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Sample records for aerobic bacterial flora

  1. Aerobic bacterial flora of addled raptor eggs in Saskatchewan.

    PubMed

    Houston, C S; Saunders, J R; Crawford, R D

    1997-04-01

    In south-central Saskatchewan, Canada, in 1986, 1987 and 1989, the aerobic bacterial flora was evaluated from 75 unhatched raptor eggs of three species: 42 of the Swainson's hawk (Buteo Swainsoni), 21 of the ferruginous hawk (Buteo regalis), and 12 of the great horned owl (Bubo virginianus). In addled Swainson's hawk eggs, the most common bacterial genera were Enterobacter (18 eggs), Escherichia (12), and Streptococcus (10). Seven great horned owl eggs and six ferruginous hawk eggs also contained Escherichia coli. Salmonella spp. were not isolated. These bacteria were interpreted as secondary contaminants and not the primary cause of reproductive failure. PMID:9131569

  2. Effects of an Antibacterial Soap on the Ecology of Aerobic Bacterial Flora of Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Voss, J. G.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of ad lib use of an antibacterial soap containing 1.0% trichlorocarbanilide and 0.5% trifluoromethyldichlorocarbanilide on the bacterial flora of six skin sites of 132 subjects were measured by comparison with the flora of 93 control subjects who avoided the use of topical antibacterials. Each subject was examined once. The test soap produced significant reductions in geometric mean counts of the total aerobic flora on the back, chest, forearm, calf, and foot; counts were also reduced in the axilla, but not to a significant extent. The overall reduction by the test soap on all sites was 62% (P < 0.001). Neither age nor sex influenced the effect of the soap on the flora. The antibacterial soap also reduced the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus on the skin, mostly by virtually eliminating it from areas other than the axilla. Partial inhibition of the gram-positive flora was not accompanied by an increase in gram-negative species. The latter were found principally in the axilla; Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter aerogenes were the species most frequently found. PMID:1103729

  3. [Aerobic bacterial flora from the digestive tract of the common vampire bat, Desmodus rotundus (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae)].

    PubMed

    Chaverri, Gloriana

    2006-09-01

    This study addresses the composition of microbial flora in the vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) primarily because all available data are outdated, and because of the economical significance of this bat species. Twenty-one bats were collected and their aerobic bacteria documented separately for stomach and intestine. Bacteria were identified through the Analytical Profile Index (API), and results analyzed with the APILAB software. A total of thirty bacterial species were isolated from sixteen females and five males. The most common species were Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, although other bacteria, such as Acinetobacterjohnsonii, Enterobacter sakazakii, Staphylococcus chromogenes, S. hyicus and S. xylosus were also common. The number of species found in the stomach and intestine was significantly different, and the intestine presented a higher diversity compared to the stomach. This has previously been found in other mammals and it is attributed to a reduction of acidity. Most of the species found in this study are considered normal components of the digestive tract of mammals, although other bacteria common in the skin of mammals and from aquatic environments were found. Bacteria from the skin may invade the vampire's stomach and/or intestine when the bat has contact with its prey, and may suggest that the vampire's feeding habit facilitates the invasion of other microbes not common in its digestive tract. The fact that bacteria from aquatic environments were also found suggests that D. rotundus, as previously found by other researchers, drinks free water when available, and water may be another source of microbial invasion.

  4. Culturable Aerobic and Facultative Anaerobic Intestinal Bacterial Flora of Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) in Southern Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Junaid; Sagheer, Mehwish; Tabassum, Nazneen; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Using morphological analysis and biochemical testing, here for the first time, we determined the culturable gut bacterial flora (aerobes and facultative anaerobes) in the venomous Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) from South Asia. The findings revealed that these snakes inhabit potentially pathogenic bacteria including Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shewanella putrefaciens, Aeromonas hydrophila, Salmonella sp., Moraxella sp., Bacillus sp., Ochrobactrum anthropi, and Providencia rettgeri. These findings are of concern, as injury from snake bite can result in wound infections and tissue necrosis leading to sepsis/necrotizing fasciitis and/or expose consumers of snake meat/medicine in the community to infections. PMID:25002979

  5. Culturable Aerobic and Facultative Anaerobic Intestinal Bacterial Flora of Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) in Southern Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Junaid; Sagheer, Mehwish; Tabassum, Nazneen; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Using morphological analysis and biochemical testing, here for the first time, we determined the culturable gut bacterial flora (aerobes and facultative anaerobes) in the venomous Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) from South Asia. The findings revealed that these snakes inhabit potentially pathogenic bacteria including Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shewanella putrefaciens, Aeromonas hydrophila, Salmonella sp., Moraxella sp., Bacillus sp., Ochrobactrum anthropi, and Providencia rettgeri. These findings are of concern, as injury from snake bite can result in wound infections and tissue necrosis leading to sepsis/necrotizing fasciitis and/or expose consumers of snake meat/medicine in the community to infections. PMID:25002979

  6. Characterisation of the aerobic bacterial flora of boid snakes: application of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Plenz, Bastian; Schmidt, Volker; Grosse-Herrenthey, Anke; Krüger, Monika; Pees, Michael

    2015-03-14

    The aim of this study was to identify aerobic bacterial isolates from the respiratory tract of boids with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). From 47 boid snakes, swabs from the oral cavity, tracheal wash samples and, in cases in which postmortem examination was performed, pulmonary tissue samples were taken. Each snake was classified as having inflammation of the respiratory tract and/or oral cavity, or without evidence of inflammation based on combination of clinical, cytological and histopathological findings. Samples collected from the respiratory tract and oral cavity were inoculated onto routine media and bacteria were cultured aerobically. All morphologically distinct individual colonies obtained were analysed using MALDI-TOF MS. Unidentified isolates detected in more than three snakes were selected for further 16S rDNA PCR and sequencing. Among all examined isolates (n=243), 49 per cent (n=119) could be sufficiently speciated using MALDI-TOF MS. Molecular biology revealed several bacterial species that have not been previously described in reptiles. With an average of 6.3 different isolates from the respiratory tract and/or oral cavity, boids with inflammatory disease harboured significantly more bacterial species than boids without inflammatory disease (average 2.8 isolates).

  7. Aerobic bacterial oral flora of garter snakes: development of normal flora and pathogenic potential for snakes and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, E J; Agyare, E O; Vagvolgyi, A E; Halpern, M

    1981-01-01

    Garter snakes that are used for scientific laboratory studies or kept as exotic pets often become ill and die early in captivity. They may also act as reservoirs of potential human pathogens or transmit infection to man. A total of 126 strains of aerobic and facultative bacteria, most potential human and snake pathogens, were isolated from 82 garter snake oropharyngeal cultures. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species were the most common species isolated. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus var. anitratus, Hafnia alvei, Arizona hinshawii, Salmonella species, Shigella species, Klebsiella oxytoca, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were among the potential pathogens isolated. The spectrum of bacteria with potential for causing oral and pulmonary infections in garter snakes is greater than has been previously appreciated. Garter snakes should also be considered reservoirs of human pathogens, and appropriate precautions should be taken by laboratory personnel and pet owners. PMID:7240404

  8. Phosphogypsum biotransformation by aerobic bacterial flora and isolated Trichoderma asperellum from Tunisian storage piles.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Jihen; Magdich, Salwa; Jarboui, Raja; Loungou, Mouna; Ammar, Emna

    2016-05-01

    Aerobic microorganisms able to grow on phosphogypsum (PG), characterized by heavy metals accumulation and high acidity were investigated by enrichment cultures. The PG was used at different concentrations, varying from 20 to 200 g/L in the enrichment culture medium supplemented with compost and Tamarix roots. This treatment reduced COD and heavy metals PG concentration. An efficient isolated fungus, identified by molecular approach as Trichoderma asperellum, was able to grow on PG as the sole carbon and energy sources at the different experimented concentrations, and to increase the culture media pH of the different PG concentrations used to 8.13. This fact would be the result of alkaline compound released during the fungus PG solubilization. Besides, the heavy metals and COD removal exceeded 52% after 7 days culture. At 200 g/LPG concentration, the experimented strain was able to reduce COD by 52.32% and metals concentrations by 73% for zinc, 63.75% for iron and 50% for cadmium. This exhibited the T. asperellum efficiency for heavy metals accumulation and for phosphogypsum bioremediation. PMID:26855183

  9. Cloacal aerobic bacterial flora and absence of viruses in free-living slow worms (Anguis fragilis), grass snakes (Natrix natrix) and European Adders (Vipera berus) from Germany.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Volker; Mock, Ronja; Burgkhardt, Eileen; Junghanns, Anja; Ortlieb, Falk; Szabo, Istvan; Marschang, Rachel; Blindow, Irmgard; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth

    2014-12-01

    Disease problems caused by viral or bacterial pathogens are common in reptiles kept in captivity. There is no information available on the incidence of viral pathogens or the physiological cloacal bacterial flora of common free-living reptiles in Germany. Therefore, 56 free-living reptiles including 23 European adders (Vipera berus), 12 grass snakes (Natrix natrix) and 21 slow worms (Anguis fragilis) were investigated on the island Hiddensee in northeastern Germany. Pharyngeal and cloacal swabs were taken immediately after capture. Bacteriological examination was performed from the cloacal swabs to study the aerobic cloacal flora. Molecular biological examination included amplification of DNA or RNA from adeno-, rana- and ferlaviruses as well as culturing on Russell's viper heart cells for virus isolation. Salmonella spp. were isolated from European adders but not from the other reptiles examined. The minimal inhibitory concentration was determined from the isolated Salmonella spp. However, some potentially human pathogenic bacteria, such as Proteus vulgaris, Aeromonas hydrophila, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli were isolated. Viruses were not detected in any of the examined reptiles. To the authors' best knowledge, the present study is the first survey of viral pathogens in free-living snakes and slow worms in Germany and the first survey of cloacal aerobic bacterial flora of slow worms.

  10. Bacterial flora of the schistosome vector snail Biomphalaria glabrata.

    PubMed

    Ducklow, H W; Boyle, P J; Maugel, P W; Strong, C; Mitchell, R

    1979-10-01

    The aerobic heterotrophic bacterial flora in over 200 individuals from 10 wild populations and 3 laboratory colonies of the schistosome vector snail Biomphalaria glabrata was examined. Internal bacterial densities were inversely proportional to snail size and were higher in stressed and laboratory-reared snails. The numerically predominant bacterial genera in individual snails included Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, Vibrio, and several members of the Enterobacteriaceae. Enterobacteriaceae seldom predominated in laboratory colonies. Our data suggest that Vibrio extorquens and a Pasteurella sp. tend to predominate in high-bacterial-density snails. These snails may be compromised and may harbor opportunistic snail pathogens. PMID:539821

  11. Bacterial flora of conjunctiva after death

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Sagili Chandrasekhara; Paul, George

    2013-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the frequency of bacterial flora of conjunctiva after death (cadaver eyes) which will give information about the bacterial contamination of donor eyes, and the in-vitro sensitivity of isolated bacteria to the commonly used antibiotics in ophthalmic practice. METHODS Conjunctival swabs were taken from the cadavers (motor vehicle accident deaths and patients who died in the hospital), within 6h after death, and sent for culture and sensitivity test. Conjunctival swabs, taken from the healthy conjunctiva of patients admitted for cataract surgery, were sent for culture and sensitivity as controls (eyes in those of living status). The bacterial isolates were tested against the commonly used antibiotics (chloramphenicol, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin) in ophthalmology practice. RESULTS Bacteria were isolated in 41 out of 100 conjunctival swabs (41%), taken from 50 cadavers (study group). Coagulase negative staphylococcus was the most common bacteria isolated (15%), followed by pseudomonas aeruginosa (5%). Gentamicin was effective against majority of the bacterial isolates (82%). Bacteria were isolated from 7 out of 100 conjunctival swabs taken as control group (eyes in living state). Coagulase negative staphylococcus was the most common organism (5%) isolated in control group; the others were staphylococcus aureus (1%) and beta hemolyticus streptococci (1%). CONCLUSION Bacteria were isolated from 41% of the cadaver eyes. High percentage sensitivity of the bacterial isolates to gentamicin (82%) supports the practice of thorough irrigation of the eyes with gentamicin solution before starting the procedure of enucleation followed by immersion of the enucleated eyeballs in gentamycin solution, to prevent the bacterial contamination. PMID:24195038

  12. [Oropharyngeal aerobic flora in patients hospitalized in an ORL department].

    PubMed

    Dumont, Y; Borderon, E; Farcy, M C; Penot, J C

    1986-01-01

    As patients with E.N.T. carcinoma have relative frequent infectious complications of E.N.T. area, we have carried out a study or oropharyngeal colonization by aerobic bacteria and fungi in 84 hospitalized patients. The results of the tests are analysed according to different parameters, essentially the presence or the absence of neoplasia and antibiotherapy. The presence of one of these two factors does not substantially modify oropharyngeal flora of patients. However their association coincides with a height percentage of colonies of enterobacteriaceae, of pseudomonas and of fungi.

  13. Bacterial Flora Changes in Conjunctiva of Rats with Streptozotocin-Induced Type I Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yali; Luo, Dan; Yang, Shufei; Kou, Xinyun; Zi, Yingxin; Deng, Tingting; Jin, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background The microbiota of both humans and animals plays an important role in their health and the development of disease. Therefore, the bacterial flora of the conjunctiva may also be associated with some diseases. However, there are no reports on the alteration of bacterial flora in conjunctiva of diabetic rats in the literature. Therefore, we investigated the changes in bacterial flora in bulbar conjunctiva of rats with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type I diabetes. Methods A high dose of STZ (60 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected into Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats to induce type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The diabetic rats were raised in the animal laboratory and at 8 months post-injection of STZ swab samples were taken from the bulbar conjunctiva for cultivation of aerobic bacteria. The bacterial isolates were identified by Gram staining and biochemical features. The identified bacteria from both diabetic and healthy rats were then compared. Results The diabetic and healthy rats had different bacterial flora present in their bulbar conjunctiva. In total, 10 and 8 bacterial species were found in the STZ and control groups, respectively, with only three species (Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus gallinarum and Escherichia coli) shared between the two groups. Gram-positive bacteria were common in both groups and the most abundant was Enterococcus faecium. However, after the development of T1DM, the bacterial flora in the rat bulbar conjunctiva changed considerably, with a reduced complexity evident. Conclusions STZ-induced diabetes caused alterations of bacterial flora in the bulbar conjunctiva in rats, with some bacterial species disappearing and others emerging. Our results indicate that the conjunctival bacterial flora in diabetic humans should be surveyed for potential diagnostic markers or countermeasures to prevent eye infections in T1DM patients. PMID:26176548

  14. Microbiology of the frankfurter process: salmonella and natural aerobic flora.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, S A; Huhtanen, C N; Smith, J L

    1974-04-01

    Salmonella senftenberg 775W added to frankfurter emulsion was killed during normal processing in the smoke house when internal product temperature was 71.1 C (160 F) or above. The thermal destruction point of S. senftenberg 775W in frankfurters (temperature at which no viable cells were detected) was a function of the length of time of the process rather than of the starting number of cells. Heating of frankfurters to 73.9 C (165 F) substantially reduced the total non-salmonella count. For total non-salmonella bacterial flora and salmonella, relatively little thermal destruction occurred below 43.3 C (110 F). The heating step can bring about a 7-log cycle decrease (10(8) to 10(1)/g) of bacteria present in the raw emulsion. The flora of this high-bacteriological-count raw emulsion was predominantly gram-negative rods. Variation in the number of bacteria (both total and salmonella) surviving at various temperatures during processing was attributed to slight variations in the temperature pattern of the smoke house during its operation. An integration process was devised which allowed calculation of exposure to temperatures above 110 F (43.3 C) on the basis of degree-minutes. Plots of degree-minutes versus log of surviving bacteria were linear. The salmonella plot had a greater slope than that of the total non-salmonella flora, indicating that salmonellae are more heat sensitive than the bacterial population as a whole. The predominant bacteria surviving the heating step were micrococci. These micrococci were able to increase in number in or on the frankfurters during storage at 5 C. PMID:4596752

  15. Changes in bacterial flora of Japanese cabbage during growth and potential source of flora.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hidemi; Sera, Kaori

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial flora of cabbage were identified and enumerated during various stages of growth, and the potential sources of contamination in the field were determined. Bacterial counts increased from below the level of detection (2.4 log CFU/g) on seeds to 2.5 to 5.7 log CFU/g on seedlings. After transplanting, the counts of mesophilic aerobic bacteria on leaves decreased and then increased to 5.7 log CFU/g on outer leaves, 5.0 log CFU/g on middle leaves, and 3.0 log CFU/g on inner leaves at the harvesting stage. Counts of coliforms were below the level of detection during the growing period of the leaves. Bacteria isolated from cabbage seeds, seedlings, and leaves were soilborne organisms such as Bacillus, Curtobacterium, and Delftia and phytopathogenic organisms such as Pseudomonas, Pantoea, and Stenotrophomonas. These bacteria were found frequently in seeding machines, potting soil mix, soil, agricultural water, pesticide solutions mixed with the agricultural water, liquid fertilizers, and chemical fertilizers. Contamination from these environmental sites occurred throughout the cabbage growing period rather than only at the harvesting stage. These results indicate that use of clean water for irrigation and for mixing with pesticides and amendments from seeding to the harvesting stage is an important part of a good agricultural practices program for cabbage in Japan. PMID:21477482

  16. Bacterial floras and biofilms of malignant wounds associated with breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Fromantin, Isabelle; Seyer, Damien; Watson, Sarah; Rollot, Florence; Elard, Jacqueline; Escande, Marie Christine; De Rycke, Yann; Kriegel, Irène; Larreta Garde, Véronique

    2013-10-01

    The risk of infections and the appearance of symptoms (e.g., odors) represent the main troubles resulting from malignant wounds. The aim of this study was to characterize the balance of bacterial floras and the relationships between biofilms and bacteria and the emergence of symptoms. Experimental research was carried out for 42 days on malignant wounds associated with breast cancer. Investigations of bacterial floras (aerobes, aero-anaerobes, and anaerobes), detection of the presence of biofilms by microscopic epifluorescence, and clinical assessment were performed. We characterized biofilms in 32 malignant wounds associated with breast cancer and bacterial floras in 25 such wounds. A mixed group of floras, composed of 54 different bacterial types, was identified, with an average number per patient of 3.6 aerobic species and 1.7 anaerobic species; the presence of strict anaerobic bacterial strains was evidenced in 70% of the wounds; biofilm was observed in 35% of the cases. Odor was a reliable indicator of colonization by anaerobes, even when this symptom was not directly linked to any of the identified anaerobic bacteria. Bacteria are more likely to be present during myelosuppression and significantly increase the emergence of odors and pain when present at amounts of >10(5) · g(-1). The presence of biofilms was not associated with clinical signs or with precise types of bacteria. No infections occurred during the 42-day evaluation period. This study provides a dynamic description of the bacterial floras of tumoral wounds. The study results highlight the absolute need for new therapeutic options that are effective for use on circulating bacteria as well as on bacteria organized in biofilm.

  17. [Qualitative and quantitative detection of bacterial flora in experimental blind loop syndrome of the rat].

    PubMed

    Menge, H; Simes, G; Germer, C T; Wagner, J; Hahn, H; Riecken, E O

    1985-08-01

    In the blind loop syndrome bacterial overgrowth--accompanied by an increase in bile acid deconjugation--is thought to be responsible for the observed morphological alterations of the small intestinal mucosa with its concomitant malabsorption syndrome. Since in this chain of events the bacterial overgrowth is of primary importance, we have performed a complete qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the intraluminal flora in rats with surgically created self-filling blind loops. The results show a significant increase in bacteria of the aerobic growing genera E. coli and Streptococcus (Enterococcus), and of the anaerobic growing genus Bacteroides, in one single rat also of the genera Lactobacillus/Bifidobacterium. In order to elucidate which strains of bacteria are predominantly responsible for the morphological and functional alterations observed in the stagnant loop syndrome, germ-free rats with self-filling blind loops should be contaminated selectively with bacteria of these genera.

  18. Use of oleic acid to reduce the population of the bacterial flora of poultry skin.

    PubMed

    Hinton, A; Ingram, K D

    2000-09-01

    The effect of oleic acid on native bacterial flora of poultry skin was examined. Skin from commercial broiler carcasses was washed once or twice in solutions of 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10% (wt/vol) oleic acid and rinsed in peptone water. Aerobic bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, Campylobacter, and enterococci in the rinsates were enumerated. Significantly fewer aerobic bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, Campylobacter, and enterococci were recovered from rinsates of skin washed in oleic acid than from control samples. Additionally, fewer bacteria were recovered from rinsates of skin washed in higher concentrations of oleic acid than from skin washed in lower concentrations of the fatty acid. In most cases, there was no significant difference in the number of bacteria recovered from rinsates of skin washed once or twice in solutions of oleic acid. Washing skin samples twice in 10% solutions of oleic acid significantly reduced the number of aerobic bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, Campylobacter, and enterococci that remained attached to the skin. Campylobacter sp., Enterococcus faecalis, and Listeria monocytogenes isolates possessed the least resistance to the antibacterial activity of oleic acid in vitro, while Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed higher resistance. Enterobacter cloacae, Staphylococcus lentus, and Salmonella Typhimurium had the greatest resistance to the antibacterial activity of oleic acid. Findings indicate that oleic acid reduces the number of bacteria on the skin of processed broilers and that the fatty acid is bactericidal to several spoilage and pathogenic bacteria associated with poultry.

  19. A Prebiotic Formula Improves the Gastrointestinal Bacterial Flora in Toddlers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Ling; Liao, Fang-Hsuean

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of enriched 3-prebiotic formula (including inulin, fructooligosaccharides, and galactooligosaccharides) on toddler gut health by measuring fecal microbiota. Our results revealed that the consumption of 3-prebiotic formula three times per day giving total intake of 1.8 g prebiotic ingredients significantly showed the increased number of probiotic Bifidobacterium spp. colonies and the reduced populations of both C. perfringens and total anaerobic bacteria on the fecal bacterial flora in toddlers at 18~36 months. In addition, total organic acids in the fecal samples significantly increased which improves the utilization of bifidus under acidic conditions after consumption of the 3-prebiotic formula. Therefore, using the formula enriched with prebiotic may maintain gut health in toddlers. PMID:27403155

  20. A Prebiotic Formula Improves the Gastrointestinal Bacterial Flora in Toddlers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Ling; Liao, Fang-Hsuean; Lin, Shyh-Hsiang; Chien, Yi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of enriched 3-prebiotic formula (including inulin, fructooligosaccharides, and galactooligosaccharides) on toddler gut health by measuring fecal microbiota. Our results revealed that the consumption of 3-prebiotic formula three times per day giving total intake of 1.8 g prebiotic ingredients significantly showed the increased number of probiotic Bifidobacterium spp. colonies and the reduced populations of both C. perfringens and total anaerobic bacteria on the fecal bacterial flora in toddlers at 18~36 months. In addition, total organic acids in the fecal samples significantly increased which improves the utilization of bifidus under acidic conditions after consumption of the 3-prebiotic formula. Therefore, using the formula enriched with prebiotic may maintain gut health in toddlers.

  1. Conjunctival sac bacterial flora isolated prior to cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Suto, Chikako; Morinaga, Masahiro; Yagi, Tomoko; Tsuji, Chieko; Toshida, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the trends of conjunctival sac bacterial flora isolated from patients prior to cataract surgery. Subjects and methods The study comprised 579 patients (579 eyes) who underwent cataract surgery. Specimens were collected by lightly rubbing the inferior palpebral conjunctival sac with a sterile cotton swab 2 weeks before surgery, and then cultured for isolation of bacteria and antimicrobial sensitivity testing. The bacterial isolates and percentage of drug-resistant isolates were compared among age groups and according to whether or not patients had diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, dialysis therapy, oral steroid use, dry eye syndrome, or allergic conjunctivitis. Results The bacterial isolation rate was 39.2%. There were 191 strains of Gram-positive cocci, accounting for the majority of all isolates (67.0%), among which methicillin-sensitive coagulase-negative staphylococci was the most frequent (127 strains, 44.5%), followed by methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (37 strains, 12.7%). All 76 Gram-positive bacillary isolates (26.7%) were from the genus Corynebacterium. Among the 16 Gram-negative bacillary isolates (5.9%), the most frequent was Escherichia coli (1.0%). The bacterial isolation rate was higher in patients >60 years old, and was lower in patients with dry eye syndrome, patients under topical treatment for other ocular disorders, and patients with hyperlipidemia. There was no significant difference in bacterial isolation rate with respect to the presence/absence of diabetes mellitus, steroid therapy, dialysis, or a history of allergic conjunctivitis. Methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci showed a significantly higher detection rate in diabetic patients than nondiabetic patients (20.3% versus 7.0%, P < 0.05). The percentage of all isolates resistant to levofloxacin, cefmenoxime, and tobramycin was 14.0%, 15.2%, and 17.9%, respectively, with no significant differences among these drugs. Conclusion

  2. Association of sexually transmitted infections, Candida species, gram-positive flora and perianal flora with bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Vahidnia, Ali; Tuin, Hellen; Bliekendaal, Harry; Spaargaren, Joke

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is characterised by depletion of the normal Lactobacillus spp. and overgrowth of commensal anaerobic bacteria. We investigated the composition of vaginal microbiota and their association with BV in women of reproductive age. Vaginal samples from 1197 women were analysed, whereby n=451 patients had normal flora and n=614 were diagnosed with BV, the remaining patients were diagnosed with having either intermediate flora (n=42) or dysbacteriosis (n=90). The reported results show that pathogens are associated with BV. This knowledge will further expand our understanding of events leading to BV, which may lead to more effective prevention and treatment strategies.

  3. Association of sexually transmitted infections, Candida species, gram-positive flora and perianal flora with bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Vahidnia, Ali; Tuin, Hellen; Bliekendaal, Harry; Spaargaren, Joke

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is characterised by depletion of the normal Lactobacillus spp. and overgrowth of commensal anaerobic bacteria. We investigated the composition of vaginal microbiota and their association with BV in women of reproductive age. Vaginal samples from 1197 women were analysed, whereby n=451 patients had normal flora and n=614 were diagnosed with BV, the remaining patients were diagnosed with having either intermediate flora (n=42) or dysbacteriosis (n=90). The reported results show that pathogens are associated with BV. This knowledge will further expand our understanding of events leading to BV, which may lead to more effective prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:26485014

  4. NORMAL VAGINAL BACTERIAL FLORA OF GIANT PANDAS (AILUROPODA MELANOLEUCA) AND THE ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERNS OF THE ISOLATES.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Yang, Jiang; Wang, Hongning; Li, Caiwu; He, Yongguo; Jin, SenYan; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; Wang, Pengyan; Xu, Yuesong; Xu, Changwen; Fan, Chengyun; Xu, Lulai; Huang, Shan; Qu, Chunmao; Li, Guo

    2016-03-01

    In order to study the typical vaginal bacterial flora of giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), we took vaginal swabs for the sake of bacterial isolation, from 24 healthy female giant pandas. A total of 203 isolates were identified, representing a total of 17 bacterial species. The most common bacteria isolated were Lactobacillus spp. (54.2%, 13 of 24), followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis (41.7%, 10 of 24) and Escherichia coli (33.3%, 8 of 24). Some opportunistic pathogenic bacteria, such as Peptostreptococcus spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis, were also isolated but showed no pathology. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of aerobic bacterial isolates was performed with disk diffusion method. Of the 152 isolates, resistance was most frequently observed with chloramphenicol (17.8%), followed by tetracycline (14.5%), ciprofloxacin (12.5%), streptomycin (11.8%), and florfenicol (11.8%), while 7.2% were multidrug resistant. This is the first report of the normal vaginal culturable bacterial flora of giant pandas, followed by the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the isolates. PMID:27010307

  5. NORMAL VAGINAL BACTERIAL FLORA OF GIANT PANDAS (AILUROPODA MELANOLEUCA) AND THE ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERNS OF THE ISOLATES.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Yang, Jiang; Wang, Hongning; Li, Caiwu; He, Yongguo; Jin, SenYan; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; Wang, Pengyan; Xu, Yuesong; Xu, Changwen; Fan, Chengyun; Xu, Lulai; Huang, Shan; Qu, Chunmao; Li, Guo

    2016-06-01

    To study the typical vaginal bacterial flora of giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), we took vaginal swabs for the sake of bacterial isolation, from 24 healthy female giant pandas. A total of 203 isolates were identified, representing a total of 17 bacterial species. The most common bacteria isolated were Lactobacillus spp. (54.2%, 13/24), followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis (41.7%, 10/24) and Escherichia coli (33.3%, 8/24). Some opportunistic pathogenic bacteria, such as Peptostreptococcus spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae , and Proteus mirabilis , were also isolated but showed no pathology. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of aerobic bacterial isolates was performed with the disk diffusion method. Of the 152 isolates, resistance was most frequently observed with chloramphenicol (17.8%), followed by tetracycline (14.5%), ciprofloxacin (12.5%), streptomycin (11.8%), and florfenicol (11.8%), whereas 7.2% were multidrug resistant. This is the first report of the normal culturable vaginal bacterial flora of giant pandas and the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the isolates. PMID:27468049

  6. NORMAL VAGINAL BACTERIAL FLORA OF GIANT PANDAS (AILUROPODA MELANOLEUCA) AND THE ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERNS OF THE ISOLATES.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Yang, Jiang; Wang, Hongning; Li, Caiwu; He, Yongguo; Jin, SenYan; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; Wang, Pengyan; Xu, Yuesong; Xu, Changwen; Fan, Chengyun; Xu, Lulai; Huang, Shan; Qu, Chunmao; Li, Guo

    2016-06-01

    To study the typical vaginal bacterial flora of giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), we took vaginal swabs for the sake of bacterial isolation, from 24 healthy female giant pandas. A total of 203 isolates were identified, representing a total of 17 bacterial species. The most common bacteria isolated were Lactobacillus spp. (54.2%, 13/24), followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis (41.7%, 10/24) and Escherichia coli (33.3%, 8/24). Some opportunistic pathogenic bacteria, such as Peptostreptococcus spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae , and Proteus mirabilis , were also isolated but showed no pathology. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of aerobic bacterial isolates was performed with the disk diffusion method. Of the 152 isolates, resistance was most frequently observed with chloramphenicol (17.8%), followed by tetracycline (14.5%), ciprofloxacin (12.5%), streptomycin (11.8%), and florfenicol (11.8%), whereas 7.2% were multidrug resistant. This is the first report of the normal culturable vaginal bacterial flora of giant pandas and the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the isolates.

  7. NORMAL VAGINAL BACTERIAL FLORA OF GIANT PANDAS (AILUROPODA MELANOLEUCA) AND THE ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERNS OF THE ISOLATES.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Yang, Jiang; Wang, Hongning; Li, Caiwu; He, Yongguo; Jin, SenYan; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; Wang, Pengyan; Xu, Yuesong; Xu, Changwen; Fan, Chengyun; Xu, Lulai; Huang, Shan; Qu, Chunmao; Li, Guo

    2016-03-01

    In order to study the typical vaginal bacterial flora of giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), we took vaginal swabs for the sake of bacterial isolation, from 24 healthy female giant pandas. A total of 203 isolates were identified, representing a total of 17 bacterial species. The most common bacteria isolated were Lactobacillus spp. (54.2%, 13 of 24), followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis (41.7%, 10 of 24) and Escherichia coli (33.3%, 8 of 24). Some opportunistic pathogenic bacteria, such as Peptostreptococcus spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis, were also isolated but showed no pathology. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of aerobic bacterial isolates was performed with disk diffusion method. Of the 152 isolates, resistance was most frequently observed with chloramphenicol (17.8%), followed by tetracycline (14.5%), ciprofloxacin (12.5%), streptomycin (11.8%), and florfenicol (11.8%), while 7.2% were multidrug resistant. This is the first report of the normal vaginal culturable bacterial flora of giant pandas, followed by the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the isolates.

  8. FLORA

    1985-04-01

    FLORA solves, in a 2D domain for the linearized stability of a long-thin (paraxial)axisymmetric equilibrium. This is of interest for determining the magnetohydrodynamic stability of a magnetic mirror plasma confinement system including finite-Larmor radius and rotation effects. An axisymmetric plasma equilibrium is specified by providing pressure profiles, the plasma mass density, the vacuum magnetic fields, and plasma electric potential as functions of (?).

  9. External Bacterial Flora and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Staphylococcus spp. and Pseudomonas spp. Isolated from Two Household Cockroaches, Blattella germanica and Blatta orientalis.

    PubMed

    Menasria, Taha; Tine, Samir; Mahcene, Djaouida; Benammar, Leyla; Megri, Rochdi; Boukoucha, Mourad; Debabza, Manel

    2015-04-01

    A study was performed to estimate the prevalence of the external bacterial flora of two domestic cockroaches (Blattella germanica and Blatta orientalis) collected from households in Tebessa (northeast Algeria). Three major bacterial groups were cultured (total aerobic, enterobacteria, and staphylococci) from 14 specimens of cockroaches, and antibiotic susceptibility was tested for both Staphylococcus and Pseudomonas isolates. Culturing showed that the total bacterial load of cockroaches from different households were comparable (P<0.001) and enterobacteria were the predominant colonizers of the insect surface, with a bacterial load of (2.1 × 10⁵ CFU/insect), whereas the staphylococci group was the minority. Twenty-eight bacterial species were isolated, and susceptibility patterns showed that most of the staphylococci isolates were highly susceptible to chloramphenicol, gentamycin, pristinamycin, ofloxacin, clindamycin, and vancomycin; however, Pseudomonas strains exhibited resistance to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, imipenem, and the second-generation antibiotic cephalosporin cefuroxime.

  10. Characterization of the bacterial flora isolated from a pilot-scale lagoon processing swine manure.

    PubMed

    Chikh, G; Pourquié, J; Kaiser, P; Davila, A M

    1997-11-01

    The bacterial flora of an experimental plant that processes liquid swine manure by an aerated compartmented (multistage) lagoon system has been studied. The total flora is characterized by a larger number of oligotrophic bacteria than eutrophic ones. Each compartment displays a specific flora, different from the flora in the manure, and consisting of a complex assembly of Gram-negative and Gram-positive ubiquitous species, such as Aeromonas spp. and Pseudomonas spp., and specialized species, such as Sphingobacterium spp. and Corynebacterium spp. The fecal indicator microorganisms have been shown to disappear in the course of the processing. A significant population of nitrifying bacteria has been observed at levels up to 10(4) bacteria.mL-1.

  11. Bacterial flora and antimicrobial resistance in raw frozen cultured seafood imported to Denmark.

    PubMed

    Noor Uddin, Gazi M; Larsen, Marianne Halberg; Guardabassi, Luca; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2013-03-01

    Intensified aquaculture includes the use of antimicrobials for disease control. In contrast to the situation in livestock, Escherichia coli and enterococci are not part of the normal gastrointestinal flora of fish and shrimp and therefore not suitable indicators of antimicrobial resistance in seafood. In this study, the diversity and phenotypic characteristics of the bacterial flora in raw frozen cultured and wild-caught shrimp and fish were evaluated to identify potential indicators of antimicrobial resistance. The bacterial flora cultured on various agar media at different temperatures yielded total viable counts of 4.0 × 10(4) to 3.0 × 10(5) CFU g(-1). Bacterial diversity was indicated by 16S rRNA sequence analysis of 84 isolates representing different colony types; 24 genera and 51 species were identified. Pseudomonas spp. (23% of isolates), Psychrobacter spp. (17%), Serratia spp. (13%), Exiguobacterium spp. (7%), Staphylococcus spp. (6%), and Micrococcus spp. (6%) dominated. Disk susceptibility testing of 39 bacterial isolates to 11 antimicrobials revealed resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, erythromycin, and third generation cephalosporins. Resistance to third generation cephalosporins was found in Pseudomonas, a genus naturally resistant to most β-lactam antibiotics, and in Staphylococcus hominis. Half of the isolates were susceptible to all antimicrobials tested. Results indicate that identification of a single bacterial resistance indicator naturally present in seafood at point of harvest is unlikely. The bacterial flora found likely represents a processing rather than a raw fish flora because of repeated exposure of raw material to water during processing. Methods and appropriate indicators, such as quantitative PCR of resistance genes, are needed to determine how antimicrobials used in aquaculture affect resistance of bacteria in retailed products.

  12. Obesity pandemics and the modification of digestive bacterial flora.

    PubMed

    Raoult, D

    2008-08-01

    Environmental factors, such as social networks, have an influence on obesity pandemics. The gut microbial flora (microbiota) plays a role in converting nutrients into calories. Variations in microbiota composition are found in obese humans and mice. The microbiota from an obese mouse confers an obese phenotype when transferred to an axenic mouse. There is a large body of experimental evidence and empirical data in the food industry showing that both antibiotics and probiotics, which modify the gut microbiota, can act as growth promoters, increasing the size and weight of animals. The current obesity pandemic may be caused, in part, by antibiotic treatments or colonization by probiotic bacteria. Using metagenomics and microarray analysis, studies of microbiota modifications after antibiotic and probiotic intake may identify the modifications associated with increased size and weight. Epidemiological studies recording these factors in an obese population may be able to link obesity with the absorption of microbiota modifiers.

  13. Evolution of bacterial flora in burn wounds: key role of environmental disinfection in control of infection.

    PubMed

    Taneja, Neelam; Chari, Ps; Singh, Malkit; Singh, Gagandeep; Biswal, Manisha; Sharma, Meera

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial flora in burn patients undergoes change over period of time and is dependent upon many factors. Study of burn flora is not only helpful in locating entry of multidrug resistant bacterial strains into the unit's usual flora but also in determining current antibiotic susceptibilities. Since no studies are available from India that have studied sequential emergence of different microorganisms in burn wound, present study was carried out to study evolution of bacterial flora in burn wounds and its correlation with invasive wound infection. Environmental sampling was also carried out for possible sources of infection. Patients with 20-70% of total burn surface were enrolled and followed up for entire duration of stay. Clinical & treatment details were noted. Surface wound swabs were collected on first, third, seventh, tenth and fourteenth day post admission. Environmental sampling was done every three months. Of 215 wound swabs collected from 71 patients, 72 were sterile and 143 yielded 214 isolates. Colonization rates were 33% on first day, 94% on 7th day and 100% by 14th day. 42% swabs grew gram negative bacteria. Overall Staphylococcus aureus was the predominant isolate (45%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (13.9%), beta hemolytic Streptococci (9.4%). Maximum invasive infections were seen at the seventh day. A high level of environmental contamination was seen with S. aureus, a substantial portion being MRSA. Better control of environmental contamination and disinfection along with rigorous hand washing and barrier precautions are recommended to prevent infection of wounds. PMID:23638328

  14. Normal flora and bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy: an overview.

    PubMed

    Redelinghuys, Mathys Jacobus; Ehlers, Marthie Magdaleen; Dreyer, Andries William; Kock, Marleen Magdalena

    2016-05-01

    The female genital tract is an intricate, yet balanced ecosystem that hosts a variety of different residential microflora. The physiological changes that occur during pregnancy may disrupt this balanced ecosystem and predispose women to a potentially pathogenic microbiota. Bacteria that are associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV) are opportunistic pathogens that frequently form part of this microbiota. The overgrowth of and infections with these bacteria are linked to poor obstetric outcomes and increased transmission of other reproductive tract infections (RTIs). These infections increase women's susceptibility of acquiring HIV, the rates of HIV shedding and the development of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in HIV-infected patients. It is unknown how the plethora of bacterial species associated with BV contributes to the dynamics of this condition. The use of high-throughput methods have led to the in-depth investigation of different BV-related bacterial species and the functional capabilities of these species. However, the pathogenesis of BV is still poorly defined and the role of individual BV-related bacterial species in specific pregnancy complications is unclear and controversial. The majority of BV infections are asymptomatic and successful diagnosis is complicated by the lack of reliable and standardized diagnostic tests. PMID:25834920

  15. Bacterial flora in bottled uncarbonated mineral drinking water.

    PubMed

    González, C; Gutiérrez, C; Grande, T

    1987-12-01

    A quantitative study of bacterial populations in mineral water was carried out. Samples were stored at 6 and 20 degrees C, and the colony counts were determined on tryptone agar plates incubated at 22 and 37 degrees C. Samples were collected from the spring source in sterile glass flasks and from the bottling factory in conventional plastic and glass containers. In both cases, the initial population (10(1)-10(2) cfu/mL water) increased to 10(5)-10(6) cfu/mL after 3 days storage as determined from plate counts incubated at 22 degrees C. The levels reached by this population were similar to those of samples of mineral water obtained at the market stage. Results from plate counts incubated at 37 degrees C showed that populations in samples collected at the bottling factory reached 10(2)-10(3) cfu/mL. No growth was observed in water collected from spring source. Bacterial multiplication was not stopped even when water was stored at 6 degrees C. Caulobacter was the genus found most frequently in both types of samples, followed by Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Pseudomonas fluorescens were frequently found in only two springs, and Pseudomonas putida, Arthrobacter, Aeromonas hydrophilia, and Corynebacterium were isolated less frequently. Janthinobacterium was recovered only once from a single spring. A giant bacterium closely resembling Hyphomicrobium and a budding one similar to Pasteuria were recovered from all samples of a single spring and from some of the commercial samples.

  16. Effect of Exposure to Hyperoxic, Hypobaric, and Hyperbaric Environments on Concentrations of Selected Aerobic and Anaerobic Fecal Flora of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gillmore, James D.; Gordon, Francis B.

    1975-01-01

    Alterations in selected aerobic and anaerobic fecal microflora of the mouse were determined during exposure to hyperoxic and normoxic hypo- and hyperbaric environments. Examination of fecal cultures obtained during exposure for 6 weeks to either 60 or 77% oxygen concentration at 1 atmosphere absolute revealed little alteration in the aerobic or anaerobic flora. There appeared to be only a retardation in the reduction of the Klebsiella-Enterobacter flora which normally occurs after weaning. During exposure to hypobaric environments (100% O2, 0.2 atmosphere absolute), significant alterations in concentrations of Escherichia coli, slow lactose fermenters, Klebsiella-Enterobacter, and enterococci were found in some instances. All alterations were toward increased concentrations. Variations in concentrations of different colony types of obligately anaerobic gram-positive (anGPR) and gram-negative (anGNR) rods cultured during the same experiments also occurred. One colony type of anGPR appeared to decrease while a second type increased in numbers. Concentrations of three colony types of anGNR were generally, but not always, increased. During hyperbaric exposure (2.8% O2, 7.5 atmospheres absolute), increased concentrations of Klebsiella-Enterobacter, E. coli, slow lactose fermenters and enterococci were also noted. Changes in numbers of both colony types of anGPR, when occurring, were in the direction of lower numbers. Alteration in numbers of anGNR were in both directions but were more frequent in the direction of higher numbers. After return to normal air for 4 weeks of either hypo- or hyperbaric exposure, fecal concentrations of all organisms tended to revert toward control values with the exception of the anGPR which remained in lower concentrations after termination of the hyperbaric exposure. These observations indicate that, despite the great variation in the fecal flora among individual mice, it is possible to discover the effects induced by altered gaseous

  17. Naturally Occurring Culturable Aerobic Gut Flora of Adult Phlebotomus papatasi, Vector of Leishmania major in the Old World

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Jaba; Braig, Henk R.; Rowton, Edgar D.; Ghosh, Kashinath

    2012-01-01

    Background Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a neglected, vector-borne parasitic disease and is responsible for persistent, often disfiguring lesions and other associated complications. Leishmania, causing zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) in the Old World are mainly transmitted by the predominant sand fly vector, Phlebotomus papatasi. To date, there is no efficient control measure or vaccine available for this widespread insect-borne infectious disease. Methodology/Principal Findings A survey was carried out to study the abundance of different natural gut flora in P. papatasi, with the long-term goal of generating a paratransgenic sand fly that can potentially block the development of Leishmania in the sand fly gut, thereby preventing transmission of leishmania in endemic disease foci. Sand flies, in particular, P. papatasi were captured from different habitats of various parts of the world. Gut microbes were cultured and identified using 16S ribosomal DNA analysis and a phylogenetic tree was constructed. We found variation in the species and abundance of gut flora in flies collected from different habitats. However, a few Gram-positive, nonpathogenic bacteria including Bacillus flexus and B. pumilus were common in most of the sites examined. Conclusion/Significance Our results indicate that there is a wide range of variation of aerobic gut flora inhabiting sand fly guts, which possibly reflect the ecological condition of the habitat where the fly breeds. Also, some species of bacteria (B. pumilus, and B. flexus) were found from most of the habitats. Important from an applied perspective of dissemination, our results support a link between oviposition induction and adult gut flora. PMID:22629302

  18. The bacterial flora of the skin surface following routine MAL-PDT.

    PubMed

    Bryld, Lars Eeik; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2006-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy using methylated 5-aminolevulate (MAL-PDT) appears to have an effect on non-neoplastic skin diseases, for example acne vulgaris and rosacea, for which antibiotics are sometimes used, and a possible antibiotic effect of PDT has previously been suggested. It does, however, also cause local immunosuppression and post-treatment barrier defects, which may promote infection. At the same time, PDT-induced therapeutic skin damage is sometimes confused with secondary bacterial infection by non-dermatologists. The possible changes in bacterial flora associated with MAL-PDT were therefore studied in 47 patients undergoing treatment. Skin swabs were taken immediately before applying the MAL and instantly after light irradiation. Bacterial growth was identified in 18 cases. No statistically significant changes were seen, either in the specific species found or the estimated bacterial density on the skin surface. The observations do not support the notion that routine MAL-PDT affects the bacterial flora of the skin in a clinically significant manner. Therefore, the possible antibacterial effect of routine MAL-PDT is probably not the main explanation of its apparent effect on non-neoplastic skin disease.

  19. The bacterial flora of tsetse fly midgut and its effect on trypanosome transmission.

    PubMed

    Soumana, Illiassou Hamidou; Simo, Gustave; Njiokou, Flobert; Tchicaya, Bernadette; Abd-Alla, Adly M M; Cuny, Gérard; Geiger, Anne

    2013-03-01

    The tsetse fly, Glossina palpalis is a vector of the trypanosome that causes sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in cattle along with associated human health problems and massive economic losses. The insect is also known to carry a number of symbionts such as Sodalis, Wigglesworthia, Wolbachia whose effects on the physiology of the insect have been studied in depth. However, effects of other bacterial flora on the physiology of the host and vector competence have received little attention. Epidemiological studies on tsetse fly populations from different geographic sites revealed the presence of a variety of bacteria in the midgut. The most common of the flora belong to the genera Entrobacter (most common), Enterococcus, and Acinetobacter. It was a little surprising to find such diversity in the tsetse midgut since the insect is monophagous consuming vertebrate blood only. Diversity of bacteria is normally associated with polyphagous insects. In contrast to the symbionts, the role of resident midgut bacterial flora on the physiology of the fly and vector competence remains to be elucidated. With regard, Sodalis glossinidius, our data showed that flies harbouring this symbiont have three times greater probability of being infected by trypanosomes than flies without the symbiont. The data delineated in these studies under score the need to carry out detailed investigations on the role of resident bacteria on the physiology of the fly and vector competence.

  20. Intestinal Bacterial Flora and Transit Time of Three Neotropical Bat Species

    PubMed Central

    Klite, P. D.

    1965-01-01

    Klite, P. D. (Middle America Research Unit, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone). Intestinal bacterial flora and transit time of three neotropical bat species. J. Bacteriol. 90:375–379. 1965.—Quantitative studies on the intestinal bacterial flora of three neotropical bat species revealed the following average bacterial populations: Molossus major, 104.8 bacteria per intestinal contents; Carollia perspicillata, 103.3; Chilonycteris rubiginosa, 103.9. In comparison, laboratory mice had an average of 109.7 bacteria per intestinal contents. Of 236 bacterial isolates obtained from 60 bats, bacteria of the Klebsiella-Aerobacter-Serratia group were found most frequently, followed by enterococci and Proteus spp. Bacteria of eight other groups were less frequently recovered. A large intestine, cecum, or appendix was absent in all three bat species, and the intestinal length was one-third to one-fifth of that in a mouse of comparable weight. The transit time through the short bat intestine was 15 min. The possible relationship of these unusual anatomical and physiological phenomena to the ability of Histoplasma capsulatum to survive in bat feces is discussed. PMID:14329450

  1. Bacterial flora of the lower respiratory tract in children with bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Fayon, M; Just, J; Thien, H V; Chiba, T; Pascual, L; Sandouk, G; Grimfeld, A

    1999-11-01

    The aims of this retrospective study were to (i) determine the risk of contamination of lower respiratory tract samples obtained during fiberoscopy in children; (ii) determine the incidence and profile of the bacterial flora of the lower respiratory tract in a selected group of asthmatic children at high risk for bacterial infection; and (iii) identify risk markers for such findings. In 29 asthmatic children, comparison of bacterial cultures of specimens obtained from the upper and, lower respiratory tracts showed that contamination was a possibility in only 3.4% (1/29) of cases. The results from bacterial samples obtained via flexible bronchoscopy in a further 273 consecutively investigated physician-diagnosed asthmatic children were analysed. Patients were selected for bronchoscopy if they had severe chronic asthma or in order to exclude other diseases able to provoke wheezing. Their mean (SD) and median ages were 32.2 (38.3) and 17.5 mo, respectively. The incidence of positive bacterial cultures was 12.1% (33/273 patients). Bacterial flora included H. influenzae (39.5%, 15/38), B. catarrhalis (23.7%, 9/38), Neisseria species (7.9%, 3/38), M. pneumoniae (7.9%, 3/38), P. non-aeruginosa (5.3%, 2/38) and P. aeruginosa (2.6%, 1/38). No clinical or radiological markers were significantly associated with lower respiratory tract bacterial infection. Large quantities of bacteria were present in the lower respiratory tracts of a substantial number of children (1/8) in this selected group of asthmatics. For the moment, however, the clinical implications of this finding remain unclear.

  2. Bioremediation of textile azo dyes by aerobic bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Senan, Resmi C; Abraham, T Emilia

    2004-08-01

    An aerobic bacterial consortium consisting of two isolated strains (BF1, BF2) and a strain of Pseudomonas putida (MTCC1194) was developed for the aerobic degradation of a mixture of textile azodyes and individual azodyes at alkaline pH (9-10.5) and salinity (0.9-3.68 g/l) at ambient temperature (28 +/- 2 degrees C). The degradation efficiency of the strains in different media (mineral media and in the Simulated textile effluent (STE)) and at different dye concentrations were studied. The presence of a H2O2 independent oxidase-laccase (26.5 IU/ml) was found in the culture filtrate of the organism BF2. The analysis of the degraded products by TLC and HPLC, after the microbial treatment of the dyes showed the absence of amines and the presence of low molecular weight oxidative degradation products. The enzymes present in the crude supernatant was found to be reusable for the dye degradation.

  3. Large intestine bacterial flora of nonhibernating and hibernating leopard frogs (Rana pipiens).

    PubMed Central

    Gossling, J; Loesche, W J; Nace, G W

    1982-01-01

    The bacteria in the large intestines of 10 northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) were enumerated and partially characterized. Four nonhibernating frogs were collected in the summer, four hibernating frogs were collected in the winter, and two frogs just emerged from hibernation were collected in the spring. All frogs had about 10(10) bacteria per g (wet weight) of intestinal contents and about 10(9) bacteria per g (wet weight) of mucosal scraping, although the counts from the winter frogs were slightly less than those from the other two groups of frogs. Another group of 14 summer frogs, after treatment to induce hibernation, showed a drop in bacterial counts accompanied by a change in the composition of the flora. In most frogs, Bacteroides was the dominant organism. Other bacteria repeatedly isolated at high dilutions were strict anaerobes, including butyrigenic and acetogenic helically coiled bacteria; fusobacteria; and acetogenic, small, gram-positive bacilli. These data indicate that the intestinal flora of frogs is similar to that of mammals and birds and that this flora can be maintained at temperatures close to freezing. PMID:6982025

  4. Aerobic cyanide degradation by bacterial isolates from cassava factory wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Sujatha; Dananjeyan, Balachandar; Krishnamurthy, Kumar; Benckiser, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains that utilize cyanide (CN) as a nitrogen source were isolated from cassava factory wastewater after enrichment in a liquid media containing sodium cyanide (1 mM) and glucose (0.2% w/v). The strains could tolerate and grow in cyanide concentrations of up to 5 mM. Increased cyanide levels in the media caused an extension of lag phase in the bacterial growth indicating that they need some period of acclimatisation. The rate of cyanide removal by the strains depends on the initial cyanide and glucose concentrations. When initial cyanide and glucose concentrations were increased up to 5 mM, cyanide removal rate increased up to 63 and 61 per cent by Bacillus pumilus and Pseudomonas putida. Metabolic products such as ammonia and formate were detected in culture supernatants, suggesting a direct hydrolytic pathway without an intermediate formamide. The study clearly demonstrates the potential of aerobic treatment with cyanide degrading bacteria for cyanide removal in cassava factory wastewaters. PMID:26413045

  5. Aerobic cyanide degradation by bacterial isolates from cassava factory wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Sujatha; Dananjeyan, Balachandar; Krishnamurthy, Kumar; Benckiser, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains that utilize cyanide (CN) as a nitrogen source were isolated from cassava factory wastewater after enrichment in a liquid media containing sodium cyanide (1 mM) and glucose (0.2% w/v). The strains could tolerate and grow in cyanide concentrations of up to 5 mM. Increased cyanide levels in the media caused an extension of lag phase in the bacterial growth indicating that they need some period of acclimatisation. The rate of cyanide removal by the strains depends on the initial cyanide and glucose concentrations. When initial cyanide and glucose concentrations were increased up to 5 mM, cyanide removal rate increased up to 63 and 61 per cent by Bacillus pumilus and Pseudomonas putida. Metabolic products such as ammonia and formate were detected in culture supernatants, suggesting a direct hydrolytic pathway without an intermediate formamide. The study clearly demonstrates the potential of aerobic treatment with cyanide degrading bacteria for cyanide removal in cassava factory wastewaters. PMID:26413045

  6. Aerobic cyanide degradation by bacterial isolates from cassava factory wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Sujatha; Dananjeyan, Balachandar; Krishnamurthy, Kumar; Benckiser, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains that utilize cyanide (CN) as a nitrogen source were isolated from cassava factory wastewater after enrichment in a liquid media containing sodium cyanide (1 mM) and glucose (0.2% w/v). The strains could tolerate and grow in cyanide concentrations of up to 5 mM. Increased cyanide levels in the media caused an extension of lag phase in the bacterial growth indicating that they need some period of acclimatisation. The rate of cyanide removal by the strains depends on the initial cyanide and glucose concentrations. When initial cyanide and glucose concentrations were increased up to 5 mM, cyanide removal rate increased up to 63 and 61 per cent by Bacillus pumilus and Pseudomonas putida. Metabolic products such as ammonia and formate were detected in culture supernatants, suggesting a direct hydrolytic pathway without an intermediate formamide. The study clearly demonstrates the potential of aerobic treatment with cyanide degrading bacteria for cyanide removal in cassava factory wastewaters.

  7. Assessment of bacterial and structural dynamics in aerobic granular biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Weissbrodt, David G.; Neu, Thomas R.; Kuhlicke, Ute; Rappaz, Yoan; Holliger, Christof

    2013-01-01

    Aerobic granular sludge (AGS) is based on self-granulated flocs forming mobile biofilms with a gel-like consistence. Bacterial and structural dynamics from flocs to granules were followed in anaerobic-aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBR) fed with synthetic wastewater, namely a bubble column (BC-SBR) operated under wash-out conditions for fast granulation, and two stirred-tank enrichments of Accumulibacter (PAO-SBR) and Competibacter (GAO-SBR) operated at steady-state. In the BC-SBR, granules formed within 2 weeks by swelling of Zoogloea colonies around flocs, developing subsequently smooth zoogloeal biofilms. However, Zoogloea predominance (37–79%) led to deteriorated nutrient removal during the first months of reactor operation. Upon maturation, improved nitrification (80–100%), nitrogen removal (43–83%), and high but unstable dephosphatation (75–100%) were obtained. Proliferation of dense clusters of nitrifiers, Accumulibacter, and Competibacter from granule cores outwards resulted in heterogeneous bioaggregates, inside which only low abundance Zoogloea (<5%) were detected in biofilm interstices. The presence of different extracellular glycoconjugates detected by fluorescence lectin-binding analysis showed the complex nature of the intracellular matrix of these granules. In the PAO-SBR, granulation occurred within two months with abundant and active Accumulibacter populations (56 ± 10%) that were selected under full anaerobic uptake of volatile fatty acids and that aggregated as dense clusters within heterogeneous granules. Flocs self-granulated in the GAO-SBR after 480 days during a period of over-aeration caused by biofilm growth on the oxygen sensor. Granules were dominated by heterogeneous clusters of Competibacter (37 ± 11%). Zoogloea were never abundant in biomass of both PAO- and GAO-SBRs. This study showed that Zoogloea, Accumulibacter, and Competibacter affiliates can form granules, and that the granulation mechanisms rely on the dominant

  8. Glossina spp. gut bacterial flora and their putative role in fly-hosted trypanosome development.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Anne; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Njiokou, Flobert; Ollivier, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is caused by trypanosomes transmitted to humans by the tsetse fly, in which they accomplish their development into their infective metacyclic form. The crucial step in parasite survival occurs when it invades the fly midgut. Insect digestive enzymes and immune defenses may be involved in the modulation of the fly's vector competence, together with bacteria that could be present in the fly's midgut. In fact, in addition to the three bacterial symbionts that have previously been characterized, tsetse flies may harbor additional bacterial inhabitants. This review focuses on the diversity of the bacterial flora in Glossina, with regards to the fly species and their geographical distribution. The rationale was (i) that these newly identified bacteria, associated with tsetse flies, may contribute to vector competence as was shown in other insects and (ii) that differences may exist according to fly species and geographic area. A more complete knowledge of the bacterial microbiota of the tsetse fly and the role these bacteria play in tsetse biology may lead to novel ways of investigation in view of developing alternative anti-vector strategies for fighting human--and possibly animal--trypanosomiasis.

  9. Glossina spp. gut bacterial flora and their putative role in fly-hosted trypanosome development

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Anne; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Njiokou, Flobert; Ollivier, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is caused by trypanosomes transmitted to humans by the tsetse fly, in which they accomplish their development into their infective metacyclic form. The crucial step in parasite survival occurs when it invades the fly midgut. Insect digestive enzymes and immune defenses may be involved in the modulation of the fly's vector competence, together with bacteria that could be present in the fly's midgut. In fact, in addition to the three bacterial symbionts that have previously been characterized, tsetse flies may harbor additional bacterial inhabitants. This review focuses on the diversity of the bacterial flora in Glossina, with regards to the fly species and their geographical distribution. The rationale was (i) that these newly identified bacteria, associated with tsetse flies, may contribute to vector competence as was shown in other insects and (ii) that differences may exist according to fly species and geographic area. A more complete knowledge of the bacterial microbiota of the tsetse fly and the role these bacteria play in tsetse biology may lead to novel ways of investigation in view of developing alternative anti-vector strategies for fighting human—and possibly animal—trypanosomiasis. PMID:23898466

  10. Bacterial flora on Cascades frogs in the Klamath mountains of California.

    PubMed

    Roth, Tara; Foley, Janet; Worth, Joy; Piovia-Scott, Jonah; Pope, Karen; Lawler, Sharon

    2013-12-01

    Amphibians are experiencing global declines due in part to the infectious disease chytridiomycosis. Some symbiotic bacteria residents on frog skin have been shown to inhibit the growth of Batrachochytrium dendrobatitis (Bd) but few studies have attempted to fully describe the resident bacterial flora of frog skin. We cultured and sequenced 130 bacterial isolates from frogs collected from the California Klamath Range, recovering predominantly Gram-negative bacteria from 20 higher order taxa and 31 genera. There were also a large number of unclassifiable isolates. Forty-three isolates were assessed for their ability to inhibit the growth of Bd in vitro; of these, two had strong and three had slight anti-Bd activity. We suggest that many bacterial species may play a secondary role in Bd resistance, acting synergistically with inhibitory species. Future research is required in order to characterize these interactions. Understanding the relationships between bacterial strains may be important in predicting and managing the effects of future anti-Bd treatments such as antimicrobial compounds or probiotic bacteria.

  11. Human fecal flora: variation in bacterial composition within individuals and a possible effect of emotional stress.

    PubMed Central

    Holdeman, L V; Good, I J; Moore, W E

    1976-01-01

    Data are presented on the distribution of 101 bacterial species and subspecies among 1,442 isolates from 25 fecal specimens from three men on: (i) their normal diet and normal living conditions, (ii) normal living conditions but eating the controlled metabolic diet designed for use in the Skylab simulation and missions, and (iii) the Skylab diet in simulated Skylab (isolation) conditions. These bacteria represent the most numerous kinds in the fecal flora. Analyses of the kinds of bacteria from each astronaut during the 5-month period showed more variation in the composition of the flora among the individual astronauts than among the eight or nine samples from each person. This observation indicates that the variations in fecal flora reported previously, but based on the study of only one specimen from each person, more certainly reflect real differences (and not daily variation) in the types of bacteria maintained by individual people. The proportions of the predominant fecal species in the astronauts were similar to those reported earlier from a Japanese-Hawaiian population and were generally insensitive to changes from the normal North American diet to the Skylab diet; only two of the most common species were affected by changes in diet. However, one of the predominant species (Bacteroides fragilis subsp. thetaiotaomicron) appeared to be affected during confinement of the men in the Skylab test chamber. Evidence is presented suggesting that an anger stress situation may have been responsible for the increase of this species simultaneously in all of the subjects studied. Phenotypic characteristics of some of the less common isolates are given. The statistical analyses used in interpretation of the results are discussed. PMID:938032

  12. TEMPO TVC for the enumeration of aerobic mesophilic flora in foods: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Erin S; Bird, Patrick M; Torontali, Marianne K; Agin, James R; Goins, David G; Johnson, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    The automated system for enumeration of total viable count (TVC) in foods, TEMPO TVC, uses a dehydrated culture medium and an enumeration card containing 48 wells across 3 different dilutions for the automatic determination of the most probable number (MPN). The alternative method was compared in a multilaboratory collaborative study to AOAC Method 966.23 for determination of aerobic plate count for nondairy products and the Standard Methods for the Examination of Dairy Products (SMEDP) Standard Plate Count for dairy products. Five food types, raw ground beef, raw ground chicken, cooked whitefish fillets, bagged lettuce, and milk, were analyzed for TVC by 14 collaborating laboratories throughout the United States and Canada. Three lots of naturally contaminated food products representing a wide range of counts were tested for each of the 5 food types. The study demonstrated that the overall repeatability, reproducibility, and mean log counts of the TEMPO TVC method were statistically comparable to those of the 2 standard methods at the 5% level.

  13. Efficiency of Various Growth Media in Recovering Oral Bacterial Flora from Human Dental Plaque

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Salam A.; Loesche, Walter J.

    1973-01-01

    MM10 sucrose blood agar (MM10 SB agar), N2C agar, Schaedler agar (SH agar), and mitis salivarius agar (MS agar) were tested for their ability to recover human dental plaque flora by a continuous anaerobic procedure and by a conventional anaerobic method. MM10 SB agar yielded higher recovery of bacteria from plaque samples as determined by the enumeration of colony-forming units (CFU). The CFU on N2C agar, SH agar, and MS agar were lower than MM10 SB agar when the continuous anaerobic procedure was used. The superior performance of MM10 SB agar was much more apparent when used for the cultivation of dental plaque by the conventional anaerobic method. Under these conditions the counts were consistently higher on MM10 SB agar as compared to the other media tested. However, the differential counts of Streptococcus sanguis and S. mutans from carious plaque samples were in general comparable on all culture media. Deletion of blood from MM10 SB agar did not lower counts. The elimination of dithiothreitol from this medium resulted in a significantly lower recovery of bacteria from the plaque samples when cultured by the conventional anaerobic method. The storage of MM10 SB agar for varying periods of time aerobic conditions did not seem to affect its performance. These findings suggest that MM10 SB agar is an ideal culture medium for the isolation, nonselective enumeration, and differential counts of bacteria present in normal and disease-associated plaques. PMID:4584588

  14. Communal microaerophilic-aerobic biodegradation of Amaranth by novel NAR-2 bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Chan, Giek Far; Rashid, Noor Aini Abdul; Chua, Lee Suan; Ab llah, Norzarini; Nasiri, Rozita; Ikubar, Mohamed Roslan Mohamad

    2012-02-01

    A novel bacterial consortium, NAR-2 which consists of Citrobacter freundii A1, Enterococcus casseliflavus C1 and Enterobacter cloacae L17 was investigated for biodegradation of Amaranth azo dye under sequential microaerophilic-aerobic condition. The NAR-2 bacterial consortium with E. casseliflavus C1 as the dominant strain enhanced the decolorization process resulting in reduction of Amaranth in 30 min. Further aerobic biodegradation, which was dominated by C. freundii A1 and E. cloacae L17, allowed biotransformation of azo reduction intermediates and mineralization via metabolic pathways including benzoyl-CoA, protocatechuate, salicylate, gentisate, catechol and cinnamic acid. The presence of autoxidation products which could be metabolized to 2-oxopentenoate was elucidated. The biodegradation mechanism of Amaranth by NAR-2 bacterial consortium was predicted to follow the steps of azo reduction, deamination, desulfonation and aromatic ring cleavage. This is for the first time the comprehensive microaerophilic-aerobic biotransformation pathways of Amaranth dye intermediates by bacterial consortium are being proposed.

  15. Associated bacterial flora, growth, and toxicity of cultured benthic dinoflagellates Ostreopsis lenticularis and Gambierdiscus toxicus.

    PubMed

    Tosteson, T R; Ballantine, D L; Tosteson, C G; Hensley, V; Bardales, A T

    1989-01-01

    The growth, toxicity, and associated bacterial flora of 10 clonal cultures of the toxic benthic dinoflagellates Ostreopsis lenticularis and Gambierdiscus toxicus isolated from the coastal waters of southwest Puerto Rico have been examined. Clonal cultures of O. lenticularis grew more rapidly and at broader temperature ranges than those of G. toxicus. All five Ostreopsis clones were toxic, while only one of the five Gambierdiscus clones was poisonous. The degree of toxicity among poisonous clones was highly variable. The number of associated bacterial genera and their frequency of occurrence were quite variable among clones of both dinoflagellate genera. Bacterial isolates represented six genera (Nocardia, Pseudomonas, Vibrio, Aeromonas, Flavobacterium, and Moraxella) in addition to coryneform bacteria. Extracts of dinoflagellate-associated bacteria grown in pure culture were not toxic. Gambierdiscus clones were characterized by the frequent presence of Pseudomonas spp. (four of five clones) and the absence of coryneforms. In O. lenticularis, only one of five clones showed the presence of Pseudomonas spp., and Moraxella sp. was absent altogether. Detailed analyses of toxicity and associated microflora in a selected Ostreopsis clone, repeatedly cultivated (four times) over a period of 160 days, showed that peak cell toxicities developed in the late static and early negative culture growth phases. Peak Ostreopsis cell toxicities in the stationary phase of culture growth were correlated with significant increases in the percent total bacteria directly associated with these cells. Changes in the quantity of bacteria directly associated with microalgal cell surfaces and extracellular matrices during culture growth may be related to variability and degree of toxicity in these laboratory-cultured benthic dinoflagellates. PMID:2705766

  16. Bacterial community composition and abundance in leachate of semi-aerobic and anaerobic landfills.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Yue, Bo; Wang, Qi; Huang, Zechun; Huang, Qifei; Zhang, Zengqiang

    2011-01-01

    The abundance and phylogenetic composition of bacterial community in leachate of semi-aerobic and anaerobic landfill were compared through real-time polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. In semi-aerobic landfill scenario, the bacterial 16S rRNA copy numbers in leachate had no significant reduction from initial stage to stable period. In the scenario of anaerobic landfill, the largest bacterial 16S rRNA gene copy number was found in leachate at initial stage, but it reduced significantly at stable period. Moreover, methane-oxidizing bacteria population in stable period was lower than that in initial period in both two landfill processes. However, semi-aerobic landfill leachate had more methanotrophic bacteria populations than that in the anaerobic one. Furthermore, according to the sequences and phylogenetic analysis, obvious difference could be detected in bacterial community composition in different scenarios. Proteobacteria and bacteroidetes took up a dominantly higher proportion in semi-aerobic landfill leachate. To summarize up, different landfill methods and its landfill ages had crucial impacts on bacterial abundance and composition in leachate of semi-aerobic and anaerobic landfills.

  17. Aerobic bacterial catabolism of persistent organic pollutants - potential impact of biotic and abiotic interaction.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong-Rok; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Baldrian, Petr; Schmidt, Stefan; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2016-04-01

    Several aerobic bacteria possess unique catabolic pathways enabling them to degrade persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs), polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The catabolic activity of aerobic bacteria employed for removal of POPs in the environment may be modulated by several biotic (i.e. fungi, plants, algae, earthworms, and other bacteria) and abiotic (i.e. zero-valent iron, advanced oxidation, and electricity) agents. This review describes the basic biochemistry of the aerobic bacterial catabolism of selected POPs and discusses how biotic and abiotic agents enhance or inhibit the process. Solutions allowing biotic and abiotic agents to exert physical and chemical assistance to aerobic bacterial catabolism of POPs are also discussed.

  18. Culturable bacterial flora associated with the dinoflagellate green Noctiluca miliaris during active and declining bloom phases in the Northern Arabian Sea.

    PubMed

    Basu, Subhajit; Deobagkar, Deepti D; Matondkar, S G Prabhu; Furtado, Irene

    2013-05-01

    A massive algal bloom of the dinoflagellate Noctiluca miliaris (green) was located in the Northern Arabian Sea by IRS-P4-2 (OCM-II) for microbiological studies, during two consecutive cruises of February-March 2009. Culturable bacterial load during bloom were ≈ 2-3-fold higher in comparison to non-bloom waters and ranged from 3.20 × 10(5) to 6.84 × 10(5) cfu ml(-1). An analysis of the dominant heterotrophs associated with Noctiluca bloom resulted in phylogenetic and a detailed metabolic characterization of 70 bacterial isolates from an overlapping active and declining bloom phase location near north-central Arabian Sea. The active phase flora was dominated by Gram-positive forms (70.59 %), a majority of which belonged to Bacillus (35.29 %) of Firmicutes. As the bloom declined, Gram-negative forms (61.11 %) emerged dominant, and these belonged to a diverse γ-proteobacterial population consisting of Shewanella (16.67 %) and equal fractions of a Cobetia-Pseudomonas-Psychrobacter-Halomonas population (36.11 %). A Unifrac-based principal coordinate analysis of partial 16S rDNA sequences showed significant differences among the active and declining phase flora and also with reported endocytic flora of Noctiluca (red). A nonparametric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) of antibiogram helped differentiation among closely related strains. The organic matter synthesized by N. miliaris appears to be quickly utilized and remineralized as seen from the high efficiency of isolates to metabolize various complex and simple C/N substrates such as carbohydrates, proteins/amino acids, lipids, sulfide production from organic matter, and solubilize phosphates. The ability of a large fraction of these strains (50-41.67 %) to further aerobically denitrify indicates their potential for nitrogen removal from these high-organic microniches of the Noctiluca bloom in the Arabian Sea, also known for high denitrification activity. The results indicate that culturable euphotic bacterial

  19. Culturable bacterial flora associated with the dinoflagellate green Noctiluca miliaris during active and declining bloom phases in the Northern Arabian Sea.

    PubMed

    Basu, Subhajit; Deobagkar, Deepti D; Matondkar, S G Prabhu; Furtado, Irene

    2013-05-01

    A massive algal bloom of the dinoflagellate Noctiluca miliaris (green) was located in the Northern Arabian Sea by IRS-P4-2 (OCM-II) for microbiological studies, during two consecutive cruises of February-March 2009. Culturable bacterial load during bloom were ≈ 2-3-fold higher in comparison to non-bloom waters and ranged from 3.20 × 10(5) to 6.84 × 10(5) cfu ml(-1). An analysis of the dominant heterotrophs associated with Noctiluca bloom resulted in phylogenetic and a detailed metabolic characterization of 70 bacterial isolates from an overlapping active and declining bloom phase location near north-central Arabian Sea. The active phase flora was dominated by Gram-positive forms (70.59 %), a majority of which belonged to Bacillus (35.29 %) of Firmicutes. As the bloom declined, Gram-negative forms (61.11 %) emerged dominant, and these belonged to a diverse γ-proteobacterial population consisting of Shewanella (16.67 %) and equal fractions of a Cobetia-Pseudomonas-Psychrobacter-Halomonas population (36.11 %). A Unifrac-based principal coordinate analysis of partial 16S rDNA sequences showed significant differences among the active and declining phase flora and also with reported endocytic flora of Noctiluca (red). A nonparametric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) of antibiogram helped differentiation among closely related strains. The organic matter synthesized by N. miliaris appears to be quickly utilized and remineralized as seen from the high efficiency of isolates to metabolize various complex and simple C/N substrates such as carbohydrates, proteins/amino acids, lipids, sulfide production from organic matter, and solubilize phosphates. The ability of a large fraction of these strains (50-41.67 %) to further aerobically denitrify indicates their potential for nitrogen removal from these high-organic microniches of the Noctiluca bloom in the Arabian Sea, also known for high denitrification activity. The results indicate that culturable euphotic bacterial

  20. Characterization of the bacterial flora in mineral waters in upstreaming fluids of deep igneous rock aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, C.; Mau, M.; SchlöMann, M.; Heinicke, J.; Koch, U.

    2007-03-01

    The bacterial community of the mineral spring Wettinquelle in the Vogtland/NW Bohemian region (German-Czech border) was characterized by sequence analysis of amplified small subunit ribosomal RNA genes. The acidulous spring water consists mostly of old groundwater from deep aquifers, which is mixed with 15-20% young water from upper groundwater horizons. The spring water contains high concentrations of iron, Ca2+ and SO42- ions. A remarkable attribute is the high radon activity of 27 kBq L-1 water. Free escaping spring gas consists mainly of CO2 originating from the mantle, N2 (1.2%) and traces of other gases, like methane and helium. Close relatives of Gallionella ferruginea, a micro-aerobic oxidizer of ferrous iron, contributed most to the clone library. Clones with sequences related to Thiobacillus aquaesulis, members of the Sulfuricurvum-cluster and members of several branches of the OP11 group were present in significantly lower numbers but still with some microdiversity. These bacterial groups, which contributed strongly to the clone library and have known physiology, obviously depend on the oxygen in the younger water and reduced compounds from the below.

  1. Bacterial flora of liver abscesses in feedlot cattle fed tylosin or no tylosin.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, T G; Beharka, A B; Chengappa, M M; Carroll, L H; Raun, A P; Laudert, S B; Parrott, J C

    1999-04-01

    Bacterial flora of liver abscesses from cattle fed tylosin or no tylosin and susceptibilities of the predominant bacterial isolates to tylosin and other antimicrobial compounds were determined. Abscessed livers were collected at slaughter from cattle originating from feedlots that had fed tylosin (n = 36) or no tylosin (n = 41) for at least 2 yr, and segments of livers with one or two intact abscesses were transported to the laboratory. Abscesses were cultured for anaerobic and facultative bacteria. Fusobacterium necrophorum, either as single culture or mixed with other bacteria, was isolated from all abscesses. The incidence of subsp. necrophorum, as part of the mixed infection, was lower (P < .05) in the tylosin group than in the no-tylosin group (33 vs 61%). However, the incidence of Actinomyces pyogenes was higher (P < .01) in the tylosin group than in the no-tylosin group (53 vs 10%). Totals of 119 F. necrophorum and 21 A. pyogenes isolates were used for determinations of susceptibilities to bacitracin, oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline, lasalocid, monensin, tylosin, tilmicosin, and virginiamycin. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of antibiotics were determined with a broth microdilution method. The mean MIC of tylosin for F. necrophorum and A. pyogenes were not different between isolates from tylosin and no-tylosin groups. We concluded that continuous feeding of tylosin did not induce resistance in F. necrophorum or A. pyogenes. Also, the higher incidence of mixed infection of F. necrophorum and A. pyogenes in liver abscesses of tylosin-fed cattle suggests a potential synergistic interaction between the two organisms in causing liver abscesses. PMID:10328365

  2. Bacterial vaginosis, vaginal flora patterns and vaginal hygiene practices in patients presenting with vaginal discharge syndrome in The Gambia, West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Demba, Edward; Morison, Linda; van der Loeff, Maarten Schim; Awasana, Akum A; Gooding, Euphemia; Bailey, Robin; Mayaud, Philippe; West, Beryl

    2005-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV) – a syndrome characterised by a shift in vaginal flora – appears to be particularly common in sub-Saharan Africa, but little is known of the pattern of vaginal flora associated with BV in Africa. We conducted a study aimed at determining the prevalence of BV and patterns of BV-associated vaginal micro-flora among women with vaginal discharge syndrome (VDS) in The Gambia, West Africa. Methods We enrolled 227 women with VDS from a large genito-urinary medicine clinic in Fajara, The Gambia. BV was diagnosed by the Nugent's score and Amsel's clinical criteria. Vaginal swabs were collected for T vaginalis and vaginal flora microscopy, and for Lactobacillus spp, aerobic organisms, Candida spp and BV-associated bacteria (Gardnerella vaginalis, anaerobic bacteria, and Mycoplasma spp) cultures; and cervical swabs were collected for N gonorrhoeae culture and C trachomatis PCR. Sera were tested for HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibodies. Sexual health history including details on sexual hygiene were obtained by standardised questionnaire. Results BV prevalence was 47.6% by Nugent's score and 30.8% by Amsel's clinical criteria. Lactobacillus spp were isolated in 37.8% of women, and 70% of the isolates were hydrogen-peroxide (H202)-producing strains. Prevalence of BV-associated bacteria were: G vaginalis 44.4%; Bacteroides 16.7%; Prevotella 15.2%; Peptostretococcus 1.5%; Mobiluncus 0%; other anaerobes 3.1%; and Mycoplasma hominis 21.4%. BV was positively associated with isolation of G vaginalis (odds-ratio [OR] 19.42, 95%CI 7.91 – 47.6) and anaerobes (P = 0.001 [OR] could not be calculated), but not with M hominis. BV was negatively associated with presence of Lactobacillus (OR 0.07, 95%CI 0.03 – 0.15), and H2O2-producing lactobacilli (OR 0.12, 95% CI 0.05 – 0.28). Presence of H2O2-producing lactobacilli was associated with significantly lower prevalence of G vaginalis, anaerobes and C trachomatis. HIV prevalence was 12.8%. Overall, there was

  3. Luminal bacterial flora determines physiological expression of intestinal epithelial cytoprotective heat shock proteins 25 and 72.

