Science.gov

Sample records for aerobic bacterial strains

  1. Pectinolytic systems of two aerobic sporogenous bacterial strains with high activity on pectin.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Margarita; Diaz, Pilar; Pastor, F I Javier

    2005-02-01

    Strains Paenibacillus sp. BP-23 and Bacillus sp. BP-7, previously isolated from soil from a rice field, secreted high levels of pectinase activity in media supplemented with pectin. Production of pectinases in strain Paenibacillus sp. BP-23 showed catabolite repression, while in Bacillus sp. BP-7 production of pectin degrading enzymes was not negatively affected by glucose. The two strains showed lyase activities as the predominant pectinases, while hydrolase activity was very low. Analysis of Paenibacillus sp. BP-23 in SDS-polyacrylamide gels and zymograms showed five pectinase activity bands. The strict requirement of Ca(2+) for lyase activity of the strain indicates that correspond to pectate lyases. For Bacillus sp. BP-7, zymograms showed four bands of different size. The strain showed a Ca(2+) requirement for lyase activity on pectate but not on pectin, indicating that the pectinolytic system of Bacillus sp. BP-7 is comprised of pectate lyases and pectin lyases. The results show differences in pectin degrading systems between the two aerobic sporogenous bacterial strains studied. PMID:15717229

  2. Aerobic digestion of tannery wastewater in a sequential batch reactor by salt-tolerant bacterial strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durai, G.; Rajasimman, M.; Rajamohan, N.

    2011-09-01

    Among the industries generating hyper saline effluents, tanneries are prominent in India. Hyper saline wastewater is difficult to treat by conventional biological treatment methods. Salt-tolerant microbes can adapt to these conditions and degrade the organics in hyper saline wastewater. In this study, the performance of a bench scale aerobic sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was investigated to treat the tannery wastewater by the salt-tolerant bacterial strains namely Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus flexus, Exiguobacterium homiense and Styphylococcus aureus. The study was carried out under different operating conditions by changing the hydraulic retention time, organic loading rate and initial substrate concentration. From the results it was found that a maximum COD reduction of 90.4% and colour removal of 78.6% was attained. From this study it was found that the salt-tolerant microorganisms could improve the reduction efficiency of COD and colour of the tannery wastewater.

  3. [Identification of a high ammonia nitrogen tolerant and heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterial strain TN-14 and its nitrogen removal capabilities].

    PubMed

    Xin, Xin; Yao, Li; Lu, Lei; Leng, Lu; Zhou, Ying-Qin; Guo, Jun-Yuan

    2014-10-01

    A new strain of high ammonia nitrogen tolerant and heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterium TN-14 was isolated from the environment. Its physiological and biochemical characteristics and molecular identification, performences of heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic, the abilities of resistance to ammonia nitrogen as well as the decontamination abilities were studied, respectively. It was preliminary identified as Acinetobacter sp. according to its physiological and biochemical characteristics and molecular identification results. In heterotrophic nitrification system, the ammonia nitrogen and total nitrogen removal rate of the bacterial strain TN-14 could reach 97.13% and 93.53% within 24 h. In nitrates denitrification system, the nitrate concentration could decline from 94.24 mg · L(-1) to 39.32 mg · L(-1) within 24 h, where the removal rate was 58.28% and the denitrification rate was 2.28 mg · (L · h)(-1); In nitrite denitrification systems, the initial concentration of nitrite could be declined from 97.78 mg · L(-1) to 21.30 mg x L(-1), with a nitrite nitrogen removal rate of 78.22%, and a denitrification rate of 2.55 mg · (L· h)(-1). Meanwhile, strain TN-14 had the capability of flocculant production, and the flocculating rate could reach 94.74% when its fermentation liquid was used to treat 0.4% kaolin suspension. Strain TN-14 could grow at an ammonia nitrogen concentration as high as 1200 mg · L(-1). In the aspect of actual piggery wastewater treatment by strain TN-14, the removal rate of COD, ammonia nitrogen, TN and TP cloud reached 85.30%, 65.72%, 64.86% and 79.41%, respectively. Strain TN-14 has a good application prospect in biological treatment of real high- ammonia wastewater. PMID:25693403

  4. Biodegradation and detoxification of melanoidin from distillery effluent using an aerobic bacterial strain SAG5 of Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Santal, Anita Rani; Singh, N P; Saharan, Baljeet Singh

    2011-10-15

    Distillery effluent retains very dark brown color even after anaerobic treatment due to presence of various water soluble, recalcitrant and coloring compounds mainly melanoidins. In laboratory conditions, melanoidin decolorizing bacteria was isolated and optimized the cultural conditions at various incubation temperatures, pH, carbon sources, nitrogen sources and combined effect of both carbon and nitrogen sources. The optimum decolorization (72.6 ± 0.56%) of melanoidins was achieved at pH 7.5 and temperature 37 °C on 5th day of cultivation. The toxicity evaluation with mung bean (Vigna radiata) revealed that the raw distillery effluent was environmentally highly toxic as compared to biologically treated distillery effluent, which indicated that the effluent after bacterial treatment is environmentally safe. This proves to be novel biological treatment technique for biodegradation and detoxification of melanoidin from distillery effluent using the bacterial strain SAG(5). PMID:21880418

  5. Isolation of high-salinity-tolerant bacterial strains, Enterobacter sp., Serratia sp., Yersinia sp., for nitrification and aerobic denitrification under cyanogenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Mpongwana, N; Ntwampe, S K O; Mekuto, L; Akinpelu, E A; Dyantyi, S; Mpentshu, Y

    2016-01-01

    Cyanides (CN(-)) and soluble salts could potentially inhibit biological processes in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), such as nitrification and denitrification. Cyanide in wastewater can alter metabolic functions of microbial populations in WWTPs, thus significantly inhibiting nitrifier and denitrifier metabolic processes, rendering the water treatment processes ineffective. In this study, bacterial isolates that are tolerant to high salinity conditions, which are capable of nitrification and aerobic denitrification under cyanogenic conditions, were isolated from a poultry slaughterhouse effluent. Three of the bacterial isolates were found to be able to oxidise NH(4)-N in the presence of 65.91 mg/L of free cyanide (CN(-)) under saline conditions, i.e. 4.5% (w/v) NaCl. The isolates I, H and G, were identified as Enterobacter sp., Yersinia sp. and Serratia sp., respectively. Results showed that 81% (I), 71% (G) and 75% (H) of 400 mg/L NH(4)-N was biodegraded (nitrification) within 72 h, with the rates of biodegradation being suitably described by first order reactions, with rate constants being: 4.19 h(-1) (I), 4.21 h(-1) (H) and 3.79 h(-1) (G), respectively, with correlation coefficients ranging between 0.82 and 0.89. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rates were 38% (I), 42% (H) and 48% (G), over a period of 168 h with COD reduction being highest at near neutral pH. PMID:27148718

  6. Aerobic cyanide degradation by bacterial isolates from cassava factory wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Sujatha; Dananjeyan, Balachandar; Krishnamurthy, Kumar; Benckiser, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains that utilize cyanide (CN) as a nitrogen source were isolated from cassava factory wastewater after enrichment in a liquid media containing sodium cyanide (1 mM) and glucose (0.2% w/v). The strains could tolerate and grow in cyanide concentrations of up to 5 mM. Increased cyanide levels in the media caused an extension of lag phase in the bacterial growth indicating that they need some period of acclimatisation. The rate of cyanide removal by the strains depends on the initial cyanide and glucose concentrations. When initial cyanide and glucose concentrations were increased up to 5 mM, cyanide removal rate increased up to 63 and 61 per cent by Bacillus pumilus and Pseudomonas putida. Metabolic products such as ammonia and formate were detected in culture supernatants, suggesting a direct hydrolytic pathway without an intermediate formamide. The study clearly demonstrates the potential of aerobic treatment with cyanide degrading bacteria for cyanide removal in cassava factory wastewaters. PMID:26413045

  7. Aerobic and anaerobic cecal bacterial flora of commercially processed broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences in the bacterial flora of aerobic and anaerobic cultures of broiler ceca collected from a commercial poultry processing facility were determined. Bacterial isolates from cecal cultures were selected based on the ability of the bacteria to grow in media supplemented with lactate and succ...

  8. Comparative study of normal and sensitive skin aerobic bacterial populations

    PubMed Central

    Hillion, Mélanie; Mijouin, Lily; Jaouen, Thomas; Barreau, Magalie; Meunier, Pauline; Lefeuvre, Luc; Lati, Elian; Chevalier, Sylvie; Feuilloley, Marc G J

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if the sensitive skin syndrome, a frequent skin disorder characterized by abnormal painful reactions to environmental factors in the absence of visible inflammatory response, could be linked to a modification in the skin bacterial population. A total of 1706 bacterial isolates was collected at the levels of the forehead, cheekbone, inner elbow, and lower area of the scapula on the skin of normal and sensitive skin syndrome-suffering volunteers of both sexes and of different ages. Among these isolates, 21 strains were randomly selected to validate in a first step the Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI)-Biotyper process as an efficient identification tool at the group and genus levels, by comparison to API® strips and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing identification techniques. In a second step, identification of the skin microbiota isolates by the MALDI-Biotyper tool allowed to pinpoint some differences in terms of bacterial diversity with regard to the collection area, and the volunteer's age and gender. Finally, comparison of the skin microbiota from normal and sensitive skin syndrome-suffering volunteers pointed out gender-related variations but no detectable correlation between a phylum, a genus or a dominant bacterial species and the sensitive skin phenotype. This study reveals that there is no dysbiosis of aerobic cultivable bacteria associated with the sensitive skin syndrome and further demonstrates that the MALDI-Biotyper is a powerful technique that can be efficiently employed to the study of cultivable human skin bacteria. To our knowledge, this is the first study focusing on bacteria in the sensitive skin syndrome. These results are of potential importance for pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries, which are looking for new strategies to treat this multiparametric disorder. PMID:24151137

  9. Comparative study of normal and sensitive skin aerobic bacterial populations.

    PubMed

    Hillion, Mélanie; Mijouin, Lily; Jaouen, Thomas; Barreau, Magalie; Meunier, Pauline; Lefeuvre, Luc; Lati, Elian; Chevalier, Sylvie; Feuilloley, Marc G J

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if the sensitive skin syndrome, a frequent skin disorder characterized by abnormal painful reactions to environmental factors in the absence of visible inflammatory response, could be linked to a modification in the skin bacterial population. A total of 1706 bacterial isolates was collected at the levels of the forehead, cheekbone, inner elbow, and lower area of the scapula on the skin of normal and sensitive skin syndrome-suffering volunteers of both sexes and of different ages. Among these isolates, 21 strains were randomly selected to validate in a first step the Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI)-Biotyper process as an efficient identification tool at the group and genus levels, by comparison to API(®) strips and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing identification techniques. In a second step, identification of the skin microbiota isolates by the MALDI-Biotyper tool allowed to pinpoint some differences in terms of bacterial diversity with regard to the collection area, and the volunteer's age and gender. Finally, comparison of the skin microbiota from normal and sensitive skin syndrome-suffering volunteers pointed out gender-related variations but no detectable correlation between a phylum, a genus or a dominant bacterial species and the sensitive skin phenotype. This study reveals that there is no dysbiosis of aerobic cultivable bacteria associated with the sensitive skin syndrome and further demonstrates that the MALDI-Biotyper is a powerful technique that can be efficiently employed to the study of cultivable human skin bacteria. To our knowledge, this is the first study focusing on bacteria in the sensitive skin syndrome. These results are of potential importance for pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries, which are looking for new strategies to treat this multiparametric disorder. PMID:24151137

  10. Characteristics of a Novel Aerobic Denitrifying Bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae Strain HNR.

    PubMed

    Guo, Long-Jie; Zhao, Bin; An, Qiang; Tian, Meng

    2016-03-01

    A novel aerobic denitrifier strain HNR, isolated from activated sludge, was identified as Enterobacter cloacae by16S rRNA sequencing analysis. Glucose was considered as the most favorable C-source for strain HNR. The logistic equation well described the bacterial growth, yielding a maximum growth rate (μmax) of 0.283 h(-1) with an initial NO3 (-)-N concentration of 110 mg/L. Almost all NO3 (-)-N was removed aerobically within 30 h with an average removal rate of 4.58 mg N L(-1) h(-1). Nitrogen balance analysis revealed that proximately 70.8 % of NO3 (-)-N was removed as gas products and only 20.7 % was transformed into biomass. GC-MS result indicates that N2 was the end product of aerobic denitrification. The enzyme activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, which are related to the process of aerobic denitrification, were 0.0688 and 0.0054 U/mg protein, respectively. Thus, the aerobic denitrification of reducing NO3 (-) to N2 by strain HNR was demonstrated. The optimal conditions for nitrate removal were C/N ratio 13, pH value 8, shaking speed 127 rpm and temperature 30 °C. These findings show that E. cloacae strain HNR has a potential application on wastewater treatment to achieve nitrate removal under aerobic conditions. PMID:26573667

  11. Bacterial Strain Diversity Within Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kirkup, Benjamin C.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Rare bacterial taxa (taxa of low relative frequency) are numerous and ubiquitous in virtually any sample—including wound samples. In addition, even the high-frequency genera and species contain multiple strains. These strains, individually, are each only a small fraction of the total bacterial population. Against the view that wounds contain relatively few kinds of bacteria, this newly recognized diversity implies a relatively high rate of migration into the wound and the potential for diversification during infection. Understanding the biological and medical importance of these numerous taxa is an important new element of wound microbiology. Recent Advances: Only recently have these numerous strains been discovered; the technology to detect, identify, and characterize them is still in its infancy. Multiple strains of both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria have been found in a single wound. In the few cases studied, the distribution of the bacteria suggests microhabitats and biological interactions. Critical Issues: The distribution of the strains, their phenotypic diversity, and their interactions are still largely uncharacterized. The technologies to investigate this level of genomic detail are still developing and have not been largely deployed to investigate wounds. Future Directions: As advanced metagenomics, single-cell genomics, and advanced microscopy develop, the study of wound microbiology will better address the complex interplay of numerous individually rare strains with both the host and each other. PMID:25566411

  12. Aerobic biotransformation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) by bacterial isolates

    PubMed Central

    Robrock, Kristin R.; Coelhan, Mehmet; Sedlak, David; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame retardants that have been used in consumer products and furniture for three decades. Currently, very little is known about their fate in the environment and specifically about their susceptibility to aerobic biotransformation. Here, we investigated the ability of the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) degrading bacteria Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 and Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 to transform mono- through hexa-BDEs at ppb levels. We also tested the PBDE transforming abilities of related strain Rhodococcus sp. RR1 and the ether-degrading Pseudonocardia dioxanivorans CB1190. The two PCB-degrading strains transformed all of the mono- through penta-BDEs and strain LB400 transformed one of the hexa-BDEs. The extent of transformation was inversely proportional to the degree of bromination. Strains RR1 and CB1190 were only able to transform the less brominated mono- and di- BDE congeners. RHA1 released stoichiometric quantities of bromide while transforming mono- and tetra-BDE congeners. LB400 instead converted most of a mono-BDE to a hydroxylated mono-BDE. This is the first report of aerobic transformation of tetra-, penta- and hexa-BDEs as well as the first report of stoichiometric release of bromide during PBDE transformation. PMID:19731666

  13. Biodegradation and detoxification of textile azo dyes by bacterial consortium under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes.

    PubMed

    Lade, Harshad; Kadam, Avinash; Paul, Diby; Govindwar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Release of textile azo dyes to the environment is an issue of health concern while the use of microorganisms has proved to be the best option for remediation. Thus, in the present study, a bacterial consortium consisting of Providencia rettgeri strain HSL1 and Pseudomonas sp. SUK1 has been investigated for degradation and detoxification of structurally different azo dyes. The consortium showed 98-99 % decolorization of all the selected azo dyes viz. Reactive Black 5 (RB 5), Reactive Orange 16 (RO 16), Disperse Red 78 (DR 78) and Direct Red 81 (DR 81) within 12 to 30 h at 100 mg L(-1) concentration at 30 ± 0.2 °C under microaerophilic, sequential aerobic/microaerophilic and microaerophilic/aerobic processes. However, decolorization under microaerophilic conditions viz. RB 5 (0.26 mM), RO 16 (0.18 mM), DR 78 (0.20 mM) and DR 81 (0.23 mM) and sequential aerobic/microaerophilic processes viz. RB 5 (0.08 mM), RO 16 (0.06 mM), DR 78 (0.07 mM) and DR 81 (0.09 mM) resulted into the formation of aromatic amines. In distinction, sequential microaerophilic/ aerobic process doesn't show the formation of amines. Additionally, 62-72 % reduction in total organic carbon content was observed in all the dyes decolorized broths under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes suggesting the efficacy of method in mineralization of dyes. Notable induction within the levels of azoreductase and NADH-DCIP reductase (97 and 229 % for RB 5, 55 and 160 % for RO 16, 63 and 196 % for DR 78, 108 and 258 % for DR 81) observed under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes suggested their critical involvements in the initial breakdown of azo bonds, whereas, a slight increase in the levels of laccase and veratryl alcohol oxidase confirmed subsequent oxidation of formed amines. Also, the acute toxicity assay with Daphnia magna revealed the nontoxic nature of the dye-degraded metabolites under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes. As biodegradation under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic

  14. Biodegradation and detoxification of textile azo dyes by bacterial consortium under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes

    PubMed Central

    Lade, Harshad; Kadam, Avinash; Paul, Diby; Govindwar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Release of textile azo dyes to the environment is an issue of health concern while the use of microorganisms has proved to be the best option for remediation. Thus, in the present study, a bacterial consortium consisting of Providencia rettgeri strain HSL1 and Pseudomonas sp. SUK1 has been investigated for degradation and detoxification of structurally different azo dyes. The consortium showed 98-99 % decolorization of all the selected azo dyes viz. Reactive Black 5 (RB 5), Reactive Orange 16 (RO 16), Disperse Red 78 (DR 78) and Direct Red 81 (DR 81) within 12 to 30 h at 100 mg L-1 concentration at 30 ± 0.2 °C under microaerophilic, sequential aerobic/microaerophilic and microaerophilic/aerobic processes. However, decolorization under microaerophilic conditions viz. RB 5 (0.26 mM), RO 16 (0.18 mM), DR 78 (0.20 mM) and DR 81 (0.23 mM) and sequential aerobic/microaerophilic processes viz. RB 5 (0.08 mM), RO 16 (0.06 mM), DR 78 (0.07 mM) and DR 81 (0.09 mM) resulted into the formation of aromatic amines. In distinction, sequential microaerophilic/ aerobic process doesn’t show the formation of amines. Additionally, 62-72 % reduction in total organic carbon content was observed in all the dyes decolorized broths under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes suggesting the efficacy of method in mineralization of dyes. Notable induction within the levels of azoreductase and NADH-DCIP reductase (97 and 229 % for RB 5, 55 and 160 % for RO 16, 63 and 196 % for DR 78, 108 and 258 % for DR 81) observed under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes suggested their critical involvements in the initial breakdown of azo bonds, whereas, a slight increase in the levels of laccase and veratryl alcohol oxidase confirmed subsequent oxidation of formed amines. Also, the acute toxicity assay with Daphnia magna revealed the nontoxic nature of the dye-degraded metabolites under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes. As biodegradation under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic

  15. Impact of adding Saccharomyces strains on fermentation, aerobic stability, nutritive value, and select lactobacilli populations in corn silage.

    PubMed

    Duniere, L; Jin, L; Smiley, B; Qi, M; Rutherford, W; Wang, Y; McAllister, T

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial inoculants can improve the conservation and nutritional quality of silages. Inclusion of the yeast Saccharomyces in the diet of dairy cattle has also been reported to be beneficial. The present study assessed the ability of silage to be used as a means of delivering Saccharomyces strains to ruminants. Two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain 1 and 3)and 1 strain of Saccharomyces paradoxus (strain 2) were inoculated (10(3) cfu/g) individually onto corn forage that was ensiled in mini silos for 90 d. Fermentation characteristics, aerobic stability, and nutritive value of silages were determined and real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to quantify S. cerevisiae, S.paradoxus, total Saccharomyces, fungal, and bacterial populations. Fermentation characteristics of silage inoculated with S1 were similar to control silage. Although strain 3 inoculation increased ash and decreased OM contents of silage (P = 0.017), no differences were observed in nutrient composition or fermentation profiles after 90 d of ensiling. Inoculation with Saccharomyces had no detrimental effect on the aerobic stability of silage. In vitro DM disappearance, gas production, and microbial protein synthesis were not affected by yeast inoculation.Saccharomyces strain 1 was quantified throughout ensiling, whereas strain 2 was detected only immediately after inoculation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain 3 was quantified until d 7 and detectable 90 d after ensiling. All inoculants were detected and quantified during aerobic exposure. Inoculation with Saccharomyces did not alter lactobacilli populations. Saccharomycetales were detected by RT-qPCR throughout ensiling in all silages. Both S. cerevisiae and S. paradoxus populations increased during aerobic exposure, demonstrating that the density of these yeast strains would increase between the time that silage was removed from storage and the time it was fed. PMID:26020328

  16. Aerobic carboxydotrophy under extremely haloalkaline conditions in Alkalispirillum/Alkalilimnicola strains isolated from soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Tourova, Tatjana P; Kovaleva, Olga L; Kuenen, J Gijs; Muyzer, Gerard

    2010-03-01

    Aerobic enrichments from soda lake sediments with CO as the only substrate resulted in the isolation of five bacterial strains capable of autotrophic growth with CO at extremely high pH and salinity. The strains belonged to the Alkalispirillum/Alkalilimnicola cluster in the Gammaproteobacteria, where the ability to oxidize CO, but not growth with CO, has been demonstrated previously. The growth with CO was possible only at an oxygen concentration below 5 % and CO concentration below 20 % in the gas phase. The isolates were also capable of growth with formate but not with H(2). The carboxydotrophic growth occurred within a narrow pH range from 8 to 10.5 (optimum at 9.5) and a broad salt concentration from 0.3 to 3.5 M total Na(+) (optimum at 1.0 M). Cells grown on CO had high respiration activity with CO and formate, while the cells grown on formate actively oxidized formate alone. In CO-grown cells, CO-dehydrogenase (CODH) activity was detectable both in soluble and membrane fractions, while the NAD-independent formate dehydrogenase (FDH) resided solely in membranes. The results of total protein profiling and the failure to detect CODH with conventional primers for the coxL gene indicated that the CO-oxidizing enzyme in haloalkaliphilic isolates might differ from the classical aerobic CODH complex. A single cbbL gene encoding the RuBisCO large subunit was detected in all strains, suggesting the presence of the Calvin cycle of inorganic carbon fixation. Overall, these results demonstrated the possibility of aerobic carboxydotrophy under extremely haloalkaline conditions. PMID:19959573

  17. Aerobic bacterial catabolism of persistent organic pollutants - potential impact of biotic and abiotic interaction.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong-Rok; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Baldrian, Petr; Schmidt, Stefan; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2016-04-01

    Several aerobic bacteria possess unique catabolic pathways enabling them to degrade persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs), polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The catabolic activity of aerobic bacteria employed for removal of POPs in the environment may be modulated by several biotic (i.e. fungi, plants, algae, earthworms, and other bacteria) and abiotic (i.e. zero-valent iron, advanced oxidation, and electricity) agents. This review describes the basic biochemistry of the aerobic bacterial catabolism of selected POPs and discusses how biotic and abiotic agents enhance or inhibit the process. Solutions allowing biotic and abiotic agents to exert physical and chemical assistance to aerobic bacterial catabolism of POPs are also discussed. PMID:26851837

  18. Bacterial population dynamics in diary waste during aerobic and anaerobic treatment and subsequent storage.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to model a typical dairy waste stream and monitor the chemical and bacterial population dynamics that occur during aerobic or anaerobic treatment and subsequent storage in a simulated lagoon, and compare them to waste held without treatment in a simulated lagoon. Both...

  19. Enhancement of aerobic biodegradability potential of municipal waste activated sludge by ultrasonic aided bacterial disintegration.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, S; Jessin Brindha, G M; Sally Gloriana, A; Rajashankar, K; Yeom, Ick Tae; Rajesh Banu, J

    2016-01-01

    An investigation was performed to study the influence of ultrasonic aided bacterial disintegration on the aerobic degradability of sludge. In first phase of the study, effective floc disruption was achieved at an ultrasonic specific energy input of 2.45kJ/kg TS with 44.5mg/L of Extracellular Polymeric Substance (EPS) release including 0.035U/mL and 0.025U/mL protease and amylase activity respectively. In second phase, experimental outcomes revealed bacterial disintegration of floc disrupted-sludge showing a maximum solubilization of about 23% and was observed to be superior to bacterially disintegrated (11%) and control (6%), respectively. The result of aerobic biodegradability of ultrasonic aided bacterially pretreated sludge showed volatile solids (VS) degradation of about 40.2%. The kinetic study of aerobic biodegradability through non linear regression modelling reveals that floc disrupted sludge showed better biodegradability with decay constant of about 0.19d(-1) relatively higher than the control (0.14d(-1)) and bacterially disintegrated (0.17d(-1)) sludges. PMID:26479431

  20. Response of the jejunal mucosa of dogs with aerobic and anaerobic bacterial overgrowth to antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Batt, R M; McLean, L; Riley, J E

    1988-01-01

    Dogs with naturally occurring aerobic or anaerobic bacterial overgrowth have been examined before and after antibiotic therapy in order to assess reversibility of damage to the jejunal mucosa. Histological changes in peroral jejunal biopsies were relatively minor before and after treatment, but sucrose density gradient centrifugation revealed specific biochemical abnormalities that responded to antibiotic therapy. Aerobic overgrowth was initially associated with a marked loss of the main brush border component of alkaline phosphatase activity; this recovered following treatment, suggesting that aerobic bacteria may cause reversible damage to the hydrophobic region of the brush border membrane. In contrast, anaerobic overgrowth was initially associated with a marked reduction in brush border density, indicative of a considerable fall in the glycoprotein-to-lipid ratio of the membrane. Density increased from 1.17 to 1.21 g/ml after antibiotic therapy, consistent with recovery from this relatively severe damage to the brush border caused by anaerobic bacteria. Reductions in soluble and peroxisomal catalase activities which could compromise mucosal protection against free radicals in dogs with aerobic overgrowth, and a loss of particulate malate dehydrogenase activity indicative of mitochondrial disruption in dogs with anaerobic overgrowth, were also reversed after treatment. These findings indicate that aerobic and anaerobic bacterial overgrowth can result in contrasting but potentially reversible damage to the jejunal mucosa which would not be detected by conventional investigative procedures. PMID:3371716

  1. Nitrogen removal by Providencia rettgeri strain YL with heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jun; Zhao, Bin; An, Qiang; Huang, Yuan-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Providencia rettgeri strain YL shows the capability of nitrogen removal under sole aerobic conditions. By using isotope ratio mass spectrometry, (15)N-labelled N2O and N2 were detected in aerobic batch cultures containing [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] or [Formula: see text]. Strain YL converted [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] to produce more N2O than N2 in the presence of [Formula: see text]. An (15)N isotope tracing experiment confirmed that the nitrogen removal pathway of strain YL was heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification. The optimal treatment conditions for nitrogen removal were pH of 8, C/N ratio of 12, temperature of 25°C and shaking speed of 105 rpm. A continuous aerobic bioreactor inoculated with strain YL was developed. With an influent [Formula: see text] concentration of 90-200 mg/L, the [Formula: see text] removal efficiency ranged from 80% to 97% and the total nitrogen removal efficiency ranged from 72% to 95%. The nitrogen balance in the continuous bioreactor revealed that approximately 35-52% of influent [Formula: see text] was denitrified aerobically to form gaseous nitrogen. These findings show that the P. rettgeri strain YL has potential application in wastewater treatment for nitrogen removal under sole aerobic conditions. PMID:26824874

  2. Bacterial Diversity in a Nonsaline Alkaline Environment: Heterotrophic Aerobic Populations

    PubMed Central

    Tiago, Igor; Chung, Ana Paula; Veríssimo, António

    2004-01-01

    Heterotrophic populations were isolated and characterized from an alkaline groundwater environment generated by active serpentinization, which results in a Ca(OH)2-enriched, extremely diluted groundwater with pH 11.4. One hundred eighty-five strains were isolated in different media at different pH values during two sampling periods. To assess the degree of diversity present in the environment and to select representative strains for further characterization of the populations, we screened the isolates by using random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR profiles and grouped them based on similarities determined by fatty acid methyl ester analysis. Phenotypic characterization, determinations of G+C content, phylogenetic analyses by direct sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and determinations of pH tolerance were performed with the selected isolates. Although 38 different populations were identified and characterized, the vast majority of the isolates were gram positive with high G+C contents and were affiliated with three distinct groups, namely, strains closely related to the species Dietzia natrolimnae (32% of the isolates), to Frigoribacterium/Clavibacter lineages (29% of the isolates), and to the type strain of Microbacterium kitamiense (20% of the isolates). Other isolates were phylogenetically related to strains of the genera Agrococcus, Leifsonia, Kytococcus, Janibacter, Kocuria, Rothia, Nesterenkonia, Citrococcus, Micrococcus, Actinomyces, Rhodococcus, Bacillus, and Staphylococcus. Only five isolates were gram negative: one was related to the Sphingobacteria lineage and the other four were related to the α-Proteobacteria lineage. Despite the pH of the environment, the vast majority of the populations were alkali tolerant, and only two strains were able to grow at pH 11. PMID:15574939

  3. A novel denitrifying bacterial isolate that degrades trimethylamine both aerobically and anaerobically via two different pathways.

    PubMed

    Kim, S G; Bae, H S; Lee, S T

    2001-10-01

    The aerobic and anaerobic degradation of trimethylamine by a newly isolated denitrifying bacterium from an enrichment culture with trimethylamine inoculated with activated sludge was studied. Based on 16S rDNA analysis, this strain was identified as a Paracoccus sp. The isolate, strain T231, aerobically degraded trimethylamine, dimethylamine and methylamine and released a stoichiometric amount of ammonium ion into the culture fluid as a metabolic product, indicating that these methylated amines were completely degraded to formaldehyde and ammonia. The strain degraded trimethylamine also under denitrifying conditions and consumed a stoichiometric amount of nitrate, demonstrating that complete degradation of trimethylamine was coupled with nitrate reduction. Cell-free extract prepared from cells grown aerobically on trimethylamine exhibited activities of trimethylamine mono-oxygenase, trimethylamine N-oxide demethylase, dimethylamine mono-oxygenase, and methylamine mono-oxygenase. Cell-free extract from cells grown anaerobically on trimethylamine and nitrate exhibited activities of trimethylamine dehydrogenase and dimethylamine dehydrogenase. These results indicate that strain T231 had two different pathways for aerobic and anaerobic degradation of trimethylamine. This is a new feature for trimethylamine metabolism in denitrifying bacteria. PMID:11685371

  4. Hyper-thermophilic aerobic bacterial ecology for space agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, T.; Kanazawa, S.; Moriya, T.; Ishikawa, Y.; Hashimoto, H.; Yamashita, M.; Space Agriculture Task Force, J.

    A material recycling is one of core issues in engineering for habitation on extraterrestrial bodies such as Mars A new composting system has been developed in Japan which utilizes some thermophilic bacteria to attain higher temperature than normally expected in the ordinary composting system Dead body of rat was found to be eaten up by the thermophilic bacteria under aerated condition and oxidized to carbon dioxide and few other inorganics within two hours Ecology of these composting bacteria is structured on the intensive symbiotic interactions among various species that participate in various reaction networks in a concert Complexity in the composting bacteria might be based on multiple interaction and interdependency among participating species and organisms Species identification and phylogeny of symbiotic bacteria and understanding of their ecology have been made Those bacterial systems are active and durable under temperature high in a range of 80 to 100 r C Biological combustion release heat and temperature goes up when air is fed through the reaction bed Since microbial activity decreases at exceeding temperature and release of heat decreases as well temperature in the reacting bed itself-regulated in the range Even though it should be verified composting bacteria themselves are presumed to be safe for human agricultural plant and animal species Their activity is restricted only to the condition under elevated temperature Their activities depend greatly on their symbiotic partners and extreme environment created by them The

  5. [Study of the aerobic bacterial flora of onycolysis and paronychia caused by Candida].

    PubMed

    Robles, A M; Negroni, R; De Hardie, N

    1976-01-01

    The aerobic bacterial flora of 63 cases of onicolysis 78 of paronychis and 5 of onicomadesis produced by yeast-like fungus were studied. Bacterial isolation was carried out in nutrient agar with a concentration of 10 mug/ml of nystatin. These microorganisms were identified following the Otto Bier and Bailey & Scott's techniques (3, 1). Bacterial contamination was very frequent. One species or more were isolated from 93,6% of onicolysis and 97% of paronychis. The onicolysis presented the following flora: "Staphylococcus aureus" in 22 cases, "Staphylococcus epidermidis" in 21, Gram positive sporulated bacilli in 17, "Enterobacteriaceae" in 13, and "Pseudomona aeruginosa" in 6. The paronychial lesions showed the following flora: "Staphylococcus aureus" in 21 cases, "Staphylococcus epidermidis" in 26, Gram positive sporulated bacilli in 17, "Enterobacteriaceae" in 17 and "Pseudomona aeruginosa" in 3. It is important to emphasize that "Pseudomona aeruginosa" was isolated in a few cases of both types of candidal onixis, contrary to usual reports (2, 4, 9). No significant difference between the aerobic bacterial flora of the onicolysis and paronychia was found, that would give an explanation of the existence of these two clinical forms of candidal nails infection. PMID:1035392

  6. Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, a halophilic bacterium producing acetone, butanol, and ethanol under aerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Hamid; Azarbaijani, Reza; Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Abolhassan; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Hosseini Salekdeh, Ghasem; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2016-01-01

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, which was isolated from Aran-Bidgol Lake (Iran), has the ability to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) as well as acetic and butyric acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This result is the first report of ABE production with a wild microorganism from a family other than Clostridia and also the first halophilic species shown to produce butanol under aerobic cultivation. The cultivation of Nesterenkonia sp. strain F under anaerobic conditions with 50 g/l of glucose for 72 h resulted in the production of 105 mg/l of butanol, 122 mg/l of acetone, 0.2 g/l of acetic acid, and 2.5 g/l of butyric acid. Furthermore, the strain was cultivated on media with different glucose concentrations (20, 50, and 80 g/l) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Through fermentation with a 50 g/l initial glucose concentration under aerobic conditions, 66 mg/l of butanol, 125 mg/l of acetone, 291 mg/l of ethanol, 5.9 g/l of acetic acid, and 1.2 g/l of butyric acid were produced. The enzymes pertaining to the fermentation pathway in the strain were compared with the enzymes of Clostridium spp., and the metabolic pathway of fermentation used by Nesterenkonia sp. strain F was investigated. PMID:26725518

  7. Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, a halophilic bacterium producing acetone, butanol, and ethanol under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Hamid; Azarbaijani, Reza; Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Abolhassan; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2016-01-01

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, which was isolated from Aran-Bidgol Lake (Iran), has the ability to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) as well as acetic and butyric acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This result is the first report of ABE production with a wild microorganism from a family other than Clostridia and also the first halophilic species shown to produce butanol under aerobic cultivation. The cultivation of Nesterenkonia sp. strain F under anaerobic conditions with 50 g/l of glucose for 72 h resulted in the production of 105 mg/l of butanol, 122 mg/l of acetone, 0.2 g/l of acetic acid, and 2.5 g/l of butyric acid. Furthermore, the strain was cultivated on media with different glucose concentrations (20, 50, and 80 g/l) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Through fermentation with a 50 g/l initial glucose concentration under aerobic conditions, 66 mg/l of butanol, 125 mg/l of acetone, 291 mg/l of ethanol, 5.9 g/l of acetic acid, and 1.2 g/l of butyric acid were produced. The enzymes pertaining to the fermentation pathway in the strain were compared with the enzymes of Clostridium spp., and the metabolic pathway of fermentation used by Nesterenkonia sp. strain F was investigated. PMID:26725518

  8. Developmental hazard assessment with FETAX: Aerobic metabolites in bacterial transformation of naphthalene

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, T.W.; Dawson, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    The underlying principle of bioremediation is the capability of microorganisms to biodegrade pollutants. When a contaminated site is biotreated, it is usually assumed that the disappearance of the pollutant means a reduction in the toxic effects of the contaminants. However, pollutants can undergo partial biodegradation or biotransformation. Microbial-mediated transformations play a critical role in the toxic effects of pollutants, as any alteration in structure can result in a change in physicochemical properties which influence toxicity. Therefore, a relevant question is; what is the toxicity of accumulative metabolites relative to the parent chemical? One class of chemicals that consistently appears at Superfund hazard waste sites is aromatic hydrocarbons. Studies of the aerobic bacterial metabolism of representative compounds, including benzene, naphthalene, and phenanthrene, have revealed similar oxidative pathways. Bacterial degradation of these aromatic hydrocarbons was initiated by the addition of two molecules of oxygen via a dioxygenase enzyme, with the resulting intermediate being converted to a catechol-like compound. From a biotransformation standpoint, one of the more thoroughly studied aromatic hydrocarbons has been naphthalene. Cerniglia (1984) has identified five major intermediates, 1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene, salicylaldehyde, salicylic acid, gentisic acid and catechol in the aerobic bacterial degradation of naphthalene. In vitro test systems such as the Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay - Xenopus (FETAX) provide a time- and resource-effective means for assessing developmental toxicity on a preliminary basis. FETAX is a 96-hr static-renewal system that uses early embryos of the frog Xenopus laevis. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the developmental hazard, using FETAX, of exposure to the model aromatic hydrocarbon, naphthalene, and it`s known major aerobic metabolites from bacterial transformation. 18 refs., 2 tabs.

  9. Phenotypic characterization of food waste degrading Bacillus strains isolated from aerobic bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Silva, Maria Teresa Saraiva Lopes da; Espírito Santo, Fátima; Pereira, Pablo Tavares; Roseiro, José Carlos Pereira

    2006-01-01

    A phenotypic characterization of seventeen Bacillus strains isolated from aerobic thermophilic bioreactors of a food waste processing company was carried out, using fatty acid and enzymatic activity profiles. It was observed that each species possessed a typical fatty acid and enzymatic production profile. Bacillus licheniformis strains exhibited the most significant enzyme production. Numerical analyses (principal component and hierarchical cluster analyses) revealed that Bacillus licheniformis strains were homogeneous regarding their fatty acid profiles whilst B. subtilis and Bacillus pumilus strains showed some phenotypic differences. However, enzymatic activities numerical analyses indicated that these three Bacillus species were more homogeneous regarding this phenotypic characteristic. PMID:16463317

  10. Characterisation of the aerobic bacterial flora of boid snakes: application of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Plenz, Bastian; Schmidt, Volker; Grosse-Herrenthey, Anke; Krüger, Monika; Pees, Michael

    2015-03-14

    The aim of this study was to identify aerobic bacterial isolates from the respiratory tract of boids with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). From 47 boid snakes, swabs from the oral cavity, tracheal wash samples and, in cases in which postmortem examination was performed, pulmonary tissue samples were taken. Each snake was classified as having inflammation of the respiratory tract and/or oral cavity, or without evidence of inflammation based on combination of clinical, cytological and histopathological findings. Samples collected from the respiratory tract and oral cavity were inoculated onto routine media and bacteria were cultured aerobically. All morphologically distinct individual colonies obtained were analysed using MALDI-TOF MS. Unidentified isolates detected in more than three snakes were selected for further 16S rDNA PCR and sequencing. Among all examined isolates (n=243), 49 per cent (n=119) could be sufficiently speciated using MALDI-TOF MS. Molecular biology revealed several bacterial species that have not been previously described in reptiles. With an average of 6.3 different isolates from the respiratory tract and/or oral cavity, boids with inflammatory disease harboured significantly more bacterial species than boids without inflammatory disease (average 2.8 isolates). PMID:25487809

  11. Biodegradation of Free Phytol by Bacterial Communities Isolated from Marine Sediments under Aerobic and Denitrifying Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rontani, Jean-François; Bonin, Patricia C.; Volkman, John K.

    1999-01-01

    Biodegradation of (E)-phytol [3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadec-2(E)-en-1-ol] by two bacterial communities isolated from recent marine sediments under aerobic and denitrifying conditions was studied at 20°C. This isoprenoid alcohol is metabolized efficiently by these two bacterial communities via 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecan-2-one and (E)-phytenic acid. The first step in both aerobic and anaerobic bacterial degradation of (E)-phytol involves the transient production of (E)-phytenal, which in turn can be abiotically converted to 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecan-2-one. Most of the isoprenoid metabolites identified in vitro could be detected in a fresh sediment core collected at the same site as the sediments used for the incubations. Since (E)-phytenal is less sensitive to abiotic degradation at the temperature of the sediments (15°C), the major part of (E)-phytol appeared to be biodegraded in situ via (E)-phytenic acid. (Z)- and (E)-phytenic acids are present in particularly large quantities in the upper section of the core, and their concentrations quickly decrease with depth in the core. This degradation (which takes place without significant production of phytanic acid) is attributed to the involvement of alternating β-decarboxymethylation and β-oxidation reaction sequences induced by denitrifiers. Despite the low nitrate concentration of marine sediments, denitrifying bacteria seem to play a significant role in the mineralization of (E)-phytol. PMID:10584007

  12. Adhesion, Biofilm Formation, and Genomic Features of Campylobacter jejuni Bf, an Atypical Strain Able to Grow under Aerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bronnec, Vicky; Turoňová, Hana; Bouju, Agnès; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Rodrigues, Ramila; Demnerova, Katerina; Tresse, Odile; Haddad, Nabila; Zagorec, Monique

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial enteritis in Europe. Human campylobacteriosis cases are frequently associated to the consumption of contaminated poultry meat. To survive under environmental conditions encountered along the food chain, i.e., from poultry digestive tract its natural reservoir to the consumer's plate, this pathogen has developed adaptation mechanisms. Among those, biofilm lifestyle has been suggested as a strategy to survive in the food environment and under atmospheric conditions. Recently, the clinical isolate C. jejuni Bf has been shown to survive and grow under aerobic conditions, a property that may help this strain to better survive along the food chain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adhesion capacity of C. jejuni Bf and its ability to develop a biofilm. C. jejuni Bf can adhere to abiotic surfaces and to human epithelial cells, and can develop biofilm under both microaerobiosis and aerobiosis. These two conditions have no influence on this strain, unlike results obtained with the reference strain C. jejuni 81-176, which harbors only planktonic cells under aerobic conditions. Compared to 81-176, the biofilm of C. jejuni Bf is more homogenous and cell motility at the bottom of biofilm was not modified whatever the atmosphere used. C. jejuni Bf whole genome sequence did not reveal any gene unique to this strain, suggesting that its unusual property does not result from acquisition of new genetic material. Nevertheless some genetic particularities seem to be shared only between Bf and few others strains. Among the main features of C. jejuni Bf genome we noticed (i) a complete type VI secretion system important in pathogenicity and environmental adaptation; (ii) a mutation in the oorD gene involved in oxygen metabolism; and (iii) the presence of an uncommon insertion of a 72 amino acid coding sequence upstream from dnaK, which is involved in stress resistance. Therefore, the atypical behavior of this strain under

  13. Adhesion, Biofilm Formation, and Genomic Features of Campylobacter jejuni Bf, an Atypical Strain Able to Grow under Aerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bronnec, Vicky; Turoňová, Hana; Bouju, Agnès; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Rodrigues, Ramila; Demnerova, Katerina; Tresse, Odile; Haddad, Nabila; Zagorec, Monique

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial enteritis in Europe. Human campylobacteriosis cases are frequently associated to the consumption of contaminated poultry meat. To survive under environmental conditions encountered along the food chain, i.e., from poultry digestive tract its natural reservoir to the consumer’s plate, this pathogen has developed adaptation mechanisms. Among those, biofilm lifestyle has been suggested as a strategy to survive in the food environment and under atmospheric conditions. Recently, the clinical isolate C. jejuni Bf has been shown to survive and grow under aerobic conditions, a property that may help this strain to better survive along the food chain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adhesion capacity of C. jejuni Bf and its ability to develop a biofilm. C. jejuni Bf can adhere to abiotic surfaces and to human epithelial cells, and can develop biofilm under both microaerobiosis and aerobiosis. These two conditions have no influence on this strain, unlike results obtained with the reference strain C. jejuni 81-176, which harbors only planktonic cells under aerobic conditions. Compared to 81-176, the biofilm of C. jejuni Bf is more homogenous and cell motility at the bottom of biofilm was not modified whatever the atmosphere used. C. jejuni Bf whole genome sequence did not reveal any gene unique to this strain, suggesting that its unusual property does not result from acquisition of new genetic material. Nevertheless some genetic particularities seem to be shared only between Bf and few others strains. Among the main features of C. jejuni Bf genome we noticed (i) a complete type VI secretion system important in pathogenicity and environmental adaptation; (ii) a mutation in the oorD gene involved in oxygen metabolism; and (iii) the presence of an uncommon insertion of a 72 amino acid coding sequence upstream from dnaK, which is involved in stress resistance. Therefore, the atypical behavior of this strain under

  14. Intracellular azo decolorization is coupled with aerobic respiration by a Klebsiella oxytoca strain.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Xie, Tian; Hu, Jin-Mei; Wang, Shi; Li, Wen-Wei

    2015-03-01

    Reduction of azo dye methyl red coupled with aerobic respiration by growing cultures of Klebsiella oxytoca GS-4-08 was investigated. In liquid media containing dye and 0.6 % glucose in a mineral salts base, 100 mg l(-1) of the dye are completely removed in 3 h under shaking conditions. The dye cannot be aerobically decolorized by strain GS-4-08 without extra carbon sources, indicating a co-metabolism process. Higher initial dye concentration prolonged the lag phase of the cell growth, but final cell concentrations of each batches reached a same level with range from 6.3 to 7.6 mg l(-1) after the dye adaption period. This strain showed stronger dye tolerance and decolorization ability than many reported strains. Furthermore, a new intracellular oxygen-insensitive azoreductase was isolated from this strain, and the specific activity of enzyme was 0.846 and 0.633 U mg(-1) protein in the presence of NADH and NADPH, respectively. N,N dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine and anthranilic acid were stoichiometrically released from MR dye, indicating the breakage of azo bonds accounts for the intracellular decolorization. Combining the characteristics of azoreductase, the stoichiometry of EMP, and TCA cycle, the electron transfer chain theory of aerobic respiration, and the possible mechanism of aerobic respiration coupled with azo reduction by K. oxytoca GS-4-08 are proposed. This study is expected to provide a sound theoretical basis for the development of the K. oxytoca strain in aerobic process for azo dye containing wastewaters. PMID:25343980

  15. Biodegradation of Ochratoxin A by Bacterial Strains Isolated from Vineyard Soils.

    PubMed

    De Bellis, Palmira; Tristezza, Mariana; Haidukowski, Miriam; Fanelli, Francesca; Sisto, Angelo; Mulè, Giuseppina; Grieco, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin with a main nephrotoxic activity contaminating several foodstuffs. In the present report, five soil samples collected from OTA-contaminated vineyards were screened to isolate microorganisms able to biodegrade OTA. When cultivated in OTA-supplemented medium, OTA was converted in OTα by 225 bacterial isolates. To reveal clonal relationships between isolates, molecular typing by using an automated rep-PCR system was carried out, thus showing the presence of 27 different strains (rep-PCR profiles). The 16S-rRNA gene sequence analysis of an isolate representative of each rep-PCR profiles indicated that they belonged to five bacterial genera, namely Pseudomonas, Leclercia, Pantoea, Enterobacter, and Acinetobacter. However, further evaluation of OTA-degrading activity by the 27 strains revealed that only Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain 396.1 and Acinetobacter sp. strain neg1, consistently conserved the above property; their further characterization showed that they were able to convert 82% and 91% OTA into OTα in six days at 24 °C, respectively. The presence of OTα, as the unique OTA-degradation product was confirmed by LC-HRMS. This is the first report on OTA biodegradation by bacterial strains isolated from agricultural soils and carried out under aerobic conditions and moderate temperatures. These microorganisms might be used to detoxify OTA-contaminated feed and could be a new source of gene(s) for the development of a novel enzymatic detoxification system. PMID:26633497

  16. Biodegradation of Ochratoxin A by Bacterial Strains Isolated from Vineyard Soils

    PubMed Central

    De Bellis, Palmira; Tristezza, Mariana; Haidukowski, Miriam; Fanelli, Francesca; Sisto, Angelo; Mulè, Giuseppina; Grieco, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin with a main nephrotoxic activity contaminating several foodstuffs. In the present report, five soil samples collected from OTA-contaminated vineyards were screened to isolate microorganisms able to biodegrade OTA. When cultivated in OTA-supplemented medium, OTA was converted in OTα by 225 bacterial isolates. To reveal clonal relationships between isolates, molecular typing by using an automated rep-PCR system was carried out, thus showing the presence of 27 different strains (rep-PCR profiles). The 16S-rRNA gene sequence analysis of an isolate representative of each rep-PCR profiles indicated that they belonged to five bacterial genera, namely Pseudomonas, Leclercia, Pantoea, Enterobacter, and Acinetobacter. However, further evaluation of OTA-degrading activity by the 27 strains revealed that only Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain 396.1 and Acinetobacter sp. strain neg1, consistently conserved the above property; their further characterization showed that they were able to convert 82% and 91% OTA into OTα in six days at 24 °C, respectively. The presence of OTα, as the unique OTA-degradation product was confirmed by LC-HRMS. This is the first report on OTA biodegradation by bacterial strains isolated from agricultural soils and carried out under aerobic conditions and moderate temperatures. These microorganisms might be used to detoxify OTA-contaminated feed and could be a new source of gene(s) for the development of a novel enzymatic detoxification system. PMID:26633497

  17. A fast molecular nondestructive protocol for evaluating aerobic bacterial load on fresh-cut lettuce.

    PubMed

    Gómez, P; Pagnon, M; Egea-Cortines, M; Artés, F; Weiss, J

    2010-10-01

    Elaboration of minimally processed or fresh-cut vegetables requires a quick and reliable method for detection of bacterial contamination over the recommended limits. PCR-based methods fulfil these requirements, but amplification from DNA preparations of the food product is often hampered due to inhibiting substances. The purpose of this study was to develop a fast quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based method for aerobic bacterial enumeration in fresh-cut lettuce, using as reference the centrifugation water (CW) that comes up during processing instead of the food matrix itself. Comparisons between bacterial numbers on lettuce leaves before processing and bacterial numbers in the CW both for naturally occurring bacterial populations and for artificially inoculated lettuce were performed. On an average, 35% of the natural bacterial population and 64% of inoculated bacteria were recovered in the CW. Bacterial number in CW was proportional to initial lettuce contamination suggesting that measures on CW allow a narrow estimation of lettuce contamination. In qPCR, a 23S rDNA region was amplified from bacterial DNA present in the CW, followed by melting peak analyses and quantification. Enumeration of cell number by qPCR did not differ significantly from plate assay and might therefore replace it. The proposed protocol, which includes sample taking, DNA extraction and qPCR from the CW can be performed within less than 5 h. The resulting quantification might be used as a proxy of initial lettuce contamination, allowing direct intervention measures before fresh-cut commodity is shipped from the factory. PMID:21339159

  18. Aerobic hydrogen production by the heterocystous cyanobacteria Anabaena spp. strains CA and 1F.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X K; Haskell, J B; Tabita, F R; Van Baalen, C

    1983-01-01

    Aerobic photoproduction of H2 was demonstrated in Anabaena spp. strains CA and 1F when cells were growing under nitrogen-fixing conditions. The rates of production, measured either by the hydrogen electrode or in a flow system by gas chromatography, were 10 to 15% of the rate of photosynthetic O2 evolution or 50 to 80% of the rates of acetylene reduction. Strains CA and 1F differed in several respects. In strain CA, H2 production was immediately partially sensitive to 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea, whereas strain 1F was not immediately affected. Strain CA also showed a consistently higher rate of H2 production than did strain 1F. H2 production in strain CA was also markedly influenced by the light intensity used for growth, although the growth rates indicated that the light intensities used were essentially saturating. PMID:6417109

  19. [Comparison of heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification system by strain qy37 and its accelerating removal characteristic of NH4+ -N].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pei-yu; Qu, Yang; Yu, De-shuang; Guo, Sha-sha; Yang, Rui-xia

    2010-08-01

    The characterization in nitrogen removal of a heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacteria (qy37) was studied. A strain coded as qy37 which had simultaneous heterotrophic nitrifying and aerobic denitrifying ability was screened. In the light of its morphological and physiological characters as well as their sequence analysis of the 16S rDNA, strain qy37 was identified as Pseudomonas sp.. In heterotrophic nitrifying system utilized ammonium chloride as nitrogen source, the concentration of NH4+ -N reduced from 138.52 mg/L to 7.88 mg/L and COD reduced from 2408.39 to 1177.49 mg/L by strain qy37 in 32 hours, the maximum accumulation of NH2OH and NO2- -N were 9.42 mg/L and 0.02 mg/L respectively, it was speculated that NH2OH was transformed to N2O and N2 directly by strain qy37. In aerobic denitrifying system utilized sodium nitrite as nitrogen source, the concentration of NO2- -N reduced from 109.25 mg/L to 2.59 mg/L by strain qy37 in 24 hours, and the maximum accumulation of NH2OH was 3.28 mg/L. Compared with heterotrophic nitrifying system, aerobic denitrifying system had a higher bacterial growth whereas the lower removal rate of TN and COD, as well as the accumulation of NH2OH. NO3- -N was also detected in aerobic denitrifying system. It is considered that the upgrowth of bacterium and utilization of energy in aerobic denitrifying system were more efficient than that in heterotrophic nitrifying system. In heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification system, the removal rate of NH4+ -N improved 37.31% in 16 hours than that in heterotrophic nitrifying system, the accumulation of NH2OH was less but N2O was higher than that in both heterotrophic nitrifying system and aerobic denitrifying system. PMID:21090299

  20. Aerobic bacterial flora of nesting green turtles (Chelonia mydas) from Tortuguero National Park, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Mario; Hernández, Giovanna; Caballero, Magaly

    2006-12-01

    Bacteriological examination of 70 nesting green turtles (Chelonia mydas) from Tortuguero National Park, Costa Rica was performed to investigate nasal and cloacal aerobic bacteria. A total of 325 bacterial isolates were obtained, including 10 Gram-negative and three Gram-positive genera. Two hundred thirty-nine were Gram-negative and 86 were Gram-positive isolates. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the most common microbe identified in turtle samples: 27/70 (38.5%) in cloacal, and 33/70 (47.1%) in nasal samples. The Enterobacteriaceae family, including Enterobacter agglomerans, E. cloacae, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, K. pneumoniae, and Serratia marcescens, was the largest Gram-negative group of bacteria recovered and comprised 127 of 239 (53.1%) of the Gram-negative isolates. Staphylococcus species was the largest Gram-positive bacteria group, including S. aureus, S. cromogenes, S. epidermis, and S. intermedius, and made up 63 of 86 (73.2%) of the Gram-positive isolates recovered. The results of this study demonstrate that the aerobic bacterial flora of nesting green turtles at Tortuguero National Park is composed of a very wide spectrum of bacteria, including several potential pathogens. PMID:17315444

  1. Pyrosequence analysis of bacterial communities in aerobic bioreactors treating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Stephen D.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Two aerobic, lab-scale, slurry-phase bioreactors were used to examine the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in contaminated soil and the associated bacterial communities. The two bioreactors were operated under semi-continuous (draw-and-fill) conditions at a residence time of 35 days, but one was fed weekly and the other monthly. Most of the quantified PAHs, including high-molecular-weight compounds, were removed to a greater extent in the weekly-fed bioreactor, which achieved total PAH removal of 76%. Molecular analyses, including pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, revealed significant shifts in the soil bacterial communities after introduction to the bioreactors and differences in the abundance and types of bacteria in each of the bioreactors. The weekly-fed bioreactor displayed a more stable bacterial community with gradual changes over time, whereas the monthly-fed bioreactor community was less consistent and may have been more strongly influenced by the influx of untreated soil during feeding. Phylogenetic groups containing known PAH-degrading bacteria previously identified through stable-isotope probing of the untreated soil were differentially affected by bioreactor conditions. Sequences from members of the Acidovorax and Sphingomonas genera, as well as the uncultivated ‘‘Pyrene Group 2’’ were abundant in the bioreactors. However, the relative abundances of sequences from the Pseudomonas, Sphingobium, and Pseudoxanthomonas genera, as well as from a group of unclassified anthracene degraders, were much lower in the bioreactors compared to the untreated soil. PMID:21369833

  2. Culture-Independent Analysis of Bacterial Fuel Contamination Provides Insight into the Level of Concordance with the Standard Industry Practice of Aerobic Cultivation ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    White, Judith; Gilbert, Jack; Hill, Graham; Hill, Edward; Huse, Susan M.; Weightman, Andrew J.; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial diversity in contaminated fuels has not been systematically investigated using cultivation-independent methods. The fuel industry relies on phenotypic cultivation-based contaminant identification, which may lack accuracy and neglect difficult-to-culture taxa. By the use of industry practice aerobic cultivation, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and strain genotyping, a collection of 152 unique contaminant isolates from 54 fuel samples was assembled, and a dominance of Pseudomonas (21%), Burkholderia (7%), and Bacillus (7%) was demonstrated. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 15 samples revealed Proteobacteria and Firmicutes to be the most abundant phyla. When 16S rRNA V6 gene pyrosequencing of four selected fuel samples (indicated by “JW”) was performed, Betaproteobacteria (42.8%) and Gammaproteobacteria (30.6%) formed the largest proportion of reads; the most abundant genera were Marinobacter (15.4%; JW57), Achromobacter (41.6%; JW63), Burkholderia (80.7%; JW76), and Halomonas (66.2%; JW78), all of which were also observed by DGGE. However, the Clostridia (38.5%) and Deltaproteobacteria (11.1%) identified by pyrosequencing in sample JW57 were not observed by DGGE or aerobic culture. Genotyping revealed three instances where identical strains were found: (i) a Pseudomonas sp. strain recovered from 2 different diesel fuel tanks at a single industrial site; (ii) a Mangroveibacter sp. strain isolated from 3 biodiesel tanks at a single refinery site; and (iii) a Burkholderia vietnamiensis strain present in two unrelated automotive diesel samples. Overall, aerobic cultivation of fuel contaminants recovered isolates broadly representative of the phyla and classes present but lacked accuracy by overrepresenting members of certain groups such as Pseudomonas. PMID:21602386

  3. Culture-independent analysis of bacterial fuel contamination provides insight into the level of concordance with the standard industry practice of aerobic cultivation.

    PubMed

    White, Judith; Gilbert, Jack; Hill, Graham; Hill, Edward; Huse, Susan M; Weightman, Andrew J; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2011-07-01

    Bacterial diversity in contaminated fuels has not been systematically investigated using cultivation-independent methods. The fuel industry relies on phenotypic cultivation-based contaminant identification, which may lack accuracy and neglect difficult-to-culture taxa. By the use of industry practice aerobic cultivation, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and strain genotyping, a collection of 152 unique contaminant isolates from 54 fuel samples was assembled, and a dominance of Pseudomonas (21%), Burkholderia (7%), and Bacillus (7%) was demonstrated. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 15 samples revealed Proteobacteria and Firmicutes to be the most abundant phyla. When 16S rRNA V6 gene pyrosequencing of four selected fuel samples (indicated by "JW") was performed, Betaproteobacteria (42.8%) and Gammaproteobacteria (30.6%) formed the largest proportion of reads; the most abundant genera were Marinobacter (15.4%; JW57), Achromobacter (41.6%; JW63), Burkholderia (80.7%; JW76), and Halomonas (66.2%; JW78), all of which were also observed by DGGE. However, the Clostridia (38.5%) and Deltaproteobacteria (11.1%) identified by pyrosequencing in sample JW57 were not observed by DGGE or aerobic culture. Genotyping revealed three instances where identical strains were found: (i) a Pseudomonas sp. strain recovered from 2 different diesel fuel tanks at a single industrial site; (ii) a Mangroveibacter sp. strain isolated from 3 biodiesel tanks at a single refinery site; and (iii) a Burkholderia vietnamiensis strain present in two unrelated automotive diesel samples. Overall, aerobic cultivation of fuel contaminants recovered isolates broadly representative of the phyla and classes present but lacked accuracy by overrepresenting members of certain groups such as Pseudomonas. PMID:21602386

  4. Pyrosequencing analysis of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacterial community structure in the oligotrophic western Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qiang; Liu, Yanting; Steindler, Laura; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2015-04-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (AAPB) represent a widespread functional bacterial group defined by their obligate aerobic and facultative photoheterotrophic abilities. They are an active part of the marine microbial community as revealed by a large number of previous investigations. Here, we made an in-depth comparison of AAPB community structures in the subsurface water and the upper twilight zone of the western Pacific Ocean using high-throughput sequencing based on the pufM gene. Approximately, 100 000 sequences, grouped into 159 OTUs (94% cut-off value), included 44 and 24 OTUs unique to the subsurface and the upper twilight zone, respectively; 92 OTUs were common to both subsurface and twilight zone, and 3 OTUs were found in all samples. Consistent with previous studies, AAPB belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria were the dominant group in the whole water column, followed by the alphaproteobacterial AAPB. Comparing the relative abundance distribution patterns of different clades, an obvious community-structure separation according to deeper or shallower environment could be observed. Sulfitobacter-like, Loktanella-like, Erythrobacter-like, Dinoroseobacter-like and Gamma-HIMB55-like AAPB preferred the high-light subsurface water, while Methylobacterium-like, 'Citromicrobium'-like, Roseovarius-like and Bradyrhizobium-like AAPB, the dim light environment. PMID:25724533

  5. Bioremediation of textile azo dyes by an aerobic bacterial consortium using a rotating biological contactor.

    PubMed

    Abraham, T Emilia; Senan, Resmi C; Shaffiqu, T S; Roy, Jegan J; Poulose, T P; Thomas, P P

    2003-01-01

    The degradation of an azo dye mixture by an aerobic bacterial consortium was studied in a rotating biological reactor. Laterite pebbles of particle size 850 microm to 1.44 mm were fixed on gramophone records using an epoxy resin on which the developed consortium was immobilized. Rate of degradation, BOD, biomass determination, enzymes involved, and fish bioassay were studied. The RBC has a high efficiency for dye degradation even at high dye concentrations (100 microg/mL) and high flow rate (36 L/h) at alkaline pH and salinity conditions normally encountered in the textile effluents. Bioassays (LD-50) using Thilapia fish in treated effluent showed that the percentage mortality was zero over a period of 96 h, whereas the mortality was 100% in untreated dye water within 26 h. Fish bioassay confirms that the effluent from RBC can be discharged safely to the environment. PMID:12892505

  6. Metabolism of 2-Methylpropene (Isobutylene) by the Aerobic Bacterium Mycobacterium sp. Strain ELW1

    PubMed Central

    Kottegoda, Samanthi; Waligora, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    An aerobic bacterium (Mycobacterium sp. strain ELW1) that utilizes 2-methylpropene (isobutylene) as a sole source of carbon and energy was isolated and characterized. Strain ELW1 grew on 2-methylpropene (growth rate = 0.05 h−1) with a yield of 0.38 mg (dry weight) mg 2-methylpropene−1. Strain ELW1 also grew more slowly on both cis- and trans-2-butene but did not grow on any other C2 to C5 straight-chain, branched, or chlorinated alkenes tested. Resting 2-methylpropene-grown cells consumed ethene, propene, and 1-butene without a lag phase. Epoxyethane accumulated as the only detected product of ethene oxidation. Both alkene consumption and epoxyethane production were fully inhibited in cells exposed to 1-octyne, suggesting that alkene oxidation is initiated by an alkyne-sensitive, epoxide-generating monooxygenase. Kinetic analyses indicated that 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane is rapidly consumed during 2-methylpropene degradation, while 2-methyl-2-propen-1-ol is not a significant metabolite of 2-methylpropene catabolism. Degradation of 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane by 2-methylpropene-grown cells led to the accumulation and further degradation of 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate, two sequential metabolites previously identified in the aerobic microbial metabolism of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). Growth of strain ELW1 on 2-methylpropene, 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane, 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol, and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate was fully inhibited when cobalt ions were omitted from the growth medium, while growth on 3-hydroxybutyrate and other substrates was unaffected by the absence of added cobalt ions. Our results suggest that, like aerobic MTBE- and TBA-metabolizing bacteria, strain ELW1 utilizes a cobalt/cobalamin-dependent mutase to transform 2-hydroxyisobutyrate. Our results have been interpreted in terms of their impact on our understanding of the microbial metabolism of alkenes and ether oxygenates. PMID:25576605

  7. Aerobic degradation of dinitrotoluenes and pathway for bacterial degradation of 2,6-dinitrotoluene

    SciTech Connect

    Nishino, S.F.; Paoli, G.C.; Spain, J.C.

