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Sample records for aerobic bacteria isolated

  1. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria Isolated From Surgical Site Infection of Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghotaslou, Reza; Beheshtirouy, Samad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Asghari, Babak; Alizadeh, Naser; Toloue Ostadgavahi, Ali; Sorayaei Somesaraei, Vida; Memar, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) are infections of incision or deep tissue at operation sites. These infections prolong hospitalization, delay wound healing, and increase the overall cost and morbidity. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate anaerobic and aerobic bacteria prevalence in surgical site infections and determinate antibiotic susceptibility pattern in these isolates. Materials and Methods: One hundred SSIs specimens were obtained by needle aspiration from purulent material in depth of infected site. These specimens were cultured and incubated in both aerobic and anaerobic condition. For detection of antibiotic susceptibility pattern in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, we used disk diffusion, agar dilution, and E-test methods. Results: A total of 194 bacterial strains were isolated from 100 samples of surgical sites. Predominant aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria isolated from these specimens were the members of Enterobacteriaceae family (66, 34.03%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26, 13.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (24, 12.37%), Acinetobacter spp. (18, 9.28%), Enterococcus spp. (16, 8.24%), coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. (14, 7.22%) and nonhemolytic streptococci (2, 1.03%). Bacteroides fragilis (26, 13.4%), and Clostridium perfringens (2, 1.03%) were isolated as anaerobic bacteria. The most resistant bacteria among anaerobic isolates were B. fragilis. All Gram-positive isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid while most of Enterobacteriaceae showed sensitivity to imipenem. Conclusions: Most SSIs specimens were polymicrobial and predominant anaerobic isolate was B. fragilis. Isolated aerobic and anaerobic strains showed high level of resistance to antibiotics. PMID:26421133

  2. Phylogenetically Diverse Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria Isolated from Epilithic Biofilms in Tama River, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Setsuko; Matsuura, Katsumi; Haruta, Shin

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria in freshwater environments, particularly in rivers, has not been examined in as much detail as in ocean environments. In the present study, we investigated the phylogenetic and physiological diversities of AAP bacteria in biofilms that developed on submerged stones in a freshwater river using culture methods. The biofilms collected were homogenized and inoculated on solid media and incubated aerobically in the dark. Sixty-eight red-, pink-, yellow-, orange-, or brown-colored colonies were isolated, and, of these, 28 isolates contained the photosynthetic pigment, bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the isolates were classified into 14 groups in 8 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and distributed in the orders Rhodospirillales, Rhodobacterales, and Sphingomonadales of Alphaproteobacteria and in Betaproteobacteria. Physiological analyses confirmed that none of the representative isolates from any of the groups grew under anaerobic phototrophic conditions. Seven isolates in 4 OTUs showed a 16S rRNA gene sequence identity of 98.0% or less with any established species, suggesting the presence of previously undescribed species of AAP bacteria. Six isolates in 2 other OTUs had the closest relatives, which have not been reported to be AAP bacteria. Physiological comparisons among the isolates revealed differences in preferences for nutrient concentrations, BChl contents, and light-harvesting proteins. These results suggest that diverse and previously unknown AAP bacteria inhabit river biofilms. PMID:27453124

  3. Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yurkov, Vladimir V.; Beatty, J. Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are a relatively recently discovered bacterial group. Although taxonomically and phylogenetically heterogeneous, these bacteria share the following distinguishing features: the presence of bacteriochlorophyll a incorporated into reaction center and light-harvesting complexes, low levels of the photosynthetic unit in cells, an abundance of carotenoids, a strong inhibition by light of bacteriochlorophyll synthesis, and the inability to grow photosynthetically under anaerobic conditions. Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are classified in two marine (Erythrobacter and Roseobacter) and six freshwater (Acidiphilium, Erythromicrobium, Erythromonas, Porphyrobacter, Roseococcus, and Sandaracinobacter) genera, which phylogenetically belong to the α-1, α-3, and α-4 subclasses of the class Proteobacteria. Despite this phylogenetic information, the evolution and ancestry of their photosynthetic properties are unclear. We discuss several current proposals for the evolutionary origin of aerobic phototrophic bacteria. The closest phylogenetic relatives of aerobic phototrophic bacteria include facultatively anaerobic purple nonsulfur phototrophic bacteria. Since these two bacterial groups share many properties, yet have significant differences, we compare and contrast their physiology, with an emphasis on morphology and photosynthetic and other metabolic processes. PMID:9729607

  4. Isolation of Optically Targeted Single Bacteria by Application of Fluidic Force Microscopy to Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophs from the Phyllosphere

    PubMed Central

    Stiefel, Philipp; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2013-01-01

    In their natural environment, bacteria often behave differently than they do under laboratory conditions. To gain insight into the physiology of bacteria in situ, dedicated approaches are required to monitor their adaptations and specific behaviors under environmental conditions. Optical microscopy is crucial for the observation of fundamental characteristics of bacteria, such as cell shape, size, and marker gene expression. Here, fluidic force microscopy (FluidFM) was exploited to isolate optically selected bacteria for subsequent identification and characterization. In this study, bacteriochlorophyll-producing bacteria, which can be visualized due to their characteristic fluorescence in the infrared range, were isolated from leaf washes. Bacterial communities from the phyllosphere were investigated because they harbor genes indicative of aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis. Our data show that different species of Methylobacterium express their photosystem in planta, and they show a distinct pattern of bacteriochlorophyll production under laboratory conditions that is dependent on supplied carbon sources. PMID:23770907

  5. Safety assessment of dairy microorganisms: aerobic coryneform bacteria isolated from the surface of smear-ripened cheeses.

    PubMed

    Denis, Catherine; Irlinger, Françoise

    2008-09-01

    The group of "coryneform bacteria" belongs to the class of Actinobacteria including a diverse and heterogeneous collection of bacteria of various genera. Most of them are known as environmental residents and/or commensal flora of humans and they are isolated frequently in clinical studies. Actinobacteria include also several aerobic species, present at the surface of smear-ripened cheeses for decades and used as ripening culture in the dairy industry. Their clinical significance is controversial because an easy combination of phenotypic and molecular methods to characterize Actinobacteria at the species level is still lacking. A bibliographical survey was conducted to assess the safety status of Actinobacteria species used as starter culture in fermented dairy foods, according to their technological interest. Aerobic coryneform bacteria isolated from smear-ripened cheeses are most commonly recovered from soil, the environment or food. To date, no clinical infection or food toxi-infection related to smear cheese coryneform bacteria ingestion has been reported. From a taxonomic viewpoint, dairy species are distant from the reference species associated with known pathologies. From a physiological viewpoint, cheese smear coryneform bacteria appear to be related to particular ecological niches: they are all oxidative species, and most are psychrotrophic and unable to grow at 37 degrees C whereas medically relevant coryneform bacteria are facultative anaerobes and grow at 35-37 degrees C. Consequently, technological strains must be selected according to taxonomic criteria (nonpathogenic species) and ecological criteria.

  6. Effect of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates on the growth of aerobic heterotrophic cultivable bacteria isolated from an agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Peinado, María del Mar; González-López, Jesús; Rodelas, Belén; Galera, Vanesa; Pozo, Clementina; Martínez-Toledo, María Victoria

    2008-08-01

    An enrichment culture technique was used to isolate soil bacteria capable of growing in the presence of two different concentrations of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) (10 and 500 microg ml(-1)). Nine bacterial strains, representatives of the major colony types of aerobic heterotrophic cultivable bacteria in the enriched samples, were isolated and subsequently identified by PCR-amplification and partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Amongst the isolates, strains LAS05 (Pseudomonas syringae), LAS06 (Staphylococcus epidermidis), LAS07 (Delftia tsuruhatensis), LAS08 (Staphylococcus epidermidis) and LAS09 (Enterobacter aerogenes), were able to grow in pure culture in dialysed soil media amended with LAS (50 microg ml(-1)). The three Gram-negative strains grew to higher cell numbers in the presence of 50 microg ml(-1) of LAS, compared to LAS-unamended dialysed soil medium, and were selected for further testing of their ability to use LAS as carbon source. However, HPLC analysis of culture supernatants showed that the three strains can tolerate but not degrade LAS when grown in pure cultures. A higher concentration of soluble phosphates was recorded in dialysed soil media amended with LAS (50 microg ml(-1)) compared to unamended control media, suggesting an effect of the surfactant that enhanced the bioavailability of P from soil. The presence of LAS at a concentration of 50 microg ml(-1) had an important impact on growth of selected aerobic heterotrophic soil bacteria, a deleterious effect which may be relevant for the normal function and evolution of agricultural soil.

  7. Isolation of Aerobic Anoxygenic Photosynthetic Bacteria from Black Smoker Plume Waters of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Yurkov, Vladimir; Beatty, J. Thomas

    1998-01-01

    A strain of the aerobic anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria was isolated from a deep-ocean hydrothermal vent plume environment. The in vivo absorption spectra of cells indicate the presence of bacteriochlorophyll a incorporated into light-harvesting complex I and a reaction center. The general morphological and physiological characteristics of this new isolate are described. PMID:16349490

  8. Isolation of aerobic cultivable cellulolytic bacteria from different regions of the gastrointestinal tract of giant land snail Achatina fulica.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Guilherme L; Correa, Raquel F; Cunha, Raquel S; Cardoso, Alexander M; Chaia, Catia; Clementino, Maysa M; Garcia, Eloi S; de Souza, Wanderley; Frasés, Susana

    2015-01-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by cellulases is one of the major limiting steps in the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to yield bioethanol. To overcome this hindrance, significant efforts are underway to identify novel cellulases. The snail Achatina fulica is a gastropod with high cellulolytic activity, mainly due to the abundance of glycoside hydrolases produced by both the animal and its resident microbiota. In this study, we partially assessed the cellulolytic aerobic bacterial diversity inside the gastrointestinal tract of A. fulica by culture-dependent methods and evaluated the hydrolytic repertoire of the isolates. Forty bacterial isolates were recovered from distinct segments of the snail gut and identified to the genus level by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Additional phenotypic characterization was performed using biochemical tests provided by the Vitek2 identification system. The overall enzymatic repertoire of the isolated strains was investigated by enzymatic plate assays, containing the following substrates: powdered sugarcane bagasse, carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), p-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (pNPG), p-nitrophenyl-β-D-cellobioside (pNPC), 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (MUG), 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-cellobioside (MUC), and 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-xylopyranoside (MUX). Our results indicate that the snail A. fulica is an attractive source of cultivable bacteria that showed to be valuable resources for the production of different types of biomass-degrading enzymes.

  9. Isolation of aerobic cultivable cellulolytic bacteria from different regions of the gastrointestinal tract of giant land snail Achatina fulica

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Guilherme L.; Correa, Raquel F.; Cunha, Raquel S.; Cardoso, Alexander M.; Chaia, Catia; Clementino, Maysa M.; Garcia, Eloi S.; de Souza, Wanderley; Frasés, Susana

    2015-01-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by cellulases is one of the major limiting steps in the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to yield bioethanol. To overcome this hindrance, significant efforts are underway to identify novel cellulases. The snail Achatina fulica is a gastropod with high cellulolytic activity, mainly due to the abundance of glycoside hydrolases produced by both the animal and its resident microbiota. In this study, we partially assessed the cellulolytic aerobic bacterial diversity inside the gastrointestinal tract of A. fulica by culture-dependent methods and evaluated the hydrolytic repertoire of the isolates. Forty bacterial isolates were recovered from distinct segments of the snail gut and identified to the genus level by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Additional phenotypic characterization was performed using biochemical tests provided by the Vitek2 identification system. The overall enzymatic repertoire of the isolated strains was investigated by enzymatic plate assays, containing the following substrates: powdered sugarcane bagasse, carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), p-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (pNPG), p-nitrophenyl-β-D-cellobioside (pNPC), 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (MUG), 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-cellobioside (MUC), and 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-xylopyranoside (MUX). Our results indicate that the snail A. fulica is an attractive source of cultivable bacteria that showed to be valuable resources for the production of different types of biomass-degrading enzymes. PMID:26347735

  10. [Sensitivity and resistance of aerobic bacteria isolated from patients with periodontitis towards antibiotics and bacteriophages (comparative analysis)].

    PubMed

    Nemsadze, T D; Mshvenieradze, D D; Apridonidze, K G

    2006-03-01

    In order to examine sensitivity and resistance of isolated aerobic bacteria from periodontitis materials towards antibiotics and bacteriophages, there has been studied exudations taken from 737 patients' periodontic pockets or the tissue taken from curettage. According to the rate of identified microorganisms, they have been arranged as follows: S. epidermidis 39,34+/-1,56%; S. pyogenes 18,84+/-1,25%; M. catarrhalis 17,09+/-1,2%; S. aureus 10,71+/-0,99%; E.coli-5,66+/-0,74%; Diphtheroids in 1,13+/-0,33%; S. Mucilaginosus 1,02+/-0,32%, proteus vulgaris - 0,72+/-0,27%; H. parainfluenzae - 0,72+/-0,27%; S. intermedium 0,61+/-0,24%; P. aeruginosa - 0,61+/-0,24%; H. influenzae - 0,51+/-0,22%, S. saprophiticus - 0,51+/-0,22%; S. viridans - 0,51+/-0,22%; S. pneumoniae - 0,41+/-0,2%; K. pneumoniae - 0,41+/-0,22%; S. haemoliticus - 0,41+/-0,2%; B. adolescentics - 0,3+/-0,17%; L. acidophilus -0,3+/-0,17%; S. salivarius-0,1+/-0,1%. It has been stated that percentage of polyresistant strains is growing. While having aerobic infections of periodontitis, kefzol, cephazolin, cephamezin, zinaceph, klaphoran, cephdazidim (cephalosporins I, II, II generation); tetracycline, doxycycline, (tetracyclines); 5-noks, cyprophloxacyne (chinolons I, II generation); ryphamphcyne (rymphamicynes); but standby medicines may be also considered: penicillin G, procaine penicillin (penicillines); streptomycin, kanamicin, gentamicin (aminoglycosides); lincomycin, clindamycin, (lincosamides); eritromycin, macropen (macrolides); chloramphenicol. Since the resistance of microbial strains was not developed towards bacteriophages during the treatment it is considerable to apply simultaneously the bacteriophages and standby antibiotics.

  11. Production of autoinducer-2 by aerobic endospore-forming bacteria isolated from the West African fermented foods.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yang; Kando, Christine Kere; Thorsen, Line; Larsen, Nadja; Jespersen, Lene

    2015-11-01

    Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) is a quorum-sensing (QS) molecule which mediates interspecies signaling and affects various bacterial behaviors in food fermentation. Biosynthesis of AI-2 is controlled by S-ribosylhomocysteine lyase encoded by the luxS gene. The objective of this study was to investigate production of AI-2 by aerobic endospore-forming bacteria (AEB) isolated from the West African alkaline fermented seed products Mantchoua and Maari. The study included 13 AEB strains of Bacillus subtilis, B. cereus, B. altitudinis, B. amyloliquefaciens, B. licheniformis, B. aryabhattai, B. safensis, Lysinibacillus macroides and Paenibacillus polymyxa. All the tested strains harbored the luxS gene and all strains except for P. polymyxa B314 were able to produce AI-2 during incubation in laboratory medium. Production of AI-2 by AEB was growth phase dependent, showing maximum activity at the late exponential phase. AI-2 was depleted from the culture medium at the beginning of the stationary growth phase, indicating that the tested AEB possess a functional AI-2 receptor that internalizes AI-2. This study provides the evidences of QS system in Bacillus spp. and L. macroides and new knowledge of AI-2 production by AEB. This knowledge contributes to the development of QS-based strategies for better control of alkaline fermentation.

  12. Biodegradation of 17β-estradiol by bacteria isolated from deep sea sediments in aerobic and anaerobic media.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Lucía; Louvado, António; Esteves, Valdemar I; Gomes, Newton C M; Almeida, Adelaide; Cunha, Ângela

    2017-02-05

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are considered as high research priority being a source of potential adverse ecological health effects in environmental waters. 17β-Estradiol (E2), a recalcitrant natural estrogen, is typically encountered in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) at levels ranging 10-30ngL(-1) in the influent flow and 1-3ngL(-1) in the effluent flow. The exposure to even extremely low concentrations of E2 may interfere with the normal function of the endocrine system of organisms. In this study, five bacteria isolated from enrichment cultures of sediments of mud volcanoes of the Gulf of Cadiz (Moroccan-Iberian margin) were identified as aerobic E2 biodegraders, which produce low amounts of biotransformed estrone (E1). Analysis of 16S rDNA gene sequences identified three of them as Virgibacillus halotolerans, Bacillus flexus and Bacillus licheniformis. Among the set of strains, Bacillus licheniformis showed also ability to biodegrade E2 under anaerobic conditions.

  13. Lactic Acid Bacteria in Total Mixed Ration Silage Containing Soybean Curd Residue: Their Isolation, Identification and Ability to Inhibit Aerobic Deterioration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y.; Wang, F.; Nishino, N.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the predominant lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on the fermentation characteristics and aerobic stability of total mixed ration (TMR) silage containing soybean curd residue (SC-TMR silage). The SC-TMR materials were ensiled in laboratory silos for 14 or 56 days. LAB predominant in SC-TMR silage were identified (Exp. 1). Lactobacillus fermentum (L. fermentum) and Streptococcus bovis (S. bovis) were found in the untreated materials, Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides (L. pseudomesenteroides) in 14-day silage and Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) in all silages. Pediococcus acidilactici (P. acidilactici), Lactobacillus paracasei (L. paracasei), and Lactobacillus brevis (L. brevis) formed more than 90% of the isolates in 56-day silage. Italian ryegrass and whole crop maize were inoculated with P. acidilactici and L. brevis isolates and the fermentation and aerobic stability determined (Exp. 2). Inoculation with P. acidilactici and L. brevis alone or combined improved the fermentation products in ryegrass silage and markedly enhanced its aerobic stability. In maize silage, P. acidilactici and L. brevis inoculation caused no changes and suppressed deterioration when combined with increases in acetic acid content. The results indicate that P. acidilactici and L. brevis may produce a synergistic effect to inhibit SC-TMR silage deterioration. Further studies are needed to identify the inhibitory substances, which may be useful for developing potential antifungal agents. PMID:26949952

  14. Aerobic bacteria from mucous membranes, ear canals, and skin wounds of feral cats in Grenada, and the antimicrobial drug susceptibility of major isolates.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Harry; Matthew, Vanessa; Fountain, Jacqueline; Snell, Alicia; Doherty, Devin; King, Brittany; Shemer, Eran; Oliveira, Simone; Sharma, Ravindra N

    2011-03-01

    In a 2-year period 54 feral cats were captured in Grenada, West Indies, and a total of 383 samples consisting of swabs from rectum, vagina, ears, eyes, mouth, nose and wounds/abscesses, were cultured for aerobic bacteria and campylobacters. A total of 251 bacterial isolates were obtained, of which 205 were identified to species level and 46 to genus level. A commercial bacterial identification system (API/Biomerieux), was used for this purpose. The most common species was Escherichia coli (N=60), followed by Staphylococcus felis/simulans (40), S. hominis (16), S. haemolyticus (12), Streptococcus canis (9), Proteus mirabilis (8), Pasteurella multocida (7), Streptococcus mitis (7), Staphylococcus xylosus (7), S. capitis (6), S. chromogenes (4), S. sciuri (3), S. auricularis (2), S. lentus (2), S. hyicus (2), Streptococcus suis (2) and Pseudomonas argentinensis (2). Sixteen other isolates were identified to species level. A molecular method using 16S rRNA sequencing was used to confirm/identify 22 isolates. Salmonella or campylobacters were not isolated from rectal swabs. E. coli and S. felis/simulans together constituted 50% of isolates from vagina. S. felis/simulans was the most common species from culture positive ear and eye samples. P. multocida was isolated from 15% of mouth samples. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most common isolates from nose and wound swabs. Staphylococcus aureus, or S. intemedius/S. pseudintermedius were not isolated from any sample. Antimicrobial drug resistance was minimal, most isolates being susceptible to all drugs tested against, including tetracycline.

  15. Isolation of aerobic, gliding, xylanolytic and laminarinolytic bacteria from acidic Sphagnum peatlands and emended description of Chitinophaga arvensicola Kampfer et al. 2006.

    PubMed

    Pankratov, Timofei A; Kulichevskaya, Irina S; Liesack, Werner; Dedysh, Svetlana N

    2006-12-01

    Four aerobic, heterotrophic, yellow-pigmented and flexirubin-producing bacterial strains with gliding motility were isolated from acidic Sphagnum-dominated wetlands of Northern Russia. These bacteria are capable of degrading xylan, laminarin and some other polysaccharides, but not cellulose, pectin or chitin. The four strains possess almost identical 16S rRNA gene sequences and are most closely related (98.9-99.5 % sequence similarity) to the recently reclassified species of the phylum Bacteroidetes, Chitinophaga arvensicola Kämpfer et al. 2006, formerly known as [Cytophaga] arvensicola Oyaizu et al. 1983. However, the novel isolates from Sphagnum peat differed from C. arvensicola DSM 3695(T) in their ability to degrade xylan and starch, by greater tolerance of acidic pH and by their inability to reduce nitrate. An emended description of this species is proposed.

  16. Iodide Accumulation by Aerobic Bacteria Isolated from Subsurface Sediments of a 129I-Contaminated Aquifer at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina ▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hsiu-Ping; Brinkmeyer, Robin; Jones, Whitney L.; Zhang, Saijin; Xu, Chen; Schwehr, Kathy A.; Santschi, Peter H.; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Yeager, Chris M.

    2011-01-01

    129I is of major concern because of its mobility in the environment, excessive inventory, toxicity (it accumulates in the thyroid), and long half-life (∼16 million years). The aim of this study was to determine if bacteria from a 129I-contaminated oxic aquifer at the F area of the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site, SC, could accumulate iodide at environmentally relevant concentrations (0.1 μM I−). Iodide accumulation capability was found in 3 out of 136 aerobic bacterial strains isolated from the F area that were closely related to Streptomyces/Kitasatospora spp., Bacillus mycoides, and Ralstonia/Cupriavidus spp. Two previously described iodide-accumulating marine strains, a Flexibacter aggregans strain and an Arenibacter troitsensis strain, accumulated 2 to 50% total iodide (0.1 μM), whereas the F-area strains accumulated just 0.2 to 2.0%. Iodide accumulation by FA-30 was stimulated by the addition of H2O2, was not inhibited by chloride ions (27 mM), did not exhibit substrate saturation kinetics with regard to I− concentration (up to 10 μM I−), and increased at pH values of <6. Overall, the data indicate that I− accumulation likely results from electrophilic substitution of cellular organic molecules. This study demonstrates that readily culturable, aerobic bacteria of the F-area aquifer do not accumulate significant amounts of iodide; however, this mechanism may contribute to the long-term fate and transport of 129I and to the biogeochemical cycling of iodine over geologic time. PMID:21278282

  17. Inhibition of the growth of Paenibacillus larvae, the causal agent of American foulbrood of honeybees, by selected strains of aerobic spore-forming bacteria isolated from apiarian sources.

    PubMed

    Alippi, Adriana M; Reynaldi, Francisco J

    2006-03-01

    The bacterium Paenibacillus larvae, the causative agent of American foulbrood disease of honeybee larvae, occurs throughout the world and is found in many beekeeping areas of Argentina. The potential as biocontrol agents of antagonic aerobic spore-forming bacteria isolated from honey samples and other apiarian sources were evaluated. Each isolate was screened against one strain of Paenibacillus larvae (ATCC 9545) by using a perpendicular streak technique. Ten randomly selected bacterial strains from the group that showed the best antagonistic effect to P. larvae ATCC 9545 were selected for further study. These were identified as Bacillus subtilis (m351), B. pumilus (m350), B. licheniformis (m347), B. cereus (mv33), B. cereus (m387), B. cereus (m6c), B. megaterium (m404), Brevibacillus laterosporus (BLAT169), B. laterosporus (BLAT170), and B. laterosporus (BLAT171). The antagonistic strains were tested against 17 P. larvae strains from different geographical origins by means of a spot test in wells. The analysis of variance and posterior comparison of means by Tukey method (P < 0.01) showed that the best antagonists were B. megaterium (m404), B. licheniformis (m347), B. cereus (m6c), B. cereus (mv33), and B. cereus (m387).

  18. Biodegradation of Asphalt Cement-20 by Aerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pendrys, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Seven gram-negative, aerobic bacteria were isolated from a mixed culture enriched for asphalt-degrading bacteria. The predominant genera of these isolates were Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Alcaligenes, Flavimonas, and Flavobacterium. The mixed culture preferentially degraded the saturate and naphthene aromatic fractions of asphalt cement-20. A residue remained on the surface which was resistant to biodegradation and protected the underlying asphalt from biodegradation. The most potent asphalt-degrading bacterium, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus NAV2, excretes an emulsifier which is capable of emulsifying the saturate and naphthene aromatic fractions of asphalt cement-20. This emulsifier is not denatured by phenol. PMID:16347928

  19. Aerobic salivary bacteria in wild and captive Komodo dragons.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Joel M; Gillespie, Don; Sastrawan, Putra; Fredeking, Terry M; Stewart, George L

    2002-07-01

    During the months of November 1996, August 1997, and March 1998, saliva and plasma samples were collected for isolation of aerobic bacteria from 26 wild and 13 captive Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis). Twenty-eight Gram-negative and 29 Gram-positive species of bacteria were isolated from the saliva of the 39 Komodo dragons. A greater number of wild than captive dragons were positive for both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The average number of bacterial species within the saliva of wild dragons was 46% greater than for captive dragons. While Escherichia coli was the most common bacterium isolated from the saliva of wild dragons, this species was not present in captive dragons. The most common bacteria isolated from the saliva of captive dragons were Staphylococcus capitis and Staphylococcus capitis and Staphylococcus caseolyticus, neither of which were found in wild dragons. High mortality was seen among mice injected with saliva from wild dragons and the only bacterium isolated from the blood of dying mice was Pasteurella multocida. A competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed the presence of anti-Pasteurella antibody in the plasma of Komodo dragons. Four species of bacteria isolated from dragon saliva showed resistance to one or more of 16 antimicrobics tested. The wide variety of bacteria demonstrated in the saliva of the Komodo dragon in this study, at least one species of which was highly lethal in mice and 54 species of which are known pathogens, support the observation that wounds inflicted by this animal are often associated with sepsis and subsequent bacteremia in prey animals.

  20. Biology of Moderately Halophilic Aerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ventosa, Antonio; Nieto, Joaquín J.; Oren, Aharon

    1998-01-01

    The moderately halophilic heterotrophic aerobic bacteria form a diverse group of microorganisms. The property of halophilism is widespread within the bacterial domain. Bacterial halophiles are abundant in environments such as salt lakes, saline soils, and salted food products. Most species keep their intracellular ionic concentrations at low levels while synthesizing or accumulating organic solutes to provide osmotic equilibrium of the cytoplasm with the surrounding medium. Complex mechanisms of adjustment of the intracellular environments and the properties of the cytoplasmic membrane enable rapid adaptation to changes in the salt concentration of the environment. Approaches to the study of genetic processes have recently been developed for several moderate halophiles, opening the way toward an understanding of haloadaptation at the molecular level. The new information obtained is also expected to contribute to the development of novel biotechnological uses for these organisms. PMID:9618450

  1. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1995-05-30

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  2. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1995-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  3. The aerobic activity of metronidazole against anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dione, Niokhor; Khelaifia, Saber; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Raoult, Didier

    2015-05-01

    Recently, the aerobic growth of strictly anaerobic bacteria was demonstrated using antioxidants. Metronidazole is frequently used to treat infections caused by anaerobic bacteria; however, to date its antibacterial activity was only tested in anaerobic conditions. Here we aerobically tested using antioxidants the in vitro activities of metronidazole, gentamicin, doxycycline and imipenem against 10 common anaerobic and aerobic bacteria. In vitro susceptibility testing was performed by the disk diffusion method, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by Etest. Aerobic culture of the bacteria was performed at 37°C using Schaedler agar medium supplemented with 1mg/mL ascorbic acid and 0.1mg/mL glutathione; the pH was adjusted to 7.2 by 10M KOH. Growth of anaerobic bacteria cultured aerobically using antioxidants was inhibited by metronidazole after 72h of incubation at 37°C, with a mean inhibition diameter of 37.76mm and an MIC of 1μg/mL; however, strains remained non-sensitive to gentamicin. No growth inhibition of aerobic bacteria was observed after 24h of incubation at 37°C with metronidazole; however, inhibition was observed with doxycycline and imipenem used as controls. These results indicate that bacterial sensitivity to metronidazole is not related to the oxygen tension but is a result of the sensitivity of the micro-organism. In future, both culture and antibiotic susceptibility testing of strictly anaerobic bacteria will be performed in an aerobic atmosphere using antioxidants in clinical microbiology laboratories.

  4. [Isolation and identification of electrochemically active microorganism from micro-aerobic environment].

    PubMed

    Wu, Song; Xiao, Yong; Zheng, Zhi-Yong; Zheng, Yue; Yang, Zhao-Hui; Zhao, Feng

    2014-10-01

    Extracellular electron transfer of electrochemically active microorganism plays vital role in biogeochemical cycling of metals and carbon and in biosynthesis of bioenergy. Compared to anaerobic anode, micro-aerobic anode captures more energy from microbial fuel cell. However, most of previous researches focused on functioning bacteria in anaerobic anode, functioning bacteria in micro-aerobic anode was rarely studied. Herein, we used the traditional aerobic screening technology to isolate functioning bacteria from a micro-aerobic anode. Three pure cultures Aeromonas sp. WS-XY2, Citrobacter sp. WS-XY3 and Bacterium strain WS-XY4 were obtained. WS-XY2 and WS-XY3 were belonged to Proteobacteria, whereas WS-XY4 was possibly a new species. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry analysis demonstrated all of them showed the electrochemical activity by direct extracellular electron transfer, and micro-aerobic anode could select bacteria that have similar electrochemical activity to proliferate on the anode. We further conclude that functioning bacteria in micro-aerobic anode are more efficient than that of anaerobic anode may be the reason that micro-aerobic anode has better performance than anaerobic anode. Therefore, a thorough study of functioning bacteria in micro-aerobic anode will significantly promote the energy recovery from microbial fuel cell.

  5. Abundance and salt tolerance of obligately aerobic, phototrophic bacteria in a marine microbial mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurkov, Vladimir V.; Van Gemerden, Hans

    Data have been collected on the abundance of obligately aerobic, bacteriochlorophyll- a-containing bacteria in a marine microbial mat on the West Frisian Island of Texel, The Netherlands. Plate counts on media rich in organic matter revealed average numbers of 3 ∗10 5·cm -3 sediment in the top 10 mm of the mat; the number of purple non-sulphur bacteria was of the same magnitude. Due to the relatively small dimensions of obligately aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria and purple non-sulphur bacteria, compared to those of purple sulphur bacteria, the contributions of either of the two former groups to the biomass of Bchl- a-containing organisms was approximately 3%. The specific Bchl- a-content of the isolated obligately aerobic phototrophs was very low (0.8 to 1.0 μg·mg -1 protein) compared to that of purple non-sulphur bacteria (16 to 20 μg·mg -1 protein), and purple sulphur bacteria (27 to 30 μg·mg -1). As a consequence, the relative contribution to the total Bchl a concentration of the two former groups (0.1% and 2.1%, respectively) was negligible, compared to that of the purple sulphur bacteria (97.8%). Salinities <50 had little effect on growth rate and yield of isolates; at salinities between 50 and 100 the doubling time increased progressively with a concomitant decrease in yield; no growth occurred at salinities > 140.

  6. Anaerobic and aerobic degradation of pyridine by a newly isolated denitrifying bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, S K; Lee, G M; Yoon, J H; Park, Y H; Bae, H S; Lee, S T

    1997-01-01

    New denitrifying bacteria that could degrade pyridine under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions were isolated from industrial wastewater. The successful enrichment and isolation of these strains required selenite as a trace element. These isolates appeared to be closely related to Azoarcus species according to the results of 16S rRNA sequence analysis. An isolated strain, pF6, metabolized pyridine through the same pathway under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Since pyridine induced NAD-linked glutarate-dialdehyde dehydrogenase and isocitratase activities, it is likely that the mechanism of pyridine degradation in strain pF6 involves N-C-2 ring cleavage. Strain pF6 could degrade pyridine in the presence of nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide as electron acceptors. In a batch culture with 6 mM nitrate, degradation of pyridine and denitrification were not sensitively affected by the redox potential, which gradually decreased from 150 to -200 mV. In a batch culture with the nitrate concentration higher than 6 mM, nitrite transiently accumulated during denitrification significantly inhibited cell growth and pyridine degradation. Growth yield on pyridine decreased slightly under denitrifying conditions from that under aerobic conditions. Furthermore, when the pyridine concentration used was above 12 mM, the specific growth rate under denitrifying conditions was higher than that under aerobic conditions. Considering these characteristics, a newly isolated denitrifying bacterium, strain pF6, has advantages over strictly aerobic bacteria in field applications. PMID:9212408

  7. Growth of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria by aerobic hydrogen oxidation.

    PubMed

    Koch, Hanna; Galushko, Alexander; Albertsen, Mads; Schintlmeister, Arno; Gruber-Dorninger, Christiane; Lücker, Sebastian; Pelletier, Eric; Le Paslier, Denis; Spieck, Eva; Richter, Andreas; Nielsen, Per H; Wagner, Michael; Daims, Holger

    2014-08-29

    The bacterial oxidation of nitrite to nitrate is a key process of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria are considered a highly specialized functional group, which depends on the supply of nitrite from other microorganisms and whose distribution strictly correlates with nitrification in the environment and in wastewater treatment plants. On the basis of genomics, physiological experiments, and single-cell analyses, we show that Nitrospira moscoviensis, which represents a widely distributed lineage of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, has the genetic inventory to utilize hydrogen (H2) as an alternative energy source for aerobic respiration and grows on H2 without nitrite. CO2 fixation occurred with H2 as the sole electron donor. Our results demonstrate a chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria outside the nitrogen cycle, suggesting greater ecological flexibility than previously assumed.

  8. The effect of bacteria, enzymes and inulin on fermentation and aerobic stability of corn silage

    PubMed Central

    Peymanfar, S; Kermanshahi, RK

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Ensiling is a conservation method for forage crops. It is based on the fact that anaerobe lactic acid bacteria (LAB) convert watersoluble carbohydrates into organic acids. Therefore, pH decreases and the forage is preserved. The aim of this study was to isolate special kinds of lactic acid bacteria from silage and to study the effect of bacteria, inulin and enzymes as silage additives on the fermentation and aerobic stability of the silage. Materials and Methods The heterofermentative LAB were isolated from corn silages in Broujerd, Iran and biochemically characterized. Acid tolerance was studied by exposure to acidic PBS and growth in bile salt was measured by the spectrophotometric method. Results The results of molecular analysis using 16SrDNA sequences showed that the isolates belonged to Lactobacillus and Enterococcus genera. To enhance stability in acidic environment and against bile salts, microencapsulation with Alginate and Chitosan was used. The Lactobacillus plantarum strains were used as control. The inoculants (1 × 107 cfu/g) alone or in combination with inulin or in combination with enzymes were added to chopped forages and ensiled in 1.5-L anaerobic jars. Conclusion Combination of the isolates Lactobacillus and Enterococcus with inulin and enzymes can improve the aerobic stability of corn silage. PMID:23205249

  9. Aerobic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria: Environmental selection and diversification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, D.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria oxidize reduced inorganic compounds to sulfuric acid. Lithotrophic sulfur oxidizer use the energy obtained from oxidation for microbial growth. Heterotrophic sulfur oxidizers obtain energy from the oxidation of organic compounds. In sulfur-oxidizing mixotrophs energy are derived either from the oxidation of inorganic or organic compounds. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are usually located within the sulfide/oxygen interfaces of springs, sediments, soil microenvironments, and the hypolimnion. Colonization of the interface is necessary since sulfide auto-oxidizes and because both oxygen and sulfide are needed for growth. The environmental stresses associated with the colonization of these interfaces resulted in the evolution of morphologically diverse and unique aerobic sulfur oxidizers.

  10. Aerobic bacterial microbiota isolated from the cloaca of the European pond turtle (Emys orbicularis) in Poland.

    PubMed

    Nowakiewicz, Aneta; Ziółkowska, Grażyna; Zięba, Przemysław; Dziedzic, Barbara Majer; Gnat, Sebastian; Wójcik, Mariusz; Dziedzic, Roman; Kostruba, Anna

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a comparative analysis of the aerobic cloacal bacteria of European pond turtles (Emys orbicularis) living in their natural environment and juvenile turtles reared under controlled conditions in a breeding center. We included 130 turtles in the study. The aerobic bacteria isolated from the cloaca of the juvenile turtles were less diverse and more prevalent than the bacteria isolated from free-living adults. We isolated 17 bacterial species from juvenile captive turtles, among which the dominant species were Cellulomonas flavigena (77/96), Enterococcus faecalis (96/96), Escherichia coli (58/96), and Proteus mirabilis (41/96). From the adult, free-living turtles, we isolated 36 bacterial species, some of which are a potential threat to public health (e.g., Salmonella enterica serovars Newport, Daytona, and Braenderup; Listeria monocytogenes; Yersinia enterocolitica; Yersinia ruckeri; Klebsiella pneumoniae; Vibrio fluvialis; and Serratia marcescens), and pathogens that are etiologic agents of diseases of ectothermic animals (e.g., Aeromonas sobria, Aeromonas caviae, Hafnia alvei, Edwardsiella tarda, and Citrobacter braakii; the last two species were isolated from both groups of animals). The cloacal bacterial biota of the European pond turtle was characterized by numerous species of bacteria, and its composition varied with turtle age and environmental conditions. The small number of isolated bacteria that are potential human pathogens may indicate that the European pond turtle is of relatively minor importance as a threat to public health.

  11. Isolation and Identification of Concrete Environment Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwan, J. M.; Anneza, L. H.; Othman, N.; Husnul, T.; Alshalif, A. F.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the isolation and molecular method for bacteria identification through PCR and DNA sequencing. Identification of the bacteria species is required in order to fully utilize the bacterium capability for precipitation of calcium carbonate in concrete. This process is to enable the addition of suitable catalyst according to the bacterium enzymatic pathway that is known through the bacteria species used. The objective of this study is to isolate, enriched and identify the bacteria species. The bacteria in this study was isolated from fresh urine and acid mine drainage water, Kota Tinggi, Johor. Enrichment of the isolated bacteria was conducted to ensure the bacteria survivability in concrete. The identification of bacteria species was done through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and rRDNA sequencing. The isolation and enrichment of the bacteria was done successfully. Whereas, the results for bacteria identification showed that the isolated bacteria strains are Bacillus sp and Enterococus faecalis.

  12. Phylogenetic and Kinetic Diversity of Aerobic Vinyl Chloride-Assimilating Bacteria from Contaminated Sites

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Nicholas V.; Mattes, Timothy E.; Gossett, James M.; Spain, Jim C.

    2002-01-01

    Aerobic bacteria that grow on vinyl chloride (VC) have been isolated previously, but their diversity and distribution are largely unknown. It is also unclear whether such bacteria contribute to the natural attenuation of VC at chlorinated-ethene-contaminated sites. We detected aerobic VC biodegradation in 23 of 37 microcosms and enrichments inoculated with samples from various sites. Twelve different bacteria (11 Mycobacterium strains and 1 Nocardioides strain) capable of growth on VC as the sole carbon source were isolated, and 5 representative strains were examined further. All the isolates grew on ethene in addition to VC and contained VC-inducible ethene monooxygenase activity. The Mycobacterium strains (JS60, JS61, JS616, and JS617) all had similar growth yields (5.4 to 6.6 g of protein/mol), maximum specific growth rates (0.17 to 0.23 day−1), and maximum specific substrate utilization rates (9 to 16 nmol/min/mg of protein) with VC. The Nocardioides strain (JS614) had a higher growth yield (10.3 g of protein/mol), growth rate (0.71 day−1), and substrate utilization rate (43 nmol/min/mg of protein) with VC but was much more sensitive to VC starvation. Half-velocity constant (Ks) values for VC were between 0.5 and 3.2 μM, while Ks values for oxygen ranged from 0.03 to 0.3 mg/liter. Our results indicate that aerobic VC-degrading microorganisms (predominantly Mycobacterium strains) are widely distributed at sites contaminated with chlorinated solvents and are likely to be responsible for the natural attenuation of VC. PMID:12450841

  13. Recovery of anaerobic, facultative, and aerobic bacteria from clinical specimens in three anaerobic transport systems.

    PubMed

    Helstad, A G; Kimball, J L; Maki, D G

    1977-06-01

    With aspirated specimens from clinical infections, we evaluated the recovery of anaerobic, aerobic, and facultative bacteria in three widely used transport systems: (i) aspirated fluid in a gassed-out tube (FGT), (ii) swab in modified Cary and Blair transport medium (SCB), and (iii) swab in a gassed-out tube (SGT). Transport tubes were held at 25 degrees C and semiquantitatively sampled at 0, 2, 24, and 48 h. Twenty-five clinical specimens yielded 75 anaerobic strains and 43 isolates of facultative and 3 of aerobic bacteria. Only one anaerobic isolate was not recovered in the first 24 h, and then, only in the SGT. At 48 h, 73 anaerobic strains (97%) were recovered in the FGT, 69 (92%) in the SCB, and 64 (85%) in the SGT. Two problems hindered the recovery of anaerobes in the SCB and SGT systems: first die-off of organisms, as evidenced by a decrease in colony-forming units of 20 strains (27%) in the SCB and 25 strains (33%) in the SGT, as compared with 7 strains (9%) in the FGT, over 48 h; and second, overgrowth of facultative bacteria, more frequent with SCB and SGT. The FGT method was clearly superior at 48 h to the SCB and SGT systems in this study and is recommended as the preferred method for transporting specimens for anaerobic culture.

  14. Aerobic Mercury-resistant bacteria alter Mercury speciation and retention in the Tagus Estuary (Portugal).

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Neusa L; Canário, João; O'Driscoll, Nelson J; Duarte, Aida; Carvalho, Cristina

    2016-02-01

    Aerobic mercury-resistant bacteria were isolated from the sediments of two highly mercury-polluted areas of the Tagus Estuary (Barreiro and Cala do Norte) and one natural reserve area (Alcochete) in order to test their capacity to transform mercury. Bacterial species were identified using 16S rRNA amplification and sequencing techniques and the results indicate the prevalence of Bacillus sp. Resistance patterns to mercurial compounds were established by the determination of minimal inhibitory concentrations. Representative Hg-resistant bacteria were further tested for transformation pathways (reduction, volatilization and methylation) in cultures containing mercury chloride. Bacterial Hg-methylation was carried out by Vibrio fluvialis, Bacillus megaterium and Serratia marcescens that transformed 2-8% of total mercury into methylmercury in 48h. In addition, most of the HgR bacterial isolates showed Hg(2+)-reduction andHg(0)-volatilization resulting 6-50% mercury loss from the culture media. In summary, the results obtained under controlled laboratory conditions indicate that aerobic Hg-resistant bacteria from the Tagus Estuary significantly affect both the methylation and reduction of mercury and may have a dual face by providing a pathway for pollution dispersion while forming methylmercury, which is highly toxic for living organisms.

  15. [Bacteria isolated from surgical infections and its susceptibilities to antimicrobial agents--special references to bacteria isolated between April 2010 and March 2011].

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Nagao; Taniguchi, Masaaki; Hirata, Koichi; Furuhata, Tomohisa; Fukuhara, Kenichiro; Mizugucwi, Tohru; Osanai, Hiroyuki; Yanai, Yoshiyuki; Hata, Fumitake; Kihara, Chikasi; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Oono, Keisuke; Nakamura, Masashi; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Hasegawa, Itaru; Kimura, Masami; Watabe, Kosho; Kobayashi, Yasuhito; Yamaue, Hiroki; Hirono, Seiko; Takesue, Yoshio; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Shinoura, Susumu; Kimura, Hideyuki; Hoshikawa, Tsuyoshi; Oshima, Hideki; Aikawa, Naoki; Sasaki, Junichi; Suzuki, Masaru; Sekine, Kazuhiko; Abe, Shinya; Takeyama, Hiromitsu; Wakasugi, Takehiro; Mashita, Keiji; Tanaka, Moritsugu; Mizuno, Akira; Ishikawa, Masakazu; Iwai, Akihiko; Saito, Takaaki; Muramoto, Masayuki; Kubo, Shoji; Lee, Shigeru; Fukuhara, Kenichiro; Iwagaki, Hiromi; Tokunaga, Naoyuki; Sueda, Taijliro; Hiyama, Elso; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Ohge, Hiroki; Uemura, Kenichiro; Tsumura, Hiroaki; Kanehiro, Tetsuya; Takeuchi, Hitoshi; Tanakaya, Koujn; Iwasaki, Mitsuhiro

    2014-10-01

    Bacteria isolated from surgical infections during the period from April 2010 to March 2011 were investigated in a multicenter study in Japan, and the following results were obtained. In this series, 631 strains including 25 strains of Candida spp. were isolated from 170 (81.7%) of 208 patients with surgical infections. Four hundred and twenty two strains were isolated from primary infections, and 184 strains were isolated from surgical site infection. From primary infections, anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria were predominant, followed by aerobic Gram-negative bacteria, while from surgical site infection aerobic Gram-positive bacteria were predominant, followed by anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria. Among aerobic Gram-positive bacteria, the isolation rate of Enterococcus spp. such as Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, and Enterococcus avium was highest, followed by Streptococcus spp. such as Streptococcus anginosus and Staphylococcus spp. such as Staphylococcus aureus, in this order, from primary infections, while Enterococcus spp. such as E. faecalis and E. faecium was highest, followed by Staphylococcus spp. such as S. aureus from surgical site infection. Among aerobic Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli was the most predominantly isolated from primary infections, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterobacter cloacae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in this order, and from surgical site infection, E. coli and R aeruginosa were most predominantly isolated, followed by E. cloacae and K. pneumoniae. Among anaerobic Gram-positive bacteria, the isolation rates of Parvimonas micra, Eggerthella lenta, Streptococcus constellatus, Gemella morbillorum, and Collinsella aerofaciens were the highest from primary infections, and the isolation rate from surgical site infection was generally low. Among anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria, the isolation rate of Bilophila wadsworthia was the highest from primary infections, followed by, Bacteroides

  16. Isolation and characterization of medically important aerobic actinomycetes in soil of iran (2006 - 2007).

    PubMed

    Aghamirian, Mohammad Reza; Ghiasian, Seyed Amir

    2009-01-01

    The aerobic actinomycetes are a large group of soil-inhabiting bacteria that occur worldwide. Some of them are the main cause of two important diseases, nocardiosis and actinomycetoma. To identify the prevalence and geographic distribution of aerobic actinomycetes in soil of Qazvin province, a study was carried out during 2006-2007. In this study, the incidence and diversity of medically important aerobic actinomycetes was determined in 300 soil samples of different parts of Qazvin. The suspensions of superficial soil samples were prepared by adding of normal saline, streptomycin and chloramphenicol and the supernatants were cultured on brain-heart infusion agar and Sabouraud's dextrose agar contain cycloheximide. The isolated microorganisms were examined by Gram and acid-fast stains and were identified biochemically and morphologically. Of 96 aerobic actinomycetes isolates identified, Actinomadura madurae and Streptomyces somaliensis were the most frequently isolated species each representing 19.8% of isolates, followed by Nocardia asteroides (15.6%), N. otitidiscaviarum (9.4%), N. brasiliensis (7.3%), A. peletieri, S. griseus, and Nocardia spp. (each 5.2%), and N. transvalensis, Nocardiopsis dassonvillei, Actinomadura spp. and Streptomyces spp. (each 3.1%). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on epidemiological investigation of medically important aerobic actinomycetes in soil samples from Iran. In recent years, mycetoma and nocardiosis have been increasingly reported in Iran. The results showed that medically important actinomycetes occur in the environment of Iran and soil could be potential source of actinomycotic infections.

  17. Competition between Two Isolates of Denitrifying Bacteria Added to Soil

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Robert E.; Parsons, Laura L.; Smith, M. Scott

    1992-01-01

    We examined the competitive relationship between two isolates of denitrifying bacteria, both of which grow well under aerobic conditions but differ in their ability to grow under denitrifying conditions. The growth and persistence of the two isolates, added to sterile soil or added to soil previously colonized by the other isolate, were monitored under aerobic and denitrifying (anaerobic) conditions. When isolates were added together to sterile soil, the isolate added at the higher density reduced the growth of the isolate added at the lower density. The magnitude of the growth reduction varied depending on the competitive abilities of the individual isolates and the aeration state of the soil. Prior colonization of soil with one of the isolates conferred a competitive advantage on the colonized isolate but did not lead to the disappearance of the challenging isolate. Fluctuations in aeration state caused large changes in the population density of one isolate and altered the competitive relationship between the two isolates. The competitive effectiveness of each isolate varied with cell density, the degree of prior colonization of the soil by the other isolate, and the aeration state of the soil. PMID:16348820

  18. Characterisation of aerobically grown non-spore-forming bacteria from paper mill pulps containing recycled fibres.

    PubMed

    Suihko, Maija-Liisa; Skyttä, Eija

    2009-01-01

    A total of 179 non-spore-forming bacteria aerobically growing on Nutrient Agar, Plate Count Agar or in specific enrichment conditions for salmonella, campylobacteria, listeria, yersinia or staphylococci, were isolated from 16 untreated paper mill pulps. After phenotypical screening the isolates were characterised by automated ribotyping and partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. They could be divided into seven taxonomical classes representing 63 taxa (species): actinobacteria (11 species), bacilli (7), flavobacteria (3) alphaproteobacteria (10), betaproteobacteria (5), gammaproteobacteria (25) and sphingobacteria (2). Most of the gammaproteobacteria were enterobacteria, mainly species of the genera Enterobacter (7 species, 7 samples/3 mills) and Klebsiella (5 species, 6 samples/3 mills). Other commonly occurring bacteria were most closely related to Microbacterium barkeri (7 samples/3 mills), Cloacibacterium normanense (6 samples/2 mills), Pseudoxanthomonas taiwanensis (5 samples/2 mills) and Sphingobacterium composti (5 samples/1 mill). Sporadic isolates of Listeria innocua, L. monocytogenes, Enterococcus casseliflavus and Staphylococcus warneri were detected, from which only L. monocytogenes is considered to be a food pathogen. No isolates of the genera Campylobacter, Salmonella or Yersinia were detected. The detected bacteria may be harmful in process control, but the load of food pathogens with recycled fibres to paper machines is insignificant. Faecal contamination of the pulp samples was not indicated.

  19. Aerobic cyanide degradation by bacterial isolates from cassava factory wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Sujatha; Dananjeyan, Balachandar; Krishnamurthy, Kumar; Benckiser, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains that utilize cyanide (CN) as a nitrogen source were isolated from cassava factory wastewater after enrichment in a liquid media containing sodium cyanide (1 mM) and glucose (0.2% w/v). The strains could tolerate and grow in cyanide concentrations of up to 5 mM. Increased cyanide levels in the media caused an extension of lag phase in the bacterial growth indicating that they need some period of acclimatisation. The rate of cyanide removal by the strains depends on the initial cyanide and glucose concentrations. When initial cyanide and glucose concentrations were increased up to 5 mM, cyanide removal rate increased up to 63 and 61 per cent by Bacillus pumilus and Pseudomonas putida. Metabolic products such as ammonia and formate were detected in culture supernatants, suggesting a direct hydrolytic pathway without an intermediate formamide. The study clearly demonstrates the potential of aerobic treatment with cyanide degrading bacteria for cyanide removal in cassava factory wastewaters. PMID:26413045

  20. Aerobic cyanide degradation by bacterial isolates from cassava factory wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Sujatha; Dananjeyan, Balachandar; Krishnamurthy, Kumar; Benckiser, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains that utilize cyanide (CN) as a nitrogen source were isolated from cassava factory wastewater after enrichment in a liquid media containing sodium cyanide (1 mM) and glucose (0.2% w/v). The strains could tolerate and grow in cyanide concentrations of up to 5 mM. Increased cyanide levels in the media caused an extension of lag phase in the bacterial growth indicating that they need some period of acclimatisation. The rate of cyanide removal by the strains depends on the initial cyanide and glucose concentrations. When initial cyanide and glucose concentrations were increased up to 5 mM, cyanide removal rate increased up to 63 and 61 per cent by Bacillus pumilus and Pseudomonas putida. Metabolic products such as ammonia and formate were detected in culture supernatants, suggesting a direct hydrolytic pathway without an intermediate formamide. The study clearly demonstrates the potential of aerobic treatment with cyanide degrading bacteria for cyanide removal in cassava factory wastewaters.

  1. Isolation of an aerobic sulfur oxidizer from the SUP05/Arctic96BD-19 clade.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Katharine T; Morris, Robert M

    2013-02-01

    Bacteria from the uncultured SUP05/Arctic96BD-19 clade of gamma proteobacterial sulfur oxidizers (GSOs) have the genetic potential to oxidize reduced sulfur and fix carbon in the tissues of clams and mussels, in oxygen minimum zones and throughout the deep ocean (>200 m). Here, we report isolation of the first cultured representative from this GSO clade. Closely related cultures were obtained from surface waters in Puget Sound and from the deep chlorophyll maximum in the North Pacific gyre. Pure cultures grow aerobically on natural seawater media, oxidize sulfur, and reach higher final cell densities when glucose and thiosulfate are added to the media. This suggests that aerobic sulfur oxidation enhances organic carbon utilization in the oceans. The first isolate from the SUP05/Arctic96BD-19 clade was given the provisional taxonomic assignment 'Candidatus: Thioglobus singularis', alluding to the clade's known role in sulfur oxidation and the isolate's planktonic lifestyle.

  2. A survey of culturable aerobic and anaerobic marine bacteria in de novo biofilm formation on natural substrates in St. Andrews Bay, Scotland.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, Lucy; Garcia-Melgares, Manuel; Gmerek, Tomasz; Huddleston, W Ryan; Palmer, Alexander; Robertson, Andrew; Shapiro, Sarah; Unkles, Shiela E

    2011-10-01

    This study reports a novel study of marine biofilm formation comprising aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Samples of quartz and feldspar, minerals commonly found on the earth, were suspended 5 m deep in the North Sea off the east coast of St. Andrews, Scotland for 5 weeks. The assemblage of organisms attached to these stones was cultivated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the laboratory. Bacteria isolated on Marine Agar 2216 were all Gram-negative and identified to genus level by sequencing the gene encoding 16S rRNA. Colwellia, Maribacter, Pseudoaltermonas and Shewanella were observed in aerobically-grown cultures while Vibrio was found to be present in both aerobic and anaerobic cultures. The obligate anaerobic bacterium Psychrilyobacter atlanticus, a recently defined genus, was identified as a close relative of isolates grown anaerobically. The results provide valuable information as to the main players that attach and form de novo biofilms on common minerals in sea water.

  3. Evaluation of the petrifilm aerobic count plate for enumeration of aerobic marine bacteria from seawater and Caulerpa lentillifera.

    PubMed

    Kudaka, Jun; Horii, Toru; Tamanaha, Koji; Itokazu, Kiyomasa; Nakamura, Masaji; Taira, Katsuya; Nidaira, Minoru; Okano, Sho; Kitahara, Akio

    2010-08-01

    The enumeration and evaluation of the activity of marine bacteria are important in the food industry. However, detection of marine bacteria in seawater or seafood has not been easy. The Petrifilm aerobic count plate (ACP) is a ready-to-use alternative to the traditional enumeration media used for bacteria associated with food. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a simple detection and enumeration method utilizing the Petrifilm ACP for enumeration of aerobic marine bacteria from seawater and an edible seaweed, Caulerpa lentillifera. The efficiency of enumeration of total aerobic marine bacteria on Petrifilm ACP was compared with that using the spread plate method on marine agar with 80 seawater and 64 C. lentillifera samples. With sterile seawater as the diluent, a close correlation was observed between the method utilizing Petrifilm ACP and that utilizing the conventional marine agar (r=0.98 for seawater and 0.91 for C. lentillifera). The Petrifilm ACP method was simpler and less time-consuming than the conventional method. These results indicate that Petrifilm ACP is a suitable alternative to conventional marine agar for enumeration of marine microorganisms in seawater and C. lentillifera samples.

  4. Aerobic biodegradation of propylene glycol by soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Giuseppe; Cavalca, Lucia; Letizia Colarieti, M; Scelza, Rosalia; Scotti, Riccardo; Rao, Maria A; Andreoni, Vincenza; Ciccazzo, Sonia; Greco, Guido

    2013-09-01

    Propylene glycol (PG) is a main component of aircraft deicing fluids and its extensive use in Northern airports is a source of soil and groundwater contamination. Bacterial consortia able to grow on PG as sole carbon and energy source were selected from soil samples taken along the runways of Oslo Airport Gardermoen site (Norway). DGGE analysis of enrichment cultures showed that PG-degrading populations were mainly composed by Pseudomonas species, although Bacteroidetes were found, as well. Nineteen bacterial strains, able to grow on PG as sole carbon and energy source, were isolated and identified as different Pseudomonas species. Maximum specific growth rate of mixed cultures in the absence of nutrient limitation was 0.014 h(-1) at 4 °C. Substrate C:N:P molar ratios calculated on the basis of measured growth yields are in good agreement with the suggested values for biostimulation reported in literature. Therefore, the addition of nutrients is suggested as a suitable technique to sustain PG aerobic degradation at the maximum rate by autochthonous microorganisms of unsaturated soil profile.

  5. Culturable aerobic and facultative bacteria from the gut of the polyphagic dung beetle Thorectes lusitanicus.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Noemi; Escudero, José A; San Millán, Álvaro; González-Zorn, Bruno; Lobo, Jorge M; Verdú, José R; Suárez, Mónica

    2015-04-01

    Unlike other dung beetles, the Iberian geotrupid, Thorectes lusitanicus, exhibits polyphagous behavior; for example, it is able to eat acorns, fungi, fruits, and carrion in addition to the dung of different mammals. This adaptation to digest a wider diet has physiological and developmental advantages and requires key changes in the composition and diversity of the beetle's gut microbiota. In this study, we isolated aerobic, facultative anaerobic, and aerotolerant microbiota amenable to grow in culture from the gut contents of T. lusitanicus and resolved isolate identity to the species level by sequencing 16S rRNA gene fragments. Using BLAST similarity searches and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses, we were able to reveal that the analyzed fraction (culturable, aerobic, facultative anaerobic, and aerotolerant) of beetle gut microbiota is dominated by the phyla Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria. Among Proteobacteria, members of the order Enterobacteriales (Gammaproteobacteria) were the most abundant. The main functions associated with the bacteria found in the gut of T. lusitanicus would likely include nitrogen fixation, denitrification, detoxification, and diverse defensive roles against pathogens.

  6. Preferential Use of Carbon Sources in Culturable Aerobic Mesophilic Bacteria of Coptotermes curvignathus's (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) Gut and Its Foraging Area.

    PubMed

    Wong, W Z; H'ng, P S; Chin, K L; Sajap, Ahmad Said; Tan, G H; Paridah, M T; Othman, Soni; Chai, E W; Go, W Z

    2015-10-01

    The lower termite, Coptotermes curvignathus, is one of the most prominent plantation pests that feed upon, digest, and receive nourishment from exclusive lignocellulose diets. The objective of this study was to examine the utilization of sole carbon sources by isolated culturable aerobic bacteria among communities from the gut and foraging pathway of C. curvignathus. We study the bacteria occurrence from the gut of C. curvignathus and its surrounding feeding area by comparing the obtained phenotypic fingerprint with Biolog's extensive species library. A total of 24 bacteria have been identified mainly from the family Enterobacteriaceae from the identification of Biolog Gen III. Overall, the bacteria species in the termite gut differ from those of foraging pathway within a location, except Acintobacter baumannii, which was the only bacteria species found in both habitats. Although termites from a different study area do not have the same species of bacteria in the gut, they do have a bacterial community with similar role in degrading certain carbon sources. Sugars were preferential in termite gut isolates, while nitrogen carbon sources were preferential in foraging pathway isolates. The preferential use of specific carbon sources by these two bacterial communities reflects the role of bacteria for regulation of carbon metabolism in the termite gut and foraging pathway.

  7. [Bacteria isolated from surgical infections and its susceptibilities to antimicrobial agents - Special references to bacteria isolated between April 2011 and March 2012].

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Nagao; Taniguchi, Masaaki; Hirata, Koichi; Furuhata, Tomohisa; Mizuguchi, Tohru; Osanai, Hiroyuki; Yanai, Yoshiyuki; Hata, Fumitake; Kihara, Chikasi; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Oono, Keisuke; Nakamura, Masashi; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Hasegawa, Itaru; Kimura, Masami; Watabe, Kosho; Hoshikawa, Tsuyoshi; Oshima, Hideki; Aikawa, Naoki; Sasaki, Junichi; Suzuki, Masaru; Sekine, Kazuhiko; Abe, Shinya; Takeyama, Hiromitsu; Wakasugi, Takehiro; Mashita, Keiji; Tanaka, Moritsugu; Mizuno, Akira; Ishikawa, Masakazu; Iwai, Akihiko; Saito, Takaaki; Muramoto, Masayuki; Kubo, Shoji; Lee, Shigeru; Fukuhara, Kenichiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhito; Yamaue, Hiroki; Hirono, Seiko; Takesue, Yoshio; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Shinoura, Susumu; Kimura, Hideyuki; Iwagaki, Hiromi; Tokunaga, Naoyuki; Sueda, Taijiro; Hiyama, Eiso; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Ohge, Hiroki; Uemura, Kenichiro; Tsumura, Hiroaki; Kanehiro, Tetsuya; Takeuchi, Hitoshi; Tanakaya, Kouji; Iwasaki, Mitsuhiro

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria isolated from surgical infections during the period from April 2011 to March 2012 were investigated in a multicenter study in Japan, and the following results were obtained. In this series, 785 strains including 31 strains of Candida spp. were isolated from 204 (78.8%) of 259 patients with surgical infections. Five hundred and twenty three strains were isolated from primary infections, and 231 strains were isolated from surgical site infection. From primary infections, anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria were predominant, followed by aerobic Gram-negative bacteria, while from surgical site infection aerobic Gram-positive bacteria were predominant, followed by anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria. Among aerobic Gram-positive bacteria, the isolation rate of Enterococcus spp. was highest, followed by Streptococcus spp. and Staphylococcus spp., in this order, from primary infections, while Enterococcus spp. was highest, followed by Staphylococcus spp. from surgical site infection. Among aerobic Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli was the most predominantly isolated from primary infections, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae, in this order, and from surgical site infection, E. coli was most predominantly isolated, followed by P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae, and E. cloacae. Among anaerobic Gram-positive bacteria, the isolation rate of Eggerthella lenta was the highest from primary infections, followed by Parvimonas micra, Collinsella aerofaciens, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Finegoldia magna, and from surgical site infection, E. lenta was most predominantly isolated, followed by P micra and L. acidophilus, in this order. Among anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria, the isolation rate of Bacteroidesfragilis was the highest from primary infections, followed by Bilophila wadsworthia, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides uniformis and Bacteroides vulgatus, and from surgical site infection, B. fragilis was most

  8. Isolation and characterization of fenamiphos degrading bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, J Alfonso; Kurtz, Andreas; Sikora, Richard A; Schouten, Alexander

    2010-11-01

    The biological factors responsible for the microbial breakdown of the organophosphorus nematicide fenamiphos were investigated. Microorganisms responsible for the enhanced degradation of fenamiphos were isolated from soil that had a long application history of this nematicide. Bacteria proved to be the most important group of microbes responsible for the fenamiphos biodegradation process. Seventeen bacterial isolates utilized the pure active ingredient fenamiphos as a carbon source. Sixteen isolates rapidly degraded the active ingredient in Nemacur 5GR. Most of the fenamiphos degrading bacteria were Microbacterium species, although Sinorhizobium, Brevundimonas, Ralstonia and Cupriavidus were also identified. This array of gram positive and gram negative fenamiphos degrading bacteria appeared to be pesticide-specific, since cross-degradation toward fosthiazate, another organophosphorus pesticide used for nematode control, did not occur. It was established that the phylogenetical relationship among nematicide degrading bacteria is closer than that to non-degrading isolates.

  9. Identification and antibiotic sensitivity of bacteria isolated from periapical lesions.

    PubMed

    Vigil, G V; Wayman, B E; Dazey, S E; Fowler, C B; Bradley, D V

    1997-02-01

    Periradicular tissues from 28 refractory endodontic cases requiring surgical intervention were submitted for histological diagnosis and microbiological culture. Bacteria isolated from these lesions were identified and then tested for their antibiotic sensitivity to a panel of common antibiotics. The periapical tissue specimens of 22 out of 28 lesions (79%) contained microorganisms. Of the 22 cases showing positive growth cultures, 15 were polymicrobial and 7 were single species isolates. Fifty-three different species were recovered: 29 anaerobes, 19 facultative anaerobes, and 5 aerobes. Microbes were observed under light microscopy in only one case. The most common organisms isolated were Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus intermedius, Wolinella recta, Fusobacterium species, and Clostridium species. Antibiotic susceptibility results showed no clear cut evidence of significant antibiotic resistance among the species tested. The results of this study seem to corroborate earlier studies regarding the microbial population of periapical lesions refractory to nonsurgical endodontics.

  10. Coevolution with bacteria drives the evolution of aerobic fermentation in Lachancea kluyveri

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Michael J.; Galafassi, Silvia; Compagno, Concetta; Piškur, Jure

    2017-01-01

    The Crabtree positive yeasts, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, prefer fermentation to respiration, even under fully aerobic conditions. The selective pressures that drove the evolution of this trait remain controversial because of the low ATP yield of fermentation compared to respiration. Here we propagate experimental populations of the weak-Crabtree yeast Lachancea kluyveri, in competitive co-culture with bacteria. We find that L. kluyveri adapts by producing quantities of ethanol lethal to bacteria and evolves several of the defining characteristics of Crabtree positive yeasts. We use precise quantitative analysis to show that the rate advantage of fermentation over aerobic respiration is insufficient to provide an overall growth advantage. Thus, the rapid consumption of glucose and the utilization of ethanol are essential for the success of the aerobic fermentation strategy. These results corroborate that selection derived from competition with bacteria could have provided the impetus for the evolution of the Crabtree positive trait. PMID:28282411

  11. Characterization of aerobic spore-forming bacteria associated with industrial dairy processing environments and product spoilage.

    PubMed

    Lücking, Genia; Stoeckel, Marina; Atamer, Zeynep; Hinrichs, Jörg; Ehling-Schulz, Monika

    2013-09-02

    Due to changes in the design of industrial food processing and increasing international trade, highly thermoresistant spore-forming bacteria are an emerging problem in food production. Minimally processed foods and products with extended shelf life, such as milk products, are at special risk for contamination and subsequent product damages, but information about origin and food quality related properties of highly heat-resistant spore-formers is still limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the biodiversity, heat resistance, and food quality and safety affecting characteristics of aerobic spore-formers in the dairy sector. Thus, a comprehensive panel of strains (n=467), which originated from dairy processing environments, raw materials and processed foods, was compiled. The set included isolates associated with recent food spoilage cases and product damages as well as isolates not linked to product spoilage. Identification of the isolates by means of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and molecular methods revealed a large biodiversity of spore-formers, especially among the spoilage associated isolates. These could be assigned to 43 species, representing 11 genera, with Bacillus cereus s.l. and Bacillus licheniformis being predominant. A screening for isolates forming thermoresistant spores (TRS, surviving 100°C, 20 min) showed that about one third of the tested spore-formers was heat-resistant, with Bacillus subtilis and Geobacillus stearothermophilus being the prevalent species. Strains producing highly thermoresistant spores (HTRS, surviving 125°C, 30 min) were found among mesophilic as well as among thermophilic species. B. subtilis and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens were dominating the group of mesophilic HTRS, while Bacillus smithii and Geobacillus pallidus were dominating the group of thermophilic HTRS. Analysis of spoilage-related enzymes of the TRS isolates showed that mesophilic strains, belonging to the B. subtilis and B. cereus

  12. Aerobic biotransformation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) by bacterial isolates

    PubMed Central

    Robrock, Kristin R.; Coelhan, Mehmet; Sedlak, David; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame retardants that have been used in consumer products and furniture for three decades. Currently, very little is known about their fate in the environment and specifically about their susceptibility to aerobic biotransformation. Here, we investigated the ability of the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) degrading bacteria Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 and Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 to transform mono- through hexa-BDEs at ppb levels. We also tested the PBDE transforming abilities of related strain Rhodococcus sp. RR1 and the ether-degrading Pseudonocardia dioxanivorans CB1190. The two PCB-degrading strains transformed all of the mono- through penta-BDEs and strain LB400 transformed one of the hexa-BDEs. The extent of transformation was inversely proportional to the degree of bromination. Strains RR1 and CB1190 were only able to transform the less brominated mono- and di- BDE congeners. RHA1 released stoichiometric quantities of bromide while transforming mono- and tetra-BDE congeners. LB400 instead converted most of a mono-BDE to a hydroxylated mono-BDE. This is the first report of aerobic transformation of tetra-, penta- and hexa-BDEs as well as the first report of stoichiometric release of bromide during PBDE transformation. PMID:19731666

  13. Aerobic biotransformation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) by bacterial isolates.

    PubMed

    Robrock, Kristin R; Coelhan, Mehmet; Sedlak, David L; Alvarez-Cohent, Lisa

    2009-08-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame retardants that have been used in consumer products and furniture for three decades. Currently, very little is known about their fate in the environment and specifically about their susceptibility to aerobic biotransformation. Here, we investigated the ability of the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) degrading bacteria Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 and Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 to transform mono- through hexa-BDEs at ppb levels. We also tested the PBDE transforming abilities of the related strain Rhodococcus sp. RR1 and the ether-degrading Pseudonocardia dioxanivorans CB1190. The two PCB-degrading strains transformed all of the mono- through penta-BDEs and strain LB400 transformed one of the hexa-BDEs. The extent of transformation was inversely proportional to the degree of bromination. Strains RR1 and CB1190 were only able to transform the less brominated mono- and di-BDE congeners. RHA1 released stoichiometric quantities of bromide while transforming mono- and tetra-BDE congeners. LB400 instead converted most of a mono-BDE to a hydroxylated mono-BDE. This is the first report of aerobic transformation of tetra-, penta,- and hexa-BDEs as well as the first report of stoichiometric release of bromide during PBDE transformation.

  14. Comparison of dry medium culture plates for mesophilic aerobic bacteria in milk, ice cream, ham, and codfish fillet products.

    PubMed

    Park, Junghyun; Kim, Myunghee

    2013-12-01

    This study was performed to compare the performance of Sanita-Kun dry medium culture plate with those of traditional culture medium and Petrifilm dry medium culture plate for the enumeration of the mesophilic aerobic bacteria in milk, ice cream, ham, and codfish fillet. Mesophilic aerobic bacteria were comparatively evaluated in milk, ice cream, ham, and codfish fillet using Sanita-Kun aerobic count (SAC), Petrifilm aerobic count (PAC), and traditional plate count agar (PCA) media. According to the results, all methods showed high correlations of 0.989~1.000 and no significant differences were observed for enumerating the mesophilic aerobic bacteria in the tested food products. SAC method was easier to perform and count colonies efficiently as compared to the PCA and PAC methods. Therefore, we concluded that the SAC method offers an acceptable alternative to the PCA and PAC methods for counting the mesophilic aerobic bacteria in milk, ice cream, ham, and codfish fillet products.

  15. Diversity of cultivated and metabolically active aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanthon, C.; Boeuf, D.; Dahan, O.; Le Gall, F.; Garczarek, L.; Bendif, E. M.; Lehours, A.-C.

    2011-07-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria play significant roles in the bacterioplankton productivity and biogeochemical cycles of the surface ocean. In this study, we applied both cultivation and mRNA-based molecular methods to explore the diversity of AAP bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea in early summer 2008. Colony-forming units obtained on three different agar media were screened for the production of bacteriochlorophyll-a (BChl-a), the light-harvesting pigment of AAP bacteria. BChl-a-containing colonies represented a low part of the cultivable fraction. In total, 54 AAP strains were isolated and the phylogenetic analyses based on their 16S rRNA and pufM genes showed that they were all affiliated to the Alphaproteobacteria. The most frequently isolated strains belonged to Citromicrobium bathyomarinum, and Erythrobacter and Roseovarius species. Most other isolates were related to species not reported to produce BChl-a and/or may represent novel taxa. Direct extraction of RNA from seawater samples enabled the analysis of the expression of pufM, the gene coding for the M subunit of the reaction centre complex of aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis. Clone libraries of pufM gene transcripts revealed that most phylotypes were highly similar to sequences previously recovered from the Mediterranean Sea and a large majority (~94 %) was affiliated to the Gammaproteobacteria. The most abundantly detected phylotypes occurred in the western and eastern Mediterranean basins. However, some were exclusively detected in the eastern basin, reflecting the highest diversity of pufM transcripts observed in this ultra-oligotrophic region. To our knowledge, this is the first study to document extensively the diversity of AAP isolates and to unveil the active AAP community in an oligotrophic marine environment. By pointing out the discrepancies between culture-based and molecular methods, this study highlights the existing gaps in the understanding

  16. Diversity of cultivated and metabolically active aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanthon, C.; Boeuf, D.; Dahan, O.; Le Gall, F.; Garczarek, L.; Bendif, E. M.; Lehours, A.-C.

