations on orbiter performance analyses are addressed, and instrumentation modifications are recommended to improve the accuracy of similar fight data systems in the future.

  2. Miniature metastable ionization detectors for exobiology flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    The Metastable Ionization Detector (MID) is three orders of magnitude more sensitive than the thermal conductivity detectors used on previous flight instruments. The miniature MID provides scientists with a much smaller and highly sensitive detector for flight gas chromatographs. A miniature MID featuring an unconventional triaxial electrode configuration was developed and used routinely in the laboratory. Although much smaller and lighter than the commercial MID, its performance characteristics parallel those of the traditional design. The detector is compatible with the modulated voltage circuitry, also developed here, and thus can perform over an expanded response range of more than 7 orders magnitude. A micro volume version of a miniature MID, with an internal volume of less than 8 microliter, was recently designed is now being tested. The micro volume MID uses carrier gas flow rates of approx. 2cc/min thus eliminating the need for makeup gas when capillary columns are used.

  3. F-16XL-2 Supersonic Laminar Flow Control Flight Test Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Scott G.; Fischer, Michael C.

    1999-01-01

    The F-16XL-2 Supersonic Laminar Flow Control Flight Test Experiment was part of the NASA High-Speed Research Program. The goal of the experiment was to demonstrate extensive laminar flow, to validate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes and design methodology, and to establish laminar flow control design criteria. Topics include the flight test hardware and design, airplane modification, the pressure and suction distributions achieved, the laminar flow achieved, and the data analysis and code correlation.

  4. An observer for a deployable antenna. [for large space structure flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waites, H. B.

    1981-01-01

    An observer is derived for use on an Orbiter-Deployable Antenna configuration. The unique feature of this observer design for this flight experiment is that all the plant inputs are not required to be directly accessible for the observer to ferret out the system states. The observer uses state and rate of the state information to reconstruct the plant states. Results are presented which show how effectively this observer design works for this large space structure flight experiment.

  5. Multi-Vehicle Flight Experiments: Recent Results and Future Directions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    Dullerud, G., “A Hovercraft Testbed for Decentralized and Cooperative Control ”, Proceedings of the American Control Conference, Boston, MA, July 2004...results in the Aerospace Controls Laboratory (ACL) at MIT. This includes flight tests using a large team of simple external UAVs and a unique indoor...allowing researchers to conduct tests for a wide variety of long-duration mission scenarios in a controlled environment. A comparison of RAVEN with

  6. Early flight test experience with Cockpit Displayed Traffic Information (CDTI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, T. S.; Moen, G. C.; Person, L. H., Jr.; Keyser, G. L., Jr.; Yenni, K. R.; Garren, J. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Coded symbology, based on the results of early human factors studies, was displayed on the electronic horizontal situation indicator and flight tested on an advanced research aircraft in order to subject the coded traffic symbology to a realistic flight environment and to assess its value by means of a direct comparison with simple, uncoded traffic symbology. The tests consisted of 28 curved, decelerating approaches, flown by research-pilot flight crews. The traffic scenarios involved both conflict-free and blunder situations. Subjective pilot commentary was obtained through the use of a questionnaire and extensive pilot debriefing sessions. The results of these debriefing sessions group conveniently under either of two categories: display factors or task performance. A major item under the display factor category was the problem of display clutter. The primary contributors to clutter were the use of large map-scale factors, the use of traffic data blocks, and the presentation of more than a few aircraft. In terms of task performance, the cockpit displayed traffic information was found to provide excellent overall situation awareness.

  7. Guidance simulation and test support for differential GPS flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geier, G. J.; Loomis, P. V. W.; Cabak, A.

    1987-01-01

    Three separate tasks which supported the test preparation, test operations, and post test analysis of the NASA Ames flight test evaluation of the differential Global Positioning System (GPS) are presented. Task 1 consisted of a navigation filter design, coding, and testing to optimally make use of GPS in a differential mode. The filter can be configured to accept inputs from external censors such as an accelerometer and a barometric or radar altimeter. The filter runs in real time onboard a NASA helicopter. It processes raw pseudo and delta range measurements from a single channel sequential GPS receiver. The Kalman filter software interfaces are described in detail, followed by a description of the filter algorithm, including the basic propagation and measurement update equations. The performance during flight tests is reviewed and discussed. Task 2 describes a refinement performed on the lateral and vertical steering algorithms developed on a previous contract. The refinements include modification of the internal logic to allow more diverse inflight initialization procedures, further data smoothing and compensation for system induced time delays. Task 3 describes the TAU Corp participation in the analysis of the real time Kalman navigation filter. The performance was compared to that of the Z-set filter in flight and to the laser tracker position data during post test analysis. This analysis allowed a more optimum selection of the parameters of the filter.

  8. A Base Drag Reduction Experiment on the X-33 Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) Flight Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Moes, Timothy R.

    1999-01-01

    Drag reduction tests were conducted on the LASRE/X-33 flight experiment. The LASRE experiment is a flight test of a roughly 20% scale model of an X-33 forebody with a single aerospike engine at the rear. The experiment apparatus is mounted on top of an SR-71 aircraft. This paper suggests a method for reducing base drag by adding surface roughness along the forebody. Calculations show a potential for base drag reductions of 8-14%. Flight results corroborate the base drag reduction, with actual reductions of 15% in the high-subsonic flight regime. An unexpected result of this experiment is that drag benefits were shown to persist well into the supersonic flight regime. Flight results show no overall net drag reduction. Applied surface roughness causes forebody pressures to rise and offset base drag reductions. Apparently the grit displaced streamlines outward, causing forebody compression. Results of the LASRE drag experiments are inconclusive and more work is needed. Clearly, however, the forebody grit application works as a viable drag reduction tool.

  9. Flutter clearance flight tests of an OV-10A airplane modified for wake vortex flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, Robert V., Jr.; Rivera, Jose A., Jr.; Stewart, Eric C.

    1995-01-01

    The envelope expansion, flight flutter tests of a modified OV-10A aircraft are described. For the wake vortex research program, the airplane was modified to incorporate three forward-extending instrumentation booms, one extending forward from each wing tip and one from the right side of the fuselage. The booms were instrumented with sensors to measure the velocity and direction of local air flow. The flutter test results show that the modified OV-10A aircraft is free from flutter at speeds up to 330 KEAS at 5000 feet altitude.

  10. Thermal Design and Flight Experience of the Mars Exploration Rover Spacecraft Computer-Controlled, Propulsion Line Heaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Keith; Kinsella, Gary; Krylo, Robert; Sunada, Eric

    2004-01-01

    The viewgraph presentation examines propulsion line heater design and problems in the Mars Rover. Topics include a Mars Exploration Rover (MER) project description and MER spacecraft configuration, mission overview, MER cruise stage hardware, thermal design drivers in the propulsion lines, propulsion line control set points prior to launch, MER A and B flight trajectories, MER A early and mid cruise flight experience, MER A and B mid cruise flight experience, MER B late cruise flight experience, and lessons learned

  11. Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment Overview and In-Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Brian P.; Campbell, Charles H.; Saucedo, Luis A.; Kinder, Gerald R.; Berger, Karen T.

    2010-01-01

    In support of the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment (BLTFE) Project, a manufactured protuberance tile was installed on the port wing of Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery for the flights of STS-119 and STS-128. Additional instrumentation was also installed in order to obtain more spatially resolved measurements downstream of the protuberance. This paper provides an overview of the BLTFE Project, including the project history, organizations involved, and motivations for the flight experiment. Significant efforts were made to place the protuberance at an appropriate location on the Orbiter and to design the protuberance to withstand the expected environments. Efforts were also extended to understand the as-fabricated shape of the protuberance and the thermal protection system tile configuration surrounding the protuberance. A high-level overview of the in-situ flight data is presented, along with a summary of the comparisons between pre- and post-flight analysis predictions and flight data. Comparisons show that predictions for boundary layer transition onset time closely match the flight data, while predicted temperatures were significantly higher than observed flight temperatures.

  12. Flight experience with a pivoting traversing boundary-layer probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, L. C.; Brauns, D. A.; Cissell, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    A pivoting traversing boundary layer probe was evaluated in flight on an F-104 airplane. The evaluation was performed at free stream Mach numbers from 0.8 to 2.0. The unit is described, and operating problems and their solutions are discussed. Conventional boundary layer profiles containing variations in flow angle within the viscous layer are shown for free stream Mach numbers of 0.8, 1.6, and 2.0. Although the unit was not optimized for size and weight, it successfully measured simultaneously flow angularity, probe height, and pitot pressure through the boundary layer.

  13. Shuttle Orbiter Active Thermal Control Subsystem design and flight experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Timothy A.; Metcalf, Jordan L.; Asuncion, Carmelo

    1991-01-01

    The paper examines the design of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Active Thermal Control Subsystem (ATCS) constructed for providing the vehicle and payload cooling during all phases of a mission and during ground turnaround operations. The operation of the Shuttle ATCS and some of the problems encountered during the first 39 flights of the Shuttle program are described, with special attention given to the major problems encountered with the degradation of the Freon flow rate on the Orbiter Columbia, the Flash Evaporator Subsystem mission anomalies which occurred on STS-26 and STS-34, and problems encountered with the Ammonia Boiler Subsystem. The causes and the resolutions of these problems are discussed.

  14. Aircraft flight simulation of spacelab experiment using an implanted telemetry system to obtain cardiovascular data from the monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccutcheon, E. P.; Miranda, R.; Fryer, T. B.; Hodges, G.; Newson, B. D.; Pace, N.

    1977-01-01

    The utility of a multichannel implantable telemetry system for obtaining cardiovascular data was tested in a monkey with a CV-990 aircraft flight simulation of a space flight experiment. Valuable data were obtained to aid planning and execution of flight experiments using chronically instrumented animals.

  15. Understanding macrophage differentiation during space flight: The importance of ground-based experiments before space flight.

    PubMed

    Chapes, Stephen K; Ortega, M Teresa

    2013-06-01

    In preparation for a space flight on STS-126, two in vitro culture systems were used to investigate macrophage colony stimulating factor-dependent macrophage differentiation from mouse primary bone marrow cells. The patented Techshot Cell Cult Bioreactor and the BioServe Fluid Processing Apparatus (FPA) were operated in different orientations to determine their impact on macrophage growth and differentiation. Bone marrow cell parameters were determined after cells were grown in FPAs incubated at 37°C in vertical or horizontal orientations, and macrophage cell recovery was significantly higher from FPAs that were incubated in the horizontal orientation compared to "vertical" FPAs. Similarly, when bone marrow cells were grown in the Techshot bioreactor, there were significant differences in the numbers of macrophages recovered after 7 days, depending on movement and orientation of the bioreactor. Macrophage recovery was highest when the patented bioreactor was rotated in the horizontal, x-axis plane (merry-go-round fashion) compared to static and vertically, y-axis plane rotated (Ferris wheel fashion) bioreactors. In addition, the expression of F4/80 and other differentiation markers varied depending on whether macrophages differentiated in FPAs or in bioreactors. After 7 days, significant differences in size, granularity and molecule expression were seen even when the same primary bone marrow cells were used to seed the cultures. These data show that culture outcomes are highly dependent on the culture device and device orientation. Moreover, the impact of the culture system needs to be understood in order to interpret space flight data.

  16. PhoneSat In-flight Experience Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, Alberto Guillen; Attai, Watson; Oyadomari, Ken Y.; Priscal, Cedric; Schimmin, Rogan S.; Gazulla, Oriol Tintore; Wolfe, Jasper L.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, consumer technology has vastly improved its performances, become more affordable and reduced its size. Modern day smartphones offer capabilities that enable us to figure out where we are, which way we are pointing, observe the world around us, and store and transmit this information to wherever we want. These capabilities are remarkably similar to those required for multi-million dollar satellites. The PhoneSat project at NASA Ames Research Center is building a series of CubeSat-size spacecrafts using an off-the-shelf smartphone as its on-board computer with the goal of showing just how simple and cheap space can be. Since the PhoneSat project started, different suborbital and orbital flight activities have proven the viability of this revolutionary approach. In early 2013, the PhoneSat project launched the first triage of PhoneSats into LEO. In the five day orbital life time, the nano-satellites flew the first functioning smartphone-based satellites (using the Nexus One and Nexus S phones), the cheapest satellite (a total parts cost below $3,500) and one of the fastest on-board processors (CPU speed of 1GHz). In this paper, an overview of the PhoneSat project as well as a summary of the in-flight experimental results is presented.

  17. Analytical and Experimental Verification of a Flight Article for a Mach-8 Boundary-Layer Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, W. Lance; Monaghan, Richard C.

    1996-01-01

    Preparations for a boundary-layer transition experiment to be conducted on a future flight mission of the air-launched Pegasus(TM) rocket are underway. The experiment requires a flight-test article called a glove to be attached to the wing of the Mach-8 first-stage booster. A three-dimensional, nonlinear finite-element analysis has been performed and significant small-scale laboratory testing has been accomplished to ensure the glove design integrity and quality of the experiment. Reliance on both the analysis and experiment activities has been instrumental in the success of the flight-article design. Results obtained from the structural analysis and laboratory testing show that all glove components are well within the allowable thermal stress and deformation requirements to satisfy the experiment objectives.

  18. Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) dumps water after first in-flight cold flow test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The NASA SR-71A successfully completed its first cold flow flight as part of the NASA/Rocketdyne/Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California on March 4, 1998. During a cold flow flight, gaseous helium and liquid nitrogen are cycled through the linear aerospike engine to check the engine's plumbing system for leaks and to check the engine operating characterisitics. Cold-flow tests must be accomplished successfully before firing the rocket engine experiment in flight. The SR-71 took off at 10:16 a.m. PST. The aircraft flew for one hour and fifty-seven minutes, reaching a maximum speed of Mach 1.58 before landing at Edwards at 12:13 p.m. PST. 'I think all in all we had a good mission today,' Dryden LASRE Project Manager Dave Lux said. Flight crew member Bob Meyer agreed, saying the crew 'thought it was a really good flight.' Dryden Research Pilot Ed Schneider piloted the SR-71 during the mission. Lockheed Martin LASRE Project Manager Carl Meade added, 'We are extremely pleased with today's results. This will help pave the way for the first in-flight engine data-collection flight of the LASRE.' The LASRE experiment was designed to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and the handling of the SR-71 linear aerospike experiment configuration. The goal of the project was to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin validate the computational predictive tools it was using to determine the aerodynamic performance of a future reusable launch vehicle. The joint NASA, Rocketdyne (now part of Boeing), and Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) completed seven initial research flights at Dryden Flight Research Center. Two initial flights were used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the LASRE apparatus (pod) on the back of the SR-71. Five later flights focused on the experiment itself. Two were used to cycle gaseous

  19. Closed-Loop HIRF Experiments Performed on a Fault Tolerant Flight Control Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcastro, Celeste M.

    1997-01-01

    ABSTRACT Closed-loop HIRF experiments were performed on a fault tolerant flight control computer (FCC) at the NASA Langley Research Center. The FCC used in the experiments was a quad-redundant flight control computer executing B737 Autoland control laws. The FCC was placed in one of the mode-stirred reverberation chambers in the HIRF Laboratory and interfaced to a computer simulation of the B737 flight dynamics, engines, sensors, actuators, and atmosphere in the Closed-Loop Systems Laboratory. Disturbances to the aircraft associated with wind gusts and turbulence were simulated during tests. Electrical isolation between the FCC under test and the simulation computer was achieved via a fiber optic interface for the analog and discrete signals. Closed-loop operation of the FCC enabled flight dynamics and atmospheric disturbances affecting the aircraft to be represented during tests. Upset was induced in the FCC as a result of exposure to HIRF, and the effect of upset on the simulated flight of the aircraft was observed and recorded. This paper presents a description of these closed- loop HIRF experiments, upset data obtained from the FCC during these experiments, and closed-loop effects on the simulated flight of the aircraft.

  20. Results from the First Two Flights of the Static Computer Memory Integrity Testing Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, Thomas M., III

    1999-01-01

    This paper details the scientific objectives, experiment design, data collection method, and post flight analysis following the first two flights of the Static Computer Memory Integrity Testing (SCMIT) experiment. SCMIT is designed to detect soft-event upsets in passive magnetic memory. A soft-event upset is a change in the logic state of active or passive forms of magnetic memory, commonly referred to as a "Bitflip". In its mildest form a soft-event upset can cause software exceptions, unexpected events, start spacecraft safeing (ending data collection) or corrupted fault protection and error recovery capabilities. In it's most severe form loss of mission or spacecraft can occur. Analysis after the first flight (in 1991 during STS-40) identified possible soft-event upsets to 25% of the experiment detectors. Post flight analysis after the second flight (in 1997 on STS-87) failed to find any evidence of soft-event upsets. The SCMIT experiment is currently scheduled for a third flight in December 1999 on STS-101.

  1. Space Technology Experiment Platform (STEP). A Shuttle-borne support facility for structures, structural dynamics, and control technology flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. E.; Pinson, L. D.

    1983-01-01

    The Space Transportation System (STS) is used for technology experiments in space. The Space Technology Experiment Platform (STEP) is a Shuttle-borne experiment support facility for use by structures, structural dynamics, and controls technology flight experiments. STEP represents a key element in the commitment to STS utilization. The STEP concept and definition process is discussed, and the results obtained to date on the configuration and function capability are summarized, and preliminary schedule information is presented.

  2. Advanced application flight experiment breadboard pulse compression radar altimeter program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Design, development and performance of the pulse compression radar altimeter is described. The high resolution breadboard system is designed to operate from an aircraft at 10 Kft above the ocean and to accurately measure altitude, sea wave height and sea reflectivity. The minicomputer controlled Ku band system provides six basic variables and an extensive digital recording capability for experimentation purposes. Signal bandwidths of 360 MHz are obtained using a reflective array compression line. Stretch processing is used to achieve 1000:1 pulse compression. The system range command LSB is 0.62 ns or 9.25 cm. A second order altitude tracker, aided by accelerometer inputs is implemented in the system software. During flight tests the system demonstrated an altitude resolution capability of 2.1 cm and sea wave height estimation accuracy of 10%. The altitude measurement performance exceeds that of the Skylab and GEOS-C predecessors by approximately an order of magnitude.

  3. Flight experiment of thermal energy storage. [for spacecraft power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkoong, David

    1989-01-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) enables a solar dynamic system to deliver constant electric power through periods of sun and shade. Brayton and Stirling power systems under current considerations for missions in the near future require working fluid temperatures in the 1100 to 1300+ K range. TES materials that meet these requirements fall into the fluoride family of salts. Salts shrink as they solidify, a change reaching 30 percent for some salts. Hot spots can develop in the TES container or the container can become distorted if the melting salt cannot expand elsewhere. Analysis of the transient, two-phase phenomenon is being incorporated into a three-dimensional computer code. The objective of the flight program is to verify the predictions of the code, particularly of the void location and its effect on containment temperature. The four experimental packages comprising the program will be the first tests of melting and freezing conducted under microgravity.

  4. Pilot interaction with cockpit automation - Operational experiences with the Flight Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarter, Nadine B.; Woods, David D.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of two studies on the potential effect of cockpit automation on the pilot's performance, which provide data on pilots' difficulties with understanding and operating one of the core systems of cockpit automation, the Flight Management System (FMS). The results of both studies indicate that, although pilots do become proficient in standard FMS operations through ground training and subsequent flight experience, they still have difficulties tracking the FMS status and behavior in certain flight contexts and show gaps in the understanding of the functional structure of the system. The results suggest that design-related factors such as opaque interfaces contribute to these difficulties, which can affect the pilot's situation awareness.

  5. Signal-to-Noise Ratio Prediction and Validation for Space Shuttle GPS Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwu, Shian U.; Adkins, Antha A.; Loh, Yin-Chung; Brown, Lisa C.; Sham, Catherine C.; Kroll, Quin D.

    2002-01-01

    A deterministic method for Space Station Global Positioning System (GPS) Signal-To- Noise Ratio (SNR) predictions is proposed. The complex electromagnetic interactions between GPS antennas and surrounding Space Station structures are taken into account by computational electromagnetic technique. This computer simulator is capable of taking into account multipath effects from dynamically changed solar panels and thermal radiators. A comparison with recent collected Space Station GPS system flight experiment data is presented. The simulation results are in close agreement with flight data.

  6. UPC BarcelonaTech Platform. Innovative aerobatic parabolic flights for life sciences experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Poch, Antoni; Gonzalez, Daniel

    We present an innovative method of performing parabolic flights with aerobatic single-engine planes. A parabolic platform has been established in Sabadell Airport (Barcelona, Spain) to provide an infraestructure ready to allow Life Sciences reduced gravity experiments to be conducted in parabolic flights. Test flights have demonstrated that up to 8 seconds of reduced gravity can be achieved by using a two-seat CAP10B aircraft, with a gravity range between 0.1 and 0.01g in the three axis. A parabolic flight campaign may be implemented with a significant reduction in budget compared to conventional parabolic flight campaigns, and with a very short time-to-access to the platform. Operational skills and proficiency of the pilot controling the aircraft during the maneuvre, sensitivity to wind gusts, and aircraft balance are the key issues that make a parabola successful. Efforts are focused on improving the total “zero-g” time and the quality of reduced gravity achieved, as well as providing more space for experiments. We report results of test flights that have been conducted in order to optimize the quality and total microgravity time. A computer sofware has been developed and implemented to help the pilot optimize his or her performance. Finally, we summarize the life science experiments that have been conducted in this platform. Specific focus is given to the very successful 'Barcelona ZeroG Challenge', this year in its third edition. This educational contest gives undergraduate and graduate students worldwide the opportunity to design their research within our platform and test it on flight, thus becoming real researchers. We conclude that aerobatic parabolic flights have proven to be a safe, unexpensive and reliable way to conduct life sciences reduced gravity experiments.

  7. The Capillary Pumped Loop Flight Experiment (CAPL): A pathfinder for EOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, D.; Hoang, T.

    1992-01-01

    The CAPL shuttle flight experiment will provide microgravity verification of the prototype capillary pumped loop (CPL) thermal control system for EOS. The design of the experiment is discussed with particular emphasis on the new technology areas in ammonia two-phase reservior design and heat pipe heat exchanger development. The thermal and hydrodynamic analysis techniques and results are also presented, including pressure losses, fluid flow, and non-orbit heat rejection capability. CAPL experiment results will be presented after the flight, presently planned for 1993.

  8. Flight Simulator Experiments on Influence of Wideness of Front View for Pilot's Roll Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumata, Kazunari; Nishihata, Michiteru; Kobayashi, Osamu

    Fixed based flight simulator experiments were conducted to investigate the influences of wideness of front view for pilot's roll control. In these experiments, the airplane's motion was considered as a single-degree-of-freedom system in roll, and three front views having different view-angle were provided. The results of these experiments showed that the pilot's roll control characteristics, and the pilot's sensing parameter and reaction time for rolling motion were influenced by the differences of wideness of front view in flight simulator.

  9. Scientific experiments on the flight of the 1979 biological satellite, draft plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The various physiological, biological, radiobiological, and radiation physics experiments to be conducted onboard the 1979 biological satellite are described. These experiments deal with the effects of space flight on living organisms, measurement of radiation, and possible methods of shielding spacecraft against such radiation.

  10. Nonlinear feedback guidance law for aero-assisted orbit transfer maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, P. K. A.

    1992-01-01

    Aero-assisted orbit transfer vehicles have the potential for significantly reducing the fuel requirements in certain classes of orbit transfer operations. Development of a nonlinear feedback guidance law for performing aero-assisted maneuvers that accomplish simultaneous change of all the orbital elements with least vehicle acceleration magnitude is discussed. The analysis is based on a sixth order nonlinear point-mass vehicle model with lift, bank angle, thrust and drag modulation as the control variables. The guidance law uses detailed vehicle aerodynamic and the atmosphere models in the feedback loop. Higher-order gravitational harmonics, planetary atmosphere rotation and ambient winds are included in the formulation. Due to modest computational requirements, the guidance law is implementable on-board an orbit transfer vehicle. The guidance performance is illustrated for three sets of boundary conditions.

  11. Project ARGO: The design and analysis of an all-propulsive and an aeroassisted version of a manned space transportation vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H.; Seifert, D.; Waidelich, J.; Mileski, M.; Herr, D.; Wilks, M.; Law, G.; Folz, A.