    2000-05-01

    An oxidative pathway for the mineralization of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) by Burkholderia sp. strain DNT has been reported previously. The authors report here the isolation of additional strains with the ability to mineralize 2,4-DNT by the same pathway and the isolation and characterization of bacterial strains that mineralize 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6-DNT) by a different pathway. Burkholderia cepacia strain JS850 and Hydrogenophaga palleronii strain JS863 grew on 2,6-DNT as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. The initial steps in the pathway for degradation of 2,6-DNT were determined by simultaneous induction, enzyme assays, and identification of metabolites through mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance. 2,6-DNT was converted to 3-methyl-4-nitrocatechol by a dioxygenation reaction accompanied by the release of nitrite. 3-Methyl-4-nitrocatechol was the substrate for extradiol ring cleavage yielding 2-hydroxy-5-nitro-6-oxohepta-2,4-dienoic acid. 2,4-DNT-degrading strains also converted 2,6-DNT to 3-methyl-4-nitrocatechol but did not metabolize the 3-methyl-4-nitrocatechol. Although 2,6-DNT prevented the degradation of 2,4-DNT by 2,4-DNT-degrading strains, the effect was not the result of inhibition of 2,4-DNT dioxygenase by 2,6-DNT or of 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol monooxygenase by 3-methyl-4-nitrocatechol.

  8. Deficient activation by a human cell strain leads to mitomycin resistance under aerobic but not hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Marshall, R S; Paterson, M C; Rauth, A M

    1989-03-01

    Two non-transformed human skin fibroblast strains, GM38 and 3437T, were found to be more sensitive to the bioreductive alkylating agents mitomycin C (MMC) and porfiromycin (PM) under hypoxic compared to aerobic conditions. One of these strains, 3437T, was 6-7 times more resistant to these agents under aerobic exposure conditions, but was identical in sensitivity to the normal strain, GM38, under hypoxic conditions. Aerobic 3437T cells demonstrated no increased resistance to cisplatin compared to the normal strain, arguing against enhanced ability to repair DNA interstrand cross-links as the underlying explanation for the mitomycin resistance. The aerobic resistance of 3437T was not altered by dicumarol, an inhibitor of the enzyme DT-diaphorase which is believed to be involved in aerobic activation of MMC and PM. Dicumarol did increase the resistance of GM38, but not to the same level of resistance demonstrated by 3437T. These results suggest that the aerobic MMC and PM resistance of 3437T may arise, in part, from a deficiency in DT-diaphorase activity. The identical sensitivities under hypoxic conditions indicate that drug activation pathways operative in the absence of oxygen are similar in both the normal and 3437T cells. PMID:2467684

  9. Deficient activation by a human cell strain leads to mitomycin resistance under aerobic but not hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, R. S.; Paterson, M. C.; Rauth, A. M.

    1989-01-01

    Two non-transformed human skin fibroblast strains, GM38 and 3437T, were found to be more sensitive to the bioreductive alkylating agents mitomycin C (MMC) and porfiromycin (PM) under hypoxic compared to aerobic conditions. One of these strains, 3437T, was 6-7 times more resistant to these agents under aerobic exposure conditions, but was identical in sensitivity to the normal strain, GM38, under hypoxic conditions. Aerobic 3437T cells demonstrated no increased resistance to cisplatin compared to the normal strain, arguing against enhanced ability to repair DNA interstrand cross-links as the underlying explanation for the mitomycin resistance. The aerobic resistance of 3437T was not altered by dicumarol, an inhibitor of the enzyme DT-diaphorase which is believed to be involved in aerobic activation of MMC and PM. Dicumarol did increase the resistance of GM38, but not to the same level of resistance demonstrated by 3437T. These results suggest that the aerobic MMC and PM resistance of 3437T may arise, in part, from a deficiency in DT-diaphorase activity. The identical sensitivities under hypoxic conditions indicate that drug activation pathways operative in the absence of oxygen are similar in both the normal and 3437T cells. PMID:2467684

  10. Antimicrobial effect against different bacterial strains and bacterial adaptation to essential oils used as feed additives

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Antonio Diego Brandão; Amaral, Amanda Figueiredo; Schaefer, Gustavo; Luciano, Fernando Bittencourt; de Andrade, Carla; Costa, Leandro Batista; Rostagno, Marcos Horácio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity and determine the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the essential oils derived from Origanum vulgare (oregano), Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree), Cinnamomum cassia (cassia), and Thymus vulgaris (white thyme) against Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. The study also investigated the ability of these different bacterial strains to develop adaptation after repetitive exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of these essential oils. The MBC of the essential oils studied was determined by disc diffusion and broth dilution methods. All essential oils showed antimicrobial effect against all bacterial strains. In general, the development of adaptation varied according to the bacterial strain and the essential oil (tea tree > white thyme > oregano). Therefore, it is important to use essential oils at efficient bactericidal doses in animal feed, food, and sanitizers, since bacteria can rapidly develop adaptation when exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of these oils. PMID:26424908

  11. Antimicrobial effect against different bacterial strains and bacterial adaptation to essential oils used as feed additives.

    PubMed

    Melo, Antonio Diego Brandão; Amaral, Amanda Figueiredo; Schaefer, Gustavo; Luciano, Fernando Bittencourt; de Andrade, Carla; Costa, Leandro Batista; Rostagno, Marcos Horácio

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity and determine the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the essential oils derived from Origanum vulgare (oregano), Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree), Cinnamomum cassia (cassia), and Thymus vulgaris (white thyme) against Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. The study also investigated the ability of these different bacterial strains to develop adaptation after repetitive exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of these essential oils. The MBC of the essential oils studied was determined by disc diffusion and broth dilution methods. All essential oils showed antimicrobial effect against all bacterial strains. In general, the development of adaptation varied according to the bacterial strain and the essential oil (tea tree > white thyme > oregano). Therefore, it is important to use essential oils at efficient bactericidal doses in animal feed, food, and sanitizers, since bacteria can rapidly develop adaptation when exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of these oils. PMID:26424908

  12. [Isolation and characterazation of a carbazole-degrading bacterial strain].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Fan; He, Yi-Liang

    2010-09-01

    A bacterial strain was isolated from soil samples using plate screening techniques. Results indicated this isolated were able to use carbazole as sole source of carbon and energy, simultaneously, including N-Methylcarbazole, 4-Hydroxycarbazole and 2,2'-Biphenol. It was identified as Flavobacterium sp. according to its morphology, and biochemical properties, and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Utilization of carbazole by the isolates was confirmed by the increase in bacterial biomass and the decrease in substrate concentration in liquid cultures. The optimal pH and temperature for cell growth and carbazole degradation were 7.5 and 30 degrees C, respectively. Resting cells grown in Luria broth also showed activity for decomposing other heterocyclic compounds. In addition, biodegradation of carbazole was carried out with carbazole degrading strain KH-6. The results indicated that 90% of the carbazole could be degraded in the sterilized soil. And strain KH-6 could enhance the degradations of carbazole significantly. PMID:21072941

  13. Identification and characterisation of potential biofertilizer bacterial strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagöz, Kenan; Kotan, Recep; Dadaşoǧlu, Fatih; Dadaşoǧlu, Esin

    2016-04-01

    In this study we aimed that isolation, identification and characterizations of PGPR strains from rhizosphere of legume plants. 188 bacterial strains isolated from different legume plants like clover, sainfoin and vetch in Erzurum province of Turkey. These three plants are cultivated commonly in the Erzurum province. It was screen that 50 out of 188 strains can fix nitrogen and solubilize phosphate. These strains were identified via MIS (Microbial identification system). According to MIS identification results, 40 out of 50 strains were identified as Bacillus, 5 as Pseudomonas, 3 as Paenibacillus, 1 as Acinetobacter, 1 as Brevibacterium. According to classical test results, while the catalase test result of all isolates are positive, oxidase, KOH and starch hydrolysis rest results are variable.

  14. [New Strains of an Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacterium Porphyrobacter donghaensis Isolated from a Siberian Thermal Spring and a Low-Mineralization Lake].

    PubMed

    Nuyanzina-Boldareva, E N; Akimova, V N; Takaiche, S; Gorlenko, V M

    2016-01-01

    A strain of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (AAPB) isolated from the surface of a cyano- bacterial mat of an Eastern Siberian thermal spring (40 C) and designated Se 4 was identified as Porphyro- bacter donghaensis according to its 16S rRNA gene sequence. A DNA-DNA hybridization level of 95% was determined between strain Se-4 and the type strain of this species; SW-132@T. The isolate was an obligate aerobe,. forming orange round colonies on solid media, which turn red in the course of growth. The cells were motile rods capable of branching. The cells divided by uniform fission by constriction. Optimal growth was observed at pH 7.5 and NaCl concentrations from 0 to 1 g/L. The pigments present were carotenoids and bacteriochlorophyll a. Another Porphyrobacter donghaensis strain, Noj- 1, isolated from a purple mat developing on the surface of a coastal set-up in a steppe low-mineralization (1.5 g/L) soda lake Nozhii (Eastern Siberia) possessed similar characteristics. Thus, the AAPB species Porphyrobacter donghaensis was shown to-occur, apart from its known habitat, marine environments, in low-mineralization soda lakes and freshwater thermal springs. Description of the species Porphyrobacter donghaensis was amended. PMID:27301129

  15. Characterization of methanotrophic bacterial populations in natural and agricultural aerobic soils of the European Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchenko, Irina; Sukhacheva, Marina; Kizilova, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric methane contributes to about 20% of the total radiative forcing by long-lived greenhouse gases, and microbial methane oxidation in upland soils is the only biological sink of methane. Microbial methane oxidation in aerated upland soils is estimated as 15 - 45 Tg yr-1 or 3-9% of the annual sink. Therefore there is need of extensive research to characterize methanotrophic activity in various ecosystems for possible application to reduce atmospheric methane fluxes and to minimize global climate change. The vast majority of known aerobic methanotrophs belongs to the Proteobacteria and placed in the families Methylococcaceae in the Gammaproteobacteria, and Methylocystaceae and Beijerinckiaceae in the Alphaproteobacteria. Known exceptions include the phylum Verrucomicrobia and uncultured methanotrophs such as Candidatus 'Methylomirabilis oxyfera' affiliated with the 'NC10' phylum. Plenty of studies of aerobic methane oxidation and key players of the process have been performed on various types of soils, and it was found that Methylocystis spp and uncultivated methanotrophs are abundant in upland soils. Two of the uncultured groups are upland soil cluster alphaproteobacteria (USCa) and gammaproteobacteria (USCg), as revealed by cultivation-independent surveys of pmoA diversity. Russia is extremely rich in soil types due to its vast territories, and most of these soils have never been investigated from the aspect of methanotrophy. This study addresses methane oxidation activity and diversity of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria in eight types of natural aerobic soils, four of which also had been under agricultural use. Methane fluxes have been measured by in situ static chamber method and methane oxidation rates in soil samples - by radioisotope tracer (14CH4) technique. Changes in methanotroph diversity and abundance were assessed by cloning and Sanger sequencing, and quantitative real-time PCR of pmoA genes. Methanotrophic population of unmanaged soils turned

  16. Comparison of the biochemical changes in the jejunal mucosa of dogs with aerobic and anaerobic bacterial overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Batt, R M; McLean, L

    1987-11-01

    Subcellular biochemical changes in the jejunal mucosa have been compared in dogs with either aerobic or anaerobic bacterial overgrowth to explore relationships between composition of the flora and mucosal damage. Affected animals comprised 17 German shepherd dogs with chronic diarrhea or weight loss, or both. Analysis of duodenal juice demonstrated aerobic overgrowth in 10 cases, most frequently comprising enterococci and Escherichia coli, and obligate anaerobic overgrowth in 7 cases, most frequently including Clostridia spp. Histologic changes were minimal; however, examination of peroral jejunal biopsy specimens by sucrose density gradient centrifugation revealed specific biochemical abnormalities. In the dogs with aerobic overgrowth, there was a selective loss of brush border alkaline phosphatase activity, and gamma-glutamyl transferase activity was increased, whereas activities of disaccharidases and aminopeptidase N were unaltered. In contrast, anaerobic overgrowth was associated with a reduction in brush border density, indicative of a considerable fall in the glycoprotein-to-lipid ratio of the brush border membrane, whereas brush border enzyme activities were unaltered. There was a loss of peroxisomal catalase activity in dogs with aerobic overgrowth, and an indication of mitochondrial disruption in dogs with anaerobic overgrowth, but little evidence for damage to other subcellular organelles. These findings demonstrate that aerobic and anaerobic overgrowth may be associated with distinct but different mucosal abnormalities particularly affecting the brush border membrane. PMID:2888701

  17. Carbazole degradation in the soil microcosm by tropical bacterial strains

    PubMed Central

    Salam, Lateef B.; Ilori, Matthew O.; Amund, Olukayode O.

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, three bacterial strains isolated from tropical hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and phylogenetically identified as Achromobacter sp. strain SL1, Pseudomonas sp. strain SL4 and Microbacterium esteraromaticum strain SL6 displayed angular dioxygenation and mineralization of carbazole in batch cultures. In this study, the ability of these isolates to survive and enhance carbazole degradation in soil were tested in field-moist microcosms. Strain SL4 had the highest survival rate (1.8 x 107 cfu/g) after 30 days of incubation in sterilized soil, while there was a decrease in population density in native (unsterilized) soil when compared with the initial population. Gas chromatographic analysis after 30 days of incubation showed that in sterilized soil amended with carbazole (100 mg/kg), 66.96, 82.15 and 68.54% were degraded by strains SL1, SL4 and SL6, respectively, with rates of degradation of 0.093, 0.114 and 0.095 mg kg−1 h−1. The combination of the three isolates as inoculum in sterilized soil degraded 87.13% carbazole at a rate of 0.121 mg kg−1 h−1. In native soil amended with carbazole (100 mg/kg), 91.64, 87.29 and 89.13% were degraded by strains SL1, SL4 and SL6 after 30 days of incubation, with rates of degradation of 0.127, 0.121 and 0.124 mg kg−1 h−1, respectively. This study successfully established the survivability (> 106 cfu/g detected after 30 days) and carbazole-degrading ability of these bacterial strains in soil, and highlights the potential of these isolates as seed for the bioremediation of carbazole-impacted environments. PMID:26691461

  18. Phosphogypsum biotransformation by aerobic bacterial flora and isolated Trichoderma asperellum from Tunisian storage piles.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Jihen; Magdich, Salwa; Jarboui, Raja; Loungou, Mouna; Ammar, Emna

    2016-05-01

    Aerobic microorganisms able to grow on phosphogypsum (PG), characterized by heavy metals accumulation and high acidity were investigated by enrichment cultures. The PG was used at different concentrations, varying from 20 to 200g/L in the enrichment culture medium supplemented with compost and Tamarix roots. This treatment reduced COD and heavy metals PG concentration. An efficient isolated fungus, identified by molecular approach as Trichoderma asperellum, was able to grow on PG as the sole carbon and energy sources at the different experimented concentrations, and to increase the culture media pH of the different PG concentrations used to 8.13. This fact would be the result of alkaline compound released during the fungus PG solubilization. Besides, the heavy metals and COD removal exceeded 52% after 7 days culture. At 200g/LPG concentration, the experimented strain was able to reduce COD by 52.32% and metals concentrations by 73% for zinc, 63.75% for iron and 50% for cadmium. This exhibited the T. asperellum efficiency for heavy metals accumulation and for phosphogypsum bioremediation. PMID:26855183

  19. New evidence for Cu-decorated binary-oxides mediating bacterial inactivation/mineralization in aerobic media.

    PubMed

    Rtimi, S; Pulgarin, C; Bensimon, M; Kiwi, J

    2016-08-01

    Binary oxide semiconductors TiO2-ZrO2 and Cu-decorated TiO2-ZrO2 (TiO2-ZrO2-Cu) uniform films were sputtered on polyester (PES). These films were irradiated under low intensity solar simulated light and led to bacterial inactivation in aerobic and anaerobic media as evaluated by CFU-plate counting. But bacterial mineralization was only induced by TiO2-ZrO2-Cu in aerobic media. The highly oxidative radicals generated on the films surface under light were identified by the use of appropriate scavengers. The hole generated on the TiO2-ZrO2 films is shown to be the main specie leading to bacterial inactivation. TiO2-ZrO2 and Cu-decorated TiO2-ZrO2 films release Zr and Ti <1ppb and Cu 4.6ppb/cm(2) as determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) This level is far below the citotoxicity permitted level allowed for mammalian cells suggesting that bacterial disinfection proceeds through an oligodynamic effect. By Fourier transform attenuated infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) the systematic shift of the predominating νs(CH2) vibrational-rotational peak making up most of the bacterial cell-wall content in C was monitored. Based on this evidence a mechanism suggested leading to CH bond stretching followed by cell lysis and cell death. Bacterial inactivation cycling was observed on TiO2-ZrO2-Cu showing the stability of these films leading to bacterial inactivation. PMID:27088192

  20. Variable effects of oxytetracycline on antibiotic resistance gene abundance and the bacterial community during aerobic composting of cow manure.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xun; Sun, Wei; Gu, Jie; Wang, Xiao-Juan; Sun, Jia-Jun; Yin, Ya-Nan; Duan, Man-Li

    2016-09-01

    Livestock manure is often subjected to aerobic composting but little is known about the variation in antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during the composting process under different concentrations of antibiotics. This study compared the effects of three concentrations of oxytetracycline (OTC; 10, 60, and 200mg/kg) on ARGs and the succession of the bacterial community during composting. Very similar trends were observed in the relative abundances (RAs) of each ARG among the OTC treatments and the control during composting. After composting, the RAs of tetC, tetX, sul1, sul2, and intI1 increased 2-43 times, whereas those of tetQ, tetM, and tetW declined by 44-99%. OTC addition significantly increased the absolute abundances and RAs of tetC and intI1, while 200mg/kg OTC also enhanced those of tetM, tetQ, and drfA7. The bacterial community could be grouped according to the composting time under different treatments. The highest concentration of OTC had a more persistent effect on the bacterial community. In the present study, the succession of the bacterial community appeared to have a greater influence on the variation of ARGs during composting than the presence of antibiotics. Aerobic composting was not effective in reducing most of the ARGs, and thus the compost product should be considered as an important reservoir for ARGs. PMID:27179201

  1. Method for construction of bacterial strains with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark I.; Sanville-Millard, Cynthia; Chatterjee, Ranjini

    2000-01-01

    A fermentation process for producing succinic acid is provided comprising selecting a bacterial strain that does not produce succinic acid in high yield, disrupting the normal regulation of sugar metabolism of said bacterial strain, and combining the mutant bacterial strain and selected sugar in anaerobic conditions to facilitate production of succinic acid. Also provided is a method for changing low yield succinic acid producing bacteria to high yield succinic acid producing bacteria comprising selecting a bacterial strain having a phosphotransferase system and altering the phosphotransferase system so as to allow the bacterial strain to simultaneously metabolize different sugars.

  2. Fate of Escherichia coli O26 in Corn Silage Experimentally Contaminated at Ensiling, at Silo Opening, or after Aerobic Exposure, and Protective Effect of Various Bacterial Inoculants▿

    PubMed Central

    Dunière, Lysiane; Gleizal, Audrey; Chaucheyras-Durand, Frédérique; Chevallier, Isabelle; Thévenot-Sergentet, Delphine

    2011-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains are responsible for human illness. Ruminants are recognized as a major reservoir of STEC, and animal feeds, such as silages, have been pointed out as a possible vehicle for the spread of STEC. The present study aimed to monitor the fate of pathogenic E. coli O26 strains in corn material experimentally inoculated (105 CFU/g) during ensiling, just after silo opening, and after several days of aerobic exposure. The addition of 3 bacterial inoculants, Propionibacterium sp., Lactobacillus buchneri, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides (106 CFU/g), was evaluated for their abilities to control these pathogens. The results showed that E. coli O26 could not survive in corn silage 5 days postensiling, and the 3 inoculants tested did not modify the fate of pathogen survival during ensiling. In the case of direct contamination at silo opening, E. coli O26 could be totally eradicated from corn silage previously inoculated with Leuconostoc mesenteroides. The combination of proper ensiling techniques and the utilization of selected bacterial inoculants appears to represent a good strategy to guarantee nutritional qualities of cattle feed while at the same time limiting the entry of pathogenic E. coli into the epidemiological cycle to improve the microbial safety of the food chain. PMID:21984243

  3. Pseudomonas sp. strain 273, and aerobic {alpha},{omega}-dichloroalkane-degrading bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Wischnak, C.; Mueller, R.; Loeffler, F.E. |; Li, J.; Urbance, J.W.

    1998-09-01

    A gram-negative, aerobic bacterium was isolated from soil; this bacterium grew in 50% (vol/vol) suspensions of 1,10-dichlorodecane (1,10-DCD) as the sole source of carbon and energy. Phenotypic and small-subunit ribosomal RNA characterizations identified the organism, designated strain 273, as a member of the genus Pseudomonas. After induction with 1,10-DCD, Pseudomonas sp. strain 273 released stoichiometric amounts of chloride from C{sub 5} to C{sub 12} {alpha},{omega}-dichloroalkanes in the presence of oxygen. No dehalogenation occurred under anaerobic conditions. The best substrates for dehalogenation and growth were C{sub 9} to C{sub 12} chloroalkanes. The isolate also grew with nonhalogenated aliphatic compounds, and decane-grown cells dechlorinated 1,10-DCD without a lag phase. In addition, cells grown on decane dechlorinated 1,10-DCD in the presence of chloramphenicol, indicating that the 1,10-DCD-dechlorinating enzyme system was also induced by decane. Other known alkane-degrading Pseudomonas species did not grow with 1,10-DCD as a carbon source. Dechlorination of 1,10-DCD was demonstrated in cell extracts of Pseudomonas sp. strain 273. Cell-free activity was strictly oxygen dependent, and NADH stimulated dechlorination, whereas EDTA had an inhibitory effect.

  4. Characterization of bacterial pectinolytic strains involved in the water retting process.

    PubMed

    Tamburini, Elena; León, Alicia Gordillo; Perito, Brunella; Mastromei, Giorgio

    2003-09-01

    Pectinolytic microorganisms involved in the water retting process were characterized. Cultivable mesophilic anaerobic and aerobic bacteria were isolated from unretted and water-retted material. A total of 104 anaerobic and 23 aerobic pectinolytic strains were identified. Polygalacturonase activity was measured in the supernatant of cell cultures; 24 anaerobic and nine aerobic isolates showed an enzymatic activity higher than the reference strains Clostridium felsineum and Bacillus subtilis respectively. We performed the first genotypic characterization of the retting microflora by a 16S amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). Anaerobic isolates were divided into five different groups, and the aerobic isolates were clustered into three groups. 84.6% of the anaerobic and 82.6% of the aerobic isolates consisted of two main haplotypes. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequences were determined for 12 strains, representative of each haplotype. All anaerobic strains were assigned to the Clostridium genus, whereas the aerobic isolates were assigned to either the Bacillus or the Paenibacillus genus. Anaerobic isolates with high polygalacturonase (PG) activity belong to two clearly distinct phylogenetic clusters related to C. acetobutylicum-C. felsineum and C. saccharobutylicum species. Aerobic isolates with high PG activity belong to two clearly distinct phylogenetic clusters related to B. subtilisT and B. pumilusT. PMID:12919408

  5. Transforming microbial genotyping: a robotic pipeline for genotyping bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    O'Farrell, Brian; Haase, Jana K; Velayudhan, Vimalkumar; Murphy, Ronan A; Achtman, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Microbial genotyping increasingly deals with large numbers of samples, and data are commonly evaluated by unstructured approaches, such as spread-sheets. The efficiency, reliability and throughput of genotyping would benefit from the automation of manual manipulations within the context of sophisticated data storage. We developed a medium- throughput genotyping pipeline for MultiLocus Sequence Typing (MLST) of bacterial pathogens. This pipeline was implemented through a combination of four automated liquid handling systems, a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) consisting of a variety of dedicated commercial operating systems and programs, including a Sample Management System, plus numerous Python scripts. All tubes and microwell racks were bar-coded and their locations and status were recorded in the LIMS. We also created a hierarchical set of items that could be used to represent bacterial species, their products and experiments. The LIMS allowed reliable, semi-automated, traceable bacterial genotyping from initial single colony isolation and sub-cultivation through DNA extraction and normalization to PCRs, sequencing and MLST sequence trace evaluation. We also describe robotic sequencing to facilitate cherrypicking of sequence dropouts. This pipeline is user-friendly, with a throughput of 96 strains within 10 working days at a total cost of < €25 per strain. Since developing this pipeline, >200,000 items were processed by two to three people. Our sophisticated automated pipeline can be implemented by a small microbiology group without extensive external support, and provides a general framework for semi-automated bacterial genotyping of large numbers of samples at low cost. PMID:23144721

  6. Transforming Microbial Genotyping: A Robotic Pipeline for Genotyping Bacterial Strains

    PubMed Central

    Velayudhan, Vimalkumar; Murphy, Ronan A.; Achtman, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Microbial genotyping increasingly deals with large numbers of samples, and data are commonly evaluated by unstructured approaches, such as spread-sheets. The efficiency, reliability and throughput of genotyping would benefit from the automation of manual manipulations within the context of sophisticated data storage. We developed a medium- throughput genotyping pipeline for MultiLocus Sequence Typing (MLST) of bacterial pathogens. This pipeline was implemented through a combination of four automated liquid handling systems, a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) consisting of a variety of dedicated commercial operating systems and programs, including a Sample Management System, plus numerous Python scripts. All tubes and microwell racks were bar-coded and their locations and status were recorded in the LIMS. We also created a hierarchical set of items that could be used to represent bacterial species, their products and experiments. The LIMS allowed reliable, semi-automated, traceable bacterial genotyping from initial single colony isolation and sub-cultivation through DNA extraction and normalization to PCRs, sequencing and MLST sequence trace evaluation. We also describe robotic sequencing to facilitate cherrypicking of sequence dropouts. This pipeline is user-friendly, with a throughput of 96 strains within 10 working days at a total cost of < €25 per strain. Since developing this pipeline, >200,000 items were processed by two to three people. Our sophisticated automated pipeline can be implemented by a small microbiology group without extensive external support, and provides a general framework for semi-automated bacterial genotyping of large numbers of samples at low cost. PMID:23144721

  7. The Campylobacter jejuni MarR-like transcriptional regulators RrpA and RrpB both influence bacterial responses to oxidative and aerobic stresses

    PubMed Central

    Gundogdu, Ozan; da Silva, Daiani T.; Mohammad, Banaz; Elmi, Abdi; Mills, Dominic C.; Wren, Brendan W.; Dorrell, Nick

    2015-01-01

    The ability of the human intestinal pathogen Campylobacter jejuni to respond to oxidative stress is central to bacterial survival both in vivo during infection and in the environment. Re-annotation of the C. jejuni NCTC11168 genome revealed the presence of two MarR-type transcriptional regulators Cj1546 and Cj1556, originally annotated as hypothetical proteins, which we have designated RrpA and RrpB (regulator of response to peroxide) respectively. Previously we demonstrated a role for RrpB in both oxidative and aerobic (O2) stress and that RrpB was a DNA binding protein with auto-regulatory activity, typical of MarR-type transcriptional regulators. In this study, we show that RrpA is also a DNA binding protein and that a rrpA mutant in strain 11168H exhibits increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide oxidative stress. Mutation of either rrpA or rrpB reduces catalase (KatA) expression. However, a rrpAB double mutant exhibits higher levels of resistance to hydrogen peroxide oxidative stress, with levels of KatA expression similar to the wild-type strain. Mutation of either rrpA or rrpB also results in a reduction in the level of katA expression, but this reduction was not observed in the rrpAB double mutant. Neither the rrpA nor rrpB mutant exhibits any significant difference in sensitivity to either cumene hydroperoxide or menadione oxidative stresses, but both mutants exhibit a reduced ability to survive aerobic (O2) stress, enhanced biofilm formation and reduced virulence in the Galleria mellonella infection model. The rrpAB double mutant exhibits wild-type levels of biofilm formation and wild-type levels of virulence in the G mellonella infection model. Together these data indicate a role for both RrpA and RrpB in the C. jejuni peroxide oxidative and aerobic (O2) stress responses, enhancing bacterial survival in vivo and in the environment. PMID:26257713

  8. Multicenter Evaluation of the Bruker MALDI Biotyper CA System for the Identification of Clinical Aerobic Gram-Negative Bacterial Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Faron, Matthew L.; Buchan, Blake W.; Hyke, Josh; Madisen, Neil; Lillie, Jennifer L.; Granato, Paul A.; Wilson, Deborah A.; Procop, Gary W.; Novak-Weekley, Susan; Marlowe, Elizabeth; Cumpio, Joven; Griego-Fullbright, Christen; Kindig, Sandra; Timm, Karen; Young, Stephen; Ledeboer, Nathan A.

    2015-01-01

    The prompt and accurate identification of bacterial pathogens is fundamental to patient health and outcome. Recent advances in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) have revolutionized bacterial identification in the clinical laboratory, but uniform incorporation of this technology in the U.S. market has been delayed by a lack of FDA-cleared systems. In this study, we conducted a multicenter evaluation of the MALDI Biotyper CA (MBT-CA) System (Bruker Daltonics Inc, Billerica, MA) for the identification of aerobic gram-negative bacteria as part of a 510(k) submission to the FDA. A total of 2,263 aerobic gram negative bacterial isolates were tested representing 23 genera and 61 species. Isolates were collected from various clinical sources and results obtained from the MBT-CA System were compared to DNA sequencing and/or biochemical testing. Isolates that failed to report as a "high confidence species ID" [log(score) ≥2.00] were re-tested using an extraction method. The MBT-CA System identified 96.8% and 3.1% of isolates with either a "high confidence" or a "low confidence" [log(score) value between 1.70 and <2.00] species ID, respectively. Two isolates did not produce acceptable confidence scores after extraction. The MBT-CA System correctly identified 99.8% (2,258/2,263) to genus and 98.2% (2,222/2,263) to species level. These data demonstrate that the MBT-CA System provides accurate results for the identification of aerobic gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26529504

  9. Bacterial vaginosis, aerobic vaginitis, vaginal inflammation and major Pap smear abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Baptista, P; Lima-Silva, J; Pinto, C; Saldanha, C; Beires, J; Martinez-de-Oliveira, J; Donders, G

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the impact of the vaginal milieu on the presence of abnormal Pap smears and a positive human papilloma virus (HPV) test. A cross-sectional study was conducted between June 2014 and May 2015, evaluating the vaginal discharge by fresh wet mount microscopy and comparing these data with Pap smear findings. Wet mount slides were scored for bacterial vaginosis (BV), aerobic vaginitis (AV), presence of Candida and Trichomonas vaginalis. Cytologic evaluation was done on all Pap smears according to the Bethesda criteria. The cobas© HPV Test (Roche) was performed for HPV detection. A total of 622 cases were evaluated. The mean age of the patients was 41.6 ± 10.65 years (range 21-75). Eighty-three women (13.3 %) had a cytology result worse than low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL). When comparing this group with the one with normal or minor [atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) or LSIL] Pap smear abnormalities, there were no differences in the presence of Candida (32.5 % vs. 33.2 %, p = 1.0), absence of lactobacilli (38.6 % vs. 32.5 %, p = 0.32) or BV (20.5 % vs. 13.2 %, p = 0.09). On the other hand, moderate or severe inflammation (msI) (41.0 % vs. 28.8 %, p = 0,04), moderate or severe AV (msAV) (16.9 % vs. 7.2 %, p = 0.009) and msAV/BV (37.3 % vs. 20.0 %, p = 0.001) were more common in women with such major cervical abnormalities. No significant association was found between deviations of the vaginal milieu and high-risk HPV infection. The presence of msI or msAV, but not BV, is independently associated with an increased risk of major cervical cytological abnormalities, but not with HPV infection. PMID:26810061

  10. Culturable Aerobic and Facultative Anaerobic Intestinal Bacterial Flora of Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) in Southern Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Junaid; Sagheer, Mehwish; Tabassum, Nazneen; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Using morphological analysis and biochemical testing, here for the first time, we determined the culturable gut bacterial flora (aerobes and facultative anaerobes) in the venomous Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) from South Asia. The findings revealed that these snakes inhabit potentially pathogenic bacteria including Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shewanella putrefaciens, Aeromonas hydrophila, Salmonella sp., Moraxella sp., Bacillus sp., Ochrobactrum anthropi, and Providencia rettgeri. These findings are of concern, as injury from snake bite can result in wound infections and tissue necrosis leading to sepsis/necrotizing fasciitis and/or expose consumers of snake meat/medicine in the community to infections. PMID:25002979

  11. Culturable Aerobic and Facultative Anaerobic Intestinal Bacterial Flora of Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) in Southern Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Junaid; Sagheer, Mehwish; Tabassum, Nazneen; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Using morphological analysis and biochemical testing, here for the first time, we determined the culturable gut bacterial flora (aerobes and facultative anaerobes) in the venomous Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) from South Asia. The findings revealed that these snakes inhabit potentially pathogenic bacteria including Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shewanella putrefaciens, Aeromonas hydrophila, Salmonella sp., Moraxella sp., Bacillus sp., Ochrobactrum anthropi, and Providencia rettgeri. These findings are of concern, as injury from snake bite can result in wound infections and tissue necrosis leading to sepsis/necrotizing fasciitis and/or expose consumers of snake meat/medicine in the community to infections. PMID:25002979

  12. [Identification and Nitrogen Removal Characteristics of a Heterotrophic Nitrification-Aerobic Denitrification Strain Isolated from Marine Environment].

    PubMed

    Sun, Qing-hua; Yu, De-shuang; Zhang, Pei-yu; Lin, Xue-zheng; Li, Jin

    2016-02-15

    A heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification strain named y5 was isolated from marine environment by traditional microbial isolation method using seawater as medium. It was identified as Klebsiella sp. based on the morphological, physiological and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The experiment results showed that the optimal carbon resource was sodium citrate; the optimal pH was 7.0; and the optimal C/N was 17. The strain could use NH4Cl, NaNO2 and KNO3 as sole nitrogen source, and the removal efficiencies were77.07%, 64.14% and 100% after 36 hours, respectively. The removal efficiency reached 100% after 36 hours in the coexistence of NH4Cl, NaNO2 and KNO3. The results showed that the strain y5 had independent and efficient heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification activities in high salt wastewater. PMID:27363156

  13. Enzymes Involved in the Aerobic Bacterial Degradation of N-Heteroaromatic Compounds: Molybdenum Hydroxylases and Ring-Opening 2,4-Dioxygenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetzner, S.

    Many N-heteroaromatic compounds are utilized by micro-organisms as a source of carbon (and nitrogen) and energy. The aerobic bacterial degradation of these growth substrates frequently involves several hydroxylation steps and subsequent dioxygenolytic cleavage of (di)hydroxy-substituted heteroaromatic intermediates to aliphatic metabolites which finally are channeled into central metabolic pathways. As a rule, the initial bacterial hydroxylation of a N-heteroaromatic compound is catalyzed by a molybdenum hydroxylase, which uses a water molecule as source of the incorporated oxygen. The enzyme's redox-active centers - the active site molybdenum ion coordinated to a distinct pyranopterin cofactor, two different [2Fe2S] centers, and in most cases, flavin adenine dinucleotide - transfer electrons from the N-heterocyclic substrate to an electron acceptor, which for many molybdenum hydroxylases is still unknown. Ring-opening 2,4-dioxygenases involved in the bacterial degradation of quinaldine and 1H-4-oxoquinoline catalyze the cleavage of two carbon-carbon bonds with concomitant formation of carbon monoxide. Since they contain neither a metal center nor an organic cofactor, and since they do not show any sequence similarity to known oxygenases, these unique dioxygenases form a separate enzyme family. Quite surprisingly, however, they appear to be structurally and mechanistically related to enzymes of the α/β hydrolase fold superfamily. Microbial enzymes are a great resource for biotechnological applications. Microbial strains or their enzymes may be used for degradative (bioremediation) or synthetic (biotransformation) purposes. Modern bioremediation or biotransformation strategies may even involve microbial catalysts or strains designed by protein engineering or pathway engineering. Prerequisite for developing such modern tools of biotechnology is a comprehensive understanding of microbial metabolic pathways, of the structure and function of enzymes, and of the

  14. Enhancement of Bacterial Transport in Aerobic and Anaerobic Environments: Assessing the Effect of Metal Oxide Chemical Heterogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    T.C. Onstott

    2005-09-30

    The goal of our research was to understand the fundamental processes that control microbial transport in physically and chemically heterogeneous aquifers and from this enhanced understanding determine the requirements for successful, field-scale delivery of microorganisms to metal contaminated subsurface sites. Our specific research goals were to determine; (1) the circumstances under which the preferential adsorption of bacteria to Fe, Mn, and Al oxyhydroxides influences field-scale bacterial transport, (2) the extent to which the adhesion properties of bacterial cells affect field-scale bacterial transport, (3) whether microbial Fe(III) reduction can enhance field-scale transport of Fe reducing bacteria (IRB) and other microorganisms and (4) the effect of field-scale physical and chemical heterogeneity on all three processes. Some of the spin-offs from this basic research that can improve biostimulation and bioaugmentation remediation efforts at contaminated DOE sites have included; (1) new bacterial tracking tools for viable bacteria; (2) an integrated protocol which combines subsurface characterization, laboratory-scale experimentation, and scale-up techniques to accurately predict field-scale bacterial transport; and (3) innovative and inexpensive field equipment and methods that can be employed to enhance Fe(III) reduction and microbial transport and to target microbial deposition under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

  15. Chemical Composition of Cell-Wall Preparations from Strains of Various Form-Genera of Aerobic Actinomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Becker, B.; Lechevalier, M. P.; Lechevalier, H. A.

    1965-01-01

    Cell-wall preparations were made from more than 140 strains of aerobic actinomycetes representing most of the form-genera that have been proposed. All cell-wall preparations contained as major constituents glucosamine, muramic acid, alanine, and glutamic acid. In addition, cell-wall preparations from various types of streptomycetes and strains of Microëllobosporia contained glycine and ll-α,ε-diaminopimelic acid; those from strains of most Actinoplanaceae and micromonosporae contained glycine and meso-α-ε-diaminopimelic acid; those from strains of Thermoactinomyces, Microbispora, Dermatophilus, and nocardiae of the madurae-pelletieri group contained meso-α,ε-diaminopimelic acid; and those from strains of Thermomonospora, Micropolyspora, and most nocardiae contained meso-α,ε-diaminopimelic acid, arabinose, and galactose. All the strains used were also studied morphologically. Images Fig. 1 PMID:14325886

  16. Marinobacter strain NNA5, a newly isolated and highly efficient aerobic denitrifier with zero N2O emission.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Ai, Guo-Min; Miao, Li-Li; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2016-04-01

    An efficient aerobic denitrification bacterium, strain NNA5, was isolated and identified as Marinobacter sp. NNA5. NNA5 did not perform heterotrophic nitrification. GC/IRMS analysis revealed that (15)N2 was produced from Na(15)NO2 and K(15)NO3. GC/MS and quantitative analyses showed that no N2O emission occurred when nitrite or nitrate was used as substrate. Single factor experiments indicated that optimal conditions for aerobic denitrification were: sodium succinate or sodium pyruvate as carbon source, temperature 35 °C, NaCl concentration 2-4%, C/N ratio 6-8, pH 7.5, rotation speed 150 rpm (giving dissolved oxygen concentration 6.08 mg/L), NO3(-)-N concentration ranging from 140 to 700 mg/L. NNA5 displayed highly efficient aerobic denitrifying ability, with maximal NO3(-)-N removal rate 112.8 mg/L/d. In view of its ability to perform aerobic denitrification with zero N2O emission, NNA5 has great potential for future application in aerobic denitrification processes in industrial and aquaculture wastewater treatment systems. PMID:26836845

  17. Biodegradation of crude oil by individual bacterial strains and a mixed bacterial consortium

    PubMed Central

    Santisi, Santina; Cappello, Simone; Catalfamo, Maurizio; Mancini, Giuseppe; Hassanshahian, Mehdi; Genovese, Lucrezia; Giuliano, Laura; Yakimov, Michail M.

    2015-01-01

    Three bacterial isolates identified as Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2, Rhodococcus erythropolis HS4 and Pseudomonas stutzeri SDM, based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, were isolated from crude oil enrichments of natural seawater. Single strains and four bacterial consortia designed by mixing the single bacterial cultures respectively in the following ratios: (Alcanivorax: Pseudomonas, 1:1), (Alcanivorax: Rhodococcus, 1:1), (Pseudomonas: Rhodococcus, 1:1), and (Alcanivorax: Pseudomonas: Rhodococcus, 1:1:1), were analyzed in order to evaluate their oil degrading capability. All experiments were carried out in microcosms systems containing seawater (with and without addition of inorganic nutrients) and crude oil (unique carbon source). Measures of total and live bacterial abundance, Card-FISH and quali-, quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons (GC-FID) were carried out in order to elucidate the co-operative action of mixed microbial populations in the process of biodegradation of crude oil. All data obtained confirmed the fundamental role of bacteria belonging to Alcanivorax genus in the degradation of linear hydrocarbons in oil polluted environments. PMID:26273252

  18. Drug resistance analysis of bacterial strains isolated from burn patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, L F; Li, J L; Ma, W H; Li, J Y

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the spectrum and drug resistance of bacteria isolated from burn patients to provide a reference for rational clinical use of antibiotics. Up to 1914 bacterial strain specimens isolated from burn patients admitted to hospital between 2001 and 2010 were subjected to resistance monitoring by using the K-B paper disk method. Retrospective analysis was performed on drug resistance analysis of burn patients. The top eight bacterium strains according to detection rate. A total of 1355 strains of Gram-negative (G(-)) bacteria and 559 strains of Gram-positive (G(+)) bacteria were detected. The top eight bacterium strains, according to detection rate, were Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Enterococcus. Drug resistance rates were higher than 90% in A. baumannii, P. aeruginosa, S. epidermidis, and S. aureus, which accounted for 52.2, 21.7, 27.8, and 33.3%, respectively, of the entire sample. Those with drug resistance rates lower than 30% accounted for 4.3, 30.4, 16.7, and 16.7%, respectively. Multidrug-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE) accounted for 49.2 and 76.4% of the S. epidermis and S. aureus resistance, respectively. Antibacterial drugs that had drug resistance rates to MRSE and MRSA higher than 90% accounted for 38.9 and 72.2%, respectively, whereas those with lower than 30% drug resistance rates accounted for 11.1 and 16.7%, respectively. The burn patients enrolled in the study were mainly infected with G(-) bacteria. These results strongly suggest that clinicians should practice rational use of antibiotics based on drug susceptibility test results. PMID:24535909

  19. Assessing carbon and nitrogen removal in a novel anoxic-aerobic cyanobacterial-bacterial photobioreactor configuration with enhanced biomass sedimentation.

    PubMed

    de Godos, I; Vargas, V A; Guzmán, H O; Soto, R; García, B; García, P A; Muñoz, R

    2014-09-15

    The carbon and nitrogen removal potential of an innovative anoxic-aerobic photobioreactor configuration operated with both internal and external recyclings was evaluated under different cyanobacterial-bacterial sludge residence times (9-31 days) during the treatment of wastewaters with low C/N ratios. Under optimal operating conditions, the two-stage photobioreactor was capable of providing organic carbon and nitrogen removals over 95% and 90%, respectively. The continuous biomass recycling from the settler resulted in the enrichment and predominance of rapidly-settling cyanobacterial-bacterial flocs and effluent suspended solid concentrations lower than 35 mg VSS L(-1). These flocs exhibited sedimentation rates of 0.28-0.42 m h(-1) but sludge volumetric indexes of 333-430 ml/g. The decoupling between the hydraulic retention time and sludge retention time mediated by the external recycling also avoided the washout of nitrifying bacteria and supported process operation at biomass concentrations of 1000-1500 mg VSS L(-1). The addition of additional NaHCO3 to the process overcame the CO2 limitation resulting from the intense competition for inorganic carbon between cyanobacteria and nitrifying bacteria in the photobioreactor, which supported the successful implementation of a nitrification-denitrification process. Unexpectedly, this nitrification-denitrification process occurred both simultaneously in the photobioreactor alone (as a result of the negligible dissolved oxygen concentrations) and sequentially in the two-stage anoxic-aerobic configuration with internal NO3(-)/NO2(-) recycling. PMID:24880959

  20. Strain-resolved microbial community proteomics reveals simultaneous aerobic and anaerobic function during gastrointestinal tract colonization of a preterm infant

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Brandon; Mueller, R. S.; Young, Jacque C.; Morowitz, Michael J.; Robert L. Hettich; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-07-01

    While there has been growing interest in the gut microbiome in recent years, it remains unclear whether closely related species and strains have similar or distinct functional roles and if organisms capable of both aerobic and anaerobic growth do so simultaneously. To investigate these questions, we implemented a high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify proteins in fecal samples collected on days of life 13 21 from an infant born at 28 weeks gestation. No prior studies have coupled strain-resolved community metagenomics to proteomics for such a purpose. Sequences were manually curated to resolve the genomes of two strains of Citrobacter that were present during the later stage of colonization. Proteome extracts from fecal samples were processed via a nano-2D-LC-MS/MS and peptides were identified based on information predicted from the genome sequences for the dominant organisms, Serratia and the two Citrobacter strains. These organisms are facultative anaerobes, and proteomic information indicates the utilization of both aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms throughout the time series. This may indicate growth in distinct niches within the gastrointestinal tract. We uncovered differences in the physiology of coexisting Citrobacter strains, including differences in motility and chemotaxis functions. Additionally, for both Citrobacter strains we resolved a community-essential role in vitamin metabolism and a predominant role in propionate production. Finally, in this case study we detected differences between genome abundance and activity levels for the dominant populations. This underlines the value in layering proteomic information over genetic potential.

  1. Pseudomonas chlororaphis Strain Sm3, Bacterial Antagonist of Pratylenchus penetrans.

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, C; Muehlkchen, A; Forge, T; Vrain, T

    2000-06-01

    The interaction of Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain Sm3 and the root-lesion nematode Pratylenchus penetrans was investigated in three separate greenhouse experiments with soils from southern British Columbia, Canada. The bacteria were applied to the roots of strawberry plants and planted in unpasteurized field soils, with natural or supplemented infestation of P. penetrans. Nematode suppression in roots was evident after 6 or 10 weeks in all experiments. Root or shoot growth were increased after 10 weeks in two experiments. Population dynamics of P. chlororaphis Sm3 in the rhizosphere was followed using an antibiotic-resistant mutant of P. chlororaphis Sm3. There was no apparent correlation between bacterial density in the rhizosphere and P. penetrans suppression in strawberry roots and rhizosphere soil, although the soil with the highest nematode reduction also had the largest P. chlororaphis Sm3 population in the rhizosphere. PMID:19270964

  2. Pseudomonas chlororaphis Strain Sm3, Bacterial Antagonist of Pratylenchus penetrans

    PubMed Central

    Hackenberg, Clemens; Muehlkchen, Andrea; Forge, Thomas; Vrain, Thierry

    2000-01-01

    The interaction of Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain Sm3 and the root-lesion nematode Pratylenchus penetrans was investigated in three separate greenhouse experiments with soils from southern British Columbia, Canada. The bacteria were applied to the roots of strawberry plants and planted in unpasteurized field soils, with natural or supplemented infestation of P. penetrans. Nematode suppression in roots was evident after 6 or 10 weeks in all experiments. Root or shoot growth were increased after 10 weeks in two experiments. Population dynamics of P. chlororaphis Sm3 in the rhizosphere was followed using an antibiotic-resistant mutant of P. chlororaphis Sm3. There was no apparent correlation between bacterial density in the rhizosphere and P. penetrans suppression in strawberry roots and rhizosphere soil, although the soil with the highest nematode reduction also had the largest P. chlororaphis Sm3 population in the rhizosphere. PMID:19270964

  3. Incomplete aerobic degradation of the antidiabetic drug Metformin and identification of the bacterial dead-end transformation product Guanylurea.

    PubMed

    Trautwein, Christoph; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2011-10-01

    Active pharmaceutical ingredients as well as personal care products are detected in increasing prevalence in different environmental compartments such as surface water, groundwater and soil. Still little is known about the environmental fate of these substances. The type II antidiabetic drug Metformin has already been detected in different surface waters worldwide, but concentrations were significantly lower than the corresponding predicted environmental concentration (PEC). In human and mammal metabolism so far no metabolites of Metformin have been identified, so the expected environmental concentrations should be very high. To assess the aerobic biodegradability of Metformin and the possible formation of degradation products, three Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) test series were performed in the present study. In the Closed Bottle test (OECD 301 D), a screening test that simulates the conditions of an environmental surface water compartment, Metformin was classified as not readily biodegradable (no biodegradation). In the Manometric Respiratory test (OEDC 301 F) working with high bacterial density, Metformin was biodegraded in one of three test bottles to 48.7% and in the toxicity control bottle to 57.5%. In the Zahn-Wellens test (OECD 302 B) using activated sludge, Metformin was biodegraded in both test vessels to an extent of 51.3% and 49.9%, respectively. Analysis of test samples by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to multiple stage mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS(n)) showed in the tests vessels were biodegradation was observed full elimination of Metformin and revealed Guanylurea (Amidinourea, Dicyandiamidine) as single and stable aerobic bacterial degradation product. In another Manometric Respiratory test Guanylurea showed no more transformation. Photodegradation of Guanylurea was also negative. A first screening in one of the greatest sewage treatment plant in southern Germany found Metformin with high concentrations

  4. Supramolecular organization of bacterial aerobic respiratory chains: From cells and back.

    PubMed

    Melo, Ana M P; Teixeira, Miguel

    2016-03-01

    Aerobic respiratory chains from all life kingdoms are composed by several complexes that have been deeply characterized in their isolated form. These membranous complexes link the oxidation of reducing substrates to the reduction of molecular oxygen, in a process that conserves energy by ion translocation between both sides of the mitochondrial or prokaryotic cytoplasmatic membranes. In recent years there has been increasing evidence that those complexes are organized as supramolecular structures, the so-called supercomplexes and respirasomes, being available for eukaryotes strong data namely obtained by electron microscopy and single particle analysis. A parallel study has been developed for prokaryotes, based on blue native gels and mass spectrometry analysis, showing that in these more simple unicellular organisms such supercomplexes also exist, involving not only typical aerobic-respiration associated complexes, but also anaerobic-linked enzymes. After a short overview of the data on eukaryotic supercomplexes, we will analyse comprehensively the different types of prokaryotic aerobic respiratory supercomplexes that have been thus far suggested, in both bacteria and archaea. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Prof Conrad Mullineaux. PMID:26546715

  5. Bacterial strains isolated from river water having the ability to split alcohol ethoxylates by central fission.

    PubMed

    Budnik, Irena; Zembrzuska, Joanna; Lukaszewski, Zenon

    2016-07-01

    Alcohol ethoxylates (AE) are a major component of the surfactant stream discharged into surface water. The "central fission" of AE with the formation of poly(ethylene glycols) (PEG) is considered to be the dominant biodegradation pathway. However, information as to which bacterial strains are able to perform this reaction is very limited. The aim of this work was to establish whether such an ability is unique or common, and which bacterial strains are able to split AE used as a sole source of organic carbon. Four bacterial strains were isolated from river water and were identified on the basis of phylogenetic trees as Enterobacter strain Z2, Enterobacter strain Z3, Citrobacter freundii strain Z4, and Stenotrophomonas strain Z5. Sterilized river water and "artificial sewage" were used for augmentation of the isolated bacteria. The test was performed in bottles filled with a mineral salt medium spiked with surfactant C12E10 (10 mg L(-1)) and an inoculating suspension of the investigated bacterial strain. Sequential extraction of the tested samples by ethyl acetate and chloroform was used for separation of PEG from the water matrix. LC-MS was used for PEG determination on the basis of single-ion chromatograms. All four selected and investigated bacterial strains exhibit the ability to split fatty alcohol ethoxylates with the production of PEG, which is evidence that this property is a common one rather than specific to certain bacterial strains. However, this ability increases in the sequence: Stenotrophomonas strain Z5 < Enterobacter strain Z2 < Enterobacter strain Z3 = Citrobacter freundii strain Z4. Graphical Abstract Biodegradation by central fission of alcohol ethoxylates by bacterial strains isolated from river water. PMID:27053052

  6. AromaDeg, a novel database for phylogenomics of aerobic bacterial degradation of aromatics

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Márcia; Jauregui, Ruy; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Junca, Howard; Pieper, Dietmar H.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding prokaryotic transformation of recalcitrant pollutants and the in-situ metabolic nets require the integration of massive amounts of biological data. Decades of biochemical studies together with novel next-generation sequencing data have exponentially increased information on aerobic aromatic degradation pathways. However, the majority of protein sequences in public databases have not been experimentally characterized and homology-based methods are still the most routinely used approach to assign protein function, allowing the propagation of misannotations. AromaDeg is a web-based resource targeting aerobic degradation of aromatics that comprises recently updated (September 2013) and manually curated databases constructed based on a phylogenomic approach. Grounded in phylogenetic analyses of protein sequences of key catabolic protein families and of proteins of documented function, AromaDeg allows query and data mining of novel genomic, metagenomic or metatranscriptomic data sets. Essentially, each query sequence that match a given protein family of AromaDeg is associated to a specific cluster of a given phylogenetic tree and further function annotation and/or substrate specificity may be inferred from the neighboring cluster members with experimentally validated function. This allows a detailed characterization of individual protein superfamilies as well as high-throughput functional classifications. Thus, AromaDeg addresses the deficiencies of homology-based protein function prediction, combining phylogenetic tree construction and integration of experimental data to obtain more accurate annotations of new biological data related to aerobic aromatic biodegradation pathways. We pursue in future the expansion of AromaDeg to other enzyme families involved in aromatic degradation and its regular update. Database URL: http://aromadeg.siona.helmholtz-hzi.de PMID:25468931

  7. Isolation and characterisation of aerobic endospore forming Bacilli from sugarcane rhizosphere for the selection of strains with agriculture potentialities.

    PubMed

    de Los Milagros Orberá Ratón, Teresa; Yano, Ricardo; Rodríguez Gámez, Odalys; Floh, Eny Iochevet Segal; de Jesús Serrat Díaz, Manuel; Barbosa, Heloíza Ramos

    2012-04-01

    Eighteen aerobic endospore forming strains were isolated from sugarcane rhizosphere in N-free medium. A phenotypic description and analysis of the 5' end hypervariable region sequences of 16S rRNA revealed a high diversity of Bacillus and related genera. Isolates were identified, and four genera were obtained: seven strains belonged to Bacillus (Bacillaceae family), four belonged to Paenibacillus, six belonged to Brevibacillus and one strain was identified as Cohnella (Paenibacillaceae family). Four Brevibacillus strains showed in vitro inhibitory activity against plant pathogens fungi Curvularia and Fusarium. Seventy-four percent of the isolated bacteria grew on pectin as the only carbon source, showing polygalacturonase activity. Pectate lyase activity was detected for the first time in a Brevibacillus genus strain. All isolates showed endoglucanase activity. Calcium phosphate solubilisation was positive in 83.3% of the isolates, with higher values than those reported for Bacillus inorganic phosphate solubilising strains. High ethylene plant hormone secretion in the culture medium was detected in 22% of the bacteria. This is the first report of ethylene secretion in Paenibacillaceae isolates. Indole-3-acetic acid production was found in a Brevibacillus genus isolate. It was reported for the first time the presence of Cohnella genus strain on sugarcane rhizosphere bearing plant growth promoting traits. The sugarcane isolate Brevibacillus B65 was identified as a plant growth inoculant because it showed wider spectra of plant stimulation capabilities, including an antifungal effect, extracellular hydrolases secretion, inorganic phosphate solubilisation and plant hormone liberation. In this work, sugarcane was shown to be a suitable niche for finding aerobic endospore forming 'Bacilli' with agriculture biotechnological purposes. PMID:22805941

  8. AEROBIC DEGRADATION OF DINITROTOLUENES AND PATHWAY FOR BACTERIAL DEGRADATION OF 2,6-DINITROTOLUENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An oxidative pathway for the mineralization of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) by Burkhoderia sp. strain DNT has been reported previously. We report here the isolation of additional strains with the ability to mineralize dinitrotoluene (2,6-DNT) by a different pathway. Burkhoderia ...

  9. Strain-resolved microbial community proteomics reveals simultaneous aerobic and anaerobic function during gastrointestinal tract colonization of a preterm infant

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brooks, Brandon; Mueller, R. S.; Young, Jacque C.; Morowitz, Michael J.; Robert L. Hettich; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-07-01

    While there has been growing interest in the gut microbiome in recent years, it remains unclear whether closely related species and strains have similar or distinct functional roles and if organisms capable of both aerobic and anaerobic growth do so simultaneously. To investigate these questions, we implemented a high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify proteins in fecal samples collected on days of life 13 21 from an infant born at 28 weeks gestation. No prior studies have coupled strain-resolved community metagenomics to proteomics for such a purpose. Sequences were manually curated to resolve the genomes of two strains ofmore » Citrobacter that were present during the later stage of colonization. Proteome extracts from fecal samples were processed via a nano-2D-LC-MS/MS and peptides were identified based on information predicted from the genome sequences for the dominant organisms, Serratia and the two Citrobacter strains. These organisms are facultative anaerobes, and proteomic information indicates the utilization of both aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms throughout the time series. This may indicate growth in distinct niches within the gastrointestinal tract. We uncovered differences in the physiology of coexisting Citrobacter strains, including differences in motility and chemotaxis functions. Additionally, for both Citrobacter strains we resolved a community-essential role in vitamin metabolism and a predominant role in propionate production. Finally, in this case study we detected differences between genome abundance and activity levels for the dominant populations. This underlines the value in layering proteomic information over genetic potential.« less

  10. Strain-resolved microbial community proteomics reveals simultaneous aerobic and anaerobic function during gastrointestinal tract colonization of a preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Brandon; Mueller, Ryan S; Young, Jacque C; Morowitz, Michael J; Hettich, Robert L; Banfield, Jillian F

    2015-01-01

    While there has been growing interest in the gut microbiome in recent years, it remains unclear whether closely related species and strains have similar or distinct functional roles and if organisms capable of both aerobic and anaerobic growth do so simultaneously. To investigate these questions, we implemented a high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify proteins in fecal samples collected on days of life 13-21 from an infant born at 28 weeks gestation. No prior studies have coupled strain-resolved community metagenomics to proteomics for such a purpose. Sequences were manually curated to resolve the genomes of two strains of Citrobacter that were present during the later stage of colonization. Proteome extracts from fecal samples were processed via a nano-2D-LC-MS/MS and peptides were identified based on information predicted from the genome sequences for the dominant organisms, Serratia and the two Citrobacter strains. These organisms are facultative anaerobes, and proteomic information indicates the utilization of both aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms throughout the time series. This may indicate growth in distinct niches within the gastrointestinal tract. We uncovered differences in the physiology of coexisting Citrobacter strains, including differences in motility and chemotaxis functions. Additionally, for both Citrobacter strains we resolved a community-essential role in vitamin metabolism and a predominant role in propionate production. Finally, in this case study we detected differences between genome abundance and activity levels for the dominant populations. This underlines the value in layering proteomic information over genetic potential. PMID:26191049

  11. Strain-resolved microbial community proteomics reveals simultaneous aerobic and anaerobic function during gastrointestinal tract colonization of a preterm infant

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Brandon; Mueller, Ryan S.; Young, Jacque C.; Morowitz, Michael J.; Hettich, Robert L.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-01-01

    While there has been growing interest in the gut microbiome in recent years, it remains unclear whether closely related species and strains have similar or distinct functional roles and if organisms capable of both aerobic and anaerobic growth do so simultaneously. To investigate these questions, we implemented a high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify proteins in fecal samples collected on days of life 13–21 from an infant born at 28 weeks gestation. No prior studies have coupled strain-resolved community metagenomics to proteomics for such a purpose. Sequences were manually curated to resolve the genomes of two strains of Citrobacter that were present during the later stage of colonization. Proteome extracts from fecal samples were processed via a nano-2D-LC-MS/MS and peptides were identified based on information predicted from the genome sequences for the dominant organisms, Serratia and the two Citrobacter strains. These organisms are facultative anaerobes, and proteomic information indicates the utilization of both aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms throughout the time series. This may indicate growth in distinct niches within the gastrointestinal tract. We uncovered differences in the physiology of coexisting Citrobacter strains, including differences in motility and chemotaxis functions. Additionally, for both Citrobacter strains we resolved a community-essential role in vitamin metabolism and a predominant role in propionate production. Finally, in this case study we detected differences between genome abundance and activity levels for the dominant populations. This underlines the value in layering proteomic information over genetic potential. PMID:26191049

  12. Aerobic bacterial oral flora of garter snakes: development of normal flora and pathogenic potential for snakes and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, E J; Agyare, E O; Vagvolgyi, A E; Halpern, M

    1981-01-01

    Garter snakes that are used for scientific laboratory studies or kept as exotic pets often become ill and die early in captivity. They may also act as reservoirs of potential human pathogens or transmit infection to man. A total of 126 strains of aerobic and facultative bacteria, most potential human and snake pathogens, were isolated from 82 garter snake oropharyngeal cultures. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species were the most common species isolated. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus var. anitratus, Hafnia alvei, Arizona hinshawii, Salmonella species, Shigella species, Klebsiella oxytoca, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were among the potential pathogens isolated. The spectrum of bacteria with potential for causing oral and pulmonary infections in garter snakes is greater than has been previously appreciated. Garter snakes should also be considered reservoirs of human pathogens, and appropriate precautions should be taken by laboratory personnel and pet owners. PMID:7240404

  13. Interaction of Cr(VI) reduction and denitrification by strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa PCN-2 under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    He, Da; Zheng, Maosheng; Ma, Tao; Li, Can; Ni, Jinren

    2015-06-01

    Inhibition of efficient denitrification in presence of toxic heavy metals is one of the current problems encountered in municipal wastewater treatment plants. This paper presents how to remove hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and nitrate simultaneously by the novel strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa PCN-2 under aerobic conditions. The capability of strain PCN-2 for Cr(VI) and nitrate reduction was confirmed by PCR analysis of gene ChrR, napA, nirS, cnorB, nosZ, while Cr(VI) reduction was proved via an initial single-electron transfer through Cr(V) detection using electron paramagnetic resonance. Experimental results demonstrated that Cr(VI) and nitrate reduction by strain PCN-2 was much faster at pH 8-9 and higher initial cell concentration. However, increasing Cr(VI) concentration would inhibit aerobic denitrification process and result in an significant delay of nitrate reduction or N2O accumulation, which was attributed to competition between three electron acceptors, i.e., Cr(VI), O2 and nitrate in the electron transport chain. PMID:25795449

  14. Aerobic bacterial pyrite oxidation and acid rock drainage during the Great Oxidation Event.

    PubMed

    Konhauser, Kurt O; Lalonde, Stefan V; Planavsky, Noah J; Pecoits, Ernesto; Lyons, Timothy W; Mojzsis, Stephen J; Rouxel, Olivier J; Barley, Mark E; Rosìere, Carlos; Fralick, Phillip W; Kump, Lee R; Bekker, Andrey

    2011-10-20

    The enrichment of redox-sensitive trace metals in ancient marine sedimentary rocks has been used to determine the timing of the oxidation of the Earth's land surface. Chromium (Cr) is among the emerging proxies for tracking the effects of atmospheric oxygenation on continental weathering; this is because its supply to the oceans is dominated by terrestrial processes that can be recorded in the Cr isotope composition of Precambrian iron formations. However, the factors controlling past and present seawater Cr isotope composition are poorly understood. Here we provide an independent and complementary record of marine Cr supply, in the form of Cr concentrations and authigenic enrichment in iron-rich sedimentary rocks. Our data suggest that Cr was largely immobile on land until around 2.48 Gyr ago, but within the 160 Myr that followed--and synchronous with independent evidence for oxygenation associated with the Great Oxidation Event (see, for example, refs 4-6)--marked excursions in Cr content and Cr/Ti ratios indicate that Cr was solubilized at a scale unrivalled in history. As Cr isotope fractionations at that time were muted, Cr must have been mobilized predominantly in reduced, Cr(III), form. We demonstrate that only the oxidation of an abundant and previously stable crustal pyrite reservoir by aerobic-respiring, chemolithoautotrophic bacteria could have generated the degree of acidity required to solubilize Cr(III) from ultramafic source rocks and residual soils. This profound shift in weathering regimes beginning at 2.48 Gyr ago constitutes the earliest known geochemical evidence for acidophilic aerobes and the resulting acid rock drainage, and accounts for independent evidence of an increased supply of dissolved sulphate and sulphide-hosted trace elements to the oceans around that time. Our model adds to amassing evidence that the Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic boundary was marked by a substantial shift in terrestrial geochemistry and biology. PMID:22012395

  15. Biosorption behavior and mechanism of lead (II) from aqueous solution by aerobic granules (AG) and bacterial alginate (BA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Li, Yu

    2012-12-01

    Lead (Pb) and its compounds are common pollutants in industrial wastewaters. To develop appropriate Pb2+ treatment technologies, aerobic granules (AG) and bacterial alginates (BA) were studied as alternative biosorbents to remove Pb2+ from aqueous solutions. The biosorption mechanism of AG and BA were further analyzed to determine which functional groups in AG and BA are active in Pb2+ biosorption. In this paper, the Pb2+ biosorption behavior of AG and BA was respectively investigated in batch experiments from the perspectives of the initial pH, contact time, and initial Pb2+ concentration. The results showed that biosorption of Pb2+ by AG and BA occurred within 60min at the initial Pb2+ concentrations (0-150 mg L-1). The actual saturated Pb2+ biosorption capability of AG was 101.97 mg g-1 (dry weight of aerobic granular biomass). When the initial pH was 5, the biosorption capability of AG and BA was highest at the initial Pb2+ concentrations (0-20mg L-1). During the process of Pb2+ biosorption, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ were released. The Ion Chromatography (IC) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) further highlighted the main role of ion exchange between Ca2+ and Pb2+ and sequestration of Pb2+ with carboxyl (-COO-) of AG and BA. This analogical analysis verifies that BA is responsible for biosorption of Pb2+ by AG. At the same optimal pH, AG cultivated with different carbon source has different Pb2+ biosorption capacity. The Pb2+ biosorption by AG with sodium acetate as the sole carbon source is higher than AG with glucose as carbon source.