    PubMed

    Arvans, Donna L; Vavricka, Stephan R; Ren, Hongyu; Musch, Mark W; Kang, Lisa; Rocha, Flavio G; Lucioni, Alvaro; Turner, Jerrold R; Alverdy, John; Chang, Eugene B

    2005-04-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSP) 25 and 72 are expressed normally by surface colonocytes but not by small intestinal enterocytes. We hypothesized that luminal commensal microflora maintain the observed colonocyte HSP expression. The ability of the small intestine to respond to bacteria and their products and modulate HSPs has not been determined. The effects of luminal bacterial flora in surgically created midjejunal self-filling (SFL) vs. self-emptying (SEL) small-bowel blind loops on epithelial HSP expression were studied. HSP25 and HSP72 expression were assessed by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry. SFL were chronically colonized, whereas SEL contained levels of bacteria normal for the proximal small intestine. SFL creation significantly increased HSP25 and HSP72 expression relative to corresponding sections from SEL. Metronidazole treatment, which primarily affects anaerobic bacteria as well as a diet lacking fermentable fiber, significantly decreased SFL HSP expression. Small bowel incubation with butyrate ex vivo induced a sustained and significant upregulation of HSP25 and altered HSP72 expression, confirming the role of short-chain fatty acids. To determine whether HSPs induction altered responses to an injury, effects of the oxidant, monochloramine, on epithelial resistance and short-circuit current (I(sc)) responses to carbachol and glucose were compared. Increased SFL HSP expression was associated with protection against oxidant-induced decreases in transmural resistance and I(sc) responses to glucose, but not secretory responses to carbachol. In conclusion, luminal microflora and their metabolic byproducts direct expression of HSPs in gut epithelial cells, an effect that contributes to preservation of epithelial cell viability under conditions of stress.

  4. Aerobic biotransformation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) by bacterial isolates.

    PubMed

    Robrock, Kristin R; Coelhan, Mehmet; Sedlak, David L; Alvarez-Cohent, Lisa

    2009-08-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame retardants that have been used in consumer products and furniture for three decades. Currently, very little is known about their fate in the environment and specifically about their susceptibility to aerobic biotransformation. Here, we investigated the ability of the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) degrading bacteria Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 and Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 to transform mono- through hexa-BDEs at ppb levels. We also tested the PBDE transforming abilities of the related strain Rhodococcus sp. RR1 and the ether-degrading Pseudonocardia dioxanivorans CB1190. The two PCB-degrading strains transformed all of the mono- through penta-BDEs and strain LB400 transformed one of the hexa-BDEs. The extent of transformation was inversely proportional to the degree of bromination. Strains RR1 and CB1190 were only able to transform the less brominated mono- and di-BDE congeners. RHA1 released stoichiometric quantities of bromide while transforming mono- and tetra-BDE congeners. LB400 instead converted most of a mono-BDE to a hydroxylated mono-BDE. This is the first report of aerobic transformation of tetra-, penta,- and hexa-BDEs as well as the first report of stoichiometric release of bromide during PBDE transformation.

  5. Aerobic biotransformation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) by bacterial isolates

    PubMed Central

    Robrock, Kristin R.; Coelhan, Mehmet; Sedlak, David; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame retardants that have been used in consumer products and furniture for three decades. Currently, very little is known about their fate in the environment and specifically about their susceptibility to aerobic biotransformation. Here, we investigated the ability of the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) degrading bacteria Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 and Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 to transform mono- through hexa-BDEs at ppb levels. We also tested the PBDE transforming abilities of related strain Rhodococcus sp. RR1 and the ether-degrading Pseudonocardia dioxanivorans CB1190. The two PCB-degrading strains transformed all of the mono- through penta-BDEs and strain LB400 transformed one of the hexa-BDEs. The extent of transformation was inversely proportional to the degree of bromination. Strains RR1 and CB1190 were only able to transform the less brominated mono- and di- BDE congeners. RHA1 released stoichiometric quantities of bromide while transforming mono- and tetra-BDE congeners. LB400 instead converted most of a mono-BDE to a hydroxylated mono-BDE. This is the first report of aerobic transformation of tetra-, penta- and hexa-BDEs as well as the first report of stoichiometric release of bromide during PBDE transformation. PMID:19731666

  6. Molecular characterization of bacterial community in aerobic granular sludge stressed by pentachlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Liu, He; Li, Guangwei; Li, Xiufen; Chen, Jian

    2008-01-01

    To characterize the effects of pentachlorophenol (PCP) on the performance and microbial community of aerobic granular sludge in sequencing batch reactor (SBR), the web-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and real-time PCR (RT-PCR) techniques were used to explore the bacterial community structure. When PCP increased from 0 to 50 mg/L, the COD removal rate changed little, while the ammonia removal rate dropped from 100% to 64.9%. The results of molecular characterization showed that the quantity of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) kept constantly, although the number of bacteria species decreased with the increase of PCP concentration. Significant shift in bacterial community structure at different PCP stresses was observed within aerobic granular sludge. When the PCP was absent, there are 69 strains in aerobic granular sludge detected by T-RFLP method. With the increase of PCP, most of bacteria disappeared and only 19 bacteria existed at all five PCP concentrations. These results contributed to comprehensive understanding of the microbial community structure under the PCP stress and its relationship with the performance for wastewater treatment by aerobic granular sludge.

  7. Fate of deposited cells in an aerobic binary bacterial biofilm

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    A biofilm is a matrix of microbial cells and their extracellular products that is associated with a solid surface. Previous studies on biofilm development have employed only dissolved compounds as growth limiting substrates, without the influence of microbial species invading from the bulk liquid. The goal of this research project was to quantify the kinetics of processes governing suspended biomass turnover in biofilm systems, and the accompanying effects of suspended cell deposition on biofilm population dynamics. Experiments were conducted with two species of bacteria, Pseudomonas putida ATCC 11172 grown on glucose, and Hyphomicrobium ZV620 grown on methanol. Cryptic growth and particulate hydrolysis studies were evaluated, using combinations of these two bacteria, by measuring the uptake of radiolabelled cell lysis products, under batch conditions. Biofilms studies were performed to investigate bacterial deposition, continual biofilm removal by shear induced erosion, and biofilm ecology. Biofilms were developed in a flow cell reactor, under laminar flow conditions. Bacterial species were differentiated by radioactively labelling each species with their carbon substrate. A mathematical model was developed to predict the biofilm ecology of mixed cultures. The equations developed predict biofilm accumulation, as well as substrate and oxygen consumption. Results indicate that cryptic growth will occur for bacteria growing on their own species soluble lysis products and in some cases, bacteria growing on the soluble lysis products of other species. Particulate hydrolysis only occurred for Pseudomonas putida growing on Pseudomonas putida lysis products, but the lack of particulate hydrolysis occurring in the other studies may have been due to the short experimental period.

  8. Hyper-thermophilic aerobic bacterial ecology for space agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, T.; Kanazawa, S.; Moriya, T.; Ishikawa, Y.; Hashimoto, H.; Yamashita, M.; Space Agriculture Task Force, J.

    A material recycling is one of core issues in engineering for habitation on extraterrestrial bodies such as Mars A new composting system has been developed in Japan which utilizes some thermophilic bacteria to attain higher temperature than normally expected in the ordinary composting system Dead body of rat was found to be eaten up by the thermophilic bacteria under aerated condition and oxidized to carbon dioxide and few other inorganics within two hours Ecology of these composting bacteria is structured on the intensive symbiotic interactions among various species that participate in various reaction networks in a concert Complexity in the composting bacteria might be based on multiple interaction and interdependency among participating species and organisms Species identification and phylogeny of symbiotic bacteria and understanding of their ecology have been made Those bacterial systems are active and durable under temperature high in a range of 80 to 100 r C Biological combustion release heat and temperature goes up when air is fed through the reaction bed Since microbial activity decreases at exceeding temperature and release of heat decreases as well temperature in the reacting bed itself-regulated in the range Even though it should be verified composting bacteria themselves are presumed to be safe for human agricultural plant and animal species Their activity is restricted only to the condition under elevated temperature Their activities depend greatly on their symbiotic partners and extreme environment created by them The

  9. [Effect of vaginal tampons on bacterial flora of the lower genitalia].

    PubMed

    Nowak-Sadzikowska, J; Bulanda, M; Heczko, P B

    A constant risk of genitary tract infections, especially during menstrual bleeding, poses several questions concerning and effect of various protective measures used during menstruation. Such measures, especially vaginal tampons, have direct contact with vaginal mucosa, and may affect normal flora. One of the most frequent causes of complaints are infections or changes in the normal flora. Several studies indicate that the intervaginal tampons did not markedly change normal flora composition due to the introduction of bacteria from the environment. However, inflammatory states of genitary tract related to the use of intravaginal tampons is merely due to irritative action of fibers used for manufacture of such tampons. Currently used raw materials are not producing any pathologies. Several authors have shown that the health hazards produced by such tampons related to toxic shock during menstruation have been due to highly absorbable fibers used for their manufacture. Actually such materials are not used anymore. Tampons used according to manufactures' recommendations are safe, and do not produce inflammatory states.

  10. Uterine bacterial flora in postpartum Danish Holstein dairy cows determined using DNA-based fingerprinting: correlation to uterine condition and calving management.

    PubMed

    Elkjær, K; Ancker, M-L; Gustafsson, H; Friggens, N C; Waldmann, A; Mølbak, L; Callesen, H

    2013-04-01

    The overall aim of this study was to describe uterine bacterial flora during the postpartum period in Danish Holstein cows using the Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) method. This method produces a pattern of nucleic acid fragments from the microorganisms present, reflecting the "fingerprint" of the actual microbial flora. As well as characterizing changes in flora with time from calving and between herds, data were examined for strong relations between uterine bacterial flora, calving management and uterine condition. In total 125 Holstein cows from five herds were included, and for each cow calving management was recorded. Cows were clinically examined on average 8 (range 0-19) and 28 (range 22-38) days after calving, and a uterine sample was taken for bacterial identification using T-RFLP. Milk samples were taken weekly for progesterone analysis. Bacteria were found in all cows at both examinations, and the flora was composed of many species, including species not traditionally reported to be present in the bovine uterus. The bacterial composition differed according to days from calving and herd. In all five herds Fusobacterium necrophorum, Pseudomonas/Acinetobacter and Bacteroides/Sphingobacterium/Prevotellaceae were among the most common at both examinations. In four herds there was a percentage decrease of F. necrophorum from first to second examination, and in all herds there was a percentage increase of Pseudomonas/Acinetobacter from first to second examination. No differences in bacterial flora were found between cows with different uterine scores, which were influenced by herd, calving difficulty and retained placenta.

  11. Fate of aerobic bacterial granules with fungal contamination under different organic loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, An-jie; Zhang, Tong; Li, Xiao-yan

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic sludge granulation is an attractive new technology for biological wastewater treatment. However, the instability of aerobic granules caused by fungal growth is still one of the main problems encountered in granular bioreactors. In this study, laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the fate and transformation of aerobic granules under different organic loading conditions. Bacterial granules (2-3mm) in a poor condition with fungi-like black filamentous growth were seeded into two 1L batch reactors. After more than 100d of cultivation, the small seed granules in the two reactors had grown into two different types of large granules (>20mm) with different and unique morphological features. In reactor R1 with a high organic loading rate of 2.0g COD L(-1)d(-1), the black filaments mostly disappeared from the granules, and the dominance of rod-shaped bacteria was recovered. In contrast, at a low loading of 0.5g COD L(-1)d(-1) in reactor R2, the filaments eventually became dominant in the black fungal granules. The bacteria in R1 granules had a unique web-like structure with large pores of a few hundred microm in size, which would allow for effective substrate and oxygen transport into the interior of the granules. DNA-based molecular analysis indicated the evolution of the bacterial population in R1 and that of the eukaryal community in R2. The experimental results suggest that a high loading rate can be an effective means of helping to control fungal bloom, recover bacterial domination and restore the stability of aerobic granules that suffer from fungal contamination.

  12. Developmental hazard assessment with FETAX: Aerobic metabolites in bacterial transformation of naphthalene

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, T.W.; Dawson, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    The underlying principle of bioremediation is the capability of microorganisms to biodegrade pollutants. When a contaminated site is biotreated, it is usually assumed that the disappearance of the pollutant means a reduction in the toxic effects of the contaminants. However, pollutants can undergo partial biodegradation or biotransformation. Microbial-mediated transformations play a critical role in the toxic effects of pollutants, as any alteration in structure can result in a change in physicochemical properties which influence toxicity. Therefore, a relevant question is; what is the toxicity of accumulative metabolites relative to the parent chemical? One class of chemicals that consistently appears at Superfund hazard waste sites is aromatic hydrocarbons. Studies of the aerobic bacterial metabolism of representative compounds, including benzene, naphthalene, and phenanthrene, have revealed similar oxidative pathways. Bacterial degradation of these aromatic hydrocarbons was initiated by the addition of two molecules of oxygen via a dioxygenase enzyme, with the resulting intermediate being converted to a catechol-like compound. From a biotransformation standpoint, one of the more thoroughly studied aromatic hydrocarbons has been naphthalene. Cerniglia (1984) has identified five major intermediates, 1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene, salicylaldehyde, salicylic acid, gentisic acid and catechol in the aerobic bacterial degradation of naphthalene. In vitro test systems such as the Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay - Xenopus (FETAX) provide a time- and resource-effective means for assessing developmental toxicity on a preliminary basis. FETAX is a 96-hr static-renewal system that uses early embryos of the frog Xenopus laevis. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the developmental hazard, using FETAX, of exposure to the model aromatic hydrocarbon, naphthalene, and it`s known major aerobic metabolites from bacterial transformation. 18 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. Effect of enzyme secreting bacterial pretreatment on enhancement of aerobic digestion potential of waste activated sludge interceded through EDTA.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, S; Adish Kumar, S; Yogalakshmi, K N; Kaliappan, S; Rajesh Banu, J

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the effect of Ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) on Extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) removal tailed with bacterial enzymatic pretreatment on aerobic digestion of activated sludge was studied. In order to enhance the accessibility of sludge to the enzyme secreting bacteria; the extracellular polymeric substances were removed using EDTA. EDTA efficiently removed the EPS with limited cell lysis and enhanced the sludge enzyme activity at its lower concentration of 0.2 g/g SS. The sludge was then subjected to bacterial pretreatment to enhance the aerobic digestion. In aerobic digestion the best results in terms of Suspended solids (SS) reduction (48.5%) and COD (Chemical oxygen demand) solubilization (47.3%) was obtained in experimental reactor than in control. These results imply that aerobic digestion can be enhanced efficiently through bacterial pretreatment of EPS removed sludge.

  14. Biofuel components change the ecology of bacterial volatile petroleum hydrocarbon degradation in aerobic sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Elazhari-Ali, Abdulmagid; Singh, Arvind K; Davenport, Russell J; Head, Ian M; Werner, David

    2013-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the biodegradation of volatile petroleum hydrocarbons (VPHs) in aerobic sandy soil is affected by the blending with 10 percent ethanol (E10) or 20 percent biodiesel (B20). When inorganic nutrients were scarce, competition between biofuel and VPH degraders temporarily slowed monoaromatic hydrocarbon degradation. Ethanol had a bigger impact than biodiesel, reflecting the relative ease of ethanol compared to methyl ester biodegradation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of bacterial 16S rRNA genes revealed that each fuel mixture selected for a distinct bacterial community, each dominated by Pseudomonas spp. Despite lasting impacts on soil bacterial ecology, the overall effects on VHP biodegradation were minor, and average biomass yields were comparable between fuel types, ranging from 0.40 ± 0.16 to 0.51 ± 0.22 g of biomass carbon per gram of fuel carbon degraded. Inorganic nutrient availability had a greater impact on petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation than fuel composition. PMID:23202642

  15. Biofuel components change the ecology of bacterial volatile petroleum hydrocarbon degradation in aerobic sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Elazhari-Ali, Abdulmagid; Singh, Arvind K; Davenport, Russell J; Head, Ian M; Werner, David

    2013-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the biodegradation of volatile petroleum hydrocarbons (VPHs) in aerobic sandy soil is affected by the blending with 10 percent ethanol (E10) or 20 percent biodiesel (B20). When inorganic nutrients were scarce, competition between biofuel and VPH degraders temporarily slowed monoaromatic hydrocarbon degradation. Ethanol had a bigger impact than biodiesel, reflecting the relative ease of ethanol compared to methyl ester biodegradation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of bacterial 16S rRNA genes revealed that each fuel mixture selected for a distinct bacterial community, each dominated by Pseudomonas spp. Despite lasting impacts on soil bacterial ecology, the overall effects on VHP biodegradation were minor, and average biomass yields were comparable between fuel types, ranging from 0.40 ± 0.16 to 0.51 ± 0.22 g of biomass carbon per gram of fuel carbon degraded. Inorganic nutrient availability had a greater impact on petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation than fuel composition.

  16. Biodegradation and detoxification of textile azo dyes by bacterial consortium under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes

    PubMed Central

    Lade, Harshad; Kadam, Avinash; Paul, Diby; Govindwar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Release of textile azo dyes to the environment is an issue of health concern while the use of microorganisms has proved to be the best option for remediation. Thus, in the present study, a bacterial consortium consisting of Providencia rettgeri strain HSL1 and Pseudomonas sp. SUK1 has been investigated for degradation and detoxification of structurally different azo dyes. The consortium showed 98-99 % decolorization of all the selected azo dyes viz. Reactive Black 5 (RB 5), Reactive Orange 16 (RO 16), Disperse Red 78 (DR 78) and Direct Red 81 (DR 81) within 12 to 30 h at 100 mg L-1 concentration at 30 ± 0.2 °C under microaerophilic, sequential aerobic/microaerophilic and microaerophilic/aerobic processes. However, decolorization under microaerophilic conditions viz. RB 5 (0.26 mM), RO 16 (0.18 mM), DR 78 (0.20 mM) and DR 81 (0.23 mM) and sequential aerobic/microaerophilic processes viz. RB 5 (0.08 mM), RO 16 (0.06 mM), DR 78 (0.07 mM) and DR 81 (0.09 mM) resulted into the formation of aromatic amines. In distinction, sequential microaerophilic/ aerobic process doesn’t show the formation of amines. Additionally, 62-72 % reduction in total organic carbon content was observed in all the dyes decolorized broths under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes suggesting the efficacy of method in mineralization of dyes. Notable induction within the levels of azoreductase and NADH-DCIP reductase (97 and 229 % for RB 5, 55 and 160 % for RO 16, 63 and 196 % for DR 78, 108 and 258 % for DR 81) observed under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes suggested their critical involvements in the initial breakdown of azo bonds, whereas, a slight increase in the levels of laccase and veratryl alcohol oxidase confirmed subsequent oxidation of formed amines. Also, the acute toxicity assay with Daphnia magna revealed the nontoxic nature of the dye-degraded metabolites under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes. As biodegradation under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic

  17. Biodegradation and detoxification of textile azo dyes by bacterial consortium under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes.

    PubMed

    Lade, Harshad; Kadam, Avinash; Paul, Diby; Govindwar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Release of textile azo dyes to the environment is an issue of health concern while the use of microorganisms has proved to be the best option for remediation. Thus, in the present study, a bacterial consortium consisting of Providencia rettgeri strain HSL1 and Pseudomonas sp. SUK1 has been investigated for degradation and detoxification of structurally different azo dyes. The consortium showed 98-99 % decolorization of all the selected azo dyes viz. Reactive Black 5 (RB 5), Reactive Orange 16 (RO 16), Disperse Red 78 (DR 78) and Direct Red 81 (DR 81) within 12 to 30 h at 100 mg L(-1) concentration at 30 ± 0.2 °C under microaerophilic, sequential aerobic/microaerophilic and microaerophilic/aerobic processes. However, decolorization under microaerophilic conditions viz. RB 5 (0.26 mM), RO 16 (0.18 mM), DR 78 (0.20 mM) and DR 81 (0.23 mM) and sequential aerobic/microaerophilic processes viz. RB 5 (0.08 mM), RO 16 (0.06 mM), DR 78 (0.07 mM) and DR 81 (0.09 mM) resulted into the formation of aromatic amines. In distinction, sequential microaerophilic/ aerobic process doesn't show the formation of amines. Additionally, 62-72 % reduction in total organic carbon content was observed in all the dyes decolorized broths under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes suggesting the efficacy of method in mineralization of dyes. Notable induction within the levels of azoreductase and NADH-DCIP reductase (97 and 229 % for RB 5, 55 and 160 % for RO 16, 63 and 196 % for DR 78, 108 and 258 % for DR 81) observed under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes suggested their critical involvements in the initial breakdown of azo bonds, whereas, a slight increase in the levels of laccase and veratryl alcohol oxidase confirmed subsequent oxidation of formed amines. Also, the acute toxicity assay with Daphnia magna revealed the nontoxic nature of the dye-degraded metabolites under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes. As biodegradation under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic

  18. Aerobic bacterial microbiota isolated from the cloaca of the European pond turtle (Emys orbicularis) in Poland.

    PubMed

    Nowakiewicz, Aneta; Ziółkowska, Grażyna; Zięba, Przemysław; Dziedzic, Barbara Majer; Gnat, Sebastian; Wójcik, Mariusz; Dziedzic, Roman; Kostruba, Anna

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a comparative analysis of the aerobic cloacal bacteria of European pond turtles (Emys orbicularis) living in their natural environment and juvenile turtles reared under controlled conditions in a breeding center. We included 130 turtles in the study. The aerobic bacteria isolated from the cloaca of the juvenile turtles were less diverse and more prevalent than the bacteria isolated from free-living adults. We isolated 17 bacterial species from juvenile captive turtles, among which the dominant species were Cellulomonas flavigena (77/96), Enterococcus faecalis (96/96), Escherichia coli (58/96), and Proteus mirabilis (41/96). From the adult, free-living turtles, we isolated 36 bacterial species, some of which are a potential threat to public health (e.g., Salmonella enterica serovars Newport, Daytona, and Braenderup; Listeria monocytogenes; Yersinia enterocolitica; Yersinia ruckeri; Klebsiella pneumoniae; Vibrio fluvialis; and Serratia marcescens), and pathogens that are etiologic agents of diseases of ectothermic animals (e.g., Aeromonas sobria, Aeromonas caviae, Hafnia alvei, Edwardsiella tarda, and Citrobacter braakii; the last two species were isolated from both groups of animals). The cloacal bacterial biota of the European pond turtle was characterized by numerous species of bacteria, and its composition varied with turtle age and environmental conditions. The small number of isolated bacteria that are potential human pathogens may indicate that the European pond turtle is of relatively minor importance as a threat to public health.

  19. Aerobic bacterial microbiota isolated from the cloaca of the European pond turtle (Emys orbicularis) in Poland.

    PubMed

    Nowakiewicz, Aneta; Ziółkowska, Grażyna; Zięba, Przemysław; Dziedzic, Barbara Majer; Gnat, Sebastian; Wójcik, Mariusz; Dziedzic, Roman; Kostruba, Anna

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a comparative analysis of the aerobic cloacal bacteria of European pond turtles (Emys orbicularis) living in their natural environment and juvenile turtles reared under controlled conditions in a breeding center. We included 130 turtles in the study. The aerobic bacteria isolated from the cloaca of the juvenile turtles were less diverse and more prevalent than the bacteria isolated from free-living adults. We isolated 17 bacterial species from juvenile captive turtles, among which the dominant species were Cellulomonas flavigena (77/96), Enterococcus faecalis (96/96), Escherichia coli (58/96), and Proteus mirabilis (41/96). From the adult, free-living turtles, we isolated 36 bacterial species, some of which are a potential threat to public health (e.g., Salmonella enterica serovars Newport, Daytona, and Braenderup; Listeria monocytogenes; Yersinia enterocolitica; Yersinia ruckeri; Klebsiella pneumoniae; Vibrio fluvialis; and Serratia marcescens), and pathogens that are etiologic agents of diseases of ectothermic animals (e.g., Aeromonas sobria, Aeromonas caviae, Hafnia alvei, Edwardsiella tarda, and Citrobacter braakii; the last two species were isolated from both groups of animals). The cloacal bacterial biota of the European pond turtle was characterized by numerous species of bacteria, and its composition varied with turtle age and environmental conditions. The small number of isolated bacteria that are potential human pathogens may indicate that the European pond turtle is of relatively minor importance as a threat to public health. PMID:25380369

  20. The influence of flucloxacillin and amoxicillin with clavulanic acid on the aerobic flora of the alimentary tract.

    PubMed

    Vlaspolder, F; de Zeeuw, G; Rozenberg-Arska, M; Egyedi, P; Verhoef, J

    1987-01-01

    In a randomized study, 42 patients undergoing extensive maxillo-facial surgery (correction of the position of the mandible or maxilla by using autologous bone transplants) received prophylactically ten-day courses of either flucloxacillin or amoxicillin with clavulanic acid. Patients were comparable with regard to age and type of surgery. During the prophylactic treatment the effect of antibiotics used on the microbial flora of the alimentary tract was studied. Patients receiving flucloxacillin showed increased numbers of Klebsiella spp. isolated from the faeces (59% of the patients versus 19% of the patients receiving amoxicillin with clavulanic acid). Patients receiving amoxicillin with clavulanic acid showed higher colonization rates of oropharynx with Enterobacteriaceae than patients receiving flucloxacillin (ten patients versus five patients). 60% of those strains isolated from patients receiving amoxicillin with clavulanic acid were resistant to this combination, as compared to 20% of gram-negative bacilli isolated from patients receiving flucloxacillin. In 50% of patients receiving amoxicillin with clavulanic acid, colonization of the gut with yeast occurred, as compared to 18% of patients receiving flucloxacillin. Only one infection leading to a partial loss of the graft was seen in the group of patients receiving flucloxacillin.

  1. Chemical and Sensory Changes Associated with Microbial Flora of Mediterranean Boque (Boops boops) Stored Aerobically at 0, 3, 7, and 10°C

    PubMed Central

    Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos; Nychas, George-John E.

    1999-01-01

    The development of a microbial population and changes in the physicochemical and sensorial characteristics of Mediterranean boque (Boops boops), called gopa in Greece, stored aerobically at 0, 3, 7, and 10°C were studied. Pseudomonads and Shewanella putrefaciens were the dominant bacteria at the end of the storage period, regardless of the temperature tested. Enterobacteria and Brochothrix thermosphacta also grew, but their population density was always 2 to 3 log10 CFU g−1 less than that of pseudomonads. The concentration of potential indicators of spoilage, glucose and lactic acid, decreased while that of the α-amino groups increased during storage. The concentrations of these carbon sources also decreased on sterile fish blocks inoculated with strains isolated from fish microbial flora. The organic acid profile of sterile fish blocks inoculated with the above-mentioned bacteria and that of naturally spoiled fish differed significantly. An excellent correlation (r = −0.96) between log10 counts of S. putrefaciens or Pseudomonas bacteria with freshness was observed in this study. PMID:9925603

  2. Linking the Composition of Bacterial and Archaeal Communities to Characteristics of Soil and Flora Composition in the Atlantic Rainforest

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Perim, Julia Elidia; Romagnoli, Emiliana Manesco; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Durrer, Ademir; Dias, Armando Cavalcante Franco; Andreote, Fernando Dini

    2016-01-01

    The description of microbiomes as intrinsic fractions of any given ecosystem is an important issue, for instance, by linking their compositions and functions with other biotic and abiotic components of natural systems and hosts. Here we describe the archaeal and bacterial communities from soils of the Atlantic Rainforest in Brazil. Based on the comparison of three areas located along an altitudinal gradient—namely, Santa Virginia, Picinguaba and Restinga—we detected the most abundant groups of Bacteria (Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria) and Archaea (Thaumarchaeota, Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota). The particular composition of such communities in each of these areas was first evidenced by PCR-DGGE patterns [determined for Bacteria, Archaea and ammonia-oxidizing organisms—ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB)]. Moreover, sequence-based analysis provided a better resolution of communities, which indicated distinct frequencies of archaeal phyla and bacterial OTUs across areas. We found, as indicated by the Mantel test and multivariate analyses, a potential effect of the flora composition that outpaces the effect of soil characteristics (either physical and chemical) influencing the assembly of these microbial communities in soils. Our results indicate a collective role of the ecosystem underlying observed differences in microbial communities in these soils. Particularly, we posit that rainforest preservation also needs to take into account the maintenance of the soil biodiversity, as this is prompted to influence major processes that affect ecosystem functioning. PMID:26752633

  3. Linking the Composition of Bacterial and Archaeal Communities to Characteristics of Soil and Flora Composition in the Atlantic Rainforest.

    PubMed

    Lima-Perim, Julia Elidia; Romagnoli, Emiliana Manesco; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Durrer, Ademir; Dias, Armando Cavalcante Franco; Andreote, Fernando Dini

    2016-01-01

    The description of microbiomes as intrinsic fractions of any given ecosystem is an important issue, for instance, by linking their compositions and functions with other biotic and abiotic components of natural systems and hosts. Here we describe the archaeal and bacterial communities from soils of the Atlantic Rainforest in Brazil. Based on the comparison of three areas located along an altitudinal gradient-namely, Santa Virginia, Picinguaba and Restinga-we detected the most abundant groups of Bacteria (Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria) and Archaea (Thaumarchaeota, Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota). The particular composition of such communities in each of these areas was first evidenced by PCR-DGGE patterns [determined for Bacteria, Archaea and ammonia-oxidizing organisms-ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB)]. Moreover, sequence-based analysis provided a better resolution of communities, which indicated distinct frequencies of archaeal phyla and bacterial OTUs across areas. We found, as indicated by the Mantel test and multivariate analyses, a potential effect of the flora composition that outpaces the effect of soil characteristics (either physical and chemical) influencing the assembly of these microbial communities in soils. Our results indicate a collective role of the ecosystem underlying observed differences in microbial communities in these soils. Particularly, we posit that rainforest preservation also needs to take into account the maintenance of the soil biodiversity, as this is prompted to influence major processes that affect ecosystem functioning.

  4. Study of the Acute Effects of Povidone–Iodine on Conjunctival Bacterial Flora

    PubMed Central

    Pettey, Jeff H.; Mifflin, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: The purpose of this laboratory study was to assess the effect of povidone–iodine (PI) use topically on the conjunctiva in regard to needle bore contamination and to compare these results with our previous findings from an evaluation of bacterial contamination following gatifloxacin and moxifloxacin administration. Methods: We performed 100 conjunctival 27-gauge needle penetrations of both eyes of 13 fresh cadavers. Eyes were then soaked in 10% PI, after which conjunctiva was again penetrated 100 times. After conjunctival penetration, the needles were irrigated, and the irrigant was assessed for bacterial growth. Results were compared with previous work assessing fluoroquinolone effectiveness through the same model. Results: We observed a 28% (P = 0.003) decrease in bacterial growth and 40% (P < 0.0001) decrease in colony counts after PI placement. Differences between the effect of PI versus moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin were not statistically significant. Conclusions: There is a greater decrease in bacterial load after treatment with PI for surface cultures than for cultures obtained through a needle bore passed through the conjunctiva. PI is a superior approach to topical antibiotics to decrease conjunctival bacterial load. PMID:26287981

  5. Phenotypic and genotypic adaptation of aerobic heterotrophic sediment bacterial communities to mercury stress.

    PubMed Central

    Barkay, T; Olson, B H

    1986-01-01

    The effects of mercury contamination of lake sediments on the phenotypic and genotypic mercury resistance of the indigenous heterotrophic aerobic bacterial communities were investigated. Strong positive correlations between mercury sediment concentration and the frequency of the gene coding for mercury volatilization (mer) (r = 0.96) or the phenotypic mercury resistance (r = 0.86) of the studied communities suggested that the inheritance via selection or genetic exchange of the mer gene had promoted bacterial adaptation to mercury. Failure to detect the mer gene in one mercury-contaminated sediment where phenotypic expression was low suggested that other mechanisms of resistance may partially determine the presence of mercury-resistant organisms in mercury-contaminated sediment or that the mercury in this particular sediment was very chemically limited in its availability to the microorganisms. PMID:3753001

  6. Effect of diving and diving hoods on the bacterial flora of the external ear canal and skin.

    PubMed Central

    Brook, I; Coolbaugh, J C; Williscroft, R G

    1982-01-01

    The bacterial flora of the external ear canals and posterior auricular skin surfaces were investigated in a group of 26 divers after 25 dry-suit dives in harbor water and 20 dry-suit dives in clear test tank test. A control group of 16 divers wore rubber hoods 19 times for a similar period (25 to 30 min) but did not dive. The protective effect of 2% acetic acid was tested by instilling it in the left ear of 14 divers and 8 nondivers. Staphylococcus epidermidis, Propionibacterium acnes, alpha-hemolytic streptococci, and enteric gram-negative rods were the predominant isolates from skin and ear samples. After the divers dove or after they wore hoods without going in the water, there was a substantial increase in the number of these organisms on the skin (46.9%) or in the external ears (43.8%) of the divers. However, an increase in the bacterial counts in the external ear canals occurred in only 13.6% of the individuals treated prophylactically with acetic acid drops. Although no gram-negative rods were recovered from the skin or external ear canals of divers in clear tank water, 23 strains were isolated after the dives in harbor water. Identical gram-negative isolates also were recovered from the harbor water. Gram-negative organisms also were recovered from three newly acquired skin lacerations, where they persisted for at least 24 h. Our data show the acquisition of gram-negative rods when dives were made in polluted water. The data also demonstrate the increase in bacterial counts that occurs when rubber diving rods are worn (in or out of water) and that this increase can be controlled by pretreatment of ears with acetic acid. PMID:7096559

  7. Bacterial communities associated with aerobic degradation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers from river sediments.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chu-Wen; Huang, Huang-Wen; Chao, Wei-Liang; Chang, Bea-Ven

    2015-03-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are persistent organic pollutants and have therefore drawn much environmental concern. We aimed to compare aerobic degradation of different PBDE congeners under various treatments and reveal the bacterial community associated with PBDE degradation in sediment. Results of this study indicate that degradation rates of BDE-15 were enhanced 45.1 and 81.3 % with the addition of suspended and microencapsulated Pseudomonas sp., respectively. However, the degradation rates of BDE-28, BDE-47, BDE-99, and BDE-100 did not differ among experimental treatments. Degradation rates of PBDE congeners were in the order of BDE-15 > BDE-28 > BDE-47 > BDE-99 > BDE-100. Using a pyrosequencing-based metagenomic approach, we found that addition of various treatments altered the microbial community composition in the sediment. Twenty-four bacterial genera associated with degradation of PBDEs; six are the core bacterial genera common among PBDE degraders. The diverse bacterial composition among different PBDE congener degradation indicates different combinations of bacteria involved in degradation of different PBDE congeners.

  8. State of the art; microbiology in health and disease. Intestinal bacterial flora in autism.

    PubMed

    Finegold, Sydney M

    2011-12-01

    Autism of the regressive variety is selected as an example of the importance of intestinal bacterial microflora in disease other than classical infection. Our studies have indicated that intestinal bacteria play a role in this disease since it responds to oral vancomycin, a drug that is not absorbed from the GI tract. Pyrosequencing studies document an abnormal gut microflora in regressive autism subjects as compared to controls. Finally, we present preliminary evidence suggesting that Desulfovibrio may play a key role in this disease.

  9. Symbiosis in an overlooked microcosm: a systematic review of the bacterial flora of mites.

    PubMed

    Chaisiri, Kittipong; McGarry, John W; Morand, Serge; Makepeace, Benjamin L

    2015-08-01

    A dataset of bacterial diversity found in mites was compiled from 193 publications (from 1964 to January 2015). A total of 143 mite species belonging to the 3 orders (Mesostigmata, Sarcoptiformes and Trombidiformes) were recorded and found to be associated with approximately 150 bacteria species (in 85 genera, 51 families, 25 orders and 7 phyla). From the literature, the intracellular symbiont Cardinium, the scrub typhus agent Orientia, and Wolbachia (the most prevalent symbiont of arthropods) were the dominant mite-associated bacteria, with approximately 30 mite species infected each. Moreover, a number of bacteria of medical and veterinary importance were also reported from mites, including species from the genera Rickettsia, Anaplasma, Bartonella, Francisella, Coxiella, Borrelia, Salmonella, Erysipelothrix and Serratia. Significant differences in bacterial infection patterns among mite taxa were identified. These data will not only be useful for raising awareness of the potential for mites to transmit disease, but also enable a deeper understanding of the relationship of symbionts with their arthropod hosts, and may facilitate the development of intervention tools for disease vector control. This review provides a comprehensive overview of mite-associated bacteria and is a valuable reference database for future research on mites of agricultural, veterinary and/or medical importance.

  10. Three-year investigation of the natural airborne bacterial flora at four localities in sweden.

    PubMed Central

    Bovallius, A; Bucht, B; Roffey, R; Anäs, P

    1978-01-01

    The concentration of airborne bacteria was recorded during a period of 3 years at four localities: (i) in an agricultural district with an average of 99 (range, 2 to 3,400) bacteria per m3; (ii) in a coastal area with an average of 63 (range, 0 to 560) bacteria per m3; (iii) in a city park with an average of 763 (range, 100 to 2,500) bacteria per m3; and (iv) in a city street with an average of 850 (range, 100 to 4,000) bacteria per m3. At all four localities the bacterial concentrations varied within broad limits, but an annual periodicity with high average counts found during summer and autumn could be seen. The influence of certain meteorological factors on the number of airborne bacteria is also reported. Rain or high relative humidity caused a decrease in the bacterial counts, while high temperature or high wind velocities increased the counts. The particle size distribution for the four localities showed that about 50% of the particles carrying bacteria were larger than 8 micrometer. PMID:655701

  11. Safety and risk assessment of the genetically modified Lactococci on rats intestinal bacterial flora.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kai-Chien; Liu, Chin-Feng; Lin, Tzu-Hsing; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2010-08-15

    The interaction between Lactococcus lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK and intestinal microflora was evaluated as a method to assess safety of genetically modified microorganisms (GMMs). L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK is one kind of GMM and able to produce the intracellular subtilisin NAT (nattokinase) under induction with nisin. The host strain L. lactis NZ9000 was a generally recognized as safe (GRAS) microorganism. Six groups of Wistar rats were orally administered with L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK and L. lactis NZ9000 for 6 weeks. Fecal and cecal contents were collected to determine the number of L. lactis NZ9000, L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK, Lactobacillus, coliform bacteria, beneficial bacteria Bifidobacterium and harmful bacteria Clostridium perfringens. The liver, spleen, kidney and blood were evaluated for the bacterial translocation. After 6 weeks consumption with GM and non-GM Lactococcus, no adverse effects were observed on the rat's body weight, hematological or serum biochemical parameters, or intestinal microflora. The bacterial translocation test showed that L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK did not translocate to any organ or blood. Bifidobacterium was significantly increased in feces after administration of both Lactococcus strains (L. lactis NZ9000 and L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK), while C. perfringens remained undetectable during the experiment. These results suggested that L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK could be safe in animal experiments and monitoring of the interaction between test strains and intestinal microflora might be applied as a method for other GMM safety assessments.

  12. Pyrosequence analysis of bacterial communities in aerobic bioreactors treating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Stephen D.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Two aerobic, lab-scale, slurry-phase bioreactors were used to examine the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in contaminated soil and the associated bacterial communities. The two bioreactors were operated under semi-continuous (draw-and-fill) conditions at a residence time of 35 days, but one was fed weekly and the other monthly. Most of the quantified PAHs, including high-molecular-weight compounds, were removed to a greater extent in the weekly-fed bioreactor, which achieved total PAH removal of 76%. Molecular analyses, including pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, revealed significant shifts in the soil bacterial communities after introduction to the bioreactors and differences in the abundance and types of bacteria in each of the bioreactors. The weekly-fed bioreactor displayed a more stable bacterial community with gradual changes over time, whereas the monthly-fed bioreactor community was less consistent and may have been more strongly influenced by the influx of untreated soil during feeding. Phylogenetic groups containing known PAH-degrading bacteria previously identified through stable-isotope probing of the untreated soil were differentially affected by bioreactor conditions. Sequences from members of the Acidovorax and Sphingomonas genera, as well as the uncultivated ‘‘Pyrene Group 2’’ were abundant in the bioreactors. However, the relative abundances of sequences from the Pseudomonas, Sphingobium, and Pseudoxanthomonas genera, as well as from a group of unclassified anthracene degraders, were much lower in the bioreactors compared to the untreated soil. PMID:21369833

  13. Pyrosequencing analysis of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacterial community structure in the oligotrophic western Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qiang; Liu, Yanting; Steindler, Laura; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2015-04-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (AAPB) represent a widespread functional bacterial group defined by their obligate aerobic and facultative photoheterotrophic abilities. They are an active part of the marine microbial community as revealed by a large number of previous investigations. Here, we made an in-depth comparison of AAPB community structures in the subsurface water and the upper twilight zone of the western Pacific Ocean using high-throughput sequencing based on the pufM gene. Approximately, 100 000 sequences, grouped into 159 OTUs (94% cut-off value), included 44 and 24 OTUs unique to the subsurface and the upper twilight zone, respectively; 92 OTUs were common to both subsurface and twilight zone, and 3 OTUs were found in all samples. Consistent with previous studies, AAPB belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria were the dominant group in the whole water column, followed by the alphaproteobacterial AAPB. Comparing the relative abundance distribution patterns of different clades, an obvious community-structure separation according to deeper or shallower environment could be observed. Sulfitobacter-like, Loktanella-like, Erythrobacter-like, Dinoroseobacter-like and Gamma-HIMB55-like AAPB preferred the high-light subsurface water, while Methylobacterium-like, 'Citromicrobium'-like, Roseovarius-like and Bradyrhizobium-like AAPB, the dim light environment.

  14. Bioremediation of textile azo dyes by an aerobic bacterial consortium using a rotating biological contactor.

    PubMed

    Abraham, T Emilia; Senan, Resmi C; Shaffiqu, T S; Roy, Jegan J; Poulose, T P; Thomas, P P

    2003-01-01

    The degradation of an azo dye mixture by an aerobic bacterial consortium was studied in a rotating biological reactor. Laterite pebbles of particle size 850 microm to 1.44 mm were fixed on gramophone records using an epoxy resin on which the developed consortium was immobilized. Rate of degradation, BOD, biomass determination, enzymes involved, and fish bioassay were studied. The RBC has a high efficiency for dye degradation even at high dye concentrations (100 microg/mL) and high flow rate (36 L/h) at alkaline pH and salinity conditions normally encountered in the textile effluents. Bioassays (LD-50) using Thilapia fish in treated effluent showed that the percentage mortality was zero over a period of 96 h, whereas the mortality was 100% in untreated dye water within 26 h. Fish bioassay confirms that the effluent from RBC can be discharged safely to the environment. PMID:12892505

  15. Aerobic digestion of tannery wastewater in a sequential batch reactor by salt-tolerant bacterial strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durai, G.; Rajasimman, M.; Rajamohan, N.

    2011-09-01

    Among the industries generating hyper saline effluents, tanneries are prominent in India. Hyper saline wastewater is difficult to treat by conventional biological treatment methods. Salt-tolerant microbes can adapt to these conditions and degrade the organics in hyper saline wastewater. In this study, the performance of a bench scale aerobic sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was investigated to treat the tannery wastewater by the salt-tolerant bacterial strains namely Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus flexus, Exiguobacterium homiense and Styphylococcus aureus. The study was carried out under different operating conditions by changing the hydraulic retention time, organic loading rate and initial substrate concentration. From the results it was found that a maximum COD reduction of 90.4% and colour removal of 78.6% was attained. From this study it was found that the salt-tolerant microorganisms could improve the reduction efficiency of COD and colour of the tannery wastewater.

  16. Bioremediation of textile azo dyes by an aerobic bacterial consortium using a rotating biological contactor.

    PubMed

    Abraham, T Emilia; Senan, Resmi C; Shaffiqu, T S; Roy, Jegan J; Poulose, T P; Thomas, P P

    2003-01-01

    The degradation of an azo dye mixture by an aerobic bacterial consortium was studied in a rotating biological reactor. Laterite pebbles of particle size 850 microm to 1.44 mm were fixed on gramophone records using an epoxy resin on which the developed consortium was immobilized. Rate of degradation, BOD, biomass determination, enzymes involved, and fish bioassay were studied. The RBC has a high efficiency for dye degradation even at high dye concentrations (100 microg/mL) and high flow rate (36 L/h) at alkaline pH and salinity conditions normally encountered in the textile effluents. Bioassays (LD-50) using Thilapia fish in treated effluent showed that the percentage mortality was zero over a period of 96 h, whereas the mortality was 100% in untreated dye water within 26 h. Fish bioassay confirms that the effluent from RBC can be discharged safely to the environment.

  17. A quasi-universal medium to break the aerobic/anaerobic bacterial culture dichotomy in clinical microbiology.

    PubMed

    Dione, N; Khelaifia, S; La Scola, B; Lagier, J C; Raoult, D

    2016-01-01

    In the mid-19th century, the dichotomy between aerobic and anaerobic bacteria was introduced. Nevertheless, the aerobic growth of strictly anaerobic bacterial species such as Ruminococcus gnavus and Fusobacterium necrophorum, in a culture medium containing antioxidants, was recently demonstrated. We tested aerobically the culture of 623 bacterial strains from 276 bacterial species including 82 strictly anaerobic, 154 facultative anaerobic, 31 aerobic and nine microaerophilic bacterial species as well as ten fungi. The basic culture medium was based on Schaedler agar supplemented with 1 g/L ascorbic acid and 0.1 g/L glutathione (R-medium). We successively optimized this media, adding 0.4 g/L uric acid, using separate autoclaving of the component, or adding haemin 0.1 g/L or α-ketoglutarate 2 g/L. In the basic medium, 237 bacterial species and ten fungal species grew but with no growth of 36 bacterial species, including 22 strict anaerobes. Adding uric acid allowed the growth of 14 further species including eight strict anaerobes, while separate autoclaving allowed the growth of all tested bacterial strains. To extend its potential use for fastidious bacteria, we added haemin for Haemophilus influenzae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae and Eikenella corrodens and α-ketoglutarate for Legionella pneumophila. This medium allowed the growth of all tested strains with the exception of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis. Testing primoculture and more fastidious species will constitute the main work to be done, but R-medium coupled with a rapid identification method (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry) will facilitate the anaerobic culture in clinical microbiology laboratories.

  18. Bacterial community analysis of swine manure treated with autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Han, Il; Congeevaram, Shankar; Ki, Dong-Won; Oh, Byoung-Taek; Park, Joonhong

    2011-02-01

    Due to the environmental problems associated with disposal of livestock sludge, many stabilization studies emphasizing on the sludge volume reduction were performed. However, little is known about the microbial risk present in sludge and its stabilized products. This study microbiologically explored the effects of anaerobic lagoon fermentation (ALF) and autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion (ATAD) on pathogen-related risk of raw swine manure by using culture-independent 16S rDNA cloning and sequencing methods. In raw swine manure, clones closely related to pathogens such as Dialister pneumosintes, Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, Succinivibrioan dextrinosolvens, and Schineria sp. were detected. Meanwhile, in the mesophilic ALF-treated swine manure, bacterial community clones closely related to pathogens such as Schineria sp. and Succinivibrio dextrinosolvens were still detected. Interestingly, the ATAD treatment resulted in no detection of clones closely related to pathogens in the stabilized thermophilic bacterial community, with the predominance of novel Clostridia class populations. These findings support the superiority of ATAD in selectively reducing potential human and animal pathogens compared to ALF, which is a typical manure stabilization method used in livestock farms. PMID:20922382

  19. Lipid biomarkers in ooids from different locations and ages: evidence for a common bacterial flora.

    PubMed

    Summons, R E; Bird, L R; Gillespie, A L; Pruss, S B; Roberts, M; Sessions, A L

    2013-09-01

    ) C-enriched isotopic signatures compared to co-occurring n-alkanes (e.g., Hamelin Pool TLE FA C24 -C32 ; δ(13) C -20 to -24.2‰ VPDB; TLE n-alkanes δ(13) C -24.1 to -26.2 -‰VPDB) indicate a microbial origin, possibly sulfate-reducing bacteria. Lastly, we identified homohopanoic acid and bishomohopanol as the primary degradation products of bacterial hopanoids. The distributions of lipids isolated from Holocene oolites from the Rice Bay Formation of Cat Island, Bahamas were very similar to the beach ooids described above and, in total, these modern and fossil biomarker data lead us to hypothesize that ooids are colonized by a defined microbial community and that these microbes possibly mediate calcification. PMID:23790232

  20. Characterization and in-vivo evaluation of potential probiotics of the bacterial flora within the water column of a healthy shrimp larviculture system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Ming; Liang, Huafang; He, Yaoyao; Wen, Chongqing

    2016-05-01

    A thorough understanding of the normal bacterial flora associated with shrimp larviculture systems contributes to probiotic screening and disease control. The bacterial community of the water column over a commercial Litopenaeus vannamei larval rearing run was characterized with both culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. A total of 27 phylotypes at the species level were isolated and identified based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of the V3-V5 region of 16S rRNA genes showed a dynamic bacterial community with major changes occurred from stages zoea to mysis during the rearing run. The sequences retrieved were affiliated to four phyla, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes, with the family Rhodobacteraceae being the most frequently recovered one. Subsequently, 13 representative strains conferred higher larval survival than the control when evaluated in the in-vivo experiments; in particular, three candidates, assigned to Phaeobacter sp., Arthrobacter sp., and Microbacterium sp., significantly improved larval survival ( P < 0.05). Therefore, the healthy shrimp larviculture system harbored a diverse and favorable bacterial flora, which contribute to larval development and are of great importance in exploiting novel probiotics.

  1. Comparison effects of dietary iron dextran and bacterial-iron supplementation on growth performance, fecal microbial flora, and blood profiles in sows and their litters.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pinyao; Upadhaya, Santi Devi; Li, Jian; Kim, Inho

    2015-11-01

    This study was conducted to compare effects of dietary administration of iron dextran and bacterial-iron on growth performance, fecal microbial flora, and blood profiles in sows and their litters. A total of 20 multiparous sows (Landrace × Yorkshire) were randomly allotted into two treatments: (i) ID (basal diet, piglets were injected with iron dextran); (ii) BR (basal diet + bacterial-iron; bacterial-iron was given to sows, piglets were not injected with iron dextran). There were five replicates per treatment with two sows per replicate. No differences were observed on sow and piglet growth performance, fecal microbial flora as well as sow blood profiles between ID and BR treatments. In piglets, blood iron, red blood cell and hemoglobin concentrations in ID treatment were higher (P < 0.05) on days 12 and 24. Furthermore, concentration of white blood cells in BR treatment was lower (P < 0.05) on day 12. However, the percentage of lymphocytes on day 12 was increased (P < 0.05) in BR treatment. In conclusion, effect of iron dextran and bacterial-iron has no difference on growth performance in lactating sows and piglets, but iron dextran injection has higher blood iron, white blood cell, red blood cell and hemoglobin concentrations in piglets.

  2. Characterization of methanotrophic bacterial populations in natural and agricultural aerobic soils of the European Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchenko, Irina; Sukhacheva, Marina; Kizilova, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric methane contributes to about 20% of the total radiative forcing by long-lived greenhouse gases, and microbial methane oxidation in upland soils is the only biological sink of methane. Microbial methane oxidation in aerated upland soils is estimated as 15 - 45 Tg yr-1 or 3-9% of the annual sink. Therefore there is need of extensive research to characterize methanotrophic activity in various ecosystems for possible application to reduce atmospheric methane fluxes and to minimize global climate change. The vast majority of known aerobic methanotrophs belongs to the Proteobacteria and placed in the families Methylococcaceae in the Gammaproteobacteria, and Methylocystaceae and Beijerinckiaceae in the Alphaproteobacteria. Known exceptions include the phylum Verrucomicrobia and uncultured methanotrophs such as Candidatus 'Methylomirabilis oxyfera' affiliated with the 'NC10' phylum. Plenty of studies of aerobic methane oxidation and key players of the process have been performed on various types of soils, and it was found that Methylocystis spp and uncultivated methanotrophs are abundant in upland soils. Two of the uncultured groups are upland soil cluster alphaproteobacteria (USCa) and gammaproteobacteria (USCg), as revealed by cultivation-independent surveys of pmoA diversity. Russia is extremely rich in soil types due to its vast territories, and most of these soils have never been investigated from the aspect of methanotrophy. This study addresses methane oxidation activity and diversity of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria in eight types of natural aerobic soils, four of which also had been under agricultural use. Methane fluxes have been measured by in situ static chamber method and methane oxidation rates in soil samples - by radioisotope tracer (14CH4) technique. Changes in methanotroph diversity and abundance were assessed by cloning and Sanger sequencing, and quantitative real-time PCR of pmoA genes. Methanotrophic population of unmanaged soils turned

  3. Bacterial survival and association with sludge flocs during aerobic and anaerobic digestion of wastewater sludge under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Farrah, S R; Bitton, G

    1983-01-01

    The fate of indicator bacteria, a bacterial pathogen, and total aerobic bacteria during aerobic and anaerobic digestion of wastewater sludge under laboratory conditions was determined. Correlation coefficients were calculated between physical and chemical parameters (temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, total solids, and volatile solids) and either the daily change in bacterial numbers or the percentage of bacteria in the supernatant. The major factor influencing survival of Salmonella typhimurium and indicator bacteria during aerobic digestion was the temperature of sludge digestion. At 28 degrees C with greater than 4 mg of dissolved oxygen per liter, the daily change in numbers of these bacteria was approximately -1.0 log10/ml. At 6 degrees C, the daily change was less than -0.3 log10/ml. Most of the bacteria were associated with the sludge flocs during aerobic digestion of sludge at 28 degrees C with greater than 2.4 mg of dissolved oxygen per liter. Lowering the temperature or the amount of dissolved oxygen decreased the fraction of bacteria associated with the flocs and increased the fraction found in the supernatant. PMID:6401978

  4. Microtus species as new herbivorous laboratory animals: reproduction; bacterial flora and fermentation in the digestive tracts; and nutritional physiology.

    PubMed

    Kudo, H; Oki, Y

    1984-05-01

    In a study of the possible introduction of Japanese field vole (Microtus montebelli ) and Hungarian voles (M. arvalis) as herbivorous experimental animals, the following biological characteristics were investigated: breeding and reproductive performance; bacterial flora and fermentation in the digestive tracts; and nutritional physiology. The animals are polyestrus , show postpartum estrus on the day of parturition, and there is little or no delay in implantation due to lactation, especially in M. arvalis. On examination of vaginal smears, Japanese field vole did not show any definite pattern, whereas most Hungarian voles showed 6- to 18- day cycles. From the esophageal sac of voles fed rations with a high fiber content, cellulolytic bacteria similar to Ruminococcus albus, Ruminococcus flavefaciens , and Bacteroides succinogenes were isolated. More than 1 000 000/g anaerobic bacteria were present in the esophageal sac and the pattern and the types of bacteria resembled those found in the rumen. Gastric fermentation took place in the esophageal sac. The pH and total VFAs were much smaller in the fundic and pyloric regions of the stomach than in the esophageal sac. Acetic and lactic acids were the major fermentation products in the esophageal sac. Following deficiency or lowering of the cellulose decomposing abilities, a decrease of VFAs and an increase in lactic acid production in the esophageal sac were observed. These effects resulted in high glucose, FFA and ketone bodies in the blood, and a higher incidence of glucosuria. Diabetes induced by administrations of drugs such as alloxan, streptozotocin and phloridzin were compared using Microtus and mice. Microtus had low sensitivity to alloxan but high sensitivity to streptozotocin. The influence of monensin on Microtus was also investigated by using diets containing 20 and 80 mg/kg monensin. Diets containing 80 mg/kg monensin led to 50 % mortality in 7 weeks and growth was hindered. Gas production from the

  5. Bacterial flora of skin of processed broiler chickens after successive washings in mixtures of potassium hydroxide and lauric acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes in the size of the populations of different groups of bacteria in the normal flora of the skin of processed broilers were examined after each of five consecutive washings with mixtures of potassium hydroxide (KOH) and lauric acid (LA). Skin from commercially processed broiler carcasses was ...

  6. New evidence for Cu-decorated binary-oxides mediating bacterial inactivation/mineralization in aerobic media.

    PubMed

    Rtimi, S; Pulgarin, C; Bensimon, M; Kiwi, J

    2016-08-01

    Binary oxide semiconductors TiO2-ZrO2 and Cu-decorated TiO2-ZrO2 (TiO2-ZrO2-Cu) uniform films were sputtered on polyester (PES). These films were irradiated under low intensity solar simulated light and led to bacterial inactivation in aerobic and anaerobic media as evaluated by CFU-plate counting. But bacterial mineralization was only induced by TiO2-ZrO2-Cu in aerobic media. The highly oxidative radicals generated on the films surface under light were identified by the use of appropriate scavengers. The hole generated on the TiO2-ZrO2 films is shown to be the main specie leading to bacterial inactivation. TiO2-ZrO2 and Cu-decorated TiO2-ZrO2 films release Zr and Ti <1ppb and Cu 4.6ppb/cm(2) as determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) This level is far below the citotoxicity permitted level allowed for mammalian cells suggesting that bacterial disinfection proceeds through an oligodynamic effect. By Fourier transform attenuated infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) the systematic shift of the predominating νs(CH2) vibrational-rotational peak making up most of the bacterial cell-wall content in C was monitored. Based on this evidence a mechanism suggested leading to CH bond stretching followed by cell lysis and cell death. Bacterial inactivation cycling was observed on TiO2-ZrO2-Cu showing the stability of these films leading to bacterial inactivation. PMID:27088192

  7. Variable effects of oxytetracycline on antibiotic resistance gene abundance and the bacterial community during aerobic composting of cow manure.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xun; Sun, Wei; Gu, Jie; Wang, Xiao-Juan; Sun, Jia-Jun; Yin, Ya-Nan; Duan, Man-Li

    2016-09-01

    Livestock manure is often subjected to aerobic composting but little is known about the variation in antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during the composting process under different concentrations of antibiotics. This study compared the effects of three concentrations of oxytetracycline (OTC; 10, 60, and 200mg/kg) on ARGs and the succession of the bacterial community during composting. Very similar trends were observed in the relative abundances (RAs) of each ARG among the OTC treatments and the control during composting. After composting, the RAs of tetC, tetX, sul1, sul2, and intI1 increased 2-43 times, whereas those of tetQ, tetM, and tetW declined by 44-99%. OTC addition significantly increased the absolute abundances and RAs of tetC and intI1, while 200mg/kg OTC also enhanced those of tetM, tetQ, and drfA7. The bacterial community could be grouped according to the composting time under different treatments. The highest concentration of OTC had a more persistent effect on the bacterial community. In the present study, the succession of the bacterial community appeared to have a greater influence on the variation of ARGs during composting than the presence of antibiotics. Aerobic composting was not effective in reducing most of the ARGs, and thus the compost product should be considered as an important reservoir for ARGs.

  8. Variable effects of oxytetracycline on antibiotic resistance gene abundance and the bacterial community during aerobic composting of cow manure.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xun; Sun, Wei; Gu, Jie; Wang, Xiao-Juan; Sun, Jia-Jun; Yin, Ya-Nan; Duan, Man-Li

    2016-09-01

    Livestock manure is often subjected to aerobic composting but little is known about the variation in antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during the composting process under different concentrations of antibiotics. This study compared the effects of three concentrations of oxytetracycline (OTC; 10, 60, and 200mg/kg) on ARGs and the succession of the bacterial community during composting. Very similar trends were observed in the relative abundances (RAs) of each ARG among the OTC treatments and the control during composting. After composting, the RAs of tetC, tetX, sul1, sul2, and intI1 increased 2-43 times, whereas those of tetQ, tetM, and tetW declined by 44-99%. OTC addition significantly increased the absolute abundances and RAs of tetC and intI1, while 200mg/kg OTC also enhanced those of tetM, tetQ, and drfA7. The bacterial community could be grouped according to the composting time under different treatments. The highest concentration of OTC had a more persistent effect on the bacterial community. In the present study, the succession of the bacterial community appeared to have a greater influence on the variation of ARGs during composting than the presence of antibiotics. Aerobic composting was not effective in reducing most of the ARGs, and thus the compost product should be considered as an important reservoir for ARGs. PMID:27179201

  9. Quantification, Distribution, and Possible Source of Bacterial Biofilm in Mouse Automated Watering Systems

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Thomas R; Maute, Carrie J; Cadillac, Joan M; Lee, Ji Young; Righter, Daniel J; Hugunin, Kelly MS; Deininger, Rolf A; Dysko, Robert C

    2008-01-01

    The use of automated watering systems for providing drinking water to rodents has become commonplace in the research setting. Little is known regarding bacterial biofilm growth within the water piping attached to the racks (manifolds). The purposes of this project were to determine whether the mouse oral flora contributed to the aerobic bacterial component of the rack biofilm, quantify bacterial growth in rack manifolds over 6 mo, assess our rack sanitation practices, and quantify bacterial biofilm development within sections of the manifold. By using standard methods of bacterial identification, the aerobic oral flora of 8 strains and stocks of mice were determined on their arrival at our animal facility. Ten rack manifolds were sampled before, during, and after sanitation and monthly for 6 mo. Manifolds were evaluated for aerobic bacterial growth by culture on R2A and trypticase soy agar, in addition to bacterial ATP quantification by bioluminescence. In addition, 6 racks were sampled at 32 accessible sites for evaluation of biofilm distribution within the watering manifold. The identified aerobic bacteria in the oral flora were inconsistent with the bacteria from the manifold, suggesting that the mice do not contribute to the biofilm bacteria. Bacterial growth in manifolds increased while they were in service, with exponential growth of the biofilm from months 3 to 6 and a significant decrease after sanitization. Bacterial biofilm distribution was not significantly different across location quartiles of the rack manifold, but bacterial levels differed between the shelf pipe and connecting elbow pipes. PMID:18351724

  10. Detection of carboxylesterase and esterase activity in culturable gut bacterial flora isolated from diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (Linnaeus), from India and its possible role in indoxacarb degradation.

    PubMed

    Ramya, Shanivarsanthe Leelesh; Venkatesan, Thiruvengadam; Srinivasa Murthy, Kottilingam; Jalali, Sushil Kumar; Verghese, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella (Linnaeus), is a notorious pest of brassica crops worldwide and is resistant to all groups of insecticides. The insect system harbors diverse groups of microbiota, which in turn helps in enzymatic degradation of xenobiotic-like insecticides. The present study aimed to determine the diversity of gut microflora in DBM, quantify esterase activity and elucidate their possible role in degradation of indoxacarb. We screened 11 geographic populations of DBM in India and analyzed them for bacterial diversity. The culturable gut bacterial flora underwent molecular characterization with 16S rRNA. We obtained 25 bacterial isolates from larvae (n=13) and adults (n=12) of DBM. In larval gut isolates, gammaproteobacteria was the most abundant (76%), followed by bacilli (15.4%). Molecular characterization placed adult gut bacterial strains into three major classes based on abundance: gammaproteobacteria (66%), bacilli (16.7%) and flavobacteria (16.7%). Esterase activity from 19 gut bacterial isolates ranged from 0.072 to 2.32μmol/min/mg protein. Esterase bands were observed in 15 bacterial strains and the banding pattern differed in Bacillus cereus - KC985225 and Pantoea agglomerans - KC985229. The bands were characterized as carboxylesterase with profenofos used as an inhibitor. Minimal media study showed that B. cereus degraded indoxacarb up to 20%, so it could use indoxacarb for metabolism and growth. Furthermore, esterase activity was greater with minimal media than control media: 1.87 versus 0.26μmol/min/mg protein. Apart from the insect esterases, bacterial carboxylesterase may aid in the degradation of insecticides in DBM. PMID:26991291

  11. Bacterial vaginosis, aerobic vaginitis, vaginal inflammation and major Pap smear abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Baptista, P; Lima-Silva, J; Pinto, C; Saldanha, C; Beires, J; Martinez-de-Oliveira, J; Donders, G

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the impact of the vaginal milieu on the presence of abnormal Pap smears and a positive human papilloma virus (HPV) test. A cross-sectional study was conducted between June 2014 and May 2015, evaluating the vaginal discharge by fresh wet mount microscopy and comparing these data with Pap smear findings. Wet mount slides were scored for bacterial vaginosis (BV), aerobic vaginitis (AV), presence of Candida and Trichomonas vaginalis. Cytologic evaluation was done on all Pap smears according to the Bethesda criteria. The cobas© HPV Test (Roche) was performed for HPV detection. A total of 622 cases were evaluated. The mean age of the patients was 41.6 ± 10.65 years (range 21-75). Eighty-three women (13.3 %) had a cytology result worse than low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL). When comparing this group with the one with normal or minor [atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) or LSIL] Pap smear abnormalities, there were no differences in the presence of Candida (32.5 % vs. 33.2 %, p = 1.0), absence of lactobacilli (38.6 % vs. 32.5 %, p = 0.32) or BV (20.5 % vs. 13.2 %, p = 0.09). On the other hand, moderate or severe inflammation (msI) (41.0 % vs. 28.8 %, p = 0,04), moderate or severe AV (msAV) (16.9 % vs. 7.2 %, p = 0.009) and msAV/BV (37.3 % vs. 20.0 %, p = 0.001) were more common in women with such major cervical abnormalities. No significant association was found between deviations of the vaginal milieu and high-risk HPV infection. The presence of msI or msAV, but not BV, is independently associated with an increased risk of major cervical cytological abnormalities, but not with HPV infection. PMID:26810061

  12. Multicenter Evaluation of the Bruker MALDI Biotyper CA System for the Identification of Clinical Aerobic Gram-Negative Bacterial Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Faron, Matthew L.; Buchan, Blake W.; Hyke, Josh; Madisen, Neil; Lillie, Jennifer L.; Granato, Paul A.; Wilson, Deborah A.; Procop, Gary W.; Novak-Weekley, Susan; Marlowe, Elizabeth; Cumpio, Joven; Griego-Fullbright, Christen; Kindig, Sandra; Timm, Karen; Young, Stephen; Ledeboer, Nathan A.

    2015-01-01

    The prompt and accurate identification of bacterial pathogens is fundamental to patient health and outcome. Recent advances in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) have revolutionized bacterial identification in the clinical laboratory, but uniform incorporation of this technology in the U.S. market has been delayed by a lack of FDA-cleared systems. In this study, we conducted a multicenter evaluation of the MALDI Biotyper CA (MBT-CA) System (Bruker Daltonics Inc, Billerica, MA) for the identification of aerobic gram-negative bacteria as part of a 510(k) submission to the FDA. A total of 2,263 aerobic gram negative bacterial isolates were tested representing 23 genera and 61 species. Isolates were collected from various clinical sources and results obtained from the MBT-CA System were compared to DNA sequencing and/or biochemical testing. Isolates that failed to report as a "high confidence species ID" [log(score) ≥2.00] were re-tested using an extraction method. The MBT-CA System identified 96.8% and 3.1% of isolates with either a "high confidence" or a "low confidence" [log(score) value between 1.70 and <2.00] species ID, respectively. Two isolates did not produce acceptable confidence scores after extraction. The MBT-CA System correctly identified 99.8% (2,258/2,263) to genus and 98.2% (2,222/2,263) to species level. These data demonstrate that the MBT-CA System provides accurate results for the identification of aerobic gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26529504

  13. Analysis of the bacterial surface ripening flora of German and French smeared cheeses with respect to their anti-listerial potential.

    PubMed

    Carnio, M C; Eppert, I; Scherer, S

    1999-03-01

    The anti-listerial potential of 19 different French smeared cheese bacterial consortia was analyzed semi-quantitatively. Comparison of the total viable cell count to the direct microscopic count yielded no indication that non-culturable bacteria contribute significantly to the undefined, complex ripening floras. From 2613 isolates, 48 showed clear inhibition of one or more Listeria monocytogenes strains on solid medium, while only three isolates excreted an anti-listerial, soluble substance when grown in liquid culture. From a total of 299 strains isolated from German dairy products, 30 strains inhibited at least one L. monocytogenes indicator strain on solid medium. Bacteria with antilisterial potential were members of the genera Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Corynebacterium, Enterococcus, Micrococcus and Microbacterium. Cluster analysis of inhibition pattern revealed that similar anti-listerial substances are produced by species belonging to different genera. Half of the strains inhibited six or more out of 12 Listeria indicator strains and are promising candidates for the development of a defined red smear cheese ripening flora. L. monocytogenes originating from red-smear cheese had a tendency to be more resistant towards anti-listerial activity than those isolated from other sources.

  14. Effects of a glucoside-hydrolase inhibitor (Bay g 5421) on serum lipids, lipoproteins and bile acids, fecal fat and bacterial flora, and intestinal gas production in hyperlipidemic patients.

    PubMed

    Maruhama, Y; Nagasaki, A; Kanazawa, Y; Hirakawa, H; Goto, Y; Nishiyama, H; Kishimoto, Y; Shimoyama, T

    1980-12-01

    Significant decrease in serum very low density lipoproteins and low density lipoproteins was observed after Bay g 5421 trial (300 mg/day for 6 weeks) in 14 hyperlipidemic patients. Although no significant changes were demonstrated in serum fractions of bile acids, the alteration in the patterns of fecal bacterial flora including the increase in obligate anaerobes was observed after the trial and this was accompanied by the increase in fecal fat excretion. Thus, the possible change in the intestinal bile acid metabolism with the altered flora may lead to an increased catabolism of cholesterol and to the reduction of serum low density lipoproteins. The meteorism developed in several patients but its etiology was shown to be independent of the patterns of the pre-trial bacterial flora and diet composition.

  15. Enhancement of Bacterial Transport in Aerobic and Anaerobic Environments: Assessing the Effect of Metal Oxide Chemical Heterogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    T.C. Onstott

    2005-09-30

    The goal of our research was to understand the fundamental processes that control microbial transport in physically and chemically heterogeneous aquifers and from this enhanced understanding determine the requirements for successful, field-scale delivery of microorganisms to metal contaminated subsurface sites. Our specific research goals were to determine; (1) the circumstances under which the preferential adsorption of bacteria to Fe, Mn, and Al oxyhydroxides influences field-scale bacterial transport, (2) the extent to which the adhesion properties of bacterial cells affect field-scale bacterial transport, (3) whether microbial Fe(III) reduction can enhance field-scale transport of Fe reducing bacteria (IRB) and other microorganisms and (4) the effect of field-scale physical and chemical heterogeneity on all three processes. Some of the spin-offs from this basic research that can improve biostimulation and bioaugmentation remediation efforts at contaminated DOE sites have included; (1) new bacterial tracking tools for viable bacteria; (2) an integrated protocol which combines subsurface characterization, laboratory-scale experimentation, and scale-up techniques to accurately predict field-scale bacterial transport; and (3) innovative and inexpensive field equipment and methods that can be employed to enhance Fe(III) reduction and microbial transport and to target microbial deposition under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

  16. Low or high doses of cefquinome targeting low or high bacterial inocula cure Klebsiella pneumoniae lung infections but differentially impact the levels of antibiotic resistance in fecal flora.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, Maleck V; Laurentie, Michel; Rolland, Jean-Guy; Perrin-Guyomard, Agnès; Henri, Jérôme; Ferran, Aude A; Toutain, Pierre-Louis; Bousquet-Mélou, Alain

    2014-01-01

    The combination of efficacious treatment against bacterial infections and mitigation of antibiotic resistance amplification in gut microbiota is a major challenge for antimicrobial therapy in food-producing animals. In rats, we evaluated the impact of cefquinome, a fourth-generation cephalosporin, on both Klebsiella pneumoniae lung infection and intestinal flora harboring CTX-M-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Germfree rats received a fecal flora specimen from specific-pathogen-free pigs, to which a CTX-M-producing Escherichia coli strain had been added. K. pneumoniae cells were inoculated in the lungs of these gnotobiotic rats by using either a low (10(5) CFU) or a high (10(9) CFU) inoculum. Without treatment, all animals infected with the low or high K. pneumoniae inoculum developed pneumonia and died before 120 h postchallenge. In the treated groups, the low-inoculum rats received a 4-day treatment of 5 mg/kg of body weight cefquinome beginning at 24 h postchallenge (prepatent phase of the disease), and the high-inoculum rats received a 4-day treatment of 50 mg/kg cefquinome beginning when the animals expressed clinical signs of infection (patent phase of the disease). The dose of 50 mg/kg targeting the high K. pneumoniae inoculum cured all the treated rats and resulted in a massive amplification of CTX-M-producing Enterobacteriaceae. A dose of 5 mg/kg targeting the low K. pneumoniae inoculum cured all the rats and averted an outbreak of clinical disease, all without any amplification of CTX-M-producing Enterobacteriaceae. These findings might have implications for the development of new antimicrobial treatment strategies that ensure a cure for bacterial infections while avoiding the amplification of resistance genes of human concern in the gut microbiota of food-producing animals.

  17. Bacterial community and groundwater quality changes in an anaerobic aquifer during groundwater recharge with aerobic recycled water.

    PubMed

    Ginige, Maneesha P; Kaksonen, Anna H; Morris, Christina; Shackelton, Mark; Patterson, Bradley M

    2013-09-01

    Managed aquifer recharge offers the opportunity to manage groundwater resources by storing water in aquifers when in surplus and thus increase the amount of groundwater available for abstraction during high demand. The Water Corporation of Western Australia (WA) is undertaking a Groundwater Replenishment Trial to evaluate the effects of recharging aerobic recycled water (secondary treated wastewater subjected to ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, and ultraviolet disinfection) into the anaerobic Leederville aquifer in Perth, WA. Using culture-independent methods, this study showed the presence of Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Bacilli, Betaproteobacteria, Cytophaga, Flavobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Sphingobacteria, and a decrease in microbial diversity with an increase in depth of aquifer. Assessment of physico-chemical and microbiological properties of groundwater before and after recharge revealed that recharging the aquifer with aerobic recycled water resulted in elevated redox potentials in the aquifer and increased bacterial numbers, but reduced microbial diversity. The increase in bacterial numbers and reduced microbial diversity in groundwater could be a reflection of an increased denitrifier and sulfur-oxidizing populations in the aquifer, as a result of the increased availability of nitrate, oxygen, and residual organic matter. This is consistent with the geochemical data that showed pyrite oxidation and denitrification within the aquifer after recycled water recharge commenced.

  18. Assessing carbon and nitrogen removal in a novel anoxic-aerobic cyanobacterial-bacterial photobioreactor configuration with enhanced biomass sedimentation.