    1989-01-01

    The Senior Aerospace System Design class at the University of Michigan undertook the design of a manned space transportation vehicle (STV) that would transport payloads between low earth orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO). Designated ARGO after the ship of the Greek adventurer Jason, two different versions of an STV that would be based, refueled, and serviced at the Space Station Freedom were designed and analyzed by the class. With the same 2-man/7-day nominal mission of transporting a 10,000-kg payload up to GEO and bringing a 5000-kg payload back to LEO, the two versions of ARGO differ in the manner in which the delta V is applied to insert the vehicle into LEO upon return from GEO. The all-propulsive ARGO (or CSTV for chemical STV) uses thrust from its LH2/LOX rocket engines to produce the delta V during all phases of its mission. While the aeroassisted ARGO (or ASTV for aeroassisted STV) also uses the same engines for the majority of the mission, the final delta V used to insert the ASTV into LEO is produced by skimming the Earth's atmosphere and using the drag on the vehicle to apply the required delta V. This procedure allows for large propellant, and thus cost, savings, but creates many design problems such as the high heating rates and decelerations experienced by a vehicle moving through the atmosphere at hypersonic velocities. The design class, consisting of 43 senior aerospace engineering students, was divided into one managerial and eight technical groups. The technical groups consisted of spacecraft configuration and integration, mission analysis, atmospheric flight, propulsion, power and communications, life support and human factors, logistics and support, and systems analysis. Two committees were set up with members from each group to create the scale models of the STV's and to produce the final report.

  12. Flight Test Results from the Rake Airflow Gage Experiment on the F-15B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Michael; Ratnayake, Nalin

    2011-01-01

    The results are described of the Rake Airflow Gage Experiment (RAGE), which was designed and fabricated to support the flight test of a new supersonic inlet design using Dryden's Propulsion Flight Test Fixture (PFTF) and F-15B testbed airplane (see figure). The PFTF is a unique pylon that was developed for flight-testing propulsion-related experiments such as inlets, nozzles, and combustors over a range of subsonic and supersonic flight conditions. The objective of the RAGE program was to quantify the local flowfield at the aerodynamic interface plane of the Channeled Centerbody Inlet Experiment (CCIE). The CCIE is a fixed representation of a conceptual mixed-compression supersonic inlet with a translating biconic centerbody. The primary goal of RAGE was to identify the relationship between free-stream and local Mach number in the low supersonic regime, with emphasis on the identification of the particular free-stream Mach number that produced a local Mach number of 1.5. Measurements of the local flow angularity, total pressure distortion, and dynamic pressure over the interface plane were also desired. The experimental data for the RAGE program were obtained during two separate research flights. During both flights, local flowfield data were obtained during straight and level acceleration segments out to steady-state test points. The data obtained from the two flights showed small variations in Mach number, flow angularity, and dynamic pressure across the interface plane at all flight conditions. The data show that a free-stream Mach number of 1.65 will produce the desired local Mach number of 1.5 for CCIE. The local total pressure distortion over the interface plane at this condition was approximately 1.5%. At this condition, there was an average of nearly 2 of downwash over the interface plane. This small amount of downwash is not expected to adversely affect the performance of the CCIE inlet.

  13. Flight Testing of the Capillary Pumped Loop 3 Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottenstein, Laura; Butler, Dan; Ku, Jentung; Cheung, Kwok; Baldauff, Robert; Hoang, Triem

    2002-01-01

    The Capillary Pumped Loop 3 (CAPL 3) experiment was a multiple evaporator capillary pumped loop experiment that flew in the Space Shuttle payload bay in December 2001 (STS-108). The main objective of CAPL 3 was to demonstrate in micro-gravity a multiple evaporator capillary pumped loop system, capable of reliable start-up, reliable continuous operation, and heat load sharing, with hardware for a deployable radiator. Tests performed on orbit included start-ups, power cycles, low power tests (100 W total), high power tests (up to 1447 W total), heat load sharing, variable/fixed conductance transition tests, and saturation temperature change tests. The majority of the tests were completed successfully, although the experiment did exhibit an unexpected sensitivity to shuttle maneuvers. This paper describes the experiment, the tests performed during the mission, and the test results.

  14. The Meduza experiment: An orbital complex ten weeks in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ovcharov, V.

    1979-01-01

    The newspaper article discusses the contribution of space research to understanding the origin of life on Earth. Part of this basic research involves studying amino acids, ribonucleic acid and DNA molecules subjected to cosmic radiation. The results from the Meduza experiment are not all analyzed as yet. The article also discusses the psychological changes in cosmonauts as evidenced by their attitude towards biology experiments in space.

  15. Catalytic surface effect on ceramic coatings for an aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steward, D. A.; Leiser, D. B.

    1984-01-01

    Surface catalytic efficiencies of glassy coatings were determined from a reaction boundary layer computation and arc-jet data. The catalytic efficiencies of the various coatings examined are discussed in terms of their reaction-rate constants. These constants are a function of the wall temperature (1290 K to 2000 K). In addition, the advantage of a thermal protection system for a bent biconic, aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle with a low surface catalytic efficiency is discussed.

  16. Design and Predictions for a High-Altitude (Low-Reynolds-Number) Aerodynamic Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Donald; Hamory, Phil; Krake, Keith; Drela, Mark

    1999-01-01

    A sailplane being developed at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center will support a high-altitude flight experiment. The experiment will measure the performance parameters of an airfoil at high altitudes (70,000 to 100,000 ft), low Reynolds numbers (200,000 to 700,000), and high subsonic Mach numbers (0.5 and 0.65). The airfoil section lift and drag are determined from pitot and static pressure measurements. The locations of the separation bubble, Tollmien-Schlichting boundary layer instability frequencies, and vortex shedding are measured from a hot-film strip. The details of the planned flight experiment are presented. Several predictions of the airfoil performance are also presented. Mark Drela from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology designed the APEX-16 airfoil, using the MSES code. Two-dimensional Navier-Stokes analyses were performed by Mahidhar Tatineni and Xiaolin Zhong from the University of California, Los Angeles, and by the authors at NASA Dryden.

  17. Design and Predictions for High-Altitude (Low Reynolds Number) Aerodynamic Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Donald; Harmory, Phil; Krake, Keith; Drela, Mark

    2000-01-01

    A sailplane being developed at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center will support a high-altitude flight experiment. The experiment will measure the performance parameters or an airfoil at high altitudes (70,000 - 100,000 ft), low Reynolds numbers (2 x 10(exp 5) - 7 x 10(exp 5)), and high subsonic Mach numbers (0.5 and 0.65). The airfoil section lift and drag are determined from pilot and static pressure measurements. The locations of the separation bubble, Tollmien-Schlichting boundary-layer instability frequencies, and vortex shedding are measured from a hot-film strip. The details of the planned flight experiment are presented as well as several predictions of the airfoil performance.

  18. Results of the Vapor Compression Distillation Flight Experiment (VCD-FE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchens, Cindy; Graves, Rex

    2004-01-01

    Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) is the chosen technology for urine processing aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Key aspects of the VCD design have been verified and significant improvements made throughout the ground;based development history. However, an important element lacking from previous subsystem development efforts was flight-testing. Consequently, the demonstration and validation of the VCD technology and the investigation of subsystem performance in micro-gravity were the primary goals of the VCD-FE. The Vapor Compression Distillation Flight Experiment (VCD-E) was a flight experiment aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia during the STS-107 mission. The VCD-FE was a full-scale developmental version of the Space Station Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) and was designed to test some of the potential micro-gravity issues with the design. This paper summarizes the experiment results.

  19. A disturbance isolation controller for the solar electric propulsion system flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waites, H. B.

    1982-01-01

    A disturbance isolation controller (DIC) is developed for a simplified model of the solar electric propulsion system (SEPS) flight experiment which consists of a rigid Sperry gimbal torquer (AGS) mounted to a rigid orbiter and the SEPS solar array (rigid) end mounted to the AGS. The main purpose of the DIC is to reduce the effects of orbiter disturbances which are transmitted to the flight experiment. The DIC uses an observer, which does not require the direct measurement of the plant inputs, to obtain estimates of the plant states and the rate of the plant states. The state and rate of state information is used to design a controller which isolates disturbances from specified segments of the plant, and for the flight experiment, the isolated segment is the SEPS solar array.

  20. Flight Test Results from Real-Time Relative Global Positioning System Flight Experiment on STS-69

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Young W.; Brazzel, Jack P., Jr.; Carpenter, J. Russell; Hinkel, Heather D.; Newman, James H.

    1996-01-01

    A real-time global positioning system (GPS) Kalman filter has been developed to support automated rendezvous with the International Space Station (ISS). The filter is integrated with existing Shuttle rendezvous software running on a 486 laptop computer under Windows. In this work, we present real-time and postflight results achieved with the filter on STS-69. The experiment used GPS data from an Osborne/Jet propulsion Laboratory TurboRouge receiver carried on the Wake Shield Facility (WSF) free flyer and a Rockwell Collins 3M receiver carried on the Orbiter. Real time filter results, processed onboard the Shuttle and replayed in near-time on the ground, are based on single vehicle mode operation and on 5 to 20 minute snapshots of telemetry provided by WSF for dual-vehicle mode operation. The Orbiter and WSF state vectors calculated using our filter compare favorably with precise reference orbits determined by the University of Texas Center for Space Research. The lessons learned from this experiment will be used in conjunction with future experiments to mitigate the technology risk posed by automated rendezvous and docking to the ISS.

  1. Parabolic Flights @ Home. An Unmanned Air Vehicle for Short-Duration Low-Gravity Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, Paul Gerke; Blum, Jürgen

    2011-02-01

    We developed an unmanned air vehicle (UAV) suitable for small parabolic-flight experiments. The flight speed of 100 m s - 1 is sufficient for zero-gravity parabolas of 16 s duration. The flight path's length of slightly more than 1 km and 400 m difference in altitude is suitable for ground controlled or supervised flights. Since this fits within the limits set for model aircraft, no additional clearance is required for operation. Our UAV provides a cost-effective platform readily available for low-g experiments, which can be performed locally without major preparation. A payload with a size of up to 0.9 ×0.3 ×0.3 m3 and a mass of ˜5 kg can be exposed to 0 g 0-5 g 0, with g 0 being the gravitational acceleration of the Earth. Flight-duration depends on the desired acceleration level, e.g. 17 s at 0.17 g 0 (lunar surface level) or 21 s at 0.38 g 0 (Martian surface level). The aircraft has a mass of 25 kg (including payload) and a wingspan of 2 m. It is powered by a jet engine with an exhaust speed of 450 m s - 1 providing a thrust of 180 N. The parabolic-flight curves are automated by exploiting the advantages of sophisticated micro-electronics to minimize acceleration errors.

  2. Operational experience and design recommendations for teleoperated flight hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, T. W.; Kuban, D. P.; Hankins, W. W.; Mixon, R. W.

    1988-01-01

    Teleoperation (remote manipulation) will someday supplement/minimize astronaut extravehicular activity in space to perform such tasks as satellite servicing and repair, and space station construction and servicing. This technology is being investigated by NASA with teleoperation of two space-related tasks having been demonstrated at the Oak Ridge National Lab. The teleoperator experiments are discussed and the results of these experiments are summarized. The related equipment design recommendations are also presented. In addition, a general discussion of equipment design for teleoperation is also presented.

  3. 14 CFR 61.411 - What aeronautical experience must I have to apply for a flight instructor certificate with a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... apply for a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating? 61.411 Section 61.411 Aeronautics... CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating... sport pilot rating? Use the following table to determine the experience you must have for each...

  4. 14 CFR 61.411 - What aeronautical experience must I have to apply for a flight instructor certificate with a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... apply for a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating? 61.411 Section 61.411 Aeronautics... CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating... sport pilot rating? Use the following table to determine the experience you must have for each...

  5. Evaluation of restraint system concepts for the Japanese Experiment Module flight demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampaio, Carlos E.; Fleming, Terence F.; Stuart, Mark A.; Backemeyer, Lynn A.

    1995-01-01

    The current International Space Station configuration includes a Japanese Experiment Module which relies on a large manipulator and a smaller dexterous manipulator to operate outside the pressurized environment of the experiment module. The module's flight demonstration is a payload that will be mounted in the aft flight deck on STS-87 to evaluate a prototype of the dexterous manipulator. Since the payload operations entail two 8-hour scenarios on consecutive days, adequate operator restraint at the workstation will be critical to the perceived success or failure of the payload. Simulations in reduced gravity environment on the KC-135A were the only way to evaluate the restraint systems and workstation configuration. Two astronaut and two non-astronaut operators evaluated the Advanced Lower Body Extremities Restraint Test and a foot loop restraint system by performing representative tasks at the workstation in each of the two restraint systems; at the end of each flight they gave their impressions of each system and the workstation. Results indicated that access to the workstation switch panels was difficult and manipulation of the hand controllers forced operators too low for optimal viewing of the aft flight deck monitors. The workstation panel should be angled for better visibility, and infrequently used switches should be on the aft flight deck panel. Pitch angle and placement of the hand controllers should optimize the operator's eye position with respect to the monitors. The lower body restraint was preferred over the foot loops because it allowed operators to maintain a more relaxed posture during long-duration tasks, its height adjustability allowed better viewing of aft flight deck monitors, and it provided better restraint for reacting forces imparted on the operator at the workstation. The foot loops provide adequate restraint for the flight demonstration tasks identified. Since results will impact the design of the workstation, both restraints should be

  6. Development of a suborbital flight experiment for validating a satellite inertia identification method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Gerardo; Inzunza-Ibarra, Marco; Ferrel, Ivann; Herrera, Brandi; Ma, Ou

    2011-06-01

    For three years, students at New Mexico State University have pursued flight experiments for validation of a newly developed inertia property identification algorithm. The robotics-based algorithm was developed and studied using computer simulations only. It has not been fully validated experimentally because of the difficulty to physically test full six degrees of freedom system dynamics in microgravity conditions on the ground. In the attempt to experimentally validate the algorithm, two experiments onboard NASA's C-9 microgravity flights have been performed. Although these flight experiments have been an invaluable experience, the zero-gravity environment desired to fully validate the algorithm has not yet been achieved. The full validation requires 6 DOF, a zero-gravity motion condition which is virtually inconceivable for ground-based testing or aircraft-based testing. Therefore, the student team is developing a suborbital experiment to further test the algorithm. The experiment has been scheduled to fly in the summer of 2011. This paper describes the activities of this suborbital flight project.

  7. Traveling-wave tube reliability estimates, life tests, and space flight experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalli, V. R.; Speck, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    Infant mortality, useful life, and wearout phase of twt life are considered. The performance of existing developmental tubes, flight experience, and sequential hardware testing are evaluated. The reliability history of twt's in space applications is documented by considering: (1) the generic parts of the tube in light of the manner in which their design and operation affect the ultimate reliability of the device, (2) the flight experience of medium power tubes, and (3) the available life test data for existing space-qualified twt's in addition to those of high power devices.

  8. Physics of Colloids in Space--Plus (PCS+) Experiment Completed Flight Acceptance Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.

    2004-01-01

    The Physics of Colloids in Space--Plus (PCS+) experiment successfully completed system-level flight acceptance testing in the fall of 2003. This testing included electromagnetic interference (EMI) testing, vibration testing, and thermal testing. PCS+, an Expedite the Process of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack payload will deploy a second set of colloid samples within the PCS flight hardware system that flew on the International Space Station (ISS) from April 2001 to June 2002. PCS+ is slated to return to the ISS in late 2004 or early 2005.

  9. Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) first flight view from above

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A NASA SR-71 made its successful first flight Oct. 31 as part of the NASA/Rocketdyne/Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The SR-71 took off at 8:31 a.m. PST. The aircraft flew for one hour and fifty minutes, reaching a maximum speed of Mach 1.2 before landing at Edwards at 10:21 a.m. PST, successfully validating the SR-71/linear aerospike experiment configuration. The goal of the first flight was to evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and the handling of the SR-71/linear aerospike experiment configuration. The engine was not fired during the flight. The LASRE experiment was designed to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and the handling of the SR-71 linear aerospike experiment configuration. The goal of the project was to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin validate the computational predictive tools it was using to determine the aerodynamic performance of a future reusable launch vehicle. The joint NASA, Rocketdyne (now part of Boeing), and Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) completed seven initial research flights at Dryden Flight Research Center. Two initial flights were used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the LASRE apparatus (pod) on the back of the SR-71. Five later flights focused on the experiment itself. Two were used to cycle gaseous helium and liquid nitrogen through the experiment to check its plumbing system for leaks and to test engine operational characteristics. During the other three flights, liquid oxygen was cycled through the engine. Two engine hot-firings were also completed on the ground. A final hot-fire test flight was canceled because of liquid oxygen leaks in the test apparatus. The LASRE experiment itself was a 20-percent-scale, half-span model of a lifting body shape (X-33) without the fins. It was rotated 90 degrees and equipped with eight thrust

  10. Radiation Hardening by Software Techniques on FPGAs: Flight Experiment Evaluation and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Andrew G.; Flatley, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We present our work on implementing Radiation Hardening by Software (RHBSW) techniques on the Xilinx Virtex5 FPGAs PowerPC 440 processors on the SpaceCube 2.0 platform. The techniques have been matured and tested through simulation modeling, fault emulation, laser fault injection and now in a flight experiment, as part of the Space Test Program- Houston 4-ISS SpaceCube Experiment 2.0 (STP-H4-ISE 2.0). This work leverages concepts such as heartbeat monitoring, control flow assertions, and checkpointing, commonly used in the High Performance Computing industry, and adapts them for use in remote sensing embedded systems. These techniques are extremely low overhead (typically <1.3%), enabling a 3.3x gain in processing performance as compared to the equivalent traditionally radiation hardened processor. The recently concluded STP-H4 flight experiment was an opportunity to upgrade the RHBSW techniques for the Virtex5 FPGA and demonstrate them on-board the ISS to achieve TRL 7. This work details the implementation of the RHBSW techniques, that were previously developed for the Virtex4-based SpaceCube 1.0 platform, on the Virtex5-based SpaceCube 2.0 flight platform. The evaluation spans the development and integration with flight software, remotely uploading the new experiment to the ISS SpaceCube 2.0 platform, and conducting the experiment continuously for 16 days before the platform was decommissioned. The experiment was conducted on two PowerPCs embedded within the Virtex5 FPGA devices and the experiment collected 19,400 checkpoints, processed 253,482 status messages, and incurred 0 faults. These results are highly encouraging and future work is looking into longer duration testing as part of the STP-H5 flight experiment.

  11. Controlled ecological life support system higher plant flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, T. W.; Wheeler, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Requirements for spaceflight experments which involve higher plants were determined. The plants are studied for use in controlled ecological life support systems (CELSS). Two categories of research requirements are discussed: (1) the physical needs which include nutrient, water and gas exchange requirements; (2) the biological and physiological functions which affect plants in zero gravity environments. Physical problems studies are given the priority since they affect all biological experiments.

  12. Coronagraph particulate measurements. Skylab flight experiment T025

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, J. M.; Schuerman, D. W.; Giovane, F.; Wang, R. T.; Hardy, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    Major results of the Skylab T025 Coronagraph experiment designed to monitor the particulate contamination about the spacecraft and to study the earth's atmospheric aerosol distribution are presented. A model for comet outbursts based on the properties of amorphous ice and ground based narrow-band and white light photography of comet Kohoutek ten days to perihelion are included. The effect of atmospheric refraction on the analysis of the T025 atmospheric data was also investigated.

  13. A Flight Experiment of Automated Payload Recovery by Parafoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, Satoshi

    elements such as avionics that have potential to be reused. In this paper, methods of recycling them are studied. This study is not based on the fully reusable vehicle, but it intends to add the partially reusable function to the conventional expendable vehicles by using parafoil. A parafoil-based system is expected to have advantages in weight and controllability compared with the other systems, including winged shape vehicles, parachute-based vehicles and the vehicles which use engines for retrieval. But unfortunately, there are only few examples of parafoil systems with heavy payloads. There are some studies of reusable vehicle that is not equipped with wings, but with parafoils. The parafoil is the wing shaped parachute, which is called as `paraglider' in sky sport. By using the parafoil at landing, we can expect the better performance than the conventional parachute. It can control the landing point by deforming the wing shaped canopy. To evaluate the controllability of the parafoil based vehicle, the author conducted the automatic landing experiments. This paper summarizes these results. parafoil based vehicle. So, it is needed to verify its feasibility under the realistic environment. The author had the experiment using the larger model of 10[m] wide canopy. The experiment is summarized and the results of tests are mentioned. The test vehicle is equipped with some sensors, including the optical navigation camera, GPS receiver, gyroscope sensor and geomagnetic sensor. And also LINUX-based PC is on-board for navigation and guidance.

  14. Experimental Results from the Thermal Energy Storage-1 (TES-1) Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wald, Lawrence W.; Tolbert, Carol; Jacqmin, David

    1995-01-01

    The Thermal Energy Storage-1 (TES-1) is a flight experiment that flew on the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-62), in March 1994, as part of the OAST-2 mission. TES-1 is the first experiment in a four experiment suite designed to provide data for understanding the long duration microgravity behavior of thermal energy storage fluoride salts that undergo repeated melting and freezing. Such data have never been obtained before and have direct application for the development of space-based solar dynamic (SD) power systems. These power systems will store solar energy in a thermal energy salt such as lithium fluoride or calcium fluoride. The stored energy is extracted during the shade portion of the orbit. This enables the solar dynamic power system to provide constant electrical power over the entire orbit. Analytical computer codes have been developed for predicting performance of a spaced-based solar dynamic power system. Experimental verification of the analytical predictions is needed prior to using the analytical results for future space power design applications. The four TES flight experiments will be used to obtain the needed experimental data. This paper will focus on the flight results from the first experiment, TES-1, in comparison to the predicted results from the Thermal Energy Storage Simulation (TESSIM) analytical computer code. The TES-1 conceptual development, hardware design, final development, and system verification testing were accomplished at the NASA lewis Research Center (LeRC). TES-1 was developed under the In-Space Technology Experiment Program (IN-STEP), which sponsors NASA, industry, and university flight experiments designed to enable and enhance space flight technology. The IN-STEP Program is sponsored by the Office of Space Access and Technology (OSAT).

  15. InP homojunction solar cell performance on the LIPS 3 flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinker, David J.; Hart, Russell E., Jr.; Weinberg, Irving; Smith, Brian S.

    1988-01-01

    Performance data for the NASA Lewis Research Center indium phosphide n+p homojunction solar cell module on the LIPS 3 Flight Experiment is presented. The objective of the experiment is to measure the performance of InP cells in the natural radiation environment of the 1100 km altitude, 60+ deg inclination orbit. Analysis of flight data indicates that the performance of the four cells throughout the first year is near expected values. No degradation in short-circuit current was seen, as was expected from radiation tolerance studies of similar cells. Details of the cell structure and flight module design are discussed. The results of the temperature dependency and radiation tolerance studies necessary for normalization and analysis of the data are included.

  16. Parabolic flight experiments on physiological data acquisition and processing technologies using small jet aircraft (MU300).

    PubMed

    Watanabe, S; Nagaoka, S; Usui, S; Miyamoto, A; Suzuki, H; Hirata, T; Yoshimoto, S; Ueno, T; Kojima, T; Yamagata, M; Ishikura, S

    1994-05-01

    The parabolic aircraft flight provides a short low gravity environment for approximately 20 seconds, which may not be sufficient for a research on the physiological phenomenon induced by actual weightlessness in space. However, the method is still useful to reveal essential and characteristic feature of physiological signs, and is available for testing hardware and also training of crew member during altered gravity. This paper reports the summary of parabolic flight experiments recently conducted as a NASDA program (1990-1992). The program is providing opportunities in low gravity research with small jet aircraft for researchers and agencies. The flight experiments in the life science area have been conducted mostly focused on a physiological changes and basic methodology which may be effective under the altered gravity condition. In this study, the following research team, NASDA, Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Nagoya University, Toyohashi University of Technology, Tokyo Metropolitan Hospital, Torey Research Center and JSUP were involved and coordinated for the research.

  17. NASA Dryden's experience in parameter estimation and its uses in flight test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, K. W.; Maine, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    An explanation of the parameter estimation method used at the Dryden Flight Research Facility is presented, and an overview is provided of experience related to the employment of this method, taking into account the utilization of this experience in flight tests. According to a definition of the aircraft parameter estimation problem, the system investigated is asumed to be modeled by a set of dynamic equations containing unknown parameters. To determine the values of the unknown parameters, the system is excited by a suitable input, and the input and actual system response are measured. The values of the unknown parameters are then inferred, based on the requirement that the model response to the given input match the actual system response. Examples of parameter estimation in flight test are discussed, giving attention to the F-14 fighter, the HiMAT (high maneuverable aircraft technology) vehicle, and the Space Shuttle.