  16. Aerobic Degradation of N-Methyl-4-Nitroaniline (MNA) by Pseudomonas sp. Strain FK357 Isolated from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fazlurrahman; Vyas, Bhawna; Pal, Deepika; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    N-Methyl-4-nitroaniline (MNA) is used as an additive to lower the melting temperature of energetic materials in the synthesis of insensitive explosives. Although the biotransformation of MNA under anaerobic condition has been reported, its aerobic microbial degradation has not been documented yet. A soil microcosms study showed the efficient aerobic degradation of MNA by the inhabitant soil microorganisms. An aerobic bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. strain FK357, able to utilize MNA as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source, was isolated from soil microcosms. HPLC and GC-MS analysis of the samples obtained from growth and resting cell studies showed the formation of 4-nitroaniline (4-NA), 4-aminophenol (4-AP), and 1, 2, 4-benzenetriol (BT) as major metabolic intermediates in the MNA degradation pathway. Enzymatic assay carried out on cell-free lysates of MNA grown cells confirmed N-demethylation reaction is the first step of MNA degradation with the formation of 4-NA and formaldehyde products. Flavin-dependent transformation of 4-NA to 4-AP in cell extracts demonstrated that the second step of MNA degradation is a monooxygenation. Furthermore, conversion of 4-AP to BT by MNA grown cells indicates the involvement of oxidative deamination (release of NH2 substituent) reaction in third step of MNA degradation. Subsequent degradation of BT occurs by the action of benzenetriol 1, 2-dioxygenase as reported for the degradation of 4-nitrophenol. This is the first report on aerobic degradation of MNA by a single bacterium along with elucidation of metabolic pathway. PMID:24116023

  17. Robustness of an aerobic metabolically vinyl chloride degrading bacterial enrichment culture.

    PubMed

    Zhao, He-Ping; Schmidt, Kathrin R; Lohner, Svenja; Tiehm, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Degradation of the lower chlorinated ethenes is crucial to the application of natural attenuation or in situ bioremediation on chlorinated ethene contaminated sites. Recently, within mixtures of several chloroethenes as they can occur in contaminated groundwater inhibiting effects on aerobic chloroethene degradation have been shown. The current study demonstrated that metabolic vinyl chloride (VC) degradation by an enrichment culture originating from groundwater was not affected by an equimolar concentration (50 μM) of cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE). Only cDCE concentrations at a ratio of 2.4:1 (initial cDCE to VC concentration) caused minor inhibition of VC degradation. Furthermore, the degradation of VC was not affected by the presence of trans-1,2-dichloroethene (tDCE), 1,1-dichloroethene (1,1-DCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and tetrachloroethene (PCE) in equimolar concentrations (50 μM). Only cDCE and tDCE were cometabolically degraded in small amounts. The VC-degrading culture demonstrated a broad pH tolerance from 5 to 9 with an optimum between 6 and 7. Results also showed that the culture could degrade VC concentrations up to 1,800 μM (110 mg/L). PMID:22020471

  18. Aerobic Bacterial Community of American Cockroach Periplaneta americana,a Step toward Finding Suitable Paratransgenesis Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Sanaz; Oshaghi, Mohammad Ali; Hashemi-Aghdam, Saedeh Sadat; Hajikhani, Sara; Oshaghi, Ghazaleh; Shirazi, Mohammad Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cockroaches mechanically spread pathogenic agents, however, little is known about their gut microbiota. Identification of midgut microbial community helps targeting novel biological control strategies such as paratransgenesis. Here the bacterial microbiota of Periplaneta americana midgut, were identified and evaluated for finding proper paratransgenesis candidate. Methods: Midgut of specimens were dissected and cultivated in different media. The bacterial isolates were then identified using the phenotypic and 16S-rRNA sequencing methods. Results: The analytical profile index (API) kit showed presence of 11 bacterial species including: Escherichia coli, Shigella flexineri, Citrobacter freundii, E. vulneris, Enterobacter cloacae, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Y. intermedia, Leclericia adecarboxylata, Klebsiella oxytoca, K. planticola, and Rahnella aquatilis in the cockroach midguts. The first three species are potentially symbiotic whereas others are transient. The conventional plating method revealed presence of only four isolates of Salmonella, E. coli, and Proteus which in three cases mismatched with API and 16S-rRNA genotyping. The API correctly identified the four isolates as Shigella flexneri, Citrobacter freundii, and E. coli (n= 2). 16S-rRNA sequence analysis confirmed the API results; however the C. freundii sequence was identical with C. murliniae indicating lack of genetic variation in the gene between these two closely related species. Conclusion: A low number of potentially symbiotic bacteria were found in the American cockroach midguts. Among them Enterobacter cloacae is a potential candidate for paratransgenesis approach whereas other bacteria are pathogens and are not useful for the approach. Data analysis showed that identification levels increase from the conventional to API and to genotyping respectively. PMID:26114142

  19. Biochemical and Genetic Investigation of Initial Reactions in Aerobic Degradation of the Bile Acid Cholate in Pseudomonas sp. Strain Chol1▿

    PubMed Central

    Birkenmaier, Antoinette; Holert, Johannes; Erdbrink, Henrike; Moeller, Heiko M.; Friemel, Anke; Schoenenberger, René; Suter, Marc J.-F.; Klebensberger, Janosch; Philipp, Bodo

    2007-01-01

    Bile acids are surface-active steroid compounds with toxic effects for bacteria. Recently, the isolation and characterization of a bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. strain Chol1, growing with bile acids as the carbon and energy source was reported. In this study, initial reactions of the aerobic degradation pathway for the bile acid cholate were investigated on the biochemical and genetic level in strain Chol1. These reactions comprised A-ring oxidation, activation with coenzyme A (CoA), and β-oxidation of the acyl side chain with the C19-steroid dihydroxyandrostadienedione as the end product. A-ring oxidizing enzyme activities leading to Δ1,4-3-ketocholyl-CoA were detected in cell extracts and confirmed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Cholate activation with CoA was demonstrated in cell extracts and confirmed with a chemically synthesized standard by LC-MS/MS. A transposon mutant with a block in oxidation of the acyl side chain accumulated a steroid compound in culture supernatants which was identified as 7α,12α-dihydroxy-3-oxopregna-1,4-diene-20-carboxylate (DHOPDC) by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The interrupted gene was identified as encoding a putative acyl-CoA-dehydrogenase (ACAD). DHOPDC activation with CoA in cell extracts of strain Chol1 was detected by LC-MS/MS. The growth defect of the transposon mutant could be complemented by the wild-type ACAD gene located on the plasmid pBBR1MCS-5. Based on these results, the initiating reactions of the cholate degradation pathway leading from cholate to dihydroxyandrostadienedione could be reconstructed. In addition, the first bacterial gene encoding an enzyme for a specific reaction step in side chain degradation of steroid compounds was identified, and it showed a high degree of similarity to genes in other steroid-degrading bacteria. PMID:17693490

  20. Aerobic degradation of ibuprofen in batch and continuous reactors by an indigenous bacterial community.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, María Susana; Fuentes Abril, Nancy Piedad; Martinefski, Manuela; Trípodi, Valeria; Papalia, Mariana; Rádice, Marcela; Gutkind, Gabriel; Gallego, Alfredo; Korol, Sonia Edith

    2016-10-01

    Water from six points from the Riachuelo-Matanza basin was analyzed in order to assess ibuprofen biodegradability. In four of them biodegradation of ibuprofen was proved and degrading bacterial communities were isolated. Biodegradation in each point could not be correlated with sewage pollution. The indigenous bacterial community isolated from the point localized in the La Noria Bridge showed the highest degradative capacity and was selected to perform batch and continuous degradation assays. The partial 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that the community consisted of Comamonas aquatica and Bacillus sp. In batch assays the community was capable of degrading 100 mg L(-1) of ibuprofen in 33 h, with a specific growth rate (μ) of 0.21 h(-1). The removal of the compound, as determined by High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), exceeded 99% of the initial concentration, with a 92.3% removal of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD). In a down-flow fixed-bed continuous reactor, the community shows a removal efficiency of 95.9% of ibuprofen and 92.3% of COD for an average inlet concentration of 110.4 mg. The reactor was kept in operation for 70 days. The maximal removal rate for the compound was 17.4 g m(-3) d(-1). Scanning electron microscopy was employed to observe biofilm development in the reactor. The ability of the isolated indigenous community can be exploited to improve the treatment of wastewaters containing ibuprofen. PMID:26905769

  1. Effects of topical erythromycin on ecology of aerobic cutaneous bacterial flora.

    PubMed Central

    Vowels, B R; Feingold, D S; Sloughfy, C; Foglia, A N; Konnikov, N; Ordoukhanian, E; Starkey, P; Leyden, J J

    1996-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that application of topical erythromycin, an antibiotic commonly used for the treatment of acne, results in an increased density of cutaneous erythromycin-resistant (Emr) coagulase-negative staphylococci; however, it is unknown if this increase results in an overall higher density of total cutaneous staphylococci or if upon cessation of erythromycin use, Emr coagulase-negative staphylococci remain at an increased density compared with the pretreatment density. To investigate this, 2% erythromycin or vehicle was applied to each subject's forehead (n = 225) twice a day by laboratory personnel for a period of 6 weeks. Samples were obtained for culture from the forehead, anterior nares, and back of the subjects at baseline and at weeks 6, 9, and 12 of the study. Cultures were performed on differential media. Plates into which erythromycin was incorporated (8 micrograms/ml) were used to identify Emr coagulase-negative staphylococci. The species of all Emr coagulase-negative staphylococci were determined, and an antibiogram for 16 antibiotics was obtained. The baseline prevalence of Emr coagulase-negative staphylococci on the forehead and nose was about 80% at the two study sites, whereas that on the back was 50%. The baseline density of Emr coagulase-negative staphylococci on the forehead, nose, and back was approximately 20% of the total flora. Following 6 weeks of erythromycin treatment, the prevalence of Emr coagulase-negative staphylococci on the forehead and nose was nearly 100% and the densities were 73 and 62%, respectively; the prevalence and density for the back were 78 and 42%, respectively. The most prevalent erythromycin resistance gene expressed by the Emr coagulase-negative staphylococci was ermC. There was no increase in the numbers of Staphylococcus aureus, gram-negative rods, or yeasts, nor was there increased resistance to any other antibiotic except clindamycin. The density of total aerobic organisms also remained

  2. Clinical Characteristics of Aerobic Vaginitis and Its Association to Vaginal Candidiasis, Trichomonas Vaginitis and Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Jahic, Mahira; Mulavdic, Mirsada; Nurkic, Jasmina; Jahic, Elmir; Nurkic, Midhat

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim of the work: Examine clinical characteristics of aerobic vaginitis and mixed infection for the purpose of better diagnostic accuracy and treatment efficiency. Materials and methods: Prospective research has been conducted at Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department for Microbiology and Pathology at Polyclinic for laboratory diagnostic and Gynecology and Obstetrics Department at Health Center Sapna. Examination included 100 examinees with the signs of vaginitis. Examination consisted of: anamnesis, clinical, gynecological and microbiological examination of vaginal smear. Results: The average age of the examinees was 32,62±2,6. Examining vaginal smears of the examinees with signs of vaginitis in 96% (N-96) different microorganisms have been isolated, while in 4% (N-4) findings were normal. AV has been found in 51% (N-51) of the examinees, Candida albicans in 17% (N-17), BV in 15% (N-15), Trichomonas vaginalis in 13% (N-13). In 21% (N-21) AV was diagnosed alone while associated with other agents in 30% (N-30). Most common causes of AV are E. coli (N-55) and E. faecalis (N-52). AV and Candida albicanis have been found in (13/30, 43%), Trichomonas vaginalis in (9/30, 30%) and BV (8/30, 26%). Vaginal secretion is in 70,05% (N-36) yellow coloured, red vagina wall is recorded in 31,13% (N-16) and pruritus in 72,54% (N-37). Increased pH value of vagina found in 94,10% (N-48). The average pH value of vaginal environment was 5,15±0,54 and in associated presence of AV and VVC, TV and BV was 5,29±0,56 which is higher value considering presence of AV alone but that is not statistically significant difference (p>0,05). Amino-odor test was positive in 29,94% (N-15) of associated infections. Lactobacilli are absent, while leukocytes are increased in 100% (N-51) of the examinees with AV. Conclusion: AV is vaginal infection similar to other vaginal infections. It is important to be careful while diagnosing because the treatment of AV differentiates from

  3. Influence of pH on bile sensitivity amongst various strains of Listeria monocytogenes under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    White, Sally J.; McClung, Daniel M.; Wilson, Jessica G.; Roberts, Brandy N.

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a dangerous bacterium that causes the food-borne disease listeriosis and accounts for nearly 20 % of food-borne deaths. This organism can survive the body's natural defences within the digestive tract, including acidic conditions and bile. Although the bile response has been analysed, limited information is available concerning the ability of L. monocytogenes to resist bile under anaerobic conditions, especially at acidic pH, which mimics conditions within the duodenum. Additionally, it is not known how the bile response varies between serotypes. In this study, the survival of strains representing six serotypes was analysed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions following exposure to bile. Exposure to bile salts at acidic pH increased toxicity of bile, resulting in a significant reduction in survival for all strains tested. However, following this initial reduction, no significant reduction was observed for an additional 2 h except for strain 10403S (P = 0.002). Anaerobic cultivation increased bile resistance, but a significant increase was only observed in virulent strains when exposed to bile at pH 5.5. Exposure to pH 3.0 prior to bile decreased viability amongst avirulent strains in bile in acidic conditions; oxygen availability did not influence viability. Together, the data suggested that being able to sense and respond to oxygen availability may influence the expression of stress response mechanisms, and this response may correspond to disease outcome. Further research is needed on additional strains to determine how L. monocytogenes senses and responds to oxygen and how this varies between invasive and non-invasive strains. PMID:26307079

  4. Influence of pH on bile sensitivity amongst various strains of Listeria monocytogenes under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    White, Sally J; McClung, Daniel M; Wilson, Jessica G; Roberts, Brandy N; Donaldson, Janet R

    2015-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a dangerous bacterium that causes the food-borne disease listeriosis and accounts for nearly 20% of food-borne deaths. This organism can survive the body's natural defences within the digestive tract, including acidic conditions and bile. Although the bile response has been analysed, limited information is available concerning the ability of L. monocytogenes to resist bile under anaerobic conditions, especially at acidic pH, which mimics conditions within the duodenum. Additionally, it is not known how the bile response varies between serotypes. In this study, the survival of strains representing six serotypes was analysed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions following exposure to bile. Exposure to bile salts at acidic pH increased toxicity of bile, resulting in a significant reduction in survival for all strains tested. However, following this initial reduction, no significant reduction was observed for an additional 2 h except for strain 10403S (P = 0.002). Anaerobic cultivation increased bile resistance, but a significant increase was only observed in virulent strains when exposed to bile at pH 5.5. Exposure to pH 3.0 prior to bile decreased viability amongst avirulent strains in bile in acidic conditions; oxygen availability did not influence viability. Together, the data suggested that being able to sense and respond to oxygen availability may influence the expression of stress response mechanisms, and this response may correspond to disease outcome. Further research is needed on additional strains to determine how L. monocytogenes senses and responds to oxygen and how this varies between invasive and non-invasive strains. PMID:26307079

  5. Metabolism of 2-Chloro-4-Nitroaniline via Novel Aerobic Degradation Pathway by Rhodococcus sp. Strain MB-P1

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fazlurrahman; Pal, Deepika; Vikram, Surendra; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    2-chloro-4-nitroaniline (2-C-4-NA) is used as an intermediate in the manufacture of dyes, pharmaceuticals, corrosion inhibitor and also used in the synthesis of niclosamide, a molluscicide. It is marked as a black-listed substance due to its poor biodegradability. We report biodegradation of 2-C-4-NA and its pathway characterization by Rhodococcus sp. strain MB-P1 under aerobic conditions. The strain MB-P1 utilizes 2-C-4-NA as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. In the growth medium, the degradation of 2-C-4-NA occurs with the release of nitrite ions, chloride ions, and ammonia. During the resting cell studies, the 2-C-4-NA-induced cells of strain MB-P1 transformed 2-C-4-NA stoichiometrically to 4-amino-3-chlorophenol (4-A-3-CP), which subsequently gets transformed to 6-chlorohydroxyquinol (6-CHQ) metabolite. Enzyme assays by cell-free lysates prepared from 2-C-4-NA-induced MB-P1 cells, demonstrated that the first enzyme in the 2-C-4-NA degradation pathway is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes the stoichiometric removal of nitro group and production of 4-A-3-CP. Oxygen uptake studies on 4-A-3-CP and related anilines by 2-C-4-NA-induced MB-P1 cells demonstrated the involvement of aniline dioxygenase in the second step of 2-C-4-NA degradation. This is the first report showing 2-C-4-NA degradation and elucidation of corresponding metabolic pathway by an aerobic bacterium. PMID:23614030

  6. Metabolism of 2-chloro-4-nitroaniline via novel aerobic degradation pathway by Rhodococcus sp. strain MB-P1.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fazlurrahman; Pal, Deepika; Vikram, Surendra; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    2-chloro-4-nitroaniline (2-C-4-NA) is used as an intermediate in the manufacture of dyes, pharmaceuticals, corrosion inhibitor and also used in the synthesis of niclosamide, a molluscicide. It is marked as a black-listed substance due to its poor biodegradability. We report biodegradation of 2-C-4-NA and its pathway characterization by Rhodococcus sp. strain MB-P1 under aerobic conditions. The strain MB-P1 utilizes 2-C-4-NA as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. In the growth medium, the degradation of 2-C-4-NA occurs with the release of nitrite ions, chloride ions, and ammonia. During the resting cell studies, the 2-C-4-NA-induced cells of strain MB-P1 transformed 2-C-4-NA stoichiometrically to 4-amino-3-chlorophenol (4-A-3-CP), which subsequently gets transformed to 6-chlorohydroxyquinol (6-CHQ) metabolite. Enzyme assays by cell-free lysates prepared from 2-C-4-NA-induced MB-P1 cells, demonstrated that the first enzyme in the 2-C-4-NA degradation pathway is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes the stoichiometric removal of nitro group and production of 4-A-3-CP. Oxygen uptake studies on 4-A-3-CP and related anilines by 2-C-4-NA-induced MB-P1 cells demonstrated the involvement of aniline dioxygenase in the second step of 2-C-4-NA degradation. This is the first report showing 2-C-4-NA degradation and elucidation of corresponding metabolic pathway by an aerobic bacterium. PMID:23614030

  7. Hydrolysis of 4-Hydroxybenzoic Acid Esters (Parabens) and Their Aerobic Transformation into Phenol by the Resistant Enterobacter cloacae Strain EM

    PubMed Central

    Valkova, Nelly; Lépine, François; Valeanu, Loredana; Dupont, Maryse; Labrie, Louisette; Bisaillon, Jean-Guy; Beaudet, Réjean; Shareck, François; Villemur, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Enterobacter cloacae strain EM was isolated from a commercial dietary mineral supplement stabilized by a mixture of methylparaben and propylparaben. It harbored a high-molecular-weight plasmid and was resistant to high concentrations of parabens. Strain EM was able to grow in liquid media containing similar amounts of parabens as found in the mineral supplement (1,700 and 180 mg of methyl and propylparaben, respectively, per liter or 11.2 and 1.0 mM) and in very high concentrations of methylparaben (3,000 mg liter−1, or 19.7 mM). This strain was able to hydrolyze approximately 500 mg of methyl-, ethyl-, or propylparaben liter−1 (3 mM) in less than 2 h in liquid culture, and the supernatant of a sonicated culture, after a 30-fold dilution, was able to hydrolyze 1,000 mg of methylparaben liter−1 (6.6 mM) in 15 min. The first step of paraben degradation was the hydrolysis of the ester bond to produce 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, followed by a decarboxylation step to produce phenol under aerobic conditions. The transformation of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid into phenol was stoichiometric. The conversion of approximately 500 mg of parabens liter−1 (3 mM) to phenol in liquid culture was completed within 5 h without significant hindrance to the growth of strain EM, while higher concentrations of parabens partially inhibited its growth. PMID:11375144

  8. [[sup 3]H] Thymidine incorporation to estimate growth rates of anaerobic bacterial strains

    SciTech Connect

    Winding, A. )

    1992-08-01

    The incorporation of [[sup 3]H] thymidine by axenic cultures of anaerobic bacteria was investigated as a means to measure growth. The three fermentative strains and one of the methanogenic strains tested incorporated [[sup 3]H] thymidine during growth. It is concluded that the [[sup 3]H] thymidine incorporation method underestimates bacterial growth in anaerobic environments.

  9. Recurrent osteomyelitis caused by infection with different bacterial strains without obvious source of reinfection.

    PubMed

    Uçkay, Ilker; Assal, Mathieu; Legout, Laurence; Rohner, Peter; Stern, Richard; Lew, Daniel; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Bernard, Louis

    2006-03-01

    Recurrence of osteomyelitis by the same bacterial strain is well known. We report three patients with a second episode of osteomyelitis at the same site caused by different strains of bacteria from the original. Formerly infected and altered bone surface might present a region of diminished resistance for a new infection. PMID:16517930

  10. Recurrent Osteomyelitis Caused by Infection with Different Bacterial Strains without Obvious Source of Reinfection

    PubMed Central

    Uçkay, Ilker; Assal, Mathieu; Legout, Laurence; Rohner, Peter; Stern, Richard; Lew, Daniel; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Bernard, Louis

    2006-01-01

    Recurrence of osteomyelitis by the same bacterial strain is well known. We report three patients with a second episode of osteomyelitis at the same site caused by different strains of bacteria from the original. Formerly infected and altered bone surface might present a region of diminished resistance for a new infection. PMID:16517930

  11. Bacterially Induced Dolomite Formation in the Presence of Sulfate Ions under Aerobic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Roman, M.; McKenzie, J. A.; Vasconcelos, C.; Rivadeneyra, M.

    2005-12-01

    The origin of dolomite remains a long-standing enigma in sedimentary geology because, although thermodynamically favorable, precipitation of dolomite from modern seawater does not occur. Experiments conducted at elevated temperatures (200 oC) indicated that the presence of small concentrations of sulfate ions inhibits the transformation of calcite to dolomite [1]. Indeed, sulfate ions appeared to inhibit dolomite formation above 2 mM concentration (versus 28 mM in modern seawater). Recently, culture experiments have demonstrated that sulfate-reducing bacteria mediate the precipitation of dolomite at Earth surface conditions in the presence of sustained sulfate ion concentrations [2,3]. Additionally, in a number of modern hypersaline environments, dolomite forms from solutions with high sulfate ion concentrations (2 to 70 times seawater). These observations suggest that the experimentally observed sulfate-ion inhibition [1] may not apply to all ancient dolomite formation. Here, we report aerobic culture experiments conducted at low temperatures (25 and 35 oC) and variable sulfate ion concentrations (0, 0.5, 1 and 2 x seawater values) using moderately halophilic bacteria, Halomonas meridiana. After an incubation period of 15 days, experiments at 35 oC with variable sulfate ion concentrations (0, 0.5 x and seawater values) contained crystals of Ca-dolomite and stochiometric dolomite. The experiment at 35 oC with 2 x seawater sulfate ion concentration produced dolomite crystals after 20 days of incubation. In a parallel set of experiments at 25 oC, precipitation of dolomite was observed after 25 days of incubation in cultures with variable sulfate ion concentrations (0, 0.5 x and seawater values). In the culture with 2 x seawater sulfate ion concentration, dolomite crystals were observed after 30 days. Our study demonstrates that halophilic bacteria (or heterotrophic microorganisms), which do not require sulfate ions for metabolism, can mediate dolomite precipitation

  12. Lysozyme-coated silver nanoparticles for differentiating bacterial strains on the basis of antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashraf, Sumaira; Chatha, Mariyam Asghar; Ejaz, Wardah; Janjua, Hussnain Ahmed; Hussain, Irshad

    2014-10-01

    Lysozyme, an antibacterial enzyme, was used as a stabilizing ligand for the synthesis of fairly uniform silver nanoparticles adopting various strategies. The synthesized particles were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, FTIR, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and TEM to observe their morphology and surface chemistry. The silver nanoparticles were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against several bacterial species and various bacterial strains within the same species. The cationic silver nanoparticles were found to be more effective against Pseudomonas aeruginosa 3 compared to other bacterial species/strains investigated. Some of the bacterial strains of the same species showed variable antibacterial activity. The difference in antimicrobial activity of these particles has led to the conclusion that antimicrobial products formed from silver nanoparticles may not be equally effective against all the bacteria. This difference in the antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles for different bacterial strains from the same species may be due to the genome islands that are acquired through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). These genome islands are expected to possess some genes that may encode enzymes to resist the antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles. These silver nanoparticles may thus also be used to differentiate some bacterial strains within the same species due to variable silver resistance of these variants, which may not possible by simple biochemical tests.

  13. Lysozyme-coated silver nanoparticles for differentiating bacterial strains on the basis of antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lysozyme, an antibacterial enzyme, was used as a stabilizing ligand for the synthesis of fairly uniform silver nanoparticles adopting various strategies. The synthesized particles were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, FTIR, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and TEM to observe their morphology and surface chemistry. The silver nanoparticles were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against several bacterial species and various bacterial strains within the same species. The cationic silver nanoparticles were found to be more effective against Pseudomonas aeruginosa 3 compared to other bacterial species/strains investigated. Some of the bacterial strains of the same species showed variable antibacterial activity. The difference in antimicrobial activity of these particles has led to the conclusion that antimicrobial products formed from silver nanoparticles may not be equally effective against all the bacteria. This difference in the antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles for different bacterial strains from the same species may be due to the genome islands that are acquired through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). These genome islands are expected to possess some genes that may encode enzymes to resist the antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles. These silver nanoparticles may thus also be used to differentiate some bacterial strains within the same species due to variable silver resistance of these variants, which may not possible by simple biochemical tests. PMID:25435831

  14. [Antibiotypes of bacterial strains isolated from patients at the intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Vega, S; Atencio, M P; Quintero, A; Sinclair, J; Toala, P

    1999-01-01

    The indiscriminate use of antibiotics in intensive care units has permitted the selection of multiple resistant bacterial strains in the hospital setting. Antibiograms present the sensitivity or resistance of these strains to drugs in current use. In this study, 100 bacterial strains were isolated from patients on medical and surgical ICU wards. The strains were identified by API-20E and sensitivity testing was performed by the E-test procedure. MIC were further analyzed with the WHONET software wich permits the identification of antibiotypes. Acinetobacter anitratus, Pseudomona aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae were the most resistant strains. Nine antibiotypes were determinated for A. Anitratus. Predominant strain presented antibiotypes with multiple resistance to ten antibiotics. P. aeruginosa presented 10 antibiotypes, the predominant one being CTX, CRO, CTX. Antibiotype determination allows phenotypic identification or resistance patterns in particular species as well as facilitates follow up and recognition of its epidemiological distribution. PMID:12442733

  15. Effects of Ensiling Fermentation and Aerobic Deterioration on the Bacterial Community in Italian Ryegrass, Guinea Grass, and Whole-crop Maize Silages Stored at High Moisture Content

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanbing; Nishino, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    The effects of storage period and aerobic deterioration on the bacterial community were examined in Italian ryegrass (IR), guinea grass (GG), and whole-crop maize (WM) silages. Direct-cut forages were stored in a laboratory silo for 3, 7, 14, 28, 56, and 120 d without any additives; live counts, content of fermentation products, and characteristics of the bacterial community were determined. 2,3-Butanediol, acetic acid, and lactic acid were the dominant fermentation products in the IR, GG, and WM silages, respectively. The acetic acid content increased as a result of prolonged ensiling, regardless of the type of silage crop, and the changes were distinctively visible from the beginning of GG ensiling. Pantoea agglomerans, Rahnella aquatilis, and Enterobacter sp. were the major bacteria in the IR silage, indicating that alcoholic fermentation may be due to the activity of enterobacteria. Staphylococcus sciuri and Bacillus pumilus were detected when IR silage was spoiled, whereas between aerobically stable and unstable silages, no differences were seen in the bacterial community at silo opening. Lactococcus lactis was a representative bacterium, although acetic acid was the major fermentation product in the GG silage. Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis, and Morganella morganii were suggested to be associated with the increase in acetic acid due to prolonged storage. Enterobacter cloacae appeared when the GG silage was spoiled. In the WM silage, no distinctive changes due to prolonged ensiling were seen in the bacterial community. Throughout the ensiling, Weissella paramesenteroides, Weissella confusa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae were present in addition to L. plantarum, L. brevis, and L. lactis. Upon deterioration, Acetobacter pasteurianus, Klebsiella variicola, Enterobacter hormaechei, and Bacillus gibsonii were detected. These results demonstrate the diverse bacterial community that evolves during ensiling and aerobic spoilage of IR, GG, and WM silages

  16. Effects of Ensiling Fermentation and Aerobic Deterioration on the Bacterial Community in Italian Ryegrass, Guinea Grass, and Whole-crop Maize Silages Stored at High Moisture Content.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanbing; Nishino, Naoki

    2013-09-01

    The effects of storage period and aerobic deterioration on the bacterial community were examined in Italian ryegrass (IR), guinea grass (GG), and whole-crop maize (WM) silages. Direct-cut forages were stored in a laboratory silo for 3, 7, 14, 28, 56, and 120 d without any additives; live counts, content of fermentation products, and characteristics of the bacterial community were determined. 2,3-Butanediol, acetic acid, and lactic acid were the dominant fermentation products in the IR, GG, and WM silages, respectively. The acetic acid content increased as a result of prolonged ensiling, regardless of the type of silage crop, and the changes were distinctively visible from the beginning of GG ensiling. Pantoea agglomerans, Rahnella aquatilis, and Enterobacter sp. were the major bacteria in the IR silage, indicating that alcoholic fermentation may be due to the activity of enterobacteria. Staphylococcus sciuri and Bacillus pumilus were detected when IR silage was spoiled, whereas between aerobically stable and unstable silages, no differences were seen in the bacterial community at silo opening. Lactococcus lactis was a representative bacterium, although acetic acid was the major fermentation product in the GG silage. Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis, and Morganella morganii were suggested to be associated with the increase in acetic acid due to prolonged storage. Enterobacter cloacae appeared when the GG silage was spoiled. In the WM silage, no distinctive changes due to prolonged ensiling were seen in the bacterial community. Throughout the ensiling, Weissella paramesenteroides, Weissella confusa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae were present in addition to L. plantarum, L. brevis, and L. lactis. Upon deterioration, Acetobacter pasteurianus, Klebsiella variicola, Enterobacter hormaechei, and Bacillus gibsonii were detected. These results demonstrate the diverse bacterial community that evolves during ensiling and aerobic spoilage of IR, GG, and WM silages

  17. How Fitness Reduced, Antimicrobial Resistant Bacteria Survive and Spread: A Multiple Pig - Multiple Bacterial Strain Model

    PubMed Central

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Toft, Nils; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo

    2014-01-01

    More than 30% of E. coli strains sampled from pig farms in Denmark over the last five years were resistant to the commonly used antimicrobial tetracycline. This raises a number of questions: How is this high level sustained if resistant bacteria have reduced growth rates? Given that there are multiple susceptible and resistant bacterial strains in the pig intestines, how can we describe their coexistence? To what extent does the composition of these multiple strains in individual pigs influence the total bacterial population of the pig pen? What happens to a complex population when antimicrobials are used? To investigate these questions, we created a model where multiple strains of bacteria coexist in the intestines of pigs sharing a pen, and explored the parameter limits of a stable system; both with and without an antimicrobial treatment. The approach taken is a deterministic bacterial population model with stochastic elements of bacterial distributions and transmission. The rates that govern the model are process-oriented to represent growth, excretion, and uptake from environment, independent of herd and meta-population structures. Furthermore, an entry barrier and elimination process for the individual strains in each pig were implemented. We demonstrate how competitive growth between multiple bacterial strains in individual pigs, and the transmission between pigs in a pen allow for strains of antimicrobial resistant bacteria to persist in a pig population to different extents, and how quickly they can become dominant if antimicrobial treatment is initiated. The level of spread depends in a non-linear way of the parameters that govern excretion and uptake. Furthermore, the sampling of initial distributions of strains and stochastic transmission events give rise to large variation in how homogenous and how resistant the bacterial population becomes. Most important: resistant bacteria are demonstrated to survive with a disadvantage in growth rate of well over 10

  18. Heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification of high-strength ammonium in anaerobically digested sludge by Alcaligenes faecalis strain No. 4.

    PubMed

    Shoda, Makoto; Ishikawa, Yoichi

    2014-06-01

    Alcaligenes faecalis strain No. 4 which is capable of heterogeneous nitrification and aerobic denitrification, was used to remove high-strength ammonium (approximately 1 g NH4(+)-N/l) from digested sludge, the product of an anaerobic digestion reactor, in which methane was produced from excess municipal sewage sludge. Repeated batch operations were conducted at 20°C and 30°C for 550 h, using a jar fermentor. The removal ratios of high-strength ammonium reached 90-100% within 24 h, and the average ammonium removal rate was 2.9 kg-N/m(3)/day, more than 200 times higher than that in conventional nitrification-denitrification processes. During these operations, the cell density was maintained at 10(8)-10(9) cells of A. faecalis strain No. 4/ml. At 3% NaCl in the digested sludge, strain No. 4 exhibited an ammonium removal rate of 3 kg-N/m(3)/day. PMID:24411668

  19. Aerobic degradation of bisphenol A by Achromobacter xylosoxidans strain B-16 isolated from compost leachate of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chang; Zeng, Guangming; Yuan, Li; Yu, Jian; Li, Jianbing; Huang, Guohe; Xi, Beidou; Liu, Hongliang

    2007-05-01

    A novel bacterium designated strain B-16 was isolated from the compost leachate of the municipal solid waste (MSW) in a laboratory reactor. This strain was identified as a gram-negative bacterium, Achromobacter xylosoxidans that could grow on bisphenol A (BPA, a representative endocrine disruptor) as a sole carbon source under aerobic condition. BPA-degrading characteristics of strain B-16 were investigated in liquid cultures. The results show that BPA degradation was influenced by several factors (e.g. inoculum size, substrate concentration, temperature and pH, etc). The half-lives, optimum temperature and pH were found to be 0.58-3.1d, 35 degrees C and 7.0, respectively. BPA-degrading activity and cell growth were inhibited at high substrate concentration. Metabolic intermediates detected during the degradation process were identified as p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and p-hydroquinone, respectively. Metabolic pathway of BPA degradation was proposed in this study. PMID:17291567

  20. Isolation and complementation of mutants of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 unable to grow aerobically on dinitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, C.P.; Cai, Y.; Cardemil, L.; Flores, E.; Hohn, B.; Murry, M.; Schmetterer, G.; Schrautemeier, B.; Wilson, R.

    1988-03-01

    Mutants of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 unable to grow aerobically on dinitrogen were isolated by mutagenesis with UV irradiation, followed by a period of incubation in yellow light and then by penicillin enrichment. A cosmid vector, pRL25C, containing replicons functional in Escherichia coli and in Anabaena species was constructed. DNA from wild-type Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 was partially digested with Sau3AI, and size-fractionated fragments about 40 kilobases (kb) in length were ligated into the phosphatase-treated unique BamHI site of pRL25C. A library of 1054 cosmid clones was generated in E. coli DH1 bearing helper plasmid pDS4101. A derivative of conjugative plasmid RP-4 was transferred to this library by conjugation, and the library was replicated to lawns of mutant Anabaena strains with defects in the polysaccharide layer of the envelopes of the heterocysts. Mutant EF116 was complemented by five cosmids, three of which were subjected to detailed restriction mapping; a 2.8-kb fragment of DNA derived from one of the cosmids was found to complement EF116. Mutant EF113 was complemented by a single cosmid, which was also restriction mapped, and was shown to be complemented by a 4.8-kb fragment of DNA derived from this cosmid.

  1. Aerobically respiring prokaryotic strains exhibit a broader temperature-pH-salinity space for cell division than anaerobically respiring and fermentative strains.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jesse P; Dobinson, Luke; Freeman, Kenneth; McKenzie, Ross; Wyllie, Dale; Nixon, Sophie L; Cockell, Charles S

    2015-09-01

    Biological processes on the Earth operate within a parameter space that is constrained by physical and chemical extremes. Aerobic respiration can result in adenosine triphosphate yields up to over an order of magnitude higher than those attained anaerobically and, under certain conditions, may enable microbial multiplication over a broader range of extremes than other modes of catabolism. We employed growth data published for 241 prokaryotic strains to compare temperature, pH and salinity values for cell division between aerobically and anaerobically metabolizing taxa. Isolates employing oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor exhibited a considerably more extensive three-dimensional phase space for cell division (90% of the total volume) than taxa using other inorganic substrates or organic compounds as the electron acceptor (15% and 28% of the total volume, respectively), with all groups differing in their growth characteristics. Understanding the mechanistic basis of these differences will require integration of research into microbial ecology, physiology and energetics, with a focus on global-scale processes. Critical knowledge gaps include the combined impacts of diverse stress parameters on Gibbs energy yields and rates of microbial activity, interactions between cellular energetics and adaptations to extremes, and relating laboratory-based data to in situ limits for cell division. PMID:26354829

  2. Aerobically respiring prokaryotic strains exhibit a broader temperature–pH–salinity space for cell division than anaerobically respiring and fermentative strains

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Jesse P.; Dobinson, Luke; Freeman, Kenneth; McKenzie, Ross; Wyllie, Dale; Nixon, Sophie L.; Cockell, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Biological processes on the Earth operate within a parameter space that is constrained by physical and chemical extremes. Aerobic respiration can result in adenosine triphosphate yields up to over an order of magnitude higher than those attained anaerobically and, under certain conditions, may enable microbial multiplication over a broader range of extremes than other modes of catabolism. We employed growth data published for 241 prokaryotic strains to compare temperature, pH and salinity values for cell division between aerobically and anaerobically metabolizing taxa. Isolates employing oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor exhibited a considerably more extensive three-dimensional phase space for cell division (90% of the total volume) than taxa using other inorganic substrates or organic compounds as the electron acceptor (15% and 28% of the total volume, respectively), with all groups differing in their growth characteristics. Understanding the mechanistic basis of these differences will require integration of research into microbial ecology, physiology and energetics, with a focus on global-scale processes. Critical knowledge gaps include the combined impacts of diverse stress parameters on Gibbs energy yields and rates of microbial activity, interactions between cellular energetics and adaptations to extremes, and relating laboratory-based data to in situ limits for cell division. PMID:26354829

  3. Volatile Emissions from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Mirror Bacterial Growth and Enable Distinction of Different Strains

    PubMed Central

    Trefz, Phillip; Koehler, Heike; Klepik, Klaus; Moebius, Petra; Reinhold, Petra; Schubert, Jochen K.; Miekisch, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Control of paratuberculosis in livestock is hampered by the low sensitivity of established direct and indirect diagnostic methods. Like other bacteria, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) emits volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Differences of VOC patterns in breath and feces of infected and not infected animals were described in first pilot experiments but detailed information on potential marker substances is missing. This study was intended to look for characteristic volatile substances in the headspace of cultures of different MAP strains and to find out how the emission of VOCs was affected by density of bacterial growth. One laboratory adapted and four field strains, three of MAP C-type and one MAP S-type were cultivated on Herrold’s egg yolk medium in dilutions of 10-0, 10-2, 10-4 and 10-6. Volatile substances were pre-concentrated from the headspace over the MAP cultures by means of Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME), thermally desorbed from the SPME fibers and separated and identified by means of GC-MS. Out of the large number of compounds found in the headspace over MAP cultures, 34 volatile marker substances could be identified as potential biomarkers for growth and metabolic activity. All five MAP strains could clearly be distinguished from blank culture media by means of emission patterns based on these 34 substances. In addition, patterns of volatiles emitted by the reference strain were significantly different from the field strains. Headspace concentrations of 2-ethylfuran, 2-methylfuran, 3-methylfuran, 2-pentylfuran, ethyl acetate, 1-methyl-1-H-pyrrole and dimethyldisulfide varied with density of bacterial growth. Analysis of VOCs emitted from mycobacterial cultures can be used to identify bacterial growth and, in addition, to differentiate between different bacterial strains. VOC emission patterns may be used to approximate bacterial growth density. In a perspective volatile marker substances could be used to diagnose MAP

  4. In Vitro Activities of Doripenem and Six Comparator Drugs against 423 Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacterial Isolates from Infected Diabetic Foot Wounds▿

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Ellie J. C.; Citron, Diane M.; Merriam, C. Vreni; Warren, Yumi A.; Tyrrell, Kerin L.; Fernandez, Helen T.

    2008-01-01

    Against 182 anaerobe and 241 aerobe strains obtained from diabetic foot infections, doripenem was the most active carbapenem against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MIC90, 2 μg/ml), more active than imipenem against Proteus mirabilis, and ertapenem was more active against Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. The MIC50 and MIC90 values were ≤0.125 μg/ml for methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and all streptococci and 0.25/1 for Bacteroides fragilis. PMID:18070958

  5. Pilot Screening to Determine Antimicrobial Synergies in a Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Strain Library.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si-Hyun; Park, Chulmin; Chun, Hye-Sun; Lee, Dong-Gun; Choi, Jae-Ki; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Cho, Sung-Yeon; Park, Sun Hee; Choi, Su-Mi; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Jin-Hong

    2016-07-01

    With the rise in multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infections, there has been increasing interest in combinations of ≥2 antimicrobial agents with synergistic effects. We established an MDR bacterial strain library to screen for in vitro antimicrobial synergy by using a broth microdilution checkerboard method and high-throughput luciferase-based bacterial cell viability assay. In total, 39 MDR bacterial strains, including 23 carbapenem-resistant gram-negative bacteria, 9 vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus, and 7 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis, were used to screen for potential antimicrobial synergies. Synergies were more frequently identified with combinations of imipenem plus trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole for carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in the library. To verify this finding, we tested 34 A. baumannii clinical isolates resistant to both imipenem and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole by the checkerboard method. The imipenem plus trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole combination showed synergy in the treatment of 21 (62%) of the clinical isolates. The results indicate that pilot screening for antimicrobial synergy in the MDR bacterial strain library could be valuable in the selection of combination therapeutic regimens to treat MDR bacterial infections. Further studies are warranted to determine whether this screening system can be useful to screen for the combined effects of conventional antimicrobials and new-generation antimicrobials or nonantimicrobials. PMID:26974861

  6. Pilot Screening to Determine Antimicrobial Synergies in a Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Strain Library

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Si-Hyun; Park, Chulmin; Chun, Hye-Sun; Choi, Jae-Ki; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Cho, Sung-Yeon; Park, Sun Hee; Choi, Su-Mi; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Jin-Hong

    2016-01-01

    With the rise in multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infections, there has been increasing interest in combinations of ≥2 antimicrobial agents with synergistic effects. We established an MDR bacterial strain library to screen for in vitro antimicrobial synergy by using a broth microdilution checkerboard method and high-throughput luciferase-based bacterial cell viability assay. In total, 39 MDR bacterial strains, including 23 carbapenem-resistant gram-negative bacteria, 9 vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus, and 7 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis, were used to screen for potential antimicrobial synergies. Synergies were more frequently identified with combinations of imipenem plus trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole for carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in the library. To verify this finding, we tested 34 A. baumannii clinical isolates resistant to both imipenem and trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole by the checkerboard method. The imipenem plus trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole combination showed synergy in the treatment of 21 (62%) of the clinical isolates. The results indicate that pilot screening for antimicrobial synergy in the MDR bacterial strain library could be valuable in the selection of combination therapeutic regimens to treat MDR bacterial infections. Further studies are warranted to determine whether this screening system can be useful to screen for the combined effects of conventional antimicrobials and new-generation antimicrobials or nonantimicrobials. PMID:26974861

  7. Increasing viscosity and yields of bacterial exopolysaccharides by repeatedly exposing strains to ampicillin.

    PubMed

    Li, Ou; Liu, Ao; Lu, Cui; Zheng, Dao-qiong; Qian, Chao-dong; Wang, Pin-Mei; Jiang, Xin-Hang; Wu, Xue-Chang

    2014-09-22

    A universal method to enhance productivity and viscosity of bacterial exopolysaccharides was developed. The technique was based on the principle that ampicillin can inhibit the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan, which shares a common synthetic pathway with that of bacterial exopolysaccharides. Serial passages of three typical representatives of bacterial EPS-producing strains, namely Sphingomonas elodea, Xanthomonas campestris, and Paenibacillus elgii, were subjected to ampicillin, which was used as a stressor and a mutagen. These mutant strains are advantageous over other strains because of two major factors. First, all of the resulting strains were almost mutants with increase in EPS productivity and viscosity. Second, isolated serial strains showed different levels of increase in EPS production and viscosity to satisfy the different requirements of practical applications. No differences were observed in the monosaccharide composition produced by the mutant and parent strains; however, high-viscosity mutant strains exhibited higher molecular weights. The results confirmed that the developed method is a controlled universal one that can improve exopolysaccharides productivity and viscosity. PMID:24906747

  8. The Mechanism for Type I Interferon Induction by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is Bacterial Strain-Dependent.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Kirsten E; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-08-01

    Type I interferons (including IFNαβ) are innate cytokines that may contribute to pathogenesis during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. To induce IFNβ, Mtb must gain access to the host cytosol and trigger stimulator of interferon genes (STING) signaling. A recently proposed model suggests that Mtb triggers STING signaling through bacterial DNA binding cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) in the cytosol. The aim of this study was to test the generalizability of this model using phylogenetically distinct strains of the Mtb complex (MTBC). We infected bone marrow derived macrophages with strains from MTBC Lineages 2, 4 and 6. We found that the Lineage 6 strain induced less IFNβ, and that the Lineage 2 strain induced more IFNβ, than the Lineage 4 strain. The strains did not differ in their access to the host cytosol and IFNβ induction by each strain required both STING and cGAS. We also found that the three strains shed similar amounts of bacterial DNA. Interestingly, we found that the Lineage 6 strain was associated with less mitochondrial stress and less mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the cytosol compared with the Lineage 4 strain. Treating macrophages with a mitochondria-specific antioxidant reduced cytosolic mtDNA and inhibited IFNβ induction by the Lineage 2 and 4 strains. We also found that the Lineage 2 strain did not induce more mitochondrial stress than the Lineage 4 strain, suggesting that additional pathways contribute to higher IFNβ induction. These results indicate that the mechanism for IFNβ by Mtb is more complex than the established model suggests. We show that mitochondrial dynamics and mtDNA contribute to IFNβ induction by Mtb. Moreover, we show that the contribution of mtDNA to the IFNβ response varies by MTBC strain and that additional mechanisms exist for Mtb to induce IFNβ. PMID:27500737

  9. The Mechanism for Type I Interferon Induction by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is Bacterial Strain-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Kirsten E.; Ernst, Joel D.

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferons (including IFNαβ) are innate cytokines that may contribute to pathogenesis during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. To induce IFNβ, Mtb must gain access to the host cytosol and trigger stimulator of interferon genes (STING) signaling. A recently proposed model suggests that Mtb triggers STING signaling through bacterial DNA binding cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) in the cytosol. The aim of this study was to test the generalizability of this model using phylogenetically distinct strains of the Mtb complex (MTBC). We infected bone marrow derived macrophages with strains from MTBC Lineages 2, 4 and 6. We found that the Lineage 6 strain induced less IFNβ, and that the Lineage 2 strain induced more IFNβ, than the Lineage 4 strain. The strains did not differ in their access to the host cytosol and IFNβ induction by each strain required both STING and cGAS. We also found that the three strains shed similar amounts of bacterial DNA. Interestingly, we found that the Lineage 6 strain was associated with less mitochondrial stress and less mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the cytosol compared with the Lineage 4 strain. Treating macrophages with a mitochondria-specific antioxidant reduced cytosolic mtDNA and inhibited IFNβ induction by the Lineage 2 and 4 strains. We also found that the Lineage 2 strain did not induce more mitochondrial stress than the Lineage 4 strain, suggesting that additional pathways contribute to higher IFNβ induction. These results indicate that the mechanism for IFNβ by Mtb is more complex than the established model suggests. We show that mitochondrial dynamics and mtDNA contribute to IFNβ induction by Mtb. Moreover, we show that the contribution of mtDNA to the IFNβ response varies by MTBC strain and that additional mechanisms exist for Mtb to induce IFNβ. PMID:27500737

  10. Use of colony-based bacterial strain typing for tracking the fate of Lactobacillus strains during human consumption

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) are important components of the healthy gut flora and have been used extensively as probiotics. Understanding the cultivable diversity of LAB before and after probiotic administration, and being able to track the fate of administered probiotic isolates during feeding are important parameters to consider in the design of clinical trials to assess probiotic efficacy. Several methods may be used to identify bacteria at the strain level, however, PCR-based methods such as Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) are particularly suited to rapid analysis. We examined the cultivable diversity of LAB in the human gut before and after feeding with two Lactobacillus strains, and also tracked the fate of these two administered strains using a RAPD technique. Results A RAPD typing scheme was developed to genetically type LAB isolates from a wide range of species, and optimised for direct application to bacterial colony growth. A high-throughput strategy for fingerprinting the cultivable diversity of human faeces was developed and used to determine: (i) the initial cultivable LAB strain diversity in the human gut, and (ii) the fate of two Lactobacillus strains (Lactobacillus salivarius NCIMB 30211 and Lactobacillus acidophilus NCIMB 30156) contained within a capsule that was administered in a small-scale human feeding study. The L. salivarius strain was not cultivated from the faeces of any of the 12 volunteers prior to capsule administration, but appeared post-feeding in four. Strains matching the L. acidophilus NCIMB 30156 feeding strain were found in the faeces of three volunteers prior to consumption; after taking the Lactobacillus capsule, 10 of the 12 volunteers were culture positive for this strain. The appearance of both Lactobacillus strains during capsule consumption was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Conclusion We have shown that genetic strain typing of the cultivable human gut microbiota can be evaluated using a high

  11. [Isolation, Identification and Nitrogen Removal Characteristics of a Heterotrophic Nitrification-Aerobic Denitrification Strain y3 Isolated from Marine Environment].

    PubMed

    Sun, Qing-hua; Yu, De-shuang; Zhang, Pei-yu; Lin, Xue-zheng; Xu, Guang-yao; Li, Jin

    2016-03-15

    A heterotrophic nitrification--aerobic denitrification bacterium named y3 was isolated from the sludge of Jiaozhou Bay using the enrichment medium with seawater as the matrix. It was identified as Pseudomonas sp. based on the morphological observation, physiological experiments and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA. The experiment results showed that the optimal carbon resource was sodium citrate, the optimal pH was 7.0, and the optimal C/N was 13. The strain could use NH₄Cl, NaNO₂ and KNO₃ as sole nitrogen source, and the removal efficiencies were 98.69%, 78.38% and 72.95% within 20 hours, respectively. There was no nitrate and nitrite accumulation during the heterotrophic nitrification process. Within 20 hours, the nitrogen removal efficiencies were 99.56%, 99.75% and 99.41%, respectively, in the mixed system with NO₃⁻-N: NO²⁻-N of 2:1, 1:1 and 1:2. When the NH₄⁺-N: NO₃⁻-N ratios were 2: 1 , 1: 1 , 1: 2, the nitrogen removal efficiencies were all 100% . When the NH₄⁺-N:NO₂⁻-N ratios were 2:1,1:1,1:2, the nitrogen removal efficiencies were 90.43%, 92.79% and 99.96%, respectively. They were higher than those with single nitrogen source. As a result, strain y3 had good nitrogen removal performance in high saline wastewater treatment. PMID:27337905

  12. Antibacterial effect of imipenem in vitro against important aerobic and anaerobic strains isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Klietmann, W; Focht, J; Nösner, K

    1987-08-01

    Imipenem is a thienamycin antibiotic of the first generation with broad antibacterial activity. It covers all gram-positive organisms (including Streptococcus faecalis) and gram-negative bacteria (including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia spp.) as well as Bacteroides fragilis and other Bacteroides species. In this comparative study the antimicrobic effect against 1020 gram-negative, 927 gram-positive and 352 anaerobic strains from fresh clinical isolates was tested and compared with that of other frequently used antibiotics. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined by means of a serial dilution test with micro standard plates. Within the group of gram-negative strains, imipenem was the most active antibiotic with a MIC90 of less than or equal to 0.25 mg/l for most isolates. Imipenem shows a broad spectrum of activity against gram-negative pathogenic bacteria including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., Proteus spp, Enterobacter spp., Citrobacter spp. and Serratia spp., and also covers resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp. and Alcaligenes faecalis. Imipenem also shows high inhibiting activity against gram-positive strains and anaerobic pathogens. PMID:3477332

  13. Isolation and analyses of uranium tolerant Serratia marcescens strains and their utilization for aerobic uranium U(VI) bioadsorption.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakshak; Acharya, Celin; Joshi, Santa Ram

    2011-08-01

    Enrichment-based methods targeted at uranium-tolerant populations among the culturable, aerobic, chemo-heterotrophic bacteria from the subsurface soils of Domiasiat (India's largest sandstone-type uranium deposits, containing an average ore grade of 0.1 % U(3)O(8)), indicated a wide occurrence of Serratia marcescens. Five representative S. marcescens isolates were characterized by a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed their relatedness to S. marcescens ATCC 13880 (≥99.4% similarity). Biochemical characteristics and random amplified polymorphic DNA profiles revealed significant differences among the representative isolates and the type strain as well. The minimum inhibitory concentration for uranium U(VI) exhibited by these natural isolates was found to range from 3.5-4.0 mM. On evaluation for their uranyl adsorption properties, it was found that all these isolates were able to remove nearly 90-92% (21-22 mg/L) and 60-70% (285-335 mg/L) of U(VI) on being challenged with 100 μM (23.8 mg/L) and 2 mM (476 mg/L) uranyl nitrate solutions, respectively, at pH 3.5 within 10 min of exposure. his capacity was retained by the isolates even after 24 h of incubation. Viability tests confirmed the tolerance of these isolates to toxic concentrations of soluble uranium U(VI) at pH 3.5. This is among the first studies to report uranium-tolerant aerobic chemoheterotrophs obtained from the pristine uranium ore-bearing site of Domiasiat. PMID:21887639

  14. Cloacal aerobic bacterial flora and absence of viruses in free-living slow worms (Anguis fragilis), grass snakes (Natrix natrix) and European Adders (Vipera berus) from Germany.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Volker; Mock, Ronja; Burgkhardt, Eileen; Junghanns, Anja; Ortlieb, Falk; Szabo, Istvan; Marschang, Rachel; Blindow, Irmgard; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth

    2014-12-01

    Disease problems caused by viral or bacterial pathogens are common in reptiles kept in captivity. There is no information available on the incidence of viral pathogens or the physiological cloacal bacterial flora of common free-living reptiles in Germany. Therefore, 56 free-living reptiles including 23 European adders (Vipera berus), 12 grass snakes (Natrix natrix) and 21 slow worms (Anguis fragilis) were investigated on the island Hiddensee in northeastern Germany. Pharyngeal and cloacal swabs were taken immediately after capture. Bacteriological examination was performed from the cloacal swabs to study the aerobic cloacal flora. Molecular biological examination included amplification of DNA or RNA from adeno-, rana- and ferlaviruses as well as culturing on Russell's viper heart cells for virus isolation. Salmonella spp. were isolated from European adders but not from the other reptiles examined. The minimal inhibitory concentration was determined from the isolated Salmonella spp. However, some potentially human pathogenic bacteria, such as Proteus vulgaris, Aeromonas hydrophila, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli were isolated. Viruses were not detected in any of the examined reptiles. To the authors' best knowledge, the present study is the first survey of viral pathogens in free-living snakes and slow worms in Germany and the first survey of cloacal aerobic bacterial flora of slow worms. PMID:24866333

  15. Chthonomonas calidirosea gen. nov., sp. nov., an aerobic, pigmented, thermophilic micro-organism of a novel bacterial class, Chthonomonadetes classis nov., of the newly described phylum Armatimonadetes originally designated candidate division OP10.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin C-Y; Dunfield, Peter F; Morgan, Xochitl C; Crowe, Michelle A; Houghton, Karen M; Vyssotski, Mikhail; Ryan, Jason L J; Lagutin, Kirill; McDonald, Ian R; Stott, Matthew B

    2011-10-01

    An aerobic, saccharolytic, obligately thermophilic, motile, non-spore-forming bacterium, strain T49(T), was isolated from geothermally heated soil at Hell's Gate, Tikitere, New Zealand. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, T49(T) is the first representative of a new class in the newly described phylum Armatimonadetes, formerly known as candidate division OP10. Cells of strain T49(T) stained Gram-negative and were catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. Cells possessed a highly corrugated outer membrane. The major fatty acids were 16 : 0, i17 : 0 and ai17 : 0. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 54.6 mol%. Strain T49(T) grew at 50-73 °C with an optimum temperature of 68 °C, and at pH 4.7-5.8 with an optimum growth pH of 5.3. A growth rate of 0.012 h(-1) was observed under optimal temperature and pH conditions. The primary respiratory quinone was MK-8. Optimal growth was achieved in the absence of NaCl, although growth was observed at NaCl concentrations as high as 2 % (w/v). Strain T49(T) was able to utilize mono- and disaccharides such as cellobiose, lactose, mannose and glucose, as well as branched or amorphous polysaccharides such as starch, CM-cellulose, xylan and glycogen, but not highly linear polysaccharides such as crystalline cellulose or cotton. On the basis of its phylogenetic position and phenotypic characteristics, we propose that strain T49(T) represents a novel bacterial genus and species within the new class Chthonomonadetes classis nov. of the phylum Armatimonadetes. The type strain of Chthonomonas calidirosea gen. nov., sp. nov. is T49(T) ( = DSM 23976(T) = ICMP 18418(T)). PMID:21097641

  16. Transport processes and mutual interactions of three bacterial strains in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpp, Christine; Lawrence, John R.; Hendry, M. Jim; Maloszewski, Pitor

    2010-05-01

    Transport processes of the bacterial strains Klebsiella oxytoca, Burkholderia cepacia G4PR-1 and Pseudomonas sp #5 were investigated in saturated column experiments to study the differences in transport characteristics and the mutual interactions of these strains during transport. Soil column experiments (114 mm long x 33 mm in diameter) were conducted with constant water velocities (3.9-5.7 cm/h) through a medium to coarse grained silica sand. All experiments were performed in freshly packed columns in quadruplicate. Chloride was used as tracer to determine the mean transit time, dispersivity and flow rate. It was injected as a pulse into the columns together with the bacterial strains suspended in artificial groundwater medium. In the first setup, each strain was investigated alone. In the second setup, transport processes were performed injecting two strains simultaneously. Finally, the transport characteristics were studied in successive experiments when one bacterium was resident on the sand grains prior to the introduction of the second strain. In all experiments the peak C/Co bacterial concentrations were attenuated with respect to the conservative tracer chloride and a well defined tailing was observed. A one dimensional mathematical model for advective-dispersive transport that accounts for irreversible and reversible sorption was used to analyze the bacterial breakthrough curves and tailing patterns. It was shown that the sorption parameters were different for the three strains that can be explained by the properties of the bacteria. For the species Klebsiella oxytoca and Burkholderia cepacia G4PR-the transport parameters were mostly in the same range independent of the experimental setup. However, Pseudomonas sp #5, which is a motile bacterium, showed differences in the breakthrough curves and sorption parameters during the experiments. The simultaneous and successive experiments indicated an influence on the reversible sorption processes when another

  17. Aerobic Degradation of Mercaptosuccinate by the Gram-Negative Bacterium Variovorax paradoxus Strain B4 ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Carbajal-Rodríguez, Irma; Stöveken, Nadine; Satola, Barbara; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Variovorax paradoxus strain B4 was isolated from soil under mesophilic and aerobic conditions to elucidate the so far unknown catabolism of mercaptosuccinate (MS). During growth with MS this strain released significant amounts of sulfate into the medium. Tn5::mob-induced mutagenesis was successfully employed and yielded nine independent mutants incapable of using MS as a carbon source. In six of these mutants, Tn5::mob insertions were mapped in a putative gene encoding a molybdenum (Mo) cofactor biosynthesis protein (moeA). In two further mutants the Tn5::mob insertion was mapped in the gene coding for a putative molybdopterin (MPT) oxidoreductase. In contrast to the wild type, these eight mutants also showed no growth on taurine. In another mutant a gene putatively encoding a 3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (paaH2) was disrupted by transposon insertion. Upon subcellular fractionation of wild-type cells cultivated with MS as sole carbon and sulfur source, MPT oxidoreductase activity was detected in only the cytoplasmic fraction. Cells grown with succinate, taurine, or gluconate as a sole carbon source exhibited no activity or much lower activity. MPT oxidoreductase activity in the cytoplasmic fraction of the Tn5::mob-induced mutant Icr6 was 3-fold lower in comparison to the wild type. Therefore, a new pathway for MS catabolism in V. paradoxus strain B4 is proposed: (i) MPT oxidoreductase catalyzes the conversion of MS first into sulfinosuccinate (a putative organo-sulfur compound composed of succinate and a sulfino group) and then into sulfosuccinate by successive transfer of oxygen atoms, (ii) sulfosuccinate is cleaved into oxaloacetate and sulfite, and (iii) sulfite is oxidized to sulfate. PMID:21075928

  18. Aerobic mineralization of 2,6-dichlorophenol by Ralstonia sp. strain RK1

    SciTech Connect

    Steinle, P.; Stucki, G.; Stettler, R.; Hanselmann, K.W.