    PubMed

    de Godos, I; Vargas, V A; Guzmán, H O; Soto, R; García, B; García, P A; Muñoz, R

    2014-09-15

    The carbon and nitrogen removal potential of an innovative anoxic-aerobic photobioreactor configuration operated with both internal and external recyclings was evaluated under different cyanobacterial-bacterial sludge residence times (9-31 days) during the treatment of wastewaters with low C/N ratios. Under optimal operating conditions, the two-stage photobioreactor was capable of providing organic carbon and nitrogen removals over 95% and 90%, respectively. The continuous biomass recycling from the settler resulted in the enrichment and predominance of rapidly-settling cyanobacterial-bacterial flocs and effluent suspended solid concentrations lower than 35 mg VSS L(-1). These flocs exhibited sedimentation rates of 0.28-0.42 m h(-1) but sludge volumetric indexes of 333-430 ml/g. The decoupling between the hydraulic retention time and sludge retention time mediated by the external recycling also avoided the washout of nitrifying bacteria and supported process operation at biomass concentrations of 1000-1500 mg VSS L(-1). The addition of additional NaHCO3 to the process overcame the CO2 limitation resulting from the intense competition for inorganic carbon between cyanobacteria and nitrifying bacteria in the photobioreactor, which supported the successful implementation of a nitrification-denitrification process. Unexpectedly, this nitrification-denitrification process occurred both simultaneously in the photobioreactor alone (as a result of the negligible dissolved oxygen concentrations) and sequentially in the two-stage anoxic-aerobic configuration with internal NO3(-)/NO2(-) recycling. PMID:24880959

  19. Impact of residual and therapeutic doses of ciprofloxacin in the human-flora-associated mice model.

    PubMed

    Perrin-Guyomard, Agnes; Poul, Jean-Michel; Corpet, Denis E; Sanders, Pascal; Fernández, A Haydée; Bartholomew, Mary

    2005-07-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of therapeutic and residual doses of ciprofloxacin on the human intestinal flora implanted into germ-free mice. Ciprofloxacin was administered daily via drinking water at concentrations to provide doses of 0, 0.125, 1.25, and 12.5mg/kg b.w. Changes in the intestinal flora composition, alteration in bacterial enzyme activities, fecal short chain fatty acid concentration and bacterial cellular fatty acid profiles, overgrowth of resistant bacteria, and disruption of the colonization barrier were the endpoints evaluated in the feces of human-flora-associated (HFA) mice. Ciprofloxacin at all tested doses decreased significantly the aerobic populations and particularly the population of Enterobacteriaceae. Selection of resistant Bacteroides fragilis group was noticed in HFA mice receiving 12.5mg/kg b.w. In mice challenged with a Salmonella strain, exogenous Salmonella persisted in the feces of all treated mice indicating that the flora responsible for the colonization barrier effect was disturbed by the antibiotic treatment. None of the studied metabolic parameters of the flora were affected by ciprofloxacin at any dose level. Under the experimental conditions of the study, the no-observed-effect level of ciprofloxacin was found to be less than 0.125 mg/kg b.w.

  20. Supramolecular organization of bacterial aerobic respiratory chains: From cells and back.

    PubMed

    Melo, Ana M P; Teixeira, Miguel

    2016-03-01

    Aerobic respiratory chains from all life kingdoms are composed by several complexes that have been deeply characterized in their isolated form. These membranous complexes link the oxidation of reducing substrates to the reduction of molecular oxygen, in a process that conserves energy by ion translocation between both sides of the mitochondrial or prokaryotic cytoplasmatic membranes. In recent years there has been increasing evidence that those complexes are organized as supramolecular structures, the so-called supercomplexes and respirasomes, being available for eukaryotes strong data namely obtained by electron microscopy and single particle analysis. A parallel study has been developed for prokaryotes, based on blue native gels and mass spectrometry analysis, showing that in these more simple unicellular organisms such supercomplexes also exist, involving not only typical aerobic-respiration associated complexes, but also anaerobic-linked enzymes. After a short overview of the data on eukaryotic supercomplexes, we will analyse comprehensively the different types of prokaryotic aerobic respiratory supercomplexes that have been thus far suggested, in both bacteria and archaea. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Prof Conrad Mullineaux. PMID:26546715

  1. Bacterial flora and the epidemiology of staphylococcus aureus in the nose among patients with symptomatic nasal septal perforations.

    PubMed

    Hulterström, Anna Karin; Sellin, Mats; Monsen, Tor; Widerström, Micael; Gurram, Bharath Kumar; Berggren, Diana

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions Patients with symptomatic perforations of the nasal septum had a high prevalence of S. aureus in the nasal mucosa. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis revealed a high genetic heterogeneity of S. aureus among both patients and controls. This indicates that presence of different strains of S. aureus can maintain a chronic inflammation in symptomatic nasal septal perforations. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the microbial flora around nasal septal perforations in patients having severe symptoms regarding bleeding, obstruction, and crustation associated with their perforation. Methods Twenty-five patients with untreated symptomatic nasal septal perforations were included. For culture, swabs around the perforations were collected. Bacteria were identified with standard laboratory techniques including a MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer. Epidemiological analysis was done using PFGE protocols. Bacteriological data were compared with data from a healthy control group. Results Staphylococcus aureus was present in the mucosa surrounding the nasal perforation significantly more often (p < 0.0001) in the patients (88%) compared to a control group (13%). Corynebacterium spp. and Propionibacterium spp. were significantly more frequently identified in the control group. The PFGE analysis of S. aureus strains revealed a high genetic heterogeneity and no specific S. aureus genotypes were associated with septal perforation. PMID:26852671

  2. AromaDeg, a novel database for phylogenomics of aerobic bacterial degradation of aromatics.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Márcia; Jauregui, Ruy; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Junca, Howard; Pieper, Dietmar H

    2014-01-01

    Understanding prokaryotic transformation of recalcitrant pollutants and the in-situ metabolic nets require the integration of massive amounts of biological data. Decades of biochemical studies together with novel next-generation sequencing data have exponentially increased information on aerobic aromatic degradation pathways. However, the majority of protein sequences in public databases have not been experimentally characterized and homology-based methods are still the most routinely used approach to assign protein function, allowing the propagation of misannotations. AromaDeg is a web-based resource targeting aerobic degradation of aromatics that comprises recently updated (September 2013) and manually curated databases constructed based on a phylogenomic approach. Grounded in phylogenetic analyses of protein sequences of key catabolic protein families and of proteins of documented function, AromaDeg allows query and data mining of novel genomic, metagenomic or metatranscriptomic data sets. Essentially, each query sequence that match a given protein family of AromaDeg is associated to a specific cluster of a given phylogenetic tree and further function annotation and/or substrate specificity may be inferred from the neighboring cluster members with experimentally validated function. This allows a detailed characterization of individual protein superfamilies as well as high-throughput functional classifications. Thus, AromaDeg addresses the deficiencies of homology-based protein function prediction, combining phylogenetic tree construction and integration of experimental data to obtain more accurate annotations of new biological data related to aerobic aromatic biodegradation pathways. We pursue in future the expansion of AromaDeg to other enzyme families involved in aromatic degradation and its regular update. Database URL: http://aromadeg.siona.helmholtz-hzi.de

  3. Urine Is Not Sterile: Use of Enhanced Urine Culture Techniques To Detect Resident Bacterial Flora in the Adult Female Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Hilt, Evann E.; McKinley, Kathleen; Pearce, Meghan M.; Rosenfeld, Amy B.; Zilliox, Michael J.; Mueller, Elizabeth R.; Brubaker, Linda; Gai, Xiaowu; Wolfe, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    Our previous study showed that bacterial genomes can be identified using 16S rRNA sequencing in urine specimens of both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients who are culture negative according to standard urine culture protocols. In the present study, we used a modified culture protocol that included plating larger volumes of urine, incubation under varied atmospheric conditions, and prolonged incubation times to demonstrate that many of the organisms identified in urine by 16S rRNA gene sequencing are, in fact, cultivable using an expanded quantitative urine culture (EQUC) protocol. Sixty-five urine specimens (from 41 patients with overactive bladder and 24 controls) were examined using both the standard and EQUC culture techniques. Fifty-two of the 65 urine samples (80%) grew bacterial species using EQUC, while the majority of these (48/52 [92%]) were reported as no growth at 103 CFU/ml by the clinical microbiology laboratory using the standard urine culture protocol. Thirty-five different genera and 85 different species were identified by EQUC. The most prevalent genera isolated were Lactobacillus (15%), followed by Corynebacterium (14.2%), Streptococcus (11.9%), Actinomyces (6.9%), and Staphylococcus (6.9%). Other genera commonly isolated include Aerococcus, Gardnerella, Bifidobacterium, and Actinobaculum. Our current study demonstrates that urine contains communities of living bacteria that comprise a resident female urine microbiota. PMID:24371246

  4. Bacterial flora and antibiotic resistance from eggs of green turtles Chelonia mydas: an indication of polluted effluents.

    PubMed

    Al-Bahry, Saif; Mahmoud, Ibrahim; Elshafie, Abdulkader; Al-Harthy, Asila; Al-Ghafri, Sabha; Al-Amri, Issa; Alkindi, Abdulaziz

    2009-05-01

    Sea turtles migrate to various habitats where they can be exposed to different pollutants. Bacteria were collected from turtle eggs and their resistance to antibiotics was used as pollutant bio-indicators of contaminated effluents. Eggs were collected randomly from turtles when they were laying their eggs. A total of 90 eggs were collected and placed into sterile plastic bags (3 eggs/turtle) during June-December of 2003. The bacteria located in the eggshell, albumen and yolk were examined, and 42% of the eggs were contaminated with 10 genera of bacteria. Pseudomonas spp. were the most frequent isolates. The albumen was found to be the part of the egg to be the least contaminated by bacterial infection. Bacterial isolates tested with 14 antibiotics showed variations in resistance. Resistance to ampicillin was the highest. The presence of antibiotic resistant bacteria in eggs indicates that the green turtle populations were subjected to polluted effluents during some of their migratory routes and feeding habitats. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that Salmonella typhimurium penetrated all eggshell layers.

  5. Aerobic De-Epoxydation of Trichothecene Mycotoxins by a Soil Bacterial Consortium Isolated Using In Situ Soil Enrichment.

    PubMed

    He, Wei-Jie; Yuan, Qing-Song; Zhang, You-Bing; Guo, Mao-Wei; Gong, An-Dong; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Wu, Ai-Bo; Huang, Tao; Qu, Bo; Li, He-Ping; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2016-09-24

    Globally, the trichothecene mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON) and nivalenol (NIV) are among the most widely distributed mycotoxins that contaminate small grain cereals. In this study, a bacterial consortium, PGC-3, with de-epoxydation activity was isolated from soil by an in situ soil enrichment method. Screening of 14 soil samples that were sprayed with DON revealed that 4 samples were able to biotransform DON into de-epoxydized DON (dE-DON). Among these, the PGC-3 consortium showed the highest and most stable activity to biotransform DON into dE-DON and NIV into dE-NIV. PGC-3 exhibited de-epoxydation activity at a wide range of pH (5-10) and temperatures (20-37 °C) values under aerobic conditions. Sequential subculturing with a continued exposure to DON substantially reduced the microbial population diversity of this consortium. Analyses of the 16S rDNA sequences indicated that PGC-3 comprised 10 bacterial genera. Among these, one species, Desulfitobacterium, showed a steady increase in relative abundance, from 0.03% to 1.55% (a 52-fold increase), as higher concentrations of DON were used in the subculture media, from 0 to 500 μg/mL. This study establishes the foundation to further develop bioactive agents that can detoxify trichothecene mycotoxins in cereals and enables for the characterization of detoxifying genes and their regulation.

  6. Aerobic De-Epoxydation of Trichothecene Mycotoxins by a Soil Bacterial Consortium Isolated Using In Situ Soil Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei-Jie; Yuan, Qing-Song; Zhang, You-Bing; Guo, Mao-Wei; Gong, An-Dong; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Wu, Ai-Bo; Huang, Tao; Qu, Bo; Li, He-Ping; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2016-01-01

    Globally, the trichothecene mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON) and nivalenol (NIV) are among the most widely distributed mycotoxins that contaminate small grain cereals. In this study, a bacterial consortium, PGC-3, with de-epoxydation activity was isolated from soil by an in situ soil enrichment method. Screening of 14 soil samples that were sprayed with DON revealed that 4 samples were able to biotransform DON into de-epoxydized DON (dE-DON). Among these, the PGC-3 consortium showed the highest and most stable activity to biotransform DON into dE-DON and NIV into dE-NIV. PGC-3 exhibited de-epoxydation activity at a wide range of pH (5–10) and temperatures (20–37 °C) values under aerobic conditions. Sequential subculturing with a continued exposure to DON substantially reduced the microbial population diversity of this consortium. Analyses of the 16S rDNA sequences indicated that PGC-3 comprised 10 bacterial genera. Among these, one species, Desulfitobacterium, showed a steady increase in relative abundance, from 0.03% to 1.55% (a 52-fold increase), as higher concentrations of DON were used in the subculture media, from 0 to 500 μg/mL. This study establishes the foundation to further develop bioactive agents that can detoxify trichothecene mycotoxins in cereals and enables for the characterization of detoxifying genes and their regulation. PMID:27669304

  7. Aerobic De-Epoxydation of Trichothecene Mycotoxins by a Soil Bacterial Consortium Isolated Using In Situ Soil Enrichment.

    PubMed

    He, Wei-Jie; Yuan, Qing-Song; Zhang, You-Bing; Guo, Mao-Wei; Gong, An-Dong; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Wu, Ai-Bo; Huang, Tao; Qu, Bo; Li, He-Ping; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2016-01-01

    Globally, the trichothecene mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON) and nivalenol (NIV) are among the most widely distributed mycotoxins that contaminate small grain cereals. In this study, a bacterial consortium, PGC-3, with de-epoxydation activity was isolated from soil by an in situ soil enrichment method. Screening of 14 soil samples that were sprayed with DON revealed that 4 samples were able to biotransform DON into de-epoxydized DON (dE-DON). Among these, the PGC-3 consortium showed the highest and most stable activity to biotransform DON into dE-DON and NIV into dE-NIV. PGC-3 exhibited de-epoxydation activity at a wide range of pH (5-10) and temperatures (20-37 °C) values under aerobic conditions. Sequential subculturing with a continued exposure to DON substantially reduced the microbial population diversity of this consortium. Analyses of the 16S rDNA sequences indicated that PGC-3 comprised 10 bacterial genera. Among these, one species, Desulfitobacterium, showed a steady increase in relative abundance, from 0.03% to 1.55% (a 52-fold increase), as higher concentrations of DON were used in the subculture media, from 0 to 500 μg/mL. This study establishes the foundation to further develop bioactive agents that can detoxify trichothecene mycotoxins in cereals and enables for the characterization of detoxifying genes and their regulation. PMID:27669304

  8. Aerobic bacterial pyrite oxidation and acid rock drainage during the Great Oxidation Event.

    PubMed

    Konhauser, Kurt O; Lalonde, Stefan V; Planavsky, Noah J; Pecoits, Ernesto; Lyons, Timothy W; Mojzsis, Stephen J; Rouxel, Olivier J; Barley, Mark E; Rosìere, Carlos; Fralick, Phillip W; Kump, Lee R; Bekker, Andrey

    2011-10-20

    The enrichment of redox-sensitive trace metals in ancient marine sedimentary rocks has been used to determine the timing of the oxidation of the Earth's land surface. Chromium (Cr) is among the emerging proxies for tracking the effects of atmospheric oxygenation on continental weathering; this is because its supply to the oceans is dominated by terrestrial processes that can be recorded in the Cr isotope composition of Precambrian iron formations. However, the factors controlling past and present seawater Cr isotope composition are poorly understood. Here we provide an independent and complementary record of marine Cr supply, in the form of Cr concentrations and authigenic enrichment in iron-rich sedimentary rocks. Our data suggest that Cr was largely immobile on land until around 2.48 Gyr ago, but within the 160 Myr that followed--and synchronous with independent evidence for oxygenation associated with the Great Oxidation Event (see, for example, refs 4-6)--marked excursions in Cr content and Cr/Ti ratios indicate that Cr was solubilized at a scale unrivalled in history. As Cr isotope fractionations at that time were muted, Cr must have been mobilized predominantly in reduced, Cr(III), form. We demonstrate that only the oxidation of an abundant and previously stable crustal pyrite reservoir by aerobic-respiring, chemolithoautotrophic bacteria could have generated the degree of acidity required to solubilize Cr(III) from ultramafic source rocks and residual soils. This profound shift in weathering regimes beginning at 2.48 Gyr ago constitutes the earliest known geochemical evidence for acidophilic aerobes and the resulting acid rock drainage, and accounts for independent evidence of an increased supply of dissolved sulphate and sulphide-hosted trace elements to the oceans around that time. Our model adds to amassing evidence that the Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic boundary was marked by a substantial shift in terrestrial geochemistry and biology. PMID:22012395

  9. Aerobic bacterial pyrite oxidation and acid rock drainage during the Great Oxidation Event.

    PubMed

    Konhauser, Kurt O; Lalonde, Stefan V; Planavsky, Noah J; Pecoits, Ernesto; Lyons, Timothy W; Mojzsis, Stephen J; Rouxel, Olivier J; Barley, Mark E; Rosìere, Carlos; Fralick, Phillip W; Kump, Lee R; Bekker, Andrey

    2011-10-19

    The enrichment of redox-sensitive trace metals in ancient marine sedimentary rocks has been used to determine the timing of the oxidation of the Earth's land surface. Chromium (Cr) is among the emerging proxies for tracking the effects of atmospheric oxygenation on continental weathering; this is because its supply to the oceans is dominated by terrestrial processes that can be recorded in the Cr isotope composition of Precambrian iron formations. However, the factors controlling past and present seawater Cr isotope composition are poorly understood. Here we provide an independent and complementary record of marine Cr supply, in the form of Cr concentrations and authigenic enrichment in iron-rich sedimentary rocks. Our data suggest that Cr was largely immobile on land until around 2.48 Gyr ago, but within the 160 Myr that followed--and synchronous with independent evidence for oxygenation associated with the Great Oxidation Event (see, for example, refs 4-6)--marked excursions in Cr content and Cr/Ti ratios indicate that Cr was solubilized at a scale unrivalled in history. As Cr isotope fractionations at that time were muted, Cr must have been mobilized predominantly in reduced, Cr(III), form. We demonstrate that only the oxidation of an abundant and previously stable crustal pyrite reservoir by aerobic-respiring, chemolithoautotrophic bacteria could have generated the degree of acidity required to solubilize Cr(III) from ultramafic source rocks and residual soils. This profound shift in weathering regimes beginning at 2.48 Gyr ago constitutes the earliest known geochemical evidence for acidophilic aerobes and the resulting acid rock drainage, and accounts for independent evidence of an increased supply of dissolved sulphate and sulphide-hosted trace elements to the oceans around that time. Our model adds to amassing evidence that the Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic boundary was marked by a substantial shift in terrestrial geochemistry and biology.

  10. Biosorption behavior and mechanism of lead (II) from aqueous solution by aerobic granules (AG) and bacterial alginate (BA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Li, Yu

    2012-12-01

    Lead (Pb) and its compounds are common pollutants in industrial wastewaters. To develop appropriate Pb2+ treatment technologies, aerobic granules (AG) and bacterial alginates (BA) were studied as alternative biosorbents to remove Pb2+ from aqueous solutions. The biosorption mechanism of AG and BA were further analyzed to determine which functional groups in AG and BA are active in Pb2+ biosorption. In this paper, the Pb2+ biosorption behavior of AG and BA was respectively investigated in batch experiments from the perspectives of the initial pH, contact time, and initial Pb2+ concentration. The results showed that biosorption of Pb2+ by AG and BA occurred within 60min at the initial Pb2+ concentrations (0-150 mg L-1). The actual saturated Pb2+ biosorption capability of AG was 101.97 mg g-1 (dry weight of aerobic granular biomass). When the initial pH was 5, the biosorption capability of AG and BA was highest at the initial Pb2+ concentrations (0-20mg L-1). During the process of Pb2+ biosorption, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ were released. The Ion Chromatography (IC) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) further highlighted the main role of ion exchange between Ca2+ and Pb2+ and sequestration of Pb2+ with carboxyl (-COO-) of AG and BA. This analogical analysis verifies that BA is responsible for biosorption of Pb2+ by AG. At the same optimal pH, AG cultivated with different carbon source has different Pb2+ biosorption capacity. The Pb2+ biosorption by AG with sodium acetate as the sole carbon source is higher than AG with glucose as carbon source.

  11. Quantitative studies on the salivary flora

    PubMed Central

    Ross, P. W.

    1971-01-01

    In a quantitative bacteriological study of the salivary flora from 50 children the following aerobic organisms were identified and enumerated: alpha-haemolytic streptococci, beta-haemolytic streptococci, Streptococcus faecalis, pneumococci, Staphylococcus aureus, Staph. albus and Staph. citreus, Neisseria spp, N. meningitidis, corynebacteria, aerobic lactobacilli, B. subtilis, H. influenzae, coliform organisms, and Candida spp. Many of the known potentially pathogenic members were present in large numbers. It is suggested that knowledge of the relative numbers of the organisms that comprise the salivary flora will lead to a greater understanding of the ecology of the mouth and of the pathogenesis of oral infections. PMID:4399776

  12. Prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes in the bacterial flora of integrated fish farming environments of Pakistan and Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Shah, Syed Q A; Colquhoun, Duncan J; Nikuli, Hamisi L; Sørum, Henning

    2012-08-21

    The use of a wide variety of antimicrobials in human and veterinary medicine, including aquaculture, has led to the emergence of antibiotic resistant pathogens. In the present study, bacteria from water, sediments, and fish were collected from fish farms in Pakistan and Tanzania with no recorded history of antibiotic use. The isolates were screened for the presence of resistance genes against various antimicrobials used in aquaculture and animal husbandry. Resistant isolates selected by disk diffusion and genotyped by Southern hybridization were further screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and amplicon sequencing. The prominent resistance genes identified encoded tetracycline [tetA(A) and tetA(G)], trimethoprim [dfrA1, dfrA5, dfrA7, dfrA12, and dfrA15], amoxicillin [bla(TEM)], streptomycin [strA-strB], chloramphenicol [cat-1], and erythromycin resistance [mefA]. The int1 gene was found in more than 30% of the bacterial isolates in association with gene cassettes. MAR indices ranged from 0.2 to 1. The bla(NDM-1) gene was not identified in ertapenem resistant isolates. It is hypothesized that integrated fish farming practices utilizing domestic farm and poultry waste along with antibiotic residues from animal husbandry may have contributed to a pool of resistance genes in the aquaculture systems studied.

  13. Bacterial diversity and spoilage-related microbiota associated with freshly prepared chicken products under aerobic conditions at 4°C.

    PubMed

    Liang, Rongrong; Yu, Xiaoqiao; Wang, Renhuan; Luo, Xin; Mao, Yanwei; Zhu, Lixian; Zhang, Yimin

    2012-06-01

    This study analyzed the bacterial diversity and spoilage-related microbiota associated with freshly prepared chicken products stored aerobically at 4°C, using "bone and chicken string," a product popular in the People's Republic of China, as the study subject. Samples collected from three different factories were tray packaged with cling film and stored at 4°C. Bacterial diversity and dominant bacteria were analyzed using PCR amplification and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Combined with selective cultivation of the dominant bacteria and correlation analysis, the dominant spoilage microbiota was determined. The results showed that bacterial diversity varied with different manufacturers. Such bacteria as Acinetobacter sp., Carnobacterium sp., Rahnella sp., Pseudomonas sp., Brochothrix sp., and Weissella sp. were detected in freshly prepared chicken products during storage. And Carnobacterium sp., Pseudomonas sp., and Brochothrix sp. bacteria were the common dominant spoilage bacteria groups in most freshly prepared chicken products from different factories. Carnobacterium was, for the first time, shown to be an important contributor to the spoilage-related microflora of freshly prepared chicken products stored aerobically under refrigeration. Our work shows the bacterial diversity and dominant spoilage microbiota of freshly prepared chicken products stored aerobically under refrigeration.

  14. Aerobic Bacterial Community of American Cockroach Periplaneta americana,a Step toward Finding Suitable Paratransgenesis Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Sanaz; Oshaghi, Mohammad Ali; Hashemi-Aghdam, Saedeh Sadat; Hajikhani, Sara; Oshaghi, Ghazaleh; Shirazi, Mohammad Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cockroaches mechanically spread pathogenic agents, however, little is known about their gut microbiota. Identification of midgut microbial community helps targeting novel biological control strategies such as paratransgenesis. Here the bacterial microbiota of Periplaneta americana midgut, were identified and evaluated for finding proper paratransgenesis candidate. Methods: Midgut of specimens were dissected and cultivated in different media. The bacterial isolates were then identified using the phenotypic and 16S-rRNA sequencing methods. Results: The analytical profile index (API) kit showed presence of 11 bacterial species including: Escherichia coli, Shigella flexineri, Citrobacter freundii, E. vulneris, Enterobacter cloacae, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Y. intermedia, Leclericia adecarboxylata, Klebsiella oxytoca, K. planticola, and Rahnella aquatilis in the cockroach midguts. The first three species are potentially symbiotic whereas others are transient. The conventional plating method revealed presence of only four isolates of Salmonella, E. coli, and Proteus which in three cases mismatched with API and 16S-rRNA genotyping. The API correctly identified the four isolates as Shigella flexneri, Citrobacter freundii, and E. coli (n= 2). 16S-rRNA sequence analysis confirmed the API results; however the C. freundii sequence was identical with C. murliniae indicating lack of genetic variation in the gene between these two closely related species. Conclusion: A low number of potentially symbiotic bacteria were found in the American cockroach midguts. Among them Enterobacter cloacae is a potential candidate for paratransgenesis approach whereas other bacteria are pathogens and are not useful for the approach. Data analysis showed that identification levels increase from the conventional to API and to genotyping respectively. PMID:26114142

  15. Aerobic degradation of ibuprofen in batch and continuous reactors by an indigenous bacterial community.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, María Susana; Fuentes Abril, Nancy Piedad; Martinefski, Manuela; Trípodi, Valeria; Papalia, Mariana; Rádice, Marcela; Gutkind, Gabriel; Gallego, Alfredo; Korol, Sonia Edith

    2016-10-01

    Water from six points from the Riachuelo-Matanza basin was analyzed in order to assess ibuprofen biodegradability. In four of them biodegradation of ibuprofen was proved and degrading bacterial communities were isolated. Biodegradation in each point could not be correlated with sewage pollution. The indigenous bacterial community isolated from the point localized in the La Noria Bridge showed the highest degradative capacity and was selected to perform batch and continuous degradation assays. The partial 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that the community consisted of Comamonas aquatica and Bacillus sp. In batch assays the community was capable of degrading 100 mg L(-1) of ibuprofen in 33 h, with a specific growth rate (μ) of 0.21 h(-1). The removal of the compound, as determined by High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), exceeded 99% of the initial concentration, with a 92.3% removal of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD). In a down-flow fixed-bed continuous reactor, the community shows a removal efficiency of 95.9% of ibuprofen and 92.3% of COD for an average inlet concentration of 110.4 mg. The reactor was kept in operation for 70 days. The maximal removal rate for the compound was 17.4 g m(-3) d(-1). Scanning electron microscopy was employed to observe biofilm development in the reactor. The ability of the isolated indigenous community can be exploited to improve the treatment of wastewaters containing ibuprofen. PMID:26905769

  16. Aerobic degradation of ibuprofen in batch and continuous reactors by an indigenous bacterial community.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, María Susana; Fuentes Abril, Nancy Piedad; Martinefski, Manuela; Trípodi, Valeria; Papalia, Mariana; Rádice, Marcela; Gutkind, Gabriel; Gallego, Alfredo; Korol, Sonia Edith

    2016-10-01

    Water from six points from the Riachuelo-Matanza basin was analyzed in order to assess ibuprofen biodegradability. In four of them biodegradation of ibuprofen was proved and degrading bacterial communities were isolated. Biodegradation in each point could not be correlated with sewage pollution. The indigenous bacterial community isolated from the point localized in the La Noria Bridge showed the highest degradative capacity and was selected to perform batch and continuous degradation assays. The partial 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that the community consisted of Comamonas aquatica and Bacillus sp. In batch assays the community was capable of degrading 100 mg L(-1) of ibuprofen in 33 h, with a specific growth rate (μ) of 0.21 h(-1). The removal of the compound, as determined by High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), exceeded 99% of the initial concentration, with a 92.3% removal of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD). In a down-flow fixed-bed continuous reactor, the community shows a removal efficiency of 95.9% of ibuprofen and 92.3% of COD for an average inlet concentration of 110.4 mg. The reactor was kept in operation for 70 days. The maximal removal rate for the compound was 17.4 g m(-3) d(-1). Scanning electron microscopy was employed to observe biofilm development in the reactor. The ability of the isolated indigenous community can be exploited to improve the treatment of wastewaters containing ibuprofen.

  17. Characterization of a Planctomycetal Organelle: a Novel Bacterial Microcompartment for the Aerobic Degradation of Plant Saccharides

    PubMed Central

    Erbilgin, Onur; McDonald, Kent L.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) are organelles that encapsulate functionally linked enzymes within a proteinaceous shell. The prototypical example is the carboxysome, which functions in carbon fixation in cyanobacteria and some chemoautotrophs. It is increasingly apparent that diverse heterotrophic bacteria contain BMCs that are involved in catabolic reactions, and many of the BMCs are predicted to have novel functions. However, most of these putative organelles have not been experimentally characterized. In this study, we sought to discover the function of a conserved BMC gene cluster encoded in the majority of the sequenced planctomycete genomes. This BMC is especially notable for its relatively simple genetic composition, its remote phylogenetic position relative to characterized BMCs, and its apparent exclusivity to the enigmatic Verrucomicrobia and Planctomycetes. Members of the phylum Planctomycetes are known for their morphological dissimilarity to the rest of the bacterial domain: internal membranes, reproduction by budding, and lack of peptidoglycan. As a result, they are ripe for many discoveries, but currently the tools for genetic studies are very limited. We expanded the genetic toolbox for the planctomycetes and generated directed gene knockouts of BMC-related genes in Planctomyces limnophilus. A metabolic activity screen revealed that BMC gene products are involved in the degradation of a number of plant and algal cell wall sugars. Among these sugars, we confirmed that BMCs are formed and required for growth on l-fucose and l-rhamnose. Our results shed light on the functional diversity of BMCs as well as their ecological role in the planctomycetes, which are commonly associated with algae. PMID:24487526

  18. Bacterially Induced Dolomite Formation in the Presence of Sulfate Ions under Aerobic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Roman, M.; McKenzie, J. A.; Vasconcelos, C.; Rivadeneyra, M.

    2005-12-01

    The origin of dolomite remains a long-standing enigma in sedimentary geology because, although thermodynamically favorable, precipitation of dolomite from modern seawater does not occur. Experiments conducted at elevated temperatures (200 oC) indicated that the presence of small concentrations of sulfate ions inhibits the transformation of calcite to dolomite [1]. Indeed, sulfate ions appeared to inhibit dolomite formation above 2 mM concentration (versus 28 mM in modern seawater). Recently, culture experiments have demonstrated that sulfate-reducing bacteria mediate the precipitation of dolomite at Earth surface conditions in the presence of sustained sulfate ion concentrations [2,3]. Additionally, in a number of modern hypersaline environments, dolomite forms from solutions with high sulfate ion concentrations (2 to 70 times seawater). These observations suggest that the experimentally observed sulfate-ion inhibition [1] may not apply to all ancient dolomite formation. Here, we report aerobic culture experiments conducted at low temperatures (25 and 35 oC) and variable sulfate ion concentrations (0, 0.5, 1 and 2 x seawater values) using moderately halophilic bacteria, Halomonas meridiana. After an incubation period of 15 days, experiments at 35 oC with variable sulfate ion concentrations (0, 0.5 x and seawater values) contained crystals of Ca-dolomite and stochiometric dolomite. The experiment at 35 oC with 2 x seawater sulfate ion concentration produced dolomite crystals after 20 days of incubation. In a parallel set of experiments at 25 oC, precipitation of dolomite was observed after 25 days of incubation in cultures with variable sulfate ion concentrations (0, 0.5 x and seawater values). In the culture with 2 x seawater sulfate ion concentration, dolomite crystals were observed after 30 days. Our study demonstrates that halophilic bacteria (or heterotrophic microorganisms), which do not require sulfate ions for metabolism, can mediate dolomite precipitation

  19. Bacterial community analysis of shallow groundwater undergoing sequential anaerobic and aerobic chloroethene biotransformation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Todd R; Franklin, Mark P; Halden, Rolf U

    2007-05-01

    At Department of Energy Site 300, beneficial hydrocarbon cocontaminants and favorable subsurface conditions facilitate sequential reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) and rapid oxidation of the resultant cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) upon periodic oxygen influx. We assessed the geochemistry and microbial community of groundwater from across the site. Removal of cis-DCE was shown to coincide with oxygen influx in hydrocarbon-containing groundwater near the source area. Principal component analysis of contaminants and inorganic compounds showed that monitoring wells could be differentiated based upon concentrations of TCE, cis-DCE, and nitrate. Structurally similar communities were detected in groundwater from wells containing cis-DCE, high TCE, and low nitrate levels. Bacteria identified by sequencing 16S rRNA genes belonged to seven phylogenetic groups, including Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria, Nitrospira, Firmicutes and Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroidetes (CFB). Whereas members of the Burkholderiales and CFB group were abundant in all wells (10(4)-10(9) 16S rRNA gene copies L(-1)), quantitative PCR showed that Alphaproteobacteria were elevated (>10(6) L(-1)) only in wells containing hydrocarbon cocontaminants. The study shows that bacterial community structure is related to groundwater geochemistry and that Alphaproteobacteria are enriched in locales where cis-DCE removal occurs.

  20. Aerobic biodegradation of a sulfonated phenylazonaphthol dye by a bacterial community immobilized in a multistage packed-bed BAC reactor.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Arias, Alfredo; Juárez-Ramírez, Cleotilde; de los Cobos-Vasconcelos, Daniel; Ruiz-Ordaz, Nora; Salmerón-Alcocer, Angélica; Ahuatzi-Chacón, Deifilia; Galíndez-Mayer, Juvencio

    2010-11-01

    A microbial community able to aerobically degrade the azo dye Acid Orange 7 was selected from riparian or lacustrine sediments collected at sites receiving textile wastewaters. Three bacterial strains, pertaining to the genera Pseudomonas, Arthrobacter, and Rhizobium, constitute the selected community. The biodegradation of AO7 was carried out in batch-suspended cell culture and in a continuously operated multistage packed-bed BAC reactor. The rapid decolorization observed in batch culture, joined to a delay of about 24 h in COD removal and cell growth, suggests that enzymes involved in biodegradation of the aromatic amines generated after AO7 azo-bond cleavage (1-amino-2-naphthol [1-A2N] and 4-aminobenzenesulfonic acid [4-ABS]), are inducible in this microbial consortium. After this presumptive induction period, the accumulated byproducts, measured through COD, were partially metabolized and transformed in cell mass. At all azo dye loading rates used, complete removal of AO7 and 1-A2N was obtained in the multistage packed-bed BAC reactor (PBR).; however, the overall COD (eta ( COD )) and 4-ABS (eta ( ABS )) removal efficiencies obtained in steady state continuous culture were about 90%. Considering the toxicity of 1-A2N, its complete removal has particular relevance. In the first stages of the packed-bed BAC reactor (Fig. 4a-c), major removal was observed. In the last stage, only a slight removal of COD and 4-ABS was obtained. Comparing to several reported studies, the continuously operated multistage packed-bed BAC reactor showed similar or superior results. In addition, the operation of large-packed-bed BAC reactors could be improved by using several shallow BAC bed stages, because the pressure drop caused by bed compaction of a support material constituted by small and fragile particles can be reduced.

  1. Aerobic biodegradation of trichloroethylene and phenol co-contaminants in groundwater by a bacterial community using hydrogen peroxide as the sole oxygen source.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Shi-yang; Wang, Xiao-li; Yang, Jie; Gu, Ji-dong; Zhu, Rui-li; Wang, Ping; Lin, Kuang-fei; Liu, Yong-di

    2015-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) and phenol were often found together as co-contaminants in the groundwater of industrial contaminated sites. An effective method to remove TCE was aerobic biodegradation by co-metabolism using phenol as growth substrates. However, the aerobic biodegradation process was easily limited by low concentration of dissolved oxygen (DO) in groundwater, and DO was improved by air blast technique with difficulty. This study enriched a bacterial community using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as the sole oxygen source to aerobically degrade TCE by co-metabolism with phenol in groundwater. The enriched cultures were acclimatized to 2-8 mM H2O2 which induced catalase, superoxide dismutase and peroxidase to decompose H2O2 to release O2 and reduce the toxicity. The bacterial community could degrade 120 mg/L TCE within 12 days by using 8 mM H2O2 as the optimum concentration, and the TCE degradation efficiency reached up to 80.6%. 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing showed that Bordetella, Stenotrophomonas sp., Sinorhizobium sp., Variovorax sp. and Sphingobium sp. were the dominant species in the enrichments, which were clustered in three phyla: Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. Polymerase chain reaction detection proved that phenol hydroxylase (Lph) gene was involved in the co-metabolic degradation of phenol and TCE, which indicated that hydroxylase might catalyse the epoxidation of TCE to form the unstable molecule TCE-epoxide. The findings are significant for understanding the mechanism of biodegradation of TCE and phenol co-contamination and helpful for the potential applications of an aerobic bioremediation in situ the contaminated sites.

  2. Variations in 13C/12C and D/H enrichment factors of aerobic bacterial fuel oxygenate degradation.

    PubMed

    Rosell, Mònica; Barceló, Damià; Rohwerder, Thore; Breuer, Uta; Gehre, Matthias; Richnow, Hans Hermann

    2007-03-15

    Reliable compound-specific isotope enrichment factors are needed for a quantitative assessment of in situ biodegradation in contaminated groundwater. To obtain information on the variability on carbon and hydrogen enrichment factors (epsilonC, epsilonH) the isotope fractionation of methyl tertiary (tert-) butyl ether (MTBE) and ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) upon aerobic degradation was studied with different bacterial isolates. Methylibium sp. R8 showed a carbon and hydrogen isotope enrichment upon MTBE degradation of -2.4 +/- 0.1 and -42 +/- 4 per thousand, respectively, which is in the range of previous studies with pure cultures (Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1) as well as mixed consortia. In contrast, epsilonC of the beta/-proteobacterium L108 (-0.48 +/- 0.05 per thousand) and Rhodococcus ruber IFP 2001 (-0.28 +/- 0.06 per thousand) was much lower and hydrogen isotope fractionation was negligible (epsilonH < or = -0.2 per thousand). The varying isotope fractionation pattern indicates that MTBE is degraded by different mechanisms by the strains R8 and PM1 compared to L108 and IFP 2001. The carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation of ETBE by L108 (epsilonC = -0.68 +/- 0.06 per thousand and epsilonH = -14 +/- 2 per thousand) and IFP 2001 (epsilonC = -0.8 +/- 0.1 per thousand and epsilonH = -11 +/- 4 per thousand) was very similar and seemed slightly higher than the fractionation observed upon MTBE degradation by the same strains. The low carbon and hydrogen enrichment factors observed during MTBE and ETBE degradation by L108 and IFP 2001 suggest a hydrolysis-like reaction type of the ether bond cleavage compared to oxidation of the alkyl group as suggested for the strains PM1 and R8. The variability of carbon and hydrogen enrichment factors should be taken into account when interpreting isotope pattern of fuel oxygenates with respect to biodegradation in contamination plumes.

  3. Impact of oxidative stress defense on bacterial survival and morphological change in Campylobacter jejuni under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Oh, Euna; McMullen, Lynn; Jeon, Byeonghwa

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni, a microaerophilic foodborne pathogen, inescapably faces high oxygen tension during its transmission to humans. Thus, the ability of C. jejuni to survive under oxygen-rich conditions may significantly impact C. jejuni viability in food and food safety as well. In this study, we investigated the impact of oxidative stress resistance on the survival of C. jejuni under aerobic conditions by examining three mutants defective in key antioxidant genes, including ahpC, katA, and sodB. All the three mutants exhibited growth reduction under aerobic conditions compared to the wild-type (WT), and the ahpC mutant showed the most significant growth defect. The CFU reduction in the mutants was recovered to the WT level by complementation. Higher levels of reactive oxygen species were accumulated in C. jejuni under aerobic conditions than microaerobic conditions, and supplementation of culture media with an antioxidant recovered the growth of C. jejuni. The levels of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation were significantly increased in the mutants compared to WT. Additionally, the mutants exhibited different morphological changes under aerobic conditions. The ahpC and katA mutants developed coccoid morphology by aeration, whereas the sodB mutant established elongated cellular morphology. Compared to microaerobic conditions, interestingly, aerobic culture conditions substantially induced the formation of coccoidal cells, and antioxidant treatment reduced the emergence of coccoid forms under aerobic conditions. The ATP concentrations and PMA-qPCR analysis supported that oxidative stress is a factor that induces the development of a viable-but-non-culturable state in C. jejuni. The findings in this study clearly demonstrated that oxidative stress resistance plays an important role in the survival and morphological changes of C. jejuni under aerobic conditions. PMID:25914692

  4. Variations of both bacterial community and extracellular polymers: the inducements of increase of cell hydrophobicity from biofloc to aerobic granule sludge.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Zhang, Sheng-Hua; Yu, Xin; Wei, Bo

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the inducements of increase of cell hydrophobicity from aerobic biofloc (ABF) and granular sludge (AGS), in this study, as the first time the hydrophilic and hydrophobic bacterial communities were analyzed independently. Meanwhile, the effect of extracellular polymers (EPS) on the cell hydrophobicity is also studied. Few Bacteroidetes were detected (1.35% in ABF and 3.84% in AGS) in hydrophilic bacteria, whereas they are abundant in the hydrophobic cells (47.8% and 43% for ABF and AGS, respectively). The main species of Bacteroidetes changed from class Sphingobacteria to Flavobacteria in AGS. On the other hand, EPS is directly responsible to cell hydrophobicity. For AGS, cell hydrophobicity was sharply decreased after EPS extraction. Both quantity and property of the extracellular protein are related to hydrophobicity. Our results showed the variation of cell hydrophobicity was resulted from variations of both bacterial population and EPS. PMID:21482465

  5. Bacterial Selection during the Formation of Early-Stage Aerobic Granules in Wastewater Treatment Systems Operated Under Wash-Out Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Weissbrodt, David G.; Lochmatter, Samuel; Ebrahimi, Sirous; Rossi, Pierre; Maillard, Julien; Holliger, Christof

    2012-01-01

    Aerobic granular sludge is attractive for high-rate biological wastewater treatment. Biomass wash-out conditions stimulate the formation of aerobic granules. Deteriorated performances in biomass settling and nutrient removal during start-up have however often been reported. The effect of wash-out dynamics was investigated on bacterial selection, biomass settling behavior, and metabolic activities during the formation of early-stage granules from activated sludge of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) over start-up periods of maximum 60 days. Five bubble-column sequencing batch reactors were operated with feast-famine regimes consisting of rapid pulse or slow anaerobic feeding followed by aerobic starvation. Slow-settling fluffy granules were formed when an insufficient superficial air velocity (SAV; 1.8 cm s−1) was applied, when the inoculation sludge was taken from a WWTP removing organic matter only, or when reactors were operated at 30°C. Fast-settling dense granules were obtained with 4.0 cm s−1 SAV, or when the inoculation sludge was taken from a WWTP removing all nutrients biologically. However, only carbon was aerobically removed during start-up. Fluffy granules and dense granules were displaying distinct predominant phylotypes, namely filamentous Burkholderiales affiliates and Zoogloea relatives, respectively. The latter were predominant in dense granules independently from the feeding regime. A combination of insufficient solid retention time and of leakage of acetate into the aeration phase during intensive biomass wash-out was the cause for the proliferation of Zoogloea spp. in dense granules, and for the deterioration of BNR performances. It is however not certain that Zoogloea-like organisms are essential in granule formation. Optimal operation conditions should be elucidated for maintaining a balance between organisms with granulation propensity and nutrient removing organisms in order to form granules with BNR activities in short

  6. Bacterial Selection during the Formation of Early-Stage Aerobic Granules in Wastewater Treatment Systems Operated Under Wash-Out Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Weissbrodt, David G; Lochmatter, Samuel; Ebrahimi, Sirous; Rossi, Pierre; Maillard, Julien; Holliger, Christof

    2012-01-01

    Aerobic granular sludge is attractive for high-rate biological wastewater treatment. Biomass wash-out conditions stimulate the formation of aerobic granules. Deteriorated performances in biomass settling and nutrient removal during start-up have however often been reported. The effect of wash-out dynamics was investigated on bacterial selection, biomass settling behavior, and metabolic activities during the formation of early-stage granules from activated sludge of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) over start-up periods of maximum 60 days. Five bubble-column sequencing batch reactors were operated with feast-famine regimes consisting of rapid pulse or slow anaerobic feeding followed by aerobic starvation. Slow-settling fluffy granules were formed when an insufficient superficial air velocity (SAV; 1.8 cm s(-1)) was applied, when the inoculation sludge was taken from a WWTP removing organic matter only, or when reactors were operated at 30°C. Fast-settling dense granules were obtained with 4.0 cm s(-1) SAV, or when the inoculation sludge was taken from a WWTP removing all nutrients biologically. However, only carbon was aerobically removed during start-up. Fluffy granules and dense granules were displaying distinct predominant phylotypes, namely filamentous Burkholderiales affiliates and Zoogloea relatives, respectively. The latter were predominant in dense granules independently from the feeding regime. A combination of insufficient solid retention time and of leakage of acetate into the aeration phase during intensive biomass wash-out was the cause for the proliferation of Zoogloea spp. in dense granules, and for the deterioration of BNR performances. It is however not certain that Zoogloea-like organisms are essential in granule formation. Optimal operation conditions should be elucidated for maintaining a balance between organisms with granulation propensity and nutrient removing organisms in order to form granules with BNR activities in short

  7. A small scale study on the effects of oral administration of the β-glucan produced by Aureobasidium pullulans on milk quality and cytokine expressions of Holstein cows, and on bacterial flora in the intestines of Japanese black calves

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The β–(1 → 3),(1 → 6)-D-glucan extracellularly produced by Aureobasidium pullulans exhibits immunomodulatory activity, and is used for health supplements. To examine the effects of oral administration of the β–(1 → 3),(1 → 6)-D-glucan to domestic animals, a small scale study was conducted using Holstein cows and newborn Japanese Black calves. Findings Holstein cows of which somatic cell count was less than 3 x 105/ml were orally administered with or without the β-(1 → 3),(1 → 6)-D-glucan-enriched A. pullulans cultured fluid (AP-CF) for 3 months, and the properties of milk and serum cytokine expression were monitored. Somatic cell counts were not significantly changed by oral administration of AP-CF, whereas the concentration of solid non fat in the milk tended to increase in the AP-CF administered cows. The results of cytokine expression analysis in the serum using ELISA indicate that the expressions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-6 in all cows which were orally administered with AP-CF became slightly lower than that of control cows after the two-month treatment. On the other hand, IL-8 expression tended to indicate a moderately higher level in all treated cows after the three-month administration of AP-CF in comparison with that of the control cows. Peripartum Japanese Black beef cows and their newborn calves were orally administered with AP-CF, and bacterial flora in the intestines of the calves were analyzed by T-RFLP (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism). The results suggest that bacterial flora are tendentiously changed by oral administration of AP-CF. Conclusions Our data indicated the possibility that oral administration of the β–(1 → 3),(1 → 6)-D- glucan produced by A. pullulans affects cytokine expressions in the serum of Holstein cows, and influences bacterial flora in the intestines of Japanese Black calves. The findings may be helpful for

  8. Effect of TiO2 nanoparticles on aerobic granulation of algal-bacterial symbiosis system and nutrients removal from synthetic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Huang, Wenli; Zhang, Chao; Feng, Sisi; Zhang, Zhenya; Lei, Zhongfang; Sugiura, Norio

    2015-01-01

    The influence of TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) (10-50mg/L) on aerobic granulation of algal-bacterial symbiosis system was investigated by using two identical sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). Although little adverse effect was observed on their nitritation efficiency (98-100% in both reactors), algal-bacterial granules in the control SBR (Rc) gradually lost stability mainly brought about by algae growth. TiO2-NPs addition to RT was found to enhance the granulation process achieving stable and compact algal-bacterial granules with remarkably improved nitratation thus little nitrite accumulation in RT when influent TiO2-NPs⩾30mg/L. Despite almost similar organics and phosphorus removals obtained in both reactors, the stably high nitratation efficiency in addition to much stable granular structure in RT suggests that TiO2-NPs addition might be a promising remedy for the long-term operation of algal-bacterial granular system, most probably attributable to the stimulated excretion of extracellular polymeric substances and less filamentous TM7.

  9. Water quality parameters and total aerobic bacterial and vibrionaceae loads in eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) from oyster gardening sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oyster gardening is a practice designed to restore habitat for marine life and to improve water quality. This study determined physical and chemical water quality parameters at two oyster gardening sites in the Delaware Inland Bays and compared them with total aerobic bacteria and Vibrionaceae conc...

  10. Study of the effect of the midgut bacterial flora of Culex quinquefasciatus on the susceptibility of mosquitoes to Japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Mourya, D T; Gokhale, M D; Pidiyar, V; Barde, P V; Patole, M; Mishra, A C; Shouche, Y

    2002-01-01

    Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes were collected from the field and microbial flora was isolated from their midgut. Isolates belonging to 13 different genera were obtained. Four most abundant isolates viz. Pseudomonas sp., Acinetobacterjunii, Staphylococcus epidermis and Aeromonas culicicola were used to study their effect on the susceptibility of mosquitoes to Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). Incorporation of individual isolates in the mosquito bloodmeal resulted in an increased susceptibility of mosquitoes to the virus. However, only the effects of Pseudomonas sp. and Acinetobacterjunii could be statistically evaluated but they were found insignificant. PMID:12693864

  11. Biodegradability of Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate/Bacterial Cellulose Composites under Aerobic Conditions, Measured via Evolution of Carbon Dioxide and Spectroscopic and Diffraction Methods.

    PubMed

    Ruka, Dianne R; Sangwan, Parveen; Garvey, Christopher J; Simon, George P; Dean, Katherine M

    2015-08-18

    Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) and bacterial cellulose (BC) are both natural polymeric materials that have the potential to replace traditional, nonrenewable polymers. In particular, the nanofibrillar form of bacterial cellulose makes it an effective reinforcement for PHB. Neat PHB, bacterial cellulose, and a composite of PHB/BC produced with 10 wt % cellulose were composted under accelerated aerobic test conditions, with biodegradability measured by the carbon dioxide evolution method, in conjunction with spectroscopic and diffraction methods to assess crystallinity changes during the biodegradation process. The PHB/BC composite biodegraded at a greater rate and extent than that of PHB alone, reaching 80% degradation after 30 days, whereas PHB did not reach this level of degradation until close to 50 days of composting. The relative crystallinity of PHB and PHB in the PHB/BC composite was found to increase in the initial weeks of degradation, with degradation occurring primarily in the amorphous region of the material and some recrystallization of the amorphous PHB. Small angle X-ray scattering indicates that the change in PHB crystallinity is accompanied by a change in morphology of semicrystalline lamellae. The increased rate of biodegradability suggests that these materials could be applicable to single-use applications and could rapidly biodegrade in compost on disposal.

  12. The effect of anaerobic-aerobic and feast-famine cultivation pattern on bacterial diversity during poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production from domestic sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changli; Liu, Di; Qi, Yingjie; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Xi; Zhao, Min

    2016-07-01

    The main objective of this work was to investigate the influence of different oxygen supply patterns on poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) yield and bacterial community diversity. The anaerobic-aerobic (A/O) sequencing batch reactors (SBR1) and feast-famine (F/F) SBR2 were used to cultivate activated sludge to produce PHB. The mixed microbial communities were collected and analyzed after 3 months cultivation. The PHB maximum yield was 64 wt% in SBR1 and 53 wt% in SBR2. Pyrosequencing analysis 16S rRNA gene of two microbial communities indicated there were nine and four bacterial phyla in SBR1 and SBR2, respectively. Specifically, Proteobacteria (36.4 % of the total bacterial community), Actinobacteria (19.7 %), Acidobacteria (14.1 %), Firmicutes (4.4 %), Bacteroidetes (1.7 %), Cyanobacteria/Chloroplast (1.5 %), TM7 (0.8 %), Gemmatimonadetes (0.2 %), and Nitrospirae (0.1 %) were present in SBR1. Proteobacteria (94.2 %), Bacteroidetes (2.9 %), Firmicutes (1.9 %), and Actinobacteria (0.7 %) were present in SBR2. Our results indicated the SBR1 fermentation system was more stable than that of SBR2 for PHB accumulation. PMID:26996908

  13. Culture-Independent Analysis of Bacterial Fuel Contamination Provides Insight into the Level of Concordance with the Standard Industry Practice of Aerobic Cultivation ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    White, Judith; Gilbert, Jack; Hill, Graham; Hill, Edward; Huse, Susan M.; Weightman, Andrew J.; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial diversity in contaminated fuels has not been systematically investigated using cultivation-independent methods. The fuel industry relies on phenotypic cultivation-based contaminant identification, which may lack accuracy and neglect difficult-to-culture taxa. By the use of industry practice aerobic cultivation, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and strain genotyping, a collection of 152 unique contaminant isolates from 54 fuel samples was assembled, and a dominance of Pseudomonas (21%), Burkholderia (7%), and Bacillus (7%) was demonstrated. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 15 samples revealed Proteobacteria and Firmicutes to be the most abundant phyla. When 16S rRNA V6 gene pyrosequencing of four selected fuel samples (indicated by “JW”) was performed, Betaproteobacteria (42.8%) and Gammaproteobacteria (30.6%) formed the largest proportion of reads; the most abundant genera were Marinobacter (15.4%; JW57), Achromobacter (41.6%; JW63), Burkholderia (80.7%; JW76), and Halomonas (66.2%; JW78), all of which were also observed by DGGE. However, the Clostridia (38.5%) and Deltaproteobacteria (11.1%) identified by pyrosequencing in sample JW57 were not observed by DGGE or aerobic culture. Genotyping revealed three instances where identical strains were found: (i) a Pseudomonas sp. strain recovered from 2 different diesel fuel tanks at a single industrial site; (ii) a Mangroveibacter sp. strain isolated from 3 biodiesel tanks at a single refinery site; and (iii) a Burkholderia vietnamiensis strain present in two unrelated automotive diesel samples. Overall, aerobic cultivation of fuel contaminants recovered isolates broadly representative of the phyla and classes present but lacked accuracy by overrepresenting members of certain groups such as Pseudomonas. PMID:21602386

  14. Evaluation of wastewater treatment in a novel anoxic-aerobic algal-bacterial photobioreactor with biomass recycling through carbon and nitrogen mass balances.

    PubMed

    Alcántara, Cynthia; Domínguez, Jesús M; García, Dimas; Blanco, Saúl; Pérez, Rebeca; García-Encina, Pedro A; Muñoz, Raúl

    2015-09-01

    Algal-bacterial symbiosis, implemented in an innovative anoxic-aerobic photobioreactor configuration with biomass recycling, supported an efficient removal of total organic carbon (86-90%), inorganic carbon (57-98%) and total nitrogen (68-79%) during synthetic wastewater treatment at a hydraulic and sludge retention times of 2 days and 20 days, respectively. The availability of inorganic carbon in the photobioreactor, determined by its supply in the wastewater and microalgae activity, governed the extent of nitrogen removal by assimilation or nitrification-denitrification. Unexpectedly, nitrate production was negligible despite the high dissolved oxygen concentrations, denitrification being only based on nitrite reduction. Biomass recycling resulted in the enrichment of rapidly settling algal flocs, which supported effluent total suspended solid concentrations below the European Union maximum discharge limits. Finally, the maximum nitrous oxide emissions recorded were far below the emission factors reported for wastewater treatment plants, confirming the environmental sustainability of this innovative photobioreactor in terms of global warming impact.

  15. Studies on perioperative skin flora.

    PubMed

    Newsom, S W; Rowland, C

    1988-04-01

    Chlorhexidine in spirit is used to reduce the skin bacterial load before surgery; and recently prewashing with chlorhexidine scrub has been advocated. We describe three studies on cardio-thoracic surgical patients--particularly those having coronary artery grafts with long leg and sternal wounds. Two studies compared prewashes with chlorhexidine scrub (Hibiscrub-ICI) or soap. Study Number One (250 patients per group) was of wound infections; and Number Two (25 patients per group) was of alterations in skin flora for 10 days postoperation. Chlorhexidine scrub failed to reduce overall wound infection rates in Study 1, although leg wounds healed more quickly with less inflammation. Study Two showed that the scrub had a significant effect on skin flora that lasted at least 3 days postoperation. Study Number Three was of 100 patients (no chlorhexidine scrub) examined for methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRSE) by cultures of swabs from the leg, sternum and chest drain site before and after operation on methicillin agar. Three per cent of patients had MRSE preoperation (1 doctor) and 23% postoperation. One thousand strains were tested by agar dilution against methicillin and chlorhexidine. MRSE had a 2-8-fold increased resistance to chlorhexidine compared to a greater than 256-fold to methicillin. Thus although chlorhexidine has a marked persistent effect on skin flora, emergence of major resistance is unlikely. Use of postoperative chlorhexidine should be investigated further.

  16. Fate of Escherichia coli O26 in Corn Silage Experimentally Contaminated at Ensiling, at Silo Opening, or after Aerobic Exposure, and Protective Effect of Various Bacterial Inoculants▿

    PubMed Central

    Dunière, Lysiane; Gleizal, Audrey; Chaucheyras-Durand, Frédérique; Chevallier, Isabelle; Thévenot-Sergentet, Delphine

    2011-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains are responsible for human illness. Ruminants are recognized as a major reservoir of STEC, and animal feeds, such as silages, have been pointed out as a possible vehicle for the spread of STEC. The present study aimed to monitor the fate of pathogenic E. coli O26 strains in corn material experimentally inoculated (105 CFU/g) during ensiling, just after silo opening, and after several days of aerobic exposure. The addition of 3 bacterial inoculants, Propionibacterium sp., Lactobacillus buchneri, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides (106 CFU/g), was evaluated for their abilities to control these pathogens. The results showed that E. coli O26 could not survive in corn silage 5 days postensiling, and the 3 inoculants tested did not modify the fate of pathogen survival during ensiling. In the case of direct contamination at silo opening, E. coli O26 could be totally eradicated from corn silage previously inoculated with Leuconostoc mesenteroides. The combination of proper ensiling techniques and the utilization of selected bacterial inoculants appears to represent a good strategy to guarantee nutritional qualities of cattle feed while at the same time limiting the entry of pathogenic E. coli into the epidemiological cycle to improve the microbial safety of the food chain. PMID:21984243

  17. Isolation of high-salinity-tolerant bacterial strains, Enterobacter sp., Serratia sp., Yersinia sp., for nitrification and aerobic denitrification under cyanogenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Mpongwana, N; Ntwampe, S K O; Mekuto, L; Akinpelu, E A; Dyantyi, S; Mpentshu, Y

    2016-01-01

    Cyanides (CN(-)) and soluble salts could potentially inhibit biological processes in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), such as nitrification and denitrification. Cyanide in wastewater can alter metabolic functions of microbial populations in WWTPs, thus significantly inhibiting nitrifier and denitrifier metabolic processes, rendering the water treatment processes ineffective. In this study, bacterial isolates that are tolerant to high salinity conditions, which are capable of nitrification and aerobic denitrification under cyanogenic conditions, were isolated from a poultry slaughterhouse effluent. Three of the bacterial isolates were found to be able to oxidise NH(4)-N in the presence of 65.91 mg/L of free cyanide (CN(-)) under saline conditions, i.e. 4.5% (w/v) NaCl. The isolates I, H and G, were identified as Enterobacter sp., Yersinia sp. and Serratia sp., respectively. Results showed that 81% (I), 71% (G) and 75% (H) of 400 mg/L NH(4)-N was biodegraded (nitrification) within 72 h, with the rates of biodegradation being suitably described by first order reactions, with rate constants being: 4.19 h(-1) (I), 4.21 h(-1) (H) and 3.79 h(-1) (G), respectively, with correlation coefficients ranging between 0.82 and 0.89. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rates were 38% (I), 42% (H) and 48% (G), over a period of 168 h with COD reduction being highest at near neutral pH. PMID:27148718

  18. The host and the flora.

    PubMed

    Nuding, S; Antoni, L; Stange, E F

    2013-01-01

    To prevent bacterial overgrowth, colonization of the epithelium and subsequent translocation, the gastrointestinal tract maintains an effective mucosal barrier. Besides mucus the most important components of this protective system are epithelial antimicrobial peptides such as defensins, the cathelicidin LL-37, lysozyme, phospholipase A, and proteins with additional antimicrobial properties such as ubiquicidin, ribosomal proteins or histones. Commensal species may tolerate intestinal antimicrobial peptides, for example Bacteroides ssp. or Parabacteroides ssp. as major species in the human colon were highly resistant to the constitutive defensin HBD-1 and only susceptible to the inducible defensin HBD-3. Reduction of disulfide bonds is an important mechanism activating HBD-1. As several studies show, alterations in the expression of antimicrobial peptides directly influence the composition of the intestinal flora. Correspondingly, an increased production of defensins or inhibition of the processing of mouse defensins to their active form led to a quantitative shift of luminal and mucosal bacterial species. On the other hand, microorganisms also modulate the synthesis of host defensins by induction or inhibition of specific peptides. Lactobacilli, the probiotic strain Escherichia coli Nissle and Salmonella enteritica stimulate HBD-2 expression, whereas Shigella flexneri downregulates the synthesis of HBD-1, HBD-3 and LL-37. Thus, the proper balance between the luminal flora and the mucosa is a permanently dynamic, sensitive and host-specific relationship. PMID:24246976

  19. Comprehensive Proteomic and Metabolomic Signatures of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-Induced Acute Otitis Media Reveal Bacterial Aerobic Respiration in an Immunosuppressed Environment.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Alistair; Dubois, Laura G; St John-Williams, Lisa; Moseley, M Arthur; Hardison, Rachael L; Heimlich, Derek R; Stoddard, Alexander; Kerschner, Joseph E; Justice, Sheryl S; Thompson, J Will; Mason, Kevin M

    2016-03-01

    A thorough understanding of the molecular details of the interactions between bacteria and host are critical to ultimately prevent disease. Recent technological advances allow simultaneous analysis of host and bacterial protein and metabolic profiles from a single small tissue sample to provide insight into pathogenesis. We used the chinchilla model of human otitis media to determine, for the first time, the most expansive delineation of global changes in protein and metabolite profiles during an experimentally induced disease. After 48 h of infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, middle ear tissue lysates were analyzed by high-resolution quantitative two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Dynamic changes in 105 chinchilla proteins and 66 metabolites define the early proteomic and metabolomic signature of otitis media. Our studies indicate that establishment of disease coincides with actin morphogenesis, suppression of inflammatory mediators, and bacterial aerobic respiration. We validated the observed increase in the actin-remodeling complex, Arp2/3, and experimentally showed a role for Arp2/3 in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae invasion. Direct inhibition of actin branch morphology altered bacterial invasion into host epithelial cells, and is supportive of our efforts to use the information gathered to modify outcomes of disease. The twenty-eight nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae proteins identified participate in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, redox homeostasis, and include cell wall-associated metabolic proteins. Quantitative characterization of the molecular signatures of infection will redefine our understanding of host response driven developmental changes during pathogenesis. These data represent the first comprehensive study of host protein and metabolite profiles in vivo in response to infection and show the feasibility of extensive characterization of host protein profiles during disease. Identification of

  20. Comprehensive Proteomic and Metabolomic Signatures of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-Induced Acute Otitis Media Reveal Bacterial Aerobic Respiration in an Immunosuppressed Environment.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Alistair; Dubois, Laura G; St John-Williams, Lisa; Moseley, M Arthur; Hardison, Rachael L; Heimlich, Derek R; Stoddard, Alexander; Kerschner, Joseph E; Justice, Sheryl S; Thompson, J Will; Mason, Kevin M

    2016-03-01

    A thorough understanding of the molecular details of the interactions between bacteria and host are critical to ultimately prevent disease. Recent technological advances allow simultaneous analysis of host and bacterial protein and metabolic profiles from a single small tissue sample to provide insight into pathogenesis. We used the chinchilla model of human otitis media to determine, for the first time, the most expansive delineation of global changes in protein and metabolite profiles during an experimentally induced disease. After 48 h of infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, middle ear tissue lysates were analyzed by high-resolution quantitative two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Dynamic changes in 105 chinchilla proteins and 66 metabolites define the early proteomic and metabolomic signature of otitis media. Our studies indicate that establishment of disease coincides with actin morphogenesis, suppression of inflammatory mediators, and bacterial aerobic respiration. We validated the observed increase in the actin-remodeling complex, Arp2/3, and experimentally showed a role for Arp2/3 in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae invasion. Direct inhibition of actin branch morphology altered bacterial invasion into host epithelial cells, and is supportive of our efforts to use the information gathered to modify outcomes of disease. The twenty-eight nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae proteins identified participate in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, redox homeostasis, and include cell wall-associated metabolic proteins. Quantitative characterization of the molecular signatures of infection will redefine our understanding of host response driven developmental changes during pathogenesis. These data represent the first comprehensive study of host protein and metabolite profiles in vivo in response to infection and show the feasibility of extensive characterization of host protein profiles during disease. Identification of

  1. [Identification of a high ammonia nitrogen tolerant and heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterial strain TN-14 and its nitrogen removal capabilities].

    PubMed

    Xin, Xin; Yao, Li; Lu, Lei; Leng, Lu; Zhou, Ying-Qin; Guo, Jun-Yuan

    2014-10-01

    A new strain of high ammonia nitrogen tolerant and heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterium TN-14 was isolated from the environment. Its physiological and biochemical characteristics and molecular identification, performences of heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic, the abilities of resistance to ammonia nitrogen as well as the decontamination abilities were studied, respectively. It was preliminary identified as Acinetobacter sp. according to its physiological and biochemical characteristics and molecular identification results. In heterotrophic nitrification system, the ammonia nitrogen and total nitrogen removal rate of the bacterial strain TN-14 could reach 97.13% and 93.53% within 24 h. In nitrates denitrification system, the nitrate concentration could decline from 94.24 mg · L(-1) to 39.32 mg · L(-1) within 24 h, where the removal rate was 58.28% and the denitrification rate was 2.28 mg · (L · h)(-1); In nitrite denitrification systems, the initial concentration of nitrite could be declined from 97.78 mg · L(-1) to 21.30 mg x L(-1), with a nitrite nitrogen removal rate of 78.22%, and a denitrification rate of 2.55 mg · (L· h)(-1). Meanwhile, strain TN-14 had the capability of flocculant production, and the flocculating rate could reach 94.74% when its fermentation liquid was used to treat 0.4% kaolin suspension. Strain TN-14 could grow at an ammonia nitrogen concentration as high as 1200 mg · L(-1). In the aspect of actual piggery wastewater treatment by strain TN-14, the removal rate of COD, ammonia nitrogen, TN and TP cloud reached 85.30%, 65.72%, 64.86% and 79.41%, respectively. Strain TN-14 has a good application prospect in biological treatment of real high- ammonia wastewater. PMID:25693403

  2. [Identification of a high ammonia nitrogen tolerant and heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterial strain TN-14 and its nitrogen removal capabilities].

    PubMed

    Xin, Xin; Yao, Li; Lu, Lei; Leng, Lu; Zhou, Ying-Qin; Guo, Jun-Yuan

    2014-10-01

    A new strain of high ammonia nitrogen tolerant and heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterium TN-14 was isolated from the environment. Its physiological and biochemical characteristics and molecular identification, performences of heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic, the abilities of resistance to ammonia nitrogen as well as the decontamination abilities were studied, respectively. It was preliminary identified as Acinetobacter sp. according to its physiological and biochemical characteristics and molecular identification results. In heterotrophic nitrification system, the ammonia nitrogen and total nitrogen removal rate of the bacterial strain TN-14 could reach 97.13% and 93.53% within 24 h. In nitrates denitrification system, the nitrate concentration could decline from 94.24 mg · L(-1) to 39.32 mg · L(-1) within 24 h, where the removal rate was 58.28% and the denitrification rate was 2.28 mg · (L · h)(-1); In nitrite denitrification systems, the initial concentration of nitrite could be declined from 97.78 mg · L(-1) to 21.30 mg x L(-1), with a nitrite nitrogen removal rate of 78.22%, and a denitrification rate of 2.55 mg · (L· h)(-1). Meanwhile, strain TN-14 had the capability of flocculant production, and the flocculating rate could reach 94.74% when its fermentation liquid was used to treat 0.4% kaolin suspension. Strain TN-14 could grow at an ammonia nitrogen concentration as high as 1200 mg · L(-1). In the aspect of actual piggery wastewater treatment by strain TN-14, the removal rate of COD, ammonia nitrogen, TN and TP cloud reached 85.30%, 65.72%, 64.86% and 79.41%, respectively. Strain TN-14 has a good application prospect in biological treatment of real high- ammonia wastewater.

  3. Microbial flora and some chemical properties of ersho, a starter for teff (Eragrostis tef) fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ashenafi, M

    1994-01-01

    Ersho is a clear, yellow liquid that accumulates on the surface of fermenting teff-flour batter and is collected to serve as an inoculum for the next fermentation. The pH of ersho samples was about 3.5 and titratable acidity ranged between 3.1% and 5.7%. The mean aerobic mesophilic counts from four households varied between 6.9×10(6) and 1.3×10(8) c.f.u./ml and the aerobic bacterial flora consisted of Bacillus spp. Mean yeast counts ranged between 5.2×10(5) and 1.8×10(6) c.f.u./ml and comprised, in order of abundance, Candida milleri, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Pichia naganishii and Debaromyces hansenii. Candida milleri was the most dominant isolate in all samples. About 90% of the teff flour samples had aerobic mesophilic counts ≥10(5) c.f.u./g and Gram-positive bacteria constituted about 71% of the total isolates. About 80% of samples had Enterobacteriaceae counts of 10(4) c.f.u./g.

  4. Bacterial structure of aerobic granules is determined by aeration mode and nitrogen load in the reactor cycle.

    PubMed

    Cydzik-Kwiatkowska, Agnieszka

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated how the microbial composition of biomass and kinetics of nitrogen conversions in aerobic granular reactors treating high-ammonium supernatant depended on nitrogen load and the number of anoxic phases in the cycle. Excellent ammonium removal and predomination of full nitrification was observed in the reactors operated at 1.1 kg TKN m(-3) d(-1) and with anoxic phases in the cycle. In all reactors, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria predominated, comprising between 90.14% and 98.59% of OTUs. Extracellular polymeric substances-producing bacteria, such as Rhodocyclales, Xanthomonadaceae, Sphingomonadales and Rhizobiales, were identified in biomass from all reactors, though in different proportions. Under constant aeration, bacteria capable of autotrophic nitrification were found in granules, whereas under variable aeration heterotrophic nitrifiers such as Pseudomonas sp. and Paracoccus sp. were identified. Constant aeration promoted more even bacteria distribution among taxa; with 1 anoxic phase, Paracoccus aminophilus predominated (62.73% of OTUs); with 2 phases, Corynebacterium sp. predominated (65.10% of OTUs).

  5. [Bacterial flora of the oral cavity, fangs and venom of Bothrops jararaca: possible source of infection at the site of bite].

    PubMed

    Jorge, M T; de Mendonça, J S; Ribeiro, L A; da Silva, M L; Kusano, E J; Cordeiro, C L

    1990-01-01

    Culture of fang, fang sheath and venom of fifteen healthy freshly captured Bothrops jararaca were analyzed. The bacteria most frequently encountered were group D streptococci (12 snakes), Enterobacter sp. (6), Providencia rettgeri (6), Providencia sp. (4), Escherichia coli (4), Morganella morganii (3) and Clostridium sp. (5). The bacteria observed are similar to those found in the abscesses from Bothrops bitten patients. Since these snake mouth bacteria may be inoculated during the snake bite, bacterial multiplication and infection may occur under favorable conditions. PMID:2259834

  6. Predictive value of the composition of the vaginal microbiota in bacterial vaginosis, a dynamic study to identify recurrence-related flora.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bingbing; Niu, Xiaoxi; Han, Na; Wang, Ben; Du, Pengcheng; Na, Risu; Chen, Chen; Liao, Qinping

    2016-06-02

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a highly prevalent disease in women, and increases the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease. It has been given wide attention because of the high recurrence rate. Traditional diagnostic methods based on microscope providing limited information on the vaginal microbiota increase the difficulty in tracing the development of the disease in bacteria resistance condition. In this study, we used deep-sequencing technology to observe dynamic variation of the vaginal microbiota at three major time points during treatment, at D0 (before treatment), D7 (stop using the antibiotics) and D30 (the 30-day follow-up visit). Sixty-five patients with BV were enrolled (48 were cured and 17 were not cured), and their bacterial composition of the vaginal microbiota was compared. Interestingly, we identified 9 patients might be recurrence. We also introduced a new measurement point of D7, although its microbiota were significantly inhabited by antibiotic and hard to be observed by traditional method. The vaginal microbiota in deep-sequencing-view present a strong correlation to the final outcome. Thus, coupled with detailed individual bioinformatics analysis and deep-sequencing technology, we may illustrate a more accurate map of vaginal microbial to BV patients, which provide a new opportunity to reduce the rate of recurrence of BV.

  7. Predictive value of the composition of the vaginal microbiota in bacterial vaginosis, a dynamic study to identify recurrence-related flora

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bingbing; Niu, Xiaoxi; Han, Na; Wang, Ben; Du, Pengcheng; Na, Risu; Chen, Chen; Liao, Qinping

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a highly prevalent disease in women, and increases the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease. It has been given wide attention because of the high recurrence rate. Traditional diagnostic methods based on microscope providing limited information on the vaginal microbiota increase the difficulty in tracing the development of the disease in bacteria resistance condition. In this study, we used deep-sequencing technology to observe dynamic variation of the vaginal microbiota at three major time points during treatment, at D0 (before treatment), D7 (stop using the antibiotics) and D30 (the 30-day follow-up visit). Sixty-five patients with BV were enrolled (48 were cured and 17 were not cured), and their bacterial composition of the vaginal microbiota was compared. Interestingly, we identified 9 patients might be recurrence. We also introduced a new measurement point of D7, although its microbiota were significantly inhabited by antibiotic and hard to be observed by traditional method. The vaginal microbiota in deep-sequencing-view present a strong correlation to the final outcome. Thus, coupled with detailed individual bioinformatics analysis and deep-sequencing technology, we may illustrate a more accurate map of vaginal microbial to BV patients, which provide a new opportunity to reduce the rate of recurrence of BV. PMID:27253522

  8. Analysis of antibiotic susceptibility and resistance of leg ulcer bacterial flora in patients hospitalized at Dermatology Department, Poznań University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Zmudzińska, Maria; Czarnecka-Operacz, Magdalena; Silny, Wojciech

    2005-01-01

    Effective treatment of frequently infected, poorly healing wounds such as leg ulcers due to chronic venous insufficiency poses a major clinical problem. Antibiotic resistance in dermatology patients, especially those with non-healing leg ulcers, is a widespread phenomenon. Various antibiotics, mainly broad-spectrum agents, are frequently and sometimes inappropriately prescribed, which often leads to the selection of antibiotic-resistant bacteria strains. The aim of this study was to analyze antibiotic susceptibility and resistance of bacterial isolates cultured from leg ulcers. Wound swabs were obtained from patients admitted to Dermatology Department, Poznań University of Medical Sciences, during the 1998-2002 period. Bacteriologic diagnosis of 175 wound swabs was performed in compliance with compulsory laboratory methods. The analysis yielded 173 positive results, predominated by Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, Proteus mirabilis and Escherichia coli. Bacterial isolates were evaluated for resistance to commonly used antibiotics, taking into consideration the presence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains. Antibiotic resistance profiles were compared between the years 1998 and 2002, with detailed account of clinical characteristics and history of leg ulcers disease. The study pointed to an increasing tendency of antibiotic resistance in the study group of patients. PMID:16146620

  9. Predictive value of the composition of the vaginal microbiota in bacterial vaginosis, a dynamic study to identify recurrence-related flora.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bingbing; Niu, Xiaoxi; Han, Na; Wang, Ben; Du, Pengcheng; Na, Risu; Chen, Chen; Liao, Qinping

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a highly prevalent disease in women, and increases the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease. It has been given wide attention because of the high recurrence rate. Traditional diagnostic methods based on microscope providing limited information on the vaginal microbiota increase the difficulty in tracing the development of the disease in bacteria resistance condition. In this study, we used deep-sequencing technology to observe dynamic variation of the vaginal microbiota at three major time points during treatment, at D0 (before treatment), D7 (stop using the antibiotics) and D30 (the 30-day follow-up visit). Sixty-five patients with BV were enrolled (48 were cured and 17 were not cured), and their bacterial composition of the vaginal microbiota was compared. Interestingly, we identified 9 patients might be recurrence. We also introduced a new measurement point of D7, although its microbiota were significantly inhabited by antibiotic and hard to be observed by traditional method. The vaginal microbiota in deep-sequencing-view present a strong correlation to the final outcome. Thus, coupled with detailed individual bioinformatics analysis and deep-sequencing technology, we may illustrate a more accurate map of vaginal microbial to BV patients, which provide a new opportunity to reduce the rate of recurrence of BV. PMID:27253522

  10. Identification and Quantification of Volatile Chemical Spoilage Indexes Associated with Bacterial Growth Dynamics in Aerobically Stored Chicken.