  18. Spacelab 1 hematology experiment (INS103): Influence of space flight on erythrokinetics in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.; Chen, J. P.; Crosby, W.; Dunn, C. D. R.; Johnson, P. C.; Lange, R. D.; Larkin, E.; Tavassoli, M.

    1985-01-01

    An experiment conducted on the 10-day Spacelab 1 mission aboard the ninth Space Shuttle flight in November to December 1983 was designed to measure factors involved in the control of erythrocyte turnover that might be altered during weightlessness. Blood samples were collected before, during, and after the flight. Immediately after landing, red cell mass showed a mean decrease of 9.3 percent in the four astronauts. Neither hyperoxia nor an increase in blood phosphate was a cause of the decrease. Red cell survival time and iron incorporation postflight were not significantly different from their preflight levels. Serum haptoglobin did not decrease, indicating that intravascular hemolysis was not a major cause of red cell mass change. An increase in serum ferritin after the second day of flight may have been caused by red cell breakdown early in flight. Erythropoietin levels decreased during and after flight, but preflight levels were high and the decrease was not significant. The space flight-induced decrease in red cell mass may result from a failure of erythropoiesis to replace cells destroyed by the spleen soon after weightlessness is attained.

  19. The IXV experience, from the mission conception to the flight results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumino, G.; Mancuso, S.; Gallego, J.-M.; Dussy, S.; Preaud, J.-P.; Di Vita, G.; Brunner, P.

    2016-07-01

    The atmospheric re-entry domain is a cornerstone of a wide range of space applications, ranging from reusable launcher stages developments, robotic planetary exploration, human space flight, to innovative applications such as reusable research platforms for in orbit validation of multiple space applications technologies. The Intermediate experimental Vehicle (IXV) is an advanced demonstrator which has performed in-flight experimentation of atmospheric re-entry enabling systems and technologies aspects, with significant advancements on Europe's previous flight experiences, consolidating Europe's autonomous position in the strategic field of atmospheric re-entry. The IXV mission objectives were the design, development, manufacturing, assembling and on-ground to in-flight verification of an autonomous European lifting and aerodynamically controlled reentry system, integrating critical re-entry technologies at system level. Among such critical technologies of interest, special attention was paid to aerodynamic and aerothermodynamics experimentation, including advanced instrumentation for aerothermodynamics phenomena investigations, thermal protections and hot-structures, guidance, navigation and flight control through combined jets and aerodynamic surfaces (i.e. flaps), in particular focusing on the technologies integration at system level for flight, successfully performed on February 11th, 2015.

  20. The Shuttle Orbiter high resolution accelerometer package experiment - Preliminary flight results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, R. C.; Rutherford, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    A description of the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP) experiment, designed to measure rarefied flow aerodynamic accelerations, is given. The ground test calibration factors, as well as post-flight data processing techniques to extract aerodynamic accelerations, are discussed and applied to the recorded reentry data of the recent STS-6 Shuttle Orbiter flight. The ratio of the measured normal-to-axial aerodynamic accelerations during reentry is used to obtain the first flight measurement of the lift-to-drag ratio (L/D) of a winged entry vehicle in the rarefied flow flight regime. The preliminary result for the free-molecule flow L/D is 0.10 + or - 0.03. The initial flight results on L/D are compared with current predictions which are based upon theoretical and empirical considerations. The measured free-molecule flow L/D value is higher than predicted by a factor of about three, indicating that surface reflection is not completely diffuse as currently assumed. In the rarefied flow transition regime, the Shuttle data book-bridging formula fits the flight data adequately. Upper altitude density profiles are also deduced from the measurements and presented. The density profiles show a wave phenomena with amplitude of about 60 percent, relative to a standard model.

  1. Overview of the Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) flight mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.

    2016-11-01

    The NASA Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) stratospheric balloon flight mission addresses the need to reduce the uncertainty in predicting human exposure to cosmic radiation in the aircraft environment. Measurements were taken that characterize the dosimetric properties of cosmic ray primaries, the ultimate source of aviation radiation exposure, and the cosmic ray secondary radiations that are produced and transported to aviation altitudes. In addition, radiation detectors were flown to assess their potential application to long-term, continuous monitoring of the aircraft radiation environment. RaD-X was successfully launched from Fort Sumner, New Mexico (34.5°N, 104.2°W), on 25 September 2015. Over 18 h of science data were obtained from a total of four different type dosimeters at altitudes above 20 km. The RaD-X flight mission was supported by laboratory radiation exposure testing of the balloon flight dosimeters and also by coordinated radiation measurements taken on ER-2 and commercial aircraft. This paper provides the science background and motivation for the RaD-X flight mission, a brief description of the balloon flight profile and the supporting aircraft flights, and a summary of the articles included in the RaD-X special collection and their contributions to the science goals of the RaD-X mission.

  2. Experience with Ada on the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle flight test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regenie, Victoria A.; Earls, Michael; Le, Jeanette; Thomson, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Considerable experience has been acquired with Ada at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility during the on-going High Alpha Technology Program. In this program, an F-18 aircraft has been highly modified by the addition of thrust-vectoring vanes to the airframe. In addition, substantial alteration was made in the original quadruplex flight control system. The result is the High Alpha Research Vehicle. An additional research flight control computer was incorporated in each of the four channels. Software for the research flight control computer was written Ada. To date, six releases of this software have been flown. This paper provides a detailed description of the modifications to the research flight control system. Efficient ground-testing of the software was accomplished by using simulations that used the Ada for portions of their software. These simulations are also described. Modifying and transferring the Ada flight software to the software simulation configuration has allowed evaluation of this language. This paper also discusses such significant issues in using Ada as portability, modifiability, and testability as well as documentation requirements.

  3. Experience with Ada on the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle Flight Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regenie, Victoria A.; Earls, Michael; Le, Jeanette; Thomson, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Considerable experience was acquired with Ada at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility during the on-going High Alpha Technology Program. In this program, an F-18 aircraft was highly modified by the addition of thrust-vectoring vanes to the airframe. In addition, substantial alteration was made in the original quadruplex flight control system. The result is the High Alpha Research Vehicle. An additional research flight control computer was incorporated in each of the four channels. Software for the research flight control computer was written in Ada. To date, six releases of this software have been flown. This paper provides a detailed description of the modifications to the research flight control system. Efficient ground-testing of the software was accomplished by using simulations that used the Ada for portions of their software. These simulations are also described. Modifying and transferring the Ada for flight software to the software simulation configuration has allowed evaluation of this language. This paper also discusses such significant issues in using Ada as portability, modifiability, and testability as well as documentation requirements.

  4. Overview of the Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) Flight Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) stratospheric balloon flight mission addresses the need to reduce the uncertainty in predicting human exposure to cosmic radiation in the aircraft environment. Measurements were taken that characterize the dosimetric properties of cosmic ray primaries, the ultimate source of aviation radiation exposure, and the cosmic ray secondary radiations that are produced and transported to aviation altitudes. In addition, radiation detectors were flown to assess their potential application to long-term, continuous monitoring of the aircraft radiation environment. RaD-X was successfully launched from Fort Sumner, New Mexico (34.5 N, 104.2 W), on 25 September 2015. Over 18 h of science data were obtained from a total of four different type dosimeters at altitudes above 20 km. The RaD-X flight mission was supported by laboratory radiation exposure testing of the balloon flight dosimeters and also by coordinated radiation measurements taken on ER-2 and commercial aircraft. This paper provides the science background and motivation for the RaD-X flight mission, a brief description of the balloon flight profile and the supporting aircraft flights, and a summary of the articles included in the RaD-X special collection and their contributions to the science goals of the RaD-X mission.

  5. JSC flight experiment recommendation in support of Space Station robotic operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berka, Reginald B.

    1993-01-01

    The man-tended configuration (MTC) of Space Station Freedom (SSF) provides a unique opportunity to move robotic systems from the laboratory into the mainstream space program. Restricted crew access due to the Shuttle's flight rate, as well as constrained on-orbit stay time, reduces the productivity of a facility dependent on astronauts to perform useful work. A natural tendency toward robotics to perform maintenance and routine tasks will be seen in efforts to increase SSF usefulness. This tendency will provide the foothold for deploying space robots. This paper outlines a flight experiment that will capitalize on the investment in robotic technology made by NASA over the past ten years. The flight experiment described herein provides the technology demonstration necessary for taking advantage of the expected opportunity at MTC. As a context to this flight experiment, a broader view of the strategy developed at the JSC is required. The JSC is building toward MTC by developing a ground-based SSF emulation funded jointly by internal funds, NASA/Code R, and NASA/Code M. The purpose of this ground-based Station is to provide a platform whereby technology originally developed at JPL, LaRC, and GSFC can be integrated into a near flight-like condition. For instance, the Automated Robotic Maintenance of Space Station (ARMSS) project integrates flat targets, surface inspection, and other JPL technologies into a Station analogy for evaluation. Also, ARMSS provides the experimental platform for the Capaciflector from GSPC to be evaluated for its usefulness in performing ORU change out or other tasks where proximity detection is required. The use and enhancement of these ground-based SSF models are planned for use through FY-93. The experimental data gathered from tests in these facilities will provide the basis for the technology content of the proposed flight experiment.

  6. Remote Manipulator System (RMS)-based Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) flight experiment feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demeo, Martha E.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of an experiment which will provide an on-orbit validation of Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) technology, was investigated. The experiment will demonstrate the on-orbit characterization and flexible-body control of large flexible structure dynamics using the shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) with an attached payload as a test article. By utilizing existing hardware as well as establishing integration, operation and safety algorithms, techniques and procedures, the experiment will minimize the costs and risks of implementing a flight experiment. The experiment will also offer spin-off enhancement to both the Shuttle RMS (SRMS) and the Space Station RMS (SSRMS).

  7. Experience with custom processors in space flight applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraeman, M. E.; Hayes, J. R.; Lohr, D. A.; Ballard, B. W.; Williams, R. L.; Henshaw, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    The Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) has developed a magnetometer instrument for a swedish satellite named Freja with launch scheduled for August 1992 on a Chinese Long March rocket. The magnetometer controller utilized a custom microprocessor designed at APL with the Genesil silicon compiler. The processor evolved from our experience with an older bit-slice design and two prior single chip efforts. The architecture of our microprocessor greatly lowered software development costs because it was optimized to provide an interactive and extensible programming environment hosted by the target hardware. Radiation tolerance of the microprocessor was also tested and was adequate for Freja's mission -- 20 kRad(Si) total dose and very infrequent latch-up and single event upset events.

  8. Control of the ST7 Disturbance Reduction System Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, P. G.; Hsu, O. C,; ODonnell, J. R., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The Space Technology 7 (ST7) experiment will perform an on-orbit system-level validation of two specific Disturbance Reduction System technologies: colloidal micronewton thrusters and drag-free control. The ST7 Disturbance Reduction System (DRS) is designed to maintain the spacecraft s position with respect to a free-floating test mass while limiting the residual accelerations of that test mass over the frequency range of 1 to 30 mHz. This paper presents the overall design and analysis of the spacecraft drag-free and attitude controllers, with particular attention given to its primary mission mode. These controllers close the loop between the drag-free sensors and the colloidal micronewton thrusters.

  9. Vented Tank Resupply Experiment--Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.; Martin, Timothy A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports the results of the Vented Tank Resupply Experiment (VTRE) which was flown as a payload on STS 77. VTRE looks at the ability of vane Propellant Management Devices (PMD) to separate liquid and gas in low gravity. VTRE used two clear 0.8 cubic foot tanks one spherical and one with a short barrel section and transferred Refrigerant 113 between them as well as venting it to space. Tests included retention of liquid during transfer, liquid free venting, and recovery of liquid into the PMD after thruster firing. Liquid was retained successfully at the highest flow rate tested (2.73 gpm). Liquid free vents were achieved for both tanks, although at a higher flow rate (0.1591 cfm) for the spherical tank than the other (0.0400 cfm). Recovery from a thruster firing which moved the liquid to the opposite end of the tank from the PMD was achieved in 30 seconds.

  10. Thermal design, analysis, and testing of the CETA Space Shuttle Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witsil, Amy K.; Foss, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    Attention is given to the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Space Shuttle flight experiment designed to demonstrate techniques and equipment for propelling and restraining crew during EVA. Emphasis is placed on the thermal analysis of the CETA hardware, including thermal design trade-offs, modeling assumptions, temperature predictions, and testing activities.

  11. Time-of-Flight Experiments in Molecular Motion and Electron-Atom Collision Kinematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, Denis P.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Describes a set of experiments for an undergraduate laboratory which demonstrates the relationship between velocity, mass, and temperature in a gas. The experimental method involves time-of-flight measurements on atoms excited to metastable states by electron impact. Effects resulting from recoil in the electron-atom collision can also be…

  12. 14 CFR 61.57 - Recent flight experience: Pilot in command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... hour after sunset and ending 1 hour before sunrise. (f) Night vision goggle operating experience. (1) A person may act as pilot in command in a night vision goggle operation with passengers on board only if... tasks as the sole manipulator of the controls on a flight during a night vision goggle operation—...

  13. 14 CFR 61.57 - Recent flight experience: Pilot in command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... hour after sunset and ending 1 hour before sunrise. (f) Night vision goggle operating experience. (1) A person may act as pilot in command in a night vision goggle operation with passengers on board only if... tasks as the sole manipulator of the controls on a flight during a night vision goggle operation—...

  14. STS-46 MS Ivins and PLC Hoffman with TOP experiment on OV-104's flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Mission Specialist (MS) Marsha S. Ivins (left) and MS and Payload Commander (PLC) Jeffrey A. Hoffman mount a camera, image intensifiers, and window shade covering in overhead window W7 on the aft flight deck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. The crewmembers, in front of the onorbit station, are conducting the Tether Optical Phenomena (TOP) experiment.

  15. Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW) experiment in flight during an intentional failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This thirty second video shows the Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW) experiment, which consisted of an 18-inch carbon fiber test wing with surface-mounted pieizoelectric strain actuators, during intentional failure on April 24, 2001. The test wing was mounted on a special ventral flight test fixture and flown on Dryden's F-15B Research Testbed aircraft.

  16. Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) during first in-flight cold flow test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This photograph shows the LASRE pod on the upper rear fuselage of an SR-71 aircraft during take-off of the first flight to experience an in-flight cold flow test. The flight occurred on 4 March 1998. The LASRE experiment was designed to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and the handling of the SR-71 linear aerospike experiment configuration. The goal of the project was to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin validate the computational predictive tools it was using to determine the aerodynamic performance of a future reusable launch vehicle. The joint NASA, Rocketdyne (now part of Boeing), and Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) completed seven initial research flights at Dryden Flight Research Center. Two initial flights were used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the LASRE apparatus (pod) on the back of the SR-71. Five later flights focused on the experiment itself. Two were used to cycle gaseous helium and liquid nitrogen through the experiment to check its plumbing system for leaks and to test engine operational characteristics. During the other three flights, liquid oxygen was cycled through the engine. Two engine hot-firings were also completed on the ground. A final hot-fire test flight was canceled because of liquid oxygen leaks in the test apparatus. The LASRE experiment itself was a 20-percent-scale, half-span model of a lifting body shape (X-33) without the fins. It was rotated 90 degrees and equipped with eight thrust cells of an aerospike engine and was mounted on a housing known as the 'canoe,' which contained the gaseous hydrogen, helium, and instrumentation gear. The model, engine, and canoe together were called a 'pod.' The experiment focused on determining how a reusable launch vehicle's engine flume would affect the aerodynamics of its lifting-body shape at specific altitudes and speeds. The interaction of the aerodynamic flow with the engine plume

  17. Inflated concepts for the earth science geostationary platform and an associated flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friese, G.

    1992-01-01

    Large parabolic reflectors and solar concentrators are of great interest for microwave transmission, solar powered rockets, and Earth observations. Collector subsystems have been under slow development for a decade. Inflated paraboloids have a great weight and package volume advantage over mechanically erected systems and, therefore, have been receiving greater attention recently. The objective of this program was to produce a 'conceptual definition of an experiment to assess in-space structural damping characteristics and effects of the space meteoroid environment upon structural integrity and service life of large inflatable structures.' The flight experiment was to have been based upon an inflated solar concentration, but much of that was being done on other programs. To avoid redundancy, the Earth Science Geostationary Platform (ESGP) was selected as a focus mission for the experiment. Three major areas were studied: the ESGP reflector configuration; flight experiment; and meteoroids.

  18. In-Space Structural Validation Plan for a Stretched-Lens Solar Array Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Woods-Vedeler, Jessica A.; Jones, Thomas W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes in-space structural validation plans for a proposed Space Shuttle-based flight experiment. The test article is an innovative, lightweight solar array concept that uses pop-up, refractive stretched-lens concentrators to achieve a power/mass density of at least 175 W/kg, which is more than three times greater than current capabilities. The flight experiment will validate this new technology to retire the risk associated with its first use in space. The experiment includes structural diagnostic instrumentation to measure the deployment dynamics, static shape, and modes of vibration of the 8-meter-long solar array and several of its lenses. These data will be obtained by photogrammetry using the Shuttle payload-bay video cameras and miniature video cameras on the array. Six accelerometers are also included in the experiment to measure base excitations and small-amplitude tip motions.

  19. Thermal Design and Flight Experience of the Mars Exploration Rover Spacecraft Computer-Controlled, Propulsion Line Heaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Keith S.; Kinsella, Gary M; Krylo, Robert J.; Sunada, Eric T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper covers the design, thermal testing and flight experiences with the computer-controlled thermostats on the propulsion line heaters. Flight experience revealed heater control behavior with propellant loaded into the system and during thruster firings that was not observable during system level testing. Explanations of flight behavior, lessons learned, and suggestions for improvement of the propellant line heater design are presented in this paper.

  20. CO, O3, and aerosol measurements from NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment - Test flights 1981

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinton, R. R.; Browell, E. V.; Gregory, G. L.; Harriss, R. C.

    1982-05-01

    A series of four instrument test flights was conducted during July 1981 in preparation for the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment. The purpose of the flights was to demonstrate the feasibility and value of simultaneously measuring several specific atmospheric pollutants over a 25 deg latitudinal range. Carbon monoxide and methane grab samples were obtained simultaneously with nearly continuous in situ ozone and remote ozone and aerosol optical radar measurements. The sampling platform was a NASA Electra, a four engine turboprop aircraft. Attention is given to CO and CH4 sample collection and analysis, ozone measurement methods, the aerosol measurement method, an interpretation of the optical radar display, and a synergistic consideration of results.

  1. Flight Experiments On Energy Scaling For In-Space Laser Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Scharring, Stefan; Eckel, Hans-Albert; Wollenhaupt, Eric; Roeser, Hans-Peter

    2010-05-06

    As a preparatory study on space-borne laser propulsion, flight experiments with a parabolic thruster were carried out on an air cushion table. The thruster was mounted like a sail on a puck, allowing for laser-driven motion in three degrees of freedom (3 DOF) in artificial weightlessness. Momentum coupling is derived from point explosion theory for various parabolic thruster geometries with respect to energy scaling issues. The experimental data are compared with theoretical predictions and with results from vertical free flights. Experimental results for the air-breakdown threshold and POM ablation inside the thruster are compared with fluence data from beam propagation modeling.

  2. Autonomous star sensor ASTRO APS: flight experience on Alphasat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, U.; Fiksel, T.; Kwiatkowski, A.; Steinbach, I.; Pradarutti, B.; Michel, K.; Benzi, E.

    2015-06-01

    Jena-Optronik GmbH, located in Jena/Germany, has profound experience in designing and manufacturing star trackers since the early 80s. Today the company has a worldwide leading position in supplying geo-stationary and Earth observation satellites with robust and reliable star tracker systems. In the first decade of the new century Jena-Optronik received a development contract (17317/2003/F/WE) from the European Space Agency to establish the technologically challenging elements for which advanced star tracker technologies as CMOS Active Pixel Sensors were being introduced or were considered strategic. This activity was performed in the frame of the Alphabus large platform pre-development lead by ESA and the industrial Joint Project Team consisting of Astrium (now Airbus Defence and Space), Thales Alenia Space and CNES (Centre national d'études spatiales). The new autonomous star tracker, ASTRO APS (Active Pixel Sensor), extends the Jena-Optronik A stro-series CCD-based star tracker products taken the full benefit of the CMOS APS technology. ASTRO APS is a fully autonomous compact star tracker carrying either the space-qualified radiation hard STAR1000 or the HAS2 APS detectors. The star tracker is one of four Technology Demonstration Payloads (TDP6) carried by Alphasat as hosted payload in the frame of a successful Private Public Partnership between ESA and Inmarsat who owns and operates the satellite as part of its geo-stationary communication satellites fleet. TDP6 supports also directly TDP1, a Laser Communication Terminal, for fine pointing tasks. Alphasat was flawlessly brought in orbit at the end of July 2013 by a European Ariane 5 launcher. Only a few hours after launch the star tracker received its switch ON command and acquired nominally within 6 s the inertial 3-axes attitude. In the following days of the early in-orbit operations of Alphasat the TDP6 unit tracked reliably all the spacecraft maneuvers including the 0.1 and 0.2°/s spin stabilization for

  3. Analysis of Crossflow Transition Flight Experiment aboard the Pegasus Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, Mujeeb R.; Li, Fei; Choudhan, Meelan

    2007-01-01

    The Pegasus wing-glove flight experiment was designed to provide crossflow transition data at high Mach numbers, specifically to help validate stability based predictions for transition onset in a flight environment. This paper provides an analysis of the flight experiment, with emphasis on computational results for crossflow disturbances and the correlation of disturbance growth factors with in-flight transition locations via the e(sup N) method. Implications of the flight data for attachment line stability are also examined. Analysis of the thermocouple data reveals that transition (from turbulent to laminar flow) was first detected during the ascending flight of the rocket when the free stream Mach number exceeded about 4. Therefore, computations have been performed for flight Mach numbers of 4.13, 4.35, 4.56 and 4.99. Due to continually decreasing unit Reynolds number at higher altitudes, the entire wing-glove boundary layer became laminar at the highest flight Mach number computed above. In contrast, the boundary layer flow over the inboard tile region remained transitional up to and somewhat beyond the time of laminarization over the instrumented glove region. Linear stability predictions confirmed that the tile boundary layer is indeed more unstable to crossflow disturbances than the much colder stainless steel glove boundary layer. The transition locations based on thermocouple data from both the glove and the tile regions are found to correlate with stationary-crossflow N-factors within the range of 7 to 12.4 and with traveling mode N-factors between 7.6 and 14.1. Data from the thermocouples and hot film sensors indicates that transition from turbulent to laminar flow (i.e., laminarization) at a fixed point over the glove is generally completed within a flight time interval of 3 seconds. However, the times at which transition begins and ends as inferred from the hot film sensors are found to differ by about 2 seconds from the corresponding estimates based

  4. Flight experiment of pilot display for search-and-rescue helicopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funabiki, Kohei; Tsuda, Hiroka; Iijima, Tomoko; Nojima, Takuya; Tawada, Kazuho; Yoshida, Takashi

    2009-05-01

    JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency), together with Shimadzu Corporation and NEC, has initiated a research project named SAVERH (Situation Awareness and Visual Enhancer for Rescue Helicopter) that aims at inventing method of presenting suitable pilot information to support helicopter search and rescue missions. As the initial stage of this research, a series of flight experiments was conducted to investigate the feasibility of operations enhanced by an E/SVS (Enhanced / Synthetic Vision System) and to clarify system issues. An integrated system comprising an HMD (Helmet Mounted Display) and a FLIR (Forward Looking Infrared) sensor were installed in a JAXA research helicopter, and Tunnel-in-the-Sky symbology and a Synthetic Terrain image combined with the FLIR image were presented on the HMD and/or on a Head Down Display (HDD). Through a total of 17 flights including night flights, the potential capability of the system was demonstrated while many issues for further investigation were identified.