    1998-07-01

    A new aerobic bacterium was isolated from the sediment of a freshwater pond close to a contaminated site at Amponville (France). It was enriched in a fixed-bed reactor fed with 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,6-DCP) as the sole carbon and energy source at pH 7.5 and room temperature. The degradation of 2,6-DCP followed Monod kinetics at low initial concentrations. At concentrations above 300 {micro}M, 2,6-DCP increasingly inhibited its own degradation. The base sequence of the 16S ribosomal DNA allowed us to assign the bacterium to the genus Ralstonia (formerly Alcaligenes). The substrate spectrum of the bacterium includes toluene, benzene, chlorobenzene, phenol, and all four ortho- and para-substituted mono- and dichlorophenol isomers. Substituents other than chlorine prevented degradation. The capacity to degrade 2,6-DCP was examined in two fixed-bed reactors. The microbial population grew on and completely mineralized 2,6-DCP at 2,6-DCP concentrations up to 740 {micro}M in continuous reactor culture supplied with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as an oxygen source. Lack of peroxide completely stopped further degradation of 2,6-DCP. Lowering the acid-neutralizing capacity of the medium to 1/10th the original capacity led to a decrease in the pH of the effluent from 7 to 6 and to a significant reduction in the degradation activity. A second fixed-bed reactor successfully removed low chlorophenol concentrations with hydraulic residence times of 8 to 30 min.

  19. [Construction and evaluation of an engineered bacterial strain for producing lipopeptide under anoxic conditions].

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao-long; Zhao, Feng; Shi, Rong-jiu; Ban, Yun-he; Zhou, Ji-dong; Han, Si-qin; Zhang, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Biosurfactant-facilitated oil recovery is one of the most important aspects of microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). However, the biosurfactant production by biosurfactant-producing microorganisms, most of which are aerobes, is severely suppressed due to the in-situ anoxic conditions within oil reservoirs. In this research, we successfully engineered a strain JD-3, which could grow rapidly and produce lipopeptide under anoxic conditions, by protoplast confusion using a Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain BQ-2 which produces biosurfactant aerobically, and a facultative anaerobic Pseudomonas stutzeri strain DQ-1 as parent strains. The alignment of 16S rDNA sequence (99% similarity) and comparisons of cell colony morphology showed that fusant JD-3 was closer to the parental strain B. amyloliquefaciens BQ-2. The surface tension of culture broth of fusant JD-3, after 36-hour cultivation under anaerobic conditions, decreased from initially 63.0 to 32.5 mN · m(-1). The results of thin layer chromatography and infrared spectrum analysis demonstrated that the biosurfactant produced by JD-3 was lipopeptide. The surface-active lipopeptide had a low critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 90 mg · L(-1) and presented a good ability to emulsify various hydrocarbons such as crude oil, liquid paraffin, and kerosene. Strain JD-3 could utilize peptone as nitrogen source and sucrose, glucose, glycerin or other common organics as carbon sources for anaerobic lipopeptide synthesis. The subculture of fusant JD-3 showed a stable lipopeptide-producing ability even after ten serial passages. All these results indicated that fusant JD-3 holds a great potential to microbially enhance oil recovery under anoxic conditions. PMID:26685621

  20. Effect of probiotic bacterial strains of Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, and Enterococcus on enteroaggregative Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yoshibumi; Kamiya, Shigeru; Hanawa, Tomoko; Fukuda, Minoru; Kawakami, Hayato; Takahashi, Hidemi; Yokota, Hiroyuki

    2010-02-01

    The effects of nine probiotic strains of Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, and Enterococcus on the growth, adhesion activity, and biofilm formation of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAggEC) were examined. The culture supernatant of the E. faecium strain, with or without pH adjustment to a neutral pH, had a strong bactericidal effect on EAggEC, including induction of membrane damage and cell lysis. Supernatants of the L. casei ss. casei and L. casei ss. rhamnosus strains also had a bactericidal effect on EAggEC, but this activity was abolished by pH adjustment to a neutral pH. No inhibitory effect of the culture supernatants of Bifidobacterium or E. faecalis strains was detected. Adhesion of EAggEC to intestinal epithelial cells was not inhibited by the bacterial strains tested. Two strains of L. casei enhanced EAggEC biofilm formation, which was characterized by increased bacterial proliferation. These results suggest that the three different bacterial species; Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, and Enterococcus, have different effects on EAggEC, and that further analysis is required for the practical use of these bacteria as probiotics against EAggEC infection. PMID:20054601

  1. Biodegradation of organochlorine pesticide endosulfan by bacterial strain Alcaligenes faecalis JBW4.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingfen; Zhu, Shaoyuan; Zhu, Lusheng; Xie, Hui; Su, Kunchang; Yan, Tongxiang; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jinhua; Wang, Fenghua; Sun, Fengxia

    2013-11-01

    The recently discovered endosulfan-degrading bacterial strain Alcaligenesfaecalis JBW4 was isolated from activated sludge. This strain is able to use endosulfan as a carbon and energy source. The optimal conditions for the growth of strain JBW4 and for biodegradation by this strain were identified, and the metabolic products of endosulfan degradation were studied in detail. The maximum level of endosulfan biodegradation by strain JBW4 was obtained using broth at an initial pH of 7.0, an incubation temperature of 40 degreeC and an endosulfan concentration of 100 mg/L. The concentration of endosulfan was determined by gas chromatography. Strain JBW4 was able to degrade 87.5% of alpha-endosulfan and 83.9% of beta-endosulfan within 5 days. These degradation rates are much higher than the previously reported bacterial strains. Endosulfan diol and endosulfan lactone were the major metabolites detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; endosulfan sulfate, which is a persistent and toxic metabolite, was not detected. These results suggested that A. faecalis JBW4 degrades endosulfan via a non-oxidative pathway. The biodegradation of endosulfan by A. faecalis is reported for the first time. Additionally, the present study indicates that strain JBW4 may have potential for the biodegradation of endosulfan residues. PMID:24552054

  2. 'Lascolabacter vaginalis' strain KHD1, a new bacterial species cultivated from human female genital tract.

    PubMed

    Diop, K; Mediannikov, O; Fournier, P-E; Raoult, D; Bretelle, F; Fenollar, F

    2016-09-01

    We present the major characteristics of 'Lascolabacter vaginalis' strain KHD1 (= CSUR P0109 = DSM 101752), a new member of the family Prevotellaceae that was cultivated from a vaginal sample of a 33-year-old woman with bacterial vaginosis. PMID:27358744

  3. Draft genome sequence of XANTHOMONAS ARBORICOLA strain 3004, causal agent of bacterial disease on barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report here the annotated genome sequence of XANTHOMONAS ARBORICOLA str. 3004, a Gram-negative phytopathogenic bacteria that includes several pathovars characterized by virulence specificity. Strain 3004 was isolated from barley leaves with symptoms of streak (bacterial blight) and also can infec...

  4. 'Olegusella massiliensis' strain KHD7, a new bacterial genus isolated from the female genital tract.

    PubMed

    Diop, K; Diop, A; Raoult, D; Fournier, P-E; Fenollar, F

    2016-07-01

    We report the main characteristics of 'Olegusella massiliensis' gen. nov., sp. nov., strain KHD7 (= CSUR P2268 = DSM 101849), a new member of the Coriobacteriaceae family isolated from the vaginal flora of a patient with bacterial vaginosis. PMID:27330814

  5. Limited diffusive fluxes of substrate facilitate coexistence of two competing bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Or, Dani; Smets, Barth F

    2008-04-01

    Soils are known to support a great bacterial diversity down to the millimeter scale, but the mechanisms by which such a large diversity is sustained are largely unknown. A feature of unsaturated soils is that water usually forms thin, poorly-connected films, which limit solute diffusive fluxes. It has been proposed, but never unambiguously experimentally tested, that a low substrate diffusive flux would impact bacterial diversity, by promoting the coexistence between slow-growing bacteria and their potentially faster-growing competitors. We used a simple experimental system, based on a Petri dish and a perforated Teflon membrane to control diffusive fluxes of substrate (benzoate) whilst permitting direct observation of bacterial colonies. The system was inoculated with prescribed strains of Pseudomonas, whose growth was quantified by microscopic monitoring of the fluorescent proteins they produced. We observed that substrate diffusion limitation reduced the growth rate of the otherwise fast-growing Pseudomonas putida KT2440 strain. This strain out-competed Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 in liquid culture, but its competitive advantage was less marked on solid media, and even disappeared under conditions of low substrate diffusion. Low diffusive fluxes of substrate, characteristic of many unsaturated media (e.g. soils, food products), can thus promote bacterial coexistence in a competitive situation between two strains. This mechanism might therefore contribute to maintaining the noncompetitive diversity pattern observed in unsaturated soils. PMID:18312376

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of a Human Cytomegalovirus Strain AD169 Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clone

    PubMed Central

    Ostermann, Eleonore; Spohn, Michael; Indenbirken, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The complete sequence of the human cytomegalovirus strain AD169 (variant ATCC) cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome (AD169-BAC, also known as HB15 or pHB15) was determined. The viral genome has a length of 230,290 bp and shows 52 nucleotide differences compared to a previously sequenced AD169varATCC clone. PMID:27034483

  7. Management of aerobic vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Tempera, Gianna; Furneri, Pio Maria

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic vaginitis is a new nonclassifiable pathology that is neither specific vaginitis nor bacterial vaginosis. The diversity of this microbiological peculiarity could also explain several therapeutic failures when patients were treated for infections identified as bacterial vaginosis. The diagnosis 'aerobic vaginitis' is essentially based on microscopic examinations using a phase-contrast microscope (at ×400 magnification). The therapeutic choice for 'aerobic vaginitis' should take into consideration an antibiotic characterized by an intrinsic activity against the majority of bacteria of fecal origin, bactericidal effect and poor/absent interference with the vaginal microbiota. Regarding the therapy for aerobic vaginitis when antimicrobial agents are prescribed, not only the antimicrobial spectrum but also the presumed ecological disturbance on the anaerobic and aerobic vaginal and rectal microbiota should be taken into a consideration. Because of their very low impact on the vaginal microbiota, kanamycin or quinolones are to be considered a good choice for therapy. PMID:21051843

  8. Variations of both bacterial community and extracellular polymers: the inducements of increase of cell hydrophobicity from biofloc to aerobic granule sludge.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Zhang, Sheng-Hua; Yu, Xin; Wei, Bo

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the inducements of increase of cell hydrophobicity from aerobic biofloc (ABF) and granular sludge (AGS), in this study, as the first time the hydrophilic and hydrophobic bacterial communities were analyzed independently. Meanwhile, the effect of extracellular polymers (EPS) on the cell hydrophobicity is also studied. Few Bacteroidetes were detected (1.35% in ABF and 3.84% in AGS) in hydrophilic bacteria, whereas they are abundant in the hydrophobic cells (47.8% and 43% for ABF and AGS, respectively). The main species of Bacteroidetes changed from class Sphingobacteria to Flavobacteria in AGS. On the other hand, EPS is directly responsible to cell hydrophobicity. For AGS, cell hydrophobicity was sharply decreased after EPS extraction. Both quantity and property of the extracellular protein are related to hydrophobicity. Our results showed the variation of cell hydrophobicity was resulted from variations of both bacterial population and EPS. PMID:21482465

  9. Emergence of potential superbug mycobacterium tuberculosis, lessons from new delhi mutant-1 bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Taha; Abraham, Suraj; Islam, Azharul

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that certain bacterial strains attain the New Delhi Metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (NDM-1) enzyme and become resistant to a broad range of antibiotics. Similarly, more dangerous "superbugs" of multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extensive drug resistant (XDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains are gradually emerging through rapid genetic mutation caused by prescription non-compliance or unsupervised indiscriminate use of anti-tubercular drugs or other antibiotics. Mycobacterium tuberculosis cases have been reported in highly susceptible population groups including the aboriginal communities of US and Canada. In Canada alone, the total number of reported tuberculosis cases has decreased over the past decade. However, there is a steady increase in HIV cases in certain communities including the aboriginal communities. Reintroduction of MDR/XDR strains of tuberculosis is possible in these susceptible communities, which in turn may pose serious public health situation. MDR/XDR strains of tuberculosis are virtually untreatable using current anti-tubercular medication protocols. Thus, MDR/XDR tuberculosis presents a grave global public health threat. The unpredictable genetic mechanism involved in generating MDR/XDR resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may pose greater challenges in developing appropriate treatment strategies. In this article, we briefly review potential genetic mechanism of emerging NDM-1 bacterial strains and draw a rationale parallel to the underlying genetic mechanism of MDR/XDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain development. PMID:23267308

  10. Detoxification of mercury pollutant leached from spent fluorescent lamps using bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghouti, Mohammad A; Abuqaoud, Reem H; Abu-Dieyeh, Mohammed H

    2016-03-01

    The spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs) are being classified as a hazardous waste due to having mercury as one of its main components. Mercury is considered the second most toxic heavy metal (arsenic is the first) with harmful effects on animal nervous system as it causes different neurological disorders. In this research, the mercury from phosphor powder was leached, then bioremediated using bacterial strains isolated from Qatari environment. Leaching of mercury was carried out with nitric and hydrochloric acid solutions using two approaches: leaching at ambient conditions and microwave-assisted leaching. The results obtained from this research showed that microwave-assisted leaching method was significantly better in leaching mercury than the acid leaching where the mercury leaching efficiency reached 76.4%. For mercury bio-uptake, twenty bacterial strains (previously isolated and purified from petroleum oil contaminated soils) were sub-cultured on Luria Bertani (LB) plates with mercury chloride to check the bacterial tolerance to mercury. Seven of these twenty strains showed a degree of tolerance to mercury. The bio-uptake capacities of the promising strains were investigated using the mercury leached from the fluorescent lamps. Three of the strains (Enterobacter helveticus, Citrobacter amalonaticus, and Cronobacter muytjensii) showed bio-uptake efficiency ranged from 28.8% to 63.6%. PMID:26725036

  11. [Isolation and characteristics of Panax ginseng autotoxin-degrading bacterial strains].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dong-Yue; Li, Yong; Ding, Wan-Long

    2013-06-01

    In this study, traditional plate culturing method was used to isolate autotoxin-degrading microbial strains, and which were then identified by 16S rDNA homological analysis and morphological characteristics. Furthermore, the growth and autotoxin-degrading efficiency of them were analyzed by liquid culturing method and GC-MS to illustrate their autotoxin-degradation characteristics. As a result, five bacterial strains having autotoxin-degrading activity were isolated from 6-years ginseng nonrhizospheric soil successfully, and which can growth successfully by taking autotoxins added artificially as carbon source in liquid culturing condition. Results indicated that it was feasible to isolate autotoxin-degrading bacteria from ginseng nonrhizospheric soil, and the isolated bacterial strains can be used to degrade autotoxins in soils once planted Panax ginseng. PMID:24010281

  12. Adherence to abiotic surface induces SOS response in Escherichia coli K-12 strains under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Costa, Suelen B; Campos, Ana Carolina C; Pereira, Ana Claudia M; de Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luiza; Júnior, Raphael Hirata; Rosa, Ana Cláudia P; Asad, Lídia M B O

    2014-09-01

    During the colonization of surfaces, Escherichia coli bacteria often encounter DNA-damaging agents and these agents can induce several defence mechanisms. Base excision repair (BER) is dedicated to the repair of oxidative DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by chemical and physical agents or by metabolism. In this work, we have evaluated whether the interaction with an abiotic surface by mutants derived from E. coli K-12 deficient in some enzymes that are part of BER causes DNA damage and associated filamentation. Moreover, we studied the role of endonuclease V (nfi gene; 1506 mutant strain) in biofilm formation. Endonuclease V is an enzyme that is involved in DNA repair of nitrosative lesions. We verified that endonuclease V is involved in biofilm formation. Our results showed more filamentation in the xthA mutant (BW9091) and triple xthA nfo nth mutant (BW535) than in the wild-type strain (AB1157). By contrast, the mutant nfi did not present filamentation in biofilm, although its wild-type strain (1466) showed rare filaments in biofilm. The filamentation of bacterial cells attaching to a surface was a consequence of SOS induction measured by the SOS chromotest. However, biofilm formation depended on the ability of the bacteria to induce the SOS response since the mutant lexA Ind(-) did not induce the SOS response and did not form any biofilm. Oxygen tension was an important factor for the interaction of the BER mutants, since these mutants exhibited decreased quantitative adherence under anaerobic conditions. However, our results showed that the presence or absence of oxygen did not affect the viability of BW9091 and BW535 strains. The nfi mutant and its wild-type did not exhibit decreased biofilm formation under anaerobic conditions. Scanning electron microscopy was also performed on the E. coli K-12 strains that had adhered to the glass, and we observed the presence of a structure similar to an extracellular matrix that depended on the

  13. Bacterial Selection during the Formation of Early-Stage Aerobic Granules in Wastewater Treatment Systems Operated Under Wash-Out Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Weissbrodt, David G.; Lochmatter, Samuel; Ebrahimi, Sirous; Rossi, Pierre; Maillard, Julien; Holliger, Christof

    2012-01-01

    Aerobic granular sludge is attractive for high-rate biological wastewater treatment. Biomass wash-out conditions stimulate the formation of aerobic granules. Deteriorated performances in biomass settling and nutrient removal during start-up have however often been reported. The effect of wash-out dynamics was investigated on bacterial selection, biomass settling behavior, and metabolic activities during the formation of early-stage granules from activated sludge of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) over start-up periods of maximum 60 days. Five bubble-column sequencing batch reactors were operated with feast-famine regimes consisting of rapid pulse or slow anaerobic feeding followed by aerobic starvation. Slow-settling fluffy granules were formed when an insufficient superficial air velocity (SAV; 1.8 cm s−1) was applied, when the inoculation sludge was taken from a WWTP removing organic matter only, or when reactors were operated at 30°C. Fast-settling dense granules were obtained with 4.0 cm s−1 SAV, or when the inoculation sludge was taken from a WWTP removing all nutrients biologically. However, only carbon was aerobically removed during start-up. Fluffy granules and dense granules were displaying distinct predominant phylotypes, namely filamentous Burkholderiales affiliates and Zoogloea relatives, respectively. The latter were predominant in dense granules independently from the feeding regime. A combination of insufficient solid retention time and of leakage of acetate into the aeration phase during intensive biomass wash-out was the cause for the proliferation of Zoogloea spp. in dense granules, and for the deterioration of BNR performances. It is however not certain that Zoogloea-like organisms are essential in granule formation. Optimal operation conditions should be elucidated for maintaining a balance between organisms with granulation propensity and nutrient removing organisms in order to form granules with BNR activities in short

  14. Decolorization of sulfonated azo dye Metanil Yellow by newly isolated bacterial strains: Bacillus sp. strain AK1 and Lysinibacillus sp. strain AK2.

    PubMed

    Anjaneya, O; Souche, S Yogesh; Santoshkumar, M; Karegoudar, T B

    2011-06-15

    Two different bacterial strains capable of decolorizing a highly water soluble azo dye Metanil Yellow were isolated from dye contaminated soil sample collected from Atul Dyeing Industry, Bellary, India. The individual bacterial strains Bacillus sp. AK1 and Lysinibacillus sp. AK2 decolorized Metanil Yellow (200 mg L(-1)) completely within 27 and 12h respectively. Various parameters like pH, temperature, NaCl and initial dye concentrations were optimized to develop an economically feasible decolorization process. The maximum concentration of Metanil Yellow (1000 mg L(-1)) was decolorized by strains AK2 and AK1 within 78 and 84 h respectively. These strains could decolorize Metanil Yellow over a broad pH range 5.5-9.0; the optimum pH was 7.2. The decolorization of Metanil Yellow was most efficient at 40°C and confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopy, TLC, HPLC and GC/MS analysis. Further, both the strains showed the involvement of azoreductase in the decolorization process. Phytotoxicity studies of catabolic products of Metanil Yellow on the seeds of chick pea and pigeon pea revealed much reduction in the toxicity of metabolites as compared to the parent dye. These results indicating the effectiveness of strains AK1 and AK2 for the treatment of textile effluents containing azo dyes. PMID:21470774

  15. Isolation of a Bacterial Strain Able To Degrade Branched Nonylphenol

    PubMed Central

    Tanghe, Tom; Dhooge, Willem; Verstraete, Willy

    1999-01-01

    Conventional enrichment of microorganisms on branched nonylphenol (NP) as only carbon and energy source yielded mixed cultures able to grow on the organic compound. However, plating yielded no single colonies capable, alone or in combination with other isolates, of degrading the NP in liquid culture. Therefore, a special approach was used, referred to as “serial dilution-plate resuspension,” to reduce culture complexity. In this way, one isolate, TTNP3, tentatively identified as a Sphingomonas sp., was found to be able to grow on NP in liquid culture. Remarkably, this isolate was able to be filtered through a 0.45-μm-pore-diameter filter. Moreover, isolate TTNP3 did not form visible colonies on mineral medium with NP, and it formed visible colonies on R2A agar only after a prolonged incubation of 1 week. High-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis of the culture media indicated that the strain starts the degradation of NP with a fission of the phenol ring and preferably uses the para isomer of NP and not the ortho isomer. No distinct accumulation of an intermediary product could be observed. PMID:9925611

  16. Aerobic Biodegradation of 2,4-Dinitroanisole by Nocardioides sp. Strain JS1661

    PubMed Central

    Fida, Tekle Tafese; Palamuru, Shannu; Pandey, Gunjan

    2014-01-01

    2,4-Dinitroanisole (DNAN) is an insensitive munition ingredient used in explosive formulations as a replacement for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Little is known about the environmental behavior of DNAN. There are reports of microbial transformation to dead-end products, but no bacteria with complete biodegradation capability have been reported. Nocardioides sp. strain JS1661 was isolated from activated sludge based on its ability to grow on DNAN as the sole source of carbon and energy. Enzyme assays indicated that the first reaction involves hydrolytic release of methanol to form 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP). Growth yield and enzyme assays indicated that 2,4-DNP underwent subsequent degradation by a previously established pathway involving formation of a hydride-Meisenheimer complex and release of nitrite. Identification of the genes encoding the key enzymes suggested recent evolution of the pathway by recruitment of a novel hydrolase to extend the well-characterized 2,4-DNP pathway. PMID:25281383

  17. Effect of TiO2 nanoparticles on aerobic granulation of algal-bacterial symbiosis system and nutrients removal from synthetic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Huang, Wenli; Zhang, Chao; Feng, Sisi; Zhang, Zhenya; Lei, Zhongfang; Sugiura, Norio

    2015-01-01

    The influence of TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) (10-50mg/L) on aerobic granulation of algal-bacterial symbiosis system was investigated by using two identical sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). Although little adverse effect was observed on their nitritation efficiency (98-100% in both reactors), algal-bacterial granules in the control SBR (Rc) gradually lost stability mainly brought about by algae growth. TiO2-NPs addition to RT was found to enhance the granulation process achieving stable and compact algal-bacterial granules with remarkably improved nitratation thus little nitrite accumulation in RT when influent TiO2-NPs⩾30mg/L. Despite almost similar organics and phosphorus removals obtained in both reactors, the stably high nitratation efficiency in addition to much stable granular structure in RT suggests that TiO2-NPs addition might be a promising remedy for the long-term operation of algal-bacterial granular system, most probably attributable to the stimulated excretion of extracellular polymeric substances and less filamentous TM7. PMID:25855527

  18. Effect of microstructure on anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour of bacterial cellulose hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xing; Shi, Zhijun; Lau, Andrew; Liu, Changqin; Yang, Guang; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2016-05-01

    This study is focused on anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour of bacterial cellulose (BC) hydrogel that can be strain-rate insensitive, hardening, softening, or strain-rate insensitive in various ranges of strain rate. BC hydrogel consists of randomly distributed nanofibres and a large content of free water; thanks to its ideal biocompatibility, it is suitable for biomedical applications. Motivated by its potential applications in complex loading conditions of body environment, its time-dependent behaviour was studied by means of in-aqua uniaxial tension tests at constant temperature of 37 °C at various strain rates ranging from 0.000 1s(-1) to 0.3s(-1). Experimental results reflect anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour that was not documented before. Micro-morphological observations allowed identification of deformation mechanisms at low and high strain rates in relation to microstructural changes. Unlike strain-rate softening behaviours in other materials, reorientation of nanofibres and kinematics of free-water flow dominate the softening behaviour of BC hydrogel at high strain rates. PMID:26952406

  19. Characterization of rumen bacterial strains isolated from enrichments of rumen content in the presence of propolis.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, Sílvia Cristina; Zeoula, Lucia Maria; do Prado, Odimari Pricila Pires; Arcuri, Pedro Braga; Forano, Evelyne

    2014-11-01

    Propolis presents many biological properties, including antibacterial activities, and has been proposed as an additive in ruminant nutrition. Twenty bacterial strains, previously isolated from enrichments of Brazilian cow rumen contents in the presence of different propolis extracts (LLOS), were characterized using phenotyping and 16S rRNA identification. Seven strains were assigned to Streptococcus sp., most likely S. bovis, and were all degrading starch. One amylolytic lactate-utilizing strain of Selenomonas ruminantium was also found. Two strains of Clostridium bifermentans were identified and showed proteolytic activity. Two strains were assigned to Mitsuokella jalaludinii and were saccharolytic. One strain belonged to a Bacillus species and seven strains were affiliated with Escherichia coli. All of the 20 strains were able to use many sugars, but none of them were able to degrade the polysaccharides carboxymethylcellulose and xylans. The effect of three propolis extracts (LLOS B1, C1 and C3) was tested on the in vitro growth of four representative isolates of S. bovis, E. coli, M. jalaludinii and C. bifermentans. The growth of S. bovis, E. coli and M. jalaludinii was not affected by the three propolis extracts at 1 mg ml(-1). C. bifermentans growth was completely inhibited at this LLOS concentration, but this bacterium was partially resistant at lower concentrations. LLOS C3, with the lower concentration of phenolic compounds, was a little less inhibitory than B1 and C1 on this strain. PMID:25172217

  20. Reduced aerobic capacity causes leaky ryanodine receptors that trigger arrhythmia in a rat strain artificially selected and bred for low aerobic running capacity

    PubMed Central

    Høydal, MA; Stølen, TO; Johnsen, AB; Alvez, M; Catalucci, D; Condorelli, G; Koch, LG; Britton, SL; Smith, GL; Wisløff, U

    2014-01-01

    Aim Rats selectively bred for inborn Low Capacity of Running (LCR) display a series of poor health indices where as rats selected for High Capacity of Running (HCR) display a healthy profile. We hypothesized that selection of low aerobic capacity over generations leads to a phenotype with increased diastolic Ca2+ leak that trigger arrhythmia. Methods We used rats selected for HCR (N=10) or LCR (N=10) to determine the effect of inborn aerobic capacity on Ca2+ leak and susceptibility of ventricular arrhythmia. We studied isolated FURA2/AM loaded cardiomyocytes to detect Ca2+-handling and function on an inverted epi-fluorescence microscope. To determine arrhythmogenicity we did a final experiment with electrical burst pacing in Langendorff perfused hearts. Results Ca2+-handling was impaired by reduced Ca2+ amplitude, prolonged time to 50% Ca2+ decay, and reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+-content. Impaired Ca2+ removal was influenced by reduced SR Ca2+ ATP-ase 2a (SERCA2a) function and increased sodium/Ca2+-exchanger (NCX) in LCR rats. Diastolic Ca2 leak was 87% higher in LCR rats. The leak was reduced by CaMKII inhibition. Expression levels of phosphorylated theorine-286 CaMKII levels and increased RyR2 phosphorylation at the Serine-2814 site mechanistically support our findings of increased leak in LCR. LCR rats had significantly higher incidence of ventricular fibrillation. Conclusion Selection of inborn low aerobic capacity over generations leads to a phenotype with increased risk of ventricular fibrillation. Increased phosphorylation of CaMKII at serine-2814 at the cardiac ryanodine receptor appears as an important mechanism of impaired Ca2+ handling and diastolic Ca2+ leak that results in increased susceptibility to ventricular fibrillation. PMID:24444142

  1. Water quality parameters and total aerobic bacterial and vibrionaceae loads in eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) from oyster gardening sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oyster gardening is a practice designed to restore habitat for marine life and to improve water quality. This study determined physical and chemical water quality parameters at two oyster gardening sites in the Delaware Inland Bays and compared them with total aerobic bacteria and Vibrionaceae conc...

  2. Rhodanobacter sp. Strain BPC1 in a Benzo[a]pyrene-Mineralizing Bacterial Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Kanaly, Robert A.; Harayama, Shigeaki; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2002-01-01

    A bacterial consortium which rapidly mineralizes benzo[a]pyrene when it is grown on a high-boiling-point diesel fuel distillate (HBD) was recovered from soil and maintained for approximately 3 years. Previous studies have shown that mobilization of benzo[a]pyrene into the supernatant liquid precedes mineralization of this compound (R. Kanaly, R. Bartha, K. Watanabe, and S. Harayama, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 66:4205-4211, 2000). In the present study, we found that sterilized supernatant liquid filtrate (SSLF) obtained from the growing consortium stimulated mineralization of benzo[a]pyrene when it was readministered to a consortium inoculum without HBD. Following this observation, eight bacterial strains were isolated from the consortium, and SSLF of each of them was assayed for the ability to stimulate benzo[a]pyrene mineralization by the original consortium. The SSLF obtained from one strain, designated BPC1, most vigorously stimulated benzo[a]pyrene mineralization by the original consortium; its effect was more than twofold greater than the effect of the SSLF obtained from the original consortium. A 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and biochemical tests identified strain BPC1 as a member of the genus Rhodanobacter, whose type strain, Rhodanobacter lindaniclasticus RP5557, which was isolated for its ability to grow on the pesticide lindane, is not extant. Strain BPC1 could not grow on lindane, benzo[a]pyrene, simple hydrocarbons, and HBD in pure culture. In contrast, a competitive PCR assay indicated that strain BPC1 grew in the consortium fed only HBD and benzo[a]pyrene. This growth of BPC1 was concomitant with growth of the total bacterial consortium and preceded the initiation of benzo[a]pyrene mineralization. These results suggest that strain BPC1 has a specialized niche in the benzo[a]pyrene-mineralizing consortium; namely, it grows on metabolites produced by fellow members and contributes to benzo[a]pyrene mineralization by increasing the bioavailability of

  3. ANItools web: a web tool for fast genome comparison within multiple bacterial strains

    PubMed Central

    Han, Na; Qiang, Yujun; Zhang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Early classification of prokaryotes was based solely on phenotypic similarities, but modern prokaryote characterization has been strongly influenced by advances in genetic methods. With the fast development of the sequencing technology, the ever increasing number of genomic sequences per species offers the possibility for developing distance determinations based on whole-genome information. The average nucleotide identity (ANI), calculated from pair-wise comparisons of all sequences shared between two given strains, has been proposed as the new metrics for bacterial species definition and classification. Results: In this study, we developed the web version of ANItools (http://ani.mypathogen.cn/), which helps users directly get ANI values from online sources. A database covering ANI values of any two strains in a genus was also included (2773 strains, 1487 species and 668 genera). Importantly, ANItools web can automatically run genome comparison between the input genomic sequence and data sequences (Genus and Species levels), and generate a graphical report for ANI calculation results. Conclusion: ANItools web is useful for defining the relationship between bacterial strains, further contributing to the classification and identification of bacterial species using genome data. Database URL: http://ani.mypathogen.cn/ PMID:27270714

  4. Lipopolysaccharide dependence of cyanophage sensitivity and aerobic nitrogen fixation in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Xu, X; Khudyakov, I; Wolk, C P

    1997-05-01

    Fox- mutants of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 are unable to fix dinitrogen in the presence of oxygen. A fragment of the DNA of Anabaena sp. was cloned by complementation of a spontaneous Fox-, cyanophage-resistant mutant, R56, and characterized. Random insertion of transposon Tn5 delimited the complementing DNA to a 0.6-kb portion of the cloned fragment. Sequencing of this region and flanking DNA showed one complete open reading frame (ORF) similar to the gene rfbP (undecaprenyl-phosphate galactosephosphotransferase) and two partial ORFs similar to genes rfbD (GDP-D-mannose dehydratase) and rfbZ (first mannosyl transferase), all of which are active in the synthesis of the O antigen unit of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) component of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria. In a transposon (Tn5-1087b)-induced, Fox-, cyanophage-resistant mutant, B14, the transposon was found within the same rfbP-like ORF. The three ORFs were insertionally inactivated with the omega cassette (P. Prentki and H. M. Krisch, Gene 29:303-313, 1984) or with Tn5::omega. Only the insertions in the rfbZ- and rfbP-like ORFs led to resistance to cyanophages A-1(L) and A-4(L) and to a Fox- phenotype. Electrophoretic analysis showed that interruption of the rfbZ- and rfbP-like ORFs resulted in a change in or loss of the characteristic pattern of the lengths of the LPS, whereas interruption of the rfbD-like ORF merely changed the distribution of the lengths of the LPS to one with a greater prevalence of low molecular weights. According to electron microscopy, interruption of the rfbP-like ORF may have led to aberrant deposition of the layers of the heterocyst envelope, resulting in increased leakage of oxygen into the heterocyst. The results suggest that modified LPS may prevent cyanophage infection of Anabaena sp. vegetative cells and the formation of a functional heterocyst envelope. PMID:9139904

  5. Identification of mosquito larvicidal bacterial strains isolated from north Sinai in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, two of the most toxic bacterial strains of Bacillus sphaericus against mosquito were identified with the most recent genetic techniques. The PCR product profiles indicated the presence of genes encoding Bin A, Bin B and Mtx1 in all analyzed strains; they are consistent with protein profiles. The preliminary bioinformatics analysis of the binary toxin genes sequence revealed that the open reading frames had high similarities when matched with nucleotides sequence in the database of other B. sphaericus strains. The biological activity of B. sphaericus strains varied according to growing medium, and cultivation time. The highest yield of viable counts, spores and larvicidal protein were attained after 5 days. Poly (P) medium achieved the highest yield of growth, sporulation, protein and larvicidal activity for all tested strains compared to the other tested media. The larvicidal protein produced by local strains (B. sphaericus EMCC 1931 and EMCC 1932) in P medium was more lethal against the 3rd instar larvae of Culex pipiens than that of reference strains (B. sphaericus 1593 and B. sphaericus 2297). The obtained results revealed that P medium was the most effective medium and will be used in future work in order to optimize large scale production of biocide by the locally isolated Bacillus sphaericus strains. PMID:22280528

  6. Make Histri: reconstructing the exchange history of bacterial and archaeal type strains.

    PubMed

    Verslyppe, Bert; De Smet, Wim; De Baets, Bernard; De Vos, Paul; Dawyndt, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Each transfer of a microbial strain between a Biological Resource Center (BRC) and an individual researcher or another BRC imposes a risk of contamination or human error. Such artifacts jeopardize the quality of scientific results. In order to trace back possible scientific discrepancies that can be linked to failure of authenticity of the biological material involved, we launched the 'Make Histri' project that aims at reconstructing the exchange history ('Histri') of all bacterial and archaeal type strains as can be deduced from the information contained in BRC online catalogs. A Histri, visualized as a rooted tree, contains all known strain numbers attributed to the various cultures of a given strain, annotated with additional information about each transfer of microbial material. PMID:21514082

  7. Comparison of two multimetal resistant bacterial strains: Enterobacter sp. YSU and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia ORO2.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Andrew; Vinayak, Anubhav; Benton, Cherise; Esbenshade, Aaron; Heinselman, Carlisle; Frankland, Daniel; Kulkarni, Samatha; Kurtanich, Adrienne; Caguiat, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    The Y-12 plant in Oak Ridge, TN, which manufactured nuclear weapons during World War II and the Cold War, contaminated East Fork Poplar Creek with heavy metals. The multimetal resistant bacterial strain, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Oak Ridge strain O2 (S. maltophilia O2), was isolated from East Fork Poplar Creek. Sequence analysis of 16s rDNA suggested that our working strain of S. maltophilia O2 was a strain of Enterobacter. Phylogenetic tree analysis and biochemical tests confirmed that it belonged to an Enterobacter species. This new strain was named Enterobacter sp. YSU. Using a modified R3A growth medium, R3A-Tris, the Hg(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), Au(III), Cr(VI), Ag(I), As(III), and Se(IV) MICs for a confirmed strain of S. maltophilia O2 were 0.24, 0.33, 5, 5, 0.25, 7, 0.03, 14, and 40 mM, respectively, compared to 0.07, 0.24, 0.8, 3, 0.05, 0.4, 0.08, 14, and 40 mM, respectively, for Enterobacter sp. YSU. Although S. maltophilia O2 was generally more metal resistant than Enterobacter sp. YSU, in comparison to Escherichia coli strain HB101, Enterobacter sp. YSU was resistant to Hg(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Au(III), Ag(I), As(III), and Se(IV). By studying metal resistances in these two strains, it may be possible to understand what makes one microorganism more metal resistant than another microorganism. This work also provided benchmark MICs that can be used to evaluate the metal resistance properties of other bacterial isolates from East Fork Poplar Creek and other metal contaminated sites. PMID:19688378

  8. A comparison of three bacterial strains for the remediation of town gas soils

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, N.E.; Akkineni, D.K.; Cutright, T.J.

    1995-12-31

    The contamination of soils from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is widespread. Although PAH contamination still occurs from current industrial processes, accidental spills, and leaking underground storage tanks, the main source of contamination is from abandoned town gas sites. To date there is a conservative estimate of 2500 town gas sites that require remediation. The most cost effective in-situ treatment for these sites is that of bioremediation. Experiments were conducted to compare the efficiencies of three bacterial strains for the remediation of an industrially PAH contaminated soil. Specifically, the efficiencies of Achromobacter sp., Mycobacterium sp., and Nocardia paraffinae were investigated. This paper will address the chemical specificity of each bacterial strains for the PAHs present.

  9. The Mosaic Genome of Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans Strain 2CP-C Suggests an Aerobic Common Ancestor to the Delta-Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sara H.; Wagner, Ryan D.; Arakaki, Adrian K.; Skolnick, Jeffrey; Kirby, John R.; Shimkets, Lawrence J.; Sanford, Robert A.; Löffler, Frank E.

    2008-01-01

    Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C is a versaphilic delta-Proteobacterium distributed throughout many diverse soil and sediment environments. 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis groups A. dehalogenans together with the myxobacteria, which have distinguishing characteristics including strictly aerobic metabolism, sporulation, fruiting body formation, and surface motility. Analysis of the 5.01 Mb strain 2CP-C genome substantiated that this organism is a myxobacterium but shares genotypic traits with the anaerobic majority of the delta-Proteobacteria (i.e., the Desulfuromonadales). Reflective of its respiratory versatility, strain 2CP-C possesses 68 genes coding for putative c-type cytochromes, including one gene with 40 heme binding motifs. Consistent with its relatedness to the myxobacteria, surface motility was observed in strain 2CP-C and multiple types of motility genes are present, including 28 genes for gliding, adventurous (A-) motility and 17 genes for type IV pilus-based motility (i.e., social (S-) motility) that all have homologs in Myxococcus xanthus. Although A. dehalogenans shares many metabolic traits with the anaerobic majority of the delta-Proteobacteria, strain 2CP-C grows under microaerophilic conditions and possesses detoxification systems for reactive oxygen species. Accordingly, two gene clusters coding for NADH dehydrogenase subunits and two cytochrome oxidase gene clusters in strain 2CP-C are similar to those in M. xanthus. Remarkably, strain 2CP-C possesses a third NADH dehydrogenase gene cluster and a cytochrome cbb3 oxidase gene cluster, apparently acquired through ancient horizontal gene transfer from a strictly anaerobic green sulfur bacterium. The mosaic nature of the A. dehalogenans strain 2CP-C genome suggests that the metabolically versatile, anaerobic members of the delta-Proteobacteria may have descended from aerobic ancestors with complex lifestyles. PMID:18461135

  10. Bacterial Cellulose Production by Acetobacter xylinum Strains from Agricultural Waste Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kongruang, Sasithorn

    Bacterial cellulose is a biopolysaccharide produced from the bacteria, Acetobacter xylinum. Static batch fermentations for bacterial cellulose production were studied in coconut and pineapple juices under 30 °C in 5-1 fermenters by using three Acetobacter strains: A. xylinum TISTR 998, A. xylinum TISTR 975, and A. xylinum TISTR 893. Experiments were carried out to compare bacterial cellulose yields along with growth kinetic analysis. Results showed that A. xylinum TISTR 998 produced a bacterial cellulose yield of 553.33 g/l, while A. xylinum TISTR 893 produced 453.33 g/l and A. xylinum TISTR 975 produced 243.33 g/l. In pineapple juice, the yields for A. xylinum TISTR 893, 975, and 998 were 576.66, 546.66, and 520 g/l, respectively. The strain TISTR 998 showed the highest productivity when using coconut juice. Morphological properties of cellulose pellicles, in terms of texture and color, were also measured, and the textures were not significantly different among treatments.

  11. Application of Whole-Genome Sequencing for Bacterial Strain Typing in Molecular Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    SenGupta, Dhruba J.; Cummings, Lisa A.; Land, Tyler A.; Hoogestraat, Daniel R.; Cookson, Brad T.

    2015-01-01

    Nosocomial infections pose a significant threat to patient health; however, the gold standard laboratory method for determining bacterial relatedness (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis [PFGE]) remains essentially unchanged 20 years after its introduction. Here, we explored bacterial whole-genome sequencing (WGS) as an alternative approach for molecular strain typing. We compared WGS to PFGE for investigating presumptive outbreaks involving three important pathogens: vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (n = 19), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (n = 17), and Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 15). WGS was highly reproducible (average ≤ 0.39 differences between technical replicates), which enabled a functional, quantitative definition for determining clonality. Strain relatedness data determined by PFGE and WGS roughly correlated, but the resolution of WGS was superior (P = 5.6 × 10−8 to 0.016). Several discordant results were noted between the methods. A total of 28.9% of isolates which were indistinguishable by PFGE were nonclonal by WGS. For A. baumannii, a species known to undergo rapid horizontal gene transfer, 16.2% of isolate pairs considered nonidentical by PFGE were clonal by WGS. Sequencing whole bacterial genomes with single-nucleotide resolution demonstrates that PFGE is prone to false-positive and false-negative results and suggests the need for a new gold standard approach for molecular epidemiological strain typing. PMID:25631811

  12. Application of whole-genome sequencing for bacterial strain typing in molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Salipante, Stephen J; SenGupta, Dhruba J; Cummings, Lisa A; Land, Tyler A; Hoogestraat, Daniel R; Cookson, Brad T

    2015-04-01

    Nosocomial infections pose a significant threat to patient health; however, the gold standard laboratory method for determining bacterial relatedness (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis [PFGE]) remains essentially unchanged 20 years after its introduction. Here, we explored bacterial whole-genome sequencing (WGS) as an alternative approach for molecular strain typing. We compared WGS to PFGE for investigating presumptive outbreaks involving three important pathogens: vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (n=19), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (n=17), and Acinetobacter baumannii (n=15). WGS was highly reproducible (average≤0.39 differences between technical replicates), which enabled a functional, quantitative definition for determining clonality. Strain relatedness data determined by PFGE and WGS roughly correlated, but the resolution of WGS was superior (P=5.6×10(-8) to 0.016). Several discordant results were noted between the methods. A total of 28.9% of isolates which were indistinguishable by PFGE were nonclonal by WGS. For A. baumannii, a species known to undergo rapid horizontal gene transfer, 16.2% of isolate pairs considered nonidentical by PFGE were clonal by WGS. Sequencing whole bacterial genomes with single-nucleotide resolution demonstrates that PFGE is prone to false-positive and false-negative results and suggests the need for a new gold standard approach for molecular epidemiological strain typing. PMID:25631811

  13. Interaction between selected bacterial strains and Arabidopsis halleri modulates shoot proteome and cadmium and zinc accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Panigati, Monica; Furini, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    The effects of plant–microbe interactions between the hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri and eight bacterial strains, isolated from the rhizosphere of A. halleri plants grown in a cadmium- and zinc-contaminated site, were analysed for shoot metal accumulation, shoot proteome, and the transcription of genes involved in plant metal homeostasis and hyperaccumulation. Cadmium and zinc concentrations were lower in the shoots of plants cultivated in the presence of these metals plus the selected bacterial strains compared with plants grown solely with these metals or, as previously reported, with plants grown with these metals plus the autochthonous rhizosphere-derived microorganisms. The shoot proteome of plants cultivated in the presence of these selected bacterial strains plus metals, showed an increased abundance of photosynthesis- and abiotic stress-related proteins (e.g. subunits of the photosynthetic complexes, Rubisco, superoxide dismutase, and malate dehydrogenase) counteracted by a decreased amount of plant defence-related proteins (e.g. endochitinases, vegetative storage proteins, and β-glucosidase). The transcription of several homeostasis genes was modulated by the microbial communities and by Cd and Zn content in the shoot. Altogether these results highlight the importance of plant-microbe interactions in plant protein expression and metal accumulation and emphasize the possibility of exploiting microbial consortia for increasing or decreasing shoot metal content. PMID:21357773

  14. The effect of anaerobic-aerobic and feast-famine cultivation pattern on bacterial diversity during poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production from domestic sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changli; Liu, Di; Qi, Yingjie; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Xi; Zhao, Min

    2016-07-01

    The main objective of this work was to investigate the influence of different oxygen supply patterns on poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) yield and bacterial community diversity. The anaerobic-aerobic (A/O) sequencing batch reactors (SBR1) and feast-famine (F/F) SBR2 were used to cultivate activated sludge to produce PHB. The mixed microbial communities were collected and analyzed after 3 months cultivation. The PHB maximum yield was 64 wt% in SBR1 and 53 wt% in SBR2. Pyrosequencing analysis 16S rRNA gene of two microbial communities indicated there were nine and four bacterial phyla in SBR1 and SBR2, respectively. Specifically, Proteobacteria (36.4 % of the total bacterial community), Actinobacteria (19.7 %), Acidobacteria (14.1 %), Firmicutes (4.4 %), Bacteroidetes (1.7 %), Cyanobacteria/Chloroplast (1.5 %), TM7 (0.8 %), Gemmatimonadetes (0.2 %), and Nitrospirae (0.1 %) were present in SBR1. Proteobacteria (94.2 %), Bacteroidetes (2.9 %), Firmicutes (1.9 %), and Actinobacteria (0.7 %) were present in SBR2. Our results indicated the SBR1 fermentation system was more stable than that of SBR2 for PHB accumulation. PMID:26996908

  15. Terminal Oxidases of Bacillus subtilis Strain 168: One Quinol Oxidase, Cytochrome aa3 or Cytochrome bd, Is Required for Aerobic Growth

    PubMed Central

    Winstedt, Lena; von Wachenfeldt, Claes

    2000-01-01

    The gram-positive endospore-forming bacterium Bacillus subtilis has, under aerobic conditions, a branched respiratory system comprising one quinol oxidase branch and one cytochrome oxidase branch. The system terminates in one of four alternative terminal oxidases. Cytochrome caa3 is a cytochrome c oxidase, whereas cytochrome bd and cytochrome aa3 are quinol oxidases. A fourth terminal oxidase, YthAB, is a putative quinol oxidase predicted from DNA sequence analysis. None of the terminal oxidases are, by themselves, essential for growth. However, one quinol oxidase (cytochrome aa3 or cytochrome bd) is required for aerobic growth of B. subtilis strain 168. Data indicating that cytochrome aa3 is the major oxidase used by exponentially growing cells in minimal and rich medium are presented. We show that one of the two heme-copper oxidases, cytochrome caa3 or cytochrome aa3, is required for efficient sporulation of B. subtilis strain 168 and that deletion of YthAB in a strain lacking cytochrome aa3 makes the strain sporulation deficient. PMID:11073895

  16. Vertical and Horizontal Variations in the Physiological Diversity of the Aerobic Chemoheterotrophic Bacterial Microflora in Deep Southeast Coastal Plain Subsurface Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Balkwill, D. L.; Fredrickson, J. K.; Thomas, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Aerobic chemoheterotrophic bacteria were isolated from surface soils and coastal plain subsurface (including deep aquifer) sediments (depths to 265 m) at a study site near Aiken, S.C., by plating on concentrated and dilute media. Morphologically distinct colonies were purified, and their responses to 21 selected physiological tests were determined. These isolates were quite diverse; 626 physiologically distinct types (i.e., types with a unique pattern of responses to the 21 tests) were detected among the 1,112 isolates obtained. Physiologically distinct types were isolated on concentrated and dilute media (only 11% overlap between the groups); isolates from surface soils and subsurface sediments were also quite different (only 3% overlap). The surface soil isolates more readily utilized all but 1 of 12 carbon sources offered, and a significantly larger proportion of them hydrolyzed esculin and gelatin. Only 4% of the subsurface isolates fermented glucose, even though 82% of them could use it aerobically. l-Malate and d-gluconate were utilized by at least 75% of the subsurface isolates, and seven other carbon sources were used by at least 40% of them. Subsurface isolates from different geological formations (depths) and, to a lesser extent, from the same geological formation at different boreholes differed distinctly in their group responses to certain physiological tests. Moreover, sediments from different depths and boreholes contained physiologically distinct types of bacteria. Thus, considerable bacterial diversity was observed in coastal plain subsurface sediments, even within defined geological formations. PMID:16347902

  17. Evaluation of wastewater treatment in a novel anoxic-aerobic algal-bacterial photobioreactor with biomass recycling through carbon and nitrogen mass balances.

    PubMed

    Alcántara, Cynthia; Domínguez, Jesús M; García, Dimas; Blanco, Saúl; Pérez, Rebeca; García-Encina, Pedro A; Muñoz, Raúl

    2015-09-01

    Algal-bacterial symbiosis, implemented in an innovative anoxic-aerobic photobioreactor configuration with biomass recycling, supported an efficient removal of total organic carbon (86-90%), inorganic carbon (57-98%) and total nitrogen (68-79%) during synthetic wastewater treatment at a hydraulic and sludge retention times of 2 days and 20 days, respectively. The availability of inorganic carbon in the photobioreactor, determined by its supply in the wastewater and microalgae activity, governed the extent of nitrogen removal by assimilation or nitrification-denitrification. Unexpectedly, nitrate production was negligible despite the high dissolved oxygen concentrations, denitrification being only based on nitrite reduction. Biomass recycling resulted in the enrichment of rapidly settling algal flocs, which supported effluent total suspended solid concentrations below the European Union maximum discharge limits. Finally, the maximum nitrous oxide emissions recorded were far below the emission factors reported for wastewater treatment plants, confirming the environmental sustainability of this innovative photobioreactor in terms of global warming impact. PMID:25989093

  18. Regional analysis of potential polychlorinated biphenyl degrading bacterial strains from China.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Jianjun; Yu, Xurun; Zhang, Jing; Xiong, Ai-Sheng; Xiong, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), the chlorinated derivatives of biphenyl, are one of the most prevalent, highly toxic and persistent groups of contaminants in the environment. The objective of this study was to investigate the biodegradation of PCBs in northeastern (Heilongjiang Province), northern (Shanxi Province) and eastern China (Shanghai municipality). From these areas, nine soil samples were screened for PCB-degrading bacteria using a functional complementarity method. The genomic 16S rDNA locus was amplified and the products were sequenced to identify the bacterial genera. Seven Pseudomonas strains were selected to compare the capacity of bacteria from different regions to degrade biphenyl by HPLC. Compared to the biphenyl content in controls of 100%, the biphenyl content went down to 3.7% for strain P9-324, 36.3% for P2-11, and 20.0% for the other five strains. These results indicate that a longer processing time led to more degradation of biphenyl. PCB-degrading bacterial strains are distributed differently in different regions of China. PMID:27140507

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Two Strains of Xanthomonas arboricola Isolated from Prunus persica Which Are Dissimilar to Strains That Cause Bacterial Spot Disease on Prunus spp.