    2011-05-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria play significant roles in the bacterioplankton productivity and biogeochemical cycles of the surface ocean. In this study, we applied both cultivation and mRNA-based molecular methods to explore the diversity of AAP bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea in early summer 2008. Colony-forming units obtained on three different agar media were screened for the production of bacteriochlorophyll-a (BChl-a), the light-harvesting pigment of AAP bacteria. BChl-a-containing colonies represented a low part of the cultivable fraction. In total, 52 AAP strains were isolated and the phylogenetic analyses based on their 16S rRNA and pufM genes showed that they were all affiliated to the Alphaproteobacteria. The most frequently isolated strains belonged to Citromicrobium bathyomarinum, and Erythrobacter and Roseovarius species. Most other isolates were related to species not reported to produce BChl-a and/or may represent novel taxa. Direct extraction of RNA from seawater samples enabled the analysis of the expression of pufM, the gene coding for the M subunit of the reaction centre complex of aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis. Clone libraries of pufM gene transcripts revealed that most phylotypes were highly similar to sequences previously recovered from the Mediterranean Sea and a large majority (~94%) was affiliated with the Gammaproteobacteria. The most abundantly detected phylotypes occurred in the western and eastern Mediterranean basins. However, some were exclusively detected in the eastern basin, reflecting the highest diversity of pufM transcripts observed in this ultra-oligotrophic region. To our knowledge, this is the first study to document extensively the diversity of AAP isolates and to unveil the active AAP community in an oligotrophic marine environment. By pointing out the discrepancies between culture-based and molecular methods, this study highlights the existing gaps in the understanding

  17. Organic osmolytes in aerobic bacteria from mono lake, an alkaline, moderately hypersaline environment.

    PubMed

    Ciulla, R A; Diaz, M R; Taylor, B F; Roberts, M F

    1997-01-01

    The identity and concentrations of intracellular organic solutes were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for two strains of aerobic, gram-negative bacteria isolated from Mono Lake, Calif., an alkaline, moderately hypersaline lake. Ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidinecarboxylic acid) was the major endogenous solute in both organisms. Concentrations of ectoine varied with external NaCl levels in strain ML-D but not in strain ML-G, where the level was high but invariant from 1.5 to 3.0 M NaCl. Hydroxyectoine also occurred in strain ML-D, especially at elevated NaCl concentrations (2.5 and 3.0 M), but at levels lower than those of ectoine. Exogenous organic solutes that might occur in Mono Lake were examined for their effects on the de novo synthesis of ectoine. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) (0.1 or 1 mM) did not significantly lower ectoine levels in either isolate, and only strain ML-G showed any capacity for DMSP accumulation. With nitrogen limitation, however, DMSP (0.1 mM) substituted for ectoine in strain ML-G and became the main organic solute. Glycine betaine (GB) was more effective than DMSP in affecting ectoine levels, principally in strain ML-D. Strain ML-D accumulated GB to 50 or 67% of its organic solute pool at 2.5 M NaCl, at an external level of 0.1 or 1 mM GB, respectively. Strain ML-D also accumulated arsenobetaine. The methylated zwitterionic compounds, probably metabolic products of phytoplankton (DMSP and GB) or brine shrimps (arsenobetaine) in Mono Lake, may function as osmolytes for indigenous bacteria when present at high concentrations or under conditions of nitrogen limitation or salt stress.

  18. Isolating DNA from Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael R; Sambrook, Joseph

    2017-01-03

    The isolation of DNA from bacteria, described in this protocol, relies upon the use of sodium dodecyl sulfate and proteinase K to lyse the cells. High-molecular-weight DNA is then sheared (to reduce its viscosity and make it more manageable), extracted with phenol:chloroform, and precipitated with isopropanol. DNA isolated according to this procedure ranges from 30 to 80 kb in length.

  19. Hydrogen evolution by strictly aerobic hydrogen bacteria under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, M; Steinbüchel, A; Schlegel, H G

    1984-08-01

    When strains and mutants of the strictly aerobic hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium Alcaligenes eutrophus are grown heterotrophically on gluconate or fructose and are subsequently exposed to anaerobic conditions in the presence of the organic substrates, molecular hydrogen is evolved. Hydrogen evolution started immediately after the suspension was flushed with nitrogen, reached maximum rates of 70 to 100 mumol of H2 per h per g of protein, and continued with slowly decreasing rates for at least 18 h. The addition of oxygen to an H2-evolving culture, as well as the addition of nitrate to cells (which had formed the dissimilatory nitrate reductase system during the preceding growth), caused immediate cessation of hydrogen evolution. Formate is not the source of H2 evolution. The rates of H2 evolution with formate as the substrate were lower than those with gluconate. The formate hydrogenlyase system was not detectable in intact cells or crude cell extracts. Rather the cytoplasmic, NAD-reducing hydrogenase is involved by catalyzing the release of excessive reducing equivalents under anaerobic conditions in the absence of suitable electron acceptors. This conclusion is based on the following experimental results. H2 is formed only by cells which had synthesized the hydrogenases during growth. Mutants lacking the membrane-bound hydrogenase were still able to evolve H2. Mutants lacking the NAD-reducing or both hydrogenases were unable to evolve H2.

  20. Anaerobic and aerobic bacteriology of the saliva and gingiva from 16 captive Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis): new implications for the "bacteria as venom" model.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Citron, Diane M; Cox, Cathleen R; Recchio, Ian M; Okimoto, Ben; Bryja, Judith; Fry, Bryan G

    2013-06-01

    It has been speculated that the oral flora of the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) exerts a lethal effect on its prey; yet, scant information about their specific oral flora bacteriology, especially anaerobes, exists. Consequently, the aerobic and anaerobic oral bacteriology of 16 captive Komodo dragons (10 adults and six neonates), aged 2-17 yr for adults and 7-10 days for neonates, from three U.S. zoos were studied. Saliva and gingival samples were collected by zoo personnel, inoculated into anaerobic transport media, and delivered by courier to a reference laboratory. Samples were cultured for aerobes and anaerobes. Strains were identified by standard methods and 16S rRNA gene sequencing when required. The oral flora consisted of 39 aerobic and 21 anaerobic species, with some variation by zoo. Adult dragons grew 128 isolates, including 37 aerobic gram-negative rods (one to eight per specimen), especially Enterobacteriaceae; 50 aerobic gram-positive bacteria (two to nine per specimen), especially Staphylococcus sciuri and Enterococcusfaecalis, present in eight of 10 and nine of 10 dragons, respectively; and 41 anaerobes (one to six per specimen), especially clostridia. All hatchlings grew aerobes but none grew anaerobes. No virulent species were isolated. As with other carnivores, captive Komodo oral flora is simply reflective of the gut and skin flora of their recent meals and environment and is unlikely to cause rapid fatal infection.

  1. Isolation and identification of Sphingomonas sp. that yields tert-octylphenol monoethoxylate under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Eriko; Yoshikawa, Hiromichi; Wakayama, Manabu; Tamura, Hiroto; Morita, Shiro; Tomita, Yoshifumi

    2005-07-01

    Topsoil samples were collected from eight golf courses in Yamaguchi Prefecture, Japan, and enrichment cultures were carried out with a basal-salt medium containing 0.2% 4-tert-octylphenol polyethoxylate (OPPEO) as sole carbon source. OPPEO-degrading activity was detected in one of the samples, from which a strain of OPPEO-degrading bacterium was isolated. The isolated bacterium grew on a nutritionally enriched medium (NE medium) containing 0.2% OPPEO as sole carbon source, and accumulated 4-tert-octylphenol diethoxylate (OP2EO) (63%), 4-tert-octylphenol triethoxylate (OP3EO) (14%), and 4-tert-octylphenol monoethoxylate (OP1EO) (2%) after 7 d cultivation under aerobic conditions. The addition of clay mineral (vermiculite) to the medium accelerated the degradation of OP2EO (40%) and OP3EO (4%) to OP1EO (23%). This is the first report about bacteria that can degrade OPPEO to OP1EO under aerobic conditions. The strain was identified as Sphingomonas macrogoltabidus, based on the homology of a 16S rDNA sequence.

  2. Testing for aerobic heterotrophic bacteria allows no prediction of contamination with potentially pathogenic bacteria in the output water of dental chair units

    PubMed Central

    Bristela, Margit; Skolka, Astrid; Schmid-Schwap, Martina; Piehslinger, Eva; Indra, Alexander; Wewalka, Günther; Stauffer, Fritz

    2012-01-01

    Background: Currently, to our knowledge, quality of output water of dental chair units is not covered by specific regulations in the European Union, and national recommendations are heterogeneous. In Germany, water used in dental chair units must follow drinking water quality. In the United States of America, testing for aerobic heterotrophic bacteria is recommended. The present study was performed to evaluate whether the counts of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria correlate with the presence of potentially pathogenic bacteria such as Legionella spp. or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Methods: 71 samples were collected from 26 dental chair units with integrated disinfection device and 31 samples from 15 outlets of the water distribution pipework within the department were examined. Samples were tested for aerobic heterotrophic bacteria at 35°C and 22°C using different culture media and for Legionella spp. and for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Additionally, strains of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 were typed with monoclonal antibodies and representative samples of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 were typed by sequence based typing. Results: Our results showed a correlation between different agars for aerobic heterotrophic bacteria but no correlation for the count of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria and the presence of Legionella spp. or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Conclusion: Testing for aerobic heterotrophic bacteria in output water or water distribution pipework within the departments alone is without any value for predicting whether the water is contaminated with potentially pathogenic bacteria like Legionella spp. or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:22558046

  3. The Bacteriohopanepolyol Inventory of Novel Aerobic Methane Oxidising Bacteria Reveals New Biomarker Signatures of Aerobic Methanotrophy in Marine Systems.

    PubMed

    Rush, Darci; Osborne, Kate A; Birgel, Daniel; Kappler, Andreas; Hirayama, Hisako; Peckmann, Jörn; Poulton, Simon W; Nickel, Julia C; Mangelsdorf, Kai; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina; Sidgwick, Frances R; Talbot, Helen M

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic methane oxidation (AMO) is one of the primary biologic pathways regulating the amount of methane (CH4) released into the environment. AMO acts as a sink of CH4, converting it into carbon dioxide before it reaches the atmosphere. It is of interest for (paleo)climate and carbon cycling studies to identify lipid biomarkers that can be used to trace AMO events, especially at times when the role of methane in the carbon cycle was more pronounced than today. AMO bacteria are known to synthesise bacteriohopanepolyol (BHP) lipids. Preliminary evidence pointed towards 35-aminobacteriohopane-30,31,32,33,34-pentol (aminopentol) being a characteristic biomarker for Type I methanotrophs. Here, the BHP compositions were examined for species of the recently described novel Type I methanotroph bacterial genera Methylomarinum and Methylomarinovum, as well as for a novel species of a Type I Methylomicrobium. Aminopentol was the most abundant BHP only in Methylomarinovum caldicuralii, while Methylomicrobium did not produce aminopentol at all. In addition to the expected regular aminotriol and aminotetrol BHPs, novel structures tentatively identified as methylcarbamate lipids related to C-35 amino-BHPs (MC-BHPs) were found to be synthesised in significant amounts by some AMO cultures. Subsequently, sediments and authigenic carbonates from methane-influenced marine environments were analysed. Most samples also did not contain significant amounts of aminopentol, indicating that aminopentol is not a useful biomarker for marine aerobic methanotophic bacteria. However, the BHP composition of the marine samples do point toward the novel MC-BHPs components being potential new biomarkers for AMO.

  4. The Bacteriohopanepolyol Inventory of Novel Aerobic Methane Oxidising Bacteria Reveals New Biomarker Signatures of Aerobic Methanotrophy in Marine Systems

    PubMed Central

    Birgel, Daniel; Kappler, Andreas; Hirayama, Hisako; Peckmann, Jörn; Poulton, Simon W.; Nickel, Julia C.; Mangelsdorf, Kai; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina; Sidgwick, Frances R.; Talbot, Helen M.

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic methane oxidation (AMO) is one of the primary biologic pathways regulating the amount of methane (CH4) released into the environment. AMO acts as a sink of CH4, converting it into carbon dioxide before it reaches the atmosphere. It is of interest for (paleo)climate and carbon cycling studies to identify lipid biomarkers that can be used to trace AMO events, especially at times when the role of methane in the carbon cycle was more pronounced than today. AMO bacteria are known to synthesise bacteriohopanepolyol (BHP) lipids. Preliminary evidence pointed towards 35-aminobacteriohopane-30,31,32,33,34-pentol (aminopentol) being a characteristic biomarker for Type I methanotrophs. Here, the BHP compositions were examined for species of the recently described novel Type I methanotroph bacterial genera Methylomarinum and Methylomarinovum, as well as for a novel species of a Type I Methylomicrobium. Aminopentol was the most abundant BHP only in Methylomarinovum caldicuralii, while Methylomicrobium did not produce aminopentol at all. In addition to the expected regular aminotriol and aminotetrol BHPs, novel structures tentatively identified as methylcarbamate lipids related to C-35 amino-BHPs (MC-BHPs) were found to be synthesised in significant amounts by some AMO cultures. Subsequently, sediments and authigenic carbonates from methane-influenced marine environments were analysed. Most samples also did not contain significant amounts of aminopentol, indicating that aminopentol is not a useful biomarker for marine aerobic methanotophic bacteria. However, the BHP composition of the marine samples do point toward the novel MC-BHPs components being potential new biomarkers for AMO. PMID:27824887

  5. Evaluation of Petrifilm method for enumerating aerobic bacteria in Crottin goat cheese.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, G B; Tamagnini, L M; González, R D; Budde, C E

    2005-01-01

    The Petrifilm Aerobic Count Plate (ACP) developed by 3M laboratories, is a ready-to-use culture medium system, useful for the enumeration of aerobic bacteria in food. Petrifilm was compared with a standard method in several different food products with satisfactory results. However, many studies showed that bacterial counts in Petrifilm were significantly lower than those obtained with conventional methods in fermented food. The purpose of this study was to compare the Petrifilm method for enumerating aerobic bacteria with a conventional method (PCA) in Crottin goat's cheese. Thirty samples were used for the colony count. The mean count and standard deviation were 7.18 +/- 1.17 log CFU g(-1) on PCA and 7.11 +/- 1.05 log CFU g(-1) on Petrifilm. Analysis of variance revealed no significant differences between both methods (t = 1.33, P = 0.193). The Pearson correlation coefficient (0.971, P = 0.0001) indicated a strong linear relationship between the Petrifilm and the standard method. The results showed that Petrifilm is suitable and a convenient alternative to this standard method for the enumeration of aerobic flora in goat soft cheese.

  6. Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria in the Mid-Atlantic Bight and the North Pacific Gyre. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cottrell, Matthew T.; Mannino, Antonio; Kirchman, David L.

    2005-01-01

    The abundance of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AM) bacteria, cyanobacteria and heterotrophs was examined in the Mid-Atlantic Bight and the central North Pacific gyre using infrared fluorescence microscopy coupled with image analysis and flow cytometry. AAP bacteria comprised 5% to 16% of total prokaryotes in the Atlantic but only 5% or less in the Pacific. In the Atlantic, AAP bacterial abundance was as much as 2-fold higher than Prochlorococcus and 10-folder higher than Synechococcus. In contrast, Prochlorococcus outnumbered AAP bacteria 5- to 50-fold in the Pacific. In both oceans, subsurface abundance maxima occurred within the photic zone, and AAP bacteria were least abundant below the 1% light depth. Concentrations of bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) were low (approx.1%) compared to chlorophyll a. Although the BChl a content of AAP bacteria per cell was typically 20- to 250-fold lower than the divinyl-chlorophyll a content of Prochlorococcus, in shelf break water the pigment content of AAP bacteria approached that of Prochlorococcus. The abundance of AAP bacteria rivaled some groups of strictly heterotrophic bacteria and was often higher than the abundance of known AAP genera (Erythrobacter and Roseobacter spp.). The distribution of AAP bacteria in the water column, which was similar in the Atlantic and the Pacific, was consistent with phototrophy.

  7. Organic osmolytes in aerobic bacteria from Mono Lake, an alkaline, moderately hypersaline environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ciulla, R.A.; Roberts, M.F.; Diaz, M.R.; Taylor, B.F.

    1997-01-01

    The identity and concentrations of intracellular organic solutes were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for two strains of aerobic, gram-negative bacteria isolated from Mono Lake, California, an alkaline, moderately hypersaline lake. Ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidinecarboxylic acid) was the major endogenous solute in both organisms. Concentrations of ectoine varied with external NaCl levels in strain ML-D but not in strain ML-G, where the level was high but invariant from 1.5 to 3.0 M NaCl. Hydroxyectoine also occurred in strain ML-D, especially at elevated NaCl concentrations (2.5 and 3.0 M), but at levels lower than those of ectoine. Exogenous organic solutes that might occur in Mono Lake were examined for their effects on the de novo synthesis of ectoine. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) (0.1 or 1 mM) did not significantly lower ectoine levels in either isolate, and only strain ML-G showed any capacity for DMSP accumulation. With nitrogen limitation, however, DMSP (0.1 mM) substituted for ectoine in strain ML-G showed any capacity for DMSP accumulation. With nitrogen limitation, however, DMSP (0.1 mM) substituted for ectoine in strain ML-G and became the main organic solute. Glycine betaine (GB) was more effective than DMSP in affecting ectoine levels, principally in strain ML-D. Strain ML-D accumulated GB to 50 or 67% of its organic solute pool at 2.5 M NaCl, at an external level of 0.1 or 1 mM GB, respectively. Strain ML-D also accumulated arsenobetaine. The methylated zwitterionic compounds, probably metabolic products of phytoplankton (DMSP and GB) or brine shrimps (arsenobetaine) in Mono Lake, may function as osmolytes for indigenous bacteria when present at high concentrations or under conditions of nitrogen limitation or salt stress. 33 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Isolation of lightning-competent soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cérémonie, Hélène; Buret, François; Simonet, Pascal; Vogel, Timothy M

    2004-10-01

    Artificial transformation is typically performed in the laboratory by using either a chemical (CaCl(2)) or an electrical (electroporation) method. However, laboratory-scale lightning has been shown recently to electrotransform Escherichia coli strain DH10B in soil. In this paper, we report on the isolation of two "lightning-competent" soil bacteria after direct electroporation of the Nycodenz bacterial ring extracted from prairie soil in the presence of the pBHCRec plasmid (Tc(r), Sp(r), Sm(r)). The electrotransformability of the isolated bacteria was measured both in vitro (by electroporation cuvette) and in situ (by lightning in soil microcosm) and then compared to those of E. coli DH10B and Pseudomonas fluorescens C7R12. The electrotransformation frequencies measured reached 10(-3) to 10(-4) by electroporation and 10(-4) to 10(-5) by simulated lightning, while no transformation was observed in the absence of electrical current. Two of the isolated lightning-competent soil bacteria were identified as Pseudomonas sp. strains.

  9. Aerobic degradation of BDE-209 by Enterococcus casseliflavus: Isolation, identification and cell changes during degradation process.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shaoyu; Yin, Hua; Chen, Shuona; Peng, Hui; Chang, Jingjing; Liu, Zehua; Dang, Zhi

    2016-05-05

    Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) is one of the most commonly used brominated flame retardants that have contaminated the environment worldwide. Microbial bioremediation has been considered as an effective technique to remove these sorts of persistent organic pollutants. Enterococcus casseliflavus, a gram-positive bacterium capable of aerobically transforming BDE-209, was isolated by our team from sediments in Guiyu, an e-waste dismantling area in Guangdong Province, China. To promote microbial bioremediation of BDE-209 and elucidate the mechanism behind its aerobic degradation, the effects of BDE-209 on the cell changes of E. casseliflavus were examined in this study. The experimental results demonstrated that the high cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) of E. casseliflavus made the bacteria absorb hydrophobic BDE-209 more easily. E. casseliflavus responded to BDE-209 stress, resulting in an increase in cell membrane permeability and accumulation of BDE-209 inside the cell. The differential expression of intracellular protein was analyzed through two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). More than 50 differentially expressed protein spots were reproducibly detected, including 25 up, and 25 down regulated after a 4 days exposure. Moreover, the apoptotic-like cell changes were observed during E. casseliflavus mediated degradation of BDE-209 by means of flow cytometry.

  10. High abundances of aerobic anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria in the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Lami, Raphaël; Cottrell, Matthew T; Ras, Joséphine; Ulloa, Osvaldo; Obernosterer, Ingrid; Claustre, Hervé; Kirchman, David L; Lebaron, Philippe

    2007-07-01

    Little is known about the abundance, distribution, and ecology of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria, particularly in oligotrophic environments, which represent 60% of the ocean. We investigated the abundance of AAP bacteria across the South Pacific Ocean, including the center of the gyre, the most oligotrophic water body of the world ocean. AAP bacteria, Prochlorococcus, and total prokaryotic abundances, as well as bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) and divinyl-chlorophyll a concentrations, were measured at several depths in the photic zone along a gradient of oligotrophic conditions. The abundances of AAP bacteria and Prochlorococcus were high, together accounting for up to 58% of the total prokaryotic community. The abundance of AAP bacteria alone was up to 1.94 x 10(5) cells ml(-1) and as high as 24% of the overall community. These measurements were consistent with the high BChl a concentrations (up to 3.32 x 10(-3) microg liter(-1)) found at all stations. However, the BChl a content per AAP bacterial cell was low, suggesting that AAP bacteria are mostly heterotrophic organisms. Interestingly, the biovolume and therefore biomass of AAP bacteria was on average twofold higher than that of other prokaryotic cells. This study demonstrates that AAP bacteria can be abundant in various oligotrophic conditions, including the most oligotrophic regime of the world ocean, and can account for a large part of the bacterioplanktonic carbon stock.

  11. Binary Interactions of Antagonistic Bacteria with Candida albicans Under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Benadé, Eliska; Stone, Wendy; Mouton, Marnel; Postma, Ferdinand; Wilsenach, Jac; Botha, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    We used both aerobic and anaerobic liquid co-cultures, prepared with Luria Bertani broth, to study the effect of bacteria on the survival of Candida albicans in the external environment, away from an animal host. The bacteria were represented by Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium, Enterobacter, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Kluyvera ascorbata and Serratia marcescens. Under aerobic conditions, the yeast's growth was inhibited in the presence of bacterial growth; however, under anaerobic conditions, yeast and bacterial growth in co-cultures was similar to that observed for pure cultures. Subsequent assays revealed that the majority of bacterial strains aerobically produced extracellular hydrolytic enzymes capable of yeast cell wall hydrolysis, including chitinases and mannan-degrading enzymes. In contrast, except for the A. hydrophila strain, these enzymes were not detected in anaerobic bacterial cultures, nor was the antimicrobial compound prodigiosin found in anaerobic cultures of S. marcescens. When we suspended C. albicans cells in crude extracellular enzyme preparations from K. pneumoniae and S. marcescens, we detected no negative effect on yeast viability. However, we found that these preparations enhance the toxicity of prodigiosin towards the yeast, especially in combination with mannan-degrading enzymes. Analyses of the chitin and mannan content of yeast cell walls revealed that less chitin was produced under anaerobic than aerobic conditions; however, the levels of mannan, known for its low permeability, remained the same. The latter phenomenon, as well as reduced production of the bacterial enzymes and prodigiosin, may contribute to anaerobic growth and survival of C. albicans in the presence of bacteria.

  12. Gram-positive bacteria of marine origin: a numerical taxonomic study on Mediterranean isolates.

    PubMed

    Ortigosa, M; Garay, E; Pujalte, M J

    1997-12-01

    A numerical taxonomic study was performed on 65 Gram-positive wild strains of heterotrophic, aerobic, marine bacteria, and 9 reference strains. The isolates were obtained from oysters and seawater sampled monthly over one year, by direct plating on Marine Agar. The strains were characterized by 96 morphological, biochemical, physiological and nutritional tests. Clustering yielded 13 phena at 0.62 similarity level (Sl coefficient). Only one of the seven phena containing wild isolates could be identified (Bacillus marinus). A pronounced salt requirement was found in most isolates.

  13. Aerobic granulation of aggregating consortium X9 isolated from aerobic granules and role of cyclic di-GMP.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chunli; Yang, Xue; Lee, Duu-Jong; Wang, Xin-Yue; Yang, Qiaoli; Pan, Xiangliang

    2014-01-01

    This study monitored the granulation process of an aggregating functional consortium X9 that was consisted of Pseudomonas putida X-1, Acinetobacter sp. X-2, Alcaligenes sp. X-3 and Comamonas testosteroni X-4 in shaken reactors. The growth curve of X9 was fit using logistic model as follows y=1.49/(1+21.3*exp(-0.33x)), the maximum specific cell growth rate for X9 was 0.33 h(-1). Initially X9 consumed polysaccharides (PS) and secreted proteins (PN) to trigger granulation. Then X9 grew in biomass and formed numerous micro-granules, driven by increasing hydrophobicity of cell membranes and of accumulated extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). In later stage the intracellular cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) was at high levels for inhibiting bacteria swarming motility, thereby promotion formation of large aerobic granules. The findings reported herein advise the way to accelerate granule formation and to stabilize operation in aerobic granular reactors.

  14. Multicenter Evaluation of the Bruker MALDI Biotyper CA System for the Identification of Clinical Aerobic Gram-Negative Bacterial Isolates.

    PubMed

    Faron, Matthew L; Buchan, Blake W; Hyke, Josh; Madisen, Neil; Lillie, Jennifer L; Granato, Paul A; Wilson, Deborah A; Procop, Gary W; Novak-Weekley, Susan; Marlowe, Elizabeth; Cumpio, Joven; Griego-Fullbright, Christen; Kindig, Sandra; Timm, Karen; Young, Stephen; Ledeboer, Nathan A

    2015-01-01

    The prompt and accurate identification of bacterial pathogens is fundamental to patient health and outcome. Recent advances in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) have revolutionized bacterial identification in the clinical laboratory, but uniform incorporation of this technology in the U.S. market has been delayed by a lack of FDA-cleared systems. In this study, we conducted a multicenter evaluation of the MALDI Biotyper CA (MBT-CA) System (Bruker Daltonics Inc, Billerica, MA) for the identification of aerobic gram-negative bacteria as part of a 510(k) submission to the FDA. A total of 2,263 aerobic gram negative bacterial isolates were tested representing 23 genera and 61 species. Isolates were collected from various clinical sources and results obtained from the MBT-CA System were compared to DNA sequencing and/or biochemical testing. Isolates that failed to report as a "high confidence species ID" [log(score) ≥2.00] were re-tested using an extraction method. The MBT-CA System identified 96.8% and 3.1% of isolates with either a "high confidence" or a "low confidence" [log(score) value between 1.70 and <2.00] species ID, respectively. Two isolates did not produce acceptable confidence scores after extraction. The MBT-CA System correctly identified 99.8% (2,258/2,263) to genus and 98.2% (2,222/2,263) to species level. These data demonstrate that the MBT-CA System provides accurate results for the identification of aerobic gram-negative bacteria.

  15. Multicenter Evaluation of the Bruker MALDI Biotyper CA System for the Identification of Clinical Aerobic Gram-Negative Bacterial Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Faron, Matthew L.; Buchan, Blake W.; Hyke, Josh; Madisen, Neil; Lillie, Jennifer L.; Granato, Paul A.; Wilson, Deborah A.; Procop, Gary W.; Novak-Weekley, Susan; Marlowe, Elizabeth; Cumpio, Joven; Griego-Fullbright, Christen; Kindig, Sandra; Timm, Karen; Young, Stephen; Ledeboer, Nathan A.

    2015-01-01

    The prompt and accurate identification of bacterial pathogens is fundamental to patient health and outcome. Recent advances in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) have revolutionized bacterial identification in the clinical laboratory, but uniform incorporation of this technology in the U.S. market has been delayed by a lack of FDA-cleared systems. In this study, we conducted a multicenter evaluation of the MALDI Biotyper CA (MBT-CA) System (Bruker Daltonics Inc, Billerica, MA) for the identification of aerobic gram-negative bacteria as part of a 510(k) submission to the FDA. A total of 2,263 aerobic gram negative bacterial isolates were tested representing 23 genera and 61 species. Isolates were collected from various clinical sources and results obtained from the MBT-CA System were compared to DNA sequencing and/or biochemical testing. Isolates that failed to report as a "high confidence species ID" [log(score) ≥2.00] were re-tested using an extraction method. The MBT-CA System identified 96.8% and 3.1% of isolates with either a "high confidence" or a "low confidence" [log(score) value between 1.70 and <2.00] species ID, respectively. Two isolates did not produce acceptable confidence scores after extraction. The MBT-CA System correctly identified 99.8% (2,258/2,263) to genus and 98.2% (2,222/2,263) to species level. These data demonstrate that the MBT-CA System provides accurate results for the identification of aerobic gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26529504

  16. The predominant bacteria isolated from radicular cysts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To detect predominant bacteria associated with radicular cysts and discuss in light of the literature. Material and methods Clinical materials were obtained from 35 radicular cysts by aspiration. Cultures were made from clinical materials by modern laboratory techniques, they underwent microbiologic analysis. Results The following are microorganisms isolated from cultures: Streptococcus milleri Group (SMG) (23.8%) [Streptococcus constellatus (19.1%) and Streptococcus anginosus (4.7%)], Streptococcus sanguis (14.3%), Streptococcus mitis (4.7%), Streptococcus cremoris (4.7%), Peptostreptococcus pevotii (4.7%), Prevotella buccae (4.7%), Prevotella intermedia (4.7%), Actinomyces meyeri (4.7%), Actinomyces viscosus (4.7%), Propionibacterium propionicum (4.7%), Bacteroides capillosus (4.7%), Staphylococcus hominis (4.7%), Rothia denticariosa (4.7%), Gemella haemolysans (4.7%), and Fusobacterium nucleatum (4.7%). Conclusions Results of this study demonstrated that radicular cysts show a great variety of anaerobic and facultative anaerobic bacterial flora. It was observed that all isolated microorganisms were the types commonly found in oral flora. Although no specific microorganism was found, Streptococcus spp. bacteria (47.5%) – especially SMG (23.8%) – were predominantly found in the microorganisms isolated. Furthermore, radicular cysts might be polymicrobial originated. Although radicular cyst is an inflammatory cyst, some radicular cyst fluids might be sterile. PMID:24011184

  17. Survival of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria in a nonsupportive gassed transport system.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, A W; Cunningham, P J; Guze, L B

    1976-01-01

    Survival of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria in a commercially available, non-supportive, gassed (oxygen-free) transport container (Anaport) was evaluated quantitatively. Saline-suspended obligate anaerobes survived significantly better in the gassed container in aerobic control tubes (P less than 0.025, t test), and counts were virtually unchanged after 8 h of holding. Similarly, initial counts and relative proportions of a mixture of Bacteroides fragilis and Staphylococcus aureus were maintained for 72 h. The value of the gassed transport system was less apparent when microorganisms were suspended in nutrient broth. The major advantage of the gassed transport system appears to be for holding of specimens collected by saline irrigation. PMID:1254710

  18. Comparative analysis of the diversity of aerobic spore-forming bacteria in raw milk from organic and conventional dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Coorevits, An; De Jonghe, Valerie; Vandroemme, Joachim; Reekmans, Rieka; Heyrman, Jeroen; Messens, Winy; De Vos, Paul; Heyndrickx, Marc

    2008-06-01

    Bacterial contamination of raw milk can originate from different sources: air, milking equipment, feed, soil, faeces and grass. It is hypothesized that differences in feeding and housing strategies of cows may influence the microbial quality of milk. This assumption was investigated through comparison of the aerobic spore-forming flora in milk from organic and conventional dairy farms. Laboratory pasteurized milk samples from five conventional and five organic dairy farms, sampled in late summer/autumn and in winter, were plated on a standard medium and two differential media, one screening for phospholipolytic and the other for proteolytic activity of bacteria. Almost 930 isolates were obtained of which 898 could be screened via fatty acid methyl ester analysis. Representative isolates were further analysed using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and (GTG)(5)-PCR. The majority of aerobic spore-formers in milk belonged to the genus Bacillus and showed at least 97% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with type strains of Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus circulans, Bacillus subtilis and with type strains of species belonging to the Bacillus cereus group. About 7% of all isolates may belong to possibly new spore-forming taxa. Although the overall diversity of aerobic spore-forming bacteria in milk from organic vs. conventional dairy farms was highly similar, some differences between both were observed: (i) a relatively higher number of thermotolerant organisms in milk from conventional dairy farms compared to organic farms (41.2% vs. 25.9%), and (ii) a relatively higher number of B. cereus group organisms in milk from organic (81.3%) and Ureibacillus thermosphaericus in milk from conventional (85.7%) dairy farms. One of these differences, the higher occurrence of B. cereus group organisms in milk from organic dairy farms, may be linked to differences in housing strategy between the two types of dairy farming. However, no plausible clarification was found for

  19. Isolation and characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria with tolerance to hypoxic environments.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Hua; Ye, Chun; Hou, Xiao-Peng; Chen, Ming-Hua; Zheng, Xiang-Yong; Cai, Xu-Yi

    2017-03-10

    Hypoxic conditions are considerably different from aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and they are widely distributed in natural environments. Many pollutants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), tend to accumulate in hypoxic environments. However, PAH biodegradation under hypoxic conditions is poorly understood compared with that under obligate aerobic and obligate anaerobic conditions. In the present study, PAH-degrading bacteria were enriched, and their biodegradation rates were tested using a hypoxic station with an 8% oxygen concentration. PAH-degrading bacteria collected from sediments in low-oxygen environments were enriched using phenanthrene (Phe) or pyrene (Pyr) as the sole carbon and energy source. Individual bacterial colonies showing the ability to degrade Phe or Pyr were isolated and identified by 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Morphological and physiological characterizations of the isolated bacterial colonies were performed. The isolated bacteria were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and were identified as Pseudomonas sp., Klebsiella sp., Bacillus sp., and Comamonas sp. Phylogenetic tree of the isolated PAH-degrading bacteria was also constructed. The biodegradation ability of these bacteria was tested at an initial Phe or Pyr concentration of 50 mg L(-1). The biodegradation kinetics were best fit by a first-order rate model and presented regression coefficients (r(2)) that varied from 0.7728 to 0.9725 (P < 0.05). The half-lives of the PAHs varied from 2.99 to 3.65 d for Phe and increased to 60.3-82.5 d for Pyr. These half-lives were much shorter than those observed under anaerobic conditions but were similar to those observed under aerobic conditions.

  20. Protection of probiotic bacteria in a synbiotic matrix following aerobic storage at 4 °C.

    PubMed

    Chaluvadi, S; Hotchkiss, A T; Call, J E; Luchansky, J B; Phillips, J G; Liu, Ls; Yam, K L

    2012-09-01

    The survival of single strains of Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Lactobacillus reuteri was investigated in synbiotics that included 10 mg/ml of fructo-oligosaccharides, inulin and pectic-oligosaccharides in an alginate matrix under refrigerated (4 °C) aerobic storage conditions. When the matrices were cross-linked with calcium (45 mM), 102-103 cfu/ml of L. acidophilus and L. reuteri, and 0-103 cfu/ml of B. breve and B. longum survived refrigerated aerobic storage for 28 days. Following refrigerated storage, acetic (3-9 mM), butyric (0-2 mM), propionic (5-16 mM) and lactic acids (1-48 mM) were produced during the growth of probiotics in BHI broth at 37 °C, suggesting their metabolic activity after storage was stressed. When calcium cross-linking was not used in synbiotics, the matrix remained more gel-like after inoculation when compared to the calcium cross-linked matrix. At least 107 cfu/ml of probiotic bacteria survived after 21 days of storage within these gel-like alginate matrices. Significantly higher levels of B. breve, L. acidophilus and L. reuteri were obtained from the synbiotic matrices supplemented with fructo-oligosaccharides, inulin and pectic-oligosaccharides compared to alginate alone. B. longum survival was the same (~7 logs) in all gel-like synbiotic matrices. These results show that synbiotics protected probiotic bacteria and extended their shelf-life under refrigerated aerobic conditions. Synbiotics represent a viable delivery vehicle for health-promoting bacteria.

  1. Evaluation of the 3M™ Petrifilm™ Rapid Aerobic Count Plate for the Enumeration of Aerobic Bacteria: Collaborative Study, First Action 2015.13.

    PubMed

    Bird, Patrick; Flannery, Jonathan; Crowley, Erin; Agin, James; Goins, David; Jechorek, Robert

    2016-05-01

    The 3M™ Petrifilm™ Rapid Aerobic Count (RAC) Plate is a sample-ready culture medium system containing dual-sensor indicator technology for the rapid quantification of aerobic bacteria in food products. The 3M Petrifilm RAC Plate was compared to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual (FDA BAM) Chapter 3 (Aerobic Plate Count) for the enumeration of aerobic bacteria in raw easy-peel shrimp and the Standard Methods for the Examination of Dairy Products (SMEDP) Chapter 6 (Standard Plate Count Method) for the enumeration of aerobic bacteria in pasteurized skim milk and instant nonfat dry milk (instant NFDM). The 3M Petrifilm RAC Plate was evaluated using a paired study design in a multilaboratory collaborative study following current AOAC validation guidelines. Three target contamination levels (low, 10-100 CFU/g; medium, 100-1000 CFU/g; and high 1000-10 000 CFU/g) were evaluated for naturally occurring aerobic microflora for each matrix. For raw easy-peel shrimp, duplicate 3M Petrifilm RAC Plates were enumerated after 24 ± 2 h incubation at both 32 and 35°C. Pasteurized skim milk 3M Petrifilm RAC Plates were enumerated after 24 ± 2 h incubation at 32°C, and instant NFDM 3M Petrifilm RAC Plates were enumerated after 48 ± 3 h incubation at 32°C. No statistical difference was observed between 3M Petrifilm RAC Plate and FDA BAM or SMEDP reference methods for each contamination level.

  2. Bacteriocin formation by dominant aerobic sporeformers isolated from traditional maari.

    PubMed

    Kaboré, Donatien; Thorsen, Line; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris; Berner, Torben Sune; Sawadogo-Lingani, Hagrétou; Diawara, Bréhima; Dicko, Mamoudou Hama; Jakobsen, Mogens

    2012-03-01

    The antimicrobial activity of 8 Bacillus spp. and 2 Lysinibacillus spp. representing the predominant aerobic sporeformers during traditional maari fermentations, a traditional fermented baobab seeds product from Burkina Faso, was investigated. The antimicrobial activity was assessed against a total of 31 indicator organisms representing various Gram-negative and positive pathogens. The screening showed that 3 Bacillus subtilis strains (B3, B122 and B222) in particular had antimicrobial activity against some Gram-positive organisms and were selected for further studies. It was found that the antimicrobial substances produced were heat stable, in-sensitive to catalase, sensitive to protease and trypsin but resistant to the proteolytic action of papain and proteinase K and equally active at pH values ranging from 3 to 11. Bacteriocin secretion started in late exponential growth phase and maximum activity was detected during the stationary growth phase. The production of bacteriocin by B. subtilis B3, B122 and B222 was dependent on the aeration conditions. Maximum production of bacteriocin was observed under reduced aeration. Specific primers were used to screen isolates B3, B122 and B222 for genes involved in the synthesis of the bacteriocins subtilosin A, subtilin, sublancin and ericin. Amplicons of the expected sizes were detected for iywB, sboA, sboX, albA and spaS involved in the biosynthesis of subtilosin and subtilin, respectively. The translated nucleotide sequences had 100% identity to the YiwB, SboX and SboA amino acid sequences of the subtilosin A producing B. subtilis subsp. subtilis strain 168. Interestingly there was a 3 amino acid deletion at the N-terminal part of AlbA in B3, B122 and B222 that probably alters the activity of this enzyme. Analysis of the spaS gene sequences of B3, B122 and B222, encoding a subtilin precursor peptide, showed that the translated nucleotide sequence had 98% identity with the corresponding SpaS amino acid sequence of

  3. Isolation of novel bacteria, including a candidate division, from geothermal soils in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Stott, Matthew B; Crowe, Michelle A; Mountain, Bruce W; Smirnova, Angela V; Hou, Shaobin; Alam, Maqsudul; Dunfield, Peter F

    2008-08-01

    We examined bacterial diversity of three geothermal soils in the Taupo Volcanic Zone of New Zealand. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes recovered directly from soils indicated that the bacterial communities differed in composition and richness, and were dominated by previously uncultured species of the phyla Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, Proteobacteria and candidate division OP10. Aerobic, thermophilic, organotrophic bacteria were isolated using cultivation protocols that involved extended incubation times, low-pH media and gellan as a replacement gelling agent to agar. Isolates represented previously uncultured species, genera, classes, and even a new phylum of bacteria. They included members of the commonly cultivated phyla Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Thermus/Deinococcus, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes, as well as more-difficult-to-cultivate groups. Isolates possessing < 85% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity to any cultivated species were obtained from the phyla Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi and the previously uncultured candidate division OP10. Several isolates were prevalent in 16S rRNA gene clone libraries constructed directly from the soils. A key factor facilitating isolation was the use of gellan-solidified plates, where the gellan itself served as an energy source for certain bacteria. The results indicate that geothermal soils are a rich potential source of novel bacteria, and that relatively simple cultivation techniques are practical for isolating bacteria from these habitats.

  4. Characteristics of alcohol dehydrogenases of certain aerobic bacteria representing human colonic flora.

    PubMed

    Nosova, T; Jousimies-Somer, H; Kaihovaara, P; Jokelainen, K; Heine, R; Salaspuro, M

    1997-05-01

    We have recently proposed the existence of a bacteriocolonic pathway for ethanol oxidation [i.e., ethanol is oxidized by alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) of intestinal bacteria resulting in high intracolonic levels of reactive and toxic acetaldehyde]. The aim of this in vitro study was to characterize further ADH activity of some aerobic bacteria, representing the normal human colonic flora. These bacteria were earlier shown to possess high cytosolic ADH activities (Escherichia coli IH 133369, Klebsiella pneumoniae IH 35385, Klebsiella oxytoca IH 35339, Pseudomonas aeruginosa IH 35342, and Hafnia alvei IH 53227). ADHs of the tested bacteria strongly preferred NAD as a cofactor. Marked ADH activities were found in all bacteria, even at low ethanol concentrations (1.5 mM) that may occur in the colon due to bacterial fermentation. The Km for ethanol varied from 29.9 mM for K. pneumoniae to 0.06 mM for Hafnia alvei. The inhibition of ADH by 4-methylpyrazole was found to be of the competitive type in 4 of 5 bacteria, and Ki varied from 18.26 +/- 3.3 mM for Escherichia coli to 0.47 +/- 0.13 mM for K. pneumoniae. At pH 7.4, ADH activity was significantly lower than at pH 9.6 in four bacterial strains. ADH of K. oxytoca, however, showed almost equal activities at neutral pH and at 9.6. In conclusion, NAD-linked alcohol dehydrogenases of aerobic colonic bacteria possess low apparent Km's for ethanol. Accordingly, they may oxidize moderate amounts of ethanol ingested during social drinking with nearly maximal velocity. This may result in the marked production of intracolonic acetaldehyde. Kinetic characteristics of the bacterial enzymes may enable some of them to produce acetaldehyde even from endogenous ethanol formed by other bacteria via alcoholic fermentation. The microbial ADHs were inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole by the same competitive inhibition as hepatic ADH, however, with nearly 1000 times lower susceptibility. Individual variations in human colonic flora may thus

  5. Isolation and characterization of novel chitinolytic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürkök, Sümeyra; Görmez, Arzu

    2016-04-01

    Chitin, a linear polymer of β-1,4-N-acetylglucosamine units, is one of the most abundant biopolymers widely distributed in the marine and terrestrial environments. It is found as a structural component of insects, crustaceans and the cell walls of fungi. Chitinases, the enzymes degrading chitin by cleaving the β-(1-4) bond, have gained increased attention due to their wide range of biotechnological applications, especially for biocontrol of harmful insects and phytopathogenic fungi in agriculture. In the present study, 200 bacterial isolates from Western Anatolia Region of Turkey were screened for chitinolytic activity on agar media amended with colloidal chitin. Based on the chitin hydrolysis zone, 13 isolates were selected for further study. Bacterial isolates with the highest chitinase activity were identified as Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Arthrobacter oxydans, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus megaterium, Brevibacillus reuszeri, Kocuria erythromyxa, Kocuria rosea, Novosphingobium capsulatum, Rhodococcus bratislaviensis, Rhodococcus fascians and Staphylococcus cohnii by MIS and BIOLOG systems. The next aims of the study are to compare the productivity of these bacteria quantitatively, to purify the enzyme from the most potent producer and to apply the pure enzyme for the fight against the phytopathogenic fungi and harmful insects.

  6. The methanogenic redox cofactor F420 is widely synthesized by aerobic soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ney, Blair; Ahmed, F Hafna; Carere, Carlo R; Biswas, Ambarish; Warden, Andrew C; Morales, Sergio E; Pandey, Gunjan; Watt, Stephen J; Oakeshott, John G; Taylor, Matthew C; Stott, Matthew B; Jackson, Colin J; Greening, Chris

    2017-01-01

    F420 is a low-potential redox cofactor that mediates the transformations of a wide range of complex organic compounds. Considered one of the rarest cofactors in biology, F420 is best known for its role in methanogenesis and has only been chemically identified in two phyla to date, the Euryarchaeota and Actinobacteria. In this work, we show that this cofactor is more widely distributed than previously reported. We detected the genes encoding all five known F420 biosynthesis enzymes (cofC, cofD, cofE, cofG and cofH) in at least 653 bacterial and 173 archaeal species, including members of the dominant soil phyla Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi and Firmicutes. Metagenome datamining validated that these genes were disproportionately abundant in aerated soils compared with other ecosystems. We confirmed through high-performance liquid chromatography analysis that aerobically grown stationary-phase cultures of three bacterial species, Paracoccus denitrificans, Oligotropha carboxidovorans and Thermomicrobium roseum, synthesized F420, with oligoglutamate sidechains of different lengths. To understand the evolution of F420 biosynthesis, we also analyzed the distribution, phylogeny and genetic organization of the cof genes. Our data suggest that although the Fo precursor to F420 originated in methanogens, F420 itself was first synthesized in an ancestral actinobacterium. F420 biosynthesis genes were then disseminated horizontally to archaea and other bacteria. Together, our findings suggest that the cofactor is more significant in aerobic bacterial metabolism and soil ecosystem composition than previously thought. The cofactor may confer several competitive advantages for aerobic soil bacteria by mediating their central metabolic processes and broadening the range of organic compounds they can synthesize, detoxify and mineralize.

  7. Growth of moderately halophilic bacteria isolated from sea water using phenol as the sole carbon source.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, J A; Pérez-Esteban, B; Esteban, M; de la Escalera, S; Gómez, M A; Martínez-Toledo, M V; González-López, J

    2001-01-01

    Moderately halophilic bacteria utilizing phenol as the sole carbon source were isolated by selective enrichment from sea water. The isolate (Gram-negative motile rods) was identified as Deleya venusta. It grew well in the presence of up to 1600 mg/L of phenol and 8% NaCl under aerobic conditions. When the cells were treated with chloramphenicol prior to the addition of phenol they did not utilize added phenol, even after prolonged incubation. Thus, the enzymes necessary for phenol metabolism appeared to be inducible.

  8. Toxinogenic and spoilage potential of aerobic spore-formers isolated from raw milk.

    PubMed

    De Jonghe, Valerie; Coorevits, An; De Block, Jan; Van Coillie, Els; Grijspeerdt, Koen; Herman, Lieve; De Vos, Paul; Heyndrickx, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The harmful effects on the quality and safety of dairy products caused by aerobic spore-forming isolates obtained from raw milk were characterized. Quantitative assessment showed strains of Bacillus subtilis, the Bacillus cereus group, Paenibacillus polymyxa and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens to be strongly proteolytic, along with Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus pumilus and Lysinibacillus fusiformis to a lesser extent. Lipolytic activity could be demonstrated in strains of B. subtilis, B. pumilus and B. amyloliquefaciens. Qualitative screening for lecithinase activity also revealed that P. polymyxa strains produce this enzyme besides the B. cereus group that is well-known for causing a 'bitty cream' defect in pasteurized milk due to lecithinase activity. We found a strain of P. polymyxa to be capable of gas production during lactose fermentation. Strains belonging to the species B. amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus clausii, Lysinibacillus sphaericus, B. subtilis and P. polymyxa were able to reduce nitrate. A heat-stable cytotoxic component other than the emetic toxin was produced by strains of B. amyloliquefaciens and B. subtilis. Heat-labile cytotoxic substances were produced by strains identified as B. amyloliquefaciens, B. subtilis, B. pumilus and the B. cereus group. Variations in expression levels between strains from the same species were noticed for all tests. This study emphasizes the importance of aerobic spore-forming bacteria in raw milk as the species that are able to produce toxins and/or spoilage enzymes are all abundantly present in raw milk. Moreover, we demonstrated that some strains are capable of growing at room temperature and staying stable at refrigeration temperatures.

  9. A Field-Suitable, Semisolid Aerobic Enrichment Medium for Isolation of Campylobacter jejuni in Small Numbers

    PubMed Central

    Jeffrey, J. S.; Hunter, A.; Atwill, E. R.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to produce an economical, easy to prepare, field-suitable enrichment medium for detection of Campylobacter jejuni in small numbers. A semisolid aerobic enrichment medium was developed. Rates of recovery from inoculated medium, sterile swabs, and mixed cultures of C. jejuni and coliform bacteria were tested. PMID:10747165

  10. Species distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of gram-negative aerobic bacteria in hospitalized cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ashour, Hossam M; El-Sharif, Amany

    2009-01-01

    Background Nosocomial infections pose significant threats to hospitalized patients, especially the immunocompromised ones, such as cancer patients. Methods This study examined the microbial spectrum of gram-negative bacteria in various infection sites in patients with leukemia and solid tumors. The antimicrobial resistance patterns of the isolated bacteria were studied. Results The most frequently isolated gram-negative bacteria were Klebsiella pneumonia (31.2%) followed by Escherichia coli (22.2%). We report the isolation and identification of a number of less-frequent gram negative bacteria (Chromobacterium violacum, Burkholderia cepacia, Kluyvera ascorbata, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, and Salmonella arizona). Most of the gram-negative isolates from Respiratory Tract Infections (RTI), Gastro-intestinal Tract Infections (GITI), Urinary Tract Infections (UTI), and Bloodstream Infections (BSI) were obtained from leukemic patients. All gram-negative isolates from Skin Infections (SI) were obtained from solid-tumor patients. In both leukemic and solid-tumor patients, gram-negative bacteria causing UTI were mainly Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, while gram-negative bacteria causing RTI were mainly Klebsiella pneumoniae. Escherichia coli was the main gram-negative pathogen causing BSI in solid-tumor patients and GITI in leukemic patients. Isolates of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Pseudomonas, and Acinetobacter species were resistant to most antibiotics tested. There was significant imipenem -resistance in Acinetobacter (40.9%), Pseudomonas (40%), and Enterobacter (22.2%) species, and noticeable imipinem-resistance in Klebsiella (13.9%) and Escherichia coli (8%). Conclusion This is the first study to report the evolution of imipenem-resistant gram-negative strains in Egypt. Mortality rates were higher in cancer patients with nosocomial Pseudomonas infections than any other bacterial infections. Policies restricting

  11. Colonization by aerobic bacteria in karst: Laboratory and in situ experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Personne, J.-C.; Poty, F.; Mahler, B.J.; Drogue, C.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the potential for bacterial colonization of different substrates in karst aquifers and the nature of the colonizing bacteria. Laboratory batch experiments were performed using limestone and PVC as substrates, a natural bacterial isolate and a known laboratory strain (Escherichia coli [E. coli]) as inocula, and karst ground water and a synthetic formula as growth media. In parallel, fragments of limestone and granite were submerged in boreholes penetrating two karst aquifers for more than one year; the boreholes are periodically contaminated by enteric bacteria from waste water. Once a month, rock samples were removed and the colonizing bacteria quantified and identified. The batch experiments demonstrated that the natural isolate and E. coli both readily colonized limestone surfaces using karst ground water as the growth medium. In contrast, bacterial colonization of both the limestone and granite substrates, when submerged in the karst, was less intense. More than 300 bacterial strains were isolated over the period sampled, but no temporal pattern in colonization was seen as far as strain, and colonization by E. coli was notably absent, although strains of Salmonella and Citrobacter were each observed once. Samples suspended in boreholes penetrating highly fractured zones were less densely colonized than those in the borehole penetrating a less fractured zone. The results suggest that contamination of karst aquifers by enteric bacteria is unlikely to be persistent. We hypothesize that this may be a result of the high flow velocities found in karst conduits, and of predation of colonizing bacteria by autochthonous zooplankton.

  12. Mutations and Misconceptions: The Isolation and Study of Mutant Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corner, Thomas R.

    1992-01-01

    Describes simple, inexpensive activities for teaching students about mutants and mutations in bacteria. Explains how to isolate bacteria from soil and leaves and how to grow bacteria on agar or in broth. Describes how to construct a gradient plate for finding the minimum inhibitory concentration of a substance and how to use this set up to find…

  13. Abundance of Common Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria in a Coastal Aquaculture Area

    PubMed Central

    Sato-Takabe, Yuki; Nakao, Hironori; Kataoka, Takafumi; Yokokawa, Taichi; Hamasaki, Koji; Ohta, Kohei; Suzuki, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (AAnPB) rely on not only heterotrophic but also phototrophic energy gain. AAnPB are known to have high abundance in oligotrophic waters and are the major portion of the bacterial carbon stock in the environment. In a yearlong study in an aquaculture area in the Uwa Sea, Japan, AAnPB, accounted for 4.7 to 24% of the total bacteria by count. Since the cell volume of AAnPB is 2.23 ± 0.674 times larger than the mean for total bacteria, AAnPB biomass is estimated to account for 10–53% of the total bacterial assemblage. By examining pufM gene sequence, a common phylogenetic AAnPB species was found in all sampling sites through the year. The common species and other season-specific species were phylogenetically close to unculturable clones recorded in the Sargasso Sea and Pacific Ocean. The present study suggests that the common species may be a cosmopolitan species with worldwide distribution that is abundant not only in the oligotrophic open ocean but also in eutrophic aquaculture areas. PMID:28018324

  14. Summer community structure of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria in the western Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Boeuf, Dominique; Cottrell, Matthew T; Kirchman, David L; Lebaron, Philippe; Jeanthon, Christian

    2013-09-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria are found in a range of aquatic and terrestrial environments, potentially playing unique roles in biogeochemical cycles. Although known to occur in the Arctic Ocean, their ecology and the factors that govern their community structure and distribution in this extreme environment are poorly understood. Here, we examined summer AAP abundance and diversity in the North East Pacific and the Arctic Ocean with emphasis on the southern Beaufort Sea. AAP bacteria comprised up to 10 and 14% of the prokaryotic community in the bottom nepheloid layer and surface waters of the Mackenzie plume, respectively. However, relative AAP abundances were low in offshore waters. Environmental pufM clone libraries revealed that AAP bacteria in the Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria classes dominated in offshore and in river-influenced surface waters, respectively. The most frequent AAP group was a new uncultivated betaproteobacterial clade whose abundance decreased along the salinity gradient of the Mackenzie plume even though its photosynthetic genes were actively expressed in offshore waters. Our data indicate that AAP bacterial assemblages represented a mixture of freshwater and marine taxa mostly restricted to the Arctic Ocean and highlight the substantial influence of riverine inputs on their distribution in coastal environments.

  15. Abundance of Common Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria in a Coastal Aquaculture Area.

    PubMed

    Sato-Takabe, Yuki; Nakao, Hironori; Kataoka, Takafumi; Yokokawa, Taichi; Hamasaki, Koji; Ohta, Kohei; Suzuki, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (AAnPB) rely on not only heterotrophic but also phototrophic energy gain. AAnPB are known to have high abundance in oligotrophic waters and are the major portion of the bacterial carbon stock in the environment. In a yearlong study in an aquaculture area in the Uwa Sea, Japan, AAnPB, accounted for 4.7 to 24% of the total bacteria by count. Since the cell volume of AAnPB is 2.23 ± 0.674 times larger than the mean for total bacteria, AAnPB biomass is estimated to account for 10-53% of the total bacterial assemblage. By examining pufM gene sequence, a common phylogenetic AAnPB species was found in all sampling sites through the year. The common species and other season-specific species were phylogenetically close to unculturable clones recorded in the Sargasso Sea and Pacific Ocean. The present study suggests that the common species may be a cosmopolitan species with worldwide distribution that is abundant not only in the oligotrophic open ocean but also in eutrophic aquaculture areas.

  16. Hexavalent chromium-resistant bacteria isolated from river sediments.

    PubMed Central

    Luli, G W; Talnagi, J W; Strohl, W R; Pfister, R M

    1983-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a known carcinogen and mutagen; however, the actual mechanisms of Cr toxicity are unknown. Two approaches were used to isolate Cr(VI)-resistant bacteria from metal-contaminated river sediments. Diluted sediments were plated directly onto a peptone-yeast extract (PYE) medium containing 0 to 100 micrograms of Cr(VI) ml-1. Approximately 8.4 x 10(5) CFU g-1 were recovered on 0 microgram of Cr(VI) ml-1, whereas 4.0 x 10(2) CFU g-1 were recovered on PYE plus 100 micrograms of Cr(VI) ml-1. Alternatively, continuous culture enrichment techniques were employed using PYE and 100 micrograms Cr(VI) ml-1 input at dilution rates of 0.02 and 0.10 h-1. After six residence periods, 10(9) CFU were recovered on PYE agar containing 0 microgram of Cr(VI) ml-1 and 10(7) CFU on PYE agar plus 100 micrograms of Cr(VI) ml-1. Of 89 isolates obtained by direct plating onto PYE, 47% were resistant to 100 micrograms of Cr(VI) ml-1, and 29% were resistant to 250 micrograms of Cr(VI) ml-1. When the same isolates were plated onto PYE containing Cr(III), 88% were resistant to 100 micrograms ml-1 but only 2% were resistant to 250 micrograms ml-1. Cr, Co, Sb, and Zn were found in significantly higher concentrations at an industry-related contaminated site than at a site 11 km downstream. Total Cr in the sediments at the contaminated site averaged 586 micrograms (dry weight) g-1, and the downstream site averaged 71 micrograms (dry weight) g-1. The Cr recovered from acid-digested Ottawa River sediment samples was predominantly hexavalent. Five acid digestion procedures followed by atomic absorption spectroscopy were compared and found to be 30 to 70% efficient for recovery of Cr relative to neutron activation analysis. A population of aerobic, heterotrophic bacteria was recovered from sediments containing elevated levels of Cr.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6639032

  17. Culturing aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and mammalian cells with a microfluidic differential oxygenator.

    PubMed

    Lam, Raymond H W; Kim, Min-Cheol; Thorsen, Todd

    2009-07-15

    In this manuscript, we report on the culture of anaerobic and aerobic species within a disposable multilayer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device with an integrated differential oxygenator. A gas-filled microchannel network functioning as an oxygen-nitrogen mixer generates differential oxygen concentration. By controlling the relative flow rate of the oxygen and nitrogen input gases, the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in proximal microchannels filled with culture media are precisely regulated by molecular diffusion. Sensors consisting of an oxygen-sensitive dye embedded in the fluid channels permit dynamic fluorescence-based monitoring of the DO concentration using low-cost light-emitting diodes. To demonstrate the general utility of the platform for both aerobic and anaerobic culture, three bacteria with differential oxygen requirements (E. coli, A. viscosus, and F. nucleatum), as well as a model mammalian cell line (murine embryonic fibroblast cells (3T3)), were cultured. Growth characteristics of the selected species were analyzed as a function of eight discrete DO concentrations, ranging from 0 ppm (anaerobic) to 42 ppm (fully saturated).

  18. Analyses of spatial distributions of sulfate-reducing bacteria and their activity in aerobic wastewater biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Okabe, Satoshi; Itoh, Tsukasa; Satoh, Hisashi; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    1999-11-01

    The vertical distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in aerobic wastewater biofilms grown on rotating disk reactors was investigated by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes. To correlate the vertical distribution of SRB populations with their activity, the microprofiles of O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, NO{sub 2}{minus}, NH{sub 2}{sup +}, and pH were measured with microelectrodes. In addition, a cross-evaluation of the FISH and microelectrode analyses was performed by comparing them with culture-based approaches and biogeochemical measurements. In situ hybridization revealed that a relatively high abundance of the probe SRB385-stained cells were evenly distributed throughout the biofilm, even in the toxic surface. The probe SRB660-stained Desulfobulbus spp. were found to be numerically important members of SRB populations. The result of microelectrode measurements showed that a high sulfate-reducing activity was found in a narrow anaerobic zone located about 150 to 300 {micro}m below the biofilm surface and above which an intensive sulfide oxidation zone was found. The biogeochemical measurements showed that elemental sulfur (S{degree}) was an important intermediate of the sulfide reoxidation in such thin wastewater biofilms, which accounted for about 75% of the total S pool in the biofilm. The contribution of an internal Fe-sulfur cycle to the overall sulfur cycle in aerobic wastewater biofilms was insignificant (less than 1%) due to the relatively high sulfate reduction rate.

  19. Diversity and phylogeny of the ectoine biosynthesis genes in aerobic, moderately halophilic methylotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Reshetnikov, Alexander S; Khmelenina, Valentina N; Mustakhimov, Ildar I; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina; Lidstrom, Mary; Trotsenko, Yuri A

    2011-11-01

    The genes of ectoine biosynthesis pathway were identified in six species of aerobic, slightly halophilic bacteria utilizing methane, methanol or methylamine. Two types of ectoine gene cluster organization were revealed in the methylotrophs. The gene cluster ectABC coding for diaminobutyric acid (DABA) acetyltransferase (EctA), DABA aminotransferase (EctB) and ectoine synthase (EctC) was found in methanotrophs Methylobacter marinus 7C and Methylomicrobium kenyense AMO1(T). In methanotroph Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum ML1, methanol-utilizers Methylophaga thalassica 33146(T) , Methylophaga alcalica M8 and methylamine-utilizer Methylarcula marina h1(T), the genes forming the ectABC-ask operon are preceded by ectR, encoding a putative transcriptional regulatory protein EctR. Phylogenetic relationships of the Ect proteins do not correlate with phylogenetic affiliation of the strains, thus implying that the ability of methylotrophs to produce ectoine is most likely the result of a horizontal transfer event.

  20. Aerobic degradation of a mixture of azo dyes in a packed bed reactor having bacteria-coated laterite pebbles.

    PubMed

    Senan, Resmi C; Shaffiqu, T S; Roy, J Jegan; Abraham, T Emilia

    2003-01-01

    A microbial consortium capable of aerobic degradation of a mixture of azo dyes consisting of two isolated strains (RRL,TVM) and one known strain of Pseudomonas putida (MTCC 1194) was immobilized on laterite stones. The amount of bacterial biomass attached to the laterite stones was 8.64 g per 100 g of the stone on a dry weight basis. The packed bed reactor was filled with these stones and had a total capacity of 850 mL and a void volume of 210 mL. The feed consisted of an equal mixture of seven azo dyes both in water as well as in a simulated textile effluent, at a pH of 9.0 and a salinity of 900 mg/L. The dye concentrations of influent were 25, 50, and 100 microg/mL. The residence time was varied between 0.78 and 6.23 h. It was found that at the lowest residence time 23.55, 45.73, and 79.95 microg of dye was degraded per hour at an initial dye concentration of 25, 50, and 100 microg, respectively. The pH was reduced from 9.0 to 7.0. Simulated textile effluent containing 50 microg/mL dye was degraded by 61.7%. Analysis of degradation products by TLC and HPLC showed that the dye mixture was degraded to nontoxic smaller molecules. The bacteria-coated pebbles were stable, there was no washout even after 2 months, and the reactor was found to be suitable for the aerobic degradation of azo dyes.

  1. Comparison between rinse and crush-and-rub sampling for aerobic bacteria recovery from broiler hatching eggs after sanitization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study compared surface and deep eggshell aerobic bacteria recovered by rinse and crush-and-rub sampling methods for commercial hatching eggs after treatment with sanitizers. Eggs were arranged into 5 treatments consisting of No-treatment, Water, and three sanitizers. Sanitizers were Hydrogen ...

  2. Comparison between Rinse and Crush-and-Rub Sampling for Aerobic Bacteria Recovery from Hatching Eggs after Sanitization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study compared surface and deep eggshell aerobic bacteria recovered by rinse and crush-and-rub sampling methods for commercial hatching eggs after treatments with sanitizers. Eggs were arranged into 5 treatments consisting of three sanitizers, Water, and No-treatment. Sanitizers were Hydrogen...

  3. Growth of Aerobic Ripening Bacteria at the Cheese Surface Is Limited by the Availability of Iron

    PubMed Central

    Back, Alexandre; Irlinger, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    The microflora on the surface of smear-ripened cheeses is composed of various species of bacteria and yeasts that contribute to the production of the desired organoleptic properties. The objective of the present study was to show that iron availability is a limiting factor in the growth of typical aerobic ripening bacteria in cheese. For that purpose, we investigated the effect of iron or siderophore addition in model cheeses that were coinoculated with a yeast and a ripening bacterium. Both iron and the siderophore desferrioxamine B stimulated the growth of ripening bacteria belonging to the genera Arthrobacter, Corynebacterium, and Brevibacterium. The extent of stimulation was strain dependent, and generally, the effect of desferrioxamine B was greater than that of iron. Measurements of the expression of genes related to the metabolism of iron by Arthrobacter arilaitensis Re117 by real-time reverse transcription-PCR showed that these genes were transcribed during growth in cheese. The addition of desferrioxamine B increased the expression of two genes encoding iron-siderophore ABC transport binding proteins. The addition of iron decreased the expression of siderophore biosynthesis genes and of part of the genes encoding iron-siderophore ABC transport components. It was concluded that iron availability is a limiting factor in the growth of typical cheese surface bacteria. The selection of strains with efficient iron acquisition systems may be useful for the development of defined-strain surface cultures. Furthermore, the importance of iron metabolism in the microbial ecology of cheeses should be investigated since it may result in positive or negative microbial interactions. PMID:22367081

  4. Growth of aerobic ripening bacteria at the cheese surface is limited by the availability of iron.

    PubMed

    Monnet, Christophe; Back, Alexandre; Irlinger, Françoise

    2012-05-01

    The microflora on the surface of smear-ripened cheeses is composed of various species of bacteria and yeasts that contribute to the production of the desired organoleptic properties. The objective of the present study was to show that iron availability is a limiting factor in the growth of typical aerobic ripening bacteria in cheese. For that purpose, we investigated the effect of iron or siderophore addition in model cheeses that were coinoculated with a yeast and a ripening bacterium. Both iron and the siderophore desferrioxamine B stimulated the growth of ripening bacteria belonging to the genera Arthrobacter, Corynebacterium, and Brevibacterium. The extent of stimulation was strain dependent, and generally, the effect of desferrioxamine B was greater than that of iron. Measurements of the expression of genes related to the metabolism of iron by Arthrobacter arilaitensis Re117 by real-time reverse transcription-PCR showed that these genes were transcribed during growth in cheese. The addition of desferrioxamine B increased the expression of two genes encoding iron-siderophore ABC transport binding proteins. The addition of iron decreased the expression of siderophore biosynthesis genes and of part of the genes encoding iron-siderophore ABC transport components. It was concluded that iron availability is a limiting factor in the growth of typical cheese surface bacteria. The selection of strains with efficient iron acquisition systems may be useful for the development of defined-strain surface cultures. Furthermore, the importance of iron metabolism in the microbial ecology of cheeses should be investigated since it may result in positive or negative microbial interactions.

  5. Effect of selected monoterpenes on methane oxidation, denitrification, and aerobic metabolism by bacteria in pure culture.

    PubMed

    Amaral, J A; Ekins, A; Richards, S R; Knowles, R

    1998-02-01

    Selected monoterpenes inhibited methane oxidation by methanotrophs (Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, Methylobacter luteus), denitrification by environmental isolates, and aerobic metabolism by several heterotrophic pure cultures. Inhibition occurred to various extents and was transient. Complete inhibition of methane oxidation by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b with 1.1 mM (-)-alpha-pinene lasted for more than 2 days with a culture of optical density of 0.05 before activity resumed. Inhibition was greater under conditions under which particulate methane monooxygenase was expressed. No apparent consumption or conversion of monoterpenes by methanotrophs was detected by gas chromatography, and the reason that transient inhibition occurs is not clear. Aerobic metabolism by several heterotrophs was much less sensitive than methanotrophy was; Escherichia coli (optical density, 0.01), for example, was not affected by up to 7.3 mM (-)-alpha-pinene. The degree of inhibition was monoterpene and species dependent. Denitrification by isolates from a polluted sediment was not inhibited by 3.7 mM (-)-alpha-pinene, gamma-terpinene, or beta-myrcene, whereas 50 to 100% inhibition was observed for isolates from a temperate swamp soil. The inhibitory effect of monoterpenes on methane oxidation was greatest with unsaturated, cyclic hydrocarbon forms [e.g., (-)-alpha-pinene, (S)-(-)-limonene, (R)-(+)-limonene, and gamma-terpinene]. Lower levels of inhibition occurred with oxide and alcohol derivatives [(R)-(+)-limonene oxide, alpha-pinene oxide, linalool, alpha-terpineol] and a noncyclic hydrocarbon (beta-myrcene). Isomers of pinene inhibited activity to different extents. Given their natural sources, monoterpenes may be significant factors affecting bacterial activities in nature.

  6. Genome Sequence of "Pedosphaera parvula" Ellin514, an Aerobic Verrucomicrobial Isolate from Pasture Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Kant, Ravi; Van Passel, Mark W.J.; Palva, Airi; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, A; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Chertkov, Olga; Larimer, Frank W; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; De Vos, Willem M.; Janssen, Peter H.; Smidt, Hauke

    2011-01-01

    Pedosphaera parvula Ellin514 is an aerobically grown verrucomicrobial isolate from pasture soil. In contrast to the high abundance of members of Verrucomicrobia subdivision 3 based on molecular surveys in terrestrial environments, Ellin514 is one of the few cultured representatives of this group.

  7. Presence and resistance of Streptococcus agalactiae in vaginal specimens of pregnant and adult non-pregnant women and association with other aerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Numanović, Fatima; Smajlović, Jasmina; Gegić, Merima; Delibegović, Zineta; Bektaš, Sabaheta; Halilović, Emir; Nurkić, Jasmina

    2017-02-01

    Aim To determine the prevalence rate and resistance profile of Streptococcus agalactiae (S. agalactiae) in vaginal swabs of pregnant and adult non-pregnant women in the Tuzla region, Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H), as well as its association with other aerobic bacteria. Methods This prospective study included 200 women, 100 pregnant and 100 adult non-pregnant. The research was conducted at the Institute of Microbiology, University Clinical Center Tuzla from October to December 2015. Standard aerobic microbiological techniques were used for isolation and identification of S. agalactiae and other aerobic bacteria. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion and microdilution method(VITEK 2/AES instrument). Results Among 200 vaginal swabs, 17 (8.50%) were positive for S. agalactiae, e. g., 7% (7/100) of pregnant and 10% (10/100) of adult non-pregnant women. In the pregnant group, 71.4% (5/7) of S. agalactiae isolates were susceptible to clindamycin and 85.7%(6/7) to erythromycin. In the adult non-pregnant group, only resistance to clindamycin was observed in one patient (1/10; 10%). S. agalactiae as single pathogen was isolated in 57.14% (4/7) of pregnant and 60% (6/10) of adult non-pregnant S. agalactiae positive women. In mixed microbial cultures S. agalactiae was most frequently associated with Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli. Conclusion The rate of S. agalactiae positive women in the population of pregnant and adult non-pregnant women of Tuzla Canton, B&H is comparable with other European countries. Large studies are needed to develop a common national strategy for the prevention of S. agalactiae infection in B&H, especially during pregnancy.

  8. An initial investigation into the ecology of culturable aerobic postmortem bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chun, Lauren P; Miguel, Marcus J; Junkins, Emily N; Forbes, Shari L; Carter, David O

    2015-12-01

    Postmortem microorganisms are increasingly recognized for their potential to serve as physical evidence. Yet, we still understand little about the ecology of postmortem microbes, particularly those associated with the skin and larval masses. We conducted an experiment to characterize microbiological and chemical properties of decomposing swine (Sus scrofa domesticus) carcasses on the island of Oahu, Hawaii, USA, during June 2013. Bacteria were collected from the head, limb, and larval mass during the initial 145h of decomposition. We also measured the pH, temperature, and oxidation-reduction potential of larval masses in situ. Bacteria were cultured aerobically on Standard Nutrient Agar at 22°C and identified using protein or genetic signals. Carcass decomposition followed a typical sigmoidal pattern and associated bacterial communities differed by sampling location and time since death, although all communities were dominated by phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria. Larval masses were reducing environments (~-200mV) of neutral pH (6.5-7.5) and high temperature (35°C-40°C). We recommend that culturable postmortem and larval mass microbiology and chemistry be investigated in more detail, as it has potential to complement culture-independent studies and serve as a rapid estimate of PMI.

  9. Reducing time to identification of aerobic bacteria and fastidious micro-organisms in positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Intra, J; Sala, M R; Falbo, R; Cappellini, F; Brambilla, P

    2016-12-01

    Rapid and early identification of micro-organisms in blood has a key role in the diagnosis of a febrile patient, in particular, in guiding the clinician to define the correct antibiotic therapy. This study presents a simple and very fast method with high performances for identifying bacteria by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) after only 4 h of incubation. We used early bacterial growth on PolyViteX chocolate agar plates inoculated with five drops of blood-broth medium deposited in the same point and spread with a sterile loop, followed by a direct transfer procedure on MALDI-TOF MS target slides without additional modification. Ninety-nine percentage of aerobic bacteria were correctly identified from 600 monomicrobial-positive blood cultures. This procedure allowed obtaining the correct identification of fastidious pathogens, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae that need complex nutritional and environmental requirements in order to grow. Compared to the traditional pathogen identification from blood cultures that takes over 24 h, the reliability of results, rapid performance and suitability of this protocol allowed a more rapid administration of optimal antimicrobial treatment in the patients.

  10. Acetic acid production from food wastes using yeast and acetic acid bacteria micro-aerobic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; He, Dongwei; Niu, Dongjie; Zhao, Youcai

    2015-05-01

    In this study, yeast and acetic acid bacteria strains were adopted to enhance the ethanol-type fermentation resulting to a volatile fatty acids yield of 30.22 g/L, and improve acetic acid production to 25.88 g/L, with food wastes as substrate. In contrast, only 12.81 g/L acetic acid can be obtained in the absence of strains. The parameters such as pH, oxidation reduction potential and volatile fatty acids were tested and the microbial diversity of different strains and activity of hydrolytic ferment were investigated to reveal the mechanism. The optimum pH and oxidation reduction potential for the acetic acid production were determined to be at 3.0-3.5 and -500 mV, respectively. Yeast can convert organic matters into ethanol, which is used by acetic acid bacteria to convert the organic wastes into acetic acid. The acetic acid thus obtained from food wastes micro-aerobic fermentation liquid could be extracted by distillation to get high-pure acetic acid.