  5. Virtual environment, a behavioral and countermeasure tool for assisted gesture in weightlessness: Experiments during parabolic flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fass, Didier

    2005-08-01

    We present results of experiments performed by three subjects on earth and in hypergravity and weightlessness during parabolic flights (Flight campaign n°8 CNES- SPACEHAB), using a virtual and augmented reality system for assisted action. Using analysis of three- dimensional hand movements (drawing of ellipses), we compare the dynamical sensory-motor integration and motor performance (orientation, shape, figural and kinematics features) with or without the assistance of virtual environments. Using this gesture-based method we evaluate physiological effects and integration of both change of gravity and artefactual environment on performance. We demonstrate how artificial visual information dynamically generated by a wearable virtual environment may help gesture in the three-dimensional space parabolic flight, according to the theoretical integrative neuroscience principles.

  6. Development of flight experiment task requirements. Volume 2: Technical Report. Part 1: Program report and Appendices A-G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatterick, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    Activities are documented of the study to determine skills required of on-orbit crew personnel of the space shuttle. The material is presented in four sections that include: (1) methodology for identifying flight experiment task-skill requirements, (2) task-skill analysis of selected flight experiments, (3) study results and conclusions, and (4) new technology.

  7. Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) first flight view from above

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This photograph shows the SR-71 with the Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment on the rear fuselage as seen from above. The photo was taken on the first flight of the aircraft with the experiment aboard, which took place on 31 October 1997. The LASRE experiment was designed to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and the handling of the SR-71 linear aerospike experiment configuration. The goal of the project was to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin validate the computational predictive tools it was using to determine the aerodynamic performance of a future reusable launch vehicle. The joint NASA, Rocketdyne (now part of Boeing), and Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) completed seven initial research flights at Dryden Flight Research Center. Two initial flights were used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the LASRE apparatus (pod) on the back of the SR-71. Five later flights focused on the experiment itself. Two were used to cycle gaseous helium and liquid nitrogen through the experiment to check its plumbing system for leaks and to test engine operational characteristics. During the other three flights, liquid oxygen was cycled through the engine. Two engine hot-firings were also completed on the ground. A final hot-fire test flight was canceled because of liquid oxygen leaks in the test apparatus. The LASRE experiment itself was a 20-percent-scale, half-span model of a lifting body shape (X-33) without the fins. It was rotated 90 degrees and equipped with eight thrust cells of an aerospike engine and was mounted on a housing known as the 'canoe,' which contained the gaseous hydrogen, helium, and instrumentation gear. The model, engine, and canoe together were called a 'pod.' The experiment focused on determining how a reusable launch vehicle's engine flume would affect the aerodynamics of its lifting-body shape at specific altitudes and speeds. The interaction of the

  8. Space flight effects on antioxidant molecules in dry tardigrades: the TARDIKISS experiment.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Angela Maria; Altiero, Tiziana; Corsetto, Paola Antonia; Montorfano, Gigliola; Guidetti, Roberto; Rebecchi, Lorena

    2015-01-01

    The TARDIKISS (Tardigrades in Space) experiment was part of the Biokon in Space (BIOKIS) payload, a set of multidisciplinary experiments performed during the DAMA (Dark Matter) mission organized by Italian Space Agency and Italian Air Force in 2011. This mission supported the execution of experiments in short duration (16 days) taking the advantage of the microgravity environment on board of the Space Shuttle Endeavour (its last mission STS-134) docked to the International Space Station. TARDIKISS was composed of three sample sets: one flight sample and two ground control samples. These samples provided the biological material used to test as space stressors, including microgravity, affected animal survivability, life cycle, DNA integrity, and pathways of molecules working as antioxidants. In this paper we compared the molecular pathways of some antioxidant molecules, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and fatty acid composition between flight and control samples in two tardigrade species, namely, Paramacrobiotus richtersi and Ramazzottius oberhaeuseri. In both species, the activities of ROS scavenging enzymes, the total content of glutathione, and the fatty acids composition between flight and control samples showed few significant differences. TARDIKISS experiment, together with a previous space experiment (TARSE), further confirms that both desiccated and hydrated tardigrades represent useful animal tool for space research.

  9. Space Flight Effects on Antioxidant Molecules in Dry Tardigrades: The TARDIKISS Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Angela Maria; Corsetto, Paola Antonia; Montorfano, Gigliola

    2015-01-01

    The TARDIKISS (Tardigrades in Space) experiment was part of the Biokon in Space (BIOKIS) payload, a set of multidisciplinary experiments performed during the DAMA (Dark Matter) mission organized by Italian Space Agency and Italian Air Force in 2011. This mission supported the execution of experiments in short duration (16 days) taking the advantage of the microgravity environment on board of the Space Shuttle Endeavour (its last mission STS-134) docked to the International Space Station. TARDIKISS was composed of three sample sets: one flight sample and two ground control samples. These samples provided the biological material used to test as space stressors, including microgravity, affected animal survivability, life cycle, DNA integrity, and pathways of molecules working as antioxidants. In this paper we compared the molecular pathways of some antioxidant molecules, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and fatty acid composition between flight and control samples in two tardigrade species, namely, Paramacrobiotus richtersi and Ramazzottius oberhaeuseri. In both species, the activities of ROS scavenging enzymes, the total content of glutathione, and the fatty acids composition between flight and control samples showed few significant differences. TARDIKISS experiment, together with a previous space experiment (TARSE), further confirms that both desiccated and hydrated tardigrades represent useful animal tool for space research. PMID:25654086

  10. Electrolysis Performance Improvement Concept Study (EPICS) flight experiment phase C/D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Lee, M. G.

    1995-01-01

    The overall purpose of the Electrolysis Performance Improvement Concept Study flight experiment is to demonstrate and validate in a microgravity environment the Static Feed Electrolyzer concept as well as investigate the effect of microgravity on water electrolysis performance. The scope of the experiment includes variations in microstructural characteristics of electrodes and current densities in a static feed electrolysis cell configuration. The results of the flight experiment will be used to improve efficiency of the static feed electrolysis process and other electrochemical regenerative life support processes by reducing power and expanding the operational range. Specific technologies that will benefit include water electrolysis for propulsion, energy storage, life support, extravehicular activity, in-space manufacturing and in-space science in addition to other electrochemical regenerative life support technologies such as electrochemical carbon dioxide and oxygen separation, electrochemical oxygen compression and water vapor electrolysis. The Electrolysis Performance Improvement Concept Study flight experiment design incorporates two primary hardware assemblies: the Mechanical/Electrochemical Assembly and the Control/Monitor Instrumentation. The Mechanical/Electrochemical Assembly contains three separate integrated electrolysis cells along with supporting pressure and temperature control components. The Control/Monitor Instrumentation controls the operation of the experiment via the Mechanical/Electrochemical Assembly components and provides for monitoring and control of critical parameters and storage of experimental data.

  11. Science objectives and performance of a radiometer and window design for atmospheric entry experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roger A.; Davy, William C.; Whiting, Ellis E.

    1994-01-01

    The Radiative Heating Experiment, RHE, aboard the Aeroassist Flight Experiment, AFE, (now cancelled) was to make in-situ measurements of the stagnation region shock layer radiation during an aerobraking maneuver from geosynchronous to low earth orbit. The measurements were to provide a data base to help develop and validate aerothermodynamic computational models. Although cancelled, much work was done to develop the science requirements and to successfully meet RHE technical challenges. This paper discusses the RHE scientific objectives and expected science performance of a small sapphire window for the RHE radiometers. The spectral range required was from 170 to 900 nm. The window size was based on radiometer sensitivity requirements including capability of on-orbit solar calibration.

  12. Development of a Closed-Loop Strap Down Attitude System for an Ultrahigh Altitude Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Fife, Mike; Brashear, Logan

    1997-01-01

    A low-cost attitude system has been developed for an ultrahigh altitude flight experiment. The experiment uses a remotely piloted sailplane, with the wings modified for flight at altitudes greater than 100,000 ft. Mission requirements deem it necessary to measure the aircraft pitch and bank angles with accuracy better than 1.0 deg and heading with accuracy better than 5.0 deg. Vehicle cost restrictions and gross weight limits make installing a commercial inertial navigation system unfeasible. Instead, a low-cost attitude system was developed using strap down components. Monte Carlo analyses verified that two vector measurements, magnetic field and velocity, are required to completely stabilize the error equations. In the estimating algorithm, body-axis observations of the airspeed vector and the magnetic field are compared against the inertial velocity vector and a magnetic-field reference model. Residuals are fed back to stabilize integration of rate gyros. The effectiveness of the estimating algorithm was demonstrated using data from the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Systems Research Aircraft (SRA) flight tests. The algorithm was applied with good results to a maximum 10' pitch and bank angles. Effects of wind shears were evaluated and, for most cases, can be safely ignored.

  13. Flight experiments and evolutionary development of a laser-propelled transatmospheric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Franklin B., Jr.; Myrabo, Leik N.; Messitt, Donald G.

    1998-09-01

    In a series of spectacular experiments conducted at the High Energy Laser Systems Test Facility (HELSTF), White Sands Missile Range (WSMR), NM, using 13- to 15-cm diameter, 40- to 60-g vehicles designed to fly on the 10 kW PLVTS pulsed carbon dioxide laser (1 kJ pulses for 30 microsecond duration at 10 Hz), Prof. Leik Myrabo of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) and Dr. Franklin Mead of the Air Force Research Laboratory's (AFRL) Propulsion Directorate, have been successfully flying laser propelled Lightcraft under a joint Air Force/NASA flight demonstration program. The axisymmetric Lightcraft vehicles are propelled by airbreathing, pulsed- detonation engines with an infinite fuel specific impulse. Impulse coupling coefficients have been measured with ballistic pendulums as well as a piezoelectric load cell and fall in the range of 100 to 200 N/MW. Horizontal wire-guided flights up to 400 ft, using a unique laser beam pointing and tracking guidance system, have demonstrated up to 2.0 G's acceleration measured by a photo-optic array. Spin-stabilized free-flights with active tracking/beam control have been accomplished to altitudes of 15.25 meters. This paper will summarize the progress made to date on the Lightcraft Technology Demonstration flight test program, since the first 12 - 14 July 1996, experiments at HELSTF.

  14. Flight Validation of On-Demand Operations: The Deep Space One Beacon Monitor Operations Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Jay; Sherwood, Rob; Sue, Miles; Szijjarto, John

    2000-01-01

    After a brief overview of the operational concept, this paper will provide a detailed description of the _as-flown_ flight software components, the DS1 experiment plan, and experiment results to date. Special emphasis will be given to experiment results and lessons learned since the basic system design has been previously reported. Mission scenarios where beacon operations is highly applicable will be described. Detailed cost savings estimates for a sample science mission will be provided as will cumulative savings that are possible over the next fifteen years of NASA missions.

  15. LDEF Space Plasma-High Voltage Drainage Experiment post-flight results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaung, J. Y.; Blakkolb, B. K.; Wong, W. C.; Ryan, L. E.; Schurig, H. J.; Taylor, W. W. L.

    1993-01-01

    The Space Plasma-High Voltage Drainage Experiment (SP-HVDE) was comprised of two identical experimental trays. With one tray located on the leading (ram facing, B10) edge and the other located on the trailing (wake facing, D4) edge of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), it was possible to directly compare the effects of ram and wake spacecraft environments on charged dielectric materials. Six arrays of Kapton dielectric samples of 2 mil, 3 mil, and 5 mil thicknesses maintained at +/- 300, +/- 500, and +/- 1000 voltage bias formed the experimental matrix of each tray. In addition, each tray carried two solar cell strings, one biased at +300 volts and the other at -300 volts, to study current leakage from High Voltage Solar Arrays (HVSA). The SP-HVDE provides the first direct, long-term, in-flight measurements of average leakage current through dielectric materials under electric stress. The experiment also yields information on the long term stability of the bulk dielectric properties of such materials. Data and findings of the SP-HVDE are an extension of those from shorter term flight experiments such as the PIX-1 (Plasma Interaction Experiment) and PIX-2 and are therefore valuable in the design and evaluation of long-lived space systems with high voltage systems exposed to the low earth orbital environment. A summary of the SP-HVDE post flight analysis final report delivered to the LDEF Project Office under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is presented.

  16. The " Daphnia" Lynx Mark I Suborbital Flight Experiment: Hardware Qualification at the Drop Tower Bremen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knie, Miriam; Schoppmann, Kathrin; Eck, Hendrik; Ribeiro, Bernard Wolfschoon; Laforsch, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The Drop Tower Bremen, a ground-based facility enabling research under real microgravity conditions, is an excellent platform for testing new types of experimental hardware to ensure full performance when deployed in costly and rare flight opportunities such as suborbital flights. Here we describe the " Daphnia" experiment which will fly on XCOR Aerospace Lynx Mark I and our experience from the hardware tests with the catapult system at the drop tower. The aim of the " Daphnia" experiment is to obtain data on the biological performance of daphnids and predator-prey interactions in microgravity, which are important for the development of aquatic bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS). The experiment consists of two subunits: The first unit is dedicated to predator-prey interactions, where behavioural analysis should reveal if microgravity interfere with prey ( Daphnia) detection or feeding and therefore may interrupt the trophic cascade. The functioning of such an artificial food web is indispensable for a long-lasting BLSS suitable for long-duration manned space missions or Earth-based explorations to extreme habitats. The second unit is designed to investigate the impact of microgravity on gene expression and the cytoskeleton in Daphnia. Next to data collection, the real microgravity conditions at the drop tower have helped to identify the weak points of the " Daphnia" experimental hardware and lead to further improvement. Hence, the drop tower is ideal for testing new experimental hardware which is indispensable before the implementation in suborbital flights.

  17. Laboratory and in-flight experiments to evaluate 3-D audio display technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericson, Mark; Mckinley, Richard; Kibbe, Marion; Francis, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory and in-flight experiments were conducted to evaluate 3-D audio display technology for cockpit applications. A 3-D audio display generator was developed which digitally encodes naturally occurring direction information onto any audio signal and presents the binaural sound over headphones. The acoustic image is stabilized for head movement by use of an electromagnetic head-tracking device. In the laboratory, a 3-D audio display generator was used to spatially separate competing speech messages to improve the intelligibility of each message. Up to a 25 percent improvement in intelligibility was measured for spatially separated speech at high ambient noise levels (115 dB SPL). During the in-flight experiments, pilots reported that spatial separation of speech communications provided a noticeable improvement in intelligibility. The use of 3-D audio for target acquisition was also investigated. In the laboratory, 3-D audio enabled the acquisition of visual targets in about two seconds average response time at 17 degrees accuracy. During the in-flight experiments, pilots correctly identified ground targets 50, 75, and 100 percent of the time at separation angles of 12, 20, and 35 degrees, respectively. In general, pilot performance in the field with the 3-D audio display generator was as expected, based on data from laboratory experiments.

  18. A guidance law for the aeroassisted plane change maneuver in the presence of atmospheric uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishne, D.; Speyer, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    A stochastic feedback control law for a space vehicle performing an aeroassisted plane-change maneuver is developed. The stochastic control law is designed to minimize the energy loss while taking into consideration the uncertainty in the atmospheric density. The solution is based on expansion of the stochastic Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation (or dynamic programming) about a zeroth-order known integrable solution. The resulting guidance law is expressed as a series expansion in the noise power spectral densities. A numerical example indicates the potential improvement of this method.

  19. Countermeasure for reducing post-flight orthostatic intolerance: Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) experiment E140

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John B.

    1993-01-01

    Investigators have shown that after 1-2 weeks of bed rest ingestion of 1000 ml of a salt water solution during 4 hours of continuous exposure to 30 mm Hg of lower body negative pressure will protect plasma volume and orthostatic function for up to 24 hours. We hypothesize that a similar countermeasure will reduce the effects of fluid loss induced by headward fluid shift during space flight. The objective of this flight experiment is to evaluate the efficacy of the proposed countermeasure in reversing these effects on the cardiovascular system. Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) involves exposing the legs and lower abdomen to reduced air pressure. The LBNP device is an air-tight chamber that seals the subject's waist to enclose the lower body. As used in this experiment, LBNP provides both the candidate treatment as well as the means of assessing the effectiveness of the treatment.

  20. Open-Loop HIRF Experiments Performed on a Fault Tolerant Flight Control Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppen, Daniel M.

    1997-01-01

    During the third quarter of 1996, the Closed-Loop Systems Laboratory was established at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to study the effects of High Intensity Radiated Fields on complex avionic systems and control system components. This new facility provided a link and expanded upon the existing capabilities of the High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory at LaRC that were constructed and certified during 1995-96. The scope of the Closed-Loop Systems Laboratory is to place highly integrated avionics instrumentation into a high intensity radiated field environment, interface the avionics to a real-time flight simulation that incorporates aircraft dynamics, engines, sensors, actuators and atmospheric turbulence, and collect, analyze, and model aircraft performance. This paper describes the layout and functionality of the Closed-Loop Systems Laboratory, and the open-loop calibration experiments that led up to the commencement of closed-loop real-time flight experiments.

  1. Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment (VSTFE): Unified Stability System (USS). Description and Users' Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozendaal, Rodger A.; Behbehani, Roxanna

    1990-01-01

    NASA initiated the Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment (VSTFE) to establish a boundary layer transition database for laminar flow wing design. For this experiment, full-span upper surface gloves were fitted to a variable sweep F-14 aircraft. The development of an improved laminar boundary layer stability analysis system called the Unified Stability System (USS) is documented and results of its use on the VSTFE flight data are shown. The USS consists of eight computer codes. The theoretical background of the system is described, as is the input, output, and usage hints. The USS is capable of analyzing boundary layer stability over a wide range of disturbance frequencies and orientations, making it possible to use different philosophies in calculating the growth of disturbances on sweptwings.

  2. Flight Experience from Space Photovoltaic Concentrator Arrays and its Implication on Terrestrial Concentrator Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael F., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Nearly all photovoltaic solar arrays flown in space have used a planar (non- concentrating) design. However, there have been a few notable exceptions where photovoltaic concentrators have been tested and used as the mission s primary power source. Among these are the success experienced by the SCARLET (Solar Concentrator Array with Refractive Linear Element Technology) concept used to power NASA's Deep Space 1 mission and the problems encountered by the original Boeing 702 reflective trough concentrator design. This presentation will give a brief overview of past photovoltaic concentrator systems that have flown in space, specifically addressing the valuable lessons learned from flight experience, and other viable concentrator concepts that are being proposed for the future. The general trends of this flight experience will be noted and discussed with regard to its implications on terrestrial photovoltaic concentrator designs.

  3. The flight experiment ANITA—a high performance air analyser for manned space cabins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuffler, T.; Mosebach, H.; Kampf, D.; Honne, A.; Tan, G.

    2004-08-01

    Analysing Interferometer for Ambient Air (ANITA) is a flight experiment as precursor for a permanent continuous trace gas monitoring system on the International Space Station (ISS). For over 10 years, under various ESA contracts the flight experiment was defined, designed, breadboarded and set up. For the safety of the crew, ANITA can detect and quantify quasi on-line and simultaneously 32 trace gases with ppm or sub-ppm detection limits. The self-standing measurement system is based on Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR) technology. The system represents a versatile air monitor allowing for the first time the detection and monitoring of trace gas dynamics of a spacecraft atmosphere. It is envisaged to accommodate ANITA in a Destiny (US LAB) Express Rack on the ISS. The transportation to the ISS is planned with the first ATV 'Jules Verne'. The options are either the Space Shuttle or the Automated Transfer Vehicle.

  4. Development of the Two Phase Flow Separator Experiment for a Reduced Gravity Aircraft Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golliher, Eric; Gotti, Daniel; Owens, Jay; Gilkey, Kelly; Pham, Nang; Stehno, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The recent hardware development and testing of a reduced gravity aircraft flight experiment has provided valuable insights for the future design of the Two Phase Flow Separator Experiment (TPFSE). The TPFSE is scheduled to fly within the Fluids Integration Rack (FIR) aboard the International Space Station (ISS) in 2020. The TPFSE studies the operational limits of gas and liquid separation of passive cyclonic separators. A passive cyclonic separator utilizes only the inertia of the incoming flow to accomplish the liquid-gas separation. Efficient phase separation is critical for environmental control and life support systems, such as recovery of clean water from bioreactors, for long duration human spaceflight missions. The final low gravity aircraft flight took place in December 2015 aboard NASA's C9 airplane.

  5. Rigidity Spectra of Protons and Helium as Measured in the First Flight of the ATIC Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zatsepin, V. I.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Batkov, K. E.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunasingha, R. M.

    2003-01-01

    ATIC (Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter) is a balloon borne experiment designed to measure cosmic ray composition for elements from hydrogen to iron and their energy spectra from 30 GeV to near 100 TeV. It is comprised of a fully active BGO calorimeter, a carbon interaction target, scintillator hodoscopes, and a silicon matrix that is used as a charge detector in the experiment. ATIC had two successful balloon flights in Antarctica: from 28 Dec 2000 to 13 Jan 2001 (ATIC-1) and from 29 Dec 2002 to 18 Jan 2003 (ATIC-2). Preliminary rigidity spectra of protons and helium nuclei and their ratio are presented for the test flight (ATIC-1). Particular attention is given to problems associated with measuring energy.

  6. Scaling analysis applied to the NORVEX code development and thermal energy flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skarda, J. Raymond Lee; Namkoong, David; Darling, Douglas

    1991-01-01

    A scaling analysis is used to study the dominant flow processes that occur in molten phase change material (PCM) under 1 g and microgravity conditions. Results of the scaling analysis are applied to the development of the NORVEX (NASA Oak Ridge Void Experiment) computer program and the preparation of the Thermal Energy Storage (TES) flight experiment. The NORVEX computer program which is being developed to predict melting and freezing with void formation in a 1 g or microgravity environment of the PCM is described. NORVEX predictions are compared with the scaling and similarity results. The approach to be used to validate NORVEX with TES flight data is also discussed. Similarity and scaling show that the inertial terms must be included as part of the momentum equation in either the 1 g or microgravity environment (a creeping flow assumption is invalid). A 10(exp -4) environment was found to be a suitable microgravity environment for the proposed PCM.

  7. Test results and flight experience of ball bearing momentum and reaction wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, W.

    1990-01-01

    The required satellite mission durations and levels of reliability have been considerably increased: While in the beginning of the 70's 3 to 5 year missions were planned, the standard is now 10 years with an expansion to 15 years and more for such programs as INTELSAT VII. Based on a 20 year test and flight experience with basically the same design, ball bearing momentum and reaction wheels with the required 15 year mission capability can be provided.

  8. Mineral balance, experiment M071. [space flight effects on human mineral metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whedon, G. D.; Rambaut, P. C.; Smith, M. C., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Concern for the long term metabolic consequences of weightless flight was the basis for the conception of the Skylab medical experiment to measure mineral balance. Proper interpretation of obtained data that diminished atmospheric pressure has no appreciable effect, or at least no protective effect, on calcium metabolism. The absence of changes in calcium metabolism indicates that a stable baseline observation has been made for Skylab as far as the effects of atmosphere or calcium metabolism are concerned.

  9. [Experiment with rats on a 22-day flight on the "Kosmos-605" biological satellite (objectives and methods)].

    PubMed

    Il'in, E A; Serova, L V; Noskin, A D

    1976-01-01

    In 1974 a rat experiment was carried out onboard the Cosmos-605 biosatellite. Inflight Wistar rats were kept unrestrained in small cages. The cages were equipped with a feeder, water supply, light source and a ventilation device. The state of the animals was assessed with respect to their motor activity. The flight experiment was preceded by a number of preparatory runs and testinns that were completed with an end-to-end experiment in a biosatellite mockup. The flight experiment was paralleled by the ground-based synchroneous experiment which simulated almost entirely the flight profile. For each experiment rats were selected and trained during a month's observation. Postflight rats were exposed to clinical, physiological, morphological, cytochemical and biochemical investigations. Tissue examinations were performed on the 2nd-3rd day (20 rats) and 26-27th day (12 rats) after flight. Four rats were kept to study remote aftereffects.