    PubMed

    Garita-Cambronero, Jerson; Palacio-Bielsa, Ana; López, María M; Cubero, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequences of two strains of Xanthomonas arboricola, isolated from asymptomatic peach trees in Spain, are reported here. These strains are avirulent and do not belong to the same phylogroup as X. arboricola pv. pruni, a causal agent of bacterial spot disease of stone fruits and almonds. PMID:27609931

  20. Exposure to bacterial endotoxin generates a distinct strain of α-synuclein fibril.

    PubMed

    Kim, Changyoun; Lv, Guohua; Lee, Jun Sung; Jung, Byung Chul; Masuda-Suzukake, Masami; Hong, Chul-Suk; Valera, Elvira; Lee, He-Jin; Paik, Seung R; Hasegawa, Masato; Masliah, Eliezer; Eliezer, David; Lee, Seung-Jae

    2016-01-01

    A single amyloidogenic protein is implicated in multiple neurological diseases and capable of generating a number of aggregate "strains" with distinct structures. Among the amyloidogenic proteins, α-synuclein generates multiple patterns of proteinopathies in a group of diseases, such as Parkinson disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and multiple system atrophy (MSA). However, the link between specific conformations and distinct pathologies, the key concept of the strain hypothesis, remains elusive. Here we show that in the presence of bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), α-synuclein generated a self-renewable, structurally distinct fibril strain that consistently induced specific patterns of synucleinopathies in mice. These results suggest that amyloid fibrils with self-renewable structures cause distinct types of proteinopathies despite the identical primary structure and that exposure to exogenous pathogens may contribute to the diversity of synucleinopathies. PMID:27488222

  1. A comprehensive study on the behavior of a novel bacterial strain Acinetobacter guillouiae for bioremediation of divalent copper.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Subhajit; Gangadhar, Gayathri; Raghuvanshi, Smita; Gupta, Suresh

    2015-09-01

    Biological methods have been successfully used to mitigate heavy metal pollution problem in wastewater. The present study was aimed towards isolation of a novel indigenous bacterial strain, Acinetobacter guillouiae from activated sludge and its subsequent application in remediation of copper (Cu(2+)) from aqueous solution. Kinetic study of bioremediation was performed for initial Cu(2+) concentrations ranging from 40 to 150 mg L(-1). Optimum values of nutrient dosage, pH, macronutrients [Nitrogen (N)-Phosphorus (P)-Potassium (K)] dosage, aerobic and facultative anaerobic conditions, temperature, and inoculum volume were determined by conducting separate batch bioremediation studies at 80 mg L(-1) initial concentration of Cu(2+). Kinetic study showed that A. guillouiae removed 98.7 % Cu(2+) for 80 mg L(-1) initial concentration of Cu(2+) after 16 h at an optimum solution pH of 7.0. Results also revealed that A. guillouiae showed maximum growth at double the standard composition of N, P and standard composition of K in nutrient dosage. Experimental data obtained in present study were utilized to validate different growth kinetic models such as Monod, Powell, Haldane, Luong, and Edwards. Growth kinetics of A. guillouiae was better understood by Luong model (R (2) = 0.97). Higher values of coefficient of determination (R (2) = 0.97-0.99) confirmed the suitability of the three-half-order kinetic model for representing the Cu(2+) bioremediation. A. guillouiae showed a robust removal mechanism for the bioremediation of Cu(2+). PMID:26017755

  2. A Catalytic DNA Activated by a Specific Strain of Bacterial Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhifa; Wu, Zaisheng; Chang, Dingran; Zhang, Wenqing; Tram, Kha; Lee, Christine; Kim, Peter; Salena, Bruno J; Li, Yingfu

    2016-02-01

    Pathogenic strains of bacteria are known to cause various infectious diseases and there is a growing demand for molecular probes that can selectively recognize them. Here we report a special DNAzyme (catalytic DNA), RFD-CD1, that shows exquisite specificity for a pathogenic strain of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile). RFD-CD1 was derived by an in vitro selection approach where a random-sequence DNA library was allowed to react with an unpurified molecular mixture derived from this strain of C. difficle, coupled with a subtractive selection strategy to eliminate cross-reactivities to unintended C. difficile strains and other bacteria species. RFD-CD1 is activated by a truncated version of TcdC, a transcription factor, that is unique to the targeted strain of C. difficle. Our study demonstrates for the first time that in vitro selection offers an effective approach for deriving functional nucleic acid probes that are capable of achieving strain-specific recognition of bacterial pathogens. PMID:26676768

  3. Effects of Aerobic Exercise Training on Cardiac Renin-Angiotensin System in an Obese Zucker Rat Strain

    PubMed Central

    Barretti, Diego Lopes Mendes; Magalhães, Flávio de Castro; Fernandes, Tiago; do Carmo, Everton Crivoi; Rosa, Kaleizu Teodoro; Irigoyen, Maria Claudia; Negrão, Carlos Eduardo; Oliveira, Edilamar Menezes

    2012-01-01

    Objective Obesity and renin angiotensin system (RAS) hyperactivity are profoundly involved in cardiovascular diseases, however aerobic exercise training (EXT) can prevent obesity and cardiac RAS activation. The study hypothesis was to investigate whether obesity and its association with EXT alter the systemic and cardiac RAS components in an obese Zucker rat strain. Methods The rats were divided into the following groups: Lean Zucker rats (LZR); lean Zucker rats plus EXT (LZR+EXT); obese Zucker rats (OZR) and obese Zucker rats plus EXT (OZR+EXT). EXT consisted of 10 weeks of 60-min swimming sessions, 5 days/week. At the end of the training protocol heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), cardiac hypertrophy (CH) and function, local and systemic components of RAS were evaluated. Also, systemic glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol and its LDL and HDL fractions were measured. Results The resting HR decreased (∼12%) for both LZR+EXT and OZR+EXT. However, only the LZR+EXT reached significance (p<0.05), while a tendency was found for OZR versus OZR+EXT (p = 0.07). In addition, exercise reduced (57%) triglycerides and (61%) LDL in the OZR+EXT. The systemic angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) activity did not differ regardless of obesity and EXT, however, the OZR and OZR+EXT showed (66%) and (42%), respectively, less angiotensin II (Ang II) plasma concentration when compared with LZR. Furthermore, the results showed that EXT in the OZR prevented increase in CH, cardiac ACE activity, Ang II and AT2 receptor caused by obesity. In addition, exercise augmented cardiac ACE2 in both training groups. Conclusion Despite the unchanged ACE and lower systemic Ang II levels in obesity, the cardiac RAS was increased in OZR and EXT in obese Zucker rats reduced some of the cardiac RAS components and prevented obesity-related CH. These results show that EXT prevented the heart RAS hyperactivity and cardiac maladaptive morphological alterations in obese Zucker rats

  4. Cockroaches as a Source of High Bacterial Pathogens with Multidrug Resistant Strains in Gondar Town, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Huruy, Kahsay; Muluye, Dagnachew; Feleke, Tigist; G/Silassie, Fisha; Ayalew, Getenet; Nagappan, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cockroaches are source of bacterial infections and this study was aimed to assess bacterial isolates and their antimicrobial profiles from cockroaches in Gondar town, Ethiopia. Methods. A total of 60 cockroaches were collected from March 1 to May 30, 2014, in Gondar town. Bacterial species were isolated from external and internal parts of cockroaches. Disk diffusion method was used to determine antibiotic susceptibility patterns. Data were entered and analyzed by using SPSS version 20; P values <0.005 were considered as statistically significant. Results. Of 181 identified bacteria species, 110 (60.8%) and 71 (39.2%) were identified from external and internal parts of cockroaches, respectively. Klebsiella pneumoniae 32 (17.7%), Escherichia coli 29 (16%), and Citrobacter spp. 27 (15%) were the predominant isolates. High resistance rate was observed to cotrimoxazole, 60 (33.1%), and least resistance rate was noted to ciprofloxacin, 2 (1.1%). Additionally, 116 (64.1%) of the isolates were MDR strains; Salmonella spp. were the leading MDR isolates (100%) followed by Enterobacter (90.5%) and Shigella spp. (76.9%). Conclusion. Cockroaches are the potential source of bacteria pathogens with multidrug resistant strains and hence effective preventive and control measures are required to minimize cockroach related infections. PMID:27340653

  5. Cockroaches as a Source of High Bacterial Pathogens with Multidrug Resistant Strains in Gondar Town, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Moges, Feleke; Eshetie, Setegn; Endris, Mengistu; Huruy, Kahsay; Muluye, Dagnachew; Feleke, Tigist; G/Silassie, Fisha; Ayalew, Getenet; Nagappan, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cockroaches are source of bacterial infections and this study was aimed to assess bacterial isolates and their antimicrobial profiles from cockroaches in Gondar town, Ethiopia. Methods. A total of 60 cockroaches were collected from March 1 to May 30, 2014, in Gondar town. Bacterial species were isolated from external and internal parts of cockroaches. Disk diffusion method was used to determine antibiotic susceptibility patterns. Data were entered and analyzed by using SPSS version 20; P values <0.005 were considered as statistically significant. Results. Of 181 identified bacteria species, 110 (60.8%) and 71 (39.2%) were identified from external and internal parts of cockroaches, respectively. Klebsiella pneumoniae 32 (17.7%), Escherichia coli 29 (16%), and Citrobacter spp. 27 (15%) were the predominant isolates. High resistance rate was observed to cotrimoxazole, 60 (33.1%), and least resistance rate was noted to ciprofloxacin, 2 (1.1%). Additionally, 116 (64.1%) of the isolates were MDR strains; Salmonella spp. were the leading MDR isolates (100%) followed by Enterobacter (90.5%) and Shigella spp. (76.9%). Conclusion. Cockroaches are the potential source of bacteria pathogens with multidrug resistant strains and hence effective preventive and control measures are required to minimize cockroach related infections. PMID:27340653

  6. Bacterial cell wall-induced arthritis: chemical composition and tissue distribution of four Lactobacillus strains.

    PubMed

    Simelyte, E; Rimpiläinen, M; Lehtonen, L; Zhang, X; Toivanen, P

    2000-06-01

    To study what determines the arthritogenicity of bacterial cell walls, cell wall-induced arthritis in the rat was applied, using four strains of Lactobacillus. Three of the strains used proved to induce chronic arthritis in the rat; all were Lactobacillus casei. The cell wall of Lactobacillus fermentum did not induce chronic arthritis. All arthritogenic bacterial cell walls had the same peptidoglycan structure, whereas that of L. fermentum was different. Likewise, all arthritogenic cell walls were resistant to lysozyme degradation, whereas the L. fermentum cell wall was lysozyme sensitive. Muramic acid was observed in the liver, spleen, and lymph nodes in considerably larger amounts after injection of an arthritogenic L. casei cell wall than following injection of a nonarthritogenic L. fermentum cell wall. The L. casei cell wall also persisted in the tissues longer than the L. fermentum cell wall. The present results, taken together with those published previously, underline the possibility that the chemical structure of peptidoglycan is important in determining the arthritogenicity of the bacterial cell wall. PMID:10816508

  7. The killing activity of microwaves on some non-sporogenic and sporogenic medically important bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Najdovski, L; Dragas, A Z; Kotnik, V

    1991-12-01

    The killing activity of microwaves of 2450 MHz frequency and 325 W, 650 W and 1400 W power on some bacterial strains was investigated. Vegetative strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes Group A, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecalis and spores of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillis stearothermophilus in aqueous suspensions were exposed to 325 W and 650 W waves for different lengths of time. Enterococcus faecalis and spores of B. subtilis and B. stearothermophilus were exposed additionally to 1400 W waves in aqueous and 'dried' suspensions. Vegetative bacteria were promptly killed in 5 min or less, E. faecalis being slightly more resistant. Bacterial spores were only killed in aqueous suspension when a 1400 W setting was used for 10 to 20 min. Bacterial spores adhering to the tube walls after the aqueous suspension was poured out were reduced in number. We assume that the conventional microwave ovens available on the market may be used for a high level of disinfection but not for sterilization, and only then if sufficient water is present. PMID:1686036

  8. Phenotypic and phylogenetic characterization of an abamectin-degrading bacterial strain isolated from a citrus orchard.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shinawar Waseem; Yu, Fang-Bo; Haider, Muhammad Saleem; Yan, Xin; Li, Shun-Peng

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial strain GB-01 was isolated from abamectin-contaminated soils by continuous enrichment culture. The preliminary identification of strain GB-01 as a Burkholderia species was based mainly on simple biochemical and substrate utilization tests; however, these tests alone cannot accurately differentiate all the species within the genus Burkholderia. The strain GB-01 was subjected to taxonomic analysis through a polyphasic approach, in which phenotypic, genotypic, and phylogenetic information was gathered to conclude the classification of this microbe. Phenotypic information comes from basic bacteriological tests and substrate utilization patterns using the Biolog GN2 MicroPlating system and automated miniature biochemical test kits, i.e. API 20 NE, ID 32 GN and API 50 CH, as well as analyzing the whole cell fatty acid profile. Genotypic information was gathered from whole genome DNA base composition (G+C mol%), and DNA-DNA hybridization with its closest species, while phylogenetic information was collected from the comparative analysis of 16S rRNA and recA gene sequences. The results of polyphasic analysis concluded that strain GB-01 is an atypical strain of the Burkholderia diffusa species. PMID:23863292

  9. Antimicrobial Activity of Monoramnholipids Produced by Bacterial Strains Isolated from the Ross Sea (Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Pietro; Maida, Isabel; Palma Esposito, Fortunato; Tortorella, Emiliana; Subko, Karolina; Ezeofor, Chidinma Christiana; Zhang, Ying; Tabudravu, Jioji; Jaspars, Marcel; Fani, Renato; de Pascale, Donatella

    2016-05-01

    Microorganisms living in extreme environments represent a huge reservoir of novel antimicrobial compounds and possibly of novel chemical families. Antarctica is one of the most extraordinary places on Earth and exhibits many distinctive features. Antarctic microorganisms are well known producers of valuable secondary metabolites. Specifically, several Antarctic strains have been reported to inhibit opportunistic human pathogens strains belonging to Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). Herein, we applied a biodiscovery pipeline for the identification of anti-Bcc compounds. Antarctic sub-sea sediments were collected from the Ross Sea, and used to isolate 25 microorganisms, which were phylogenetically affiliated to three bacterial genera (Psychrobacter, Arthrobacter, and Pseudomonas) via sequencing and analysis of 16S rRNA genes. They were then subjected to a primary cell-based screening to determine their bioactivity against Bcc strains. Positive isolates were used to produce crude extracts from microbial spent culture media, to perform the secondary screening. Strain Pseudomonas BNT1 was then selected for bioassay-guided purification employing SPE and HPLC. Finally, LC-MS and NMR structurally resolved the purified bioactive compounds. With this strategy, we achieved the isolation of three rhamnolipids, two of which were new, endowed with high (MIC < 1 μg/mL) and unreported antimicrobial activity against Bcc strains. PMID:27128927

  10. Antimicrobial Activity of Monoramnholipids Produced by Bacterial Strains Isolated from the Ross Sea (Antarctica) †

    PubMed Central

    Tedesco, Pietro; Maida, Isabel; Palma Esposito, Fortunato; Tortorella, Emiliana; Subko, Karolina; Ezeofor, Chidinma Christiana; Zhang, Ying; Tabudravu, Jioji; Jaspars, Marcel; Fani, Renato; de Pascale, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    Microorganisms living in extreme environments represent a huge reservoir of novel antimicrobial compounds and possibly of novel chemical families. Antarctica is one of the most extraordinary places on Earth and exhibits many distinctive features. Antarctic microorganisms are well known producers of valuable secondary metabolites. Specifically, several Antarctic strains have been reported to inhibit opportunistic human pathogens strains belonging to Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). Herein, we applied a biodiscovery pipeline for the identification of anti-Bcc compounds. Antarctic sub-sea sediments were collected from the Ross Sea, and used to isolate 25 microorganisms, which were phylogenetically affiliated to three bacterial genera (Psychrobacter, Arthrobacter, and Pseudomonas) via sequencing and analysis of 16S rRNA genes. They were then subjected to a primary cell-based screening to determine their bioactivity against Bcc strains. Positive isolates were used to produce crude extracts from microbial spent culture media, to perform the secondary screening. Strain Pseudomonas BNT1 was then selected for bioassay-guided purification employing SPE and HPLC. Finally, LC-MS and NMR structurally resolved the purified bioactive compounds. With this strategy, we achieved the isolation of three rhamnolipids, two of which were new, endowed with high (MIC < 1 μg/mL) and unreported antimicrobial activity against Bcc strains. PMID:27128927

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Gluconacetobacter hansenii Strain NQ5 (ATCC 53582), an Efficient Producer of Bacterial Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Pfeffer, Sarah; Mehta, Kalpa

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the release of the complete nucleotide sequence of Gluconacetobacter hansenii strain NQ5 (ATCC 53582). This strain was isolated by R. Malcolm Brown, Jr. in a sugar mill in North Queensland, Australia, and is an efficient producer of bacterial cellulose. The elucidation of the genome will contribute to the study of the molecular mechanisms necessary for cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:27516505

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Gluconacetobacter hansenii Strain NQ5 (ATCC 53582), an Efficient Producer of Bacterial Cellulose.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Sarah; Mehta, Kalpa; Brown, R Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the release of the complete nucleotide sequence of Gluconacetobacter hansenii strain NQ5 (ATCC 53582). This strain was isolated by R. Malcolm Brown, Jr. in a sugar mill in North Queensland, Australia, and is an efficient producer of bacterial cellulose. The elucidation of the genome will contribute to the study of the molecular mechanisms necessary for cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:27516505

  13. Comparative analysis of midgut bacterial communities of Aedes aegypti mosquito strains varying in vector competence to dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Charan, Shakti S; Pawar, Kiran D; Severson, David W; Patole, Milind S; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2013-07-01

    Differences in midgut bacterial communities of Aedes aegypti, the primary mosquito vector of dengue viruses (DENV), might influence the susceptibility of these mosquitoes to infection by DENV. As a first step toward addressing this hypothesis, comparative analysis of bacterial communities from midguts of mosquito strains with differential genetic susceptibility to DENV was performed. 16S rRNA gene libraries and real-time PCR approaches were used to characterize midgut bacterial community composition and abundance in three Aedes aegypti strains: MOYO, MOYO-R, and MOYO-S. Although Pseudomonas spp.-related clones were predominant across all libraries, some interesting and potentially significant differences were found in midgut bacterial communities among the three strains. Pedobacter sp.- and Janthinobacterium sp.-related phylotypes were identified only in the MOYO-R strain libraries, while Bacillus sp. was detected only in the MOYO-S strain. Rahnella sp. was found in MOYO-R and MOYO strains libraries but was absent in MOYO-S libraries. Both 16S rRNA gene library and real-time PCR approaches confirmed the presence of Pedobacter sp. only in the MOYO-R strain. Further, real-time PCR-based quantification of 16S rRNA gene copies showed bacterial abundance in midguts of the MOYO-R strain mosquitoes to be at least 10-100-folds higher than in the MOYO-S and MOYO strain mosquitoes. Our study identified some putative bacteria with characteristic physiological properties that could affect the infectivity of dengue virus. This analysis represents the first report of comparisons of midgut bacterial communities with respect to refractoriness and susceptibility of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes to DENV and will guide future efforts to address the potential interactive role of midgut bacteria of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in determining vectorial capacity for DENV. PMID:23636307

  14. Comprehensive Proteomic and Metabolomic Signatures of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-Induced Acute Otitis Media Reveal Bacterial Aerobic Respiration in an Immunosuppressed Environment.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Alistair; Dubois, Laura G; St John-Williams, Lisa; Moseley, M Arthur; Hardison, Rachael L; Heimlich, Derek R; Stoddard, Alexander; Kerschner, Joseph E; Justice, Sheryl S; Thompson, J Will; Mason, Kevin M

    2016-03-01

    A thorough understanding of the molecular details of the interactions between bacteria and host are critical to ultimately prevent disease. Recent technological advances allow simultaneous analysis of host and bacterial protein and metabolic profiles from a single small tissue sample to provide insight into pathogenesis. We used the chinchilla model of human otitis media to determine, for the first time, the most expansive delineation of global changes in protein and metabolite profiles during an experimentally induced disease. After 48 h of infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, middle ear tissue lysates were analyzed by high-resolution quantitative two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Dynamic changes in 105 chinchilla proteins and 66 metabolites define the early proteomic and metabolomic signature of otitis media. Our studies indicate that establishment of disease coincides with actin morphogenesis, suppression of inflammatory mediators, and bacterial aerobic respiration. We validated the observed increase in the actin-remodeling complex, Arp2/3, and experimentally showed a role for Arp2/3 in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae invasion. Direct inhibition of actin branch morphology altered bacterial invasion into host epithelial cells, and is supportive of our efforts to use the information gathered to modify outcomes of disease. The twenty-eight nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae proteins identified participate in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, redox homeostasis, and include cell wall-associated metabolic proteins. Quantitative characterization of the molecular signatures of infection will redefine our understanding of host response driven developmental changes during pathogenesis. These data represent the first comprehensive study of host protein and metabolite profiles in vivo in response to infection and show the feasibility of extensive characterization of host protein profiles during disease. Identification of

  15. Strain ŽP - the first bacterial conjugation-based "kill"-"anti-kill" antimicrobial system.

    PubMed

    Starčič Erjavec, Marjanca; Petkovšek, Živa; Kuznetsova, Marina V; Maslennikova, Irina L; Žgur-Bertok, Darja

    2015-11-01

    As multidrug resistant bacteria pose one of the greatest risks to human health new alternative antibacterial agents are urgently needed. One possible mechanism that can be used as an alternative to traditional antibiotic therapy is transfer of killing agents via conjugation. Our work was aimed at providing a proof of principle that conjugation-based antimicrobial systems are possible. We constructed a bacterial conjugation-based "kill"-"anti-kill" antimicrobial system employing the well known Escherichia coli probiotic strain Nissle 1917 genetically modified to harbor a conjugative plasmid carrying the "kill" gene (colicin ColE7 activity gene) and a chromosomally encoded "anti-kill" gene (ColE7 immunity gene). The constructed strain acts as a donor in conjugal transfer and its efficiency was tested in several types of conjugal assays. Our results clearly demonstrate that conjugation-based antimicrobial systems can be highly efficient. PMID:26436830

  16. Exposure to bacterial endotoxin generates a distinct strain of α-synuclein fibril

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Changyoun; Lv, Guohua; Lee, Jun Sung; Jung, Byung Chul; Masuda-Suzukake, Masami; Hong, Chul-Suk; Valera, Elvira; Lee, He-Jin; Paik, Seung R.; Hasegawa, Masato; Masliah, Eliezer; Eliezer, David; Lee, Seung-Jae

    2016-01-01

    A single amyloidogenic protein is implicated in multiple neurological diseases and capable of generating a number of aggregate “strains” with distinct structures. Among the amyloidogenic proteins, α-synuclein generates multiple patterns of proteinopathies in a group of diseases, such as Parkinson disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and multiple system atrophy (MSA). However, the link between specific conformations and distinct pathologies, the key concept of the strain hypothesis, remains elusive. Here we show that in the presence of bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), α-synuclein generated a self-renewable, structurally distinct fibril strain that consistently induced specific patterns of synucleinopathies in mice. These results suggest that amyloid fibrils with self-renewable structures cause distinct types of proteinopathies despite the identical primary structure and that exposure to exogenous pathogens may contribute to the diversity of synucleinopathies. PMID:27488222

  17. Identification and analysis of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)--biodegrading bacterial strains from refinery soil of India.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Priyanka; Sahay, Harmesh; Sharma, Richa; Pandey, Alok Kumar; Singh, Shashi Bala; Saxena, A K; Nain, Lata

    2015-06-01

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) utilizing bacteria were isolated from soils of seven sites of Mathura refinery, India. Twenty-six bacterial strains with different morphotypes were isolated. These strains were acclimatized to utilize a mixture of four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, i.e., anthracene, fluorene, phenanthrene, and pyrene, each at 50 mg/L concentration as sole carbon source. Out of total isolates, 15 potent isolates were subjected to 16S rDNA sequencing and identified as a member of diverse genera, i.e., Bacillus, Acinetobacter, Stenotrophomonas, Alcaligenes, Lysinibacillus, Brevibacterium, Serratia, and Streptomyces. Consortium of four promising isolates (Acinetobacter, Brevibacterium, Serratia, and Streptomyces) were also investigated for bioremediation of PAH mixture. This consortium was proved to be efficient PAH degrader resulting in 40-70 % degradation of PAH within 7 days. Results of this study indicated that these genera may play an active role in bioremediation of PAHs. PMID:26026847

  18. Effect of Lactobacillus strains (L. casei and L. Acidophillus Strains cerela) on bacterial overgrowth-related chronic diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Gaon, David; Garmendia, Carmen; Murrielo, Norberto O; de Cucco Games, Alfredo; Cerchio, Angel; Quintas, Ricardo; González, Silvia N; Oliver, Guillermo

    2002-01-01

    Small bowel bacterial overgrowth and related diarrhea is a condition that frequently accompanies anatomic disorders, surgically created blind loops or strictures with partial small bowel obstruction and although it is often controlled with antimicrobial therapy, alternative treatment may be needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of an oral probiotic preparation of 2 viable lyophilized strains of lactobacilli (1.5 g each) compared with placebo. Twenty two patients with proven overgrowth and chronic diarrhea are described. In random order and double-blind fashion, 2 groups of patients received identical capsules with both Lactobacillus casei and L. acidophillus strains CERELA (12 patients) (LC) and placebo (10 patients) (P) during three consecutive periods of 7 days each followed by a similar three periods of control after withdrawal. At the end of each period the mean daily number of stools, glucose breath H2 test, and symptoms were considered. Lactobacillus were investigated in feces in both groups at day 0 (baseline), on day 21 of treatment with LC and P and on day 21 after withdrawal. Compared with P a significant reduction in mean daily number of stools was achieved with LC (p < 0.005) at 15 days, and (p < 0.0005) at 21 days and the effect was sustained at 7 days and 15 days (p < 0.005) after withdrawal. With respect to breath H2 level a significant decrease in H2 concentration was noted at 7 days (p < 0.005) at 15 days, and 21 days (p < 0.0001) with LC and only a significant decrease (p < 0.005) was observed at 7 days after withdrawal. No significant changes were observed with respect to symptoms. The Lactobacillus CERELA strains were isolated from the feces in all patients LC (n = 12) on day 21, and by contrast no Lactobacillus were observed except in two patients out of seven patients after withdrawal. In summary, this study provides evidence that LC are effective for treatment of bacterial overgrowth--related chronic diarrhea, and suggest

  19. Modular microfluidic system fabricated in thermoplastics for the strain-specific detection of bacterial pathogens†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Hong; Hupert, Mateusz; Witek, Makgorzata; Dharmasiri, Udara; Pingle, Maneesh R.; Barany, Francis

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreaks of a lethal E. coli strain in Germany have aroused renewed interest in developing rapid, specific and accurate systems for detecting and characterizing bacterial pathogens in suspected contaminated food and/or water supplies. To address this need, we have designed, fabricated and tested an integrated modular-based microfluidic system and the accompanying assay for the strain-specific identification of bacterial pathogens. The system can carry out the entire molecular processing pipeline in a single disposable fluidic cartridge and detect single nucleotide variations in selected genes to allow for the identification of the bacterial species, even its strain with high specificity. The unique aspect of this fluidic cartridge is its modular format with task-specific modules interconnected to a fluidic motherboard to permit the selection of the target material. In addition, to minimize the amount of finishing steps for assembling the fluidic cartridge, many of the functional components were produced during the polymer molding step used to create the fluidic network. The operation of the cartridge was provided by electronic, mechanical, optical and hydraulic controls located off-chip and packaged into a small footprint instrument (1 ft3). The fluidic cartridge was capable of performing cell enrichment, cell lysis, solid-phase extraction (SPE) of genomic DNA, continuous flow (CF) PCR, CF ligase detection reaction (LDR) and universal DNA array readout. The cartridge was comprised of modules situated on a fluidic motherboard; the motherboard was made from polycarbonate, PC, and used for cell lysis, SPE, CF PCR and CF LDR. The modules were task-specific units and performed universal zip-code array readout or affinity enrichment of the target cells with both made from poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA. Two genes, uidA and sipB/C, were used to discriminate between E. coli and Salmonella, and evaluated as a model system. Results showed that the fluidic system

  20. Modular microfluidic system fabricated in thermoplastics for the strain-specific detection of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Hong; Hupert, Mateusz; Witek, Makgorzata; Dharmasiri, Udara; Pingle, Maneesh R; Barany, Francis; Soper, Steven A

    2012-09-21

    The recent outbreaks of a lethal E. coli strain in Germany have aroused renewed interest in developing rapid, specific and accurate systems for detecting and characterizing bacterial pathogens in suspected contaminated food and/or water supplies. To address this need, we have designed, fabricated and tested an integrated modular-based microfluidic system and the accompanying assay for the strain-specific identification of bacterial pathogens. The system can carry out the entire molecular processing pipeline in a single disposable fluidic cartridge and detect single nucleotide variations in selected genes to allow for the identification of the bacterial species, even its strain with high specificity. The unique aspect of this fluidic cartridge is its modular format with task-specific modules interconnected to a fluidic motherboard to permit the selection of the target material. In addition, to minimize the amount of finishing steps for assembling the fluidic cartridge, many of the functional components were produced during the polymer molding step used to create the fluidic network. The operation of the cartridge was provided by electronic, mechanical, optical and hydraulic controls located off-chip and packaged into a small footprint instrument (1 ft(3)). The fluidic cartridge was capable of performing cell enrichment, cell lysis, solid-phase extraction (SPE) of genomic DNA, continuous flow (CF) PCR, CF ligase detection reaction (LDR) and universal DNA array readout. The cartridge was comprised of modules situated on a fluidic motherboard; the motherboard was made from polycarbonate, PC, and used for cell lysis, SPE, CF PCR and CF LDR. The modules were task-specific units and performed universal zip-code array readout or affinity enrichment of the target cells with both made from poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA. Two genes, uidA and sipB/C, were used to discriminate between E. coli and Salmonella, and evaluated as a model system. Results showed that the fluidic

  1. Biodegradation of the metallic carcinogen hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) by an indigenously isolated bacterial strain

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Susmita

    2010-01-01

    Background: Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], a potential mutagen and carcinogen, is regularly introduced into the environment through diverse anthropogenic activities, including electroplating, leather tanning, and pigment manufacturing. Human exposure to this toxic metal ion not only causes potential human health hazards but also affects other life forms. The World Health Organization, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and the Environmental Protection Agency have determined that Cr(VI) compounds are known human carcinogens. The Sukinda valley in Jajpur District, Orissa, is known for its deposit of chromite ore, producing nearly 98% of the chromite ore in India and one of the prime open cast chromite ore mines in the world (CES, Orissa Newsletter). Materials and Methods: Our investigation involved microbial remediation of Cr(VI) without producing any byproduct. Bacterial cultures tolerating high concentrations of Cr were isolated from the soil sample collected from the chromite-contaminated sites of Sukinda, and their bioaccumulation properties were investigated. Strains capable of growing at 250 mg/L Cr(VI) were considered as Cr resistant. Results: The experimental investigation showed the maximum specific Cr uptake at pH 7 and temperature 30°C. At about 50 mg/L initial Cr(VI) concentrations, uptake of the selected potential strain exceeded 98% within 12 h of incubation. The bacterial isolate was identified by 16S rRNA sequencing as Brevebacterium casei. Conclusion: Results indicated promising approach for microbial remediation of effluents containing elevated levels of Cr(VI). PMID:20976016

  2. Substrate utilization profiles of bacterial strains in plankton from the River Warnow, a humic and eutrophic river in north Germany.

    PubMed

    Freese, Heike M; Eggert, Anja; Garland, Jay L; Schumann, Rhena

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria are very important degraders of organic substances in aquatic environments. Despite their influential role in the carbon (and many other element) cycle(s), the specific genetic identity of active bacteria is mostly unknown, although contributing phylogenetic groups had been investigated. Moreover, the degree to which phenotypic potential (i. e., utilization of environmentally relevant carbon substrates) is related to the genomic identity of bacteria or bacterial groups is unclear. The present study compared the genomic fingerprints of 27 bacterial isolates from the humic River Warnow with their ability to utilize 14 environmentally relevant substrates. Acetate was the only substrate utilized by all bacterial strains. Only 60% of the strains respired glucose, but this substrate always stimulated the highest bacterial activity (respiration and growth). Two isolates, both closely related to the same Pseudomonas sp., also had very similar substrate utilization patterns. However, similar substrate utilization profiles commonly belonged to genetically different strains (e.g., the substrate profile of Janthinobacterium lividum OW6/RT-3 and Flavobacterium sp. OW3/15-5 differed by only three substrates). Substrate consumption was sometimes totally different for genetically related isolates. Thus, the genomic profiles of bacterial strains were not congruent with their different substrate utilization profiles. Additionally, changes in pre-incubation conditions strongly influenced substrate utilization. Therefore, it is problematic to infer substrate utilization and especially microbial dissolved organic matter transformation in aquatic systems from bacterial molecular taxonomy. PMID:19936822

  3. Aflatoxin B1 degradation by liquid cultures and lysates of three bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Adebo, Oluwafemi Ayodeji; Njobeh, Patrick Berka; Sidu, Sibusiso; Tlou, Matsobane Godfrey; Mavumengwana, Vuyo

    2016-09-16

    Aflatoxin contamination remains a daunting issue to address in food safety. In spite of the efforts geared towards prevention and elimination of this toxin, it still persists in agricultural commodities. This has necessitated the search for other measures such as microbial degradation to combat this hazard. In this study, we investigated the biodegradation of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), using lysates of three bacterial strains (Pseudomonas anguilliseptica VGF1, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Staphylococcus sp. VGF2) isolated from a gold mine aquifer. The bacterial cells were intermittently lysed in the presence and absence of protease inhibitors to obtain protease free lysates, subsequently incubated with AFB1 for 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48h to investigate whether any possible AFB1 degradation occurred using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for detection. Results obtained revealed that after 6h of incubation, protease inhibited lysates of Staphylococcus sp. VGF2 demonstrated the highest degradation capacity of 100%, whereas P. anguilliseptica VGF1 and P. fluorescens lysates degraded AFB1 by 66.5 and 63%, respectively. After further incubation to 12h, no residual AFB1 was detected for all the lysates. Lower degrading ability was however observed for liquid cultures and uninhibited lysates. Data on cytotoxicity studies against human lymphocytes showed that the degraded products were less toxic than the parent AFB1. From this study, it can thus be deduced that the mechanism of degradation by these bacterial lysates is enzymatic. This study shows the efficacy of crude bacterial lysates for detoxifying AFB1 indicating potential for application in the food and feed industry. PMID:27294556

  4. Identification and Quantification of Volatile Chemical Spoilage Indexes Associated with Bacterial Growth Dynamics in Aerobically Stored Chicken.

    PubMed

    Mikš-Krajnik, Marta; Yoon, Yong-Jin; Ukuku, Dike O; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2016-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as chemical spoilage indexes (CSIs) of raw chicken breast stored aerobically at 4, 10, and 21 °C were identified and quantified using solid phase microextraction (SPME) combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The growth dynamics of total viable count (TVC), psychrotrophs, Pseudomonas spp., lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Brochothrix thermosphacta and H2 S producing bacteria were characterized based on maximum growth rates (μmax ), maximal microbial concentration (Nmax ) and at the moment of microbial shelf life (Svalues ), calculated from Gompertz-fitted growth curves. Pseudomonas spp. was predominant species, while B. thermosphacta was characterized by the highest μmax . The microbiological and sensory shelf lives were estimated based on TVC, Pseudomonas spp., and B. thermosphacta counts and sensory evaluation, respectively. Among 27 VOCs identified by GC-MS in spoiled chicken samples, ethanol (EtOH), 1-butanol-3-methyl (1But-3M), and acetic acid (C2 ) achieved the highest Pearson's correlation coefficients of 0.66, 0.61, and 0.59, respectively, with TVC, regardless of storage temperature. Partial least squares (PLS) regression revealed that the synthesis of 1But-3M and C2 was most likely induced by the metabolic activity of B. thermosphacta and LAB, while EtOH was attributed to Pseudomonas spp. The increase in concentration of selected volatile spoilage markers (EtOH, 1But-3M, and C2 ) in the headspace over spoiled chicken breast was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05) with TVC growth. These findings highlight the possibility of analyzing the combination of 3 selected spoilage markers: EtOH, 1But-3M, and C2 as rapid evaluation for poultry quality testing using SPME-GC-MS. PMID:27332555

  5. Single bacterial strain capable of significant contribution to carbon cycling in the surface ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedler, Byron E.; Aluwihare, Lihini I.; Azam, Farooq

    2014-05-01

    Marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) encompasses one of the largest reservoirs of carbon on Earth. Heterotrophic bacteria are the primary biotic force regulating the fate of this material, yet the capacity of individual strains to significantly contribute to carbon cycling is unknown. Here we quantified the ability of a single Alteromonas strain [Alteromonas sp. strain Scripps Institution of Oceanography (AltSIO)] to drawdown ambient DOC in a coastal ecosystem. In three experiments, AltSIO alone consumed the entire pool of labile DOC, defined here as the quantity consumed by the submicron size fraction of ambient microbial assemblages within 5 d. These findings demonstrate that complete removal of the labile DOC pool in coastal surface seawater can be achieved by a single taxon. During long-term incubations (>1 y) testing semilabile DOC consumption, AltSIO entered dormancy but remained viable, while the diverse assemblages continued to consume carbon. Given that AltSIO is a large bacterium and thus subject to increased grazing pressure, we sought to determine the ecological relevance of this phenotype. Growth dynamics in natural seawater revealed that AltSIO rapidly outgrew the native bacteria, and despite intense grazing pressure, was never eliminated from the population. A survey in the California Current Ecosystem revealed that large bacteria (≥40 fg Cṡcell-1) were persistent, accounting for up to 12% of total bacterial abundance and 24% of total bacterial biomass. We conclude that large, rapidly growing bacteria have the potential to disproportionately alter the fate of carbon in the mesotrophic ocean and play an important role in ecosystem function.

  6. Characterization of a marine origin aerobic nitrifying-denitrifying bacterium.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hai-Yan; Liu, Ying; Gao, Xi-Yan; Ai, Guo-Min; Miao, Li-Li; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2012-07-01

    The bacterial strain F6 was isolated from a biological aerated filter that is used for purifying recirculating water in a marine aquaculture system and was identified as Marinobacter sp. based on the analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence. Strain F6 showed efficient aerobic denitrifying ability. One hundred percent of nitrates and 73.10% of nitrites were removed, and the total nitrogen (TN) removal rates reached 50.08% and 33.03% under a high nitrate and nitrite concentration in the medium, respectively. N(2)O and (15)N(2), as revealed by GC-MS and GC-IRMS, were the products of aerobic denitrification. Factors affecting the growth and aerobic denitrifying performance of strain F6 were investigated. The results showed that the optimum aerobic denitrification conditions for strain F6 were the presence of sodium succinate as a carbon source, a C/N ratio of 15, salinity ranging from 32-35 g/L of NaCl, incubation temperature of 30°C, an initial pH of 7.5, and rotation speed of 150 rpm [dissolved oxygen (DO) 6.75 mg/L]. In addition, strain F6 was confirmed to be a heterotrophic nitrifier through its NO(2)(-) generation and 25.96% TN removal when NH(4)(+) was used as the sole N source. Therefore, strain F6, the first reported member of genus Marinobacter with aerobic heterotrophic nitrifying-denitrifying ability, is an excellent candidate for facilitating simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) in industry and aquaculture wastewater. PMID:22578593

  7. A suite of recombinant luminescent bacterial strains for the quantification of bioavailable heavy metals and toxicity testing

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Recombinant whole-cell sensors have already proven useful in the assessment of the bioavailability of environmental pollutants like heavy metals and organic compounds. In this work 19 recombinant bacterial strains representing various Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens) bacteria were constructed to express the luminescence encoding genes luxCDABE (from Photorhabdus luminescens) as a response to bioavailable heavy metals ("lights-on" metal sensors containing metal-response elements, 13 strains) or in a constitutive manner ("lights-off" constructs, 6 strains). Results The bioluminescence of all 13 "lights-on" metal sensor strains was expressed as a function of the sub-toxic metal concentrations enabling the quantitative determination of metals bioavailable for these strains. Five sensor strains, constructed for detecting copper and mercury, proved to be target metal specific, whereas eight other sensor strains were simultaneously induced by Cd2+, Hg2+, Zn2+and Pb2+. The lowest limits of determination of the "lights-on" sensor strains for the metals tested in this study were (μg l-1): 0.002 of CH3HgCl, 0.03 of HgCl2, 1.8 of CdCl2, 33 of Pb(NO3)2, 1626 of ZnSO4, 24 of CuSO4 and 340 of AgNO3. In general, the sensitivity of the "lights-on" sensor strains was mostly dependent on the metal-response element used while the selection of host bacterium played a relatively minor role. In contrast, toxicity of metals to the "lights-off" strains was only dependent on the bacterial host so that Gram-positive strains were remarkably more sensitive than Gram-negative ones. Conclusion The constructed battery of 19 recombinant luminescent bacterial strains exhibits several novel aspects as it contains i) metal sensor strains with similar metal-response elements in different host bacteria; ii) metal sensor strains with metal-response elements in different copies and iii) a "lights

  8. Development of Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism-Derived Functional Strain-Specific Markers To Assess the Persistence of 10 Bacterial Strains in Soil Microcosms▿

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, S.-R.; Cook, M.; Saucier, S.; Gillespie, P.; Socha, R.; Scroggins, R.; Beaudette, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    To augment the information on commercial microbial products, we investigated the persistence patterns of high-priority bacterial strains from the Canadian Domestic Substance List (DSL). Specific DNA markers for each of the 10 DSL bacterial strains were developed using the amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) technique, and the fates of DSL strains introduced in soil were assessed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The results indicated that all DNA markers had high specificity at the functional strain level and that detection of the target microorganisms was sensitive at a detection limitation range from 1.3 × 102 to 3.25 × 105 CFU/g of dry soil. The results indicated that all introduced strains showed a trend toward a declining persistence in soil and could be categorized into three pattern types. The first type was long-term persistence exemplified by Pseudomonas stutzeri (ATCC 17587) and Pseudomonas denitrificans (ATCC 13867) strains. In the second pattern, represented by Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6051) and Escherichia hermannii (ATCC 700368), the inoculated strain populations dropped dramatically below the detection threshold after 10 to 21 days, while in the third pattern there was a gradual decrease, with the population falling below the detectable level within the 180-day incubation period. These patterns indicate a selection effect of a microbial community related to the ecological function of microbial strains introduced in soil. As a key finding, the DSL strains can be quantitatively tracked in soil with high sensitivity and specificity at the functional strain level. This provides the basic evidence for further risk assessment of the priority DSL strains. PMID:20817796

  9. Bacterial flora of Tasmanian SIDS infants with special reference to pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Bettiol, S. S.; Radcliff, F. J.; Hunt, A. L.; Goldsmid, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The general bacterial flora of 38 Tasmanian SIDS infants was examined together with faecal flora of 134 comparison infants ranging in age from birth to 6 months. The microflora of all specimens received was investigated with special emphasis on the toxigenic Escherichia coli (TEC). Samples were examined for verocytotoxigenic E. coli, free faecal verocytotoxin (FVT), heat labile toxin (LT) and heat stable toxin (ST) producers with the use of a Vero cell assay and commercial kits. The findings of this study revealed a high isolation rate (39%) of TEC from SIDS infants as compared to 1.5% from the healthy comparison infants. Atypical E. coli strains were also identified during the study, including E. coli A-D. An analysis of the same specimens for rotaviral and adenoviral antigens indicated that 30% of the SIDS cases were positive as compared to 20% in the comparison group. PMID:8150001

  10. Evidence of polyethylene biodegradation by bacterial strains from the guts of plastic-eating waxworms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Yang, Yu; Wu, Wei-Min; Zhao, Jiao; Jiang, Lei

    2014-12-01

    Polyethylene (PE) has been considered nonbiodegradable for decades. Although the biodegradation of PE by bacterial cultures has been occasionally described, valid evidence of PE biodegradation has remained limited in the literature. We found that waxworms, or Indian mealmoths (the larvae of Plodia interpunctella), were capable of chewing and eating PE films. Two bacterial strains capable of degrading PE were isolated from this worm's gut, Enterobacter asburiae YT1 and Bacillus sp. YP1. Over a 28-day incubation period of the two strains on PE films, viable biofilms formed, and the PE films' hydrophobicity decreased. Obvious damage, including pits and cavities (0.3-0.4 μm in depth), was observed on the surfaces of the PE films using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The formation of carbonyl groups was verified using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and microattenuated total reflectance/Fourier transform infrared (micro-ATR/FTIR) imaging microscope. Suspension cultures of YT1 and YP1 (10(8) cells/mL) were able to degrade approximately 6.1 ± 0.3% and 10.7 ± 0.2% of the PE films (100 mg), respectively, over a 60-day incubation period. The molecular weights of the residual PE films were lower, and the release of 12 water-soluble daughter products was also detected. The results demonstrated the presence of PE-degrading bacteria in the guts of waxworms and provided promising evidence for the biodegradation of PE in the environment. PMID:25384056

  11. Degradation and metabolism of hexazinone by two isolated bacterial strains from soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuedong; Wang, Huili; Tan, Chengxia

    2005-12-01

    Two hexazinone-degrading bacterial strains were isolated from soil by enrichment culture technique, and identified as Pseudomonas sp. and Enterobacter cloacap. The two purified isolates, designated as WFX-1 and WFX-2, could rapidly degrade hexazinone with a half-life of 3.08 days and 2.95 days in mineral salt medium (MSM), while their mixed bacterial culture was found to degrade hexazinone, at an initial concentration of 50 microg/ml, by enhancing 2.3-fold over that when the isolates were used alone. Two microbial metabolites (A and D) were obtained by preparative TLC and identified on the basis of the spectral data of IR, 1H NMR and HPLC-ESI-MS, but both of them were known products as they had been reported in soil and vegetation metabolites of hexazinone. However, metabolites B and C were new degradates, whose molecular weights (MW) were 157 and 156, respectively, being reported from microbial metabolism for the first time. PMID:15987651

  12. Biodegradation of hexazinone by two isolated bacterial strains (WFX-1 and WFX-2).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuedong; Zhou, Sumei; Wang, Huili; Yang, Shao

    2006-08-01

    Two hexazinone-degrading bacterial strains were isolated from soil by enrichment culture technique, and identified as Pseudomonas sp. and Enterobacter cloacap, respectively. The two purified isolates, designated as WFX-1 and WFX-2, could rapidly degrade hexazinone with half-lives of 3.08 and 2.95 days in mineral salts medium (hereafter referred to as MSM). In contrast, their mixed bacterial culture (herein abbreviated as MBC) was found to degrade hexazinone, at an initial concentration of 50 mg l(-1), by enhancing 2.3-fold over that when the isolates were used alone. The degradation of hexazinone by MBC in MSM clearly decreased concomitant with the increase of initial concentration, and the level of hexazinone that was toxic enough to totally inhibit degradation was in the range of 150-200 mg l(-1). The appropriately combined conditions for hexazinone degradation by MBC in MSM were studied, and found to be pH 5.5, 30 degrees C and at agitation of 120 rpm. The addition of MBC to soil had a greater impact on disappearance of hexazinone, which nearly increased fivefold over that of the control set. As a result, findings in the present investigation provide useful information for soil and water decontamination of hexazinone. PMID:16570230

  13. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-supplemented formula expands butyrate-producing bacterial strains in food allergic infants.

    PubMed

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Sangwan, Naseer; Stefka, Andrew T; Nocerino, Rita; Paparo, Lorella; Aitoro, Rosita; Calignano, Antonio; Khan, Aly A; Gilbert, Jack A; Nagler, Cathryn R

    2016-03-01

    Dietary intervention with extensively hydrolyzed casein formula supplemented with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (EHCF+LGG) accelerates tolerance acquisition in infants with cow's milk allergy (CMA). We examined whether this effect is attributable, at least in part, to an influence on the gut microbiota. Fecal samples from healthy controls (n=20) and from CMA infants (n=19) before and after treatment with EHCF with (n=12) and without (n=7) supplementation with LGG were compared by 16S rRNA-based operational taxonomic unit clustering and oligotyping. Differential feature selection and generalized linear model fitting revealed that the CMA infants have a diverse gut microbial community structure dominated by Lachnospiraceae (20.5±9.7%) and Ruminococcaceae (16.2±9.1%). Blautia, Roseburia and Coprococcus were significantly enriched following treatment with EHCF and LGG, but only one genus, Oscillospira, was significantly different between infants that became tolerant and those that remained allergic. However, most tolerant infants showed a significant increase in fecal butyrate levels, and those taxa that were significantly enriched in these samples, Blautia and Roseburia, exhibited specific strain-level demarcations between tolerant and allergic infants. Our data suggest that EHCF+LGG promotes tolerance in infants with CMA, in part, by influencing the strain-level bacterial community structure of the infant gut. PMID:26394008

  14. Detection of low-abundance bacterial strains in metagenomic datasets by eigengenome partitioning.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Brian; Brito, Ilana Lauren; Huang, Katherine; Gevers, Dirk; Shea, Terrance; Young, Sarah; Alm, Eric J

    2015-10-01

    Analyses of metagenomic datasets that are sequenced to a depth of billions or trillions of bases can uncover hundreds of microbial genomes, but naive assembly of these data is computationally intensive, requiring hundreds of gigabytes to terabytes of RAM. We present latent strain analysis (LSA), a scalable, de novo pre-assembly method that separates reads into biologically informed partitions and thereby enables assembly of individual genomes. LSA is implemented with a streaming calculation of unobserved variables that we call eigengenomes. Eigengenomes reflect covariance in the abundance of short, fixed-length sequences, or k-mers. As the abundance of each genome in a sample is reflected in the abundance of each k-mer in that genome, eigengenome analysis can be used to partition reads from different genomes. This partitioning can be done in fixed memory using tens of gigabytes of RAM, which makes assembly and downstream analyses of terabytes of data feasible on commodity hardware. Using LSA, we assemble partial and near-complete genomes of bacterial taxa present at relative abundances as low as 0.00001%. We also show that LSA is sensitive enough to separate reads from several strains of the same species. PMID:26368049

  15. Biotransformation of tetracycline by a novel bacterial strain Stenotrophomonas maltophilia DT1.

    PubMed

    Leng, Yifei; Bao, Jianguo; Chang, Gaofeng; Zheng, Han; Li, Xingxing; Du, Jiangkun; Snow, Daniel; Li, Xu

    2016-11-15

    Although several abiotic processes have been reported that can transform antibiotics, little is known about whether and how microbiological processes may degrade antibiotics in the environment. This work isolated one tetracycline degrading bacterial strain, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strain DT1, and characterized the biotransformation of tetracycline by DT1 under various environmental conditions. The biotransformation rate was the highest when the initial pH was 9 and the reaction temperature was at 30°C, and can be described using the Michaelis-Menten model under different initial tetracycline concentrations. When additional substrate was present, the substrate that caused increased biomass resulted in a decreased biotransformation rate of tetracycline. According to disk diffusion tests, the biotransformation products of tetracycline had lower antibiotic potency than the parent compound. Six possible biotransformation products were identified, and a potential biotransformation pathway was proposed that included sequential removal of N-methyl, carbonyl, and amine function groups. Results from this study can lead to better estimation of the fate and transport of antibiotics in the environment and has the potential to be utilized in designing engineering processes to remove tetracycline from water and soil. PMID:27420384

  16. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-supplemented formula expands butyrate-producing bacterial strains in food allergic infants

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Sangwan, Naseer; Stefka, Andrew T.; Nocerino, Rita; Paparo, Lorella; Aitoro, Rosita; Calignano, Antonio; Khan, Aly A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Nagler, Cathryn R.

    2015-09-22

    Dietary intervention with extensively hydrolyzed casein formula supplemented with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (EHCF+LGG) accelerates tolerance acquisition in infants with cow’s milk allergy (CMA). We examined whether this effect is attributable, at least in part, to an influence on the gut microbiota. Fecal samples from healthy controls (n=20) and from CMA infants (n=19) before and after treatment with EHCF with (n=12) and without (n=7) supplementation with LGG were compared by 16S rRNA-based operational taxonomic unit clustering and oligotyping. Differential feature selection and generalized linear model fitting revealed that the CMA infants have a diverse gut microbial community structure dominated by Lachnospiraceaemore » (20.5±9.7%) and Ruminococcaceae (16.2±9.1%). Blautia, Roseburia and Coprococcus were significantly enriched following treatment with EHCF and LGG, but only one genus, Oscillospira, was significantly different between infants that became tolerant and those that remained allergic. However, most tolerant infants showed a significant increase in fecal butyrate levels, and those taxa that were significantly enriched in these samples, Blautia and Roseburia, exhibited specific strain-level demarcations between tolerant and allergic infants. As a result, our data suggest that EHCF+LGG promotes tolerance in infants with CMA, in part, by influencing the strain-level bacterial community structure of the infant gut.« less

  17. Increasing antibiotic resistance in preservative-tolerant bacterial strains isolated from cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Orús, Pilar; Gomez-Perez, Laura; Leranoz, Sonia; Berlanga, Mercedes

    2015-03-01

    To ensure the microbiological quality, consumer safety and organoleptic properties of cosmetic products, manufacturers need to comply with defined standards using several preservatives and disinfectants. A drawback regarding the use of these preservatives is the possibility of generating cross-insusceptibility to other disinfectants or preservatives, as well as cross resistance to antibiotics. Therefore, the objective of this study was to understand the adaptive mechanisms of Enterobacter gergoviae, Pseudomonas putida and Burkholderia cepacia that are involved in recurrent contamination in cosmetic products containing preservatives. Diminished susceptibility to formaldehyde-donors was detected in isolates but not to other preservatives commonly used in the cosmetics industry, although increasing resistance to different antibiotics (β-lactams, quinolones, rifampicin, and tetracycline) was demonstrated in these strains when compared with the wild-type strain. The outer membrane protein modifications and efflux mechanism activities responsible for the resistance trait were evaluated. The development of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms due to the selective pressure from preservatives included in cosmetic products could be a risk for the emergence and spread of bacterial resistance in the environment. Nevertheless, the large contribution of disinfection and preservation cannot be denied in cosmetic products. PMID:26415667

  18. A bacterial strain with a unique quadruplet codon specifying non-native amino acids.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Abhishek; Lajoie, Marc J; Xiao, Han; Church, George M; Schultz, Peter G

    2014-08-18

    The addition of noncanonical amino acids to the genetic code requires unique codons not assigned to the 20 canonical amino acids. Among the 64 triplet codons, only the three nonsense "stop" codons have been used to encode non-native amino acids. Use of quadruplet "frame-shift" suppressor codons provides an abundant alternative but suffers from low suppression efficiency as a result of competing recognition of their first three bases by endogenous host tRNAs or release factors. Deletion of release factor 1 in a genomically recoded strain of E. coli (E. coli C321), in which all endogenous amber stop codons (UAG) are replaced with UAA, abolished UAG mediated translation termination. Here we show that a Methanocaldococcus jannaschii-derived frame-shift suppressor tRNA/aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pair enhanced UAGN suppression efficiency in this recoded bacterial strain. These results demonstrate that efficient quadruplet codons for encoding non-native amino acids can be generated by eliminating competing triplet codon recognition at the ribosome. PMID:24867343

  19. Rapid Identification of ESKAPE Bacterial Strains Using an Autonomous Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Jack Y.; Cira, Nate J.; Crooks, John A.; Baeza, Josue; Weibel, Douglas B.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes Bacteria ID Chips (‘BacChips’): an inexpensive, portable, and autonomous microfluidic platform for identifying pathogenic strains of bacteria. BacChips consist of a set of microchambers and channels molded in the elastomeric polymer, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Each microchamber is preloaded with mono-, di-, or trisaccharides and dried. Pressing the layer of PDMS into contact with a glass coverslip forms the device; the footprint of the device in this article is ∼6 cm2. After assembly, BacChips are degased under large negative pressure and are stored in vacuum-sealed plastic bags. To use the device, the bag is opened, a sample containing bacteria is introduced at the inlet of the device, and the degased PDMS draws the sample into the central channel and chambers. After the liquid at the inlet is consumed, air is drawn into the BacChip via the inlet and provides a physical barrier that separates the liquid samples in adjacent microchambers. A pH indicator is admixed with the samples prior to their loading, enabling the metabolism of the dissolved saccharides in the microchambers to be visualized. Importantly, BacChips operate without external equipment or instruments. By visually detecting the growth of bacteria using ambient light after ∼4 h, we demonstrate that BacChips with ten microchambers containing different saccharides can reproducibly detect the ESKAPE panel of pathogens, including strains of: Enterococcus faecalis, Enteroccocus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Enterobacter cloacae. This article describes a BacChip for point-of-care detection of ESKAPE pathogens and a starting point for designing multiplexed assays that identify bacterial strains from clinical samples and simultaneously determine their susceptibility to antibiotics. PMID:22848451

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strain BPL5 (CECT 8800), a Probiotic for Treatment of Bacterial Vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Chenoll, Empar; Codoñer, Francisco M; Martinez-Blanch, Juan F; Ramón, Daniel; Genovés, Salvador; Menabrito, Marco

    2016-01-01

    ITALIC! Lactobacillus rhamnosusBPL5 (CECT 8800), is a probiotic strain suitable for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis. Here, we report its complete genome sequence deciphered by PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology. Analysis of the sequence may provide insight into its functional activity. PMID:27103719

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strain BPL5 (CECT 8800), a Probiotic for Treatment of Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Codoñer, Francisco M.; Martinez-Blanch, Juan F.; Ramón, Daniel; Menabrito, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus BPL5 (CECT 8800), is a probiotic strain suitable for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis. Here, we report its complete genome sequence deciphered by PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology. Analysis of the sequence may provide insight into its functional activity. PMID:27103719

  2. Discrimination of bacterial strains by Fourier-transform near-infrared spectroscopy using an aluminum oxide membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Saona, Luis E.; Khambaty, Farukh M.; Fry, Francis S.; Calvey, Elizabeth M.

    2002-02-01

    To address the need for a fast and sensitive method for the detection of bacterial contamination in solutions, the use of Fourier-transform near infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy and multivariate pattern recognition techniques was evaluated. The complex cellular composition of bacteria yields FT-NIR vibrational transitions (overtone and combination bands) that might be useful for identification and sub-typing. Bacteria including strains of Escherichia coli spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus spp. and Listeria innocua were evaluated. The harvested cells were treated with ethanol (70% v/v) to reduce the safety concerns when evaluating pathogenic strains. The bacterial cells were concentrated on an aluminum oxide membrane to obtain a thin bacterial film. Spectra were collected by FT-NIR by using a diffuse reflection-integrating sphere. This simple membrane filtration procedure generated reproducible FT-NIR spectra that can be used for rapid discrimination among closely related strains. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of transformed spectra in the 5000-4000 cm-1 region exhibited clusters that discriminated between bacteria species at levels < 1 mg wet cells weight (approximately 106-107 CFU/mg). Variations in the growth conditions of the bacteria substantially affected the FT-NIR spectra and diminished the ability of PCA to differentiate among strains; this underscores the importance of developing robust sampling protocols. FT-NIR in conjunction with multivariate techniques can be used for the rapid and accurate evaluation of potential bacterial contamination in liquids with minimal sample manipulation.

  3. Enhanced treatment of tannery wastewater in an integrated multistage bioreactor (IMBR) by the predominant bacterial strains enriched from marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guangdao; Fan, Guofeng; Liu, Guoguang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative integrated multistage bioreactor (IMBR) system, which was augmented with three predominant bacterial strains (Lactobacillus paracasei CL1107, Pichia jadinii CL1705, and Serratia marcescens CL1502) isolated from marine sediments, was developed to treat real tannery wastewater without performing physicochemical pretreatment, with the potential to reduce the generation of waste sludge and odors. The performance of the IMBR treatment system, with and without the inclusion of the predominant bacterial strains, was compared. The results indicated that the performance of the IMBR system without bioaugmentation by the predominant bacterial strains was poor. However, when in the presence of the predominant bacterial strains, the IMBR system exhibited high removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand (COD) (97%), NH4(+)-N (97.7%), and total nitrogen (TN) (90%). In addition, the system had the capacity for the simultaneous removal of organics and nitrogen, heterotrophic nitrification and denitrification being carried out concurrently, thereby avoiding the strong inhibition of high concentrations of COD on nitrification. The system possessed excellent adaptability and ability to resist influent loading fluctuations, and had a good alkalinity balance such that it could achieve a high NH4(+)-N, and TN removal efficiency without a supplement of external alkalinity. In addition, an empirical performance modeling of the IMBR system was analyzed. PMID:26901723

  4. Long-term exposure of bacterial and protozoan communities to TiO2 nanoparticles in an aerobic-sequencing batch reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supha, Chitpisud; Boonto, Yuphada; Jindakaraked, Manee; Ananpattarachai, Jirapat; Kajitvichyanukul, Puangrat

    2015-06-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanopowders at different concentrations (0-50 mg L-1) were injected into an aerobic-sequencing batch reactor (SBR) to investigate the effects of long-term exposure to nanoparticles on bacterial and protozoan communities. The detection of nanoparticles in the bioflocs was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The SBR wastewater experiments were conducted under the influence of ultraviolet light with photocatalytic TiO2. The intrusion of TiO2 nanoparticles was found both on the surface and inside of the bioflocs. The change of microbial population in terms of mixed liquor-suspended solids and the sludge volume index was monitored. The TiO2 nanoparticles tentatively exerted an adverse effect on the microbial population, causing the reduction of microorganisms (both bacteria and protozoa) in the SBR. The respiration inhibition rate of the bacteria was increased, and the viability of the microbial population was reduced at the high concentration (50 mg L-1) of TiO2. The decreasing number of protozoa in the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles during 20 days of treatment with 0.5 and 1.0 mg L-1 TiO2 is clearly demonstrated. The measured chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the effluent tends to increase with a long-term operation. The increase of COD in the system suggests a decrease in the efficiency of the wastewater treatment plant. However, the SBR can effectively remove the TiO2 nanoparticles (up to 50 mg L-1) from the effluent.

  5. Bacterial wilt resistance in tomato, pepper, and eggplant: genetic resources respond to diverse strains in the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex.

    PubMed

    Lebeau, A; Daunay, M-C; Frary, A; Palloix, A; Wang, J-F; Dintinger, J; Chiroleu, F; Wicker, E; Prior, P

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial wilt, caused by strains belonging to the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex, inflicts severe economic losses in many crops worldwide. Host resistance remains the most effective control strategy against this disease. However, wilt resistance is often overcome due to the considerable variation among pathogen strains. To help breeders circumvent this problem, we assembled a worldwide collection of 30 accessions of tomato, eggplant and pepper (Core-TEP), most of which are commonly used as sources of resistance to R. solanacearum or for mapping quantitative trait loci. The Core-TEP lines were challenged with a core collection of 12 pathogen strains (Core-Rs2) representing the phylogenetic diversity of R. solanacearum. We observed six interaction phenotypes, from highly susceptible to highly resistant. Intermediate phenotypes resulted from the plants' ability to tolerate latent infections (i.e., bacterial colonization of vascular elements with limited or no wilting). The Core-Rs2 strains partitioned into three pathotypes on pepper accessions, five on tomato, and six on eggplant. A "pathoprofile" concept was developed to characterize the strain clusters, which displayed six virulence patterns on the whole set of Core-TEP host accessions. Neither pathotypes nor pathoprofiles were phylotype specific. Pathoprofiles with high aggressiveness were mainly found in strains from phylotypes I, IIB, and III. One pathoprofile included a strain that overcame almost all resistance sources. PMID:20795852

  6. Aerobic secondary utilization of a non-growth and inhibitory substrate 2,4,6-trichlorophenol by Sphingopyxis chilensis S37 and sphingopyxis-like strain S32.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Carlos; Godoy, Félix; Becerra, José; Barra, Ricardo; Martínez, Miguel

    2003-08-01

    This paper reports 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (246TCP) degradation by Sphingopyxis chilensis S37 and Sphingopyxis chilensis-like strain S32, which were unable to use 246TCP as the sole carbon and energy source. In R2A broth, the strains degraded 246TCP up to 0.5 mM. Results with mixtures of different 246TCP and glucose concentrations in mineral salt media demonstrated dependence on glucose to allow bacterial growth and degradation of 246TCP. Strain S32 degraded halophenol up to 0.2 mM when 5.33 mM glucose was simultaneously added, while strain S37 degraded the compound up to 0.1 mM when 1.33 mM glucose was added. These 246TCP concentrations were lethal for inocula in absence of glucose. Stoichiometric releases of chloride and analysis by HPLC, GC-ECD and GC-MS indicated 246TCP mineralisation by both strains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of bacteria able to mineralize a chlorophenol as a non-growth and inhibitory substrate. The concept of secondary utilization instead of cometabolism is proposed for this activity. PMID:12948056

  7. Isolation and characterization of different bacterial strains for bioremediation of n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Guermouche M'rassi, A; Bensalah, F; Gury, J; Duran, R

    2015-10-01

    Crude oil is a common environmental pollutant composed of a large number of both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Biodegradation is carried out by microbial communities that are important in determining the fate of pollutants in the environment. The intrinsic biodegradability of the hydrocarbons and the distribution in the environment of competent degrading microorganisms are crucial information for the implementation of bioremediation processes. In the present study, the biodegradation capacities of various bacteria toward aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons were determined. The purpose of the study was to isolate and characterize hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria from contaminated soil of a refinery in Arzew, Algeria. A collection of 150 bacterial strains was obtained; the bacterial isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and their ability to degrade hydrocarbon compounds characterized. The isolated strains were mainly affiliated to the Gamma-Proteobacteria class. Among them, Pseudomonas spp. had the ability to metabolize high molecular weight hydrocarbon compounds such as pristane (C19) at 35.11 % by strain LGM22 and benzo[a] pyrene (C20) at 33.93 % by strain LGM11. Some strains were able to grow on all the hydrocarbons tested including octadecane, squalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene. Some strains were specialized degrading only few substrates. In contrast, the strain LGM2 designated as Pseudomonas sp. was found able to degrade both linear and branched alkanes as well as low and high poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The alkB gene involved in alkane degradation was detected in LGM2 and other Pseudomonas-related isolates. The capabilities of the isolated bacterial strains to degrade alkanes and PAHs should be of great practical significance in bioremediation of oil-contaminated environments. PMID:25813636

  8. Synergistic Degradation of Linuron by a Bacterial Consortium and Isolation of a Single Linuron-Degrading Variovorax Strain

    PubMed Central

    Dejonghe, Winnie; Berteloot, Ellen; Goris, Johan; Boon, Nico; Crul, Katrien; Maertens, Siska; Höfte, Monica; De Vos, Paul; Verstraete, Willy; Top, Eva M.

    2003-01-01

    The bacterial community composition of a linuron-degrading enrichment culture and the role of the individual strains in linuron degradation have been determined by a combination of methods, such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of the total 16S rRNA gene pool, isolation and identification of strains, and biodegradation assays. Three strains, Variovorax sp. strain WDL1, Delftia acidovorans WDL34, and Pseudomonas sp. strain WDL5, were isolated directly from the linuron-degrading culture. In addition, subculture of this enrichment culture on potential intermediates in the degradation pathway of linuron (i.e., N,O-dimethylhydroxylamine and 3-chloroaniline) resulted in the isolation of, respectively, Hyphomicrobium sulfonivorans WDL6 and Comamonas testosteroni WDL7. Of these five strains, only Variovorax sp. strain WDL1 was able to use linuron as the sole source of C, N, and energy. WDL1 first converted linuron to 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA), which transiently accumulated in the medium but was subsequently degraded. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a strain that degrades linuron further than the aromatic intermediates. Interestingly, the rate of linuron degradation by strain WDL1 was lower than that for the consortium, but was clearly increased when WDL1 was coinoculated with each of the other four strains. D. acidovorans WDL34 and C. testosteroni WDL7 were found to be responsible for degradation of the intermediate 3,4-DCA, and H. sulfonivorans WDL6 was the only strain able to degrade N,O-dimethylhydroxylamine. The role of Pseudomonas sp. strain WDL5 needs to be further elucidated. The degradation of linuron can thus be performed by a single isolate, Variovorax sp. strain WDL1, but is stimulated by a synergistic interaction with the other strains isolated from the same linuron-degrading culture. PMID:12620840

  9. Comparison of effects of compost amendment and of single-strain inoculation on root bacterial communities of young cucumber seedlings.

    PubMed

    Ofek, Maya; Hadar, Yitzhak; Minz, Dror

    2009-10-01

    Compost amendment and inoculations with specific microorganisms are fundamentally different soil treatment methods, commonly used in agriculture for the improvement of plant growth and health. Although distinct, both methods affect the rhizosphere and the plant roots. In the present study we used a 16S rRNA gene approach to achieve an overview of early consequences of these treatments on the assemblage of plant root bacterial communities. For this purpose, cucumber seedlings were grown, under controlled conditions, in perlite potting mix amended with biosolid compost or straw compost, or inoculated with Streptomyces spp. A uniform trend of response of root bacterial communities for all treatments was observed. Root bacterial density, measured as bacterial targets per plant tef gene by real-time PCR, was reduced in 31 to 67%. In addition, increased taxonomic diversity accompanied shifts in composition (alpha-diversity). The magnitude of change in these parameters relative to the perlite control varied between the different treatments but not in relation to the treatment method (compost amendments versus inoculations). Similarity between the compositions of root and of potting mix bacterial communities (beta-diversity) was relatively unchanged. The abundance of Oxalobacteraceae was >50% of the total root bacterial community in the untreated perlite. Root domination by this group subsided >10-fold (straw compost) to >600-fold (Streptomyces sp. strain S1) after treatment. Thus, loss of dominance appears to be the major phenomenon underlining the response trend of the root bacterial communities. PMID:19700550

  10. Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yurkov, Vladimir V.; Beatty, J. Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are a relatively recently discovered bacterial group. Although taxonomically and phylogenetically heterogeneous, these bacteria share the following distinguishing features: the presence of bacteriochlorophyll a incorporated into reaction center and light-harvesting complexes, low levels of the photosynthetic unit in cells, an abundance of carotenoids, a strong inhibition by light of bacteriochlorophyll synthesis, and the inability to grow photosynthetically under anaerobic conditions. Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are classified in two marine (Erythrobacter and Roseobacter) and six freshwater (Acidiphilium, Erythromicrobium, Erythromonas, Porphyrobacter, Roseococcus, and Sandaracinobacter) genera, which phylogenetically belong to the α-1, α-3, and α-4 subclasses of the class Proteobacteria. Despite this phylogenetic information, the evolution and ancestry of their photosynthetic properties are unclear. We discuss several current proposals for the evolutionary origin of aerobic phototrophic bacteria. The closest phylogenetic relatives of aerobic phototrophic bacteria include facultatively anaerobic purple nonsulfur phototrophic bacteria. Since these two bacterial groups share many properties, yet have significant differences, we compare and contrast their physiology, with an emphasis on morphology and photosynthetic and other metabolic processes. PMID:9729607

  11. Interaction of mouse splenocytes and macrophages with bacterial strains in vitro: the effect of age in the immune response.