    PubMed

    Mikš-Krajnik, Marta; Yoon, Yong-Jin; Ukuku, Dike O; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2016-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as chemical spoilage indexes (CSIs) of raw chicken breast stored aerobically at 4, 10, and 21 °C were identified and quantified using solid phase microextraction (SPME) combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The growth dynamics of total viable count (TVC), psychrotrophs, Pseudomonas spp., lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Brochothrix thermosphacta and H2 S producing bacteria were characterized based on maximum growth rates (μmax ), maximal microbial concentration (Nmax ) and at the moment of microbial shelf life (Svalues ), calculated from Gompertz-fitted growth curves. Pseudomonas spp. was predominant species, while B. thermosphacta was characterized by the highest μmax . The microbiological and sensory shelf lives were estimated based on TVC, Pseudomonas spp., and B. thermosphacta counts and sensory evaluation, respectively. Among 27 VOCs identified by GC-MS in spoiled chicken samples, ethanol (EtOH), 1-butanol-3-methyl (1But-3M), and acetic acid (C2 ) achieved the highest Pearson's correlation coefficients of 0.66, 0.61, and 0.59, respectively, with TVC, regardless of storage temperature. Partial least squares (PLS) regression revealed that the synthesis of 1But-3M and C2 was most likely induced by the metabolic activity of B. thermosphacta and LAB, while EtOH was attributed to Pseudomonas spp. The increase in concentration of selected volatile spoilage markers (EtOH, 1But-3M, and C2 ) in the headspace over spoiled chicken breast was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05) with TVC growth. These findings highlight the possibility of analyzing the combination of 3 selected spoilage markers: EtOH, 1But-3M, and C2 as rapid evaluation for poultry quality testing using SPME-GC-MS.

  11. Identification and Quantification of Volatile Chemical Spoilage Indexes Associated with Bacterial Growth Dynamics in Aerobically Stored Chicken.

    PubMed

    Mikš-Krajnik, Marta; Yoon, Yong-Jin; Ukuku, Dike O; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2016-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as chemical spoilage indexes (CSIs) of raw chicken breast stored aerobically at 4, 10, and 21 °C were identified and quantified using solid phase microextraction (SPME) combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The growth dynamics of total viable count (TVC), psychrotrophs, Pseudomonas spp., lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Brochothrix thermosphacta and H2 S producing bacteria were characterized based on maximum growth rates (μmax ), maximal microbial concentration (Nmax ) and at the moment of microbial shelf life (Svalues ), calculated from Gompertz-fitted growth curves. Pseudomonas spp. was predominant species, while B. thermosphacta was characterized by the highest μmax . The microbiological and sensory shelf lives were estimated based on TVC, Pseudomonas spp., and B. thermosphacta counts and sensory evaluation, respectively. Among 27 VOCs identified by GC-MS in spoiled chicken samples, ethanol (EtOH), 1-butanol-3-methyl (1But-3M), and acetic acid (C2 ) achieved the highest Pearson's correlation coefficients of 0.66, 0.61, and 0.59, respectively, with TVC, regardless of storage temperature. Partial least squares (PLS) regression revealed that the synthesis of 1But-3M and C2 was most likely induced by the metabolic activity of B. thermosphacta and LAB, while EtOH was attributed to Pseudomonas spp. The increase in concentration of selected volatile spoilage markers (EtOH, 1But-3M, and C2 ) in the headspace over spoiled chicken breast was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05) with TVC growth. These findings highlight the possibility of analyzing the combination of 3 selected spoilage markers: EtOH, 1But-3M, and C2 as rapid evaluation for poultry quality testing using SPME-GC-MS. PMID:27332555

  12. Risk factors for wound infection in health care facilities in Buea, Cameroon: aerobic bacterial pathogens and antibiogram of isolates

    PubMed Central

    Kihla, Akoachere Jane-Francis Tatah; Ngunde, Palle John; Evelyn, Mbianda Soupsop; Gerard, Nkwelang; Ndip, Roland Ndip

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Wound infection is a significant clinical challenge in hospitals in developing countries where proper healthcare delivery is hampered by limited resources. This study investigated the antibiotic susceptibility pattern of bacteria causing wound infection and risk factors for infection among hospitalized patients in Buea, Cameroon, to generate findings which could drive reformation of policies on infection control. Methods Aerobic bacteria were isolated from 212 swabs collected from patients with clinically diagnosed infected wounds. Risk factors for wound infection were investigated. Antibiotic susceptibility of isolates was determined by disk diffusion technique. The Chi-square test was employed to determine significant differences in isolation and distribution of organisms in various specimens. Differences were considered significant at P < 0.05. Results Twelve bacteria species were isolated from 169 (79.7%) specimens. Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae, the predominant isolates in all wound types exhibited a high preponderance of multidrug resistant strains. High rate of infection was attributed to lack of constant water supply and breakdown of sterilization equipment during the study period. Highest diversity of pathogens occurred in open wounds. There were no significant differences (P>0.05) in isolation of pathogens with respect to age, gender and wound type. Co-existing morbidity increased risk of wound infection. Isolates were susceptible to fluoroquinolones and resistant to oxacillin. Conclusion Wound infection with resistant bacteria constitutes a significant cause of morbidity in the study area. Findings reiterate the need to strengthen infection control and drug dispensing policies, and greater collaboration between microbiologists and medical practioners to stem the spread of resistant bacteria. PMID:25360190

  13. [Significance of deficient bacterial colonization in the pathogenesis of mucosal lesions in experimental blind loop syndrome].

    PubMed

    Menge, H; Germer, C T; Stössel, R; Simes, G; Wagner, J; Hahn, H; Riecken, E O

    1985-07-20

    A complete evaluation of the bacterial flora in jejunal self-filling blind loops was performed. The results show a significant increase in bacteria of the genera E. coli, Streptococcus and Bacteroides. In further experiments, jejunal self-filling blind loops were created in germ-free animals. In spite of the germ-free state the mucosa displayed marked hyperplasia. The same was true when the blind loops had been contaminated with aerobic bacteria. These results demonstrate that other factors in addition to bacterial overgrowth contribute to the mucosal damage observed in self-filling blind loops.

  14. Developmental intestinal aerobic microflora in the kori bustard (Ardeotis kori).

    PubMed

    Naldo, J L; Silvanose, C D; Samour, J H; Bailey, T A

    1998-01-01

    A study was carried out to investigate the normal aerobic bacterial flora of developing kori bustard (Ardeotis kori) chicks, captive bred at the National Avian Research Center, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Faecal samples were collected from 14 birds at different ages from the first day of hatching until 99 days old and were cultured for aerobic bacteria. Several bacterial species were isolated from the cultures, they included Escherichia coli, Streptococcus viridians, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella oxytoca, Proteus spp., Enterobacter, spp. and Serratia marcescens. Gram-negative bacilli were isolated from all but one of the faecal samples collected. They were also the predominant bacteria, accounting for between 55.6 and 73.4% of the mean colony count of faecal cultures from all age groups. E. coli was the most frequently isolated bacteria, the frequency and mean colony count increased as the birds grew older. Gram-positive cocci were isolated from between 50 and 100% of the faecal samples from all age groups, and they accounted for between 26.6 and 44.4% of the mean colony count. Results from this study indicated that Gram-negative bacilli and Gram-positive cocci can be isolated frequently from the faeces of developing, clinically normal, captive bred kori bustard chicks. PMID:18484014

  15. Developmental intestinal aerobic microflora in the kori bustard (Ardeotis kori).

    PubMed

    Naldo, J L; Silvanose, C D; Samour, J H; Bailey, T A

    1998-01-01

    A study was carried out to investigate the normal aerobic bacterial flora of developing kori bustard (Ardeotis kori) chicks, captive bred at the National Avian Research Center, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Faecal samples were collected from 14 birds at different ages from the first day of hatching until 99 days old and were cultured for aerobic bacteria. Several bacterial species were isolated from the cultures, they included Escherichia coli, Streptococcus viridians, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella oxytoca, Proteus spp., Enterobacter, spp. and Serratia marcescens. Gram-negative bacilli were isolated from all but one of the faecal samples collected. They were also the predominant bacteria, accounting for between 55.6 and 73.4% of the mean colony count of faecal cultures from all age groups. E. coli was the most frequently isolated bacteria, the frequency and mean colony count increased as the birds grew older. Gram-positive cocci were isolated from between 50 and 100% of the faecal samples from all age groups, and they accounted for between 26.6 and 44.4% of the mean colony count. Results from this study indicated that Gram-negative bacilli and Gram-positive cocci can be isolated frequently from the faeces of developing, clinically normal, captive bred kori bustard chicks.

  16. Upper respiratory tract and aural flora of saturation divers.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, D M; Davis, P

    1978-01-01

    The conditions of helium saturation diving promote the proliferation of Gram-negative bacterial species in the external auditory meatus of divers. These changes in flora occurred in the absence of operational diving, that is, no contact with water. The colonising bacteria were autogenous in origin and cross-colonisation was observed between divers. On return to normal atmospheric conditions the aural flora became predominantly Gram-positive again within 48 hours. PMID:690235

  17. Evaluation of the mandibular third molar pericoronitis flora and its susceptibility to different antibiotics prescribed in france.

    PubMed

    Sixou, Jean-Louis; Magaud, Christophe; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Cormier, Michel; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine

    2003-12-01

    This work assessed the polymicrobial flora of mandibular third molar pericoronitis. Obligate anaerobes were found in almost all cases (32 of 35). Amoxicillin and pristinamycin were the most effective against the flora, particularly aerobic organisms. Metronidazole alone or combined with spiramycin was the most effective drug against obligate anaerobes.

  18. Long-term exposure of bacterial and protozoan communities to TiO2 nanoparticles in an aerobic-sequencing batch reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supha, Chitpisud; Boonto, Yuphada; Jindakaraked, Manee; Ananpattarachai, Jirapat; Kajitvichyanukul, Puangrat

    2015-06-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanopowders at different concentrations (0-50 mg L-1) were injected into an aerobic-sequencing batch reactor (SBR) to investigate the effects of long-term exposure to nanoparticles on bacterial and protozoan communities. The detection of nanoparticles in the bioflocs was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The SBR wastewater experiments were conducted under the influence of ultraviolet light with photocatalytic TiO2. The intrusion of TiO2 nanoparticles was found both on the surface and inside of the bioflocs. The change of microbial population in terms of mixed liquor-suspended solids and the sludge volume index was monitored. The TiO2 nanoparticles tentatively exerted an adverse effect on the microbial population, causing the reduction of microorganisms (both bacteria and protozoa) in the SBR. The respiration inhibition rate of the bacteria was increased, and the viability of the microbial population was reduced at the high concentration (50 mg L-1) of TiO2. The decreasing number of protozoa in the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles during 20 days of treatment with 0.5 and 1.0 mg L-1 TiO2 is clearly demonstrated. The measured chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the effluent tends to increase with a long-term operation. The increase of COD in the system suggests a decrease in the efficiency of the wastewater treatment plant. However, the SBR can effectively remove the TiO2 nanoparticles (up to 50 mg L-1) from the effluent.

  19. [Effectiveness of 9 soaps and/or antiseptics on hand flora after surgical-type washing].

    PubMed

    Reverdy, M E; Martra, A; Fleurette, J

    1984-06-01

    We studied the effect of nine soaps and/or antiseptics on the bacterial flora of hands 5 minutes after a surgical scrub. Each agent was used by ten healthy volunteers, free of skin lesions. The following agents were used: chlorhexidine gluconate 4% and 1.5%, povidone iodine 4%, ethanol 70 degrees, isopropanol 70 degrees, a non-antiseptic soap, and another soap followed by either ethanol 70 degrees, isopropanol 70 degrees or a preparation containing H2O2. The surgical scrub procedure varied slightly according to whether or not the agent was soapy and required rinsing. Sampling was carried out using Gaschen's bag method with 400 ml of neutralising solution. Counts were made after 48 hours aerobic incubation at 35 degrees C on tryptic soy agar with 1% Tween 80, and after 8 days anaerobic incubation at 35 degrees C on Brewer's yeast agar with 1% Tween 80. Results were expressed as the log 10 to the number of bacteria per hand. Statistical significance was determined using the Student t test. The greatest reduction in aerobic flora was produced by isopropanol 70 degrees C (1.7 log 10). 1.5 to 0.5 log 10 reductions were produced, in the following decreasing order, by ethanol 70 degrees, povidone iodine, chlorhexidine gluconate 4% and 1.5% and a soap with ethanol 70 degrees. A reduction of less than 0.5 log 10 was produced by a soap with isopropanol 70 degrees, and soaps with H2O2. Similar results were obtained with the facultative anaerobes.

  20. Composition and properties of the actinomycete flora in a ferralitic tropical soil (oxisol)-sugar cane ecological system.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, C; Szabó, I M

    1978-01-01

    Streptomycetes constituted about 46--48 per cent of the total aerobic microflora in the cultivated horizon of the studied ferralitic tropical soil below sugar cane plantation. This streptomycete fraction of the soil microbial community was composed of 13 (or more) species of Streptomyces (S. chromofuscus, S. chromogenus, S. diastatochromogenes, S. flavochromogenes, S. griseolus, S. nigrescens, S. phaeofaciens, S. sterilis, S. violaceus, Streptomyces sp. I--III), and Streptoverticillium (Sv. aspergilloides). None of these organisms did occur, with detectable frequency of occurrence, in the root surface region of sugar cane. Here, in the rhizoplane, we found a numerically small population of streptomycetes (about 5 per cent of the total bacterial flora), composed of two species (Streptomyces sp. IV and S. griseorubiginosus) which were, however, not detected in soil samples. PMID:664932

  1. Influence of the Natural Microbial Flora on the Acid Tolerance Response of Listeria monocytogenes in a Model System of Fresh Meat Decontamination Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Samelis, John; Sofos, John N.; Kendall, Patricia A.; Smith, Gary C.

    2001-01-01

    Depending on its composition and metabolic activity, the natural flora that may be established in a meat plant environment can affect the survival, growth, and acid tolerance response (ATR) of bacterial pathogens present in the same niche. To investigate this hypothesis, changes in populations and ATR of inoculated (105 CFU/ml) Listeria monocytogenes were evaluated at 35°C in water (10 or 85°C) or acidic (2% lactic or acetic acid) washings of beef with or without prior filter sterilization. The model experiments were performed at 35°C rather than lower (≤15°C) temperatures to maximize the response of inoculated L. monocytogenes in the washings with or without competitive flora. Acid solution washings were free (<1.0 log CFU/ml) of natural flora before inoculation (day 0), and no microbial growth occurred during storage (35°C, 8 days). Inoculated L. monocytogenes died off (negative enrichment) in acid washings within 24 h. In nonacid (water) washings, the pathogen increased (approximately 1.0 to 2.0 log CFU/ml), irrespective of natural flora, which, when present, predominated (>8.0 log CFU/ml) by day 1. The pH of inoculated water washings decreased or increased depending on absence or presence of natural flora, respectively. These microbial and pH changes modulated the ATR of L. monocytogenes at 35°C. In filter-sterilized water washings, inoculated L. monocytogenes increased its ATR by at least 1.0 log CFU/ml from days 1 to 8, while in unfiltered water washings the pathogen was acid tolerant at day 1 (0.3 to 1.4 log CFU/ml reduction) and became acid sensitive (3.0 to >5.0 log CFU/ml reduction) at day 8. These results suggest that the predominant gram-negative flora of an aerobic fresh meat plant environment may sensitize bacterial pathogens to acid. PMID:11375145

  2. Balance of flora, galt, and mucosal integrity.

    PubMed

    Hanaway, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    It is clear that there is a dynamic relationship involving the gastrointestinal flora, environmental inputs (food and other nutrients), and the health of the immune system. Recent research has taught us a great deal about the role of diet and commensal bacteria in promoting health. It appears that Nobel Laureate Eli Metchnikov may have been correct in his assertion that live bacterial cultures are "the elixir of life". We are unlocking a number of secrets about immune system functioning, but we keep coming back to a simple intervention that has an ever-expanding opus of research to support it, and an extremely low toxicity ratio. Future studies will help us to clarify the best strains and the best dosages for individual patients and specific conditions. Assessment of commensal flora and a genomic scan for markers of immunologic dysregulation will be more accurate and more widely available. It appears, however, that the diagnostic and therapeutic tools we have to work with today can make a tremendous difference in reducing the burden of suffering for our patients. If "form follows function," as Buckminster Fuller was fond of saying, then the form of our immune system may be following the precise functions that our commensal flora is dictating. We have the opportunity to encourage breastfeeding, decrease unnecessary antibiotic and antimicrobial usage (especially in the first two years of life), improve oral tolerance with a healthy n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio, and support the development of a healthy commensal flora. These actions on behalf of our immune systems will pay dividends for years to come.

  3. Independent behavior of commensal flora for carriage of fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria in patients at admission.

    PubMed

    de Lastours, Victoire; Chau, Françoise; Tubach, Florence; Pasquet, Blandine; Ruppé, Etienne; Fantin, Bruno

    2010-12-01

    The important role of commensal flora as a natural reservoir of bacterial resistance is now well established. However, whether the behavior of each commensal flora is similar to that of other floras in terms of rates of carriage and risk factors for bacterial resistance is unknown. During a 6-month period, we prospectively investigated colonization with fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria in the three main commensal floras from hospitalized patients at admission, targeting Escherichia coli in the fecal flora, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CNS) in the nasal flora, and α-hemolytic streptococci in the pharyngeal flora. Resistant strains were detected on quinolone-containing selective agar. Clinical and epidemiological data were collected. A total of 555 patients were included. Carriage rates of resistance were 8.0% in E. coli, 30.3% in CNS for ciprofloxacin, and 27.2% in streptococci for levofloxacin; 56% of the patients carried resistance in at least one flora but only 0.9% simultaneously in all floras, which is no more than random. Risk factors associated with the carriage of fluoroquinolone-resistant strains differed between fecal E. coli (i.e., colonization by multidrug-resistant bacteria) and nasal CNS (i.e., age, coming from a health care facility, and previous antibiotic treatment with a fluoroquinolone) while no risk factors were identified for pharyngeal streptococci. Despite high rates of colonization with fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria, each commensal flora behaved independently since simultaneous carriage of resistance in the three distinct floras was uncommon, and risk factors differed. Consequences of environmental selective pressures vary in each commensal flora according to its local specificities (clinical trial NCT00520715 [http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00520715]).

  4. Bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, C A

    1991-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common of the vaginitides affecting women of reproductive age. It appears to be due to an alteration in the vaginal ecology by which Lactobacillus spp., the predominant organisms in the healthy vagina, are replaced by a mixed flora including Prevotella bivia, Prevotella disiens, Porphyromonas spp., Mobiluncus spp., and Peptostreptococcus spp. All of these organisms except Mobiluncus spp. are also members of the endogenous vaginal flora. While evidence from treatment trials does not support the notion that BV is sexually transmitted, recent studies have shown an increased risk associated with multiple sexual partners. It has also been suggested that the pathogenesis of BV may be similar to that of urinary tract infections, with the rectum serving as a reservoir for some BV-associated flora. The organisms associated with BV have also been recognized as agents of female upper genital tract infection, including pelvic inflammatory disease, and the syndrome BV has been associated with adverse outcome of pregnancy, including premature rupture of membranes, chorioamnionitis, and fetal loss; postpartum endometritis; cuff cellulitis; and urinary tract infections. The mechanisms by which the BV-associated flora causes the signs of BV are not well understood, but a role for H2O2-producing Lactobacillus spp. in protecting against colonization by catalase-negative anaerobic bacteria has been recognized. These and other aspects of BV are reviewed. PMID:1747864

  5. Conjunctival Flora in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Mehmet; Balcı, Mehmet; Bayhan, Hasan Ali; İnkaya, Ahmet Çağkan; Uyar, Mehmet; Gürdal, Canan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the conjunctival bacterial flora in diabetic patients and nondiabetic subjects. Materials and Methods: Fifty-three diabetic patients and 43 nondiabetic healthy individuals were included in the study. A specimen was taken from each participant for the study by rubbing a sterile cotton-tipped swab on the inferior palpebral conjunctiva of the right eye. Samples were incubated in blood agar, chocolate agar, eosin methylene-blue lactose sucrose agar and sabouraud 4% dextrose agar. Isolated microorganisms were identified using routine microbiological methods. Results: Rates for bacterial isolations were determined as 38.5% in diabetic patients and 34.9% in nondiabetic controls. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in 30% of cases in the diabetic patient group, while 20% tested positive for Escherichia coli, 10% for coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, 10% for Klebsiella pneumoniae and 30% for multiple bacteria. In the non-diabetic group, 53.3% of patients were positive for Staphylococcus aureus while coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was isolated in 26.7%, Klebsiella pneumoniae in 6.7% and multiple bacteria in 13.3% of patients. Although there was no statistically significant difference in the number of isolated bacteria between the diabetic and nondiabetic groups, gram-negative bacterial colonization was significantly higher in diabetic patients (χ2=0.129, p=0.719 and χ2=5.60, p=0.018, respectively). Conclusion: Gram-negative bacteria are more common in the conjunctival flora of diabetic patients. This should be considered by clinicians when treating ocular infections in diabetic patients. PMID:27800231

  6. Bacterial Wound Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  7. [Disorders of intestinal flora in intensive care patients].

    PubMed

    Graninger, W

    1985-09-01

    The intestinal flora under normal conditions prevents colonisation of the intestinal mucosa with pathogenic bacteria. Various diseases as well as antibiotics may disturb the host/bacteria balance. If patients are in addition immunocompromised, otherwise commensal bacteria may cause life threatening infections. Treatment of intensive care patients with antibiotics thus should account for preservation of resistance against colonization. Antibiotics active against anaerobes or poorly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, or excreted in the bile should be avoided. In patients with colitis induced by antibiotics the number of clostridium difficile with subsequent toxin production are greatly increased as a consequence of the killing of the normal anaerobic colon bacterial flora; in these patients vancomycin has to be applied. Mostly "dysbiosis" caused by antibiotics does not need any treatment. Therapeutic adjuncts like the administration of bacterial preparations e.g. lactobacilli are of no value.

  8. Gemmatimonas aurantiaca gen. nov., sp. nov., a gram-negative, aerobic, polyphosphate-accumulating micro-organism, the first cultured representative of the new bacterial phylum Gemmatimonadetes phyl. nov.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Hanada, Satoshi; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kim, Hongik; Kamagata, Yoichi; Nakamura, Kazunori

    2003-07-01

    A phylogenetically novel aerobic bacterium was isolated from an anaerobic-aerobic sequential batch reactor operated under enhanced biological phosphorus removal conditions for wastewater treatment. The isolation strategy used targeted slowly growing polyphosphate-accumulating bacteria by combining low-speed centrifugations and prolonged incubation on a low-nutrient medium. The isolate, designated strain T-27T, was a gram-negative, rod-shaped aerobe. Cells often appeared to divide by budding replication. Strain T-27T grew at 25-35 degrees C with an optimum growth temperature of 30 degrees C, whilst no growth was observed below 20 degrees C or above 37 degrees C within 20 days incubation. The pH range for growth was 6.5-9.5, with an optimum at pH 7.0. Strain T-27T was able to utilize a limited range of substrates, such as yeast extract, polypepton, succinate, acetate, gelatin and benzoate. Neisser staining was positive and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole-stained cells displayed a yellow fluorescence, indicative of polyphosphate inclusions. Menaquinone 9 was the major respiratory quinone. The cellular fatty acids of the strain were mainly composed of iso-C15:0, C16:1 and C14:0. The G + C content of the genomic DNA was 66 mol%. Comparative analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain T-27T belongs to candidate division BD (also called KS-B), a phylum-level lineage in the bacterial domain, to date comprised exclusively of environmental 16S rDNA clone sequences. Here, a new genus and species are proposed, Gemmatimonas aurantiaca (type strain T-27T=JCM 11422T=DSM 14586T) gen. nov., sp. nov., the first cultivated representative of the Gemmatimonadetes phyl. nov. Environmental sequence data indicate that this phylum is widespread in nature and has a phylogenetic breadth (19% 16S rDNA sequence divergence) that is greater than well-known phyla such as the Actinobacteria (18% divergence).

  9. Biodiversity of aerobic endospore-forming bacterial species occurring in Yanyanku and Ikpiru, fermented seeds of Hibiscus sabdariffa used to produce food condiments in Benin.

    PubMed

    Agbobatinkpo, Pélagie B; Thorsen, Line; Nielsen, Dennis S; Azokpota, Paulin; Akissoe, Noèl; Hounhouigan, Joseph D; Jakobsen, Mogens

    2013-05-15

    Yanyanku and Ikpiru made by the fermentation of Malcavene bean (Hibiscus sabdariffa) are used as functional additives for Parkia biglobosa seed fermentations in Benin. A total of 355 aerobic endospore-forming bacteria (AEFB) isolated from Yanyanku and Ikpiru produced in northern and southern Benin were identified using phenotypic and genotypic methods, including GTG5-PCR, M13-PCR, 16S rRNA, gyrA and gyrB gene sequencing. Generally, the same 5-6 species of the genus Bacillus predominated: Bacillus subtilis (17-41% of isolates), Bacillus cereus (8-39%), Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (9-22%), Bacillus licheniformis (3-26%), Bacillus safensis (8-19%) and Bacillus altitudinis (0-19%). Bacillus aryabhattai, Bacillus flexus, and Bacillus circulans (0-2%), and species of the genera Lysinibacillus (0-14%), Paenibacillus (0-13%), Brevibacillus (0-4%), and Aneurinibacillus (0-3%) occurred sporadically. The diarrheal toxin encoding genes cytK-1, cytK-2, hblA, hblC, and hblD were present in 0%, 91% 15%, 34% and 35% of B. cereus isolates, respectively. 9% of them harbored the emetic toxin genetic determinant, cesB. This study is the first to identify the AEFB of Yanyanku and Ikpiru to species level and perform a safety evaluation based on toxin gene detections. We further suggest, that the gyrA gene can be used for differentiating the closely related species Bacillus pumilus and B. safensis.

  10. Bacterial flora as indicated by PCR-temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) of 16S rDNA gene fragments from isolated guts of phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae).

    PubMed

    Guernaoui, S; Garcia, D; Gazanion, E; Ouhdouch, Y; Boumezzough, A; Pesson, B; Fontenille, D; Sereno, D

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we tested the capacity of Temperature Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (TGGE)-based fingerprinting of 16S rDNA PCR fragments to assess bacterial composition in a single isolated sand fly gut. Bacterial content was studied in different life stages of a laboratory-reared colony of Phlebotomus duboscqi and in a wild-caught Phlebotomus papatasi population. Our study demonstrates that a major reorganization in the gut bacterial community occurs during metamorphosis of sand flies. Chloroflexi spp. was dominant in the guts of pre-imaginal stages, although Microbacterium spp. and another as yet unidentified bacteria were detected in the gut of the adult specimen. Interestingly, Microbacterium spp. was also found in all the adult guts of both species. We demonstrate that the analysis of bacterial diversity in an individualized sand fly gut is possible with fingerprinting of 16S rDNA. The use of such methodology, in conjunction with other culture-based methods, will be of great help in investigating the behavior of the Leishmania-bacterial community in an ecological context.

  11. Bacterial colonization on different suture materials--a potential risk for intraoral dentoalveolar surgery.

    PubMed

    Otten, J-E; Wiedmann-Al-Ahmad, M; Jahnke, H; Pelz, K

    2005-07-01

    In this in vivo and in vitro study on resorbable (Monocryl and nonresorbable (Deknalon) monofilament sutures used in intraoral dentoalveolar surgery the bacterial colonization was compared. For the in vivo study the sutures were applied in 11 patients during dental surgery. Eight days postoperative the sutures were removed and the adhered bacteria were isolated and identified by biochemistry, morphology, antibiotic susceptibility, and gas chromatography. The colonization was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Aerobic and anaerobic bacteria were isolated in nearly equal colony-forming units (cfu) on each suture. In comparison with Monocryl about 15% more aerobic and anaerobic strains were isolated on Deknalon. Regarding the pathogens only, about three times more anaerobic strains were isolated on both sutures in total. Additionally, more pathogens were found on Deknalon than on Monocryl (aerobic >40%, anaerobic >25%). The variety of bacteria correspond with purulent infections, not with normal oral flora. Intraindividual comparisons of cfu showed differences in dependence of the patient as described for subgingivale plaques. For the in vitro study the sutures were incubated with Streptococcus intermedius and Prevotella intermedia for 0.5 h. Scanning electron microscopy was performed to examine qualitatively the level of bacterial adherence. After 0.5 h the bacteria adhered very well. The colonization rate of Streptococcus intermedius on both sutures was similar. Coccoid bacteria within biofilms were seen. The growth of Prevotella intermedia was much better on Deknalon than on Monocryl. The risk of bacteremia at the time of suture removal is discussed.

  12. Exploring the Bacterial Diversity of Belgian Steak Tartare Using Metagenetics and Quantitative Real-Time PCR Analysis.

    PubMed

    Delhalle, L; Korsak, N; Taminiau, B; Nezer, C; Burteau, S; Delcenserie, V; Poullet, J B; Daube, G

    2016-02-01

    Steak tartare is a popular meat dish in Belgium. It is prepared with raw minced beef and is eaten with sauce, vegetables, and spices. Because it contains raw meat, steak tartare is highly prone to bacterial spoilage. The objective of this study was to explore the diversity of bacterial flora in steak tartare in Belgium according to the source and to determine which bacteria are able to grow during shelf life. A total of 58 samples from butchers' shops, restaurants, sandwich shops, and supermarkets were collected. These samples were analyzed using 16S rDNA metagenetics, a classical microbiological technique, and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) targeting the Lactobacillus genus. Samples were analyzed at the beginning and at the end of their shelf life, except for those from restaurants and sandwich shops, which were analyzed only on the purchase date. Metagenetic analysis identified up to 180 bacterial species and 90 genera in some samples. But only seven bacterial species were predominant in the samples, depending on the source: Brochothrix thermosphacta, Lactobacillus algidus, Lactococcus piscium, Leuconostoc gelidum, Photobacterium kishitani, Pseudomonas spp., and Xanthomonas oryzae. With this work, an alternative method is proposed to evaluate the total flora in food samples based on the number of reads from metagenetic analysis and the results of qPCR. The degree of underestimation of aerobic plate counts at 30°C estimated with the classical microbiology method was demonstrated in comparison with the proposed culture-independent method. Compared with culture-based methods, metagenetic analysis combined with qPCR targeting Lactobacillus provides valuable information for characterizing the bacterial flora of raw meat.

  13. Exploring the Bacterial Diversity of Belgian Steak Tartare Using Metagenetics and Quantitative Real-Time PCR Analysis.

    PubMed

    Delhalle, L; Korsak, N; Taminiau, B; Nezer, C; Burteau, S; Delcenserie, V; Poullet, J B; Daube, G

    2016-02-01

    Steak tartare is a popular meat dish in Belgium. It is prepared with raw minced beef and is eaten with sauce, vegetables, and spices. Because it contains raw meat, steak tartare is highly prone to bacterial spoilage. The objective of this study was to explore the diversity of bacterial flora in steak tartare in Belgium according to the source and to determine which bacteria are able to grow during shelf life. A total of 58 samples from butchers' shops, restaurants, sandwich shops, and supermarkets were collected. These samples were analyzed using 16S rDNA metagenetics, a classical microbiological technique, and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) targeting the Lactobacillus genus. Samples were analyzed at the beginning and at the end of their shelf life, except for those from restaurants and sandwich shops, which were analyzed only on the purchase date. Metagenetic analysis identified up to 180 bacterial species and 90 genera in some samples. But only seven bacterial species were predominant in the samples, depending on the source: Brochothrix thermosphacta, Lactobacillus algidus, Lactococcus piscium, Leuconostoc gelidum, Photobacterium kishitani, Pseudomonas spp., and Xanthomonas oryzae. With this work, an alternative method is proposed to evaluate the total flora in food samples based on the number of reads from metagenetic analysis and the results of qPCR. The degree of underestimation of aerobic plate counts at 30°C estimated with the classical microbiology method was demonstrated in comparison with the proposed culture-independent method. Compared with culture-based methods, metagenetic analysis combined with qPCR targeting Lactobacillus provides valuable information for characterizing the bacterial flora of raw meat. PMID:26818982

  14. The vaginal microbiome: New information about genital tract flora using molecular based techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, Ronald F.; Sobel, Jack D.; Akins, Robert A.; Hassan, Sonia S.; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Romero, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Vaginal microbiome studies provide information which may change the way we define vaginal flora. Normal flora appears dominated by one or two species of Lactobacillus. Significant numbers of healthy women lack appreciable numbers of vaginal lactobacilli. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is not a single entity, but different bacterial communities or profiles of greater microbial diversity than is evident from cultivation-dependent studies. BV should be considered a syndrome of variable composition which results in different symptoms, phenotypical outcomes, and responses to different antibiotic regimens. This information may help to elucidate the link between BV and infection-related adverse outcomes of pregnancy. PMID:21251190

  15. [The occurrence of Escherichia coli, Aeromonas hydrophila, Plesiomonas shigelloides and Clostridium perfringens in the intestinal flora of gray herons (Ardea cinerea)].

    PubMed

    Glünder, G

    1989-05-01

    The flora of the large intestine of 92 grey herons was examined for the frequency of aerobic and microaerobic growing bacteria. Clostridium perfringens, Aeromonas hydrophila, Plesiomonas shigelloides and E. coli were isolated from 55%, 48%, 14% and 35% of the birds, respectively. It could be demonstrated that the findings of these bacteria in the intestinal flora are depending on the age of the birds. The percentage of carriers of Clostridium perfringens, Aeromonas hydrophila and Plesiomonas shigelloides was highest in nestlings younger than 18 days, less high in older nestlings and lowest in adult grey herons. Contrary to those bacteria, E. coli was found more often in the intestinal flora at increasing age of the birds. Salmonella spp. were isolated from 6 birds. Two birds yielded positive for Yersinia enterocolitica and Campylobacter spp., respectively. Other aerobic and microaerobic bacteria play a less significant role as part of the intestinal flora.

  16. Impact of the indigenous flora in animal models of shock and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wells, Carol L; Hess, Donavon J; Erlandsen, Stanley L

    2004-12-01

    Septicemia is currently the 10th leading cause of death in the United States, and shock and trauma patients are the source of much of the morbidity and mortality associated with septicemia. There is substantial evidence that the composition of the indigenous flora plays an important role in modulating outcome variables in animal models of shock and sepsis. Germ-free animals that lack an indigenous flora are not as susceptible to shock as their conventionally reared counterparts. And, in conventionally reared animals, the composition of the intestinal flora can also modulate outcome in shock and sepsis. For example, certain bacterial species/strains disseminate from the intestinal tract more easily than others, antibiotic-induced alterations of the flora can modulate the incidence of systemic spread, and a certain threshold number of intestinal bacteria facilitates extraintestinal dissemination. The composition of the intestinal flora can also affect intestinal permeability, the production of inflammatory mediators, and the responses of immune cells in extraintestinal sites. And, there is evidence that prior exposure to endotoxin, via either the oral or systemic route, can influence outcome in animals challenged with parenteral endotoxin, a widely used model of endotoxin shock. The general composition of intestinal flora of experimental animals can be characterized with relative ease. This knowledge can aid data interpretation, either to help explain irreproducible or expected results or to verify that observed differences are likely related to the dependent variable studied rather than the composition of the indigenous flora.

  17. Pattern of elemental release during the granite dissolution can be changed by aerobic heterotrophic bacterial strains isolated from Damma Glacier (central Alps) deglaciated granite sand.

    PubMed

    Lapanje, Aleš; Wimmersberger, Celine; Furrer, Gerhard; Brunner, Ivano; Frey, Beat

    2012-05-01

    Colonisation and weathering of freshly deglaciated granite are key processes in initial soil formation and development. We have obtained 438 isolates from granite sand covering glacial toe, 284 isolates at 22°C and 154 at 4°C incubation temperatures, respectively, to obtain cultures for the investigation of their weathering capabilities under laboratory conditions. The isolation of bacteria from granite sand was performed on rich-, intermediate- and low-nutrient-content solid media. Isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. According to the genera-associated weathering capabilities described in the literature and according to their abundance in our culture collection, we selected eight strains to analyse their effects on the weathering dynamics of granite sand during the batch culture experiment. Analysis of culturable bacteria showed higher species richness among isolates from 22°C than from 4°C incubations. In the R2A and 1/100 Ravan media, we observed the highest species richness of isolates obtained at 22°C and 4°C incubation temperatures, respectively. The obtained 16S rRNA sequences revealed the presence of alpha-, beta- and gamma-proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. The most numerous group of isolates was distantly related to Collimonas representatives, and according to the sequences of the 16S rRNA genes, they can form a new genus. Isolates from this group had the capability of causing increased dissolution rates for Fe, W, Ni and Rb. In general, at each sampling during the 30-day experiment, every strain showed a unique weathering profile resulting from differential rates of the dissolution and the precipitation of different minerals in the batch culture. Consequently, the presence of different strains, their growth stage and changes in proportions of strains in the bacterial community can affect further soil development and the successive colonisation by plants.

  18. Survival of Human Dental Plaque Flora in Various Transport Media

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Salam A.; Loesche, Walter J.

    1972-01-01

    Dental plaque samples from (i) subjects with no apparent oral disease, (ii) mentally retarded subjects with periodontal disease, and (iii) subjects with active caries were collected in three transport media viz. a dithiothreitol poised balanced mineral salt solution designated as reduced transport fluid (RTF), VMG II, and modified Stuart medium (SBL). The samples were dispersed by sonic treatment, diluted in the respective medium in which they were collected, and cultured on MM10 sucrose agar. The efficiency of the transport media in the survival of dental plaque flora was determined by comparing the quantitative recovery (expressed as percentage of the initial viable count) from the specimens stored for various lengths of time. The data showed a great variation in the recovery of the oral bacterial flora from the plaque samples. VMG II and SBL served better than RTF as storage media for non-disease-associated dental plaque cultured under strict anaerobic conditions. Recoveries of bacteria from periodontal plaque specimens stored in RTF were higher than SBL and VMG II under identical conditions. The organisms present in the carious plaque samples appeared to survive much better in RTF and VMG II than in SBL as determined by conventional anaerobic culturing technique. However, VMG II showed a higher recovery of organisms from these specimens with an increase in the storage period, suggesting multiplication of the plaque flora. RTF did not allow the growth of oral bacterial flora under all experimental conditions. On the basis of the relative performance of these media it is suggested that RTF is a satisfactory medium for the transport of oral bacteria present in the samples. PMID:4628799

  19. Aerobic bacterial, coliform, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus counts of raw and processed milk from selected smallholder dairy farms of Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Mhone, Tryness A; Matope, Gift; Saidi, Petronella T

    2011-12-01

    A cross sectional study was conducted to enumerate total viable bacteria (TBC), coliforms, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in raw (n=120) and processed (n=20) milk from individual farms from three smallholder dairy schemes of Zimbabwe between October, 2009 and February, 2010. Data on management factors were collected using a structured questionnaire. A standard pour plate technique was used to enumerate total viable bacteria, while for coliforms, E. coli and S. aureus, counts were assessed by the spread plate technique. The association of total viable bacterial counts and management factors was assessed using univariable and a linear regression model. The log₁₀ TBC for raw milk differed significantly (P<0.05) amongst the schemes with the lowest (5.6±4.7 log₁₀ cfu/ml) and highest (6.7±5.8 log₁₀ cfu/ml) recorded from Marirangwe and Nharira respectively. The mean log₁₀ of TBC of processed milk (6.6±6.0 log₁₀ cfu/ml) were marginally higher than those of raw milk (6.4±5.6 log₁₀ cfu/ml) but not significant (P>0.05). The coliform, E. coli and S. aureus counts for raw milk significantly differed (P<0.05) amongst the study areas. The variation in TBC, coliforms, E. coli and S. aureus counts amongst the schemes could be attributed to differences in milking hygiene where farms with more access to training and monitoring of microbiological quality of milk had lower counts. Linear regression analysis revealed dairy scheme, delivery time and season of milking as independently associated with increased TBC of raw milk. The high TBC of raw and processed milk generally indicated low levels of milking hygienic practices, and high level of post-processing contamination, respectively. The high TBC, coliform, E. coli and S. aureus counts of both raw and processed milk may present a public health hazard. Thus, educating the farmers on general hygienic practices, quickening the delivery of milk to collection centres, or availing cooling facilities

  20. Selecting anti-microbial treatment of aerobic vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Donders, Gilbert G G; Ruban, Katerina; Bellen, Gert

    2015-05-01

    Aerobic vaginitis (AV) is a vaginal infectious condition which is often confused with bacterial vaginosis (BV) or with the intermediate microflora as diagnosed by Nugent's method to detect BV on Gram-stained specimens. However, although both conditions reflect a state of lactobacillary disruption in the vagina, leading to an increase in pH, BV and AV differ profoundly. While BV is a noninflammatory condition composed of a multiplex array of different anaerobic bacteria in high quantities, AV is rather sparely populated by one or two enteric commensal flora bacteria, like Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylocuccus aureus, or Escherichia coli. AV is typically marked by either an increased inflammatory response or by prominent signs of epithelial atrophy or both. The latter condition, if severe, is also called desquamative inflammatory vaginitis. As AV is per exclusionem diagnosed by wet mount microscopy, it is a mistake to treat just vaginal culture results. Vaginal cultures only serve as follow-up data in clinical research projects and are at most used in clinical practice to confirm the diagnosis or exclude Candida infection. AV requires treatment based on microscopy findings and a combined local treatment with any of the following which may yield the best results: antibiotic (infectious component), steroids (inflammatory component), and/or estrogen (atrophy component). In cases with Candida present on microscopy or culture, antifungals must be tried first in order to see if other treatment is still needed. Vaginal rinsing with povidone iodine can provide rapid relief of symptoms but does not provide long-term reduction of bacterial loads. Local antibiotics most suitable are preferably non-absorbed and broad spectrum, especially those covering enteric gram-positive and gram-negative aerobes, like kanamycin. To achieve rapid and short-term improvement of severe symptoms, oral therapy with amoxyclav or moxifloxacin can be used, especially in deep dermal vulvitis and

  1. Flora: A Proposed Hyperspectral Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Stephen; Asner, Gregory; Green, Robert; Knox, Robert

    2006-01-01

    In early 2004, one of the authors (Stephen Ungar, NASA GSFC) presented a mission concept called "Spectrasat" at the AVIRIS Workshop in Pasadena, CA. This mission concept grew out of the lessons learned from the Earth Observing-One (EO-1) Hyperion Imaging Spectrometer and was structured to more effectively accomplish the types of studies conducted with Hyperion. The Spectrasat concept represented an evolution of the technologies and operation strategies employed on EO-I. The Spectrasat concept had been preceded by two community-based missions proposed by Susan Ustin, UC Davis and Robert Green, NASA JPL. As a result of community participation, starting at this AVIRIS Workshop, the Spectrasat proposal evolved into the Flora concept which now represents the combined visions of Gregory Asner (Carnegie Institute), Stephen Ungar, Robert Green and Robert Knox, NASA GSFC. Flora is a proposed imaging spectrometer mission, designed to address global carbon cycle science issues. This mission centers on measuring ecological disturbance for purposes of ascertaining changes in global carbon stocks and draws heavily on experience gained through AVIRIS airborne flights and Hyperion space born flights. The observing strategy exploits the improved ability of imaging spectrometers, as compared with multi-spectral observing systems, to identify vegetation functional groups, detect ecosystem response to disturbance and assess the related discovery. Flora will be placed in a sun synchronous orbit, with a 45 meter pixel size, a 90 km swath width and a 31 day repeat cycle. It covers the spectral range from 0.4 to 2.5 micrometers with a spectral sampling interval of 10 nm. These specifications meet the needs of the Flora science team under the leadership of Gregory Asner. Robert Green, has introduced a spectrometer design for Flora which is expected to have a SNR of 600: 1 in the VNIR and 450: 1 in the SWIR. The mission team at NASA GSFC is designing an Intelligent Payload Module (IPM

  2. Chthonomonas calidirosea gen. nov., sp. nov., an aerobic, pigmented, thermophilic micro-organism of a novel bacterial class, Chthonomonadetes classis nov., of the newly described phylum Armatimonadetes originally designated candidate division OP10.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin C-Y; Dunfield, Peter F; Morgan, Xochitl C; Crowe, Michelle A; Houghton, Karen M; Vyssotski, Mikhail; Ryan, Jason L J; Lagutin, Kirill; McDonald, Ian R; Stott, Matthew B

    2011-10-01

    An aerobic, saccharolytic, obligately thermophilic, motile, non-spore-forming bacterium, strain T49(T), was isolated from geothermally heated soil at Hell's Gate, Tikitere, New Zealand. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, T49(T) is the first representative of a new class in the newly described phylum Armatimonadetes, formerly known as candidate division OP10. Cells of strain T49(T) stained Gram-negative and were catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. Cells possessed a highly corrugated outer membrane. The major fatty acids were 16 : 0, i17 : 0 and ai17 : 0. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 54.6 mol%. Strain T49(T) grew at 50-73 °C with an optimum temperature of 68 °C, and at pH 4.7-5.8 with an optimum growth pH of 5.3. A growth rate of 0.012 h(-1) was observed under optimal temperature and pH conditions. The primary respiratory quinone was MK-8. Optimal growth was achieved in the absence of NaCl, although growth was observed at NaCl concentrations as high as 2 % (w/v). Strain T49(T) was able to utilize mono- and disaccharides such as cellobiose, lactose, mannose and glucose, as well as branched or amorphous polysaccharides such as starch, CM-cellulose, xylan and glycogen, but not highly linear polysaccharides such as crystalline cellulose or cotton. On the basis of its phylogenetic position and phenotypic characteristics, we propose that strain T49(T) represents a novel bacterial genus and species within the new class Chthonomonadetes classis nov. of the phylum Armatimonadetes. The type strain of Chthonomonas calidirosea gen. nov., sp. nov. is T49(T) ( = DSM 23976(T) = ICMP 18418(T)). PMID:21097641

  3. Chthonomonas calidirosea gen. nov., sp. nov., an aerobic, pigmented, thermophilic micro-organism of a novel bacterial class, Chthonomonadetes classis nov., of the newly described phylum Armatimonadetes originally designated candidate division OP10.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin C-Y; Dunfield, Peter F; Morgan, Xochitl C; Crowe, Michelle A; Houghton, Karen M; Vyssotski, Mikhail; Ryan, Jason L J; Lagutin, Kirill; McDonald, Ian R; Stott, Matthew B

    2011-10-01

    An aerobic, saccharolytic, obligately thermophilic, motile, non-spore-forming bacterium, strain T49(T), was isolated from geothermally heated soil at Hell's Gate, Tikitere, New Zealand. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, T49(T) is the first representative of a new class in the newly described phylum Armatimonadetes, formerly known as candidate division OP10. Cells of strain T49(T) stained Gram-negative and were catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. Cells possessed a highly corrugated outer membrane. The major fatty acids were 16 : 0, i17 : 0 and ai17 : 0. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 54.6 mol%. Strain T49(T) grew at 50-73 °C with an optimum temperature of 68 °C, and at pH 4.7-5.8 with an optimum growth pH of 5.3. A growth rate of 0.012 h(-1) was observed under optimal temperature and pH conditions. The primary respiratory quinone was MK-8. Optimal growth was achieved in the absence of NaCl, although growth was observed at NaCl concentrations as high as 2 % (w/v). Strain T49(T) was able to utilize mono- and disaccharides such as cellobiose, lactose, mannose and glucose, as well as branched or amorphous polysaccharides such as starch, CM-cellulose, xylan and glycogen, but not highly linear polysaccharides such as crystalline cellulose or cotton. On the basis of its phylogenetic position and phenotypic characteristics, we propose that strain T49(T) represents a novel bacterial genus and species within the new class Chthonomonadetes classis nov. of the phylum Armatimonadetes. The type strain of Chthonomonas calidirosea gen. nov., sp. nov. is T49(T) ( = DSM 23976(T) = ICMP 18418(T)).

  4. Teaching Aerobic Fitness Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Allan N.; Ratliffe, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to teach aerobic fitness concepts to elementary students. Some of the K-2 activities include location, size, and purpose of the heart and lungs; the exercise pulse; respiration rate; and activities to measure aerobic endurance. Some of the 3-6 activities include: definition of aerobic endurance; heart disease risk factors;…

  5. A study of predominant aerobic microflora of black bears (Ursus americanus) and grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in northwestern Alberta.

    PubMed

    Goatcher, L J; Barrett, M W; Coleman, R N; Hawley, A W; Qureshi, A A

    1987-11-01

    Swab specimens were obtained from nasal, rectal, and preputial or vaginal areas of 37 grizzly and 17 black bears, captured during May to June of 1981 to 1983, to determine the types and frequency of predominant aerobic microflora. Bacterial genera most frequently isolated from bears were Escherichia, Citrobacter, Hafnia, Proteus, Staphylococcus, and Streptococcus species, comprising about 65% of the isolates. Erwinia, Xanthomonas, Agrobacterium, Rhizobium, and Gluconobacter/Acetobacter were also isolated but at lower frequencies (less than 5%). Comparison of bacterial generic composition using similarity quotient values showed no appreciable differences between grizzly and black bear flora. Also, no outstanding differences in bacterial generic composition were observed among grizzly bear samples; however, differences were noted among black bear samples. Fungal genera most commonly encountered included Cryptococcus, Rhodotorula, Cladosporium, Penicillium, Sporobolomyces, and Candida. In general, the microflora of both bear types were marked by generic diversity and random distribution. The majority of microorganisms isolated from the plant samples in the study area were also found in bear samples. This observation and the presence of certain water and soil bacteria in samples from bears suggest that the predominant microflora of both grizzly and black bears were transient and probably influenced by their foraging habits and surrounding environments.

  6. Nonabsorbable Antibiotics Reduce Bacterial and Endotoxin Translocation in Hepatectomised Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kakkos, S. K.; Kirkilesis, J.; Scopa, C. D.; Arvaniti, A.; Alexandrides, T.

    1997-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that septic complications, occurring after major hepatectomies, may be caused by gram negative bacteria, translocating from the gut. We investigated in rats, the effect of extended hepatectomy on the structure and morphology of the intestinal mucosa as well as on the translocation of intestinal bacteria and endotoxins. We also examined the effect of nonabsorbable antibiotics on reducing the intestinal flora and consequently the phenomenon of translocation by administering neomycin sulphate and cefazoline. Hepatectomy was found to increase translocation, while administration of nonabsorbable antibiotics decreased it significantly. In addition, hepatectomy increased the aerobic cecal bacterial population, which normalised in the group receiving antibiotics. Among the histological parameters evaluated, villus height demonstrated a significant reduction after hepatectomy, while the number of villi per cm and the number of mitoses per crypt, remained unchanged. Our results indicate that administration of nonabsorbable antibiotics presents a positive effect on bacterial and endotoxin translocation after extended hepatectomy, and this may be related to reduction of colonic bacterial load as an intraluminal effect of antibiotics. PMID:9298382

  7. Anaerobic and aerobic bacteriology of the saliva and gingiva from 16 captive Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis): new implications for the "bacteria as venom" model.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Citron, Diane M; Cox, Cathleen R; Recchio, Ian M; Okimoto, Ben; Bryja, Judith; Fry, Bryan G

    2013-06-01

    It has been speculated that the oral flora of the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) exerts a lethal effect on its prey; yet, scant information about their specific oral flora bacteriology, especially anaerobes, exists. Consequently, the aerobic and anaerobic oral bacteriology of 16 captive Komodo dragons (10 adults and six neonates), aged 2-17 yr for adults and 7-10 days for neonates, from three U.S. zoos were studied. Saliva and gingival samples were collected by zoo personnel, inoculated into anaerobic transport media, and delivered by courier to a reference laboratory. Samples were cultured for aerobes and anaerobes. Strains were identified by standard methods and 16S rRNA gene sequencing when required. The oral flora consisted of 39 aerobic and 21 anaerobic species, with some variation by zoo. Adult dragons grew 128 isolates, including 37 aerobic gram-negative rods (one to eight per specimen), especially Enterobacteriaceae; 50 aerobic gram-positive bacteria (two to nine per specimen), especially Staphylococcus sciuri and Enterococcusfaecalis, present in eight of 10 and nine of 10 dragons, respectively; and 41 anaerobes (one to six per specimen), especially clostridia. All hatchlings grew aerobes but none grew anaerobes. No virulent species were isolated. As with other carnivores, captive Komodo oral flora is simply reflective of the gut and skin flora of their recent meals and environment and is unlikely to cause rapid fatal infection.

  8. Anaerobic and aerobic bacteriology of the saliva and gingiva from 16 captive Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis): new implications for the "bacteria as venom" model.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Citron, Diane M; Cox, Cathleen R; Recchio, Ian M; Okimoto, Ben; Bryja, Judith; Fry, Bryan G

    2013-06-01

    It has been speculated that the oral flora of the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) exerts a lethal effect on its prey; yet, scant information about their specific oral flora bacteriology, especially anaerobes, exists. Consequently, the aerobic and anaerobic oral bacteriology of 16 captive Komodo dragons (10 adults and six neonates), aged 2-17 yr for adults and 7-10 days for neonates, from three U.S. zoos were studied. Saliva and gingival samples were collected by zoo personnel, inoculated into anaerobic transport media, and delivered by courier to a reference laboratory. Samples were cultured for aerobes and anaerobes. Strains were identified by standard methods and 16S rRNA gene sequencing when required. The oral flora consisted of 39 aerobic and 21 anaerobic species, with some variation by zoo. Adult dragons grew 128 isolates, including 37 aerobic gram-negative rods (one to eight per specimen), especially Enterobacteriaceae; 50 aerobic gram-positive bacteria (two to nine per specimen), especially Staphylococcus sciuri and Enterococcusfaecalis, present in eight of 10 and nine of 10 dragons, respectively; and 41 anaerobes (one to six per specimen), especially clostridia. All hatchlings grew aerobes but none grew anaerobes. No virulent species were isolated. As with other carnivores, captive Komodo oral flora is simply reflective of the gut and skin flora of their recent meals and environment and is unlikely to cause rapid fatal infection. PMID:23805543

  9. Evaluation of nasal and oropharyngeal flora in patients with acne vulgaris according to treatment options.

    PubMed

    Ozuguz, Pınar; Callioglu, Elif E; Tulaci, Kamil G; Kacar, Seval D; Balta, Ilknur; Asik, Gulsah; Karatas, Serap; Karaca, Semsettin

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in nasal and oropharyngeal flora in patients with acne during treatments with tetracycline and isotretinoin. Swab specimens were taken from the right and left nasal cavities and oropharynx of 55 patients with acne and 20 healthy volunteers who were admitted to the dermatology department (Etlik Educational and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey) before the administration of treatment and in the third month of treatment. Study participants were divided into four groups as follows: patients with acne on topical treatment only, systemic isotretinoin, and systemic tetracycline, and the control group. Of 55 patients with acne, 18 were male and 37 were female. The mean age of the patients and the control group was 22.21 ± 4.22 and 21.95 ± 7.64, respectively. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from the nasal flora of five patients, normal flora was suppressed in the oropharyngeal cultures of seven patients, and normal flora grew in the cultures of the other 20 patients who were on tetracycline treatment. On the other hand, normal flora grew in the nasal and oropharyngeal cultures of all the patients who were on isotretinoin treatment. Treatment options and follow-up procedures for acne vulgaris may lead to the development of bacterial resistance and damage to flora. In particular, systemic tetracycline treatment leads to changes in flora of the nose and throat in patients with acne with an increased carriage of S. aureus. Therefore, careful attention should be paid to the duration of tetracycline treatment in order to not increase the risk of disturbance of microbial flora.

  10. Detection of bacterial spoilage in some fruit flavoured ultra-high temperature milks in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Acheampong, Y B

    1986-01-01

    Statistical analyses of pH measurements and microbiological methods have been employed to monitor microbial activity (spoilage) in a brand of non-refrigerated mango and vanilla flavoured ultra-high temperature (UHT) milk drinks in Nigeria. The mango flavoured milks were more sensitive to changes in storage conditions than was the vanilla flavoured milks. The aerobic bacterial flora in the spoiled flavoured milks was dominated by Gram-positive cocci, both catalase-positive and catalase-negative types. Coliforms and pseudomonads were also detected. The importance of this study to the methods for detecting spoilage in quality control and to the storage conditions of such products in the tropics is discussed.

  11. Basic vaginal pH, bacterial vaginosis and aerobic vaginitis: prevalence in early pregnancy and risk of spontaneous preterm delivery, a prospective study in a low socioeconomic and multiethnic South American population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV) increases the risk of spontaneous preterm deliveries (PD) in developed countries. Its prevalence varies with ethnicity, socioeconomic conditions and gestational age. Aerobic vaginitis (AV) has also been implicated with spontaneous PD. The present study aimed to estimate the prevalence of asymptomatic BV, the accuracy of vaginal pH level to predict BV and to estimate the risk of spontaneous PD <34 and <37 weeks’ gestation of BV and AV. Methods Women attending prenatal public services in Rio de Janeiro were screened to select asymptomatic pregnant women, < 20 weeks’ gestation, with no indication for elective PD and without risk factors of spontaneous PD. Vaginal smears of women with vaginal pH > = 4.5 were collected to determine the Nugent score; a sample of those smears was also classified according to a modified Donders’ score. Primary outcomes were spontaneous PD < 34 and <37 weeks’ gestation and abortion. Results Prevalence of asymptomatic BV was estimated in 28.1% (n = 1699); 42.4% of the smears were collected before 14 weeks’ gestation. After an 8-week follow up, nearly 40% of the initially BV positive women became BV negative. The prevalence of BV among white and black women was 28.1% (95% CI: 24.6%-32.0%) and 32.5% (95% CI: 28.2%-37.2%), respectively. The sensitivity of vaginal pH= > 4.5 and = > 5.0 to predict BV status was 100% and 82%, correspondingly; the 5.0 cutoff value doubled the specificity, from 41% to 84%. The incidence of < 37 weeks’ spontaneous PDs among BV pregnant women with a pH= > 4.5 was 3.8%. The RR of spontaneous PD < 34 and <37 weeks among BV women with pH > =4.5, as compared with those with intermediate state, were 1.24 and 1.86, respectively (Fisher’s exact test, p value = 1; 0.52, respectively, both ns). No spontaneous case of PD or abortion was associated with severe or moderate AV. Conclusions A high prevalence of asymptomatic BV was

  12. Copper intoxication inhibits aerobic nucleotide synthesis in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Michael D. L.; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E.; Rosch, Jason W.

    2015-01-01

    Copper is universally toxic in excess, a feature exploited by the human immune system to facilitate bacterial clearance. The mechanism of copper intoxication remains unknown for many bacterial species. Here, we demonstrate that copper toxicity in Streptococcus pneumoniae is independent from oxidative stress but, rather, is the result of copper inhibiting the aerobic dNTP biosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, we show that copper-intoxicated S. pneumoniae is rescued by manganese, which is an essential metal in the aerobic nucleotide synthesis pathway. These data provide insight into new targets to enhance copper-mediated toxicity during bacterial clearance. PMID:25730343

  13. [Effects of allelopathic rice on rhizosphere microbial flora and enzyme activity].

    PubMed

    Hu, Kaihui; Luo, Qingguo; Wang, Shihua; Lin, Xuan; Lin, Wenxiong

    2006-06-01

    This paper studied the dynamics of microbial flora and enzyme activity in the rhizosphere of allelopathic rice PI312777 (PI) and non-allelopathic rice Lemont (LE) at the growth stage of 3 - 7 leaves. The results showed that in the rhizosphere of PI, the amounts of bacteria, actinomycetes and azotobacter were 11.2% - 28.3%, 40% - 78.6% and 111.5% - 173.9%, respectively, while that of fungi was lower, with the maximum being 25.5% of that in the rhizosphere of LE, suggesting that allelopathic rice PI promoted the growth of bacteria, actinomycetes and azotobacter, but inhibited that of fungi. Further analysis on the physiological groups of microbial flora showed that PI favored the growth of ammonifier, aerobic azotobacter, aerobic cellulose - decomposer, sulphate - reducer, nitrite - bacteria and nitrate - bacteria, among which, ammonifier and aerobic azotobacter increased by 53.7% and 57.6%, respectively, while inhibited the growth of desulphate bacteria and denitrifyier. Moreover, PI increased the activities of urease, phosphatase and sucrase, but decreased the catalase activity in its rhizosphere.

  14. Effect of a prolonged stay in a locked environment on the microbial flora in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balish, E.; Shih, C.-N.; Yale, C. E.; Mandel, A. D.

    1974-01-01

    Ten purebred Beagle dogs (all males) were used to determine the effect of a prolonged stay in a locked environment (i.e., no exogenous microbial contamination) on the microbial flora. At monthly intervals the microbial profile (feces, nose, and throat) of each dog was assessed. After 12 months it was found there was no drastic alteration or simplification of the microbial profile of isolated or control dogs. Although isolated dogs had slightly higher levels of anaerobic bacteria and somewhat lower levels of enterococci, the major groups of anaerobic, aerobic, and facultative bacteria remained qualitatively and quantitatively similar for the 12-month study period. Although they were only minor components of the fecal flora, Candida albicans and Shigella sonnei were consistently isolated in larger numbers from the dogs in the locked environment.

  15. [Bacterial flora in children with recurrent acute otitis media].

    PubMed

    Zielnik-Jurkiewicz, Beata; Kolczyńska, Magdalena

    2005-02-01

    The aim of the study was to identify microorganisms and antimicrobial susceptibilities of pathogens from middle ear in children with recurrent acute otitis media and acute otitis media. The study comprised 83 children--42 with recurrent acute otitis media and 41 with acute otitis emdia classified for paracentesis. Agar, chocolate, blood and Chapman plates were inoculated for isolation of bacteria. The plates were incubated at 37 degrees C and examined at 24 hours. The susceptibility of bacteria was determined by disk diffusion technique containing concentration gradients for following antibiotics: penicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, ampicillin/sulbactam, cefaclor, cefprozil, cefuroxime, erythromycin, azithromycin, clinadamycin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. 217 organisms from middle ear in children with recurrent acute otitis media and 131 organisms from middle ear in children with acute otitis media were isolated. Most frequent cultured bacteria were: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis--71.4% in recurrent acute otitis media and 47.3% in acute otitis media. We observed statistically significant (p < 0.05) increased of Moraxella catarrhalis in specimens from the middle ear in children with recurrent acute otitis media older than 2 years. The best susceptibility was observed to amoxicillin/clavulanate (79.7% of bacteria in children with recurrent acute otitis media and 83.2% of bacteria in children with acute otitis media). The most of organisms presented resistance to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole--65.9% of bacteria in children with recurrent acute otitis media and 62.6% of bacteria in children with acute otitis media. Our investigation showed that resistance to bacteria increase in children with recurrent acute otitis media, most frequent appear in children older than 2 years and depend on number of episodes of acute otitis media and day care.

  16. Vaginal bacterial flora activates rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Brzezińska - Błaszczyk, E.; Wasiela, M.

    2002-01-01

    Sixteen strains of physiological and pathological vaginal bacteria were tested for their ability to secrete histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells in vitro. We noticed that Mycoplasma hominis-induced histamine release was very high (up to 53.6%). The stimulation of rat mast cells with Staphylococccus cohnii, Staphylococcus coagulase(-) (two strains), Ureaplasma urealyticum, Peptostreptococcus spp., Bacteroides capillosus, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae resulted in lower but significant histamine secretion (11.2%-17.5%). Other bacteria strains (Staphylococcus epidermidids, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Actinomyces naeslundii (two strains) and Lactobacillus fermentum (two strains) caused very low (4.2% - 8.8%) histamine release.

  17. The effects of additional flora on the response of salmonella mutants lodged in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, L A; Carter, J H; Ingelfinger, J A; Soderberg, F B; Goldman, P

    1977-02-01

    A histidine auxotroph of Salmonella typhimurium, strain TA1538, will lodge for several months in the gastrointestinal tract of otherwise germ-free rats and of rats additionally associated with bacteria characteristic of the normal flora such as Lactobacillus plantarum and Bacteroides vulgatus. In the presence of the additional flora, the concentration of strain TA1538 is diminished in the stomach but not in the lower gastrointestinal tract or in the feces. Following the ingestion of 2-nitrofluorene, there is an increase in the concentration of revertants in the feces which reflects that observed in the colon and cecum. A dose-response relationship can be demonstrated between the amount of 2-nitrofluorene ingested and the concentration of revertants in the feces. A given dose of 2-nitrofluorene, however, produces fewer revertants in the feces of rats with the additional flora than in the feces of rats associated only with strain TA1538. It is not clear whether the decreased number of revertants in the feces in the presence of the additional flora is a result of metabolic transformations of 2-nitrofluorene by B. vulgatus, which can be demonstrated in vitro, or a result of the displacement of strain TA1538 from the stomach. The rat associated with strain TA1538, or other Ames tester strains, may be useful for detecting carcinogens as mutagens within the gastrointestinal tract and for determining the influence of various constituents of the bacterial flora on the concentration of mutagenic compounds. PMID:318921

  18. [The bacterial microflora of diabetic foot infection and factors determining its spectrum in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)].

    PubMed

    Guira, O; Tiéno, H; Traoré, S; Diallo, I; Ouangré, E; Sagna, Y; Zabsonré, J; Yanogo, D; Traoré, S S; Drabo, Y J

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the bacterial microflora of diabetic foot infection and to identify the factors which determine the bacterial spectrum in order to increase empiric antibiotic prescription in Ouagadougou. The study was a cross-sectional one, carried from July 1st, 2011 to June 30, 2012 in the departments of internal medicine and general and digestive surgery in Yalgado Ouédraogo teaching hospital. Samples for bacteriological tests consisted of aspiration of pus through the healthy skin, curettage and swab of the base of the ulceration or tissue biopsy from foot lesions. The bacteria's sensitivity to antibiotics has been tested by the qualitative method (Kirby-Bauer). The frequency of diabetic foot infection was 14.45% and the monthly incidence 5.33. The mean age of patients was 56 years and the sex ratio 1.37. Foot ulcerations were chronic in 33 (51.56%), necrotic in 51 (79.69%) and associated with osteitis in 40 (62.5%) patients. Infection was grade 3 in 70.3% cases. Thirty-nine patients had received antibiotics before hospital admission. Among the 71 samples, 62 (87.32%) cultures were positive: 53 (85.48%) monomicrobial and 9 (14.52%) bimicrobial. Aerobic Gram-positive cocci (76%) were the most frequent from ulcerations: Staphylococcus aureus (32.39%), Streptococcus sp (18.30%). Negative coagulase staphylococci have been found in 23.94% cases. Aerobic gram-negative bacilli have been isolated from 24% ulcerations. No factor was associated with the type of bacteria. Gram-positive pathogen cocci showed a high sensitivity to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and oxacillin. No methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or extended-spectrum beta lactamase Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL) have been isolated. A better design is necessary to a clarification of bacterial flora in diabetic foot infections. Prevention of bacterial resistance is also needed.

  19. [The bacterial microflora of diabetic foot infection and factors determining its spectrum in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)].

    PubMed

    Guira, O; Tiéno, H; Traoré, S; Diallo, I; Ouangré, E; Sagna, Y; Zabsonré, J; Yanogo, D; Traoré, S S; Drabo, Y J

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the bacterial microflora of diabetic foot infection and to identify the factors which determine the bacterial spectrum in order to increase empiric antibiotic prescription in Ouagadougou. The study was a cross-sectional one, carried from July 1st, 2011 to June 30, 2012 in the departments of internal medicine and general and digestive surgery in Yalgado Ouédraogo teaching hospital. Samples for bacteriological tests consisted of aspiration of pus through the healthy skin, curettage and swab of the base of the ulceration or tissue biopsy from foot lesions. The bacteria's sensitivity to antibiotics has been tested by the qualitative method (Kirby-Bauer). The frequency of diabetic foot infection was 14.45% and the monthly incidence 5.33. The mean age of patients was 56 years and the sex ratio 1.37. Foot ulcerations were chronic in 33 (51.56%), necrotic in 51 (79.69%) and associated with osteitis in 40 (62.5%) patients. Infection was grade 3 in 70.3% cases. Thirty-nine patients had received antibiotics before hospital admission. Among the 71 samples, 62 (87.32%) cultures were positive: 53 (85.48%) monomicrobial and 9 (14.52%) bimicrobial. Aerobic Gram-positive cocci (76%) were the most frequent from ulcerations: Staphylococcus aureus (32.39%), Streptococcus sp (18.30%). Negative coagulase staphylococci have been found in 23.94% cases. Aerobic gram-negative bacilli have been isolated from 24% ulcerations. No factor was associated with the type of bacteria. Gram-positive pathogen cocci showed a high sensitivity to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and oxacillin. No methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or extended-spectrum beta lactamase Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL) have been isolated. A better design is necessary to a clarification of bacterial flora in diabetic foot infections. Prevention of bacterial resistance is also needed. PMID:26187771

  20. [EPIDEMIOLOGICAL, CLINICAL AND MICROBIOLOGICAL FINDINGS IN WOMEN WITH AEROBIC VAGINITIS].

    PubMed

    Dermendjiev, T; Pehlivanov, B; Hadjieva, K; Stanev, S

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic vaginitis (AV) is an alterarion of the normal lactobacillic flora accompanied by signs of inflammation, presence of mainly aerobic microorganisms from intestinal commensals or other aerobic pathogens. Clinical symptoms may vary by type and intensity and are marked by a high tendency for recurrence and chronification. Inflammation and ulcerations in AV could increase the risk of contracting HIV or other sexually transmitted infections. The aim is to study some epidemiological, clinical and microbiological features of the aerobic vaginitis in patients of the specialized Obstetric and Gynecological Clinic in Plovdiv, Bulgaria. In a retrospective research 4687 vaginal smears have been gathered in Microbiological laboratory at "St. George" Hospital - Plovdiv. We used clinical, microbiological and statistical methods. Information processing is performed by variation, alternative, correlation and graphical analysis using specialized package SPSS v13.0. The overall prevalence rate of AV in the studied population is 11.77%. The levels of prevalence of AV in pregnant and non-pregnant women are respectively 13.08% and 4.34%. The highest frequency of AV is in the age group 21-30 years (32.3%). The results show a marked association between Escherichia coli and the cases of AV (p < 0.001). AV is a common cause of vaginal symptoms in patients of specialized ambulatory outpatient. One in ten women with vaginal complaints suffers from AV Streptococcus agalactiae and Escherichia coli are most often isolated aerobic microorganisms. PMID:26863788

  1. Evaluation of microbial flora in orofacial space infections of odontogenic origin

    PubMed Central

    Patankar, Amod; Dugal, Arun; Kshirsagar, Rajesh; Hariram; Singh, Vikram; Mishra, Akshay

    2014-01-01

    Background: The microbiology of acute dental infections has been in the midst of many researches. Various bacteriological studies show variations in their conclusion. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the microbial flora in orofacial space infections of odontogenic origin, which is essential for appropriate antibiotic selection. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients with odontogenic infection causing fascial space involvement were included. Aspirated specimen was transported in nutrient broth and thyoglycollate media within an hour for further culture and sensitivity testing. Result and Conclusion: This study indicates that orofacial odontogenic infections are usually polymicrobial, consisting of a complex mixture of both anaerobes and aerobes. PMID:25937727

  2. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    PubMed

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists. PMID:27474242

  3. Aerobic Conditioning Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Neil R.

    1980-01-01

    An aerobic exercise class that focuses on the conditioning of the cardiovascular and muscular systems is presented. Students complete data cards on heart rate, pulse, and exercises to be completed during the forty minute course. (CJ)

  4. Oral flora in the age of molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Perea, Evelio J

    2004-01-01

    The present work describes the fundamental aspects of the molecular methods that are applied to oral microbiology: probes, PCR, multiple real time PCR, 16S rDNA, and proteomics. Likewise, it presents the results obtained by applying these methods to the study of the bacterial flora encountered inside the mouth. By identifying 16S rDNA, up to 132 known species and 215 new, unknown phylotypes have been detected inside patients s periodontal pockets. We are currently using a commercial system based on multiple PCR (genomic amplification), followed by reverse hybridization to detect the five species known to cause periodontal disease. We also summarize the findings derived from the application of proteomic techniques to the study of odontologic infections pathogenesis and from the use of molecular methods in the study of resistance to antimicrobial agents. Finally, it puts forth the problems that remain unsolved with respect to oral flora and the treatment of odontogenic infections. Traditional culture methods continue to be indispensable, as they make it possible to later work with the cultured microorganisms.

  5. Role of Lactobacillus Species in the Intermediate Vaginal Flora in Early Pregnancy: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Alex; Kiss, Herbert; Hagmann, Michael; Machal, Susanne; Holzer, Iris; Kueronya, Verena; Husslein, Peter Wolf; Petricevic, Ljubomir

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor obstetrical outcomes are associated with imbalances in the vaginal flora. The present study evaluated the role of vaginal Lactobacillus species in women with intermediate vaginal flora with regard to obstetrical outcomes. Methods We retrospectively analysed data from all women with singleton pregnancies who had undergone routine screening for asymptomatic vaginal infections at our tertiary referral centre between 2005 and 2014. Vaginal smears were Gram-stained and classified according to the Nugent scoring system as normal flora (score 0–3), intermediate vaginal flora (4–6), or bacterial vaginosis (7–10). Only women with intermediate vaginal flora were investigated. Women with a Nugent score of 4 were categorised into those with and without Lactobacilli. Follow-up smears were obtained 4–6 weeks after the initial smears. Descriptive data analysis, the Welch’s t-test, the Fisher’s exact test, and multiple regression analysis with adjustment for confounders were performed. Gestational age at delivery and birth weight were the outcome measures. Results At antenatal screening, 529/8421 women presented with intermediate vaginal flora. Amongst these, 349/529 (66%) had a Nugent score of 4, 94/529 (17.8%) a Nugent score of 5, and 86/529 (16.2%) a Nugent score of 6. Amongst those with a Nugent score of 4, 232/349 (66.5%) women were in the Lactobacilli group and 117/349 (33.5%) in the Non-Lactobacilli group. The preterm delivery rate was significantly lower in the Lactobacilli than in the Non-Lactobacilli group (OR 0.34, CI 0.21–0.55; p<0.001). Mean birth weight was 2979 ± 842 g and 2388 ± 1155 g in the study groups, respectively (MD 564.12, CI 346.23–781.92; p<0.001). On follow-up smears, bacterial vaginosis rates were 9% in the Lactobacilli and 7.8% in the Non-Lactobacilli group. Conclusions The absence of vaginal Lactobacillus species and any bacterial colonisation increases the risks of preterm delivery and low birth weight in women with

  6. [Influence of chlorhexidine on the flora of burns].

    PubMed

    de Barbeyrac, B; Perro, G; Quentin, C; Cutillas, M; Bebear, C; Sanchez, R

    1985-06-01

    The effect of chlorhexidine baths on surface and in-depth colonization of burns was studied in 12 severely burned patients. 202 swabs and 202 biopsy specimens were cultured. Each patient was sampled before and after a daily chlorhexidine bath on several days. Subsequent to bathing, 41% of swabs became sterile and a 1.41 log10 reduction in the number of germs in biopsy specimens was observed. However, deep flora was unchanged in almost half of cases (43.3%) and was reduced by only 1 to 2 log10 in one-third of cases (35.3%). Chlorhexidine added to baths inhibited surface bacterial growth but had an inconsistent and limited effect on in-depth colonization.

  7. [Influence of chlorhexidine on the flora of burns].