  10. Ground-facilities at the DLR Institute of Aerospace Medicine for preparation of flight experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmersbach, Ruth; Hendrik Anken, Ralf; Hauslage, Jens; von der Wiesche, Melanie; Baerwalde, Sven; Schuber, Marianne

    In order to investigate the influence of altered gravity on biological systems and to identify gravisensitive processes, various experimental platforms have been developed, which are useful to simulate weightlessness or are able to produce hypergravity. At the Institute of Aerospace Medicine, DLR Cologne, a broad spectrum of applications is offered to scientists: clinostats with one rotation axis and variable rotation speeds for cultivation of small objects (including aquatic organisms) in simulated weightlessness conditions, for online microscopic observations and for online kinetic measurements. Own research concentrates on comparative studies with other kinds of methods to simulate weightlessness, also available at the institute: Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) for aquatic studies, Random Positioning Machine (RPM; manufactured by Dutch Space, Leiden, The Netherlands). Correspondingly, various centrifuge devices are available to study different test objects under hypergravity conditions -such as NIZEMI, a slow rotating centrifuge microscope, and MUSIC, a multi-sample centrifuge. Mainly for experiments with human test subjects (artificial gravity), but also for biological systems or for testing various kinds of (flight-) hardware, the SAHC, a short arm human centrifuge -loaned by ESA -was installed in Cologne and completes our experimental scenario. Furthermore, due to our specific tasks such as providing laboratories during the German Parabolic Flight Experiments starting from Cologne and being the Facility Responsible Center for BIOLAB, a science rack in the Columbus module aboard the ISS, scientists have the possibility for an optimal preparation of their flight experiments.

  11. Fluid Acquisition and Resupply Experiments on Space Shuttle Flights STS-53 and STS-57

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, S. M.; Tegart, J. R.; Driscoll, S. L.; Sledd, J. D.; Hastings, L. J.

    2011-01-01

    The Fluid Acquisition and Resupply Experiment (FARE) program, managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center Space Propulsion Branch with Martin Marietta Civil Space and Communications as the contractor, consisted of two flights designated FARE I and FARE II. FARE I flew in December 1992 on STS-53 with a screen channel liquid acquisition device (LAD) and FARE II flew in June 1993 on STS-57 with a vane-type LAD. Thus, the FARE I and II flights represent the two basic LAD categories usually considered for in-space fluid management. Although both LAD types have been used extensively, the usefulness of the on-orbit data has been constrained by the lack of experimentation beyond predicted performance limits, including both propellant fill and expulsion. Therefore, the FARE tests were designed to obtain data that would satisfy two primary objectives: (1) Demonstrate the performance of the two types of LADs, screen channel and vane, and (2) support the anchoring of analytical models. Both flights were considered highly successful in meeting these two primary objectives.

  12. Insect gravitational biology: ground-based and shuttle flight experiments using the beetle Tribolium castaneum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, R. L.; Abbott, M. K.; Denell, R. E.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Many of the traditional experimental advantages of insects recommend their use in studies of gravitational and space biology. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is an obvious choice for studies of the developmental significance of gravity vectors because of the unparalleled description of regulatory mechanisms controlling oogenesis and embryogenesis. However, we demonstrate that Drosophila could not survive the conditions mandated for particular flight opportunities on the Space Shuttle. With the exception of Drosophila, the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, is the insect best characterized with respect to molecular embryology and most frequently utilized for past space flights. We show that Tribolium is dramatically more resistant to confinement in small sealed volumes. In preparation for flight experiments we characterize the course and timing of the onset of oogenesis in newly eclosed adult females. Finally, we present results from two shuttle flights which indicate that a number of aspects of the development and function of the female reproductive system are not demonstrably sensitive to microgravity. Available information supports the utility of this insect for future studies of gravitational biology.

  13. Development of a low-aspect ratio fin for flight research experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richwine, David M.; Delfrate, John H.

    1994-01-01

    A second-generation flight test fixture, developed at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, offers a generic testbed for aerodynamic and fluid mechanics research. The new fixture, a low-aspect ratio vertical fin shape mounted on the centerline of an F-15B aircraft lower fuselage, is designed for flight research at Mach numbers up to 2.0. The new fixture is a composite structure with a modular configuration and removable components for functional flexibility. This report describes the multidisciplinary design and analysis approach used to develop the fixture. The approach integrates conservative assumptions with simple analysis techniques to minimize the time and cost associated with its development. Presented are the principal disciplines required for this effort, which include aerodynamics, structures, stability, and operational considerations. In addition, preliminary results from the first phase of flight testing are presented. Acceptable directional stability and flow quality are documented and show agreement with predictions. Future envelope expansion activities will minimize current limitations so that the fixture can be used for a wide variety of high-speed aerodynamic and fluid mechanics research experiments.

  14. Design and test of a mechanically pumped two-phase thermal control flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grote, M. G.; Stark, J. A.; Butler, C. D.; Mcintosh, R.

    1987-01-01

    A flight experiment of a mechanically pumped two-phase ammonia thermal control system, incorporating a number of new component designs, has been assembled and tested in a 1-g environment. Additional microgravity tests are planned on the Space Shuttle when Shuttle flights are resumed. The primary purpose of this experiment is to evaluate the operation of a mechanically pumped two-phase ammonia system, with emphasis on determining the performance of an evaporative Two-Phase Mounting Plate. The experiment also evaluates the performance of other specially designed components, such as the two-phase reservoir for temperature control, condensing radiator/heat sink, spiral tube boiler, and pressure drop experiment. The 1-g tests have shown that start-up of the two-phase experiment is easily accomplished with only a partial fill of ammonia. The experiment maintained a constant mounting plate temperature without flow rate controls over a very wide range of heat loads, flow rates, inlet flow conditions and exit qualities. The tests also showed the successful operation of the mounting plate in the heat sharing condensing mode.

  15. First Flight of the ASTROCULTURE™ Experiment as A Part of The U.S. Shuttle/MIR Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bula, R. J.; Zhou, Weijia

    A number of space-based experiments have been conducted to assess the impact of microgravity on plant growth and development. In general, these experiments did not identify any profound impact of microgravity on plant growth and development, though investigations to study seed development have indicated difficulty in plants completing their reproductive cycle. However, it was not clear whether the lack of seed production was due to gravity effects or some other environmental condition prevailing in the unit used for conducting the experiment. The ASTROCULTURE™ flight unit contains a totally enclosed plant chamber in which all the critically important environmental conditions are controlled. Normal wheat (Triticum asetivum L.) growth and development in the ASTROCULTURE™ flight unit was observed during a ground experiment conducted prior to the space experiment. Subsequent to the ground experiment, the flight unit was transported to MIR by STS-89, as part of the U.S. Shuttle/MIR program, in an attempt to determine if super dwarf wheat plants that were germinated in microgravity would grow normally and produce seeds. The experiment was initiated on-orbit after the flight unit was transferred from the Space Shuttle to MIR. The ASTROCULTURE™ flight unit performed nominally for the first 24 hours after the flight unit was activated, and then the unit stopped functioning abruptly. Since it was not possible to return the unit to nominal operation it was decided to terminate the experiment. On return of the flight unit, it was confirmed that the control computer of the ASTROCULTURE™ flight unit sustained a radiation hit that affected the control software embedded in the computer. This experience points out that at high orbital inclinations, such as that of MIR and that projected for the International Space Station, the danger of encountering harmful radiation effects are likely unless the electronic components of the flight hardware are resistant to such impacts

  16. First flight of the ASTROCULTURE (TM) experiment as a part of the U.S. Shuttle/MIR program.

    PubMed

    Bula, R J; Zhou, W

    2000-01-01

    A number of space-based experiments have been conducted to assess the impact of microgravity on plant growth and development. In general, these experiments did not identify any profound impact of microgravity on plant growth and development, though investigations to study seed development have indicated difficulty in plants completing their reproductive cycle. However, it was not clear whether the lack of seed production was due to gravity effects or some other environmental condition prevailing in the unit used for conducting the experiment. The ASTROCULTURE (TM) flight unit contains a totally enclosed plant chamber in which all the critically important environmental conditions are controlled. Normal wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) growth and development in the ASTROCULTURE (TM) flight unit was observed during a ground experiment conducted prior to the space experiment. Subsequent to the ground experiment, the flight unit was transported to MIR by STS-89, as part of the U.S. Shuttle/MIR program, in an attempt to determine if super dwarf wheat plants that were germinated in microgravity would grow normally and produce seeds. The experiment was initiated on-orbit after the flight unit was transferred from the Space Shuttle to MIR. The ASTROCULTURE (TM) flight unit performed nominally for the first 24 hours after the flight unit was activated, and then the unit stopped functioning abruptly. Since it was not possible to return the unit to nominal operation it was decided to terminate the experiment. On return of the flight unit, it was confirmed that the control computer of the ASTROCULTURE (TM) flight unit sustained a radiation hit that affected the control software embedded in the computer. This experience points out that at high orbital inclinations, such as that of MIR and that projected for the International Space Station, the danger of encountering harmful radiation effects are likely unless the electronic components of the flight hardware are resistant to such

  17. Design and Implementation of the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment on Space Shuttle Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanos, Theodoros A.; Micklos, Ann

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to better the understanding of high speed aerodynamics, a series of flight experiments were installed on Space Shuttle Discovery during the STS-119 and STS-128 missions. This experiment, known as the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment (BLTFE), provided the technical community with actual entry flight data from a known height protuberance at Mach numbers at and above Mach 15. Any such data above Mach 15 is irreproducible in a laboratory setting. Years of effort have been invested in obtaining this valuable data, and many obstacles had to be overcome in order to ensure the success of implementing an Orbiter modification. Many Space Shuttle systems were involved in the installation of appropriate components that revealed 'concurrent engineering' was a key integration tool. This allowed the coordination of all various parts and pieces which had to be sequenced appropriately and installed at the right time. Several issues encountered include Orbiter configuration and access, design requirements versus current layout, implementing the modification versus typical processing timelines, and optimizing the engineering design cycles and changes. Open lines of communication within the entire modification team were essential to project success as the team was spread out across the United States, from NASA Kennedy Space Center in Florida, to NASA Johnson Space Center in Texas, to Boeing Huntington Beach, California among others. The forum permits the discussion of processing concerns from the design phase to the implementation phase, which eventually saw the successful flights and data acquisition on STS-119 in March 2009 and on STS-128 in September 2009.

  18. Soviet experiments aimed at investigating the influence of space flight factors on the physiology of animals and man.

    PubMed

    Parin, V V; Gazenko, O G

    1963-01-01

    Results are given of biological experiments on space ship-satellites II, III, IV and V, and of scientific investigations made during the flights of Cosmonauts Gagarin and Titov aboard space ships Vostok I and Vostok II. Physiological reactions to the action of the flight stress-factors are not of a pathological character. In the post-flight period no alterations in health conditions of either cosmonauts or animals were observed. At the same time some peculiarities which were revealed while analyzing physiological reactions and a number of biological indices require further investigations. The most important tasks remaining are to study the influence of protracted weightlessness, of the biological action of space radiation, of the action of acceleration stresses after prolonged stay under zero-gravity conditions and also to analyze the influence on the organism of the whole combination of spaceflight factors, including emotional strain. In the Soviet Union, a great number of biological experiments have been conducted with a view to elucidating the action of space flight factors on living organisms and the design of systems necessary to ensure healthy activity during flight aboard rocket space vehicles. The first flight experiments with animals were conducted by means of geophysical rockets. The next step in this direction was made by the launching of Sputnik II in 1957 and by experiments on space ship-satellites in 1960-61. The main purpose of flight and laboratory investigations was to obtain the objective scientific criteria essential for ensuring the safety of manned space flight.

  19. The Numerical Studies Program for the Atmospheric General Circulation Experiment (AGCE) for Spacelab Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowlis, W. W. (Editor); Davis, M. H. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The atmospheric general circulation experiment (AGCE) numerical design for Spacelab flights was studied. A spherical baroclinic flow experiment which models the large scale circulations of the Earth's atmosphere was proposed. Gravity is simulated by a radial dielectric body force. The major objective of the AGCE is to study nonlinear baroclinic wave flows in spherical geometry. Numerical models must be developed which accurately predict the basic axisymmetric states and the stability of nonlinear baroclinic wave flows. A three dimensional, fully nonlinear, numerical model and the AGCE based on the complete set of equations is required. Progress in the AGCE numerical design studies program is reported.

  20. A landmark recognition and tracking experiment for flight on the Shuttle/Advanced Technology Laboratory (ATL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    The preliminary design of an experiment for landmark recognition and tracking from the Shuttle/Advanced Technology Laboratory is described. It makes use of parallel coherent optical processing to perform correlation tests between landmarks observed passively with a telescope and previously made holographic matched filters. The experimental equipment including the optics, the low power laser, the random access file of matched filters and the electro-optical readout device are described. A real time optically excited liquid crystal device is recommended for performing the input non-coherent optical to coherent optical interface function. A development program leading to a flight experiment in 1981 is outlined.

  1. Design and Preparation of a Particle Dynamics Space Flight Experiment, SHIVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trolinger, James; L'Esperance, Drew; Rangel, Roger; Coimbra, Carlos; Wiltherow, William

    2003-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper describes the flight experiment, supporting ground science, and the design rationale for project SHIVA (Spaceflight Holography Investigation in a Virtual Apparatus). SHIVA is a fundamental study of particle dynamics in fluids in microgravity. Gravity often dominates the equations of motion of a particle in a fluid, so microgravity provides an ideal environment to study the other forces, such as the pressure and viscous drag and especially the Basset history force. We have developed diagnostic recording methods using holography to save all of the particle field optical characteristics, essentially allowing the experiment to be transferred from space back to earth in what we call the "virtual apparatus" for on-earth microgravity experimentation. We can quantify precisely the three-dimensional motion of sets of particles, allowing us to test and apply new analytical solutions developed by members of the team as reported in the 2001 Conference (Banff, Canada). In addition to employing microgravity to augment the fundamental study of these forces, the resulting data will allow us to quantify and understand the ISS environment with great accuracy. This paper shows how we used both experiment and theory to identify and resolve critical issues and produce an optimal the study. We examined the response of particles of specific gravity from 0.1 to 20, with radii from 0.2 to 2mm. to fluid oscillation at frequencies up to 80 Hz with amplitudes up to 200 microns. To observe some of the interesting effects predicted by the new solutions requires the precise location of the position of a particle in three dimensions. To this end we have developed digital holography algorithms that enable particle position location to a small fraction of a pixel in a CCD array. The spaceflight system will record holograms both on film and electronically. The electronic holograms can be downlinked providing real time data, essentially acting like a remote window into the ISS

  2. Optimal reentry guidance for aeroassisted orbit transfer vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calise, Anthony J.; Bae, Gyoung H.

    A three-state model is presented for analyzing the problem of optimal changes in heading with minimum energy loss for a hypersonic gliding vehicle. A further model order reduction to a single state model is examined using singular perturbation theory. The optimal solution for the reduced problem defines an optimal altitude profile dependent on the current energy of the vehicle. A separate boundary-layer analysis is used to account for altitude and flight path angle dynamics, and to obtain lift and bank angle control solutions. By considering alternative approximations to solve the boundary-layer problem, three guidance laws are obtained, each having a feedback form. The guidance laws are evaluated for a hypothetical vehicle, and compared to an optimal solution obtained using a multiple shooting algorithm.

  3. Optimal reentry guidance for aeroassisted orbit transfer vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, Anthony J.; Bae, Gyoung H.

    1988-01-01

    A three-state model is presented for analyzing the problem of optimal changes in heading with minimum energy loss for a hypersonic gliding vehicle. A further model order reduction to a single state model is examined using singular perturbation theory. The optimal solution for the reduced problem defines an optimal altitude profile dependent on the current energy of the vehicle. A separate boundary-layer analysis is used to account for altitude and flight path angle dynamics, and to obtain lift and bank angle control solutions. By considering alternative approximations to solve the boundary-layer problem, three guidance laws are obtained, each having a feedback form. The guidance laws are evaluated for a hypothetical vehicle, and compared to an optimal solution obtained using a multiple shooting algorithm.

  4. Optimal aeroassisted orbital transfer with plane change using collocation and nonlinear programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Yun. Y.; Nelson, R. L.; Young, D. H.

    1990-01-01

    The fuel optimal control problem arising in the non-planar orbital transfer employing aeroassisted technology is addressed. The mission involves the transfer from high energy orbit (HEO) to low energy orbit (LEO) with orbital plane change. The basic strategy here is to employ a combination of propulsive maneuvers in space and aerodynamic maneuvers in the atmosphere. The basic sequence of events for the aeroassisted HEO to LEO transfer consists of three phases. In the first phase, the orbital transfer begins with a deorbit impulse at HEO which injects the vehicle into an elliptic transfer orbit with perigee inside the atmosphere. In the second phase, the vehicle is optimally controlled by lift and bank angle modulations to perform the desired orbital plane change and to satisfy heating constraints. Because of the energy loss during the turn, an impulse is required to initiate the third phase to boost the vehicle back to the desired LEO orbital altitude. The third impulse is then used to circularize the orbit at LEO. The problem is solved by a direct optimization technique which uses piecewise polynomial representation for the state and control variables and collocation to satisfy the differential equations. This technique converts the optimal control problem into a nonlinear programming problem which is solved numerically. Solutions were obtained for cases with and without heat constraints and for cases of different orbital inclination changes. The method appears to be more powerful and robust than other optimization methods. In addition, the method can handle complex dynamical constraints.

  5. Research instrumentation requirements for flight/wind-tunnel tests of the YF-12 propulsion system and related flight experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweikhard, W. G.; Montoya, E. J.

    1974-01-01

    Description of the requirements for a comprehensive flight and wind-tunnel propulsion research program to examine the predictability of inlet performance, evaluate the effects of high-frequency pressure phenomena on inlets, and investigate improved control concepts in order to cope with airframe interactions. This program is unique in that it requires precise similarity of the geometry of the flight vehicle and tunnel modes; the test conditions, including local flow at the inlet; and instrumentation. Although few wind-tunnel instrumentation problems exist, many problems emerge during flight tests because of the thermal environment. Mach 3 flight temperatures create unique problems with transducers, connectors, and wires. All must be capable of withstanding continuous 1000 F temperatures, as well as the mechanical stresses imposed by vibration and thermal cycling.

  6. NASA Alternative-Fuel Effects on Contrails and Cruise Emissions (ACCESS) Flight Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, B. E.; Moore, R.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Shook, M.; Winstead, E.; Ziemba, L. D.; Bulzan, D. L.; Brown, A.; Beaton, B.; Schlager, H.

    2014-12-01

    Although the emission performance of gas-turbine engines burning renewable aviation fuels have been thoroughly documented in recent ground-based studies, there is still great uncertainty regarding how the fuels effect aircraft exhaust composition and contrail formation at cruise altitudes. To fill this information gap, the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate sponsored the ACCESS flight series to make detailed measurements of trace gases, aerosols and ice particles in the near-field behind the NASA DC-8 aircraft as it burned either standard petroleum-based fuel of varying sulfur content or a 50:50 blend of standard fuel and a hydro-treated esters and fatty acid (HEFA) jet fuel produced from camelina plant oil. ACCESS 1, conducted in spring 2013 near Palmdale CA, focused on refining flight plans and sampling techniques and used the instrumented NASA Langley HU-25 aircraft to document DC-8 emissions and contrails on five separate flights of ~2 hour duration. ACCESS 2, conducted from Palmdale in May 2014, engaged partners from the Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) and National Research Council-Canada to provide additional scientific expertise and sampling aircraft (Falcon 20 and CT-133, respectively) with more extensive trace gas, particle, or air motion measurement capability. Eight, muliti-aircraft research flights of 2 to 4 hour duration were conducted to document the emissions and contrail properties of the DC-8 as it 1) burned low sulfur Jet A, high sulfur Jet A or low sulfur Jet A/HEFA blend, 2) flew at altitudes between 6 and 11 km, and 3) operated its engines at three different fuel flow rates. This presentation further describes the ACCESS flight experiments, examines fuel type and thrust setting impacts on engine emissions, and compares cruise-altitude observations with similar data acquired in ground-test venues.

  7. Alternative-Fuel Effects on Contrails & Cruise Emissions (ACCESS-2) Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    Although the emission performance of gas-turbine engines burning renewable aviation fuels have been thoroughly documented in recent ground-based studies, there is still great uncertainty regarding how the fuels effect aircraft exhaust composition and contrail formation at cruise altitudes. To fill this information gap, the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate sponsored the ACCESS flight series to make detailed measurements of trace gases, aerosols and ice particles in the near-field behind the NASA DC-8 aircraft as it burned either standard petroleum-based fuel of varying sulfur content or a 50:50 blend of standard fuel and a hydro-treated esters and fatty acid (HEFA) jet fuel produced from camelina plant oil. ACCESS 1, conducted in spring 2013 near Palmdale CA, focused on refining flight plans and sampling techniques and used the instrumented NASA Langley HU-25 aircraft to document DC-8 emissions and contrails on five separate flights of approx.2 hour duration. ACCESS 2, conducted from Palmdale in May 2014, engaged partners from the Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) and National Research Council-Canada to provide additional scientific expertise and sampling aircraft (Falcon 20 and CT-133, respectively) with more extensive trace gas, particle, or air motion measurement capability. Eight, muliti-aircraft research flights of 2 to 4 hour duration were conducted to document the emissions and contrail properties of the DC-8 as it 1) burned low sulfur Jet A, high sulfur Jet A or low sulfur Jet A/HEFA blend, 2) flew at altitudes between 6 and 11 km, and 3) operated its engines at three different fuel flow rates. This presentation further describes the ACCESS flight experiments, examines fuel type and thrust setting impacts on engine emissions, and compares cruise-altitude observations with similar data acquired in ground tests.

  8. Results of recent fluid physics and transport phenomena space flight experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Singh, Bhim S.

    2000-01-01

    A number of space flight experiments in fluid physics and transport phenomena have been conducted under the auspices of NASA's Office of Life and Microgravity Science and Applications. Results of these have been reported in various journals and technical society meetings. As preparations for a new generation of low gravity experiments to be conducted on ISS are well underway, it is useful to review the results of experiments conducted on the ``Shuttle.'' This paper summarizes the key findings of several recent experiments and emphasizes that such low earth orbit spacecraft should be considered as resource in which experiments can be conducted in near weightless conditions for extended time periods. It is hoped that the scientific community will realize the value of a ``microgravity laboratory'' and, stimulated by past results, will propose new experiments that take maximum advantage of the facilities and long duration microgravity conditions afforded by the ISS. The experiments described in this paper include: Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment, Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment, Pool Boiling Experiment, Thermocapillary Migration of Bubbles and Drops, Electrohydrodynamics of Liquid Bridges, Colloidal Disorder Order Transition, Critical Dynamics of Fluids, Mechanics of Granular Materials, and the Angular Liquid Bridge and Interface Configuration Experiment. .

  9. Historical parallels of biological space experiments from Soyuz, Salyut and Mir to Shenzhou flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechitailo, Galina S.; Kondyurin, Alexey

    2016-07-01

    Human exploitation of space is a great achievement of our civilization. After the first space flights a development of artificial biological environment in space systems is a second big step. First successful biological experiments on a board of space station were performed on Salyut and Mir stations in 70-90th of last century such as - first long time cultivation of plants in space (wheat, linen, lettuce, crepis); - first flowers in space (Arabidopsis); - first harvesting of seeds in space (Arabidopsis); - first harvesting of roots (radish); - first full life cycle from seeds to seeds in space (wheat), Guinness recorded; - first tissue culture experiments (Panax ginseng L, Crocus sativus L, Stevia rebaundiana B; - first tree growing in space for 2 years (Limonia acidissima), Guinness recorded. As a new wave, the modern experiments on a board of Shenzhou Chinese space ships are performed with plants and tissue culture. The space flight experiments are now focused on applications of the space biology results to Earth technologies. In particular, the tomato seeds exposed 6 years in space are used in pharmacy industry in more then 10 pharmaceutical products. Tissue culture experiments are performed on the board of Shenzhou spaceship for creation of new bioproducts including Space Panax ginseng, Space Spirulina, Space Stetatin, Space Tomato and others products with unique properties. Space investments come back.

  10. Visual Earth observation performance in the space environment. Human performance measurement 4: Flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huth, John F.; Whiteley, James D.; Hawker, John E.

    1993-01-01

    A wide variety of secondary payloads have flown on the Space Transportation System (STS) since its first flight in the 1980's. These experiments have typically addressed specific issues unique to the zero-gravity environment. Additionally, the experiments use the experience and skills of the mission and payload specialist crew members to facilitate data collection and ensure successful completion. This paper presents the results of the Terra Scout experiment, which flew aboard STS-44 in November 1991. This unique Earth Observation experiment specifically required a career imagery analyst to operate the Spaceborne Direct-View Optical System (SpaDVOS), a folded optical path telescope system designed to mount inside the shuttle on the overhead aft flight deck windows. Binoculars and a small telescope were used as backup optics. Using his imagery background, coupled with extensive target and equipment training, the payload specialist was tasked with documenting the following: (1) the utility of the equipment; (2) his ability to acquire and track ground targets; (3) the level of detail he could discern; (4) the atmospheric conditions; and (5) other in-situ elements which contributed to or detracted from his ability to analyze targets. Special emphasis was placed on the utility of a manned platform for research and development of future spaceborne sensors. The results and lessons learned from Terra Scout will be addressed including human performance and equipment design issues.