  11. Multicenter Evaluation of the Vitek MS Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry System for Identification of Gram-Positive Aerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, Carey-Ann D.; Bythrow, Maureen; Garner, Omai B.; Ginocchio, Christine C.; Jennemann, Rebecca; Lewinski, Michael A.; Manji, Ryhana; Mochon, A. Brian; Procop, Gary W.; Richter, Sandra S.; Sercia, Linda; Westblade, Lars F.; Ferraro, Mary Jane; Branda, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) is gaining momentum as a tool for bacterial identification in the clinical microbiology laboratory. Compared with conventional methods, this technology can more readily and conveniently identify a wide range of organisms. Here, we report the findings from a multicenter study to evaluate the Vitek MS v2.0 system (bioMérieux, Inc.) for the identification of aerobic Gram-positive bacteria. A total of 1,146 unique isolates, representing 13 genera and 42 species, were analyzed, and results were compared to those obtained by nucleic acid sequence-based identification as the reference method. For 1,063 of 1,146 isolates (92.8%), the Vitek MS provided a single identification that was accurate to the species level. For an additional 31 isolates (2.7%), multiple possible identifications were provided, all correct at the genus level. Mixed-genus or single-choice incorrect identifications were provided for 18 isolates (1.6%). Although no identification was obtained for 33 isolates (2.9%), there was no specific bacterial species for which the Vitek MS consistently failed to provide identification. In a subset of 463 isolates representing commonly encountered important pathogens, 95% were accurately identified to the species level and there were no misidentifications. Also, in all but one instance, the Vitek MS correctly differentiated Streptococcus pneumoniae from other viridans group streptococci. The findings demonstrate that the Vitek MS system is highly accurate for the identification of Gram-positive aerobic bacteria in the clinical laboratory setting. PMID:23658261

  12. Multicenter evaluation of the Vitek MS matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry system for identification of Gram-positive aerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rychert, Jenna; Burnham, Carey-Ann D; Bythrow, Maureen; Garner, Omai B; Ginocchio, Christine C; Jennemann, Rebecca; Lewinski, Michael A; Manji, Ryhana; Mochon, A Brian; Procop, Gary W; Richter, Sandra S; Sercia, Linda; Westblade, Lars F; Ferraro, Mary Jane; Branda, John A

    2013-07-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) is gaining momentum as a tool for bacterial identification in the clinical microbiology laboratory. Compared with conventional methods, this technology can more readily and conveniently identify a wide range of organisms. Here, we report the findings from a multicenter study to evaluate the Vitek MS v2.0 system (bioMérieux, Inc.) for the identification of aerobic Gram-positive bacteria. A total of 1,146 unique isolates, representing 13 genera and 42 species, were analyzed, and results were compared to those obtained by nucleic acid sequence-based identification as the reference method. For 1,063 of 1,146 isolates (92.8%), the Vitek MS provided a single identification that was accurate to the species level. For an additional 31 isolates (2.7%), multiple possible identifications were provided, all correct at the genus level. Mixed-genus or single-choice incorrect identifications were provided for 18 isolates (1.6%). Although no identification was obtained for 33 isolates (2.9%), there was no specific bacterial species for which the Vitek MS consistently failed to provide identification. In a subset of 463 isolates representing commonly encountered important pathogens, 95% were accurately identified to the species level and there were no misidentifications. Also, in all but one instance, the Vitek MS correctly differentiated Streptococcus pneumoniae from other viridans group streptococci. The findings demonstrate that the Vitek MS system is highly accurate for the identification of Gram-positive aerobic bacteria in the clinical laboratory setting.

  13. Isolation of pathogenic bacteria from hospital staff apparel in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Orji, M U; Mbata, T I; Kalu, O U

    2005-12-01

    A survey of bacteria contamination of hospital staff apparel in use in Anambra State, Nigeria, was carried out to determine the extent of contamination by clinically important bacteria. Of a total of 125 swab samples of hospital staff apparel, 72 (58%) showed bacterial contamination including 32 (70%) of 46 samples from hand gloves, 28 of 45 (62%) samples from protective gowns, and 12 of 34 (35%) samples from face-shields. The potentially pathogenic bacteria isolated were Salmonella spp, Proteus vulgaris, Shigella dysenteriae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. The isolation of clinically important bacteria from the apparel suggests the need for improved infection control measures.

  14. Sulfur oxidation in rice field soil: activity, enumeration, isolation and characterization of thiosulfate-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stubner, S; Wind, T; Conrad, R

    1998-12-01

    In rice paddy fields the bulk soil is anoxic, but oxygenated zones occur in the surrounding of the rice roots to where oxygen is transported via the aerenchyma system of the rice plants. In the anaerobic soil compartments sulfate is consumed by sulfate-reducing bacteria. In the rhizosphere the reduced sulfur compounds can be reoxidized by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. Measurements of the potential activity of thiosulfate-oxidizing bacteria in soil slurries derived from planted rice soil microcosms showed turnover rates of 2-6 mumol d-1 g-dw-1. Thiosulfate was oxidized to sulfate with tetrathionate as intermediate. Most probable number (MPN) enumeration with three aerobic media and one anaerobic nitrate-amended medium showed that thiosulfate-oxidizing bacteria were abundant in paddy soil and in rhizosphere soil at numbers of 10(5) to 10(6) per gram dry weight soil. Nine isolates of S-oxidizing bacteria were obtained from enrichment cultures or from the highest dilutions of the MPN series and were affiliated to four different phylogenetic groups. These isolates were characterized by physiological properties and by comparative 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Three isolates (TA1-AE1, TA1-A1 and TA12-21) were shown to be facultatively chemolithoautotrophic strains of Ancylobacter aquaticus. Three further isolates (Tv6-2b, Z2A-6A and Z4A-2A) were also facultatively chemolithoautotrophic and were affiliated with the Xanthobacter sp. group, probably representing new strains of X. flavus or X. tagetidis. Strain SZ-2111 was phylogenetically related to Bosea thiooxidans. However, the genus Bosea is described as obligately heterotrophic, whereas strain 5Z-2111 was able to grow autotrophically. The isolates 5Z-C1 and TBW3 were obligate chemolithoautotrophs and were closely affiliated with Thiobacillus thioparus. Our results showed that S-oxidizing bacteria were abundant and active in rice paddy soil and consisted of physiologically and phylogenetically diverse populations.

  15. Isolation of fucosyltransferase-producing bacteria from marine environments.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Hitomi; Toda, Munetoyo; Mine, Toshiki; Nakada, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    Fucose-containing oligosaccharides on the cell surface of some pathogenic bacteria are thought to be important for host-microbe interactions and to play a major role in the pathogenicity of bacterial pathogens. Here, we screened marine bacteria for glycosyltransferases using two methods: a one-pot glycosyltransferase assay method and a lectin-staining method. Using this approach, we isolated marine bacteria with fucosyltransferase activity. There have been no previous reports of marine bacteria producing fucosyltransferase. This paper thus represents the first report of fucosyltransferase-producing marine bacteria.

  16. Deep Subsurface Life from North Pond: Enrichment, Isolation, Characterization and Genomes of Heterotrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Joseph A.; León-Zayas, Rosa; Wrighton, Kelly; Biddle, Jennifer F.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of subsurface microorganisms have yielded few environmentally relevant isolates for laboratory studies. In order to address this lack of cultivated microorganisms, we initiated several enrichments on sediment and underlying basalt samples from North Pond, a sediment basin ringed by basalt outcrops underlying an oligotrophic water-column west of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 22°N. In contrast to anoxic enrichments, growth was observed in aerobic, heterotrophic enrichments from sediment of IODP Hole U1382B at 4 and 68 m below seafloor (mbsf). These sediment depths, respectively, correspond to the fringes of oxygen penetration from overlying seawater in the top of the sediment column and upward migration of oxygen from oxic seawater from the basalt aquifer below the sediment. Here we report the enrichment, isolation, initial characterization and genomes of three isolated aerobic heterotrophs from North Pond sediments; an Arthrobacter species from 4 mbsf, and Paracoccus and Pseudomonas species from 68 mbsf. These cultivated bacteria are represented in the amplicon 16S rRNA gene libraries created from whole sediments, albeit at low (up to 2%) relative abundance. We provide genomic evidence from our isolates demonstrating that the Arthrobacter and Pseudomonas isolates have the potential to respire nitrate and oxygen, though dissimilatory nitrate reduction could not be confirmed in laboratory cultures. The cultures from this study represent members of abundant phyla, as determined by amplicon sequencing of environmental DNA extracts, and allow for further studies into geochemical factors impacting life in the deep subsurface. PMID:27242705

  17. Deep subsurface life from North Pond: Enrichment, isolation, characterization and genomes of heterotrophic bacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Russell, Joseph A.; Leon-Zayas, Rosa; Wrighton, Kelly; ...

    2016-05-10

    Studies of subsurface microorganisms have yielded few environmentally relevant isolates for laboratory studies. In order to address this lack of cultivated microorganisms, we initiated several enrichments on sediment and underlying basalt samples from North Pond, a sediment basin ringed by basalt outcrops underlying an oligotrophic watercolumn west of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 22° N. In contrast to anoxic enrichments, growth was observed in aerobic, heterotrophic enrichments from sediment of IODP Hole U1382B at 4 and 68 m below seafloor (mbsf). These sediment depths, respectively, correspond to the fringes of oxygen penetration from overlying seawater in the top of the sedimentmore » column and upward migration of oxygen from oxic seawater from the basalt aquifer below the sediment. Here we report the enrichment, isolation, initial characterization and genomes of three isolated aerobic heterotrophs from North Pond sediments; an Arthrobacter species from 4 mbsf, and Paracoccus and Pseudomonas species from 68 mbsf. These cultivated bacteria are represented in the amplicon 16S rRNA gene libraries created from whole sediments, albeit at low (up to 2%) relative abundance. We provide genomic evidence from our isolates demonstrating that the Arthrobacter and Pseudomonas isolates have the potential to respire nitrate and oxygen, though dissimilatory nitrate reduction could not be confirmed in laboratory cultures. Furthermore, the cultures from this study represent members of abundant phyla, as determined by amplicon sequencing of environmental DNA extracts, and allow for further studies into geochemical factors impacting life in the deep subsurface.« less

  18. Diversity and Habitat Preferences of Cultivated and Uncultivated Aerobic Methanotrophic Bacteria Evaluated Based on pmoA as Molecular Marker

    PubMed Central

    Knief, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria are characterized by their capability to grow on methane as sole source of carbon and energy. Cultivation-dependent and -independent methods have revealed that this functional guild of bacteria comprises a substantial diversity of organisms. In particular the use of cultivation-independent methods targeting a subunit of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA) as functional marker for the detection of aerobic methanotrophs has resulted in thousands of sequences representing “unknown methanotrophic bacteria.” This limits data interpretation due to restricted information about these uncultured methanotrophs. A few groups of uncultivated methanotrophs are assumed to play important roles in methane oxidation in specific habitats, while the biology behind other sequence clusters remains still largely unknown. The discovery of evolutionary related monooxygenases in non-methanotrophic bacteria and of pmoA paralogs in methanotrophs requires that sequence clusters of uncultivated organisms have to be interpreted with care. This review article describes the present diversity of cultivated and uncultivated aerobic methanotrophic bacteria based on pmoA gene sequence diversity. It summarizes current knowledge about cultivated and major clusters of uncultivated methanotrophic bacteria and evaluates habitat specificity of these bacteria at different levels of taxonomic resolution. Habitat specificity exists for diverse lineages and at different taxonomic levels. Methanotrophic genera such as Methylocystis and Methylocaldum are identified as generalists, but they harbor habitat specific methanotrophs at species level. This finding implies that future studies should consider these diverging preferences at different taxonomic levels when analyzing methanotrophic communities. PMID:26696968

  19. Diversity and Habitat Preferences of Cultivated and Uncultivated Aerobic Methanotrophic Bacteria Evaluated Based on pmoA as Molecular Marker.

    PubMed

    Knief, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria are characterized by their capability to grow on methane as sole source of carbon and energy. Cultivation-dependent and -independent methods have revealed that this functional guild of bacteria comprises a substantial diversity of organisms. In particular the use of cultivation-independent methods targeting a subunit of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA) as functional marker for the detection of aerobic methanotrophs has resulted in thousands of sequences representing "unknown methanotrophic bacteria." This limits data interpretation due to restricted information about these uncultured methanotrophs. A few groups of uncultivated methanotrophs are assumed to play important roles in methane oxidation in specific habitats, while the biology behind other sequence clusters remains still largely unknown. The discovery of evolutionary related monooxygenases in non-methanotrophic bacteria and of pmoA paralogs in methanotrophs requires that sequence clusters of uncultivated organisms have to be interpreted with care. This review article describes the present diversity of cultivated and uncultivated aerobic methanotrophic bacteria based on pmoA gene sequence diversity. It summarizes current knowledge about cultivated and major clusters of uncultivated methanotrophic bacteria and evaluates habitat specificity of these bacteria at different levels of taxonomic resolution. Habitat specificity exists for diverse lineages and at different taxonomic levels. Methanotrophic genera such as Methylocystis and Methylocaldum are identified as generalists, but they harbor habitat specific methanotrophs at species level. This finding implies that future studies should consider these diverging preferences at different taxonomic levels when analyzing methanotrophic communities.

  20. Space agriculture for habitation on Mars with hyper-thermophilic aerobic composting bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Space Agriculture Task Force; Ishikawa, Y.; Tomita-Yokotani, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Kitaya, Y.; Yamashita, M.; Nagatomo, M.; Oshima, T.; Wada, H.

    Manned Mars exploration, especially for extended periods of time, will require recycle of materials to support human life. Here, a conceptual design is developed for a Martian agricultural system driven by biologically regenerative functions. One of the core biotechnologies function is the use of hyper-thermophilic aerobic composting bacterial ecology. These thermophilic bacteria can play an important role in increasing the effectiveness of the processing of human metabolic waste and inedible biomass and of converting them to fertilizer for the cultivation of plants. This microbial technology has been already well established for the purpose of processing sewage and waste materials for small local communities in Japan. One of the characteristics of the technology is that the metabolic heat release that occurs during bacterial fermentation raises the processing temperature sufficiently high at 80 100 °C to support hyper-thermophilic bacteria. Such a hyper-thermophilic system is found to have great capability of decomposing wastes including even their normally recalcitrant components, in a reasonably short period of time and of providing a better quality of fertilizer as an end-product. High quality compost has been shown to be a key element in creating a healthy regenerative food production system. In ground-based studies, the soil microbial ecology after the addition of high quality compost was shown to improve plant growth and promote a healthy symbiosis of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Another advantage of such high processing temperature is the ability to sterilize the pathogenic organisms through the fermentation process and thus to secure the hygienic safety of the system. Plant cultivation is one of the other major systems. It should fully utilize solar energy received on the Martian surface for supplying energy for photosynthesis. Subsurface water and atmospheric carbon dioxide mined on Mars should be also used in the plant cultivation system. Oxygen and

  1. Bacteria isolated from the duodenum, ileum, and cecum of young chicks.

    PubMed Central

    Salanitro, J P; Blake, I G; Muirehead, P A; Maglio, M; Goodman, J R

    1978-01-01

    Facultatively anaerobic and strictly anaerobic bacteria colonizing the intestinal tracts of 14-day-old chicks fed a corn-based diet were enumerated, isolated, and identified. Colony counts from anaerobic roll tubes (rumen fluid medium) or aerobic plates (brain heart infusion agar) recovered from homogenates of the duodenum, upper and lower ileum, and cecum varied appreciably among samples from individual birds. Anaerobic and aerobic counts from the duodenum and ileum were similar. Anaerobic counts were highest from the cecum (0.7 X 10(11) to 1.6 X 10(11)/g of dry tissue) and exceeded aerobic plate counts by a factor of at least 10(2). Facultatively anaerobic groups (Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Lactobacillus, and Escherichia coli) comprised the predominant flora of the duodenum and ileum, although large numbers of anaerobes (9 to 39% of the small intestine isolates), represented by species of Eubacterium, Propionibacterium, Clostridium, Gemmiger, and Fusobacterium, were also recovered. Strict anaerobes (anaerobic gram-positive cocci, Eubacterium, Clostridium Gemmiger, Fusobacterium, and Bacteriodes) made up nearly the entire microbial population of the cecum. Scanning electron microscopy of the intestinal epithelia of chicks revealed populations of microbes on the duodenal, ileal, and cecal mucosal surfaces. Images PMID:646359

  2. Isolation of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria from Human Thoracoabdominal Pus

    PubMed Central

    Loubinoux, Julien; Jaulhac, Benoit; Piemont, Yves; Monteil, Henri; Le Faou, Alain E.

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of sulfate-reducing bacteria in septic processes, we searched for these bacteria by culture in 100 consecutive abdominal and pleural pus specimens. Twelve isolates were obtained from abdominal samples and were identified by a multiplex PCR as Desulfovibrio piger (formerly Desulfomonas pigra) (seven strains), Desulfovibrio fairfieldensis (four strains), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (one strain). PMID:12624073

  3. Isolation of carbohydrate-metabolizing, extremely halophilic bacteria.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlinson, G. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1972-01-01

    Four previously unrecognized strains of extremely halophilic bacteria that utilize carbohydrates have been isolated. Gas production proved an unreliable index of carbohydrate metabolism; therefore, carbohydrate utilization was measured by determining acid formation and sugar disappearance during growth. By these procedures, carbohydrate utilization was readily detected. The results suggest that carbohydrate dissimilation by extremely halophilic bacteria may be more common than previously thought and that the apparent rarity of carbohydrate-metabolizing halophiles may be an artifact of the isolation procedures used.

  4. Spatial and temporal variability of aerobic anoxygenic photoheterotrophic bacteria along the east coast of Australia.

    PubMed

    Bibiloni-Isaksson, Jaime; Seymour, Justin R; Ingleton, Tim; van de Kamp, Jodie; Bodrossy, Levente; Brown, Mark V

    2016-12-01

    Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria (AAnPB) are ecologically important microorganisms, widespread in oceanic photic zones. However, the key environmental drivers underpinning AAnPB abundance and diversity are still largely undefined. The temporal patterns in AAnPB dynamics at three oceanographic reference stations spanning at approximately 15° latitude along the Australian east coast were examined. AAnPB abundance was highly variable, with pufM gene copies ranging from 1.1 × 10(2) to 1.4 × 10(5) ml(-1) and positively correlated with day length and solar radiation. pufM gene Miseq sequencing revealed that the majority of sequences were closely related to those obtained previously, suggesting that key AAnPB groups are widely distributed across similar environments globally. Temperature was a major structuring factor for AAnPB assemblages across large spatial scales, correlating positively with richness and Gammaproteobacteria (phylogroup K) abundance but negatively with Roseobacter-clade (phylogroup E) abundance, with temperatures between 16°C and 18°C identified as a potential transition zone between these groups. Network analysis revealed that discrete AAnPB populations exploit specific niches defined by varying temperature, light and nutrient conditions in the Tasman Sea system, with evidence for both niche sharing and partitioning amongst closely related operational taxonomic units.

  5. Effects of exogenous aerobic bacteria on methane production and biodegradation of municipal solid waste in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Ge, Sai; Liu, Lei; Xue, Qiang; Yuan, Zhiming

    2016-09-01

    Landfill is the most common and efficient ways of municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal and the landfill biogas, mostly methane, is currently utilized to generate electricity and heat. The aim of this work is to study the effects and the role of exogenous aerobic bacteria mixture (EABM) on methane production and biodegradation of MSW in bioreactors. The results showed that the addition of EABM could effectively enhance hydrolysis and acidogenesis processes of MSW degradation, resulting in 63.95% reduction of volatile solid (VS), the highest methane production rate (89.83Lkg(-1) organic matter) ever recorded and a threefold increase in accumulative methane production (362.9L) than the control (127.1L). In addition, it is demonstrated that white-rot fungi (WRF) might further promote the methane production through highly decomposing lignin, but the lower pH value in leachate and longer acidogenesis duration may cause methane production reduced. The data demonstrated that methane production and biodegradation of MSW in bioreactors could be significantly enhanced by EABM via enhanced hydrolysis and acidogenesis processes, and the results are of great economic importance for the future design and management of landfill.

  6. Hexavalent chromium reduction by aerobic heterotrophic bacteria indigenous to chromite mine overburden

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Satarupa; Paul, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    Microbiological analysis of overburden samples collected from chromite mining areas of Orissa, India revealed that they are rich in microbial density as well as diversity and dominated by Gram-negative (58%) bacteria. The phenotypically distinguishable bacterial isolates (130) showed wide degree of tolerance to chromium (2–8 mM) when tested in peptone yeast extract glucose agar medium. Isolates (92) tolerating 2 mM chromium exhibited different degrees of Cr+6 reducing activity in chemically defined Vogel Bonner (VB) broth and complex KSC medium. Three potent isolates, two belonging to Arthrobacter spp. and one to Pseudomonas sp. were able to reduce more than 50 and 80% of 2 mM chromium in defined and complex media respectively. Along with Cr+6 (MIC 8.6–17.8 mM), the isolates showed tolerance to Ni+2, Fe+3, Cu+2 and Co+2 but were extremely sensitive to Hg+2 followed by Cd+2, Mn+2 and Zn+2. In addition, they were resistant to antibiotics like penicillin, methicillin, ampicillin, neomycin and polymyxin B. During growth under shake-flask conditions, Arthrobacter SUK 1201 and SUK 1205 showed 100% reduction of 2 mM Cr+6 in KSC medium with simultaneous formation of insoluble precipitates of chromium salts. Both the isolates were also equally capable of completely reducing the Cr+6 present in mine seepage when grown in mine seepage supplemented with VB concentrate. PMID:24159321

  7. Agar-degrading bacteria isolated from Antarctic macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Roxana; Leiva, Sergio

    2017-03-10

    This study describes the taxonomic diversity of pigmented, agar-degrading bacteria isolated from the surface of macroalgae collected in King George Island, Antarctica. A total of 30 pigmented, agarolytic bacteria were isolated from the surface of the Antarctic macroalgae Adenocystis utricularis, Monostroma hariotii, Iridaea cordata, and Pantoneura plocamioides. Based on the 16S rRNA data, the agarolytic isolates were affiliated to the genera Algibacter, Arthrobacter, Brachybacterium, Cellulophaga, Citricoccus, Labedella, Microbacterium, Micrococcus, Salinibacterium, Sanguibacter, and Zobellia. Isolates phylogenetically related to Cellulophaga algicola showed the highest agarase activity in culture supernatants when tested at 4 and 37 °C. This is the first investigation of pigmented agar-degrading bacteria, members of microbial communities associated with Antarctic macroalgae, and the results suggest that they represent a potential source of cold-adapted agarases of possible biotechnological interest.

  8. Differentiation among bacteria isolated from turkeys with coryza (rhinotracheitis).

    PubMed

    Rimler, R B; Simmons, D G

    1983-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria isolated from turkeys with coryza in the United States, the Federal Republic of Germany, and the Republic of South Africa were compared with known Alcaligenes species and Bordetella bronchiseptica. The turkey isolates were separated into three distinct groups based on biochemical and physiologic tests. Forty of the 68 isolates studied (group I) were different from Alcaligenes sp. and B. bronchiseptica. Isolates in group I produced a heat-labile hemagglutinin and did not grow on Simmons' citrate agar. Isolates in group II (25 isolates) were similar to A. faecalis and A. odorans, grew on Simmons' citrate agar, and did not produce a hemagglutinin. Isolates in group III were B. bronchiseptica. Isolates from groups I and II caused coryza in poults. Group III isolates were not pathogenic.

  9. Characterization of alginate-like exopolysaccharides isolated from aerobic granular sludge in pilot-plant.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuemei; de Kreuk, Merle; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Adin, Avner

    2010-06-01

    To understand functional gel-forming exopolysaccharides in aerobic granular sludge, alginate-like exopolysaccharides were specifically extracted from aerobic granular sludge cultivated in a pilot plant treating municipal sewage. The exopolysaccharides were identified by the FAO/WHO alginate identification tests, characterized by biochemical assays, gelation with Ca(2+), blocks fractionation, spectroscopic analysis as UV-visible, FT-IR and MALDI-TOF MS, and electrophoresis. The yield of extractable alginate-like exopolysaccharides was reached 160+/-4mg/g (VSS ratio). They resembled seaweed alginate in UV-visible and MALDI-TOF MS spectra, and distinguished from it in the reactions with acid ferric sulfate, phenol-sulfuric acid and Coomassie brilliant blue G250. Characterized by their high percentage of poly guluronic acid blocks (69.07+/-8.95%), the isolated exopolysaccharides were capable to form rigid, non-deformable gels in CaCl(2). They were one of the dominant exopolysaccharides in aerobic granular sludge. We suggest that polymers play a significant role in providing aerobic granular sludge a highly hydrophobic, compact, strong and elastic structure.

  10. Comparison between rinse and crush-and-rub sampling for aerobic bacteria recovery from broiler hatching eggs after sanitization.

    PubMed

    Spickler, J L; Buhr, R J; Cox, N A; Bourassa, D V; Rigsby, L L

    2011-07-01

    This study compared surface and deep eggshell aerobic bacteria recovered by the rinse and crush-and-rub sampling methods for commercial hatching eggs after treatment with sanitizers. Eggs were arranged into 5 treatments consisting of no treatment, water, and 3 sanitizers. The sanitizers were H(2)O(2), phenol, and Q(4)B (a compound chemical containing 4 quaternary ammoniums and 1 biguanide moiety). Eggs were sprayed according to treatment and allowed to dry for 1 h before sampling. To collect samples for the eggshell rinse, each egg was massaged in a plastic bag with 20 mL of saline. Eggshells were then aseptically opened and their contents were discarded before being individually crushed into 50-mL centrifuge tubes containing 20 mL of saline. Aerobic bacteria were enumerated on Petrifilm after 48 h of incubation at 37°C. Aerobic bacteria recovered (log(10) cfu/mL) from the eggshell rinse were highest and similar for the no-treatment (4.0) and water (3.7) groups, lower for the phenol (3.2) and H(2)O(2) (3.1) groups, and lowest for the Q(4)B (2.4) group. Aerobic bacteria levels with the crush-and-rub method were similar for the no-treatment (2.5) and water (2.3) groups, lower for the phenol (1.6) group, intermediate for the H(2)O(2) (1.2) group, and lowest for the Q(4)B (0.9) group. The overall correlation between the rinse and crush-and-rub sampling methods for individual egg aerobic bacteria counts was r = 0.71. The correlation within each treatment revealed the following r values: no treatment, 0.55; water, 0.72; H(2)O(2), 0.67; phenol, 0.73; and Q(4)B, 0.38. A second experiment was designed to further examine the lower aerobic bacterial levels recovered by the crush-and-rub method (for previously rinsed eggs) than the levels recovered in the initial eggshell rinse sample. Eggs were either rinsed and then crushed and rubbed, or they were only crushed and rubbed without a prior rinse. Results confirmed a significant decrease (1.5 log(10) cfu/mL) in bacteria levels

  11. Isolation and Identification of Cellulolytic Bacteria from the Gut of Holotrichia parallela Larvae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shengwei; Sheng, Ping; Zhang, Hongyu

    2012-01-01

    In this study, 207 strains of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria were isolated from the gut of Holotrichia parallela larvae. These bacterial isolates were assigned to 21 genotypes by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). A partial 16S rDNA sequence analysis and standard biochemical and physiological tests were used for the assignment of the 21 representative isolates. Our results show that the cellulolytic bacterial community is dominated by the Proteobacteria (70.05%), followed by the Actinobacteria (24.15%), the Firmicutes (4.35%), and the Bacteroidetes (1.45%). At the genus level, Gram-negative bacteria including Pseudomonas, Ochrobactrum, Rhizobium, Cellulosimicrobium, and Microbacterium were the predominant groups, but members of Bacillus, Dyadobacter, Siphonobacter, Paracoccus, Kaistia, Devosia, Labrys, Ensifer, Variovorax, Shinella, Citrobacter, and Stenotrophomonas were also found. Furthermore, our results suggest that a significant amount of bacterial diversity exists among the cellulolytic bacteria, and that Siphonobacter aquaeclarae, Cellulosimicrobium funkei, Paracoccus sulfuroxidans, Ochrobactrum cytisi, Ochrobactrum haematophilum, Kaistia adipata, Devosia riboflavina, Labrys neptuniae, Ensifer adhaerens, Shinella zoogloeoides, Citrobacter freundii, and Pseudomonas nitroreducens are reported to be cellulolytic for the first time in this study. Our results indicate that the scarab gut is an attractive source for the study of novel cellulolytic microorganisms and enzymes useful for cellulose degradation. PMID:22489111

  12. Isolation and characterization of bacteria degrading polychlorinated biphenyls from transformer oil.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Avelizapa, N G; Rodríguez-Vázquez, R; Martínez-Cruz, J; Esparza-García, F; Montes de Oca-García, A; Ríos-Leal, E; Fernández-Villagómez, G

    1999-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls from transformer oil were degraded in liquid culture under aerobic conditions using a mixed bacterial culture isolated from a transformer oil sample with a high content of polychlorinated biphenyls and other hydrocarbons. Four strains were identified, three of them corresponded to genus Bacillus, the other one to Erwinia. Bacteria in the transformer oil could remove as much as 65% of polychlorinated biphenyls (88% W/V in the transformer oil). Additional data showed that the two isolated strains of B. lentus were able to grow on transformer oil and degrade polychlorinated biphenyls by 80 and 83%. Our results provide evidence that microorganisms occurring in transformer oil have the potential to degrade polychlorinated biphenyls.

  13. Dynamics of phosphorus and phytate-utilizing bacteria during aerobic degradation of dairy cattle dung.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Bárbara; Jorquera, Milko; Mora, María de la Luz

    2009-01-01

    During organic wastes degradation, P is transformed which may affect its availability. In this study, the dynamics of P and the occurrence of phytate-utilizing bacteria (PUB) were evaluated during aerobic degradation of dairy cattle dung in laboratory-scale reactors for 105 d. The results showed an increase of water-soluble inorganic P (Pi) (from 570 to 1890 mg kg(-1)) and biomass P (from 390 to 870 mg kg(-1)) during the initial 40 d. After this period, water-soluble Pi remained constant (around 1500 mg kg(-1)) and biomass P decreased (around 220 mg kg(-1)) probably due to the decrease of easily available C in dung. Under the acidic conditions in the first 20 d there was an increase in concentration of Al (25 mg kg(-1)) and Fe (27 mg kg(-1)) ions. These ions were no longer detectable in the alkaline conditions occurring after 40 d. In the same period, the Ca concentration increased (from 1170 to 2370 mg kg(-1)) and chemical speciation revealed permanent association of Ca ions with Pi. Sequential P fractionation showed a decrease of organic P in NaHCO(3), NaOH and HCl fractions and an increase of residual P (25-52% with respect to total P). Analysis by (31)P NMR also showed a decrease (from 14% to 1.6%) of phytic acid content during final experimental period (60 and 105 d). The bacteriological analysis revealed various PUB involved in degradation of the dung. Two morphotypes, genetically characterized as Enterobacter and Rahnella, which were dominant under higher content of residual P, showed strong utilization of phytate in vitro.

  14. Aerobic spore-forming bacteria for assessing quality of drinking water produced from surface water.

    PubMed

    Mazoua, Stephane; Chauveheid, Eric

    2005-12-01

    Cryptosporidium and Giardia represent a major microbiological issue for drinking water production from surface water. As their monitoring through a treatment process is rather tedious and as low-concentration goals should be reached for drinking water, aerobic spore-forming bacteria (ASFB) have been studied as an indicator microorganism for a drinking water treatment plant using surface water. The results reveal that monitoring naturally occurring ASFB better highlights daily achievable performances and identifies unusual process events for global disinfection, for both physical and chemical treatment steps in a multi-barrier drinking water treatment plant. Advantages of ASFB over usual process parameters are that these microorganisms are more sensitive to process fluctuations. The use of ASFB also showed that the efficiency of ozone disinfection is not as significantly influenced by the water temperature as reported, despite similar or higher CT values applied during warmer periods. Thus, the disinfection of resistant microorganisms with ozone can also be an efficient process at lower water temperature. ASFB have been shown to be a conservative indicator for Cryptosporidium and Giardia up to a 1st stage filtration and the ASFB Log removals can be used to estimate Log removals for Cryptosporidium and Giardia: compared to ASFB, the Log removals for Cryptosporidium or Giardia are at least equal or 50% higher, respectively. Thus, the monitoring of ASFB along a drinking water treatment process could be a useful tool for performing risk analysis for parasites such as Cryptosporidium and Giardia, and would further allow integration of daily variability into a risk analysis.

  15. Mycoplasma and associated bacteria isolated from ovine pink-eye.

    PubMed

    Langford, E V

    1971-01-01

    A mycoplasma was recovered from the untreated conjunctival membranes of nine sheep affected by Pink-eye. It was neither isolated from the conjunctiva of treated animals which were affected nor from the conjunctiva of normal animals either in contact or not in contact with affected animals. Bacteria found on normal conjunctival membranes were Neisseria ovis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermididis, Streptococcus and Bacillus spp. Bacteria found in clinical cases of Pink-eye were N. ovis, E. coli, a Streptococcus and Pseudomonas spp.

  16. Isolation and characterization of pigmented algicidal bacteria from seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaima, A.; Gires, U.; Asmat, A.

    2014-09-01

    Some dinoflagellate species are toxic and widely distributed in Malaysian marines ecosystems. They can cause many problems to aquatic life due to the production of various potential and natural toxins that accumulate in filter feeding shellfish and cause food poisoning to human. In recent decades, bacteria have been widely used as a biological control against these harmful algae. In the present study, pigmented bacteria isolated from marine water of Port Dickson beach was studied for their anti-algal activity towards toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum. Four isolates were studied and only one was capable of inhibiting algal growth when treated with bacterial culture. The algilytic effect on dinoflagellate was evaluated based on direct cell count under the microscope. Results showed that only isolate Sdpd-310 with orange colour has an inhibitory effect on A. minutum growth. This study demonstrated the rapid algicidal activity of a marine pigmented bacteria against the toxic dinoflagellate A. minutum.

  17. Isolation and identification of Profenofos degrading bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Malghani, Saadatullah; Chatterjee, Nivedita; Yu, Hu Xue; Luo, Zejiao

    2009-01-01

    An enrichment culture technique was used to isolate bacterial strains responsible for the biodegradation of profenofos in a soil from Hubei province of central China. Two pure bacterial cultures, named W and Y, were isolated and subsequently characterized by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and biochemical tests. Isolate W showed 96% similarity to the 16S rRNA gene of a Pseudomonas putida unlike Y which showed 99% similarity to the 16S rRNA gene of Burkholderia gladioli. Both strains grew well at pH 5.5-7.2 with a broad temperature profile ranging from 28° to 36 °C. Bioremediation of profenofos-contaminated soil was examined using soil treated with 200 ug g-1; profenofos resulted in a higher degradation rate than control soils without inoculation. In a mineral salt medium (FTW) reduction in profenofos concentration was 90% within 96 hours of incubation. A literature survey revealed that no data is available regarding the role of Burkholderia gladioli on pesticide biodegradation as well as on profenofos. PMID:24031438

  18. Effectiveness of Active Packaging on Control of Escherichia Coli O157:H7 and Total Aerobic Bacteria on Iceberg Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haixia; Zhu, Junli; Li, Jianrong; Chen, Jinru

    2015-06-01

    Contaminated leafy green vegetables have been linked to several outbreaks of human gastrointestinal infections. Antimicrobial interventions that are adoptable by the fresh produce industry for control of pathogen contamination are in great demand. This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of sustained active packaging on control of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and total aerobic bacteria on lettuce. Commercial Iceberg lettuce was inoculated with a 3-strain mixture of E. coli O157:H7 at 10(2) or 10(4) CFU/g. The contaminated lettuce and un-inoculated controls were placed respectively in 5 different active packaging structures. Traditional, nonactive packaging structure was included as controls. Packaged lettuce was stored at 4, 10, or 22 °C for 3 wk and sampled weekly for the population of E. coli O157:H7 and total aerobic bacteria. Results showed that packaging structures with ClO2 generator, CO2 generator, or one of the O2 scavengers effectively controlled the growth of E. coli O157:H7 and total aerobic bacteria under all storage conditions. Packaging structure with the ClO2 generator was most effective and no E. coli O157:H7 was detected in samples packaged in this structure except for those that were inoculated with 4 log CFU/g of E. coli O157:H7 and stored at 22 °C. Packaging structures with an oxygen scavenger and the allyl isothiocyanate generator were mostly ineffective in control of the growth of the bacteria on Iceberg lettuce. The research suggests that some of the packaging structures evaluated in the study can be used to control the presence of foodborne pathogens on leafy green vegetables.

  19. Determinative factors of competitive advantage between aerobic bacteria for niches at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Haruta, Shin; Kato, Souichiro; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2010-01-01

    We focused on bacterial interspecies relationships at the air-liquid interface where the formation of pellicles by aerobes was observed. Although an obligate aerobe (Brevibacillus sp. M1-5) was initially dominant in the pellicle population, a facultative aerobe (Pseudoxanthomonas sp. M1-3) emerged and the viability of M1-5 rapidly decreased due to severe competition for oxygen. Supplementation of the medium with carbohydrates allowed the two species to coexist at the air-liquid interface. These results indicate that the population dynamics within pellicles are primarily governed by oxygen utilization which was affected by a combination of carbon sources.

  20. Isolation of Vermamoeba vermiformis and associated bacteria in hospital water.

    PubMed

    Pagnier, Isabelle; Valles, Camille; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    To detect new potential pathogens in hospital water, we isolated free-living amoebae in water samples taken from three different hospitals in Marseille (France). The samples were inoculated in media containing saline buffer and various bacteria as nutrient sources. The isolated amoebae were identified by gene sequencing. Among the 105 water samples, taken from 19 sites, we isolated 14 amoebae, of which 9 Vermamoeba vermiformis and 5 Acanthamoeba sp. None of the amoebae showed the presence of obligate bacterial endosymbionts. Because V. vermiformis was most commonly isolated, we used an axenic collection strain to isolate amoeba-resistant bacteria from the same sites. The isolated bacterial species included Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Legionella sp. Legionella taurinensis was isolated for the first time in association with amoebae. A strict intracellular bacterium was isolated, that may represent a new genus among the Chlamydiales. We propose that it be named "Candidatus Rubidus massiliensis". Our study shows that the isolation and identification of new pathogens associated with amoebae, which were previously performed using Acanthamoeba sp., should instead use V. vermiformis because this organism is more commonly associated with humans and is an essential complement of Acanthamoeba sp. co-culture to study the ecology of hospital water supplies.

  1. Variable carbon isotope fractionation expressed by aerobic CH 4-oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, Alexis S.; Chu, Kung-Hui; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa; Conrad, Mark E.

    2006-04-01

    Carbon isotope fractionation factors reported for aerobic bacterial oxidation of CH 4(α) range from 1.003 to 1.039. In a series of experiments designed to monitor changes in the carbon isotopic fractionation of CH 4 by Type I and Type II methanotrophic bacteria, we found that the magnitude of fractionation was largely due to the first oxidation step catalyzed by methane monooxygenase (MMO). The most important factor that modulates the (α) is the fraction of the total CH 4 oxidized per unit time, which strongly correlates to the cell density of the growth cultures under constant flow conditions. At cell densities of less than 0.1 g/L, fractionation factors greater than 1.03 were observed, whereas at cell densities greater than 0.5 g/L the fractionation factors decreased to as low as 1.002. At low cell densities, low concentrations of MMO limit the amount of CH 4 oxidized, while at higher cell densities, the overall rates of CH 4 oxidation increase sufficiently that diffusion of CH 4 from the gaseous to dissolved state and into the cells is likely the rate-determining step. Thus, the residual CH 4 is more fractionated at low cell densities, when only a small fraction of the total CH 4 has been oxidized, than at high cell densities, when up to 40% of the influent CH 4 has been utilized. Therefore, since Rayleigh distillation behavior is not observed, δ 13C values of the residual CH 4 cannot be used to infer the amount oxidized in either laboratory or field-studies. The measured (α) was the same for both Type I and Type II methanotrophs expressing particulate or soluble MMO. However, large differences in the δ 13C values of biomass produced by the two types of methanotrophs were observed. Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b (Type II) produced biomass with δ 13C values about 15‰ higher than the dissimilated CO 2, whereas Methylomonas methanica (Type I) produced biomass with δ 13C values only about 6‰ higher than the CO 2. These effects were independent of the

  2. Isolation and Functional Gene Analyses of Aromatic-Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacteria from a Polychlorinated-Dioxin-Dechlorinating Process

    PubMed Central

    Kaiya, Shinichi; Utsunomiya, Sati; Suzuki, Saori; Yoshida, Naoko; Futamata, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Takeshi; Hiraishi, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Aerobic aromatic-hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria from a semi-anaerobic microbial microcosm that exhibited apparent complete dechlorination of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) were isolated through enrichment and plating culture procedures with dibenzofuran as the model substrate. By 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons, these dibenzofuran-degrading isolates were identified as being members of the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria, among which those of the genera Paenibacillus and Rhizobium were most abundant. All of the isolates utilized naphthalene as the sole carbon and energy source and degraded dibenzofuran metabolically or co-metabolically; however, they hardly attacked monochlorinated dibenzofuran and dibenzo-p-dioxin. By PCR cloning and sequencing, genes predicted to encode aromatic-ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase (AhDO) were detected in all test isolates. Real-time quantitative PCR assays with specific primer sets detected approximately 105 copies of the AhDO large subunit genes g−1 wet wt in the microcosm from which the isolates were obtained. This order of the copy number corresponded to approximately 1% of the 16S rRNA gene copies from “Dehalococcoides” and its relatives present as potent dechlorinators. These results suggest that aerobic AhDO-containing bacteria co-exist and play a role in the oxidative degradation of less chlorinated and completely dechlorinated products in the PCDD/F-dechlorinating process, thereby achieving the apparent complete dechlorination of PCDD/Fs. PMID:22791044

  3. Aerobic carboxydotrophy under extremely haloalkaline conditions in Alkalispirillum/Alkalilimnicola strains isolated from soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Tourova, Tatjana P; Kovaleva, Olga L; Kuenen, J Gijs; Muyzer, Gerard

    2010-03-01

    Aerobic enrichments from soda lake sediments with CO as the only substrate resulted in the isolation of five bacterial strains capable of autotrophic growth with CO at extremely high pH and salinity. The strains belonged to the Alkalispirillum/Alkalilimnicola cluster in the Gammaproteobacteria, where the ability to oxidize CO, but not growth with CO, has been demonstrated previously. The growth with CO was possible only at an oxygen concentration below 5 % and CO concentration below 20 % in the gas phase. The isolates were also capable of growth with formate but not with H(2). The carboxydotrophic growth occurred within a narrow pH range from 8 to 10.5 (optimum at 9.5) and a broad salt concentration from 0.3 to 3.5 M total Na(+) (optimum at 1.0 M). Cells grown on CO had high respiration activity with CO and formate, while the cells grown on formate actively oxidized formate alone. In CO-grown cells, CO-dehydrogenase (CODH) activity was detectable both in soluble and membrane fractions, while the NAD-independent formate dehydrogenase (FDH) resided solely in membranes. The results of total protein profiling and the failure to detect CODH with conventional primers for the coxL gene indicated that the CO-oxidizing enzyme in haloalkaliphilic isolates might differ from the classical aerobic CODH complex. A single cbbL gene encoding the RuBisCO large subunit was detected in all strains, suggesting the presence of the Calvin cycle of inorganic carbon fixation. Overall, these results demonstrated the possibility of aerobic carboxydotrophy under extremely haloalkaline conditions.

  4. Aerobic Reduction of Arsenate by a Bacterium Isolated From Activated Sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozai, N.; Ohnuki, T.; Hanada, S.; Nakamura, K.; Francis, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    Microlunatus phosphovorus strain NM-1 is a polyphosphate-accumulating bacterium isolated from activated sludge. This bacterium takes up a large amount of polyphosphate under aerobic conditions and release phosphate ions by hydrolysis of polyphosphate to orthophosphate under anaerobic conditions to derive energy for taking up substrates. To understand the nature of this strain, especially, influence of potential contaminants in sewage and wastewater on growth, we have been investigating behavior of this bacterium in media containing arsenic. The present paper mainly reports reduction of arsenate by this bacterium under aerobic conditions. The strain NM-1 (JCM 9379) was aerobically cultured at 30 °C in a nutrient medium containing 2.5 g/l peptone, 0.5 g/l glucose, 1.5 g/l yeast extract, and arsenic [Na2HAsO4 (As(V)) or Na3AsO3 (As(III))] at concentrations between 0 and 50 mM. The cells collected from arsenic-free media were dispersed in buffer solutions containing 2mM HEPES, 10mM NaCl, prescribed concentrations of As(V), and 0-0.2 percent glucose. Then, this cell suspension was kept at 20 °C under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. The speciation of arsenic was carried out by ion chromatography and ICP-MS. The growth of the strain under aerobic conditions was enhanced by the addition of As(V) at the concentration between 1 and 10 mM. The maximum optical density of the culture in the medium containing 5mM As(V) was 1.4 times greater than that of the control culture. Below the As(V) concentration of 10mM, most of the As(V) was reduced to As(III). The growth of the strain under anaerobic conditions has not been observed so far. The cells in the buffer solutions reduced As(V) under aerobic condition. The reduction was enhanced by the addition of glucose. However, the cell did not reduce As(V) under anaerobic conditions. The strain NM-1 showed high resistance to As(V) and As(III). The maximum optical density of the culture grown in a medium containing 50 mM As(V) was only

  5. Deep subsurface life from North Pond: Enrichment, isolation, characterization and genomes of heterotrophic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Joseph A.; Leon-Zayas, Rosa; Wrighton, Kelly; Biddle, Jennifer F.

    2016-05-10

    Studies of subsurface microorganisms have yielded few environmentally relevant isolates for laboratory studies. In order to address this lack of cultivated microorganisms, we initiated several enrichments on sediment and underlying basalt samples from North Pond, a sediment basin ringed by basalt outcrops underlying an oligotrophic watercolumn west of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 22° N. In contrast to anoxic enrichments, growth was observed in aerobic, heterotrophic enrichments from sediment of IODP Hole U1382B at 4 and 68 m below seafloor (mbsf). These sediment depths, respectively, correspond to the fringes of oxygen penetration from overlying seawater in the top of the sediment column and upward migration of oxygen from oxic seawater from the basalt aquifer below the sediment. Here we report the enrichment, isolation, initial characterization and genomes of three isolated aerobic heterotrophs from North Pond sediments; an Arthrobacter species from 4 mbsf, and Paracoccus and Pseudomonas species from 68 mbsf. These cultivated bacteria are represented in the amplicon 16S rRNA gene libraries created from whole sediments, albeit at low (up to 2%) relative abundance. We provide genomic evidence from our isolates demonstrating that the Arthrobacter and Pseudomonas isolates have the potential to respire nitrate and oxygen, though dissimilatory nitrate reduction could not be confirmed in laboratory cultures. Furthermore, the cultures from this study represent members of abundant phyla, as determined by amplicon sequencing of environmental DNA extracts, and allow for further studies into geochemical factors impacting life in the deep subsurface.

  6. Survival, injury and inactivation of Escherichia coli 0157:H7, salmonella and aerobic mesophilic bacteria in apple juice and cider amended with nisin-edta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For health reasons, people are consuming fresh juices or minimally processed fruit and vegetable juices, thereby, exposing themselves to the risk of foodborne illness if such juices are contaminated with bacteria pathogens. Behavior of aerobic mesophilic bacteria, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmon...

  7. Isolation of antifungal bacteria from Japanese fermented soybeans, natto.

    PubMed

    Murata, Daichi; Sawano, Sayaka; Ohike, Tatsuya; Okanami, Masahiro; Ano, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    An inhibitory effect of a traditional Japanese fermented food, natto, was found against plant pathogens such as Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium oxysporum, and the bacteria which showed inhibition were isolated from the natto. Among isolated bacteria, BC-1 and GAc exhibited a strong antagonistic effect in vitro against plant pathogens on an agar medium. The supernatant of bacterial culture also showed strong activity against R. solani, which meant the antimicrobial substances were produced and secreted into the medium. Both of the bacteria were estimated as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens from a partial sequence of the 16s rRNA gene. High performance liquid chromatography analysis clearly showed the production of the lipopeptide antibiotic iturin A by BC-1 and GAc.

  8. Isolation of lactic acid-forming bacteria from biogas plants.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Jelena; Yüksel-Dadak, Aytül; Dröge, Stefan; König, Helmut

    2017-02-20

    Direct molecular approaches provide hints that lactic acid bacteria play an important role in the degradation process of organic material to methanogenetic substrates in biogas plants. However, their diversity in biogas fermenter samples has not been analyzed in detail yet. For that reason, five different biogas fermenters, which were fed mainly with maize silage and manure from cattle or pigs, were examined for the occurrence of lactic acid-forming bacteria. A total of 197 lactic acid-forming bacterial strains were isolated, which we assigned to 21 species, belonging to the genera Bacillus, Clostridium, Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Streptococcus and Pseudoramibacter-related. A qualitative multiplex system and a real-time quantitative PCR could be developed for most isolates, realized by the selection of specific primers. Their role in biogas plants was discussed on the basis of the quantitative results and on physiological data of the isolates.

  9. Application of Potential Phosphate-Solubilizing Bacteria and Organic Acids on Phosphate Solubilization from Phosphate Rock in Aerobic Rice

    PubMed Central

    Jusop, Shamshuddin; Naher, Umme Aminun; Othman, Radziah; Razi, Mohd Ismail

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted at Universiti Putra Malaysia to determine the effect of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) and organic acids (oxalic & malic) on phosphate (P) solubilization from phosphate rock (PR) and growth of aerobic rice. Four rates of each organic acid (0, 10, 20, and 30 mM), and PSB strain (Bacillus sp.) were applied to aerobic rice. Total bacterial populations, amount of P solubilization, P uptake, soil pH, and root morphology were determined. The results of the study showed significantly high P solubilization in PSB with organic acid treatments. Among the two organic acids, oxalic acid was found more effective compared to malic acid. Application of oxalic acid at 20 mM along with PSB16 significantly increased soluble soil P (28.39 mg kg−1), plant P uptake (0.78 P pot−1), and plant biomass (33.26 mg). Addition of organic acids with PSB and PR had no influence on soil pH during the planting period. A higher bacterial population was found in rhizosphere (8.78 log10 cfu g−1) compared to the nonrhizosphere and endosphere regions. The application of organic acids along with PSB enhanced soluble P in the soil solution, improved root growth, and increased plant biomass of aerobic rice seedlings without affecting soil pH. PMID:24288473

  10. Polysaccharide-producing bacteria isolated from paper machine slime deposits.

    PubMed

    Rättö, M; Suihko, M-L; Siika-aho, M

    2005-03-01

    Development of novel enzymatic methods for slime deposit control in paper mills requires knowledge of polysaccharide-producing organisms and the polysaccharide structures present in deposits. In this work, 27 polysaccharide-producing bacteria were isolated from slime samples collected from different parts of a paper machine. Most of the isolates produced polysaccharides in liquid culture and nine of them were selected for production of polysaccharides for characterisation. The selected isolates belonged to seven different genera: Bacillus, Brevundimonas, Cytophaga, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, Paenibacillus and Starkeya. Using ribotyping, partial 16S rDNA sequencing, physiological tests and fatty acid analysis, four of the nine isolates: Bacillus cereus, Brevundimonas vesicularis, K. pneumoniae and P. stellifer were identified to the species level. Production of polysaccharides by the selected isolates varied between 0.07 and 1.20 g L(-1), the highest amount being produced by B. vesicularis. The polysaccharides were heteropolysaccharides with varying proportions of galactose, glucose mannose, rhamnose fucose and uronic acids.

  11. Validation of the Peel Plate™ AC for Detection of Total Aerobic Bacteria in Dairy and Nondairy Products.

    PubMed

    Salter, Robert S; Durbin, Gregory W; Bird, Patrick; Fisher, Kiel; Crowley, Erin; Hammack, Thomas; Chen, Yi; Clark, Dorn; Ziemer, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Peel Plate™ AC (aerobic count) is a low-profile plastic 47 mm culture dish with adhesive top that contains a dried standard plate count medium with oxidation/reduction indicator triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) that turns red with dehydrogenase enzyme activity of growing aerobic bacteria. The method provides a conventional quantitative count with simple rehydration and incubation for 48 ± 3 h at 35 ± 1°C for most food matrixes and 32 ± 1°C for 48 ± 3 h for dairy products. Dairy matrixes claimed and supported with total aerobic count data are whole milk, skim milk, chocolate milk (2% fat), light cream (20% fat), pasteurized whole goat milk, ultra-high temperature pasteurized milk, nonfat dried milk, lactose-reduced milk, strawberry milk, raw cow milk, raw goat milk, raw sheep milk, condensed skim milk, and vanilla ice cream. Food matrixes claimed for aerobic count detection are raw ground beef, environmental sponge of stainless steel, raw ground turkey, dry dog food, liquid whole pasteurized eggs, milk chocolate, poultry carcass rinse, and large animal carcass sponge. The method has been independently evaluated for aerobic count in dairy products: whole milk, skim milk, chocolate milk, and light cream. The method was also independently evaluated for aerobic count in food matrixes: ground beef and sponge rinse from stainless steel surfaces. In the matrix study, each matrix was assessed separately at each contamination level in comparison to an appropriate reference method. Colony counts were determined for each level and then log10-transformed. The transformed data were evaluated for repeatability, mean comparison between methods with 95% confidence interval (CI), and r(2). A CI range of (-0.5, 0.5) on the mean difference was used as the acceptance criterion to establish significant statistical differences between methods. The evaluations demonstrate that the Peel Plate AC provides no statistical differences across most of the matrixes with r(2) > 0

  12. Optimization of Cellulase Production from Bacteria Isolated from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Sonia; Datta, Aparna; Gupta, B. Lal; Gupta, Saksham

    2013-01-01

    Cellulase-producing bacteria were isolated from soil and identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens, Bacillus subtilIs, E. coli, and Serratia marcescens. Optimization of the fermentation medium for maximum cellulase production was carried out. The culture conditions like pH, temperature, carbon sources, and nitrogen sources were optimized. The optimum conditions found for cellulase production were 40°C at pH 10 with glucose as carbon source and ammonium sulphate as nitrogen source, and coconut cake stimulates the production of cellulase. Among bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens is the best cellulase producer among the four followed by Bacillus subtilis, E. coli, and Serratia marscens. PMID:25937986

  13. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinically isolated anaerobic bacteria in a University Hospital Centre Split, Croatia in 2013.

    PubMed

    Novak, Anita; Rubic, Zana; Dogas, Varja; Goic-Barisic, Ivana; Radic, Marina; Tonkic, Marija

    2015-02-01

    .7%) received empiric antimicrobial therapy. One hundred and one patients (82.8%) had polymicrobial aerobic/anaerobic isolates cultivated from the same specimens. Almost all aerobic bacteria were of endogenous origin and showed fully susceptible antimicrobial profile; only 8.7% (9/104) were multiresistant and considered as hospital acquired. Based on our findings, β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations and metronidazole remain useful antimicrobials for empiric treatment of anaerobic infections, while carbapenems should be reserved for situations were multidrug resistant, aerobic or facultative Gram-negative bacteria are expected. However, a certain percentage of resistant isolates were observed for each of these agents. Therefore, periodic resistance surveillance in anaerobes is highly recommended in order to guide empirical therapy.

  14. Antibiotic resistance of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Chinese yogurts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, N; Zhang, J X; Fan, M T; Wang, J; Guo, G; Wei, X Y

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility of 43 strains of lactic acid bacteria, isolated from Chinese yogurts made in different geographical areas, to 11 antibiotics (ampicillin, penicillin G, roxithromycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, chlortetracycline, lincomycin, kanamycin, streptomycin, neomycin, and gentamycin). The 43 isolates (18 Lactobacillus bulgaricus and 25 Streptococcus thermophilus) were identified at species level and were typed by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis. Thirty-five genotypically different strains were detected and their antimicrobial resistance to 11 antibiotics was determined using the agar dilution method. Widespread resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, chlortetracycline, tetracyclines, lincomycin, streptomycin, neomycin, and gentamycin was found among the 35 strains tested. All of the Strep. thermophilus strains tested were susceptible to penicillin G and roxithromycin, whereas 23.5 and 64.7% of Lb. bulgaricus strains, respectively, were resistant. All of the Strep. thermophilus and Lb. bulgaricus strains were found to be resistant to kanamycin. The presence of the corresponding resistance genes in the resistant isolates was investigated through PCR, with the following genes detected: tet(M) in 1 Lb. bulgaricus and 2 Strep. thermophilus isolates, ant(6) in 2 Lb. bulgaricus and 2 Strep. thermophilus isolates, and aph(3')-IIIa in 5 Lb. bulgaricus and 2 Strep. thermophilus isolates. The main threat associated with these bacteria is that they may transfer resistance genes to pathogenic bacteria, which has been a major cause of concern to human and animal health. To our knowledge, the aph(3')-IIIa and ant(6) genes were found in Lb. bulgaricus and Strep. thermophilus for the first time. Further investigations are required to analyze whether the genes identified in Lb. bulgaricus and Strep. thermophilus isolates might be horizontally transferred to other species.

  15. Inhibition of Salmonella Typhimurium by Cultures of Cecal Bacteria during Aerobic Incubation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two trials were conducted to examine the ability of cecal bacterial cultures from broilers to inhibit growth of Salmonella Typhimurium during aerobic incubation. Cecal broth media was inoculated with 10 µl of cecal contents from 6 week old broilers taken from 2 separate flocks. Cultures were incubat...

  16. Summary report on the aerobic degradation of diesel fuel and the degradation of toluene under aerobic, denitrifying and sulfate reducing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Coyne, P.; Smith, G.

    1995-08-15

    This report contains a number of studies that were performed to better understand the technology of the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. Topics of investigation include the following: diesel fuel degradation by Rhodococcus erythropolis; BTEX degradation by soil isolates; aerobic degradation of diesel fuel-respirometry; aerobic degradation of diesel fuel-shake culture; aerobic toluene degradation by A3; effect of HEPES, B1, and myo-inositol addition on the growth of A3; aerobic and anaerobic toluene degradation by contaminated soils; denitrifying bacteria MPNs; sulfate-reducing bacteria MPNs; and aerobic, DNB and SRB enrichments.

  17. Bacteria isolated from the different developmental stages and larval organs of the obligate parasitic fly, Wohlfahrtia magnifica (Diptera: Sarcophagidae).

    PubMed

    Tóth, E M; Hell, E; Kovács, G; Borsodi, A K; Márialigeti, K

    2006-01-01

    Wohlfahrtia magnifica (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) is the major myiasis-causing fly species in the whole of Eurasia for most important domestic animals. The aim of the present work was to obtain data on the culturable bacteria isolated under aerobic conditions from this fly: bacteria were isolated from all developmental stages (larvae, pupa, and imago) of Wohlfahrtia magnifica, and the third-stage larval organs were also sampled. To determine the possible antagonistic effects between the dominant bacterial groups, an antibiosis assay was carried out. Plating and isolation of bacteria was performed by classical microbiological methods. Characterization of the isolated strains was carried out via a polyphasic approach; classical phenotypic tests, chemotaxonomical examinations, and 16S rDNA sequence analyses were also applied. In the case of maggot macerate samples, members of the family Enterobacteriaceae were characteristic. Members of a new genus (Schineria) belonging to the gamma subdivision of proteobacteria were also isolated. According to our data, the shifts in the Schineria and Proteus populations within the larvae are strongly influenced by their interactions with each other and among the members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. The pupa and imago samples contained several other Gram-negative bacteria (Stenotrophomonas, Brevundimonas, etc.). Among Gram-positive bacteria, in all maggot macerate samples, members of the genus Bacillus and the Arthrobacter-Micrococcus group of actinobacteria were dominant (neither of them was a producer or sensitive to the compounds of other microorganisms), and bacteria related to the genus Corynebacterium were also found. From the larvae Aureobacterium liquefaciens and Enterococcus faecalis were isolated, and from the pupae Dietzia maris and Enterococcus faecalis. In the samples of third-stage larval organs, the dominant groups were the same as in the third-stage larval macerate sample; however, several additional genera

  18. Characteristics of CDC group 1 and group 1-like coryneform bacteria isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Funke, G; Lucchini, G M; Pfyffer, G E; Marchiani, M; von Graevenitz, A

    1993-01-01

    Fifteen strains of CDC group 1 coryneform and biochemically similar bacteria were isolated from clinical specimens. Of the 15 strains isolated, 11 were derived from abscesses and purulent lesions, mostly from the upper part of the body, and 3 were grown from blood cultures. Nine strains were associated with mixed anaerobic but no other aerobic flora. Seven strains exhibited the classical biochemical profile of CDC coryneform group 1; however, eight strains were unable to reduce nitrate and were called "group 1-like." Other reactions to differentiate CDC group 1 and group 1-like coryneform rods include alpha-hemolysis on human blood agar, fermentation of adonitol, and the presence of alkaline phosphatase. Fifteen strains showed marked CAMP reactions on different erythrocyte agars. Gas-liquid chromatography of volatile and nonvolatile fatty acids as well as cellular fatty acid patterns and the composition of cell wall components suggest that CDC group 1 and group 1-like coryneform bacteria do not belong to the genus Corynebacterium but possibly to the genus Actinomyces or Arcanobacterium. DNA-DNA hybridization studies revealed that group 1 and group 1-like strains represent different species. Images PMID:8263175

  19. Isolation and characterization of alkaliphilic, chemolithoautotrophic, sulphur-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, D Y; Robertson, L A; Kuenen, J G

    2000-04-01

    Alkaliphilic sulphur-oxidizing bacteria were isolated from samples from alkaline environments including soda soil and soda lakes. Two isolates, currently known as strains AL 2 and AL 3, were characterized. They grew over a pH range 8.0-10.4 with an optimum at 9.5-9.8. Both strains could oxidize thiosulphate, sulphide, polysulphide, elemental sulphur and tetrathionate. Strain AL 3 more actively oxidized thiosulphate and sulphide, while isolate AL 2 had higher activity with elemental sulphur and tetrathionate. Isolate AL 2 was also able to oxidize trithionate. The pH optimum for thiosulphate and sulphide oxidation was between 9-10. Some activity remained at pH 11, but was negligible at pH 7. Metabolism of tetrathionate by isolate AL 2 involved initial anaerobic hydrolysis to form sulphur, thiosulphate and sulphate in a sequence similar to that in other colourless sulphur-oxidizing bacteria. Sulphate was produced by both strains. During batch growth on thiosulphate, elemental sulphur and sulphite transiently accumulated in cultures of isolates AL 2 and AL 3, respectively. At lower pH values, both strains accumulated sulphur during sulphide and thiosulphate oxidation. Both strains contained ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. Thiosulphate oxidation in isolate AL 3 appeared to be sodium ion-dependent. Isolate AL 2 differed from AL 3 by its high GC mol % value (65.5 and 49.5, respectively), sulphur deposition in its periplasm, the absence of carboxysomes, lower sulphur-oxidizing capacity, growth kinetics (lower growth rate and higher growth yield) and cytochrome composition.

  20. Identification of vancomycin-resistant lactic bacteria isolated from humans.

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, T; Lejeune, V; Janssens, M; Wauters, G

    1993-01-01

    By using cell morphology, arginine dihydrolase, and gas production in de Man, Sharp, Rogosa broth, 122 isolates of vancomycin-resistant lactic bacteria from humans were assigned to five profiles, allowing us to distinguish Pediococcus, homofermentative and heterofermentative Lactobacillus, and Leuconostoc species. The absence of L-(+)-lactic acid, as detected spectrophotometrically, was confirmatory for Leuconostoc species. API 50 CHL panels were useful for the identification of Lactobacillus species. PMID:8408575

  1. Remediation of polychlorinated biphenyl impacted sediment by concurrent bioaugmentation with anaerobic halorespiring and aerobic degrading bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Rayford B.; Fagervold, Sonja K.; May, Harold D.; Sowers, Kevin R.

    2013-01-01

    Bioremediation of sediments contaminated with commercial PCBs is potentially achievable by the sequential activity of anaerobic halorespiration to convert higher chlorinated congeners to less chlorinated congeners that are susceptible to aerobic respiratory degradation. The efficacy of bioaugmentation with anaerobic halorespiring “Dehalobium chlorocoercia” DF1 and aerobic Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 added concurrently with GAC as a delivery system was determined in 2-liter laboratory mesocosms containing weathered Aroclor-contaminated sediment from Baltimore Harbor, MD. The greatest effect was seen in the mesocosm bioaugmented with both DF1 and LB400 together, which resulted in an 80% decrease by mass of PCBs, from 8 mg/kg to less than 2 mg/kg after 120 days. There was no significant increase in lesser-chlorinated congeners, indicating that both anaerobic dechlorination by DF1 and aerobic degradation by LB400 occurred. In contrast, non-bioaugmented controls containing filtered culture supernatant showed only 25% decrease in total levels of PCBs after 365 days, which was likely due to biostimulation of the indigenous population by the medium. Direct colony counts and molecular analysis targeting a putative reductive dehalogenase gene of D. chlorocoercia, or the bphA gene of LB400 showed the presence of viable DF1 and LB400 in bioaugmented mesocosms after 365 days, indicating that both non-indigenous strains were sustainable within the indigenous microbial community. These results suggest that an in situ treatment employing the simultaneous application of anaerobic and aerobic microorganisms could be an effective, environmentally sustainable strategy to reduce PCBs levels in contaminated sediment. PMID:23463900

  2. In silico analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing based methods for identification of medically important aerobic Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Teng, Jade L L; Yeung, Ming-Yiu; Yue, Geoffrey; Au-Yeung, Rex K H; Yeung, Eugene Y H; Fung, Ami M Y; Tse, Herman; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2011-09-01

    This study provides guidelines on the usefulness of full and 527 bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing and Microseq databases for identifying medically important aerobic Gram-negative bacteria. Overall, full and 527 bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing can identify 26.1 % and 32.6 %, respectively, of medically important aerobic Gram-negative bacteria confidently to the species level, whereas the full-MicroSeq and 500-MicroSeq databases can identify 15.2 % and 26.1 %, respectively, of medically important aerobic Gram-negative bacteria confidently to the species level. Among the major groups of aerobic Gram-negative bacteria, the methods and databases are least useful for identification of Aeromonas, Bordetella and Bartonella species. None of the Aeromonas species can be confidently or doubtfully identified, whereas only 0 % and 0-33.3 % of Bordetella species and 0-10 % and 0-10 % of Bartonella species can be confidently and doubtfully identified, respectively. On the other hand, these methods and databases are most useful for identification of members of the families Pasteurellaceae and Legionellaceae and Campylobacter species: 29.6-59.3 % and 7.4-18.5 % of members of Pasteurellaceae, 36-52 % and 12-24 % of members of Legionellaceae, and 26.7-60 % and 0-13.3 % of Campylobacter species can be confidently and doubtfully identified, respectively. Thirty-nine medically important aerobic Gram-negative bacteria that should be confidently identified by full 16S rRNA gene sequencing are not included in the full-MicroSeq database. Twenty-three medically important aerobic Gram-negative bacteria that should be confidently identified by 527 bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing are not included in the 500-MicroSeq database. Compared with results of our previous studies on anaerobic and Gram-positive bacteria, full and 527 bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing are able to confidently identify significantly more anaerobic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria than aerobic Gram

  3. Novel co-enrichment method for isolation of magnetotactic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sorty, Ajay M; Shaikh, Nasir R

    2015-04-01

    A novel co-enrichment technique was designed for enrichment of magnetotactic bacteria from soil, water, and sediments. Delayed addition of iron uptake inducer and the iron source proved amenable to induce magnetosome synthesis by MTB followed by their separation from consortium using magnetic flux. We successfully enriched and isolated both North seeking as well as South seeking magnetotactic bacteria from Lonar Lake (Buldhana), Moti Lake (Jalna), Ghanewadi Lake (Jalna), Ganesh Lake (Miraj), Rankala Lake (Kolhapur), and industrial metal-contaminated glaying soils (Jalna) and a soil (Karad), (MS, India) exposed to high-voltage electric current. The hanging drop preparations and growth under magnetic stress on low-agar media allowed conformation of magnetotactic behavior of the isolates. Both Gram positive and Gram negative MTB were isolated with diverse morphologies. South seeking population was more predominant. The soil inhabitants showed little dwelling property which was more prominent in case of aquatic inhabitants. The use of in situ pH and salt concentrations during enrichment and isolation found suited. The simultaneous growth of whole consortium in the system ensured the in situ simulation of microenvironment needful for proper growth of fastidious MTB.

  4. Aerobic microbial enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Torsvik, T.; Gilje, E.; Sunde, E.

    1995-12-31

    In aerobic MEOR, the ability of oil-degrading bacteria to mobilize oil is used to increase oil recovery. In this process, oxygen and mineral nutrients are injected into the oil reservoir in order to stimulate growth of aerobic oil-degrading bacteria in the reservoir. Experiments carried out in a model sandstone with stock tank oil and bacteria isolated from offshore wells showed that residual oil saturation was lowered from 27% to 3%. The process was time dependent, not pore volume dependent. During MEOR flooding, the relative permeability of water was lowered. Oxygen and active bacteria were needed for the process to take place. Maximum efficiency was reached at low oxygen concentrations, approximately 1 mg O{sub 2}/liter.

  5. Comparison of growth rates of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria and other bacterioplankton groups in coastal Mediterranean waters.

    PubMed

    Ferrera, Isabel; Gasol, Josep M; Sebastián, Marta; Hojerová, Eva; Koblízek, Michal

    2011-11-01

    Growth is one of the basic attributes of any living organism. Surprisingly, the growth rates of marine bacterioplankton are only poorly known. Current data suggest that marine bacteria grow relatively slowly, having generation times of several days. However, some bacterial groups, such as the aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria, have been shown to grow much faster. Two manipulation experiments, in which grazing, viruses, and resource competition were reduced, were conducted in the coastal Mediterranean Sea (Blanes Bay Microbial Observatory). The growth rates of AAP bacteria and of several important phylogenetic groups (the Bacteroidetes, the alphaproteobacterial groups Roseobacter and SAR11, and the Gammaproteobacteria group and its subgroups the Alteromonadaceae and the NOR5/OM60 clade) were calculated from changes in cell numbers in the manipulation treatments. In addition, we examined the role that top-down (mortality due to grazers and viruses) and bottom-up (resource availability) factors play in determining the growth rates of these groups. Manipulations resulted in an increase of the growth rates of all groups studied, but its extent differed largely among the individual treatments and among the different groups. Interestingly, higher growth rates were found for the AAP bacteria (up to 3.71 day⁻¹) and for the Alteromonadaceae (up to 5.44 day⁻¹), in spite of the fact that these bacterial groups represented only a very low percentage of the total prokaryotic community. In contrast, the SAR11 clade, which was the most abundant group, was the slower grower in all treatments. Our results show that, in general, the least abundant groups exhibited the highest rates, whereas the most abundant groups were those growing more slowly, indicating that some minor groups, such the AAP bacteria, very likely contribute much more to the recycling of organic matter in the ocean than what their abundances alone would predict.

  6. Diverse bacteria isolated from microtherm oil-production water.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ji-Quan; Xu, Lian; Zhang, Zhao; Li, Yan; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2014-02-01

    In total, 435 pure bacterial strains were isolated from microtherm oil-production water from the Karamay Oilfield, Xinjiang, China, by using four media: oil-production water medium (Cai medium), oil-production water supplemented with mineral salt medium (CW medium), oil-production water supplemented with yeast extract medium (CY medium), and blood agar medium (X medium). The bacterial isolates were affiliated with 61 phylogenetic groups that belong to 32 genera in the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria. Except for the Rhizobium, Dietzia, and Pseudomonas strains that were isolated using all the four media, using different media led to the isolation of bacteria with different functions. Similarly, nonheme diiron alkane monooxygenase genes (alkB/alkM) also clustered according to the isolation medium. Among the bacterial strains, more than 24 % of the isolates could use n-hexadecane as the sole carbon source for growth. For the first time, the alkane-degrading ability and alkB/alkM were detected in Rhizobium, Rhodobacter, Trichococcus, Micrococcus, Enterococcus, and Bavariicoccus strains, and the alkM gene was detected in Firmicutes strains.

  7. Radioassay for Hydrogenase Activity in Viable Cells and Documentation of Aerobic Hydrogen-Consuming Bacteria Living in Extreme Environments

    PubMed Central

    Schink, Bernhard; Lupton, F. S.; Zeikus, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    An isotopic tracer assay based on the hydrogenase-dependent formation of tritiated water from tritium gas was developed for in life analysis of microbial hydrogen transformation. This method allowed detection of bacterial hydrogen metabolism in pure cultures or in natural samples obtained from aquatic ecosystems. A differentiation between chemical-biological and aerobic-anaerobic hydrogen metabolism was established by variation of the experimental incubation temperature or by addition of selective inhibitors. Hydrogenase activity was shown to be proportional to the consumption or production of hydrogen by cultures of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, Clostridium pasteurianum, and Methanosarcina barkeri. This method was applied, in connection with measurements of free hydrogen and most-probable-number enumerations, in aerobic natural source waters to establish the activity and document the ecology of hydrogen-consuming bacteria in extreme acid, thermal, or saline environments. The utility of the assay is based in part on the ability to quantify bacterial hydrogen transformation at natural hydrogen partial pressures, without the use of artificial electron acceptors. PMID:16346288

  8. Macrolides resistance of common bacteria isolated from Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, S C; Chen, Y C; Luh, K T; Hsieh, W C

    1995-12-01

    To determine the susceptibility to macrolides of common pathogenic bacteria isolated from Taiwan, the in vitro activities of erythromycin, roxithromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, and dirithromycin were tested against 492 clinical isolates of eight different bacteria, collected from the National Taiwan University Hospital. The results showed high minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) against most of the tested bacteria. The MIC90s for Staphylococcus aureus (both methicillin-resistant and -sensitive strains), coagulase-negative staphylococci (both methicillin-resistant and -sensitive strains), Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, enterococci, peptostreptococci, and Bacteroides fragilis were all > or = 256 micrograms/ml. The MIC50s for methicillin-resistant strains of S. aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci, and enterococci were > or = 256 micrograms/ml. For S. pneumoniae, peptostreptococci, and B. fragilis, the MIC50s were > 8 micrograms/ml. The resistance rates to macrolides were 80% or more in methicillin-resistant staphylococci and about 30% in methicillin-sensitive staphylococci. Around 55% of S. pneumoniae strains and 37 approximately 42% of S. pyogenes strains were resistant to macrolides. Cross-resistance to different macrolides was clearly demonstrated in most of the resistant strains.