    PubMed

    de Barbeyrac, B; Perro, G; Quentin, C; Cutillas, M; Bebear, C; Sanchez, R

    1985-06-01

    The effect of chlorhexidine baths on surface and in-depth colonization of burns was studied in 12 severely burned patients. 202 swabs and 202 biopsy specimens were cultured. Each patient was sampled before and after a daily chlorhexidine bath on several days. Subsequent to bathing, 41% of swabs became sterile and a 1.41 log10 reduction in the number of germs in biopsy specimens was observed. However, deep flora was unchanged in almost half of cases (43.3%) and was reduced by only 1 to 2 log10 in one-third of cases (35.3%). Chlorhexidine added to baths inhibited surface bacterial growth but had an inconsistent and limited effect on in-depth colonization. PMID:3937137

  8. Bacterial community structure in the rhizosphere of three cactus species from semi-arid highlands in central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Garrido, J Félix; Montiel-Lugo, Daniel; Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Torres-Cortes, Gloria; Millán, Vicenta; Toro, Nicolás; Martínez-Abarca, Francisco; Ramírez-Saad, Hugo C

    2012-05-01

    The nature reserve of Tehuacan-Cuicatlan in central Mexico is known for its diversity and endemism mainly in cactus plants. Although the xerophytic flora is reasonably documented, the bacterial communities associated with these species have been largely neglected. We assessed the diversity and composition of bacterial communities in bulk (non-rhizospheric) soil and the rhizosphere of three cactus plant species: Mammillaria carnea, Opuntia pilifera and Stenocereus stellatus, approached using cultivation and molecular techniques, considering the possible effect of dry and rainy seasons. Cultivation-dependent methods were focused on putative N(2)-fixers and heterotrophic aerobic bacteria, in the two media tested the values obtained for dry season samples grouped together regardless of the sample type (rhizospheric or non-rhizospheric), these groups also included the non-rhizospheric sample for rainy season, on each medium. These CFU values were smaller and significantly different from those obtained on rhizospheric samples from rainy season. Genera composition among isolates of the rhizospheric samples was very similar for each season, the most abundant taxa being α-Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. Interestingly, the genus Ochrobactrum was highly represented among rhizospheric samples, when cultured in N-free medium. The structure of the bacterial communities was approached with molecular techniques targeting partial 16S rRNA sequences such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and serial analysis of ribosomal sequence tags. Under these approaches, the most represented bacterial phyla were Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria. The first two were also highly represented when using isolation techniques.

  9. [Implantation of Escherichia coli in pilot experiments and the influence of competition on the flora].

    PubMed

    Le Guyader, F; Pommepuy, M; Cormier, M

    1991-02-01

    Implantation in seawater and (or) sediment of bacterial flora and the influence of such flora upon the survival and growth of an Escherichia coli of human origin have been the object of experimental pilot studies. The selected pilot plant permitted work on large volumes of seawater and sediment, and maintenance of the structure of the latter. Diverse experiments were carried out in the presence or absence of seawater and (or) sediment bacterial flora during 13 days. Escherichia coli bacteria were introduced in the seawater experimental system at concentrations of 1 to 3 X 10(5) colony-forming units (cfu) per 100 mL. In sterile sediment, E. coli bacteria first went through a proliferative phase and then implanted themselves (3 X 10(4) cfu/100 g at 0 days and 4 X 10(5) cfu/100 g at 13 days). Diffusion in the supernatant sterile seawater of organic matter released from sediment allowed the strain to proliferate (8 X 10(6) cfu/100 mL at 1 day) and survive for a few days (1 X 10(4) cfu/100 mL at 6 days), prior to an ultimate decreasing phase (1 cfu/100 mL at 13 days). In the presence of the seawater indigenous flora, an immediate decrease (2 X 10(3) cfu/100 mL at 6 days), without a growth or even a survival phase, evidenced a selection pressure. In a nonsterile sediment, in the presence or absence of seawater indigenous flora, E. coli bacteria implanted themselves quickly (5 X 10(4) cfu/100 g at 1 day) and survived (1 X 10(4) cfu/100 g at 13 days). In the supernatant seawater, a decrease was observed from the 1st day.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Flora-On: Occurrence data of the vascular flora of mainland Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Ana Júlia; Francisco, Ana; Porto, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Flora-On dataset currently includes 253,310 occurrence records for the class Embryopsidae (vascular plants), comprising data collated via the platform http://flora-on.pt/ relating to observation records of vascular plants across mainland Portugal. Observations are uploaded directly to the database primarily by experienced botanists and naturalists, typically on a weekly basis, and consist of geo-referenced data points for species (or infraspecific taxa) along with their date of observation and phenological state. The Flora-On project aims to compile and make publicly accessible chorological, ecological, morphological and photographic information for the entire vascular flora of Portugal. The project’s website offers powerful query and visualization capabilities, of which we highlight the probabilistic bioclimatic and phenological queries which operate based on the empirical density distributions of species in those variables. Flora-On was created and continues to be maintained by volunteers who are Associate members of Sociedade Portuguesa de Botânica (Botanical Society of Portugal). Given its focus on research-grade and current data, the Flora-On project represents a significant contribution to the knowledge of the present distribution and status of the Portuguese flora. PMID:27698587

  11. Flora-On: Occurrence data of the vascular flora of mainland Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Ana Júlia; Francisco, Ana; Porto, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Flora-On dataset currently includes 253,310 occurrence records for the class Embryopsidae (vascular plants), comprising data collated via the platform http://flora-on.pt/ relating to observation records of vascular plants across mainland Portugal. Observations are uploaded directly to the database primarily by experienced botanists and naturalists, typically on a weekly basis, and consist of geo-referenced data points for species (or infraspecific taxa) along with their date of observation and phenological state. The Flora-On project aims to compile and make publicly accessible chorological, ecological, morphological and photographic information for the entire vascular flora of Portugal. The project’s website offers powerful query and visualization capabilities, of which we highlight the probabilistic bioclimatic and phenological queries which operate based on the empirical density distributions of species in those variables. Flora-On was created and continues to be maintained by volunteers who are Associate members of Sociedade Portuguesa de Botânica (Botanical Society of Portugal). Given its focus on research-grade and current data, the Flora-On project represents a significant contribution to the knowledge of the present distribution and status of the Portuguese flora.

  12. Prevalence of the microbiologic flora in contact lens wearers at the Puerto Rico Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, N; Díaz Mendoza, S; Townsend, W; Carro, J

    1991-03-01

    The prevalence of microbioogic flora was determined in a convenience sample of contact lens wearers at the Puerto Rico Medical Center, ophthalmology clinics obtaining cultures from the conjunctival fornices. Gram positive bacterial prevalence was 100% in the control group, as well as in rigid gas permeable lens wearers. In the soft contact lens group, gram positive bacterial prevalence was 94.7%. On the other hand prevalence of Gram negative bacteria is null in the soft contact lens wearer population, being only 2.5% in control group, and 45.5% for Rigid Gas Permeable wearers. These contact lens wearers were using different disinfection systems. PMID:1854385

  13. [Effects of successive cropping Rehmannia glutinosa on rhizosphere soil microbial flora and enzyme activities].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Hao, Hui-Rong; Xiong, Jun; Qi, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Chong-Yi; Lin, Wen-Xiong

    2007-12-01

    With the soils cropped Rehmannia glutinosa for one and two years as test materials, this paper studied the variations of microbial flora and enzyme activities in rhizosphere. The results showed that with increasing year of cropping, the numbers of bacteria and fungi in rihzosphere had a slight decrease. In the soil successively cropped R. glutinosa for two years, the number of actinomycetes in rihzosphere was 4 times higher, the ammonifier, aerobic azotobacter, sulphate reducer, denitrifier, and anaerobic cellulose-decomposer increased by 25.99, 45.39, 11.43, 1.36, and 1.43 folds, respectively, while aerobic cellulose-decomposer reduced by 86.74%, compared with those in the soil cropped R. glutinosa for one year. The root exudates of successively cropped R. glutinosa increased the activities of urease, polyhphenol oxidase, sucrase, protease and cellulase in rhizosphere by 62.87%, 9.43%, 47.91%, 139.62% and 31.33%, respectively, but inhibited the activity of catalase. The findings suggested that successive cropping R. glutinosa would destroy the balance of rhizosphere soil microbial flora.

  14. Evaluation of crew skin flora under conditions of a full quarantine lunar-exploration mission.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, C; Taylor, G R

    1977-08-01

    Crew-members of the Apollo 14 lunar exploration mission underwent a pre-flight seclusion designed to stabilize their health by freeing them from exposure to potentially infectious agents. After the flight, the crew-members were quarantined to protect the biosphere from possible lunar contamination. These isolations, along with the complete isolation of the spaceflight itself, provided the opportunity for a skin flora survey which included the sampling of seven sites at five different times. Quantification and identification of all aerobic and anaerobic bacteria from each site were performed. The results indicated that the pre-flight quarantine measures resulted in a decrease in total numbers of isolates as well as a decrease in the anaerobes. This was followed by a continued decrease throughout the flight with a return to the pre-flight norm within 16 days after the flight. The quantitative load of aerobic bacteria increased during the flight, due largely to an increase in coryneforms and micrococcaceae. The quantitative load of anaerobic bacteria decreased before and during the flight. No instance of microbial shock or intercrew transfer of micro-organisms was demonstrated. These findings indicate that alterations in the skin flora do not pose any unusual problem during short duration space flights. Further, there are no indications that problems will arise on longer missions.

  15. Controlled study of lactoperoxidase gel on oral flora and saliva in irradiated patients with oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Katalin; Urban, Edit; Fazekas, Olga; Thurzo, Laszlo; Nagy, Elisabeth

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if radiotherapy induces hyposalivation altering oral microbial flora. The purpose of this placebo-controlled, single-blind study was to determine beneficial effects of a saliva substitute and an oral hygiene product on irradiated patients with oropharyngeal cancer. Eighteen patients were assigned to the test group (Biotène Oral Balance gel [Lacléde Incorporated Healthcare Products, Gardena, CA] and toothpaste used daily), and another 18 were put on a conventional daily regimen (carboxymethylcellulose gel and Oral-B toothpaste [Laclede Pharmaceuticals, Gardena, CA]). Cultures for identifying and quantitating microorganisms, whole unstimulated saliva, and visual analog measurements for comfort were obtained before mucositis occurred and after treatment. Daily use of Biotène products enhanced control of microbial flora, improved salivary flow, and increased oral comfort as compared with control subjects. Four weeks after mucositis, some aerobic isolates disappeared in the test group; periodontal-associated bacteria were markedly decreased in the test group; and candidal species were significantly lowered in the test group. Although baseline saliva was lower in the test group (P = 0.001), after 4 weeks, no difference between groups existed; comfort was greater in the test group (P = 0.007). Use of enzyme-engineered Biotène products that assist in control of the oral microbial flora as well as supporting oral comfort through lubrication appear to be useful aids for irradiated patients with oropharyngeal cancer.

  16. Anticancer Drugs from Marine Flora: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Sithranga Boopathy, N.; Kathiresan, K.

    2010-01-01

    Marine floras, such as bacteria, actinobacteria, cyanobacteria, fungi, microalgae, seaweeds, mangroves, and other halophytes are extremely important oceanic resources, constituting over 90% of the oceanic biomass. They are taxonomically diverse, largely productive, biologically active, and chemically unique offering a great scope for discovery of new anticancer drugs. The marine floras are rich in medicinally potent chemicals predominantly belonging to polyphenols and sulphated polysaccharides. The chemicals have displayed an array of pharmacological properties especially antioxidant, immunostimulatory, and antitumour activities. The phytochemicals possibly activate macrophages, induce apoptosis, and prevent oxidative damage of DNA, thereby controlling carcinogenesis. In spite of vast resources enriched with chemicals, the marine floras are largely unexplored for anticancer lead compounds. Hence, this paper reviews the works so far conducted on this aspect with a view to provide a baseline information for promoting the marine flora-based anticancer research in the present context of increasing cancer incidence, deprived of the cheaper, safer, and potent medicines to challenge the dreadful human disease. PMID:21461373

  17. Dance--Aerobic and Anaerobic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlette

    1984-01-01

    This article defines and explains aerobic exercise and its effects on the cardiovascular system. Various studies on dancers are cited indicating that dance is an anaerobic activity with some small degree of aerobic benefit. (DF)

  18. On the asteroidal jet-stream Flora A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klacka, Jozef

    1992-01-01

    The problems of the virtual existence of the Flora 1, separated from the rest of the Flora family, and jet-stream Flora A (Alfven 1969) is discussed in connection with the observational selection effects. It is shown that observational selection effects operate as a whole and can be important in incomplete observational data set.

  19. User's manual for the FLORA equilibrium and stability code

    SciTech Connect

    Freis, R.P.; Cohen, B.I.

    1985-04-01

    This document provides a user's guide to the content and use of the two-dimensional axisymmetric equilibrium and stability code FLORA. FLORA addresses the low-frequency MHD stability of long-thin axisymmetric tandem mirror systems with finite pressure and finite-larmor-radius effects. FLORA solves an initial-value problem for interchange, rotational, and ballooning stability.

  20. An analysis of the microbial flora of premature neonates.

    PubMed

    Savey, A; Fleurette, J; Salle, B L

    1992-08-01

    An analysis of the microbial flora of 10 premature neonates hospitalized in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) was made. The babies had received neither antibiotics nor antiseptics and nine out of 10 were born by caesarean section. Samples were collected on the fourth or fifth day of life from 18 skin or mucosal sites. Detailed bacterial counts were obtained by plating out suitable dilutions of the samples on to selective media. Representative samples of each colony type were then subcultured and identified, using standard laboratory methods. Two hundred and fifty-six isolates of staphylococci were obtained and their susceptibility to 23 antibiotics tested. Only 11% of the samples were sterile. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) were the commonest species isolated and were predominant in every site studied. They were found in 79% of the samples and represented almost 81% of the neonates' flora. Eight species and biotypes of CNS were identified. In decreasing order of frequency, they comprised S. epidermidis (biotypes 1 and 2), S. hominis (biotype 1), S. warneri, S. haemolyticus, S. capitis, S. cohnii and S. hominis (biotype 2). CNS distribution appeared to be highly heterogeneous with no significant specificity of any species for a particular body site. The main quantitative and qualitative variations seemed to relate to the method of delivery, and the intensity and nature of exposure of the neonate to its local environment. A high level of antibiotic resistance was found among the CNS isolates (especially S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus): penicillin G (96%), oxacillin (31%), erythromycin (52%) and gentamicin (28%). Moreover, multiresistant strains were numerous, supporting the nosocomial origin of CNS.

  1. Effect of high-fiber and high-oil diets on the fecal flora of swine.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, W E; Moore, L V; Cato, E P; Wilkins, T D; Kornegay, E T

    1987-01-01

    Six pairs of pigs were fed a basal diet, a high-fiber diet, and a diet high in corn oil in different sequences to minimize the carry-over effect of diet. After 2 months on each diet, a fecal specimen from each pig was cultured on nonselective medium in roll tubes. Fifty colonies were randomly selected from each fecal sample, and isolates were characterized to identify a representative cross section of the fecal flora. The bacterial composition of the fecal flora differed between basal and high-fiber diets (P = 0.002) and between high-fiber and high-oil diets (P = 0.015). However, the floras were not significantly different between the basal and the high-oil diets (P = 0.135), nor were the floras of the 12 individual pigs (each on all three diets) statistically different (P = 0.103). Only 14 of the 160 observed taxa have been detected in the human fecal flora, and only 159 of 1,871 total isolates (8.5%) were members of described species. The most common isolate was a Streptococcus species similar to that reported by Robinson et al. (I. M. Robinson, S. C. Whipp, J. A. Bucklin, and M. J. Allison, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 48:964-969, 1984), which was found in 34 of 36 samples and which represented 27.5% of all isolates. Lactobacillus, Fusobacterium, Eubacterium, Bacteroides, and Peptostreptococcus species were the next most common bacteria. Escherichia coli represented 1.7% of all fecal isolates, which is somewhat higher than the 0.1 to 0.6% observed in human feces cultured similarly with prereduced anaerobically sterilized media.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2821900

  2. Increased survival in experimental dog heatstroke after reduction of gut flora.

    PubMed

    Bynum, G; Brown, J; Dubose, D; Marsili, M; Leav, I; Pistole, T G; Hamlet, M; LeMaire, M; Caleb, B

    1979-08-01

    A study was undertaken to determine if gut flora contribute to the pathophysiology of experimental canine heatstroke. Fifty animals in four groups were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital (25 mg/kg) intravenously. An air temperature of 42-46 degrees C was maintained adjacent to the dog with a water-heated blanket for approximately 2 h until rectal temperatures rose to 43.5 +/- 0.4 degrees C. Animals were then cooled passively in room air (28 degrees C, 20% RH) until death or until 18 h elapsed, and were euthanized. Reduction of intestine stool and bacterial contents with antibiotics, cathartics, and enemas prior to heatstroke increased the incidence of 18-h survival from 20.0% to 70.6%; antibiotics administered after heatstroke did not alter the incidence of survival over control values. These data suggest that gut flora, presumably through endotoxemia, contribute to the evolution of heatstroke pathophysiology.

  3. [Multiple Sclerosis and Commensal Gut Flora].

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    Although a symbiotic relationship between commensal gut microbiota and host is widely appreciated, recent works have indicated that normal gut flora functions to prevent inflammatory bowel diseases and obesity in the host, indicating a more mutualistic relationship. Dysbiosis of the commensal flora may lead to development of these disorders. Studies using experimental auto immune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a rodent model for studying multiple sclerosis (MS), revealed that onset of MS may be triggered by dysbiosis in the gut. We recently revealed a significant reduction in certain clostridia strains, which probably function to induce regulatory T cells, in the gut microbiota of patients with MS. Results from this study should be consideved when designing strategies for the prevention and treatment of MS. PMID:27279159

  4. Differentiation signatures in the Flora region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oszkiewicz, Dagmara; Kankiewicz, Paweł; Włodarczyk, Ireneusz; Kryszczyńska, Agnieszka

    2015-12-01

    Context. Most asteroid families are very homogeneous in physical properties. Some show greater diversity, however. The Flora family is the most intriguing of them. The Flora family is spread widely in the inner main belt, has a rich collisional history, and is one of the most taxonomically diverse regions in the main belt. As a result of its proximity to the asteroid (4) Vesta (the only currently known intact differentiated asteroid) and its family, migration between the two regions is possible. This dynamical path is one of the counter arguments to the hypothesis that there may be traces of a differentiated parent body other than Vesta in the inner main belt region. We here investigate the possibility that some of the V- and A-types (commonly interpreted as basaltoids and dunites - parts of the mantle and crust of differentiated parent bodies) in the Flora dynamical region are not dynamically connected to Vesta. Aims: The goal of this study is to investigate asteroids in the Flora dynamical region that may be witness to the differentiation of a parent body other than (4) Vesta. In particular, we aim at predicting which asteroids may be fragments of a differentiated body or bodies (taxonomical V-types). We also investigate their possible dynamical linkage to the nearby Vesta family. Methods: To predict the taxonomic types of asteroids we used the naive Bayes classifier. We studied their dynamical past through numerical integration including gravitational and Yarkovsky forces. Each asteroid was cloned, and average orbital elements were computed at each step. When possible, we used observationally constrained physical parameters for the thermal forces. Results: Most of the asteroids in the Flora region are predicted to originate from the S-complex (around 47.8%). Tens of asteroids with potentially differential origins are identified in the region, including 164 potential V-types. We investigated the dynamical evolution of selected objects to examine possible linkages

  5. Flora of the Orange Cliffs of Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Shultz, L.M.; Neely, E.E.; Tuhy, J.S.

    1987-04-30

    The Orange Cliffs area, an area rich in oil sands deposits and defined here as part of the Colorado Plateau floristic province, harbors approximately 209 species in 123 genera and 49 families. Because of the potential of exploitation of the oil sands deposits in the area, a species checklist was made and a discussion of physical and floristic aspects of the region is given here. The flora is compared statistically to the San Rafael Swell flora, which is also a subset of the Colorado Plateau. They define six vegetation types and three edaphic communities; these are described and mapped. Of eleven endemic plant species in the Orange Cliffs, three are local and rare. Sites for Astragalus nidularius, A. moencoppensis, and Xylorhiza glabriuscula var. linearifolia are discussed and mapped. 24 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  6. A Survey of Environmental Microbial Flora During Closed Chamber Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. Mark; Groves, Theron O.; Bell-Robinson, Denetia; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Services, Inc. and NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX As NASA prepares for long-term missions aboard the International Space Station and the eventual exploration of Mars, closed-environment chambers on Earth have become important test beds for systems evaluations. During 2 separate studies of a selfcontained ecosystem containing 4 crewmembers, microbial surveys of samples from 13 surface and 3 air sites were performed. Microbial concentration of samples from surface sites with frequent water contact (e.g., urinal, sink) did not indicate significantly higher levels of contamination than drier areas, though surface cleaning by the crew may have influenced this conclusion. Changes in bacterial diversity on surface sites implied that the number of transient species was high, suggesting movement by crew activities, aerosols, or both. A non-linear relationship between bacterial diversity and enumeration from surface samples indicated that a rapid increase occurred in the number of species as cell concentration increased to 5 CFU/sq cm. Above this concentration, the number of different bacterial species varied between 11 and 16. Airborne bacteria and fungi averaged only 160 and 1 CFU/m3, respectively. Microbial contamination of the potable water system primarily consisted of 3 species of Gram negative bacteria; however, after 60 days during one study, several species of Bacillus became the dominant flora. This study suggests that under these conditions, microbial contamination in the air and water was suppressed by the life-support systems, though contamination was possible. Conversely, the crew and their activities controlled microbial levels on surfaces. Understanding the factors that affect microbial control will improve the design of microbial testing both during space flight and in analogous Earth-based environments.

  7. Biology of Moderately Halophilic Aerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ventosa, Antonio; Nieto, Joaquín J.; Oren, Aharon

    1998-01-01

    The moderately halophilic heterotrophic aerobic bacteria form a diverse group of microorganisms. The property of halophilism is widespread within the bacterial domain. Bacterial halophiles are abundant in environments such as salt lakes, saline soils, and salted food products. Most species keep their intracellular ionic concentrations at low levels while synthesizing or accumulating organic solutes to provide osmotic equilibrium of the cytoplasm with the surrounding medium. Complex mechanisms of adjustment of the intracellular environments and the properties of the cytoplasmic membrane enable rapid adaptation to changes in the salt concentration of the environment. Approaches to the study of genetic processes have recently been developed for several moderate halophiles, opening the way toward an understanding of haloadaptation at the molecular level. The new information obtained is also expected to contribute to the development of novel biotechnological uses for these organisms. PMID:9618450

  8. Covariance of lichen and vascular plant floras

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.P.; Wetmore, C.M.

    1999-01-01

    The geographic relationships among taxonomic groups are important to study to determine patterns of biodiversity and whether or not associations occur between large groups, e.g., birds and vascular plants. This study was undertaken to determine relationships between higher plants and lower plants, specifically vascular plant and lichen floras in nine national parks of the Great Lakes region. No significant relationship was found between vascular plant floras and lichen floras in this area, which spans 1200 km longitudinally, or between an additional 19 areas from North America that were less than 1000 km(2) in area. For areas larger than 1000 km(2), however, a significant positive relationship existed for 33 areas that span one to approximately 150 million km(2). The ratio of numbers of vascular plants to lichens appeared to average just over 6 across the 33 areas. In the Great Lakes parks, between 28-30% of either the vascular plant or lichen species were singletons (occurring in only one park), but the parks that contained the most singletons were not congruent: Isle Royale had the most singleton lichens, while Indiana Dunes had the most vascular plant singletons. Fewer lichen species (2%) than vascular plants (4%) occurred in all nine parks. Latitude appeared to explain some of the variation between the two groups: vascular plants decreased with increasing latitude, while lichens increased.

  9. The flora of Oktibbeha County, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leidolf, A.; McDaniel, S.; Nuttle, T.

    2002-01-01

    We surveyed the flora of Oktibbeha County, Mississippi, U.S.A., from February 1994 to 1996. Occupying 118 square kilometers in east-central Mississippi, Oktibbeha County lies among 3 physiographic regions that include, from west to east, Interior Flatwoods, Pontotoc Ridge, and Black Prairie. Accordingly, the county harbors a diverse flora. Based on field work, as well as an extensive review of published literature and herbarium records at IBE and MISSA, we recorded a total of 1,148 taxa (1,125 species, 7 hybrids, 16 infraspecific taxa) belonging to 514 genera in 160 families, over 85% of all taxa documented were native. Compared to 3 other counties in east-central Mississippi, Oktibbeha County has the second largest recorded flora. The number of state-listed (endangered, threatened, or of special concern) taxa (67) documented in this survey far exceeds that reported from any other county in the region. Three introduced species, Ilex cornuta Lindl. & Paxton, Mahonia bealei (Fortune) Carrie??re, and Nandina domestica Thunb., are reported in a naturalized state for the first time from Mississippi. We also describe 16 different plant communities belonging to 5 broad habitat categories: bottomland forests, upland forests and prairies, aquatic habitats, seepage areas, and human-influenced habitats. A detailed description of the vegetation associated with each of these communities is provided.

  10. The Cutaneous Bacterial Microflora of the Bodybuilders Using Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids

    PubMed Central

    Zomorodian, Kamiar; Rahimi, Mohammad Javad; Taheri, Mohammad; Ghanbari Asad, Ali; Khani, Soghra; Ahrari, Iman; Pakshir, Keyvan; Khashei, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) abuse by the athletes has dramatically increased during the recent decades. These substances might increase the skin lipids and enhance the cutaneous microbial proliferation. Objectives: The current study aimed to investigate the potential side effects of AAS on the bacterial microflora colonization of the bodybuilders` skin. Patients and Methods: The skin samples of 94 male bodybuilders (71 AAS users, 23 non-AAS users) and 46 subjects of the control group, with similar gender and age, were cultured and incubated in both aerobic condition to isolate Staphylococcus aureus and anaerobic condition for Propionibacterium acnes. The isolated bacteria were identified by standard microbiological techniques. Results: The skin lesions were more frequent in the body builders than the controls. Moreover, statistically significant differences were also observed in skin lesions among the AAS users and the non-AAS user athletes. The prevalence of S. aureus and P. acnes in the athletes was higher than that of the control group. In addition, there was a significant difference in distribution of P. acnes between the bodybuilders who used AAS and those who did not. Conclusions: A higher number of bacterial flora was found in the bodybuilders particularly those using AAS in comparison to the controls, which might be due to the influence of these AAS on the skin microflora and transmission of the bacteria through the direct contact of the naked skin with the exercise instruments. PMID:25789120

  11. Bacterial contamination of autogenous bone collected by rongeur compared with that collected by bone filter during implant surgery.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Hamid Mahmood; Beshkar, Majid

    2011-09-01

    The aim was to compare the degree of microbial contamination of autogenous bone collected by a bone filter with that of autogenous bone harvested by a rongeur during implant surgery. Thirty healthy patients had dental implants inserted. A strict aspiration protocol was used during the operation to collect particulate bone with minimal risk of contamination by oral flora. A fragment of bone (mainly from the tuberosity) was also harvested with a rongeur. Samples from both groups were sent to the laboratory for the microbes to be counted. All samples yielded viable micro-organisms. There was no significant difference between the number of aerobes in the bone filter and those in the bone fragment group (p=0.9). However, there were significantly more anaerobes in the bone filter group than in the bone fragment group. There were significantly more micro-organisms (both aerobes and anaerobes) in the bone filter group than the bone fragment group (p=0.0001). Even with the use of a stringent aspiration protocol the degree of bacterial contamination was significantly higher in collected bone debris than in bone harvested by rongeur during implant surgery.

  12. Evaluation of nasopharyngeal microbial flora and antibiogram and its relation to otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Nourizadeh, Navid; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Gharavi, Vahideh; Nourizadeh, Niloufar; Movahed, Rahman

    2016-04-01

    Acute otitis media and otitis media with effusion (OME) are the main causes of hearing impairment in children which require proper treatment, mainly antibiotic therapy. Patients whom were appropriate candidates for adenoidectomy were divided into two groups regarding the presence of middle ear effusion. Adenoid tissue specimens were cultured in both groups and the bacterial flora and anti-microbial resistance pattern were determined. 72 patients were studied, 42 % had OME while 58 % did not. The following bacteria were isolated and cultured from both groups with no meaningful difference in prevalence: Streptococcus viridans (p = 0.265), Staphylococcus aureus (p = 0.72), H. influenza (p = 0.806), Entrococcus. spp (0.391), Streptococcus pneumonia (p = 0.391), nonhemolytic Streptococcus (p = 0.230). Bacterial sensitivity was similar for Amoxicillin-clavulanate (p = 0.935), Amoxicillin (p = 0.935), Cephalexin (p = 0.806), Cefixime (p = 0.391) and Azithromycin in both groups. The two groups showed no meaningful difference considering the bacterial flora of nasopharynx and their sensitivity. Bacteria in both groups were sensitive to Amoxicillin and Amoxicillin-clavulanate and resistant to Azithromycin, Cefixime and Cephalexin.

  13. Evaluation of nasopharyngeal microbial flora and antibiogram and its relation to otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Nourizadeh, Navid; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Gharavi, Vahideh; Nourizadeh, Niloufar; Movahed, Rahman

    2016-04-01

    Acute otitis media and otitis media with effusion (OME) are the main causes of hearing impairment in children which require proper treatment, mainly antibiotic therapy. Patients whom were appropriate candidates for adenoidectomy were divided into two groups regarding the presence of middle ear effusion. Adenoid tissue specimens were cultured in both groups and the bacterial flora and anti-microbial resistance pattern were determined. 72 patients were studied, 42 % had OME while 58 % did not. The following bacteria were isolated and cultured from both groups with no meaningful difference in prevalence: Streptococcus viridans (p = 0.265), Staphylococcus aureus (p = 0.72), H. influenza (p = 0.806), Entrococcus. spp (0.391), Streptococcus pneumonia (p = 0.391), nonhemolytic Streptococcus (p = 0.230). Bacterial sensitivity was similar for Amoxicillin-clavulanate (p = 0.935), Amoxicillin (p = 0.935), Cephalexin (p = 0.806), Cefixime (p = 0.391) and Azithromycin in both groups. The two groups showed no meaningful difference considering the bacterial flora of nasopharynx and their sensitivity. Bacteria in both groups were sensitive to Amoxicillin and Amoxicillin-clavulanate and resistant to Azithromycin, Cefixime and Cephalexin. PMID:25929414

  14. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    DOEpatents

    Hudgins, Mark P; Bessette, Bernard J; March, John C; McComb, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention includes a system of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  15. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    DOEpatents

    Hudgins, Mark P; Bessette, Bernard J; March, John; McComb, Scott T.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  16. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, M.P.; Bessette, B.J.; March, J.; McComb, S.T.

    2000-02-15

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120 F and 140 F in steady state.

  17. Low-Impact Aerobics: Better than Traditional Aerobic Dance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koszuta, Laurie Einstein

    1986-01-01

    A form of dance exercise called low-impact aerobics is being touted as a misery-free form of aerobic dance. Because this activity is relatively new, the exact kinds and frequencies of injuries are not known and the fitness benefits have not been examined. (MT)

  18. [Microbial flora in Cerasus sachalinensis rhizosphere].

    PubMed

    Yu, Cui; Lü, De-Guo; Qin, Si-Jun; Du, Guo-Dong; Liu, Guo-Cheng

    2007-10-01

    By using selected culture media, the microbes in Cerasus sachalinensis rhizosphere were isolated, identified and classified, with their community structure and dynamic changes at different growth stages of C. sachalinensis studied. The bacteria isolated were belonged to 15 genera, among which, Bacillus, Pseudomonas and Flavobacterium were the dominant ones. Flavus and Albosporus were the two dominant genera in seven groups of Actinomyces, and Mucor, Aspergillus and Penicillium were the main genera of fungi. The microbial flora varied with C. sachalinensis growth stage, being the richest at defoliation stage and the least at budding stage. PMID:18163310

  19. The Role of the Upper Gastrointestinal Flora in the Malabsorption Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, D. C.; Reed, P. I.; Vidinli, M.; Finlay, J. M.

    1964-01-01

    Bacterial contamination of the upper gastrointestinal tract by colonic flora appears important in the production of some forms of secondary steatorrhea. Gastric contents have been studied in patients with normal intestinal absorption and with malabsorption syndrome. In secondary steatorrhea there is a significantly increased incidence of gastric contamination by colon organisms, and this is usually associated with absence of free hydrochloric acid. It seems probable that such contamination interferes with intestinal digestion and absorption. The benefit resulting from the oral administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics to a group of patients with secondary steatorrhea supports this concept. PMID:14118698

  20. Pulmonary clearance and phagocytic cell response to normal pharyngeal flora.

    PubMed

    Onofrio, J M; Shulkin, A N; Heidbrink, P J; Toews, G B; Pierce, A K

    1981-02-01

    Because human lungs are repetitively inoculated with the normal bacterial flora of the pharynx, we determined the pulmonary clearance of representative species after aerosol inoculation of a murine model, and characterized the phagocytic cell response by bronchoalveolar lavage. Viable bacteria remaining in the lungs at 1, 2, and 4 h were: Streptococcus sanguis, 24%, 8%, and 1%; Streptococcus salivarius, 49%, 24%, and 5%; Neisseria catarrhalis, 69%, 49%, and 22%. Clearance of Streptococcus sanguis was associated with a twofold increase in alveolar macrophages (p less than 0.05); Streptococcus salivarius evoked a doubling of alveolar macrophages and a 20-fold rise in granulocytes (p less than 0.05); the response to Neisseria catarrhalis was a 400-fold increase in granulocytes (p less than 0.05). Thus, normal pharyngeal organisms are cleared rapidly from the lung by a dual phagocytic cell system. It is speculated that bacteria-phagocyte interaction allows the possibility of lung injury from proteolytic enzymes released from either set of phagocytes.

  1. Activation of cycasin to a mutagen for Saccharomyces cerevisiae by rat intestinal flora.

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, V W; Goin, C J

    1983-01-01

    Genetic test systems involving microorganisms and liver enzyme preparations may be insufficient to detect compounds that require breakdown by enzymes provided by the microbial flora of the intestinal tract. A method is described for providing such activation and for simultaneously testing the potential genetic activity of breakdown products in an indicator organism. Parabiotic chambers containing Saccharomyces cerevisiae genetic test organisms in one chamber were separated by a membrane filter from rat cecal organisms and test chemical contained in the other chamber. The genetic activities of cycasin breakdown products for mutation, gene conversion, and mitotic crossing-over in samples incubated aerobically are reported. Samples containing cycasin alone had a small but clearly increased frequency of genetic damage. Samples containing rat cecal organisms without cycasin showed no increase in genetic activity. Anaerobic incubation resulted in no increase in genetic activity in any of the samples. PMID:6338830

  2. Effect of preoperative shampoos with chlorhexidine or iodophor on emergence of resident scalp flora in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Leclair, J M; Winston, K R; Sullivan, B F; O'Connell, J M; Harrington, S M; Goldmann, D A

    1988-01-01

    Wound contamination with endogenous bacterial scalp flora plays an important role in the pathogenesis of postoperative neurosurgical infections. To assess the effect of preoperative antiseptic shampoos on the emergence of resident scalp flora during surgery and subsequent wound contamination, we randomized 151 neurosurgical procedures into four study groups: group A--preoperative shampoos with chlorhexidine, surgical scalp preparation with chlorhexidine; group B--no shampoos, surgical preparation with chlorhexidine; group C--shampoos with iodophor, surgical preparation with iodophor; group D--no shampoos, surgical preparation with iodophor. Quantitative cultures of the scalp were obtained preoperatively and at the end of surgery, and qualitative wound cultures were taken prior to wound closure. Group A had the lowest concentration of bacteria on the scalp both preoperatively and postoperatively (median range = 30 [0-5.7 x 10(5)] and 0 [0-2.5 x 10(3)] respectively). Group A also had significantly fewer positive postoperative scalp cultures (29%) than groups B (51%), C (58%), and D (53%) (P less than 0.05), as well as fewer positive wound cultures (20% v 25%, 42%, and 30% respectively). A density of bacteria on the scalp of greater than 10(2)/4cm2 best predicted the presence of bacteria in the wound. Repeated preoperative shampoos with chlorhexidine reduce intraoperative emergence of resident skin flora and subsequent contamination of the wound.

  3. Effect of preoperative shampoos with chlorhexidine or iodophor on emergence of resident scalp flora in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Leclair, J M; Winston, K R; Sullivan, B F; O'Connell, J M; Harrington, S M; Goldmann, D A

    1988-01-01

    Wound contamination with endogenous bacterial scalp flora plays an important role in the pathogenesis of postoperative neurosurgical infections. To assess the effect of preoperative antiseptic shampoos on the emergence of resident scalp flora during surgery and subsequent wound contamination, we randomized 151 neurosurgical procedures into four study groups: group A-preoperative shampoos with chlorhexidine, surgical scalp preparation with chlorhexidine; group B-no shampoos, surgical preparation with chlorhexidine; group C-shampoos with iodophor, surgical preparation with iodophor; group D-no shampoos, surgical preparation with iodophor. Quantitative cultures of the scalp were obtained preoperatively and at the end of surgery, and qualitative wound cultures were taken prior to wound closure. Group A had the lowest concentration of bacteria on the scalp both preoperatively and postoperatively (median range = 30 [0-5.7 x 10(5)] and 0 [0-2.5 x 10(3)] respectively). Group A also had significantly fewer positive postoperative scalp cultures (29%) than groups B (51%), C (58%), and D (53%) (P<0.05), as well as fewer positive wound cultures (20% v 25%, 42%, and 30% respectively). A density of bacteria on the scalp of < 10(2)/4 cm(2) best predicted the presence of bacteria in the wound. Repeated preoperative shampoos with chlorhexidine reduce intraoperative emergence of resident skin flora and subsequent contamination of the wound.

  4. Anaerobic oral flora in the North American black bear (Ursus americanus) in eastern North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Elsburgh O; Stoskopf, Michael K; Minter, Larry J; Stringer, Elizabeth M

    2012-06-01

    Microbial flora can provide insight into the ecology and natural history of wildlife in addition to improving understanding of health risks. This study examines the anaerobic oral flora of hunter killed black bears (Ursus americanus) in eastern North Carolina. Oral swabs from the buccal and lingual supragingival tooth surfaces of the first and second mandibular and maxillary molars of 22 black bears were inoculated onto Brucella Blood Agar plates supplemented with hemin and vitamin K after transport from the field using reduced oxoid nutrient broth. Sixteen anaerobic bacterial species, representing nine genera were identified using the RapID ANA II Micromethod Kit system and a number of organisms grown that could not be identified with the system. The most frequently identified anaerobes were Peptostreptococcus prevotii, Streptococcus constellatus, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The diversity in the anaerobic oral flora of black bear in eastern North Carolina suggests the importance of including these organisms in basic health risk assessment protocols and suggests a potential tool for assessment of bear/habitat interactions. PMID:22503889

  5. Aerobic Fitness and School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkle, J. Scott

    1997-01-01

    Provides school counselors with information on aerobic exercise (specifically running) and the psychological, behavioral, and physical benefits children obtained by participating in fitness programs. Recommends collaboration between school counselors and physical education teachers and gives a preliminary discussion of aerobic running and its…

  6. Aerobic Fitness and School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkle, J. Scott

    1992-01-01

    Provides school counselors with information regarding aerobic exercise (specifically running), and the psychological, behavioral, and physical benefits children obtain by participating in fitness programs. Presents methods of collaboration between school counselors and physical education teachers. Offers preliminary discussion of aerobic running…

  7. Exercise, Animal Aerobics, and Interpretation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Valerie

    1996-01-01

    Describes an aerobic activity set to music for children that mimics animal movements. Example exercises include walking like a penguin or jumping like a cricket. Stresses basic aerobic principles and designing the program at the level of children's motor skills. Benefits include reaching people who normally don't visit nature centers, and bridging…

  8. Aerobic biotransformation and mineralization of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, B.H.; Autenrieth, R.L.; Bonner, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    Respirometric mineralization studies of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) were conducted with microorganisms isolated from a site contaminated with munitions waste in Illinois. Nine aerobic bacterial species were isolated under a carbon- and nitrogen-limited condition and tentatively identified as: one Pseudomonas species; one Enterobacter species; and seven Alcaligenes species. Experiments were performed using each of the nine organisms individually and with a consortium of all nine bacterial species. The aerobic microorganisms were cultured in a sterile nutrient solution with glucose and 20 mg/L TNT. Mineralization was determined using uniformly ring-labeled {sup 14}C-TNT in a respirometer that trapped the evolved CO{sub 2}. Biodegradation behavior was characterized based on oxygen consumption, distribution of {sup 14}C activity, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of TNT and its transformation products.

  9. The aerobic activity of metronidazole against anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dione, Niokhor; Khelaifia, Saber; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Raoult, Didier

    2015-05-01

    Recently, the aerobic growth of strictly anaerobic bacteria was demonstrated using antioxidants. Metronidazole is frequently used to treat infections caused by anaerobic bacteria; however, to date its antibacterial activity was only tested in anaerobic conditions. Here we aerobically tested using antioxidants the in vitro activities of metronidazole, gentamicin, doxycycline and imipenem against 10 common anaerobic and aerobic bacteria. In vitro susceptibility testing was performed by the disk diffusion method, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by Etest. Aerobic culture of the bacteria was performed at 37°C using Schaedler agar medium supplemented with 1mg/mL ascorbic acid and 0.1mg/mL glutathione; the pH was adjusted to 7.2 by 10M KOH. Growth of anaerobic bacteria cultured aerobically using antioxidants was inhibited by metronidazole after 72h of incubation at 37°C, with a mean inhibition diameter of 37.76mm and an MIC of 1μg/mL; however, strains remained non-sensitive to gentamicin. No growth inhibition of aerobic bacteria was observed after 24h of incubation at 37°C with metronidazole; however, inhibition was observed with doxycycline and imipenem used as controls. These results indicate that bacterial sensitivity to metronidazole is not related to the oxygen tension but is a result of the sensitivity of the micro-organism. In future, both culture and antibiotic susceptibility testing of strictly anaerobic bacteria will be performed in an aerobic atmosphere using antioxidants in clinical microbiology laboratories.

  10. [Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis].

    PubMed

    Djukić, Slobodanka; Ćirković, Ivana; Arsić, Biljana; Garalejić, Eliana

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a common, complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora. When symptomatic, it is associated with a malodorous vaginal discharge and on occasion vaginal burning or itching. Under normal conditions, lactobacilli constitute 95% of the bacteria in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with severe reduction or absence of the normal H2O2-producing lactobacilli and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria and Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mobiluncus species. Most types of infectious disease are diagnosed by culture, by isolating an antigen or RNA/DNA from the microbe, or by serodiagnosis to determine the presence of antibodies to the microbe. Therefore, demonstration of the presence of an infectious agent is often a necessary criterion for the diagnosis of the disease. This is not the case for bacterial vaginosis, since the ultimate cause of the disease is not yet known. There are a variety of methods for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis but no method can at present be regarded as the best. Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel, whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Nugent's scoring system has been further developed and includes validation of the categories of observable bacteria structures. Up-to-date molecular tests are introduced, and better understanding of vaginal microbiome, a clear definition for bacterial vaginosis, and short-term and long-term fluctuations in vaginal microflora will help to better define molecular tests within the broader clinical context. PMID:24073569

  11. Enhancing flora balance in the gastrointestinal tract of mice by lactic acid bacteria from Chinese sourdough and enzyme activities indicative of metabolism of protein, fat, and carbohydrate by the flora.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong; Yu, Xiaomin; Wu, Yaoping; Chen, Xingxing; Wei, Hua; Shah, Nagendra P; Xu, Feng

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of administration of 5 strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from traditional Chinese sourdough on the flora balance of gastrointestinal tract of mice. We specifically measured Enterococcus, Enterobacter, Bacteroides, and Lactobacillus by plate count and real-time PCR methods, and α-glucosidase, lactate dehydrogenase, esterase, and aminopeptidase activities as indicative of metabolism of sugar, fat, and protein from LAB isolated from feces of mice in vitro. The results showed that administration of Lactobacillus acidophilus LAC0201 and Lactobacillus fermentum LFE0302 lowered the uricacid index of serum. Lactobacillus acidophilus LAC0201, L. fermentum LFE0302, as well as Lactobacillus curvatus LCU0401 administration resulted in a reduction in the opportunistic pathogens (i.e., Enterococcus and Enterobacter), meanwhile, administration of L. fermentum LFE0302 and Lactobacillus sp. ULA0104 resulted in an increase in the counts of Lactobacillus. Lactobacillus fermentum LFE0302 administration increased starch digestion of intestinal flora after 4wk of feeding and also resulted in increased α-glucosidase activity in the intestinal flora after 3wk of feeding. We found a similar trend in esterase activity after administration of L. acidophilus LAC0201 for 3wk. Hence, our study suggested that LAB from Chinese sourdough might be used as potential probiotics to strengthen the flora balance in gastrointestinal tract and positively change the metabolism of nutrients through bacterial enzyme activities. PMID:27448855

  12. Arman' Flora of the magadan region and development of floras in the North Pacific during the Albian-Paleocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, A. B.

    2011-02-01

    The Arman' Flora from volcanogenic-sedimentary deposits in the Arman' River basin and Naraula Formation in the Nel'kandzha-Khasyn interfluve includes 82 species of fossil plants comprising liverworts, horsetails, ferns, caytonealeans, cycadaleans, ginkgoaleans, czekanowskialeans, conifers, gymnosperms incertae sedis, and angiosperms. The Arman' Flora appears to be of Turonian-Coniacian age, as it is close to the reliably dated Penzhina and Kaivayam floras from the Northwest Kamchatka and to Tyl'pegyrgynai Flora of the Pekul'nei Ridge. The dating is consistent with isotopic dates (40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb SHRIMP) characterizing the age of plant-bearing sequences. Based on the considered position of the Arman' Flora in the scheme of Cretaceous florogenesis, a leading role in that florogenesis was played by the gradual invasion of floras by new, angiosperm dominated, plant communities. These communities initially populated unstable habitats in the coastal lowlands of Northeast Asia and Alaska, gradually invading with time the Asiatic intracontinental areas. The peculiar combination of Early and Late Cretaceous plants characteristic of the Arman' Flora is strong evidence that Cenophytic plant communities dominated by angiosperms colonized areas still populated in the Late Cretaceous by Mesophytic communities. Absence of Mesophytic and Cenophytic taxa mixing in the Arman' Flora burials suggests a replacement of plant communities as whole rather than of separate plants by more advanced taxa.

  13. [The conjunctival flora of HIV-positive patients in an advanced stage].

    PubMed

    Gümbel, H; Ohrloff, C; Shah, P M

    1990-01-01

    We evaluated the incidence of bacterial cultures taken from 23 outpatient and nosocomial AIDS patients. It was found that 36.6% of the 11 outpatients had non-pathogenic bacterial flora (Staphylococcus epidermis). Staphylococcus aureus as a pathogenic bacterium was found in 25% of the positive cultures in a group of 12 nosocomial patients. Candida albicans, a fungus, was also found in 25%, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the only gram-negative bacteria, was identified in 8.3%. Staphylococcus epidermidis was found in 18.8%. It was concluded that preoperative cultures of the conjunctival sac of hospitalized AIDS patients are essential before intraocular procedures are carried out. There must be no apparent infection of the conjunctiva. PMID:2120120

  14. Conjunctival flora of healthy and diseased eyes of grey seals (Halichoerus grypus): implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Fleming, M; Bexton, S

    2016-07-23

    Ocular pathology is relatively common in stranded seals admitted to wildlife rehabilitation hospitals. Some have pre-existing problems, while others develop eye problems in captivity, and in particular ulcerative keratitis, due to factors such as large prominent eyes, suboptimal water quality, trauma and infighting. Despite treatment, corneal ulcerations can rapidly progress to 'melting' ulcers with subsequent rupture of the globe. In this case series, 32 grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) had conjunctival swabs taken on admission to a UK wildlife hospital to identify ocular bacterial flora and nine had subsequent swabs taken after four weeks to see if this changed in captivity. Additionally, nine seals with ocular pathology were also swabbed. Although a wide range of bacteria were cultured on admission, the most common isolates were Gemella haemolysans, Escherichia coli and Clostridium perfringens All 'melting' ulcers were associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which suggests this bacterial species may be significant in the pathogenesis of progressive stromal ulceration in grey seals. PMID:27188623

  15. Hand washing: changes in the skin flora.

    PubMed

    de Almeida e Borges, Lizandra Ferreira; Silva, Bruno Leonardo; Gontijo Filho, Paulo Pinto

    2007-08-01

    Frequent hand washing may result in skin damage and increase the number of microorganisms that colonize the skin. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in total flora of healthy and damaged hands that were caused by the use of gloves, soap, and antiseptics. Samples were collected from the healthy and damaged hands of 30 health care professionals before and after washing with water and nonmedicated soap for the technique of sterile polyethylene bag. Fifteen additional volunteers (technicians and students) were asked to wash their hands 20 times with water and soap; those with complaints of irritation were evaluated separately. Damaged or healthy hands did not present statistically significant differences (P > .05) in terms of qualitative analysis of epidemiologically important microorganisms; however, washing with water and soap was effective only for healthy hands. In short, the water and soap washing of damaged hands was not effective in reducing their contamination.

  16. Quantifying factors limiting aerobic degradation during aerobic bioreactor landfilling.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Ramin; Mostafid, M Erfan; Han, Byunghyun; Imhoff, Paul T; Chiu, Pei; Augenstein, Don; Kayhanian, Masoud; Tchobanoglous, George

    2010-08-15

    A bioreactor landfill cell at Yolo County, California was operated aerobically for six months to quantify the extent of aerobic degradation and mechanisms limiting aerobic activity during air injection and liquid addition. The portion of the solid waste degraded anaerobically was estimated and tracked through time. From an analysis of in situ aerobic respiration and gas tracer data, it was found that a large fraction of the gas-filled pore space was in immobile zones where it was difficult to maintain aerobic conditions, even at relatively moderate landfill cell-average moisture contents of 33-36%. Even with the intentional injection of air, anaerobic activity was never less than 13%, and sometimes exceeded 65%. Analyses of gas tracer and respiration data were used to quantify rates of respiration and rates of mass transfer to immobile gas zones. The similarity of these rates indicated that waste degradation was influenced significantly by rates of oxygen transfer to immobile gas zones, which comprised 32-92% of the gas-filled pore space. Gas tracer tests might be useful for estimating the size of the mobile/immobile gas zones, rates of mass transfer between these regions, and the difficulty of degrading waste aerobically in particular waste bodies. PMID:20704218

  17. Nested taxa-area curves for eastern United States floras

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The slopes of log-log species-area curves have been studied extensively and found to be influenced by the range of areas under study. Two such studies of eastern United States floras have yielded species-area curve slopes which differ by more than 100%: 0.251 and 0.113. The first slope may be too steep because the flora of the world was included, and both may be too steep because noncontiguous areas were used. These two hypotheses were tested using a set of nested floras centered in Ohio and continuing up to the flora of the world. The results suggest that this set of eastern United States floras produces a log-log species-area curve with a slope of approximately 0.20 with the flora of the world excluded, and regardless of whether or not the floras are from nested areas. Genera- and family-area curves are less steep than species-area curves and show similar patterns. Taxa ratio curves also increase with area, with the species/family ratio showing the steepest slope.

  18. Effect of wine-based marinades on the behavior of Salmonella Typhimurium and background flora in beef fillets.

    PubMed

    Nisiotou, A; Chorianopoulos, N G; Gounadaki, A; Panagou, E Z; Nychas, G-J E

    2013-06-17

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the wine-based marinades to control the survival of acid-adapted and non-adapted Salmonella Typhimurium and background flora of fresh beef stored aerobically or under modified atmosphere. Beef slices were inoculated with a 3-strain cocktail of acid-adapted or non-adapted Salmonella Typhimurium strains DT 193, 4/74 and DSM 554 and marinated by immersion in wine (W) or wine supplemented with 0.3% thyme essential oil (WEO), for 12h at 4°C. Marinated slices were then stored under air or modified atmosphere conditions at 5°C. S. Typhimurium and background flora were followed for a 19-day period of storage. S. Typhimurium individual strains were monitored by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Marination with wine significantly (P<0.05) reduced the background flora compared to the control (non-marinated). Furthermore, immersion of fillets in W or WEO marinades for 12h significantly (P<0.05) reduced the levels of S. Typhimurium compared to the non-marinated (control) samples by 1.1 and 1.4logCFU/g or 2.0 and 1.9logCFU/g for acid-adapted and non-adapted cells, respectively. Acid-adapted cells were more susceptible (P<0.05) to the addition of thyme essential oil in the wine marinade. The epidemic multi-drug resistant DT 193, the 4/74 and DSM 554 strains survived marination (for both W and WEO) and were detected at about similar proportions as revealed by PFGE results. Present results indicate that wine-based marinades are efficient, from a safety and shelf life stand point, in reducing pathogen's levels as well as the background beef flora. PMID:23669095

  19. NASOPHARYNGEAL FLORA IN HEALTH AND DURING RESPIRATORY DISEASE IN ISOLATED COMMUNITIES IN ALABAMA AND LABRADOR

    PubMed Central

    Burky, E. L.; Smillie, W. G.

    1929-01-01

    Studies of the bacterial flora of the nasopharynx were made in isolated communities in South Alabama and Labrador. The basic flora was determined in both communities. In Alabama an epidemic of common colds was studied. In Labrador cases of sporadic colds and an epidemic of tracheitis were studied. Gram-negative cocci were found in nearly all normal individuals in moderate numbers. In pathological states there was a suppression of these organisms. Staphylococci were found in small numbers in about half of the normal individuals. In pathological conditions they disappeared from most of those affected but were found in increased numbers in a few individuals. Pfeiffer bacilli were absent or present only in small numbers in normal individuals. During the epidemic of colds in Alabama there was an increase in the number of strains recovered and an increase in the relative numbers of the bacilli in each throat. The highest prevalence was found one month after the epidemic had reached its height. In Labrador a similar increase was coincident with an epidemic of tracheitis. During normal periods the majority of the Pfeiffer strains were of the para non-indol-forming type. During epidemic periods the strains recovered were largely true indol-forming B. Pfeifferi. Hemolytic streptococci were rarely found in normals. During disease prevalence periods they appeared in a small number of persons. In Alabama, indifferent streptococci resembled the hemolytic streptococci in their distribution. In Labrador they were found to be widely distributed in both health and disease and composed apparently a part of the normal flora. Green streptococci were found to be widely distributed in fairly large numbers both in health and disease. Intermediates, or organisms midway between green streptococci and pneumococci, were found in moderate numbers in each series of persons studied. Early in the Alabama epidemic they were present in large numbers in nearly all persons. Pneumococci were not found

  20. Bats as reservoir hosts of human bacterial pathogen, Bartonella mayotimonensis.

    PubMed

    Veikkolainen, Ville; Vesterinen, Eero J; Lilley, Thomas M; Pulliainen, Arto T

    2014-06-01

    A plethora of pathogenic viruses colonize bats. However, bat bacterial flora and its zoonotic threat remain ill defined. In a study initially conducted as a quantitative metagenomic analysis of the fecal bacterial flora of the Daubenton's bat in Finland, we unexpectedly detected DNA of several hemotrophic and ectoparasite-transmitted bacterial genera, including Bartonella. Bartonella spp. also were either detected or isolated from the peripheral blood of Daubenton's, northern, and whiskered bats and were detected in the ectoparasites of Daubenton's, northern, and Brandt's bats. The blood isolates belong to the Candidatus-status species B. mayotimonensis, a recently identified etiologic agent of endocarditis in humans, and a new Bartonella species (B. naantaliensis sp. nov.). Phylogenetic analysis of bat-colonizing Bartonella spp. throughout the world demonstrates a distinct B. mayotimonensis cluster in the Northern Hemisphere. The findings of this field study highlight bats as potent reservoirs of human bacterial pathogens.

  1. Hypothetical flora and fauna of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksanfomality, L. V.

    2014-12-01

    Hypothetical habitability of some of extrasolar planets is a fundamental question of science. Some of exoplanets possess physical conditions close to those of Venus. Therefore, the planet Venus, with its dense and hot (735 K) oxygen-free atmosphere of CO2, having a high pressure of 9.2 MPa at the surface, can be a natural laboratory for this kind of studies. The only existing data on the planet's surface are still the results obtained by the Soviet VENERA landers in the 1970s and 1980s. The TV experiments of Venera-9 and 10 (October, 1975) and Venera-13 and 14 (March, 1982) delivered 41 panoramas of Venus surface (or their fragments). There have not been any similar missions to Venus in the subsequent 39 and 32 years. In the absence of new landing missions to Venus, the VENERA panoramas have been re-processed. The results of these missions are studied anew. A dozen of relatively large objects, from a decimeter to half a meter in size, with an unusual morphology have been found which moved very slowly or changed slightly their shape. Their emergence by chance could hardly be explained by noise. Certain unusual findings that have similar structure were found in different areas of the planet. This paper presents the last results obtained of a search for hypothetical flora and fauna of Venus.

  2. Microbial background flora in small-scale cheese production facilities does not inhibit growth and surface attachment of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, B C T; Heir, E; Møretrø, T; Skaar, I; Langsrud, S

    2013-10-01

    The background microbiota of 5 Norwegian small-scale cheese production sites was examined and the effect of the isolated strains on the growth and survival of Listeria monocytogenes was investigated. Samples were taken from the air, food contact surfaces (storage surfaces, cheese molds, and brine) and noncontact surfaces (floor, drains, and doors) and all isolates were identified by sequencing and morphology (mold). A total of 1,314 isolates were identified and found to belong to 55 bacterial genera, 1 species of yeast, and 6 species of mold. Lactococcus spp. (all of which were Lactococcus lactis), Staphylococcus spp., Microbacterium spp., and Psychrobacter sp. were isolated from all 5 sites and Rhodococcus spp. and Chryseobacterium spp. from 4 sites. Thirty-two genera were only found in 1 out of 5 facilities each. Great variations were observed in the microbial background flora both between the 5 producers, and also within the various production sites. The greatest diversity of bacteria was found in drains and on rubber seals of doors. The flora on cheese storage shelves and in salt brines was less varied. A total of 62 bacterial isolates and 1 yeast isolate were tested for antilisterial activity in an overlay assay and a spot-on-lawn assay, but none showed significant inhibitory effects. Listeria monocytogenes was also co-cultured on ceramic tiles with bacteria dominating in the cheese production plants: Lactococcus lactis, Pseudomonas putida, Staphylococcus equorum, Rhodococcus spp., or Psychrobacter spp. None of the tested isolates altered the survival of L. monocytogenes on ceramic tiles. The conclusion of the study was that no common background flora exists in cheese production environments. None of the tested isolates inhibited the growth of L. monocytogenes. Hence, this study does not support the hypothesis that the natural background flora in cheese production environments inhibits the growth or survival of L. monocytogenes.

  3. Prevention of Aerobic Spoilage of Maize Silage by a Genetically Modified Killer Yeast, Kluyveromyces lactis, Defective in the Ability To Grow on Lactic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kitamoto, H. K.; Hasebe, A.; Ohmomo, S.; Suto, E. G.; Muraki, M.; Iimura, Y.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we propose a new process of adding a genetically modified killer yeast to improve the aerobic stability of silage. Previously constructed Kluyveromyces lactis killer strain PCK27, defective in growth on lactic acid due to disruption of the gene coding for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, a key enzyme for gluconeogenesis, inhibited the growth of Pichia anomala inoculated as an aerobic spoilage yeast and prevented a rise in pH in a model of silage fermentation. This suppressive effect of PCK27 was not only due to growth competition but also due to the killer protein produced. From these results, we concluded that strain PCK27 can be used as an additive to prolong the aerobic stability of maize silage. In the laboratory-scale experiment of maize silage, the addition of a killer yeast changed the yeast flora and significantly reduced aerobic spoilage. PMID:10508111

  4. Historical development of ornithophily in the western North American flora.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, V

    1994-01-01

    The 129 ornithophilous plant species in western North America have floristic affinities with one or the other of four geofloras: the Arcto-Tertiary flora (101 species), Madro-Tertiary flora (19 species), Madrean-Tethyan flora (8 species), and Neotropical flora (1 species). The last three floras have been in continuous contact with hummingbirds since some time early in the Tertiary, and ornithophily is old in this subset of western ornithophilous plants. The Arcto-Tertiary flora had no contact with hummingbirds in Eurasia or in its early history in North America. Ornithophily is a new condition in Arcto-Tertiary plant groups, dating from the first significant contact of these plants with hummingbirds in the Eocene. Buildup of the hummingbird pollination system in the Arcto-Tertiary flora is expected to be gradual and stepwise for several reasons. Ornithophilous plant groups with Arcto-Tertiary affinities in the modern western flora form a graded series with respect to taxonomic rank, taxonomic size, and ecological diversity. The series consists of one large genus (Castilleja), three small genera (Zauschneria, etc.), species groups in several genera (Penstemon, Aquilegia, etc.), single ornithophilous species in otherwise nonornithophilous genera (seven genera--e.g., Pedicularis, Monardella), and ornithophilous races in otherwise nonornithophilous species (known in two species). It is suggested that the gradations in size of the groups approximately reflect stages in their development, with the largest ornithophilous genus being oldest, with single ornithophilous species being relatively recent, and with ornithophilous races being most recent. The observed distribution of numbers of ornithophilous species among genera is in agreement with the expectation of a gradual and stepwise development of ornithophily. PMID:7937964

  5. Microbial Flora in Chronic Periodontitis: Study at a Tertiary Health Care Center from North Karnataka

    PubMed Central

    Benachinmardi, Kirtilaxmi K; Nagamoti, Jyoti; Kothiwale, Shaila; Metgud, Sharada C

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Periodontitis is a major public health problem in India with a prevalence of 60–80%. If untreated it acts as a risk factor for systemic diseases. Data on anaerobic periodontal microflora in the Indian population is very scarce. Hence, this study was undertaken to know the nature of oral microbiota in chronic periodontitis in this region of India and also the semiquantitative study in pre- and post-treatment group and to determine antibiotic susceptibility pattern for aerobic isolates. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted on 60 cases. Material was collected from the subgingival pockets in patients with chronic periodontitis attending the Periodontology, Outpatient Department. Clinical samples were transported to the laboratory in fluid thioglycollate medium. Initially Gram's stain and Fontana stains were done. Aerobic, anaerobic, and microaerophilic culture were put up. Antibiotic sensitivity test was done for aerobic isolates. Results: Sixty samples yielded 121 isolates of which 78.34% were polymicrobial, 11.66% were monomicrobial and oral commensals were grown in 10% cases. Out of 121 isolates 91.74% were anaerobic, 7.43% were aerobic and 0.83% were microaerophilic. Fusobacterium species was the most common isolate among anaerobes. Using “paired t-test” “P” value was significant indicating significant reduction in colony count after phase-I periodontal therapy. Conclusion: This study has shown that anaerobic bacteria are important cause of chronic periodontitis, along with aerobes and microaerophilic organisms. Fusobacterium spp, Bacteroides fragilis, Porphyromonas spp and Prevotella intermedia are the most common anaerobic pathogens. Bacterial culture methods are still economical and gold standard. PMID:25949060

  6. Bacterial Diversity in a Nonsaline Alkaline Environment: Heterotrophic Aerobic Populations

    PubMed Central

    Tiago, Igor; Chung, Ana Paula; Veríssimo, António

    2004-01-01

    Heterotrophic populations were isolated and characterized from an alkaline groundwater environment generated by active serpentinization, which results in a Ca(OH)2-enriched, extremely diluted groundwater with pH 11.4. One hundred eighty-five strains were isolated in different media at different pH values during two sampling periods. To assess the degree of diversity present in the environment and to select representative strains for further characterization of the populations, we screened the isolates by using random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR profiles and grouped them based on similarities determined by fatty acid methyl ester analysis. Phenotypic characterization, determinations of G+C content, phylogenetic analyses by direct sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and determinations of pH tolerance were performed with the selected isolates. Although 38 different populations were identified and characterized, the vast majority of the isolates were gram positive with high G+C contents and were affiliated with three distinct groups, namely, strains closely related to the species Dietzia natrolimnae (32% of the isolates), to Frigoribacterium/Clavibacter lineages (29% of the isolates), and to the type strain of Microbacterium kitamiense (20% of the isolates). Other isolates were phylogenetically related to strains of the genera Agrococcus, Leifsonia, Kytococcus, Janibacter, Kocuria, Rothia, Nesterenkonia, Citrococcus, Micrococcus, Actinomyces, Rhodococcus, Bacillus, and Staphylococcus. Only five isolates were gram negative: one was related to the Sphingobacteria lineage and the other four were related to the α-Proteobacteria lineage. Despite the pH of the environment, the vast majority of the populations were alkali tolerant, and only two strains were able to grow at pH 11. PMID:15574939

  7. Die aerobe Glykolyse der Tumorzelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Friedhelm

    1981-01-01

    A high aerobic glycolysis (aerobic lactate production) is the most significant feature of the energy metabolism of rapidly growing tumor cells. Several mechanisms, which may be different in different cell lines, seem to be involved in this characteristic of energy metabolism of the tumor cell. Changes in the cell membrane leading to increased uptake and utilization of glucose, a high level of fetal types of isoenzymes, a decreased number of mitochondria and a reduced capacity to metabolize pyruvate are some factors which must be taken into consideration. It is not possible to favour one of them at the present time.

  8. Fusobacterium prausnitzii and related species represent a dominant group within the human fecal flora.

    PubMed

    Suau, A; Rochet, V; Sghir, A; Gramet, G; Brewaeys, S; Sutren, M; Rigottier-Gois, L; Doré, J

    2001-04-01

    The human gut microflora plays a key role in nutrition and health. It has been extensively studied by conventional culture techniques. However these methods are difficult, time consuming and their results not always consistent. Furthermore microscopic counts indicate that only 20 to 40% of the total flora can be cultivated. Among the predominant species of the human gut, Fusobacterium prausnitzii was reported either as one of the most frequent and numerous species or was seldom retrieved. We designed and validated a specific rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probe, called S-*-Fprau-0645-a-A-23, to accurately detect and quantify F. prausnitzii and relatives within the human fecal microflora. The target group accounted for 5.3 +/- 3% of total bacterial 16S rRNA using dot blot hybridization (10 human fecal samples) and 16.5 +/- 7% of cells stained with Dapi using in situ hybridization (10 other human fecal samples). A specific morphology seemed to be typical and dominant: two cells forming an asymmetrical double droplet. This work showed that F. prausnitzii and phylogenetically related species represent a dominant group within the human fecal flora.

  9. Does the microbial flora in the ejaculate affect the freezeability of stallion sperm?

    PubMed

    Ortega-Ferrusola, C; González-Fernández, L; Muriel, A; Macías-García, B; Rodríguez-Martínez, H; Tapia, J A; Alonso, J M; Peña, F J

    2009-06-01

    In an attempt to evaluate the possible relationship between the microbial flora in the stallion ejaculate and its ability to freeze,three ejaculates from five stallions were frozen using a standard protocol. Before freezing, an aliquot was removed for bacteriological analysis. Bacterial growth was observed in all the ejaculates studied. The isolated microorganisms were:Staphylococcus spp. and Micrococcus spp. (in all the stallions), beta-haemolytic Streptococcus (in stallions 3 and 4), Corynebacterium spp. (in stallions 1, 3-5), Rhodococcus spp. (in stallion number 2), Pseudomonas spp. (in stallion number 1) and Klebsiella spp. (in stallions 1, 3 and 5). The presence and richness of Klebsiella and beta-haemolytic Streptococcus in the ejaculate were related to two sperm variables post-thaw,namely the proportion of dead spermatozoa (ethidium+ cells; r = 0.55, p < 0.05) and the amplitude of lateral displacement of the sperm head (ALH, microm; r = -0.56, p < 0.05), respectively.The degree of growth of Corynebacterium spp. in the ejaculate was positively correlated with the percentage of spermatozoa showing high caspase activity post-thaw(r = 0.62, p < 0.05). The presence and number of colonies of beta-haemolytic Streptococcus were negatively correlated (r = -0.55, p < 0.05) with low sperm caspase activity. It is concluded that the microbial flora of the equine ejaculate maybe responsible for some of the sublethal damage experimented by the spermatozoa during cryopreservation.

  10. Variations in the Oral Anaerobic Microbial Flora in Relation to Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Basavaraju, Anuradha; Durga S., Vijaya; Vanitha, B.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Pregnancy gingivitis is a major oral infection. Periodontium acts as a reservoir of inflammatory mediators and sub gingival biofilms of bacteria. Aim: To evaluate the anaerobic oral microbial flora in pregnant women before delivery and after delivery by comparing them with control group. Material and Methods: The study group included fifteen cases of pregnant women before and after delivery and healthy non-pregnant women of same age as control group. Sub gingival plaque samples were collected with the help of dentists. The samples were inoculated immediately into Thioglycollate broth (MV010), transported to the laboratory, inoculated on to selective media for anaerobes (Hi-media laboratories) incubated anaerobically (Gas pack). Results: Prevotella, Tanerella forsythia, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum, Veillonella, Peptostreptococcus were isolated. Discussion: The anaerobic bacteria in pregnant women were Prevotella, Tanerella forsythia and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Viellonella and Peptostreptococcus were seen in control group and after delivery. Research suggests that periodontal pathogens may travel the blood stream from the oral cavity to the placenta. Conclusion: Pregnancy has significant effect on periodontal tissue. There is a significant alteration of bacterial flora during and after pregnancy. Oral health has to become a part of antenatal care /check up. PMID:23285437

  11. Irinotecan-induced mucositis manifesting as diarrhoea corresponds with an amended intestinal flora and mucin profile

    PubMed Central

    Stringer, Andrea M; Gibson, Rachel J; Bowen, Joanne M; Logan, Richard M; Ashton, Kimberly; Yeoh, Ann SJ; Al-Dasooqi, Noor; Keefe, Dorothy MK

    2009-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced diarrhoea is a major oncological problem, caused by the cytotoxic effects of cancer chemotherapy. Irinotecan is linked with severe mucositis and diarrhoea, the mechanisms of which remain poorly understood. Bacterial β-glucuronidase is thought to be involved in the metabolism of irinotecan, implicating the intestinal flora. Intestinal mucins may also be implicated in the development of chemotherapy-induced diarrhoea. Rats were treated with 200 mg/kg of irinotecan and killed at 96, 120 and 144 h. The rats were monitored for diarrhoea. Pathology and immunohistochemical staining was performed. The samples were cultured and faecal DNA was analysed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Severe diarrhoea was observed from 72 to 96 h. A decrease in body mass was also observed after treatment. Significant changes in goblet cell numbers (both complete and cavitated cells) were observed in the small and large intestines. Changes in MUC gene expression were observed in the small intestine only. Modifications were observed to the intestinal flora profile, especially Escherichia coli, and an increase in the expression of β-glucuronidase was detected. In conclusion, irinotecan-induced diarrhoea may be caused by an increase in some β-glucuronidase-producing bacteria, especially E. coli, exacerbating the toxicity of active metabolites. Accelerated mucous secretion and mucin release may also contribute to the delayed onset of diarrhoea. PMID:19765103

  12. Fasting hypochlorhydria with gram positive gastric flora is highly prevalent in healthy old people.

    PubMed Central

    Husebye, E; Skar, V; Høverstad, T; Melby, K

    1992-01-01

    Fifteen healthy old people mean age 84 years (range 80-91 years), were examined to assess the effect of advanced age on the microecology of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Twelve of 15 (80%) were hypochlorhydric with pH 6.6 (0.3) (mean (SEM) and a mean bacterial count of 10(8) colony forming units (CFU) per ml (range 10(5)-10(10)) in fasting gastric aspirate. Normochlorhydric subjects had low counts (< or = 10(1) CFU/ml). The microbial flora was dominated by viridans streptococci, coagulase negative staphylococci, and Haemophilus sp. Only one subject harboured significant concentrations of Gram negative bacilli with Escherichia coli (10(4-5) CFU/ml) and Klebsiella (10(4-5)). Strict anaerobes were not found. The total concentration of short chain fatty acids in gastric aspirate was 10.6 (2.9) mmol/l (mean (SEM). Absence of significant, intraluminal fermentation of xylose to CO2 was shown by the 14C-d Xylose breath test, and ambulatory manometry showed preserved fasting motility pattern of the small intestine. Serum immunoglobulins were normal. Advanced age is accompanied by fasting hypochlorhydria and colonisation with mainly Gram positive flora in the upper gut. Other factors than old age and fasting hypochlorhydria are required for colonisation with Gram negative bacilli. PMID:1446855

  13. The Transition from Aerobic to Anaerobic Metabolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, James S.; McLellan, Thomas H.

    1980-01-01

    The transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism is discussed. More research is needed on different kinds of athletes and athletic activities and how they may affect aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms. (CJ)

  14. Aerobic exercise attenuates pulmonary inflammation induced by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Olivo, Clarice R; Miyaji, Eliane N; Oliveira, Maria Leonor S; Almeida, Francine M; Lourenço, Juliana D; Abreu, Rodrigo M; Arantes, Petra M M; Lopes, Fernanda Dtqs; Martins, Milton A

    2014-11-01

    Aerobic exercise has been recognized as a stimulator of the immune system, but its effect on bacterial infection has not been extensively evaluated. We studied whether moderate aerobic exercise training prior to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection influences pulmonary inflammatory responses. BALB/c mice were divided into four groups: Sedentary Untreated (sedentary without infection); Sedentary Infected (sedentary with infection); Trained Untreated (aerobic training without infection); and Trained Infected (aerobic training with infection). Animals underwent aerobic training for 4 wk, and 72 h after last exercise training, animals received a challenge with S. pneumoniae and were evaluated either 12 h or 10 days after instillation. In acute phase, Sedentary Infected group had an increase in respiratory system resistance and elastance; number of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL); polymorphonuclear cells in lung parenchyma; and levels of keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin (IL)-1β (IL-1β) in lung homogenates. Exercise training significantly attenuated the increase in all of these parameters and induced an increase in expression of antioxidant enzymes (CuZnSOD and MnSOD) in lungs. Trained Infected mice had a significant decrease in the number of colony-forming units of pneumococci in the lungs compared with Sedentary Infected animals. Ten days after infection, Trained Infected group exhibited lower numbers of macrophages in BAL, polymorphonuclear cells in lung parenchyma and IL-6 in lung homogenates compared with Sedentary Infected group. Our results suggest a protective effect of moderate exercise training against respiratory infection with S. pneumoniae. This effect is most likely secondary to an effect of exercise on oxidant-antioxidant balance.

  15. Antibacterial Action of Nitric Oxide-Releasing Chitosan Oligosaccharides against Pseudomonas aeruginosa under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Reighard, Katelyn P.

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan oligosaccharides were modified with N-diazeniumdiolates to yield biocompatible nitric oxide (NO) donor scaffolds. The minimum bactericidal concentrations and MICs of the NO donors against Pseudomonas aeruginosa were compared under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Differential antibacterial activities were primarily the result of NO scavenging by oxygen under aerobic environments and not changes in bacterial physiology. Bacterial killing was also tested against nonmucoid and mucoid biofilms and compared to that of tobramycin. Smaller NO payloads were required to eradicate P. aeruginosa biofilms under anaerobic versus aerobic conditions. Under oxygen-free environments, the NO treatment was 10-fold more effective at killing biofilms than tobramycin. These results demonstrate the potential utility of NO-releasing chitosan oligosaccharides under both aerobic and anaerobic environments. PMID:26239983

  16. Membrane thickening aerobic digestion processes.

    PubMed

    Woo, Bryen

    2014-01-01

    Sludge management accounts for approximately 60% of the total wastewater treatment plant expenditure and laws for sludge disposal are becoming increasingly stringent, therefore much consideration is required when designing a solids handling process. A membrane thickening aerobic digestion process integrates a controlled aerobic digestion process with pre-thickening waste activated sludge using membrane technology. This process typically features an anoxic tank, an aerated membrane thickener operating in loop with a first-stage digester followed by second-stage digestion. Membrane thickening aerobic digestion processes can handle sludge from any liquid treatment process and is best for facilities obligated to meet low total phosphorus and nitrogen discharge limits. Membrane thickening aerobic digestion processes offer many advantages including: producing a reusable quality permeate with minimal levels of total phosphorus and nitrogen that can be recycled to the head works of a plant, protecting the performance of a biological nutrient removal liquid treatment process without requiring chemical addition, providing reliable thickening up to 4% solids concentration without the use of polymers or attention to decanting, increasing sludge storage capacities in existing tanks, minimizing the footprint of new tanks, reducing disposal costs, and providing Class B stabilization.