  11. Flight Test Measurements From The Tu-144LL Structure/Cabin Noise Follow-On Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Rackl, Robert G.; Andrianov, Eduard V.

    2000-01-01

    This follow-on flight experiment on the TU-144LL Supersonic Flying Laboratory, conducted during the period September 1998 to April 1999, was a continuation of previous Structure/Cabin Noise Experiment 2.1. Data was obtained over a wide range of altitudes and Mach numbers. Measured were: turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuations on the fuselage over its length; structural response on skin panels using accelerometers; and flow direction over three windows using 'flow cones'. The effect of steps in the flow was also measured using two window blank pairs; each pair bridged by a plate which created small sharp forward and aft facing steps. The effect of transducer flushness with the exterior surface was also measured during flight. Height test points were chosen to cover much of the TU-144's flight envelope, as well as to obtain as large a unit Reynolds number range as possible at various Mach numbers: takeoff, subsonic, transonic, and supersonic cruise conditions up to Mach 2. Data on engine runups and background noise were acquired on the ground. The data in the form of time histories of the acoustic signals, together with auxiliary data and basic MATLAB processing modules, are available on CD-R disks.

  12. GRAINE 2011 balloon-borne experiment: flight data analysis and detector performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokujo, Hiroki

    2012-07-01

    Gamma-Ray Astro-Imager with Nuclear Emulsion (GRAINE) is the balloon-born experiment project to observe gamma-ray sources precisely in the 10MeV-100GeV region. A new generation detector "emulsion gamma-ray telescope" has one order higher angular resolution compared with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. As the first step in GRAINE, a technical flight was performed by employing a small-scale prototype (125 cm ^{2} aperture). On June 8, 2011, the balloon was launched from Taiki Aerospace Research Field and realized the level flight at the altitude of 34.8 km for 1.5 hours. Tracks recorded in emulsion chambers were read by the fully automated scanning system and gamma-ray events in field of view in 2.2 sr were reconstructed. Event time stamps were done by "multi-stage shifter" mechanism, which gives sub-second time resolution to tracks using their position displacements caused by shifting multiple chambers during the flight. As an initial result, we succeeded in pointing gamma-ray directions on celestial coordinates, and demonstrated feasibility of each component of the detector for future experiments with larger apertures.

  13. Description of International Caenorhabditis elegans Experiment first flight (ICE-FIRST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szewczyk, N. J.; Tillman, J.; Conley, C. A.; Granger, L.; Segalat, L.; Higashitani, A.; Honda, S.; Honda, Y.; Kagawa, H.; Adachi, R.; Higashibata, A.; Fujimoto, N.; Kuriyama, K.; Ishioka, N.; Fukui, K.; Baillie, D.; Rose, A.; Gasset, G.; Eche, B.; Chaput, D.; Viso, M.

    2008-09-01

    Traveling, living and working in space is now a reality. The number of people and length of time in space is increasing. With new horizons for exploration it becomes more important to fully understand and provide countermeasures to the effects of the space environment on the human body. In addition, space provides a unique laboratory to study how life and physiologic functions adapt from the cellular level to that of the entire organism. Caenorhabditis elegans is a genetic model organism used to study physiology on Earth. Here we provide a description of the rationale, design, methods, and space culture validation of the ICE-FIRST payload, which engaged C. elegans researchers from four nations. Here we also show C. elegans growth and development proceeds essentially normally in a chemically defined liquid medium on board the International Space Station (10.9 day round trip). By setting flight constraints first and bringing together established C. elegans researchers second, we were able to use minimal stowage space to successfully return a total of 53 independent samples, each containing more than a hundred individual animals, to investigators within one year of experiment concept. We believe that in the future, bringing together individuals with knowledge of flight experiment operations, flight hardware, space biology, and genetic model organisms should yield similarly successful payloads.

  14. Overview of the LaNCETS Flight Experiment and CFD Analysis. Supplemental Movies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliatt, Larry J., II; Haering, Edward A., Jr.; Bui, Trong

    2008-01-01

    This presentation focuses on nearfield airborne pressure signatures from the Lift and Nozzle Change Effect on Tail Shocks (LaNCETS) flight test experiment. The primary motivation for nearfield probing in the supersonic regime is to measure the shock structure of aircraft in an ongoing effort to overcome the overland sonic boom barrier for commercial supersonic transportation. LaNCETS provides the opportunity to investigate lift distribution and engine plume effects. During Phase 1 flight testing an F-15B was used to probe the F-15 LaNCETS aircraft in order to validate CFD and pre-flight prediction tools. A total of 29 probings were taken at 40,000 ft. altitude at Machs 1.2, 1.4 and 1.6. LaNCETS Phase 1 flight data are presented as a detailed pressure signature superimposed over a picture of the LaNCETS aircraft. The attenuation of the Inlet-Canard shocks with distance as well as its forward propagation and the coalescence of the noseboom shock are illustrated. A detailed CFD study on a simplified LaNCETS aircraft jet nozzle was performed providing the ability to more accurately capture the shocks from the propulsion system and emphasizing how under- and over-expanding the nozzle affects the existence of shock trains inside the jet plume. With Phase 1 being a success preparations are being made to move forward to Phase 2. Phase 2 will fly similar flight conditions, but this time changing the aircraft's lift distribution by biasing the canard positions, and changing the plume shape by under- and over-expanding the nozzle. Nearfield probing will again be completed in the same manner as in Phase 1. An additional presentation focuses on LaNCETS CFD solution methodology. Discussions highlight grid preprocessing, grid shearing and stretching, flow solving and contour plots. Efforts are underway to better capture the flow features via grid modification and flow solution methodology, which will help to achieve better agreement with flight data. An included CD-ROM provides

  15. NASA GL-10 Tilt-Wing VTOL UAS Flight Validation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredericks, William J.; North, David D.; Agate, Mark A.; Johns, Zachary R.

    2015-01-01

    Greased Lightning (GL-10) is an aircraft configuration that combines the characteristics of a cruise efficient airplane with the ability to perform vertical takeoffs and landings (VTOL). This presentation will summarize the results of the flight test experiments. Two key technologies have been utilized in this aircraft design. Namely, distributed electric propulsion and closed loop control laws to be able to fly an inherently unstable aircraft. For many decades we as an aviation industry have been attempting to build a vehicle that can combine the speed and efficiency of an airplane with the vertical takeoff and landing of a rotorcraft. Overall it has been determined thru flight test that a design that leverages these new technologies can yield a useful VTOL cruise efficient aircraft.

  16. Entry trajectory, entry environment, and analysis of spacecraft motion for the RAM C-3 flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, W. L.; Bowen, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    The RAM C-3 flight experiment was launched to study the problem of radiofrequency blackout at an entry velocity of 24,300 ft/sec. The flight is described, and data for the entry trajectory and environment, which include the effects of actual temperature measured the day of launch, are presented. An analysis of entry spacecraft motions was performed. This analysis included the determination of wind angles from measured accelerations and estimates of wind angles at high altitudes from gyro-measured rotation rates. The maximum wind angles were found to be less than 5 deg to the point of pitch-roll resonance where the total wind angle increased to 8.5 deg and the roll rate started decreasing. A plausible cause for the decrease in roll rate was shown to be a combination of trim angle and an offset center of gravity.

  17. Previous experience in manned space flight: A survey of human factors lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandlee, George O.; Woolford, Barbara

    1993-01-01

    Previous experience in manned space flight programs can be used to compile a data base of human factors lessons learned for the purpose of developing aids in the future design of inhabited spacecraft. The objectives are to gather information available from relevant sources, to develop a taxonomy of human factors data, and to produce a data base that can be used in the future for those people involved in the design of manned spacecraft operations. A study is currently underway at the Johnson Space Center with the objective of compiling, classifying, and summarizing relevant human factors data bearing on the lessons learned from previous manned space flights. The research reported defines sources of data, methods for collection, and proposes a classification for human factors data that may be a model for other human factors disciplines.

  18. Flight experiments measuring boundary-layer disturbances in laminar flow and correlation with stability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Cynthia C.; Obara, Clifford J.; Vijgen, Paul M.; Wusk, Michael S.

    1991-01-01

    Flight test results are reported from an experiment designed to study the detailed growth of disturbances in the laminar boundary layer. A gloved wing section incorporating closely-spaced flush-mounted streamwise-located instrumentation for measuring instability frequencies and amplitude growths as well as pressure distributions was used. The growth of Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) and crossflow instabilities is predicted by the linear e exp n method and compared to the measured boundary-layer disturbance frequencies. The predictions showed good agreement with the measured data. The results exhibited fair agreement with previous n(T-S) and n(CF) flight correlations for several of the conditions analyzed. It is inferred from the high n(T-S) values for these data that moderately swept wings at compressible speeds can withstand higher combinations of n(T-S) and n(CF) values and still remain laminar than previously thought.

  19. Analysis procedures and subjective flight results of a simulator validation and cue fidelity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, Peter C.; Mckissick, Burnell T.

    1988-01-01

    A joint experiment to investigate simulator validation and cue fidelity was conducted by the Dryden Flight Research Facility of NASA Ames Research Center (Ames-Dryden) and NASA Langley Research Center. The primary objective was to validate the use of a closed-loop pilot-vehicle mathematical model as an analytical tool for optimizing the tradeoff between simulator fidelity requirements and simulator cost. The validation process includes comparing model predictions with simulation and flight test results to evaluate various hypotheses for differences in motion and visual cues and information transfer. A group of five pilots flew air-to-air tracking maneuvers in the Langley differential maneuvering simulator and visual motion simulator and in an F-14 aircraft at Ames-Dryden. The simulators used motion and visual cueing devices including a g-seat, a helmet loader, wide field-of-view horizon, and a motion base platform.

  20. Development of Experiment Kits for Processing Biological Samples In-Flight on SLS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaquez, R.; Savage, P. D.; Hinds, W. E.; Evans, J.; Dubrovin, L.

    1994-01-01

    The design of the hematology experiment kits for SLS-2 has resulted in a modular, flexible configuration which maximizes crew efficiency and minimizes error and confusion when dealing with over 1200 different components over the course of the mission. The kit layouts proved to be very easy to use and their packaging design provided for positive, secure containment of the many small components. The secondary Zero(Tm) box enclosure also provided an effective means for transport of the kits within the Spacelab and for grouping individual kits by flight day usage. The kits are readily adaptable to use on future flights by simply replacing the inner components as required and changing the labelling scheme to match new mission requirements.

  1. Adaptive Augmenting Control Flight Characterization Experiment on an F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Orr, Jeb S.; Wall, John H.; Gilligan, Eric T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes the Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) flight characterization experiments performed using an F/A-18 (TN 853). AAC was designed and developed specifically for launch vehicles, and is currently part of the baseline autopilot design for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS). The scope covered here includes a brief overview of the algorithm (covered in more detail elsewhere), motivation and benefits of flight testing, top-level SLS flight test objectives, applicability of the F/A-18 as a platform for testing a launch vehicle control design, test cases designed to fully vet the AAC algorithm, flight test results, and conclusions regarding the functionality of AAC. The AAC algorithm developed at Marshall Space Flight Center is a forward loop gain multiplicative adaptive algorithm that modifies the total attitude control system gain in response to sensed model errors or undesirable parasitic mode resonances. The AAC algorithm provides the capability to improve or decrease performance by balancing attitude tracking with the mitigation of parasitic dynamics, such as control-structure interaction or servo-actuator limit cycles. In the case of the latter, if unmodeled or mismodeled parasitic dynamics are present that would otherwise result in a closed-loop instability or near instability, the adaptive controller decreases the total loop gain to reduce the interaction between these dynamics and the controller. This is in contrast to traditional adaptive control logic, which focuses on improving performance by increasing gain. The computationally simple AAC attitude control algorithm has stability properties that are reconcilable in the context of classical frequency-domain criteria (i.e., gain and phase margin). The algorithm assumes that the baseline attitude control design is well-tuned for a nominal trajectory and is designed to adapt only when necessary. Furthermore, the adaptation is attracted to the nominal design and adapts only on an as-needed basis

  2. STS-107 crew look over experiments in a flight configured module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At SPACEHAB, Cape Canaveral, Fla., members of the STS-107 crew look over experiments for their mission. Pilot William 'Willie' McCool (left) displays a glove box experiment for the trainers (right). STS-107 has two payload elements, the Double Module in its first flight into space and a Hitchhiker payload. The experiments range from material sciences to life sciences (many rats). The Hitchhiker carrier system is modular and expandable in accordance with payload requirements. Hitchhiker experiments are housed in canisters or attached to mounting plates. The Hitchhiker canister comes in two varieties--the Hitchhiker Motorized Door Canister and the Sealed Canisters. STS-107 is scheduled to launch in June 2002

  3. Experimental Results from the Thermal Energy Storage-2 (TES-2) Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Carol

    2000-01-01

    Thermal Energy Storage-2 (TES-2) is a flight experiment that flew on the Space Shuttle Endeavour (STS-72), in January 1996. TES-2 originally flew with TES-1 as part of the OAST-2 Hitchhiker payload on the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-62) in early 1994. The two experiments, TES-1 and TES-2 were identical except for the fluoride salts to be characterized. TES-1 provided data on lithium fluoride (LiF), TES-2 provided data on a fluoride eutectic (LiF/CaF2). Each experiment was a complex autonomous payload in a Get-Away-Special payload canister. TES-1 operated flawlessly for 22 hr. Results were reported in a paper entitled, Effect of Microgravity on Materials Undergoing Melting and Freezing-The TES Experiment, by David Namkoong et al. A software failure in TES-2 caused its shutdown after 4 sec of operation. TES-1 and 2 were the first experiments in a four experiment suite designed to provide data for understanding the long duration microgravity behavior of thermal energy storage salts that undergo repeated melting and freezing. Such data have never been obtained before and have direct application for the development of space-based solar dynamic (SD) power systems. These power systems will store energy in a thermal energy salt such as lithium fluoride or a eutectic of lithium fluoride/calcium difluoride. The stored energy is extracted during the shade portion of the orbit. This enables the solar dynamic power system to provide constant electrical power over the entire orbit. Analytical computer codes were developed for predicting performance of a space-based solar dynamic power system. Experimental verification of the analytical predictions were needed prior to using the analytical results for future space power design applications. The four TES flight experiments were to be used to obtain the needed experimental data. This paper will address the flight results from the first and second experiments, TES-1 and 2, in comparison to the predicted results from the Thermal

  4. A Helium GC/IMS for the Analysis of Extraterrestrial Volatiles in Exobiology Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Carle, Glenn C.; Humphry, Donald E.; Shao, Maxine; Takeuchi, Nori

    1995-01-01

    For exobiology experiments on board spacecraft or space probes, a wide range of chemical species often must be detected and identified. The limited amount of power and space available for flight instruments severely limits the number of instruments that can be flown on any given mission. It is important then, that these experiments utilize instrumentation with universal response, so that all species of interest can be analyzed. Instrumentation to fulfill the analytical requirements of exobiology experiments has been developed utilizing Gas Chromatography - Ion Mobility Spectrometry. The Gas Chromatograph (GC) combines columns developed specifically for the complex mixtures anticipated with highly sensitive Metastable Ionization Detectors (a type of Helium Ionization Detector). To satisfy the limitations placed on resources, the Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS) uses the same ultra high purity helium as the GC. This GC-MS provides the analytical capability to fulfill a wide range of exobiology flight experiment applications and has been included on a proposed Discovery Mission and proposals for both Lander and Orbiter of the European Space Agency's Rosetta Comet Mission. A data base of helium IMS spectra is now being built for these future applications.

  5. Phantom torso experiment on the international space station; flight measurements and calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwell, W.; Semones, E.; Cucinotta, F.

    The Phantom Torso Experiment (PTE) first flew on the 10-day Space Shuttle mission STS-91 in June 1998 during a period near solar minimum. The PTE was re- f l o w n on the I ternational Space Station (ISS) Increment 2 mission from April-n A u g u s t 2001 during a period near solar maximum. The experiment was located with a suite of other radiation experiments in the US Lab module Human Research Facility (HRF) rack. The objective of the experiment was to measure space radiation exposures at several radiosensitive critical body organs (brain, thyroid, heart/lung, stomach and colon) and two locations on the surface (skin) of a modified RandoTM phantom. Prior to flight, active solid -state silicon dosimeters were located at the RandoTM critical body organ locations and passive dosimeters were placed at the two surface locations. Using a mathematically modified Computerized Anatomical Male (CAM) model, shielding distributions were generated for the five critical body organ and two skin locations. These shielding distributions were then combined with the ISS HRF rack shielding distribution to account for the total shielding "seen" by the PTE. Using the trapped proton and galactic cosmic radiation environment models and high -energy particle transport codes, absorbed dose, dose equivalent, and LET (linear energy transfer) values were computed for the seven dose point locations of interest. The results of these computations are compared with the actual flight measurements.

  6. LDEF (Flight), AO171 : Solar-Array-Materials Passive LDEF Experiment, Tray A08

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO171 : Solar-Array-Materials Passive LDEF Experiment, Tray A08 EL-1994-00666 LDEF (Flight), AO171 : Solar-Array-Materials Passive LDEF Experiment, Tray A08 The flight photograph was taken from the Orbiter aft flight deck during the LDEF retrieval prior to berthing the LDEF in the Orbiter cargo bay and shows the Solar Array Materials Passive LDEF Experiment (SAMPLE) on the LDEF. Six (6) plates of passive components, provided by various experiment organizations and designated plate I thru plate VI, are shown mounted in a three (3) inch deep LDEF peripheral tray. All six plates are aluminum and attach to the LDEF experiment tray with non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners. Plate I, located in the upper left corner, consist of a combination of solar cells with and without covers, solar cell modules and solar arrays assembled on the baseplate. Two of the four solar arrays are missing and one appears to be attached at only one corner. Other components appear to be secure. Plate II in the left center section, has twenty-seven (27) composite samples, carbon fiber and glass fiber, mounted on the baseplate. The composites appear to be intact with no physical damage. Plate III, in the lower left corner, consist mostly of metallized and thin polymeric films (Kapton, Mylar, TEFLON® , white Tedlar,etc.). The thin films without protective coatings sustained significant damage and most were destroyed. The metallized film apparently survived with minimum damage. Plate IV located in the upper right corner consist of metals and coatings mounted in an aluminum baseplate and covered with a thin aluminum coverplate that partially mask the specimen. Several of the coatings appear to have changed to a darker color and a light brown discoloration appears around the outer edges of the mounting plate and along the right edge of the coverplates. Plate V, in the right center section, contained thermal plastics and structural film configured into tensile and shear specimen. All

  7. Development of a Dynamically Scaled Generic Transport Model Testbed for Flight Research Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Thomas; Langford, William; Belcastro, Christine; Foster, John; Shah, Gautam; Howland, Gregory; Kidd, Reggie

    2004-01-01

    This paper details the design and development of the Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) test-bed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The aircraft is a 5.5% dynamically scaled, remotely piloted, twin-turbine, swept wing, Generic Transport Model (GTM) which will be used to provide an experimental flight test capability for research experiments pertaining to dynamics modeling and control beyond the normal flight envelope. The unique design challenges arising from the dimensional, weight, dynamic (inertial), and actuator scaling requirements necessitated by the research community are described along with the specific telemetry and control issues associated with a remotely piloted subscale research aircraft. Development of the necessary operational infrastructure, including operational and safety procedures, test site identification, and research pilots is also discussed. The GTM is a unique vehicle that provides significant research capacity due to its scaling, data gathering, and control characteristics. By combining data from this testbed with full-scale flight and accident data, wind tunnel data, and simulation results, NASA will advance and validate control upset prevention and recovery technologies for transport aircraft, thereby reducing vehicle loss-of-control accidents resulting from adverse and upset conditions.

  8. Assessment of ground effects on the propagation of aircraft noise: The T-38A flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, W. L., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A flight experiment was conducted to investigate air to ground propagation of sound at gazing angles of incidence. A turbojet powered airplane was flown at altitudes ranging from 10 to 160 m over a 20-microphone array positioned over grass and concrete. The dependence of ground effects on frequency, incidence angle, and slant range was determined using two analysis methods. In one method, a microphone close to the flight path is compared to down range microphones. In the other method, comparisons are made between two microphones which were equidistant from the flight path but positioned over the two surfaces. In both methods, source directivity angle was the criterion by which portions of the microphone signals were compared. The ground effects were largest in the frequency range of 200 to 400 Hz and were found to be dependent on incidence angle and slant range. Ground effects measured for angles of incidence greater than 10 deg to 15 deg were near zero. Measured attenuation increased with increasing slant range for slant ranges less than 750 m. Theoretical predictions were found to be in good agreement with the major details of the measured results.

  9. Flight Experiment Investigation of General Aviation Self-Separation and Sequencing Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murdoch, Jennifer L.; Ramiscal, Ermin R.; McNabb, Jennifer L.; Bussink, Frank J. L.

    2005-01-01

    A new flight operations concept called Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) Higher Volume Operations (HVO) was developed to increase capacity during Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) at non-towered, non-radar airports by enabling concurrent operations of multiple aircraft. One aspect of this concept involves having pilots safely self-separate from other aircraft during approaches into these airports using appropriate SATS HVO procedures. A flight experiment was conducted to determine if instrument-rated general aviation (GA) pilots could self-separate and sequence their ownship aircraft, while following a simulated aircraft, into a non-towered, non-radar airport during simulated IMC. Six GA pilots' workload levels and abilities to perform self-separation and sequencing procedures while flying a global positioning system (GPS) instrument approach procedure were examined. The results showed that the evaluation pilots maintained at least the minimum specified separation between their ownship aircraft and simulated traffic and maintained their assigned landing sequence 100-percent of the time. Neither flight path deviations nor subjective workload assessments were negatively impacted by the additional tasks of self-separating and sequencing during these instrument approaches.

  10. The Plasma Interaction Experiment /PIX/ - Description and flight qualification test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ignaczak, L. R.; Haley, F. A.; Domino, E. J.; Culp, D. H.; Shaker, F. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Plasma Interaction Experiment (PIX) is a battery powered preprogrammed auxiliary payload on the Landsat-C launch. This experiment is part of a larger program to investigate space plasma interactions with spacecraft surfaces and components. The varying plasma densities encountered during available telemetry coverage periods are deemed sufficient to determine first order interactions between the space plasma environment and the biased experimental surfaces. The specific objectives of the PIX flight experiment are to measure the plasma coupling current and the negative voltage breakdown characteristics of a solar array segment and a gold plated steel disk. Measurements will be made over a range of surface voltages up to plus or minus 1 kilovolt. The orbital environment will provide a range of plasma densities. The experimental surfaces will be voltage-biased in a preprogrammed step sequence to optimize the data returned for each plasma region and for the available telemetry coverage.

  11. Experimental Results From the Thermal Energy Storage-1 (TES-1) Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacqmin, David

    1995-01-01

    The Thermal Energy Storage (TES) experiments are designed to provide data to help researchers understand the long-duration microgravity behavior of thermal energy storage fluoride salts that undergo repeated melting and freezing. Such data, which have never been obtained before, have direct application to space-based solar dynamic power systems. These power systems will store solar energy in a thermal energy salt, such as lithium fluoride (LiF) or a eutectic of lithium fluoride/calcium difluoride (LiF-CaF2) (which melts at a lower temperature). The energy will be stored as the latent heat of fusion when the salt is melted by absorbing solar thermal energy. The stored energy will then be extracted during the shade portion of the orbit, enabling the solar dynamic power system to provide constant electrical power over the entire orbit. Analytical computer codes have been developed to predict the performance of a spacebased solar dynamic power system. However, the analytical predictions must be verified experimentally before the analytical results can be used for future space power design applications. Four TES flight experiments will be used to obtain the needed experimental data. This article focuses on the flight results from the first experiment, TES-1, in comparison to the predicted results from the Thermal Energy Storage Simulation (TESSIM) analytical computer code.