  9. Novel cellulose-binding domains, NodB homologues and conserved modular architecture in xylanases from the aerobic soil bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa and Cellvibrio mixtus.

    PubMed Central

    Millward-Sadler, S J; Davidson, K; Hazlewood, G P; Black, G W; Gilbert, H J; Clarke, J H

    1995-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that selective pressure has led to the retention of cellulose-binding domains (CBDs) by hemicellulase enzymes from aerobic bacteria, four new xylanase (xyn) genes from two cellulolytic soil bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa and Cellvibrio mixtus, have been isolated and sequenced. Pseudomonas genes xynE and xynF encoded modular xylanases (XYLE and XYLF) with predicted M(r) values of 68,600 and 65000 respectively. XYLE contained a glycosyl hydrolase family 11 catalytic domain at its N-terminus, followed by three other domains; the second of these exhibited sequence identity with NodB from rhizobia. The C-terminal domain (40 residues) exhibited significant sequence identity with a non-catalytic domain of previously unknown function, conserved in all the cellulases and one of the hemicellulases previously characterized from the pseudomonad, and was shown to function as a CBD when fused to the reporter protein glutathione-S-transferase. XYLF contained a C-terminal glycosyl hydrolase family 10 catalytic domain and a novel CBD at its N-terminus. C. mixtus genes xynA and xynB exhibited substantial sequence identity with xynE and xynF respectively, and encoded modular xylanases with the same molecular architecture and, by inference, the same functional properties. In the absence of extensive cross-hybridization between other multiple cel (cellulase) and xyn genes from P. fluorescens subsp. cellulosa and genomic DNA from C. mixtus, similarity between the two pairs of xylanases may indicate a recent transfer of genes between the two bacteria. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:7492333

  10. Ulcerative enteritis in Homarus americanus: case report and molecular characterization of intestinal aerobic bacteria of apparently healthy lobsters in live storage.

    PubMed

    Battison, Andrea L; Després, Béatrice M; Greenwood, Spencer J

    2008-10-01

    An intermoult male American lobster, Homarus americanus, with severe intestinal lesions was encountered while collecting samples of aerobic intestinal bacteria from lobsters held in an artificial sea-water recirculation aquarium system. Grossly, the intestine was firm, thickened, and white. Histologic examination revealed a severe, diffuse, ulcerative enteritis which spared the chitin-lined colon, somewhat similar to hemocytic enteritis of shrimp. The bacterial isolates from this lobster were compared to 11 other lobsters lacking gross intestinal lesions. Two organisms, one identified as Vibrio sp. and another most similar to an uncultured proteobacterium (98.9%), clustering with Rhanella and Serratia species using 16S rDNA PCR, were isolated from the intestines of the 11, grossly normal, lobsters and the affected lobster. An additional two intestinal isolates were cultured only from the lobster with ulcerative enteritis. One, a Flavobacterium, similar to Lutibacter litoralis (99.3%), possibly represented a previously described commensal of the distal intestine. The second, a Vibrio sp., was unique to the affected animal. While the etiology of the ulcerative enteritis remains undetermined, this report represents the first description of gross and histologic findings in H. americanus of a condition which has morphologic similarities to hemocytic enteritis of shrimp. An additional observation was a decrease in the number of intestinal isolates recovered from the 11 apparently healthy lobsters compared to that previously reported for recently harvested lobster. More comprehensive studies of the relationship between the health of lobsters, gut microbial flora and the husbandry and environment maintained within holding units are warranted.

  11. Space agriculture for habitation on Mars with hyper-thermophilic aerobic composting bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, S.; Ishikawa, Y.; Tomita-Yokotani, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Kitaya, Y.; Yamashita, M.; Nagatomo, M.; Oshima, T.; Wada, H.; Space Agriculture Task Force, J.

    Manned Mars exploration requires recycle of materials to support human life A conceptual design is developed for space agriculture which is driven by the biologically regenerative function Hyper-thermophilic aerobic composting bacterial ecology is the core of materials recycling system to process human metabolic waste and inedible biomass and convert them to fertilizer for plants cultivation A photosynthetic reaction of plants will be driven by solar energy Water will be recycled by cultivation of plants and passing it through plant bodies Sub-surface water and atmospheric carbon dioxide are the natural resource available on Mars and these resources will be converted to oxygen and foods We envision that the agricultural system will be scaled up by importing materials from Martian environment Excess oxygen will be obtained from growing trees for structural and other components Minor elements including N P K and other traces will be introduced as fertilizers or nutrients into the agricultural materials circulation Nitrogen will be collected from Martian atmosphere We will assess biological fixation of nitrogen using micro-organisms responsible in Earth biosphere Hyper-thermophilic aerobic bacterial ecology is effective to convert waste materials into useful forms to plants This microbial technology has been well established on ground for processing sewage and waste materials For instance the hyper-thermophilic bacterial system is applied to a composting machine in a size of a trash box in home kitchen Since such a home electronics

  12. Isolation and characterization of bacteria resistant to metallic copper surfaces.

    PubMed

    Santo, Christophe Espírito; Morais, Paula Vasconcelos; Grass, Gregor

    2010-03-01

    Metallic copper alloys have recently attracted attention as a new antimicrobial weapon for areas where surface hygiene is paramount. Currently it is not understood on a molecular level how metallic copper kills microbes, but previous studies have demonstrated that a wide variety of bacteria, including Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Clostridium difficile, are inactivated within minutes or a few hours of exposure. In this study, we show that bacteria isolated from copper alloy coins comprise strains that are especially resistant against the toxic properties exerted by dry metallic copper surfaces. The most resistant of 294 isolates were Gram-positive staphylococci and micrococci, Kocuria palustris, and Brachybacterium conglomeratum but also included the proteobacterial species Sphingomonas panni and Pseudomonas oleovorans. Cells of some of these bacterial strains survived on copper surfaces for 48 h or more. Remarkably, when these dry-surface-resistant strains were exposed to moist copper surfaces, resistance levels were close to those of control strains and MICs for copper ions were at or below control strain levels. This suggests that mechanisms conferring resistance against dry metallic copper surfaces in these newly isolated bacterial strains are different from well-characterized copper ion detoxification systems. Furthermore, staphylococci on coins did not exhibit increased levels of resistance to antibiotics, arguing against coselection with copper surface resistance traits.

  13. Naturally Occurring Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Tomato Pomace Silage

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing-jing; Du, Rui-ping; Gao, Min; Sui, Yao-qiang; Xiu, Lei; Wang, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Silage making has become a significant method of forage conservation worldwide. To determine how tomato pomace (TP) may be used effectively as animal feed, it was ensilaged for 90 days and microbiology counts, fermentation characteristics and chemical composition of tomato pomace silage (TPS) were evaluated at the 30th, 60th, and 90th days, respectively. In addition, 103 lactic acid bacteria were isolated from TPS. Based on the phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, 16S rDNA sequence and carbohydrate fermentation tests, the isolates were identified as 17 species namely: Lactobacillus coryniformis subsp. torquens (0.97%), Lactobacillus pontis (0.97%), Lactobacillus hilgardii (0.97%), Lactobacillus pantheris (0.97%), Lactobacillus amylovorus (1.9%), Lactobacillus panis (1.9%), Lactobacillus vaginalis (1.9%), Lactobacillus rapi (1.9%), Lactobacillus buchneri (2.9%), Lactobacillus parafarraginis (2.9%), Lactobacillus helveticus (3.9%), Lactobacillus camelliae (3.9%), Lactobacillus fermentum (5.8%), Lactobacillus manihotivorans (6.8%), Lactobacillus plantarum (10.7%), Lactobacillus harbinensis (16.5%) and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei (35.0%). This study has shown that TP can be well preserved for 90 days by ensilaging and that TPS is not only rich in essential nutrients, but that physiological and biochemical properties of the isolates could provide a platform for future design of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) inoculants aimed at improving the fermentation quality of silage. PMID:25049999

  14. Survival of Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria in Purulent Clinical Specimens Maintained in the Copan Venturi Transystem and Becton Dickinson Port-a-Cul Transport Systems

    PubMed Central

    Citron, Diane M.; Warren, Yumi A.; Hudspeth, Marie K.; Goldstein, Ellie J. C.

    2000-01-01

    Recovery of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria from clinical specimens maintained in the Copan Venturi Transystem and the Becton Dickinson Port-a-Cul transport was assessed. Of 54 anaerobes, 53 were recovered after 4 h, and 52 were recovered after 24 h, from both systems. After 48 h, 45 and 50 were recovered from the two systems, respectively. PMID:10655410

  15. Diversity of halophilic bacteria isolated from Rambla Salada, Murcia (Spain).

    PubMed

    Luque, Rocío; Béjar, Victoria; Quesada, Emilia; Llamas, Inmaculada

    2014-12-01

    In this study we analyzed the diversity of the halophilic bacteria community from Rambla Salada during the years 2006 and 2007. We collected a total of 364 strains, which were then identified by means of phenotypic tests and by the hypervariable V1-V3 region of the 16S rRNA sequences (around 500 bp). The ribosomal data showed that the isolates belonged to Proteobacteria (72.5%), Firmicutes (25.8%), Actinobacteria (1.4%), and Bacteroidetes (0.3%) phyla, with Gammaproteobacteria the predominant class. Halomonas was the most abundant genus (41.2% isolates) followed by Marinobacter (12.9% isolates) and Bacillus (12.6% isolates). In addition, 9 strains showed <97% sequence identity with validly described species and may well represent new taxa. The diversity of the bacterial community analyzed with the DOTUR package determined 139 operational taxonomic units at 3% genetic distance level. Rarefaction curves and diversity indexes demonstrated that our collection of isolates adequately represented all the bacterial community at Rambla Salada that can be grown under the conditions used in this work. We found that the sampling season influenced the composition of the bacterial community, and bacterial diversity was higher in 2007; this fact could be related to lower salinity at this sampling time.

  16. Isolation and identification of novel geosmin-degrading bacteria.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qiang; Chen, Gang; Shimizu, Kazuya; Sakharkar, Meena Kishore; Utsumi, Motoo; Chen, Honghan; Li, Miao; Zhang, Zhenya; Sugiura, Norio

    2011-06-01

    Three novel geosmin-degrading bacteria were isolated from the sediments of Lake Kasumigaura, Japan. All strains were identified as Acinetobacter spp. by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and can biodegrade geosmin at an initial geosmin concentration of 2 mg/L after 2 days. Furthermore, at an initial geosmin concentration of 40 microg/L, geosmin removal was more than 68per cent by GSM-2 strain, and the degradation mechanism followed a pseudo-first-order mode. A rate constant of 0.026 reveals rapid geosmin degradation. This is the first report on geosmin degradation by by Acinetobacter spp.

  17. Monitoring Methanotrophic Bacteria in Hybrid Anaerobic-Aerobic Reactors with PCR and a Catabolic Gene Probe

    PubMed Central

    Miguez, Carlos B.; Shen, Chun F.; Bourque, Denis; Guiot, Serge R.; Groleau, Denis

    1999-01-01

    We attempted to mimic in small upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) bioreactors the metabolic association found in nature between methanogens and methanotrophs. UASB bioreactors were inoculated with pure cultures of methanotrophs, and the bioreactors were operated by using continuous low-level oxygenation in order to favor growth and/or survival of methanotrophs. Unlike the reactors in other similar studies, the hybrid anaerobic-aerobic bioreactors which we used were operated synchronously, not sequentially. Here, emphasis was placed on monitoring various methanotrophic populations by using classical methods and also a PCR amplification assay based on the mmoX gene fragment of the soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO). The following results were obtained: (i) under the conditions used, Methylosinus sporium appeared to survive better than Methylosinus trichosporium; (ii) the PCR method which we used could detect as few as about 2,000 sMMO gene-containing methanotrophs per g (wet weight) of granular sludge; (iii) inoculation of the bioreactors with pure cultures of methanotrophs contributed greatly to increases in the sMMO-containing population (although the sMMO-containing population decreased gradually with time, at the end of an experiment it was always at least 2 logs larger than the initial population before inoculation); (iv) in general, there was a good correlation between populations with the sMMO gene and populations that exhibited sMMO activity; and (v) inoculation with sMMO-positive cultures helped increase significantly the proportion of sMMO-positive methanotrophs in reactors, even after several weeks of operation under various regimes. At some point, anaerobic-aerobic bioreactors like those described here might be used for biodegradation of various chlorinated pollutants. PMID:9925557

  18. Isolation and characterization of heavy metal resistant bacteria from Barak River contaminated with pulp paper mill effluent, South Assam.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, Bibhas; Sharma, G D; Paul, A K

    2012-08-01

    A group of 15 heavy metal resistant bacteria were isolated from Barak River contaminated with paper and pulp effluents. These isolates displayed different degrees of chromium tolerance. Four isolates showed 34 %-49 % of growth at a concentration of 4.0 mM of Cr(6+) and subjected to chromium reduction assay under aerobic condition. The isolate E (4) showed highest reduction (34.38 %) followed by E (3) and K(6)PA6, both showed 28.75 % reduction and then D (2) (27.5 %) after 72 h of incubation. These 4 isolates also showed different degrees of resistance to other heavy metals like Ni, Cu, Co and Cd. Antibiotic sensitivity profile of these selected bacterial strains was determined against 10 different antibiotics. Isolate E (4) appeared to be most susceptible being inhibited by eight antibiotics and resistant to penicillin G and ampicillin. The isolate E (3) was resistant to as many as five antibiotics and showed susceptible responses to the rest of the antibiotics. Both the isolates K(6)PA6 and D (2) were resistant to four antibiotics and showed intermediate to susceptible responses to the rest of the antibiotics.

  19. Bacteria isolated from lung modulate asthma susceptibility in mice.

    PubMed

    Remot, Aude; Descamps, Delphyne; Noordine, Marie-Louise; Boukadiri, Abdelhak; Mathieu, Elliot; Robert, Véronique; Riffault, Sabine; Lambrecht, Bart; Langella, Philippe; Hammad, Hamida; Thomas, Muriel

    2017-01-03

    Asthma is a chronic, non-curable, multifactorial disease with increasing incidence in industrial countries. This study evaluates the direct contribution of lung microbial components in allergic asthma in mice. Germ-Free and Specific-Pathogen-Free mice display similar susceptibilities to House Dust Mice-induced allergic asthma, indicating that the absence of bacteria confers no protection or increased risk to aeroallergens. In early life, allergic asthma changes the pattern of lung microbiota, and lung bacteria reciprocally modulate aeroallergen responsiveness. Primo-colonizing cultivable strains were screened for their immunoregulatory properties following their isolation from neonatal lungs. Intranasal inoculation of lung bacteria influenced the outcome of allergic asthma development: the strain CNCM I 4970 exacerbated some asthma features whereas the pro-Th1 strain CNCM I 4969 had protective effects. Thus, we confirm that appropriate bacterial lung stimuli during early life are critical for susceptibility to allergic asthma in young adults.The ISME Journal advance online publication, 3 January 2017; doi:10.1038/ismej.2016.181.

  20. Isolation and Identification of hydrocarbon degrading bacteria from Ennore creek

    PubMed Central

    Subathra, Mamitha Kumar; Immanuel, Grasian; Suresh, Albert Haridoss

    2013-01-01

    The widespread problem caused due to petroleum products, is their discharge and accidental spillage in marine environment proving to be hazardous to the surroundings as well as life forms. Thus remediation of these hydrocarbons by natural decontamination process is of utmost importance. Bioremediation is a non-invasive and cost effective technique for the clean-up of these petroleum hydrocarbons. In this study we have investigated the ability of microorganisms present in the sediment sample to degrade these hydrocarbons, crude oil in particular, so that contaminated soils and water can be treated using microbes. Sediments samples were collected once in a month for a period of twelve months from area surrounding Ennore creek and screened for hydrocarbon degrading bacteria. Of the 113 crude oil degrading isolates 15 isolates were selected and cultivated in BH media with 1% crude oil as a sole carbon and energy source. 3 efficient crude oil bacterial isolates Bacillus subtilis I1, Pseudomonas aeruginosa I5 and Pseudomonas putida I8 were identified both biochemically and phylogenetically. The quantitative analysis of biodegradation is carried out gravimetrically and highest degradation rate, 55% was recorded by Pseudomonas aeruginosa I5 isolate. PMID:23424279

  1. Identification of lactic acid bacteria isolated from corn stovers.

    PubMed

    Pang, Huili; Zhang, Meng; Qin, Guangyong; Tan, Zhongfang; Li, Zongwei; Wang, Yanping; Cai, Yimin

    2011-10-01

    One hundred and twenty-six strains were isolated from corn stover in Henan Province, China, of which 105 isolates were considered to be lactic acid bacteria (LAB) according to Gram-positive, catalase-negative and mainly metabolic lactic acid product. Analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA sequence of 21 representative strains was used to confirm the presence of the predominant groups and to determine the phylogenetic affiliation of isolates. The sequences from the various LAB isolates showed high degrees of similarity to those of the GenBank type strains between 99.4% and 100%. The prevalent LAB, predominantly Lactobacillus (85.6%), consisted of L. plantarum (33.3%), L. pentosus (28.6%) and L. brevis (23.7%). Other LAB species as Leuconostoc lactis (4.8%), Weissella cibaria (4.8%) and Enterococcus mundtii (4.8%) also presented in corn stover. The present study is the first to fully document corn stover-associated LAB involved in the silage fermentation. The identification results revealed LAB composition inhabiting corn stover and enabling the future design of appropriate inoculants aimed at improving the fermentation quality of silage.

  2. Isolation and characterization of arsenic resistant bacteria from wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Syed Zaghum; Riaz, Mehwish; Ramzan, Naseem; Zahid, M. Tariq; Shakoori, Farah R.; Rafatullah, Mohd.

    2014-01-01

    The present study proposed the isolation of arsenic resistant bacteria from wastewater. Only three bacterial isolates (MNZ1, MNZ4 and MNZ6) were able to grow in high concentrations of arsenic. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of arsenic against MNZ1, MNZ4 and MNZ6 were 300 mg/L, 300 mg/L and 370 mg/L respectively. The isolated strains showed maximum growth at 37 °C and at 7.0 pH in control but in arsenite stress Luria Bertani broth the bacterial growth is lower than control. All strains were arsenite oxidizing. All strains were biochemically characterized and ribotyping (16S rRNA) was done for the purpose of identification which confirmed that MNZ1 was homologous to Enterobacter sp. while MNZ4 and MNZ6 showed their maximum homology with Klebsiella pneumoniae. The protein profiling of these strains showed in arsenic stressed and non stressed conditions, so no bands of induced proteins appeared in stressed conditions. The bacterial isolates can be exploited for bioremediation of arsenic containing wastes, since they seem to have the potential to oxidize the arsenite (more toxic) into arsenate (less toxic) form. PMID:25763035

  3. Isolation of iron bacteria from terrestrial and aquatic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Bertram; Szewzyk, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    Bacteria, which are capable of iron oxidation or at least iron deposition are widely distributed in environments where zones of dissolved ferrous iron and oxygen gradients are overlapping [1]. They take part in the biological cycling of iron and influence other cycles of elements for example carbon [2]. Manganese can be used for similar metabolic purposes as iron, because it can be biologically oxidized by chemolithotrophs or can be reduced by respirating bacteria as well [3, 4]. Bacterial activity is responsible for the accumulation of ferric iron compounds in their surroundings. The formation of bog ore is a well known example for a soil horizon, with an extreme enrichment of biogenic ferric iron [5]. We focused on the isolation of neutrophilic iron bacteria and bacteria capable of manganese oxidation. We used samples from Tierra del Fuego (Argentina) the National Park "Unteres Odertal" (Germany) and Berlin ground water wells. Microscopic examination of the samples revealed a considerable diversity of iron encrusted structures of bacterial origin. Most of these morphologic types are already well known. The taxonomic classification of many of these organisms is based on morphologic features and is not reliable compared to recent methods of molecular biology. That is mainly due to the fact, that most of these bacteria are hardly culturable or do not show their characteristic morphologic features under culture conditions. We established a collection of more than 300 iron depositing strains. Phylogenetic analyses showed that we have many yet uncultured strains in pure culture. We obtained many isolates which form distinct branches within long known iron bacteria groups like the Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix cluster. But some of the strains belong to groups, which have not yet been associated with iron oxidation activity. The strains deposit high amounts of oxidized iron and manganese compounds under laboratory conditions. However it is unclear if these precipitations are

  4. Isolation and identification of thermophilic and mesophylic proteolytic bacteria from shrimp paste "Terasi"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murwani, R.; Supriyadi, Subagio, Trianto, A.; Ambariyanto

    2015-12-01

    Terasi is a traditional product generally made of fermented shrimp. There were many studies regarding lactic acid bacteria of terasi but none regarding proteolitic bacteria. This study was conducted to isolate and identify the thermophilic and mesophylic proteolytic bacteria from terasi. In addition, the effect of different salt concentrations on the growth of the isolated proteolytic bacteria with the greatest proteolytic activity was also studied. Terasi samples were obtained from the Northern coast region of Java island i.e. Jepara, Demak and Batang. The study obtained 34 proteolytic isolates. Four isolates were identified as Sulfidobacillus, three isolates as Vibrio / Alkaligenes / Aeromonas, two isolates as Pseudomonas, 21 isolates as Bacillus, three isolates as Kurthia/ Caryophanon and one isolates as Amphibacillus. The growth of proteolytic bacteria was affected by salt concentration. The largest growth was found at 0 ppm salt concentrations and growth was declined as salt concentration increased. Maximum growth at each salt concentration tested was found at 8 hours incubation.

  5. Aerobic biogenesis of selenium nanospheres by Bacillus cereus isolated from coalmine soil

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Microorganisms that are exposed to pollutants in the environment, such as metals/metalloids, have a remarkable ability to fight the metal stress by various mechanisms. These metal-microbe interactions have already found an important role in biotechnological applications. It is only recently that microorganisms have been explored as potential biofactories for synthesis of metal/metalloid nanoparticles. Biosynthesis of selenium (Se0) nanospheres in aerobic conditions by a bacterial strain isolated from the coalmine soil is reported in the present study. Results The strain CM100B, identified as Bacillus cereus by morphological, biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequencing [GenBank:GU551935.1] was studied for its ability to generate selenium nanoparticles (SNs) by transformation of toxic selenite (SeO32-) anions into red elemental selenium (Se0) under aerobic conditions. Also, the ability of the strain to tolerate high levels of toxic selenite ions was studied by challenging the microbe with different concentrations of sodium selenite (0.5 mM-10 mM). ESEM, AFM and SEM studies revealed the spherical Se0 nanospheres adhering to bacterial biomass as well as present as free particles. The TEM microscopy showed the accumulation of spherical nanostructures as intracellular and extracellular deposits. The deposits were identified as element selenium by EDX analysis. This is also indicated by the red coloration of the culture broth that starts within 2-3 h of exposure to selenite oxyions. Selenium nanoparticles (SNs) were further characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, TEM and zeta potential measurement. The size of nanospheres was in the range of 150-200 nm with high negative charge of -46.86 mV. Conclusions This bacterial isolate has the potential to be used as a bionanofactory for the synthesis of stable, nearly monodisperse Se0 nanoparticles as well as for detoxification of the toxic selenite anions in the environment. A hypothetical mechanism for the biogenesis

  6. Effect of applying lactic acid bacteria and propionic acid on fermentation quality and aerobic stability of oats-common vetch mixed silage on the Tibetan plateau.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Guo, Gang; Chen, Lei; Li, Junfeng; Yuan, Xianjun; Yu, Chengqun; Shimojo, Masataka; Shao, Tao

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of lactic acid bacteria and propionic acid on the fermentation quality and aerobic stability of oats-common vetch mixed silage by using a small-scale fermentation system on the Tibetan plateau. (i) An inoculant (Lactobacillus plantarum) (L) or (ii) propionic acid (P) or (iii) inoculant + propionic acid (PL) were used as additives. After fermenting for 60 days, silos were opened and the aerobic stability was tested for the following 15 days. The results showed that all silages were well preserved with low pH and NH3 -N, and high lactic acid content and V-scores. L and PL silages showed higher (P < 0.05) lactic acid and crude protein content than the control silage. P silage inhibited lactic acid production. Under aerobic conditions, L silage had similar yeast counts as the control silage (> 10(5) cfu/g fresh matter (FM)); however, it numerically reduced aerobic stability for 6 h. P and PL silages showed fewer yeasts (< 10(5) cfu/g FM) (P < 0.05) and markedly improved the aerobic stability (> 360 h). The result suggested that PL is the best additive as it could not only improved fermentation quality, but also aerobic stability of oats-common vetch mixed silage on the Tibetan plateau.

  7. (An)aerobic bacteria found in secondary-cataract material. A SEM/TEM study.

    PubMed

    Kalicharan, D; Jongebloed, W L; Los, L I; Worst, J G

    1992-01-01

    Twenty four patients, who had marked reduction of vision due to secondary-cataract developed after an ECCE, were treated by surgical cleaning of the posterior lens capsule. During this procedure globular secondary-cataract material was removed and collected for morphological examination by SEM and TEM. Fragments of various sizes and shapes, including some with a 'golf ball' structure, were seen; these closely resembled particles frequently found in cataractous lenses. In addition, in 18 patients micro-organisms were found: rod-shaped bacteria, cocci, and in 2 cases yeasts. These findings were the more remarkable because these were clinically quiet eyes with no signs of intra-ocular inflammation and cultures have been persistently negative. We imagine that these bacteria must have entered the eye during the cataract extraction and have settled there without causing an infection.

  8. Effect of a preparation containing lactic fermentation bacteria on the hygienic status and aerobic stability of silages.

    PubMed

    Selwet, M

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of biological silage additive (Bonsilage) on the hygiene quality and nutritive value of maize and grass-legume silages. The experiments were conducted on FAO 240 maize (Zea mays L.) and a mixture of italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.), 50% with alfalfa (Medicago media Pers.), 50%. Group 1 was a control and comprised silage without any additives, group 2 was ensiled with the addition of 4 cm3 kg(-1) biological silage additive. After 60 days of silage process individual silages were subjected to microbiological composition, and chemical analyses of silages were also determined. Similar analyses were repeated at day 7 following exposure to oxygen. The applied biological silage additive was found to reduce (P<0.05) numbers of Clostridium, Enterobacteriaceae, yeasts and mold fungi cells, and increase (P<0.05) the number of LAB (lactic acid bacteria) in comparison with the control in both silages. Chemical analysis of the maize silage showed that the biological additive caused an increase (P<0.05) in DM (dry matter), CP (crude protein), WSC (water soluble carbohydrates), LA (lactic acid), AA (acetic acid), ethanol, and a decrease (P<0.05) in the concentration of BA (butyric acid), N-NH3 and pH value in comparison with the control. Chemical analysis of silage samples from the grass-legume mixture showed that the additive caused an increase (P<0.05) in the content of DM, CP, WSC, LA and AA in comparison with the control. Samples of silage with the addition of an inoculant were characterized by a lower (P<0.05) content of BA, N-NH3, ethanol and pH value. The biological additive impoved the aerobic stability of silages in the aerobic phase.

  9. Synergistic Effect of Photosynthetic Bacteria and Isolated Bacteria in Their Antifungal Activities against Root Rot Fungi.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongyi; Okunishi, Suguru; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Kamei, Yuto; Dawwoda, Mahmoud A O; Santander-DE Leon, Sheila Mae S; Nuñal, Sharon Nonato; Maeda, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    Antifungal bacteria (AB) in root rot fungus (RRF)-contaminated sweet potato farms were isolated, and seven strains were initially chosen as antagonistic candidates. An antagonistic test by using the mycelial disk placement method revealed that one AB strain by itself could inhibit the RRF growth. This AB strain was identified as Bacillus polyfermenticus based on phylogeny of 16S ribosomal RNA genes. Two AB strains (Bacillus aerophilus) displayed high levels of antifungal activity when paired with photosynthetic bacterial strain A (a purple nonsulfur photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas faecalis). The results suggest the possible use of the isolates as agents for the biological control of the RRF infection of agricultural products in fields of cultivation.

  10. Diversity and Distribution of Freshwater Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria across a Wide Latitudinal Gradient.

    PubMed

    Ferrera, Isabel; Sarmento, Hugo; Priscu, John C; Chiuchiolo, Amy; González, José M; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2017-01-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs (AAPs) have been shown to exist in numerous marine and brackish environments where they are hypothesized to play important ecological roles. Despite their potential significance, the study of freshwater AAPs is in its infancy and limited to local investigations. Here, we explore the occurrence, diversity and distribution of AAPs in lakes covering a wide latitudinal gradient: Mongolian and German lakes located in temperate regions of Eurasia, tropical Great East African lakes, and polar permanently ice-covered Antarctic lakes. Our results show a widespread distribution of AAPs in lakes with contrasting environmental conditions and confirm that this group is composed of different members of the Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria. While latitude does not seem to strongly influence AAP abundance, clear patterns of community structure and composition along geographic regions were observed as indicated by a strong macro-geographical signal in the taxonomical composition of AAPs. Overall, our results suggest that the distribution patterns of freshwater AAPs are likely driven by a combination of small-scale environmental conditions (specific of each lake and region) and large-scale geographic factors (climatic regions across a latitudinal gradient).

  11. Diversity and Distribution of Freshwater Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria across a Wide Latitudinal Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Ferrera, Isabel; Sarmento, Hugo; Priscu, John C.; Chiuchiolo, Amy; González, José M.; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2017-01-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs (AAPs) have been shown to exist in numerous marine and brackish environments where they are hypothesized to play important ecological roles. Despite their potential significance, the study of freshwater AAPs is in its infancy and limited to local investigations. Here, we explore the occurrence, diversity and distribution of AAPs in lakes covering a wide latitudinal gradient: Mongolian and German lakes located in temperate regions of Eurasia, tropical Great East African lakes, and polar permanently ice-covered Antarctic lakes. Our results show a widespread distribution of AAPs in lakes with contrasting environmental conditions and confirm that this group is composed of different members of the Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria. While latitude does not seem to strongly influence AAP abundance, clear patterns of community structure and composition along geographic regions were observed as indicated by a strong macro-geographical signal in the taxonomical composition of AAPs. Overall, our results suggest that the distribution patterns of freshwater AAPs are likely driven by a combination of small-scale environmental conditions (specific of each lake and region) and large-scale geographic factors (climatic regions across a latitudinal gradient). PMID:28275369

  12. A MEMBRANE FILTER PROCEDURE FOR ASSAYING CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITY IN HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytotoxic activity assays of Gram-negative, heterotrophic bacteria are often laborious and time consuming. The objective of this study was to develop in situ procedures for testing potential cytotoxic activities of heterotrophic bacteria isolated from drinking water systems. Wate...

  13. Biodegradation of aniline by Candida tropicalis AN1 isolated from aerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dianzhan; Zheng, Guanyu; Wang, Shimei; Zhang, Dewei; Zhou, Lixiang

    2011-01-01

    Aniline-degrading microbes were cultivated and acclimated with the initial activated sludge collected from a chemical wastewater treatment plant. During the acclimation processes, aerobic granular sludge being able to effectively degrade aniline was successfully formed, from which a preponderant bacterial strain was isolated and named as AN1. Effects of factors including pH, temperature, and second carbon/nitrogen source on the biodegradation of aniline were investigated. Results showed that the optimal conditions for the biodegradation of aniline by the strain AN1 were at pH 7.0 and 28-35 degrees C. At the optimal pH and temperature, the biodegradation rate of aniline could reach as high as 17.8 mg/(L x hr) when the initial aniline concentration was 400 mg/L. Further studies revealed that the addition of 1 g/L glucose or ammonium chloride as a second carbon or nitrogen source could slightly enhance the biodegradation efficiency from 93.0% to 95.1%-98.5%. However, even more addition of glucose or ammonium could not further enhance the biodegradation process but delayed the biodegradation of aniline by the strain AN1. Based on morphological and physiological characteristics as well as the phylogenetic analysis of 26S rDNA sequences, the strain AN1 was identified as Candida tropicalis.

  14. Phosphogypsum biotransformation by aerobic bacterial flora and isolated Trichoderma asperellum from Tunisian storage piles.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Jihen; Magdich, Salwa; Jarboui, Raja; Loungou, Mouna; Ammar, Emna

    2016-05-05

    Aerobic microorganisms able to grow on phosphogypsum (PG), characterized by heavy metals accumulation and high acidity were investigated by enrichment cultures. The PG was used at different concentrations, varying from 20 to 200 g/L in the enrichment culture medium supplemented with compost and Tamarix roots. This treatment reduced COD and heavy metals PG concentration. An efficient isolated fungus, identified by molecular approach as Trichoderma asperellum, was able to grow on PG as the sole carbon and energy sources at the different experimented concentrations, and to increase the culture media pH of the different PG concentrations used to 8.13. This fact would be the result of alkaline compound released during the fungus PG solubilization. Besides, the heavy metals and COD removal exceeded 52% after 7 days culture. At 200 g/LPG concentration, the experimented strain was able to reduce COD by 52.32% and metals concentrations by 73% for zinc, 63.75% for iron and 50% for cadmium. This exhibited the T. asperellum efficiency for heavy metals accumulation and for phosphogypsum bioremediation.

  15. Simultaneous Heterotrophic Nitrification and Aerobic Denitrification by Chryseobacterium sp. R31 Isolated from Abattoir Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Pradyut; Pramanik, Arnab; Dasgupta, Arpita; Mukherjee, Somnath; Mukherjee, Joydeep

    2014-01-01

    A heterotrophic carbon utilizing microbe (R31) capable of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) was isolated from wastewater of an Indian slaughterhouse. From an initial COD value of 583.0 mg/L, 95.54% was removed whilst, from a starting NH4+-N concentration of 55.7 mg/L, 95.87% was removed after 48 h contact. The concentrations of the intermediates hydroxylamine, nitrite, and nitrate were low, thus ensuring nitrogen removal. Aerobic denitrification occurring during ammonium removal by R31 was confirmed by utilization of both nitrate and nitrite as nitrogen substrates. Glucose and succinate were superior while acetate and citrate were poor substrates for nitrogen removal. Molecular phylogenetic identification, supported by chemotaxonomic and physiological properties, assigned R31 as a close relative of Chryseobacterium haifense. The NH4+-N utilization rate and growth of strain R31 were found to be higher at C/N = 10 in comparison to those achieved with C/N ratios of 5 and 20. Monod kinetic coefficients, half saturation concentration (Ks), maximum rate of substrate utilization (k), yield coefficient, (Y) and endogenous decay coefficient (Kd) indicated potential application of R31 in large-scale SND process. This is the first report on concomitant carbon oxidation, nitrification, and denitrification in the genus Chryseobacterium and the associated kinetic coefficients. PMID:24991552

  16. Symbiotic root nodule bacteria isolated from yam bean (Pachyrhizus erosus).

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Jenet B; Abe, Mikiko; Uchiumi, Toshiki; Suzuki, Akihiro; Higashi, Shiro

    2002-08-01

    A total of 25 isolates from root nodules of yam bean (Pachyrhizus erosus L. Urban), a tuber-producing leguminous plant, were characterized. All isolates formed effective nodules mainly on lateral roots while edible tubers were developed on the taproot. The root nodules formed were identified as the typical determinate type. By an analysis of the partial sequences of the 16S rRNA gene (approximately 300 bp) of 10 strains which were selected randomly, the isolated root nodule bacteria of yam bean were classified into two different genera, Rhizobium and Bradyrhizobium. Two strains, YB2 (Bradyrhizobium group) and YB4 (Rhizobium group) were selected and used for further analyses. The generation time of each strain was shown to be 22.5 h for strain YB2 and 0.8 h for strain YB4, respectively. Differences between strains YB2 and YB4 were also reflected in the bacteroid state in the symbiosome. Symbiosome in nodule cells for the strain YB4 contained one bacteroid cell in a peribacteroid membrane, whereas a symbiosome for strain YB2 contained several bacteroid cells.

  17. [Identification and Nitrogen Removal Characteristics of a Heterotrophic Nitrification-Aerobic Denitrification Strain Isolated from Marine Environment].

    PubMed

    Sun, Qing-hua; Yu, De-shuang; Zhang, Pei-yu; Lin, Xue-zheng; Li, Jin

    2016-02-15

    A heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification strain named y5 was isolated from marine environment by traditional microbial isolation method using seawater as medium. It was identified as Klebsiella sp. based on the morphological, physiological and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The experiment results showed that the optimal carbon resource was sodium citrate; the optimal pH was 7.0; and the optimal C/N was 17. The strain could use NH4Cl, NaNO2 and KNO3 as sole nitrogen source, and the removal efficiencies were77.07%, 64.14% and 100% after 36 hours, respectively. The removal efficiency reached 100% after 36 hours in the coexistence of NH4Cl, NaNO2 and KNO3. The results showed that the strain y5 had independent and efficient heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification activities in high salt wastewater.

  18. Horizontal Gene Transfer of PIB-Type ATPases among Bacteria Isolated from Radionuclide- and Metal-Contaminated Subsurface Soils

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Robert J.; Wang, Yanling; Raimondo, Melanie A.; Coombs, Jonna M.; Barkay, Tamar; Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2006-01-01

    Aerobic heterotrophs were isolated from subsurface soil samples obtained from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Field Research Center (FRC) located at Oak Ridge, Tenn. The FRC represents a unique, extreme environment consisting of highly acidic soils with cooccurring heavy metals, radionuclides, and high nitrate concentrations. Four hundred isolates obtained from contaminated soil were assayed for heavy metal resistance, and a smaller subset was assayed for tolerance to uranium. The vast majority of the isolates were gram-positive bacteria and belonged to the high-G+C- and low-G+C-content genera Arthrobacter and Bacillus, respectively. Genomic DNA from a randomly chosen subset of 50 Pb-resistant (Pbr) isolates was amplified with PCR primers specific for PIB-type ATPases (i.e., pbrA/cadA/zntA). A total of 10 pbrA/cadA/zntA loci exhibited evidence of acquisition by horizontal gene transfer. A remarkable dissemination of the horizontally acquired PIB-type ATPases was supported by unusual DNA base compositions and phylogenetic incongruence. Numerous Pbr PIB-type ATPase-positive FRC isolates belonging to the genus Arthrobacter tolerated toxic concentrations of soluble U(VI) (UO22+) at pH 4. These unrelated, yet synergistic, physiological traits observed in Arthrobacter isolates residing in the contaminated FRC subsurface may contribute to the survival of the organisms in such an extreme environment. This study is, to the best of our knowledge, the first study to report broad horizontal transfer of PIB-type ATPases in contaminated subsurface soils and is among the first studies to report uranium tolerance of aerobic heterotrophs obtained from the acidic subsurface at the DOE FRC. PMID:16672448

  19. Bacteria isolated from conspecific bite wounds in Norway and black rats: implications for rat bite-associated infections in people.

    PubMed

    Himsworth, Chelsea G; Zabek, Erin; Tang, Patrick; Parsons, Kirbee L; Koehn, Martha; Jardine, Claire M; Patrick, David M

    2014-02-01

    Bites associated with wild and domestic Norway and black rats (Rattus norvegicus and Rattus rattus) may have a variety of health consequences in people. Bite-related infections are among the most significant of these consequences; however, there is little data on the infectious agents that can be transmitted from rats to people through biting. This is problematic because without an accurate understanding of bite-related infection risks, it is difficult for health professionals to evaluate the adequacy of existing guidelines for empirical therapy. The objectives of this study were to increase our knowledge of the bacterial species associated with rat bites by studying bite wounds that wild rats inflict upon one another and to review the literature regarding rat bites and bite wound management. Wild Norway and black rats (n=725) were trapped in Vancouver, Canada, and examined for bite wounds in the skin. All apparently infected wounds underwent aerobic and anaerobic culture, and isolated bacteria were identified. Thirty-six rats had bite wound-related infections, and approximately 22 different species of bacteria belonging to 18 genera were identified. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common isolate; however, the majority of infections (72.5%) were polymicrobial. Rat bites can result in infection with a number of aerobic and anaerobic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In humans, these wounds are best managed through early recognition and cleansing. The benefit of prophylactic antimicrobial treatment is debatable, but given the deep puncturing nature of rodent bites, we suggest that they should be considered a high risk for infection. Antibiotics selected should include coverage for a broad range of bacterial species.

  20. Aerobic respiration metabolism in lactic acid bacteria and uses in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Martin B; Gaudu, Philippe; Lechardeur, Delphine; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Gruss, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    The lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are essential for food fermentations and their impact on gut physiology and health is under active exploration. In addition to their well-studied fermentation metabolism, many species belonging to this heterogeneous group are genetically equipped for respiration metabolism. In LAB, respiration is activated by exogenous heme, and for some species, heme and menaquinone. Respiration metabolism increases growth yield and improves fitness. In this review, we aim to present the basics of respiration metabolism in LAB, its genetic requirements, and the dramatic physiological changes it engenders. We address the question of how LAB acquired the genetic equipment for respiration. We present at length how respiration can be used advantageously in an industrial setting, both in the context of food-related technologies and in novel potential applications.

  1. Formation of polyhydroxyalkanoate in aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria and its relationship to carbon source and light availability.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Na; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2011-11-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (AAPB) are unique players in carbon cycling in the ocean. Cellular carbon storage is an important mechanism regulating the nutrition status of AAPB but is not yet well understood. In this paper, six AAPB species (Dinoroseobacter sp. JL1447, Roseobacter denitrificans OCh 114, Roseobacter litoralis OCh 149, Dinoroseobacter shibae DFL 12(T), Labrenzia alexandrii DFL 11(T), and Erythrobacter longus DSMZ 6997) were examined, and all of them demonstrated the ability to form the carbon polymer polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) in the cell. The PHA in Dinoroseobacter sp. JL1447 was identified as poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) according to evidence from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy examinations. Carbon sources turned out to be critical for PHA production in AAPB. Among the eight media tested with Dinoroseobacter sp. JL1447, sodium acetate, giving a PHA production rate of 72%, was the most productive carbon source, followed by glucose, with a 68% PHA production rate. Such PHA production rates are among the highest recorded for all bacteria. The C/N ratio of substrates was verified by the experiments as another key factor in PHA production. In the case of R. denitrificans OCh 114, PHA was not detected when the organism was cultured at C/N ratios of <2 but became apparent at C/N ratios of >3. Light is also important for the formation of PHA in AAPB. In the case of Dinoroseobacter sp. JL1447, up to a one-quarter increase in PHB production was observed when the culture underwent growth in a light-dark cycle compared to growth completely in the dark.

  2. Isolation of bacteria capable of growth with 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin as the sole carbon and energy sources.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Lior; van Rijn, Jaap

    2012-01-01

    Using a relatively simple enrichment technique, geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB)-biodegrading bacteria were isolated from a digestion basin in an aquaculture unit. Comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences affiliated one of the three isolates with the Gram-positive genus Rhodococcus, while the other two isolates were found to be closely related to the Gram-negative family Comamonadaceae (Variovorax and Comamonas). Growth rates and geosmin and MIB removal rates by the isolates were determined under aerated and nonaerated conditions in mineral medium containing either of the two compounds as the sole carbon and energy source. All isolates exhibited their fastest growth under aerobic conditions, with generation times ranging from 3.1 to 5.7 h, compared to generation times of up to 19.1 h in the nonaerated flasks. Incubation of the isolates with additional carbon sources caused a significant increase in their growth rates, while removal rates of geosmin and MIB were significantly lower than those for incubation with only geosmin or MIB. By fluorescence in situ hybridization, members of the genera Rhodococcus and Comamonas were detected in geosmin- and MIB-enriched sludge from the digestion basin.

  3. Real-time PCR assays compared to culture-based approaches for identification of aerobic bacteria in chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Melendez, J H; Frankel, Y M; An, A T; Williams, L; Price, L B; Wang, N-Y; Lazarus, G S; Zenilman, J M

    2010-12-01

    Chronic wounds cause substantial morbidity and disability. Infection in chronic wounds is clinically defined by routine culture methods that can take several days to obtain a final result, and may not fully describe the community of organisms or biome within these wounds. Molecular diagnostic approaches offer promise for a more rapid and complete assessment. We report the development of a suite of real-time PCR assays for rapid identification of bacteria directly from tissue samples. The panel of assays targets 14 common, clinically relevant, aerobic pathogens and demonstrates a high degree of sensitivity and specificity using a panel of organisms commonly associated with chronic wound infection. Thirty-nine tissue samples from 29 chronic wounds were evaluated and the results compared with those obtained by culture. As revealed by culture and PCR, the most common organisms were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) followed by Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The sensitivities of the PCR assays were 100% and 90% when quantitative and qualitative culture results were used as the reference standard, respectively. The assays allowed the identification of bacterial DNA from ten additional organisms that were not revealed by quantitative or qualitative cultures. Under optimal conditions, the turnaround time for PCR results is as short as 4-6 h. Real-time PCR is a rapid and inexpensive approach that can be easily introduced into clinical practice for detection of organisms directly from tissue samples. Characterization of the anaerobic microflora by real-time PCR of chronic wounds is warranted.

  4. Piezophilic Bacteria Isolated from Sediment of the Shimokita Coalbed, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, J.; Kato, C.; Hori, T.; Morono, Y.; Inagaki, F.

    2013-12-01

    The Earth is a cold planet as well as pressured planet, hosting both the surface biosphere and the deep biosphere. Pressure ranges over four-orders of magnitude in the surface biosphere and probably more in the deep biosphere. Pressure is an important thermodynamic property of the deep biosphere that affects microbial physiology and biochemistry. Bacteria that require high-pressure conditions for optimal growth are called piezophilic bacteria. Subseafloor marine sediments are one of the most extensive microbial habitats on Earth. Marine sediments cover more than two-thirds of the Earth's surface, and represent a major part of the deep biosphere. Owing to its vast size and intimate connection with the surface biosphere, particularly the oceans, the deep biosphere has enormous potential for influencing global-scale biogeochemical processes, including energy, climate, carbon and nutrient cycles. Therefore, studying piezophilic bacteria of the deep biosphere has important implications in increasing our understanding of global biogeochemical cycles, the interactions between the biosphere and the geosphere, and the evolution of life. Sediment samples were obtained during IODP Expedition 337, from 1498 meters below sea floor (mbsf) (Sample 6R-3), 1951~1999 mbsf (19R-1~25R-3; coalbed mix), and 2406 mbsf (29R-7). The samples were mixed with MB2216 growth medium and cultivated under anaerobic conditions at 35 MPa (megapascal) pressure. Growth temperatures were adjusted to in situ environmental conditions, 35°C for 6R-3, 45°C for 19R-1~25R-3, and 55°C for 29R-7. The cultivation was performed three times, for 30 days each time. Microbial cells were obtained and the total DNA was extracted. At the same time, isolation of microbes was also performed under anaerobic conditions. Microbial communities in the coalbed sediment were analyzed by cloning, sequencing, and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (t-RFLP) of 16S ribosomal RNA genes. From the partial 16S r

  5. [Biosynthesis of the bioprotectant ectoin by aerobic methylotrophic bacteria from methanol].

    PubMed

    Doronina, N V; Ezhov, V A; Beschastnyĭ, A P; Trotsenko, Iu A

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that neutrophilic methylobacteria Methylophaga thalassica and M. marina have higher rates of growth and ectoin accumulation compared to the haloalkaliphilic species M. alcalica and M. natronia and methanotrophs Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum and M. kenyense. The conditions of M. thalassica cultivation in methanol-containing medium were optimized. The yield of this process reached 60 g/l of absolutely dry biomass containing 15-19% (9-11 g/l) ectoine. The scheme of ectoin isolation from the biomass by extraction and subsequent purification, which allowed obtaining preparations of different degree of purity, was developed.

  6. Antimycobacterial activity in vitro of pigments isolated from Antarctic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mojib, Nazia; Philpott, Rachel; Huang, Jonathan P; Niederweis, Michael; Bej, Asim K

    2010-11-01

    In this study, we describe the antimycobacterial activity of two pigments, violacein, a purple violet pigment from Janthinobacterium sp. Ant5-2 (J-PVP), and flexirubin, a yellow-orange pigment from Flavobacterium sp. Ant342 (F-YOP). These pigments were isolated from bacterial strains found in the land-locked freshwater lakes of Schirmacher Oasis, East Antarctica. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of these pigments for avirulent and virulent mycobacteria were determined by the microplate Alamar Blue Assay (MABA) and Nitrate Reductase Assay (NRA). Results indicated that the MICs of J-PVP and F-YOP were 8.6 and 3.6 μg/ml for avirulent Mycobacterium smegmatis mc²155; 5 and 2.6 μg/ml for avirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis mc²6230; and 34.4 and 10.8 μg/ml for virulent M. tuberculosis H₃₇Rv, respectively. J-PVP exhibited a ~15 times lower MIC for Mycobacterium sp. than previously reported for violacein pigment from Chromobacterium violaceum, while the antimycobacterial effect of F-YOP remains undocumented. Our results indicate these pigments isolated from Antarctic bacteria might be valuable lead compounds for new antimycobacterial drugs used for chemotherapy of tuberculosis.

  7. Archaea produce lower yields of N2 O than bacteria during aerobic ammonia oxidation in soil.

    PubMed

    Hink, Linda; Nicol, Graeme W; Prosser, James I

    2016-03-11

    Nitrogen fertilisation of agricultural soil contributes significantly to emissions of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2 O), which is generated during denitrification and, in oxic soils, mainly by ammonia oxidisers. Although laboratory cultures of ammonia oxidising bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) produce N2 O, their relative activities in soil are unknown. This work tested the hypothesis that AOB dominate ammonia oxidation and N2 O production under conditions of high inorganic ammonia (NH3 ) input, but result mainly from the activity of AOA when NH3 is derived from mineralisation. 1-octyne, a recently discovered inhibitor of AOB, was used to distinguish N2 O production resulting from archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidation in soil microcosms, and specifically inhibited AOB growth, activity and N2 O production. In unamended soils, ammonia oxidation and N2 O production were lower and resulted mainly from ammonia oxidation by AOA. The AOA N2 O yield relative to nitrite produced was half that of AOB, likely due to additional enzymatic mechanisms in the latter, but ammonia oxidation and N2 O production were directly linked in all treatments. Relative contributions of AOA and AOB to N2 O production, therefore, reflect their respective contributions to ammonia oxidation. These results suggest potential mitigation strategies for N2 O emissions from fertilised agricultural soils.

  8. Studies on bioflocculant production by Arthrobacter sp. Raats, a freshwater bacteria isolated from Tyume River, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Mabinya, Leonard V; Cosa, Sekelwa; Nwodo, Uchechukwu; Okoh, Anthony I

    2012-01-01

    A bioflocculant-producing bacteria was isolated from Tyume River in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa and identified by 16S rRNA gene nucleotide sequence to have 91% similarity to Arthrobacter sp. 5J12A, and the nucleotide sequence was deposited in GenBank as Arthrobacter sp. Raats (accession number HQ875723). The bacteria produced an extracellular bioflocculant when grown aerobically in a production medium containing glucose as sole carbon source and had an initial pH of 7.0. Influences of carbon, nitrogen and metal ions sources, as well as initial pH on flocculating activity were investigated. The bacteria optimally produced the bioflocullant when lactose and urea were used as sole sources of carbon and nitrogen respectively with flocculating activities of 75.4% and 83.4% respectively. Also, the bacteria produced the bioflocculant optimally when initial pH of the medium was 7.0 (flocculating activity 84%), and when Mg(2+) was used as cation (flocculating activity 77%). Composition analyses indicated the bioflocculant to be principally a glycoprotein made up of about 56% protein and 25% total carbohydrate.

  9. Studies on Bioflocculant Production by Arthrobacter sp. Raats, a Freshwater Bacteria Isolated from Tyume River, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mabinya, Leonard V.; Cosa, Sekelwa; Nwodo, Uchechukwu; Okoh, Anthony I.

    2012-01-01

    A bioflocculant-producing bacteria was isolated from Tyume River in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa and identified by 16S rRNA gene nucleotide sequence to have 91% similarity to Arthrobacter sp. 5J12A, and the nucleotide sequence was deposited in GenBank as Arthrobacter sp. Raats (accession number HQ875723). The bacteria produced an extracellular bioflocculant when grown aerobically in a production medium containing glucose as sole carbon source and had an initial pH of 7.0. Influences of carbon, nitrogen and metal ions sources, as well as initial pH on flocculating activity were investigated. The bacteria optimally produced the bioflocullant when lactose and urea were used as sole sources of carbon and nitrogen respectively with flocculating activities of 75.4% and 83.4% respectively. Also, the bacteria produced the bioflocculant optimally when initial pH of the medium was 7.0 (flocculating activity 84%), and when Mg2+ was used as cation (flocculating activity 77%). Composition analyses indicated the bioflocculant to be principally a glycoprotein made up of about 56% protein and 25% total carbohydrate. PMID:22312304

  10. [Isolation identification and characterization of halotolerant petroleum-degrading bacteria].

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Xie, Wen-Jun; Yi, Yan-Li; Li, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Jun; Hu, Xiang-Ming

    2012-11-01

    To obtain efficient halotolerant petroleum-degrading bacteria, 39 bacteria strains were isolated from 30 petroleum contaminated saline soil samples in Yellow River Delta, an important base of petroleum production in China. One bacterium (strain BM38) was found to efficiently degrade crude oil in highly saline environments based on a series of liquid and soil incubation experiments. According to its morphology, physiochemical characteristics and 16S rDNA sequence analysis, this strain was identified as Pseudomonas putida. Moreover, a series of liquid incubation experiments were conducted to investigate its characteristics such as halotolerance, biosurfactants production and degrading efficiency for various hydrocarbons. The salt resistance test demonstrated that strain BM38 grew well at NaCl concentrations ranging from 0.5% to 6.0%. Petroleum degradation experiments showed that strain BM38 could degrade 73.5% crude oil after 7 days in a liquid culture medium containing 1.0% NaCl and remove more than 40% of total petroleum hydrocarbons after 40 days in the soil with 0.22% and 0.61% of salinity, these results proved that the strain was effective in removing petroleum hydrocarbons. Strain BM38 could produce a bioemulsifier in a liquid culture medium. The NaCl concentration had the significant effect on the EI24 of fermentation broth, which decreased sharply if the NaCl concentration was greater than 1.0%. However, the EI24 of BM38 was still quite high in the presence of 2.0% of NaCl, and the value was 61.0%. Furthermore, this strain was also able to grow in mineral liquid media amended with hexadecane, toluene, phenanthrene, isooctane and cyclohexane as the sole carbon sources. Among these hydracarbons, strain BM38 showed relatively high ability in degrading n-alkanes and aromatic hydracarbons. The results indicated that strain BM38 had potential for application in bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated saline soil.

  11. Characterization of aerobic oil and grease-degrading bacteria in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Nzila, Alexis; Thukair, Assad; Sankara, Saravanan; Abdur Razzak, Shaikh

    2017-03-01

    A bacterial consortium that degrades cooking oil (CO) has been isolated in wastewater (WW) samples, by enrichment in olive CO. This consortium could degrade 90% of CO within 7-9 days (from an initial 1% [w/v]), and it is more active at alkaline conditions. The 16S ribonucleic acid (RNA) gene analysis showed that it contains five bacterium species: Stenotrophomonas rhizophila, Sphingobacterium sp., Pseudomonas libanensis, Pseudomonas poae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This consortium can degrade the free fatty acids (FFA): palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids; glycerol, glucose and amylose; and albumin, but could not efficiently degrade carboxymethyl-cellulose. Each strain could also degrade CO and FFAs. The level of bacterial crude-activity of extracellular lipases was found to be between 0.2 and 4U/ml. Using synthetic WW, the consortium could reduce 80% of the chemical oxygen demand [from 10550 ± 2828 mg/l], 80% of nitrogen (from 410 ± 78 mgl/l) and 57% of phosphorus (from 93 ± 25 mg/l). Thus, this consortium can be utilized in the removal of CO from WW.

  12. Application potential of a newly isolated indigenous aerobic denitrifier for nitrate and ammonium removal of eutrophic lake water.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liyun; Chen, Qiankun; Fang, Fei; Hu, Zhixin; Wu, Jun; Miao, Aijun; Xiao, Lin; Chen, Xiaofeng; Yang, Liuyan

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the utilization potential of a newly isolated indigenous aerobic denitrifier, Pseudomonas stutzeri strain T1, for nitrogen removal from the eutrophic Lake Taihu in China. The strain was capable of conducting heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification and had both excellent nitrate and ammonium removal without nitrite build-up. The characteristics of P. stutzeri strain T1 were studied under different cultural conditions. Furthermore, under the optimized cultivation conditions, strain T1 was added into the water samples from Lake Taihu, the ammonium and nitrate removal rates of the strain reached to 60% and 75%, respectively. Via adding this strain, the water qualities of the sample ameliorated from Grade V to Grade II. Thus, the strain T1 should be an useful biological tool to remediate eutrophic lakes and do not meet acclimation problems.

  13. The determination of the real nano-scale sizes of bacteria in chernozem during microbial succession by means of hatching of a soil in aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbacheva, M.

    2012-04-01

    M.A. Gorbacheva,L.M. Polyanskaya The Faculty of Soil Science, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, GSP-1, Moscow,119991,Russia In recent years there's been particular attention paid to the smallest life's forms- bacteria which size can be measured in nanometer. These are the forms of bacteria with diameter of 5-200 nm. Theoretical calculations based on the content of the minimum number of DNA, enzyme, lipids in and ribosome in cells indicates impossibility of existence of a living cells within diameter less than 300 nm. It is theoretically possible for a living cell to exist within possible diameter of approximately 140 nm. Using a fluorescence microscope there's been indicated in a number of samples from lakes, rivers, soil, snow and rain water that 200 nm is the smallest diameter of a living cell. Supposingly, such a small size of bacteria in soil is determined by natural conditions which limit their development by nutritious substances and stress-factors. Rejuvenescence of nanobacteria under unfavourable natural conditions and stress-factors is studied in laboratory environment. The object of the current study has become the samples of typical arable chernozem of the Central Chernozem State Biosphere Reserve in Kursk. The detailed morphological description of the soil profile and its basic analytical characteristics are widely represented in scientific publications. The soil is characterized by a high carbon content which makes up 3,96% ,3,8% , and 2,9% for the upper layers of the A horizon, and 0,79% for the layer of the B horizon. A microbial succession was studied under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by means of experiments with microcosms in upper A horizons and B horizon of a chernozem. The final aim is to identify the cells size of bacteria in aerobic and anaerobic soil conditions in chernozem during the microbial succession, by dampening and application of chitin by means of «cascade filtration» method. The study of the microcosms is important for

  14. Isolation of aerobic microbes from Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae), the vector of Lyme disease in the eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Martin, P A; Schmidtmann, E T

    1998-08-01

    The spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi Johnson, Schmid, Hyde, Steigerwalt & Benner is transmitted by Ixodes scapularis Say, a vector of Lyme disease. As a 1st step into investigating the possibility of biocontrol of the tick, we identified the microbiota associated with the ticks. We collected, identified, and determined the sex of ticks from foliage and deer. Seventy-three initial bacterial isolates were recovered from 43 ticks (27 adults and 16 nymphs). The bacteria isolated from nymphs were qualitatively different (mainly gram-negative cocci) from the bacteria isolated from adult ticks (gram-negative and gram-positive rods). To determine long-term viability, these isolates were stored for 6 mo under laboratory conditions. After storage, 63 surviving bacterial isolates were characterized using the Biology System of identification by substrate utilization. Forty-four isolates were identified to the species level. Our characterization efforts focused on the 40 spore-forming bacteria, which could prove useful in the biocontrol of ticks. Eleven species of Bacillus were identified. Bacillus thuringiensis-B. cereus was the predominant species group isolated. Six isolates from this group formed crystals.

  15. Isolation and characterization of novel thermophilic lipase-secreting bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Mohammed; Bagherinejad, Mohammad Reza; Sadeghi, Hamid MirMohammad; Shariat, Ziaedin Samsam; Etemadifar, Zahra; Moazen, Fatemeh; Rahbari, Manizheh; Mafakher, Ladan; Zaghian, Saeideh

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to screen and identify the lipase-producing microorganisms from various regions of Iran. Samples collected from hot spring, Persian Gulf, desert area and oil-contaminated soil, were analyzed for thermophilic extracellular-lipase producing organisms. Six strains with high activity on rhodamine B plates were selected for chemical identification and further study. Among these isolated bacteria, four strains show higher activity in pH-Stat method at 55 °C. These strains were identified by PCR amplification of 16s rRNA genes using universal primers. Fermentation increased the activity up to 50%. The growth medium, designed for lipase production, increased the activity up to 4.55 folds. The crude supernatant of ZR-5 after fermentation and separation the cells, was lyophilized and the activity was measured. Total activity of this strain was 12 kU/g that shows its potential for industrial uses. Further study is required for purification of enzyme and calculation its specific activity. Immobilization is another approach should be considered.

  16. Isolation and characterisation of lactic acid bacteria from donkey milk.

    PubMed

    Soto Del Rio, Maria de Los Dolores; Andrighetto, Christian; Dalmasso, Alessandra; Lombardi, Angiolella; Civera, Tiziana; Bottero, Maria Teresa

    2016-08-01

    During the last years the interest in donkey milk has increased significantly mainly because of its compelling functional elements. Even if the composition and nutritional properties of donkey milk are known, its microbiota is less studied. This Research Communication aimed to provide a comprehensive characterisation of the lactic acid bacteria in raw donkey milk. RAPD-PCR assay combined with 16S rDNA sequencing analysis were used to describe the microbial diversity of several donkey farms in the North West part of Italy. The more frequently detected species were: Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactococcus lactis and Carnobacterium maltaromaticum. Less abundant genera were Leuconostoc, Enterococcus and Streptococcus. The yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus was also isolated. The bacterial and biotype distribution notably diverged among the farms. Several of the found species, not previously detected in donkey milk, could have an important probiotic activity and biotechnological potential. This study represents an important insight to the ample diversity of the microorganisms present in the highly selective ecosystem of raw donkey milk.

  17. Isolation and characterization of novel thermophilic lipase-secreting bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rabbani, Mohammed; Bagherinejad, Mohammad Reza; Sadeghi, Hamid MirMohammad; Shariat, Ziaedin Samsam; Etemadifar, Zahra; Moazen, Fatemeh; Rahbari, Manizheh; Mafakher, Ladan; Zaghian, Saeideh

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to screen and identify the lipase-producing microorganisms from various regions of Iran. Samples collected from hot spring, Persian Gulf, desert area and oil-contaminated soil, were analyzed for thermophilic extracellular-lipase producing organisms. Six strains with high activity on rhodamine B plates were selected for chemical identification and further study. Among these isolated bacteria, four strains show higher activity in pH-Stat method at 55 °C. These strains were identified by PCR amplification of 16s rRNA genes using universal primers. Fermentation increased the activity up to 50%. The growth medium, designed for lipase production, increased the activity up to 4.55 folds. The crude supernatant of ZR-5 after fermentation and separation the cells, was lyophilized and the activity was measured. Total activity of this strain was 12 kU/g that shows its potential for industrial uses. Further study is required for purification of enzyme and calculation its specific activity. Immobilization is another approach should be considered. PMID:24688500

  18. Isolation and characterization of cesium-accumulating bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Tomioka, N; Uchiyama, H; Yagi, O

    1992-01-01

    Cesium-accumulating bacteria, strains CS98 and CS402, were isolated from soil by a radioactive autoradiographic method using 137Cs. These strains displayed the rod-coccus growth cycle and contained mesodiaminopimelic acid, mycolic acids, and tuberculostearic acids. The major menaquinone of CS98 was MK-8(H2). On the basis of these characteristics, strain CS98 was identified as Rhodococcus erythropolis and strain CS402 was classified in the genus Rhodococcus. The maximum values of cesium removal efficiencies in the liquid culture containing 10 mumol of cesium per liter for strains CS98 and CS402 were 90 and 47%, respectively. The maximum cesium contents in strains CS98 and CS402 were 52.0 and 18.8 mumol/g (dry weight) of cells, respectively. Maximum values of cesium concentration factors for strains CS98 and CS402 were 3.5 x 10(4) and 3.6 x 10(3), respectively. Images PMID:1575473

  19. [Nonfermentative gram-negative bacteria: isolation rates and antibiotic sensitivity].

    PubMed

    Bogomolova, N S; Bol'shakov, L V; Kuznetsova, S M; Oreshkina, T D

    2010-01-01

    The isolation rates of nonfermentative gram-negative bacteria (NFGNB) are analyzed in the inpatients treated at the B. V. Petrovsky Russian Surgery Research Center in 2005-2009 and antibiotic resistance trends in nosocomial strains of NFGNB are traced in the above period. The study of the etiological structure of nosocomial infections has shown that the past 2 years (2008 and 2009) were marked by a clear tendency for the preponderance of gram-positive coccal pathogens (46.8 and 53.9%) with a considerable (1.5-2-fold) reduction in the proportion of representatives of enterobacteria (31.5 and 24.5%) and NFGB (13.4 and 11.3%), but with an increase in the proportion of fungi up to 7.1 and 8.6%, respectively. Among the NFGNBs, P. aeruginosa remains ohe of the most common pathogens for nosocomial infections although its portion in the number of all etiologically significant microorganisms was substantially reduced (from 13% in 2005 to 4.6% in 2009). It continues to remain one of the most common causative agents for infections of the urinary tract (e.g., after renal transplantation) and upper and lower respiratory tract (e.g. nosocomial pneumonia) and for those developing after surgical interventions (postoperative wound suppuration discharged along the drainages, from a T-sized tube, etc.). Among the NFGNBs, Acinetobacter spp. was the second frequently isolated pathogen, the isolation rate for which also decreased from 7.9% in 2005 to 2.6% in 2009. Polymyxin B and carbapenems (imipenem, meropenem, and doripenem) showed the highest activity against the vast majority of the test strains; however, there was an absolutely clear declining trend in the proportion of carbapenem-sensitive strains among virtually all the NFGNBs under study. According to the proportion of imipenem-, meropenem-, and doripenem-sensitive nosocomial P. aeroginosa strains (66.7, 46.6, and 44.7%, respectively), doripenem had the least activity. Acinetobacter spp. strains sensitive to these drugs showed

  20. Isolation of lactic acid bacteria with potential protective culture characteristics from fruits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, Nurul Huda; Sani, Norrakiah Abdullah

    2015-09-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are also known as beneficial microorganisms abundantly found in fermented food products. In this study, lactic acid bacteria were isolated from fresh cut fruits obtained from local markets. Throughout the isolation process from 11 samples of fruits, 225 presumptive lactic acid bacteria were isolated on MRS agar medium. After catalase and oxidase tests, 149 resulted to fit the characteristics of lactic acid bacteria. Further identification using Gram staining was conducted to identify the Gram positive bacteria. After this confirmation, the fermentation characteristics of these isolates were identified. It was found that 87 (58.4%) isolates were heterofermentative, while the rest of 62 (41.6%) are homofermentative lactic acid bacteria. Later, all these isolates were investigated for the ability to inhibit growth of Staphylococcus aureus using agar spot assay method. Seven (4.7%) isolates showed strong antagonistic capacity, while 127 (85.2%) and 8 (5.4%) isolates have medium and weak antagonistic capacity, respectively. The other 7 (4.7%) isolates indicated to have no antagonistic effect on S. aureus. Results support the potential of LAB isolated in this study which showed strong antagonistic activity against S. aureus may be manipulated to become protective cultures in food products. While the homofermentative or heterofermentative LAB can be utilized in fermentation of food and non-food products depending on the by-products required during the fermentation.

  1. Isolation and Analysis of Novel Electrochemically Active Bacteria for Enhanced Power Generation in Microbial Fuel Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-07

    ISOLATION AND ANALYSIS OF NOVEL ELECTROCHEMICALLY ACTIVE BACTERIA FOR ENHANCED POWER GENERATION IN MICROBIAL FUEL CELLS B.E. Logan, J.M. Regan...new exoelectrogenic bacteria during this project. We isolated Rhodopseudomonas palustris DX-1, and demonstrated for the first time that a pure culture... isolated Ochrobactrum anthropi YZ-1, which had the remarkable characteristic that it was unable to respire using hydrous Fe(lll) oxide but produced

  2. Occurrence of horizontal gene transfer of P(IB)-type ATPase genes among bacteria isolated from the uranium rich deposit of Domiasiat in North East India.

    PubMed

    Nongkhlaw, Macmillan; Kumar, Rakshak; Acharya, Celin; Joshi, Santa Ram

    2012-01-01

    Uranium (U) tolerant aerobic heterotrophs were isolated from the subsurface soils of one of the pre-mined U-rich deposits at Domiasiat located in the north-eastern part of India. On screening of genomic DNA from 62 isolates exhibiting superior U and heavy metal tolerance, 32 isolates were found to be positive for P(IB)-type ATPase genes. Phylogenetic incongruence and anomalous DNA base compositions revealed the acquisition of P(IB)-type ATPase genes by six isolates through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Three of these instances of HGT appeared to have occurred at inter-phylum level and the other three instances indicated to have taken place at intra-phylum level. This study provides an insight into one of the possible survival strategies that bacteria might employ to adapt to environments rich in uranium and heavy metals.

  3. Occurrence of Horizontal Gene Transfer of PIB-type ATPase Genes among Bacteria Isolated from the Uranium Rich Deposit of Domiasiat in North East India

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Celin; Joshi, Santa Ram

    2012-01-01

    Uranium (U) tolerant aerobic heterotrophs were isolated from the subsurface soils of one of the pre-mined U-rich deposits at Domiasiat located in the north-eastern part of India. On screening of genomic DNA from 62 isolates exhibiting superior U and heavy metal tolerance, 32 isolates were found to be positive for PIB-type ATPase genes. Phylogenetic incongruence and anomalous DNA base compositions revealed the acquisition of PIB-type ATPase genes by six isolates through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Three of these instances of HGT appeared to have occurred at inter-phylum level and the other three instances indicated to have taken place at intra-phylum level. This study provides an insight into one of the possible survival strategies that bacteria might employ to adapt to environments rich in uranium and heavy metals. PMID:23133569

  4. Isolation and characteristics of lactic acid bacteria isolated from ripe mulberries in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-sheng; Wu, Hui-chung; Yanagida, Fujitoshi

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate, characterize, and identify lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from ripe mulberries collected in Taiwan. Ripe mulberry samples were collected at five mulberry farms, located in different counties of Taiwan. Eighty-eight acid-producing cultures were isolated from these samples, and isolates were divided into classes first by phenotype, then into groups by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and sequencing of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA). Phenotypic and biochemical characteristics led to identification of four bacterial groups (A to D). Weissella cibaria was the most abundant type of LAB distributed in four mulberry farms, and Lactobacillus plantarum was the most abundant LAB found in the remaining farm. Ten W. cibaria and one Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis isolate produced bacteriocins against the indicator strain Lactobacillus sakei JCM 1157T. These results suggest that various LAB are distributed in ripe mulberries and W. cibaria was the most abundant LAB found in this study. PMID:24031571

  5. Growth parameters of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, and aerobic mesophilic bacteria of apple cider amended with nisin-EDTA.

    PubMed

    Ukuku, Dike O; Zhang, Howard; Huang, Lihan

    2009-05-01

    The effect of nisin (0 or 300 IU/mL), ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA, 20 mM), and nisin (300 IU)-EDTA (20 mM) on growth parameters, including lag period (LP) and generation time, of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella spp. in the presence or absence of aerobic mesophilic bacteria of apple cider during storage at 5 degrees C for up to 16 days or 23 degrees C for 16 h was investigated. The growth data were analyzed and fitted to the modified Gompertz model. The LP values for aerobic mesophilic bacteria of apple cider (control) and those amended with EDTA and nisin during storage at 5 degrees C were 1.61, 1.76, and 5.45 days, respectively. In apple cider stored at 23 degrees C for 16 h, the LP values for the same bacteria and treatment were 3.24, 3.56, and 5.85 h, respectively. The LP values for E. coli O157:H7 determined in the presence of aerobic mesophilic bacteria of apple cider stored at 23 degrees C for 16 h was 1.48 h, while populations for L. monocytogenes and Salmonella in the same cider declined. In sterile apple cider left at 23 degrees C for 16 h, the LP values for E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and L. monocytogenes averaged 2.74, 2.37, and 3.16 h, respectively. The generation time for these pathogens were 0.402, 0.260, and 0.187 log (CFU/mL)/h, respectively. Addition of nisin and EDTA combination caused a decline in lag phase duration and the populations for all pathogens tested, suggesting possible addition of this additive to freshly prepared apple cider to enhance its microbial safety and prevent costly recalls.

  6. ["In vitro" susceptibility of some aerobic and anaerobic bacteria to three 5-nitro-imidazole derivatives: metronidazole, ornidazole and tinidazole (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Dublanchet, A; Durieux, R

    1980-01-01

    As shown earlier, the three drugs are effective against most anaerobic bacteria. However, with Bacteroides fragilis the geometric mean MIC of metronidazole (0.43 microgram/ml), ornidazole (0.37 microgram/ml) and tinidazole (0.20 microgram/ml) are statistically different. Moreover, and contrary to generally accepted opinion, some aerobic bacteria such as Moraxella and Bacillus can be susceptible to nitro-imidazoles. The results suggest another mechanism for the action of nitro-imidazoles, different from that previously described. This underscores the major role of the reduction of the nitrogroup by a low-redox-potential. Two strains of strictly anaerobic bacteria show a relative resistance in the microaerophilic zone.