  17. Arthritis and Aerobic Exercise: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ike, Robert W.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Arthritic patients who regularly do aerobic exercise make significant gains in aerobic and functional status, and in subjective areas like pain tolerance and mood. Still, they are often advised to curtail physical activity. Guidelines are presented for physicians prescribing aerobic exercise. An exercise tolerance test is recommended. (SM)

  18. Bacteriotherapy using fecal flora: toying with human motions.

    PubMed

    Borody, Thomas J; Warren, Eloise F; Leis, Sharyn M; Surace, Rosa; Ashman, Ori; Siarakas, Steven

    2004-07-01

    The intestinal flora may play a key role in the pathogenesis of certain gastrointestinal (GI) diseases. Components of bowel flora such as Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidus have long been used empirically as therapeutic agents for GI disorders. More complex combinations of probiotics for therapeutic bacteriotherapy have also recently become available, however the most elaborate mix of human-derived probiotic bacteria is, by definition, the entire fecal flora. Fecal bacteriotherapy uses the complete normal human flora as a therapeutic probiotic mixture of living organisms. This type of bacteriotherapy has a longstanding history in animal health and has been used sporadically against chronic infections of the bowel, especially as a treatment of last resort for patients with severe Clostridium difficile syndromes including recurrent diarrhea, colitis, and pseudomembranous colitis. Encouraging results have also been observed following infusions of human fecal flora in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and chronic constipation. The therapeutic use of fecal bacteriotherapy is reviewed here and possible mechanisms of action and potential applications explored. Published reports on fecal bacteriotherapy are few in number, and detail the results of small uncontrolled open studies and case reports. Nevertheless, given the promising clinical responses, formal research into fecal bacteriotherapy is now warranted. PMID:15220681

  19. A Cretaceous origin for fire adaptations in the Cape flora

    PubMed Central

    He, Tianhua; Lamont, Byron B.; Manning, John

    2016-01-01

    Fire has had a profound effect on the evolution of worldwide biotas. The Cape Floristic Region is one of the world’s most species-rich regions, yet it is highly prone to recurrent fires and fire-adapted species contribute strongly to the overall flora. It is hypothesized that the current fire regimes in the Cape could be as old as 6–8 million years (My), while indirect evidence indicates that the onset of fire could have reached 18 million years ago (Ma). Here, we trace the origin of fire-dependent traits in two monocot families that are significant elements in the fire-prone Cape flora. Our analysis shows that fire-stimulated flowering originated in the Cape Haemodoraceae 81 Ma, while fire-stimulated germination arose in the African Restionaceae at least 70 Ma, implying that wildfires have been a significant force in the evolution of the Cape flora at least 60 My earlier than previous estimates. Our results provide strong evidence for the presence of fire adaptations in the Cape from the Cretaceous, leading to the extraordinary persistence of a fire-adapted flora in this biodiversity hotspot, and giving support to the hypothesis that Cretaceous fire was a global phenomenon that shaped the evolution of terrestrial floras. PMID:27703273

  20. [Effects of planting years of vegetable solar greenhouse on soil microbial flora and enzyme activities].

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Li, Liang

    2013-09-01

    Taking the vegetable solar greenhouses having been planted for 2, 4, 6, 11, 13, 16, and 19 years as test objects, and with the open vegetable field as the control, this paper studied the variations of soil microbial flora and enzyme activities. With the increasing years of planting, the numbers of soil bacteria, actinomycetes, and total microbes in vegetable solar greenhouses decreased after an initial increase, and reached the maximum in the greenhouse of 11 years planting, with a significant increment of 54.8%, 63.7%, and 55.4%, respectively, as compared to the control. The number of soil fungi in the vegetable solar greenhouses increased steadily with increasing planting years, being about 2.2 times higher in the greenhouse of 11 years planting. Among the microbial physiological groups, the numbers of aerobic cellulose-decomposer, aerobic azotobacter, nitrite bacteria, denitrifier, and sulphur reducer showed the same variation trend as the soil bacteria's, and those in the greenhouse of 11 years planting being 1.5, 1.6, 1.9, 1.4, and 1.1 times of the control, respectively. The number of ammonifiers increased after an initial decrease, reached the minimum in the greenhouse of 13 years planting, being only 56.0% of the control. The enzyme activities of soil urease, polyphenol oxidase, sucrase, protease, cellulase, and alkaline phosphatase increased firstly and then decreased with the increasing years of planting, but soil catalase activity was relatively stable. Correlation analysis showed that the numbers of soil bacteria, actinomycetes, and total microbes were significantly positively correlated with all test soil enzyme activities, while the number of soil fungi had significant negative correlation with the activity of soil catalase. PMID:24417112

  1. [Effects of planting years of vegetable solar greenhouse on soil microbial flora and enzyme activities].

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Li, Liang

    2013-09-01

    Taking the vegetable solar greenhouses having been planted for 2, 4, 6, 11, 13, 16, and 19 years as test objects, and with the open vegetable field as the control, this paper studied the variations of soil microbial flora and enzyme activities. With the increasing years of planting, the numbers of soil bacteria, actinomycetes, and total microbes in vegetable solar greenhouses decreased after an initial increase, and reached the maximum in the greenhouse of 11 years planting, with a significant increment of 54.8%, 63.7%, and 55.4%, respectively, as compared to the control. The number of soil fungi in the vegetable solar greenhouses increased steadily with increasing planting years, being about 2.2 times higher in the greenhouse of 11 years planting. Among the microbial physiological groups, the numbers of aerobic cellulose-decomposer, aerobic azotobacter, nitrite bacteria, denitrifier, and sulphur reducer showed the same variation trend as the soil bacteria's, and those in the greenhouse of 11 years planting being 1.5, 1.6, 1.9, 1.4, and 1.1 times of the control, respectively. The number of ammonifiers increased after an initial decrease, reached the minimum in the greenhouse of 13 years planting, being only 56.0% of the control. The enzyme activities of soil urease, polyphenol oxidase, sucrase, protease, cellulase, and alkaline phosphatase increased firstly and then decreased with the increasing years of planting, but soil catalase activity was relatively stable. Correlation analysis showed that the numbers of soil bacteria, actinomycetes, and total microbes were significantly positively correlated with all test soil enzyme activities, while the number of soil fungi had significant negative correlation with the activity of soil catalase.

  2. Probiotics Shown To Change Bacterial Community Structure in the Avian Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Netherwood, Trudy; Gilbert, H. J.; Parker, D. S.; O’Donnell, A. G.

    1999-01-01

    Culturing and molecular techniques were used to monitor changes in the bacterial flora of the avian gastrointestinal (GI) tract following introduction of genetically modified (GM) and unmodified probiotics. Community hybridization of amplified 16S ribosomal DNA demonstrated that the bacterial flora of the GI tract changed significantly in response to the probiotic treatments. The changes were not detected by culturing. Although both GM and non-GM strains of Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 11508 changed the bacterial flora of the chicken GI tract, they did so differently. Probing the community DNA with an Enterococcus faecalis-specific probe showed that the relative amount of E. faecalis in the total eubacterial population increased in the presence of the non-GM strain and decreased in the presence of the GM probiotic compared with the results obtained with an untreated control group. PMID:10543832

  3. Bacterial Sialidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Data shows that elevated sialidase in bacterial vaginosis patients correlates to premature births in women. Bacterial sialidase also plays a significant role in the unusual colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients. Crystals of Salmonella sialidase have been reproduced and are used for studying the inhibitor-enzyme complexes. These inhibitors may also be used to inhibit a trans-sialidase of Trypanosome cruzi, a very similar enzyme to bacterial sialidase, therefore preventing T. cruzi infection, the causitive agent of Chagas' disease. The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography suggests that inhibitors of bacterial sialidases can be used as prophylactic drugs to prevent bacterial infections in these critical cases.

  4. Effects of a Chlorhexidine Gluconate-Containing Mouthwash on the Vitality and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of In Vitro Oral Bacterial Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    McBain, Andrew J.; Bartolo, Robert G.; Catrenich, Carl E.; Charbonneau, Duane; Ledder, Ruth G.; Gilbert, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Oral bacterial microcosms, established using saliva inocula from three individuals, were maintained under a feast-famine regime within constant-depth film fermenters. Steady-state communities were exposed four times daily, postfeeding, to a chlorhexidine (CHX) gluconate-containing mouthwash (CHXM) diluted to 0.06% (wt/vol) antimicrobial content. The microcosms were characterized by heterotrophic plate counts and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). CHXM caused significant decreases in both total anaerobe and total aerobe/facultative anaerobe counts (P < 0.05), together with lesser decreases in gram-negative anaerobes. The degree of streptococcal and actinomycete inhibition varied considerably among individuals. DGGE showed that CHXM exposure caused considerable decreases in microbial diversity, including marked reductions in Prevotella sp. and Selenomonas infelix. Pure-culture studies of 10 oral bacteria (eight genera) showed that Actinomyces naeslundii, Veillonella dispar, Prevotella nigrescens, and the streptococci were highly susceptible to CHX, while Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Neisseria subflava were the least susceptible. Determination of the MICs of triclosan, CHX, erythromycin, penicillin V, vancomycin, and metronidazole for microcosm isolates, before and after 5 days of CHXM exposure, showed that CHXM exposure altered the distribution of isolates toward those that were less susceptible to CHX (P < 0.05). Changes in susceptibility distributions for the other test agents were not statistically significant. In conclusion, population changes in plaque microcosms following repeated exposure to CHXM represented an inhibition of the most susceptible flora with a clonal expansion of less susceptible species. PMID:12902270

  5. Distribution patterns in the native vascular flora of Iceland.

    PubMed

    Wasowicz, Pawel; Pasierbiński, Andrzej; Przedpelska-Wasowicz, Ewa Maria; Kristinsson, Hörður

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to reveal biogeographical patterns in the native vascular flora of Iceland and to define ecological factors responsible for these patterns. We analysed dataset of more than 500,000 records containing information on the occurrence of vascular plants. Analysis of ecological factors included climatic (derived from WORLDCLIM data), topographic (calculated from digital elevation model) and geological (bedrock characteristics) variables. Spherical k-means clustering and principal component analysis were used to detect biogeographical patterns and to study the factors responsible for them. We defined 10 biotic elements exhibiting different biogeographical patterns. We showed that climatic (temperature-related) and topographic variables were the most important factors contributing to the spatial patterns within the Icelandic vascular flora and that these patterns are almost completely independent of edaphic factors (bedrock type). Our study is the first one to analyse the biogeographical differentiation of the native vascular flora of Iceland.

  6. Flora from the Induan stage (Lower Triassic) of Middle Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogucheva, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    The first data on the taxonomic composition of the Induan flora of Siberia are presented. The investigation of Triassic reference sections in northern Siberia (eastern Taimyr, Lena-Anabar Trough, Verkhoyansk region) and correlation with volcano-sedimentary complexes of the Tungus and Kuznetsk basins made it possible to establish for the first time the taxonomic composition of the flora from the Induan Stage of Siberia. Its composition is heterogeneous, forming two large plant formations, which occupied different ecological niches. On the eastern coastal-marine margins of Siberia (eastern Taimyr, Olenek coast, Verkhoyansk region), the Induan flora was largely characterized by lepidophytic ( Tomiostrobus) plants, while in the intracontinental areas (Tungus and Kuznetsk basins, partly Verkhoyansk region), it was characterized by Equisetales-Filicales communities.

  7. Distribution patterns in the native vascular flora of Iceland.

    PubMed

    Wasowicz, Pawel; Pasierbiński, Andrzej; Przedpelska-Wasowicz, Ewa Maria; Kristinsson, Hörður

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to reveal biogeographical patterns in the native vascular flora of Iceland and to define ecological factors responsible for these patterns. We analysed dataset of more than 500,000 records containing information on the occurrence of vascular plants. Analysis of ecological factors included climatic (derived from WORLDCLIM data), topographic (calculated from digital elevation model) and geological (bedrock characteristics) variables. Spherical k-means clustering and principal component analysis were used to detect biogeographical patterns and to study the factors responsible for them. We defined 10 biotic elements exhibiting different biogeographical patterns. We showed that climatic (temperature-related) and topographic variables were the most important factors contributing to the spatial patterns within the Icelandic vascular flora and that these patterns are almost completely independent of edaphic factors (bedrock type). Our study is the first one to analyse the biogeographical differentiation of the native vascular flora of Iceland. PMID:25036368

  8. Distribution Patterns in the Native Vascular Flora of Iceland

    PubMed Central

    Wasowicz, Pawel; Pasierbiński, Andrzej; Przedpelska-Wasowicz, Ewa Maria; Kristinsson, Hörður

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to reveal biogeographical patterns in the native vascular flora of Iceland and to define ecological factors responsible for these patterns. We analysed dataset of more than 500,000 records containing information on the occurrence of vascular plants. Analysis of ecological factors included climatic (derived from WORLDCLIM data), topographic (calculated from digital elevation model) and geological (bedrock characteristics) variables. Spherical k-means clustering and principal component analysis were used to detect biogeographical patterns and to study the factors responsible for them. We defined 10 biotic elements exhibiting different biogeographical patterns. We showed that climatic (temperature-related) and topographic variables were the most important factors contributing to the spatial patterns within the Icelandic vascular flora and that these patterns are almost completely independent of edaphic factors (bedrock type). Our study is the first one to analyse the biogeographical differentiation of the native vascular flora of Iceland. PMID:25036368

  9. [Probable flora: an expression mean of ecological gradients in France].

    PubMed

    Garbolino, Emmanuel; De Ruffray, Patrice; Brisse, Henry; Grandjouan, Gilles

    2013-02-01

    The application of the criterion of fidelity of plants to plants over four millions botanical observations in France is considered to characterize the ecology of 215,000 phytosociological surveys. Among those discriminant plants, some are missing of the surveys, but they can have a certain probability of occurrence: these plants are called "probable plants" and they represent the "probable flora" of a territory. The study of their geographical distribution shows ecological gradients of flora across France in a better way than only considering the botanical observations. In fact, this method mitigates the discontinuities of taxa observations whose absence may be due to historical and/or anthropogenic factors.

  10. Phytochemistry and Ethnopharmacology of the Ecuadorian Flora. A Review.

    PubMed

    Malagón, Omar; Ramírez, Jorge; Andradea, José Miguel; Morochoa, Vladimir; Armijosa, Chabaco; Gilardoni, Gianluca

    2016-03-01

    Ecuador owns many high quantity and wealthy ecosystems that contain an elevated biodiversity in flora and fauna. The use of native medicinal plants has been maintained by at least 18 different indigenous cultures; furthermore, this country has been the witness of the discovery of important medicinal plants, such as Cinchona, and is an understudied resource of new natural products. The objective of this review is to update the ethnopharmacological and phytochemical studies accomplished on the Ecuadorian flora, pointing to the 253 native families and more than 15,000 species registered at present.

  11. Bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy treated with yoghurt.

    PubMed

    Neri, A; Sabah, G; Samra, Z

    1993-01-01

    As various drugs might have an effect on the fetus during pregnancy, the use of drugs should be minimized in the pregnant woman. Since bacterial vaginosis (BV) can be associated with prematurity and postpartum complications, we searched for alternative therapy for its cure during pregnancy. Commercial yoghurt incorporates both factors necessary for maintaining the protective mechanism of the vagina, vaginal pH and lactobacillus. A total of 32 women with BV in the first trimester of pregnancy were treated with intravaginal application of yoghurt. The result was favorable indicating that the continuous correction of vaginal pH and lactobacillus flora is crucial for normal vaginal ecology. During pregnancy, a local treatment restoring the normal acidity and vaginal flora, without systemic effect, may be preferable to any other treatment. PMID:8382424

  12. Aerobic microbial enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Torsvik, T.; Gilje, E.; Sunde, E.

    1995-12-31

    In aerobic MEOR, the ability of oil-degrading bacteria to mobilize oil is used to increase oil recovery. In this process, oxygen and mineral nutrients are injected into the oil reservoir in order to stimulate growth of aerobic oil-degrading bacteria in the reservoir. Experiments carried out in a model sandstone with stock tank oil and bacteria isolated from offshore wells showed that residual oil saturation was lowered from 27% to 3%. The process was time dependent, not pore volume dependent. During MEOR flooding, the relative permeability of water was lowered. Oxygen and active bacteria were needed for the process to take place. Maximum efficiency was reached at low oxygen concentrations, approximately 1 mg O{sub 2}/liter.

  13. Degradation of triclosan under aerobic, anoxic, and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Gangadharan Puthiya Veetil, Prajeesh; Vijaya Nadaraja, Anupama; Bhasi, Arya; Khan, Sudheer; Bhaskaran, Krishnakumar

    2012-07-01

    Triclosan (2, 4, 4'-trichloro-2'-hydroxyl diphenyl ether) is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent present in a number of house hold consumables. Aerobic and anaerobic enrichment cultures tolerating triclosan were developed and 77 bacterial strains tolerating triclosan at different levels were isolated from different inoculum sources. Biodegradation of triclosan under aerobic, anoxic (denitrifying and sulphate reducing conditions), and anaerobic conditions was studied in batch cultures with isolated pure strains and enrichment consortium developed. Under aerobic conditions, the isolated strains tolerated triclosan up to 1 g/L and degraded the compound in inorganic-mineral-broth and agar media. At 10 mg/L level triclosan, 95 ± 1.2% was degraded in 5 days, producing phenol, catechol and 2, 4-dichlorophenol as the degradation products. The strains were able to metabolize triclosan and its degradation products in the presence of monooxygenase inhibitor 1-pentyne. Under anoxic/anaerobic conditions highest degradation (87%) was observed in methanogenic system with acetate as co-substrate and phenol, catechol, and 2, 4-dichlorophenol were among the products. Three of the isolated strains tolerating 1 g/L triclosan were identified as Pseudomonas sp. (BDC 1, 2, and 3).

  14. Characteristics of a Novel Aerobic Denitrifying Bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae Strain HNR.

    PubMed

    Guo, Long-Jie; Zhao, Bin; An, Qiang; Tian, Meng

    2016-03-01

    A novel aerobic denitrifier strain HNR, isolated from activated sludge, was identified as Enterobacter cloacae by16S rRNA sequencing analysis. Glucose was considered as the most favorable C-source for strain HNR. The logistic equation well described the bacterial growth, yielding a maximum growth rate (μmax) of 0.283 h(-1) with an initial NO3 (-)-N concentration of 110 mg/L. Almost all NO3 (-)-N was removed aerobically within 30 h with an average removal rate of 4.58 mg N L(-1) h(-1). Nitrogen balance analysis revealed that proximately 70.8 % of NO3 (-)-N was removed as gas products and only 20.7 % was transformed into biomass. GC-MS result indicates that N2 was the end product of aerobic denitrification. The enzyme activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, which are related to the process of aerobic denitrification, were 0.0688 and 0.0054 U/mg protein, respectively. Thus, the aerobic denitrification of reducing NO3 (-) to N2 by strain HNR was demonstrated. The optimal conditions for nitrate removal were C/N ratio 13, pH value 8, shaking speed 127 rpm and temperature 30 °C. These findings show that E. cloacae strain HNR has a potential application on wastewater treatment to achieve nitrate removal under aerobic conditions.

  15. Use of aerobic spores as a surrogate for cryptosporidium oocysts in drinking water supplies.

    PubMed

    Headd, Brendan; Bradford, Scott A

    2016-03-01

    Waterborne illnesses are a growing concern among health and regulatory agencies worldwide. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has established several rules to combat the contamination of water supplies by cryptosporidium oocysts, however, the detection and study of cryptosporidium oocysts is hampered by methodological and financial constraints. As a result, numerous surrogates for cryptosporidium oocysts have been proposed by the scientific community and efforts are underway to evaluate many of the proposed surrogates. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the suitability of aerobic bacterial spores to serve as a surrogate for cryptosporidium oocysts in identifying contaminated drinking waters. To accomplish this we present a comparison of the biology and life cycles of aerobic spores and oocysts and compare their physical properties. An analysis of their surface properties is presented along with a review of the literature in regards to the transport, survival, and prevalence of aerobic spores and oocysts in the saturated subsurface environment. Aerobic spores and oocysts share many commonalities with regard to biology and survivability, and the environmental prevalence and ease of detection make aerobic spores a promising surrogate for cryptosporidium oocysts in surface and groundwater. However, the long-term transport and release of aerobic spores still needs to be further studied, and compared with available oocyst information. In addition, the surface properties and environmental interactions of spores are known to be highly dependent on the spore taxa and purification procedures, and additional research is needed to address these issues in the context of transport.

  16. Bacterial Proteasomes

    PubMed Central

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-01-01

    Interest in bacterial proteasomes was sparked by the discovery that proteasomal degradation is required for the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, one of the world's deadliest pathogens. Although bacterial proteasomes are structurally similar to their eukaryotic and archaeal homologs, there are key differences in their mechanisms of assembly, activation, and substrate targeting for degradation. In this article, we compare and contrast bacterial proteasomes with their archaeal and eukaryotic counterparts, and we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how bacterial proteasomes function to influence microbial physiology. PMID:26488274

  17. Methods to determine aerobic endurance.

    PubMed

    Bosquet, Laurent; Léger, Luc; Legros, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Physiological testing of elite athletes requires the correct identification and assessment of sports-specific underlying factors. It is now recognised that performance in long-distance events is determined by maximal oxygen uptake (V(2 max)), energy cost of exercise and the maximal fractional utilisation of V(2 max) in any realised performance or as a corollary a set percentage of V(2 max) that could be endured as long as possible. This later ability is defined as endurance, and more precisely aerobic endurance, since V(2 max) sets the upper limit of aerobic pathway. It should be distinguished from endurance ability or endurance performance, which are synonymous with performance in long-distance events. The present review examines methods available in the literature to assess aerobic endurance. They are numerous and can be classified into two categories, namely direct and indirect methods. Direct methods bring together all indices that allow either a complete or a partial representation of the power-duration relationship, while indirect methods revolve around the determination of the so-called anaerobic threshold (AT). With regard to direct methods, performance in a series of tests provides a more complete and presumably more valid description of the power-duration relationship than performance in a single test, even if both approaches are well correlated with each other. However, the question remains open to determine which systems model should be employed among the several available in the literature, and how to use them in the prescription of training intensities. As for indirect methods, there is quantitative accumulation of data supporting the utilisation of the AT to assess aerobic endurance and to prescribe training intensities. However, it appears that: there is no unique intensity corresponding to the AT, since criteria available in the literature provide inconsistent results; and the non-invasive determination of the AT using ventilatory and heart rate

  18. Kinetics of physiological skin flora in a suction blister wound model on healthy subjects after treatment with water-filtered infrared-A radiation.

    PubMed

    Daeschlein, G; Alborova, J; Patzelt, A; Kramer, A; Lademann, J

    2012-01-01

    The effect of water-filtered infrared-A radiation (wIRA) on normal skin flora was investigated by generating experimental wounds on the forearms of volunteers utilizing the suction blister technique. Over 7 days, recolonization was monitored parallel to wound healing. Four groups of treatment were compared: no therapy (A), dexpanthenol cream once daily (B), 20 min wIRA irradiation at 30 cm distance (C), and wIRA irradiation for 30 min once daily together with dexpanthenol cream once daily (D). All treatments strongly inhibited the recolonization of the wounds. Whereas dexpanthenol completely suppressed recolonization over the test period, recolonization after wIRA without (C) and in combination with dexpanthenol (D) was suppressed, but started on day 5 with considerably higher amounts after the combination treatment (D). Whereas the consequence without treatment (A) was an increasing amount of physiological skin flora including coagulase-negative staphylococci, all treatments (B-D) led to a reduction in physiological skin flora, including coagulase-negative staphylococci. In healthy volunteers, wIRA alone and in combination with dexpanthenol strongly inhibited bacterial recolonization with physiological skin flora after artificial wound setting using a suction-blister wound model. This could support the beneficial effects of wIRA in the promotion of wound healing.

  19. Kinetics of physiological skin flora in a suction blister wound model on healthy subjects after treatment with water-filtered infrared-A radiation.

    PubMed

    Daeschlein, G; Alborova, J; Patzelt, A; Kramer, A; Lademann, J

    2012-01-01

    The effect of water-filtered infrared-A radiation (wIRA) on normal skin flora was investigated by generating experimental wounds on the forearms of volunteers utilizing the suction blister technique. Over 7 days, recolonization was monitored parallel to wound healing. Four groups of treatment were compared: no therapy (A), dexpanthenol cream once daily (B), 20 min wIRA irradiation at 30 cm distance (C), and wIRA irradiation for 30 min once daily together with dexpanthenol cream once daily (D). All treatments strongly inhibited the recolonization of the wounds. Whereas dexpanthenol completely suppressed recolonization over the test period, recolonization after wIRA without (C) and in combination with dexpanthenol (D) was suppressed, but started on day 5 with considerably higher amounts after the combination treatment (D). Whereas the consequence without treatment (A) was an increasing amount of physiological skin flora including coagulase-negative staphylococci, all treatments (B-D) led to a reduction in physiological skin flora, including coagulase-negative staphylococci. In healthy volunteers, wIRA alone and in combination with dexpanthenol strongly inhibited bacterial recolonization with physiological skin flora after artificial wound setting using a suction-blister wound model. This could support the beneficial effects of wIRA in the promotion of wound healing. PMID:22123525

  20. A Synoptic Account of Flora of Solapur District, Maharashtra (India)

    PubMed Central

    Garad, Krushnadeoray U.; Gaikwad, Sayajirao P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The present paper provides the first systematic and comprehensive account of the flora of Solapur district of Maharashtra (India). The flora of this region demonstrates a wide range of species diversity and growth forms. The vegetation of the district mainly represents tropical dry deciduous forests, thorny open scrub and vast grasslands. During the present work, a total of 1441 taxa belonging to 699 genera and 125 families of flowering plants were recorded. A new species Crinum solapurense Gaikwad et al. is described. Fabaceae is the dominant family with 210 taxa, followed by Poaceae (157 taxa), Asteraceae (85 taxa), Malvaceae (68 taxa) and Euphorbiaceae (48 taxa). Acacia is the largest genus with 25 taxa, followed by Euphorbia (23), Cyperus (22), Crotalaria (19) and Ipomoea (19). The herbaceous flora of the district is notable as it amounts to 56.21% of the whole of flora. The ratio of indigenous woody to herbaceous components is 1:1.28. The proportion of indigenous taxa (978) to the cultivated ones (460) is 1.35: 0.5 in the district. PMID:25632259

  1. Vascular flora of Douglas Point, Charles County, Maryland. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    The environment and vascular flora of a 561 hectare (1400 acre) site on the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland are described. Six habitats are represented: mixed hardwood forest, pine forest, open field, freshwater marsh, shrub swamp, and tree swamp. An annotated list of 531 species is included.

  2. Flora White (1860-1948): New Woman, Stark Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morice, Linda C.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the life of education reformer Flora White, who both represented and deviated from the stereotypical new woman portrayed in popular literature of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. White's decision to reject marriage and children in favor of a career resulted in greater financial insecurity and an unmet desire…

  3. Marine Flora and Fauna of the Northeastern United States. Sipuncula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutler, Edward B.

    This report is part of a subseries entitled "Marine Flora and Fauna of the Northeastern United States" which is designed for use by biology students, biologists, biological oceanographers and informed laymen. Contents of this report include: (1) Introduction; (2) Key to Sipuncula (Peanut Worms); (3) Annotated Systematic List of Species; (4)…

  4. A synoptic account of flora of solapur district, maharashtra (India).

    PubMed

    Garad, Krushnadeoray U; Gore, Ramchandra D; Gaikwad, Sayajirao P

    2015-01-01

    The present paper provides the first systematic and comprehensive account of the flora of Solapur district of Maharashtra (India). The flora of this region demonstrates a wide range of species diversity and growth forms. The vegetation of the district mainly represents tropical dry deciduous forests, thorny open scrub and vast grasslands. During the present work, a total of 1441 taxa belonging to 699 genera and 125 families of flowering plants were recorded. A new species Crinumsolapurense Gaikwad et al. is described. Fabaceae is the dominant family with 210 taxa, followed by Poaceae (157 taxa), Asteraceae (85 taxa), Malvaceae (68 taxa) and Euphorbiaceae (48 taxa). Acacia is the largest genus with 25 taxa, followed by Euphorbia (23), Cyperus (22), Crotalaria (19) and Ipomoea (19). The herbaceous flora of the district is notable as it amounts to 56.21% of the whole of flora. The ratio of indigenous woody to herbaceous components is 1:1.28. The proportion of indigenous taxa (978) to the cultivated ones (460) is 1.35: 0.5 in the district. PMID:25632259

  5. A synoptic account of flora of solapur district, maharashtra (India).

    PubMed

    Garad, Krushnadeoray U; Gore, Ramchandra D; Gaikwad, Sayajirao P

    2015-01-01

    The present paper provides the first systematic and comprehensive account of the flora of Solapur district of Maharashtra (India). The flora of this region demonstrates a wide range of species diversity and growth forms. The vegetation of the district mainly represents tropical dry deciduous forests, thorny open scrub and vast grasslands. During the present work, a total of 1441 taxa belonging to 699 genera and 125 families of flowering plants were recorded. A new species Crinumsolapurense Gaikwad et al. is described. Fabaceae is the dominant family with 210 taxa, followed by Poaceae (157 taxa), Asteraceae (85 taxa), Malvaceae (68 taxa) and Euphorbiaceae (48 taxa). Acacia is the largest genus with 25 taxa, followed by Euphorbia (23), Cyperus (22), Crotalaria (19) and Ipomoea (19). The herbaceous flora of the district is notable as it amounts to 56.21% of the whole of flora. The ratio of indigenous woody to herbaceous components is 1:1.28. The proportion of indigenous taxa (978) to the cultivated ones (460) is 1.35: 0.5 in the district.

  6. Natural products from true mangrove flora: source, chemistry and bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Xiao, Qiang; Xu, Jing; Li, Min-Yi; Pan, Jian-Yu; Yang, Mei-hua

    2008-10-01

    The mangrove flora is a diverse group of salt-tolerant plants growing in tropical and subtropical intertidal estuarine zones. This review summarizes the source, chemistry and bioactivities of natural products from true mangrove species worldwide. It includes 349 metabolites and 150 references. The molecular phylogeny and chemotaxonomy of true mangrove plants is discussed.

  7. Systematic analysis of the association between gut flora and obesity through high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics approaches.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chih-Min; Huang, Wei-Chih; Weng, Shun-Long; Tseng, Han-Chi; Liang, Chao; Wang, Wei-Chi; Yang, Ting; Yang, Tzu-Ling; Weng, Chen-Tsung; Chang, Tzu-Hao; Huang, Hsien-Da

    2014-01-01

    Eighty-one stool samples from Taiwanese were collected for analysis of the association between the gut flora and obesity. The supervised analysis showed that the most, abundant genera of bacteria in normal samples (from people with a body mass index (BMI) ≤ 24) were Bacteroides (27.7%), Prevotella (19.4%), Escherichia (12%), Phascolarctobacterium (3.9%), and Eubacterium (3.5%). The most abundant genera of bacteria in case samples (with a BMI ≥ 27) were Bacteroides (29%), Prevotella (21%), Escherichia (7.4%), Megamonas (5.1%), and Phascolarctobacterium (3.8%). A principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) demonstrated that normal samples were clustered more compactly than case samples. An unsupervised analysis demonstrated that bacterial communities in the gut were clustered into two main groups: N-like and OB-like groups. Remarkably, most normal samples (78%) were clustered in the N-like group, and most case samples (81%) were clustered in the OB-like group (Fisher's P  value = 1.61E - 07). The results showed that bacterial communities in the gut were highly associated with obesity. This is the first study in Taiwan to investigate the association between human gut flora and obesity, and the results provide new insights into the correlation of bacteria with the rising trend in obesity.

  8. High bacterial biodiversity increases degradation performance of hydrocarbons during bioremediation of contaminated harbor marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Dell'Anno, Antonio; Beolchini, Francesca; Rocchetti, Laura; Luna, Gian Marco; Danovaro, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    We investigated changes of bacterial abundance and biodiversity during bioremediation experiments carried out on oxic and anoxic marine harbor sediments contaminated with hydrocarbons. Oxic sediments, supplied with inorganic nutrients, were incubated in aerobic conditions at 20 °C and 35 °C for 30 days, whereas anoxic sediments, amended with organic substrates, were incubated in anaerobic conditions at the same temperatures for 60 days. Results reported here indicate that temperature exerted the main effect on bacterial abundance, diversity and assemblage composition. At higher temperature bacterial diversity and evenness increased significantly in aerobic conditions, whilst decreased in anaerobic conditions. In both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, biodegradation efficiencies of hydrocarbons were significantly and positively related with bacterial richness and evenness. Overall results presented here suggest that bioremediation strategies, which can sustain high levels of bacterial diversity rather than the selection of specific taxa, may significantly increase the efficiency of hydrocarbon degradation in contaminated marine sediments.

  9. Aerobic granular processes: Current research trends.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quanguo; Hu, Jianjun; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-06-01

    Aerobic granules are large biological aggregates with compact interiors that can be used in efficient wastewater treatment. This mini-review presents new researches on the development of aerobic granular processes, extended treatments for complicated pollutants, granulation mechanisms and enhancements of granule stability in long-term operation or storage, and the reuse of waste biomass as renewable resources. A discussion on the challenges of, and prospects for, the commercialization of aerobic granular process is provided. PMID:26873285

  10. Real-time analysis of gut flora in Entamoeba histolytica infected patients of Northern India

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Amebic dysentery is caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica and the ingestion of quadrinucleate cyst of E. histolytica from fecally contaminated food or water initiates infection. Excystation occurs in the lumen of small intestine, where motile and potentially invasive trophozoites germinate from cysts. The ability of trophozoites to interact and digest gut bacteria is apparently important for multiplication of the parasite and its pathogenicity; however the contribution of resident bacterial flora is not well understood. We quantified the population of Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium, Ruminococcus, Lactobacillus, Clostridium leptum subgroup, Clostridium coccoides subgroup, Eubacterium, Campylobacter, Methanobrevibacter smithii and Sulphur reducing bacteria using genus specific primers in healthy (N = 22) vs amebic patients (E. histolytica positive, N = 17) stool samples by Real-time PCR. Results Absolute quantification of Bacteroides (p = .001), Closrtridium coccoides subgroup (p = 0.002), Clostridium leptum subgroup (p = 0.0001), Lactobacillus (p = 0.037), Campylobacter (p = 0.0014) and Eubacterium (p = 0.038) show significant drop in their population however, significant increase in Bifdobacterium (p = 0.009) was observed where as the population of Ruminococcus (p = 0.33) remained unaltered in healthy vs amebic patients (E. histolytica positive). We also report high prevalence of nimE gene in stool samples of both healthy volunteers and amebic patients. No significant decrease in nimE gene copy number was observed before and after the treatment with antiamebic drug. Conclusions Our results show significant alteration in predominant gut bacteria in E. histolytica infected individuals. The frequent episodes of intestinal amoebic dysentery thus result in depletion of few predominant genera in gut that may lead to poor digestion and absorption of food in intestine. It further disturbs the homeostasis

  11. Survey and comparison of major intestinal flora in captive and wild ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) populations.

    PubMed

    Villers, Lynne M; Jang, Spencer S; Lent, Cheryl L; Lewin-Koh, Sock-Cheng; Norosoarinaivo, Jeanne Aimée

    2008-02-01

    A survey to identify the major intestinal species of aerobic bacteria, protozoa and helminths was conducted on captive and wild populations of ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta). Samples were collected from 50 captive lemurs at 11 zoological institutions in the United States. In Madagascar, 98 aerobic bacteria samples and 99 parasite samples were collected from eight sites chosen to cover a variety of populations across the species range. Identical collection, preservation and lab techniques were used for captive and wild populations. The predominant types of aerobic bacteria flora were identified via five separate tests. The tests for parasites conducted included flotation, sedimentation and FA/GC. Twenty-seven bacteria unique to either the captive or wild populations were cultured with eight of these being statistically significantly different. Fourteen bacteria common to both populations were cultured, of which six differed significantly. Entamoeba coli was the only parasite common to both the captive and wild populations. Giardia spp., Isospora spp., strongyles-type ova, Entamoeba spp. and Entamoeba polecki were found only in captive samples. Cryptosporidium, Balantidium coli, pinworm-type ova, and two fluke-like ova were seen only in wild samples. In addition, samples were compared for both bacteria and parasites from three unique field sites in Madagascar. In this three-site comparison, six types of bacteria were statistically significantly different. No significant differences regarding parasites were seen. Significant differences were found between the captive and wild populations, whereas fewer differences were found between sites within Madagascar. Although we isolated Campylobacter and Giardia, all animals appeared clinically healthy. PMID:17854057

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Intestinal Flora of Uygur and Han Ethnic Chinese Patients with Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ping; Cui, Min; Wang, Haikun; Gao, Hongliang; Wang, Lei; Yang, Tao; Cheng, Yongbo

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To study the correlation between intestinal flora and ulcerative colitis by analyzing the abundance of Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Clostridium, Bifidobacterium spp., and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii in the intestinal of ulcerative colitis (UC) patients and healthy controls with Uygur and Han ethnic. Methods. Bacterial genomic DNA was extracted from fecal samples and analyzed with real-time fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to identify the abundance of Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Clostridium, Bifidobacterium spp., and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. Results. The samples from UC patients, Uygur and Han ethnic combined, had higher abundance of Bacteroides (P = 0.026) but lower Clostridium (P = 0.004), Bifidobacterium spp. (P = 0.009), and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (P = 0.008) than those from healthy controls. Among UC patients, Bacteroides population was raised in acute UC patients (P ≤ 0.05), while the abundance of Clostridium, Bifidobacterium spp., Fusobacterium, and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii decreased (P ≤ 0.05) compared with the remission. In both UC patients group and control group, no difference was observed in the abundance of these 5 bacteria between the Han and the Uygur group. Conclusions. Variations in the abundance of these five bacterial strains in intestines may be associated with the occurrence of UC in Uygur and Han populations; however, these variations were not associated with ethnic difference.

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Intestinal Flora of Uygur and Han Ethnic Chinese Patients with Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Ping; Cui, Min; Wang, Haikun; Gao, Hongliang; Wang, Lei; Yang, Tao; Cheng, Yongbo

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To study the correlation between intestinal flora and ulcerative colitis by analyzing the abundance of Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Clostridium, Bifidobacterium spp., and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii in the intestinal of ulcerative colitis (UC) patients and healthy controls with Uygur and Han ethnic. Methods. Bacterial genomic DNA was extracted from fecal samples and analyzed with real-time fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to identify the abundance of Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Clostridium, Bifidobacterium spp., and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. Results. The samples from UC patients, Uygur and Han ethnic combined, had higher abundance of Bacteroides (P = 0.026) but lower Clostridium (P = 0.004), Bifidobacterium spp. (P = 0.009), and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (P = 0.008) than those from healthy controls. Among UC patients, Bacteroides population was raised in acute UC patients (P ≤ 0.05), while the abundance of Clostridium, Bifidobacterium spp., Fusobacterium, and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii decreased (P ≤ 0.05) compared with the remission. In both UC patients group and control group, no difference was observed in the abundance of these 5 bacteria between the Han and the Uygur group. Conclusions. Variations in the abundance of these five bacterial strains in intestines may be associated with the occurrence of UC in Uygur and Han populations; however, these variations were not associated with ethnic difference. PMID:26839545

  14. Lower limb loading in step aerobic dance.

    PubMed

    Wu, H-W; Hsieh, H-M; Chang, Y-W; Wang, L-H

    2012-11-01

    Participation in aerobic dance is associated with a number of lower extremity injuries, and abnormal joint loading seems to be a factor in these. However, information on joint loading is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate the kinetics of the lower extremity in step aerobic dance and to compare the differences of high-impact and low-impact step aerobic dance in 4 aerobic movements (mambo, kick, L step and leg curl). 18 subjects were recruited for this study. High-impact aerobic dance requires a significantly greater range of motion, joint force and joint moment than low-impact step aerobic dance. The peak joint forces and moments in high-impact step aerobic dance were found to be 1.4 times higher than in low-impact step aerobic dance. Understanding the nature of joint loading may help choreographers develop dance combinations that are less injury-prone. Furthermore, increased knowledge about joint loading may be helpful in lowering the risk of injuries in aerobic dance instructors and students.

  15. Can bacterial interference prevent infection?

    PubMed

    Reid, G; Howard, J; Gan, B S

    2001-09-01

    The concept that one bacterial species can interfere with the ability of another to colonize and infect the host has at its foundation the prerequisite that bacteria must attach to biological surfaces to cause infection. Although this is an over-simplification of pathogenesis, it has led to studies aimed at creating vaccines that block adhesion events. Arguably, the use of commensal bacteria (also referred to as "normal flora", "indigenous" or "autochthonous" microorganisms) to inhibit pathogens has even greater potential than vaccine use, because these bacteria are natural competitors of pathogens and their action does not require host immune stimulation. Exogenous application of commensal organisms (probiotics) has been shown to reduce the risk of infections in the gut, urogenital tract and wound sites. To manipulate and optimize these effects, further studies are required to understand cell signaling amongst commensals and pathogens within biofilms adherent to host tissues. The potential for new therapeutic regimens using probiotics is significant and worthy of further study.

  16. Binary Interactions of Antagonistic Bacteria with Candida albicans Under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Benadé, Eliska; Stone, Wendy; Mouton, Marnel; Postma, Ferdinand; Wilsenach, Jac; Botha, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    We used both aerobic and anaerobic liquid co-cultures, prepared with Luria Bertani broth, to study the effect of bacteria on the survival of Candida albicans in the external environment, away from an animal host. The bacteria were represented by Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium, Enterobacter, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Kluyvera ascorbata and Serratia marcescens. Under aerobic conditions, the yeast's growth was inhibited in the presence of bacterial growth; however, under anaerobic conditions, yeast and bacterial growth in co-cultures was similar to that observed for pure cultures. Subsequent assays revealed that the majority of bacterial strains aerobically produced extracellular hydrolytic enzymes capable of yeast cell wall hydrolysis, including chitinases and mannan-degrading enzymes. In contrast, except for the A. hydrophila strain, these enzymes were not detected in anaerobic bacterial cultures, nor was the antimicrobial compound prodigiosin found in anaerobic cultures of S. marcescens. When we suspended C. albicans cells in crude extracellular enzyme preparations from K. pneumoniae and S. marcescens, we detected no negative effect on yeast viability. However, we found that these preparations enhance the toxicity of prodigiosin towards the yeast, especially in combination with mannan-degrading enzymes. Analyses of the chitin and mannan content of yeast cell walls revealed that less chitin was produced under anaerobic than aerobic conditions; however, the levels of mannan, known for its low permeability, remained the same. The latter phenomenon, as well as reduced production of the bacterial enzymes and prodigiosin, may contribute to anaerobic growth and survival of C. albicans in the presence of bacteria.

  17. Binary Interactions of Antagonistic Bacteria with Candida albicans Under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Benadé, Eliska; Stone, Wendy; Mouton, Marnel; Postma, Ferdinand; Wilsenach, Jac; Botha, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    We used both aerobic and anaerobic liquid co-cultures, prepared with Luria Bertani broth, to study the effect of bacteria on the survival of Candida albicans in the external environment, away from an animal host. The bacteria were represented by Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium, Enterobacter, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Kluyvera ascorbata and Serratia marcescens. Under aerobic conditions, the yeast's growth was inhibited in the presence of bacterial growth; however, under anaerobic conditions, yeast and bacterial growth in co-cultures was similar to that observed for pure cultures. Subsequent assays revealed that the majority of bacterial strains aerobically produced extracellular hydrolytic enzymes capable of yeast cell wall hydrolysis, including chitinases and mannan-degrading enzymes. In contrast, except for the A. hydrophila strain, these enzymes were not detected in anaerobic bacterial cultures, nor was the antimicrobial compound prodigiosin found in anaerobic cultures of S. marcescens. When we suspended C. albicans cells in crude extracellular enzyme preparations from K. pneumoniae and S. marcescens, we detected no negative effect on yeast viability. However, we found that these preparations enhance the toxicity of prodigiosin towards the yeast, especially in combination with mannan-degrading enzymes. Analyses of the chitin and mannan content of yeast cell walls revealed that less chitin was produced under anaerobic than aerobic conditions; however, the levels of mannan, known for its low permeability, remained the same. The latter phenomenon, as well as reduced production of the bacterial enzymes and prodigiosin, may contribute to anaerobic growth and survival of C. albicans in the presence of bacteria. PMID:26566932

  18. Study of gene transfer in vitro and in the digestive tract of gnotobiotic mice from Lactococcus lactis strains to various strains belonging to human intestinal flora.

    PubMed

    Gruzza, M; Fons, M; Ouriet, M F; Duval-Iflah, Y; Ducluzeau, R

    1994-07-01

    The use of genetically modified organisms (GMO) in dairy products requires evaluation of the DNA transfer capacity from such organisms among the human intestinal microflora. Thus, both in vitro and in vivo [in the digestive tract (DT) of mice] transfer from Lactococcus lactis donor strains of the conjugative plasmid pIL205 (CmR) and the non-conjugative plasmid pIL253 (EmR) to: (1) recipient strains isolated from human faecal flora Bacteroides sp., Bifidobacterium sp., Peptostreptococcus sp. (strictly anaerobic bacterial strains) and Enterococcus faecalis, (2) a whole human faecal flora, was studied. In both cases, no gene transfer was observed to strictly anaerobic bacterial strains. DNA transfer was only observed to the E. faecalis strain: in vivo CmR E. faecalis transconjugants were isolated from sequentially multi-associated mice and when the recipient strains associated with the mice, they were a defined mixture of Bacteroides sp., Bifidobacterium sp., Peptostreptococcus sp. and E. faecalis strains. When mice were associated with the whole human faecal flora, the plasmid pIL205 was transferred into some facultative anaerobic streptococci. It was also shown that DNA transfer occurred even when the lactococcal donor strain was transient in the DT of the gnotobiotic host animals.

  19. Laboratory Study of Chemical Speciation of Mercury in Lake Sediment and Water under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Regnell, Olof; Tunlid, Anders

    1991-01-01

    Chemical speciation and partitioning of radiolabeled HgCl2 were studied in model aquatic systems consisting of undisturbed eutrophic lake sediment and water in plastic cylinders. The cylinders were either gradually made anaerobic by a gentle flow of N2-CO2 or kept aerobic by air flow. The proportion of methylated 203Hg was significantly higher, in both water and sediment, in the anaerobic systems than in the aerobic systems. The composition and total concentration of fatty acids originating from bacterial phospholipids, as well as the concentration of vitamin B12, including related cobalamins, were similar in sediments from the anaerobic and aerobic systems. Bacterial cell numbers were, on average, 3.6 times higher in the anaerobic water columns than in the aerobic ones. Volatilization of 203Hg occurred in all systems except in an autoclaved control and was of similar magnitudes in the anaerobic and aerobic systems. Incorporation of 203Hg into the sediment was significantly faster in the aerobic systems than in the anaerobic systems. These results suggest that episodes of anoxia in bottom waters and sediment cause an increase in net mercury methylation and, hence, an increase in bioavailable mercury. PMID:16348444

  20. Bacterial infections complicating tongue piercing

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Catherine HY; Minnema, Brian J; Gold, Wayne L

    2010-01-01

    Tongue piercing has become an increasingly popular form of body art. However, this procedure can occasionally be complicated by serious bacterial infections. The present article reports a case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by a Gemella species in a patient with a pierced tongue, and reviews 18 additional cases of local and systemic bacterial infections associated with tongue piercing. Infections localized to the oral cavity and head and neck region included molar abscess, glossal abscess, glossitis, submandibular lymphadenitis, submandibular sialadenitis, Ludwig’s angina and cephalic tetanus. Infections distal to the piercing site included eight cases of infective endocarditis, one case of chorioamnionitis and one case of cerebellar abscess. Oropharyngeal flora were isolated from all cases. While bacterial infections following tongue piercing are rare, there are reports of potentially life-threatening infections associated with the procedure. Both piercers and their clients should be aware of these potential complications, and standardized infection prevention and control practices should be adopted by piercers to reduce the risk. PMID:21358880

  1. Experimental determination of carbon dioxide evolution during aerobic composting of agro-wastes.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Shilpa; Srivastava, J K

    2012-10-01

    This work aims at optimal composting of agro-wastes like sugarcane bagasse, wood straw and soya husk. A mixture of these substances along with small quantity of food waste as the seed was composted aerobically and carbon dioxide evolved was determined experimentally using a composting system comprising aerobic digester, operating in near-optimal conditions with regard to adequacy of oxygen and temperature in the system. During aerobic composting of agro-waste carbon dioxide is produced due to degradation of different carbon fractions in the substrate. Carbon dioxide production rate, which is a measure of bacterial/fungal activity in composting systems, can be related to various process parameters like different carbon fractions present in the substrate and their reaction rates, progress and termination of compost phenomenon and stabilization of organic matter. This gives a balanced compromise between complexity of mathematical model and extensive experimentation, and can be used for determining optimum conditions for composting. PMID:25151714

  2. The floras of southern and tropical southeastern Yunnan have been shaped by divergent geological histories.

    PubMed

    Hua, Zhu

    2013-01-01

    The southern and tropical southeastern regions of the Yunnan Province in southwestern China have similar monsoonal climates and lowland tropical rain forest vegetations. The floras of both regions are dominated by tropical floristic elements (78.3% in southern Yunnan and 68.83% in southeastern Yunnan), and both belong to the Indo-Malaysian flora at the northern margin of tropical Asia. However, some temperate East Asian characteristic families are well represented in the flora of tropical southeastern Yunnan, while families characteristic of tropical Asia are well represented in the flora of southern Yunnan. Additionally, there are 14 mainly east Asian families in tropical southeastern Yunnan that are not found in southern Yunnan. Although the two regions share 80% of their genera, 237 genera are restricted to southern Yunnan, and 349 genera to tropical southeastern Yunnan. Furthermore, 57 genera with an East Asian distribution, 53 genera with a North temperate distribution, 22 genera endemic to China, and 17 genera with an East Asia and North America disjunct distribution are found only in tropical southeastern Yunnan. The flora of tropical southeastern Yunnan is more closely related to Eastern Asian flora, while the flora of southern Yunnan is more closely related to Indo-Malaysian flora. The divergence of the flora is well supported by the geological history of the region; the flora of tropical southeastern Yunnan was mainly derived from the South China Geoblock, while the southern Yunnan flora derived from the Shan-Thai Geoblock. PMID:23724036

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial isolates from sea otters (Enhydra lutris).

    PubMed

    Brownstein, Deborah; Miller, Melissa A; Oates, Stori C; Byrne, Barbara A; Jang, Spencer; Murray, Michael J; Gill, Verena A; Jessup, David A

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial infections are an important cause of sea otter (Enhydra lutris) mortality, and some of these infections may originate from terrestrial and anthropogenic sources. Antimicrobials are an important therapeutic tool for management of bacterial infections in stranded sea otters and for prevention of infection following invasive procedures in free-ranging otters. In this study, susceptibility to commonly used antimicrobials was determined for 126 isolates of 15 bacterial species or groups from necropsied, live-stranded injured or sick, and apparently healthy wild sea otters examined between 1998 and 2005. These isolates included both gram-positive and gram-negative strains of primary pathogens, opportunistic pathogens, and environmental flora, including bacterial species with proven zoonotic potential. Minimal evidence of antimicrobial resistance and no strains with unusual or clinically significant multiple-drug resistance patterns were identified. Collectively, these findings will help optimize selection of appropriate antimicrobials for treatment of bacterial diseases in sea otters and other marine species.

  4. Antimicrobial efficacy of preoperative skin antisepsis and clonal relationship to postantiseptic skin-and-wound flora in patients undergoing clean orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Daeschlein, G; Napp, M; Layer, F; von Podewils, S; Haase, H; Spitzmueller, R; Assadian, O; Kasch, R; Werner, G; Jünger, M; Hinz, P; Ekkernkamp, A

    2015-11-01

    Nosocomial surgical site infections (SSI) are still important complications in surgery. The underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to elucidate the possible role of skin flora surviving preoperative antisepsis as a possible cause of SSI. We conducted a two-phase prospective clinical trial in patients undergoing clean orthopedic surgery at a university trauma center in northern Germany. Quantitative swab samples were taken from pre- and postantiseptic skin and, additionally, from the wound base, wound margin, and the suture of 137 patients. Seventy-four patients during phase I and 63 during phase II were investigated. Microbial growth, species spectrum, and antibiotic susceptibility were analyzed. In phase two, the clonal relationship of strains was additionally analyzed. 18.0 % of the swab samples were positive for bacterial growth in the wound base, 24.5 % in the margin, and 27.3 % in the suture. Only 65.5 % of patients showed a 100 % reduction of the skin flora after antisepsis. The microbial spectrum in all postantiseptic samples was dominated by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). Clonally related staphylococci were detected in ten patients [nine CoNS, one methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA)]. Six of ten patients were suspected of having transmitted identical clones from skin flora into the wound. Ethanol-based antisepsis results in unexpected high levels of skin flora, which can be transmitted into the wound during surgery causing yet unexplained SSI. Keeping with the concept of zero tolerance, further studies are needed in order to understand the origin of this flora to allow further reduction of SSI. PMID:26337434

  5. Bacterial Keratitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... very quickly, and if left untreated, can cause blindness. The bacteria usually responsible for this type of ... to intense ultraviolet radiation exposure, e.g. snow blindness or welder's arc eye). Next Bacterial Keratitis Symptoms ...

  6. Climate Change and the Future of California's Endemic Flora

    PubMed Central

    Loarie, Scott R.; Carter, Benjamin E.; Hayhoe, Katharine; McMahon, Sean; Moe, Richard; Knight, Charles A.; Ackerly, David D.

    2008-01-01

    The flora of California, a global biodiversity hotspot, includes 2387 endemic plant taxa. With anticipated climate change, we project that up to 66% will experience >80% reductions in range size within a century. These results are comparable with other studies of fewer species or just samples of a region's endemics. Projected reductions depend on the magnitude of future emissions and on the ability of species to disperse from their current locations. California's varied terrain could cause species to move in very different directions, breaking up present-day floras. However, our projections also identify regions where species undergoing severe range reductions may persist. Protecting these potential future refugia and facilitating species dispersal will be essential to maintain biodiversity in the face of climate change. PMID:18648541

  7. Fire and explosion hazards to flora and fauna from explosives.

    PubMed

    Merrifield, R

    2000-06-30

    Deliberate or accidental initiation of explosives can produce a range of potentially damaging fire and explosion effects. Quantification of the consequences of such effects upon the surroundings, particularly on people and structures, has always been of paramount importance. Information on the effects on flora and fauna, however, is limited, with probably the weakest area lying with fragmentation of buildings and their effects on different small mammals. Information has been used here to gain an appreciation of the likely magnitude of the potential fire and explosion effects on flora and fauna. This is based on a number of broad assumptions and a variety of data sources including World War II bomb damage, experiments performed with animals 30-40 years ago, and more recent field trials on building break-up under explosive loading. PMID:10794911

  8. Paleogeomorphology affecting early Pennsylvanian floras in Rock Island County, Illinois

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, R. L.

    1980-12-01

    Plant fossils preserved in basal Pennsylvanian rocks of western Illinois are significant because composition of many of the paleofloras differs from those of more commonly preserved and better studied coal swamp floras. Floras dominated by Megalopteris and Lesleya and containing Noeggerathiales and Cordaites grew on well drained uplands. Subsurface data and exposure of the pre-Pennsylvanian unconformity in Rock Island County, Illinois, reveal a surface of low relief with scattered steep sided valleys as much as 60 m deep and hills up to 20 m high. A karst topography developed on Devonian limestone in the Rock Island County area. Basal Pennsylvanian strata in the Rock Island County area provide evidence for several cycles of erosion and deposition. Paleoland forms, smooth bedrock surfaces, and lack of limestone debris at the pre-Pennsylvanian unconformity (post Late Devonian - preWestphalian B) surface indicate a warm, humid climate in earliest Pennsylvanian.

  9. [Effects of nifuroxazide on fecal flora in healthy subjects].

    PubMed

    Buisson, Y; Larribaud, J

    1989-01-01

    Effect of nifuroxazide on fecal flora was studied in 12 healthy volunteers receiving, in hazardous order and double-blind procedure, three six-days courses of treatment separated by eight-days spaces of time: the conventional dosage of 400 mg twice a day, a dosage of 1200 mg once a day, and placebo. Among six settled bacteriological index (wealth of the fecal flora, percentage of gram-negative bacteria, numbers of E. coli, Enterococcus, Clostridium and Bacteroides), no significant variation was found by means of statistical study between D0, D2 and D7, nor between the three courses of treatment. Therefore nifuroxazide, even in high dosage, does not injure integrity of microbial intestinal ecosystem under so defined experimental conditions, similar with clinical conditions. PMID:2756516

  10. The Middle Eocene flora of Csordakút (N Hungary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdei, Boglárka; Rákosi, László

    2009-02-01

    The Middle Eocene fossil plant assemblage from Csordakút (N Hungary) comprises plant remains preserved exclusively as impressions. Algae are represented by abundant remains of Characeae, including both vegetative fragments and gyrogonites. Remains of angiosperms comprise Lauraceae (Daphnogene sp.), Fagaceae (cf. Eotrigonobalanus furcinervis), Ulmaceae (Cedrelospermum div. sp.), Myricaceae (Myrica sp., Comptonia div. sp.), Leguminosae (leaves and fruit), Rhamnaceae (?Zizyphus zizyphoides), Elaeocarpaceae (Sloanea nimrodi, Sloanea sp. fruit), Smilacaceae (Smilax div. sp.). The absence of gymnosperms is indicative of a floristic similarity to the coeval floras of Tatabánya (N Hungary) and Girbou in Romania. Sloanea nimrodi (Ettingshausen) Kvaček & Hably, a new element for the Hungarian fossil record indicates a floristic relation to the Late Eocene flora of Kučlin (Bohemia).

  11. Aerobic rice mechanization: techniques for crop establishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusairy, K. M.; Ayob, H.; Chan, C. S.; Fauzi, M. I. Mohamed; Mohamad Fakhrul, Z. O.; Shahril Shah, G. S. M.; Azlan, O.; Rasad, M. A.; Hashim, A. M.; Arshad, Z.; E, E. Ibrahim; Saifulizan, M. N.

    2015-12-01

    Rice being the staple food crops, hundreds of land races in it makes the diversity of rice crops. Aerobic rice production was introduced which requires much less water input to safeguard and sustain the rice production and conserve water due to decreasing water resources, climatic changes and competition from urban and industrial users. Mechanization system plays an important role for the success of aerobic rice cultivation. All farming activities for aerobic rice production are run on aerobic soil conditions. Row seeder mechanization system is developed to replace conventional seeding technique on the aerobic rice field. It is targeted for small and the large scale aerobic rice farmers. The aero - seeder machine is used for the small scale aerobic rice field, while the accord - seeder is used for the large scale aerobic rice field. The use of this mechanization machine can eliminate the tedious and inaccurate seeding operations reduce labour costs and increases work rate. The machine is easy to operate and it can increase crop establishment rate. It reduce missing hill, increasing planting and crop with high yield can be produce. This machine is designed for low costs maintenance and it is easy to dismantle and assemble during maintenance and it is safe to be used.

  12. Aerobic Dancing--A Rhythmic Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Jacki

    Fitness programs now and in the future must offer built-in cardiovascular conditioning, variety, novelty, and change to meet the physical, mental, and emotional needs of our society. Aerobic dancing (dancing designed to train and strengthen the heart, lungs, and vascular system) is one of the first indoor group Aerobic exercise programs designed…

  13. Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy after Aerobic Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Adam R.; Harber, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Current dogma suggests aerobic exercise training has minimal effect on skeletal muscle size. We and others have demonstrated that aerobic exercise acutely and chronically alters protein metabolism and induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy. These findings promote an antithesis to the status quo by providing novel perspective on skeletal muscle mass regulation and insight into exercise-countermeasures for populations prone to muscle loss. PMID:24508740

  14. Contribution to the Pteridophyte Flora of Langkawi Archipelago, Peninsular Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Maideen, Haja; Damanhuri, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    The pteridophyte flora of Langkawi Archipelago consists of 130 species, 1 subspecies and 12 varieties in 68 genera and 27 families. This value represents 22.1% of the 647 taxa at the species level and below reported for Peninsular Malaysia. Of the 143 recorded taxa of pteridophytes at the species level and below, 8 species in 2 genera and 2 families are lycophytes and the other 135 taxa in 66 genera and 25 families are monilophytes or ferns. PMID:26868714

  15. Contribution to the Pteridophyte Flora of Langkawi Archipelago, Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Maideen, Haja; Damanhuri, Ahmad

    2015-12-01

    The pteridophyte flora of Langkawi Archipelago consists of 130 species, 1 subspecies and 12 varieties in 68 genera and 27 families. This value represents 22.1% of the 647 taxa at the species level and below reported for Peninsular Malaysia. Of the 143 recorded taxa of pteridophytes at the species level and below, 8 species in 2 genera and 2 families are lycophytes and the other 135 taxa in 66 genera and 25 families are monilophytes or ferns.

  16. Influence of microbial community structure of seed sludge on the properties of aerobic nitrifying granules.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhiwei; Li, Ting; Wang, Qiuxu; Pan, Yu; Li, Lixin

    2015-09-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of microbial community structure of seed sludge on the properties of aerobic nitrifying granules, these granules were cultivated with different seed sludge, and the variation of microbial community and dominant bacterial groups that impact the nitrogen removal efficiency of the aerobic nitrifying granules were analyzed and identified using 16s rDNA sequence and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles. The results presented here demonstrated that the influence of the community structure of seed sludge on the properties of aerobic nitrifying granules was remarkable, and the granules cultivated by activated sludge from a beer wastewater treatment plant showed better performance, with a stable sludge volume index (SVI) value of 20mL/g, high extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) content of 183.3mg/L, high NH4(+)-N removal rate of 89.42% and abundant microbial population with 10 dominant bacterial groups. This indicated that activated sludge with abundant communities is suitable for use as seed sludge in culturing aerobic nitrifying granules. PMID:26354703

  17. In vitro activity of rifaximin against isolates from patients with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Pistiki, Aikaterini; Galani, Irene; Pyleris, Emmanouel; Barbatzas, Charalambos; Pimentel, Mark; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J

    2014-03-01

    Rifaximin, a non-absorbable rifamycin derivative, has published clinical efficacy in the alleviation of symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is associated with the pathogenesis of IBS. This study describes for the first time the antimicrobial effect of rifaximin against SIBO micro-organisms from humans. Fluid was aspirated from the third part of the duodenum from 567 consecutive patients; quantitative cultures diagnosed SIBO in 117 patients (20.6%). A total of 170 aerobic micro-organisms were isolated and the in vitro efficacy of rifaximin was studied by (i) minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) testing by a microdilution technique and (ii) time-kill assays using bile to simulate the small intestinal environment. At a breakpoint of 32 μg/mL, rifaximin inhibited in vitro 85.4% of Escherichia coli, 43.6% of Klebsiella spp., 34.8% of Enterobacter spp., 54.5% of other Enterobacteriaceae spp., 82.6% of non-Enterobacteriaceae Gram-negative spp., 100% of Enterococcus faecalis, 100% of Enterococcus faecium and 100% of Staphylococcus aureus. For the time-kill assays, 11 E. coli, 15 non-E. coli Gram-negative enterobacteria and three E. faecalis isolates were studied. Rifaximin produced a >3 log10 decrease in the starting inoculum against most of the tested isolates at 500 μg/mL after 24h of growth. The results indicate that rifaximin has a potent effect on specific small bowel flora associated with SIBO. This conclusion should be regarded in light of the considerable time-kill effect at concentrations lower than those achieved in the bowel lumen after administration of conventional doses in humans. PMID:24461710

  18. The Flora Mission for Ecosystem Composition, Disturbance and Productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asner, Gregory P.; Knox, Robert G.; Green, Robert O.; Ungar, Stephen G.

    2005-01-01

    Global land use and climate variability alter ecosystem conditions - including structure, function, and biological diversity - at a pace that requires unambiguous observations from satellite vantage points. Current global measurements are limited to general land cover, some disturbances, vegetation leaf area index, and canopy energy absorption. Flora is a pathfinding mission that provides new measurements of ecosystem structure, function, and diversity to understand the spatial and temporal dynamics of human and natural disturbances, and the biogeochemical and physiological responses of ecosystems to disturbance. The mission relies upon high-fidelity imaging spectroscopy to deliver full optical spectrum measurements (400-2500 nm) of the global land surface on a monthly time step at 45 meter spatial resolution for three years. The Flora measurement objectives are: (i) fractional cover of biological materials, (ii) canopy water content, (iii) vegetation pigments and light-use efficiency, (iv) plant functional types, (v) fire fuel load and fuel moisture content, and (vi) disturbance occurrence, type and intensity. These measurements are made using a multi-parameter, spectroscopic analysis approach afforded by observation of the full optical spectrum. Combining these measurements, along with additional observations from multispectral sensors, Flora will far advance global studies and models of ecosystem dynamics and change.

  19. Filamentous bacteria existence in aerobic granular reactors.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, M; Val del Río, A; Campos, J L; Méndez, R; Mosquera-Corral, A

    2015-05-01

    Filamentous bacteria are associated to biomass settling problems in wastewater treatment plants. In systems based on aerobic granular biomass they have been proposed to contribute to the initial biomass aggregation process. However, their development on mature aerobic granular systems has not been sufficiently studied. In the present research work, filamentous bacteria were studied for the first time after long-term operation (up to 300 days) of aerobic granular systems. Chloroflexi and Sphaerotilus natans have been observed in a reactor fed with synthetic wastewater. These filamentous bacteria could only come from the inoculated sludge. Thiothrix and Chloroflexi bacteria were observed in aerobic granular biomass treating wastewater from a fish canning industry. Meganema perideroedes was detected in a reactor treating wastewater from a plant processing marine products. As a conclusion, the source of filamentous bacteria in these mature aerobic granular systems fed with industrial effluents was the incoming wastewater.

  20. Isolation and characterization of aerobic microorganisms with cellulolytic activity in the gut of endogeic earthworms.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Katsuhiko; Ikeda, Kana; Yoshida, Seo

    2012-09-01

    The ability of earthworms to decompose lignocellulose involves the assistance of microorganisms in their digestive system. While many studies have revealed a diverse microbiota in the earthworm gut, including aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms, it remains unclear which of these species contribute to lignocellulose digestion. In this study, aerobic microorganisms with cellulolytic activity isolated from the gut of two endogeic earthworms, Amynthas heteropoda (Megascolecidae) and Eisenia fetida (Lumbricidae) were isolated by solid culture of gut homogenates using filter paper as a carbon source. A total of 48 strains, including four bacterial and four fungal genera, were isolated from two earthworm species. Characterization of these strains using enzyme assays showed that the most representative ones had exocellulase and xylanase activities, while some had weak laccase activity. These findings suggest that earthworms digest lignocellulose by exploiting microbial exocellulase and xylanase besides their own endocellulase. Phylogenetic analysis showed that among the cellulolytic isolates in both earthworm species Burkholderia and Chaetomium were the dominant bacterial and fungal members.

  1. 'Olegusella massiliensis' strain KHD7, a new bacterial genus isolated from the female genital tract.

    PubMed

    Diop, K; Diop, A; Raoult, D; Fournier, P-E; Fenollar, F

    2016-07-01

    We report the main characteristics of 'Olegusella massiliensis' gen. nov., sp. nov., strain KHD7 (= CSUR P2268 = DSM 101849), a new member of the Coriobacteriaceae family isolated from the vaginal flora of a patient with bacterial vaginosis. PMID:27330814

  2. Bacterial flora on cell phones of health care providers in a teaching institution.

    PubMed

    Sadat-Ali, Mir; Al-Omran, Ammar K; Azam, Quamar; Bukari, Huda; Al-Zahrani, AlHussain J; Al-Turki, Rasha A; Al-Omran, Abdallah S

    2010-06-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional study involving culture of cell phones of 288 health care providers (HCP) during a 6-month period. One hundred nine (43.6%) HCP carried infective organisms on their cell phones. It is recommended that cell phones be cleaned regularly.

  3. Bacterial flora in the sputum and comorbidity in patients with acute exacerbations of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Boixeda, Ramon; Almagro, Pere; Díez-Manglano, Jesús; Cabrera, Francisco Javier; Recio, Jesús; Martin-Garrido, Isabel; Soriano, Joan B

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine in patients admitted with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AE-COPD) the association between the isolation of potential pathogens in a conventional sputum culture and comorbidities. Patients and methods The ESMI study is a multicenter observational study. Patients with AE-COPD admitted to the Internal Medicine departments of 70 hospitals were included. The clinical characteristics, treatments, and comorbidities were gathered. The results of conventional sputum cultures were recorded. Results A total of 536 patients were included, of which 161 produced valid sputum and a potentially pathogenic microorganism was isolated from 88 subjects (16.4%). The isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30.7%) was associated with a greater severity of the lung disease (previous admissions [P= 0.026], dyspnea scale [P=0.047], post-broncodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) [P=0.005], and the BODEx index [P=0.009]); also with higher prevalence of cor pulmonale (P=0.017), heart failure (P=0.048), and cerebrovascular disease (P=0.026). Streptococcus pneumoniae (26.1%) was associated with more comorbidity according to number of diseases (P=0.018); notably, peripheral artery disease (P=0.033), hypertension (P=0.029), dyslipidemia (P=0.039), osteoporosis (P=0.0001), and depression (P=0.005). Conclusion Patients with AE-COPD and P. aeruginosa present higher severity of COPD, while those with S. pneumoniae present greater comorbidity. The potentially pathogenic microorganism obtained in the sputum culture depends on the associated comorbidities. PMID:26664106

  4. Significance of bacterial flora in abdominal irradiation-induced inhibition of lung metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Ando, K.; Koike, S.

    1988-06-01

    We have previously reported that abdominal irradiation prior to i.v. injection of syngeneic tumor cells reduced metastases in lung. Our report described an investigation of the significance of intestinal organisms in the radiation effect. We found that eliminating intestinal organisms with antibiotics totally abolished the radiation effect. Monoassociation of germ-free mice revealed that the radiation effect was observable only for Enterobacter cloacae, never for Streptococcus faecium, Bifidobacterium adlesentis, or Escherichia coli. After abdominal irradiation of regular mice, E. cloacae multiplied in cecal contents, adhered to mucous membranes, invaded the cecal wall, and translocated to mesenteric lymph nodes. Intravenous administration of E. cloacae in place of abdominal irradiation inhibited metastases. E. cloacae-monoassociated mice developed fewer metastases than germ-free mice, and the reduction was further enhanced by abdominal irradiation. We concluded that abdominal irradiation caused the invasion of E. cloacae from the mucous membrane of the intestine and inhibited formation of lung metastases.

  5. Effect of chlorhexidine 0.5% on the hand bacterial flora.

    PubMed

    Sia, R L; van der Goot, L; van Saene, H K

    1986-08-01

    The effects of cleaning the dorsal hand with chlorhexidine 0.5% in spirit was evaluated by bacteriological study in 45 adult patients. In the absence of cleaning it was found that the prevalent microorganisms were Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus viridans and Enterobacteriaceae. Cleaning the hand with chlorhexidine 0.5% eliminated all bacteria except S. epidermidis and S. aureus. In both instances, the culture results showed that the microorganisms were present in very low growth density.

  6. Band Wind Instrument Mouthpieces May Harbor Countless Disease Viruses and Bacterial Flora

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Arthur H.

    1969-01-01

    Presents the procedures, results, and conclusions of a study designed to determine (a) the amount and kind of microorganisms present on the uncleaned mouthpieces of band wind instruments and (b) the preventive measures that may be taken to destroy the microorganisms. Considers oral hygiene a must for all wind instrument players. Bibliography. (LC)

  7. Bacterial flora of skin of processed broilers after consecutive washings in potassium hydroxide and lauric aid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteria on skin of processed broilers were enumerated after each of five consecutive washes in mixtures of potassium hydroxide and lauric acid. Breast skin was taken from carcasses obtained from a commercial processing facility, and skin was cut into 5 g samples. Portions of skin were washed using ...

  8. Could petroleum biodegradation be a joint achievement of aerobic and anaerobic microrganisms in deep sea reservoirs?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Several studies suggest that petroleum biodegradation can be achieved by either aerobic or anaerobic microorganisms, depending on oxygen input or other electron acceptors and appropriate nutrients. Evidence from in vitro experiments with samples of petroleum formation water and oils from Pampo Field indicate that petroleum biodegradation is more likely to be a joint achievement of both aerobic and anaerobic bacterial consortium, refining our previous observations of aerobic degradation. The aerobic consortium depleted, in decreasing order, hydrocarbons > hopanes > steranes > tricyclic terpanes while the anaerobic consortium depleted hydrocarbons > steranes > hopanes > tricyclic terpanes. The oxygen content of the mixed consortia was measured from time to time revealing alternating periods of microaerobicity (O2 ~0.8 mg.L-1) and of aerobicity (O2~6.0 mg.L-1). In this experiment, the petroleum biodegradation changed from time to time, alternating periods of biodegradation similar to the aerobic process and periods of biodegradation similar to the anaerobic process. The consortia showed preferences for metabolizing hydrocarbons > hopanes > steranes > tricyclic terpanes during a 90-day period, after which this trend changed and steranes were more biodegraded than hopanes. The analysis of aerobic oil degrading microbiota by the 16S rRNA gene clone library detected the presence of Bacillus, Brevibacterium, Mesorhizobium and Achromobacter, and the analysis of the anaerobic oil degrading microbiota using the same technique detected the presence of Bacillus and Acinetobacter (facultative strains). In the mixed consortia Stenotrophomonas, Brevibacterium, Bacillus, Rhizobium, Achromobacter and 5% uncultured bacteria were detected. This is certainly a new contribution to the study of reservoir biodegradation processes, combining two of the more important accepted hypotheses. PMID:22196374

  9. Could petroleum biodegradation be a joint achievement of aerobic and anaerobic microrganisms in deep sea reservoirs?

    PubMed

    da Cruz, Georgiana F; de Vasconcellos, Suzan P; Angolini, Célio Ff; Dellagnezze, Bruna M; Garcia, Isabel Ns; de Oliveira, Valéria M; Dos Santos Neto, Eugenio V; Marsaioli, Anita J

    2011-12-23

    Several studies suggest that petroleum biodegradation can be achieved by either aerobic or anaerobic microorganisms, depending on oxygen input or other electron acceptors and appropriate nutrients. Evidence from in vitro experiments with samples of petroleum formation water and oils from Pampo Field indicate that petroleum biodegradation is more likely to be a joint achievement of both aerobic and anaerobic bacterial consortium, refining our previous observations of aerobic degradation. The aerobic consortium depleted, in decreasing order, hydrocarbons > hopanes > steranes > tricyclic terpanes while the anaerobic consortium depleted hydrocarbons > steranes > hopanes > tricyclic terpanes. The oxygen content of the mixed consortia was measured from time to time revealing alternating periods of microaerobicity (O2 ~0.8 mg.L-1) and of aerobicity (O2~6.0 mg.L-1). In this experiment, the petroleum biodegradation changed from time to time, alternating periods of biodegradation similar to the aerobic process and periods of biodegradation similar to the anaerobic process. The consortia showed preferences for metabolizing hydrocarbons > hopanes > steranes > tricyclic terpanes during a 90-day period, after which this trend changed and steranes were more biodegraded than hopanes. The analysis of aerobic oil degrading microbiota by the 16S rRNA gene clone library detected the presence of Bacillus, Brevibacterium, Mesorhizobium and Achromobacter, and the analysis of the anaerobic oil degrading microbiota using the same technique detected the presence of Bacillus and Acinetobacter (facultative strains). In the mixed consortia Stenotrophomonas, Brevibacterium, Bacillus, Rhizobium, Achromobacter and 5% uncultured bacteria were detected. This is certainly a new contribution to the study of reservoir biodegradation processes, combining two of the more important accepted hypotheses.

  10. Dependence of structure stability and integrity of aerobic granules on ATP and cell communication.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Liu, Yu

    2013-06-01

    Aerobic granules are dense and compact microbial aggregates with various bacterial species. Recently, aerobic granulation technology has been extensively explored for treatment of municipal and industrial wastewaters. However, little information is currently available with regard to their structure stability and integrity at levels of energy metabolism and cell communication. In the present study, a typical chemical uncoupler, 3,3',4',5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide with the power to dissipate proton motive force and subsequently inhibit adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generation, was used to investigate possible roles of ATP and cell communication in maintaining the structure stability and integrity of aerobic granules. It was found that inhibited ATP synthesis resulted in the reduced production of autoinducer-2 and N-acylhomoserine lactones essential for cell communication, while lowered extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) production was also observed. As a consequence, aerobic granules appeared to break up. This study showed that ATP-dependent quorum sensing and EPS were essential for sustaining the structure stability and integrity of aerobic granules. PMID:23011346

  11. Semiquantitative determination of mesophilic, aerobic microorganisms in cocoa products using the Soleris NF-TVC method.

    PubMed

    Montei, Carolyn; McDougal, Susan; Mozola, Mark; Rice, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The Soleris Non-fermenting Total Viable Count method was previously validated for a wide variety of food products, including cocoa powder. A matrix extension study was conducted to validate the method for use with cocoa butter and cocoa liquor. Test samples included naturally contaminated cocoa liquor and cocoa butter inoculated with natural microbial flora derived from cocoa liquor. A probability of detection statistical model was used to compare Soleris results at multiple test thresholds (dilutions) with aerobic plate counts determined using the AOAC Official Method 966.23 dilution plating method. Results of the two methods were not statistically different at any dilution level in any of the three trials conducted. The Soleris method offers the advantage of results within 24 h, compared to the 48 h required by standard dilution plating methods.