  12. SHEFEX II - Aerodynamic Re-Entry Controlled Sharp Edge Flight Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, J. M. A.; Turner, J.; Weihs, H.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the basic goals and architecture of the SHEFEX II mission is presented. Also launched by a two staged sounding rocket system SHEFEX II is a consequent next step in technology test and demonstration. Considering all experience and collected flight data obtained during the SHEFEX I Mission, the test vehicle has been re-designed and extended by an active control system, which allows active aerodynamic control during the re-entry phase. Thus, ceramic based aerodynamic control elements like rudders, ailerons and flaps, mechanical actuators and an automatic electronic control unit has been implemented. Special focus is taken on improved GNC Elements. In addition, some other experiments including an actively cooled thermal protection element, advanced sensor equipment, high temperature antenna inserts etc. are part of the SHEFEX II experimental payload. A final 2 stage configuration has been selected considering Brazilian solid rocket boosters derived from the S 40 family. During the experiment phase a maximum entry velocity of Mach around 10 is expected for 50 seconds. Considering these flight conditions, the heat loads are not representative for a RLV re-entry, however, it allows to investigate the principal behaviour of such a facetted ceramic TPS, a sharp leading edge at the canards and fins and all associated gas flow effects and their structural response.

  13. Droplet combustion experiment drop tower tests using models of the space flight apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggard, J. B.; Brace, M. H.; Kropp, J. L.; Dryer, F. L.

    1989-01-01

    The Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) is an experiment that is being developed to ultimately operate in the shuttle environment (middeck or Spacelab). The current experiment implementation is for use in the 2.2 or 5 sec drop towers at NASA Lewis Research Center. Initial results were reported in the 1986 symposium of this meeting. Since then significant progress was made in drop tower instrumentation. The 2.2 sec drop tower apparatus, a conceptual level model, was improved to give more reproducible performance as well as operate over a wider range of test conditions. Some very low velocity deployments of ignited droplets were observed. An engineering model was built at TRW. This model will be used in the 5 sec drop tower operation to obtain science data. In addition, it was built using the flight design except for changes to accommodate the drop tower requirements. The mechanical and electrical assemblies have the same level of complexity as they will have in flight. The model was tested for functional operation and then delivered to NASA Lewis. The model was then integrated into the 5 sec drop tower. The model is currently undergoing initial operational tests prior to starting the science tests.

  14. Pre-Flight Characterization of Samples for the MISSE-7 Spacesuit Fabric Exposure Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; McCue, Terry R.; Clark, Gregory W.; Rogers, Kerry J.; Mengesu, Tsega

    2009-01-01

    A series of six sample spacesuit pressure garment assembly (PGA) fabric samples were prepared for the Materials International Space Station Experiment 7 (MISSE-7) flight experiment to test the effects of damage by lunar dust on the susceptibility of the fabrics to radiation damage. These included pristine Apollo-era fluorinated ethylene-propylene (FEP) fabric, Apollo-era FEP fabric that had been abraded with JSC-1A lunar simulant, and a piece of Alan Bean s Apollo 12 PGA sectioned from near the left knee. Also included was a sample of pristine orthofabric, and orthofabric that had been abraded to two different levels with JSC-1A. The samples were characterized using optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Two sets of six samples were then loaded in space environment exposure hardware, one of which was stored as control samples. The other set was affixed to the MISSE-7 experiment package, and will be mounted on the International Space Station, and exposed to the wake-side low Earth orbit environment. It will be retrieved after an exposure of approximately 12 months, and returned for post flight analysis.

  15. Electron beam injection experiments - Replication of flight observations in a laboratory beam plasma discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, W.; Mcgarity, J. O.; Konradi, A.

    1983-01-01

    Recent electron beam injection experiments in the lower ionosphere have produced two perplexing results: (1) At altitudes from 140 km to 220 km, the beam associated 391.4 nm intensity is relatively independent of altitude despite the decreasing N2 abundance. (2) The radial extent of the perturbed region populated by beam associated energetic electrons significantly exceeds the nominal gyrodiameter for 90 deg injection. A series of laboratory measurements is described in which both of these flight results appear to have been closely reproduced. The laboratory results are reasonably consistent with the transition from a collision dominated to collisionless beam-plasma discharge configuration.

  16. The 30/20 GHz flight experiment system, phase 2. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronstein, L.; Kawamoto, Y.; Ribarich, J. J.; Scope, J. R.; Forman, B. J.; Bergman, S. G.; Reisenfeld, S.

    1981-01-01

    Summary information on the final communication system design, communication payload, space vehicle, and development plan for the 30/20 GHz flight experiment will be installed on the LEASAT spacecraft which will be placed into orbit from the space shuttle cargo bay. The communication concept has two parts: a truck service and a customer premise service (CPS). The trucking system serves four spot beams which are interconnected in a satellite switched time division multiple access mode by an IF switch matrix. The CPS covers two large areas of the eastern United States with a pair of scanning beams.

  17. Analysis of the neutron time-of-flight spectra from inertial confinement fusion experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Hatarik, R.; Sayre, D. B.; Caggiano, J. A.; ...

    2015-11-12

    For a long time, neutron time-of-flight diagnostics been used to characterize the neutron spectrum produced by inertial confinement fusion experiments. The primary diagnostic goals are to extract the d+t→n+α (DT) and d+d→n+³He (DD) neutron yields and peak widths, and the amount DT scattering relative to its unscattered yield, which is also known as the down-scatter ratio (DSR). These quantities are used to infer yield weighted plasma conditions, such as ion temperature (Tion) and cold fuel areal density. We explain such novel methodologies used to determine neutron yield, apparent Tion and DSR.

  18. Development of electrical feedback controlled heat pipes and the advanced thermal control flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienert, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    The development and characteristics of electrical feedback controlled heat pipes (FCHP) are discussed. An analytical model was produced to describe the performance of the FCHP under steady state and transient conditions. An advanced thermal control flight experiment was designed to demonstrate the performance of the thermal control component in a space environment. The thermal control equipment was evaluated on the ATS-F satellite to provide performance data for the components and to act as a thermal control system which can be used to provide temperature stability of spacecraft components in future applications.

  19. Analysis of the neutron time-of-flight spectra from inertial confinement fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hatarik, R.; Sayre, D. B.; Caggiano, J. A.; Phillips, T.; Eckart, M. J.; Bond, E. J.; Cerjan, C.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Knauer, J. P.; Mcnaney, J. M.; Munro, D. H.

    2015-11-12

    For a long time, neutron time-of-flight diagnostics been used to characterize the neutron spectrum produced by inertial confinement fusion experiments. The primary diagnostic goals are to extract the d+t→n+α (DT) and d+d→n+³He (DD) neutron yields and peak widths, and the amount DT scattering relative to its unscattered yield, which is also known as the down-scatter ratio (DSR). These quantities are used to infer yield weighted plasma conditions, such as ion temperature (Tion) and cold fuel areal density. We explain such novel methodologies used to determine neutron yield, apparent Tion and DSR.

  20. Techniques used in the F-14 variable-sweep transition flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bianca Trujillo; Meyer, Robert R., Jr.; Chiles, Harry R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses and evaluates the test measurement techniques used to determine the laminar-to-turbulent boundary layer transition location in the F-14 variable-sweep transition flight experiment (VSTFE). The main objective of the VSTFE was to determine the effects of wing sweep on the laminar-to-turbulent transition location at conditions representative of transport aircraft. Four methods were used to determine the transition location: (1) a hot-film anemometer system; (2) two boundary-layer rakes; (3) surface pitot tubes; and (4) liquid crystals for flow visualization. Of the four methods, the hot-film anemometer system was the most reliable indicator of transition.

  1. The 30/20 GHz flight experiment system, phase 2. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronstein, L.; Kawamoto, Y.; Ribarich, J. J.; Scope, J. R.; Forman, B. J.; Bergman, S. G.; Reisenfeld, S.

    1981-07-01

    Summary information on the final communication system design, communication payload, space vehicle, and development plan for the 30/20 GHz flight experiment will be installed on the LEASAT spacecraft which will be placed into orbit from the space shuttle cargo bay. The communication concept has two parts: a truck service and a customer premise service (CPS). The trucking system serves four spot beams which are interconnected in a satellite switched time division multiple access mode by an IF switch matrix. The CPS covers two large areas of the eastern United States with a pair of scanning beams.

  2. The Gravity-Probe-B relativity gyroscope experiment - Development of the prototype flight instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turneaure, J. P.; Everitt, C. W. F.; Parkinson, B. W.; Bardas, D.; Breakwell, J. V.

    1989-01-01

    The Gravity-Probe-B relativity gyroscope experiment (GP-B) will measure the geodetic and frame-dragging precession rates of gyroscopes in a 650 km high polar orbit about the earth. The goal is to measure these two effects, which are predicted by Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, to 0.01 percent (geodetic) and 1 percent (frame-dragging). This paper presents the development progress for full-size prototype flight hardware including the gyroscopes, gyro readout and magnetic shielding system, and an integrated ground test instrument.

  3. LDEF (Flight), S1005 : Transverse Flat-Plate Heat Pipe Experiment, Tray B10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), S1005 : Transverse Flat-Plate Heat Pipe Experiment, Tray B10 EL-1994-00017 The Transverse Flat-Plate Heat Pipe Experiment flight photograph was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. No change in the color of the white paint dots on experiment tray clamp blocks is apparent. The Transverse Flat-Plate Heat Pipe Experiment consist of three (3) transverse flat heat-pipe modules , a power system for the heaters, a data acquisition and storage system and an aluminum support structure placed in a twelve (12) inch deep LDEF experiment tray. The surface of the experiment exposed to the space environment consist of the three heat pipe modules exterior surfaces, silver TEFLON®, and the thermal blankets covering the aluminum mounting hardware and openings between the hardware and the tray sidewalls. The raised surface at the top of each heat pipe module is the fluid reservoir. Five thermocouples, for monitoring the external surface temperature, are located on each module. The specular surface of the silver TEFLON® has become diffuse and appears white. Numerous impact craters, black specks, can be seen on the white surfaces of the modules. There appears to be a light tan discoloration on the surfaces of all three heat pipe modules. Two different types of discolorations can be seen at the top end of the center heat pipe; a dark brown color to the left of the thermocouple and what appears as two multi-color irregular shaped patterns to the right of the thermocouple. A square shaped light brown discoloration is seen near the left edge of the left thermal blanket, approximately half way between the tray bottom and center clamp blocks and also near the top of the thermal blanket between the left heat pipe module and the center heat pipe module.

  4. Immunotoxicity and genotoxicity testing for in-flight experiments under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Peter-Diedrich; Hansen, Peter-Diedrich; Unruh, Eckehardt

    Life Sciences as Related to Space (F) Influence of Spaceflight Environment on Biological Systems (F44) Immunotoxicity and genotoxicity testing for In-flight experiments under microgravity Sensing approaches for ecosystem and human health Author: Peter D. Hansen Technische Universit¨t Berlin, Faculty VI - Planen, Bauen, Umwelt, a Institute for Ecological Research and Technology, Department for Ecotoxicology, Berlin, Germany Peter-diedrich.hansen@tu-berlin.de Eckehardt Unruh Technische Universit¨t Berlin, Faculty VI - Planen, Bauen, Umwelt, Institute a for Ecological Research and Technology, Department for Ecotoxicology, Berlin, Germany An immune response by mussel hemocytes is the selective reaction to particles which are identified as foreign by its immune system shown by phagocytosis. Phagocytotic activity is based on the chemotaxis and adhesion, ingestion and phagosome formation. The attachment at the surface of the hemocytes and consequently the uptake of the particles or bacteria can be directly quantified in the format of a fluorescent assay. Another relevant endpoint of phagocytosis is oxidative burst measured by luminescence. Phagocytosis-related production of ROS will be stimulated with opsonised zymosan. The hemocytes will be stored frozen at -80oC and reconstituted in-flight for the experiment. The assay system of the TRIPLELUX-B Experiment has been performed with a well-defined quantification and evaluation of the immune function phagocytosis. The indicator cells are the hemocytes of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis). The signals of the immuno cellular responses are translated into luminescence as a rapid optical reporter system. The results expected will determine whether the observed responses are caused by microgravity and/or radiation (change in permeability, endpoints in genotoxicity: DNA unwinding). The samples for genotoxicity will be processed after returning to earth. The immune system of invertebrates has not been studied so far in space. The

  5. Spaceflight Holography Investigation in a Virtual Apparatus (SHIVA) Ground Experiments and Concepts for Flight Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miernik, Janie H.; Trolinger, James D.; Lackey, Jeffrey D.; Milton, Martha E.; Waggoner, Jason; Pope, Regina D.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the development and design of an experimental test cell for ground-based testing to provide requirements for the Spaceflight Holography Investigation in a Virtual Apparatus (SHIVA) experiment. Ground-based testing of a hardware breadboard set-up is being conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. SHIVA objectives are to test and validate new solutions of the general equation of motion of a particle in a fluid, including particle-particle interaction, wall effects, motion at higher Reynolds Number, and a motion and dissolution of a crystal moving in a fluid. These objectives will be achieved by recording a large number of holograms of particle motion in the International Space Station (ISS) glove box under controlled conditions, extracting the precise three- dimensional position of all the particles as a function of time, and examining the effects of all parameters on the motion of the particles. This paper will describe the mechanistic approach to enabling the SHIVA experiment to be performed in a ISS glove box in microgravity. Because the particles are very small, surface tension becomes a major consideration in designing the mechanical method to meet the experiments objectives in microgravity, To keep a particle or particles in the center of the test cell long enough to perform and record the experiment and to preclude contribution to particle motion, requires avoiding any initial velocity in particle placement. A Particle Injection Mechanism (PIM) designed for microgravity has been devised and tested to enable SHIVA imaging. Also, a test cell capture mechanism, to secure the test cell during vibration on a specially designed shaker table for the SHIVA experiment will be described. Concepts for flight design are also presented.

  6. Meteorology Associated with Turbulence Encounters During NASA's Fall-2000 Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, David W.; Proctor, Fred H.

    2002-01-01

    Initial flight experiments have been conducted to investigate convectively induced turbulence and to test technologies for its airborne detection. Turbulence encountered during the experiments is described with sources of data measured from in situ sensors, groundbased and airborne Doppler radars, and aircraft video. Turbulence measurements computed from the in situ system were quantified in terms of RMS normal loads (sigma(sub Delta n)), where 0.20 g is less than or equal to sigma(sub Delta n) is less than or equal to 0.30 g is considered moderate and sigma(sub Delta n) is greater than 0.30 g is severe. During two flights, 18 significant turbulence encounters (sigma(sub Delta) is greater than or equal to 0.20 g) occurred in the vicinity of deep convection; 14 moderate and 4 severe. In all cases, the encounters with turbulence occurred along the periphery of cumulus convection. These events were associated with relatively low values of radar reflectivity, i.e. RRF is less than 35 dBz, with most levels being below 20 dBz. The four cases of severe turbulence occurred in precipitation and were centered at the interface between a cumulus updraft turret and a downwind downdraft. Horizontal gradients of vertical velocity at this interface were found to be strongest on the downwind side of the cumulus turrets. Furthermore, the greatest loads to the aircraft occurred while flying along, not orthogonal to, the ambient environmental wind vector. During the two flights, no significant turbulence was encountered in the clear air (visual meteorological conditions), not even in the immediate vicinity of the deep convection.

  7. Matched asymptotic expansion of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation for aeroassisted plane-change maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, Anthony J.; Melamed, Nahum

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we develop a general procedure for constructing a matched asymptotic expansion of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation based on the method of characteristics. The development is for a class of perturbation problems whose solution exhibits two-time-scale behavior. A regular expansion for problems of this type is inappropriate since it is not uniformly valid over a narrow range of the independent variable. Of particular interest here is the manner in which matching and boundary conditions are enforced when the expansion is carried out to first order. Two cases are distinguished - one where the left boundary condition coincides with or lies to the right of the singular region and one where the left boundary condition lies to the left of the singular region. A simple example is used to illustrate the procedure, and its potential application to aeroassisted plane change is described.

  8. Evaluation of an optimal guidance algorithm for aero-assisted orbit transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melamed, N.; Calise, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    A detailed evaluation is performed of a guidance algorithm for aeroassisted orbit transfer that was developed earlier based on the method of matched asymptotic expansions. It is shown that, by exploiting the structure of the matched asymptotic expansion solution procedure, the original problem which requires the solution of a set of 20 implicit algebraic equations can be reduced to a problem of six implicit equations in six unknowns. The main contribution here is that it was possible to obtain a solution that is near optimal, requires a minimum of computation, and thus can be implemented in real time and on-board the vehicle. Guidance law implementation entails treating the current state as a new initial state and repetitively solving the matched asymptotic expansion problem to obtain the feedback controls.

  9. An analysis of the effect of aeroassist maneuvers on orbital transfer vehicle performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Gregory O.; Suit, William T.

    1987-01-01

    This paper summarizes a Langley Research Summer Scholars (LARSS) research project (Summer 1986) dealing with the topic of the effectiveness of aeroassist maneuvers to accomplish a change in the orbital inclination of an Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV). This task was subject to OTV design constraints, chief of which were the axial acceleration and the aerodynamic heating rate limits of the OTV. The use of vehicle thrust to replace lost kinetic energy and, thereby, to increase the maximum possible change in orbital inclination was investigated. A relation between time in the hover orbit and payload to LEO was established. The amount of plane change possible during this type of maneuver was checked for several runs and a possible thrusting procedure to increase the plane change and still get to LEO was suggested. Finally, the sensitivity of various target parameters to controllable independent variables was established, trades between the amount of control allowed, and payload to LEO suggested.

  10. System technology analysis of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles - Moderate lift/drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florence, D. E.; Fischer, G.

    1983-01-01

    The utilization of procedures involving aerodynamic braking and/or aerodynamic maneuvering on return from higher altitude orbits to low-earth orbit makes it possible to realize significant performance benefits. The present study is concerned with a number of mission scenarios for Aeroassisted Orbital Transfer Vehicles (AOTV) and the impact of potential technology advances in the performance enhancement of the class of AOTV's having a hypersonic lift to drag ratio (L/D) of 0.75 to 1.5. It is found that the synergistic combination of a hypersonic L/D of 1.2, an advanced cryopropelled engine, and an LH2 drop tank (1-1/2 stage) leads to a single 65,000 pound shuttle, two-man geosynchronous mission with 2100 pounds of useful paylod. Additional payload enhancement is possible with AOTV dry weight reductions due to technology advances in the areas of vehicle structures and thermal protection systems and other subsystems.

  11. The E and B EXperiment: Implementation and Analysis of the 2009 Engineering Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milligan, Michael Bryce

    The E and B EXperiment (EBEX) is a balloon-borne telescope designed to map the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and emission from galactic dust at millimeter wavelengths from 150 to 410 GHz. The primary science objectives of EBEX are to: detect or constrain the primordial B-mode polarization of the CMB predicted by inflationary cosmology; measure the CMB B-mode signal induced by gravitational lensing; and characterize the polarized thermal emission from interstellar dust. EBEX will observe a 420 square degree patch of the sky at high galactic latitude with a telescope and camera that provide an 8 arcminute beam at three observing bands (150, 250, and 410 GHz) and a 6.2 degree diffraction limited field of view to two large-format bolometer array focal planes. Polarimetry is achieved via a continuously rotating half-wave plate (HWP), and the optical system is designed from the ground up for control of sidelobe response and polarization systematic errors. EBEX is intended to execute fly or more Antarctic long duration balloon campaigns. In June 2009 EBEX completed a North American engineering flight launched from NASA's Columbia Scientific Ballooning Facility (CSBF) in Ft. Sumner, NM and operated in the stratosphere above 30 km altitude for ˜10 hours. During flight EBEX must be largely autonomous as it conducts pointed, scheduled observations; tunes and operates 1432 TES bolometers via 28 embedded Digital frequency-domain multiplexing (DfMux) computers; logs over 3 GiB/hour of science and housekeeping data to onboard redundant disk storage arrays; manages and dispatches jobs over a fault-tolerant onboard Ethernet network; and feeds a complex real-time data processing infrastructure on the ground via satellite and line-of-sight (LOS) downlinks. In this thesis we review the EBEX instrument, present the optical design and the computational architecture for in-flight control and data handling, and the quick-look software stack. Finally we describe

  12. Stability and Control Estimation Flight Test Results for the SR-71 Aircraft With Externally Mounted Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moes, Timothy R.; Iliff, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    A maximum-likelihood output-error parameter estimation technique is used to obtain stability and control derivatives for the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center SR-71A airplane and for configurations that include experiments externally mounted to the top of the fuselage. This research is being done as part of the envelope clearance for the new experiment configurations. Flight data are obtained at speeds ranging from Mach 0.4 to Mach 3.0, with an extensive amount of test points at approximately Mach 1.0. Pilot-input pitch and yaw-roll doublets are used to obtain the data. This report defines the parameter estimation technique used, presents stability and control derivative results, and compares the derivatives for the three configurations tested. The experimental configurations studied generally show acceptable stability, control, trim, and handling qualities throughout the Mach regimes tested. The reduction of directional stability for the experimental configurations is the most significant aerodynamic effect measured and identified as a design constraint for future experimental configurations. This report also shows the significant effects of aircraft flexibility on the stability and control derivatives.

  13. The two-phase extended evaluation in microgravity (TEEM) flight experiment: Description and overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurlbert, Kathryn Miller

    1997-01-01

    The future missions of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) may include orbiting satellites, orbiting platforms or stations, interplanetary vehicles, planetary surface missions, and planetary research probes. Current thermal control technology, using single-phase liquid coolant loops, is not a viable option for some of these future missions due to the associated power system weight and size penalty. Two-phase (liquid-vapor) flow thermal control systems can offer significant advantages over single-phase thermal systems in reducing the required power system mass and size. The Two-Phase Extended Evaluation in Microgravity (TEEM) Flight Experiment is currently being developed by NASA, and the Department of Defense (DOD) Space Test Program (STP) and the United States Air Force (USAF) Phillips Laboratory, with the cooperation of university researchers, to demonstrate operations of a closed-loop, two-phase system in a relevant mission environment. TEEM will also provide fully developed, two-phase flow data for zero-g conditions. This paper presents a description of the flight experiment, and a summary of the science of interest to the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC).

  14. Development of the Flight Hardware for the Experiment XENOPUS on the Kubik BIO4-Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Eberhard R.; Böser, Sybille; Franz, Markus; Gabriel, Martin; Hiesgen, Norbert; Kübler, Ulrich; Porciani, Massimiliano; Schwarzwälder, Achim; Zolesi, Valfredo

    2011-02-01

    The needs of developing aquatic animals depend on their age. For example, amphibian tadpole stages require regular food supply while embryos use their yolk as food source. Thus, life support systems have to be adapted to the different ages; an efficient control for water cleanness and steady food supply is mandatory for a safe flight in microgravity. A list of biological and technical requirements prompted the concept of the Dornier-Mini-System and the design for the Astrium SUPPLY Unit. These life support systems are connected with the Astrium miniaquarium that was used several times for the transport of small aquatic animals in space. Scientific experience from this concept was considered by Kayser Italia to design and develop a space suitable hardware. Its functionality was successfully demonstrated by the experiment XENOPUS that flew on the Soyuz TMA13/TMA12 mission in 2008. From 36 launched tadpoles, 35 returned back to Earth after the 12 days lasting space flight in physiologically stable conditions.

  15. The Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment: Flight Characterization Of The Ciber Narrow Band Spectrometer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levenson, Louis R.; Battle, J.; Bock, J. J.; Cooray, A.; Hristov, V.; Keating, B.; Lee, D.; Mason, P.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuura, S.; Nam, U. W.; Renbarger, T.; Sullivan, I.; Suzuki, K.; Wada, T.; Zemcov, M.

    2011-01-01

    Subtraction of the Zodiacal light foreground is the dominant source of uncertainty in absolute photometric measurements of the extra-galactic background at near-infrared to optical wavelengths. The second flight of the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment (CIBER) occurred on July 10th, 2010. CIBER is a NASA sounding rocket experiment carrying four co-aligned instruments including two imaging telescopes with wide passbands centered at 1 and 1.6 microns, respectively, as well as a low resolution spectrometer and a narrow-band spectrometer. THE CIBER spectrometers are absolutely calibrated in collaboration with NIST. The narrow-band spectrometer filter is centered on the Ca II solar Fraunhofer line at 854.2 nm and is designed to measure the equivalent width of the solar line reflected by the interplanetary dust in order to obtain an absolute measurement of the Zodiacal contribution to the infrared sky at that wavelength. In conjunction with measured low resolution spectrum from 700 to 1900 nm, this will provide an accurate independent check of the DIRBE Zodiacal light models. Here we describe the NBS instrument, calibration and in-flight characterization.