  7. Aerobic Degradation of N-Methyl-4-Nitroaniline (MNA) by Pseudomonas sp. Strain FK357 Isolated from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fazlurrahman; Vyas, Bhawna; Pal, Deepika; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    N-Methyl-4-nitroaniline (MNA) is used as an additive to lower the melting temperature of energetic materials in the synthesis of insensitive explosives. Although the biotransformation of MNA under anaerobic condition has been reported, its aerobic microbial degradation has not been documented yet. A soil microcosms study showed the efficient aerobic degradation of MNA by the inhabitant soil microorganisms. An aerobic bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. strain FK357, able to utilize MNA as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source, was isolated from soil microcosms. HPLC and GC-MS analysis of the samples obtained from growth and resting cell studies showed the formation of 4-nitroaniline (4-NA), 4-aminophenol (4-AP), and 1, 2, 4-benzenetriol (BT) as major metabolic intermediates in the MNA degradation pathway. Enzymatic assay carried out on cell-free lysates of MNA grown cells confirmed N-demethylation reaction is the first step of MNA degradation with the formation of 4-NA and formaldehyde products. Flavin-dependent transformation of 4-NA to 4-AP in cell extracts demonstrated that the second step of MNA degradation is a monooxygenation. Furthermore, conversion of 4-AP to BT by MNA grown cells indicates the involvement of oxidative deamination (release of NH2 substituent) reaction in third step of MNA degradation. Subsequent degradation of BT occurs by the action of benzenetriol 1, 2-dioxygenase as reported for the degradation of 4-nitrophenol. This is the first report on aerobic degradation of MNA by a single bacterium along with elucidation of metabolic pathway. PMID:24116023

  8. Antifouling potential of bacteria isolated from a marine biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Min; Wang, Ke; Su, Rongguo; Li, Xuzhao; Lu, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Marine microorganisms are a new source of natural antifouling compounds. In this study, two bacterial strains, Kytococcus sedentarius QDG-B506 and Bacillus cereus QDG-B509, were isolated from a marine biofilm and identified. The bacteria fermentation broth could exert inhibitory effects on the growth of Skeletonema costatum and barnacle larvae. A procedure was employed to extract and identify the antifouling compounds. Firstly, a toxicity test was conducted by graduated pH and liquid-liquid extraction to determine the optimal extraction conditions. The best extraction conditions were found to be pH 2 and 100% petroleum ether. The EC 50 value of the crude extract of K. sedentarius against the test microalgae was 236.7 ± 14.08 μg mL-1, and that of B. cereus was 290.6 ± 27.11 μg mL-1. Secondly, HLB SPE columns were used to purify the two crude extracts. After purification, the antifouling activities of the two extracts significantly increased: the EC 50 of the K. sedentarius extract against the test microalgae was 86.4 ± 3.71 μg mL-1, and that of B. cereus was 92.6 ± 1.47 μg mL-1. These results suggest that the metabolites produced by the two bacterial strains are with high antifouling activities and they should be fatty acid compounds. Lastly, GC-MS was used for the structural elucidation of the compounds. The results show that the antifouling compounds produced by the two bacterial strains are myristic, palmitic and octadecanoic acids.

  9. Isolation and characterization of biosurfactant producing bacteria from Persian Gulf (Bushehr provenance).

    PubMed

    Hassanshahian, Mehdi

    2014-09-15

    Biosurfactants are surface active materials that are produced by some microorganisms. These molecules increase biodegradation of insoluble pollutants. In this study sediments and seawater samples were collected from the coastline of Bushehr provenance in the Persian Gulf and their biosurfactant producing bacteria were isolated. Biosurfactant producing bacteria were isolated by using an enrichment method in Bushnell-Hass medium with diesel oil as the sole carbon source. Five screening tests were used for selection of Biosurfactant producing bacteria: hemolysis in blood agar, oil spreading, drop collapse, emulsification activity and Bacterial Adhesion to Hydrocarbon test (BATH). These bacteria were identified using biochemical and molecular methods. Eighty different colonies were isolated from the collected samples. The most biosurfactant producing isolates related to petrochemical plants of Khark Island. Fourteen biosurfactant producing bacteria were selected between these isolates and 7 isolates were screened as these were predominant producers that belong to Shewanella alga, Shewanella upenei, Vibrio furnissii, Gallaecimonas pentaromativorans, Brevibacterium epidermidis, Psychrobacter namhaensis and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The largest clear zone diameters in oil spreading were observed for G. pentaromativorans strain O15. Also, this strain has the best emulsification activity and reduction of surface tension, suggesting it is the best of thee isolated strains. The results of this study confirmed that there is high diversity of biosurfactant producing bacteria in marine ecosystem of Iran and by application of these bacteria in petrochemical waste water environmental problems can be assisted.

  10. Isolation and characterization of cellulolytic bacteria from the Stain house Lake, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Melo, Itamar S; Zucchi, Tiago D; Silva, Rafael E; Vilela, Elke S D; Sáber, Mirian Lobo; Rosa, Luiz H; Pellizari, Vivian H

    2014-07-01

    The main aim was to evaluate the occurrence of cellulolytic bacteria from the Stain house Lake, located at Admiralty Bay, Antarctica. Thick cotton string served as a cellulose bait for the isolation of bacteria. A total of 52 bacterial isolates were recovered and tested for their cellulase activity, and two of them, isolates CMAA 1184 and CMAA 1185, showed significant cellulolytic activity on carboxymethylcellulose agar plates. Phylogenetic analysis placed the isolates into the Bacillus 16S ribosomal RNA gene subclade. Both isolates produced a cold-active cellulase which may play a crucial role in this extreme environment.

  11. [Marine bacteria producing antibacterial compounds isolated from inter-tidal invertebrates].

    PubMed

    León, Jorge; Liza, Libia; Soto, Isela; Torres, Magali; Orosco, Andrés

    2010-06-01

    Prospective sampling activities of intertidal invertebrates in the Ancon Bay (Lima, Peru) were done in order to select marine bacteria producing antimicrobial substances. The study included the isolation of bacteria in marine agar, in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing and electronic microscopic observations. We report the isolation, phenotypical characterization and antimicrobial properties of 10 strains of marine bacteria including the genus Vibrio, Pseudomonas, and Flavobacterium, and the order Actinomycetae that inhibit human pathogens. The results indicate that the marine invertebrates would be sources of bacteria producing antibiotic substances.

  12. Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) by Bacteria Isolated from Light Oil Polluted Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnuma, T.; Suto, K.; Inoue, C.

    2007-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have polluted soil and groundwater widely and for long term because of their low solubility at normal temperature. Several microorganisms, such as Pseudomonas sp., Sphigomonas sp., a white-rot fungus and so on, being able to decompose PAHs, have been isolated and researched. This study reported to investigate biodegradation of low molecule PAH by isolated bacteria from light oil polluted soil. 12 isolates were obtained from a light oil polluted soil using naphthalene, fluorene and anthracene as sole carbon source, of which 4 isolates grew with naphthalene, 4 isolates did with fluorene and 4 isolates did with anthracene. Among them 3 isolates showed the ability to degrade phenanthrene additionally. These phenanthrene degradation and growth rates were almost same as that of S. yanoikuyae (DSM6900), which is the typical bacteria of PAHs degrader. Therefore, the isolate seemed to have an expectation for PAHs degradation.

  13. Lipase Activity among Bacteria Isolated from Amazonian Soils

    PubMed Central

    Willerding, André Luis; de Oliveira, Luiz Antonio; Moreira, Francisco Wesen; Germano, Mariana Gomes; Chagas, Aloísio Freitas

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to select lipase-producing bacteria collected from different counties of the Amazon region. Of the 440 bacteria strains, 181 were selected for the lipase assay in qualitative tests at Petri dishes, being 75 (41%) lipase positive. The enzymatic index was determined during fifteen days at different temperatures (30°, 35°, 40°, and 45°C). The highest lipase activity was observed within 72 hours at 30°C. Twelve bacteria strains presented an index equal to or greater than the standard used like reference, demonstrating the potential of microbial resource. After the bioassay in Petri dishes, the selected bacteria strains were analyzed in quantitative tests on p-nitrophenyl palmitate (p-NPP). A group of the strains was selected for other phases of study with the use in oleaginous substrates of the Amazonian flora, aiming for the application in processes like oil biotransformation. PMID:22007294

  14. Enrichment and isolation of crude oil degrading bacteria from some mussels collected from the Persian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Zeynab; Hassanshahian, Mehdi; Hesni, Majid Askari

    2015-12-15

    To date, little is known about existing relationships between mussels and bacteria in hydrocarbon-contaminated marine environments. The aim of this study is to find crude oil degrading bacteria in some mussels at the Persian Gulf. Twenty eight crude oil degrading bacteria were isolated from three mussels species collected from oil contaminated area at Persian Gulf. According to high growth and degradation of crude oil four strains were selected between 28 isolated strains for more study. Determination the nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding for 16S rRNA show that these isolated strains belong to: Shewanella algae isolate BHA1, Micrococcus luteus isolate BHA7, Pseudoalteromonas sp. isolate BHA8 and Shewanella haliotis isolate BHA35. The residual crude oil in culture medium was analysis by Gas Chromatography (GC). The results confirmed that these strains can degrade: 47.24%, 66.08%, 27.13% and 69.17% of crude oil respectively. These strains had high emulsification activity and biosurfactant production. Also, the effects of some factors on crude oil degradation by isolated strains were studied. The results show that the optimum concentration of crude oil was 2.5% and the best degradation take place at 12% of salinity. This research is the first reports on characterization of crude oil degrading bacteria from mussels at Persian Gulf and by using of these bacteria in the field the effect of oil pollution can be reduce on this marine environment.

  15. [Purple sulfur bacteria isolated from reservoirs of the Yavoriv sulfur deposit].

    PubMed

    Kim, L Ia; Hudz', S P

    2007-01-01

    Three pure cultures of purple sulfur bacteria were isolated from reservoirs of the Yavoriv sulfur deposit. The studying of their morphology, cytology and physiology has confirmed the belonging of these bacteria to Chromatiaceae family and has allowed identifying them as Thiocapsa sp., Lamprocystis sp. and Chromatium sp.

  16. Genome Sequences of Three Spore-Forming Bacteria Isolated from the Feces of Organically Raised Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Victoria; Van Laar, Tricia A.; Aleru, Omoshola; Thomas, Michael; Ganci, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic feed supplements have been implicated in the rise of multidrug-resistant bacteria. An alternative to antibiotics is probiotics. Here, we report the genome sequences of two Bacillus and one Solibacillus species, all spore-forming, Gram-positive bacteria, isolated from the feces organically raised chicken feces, with potential to serve as probiotics. PMID:27587809

  17. Effects of carbon dioxide on the fate of Listeria monocytogenes, of aerobic bacteria and on the development of spoilage in minimally processed fresh endive.

    PubMed

    Carlin, F; Nguyen-the, C; Abreu Da Silva, A; Cochet, C

    1996-09-01

    Minimally processed fresh broad-leaved endive (Cichorium endivia L.) were stored at 3 and 10 degrees C in modified atmospheres containing air, 10% CO2/10% O2, 30% CO2/10% O2, and 50% CO2/10% O2. The effects of these modified atmospheres on the fate of both aerobic bacteria and three strains of Listeria monocytogenes, was investigated. Increases in CO2 concentrations significantly reduced the growth of the aerobic microflora. The best preservation of the visual quality occurred on endive leaves stored in 10% CO2/10% O2, whereas leaves stored in 30% CO2/10% O2 and 50% CO2/10% O2, and to a lesser extent in air, showed extensive spoilage after storage. Listeria monocytogenes was slightly affected at 3 degrees C by the modified atmospheres, as compared to air. At 10 degrees C, results varied between replicate experiments, but L. monocytogenes generally grew better as the CO2 concentration was increased. The three test strains behaved in a similar way. In conclusion, among the modified atmospheres tested, a modified atmosphere containing 10% CO2/10% O2 resulted in improved visual quality of minimally processed fresh endive, without a marked effect on the growth of the aerobic microflora or of L. monocytogenes.

  18. Comparative in vitro activities of azithromycin, Bay y 3118, levofloxacin, sparfloxacin, and 11 other oral antimicrobial agents against 194 aerobic and anaerobic bite wound isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, E J; Nesbit, C A; Citron, D M

    1995-01-01

    The activities of sparfloxacin, levofloxacin, Bay y 3118, azithromycin, cefprozil, loracarbef, and nine other oral antimicrobial agents against 194 aerobic and anaerobic clinical bite wound isolates were determined by the agar dilution method. Sparfloxacin, levofloxacin, and Bay y 3118 were active against all aerobic isolates (MICs at which 90% of the isolates are inhibited [MIC90], < or = 1.0 microgram/ml for sparfloxacin and levofloxacin and 0.1 microgram/ml for Bay y 3118) and many anaerobic isolates, with the exception of the fusobacteria. Azithromycin was more active than erythromycin by 1 to 2 dilutions against many aerobes, including Pasteurella multocida and Eikenella corrodens, and by 2 to 4 dilutions against anaerobic isolates. Cefprozil was more active (MIC90, < or = 1 microgram/ml) than loracarbef (MIC90, < or = 4 micrograms/ml) against aerobic gram-positive isolates, but both had poor activity (MIC90, > or = 16 micrograms/ml) against peptostreptococci. Both cefprozil and loracarbef had MIC90s of < or = 0.5 micrograms/ml against P. multocida. PMID:7625795

  19. Molecular analysis of endophytic bacteria from the genus Bacillus isolated from tropical maize (Zea mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, José Edson Fontes; Gomes, Eliane Aparecida; Guimarães, Claudia Teixeira; de Paula Lana, Ubiraci Gomes; Teixeira, Marta Aparecida; Lima, Guilherme Vitor Corrêa; Bressan, Wellington

    2009-01-01

    Endophytic bacteria play an important role in agriculture by improving plant performance and adaptation against biotic and abiotic stresses. In the present study molecular methods were used for identifying Bacillus endophytic bacteria isolated from Brazilian sweet corn. SDS-PAGE of whole-cell protein extract of forty-two isolates revealed a high number of scrutinable bands. Twenty-four isolates were identified in nine different groups of duplicated bacteria and eighteen were identified as unique. Some high-accumulated polipeptides with variable length were observed in almost isolates. Partial sequencing of 16S ribosomal gene revealed that all isolates are Bacillus sp. and among thirteen isolates with similar protein profiles, two were different strains. Among the forty-two isolates identified by rDNA sequencing, Bacillus subitilis and B. pumilus were the most frequenty species (15 and 12 isolates, respectively) followed by B. licheniformes (7 isolates), B. cereus (5 isolates) and B. amiloliquefascens (3 isolates). According to present results, SDS-PAGE technique could be used as a fast and cheap first tool for identifying inter-specific variation in maize endophytic bacterial collections while rDNA sequencing could be applied for analyzing intra-specific variation among isolates with similar protein profile as well as for taxonomic studies. PMID:24031395

  20. Potential of siderophore production by bacteria isolated from heavy metal: polluted and rhizosphere soils.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Khalid A; Joo, Jin Ho

    2014-06-01

    Recently, heavy metals have been shown to have a stimulating effect on siderophore biosynthesis in various bacteria. In addition, several studies have found that siderophore production is greater in bacteria isolated from soil near plant roots. The aim of this study was to compare the production of siderophores by bacterial strains isolated from heavy metal-contaminated and uncontaminated soils. Chrome azurol sulphonate was used to detect siderophore secretion by several bacterial strains isolated from heavy metal-contaminated and rhizosphere-uncontaminated soils with both a qualitative disc diffusion method and a quantitative ultraviolet spectrophotometric method. Siderophore production by rhizosphere bacteria was significantly greater than by bacteria isolated from contaminated soil. The Pearson's correlation test indicated a positive correlation between the amount of siderophore produced by bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere using the quantitative and qualitative detection methods and the amount of heavy metal in the soil. However, a significant negative correlation was observed between the amount of siderophore produced by bacteria isolated from heavy metal-contaminated soil and the amount of heavy metal (r value of -0.775, P < 0.001).

  1. Identification and antibacterial resistance of bacteria isolated from poultry.

    PubMed

    El-Rami, Fadi E; Sleiman, Fawwak T; Abdelnoor, Alexander M

    2012-01-01

    Food-borne infections are among the prominent health hazards. Antibacterial agents (ABA) are usually administered to poultry in Lebanon as antibiotic growth promoters (AGP), which might lead to the dissemination of resistant bacterial strains. The aims of this study were to isolate potential food borne pathogens from poultry and investigate an association between AGP usage and antibacterial resistance (ABR). Isolates were obtained from the culture of cloacae swabs and identified. Escherichia coli was the predominant isolate. There was a significant association between the use of tetracycline and gentamicin as AGP and the number of E. coli isolates resistant to these ABA.

  2. Isolation and identification of bacteria from paperboard food packaging

    PubMed Central

    Mashhadi Mohammadzadeh-Vazifeh, Mojtaba; Khajeh-Nasiri, Shamsolmoluk; Hashemi, Shabnam; Fakhari, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Paper and paperboard packaging play an important role in safety and quality of food products. Common bacteria of paper and paperboard food packaging could grow due to specific conditions included humidity, temperature and major nutrition to contaminate the food. The purpose of this research was to investigate numbers and the types of bacteria in the food packaging paperboard. Materials and Methods: The surface and the depth of the each paperboard sample were examined by the dimension of one cm2 and one gram. The paperboard samples were randomly collected from popular confectionaries and fast food restaurants in Tehran, Iran. Results: The results indicated the range of 0.2×103 to >1.0×105 cfu/1g bacterial contamination in paperboard food packaging. Also, most detected bacteria were from spore forming and family Bacillaceae. Conclusion: The bioburden paperboard used for food packaging showed high contamination rate more than standard acceptance level. PMID:26719786

  3. Aerobic and anaerobic cecal bacterial flora of commercially processed broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences in the bacterial flora of aerobic and anaerobic cultures of broiler ceca collected from a commercial poultry processing facility were determined. Bacterial isolates from cecal cultures were selected based on the ability of the bacteria to grow in media supplemented with lactate and succ...

  4. Genetic Diversity and Association Characters of Bacteria Isolated from Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Spore Walls.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, Gopal; Krishnamoorthy, Ramasamy; Kim, Kiyoon; Sa, Tong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Association between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and bacteria has long been studied. However, the factors influencing their association in the natural environment is still unknown. This study aimed to isolate bacteria associated with spore walls of AMF and identify their potential characters for association. Spores collected from coastal reclamation land were differentiated based on their morphology and identified by 18S rDNA sequencing as Funneliformis caledonium, Racocetra alborosea and Funneliformis mosseae. Bacteria associated with AMF spore walls were isolated after treating them with disinfection solution at different time intervals. After 0, 10 and 20 min of spore disinfection, 86, 24 and 10 spore associated bacteria (SAB) were isolated, respectively. BOX-PCR fingerprinting analysis showed that diverse bacterial communities were associated to AMF spores. Bacteria belonging to the same genera could associate with different AMF spores. Gram positive bacteria were more closely associated with AMF spores. Isolated SAB were characterized and tested for spore association characters such as chitinase, protease, cellulase enzymes and exopolysaccharide production (EPS). Among the 120 SAB, 113 SAB were able to show one or more characters for association and seven SAB did not show any association characters. The 16S rDNA sequence of SAB revealed that bacteria belonging to the phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bactereiodes were associated with AMF spore walls.

  5. Genetic Diversity and Association Characters of Bacteria Isolated from Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Spore Walls

    PubMed Central

    Selvakumar, Gopal; Krishnamoorthy, Ramasamy; Kim, Kiyoon; Sa, Tong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Association between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and bacteria has long been studied. However, the factors influencing their association in the natural environment is still unknown. This study aimed to isolate bacteria associated with spore walls of AMF and identify their potential characters for association. Spores collected from coastal reclamation land were differentiated based on their morphology and identified by 18S rDNA sequencing as Funneliformis caledonium, Racocetra alborosea and Funneliformis mosseae. Bacteria associated with AMF spore walls were isolated after treating them with disinfection solution at different time intervals. After 0, 10 and 20 min of spore disinfection, 86, 24 and 10 spore associated bacteria (SAB) were isolated, respectively. BOX-PCR fingerprinting analysis showed that diverse bacterial communities were associated to AMF spores. Bacteria belonging to the same genera could associate with different AMF spores. Gram positive bacteria were more closely associated with AMF spores. Isolated SAB were characterized and tested for spore association characters such as chitinase, protease, cellulase enzymes and exopolysaccharide production (EPS). Among the 120 SAB, 113 SAB were able to show one or more characters for association and seven SAB did not show any association characters. The 16S rDNA sequence of SAB revealed that bacteria belonging to the phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bactereiodes were associated with AMF spore walls. PMID:27479250

  6. Bacteria isolated from parasitic nematodes--a potential novel vector of pathogens?

    PubMed

    Lacharme-Lora, Lizeth; Salisbury, Vyv; Humphrey, Tom J; Stafford, Kathryn; Perkins, Sarah E

    2009-12-21

    Bacterial pathogens are ubiquitous in soil and water - concurrently so are free-living helminths that feed on bacteria. These helminths fall into two categories; the non-parasitic and the parasitic. The former have been the focus of previous work, finding that bacterial pathogens inside helminths are conferred survival advantages over and above bacteria alone in the environment, and that accidental ingestion of non-parasitic helminths can cause systemic infection in vertebrate hosts. Here, we determine the potential for bacteria to be associated with parasitic helminths. After culturing helminths from fecal samples obtained from livestock the external bacteria were removed. Two-hundred parasitic helminths from three different species were homogenised and the bacteria that were internal to the helminths were isolated and cultured. Eleven different bacterial isolates were found; of which eight were indentified. The bacteria identified included known human and cattle pathogens. We concluded that bacteria of livestock can be isolated in parasitic helminths and that this suggests a mechanism by which bacteria, pathogenic or otherwise, can be transmitted between individuals. The potential for helminths to play a role as pathogen vectors poses a potential livestock and human health risk. Further work is required to assess the epidemiological impact of this finding.

  7. Production of halomethanes and isoprene in the culture of bacteria isolated from brackish water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, T.; Taniai, G.; Kurihara, M.; Tamegai, H.; Hashimoto, S.

    2010-12-01

    Halomethanes produced naturally are important source of halogen in troposphere and stratosphere. In the ocean, macroalgae and phytoplankton have been considered to be the main producers of halomethanes. Recent investigations have shown that marine bacteria also produces halomethane such as iodomethane. However, knowledge of aquatic halomethane production, especially by bacteria, is insufficient. Here we survey bacteria, which produce volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including halomethanes, from brackish area (salinity: about 5‰) where high halomethane productions were observed. Bacteria was isolated and incubated in marine broth 2216, which is the media for marine bacteria. The VOCs such as halomethanes in the gas phase above cultured samples was determined using dynamic headspace (GESTEL DHS) - gas chromatograph (Agilent 6890N)- mass spectrometer (Agilent 5975C). The optical density at 600 nm (OD600) was also measured during the cultured period. From the result of the isolation and measurement of VOCs, some of the isolated bacteria produced halomethanes. For example, monohalomethanes (from 1 to about 600 nM) and isoprene (up to about 400 nM) were increased for several days in the culture (dibromomethane, chloroiodomethane, bromoiodomethane, and tribromomethane were not detected). Since halomethanes are abundant at the sampling point (under 1% of light intensity of the surface), bacteria is one of the possible candidates for halomethane producer there. Now, we are studying on the identification by 16S rRNA sequence analysis of bacteria collected from brackish water.

  8. [Characteristics of microbial community structure during isolation of electrical active bacteria].

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Zhao, Yang- Guo; Lu, Shan-Shan

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the effect of selective culturing on microorganisms and functional role of electrical active bacteria in biofilm, some exoelectrogens were isolated from microbial fuel cell (MFC) anodic biofilm using Hungate roll-tube technique with iron oxide as indicator. At the same time, the dynamics of the microbial community structure was monitored during the pure culture isolation. The results show that maximum voltages of MFCs feeding with lactic acid, acetic acid and steroid wastewater are 0.57, 0.60 and 0.40 V respectively. The dominant bacteria isolated from seed sludge and anodic films feeding with acetate and lactate belong to phylum Proteobacteria; while steroid wastewater contains relative high diversity of bacteria, i. e. Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. After enriching and culturing, two bacteria were consequently obtained, which shared the highest similarity with Enterobacter ludwigii and Citrobacter freundii respectively. When inoculated in MFC with lactic acid as the substrate, they produced maximum voltage of 0.10 and 0.17 V individually. This study shows that electrical active bacteria can be isolated from the MFC anodic biofilm using anaerobic gradient dilution culture techniques with iron oxide as indicator. Microbial community structure presents markedly shifting during the bacteria isolation owing to its selectivity.

  9. Multidrug-Resistance and Toxic Metal Tolerance of Medically Important Bacteria Isolated from an Aquaculture System

    PubMed Central

    Resende, Juliana Alves; Silva, Vânia L.; Fontes, Cláudia Oliveira; Souza-Filho, Job Alves; de Oliveira, Tamara Lopes Rocha; Coelho, Cíntia Marques; César, Dionéia Evangelista; Diniz, Cláudio Galuppo

    2012-01-01

    The use of antimicrobials and toxic metals should be considered carefully in aquaculture and surrounding environments. We aimed to evaluate medically relevant bacteria in an aquaculture system and their susceptibility to antimicrobials and toxic metals. Selective cultures for enterobacteria (ENT), non-fermenting Gram-negative rods (NFR) and Gram-positive cocci (GPC) were obtained from water samples collected in two different year seasons. The isolated bacteria were biochemically identified and antimicrobial and toxic metal susceptibility patterns were determined. Overall, 407 representative strains were recovered. In general, bacteria isolated from fish ponds showed higher multiple antibiotic resistance indices when compared to those isolated from a water-fed canal. Resistance to penicillin and azithromycin was observed more frequently in the GPC group, whereas resistance to ampicillin and ampicillin/sulbactam or gentamicin was observed more frequently in the ENT and NFR groups, respectively. All the isolated bacteria were tolerant to nickel, zinc, chromium and copper at high levels (≥1,024 μg mL−1), whereas tolerance to cadmium and mercury varied among the isolated bacteria (2–1,024 μg mL−1). Multidrug-resistant bacteria were more frequent and diverse in fish ponds than in the water-fed canal. A positive correlation was observed between antimicrobial resistance and metal tolerance. The data point out the need for water treatment associated with the aquaculture system. PMID:22972388

  10. Isolation and Physiology of Bacteria from Contaminated Subsurface Sediments▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bollmann, Annette; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Lewis, Kim; Epstein, Slava S.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of environmental microorganisms cannot be grown by traditional techniques. Here we employed, and contrasted with conventional plating, an alternative approach based on cultivation of microorganisms inside diffusion chambers incubated within natural samples, followed by subculturing in petri dishes. Using this approach, we isolated microorganisms from subsurface sediments from the Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. The sediments were acidic and highly contaminated with uranium, heavy metals, nitrate, and organic pollutants. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed clear differences between diversity of isolates obtained by the diffusion chamber approach and those obtained by conventional plating. The latter approach led to isolation of members of the Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia. Isolates obtained via the diffusion chamber approach represented the Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. Notably, one-third of the isolates obtained by the new method were closely related to species known from previous molecular surveys conducted in the FRC area. Since the initial growth of microorganisms inside diffusion chambers occurred in the presence of the environmental stress factors, we expected the isolates we obtained to be tolerant of these factors. We investigated the physiologies of selected isolates and discovered that the majority were indeed capable of growth under low pH and/or high concentrations of heavy metals and nitrate. This indicated that in contrast to conventional isolation, the diffusion chamber-based approach leads to isolation of species that are novel, exhibit tolerance to extant environmental conditions, and match some of the species previously discovered by molecular methods. PMID:20870785

  11. Isolation, Characterisation and Antagonistic Activity of Bacteria Symbionts Hardcoral Pavona sp. Isolated from Panjang Island, Jepara Against Infectious Multi-drug Resistant (MDR) Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayuningrum, D.; Kristiana, R.; Asagabaldan, M. A.; Sabdono, A.; Radjasa, O. K.; Nuryadi, H.; Trianto, A.

    2017-02-01

    Pavona sp. is highly spread over Indonesian waters including Panjang Island. Several studies showed that bacteria symbionts hardcoral were the big source of antibiotic product, but there was limited research of the bacteria symbionts with hardcoral Pavona sp. In this research bacteria symbionts from hardcoral Pavona sp. had been collected from Panjang Island, Jepara. Marine bacteria symbionts were isolated by serial dillution method, while antibacterial activity was performed by using overlay and agar block method. The total of 2 from 5 isolates were active to MDR bacteria such as Enterobacter aerogenes and Acinetobacter baumanii, the code were PHC 44/04 and PHC 44/05. Then both of them were identified by morphological and molecular DNA characterization using 16 S rRNA gene sequence. The result of 16 S rRNA identification shows PHC 44/04 has 99% similarities with Virgibacillus salarius strain sa-Vb 1, while PHC 44/05 shows 99% similarities with Pseudoalteromonas flavipulchra strain NCIMB 2033.

  12. Aerobic and anoxic growth and nitrate removal capacity of a marine denitrifying bacterium isolated from a recirculation aquaculture system.

    PubMed

    Borges, Maria-Teresa; Sousa, André; De Marco, Paolo; Matos, Ana; Hönigová, Petra; Castro, Paula M L

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial biofilters used in marine recirculation aquaculture systems need improvements to enhance nitrogen removal efficiency. Relatively little is known about biofilter autochthonous population structure and function. The present study was aimed at isolating and characterizing an autochthonous denitrifying bacterium from a marine biofilter installed at a recirculation aquaculture system. Colonization of four different media in a marine fish farm was followed by isolation of various denitrifying strains and molecular classification of the most promising one, strain T2, as a novel member of the Pseudomonas fluorescens cluster. This strain exhibits high metabolic versatility regarding N and C source utilization and environmental conditions for growth. It removed nitrate through aerobic assimilatory metabolism at a specific rate of 116.2 mg NO(3)-N g dw(-1) h(-1). Dissimilatory NO(3)-N removal was observed under oxic conditions at a limited rate, where transient NO(2)-N formed represented 22% (0.17 mg L(-1)) of the maximum transient NO(2)-N observed under anoxic conditions. Dissimilatory NO(3)-N removal under anoxic conditions occurred at a specific rate of 53.5 mg NO(3)-N g dw(-1) h(-1). The isolated denitrifying strain was able to colonize different materials, such as granular activated carbon (GAC), Filtralite and Bioflow plastic rings, which allow the development of a prototype bioreactor for strain characterization under dynamic conditions and mimicking fish-farm operating conditions.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas hussainii Strain MB3, a Denitrifying Aerobic Bacterium Isolated from the Rhizospheric Region of Mangrove Trees in the Andaman Islands, India.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Shubham K; Saxena, Rituja; Mittal, Parul; Gupta, Ankit; Sharma, Vineet K

    2017-02-02

    The genome sequence of Pseudomonas hussainii MB3, isolated from the rhizospheric region of mangroves in the Andaman Islands, is comprised of 3,644,788 bp and 3,159 protein coding genes. Draft genome analysis indicates that MB3 is an aerobic bacterium capable of performing assimilatory sulfate reduction, dissimilatory nitrate reduction, and denitrification.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Anoxybacillus mongoliensis Strain MB4, a Sulfur-Utilizing Aerobic Thermophile Isolated from a Hot Spring in Tattapani, Central India

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Parul; Saxena, Rituja

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Anoxybacillus mongoliensis strain MB4, an aerobic thermophile, was isolated from a hot spring located in central India. Its first draft genome sequence reported in this study comprises 2,807,516 bp and 2,853 protein-coding genes. Detailed genomic analysis indicates that it is capable of performing sulfur metabolism. PMID:28254979

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas hussainii Strain MB3, a Denitrifying Aerobic Bacterium Isolated from the Rhizospheric Region of Mangrove Trees in the Andaman Islands, India

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Shubham K.; Saxena, Rituja; Mittal, Parul; Gupta, Ankit

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genome sequence of Pseudomonas hussainii MB3, isolated from the rhizospheric region of mangroves in the Andaman Islands, is comprised of 3,644,788 bp and 3,159 protein coding genes. Draft genome analysis indicates that MB3 is an aerobic bacterium capable of performing assimilatory sulfate reduction, dissimilatory nitrate reduction, and denitrification. PMID:28153890

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Anoxybacillus mongoliensis Strain MB4, a Sulfur-Utilizing Aerobic Thermophile Isolated from a Hot Spring in Tattapani, Central India.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Parul; Saxena, Rituja; Sharma, Vineet K

    2017-03-02

    Anoxybacillus mongoliensis strain MB4, an aerobic thermophile, was isolated from a hot spring located in central India. Its first draft genome sequence reported in this study comprises 2,807,516 bp and 2,853 protein-coding genes. Detailed genomic analysis indicates that it is capable of performing sulfur metabolism.

  17. Isolation characterization and growth of locally isolated hydrocarbonoclastic marine bacteria (eastern Algerian coast).

    PubMed

    Feknous, N; Branes, Z; Rouabhia, K; Batisson, I; Amblard, C

    2017-01-01

    The Algerian coastline is being exposed to several types of pollution, including that of hydrocarbons. This environment rich in oil could be the source of proliferation of hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria. The objective of the study is to isolate and identify indigenous bacterial strains from marine waters of two ports in the eastern Algerian coast and to test their growth in the presence of hydrocarbons with and without biostimulation throughout the intake of nitrogen and phosphate. Results recorded the highest level of both total hydrocarbons and phosphates in the port of Annaba, followed by El-Kala station and then the control station, while that of total nitrogen was vice versa. Fifty-three bacterial strains were identified from which four were selected to perform the growth tests. Results showed that the growth and the biodegradation differ from one species to another. Thus, the strains tested (Halomonas venusta NY-8, Exiguobacterium aurantiacum NB11-3A, Vibrio alginolyticus Pb-WC11099, and Dietzia sp. CNJ898 PL04) seem very active, in which better growth was obtained with the last two strains during nitrogen and phosphate supplementation. Such strains are suggested to participate a lot in the biodegradation of oil at polluted sites.

  18. The aflatoxin B1 isolating potential of two lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hamidi, Adel; Mirnejad, Reza; Yahaghi, Emad; Behnod, Vahid; Mirhosseini, Ali; Amani, Sajad; Sattari, Sara; Darian, Ebrahim Khodaverdi

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine lactic acid bacteria's capability to enhance the process of binding and isolating aflatoxin B1 and to utilize such lactic acid bacteria as a food supplement or probiotic products for preventing absorption of aflatoxin B1 in human and animal bodies. Methods In the present research, the bacteria were isolated from five different sources. For surveying the capability of the bacteria in isolating aflatoxin B1, ELISA method was implemented, and for identifying the resultant strains through 16S rRNA sequencing method, universal primers were applied. Results Among the strains which were isolated, two strains of Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus beveris exhibited the capability of absorbing and isolating aflatoxin B1 by respectively absorbing and discharging 17.4% and 34.7% of the aforementioned toxin existing in the experiment solution. Conclusions Strains of Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus beveris were isolated from human feces and local milk samples, respectively. And both strains has the ability to isolate or bind with aflatoxin B1. PMID:23998015

  19. Application of a single-colony coculture technique to the isolation of hitherto unculturable gut bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshiki; Benno, Yoshimi

    2015-02-01

    Molecular studies have led to postulation of a relationship between gut microbiota and certain diseases. However, because studies of hitherto uncultured species in vivo are essential for characterizing the biology and pathogenic properties of gut bacteria, techniques for culturing and isolating such bacteria must be developed. Here, a technique is described that partially overcomes the obstacles that prevent detection of interbacterial communication in vitro and are thus responsible for the failure to culture certain bacterial species. For this purpose, a ring with a membrane filter at the bottom was designed and a relatively simple nutrient medium was used instead of conventional media. Gut bacteria were cocultivated in soft agar separated by the membrane filter to simulate interbacterial communication in vitro. Use of this soft agar coculture technique led to the successful isolation of hitherto uncultured bacteria and the demonstration of multistage interbacterial communication among gut bacteria in vitro. Cultivation and isolation of single colonies of bacteria that require other bacteria for growth will enhance efforts to better understand the physiological and pathogenic roles of gut microbiota.

  20. High isolation rates of multidrug-resistant bacteria from water and carpets of mosques

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed Ali, Mostafa Mohamed; Alemary, Fuoad; Alrtail, Amna; Rzeg, Moftah M.; Albakush, Abdulla M.; Ghenghesh, Khalifa Sifaw

    2014-01-01

    Objective There is little information regarding the isolation of antimicrobial-resistant potentially pathogenic bacteria from water and carpets of mosques worldwide. The objective of the present investigation is to determine the bacteriological quality of water and carpets of mosques in Elkhomes city in Libya. Methods Potentially pathogenic bacteria were isolated from water samples (n=44) and dust samples from carpets (n=50) of 50 mosques in Elkhomes city, Libya, using standard bacteriological procedures. Susceptibility of isolated bacteria to antimicrobial agents was determined by the disc-diffusion method. Results Of the water samples examined, 12 (27.3%) were positive for Escherichia coli, 10 (22.7%) for Klebsiella spp., and 15 (34.1%) for other enteric bacteria. Of the dust samples of carpets examined, 6 (12%) were positive for E. coli, 33 (66%) for Klebsiella spp., and 30 (60%) for Staphylococcus spp. Multidrug resistance (MDR, resistance to three or more antimicrobial groups) was found among 48.7% (19/37) and 46.9% (30/64) of the examined enterobacteria from water and carpets, respectively, and among 66.7% (20/30) of Staphylococcus spp. from carpets. In addition, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was isolated from a carpet of one mosque. Conclusion Presence of multidrug-resistant potentially pathogenic bacteria in examined water and carpets indicate that mosques as communal environments may play a role in the spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria in the community and pose a serious health risk to worshipers. PMID:25128691

  1. Isolation and characterization of bacteriocinogenic lactic bacteria from M-Tuba and Tepache, two traditional fermented beverages in México.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente-Salcido, Norma M; Castañeda-Ramírez, José Cristobal; García-Almendárez, Blanca E; Bideshi, Dennis K; Salcedo-Hernández, Rubén; Barboza-Corona, José E

    2015-09-01

    Mexican Tuba (M-Tuba) and Tepache are Mexican fermented beverages prepared mainly with pineapple pulp and coconut palm, respectively. At present, reports on the microbiota and nutritional effects of both beverages are lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine whether M-Tuba and Tepache contain cultivable lactic acid bacteria (LAB) capable of producing bacteriocins. Tepache and M-Tuba contain mesophilic aerobic bacteria, LAB, and yeast. Bacillus subtilis, Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria innocua, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella typhimurium, and Salmonella spp, were the microorganisms most susceptible to metabolites produced by bacterial isolates. M-Tuba and Tepache contain bacteria that harbor genes coding for nisin and enterocin, but not pediocin. The presence of Lactococcus lactis and E. faecium in M-Tuba and Tepache, was identified by 16S rDNA. These bacteria produced bacteriocins of ∼3.5 kDa and 4.0-4.5 kDa, respectively. Partial purified bacteriocins showed inhibitory effect against Micrococcus luteus, L. monocytogenes, L. innocua, Str. agalactiae, S. aureus, Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis, E. faecalis, and K. pneumoniae. We characterized, for the first time, cultivable microbiota of M-Tuba and Tepache, and specifically, identified candidate lactic bacteria (LAB) present in these beverages that were capable of synthesizing antimicrobial peptides, which collectively could provide food preservative functions.

  2. Isolation and characterization of bacteriocinogenic lactic bacteria from M-Tuba and Tepache, two traditional fermented beverages in México

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente-Salcido, Norma M; Castañeda-Ramírez, José Cristobal; García-Almendárez, Blanca E; Bideshi, Dennis K; Salcedo-Hernández, Rubén; Barboza-Corona, José E

    2015-01-01

    Mexican Tuba (M-Tuba) and Tepache are Mexican fermented beverages prepared mainly with pineapple pulp and coconut palm, respectively. At present, reports on the microbiota and nutritional effects of both beverages are lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine whether M-Tuba and Tepache contain cultivable lactic acid bacteria (LAB) capable of producing bacteriocins. Tepache and M-Tuba contain mesophilic aerobic bacteria, LAB, and yeast. Bacillus subtilis, Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria innocua, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella typhimurium, and Salmonella spp, were the microorganisms most susceptible to metabolites produced by bacterial isolates. M-Tuba and Tepache contain bacteria that harbor genes coding for nisin and enterocin, but not pediocin. The presence of Lactococcus lactis and E. faecium in M-Tuba and Tepache, was identified by 16S rDNA. These bacteria produced bacteriocins of ∼3.5 kDa and 4.0–4.5 kDa, respectively. Partial purified bacteriocins showed inhibitory effect against Micrococcus luteus, L. monocytogenes, L. innocua, Str. agalactiae, S. aureus, Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis, E. faecalis, and K. pneumoniae. We characterized, for the first time, cultivable microbiota of M-Tuba and Tepache, and specifically, identified candidate lactic bacteria (LAB) present in these beverages that were capable of synthesizing antimicrobial peptides, which collectively could provide food preservative functions. PMID:26405529

  3. Isolation and characterization of monochloroacetic acid-degrading bacteria.

    PubMed

    Horisaki, Tadafumi; Yoshida, Eiko; Sumiya, Kaori; Takemura, Tetsuo; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    Five Burkholderia strains (CL-1, CL-2, CL-3, CL-4, and CL-5) capable of degrading monochloroacetic acid (MCA) were isolated from activated sludge or soil samples gathered from several parts of Japan. All five isolates were able to grow on MCA as the sole source of carbon and energy, and argentometry and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analyses showed that these five strains consumed MCA completely and released chloride ions stoichiometrically within 25 h. The five isolates also grew on monobromoacetic acid, monoiodoacetic acid, and L-2-monochloropropionic acid as sole sources of carbon and energy. In addition, the five isolates could not grow with DCA but dehalogenate single chlorine from DCA. Because PCR analyses revealed that all five isolates have an identical group II dehalogenase gene fragment and no group I deh gene, only strain CL-1 was analyzed further. The partial amino acid sequence of the group II dehalogenase of strain CL-1, named DehCL1, showed 74.6% and 65.2% identities to corresponding regions of the two MCA dehalogenases, DehCI from Pseudomonas sp. strain CBS-3 and Hdl IVa from Burkholderia cepacia strain MBA4, respectively. The secondary-structure motifs of the haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily and the amino acid residues involved in substrate binding, catalysis, and hydrophobic pocket formation were conserved in the partial amino acid sequence of DehCL1.

  4. Microbiological oxidation of antimony(III) with oxygen or nitrate by bacteria isolated from contaminated mine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Terry, Lee R.; Kulp, Thomas R.; Wiatrowski, Heather A.; Miller, Laurence G.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial oxidation of arsenite [As(III)] is a well-studied and important biogeochemical pathway that directly influences the mobility and toxicity of arsenic in the environment. In contrast, little is known about microbiological oxidation of the chemically similar anion antimonite [Sb(III)]. In this study, two bacterial strains, designated IDSBO-1 and IDSBO-4, which grow on tartrate compounds and oxidize Sb(III) using either oxygen or nitrate, respectively, as a terminal electron acceptor, were isolated from contaminated mine sediments. Both isolates belonged to the Comamonadaceae family and were 99% similar to previously described species. We identify these novel strains as Hydrogenophagataeniospiralis strain IDSBO-1 and Variovorax paradoxus strain IDSBO-4. Both strains possess a gene with homology to the aioA gene, which encodes an As(III)-oxidase, and both oxidize As(III) aerobically, but only IDSBO-4 oxidized Sb(III) in the presence of air, while strain IDSBO-1 could achieve this via nitrate respiration. Our results suggest that expression of aioA is not induced by Sb(III) but may be involved in Sb(III) oxidation along with an Sb(III)-specific pathway. Phylogenetic analysis of proteins encoded by the aioA genes revealed a close sequence similarity (90%) among the two isolates and other known As(III)-oxidizing bacteria, particularly Acidovorax sp. strain NO1. Both isolates were capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth using As(III) as a primary electron donor, and strain IDSBO-4 exhibited incorporation of radiolabeled [14C]bicarbonate while oxidizing Sb(III) from Sb(III)-tartrate, suggesting possible Sb(III)-dependent autotrophy. Enrichment cultures produced the Sb(V) oxide mineral mopungite and lesser amounts of Sb(III)-bearing senarmontite as precipitates.

  5. Microbiological Oxidation of Antimony(III) with Oxygen or Nitrate by Bacteria Isolated from Contaminated Mine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Lee R.; Wiatrowski, Heather; Miller, Laurence G.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial oxidation of arsenite [As(III)] is a well-studied and important biogeochemical pathway that directly influences the mobility and toxicity of arsenic in the environment. In contrast, little is known about microbiological oxidation of the chemically similar anion antimonite [Sb(III)]. In this study, two bacterial strains, designated IDSBO-1 and IDSBO-4, which grow on tartrate compounds and oxidize Sb(III) using either oxygen or nitrate, respectively, as a terminal electron acceptor, were isolated from contaminated mine sediments. Both isolates belonged to the Comamonadaceae family and were 99% similar to previously described species. We identify these novel strains as Hydrogenophaga taeniospiralis strain IDSBO-1 and Variovorax paradoxus strain IDSBO-4. Both strains possess a gene with homology to the aioA gene, which encodes an As(III)-oxidase, and both oxidize As(III) aerobically, but only IDSBO-4 oxidized Sb(III) in the presence of air, while strain IDSBO-1 could achieve this via nitrate respiration. Our results suggest that expression of aioA is not induced by Sb(III) but may be involved in Sb(III) oxidation along with an Sb(III)-specific pathway. Phylogenetic analysis of proteins encoded by the aioA genes revealed a close sequence similarity (90%) among the two isolates and other known As(III)-oxidizing bacteria, particularly Acidovorax sp. strain NO1. Both isolates were capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth using As(III) as a primary electron donor, and strain IDSBO-4 exhibited incorporation of radiolabeled [14C]bicarbonate while oxidizing Sb(III) from Sb(III)-tartrate, suggesting possible Sb(III)-dependent autotrophy. Enrichment cultures produced the Sb(V) oxide mineral mopungite and lesser amounts of Sb(III)-bearing senarmontite as precipitates. PMID:26431974

  6. Microbiological oxidation of antimony(III) with oxygen or nitrate by bacteria isolated from contaminated mine sediments.

    PubMed

    Terry, Lee R; Kulp, Thomas R; Wiatrowski, Heather; Miller, Laurence G; Oremland, Ronald S

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial oxidation of arsenite [As(III)] is a well-studied and important biogeochemical pathway that directly influences the mobility and toxicity of arsenic in the environment. In contrast, little is known about microbiological oxidation of the chemically similar anion antimonite [Sb(III)]. In this study, two bacterial strains, designated IDSBO-1 and IDSBO-4, which grow on tartrate compounds and oxidize Sb(III) using either oxygen or nitrate, respectively, as a terminal electron acceptor, were isolated from contaminated mine sediments. Both isolates belonged to the Comamonadaceae family and were 99% similar to previously described species. We identify these novel strains as Hydrogenophaga taeniospiralis strain IDSBO-1 and Variovorax paradoxus strain IDSBO-4. Both strains possess a gene with homology to the aioA gene, which encodes an As(III)-oxidase, and both oxidize As(III) aerobically, but only IDSBO-4 oxidized Sb(III) in the presence of air, while strain IDSBO-1 could achieve this via nitrate respiration. Our results suggest that expression of aioA is not induced by Sb(III) but may be involved in Sb(III) oxidation along with an Sb(III)-specific pathway. Phylogenetic analysis of proteins encoded by the aioA genes revealed a close sequence similarity (90%) among the two isolates and other known As(III)-oxidizing bacteria, particularly Acidovorax sp. strain NO1. Both isolates were capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth using As(III) as a primary electron donor, and strain IDSBO-4 exhibited incorporation of radiolabeled [(14)C]bicarbonate while oxidizing Sb(III) from Sb(III)-tartrate, suggesting possible Sb(III)-dependent autotrophy. Enrichment cultures produced the Sb(V) oxide mineral mopungite and lesser amounts of Sb(III)-bearing senarmontite as precipitates.

  7. Isolation and characterisation of azoxystrobin degrading bacteria from soil.

    PubMed

    Howell, Christopher C; Semple, Kirk T; Bending, Gary D

    2014-01-01

    The first strobilurin fungicides were introduced in 1996, and have since been used in a vast array of disease/plant systems worldwide. The strobilurins now consist of 16 compounds and represent the 2nd most important fungicide group worldwide with 15% of the total fungicide market share. Strobilurins are moderately persistent in soil, and some degradation products (e.g. azoxystrobin acid) have been detected as contaminants of freshwater systems. Little is currently known about the transformation processes involved in the biodegradation of strobilurins or the microbial groups involved. Using sequential soil and liquid culture enrichments, we isolated two bacterial strains which were able to degrade the most widely used strobilurin, azoxystrobin, when supplied as a sole carbon source. 16S rRNA showed that the strains showed homology to Cupriavidus sp. and Rhodanobacter sp. Both isolated strains were also able to degrade the related strobilurin compounds trifloxystrobin, pyraclostrobin, and kresoxim-methyl. An additional nitrogen source was required for degradation to occur, but the addition of a further carbon source reduced compound degradation by approximately 50%. However, (14)C radiometric analysis showed that full mineralisation of azosxystrobin to (14)CO2 was negligible for both isolates. 16S rRNA T-RFLP analysis using both DNA and RNA extracts showed that degradation of azoxystrobin in soil was associated with shifts in bacterial community structure. However, the phylotypes which proliferated during degradation could not be attributed to the isolated degraders.

  8. Isolation and identification of cobalt- and caesium-resistant bacteria from a nuclear fuel storage pond.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Linda; Osborne, Thomas H; Santini, Joanne M

    2014-10-01

    One of the issues facing the nuclear power industry is how to store spent nuclear fuel which is contaminated with radionuclides produced during nuclear fission, including caesium ((134)Cs(+), (135)Cs(+) and (137)Cs(+)) and cobalt ((60)Co(2+)). In this study, we have isolated Co(2+)- and Cs(+)-resistant bacteria from water collected from a nuclear fuel storage pond. The most resistant Cs(+) and Co(2+) isolates grew in the presence of 500 mM CsCl and 3 mM CoCl2. Strain Cs67-2 is resistant to fourfold more Cs(+) than Cupriavidus metallidurans str. CH34 making it the most Cs(+)-resistant strain identified to date. The Cs(+)-resistant isolates were closely related to bacteria in the Serratia and Yersinia genera, while the Co(2+)-resistant isolates were closely related to the Curvibacter and Tardiphaga genera. These new isolates could be used for bioremediation.

  9. Molecular analysis of antimicrobial resistance in gram-negative bacteria isolated from fish farms in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yojiro; Ahmed, Ashraf M; Mahfouz, Nadia B; Kimura, Tomomi; El-Khodery, Sabry A; Moawad, Amgad A; Shimamoto, Tadashi

    2010-06-01

    As little is known about antimicrobial resistance genes in fish farms, this study was conducted to monitor the incidence and prevalence of a wide range of antimicrobial resistance genes in Gram-negative bacteria isolated from water samples taken from fish farms in the northern part of Egypt. Ninety-one out of two hundred seventy-four (33.2%) non-repetitive isolates of Gram-negative bacteria showed multidrug resistance phenotypes and harbored at least one antimicrobial resistance gene. PCR and DNA sequencing results showed that 72 (26.3%) isolates contain tetracycline resistance genes and 19 (6.9%) isolates were positive for class 1 integrons with 12 different gene cassettes. The beta-lactamase-encoding genes were identified in 14 (5.1%) isolates. The plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes, qnr and aac(6')-Ib-cr, were identified in 16 (5.8%) and 3 (1.1%) isolates, respectively. Finally, the florphenicol resistance gene, floR, was identified in four (1.5%) isolates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report for molecular characterization of antimicrobial resistance in Gram-negative bacteria isolated from fish farms in Africa.

  10. Resistance to β-lactams in Bacteria Isolated from Different Types of Portuguese Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Paula; Fernandes, Ruben; Prudêncio, Cristina; Brito, Luísa

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of β-lactam-resistant bacteria in six different types of Portuguese cheese. The numbers of ampicillin resistant (AMPr) bacteria varied from 4.7 × 102 to 1.5 × 107 CFU/g. Within 172 randomly selected β-lactam-resistant bacteria, 44 resistant phenotypes were found and 31.4% were multidrug resistant. The majority (85%) of the isolates identified belonged to the Enterobacteriaceae family. The presence of the blaTEM gene was detected in 80.9% of the tested isolates. The results suggest that without thermal processing of the milk and good hygienic practices, cheese may act as a vehicle of transfer of β-lactam-resistant bacteria to the gastrointestinal tract of consumers. PMID:19468324

  11. Coincident plasmids and antimicrobial resistance in marine bacteria isolated from polluted and unpolluted Atlantic Ocean Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Baya, A.M.; Brayton, P.R.; Brown, V.L.; Grimes, D.J.; Russek-Cohen, E.; Colwell, R.R.

    1986-06-01

    Sewage effluent and outfall confluence samples were collected at the Barceloneta Regional Treatment Plant in Barceloneta, Puerto Rico; outfall confluence samples at Ocean City, Md., were also collected. Samples from uncontaminated open ocean areas served as clean-water controls. Bacteria were enriched in marine broth 2216 amended with 1 ..mu..g of one of a set of chemical selected for study per ml: nitrobenzene, dibutyl phthalate, m-cresol, o-cresol, 4-nitroaniline, bis(tributyltin) oxide, and quinone. MICs of the chemicals were determined individually for all isolates. Bacterial isolates were evaluated for resistance to nine different antibiotics and for the presence of plasmid DNA. Treated sewage was found to contain large numbers of bacteria simultaneously possessing antibiotic resistance, chemical resistance, and multiple bands of plasmic DNA. Bacteria resistant to penicillin, erythromycin, nalidixic acid, ampicillin, m-cresol, quinone, and bis(tributyltin) oxide were detected in nearly all samples, but only sewage outfall confluence samples yielded bacterial isolates that were resistant to streptomycin. Bacteria resistant to a combination of antibiotics, including kanamycin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, and tetracycline, were isolated only from sewage effluent samples. It is concluded that bacterial isolates derived from toxic chemical wastes more frequently contain plasmid DNA and demonstrate antimicrobial resistance than do bacterial isolates from domestic sewage-impacted waters or from uncontaminated open ocean sites.

  12. Lactate is released and taken up by isolated rabbit vagus nerve during aerobic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Véga, C; Poitry-Yamate, C L; Jirounek, P; Tsacopoulos, M; Coles, J A

    1998-07-01

    To determine if lactate is produced during aerobic metabolism in peripheral nerve, we incubated pieces of rabbit vagus nerve in oxygenated solution containing D-[U-14C]glucose while stimulating electrically. After 30 min, nearly all the radioactivity in metabolites in the nerve was in lactate, glucose 6-phosphate, glutamate, and aspartate. Much lactate was released to the bath: 8.2 pmol (microg dry wt)(-1) from the exogenous glucose and 14.2 pmol (microg dry wt)(-1) from endogenous substrates. Lactate release was not increased when bath PO2 was decreased, indicating that it did not come from anoxic tissue. When the bath contained [U-14C]lactate at a total concentration of 2.13 mM and 1 mM glucose, 14C was incorporated in CO2 and glutamate. The initial rate of formation of CO2 from bath lactate was more rapid than its formation from bath glucose. The results are most readily explained by the hypothesis that has been proposed for brain tissue in which glial cells supply lactate to neurons.

  13. Nitrogen Removal Characteristics of a Newly Isolated Indigenous Aerobic Denitrifier from Oligotrophic Drinking Water Reservoir, Zoogloea sp. N299.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ting-Lin; Zhou, Shi-Lei; Zhang, Hai-Han; Bai, Shi-Yuan; He, Xiu-Xiu; Yang, Xiao

    2015-05-04

    Nitrogen is considered to be one of the most widespread pollutants leading to eutrophication of freshwater ecosystems, especially in drinking water reservoirs. In this study, an oligotrophic aerobic denitrifier was isolated from drinking water reservoir sediment. Nitrogen removal performance was explored. The strain was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis as Zoogloea sp. N299. This species exhibits a periplasmic nitrate reductase gene (napA). Its specific growth rate was 0.22 h-1. Obvious denitrification and perfect nitrogen removal performances occurred when cultured in nitrate and nitrite mediums, at rates of 75.53%±1.69% and 58.65%±0.61%, respectively. The ammonia removal rate reached 44.12%±1.61% in ammonia medium. Zoogloea sp. N299 was inoculated into sterilized and unsterilized reservoir source waters with a dissolved oxygen level of 5-9 mg/L, pH 8-9, and C/N 1.14:1. The total nitrogen removal rate reached 46.41%±3.17% (sterilized) and 44.88%±4.31% (unsterilized). The cell optical density suggested the strain could survive in oligotrophic drinking water reservoir water conditions and perform nitrogen removal. Sodium acetate was the most favorable carbon source for nitrogen removal by strain N299 (p<0.05). High C/N was beneficial for nitrate reduction (p<0.05). The nitrate removal efficiencies showed no significant differences among the tested inoculums dosage (p>0.05). Furthermore, strain N299 could efficiently remove nitrate at neutral and slightly alkaline and low temperature conditions. These results, therefore, demonstrate that Zoogloea sp. N299 has high removal characteristics, and can be used as a nitrogen removal microbial inoculum with simultaneous aerobic nitrification and denitrification in a micro-polluted reservoir water ecosystem.

  14. The antagonism activity of bacteria isolated from potato cultivated soil.

    PubMed

    Mezaache-Aichour, S; Sayah, N; Zerroug, M M; Guechi, A

    2012-01-01

    Soil-borne fungal and bacterial root pathogens can cause serious losses to agricultural crops. Resistant plant varieties are not available for several soil-borne pathogens and chemical control is often insufficiently effective in soil. The enhancement of disease suppressive properties of soils will limit disease development, thus, being of great importance for sustainable agriculture as well as organic farming systems. The aim of this research is to find and identify suppressive soils in the Sétif's areas (potato field located in different regions of Sétif); this allows the selection of the indigenous soil bacteria that are able to develop several mechanisms of action related to biocontrol of phytopathogenic fungi affecting potato crops. Among 50 bacterial strains only 14 showed a wide range of antifungal action against the tested phytopathogenic fungi. With a range of inhibition percent from 0 to 92.30% especially Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. albedinis with 92% inhibition.

  15. Numerical taxonomy of phenanthrene-degrading bacteria isolated from the Chesapeake Bay.

    PubMed Central

    West, P A; Okpokwasili, G C; Brayton, P R; Grimes, D J; Colwell, R R

    1984-01-01

    Phenanthrene-degrading bacteria were isolated from Chesapeake Bay samples by the use of a solid medium which had been overlaid with an ethanol solution of phenanthrene before inoculation. Eighteen representative strains of phenanthrene-degrading bacteria with 21 type and reference bacteria were examined for 123 characteristics representing physiological, biochemical, and nutritional properties. Relationships between strains were computed with several similarity coefficients. The phenogram constructed by unweighted-pair-group arithmetic average linkage and use of the simple Jaccard (SJ) coefficient was used to identify seven phena. Phenanthrene-degrading bacteria were identified as Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio fluvialis by their clustering with type and reference strains. Several phenanthrene-degrading bacteria resembled Enterobacteriaceae family members, although some Vibrio-like phenanthrene degraders could not be identified. PMID:6508314

  16. Numerical taxonomy of phenanthrene-degrading bacteria isolated from the Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect

    West, P.A.; Okpokwasili, G.C.; Brayton, P.R.; Grimes, D.J.; Colwell, R.R.

    1984-11-01

    Phenanthrene-degrading bacteria were isolated from Chesapeake Bay samples by the use of a solid medium which had been overlaid with an ethanol solution of phenanthrene before inoculation. Eighteen representative strains of phenanthrene-degrading bacteria with 21 type and reference bacteria were examined for 123 characteristics representing physiological, biochemical, and nutritional properties. Relationships between strains were computed with several similarity coefficients. The phenogram constructed by unweighted-pair-group arithmetic average linkage and use of the simple Jaccard (S/sub J/) coefficient was used to identify seven phena. Phenanthrene-degrading bacteria were identified as Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio fluvialis by their clustering with type and reference strains. Several phenanthrene-degrading bacteria resembled Enterobacteriaceae family members, although some Vibrio-like phenanthrene degraders could not be identified. 22 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  17. Anaerobic facultative bacteria isolated from the gut of rabbits fed different diets.

    PubMed

    Canganella, F; Zirletta, G; Gualterio, L; Massa, S; Trovatelli, L D

    1992-11-01

    Anaerobic facultative bacteria colonizing the intestinal tract of conventional rabbits fed three different diets (standard pellet, hay and pellet/hay mixture) were enumerated in brain heart infusion agar. Colony counts recovered from homogenized samples of small intestine, caecum and rectum differed with reference to the diet given. Among anaerobic groups, identified from rabbit fed pellet/hay mixture, Enterococci (E. faecalis, E. avium, E. faecium and E. durans) represented the predominant flora. Enterobacters (E. cloacae and E. aerogenes) accounted for about 10 to 25% of the bacteria in the rectum and colon respectively, whereas Staphylococci (S. intermedius, S. epidermidis and S. lentus) represented 11% of the bacteria isolated from colon.

  18. Isolation and characterization of bacteria from midgut of the rice water weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Lu, Fang; Kang, Xiaoying; Jiang, Cong; Lou, Binggan; Jiang, Mingxing; Way, Michael O

    2013-10-01

    Gut bacteria are known to play important and often essential roles in the biology of insects. Theoretically, they can be genetically manipulated, then reintroduced into insects to negatively modify specific biological features. The weevil superfamily Curculionoidea is one of the most species-rich and successful animal groups on earth, but currently the overall knowledge of the bacterial communities in weevils and their associations with hosts is still limited. In this study, we isolated and characterized the bacteria in the midgut of an invasive weevil, Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel, by culturing methods. Female adults of this weevil were collected from four different geographic regions of the United States and mainland China. Sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA amplicons demonstrated that the major culturable gut bacteria of rice water weevil are γ-proteobacteria and Bacilli. The gut bacterial composition differs among regions, with many of the bacteria isolated from only a single region while several were detected from more than one region. Overall, the diversity of gut bacteria in rice water weevil is relatively low. The possible origins of certain bacteria are discussed in relation to the weevil, rice plant, and bacteria.

  19. Isolation and identification of bacteria associated with the surfaces of several algal species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zifeng; Xiao, Tian; Pang, Shaojun; Liu, Min; Yue, Haidong

    2009-09-01

    We conducted this study to assess the diversity of bacteria associated with the surfaces of algae based on 16S rDNA sequence analyses. Twelve strains of bacteria were obtained from the surfaces of the following four species of algae: Gracilaria textorii, Ulva pertusa, Laminaria japonica, and Polysiphonia urceolata. The isolated strains of bacteria can be divided into two groups: Halomonas and Vibrio, in physiology, biochemical characteristics and 16S rDNA sequence analyses. The phylogenetic tree constructed based on 16S rDNA sequences of the isolates shows four obvious clusters, Halomonas venusta, Vibrio tasmaniensis, Vibrio lentus, and Vibrio splendidus. Isolates from the surface of P. urceolata are more abundant and diverse, of which strains P9 and P28 have a 16S rDNA sequence very similar (97.5%-99.8%) to that of V. splendidus. On the contrary, the isolates from the surfaces of G. textorii, U. pertusa and L. japonica are quite simple and distribute on different branches of the phylogenetic tree. In overall, the results of this study indicate that the genetic relationships among the isolates are quite close and display a certain level of host species specificity, and alga-associated bacteria species are algal species specific.

  20. Arsenic resistance and accumulation by two bacteria isolated from a natural arsenic contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Neha; Bhatt, Renu

    2015-11-01

    Forty-three indigenous arsenic resistant bacteria were isolated from arsenic rich soil of Rajnandgaon district in the state of Chhattisgarh, India by enrichment culture technique. Among the isolates, two of the bacteria (As-9 and As-14) exhibited high resistance to As(V) [MIC ≥ 700 mM] and As(III) [MIC ≥ 10 mM] and were selected for further studies. Both these bacteria grew well in the presence of arsenic [20 mM As(V) and 5 mM As(III)], but the isolate As-14 strictly required arsenic for its survival and growth and was characterized as a novel arsenic dependent bacterium. The isolates contributed to 99% removal of arsenic from the growth medium which was efficiently accumulated in the cell. Quantitative estimation of arsenic through Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer revealed that there was >60% accumulation of both As(V) and As(III) by the two isolates. Scanning Electron Microscopic analysis showed a fourfold increase in bacterial cell volume when grown in the presence of arsenic and the results of Transmission Electron Microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy proved that such an alteration was due to arsenic accumulation. Such arsenic resistant bacteria with efficient accumulating property could be effectively applied in the treatment of arsenic contaminated water.

  1. Isolation and characterization of homodimeric type-I reaction center complex from Candidatus Chloracidobacterium thermophilum, an aerobic chlorophototroph.

    PubMed

    Tsukatani, Yusuke; Romberger, Steven P; Golbeck, John H; Bryant, Donald A

    2012-02-17

    The recently discovered thermophilic acidobacterium Candidatus Chloracidobacterium thermophilum is the first aerobic chlorophototroph that has a type-I, homodimeric reaction center (RC). This organism and its type-I RCs were initially detected by the occurrence of pscA gene sequences, which encode the core subunit of the RC complex, in metagenomic sequence data derived from hot spring microbial mats. Here, we report the isolation and initial biochemical characterization of the type-I RC from Ca. C. thermophilum. After removal of chlorosomes, crude membranes were solubilized with 0.1% (w/v) n-dodecyl β-D-maltoside, and the RC complex was purified by ion-exchange chromatography. The RC complex comprised only two polypeptides: the reaction center core protein PscA and a 22-kDa carotenoid-binding protein denoted CbpC. The absorption spectrum showed a large, broad absorbance band centered at ∼483 nm from carotenoids as well as smaller Q(y) absorption bands at 672 and 812 nm from chlorophyll a and bacteriochlorophyll a, respectively. The light-induced difference spectra of whole cells, membranes, and the isolated RC showed maximal bleaching at 840 nm, which is attributed to the special pair and which we denote as P840. Making it unique among homodimeric type-I RCs, the isolated RC was photoactive in the presence of oxygen. Analyses by optical spectroscopy, chromatography, and mass spectrometry revealed that the RC complex contained 10.3 bacteriochlorophyll a(P), 6.4 chlorophyll a(PD), and 1.6 Zn-bacteriochlorophyll a(P)' molecules per P840 (12.8:8.0:2.0). The possible functions of the Zn-bacteriochlorophyll a(P)' molecules and the carotenoid-binding protein are discussed.

  2. Isolation of acetic, propionic and butyric acid-forming bacteria from biogas plants.

    PubMed

    Cibis, Katharina Gabriela; Gneipel, Armin; König, Helmut

    2016-02-20

    In this study, acetic, propionic and butyric acid-forming bacteria were isolated from thermophilic and mesophilic biogas plants (BGP) located in Germany. The fermenters were fed with maize silage and cattle or swine manure. Furthermore, pressurized laboratory fermenters digesting maize silage were sampled. Enrichment cultures for the isolation of acid-forming bacteria were grown in minimal medium supplemented with one of the following carbon sources: Na(+)-dl-lactate, succinate, ethanol, glycerol, glucose or a mixture of amino acids. These substrates could be converted by the isolates to acetic, propionic or butyric acid. In total, 49 isolates were obtained, which belonged to the phyla Firmicutes, Tenericutes or Thermotogae. According to 16S rRNA gene sequences, most isolates were related to Clostridium sporosphaeroides, Defluviitoga tunisiensis and Dendrosporobacter quercicolus. Acetic, propionic or butyric acid were produced in cultures of isolates affiliated to Bacillus thermoamylovorans, Clostridium aminovalericum, Clostridium cochlearium/Clostridium tetani, C. sporosphaeroides, D. quercicolus, Proteiniborus ethanoligenes, Selenomonas bovis and Tepidanaerobacter sp. Isolates related to Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum produced acetic, butyric and lactic acid, and isolates related to D. tunisiensis formed acetic acid. Specific primer sets targeting 16S rRNA gene sequences were designed and used for real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The isolates were physiologically characterized and their role in BGP discussed.

  3. Isolation and characterization of crude oil degrading bacteria from the Persian Gulf (Khorramshahr provenance).

    PubMed

    Hassanshahian, Mehdi; Zeynalipour, Mohammad Saleh; Musa, Farzaneh Hosseinzadeh

    2014-05-15

    Fifteen crude oil degrading bacteria were isolated from oil contaminated sites in the Persian Gulf at Khorramshahr provenance. These bacteria were screened with two important factors such as growth rate on crude oil and hydrocarbon biodegradation, and then three strains were selected from 15 isolated strains for further study. One strain (PG-Z) that show the best crude oil biodegradation was selected between all isolates. Nucleotides sequencing of the gene encoding for 16S rRNA show that strain PG-Z belong to Corynebacterium variabile genus. This strain was efficient in degrading of crude oil. This strain was capable to degraded 82% of crude-oil after one week incubation in ONR7a medium. The PG-Z strain had high emulsification activity and biosurfactant production between all isolates. GC-MS analysis shows that C. variabile strain PG-Z can degrade different alkanes in crude oil.

  4. Evaluation of Malolactic Bacteria Isolated from Oregon Wines †

    PubMed Central

    Henick-Kling, T.; Sandine, W. E.; Heatherbell, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Oregon is a cool wine-producing region where grapes characteristically contain high concentrations of organic acids. To reduce the natural acidity and increase the microbiological stability and flavor complexity of the wine, malolactic fermentation is encouraged. In this study, strains of Leuconostoc oenos indigenous to Oregon wines were evaluated for their suitability to conduct malolactic fermentation in Oregon wines. Tests determined the malolactic activity of the Oregon isolates in comparison with commercial strains ML-34, PSU-1, MLT-kli, and ens 44-40 under various temperature and pH conditions. Sensitivities to sulfur dioxide, ethanol, and fumaric acid also were determined. Two Oregon strains, Er-1a and Ey-2d, were selected for commercial winemaking tests because they had greater malolactic activity under conditions of low pH (3.0) and low temperature (15 and 8°C), respectively. PMID:16347992

  5. Production of biosurfactant by indigenous isolated bacteria in fermentation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fooladi, Tayebeh; Hamid, Aidil Bin Abd; Yusoff, Wan Mohtar Wan; Moazami, Nasrin; Shafiee, Zahra

    2013-11-01

    Bacillus pumilus 2IR is a soil isolate bacterium from an Iranian oil field that produces promising yield of biosurfactant in medium E. The production of biosurfactant by strain 2IR has been investigated using different carbon and nitrogen sources. The strain was able to grow and to produce surfactant, reducing the surface tension of the medium from 60mN/m to 31mN/m on glucose after 72 h of cultivation. The strain was able to produce the maximum amount of biosurfactant (0.72 g/l) when potassium nitrate and glucose used as a nitrogen and carbon sources respectively. Production of biosurfactant reaches to highest amount at a C/N ratio of 12.

  6. Thermophilic lactic acid bacteria phages isolated from Argentinian dairy industries.

    PubMed

    Suárez, V B; Quiberoni, A; Binetti, A G; Reinheimer, J A

    2002-10-01

    Sixty-one natural phages (59 of Streptococcus thermophilus and 2 of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus) were isolated from Argentinian dairy plants from November 1994 to July 2000. Specifically, 17 yogurt samples (18% of all samples) and 26 cheese samples (79%) contained phages lytic to S. thermophilus strains. The number of viral particles found in samples ranged from 10(2) to 10(9) PFU/ml. The phages belonged to Bradley's group B or the Siphoviridae family (morphotype B1). They showed high burst size values and remarkably short latent periods. The results of this study show that phages were found more frequently in cheesemaking processes than in yogurt-making processes. The commercial streptococcus strains appeared to propagate more phages, whereas the natural strains propagated fewer phage strains. These results suggest that the naturally occurring cultures are inherently more phage resistant.

  7. Isolation and identification of soil bacteria growing at the expense of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Lecomte, Julie; St-Arnaud, Marc; Hijri, Mohamed

    2011-04-01

    Soil-microorganism symbioses are of fundamental importance for plant adaptation to the environment. Research in microbial ecology has revealed that some soil bacteria are associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). However, these interactions may be much more complex than originally thought. To assess the type of bacteria associated with AMF, we initially isolated spores of Glomus irregulare from an Agrostis stolonifera rhizosphere. The spores were washed with sterile water and plated onto G. irregulare mycelium growing in vitro in a root-free compartment of bicompartmented Petri dishes. We hypothesized that this system should select for bacteria closely associated with the fungus because the only nutrients available to the bacteria were those derived from the hyphae. Twenty-nine bacterial colonies growing on the AMF hyphae were subcultured and identified using 16S rRNA gene sequences. All bacterial isolates showed high sequence identity to Bacillus cereus, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus simplex, Kocuria rhizophila, Microbacterium ginsengisoli, Sphingomonas sp. and Variovorax paradoxus. We also assessed bacterial diversity on the surface of spores by PCR-denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis. Finally, we used live cellular imaging to show that the bacteria isolated can grow on the surface of hyphae with different growing patterns in contrast to Escherichia coli as a control.

  8. Multidrug resistant bacteria isolated from cockroaches in long-term care facilities and nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Pai, Hsiu-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Residents in long-term care facilities and nursing homes have a relative higher risk for infections. The nocturnal and filthy habits of cockroaches may be ideal disseminators of pathogenic microorganisms in these institutions. This study was designed to determine the infestation and vector potential of cockroaches under this institutional environment. Cockroaches were collected from 69 long-term care facilities and nursing homes in Kaohsiung City. Risk factors related to cockroach infestation were determined by questionnaire survey. In addition, bacteria were isolated and identified from the alimentary tract and external surface of these insects. Antibiotic resistances of these microorganisms were then determined. Cockroach infestation was found in 45 (65.2%) institutions and 558 cockroaches (119 Periplaneta americana and 439 Blattella germanica) were collected. A significant association was found between cockroach infestation and indoor environmental sanitation. From 250 adult cockroaches, 38 species of gram-negative bacteria, 20 species of glucose non-fermenter bacilli and 6 species of gram-positive bacteria were isolated. Moreover, antibiotic resistances were found among the bacteria isolated. These findings indicate that cockroaches have the potential in transmitting pathogenic bacteria with multidrug resistances in long-term care facilities and nursing homes.

  9. Novel pod for chlorine dioxide generation and delivery to control aerobic bacteria on the inner surface of floor drains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Floor drains in poultry processing and further processing plants are a harborage site for bacteria both free swimming and in biofilms. This population can include Listeria monocytogenes which has been shown to have potential for airborne spreading from mishandled open drains. Chlorine dioxide (ClO...