    PubMed

    Van Beek, A A; Hoogerland, J A; Belzer, C; De Vos, P; De Vos, W M; Savelkoul, H F J; Leenen, P J M

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics influence the immune system, both at the local and systemic level. Recent findings suggest the relation between microbiota and the immune system alters with age. Our objective was to address direct effects of six bacterial strains on immune cells from young and aged mice: Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1, Lactobacillus casei BL23, Lactococcus lactis MG1363, Bifidobacterium breve ATCC15700, Bifidobacterium infantis ATCC15697, and Akkermansia muciniphila ATCC BAA-835. We used splenocytes and naïve or interferon-γ-stimulated bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) as responder populations. All tested bacterial strains induced phenotypic and cytokine responses in splenocytes and BMDM. Based on magnitude of the cellular inflammatory response and cytokine profiles, two subgroups of bacteria were identified, i.e. L. plantarum and L. casei versus B. breve, B. infantis, and A. muciniphila. The latter group of bacteria induced high levels of cytokines produced under inflammatory conditions, including tumour necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10. Responses to L. lactis showed features of both subgroups. In addition, we compared responses by splenocytes and BMDM derived from young mice to those of aged mice, and found that splenocytes and BMDM derived from aged mice had an increased IL-10 production and dysregulated IL-6 and TNF production compared to young immune cells. Overall, our study shows differential inflammatory responses to distinct bacterial strains, and profound age-dependent effects. These findings, moreover, support the view that immune environment importantly influences bacterial immune effects. PMID:26689225

  12. The Kolumbo submarine volcano of Santorini island is a large pool of bacterial strains with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Bourbouli, Maria; Katsifas, Efstathios A; Papathanassiou, Evangelos; Karagouni, Amalia D

    2015-05-01

    Microbes in hydrothermal vents with their unique secondary metabolism may represent an untapped potential source of new natural products. In this study, samples were collected from the hydrothermal field of Kolumbo submarine volcano in the Aegean Sea, in order to isolate bacteria with antimicrobial activity. Eight hundred and thirty-two aerobic heterotrophic bacteria were isolated and then differentiated through BOX-PCR analysis at the strain level into 230 genomic fingerprints, which were screened against 13 different type strains (pathogenic and nonpathogenic) of Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. Forty-two out of 176 bioactive-producing genotypes (76 %) exhibited antimicrobial activity against at least four different type strains and were selected for 16S rDNA sequencing and screening for nonribosomal peptide (NRPS) and polyketide (PKS) synthases genes. The isolates were assigned to genus Bacillus and Proteobacteria, and 20 strains harbored either NRPS, PKS type I or both genes. This is the first report on the diversity of culturable mesophilic bacteria associated with antimicrobial activity from Kolumbo area; the extremely high proportion of antimicrobial-producing strains suggested that this unique environment may represent a potential reservoir of novel bioactive compounds. PMID:25627249

  13. Quantification, Distribution, and Possible Source of Bacterial Biofilm in Mouse Automated Watering Systems

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Thomas R; Maute, Carrie J; Cadillac, Joan M; Lee, Ji Young; Righter, Daniel J; Hugunin, Kelly MS; Deininger, Rolf A; Dysko, Robert C

    2008-01-01

    The use of automated watering systems for providing drinking water to rodents has become commonplace in the research setting. Little is known regarding bacterial biofilm growth within the water piping attached to the racks (manifolds). The purposes of this project were to determine whether the mouse oral flora contributed to the aerobic bacterial component of the rack biofilm, quantify bacterial growth in rack manifolds over 6 mo, assess our rack sanitation practices, and quantify bacterial biofilm development within sections of the manifold. By using standard methods of bacterial identification, the aerobic oral flora of 8 strains and stocks of mice were determined on their arrival at our animal facility. Ten rack manifolds were sampled before, during, and after sanitation and monthly for 6 mo. Manifolds were evaluated for aerobic bacterial growth by culture on R2A and trypticase soy agar, in addition to bacterial ATP quantification by bioluminescence. In addition, 6 racks were sampled at 32 accessible sites for evaluation of biofilm distribution within the watering manifold. The identified aerobic bacteria in the oral flora were inconsistent with the bacteria from the manifold, suggesting that the mice do not contribute to the biofilm bacteria. Bacterial growth in manifolds increased while they were in service, with exponential growth of the biofilm from months 3 to 6 and a significant decrease after sanitization. Bacterial biofilm distribution was not significantly different across location quartiles of the rack manifold, but bacterial levels differed between the shelf pipe and connecting elbow pipes. PMID:18351724

  14. Biostimulation of the autochthonous bacterial community and bioaugmentation of selected bacterial strains for the depletion of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in a historically contaminated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiGregorio, Simona; Ruffini Castglione, Monica; Gentini, Alessandro; Lorenzi, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a large group of organic contaminants causing hazards to organisms including humans. The objective of the study was (1) to validate the biostimulation of the autochthonous bacterial population by the amendment of lignocellulosic matrices inoculated with white rot fungi, to be exploited for the depletion of PAHs (5687 ppm) in a historical contaminated soil. (2) to validate the isolation of autochthonous bacterial strains capable to use PAHs as sole carbon source and their massive bioaugmentation for PAH depletion in a historical contaminated soil. The validation has been performed at mesocosm and pilot scale (7 tons of soil in a biopile). The two approaches end up with the complete depletion of the PAHs. A genotoxicological assessment of the process and of the soil at the end of the process of decontamination has been performed. The process of soil decontamination showed an increase in the genotoxicity of either the soil and the deriving elutriates. The bioaugmetation of selected bacterial strains determined the complete detoxification of the decontaminated soil after 21 weeks. The microbial ecology of the system during the process of decontamination has been monitored.

  15. Kibdelomycin Is a Bactericidal Broad-Spectrum Aerobic Antibacterial Agent

    PubMed Central

    Dayananth, Priya; Balibar, Carl J.; Garlisi, Charles G.; Lu, Jun; Kishii, Ryuta; Takei, Masaya; Fukuda, Yasumichi; Ha, Sookhee; Young, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics continues to grow and pose serious challenges, while the discovery rate for new antibiotics declines. Kibdelomycin is a recently discovered natural-product antibiotic that inhibits bacterial growth by inhibiting the bacterial DNA replication enzymes DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. It was reported to be a broad-spectrum aerobic Gram-positive agent with selective inhibition of the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium difficile. We have extended the profiling of kibdelomycin by using over 196 strains of Gram-positive and Gram-negative aerobic pathogens recovered from worldwide patient populations. We report the MIC50s, MIC90s, and bactericidal activities of kibdelomycin. We confirm the Gram-positive spectrum and report for the first time that kibdelomycin shows strong activity (MIC90, 0.125 μg/ml) against clinical strains of the Gram-negative nonfermenter Acinetobacter baumannii but only weak activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We confirm that well-characterized resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae show no cross-resistance to kibdelomycin and quinolones and coumarin antibiotics. We also show that kibdelomycin is not subject to efflux in Pseudomonas, though it is in Escherichia coli, and it is generally affected by the outer membrane permeability entry barrier in the nonfermenters P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii, which may be addressable by structure-based chemical modification. PMID:25845866

  16. Application of two bacterial strains for wastewater bioremediation and assessment of phenolics biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Paisio, Cintia E; Quevedo, María R; Talano, Melina A; González, Paola S; Agostini, Elizabeth

    2014-08-01

    The use of native bacteria is a useful strategy to decontaminate industrial effluents. In this work, two bacterial strains isolated from polluted environments constitutes a promising alternative since they were able to remove several phenolic compounds not only from synthetic solutions but also from effluents derived from a chemical industry and a tannery which are complex matrices. Acinetobacter sp. RTE 1.4 showed ability to completely remove 2-methoxyphenol (1000 mg/L) while Rhodococcus sp. CS 1 not only degrade the same concentration of this compound but also removed 4- chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol with high efficiency. Moreover, both bacteria degraded phenols naturally present or even exogenously added at high concentrations in effluents from the chemical industry and a tannery in short time (up to 5 d). In addition, a significant reduction of biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand values was achieved after 7 d of treatment for both effluents using Acinetobacter sp. RTE 1.4 and Rhodococcus sp. CS1, respectively. These results showed that Acinetobacter sp. RTE1.4 and Rhodococcus sp. CS 1 might be considered as useful biotechnological tools for an efficient treatment of different effluents, since they showed wide versatility to detoxify these complex matrices, even supplemented with high phenol concentrations. PMID:24956773

  17. Biodegradation potentiality of psychrophilic bacterial strain Oleispira antarctica RB-8(T).

    PubMed

    Gentile, G; Bonsignore, M; Santisi, S; Catalfamo, M; Giuliano, L; Genovese, L; Yakimov, M M; Denaro, R; Genovese, M; Cappello, S

    2016-04-15

    The present study is focused on assessing the growth and hydrocarbon-degrading capability of the psychrophilic strain Oleispira antarctica RB-8(T). This study considered six hydrocarbon mixtures that were tested for 22days at two different cultivation temperatures (4 and 15°C). During the incubation period, six sub-aliquots of each culture at different times were processed for total bacterial abundance and GC-FID (gas chromatography-flame ionization detection) hydrocarbon analysis. Results from DNA extraction and DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining showed a linear increase during the first 18days of the experiment in almost all the substrates used; both techniques showed a good match, but the difference in values obtained was approximately one order of magnitude. GC-FID results revealed a substantial hydrocarbon degradation rate in almost all hydrocarbon sources and in particular at 15°C rather than 4°C (for commercial oil engine, oily waste, fuel jet, and crude oil). A more efficient degradation was observed in cultures grown with diesel and bilge water at 4°C. PMID:26912198

  18. Lectin microarray reveals binding profiles of Lactobacillus casei strains in a comprehensive analysis of bacterial cell wall polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Emi; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Hirabarashi, Jun; Iino, Tohru; Sako, Tomoyuki

    2011-07-01

    We previously showed a pivotal role of the polysaccharide (PS) moiety in the cell wall of the Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (YIT 9029) as a possible immune modulator (E. Yasuda M. Serata, and T. Sako, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 74:4746-4755, 2008). To distinguish PS structures on the bacterial cell surface of individual strains in relation to their activities, it would be useful to have a rapid and high-throughput methodology. Recently, a new technique called lectin microarray was developed for rapid profiling of glycosylation in eukaryotic polymers and cell surfaces. Here, we report on the development of a simple and sensitive method based on this technology for direct analysis of intact bacterial cell surface glycomes. The method involves labeling bacterial cells with SYTOX Orange before incubation with the lectin microarray. After washing, bound cells are directly detected using an evanescent-field fluorescence scanner in a liquid phase. Using this method, we compared the cell surface glycomes from 16 different strains of L. casei. The patterns of lectin-binding affinity of most strains were found to be unique. There appears to be two types of lectin-binding profiles: the first is characterized by a few lectins, and the other is characterized by multiple lectins with different specificities. We also showed a dramatic change in the lectin-binding profile of a YIT 9029 derivative with a mutation in the cps1C gene, encoding a putative glycosyltransferase. In conclusion, the developed technique provided a novel strategy for rapid profiling and, more importantly, differentiating numerous bacterial strains with relevance to the biological functions of PS. PMID:21602390

  19. Lectin Microarray Reveals Binding Profiles of Lactobacillus casei Strains in a Comprehensive Analysis of Bacterial Cell Wall Polysaccharides▿†

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Emi; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabarashi, Jun; Iino, Tohru; Sako, Tomoyuki

    2011-01-01

    We previously showed a pivotal role of the polysaccharide (PS) moiety in the cell wall of the Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (YIT 9029) as a possible immune modulator (E. Yasuda M. Serata, and T. Sako, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 74:4746-4755, 2008). To distinguish PS structures on the bacterial cell surface of individual strains in relation to their activities, it would be useful to have a rapid and high-throughput methodology. Recently, a new technique called lectin microarray was developed for rapid profiling of glycosylation in eukaryotic polymers and cell surfaces. Here, we report on the development of a simple and sensitive method based on this technology for direct analysis of intact bacterial cell surface glycomes. The method involves labeling bacterial cells with SYTOX Orange before incubation with the lectin microarray. After washing, bound cells are directly detected using an evanescent-field fluorescence scanner in a liquid phase. Using this method, we compared the cell surface glycomes from 16 different strains of L. casei. The patterns of lectin-binding affinity of most strains were found to be unique. There appears to be two types of lectin-binding profiles: the first is characterized by a few lectins, and the other is characterized by multiple lectins with different specificities. We also showed a dramatic change in the lectin-binding profile of a YIT 9029 derivative with a mutation in the cps1C gene, encoding a putative glycosyltransferase. In conclusion, the developed technique provided a novel strategy for rapid profiling and, more importantly, differentiating numerous bacterial strains with relevance to the biological functions of PS. PMID:21602390

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Criibacterium bergeronii gen. nov., sp. nov., Strain CCRI-22567T, Isolated from a Vaginal Sample from a Woman with Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Maheux, Andrée F.; Bérubé, Ève; Boudreau, Dominique K.; Raymond, Frédéric; Corbeil, Jacques; Roy, Paul H.

    2016-01-01

    Criibacterium bergeronii gen. nov., sp. nov., CCRI-22567 is the type strain of the new genus Criibacterium. The strain was isolated from a woman with bacterial vaginosis. The genome assembly comprised 2,384,460 bp, with 34.4% G+C content. This is the first genome announcement of a strain belonging to the genus Criibacterium. PMID:27587833

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Criibacterium bergeronii gen. nov., sp. nov., Strain CCRI-22567T, Isolated from a Vaginal Sample from a Woman with Bacterial Vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Maheux, Andrée F; Bérubé, Ève; Boudreau, Dominique K; Raymond, Frédéric; Corbeil, Jacques; Roy, Paul H; Boissinot, Maurice; Omar, Rabeea F

    2016-01-01

    Criibacterium bergeronii gen. nov., sp. nov., CCRI-22567 is the type strain of the new genus Criibacterium The strain was isolated from a woman with bacterial vaginosis. The genome assembly comprised 2,384,460 bp, with 34.4% G+C content. This is the first genome announcement of a strain belonging to the genus Criibacterium. PMID:27587833

  2. [Algicidal activity against red-tide algaes by marine bacterial strain N3 isolated from a HABs area, southern China].

    PubMed

    Shi, Rong-jun; Huang, Hong-hui; Qi, Zhan-hui; Hu, Wei-an; Tian, Zi-yang; Dai, Ming

    2013-05-01

    A marine algicidal bacterium N3 was isolated from a HABs area in Mirs Bay, a subtropical bay, in southern China. Algicidal activity and algicidal mode against Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Scrippsiella trochoidea, Prorocentrum micans and Skeletonema costatum were observed by the liquid infection method. The results showed that there were no algicidal activities against P. tricornutum and S. costatum. However, when the bacterial volume fractions were 2% and 10% , S. trochoidea and P. micans could be killed, respectively. S. trochoidea cells which were exposed to strain N3 became irregular in shape and the cellular components lost their integrity and were decomposed. While, the P. micans cells became inflated and the cellular components aggregated, followed by cell lysis. Strain N3 killed S. trochoidea and P. micans directly, and the algicidal activities of the bacterial strain N3 was concentration-dependent. To S. trochoidea, 2% (V/V) of bacteria in algae showed the strongest algicidal activity, all of the S. trochoidea cells were killed within 120 h. But the growth rates of cells, in the 1% and 0. 1% treatment groups, were only slightly lower than that in the control group. In all treatment groups, the densities of strain N3 were in declining trends. While, to P. micans, 10% and 5% of bacteria in algae showed strong algicidal activities, 78% and 70% of the S. trochoidea were killed within 120 h, respectively. However, the number of S. trochoidea after exposure to 1% of bacterial cultures still increased up to 5 incubation days. And in the three treatment groups, the densities of strain N3 experienced a decrease process. The isolated strain N3 was identified as Bacillus sp. by morphological observation, physiological and biochemical characterization, and homology comparisons based on 16S rRNA sequences. PMID:23914549

  3. Reactivity of sera from sheep immunised with individual outer membrane proteins of Bacteroides nodosus against heterologous bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Emery, D L

    1984-09-01

    In order to identify those bacterial antigens which might be involved in immunity against ovine footrot, antisera were raised in sheep to 6 proteins in the outer membrane complex (OMC) of one strain of Bacteroides nodosus. Examination of the specificity of these antisera by Western blotting, crossed immunoelectrophoresis (XIEP) and IEP, revealed that they recognized the homologous OMC protein, but did not precipitate either undenatured pili or OMC, nor could they agglutinate the homologous bacteria. In contrast, anti-OMC and anti-pili sera could precipitate OMC or pili respectively, and agglutinate whole bacteria. Subsequent analysis of these sera against 5 strains of B. nodosus from different serogroups revealed that Proteins 1, 3 and 4 had a similar antigenic structure in all strains examined. The reactivity of anti-pili sera was restricted to homologous bacteria whereas anti-pilin sera (raised against denatured pili) also reacted with pilin from 2 of 3 heterologous strains. However, none of the patterns of staining or absorption of any of these sera matched the spectrum of cross-protection afforded by vaccination of sheep with B. nodosus strain 198 cells. The results question the role of individual OMC proteins in cross-protective immunity and may imply that interactions between several bacterial components are involved in the phenomenon. PMID:6208674

  4. Pan-proteomics, a concept for unifying quantitative proteome measurements when comparing closely-related bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, James A; Broszczak, Daniel A; Tennakoon, Imalka U K; Huygens, Flavia

    2016-04-01

    The comparison of proteomes between genetically heterogeneous bacterial strains may offer valuable insights into physiological diversity and function, particularly where such variation aids in the survival and virulence of clinically-relevant strains. However, reports of such comparisons frequently fail to account for underlying genetic variance. As a consequence, the current knowledge regarding bacterial physiological diversity at the protein level may be incomplete or inaccurate. To address this, greater consideration must be given to the impact of genetic heterogeneity on proteome comparisons. This may be possible through the use of pan-proteomics, an analytical concept that permits the ability to qualitatively and quantitatively compare the proteomes of genetically heterogeneous organisms. Limited examples of this emerging technology highlight currently unmet analytical challenges. In this article we define pan-proteomics, where its value lies in microbiology, and discuss the technical considerations critical to its successful execution and potential future application. PMID:26889693

  5. High-throughput genomic sequencing of cassava bacterial blight strains identifies conserved effectors to target for durable resistance.

    PubMed

    Bart, Rebecca; Cohn, Megan; Kassen, Andrew; McCallum, Emily J; Shybut, Mikel; Petriello, Annalise; Krasileva, Ksenia; Dahlbeck, Douglas; Medina, Cesar; Alicai, Titus; Kumar, Lava; Moreira, Leandro M; Rodrigues Neto, Júlio; Verdier, Valerie; Santana, María Angélica; Kositcharoenkul, Nuttima; Vanderschuren, Hervé; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bernal, Adriana; Staskawicz, Brian J

    2012-07-10

    Cassava bacterial blight (CBB), incited by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam), is the most important bacterial disease of cassava, a staple food source for millions of people in developing countries. Here we present a widely applicable strategy for elucidating the virulence components of a pathogen population. We report Illumina-based draft genomes for 65 Xam strains and deduce the phylogenetic relatedness of Xam across the areas where cassava is grown. Using an extensive database of effector proteins from animal and plant pathogens, we identify the effector repertoire for each sequenced strain and use a comparative sequence analysis to deduce the least polymorphic of the conserved effectors. These highly conserved effectors have been maintained over 11 countries, three continents, and 70 y of evolution and as such represent ideal targets for developing resistance strategies. PMID:22699502

  6. Colour removal from aqueous solutions of metal-complex azo dyes using bacterial cells of Shewanella strain J18 143.

    PubMed

    Li, Tie; Guthrie, James Thomas

    2010-06-01

    The decoloration treatment of textile dye effluents through biodegradation, using bacterial cells, has been studied as a possible means of solving some of the problems that are associated with the pollution of water sources by colorants. In this paper, the use of whole bacterial cells of Shewanella J18 143 for the reduction of aqueous solutions of selected mono-azo, metal-complex dyes, namely Irgalan Grey GLN, Irgalan Black RBLN and Irgalan Blue 3GL, was investigated. The effects of temperature, pH and dye concentration on colour removal were also investigated and shown to be important. The operative conditions for the removal of colour were 30 degrees C, at pH 6.8, with a final dye concentration of 0.12 g/L in the colour reduction system. This study provides an extension to the application of Shewanella strain J18 143 bacterial cells in the decoloration of textile wastewaters. PMID:20167478

  7. Genome Sequence of a Copper-Resistant Strain of Acidovorax citrulli Causing Bacterial Fruit Blotch of Melons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tielin; Yang, Yuwen

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial fruit blotch (BFB) of melons is a seed-borne disease caused by Acidovorax citrulli. We determined the draft genome of A. citrulli Tw6. The strain was isolated from a watermelon collected from Beijing, China. The A. citrulli Tw6 genome contains 5,080,614 bp and has a G+C content of 68.7 mol%. PMID:25908132

  8. IDENTIFICATION OF A FLAVOBACTERIUM STRAIN VIRULENT AGAINT GIARDIA LAMBLIA CYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have isolated a bacterial strain capable of killing the cyst form of Giardia lamblia, from a Kentucky stream. This bacterium, designated Sun4, is a Gram negative, aerobic rod which produces a yellow pigment, but not of the flexirubin-type. Although true gliding motility has no...

  9. Metagenomic characterization of 'Candidatus Defluviicoccus tetraformis strain TFO71', a tetrad-forming organism, predominant in an anaerobic-aerobic membrane bioreactor with deteriorated biological phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Nobu, Masaru K; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Kubota, Kengo; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2014-09-01

    In an acetate-fed anaerobic-aerobic membrane bioreactor with deteriorated enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR), Defluviicoccus-related tetrad-forming organisms (DTFO) were observed to predominate in the microbial community. Using metagenomics, a partial genome of the predominant DTFO, 'Candidatus Defluviicoccus tetraformis strain TFO71', was successfully constructed and characterized. Examining the genome confirmed the presence of genes related to the synthesis and degradation of glycogen and polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA), which function as energy and carbon storage compounds. TFO71 and 'Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis' (CAP) UW-1 and CAP UW-2, representative polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO), have PHA metabolism-related genes with high homology, but TFO71 has unique genes for PHA synthesis, gene regulation and granule management. We further discovered genes encoding DTFO polyphosphate (polyP) synthesis, suggesting that TFO71 may synthesize polyP under untested conditions. However, TFO71 may not activate these genes under EBPR conditions because the retrieved genome does not contain all inorganic phosphate transporters that are characteristic of PAOs (CAP UW-1, CAP UW-2, Microlunatus phosphovorus NM-1 and Tetrasphaera species). As a first step in characterizing EBPR-associated DTFO metabolism, this study identifies important differences between DTFO and PAO that may contribute to EBPR community competition and deterioration. PMID:24428681

  10. Relationship Between Bacterial Strain Type, Host Biomarkers, and Mortality in Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Walker, A. Sarah; Eyre, David W.; Wyllie, David H.; Dingle, Kate E.; Griffiths, David; Shine, Brian; Oakley, Sarah; O'Connor, Lily; Finney, John; Vaughan, Alison; Crook, Derrick W.; Wilcox, Mark H.; Peto, Tim E. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Despite substantial interest in biomarkers, their impact on clinical outcomes and variation with bacterial strain has rarely been explored using integrated databases. Methods. From September 2006 to May 2011, strains isolated from Clostridium difficile toxin enzyme immunoassay (EIA)–positive fecal samples from Oxfordshire, United Kingdom (approximately 600 000 people) underwent multilocus sequence typing. Fourteen-day mortality and levels of 15 baseline biomarkers were compared between consecutive C. difficile infections (CDIs) from different clades/sequence types (STs) and EIA-negative controls using Cox and normal regression adjusted for demographic/clinical factors. Results. Fourteen-day mortality was 13% in 2222 adults with 2745 EIA-positive samples (median, 78 years) vs 5% in 20 722 adults with 27 550 EIA-negative samples (median, 74 years) (absolute attributable mortality, 7.7%; 95% CI, 6.4%–9.0%). Mortality was highest in clade 5 CDIs (25% [16 of 63]; polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotype 078/ST 11), then clade 2 (20% [111 of 560]; 99% PCR ribotype 027/ST 1) versus clade 1 (12% [137 of 1168]; adjusted P < .0001). Within clade 1, 14-day mortality was only 4% (3 of 84) in ST 44 (PCR ribotype 015) (adjusted P = .05 vs other clade 1). Mean baseline neutrophil counts also varied significantly by genotype: 12.4, 11.6, and 9.5 × 109 neutrophils/L for clades 5, 2 and 1, respectively, vs 7.0 × 109 neutrophils/L in EIA-negative controls (P < .0001) and 7.9 × 109 neutrophils/L in ST 44 (P = .08). There were strong associations between C. difficile-type-specific effects on mortality and neutrophil/white cell counts (rho = 0.48), C-reactive-protein (rho = 0.43), eosinophil counts (rho = −0.45), and serum albumin (rho = −0.47). Biomarkers predicted 30%–40% of clade-specific mortality differences. Conclusions. C. difficile genotype predicts mortality, and excess mortality correlates with genotype-specific changes in biomarkers, strongly

  11. Discovery and application of new bacterial strains for asymmetric synthesis of L-tert-butyl leucine in high enantioselectivity.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jian-Zhong; Chang, Dong-Liang; Zhang, Jie

    2011-06-01

    Discovery of new bacterial strains with fast identification in a miniaturized system was performed for the synthesis of optically active L-tert-butyl leucine. With tert-butyl leucine amide as nitrogen source, one bacterial strain with high conversion and high enantioselectivity was discovered among 120 isolated microorganisms from local soils and identified as Mycobacterium sp. JX009. Glucose and ammonium chloride were examined as the good carbon source and nitrogen source for the cells' growth separately. The cells grew better at 30 °C and at pH 7.5 with higher activity of 2,650 U/l in comparison with other conditions. Cells' stability was improved by immobilization on synthetic resin 0730 without pretreatment. Tert-butyl leucine amide (30 mM) was successfully hydrolyzed by immobilized cells and examined as the highest chemical concentration that cells could endure. After six reaction cycles, the immobilized cells retained 90% activity with production of L-tert-butyl leucine in 98% ee. The results firstly reported the application of new bacterial strain in the hydrolysis of tert-butyl leucine amide to produce optically active L-tert-butyl leucine in an efficient way with investigation in detail. PMID:21153891

  12. Hydrogen production from organic substrates in an aerobic nitrogen-fixing marine unicellular cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain Miami BG 043511

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.H.; Mitsui, A. )

    1994-11-20

    Synechococcus sp. strain Miami BG 043511 exhibits very high H[sub 2] photoproduction from water, but the H[sub 2] photo-production capability is lost rapidly with the age of the batch culture. The decrease of the capability coincides with the decrease of cellular glucose content. However, H[sub 2] photoproduction capability can be restored by the addition of organic substrates. Among 40 organic compounds tested, carbohydrates such as glucose, fructose, maltose, and sucrose were effective electron donors. Among organic acids tested, only pyruvate was an effective electron donor. Among alcohols tested, glycerol was a good electron donor, whereas ethanol was a poor but positive electron donor. These results demonstrate that this unicellular cyanobacterium exhibits a wide substrate specificity for H[sub 2] photoproduction but has a different substrate specificity compared to photosynthetic bacteria. The maximum rates of H[sub 2] photoproduction from a 6-day-old batch culture with 25 mmol of pyruvate, glucose, maltose, sucrose, fructose, and glycerol were 1.11, 0.62, 0.05, 0.47, 0.30, and 0.39 [mu]moles per mg cell dry weight per hour respectively. Therefore, this cyanobacterial strain may have a potential significance in removing organic materials from the wastewater and simultaneously transforming them to H[sub 2] gas, a pollution-free energy. The activity of nitrogenase, which catalyzes hydrogen production, completely disappeared when intracellular glucose was used up, but it could be restored by the addition of organic substrates such as glucose and pyruvate.

  13. Simultaneous transport of two bacterial strains in intact cores from Oyster, Virginia: biological effects and numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hailiang; Rothmel, Randi; Onstott, Tullis C; Fuller, Mark E; DeFlaun, Mary F; Streger, Sheryl H; Dunlap, Robb; Fletcher, Madilyn

    2002-05-01

    The transport characteristics of two adhesion-deficient, indigenous groundwater strains, Comamonas sp. strain DA001 and Erwinia herbicola OYS2-A, were studied by using intact sediment cores (7 by 50 cm) from Oyster, Va. Both strains are gram-negative rods (1.10 by 0.56 and 1.56 by 0.46 microm, respectively) with strongly hydrophilic membranes and a slightly negative surface charge. The two strains exhibited markedly different behaviors when they were transported through granular porous sediment. To eliminate any effects of physical and chemical heterogeneity on bacterial transport and thus isolate the biological effect, the two strains were simultaneously injected into the same core. DA001 cells were metabolically labeled with (35)S and tagged with a vital fluorescent stain, while OYS2-A cells were metabolically labeled with (14)C. The fast decay of (35)S allowed deconvolution of the two isotopes (and therefore the two strains). Dramatic differences in the transport behaviors were observed. The breakthrough of DA001 and the breakthrough of OYS2-A both occurred before the breakthrough of a conservative tracer (termed differential advection), with effluent recoveries of 55 and 30%, respectively. The retained bacterial concentration of OYS2-A in the sediment was twofold higher than that of DA001. Among the cell properties analyzed, the statistically significant differences between the two strains were cell length and diameter. The shorter, larger-diameter DA001 cells displayed a higher effluent recovery than the longer, smaller-diameter OYS2-A cells. CXTFIT modeling results indicated that compared to the DA001 cells, the OYS2-A cells experienced lower pore velocity, higher porosity, a higher attachment rate, and a lower detachment rate. All these factors may contribute to the observed differences in transport. PMID:11976080

  14. Implications of Genome-Based Discrimination between Clostridium botulinum Group I and Clostridium sporogenes Strains for Bacterial Taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Weigand, Michael R.; Pena-Gonzalez, Angela; Shirey, Timothy B.; Broeker, Robin G.; Ishaq, Maliha K.; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.

    2015-01-01

    Taxonomic classification of Clostridium botulinum is based on the production of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), while closely related, nontoxic organisms are classified as Clostridium sporogenes. However, this taxonomic organization does not accurately mirror phylogenetic relationships between these species. A phylogenetic reconstruction using 2,016 orthologous genes shared among strains of C. botulinum group I and C. sporogenes clearly separated these two species into discrete clades which showed ∼93% average nucleotide identity (ANI) between them. Clustering of strains based on the presence of variable orthologs revealed 143 C. sporogenes clade-specific genetic signatures, a subset of which were further evaluated for their ability to correctly classify a panel of presumptive C. sporogenes strains by PCR. Genome sequencing of several C. sporogenes strains lacking these signatures confirmed that they clustered with C. botulinum strains in a core genome phylogenetic tree. Our analysis also identified C. botulinum strains that contained C. sporogenes clade-specific signatures and phylogenetically clustered with C. sporogenes strains. The genome sequences of two bont/B2-containing strains belonging to the C. sporogenes clade contained regions with similarity to a bont-bearing plasmid (pCLD), while two different strains belonging to the C. botulinum clade carried bont/B2 on the chromosome. These results indicate that bont/B2 was likely acquired by C. sporogenes strains through horizontal gene transfer. The genome-based classification of these species used to identify candidate genes for the development of rapid assays for molecular identification may be applicable to additional bacterial species that are challenging with respect to their classification. PMID:26048939

  15. Bioaugmentation and enhanced formation of microbial granules used in aerobic wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Volodymyr; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Tay, Stephen Tiong-Lee; Tay, Joo-Hwa

    2006-04-01

    Microbial aggregates of an aerobic granular sludge can be used for the treatment of industrial or municipal wastewater, but their formation from a microbial activated sludge requires several weeks. Therefore, the aim of this research was the selection of microbial cultures to shorten the granule-forming period from several weeks to a few days. An enrichment culture with the ability to accelerate granulation was obtained by repeating the selection and batch cultivation of fast-settling microbial aggregates isolated from the aerobic granular sludge. Bacterial cultures of Klebsiella pneumoniae strain B and Pseudomonas veronii strain F, with self-aggregation indexes of 65 and 51%, respectively, and a coaggregation index of 58%, were isolated from the enrichment culture. A mixture of these strains with the activated sludge was used as an inoculum in an experimental sequencing batch reactor to start up an aerobic granulation process. Aerobic granules with a mean diameter of 446+/-76 microm were formed in an experiment after 8 days of cultivation, but microbial granules were absent in controls. Considering biosafety issues, K. pneumoniae strain B was excluded from further studies, but P. veronii strain F was selected for larger-scale testing. PMID:16091930

  16. Differential neutrophil responses to bacterial stimuli: Streptococcal strains are potent inducers of heparin-binding protein and resistin-release

    PubMed Central

    Snäll, Johanna; Linnér, Anna; Uhlmann, Julia; Siemens, Nikolai; Ibold, Heike; Janos, Marton; Linder, Adam; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Herwald, Heiko; Johansson, Linda; Norrby-Teglund, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are critical for the control of bacterial infections, but they may also contribute to disease pathology. Here we explore neutrophil responses, in particular the release of sepsis-associated factors heparin-binding protein (HBP) and resistin in relation to specific bacterial stimuli and sepsis of varying aetiology. Analyses of HBP and resistin in plasma of septic patients revealed elevated levels as compared to non-infected critically ill patients. HBP and resistin correlated significantly in septic patients, with the strongest association seen in group A streptococcal (GAS) cases. In vitro stimulation of human neutrophils revealed that fixed streptococcal strains induced significantly higher release of HBP and resistin, as compared to Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli. Similarly, neutrophils stimulated with the streptococcal M1-protein showed a significant increase in co-localization of HBP and resistin positive granules as well as exocytosis of these factors, as compared to LPS. Using a GAS strain deficient in M1-protein expression had negligible effect on neutrophil activation, while a strain deficient in the stand-alone regulator MsmR was significantly less stimulatory as compared to its wild type strain. Taken together, the findings suggest that the streptococcal activation of neutrophils is multifactorial and involves, but is not limited to, proteins encoded by the FCT-locus. PMID:26887258

  17. Protein Expression Profile of an Environmentally Important Bacterial Strain: the Chromate Response of Arthrobacter Species Strain FB24

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, Kristene L.; Turse, Joshua E.; Nakatsu, C. H.; Konopka, Allan

    2011-05-03

    The global proteomic response of Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 to different levels of chromate stress was evaluated with both two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC/LC-MS/MS) [Henne et al. 2009b]. Proteome coverage of 22% and 71% was obtained with 2-DGE and LC/LC-MS/MS, respectively. The strong response of strain FB24 to chromate suggests a condition of sulfur limitation, which could be driven by competition for the sulfate transporter by the structurally similar chromate ion. Additionally, the involvement of genes hypothesized to be directly involved in chromate resistance in strain FB24 was supported at the protein level.

  18. Differentiation of xanthomonads causing the bacterial leaf spot of poinsettia in China from the pathotype strain of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. poinsettiicola *

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Xie, Guan-lin; Swings, J.

    2005-01-01

    In October 2003, a new bacterial disease with symptoms similar to those caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. poinsettiicola was observed on poinsettia leaves at a flower nursery in Zhejiang Province of China. Three Xanthomonas strains were isolated from infected plants and classified as X. axonopodis. They were differentiated from the pathotype strain LMG849 of X. axonopodis pv. poinsettiicola causing bacterial leaf spot of poinsettia by comparison of pathogenicity, substrate utilization and BOX-PCR genomic fingerprints. PMID:15909325

  19. Induced drought tolerance through wild and mutant bacterial strain Pseudomonas simiae in mung bean (Vigna radiata L.).

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sarita; Vaishnav, Anukool; Jain, Shekhar; Varma, Ajit; Choudhary, Devendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The present study focused on the overproducing mutant of a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) Pseudomonas simiae strain AU (MTCC-12057) for significant drought tolerance in mung bean plants. Five mutants namely AU-M1, AU-M2, AU-M3, AU-M4 and AU-M5 were made after treatment of wild type strain with N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Mutant strain AU-M4 was recorded for enhanced ACC deaminase (ACC-D) activity, indole acetic acid (IAA) production and inorganic phosphate (Pi) solubilization compared to wild strain and other four mutant strains under drought condition. AU-M4 showed higher phosphate solubilization index (8.17) together with higher ACC-D activity (98 nmol/mg/h) and IAA concentration (69.35 µg/ml) compared with the wild type P. simiae strain AU ACC-D activity (79 nmol/mg/h) and IAA concentration (38.98 µg/ml) respectively. In this report, we investigated the effect of both wild and mutant type bacterial strain on mung bean plants under drought stress. Results showed that mutant AU-M4 and wild type strain AU inoculated plants exhibited superior tolerance against drought stress, as shown by their enhanced plant biomass (fresh weight), higher water content, higher proline accumulation and lower osmotic stress injury. Mutant AU-M4 and wild strain AU inoculated plants reduced the ethylene level by 59 and 45% respectively, compared to the control under stress condition. Furthermore, bacterial inoculated plants showed enhanced induced systemic drought tolerance by reducing stomata size and net photosynthesis resulting higher water content in mung bean plants that may help in survival of plants during drought condition. To mitigate the effects of drought stress, use of PGPR will be needed to ensure sufficient production of food from crop plants. Taking current leads available, concerted future research is needed in this area, particularly on field evaluation with application of potential microorganisms. PMID:26712619

  20. Comparative analysis of bacterial community and antibiotic-resistant strains in different developmental stages of the housefly (Musca domestica).

    PubMed

    Wei, Ting; Hu, Jun; Miyanaga, Kazuhiko; Tanji, Yasunori

    2013-02-01

    The housefly (Musca domestica) is an important host for a variety of bacteria, including some pathogenic and antibiotic-resistant strains. To further investigate the relationship between the housefly and the bacteria it harbors, it is necessary to understand the fate of microorganisms during the larval metamorphosis. The major bacterial communities in three developmental stages of the housefly (maggot, pupa, and adult fly) were investigated by a culture-independent method, polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis of 16S rRNA genes. The bacteria that were identified using DGGE analysis spanned phyla Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. Changes in the predominant genera were observed during the housefly development. Bacteroides, Koukoulia, and Schineria were detected in maggots, Neisseria in pupae, and Macrococcus, Lactococcus, and Kurthia in adult flies. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria were screened using a selective medium and tested for antibiotic susceptibility. Most resistant isolates from maggots and pupae were classified as Proteus spp., while those from adult flies were much more diverse and spanned 12 genera. Among 20 tested strains across the three stages, 18 were resistant to at least two antibiotics. Overall, we demonstrated that there are changes in the major bacterial communities and antibiotic-resistant strains as the housefly develops. PMID:22526786

  1. [Isolation and identification of a bacterial strain JS018 capable of degrading several kinds of organophosphate pesticides].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu-Ji; Deng, You-Jin; Liu, Xin-Rui; Xie, Bao-Gui; Hu, Fang-Ping

    2006-06-01

    Organophosphate pesticides are used widely all over the world and play an important role in plant pest control. However these pesticides are considered as pollutants and harmful to human health. To search for microorganisms that can degrade organophosphate pesticides with high efficiency, a bacterial strain, coded as JS018, was isolated and screened from the soil in the vicinity of Shanming Pesticides Factory, Shanming, Fujian. Laboratory tests showed that the bacterium could degrade several kinds of organophosphate pesticides, such as Parathion-methyl and phoxin. The strain's degrading rates on phoxin, Parathion-methyl, hostathion and dichlorvos in LB liquid fermentation medium for 36 h were 99%, 96%, 80.4% and 69.0% respectively. The bacterial colonies on LB plate appeared shiny and pale-pink in color. The bacteria were Gram-negative coccoids, 0.5 - 0.7 microm in diameter. They grew well at 30 - 38 degrees C and pH 7.0 - 9.0. The optimal temperature and pH for cell growth was 32 degrees C and pH 7.5 - 8.0, respectively. They did not grow in medium containing 6% or more NaCl. The antibiotic susceptibility tests showed that the strain was resistant to ampicillin, penicillin and lincomycin. It was sensitive to kanamycin, tetracycline and gentamicin. Laboratory tests also showed that the strain could ferment D-glucose, trehalose, melezitose and ethanol. It was negative in the production of indole and hydrogen sulfide. It could not liquefy gelatin, utilize citrate, nor ferment L-arabinose, sucrose, D-mannitol, D-xylose, fructose, D-galactose, maltose or lactose. The catalase, urease and nitrate reduction were positive. Based on its morphological, physiological and biochemical properties as well as the 16S rDNA sequence analysis result, the strain was tentatively identified as Roseomonas sp. PMID:16933622

  2. Cloning of a very virulent plus, 686 strain of Marek's disease virus as a bacterial artificial chromosome.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Sanjay M; Sun, Aijun; Khan, Owais A; Lee, Lucy F; Lupiani, Blanca

    2013-06-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vectors were first developed to facilitate propagation and manipulation of large DNA fragments. This technology was later used to clone full-length genomes of large DNA viruses to study viral gene function. Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a highly oncogenic herpesvirus that causes rapid induction of T-cell lymphomas in chickens. Based on the virus's ability to cause disease in vaccinated chickens, MDV strains are classified into pathotypes, with the most virulent strains belonging to the very virulent plus (vv+) pathotype. Here we report the construction of BAC clones of 686 (686-BAC), a vv+ strain of MDV. Transfection of DNA isolated from two independent clones into duck embryo fibroblasts resulted in recovery of infectious virus. Pathogenesis studies showed that the BAC-derived 686 viruses were more virulent than Md5, a vv strain of MDV. With the use of a two-step red-mediated mutagenesis process, both copies of viral interleukin 8 (vIL-8) were deleted from the MDV genome, showing that 686-BACs were amenable to mutagenesis techniques. The generation of BAC clones from a vv+ strain of MDV is a significant step toward understanding molecular basis of MDV pathogenesis. PMID:23901763

  3. Identification of a New Marine Bacterial Strain SD8 and Optimization of Its Culture Conditions for Producing Alkaline Protease

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Hongxia; Yang, Muyang; Wang, Liping; Xian, Cory J.

    2015-01-01

    While much attention has been given to marine microorganisms for production of enzymes, which in general are relatively more stable and active compared to those from plants and animals, studies on alkaline protease production from marine microorganisms have been very limited. In the present study, the alkaline protease producing marine bacterial strain SD8 isolated from sea muds in the Geziwo Qinhuangdao sea area of China was characterized and its optimal culture conditions were investigated. Strain SD8 was initially classified to belong to genus Pseudomonas by morphological, physiological and biochemical characterizations, and then through 16S rDNA sequence it was identified to be likely Pseudomonas hibiscicola. In addition, the culture mediums, carbon sources and culture conditions of strain SD8 were optimized for maximum production of alkaline protease. Optimum enzyme production (236U/mL when cultured bacteria being at 0.75 mg dry weight/mL fermentation broth) was obtained when the isolate at a 3% inoculum size was grown in LB medium at 20 mL medium/100mL Erlenmeyer flask for 48h culture at 30°C with an initial of pH 7.5. This was the first report of strain Pseudomonas hibiscicola secreting alkaline protease, and the data for its optimal cultural conditions for alkaline protease production has laid a foundation for future exploration for the potential use of SD8 strain for alkaline protease production. PMID:26716833

  4. Identification of a New Marine Bacterial Strain SD8 and Optimization of Its Culture Conditions for Producing Alkaline Protease.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongxia; Yang, Muyang; Wang, Liping; Xian, Cory J

    2015-01-01

    While much attention has been given to marine microorganisms for production of enzymes, which in general are relatively more stable and active compared to those from plants and animals, studies on alkaline protease production from marine microorganisms have been very limited. In the present study, the alkaline protease producing marine bacterial strain SD8 isolated from sea muds in the Geziwo Qinhuangdao sea area of China was characterized and its optimal culture conditions were investigated. Strain SD8 was initially classified to belong to genus Pseudomonas by morphological, physiological and biochemical characterizations, and then through 16S rDNA sequence it was identified to be likely Pseudomonas hibiscicola. In addition, the culture mediums, carbon sources and culture conditions of strain SD8 were optimized for maximum production of alkaline protease. Optimum enzyme production (236U/mL when cultured bacteria being at 0.75 mg dry weight/mL fermentation broth) was obtained when the isolate at a 3% inoculum size was grown in LB medium at 20 mL medium/100mL Erlenmeyer flask for 48h culture at 30°C with an initial of pH 7.5. This was the first report of strain Pseudomonas hibiscicola secreting alkaline protease, and the data for its optimal cultural conditions for alkaline protease production has laid a foundation for future exploration for the potential use of SD8 strain for alkaline protease production. PMID:26716833

  5. Characterization of a bacterial strain capable of degrading DDT congeners and its use in bioremediation of contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hua; Dong, Bin; Yan, Hu; Tang, Feifan; Yu, Yunlong

    2010-12-15

    A bacterial strain DDT-6 (D6) capable of utilizing dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD), and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) (DDTs) as its sole carbon and energy source was isolated and identified as Sphingobacterium sp. The degradation of DDTs by strain D6 in mineral salt medium and in field soil was investigated. The half-lives of the degradation of DDTs increased with increasing concentration ranging from 1 to 50 mg L(-1). Favorable degradation conditions for DDTs by strain D6 were found to be pH 7.0 and 30°C. The degradation of DDTs by strain D6 was found to be statistically significantly enhanced (p ≤ 0.05) by the addition of glucose. Based on the metabolites detected, a pathway was proposed for DDT degradation in which it undergoes dechlorination, hydrogenation, dioxygenation, decarboxylation, hydroxylation, and phenyl ring-cleavage reactions to complete the mineralization process. The addition of strain D6 into the contaminated soils was found to statistically significantly enhance (p ≤ 0.05) the degradation of DDTs. The results indicate that the isolate D6 can be used successfully for the removal or detoxification of residues of DDTs in contaminated soil. PMID:20828928

  6. Engineering control of bacterial cellulose production using a genetic toolkit and a new cellulose-producing strain

    PubMed Central

    Florea, Michael; Hagemann, Henrik; Santosa, Gabriella; Micklem, Chris N.; Spencer-Milnes, Xenia; de Arroyo Garcia, Laura; Paschou, Despoina; Lazenbatt, Christopher; Kong, Deze; Chughtai, Haroon; Jensen, Kirsten; Freemont, Paul S.; Kitney, Richard; Reeve, Benjamin; Ellis, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose is a strong and ultrapure form of cellulose produced naturally by several species of the Acetobacteraceae. Its high strength, purity, and biocompatibility make it of great interest to materials science; however, precise control of its biosynthesis has remained a challenge for biotechnology. Here we isolate a strain of Komagataeibacter rhaeticus (K. rhaeticus iGEM) that can produce cellulose at high yields, grow in low-nitrogen conditions, and is highly resistant to toxic chemicals. We achieved external control over its bacterial cellulose production through development of a modular genetic toolkit that enables rational reprogramming of the cell. To further its use as an organism for biotechnology, we sequenced its genome and demonstrate genetic circuits that enable functionalization and patterning of heterologous gene expression within the cellulose matrix. This work lays the foundations for using genetic engineering to produce cellulose-based materials, with numerous applications in basic science, materials engineering, and biotechnology. PMID:27247386

  7. Engineering control of bacterial cellulose production using a genetic toolkit and a new cellulose-producing strain.

    PubMed

    Florea, Michael; Hagemann, Henrik; Santosa, Gabriella; Abbott, James; Micklem, Chris N; Spencer-Milnes, Xenia; de Arroyo Garcia, Laura; Paschou, Despoina; Lazenbatt, Christopher; Kong, Deze; Chughtai, Haroon; Jensen, Kirsten; Freemont, Paul S; Kitney, Richard; Reeve, Benjamin; Ellis, Tom

    2016-06-14

    Bacterial cellulose is a strong and ultrapure form of cellulose produced naturally by several species of the Acetobacteraceae Its high strength, purity, and biocompatibility make it of great interest to materials science; however, precise control of its biosynthesis has remained a challenge for biotechnology. Here we isolate a strain of Komagataeibacter rhaeticus (K. rhaeticus iGEM) that can produce cellulose at high yields, grow in low-nitrogen conditions, and is highly resistant to toxic chemicals. We achieved external control over its bacterial cellulose production through development of a modular genetic toolkit that enables rational reprogramming of the cell. To further its use as an organism for biotechnology, we sequenced its genome and demonstrate genetic circuits that enable functionalization and patterning of heterologous gene expression within the cellulose matrix. This work lays the foundations for using genetic engineering to produce cellulose-based materials, with numerous applications in basic science, materials engineering, and biotechnology. PMID:27247386

  8. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of crude protein extracts from seeds of six different medical plants against standard bacterial strains

    PubMed Central

    Al Akeel, Raid; Al-Sheikh, Yazeed; Mateen, Ayesha; Syed, Rabbani; Janardhan, K.; Gupta, V.C.

    2013-01-01

    A huge group of natural antimicrobial compounds are active against a large spectrum of bacterial strains causing infectious threat. The present study was conducted to investigate the crude extracts of antimicrobial protein and peptide efficacy from six medicinal plant seeds. Extraction was carried out in Sodium phosphate citrate buffer, and Sodium acetate buffer using different pH. Antimicrobial activities of these plants were determined by the microbiological technique using Agar well diffusion Assay. Extremely strong activity was observed in the seed extracts of Allium ascolinicum extracted in sodium phosphate citrate buffer at pH (5.8) against Proteus vulgaris, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus with zone of inhibition 17 mm, 17 mm and 15 mm and Rumex vesicarius at pH (7.6), Ammi majus at pH (6.8), Cichorium intybus at pH (7.4) and Cucumis sativus at pH (7.8) also showed better sensitivity against the bacterial strains with zone of inhibition ranges 16–10 mm and some of the strains were found to be resistant. Antibacterial activity pattern of different plant extracts prepared in sodium acetate buffer pH (6.5), among all the plant seed extracts used Foeniculum vulgare had shown good inhibition in all the bacterial strains used, with zone of inhibition ranges 11–12.5 mm, The extracts of C. intybus and C. sativus were found to be effective with zone of inhibition 11–6 mm and some of the strains were found to be resistant. Most of the strains found to have shown better sensitivity compared with the standard antibiotic Chloramphenicol (25 mcg). Our results showed that the plants used for our study are the richest source for antimicrobial proteins and peptides and they may be used for industrial extraction and isolation of antimicrobial compounds which may find a place in medicine industry as constituents of antibiotics. PMID:24600307

  9. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of crude protein extracts from seeds of six different medical plants against standard bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Al Akeel, Raid; Al-Sheikh, Yazeed; Mateen, Ayesha; Syed, Rabbani; Janardhan, K; Gupta, V C

    2014-04-01

    A huge group of natural antimicrobial compounds are active against a large spectrum of bacterial strains causing infectious threat. The present study was conducted to investigate the crude extracts of antimicrobial protein and peptide efficacy from six medicinal plant seeds. Extraction was carried out in Sodium phosphate citrate buffer, and Sodium acetate buffer using different pH. Antimicrobial activities of these plants were determined by the microbiological technique using Agar well diffusion Assay. Extremely strong activity was observed in the seed extracts of Allium ascolinicum extracted in sodium phosphate citrate buffer at pH (5.8) against Proteus vulgaris, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus with zone of inhibition 17 mm, 17 mm and 15 mm and Rumex vesicarius at pH (7.6), Ammi majus at pH (6.8), Cichorium intybus at pH (7.4) and Cucumis sativus at pH (7.8) also showed better sensitivity against the bacterial strains with zone of inhibition ranges 16-10 mm and some of the strains were found to be resistant. Antibacterial activity pattern of different plant extracts prepared in sodium acetate buffer pH (6.5), among all the plant seed extracts used Foeniculum vulgare had shown good inhibition in all the bacterial strains used, with zone of inhibition ranges 11-12.5 mm, The extracts of C. intybus and C. sativus were found to be effective with zone of inhibition 11-6 mm and some of the strains were found to be resistant. Most of the strains found to have shown better sensitivity compared with the standard antibiotic Chloramphenicol (25 mcg). Our results showed that the plants used for our study are the richest source for antimicrobial proteins and peptides and they may be used for industrial extraction and isolation of antimicrobial compounds which may find a place in medicine industry as constituents of antibiotics. PMID:24600307

  10. Effects of ruminal dosing of Holstein cows with Megasphaera elsdenii on milk fat production, ruminal chemistry, and bacterial strain persistence.

    PubMed

    Weimer, P J; Da Silva Cabral, L; Cacite, F

    2015-11-01

    Megasphaera elsdenii is a lactate-utilizing bacterium whose ruminal abundance has been shown to be greatly elevated during milk fat depression (MFD). To further examine this association, a total of 23 cannulated multiparous Holstein cows were examined in 3 experiments in which strains of M. elsdenii were directly dosed into the rumen (~2 × 10(12) cells/dose); control cows were dosed with sterile lactate-free culture medium. Cows were fed a total mixed ration (292 g of starch/kg of dry matter) that contained primarily corn silage, alfalfa silage, finely ground high-moisture corn, supplemental protein, and corn oil (3 g/kg of dry matter). Experiments differed in stage of lactation of the cows (early or late), dosing events (single dose, or 4 doses over a 5-d period), timing of dose (prefeed or 4 h postfeed), and M. elsdenii strain (laboratory strain YI9 or 3 strains isolated from cows in the same herd). Dry matter intake and milk yield and composition were measured from 5 to 0 d before dosing and 1 to 7d after first dosing, plus later time points that varied by experiment. Milk yield and composition were not affected by dosing. Megasphaera elsdenii was quantified in the liquid phase of ruminal contents by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis, or by PCR with relative quantification (M. elsdenii 16S rRNA gene copy number as a percentage of total bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies). Neither the M. elsdenii-dosed or control cows displayed MFD after dosing, and in almost all cases M. elsdenii populations returned to low baseline levels (<0.02% of 16S rRNA gene copy number) within 24 h of dosing. This rapid decline in M. elsdenii also occurred in several cows that were dosed with a strain of M. elsdenii that had been isolated from that particular cow during a previous bout of MFD. Ruminal pH and total millimolar volatile fatty acids and lactate did not differ between dosed and control cows, although acetate-to-propionate ratio declined in both groups and butyrate

  11. Inhibitory activity of Salvadora persica extracts against oral bacterial strains associated with periodontitis: An in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Amir Alireza, Rasouli Ghahroudi; Afsaneh, Rezaei; Seied Hosein, Mohseni Salehifard; Siamak, Yaghoobee; Afshin, Khorsand; Zeinab, Kadkhoda; Mahvash, Moosavi Jazi; Amir Reza, Rokn

    2014-01-01

    Aims The use of natural plant extracts in pharmacology, medicine and dental hygiene has found a growing interest in modern scientific research. Salvadora persica is a natural tree whose fibrous branches have been approved by the World Health Organization for oral hygiene. Periodontitis is a highly prevalent adult gingival disease that leads to bone destruction and connective tissue attachment loss. The aim of this research was assessment the antimicrobial activities of methanolic extract of Salvadora persica (miswak) on isolated strains from the oral fluid. Methods In practical section, 50 female university students (21.4 ± 1 year) participated in the study. Based on examination by a periodontist, they were grouped into (Group I, n = 21) and (Group II, n = 29) i.e. with and without periodontitis respectively. Their un-stimulated saliva samples were obtained in sterile tubes. While three bacterial genera, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus and Lactobacillus were identified in all subjects, Enterococcus and Escherichia were only detected in Group I. Results A statistically significant difference in colonization levels between the two groups was observed. The effect of methanolic extract of S. persica against oral bacterial strains isolated from saliva was investigated using agar disc diffusion and microdilution methods. Although methanolic extract of S. persica was effective on growth inhibition of all strains, it was significantly more effective on Gram positive bacteria than Gram negative ones. Conclusions Effective substances present in S. persica extracts, exhibit a broad range of antibacterial activity and affect almost all bacterial species regardless of the Gram-staining nature. PMID:25737914

  12. Binary Interactions of Antagonistic Bacteria with Candida albicans Under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Benadé, Eliska; Stone, Wendy; Mouton, Marnel; Postma, Ferdinand; Wilsenach, Jac; Botha, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    We used both aerobic and anaerobic liquid co-cultures, prepared with Luria Bertani broth, to study the effect of bacteria on the survival of Candida albicans in the external environment, away from an animal host. The bacteria were represented by Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium, Enterobacter, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Kluyvera ascorbata and Serratia marcescens. Under aerobic conditions, the yeast's growth was inhibited in the presence of bacterial growth; however, under anaerobic conditions, yeast and bacterial growth in co-cultures was similar to that observed for pure cultures. Subsequent assays revealed that the majority of bacterial strains aerobically produced extracellular hydrolytic enzymes capable of yeast cell wall hydrolysis, including chitinases and mannan-degrading enzymes. In contrast, except for the A. hydrophila strain, these enzymes were not detected in anaerobic bacterial cultures, nor was the antimicrobial compound prodigiosin found in anaerobic cultures of S. marcescens. When we suspended C. albicans cells in crude extracellular enzyme preparations from K. pneumoniae and S. marcescens, we detected no negative effect on yeast viability. However, we found that these preparations enhance the toxicity of prodigiosin towards the yeast, especially in combination with mannan-degrading enzymes. Analyses of the chitin and mannan content of yeast cell walls revealed that less chitin was produced under anaerobic than aerobic conditions; however, the levels of mannan, known for its low permeability, remained the same. The latter phenomenon, as well as reduced production of the bacterial enzymes and prodigiosin, may contribute to anaerobic growth and survival of C. albicans in the presence of bacteria. PMID:26566932

  13. Isolation and characterization of rhamnolipid-producing bacterial strains from a biodiesel facility.

    PubMed

    Rooney, Alejandro P; Price, Neil P J; Ray, Karen J; Kuo, Tsung-Min

    2009-06-01

    Novel strains of rhamnolipid-producing bacteria were isolated from soils at a biodiesel facility on the basis of their ability to grow on glycerol as a sole carbon source. Strains were identified as Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Enterobacter asburiae, Enterobacter hormaechei, Pantoea stewartii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The strains of the former five species were found to produce rhamnolipids in quantities the same as, or similar to, coisolated strains of P. aeruginosa. Measurements of surface tension revealed that that emulsifying properties of these strains were similar to levels displayed by rhamnolipids produced by P. aeruginosa. Results of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight MS analyses revealed that the predominant compounds made by all strains were C10-C10 mono- and dirhamnolipids. Notably, E. hormaechei and one strain of A. calcoaceticus produced rhamnolipids in amounts similar to the pseudomonads. As all strains examined were from the same taxonomic class of Proteobacteria, further examination of this group may reveal many additional species not previously known to produce rhamnolipids in addition to novel strains of species currently known to produce rhamnolipids. PMID:19473254

  14. Characterization of certain bacterial strains for potential use as starter or probiotic cultures in dairy products.

    PubMed

    Monteagudo-Mera, A; Caro, I; Rodríguez-Aparicio, L B; Rúa, J; Ferrero, M A; García-Armesto, M R

    2011-08-01

    The present work was aimed at characterizing 12 strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to obtain improved potential starter or probiotic cultures that could be used for making dairy products from ewe's milk and cow's milk. Eight strains with antimicrobial properties, isolated from ewe's milk and from cheese made from ewe's and/or cow's milk, were studied. They were identified as Enterococcus faecalis (five strains), Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei (one strain of each species). Additionally, four strains were obtained from the American Type Culture Collection: Lactobacillus casei 393 (isolated from cheese), L. lactis subsp. lactis 11454 (origin nonspecified and a producer of nisin), and two strains isolated from human feces (L. paracasei subsp. paracasei 27092 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus 53103, antibacterial agent producer). All E. faecalis strains showed at least one virulence factor (either hemolysin or gelatinase), which emphasizes the importance of these studies in this species. Both L. lactis strains and most Lactobacillus spp. were good acidifiers in ewe's milk and cow's milk at 30°C. High β-galactosidase activity, as well as aminopeptidase activities that favor the development of desirable flavors in cheese, were detected in all Lactobacillus spp. strains. Furthermore, L. rhamnosus ATCC 53103 showed α-fucosidase activity (thought to help colonization of the intestine) and lack of α-glucosidase activity (a trait considered positive for diabetic and obese humans). This last enzymatic activity was also lacking in L. lactis ATCC 11454. L. mesenteroides was the only strain D(2)-lactic acid producer. The selection of any particular strain for probiotic or dairy cultures should be performed according to the technological and/or functional abilities needed. PMID:21819671

  15. Voice Prosthetic Biofilm Formation and Candida Morphogenic Conversions in Absence and Presence of Different Bacterial Strains and Species on Silicone-Rubber

    PubMed Central

    van der Mei, Henny C.; Buijssen, Kevin J. D. A.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Ovchinnikova, Ekatarina; Geertsema-Doornbusch, Gésinda I.; Atema-Smit, Jelly; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Busscher, Henk J.

    2014-01-01

    Morphogenic conversion of Candida from a yeast to hyphal morphology plays a pivotal role in the pathogenicity of Candida species. Both Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis, in combination with a variety of different bacterial strains and species, appear in biofilms on silicone-rubber voice prostheses used in laryngectomized patients. Here we study biofilm formation on silicone-rubber by C. albicans or C. tropicalis in combination with different commensal bacterial strains and lactobacillus strains. In addition, hyphal formation in C. albicans and C. tropicalis, as stimulated by Rothia dentocariosa and lactobacilli was evaluated, as clinical studies outlined that these bacterial strains have opposite results on the clinical life-time of silicone-rubber voice prostheses. Biofilms were grown during eight days in a silicone-rubber tube, while passing the biofilms through episodes of nutritional feast and famine. Biofilms consisting of combinations of C. albicans and a bacterial strain comprised significantly less viable organisms than combinations comprising C. tropicalis. High percentages of Candida were found in biofilms grown in combination with lactobacilli. Interestingly, L. casei, with demonstrated favorable effects on the clinical life-time of voice prostheses, reduced the percentage hyphal formation in Candida biofilms as compared with Candida biofilms grown in absence of bacteria or grown in combination with R. dentocariosa, a bacterial strain whose presence is associated with short clinical life-times of voice prostheses. PMID:25111806

  16. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria Isolated From Surgical Site Infection of Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghotaslou, Reza; Beheshtirouy, Samad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Asghari, Babak; Alizadeh, Naser; Toloue Ostadgavahi, Ali; Sorayaei Somesaraei, Vida; Memar, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) are infections of incision or deep tissue at operation sites. These infections prolong hospitalization, delay wound healing, and increase the overall cost and morbidity. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate anaerobic and aerobic bacteria prevalence in surgical site infections and determinate antibiotic susceptibility pattern in these isolates. Materials and Methods: One hundred SSIs specimens were obtained by needle aspiration from purulent material in depth of infected site. These specimens were cultured and incubated in both aerobic and anaerobic condition. For detection of antibiotic susceptibility pattern in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, we used disk diffusion, agar dilution, and E-test methods. Results: A total of 194 bacterial strains were isolated from 100 samples of surgical sites. Predominant aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria isolated from these specimens were the members of Enterobacteriaceae family (66, 34.03%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26, 13.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (24, 12.37%), Acinetobacter spp. (18, 9.28%), Enterococcus spp. (16, 8.24%), coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. (14, 7.22%) and nonhemolytic streptococci (2, 1.03%). Bacteroides fragilis (26, 13.4%), and Clostridium perfringens (2, 1.03%) were isolated as anaerobic bacteria. The most resistant bacteria among anaerobic isolates were B. fragilis. All Gram-positive isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid while most of Enterobacteriaceae showed sensitivity to imipenem. Conclusions: Most SSIs specimens were polymicrobial and predominant anaerobic isolate was B. fragilis. Isolated aerobic and anaerobic strains showed high level of resistance to antibiotics. PMID:26421133

  17. Pseudomonas reactans, a bacterial strain isolated from the intestinal flora of Blattella germanica with anti-Beauveria bassiana activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Huang, Yan Hong; Liu, Shu Zhen; Zhang, Lei; Li, Bo Tai; Zhao, Xiao Xu; Fu, Ying; Liu, Jian Jun; Zhang, Xue Xia

    2013-06-01

    Anti-Beauveria bassiana activity of aqueous fecal extracts from conventional German cockroaches [Blattella germanica (L.)] was detected, but was not detected in samples from germ-free German cockroaches. Subsequently, bacterial strain BGI-14 was isolated from the gut of conventional German cockroaches and was identified as Pseudomonas reactans based on 16S rDNA sequence. The strain BGI-14 not only inhibited the germination of conidia, but also inhibited the growth of B. bassiana hyphae. Further studies demonstrated that B. bassiana infections in German cockroaches orally treated with the extracts of BGI-14 fermentation were significantly weakened. Compared with the control group, the cumulative mortality rate of treatment group was reduced by 10.3% at 20 d postinoculation. These studies imply that intestinal flora with anti-B. bassiana activity might contribute to resistance of infection by entomopathogenic fungi. PMID:23726054

  18. Distribution and Physiology of Aerobic Bacteria Containing Bacteriochlorophyll a on the East and West Coasts of Australia †

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Tsuneo; Shioi, Yuzo; Takamiya, Ken-Ichiro; Sutton, David C.; Wilkinson, Clive R.