  16. Flight Crew Responses to the Interval Management Alternative Clearances (IMAC) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxley, Brian T.; Wilson, Sara R.; Swieringa, Kurt A.; Roper, Roy D.

    2016-01-01

    Interval Management Alternative Clearances (IMAC) was a human-in-the-loop simulation experiment conducted to explore the efficacy and acceptability of three IM operations: CAPTURE, CROSS, and MAINTAIN. Two weeks of data collection were conducted, with each week using twelve subject pilots and four subject controllers flying ten high-density arrival scenarios into the Denver International Airport. Overall, both the IM operations and procedures were rated very favorably by the flight crew in terms of acceptability, workload, and pilot head down time. However, several critical issues were identified requiring resolution prior to real-world implementation, including the high frequency of IM speed commands, IM speed commands requiring changes to aircraft configuration, and ambiguous IM cockpit displays that did not trigger the intended pilot reaction. The results from this experiment will be used to prepare for a flight test in 2017, and to support the development of an advanced IM concept of operations by the FAA (Federal Aviation Agency) and aviation industry.

  17. Pilot-in-the-Loop Analysis of Aileron Operation and Flight Simulator Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujinaga, Jin; Tokutake, Hiroshi; Miura, Yumiko

    Lateral-directional piloted simulation experiments were conducted in order to analyze pilot responses when the pilot controls an aircraft with only the ailerons after rudder failure. The experiments were carried out using a fixed-base flight simulator and four pilots. Six aircraft configurations, made by changing the stability derivatives, were tested, and pilot models were identified using the least-squares method. An analysis of the closed-loop shows that the closed-loop gain and stabilities correlate with the tracking error of the compensation task. Additionally, from the results of analysis, an evaluation function using pilot-in-the-loop with a fixed pilot model was developed. This function was able to predict the compensational error analytically from the airplane dynamics.

  18. Geometry Survey of the Time-of-Flight Neutron-Elastic Scattering (Antonella) Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Oshinowo, Babatunde O.; Izraelevitch, Federico

    2016-10-17

    The Antonella experiment is a measurement of the ionization efficiency of nuclear recoils in silicon at low energies [1]. It is a neutron elastic scattering experiment motivated by the search for dark matter particles. In this experiment, a proton beam hits a lithium target and neutrons are produced. The neutron shower passes through a collimator that produces a neutron beam. The beam illuminates a silicon detector. With a certain probability, a neutron interacts with a silicon nucleus of the detector producing elastic scattering. After the interaction, a fraction of the neutron energy is transferred to the silicon nucleus which acquires kinetic energy and recoils. This kinetic energy is then dissipated in the detector producing ionization and thermal energy. The ionization produced is measured with the silicon detector electronics. On the other hand, the neutron is scattered out of the beam. A neutron-detector array (made of scintillator bars) registers the neutron arrival time and the scattering angle to reconstruct the kinematics of the neutron-nucleus interaction with the time-of-flight technique [2]. In the reconstruction equations, the energy of the nuclear recoil is a function of the scattering angle with respect to the beam direction, the time-of-flight of the neutron and the geometric distances between components of the setup (neutron-production target, silicon detector, scintillator bars). This paper summarizes the survey of the different components of the experiment that made possible the off-line analysis of the collected data. Measurements were made with the API Radian Laser Tracker and I-360 Probe Wireless. The survey was completed at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana, USA in February 2015.

  19. Passive exposure of Earth radiation budget experiment components LDEF experiment AO-147: Post-flight examinations and tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, John R.

    1991-01-01

    The Passive Exposure of Earth Radiation Budget Experiment Components (PEERBEC) experiment of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) mission was composed of sensors and components associated with the measurement of the earth radiation budget (ERB) from satellites. These components included the flight spare sensors from the ERB experiment which operated on Nimbus 6 and 7 satellites. The experiment components and materials as well as the pertinent background and ancillary information necessary for the understanding of the intended mission and the results are described. The extent and timing of the LDEF mission brought the exposure from solar minimum between cycles 21 and 22 through the solar maximum of cycle 22. The orbital decay, coupled with the events of solar maximum, caused the LDEF to be exposed to a broader range of space environmental effects than were anticipated. The mission spanned almost six years concurrent with the 12 year (to date) Nimbus 7 operations. Preliminary information is presented on the following: (1) the changes in transmittance experienced by the interference filters; (2) the results of retesting of the thermopile sensors, which appear to be relatively unaffected by the exposure; and (3) the results of the recalibration of the APEX cavity radiometer. The degradation and recovery of the filters of the Nimbus 7 ERB are also discussed relative to the apparent atomic oxygen cleaning which also applies to the LDEF.

  20. Science Requirements for a Space Flight Experiment Entitled Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    We propose to measure in low gravity the viscosity of xenon close to its critical point. The accuracy will be sufficient to eliminate uncertainties currently associated with the analysis of l-g experiments. The measurements will provide the first direct observation of the predicted power-law divergence of viscosity in a pure fluid. The measurements will also strengthen Zeno's test of mode coupling theory by greatly increasing the reliability of the extrapolation of viscosity to low reduced temperatures. Our scientific objectives are described in more detail in one of the attached reports. The low-gravity experiment will be the final stage of a program whose completed ground-based stages are: (1) theoretical studies by one of the principal investigators (MRM) and coworkers, (2) critical viscosity measurements of binary liquid mixtures, (3) critical viscosity measurements of pure fluids in l-g, and development of a suitable vibration-insensitive viscometer. Our technical approach is described in the draft Science Requirements Document. One of us (MRM) has reviewed opportunities for critical phenomena research in low gravity. Both of us were co-principal investigators in the Thermal Equilibration Experiment in the Critical Point Facility, flown on IML-1 in 1992. From this experience, and from the technical maturity of our ground-based work, we believe our critical point viscometer is ready for development as a flight experiment.

  1. Review study and evaluation of possible flight experiments relating to cloud physics experiments in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, R. J.; Wu, S. T.

    1976-01-01

    The general objectives of the Zero-Gravity Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory Program are to improve the level of knowledge in atmospheric cloud research by placing at the disposal of the terrestrial-bound atmospheric cloud physicist a laboratory that can be operated in the environment of zero-gravity or near zero-gravity. This laboratory will allow studies to be performed without mechanical, aerodynamic, electrical, or other techniques to support the object under study. The inhouse analysis of the Skylab 3 and 4 experiments in dynamics of oscillations, rotations, collisions and coalescence of water droplets under low gravity-environment is presented.

  2. STS-40 orbital acceleration research experiment flight results during a typical sleep period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, R. C.; Nicholson, J. Y.; Ritter, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE), an electrostatic accelerometer package with complete on-orbit calibration capabilities, was flown for the first time aboard the Space Shuttle on STS-40. This is also the first time an accelerometer package with nano-g sensitivity and a calibration facility has flown aboard the Space Shuttle. The instrument is designed to measure and record the Space Shuttle aerodynamic acceleration environment from the free molecule flow regime through the rarified flow transition into the hypersonic continuum regime. Because of its sensitivity, the OARE instrument defects aerodynamic behavior of the Space Shuttle while in low-earth orbit. A 2-hour orbital time period on day seven of the mission, when the crew was asleep and other spacecraft activities were at a minimum, was examined. During the flight, a 'trimmed-mean' filter was used to produce high quality, low frequency data which was successfully stored aboard the Space Shuttle in the OARE data storage system. Initial review of the data indicated that, although the expected precision was achieved, some equipment problems occurred resulting in uncertain accuracy. An acceleration model which includes aerodynamic, gravity-gradient, and rotational effects was constructed and compared with flight data. Examination of the model with the flight data shows the instrument to be sensitive to all major expected low frequency acceleration phenomena; however, some erratic instrument bias behavior persists in two axes. In these axes, the OARE data can be made to match a comprehensive atmospheric-aerodynamic model by making bias adjustments and slight linear corrections for drift. The other axis does not exhibit these difficulties and gives good agreement with the acceleration model.

  3. Flight dynamics facility operational orbit determination support for the ocean topography experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolvin, D. T.; Schanzle, A. F.; Samii, M. V.; Doll, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    The Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX/POSEIDON) mission is designed to determine the topography of the Earth's sea surface across a 3 yr period, beginning with launch in June 1992. The Goddard Space Flight Center Dynamics Facility has the capability to operationally receive and process Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) tracking data. Because these data will be used to support orbit determination (OD) aspects of the TOPEX mission, the Dynamics Facility was designated to perform TOPEX operational OD. The scientific data require stringent OD accuracy in navigating the TOPEX spacecraft. The OD accuracy requirements fall into two categories: (1) on orbit free flight; and (2) maneuver. The maneuver OD accuracy requirements are of two types; premaneuver planning and postmaneuver evaluation. Analysis using the Orbit Determination Error Analysis System (ODEAS) covariance software has shown that, during the first postlaunch mission phase of the TOPEX mission, some postmaneuver evaluation OD accuracy requirements cannot be met. ODEAS results also show that the most difficult requirements to meet are those that determine the change in the components of velocity for postmaneuver evaluation.

  4. Barrel time-of-flight detector for the PANDA experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, L.; Brunner, S. E.; Marton, J.; Orth, H.; Suzuki, K.

    2016-07-01

    The barrel time-of-flight detector for the PANDA experiment at FAIR is foreseen as a Scintillator Tile (SciTil) Hodoscope based on several thousand small plastic scintillator tiles read-out with directly attached Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). The main tasks of the system are an accurate determination of the time origin of particle tracks to avoid event mixing at high collision rates, relative time-of-flight measurements as well as particle identification in the low momentum regime. The main requirements are the use of a minimum material amount and a time resolution of σ < 100 ps. We have performed extensive optimization studies and prototype tests to prove the feasibility of the SciTil design and finalize the R&D phase. In a 2.7 GeV/c proton beam at Forschungszentrum Jülich a time resolution of about 80 ps has been achieved using SiPMs from KETEK and Hamamatsu with an active area of 3 × 3mm2. Employing the Digital Photon Counter from Philips a time resolution of about 30 ps has been reached.

  5. A Practical, Affordable Cryogenic Propellant Depot Based on ULA's Flight Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutter, Bernard F.; Zegler, Frank; O'Neil, Gary; Pitchford, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Mankind is embarking on the next step in the journey of human exploration. We are returning to the moon and eventually moving to Mars and beyond. The current Exploration architecture seeks a balance between the need for a robust infrastructure on the lunar surface, and the performance limitations of Ares I and V. The ability to refuel or top-off propellant tanks from orbital propellant depots offers NASA the opportunity to cost effectively and reliably satisfy these opposing requirements. The ability to cache large orbital quantities of propellant is also an enabling capability for missions to Mars and beyond. This paper describes an option for a propellant depot that enables orbital refueling supporting Exploration, national security, science and other space endeavors. This proposed concept is launched using a single EELV medium class rocket and thus does not require any orbital assembly. The propellant depot provides cryogenic propellant storage that utilizes flight proven technologies augmented with technologies currently under development. The propellant depot system, propellant management, flight experience, and key technologies are also discussed. Options for refueling the propellant depot along with an overview of Exploration architecture impacts are also presented.

  6. Local Flow Conditions for Propulsion Experiments on the NASA F-15B Propulsion Flight Test Fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vachon, Michael J.; Moes, Timothy R.; Corda, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Local flow conditions were measured underneath the National Aeronautics and Space Administration F-15B airplane to support development of future experiments on the Propulsion Flight Test Fixture (PFTF). The local Mach number and flow angles were measured using a conventional air data boom on a cone-cylinder mounted under the PFTF and compared with the airplane air data nose boom measurements. At subsonic flight speeds, the airplane and PFTF Mach numbers were approximately equal. Transonic Mach number values were up to 0.1 greater at the PFTF than the airplane, which is a counterintuitive result. The PFTF local supersonic Mach numbers were as much as 0.46 less than the airplane values. The maximum local Mach number at the PFTF was approximately 1.6 at an airplane Mach number near 2.0. The PFTF local angle of attack was negative at all Mach numbers, ranging from -3 to -8 degrees. When the airplane angle of sideslip was zero, the PFTF local value was zero between Mach 0.8 and Mach 1.1, -2 degrees between Mach 1.1 and Mach 1.5, and increased from zero to 1 degree from Mach 1.5 to Mach 2.0. Airplane inlet shock waves crossed the aerodynamic interface plane between Mach 1.85 and Mach 1.90.

  7. Test results of the SHARE II Mid-deck Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Richard F.; Dominguez, Peter; Cornwell, John

    1992-01-01

    The SHARE II (Space Station Advanced Radiator Experiment II) Mid-deck Experiment was flown on board the Space Shuttle (STS-37) from April 5 to 12, 1991. The purpose of the experiment was to demonstrate the operation of several design changes proposed for the NASA/Grumman SHARE II heat pipe as a result of the lessons learned during the first SHARE flight (STS-29) in March 1989. Two test articles flew during the mission. The first, the Bubble Management Test Article, was a Plexiglas model of the monogroove heat pipe. This test article was primarily used to evaluate the performance of two 0-g bubble management devices; the redesigned evaporator screen artery and the condenser bubble trap. The second, the Blended Manifold Priming Test Article, also constructed of Plexiglas, was used to demonstrate passive self-priming of a heat pipe blended manifold connecting three evaporator legs to a single condenser leg. Both test articles used a 50/50 mixture of ethanol and water as the working fluid. Overall, the experiment was highly successful, with all the major test objectives fulfilled, including blended manifold priming, condenser bubble trap operation, screen artery bubble ingestion, and elimination of hydraulic diameter mismatch.

  8. Capsule Aerothermodynamics. CFD Prediction Methodology; Database for CFD Validation; Capsule Flight Programs: AFE and Apollo Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiwert, George S.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Features of chemically reacting separated hypersonic flows are identified and issues concerning their analysis and simulation are discussed. Emphasis is placed on flows of high temperature dissociating and ionizing air and current methods for studying and characterizing these flows, including separation, are reviewed. The aeroassist orbital transfer vehicle and its flight trajectory are used for illustration. Thermochemical nonequilibrium phenomena are emphasized and extension of continuum analysis to the high altitude slip-flow regime is considered.

  9. The role of flight experiments in the development of cryogenic fluid management technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chato, David J.

    2006-02-01

    This paper reviews the history of cryogenic fluid management technology development and infusion into both the Saturn and Centaur vehicles. Ground testing and analysis proved inadequate to demonstrate full scale performance. As a consequence flight demonstration with full scale vehicle was required by both the Saturn and Centaur programs to build confidence that problems were addressed. However; the flight vehicles were highly limited on flight instrumentation and the flight demonstration “locked-in” the design without challenging the function of design elements. Projects reviewed include: the Aerobee Sounding Rocket Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) tests which served as a valuable stepping stone to flight demonstration and built confidence in the ability to handle hydrogen in low gravity; the Saturn IVB Fluid Management Qualification flight test; the Atlas Centaur demonstration flights to develop two burn capability; and finally the Titan Centaur two post mission flight tests.

  10. The Role of Flight Experiments in the Development of Cryogenic Fluid Management Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the history of cryogenic fluid management technology development and infusion into both the Saturn and Centaur vehicles. Ground testing and analysis proved inadequate to demonstrate full scale performance. As a consequence flight demonstration with a full scale vehicle was required by both the Saturn and Centaur programs to build confidence that problems were addressed. However; the flight vehicles were highly limited on flight instrumentation and the flight demonstration locked-in the design without challenging the function of design elements. Projects reviewed include: the Aerobee Sounding Rocket Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) tests which served as a valuable stepping stone to flight demonstration and built confidence in the ability to handle hydrogen in low gravity; the Saturn IVB Fluid Management Qualification flight test; the Atlas Centaur demonstration flights to develop two burn capability; and finally the Titan Centaur two post mission flight tests.

  11. Upper Stage Flight Experiment 10K Engine Design and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, R.; Morgan, D.; Crockett, D.; Martinez, L.; Anderson, W.; McNeal, C.

    2000-01-01

    A 10,000 lbf thrust chamber was developed for the Upper Stage Flight Experiment (USFE). This thrust chamber uses hydrogen peroxide/JP-8 oxidizer/fuel combination. The thrust chamber comprises an oxidizer dome and manifold, catalyst bed assembly, fuel injector, and chamber/nozzle assembly. Testing of the engine was done at NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC) to verify its performance and life for future upper stage or Reusable Launch Vehicle applications. Various combinations of silver screen catalyst beds, fuel injectors, and combustion chambers were tested. Results of the tests showed high C* efficiencies (97% - 100%) and vacuum specific impulses of 275 - 298 seconds. With fuel film cooling, heating rates were low enough that the silica/quartz phenolic throat experienced minimal erosion. Mission derived requirements were met, along with a perfect safety record.

  12. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment - Science, engineering, and hardware development for USMP space flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Hahn, R. C.; Koss, M. B.; Tirmizi, S. H.; Selleck, M. E.; Velosa, A.; Winsa, E.

    1991-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) has been designed to provide microgravity data on dendritic growth for a critical test of theory. This paper updates progress on constructing a crystal growth chamber suitable for space flight. The IDGE chamber is constructed from glass and stainless steel and is hermetically sealed by electron beam welds and glass-metal seals. Initial tests of the chambers sample's melting point plateau show that the new chamber design is capable of preserving the 99.9995 percent purity of succinonitrile. Dendrite growth can be initiated in the center of the IDGE chamber by means of thermo-electric coolers and a capillary injector tube (stinger). The new IDGE chamber is ready for fully integrated tests with the prototype IDGE engineering hardware at NASA's Lewis Research Center.

  13. Preliminary results from the flight of the Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment (SAMPIE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Hillard, G. Barry

    1994-01-01

    SAMPIE, the Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment, flew in the Space Shuttle Columbia payload bay as part of the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology-2 (OAST-2) mission on STS-62, March, 1994. SAMPIE biased samples of solar arrays and space power materials to varying potentials with respect to the surrounding space plasma, and recorded the plasma currents collected and the arcs which occurred, along with a set of plasma diagnostics data. A large set of high quality data was obtained on the behavior of solar arrays and space power materials in the space environment. This paper is the first report on the data SAMPIE telemetered to the ground during the mission. It will be seen that the flight data promise to help determine arcing thresholds, snapover potentials, and floating potentials for arrays and spacecraft in LEO.

  14. Summary of Results from the Risk Management Program for the Mars Microrover Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shishko, Robert; Matijevic, Jacob R.

    2000-01-01

    On 4 July 1997, the Mars Pathfinder landed on the surface of Mars carrying the first planetary rover, known as the Sojourner. Formally known as the Microrover Flight Experiment (MFEX), the Sojourner was a low cost, high-risk technology demonstration, in which new risk management techniques were tried. This paper summarizes the activities and results of the effort to conduct a low-cost, yet meaningful risk management program for the MFEX. The specific activities focused on cost, performance, schedule, and operations risks. Just as the systems engineering process was iterative and produced successive refinements of requirements, designs, etc., so was the risk management process. Qualitative risk assessments were performed first to gain some insights for refining the microrover design and operations concept. These then evolved into more quantitative analyses. Risk management lessons from the manager's perspective is presented for other low-cost, high-risk space missions.

  15. STS-40 orbital acceleration research experiment flight results during a typical sleep period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Nicholson, John Y.; Ritter, James R.

    1992-01-01

    The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE), an electrostatic accelerometer package with complete on-orbit calibration capabilities was flown aboard Shuttle on STS-40. The instrument is designed to measure and record the Shuttle aerodynamic acceleration environment from the free molecule flow regime through the rarefied flow transition into the hypersonic continuum regime. Because of its sensitivity, the OARE instrument detects aerodynamic behavior of the Shuttle while in low-earth orbit. A 2-h orbital time period on day seven of the mission, when the crew was asleep and other spacecraft activities were at a minimum, was examined. Examination of the model with the flight data shows the instrument to be sensitive to all major expected low-frequency acceleration phenomena; however, some erratic instrument bias behavior persists in two axes. In these axes, the OARE data can be made to match a comprehensive atmospheric-aerodynamic model by making bias adjustments and slight liner corrections for drift.

  16. Enhanced data reduction of the velocity data on CETA flight experiment. [Crew and Equipment Translation Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Tom D.; Wong, Douglas T.; Tripp, John S.

    1993-01-01

    A newly developed technique for enhanced data reduction provides an improved procedure that allows least squares minimization to become possible between data sets with an unequal number of data points. This technique was applied in the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) experiment on the STS-37 Shuttle flight in April 1991 to obtain the velocity profile from the acceleration data. The new technique uses a least-squares method to estimate the initial conditions and calibration constants. These initial conditions are estimated by least-squares fitting the displacements indicated by the Hall-effect sensor data to the corresponding displacements obtained from integrating the acceleration data. The velocity and displacement profiles can then be recalculated from the corresponding acceleration data using the estimated parameters. This technique, which enables instantaneous velocities to be obtained from the test data instead of only average velocities at varying discrete times, offers more detailed velocity information, particularly during periods of large acceleration or deceleration.

  17. Short duration microgravity experiments in physical and life sciences during parabolic flights: the first 30 ESA campaigns.

    PubMed

    Pletser, Vladimir

    2004-11-01

    Aircraft parabolic flights provide repetitively up to 20 s of reduced gravity during ballistic flight manoeuvres. Parabolic flights are used to conduct short microgravity investigations in Physical and Life Sciences, to test instrumentation and to train astronauts before a space flight. The European Space Agency (ESA) has organized since 1984 thirty parabolic flight campaigns for microgravity research experiments utilizing six different airplanes. More than 360 experiments were successfully conducted during more than 2800 parabolas, representing a cumulated weightlessness time of 15 h 30 m. This paper presents the short duration microgravity research programme of ESA. The experiments conducted during these campaigns are summarized, and the different airplanes used by ESA are shortly presented. The technical capabilities of the Airbus A300 'Zero-G' are addressed. Some Physical Science, Technology and Life Science experiments performed during the last ESA campaigns with the Airbus A300 are presented to show the interest of this unique microgravity research tool to complement, support and prepare orbital microgravity investigations.

  18. Overview of the LaNCETS Flight Experiment and the CFD Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliatt, Larry J., II; Haering, Edward A., Jr.; Bui, Trong

    2008-01-01

    LaCETS baseline flight study include: 29 high-quality nearfield shock structure probings at three Mach numbers; Shocks in exhaust plume measured; ! CFD study of simplified nozzle shows similar plume structures as flight data; ! Phase II flights scheduled for October 2008; and ! US Industry and Academia invited to participate in analysis, review, and assessment of LaNCETS data.

  19. Spacelab life sciences flight experiments - An integrated approach to the study of cardiovascular deconditioning and orthostatic hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffney, F. A.

    1985-01-01

    A Spacelab experiment to study cardiovascular deconditioning and orthostatic hypotension is proposed. Previous experiments that have attempted to explain the factors which cause alterations in cardiovascular regulation are investigated. Based on these observations a hypothesis which states cephalad fluid shift produces cardiovascular changes is studied. The testing of the hypothesis is to include the analysis of physiological and anatomical changes in humans and animals for preflight and in-flight periods. The procedures and measurement techniques for the experiment are described.

  20. Optimization of moisture content for wheat seedling germination in a cellulose acetate medium for a space flight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. F.; Dreschel, T. W.; Brown, C. S.; Wheeler, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    The Porous Tube Plant Nutrient Delivery System (PTPNDS), a hydrophilic, microporous ceramic tube hydroponic system designed for microgravity, will be tested in a middeck locker of the Space Shuttle. The flight experiment will focus on hardware operation and assess its ability to support seed germination and early seedling growth in microgravity. The water controlling system of the PTPNDS hardware has been successfully tested during the parabolic flight of the KC-135. One challenge to the development of the space flight experiment was to devise a method of holding seeds to the cylindrical porous tube. The seed-holder must provide water and air to be seed, absorb water from the porous tube, withstand sterilization, provide a clear path for shoots and roots to emerge, and be composed of flight qualified materials. In preparation for the flight experiment, a wheat seed-holder has been designed that utilizes a cellulose acetate plug to facilitate imbibition and to hold the wheat seeds in contact with the porous tube in the correct orientation during the vibration of launch and the microgravity environment of orbit. Germination and growth studies with wheat at a range of temperatures showed that optimal moisture was 78% (by weight) in the cellulose acetate seed holders. These and other design considerations are discussed.