  10. Comparison of two transport systems available in Japan (TERUMO kenkiporter II and BBL Port-A-Cul) for maintenance of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Daichi; Takegawa, Hiroshi; Doi, Asako; Sakizono, Kenji; Kotani, Yoko; Miki, Kanji; Naito, Takuya; Niki, Marie; Miyamoto, Junko; Tamai, Koji; Nagata, Kazuma; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Tachikawa, Ryo; Otsuka, Kojiro; Katakami, Nobuyuki; Tomii, Keisuke

    2014-01-01

    The kenkiporter II (KP II) transport system is commonly used in many hospitals in Japan for transporting bacterial specimens to microbiology laboratories. Recently, the BBL Port-A-Cul (PAC) fluid vial became available. However, no reports thus far have compared the effectiveness of these two transport systems. We chose 4 aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria as well as 8 anaerobic organisms, and prepared three strains of each bacterium in culture media for placement into PAC and KP II containers. We compared the effectiveness of each transport system for preserving each organism at 6, 24, and 48 h after inoculation at room temperature. Thirty-six strains out of 12 bacteria were used in this study. The PAC system yielded better recovery in quantity of organisms than the KP II system at 6, 24 and 48 h. More strains were significantly recovered with the PAC system than with the KP II at 24 h (36/36 vs. 23/36, P < 0.001) and 48 h (30/36 vs. 12/36, P < 0.001). The PAC system was better in the recovery of viable organisms counted at 24 and 48 h after inoculation compared with the KP II system. The PAC system may be recommended for the transfer of bacterial specimens in clinical settings.

  11. How-to-Do-It: A Simple DNA Isolation Technique Using Halophilic Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilfoile, Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Described is a simple technique for isolating DNA from halophilic bacteria. Materials, procedure, and additional experiments are outlined. It is stated that the DNA obtained will be somewhat contaminated with cellular proteins and RNA. Offers a procedure for greater purification. (RT)

  12. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Artisanal Italian goat cheese.

    PubMed

    Colombo, E; Franzetti, L; Frusca, M; Scarpellini, M

    2010-04-01

    The lactic acid bacteria community in traditional goat cheese produced in three dairies in Valsesia (Piemonte, Italy) was studied at different steps of the manufacturing process. These cheeses were produced from raw milk without starter bacteria, and no protocol was followed during the manufacturing process. Three hundred thirty-two isolates were characterized and grouped by results of both morphophysiological tests and random amplification of polymorphic DNA plus PCR analysis. Bacteria were identified by partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Lactococci were the dominant lactic acid bacteria in raw milk. Their initial numbers ranged from 5 to 7 log CFU ml(-1). Their levels increased during manufacturing and decreased during ripening. The growth trend for enterococci was comparable to that of lactococci, although enterococci counts were lower. Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, Lactococcus garviae, and Enterococcus faecalis were the most frequently isolated species during goat cheese manufacturing, whereas the highest numbers of Enterococcus (E. faecium, E. durans, E. gilvus, and E. casseliflavus) were isolated with the greatest frequency from ripened cheese samples. Occasionally, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Leuconostoc lactis, and Lactobacillus paraplantarum also were isolated.

  13. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Some Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Bee Pollen: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    BELHADJ, Hani; HARZALLAH, Daoud; BOUAMRA, Dalila; KHENNOUF, Seddik; Dahamna, Saliha; GHADBANE, Mouloud

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, five hundred and sixty-seven isolates of lactic acid bacteria were recovered from raw bee pollen grains. All isolates were screened for their antagonistic activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. Neutralized supernatants of 54 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) cultures from 216 active isolates inhibited the growth of indicator bacteria. They were phenotypically characterized, based on the fermentation of 39 carbohydrates. Using the simple matching coefficient and unweighted pair group algorithm with arithmetic averages (UPGMA), seven clusters with other two members were defined at the 79% similarity level. The following species were characterized: Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactococcus lactis, Pediococcus acidilactici, Pediococcus pentosaceus, and unidentified lactobacilli. Phenotypic characteristics of major and minor clusters were also identified. Partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene of representative isolates from each cluster was performed, and ten strains were assigned to seven species: Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus ingluviei, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactobacillus acidipiscis and Weissella cibaria. The molecular method used failed to determine the exact taxonomic status of BH0900 and AH3133. PMID:24936378

  14. Epibiotic Vibrio luminous bacteria isolated from some hydrozoa and bryozoa species.

    PubMed

    Stabili, L; Gravili, C; Tredici, S M; Piraino, S; Talà, A; Boero, F; Alifano, P

    2008-11-01

    Luminous bacteria are isolated from both Hydrozoa and Bryozoa with chitinous structures on their surfaces. All the specimens of the examined hydroid species (Aglaophenia kirchenpaueri, Aglaophenia octodonta, Aglaophenia tubiformis, Halopteris diaphana, Plumularia setacea, Ventromma halecioides), observed under blue light excitation, showed a clear fluorescence on the external side of the perisarc (chitinous exoskeleton) around hydrocladia. In the bryozoan Myriapora truncata, luminous bacteria are present on the chitinous opercula. All the isolated luminous bacteria were identified on the basis of both phenotypic and genotypic analysis. The isolates from A. tubiformis and H. diaphana were unambiguously assigned to the species Vibrio fischeri. In contrast, the isolates from the other hydroids, phenotypically assigned to the species Vibrio harveyi, were then split into two distinct species by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences and DNA-DNA hybridization experiments. Scanning electron microscopy analysis and results of culture-based and culture-independent approaches enabled us to establish that luminous vibrios represent major constituents of the bacterial community inhabiting the A. octodonta surface suggesting that the interactions between luminous bacteria and the examined hydrozoan and bryozoan species are highly specific. These interactions might have epidemiological as well as ecological implications because of the opportunistic pathogenicity of luminous Vibrio species for marine organisms and the wide-distribution of the hydrozoan and bryozoan functioning as carriers.

  15. Isolation and characterization of plant growth promoting endophytic diazotrophic bacteria from Korean rice cultivars.

    PubMed

    Ji, Sang Hye; Gururani, Mayank Anand; Chun, Se-Chul

    2014-01-20

    We have isolated 576 endophytic bacteria from the leaves, stems, and roots of 10 rice cultivars and identified 12 of them as diazotrophic bacteria using a specific primer set of nif gene. Through 16S rDNA sequence analysis, nifH genes were confirmed in the two species of Penibacillus, three species of Microbacterium, three Bacillus species, and four species of Klebsiella. Rice seeds treated with these plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) showed improved plant growth, increased height and dry weight and antagonistic effects against fungal pathogens. In addition, auxin and siderophore producing ability, and phosphate solubilizing activity were studied for the possible mechanisms of plant growth promotion. Among 12 isolates tested, 10 strains have shown higher auxin producing activity, 6 isolates were confirmed as strains with high siderophore producing activity while 4 isolates turned out to have high phosphate-solubilizing activity. These results strongly suggest that the endophytic diazotrophic bacteria characterized in this study could be successfully used to promote plant growth and inducing fungal resistance in plants.

  16. Cellulolytic and proteolytic ability of bacteria isolated from gastrointestinal tract and composting of a hippopotamus.

    PubMed

    da Cruz Ramos, Geomárcia Feitosa; Ramos, Patricia Locosque; Passarini, Michel Rodrigo Zambrano; Vieira Silveira, Marghuel A; Okamoto, Débora Noma; de Oliveira, Lilian Caroline Gonçalves; Zezzo, Larissa Vieira; Marem, Alyne; Santos Rocha, Rafael Costa; da Cruz, João Batista; Juliano, Luiz; de Vasconcellos, Suzan Pantaroto

    2016-03-01

    The bioprospection for cellulase and protease producers is a promise strategy for the discovery of potential biocatalysts for use in hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials as well as proteic residues. These enzymes can increment and turn viable the production of second generation ethanol from different and alternative sources. In this context, the goal of this study was the investigation of cellulolytic and proteolytic abilities of bacteria isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of a hippopotamus as well as from its composting process. It is important to highlight that hippopotamus gastrointestinal samples were a non-typical sources of efficient hydrolytic bacteria with potential for application in biotechnological industries, like biofuel production. Looking for this, a total of 159 bacteria were isolated, which were submitted to qualitative and quantitative enzymatic assays. Proteolytic analyzes were conducted through the evaluation of fluorescent probes. Qualitative assays for cellulolytic abilities revealed 70 positive hits. After quantitative analyzes, 44 % of these positive hits were selected, but five (5) strains showed cellulolytic activity up to 11,8 FPU/mL. Regarding to proteolytic activities, six (6) strains showed activity above 10 %, which overpassed results described in the literature. Molecular analyzes based on the identification of 16S rDNA, revealed that all the selected bacterial isolates were affiliated to Bacillus genus. In summary, these results strongly indicate that the isolated bacteria from a hippopotamus can be a potential source of interesting biocatalysts with cellulolytic and proteolytic activities, with relevance for industrial applications.

  17. [Characteristics of bacteria isolated from body surface of German cockroaches caught in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Czajka, Ewa; Pancer, Katarzyna; Kochman, Maria; Gliniewicz, Aleksandra; Sawicka, Bozena; Rabczenko, Daniel; Stypułkowska-Misiurewicz, Hanna

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the study was to identify bacterial flora from external parts of German cockroaches caught in hospitals. The susceptibility of the bacteria to the most important groups of antimicrobial agents was also examined. 80 strains of bacteria were isolated, among them 34 strains of Gram-positive cocci and 31 strains of Gram-negative rods. One of isolated strains of Citrobacter freundii and two strains of Serratia liquefaciens showed ESBL mechanism of resistance and extended level of AmpC--type beta-lactamases. Two Staphylococcus strains (S. epidermidis and S. equorum) were resistant to erythromycin and clindamycin (MLSB mechanism of resistance). Such strains, resistant to antibiotics and chemiotherapeutics may be reservoirs of resistance genes which can be transmitted into other bacteria. Presence of such pathogens on the body surface of German cockroaches, very mobile insects, might create conditions for easy dissemination of them in hospital environment.

  18. Amoebae-resisting bacteria isolated from human nasal swabs by amoebal coculture.

    PubMed

    Greub, Gilbert; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier

    2004-03-01

    Amoebae feed on bacteria, and few bacteria can resist their microbicidal ability. Amoebal coculture could therefore be used to selectively grow these amoebae-resisting bacteria (ARB), which may be human pathogens. To isolate new ARB, we performed amoebal coculture from 444 nasal samples. We recovered 7 (1.6%) ARB from 444 nasal swabs, including 4 new species provisionally named Candidatus Roseomonas massiliae, C. Rhizobium massiliae, C. Chryseobacterium massiliae, and C. Amoebinatus massiliae. The remaining isolates were closely related to Methylobacterium extorquens, Bosea vestrii, and Achromobacter xylosoxidans. Thus, amoebal coculture allows the recovery of new bacterial species from heavily contaminated samples and might be a valuable approach for the recovery of as-yet unrecognized emerging pathogens from clinical specimens.

  19. Isolation, characterization and evaluation of probiotic lactic acid bacteria for potential use in animal production.

    PubMed

    García-Hernández, Yaneisy; Pérez-Sánchez, Tania; Boucourt, Ramón; Balcázar, José L; Nicoli, Jacques R; Moreira-Silva, João; Rodríguez, Zoraya; Fuertes, Héctor; Nuñez, Odalys; Albelo, Nereyda; Halaihel, Nabil

    2016-10-01

    In livestock production, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are the most common microorganisms used as probiotics. For such use, these bacteria must be correctly identified and characterized to ensure their safety and efficiency. In the present study, LAB were isolated from broiler excreta, where a fermentation process was used. Nine among sixteen isolates were identified by biochemical and molecular (sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene) methods as Lactobacillus crispatus (n=1), Lactobacillus pentosus (n=1), Weissella cibaria (n=1), Pediococcus pentosaceus (n=2) and Enterococcus hirae (n=4). Subsequently, these bacteria were characterized for their growth capabilities, lactic acid production, acidic pH and bile salts tolerance, cell surface hydrophobicity, antimicrobial susceptibility and antagonistic activity. Lactobacillus pentosus strain LB-31, which showed the best characteristics, was selected for further analysis. This strain was administered to broilers and showed the ability of modulating the immune response and producing beneficial effects on morpho-physiological, productive and health indicators of the animals.

  20. Isolation of bacteria with antibiotic resistance from household cockroaches (Periplaneta americana and Blattella germanica).

    PubMed

    Pai, Hsiu-Hua; Chen, Wei-Chen; Peng, Chien-Fang

    2005-03-01

    Cockroaches may harbor and disseminate microorganisms to the environment. In this study, Periplaneta americana and Blattella germanica were collected from 40 households in Kaohsiung City and Kaohsiung County, Taiwan. Cockroach infestation was found in 50% of the studied households and 226 cockroaches (123 P. americana and 103 B. germanica) collected by trapping. P. americana was more often found in the kitchen (70.7%) whereas B. germanica in the storage room (51.5%) and kitchen (36.9%). There was no significant difference between the percentages of P. americana (99.9%) and B. germanica (98.0%) carrying bacteria. A total of 25 species of bacteria was isolated from P. americana and only 21 from B. germanica. Antibiotic resistance was found in Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus species, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, and Proteus species isolated from the cockroaches. These findings suggest a potential role of cockroaches in the transmission of pathogenic bacteria with antibiotic resistance in households.

  1. Ammonium removal at low temperature by a newly isolated heterotrophic nitrifying and aerobic denitrifying bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens wsw-1001.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shumei; Sha, Changqing; Jiang, Wei; Li, Weiguang; Zhang, Duoying; Li, Jing; Meng, Liqiang; Piao, Yongjian

    2015-01-01

    A heterotrophic nitrifier wsw-1001 was isolated from Songhua River and identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens. Ammonium removal by the strain at low temperature was investigated. The effect of initial ammonium concentration (from 5 to 1000 mg/L) and culture temperature (from 4°C to 30°C) on ammonium removal efficiency was studied. Biodegradation product, [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], N2, N2O and intercellular N were monitored. The results indicated that the strain had potential for water and wastewater treatment. Ammonium could be removed by the strain at low temperature. Ammonium removal efficiency increased with temperature from 4°C to 20°C and decreased with ammonium concentration from 5 to 1000 mg/L. The strain exhibited a capability of heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification using [Formula: see text] as the sole nitrogen source at 8°C. [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] were reduced by the strain. Nitrogen balance analysis in the presence of 39.7 mg/L [Formula: see text] indicated that 71.2% [Formula: see text] was removed by converting to N2 (46.3%) and assimilating as biomass (42.5%). Substances such as [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and N2O were detected at very low concentrations. Ammonium mono-oxygenase, hydroxylamine oxidase, nitrite reductase and nitrate reductase activity were measured. The ammonium removal pathway of the strain was speculated to be [Formula: see text].

  2. Aerobic De-Epoxydation of Trichothecene Mycotoxins by a Soil Bacterial Consortium Isolated Using In Situ Soil Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei-Jie; Yuan, Qing-Song; Zhang, You-Bing; Guo, Mao-Wei; Gong, An-Dong; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Wu, Ai-Bo; Huang, Tao; Qu, Bo; Li, He-Ping; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2016-01-01

    Globally, the trichothecene mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON) and nivalenol (NIV) are among the most widely distributed mycotoxins that contaminate small grain cereals. In this study, a bacterial consortium, PGC-3, with de-epoxydation activity was isolated from soil by an in situ soil enrichment method. Screening of 14 soil samples that were sprayed with DON revealed that 4 samples were able to biotransform DON into de-epoxydized DON (dE-DON). Among these, the PGC-3 consortium showed the highest and most stable activity to biotransform DON into dE-DON and NIV into dE-NIV. PGC-3 exhibited de-epoxydation activity at a wide range of pH (5–10) and temperatures (20–37 °C) values under aerobic conditions. Sequential subculturing with a continued exposure to DON substantially reduced the microbial population diversity of this consortium. Analyses of the 16S rDNA sequences indicated that PGC-3 comprised 10 bacterial genera. Among these, one species, Desulfitobacterium, showed a steady increase in relative abundance, from 0.03% to 1.55% (a 52-fold increase), as higher concentrations of DON were used in the subculture media, from 0 to 500 μg/mL. This study establishes the foundation to further develop bioactive agents that can detoxify trichothecene mycotoxins in cereals and enables for the characterization of detoxifying genes and their regulation. PMID:27669304

  3. Characterization of root-nodule bacteria isolated from Vicia faba and selection of plant growth promoting isolates.

    PubMed

    Saïdi, Sabrine; Chebil, Samir; Gtari, Maher; Mhamdi, Ridha

    2013-06-01

    A collection of 104 isolates from root-nodules of Vicia faba was submitted to 16S rRNA PCR-RFLP typing. A representative sample was further submitted to sequence analysis of 16S rRNA. Isolates were assigned to 12 genera. All the nodulating isolates (45 %) were closely related to Rhizobium leguminosarum USDA2370(T) (99.34 %). The remaining isolates, including potential human pathogens, failed to nodulate their original host. They were checked for presence of symbiotic genes, P-solubilization, phytohormone and siderophore production, and then tested for their growth promoting abilities. Results indicated that 9 strains could induce significant increase (41-71 %) in shoot dry yield of faba bean. A Pseudomonas strain was further assessed in on-farm trial in combination with a selected rhizobial strain. This work indicated that nodule-associated bacteria could be a valuable pool for selection of effective plant growth promoting isolates. Nevertheless, the possible involvement of nodules in increasing risks related to pathogenic bacteria should not be neglected and needs to be investigated further.

  4. Efficacy of Locally Isolated Lactic Acid Bacteria Against Antibiotic-Resistant Uropathogens

    PubMed Central

    Manzoor, Asma; Ul-Haq, Ikram; Baig, Shahjhan; Qazi, Javed Iqbal; Seratlic, Sanja

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antibiotic resistance represents a serious global health threat to public health, so infections such as pneumonia and urinary tract infection (UTI) are becoming harder to treat. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an action plan to restrain the problem of antibiotic resistance. One approach in UTI control could be the use of lactobacilli because these indigenous inhabitants in human intestine have been found to play an important role in protecting the host from various infections. Objectives: We sought to check the efficacy of locally isolated Lactobacillus species to eradicate antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria causing UTI. Materials and Methods: Lactic acid bacteria isolated from spoiled fruits and vegetables and grown in MRS medium were screened against multi-drug-resistant Candida albicans, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Enterococcus fecalis. Results: Fifty-four lactic acid bacteria were isolated from spoiled fruits and vegetables, of which 11 Gram-positive and catalase-negative Lactobacillus isolates were identified by carbohydrate assimilation profiles as Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. paracasei, L. delbrueckii, L. casei, L. helveticus, L. brevis, L. salivarius, L. fermentum, L. rhamnosus, L. animalis, and L. plantarum. The latter organism had the highest abundance of all the samples, so its isolates were also verified through 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The isolated Lactobacilli were screened against multi-drug-resistant uropathogens, viz. C. albicans, P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae, E. fecalis, and E. coli. The growth inhibition zone (GIZ) was over 10 mm against all the uropathogenic test organisms, where L. fermentum and L. plantarum strains demonstrated remarkable inhibitory activities against E. coli and E. faecalis, with a GIZ up to 28 mm. The susceptibility test to 16 antibiotics showed multidrug resistance (3 to 5 antibiotics) among all the tested uropathogens. Conclusions: The obtained results

  5. Identification of aerobic gut bacteria from the kala azar vector, Phlebotomus argentipes: a platform for potential paratransgenic manipulation of sand flies.

    PubMed

    Hillesland, Heidi; Read, Amber; Subhadra, Bobban; Hurwitz, Ivy; McKelvey, Robin; Ghosh, Kashinath; Das, Pradeep; Durvasula, Ravi

    2008-12-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is an understudied parasitic disease responsible for significant global morbidity and mortality. We are presently investigating a method of disease prevention termed paratransgenesis. In this approach, symbiotic or commensal bacteria are transformed to produce anti-Leishmania molecules. The transformed bacteria are delivered back to sand flies to inactivate the parasite within the vector itself. In this study, we identified 28 distinct gut microorganisms from Phlebotomus argentipes trapped from four visceral leishmaniasis-endemic sites in India. A significant percent of Staphylococcus spp., environmental bacteria, and Enterobacteriaceae were identified. Two non-pathogenic organisms, Bacillus megaterium and Brevibacterium linens, were also isolated. Both organisms are also used extensively in industry. Our results indicate that B. megaterium and B. linens are possible candidates for use in a model of paratransgenesis to prevent transmission of Leishmania.

  6. Epidemiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of Gram-negative aerobic bacteria causing intra-abdominal infections during 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Hawser, Stephen; Hoban, Daryl J; Badal, Robert E; Bouchillon, Samuel K; Biedenbach, Douglas; Hackel, Meredith; Morrissey, Ian

    2015-02-01

    The study for monitoring antimicrobial resistance trends (SMART) surveillance program monitors the epidemiology and trends in antibiotic resistance of intra-abdominal pathogens to currently used therapies. The current report describes such trends during 2010-2011. A total of 25,746 Gram-negative clinical isolates from intra-abdominal infections were collected and classified as hospital-associated (HA) if the hospital length of stay (LOS) at the time of specimen collection was ≥48 hours, community-associated (CA) if LOS at the time of specimen collection was <48 hours, or unknown (no designation given by participating centre). A total of 92 different species were collected of which the most common was Escherichia coli: 39% of all isolates in North America to 55% in Africa. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the second most common pathogen: 11% of all isolates from Europe to 19% of all isolates from Asia. Isolates were from multiple intra-abdominal sources of which 32% were peritoneal fluid, 20% were intra-abdominal abscesses, and 16.5% were gall bladder infections. Isolates were further classified as HA (55% of all isolates), CA (39% of all isolates), or unknown (6% of all isolates). The most active antibiotics tested were imipenem, ertapenem, amikacin, and piperacillin-tazobactam. Resistance rates to all other antibiotics tested were high. Considering the current data set and high-level resistance of intra-abdominal pathogens to various antibiotics, further monitoring of the epidemiology of intra-abdominal infections and their susceptibility to antibiotics through SMART is warranted.

  7. [Antibiotic properties of the Pseudoalteromonas genus bacteria isolated from the Black Sea water and molluscs].

    PubMed

    Onyshchenko, O M; Kiprianova, O A; Lysenko, T H; Smirnov, V V

    2002-01-01

    Antagonistic properties of 41 strains of Alteromonas-like bacteria isolated from the Black Sea water and molluscs have been studied. Being grown on the rich medium "B" for marine bacteria, 21% of strains have shown high antagonistic activity against phytopathogenic fungi; 6% of strains inhibited the growth of Bacillus subtilis, Proteus vulgaris and Candida albicans. Spectrum of antagonistic activity was essentially changed on synthetic "BM" medium with acetate, glutamate, alpha-alanine as a single source of carbon and was directed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Culture liquids and acetone extracts of microbial biomass of 34% of the studied strains have shown activity against bacteria, fungi and cyanobacteria. Strains producing the wide spectrum of antimicrobial substances (Alteromonas macleodii, Pseudoalteromonas citrea, P. haloplanktis, P. aurantia, Pseudoalteromonas sp.), fungicidal and algocidal substances have been found. Both extra- and intracellular metabolities of marine bacteria (including the pigments) were active.

  8. Isolation of Fecal Coliform Bacteria from the Diamondback Terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin centrata)

    PubMed Central

    Harwood, Valerie J.; Butler, Joseph; Parrish, Danny; Wagner, Victoria

    1999-01-01

    Total and fecal coliform bacteria were isolated from the cloaca and feces of the estuarine diamondback terrapin. The majority of samples contained fecal coliforms. Escherichia coli was the predominant fecal coliform species isolated, and members of the genus Salmonella were isolated from 2 of 39 terrapins. Fecal coliform numbers are used to regulate shellfish harvests, and diamondback terrapins inhabit the brackish-water habitats where oyster beds are found; therefore, these findings have implications for the efficacy of current regulatory parameters in shellfishing waters. PMID:9925633

  9. Isolation of fecal coliform bacteria from the diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin centrata).

    PubMed

    Harwood, V J; Butler, J; Parrish, D; Wagner, V

    1999-02-01

    Total and fecal coliform bacteria were isolated from the cloaca and feces of the estuarine diamondback terrapin. The majority of samples contained fecal coliforms. Escherichia coli was the predominant fecal coliform species isolated, and members of the genus Salmonella were isolated from 2 of 39 terrapins. Fecal coliform numbers are used to regulate shellfish harvests, and diamondback terrapins inhabit the brackish-water habitats where oyster beds are found; therefore, these findings have implications for the efficacy of current regulatory parameters in shellfishing waters.

  10. Isolation and identification of amylase-producing, endospore-forming bacteria from the alimentary tract of commercially processed broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial cultures of crop and cecal contents of adult poultry contain beneficial bacteria that reduce colonization of young poultry by Salmonella. Since endospore-forming bacteria may play a role in competitive exclusion of Salmonella in poultry, 3 trials were conducted to isolate these bacteria fr...

  11. Innovative Approaches Using Lichen Enriched Media to Improve Isolation and Culturability of Lichen Associated Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Biosca, Elena G.; Flores, Raquel; Santander, Ricardo D.; Díez-Gil, José Luis; Barreno, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Lichens, self-supporting mutualistic associations between a fungal partner and one or more photosynthetic partners, also harbor non-photosynthetic bacteria. The diversity and contribution of these bacteria to the functioning of lichen symbiosis have recently begun to be studied, often by culture-independent techniques due to difficulties in their isolation and culture. However, culturing as yet unculturable lichenic bacteria is critical to unravel their potential functional roles in lichen symbiogenesis, to explore and exploit their biotechnological potential and for the description of new taxa. Our objective was to improve the recovery of lichen associated bacteria by developing novel isolation and culture approaches, initially using the lichen Pseudevernia furfuracea. We evaluated the effect of newly developed media enriched with novel lichen extracts, as well as the influence of thalli washing time and different disinfection and processing protocols of thalli. The developed methodology included: i) the use of lichen enriched media to mimic lichen nutrients, supplemented with the fungicide natamycin; ii) an extended washing of thalli to increase the recovery of ectolichenic bacteria, thus allowing the disinfection of thalli to be discarded, hence enhancing endolichenic bacteria recovery; and iii) the use of an antioxidant buffer to prevent or reduce oxidative stress during thalli disruption. The optimized methodology allowed significant increases in the number and diversity of culturable bacteria associated with P. furfuracea, and it was also successfully applied to the lichens Ramalina farinacea and Parmotrema pseudotinctorum. Furthermore, we provide, for the first time, data on the abundance of culturable ecto- and endolichenic bacteria that naturally colonize P. furfuracea, R. farinacea and P. pseudotinctorum, some of which were only able to grow on lichen enriched media. This innovative methodology is also applicable to other microorganisms inhabiting these

  12. Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate tolerance in bacteria isolated from sediment of tropical water bodies polluted with detergents.

    PubMed

    Eniola, Kehinde I T; Olayemi, Albert B

    2008-12-01

    The discharge of untreated detergent-bearing waste introduces linear alklcylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) to the aquatic environment. The surfactant persists in some streams and rivers in Nigeria, some is adsorbed to suspended materials and end in the sediment of the receiving water bodies. In this study, bacteria isolated from sediments of some tropical detergent-effluent-polluted streams were tested for tolerance to LAS using the media dilution technique. LAS-tolerance was indicated by growth of the bacteria in the presence of the surfactant. The pH, concentrations of surfactant, population of heterotrophic bacteria and population of LAS-tolerant bacteria in the sediments were determined. A direct relationship (r = 0.9124) was found between the alkaline conditions (pH= 8.2-12.0) and high surfactant concentrations (45-132 mg/g) in the sediment. The sediments harboured a high population and a wide variety of bacteria; the populations of viable heterotrophic bacteria (VHB: 2.9 x 10(5) to 1.2 x 10(7) cfu/g) and LAS tolerant bacteria (LTB: 1.5 x 10(4) to 1.2 x 10(6) cfu/g) had a direct relationship (r = 0.9500). An inverse relationship resulted between each of them and the concentration of surfactant in the sediment, r(VHB/LAS) = -0.9303 and r(LTB/LAS) = -0.9143, respectively. Twelve bacteria species were isolated from the sediment: Alcaligenes odorans, Bacillus subtilis, Burkholderia cepacia, Citrobacter freundii, Citrobacter diversus, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, Micrococcus albus, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcusfaecalis. Most of them were adapted to the surfactant with their maximum acceptable concentrations ranging between 0.03 and >1.0% (w/v). The sediments could serve as source of adapted organisms which can be used in bio-treatment of LAS-bearing waste.

  13. Burkholderia dabaoshanensis sp. nov., a Heavy-Metal-Tolerant Bacteria Isolated from Dabaoshan Mining Area Soil in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Honghui; Guo, Jianhua; Chen, Meibiao; Feng, Guangda; Yao, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Heavy-metal-tolerant bacteria, GIMN1.004T, was isolated from mine soils of Dabaoshan in South China, which were acidic (pH 2–4) and polluted with heavy metals. The isolation was Gram-negative, aerobic, non-spore-forming, and rod-shaped bacteria having a cellular width of 0.5−0.6 µm and a length of 1.3−1.8 µm. They showed a normal growth pattern at pH 4.0–9.0 in a temperature ranging from 5°C to 40°C.The organism contained ubiquinone Q-8 as the predominant isoprenoid quinine, and C16∶0, summed feature 8 (C18∶1ω7c and C18∶1ω6c), C18∶0, summed feature 3 (C16∶1ω7c or iso-C15∶0 2-OH), C17∶0 cyclo, C18∶1ω9c, C19∶0 cyclo ω8c, C14∶0 as major fatty acid. These profiles were similar to those reported for Burkholderia species. The DNA G+C % of this strain was 61.6%. Based on the similarity to 16S rRNA gene sequence, GIMN1.004T was considered to be in the genus Burkholderia. The similarities of 16S rRNA gene sequence between strain GIMN1.004T and members of the genus Burkholderia were 96−99.4%, indicating that this novel strain was phylogenetically related to members of that genus. The novel strain showed the highest sequence similarities to Burkholderia soli DSM 18235T (99.4%); Levels of DNA-DNA hybridization with DSM 18235T was 25%. Physiological and biochemical tests including cell wall composition analysis, differentiated phenotype of this strain from that closely related Burkholderia species. The isolation had great tolerance to cadmium with MIC of 22 mmol/L, and adsorbability of 144.94 mg/g cadmium,and it was found to exhibit antibiotic resistance characteristics. The adsorptive mechanism of GIMN1.004T for cadmium depended on the action of the amide,carboxy and phosphate of cell surface and producing low-molecular-weight (LMW ) organic acids to complex or chelated Cd2+.Therefore, the strain GIMN1.004T represented a new cadmium resistance species, which was tentatively named as Burkholderia dabaoshanensis sp. nov. The strain type is

  14. Isolation and characterization of integron-containing bacteria without antibiotic selection.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Robert S; Pemberton, John M; Desmarchelier, Patricia M; Gobius, Kari S

    2004-03-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance among pathogenic and commensal bacteria has become a serious problem worldwide. The use and overuse of antibiotics in a number of settings are contributing to the development of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. The class 1 and 2 integrase genes (intI1 and intI2, respectively) were identified in mixed bacterial cultures enriched from bovine feces by growth in buffered peptone water (BPW) followed by integrase-specific PCR. Integrase-positive bacterial colonies from the enrichment cultures were then isolated by using hydrophobic grid membrane filters and integrase-specific gene probes. Bacterial clones isolated by this technique were then confirmed to carry integrons by further testing by PCR and DNA sequencing. Integron-associated antibiotic resistance genes were detected in bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Aeromonas spp., Proteus spp., Morganella morganii, Shewanella spp., and urea-positive Providencia stuartii isolates from bovine fecal samples without the use of selective enrichment media containing antibiotics. Streptomycin and trimethoprim resistance were commonly associated with integrons. The advantages conferred by this methodology are that a wide variety of integron-containing bacteria may be simultaneously cultured in BPW enrichments and culture biases due to antibiotic selection can be avoided. Rapid and efficient identification, isolation, and characterization of antibiotic resistance-associated integrons are possible by this protocol. These methods will facilitate greater understanding of the factors that contribute to the presence and transfer of integron-associated antibiotic resistance genes in bacterial isolates from red meat production animals.

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Integron-Containing Bacteria without Antibiotic Selection

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Robert S.; Pemberton, John M.; Desmarchelier, Patricia M.; Gobius, Kari S.

    2004-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance among pathogenic and commensal bacteria has become a serious problem worldwide. The use and overuse of antibiotics in a number of settings are contributing to the development of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. The class 1 and 2 integrase genes (intI1 and intI2, respectively) were identified in mixed bacterial cultures enriched from bovine feces by growth in buffered peptone water (BPW) followed by integrase-specific PCR. Integrase-positive bacterial colonies from the enrichment cultures were then isolated by using hydrophobic grid membrane filters and integrase-specific gene probes. Bacterial clones isolated by this technique were then confirmed to carry integrons by further testing by PCR and DNA sequencing. Integron-associated antibiotic resistance genes were detected in bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Aeromonas spp., Proteus spp., Morganella morganii, Shewanella spp., and urea-positive Providencia stuartii isolates from bovine fecal samples without the use of selective enrichment media containing antibiotics. Streptomycin and trimethoprim resistance were commonly associated with integrons. The advantages conferred by this methodology are that a wide variety of integron-containing bacteria may be simultaneously cultured in BPW enrichments and culture biases due to antibiotic selection can be avoided. Rapid and efficient identification, isolation, and characterization of antibiotic resistance-associated integrons are possible by this protocol. These methods will facilitate greater understanding of the factors that contribute to the presence and transfer of integron-associated antibiotic resistance genes in bacterial isolates from red meat production animals. PMID:14982773

  16. Isolation of Extended Spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) Producing Bacteria from Urban Surface Waters in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Tissera, Shehani; Lee, Sui Mae

    2013-01-01

    Background: This was a preliminary study to test for the presence of multiple antibiotic-resistant extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria in Malaysian urban surface waters. Although the literature review revealed several published papers on clinical ESBL isolates in Malaysia, none were found on ESBL isolates obtained from local surface waters Methods: Isolated bacterial species were tested for resistance to cefotaxime, amoxicillin/clavulanate and aztreonam, and susceptibility to imipenem and meropenem using antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) by disc diffusion. This served as a screening step to detect bacteria that could be potential ESBL species. 16S ribose ribonucleic acid (rRNA) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing with two clusters of bla (β-lactamase) gene primers was used to test for the bla genes CTX-M (Groups 1, 2, 9), OXA-1, SHV and TEM. Results: A total of 19 isolates were found, possessing at least one of the bla genes tested for. There was a relatively high occurrence of CTX-M genes (84.2%) among these, followed by TEM genes (47.4%). The isolates were identified as Enterobacteriaceae (89.5%), predominantly Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Conclusion: There appears to be a high occurrence of ESBL-bacteria in local surface waters, among these being opportunistic pathogens. The persistence and spread of these species in the environment poses a threat to exposed human populations. PMID:23966820

  17. Isolation and characterization of beneficial bacteria associated with citrus roots in Florida.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Pankaj; Spann, Timothy; Wang, Nian

    2011-08-01

    Cultivable diversity of bacteria associated with citrus was investigated as part of a larger study to understand the roles of beneficial bacteria and utilize them to increase the productive capacity and sustainability of agro-ecosystems. Citrus roots from Huanglongbing (HLB) diseased symptomatic and asymptomatic citrus were used in this study. A total of 227 and 125 morphologically distinct colonies were isolated and characterized from HLB asymptomatic and symptomatic trees, respectively. We observed that the frequency of bacterial isolates possessing various plant beneficial properties was significantly higher in the asymptomatic samples. A total of 39 bacterial isolates showing a minimum of five beneficial traits related to mineral nutrition [phosphate (P) solubilization, siderophore production, nitrogen (N) fixation], development [indole acetic acid (IAA) synthesis], health [production of antibiotic and lytic enzymes (chitinase)], induction of systemic resistance [salicylic acid (SA) production], stress relief [production of 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase] and production of quorum sensing [N-acyl homoserine lactones] signals were characterized. A bioassay using ethidium monoazide (EMA)-qPCR was developed to select bacteria antagonistic to Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. Using the modified EMA-qPCR assay, we found six bacterial isolates showing maximum similarity to Paenibacillus validus, Lysinibacillus fusiformis, Bacillus licheniformis, Pseudomonas putida, Microbacterium oleivorans, and Serratia plymutica could significantly reduce the population of viable Ca. L. asiaticus in HLB symptomatic leaf samples. In conclusion, we have isolated and characterized multiple beneficial bacterial strains from citrus roots which have the potential to enhance plant growth and suppress diseases.

  18. Picoplankton Bloom in Global South? A High Fraction of Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria in Metagenomes from a Coastal Bay (Arraial do Cabo—Brazil)

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrat, Rafael R. C.; Ferrera, Isabel; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Dávila, Alberto M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Marine habitats harbor a great diversity of microorganism from the three domains of life, only a small fraction of which can be cultivated. Metagenomic approaches are increasingly popular for addressing microbial diversity without culture, serving as sensitive and relatively unbiased methods for identifying and cataloging the diversity of nucleic acid sequences derived from organisms in environmental samples. Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (AAP) play important roles in carbon and energy cycling in aquatic systems. In oceans, those bacteria are widely distributed; however, their abundance and importance are still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to estimate abundance and diversity of AAPs in metagenomes from an upwelling affected coastal bay in Arraial do Cabo, Brazil, using in silico screening for the anoxygenic photosynthesis core genes. Metagenomes from the Global Ocean Sample Expedition (GOS) were screened for comparative purposes. AAPs were highly abundant in the free-living bacterial fraction from Arraial do Cabo: 23.88% of total bacterial cells, compared with 15% in the GOS dataset. Of the ten most AAP abundant samples from GOS, eight were collected close to the Equator where solar irradiation is high year-round. We were able to assign most retrieved sequences to phylo-groups, with a particularly high abundance of Roseobacter in Arraial do Cabo samples. The high abundance of AAP in this tropical bay may be related to the upwelling phenomenon and subsequent picoplankton bloom. These results suggest a link between upwelling and light abundance and demonstrate AAP even in oligotrophic tropical and subtropical environments. Longitudinal studies in the Arraial do Cabo region are warranted to understand the dynamics of AAP at different locations and seasons, and the ecological role of these unique bacteria for biogeochemical and energy cycling in the ocean. PMID:26871866

  19. Thermotolerance and multidrug resistance in bacteria isolated from equids and their environment.

    PubMed

    Singh, B R

    2009-06-13

    Sixty-nine vaginal swabs and 138 rectal swabs collected from 195 equids were analysed for the presence of thermotolerant bacteria, that is, bacteria surviving at 60+/-0.1 degrees C for one hour. Thermotolerant Escherichia coli, Enterobacter species, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus species and Pseudomonas species were isolated from 41, 16, nine, three and three of the 138 rectal swabs, respectively; seven of the E coli and two of the Enterobacter species isolates survived pasteurisation at 63.8+/-0.1 degrees C for 30 minutes. All except three E coli, two Enterobacter species and one Proteus species isolate were resistant to three or more antimicrobial drugs, that is, they were multidrug resistant. Thermotolerant E coli, Enterobacter species and Proteus species were isolated from 11, two and two of the 69 vaginal swabs, respectively, but only one isolate of E coli survived pasteurisation at 63.8+/-0.1 degrees C for 30 minutes. All except two of the E coli isolates were multidrug resistant. None of the four thermotolerant isolates from nine soil samples collected on four of the farms where the equids were kept was pasteurisation resistant, but they were all multidrug resistant. Of the 10 pasteurisation-resistant isolates, nine were multidrug resistant but none was resistant to chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, cotrimazine, cotrimoxazole or streptomycin. All the isolates grew at 42+/-0.1 degrees C but none grew at 46+/-0.1 degrees C or above. The Enterobacter isolates were more tolerant to pasteurisation than the E coli isolates, particularly during the first few minutes of exposure.

  20. Isolation and characterization of halophilic bacteria from Urmia Lake in Iran.

    PubMed

    Vahed, Sepideh Zununi; Forouhandeh, Haleh; Hassanzadeh, Salar; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Hejazi, Mohammad Amin; Hejazi, Mohammad Saeid

    2011-01-01

    Urmia Lake is one of the most permanent hypersaline lakes in the world which is threatened by hypersalinity and serious dryness. In spite of its importance no paper has been published regarding bacterial community of this lake. Accordingly, the present study aimed to investigate the halophilic bacteria in the aforementioned lake. In so doing, thirty seven strains were isolated on six different culture media. The isolated strains were characterized using phenotypic and genotypic methods. Growth of the strains occurred at 2535 degrees C, pH 6-9 and 7 to 20% (w/v) NaCl indicating that most of the isolates were moderately halophiles. Catalase, oxidase and urease activities were found to be positive for the majority of the isolates. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the isolated bacteria belonged to two major taxa: Gammaproteobacteria (92%, including Salicola [46%], Pseudomonas [13.5%], Marinobacter [ 11%], Idiomarina [11%], and Halomonas [8%]) and Firmicutes (8%, including Bacillus [5%] and Halobacillus [3%]). In addition, a novel bacterium whose 16S rRNA gene sequence showed almost 98% sequence identity with the taxonomically troubled DSM 3050T, Halovibrio denitrificans HGD 3T and Halospina denitrificans HGD 1-3T, each, was isolated. 16S rRNA gene similarity levels along with phenotypic characteristics suggest that some of the isolated strains could be regarded as potential type strain for novel species, on which further studies are recommended.

  1. Isolation and characterization of cellulose-decomposing bacteria inhabiting sawdust and coffee residue composts.

    PubMed

    Fathallh Eida, Mohamed; Nagaoka, Toshinori; Wasaki, Jun; Kouno, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Clarifying the identity and enzymatic activities of microorganisms associated with the decomposition of organic materials is expected to contribute to the evaluation and improvement of composting processes. In this study, we examined the cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic abilities of bacteria isolated from sawdust compost (SDC) and coffee residue compost (CRC). Cellulolytic bacteria were isolated using Dubos mineral salt agar containing azurine cross-linked (AZCL) HE-cellulose. Bacterial identification was performed based on the sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes, and cellulase, xylanase, β-glucanase, mannanase, and protease activities were characterized using insoluble AZCL-linked substrates. Eleven isolates were obtained from SDC and 10 isolates from CRC. DNA analysis indicated that the isolates from SDC and CRC belonged to the genera Streptomyces, Microbispora, and Paenibacillus, and the genera Streptomyces, Microbispora, and Cohnella, respectively. Microbispora was the most dominant genus in both compost types. All isolates, with the exception of two isolates lacking mannanase activity, showed cellulase, xylanase, β-glucanase, and mannanase activities. Based on enzyme activities expressed as the ratio of hydrolysis zone diameter to colony diameter, it was suggested that the species of Microbispora (SDCB8, SDCB9) and Paenibacillus (SDCB10, SDCB11) in SDC and Microbispora (CRCB2, CRCB6) and Cohnella (CRCB9, CRCB10) in CRC contribute to efficient cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic processes during composting.

  2. Isolation of palm oil-utilising, polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA)-producing bacteria by an enrichment technique.

    PubMed

    Alias, Zazali; Tan, Irene K P

    2005-07-01

    In early attempts to isolate palm oil-utilising bacteria from palm oil mill effluent (POME), diluted liquid samples of POME were spread on agar containing POME as primary nutrient. 45 purified colonies were screened for intracellular lipids by staining with Sudan Black B. Of these, 10 isolates were positively stained. The latter were grown in a nitrogen-limiting medium with palm olein (a triglyceride) or saponified palm olein (salts of fatty acids) as carbon source. None of the isolates grew in the palm olein medium but all grew well in the saponified palm olein medium. Of the latter however, only one isolate was positively stained with Nile Blue A, indicating the presence of PHA. This method did not successfully generate bacterial isolates which could metabolise palm olein to produce PHA. An enrichment technique was therefore developed whereby a selective medium was designed. The latter comprised minerals and palm olein (1% w/v) as sole carbon source to which POME (2.5% v/v) was added as the source of bacteria. The culture was incubated with shaking at 30 degrees C for 4 weeks. Out of seven isolates obtained from the selective medium, two isolates, FLP1 and FLP2, could utilise palm olein for growth and production of the homopolyester, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate). FLP1 is gram-negative and is identified (BIOLOG) to have 80% similarity to Burkholderia cepacia. When grown with propionate or valerate, FLP1 produced a copolyester, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate).

  3. Central Role of Dynamic Tidal Biofilms Dominated by Aerobic Hydrocarbonoclastic Bacteria and Diatoms in the Biodegradation of Hydrocarbons in Coastal Mudflats

    PubMed Central

    Coulon, Frédéric; Chronopoulou, Panagiota-Myrsini; Fahy, Anne; Païssé, Sandrine; Goñi-Urriza, Marisol; Peperzak, Louis; Acuña Alvarez, Laura; McKew, Boyd A.; Brussaard, Corina P. D.; Underwood, Graham J. C.; Timmis, Kenneth N.; Duran, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Mudflats and salt marshes are habitats at the interface of aquatic and terrestrial systems that provide valuable services to ecosystems. Therefore, it is important to determine how catastrophic incidents, such as oil spills, influence the microbial communities in sediment that are pivotal to the function of the ecosystem and to identify the oil-degrading microbes that mitigate damage to the ecosystem. In this study, an oil spill was simulated by use of a tidal chamber containing intact diatom-dominated sediment cores from a temperate mudflat. Changes in the composition of bacteria and diatoms from both the sediment and tidal biofilms that had detached from the sediment surface were monitored as a function of hydrocarbon removal. The hydrocarbon concentration in the upper 1.5 cm of sediments decreased by 78% over 21 days, with at least 60% being attributed to biodegradation. Most phylotypes were minimally perturbed by the addition of oil, but at day 21, there was a 10-fold increase in the amount of cyanobacteria in the oiled sediment. Throughout the experiment, phylotypes associated with the aerobic degradation of hydrocarbons, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (Cycloclasticus) and alkanes (Alcanivorax, Oleibacter, and Oceanospirillales strain ME113), substantively increased in oiled mesocosms, collectively representing 2% of the pyrosequences in the oiled sediments at day 21. Tidal biofilms from oiled cores at day 22, however, consisted mostly of phylotypes related to Alcanivorax borkumensis (49% of clones), Oceanospirillales strain ME113 (11% of clones), and diatoms (14% of clones). Thus, aerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation is most likely to be the main mechanism of attenuation of crude oil in the early weeks of an oil spill, with tidal biofilms representing zones of high hydrocarbon-degrading activity. PMID:22407688

  4. Constraints in the colonization of natural and engineered subterranean igneous rock aquifers by aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria inferred by culture analysis.

    PubMed

    Chi Fru, E

    2008-08-01

    The aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) are suggested to be important for the removal of oxygen from subterranean aquifers that become oxygenated by natural and engineering processes. This is primarily because MOB are ubiquitous in the environment and in addition reduce oxygen efficiently. The biogeochemical factors that will control the success of the aerobic MOB in these kinds of underground aquifers remain unknown. In this study, viable and cultivable MOB occurring at natural and engineered deep granitic aquifers targeted for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in the Fennoscandian Shield (approximately 3-1000 m) were enumerated. The numbers were correlated with in situ salinity, methane concentrations, conductivity, pH, and depth. A mixed population habiting freshwater aquifers (approximately 3-20 m), a potential source for the inoculation of MOB into the deeper aquifers was tested for tolerance to NaCl, temperature, pH, and an ability to produce cysts and exospores. Extrapolations show that due to changing in situ parameters (salinity, conductivity, and pH), the numbers of MOB in the aquifers dropped quickly with depth. A positive correlation between the most probable numbers of MOB and methane concentrations was observed. Furthermore, the tolerance-based tests of cultured strains indicated that the MOB in the shallow aquifers thrived best in mesophilic and neutrophilic conditions as opposed to the hyperthermophilic and alkaliphilic conditions expected to develop in an engineered subterranean SNF repository. Overall, the survival of the MOB both quantitatively and physiologically in the granitic aquifers was under the strong influence of biogeochemical factors that are strongly depth-dependent.

  5. Evaluation of the Removal of Indicator Bacteria from Domestic Sludge Processed by Autothermal Thermophilic Aerobic Digestion (ATAD)

    PubMed Central

    Piterina, Anna V.; Bartlett, John; Pembroke, Tony J.

    2010-01-01

    The degradation of sludge solids in an insulated reactor during Autothermal Thermophilic Aerobic Digestion (ATAD) processing results in auto-heating, thermal treatment and total solids reduction, however, the ability to eliminate pathogenic organisms has not been analysed under large scale process conditions. We evaluated the ATAD process over a period of one year in a two stage, full scale Irish ATAD plant established in Killarney and treating mixed primary and secondary sludge, by examining the sludge microbiologically at various stages during and following ATAD processing to determine its ability to eliminate indicator organisms. Salmonella spp. (pathogen) and fecal-coliform (indicator) densities were well below the limits used to validate class A biosolids in the final product. Enteric pathogens present at inlet were deactivated during the ATAD process and were not detected in the final product using both traditional microbial culture and molecular phylogenetic techniques. A high DNase activity was detected in the bulk sludge during the thermophilic digestion stage which may be responsible for the rapid turn over of DNA from lysed cells and the removal of mobile DNA. These results offer assurance for the safe use of ATAD sludge as a soil supplement following processing. PMID:20948933

  6. Availability of O2 as a substrate in the cytoplasm of bacteria under aerobic and microaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Arras, T; Schirawski, J; Unden, G

    1998-04-01

    The growth rates of Pseudomonas putida KT2442 and mt-2 on benzoate, 4-hydroxybenzoate, or 4-methylbenzoate showed an exponential decrease with decreasing oxygen tensions (partial O2 tension [pO2] values). The oxygen tensions resulting in half-maximal growth rates were in the range of 7 to 8 mbar of O2 (corresponding to 7 to 8 microM O2) (1 bar = 10(5) Pa) for aromatic compounds, compared to 1 to 2 mbar for nonaromatic compounds like glucose or succinate. The decrease in the growth rates coincided with excretion of catechol or protocatechuate, suggesting that the activity of the corresponding oxygenases became limiting. The experiments directly establish that under aerobic and microaerobic conditions (about 10 mbar of O2), the diffusion of O2 into the cytoplasm occurs at high rates sufficient for catabolic processes. This is in agreement with calculated O2 diffusion rates. Below 10 mbar of O2, oxygen became limiting for the oxygenases, probably due to their high Km values, but the diffusion of O2 into the cytoplasm presumably should be sufficiently rapid to maintain ambient oxygen concentrations at oxygen tensions as low as 1 mbar of O2. The consequences of this finding for the availability of O2 as a substrate or as a regulatory signal in the cytoplasm of bacterial cells are discussed.

  7. Availability of O2 as a Substrate in the Cytoplasm of Bacteria under Aerobic and Microaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Arras, Tanja; Schirawski, Jan; Unden, Gottfried

    1998-01-01

    The growth rates of Pseudomonas putida KT2442 and mt-2 on benzoate, 4-hydroxybenzoate, or 4-methylbenzoate showed an exponential decrease with decreasing oxygen tensions (partial O2 tension [pO2] values). The oxygen tensions resulting in half-maximal growth rates were in the range of 7 to 8 mbar of O2 (corresponding to 7 to 8 μM O2) (1 bar = 105 Pa) for aromatic compounds, compared to 1 to 2 mbar for nonaromatic compounds like glucose or succinate. The decrease in the growth rates coincided with excretion of catechol or protocatechuate, suggesting that the activity of the corresponding oxygenases became limiting. The experiments directly establish that under aerobic and microaerobic conditions (about 10 mbar of O2), the diffusion of O2 into the cytoplasm occurs at high rates sufficient for catabolic processes. This is in agreement with calculated O2 diffusion rates. Below 10 mbar of O2, oxygen became limiting for the oxygenases, probably due to their high Km values, but the diffusion of O2 into the cytoplasm presumably should be sufficiently rapid to maintain ambient oxygen concentrations at oxygen tensions as low as 1 mbar of O2. The consequences of this finding for the availability of O2 as a substrate or as a regulatory signal in the cytoplasm of bacterial cells are discussed. PMID:9555896

  8. Spore-Forming Thermophilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Isolated from North Sea Oil Field Waters

    PubMed Central

    Rosnes, Jan Thomas; Torsvik, Terje; Lien, Torleiv

    1991-01-01

    Thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria were isolated from oil field waters from oil production platforms in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea. Spore-forming rods dominated in the enrichments when lactate, propionate, butyrate, or a mixture of aliphatic fatty acids (C4 through C6) was added as a carbon source and electron donor. Representative strains were isolated and characterized. The isolates grew autotrophically on H2-CO2 and heterotrophically on fatty acids such as formate, propionate, butyrate, caproate, valerate, pyruvate, and lactate and on alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, and propanol. Sulfate, sulfite, and thiosulfate but not nitrate could be used as an electron acceptor. The temperature range for growth was 43 to 78°C; the spores were extremely heat resistant and survived 131°C for 20 min. The optimum pH was 7.0. The isolates grew well in salt concentrations ranging from 0 to 800 mmol of NaCl per liter. Sulfite reductase P582 was present, but cytochrome c and desulfoviridin were not found. Electron micrographs revealed a gram-positive cell organization. The isolates were classified as a Desulfotomaculum sp. on the basis of spore formation, general physiological characteristics, and submicroscopic organization. To detect thermophilic spore-forming sulfate-reducing bacteria in oil field water, polyvalent antisera raised against antigens from two isolates were used. These bacteria were shown to be widespread in oil field water from different platforms. The origin of thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria in the pore water of oil reservoirs is discussed. Images PMID:16348538

  9. Aerobic Microbial Degradation of Glucoisosaccharinic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Strand, S. E.; Dykes, J.; Chiang, V.

    1984-01-01

    α-Glucoisosaccharinic acid (GISA), a major by-product of kraft paper manufacture, was synthesized from lactose and used as the carbon source for microbial media. Ten strains of aerobic bacteria capable of growth on GISA were isolated from kraft pulp mill environments. The highest growth yields were obtained with Ancylobacter spp. at pH 7.2 to 9.5. GISA was completely degraded by cultures of an Ancylobacter isolate. Ancylobacter cell suspensions consumed oxygen and produced carbon dioxide in response to GISA addition. A total of 22 laboratory strains of bacteria were tested, and none was capable of growth on GISA. GISA-degrading isolates were not found in forest soils. Images PMID:16346467

  10. Antibiotic resistance profiles among mesophilic aerobic bacteria in Nigerian chicken litter and associated antibiotic resistance genes1.

    PubMed

    Olonitola, Olayeni Stephen; Fahrenfeld, Nicole; Pruden, Amy

    2015-05-01

    The effect of global antibiotic use practices in livestock on the emergence of antibiotic resistant pathogens is poorly understood. There is a paucity of data among African nations, which suffer from high rates of antibiotic resistant infections among the human population. Escherichia (29.5%), Staphylococcus (15.8%), and Proteus (15.79%) were the dominant bacterial genera isolated from chicken litter from four different farms in Zaria, Nigeria, all of which contain human pathogenic members. Escherichia isolates were uniformly susceptible to augmentin and cefuroxime, but resistant to sulfamethoxazole (54.5%), ampicillin (22.7%), ciprofloxacin (18.2%), cephalothin (13.6%) and gentamicin (13.6%). Staphylococcus isolates were susceptible to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and sulfamethoxazole, but resistant to tetracycline (86.7%), erythromycin (80%), clindamycin (60%), and penicillin (33.3%). Many of the isolates (65.4%) were resistant to multiple antibiotics, with a multiple antibiotic resistance index (MARI) ≥ 0.2. sul1, sul2, and vanA were the most commonly detected antibiotic resistance genes among the isolates. Chicken litter associated with antibiotic use and farming practices in Nigeria could be a public health concern given that the antibiotic resistant patterns among genera containing pathogens indicate the potential for antibiotic treatment failure. However, the MARI values were generally lower than reported for Escherichia coli from intensive poultry operations in industrial nations.

  11. Bioremediation of coastal areas 5 years after the Nakhodka oil spill in the Sea of Japan: isolation and characterization of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chaerun, S Khodijah; Tazaki, Kazue; Asada, Ryuji; Kogure, Kazuhiro

    2004-09-01

    Five years after the 1997 Nakhodka oil spill in the Sea of Japan, seven bacterial strains capable of utilizing the heavy oil spilled from the Nakhodka Russian oil tanker were isolated from three coastal areas (namely Katano Seashore of Fukui Prefecture, Osawa and Atake seashores of Ishikawa Prefecture) and the Nakhodka Russian oil tanker after a 5-year bioremediation process. All bacterial strains isolated could utilize long-chain-length alkanes efficiently, but not aromatic, and all of them were able to grow well on heavy oil. Using 16S rDNA sequencing, most of the strains were affiliated to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Comparing between the year 1997 (at the beginning of bioremediation process) and the year 2001 (after 5 years of bioremediation), there was no significant change in morphology and size of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria during the 5-year bioremediation. Scanning and transmission electron microscopic observations revealed that a large number of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria still existed in the sites consisting of a variety of morphological forms of bacteria, such as coccus (Streptococcus and Staphylococcus) and bacillus (Streptobacillus). On the application of bioremediation processes on the laboratory-scale, laboratory microcosm experiments (containing seawater, beach sand, and heavy oil) under aerobic condition by two different treatments (i.e., placed the inside building and the outside building) were established for bioremediation of heavy oil to investigate the significance of the role of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria on them. There was no significant bacterial activity differentiation in the two treatments, and removal of heavy oil by hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the outside building was slightly greater than that in the inside building. The values of pH, Eh, EC, and dissolved oxygen (DO) in two treatments indicated that the bioremediation process took place under aerobic conditions (DO: 1-6 mg/l; Eh: 12-300 mV) and neutral

  12. Inactivation of koi-herpesvirus in water using bacteria isolated from carp intestines and carp habitats.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, N; Sasaki, R-K; Kasai, H; Yoshimizu, M

    2013-12-01

    Since its first outbreak in Japan in 2003, koi-herpesvirus (KHV) remains a challenge to the carp Cyprinus carpio L. breeding industry. In this study, inactivation of KHV in water from carp habitats (carp habitat water) was investigated with the aim of developing a model for rapidly inactivating the pathogen in aquaculture effluent. Experiments with live fish showed that, in carp habitat water, KHV lost its infectivity within 3 days. Indications were that inactivation of KHV was caused by the antagonistic activity of bacteria (anti-KHV bacteria) in the water from carp habitats. Carp habitat water and the intestinal contents of carp were therefore screened for anti-KHV bacteria. Of 581 bacterial isolates, 23 showed anti-KHV activity. An effluent treatment model for the disinfection of KHV in aquaculture effluent water using anti-KHV bacteria was developed and evaluated. The model showed a decrease in cumulative mortality and in the number of KHV genome copies in kidney tissue of fish injected with treated effluent compared with a positive control. It is thought that anti-KHV bacteria isolated from the intestinal contents of carp and from carp habitat water can be used to control KHV outbreaks.

  13. Occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes in culturable bacteria isolated from Turkish trout farms and their local aquatic environment.

    PubMed

    Capkin, Erol; Terzi, Ertugrul; Altinok, Ilhan

    2015-05-21

    Antibiotic resistance and presence of the resistance genes were investigated in the bacteria isolated from water, sediment, and fish in trout farms. A total of 9 bacterial species, particularly Escherichia coli, were isolated from the water and sediment samples, and 12 species were isolated from fish. The antimicrobial test indicated the highest resistance against sulfamethoxazole and ampicillin in coliform bacteria, and against sulfamethoxazole, imipenem, and aztreonam in known pathogenic bacteria isolated from fish. The most effective antibiotics were rifampicin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline. The multiple antibiotic resistance index was above the critical limit for almost all of the bacteria isolated. The most common antibiotic resistance gene was ampC, followed by tetA, sul2, blaCTX-M1, and blaTEM in the coliform bacteria. At least one resistance gene was found in 70.8% of the bacteria, and 66.6% of the bacteria had 2 or more resistance genes. Approximately 36.54% of the bacteria that contain plasmids were able to transfer them to other bacteria. The plasmid-mediated transferable resistance genes were ampC, blaCTX-M1, tetA, sul2, and blaTEM. These results indicate that the aquatic environment could play an important role in the development of antibiotic resistance and the dissemination of resistance genes among bacteria.

  14. [Resistance of chemoorganotrophic bacteria isolated from Antarctic cliffs to toxic metals].

    PubMed

    Tashirev, A B; Rokitko, P V; Levishko, A S; Romanovskaia, V A; Tashireva, A A

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to toxic metals ( Hg2+, Cu2+, Ni2+, Co2+, Cr(VI)) of bacteria isolated from rock lichen samples of vertical cliffs located on the biogeographic polygon of Ukrainian Antarctic Station Akademik Vernadsky (island Galindez) is studied. Among the Antarctic rock microorganisms isolated on nonselective medium (without toxic metals), bacteria able to grow at toxic metal concentrations lethal for the majority of microorganisms (Hg2+, Cu2+, Ni2+, Co2+, Cr(VI)) are found out. The studied bacteria are most resistant to Cr(VI) possessing oxidative properties in concentration range 1.25-20.0 g/l depending on the strain. Maximal metal concentrations, at which the growth of bacteria was possible, was: Ni2+ to toxic metals - 2.0 g/l, Co(2+) - 0.1 g/l. In the presence of metal ions possessing both replacing and oxidative properties the strains grew in a concentration range: Hg(2+) - 0.005-0.05 g/l, Cu(2+) - 0.1-1.25 g/l. The highest toxic effect was shown for mercury ions. One of the isolated Antarctic strains which was superresistant to high toxic metal concentrations (g/l): Cr(VI) - 20.0, Ni(2+) - 2.0, Cu(2+) - 1.25, Co(2+) - 0.1, Hg(2+) - 0.05. Thus, for the Antarctic bacteria isolated from rock damaging or bactericidal toxic metal concentrations are by 2-3 orders higher than for the majority of microorganisms.

  15. Anti-Quorum Sensing Activity of Substances Isolated from Wild Berry Associated Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Abudoleh, Suha M.; Mahasneh, Adel M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Quorum Sensing (QS) is a mechanism used by bacteria to determine their physiological activities and coordinate gene expression based on cell to cell signaling. Many bacterial physiological functions are under the regulation of quorum sensing such as virulence, luminescence, motility, sporulation and biofilm formation. The aim of the present study was to isolate and characterize Quorum Sensing Inhibitory (QSI) substances from epiphytic bacteria residing on wild berries surfaces. Methods: Fifty nine bacterial isolates out of 600 screened bacteria were successfully isolated. These bacteria were obtained from berry surfaces of different plants in the wild forests of Ajloun-Jordan. Screening for QSI activity using Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472 monitor strain, resulted in isolating 6 isolates exhibiting QSI activity only, 11 isolates with QSI and antibacterial activity, and 42 isolates with antibacterial activity only. Three potential isolates S 130, S 153, and S 664, were gram positive rods and spore formers, catalase positive and oxidase negative. These were chosen for further testing and characterization. Results: Different solvent extraction of the QSI substances based on polarity indicated that the activity of S 130 was in the butanol extract, S 153 activity in both chloroform and butanol; and for S 664, the activity was detected in the hexane extract. The chloroform extract of S 153 and hexane extract of S 664 were proteinaceous in nature while QSI substances of the butanol extract of S 130 and S 153 were non-proteinaceous. All the tested QSI substances showed a marked thermal stability when subjected at several time intervals to 70°C, with the highest stability observed for the butanol extract of S 153. Assessing the QSI substances using violacein quantification assay revealed varying degrees of activity depending upon the extracting solvent, type of the producer bacteria and the concentration of the substances. Conclusion: This study

  16. Isolation and characterization of halophilic lactic acid bacteria isolated from "terasi" shrimp paste: a traditional fermented seafood product in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Kajiwara, Michika; Wahyuni, Mita; Kitakado, Toshihide; Hamada-Sato, Naoko; Imada, Chiaki; Watanabe, Etsuo

    2003-10-01

    Lactic acid bacteria from "terasi" shrimp paste, a highly popular fermented seafood in Indonesia were isolated and characterized. Viable cell counts were 10(4) to 10(6) cfu/g on MRS medium. All the isolates were catalase-negative, gram-positive cocci and were able to grow at 15% NaCl. Numerical phenotypic analysis showed that the isolates clustered into one group. However, they could be classified into two types: the Tetragenococcus halophilus group and the T. muriaticus group as revealed by a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. This study is the first to show that both species of Tetragenococcus are distributed in Indonesian fermented foods.

  17. Stone-isolated carbonatogenic bacteria as inoculants in bioconsolidation treatments for historical limestone.

    PubMed

    Jroundi, Fadwa; Gómez-Suaga, Patricia; Jimenez-Lopez, Concepción; González-Muñoz, Maria Teresa; Fernandez-Vivas, Maria Antonia

    2012-05-15

    Stone consolidation treatments that use bacterial biomineralization are mainly based on two strategies: (1) the inoculation of a bacterial culture with proven carbonatogenic ability and/or (2) the application of a culture medium capable of activating those bacteria able to induce the formation of calcium carbonate, from amongst the bacterial community of the stone. While the second strategy has been demonstrated to be effective and, unlike first strategy, it does not introduce any exogenous microorganism into the stone, problems may arise when the bacterial community of the stone is altered, for instance by the use of biocides in the cleaning process. In this study we isolate bacteria that belong to the natural microbial community of the stone and which have proven biomineralization capabilities, with the aim of preparing an inoculum that may be used in stone consolidation treatments wherein the natural community of those stones is altered. With this aim, outdoor experiments were undertaken to activate and isolate bacteria that display high biomineralization capacity from altered calcarenite stone. Most of the bacteria precipitated calcium carbonate in the form of calcite. The selected bacteria were phylogenetically affiliated with members of Actinobacteria, Gamma-proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Furthermore, the capability of these selected carbonatogenic bacteria to consolidate altered calcarenite stone slabs was studied in in vitro experiments, both in the presence and the absence of Myxococcus xanthus, as a potential reinforcement for the bacterial biomineralization. Herein, Acinetobacter species, belonging to the microbial community of the stone, are proposed as powerful carbonatogenic bacteria that, inoculated under appropriate conditions, may be used as inoculum for calcareous stone conservation/consolidation in restoration interventions where the microbial community of the stone is altered.

  18. Adhesion and biofilm formation on polystyrene by drinking water-isolated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Simões, Lúcia Chaves; Simões, Manuel; Vieira, Maria João

    2010-10-01

    This study was performed in order to characterize the relationship between adhesion and biofilm formation abilities of drinking water-isolated bacteria (Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Burkholderia cepacia, Methylobacterium sp., Mycobacterium mucogenicum, Sphingomonas capsulata and Staphylococcus sp.). Adhesion was assessed by two distinct methods: thermodynamic prediction of adhesion potential by quantifying hydrophobicity and the free energy of adhesion; and by microtiter plate assays. Biofilms were developed in microtiter plates for 24, 48 and 72 h. Polystyrene (PS) was used as adhesion substratum. The tested bacteria had negative surface charge and were hydrophilic. PS had negative surface charge and was hydrophobic. The free energy of adhesion between the bacteria and PS was > 0 mJ/m(2) (thermodynamic unfavorable adhesion). The thermodynamic approach was inappropriate for modelling adhesion of the tested drinking water bacteria, underestimating adhesion to PS. Only three (B. cepacia, Sph. capsulata and Staphylococcus sp.) of the six bacteria were non-adherent to PS. A. calcoaceticus, Methylobacterium sp. and M. mucogenicum were weakly adherent. This adhesion ability was correlated with the biofilm formation ability when comparing with the results of 24 h aged biofilms. Methylobacterium sp. and M. mucogenicum formed large biofilm amounts, regardless the biofilm age. Given time, all the bacteria formed biofilms; even those non-adherents produced large amounts of matured (72 h aged) biofilms. The overall results indicate that initial adhesion did not predict the ability of the tested drinking water-isolated bacteria to form a mature biofilm, suggesting that other events such as phenotypic and genetic switching during biofilm development and the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), may play a significant role on biofilm formation and differentiation. This understanding of the relationship between adhesion and biofilm formation is important for

  19. Preliminary study on swarming marine bacteria isolated from Pulau Tinggi's sponges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sairi, Fareed; Idris, Hamidah; Zakaria, Nur Syuhana; Usup, Gires; Ahmad, Asmat

    2015-09-01

    Marine sponges were known to produce novel bioactive compounds that have anti-bacterial, anti-viral, anti-cancer and anti-fungal activities. Most of the bioactive compounds were secreted from the bacteria that lives on the sponges. The bacterial communities also produced biofilm, toxin or biosurfactant that protect the sponges from disease or in-coming predator. In this study, twenty nine marine bacteria with swarming motility characteristic was isolated from 2 different sponge samples collected in Pulau Tinggi These isolates were grown and their genome were extracted for molecular identification using the 16S rRNA approach. Sequence comparison using BLASTn and multiple alignments using MEGA4 was performed to produce a phylogenetic tree. The phylogenetic tree revealed that 20 of the isolates were grouped under α-Proteobacteria that comprised of 19 isolates in the Vibrionaceae family and one belongs to Aeromonadaceae family. Furthermore, six isolates from Actinobacteria family and three isolates from Firmicutes were also detected. The swarming characteristic indicates the possible production of biosurfactant.

  20. Characterization of some bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria isolated from fermented foods.

    PubMed

    Grosu-Tudor, Silvia-Simona; Stancu, Mihaela-Marilena; Pelinescu, Diana; Zamfir, Medana

    2014-09-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from different sources (dairy products, fruits, fresh and fermented vegetables, fermented cereals) were screened for antimicrobial activity against other bacteria, including potential pathogens and food spoiling bacteria. Six strains have been shown to produce bacteriocins: Lactococcus lactis 19.3, Lactobacillus plantarum 26.1, Enterococcus durans 41.2, isolated from dairy products and Lactobacillus amylolyticus P40 and P50, and Lactobacillus oris P49, isolated from bors. Among the six bacteriocins, there were both heat stable, low molecular mass polypeptides, with a broad inhibitory spectrum, probably belonging to class II bacteriocins, and heat labile, high molecular mass proteins, with a very narrow inhibitory spectrum, most probably belonging to class III bacteriocins. A synergistic effect of some bacteriocins mixtures was observed. We can conclude that fermented foods are still important sources of new functional LAB. Among the six characterized bacteriocins, there might be some novel compounds with interesting features. Moreover, the bacteriocin-producing strains isolated in our study may find applications as protective cultures.

  1. Characterization of culturable bacteria isolated from the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galkiewicz, Julia P.; Pratte, Zoe A.; Gray, Michael A.; Kellogg, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    Microorganisms associated with corals are hypothesized to contribute to the function of the host animal by cycling nutrients, breaking down carbon sources, fixing nitrogen, and producing antibiotics. This is the first study to culture and characterize bacteria from Lophelia pertusa, a cold-water coral found in the deep sea, in an effort to understand the roles that the microorganisms play in the coral microbial community. Two sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico were sampled over 2 years. Bacteria were cultured from coral tissue, skeleton, and mucus, identified by 16S rRNA genes, and subjected to biochemical testing. Most isolates were members of the Gammaproteobacteria, although there was one isolate each from the Betaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria. Phylogenetic results showed that both sampling sites shared closely related isolates (e.g. Pseudoalteromonas spp.), indicating possible temporally and geographically stable bacterial-coral associations. The Kirby-Bauer antibiotic susceptibility test was used to separate bacteria to the strain level, with the results showing that isolates that were phylogenetically tightly grouped had varying responses to antibiotics. These results support the conclusion that phylogenetic placement cannot predict strain-level differences and further highlight the need for culture-based experiments to supplement culture-independent studies.

  2. Proof of Concept to Isolate and Culture Primary Muscle Cells from Northern Elephant Seals to Study the Mechanisms that Maintain Aerobic Metabolism Under the Hypoxic Conditions of Breath-hold Diving

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    Cells from Northern Elephant Seals to Study the Mechanisms that Maintain Aerobic Metabolism Under the Hypoxic Conditions of Breath-hold Diving...To isolate and culture primary muscle cells from the swimming muscles of northern elephant seals . OBJECTIVES Objective 1. To test the...Proof of Concept to Isolate and Culture Primary Muscle Cells from Northern Elephant Seals to Study the Mechanisms that Maintain Aerobic Metabolism Under

  3. Bioleaching of electronic waste using bacteria isolated from the marine sponge Hymeniacidon heliophila (Porifera).

    PubMed

    Rozas, Enrique E; Mendes, Maria A; Nascimento, Claudio A O; Espinosa, Denise C R; Oliveira, Renato; Oliveira, Guilherme; Custodio, Marcio R

    2017-05-05

    The bacteria isolated from Hymeniacidon heliophila sponge cells showed bioleaching activity. The most active strain, Hyhel-1, identified as Bacillus sp., was selected for bioleaching tests under two different temperatures, 30°C and 40°C, showing rod-shaped cells and filamentous growth, respectively. At 30°C, the bacteria secreted substances which linked to the leached copper, and at 40°C metallic nanoparticles were produced inside the cells. In addition, infrared analysis detected COOH groups and linear peptides in the tested bacteria at both temperatures. The Hyhel-1 strain in presence of electronic waste (e-waste) induced the formation of crust, which could be observed due to bacteria growing on the e-waste fragment. SEM-EDS measurements showed that the bacterial net surface was composed mostly of iron (16.1% w/w), while a higher concentration of copper was observed in the supernatant (1.7% w/w) and in the precipitated (49.8% w/w). The substances linked to copper in the supernatant were sequenced by MALDI-TOF-ms/ms and identified as macrocyclic surfactin-like peptides, similar to the basic sequence of Iturin, a lipopeptide from Bacillus subtilis. Finally, the results showed that Hyhel-1 is a bioleaching bacteria and cooper nanoparticles producer and that this bacteria could be used as a copper recovery tool from electronic waste.

  4. The antimicrobial activity of heterotrophic bacteria isolated from the marine sponge Erylus deficiens (Astrophorida, Geodiidae)

    PubMed Central

    Graça, Ana Patrícia; Viana, Flávia; Bondoso, Joana; Correia, Maria Inês; Gomes, Luis; Humanes, Madalena; Reis, Alberto; Xavier, Joana R.; Gaspar, Helena; Lage, Olga M.