  12. Bacterial rheotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Marcos; Fu, Henry C.; Powers, Thomas R.; Stocker, Roman

    2012-01-01

    The motility of organisms is often directed in response to environmental stimuli. Rheotaxis is the directed movement resulting from fluid velocity gradients, long studied in fish, aquatic invertebrates, and spermatozoa. Using carefully controlled microfluidic flows, we show that rheotaxis also occurs in bacteria. Excellent quantitative agreement between experiments with Bacillus subtilis and a mathematical model reveals that bacterial rheotaxis is a purely physical phenomenon, in contrast to fish rheotaxis but in the same way as sperm rheotaxis. This previously unrecognized bacterial taxis results from a subtle interplay between velocity gradients and the helical shape of flagella, which together generate a torque that alters a bacterium's swimming direction. Because this torque is independent of the presence of a nearby surface, bacterial rheotaxis is not limited to the immediate neighborhood of liquid–solid interfaces, but also takes place in the bulk fluid. We predict that rheotaxis occurs in a wide range of bacterial habitats, from the natural environment to the human body, and can interfere with chemotaxis, suggesting that the fitness benefit conferred by bacterial motility may be sharply reduced in some hydrodynamic conditions. PMID:22411815

  13. The problem of bacterial diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Harries, J T

    1976-01-01

    The reported incidence of "pathogenic" bacteria, as judged by serotype, in the stools of children with acute diarrhoea has varied from 4 to 33% over the last twenty years. Techniques such as tissue culture provide a means for detecting enterotoxin-producing strains of bacteria, strains which often do not possess "pathogenic" serotypes. "Pathogenicity" requires redefinition, and the aetiological importance of bacteria in diarrhoea is probably considerably greater than previous reports have indicated. Colonization of the bowel by a pathogen will result in structural and/or mucosal abnormalities, and will depend on a series of complex interactions between the external environment, the pathogen, and the host and its resident bacterial flora. Enteropathogenic bacteria may be broadly classified as (i) invasive (e.g. Shigella, Salmonella and some Escherichia coli) which predominantly affect the distal bowel, or (ii) non-invasive (e.g. Vibrio cholerae and E. coli) which affect the proximal bowel. V. cholerae and E. coli elaborate heat-labile enterotoxins which activate adenylate cyclase and induce small intestinal secretion; the secretory effects of heat-stable E. coli and heat-labile Shigella dysenteriae enterotoxins are not accompanied by cyclase activation. The two major complications of acute diarrhoea are (i) hypernatraemic dehydration with its attendant neurological, renal and vascular lesions, and (ii) protracted diarrhoea which may lead to severe malnutrition. Deconjugation of bile salts and colonization of the small bowel with toxigenic strains of E. coli may be important in the pathophysiology of the protracted diarrhoea syndrome. The control of bacterial diarrhoea requires a corrdinated political, educational, social, public health and scientific attack. Bacterial diarrhoea is a major health problem throughout the world, and carries an appreciable morbidity and mortality. This is particularly the case during infancy, and in those developing parts of the world

  14. Fit women are not able to use the whole aerobic capacity during aerobic dance.

    PubMed

    Edvardsen, Elisabeth; Ingjer, Frank; Bø, Kari

    2011-12-01

    Edvardsen, E, Ingjer, F, and Bø, K. Fit women are not able to use the whole aerobic capacity during aerobic dance. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3479-3485, 2011-This study compared the aerobic capacity during maximal aerobic dance and treadmill running in fit women. Thirteen well-trained female aerobic dance instructors aged 30 ± 8.17 years (mean ± SD) exercised to exhaustion by running on a treadmill for measurement of maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2)max) and peak heart rate (HRpeak). Additionally, all subjects performed aerobic dancing until exhaustion after a choreographed videotaped routine trying to reach the same HRpeak as during maximal running. The p value for statistical significance between running and aerobic dance was set to ≤0.05. The results (mean ± SD) showed a lower VO(2)max in aerobic dance (52.2 ± 4.02 ml·kg·min) compared with treadmill running (55.9 ± 5.03 ml·kg·min) (p = 0.0003). Further, the mean ± SD HRpeak was 182 ± 9.15 b·min in aerobic dance and 192 ± 9.62 b·min in treadmill running, giving no difference in oxygen pulse between the 2 exercise forms (p = 0.32). There was no difference in peak ventilation (aerobic dance: 108 ± 10.81 L·min vs. running: 113 ± 11.49 L·min). In conclusion, aerobic dance does not seem to be able to use the whole aerobic capacity as in running. For well endurance-trained women, this may result in a lower total workload at maximal intensities. Aerobic dance may therefore not be as suitable as running during maximal intensities in well-trained females.

  15. Degradation of acid orange 7 in an aerobic biofilm.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Michael F; Kinkle, Brian K; Bishop, Paul L

    2002-01-01

    A stable microbial biofilm community capable of completely mineralizing the azo dye acid orange 7 (AO7) was established in a laboratory scale rotating drum bioreactor (RDBR) using waste liquor from a sewage treatment plant. A broad range of environmental conditions including pH (5.8-8.2), nitrification (0.0-4.0 mM nitrite), and aeration (0.2-6.2 mg O2 l(-1)) were evaluated for their effects on the biodegradation of AO7. Furthermore the biofilm maintained its biodegradative ability for over a year while the effects of these environmental conditions were evaluated. Reduction of the azo bond followed by degradation of the resulting aromatic amine appears to be the mechanism by which this dye is biodegraded. Complete loss of color, sulfanilic acid, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) indicate that AO7 is mineralized. To our knowledge this is the first reported occurrence of a sulfonated phenylazonaphthol dye being completely mineralized under aerobic conditions. Two bacterial strains (ICX and SAD4i) originally isolated from the RDBR were able to mineralize, in co-culture, up to 90% of added AO7. During mineralization of AO7, strain ICX reduces the azo bond under aerobic conditions and consumes the resulting cleavage product 1-amino-2-naphthol. Strain SAD4i consumes the other cleavage product, sulfanilic acid. The ability of the RDBR biofilm to aerobically mineralize an azo dye without exogenous carbon and nitrogen sources suggests that this approach could be used to remediate industrial wastewater contaminated with spent dye.

  16. Aerobic biodegradation of 4-methylquinoline by a soil bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, S D; Pfaller, S L; Shann, J R; Warshawsky, D; Kinkle, B K; Vestal, J R

    1996-01-01

    Methylquinolines and related N-heterocyclic aromatic compounds are common contaminants associated with the use of hydrocarbons in both coal gasification and wood treatment processes. These compounds have been found in groundwater, and many are known mutagens. A stable, five-member bacterial consortium able to degrade 4-methylquinoline was established by selective enrichment using soil collected from an abandoned coal gasification site. The consortium was maintained for 5 years by serial transfer in a medium containing 4-methylquinoline. A gram-negative soil bacterium, strain Lep1, was isolated from the consortium and shown to utilize 4-methylquinoline as a source of carbon and energy during growth in liquid medium. A time course experiment demonstrated that both the isolate Lep1 and the consortium containing Lep1 were able to degrade 4-methylquinoline under aerobic conditions. Complete degradation of 4-methylquinoline by either strain Lep1 alone or the consortium was characterized by the production and eventual disappearance of 2-hydroxy-4-methylquinoline, followed by the appearance and persistence of a second metabolite tentatively identified as a hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin. Currently, there is no indication that 4-methylquinoline degradation proceeds differently in the consortium culture compared with Lep1 alone. This is the first report of 4-methylquinoline biodegradation under aerobic conditions. PMID:8702284

  17. Single-culture aerobic granules with Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed

    Adav, Sunil S; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2008-03-01

    Aerobic granules are cultivated by a single bacterial strain, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). This strain presents as a good phenol reducer and an efficient auto coagulator in the presence of phenol, mediated by heat-sensitive adhesins proteins. Stable 2.3-mm granules were formed in the SBR following a 7-week cultivation. These granules exhibit excellent settling attributes and degrade phenol efficiently at concentrations of 250-2,000 mg l(-1). The corresponding phenol degradation rate reached 993.6 mg phenol g(-1) volatile suspended solids (VSS) day(-1) at 250 mg l(-1) phenol and 519.3 mg phenol g(-1) VSS day(-1) at 2,000 mg l(-1) phenol concentration. Meanwhile, free A. calcoaceticus cells were fully inhibited at phenol>1,500 mg l(-1). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprint profile demonstrated no genetic modification in the strain during aerobic granulation. The present single-strain granules showed long-term structural stability and performed high phenol degrading capacity and high phenol tolerance. The confocal laser scanning microscopic test revealed that live A. calcoaceticus cells principally distributed at 200-250 microm beneath the outer surface, with an extracellular polymeric substance layer covering them to defend phenol toxicity. Autoaggregation assay tests demonstrated the possibly significant role of secreted proteins on the formation of single-culture A. calcoaceticus granules.

  18. The Human Microbiome during Bacterial Vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Onderdonk, Andrew B; Delaney, Mary L; Fichorova, Raina N

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most commonly reported microbiological syndrome among women of childbearing age. BV is characterized by a shift in the vaginal flora from the dominant Lactobacillus to a polymicrobial flora. BV has been associated with a wide array of health issues, including preterm births, pelvic inflammatory disease, increased susceptibility to HIV infection, and other chronic health problems. A number of potential microbial pathogens, singly and in combinations, have been implicated in the disease process. The list of possible agents continues to expand and includes members of a number of genera, including Gardnerella, Atopobium, Prevotella, Peptostreptococcus, Mobiluncus, Sneathia, Leptotrichia, Mycoplasma, and BV-associated bacterium 1 (BVAB1) to BVAB3. Efforts to characterize BV using epidemiological, microscopic, microbiological culture, and sequenced-based methods have all failed to reveal an etiology that can be consistently documented in all women with BV. A careful analysis of the available data suggests that what we term BV is, in fact, a set of common clinical signs and symptoms that can be provoked by a plethora of bacterial species with proinflammatory characteristics, coupled to an immune response driven by variability in host immune function. PMID:26864580

  19. Ecology of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs in aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Koblížek, Michal

    2015-11-01

    Recognition of the environmental role of photoheterotrophic bacteria has been one of the main themes of aquatic microbiology over the last 15 years. Aside from cyanobacteria and proteorhodopsin-containing bacteria, aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria are the third most numerous group of phototrophic prokaryotes in the ocean. This functional group represents a diverse assembly of species which taxonomically belong to various subgroups of Alpha-, Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria. AAP bacteria are facultative photoheterotrophs which use bacteriochlorophyll-containing reaction centers to harvest light energy. The light-derived energy increases their bacterial growth efficiency, which provides a competitive advantage over heterotrophic species. Thanks to their enzymatic machinery AAP bacteria are active, rapidly growing organisms which contribute significantly to the recycling of organic matter. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge of the ecology of AAP bacteria in aquatic environments, implying their specific role in the microbial loop.

  20. Growth of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria by aerobic hydrogen oxidation.

    PubMed

    Koch, Hanna; Galushko, Alexander; Albertsen, Mads; Schintlmeister, Arno; Gruber-Dorninger, Christiane; Lücker, Sebastian; Pelletier, Eric; Le Paslier, Denis; Spieck, Eva; Richter, Andreas; Nielsen, Per H; Wagner, Michael; Daims, Holger

    2014-08-29

    The bacterial oxidation of nitrite to nitrate is a key process of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria are considered a highly specialized functional group, which depends on the supply of nitrite from other microorganisms and whose distribution strictly correlates with nitrification in the environment and in wastewater treatment plants. On the basis of genomics, physiological experiments, and single-cell analyses, we show that Nitrospira moscoviensis, which represents a widely distributed lineage of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, has the genetic inventory to utilize hydrogen (H2) as an alternative energy source for aerobic respiration and grows on H2 without nitrite. CO2 fixation occurred with H2 as the sole electron donor. Our results demonstrate a chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria outside the nitrogen cycle, suggesting greater ecological flexibility than previously assumed.

  1. Qualitative Parameters of the Colonic Flora in Patients with HNF1A-MODY Are Different from Those Observed in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Mrozinska, Sandra; Radkowski, Piotr; Gosiewski, Tomasz; Szopa, Magdalena; Bulanda, Malgorzata; Ludwig-Galezowska, Agnieszka H.; Morawska, Iwona; Sroka-Oleksiak, Agnieszka; Matejko, Bartlomiej; Kapusta, Przemyslaw; Salamon, Dominika; Malecki, Maciej T.; Wolkow, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is determined by genetic and environmental factors. There have been many studies on the relationship between the composition of the gastrointestinal bacterial flora, T2DM, and obesity. There are no data, however, on the gut microbiome structure in monogenic forms of the disease including Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY). Methods. The aim of the investigation was to compare the qualitative parameters of the colonic flora in patients with HNF1A-MODY and T2DM and healthy individuals. 16S sequencing of bacterial DNA isolated from the collected fecal samples using the MiSeq platform was performed. Results. There were significant between-group differences in the bacterial profile. At the phylum level, the amount of Proteobacteria was higher (p = 0.0006) and the amount of Bacteroidetes was lower (p = 0.0005) in T2DM group in comparison to the control group. In HNF1A-MODY group, the frequency of Bacteroidetes was lower than in the control group (p = 0.0143). At the order level, Turicibacterales was more abundant in HNF1A-MODY group than in T2DM group. Conclusions. It appears that there are differences in the gut microbiome composition between patients with HNF1A-MODY and type 2 diabetes. Further investigation on this matter should be conducted. PMID:27807544

  2. Future of endemic flora of biodiversity hotspots in India.

    PubMed

    Chitale, Vishwas Sudhir; Behera, Mukund Dev; Roy, Partha Sarthi

    2014-01-01

    India is one of the 12 mega biodiversity countries of the world, which represents 11% of world's flora in about 2.4% of global land mass. Approximately 28% of the total Indian flora and 33% of angiosperms occurring in India are endemic. Higher human population density in biodiversity hotspots in India puts undue pressure on these sensitive eco-regions. In the present study, we predict the future distribution of 637 endemic plant species from three biodiversity hotspots in India; Himalaya, Western Ghats, Indo-Burma, based on A1B scenario for year 2050 and 2080. We develop individual variable based models as well as mixed models in MaxEnt by combining ten least co-related bioclimatic variables, two disturbance variables and one physiography variable as predictor variables. The projected changes suggest that the endemic flora will be adversely impacted, even under such a moderate climate scenario. The future distribution is predicted to shift in northern and north-eastern direction in Himalaya and Indo-Burma, while in southern and south-western direction in Western Ghats, due to cooler climatic conditions in these regions. In the future distribution of endemic plants, we observe a significant shift and reduction in the distribution range compared to the present distribution. The model predicts a 23.99% range reduction and a 7.70% range expansion in future distribution by 2050, while a 41.34% range reduction and a 24.10% range expansion by 2080. Integration of disturbance and physiography variables along with bioclimatic variables in the models improved the prediction accuracy. Mixed models provide most accurate results for most of the combinations of climatic and non-climatic variables as compared to individual variable based models. We conclude that a) regions with cooler climates and higher moisture availability could serve as refugia for endemic plants in future climatic conditions; b) mixed models provide more accurate results, compared to single variable based

  3. Assessing Antibiotic Resistance of Staphyloccocus: Students Use Their Own Microbial Flora To Explore Antibiotic Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omoto, Charlotte K.; Malm, Kirstin

    2003-01-01

    Describes a microbiology laboratory experiment in which students test their own microbial flora of Staphylococcus for antibiotic resistance. Provides directions on how to conduct the experiment. (YDS)

  4. [Role of intestinal flora in inflammatory bowel disease and probiotics place in their management].

    PubMed

    Belkahla, Néziha; Maamouri, Nadia; Ouerghi, Hajer; Ben Ammar, Ahmed

    2005-03-01

    The pathogenic role of certain microorganism of intestinal flora has been demonstrated in experimental colitis in animals and strongly suspected in inflammatory bowel disease in human, especially in Crohn's disease and pouchitis. Probiotics are living non pathogenic microorganisms that, upon oral ingestion exert benefits on human health by modulating enteric flora or by stimulation of local immune system. The aim of this article is to remind the role of intestinal flora in inflammatory bowel disease, the mechanism of inflammation induced by this flora and to review through the literature, the different clinical studies performed with probiotics in human.

  5. Fecalase: a model for activation of dietary glycosides to mutagens by intestinal flora.

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, G; Gold, C; Ferro-Luzzi, A; Ames, B N

    1980-01-01

    Many substances in the plant kingdom and in man's diet occur as glycosides. Recent studies have indicated that many glycosides that are not mutagenic in tests such as the Salmonella test become mutagenic upon hydrolysis of the glycosidic linkages. The Salmonella test utilizes a liver homogenate to approximate mammalian metabolism but does not provide a source of the enzymes present in intestinal bacterial flora that hydrolyze the wide variety of glycosides present in nature. We describe a stable cell-free extract of human feces, fecalase, which is shown to contain various glycosidases that allow the in vitro activation of many natural glycosides to mutagens in the Salmonella/liver homogenate test. Many beverages, such as red wine (but apparently not white wine) and tea, contain glycosides of the mutagne quercetin. Red wine, red grape juice, and tea were mutagenic in the test when fecalase was added, and red wine contained considerable direct mutagenic activity in the absence of fecalase. The implications of quercetin mutagenicity and carcinogenicity are discussed. PMID:6933540

  6. [A case with both infectious cavernous sinus thrombosis and Lemierre syndrome due to intraoral resident flora].

    PubMed

    Nishida, Akihiro; Ogata, Toshiyasu; Kudo, Masataka; Fukuhara, Kousuke; Fukae, Jiro; Tsuboi, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The present report describes a 54-year-old woman with cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) presenting with fever, and marked periorbital swelling. There is a history of untreated periodontal disease. On initial examination, periorbital pain associated with bilateral blephaloptosis, chemosis, and disturbed eye movement was present. The laboratory evaluation showed significant elevations in inflammatory and fibrinolytic markers. Diffusion-weighted MRI revealed high signal intensities in the bilateral superior ophthalmic veins (SOV). Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) of the cranium showed an enlarged right SOV and a non-enhancing lesion within the right SOV and bilateral cavernous sinus, indicating cavernous sinus thrombosis with diffuse SOV thrombosis. Blood culture performed on admission showed bacterial infection by intraoral resident flora; therefore, the CST was attributed to untreated periodontal disease. Contrast-enhanced CT of the case also revealed the presence of thrombosis in the jugular vein associated with micropulmonary embolus, indicating co-occurrence of Lemierre's syndrome. Antibiotic and anticoagulant treatment were initiated, and the tooth decay was treated; all clinical symptoms and signs subsequently improved. Additional neuroimaging showed that the thrombus was absent from both SOV and the cavernous sinus. Infectious CST is life threatening; therefore, laboratory and imaging examination should be performed quickly, and antibiotic and anticoagulant therapy administrated immediately. PMID:26041393

  7. Fecalase: a model for activation of dietary glycosides to mutagens by intestinal flora

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, G.; Gold, C.; Ferro-Luzzi, A.; Ames, B.N.

    1980-08-01

    Many substances in the plant kingdom and in man's diet occur as glycosides. Recent studies have indicated that many glycosides that are not mutagenic in tests such as the Salmonella test become mutagenic upon hydrolysis of the glycosidic linkages. The Salmonella test utilizes a liver homogenate to approximate mammalian metabolism but does not provide a source of the enzymes present in intestinal bacterial flora that hydrolyze the wide variety of glycosides present in nature. We describe a stable cell-free extract of human feces, fecalase, which is shown to contain various glycosidases that allow the in vitro activation of many natural glycosides to mutagens in the Salmonella/liver homogenate test. Many beverages, such as red wine (but apparently not white wine) and tea, contain glycosides of the mutagen quercetin. Red wine, red grape juice, and teas were mutagenic in the test when fecalase was added, and red wine contained considerable direct mutagenic activity in the absence of fecalase. The implications of quercetin mutagenicity and carcinogenicity are discussed.

  8. Elimination of microbial flora from conventionally raised Syrian hamsters by antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, K K

    1988-04-01

    An attempt was made to identify and eliminate the normal endogenous microflora from conventionally-raised Syrian hamsters. A total of 14 bacterial and 2 yeast species were identified using enrichment, differential and selective media. The elimination of endogenous flora was carried out in two steps. In each step, hamsters were given a filter-sterilized mixture of two or more antibiotics for 10 weeks continuously through drinking water. During the second week, the hamsters were immersed once into a germicidal solution then housed in horizontal laminar-flow units. They were monitored at weekly intervals for the presence or absence of microorganisms in their fecal samples and fur swabs which were cultured on media as mentioned above. In step I, up to four resistant bacteria were cultured. On the basis of the antibiotic sensitivity profile of the surviving bacteria, step II procedure was started. The antibiotic mixture containing Kanamycin and Amphotericin B was fatal for the hamsters in both steps. Within 4 to 5 weeks of step II, all groups of hamsters tested bacteria-free and remained so for the duration of the step. Two weeks following withdrawal of antibiotics from drinking water, only one group of hamsters showed the presence of Escherichia coli. The other groups of hamsters tested bacteria-free for the 5 week duration of the experiment. The autopsies of these hamsters revealed greatly enlarged and thin-walled cecums, a characteristic of the germfree state.

  9. The Energetics of Aerobic versus Anaerobic Respiration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champion, Timothy D.; Schwenz, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    Background information, laboratory procedures, and a discussion of the results of an experiment designed to investigate the difference in energy gained from the aerobic and anaerobic oxidation of glucose are presented. Sample experimental and calculated data are included. (CW)

  10. Neuromodulation of Aerobic Exercise—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Heijnen, Saskia; Hommel, Bernhard; Kibele, Armin; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2016-01-01

    Running, and aerobic exercise in general, is a physical activity that increasingly many people engage in but that also has become popular as a topic for scientific research. Here we review the available studies investigating whether and to which degree aerobic exercise modulates hormones, amino acids, and neurotransmitters levels. In general, it seems that factors such as genes, gender, training status, and hormonal status need to be taken into account to gain a better understanding of the neuromodular underpinnings of aerobic exercise. More research using longitudinal studies and considering individual differences is necessary to determine actual benefits. We suggest that, in order to succeed, aerobic exercise programs should include optimal periodization, prevent overtraining and be tailored to interindividual differences, including neuro-developmental and genetically-based factors. PMID:26779053

  11. Neuromodulation of Aerobic Exercise-A Review.

    PubMed

    Heijnen, Saskia; Hommel, Bernhard; Kibele, Armin; Colzato, Lorenza S

    2015-01-01

    Running, and aerobic exercise in general, is a physical activity that increasingly many people engage in but that also has become popular as a topic for scientific research. Here we review the available studies investigating whether and to which degree aerobic exercise modulates hormones, amino acids, and neurotransmitters levels. In general, it seems that factors such as genes, gender, training status, and hormonal status need to be taken into account to gain a better understanding of the neuromodular underpinnings of aerobic exercise. More research using longitudinal studies and considering individual differences is necessary to determine actual benefits. We suggest that, in order to succeed, aerobic exercise programs should include optimal periodization, prevent overtraining and be tailored to interindividual differences, including neuro-developmental and genetically-based factors. PMID:26779053

  12. Conditioning and Aerobics for Older Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Joyce

    1980-01-01

    A class designed for the maintenance and gradual improvement of senior citizens' physical fitness includes relaxation training, flexibility and stretching exercises, interval training activities (designed as a link between less strenuous exercise and more strenuous activities), and aerobic exercises. (CJ)

  13. Treatment of abnormal vaginal flora in early pregnancy with clindamycin for the prevention of spontaneous preterm birth: a systematic review and metaanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, Ronald F.; Nhan-Chang, Chia-Ling; Sobel, Jack D.; Workowski, Kimberly; Conde-Agudelo, Agustin; Romero, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the administration of clindamycin to women with abnormal vaginal flora at <22 weeks of gestation reduces the risk of preterm birth and late miscarriage. We conducted a systematic review and metaanalysis of randomized controlled trials of the early administration of clindamycin to women with abnormal vaginal flora at <22 weeks of gestation. Five trials that comprised 2346 women were included. Clindamycin that was administered at <22 weeks of gestation was associated with a significantly reduced risk of preterm birth at <37 weeks of gestation and late miscarriage. There were no overall differences in the risk of preterm birth at <33 weeks of gestation, low birthweight, very low birthweight, admission to neonatal intensive care unit, stillbirth, peripartum infection, and adverse effects. Clindamycin in early pregnancy in women with abnormal vaginal flora reduces the risk of spontaneous preterm birth at <37 weeks of gestation and late miscarriage. There is evidence to justify further randomized controlled trials of clindamycin for the prevention of preterm birth. However, a deeper understanding of the vaginal microbiome, mucosal immunity, and the biology of bacterial vaginosis will be needed to inform the design of such trials. PMID:22071048

  14. Enrichment of anodic biofilm inoculated with anaerobic or aerobic sludge in single chambered air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chongyang; Wang, Aijie; Wu, Wei-Min; Yin, Yalin; Zhao, Yang-Guo

    2014-09-01

    Aerobic sludge after anaerobic pretreatment and anaerobic sludge were separately used as inoculum to start up air-cathode single-chamber MFCs. Aerobic sludge-inoculated MFCs arrived at 0.27 V with a maximum power density of 5.79 W m(-3), while anaerobic sludge-inoculated MFCs reached 0.21 V with 3.66 W m(-3). Microbial analysis with DGGE profiling and high-throughput sequencing indicated that aerobic sludge contained more diverse bacterial populations than anaerobic sludge. Nitrospira species dominated in aerobic sludge, while anaerobic sludge was dominated by Desulfurella and Acidithiobacillus species. Microbial community structure and composition in anodic biofilms enriched, respectively from aerobic and anaerobic sludges tended gradually to be similar. Potentially exoelectrogenic Geobacter and Anaeromusa species, biofilm-forming Zoogloea and Acinetobacter species were abundant in both anodic biofilms. This study indicated that aerobic sludge performed better for MFCs startup, and the enrichment of anodic microbial consortium with different inocula but same substrate resulted in uniformity of functional microbial communities.

  15. Aerobic and Facultative Microflora of Fresh and Spoiled Refrigerated Dough Products

    PubMed Central

    Hesseltine, C. W.; Graves, R. R.; Rogers, Ruth; Burmeister, H. R.

    1969-01-01

    The microbial flora of fresh, unsterile, dough products held at refrigeration temperatures was compared with the microbial flora of the same products that had spoiled spontaneously. Various methods based on selective media were used to determine molds, yeasts, and bacteria present. Except for two special cases in which a yeast and Penicillium roqueforti induced spoilage, all of the samples deteriorated because of bacterial growth. A total of 1,132 bacterial isolates was subjected to further classification. In the spoiled products, 92% of the isolates belonged to the Lactobacillaceae. More than one-half of these (53%) belonged to the genus Lactobacillus, and an additional 36% were in the genus Leuconostoc. In the genus Leuconostoc almost all of the strains (94%) were L. mesenteroides. The third most common genus present was Streptococcus, represented by 3% of the total isolates. A preliminary taxonomic study of the microflora of refrigerated dough products revealed none of the isolates to be indicators of fecal contamination and none to be forms known to produce toxins. The highest counts encountered in the moist, fresh products were up to 200 million lactic acid bacteria per g in buttermilk biscuits, with a psychrophilic count as high as 4.8 million. In the spoiled samples, the highest total counts were 820 million in buttermilk biscuits. Mold counts were no higher than 1,800, except in the sample ruined by P. roqueforti where the count was 130,000 mold colonies. PMID:4905604

  16. The Flora of Chad: a checklist and brief analysis.

    PubMed

    Brundu, Giuseppe; Camarda, Ignazio

    2013-01-01

    A checklist of the flora of Chad has been compiled by the authors, based on literature, on-line data-bases, herbarium collections and land surveys (1998-2011). It counts 2,460 records, i.e. 2,288 species (including 128 autonyms), 83 subspecies, 81 varieties, 8 forms, while all the previous available information reported 1,600 species. They belong to 151 Families, with 48.7% of the taxa belonging to the 6 largest families, i.e. Poaceae (14.6%), Fabaceae (13.6%), Cyperaceae (7.0%), Asteraceae (6.2 %), Malvaceae (3.9%) and Rubiaceae (3.4%). A total number or 2,173 species (88.3%) are native to Chad, including 55 (2.2%) endemic species, while 274 (11.0%) are alien to Chad, and 13 (0.5%) are considered cryptogenic, i.e. of uncertain status. It represents a considerable update on previous knowledge on the alien flora of Chad that counted for 131 taxa (5.3%). There are 657 therophytes (26.7%), 546 phanerophytes (22.2%), 378 hemicryptophytes (15.4%), 256 chamaephytes (10.4%), 160 geophytes (6.5%), 107 helophytes (4.3%), 104 hydrophytes (4.2%). A total of 252 taxa (10.2) may have different life forms (e.g. terophytes or chamaephytes).

  17. The Flora of Chad: a checklist and brief analysis

    PubMed Central

    Brundu, Giuseppe; Camarda, Ignazio

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A checklist of the flora of Chad has been compiled by the authors, based on literature, on-line data-bases, herbarium collections and land surveys (1998-2011). It counts 2,460 records, i.e. 2,288 species (including 128 autonyms), 83 subspecies, 81 varieties, 8 forms, while all the previous available information reported 1,600 species. They belong to 151 Families, with 48.7% of the taxa belonging to the 6 largest families, i.e. Poaceae (14.6%), Fabaceae (13.6%), Cyperaceae (7.0%), Asteraceae (6.2 %), Malvaceae (3.9%) and Rubiaceae (3.4%). A total number or 2,173 species (88.3%) are native to Chad, including 55 (2.2%) endemic species, while 274 (11.0%) are alien to Chad, and 13 (0.5%) are considered cryptogenic, i.e. of uncertain status. It represents a considerable update on previous knowledge on the alien flora of Chad that counted for 131 taxa (5.3%). There are 657 therophytes (26.7%), 546 phanerophytes (22.2%), 378 hemicryptophytes (15.4%), 256 chamaephytes (10.4%), 160 geophytes (6.5%), 107 helophytes (4.3%), 104 hydrophytes (4.2%). A total of 252 taxa (10.2) may have different life forms (e.g. terophytes or chamaephytes). PMID:23805051

  18. ELF communications system ecological monitoring program: Upland flora studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Glenn D.; Cattelino, Peter J.; Gale, Margaret R.; Jones, Elizabeth A.; Jurgensen, Martin F.

    1994-10-01

    The U.S. Navy has completed a program monitoring flora, fauna, and ecological relationships for possible effects from electromagnetic (EM) fields produced by its Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) Communications System. This report documents studies of upland flora conducted near the Navy's transmitting antenna in Michigan. From 1982 through 1993 researchers from the Michigan Technological University (MTU) monitored tree, herb, and fungal species dominant in areas near (treatment) and far (control) from the ELF antenna. Above-ground parameters included the productivity, physiology, and phenology of trees, as well as the morphology and phenology of an herb. Below-ground, the important association between tree roots and fungi were monitored. Investigators also measured ambient weather conditions, soil nutrients, and EM field intensities. The MTU research team used analysis of variance and covariance to examine the data. When site-by-year interactions were significant, correlations and regressions were used to determine whether residuals were related to EM exposure. Results suggest a possible subtle EM effect to the cambial and stemwood growth of some tree species but not to any other parameter. MTU investigators conclude no short-term, adverse effects on forest health from exposure to EM fields produced by the Naval Radio Transmitting Facility-Republic, Michigan.

  19. Oral flora of elderly patients following acute medical admission.

    PubMed

    Preston, A J; Gosney, M A; Noon, S; Martin, M V

    1999-01-01

    The human oral microflora is diverse and is usually predominately composed of Gram-positive bacteria. It is uncommon to find Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) in healthy mouths. The incidence of infection with GNB rises in institutionalised, frail elderly subjects. There is also evidence of an association between intra-oral GNB presence and denture wearing. There have been few studies which have investigated intra-oral GNB carriage in acutely ill elderly patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the oral flora of a group of elderly patients during an acute medical admission and to investigate any associations between the oral microflora and existing medical or oral factors. A total of 28 patients (17 females and 11 males; age: 74-93 years) on a care for the elderly ward were studied. Epidemiological data, detailed medical histories and oral examinations were undertaken. In addition, oral swabs of the palate area were taken to determine their oral flora. Twelve (43%) of the patients had GNB in their oral cavities. These patients were suffering from a variety of medical conditions and were on various drug regimes. There was a correlation between oral GNB presence and denture use. There was no association between GNB presence and denture hygiene. As oropharyngeal GNB colonisation can be associated with infections such as aspiration pneumonia, it is important in patients at risk that intra-oral organisms are identified and managed.

  20. Microbial diversity differences within aerobic granular sludge and activated sludge flocs.

    PubMed

    Winkler, M-K H; Kleerebezem, R; de Bruin, L M M; Verheijen, P J T; Abbas, B; Habermacher, J; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we investigated during 400 days the microbial community variations as observed from 16S DNA gene DGGE banding patterns from an aerobic granular sludge pilot plant as well as the from a full-scale activated sludge treatment plant in Epe, the Netherlands. Both plants obtained the same wastewater and had the same relative hydraulic variations and run stable over time. For the total bacterial population, a similarity analysis was conducted showing that the community composition of both sludge types was very dissimilar. Despite this difference, general bacterial population of both systems had on average comparable species richness, entropy, and evenness, suggesting that different bacteria were sharing the same functionality. Moreover, multi-dimensional scaling analysis revealed that the microbial populations of the flocculent sludge system moved closely around the initial population, whereas the bacterial population in the aerobic granular sludge moved away from its initial population representing a permanent change. In addition, the ammonium-oxidizing community of both sludge systems was studied in detail showing more unevenness than the general bacterial community. Nitrosomonas was the dominant AOB in flocculent sludge, whereas in granular sludge, Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira were present in equal amounts. A correlation analysis of process data and microbial data from DGGE gels showed that the microbial diversity shift in ammonium-oxidizing bacteria clearly correlated with fluctuations in temperature. PMID:23064482

  1. Aerobic Excercise and Research Opportunities to Benefit Impaired Children. (Project AEROBIC). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho Univ., Moscow.

    The final report summarizes accomplishments of Project AEROBIC (Aerobic Exercise and Research Opportunities to Benefit Impaired Children), which provided a physical education exercise program for severely, profoundly, and multiply handicapped children aged 10-21. Activities are outlined for the 3 year period and include modification of exercise…

  2. The Flora North America Generalized System for Describing the Morphology of Organisms. Research Report No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shetler, Stanwyn G.

    The file organization for the computerized Flora North America (FNA) data bank is described. A four level character hierarchy allows subdivision of any flora description into as many as four levels in order to specify plant character precisely. Terms at any one level will not necessarily be parallel in status. Both PLANTS and LEAVES serve as…

  3. The physical conditions and age indicated by the flora of the Alum Bluff formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berry, Edward Wilber

    1917-01-01

    The present paper has for its purpose the description of a small flora collected from the Alum Bluff formation, representing a horizon hitherto unrepresented paleobotanically in southeastern North America, and the discussion of the bearing of this flora on the physical conditions of deposition and the probable age of the deposits.

  4. [State and tendencies in development of floras of man-transformed ecosystems].

    PubMed

    Khmelev, K F; Berezutskiĭ, M A

    2001-01-01

    Basing on published data, authors estimate the current state and tendencies in the development of man-transformed floras. Special attention is given to the flora of cities and such man-transformed habitats, as open-cast mines, dumps, hydrotechnical constructions and railway embankments. Floras of man-made forests and plant communities of cultivated lands were also analyzed. Structure of urbanized landscapes are considered as the aggregates of man-transformed landscapes with fragments of natural vegetation. Floras of urbanized areas are characterized by high species diversity, inconsistency of species composition and diminishing influence of natural vegetation characteristic for particulate zone. Species variety and structure of floras of man-transformed habitats depend on specificity of substrate, geographical latitude, neighboring natural communities and intensity of technical plants exploitation. In the floras of railway embankments species of 10 main families are more abundant then those in natural ecosystems of the same latitude. Floras of man-made forests are characterized by very high species diversity, this type of habitats plays the main compensating role. Analysis of segetal floras reveals the replacement of oligotrophic weeds by eutrophic ones and the increase in diversity of Poaceae species. PMID:11569145

  5. Aerobic biodegradation of propylene glycol by soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Giuseppe; Cavalca, Lucia; Letizia Colarieti, M; Scelza, Rosalia; Scotti, Riccardo; Rao, Maria A; Andreoni, Vincenza; Ciccazzo, Sonia; Greco, Guido

    2013-09-01

    Propylene glycol (PG) is a main component of aircraft deicing fluids and its extensive use in Northern airports is a source of soil and groundwater contamination. Bacterial consortia able to grow on PG as sole carbon and energy source were selected from soil samples taken along the runways of Oslo Airport Gardermoen site (Norway). DGGE analysis of enrichment cultures showed that PG-degrading populations were mainly composed by Pseudomonas species, although Bacteroidetes were found, as well. Nineteen bacterial strains, able to grow on PG as sole carbon and energy source, were isolated and identified as different Pseudomonas species. Maximum specific growth rate of mixed cultures in the absence of nutrient limitation was 0.014 h(-1) at 4 °C. Substrate C:N:P molar ratios calculated on the basis of measured growth yields are in good agreement with the suggested values for biostimulation reported in literature. Therefore, the addition of nutrients is suggested as a suitable technique to sustain PG aerobic degradation at the maximum rate by autochthonous microorganisms of unsaturated soil profile.

  6. Biodegradation of tributyl phosphate, an organosphate triester, by aerobic granular biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nancharaiah, Y V; Kiran Kumar Reddy, G; Krishna Mohan, T V; Venugopalan, V P

    2015-01-01

    Tributyl phosphate (TBP) is commercially used in large volumes for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. TBP is a very stable compound and persistent in natural environments and it is not removed in conventional wastewater treatment plants. In this study, cultivation of aerobic granular biofilms in a sequencing batch reactor was investigated for efficient biodegradation of TBP. Enrichment of TBP-degrading strains resulted in efficient degradation of TBP as sole carbon or along with acetate. Complete biodegradation of 2mM of TBP was achieved within 5h with a degradation rate of 0.4 μmol mL(-1) h(-1). TBP biodegradation was accompanied by release of inorganic phosphate in stoichiometric amounts. n-Butanol, hydrolysed product of TBP was rapidly biodegraded. But, dibutyl phosphate, a putative intermediate of TBP degradation was only partially degraded pointing to an alternative degradation pathway. Phosphatase activity was 22- and 7.5-fold higher in TBP-degrading biofilms as compared to bioflocs and acetate-fed aerobic granules. Community analysis by terminal restriction length polymorphism revealed presence of 30 different bacterial strains. Seven bacterial stains, including Sphingobium sp. a known TBP degrader were isolated. The results show that aerobic granular biofilms are promising for treatment of TBP-bearing wastes or ex situ bioremediation of TBP-contaminated sites. PMID:25464313

  7. Rhamnolipid-enhanced aerobic biodegradation of triclosan (TCS) by indigenous microorganisms in water-sediment systems.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qian; Yan, Jia; Wen, Junjie; Hu, Yongyou; Chen, Yuanbo; Wu, Wenjin

    2016-11-15

    Bioremediation of triclosan (TCS) is a challenge because of its low bioavailability, persistence in the environment and recalcitrance to remediation efforts. Rhamnolipid (RL) was used to enhance TCS biodegradation by indigenous microbes in an aerobic water-sediment system. However, knowledge of the effects of TCS on the bacterial community and environmental factors in an RL-enhanced, TCS-degrading system are lacking. Therefore, in this study, the influence of environmental factors on RL-enhanced biodegradation of TCS was investigated by single factor experiments, and shifts in aerobic TCS-degrading bacterial populations, with and without RL, were analyzed by high-throughput sequencing technology. The results showed that aerobic biodegradation of TCS was significantly promoted by the addition of RL. Environmental conditions, which included RL addition (0.125-0.5g/L), medium concentrations of TCS (<90μg/g), water disturbance, elevated temperature, ionic strength (0.001-0.1mol/L NaCl) and weak alkaline environments (pH8-9), were monitored. High concentrations of TCS had a remarkable influence on the bacterial community structure, and this influence on the distribution proportion of the main microorganisms was strengthened by RL addition. Alpha-proteobacteria (e.g., Sphingomonadaceae and Caulobacteraceae) might be resistant to TCS or even capable of TCS biodegradation, while Sphingobacteria, Beta- and Delta-proteobacteria were sensitive to TCS toxicity. This research provides ecological information on the degradation efficiency and bacterial community stability in RL-enhanced bioremediation of TCS-polluted aquatic environments. PMID:27476727

  8. Rhamnolipid-enhanced aerobic biodegradation of triclosan (TCS) by indigenous microorganisms in water-sediment systems.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qian; Yan, Jia; Wen, Junjie; Hu, Yongyou; Chen, Yuanbo; Wu, Wenjin

    2016-11-15

    Bioremediation of triclosan (TCS) is a challenge because of its low bioavailability, persistence in the environment and recalcitrance to remediation efforts. Rhamnolipid (RL) was used to enhance TCS biodegradation by indigenous microbes in an aerobic water-sediment system. However, knowledge of the effects of TCS on the bacterial community and environmental factors in an RL-enhanced, TCS-degrading system are lacking. Therefore, in this study, the influence of environmental factors on RL-enhanced biodegradation of TCS was investigated by single factor experiments, and shifts in aerobic TCS-degrading bacterial populations, with and without RL, were analyzed by high-throughput sequencing technology. The results showed that aerobic biodegradation of TCS was significantly promoted by the addition of RL. Environmental conditions, which included RL addition (0.125-0.5g/L), medium concentrations of TCS (<90μg/g), water disturbance, elevated temperature, ionic strength (0.001-0.1mol/L NaCl) and weak alkaline environments (pH8-9), were monitored. High concentrations of TCS had a remarkable influence on the bacterial community structure, and this influence on the distribution proportion of the main microorganisms was strengthened by RL addition. Alpha-proteobacteria (e.g., Sphingomonadaceae and Caulobacteraceae) might be resistant to TCS or even capable of TCS biodegradation, while Sphingobacteria, Beta- and Delta-proteobacteria were sensitive to TCS toxicity. This research provides ecological information on the degradation efficiency and bacterial community stability in RL-enhanced bioremediation of TCS-polluted aquatic environments.

  9. RECIPROCAL RELATION BETWEEN POPULATION AND ENVIRONMENT: INNOVATIONS ON FLORA DATA COLLECTION.

    PubMed

    Dangol, D R

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, social and natural scientists have gained interest in understanding reciprocal relations between human populations and the environment. Research methods have been developed for investigating the secrets of interations of human and environment. This paper describes the flora data collection methods used in a longitudinal research project "Reciprocal Relation Between Population and the Environment" and highlights how the research sites were selected, how the research plots were designed in each site and how the qualitative and quantitative data of flora found in each research plot were recorded. This paper also discusses how the flora data can be linked with sociodemographic data and how the data can be used to unfold the effect of human activities on flora diversity and/or the effect of flora on the life of the human population in the study area. PMID:22923985

  10. Effects of moxifloxacin exposure on the conjunctival flora and antibiotic resistance profile following repeated intravitreal injections

    PubMed Central

    Ataş, Mustafa; Başkan, Burhan; Özköse, Ayşe; Mutlu Sarıgüzel, Fatma; Demircan, Süleyman; Pangal, Emine

    2014-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effects of moxifloxacin exposure on the conjunctival flora and antibiotic resistance profile following repeated intravitreal injections. METHODS Seventy-two eyes of 36 patients [36 eyes in control group, 36 eyes in intravitreal injection (IVI) group] were enrolled in the study. All the eyes had at least one IVI and had diabetic macular edema (DME) or age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). Moxifloxacin was prescribed to all the patients four times a day for five days following injection. Conjunctival cultures were obtained from the lower fornix via standardized technique with every possible effort made to minimize contamination from the lids, lashes, or skin. Before the application of any ophthalmic medication, conjunctival cultures were obtained from both eyes using sterile cotton culture. An automated microbiology system was used to identify the growing bacteria and determine antibiotic sensitivity. RESULTS The bacterial cultures were isolated from 72 eyes of 36 patients, sixteen of whom patients (44.4%) were male and twenty (55.6%) were female. Average age was 68.4±9.0 (range 50-86). The average number of injections before taking cultures was 3.1+1.0. Forty-eight (66.7%) of 72 eyes had at least one significant organism. There was no bacterial growth in 8 (20.5%) of IVI eyes and in 16 (44.4%) of control eyes (P=0.03). Of the bacteria isolated from culture, 53.8% of coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) in IVI eyes and 47.2% CoNS in control eyes. This difference between IVI eyes and control eyes about bacteria isolated from culture was not statistically significant (P=0.2). Eleven of 25 bacteria (44.0%) isolated from IVI eyes and 11 (57.9%) of 19 bacteria isolated from control eyes were resistant to oxacillin. The difference in frequency of moxifloxacine resistance between two groups was not statistically significant (12.0% in IVI eyes and 21.1% in control eyes) (P=0.44). There were no cases of resistance to vancomycin, teicoplanin and

  11. Intestinal microbial flora after feeding phytohemagglutinin lectins (Phaseolus vulgaris) to rats.

    PubMed Central

    Banwell, J G; Howard, R; Cooper, D; Costerton, J W

    1985-01-01

    Incorporation of purified phytohemagglutinin (PHA) lectins derived from red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) in the diet of weanling rats will cause growth failure, malabsorption of nutrients, and bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine. These effects are not caused by feeding a similar quantity of PHA to germfree rats. To define the morphological and bacterial changes on the mucosal surfaces of the jejunum, ileum, and cecum in greater detail, we pair fed two groups of weanling rats isocaloric, isonitrogenous diets with or without 0.5% PHA protein. On the jejunal surfaces of control rats, the mucous layer was a confluent covering with sparsely scattered bacteria and protozoa. In PHA-treated rats, the mucous layer was thin and discontinuous, and the microvillous surface of the tissue was extensively populated by bacterial cells of two distinct morphotypes--a gram-negative rod and a gram-positive coccobacillus. In all PHA-treated animals, these bacteria formed adherent monospecific or mixed adherent microcolonies on the tissue surface. Tissue damage was observed in PHA-exposed jejunal tissue as evidenced by vesiculation of the microvillous plasma membrane and by damage to the brush border membrane. On the ileal surfaces of control rats, there was a thick mucous layer within which small numbers of bacteria and protozoa were seen. Segmented filamentous bacteria were anchored in the tissue surface. In PHA-treated rats, the ileal surface was only incompletely covered by a mucous layer, and the overlying mucosal surface was extensively covered by large numbers of protozoan cells (predominantly Hexamita muris). Most of the ileal surfaces not covered by the mucous layer were occupied and virtually occluded by an overgrowth of these protozoan cells with occasional cells of Giardia muris and the tissue-associated segmented bacillus. In the ceca of control rats, the mucosa was incompletely covered by a discontinuous mucous layer and colonized by an unnamed Spirillum sp

  12. Host Antimicrobial Peptides in Bacterial Homeostasis and Pathogenesis of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Heimlich, Derek R.; Harrison, Alistair; Mason, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    Innate immune responses function as a first line of host defense against the development of bacterial infection, and in some cases to preserve the sterility of privileged sites in the human host. Bacteria that enter these sites must counter host responses for colonization. From the host’s perspective, the innate immune system works expeditiously to minimize the bacterial threat before colonization and subsequent dysbiosis. The multifactorial nature of disease further challenges predictions of how each independent variable influences bacterial pathogenesis. From bacterial colonization to infection and through disease, the microenvironments of the host are in constant flux as bacterial and host factors contribute to changes at the host-pathogen interface, with the host attempting to eradicate bacteria and the bacteria fighting to maintain residency. A key component of this innate host response towards bacterial infection is the production of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). As an early component of the host response, AMPs modulate bacterial load and prevent establishment of infection. Under quiescent conditions, some AMPs are constitutively expressed by the epithelium. Bacterial infection can subsequently induce production of other AMPs in an effort to maintain sterility, or to restrict colonization. As demonstrated in various studies, the absence of a single AMP can influence pathogenesis, highlighting the importance of AMP concentration in maintaining homeostasis. Yet, AMPs can increase bacterial virulence through the co-opting of the peptides or alteration of bacterial virulence gene expression. Further, bacterial factors used to subvert AMPs can modify host microenvironments and alter colonization of the residential flora that principally maintain homeostasis. Thus, the dynamic interplay between host defense peptides and bacterial factors produced to quell peptide activity play a critical role in the progression and outcome of disease. PMID:26029470

  13. Multiple endobronchial mycetomas with varied appearances and mixed fungal flora.

    PubMed

    Dillard, Thomas A; Ortega, Ismael

    2013-04-01

    We present images of a patient with multiple endobronchial mycetomas visible by bronchoscopy with varying appearances and with mixed fungal flora on culture. A 44-year-old African American male previously treated for pulmonary tuberculosis 11 years earlier presented with moderate hemoptysis and infiltrates in the right upper lobe on chest radiograph. He received levofloxacin without improvement in the infiltrate. Computed tomography scan revealed bronchiectasis, multiple intrabronchial masses, and air crescents. Diagnostic evaluation was negative for acid fast bacilli. Bronchoscopy revealed 4 separate endobronchial masses with varied appearances within dilated bronchiectatic airways. Culture of washings revealed Cunninghamella species, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Penicillium species. The patient underwent a lobectomy and was discharged on an azole antifungal agent, which was discontinued after 6 weeks.

  14. Antimicrobial textiles, skin-borne flora and odour.

    PubMed

    Höfer, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    Along with climate and physical activity, textiles have an effect on sweating and the development of odours. Accordingly, textiles inadequately optimized in terms of clothing technology as a result of poorly cut structures or poor materials result in increased sweating and odour. However, the development of body odour itself cannot be avoided, even with optimally designed clothing. Therefore new textiles, 'treated with antimicrobial agents', have been developed, with the aim of reducing odour by decreasing the number of germs on the skin. From the scientific point of view, the interactions between textiles, sweat, skin and skin flora are extremely complex. For this reason, this article explains in more detail the basic principles of odour formation resulting from sweat and how this can be influenced by textiles treated with antimicrobial agents. With reference to the results of recent research, the article looks into questions of how textiles treated with antimicrobial agents have an effect on populations of skin bacteria.

  15. The Moss Flora of Akdağ Mountain (Amasya, Turkey)

    PubMed Central

    Canli, Kerem; Çetin, Barbaros

    2014-01-01

    The moss flora of Akdağ Mountain (Amasya, Turkey) was investigated. At the result of identifications of 1500 moss specimens, collected from the research area, 178 taxa belonging to 69 genera and 26 families were determined. Among them, 94 taxa are new for A3 grid square according to the Turkey grid system which was adopted by Henderson. The location data of Grimmia crinitoleucophaea Cardot and Barbula enderesii Garov. are the first records for Turkey, and Encalypta spathulata Müll. Hal., Schistidium dupretii (Thér.) W. A. Weber, Weissia condensa var. armata (Thér. & Trab.) M. J. Cano, Ros & J. Guerra, Tortella bambergeri (Schimp.), Barbula enderesii Garov., Hedwigia ciliata var. leucophaea Bruch & Schimp., and Campyliadelphus elodes (Lindb.) Kanda are recorded for the second time to the byroflora of Turkey. PMID:25587573

  16. [Terrestrial flora of Malpelo Island, Colombia, Eastern Tropical Pacific].

    PubMed

    González-Román, Rubén D; López-Victoria, Mateo; Silverstone-Sopkin, Philip A

    2014-03-01

    Malpelo Island is located 380km off the mainland continental coast of Colombia, in the Pacific Ocean. Several geological, ecological, and zoological studies, both marine and terrestrial, have been conducted in this island. Despite some marginal comments on some publications, no single specific survey has been devoted to botany so far. In order to make a floristic inventory of the terrestrial flora of this island, three field trips were made in 2010 to collect vascular plants, mosses, and lichens, as well as data on their distribution within the island. We collected and identified 25 species of lichens, two species of vascular plants and one moss. Lichens were the most diverse group found, including records of four new genera (Endocarpon, Fuscidea, Lecanographa and Verrucaria) and 13 new species for Colombia. The high lichen richness on Malpelo might be explained by their efficient form of asexual reproduction (soredia and isidia), that may have facilitated their transport to the island by migrating birds or wind. Once on the island, it is possible that lichens persist by being chemically protected against herbivores. The great number of new generic and species records for Colombia is explained by the low number of studies in saxicolous lichens conducted so far in the country, particularly on coastal areas and remote islands. Only two species of vascular plants were collected, a grass, Paspalum sp., and a fern, Pityrogramma calomelanos, and both of them correspond to new determinations for Malpelo. A moss species previously reported but with no positive identification was collected and identified as Octoblepharum albidum. Other species previously reported, for example, some species of shrubs, were not observed. The low number of vascular plants is probably due to a combination of soil conditions and herbivory by land crabs. This study is the first complete inventory of the flora of Malpelo and is a starting and reference point for future comparisons among islands in

  17. Possible Signs of Fauna and Flora on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksanfomality, Leonid V.; Selivanov, Arnold S.; Gektin, Yuryi M.

    2015-08-01

    Habitability of planets is a fundamental question of science. Some of exoplanets possess physical conditions close to those of Venus. The planet Venus, despite its dense and hot (735 K) oxygen-free atmosphere of CO2, having a high pressure of 9.2 MPa at the surface, can be a natural laboratory for this kind of studies. The only existing data on the planet’s surface are still the results obtained by the Soviet VENERA landers.The TV experiments of Venera-9 and 10 (October, 1975) and Venera-13 and 14 (March, 1982) delivered 41 panoramas of Venus surface (or their fragments). The experiments were of extreme technical complexity. There have not been any similar missions to Venus in the subsequent 40 and 33 years. In the absence of new landing missions to Venus, the VENERA panoramas have been re-processed by modern means. The results of these missions are studied anew. A dozen of relatively large objects, from a decimeter to half a meter in size, with an unusual morphology have been found which moved very slowly or changed slightly their shape. Certain unusual findings that have a structure similar to the Earth’ fauna and flora were found in different areas of the planet. There are more then 30 papers on the topic published in 2012-2014 (e.g., “Acta Astronautica”, 2014, V. 105, pp. 521-533). Due to the availability of up to eight duplicates of the images obtained and their low level of masking noise, the VENERA archive panoramas permit identifying and exploring some types of hypothetical life forms of Venus. Analysis of treated once again VENERA panoramic images revealed objects that might indicate the presence of about 12 hypothetical forms of Venusian flora and fauna. Among them is ‘amisada’ that stands out with its unusual lizard shape against the stone plates surrounding it.

  18. Fire-adapted Gondwanan Angiosperm floras evolved in the Cretaceous

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fires have been widespread over the last 250 million years, peaking 60−125 million years ago (Ma), and might therefore have played a key role in the evolution of Angiosperms. Yet it is commonly believed that fireprone communities existed only after the global climate became more arid and seasonal 15 Ma. Recent molecular-based studies point to much earlier origins of fireprone Angiosperm floras in Australia and South Africa (to 60 Ma, Paleocene) but even these were constrained by the ages of the clades examined. Results Using a molecular-dated phylogeny for the great Gondwanan family Proteaceae, with a 113-million-year evolutionary history, we show that the ancestors of many of its characteristic sclerophyll genera, such as Protea, Conospermum, Leucadendron, Petrophile, Adenanthos and Leucospermum (all subfamily Proteoideae), occurred in fireprone habitats from 88 Ma (83−94, 95% HPD, Mid-Upper Cretaceous). This coincided with the highest atmospheric oxygen (combustibility) levels experienced over the past 150 million years. Migration from non-fireprone (essentially rainforest-climate-type) environments was accompanied by the evolution of highly speciose clades with a range of seed storage traits and fire-cued seed release or germination mechanisms that was diagnostic for each clade by 71 Ma, though the ant-dispersed lineage (as a soil seed-storage subclade) was delayed until 45 Ma. Conclusions Focusing on the widespread 113-million-year-old family Proteaceae, fireproneness among Gondwanan Angiosperm floras can now be traced back almost 90 million years into the fiery Cretaceous. The associated evolution of on-plant (serotiny) and soil seed storage, and later ant dispersal, affirms them as ancient adaptations to fire among flowering plants. PMID:23171161

  19. Controlling the catalytic aerobic oxidation of phenols.

    PubMed

    Esguerra, Kenneth Virgel N; Fall, Yacoub; Petitjean, Laurène; Lumb, Jean-Philip

    2014-05-28

    The oxidation of phenols is the subject of extensive investigation, but there are few catalytic aerobic examples that are chemo- and regioselective. Here we describe conditions for the ortho-oxygenation or oxidative coupling of phenols under copper (Cu)-catalyzed aerobic conditions that give rise to ortho-quinones, biphenols or benzoxepines. We demonstrate that each product class can be accessed selectively by the appropriate choice of Cu(I) salt, amine ligand, desiccant and reaction temperature. In addition, we evaluate the effects of substituents on the phenol and demonstrate their influence on selectivity between ortho-oxygenation and oxidative coupling pathways. These results create an important precedent of catalyst control in the catalytic aerobic oxidation of phenols and set the stage for future development of catalytic systems and mechanistic investigations. PMID:24784319

  20. Drying and recovery of aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianjun; Zhang, Quanguo; Chen, Yu-You; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-10-01

    To dehydrate aerobic granules to bone-dry form was proposed as a promising option for long-term storage of aerobic granules. This study cultivated aerobic granules with high proteins/polysaccharide ratio and then dried these granules using seven protocols: drying at 37°C, 60°C, 4°C, under sunlight, in dark, in a flowing air stream or in concentrated acetone solutions. All dried granules experienced volume shrinkage of over 80% without major structural breakdown. After three recovery batches, although with loss of part of the volatile suspended solids, all dried granules were restored most of their original size and organic matter degradation capabilities. The strains that can survive over the drying and storage periods were also identified. Once the granules were dried, they can be stored over long period of time, with minimal impact yielded by the applied drying protocols. PMID:27392096

  1. Organic micropollutants in aerobic and anaerobic membrane bioreactors: Changes in microbial communities and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Harb, Moustapha; Wei, Chun-Hai; Wang, Nan; Amy, Gary; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2016-10-01

    Organic micro-pollutants (OMPs) are contaminants of emerging concern in wastewater treatment due to the risk of their proliferation into the environment, but their impact on the biological treatment process is not well understood. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of the presence of OMPs on the core microbial populations of wastewater treatment. Two nanofiltration-coupled membrane bioreactors (aerobic and anaerobic) were subjected to the same operating conditions while treating synthetic municipal wastewater spiked with OMPs. Microbial community dynamics, gene expression levels, and antibiotic resistance genes were analyzed using molecular-based approaches. Results showed that presence of OMPs in the wastewater feed had a clear effect on keystone bacterial populations in both the aerobic and anaerobic sludge while also significantly impacting biodegradation-associated gene expression levels. Finally, multiple antibiotic-type OMPs were found to have higher removal rates in the anaerobic MBR, while associated antibiotic resistance genes were lower.

  2. Organic micropollutants in aerobic and anaerobic membrane bioreactors: Changes in microbial communities and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Harb, Moustapha; Wei, Chun-Hai; Wang, Nan; Amy, Gary; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2016-10-01

    Organic micro-pollutants (OMPs) are contaminants of emerging concern in wastewater treatment due to the risk of their proliferation into the environment, but their impact on the biological treatment process is not well understood. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of the presence of OMPs on the core microbial populations of wastewater treatment. Two nanofiltration-coupled membrane bioreactors (aerobic and anaerobic) were subjected to the same operating conditions while treating synthetic municipal wastewater spiked with OMPs. Microbial community dynamics, gene expression levels, and antibiotic resistance genes were analyzed using molecular-based approaches. Results showed that presence of OMPs in the wastewater feed had a clear effect on keystone bacterial populations in both the aerobic and anaerobic sludge while also significantly impacting biodegradation-associated gene expression levels. Finally, multiple antibiotic-type OMPs were found to have higher removal rates in the anaerobic MBR, while associated antibiotic resistance genes were lower. PMID:27441825

  3. Big Soda Lake (Nevada). 1. Pelagic bacterial heterotrophy and biomass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zehr, Jon P.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Cloern, James E.; George, Leah H.; Lane, Judith L.

    1987-01-01

    Bacterial activities and abundance were measured seasonally in the water column of meromictic Big Soda Lake which is divided into three chemically distinct zones: aerobic mixolimnion, anaerobic mixolimnion, and anaerobic monimolimnion. Bacterial abundance ranged between 5 and 52 x 106 cells ml−1, with highest biomass at the interfaces between these zones: 2–4 mg C liter−1 in the photosynthetic bacterial layer (oxycline) and 0.8–2.0 mg C liter−1 in the chemocline. Bacterial cell size and morphology also varied with depth: small coccoid cells were dominant in the aerobic mixolimnion, whereas the monimolimnion had a more diverse population that included cocci, rods, and large filaments. Heterotrophic activity was measured by [methyl-3H]thymidine incorporation and [14C]glutamate uptake. Highest uptake rates were at or just below the photosynthetic bacterial layer and were attributable to small (<1 µm) heterotrophs rather than the larger photosynthetic bacteria. These high rates of heterotrophic uptake were apparently linked with fermentation; rates of other mineralization processes (e.g. sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, denitrification) in the anoxic mixolimnion were insignificant. Heterotrophic activity in the highly reduced monimolimnion was generally much lower than elsewhere in the water column. Therefore, although the monimolimnion contained most of the bacterial abundance and biomass (∼60%), most of the cells there were inactive.

  4. Comprehensive analysis of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria found on dental bib clips.

    PubMed

    Alt-Holland, Addy; Murphy, Christina M; Powers, Anne; Kublin, Claire L; Jeong, Youjin Natalie; DiMattia, Michelle; Pham, Linh; Park, Angel; Finkelman, Matthew; Lombard, Maureen; Hanley, James B; Paster, Bruce J; Kugel, Gerard

    2013-04-01

    Multiple-use dental bib clips are considered to present relatively low risks for transmitting infections and, thus, are thought to only require disinfection between patient visits. This study was designed to: 1) determine the presence and composition of bacterial contaminants on reusable rubber-faced metal bib clips after dental treatment at the hygiene clinic at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine and 2) evaluate the effectiveness of the disinfection for this clip type. Aerobic and anaerobic bacterial contaminant loads on the surfaces of the clips were investigated immediately after hygiene treatments were rendered and again after clips were disinfected. The species and strains of bacterial isolates were identified using 16S rDNA sequencing and Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray analyses. The results demonstrated that although the use of disinfection proved to be significantly effective, some clips retained at least one bacterium on their surfaces after disinfection. Although the bacterial species present on disinfected clips were typical skin or environmental isolates, some were oral in origin. In the study's settings, bacterial presence on the clips did not indicate an infectious disease problem. The different bacterial loads on clips suggest that cross-contamination risks may not be the same for all clinics, and that this difference may be related to the type of treatments and services performed.

  5. Leaky gut and the liver: A role for bacterial translocation in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ilan, Yaron

    2012-01-01

    Gut flora and bacterial translocation (BT) play important roles in the pathogenesis of chronic liver disease, including cirrhosis and its complications. Intestinal bacterial overgrowth and increased bacterial translocation of gut flora from the intestinal lumen predispose patients to bacterial infections, major complications and also play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic liver disorders. Levels of bacterial lipopolysaccharide, a component of gram-negative bacteria, are increased in the portal and/or systemic circulation in several types of chronic liver disease. Impaired gut epithelial integrity due to alterations in tight junction proteins may be the pathological mechanism underlying bacterial translocation. Preclinical and clinical studies over the last decade have suggested a role for BT in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Bacterial overgrowth, immune dysfunction, alteration of the luminal factors, and altered intestinal permeability are all involved in the pathogenesis of NASH and its complications. A better understanding of the cell-specific recognition and intracellular signaling events involved in sensing gut-derived microbes will help in the development of means to achieve an optimal balance in the gut-liver axis and ameliorate liver diseases. These may suggest new targets for potential therapeutic interventions for the treatment of NASH. Here, we review some of the mechanisms connecting BT and NASH and potential therapeutic developments. PMID:22690069

  6. Bacterial associations reveal spatial population dynamics in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Moritz; Nilsson, Louise K. J.; Brunius, Carl; Dabiré, Roch K.; Hopkins, Richard; Terenius, Olle

    2016-01-01

    The intolerable burden of malaria has for too long plagued humanity and the prospect of eradicating malaria is an optimistic, but reachable, target in the 21st century. However, extensive knowledge is needed about the spatial structure of mosquito populations in order to develop effective interventions against malaria transmission. We hypothesized that the microbiota associated with a mosquito reflects acquisition of bacteria in different environments. By analyzing the whole-body bacterial flora of An. gambiae mosquitoes from Burkina Faso by 16 S amplicon sequencing, we found that the different environments gave each mosquito a specific bacterial profile. In addition, the bacterial profiles provided precise and predicting information on the spatial dynamics of the mosquito population as a whole and showed that the mosquitoes formed clear local populations within a meta-population network. We believe that using microbiotas as proxies for population structures will greatly aid improving the performance of vector interventions around the world. PMID:26960555

  7. Parallel pathways of ethoxylated alcohol biodegradation under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Zembrzuska, Joanna; Budnik, Irena; Lukaszewski, Zenon

    2016-07-01

    Non-ionic surfactants (NS) are a major component of the surfactant flux discharged into surface water, and alcohol ethoxylates (AE) are the major component of this flux. Therefore, biodegradation pathways of AE deserve more thorough investigation. The aim of this work was to investigate the stages of biodegradation of homogeneous oxyethylated dodecanol C12E9 having 9 oxyethylene subunits, under aerobic conditions. Enterobacter strain Z3 bacteria were chosen as biodegrading organisms under conditions with C12E9 as the sole source of organic carbon. Bacterial consortia of river water were used in a parallel test as an inoculum for comparison. The LC-MS technique was used to identify the products of biodegradation. Liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate was selected for the isolation of C12E9 and metabolites from the biodegradation broth. The LC-MS/MS technique operating in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode was used for quantitative determination of C12E9, C12E8, C12E7 and C12E6. Apart from the substrate, the homologues C12E8, C12E7 and C12E6, being metabolites of C12E9 biodegradation by shortening of the oxyethylene chain, as well as intermediate metabolites having a carboxyl end group in the oxyethylene chain (C12E8COOH, C12E7COOH, C12E6COOH and C12E5COOH), were identified. Poly(ethylene glycols) (E) having 9, 8 and 7 oxyethylene subunits were also identified, indicating parallel central fission of C12E9 and its metabolites. Similar results were obtained with river water as inoculum. It is concluded that AE, under aerobic conditions, are biodegraded via two parallel pathways: by central fission with the formation of PEG, and by Ω-oxidation of the oxyethylene chain with the formation of carboxylated AE and subsequent shortening of the oxyethylene chain by a single unit. PMID:27037882

  8. Bacterial Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells, yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micrometer scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, I review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  9. Bacterial arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ho, G

    2001-07-01

    The septic arthritis literature of 2000 revisited several topics previously examined in some detail. These include septic arthritis in rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatic manifestations of bacterial endocarditis, and infectious complications of prosthetic joints. The trend in antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent late infections in total joint replacement is to narrow the targeted hosts to those most at risk, to define the procedures associated with the greatest risk of bacteremia, and to simplify the antibiotic regimen. The diagnoses of septic arthritis of the lumbar facet joint and septic arthritis caused by direct inoculation of bacteria by a foreign object penetrating the joint are facilitated by noninvasive imaging technologies. Septic arthritis caused by uncommon microorganisms and septic arthritis in immunocompromised hosts are other noteworthy topics in this year's literature. PMID:11555734

  10. Microbial degradation of 4-monobrominated diphenyl ether in an aerobic sludge and the DGGE analysis of diversity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Yao; Wang, Chun-Kang; Shih, Yang-Hsin

    2010-07-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were applied as flame retardant additives in polymers for many plastic and electronic products. Due to their ubiquitous distribution in the environment, potential toxicity to human and tendency for bioaccumulation, PBDEs have raised public safety concern. In this study we examined the degradation of 4-monobrominated diphenyl ether (4-BDE) in aerobic sludge, as a model for PBDE biodegradation. Degradation of 4-BDE was observed in aerobic sludge. Co-metabolism with toluene or diphenyl ether facilitated 4-BDE biodegradation in terms of kinetics and efficiency. Diphenyl ether seems to perform slightly better as an auxiliary carbon source than toluene in facilitating 4-BDE degradation. During the experiment we identified diphenyl ether by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry(GC/MS), which indicates that an anaerobic debromination has occurred. Bacterial community composition was monitored with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. The fragments enriched in 4-BDE-degrading aerobic sludge samples belong to presumably a novel anaerobic Clostridiales species distantly related to all known debrominating microbes. This suggests that 4-BDE biodegradation can occur in anaerobic micro-niche in an apparently aerobic environment, by a previously unknown bacterial species. These findings can provide better understandings of biodegradation of brominated diphenyl ethers and can facilitate the prediction of the fate of PBDEs in the environment. PMID:20512728

  11. Geographical constraints are stronger than invasion patterns for European urban floras.

    PubMed

    Ricotta, Carlo; Celesti-Grapow, Laura; Kühn, Ingolf; Rapson, Gillian; Pyšek, Petr; La Sorte, Frank A; Thompson, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that affect invasion success of alien species is an important prerequisite for the effective management of present and future aliens. To gain insight into this matter we asked the following questions: Are the geographical patterns of species distributions in urban floras different for native compared with alien plant species? Does the introduction of alien species contribute to the homogenization of urban floras? We used a Mantel test on Jaccard dissimilarity matrices of 30 urban floras across the British Isles, Italy and central Europe to compare the spatial distribution of native species with four classes of alien species: archaeophytes, all neophytes, non-invasive neophytes, and invasive neophytes. Archaeophytes and neophytes are species that were introduced into Europe before and after 1500 AD, respectively. To analyze the homogenizing effect of alien species on the native urban floras, we tested for differences in the average dissimilarity of individual cities from their group centroid in ordination space. Our results show that the compositional patterns of native and alien species seem to respond to the same environmental drivers, such that all four classes of alien species were significantly related to native species across urban floras. In this framework, alien species may have an impact on biogeographic patterns of urban floras in ways that reflect their history of introduction and expansion: archaeophytes and invasive neophytes tended to homogenize, while non-invasive neophytes tended to differentiate urban floras.

  12. Bacterial Exposures and Associations with Atopy and Asthma in Children

    PubMed Central

    Valkonen, Maria; Wouters, Inge M.; Täubel, Martin; Rintala, Helena; Lenters, Virissa; Vasara, Ritva; Genuneit, Jon; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Piarroux, Renaud; von Mutius, Erika; Heederik, Dick; Hyvärinen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background The increase in prevalence of asthma and atopic diseases in Western countries has been linked to aspects of microbial exposure patterns of people. It remains unclear which microbial aspects contribute to the protective farm effect. Objective The objective of this study was to identify bacterial groups associated with prevalence of asthma and atopy, and to quantify indoor exposure to some of these bacterial groups. Methods A DNA fingerprinting technique, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), was applied to mattress dust samples of farm children and control children in the context of the GABRIEL Advanced study. Associations between signals in DGGE and atopy, asthma and other allergic health outcomes were analyzed. Quantitative DNA based assays (qPCR) for four bacterial groups were applied on the dust samples to seek quantitative confirmation of associations indicated in DNA fingerprinting. Results Several statistically significant associations between individual bacterial signals and also bacterial diversity in DGGE and health outcomes in children were observed. The majority of these associations showed inverse relationships with atopy, less so with asthma. Also, in a subsequent confirmation study using a quantitative method (qPCR), higher mattress levels of specifically targeted bacterial groups - Mycobacterium spp., Bifidobacteriaceae spp. and two different clusters of Clostridium spp. - were associated with a lower prevalence of atopy. Conclusion DNA fingerprinting proved useful in identifying bacterial signals that were associated with atopy in particular. These findings were quantitatively confirmed for selected bacterial groups with a second method. High correlations between the different bacterial exposures impede a clear attribution of protective effects to one specific bacterial group. More diverse bacterial flora in mattress dust may link to microbial exposure patterns that protect against development of atopic diseases. PMID:26121165

  13. ANAEROBIC AND AEROBIC TREATMENT OF CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biological degradation of 12 chlorinated aliphatic compounds (CACs) was assessed in bench-top reactors and in serum bottle tests. Three continuously mixed daily batch-fed reactor systems were evaluated: anaerobic, aerobic, and sequential-anaerobic-aerobic (sequential). Glucose,...

  14. Aerobic and anaerobic microbial degradation of crude (4-methylcyclohexyl)methanol in river sediments.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Li; Zhi, Wei; Liu, Yangsheng; Smiley, Elizabeth; Gallagher, Daniel; Chen, Xi; Dietrich, Andrea; Zhang, Husen

    2016-03-15

    Cyclohexane and some of its derivatives have been a major concern because of their significant adverse human health effects and widespread occurrence in the environment. The 2014 West Virginia chemical spill has raised public attention to (4-methylcyclohexyl)methanol (4-MCHM), one cyclohexane derivative, which is widely used in coal processing but largely ignored. In particular, the environmental fate of its primary components, cis- and trans-4-MCHM, remains largely unexplored. This study aimed to investigate the degradation kinetics and mineralization of cis- and trans-4-MCHM by sediment microorganisms under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. We found the removal of cis- and trans-4-MCHM was mainly attributed to biodegradation with little contribution from sorption. A nearly complete aerobic degradation of 4-MCHM occurred within 14 days, whereas the anaerobic degradation was reluctant with residual percentages of 62.6% of cis-4-MCHM and 85.0% of trans-4-MCHM after 16-day incubation. The cis-4-MCHM was degraded faster than the trans under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, indicating an isomer-specific degradation could occur during the 4-MCHM degradation. Nitrate addition enhanced 4-MCHM mineralization by about 50% under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Both cis- and trans-4-MCHM fit well with the first-order kinetic model with respective degradation rates of 0.46-0.52 and 0.19-0.31 day(-)(1) under aerobic condition. Respective degradation rates of 0.041-0.095 and 0.013-0.052 day(-)(1) occurred under anaerobic condition. One bacterial strain capable of effectively degrading 4-MCHM isomers was isolated from river sediments and identified as Bacillus pumilus at the species level based on 16S rRNA gene sequence and 97% identity. Our findings will provide critical information for improving the prediction of the environmental fate of 4-MCHM and other cyclohexane derivatives with similar structure as well as enhancing the development of feasible treatment

  15. Aerobic and anaerobic microbial degradation of crude (4-methylcyclohexyl)methanol in river sediments.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Li; Zhi, Wei; Liu, Yangsheng; Smiley, Elizabeth; Gallagher, Daniel; Chen, Xi; Dietrich, Andrea; Zhang, Husen

    2016-03-15

    Cyclohexane and some of its derivatives have been a major concern because of their significant adverse human health effects and widespread occurrence in the environment. The 2014 West Virginia chemical spill has raised public attention to (4-methylcyclohexyl)methanol (4-MCHM), one cyclohexane derivative, which is widely used in coal processing but largely ignored. In particular, the environmental fate of its primary components, cis- and trans-4-MCHM, remains largely unexplored. This study aimed to investigate the degradation kinetics and mineralization of cis- and trans-4-MCHM by sediment microorganisms under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. We found the removal of cis- and trans-4-MCHM was mainly attributed to biodegradation with little contribution from sorption. A nearly complete aerobic degradation of 4-MCHM occurred within 14 days, whereas the anaerobic degradation was reluctant with residual percentages of 62.6% of cis-4-MCHM and 85.0% of trans-4-MCHM after 16-day incubation. The cis-4-MCHM was degraded faster than the trans under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, indicating an isomer-specific degradation could occur during the 4-MCHM degradation. Nitrate addition enhanced 4-MCHM mineralization by about 50% under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Both cis- and trans-4-MCHM fit well with the first-order kinetic model with respective degradation rates of 0.46-0.52 and 0.19-0.31 day(-)(1) under aerobic condition. Respective degradation rates of 0.041-0.095 and 0.013-0.052 day(-)(1) occurred under anaerobic condition. One bacterial strain capable of effectively degrading 4-MCHM isomers was isolated from river sediments and identified as Bacillus pumilus at the species level based on 16S rRNA gene sequence and 97% identity. Our findings will provide critical information for improving the prediction of the environmental fate of 4-MCHM and other cyclohexane derivatives with similar structure as well as enhancing the development of feasible treatment

  16. Aerobic Mercury-resistant bacteria alter Mercury speciation and retention in the Tagus Estuary (Portugal).

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Neusa L; Canário, João; O'Driscoll, Nelson J; Duarte, Aida; Carvalho, Cristina

    2016-02-01

    Aerobic mercury-resistant bacteria were isolated from the sediments of two highly mercury-polluted areas of the Tagus Estuary (Barreiro and Cala do Norte) and one natural reserve area (Alcochete) in order to test their capacity to transform mercury. Bacterial species were identified using 16S rRNA amplification and sequencing techniques and the results indicate the prevalence of Bacillus sp. Resistance patterns to mercurial compounds were established by the determination of minimal inhibitory concentrations. Representative Hg-resistant bacteria were further tested for transformation pathways (reduction, volatilization and methylation) in cultures containing mercury chloride. Bacterial Hg-methylation was carried out by Vibrio fluvialis, Bacillus megaterium and Serratia marcescens that transformed 2-8% of total mercury into methylmercury in 48h. In addition, most of the HgR bacterial isolates showed Hg(2+)-reduction andHg(0)-volatilization resulting 6-50% mercury loss from the culture media. In summary, the results obtained under controlled laboratory conditions indicate that aerobic Hg-resistant bacteria from the Tagus Estuary significantly affect both the methylation and reduction of mercury and may have a dual face by providing a pathway for pollution dispersion while forming methylmercury, which is highly toxic for living organisms.