    1991-01-01

    Aerobic heterotrophic bacteria containing bacteriochlorophyll were isolated from specimens from a wide variety of marine environments on the west (Shark Bay, Lake Clifton, Lake Heyward, and Perth) and east (near Townsville and Brisbane) coasts of Australia. The bacteria were found in a high proportion (10 to 30%) of the total heterotrophic bacterial strains isolated from marine algae, seagrasses, stromatolites, the epiphytes on stromatolites, seawater, and sands; in some cases they constituted up to 49% of the total. This is much higher than the previous report of 6% from Japan. A high percentage, 13%, was also found in the seawater of Hamelin Pool, at Shark Bay, where the salinity was 66%. The number of these bacteria was generally low in seawater and sands, with a few exceptions. There were no aerobic bacteriochlorophyll-containing bacteria on sponges or corals. The isolated strains were orange or pink, and most had absorption maxima around 800 and 850 to 870 nm, the latter range being the absorption of bacteriochlorophyll a in vivo. The maximum bacteriochlorophyll content was 1 nmol/mg (dry weight) of bacterial cells. Most of the bacteria did not grow phototrophically under anaerobic conditions in a broth medium containing succinate. Cells and cell extracts grown under aerobic conditions had photochemical activities such as reversible photooxidations of the reaction center and cytochrome(s). Some strains showed denitrifying activity. The optimal salinity for bacterial growth varied between strains. PMID:16348398

  19. Isolation and Characterization of Rhamnolipid-Producing Bacterial Strains from a Biodiesel Facility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel strains of rhamnolipid-producing bacteria were isolated from soils at a biodiesel facility on the basis of their ability to grow on glycerol as a sole carbon source. Strains were identified as Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Enterobacter asburiae, E. hormaecheii, Pantoea stewartii and Pseudomona...

  20. Use of Response Surface Methodology to Optimize Culture Conditions for Hydrogen Production by an Anaerobic Bacterial Strain from Soluble Starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieu, Hoa Thi Quynh; Nguyen, Yen Thi; Dang, Yen Thi; Nguyen, Binh Thanh

    2016-05-01

    Biohydrogen is a clean source of energy that produces no harmful byproducts during combustion, being a potential sustainable energy carrier for the future. Therefore, biohydrogen produced by anaerobic bacteria via dark fermentation has attracted attention worldwide as a renewable energy source. However, the hydrogen production capability of these bacteria depends on major factors such as substrate, iron-containing hydrogenase, reduction agent, pH, and temperature. In this study, the response surface methodology (RSM) with central composite design (CCD) was employed to improve the hydrogen production by an anaerobic bacterial strain isolated from animal waste in Phu Linh, Soc Son, Vietnam (PL strain). The hydrogen production process was investigated as a function of three critical factors: soluble starch concentration (8 g L-1 to 12 g L-1), ferrous iron concentration (100 mg L-1 to 200 mg L-1), and l-cysteine concentration (300 mg L-1 to 500 mg L-1). RSM analysis showed that all three factors significantly influenced hydrogen production. Among them, the ferrous iron concentration presented the greatest influence. The optimum hydrogen concentration of 1030 mL L-1 medium was obtained with 10 g L-1 soluble starch, 150 mg L-1 ferrous iron, and 400 mg L-1 l-cysteine after 48 h of anaerobic fermentation. The hydrogen concentration produced by the PL strain was doubled after using RSM. The obtained results indicate that RSM with CCD can be used as a technique to optimize culture conditions for enhancement of hydrogen production by the selected anaerobic bacterial strain. Hydrogen production from low-cost organic substrates such as soluble starch using anaerobic fermentation methods may be one of the most promising approaches.

  1. Natural history of the infant gut microbiome and impact of antibiotic treatment on bacterial strain diversity and stability.

    PubMed

    Yassour, Moran; Vatanen, Tommi; Siljander, Heli; Hämäläinen, Anu-Maaria; Härkönen, Taina; Ryhänen, Samppa J; Franzosa, Eric A; Vlamakis, Hera; Huttenhower, Curtis; Gevers, Dirk; Lander, Eric S; Knip, Mikael; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2016-06-15

    The gut microbial community is dynamic during the first 3 years of life, before stabilizing to an adult-like state. However, little is known about the impact of environmental factors on the developing human gut microbiome. We report a longitudinal study of the gut microbiome based on DNA sequence analysis of monthly stool samples and clinical information from 39 children, about half of whom received multiple courses of antibiotics during the first 3 years of life. Whereas the gut microbiome of most children born by vaginal delivery was dominated by Bacteroides species, the four children born by cesarean section and about 20% of vaginally born children lacked Bacteroides in the first 6 to 18 months of life. Longitudinal sampling, coupled with whole-genome shotgun sequencing, allowed detection of strain-level variation as well as the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes. The microbiota of antibiotic-treated children was less diverse in terms of both bacterial species and strains, with some species often dominated by single strains. In addition, we observed short-term composition changes between consecutive samples from children treated with antibiotics. Antibiotic resistance genes carried on microbial chromosomes showed a peak in abundance after antibiotic treatment followed by a sharp decline, whereas some genes carried on mobile elements persisted longer after antibiotic therapy ended. Our results highlight the value of high-density longitudinal sampling studies with high-resolution strain profiling for studying the establishment and response to perturbation of the infant gut microbiome. PMID:27306663

  2. Strain Dependent Genetic Networks for Antibiotic-Sensitivity in a Bacterial Pathogen with a Large Pan-Genome.

    PubMed

    van Opijnen, Tim; Dedrick, Sandra; Bento, José

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between an antibiotic and bacterium is not merely restricted to the drug and its direct target, rather antibiotic induced stress seems to resonate through the bacterium, creating selective pressures that drive the emergence of adaptive mutations not only in the direct target, but in genes involved in many different fundamental processes as well. Surprisingly, it has been shown that adaptive mutations do not necessarily have the same effect in all species, indicating that the genetic background influences how phenotypes are manifested. However, to what extent the genetic background affects the manner in which a bacterium experiences antibiotic stress, and how this stress is processed is unclear. Here we employ the genome-wide tool Tn-Seq to construct daptomycin-sensitivity profiles for two strains of the bacterial pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Remarkably, over half of the genes that are important for dealing with antibiotic-induced stress in one strain are dispensable in another. By confirming over 100 genotype-phenotype relationships, probing potassium-loss, employing genetic interaction mapping as well as temporal gene-expression experiments we reveal genome-wide conditionally important/essential genes, we discover roles for genes with unknown function, and uncover parts of the antibiotic's mode-of-action. Moreover, by mapping the underlying genomic network for two query genes we encounter little conservation in network connectivity between strains as well as profound differences in regulatory relationships. Our approach uniquely enables genome-wide fitness comparisons across strains, facilitating the discovery that antibiotic responses are complex events that can vary widely between strains, which suggests that in some cases the emergence of resistance could be strain specific and at least for species with a large pan-genome less predictable. PMID:27607357

  3. Aerobic bacterial microflora of Broad-snouted caiman (Caiman latirostris) oral cavity and cloaca, originating from parque Zoológico Arruda Câmara, Paraíba, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, J S A; Mota, R A; Pinheiro Júnior, J W; Almeida, M C S; Silva, D R; Ferreira, D R A; Azevedo, J C N

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate and identify the aerobic bacterial microflora from the oral cavity mucosa and cloaca's samples, collected from Broad-snouted caiman (Caiman latirostris), born and bred in captivity at Parque Zoológico Arruda Câmara, João Pessoa, Paraíba, Brazil. The most common bacteria were Staphylococcus sp. (14.74%), Corynebacterium sp. (13.68%), Escherichia coli (13.68%) and Shigella sp.(11.58%), and the less common were Citrobacter sp. (1.05%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (1.05%) and Salmonella sp. (1.05%).This emphasizes the importance of these microorganisms' participation in infectious processes (sepsis) and injuries caused by crocodilians. PMID:24031343

  4. Production of putrescine-capped stable silver nanoparticle: its characterization and antibacterial activity against multidrug-resistant bacterial strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Saswati; Gupta, Bhaskar; Gupta, Kamala; Chaudhuri, Mahua Ghosh

    2016-04-01

    Integration of biology with nanotechnology is now becoming attention-grabbing area of research. The antimicrobial potency of silver has been eminent from antiquity. Due to the recent desire for the enhancement of antibacterial efficacy of silver, various synthesis methods of silver in their nano dimensions are being practiced using a range of capping material. The present work highlights a facile biomimetic approach for production of silver nanoparticle being capped and stabilized by putrescine, possessing a diameter of 10-25 ± 1.5 nm. The synthesized nanoparticles have been analyzed spectrally and analytically. Morphological studies are carried out by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and crystallinity by selected area electron diffraction patterns. Moreover, the elemental composition of the capped nanoparticles was confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. A comparative study (zone of inhibition and minimum inhibitory concentration) regarding the interactions and antibacterial potentiality of the capped silver nanoparticles with respect to the bare ones reveal the efficiency of the capped one over the bare one. The bacterial kinetic study was executed to monitor the interference of nanoparticles with bacterial growth rate. The results also highlight the efficacy of putrescine-capped silver nanoparticles as effective growth inhibitors against multi-drug resistant human pathogenic bacterial strains, which may, thus, potentially be applicable as an effective antibacterial control system to fight diseases.

  5. Removal of two waterborne pathogenic bacterial strains by activated carbon particles prior to and after charge modification.

    PubMed

    Busscher, Henk J; Dijkstra, Rene J B; Engels, Eefje; Langworthy, Don E; Collias, Dimitris I; Bjorkquist, David W; Mitchell, Michael D; Van der Mei, Henny C

    2006-11-01

    Waterborne diseases constitute a threat to public health despite costly treatment measures aimed at removing pathogenic microorganisms from potable water supplies. This paper compared the removal of Raoultella terrigena ATCC 33257 and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 by negatively and positively charged types of activated carbon particles. Both strains display bimodal negative zeta-potential distributions in stabilized water. Carbon particles were suspended to an equivalent external geometric surface area of 700 cm2 in 250 mL of a bacterial suspension, with shaking. Samples were taken after different durations for plate counting. Initial removal rates were less elevated for the positively charged carbon particle than expected, yielding the conclusion that bacterial adhesion under shaking is mass-transport limited. After 360 min, however, the log-reduction of the more negatively charged R. terrigena in suspension was largest for the positively charged carbon particles as compared with the negatively charged ones, although conditioning in ultrapure or tap water of positively charged carbon particles for 21 days eliminated the favorable effect of the positive charge due to counterion adsorption from the water. Removal of the less negatively charged E. coli was less affected by aging of the (positively charged) carbon particles, confirming the role of electrostatic interactions in bacterial removal by activated carbon particles. The microporous, negatively charged coconut carbon performed less than the mesoporous, positively charged carbon particle prior to conditioning but did not suffer from loss of effect after conditioning in ultrapure or tap water. PMID:17144313

  6. EFFECTS OF BACTERIAL LIGNIN PEROXIDASE ON ORGANIC CARBON MINERALIZATION IN SOIL, USING RECOMBINANT STREPTOMYCES STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purified lignin peroxidase was added to sterile and nonsterile silt loam soil to study the effects of bacterial lignin peroxidase ALip-P3 of Streptomyces viridosporus T7A on the rate of organic carbon turnover in soil. ignin peroxidase ALip-P3 appears to affect the short-term tur...

  7. Molecular characterization of Xanthomonas strains responsible for bacterial leaf spot of tomato in Ethiopia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial spot of tomato (BST) is a major constraint to tomato production in Ethiopia and many other countries leading to significant crop losses. In the present study, using pathogenicity tests, sensitivity to copper and streptomycin, and multilocus sequence analysis, a diverse group of Xanthomonas...

  8. Inoculation methods using Rhodococcus erythropolis strain P30 affects bacterial assisted phytoextraction capacity of Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-López, V; Prieto-Fernández, A; Janssen, J; Herzig, R; Vangronsveld, J; Kidd, P S

    2016-01-01

    In this study different bacterial inoculation methods were tested for tobacco plants growing in a mine-soil contaminated with Pb, Zn, and Cd. The inoculation methods evaluated were: seed inoculation, soil inoculation, dual soil inoculation event, and seed+soil inoculation. Each inoculum was added at two bacterial densities (10(6) CFUs mL(-1) and 10(8) CFUs mL(-1)). The objectives were to evaluate whether or not the mode of inoculation or the number of applied microorganisms influences plant response. The most pronounced bacterial-induced effect was found for biomass production, and the soil inoculation treatment (using 10(6) CFUs mL(-1)) led to the highest increase in shoot dry weight yield (up to 45%). Bacterial-induced effects on shoot metal concentrations were less pronounced; although a positive effect was found on shoot Pb concentration when using 10(8) CFUs mL(-1) in the soil inoculation (29% increase) and in the seed+soil inoculation (34% increase). Also shoot Zn concentration increased by 24% after seed inoculation with 10(6) CFUs mL(-1). The best effects on the total metal yield were not correlated with an increasing number of inoculated bacteria. In fact the best results were found after a single soil inoculation using the lower cellular density of 10(6) CFUs mL(-1). PMID:26552496

  9. Genome Sequence of Acidovorax citrulli Group 1 Strain pslb65 Causing Bacterial Fruit Blotch of Melons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tielin; Sun, Baixin; Yang, Yuwen

    2015-01-01

    Acidovorax citrulli is typed into two groups, mainly based on the host. We determined the draft genome of A. citrulli group 1 strain pslb65. The strain was isolated from melon collected from Xinjiang province, China. The A. citrulli pslb65 genome contains 4,903,443 bp and has a G+C content of 68.8 mol%. PMID:25908136

  10. Comparative Genomics between Two Xenorhabdus bovienii Strains Highlights Differential Evolutionary Scenarios within an Entomopathogenic Bacterial Species

    PubMed Central

    Bisch, Gaëlle; Ogier, Jean-Claude; Médigue, Claudine; Rouy, Zoé; Vincent, Stéphanie; Tailliez, Patrick; Givaudan, Alain; Gaudriault, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Xenorhabdus are symbionts of soil entomopathogenic nematodes of the genus Steinernema. This symbiotic association constitutes an insecticidal complex active against a wide range of insect pests. Within Xenorhabdus bovienii species, the X. bovienii CS03 strain (Xb CS03) is nonvirulent when directly injected into lepidopteran insects, and displays a low virulence when associated with its Steinernema symbiont. The genome of Xb CS03 was sequenced and compared with the genome of a virulent strain, X. bovienii SS-2004 (Xb SS-2004). The genome size and content widely differed between the two strains. Indeed, Xb CS03 had a large genome containing several specific loci involved in the inhibition of competitors, including a few NRPS-PKS loci (nonribosomal peptide synthetases and polyketide synthases) producing antimicrobial molecules. Consistently, Xb CS03 had a greater antimicrobial activity than Xb SS-2004. The Xb CS03 strain contained more pseudogenes than Xb SS-2004. Decay of genes involved in the host invasion and exploitation (toxins, invasins, or extracellular enzymes) was particularly important in Xb CS03. This may provide an explanation for the nonvirulence of the strain when injected into an insect host. We suggest that Xb CS03 and Xb SS-2004 followed divergent evolutionary scenarios to cope with their peculiar life cycle. The fitness strategy of Xb CS03 would involve competitor inhibition, whereas Xb SS-2004 would quickly and efficiently kill the insect host. Hence, Xenorhabdus strains would have widely divergent host exploitation strategies, which impact their genome structure. PMID:26769959

  11. Comparative Genomics between Two Xenorhabdus bovienii Strains Highlights Differential Evolutionary Scenarios within an Entomopathogenic Bacterial Species.

    PubMed

    Bisch, Gaëlle; Ogier, Jean-Claude; Médigue, Claudine; Rouy, Zoé; Vincent, Stéphanie; Tailliez, Patrick; Givaudan, Alain; Gaudriault, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Xenorhabdus are symbionts of soil entomopathogenic nematodes of the genus Steinernema. This symbiotic association constitutes an insecticidal complex active against a wide range of insect pests. Within Xenorhabdus bovienii species, the X. bovienii CS03 strain (Xb CS03) is nonvirulent when directly injected into lepidopteran insects, and displays a low virulence when associated with its Steinernema symbiont. The genome of Xb CS03 was sequenced and compared with the genome of a virulent strain, X. bovienii SS-2004 (Xb SS-2004). The genome size and content widely differed between the two strains. Indeed, Xb CS03 had a large genome containing several specific loci involved in the inhibition of competitors, including a few NRPS-PKS loci (nonribosomal peptide synthetases and polyketide synthases) producing antimicrobial molecules. Consistently, Xb CS03 had a greater antimicrobial activity than Xb SS-2004. The Xb CS03 strain contained more pseudogenes than Xb SS-2004. Decay of genes involved in the host invasion and exploitation (toxins, invasins, or extracellular enzymes) was particularly important in Xb CS03. This may provide an explanation for the nonvirulence of the strain when injected into an insect host. We suggest that Xb CS03 and Xb SS-2004 followed divergent evolutionary scenarios to cope with their peculiar life cycle. The fitness strategy of Xb CS03 would involve competitor inhibition, whereas Xb SS-2004 would quickly and efficiently kill the insect host. Hence, Xenorhabdus strains would have widely divergent host exploitation strategies, which impact their genome structure. PMID:26769959

  12. Bioremediation of Cd and carbendazim co-contaminated soil by Cd-hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii associated with carbendazim-degrading bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wendan; Wang, Huan; Li, Tingqiang; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jie; He, Zhenli; Yang, Xiaoe

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a bioremediation strategy for cadmium (Cd) and carbendazim co-contaminated soil using a hyperaccumulator plant (Sedum alfredii) combined with carbendazim-degrading bacterial strains (Bacillus subtilis, Paracoccus sp., Flavobacterium and Pseudomonas sp.). A pot experiment was conducted under greenhouse conditions for 180 days with S. alfredii and/or carbendazim-degrading strains grown in soil artificially polluted with two levels of contaminants (low level, 1 mg kg(-1) Cd and 21 mg kg(-1) carbendazim; high level, 6 mg kg(-1) Cd and 117 mg kg(-1) carbendazim). Cd removal efficiencies were 32.3-35.1 % and 7.8-8.2 % for the low and high contaminant level, respectively. Inoculation with carbendazim-degrading bacterial strains significantly (P < 0.05) increased Cd removal efficiencies at the low level. The carbendazim removal efficiencies increased by 32.1-42.5 % by the association of S. alfredii with carbendazim-degrading bacterial strains, as compared to control, regardless of contaminant level. Cultivation with S. alfredii and inoculation of carbendazim-degrading bacterial strains increased soil microbial biomass, dehydrogenase activities and microbial diversities by 46.2-121.3 %, 64.2-143.4 %, and 2.4-24.7 %, respectively. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis revealed that S. alfredii stimulated the activities of Flavobacteria and Bradyrhizobiaceae. The association of S. alfredii with carbendazim-degrading bacterial strains enhanced the degradation of carbendazim by changing microbial activity and community structure in the soil. The results demonstrated that association of S. alfredii with carbendazim-degrading bacterial strains is promising for remediation of Cd and carbendazim co-contaminated soil. PMID:22529002

  13. Different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae differ in their effects on ruminal bacterial numbers in vitro and in sheep.

    PubMed

    Newbold, C J; Wallace, R J; Chen, X B; McIntosh, F M

    1995-06-01

    A ruminal simulation device (Rusitec) was used to compare the effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains NCYC 240, NCYC 694, NCYC 1026, NCYC 1088, and Yea-Sacc (a commercial product containing S. cerevisiae) on ruminal fermentation. S. cerevisiae NCYC 240, NCYC 1088, NCYC 1026, and NCYC 694 were grown on malt extract at 30 degrees C in aerated fed-batch culture and harvested along with spent growth medium by freeze-drying. Each vessel received daily 20 g of a basal diet consisting of hay, barley, molasses, fishmeal, and a minerals/vitamins mixture at 500, 299.5, 100, 91, and 9.5 g/kg of DM, respectively. Yeast preparations (500 mg/d) were added along with the feed. S. cerevisiae NCYC 240, NCYC 1026, and Yea-Sacc stimulated total and cellulolytic bacterial numbers, whereas S. cerevisiae NCYC 694 and NCYC 1088 had no effect on the numbers of bacteria. The effects of S. cerevisiae NCYC 240, NCYC 1026, and Yea-Sacc on ruminal fermentation were further investigated in vivo using ruminally cannulated sheep fed 1.5 kg/d of the diet used in Rusitec, supplemented with 2 g/d of yeast culture. All treatments tended to stimulate total and cellulolytic bacterial numbers. However, the stimulation was only statistically significant for S. cerevisiae NCYC 1026 with total bacterial numbers and S. cerevisiae NCYC 240 with cellulolytic bacteria (P < .05). Increased bacterial numbers were associated with an increase in the rate of straw degradation in the rumen and a nonsignificant (P > .05) increase in the excretion of purine derivatives in the urine, measured as an index of microbial nitrogen leaving the rumen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7673076

  14. Competitive Ability and Survival in Soil of Pseudomonas Strain 679-2, a Dominant, Nonobligate Bacterial Predator of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Casida, L. E.

    1992-01-01

    A copper-resistant, nonobligate, bacterial predator of bacteria was isolated from soil. It was a Pseudomonas species, designated strain 679-2. It attacked most other nonobligate bacterial predators and hence could control their predatory and other activities in nature. It also inhibited various fungi. It attached to prey cells and produced a toxic, copper-related, growth initiation factor like that produced by Cupriavidus necator. In addition, it produced a second, novel compound that was both antibacterial and antifungal. Strain 679-2 appeared to have only a very limited natural occurrence. It was found only in the soil from one small area in one field. It was absent on the leaves of the plant species that were examined. Regardless of its rarity, however, it was highly competitive in soil. An inoculum consisting of only a few cells added to soil multiplied rapidly to become a major component of the soil microflora within 24 h. A small amount of glutamic acid could be added along with the cells to stimulate production of the toxic compounds noted above, but this was not necessary. After this multiplication, or when large numbers of cells were added to soil, the numbers decreased only slowly during the next several months. Cell survival also was good on plant leaves. The survival in soil and on plant leaves occurred in both laboratory and field experiments. Other than desiccation, the natural mechanism for controlling the numbers or activities of strain 679-2 in soil is not known. The various characteristics of this bacterium, as noted above, are of particular interest because they indicate a possible use of the cells or inhibitor compounds for controlling organisms in soil or on plant surfaces. PMID:16348631

  15. Intraspecies Variation in the Emergence of Hyperinfectious Bacterial Strains in Nature

    PubMed Central

    House, John K.; Xie, Yi; Weimer, Bart C.; Sinsheimer, Robert L.; Mahan, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella is a principal health concern because of its endemic prevalence in food and water supplies, the rise in incidence of multi-drug resistant strains, and the emergence of new strains associated with increased disease severity. Insights into pathogen emergence have come from animal-passage studies wherein virulence is often increased during infection. However, these studies did not address the prospect that a select subset of strains undergo a pronounced increase in virulence during the infective process- a prospect that has significant implications for human and animal health. Our findings indicate that the capacity to become hypervirulent (100-fold decreased LD50) was much more evident in certain S. enterica strains than others. Hyperinfectious salmonellae were among the most virulent of this species; restricted to certain serotypes; and more capable of killing vaccinated animals. Such strains exhibited rapid (and rapidly reversible) switching to a less-virulent state accompanied by more competitive growth ex vivo that may contribute to maintenance in nature. The hypervirulent phenotype was associated with increased microbial pathogenicity (colonization; cytotoxin production; cytocidal activity), coupled with an altered innate immune cytokine response within infected cells (IFN-β; IL-1β; IL-6; IL-10). Gene expression analysis revealed that hyperinfectious strains display altered transcription of genes within the PhoP/PhoQ, PhoR/PhoB and ArgR regulons, conferring changes in the expression of classical virulence functions (e.g., SPI-1; SPI-2 effectors) and those involved in cellular physiology/metabolism (nutrient/acid stress). As hyperinfectious strains pose a potential risk to human and animal health, efforts toward mitigation of these potential food-borne contaminants may avert negative public health impacts and industry-associated losses. PMID:22511871

  16. Rice bacterial endophytes: isolation of a collection, identification of beneficial strains and microbiome analysis.

    PubMed

    Bertani, Iris; Abbruscato, Pamela; Piffanelli, Pietro; Subramoni, Sujatha; Venturi, Vittorio

    2016-06-01

    Endophytes are harmless or beneficial microorganisms that live inside plants between cells. The relationship they develop with the plant as well as their potential role in plant health is at large unexplored and it is believed that the opportunity to find new and interesting endophytes among the large variety of plants is great. Here, we present the isolation and analysis of a large collection of endophytes from one cultivar of rice grown in Italy. A total 1318 putative endophytes were isolated from roots, leaves and stems from rice grown in submerged and dry conditions and a working collection of 229 isolates was created. Among these, several isolates were confirmed to be endophytes and a few displayed the trait of plant growth promotion. A cultivation independent analysis via 16S rDNA amplicons of the bacterial community of the endosphere was also performed providing information on bacterial diversity in the rice endopshere. PMID:27038229

  17. Relation between bacterial strain resistance to solvents and biodesulfurization activity in organic medium.

    PubMed

    Bouchez-Naïtali, Murielle; Abbad-Andaloussi, Samir; Warzywoda, Michel; Monot, Frédéric

    2004-09-01

    Microorganisms used in biodesulfurization of petroleum products have to withstand high concentrations of hydrocarbons. The capacities of seven desulfurizing strains of Rhodococcus to be active in the presence of solvents were evaluated. Octanol and toluene (log P=2.9) were selected as toxic solvents. The effect of the solvents was determined by measuring either inhibition of growth or the decrease in respiratory activity of the cells. Differences among strains in their resistance to solvent responses were observed, but these variations were dependent on the test used. Resistance to solvents was then compared to the capacity of the different strains to retain biodesulfurization activity in the presence of hexadecane. Inhibition of desulfurization by high concentrations of hexadecane was found to be well correlated to the sensitivity of the strains to respiration inhibition by toluene, but not to growth inhibition. This result also showed that the respirometric test was a rapid and reliable test to select solvent-resistant strains for use as resting cells in biocatalysis processes, such as biodesulfurization, in organic media. PMID:15133641

  18. Data on true tRNA diversity among uncultured and bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Rekadwad, Bhagwan N; Khobragade, Chandrahasya N

    2016-06-01

    Complete genome sequences of two uncultured archaea (BX649197 and CR937008) and 10 uncultured bacteria (AC160099, FP245538-FP245540, FP312972, FP312974-75, FP312977, FP312985 and NZ_JPJG01000067) were used for creation of digital data of tRNA. tRNAscan-SE and ENDMEMO GC calculating tools were used for detection of tRNA, drawing their structures and calculation of GC percent. Seven archaeal and 48 bacterial tRNA were detected from above 12 sequences. Four archaeal and 30 bacterial tRNA showed cove score more than 20% are called as true tRNA. Three tRNA of uncultured bacteria (AC160099) has the presence of the variable loop. The tRNA of FP245540, FP245575, FP245577 and FP245585 has one variable loop each. The true tRNA of archaea were Alanine, Arginine and Cysteine-type tRNA, while the majority of bacteria true tRNA classified as Alanine, Glutamic acid, Isoleucine, Leucine, Methionine, Phenylalanine, Proline and Valine-type tRNA with cove score ranged from 70% to 97.15%. Archaeal and bacterial have GC content approximately 43% and 34.7-63.3% respectively. Archaeal tRNA has 60.4-64.2% GC content. Similarly, bacterial tRNA contributed 49.3-66.3% GC content to the total GC content. This generated data is useful for studies on diversity of tRNA among prokaryotes. PMID:27222849

  19. New lactic acid bacterial strains from traditional Mongolian fermented milk products have altered adhesion to porcine gastric mucin depending on the carbon source.

    PubMed

    Kimoto-Nira, Hiromi; Yamasaki, Seishi; Sasaki, Keisuke; Moriya, Naoko; Takenaka, Akio; Suzuki, Chise

    2015-03-01

    Attachment of lactic acid bacteria to the mucosal surface of the gastrointestinal tract is a major property of probiotics. Here, we examined the ability of 21 lactic acid bacterial strains isolated from traditional fermented milk products in Mongolia to adhere to porcine gastric mucin in vitro. Higher attachment was observed with Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strains 6-8 and 8-1 than with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (positive control). Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strain 7-1 adhered to mucin as effectively as did strain GG. Heat inactivation decreased the adhesive ability of strains 6-8 and 8-1 but did not affect strain 7-1. The adhesion of strains 6-8, 7-1 and 8-1 was significantly inhibited when the cells were pretreated with periodate and trypsin, indicating that proteinaceous and carbohydrate-like cell surface compounds are involved in the adhesion of these strains. The adhesion of strain 7-1 was affected by the type of carbohydrate present in the growth medium, being higher with fructose than with lactose, galactose or xylose as the carbon source. The sugar content of 7-1 cells grown on various carbohydrates was negatively correlated with its adhesive ability. We provide new probiotic candidate strains and new information regarding carbohydrate preference that influences lactic acid bacterial adhesion to mucin. PMID:25186082

  20. Culturable bacterial microbiota of Plagiodera versicolora (L.) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and virulence of the isolated strains.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Meryem; Sevim, Elif; Demir, İsmail; Sevim, Ali

    2013-05-01

    Plagiodera versicolora (Laicharting, 1781) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) is an important forest pest which damages many trees such as willow, poplar, and hazelnut. In order to find new microbes that can be utilized as a possible microbial control agent against this pest, we investigated the culturable bacterial flora of it and tested the isolated bacteria against P. versicolora larvae and adults. We were able to isolate nine bacteria from larvae and adults. The isolates were characterized using a combination of morphological, biochemical, and physiological methods. Additionally, we sequenced the partial sequence of the 16S rRNA gene to verify conventional identification results. Based on characterization studies, the isolates were identified as Staphylococcus sp. Pv1, Rahnella sp. Pv2, Rahnella sp. Pv3, Rahnella sp. Pv4, Rahnella sp. Pv5, Pantoea agglomerans Pv6, Staphylococcus sp. Pv7, Micrococcus luteus Pv8, and Rahnella sp. Pv9. The highest insecticidal activity against larvae and adults was obtained from M. luteus Pv8 with 50 and 40 % mortalities within 10 days after treatment, respectively. Extracellular enzyme activity of the bacterial isolates such as amylase, proteinase, lipase, cellulose, and chitinase was also determined. Consequently, our results show that M. luteus Pv8 might be a good candidate as a possible microbial control agent against P. versicolora and were discussed with respect to biocontrol potential of the bacterial isolates. PMID:23054688

  1. Enhanced production of bacterial cellulose by using Gluconacetobacter hansenii NCIM 2529 strain under shaking conditions.

    PubMed

    Mohite, Bhavna V; Salunke, Bipinchandra K; Patil, Satish V

    2013-03-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC), a biopolymer, due to its unique properties is valuable for production of vital products in food, textile, medicine, and agriculture. In the present study, the optimal fermentation conditions for enhanced BC production by Gluconacetobacter hansenii NCIM 2529 were investigated under shaking conditions. The investigation on media components and culture parameters revealed that 2 % (w/v) sucrose as carbon source, 0.5 % (w/v) potassium nitrate as nitrogen source, 0.4 % (w/v) disodium phosphate as phosphate source, 0.04 % (w/v) magnesium sulfate, and 0.8 % (w/v) calcium chloride as trace elements, pH5.0, temperature 25 °C, and agitation speed 170 rpm with 6 days of fermentation period are optimal for maximum BC production. Production of BC using optimized media components and culture parameters was 1.66 times higher (5.0 g/l) than initial non optimized media (3.0 g/l). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectrum and comparison with the available literature suggests that the produced component by G. hansenii in the present study is pure bacterial cellulose. The specific action of cellulase out of the investigated hydrolytic enzymes (cellulase, amylase, and protease) further confirmed purity of the produced BC. These findings give insight into conditions necessary for enhanced production of bacterial cellulose, which can be used for a variety of applications. PMID:23319186

  2. Biodegradation of semiconductor volatile organic compounds by four novel bacterial strains: a kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Su, Tien-Tsai; Lin, Chi-Wen; I, Yet-Po; Wu, Chih-Hung

    2012-09-01

    This study isolated pure microorganisms for further bioreactor applications. Four novel strains of Pseudomonas citronellolis YAIP521, Paracoccus versutus HSAC51, Burkholderia sp. HUEL671, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa JUPG561 were isolated and tested for biodegradation of isopropyl alcohol (IPA), acetone, ethyl lactate (EL), and propylene glycol mono methyl ether acetate (PGMEA), respectively. The maximum biodegradation rates for IPA, acetone, EL, and PGMEA were 5.27, 3.87, 26.86, and 48.93 mg L(-1) h(-1), respectively. The Haldane kinetic parameters determined for these strains when degrading targeted volatile organic compounds were maximum specific growth rate, half-saturation constant, and inhibition constant. The isolated strains have potential application in various bioreactors. The kinetic parameters obtained in this study provide a basis for further bioreactor experiments. PMID:22322527

  3. The Genomic Sequence of the Oral Pathobiont Strain NI1060 Reveals Unique Strategies for Bacterial Competition and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yizu; Hasegawa, Mizuho; Moon, Henry; Núñez, Gabriel; Inohara, Naohiro; Raes, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Strain NI1060 is an oral bacterium responsible for periodontitis in a murine ligature-induced disease model. To better understand its pathogenicity, we have determined the complete sequence of its 2,553,982 bp genome. Although closely related to Pasteurella pneumotropica, a pneumonia-associated rodent commensal based on its 16S rRNA, the NI1060 genomic content suggests that they are different species thriving on different energy sources via alternative metabolic pathways. Genomic and phylogenetic analyses showed that strain NI1060 is distinct from the genera currently described in the family Pasteurellaceae, and is likely to represent a novel species. In addition, we found putative virulence genes involved in lipooligosaccharide synthesis, adhesins and bacteriotoxic proteins. These genes are potentially important for host adaption and for the induction of dysbiosis through bacterial competition and pathogenicity. Importantly, strain NI1060 strongly stimulates Nod1, an innate immune receptor, but is defective in two peptidoglycan recycling genes due to a frameshift mutation. The in-depth analysis of its genome thus provides critical insights for the development of NI1060 as a prime model system for infectious disease. PMID:27409077

  4. Control Efficacy of an Endophytic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Strain BZ6-1 against Peanut Bacterial Wilt, Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Guobin

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to isolate and identify endophytic bacteria that might have efficacy against peanut bacterial wilt (BW) caused by Ralstonia solanacearum. Thirty-seven endophytic strains were isolated from healthy peanut plants in R. solanacearum-infested fields and eight showed antagonistic effects against R. solanacearum. Strain BZ6-1 with the highest antimicrobial activity was identified as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens based on morphology, biochemistry, and 16S rRNA analysis. Culture conditions of BZ6-1 were optimized using orthogonal test method and inhibitory zone diameter in dual culture plate assay reached 34.2 mm. Furthermore, main antimicrobial substances of surfactin and fengycin A homologues produced by BZ6-1 were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Finally, pot experiments were adopted to test the control efficiency of BZ6-1 against peanut BW. Disease incidence decreased significantly from 84.5% in the control to 12.1% with addition of 15 mL (108 cfu mL−1) culture broth for each seedling, suggesting the feasibility of strain BZ6-1 in the biological control of peanut plants BW. PMID:24527448

  5. The Genomic Sequence of the Oral Pathobiont Strain NI1060 Reveals Unique Strategies for Bacterial Competition and Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Darzi, Youssef; Jiao, Yizu; Hasegawa, Mizuho; Moon, Henry; Núñez, Gabriel; Inohara, Naohiro; Raes, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Strain NI1060 is an oral bacterium responsible for periodontitis in a murine ligature-induced disease model. To better understand its pathogenicity, we have determined the complete sequence of its 2,553,982 bp genome. Although closely related to Pasteurella pneumotropica, a pneumonia-associated rodent commensal based on its 16S rRNA, the NI1060 genomic content suggests that they are different species thriving on different energy sources via alternative metabolic pathways. Genomic and phylogenetic analyses showed that strain NI1060 is distinct from the genera currently described in the family Pasteurellaceae, and is likely to represent a novel species. In addition, we found putative virulence genes involved in lipooligosaccharide synthesis, adhesins and bacteriotoxic proteins. These genes are potentially important for host adaption and for the induction of dysbiosis through bacterial competition and pathogenicity. Importantly, strain NI1060 strongly stimulates Nod1, an innate immune receptor, but is defective in two peptidoglycan recycling genes due to a frameshift mutation. The in-depth analysis of its genome thus provides critical insights for the development of NI1060 as a prime model system for infectious disease. PMID:27409077

  6. Control efficacy of an endophytic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain BZ6-1 against peanut bacterial Wilt, Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaobing; Liang, Guobin

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to isolate and identify endophytic bacteria that might have efficacy against peanut bacterial wilt (BW) caused by Ralstonia solanacearum. Thirty-seven endophytic strains were isolated from healthy peanut plants in R. solanacearum-infested fields and eight showed antagonistic effects against R. solanacearum. Strain BZ6-1 with the highest antimicrobial activity was identified as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens based on morphology, biochemistry, and 16S rRNA analysis. Culture conditions of BZ6-1 were optimized using orthogonal test method and inhibitory zone diameter in dual culture plate assay reached 34.2 mm. Furthermore, main antimicrobial substances of surfactin and fengycin A homologues produced by BZ6-1 were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Finally, pot experiments were adopted to test the control efficiency of BZ6-1 against peanut BW. Disease incidence decreased significantly from 84.5% in the control to 12.1% with addition of 15 mL (10(8) cfu mL(-1)) culture broth for each seedling, suggesting the feasibility of strain BZ6-1 in the biological control of peanut plants BW. PMID:24527448

  7. The strains recommended for use in the bacterial reverse mutation test (OECD guideline 471) can be certified as non-genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Kei-Ichi; Yamada, Masami; Awogi, Takumi; Hakura, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial reverse mutation test, commonly called Ames test, is used worldwide. In Japan, the genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are regulated under the Cartagena Domestic Law, and organisms obtained by self-cloning and/or natural occurrence would be exempted from the law case by case. The strains of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli recommended for use in the bacterial reverse mutation test (OECD guideline 471), have been considered as non-GMOs because they can be constructed by self-cloning or naturally occurring bacterial strains, or do not disturb the biological diversity. The present article explains the reasons why these tester strains should be classified as non-GMOs. PMID:27350822

  8. Bacillus rubiinfantis sp. nov. strain mt2T, a new bacterial species isolated from human gut

    PubMed Central

    Tidjiani Alou, M.; Rathored, J.; Khelaifia, S.; Michelle, C.; Brah, S.; Diallo, B.A.; Raoult, D.; Lagier, J.-C.

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus rubiinfantis sp. nov. strain mt2T is the type strain of B. rubiinfantis sp. nov., isolated from the fecal flora of a child with kwashiorkor in Niger. It is Gram-positive facultative anaerobic rod belonging to the Bacillaceae family. We describe the features of this organism alongside the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 4 311 083 bp long genome (one chromosome but no plasmid) contains 4028 protein-coding gene and 121 RNA genes including nine rRNA genes. PMID:27076912

  9. Bacterial Wound Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  10. Isolation and characterization of a bacterial strain that degrades cis-dichloroethenein the absence of aromatic inducers.

    PubMed

    Yonezuka, Kenta; Araki, Naoto; Shimodaira, Jun; Ohji, Shoko; Hosoyama, Akira; Numata, Mitsuru; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Kasai, Daisuke; Masai, Eiji; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Ezaki, Takayuki; Fukuda, Masao

    2016-07-14

    Bacteria capable of degrading cis-dichloroethene (cDCE) were screened from cDCE-contaminated soil, and YKD221, a bacterial strain that exhibited a higher growth on minimal salt agar plates in the presence of cDCE than in the absence of cDCE, were isolated. Phylogenetic studies of the 16S rRNA as well as gyrB, rpoD, and recA in YKD221 indicated that this strain is closely related to the type strains of Pseudomonas plecoglossicida, monteilii, and putida. An average nucleotide identity analysis indicated that YKD221 is most closely related to P. putida strains, including the type strain, which suggests that YKD221 belongs to P. putida. Although the genome of YKD221 was very similar to that of P. putida F1, a toluene-degrading strain, the YKD221 genome has 15 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 4 insertions compared with the F1 genome. YKD221 caused the release of sufficient chloride ions from cDCE to suggest that the strain is able to completely dechlorinate and degrade cDCE. YKD221 also degraded trichloroethene but was unable to degrade trans-dichloroethene and tetrachloroethene. The degradation activity of YKD221 was elevated after growth on toluene. Inactivation of todC1, which encodes for a large subunit of the catalytic terminal component in toluene dioxygenase, resulted in a complete loss of growth on toluene and cDCE degradation activity. This is the first evidence of the involvement of todC1C2BA-coded toluene dioxygenase in cDCE degradation. YKD221 did not appear to grow on cDCE in a minimal salt liquid medium. However, YKD221 did exhibit an enhanced increase in cell concentration and volume of cells during growth on minimal salt agar plates with cDCE when first grown in LB medium. This behavior appears to have led us to misinterpret our initial results on YKD221 as an indication of improved growth in the presence of cDCE. PMID:27211831

  11. Arsenic-tolerant, arsenite-oxidising bacterial strains in the contaminated soils of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Aparajita; Bhattacharyya, K; Bhattacharyya, S; Kole, S C

    2013-10-01

    As biological agents represent an affordable alternative to costly metal decontamination technologies, we isolated arsenic (As) oxidising bacteria from the As-contaminated soils of West Bengal, India. These strains were closely related to various species of Bacillus and Geobacillus based on their 16S rRNA gene sequences. They were found to be hyper-resistant to both As(V) (167-400 mM) and As(III) (16-47 mM). Elevated rates of As(III) oxidation (278-1250 μM h(-1)) and arsenite oxidase activity (2.1-12.5 nM min(-1) mg(-1) protein) were observed in these isolates. Screening identified four strains as superior As-oxidisers. Among them, AMO-10 completely (100%) oxidised 30 mM of As(III) within 24 h. The presence of the aoxB gene was confirmed in the screened isolates. Phylogenetic tree construction based on the aoxB sequence revealed that two strains, AGO-S5 and AGH-02, clustered with Achromobacter and Variovorax, whereas the other two (AMO-10 and ADP-25) remained unclustered. The increased rate of As(III) oxidation by these native strains might be exploited for the remediation of As in contaminated environments. Notably, this study presents the first correlation regarding the presence of the aoxB gene and As(III) oxidation ability in Geobacillus stearothermophilus. PMID:23876545

  12. Genomic comparisons between paired bacterial strains with strong and weak GC skews.

    PubMed

    Song, Tie-Jun; Wang, Yue; Shen, Jian-Gen; Pan, Jian-Ping; Huang, Jun

    2014-02-01

    A majority of known eubacterial genomes are characteristic of GC skew, i.e., the leading strand has exceeding number of G over C. The cause of this compositional bias is still not very clear. In this study, we chose five pairs of genomes from distantly related bacterial genera, i.e., Buchnera, Haemophilus, Mycoplasma, Mycobacterium, and Synechococcus, each containing one with strong GC skew and the other with weak GC skew. Through comparison of the orthologous genes in these genera, we found that neither chromosomal rearrangement nor CDS skew has direct relationship with GC skew. PMID:23457112

  13. In Vitro Antibacterial Spectrum of Sodium Selenite against Selected Human Pathogenic Bacterial Strains

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Mohammad Firoz; Safhi, Mohammed M.; Moni, Sivakumar Sivagurunathan; Jabeen, Aamena

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to predict the antibacterial properties of sodium selenite against selected human pathogens. A group of six human bacterial pathogens including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella planticola were utilized for screening. The spectrum of activity was qualified based on zone of inhibition. Our study demonstrated that sodium selenite exhibits a strong spectrum of activity against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella planticola. The spectrum of activity was compared with standard ciprofloxacin disc (5 μg/disc) and observed to have satisfactory effect. PMID:27066293

  14. Genomic Survey of Pathogenicity Determinants and VNTR Markers in the Cassava Bacterial Pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. Manihotis Strain CIO151

    PubMed Central

    Arrieta-Ortiz, Mario L.; Rodríguez-R, Luis M.; Pérez-Quintero, Álvaro L.; Poulin, Lucie; Díaz, Ana C.; Arias Rojas, Nathalia; Trujillo, Cesar; Restrepo Benavides, Mariana; Bart, Rebecca; Boch, Jens; Boureau, Tristan; Darrasse, Armelle; David, Perrine; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Fontanilla, Paula; Gagnevin, Lionel; Guérin, Fabien; Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Lauber, Emmanuelle; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Medina, Cesar; Medina, Edgar; Montenegro, Nathaly; Muñoz Bodnar, Alejandra; Noël, Laurent D.; Ortiz Quiñones, Juan F.; Osorio, Daniela; Pardo, Carolina; Patil, Prabhu B.; Poussier, Stéphane; Pruvost, Olivier; Robène-Soustrade, Isabelle; Ryan, Robert P.; Tabima, Javier; Urrego Morales, Oscar G.; Vernière, Christian; Carrere, Sébastien; Verdier, Valérie; Szurek, Boris; Restrepo, Silvia; López, Camilo

    2013-01-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam) is the causal agent of bacterial blight of cassava, which is among the main components of human diet in Africa and South America. Current information about the molecular pathogenicity factors involved in the infection process of this organism is limited. Previous studies in other bacteria in this genus suggest that advanced draft genome sequences are valuable resources for molecular studies on their interaction with plants and could provide valuable tools for diagnostics and detection. Here we have generated the first manually annotated high-quality draft genome sequence of Xam strain CIO151. Its genomic structure is similar to that of other xanthomonads, especially Xanthomonas euvesicatoria and Xanthomonas citri pv. citri species. Several putative pathogenicity factors were identified, including type III effectors, cell wall-degrading enzymes and clusters encoding protein secretion systems. Specific characteristics in this genome include changes in the xanthomonadin cluster that could explain the lack of typical yellow color in all strains of this pathovar and the presence of 50 regions in the genome with atypical nucleotide composition. The genome sequence was used to predict and evaluate 22 variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) loci that were subsequently demonstrated as polymorphic in representative Xam strains. Our results demonstrate that Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis strain CIO151 possesses ten clusters of pathogenicity factors conserved within the genus Xanthomonas. We report 126 genes that are potentially unique to Xam, as well as potential horizontal transfer events in the history of the genome. The relation of these regions with virulence and pathogenicity could explain several aspects of the biology of this pathogen, including its ability to colonize both vascular and non-vascular tissues of cassava plants. A set of 16 robust, polymorphic VNTR loci will be useful to develop a multi-locus VNTR analysis

  15. Genomic survey of pathogenicity determinants and VNTR markers in the cassava bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. Manihotis strain CIO151.

    PubMed

    Arrieta-Ortiz, Mario L; Rodríguez-R, Luis M; Pérez-Quintero, Álvaro L; Poulin, Lucie; Díaz, Ana C; Arias Rojas, Nathalia; Trujillo, Cesar; Restrepo Benavides, Mariana; Bart, Rebecca; Boch, Jens; Boureau, Tristan; Darrasse, Armelle; David, Perrine; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Fontanilla, Paula; Gagnevin, Lionel; Guérin, Fabien; Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Lauber, Emmanuelle; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Medina, Cesar; Medina, Edgar; Montenegro, Nathaly; Muñoz Bodnar, Alejandra; Noël, Laurent D; Ortiz Quiñones, Juan F; Osorio, Daniela; Pardo, Carolina; Patil, Prabhu B; Poussier, Stéphane; Pruvost, Olivier; Robène-Soustrade, Isabelle; Ryan, Robert P; Tabima, Javier; Urrego Morales, Oscar G; Vernière, Christian; Carrere, Sébastien; Verdier, Valérie; Szurek, Boris; Restrepo, Silvia; López, Camilo; Koebnik, Ralf; Bernal, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam) is the causal agent of bacterial blight of cassava, which is among the main components of human diet in Africa and South America. Current information about the molecular pathogenicity factors involved in the infection process of this organism is limited. Previous studies in other bacteria in this genus suggest that advanced draft genome sequences are valuable resources for molecular studies on their interaction with plants and could provide valuable tools for diagnostics and detection. Here we have generated the first manually annotated high-quality draft genome sequence of Xam strain CIO151. Its genomic structure is similar to that of other xanthomonads, especially Xanthomonas euvesicatoria and Xanthomonas citri pv. citri species. Several putative pathogenicity factors were identified, including type III effectors, cell wall-degrading enzymes and clusters encoding protein secretion systems. Specific characteristics in this genome include changes in the xanthomonadin cluster that could explain the lack of typical yellow color in all strains of this pathovar and the presence of 50 regions in the genome with atypical nucleotide composition. The genome sequence was used to predict and evaluate 22 variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) loci that were subsequently demonstrated as polymorphic in representative Xam strains. Our results demonstrate that Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis strain CIO151 possesses ten clusters of pathogenicity factors conserved within the genus Xanthomonas. We report 126 genes that are potentially unique to Xam, as well as potential horizontal transfer events in the history of the genome. The relation of these regions with virulence and pathogenicity could explain several aspects of the biology of this pathogen, including its ability to colonize both vascular and non-vascular tissues of cassava plants. A set of 16 robust, polymorphic VNTR loci will be useful to develop a multi-locus VNTR analysis

  16. Synergistic and Additive Effect of Oregano Essential Oil and Biological Silver Nanoparticles against Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Strains.

    PubMed

    Scandorieiro, Sara; de Camargo, Larissa C; Lancheros, Cesar A C; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F; Nakamura, Celso V; de Oliveira, Admilton G; Andrade, Célia G T J; Duran, Nelson; Nakazato, Gerson; Kobayashi, Renata K T

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics has become a clinical and public health problem, making therapeutic decisions more challenging. Plant compounds and nanodrugs have been proposed as potential antimicrobial alternatives. Studies have shown that oregano (Origanum vulgare) essential oil (OEO) and silver nanoparticles have potent antibacterial activity, also against multidrug-resistant strains; however, the strong organoleptic characteristics of OEO and the development of resistance to these metal nanoparticles can limit their use. This study evaluated the antibacterial effect of a two-drug combination of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles (bio-AgNP), produced by Fusarium oxysporum, and OEO against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including multidrug-resistant strains. OEO and bio-AgNP showed bactericidal effects against all 17 strains tested, with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranging from 0.298 to 1.193 mg/mL and 62.5 to 250 μM, respectively. Time-kill curves indicated that OEO acted rapidly (within 10 min), while the metallic nanoparticles took 4 h to kill Gram-negative bacteria and 24 h to kill Gram-positive bacteria. The combination of the two compounds resulted in a synergistic or additive effect, reducing their MIC values and reducing the time of action compared to bio-AgNP used alone, i.e., 20 min for Gram-negative bacteria and 7 h for Gram-positive bacteria. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed similar morphological alterations in Staphylococcus aureus (non-methicillin-resistant S. aureus, non-MRSA) cells exposed to three different treatments (OEO, bio-AgNP and combination of the two), which appeared cell surface blebbing. Individual and combined treatments showed reduction in cell density and decrease in exopolysaccharide matrix compared to untreated bacterial cells. It indicated that this composition have an antimicrobial activity against S. aureus by disrupting cells. Both compounds showed very low

  17. Synergistic and Additive Effect of Oregano Essential Oil and Biological Silver Nanoparticles against Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Strains

    PubMed Central

    Scandorieiro, Sara; de Camargo, Larissa C.; Lancheros, Cesar A. C.; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F.; Nakamura, Celso V.; de Oliveira, Admilton G.; Andrade, Célia G. T. J.; Duran, Nelson; Nakazato, Gerson; Kobayashi, Renata K. T.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics has become a clinical and public health problem, making therapeutic decisions more challenging. Plant compounds and nanodrugs have been proposed as potential antimicrobial alternatives. Studies have shown that oregano (Origanum vulgare) essential oil (OEO) and silver nanoparticles have potent antibacterial activity, also against multidrug-resistant strains; however, the strong organoleptic characteristics of OEO and the development of resistance to these metal nanoparticles can limit their use. This study evaluated the antibacterial effect of a two-drug combination of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles (bio-AgNP), produced by Fusarium oxysporum, and OEO against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including multidrug-resistant strains. OEO and bio-AgNP showed bactericidal effects against all 17 strains tested, with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranging from 0.298 to 1.193 mg/mL and 62.5 to 250 μM, respectively. Time-kill curves indicated that OEO acted rapidly (within 10 min), while the metallic nanoparticles took 4 h to kill Gram-negative bacteria and 24 h to kill Gram-positive bacteria. The combination of the two compounds resulted in a synergistic or additive effect, reducing their MIC values and reducing the time of action compared to bio-AgNP used alone, i.e., 20 min for Gram-negative bacteria and 7 h for Gram-positive bacteria. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed similar morphological alterations in Staphylococcus aureus (non-methicillin-resistant S. aureus, non-MRSA) cells exposed to three different treatments (OEO, bio-AgNP and combination of the two), which appeared cell surface blebbing. Individual and combined treatments showed reduction in cell density and decrease in exopolysaccharide matrix compared to untreated bacterial cells. It indicated that this composition have an antimicrobial activity against S. aureus by disrupting cells. Both compounds showed very low

  18. Antibacterial efficacy of the seed extracts of Melia azedarach against some hospital isolated human pathogenic bacterial strains

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Abdul Viqar; Ahmed, Qamar Uddin; Mir, M Ramzan; Shukla, Indu; Khan, Athar Ali

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antibacterial potential of the polar and non-polar extracts of the seeds of Melia azedarach (M. azedarach) L. (Meliaceae) against eighteen hospital isolated human pathogenic bacterial strains. Methods Petrol, benzene, ethyl acetate, methanol, and aqueous extracts at five different concentrations (1, 2, 5, 10 and 15 mg/mL) were evaluated. Disk diffusion method was followed to evaluate the antibacterial efficacy. Results All extracts of the seeds demonstrated significant antibacterial activity against tested pathogens. Among all extracts, ethyl acetate extract revealed the highest inhibition comparatively. The present study also favored the traditional uses reported earlier. Conclusions Results of this study strongly confirm that the seed extracts of M. azedarach could be effective antibiotics, both in controlling gram-positive and gram-negative human pathogenic infections. PMID:23569812

  19. First Comprehensive Evaluation of the M.I.C. Evaluator Device Compared to Etest and CLSI Broth Microdilution for MIC Testing of Aerobic Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacterial Species

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, L.; Brosnikoff, C.; Cloke, J.

    2012-01-01

    The M.I.C. Evaluator strip (Thermo Fisher Scientific, Basingstoke, United Kingdom) uses a methodology similar to that of Etest. In this first assessment of the M.I.C. Evaluator device, 409 strains of aerobic Gram-positive bacteria (staphylococci, streptococci, and enterococci) and 325 strains of Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas species, and Acinetobacter species were tested by M.I.C. Evaluator strip, Etest, and broth microdilution as a reference standard. The Gram-positive bacteria included staphylococci (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, and coagulase-negative staphylococci), Streptococcus pneumoniae, beta-hemolytic streptococci and viridians group strains, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and other enterococci. The Gram-negative bacteria included 250 strains of 60 Enterobacteriaceae species plus 50 Pseudomonas and 25 Acinetobacter species. A total of 14 antimicrobial agents (depending on the species) were included. The same methodology and reading format were used for M.I.C. Evaluator strips and Etest. Broth microdilution methodology was performed according to CLSI document M07-A8. For the clinical strains, >95% of results were plus or minus one doubling dilution for all species. There were fewer than 5% minor errors, fewer than 3% major errors, and fewer than 1% very major errors. M.I.C. Evaluator strips and Etest often reported higher MICs than the reference broth microdilution method. The M.I.C. Evaluator strips provided results comparable to those of the predicate Etest device and are of value for the accurate testing of MICs for these important pathogens. PMID:22238441

  20. High Frequency and Diversity of Antimicrobial Activities Produced by Nasal Staphylococcus Strains against Bacterial Competitors

    PubMed Central

    Janek, Daniela; Zipperer, Alexander; Kulik, Andreas; Krismer, Bernhard; Peschel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The human nasal microbiota is highly variable and dynamic often enclosing major pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus. The potential roles of bacteriocins or other mechanisms allowing certain bacterial clones to prevail in this nutrient-poor habitat have hardly been studied. Of 89 nasal Staphylococcus isolates, unexpectedly, the vast majority (84%) was found to produce antimicrobial substances in particular under habitat-specific stress conditions, such as iron limitation or exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Activity spectra were generally narrow but highly variable with activities against certain nasal members of the Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, or several groups of bacteria. Staphylococcus species and many other Firmicutes were insusceptible to most of the compounds. A representative bacteriocin was identified as a nukacin-related peptide whose inactivation reduced the capacity of the producer Staphylococcus epidermidis IVK45 to limit growth of other nasal bacteria. Of note, the bacteriocin genes were found on mobile genetic elements exhibiting signs of extensive horizontal gene transfer and rearrangements. Thus, continuously evolving bacteriocins appear to govern bacterial competition in the human nose and specific bacteriocins may become important agents for eradication of notorious opportunistic pathogens from human microbiota. PMID:27490492

  1. Differential fusion expression and purification of a cystatin in two different bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh, A

    2013-01-01

    To date, the identification of the novel multifunctional properties of cysteine proteinase inhibitors "known as cystatins" is the great of interests for molecular biologists. The efficient production, purification and correctly folded form of these proteins are the most important requirements for their any basic research. To the best of our knowledge, maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion tags are being used to overcome the impediment to their heterologous recombinant expression in Escherichia coli as insoluble and bio-inactive inclusion bodies. In the present work, to evaluate the expression efficiency of a cystatin molecule in E. coli cells by using MBP tags, the expression of Celosia cystatin was studied in two different strains of this bacterium. The quantitative analysis results based on the one-step purification yield of the fused product showed the excellency of the E. coli TB1 strain in comparison to E. coli DH5alpha for the high-level production of active product. PMID:24455860

  2. Aerobic granular sludge mediated biodegradation of an organophosphorous ester, dibutyl phosphite.

    PubMed

    Kiran Kumar Reddy, G; Nancharaiah, Yarlagadda Venkata; Venugopalan, Vayalam Purath

    2014-10-01

    Dibutyl phosphite, an organophosphorous compound, finds applications in different chemical industries and processes. Here, we report an efficient approach of biodegradation to be eventually used in bioremediation of dibutyl phosphite. Aerobic granules capable of dibutyl phosphite biodegradation were cultivated in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The SBR was operated with a 24-h cycle by feeding with dibutyl phosphite as a cosubstrate along with acetate. During the course of the SBR operation, aerobic granules of 0.9 ± 0.3 mm size were developed. Complete biodegradation of 1.4, 2 and 3 mM of dibutyl phosphite was achieved in 4, 5 and 8 h, respectively, accompanied by stoichiometric release of phosphite (H3 PO3). Phosphatase activity in the dibutyl phosphite-degrading granular biomass was 3- and 1.5-fold higher as compared to the activated sludge (seed biomass) and acetate-fed aerobic granules, respectively, indicating involvement in the hydrolysis of dibutyl phosphite. Microbial community analysis by t-RFLP showed the presence of 12 different bacterial types. Two bacterial strains capable of growth on dibutyl phosphite as sole carbon source were isolated and characterized as Acidovorax sp. and Sphingobium sp. The results show that aerobic microbial granules based process is suitable for the treatment of dibutyl phosphite contaminated water. PMID:25135363

  3. Aerobic granulation strategy for bioaugmentation of a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) treating high strength pyridine wastewater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaodong; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Xin; Jiang, Xinbai; Wu, Shijing; Shen, Jinyou; Sun, Xiuyun; Li, Jiansheng; Lu, Lude; Wang, Lianjun

    2015-09-15

    Aerobic granules were successfully cultivated in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR), using a single bacterial strain Rhizobium sp. NJUST18 as the inoculum. NJUST18 presented as both a good pyridine degrader and an efficient autoaggregator. Stable granules with diameter of 0.5-1 mm, sludge volume index of 25.6 ± 3.6 mL g(-1) and settling velocity of 37.2 ± 2.7 m h(-1), were formed in SBR following 120-day cultivation. These granules exhibited excellent pyridine degradation performance, with maximum volumetric degradation rate (Vmax) varied between 1164.5 mg L(-1) h(-1) and 1867.4 mg L(-1) h(-1). High-throughput sequencing analysis exhibited a large shift in microbial community structure, since the SBR was operated under open condition. Paracoccus and Comamonas were found to be the most predominant species in the aerobic granule system after the system had stabilized. The initially inoculated Rhizobium sp. lost its dominance during aerobic granulation. However, the inoculation of Rhizobium sp. played a key role in the start-up process of this bioaugmentation system. This study demonstrated that, in addition to the hydraulic selection pressure during settling and effluent discharge, the selection of aggregating bacterial inocula is equally important for the formation of the aerobic granule. PMID:25897697

  4. Control of Shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli in cheese by dairy bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Callon, Cécile; Arliguie, Céline; Montel, Marie-Christine

    2016-02-01

    Bio-preservation could be a valuable way to control Shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in cheese. To this end, 41 strains were screened for their inhibitory potential on model cheese curd and on pasteurized and raw milk uncooked pressed cheeses. Strains of Lactococcus lactis, Lactococcus garvieae, Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides, Leuconostoc citreum, Lactobacillus sp, Carnobacterium mobile, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Macrococcus caseolyticus and Hafnia alvei reduced STEC O26:H11 counts by 1.4-2.5 log cfu g(-1) and to a lesser extent STEC O157:H7 counts in pasteurized milk cheeses. Some strains can act in synergy to inhibit STEC in raw milk uncooked pressed cheeses. Inhibitory associations had no adverse effect on the sensory characteristics of these cheeses. The association of H. alvei, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lc. lactis was the most inhibitory: after inoculation of this consortium into milk, STEC O26:H11 and O157:H7, inoculated at 2 log cfu ml(-1), were reduced by up to 3 log cfu g(-1) in ripened cheese. Inhibition in cheese cannot be predicted from H2O2 production in BHI medium, decreased pH or milk reduction. It is not clear what role the rapid decrease in pH during the first 6 h may play in the inhibition. Further studies will be needed to determine the nature of the inhibition. PMID:26678131

  5. Towards a tolerance toolkit: Gene expression signatures enabling the emergence of resistant bacterial strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Keesha; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2014-03-01

    Microbial pathogens are able to rapidly acquire tolerance to chemical toxins. Developing next-generation antibiotics that impede the emergence of resistance will help avoid a world-wide health crisis. Conversely, the ability to induce rapid tolerance gains could lead to high-yielding strains for sustainable production of biofuels and commodity chemicals. Achieving these goals requires an understanding of the general mechanisms allowing microbes to become resistant to diverse toxins. We apply top-down and bottom-up methodologies to identify biological network changes leading to adaptation and tolerance. Using a top-down approach, we perform evolution experiments to isolate resistant strains, collect samples for transcriptomic and proteomic analysis, and use the omics data to inform mathematical gene regulatory models. Using a bottom-up approach, we build and test synthetic genetic devices that enable increased or decreased expression of selected genes. Unique patterns in gene expression are identified in cultures actively gaining resistance, especially in pathways known to be involved with stress response, efflux, and mutagenesis. Genes correlated with tolerance could potentially allow the design of resistance-free antibiotics or robust chemical production strains.