    2015-01-01

    Interest in the study of marine sponges and their associated microbiome has increased both for ecological reasons and for their great biotechnological potential. In this work, heterotrophic bacteria associated with three specimens of the marine sponge Erylus deficiens, were isolated in pure culture, phylogenetically identified and screened for antimicrobial activity. The isolation of bacteria after an enrichment treatment in heterotrophic medium revealed diversity in bacterial composition with only Pseudoalteromonas being shared by two specimens. Of the 83 selected isolates, 58% belong to Proteobacteria, 23% to Actinobacteria and 19% to Firmicutes. Diffusion agar assays for bioactivity screening against four bacterial strains and one yeast, revealed that a high number of the isolated bacteria (68.7%) were active, particularly against Candida albicans and Vibrio anguillarum. Pseudoalteromonas, Microbacterium, and Proteus were the most bioactive genera. After this preliminary screening, the bioactive strains were further evaluated in liquid assays against C. albicans, Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli. Filtered culture medium and acetone extracts from three and 5 days-old cultures were assayed. High antifungal activity against C. albicans in both aqueous and acetone extracts as well as absence of activity against B. subtilis were confirmed. Higher levels of activity were obtained with the aqueous extracts when compared to the acetone extracts and differences were also observed between the 3 and 5 day-old extracts. Furthermore, a low number of active strains was observed against E. coli. Potential presence of type-I polyketide synthases (PKS-I) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) genes were detected in 17 and 30 isolates, respectively. The high levels of bioactivity and the likely presence of associated genes suggest that Erylus deficiens bacteria are potential sources of novel marine bioactive compounds. PMID:25999928

  5. Comparative genomics of Roseobacter clade bacteria isolated from the accessory nidamental gland of Euprymna scolopes.

    PubMed

    Collins, Andrew J; Fullmer, Matthew S; Gogarten, Johann P; Nyholm, Spencer V

    2015-01-01

    The accessory nidamental gland (ANG) of the female Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, houses a consortium of bacteria including members of the Flavobacteriales, Rhizobiales, and Verrucomicrobia but is dominated by members of the Roseobacter clade (Rhodobacterales) within the Alphaproteobacteria. These bacteria are deposited into the jelly coat of the squid's eggs, however, the function of the ANG and its bacterial symbionts has yet to be elucidated. In order to gain insight into this consortium and its potential role in host reproduction, we cultured 12 Rhodobacterales isolates from ANGs of sexually mature female squid and sequenced their genomes with Illumina sequencing technology. For taxonomic analyses, the ribosomal proteins of 79 genomes representing both roseobacters and non-roseobacters along with a separate MLSA analysis of 33 housekeeping genes from Roseobacter organisms placed all 12 isolates from the ANG within two groups of a single Roseobacter clade. Average nucelotide identity analysis suggests the ANG isolates represent three genera (Leisingera, Ruegeria, and Tateyamaria) comprised of seven putative species groups. All but one of the isolates contains a predicted Type VI secretion system, which has been shown to be important in secreting signaling and/or effector molecules in host-microbe associations and in bacteria-bacteria interactions. All sequenced genomes also show potential for secondary metabolite production, and are predicted to be involved with the production of acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) and/or siderophores. An AHL bioassay confirmed AHL production in three tested isolates and from whole ANG homogenates. The dominant symbiont, Leisingera sp. ANG1, showed greater viability in iron-limiting conditions compared to other roseobacters, possibly due to higher levels of siderophore production. Future comparisons will try to elucidate novel metabolic pathways of the ANG symbionts to understand their putative role in host development.

  6. Phytate degrading activities of lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional fermented food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damayanti, Ema; Ratisiwi, Febiyani Ndaru; Istiqomah, Lusty; Sembiring, Langkah; Febrisiantosa, Andi

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the potential of LAB with phytate degrading activity from fermented traditional food grain-based and legume-based. Lactic acid bacteria were isolated from different sources of traditional fermented food from Gunungkidul Yogyakarta Indonesia such as gembus tempeh (tofu waste), soybean tempeh, lamtoro tempeh (Leucaena bean) and kara tempeh. Isolation of LAB was performed using Total Plate Count (TPC) on de Man Rogosa Sharpe Agar (MRSA) medium supplemented with CaCO3. They were screened for their ability to degrade myo-inositol hexaphosphate or IP6 by using qualitative streak platemethod with modified de Man Rogosa-MorpholinoPropanesulfonic Acid Sharpe (MRS-MOPS) medium contained sodium salt of phytic acid as substrate and cobalt chloride staining (plate assay) method. The selected isolates were further assayed for phytase activities using quantitative method with spectrophotometer and the two selected isolates growth were optimized. Furthermore, thhe isolates that shown the highest phytase activity was characterized and identified using API 50 CH kitand 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The results showed that there were 18 LAB isolates obtained from samplesand 13 isolates were able to degrade sodium phytate based on qualitative screening. According to quantitative assay, the highest phytate degrading activities were found in TG-2(23.562 U/mL) and TG-1 (19.641 U/mL) isolated from gembus tempeh. The phytate activity of TG-2 was optimum at 37 °C with agitation, while the phytate activity of TG-1 was optimum at 45 °C without agitation. Characterization and identification of TG-2 isolate with the highest phytate degrading activity using API 50 CH and 16S rRNA showed that TG-2had homology with Lactobacillus fermentum. It could be concluded that LAB from from fermented traditional food grain-based and legume-based produced the extracellular phytase. Keywords: lactic acid bacteria, tempeh, phytatedegrading activity

  7. Tumebacillus permanentifrigoris gen. nov., sp. nov., an aerobic, spore-forming bacterium isolated from Canadian high Arctic permafrost.

    PubMed

    Steven, Blaire; Chen, Min Qun; Greer, Charles W; Whyte, Lyle G; Niederberger, Thomas D

    2008-06-01

    A Gram-positive, aerobic, rod-shaped bacterium (strain Eur1 9.5(T)) was isolated from a 9-m-deep permafrost sample from the Canadian high Arctic. Strain Eur1 9.5(T) could not be cultivated in liquid medium and grew over the temperature range 5-37 degrees C; no growth was observed at 42 degrees C and only slow growth was observed at 5 degrees C following 1 month of incubation. Eur1 9.5(T) grew over the pH range 5.5-8.9 and tolerated NaCl concentrations of 0-0.5 % (w/v). Eur1 9.5(T) grew heterotrophically on complex carbon substrates and chemolithoautotrophically on inorganic sulfur compounds, as demonstrated by growth on sodium thiosulfate and sulfite as sole electron donors. Eur1 9.5(T) contained iso-C(15 : 0) as the major cellular fatty acid and menaquinone 7 (MK-7) as the major respiratory quinone. The cell-wall peptidoglycan was of type A1gamma. The DNA G+C content was 53.1 mol%. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain Eur1 9.5(T) was only distantly related (

  8. Thiomicrospira hydrogeniphila sp. nov., an aerobic, hydrogen- and sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotroph isolated from a seawater tank containing a block of beef tallow.

    PubMed

    Watsuji, Tomo-O; Hada, Emi; Miyazaki, Masayuki; Ichimura, Masako; Takai, Ken

    2016-09-01

    A moderately psychrophilic, aerobic, hydrogen- and sulfur-oxidizing bacterium, designated strain MAS2T, was isolated from a tank containing coastal seawater from Tokyo Bay and a block of beef tallow added as organic material. Growth occurred under aerobic chemolithoautotrophic conditions in the presence of molecular hydrogen, thiosulfate, tetrathionate, elemental sulfur or sulfide as the sole energy source and bicarbonate as a carbon source. The isolate represented a Gram-staining-negative rod with a single polar flagellum and grew in artificial seawater medium with thiosulfate at 2-40 °C (optimum 30 °C). The isolate grew in media with thiosulfate at Na+ concentrations between 30 and 1380 mM (optimum 270 mM). MAS2T possessed C16 : 0, C16 : 1 and C18 : 1 as the major fatty acids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 39.6 mol%. The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity analysis showed that the isolate represented a member of the genus Thiomicrospira within the class Gammaproteobacteria and was most closely related to Thiomicrospira frisia JB-A2T. On the basis of phenotypic and molecular properties, the isolate represents a novel species of the genus Thiomicrospira, for which the name Thiomicrospira hydrogeniphila sp. nov. is proposed (type strain, MAS2T=JCM 30760T=DSM 100274T).

  9. Isolation and partial characterization of phosphate solubilizing bacteria isolated from soil and marine samples.

    PubMed

    Mujahid, Talat Yasmeen; Siddiqui, Khaizran; Ahmed, Rifat; Kazmi, Shahana U; Ahmed, Nuzhat

    2014-09-01

    In the present study the potential of indigenous bacterial isolates from soil rhizosphere and marine environment to promote plant growth was determined. Eight bacterial strains isolated from soil and marine samples were characterized for the phosphate solubilizing activity. Qualitative and quantitative estimation of phosphate solubilization is done. MIC of antibiotic and heavy metals were checked for these strains. Strains show a diverse pattern of antibiotic and heavy metals resistance.

  10. Isolation and Screening of Rhizosphere Bacteria from Grasses in East Kavango Region of Namibia for Plant Growth Promoting Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Haiyambo, D H; Chimwamurombe, P M; Reinhold-Hurek, B

    2015-11-01

    A diverse group of soil bacteria known as plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) is able to inhabit the area close to plant roots and exert beneficial effects on plant growth. Beneficial interactions between rhizospheric bacteria and plants provide prospects for isolating culturable PGPR that can be used as bio-fertilizers for sustainable crop production in communities that cannot easily afford chemical fertilizers. This study was conducted with the aim of isolating rhizospheric bacteria from grasses along the Kavango River and screening the bacterial isolates for plant growth promoting characteristics. The bacteria were isolated from rhizospheres of Phragmites australis, Sporobolus sp., Vetiveria nigritana, Pennisetum glaucum and Sorghum bicolor. The isolates were screened for inorganic phosphate solubilization, siderophore production and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) production. The nitrogen-fixing capability of the bacteria was determined by screening for the presence of the nifH gene. Up to 21 isolates were obtained from P. australis, Sporobolus sp., S. bicolor, P. glaucum and V. nigritana. The genera Bacillus, Enterobacter, Kocuria, Pseudomonas and Stenotrophomonas, identified via 16S rDNA were represented in the 13 PGPR strains isolated. The isolates exhibited more than one plant growth promoting trait and they were profiled as follows: three phosphate solubilizers, four siderophore producers, eight IAA producing isolates and five nitrogen-fixers. These bacteria can be used to develop bio-fertilizer inoculants for improved soil fertility management and sustainable production of local cereals.

  11. Diverse endophytic bacteria isolated from a leguminous tree Conzattia multiflora grown in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Wang, En Tao; Tan, Zhi Yuan; Guo, Xian Wu; Rodríguez-Duran, Rolando; Boll, Gisela; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2006-10-01

    Conzattia multiflora is a leguminous tree present only in Mexico and Guatemala. There is no record about its symbiotic or pathogenic microbes. In this study, we found that numerous bacteria with 10(4)-10(6) individuals per gram of fresh epidermis were distributed in the tissue of this plant. All the bacteria isolated from the Conzattia epidermis were Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic rods and formed yellow or colorless colonies. They were identified as endophytes by inoculation tests. Some of the bacteria could significantly promote the growth of Conzattia seedlings. Nine different groups were defined by PCR-based RFLP, which were classified as Pantoea, Erwinia, Salmonella, Enterobacter, Citrobacter and Klebsiella by the phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes. The existence of plant-borne lineages of Salmonella indicates that the unexplored plants may harbor some unknown microbes.

  12. Isolation and characterization of histamine-producing bacteria from fermented fish products.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jin Seok; Kim, So-Young; Cho, Kyung-Ju; Yang, Seung-Joon; Yoon, Gun-Mook; Eom, Hyun-Ju; Han, Nam Soo

    2013-12-01

    Histamine is mainly produced by microorganisms that are found in fermented foods, and is frequently involved in food poisoning. Two histamine-producing bacteria were isolated from fermented fish products, anchovy sauce, and sand lance sauce by using a histidine decarboxylating medium. The species were identified as Bacillus licheniformis A7 and B. coagulans SL5. Multiplex PCR analysis showed the presence of the conserved histidine decarboxylase (hdc) gene in the chromosome of these bacteria. B. licheniformis A7 and B. coagulans SL5 produced the maximum amount of histamine (22.3±3.5 and 15.1±1.5 mg/L, respectively). As such, they were determined to be potential histamine-producing bacteria among the tested cultures.

  13. Characterization of some efficient cellulase producing bacteria isolated from paper mill sludges and organic fertilizers

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Miranda L; Broere, Michael; Leung, Kam Tin; Qin, Wensheng

    2011-01-01

    The wide variety of bacteria in the environment permits screening for more efficient cellulases to help overcome current challenges in biofuel production. This study focuses on the isolation of efficient cellulase producing bacteria found in organic fertilizers and paper mill sludges which can be considered for use in large scale biorefining. Pure isolate cultures were screened for cellulase activity. Six isolates: S1, S2, S3, S4, E2, and E4, produced halos greater in diameter than the positive control (Cellulomonas xylanilytica), suggesting high cellulase activities. A portion of the 16S rDNA genes of cellulase positive isolates were amplified and sequenced, then BLASTed to determine likely genera. Phylogenetic analysis revealed genera belonging to two major Phyla of Gram positive bacteria: Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. All isolates were tested for the visible degradation of filter paper; only isolates E2 and E4 (Paenibacillus species) were observed to completely break down filter paper within 72 and 96 h incubation, respectively, under limited oxygen condition. Thus E2 and E4 were selected for the FP assay for quantification of total cellulase activities. It was shown that 1% (w/v) CMC could induce total cellulase activities of 1652.2±61.5 and 1456.5±30.7 μM of glucose equivalents for E2 and E4, respectively. CMC could induce cellulase activities 8 and 5.6X greater than FP, therefore CMC represented a good inducing substrate for cellulase production. The genus Paenibacillus are known to contain some excellent cellulase producing strains, E2 and E4 displayed superior cellulase activities and represent excellent candidates for further cellulase analysis and characterization. PMID:21969070

  14. Isolation and characterization of PAH-degrading bacteria from the Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Oyehan, Tajudeen A; Al-Thukair, Assad A

    2017-02-15

    Contaminated sediment samples were collected from the Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia for isolation of pyrene- and phenanthrene-degrading bacteria by enrichment method. Four isolates were morphologically characterized as Gram-negative rod strains and 16S rRNA sequence analysis revealed the isolates as closely related to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. citronellolis, Ochrobactrum intermedium and Cupriavidus taiwanensis. Degradation of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by the latter three strains was investigated in liquid cultures. Results of concentration reduction analyzed with gas chromatography show that P. citronellolis_LB was efficient in removing phenanthrene, degrading 94% of 100ppm in 15days while O. intermedium_BC1 was more efficient in pyrene-removal, degrading 62% in 2weeks. Furthermore, bacterial growth assessment using optical density and population counts revealed the latter as more suitable for microbial growth analysis in PAH-containing cultures. In conclusion, the isolated bacterial strains could be further developed for efficient use in biodegradation of PAH.

  15. Evaluation of the probiotic characteristics of newly isolated lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Aswathy, Ravindran Girija; Ismail, Bindhumol; John, Rojan Pappy; Nampoothiri, Kesavan Madhavan

    2008-12-01

    Lactic acid bacteria were isolated from fermented vegetables, sour dough, milk products, sheep and human excreta. The newly isolated cultures were evaluated for a number of probiotic characteristics like bile salt resistance, salt tolerance in general, survival in low pH, hydrophobicity of the cell surface, resistance to low phenol concentration, antimicrobial activity and susceptibility pattern against vancomycin and erythromycin. The selected cultures were further screened for their ability to produce the nutraceticals such as folic acid and exopolysaccharide (EPS). Two potent isolates, CB2 (from cabbage) and SD2 (from sour dough) were found to produce both extracellular and intracellular folate. One of the isolates from yogurt (MC-1) and the one from whey (W3) produced significant amount of EPS with a maximum production of 8.79 +/- 0.05 g/l by MC-1.

  16. Isolation and identification of bacteria to improve the strength of concrete.

    PubMed

    Krishnapriya, S; Venkatesh Babu, D L; G, Prince Arulraj

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this research work is to isolate and identify calcite precipitating bacteria and to check the suitability of these bacteria for use in concrete to improve its strength. Bacteria to be incorporated in concrete should be alkali resistant to endure the high pH of concrete and endospore forming to withstand the mechanical stresses induced in concrete during mixing. They must exhibit high urease activity to precipitate calcium carbonate in the form of calcite. Bacterial strains were isolated from alkaline soil samples of a cement factory and were tested for urease activity, potential to form endospores and precipitation of calcium carbonate. Based on these results, three isolates were selected and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. They were identified as Bacillus megaterium BSKAU, Bacillus licheniformis BSKNAU and Bacillus flexus BSKNAU. The results were compared with B. megaterium MTCC 1684 obtained from Microbial Type Culture Collection and Gene Bank, Chandigarh, India. Experimental work was carried out to assess the influence of bacteria on the compressive strength and tests revealed that bacterial concrete specimens showed enhancement in compressive strength. The efficiency of bacteria toward crack healing was also tested. Substantial increase in strength and complete healing of cracks was observed in concrete specimens cast with B. megaterium BSKAU, B. licheniformis BSKNAU and B. megaterium MTCC 1684. This indicates the suitability of these bacterial strains for use in concrete. The enhancement of strength and healing of cracks can be attributed to the filling of cracks in concrete by calcite which was visualized by scanning electron microscope.

  17. Isolation and characterization of entomopathogenic bacteria from soil samples from the western region of Cuba.

    PubMed

    González, Aileen; Rodríguez, Graciela; Bruzón, Rosa Y; Díaz, Manuel; Companionis, Ariamys; Menéndez, Zulema; Gato, René

    2013-06-01

    The use of insect pathogens is a viable alternative for insect control because of their relative specificity and lower environmental impact. The search for wild strains against dipterans could have an impact on mosquito control programs. We have made an extensive screening of soil in western Cuba to find bacteria with larvicidal activity against mosquitoes. A total of 150 soil samples were collected and isolates were identifying using the API 50 CHB gallery. Phenotypic characteristics were analyzed by hierarchical ascending classification. Quantitative bioassays were conducted under laboratory conditions following the World Health Organization protocol in order to ascertain the toxicity and efficacy of isolates. The protein profiles of the crystal components were determined by SDS-PAGE. Eight hundred and eighty-one bacterial isolates were obtained, and 13 isolates with entomopathogenic activity were isolated from nine samples. Nine isolates displayed higher entomopathogenic activity against both Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. aegypti compared with the reference strain 266/2. All toxic isolates showed higher biological potency than the 266/2 strain. These isolates with high entomopathogenic activity displayed a protein pattern similar to the B. thuringiensis var. israelensis IPS-82 and 266/2 strains. These results are a valuable tool for the control of Diptera of medical importance.

  18. Isolation and characterization of diesel degrading bacteria, Sphingomonas sp. and Acinetobacter junii from petroleum contaminated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiuzhuo; Wang, Duanchao; Li, Mengmeng; Xiang, Wei-Ning; Achal, Varenyam

    2014-03-01

    Two indigenous bacteria of petroleum contaminated soil were characterized to utilize diesel fuel as the sole carbon and energy sources in this work. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis identified these bacteria as Sphingomonas sp. and Acinetobacter junii. The ability to degrade diesel fuel has been demonstrated for the first time by these isolates. The results of IR analyses showed that Sphingomonas sp. VA1 and A. junii VA2 degraded up to 82.6% and 75.8% of applied diesel over 15 days, respectively. In addition, Sphingomonas sp. VA1 possessed the higher cellular hydrophobicities of 94% for diesel compared to 81% by A. junii VA2. The isolates Sphingomonas sp. VA1 and A. junii VA2 exhibited 24% and 18%, respectively emulsification activity. This study reports two new diesel degrading bacterial species, which can be effectively used for bioremediation of petroleum contaminated sites.

  19. Biochemical characteristics and virulence of environmental group F bacteria isolated in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Seidler, R J; Allen, D A; Colwell, R R; Joseph, S W; Daily, O P

    1980-01-01

    Bacteria phenotypically resembling Aeromonas hydrophila, but requiring NaCl for growth, have been isolated form the New York Bight. The bacteria proved to be identical to group F organisms isolated from cases of human diarrhea in Indonesia and Bangladesh. Anaerogenic strains initiated responses in Y-1 tissue culture and rabbit ileal loop, consistent with those associated with cytotoxin- and enterotoxin-producing Aeromonas spp. strains. Separation on the basis of production of gas from glucose by group F strains was correlated with differences in mean guanine-plus-cytosine deoxyribonucleic acid base composition and in deoxyribonucleic acid relative reassociation. Both aerogenic and anaerogenic strains reassociated to a significantly greater extent with Vibrio spp. than with Aeromonas spp. and indeed should be considered a new species of the genus Vibrio. PMID:7425623

  20. Isolation and Characterization of Bacteria Capable of Tolerating the Extreme Conditions of Clean Room Environments▿

    PubMed Central

    La Duc, Myron T.; Dekas, Anne; Osman, Shariff; Moissl, Christine; Newcombe, David; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2007-01-01

    In assessing the bacterial populations present in spacecraft assembly, spacecraft test, and launch preparation facilities, extremophilic bacteria (requiring severe conditions for growth) and extremotolerant bacteria (tolerant to extreme conditions) were isolated. Several cultivation approaches were employed to select for and identify bacteria that not only survive the nutrient-limiting conditions of clean room environments but can also withstand even more inhospitable environmental stresses. Due to their proximity to spacefaring objects, these bacteria pose a considerable risk for forward contamination of extraterrestrial sites. Samples collected from four geographically distinct National Aeronautics and Space Administration clean rooms were challenged with UV-C irradiation, 5% hydrogen peroxide, heat shock, pH extremes (pH 3.0 and 11.0), temperature extremes (4°C to 65°C), and hypersalinity (25% NaCl) prior to and/or during cultivation as a means of selecting for extremotolerant bacteria. Culture-independent approaches were employed to measure viable microbial (ATP-based) and total bacterial (quantitative PCR-based) burdens. Intracellular ATP concentrations suggested a viable microbial presence ranging from below detection limits to 106 cells/m2. However, only 0.1 to 55% of these viable cells were able to grow on defined culture medium. Isolated members of the Bacillaceae family were more physiologically diverse than those reported in previous studies, including thermophiles (Geobacillus), obligate anaerobes (Paenibacillus), and halotolerant, alkalophilic species (Oceanobacillus and Exiguobacterium). Non-spore-forming microbes (α- and β-proteobacteria and actinobacteria) exhibiting tolerance to the selected stresses were also encountered. The multiassay cultivation approach employed herein enhances the current understanding of the physiological diversity of bacteria housed in these clean rooms and leads us to ponder the origin and means of translocation of

  1. Bacteriocin-Producing Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Traditional Fermented Food

    PubMed Central

    Kormin, Salasiah; Rusul, Gulam; Radu, Son; Ling, Foo Hooi

    2001-01-01

    Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) isolated from several traditional fermented foods such as “tempeh”, “tempoyak” and “tapai” were screened for the production of bacteriocin. One strain isolated from “tempeh” gives an inhibitory activity against several LAB. The strain was later identified as Lactobacillus plantarum BS2. Study shows that the inhibitory activity was not caused by hydrogen peroxide, organic acids or bacteriophage. The bacteriocin production was maximum after 10 hours of incubation with an activity of 200 AU/ml. The bacteriocin was found to be sensitive towards trypsin, α-chymotrypsin, β-chymotrypsin, α-amylase and lysozyme. PMID:22973159

  2. Isolation and Genetic Analysis of Multidrug Resistant Bacteria from Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Shailesh K.; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Severe diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) patients visiting Sir Sunderlal Hospital, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, were selected for this study. Bacteria were isolated from swab and deep tissue of 42 patients, for examining their prevalence and antibiotic sensitivity. DFUs of majority of the patients were found infected with Enterococcus spp. (47.61%), Escherichia coli (35.71%), Staphylococcus spp. (33.33%), Alcaligenes spp. (30.95%), Pseudomonas spp. (30.95%), and Stenotrophomonas spp. (30.95%). Antibiotic susceptibility assay of 142 bacteria with 16 antibiotics belonging to eight classes showed the presence of 38 (26.76%) isolates with multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotypes. MDR character appeared to be governed by integrons as class 1 integrons were detected in 26 (68.42%) isolates. Altogether six different arrays of genes (aadA1, aadB, aadAV, dhfrV, dhfrXII, and dhfrXVII) were found within class 1 integron. Gene cassette dhfrAXVII-aadAV (1.6 kb) was present in 12 (3 Gram positive and 9 Gram negative) isolates and was conserved across all the isolates as evident from RFLP analysis. In addition to the presence of class 1 integron, six β-lactamase resistance encoding genes namely blaTEM, blaSHV, blaOXA, blaCTX−M−gp1, blaCTX−M−gp2, and blaCTX−M−gp9 and two methicillin resistance genes namely mecA and femA and vancomycin resistance encoding genes (vanA and vanB) were identified in different isolates. Majority of the MDR isolates were positive for blaTEM (89.47%), blaOXA (52.63%), and blaCTX−M−gp1 (34.21%). To our knowledge, this is the first report of molecular characterization of antibiotic resistance in bacteria isolated from DFUs from North India. In conclusion, findings of this study suggest that class-1 integrons and β-lactamase genes contributed to the MDR in above bacteria. PMID:26779134

  3. Isolation and Genetic Analysis of Multidrug Resistant Bacteria from Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Shailesh K; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Severe diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) patients visiting Sir Sunderlal Hospital, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, were selected for this study. Bacteria were isolated from swab and deep tissue of 42 patients, for examining their prevalence and antibiotic sensitivity. DFUs of majority of the patients were found infected with Enterococcus spp. (47.61%), Escherichia coli (35.71%), Staphylococcus spp. (33.33%), Alcaligenes spp. (30.95%), Pseudomonas spp. (30.95%), and Stenotrophomonas spp. (30.95%). Antibiotic susceptibility assay of 142 bacteria with 16 antibiotics belonging to eight classes showed the presence of 38 (26.76%) isolates with multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotypes. MDR character appeared to be governed by integrons as class 1 integrons were detected in 26 (68.42%) isolates. Altogether six different arrays of genes (aadA1, aadB, aadAV, dhfrV, dhfrXII, and dhfrXVII) were found within class 1 integron. Gene cassette dhfrAXVII-aadAV (1.6 kb) was present in 12 (3 Gram positive and 9 Gram negative) isolates and was conserved across all the isolates as evident from RFLP analysis. In addition to the presence of class 1 integron, six β-lactamase resistance encoding genes namely bla TEM, bla SHV, bla OXA, bla CTX-M-gp1, bla CTX-M-gp2, and bla CTX-M-gp9 and two methicillin resistance genes namely mecA and femA and vancomycin resistance encoding genes (vanA and vanB) were identified in different isolates. Majority of the MDR isolates were positive for bla TEM (89.47%), bla OXA (52.63%), and bla CTX-M-gp1 (34.21%). To our knowledge, this is the first report of molecular characterization of antibiotic resistance in bacteria isolated from DFUs from North India. In conclusion, findings of this study suggest that class-1 integrons and β-lactamase genes contributed to the MDR in above bacteria.

  4. Fate of mesophilic aerobic bacteria and Salmonella enterica on the surface of eggs as affected by chicken feces, storage temperature, and relative humidity.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunhyung; Choi, Seonyeong; Kim, Hoikyung; Kim, Yoonsook; Kim, Byeong-sam; Beuchat, Larry R; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2015-06-01

    We compared the microbiological quality of chicken eggshells obtained from a traditional wholesale market and a modern supermarket. We also determined the survival and growth characteristics of naturally occurring mesophilic aerobic bacteria (MAB) and artificially inoculated Salmonella enterica on eggshells under various environmental conditions (presence of chicken feces, temperature [4, 12, or 25 °C], and relative humidity [RH; 43 or 85%]). The populations of MAB, coliforms, and molds and yeasts on eggshells purchased from a traditional wholesale market were significantly (P ≤ 0.05) higher than those from a modern supermarket. In the second study, when we stored uninoculated eggs under various storage conditions, the population of MAB on eggshells (4.7-4.9 log CFU/egg) remained constant for 21 days, regardless of storage conditions. However, when eggshells were inoculated with S. enterica and stored under the same conditions, populations of the pathogen decreased significantly (P ≤ 0.05) under all tested conditions. Survival of S. enterica increased significantly (P ≤ 0.05) in the presence of feces, at low temperatures, and at low RH. These observations will be of value when predicting the behavior of microorganisms on eggshells and selecting storage conditions that reduce the populations of S. enterica on eggshells during distribution.

  5. Microbiological Quality of Ready-to-Eat Vegetables Collected in Mexico City: Occurrence of Aerobic-Mesophilic Bacteria, Fecal Coliforms, and Potentially Pathogenic Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cerna-Cortes, Jorge Francisco; Leon-Montes, Nancy; Cortes-Cueto, Ana Laura; Salas-Rangel, Laura P.; Helguera-Repetto, Addy Cecilia; Lopez-Hernandez, Daniel; Rivera-Gutierrez, Sandra; Fernandez-Rendon, Elizabeth; Gonzalez-y-Merchand, Jorge Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the microbiological quality and the occurrence of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in a variety of salads and sprouts from supermarkets and street vendors in Mexico City. Aerobic-mesophilic bacteria (AMB) were present in 100% of RTE-salads samples; 59% of samples were outside guidelines range (>5.17 log10 CFU per g). Although fecal coliforms (FC) were present in 32% of samples, only 8% of them exceeded the permissible limit (100 MPN/g). Regarding the 100 RTE-sprouts, all samples were also positive for AMB and total coliforms (TC) and 69% for FC. Seven NTM species were recovered from 7 salad samples; they included three M. fortuitum, two M. chelonae, one M. mucogenicum, and one M. sp. Twelve RTE-sprouts samples harbored NTM, which were identified as M. porcinum (five), M. abscessus (two), M. gordonae (two), M. mucogenicum (two), and M. avium complex (one). Most RTE-salads and RTE-sprouts had unsatisfactory microbiological quality and some harbored NTM associated with illness. No correlation between the presence of coliforms and NTM was found. Overall, these results suggest that RTE-salads and RTE-sprouts might function as vehicles for NTM transmission in humans; hence, proper handling and treatment before consumption of such products might be recommendable. PMID:25918721

  6. Adequacy of Petrifilm™ Aerobic Count plates supplemented with de Man, Rogosa & Sharpe broth and chlorophenol red for enumeration of lactic acid bacteria in salami.

    PubMed

    de Castilho, Natália Parma Augusto; Okamura, Vivian Tiemi; Camargo, Anderson Carlos; Pieri, Fábio Alessandro; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2015-12-01

    The present study aimed to assess the performance of alternative protocols to enumerate lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in salami. Fourteen cultures and two mixed starter cultures were plated using six protocols: 1) Petrifilm™ Aerobic Count (AC) with MRS broth and chlorophenol red (CR), incubated under aerobiosis or 2) under anaerobiosis, 3) MRS agar with CR, 4) MRS agar with bromocresol purple, 5) MRS agar at pH5.7, and 6) All Purpose Tween agar. Samples of salami were obtained and the LAB microbiota was enumerated by plating according protocols 1, 2, 3 and 5. Regression analysis showed a significant correlation between the tested protocols, based on culture counts (p<0.05). Similar results were observed for salami, and no significant differences of mean LAB counts between selected protocols (ANOVA, p>0.05). Colonies were confirmed as LAB, indicating proper selectivity of the protocols. The results showed the adequacy of Petrifilm™ AC supplemented with CR for the enumeration of LAB in salami.

  7. Microbiological Quality of Ready-to-Eat Vegetables Collected in Mexico City: Occurrence of Aerobic-Mesophilic Bacteria, Fecal Coliforms, and Potentially Pathogenic Nontuberculous Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Cerna-Cortes, Jorge Francisco; Leon-Montes, Nancy; Cortes-Cueto, Ana Laura; Salas-Rangel, Laura P; Helguera-Repetto, Addy Cecilia; Lopez-Hernandez, Daniel; Rivera-Gutierrez, Sandra; Fernandez-Rendon, Elizabeth; Gonzalez-y-Merchand, Jorge Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the microbiological quality and the occurrence of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in a variety of salads and sprouts from supermarkets and street vendors in Mexico City. Aerobic-mesophilic bacteria (AMB) were present in 100% of RTE-salads samples; 59% of samples were outside guidelines range (>5.17 log10 CFU per g). Although fecal coliforms (FC) were present in 32% of samples, only 8% of them exceeded the permissible limit (100 MPN/g). Regarding the 100 RTE-sprouts, all samples were also positive for AMB and total coliforms (TC) and 69% for FC. Seven NTM species were recovered from 7 salad samples; they included three M. fortuitum, two M. chelonae, one M. mucogenicum, and one M. sp. Twelve RTE-sprouts samples harbored NTM, which were identified as M. porcinum (five), M. abscessus (two), M. gordonae (two), M. mucogenicum (two), and M. avium complex (one). Most RTE-salads and RTE-sprouts had unsatisfactory microbiological quality and some harbored NTM associated with illness. No correlation between the presence of coliforms and NTM was found. Overall, these results suggest that RTE-salads and RTE-sprouts might function as vehicles for NTM transmission in humans; hence, proper handling and treatment before consumption of such products might be recommendable.

  8. Polyhydroxyalkanoate production by antarctic soil bacteria isolated from Casey Station and Signy Island.

    PubMed

    Goh, Yuh Shan; Tan, Irene Kit Ping

    2012-04-20

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) is a family of biopolymers produced by some bacteria and is accumulated intracellularly as carbon and energy storage material. Fifteen PHA-producing bacterial strains were identified from bacteria isolated from Antarctic soils collected around Casey Station (66°17'S, 110°32'E) and Signy Island (60°45'S, 45°36'W). Screening for PHA production was carried out by incubating the isolates in PHA production medium supplemented with 0.5% (w/v) sodium octanoate or glucose. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the isolated PHA-producing strains were mainly Pseudomonas spp. and a few were Janthinobacterium spp. All the isolated Pseudomonas strains were able to produce medium-chain-length (mcl) PHA using fatty acids as carbon source, while some could also produce mcl-PHA by using glucose. The Janthinobacterium strains could only utilize glucose to produce polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB). A Pseudomonas isolate, UMAB-40, accumulated PHA up to 48% cell dry mass when utilizing fatty acids as carbon source. This high accumulation occurred at between 5°C and 20°C, then decreased with increasing temperatures. Highly unsaturated mcl-PHA was produced by UMAB-40 from glucose. Such characteristics may be associated with the ability of UMAB-40 to survive in the cold.

  9. Isolation, Culture Characteristics, and Identification of Anaerobic Bacteria from the Chicken Cecum

    PubMed Central

    Salanitro, J. P.; Fairchilds, I. G.; Zgornicki, Y. D.

    1974-01-01

    Studies on the anaerobic cecal microflora of the 5-week-old chicken were made to determine a suitable roll-tube medium for enumeration and isolation of the bacterial population, to determine effects of medium components on recovery of total anaerobes, and to identify the predominant bacterial groups. The total number of microorganisms in cecal contents determined by direct microscope cell counts varied (among six samples) from 3.83 × 1010 to 7.64 × 1010 per g. Comparison of different nonselective media indicated that 60% of the direct microscope count could be recovered with a rumen fluid medium (M98-5) and 45% with medium 10. Deletion of rumen fluid from M98-5 reduced the total anaerobic count by half. Colony counts were lower if chicken cecal extract was substituted for rumen fluid in M98-5. Supplementing medium 10 with liver, chicken fecal, or cecal extracts improved recovery of anaerobes slightly. Prereduced blood agar media were inferior to M98-5. At least 11 groups of bacteria were isolated from high dilutions (10-9) of cecal material. Data on morphology and physiological and fermentation characteristics of 90% of the 298 isolated strains indicated that these bacteria represented species of anaerobic gram-negative cocci, facultatively anaerobic cocci and streptococci, Peptostreptococcus, Propionibacterium, Eubacterium, Bacteroides, and Clostridium. The growth of many of these strains was enhanced by rumen fluid, yeast extract, and cecal extract additions to basal media. These studies indicate that some of the more numerous anaerobic bacteria present in chicken cecal digesta can be isolated and cultured when media and methods that have been developed for ruminal bacteria are employed. PMID:4596749

  10. Improved oil recovery using bacteria isolated from North Sea petroleum reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Davey, R.A.; Lappin-Scott, H.

    1995-12-31

    During secondary oil recovery, water is injected into the formation to sweep out the residual oil. The injected water, however, follows the path of least resistance through the high-permeability zones, leaving oil in the low-permeability zones. Selective plugging of these their zones would divert the waterflood to the residual oil and thus increase the life of the well. Bacteria have been suggested as an alternative plugging agent to the current method of polymer injection. Starved bacteria can penetrate deeply into rock formations where they attach to the rock surfaces, and given the right nutrients can grow and produce exo-polymer, reducing the permeability of these zones. The application of microbial enhanced oil recovery has only been applied to shallow, cool, onshore fields to date. This study has focused on the ability of bacteria to enhance oil recovery offshore in the North Sea, where the environment can be considered extreme. A screen of produced water from oil reservoirs (and other extreme subterranean environments) was undertaken, and two bacteria were chosen for further work. These two isolates were able to grow and survive in the presence of saline formation waters at a range of temperatures above 50{degrees}C as facultative anaerobes. When a solution of isolates was passed through sandpacks and nutrients were added, significant reductions in permeabilities were achieved. This was confirmed in Clashach sandstone at 255 bar, when a reduction of 88% in permeability was obtained. Both isolates can survive nutrient starvation, which may improve penetration through the reservoir. Thus, the isolates show potential for field trials in the North Sea as plugging agents.

  11. Biodegradation of Phenol by Bacteria Strain Acinetobacter Calcoaceticus PA Isolated from Phenolic Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenghui; Xie, Wenyu; Li, Dehao; Peng, Yang; Li, Zesheng; Liu, Shusi

    2016-01-01

    A phenol-degrading bacterium strain PA was successfully isolated from the effluent of petrochemical wastewater. Based on its morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics, the strain PA was characterized as a Gram-negative, strictly aerobic, nonmotile and short rod-shaped bacterium that utilizes phenol as a sole carbon and energy source. 16S rDNA sequence analysis revealed that this strain is affiliated to Acinetobacter calcoaceticus in the group of Gammaproteobacteria. The strain was efficient in removing 91.6% of the initial 800 mg∙L−1 phenol within 48 h, and had a tolerance of phenol concentration as high as 1700 mg∙L−1. These results indicated that A. calcoaceticus possesses a promising potential in treating phenolic wastewater. PMID:27005648

  12. Biofilm-forming activity of bacteria isolated from toilet bowl biofilms and the bactericidal activity of disinfectants against the isolates.

    PubMed

    Mori, Miho; Gomi, Mitsuhiro; Matsumune, Norihiko; Niizeki, Kazuma; Sakagami, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the sanitary conditions of toilets, the bacterial counts of the toilet bowl biofilms in 5 Kansai area and 11 Kansai and Kanto area homes in Japan were measured in winter and summer seasons, respectively. Isolates (128 strains) were identified by analyzing 16S ribosomal RNA sequences. The number of colonies and bacterial species from biofilms sampled in winter tended to be higher and lower, respectively, than those in summer. Moreover, the composition of bacterial communities in summer and winter samples differed considerably. In summer samples, biofilms in Kansai and Kanto areas were dominated by Blastomonas sp. and Mycobacterium sp., respectively. Methylobacterium sp. was detected in all toilet bowl biofilms except for one sample. Methylobacterium sp. constituted the major presence in biofilms along with Brevundimonas sp., Sphingomonas sp., and/or Pseudomonas sp. The composition ratio of the sum of their genera was 88.0 from 42.9% of the total bacterial flora. The biofilm formation abilities of 128 isolates were investigated, and results suggested that Methylobacterium sp. and Sphingomonas sp. were involved in biofilm formation in toilet bowls. The biofilm formation of a mixed bacteria system that included bacteria with the highest biofilm-forming ability in a winter sample was greater than mixture without such bacteria. This result suggests that isolates possessing a high biofilm-forming activity are involved in the biofilm formation in the actual toilet bowl. A bactericidal test against 25 strains indicated that the bactericidal activities of didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) tended to be higher than those of polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) and N-benzyl-N,N-dimethyldodecylammonium chloride (ADBAC). In particular, DDAC showed high bactericidal activity against approximately 90% of tested strains under the 5 h treatment.

  13. Isolation of butyrate-utilizing bacteria from thermophilic and mesophilic methane-producing ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The ability of various ecosystems to convert butyrate to methane was studied in order to isolate the bacteria responsible for the conversion. When thermophilic digester sludge was enriched with butyrate, methane was produced without a lag period. Marine sediments enriched with butyrate required a 2-week incubation period before methanogenesis began. A thermophilic digester was studied in more detail and found by most-probable-number enumeration to have ca. 5 x 10/sup 6/ butyrate-utilizing bactera/ml of sludge. A thermophilic butyrate-utilizing bacterium was isolated in coculture with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and a Methanosarcina sp. This bacterium was a gram-negative, slightly curved rod that occurred singly, was nonmotile, and did not appear to produce spores. The thermophilic digester was infused with butyrate at the rate of 10 ..mu..moles/ml of sludge per day. Biogas production increased by 150%, with the percentage of methane increasing from 58% to 68%. Acetate, propionate, and butyrate did not accumulate. Butyrate-utilizing enrichments from mesophilic ecosystems were used in obtaining cocultures of butyrate-utilizing bacteria. These cocultures served as inocula for attempts to isolate pure cultures of butyrate-utilizing bacteria by use of hydrogenase-containing membrane fragments of Escherichia coli. After a 3-week incubation period, colonies appeared only in inoculated tubes that contained membrane fragments and butyrate.

  14. Morphological and genetic characterization of endophytic bacteria isolated from roots of different maize genotypes.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Angela Cristina; Bassani, Luciana Lange; Adamoski, Douglas; Stringari, Danyelle; Cordeiro, Vanessa Kava; Glienke, Chirlei; Steffens, Maria Berenice Reynaud; Hungria, Mariangela; Galli-Terasawa, Lygia Vitoria

    2013-01-01

    Maize is one of the most important crops worldwide, and in Brazil, the state of Paraná stands as its largest producer. The crop demands high inputs of N fertilizers, therefore all strategies aiming to optimize the grain production with lower inputs are very relevant. Endophytic bacteria have a high potential to increment maize grain yield by means of input via biological nitrogen fixation and/or plant growth promotion, in this last case increasing the absorption of water and nutrients by the plants. In this study, we established a collection of 217 endophytic bacteria, isolated from roots of four lineages and three hybrid genotypes of maize, and isolated in four different N-free culture media. Biochemical-comprising growth in different carbon sources, intrinsic tolerance to antibiotics, and biochemical tests for catalase, nitrate reductase, urease, and growth in N-free media in vitro-and genetic characterization by BOX-PCR revealed great variability among the isolates. Both commercial hybrids and homozygous lineages were broadly colonized by endophytes, and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene revealed the presence of bacteria belonging to the genera Pantoea, Bacillus, Burkholderia, and Klebsiella. Qualitative differences in endophytic colonization were detected between lineages and hybrid genotypes.

  15. Antimicrobial activities of novel cultivable bacteria isolated from marine sponge Tedania anhelans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhen; Zhao, Jing; Ke, Caihuan; Wang, Dexiang

    2013-05-01

    Marine sponge Tedania anhelans distributes throughout the intertidal zone of Fujian, southeastern China, and is a potential source of natural bioactive products. The sponge harbors a large number of bacterial groups that have been identified using various techniques, including fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Fractionation of dissociated sponge allowed isolation of 25 bacterial species. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, phylogenetic analysis attributed most of these eubacteria to α- Proteobacteria, γ- Proteobacteria, Cytophaga / Flavobacterium / Bacteroidetes (CFB group), and the family Bacillaceae of Gram-positive bacteria. In sequence similarity, five putatively novel species were identified with less than 98% similarity to other strains in the NCBI database. Tests for antimicrobial activities were performed against Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, fungi, antitumor indicators Escherichia coli 343/591 (with DNA repair deficiency), regular E. coli 343/636 (with different DNA repair capacity), and 10 bacterial isolates exhibited inhibitory bioactivities. Among these strains, three isolates were detected involving function gene NRPS-A domains, which were most closely related to the amino acid sequences of linear gramicidin synthetase and pyoverdine synthetase. These results contribute to our knowledge of the microbes associated with marine sponges and further reveal novel bacterial resources for the screening of bioactive marine natural products.

  16. Functional characterization of bacteria isolated from ancient arctic soil exposes diverse resistance mechanisms to modern antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Perron, Gabriel G; Whyte, Lyle; Turnbaugh, Peter J; Goordial, Jacqueline; Hanage, William P; Dantas, Gautam; Desai, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    Using functional metagenomics to study the resistomes of bacterial communities isolated from different layers of the Canadian high Arctic permafrost, we show that microbial communities harbored diverse resistance mechanisms at least 5,000 years ago. Among bacteria sampled from the ancient layers of a permafrost core, we isolated eight genes conferring clinical levels of resistance against aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline antibiotics that are naturally produced by microorganisms. Among these resistance genes, four also conferred resistance against amikacin, a modern semi-synthetic antibiotic that does not naturally occur in microorganisms. In bacteria sampled from the overlaying active layer, we isolated ten different genes conferring resistance to all six antibiotics tested in this study, including aminoglycoside, β-lactam and tetracycline variants that are naturally produced by microorganisms as well as semi-synthetic variants produced in the laboratory. On average, we found that resistance genes found in permafrost bacteria conferred lower levels of resistance against clinically relevant antibiotics than resistance genes sampled from the active layer. Our results demonstrate that antibiotic resistance genes were functionally diverse prior to the anthropogenic use of antibiotics, contributing to the evolution of natural reservoirs of resistance genes.

  17. Bacteria isolated from dugongs (Dugong dugon) submitted for postmortem examination in Queensland, Australia, 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Kristen A; Owen, Helen C; Mills, Paul C; Flint, Mark; Gibson, Justine S

    2013-03-01

    Microbial infection may contribute to disease in a significant proportion of marine mammal mortalities, but little is known about infectious bacterial species and their prevalence in dugongs (Dugong dugon). This study represents a survey of the species of bacteria and fungi isolated from dugongs submitted to the University of Queensland's School of Veterinary Science for postmortem examination. Thirty-six dugongs were included in the survey, with 23 species of bacteria and four species of fungus cultured from lesions that were suspected of contributing to local infection, systemic infection, or both. The most abundant bacteria included Aeromonas spp., Clostridium spp., Vibrio spp., Enterococcus faecalis, and Pseudomonas spp. In six cases, the microorganism(s) cultured were considered to have been associated with disease. Mixed infections containing Aeromonas spp. and Vibrio spp.; Morganella morganii, Pasteurella multocida, and Serratia marcescens; and Actinomyces spp. and Peptostreptococcus spp. were associated with pneumonia or pleuritis, and Enterococcus faecalis was associated with a multisystemic infection in a neonate. Clostridium spp. was cultured from two animals with peritonitis and likely septicemia. The significance of many of the other isolates is uncertain because the samples were taken after death, and some of the species isolated may represent postmortem overgrowth. It is also difficult to fulfil Koch's postulates through experimental infection in marine mammals. Regardless, this information will assist clinicians working with dugongs to make treatment decisions and the baseline data on the prevalence of bacterial and fungal species is of value for monitoring coastal water habitat health and risks of zoonotic disease transmission.

  18. Microbial utilization of the industrial wastewater pollutants 2-ethylhexylthioglycolic acid and iso-octylthioglycolic acid by aerobic gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Toups, Mario; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2010-04-01

    Industrial wastewater from the production of sulfur containing esters and the resulting products of this synthesis, 2-ethylhexylthioglycolic acid (EHTG) and iso-octylthioglycolic acid (IOTG), were deployed in this study to enrich novel bacterial strains, since no wastewater and EHTG or IOTG degrading microorganisms were hitherto described or available. In addition, nothing is known about the biodegradation of these thiochemicals. The effect of this specific wastewater on the growth behaviour of microorganisms was investigated using three well-known Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida, and Ralstonia eutropha). Concentrations of 5% (v/v) wastewater in complex media completely inhibited growth of these three bacterial strains. Six bacterial strains were successfully isolated, characterized and identified by sequencing their 16S rRNA genes. Two isolates referred to as Achromobacter sp. strain MT-E3 and Pseudomonas sp. strain MT-I1 used EHTG or IOTG, respectively, as well as the wastewater as sole source of carbon and energy for weak growth. More notably, both isolates removed these sulfur containing esters in remarkable amounts from the cultures supernatant. One further isolate was referred to as Klebsiella sp. strain 58 and exhibited an unusual high tolerance against the wastewater's toxicity without utilizing the contaminative compounds. If cultivated with gluconic acid as additional carbon source, the strain grew even in presence of more than 40% (v/v) wastewater. Three other isolates belonging to the genera Bordetella and Pseudomonas tolerated these organic sulfur compounds but showed no degradation abilities.

  19. Multidrug-resistant bacteria infection control: study of compliance with isolation precautions in a Paris university hospital.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Trecan, G M; Delamare, N; Tcherny-Lessenot, S; Lamory, J; Baudin, F; de Prittwitz, M; Salmon-Ceron, D

    2001-02-01

    Isolation practices in a university hospital were analyzed for 137 patients with multidrug-resistant bacteria. Isolation was ordered in writing by physicians for 40% and instituted by nurses for 60%; 74% were isolated. Compliance depended on physician ordering in writing (odds ratio, 36.3; 95% confidence interval, 4.8-274.9). Nurses complied best with hand washing.

  20. Massilia eurypsychrophila sp. nov. a facultatively psychrophilic bacteria isolated from ice core.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liang; Liu, Yongqin; Gu, Zhengquan; Xu, Baiqing; Wang, Ninglian; Jiao, Nianzhi; Liu, Hongcan; Zhou, Yuguang

    2015-07-01

    Strain B528-3(T), a Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, aerobic, facultatively psychrophilic bacterium with polar flagella, was isolated from an ice core drilled from Muztagh Glacier, Xinjiang, China. The novel isolate was classified into the genus Massilia. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of the novel isolate shares a pairwise similarity of less than 97% with those of all the type strains of the genus Massilia. The major fatty acids of strain B528-3(T) were summed feature 3 (C16:1ω7c and/or iso-C15:0 2-OH) (57.31%), C16:0 (11.46%) and C18:1ω7c (14.72%). The predominant isoprenoid quinone was Q-8. The DNA G + C content was 62.2 mol% (Tm). The major polar lipids of this bacterium were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol. From the genotypic and phenotypic data, it is evident that strain B528-3(T) represents a novel species of the genus Massilia, for which the name Massilia eurypsychrophila sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is B528-3(T) ( = JCM 30074(T) = CGMCC 1.12828(T)).

  1. Novel autotrophic arsenite-oxidizing bacteria isolated from soil and sediments.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Dominguez, Elizabeth; Mumford, Adam; Rhine, Elizabeth Danielle; Paschal, Amber; Young, Lily Y

    2008-11-01

    Arsenic oxidation is recognized as being mediated by both heterotrophic and chemoautotrophic microorganisms. Enrichment cultures were established to determine whether chemoautotrophic microorganisms capable of oxidizing arsenite As(III) to arsenate As(V) are present in selected contaminated but nonextreme environments. Three new organisms, designated as strains OL-1, S-1 and CL-3, were isolated and found to oxidize 10 mM arsenite to arsenate under aerobic conditions using CO2-bicarbonate (CO2/HCO3-) as a carbon source. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses, strain OL-1 was 99% most closely related to the genus Ancylobacter, strain S-1 was 99% related to Thiobacillus and strain CL-3 was 98% related to the genus Hydrogenophaga. The isolates are facultative autotrophs and growth of isolated strains on different inorganic electron donors other than arsenite showed that all three had a strong preference for several sulfur species, while CL-3 was also able to grow on ammonium and nitrite. The RuBisCO Type I (cbbL) gene was positively amplified and sequenced in strain CL-3, and the Type II (cbbM) gene was detected in strains OL-1 and S-1, supporting the autotrophic nature of the organisms.

  2. Comparative genomics of Roseobacter clade bacteria isolated from the accessory nidamental gland of Euprymna scolopes

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Andrew J.; Fullmer, Matthew S.; Gogarten, Johann P.; Nyholm, Spencer V.

    2015-01-01

    The accessory nidamental gland (ANG) of the female Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, houses a consortium of bacteria including members of the Flavobacteriales, Rhizobiales, and Verrucomicrobia but is dominated by members of the Roseobacter clade (Rhodobacterales) within the Alphaproteobacteria. These bacteria are deposited into the jelly coat of the squid’s eggs, however, the function of the ANG and its bacterial symbionts has yet to be elucidated. In order to gain insight into this consortium and its potential role in host reproduction, we cultured 12 Rhodobacterales isolates from ANGs of sexually mature female squid and sequenced their genomes with Illumina sequencing technology. For taxonomic analyses, the ribosomal proteins of 79 genomes representing both roseobacters and non-roseobacters along with a separate MLSA analysis of 33 housekeeping genes from Roseobacter organisms placed all 12 isolates from the ANG within two groups of a single Roseobacter clade. Average nucelotide identity analysis suggests the ANG isolates represent three genera (Leisingera, Ruegeria, and Tateyamaria) comprised of seven putative species groups. All but one of the isolates contains a predicted Type VI secretion system, which has been shown to be important in secreting signaling and/or effector molecules in host–microbe associations and in bacteria–bacteria interactions. All sequenced genomes also show potential for secondary metabolite production, and are predicted to be involved with the production of acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) and/or siderophores. An AHL bioassay confirmed AHL production in three tested isolates and from whole ANG homogenates. The dominant symbiont, Leisingera sp. ANG1, showed greater viability in iron-limiting conditions compared to other roseobacters, possibly due to higher levels of siderophore production. Future comparisons will try to elucidate novel metabolic pathways of the ANG symbionts to understand their putative role in host

  3. Bacteria isolated from sewage influent resistant to ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol and tetracycline.

    PubMed

    Zwenger, Sam R; Gillock, Eric T

    2009-02-01

    This study assessed the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in sewage influent. Resistance was measured by determining the lowest concentration of antibiotic, in micrograms per milliliter (microg mL(- 1)). To determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), which is used in diagnostic laboratories, we used the Etest, a plastic strip containing an antibiotic concentration gradient. In total, we sampled five sewage treatment plants of various sizes in Kansas and isolated bacteria resistant to three broad-spectrum antibiotics; ciprofloxacin (1-cyclopropyl-6-fluoro-4-oxo-7-piperazin-1-yl-quinoline-3-carboxylic acid), chloramphenicol 2,2-dichlor-N-[(aR, bR)-b-hydroxy-a-hydroxymethyl-4-nitrophenethyl] acetamide), and tetracycline (2-(amino-hydroxy-ethylidene)-4-dimethylamino-6,10,11,12a-tetrahydroxy-6-methyl-4,4a,5,5a-tetrahydrotetracene-1,3,12-trione). In total, 25 Gram-negative isolates were found to be resistant to at least one of the antibiotics tested. Some isolates were multi-drug resistant, regardless of the amount of influent the sewage treatment plant received. A Pseudomonas isolate from the smallest sewage treatment plant (approximately 2 million gallons treated per day) showed resistance to all three antibiotics, albeit at low levels (10 microg mL(- 1)). The largest number of bacteria (6 species) were isolated from the largest sewage treatment plant (45 million gallons per day). Regardless, the results of this study are in agreement with similar studies, antibiotic resistance can persist long after the antibiotics have been forgotten.

  4. Biochemical and molecular characterization of high population density bacteria isolated from sunflower.

    PubMed

    Guerra Pinheiro de Goes, Kelly Campos; de Castro Fisher, Maria Luisa; Cattelan, Alexandre José; Nogueira, Marco Antonio; Portela de Carvalho, Claudio Guilherme; Martinez de Oliveira, Andre Luiz

    2012-04-01

    Natural and beneficial associations between plants and bacteria have demonstrated potential commercial application for several agricultural crops. The sunflower has acquired increasing importance in Brazilian agribusiness owing to its agronomic characteristics such as the tolerance to edaphoclimatic variations, resistance to pests and diseases, and adaptation to the implements commonly used for maize and soybean, as well as the versatility of the products and by-products obtained from its cultivation. A study of the cultivable bacteria associated with two sunflower cultivars, using classical microbiological methods, successfully obtained isolates from different plant tissues (roots, stems, florets, and rhizosphere). Out of 57 plantgrowth- promoting isolates obtained, 45 were identified at the genus level and phylogenetically positioned based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing: 42 Bacillus (B. subtilis, B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, B. pumilus, B. megaterium, and Bacillus sp.) and 3 Methylobacterium komagatae. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis showed a broad diversity among the Bacillus isolates, which clustered into 2 groups with 75% similarity and 13 subgroups with 85% similarity, suggesting that the genetic distance correlated with the source of isolation. The isolates were also analyzed for certain growth-promoting activities. Auxin synthesis was widely distributed among the isolates, with values ranging from 93.34 to 1653.37 microM auxin per microng of protein. The phosphate solubilization index ranged from 1.25 to 3.89, and siderophore index varied from 1.15 to 5.25. From a total of 57 isolates, 3 showed an ability to biologically fix atmospheric nitrogen, and 7 showed antagonism against the pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. The results of biochemical characterization allowed identification of potential candidates for the development of biofertilizers targeted to the sunflower crop.

  5. Meta-analysis of effects of inoculation with homofermentative and facultative heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria on silage fermentation, aerobic stability, and the performance of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, André S; Weinberg, Zwi G; Ogunade, Ibukun M; Cervantes, Andres A P; Arriola, Kathy G; Jiang, Yun; Kim, Donghyeon; Li, Xujiao; Gonçalves, Mariana C M; Vyas, Diwakar; Adesogan, Adegbola T

    2017-03-22

    Forages are usually inoculated with homofermentative and facultative heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to enhance lactic acid fermentation of forages, but effects of such inoculants on silage quality and the performance of dairy cows are unclear. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to examine the effects of LAB inoculation on silage quality and preservation and the performance of dairy cows. A second objective was to examine the factors affecting the response to silage inoculation with LAB. The studies that met the selection criteria included 130 articles that examined the effects of LAB inoculation on silage quality and 31 articles that investigated dairy cow performance responses. The magnitude of the effect (effect size) was evaluated using raw mean differences (RMD) between inoculated and uninoculated treatments. Heterogeneity was explored by meta-regression and subgroup analysis using forage type, LAB species, LAB application rate, and silo scale (laboratory or farm-scale) as covariates for the silage quality response and forage type, LAB species, diet type [total mixed ration (TMR) or non-TMR], and the level of milk yield of the control cows as covariates for the performance responses. Inoculation with LAB (≥10(5) cfu/g as fed) markedly increased silage fermentation and dry matter recovery in temperate and tropical grasses, alfalfa, and other legumes. However, inoculation did not improve the fermentation of corn, sorghum, or sugarcane silages. Inoculation with LAB reduced clostridia and mold growth, butyric acid production, and ammonia-nitrogen in all silages, but it had no effect on aerobic stability. Silage inoculation (≥10(5) cfu/g as fed) increased milk yield and the response had low heterogeneity. However, inoculation had no effect on diet digestibility and feed efficiency. Inoculation with LAB improved the fermentation of grass and legume silages and the performance of dairy cows but did not affect the fermentation of corn, sorghum

  6. Characterization of culturable bacteria isolated from hot springs for plant growth promoting traits and effect on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) seedling.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kinjal Samir; Naik, Jinal Hardik; Chaudhari, Sejal; Amaresan, Natarajan

    2017-03-23

    To elucidate the functional diversity of hot spring bacteria, 123 bacteria were isolated and screened for evaluating their multifunctional plant growth promoting (PGP) properties. The antagonistic activity against different phytopathogens showed the presence of a high amount of biocontrol bacteria in the hot springs. During screening for PGP properties, 61.0% isolates showed production of indole acetic acid and 23.6% showed inorganic phosphate solubilization qualitatively. For production of extracellular enzymes, it was found that 61.0% isolates produced lipase, 56.9% produced protease, and 43.9% produced cellulase. In extreme properties, half of the isolates showed tolerance to 5% NaCl (w/v) and 48.8% isolates survived heat shock at 70°C. The identification of 12 multipotential bacteria based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that the bacteria belonged to Aneurinibacillus aneurinilyticus and Bacillus spp. Bacterization of tomato seeds showed that the hot spring bacteria promoted shoot height, fresh shoot weight, root length, and fresh root weight of tomato seedlings, with values ranging from 3.12% to 74.37%, 33.33% to 350.0%, 16.06% to 130.41%, and 36.36% to 318.18%, respectively, over the control. This research shows that multifunctional bacteria could be isolated from the hot springs. The outcome of this research may have a potential effect on crop production methodologies used in saline and arid environments.

  7. Aerobic intestinal flora of wild-caught African dwarf crocodiles Osteolaemus tetraspis.

    PubMed

    Huchzermeyer, F W; Henton, M M; Riley, J; Agnagna, M

    2000-09-01

    Intestinal contents were collected from wild-caught African dwarf crocodiles (Osteolaemus tetraspis) in 1993 and 1995 which were slaughtered at urban markets in the Congo Republic. The samples were kept frozen and brought back to Onderstepoort for aerobic culture. Out of 29 specimens, 33 species of bacteria and 20 species of fungi were isolated. The bacteria included three isolates of Salmonella and eight isolates of Escherichia coli, most of the latter being rough strains. The flora of individual specimens contained 1-5 bacterial and 0-5 fungal species. Neither Aeromonas hydrophila nor Edwardsiella tarda were isolated from any of the samples.

  8. Isolation and physiological characterization of psychrophilic denitrifying bacteria from permanently cold Arctic fjord sediments (Svalbard, Norway).

    PubMed

    Canion, Andy; Prakash, Om; Green, Stefan J; Jahnke, Linda; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Kostka, Joel E

    2013-05-01

    A large proportion of reactive nitrogen loss from polar sediments is mediated by denitrification, but microorganisms mediating denitrification in polar environments remain poorly characterized. A combined approach of most-probable-number (MPN) enumeration, cultivation and physiological characterization was used to describe psychrophilic denitrifying bacterial communities in sediments of three Arctic fjords in Svalbard (Norway). A MPN assay showed the presence of 10(3) -10(6) cells of psychrophilic nitrate-respiring bacteria g(-1) of sediment. Fifteen strains within the Proteobacteria were isolated using a systematic enrichment approach with organic acids as electron donors and nitrate as an electron acceptor. Isolates belonged to five genera, including Shewanella, Pseudomonas, Psychromonas (Gammaproteobacteria), Arcobacter (Epsilonproteobacteria) and Herminiimonas (Betaproteobacteria). All isolates were denitrifiers, except Shewanella, which exhibited the capacity for dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). Growth from 0 to 40°C demonstrated that all genera except Shewanella were psychrophiles with optimal growth below 15°C, and adaptation to low temperature was demonstrated as a shift from primarily C16:0 saturated fatty acids to C16:1 monounsaturated fatty acids at lower temperatures. This study provides the first targeted enrichment and characterization of psychrophilic denitrifying bacteria from polar sediments, and two genera, Arcobacter and Herminiimonas, are isolated for the first time from permanently cold marine sediments.

  9. Isolation and Physiological Characterization of Psychrophilic Denitrifying Bacteria from Permanently Cold Arctic Fjord Sediments (Svalbard, Norway)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canion, Andy; Prakash, Om; Green, Stefan J.; Jahnke, Linda; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2013-01-01

    A large proportion of reactive nitrogen loss from polar sediments is mediated by denitrification, but microorganisms mediating denitrification in polar environments remain poorly characterized. A combined approach of most-probable-number (MPN) enumeration, cultivation and physiological characterization was used to describe psychrophilic denitrifying bacterial communities in sediments of three Arctic fjords in Svalbard (Norway). A MPN assay showed the presence of 10(sup 3)-10(sup 6) cells of psychrophilic nitrate-respiring bacteria g(sup -1) of sediment. Fifteen strains within the Proteobacteria were isolated using a systematic enrichment approach with organic acids as electron donors and nitrate as an electron acceptor. Isolates belonged to five genera, including Shewanella, Pseudomonas, Psychromonas (Gammaproteobacteria), Arcobacter (Epsilonproteobacteria) and Herminiimonas (Betaproteobacteria). All isolates were denitrifiers, except Shewanella, which exhibited the capacity for dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). Growth from 0 to 40 degC demonstrated that all genera except Shewanella were psychrophiles with optimal growth below 15 degC, and adaptation to low temperature was demonstrated as a shift from primarily C16:0 saturated fatty acids to C16:1 monounsaturated fatty acids at lower temperatures. This study provides the first targeted enrichment and characterization of psychrophilic denitrifying bacteria from polar sediments, and two genera, Arcobacter and Herminiimonas, are isolated for the first time from permanently cold marine sediments.

  10. Isolation and characterization of methane utilizing bacteria from wetland paddy ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Jhala, Y K; Vyas, R V; Shelat, H N; Patel, H K; Patel, H K; Patel, K T

    2014-06-01

    Methylotrophic bacteria which are known to utilize C1 compounds including methane. Research during past few decades increased the interest in finding out novel genera of methane degrading bacteria to efficiently utilize methane to decrease global warming effect. Moreover, evaluation of certain known plant growth promoting strains for their methane degrading potential may open up a new direction for multiple utility of such cultures. In this study, efficient methylotrophic cultures were isolated from wetland paddy fields of Gujarat. From the overall morphological, biochemical and molecular characterization studies, the isolates were identified and designated as Bacillus aerius AAU M 8; Rhizobium sp. AAU M 10; B. subtilis AAU M 14; Paenibacillus illinoisensis AAU M 17 and B. megaterium AAU M 29. Gene specific PCR analysis of the isolates, P. illinoisensis, B. aerius, Rhizobium sp. and B. subtilis showed presence of pmoA gene encoding α subunit particulate methane monooxygenase cluster. B. megaterium, P. illinoisensis, Rhizobium sp. and Methylobacterium extrorquens showed presence of mmoX gene encoding α subunit of the hydroxylase component of the soluble methane monooxygenase cluster. P. illinoisensis and Rhizobium sp. showed presence mxaF gene encoding α subunit region of methanol dehydrogenase gene cluster showing that both isolates are efficient utilizers of methane. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time report showing presence of methane degradation enzymes and genes within the known PGPB group of organisms from wet land paddy agro-ecosystem, which is considered as one of the leading methane producer.

  11. Heavy-metal resistance in Gram-negative bacteria isolated from Kongsfjord, Arctic.

    PubMed

    Neethu, C S; Mujeeb Rahiman, K M; Saramma, A V; Mohamed Hatha, A A

    2015-06-01

    Isolation and characterization of heterotrophic Gram-negative bacteria was carried out from the sediment and water samples collected from Kongsfjord, Arctic. In this study, the potential of Arctic bacteria to tolerate heavy metals that are of ecological significance to the Arctic (selenium (Se), mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn)) was investigated. Quantitative assay of 130 isolates by means of plate diffusion and tube dilution methods was carried out by incorporation of different concentrations of metals. Growth in Se and Pb at a concentration of 3000 μg/L was significantly lower (P≤0.0001) than at 2000 μg/L. The minimum inhibitory concentration for Cd and Hg was 50 μg/L (P≤0.0001, F=264.23 and P≤0.0001, F=291.08, respectively) even though in the tube dilution test, Hg-containing tubes showed much less growth, revealing its superior toxicity to Cd. Thus, the level of toxicity of heavy metals was found to be in the order of Hg>Cd>Cu>Zn>Pb>Se. Multiple-metal-resistant isolates were investigated for their resistance against antibiotics, and a positive correlation was observed between antibiotic and metal resistance for all the isolates tested. The resistant organisms thus observed might influence the organic and inorganic cycles in the Arctic and affect the ecosystem.

  12. Biogeochemistry and Genetic Potential related to Denitrification of Heterotrophic Bacteria isolated from Lake Vida Cryobrine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trubl, G.; Kuhn, E.; Ichimura, A.; Fritsen, C. H.; Murray, A. E.

    2012-12-01

    Lake Vida, one of the largest lakes in McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, is a thick block of ice permeated by brine channels below 16 m that contain the highest levels of nitrous oxide (N2O) that have been reported from a terrestrial environment (86.6 ± 5.9 μM). The subzero -13.4oC brine (18% salinity) has an unusual geochemistry with high levels of iron, dissolved organic carbon, nitrate, and ammonium. A number of heterotrophic bacteria were cultivated from this unusual, extreme ecosystem that has been isolated for at least three thousand years. The aim of this research was to phylogenetically characterize the bacterial isolates (using 16S ribosomal RNA analysis) and investigate their denitrifying abilities and genetic potential related to key reactions in the denitrification cycle. Fifteen phylotypes were isolated from Lake Vida brine among three phyla: Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. Based on the 16S ribosomal RNA analysis, Marinobacter was the most abundant (56%) genus identified among the 57 isolates. The other isolates were related to the genera Psychrobacter, Exiguobacterium, Kocuria, and Microbacterium. Representatives of each phylotype were characterized and verified for: (1) Nitrate (NO3-) reduction to either N2O or dinitrogen (N2) by Gas Chromatography; (2) presence of the genes nirK or nirS for NO3- reduction and nosZ for nitric oxide (NO) reduction by polymerase chain reaction (PCR); and (3) growth response to salinity and temperature gradients. Thirty five of the Lake Vida isolates produced either N2O or N2 coupled to cell growth. All 57 isolates have grown across a 32°C temperature range (-10°C to 22°C) and 54 isolates were halotolerant bacteria (growing in 0% to 16% salinity), while the last three isolates were halophilic. Electron microscopy revealed membrane vesicles and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) around the Lake Vida isolates, which may be a survival adaptation. Investigating the denitrification and other

  13. Isolation, screening and characterization of bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional fermented food.

    PubMed

    El-Shafei, H A; Abd-El-Sabour, H; Ibrahim, N; Mostafa, Y A

    2000-03-01

    100 lactic acid bacterial strains isolated from traditional fermented foods (yoghurt, milk cream, sour dough and milk) were screened for bacteriocin production. Twenty six strains producing a nisin-like bacteriocin were selected. Most of these isolates gave only a narrow inhibitory spectrum, although one showed a broad inhibitory spectrum against the indicator strains tested, this strain was determined as Lactococcus lactis. The influence of several parameters on the fermentative production of nisin by Lactococcus lactis was studied. Production of nisin was optimal at 30 degrees C and in the pH range 5.5-6.3. The effect of different sulphur and nitrogen sources on Lactococcus lactis growth and nisin production was studied. Magnesium sulfate and manganese sulfate were found to be the best sulphur sources while triammonium citrate was the best inorganic nitrogen source and meat extract, peptone and yeast extract were the best organic nitrogen source for nisin production.

  14. Antibiogram of bacteria isolated from automated teller machines in Hamadan, West Iran.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Hassan; Arabestani, Mohammad Reza; Alikhani, Mohammad Yousef; Sedighi, Iraj; Kohan, Hamed Farhadi; Molavi, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Bacteria are ubiquitous in the environment. In keeping with the continued expansion of urbanization and the growing population, an increasing number of people use automated banking, i.e. automated teller machines (ATMs). The aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial contamination and its antibiotic sensitivity on computer keyboards located at ATMs in Hamadan province, Iran. Method: Out of 360 ATMs at four locations in Hamadan, 96 were randomly selected for this study. The antibiotic susceptibility pattern of all isolates was determined by the agar disk diffusion method using gentamicin (10 µg), vancomycin (30 µg), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (25 µg), amikacin (30 µg), tobramycin (10 µg), cephalotin (30 µg), norfloxacin (5 µg), and ceftizoxim (30 µg) disks. Results: Melli and Saderat Banks had the most frequently contaminated ATMS, with 18 (27.7%) and 12 (18.5%), respectively. The most frequently isolated bacteria were Staphylococcus epidermidis in 12 (18.5%) ATMs, Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 12 (18.5%), Bacillus subtilis in 11 (16.9%), Escherichia coli in 6 (9.2%), Klebsiella spp. in 8 (12.3%), Enterobacter spp. in 2 (3.1%), Bacillus cereus in 6 (9.2%), Staphylococcus aureus in 3 (4.6%), and Micrococcaceae spp. in 5 (7.69%) cases. All isolated bacteria were susceptible to gentamicin, cephalotin, tobramycin, amikacin, norfloxacin, and vancomycin. The S. aureus resistance rate to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole was 50%. Conclusion: All tested ATM keyboards were contaminated with at least one species of bacteria. Based on these findings, it is recommendable to disinfect the hands after entering one's own apartment, work area or a hospital, in order to hinder the spread of critical pathogens in the personal environment or in the hospital.

  15. Antibiogram of bacteria isolated from automated teller machines in Hamadan, West Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Hassan; Arabestani, Mohammad Reza; Alikhani, Mohammad Yousef; Sedighi, Iraj; Kohan, Hamed Farhadi; Molavi, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Bacteria are ubiquitous in the environment. In keeping with the continued expansion of urbanization and the growing population, an increasing number of people use automated banking, i.e. automated teller machines (ATMs). The aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial contamination and its antibiotic sensitivity on computer keyboards located at ATMs in Hamadan province, Iran. Method: Out of 360 ATMs at four locations in Hamadan, 96 were randomly selected for this study. The antibiotic susceptibility pattern of all isolates was determined by the agar disk diffusion method using gentamicin (10 µg), vancomycin (30 µg), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (25 µg), amikacin (30 µg), tobramycin (10 µg), cephalotin (30 µg), norfloxacin (5 µg), and ceftizoxim (30 µg) disks. Results: Melli and Saderat Banks had the most frequently contaminated ATMS, with 18 (27.7%) and 12 (18.5%), respectively. The most frequently isolated bacteria were Staphylococcus epidermidis in 12 (18.5%) ATMs, Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 12 (18.5%), Bacillus subtilis in 11 (16.9%), Escherichia coli in 6 (9.2%), Klebsiella spp. in 8 (12.3%), Enterobacter spp. in 2 (3.1%), Bacillus cereus in 6 (9.2%), Staphylococcus aureus in 3 (4.6%), and Micrococcaceae spp. in 5 (7.69%) cases. All isolated bacteria were susceptible to gentamicin, cephalotin, tobramycin, amikacin, norfloxacin, and vancomycin. The S. aureus resistance rate to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole was 50%. Conclusion: All tested ATM keyboards were contaminated with at least one species of bacteria. Based on these findings, it is recommendable to disinfect the hands after entering one’s own apartment, work area or a hospital, in order to hinder the spread of critical pathogens in the personal environment or in the hospital. PMID:28197394

  16. Isolation of acetogenic bacteria that induce biocorrosion by utilizing metallic iron as the sole electron donor.

    PubMed

    Kato, Souichiro; Yumoto, Isao; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion of iron occurring under anoxic conditions, which is termed microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) or biocorrosion, is mostly caused by microbial activities. Microbial activity that enhances corrosion via uptake of electrons from metallic iron [Fe(0)] has been regarded as one of the major causative factors. In addition to sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea in marine environments, acetogenic bacteria in freshwater environments have recently been suggested to cause MIC under anoxic conditions. However, no microorganisms that perform acetogenesis-dependent MIC have been isolated or had their MIC-inducing mechanisms characterized. Here, we enriched and isolated acetogenic bacteria that induce iron corrosion by utilizing Fe(0) as the sole electron donor under freshwater, sulfate-free, and anoxic conditions. The enriched communities produced significantly larger amounts of Fe(II) than the abiotic controls and produced acetate coupled with Fe(0) oxidation prior to CH4 production. Microbial community analysis revealed that Sporomusa sp. and Desulfovibrio sp. dominated in the enrichments. Strain GT1, which is closely related to the acetogen Sporomusa sphaeroides, was eventually isolated from the enrichment. Strain GT1 grew acetogenetically with Fe(0) as the sole electron donor and enhanced iron corrosion, which is the first demonstration of MIC mediated by a pure culture of an acetogen. Other well-known acetogenic bacteria, including Sporomusa ovata and Acetobacterium spp., did not grow well on Fe(0). These results indicate that very few species of acetogens have specific mechanisms to efficiently utilize cathodic electrons derived from Fe(0) oxidation and induce iron corrosion.