  17. Evaluation of nitrate removal by continuous culturing of an aerobic denitrifying bacterium, Paracoccus pantotrophus.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa-Kurisu, K; Otani, Y; Hanaki, K

    2006-01-01

    Nitrate removal under aerobic conditions was investigated using pure cultures of Paracoccus pantotrophus, which is a well-known aerobic-denitrifying (AD) bacterium. When a high concentration of cultures with a high carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio was preserved at the beginning of batch experiments, subsequently added nitrate was completely removed. When continuous culturing was perpetuated, a high nitrate removal rate (66.5%) was observed on day 4 post-culture, although gradual decreases in AD ability with time were observed. The attenuation in AD ability was probably caused by carbon limitation, because when carbon concentration of inflow water was doubled, nitrate removal efficiency improved from 18.1% to 59.6%. Bacterial community analysis using the polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) method showed that P. pantotrophus disappeared in the suspended medium on day 8 post-culture, whereas other bacterial communities dominated by Acidovorax sp. appeared. Interestingly, this replaced bacterial community also showed AD ability. As P. pantotrophus was detected as attached colonies around the membrane and bottom of the reactor, this bacterium can therefore be introduced in a fixed form for treatment of wastewater containing nitrate with a high C/N ratio. PMID:17163031

  18. Space agriculture for habitation on Mars with hyper-thermophilic aerobic composting bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, S.; Ishikawa, Y.; Tomita-Yokotani, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Kitaya, Y.; Yamashita, M.; Nagatomo, M.; Oshima, T.; Wada, H.; Space Agriculture Task Force, J.

    Manned Mars exploration requires recycle of materials to support human life A conceptual design is developed for space agriculture which is driven by the biologically regenerative function Hyper-thermophilic aerobic composting bacterial ecology is the core of materials recycling system to process human metabolic waste and inedible biomass and convert them to fertilizer for plants cultivation A photosynthetic reaction of plants will be driven by solar energy Water will be recycled by cultivation of plants and passing it through plant bodies Sub-surface water and atmospheric carbon dioxide are the natural resource available on Mars and these resources will be converted to oxygen and foods We envision that the agricultural system will be scaled up by importing materials from Martian environment Excess oxygen will be obtained from growing trees for structural and other components Minor elements including N P K and other traces will be introduced as fertilizers or nutrients into the agricultural materials circulation Nitrogen will be collected from Martian atmosphere We will assess biological fixation of nitrogen using micro-organisms responsible in Earth biosphere Hyper-thermophilic aerobic bacterial ecology is effective to convert waste materials into useful forms to plants This microbial technology has been well established on ground for processing sewage and waste materials For instance the hyper-thermophilic bacterial system is applied to a composting machine in a size of a trash box in home kitchen Since such a home electronics

  19. Treatment of phenolics, aromatic hydrocarbons, and cyanide-bearing wastewater in individual and combined anaerobic, aerobic, and anoxic bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Naresh K; Philip, Ligy

    2015-01-01

    Studies were conducted on a mixture of pollutants commonly found in coke oven wastewater (CWW) to evaluate the biodegradation of various pollutants under anaerobic, aerobic, and anoxic conditions. The removal of the pollutants was monitored during individual bioreactor operation and using a combination of bioreactors operating in anaerobic-aerobic-anoxic sequence. While studying the performance of individual reactors, it was observed that cyanide removal (83.3 %) was predominant in the aerobic bioreactor, while much of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) (69 %) was consumed in the anoxic bioreactor. With the addition of cyanide, the COD removal efficiency was affected in all the bioreactors, and several intermediates were detected. While treating synthetic CWW using the combined bioreactor system, the overall COD removal efficiency was 86.79 % at an OLR of 2.4 g COD/L/day and an HRT of 96 h. The removal efficiency of 3,5-xylenol and cyanide, with inlet concentration of 150 and 10 mg/L, was found to be 91.8 and 93.6 % respectively. It was found that the impact of xylenol on the performance of the bioreactors was less than cyanide toxicity. Molecular analysis using T-RFLP revealed the dominance of strictly aerobic, mesophilic proteobacterium, Bosea minatitlanensis, in the aerobic bioreactor. The anoxic bioreactor was dominant with Rhodococcus pyridinivorans, known for its remarkable aromatic decomposing activity, while an unclassified Myxococcales bacterium was identified as the predominant bacterial species in the anaerobic bioreactor.

  20. Bacterial dehalorespiration with chlorinated benzenes.

    PubMed

    Adrian, L; Szewzyk, U; Wecke, J; Görisch, H

    2000-11-30

    Chlorobenzenes are toxic, highly persistent and ubiquitously distributed environmental contaminants that accumulate in the food chain. The only known microbial transformation of 1,2,3,5-tetrachlorobenzene (TeCB) and higher chlorinated benzenes is the reductive dechlorination to lower chlorinated benzenes under anaerobic conditions observed with mixed bacterial cultures. The lower chlorinated benzenes can subsequently be mineralized by aerobic bacteria. Here we describe the isolation of the oxygen-sensitive strain CBDB1, a pure culture capable of reductive dechlorination of chlorobenzenes. Strain CBDB1 is a highly specialized bacterium that stoichiometrically dechlorinates 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene (TCB), 1,2,4-TCB, 1,2,3,4-TeCB, 1,2,3,5-TeCB and 1,2,4,5-TeCB to dichlorobenzenes or 1,3,5-TCB. The presence of chlorobenzene as an electron acceptor and hydrogen as an electron donor is essential for growth, and indicates that strain CBDB1 meets its energy needs by a dehalorespiratory process. According to their 16S rRNA gene sequences, strain CBDB1, Dehalococcoides ethenogenes and several uncultivated bacteria form a new bacterial cluster, of which strain CBDB1 is the first, so far, to thrive on a purely synthetic medium.

  1. Cefoxitin therapy for bacterial endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Webb, D; Thadepalli, H; Bach, V

    1979-01-01

    Of 22 patients who were suspected of having bacterial endocarditis and who were treated with cefoxitin intravenously (8-12 g per day), 12 were evaluated for responses to therapy. Ten patients had infections due to a single pathogen, and two had polymicrobial infections. Staphylococci were isolated from eight patients, and streptococci from four; both of these pathogens were susceptible to 2-16 micrograms of cefoxitin/ml. Staphylococcus aureus and four strains of anaerobic bacteria, including Bacteroides fragilis (minimal inhibitory concentration, 32 micrograms/ml), were isolated from one patient. The average level of cefoxitin in serum was 32.8 micrograms/ml (range, 14.5-64 micrograms/ml) at 1 hr after an intravenous dose of 2 g; after 5 hr the average level in serum was 8.5 micrograms/ml (range, 2-20 micrograms/ml). The mean (+/- SD) level of cefoxitin in myocardial tissues from eight rabbits at 1 hr following a 250-mg/kg dose of the antibiotic was 4 +/- 0.5 micrograms/g. On the average, patients were treated for 29 days (range, 14-40 days), and they became afebrile in 6.2 days (range, three to 20 days). Both clinical and microbiologic responses to cefoxitin therapy were excellent in 10 patients with monobacterial infections. Both patients with polymicrobial infections were not cured. One, who was infected with a mixed flora of anaerobes, died; the other was cured after surgical valvectomy. These results suggest that cefoxitin is effective in the treatment of endocarditis due to a single susceptible organism but that this antibiotic should be used with caution in patients whose endocarditis is caused by a mixed population of bacterial pathogens.

  2. Are molecular and isotopic patterns in modern plants representative of ancient floras? Examples from Paleocene and Eocene floras and sediments in the Bighorn Basin (WY, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diefendorf, A. F.; Freeman, K. H.; Wing, S. L.; Currano, E. D.

    2011-12-01

    In modern ecosystems, climate, biome and plant community are important predictors of carbon isotope patterns recorded in leaves, leaf waxes, and leaf terpenoids. However, it is unclear if modern carbon isotope patterns are useful analogs in the past when climate and atmospheric CO2 conditions were drastically different than today. It is also uncertain if molecular carbon isotope approaches are more robust with respect to reconstructing patterns of atmospheric δ13C compared to bulk isotope approaches. To evaluate these questions, we present a study of carbon isotope values of bulk organic matter and biomarkers for terrestrial plants (di- and triterpenoids and n-alkanes) from the late Paleocene (62 MA) to the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO; 52.6 MA) in the Bighorn Basin (WY, USA). We sampled along eight laterally extensive outcrops from the Fort Union and Willwood Formations. Each unit varies in exposure from tens of meters to eighteen kilometers. Sediment lithology includes carbonaceous mudstones, shales, and lignites with total organic carbon ranging from 0.2% to 55%. Climate during this interval, as determined from fossil leaf metrics, warmed from the cooler Paleocene (~10.5°C) to the hot Eocene (~22.2°C) with mean annual precipitation varying from 110 to 170 cm. We collected multiple samples across a laterally extensive outcrop to capture previously reported spatial variability in flora and depositional environment. Carbon isotopes of bulk organic matter, n-alkanes, and di- and triterpenoids (specific for conifers and angiosperms, respectively) were characterized. To determine if plant biomarker relationships from modern plants are applicable to ancient plants, we reconstructed carbon isotope fractionation during photosynthesis (Δleaf) from biomarker carbon isotope values (n-alkanes and terpenoids) and from δ13C values of atmospheric CO2 estimated from planktonic foraminifera. Reconstructed Δleaf values are consistent with predicted Δleaf values when

  3. Effects of rare earth element lanthanum on rumen methane and volatile fatty acid production and microbial flora in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T T; Zhao, G Y; Zheng, W S; Niu, W J; Wei, C; Lin, S X

    2015-06-01

    The objectives of the trial were to study the effects of rare earth element (REE) lanthanum (La) on the in vitro rumen methane (CH4 ) and volatile fatty acid (VFA) production and the microbial flora of feeds. Four feed mixtures with different levels of neutral detergent fibre (NDF), that is 20.0% (I), 31.0% (II), 41.9% (III) and 52.7% (IV), were formulated as substrates. Five levels of LaCl3 , that is 0, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 mmol/kg dry matter (DM), were added to the feed mixtures, respectively, as experimental treatments in a two-factor 5 × 4 randomized design. The in vitro incubation lasted for 24 h. The results showed that supplementing LaCl3 increased the total gas (p < 0.001) production and tended to increase the total VFA production (p = 0.072) and decreased the CH4 production (p = 0.001) and the ratios of acetate/propionate (p = 0.019) and CH4 /total VFA (p < 0.001). Interactions between LaCl3 and NDF were significant in total gas production (p = 0.030) and tended to be significant in CH4 production (p = 0.071). Supplementing LaCl3 at the level of 0.8 mmol/g DM decreased the relative abundance of methanogens and protozoa in the total bacterial 16S rDNA analysed using the real-time PCR (p < 0.0001), increased F. succinogenes (p = 0.0003) and decreased R. flavefaciens (p < 0.0001) whereas did not affect R. albus and anaerobic fungi (p > 0.05). It was concluded that LaCl3 decreased the CH4 production without negatively affecting feed digestion through manipulating rumen microbial flora when feed mixtures with different levels of NDF were used as substrates.

  4. Aerobic Exercise Prescription for Rheumatoid Arthritics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Blanche W.; Williams, Hilda L.

    The use of exercise as a general treatment for rheumatoid arthritics (RA) has included range of motion, muscular strength, water exercise and rest therapy while virtually ignoring possible benefits of aerobic exercise. The purposes of this project were to examine the guidelines for exercise prescription in relation to this special population and…

  5. Response of aerobic rice to Piriformospora indica.

    PubMed

    Das, Joy; Ramesh, K V; Maithri, U; Mutangana, D; Suresh, C K

    2014-03-01

    Rice cultivation under aerobic condition not only saves water but also opens up a splendid scope for effective application of beneficial root symbionts in rice crop unlike conventional puddled rice cultivation where water logged condition acts as constraint for easy proliferation of various beneficial soil microorganisms like arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Keeping these in view, an in silico investigation were carried out to explore the interaction of hydrogen phosphate with phosphate transporter protein (PTP) from P. indica. This was followed by greenhouse investigation to study the response of aerobic rice to Glomusfasciculatum, a conventional P biofertilizer and P. indica, an alternative to AM fungi. Computational studies using ClustalW tool revealed several conserved motifs between the phosphate transporters from Piriformospora indica and 8 other Glomus species. The 3D model of PTP from P. indica resembling "Mayan temple" was successfully docked onto hydrogen phosphate, indicating the affinity of this protein for inorganic phosphorus. Greenhouse studies revealed inoculation of aerobic rice either with P. indica, G. fasciculatum or both significantly enhanced the plant growth, biomass and yield with higher NPK, chlorophyll and sugar compared to uninoculated ones, P. indica inoculated plants being superior. A significantly enhanced activity of acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase were noticed in the rhizosphere soil of rice plants inoculated either with P. indica, G. fasciculatum or both, contributing to higher P uptake. Further, inoculation of aerobic rice plants with P. indica proved to be a better choice as a potential biofertilizer over mycorrhiza. PMID:24669667

  6. AEROBIC DENITRIFICATION: IMPLICATIONS FOR NITROGEN FATE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the Mississippi, as well as most nitrogen-degraded rivers and streams, NO3- is the dominant N species and therefore understanding its biogeochemical behavior is critical for accurate nitrogen fate modeling. To our knowledge this is the first work to report aerobic denitrificat...

  7. Media for the aerobic growth of campylobacter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of agar and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) concentration on aerobic growth of Campylobacter in a fumarate-pyruvate medium was examined. The broth medium was supplemented with 0.0 to 0.2% agar and inoculated with 106 CFU/ml of Campylobacter coli 33559, Campylobacter fetus 27349, Campylobacter...

  8. Reflections on Psychotherapy and Aerobic Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Wade

    This document provides a series of reflections by a practicing psychologist on the uses of aerobic workouts in psychotherapy. Two case histories are cited to illustrate the contention that the mode of exercise, rather than simply its presence or absence, is the significant indicator of a patient's emotional well-being or psychopathology. The first…

  9. A proposed aerobic granules size development scheme for aerobic granulation process.

    PubMed

    Dahalan, Farrah Aini; Abdullah, Norhayati; Yuzir, Ali; Olsson, Gustaf; Salmiati; Hamdzah, Myzairah; Din, Mohd Fadhil Mohd; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Khalil, Khalilah Abdul; Anuar, Aznah Nor; Noor, Zainura Zainon; Ujang, Zaini

    2015-04-01

    Aerobic granulation is increasingly used in wastewater treatment due to its unique physical properties and microbial functionalities. Granule size defines the physical properties of granules based on biomass accumulation. This study aims to determine the profile of size development under two physicochemical conditions. Two identical bioreactors namely Rnp and Rp were operated under non-phototrophic and phototrophic conditions, respectively. An illustrative scheme was developed to comprehend the mechanism of size development that delineates the granular size throughout the granulation. Observations on granules' size variation have shown that activated sludge revolutionised into the form of aerobic granules through the increase of biomass concentration in bioreactors which also determined the changes of granule size. Both reactors demonstrated that size transformed in a similar trend when tested with and without illumination. Thus, different types of aerobic granules may increase in size in the same way as recommended in the aerobic granule size development scheme.

  10. Ventilation and Speech Characteristics during Submaximal Aerobic Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Susan E.; Hipp, Jenny; Alessio, Helaine

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined alterations in ventilation and speech characteristics as well as perceived dyspnea during submaximal aerobic exercise tasks. Method: Twelve healthy participants completed aerobic exercise-only and simultaneous speaking and aerobic exercise tasks at 50% and 75% of their maximum oxygen consumption (VO[subscript 2] max).…

  11. Adolescents' Interest and Performances in Aerobic Fitness Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Xihe; Chen, Senlin; Parrott, James

    2014-01-01

    This study examined adolescents' interest in aerobic fitness testing and its relation to the test performances. Adolescents (N = 356) from three middle schools participated in the study. The participants took two aerobic fitness tests: the Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run (PACER) and One-Mile Run (1MR) with a two-day interval,…

  12. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Enteric Gram Negative Facultative Anaerobe Bacilli in Aerobic versus Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Amachawadi, Raghavendra G.; Renter, David G.; Volkova, Victoriya V.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial treatments result in the host’s enteric bacteria being exposed to the antimicrobials. Pharmacodynamic models can describe how this exposure affects the enteric bacteria and their antimicrobial resistance. The models utilize measurements of bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility traditionally obtained in vitro in aerobic conditions. However, in vivo enteric bacteria are exposed to antimicrobials in anaerobic conditions of the lower intestine. Some of enteric bacteria of food animals are potential foodborne pathogens, e.g., Gram-negative bacilli Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. These are facultative anaerobes; their physiology and growth rates change in anaerobic conditions. We hypothesized that their antimicrobial susceptibility also changes, and evaluated differences in the susceptibility in aerobic vs. anaerobic conditions of generic E. coli and Salmonella enterica of diverse serovars isolated from cattle feces. Susceptibility of an isolate was evaluated as its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measured by E-Test® following 24 hours of adaptation to the conditions on Mueller-Hinton agar, and on a more complex tryptic soy agar with 5% sheep blood (BAP) media. We considered all major antimicrobial drug classes used in the U.S. to treat cattle: β-lactams (specifically, ampicillin and ceftriaxone E-Test®), aminoglycosides (gentamicin and kanamycin), fluoroquinolones (enrofloxacin), classical macrolides (erythromycin), azalides (azithromycin), sulfanomides (sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim), and tetracyclines (tetracycline). Statistical analyses were conducted for the isolates (n≥30) interpreted as susceptible to the antimicrobials based on the clinical breakpoint interpretation for human infection. Bacterial susceptibility to every antimicrobial tested was statistically significantly different in anaerobic vs. aerobic conditions on both media, except for no difference in susceptibility to ceftriaxone on BAP agar. A satellite experiment

  13. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Enteric Gram Negative Facultative Anaerobe Bacilli in Aerobic versus Anaerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    DeMars, Zachary; Biswas, Silpak; Amachawadi, Raghavendra G; Renter, David G; Volkova, Victoriya V

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial treatments result in the host's enteric bacteria being exposed to the antimicrobials. Pharmacodynamic models can describe how this exposure affects the enteric bacteria and their antimicrobial resistance. The models utilize measurements of bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility traditionally obtained in vitro in aerobic conditions. However, in vivo enteric bacteria are exposed to antimicrobials in anaerobic conditions of the lower intestine. Some of enteric bacteria of food animals are potential foodborne pathogens, e.g., Gram-negative bacilli Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. These are facultative anaerobes; their physiology and growth rates change in anaerobic conditions. We hypothesized that their antimicrobial susceptibility also changes, and evaluated differences in the susceptibility in aerobic vs. anaerobic conditions of generic E. coli and Salmonella enterica of diverse serovars isolated from cattle feces. Susceptibility of an isolate was evaluated as its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measured by E-Test® following 24 hours of adaptation to the conditions on Mueller-Hinton agar, and on a more complex tryptic soy agar with 5% sheep blood (BAP) media. We considered all major antimicrobial drug classes used in the U.S. to treat cattle: β-lactams (specifically, ampicillin and ceftriaxone E-Test®), aminoglycosides (gentamicin and kanamycin), fluoroquinolones (enrofloxacin), classical macrolides (erythromycin), azalides (azithromycin), sulfanomides (sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim), and tetracyclines (tetracycline). Statistical analyses were conducted for the isolates (n≥30) interpreted as susceptible to the antimicrobials based on the clinical breakpoint interpretation for human infection. Bacterial susceptibility to every antimicrobial tested was statistically significantly different in anaerobic vs. aerobic conditions on both media, except for no difference in susceptibility to ceftriaxone on BAP agar. A satellite experiment

  14. Bacterial spores in silage and raw milk.

    PubMed

    te Giffel, M C; Wagendorp, A; Herrewegh, A; Driehuis, F

    2002-08-01

    Spore-forming bacteria can survive food-processing treatments. In the dairy industry, Bacillus and Clostridium species determine the shelf-life of a variety of heat-treated milk products, mainly if the level of post-process contamination is low. In order to minimize problems caused by bacterial spores in foods and food production processes a chain management approach, from raw materials, ingredients and environmental sources to final product storage conditions, is most effective. Silage is considered to be a significant source of contamination of raw milk with spores. PCR-RAPD fingerprinting and heat resistance studies of populations of aerobic spore-formers isolated from grass and maize silage and from raw milk confirmed this assumption. Prevention of outgrowth of aerobic spores in silage will contribute to reduction of the total spore load of raw milk. Therefore, it is important that the silage fermentation process is controlled. Application of cultures of lactic acid bacteria or chemical additives can aid silage fermentation and improve aerobic stability. PMID:12448758

  15. Relationships between periodontal disease and bacterial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Scannapieco, F A; Mylotte, J M

    1996-10-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a prevalent and costly infection that is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients of all ages. The continuing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (e.g., penicillin-resistant pneumococci) suggests that bacterial pneumonia will assume increasing importance in the coming years. Thus, knowledge of the pathogenesis of, and risk factors for, bacterial pneumonia is critical to the development of strategies for prevention and treatment of these infections. Bacterial pneumonia in adults is the result of aspiration of oropharyngeal flora into the lower respiratory tract and failure of host defense mechanisms to eliminate the contaminating bacteria, which multiply in the lung and cause infection. It is recognized that community-acquired pneumonia and lung abscesses can be the result of infection by anaerobic bacteria; dental plaque would seem to be a logical source of these bacteria, especially in patients with periodontal disease. It is also possible that patients with high risk for pneumonia, such as hospitalized patients and nursing home residents, are likely to pay less attention to personal hygiene than healthy patients. One important dimension of this personal neglect may be diminished attention to oral hygiene. Poor oral hygiene and periodontal disease may promote oropharyngeal colonization by potential respiratory pathogens (PRPs) including Enterobacteriaceae (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter species, etc.), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus. This paper provides the rationale for the development of this hypothesis especially as it pertains to mechanically ventilated intensive care unit patients and nursing home residents, two patient groups with a high risk for bacterial pneumonia. PMID:8910830

  16. Antimicriobial resistance patterns of colonizing flora on nurses' hands in the neonatal intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Heather A.; Cimiotti, Jeannie P.; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Saiman, Lisa; Larson, Elaine L.

    2007-01-01

    Background The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends the use of an alcohol-based handrub for health care worker hand hygiene. The purpose of this study was to examine effects of hand hygiene product and skin condition on the antimicrobial resistance patterns of colonizing hand flora among nurses. Methods Colonizing hand flora of 119 nurses working in 2 neonatal intensive care units was compared during a 22-month crossover study using alcohol handrub or antiseptic soap. Results Altogether, 1442 isolates from 834 hand cultures (mean, 7 cultures/nurse) were obtained. In 3 of 9 regression analyses modeling for resistant staphylococcal flora, the use of antiseptic soap was a significant predictor of resistance, and nurses with damaged skin were 2.79 times more likely to carry Staphylococcus warneri isolates resistant to gentamicin. Conclusion Hand hygiene product and skin condition may influence resistance patterns of hand flora of care providers. PMID:17482994

  17. The vascular plant flora of Hopewell Culture National Historical Park. Ross County, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.P.; Course, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    HopewellCulture National Historical Park, a unit of the United States National Park Service located in Ross County in south central Ohio, was created to restore, protect, and interpret the legacy of the mound building Hopewell prehistoric peoples. The vascular flora of the park had been estimated to be only 20% known prior to the undertaking of this project. During the spring, summer, and fall of 1995, almost 700 plant specimens were collected by three investigators from five units of the park. Totals of 438 species, 281 genera, and 93 families of vascular plants were discovered, representing 40% of the flora of Ross County, and 17% of the flora of Ohio. Introduced species constituted 32% of the flora. Sixty-five species are new records for Ross County. Two species of special concern, Spiranthes ovalis and Eleocharis ovata, are on the state's threatened and endangered species list. The Hopewell unit had the highest plant diversity of the five units.

  18. Marrubium eriocephalum (Lamiaceae); a species new to the flora of Turkey, with contributions to its taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Fırat, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Marrubium eriocephalum (Lamiaceae) is described as a new record for the Flora of Turkey (B9 Van). A detailed morphological description, photographs, distribution map, and pollen and nutlet morphology of this new record are given. PMID:26884703

  19. Flora of the Mayacmas Mountains. [Listing of 679 species in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, J.A.

    1981-09-01

    This flora describes the plants that occur within the Mayacmas Mountain Range of northern California. It is the result of ten years of environmental assessment by the author in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area, located in the center of the Mayacmas Range. The flora includes notes on plant communities and ecology of the area, as well as habitat and collection data for most of the 679 species covered. Altogether 74 families, 299 genera and 679 species are included in the flora. The work is divided into eight subdivisions: trees; shrubs; ferns and fern allies; aquatic plants; tules, sedges, and rushes; lilies and related plants; dicot herbs; and grasses. Within each subdivision, family, genera and species are listed alphabetically. Keys are provided at the beginning of each subdivision. A unique combination of physical, environmental and geologic factors have resulted in a rich and diverse flora in the Mayacmas. Maps have been provided indicating known locations for species of rare or limited occurrence.

  20. Changes in tropical Late Carboniferous compression floras and their causes

    SciTech Connect

    Pfefferkorn, H.W. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    In the Late Carboniferous ten biostratigraphic boundaries can be recognized based on compression floras. Some of these boundaries coincide with classical stage boundaries whereas others do not. These boundaries are observable throughout Eurameria. In most cases the same species are involved in North America and Europe. Four boundaries are characterized by extinction events that involve only a few or many taxa. Four boundaries are characterized by origination of single taxa or by changes in the dominance of taxonomic groups. Two boundaries near the base of the Late Carboniferous seem to coincide with different stages in the onset of the ice age on Gondwanaland. However, it has not been clearly demonstrated what the local climatic signals in the tropics were. Three boundaries in the late Late Carboniferous are connected with well established trends toward dryer climate. It appears that many of these floral changes were climatically controlled. The actual triggering condition seems to have been produced by a variable combination of short term (allocyclic) and long term (orogeny, continental movement) effects. In one case the reason for the extinction is not obvious and could be biotic in nature.

  1. Global patterns and drivers of phylogenetic structure in island floras.

    PubMed

    Weigelt, Patrick; Kissling, W Daniel; Kisel, Yael; Fritz, Susanne A; Karger, Dirk Nikolaus; Kessler, Michael; Lehtonen, Samuli; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Kreft, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Islands are ideal for investigating processes that shape species assemblages because they are isolated and have discrete boundaries. Quantifying phylogenetic assemblage structure allows inferences about these processes, in particular dispersal, environmental filtering and in-situ speciation. Here, we link phylogenetic assemblage structure to island characteristics across 393 islands worldwide and 37,041 vascular plant species (representing angiosperms overall, palms and ferns). Physical and bioclimatic factors, especially those impeding colonization and promoting speciation, explained more variation in phylogenetic structure of angiosperms overall (49%) and palms (52%) than of ferns (18%). The relationships showed different or contrasting trends among these major plant groups, consistent with their dispersal- and speciation-related traits and climatic adaptations. Phylogenetic diversity was negatively related to isolation for palms, but unexpectedly it was positively related to isolation for angiosperms overall. This indicates strong dispersal filtering for the predominantly large-seeded, animal-dispersed palm family whereas colonization from biogeographically distinct source pools on remote islands likely drives the phylogenetic structure of angiosperm floras. We show that signatures of dispersal limitation, environmental filtering and in-situ speciation differ markedly among taxonomic groups on islands, which sheds light on the origin of insular plant diversity. PMID:26198002

  2. Global patterns and drivers of phylogenetic structure in island floras

    PubMed Central

    Weigelt, Patrick; Daniel Kissling, W.; Kisel, Yael; Fritz, Susanne A.; Karger, Dirk Nikolaus; Kessler, Michael; Lehtonen, Samuli; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Kreft, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Islands are ideal for investigating processes that shape species assemblages because they are isolated and have discrete boundaries. Quantifying phylogenetic assemblage structure allows inferences about these processes, in particular dispersal, environmental filtering and in-situ speciation. Here, we link phylogenetic assemblage structure to island characteristics across 393 islands worldwide and 37,041 vascular plant species (representing angiosperms overall, palms and ferns). Physical and bioclimatic factors, especially those impeding colonization and promoting speciation, explained more variation in phylogenetic structure of angiosperms overall (49%) and palms (52%) than of ferns (18%). The relationships showed different or contrasting trends among these major plant groups, consistent with their dispersal- and speciation-related traits and climatic adaptations. Phylogenetic diversity was negatively related to isolation for palms, but unexpectedly it was positively related to isolation for angiosperms overall. This indicates strong dispersal filtering for the predominantly large-seeded, animal-dispersed palm family whereas colonization from biogeographically distinct source pools on remote islands likely drives the phylogenetic structure of angiosperm floras. We show that signatures of dispersal limitation, environmental filtering and in-situ speciation differ markedly among taxonomic groups on islands, which sheds light on the origin of insular plant diversity. PMID:26198002

  3. Climate threat on the Macaronesian endemic bryophyte flora

    PubMed Central

    Patiño, Jairo; Mateo, Rubén G.; Zanatta, Florian; Marquet, Adrien; Aranda, Silvia C.; Borges, Paulo A. V.; Dirkse, Gerard; Gabriel, Rosalina; Gonzalez-Mancebo, Juana M.; Guisan, Antoine; Muñoz, Jesús; Sim-Sim, Manuela; Vanderpoorten, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Oceanic islands are of fundamental importance for the conservation of biodiversity because they exhibit high endemism rates coupled with fast extinction rates. Nowhere in Europe is this pattern more conspicuous than in the Macaronesian biogeographic region. A large network of protected areas within the region has been developed, but the question of whether these areas will still be climatically suitable for the globally threatened endemic element in the coming decades remains open. Here, we make predictions on the fate of the Macaronesian endemic bryophyte flora in the context of ongoing climate change. The potential distribution of 35 Macaronesian endemic bryophyte species was assessed under present and future climate conditions using an ensemble modelling approach. Projections of the models under different climate change scenarios predicted an average decrease of suitable areas of 62–87% per species and a significant elevational increase by 2070, so that even the commonest species were predicted to fit either the Vulnerable or Endangered IUCN categories. Complete extinctions were foreseen for six of the studied Macaronesian endemic species. Given the uncertainty regarding the capacity of endemic species to track areas of suitable climate within and outside the islands, active management associated to an effective monitoring program is suggested. PMID:27377592

  4. Climate threat on the Macaronesian endemic bryophyte flora.

    PubMed

    Patiño, Jairo; Mateo, Rubén G; Zanatta, Florian; Marquet, Adrien; Aranda, Silvia C; Borges, Paulo A V; Dirkse, Gerard; Gabriel, Rosalina; Gonzalez-Mancebo, Juana M; Guisan, Antoine; Muñoz, Jesús; Sim-Sim, Manuela; Vanderpoorten, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Oceanic islands are of fundamental importance for the conservation of biodiversity because they exhibit high endemism rates coupled with fast extinction rates. Nowhere in Europe is this pattern more conspicuous than in the Macaronesian biogeographic region. A large network of protected areas within the region has been developed, but the question of whether these areas will still be climatically suitable for the globally threatened endemic element in the coming decades remains open. Here, we make predictions on the fate of the Macaronesian endemic bryophyte flora in the context of ongoing climate change. The potential distribution of 35 Macaronesian endemic bryophyte species was assessed under present and future climate conditions using an ensemble modelling approach. Projections of the models under different climate change scenarios predicted an average decrease of suitable areas of 62-87% per species and a significant elevational increase by 2070, so that even the commonest species were predicted to fit either the Vulnerable or Endangered IUCN categories. Complete extinctions were foreseen for six of the studied Macaronesian endemic species. Given the uncertainty regarding the capacity of endemic species to track areas of suitable climate within and outside the islands, active management associated to an effective monitoring program is suggested. PMID:27377592

  5. Mucosal flora in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis - an overview.

    PubMed

    Swidsinski, A; Loening-Baucke, V; Herber, A

    2009-12-01

    The intestinal flora harbors varies pathogens. Clostridium perfringens (gas gangrene), Enterococci (endocarditis), Enterobacteriaceae (sepsis), Bacteroides (abscesses) are present in the large intestine of every healthy person in high concentrations. These bacteria are, however, separated from the colonic wall by an impenetrable mucus layer and are tolerated by the host. This separation is disturbed in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), where bacteria adhere to the mucosa and invade epithelial cells with concomitant inflammatory response. This chronic bowel inflammation can not subside as long as the mucus barrier remains defective. The inflammatory response interferes with the state of tolerance to the intestinal bacteria and leads to characteristic changes in the biostructure of the faecal microbiota. These changes in the biostructure of faecal microbiota are specific for active Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (UC) and can be longitudinally monitored. The reason for the defect of the mucus barrier in IBD patients is unclear. Epidemiologic studies indicate a negative role of western lifestyle and foods and document the rise in the incidence of IBD in the industrialized countries during the 20(th) century. In parallel to this, detergents were introduced in households and emulsifiers were increasingly added to food. The cleaning effect of these on the colonic mucus has to be investigated. The present contribution summarizes new data on the biostructure of the intestinal microbiota.

  6. Bacterial concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Venkataswamy; Ramesh, K. P.; Bang, S. S.

    2001-04-01

    Cracks in concrete are inevitable and are one of the inherent weaknesses of concrete. Water and other salts seep through these cracks, corrosion initiates, and thus reduces the life of concrete. So there was a need to develop an inherent biomaterial, a self-repairing material which can remediate the cracks and fissures in concrete. Bacterial concrete is a material, which can successfully remediate cracks in concrete. This technique is highly desirable because the mineral precipitation induced as a result of microbial activities is pollution free and natural. As the cell wall of bacteria is anionic, metal accumulation (calcite) on the surface of the wall is substantial, thus the entire cell becomes crystalline and they eventually plug the pores and cracks in concrete. This paper discusses the plugging of artificially cracked cement mortar using Bacillus Pasteurii and Sporosarcina bacteria combined with sand as a filling material in artificially made cuts in cement mortar which was cured in urea and CaCl2 medium. The effect on the compressive strength and stiffness of the cement mortar cubes due to the mixing of bacteria is also discussed in this paper. It was found that use of bacteria improves the stiffness and compressive strength of concrete. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) is used to document the role of bacteria in microbiologically induced mineral precipitation. Rod like impressions were found on the face of calcite crystals indicating the presence of bacteria in those places. Energy- dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectra of the microbial precipitation on the surface of the crack indicated the abundance of calcium and the precipitation was inferred to be calcite (CaCO3).

  7. Purple Sulfur Bacteria Control the Growth of Aerobic Heterotrophic Bacterioplankton in a Meromictic Salt Lake

    PubMed Central

    Overmann, J.; Beatty, J. T.; Hall, K. J.

    1996-01-01

    In meromictic Mahoney Lake, British Columbia, Canada, the heterotrophic bacterial production in the mixolimnion exceeded concomitant primary production by a factor of 7. Bacterial growth rates were correlated neither to primary production nor to the amount of chlorophyll a. Both results indicate an uncoupling of bacteria and phytoplankton. In the chemocline of the lake, an extremely dense population of the purple sulfur bacterium Amoebobacter purpureus is present year round. We investigated whether anoxygenic phototrophs are significant for the growth of aerobic bacterioplankton in the overlaying water. Bacterial growth rates in the mixolimnion were limited by inorganic phosphorus or nitrogen most of the time, and the biomass of heterotrophic bacteria did not increase until, in autumn, 86% of the cells of A. purpureus appeared in the mixolimnion because of their reduced buoyant density. The increase in heterotrophic bacterial biomass, soluble phosphorus concentrations below the detection limit, and an extraordinarily high activity of alkaline phosphatase in the mixolimnion indicate a rapid liberation of organically bound phosphorus from A. purpureus cells accompanied by a simultaneous incorporation into heterotrophic bacterioplankton. High concentrations of allochthonously derived dissolved organic carbon (mean, 60 mg of C(middot)liter(sup-1)) were measured in the lake water. In Mahoney Lake, liberation of phosphorus from upwelling purple sulfur bacteria and degradation of allochthonous dissolved organic carbon as an additional carbon source render heterotrophic bacterial production largely independent of the photosynthesis of phytoplankton. A recycling of inorganic nutrients via phototrophic bacteria also appears to be relevant in other lakes with anoxic bottom waters. PMID:16535399

  8. Fatiguing upper body aerobic exercise impairs balance.

    PubMed

    Douris, Peter C; Handrakis, John P; Gendy, Joseph; Salama, Mina; Kwon, Dae; Brooks, Richard; Salama, Nardine; Southard, Veronica

    2011-12-01

    Douris, PC, Handrakis, JP, Gendy, J, Salama, M, Kwon, D, Brooks, R, Salama, N, and Southard, V. Fatiguing upper body aerobic exercise impairs balance. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3299-3305, 2011-There are many studies that have examined the effects of selectively fatiguing lower extremity muscle groups with various protocols, and they have all shown to impair balance. There is limited research regarding the effect of fatiguing upper extremity exercise on balance. Muscle fiber-type recruitment patterns may be responsible for the difference between balance impairments because of fatiguing aerobic and anaerobic exercise. The purpose of our study was to investigate the effect that aerobic vs. anaerobic fatigue, upper vs. lower body fatigue will have on balance, and if so, which combination will affect balance to a greater degree. Fourteen healthy subjects, 7 men and 7 women (mean age 23.5 ± 1.7 years) took part in this study. Their mean body mass index was 23.6 ± 3.2. The study used a repeated-measures design. The effect on balance was documented after the 4 fatiguing conditions: aerobic lower body (ALB), aerobic upper body (AUB), anaerobic lower body, anaerobic upper body (WUB). The aerobic conditions used an incremental protocol performed to fatigue, and the anaerobic used the Wingate protocol. Balance was measured as a single-leg stance stability score using the Biodex Balance System. A stability score for each subject was recorded immediately after each of the 4 conditions. A repeated-measures analysis of variance with the pretest score as a covariate was used to analyze the effects of the 4 fatiguing conditions on balance. There were significant differences between the 4 conditions (p = 0.001). Post hoc analysis revealed that there were significant differences between the AUB, mean score 4.98 ± 1.83, and the WUB, mean score 4.09 ± 1.42 (p = 0.014) and between AUB and ALB mean scores 4.33 ± 1.40 (p = 0.029). Normative data for single-leg stability testing for

  9. Interaction of Cadmium With the Aerobic Bacterium Pseudomonas Mendocina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, P. J.; Haack, E. A.; Maurice, P. A.

    2006-05-01

    The fate of toxic metals in the environment can be heavily influenced by interaction with bacteria in the vadose zone. This research focuses on the interactions of cadmium with the strict aerobe Pseudomonas mendocina. P. mendocina is a gram-negative bacterium that has shown potential in the bioremediation of recalcitrant organic compounds. Cadmium is a common environmental contaminant of wide-spread ecological consequence. In batch experiments P. mendocina shows typical bacterial growth curves, with an initial lag phase followed by an exponential phase and a stationary to death phase; concomitant with growth was an increase in pH from initial values of 7 to final values at 96 hours of 8.8. Cd both delays the onset of the exponential phase and decreases the maximum population size, as quantified by optical density and microscopic cell counts (DAPI). The total amount of Cd removed from solution increases over time, as does the amount of Cd removed from solution normalized per bacterial cell. Images obtained with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the production of a cadmium, phosphorus, and iron containing precipitate that was similar in form and composition to precipitates formed abiotically at elevated pH. However, by late stationary phase, the precipitate had been re-dissolved, perhaps by biotic processes in order to obtain Fe. Stressed conditions are suggested by TEM images showing the formation of pili, or nanowires, when 20ppm Cd was present and a marked decrease in exopolysaccharide and biofilm material in comparison to control cells (no cadmium added).

  10. Massive Parallel Sequencing Provides New Perspectives on Bacterial Brain Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelmsen, Marianne Thulin; Skrede, Steinar; Meisal, Roger; Jakovljev, Aleksandra; Gaustad, Peter; Hermansen, Nils Olav; Vik-Mo, Einar; Solheim, Ole; Ambur, Ole Herman; Sæbø, Øystein; Høstmælingen, Christina Teisner; Helland, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Rapid development within the field of massive parallel sequencing (MPS) is about to bring this technology within reach for diagnostic microbiology laboratories. We wanted to explore its potential for improving diagnosis and understanding of polymicrobial infections, using bacterial brain abscesses as an example. We conducted a prospective nationwide study on bacterial brain abscesses. Fifty-two surgical samples were included over a 2-year period. The samples were categorized as either spontaneous intracerebral, spontaneous subdural, or postoperative. Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified directly from the specimens and sequenced using Ion Torrent technology, with an average of 500,000 reads per sample. The results were compared to those from culture- and Sanger sequencing-based diagnostics. Compared to culture, MPS allowed for triple the number of bacterial identifications. Aggregatibacter aphrophilus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Streptococcus intermedius or combinations of them were found in all spontaneous polymicrobial abscesses. F. nucleatum was systematically detected in samples with anaerobic flora. The increased detection rate for Actinomyces spp. and facultative Gram-negative rods further revealed several species associations. We suggest that A. aphrophilus, F. nucleatum, and S. intermedius are key pathogens for the establishment of spontaneous polymicrobial brain abscesses. In addition, F. nucleatum seems to be important for the development of anaerobic flora. MPS can accurately describe polymicrobial specimens when a sufficient number of reads is used to compensate for unequal species concentrations and principles are defined to discard contaminant bacterial DNA in the subsequent data analysis. This will contribute to our understanding of how different types of polymicrobial infections develop. PMID:24671797

  11. Effects of human intestinal flora on mutagenicity of and DNA adduct formation from food and environmental mutagens.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, K; Baranczewski, P; Akerlund, J E; Midtvedt, T; Möller, L; Rafter, J

    2000-11-01

    Although the intestinal flora is believed to have a critical role in carcinogenesis, little is known about the role of the human intestinal flora on the effects of mutagens in vivo. The aim of the present study was to address a possible role of the human intestinal flora in carcinogenesis, by exploiting human-flora-associated (HFA) mice. The capacity of human faeces to activate or inactivate 2-amino-3-methyl-3H:-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) and 2-nitrofluorene was determined using the Ames assay. Human faecal suspensions that were active in this regard were then selected and orally inoculated into germfree NMRI mice to generate HFA mice. HFA, germfree, conventionalized and conventional mice were administered IQ, 2-amino-9H:-pyrido[2,3-b]indole (2-amino-alpha-carboline; AAC) and 2-nitrofluorene. The activity of human intestinal flora against mutagens could be transferred into the mice. In comparing germfree mice and mice harbouring an intestinal flora, the presence of a flora was essential for the activities of faeces against mutagens. After administration of IQ and 2-nitrofluorene, DNA adducts were observed in the mice with a flora, while adducts were extremely low or absent in germfree animals. DNA adducts after AAC treatment were higher in germfree mice in some tissues including colon than in mice with bacteria. Differences in DNA adduct formation were also observed between HFA mice and mice with mouse flora in many tissues. These results clearly indicate that the intestinal flora have an active role in DNA adduct formation and that the role is different for the different chemicals to which the animals are exposed. The results also demonstrate that the human intestinal flora have different effects from the mouse flora on DNA adduct formation as well as in vitro metabolic activities against mutagens. Studies using HFA mice could thus provide much-needed information on the role of the human intestinal flora on carcinogenesis in vivo. PMID:11062175

  12. Identification of bacterial species associated with the sheep scab mite (Psoroptes ovis) by using amplified genes coding for 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Hogg, J C; Lehane, M J

    1999-09-01

    This was the first molecular study of the bacterial flora of the sheep scab mite (Psoroptes ovis). A sequence analysis of genes coding for 16S rRNA revealed that Serratia marcescens and bacteria closely related to Staphylococcus intermedius or Staphylococcus chromogens and Alloiococcus otitidis were present. These bacteria were associated with skin lesions, dermatitis, and otitis media caused by P. ovis.

  13. Comparison of aerobic denitrifying activity among three cultural species with various carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Otani, Y; Hasegawa, K; Hanaki, K

    2004-01-01

    Abilities of three aerobic denitrifiers such as Alcaligenes faecalis, Microvirgula aerodenitrificans and Paracoccus pantotrophus were compared from the viewpoints of nitrate removal efficiency and organic matter utilization. First, the effect of carbon source was investigated. Although nitrate reduction was observed in all strains under aerobic conditions, a change of carbon source considerably affected the denitrification ability. In the case of P. pantotrophus, nitrate and nitrite were completely removed in three days under sodium acetate or leucine as a carbon source. In the case of A. faecalis, sufficient nitrate removal was observed only when sodium acetate or ethanol was added. P. pantotrophus and A. faecalis showed a higher ability of nitrate removal than that of M. aerodenitrificans. Therefore, P. pantotrophus was selected in order to investigate the effects of concentration and repetitive addition of carbon. Sodium acetate was used as a sole carbon source. Nitrate was not reduced when the carbon concentration was below 500 mgC/L. However, when carbon source was added repeatedly, nitrate was reduced under 100 mgC/L after the optical density of the bacterium reached above 1.0. This result indicated that a high enough level of bacterial density was necessary to express aerobic denitrification activity. PMID:15566182

  14. Biodegradation of methyl t-butyl ether by aerobic granules under a cosubstrate condition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L L; Chen, J M; Fang, F

    2008-03-01

    Aerobic granules efficient at degrading methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) with ethanol as a cosubstrate were successfully developed in a well-mixed sequencing batch reactor (SBR). Aerobic granules were first observed about 100 days after reactor startup. Treatment efficiency of MTBE in the reactor during stable operation exceeded 99.9%, and effluent MTBE was in the range of 15-50 microg/L. The specific MTBE degradation rate was observed to increase with increasing MTBE initial concentration from 25 to 500 mg/L, which peaked at 22.7 mg MTBE/g (volatile suspended solids).h and declined with further increases in MTBE concentration as substrate inhibition effects became significant. Microbial-community deoxyribonucleic acid profiling was carried out using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid. The reactor was found to be inhabited by several diverse bacterial species, most notably microorganisms related to the genera Sphingomonas, Methylobacterium, and Hyphomicrobium vulgare. These organisms were previously reported to be associated with MTBE biodegradation. A majority of the bands in the reactor represented a group of organisms belonging to the Flavobacteria-Proteobacteria-Actinobacteridae class of bacteria. This study demonstrates that MTBE can be effectively degraded by aerobic granules under a cosubstrate condition and gives insight into the microorganisms potentially involved in the process. PMID:18183384

  15. Accelerating Aerobic Sludge Granulation by Adding Dry Sewage Sludge Micropowder in Sequencing Batch Reactors.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Liu, Jun; Wang, Danjun; Chen, Tao; Ma, Ting; Wang, Zhihong; Zhuo, Weilong

    2015-08-01

    Micropowder (20-250 µm) made from ground dry waste sludge from a municipal sewage treatment plant was added in a sequencing batch reactor (R2), which was fed by synthetic wastewater with acetate as carbon source. Compared with the traditional SBR (R1), aerobic sludge granulation time was shortened 15 days in R2. Furthermore, filamentous bacteria in bulking sludge were controlled to accelerate aerobic granulation and form large granules. Correspondingly, the SVI decreased from 225 mL/g to 37 mL/g. X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) analysis demonstrated that Al and Si from the micropowder were accumulated in granules. A mechanism hypotheses for the acceleration of aerobic granulation by adding dry sludge micropowder is proposed: added micropowder acts as nuclei to induce bacterial attachment; dissolved matters from the micropowder increase abruptly the organic load for starved sludge to control overgrown filamentous bacteria as a framework for aggregation; increased friction from the movement of micropowder forces the filaments which extend outwards to shrink for shaping granules. PMID:26308025

  16. Biodegradation and kinetics of aerobic granules under high organic loading rates in sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Jiang, Wenju; Liang, David Tee; Tay, Joo Hwa

    2008-05-01

    Biodegradation, kinetics, and microbial diversity of aerobic granules were investigated under a high range of organic loading rate 6.0 to 12.0 kg chemical oxygen demand (COD) m(-3) day(-1) in a sequencing batch reactor. The selection and enriching of different bacterial species under different organic loading rates had an important effect on the characteristics and performance of the mature aerobic granules and caused the difference on granular biodegradation and kinetic behaviors. Good granular characteristics and performance were presented at steady state under various organic loading rates. Larger and denser aerobic granules were developed and stabilized at relatively higher organic loading rates with decreased bioactivity in terms of specific oxygen utilization rate and specific growth rate (muoverall) or solid retention time. The decrease of bioactivity was helpful to maintain granule stability under high organic loading rates and improve reactor operation. The corresponding biokinetic coefficients of endogenous decay rate (kd), observed yield (Yobs), and theoretical yield (Y) were measured and calculated in this study. As the increase of organic loading rate, a decreased net sludge production (Yobs) is associated with an increased solid retention time, while kd and Y changed insignificantly and can be regarded as constants under different organic loading rates.

  17. Measuring aerobic respiration in stream ecosystems using the resazurin-resorufin system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GonzáLez-Pinzón, Ricardo; Haggerty, Roy; Myrold, David D.

    2012-09-01

    The use of smart tracers to study hydrologic systems is becoming more widespread. Smart tracers are compounds that irreversibly react in the presence of a process or condition under investigation. Resazurin (Raz) is a smart tracer that undergoes an irreversible reduction to resorufin (Rru) in the presence of cellular metabolic activity. We quantified the relationship between the transformation of Raz and aerobic bacterial respiration in pure culture experiments using two obligate aerobes and two facultative anaerobes, and in colonized surface and shallow (<10 cm) hyporheic sediments using reach-scale experiments. We found that the transformation of Raz to Rru was nearly perfectly (minr2 = 0.986), positively correlated with aerobic microbial respiration in all experiments. These results suggest that Raz can be used as a surrogate to measure respiration in situ and in vivoat different spatial scales, thus providing an alternative to investigate mechanistic controls of solute transport and stream metabolism on nutrient processing. Lastly, a comparison of respiration and mass-transfer rates in streams suggests that field-scale respiration is controlled by the slower of respiration and mass transfer, highlighting the need to understand both biogeochemistry and physics in stream ecosystems.

  18. Pleistocene changes in the fauna and flora of South america.

    PubMed

    Vuilleumier, B S

    1971-08-27

    In recent years, the view that Pleistocene climatic events played a major role in the evolution of the biotas of southern, primarily tropical continents has begun to displace the previously held conviction that these areas remained relatively stable during the Quaternary. Studies of speciation patterns of high Andean plant and avian taxa (7-14) have led to the conclusion that Pleistocene climatic events were the factors that ultimately shaped the patterns now observed in the paramo-puna and the related Patagonian flora and fauna. The final uplift of the Andes at the end of the Tertiary automatically limits the age of the high Andean habitats and their biotas to the Quaternary. Within this period, the number of ecological fluctuations caused by the glaciations could easily have provided the mechanism behind the patterns now present in these habitats (Appendix, 1; Figs. 1 and 2; Table 1). In glacial periods, when vegetation belts, were lowered, organisms in the paramo-puna habitat were allowed to expand their ranges. In interglacial periods, these taxa were isolated on disjunct peaks, where differentiation could occur. At times of ice expansion, glacial tongues and lakes provided local barriers to gene exchange, whereas in warm, interglacial times, dry river valleys were a major deterrent to the interbreeding of populations on different mountains (Fig. 2; Table 2). A preliminary analysis of about 10 to 12 percent of the total South American avifauna (14), subsequent to the study of the high Andean biota, suggested that the birds of all the major habitats of the continent possess, with about equal frequency, similar stages of speciation. This correspondence in levels of evolution indicated that the avifauna of vegetation zones which were thought to have been more stable (for example, tropical rainforests) are as actively speciating as are those of the more recent paramo-puna habitats. More intensive work on lowland tropical taxa (16, 19-21) and recent work on montane

  19. Evaluation of fungal flora in normal and diseased canine ears.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jacquelyn J; Coyner, Kimberly S; Rankin, Shelley C; Lewis, Thomas P; Schick, Anthea E; Shumaker, Amy K

    2010-12-01

    This study was undertaken to characterize otic fungal flora encountered in normal dogs, atopic dogs with no clinical or cytological evidence of otitis and dogs with otitis externa. Forty-two normal dogs, 23 atopic dogs and 32 dogs with otitis were included in the study. Samples for otic fungal culture and cytology were obtained from all animals, for a total of 194 ears. Sixty-seven ear samples (34%) were culture positive for saprophytic fungal organisms, as follows: 43 (64%) Penicillium species, 13 (19%) Aspergillus species and the remaining 17% comprised of various other saprophytic fungal organisms. Cytological evidence of saprophytic fungal colonization or infection was not found in any animal. There was no relationship between positive saprophytic fungal culture and any study group. Thirty-three ear samples (17%) were positive for Malassezia pachydermatis. Cytological findings of Malassezia were significantly associated with positive culture for Malassezia (P = 0.006 left ear; P = 0.019 right ear). Furthermore, increased numbers of Malassezia led to a higher chance of positive culture (P = 0.003 left ear; P = 0.008 right ear; McNemar's test). Malassezia pachydermatis was more likely to be cultured from ears with increased cerumen. Ear type (erect or pendulous) was not significantly associated with positive culture for Malassezia or saprophytic fungal organisms. There was no relationship between positive Malassezia culture and any study group; however, Malassezia was more likely to be cultured from individual dogs in the atopic or otitis groups that also had other dermatological signs consistent with allergic dermatitis and/or pyoderma (P = 0.031 left ear; P = 0.005 right ear). PMID:20868397

  20. Mycological examinations on the fungal flora of the chicken comb.

    PubMed

    Gründer, S; Mayser, P; Redmann, T; Kaleta, E F

    2005-03-01

    Kloeckera apiculata are suggested to be classified as members of the resident flora of the chicken comb. PMID:15743428

  1. Hydrogeology of Palm Valley, central Australia; a Pleistocene flora refuge?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wischusen, John D. H.; Fifield, L. Keith; Cresswell, Richard G.

    2004-06-01

    The Palm Valley Oasis (Finke Gorge National Park) in arid central Australia is characterised by large stands of red cabbage palm trees ( Livistona mariae). How these unique plants, over 1000 km away from nearest relatives in the tropical parts of northern Australia persist, has long fascinated visitors. The hydrogeology of this area helps explain this phenomenon. Stable isotope (δ 2H, δ 8O) analyses shows groundwater to have a uniform composition that plots on or near a local meteoric water line. Carbon-14 results are observed to vary throughout this aquifer from effectively dead (<4%) to 87% modern carbon. Ratios of chlorine-36 to chloride range from 130 to 290×10 -1536Cl/Cl. In this region atmospheric 36Cl/Cl ratio is around 300×10 -15. Thus an age range of around 300 ka is indicated if, as is apparent radioactive decay is the only significant cause of 36Cl/Cl variation within the aquifer. The classic homogenous aquifer with varying surface topography flow model is the simplest conceptual model that need be invoked to explain these data. Complexities, associated with local topography flow cells superimposed on the regional gradient, may mean groundwater with markedly different flow path lengths has been sampled. This potential flow path complexity, which is also evidenced by slight variation in groundwater cation ratios, can account for the distribution of isotope age data throughout the aquifer. Given the likely very slow travel times indicated by this aquifer's hydraulic properties, age differences of the magnitude indicated from chlorine-36 data are feasible. The likely slow travel times (>100 ka) along some flow paths indicate groundwater discharge would endure through arid phases associated with Quaternary climate oscillations. Such a flow system can explain the persistence of this population of Palms and also highlight the possibility that Palm Valley has acted as a flora refuge since at least the mid Pleistocene.

  2. Aerobic degradation study of three fluoroanilines and microbial community analysis: the effects of increased fluorine substitution.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-Qing; Tian, Bao-Hu; Zhang, Xuan; Ghulam, Abbas; Zheng, Tu-Cai; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    The fate of fluorinated compounds in the environment, especially polyfluorinated aromatics, is a matter of great concern. In this work, 4-Fluoroaniline (4-FA), 2,4-Difluoroanilines (2,4-DFA), and 2,3,4-Trifluoroanilines (2,3,4-TFA), were chosen as the target pollutants to study their biodegradability under aerobic conditions. The required enriched time of the mixed bacterial culture for degrading 4-FA, 2,4-DFA, and 2,3,4-TFA was 26, 51, and 165 days, respectively, which suggested that the longer enrichment time was required with the increase of fluorine substitution. At the initial concentrations of 100-200 mg L(-1), the 4-FA, 2,4-DFA, and 2,3,4-TFA could be degraded completely by the mixed bacterial culture. The maximum specific degradation rates of 4-FA, 2,4-DFA, and 2,3,4-TFA were 22.48 ± 0.55, 15.27 ± 2.04, and 8.84 ± 0.93 mg FA (g VSS h)(-1), respectively. Also, the three FAs enriched cultures showed certain potential of degrading other two FAs. The results from enzyme assay suggested the expression of meta-cleavage pathways during three FAs degradation. The denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that unique bacterial communities were formed after FAs enrichment and these were principally composed of β-Proteobacteria, Oscillatoriophycideae, δ-Proteobacteria, α-Proteobacteria, Thermales, Xanthomonadales, Deinococci, Flavobacteriia, and Actinobacteridae. The Shannon-Wiener indexes in three FAs enriched culture decreased with the increase of fluorine substitution, indicating the significant effect of fluorine substitution on the microbial diversity. These findings supply important information on the fate of three FAs under aerobic environment, and the bacterial communities in their degradation systems.

  3. Performance and microbial community composition in a long-term sequential anaerobic-aerobic bioreactor operation treating coking wastewater.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Dev Raj; Zhang, Yu; Tian, Zhe; Gao, Yingxin; Yang, Min

    2016-09-01

    The combined anaerobic-aerobic biosystem is assumed to consume less energy for the treatment of high strength industrial wastewater. In this study, pollutant removal performance and microbial diversity were assessed in a long-term (over 300 days) bench-scale sequential anaerobic-aerobic bioreactor treating coking wastewater. Anaerobic treatment removed one third of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and more than half of the phenols with hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 42 h, while the combined system with total HRT of 114 h removed 81.8, 85.6, 99.9, 98.2, and 85.4 % of COD, total organic carbon (TOC), total phenols, thiocyanate, and cyanide, respectively. Two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry showed complete removal of phenol derivatives and nitrogenous heterocyclic compounds (NHCs) via the combined system, with the anaerobic process alone contributing 58.4 and 58.6 % removal on average, respectively. Microbial activity in the bioreactors was examined by 454 pyrosequencing of the bacterial, archaeal, and fungal communities. Proteobacteria (61.2-93.4 %), particularly Betaproteobacteria (34.4-70.1 %), was the dominant bacterial group. Ottowia (14.1-46.7 %), Soehngenia (3.0-8.2 %), and Corynebacterium (0.9-12.0 %), which are comprised of phenol-degrading and hydrolytic bacteria, were the most abundant genera in the anaerobic sludge, whereas Thiobacillus (6.6-43.6 %), Diaphorobacter (5.1-13.0 %), and Comamonas (0.2-11.1 %) were the major degraders of phenol, thiocyanate, and NHCs in the aerobic sludge. Despite the low density of fungi, phenol degrading oleaginous yeast Trichosporon was abundant in the aerobic sludge. This study demonstrated the feasibility and optimization of less energy intensive treatment and the potential association between abundant bacterial groups and biodegradation of key pollutants in coking wastewater. PMID:27221291

  4. Performance and microbial community composition in a long-term sequential anaerobic-aerobic bioreactor operation treating coking wastewater.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Dev Raj; Zhang, Yu; Tian, Zhe; Gao, Yingxin; Yang, Min

    2016-09-01

    The combined anaerobic-aerobic biosystem is assumed to consume less energy for the treatment of high strength industrial wastewater. In this study, pollutant removal performance and microbial diversity were assessed in a long-term (over 300 days) bench-scale sequential anaerobic-aerobic bioreactor treating coking wastewater. Anaerobic treatment removed one third of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and more than half of the phenols with hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 42 h, while the combined system with total HRT of 114 h removed 81.8, 85.6, 99.9, 98.2, and 85.4 % of COD, total organic carbon (TOC), total phenols, thiocyanate, and cyanide, respectively. Two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry showed complete removal of phenol derivatives and nitrogenous heterocyclic compounds (NHCs) via the combined system, with the anaerobic process alone contributing 58.4 and 58.6 % removal on average, respectively. Microbial activity in the bioreactors was examined by 454 pyrosequencing of the bacterial, archaeal, and fungal communities. Proteobacteria (61.2-93.4 %), particularly Betaproteobacteria (34.4-70.1 %), was the dominant bacterial group. Ottowia (14.1-46.7 %), Soehngenia (3.0-8.2 %), and Corynebacterium (0.9-12.0 %), which are comprised of phenol-degrading and hydrolytic bacteria, were the most abundant genera in the anaerobic sludge, whereas Thiobacillus (6.6-43.6 %), Diaphorobacter (5.1-13.0 %), and Comamonas (0.2-11.1 %) were the major degraders of phenol, thiocyanate, and NHCs in the aerobic sludge. Despite the low density of fungi, phenol degrading oleaginous yeast Trichosporon was abundant in the aerobic sludge. This study demonstrated the feasibility and optimization of less energy intensive treatment and the potential association between abundant bacterial groups and biodegradation of key pollutants in coking wastewater.

  5. Bacterial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, L; Agabian-Keshishian, N; Bendis, I

    1971-09-01

    technique can be used to select for mutants blocked in the various stages of morphogenesis. 3) Temperature-sensitive mutants of Caulobacter that are restricted in macromolecular synthesis and development at elevated temperatures have been isolated. 4) Genetic exchange in the Calflobacter genus has been demonstrated and is now being defined. Two questions related to control processes can now readily be approached experimentally. (i) Is the temporal progression of events occurring during bacterial differentiation controlled by regulator gene products? (ii) Is the differentiation cycle like a biosynthetic pathway where one event must follow another? The availability of temperature-sensitive mutants blocked at various stages of development permits access to both questions. An interesting feature of the differentiation cycle is that the polar organelle may represent a special segregated unit which is operative in the control of the differentiation process. Perhaps the sequential morphogenic changes exhibited by Caulobacter are dependent on the initial synthesis of this organelle. Because the ultimate expression of cell changes are dependent on selective protein synthesis, specific messenger RNA production-either from DNA present in an organelle or from the chromosome-may prove to be a controlling factor in cell differentiation. We have begun studies with RNA polymerase purified from Caulobacter crescentus to determine whether cell factors or alterations in the enzyme structure serve to change the specificity of transcription during the cell cycle. Control of sequential cell changes at the level of transcription has long been postulated and has recently been substantiated in the case of Bacillus sporulation (6). The Caulobacter bacteria now present another system in which direct analysis of these control mechanisms is feasible. PMID:5572165

  6. Aerobic biodegradation of dichloroethenes by indigenous bacteria isolated from contaminated sites in Africa.

    PubMed

    Olaniran, Ademola O; Pillay, Dorsamy; Pillay, Balakrishna

    2008-08-01

    The widespread use of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) as dry cleaning solvents and degreasing agents for military and industrial applications has resulted in significant environmental contamination worldwide. Anaerobic biotransformation of PCE and TCE through reductive dechlorination frequently lead to the accumulation of dichloroethenes (DCEs), thus limiting the use of reductive dechlorination for the biotransformation of the compounds. In this study, seven bacteria indigenous to contaminated sites in Africa were characterized for DCE degradation under aerobic conditions. The specific growth rate constants of the bacterial isolates ranged between 0.346-0.552 d(-1) and 0.461-0.667 d(-1) in cis-DCE and trans-DCE, respectively. Gas chromatographic analysis revealed that up to 75% of the compounds were degraded within seven days with the degradation rate constants ranging between 0.167 and 0.198 d(-1). The two compounds were also observed to be significantly degraded, simultaneously, rather than sequentially, when present as a mixture. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the bacterial isolates revealed their identity as well as their relation to other environmentally-important bacteria. The observed biodegradation of DCEs may contribute to PCE and TCE removal at the aerobic fringe of groundwater plumes undergoing reductive dechlorination in contaminated sites. PMID:18635246

  7. Aerobic biodegradation of dichloroethenes by indigenous bacteria isolated from contaminated sites in Africa.

    PubMed

    Olaniran, Ademola O; Pillay, Dorsamy; Pillay, Balakrishna

    2008-08-01

    The widespread use of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) as dry cleaning solvents and degreasing agents for military and industrial applications has resulted in significant environmental contamination worldwide. Anaerobic biotransformation of PCE and TCE through reductive dechlorination frequently lead to the accumulation of dichloroethenes (DCEs), thus limiting the use of reductive dechlorination for the biotransformation of the compounds. In this study, seven bacteria indigenous to contaminated sites in Africa were characterized for DCE degradation under aerobic conditions. The specific growth rate constants of the bacterial isolates ranged between 0.346-0.552 d(-1) and 0.461-0.667 d(-1) in cis-DCE and trans-DCE, respectively. Gas chromatographic analysis revealed that up to 75% of the compounds were degraded within seven days with the degradation rate constants ranging between 0.167 and 0.198 d(-1). The two compounds were also observed to be significantly degraded, simultaneously, rather than sequentially, when present as a mixture. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the bacterial isolates revealed their identity as well as their relation to other environmentally-important bacteria. The observed biodegradation of DCEs may contribute to PCE and TCE removal at the aerobic fringe of groundwater plumes undergoing reductive dechlorination in contaminated sites.

  8. Aerobic methanotrophic communities at the Red Sea brine-seawater interface

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Rehab Z.; Adel, Mustafa; Ouf, Amged; Sayed, Ahmed; Ghazy, Mohamed A.; Alam, Intikhab; Essack, Magbubah; Lafi, Feras F.; Bajic, Vladimir B.; El-Dorry, Hamza; Siam, Rania

    2014-01-01

    The central rift of the Red Sea contains 25 brine pools with different physicochemical conditions, dictating the diversity and abundance of the microbial community. Three of these pools, the Atlantis II, Kebrit and Discovery Deeps, are uniquely characterized by a high concentration of hydrocarbons. The brine-seawater interface, described as an anoxic-oxic (brine-seawater) boundary, is characterized by a high methane concentration, thus favoring aerobic methane oxidation. The current study analyzed the aerobic free–living methane-oxidizing bacterial communities that potentially contribute to methane oxidation at the brine-seawater interfaces of the three aforementioned brine pools, using metagenomic pyrosequencing, 16S rRNA pyrotags and pmoA library constructs. The sequencing of 16S rRNA pyrotags revealed that these interfaces are characterized by high microbial community diversity. Signatures of aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria were detected in the Atlantis II Interface (ATII-I) and the Kebrit Deep Upper (KB-U) and Lower (KB-L) brine-seawater interfaces. Through phylogenetic analysis of pmoA, we further demonstrated that the ATII-I aerobic methanotroph community is highly diverse. We propose four ATII-I pmoA clusters. Most importantly, cluster 2 groups with marine methane seep methanotrophs, and cluster 4 represent a unique lineage of an uncultured bacterium with divergent alkane monooxygenases. Moreover, non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) based on the ordination of putative enzymes involved in methane metabolism showed that the Kebrit interface layers were distinct from the ATII-I and DD-I brine-seawater interfaces. PMID:25295031

  9. Impact of space flight on bacterial virulence and antibiotic susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Peter William

    2015-01-01

    Manned space flight induces a reduction in immune competence among crew and is likely to cause deleterious changes to the composition of the gastrointestinal, nasal, and respiratory bacterial flora, leading to an increased risk of infection. The space flight environment may also affect the susceptibility of microorganisms within the spacecraft to antibiotics, key components of flown medical kits, and may modify the virulence characteristics of bacteria and other microorganisms that contaminate the fabric of the International Space Station and other flight platforms. This review will consider the impact of true and simulated microgravity and other characteristics of the space flight environment on bacterial cell behavior in relation to the potential for serious infections that may appear during missions to astronomical objects beyond low Earth orbit. PMID:26251622

  10. Impact of space flight on bacterial virulence and antibiotic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Peter William

    2015-01-01

    Manned space flight induces a reduction in immune competence among crew and is likely to cause deleterious changes to the composition of the gastrointestinal, nasal, and respiratory bacterial flora, leading to an increased risk of infection. The space flight environment may also affect the susceptibility of microorganisms within the spacecraft to antibiotics, key components of flown medical kits, and may modify the virulence characteristics of bacteria and other microorganisms that contaminate the fabric of the International Space Station and other flight platforms. This review will consider the impact of true and simulated microgravity and other characteristics of the space flight environment on bacterial cell behavior in relation to the potential for serious infections that may appear during missions to astronomical objects beyond low Earth orbit.

  11. Faropenem medoxomil: a treatment option in acute bacterial rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Hadley, James A; Tillotson, Glenn S; Tosiello, Robert; Echols, Roger M

    2006-12-01

    Faropenem medoxomil is the first oral penem in a new class of beta-lactam antibiotics. Faropenem medoxomil has excellent in vitro activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and other key pathogens implicated in acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Clinical studies have demonstrated that, in the treatment of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis in adults, 7 days of treatment with faropenem medoxomil is as clinically and bacteriologically effective as 10 days of treatment with cefuroxime axetil. One study showed faropenem medoxomil to be superior to cefuroxime axetil. Overall, the safety profile of faropenem medoxomil is similar to that of most comparators. Specifically, the minimal impact of faropenem medoxomil on the gastrointestinal flora leads to less diarrhea and other adverse events than coamoxicillin-clavulanate. Faropenem medoxomil has almost no drug-drug interactions and little requirement for dosage adjustments in the typical acute rhinosinusitis population. PMID:17181408

  12. Assessment of bacterial antibiotic resistance transfer in the gut.

    PubMed

    Schjørring, Susanne; Krogfelt, Karen A

    2011-01-01

    We assessed horizontal gene transfer between bacteria in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. During the last decades, the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains and treatment failures of bacterial infections have increased the public awareness of antibiotic usage. The use of broad spectrum antibiotics creates a selective pressure on the bacterial flora, thus increasing the emergence of multiresistant bacteria, which results in a vicious circle of treatments and emergence of new antibiotic resistant bacteria. The human gastrointestinal tract is a massive reservoir of bacteria with a potential for both receiving and transferring antibiotic resistance genes. The increased use of fermented food products and probiotics, as food supplements and health promoting products containing massive amounts of bacteria acting as either donors and/or recipients of antibiotic resistance genes in the human GI tract, also contributes to the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains. This paper deals with the assessment of antibiotic resistance gene transfer occurring in the gut. PMID:21318188

  13. Altered motility and duration of bacterial overgrowth in experimental blind loop syndrome.

    PubMed

    Justus, P G; Mcherron, L E; Ward, T T

    1984-07-01

    To better understand the pathogenesis of the increased motility previously described in the blind loop rat, we studied the relationship between duration of bacterial overgrowth and both myoelectric activity and bacterial flora in this model. Myoelectric studies and quantitative bacterial cultures were performed on self-filling and self-emptying (control) blind loop rats one, two, and three weeks postoperatively. All self-filling blind loop rats had greater random action potential activity and higher frequencies of migrating action potential complexes than controls (P less than 0.05). One-week self-filling blind loop rats had a higher frequency of migrating action potential complexes (P less than 0.05) and a higher ratio of counts of Escherichia coli to Bacteroides species (P less than 0.05) than the two- or three-week self-filling blind loop groups. Thus, qualitative changes in myoelectric activity occur during the development of bacterial overgrowth in the blind loop rat which may reflect evolving alterations in the bacterial flora.

  14. [Sulfa-drug wastewater treatment with anaerobic/aerobic process].

    PubMed

    Wu, L; Zhang, H; Zhu, H; Zhang, Z; Zhuang, Y; Dai, S

    2001-09-01

    Sulfa drug wastewater was treated with anaerobic/aerobic process. The removal ratios of TOC reached about 50% in anaerobic phase and about 70% in aerobic phase respectively, while volume loading rate of TOC was about 1.2 kg/(m3.d) in anaerobic phase and about 0.6 kg/(m3.d) in aerobic phase. Removal of TOC in anaerobic phase was attributed to the reduction of sulfate.

  15. Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins Protect Mice from Experimental Colitis by Promoting Normal Gut Flora and Preventing Induction of Interferon-γ

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sukumar; Jing, Xuefang; Park, Shin Yong; Wang, Shiyong; Li, Xinna; Gupta, Dipika; Dziarski, Roman

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY There are multiple mechanisms of maintaining tolerance in the gut that protect the intestine from excessive inflammatory response to intestinal microorganisms. We report here that all four mammalian Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins (PGRPs or Pglyrps) protect the host from colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Pglyrp1−/−, Pglyrp2−/−, Pglyrp3−/−, and Pglyrp4−/− mice are all more sensitive than wild type (WT) mice to DSS-induced colitis due to changes to more inflammatory gut microflora, higher production of interferon-γ and interferon-inducible genes, and increase in NK cells in the colon upon initial exposure to DSS, which leads to severe hyperplasia of the lamina propria, loss of epithelial cells, and ulceration in the colon. Thus in WT mice PGRPs protect the colon from early inflammatory response and loss of the barrier function of intestinal epithelium by promoting normal bacterial flora and by preventing damaging production of interferon-γ by NK cells in response to injury. PMID:20709292

  16. Climatic and tectonic implications of the late Miocene Jakokkota flora, Bolivian Altiplano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory-Wodzicki, Kathryn M.; McIntosh, W. C.; Velasquez, Kattia

    1998-12-01

    When compared to a database of modern foliar physiognomy and climate, the physiognomy of a new collection of dicotyledonous leaves from the 10.66±0.06 Ma Jakokkota flora, Bolivian Altiplano, implies a mean annual temperature (MAT) of 18.6-21.0±2.5°C. Similarly, a literature-derived sample of the early-middle Miocene Potosı´flora, Cordillera Oriental, implies a MAT of 21.5-21.7±2.1°C. We estimate that both floras experienced a growing season precipitation of 50±40 cm. The paleoclimate thus appears considerably warmer than the current highland climate, with MATs of 8-9°C; the paleoprecipitation is indistinguishable from modern levels. A comparison of the Miocene MATs with the modern MATs, with the effects of latitudinal continental drift and global climate change subtracted, suggests that the Jakokkota flora grew at an elevation of 590-1610±1000 m, and the Potosı´flora grew at an elevation of 0-1320±1000 m. Both paleoelevation estimates are significantly lower than the present elevations of 3940 and 4300 m, respectively, requiring a substantial component of Andean uplift since 10.7 Ma. This uplift history is consistent with two-stage tectonic models of Andean orogeny.

  17. Gastrointestinal bacterial overgrowth: pathogenesis and clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Sachdev, Amit H.

    2013-01-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is defined as the presence of an abnormally high number of coliform bacteria in the small bowel. It is associated with a broad range of predisposing small intestinal motility disorders and with surgical procedures that result in bowel stasis. The most common symptoms associated with SIBO include diarrhea, flatulence, abdominal pain and bloating. Quantitative culture of small bowel contents and a variety of indirect tests have been used over the years in an attempt to facilitate the diagnosis of SIBO. The indirect tests include breath tests and biochemical tests based on bacterial metabolism of a variety of substrates. Unfortunately, there is no single valid test for SIBO, and the accuracy of all current tests remains limited due to the failure of culture to be a gold standard and the lack of standardization of the normal bowel flora in the small intestine. Currently, the ideal approach to treat SIBO is to treat the underlying disease, eradicate overgrowth, and address nutritional deficiencies that may be associated with the development of SIBO. PMID:23997926

  18. Applications of bacterial cellulose and its composites in biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Rajwade, J M; Paknikar, K M; Kumbhar, J V

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial cellulose produced by few but specific microbial genera is an extremely pure natural exopolysaccharide. Besides providing adhesive properties and a competitive advantage to the cellulose over-producer, bacterial cellulose confers UV protection, ensures maintenance of an aerobic environment, retains moisture, protects against heavy metal stress, etc. This unique nanostructured matrix is being widely explored for various medical and nonmedical applications. It can be produced in various shapes and forms because of which it finds varied uses in biomedicine. The attributes of bacterial cellulose such as biocompatibility, haemocompatibility, mechanical strength, microporosity and biodegradability with its unique surface chemistry make it ideally suited for a plethora of biomedical applications. This review highlights these qualities of bacterial cellulose in detail with emphasis on reports that prove its utility in biomedicine. It also gives an in-depth account of various biomedical applications ranging from implants and scaffolds for tissue engineering, carriers for drug delivery, wound-dressing materials, etc. that are reported until date. Besides, perspectives on limitations of commercialisation of bacterial cellulose have been presented. This review is also an update on the variety of low-cost substrates used for production of bacterial cellulose and its nonmedical applications and includes patents and commercial products based on bacterial cellulose. PMID:25666681