  17. [Isolation and Identification of Petroleum Degradation Bacteria and Interspecific Interactions Among Four Bacillus Strains].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-nan; Shi, Yan-yun; Zheng, Li-yan; Wang, Zhe; Cai, Zhang; Liu, Jie

    2015-06-01

    Six petroleum-degrading strains were isolated from oil-contaminated soil at Dagang oil field and oil sewage on Bohai offshore drilling platform in Tianjin using enrichment culture and isolation method. The physiological biochemical test together with 16S rDNA sequencing analysis indicated that they belonged to Bacillus (S1, S2, S3, S4), Pseudomonas (W1) and Ochrobactrum (W2), respectively. The strain S3 had the maximum degradation rate of alkane (41.3%) and aromatic hydrocarbon (30.9%) among all isolated strains showing the better degradation efficiency by endogenous bacteria when compared to that by the exogenous bacteria. The four Bacillus strains were used to construct microbiome, thereafter subjected to petroleum degradation efficiency test and analyzed. The results showed that microbiome F3 consisting of S1 and S4 had the maximum degradation rates of alkane (50.5%) and aromatic hydrocarbon (54.0%), which were 69.9% and 156.1% higher than those by single bacterium, respectively. Furthermore, they were 22.1% and 74.6% respectively higher than those by the most optimal degradation bacterium S3. Microbiome F4 consisting of S2 and S3 had the minimum degradation rates of alkane (18.5%) and aromatic hydrocarbon (18.9%) which were 55.3% and 39.0% lower than the degradation rates of single bacterium, respectively. The results also demonstrated that there were both microbial synergy promotion and antagonism inhibition among bacteria of the same genus in the petroleum degradation period. Bacteria with close affinity in Bacillus genus displayed mainly promoted petroleum degradation effect.

  18. Isolation, Screening, and Identification of Cellulolytic Bacteria from Natural Reserves in the Subtropical Region of China and Optimization of Cellulase Production by Paenibacillus terrae ME27-1

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yan-Ling; Zhang, Zheng; Wu, Min; Wu, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    From different natural reserves in the subtropical region of China, a total of 245 aerobic bacterial strains were isolated on agar plates containing sugarcane bagasse pulp as the sole carbon source. Of the 245 strains, 22 showed hydrolyzing zones on agar plates containing carboxymethyl cellulose after Congo-red staining. Molecular identification showed that the 22 strains belonged to 10 different genera, with the Burkholderia genus exhibiting the highest strain diversity and accounting for 36.36% of all the 22 strains. Three isolates among the 22 strains showed higher carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase) activity, and isolate ME27-1 exhibited the highest CMCase activity in liquid culture. The strain ME27-1 was identified as Paenibacillus terrae on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis as well as physiological and biochemical properties. The optimum pH and temperature for CMCase activity produced by the strain ME27-1 were 5.5 and 50°C, respectively, and the enzyme was stable at a wide pH range of 5.0–9.5. A 12-fold improvement in the CMCase activity (2.08 U/mL) of ME27-1 was obtained under optimal conditions for CMCase production. Thus, this study provided further information about the diversity of cellulose-degrading bacteria in the subtropical region of China and found P. terrae ME27-1 to be highly cellulolytic. PMID:25050355

  19. Isolation and identification of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) from the sediment pond after a coal mine in Samarinda, East Kalimantan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusumawati, Eko; Sudrajat, Putri, Junita Susilaning

    2017-02-01

    Title isolation and identification of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) of sediment pond former coal mine in Samarinda, East Kalimantan. Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) is a group of microbes that can be used to improve the quality of sediment former coal mine. In the metabolic activities, the SRB can reduce sulfate to H2S which immediately binds to metals that are widely available on mined lands and precipitated in the form of metal sulfides reductive. Isolation and identification of sulfate reducing bacteria carried out in the Laboratory of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Mulawarman, Samarinda. Postgate B is a liquid medium used for isolation through serial dilution. Physiological and biochemical characterization was done by Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology. Six isolates of sulfate reducing bacteria were isolated from the sediment pond former coal mine in Samarinda. Several groups of bacteria can grow at 14 days of incubation, however, another group of bacteria which takes 21 days to grow. The identification results showed that two isolates belong to the genus Desulfotomaculum sp., and each of the other isolates belong to the genus Desulfococcus sp., Desulfobacter sp., Desulfobulbus sp. and Desulfobacterium sp.

  20. Degradation of TCE using sequential anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapatwala, Kirit D.; Babu, G. R. V.; Baresi, Larry; Trunzo, Richard M.

    1995-01-01

    Bacteria capable of degrading trichloroethylene (TCE) were isolated from contaminated wastewaters and soil sites. The aerobic cultures were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (four species) and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The optimal conditions for the growth of aerobic cultures were determined. The minimal inhibitory concentration values of TCE for Pseudomonas sps. were also determined. The aerobic cells were immobilized in calcium alginate in the form of beads. Degradation of TCE by the anaerobic and dichloroethylene (DCE) by aerobic cultures was studied using dual reactors - anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor. The minimal mineral salt (MMS) medium saturated with TCE was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the anaerobic reactor. The MMS medium saturated with DCE and supplemented with xylenes and toluene (3 ppm each) was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the fluidized air-uplift-type reactor containing the immobilized aerobic cells. The concentrations of TCE and DCE and the metabolites formed during their degradation by the anaerobic and aerobic cultures were monitored by GC. The preliminary study suggests that the anaerobic and aerobic cultures of our isolates can degrade TCE and DCE.

  1. Utilization of Vinegar for Isolation of Cellulose Producing Acetic Acid Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Aydin, Y. Andelib; Aksoy, Nuran Deveci

    2010-06-17

    Wastes of traditionally fermented Turkish vinegar were used in the isolation of cellulose producing acetic acid bacteria. Waste material was pre-enriched in Hestrin-Schramm medium and microorganisms were isolated by plating dilution series on HS agar plates The isolated strains were subjected to elaborate biochemical and physiological tests for identification. Test results were compared to those of reference strains Gluconacetobacter xylinus DSM 46604, Gluconacetobacter hansenii DSM 5602 and Gluconacetobacter liquefaciens DSM 5603. Seventeen strains, out of which only three were found to secrete the exopolysaccharide cellulose. The highest cellulose yield was recorded as 0.263+-0.02 g cellulose L{sup -1} for the strain AS14 which resembled Gluconacetobacter hansenii in terms of biochemical tests.

  2. Utilization of Vinegar for Isolation of Cellulose Producing Acetic Acid Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Y. Andelib; Aksoy, Nuran Deveci

    2010-06-01

    Wastes of traditionally fermented Turkish vinegar were used in the isolation of cellulose producing acetic acid bacteria. Waste material was pre-enriched in Hestrin-Schramm medium and microorganisms were isolated by plating dilution series on HS agar plates The isolated strains were subjected to elaborate biochemical and physiological tests for identification. Test results were compared to those of reference strains Gluconacetobacter xylinus DSM 46604, Gluconacetobacter hansenii DSM 5602 and Gluconacetobacter liquefaciens DSM 5603. Seventeen strains, out of which only three were found to secrete the exopolysaccharide cellulose. The highest cellulose yield was recorded as 0.263±0.02 g cellulose L-1 for the strain AS14 which resembled Gluconacetobacter hansenii in terms of biochemical tests.

  3. Identification and Antibacterial Activity of Bacteria Isolated from Marine Sponge Haliclona (Reniera) sp. against Multi-Drug Resistant Human Pathogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhanu Asagabaldan, Meezan; Ayuningrum, D.; Kristiana, R.; Sabdono, A.; Radjasa, O. K.; Trianto, A.

    2017-02-01

    The marine sponge Haliclona (Reniera) sp. was a potential source of natural bioactive compounds. This sponge widely distributed along the coast of Panjang Island, Jepara, Indonesia. The aims of this research were to isolate the associated bacteria with Haliclona (Reniera) sp. and to screen the antibacterial activity against Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) bacteria. Amount five bacteria were isolated using media selective for bacteria. The antibacterial activities of bacteria were performed by overlay methods. The bacteria strain PSP. 39-04 had the best activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Enterobacter cloaceae. Based on colony morphology and phylogenetic characterization using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, PSP 39-04 was closely related with Chromohalobacter salixigens strain DSM3043.

  4. Dry matter and nutritional losses during aerobic deterioration of corn and sorghum silages as influenced by different lactic acid bacteria inocula.

    PubMed

    Tabacco, E; Righi, F; Quarantelli, A; Borreani, G

    2011-03-01

    The economic damage that results from aerobic deterioration of silage is a significant problem for farm profitability and feed quality. This paper quantifies the dry matter (DM) and nutritional losses that occur during the exposure of corn and sorghum silages to air over 14 d and assesses the possibility of enhancing the aerobic stability of silages through inoculation with lactic acid bacteria (LAB). The trial was carried out in Northern Italy on corn (50% milk line) and grain sorghum (early dough stage) silages. The crops were ensiled in 30-L jars, without a LAB inoculant (C), with a Lactobacillus plantarum inoculum (LP), and with a Lactobacillus buchneri inoculum (LB; theoretical rate of 1 × 10(6) cfu/g of fresh forage). The pre-ensiled material, the silage at silo opening, and the aerobically exposed silage were analyzed for DM content, fermentative profiles, yeast and mold count, starch, crude protein, ash, fiber components, 24-h and 48-h DM digestibility and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) degradability. The yield and nutrient analysis data of the corn and sorghum silages were used as input for Milk2006 to estimate the total digestible nutrients, net energy of lactation, and milk production per Mg of DM. The DM fermentation and respiration losses were also calculated. The inocula influenced the in vitro NDF digestibility at 24h, the net energy for lactation (NE(L)), and the predicted milk yield per megagram of DM, whereas the length of time of air exposure influenced DM digestibility at 24 and 48 h, the NE(L), and the predicted milk yield per megagram of DM in the corn silages. The inocula only influenced the milk yield per megagram of DM and the air exposure affected the DM digestibility at 24h, the NE(L), and the milk yield per megagram of DM in the sorghum silages. The milk yield, after 14 d of air exposure, decreased to 1,442, 1,418, and 1,277 kg/Mg of DM for C, LB, and LP corn silages, respectively, compared with an average value of 1,568 kg of silage at

  5. Isolation and Screening of Polyhydroxyalkanoates Producing Bacteria from Pulp, Paper, and Cardboard Industry Wastes

    PubMed Central

    Bhuwal, Anish Kumari; Singh, Gulab; Aggarwal, Neeraj Kumar; Goyal, Varsha; Yadav, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Background. Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are storage materials that accumulate by various bacteria as energy and carbon reserve materials. They are biodegradable, environmentally friendly, and also biocompatible bioplastics. Unlike petrochemical-based plastics that take several decades to fully degrade, PHAs can be completely degraded within a year by variety of microorganisms into CO2 and water. In the present study, we aim to utilize pulp, paper, and cardboard industry sludge and waste water for the isolation and screening of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) accumulating bacteria and production of cost-effective PHB using cardboard industry waste water. Results. A total of 42 isolates showed black-blue coloration when stained with Sudan black B, a preliminary screening agent for lipophilic compounds, and a total of 15 isolates showed positive result with Nile blue A staining, a more specific dye for PHA granules. The isolates NAP11 and NAC1 showed maximum PHA production 79.27% and 77.63% with polymer concentration of 5.236 g/L and 4.042 g/L with cardboard industry waste water. Both of the selected isolates, NAP11 and NAC1, were classified up to genus level by studying their morphological and biochemical characteristics and were found to be Enterococcus sp., Brevundimonas sp. and, respectively. Conclusion. The isolates Enterococcus sp. NAP11 and Brevundimonas sp. NAC1 can be considered as good candidates for industrial production of PHB from cardboard industry waste water. We are reporting for the first time the use of cardboard industry waste water as a cultivation medium for the PHB production. PMID:24288534

  6. Isolation and screening of polyhydroxyalkanoates producing bacteria from pulp, paper, and cardboard industry wastes.

    PubMed

    Bhuwal, Anish Kumari; Singh, Gulab; Aggarwal, Neeraj Kumar; Goyal, Varsha; Yadav, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Background. Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are storage materials that accumulate by various bacteria as energy and carbon reserve materials. They are biodegradable, environmentally friendly, and also biocompatible bioplastics. Unlike petrochemical-based plastics that take several decades to fully degrade, PHAs can be completely degraded within a year by variety of microorganisms into CO2 and water. In the present study, we aim to utilize pulp, paper, and cardboard industry sludge and waste water for the isolation and screening of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) accumulating bacteria and production of cost-effective PHB using cardboard industry waste water. Results. A total of 42 isolates showed black-blue coloration when stained with Sudan black B, a preliminary screening agent for lipophilic compounds, and a total of 15 isolates showed positive result with Nile blue A staining, a more specific dye for PHA granules. The isolates NAP11 and NAC1 showed maximum PHA production 79.27% and 77.63% with polymer concentration of 5.236 g/L and 4.042 g/L with cardboard industry waste water. Both of the selected isolates, NAP11 and NAC1, were classified up to genus level by studying their morphological and biochemical characteristics and were found to be Enterococcus sp., Brevundimonas sp. and, respectively. Conclusion. The isolates Enterococcus sp. NAP11 and Brevundimonas sp. NAC1 can be considered as good candidates for industrial production of PHB from cardboard industry waste water. We are reporting for the first time the use of cardboard industry waste water as a cultivation medium for the PHB production.

  7. Antimicrobial activity of bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria isolated from cheeses and yogurts.

    PubMed

    Yang, En; Fan, Lihua; Jiang, Yueming; Doucette, Craig; Fillmore, Sherry

    2012-09-10

    The biopreservation of foods using bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated directly from foods is an innovative approach. The objectives of this study were to isolate and identify bacteriocinogenic LAB from various cheeses and yogurts and evaluate their antimicrobial effects on selected spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms in vitro as well as on a food commodity.LAB were isolated using MRS and M17 media. The agar diffusion bioassay was used to screen for bacteriocin or bacteriocin-like substances (BLS) producing LAB using Lactobacillus sakei and Listeria innocua as indicator organisms. Out of 138 LAB isolates, 28 were found to inhibit these bacteria and were identified as strains of Enterococcus faecium, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus sakei subsp. sakei using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Eight isolates were tested for antimicrobial activity at 5°C and 20°C against L. innocua, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Erwinia carotovora, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides using the agar diffusion bioassay, and also against Penicillium expansum, Botrytis cinerea and Monilinia frucitcola using the microdilution plate method. The effect of selected LAB strains on L. innocua inoculated onto fresh-cut onions was also investigated.Twenty percent of our isolates produced BLS inhibiting the growth of L. innocua and/or Lact. sakei. Organic acids and/or H2O2 produced by LAB and not the BLS had strong antimicrobial effects on all microorganisms tested with the exception of E. coli. Ent. faecium, Strep. thermophilus and Lact. casei effectively inhibited the growth of natural microflora and L. innocua inoculated onto fresh-cut onions. Bacteriocinogenic LAB present in cheeses and yogurts may have potential to be used as biopreservatives in foods.

  8. Antimicrobial activity of bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria isolated from cheeses and yogurts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The biopreservation of foods using bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated directly from foods is an innovative approach. The objectives of this study were to isolate and identify bacteriocinogenic LAB from various cheeses and yogurts and evaluate their antimicrobial effects on selected spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms in vitro as well as on a food commodity. LAB were isolated using MRS and M17 media. The agar diffusion bioassay was used to screen for bacteriocin or bacteriocin-like substances (BLS) producing LAB using Lactobacillus sakei and Listeria innocua as indicator organisms. Out of 138 LAB isolates, 28 were found to inhibit these bacteria and were identified as strains of Enterococcus faecium, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus sakei subsp. sakei using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Eight isolates were tested for antimicrobial activity at 5°C and 20°C against L. innocua, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Erwinia carotovora, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides using the agar diffusion bioassay, and also against Penicillium expansum, Botrytis cinerea and Monilinia frucitcola using the microdilution plate method. The effect of selected LAB strains on L. innocua inoculated onto fresh-cut onions was also investigated. Twenty percent of our isolates produced BLS inhibiting the growth of L. innocua and/or Lact. sakei. Organic acids and/or H2O2 produced by LAB and not the BLS had strong antimicrobial effects on all microorganisms tested with the exception of E. coli. Ent. faecium, Strep. thermophilus and Lact. casei effectively inhibited the growth of natural microflora and L. innocua inoculated onto fresh-cut onions. Bacteriocinogenic LAB present in cheeses and yogurts may have potential to be used as biopreservatives in foods. PMID:22963659

  9. Isolation and characterization of lactic acid bacteria strains with ornithine producing capacity from natural sea salt.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin-Ju; Oh, Suk-Heung

    2010-08-01

    Two lactic acid bacteria (LAB) having ornithine-producing capacity were isolated from Korean natural sea salt. They were Gram-positive, short rod-type bacteria, and able to grow anaerobically with CO(2) production. The isolates grew well on MRS broth at 30-37 degrees C and a pH of 6.5-8.0. The optimum temperature and pH for growth are 37 degrees C and pH 7.0. The isolates fermented D-ribose, D-galactose, D-lactose, D-maltose, Dcellobiose, D-tagatose, D-trehalose, sucrose, D-melezitose, gentiobiose, D-glucose but not D-melibiose, inositol, and L-sorbose. The 16S rDNA sequences of the two isolates showed 99.5% and 99.6% homology with the Weissella koreensis S5623 16S rDNA (Access no. AY035891). They were accordingly identified and named as Weissella koreensis MS1-3 and Weissella koreensis MS1-14, and produced intracellular ornithine at levels of 72 mg/100 g cell F.W. and 105 mg/100 g cell F.W. and extracellular ornithine at levels of 4.5 mg/100 ml and 4.6 mg/100 ml medium, respectively, by culturing in MRS broth supplemented with 1% arginine. High cell growth was maintained in MRS broth with a NaCl concentration of 0-6%. These results show for the first time that Korean natural sea salts contain lactic acid bacteria Weissella koreensis strains having ornithine producing capacity.

  10. Isolation and Chemical Characterization of Lipid A from Gram-negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Jeremy C.; O'Brien, John P.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.; Trent, M. Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the major cell surface molecule of gram-negative bacteria, deposited on the outer leaflet of the outer membrane bilayer. LPS can be subdivided into three domains: the distal O-polysaccharide, a core oligosaccharide, and the lipid A domain consisting of a lipid A molecular species and 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid residues (Kdo). The lipid A domain is the only component essential for bacterial cell survival. Following its synthesis, lipid A is chemically modified in response to environmental stresses such as pH or temperature, to promote resistance to antibiotic compounds, and to evade recognition by mediators of the host innate immune response. The following protocol details the small- and large-scale isolation of lipid A from gram-negative bacteria. Isolated material is then chemically characterized by thin layer chromatography (TLC) or mass-spectrometry (MS). In addition to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) MS, we also describe tandem MS protocols for analyzing lipid A molecular species using electrospray ionization (ESI) coupled to collision induced dissociation (CID) and newly employed ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) methods. Our MS protocols allow for unequivocal determination of chemical structure, paramount to characterization of lipid A molecules that contain unique or novel chemical modifications. We also describe the radioisotopic labeling, and subsequent isolation, of lipid A from bacterial cells for analysis by TLC. Relative to MS-based protocols, TLC provides a more economical and rapid characterization method, but cannot be used to unambiguously assign lipid A chemical structures without the use of standards of known chemical structure. Over the last two decades isolation and characterization of lipid A has led to numerous exciting discoveries that have improved our understanding of the physiology of gram-negative bacteria, mechanisms of antibiotic resistance, the human innate

  11. Molecular characterization of antimicrobial resistance in Gram-negative bacteria isolated from bovine mastitis in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ashraf M; Shimamoto, Tadashi

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the genetic basis of multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria isolated from bovine mastitis cases in Egypt. Multidrug resistance phenotypes were found in 34 of 112 (30.4%) Gram-negative bacterial isolates, which harbored at least one antimicrobial resistance gene. The most prevalent multidrug-resistant (MDR) species were Enterobacter cloacae (8 isolates, 7.1%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (7 isolates, 6.3%), Klebsiella oxytoca (7 isolates, 6.3%), Escherichia coli (5 isolates, 4.5%), and Citrobacter freundii (3 isolates, 2.7%). The most commonly observed resistance phenotypes were against ampicillin (97.0%), streptomycin (94.1%), tetracycline (91.2%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (88.2%), nalidixic acid (85.3%), and chloramphenicol (76.5%). Class 1 integrons were detected in 28 (25.0%) isolates. The gene cassettes within class 1 integrons included those encoding resistance to trimethoprim (dfrA1, dfrA5, dfrA7, dfrA12, dfrA15, dfrA17, and dfrA25), aminoglycosides (aadA1, aadA2, aadA5, aadA7, aadA12, aadA22, and aac(3)-Id), chloramphenicol (cmlA), erythromycin (ereA2), and rifampicin (arr-3). Class 2 integrons were identified in 6 isolates (5.4%) with three different profiles. Furthermore, the β-lactamase encoding genes, bla(TEM), bla(SHV), bla(CTX-M), and bla(OXA), the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes, qnr and aac(6)-Ib-cr, and the florfenicol resistance gene, floR, were also identified. To the best of our knowledge, the results identified class 2 integrons, qnr and aac(6)-Ib-cr from cases of mastitis for the first time. This is the first report of molecular characterization for antimicrobial resistance in Gram-negative bacteria isolated from bovine mastitis in Africa.

  12. In vitro antibacterial potency of Butea monosperma Lam. against 12 clinically isolated multidrug resistant bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Mahesh Chandra; Padhy, Rabindra Nath

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antibacterial activity, using cold and hot extraction procedures with five solvents, petroleum ether, acetone, ethanol, methanol and water to validate medicinal uses of Butea monosperma Lam (B. monosperma) in controlling infections; and to qualitatively estimate phytochemical constituents of leaf-extracts of the plant. Methods The antibacterial activity of leaf-extracts was evaluated by the agar-well diffusion method against clinically isolated 12 Gram-positive and -negative multidrug resistant (MDR) pathogenic bacteria in vitro. Values of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of leaf-extracts against each bacterium were obtained in a 96-well micro-titre plate, by broth dilution micro-titre plate technique. Results The presence of tannins, flavonoids, starch, glycosides and carbohydrates in different leaf extracts was established. Pathogenic bacteria used were, Acinetobacter sp., Chromobacterium violaceum, Citrobacter freundii, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, Shigella sp., Enterococcus sp., Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), methicillin resistant S. aureus and vancomycin resistant S. aureus, along with standard bacterial strains. These MDR bacteria had been recorded to have significant inhibitions by leaf extracts, obtained by cold and hot extraction procedures with five solvents. In addition, the hot aqueous extract against Enterococcus sp. had the highest inhibition zone-size (21 mm). Ciprofloxacin 30 µg/disc was the positive/reference control and the diluting solvent, 10% dimethyl sulphoxide was the negative control. Recorded MIC values of different extracts ranged between 0.23 and 13.30 mg/mL, and MBC values were 0.52 to 30.00 mg/mL, for these bacteria. Conclusions Leaf-extracts with hot water and ethanol had shown significant antibacterial activity against all bacteria. B. monosperma leaf-extract could be used in treating infectious

  13. Phytobeneficial Properties of Bacteria Isolated from the Rhizosphere of Maize in Southwestern Nigerian Soils

    PubMed Central

    Odebode, A. C.; Hsu, S. F.

    2015-01-01

    Biocontrol agents isolated outside Africa have performed inconsistently under field conditions in Africa. The development of indigenous phytobeneficial microbial strains that suit local environments may help enhance competitiveness with in situ microorganisms and effectiveness at suppressing local pathogen strains. We isolated bacteria from the rhizosphere of maize growing in southwestern Nigeria and assessed them for growth-promoting characteristics. The best isolates were characterized using 16S rRNA genes and were further evaluated in the greenhouse on maize seedlings. Four isolates (EBS8, IGBR11, EPR2, and ADS14) were outstanding in in vitro assays of antagonistic activity against a local strain of Fusarium verticillioides, phosphate solubilization efficiency, chitinase enzyme activity, and indole-3-acetic acid production. Inoculation of maize seeds with these isolates resulted in ≥95% maize seed germination and significantly enhanced radicle and plumule length. In the greenhouse, maize seedling height, stem girth, number of leaves, leaf area, shoot mass (dry matter), and nutrient contents were significantly enhanced. The bioprotectant and phytobeneficial effects were strongest and most consistent for isolate EBS8, which was identified as a Bacillus strain by 16S rRNA gene analysis. As a bacterial strain that exhibits multiple growth-promoting characteristics and is adapted to local conditions, EBS8 should be considered for the development of indigenous biological fertilizer treatments. PMID:25956774

  14. Isolation and enzyme bioprospection of endophytic bacteria associated with plants of Brazilian mangrove ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Castro, Renata A; Quecine, Maria Carolina; Lacava, Paulo T; Batista, Bruna D; Luvizotto, Danice M; Marcon, Joelma; Ferreira, Anderson; Melo, Itamar S; Azevedo, João L

    2014-01-01

    The mangrove ecosystem is a coastal tropical biome located in the transition zone between land and sea that is characterized by periodic flooding, which confers unique and specific environmental conditions on this biome. In these ecosystems, the vegetation is dominated by a particular group of plant species that provide a unique environment harboring diverse groups of microorganisms, including the endophytic microorganisms that are the focus of this study. Because of their intimate association with plants, endophytic microorganisms could be explored for biotechnologically significant products, such as enzymes, proteins, antibiotics and others. Here, we isolated endophytic microorganisms from two mangrove species, Rhizophora mangle and Avicennia nitida, that are found in streams in two mangrove systems in Bertioga and Cananéia, Brazil. Bacillus was the most frequently isolated genus, comprising 42% of the species isolated from Cananéia and 28% of the species from Bertioga. However, other common endophytic genera such as Pantoea, Curtobacterium and Enterobacter were also found. After identifying the isolates, the bacterial communities were evaluated for enzyme production. Protease activity was observed in 75% of the isolates, while endoglucanase activity occurred in 62% of the isolates. Bacillus showed the highest activity rates for amylase and esterase and endoglucanase. To our knowledge, this is the first reported diversity analysis performed on endophytic bacteria obtained from the branches of mangrove trees and the first overview of the specific enzymes produced by different bacterial genera. This work contributes to our knowledge of the microorganisms and enzymes present in mangrove ecosystems.

  15. Isolation of alkaliphilic bacteria for production of high optically pure L-(+)-lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Yokaryo, Hiroto; Tokiwa, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria that grow under alkaline conditions (pH 10) were isolated from various sources in Okinawa (Japan). These alkali-tolerant and alkaliphilic bacteria were classified as follows: Microbacterium sp. (1 strain), Enterococcus spp. (9 strains), Alkalibacterium spp. (3 strains), Exiguobacterium spp. (5 strains), Oceanobacillus spp. (3 strains) and Bacillus spp. (7 strains) by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. By fermentation, many strains were able to convert glucose into mainly L-(+)-lactic acid of high optical purity in alkaline broth. This result indicated that valuable L-(+)-lactic acid-producing bacteria could be isolated efficiently by screening under alkaline conditions. Six strains were selected and their ability to produce lactic acid at different initial pH was compared. Enterococcus casseliflavus strain 79w3 gave the highest lactic acid concentration. Lactic acid concentration and productivity were 103 g L(-1) (optical purity of 99.5% as L-isomer) and 2.2 g L(-1) h(-1), respectively when 129 g L(-1) of glucose was used by batch fermentation.

  16. Isolation of Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix strains from iron bacteria communities in Tierra del Fuego wetlands.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Bertram; Sánchez, Leandro A; Fretschner, Till; Kreps, Gastón; Ferrero, Marcela A; Siñeriz, Faustino; Szewzyk, Ulrich

    2014-11-01

    Sheath-forming iron- and manganese-depositing bacteria belonging to the Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group (SLG) are widespread in natural and artificial water systems. Known requirements for their growth include the presence of organic substrates and molecular oxygen. High concentrations of reduced iron or manganese, although not necessary for most species, make their growth a noticeable phenomenon. Such microbial communities have been studied mostly in the Northern Hemisphere. Here, we present descriptions of diverse ochre-depositing microbial communities in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, using a combined approach of microscopical examination, clone library construction and cultivation focused on SLG bacteria. To date, only few SLG type strains are available. The present work increases the number and diversity of cultivated SLG bacteria by obtaining isolates from biofilms and sediment samples of wetlands in Tierra del Fuego. Thirty isolates were selected based on morphological features such as sheath formation and iron/manganese deposition. Five operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were deduced. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed that one OTU is identical to the Leptothrix mobilis Feox-1(T) -sequence while the four remaining OTUs show similarity values related to previously described type strains. Similarity values ranged from 96.5% to 98.8%, indicating possible new species and subspecies.

  17. Novel thermo-acidophilic bacteria isolated from geothermal sites in Yellowstone National Park: physiological and phylogenetic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D Barrie; Okibe, Naoko; Roberto, Francisco F

    2003-07-01

    Moderately thermophilic acidophilic bacteria were isolated from geothermal (30-83 degrees C) acidic (pH 2.7-3.7) sites in Yellowstone National Park. The temperature maxima and pH minima of the isolates ranged from 50 to 65 degrees C, and pH 1.0-1.9. Eight of the bacteria were able to catalyze the dissimilatory oxidation of ferrous iron, and eleven could reduce ferric iron to ferrous iron in anaerobic cultures. Several of the isolates could also oxidize tetrathionate. Six of the iron-oxidizing isolates, and one obligate heterotroph, were low G+C gram-positive bacteria ( Firmicutes). The former included three Sulfobacillus-like isolates (two closely related to a previously isolated Yellowstone strain, and the third to a mesophilic bacterium isolated from Montserrat), while the other three appeared to belong to a different genus. The other two iron-oxidizers were an Actinobacterium (related to Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans) and a Methylobacterium-like isolate (a genus within the alpha -Proteobacteria that has not previously been found to contain either iron-oxidizers or acidophiles). The other three (heterotrophic) isolates were also alpha-Proteobacteria and appeared be a novel thermophilic Acidisphaera sp. An ARDREA protocol was developed to discriminate between the iron-oxidizing isolates. Digestion of amplified rRNA genes with two restriction enzymes ( SnaBI and BsaAI) separated these bacteria into five distinct groups; this result was confirmed by analysis of sequenced rRNA genes.

  18. Identification of effective Pb resistant bacteria isolated from Lens culinaris growing in lead contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Jebara, Salwa Harzalli; Abdelkerim, Souhir; Fatnassi, Imen Challougui; Chiboub, Manel; Saadani, Omar; Jebara, Moez

    2015-03-01

    Soil bacteria are a new phytoremediation system for the removal of heavy metals from soils. In this study, fifteen soil bacteria were isolated from root nodules of lentil growing in heavy metals contaminated soils, particularly by lead. Molecular characterization of the collection showed a large diversity, including Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Rahnella aquatilis, Pseudomonas, and Rhizobium sp. These soil bacteria had a wide range of tolerance to heavy metals. Among them, strains of A. tumefaciens and R. aquatilis tolerated up to 3.35 mM Pb; whereas Pseudomonas tolerated up to 3.24 mM Pb. The inoculation of lentil grown hydroponically with inoculums formed by these efficient and Pb resistant bacteria enhanced plant biomass. The treatment of this symbiosis by 1 mM Pb for 10 days or by 2 mM Pb for 3 days demonstrated that lentil had Pb accumulation capacity and can be considered a Pb accumulator plant, elsewhere, roots accumulated more Pb than shoots, and the inoculation decreased the Pb up take by the plants, suggesting that this symbiosis should be investigated for use in phytostabilization of Pb-contaminated soils. At the same time, a modulation in the antioxidant enzyme activity and a specific duration was required for the induction of the superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POX), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) response and to adapt to Pb stress. These results suggested that these enzymes may be involved in the main mechanism of antioxidative defense in lentil exposed to Pb oxidative stress.

  19. Isolation and Identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from a Traditional Jeotgal Product in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Gyu Sung; Do, Hyung Ki

    2006-06-01

    Seventeen lactic acid bacterial strains (LAB) were isolated using MRS agar medium from Jeotgal, a Korean fermented food, purchased at the Jukdo market of Pohang. To identify the strains isolated, they were tested by examining their cell morphologies, gram-staining, catalase activity, arginine hydrolase activity, D-L lactate form and carbohydrate fermentation. According to the phenotypic characteristics, three strains were tent atively identified as Lactobacillus spp., ten were Enterococcus spp. (or Streptococcus spp., or Pediococcus spp.) and the rest were Leuconostoc spp. (or Weissella spp.). Five strains among 17 were chosen by preliminary bacteriocin activity test. Four bacterial strains which inhibited both indicator microorganisms were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. The results are as follows; Leuconostoc mesenteroides (HK 4), Leuconostoc mesenteroides (HK 5), Leuconostoc mesenteroides(HK 11), Streptococcus salivarius(HK 8). In order to check LAB which are showing a high survival rate in gut, we investigated three strains inhibiting both indicator microorganisms in artificial gastric acid and bile juice -all except HK8. The three strains mentioned above grew in extreme low acid conditions.

  20. Detection of bacteria and fungi and assessment of the molecular aspects and resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from confiscated passerines intended for reintroduction programs.

    PubMed

    Braconaro, Patricia; Saidenberg, André B S; Benites, Nilson R; Zuniga, Eveline; da Silva, Adriana M J; Sanches, Thais C; Zwarg, Ticiana; Brandão, Paulo E; Melville, Priscilla A

    2015-11-01

    Many native bird species are currently considered rare in Brazil because they have been indiscriminately collected by animal traffickers and commercialized, leading to dwindling numbers in their natural habitats. Confiscated animals are at times destined for reintroduction programs that must ensure these animals do not pose a risk to native populations. Healthy or sick wild passerines may carry a great diversity of microorganisms. Therefore, knowledge of the sanitary status of confiscated animals destined for reintroduction is critical to assess whether these animals act as microorganism carriers and to investigate the epidemiology of transmissible diseases, a crucial aspect for animal and human health preservation. This study examined the occurrence of aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria and fungi in cloacal swabs collected from wild confiscated passerines intended for reintroduction programs. In vitro susceptibility tests of the most frequent isolates as well as studies of the molecular aspects of Escherichia coli isolates were also performed. There was microorganism growth in 62.5% of 253 samples. The microorganisms that were most frequently isolated were Staphylococcus spp. (15.0%), Micrococcus spp. (11.5%), E. coli (10.7%) and Klebsiella spp. (10.7%). Fifteen bacteria genera and seven fungi genera were isolated. Multidrug-resistance to antimicrobials was observed in Staphylococcus spp., Micrococcus spp., E. coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates. The high occurrence of Enterobacteria observed is possibly related to the sanitary conditions in which confiscated animals are usually kept. One E. coli sample (out of 27 isolates) was positive for the S-fimbrial adhesion encoding gene (sfa). Considering the low occurrence of genes that encode virulence factors, confiscated passerines may represent a low risk for the potential transmission of EPEC, APEC, UPEC and NMEC isolates to other animals or humans. The potential risk of intra- or inter-specific transmission of

  1. Bacteria Isolated from Bats Inhibit the Growth of Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the Causative Agent of White-Nose Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hoyt, Joseph R.; Cheng, Tina L.; Langwig, Kate E.; Hee, Mallory M.; Frick, Winifred F.; Kilpatrick, A. Marm

    2015-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases are a key threat to wildlife. Several fungal skin pathogens have recently emerged and caused widespread mortality in several vertebrate groups, including amphibians, bats, rattlesnakes and humans. White-nose syndrome, caused by the fungal skin pathogen Pseudogymnoascus destructans, threatens several hibernating bat species with extinction and there are few effective treatment strategies. The skin microbiome is increasingly understood to play a large role in determining disease outcome. We isolated bacteria from the skin of four bat species, and co-cultured these isolates with P. destructans to identify bacteria that might inhibit or kill P. destructans. We then conducted two reciprocal challenge experiments in vitro with six bacterial isolates (all in the genus Pseudomonas) to quantify the effect of these bacteria on the growth of P. destructans. All six Pseudomonas isolates significantly inhibited growth of P. destructans compared to non-inhibitory control bacteria, and two isolates performed significantly better than others in suppressing P. destructans growth for at least 35 days. In both challenge experiments, the extent of suppression of P. destructans growth was dependent on the initial concentration of P. destructans and the initial concentration of the bacterial isolate. These results show that bacteria found naturally occurring on bats can inhibit the growth of P. destructans in vitro and should be studied further as a possible probiotic to protect bats from white-nose syndrome. In addition, the presence of these bacteria may influence disease outcomes among individuals, populations, and species. PMID:25853558

  2. Bacteria isolated from bats inhibit the growth of Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the causative agent of white-nose syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Joseph R; Cheng, Tina L; Langwig, Kate E; Hee, Mallory M; Frick, Winifred F; Kilpatrick, A Marm

    2015-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases are a key threat to wildlife. Several fungal skin pathogens have recently emerged and caused widespread mortality in several vertebrate groups, including amphibians, bats, rattlesnakes and humans. White-nose syndrome, caused by the fungal skin pathogen Pseudogymnoascus destructans, threatens several hibernating bat species with extinction and there are few effective treatment strategies. The skin microbiome is increasingly understood to play a large role in determining disease outcome. We isolated bacteria from the skin of four bat species, and co-cultured these isolates with P. destructans to identify bacteria that might inhibit or kill P. destructans. We then conducted two reciprocal challenge experiments in vitro with six bacterial isolates (all in the genus Pseudomonas) to quantify the effect of these bacteria on the growth of P. destructans. All six Pseudomonas isolates significantly inhibited growth of P. destructans compared to non-inhibitory control bacteria, and two isolates performed significantly better than others in suppressing P. destructans growth for at least 35 days. In both challenge experiments, the extent of suppression of P. destructans growth was dependent on the initial concentration of P. destructans and the initial concentration of the bacterial isolate. These results show that bacteria found naturally occurring on bats can inhibit the growth of P. destructans in vitro and should be studied further as a possible probiotic to protect bats from white-nose syndrome. In addition, the presence of these bacteria may influence disease outcomes among individuals, populations, and species.

  3. Identification and Characteristics of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Sour Dough Sponges.

    PubMed

    Okada, S; Ishikawa, M; Yoshida, I; Uchimura, T; Ohara, N; Kozaki, M

    1992-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria in four samples of sour dough sponges were studied quantitatively and qualitatively. In each sponge, there were one or two species of the genus Lactobacillus: L. reuteri and L. curvatus in San Francisco sour dough sponge, L. brevis and L. hilgardii in panettone sour dough sponge produced in Italy, L. sanfrancisco from a rye sour dough sponge produced in Germany, and L. casei and L. curvatus from a rye sour dough sponge produced in Switzerland. For all isolates except the L. reuteri strains oleic acid, a component of the Tween 80 added to the medium, was essential for growth. It was of interest that lactobacilli requiring oleic acid were the predominant flora of lactic acid bacteria in the microbial environment of sour dough sponges.

  4. Behavior of Psychrotrophic Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Spoiling Cooked Meat Products

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Yoshikatsu; Ayaki, Mitsuko; Fuchu, Hidetaka; Sugiyama, Masaaki; Morita, Hidetoshi

    2003-01-01

    Three kinds of lactic acid bacteria were isolated from spoiling cooked meat products stored below 10°C. They were identified as Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, and Leuconostoc citreum. All three strains grew well in MRS broth at 10°C. In particular, L. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides and L. citreum grew even at 4°C, and their doubling times were 23.6 and 51.5 h, respectively. On the other hand, although the bacteria were initially below the detection limit (<10 CFU/g) in model cooked meat products, the bacterial counts increased to 108 CFU/g at 10°C after 7 to 12 days. PMID:12788779

  5. Supporting data for identification of biosurfactant-producing bacteria isolated from agro-food industrial effluent.

    PubMed

    Fulazzaky, Mohamad Ali; Abdullah, Shakila; Salim, Mohd Razman

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study was to identify the biosurfactant-producing bacteria isolated from agro-food industrial effluet. The identification of the potential bacterial strain using a polymerase chain reaction of the 16S rRNA gene analysis was closely related to Serratia marcescens with its recorded strain of SA30 "Fundamentals of mass transfer and kinetics for biosorption of oil and grease from agro-food industrial effluent by Serratia marcescens SA30" (Fulazzaky et al., 2015) [1]; however, many biochemical tests have not been published yet. The biochemical tests of biosurfactant production, haemolytic assay and cell surface hydrophobicity were performed to investigate the beneficial strain of biosurfactant-producing bacteria. Here we do share data collected from the biochemical tests to get a better understanding of the use of Serratia marcescens SA30 to degrade oil, which contributes the technical features of strengthening the biological treatment of oil-contaminated wastewater in tropical environments.

  6. Current state of purification, isolation and analysis of bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kaškonienė, Vilma; Stankevičius, Mantas; Bimbiraitė-Survilienė, Kristina; Naujokaitytė, Gintarė; Šernienė, Loreta; Mulkytė, Kristina; Malakauskas, Mindaugas; Maruška, Audrius

    2017-02-01

    The scientific interest for the search of natural means of microbial inhibitors has not faded for several years. A search of natural antibiotics, so-called bacteriocins which are produced by lactic acid bacteria (LAB), gains a huge attention of the scientists in the last century, in order to reduce the usage of synthetic food additives. Pure bacteriocins with wide spectra of antibacterial activity are promising among the natural biopreservatives. The usage of bacteriocin(s) producing LAB as starter culture for the fermentation of some food products, in order to increase their shelf-life, when synthetic preservatives are not allowable, is also possible. There are a lot of studies focusing on the isolation of new bacteriocins from traditional fermented food, dairy products and other foods or sometimes even from unusual non-food matrices. Bacteriocins producing bacteria have been isolated from different sources with the different antibacterial activity against food-borne microorganisms. This review covers the classification of bacteriocins, diversity of sources of bacteriocin(s) producing LAB, antibacterial spectra of isolated bacteriocins and analytical methods for the bacteriocin purification and analysis within the last 15 years.

  7. Isolation and Characterization of Bacteria Resistant to Metallic Copper Surfaces▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Espírito Santo, Christophe; Morais, Paula Vasconcelos; Grass, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    Metallic copper alloys have recently attracted attention as a new antimicrobial weapon for areas where surface hygiene is paramount. Currently it is not understood on a molecular level how metallic copper kills microbes, but previous studies have demonstrated that a wide variety of bacteria, including Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Clostridium difficile, are inactivated within minutes or a few hours of exposure. In this study, we show that bacteria isolated from copper alloy coins comprise strains that are especially resistant against the toxic properties exerted by dry metallic copper surfaces. The most resistant of 294 isolates were Gram-positive staphylococci and micrococci, Kocuria palustris, and Brachybacterium conglomeratum but also included the proteobacterial species Sphingomonas panni and Pseudomonas oleovorans. Cells of some of these bacterial strains survived on copper surfaces for 48 h or more. Remarkably, when these dry-surface-resistant strains were exposed to moist copper surfaces, resistance levels were close to those of control strains and MICs for copper ions were at or below control strain levels. This suggests that mechanisms conferring resistance against dry metallic copper surfaces in these newly isolated bacterial strains are different from well-characterized copper ion detoxification systems. Furthermore, staphylococci on coins did not exhibit increased levels of resistance to antibiotics, arguing against coselection with copper surface resistance traits. PMID:20048058

  8. Characterization of acetanilide herbicides degrading bacteria isolated from tea garden soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yei-Shung; Liu, Jian-Chang; Chen, Wen-Ching; Yen, Jui-Hung

    2008-04-01

    Three different green manures were added to the tea garden soils separately and incubated for 40 days. After, incubation, acetanilide herbicides alachlor and metolachlor were spiked into the soils, separately, followed by the isolation of bacteria in each soil at designed intervals. Several bacterial strains were isolated from the soils and identified as Bacillus silvestris, B. niacini, B. pseudomycoides, B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, B. simplex, B. megaterium, and two other Bacillus sp. (Met1 and Met2). Three unique strains with different morphologies were chosen for further investigation. They were B. megaterium, B. niacini, and B. silvestris. The isolated herbicide-degrading bacteria showed optimal performance among three incubation temperatures of 30 degrees C and the best activity in the 10 to 50 microg/ml concentration of the herbicide. Each bacterial strain was able to degrade more than one kind of test herbicides. After incubation for 119 days, B. cereus showed the highest activity to degrade alachlor and propachlor, and B. thuringiensis to degrade metolachlor.

  9. Isolation of Adherent Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH)-Degrading Bacteria Using PAH-Sorbing Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Bastiaens, Leen; Springael, Dirk; Wattiau, Pierre; Harms, Hauke; deWachter, Rupert; Verachtert, Hubert; Diels, Ludo

    2000-01-01

    Two different procedures were compared to isolate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-utilizing bacteria from PAH-contaminated soil and sludge samples, i.e., (i) shaken enrichment cultures in liquid mineral medium in which PAHs were supplied as crystals and (ii) a new method in which PAH degraders were enriched on and recovered from hydrophobic membranes containing sorbed PAHs. Both techniques were successful, but selected from the same source different bacterial strains able to grow on PAHs as the sole source of carbon and energy. The liquid enrichment mainly selected for Sphingomonas spp., whereas the membrane method exclusively led to the selection of Mycobacterium spp. Furthermore, in separate membrane enrichment set-ups with different membrane types, three repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR-related Mycobacterium strains were recovered. The new Mycobacterium isolates were strongly hydrophobic and displayed the capacity to adhere strongly to different surfaces. One strain, Mycobacterium sp. LB501T, displayed an unusual combination of high adhesion efficiency and an extremely high negative charge. This strain may represent a new bacterial species as suggested by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. These results indicate that the provision of hydrophobic sorbents containing sorbed PAHs in the enrichment procedure discriminated in favor of certain bacterial characteristics. The new isolation method is appropriate to select for adherent PAH-degrading bacteria, which might be useful to biodegrade sorbed PAHs in soils and sludge. PMID:10788347

  10. Characterization of boron tolerant bacteria isolated from a fly ash dumping site for bacterial boron remediation.

    PubMed

    Edward Raja, Chellaiah; Omine, Kiyoshi

    2013-08-01

    Boron is an essential micronutrient for plants, but can above certain concentrations be toxic to living organisms. A major environmental concern is the removal of boron from contaminated water and fly ash. For this purpose, the samples were collected from a fly ash dumping site, Nagasaki prefecture, Japan. The chemical characteristics and heavy metal concentration of the samples were performed by X-ray fluorescent analysis and leaching test. For bacterial analysis, samples were collected in sterile plastic sheets and isolation was carried out by serial dilution method. The boron tolerant isolates that showed values of maximum inhibitory concentration toward boron ranging from 100 to 260 mM level were screened. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, the isolates were most closely related to the genera Bacillus, Lysinibacillus, Microbacterium and Ralstonia. The boron tolerance of these strains was also associated with resistant to several heavy metals, such as As (III), Cr (VI), Cd, Cu, Pb, Ni, Se (III) and Zn. Indeed, these strains were arsenic oxidizing bacteria confirmed by silver nitrate test. These strains exhibited their salt resistances ranging from 4 to 15 % were determined in Trypticase soy agar medium. The boron tolerant strains were capable of removing 0.1-2.0 and 2.7-3.7 mg l(-1) boron from the medium and fly ash at 168 h. Thus, we have successfully identified the boron tolerant and removal bacteria from a fly ash dumping site for boron remediation.

  11. Isolation of adherent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria using PAH-sorbing carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Bastiaens, L.; Springael, D.; Wattiau, P.; Harms, H.; DeWachter, R.; Verachtert, H.; Diels, L.

    2000-05-01

    Two different procedures were compared to isolate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-utilizing bacteria from PAH-contaminated soil and sludge samples, i.e., (i) shaken enrichment cultures in liquid mineral medium in which PAHs were supplied as crystals and (ii) a new method in which PAH degraders were enriched on and recovered from hydrophobic membranes containing sorbed PAHs. Both techniques were successful, but selected from the same source different bacterial strains able to grow on PAHs as the sole source of carbon and energy. The liquid enrichment mainly selected for Sphingomonas spp., whereas the membrane method exclusively led to the selection of Mycobacterium spp. Furthermore, in separate membrane enrichment set-ups with different membrane types, three repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR-related Mycobacterium strains were recovered. The new Mycobactereium isolates were strongly hydrophobic and displayed the capacity to adhere strongly to different surfaces. One strain, Mycobacterium sp. LB501T, displayed an unusual combination of high adhesion efficiency and an extremely high negative charge. This strain may represent a new bacterial species as suggested by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. These results indicate that the provision of hydrophobic sorbents containing sorbed PAHs in the enrichment procedure discriminated in favor of certain bacterial characteristics. The new isolation method is appropriate to select for adherent PAH-degrading bacteria, which might be useful to biodegrade sorbed PAHs in soils and sludge.

  12. Isolation and characterization of bacteria from the rhizosphere and bulk soil of Stellera chamaejasme L.

    PubMed

    Cui, Haiyan; Yang, Xiaoyan; Lu, Dengxue; Jin, Hui; Yan, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jixiang; Li, Xiuzhuang; Qin, Bo

    2015-03-01

    This study is the first to describe the composition and characteristics of culturable bacterial isolates from the rhizosphere and bulk soil of the medicinal plant Stellera chamaejasme L. at different growth stages. Using a cultivation-dependent approach, a total of 148 isolates showing different phenotypic properties were obtained from the rhizosphere and bulk soil. Firmicutes and Actinobacteria were the major bacterial groups in both the rhizosphere and bulk soil at all 4 growth stages of S. chamaejasme. The diversity of the bacterial community in the rhizosphere was higher than that in bulk soil in flowering and fruiting stages. The abundance of bacterial communities in the rhizosphere changed with the growth stages and had a major shift at the fruiting stage. Dynamic changes of bacterial abundance and many bacterial groups in the rhizosphere were similar to those in bulk soil. Furthermore, most bacterial isolates exhibited single or multiple biochemical activities associated with S. chamaejasme growth, which revealed that bacteria with multiple physiological functions were abundant and widespread in the rhizosphere and bulk soil. These results are essential (i) for understanding the ecological roles of bacteria in the rhizosphere and bulk soil and (ii) as a foundation for further evaluating their efficacy as effective S. chamaejasme growth-promoting rhizobacteria.

  13. Antifungal Activity of Lactic Acid Bacteria Strains Isolated from Natural Honey against Pathogenic Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Bulgasem, Bulgasem Y.; Lani, Mohd Nizam; Wan Yusoff, Wan Mohtar; Fnaish, Sumaya G.

    2016-01-01

    The role of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in honey as antifungal activity has received little attention and their mechanism of inhibitory of fungi is not fully understood. In this study, LAB were isolated from honey samples from Malaysia, Libya, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen. Twenty-five isolates were confirmed LAB by catalase test and Gram staining, and were screened for antifungal activity. Four LAB showed inhibitory activity against Candida spp. using the dual agar overlay method. And they were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum HS isolated from Al-Seder honey, Lactobacillus curvatus HH isolated from Al-Hanon honey, Pediococcus acidilactici HC isolated from Tualang honey and Pediococcus pentosaceus HM isolated from Al-Maray honey by the 16S rDNA sequence. The growth of Candida glabrata ATCC 2001 was strongly inhibited (>15.0 mm) and (10~15 mm) by the isolates of L. curvatus HH and P. pentosaceus HM, respectively. The antifungal activity of the crude supernatant (cell free supernatant, CFS) was evaluated using well diffusion method. The CFS showed high antifungal activity against Candida spp. especially The CFS of L. curvatus HH was significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited growth of C. glabrata ATCC 2001, C. parapsilosis ATCC 2201, and C. tropicalis ATCC 750 with inhibitory zone 22.0, 15.6, and 14.7 mm, respectively. While CFS of P. pentosaceus HM was significantly (p < 0.05) effective against C. krusei, C. glabrata, and C. albicans with inhibition zone 17.2, 16.0, and 13.3 mm, respectively. The results indicated that LAB isolated from honey produced compounds which can be used to inhibit the growth of the pathogenic Candida species. PMID:28154488

  14. Antifungal Activity of Lactic Acid Bacteria Strains Isolated from Natural Honey against Pathogenic Candida Species.

    PubMed

    Bulgasem, Bulgasem Y; Lani, Mohd Nizam; Hassan, Zaiton; Wan Yusoff, Wan Mohtar; Fnaish, Sumaya G

    2016-12-01

    The role of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in honey as antifungal activity has received little attention and their mechanism of inhibitory of fungi is not fully understood. In this study, LAB were isolated from honey samples from Malaysia, Libya, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen. Twenty-five isolates were confirmed LAB by catalase test and Gram staining, and were screened for antifungal activity. Four LAB showed inhibitory activity against Candida spp. using the dual agar overlay method. And they were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum HS isolated from Al-Seder honey, Lactobacillus curvatus HH isolated from Al-Hanon honey, Pediococcus acidilactici HC isolated from Tualang honey and Pediococcus pentosaceus HM isolated from Al-Maray honey by the 16S rDNA sequence. The growth of Candida glabrata ATCC 2001 was strongly inhibited (>15.0 mm) and (10~15 mm) by the isolates of L. curvatus HH and P. pentosaceus HM, respectively. The antifungal activity of the crude supernatant (cell free supernatant, CFS) was evaluated using well diffusion method. The CFS showed high antifungal activity against Candida spp. especially The CFS of L. curvatus HH was significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited growth of C. glabrata ATCC 2001, C. parapsilosis ATCC 2201, and C. tropicalis ATCC 750 with inhibitory zone 22.0, 15.6, and 14.7 mm, respectively. While CFS of P. pentosaceus HM was significantly (p < 0.05) effective against C. krusei, C. glabrata, and C. albicans with inhibition zone 17.2, 16.0, and 13.3 mm, respectively. The results indicated that LAB isolated from honey produced compounds which can be used to inhibit the growth of the pathogenic Candida species.

  15. Isolation of Lactic Acid Bacteria Showing Antioxidative and Probiotic Activities from Kimchi and Infant Feces.

    PubMed

    Ji, Keunho; Jang, Na Young; Kim, Young Tae

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate lactic acid bacteria with antioxidative and probiotic activities isolated from Korean healthy infant feces and kimchi. Isolates A1, A2, S1, S2, and S3 were assigned to Lactobacillus sp. and isolates A3, A4, E1, E2, E3, and E4 were assigned to Leuconostoc sp. on the basis of their physiological properties and 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis. Most strains were confirmed as safe bioresources through nonhemolytic activities and non-production of harmful enzymes such as β-glucosidase, β- glucuronidase and tryptophanase. The 11 isolates showed different resistance to acid and bile acids. In addition, they exhibited antibacterial activity against foodborne bacteria, especially Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Escherichia coli. Furthermore, all strains showed significantly high levels of hydrophobicity. The antioxidant effects of culture filtrates of the 11 strains included 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging capacity, 2.2'- azino-bis (2-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical cation scavenging activity, and superoxide dismutase activity. The results revealed that most of the culture filtrates have effective scavenging activity for DPPH and ABTS radicals. All strains appeared to have effective superoxide dismutase activity. In conclusion, the isolated strains A1, A3, S1, and S3 have significant probiotic activities applicable to the development of functional foods and health-related products. These strains might also contribute to preventing and controlling several diseases associated with oxidative stress, when used as probiotics.

  16. Isolation of free-living dinitrogen-fixing bacteria and their activity in compost containing de-inking paper sludge.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Chantal J; Lévesque, Gabriel; Prévost, Danielle; Chalifour, François-P

    2006-05-01

    Knowledge of the microbiology of dinitrogen (N2)-fixing bacteria in compost rich in de-inking paper sludge (DPS) is limited. Dinitrogen (N2)-fixing bacteria from DPS composts were isolated and studied for their N2-fixing activity in vitro and in vivo. Two Gram-negative N2-fixing isolates were identified as Pseudomonas. At 20 degrees C, both isolates revealed that N2-fixing activity was higher than that of three arctic Pseudomonas strains. Their N2-fixing activity was found to occur between 18 and 25 degrees C, a pattern that was similar to the reference isolate Azotobacter ATCC 7486. Composts successfully showed N2-fixing activity after carbohydrate amendments both with and without inoculation of a N2-fixing isolate. These results suggest that DPS composts support N2-fixing bacteria and that N2-fixing activity is dependent on a usable carbohydrate source.

  17. Lactate-utilizing bacteria, isolated from human feces, that produce butyrate as a major fermentation product.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Sylvia H; Louis, Petra; Flint, Harry J

    2004-10-01

    The microbial community of the human colon contains many bacteria that produce lactic acid, but lactate is normally detected only at low concentrations (<5 mM) in feces from healthy individuals. It is not clear, however, which bacteria are mainly responsible for lactate utilization in the human colon. Here, bacteria able to utilize lactate and produce butyrate were identified among isolates obtained from 10(-8) dilutions of fecal samples from five different subjects. Out of nine such strains identified, four were found to be related to Eubacterium hallii and two to Anaerostipes caccae, while the remaining three represent a new species within clostridial cluster XIVa based on their 16S rRNA sequences. Significant ability to utilize lactate was not detected in the butyrate-producing species Roseburia intestinalis, Eubacterium rectale, or Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. Whereas E. hallii and A. caccae strains used both D- and L-lactate, the remaining strains used only the d form. Addition of glucose to batch cultures prevented lactate utilization until the glucose became exhausted. However, when two E. hallii strains and one A. caccae strain were grown in separate cocultures with a starch-utilizing Bifidobacterium adolescentis isolate, with starch as the carbohydrate energy source, the L-lactate produced by B. adolescentis became undetectable and butyrate was formed. Such cross-feeding may help to explain the reported butyrogenic effect of certain dietary substrates, including resistant starch. The abundance of E. hallii in particular in the colonic ecosystem suggests that these bacteria play important roles in preventing lactate accumulation.

  18. Isolation, identification and characterization of highly tellurite-resistant, tellurite-reducing bacteria from Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenas, Felipe A.; Pugin, Benoit; Henríquez, Nicole A.; Arenas-Salinas, Mauricio A.; Díaz-Vásquez, Waldo A.; Pozo, María F.; Muñoz, Claudia M.; Chasteen, Thomas G.; Pérez-Donoso, José M.; Vásquez, Claudio C.

    2014-03-01

    The tellurium oxyanion, tellurite, is extremely noxious to most living organisms. Its toxicity has been mainly related to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as to an unbalancing of the thiol:redox buffering system. Nevertheless, a few bacteria are capable of thriving at high tellurite concentrations. One mechanism of resistance is the enzymatic and non-enzymatic reduction of tellurite to the less toxic elemental tellurium. This reduction generates nano- to micrometric tellurium crystals that display different shapes and sizes. To date, a very limited number of highly tellurite-resistant and tellurite-reducing bacterial species are available from international culture collections. In this work, we decided to look for tellurite-reducing bacteria from an extreme environment, Antarctica. This environment exhibits a combination of several extreme factors such as high UV-radiation and desiccation and freezing conditions that impact directly on the local biodiversity. Since, as does, all these factors induce ROS formation, we hypothesized that Antarctic bacteria could also exhibit tellurite-resistance. In this context, we isolated 123 tellurite-resistant bacteria, and characterized six new tellurite-resistant and tellurite-reducing bacterial strains from samples collected in Antarctica. These strains were identified according to their 16S rRNA gene sequence as Staphylococcus hameolyticus, Staphylococcus sciuri, Acinetobacter haemolyticus, Pseudomonas lini, and two strains of Psychrobacter immobilis. The isolates display tellurite-resistance about 35- to 500-fold higher than Escherichia coli (Te-sensitive organism), and a high level of tellurite reduction which might be interesting for an application in the field of bioremediation or nanoparticle biosynthesis.

  19. Physiological and functional diversity of phenol degraders isolated from phenol-grown aerobic granules: Phenol degradation kinetics and trichloroethylene co-metabolic activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Tay, Joo Hwa

    2016-03-15

    Aerobic granule is a novel form of microbial aggregate capable of degrading toxic and recalcitrant substances. Aerobic granules have been formed on phenol as the growth substrate, and used to co-metabolically degrade trichloroethylene (TCE), a synthetic solvent not supporting aerobic microbial growth. Granule formation process, rate limiting factors and the comprehensive toxic effects of phenol and TCE had been systematically studied. To further explore their potential at the level of microbial population and functions, phenol degraders were isolated and purified from mature granules in this study. Phenol and TCE degradation kinetics of 15 strains were determined, together with their TCE transformation capacities and other physiological characteristics. Isolation in the presence of phenol and TCE exerted stress on microbial populations, but the procedure was able to preserve their diversity. Wide variation was found with the isolates' kinetic behaviors, with the parameters often spanning 3 orders of magnitude. Haldane kinetics described phenol degradation well, and the isolates exhibited actual maximum phenol-dependent oxygen utilization rates of 9-449 mg DO g DW(-1) h(-1), in phenol concentration range of 4.8-406 mg L(-1). Both Michaelis-Menten and Haldane types were observed for TCE transformation, with the actual maximum rate of 1.04-21.1 mg TCE g DW(-1) h(-1) occurring between TCE concentrations of 0.42-4.90 mg L(-1). The TCE transformation capacities and growth yields on phenol ranged from 20-115 mg TCE g DW(-1) and 0.46-1.22 g DW g phenol(-1), respectively, resulting in TCE transformation yields of 10-70 mg TCE g phenol(-1). Contact angles of the isolates were between 34° and 82°, suggesting both hydrophobic and hydrophilic cell surface. The diversity in the isolates is a great advantage, as it enables granules to be versatile and adaptive under different operational conditions.

  20. Highly effective bacterial agents against Cimbex quadrimaculatus (Hymenoptera: Cimbicidae): isolation of bacteria and their insecticidal activities.

    PubMed

    Cakici, Filiz Ozkan; Ozgen, İnanc; Bolu, Halil; Erbas, Zeynep; Demirbağ, Zihni; Demir, İsmail

    2015-01-01

    Cimbex quadrimaculatus (Hymenoptera: Cimbicidae) is one of the serious pests of almonds in Turkey and worldwide. Since there is no effective control application against this pest, it has been a serious problem up to now. Therefore, we aimed to find an effective bacterium that can be utilized as a biocontrol agent against C. quadrimaculatus in pest management. We isolated seven bacteria from dead and live C. quadrimaculatus larvae, and evaluated the larvicidal potency of all isolates on the respective pest. Based on the morphological, physiological, biochemical and molecular properties (partial sequence of 16S rRNA gene), the isolates were identified to be Bacillus safensis (CQ1), Bacillus subtilis (CQ2), Bacillus tequilensis (CQ3), Enterobacter sp. (CQ4), Kurthia gibsonii (CQ5), Staphylococcus sp. (CQ6) and Staphylococcus sciuri (CQ7). The results of the larvicidal activities of these isolates indicated that the mortality value obtained from all treatments changed from 58 to 100 %, and reached 100 % with B. safensis (CQ1) and B. subtilis (CQ2) on the 3rd instar larvae within 10 days of application of 1.89 × 10(9) cfu/mL bacterial concentration at 25 °C under laboratory conditions. Findings from this study indicate that these isolates appear to be a promising biocontrol agent for C. quadrimaculatus.

  1. [Effectiveness and risks of isolation precautions in patients with MRSA and other multidrug-resistant bacteria].

    PubMed

    Dettenkofer, M; Utzolino, S; Luft, D; Lemmen, S

    2010-04-01

    The transmission of multidrug-resistant organisms (MRSA, VRE and ESBL producing bacteria) occurs predominantly if health-care workers are not compliant with hand hygiene procedures. The impact of single-room isolation in transmission prevention is often overestimated. As long as hand disinfection is not performed before and after patient contact and gloves are not removed, a single room will not prevent transmission by -itself. Understaffing is additionally worsening the situation. There is no consistent evidence sup-port-ing strict single-room isolation even though data show supportive tendencies. Social isolation is one of the risks that should be considered as well as the economic impact of using shared rooms as a single room. Up-to-date, evidence-based standard operating procedures and individual infection control recommendations should take these considerations into account. In general, contact precautions including isolation in a single room are performed in MRSA and VRE-positive patients. If a single room cannot be provided in a given case (a common problem in intensive care units), contact precautions can be performed in a shared room as an alternative. The problem of establishing an optimal compliance with standard precautions (especially hand hygiene) throughout all professional groups should be addressed. Additional precautions, including single-room isolation, should be implemented critically if indicated.

  2. Isolation and identification of bacteria associated with adult laboratory Mexican fruit flies, Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Kuzina, L V; Peloquin, J J; Vacek, D C; Miller, T A

    2001-04-01

    From the guts of new and old colonies (female and male) of Mexican fruit flies, Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae), we identified a total of 18 different bacterial species belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, Vibrionaceae, Micrococcaceae, Deinococcacea, Bacillaceae, and the genus Listeria. Enterobacter, Providencia, Serratia, and Staphylococcus spp. were the most frequently isolated genera, with Citrobacter, Streptococcus, Aerococcus, and Listeria found less frequently. We found Bacillus cereus, Enterobacter sakazakii, Providencia stuartii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa only in the new colony, Aeromonas hydrophila and Klebsiella pneumoniae spp. pneumoniae only in the old colony. We also studied resistance/sensitivity to 12 antibiotics for six bacterial isolates such as Enterobacter cloacae, E. sakazakii, K. pneumoniae spp., Providencia rettgeri, P. aeruginosa, and Bacillus cereus. Isolates on the whole were resistant to penicillin and ampicillin (five of six isolates) and sensitive to rifampin and streptomycin (six of six isolates). Antibiotic resistance profiles might be useful characteristics for distinguishing among species and strains of these bacteria, probably having ecological significance with respect to intra- and inter-specific competition within host cadavers, and could have implications for the utility of these organisms for biological control, including the alternative control strategy, paratransgenesis.

  3. Isolation and characterization of Pediococcus halophilus from salted anchovies (Engraulis anchoita).

    PubMed Central

    Villar, M; de Ruiz Holgado, A P; Sanchez, J J; Trucco, R E; Oliver, G

    1985-01-01

    The presence of bacteria in salted anchovies during and at the end of the curing process was investigated. Attempts to isolate bacteria under aerobic or anaerobic conditions led to the isolation of only bacteria of the genus Pediococcus which were identified as Pediococcus halophilus. The isolates correspond to a rather heterogeneous group in which some of the members differ in some biochemical tests from the types described in the literature. PMID:3994370

  4. Isolation and identification of chitinolytic bacteria of pohara river of South East Sulawesi and the optimization production of chitinase enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halimahtussadiyah, R.; Natsir, Muh.; Kurniawati, Desy; Utamy, Sukma Puspita

    2017-03-01

    Isolation and identification of chitinolytic bacteria from pohara river and optimation of chitinase enzyme production has been conducted. The aims of the study were isolation, characterize and optimaze of chitinase enzyme production. This study was carried out in three stages; isolation and selection of chitinolytic bacteria, characterization and identification of selected bacteria; optimization of the production of the enzyme (substrate concentration, temperature, and pH), and the determination of growth curve of T3 isolate. The chitinase activity assay was carried out using Schales method. The results of the screening obtained 6 isolates of potential bacteria of chitinolytic. The T3 isolate then was selected for the enzyme production, because it had the highest chitinolytic index of 22.31 mm. The morphological and biochemical observation showed that T3 isolate as a group of bacteria Aerobacter with Gram-negative nature, and shaped bacillus. The optimum condition for chitinase enzyme production was in chitin substrat concentration 0.06%, temperature of 30°C, and pH of 6.

  5. Optimum detection times for bacteria and yeast species with the BACTEC 9120 aerobic blood culture system: evaluation for a 5-year period in a Turkish university hospital.

    PubMed

    Durmaz, Gül; Us, Tercan; Aydinli, Aydin; Kiremitci, Abdurrahman; Kiraz, Nuri; Akgün, Yurdanur

    2003-02-01

    We tracked and documented the time of positivity of blood cultures by using the BACTEC 9120 (Becton Dickinson Diagnostic Instrument Systems) blood culture system over a 5-year study period. A 7-day protocol of the incubation period was selected, and a total of 11156 blood cultures were evaluated. The clinically significant microorganisms (32.95%) were isolated in 3676 specimens. Gram-positive and -negative bacterial isolation rates were found to be 41.07 and 44.88%, respectively. Yeasts were found in 14.03% of all pathogens. Both the false-positivity and -negativity rates were very low (0.1 and 0.3%, respectively). The mean detection times for all of the pathogens were determined to be 19.45 h. Yeasts, nonfermentative gram-negative bacteria, and Brucella melitensis strains were isolated within 5 days. By taking these data into account, we decided to establish a 5-day-incubation protocol in our laboratory instead of the 7 days that are commonly used.

  6. Optimum Detection Times for Bacteria and Yeast Species with the BACTEC 9120 Aerobic Blood Culture System: Evaluation for a 5-Year Period in a Turkish University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Durmaz, Gül; Us, Tercan; Aydinli, Aydin; Kiremitci, Abdurrahman; Kiraz, Nuri; Akgün, Yurdanur

    2003-01-01

    We tracked and documented the time of positivity of blood cultures by using the BACTEC 9120 (Becton Dickinson Diagnostic Instrument Systems) blood culture system over a 5-year study period. A 7-day protocol of the incubation period was selected, and a total of 11,156 blood cultures were evaluated. The clinically significant microorganisms (32.95%) were isolated in 3,676 specimens. Gram-positive and -negative bacterial isolation rates were found to be 41.07 and 44.88%, respectively. Yeasts were found in 14.03% of all pathogens. Both the false-positivity and -negativity rates were very low (0.1 and 0.3%, respectively). The mean detection times for all of the pathogens were determined to be 19.45 h. Yeasts, nonfermentative gram-negative bacteria, and Brucella melitensis strains were isolated within 5 days. By taking these data into account, we decided to establish a 5-day-incubation protocol in our laboratory instead of the 7 days that are commonly used. PMID:12574291

  7. Phospholipid composition of gliding bacteria: oral isolates of Capnocytophaga compared with Sporocytophaga.

    PubMed Central

    Holt, S C; Doundowlakis, J; Takacs, B J

    1979-01-01

    The distribution of acetone-soluble (neutral glycolipid) and acetone-insoluble (phospholipid isoprenoids) lipids in oral isolates of gram-negative gliding bacteria of the genus Capnocytophaga was compared with those in a non-host-related gliding bacterium, Sporocytophaga myxococcoides. The acetone-soluble material accounted for 34 to 55% of the extracted lipids; the remainder was acetone-insoluble material. The major phospholipid was phosphatidylethanolamine (67%), with lesser amounts of lysophosphatidylethanolamine and several unidentified phosphate-containing compounds. Capnocytophaga also contained significant amounts of an ornithine-amino lipid. PMID:500209

  8. Diversity of bacteria isolated from crustacea larvae and their rearing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haryanti; Sugama, Ketut; Nishijima, Toshitaka

    2003-04-01

    The bacteria in the genus Vibrio are heterothrophic, which exist in the larval rearing water of Crustacea and often show diverse pathogenicities to marine animals. In order to assess the bacterial diversity associated with Crustacean seed production, 32 strains were isolated from black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) and mangrove crab (Scylla paramamosain) larvae and their rearing-water and characterized using biochemical and molecular approaches. Two or more genotypically different species were identified. The vibriosis of black tiger shrimp was causes by V. harveyi, V. alginolyticus and Vibrio spp. predominantly, while that of crab by V. harveyi and V. alginolyticus only.

  9. [Antagonistic properties of lactic acid bacteria isolated from apparently healthy and osteoporotic women].

    PubMed

    Ohirchuk, K S; Poltavs'ka, O A; Kovalenko, N K

    2013-01-01

    Antagonistic activity of 74 cultures of lactic acid bacteria, isolated from healthy and osteoporotic women-patients aged 50-79 years, has been studied. It has been shown that the inhibitory effect of the strain studied was independent of the health of women (control group of women or patients with osteoporosis), but had strain specificity. Seventeen most active strains of lactobacilli, which showed the highest inhibitory activity against B. cereus, P. aeruginosa, P. vulgaris were selected. Only 6 strains of lactobacillus demonstrated specific antagonistic activity against the test-strains.

  10. Isolation, Identification and Phenotypic Characterization of Microcystin-Degrading Bacteria from Lake Erie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, A.; Mou, X. J.

    2015-12-01

    Lake Erie, the smallest and warmest lake among the Laurentian Great Lakes, is known for its problem of eutrophication and frequent occurrence of harmful cyanobacterial blooms (CyanoHABs). One major harmful effect of CyanoHABs is the production of cyanotoxins, especially microcystins. Microcystins (MC) are a group of hepatotoxins and the predominant variant of them is MC-LR. Field measurements and lab experiments indicate that MC degradation in Lake Erie is mainly carried out by indigenous bacteria