  6. Bacterial treatment of alkaline cement kiln dust using Bacillus halodurans strain KG1.

    PubMed

    Kunal; Rajor, Anita; Siddique, Rafat

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to isolate an acid-producing, alkaliphilic bacterium to reduce the alkalinity of cement industry waste (cement kiln dust). Gram-positive isolate KG1 grew well at pH values of 6-12, temperatures of 28-50°C, and NaCl concentrations of 0-16% and thus was further screened for its potential to reduce the pH of an alkaline medium. Phenotypic characteristics of the KG1 isolate were consistent with those of the genus Bacillus, and the highest level of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity was found with Bacillus halodurans strain DSM 497 (94.7%). On the basis of its phenotypic characteristics and genotypic distinctiveness from other phylogenetic neighbors belonging to alkaliphilic Bacillus species, the isolated strain was designated B. halodurans strain KG1, with GenBank accession number JQ307184 (= NCIM 5439). Isolate KG1 reduced the alkalinity (by 83.64%) and the chloride content (by 86.96%) of cement kiln dust and showed a potential to be used in the cement industry for a variety of applications. PMID:26887220

  7. Bacterial treatment of alkaline cement kiln dust using Bacillus halodurans strain KG1

    PubMed Central

    Kunal; Rajor, Anita; Siddique, Rafat

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to isolate an acid-producing, alkaliphilic bacterium to reduce the alkalinity of cement industry waste (cement kiln dust). Gram-positive isolate KG1 grew well at pH values of 6–12, temperatures of 28–50 °C, and NaCl concentrations of 0–16% and thus was further screened for its potential to reduce the pH of an alkaline medium. Phenotypic characteristics of the KG1 isolate were consistent with those of the genus Bacillus, and the highest level of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity was found with Bacillus halodurans strain DSM 497 (94.7%). On the basis of its phenotypic characteristics and genotypic distinctiveness from other phylogenetic neighbors belonging to alkaliphilic Bacillus species, the isolated strain was designated B. halodurans strain KG1, with GenBank accession number JQ307184 (= NCIM 5439). Isolate KG1 reduced the alkalinity (by 83.64%) and the chloride content (by 86.96%) of cement kiln dust and showed a potential to be used in the cement industry for a variety of applications. PMID:26887220

  8. Bioconversion of styrene to poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA) by the new bacterial strain Pseudomonas putida NBUS12.

    PubMed

    Tan, Giin-Yu Amy; Chen, Chia-Lung; Ge, Liya; Li, Ling; Tan, Swee Ngin; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Styrene is a toxic pollutant commonly found in waste effluents from plastic processing industries. We herein identified and characterized microorganisms for bioconversion of the organic eco-pollutant styrene into a valuable biopolymer medium-chain-length poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (mcl-PHA). Twelve newly-isolated styrene-degrading Pseudomonads were obtained and partial phaC genes were detected by PCR in these isolates. These isolates assimilated styrene to produce mcl-PHA, forming PHA contents between 0.05±0.00 and 23.10±3.25% cell dry mass (% CDM). The best-performing isolate was identified as Pseudomonas putida NBUS12. A genetic analysis of 16S rDNA and phaZ genes revealed P. putida NBUS12 as a genetically-distinct strain from existing phenotypically-similar bacterial strains. This bacterium achieved a final biomass of 1.28±0.10 g L(-1) and PHA content of 32.49±2.40% CDM. The extracted polymer was mainly comprised of 3-hydroxyhexanoate (C6 ), 3-hydroxyoctanoate (C8 ), 3-hydroxydecanoate (C10 ), 3-hydroxydodecanoate (C12 ), and 3-hydroxytetradecanoate (C14 ) monomers at a ratio of 2:42:1257:17:1. These results collectively suggested that P. putida NBUS12 is a promising candidate for the biotechnological conversion of styrene into mcl-PHA. PMID:25740622

  9. Mouse hepatitis virus strain UAB infection enhances resistance to Salmonella typhimurium in mice by inducing suppression of bacterial growth.

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, M T; Benjamin, W H; Schoeb, T R; Briles, D E

    1991-01-01

    We have previously shown that intranasal infection of mice with mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) strain UAB (MHV-UAB) increases their resistance to Salmonella typhimurium injected intravenously 6 days later. To study how salmonella resistance was induced, BALB/cAnNCr mice were infected with salmonella strains carrying specific genetic alterations. One set of studies compared the effect of MHV infection on subsequent salmonella infections with AroA- (avirulent) and Aro+ (virulent) salmonellae. Unlike its effect on Aro+ salmonellae, MHV failed to reduce the number of AroA- salmonellae recovered from mice. Because AroA- S. typhimurium shows almost no growth in vivo, this failure indicated that the effect of MHV on salmonella resistance required growth of the infecting salmonellae. In other studies, the effect of MHV infection on both growth and killing were monitored simultaneously in mice with growing salmonellae carrying a single copy of the temperature-sensitive pHSG422 plasmid, which is unable to replicate in vivo. MHV infection reduced salmonella growth but caused no increase in salmonella killing. MHV infection of mice given wild-type salmonellae also resulted in no increase in salmonella killing 4 h after salmonella challenge. These studies demonstrate that MHV-UAB infection increases host resistance to salmonellae by enhancing suppression of bacterial growth instead of by increasing the amount of salmonella killing. PMID:1847697

  10. Bioconversion of Styrene to Poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA) by the New Bacterial Strain Pseudomonas putida NBUS12

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Giin-Yu Amy; Chen, Chia-Lung; Ge, Liya; Li, Ling; Tan, Swee Ngin; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Styrene is a toxic pollutant commonly found in waste effluents from plastic processing industries. We herein identified and characterized microorganisms for bioconversion of the organic eco-pollutant styrene into a valuable biopolymer medium-chain-length poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (mcl-PHA). Twelve newly-isolated styrene-degrading Pseudomonads were obtained and partial phaC genes were detected by PCR in these isolates. These isolates assimilated styrene to produce mcl-PHA, forming PHA contents between 0.05±0.00 and 23.10±3.25% cell dry mass (% CDM). The best-performing isolate was identified as Pseudomonas putida NBUS12. A genetic analysis of 16S rDNA and phaZ genes revealed P. putida NBUS12 as a genetically-distinct strain from existing phenotypically-similar bacterial strains. This bacterium achieved a final biomass of 1.28±0.10 g L−1 and PHA content of 32.49±2.40% CDM. The extracted polymer was mainly comprised of 3-hydroxyhexanoate (C6 ), 3-hydroxyoctanoate (C8 ), 3-hydroxydecanoate (C10 ), 3-hydroxydodecanoate (C12 ), and 3-hydroxytetradecanoate (C14 ) monomers at a ratio of 2:42:1257:17:1. These results collectively suggested that P. putida NBUS12 is a promising candidate for the biotechnological conversion of styrene into mcl-PHA. PMID:25740622

  11. Detection of traces of tetracyclines from fish with a bioluminescent sensor strain incorporating bacterial luciferase reporter genes.

    PubMed

    Pellinen, Teijo; Bylund, Göran; Virta, Marko; Niemi, Anneli; Karp, Matti

    2002-08-14

    Bioluminescent Escherichia coli K-12 strain for the specific detection of the tetracycline family of antimicrobial agents was optimized to work with fish samples. The biosensing strain contains a plasmid incorporating the bacterial luciferase operon of Photorhabdus luminescens under the control of the tetracycline responsive element from transposon Tn10 (Korpela et al. Anal. Chem. 1998, 70, 4457-4462). The extraction procedure of oxytetracycline from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) tissue was optimized. There was neither need for centrifugation of homogenized tissue nor use of organic solvents. The lowest levels of detection of tetracycline and oxytetracycline from spiked fish tissue were 20 and 50 microg/kg, respectively, in a 2-h assay. The optimized assay protocol was tested with fish that were given a single oral dose of high and low concentrations of oxytetracycline. The assay was able to detect oxytetracycline residues below the European Union maximum residue limits, and the results correlated well with those obtained by conventional HPLC (R = 0.81). PMID:12166964

  12. Genome sequencing and systems biology analysis of a lipase-producing bacterial strain.

    PubMed

    Li, N; Li, D D; Zhang, Y Z; Yuan, Y Z; Geng, H; Xiong, L; Liu, D L

    2016-01-01

    Lipase-producing bacteria are naturally-occurring, industrially-relevant microorganisms that produce lipases, which can be used to synthesize biodiesel from waste oils. The efficiency of lipase expression varies between various microbial strains. Therefore, strains that can produce lipases with high efficiency must be screened, and the conditions of lipase metabolism and optimization of the production process in a given environment must be thoroughly studied. A high efficiency lipase-producing strain was isolated from the sediments of Jinsha River, identified by 16S rRNA sequence analysis as Serratia marcescens, and designated as HS-L5. A schematic diagram of the genome sequence was constructed by high-throughput genome sequencing. A series of genes related to lipid degradation were identified by functional gene annotation through sequence homology analysis. A genome-scale metabolic model of HS-ML5 was constructed using systems biology techniques. The model consisted of 1722 genes and 1567 metabolic reactions. The topological graph of the genome-scale metabolic model was compared to that of conventional metabolic pathways using a visualization software and KEGG database. The basic components and boundaries of the tributyrin degradation subnetwork were determined, and its flux balance analyzed using Matlab and COBRA Toolbox to simulate the effects of different conditions on the catalytic efficiency of lipases produced by HS-ML5. We proved that the catalytic activity of microbial lipases was closely related to the carbon metabolic pathway. As production and catalytic efficiency of lipases varied greatly with the environment, the catalytic efficiency and environmental adaptability of microbial lipases can be improved by proper control of the production conditions. PMID:27050954

  13. Biodiversity of aerobic endospore-forming bacterial species occurring in Yanyanku and Ikpiru, fermented seeds of Hibiscus sabdariffa used to produce food condiments in Benin.

    PubMed

    Agbobatinkpo, Pélagie B; Thorsen, Line; Nielsen, Dennis S; Azokpota, Paulin; Akissoe, Noèl; Hounhouigan, Joseph D; Jakobsen, Mogens

    2013-05-15

    Yanyanku and Ikpiru made by the fermentation of Malcavene bean (Hibiscus sabdariffa) are used as functional additives for Parkia biglobosa seed fermentations in Benin. A total of 355 aerobic endospore-forming bacteria (AEFB) isolated from Yanyanku and Ikpiru produced in northern and southern Benin were identified using phenotypic and genotypic methods, including GTG5-PCR, M13-PCR, 16S rRNA, gyrA and gyrB gene sequencing. Generally, the same 5-6 species of the genus Bacillus predominated: Bacillus subtilis (17-41% of isolates), Bacillus cereus (8-39%), Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (9-22%), Bacillus licheniformis (3-26%), Bacillus safensis (8-19%) and Bacillus altitudinis (0-19%). Bacillus aryabhattai, Bacillus flexus, and Bacillus circulans (0-2%), and species of the genera Lysinibacillus (0-14%), Paenibacillus (0-13%), Brevibacillus (0-4%), and Aneurinibacillus (0-3%) occurred sporadically. The diarrheal toxin encoding genes cytK-1, cytK-2, hblA, hblC, and hblD were present in 0%, 91% 15%, 34% and 35% of B. cereus isolates, respectively. 9% of them harbored the emetic toxin genetic determinant, cesB. This study is the first to identify the AEFB of Yanyanku and Ikpiru to species level and perform a safety evaluation based on toxin gene detections. We further suggest, that the gyrA gene can be used for differentiating the closely related species Bacillus pumilus and B. safensis. PMID:23571124

  14. Growth kinetics of a diesel-degrading bacterial strain from petroleum-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Dahalan, S F A; Yunus, I; Johari, W L W; Shukor, M Y; Halmi, M I E; Shamaan, N A; Syed, M A

    2014-03-01

    A diesel-degrading bacterium was isolated from a diesel-contaminated site in Selangor, Malaysia. The isolate was tentatively identified as Acinetobacter sp. strain DRY12 based on partial 16S rDNA molecular phylogeny and Biolog GN microplate panels and Microlog database. Optimum growth occurred from 3 to 5% diesel and the strain was able to tolerate as high as 8% diesel. The optimal pH that supported growth of the bacterium was between pH 7.5 to 8.0. The isolate exhibited optimal growth in between 30 and 35 degrees C. The best nitrogen source was potassium nitrate (between 0.6 and 0.9% (w/v)) followed by ammonium chloride, sodium nitrite and ammonium sulphate in descending order. An almost complete removal of diesel components was seen from the reduction in hydrocarbon peaks observed using Solid Phase Microextraction Gas Chromatography analysis after 10 days of incubation. The best growth kinetic model to fit experimental data was the Haldane model of substrate inhibiting growth with a correlation coefficient value of 0.97. The maximum growth rate- micromax was 0.039 hr(-1) while the saturation constant or half velocity constant Ks and inhibition constant Ki, were 0.387% and 4.46%, respectively. MATH assays showed that 75% of the bacterium was found in the hexadecane phase indicating that the bacterium was hydrophobic. The characteristics of this bacterium make it useful for bioremediation works in the Tropics. PMID:24665769

  15. Rhizospheric Bacterial Strain Brevibacterium casei MH8a Colonizes Plant Tissues and Enhances Cd, Zn, Cu Phytoextraction by White Mustard

    PubMed Central

    Płociniczak, Tomasz; Sinkkonen, Aki; Romantschuk, Martin; Sułowicz, Sławomir; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollution by heavy metals has become a serious problem in the world. Phytoextraction, which is one of the plant-based technologies, has attracted the most attention for the bioremediation of soils polluted with these contaminants. The aim of this study was to determine whether the multiple-tolerant bacterium, Brevibacterium casei MH8a isolated from the heavy metal-contaminated rhizosphere soil of Sinapis alba L., is able to promote plant growth and enhance Cd, Zn, and Cu uptake by white mustard under laboratory conditions. Additionally, the ability of the rifampicin-resistant spontaneous mutant of MH8a to colonize plant tissues and its mechanisms of plant growth promotion were also examined. In order to assess the ecological consequences of bioaugmentation on autochthonous bacteria, the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis was used. The MH8a strain exhibited the ability to produce ammonia, 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase, indole 3-acetic acid and HCN but was not able to solubilize inorganic phosphate and produce siderophores. Introduction of MH8a into soil significantly increased S. alba biomass and the accumulation of Cd (208%), Zn (86%), and Cu (39%) in plant shoots in comparison with those grown in non-inoculated soil. Introduced into the soil, MH8a was able to enter the plant and was found in the roots and leaves of inoculated plants thus indicating its endophytic features. PLFA analysis revealed that the MH8a that was introduced into soil had a temporary influence on the structure of the autochthonous bacterial communities. The plant growth-promoting features of the MH8a strain and its ability to enhance the metal uptake by white mustard and its long-term survival in soil as well as its temporary impact on autochthonous microorganisms make the strain a suitable candidate for the promotion of plant growth and the efficiency of phytoextraction. PMID:26909087

  16. Rhizospheric Bacterial Strain Brevibacterium casei MH8a Colonizes Plant Tissues and Enhances Cd, Zn, Cu Phytoextraction by White Mustard.

    PubMed

    Płociniczak, Tomasz; Sinkkonen, Aki; Romantschuk, Martin; Sułowicz, Sławomir; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollution by heavy metals has become a serious problem in the world. Phytoextraction, which is one of the plant-based technologies, has attracted the most attention for the bioremediation of soils polluted with these contaminants. The aim of this study was to determine whether the multiple-tolerant bacterium, Brevibacterium casei MH8a isolated from the heavy metal-contaminated rhizosphere soil of Sinapis alba L., is able to promote plant growth and enhance Cd, Zn, and Cu uptake by white mustard under laboratory conditions. Additionally, the ability of the rifampicin-resistant spontaneous mutant of MH8a to colonize plant tissues and its mechanisms of plant growth promotion were also examined. In order to assess the ecological consequences of bioaugmentation on autochthonous bacteria, the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis was used. The MH8a strain exhibited the ability to produce ammonia, 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase, indole 3-acetic acid and HCN but was not able to solubilize inorganic phosphate and produce siderophores. Introduction of MH8a into soil significantly increased S. alba biomass and the accumulation of Cd (208%), Zn (86%), and Cu (39%) in plant shoots in comparison with those grown in non-inoculated soil. Introduced into the soil, MH8a was able to enter the plant and was found in the roots and leaves of inoculated plants thus indicating its endophytic features. PLFA analysis revealed that the MH8a that was introduced into soil had a temporary influence on the structure of the autochthonous bacterial communities. The plant growth-promoting features of the MH8a strain and its ability to enhance the metal uptake by white mustard and its long-term survival in soil as well as its temporary impact on autochthonous microorganisms make the strain a suitable candidate for the promotion of plant growth and the efficiency of phytoextraction. PMID:26909087

  17. Selective enrichment and characterization of a phosphorus-removing bacterial consortium from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Hollender, J; Dreyer, U; Kornberger, L; Kämpfer, P; Dott, W

    2002-01-01

    Under alternating aerobic/anaerobic conditions and without additional carbon sources, a bacterial consortium consisting initially of 18 bacterial strains was obtained in a sequence batch reactor. The phosphorus removal capability could only be maintained using sterile filtrate of activated sludge as medium. The addition of calcium and magnesium salts, as well as vitamins and trace elements, to autoclaved sterile filtrate of activated sludge was not sufficient to achieve stable phosphorus removal. A further enrichment by subcultivation on solid, agar, freezing, and shortening of the aerobic and anaerobic phases led to a defined bacterial consortium consisting of four strains. On the basis of physiological and chemotaxonomic characterization, and partial 16S rRNA sequencing, one of the organisms was identified as Delftia acidovorans. A further isolate belonged to the Bacillus cereus group, and the third isolate was identified as Microbacterium sp.. The remaining strain seems to represent a new genus within the Flavobacteriaceae. Under continuous chemostat conditions, this consortium was able to remove up to 9.6 mg P/l phosphate in the aerobic phase and released up to 8.5 mg/l in the anaerobic phase. Up to 25 mg P-polyphosphate/g dry mass was stored under aerobic conditions. PMID:11831470

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Paracoccus sp. MKU1, a New Bacterial Strain Isolated from an Industrial Effluent with Potential for Bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Nisha, Kamaldeen Nasrin; Sridhar, Jayavel; Varalakshmi, Perumal; Ashokkumar, Balasubramaniem

    2016-01-01

    Paracoccus sp. MKU1, a novel dimethylformamide degrading bacterial strain was originally isolated from an industrial effluent, Tirupur region, Tamil Nadu, India. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Paracoccus sp. MKU1, which could provide the genetic insights on its evolution and application of this versatile bacterium for effective degradation of xenobiotics and thus in bioremediation. PMID:27326263

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Paracoccus sp. MKU1, a New Bacterial Strain Isolated from an Industrial Effluent with Potential for Bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Nisha, Kamaldeen Nasrin; Sridhar, Jayavel; Varalakshmi, Perumal; Ashokkumar, Balasubramaniem

    2016-01-01

    Paracoccus sp. MKU1, a novel dimethylformamide degrading bacterial strain was originally isolated from an industrial effluent, Tirupur region, Tamil Nadu, India. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Paracoccus sp. MKU1, which could provide the genetic insights on its evolution and application of this versatile bacterium for effective degradation of xenobiotics and thus in bioremediation. PMID:27326263

  20. Biodegradation of tributyl phosphate, an organosphate triester, by aerobic granular biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nancharaiah, Y V; Kiran Kumar Reddy, G; Krishna Mohan, T V; Venugopalan, V P

    2015-01-01

    Tributyl phosphate (TBP) is commercially used in large volumes for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. TBP is a very stable compound and persistent in natural environments and it is not removed in conventional wastewater treatment plants. In this study, cultivation of aerobic granular biofilms in a sequencing batch reactor was investigated for efficient biodegradation of TBP. Enrichment of TBP-degrading strains resulted in efficient degradation of TBP as sole carbon or along with acetate. Complete biodegradation of 2mM of TBP was achieved within 5h with a degradation rate of 0.4 μmol mL(-1) h(-1). TBP biodegradation was accompanied by release of inorganic phosphate in stoichiometric amounts. n-Butanol, hydrolysed product of TBP was rapidly biodegraded. But, dibutyl phosphate, a putative intermediate of TBP degradation was only partially degraded pointing to an alternative degradation pathway. Phosphatase activity was 22- and 7.5-fold higher in TBP-degrading biofilms as compared to bioflocs and acetate-fed aerobic granules. Community analysis by terminal restriction length polymorphism revealed presence of 30 different bacterial strains. Seven bacterial stains, including Sphingobium sp. a known TBP degrader were isolated. The results show that aerobic granular biofilms are promising for treatment of TBP-bearing wastes or ex situ bioremediation of TBP-contaminated sites. PMID:25464313

  1. Multilocus sequence analysis of xanthomonads causing bacterial spot of tomato and pepper plants reveals strains generated by recombination among species and recent global spread of Xanthomonas gardneri.

    PubMed

    Timilsina, Sujan; Jibrin, Mustafa O; Potnis, Neha; Minsavage, Gerald V; Kebede, Misrak; Schwartz, Allison; Bart, Rebecca; Staskawicz, Brian; Boyer, Claudine; Vallad, Gary E; Pruvost, Olivier; Jones, Jeffrey B; Goss, Erica M

    2015-02-01

    Four Xanthomonas species are known to cause bacterial spot of tomato and pepper, but the global distribution and genetic diversity of these species are not well understood. A collection of bacterial spot-causing strains from the Americas, Africa, Southeast Asia, and New Zealand were characterized for genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships using multilocus sequence analysis of six housekeeping genes. By examining strains from different continents, we found unexpected phylogeographic patterns, including the global distribution of a single multilocus haplotype of X. gardneri, possible regional differentiation in X. vesicatoria, and high species diversity on tomato in Africa. In addition, we found evidence of multiple recombination events between X. euvesicatoria and X. perforans. Our results indicate that there have been shifts in the species composition of bacterial spot pathogen populations due to the global spread of dominant genotypes and that recombination between species has generated genetic diversity in these populations. PMID:25527544

  2. Could petroleum biodegradation be a joint achievement of aerobic and anaerobic microrganisms in deep sea reservoirs?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Several studies suggest that petroleum biodegradation can be achieved by either aerobic or anaerobic microorganisms, depending on oxygen input or other electron acceptors and appropriate nutrients. Evidence from in vitro experiments with samples of petroleum formation water and oils from Pampo Field indicate that petroleum biodegradation is more likely to be a joint achievement of both aerobic and anaerobic bacterial consortium, refining our previous observations of aerobic degradation. The aerobic consortium depleted, in decreasing order, hydrocarbons > hopanes > steranes > tricyclic terpanes while the anaerobic consortium depleted hydrocarbons > steranes > hopanes > tricyclic terpanes. The oxygen content of the mixed consortia was measured from time to time revealing alternating periods of microaerobicity (O2 ~0.8 mg.L-1) and of aerobicity (O2~6.0 mg.L-1). In this experiment, the petroleum biodegradation changed from time to time, alternating periods of biodegradation similar to the aerobic process and periods of biodegradation similar to the anaerobic process. The consortia showed preferences for metabolizing hydrocarbons > hopanes > steranes > tricyclic terpanes during a 90-day period, after which this trend changed and steranes were more biodegraded than hopanes. The analysis of aerobic oil degrading microbiota by the 16S rRNA gene clone library detected the presence of Bacillus, Brevibacterium, Mesorhizobium and Achromobacter, and the analysis of the anaerobic oil degrading microbiota using the same technique detected the presence of Bacillus and Acinetobacter (facultative strains). In the mixed consortia Stenotrophomonas, Brevibacterium, Bacillus, Rhizobium, Achromobacter and 5% uncultured bacteria were detected. This is certainly a new contribution to the study of reservoir biodegradation processes, combining two of the more important accepted hypotheses. PMID:22196374

  3. Antibacterial action of doped CoFe2O4 nanocrystals on multidrug resistant bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Velho-Pereira, S; Noronha, A; Mathias, A; Zakane, R; Naik, V; Naik, P; Salker, A V; Naik, S R

    2015-01-01

    The bactericidal effect of pristine and doped cobalt ferrite nanoparticles has been evaluated against multiple drug resistant clinical strains by assessing the number of colony-forming units (CFU). Monophasic polycrystalline ferrites have been prepared by the malate-glycolate sol-gel autocombustion method as confirmed by the X-ray diffraction study. Various changes occurring during the preparative stages have been demonstrated using TG-DTA analysis which is well complemented by the FTIR spectroscopy. The antibacterial studies carried out demonstrate a bactericidal effect of the nanoparticles wherein the number of CFU has been found to decrease with doping. Cellular distortions have been revealed through SEM. Variation in the number of CFU with dopant type has also been reported herein. PMID:25953569

  4. Water-quality parameters and total aerobic bacterial and Vibrionaceae loads in Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) from oyster-gardening sites.

    PubMed

    Fay, Johnna P; Richards, Gary P; Ozbay, Gulnihal

    2012-05-01

    Oyster gardening is a practice designed to restore habitat for marine life and to improve water quality. This study determined physical and chemical water-quality parameters at two oyster gardening sites in the Delaware Inland Bays and compared them with total aerobic bacteria and Vibrionaceae concentrations in Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica). One site was located at the end of a man-made canal, whereas the other was located in an open bay. Measured water parameters included temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), salinity, pH, total nitrogen, nitrate, nitrite, total phosphorus, and total suspended solids. The highest Vibrionaceae levels, as determined by the colony overlay procedure for peptidases, were at the canal site in September (3.5 × 10(5) g(-1)) and at the bay site in August (1.9 × 10(5) g(-1)). Vibrionaceae levels were significantly greater during the duration of the study at the canal site (P = 0.01). This study provides the first baseline levels for total Vibrionaceae in the Delaware Inland Bays. Minimum DO readings at the bay and canal sites were 3.0 and 2.3 mg l(-1), respectively, far less than the state-targeted minimum threshold of 5.0 mg l(-1). Total phosphorus levels exceeded recommendations of ≤0.1 mg l(-1) at the bay and canal sites for all monthly samplings, with mean monthly highs at both sites ≥0.68 mg l(-1) in August. Nitrogen occasionally exceeded the recommended level of 1.0 mg l(-1) at both sites. Overall, waters were highly degraded from high phosphates, nitrogen, and total suspended solids as well as low DO. PMID:22183874

  5. Optimization of Culture Parameters for Maximum Polyhydroxybutyrate Production by Selected Bacterial Strains Isolated from Rhizospheric Soils.

    PubMed

    Lathwal, Priyanka; Nehra, Kiran; Singh, Manpreet; Jamdagni, Pragati; Rana, Jogender S

    2015-01-01

    The enormous applications of conventional non-biodegradable plastics have led towards their increased usage and accumulation in the environment. This has become one of the major causes of global environmental concern in the present century. Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), a biodegradable plastic is known to have properties similar to conventional plastics, thus exhibiting a potential for replacing conventional non-degradable plastics. In the present study, a total of 303 different bacterial isolates were obtained from soil samples collected from the rhizospheric area of three crops, viz., wheat, mustard and sugarcane. All the isolates were screened for PHB (Poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid) production using Sudan Black staining method, and 194 isolates were found to be PHB positive. Based upon the amount of PHB produced, the isolates were divided into three categories: high, medium and low producers. Representative isolates from each category were selected for biochemical characterization; and for optimization of various culture parameters (carbon source, nitrogen source, C/N ratio, different pH, temperature and incubation time periods) for maximizing PHB accumulation. The highest PHB yield was obtained when the culture medium was supplemented with glucose as the carbon source, ammonium sulphate at a concentration of 1.0 g/l as the nitrogen source, and by maintaining the C/N ratio of the medium as 20:1. The physical growth parameters which supported maximum PHB accumulation included a pH of 7.0, and an incubation temperature of 30 degrees C for a period of 48 h. A few isolates exhibited high PHB accumulation under optimized conditions, thus showing a potential for their industrial exploitation. PMID:26638531

  6. Presence of a loner strain maintains cooperation and diversity in well-mixed bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Inglis, R F; Biernaskie, J M; Gardner, A; Kümmerli, R

    2016-01-13

    Cooperation and diversity abound in nature despite cooperators risking exploitation from defectors and superior competitors displacing weaker ones. Understanding the persistence of cooperation and diversity is therefore a major problem for evolutionary ecology, especially in the context of well-mixed populations, where the potential for exploitation and displacement is greatest. Here, we demonstrate that a 'loner effect', described by economic game theorists, can maintain cooperation and diversity in real-world biological settings. We use mathematical models of public-good-producing bacteria to show that the presence of a loner strain, which produces an independent but relatively inefficient good, can lead to rock-paper-scissor dynamics, whereby cooperators outcompete loners, defectors outcompete cooperators and loners outcompete defectors. These model predictions are supported by our observations of evolutionary dynamics in well-mixed experimental communities of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We find that the coexistence of cooperators and defectors that produce and exploit, respectively, the iron-scavenging siderophore pyoverdine, is stabilized by the presence of loners with an independent iron-uptake mechanism. Our results establish the loner effect as a simple and general driver of cooperation and diversity in environments that would otherwise favour defection and the erosion of diversity. PMID:26763707

  7. Presence of a loner strain maintains cooperation and diversity in well-mixed bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    Inglis, R. F.; Biernaskie, J. M.; Gardner, A.; Kümmerli, R.

    2016-01-01

    Cooperation and diversity abound in nature despite cooperators risking exploitation from defectors and superior competitors displacing weaker ones. Understanding the persistence of cooperation and diversity is therefore a major problem for evolutionary ecology, especially in the context of well-mixed populations, where the potential for exploitation and displacement is greatest. Here, we demonstrate that a ‘loner effect’, described by economic game theorists, can maintain cooperation and diversity in real-world biological settings. We use mathematical models of public-good-producing bacteria to show that the presence of a loner strain, which produces an independent but relatively inefficient good, can lead to rock–paper–scissor dynamics, whereby cooperators outcompete loners, defectors outcompete cooperators and loners outcompete defectors. These model predictions are supported by our observations of evolutionary dynamics in well-mixed experimental communities of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We find that the coexistence of cooperators and defectors that produce and exploit, respectively, the iron-scavenging siderophore pyoverdine, is stabilized by the presence of loners with an independent iron-uptake mechanism. Our results establish the loner effect as a simple and general driver of cooperation and diversity in environments that would otherwise favour defection and the erosion of diversity. PMID:26763707

  8. Characterization of a novel oxyfluorfen-degrading bacterial strain Chryseobacterium aquifrigidense and its biochemical degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huanhuan; Xu, Jun; Dong, Fengshou; Liu, Xingang; Wu, Yanbing; Wu, Xiaohu; Zheng, Yongquan

    2016-08-01

    Persistent use of the diphenyl ether herbicides oxyfluorfen may seriously increase the health risks and ecological safety problems. A newly bacterium R-21 isolated from active soil was able to degrade and utilize oxyfluorfen as the sole carbon source. R-21 was identified as Chryseobacterium aquifrigidense by morphology, physiobiochemical characteristics, and genetic analysis. Under the optimum cultural conditions (pH 6.9, temperature 33.4 °C, and inoculum size 0.2 g L(-1)), R-21 could degrade 92.1 % of oxyfluorfen at 50 mg L(-1) within 5 days. During oxyfluorfen degradation, six metabolites were detected and identified by atmospheric pressure gas chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry and ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry, and a plausible degradation pathway was deduced. Strain R-21 is a promising potential in bioremediation of oxyfluorfen-contaminated environments. PMID:27079576

  9. [Isolation of a monocrotophos-degrading bacterial strain and characterization of enzymatic degradation].

    PubMed

    Jia, Kai-Zhi; Li, Xiao-Hui; He, Jian; Gu, Li-Feng; Ma, Ji-Ping; Li, Shun-Peng

    2007-04-01

    A monocrotophos [dimethyl (E)-1-2-methylcarbamoylvinylphosphate or MCP] -degrading strain named as M-1 was isolated from sludge collected from the wastewater treatment pool of a pesticide factory and identified as Paracoccus sp. according to its morphology and biochemical properties and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Using MCP as a sole carbon source, M-1 was able to degrade MCP(100 mg x L(-1)) by 92.47% in 24 h. The key enzyme(s) involved in the initial biodegradation of monocrotophos in M-1 was shown to be constitutively expressed cytosolic proteins and showed the greatest activity at pH 8.0 and 25 degrees C, with its Michaelis-Mentn's constant (K(m)) and maximum degradation rate (V(max)) of 0.29 micromol x mL(-1) and 682.12 micromol (min x mg)(-1) respectively. This degrading enzyme(s) was sensitive to high temperature, but kept high activity under alkaline conditions. PMID:17639959

  10. Growth promotion and colonization of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) cv. Alamo by bacterial endophyte Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Switchgrass is one of the most promising bioenergy crop candidates for the US. It gives relatively high biomass yield and can grow on marginal lands. However, its yields vary from year to year and from location to location. Thus it is imperative to develop a low input and sustainable switchgrass feedstock production system. One of the most feasible ways to increase biomass yields is to harness benefits of microbial endophytes. Results We demonstrate that one of the most studied plant growth promoting bacterial endophytes, Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN, is able to colonize and significantly promote growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under in vitro, growth chamber, and greenhouse conditions. In several in vitro experiments, the average fresh weight of PsJN-inoculated plants was approximately 50% higher than non-inoculated plants. When one-month-old seedlings were grown in a growth chamber for 30 days, the PsJN-inoculated Alamo plants had significantly higher shoot and root biomass compared to controls. Biomass yield (dry weight) averaged from five experiments was 54.1% higher in the inoculated treatment compared to non-inoculated control. Similar results were obtained in greenhouse experiments with transplants grown in 4-gallon pots for two months. The inoculated plants exhibited more early tillers and persistent growth vigor with 48.6% higher biomass than controls. We also found that PsJN could significantly promote growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under sub-optimal conditions. However, PsJN-mediated growth promotion in switchgrass is genotype specific. Conclusions Our results show B. phytofirmans strain PsJN significantly promotes growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under different conditions, especially in the early growth stages leading to enhanced production of tillers. This phenomenon may benefit switchgrass establishment in the first year. Moreover, PsJN significantly stimulated growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under sub-optimal conditions

  11. Aerobic and anaerobic metabolism of 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecan-2-one by a denitrifying bacterium isolated from marine sediments.

    PubMed Central

    Rontani, J F; Gilewicz, M J; Michotey, V D; Zheng, T L; Bonin, P C; Bertrand, J C

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the metabolism of 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecan-2-one by a denitrifying bacterium (Marinobacter sp. strain CAB) isolated from marine sediments. Under aerobic and denitrifying conditions, this strain efficiently degraded this ubiquitous isoprenoid ketone. Several bacterial metabolites, 4,8,12-trimethyl-tridecan-1-ol, 4,8,12-trimethyltridecanal, 4,8,12-trimethyltridecanoic acid, Z-3,7-dimethylocten-2-oic acid, Z-3,7,11-trimethyldodecen-2-oic acid, and 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecan-2-ol, were formally identified, and different pathways were proposed to explain the formation of such isoprenoid compounds. PMID:9023941

  12. Plant growth promotion by inoculation with selected bacterial strains versus mineral soil supplements.

    PubMed

    Wernitznig, S; Adlassnig, W; Sprocati, A R; Turnau, K; Neagoe, A; Alisi, C; Sassmann, S; Nicoara, A; Pinto, V; Cremisini, C; Lichtscheidl, I

    2014-01-01

    In the process of remediation of mine sites, the establishment of a vegetation cover is one of the most important tasks. This study tests two different approaches to manipulate soil properties in order to facilitate plant growth. Mine waste from Ingurtosu, Sardinia, Italy rich in silt, clay, and heavy metals like Cd, Cu, and Zn was used in a series of greenhouse experiments. Bacteria with putative beneficial properties for plant growth were isolated from this substrate, propagated and consortia of ten strains were used to inoculate the substrate. Alternatively, sand and volcanic clay were added. On these treated and untreated soils, seeds of Helianthus annuus, of the native Euphorbia pithyusa, and of the grasses Agrostis capillaris, Deschampsia flexuosa and Festuca rubra were germinated, and the growth of the seedlings was monitored. The added bacteria established well under all experimental conditions and reduced the extractability of most metals. In association with H. annuus, E. pithyusa and D. flexuosa bacteria improved microbial activity and functional diversity of the original soil. Their effect on plant growth, however, was ambiguous and usually negative. The addition of sand and volcanic clay, on the other hand, had a positive effect on all plant species except E. pithyusa. Especially the grasses experienced a significant benefit. The effects of a double treatment with both bacteria and sand and volcanic clay were rather negative. It is concluded that the addition of mechanical support has great potential to boost revegetation of mining sites though it is comparatively expensive. The possibilities offered by the inoculation of bacteria, on the other hand, appear rather limited. PMID:23990253

  13. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-supplemented formula expands butyrate-producing bacterial strains in food allergic infants

    SciTech Connect

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Sangwan, Naseer; Stefka, Andrew T.; Nocerino, Rita; Paparo, Lorella; Aitoro, Rosita; Calignano, Antonio; Khan, Aly A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Nagler, Cathryn R.

    2015-09-22

    Dietary intervention with extensively hydrolyzed casein formula supplemented with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (EHCF+LGG) accelerates tolerance acquisition in infants with cow’s milk allergy (CMA). We examined whether this effect is attributable, at least in part, to an influence on the gut microbiota. Fecal samples from healthy controls (n=20) and from CMA infants (n=19) before and after treatment with EHCF with (n=12) and without (n=7) supplementation with LGG were compared by 16S rRNA-based operational taxonomic unit clustering and oligotyping. Differential feature selection and generalized linear model fitting revealed that the CMA infants have a diverse gut microbial community structure dominated by Lachnospiraceae (20.5±9.7%) and Ruminococcaceae (16.2±9.1%). Blautia, Roseburia and Coprococcus were significantly enriched following treatment with EHCF and LGG, but only one genus, Oscillospira, was significantly different between infants that became tolerant and those that remained allergic. However, most tolerant infants showed a significant increase in fecal butyrate levels, and those taxa that were significantly enriched in these samples, Blautia and Roseburia, exhibited specific strain-level demarcations between tolerant and allergic infants. As a result, our data suggest that EHCF+LGG promotes tolerance in infants with CMA, in part, by influencing the strain-level bacterial community structure of the infant gut.

  14. Expression of a Heterologous Xylose Transporter in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain Engineered to Utilize Xylose Improves Aerobic Xylose Co-consumption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been engineered to utilize xylose by expression of the genes for xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase, or xylose isomerase. These strains are still limited in their ability to efficiently use xylose. Unlike native xylose assimilating yeasts such as Pi...

  15. Safety assessment of potential probiotic lactic acid bacterial strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001, Lb. acidophilus HN017, and Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J S; Shu, Q; Rutherfurd, K J; Prasad, J; Birtles, M J; Gopal, P K; Gill, H S

    2000-05-25

    The general safety of immune-enhancing lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 (DR20), Lb. acidophilus HN017, and Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 (DR10) was investigated in a feeding trial. Groups of BALB/c mice were orally administered test LAB strains or the commercial reference strain Lb. acidophilus LA-1 at 2.5 x 10(9), 5 x 10(10) or 2.5 x 10(12) colony forming units (CFU)/kg body weight/day for 4 weeks. Throughout this time, their feed intake, water intake, and live body weight were monitored. At the end of the 4 week observation period, samples of blood, liver, spleen, kidney, mesenteric lymph nodes, and gut tissues (ileum, caecum, and colon) were collected to determine: haematological parameters (red blood cell and platelet counts, haemoglobin concentration, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular haemoglobin, and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration); differential leukocyte counts; blood biochemistry (plasma total protein, albumin, cholesterol, and glucose); mucosal histology (epithelial cell height, mucosal thickness, and villus height); and bacterial translocation to extra-gut tissues (blood, liver, spleen, kidney and mesenteric lymph nodes). DNA finger printing techniques were used to identify any viable bacterial strains recovered from these tissues. The results demonstrated that 4 weeks consumption of these LAB strains had no adverse effects on animals' general health status, haematology, blood biochemistry, gut mucosal histology parameters, or the incidence of bacterial translocation. A few viable LAB cells were recovered from the tissues of animals in both control and test groups, but DNA fingerprinting did not identify any of these as the inoculated strains. The results obtained in this study suggest that the potentially probiotic LAB strains HN001, HN017, and HN019 are non-toxic for mice and are therefore likely to be safe for human use. PMID:10857928

  16. Enhanced Degradation of Diesel in the Rhizosphere of after Inoculation with Diesel-Degrading and Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterial Strains.

    PubMed

    Balseiro-Romero, María; Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Kidd, Petra S; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Monterroso, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    The association of plants and rhizospheric bacteria provides a successful strategy to clean up contaminated soils. The purpose of this work was to enhance diesel degradation in rhizosphere by inoculation with selected bacterial strains: a diesel degrader (D), plant growth-promoting (PGP) strains, or a combination (D+PGP). Plants were set up in pots with the A or B horizon of an umbric Cambisol (A and B) spiked with diesel (1.25%, w/w). After 1 mo, the dissipation of diesel range organics (DRO) with respect to = 0 (i.e., 1 wk after preparing the pots with the seedlings) concentration was significantly higher in inoculated than in noninoculated (NI) pots: The highest DRO losses were found in A D+PGP pots (close to 15-20% higher than NI) and in B D pots (close to 10% higher). The water-extractable DRO fraction was significantly higher at = 30 d (15-25%) compared with = 0 (<5%), probably due to the effects of plant root exudates and biosurfactants produced by the degrader strain. The results of this experiment reflect the importance of the partnerships between plants and bacterial inoculants and demonstrate the relevance of the effect of bacterial biosurfactants and plant root exudates on contaminant bioavailability, a key factor for enhancing diesel rhizodegradation. The association of lupine with D and PGP strains resulted in a promising combination for application in the rhizoremediation of soils with moderate diesel contamination. PMID:27136159

  17. A Nonluminescent and Highly Virulent Vibrio harveyi Strain Is Associated with “Bacterial White Tail Disease” of Litopenaeus vannamei Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Junfang; Fang, Wenhong; Yang, Xianle; Zhou, Shuai; Hu, Linlin; Li, Xincang; Qi, Xinyong; Su, Hang; Xie, Layue

    2012-01-01

    Recurrent outbreaks of a disease in pond-cultured juvenile and subadult Litopenaeus vannamei shrimp in several districts in China remain an important problem in recent years. The disease was characterized by “white tail” and generally accompanied by mass mortalities. Based on data from the microscopical analyses, PCR detection and 16S rRNA sequencing, a new Vibrio harveyi strain (designated as strain HLB0905) was identified as the etiologic pathogen. The bacterial isolation and challenge tests demonstrated that the HLB0905 strain was nonluminescent but highly virulent. It could cause mass mortality in affected shrimp during a short time period with a low dose of infection. Meanwhile, the histopathological and electron microscopical analysis both showed that the HLB0905 strain could cause severe fiber cell damages and striated muscle necrosis by accumulating in the tail muscle of L. vannamei shrimp, which led the affected shrimp to exhibit white or opaque lesions in the tail. The typical sign was closely similar to that caused by infectious myonecrosis (IMN), white tail disease (WTD) or penaeid white tail disease (PWTD). To differentiate from such diseases as with a sign of “white tail” but of non-bacterial origin, the present disease was named as “bacterial white tail disease (BWTD)”. Present study revealed that, just like IMN and WTD, BWTD could also cause mass mortalities in pond-cultured shrimp. These results suggested that some bacterial strains are changing themselves from secondary to primary pathogens by enhancing their virulence in current shrimp aquaculture system. PMID:22383954

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of the Aerobic Marine Methanotroph Methylomonas methanica MC09

    SciTech Connect

    Boden, Rich; Cunliffe, Michael; Scanlan, Julie; Moussard, Helene; Kits, K. Dimitri; Klotz, Martin G; Jetten, MSM; Vuilleumier, Stephane; Han, James; Peters, Lin; Mikhailova, Natalia; Teshima, Hazuki; Tapia, Roxanne; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N; Pagani, Ioanna; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Pitluck, Sam; Woyke, Tanja; Stein, Lisa Y.; Murrell, Collin

    2011-01-01

    Methylomonas methanica MC09 is a mesophilic, halotolerant, aerobic, methanotrophic member of the Gammaproteobacteria, isolated from coastal seawater. Here we present the complete genome sequence of this strain, the first available from an aerobic marine methanotroph.

  19. Complete genome sequence of the aerobic, heterotroph Marinithermus hydrothermalis type strain (T1T) from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimney

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, A; Gu, Wei; Yasawong, Montri; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Deshpande, Shweta; Pagani, Ioanna; Tapia, Roxanne; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Pan, Chongle; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian; Sikorski, Johannes; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Marinithermus hydrothermalis Sako et al. 2003 is the type species of the monotypic genus Marinithermus. M. hydrothermalis T1 T was the first isolate within the phylum ThermusDeinococcus to exhibit optimal growth under a salinity equivalent to that of sea water and to have an absolute requirement for NaCl for growth. M. hydrothermalis T1 T is of interest because it may provide a new insight into the ecological significance of the aerobic, thermophilic decomposers in the circulation of organic compounds in deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Marinithermus and the seventh sequence from the family Thermaceae. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2,269,167 bp long genome with its 2,251 protein-coding and 59 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  20. Genome sequence of the free-living aerobic spirochete Turneriella parva type strain (HT), and emendation of the species Turneriella parva

    SciTech Connect

    Stackebrandt, Erko; Chertkov, Olga; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Pan, Chongle; Rohde, Manfred; Gronow, Sabine; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Turneriella parva Levett et al. 2005 is the only species of the genus Turneriella which was es- tablished as a result of the reclassification of Leptospira parva Hovind-Hougen et al. 1982. Together with Leptonema and Leptospira, Turneriella constitutes the family Leptospiraceae, within the order Spirochaetales. Here we describe the features of this free-living aerobic spi- rochete together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first com- plete genome sequence of a member of the genus Turneriella and the 13th member of the family Leptospiraceae for which a complete or draft genome sequence is now available. The 4,409,302 bp long genome with its 4,169 protein-coding and 45 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  1. Selection and Characterization of Cheonggukjang (Fast Fermented Soybean Paste)-Originated Bacterial Strains with a High Level of S-adenosyl-L-methionine Production and Probiotics Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sunhyun; Kim, Min-Jeong; Hong, Jiyoung; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Yi, Sung-Hun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study was executed to develop probiotics producing S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe), a methyl group donor in the 5-methyltetrahydrofolate methylation reaction in animal cells. SAMe is an essential substance in the synthesis, activation, and metabolism of hormones, neurotransmitters, nucleic acids, phospholipids, and cell membranes of animals. SAMe is also known as a nutritional supplement for improving human brain function. In this study, SAMe-producing strains were identified in six kinds of Cheonggukjang, and strains with excellent SAMe production were identified, with one strain in the Enterococcus genus and six strains in the Bacillus genus. Strains with a large amount of SAMe production included lactic acid bacteria, such as Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus durans, and Enterococcus sanguinicola, as well as various strains in the Bacillus genus. The SAMe-overproducing strains showed antibacterial activity against some harmful microbes, in addition to weak acid resistance and strong bile resistance, indicating characteristics of probiotics. Cheonggukjang-originated beneficial bacterial strains overproducing SAMe may be commercially useful for manufacturing SAMe-rich foods. PMID:25268945

  2. Selection and characterization of Cheonggukjang (fast fermented soybean paste)-originated bacterial strains with a high level of S-adenosyl-L-methionine production and probiotics efficacy.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunhyun; Kim, Min-Jeong; Hong, Jiyoung; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Yi, Sung-Hun; Lee, Myung-Ki

    2014-11-01

    This study was executed to develop probiotics producing S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe), a methyl group donor in the 5-methyltetrahydrofolate methylation reaction in animal cells. SAMe is an essential substance in the synthesis, activation, and metabolism of hormones, neurotransmitters, nucleic acids, phospholipids, and cell membranes of animals. SAMe is also known as a nutritional supplement for improving human brain function. In this study, SAMe-producing strains were identified in six kinds of Cheonggukjang, and strains with excellent SAMe production were identified, with one strain in the Enterococcus genus and six strains in the Bacillus genus. Strains with a large amount of SAMe production included lactic acid bacteria, such as Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus durans, and Enterococcus sanguinicola, as well as various strains in the Bacillus genus. The SAMe-overproducing strains showed antibacterial activity against some harmful microbes, in addition to weak acid resistance and strong bile resistance, indicating characteristics of probiotics. Cheonggukjang-originated beneficial bacterial strains overproducing SAMe may be commercially useful for manufacturing SAMe-rich foods. PMID:25268945

  3. Comparative Genomic and Phenotypic Characterization of Pathogenic and Non-Pathogenic Strains of Xanthomonas arboricola Reveals Insights into the Infection Process of Bacterial Spot Disease of Stone Fruits

    PubMed Central

    Garita-Cambronero, Jerson; Palacio-Bielsa, Ana; López, María M.

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas arboricola pv. pruni is the causal agent of bacterial spot disease of stone fruits, a quarantinable pathogen in several areas worldwide, including the European Union. In order to develop efficient control methods for this disease, it is necessary to improve the understanding of the key determinants associated with host restriction, colonization and the development of pathogenesis. After an initial characterization, by multilocus sequence analysis, of 15 strains of X. arboricola isolated from Prunus, one strain did not group into the pathovar pruni or into other pathovars of this species and therefore it was identified and defined as a X. arboricola pv. pruni look-a-like. This non-pathogenic strain and two typical strains of X. arboricola pv. pruni were selected for a whole genome and phenotype comparative analysis in features associated with the pathogenesis process in Xanthomonas. Comparative analysis among these bacterial strains isolated from Prunus spp. and the inclusion of 15 publicly available genome sequences from other pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of X. arboricola revealed variations in the phenotype associated with variations in the profiles of TonB-dependent transporters, sensors of the two-component regulatory system, methyl accepting chemotaxis proteins, components of the flagella and the type IV pilus, as well as in the repertoire of cell-wall degrading enzymes and the components of the type III secretion system and related effectors. These variations provide a global overview of those mechanisms that could be associated with the development of bacterial spot disease. Additionally, it pointed out some features that might influence the host specificity and the variable virulence observed in X. arboricola. PMID:27571391

  4. Comparative Genomic and Phenotypic Characterization of Pathogenic and Non-Pathogenic Strains of Xanthomonas arboricola Reveals Insights into the Infection Process of Bacterial Spot Disease of Stone Fruits.

    PubMed

    Garita-Cambronero, Jerson; Palacio-Bielsa, Ana; López, María M; Cubero, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas arboricola pv. pruni is the causal agent of bacterial spot disease of stone fruits, a quarantinable pathogen in several areas worldwide, including the European Union. In order to develop efficient control methods for this disease, it is necessary to improve the understanding of the key determinants associated with host restriction, colonization and the development of pathogenesis. After an initial characterization, by multilocus sequence analysis, of 15 strains of X. arboricola isolated from Prunus, one strain did not group into the pathovar pruni or into other pathovars of this species and therefore it was identified and defined as a X. arboricola pv. pruni look-a-like. This non-pathogenic strain and two typical strains of X. arboricola pv. pruni were selected for a whole genome and phenotype comparative analysis in features associated with the pathogenesis process in Xanthomonas. Comparative analysis among these bacterial strains isolated from Prunus spp. and the inclusion of 15 publicly available genome sequences from other pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of X. arboricola revealed variations in the phenotype associated with variations in the profiles of TonB-dependent transporters, sensors of the two-component regulatory system, methyl accepting chemotaxis proteins, components of the flagella and the type IV pilus, as well as in the repertoire of cell-wall degrading enzymes and the components of the type III secretion system and related effectors. These variations provide a global overview of those mechanisms that could be associated with the development of bacterial spot disease. Additionally, it pointed out some features that might influence the host specificity and the variable virulence observed in X. arboricola. PMID:27571391

  5. Laboratory evaluation of bioaugmentation for aerobic treatment of RDX in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Mark E; Hatzinger, Paul B; Condee, Charles W; Andaya, Christina; Vainberg, Simon; Michalsen, Mandy M; Crocker, Fiona H; Indest, Karl J; Jung, Carina M; Eaton, Hillary; Istok, Jonathan D

    2015-02-01

    The potential for bioaugmentation with aerobic explosive degrading bacteria to remediate hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) contaminated aquifers was demonstrated. Repacked aquifer sediment columns were used to examine the transport and RDX degradation capacity of the known RDX degrading bacterial strains Gordonia sp. KTR9 (modified with a kanamycin resistance gene) Pseudomonas fluorescens I-C, and a kanamycin resistant transconjugate Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 pGKT2:Km+. All three strains were transported through the columns and eluted ahead of the conservative bromide tracer, although the total breakthrough varied by strain. The introduced cells responded to biostimulation with fructose (18 mg L(-1), 0.1 mM) by degrading dissolved RDX (0.5 mg L(-1), 2.3 µM). The strains retained RDX-degrading activity for at least 6 months following periods of starvation when no fructose was supplied to the column. Post-experiment analysis of the soil indicated that the residual cells were distributed along the length of the column. When the strains were grown to densities relevant for field-scale application, the cells remained viable and able to degrade RDX for at least 3 months when stored at 4 °C. These results indicate that bioaugmentation may be a viable option for treating RDX in large dilute aerobic plumes. PMID:25503243

  6. Assessment of functional and genetic diversity of aerobic endospore forming Bacilli from rhizospheric soil of Phyllanthus amarus L.

    PubMed

    Kadyan, Sangeeta; Panghal, Manju; Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Khushboo; Yadav, Jaya Parkash

    2013-09-01

    Fifty two aerobic and endospore forming Bacilli (AEFB) strains were recovered from rhizospheric soil of Phyllanthus amarus. Morphological, biochemical and molecular characterization by 16S rDNA gene sequencing has shown that these bacterial strains belong to six different genera of AEFB i.e. Bacillus, Brevibacillus, Lysinibacillus, Paenibacillus, Terribacillus and Jeotgalibacillus. Analysis of their PGP activities has shown that 92.30 % strains produced indole acetic acid hormone, 86.53 % of the strains solubilized Phosphate and 44.23 % strains produced siderophore. Chitinase production activity was shown by 42.30 % of the strains and 21.15 % of the strains produced 1-amino cyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase. 46.15 % of isolates have shown antagonistic activity against common fungal pathogen of the plant i.e. Corynespora cassiicola. Among all of the isolated strains B. Cereus JP44SK22 and JP44SK42 have shown all of the six plant growth promoting traits tested. B. megaterium strains (JP44SK18 and JP44SK35), Lysinibacillus sphaericus strains (JP44SK3 and JP44SK4) and Brevibacillus laterosporus strain JP44SK51 have also shown multiple PGP activities except ACC deaminase production activity. In the present study bacterial strain belonging to genera Jeotgalibacillus sp. JP44SK37 has been reported first time as a member of rhizospheric soil habitat and has also shown PGP activities. It can be concluded that Rhizosphere of P. amarus has harboured a good diversity of AEFB bacterial strains having a lot of biofertilizing and biocontrol abilities. PMID:23526192

  7. A possible mechanism of action of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strain Bacillus pumilus WP8 via regulation of soil bacterial community structure.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yijun; Shen, Min; Wang, Huanli; Zhao, Qingxin

    2013-01-01

    According to the traditional view, establishment and maintenance of critical population densities in the rhizosphere was the premise of PGPR to exert growth-promoting effects. In light of the facts that soil bacterial community structures can be changed by some PGPR strains including Bacillus pumilus WP8, we hypothesize that regulation of soil bacterial community structure is one of the plant growth-promoting mechanisms of B. pumilus WP8, rather than depending on high-density cells in soil. In this study, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was performed to evaluate the relationship between changes in soil bacterial community structure and growth-promoting effect on the seedling growth of fava beans (Vicia faba L.) during three successive cultivations. We found that B. pumilus WP8 lacks capacity to reproduce in large enough numbers to survive in bulk soil more than 40 days, yet the bacterial community structures were gradually influenced by inoculation of WP8, especially on dominant populations. Despite WP8 being short-lived, it confers the ability of steadily promoting fava bean seedling growth on soil during the whole growing period for at least 90 days. Pseudomonas chlororaphis RA6, another tested PGPR strain, exists in large numbers for at least 60 days but less than 90 days, whilst giving rise to slight influence on bacterial community structure. In addition, along with the extinction of RA6 cells in bulk soils, the effect of growth promotion disappeared simultaneously. Furthermore, the increment of soil catalase activity from WP8 treatment implied the ability to stimulate soil microbial activity, which may be the reason why the dominant population changed and increased as time passed. Our study suggests that regulation of treated soil bacterial community structure may be another possible action mechanism. PMID:24005176

  8. Strain-level bacterial identification by CeO2-catalyzed MALDI-TOF MS fatty acid analysis and comparison to commercial protein-based methods

    PubMed Central

    Cox, C. R.; Jensen, K. R.; Saichek, N. R.; Voorhees, K. J.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has emerged as a rapid approach for clinical bacterial identification. However, current protein-based commercial bacterial ID methods fall short when differentiating closely related species/strains. To address this shortcoming, we employed CeO2-catalyzed fragmentation of lipids to produce fatty acids using the energy inherent to the MALDI laser as a novel alternative to protein profiling. Fatty acid profiles collected from Enterobacteriaceae, Acinetobacter, and Listeria using CeO2-catalyzed metal oxide laser ionization (MOLI MS), processed by principal component analysis, and validated by leave–one-out cross-validation (CV), showed 100% correct classification at the species level and 98% at the strain level. In comparison, protein profile data from the same bacteria yielded 32%, 54% and 67% mean species-level accuracy using two MALDI-TOF MS platforms, respectively. In addition, several pathogens were misidentified by protein profiling as non-pathogens and vice versa. These results suggest novel CeO2-catalyzed lipid fragmentation readily produced (i) taxonomically tractable fatty acid profiles by MOLI MS, (ii) highly accurate bacterial classification and (iii) consistent strain-level ID for bacteria that were routinely misidentified by protein-based methods. PMID:26190224

  9. A Lactobacillus acidophilus strain of human gastrointestinal microbiota origin elicits killing of enterovirulent Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium by triggering lethal bacterial membrane damage.

    PubMed

    Coconnier-Polter, Marie-Hélène; Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Servin, Alain L

    2005-10-01

    The human gastrointestinal microbiota produces antagonistic activities against gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens. We undertook a study to investigate the mechanism(s) by which a Lactobacillus acidophilus strain of human microbiota origin antagonizes the gram-negative enteroinvasive pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. We showed that the cell-free culture supernatant of L. acidophilus strain LB (LB-CFCS) induced the following effects in S. enterica SL1344: (i) a decrease in intracellular ATP that paralleled bacterial death, (ii) the release of lipopolysaccharide, (iii) permeabilization of the bacterial membrane, and (iv) an increase in the sensitivity of Salmonella to the lytic action of sodium dodecyl sulfate. Finally, we showed using two mutant strains of Salmonella, PhoP MS7953s and PmrA JKS1170, that the two-component regulatory systems PhoP-PhoQ and PmrA-PmrB that regulate the mechanisms of resistance to antibacterial agents in Salmonella did not influence the anti-Salmonella effect of LB-CFCS. PMID:16204528

  10. Teaching Aerobic Fitness Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Allan N.; Ratliffe, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to teach aerobic fitness concepts to elementary students. Some of the K-2 activities include location, size, and purpose of the heart and lungs; the exercise pulse; respiration rate; and activities to measure aerobic endurance. Some of the 3-6 activities include: definition of aerobic endurance; heart disease risk factors;…

  11. The plant pathogenic fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici improves bacterial growth and triggers early gene regulations in the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp.

    PubMed

    Barret, M; Frey-Klett, P; Boutin, M; Guillerm-Erckelboudt, A-Y; Martin, F; Guillot, L; Sarniguet, A

    2009-01-01

    In soil, some antagonistic rhizobacteria contribute to reduce root diseases caused by phytopathogenic fungi. Direct modes of action of these bacteria have been largely explored; however, commensal interaction also takes place between these microorganisms and little is known about the influence of filamentous fungi on bacteria. An in vitro confrontation bioassay between the pathogenic fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt) and the biocontrol bacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp was set up to analyse bacterial transcriptional changes induced by the fungal mycelium at three time-points of the interaction before cell contact and up until contact. For this, a Pf29Arp shotgun DNA microarray was constructed. Specifity of Ggt effect was assessed in comparison with one of two other filamentous fungi, Laccaria bicolor and Magnaporthe grisea. During a commensal interaction, Ggt increased the growth rate of Pf29Arp. Before contact, Ggt induced bacterial genes involved in mycelium colonization. At contact, genes encoding protein of stress response and a patatin-like protein were up-regulated. Among all the bacterial genes identified, xseB was specifically up-regulated at contact by Ggt but down-regulated by the other fungi. Data showed that the bacterium sensed the presence of the fungus early, but the main gene alteration occurred during bacterial-fungal cell contact. PMID:19121038

  12. Phylogenetic identification of bacterial MazF toxin protein motifs among probiotic strains and foodborne pathogens and potential implications of engineered probiotic intervention in food

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are commonly found in bacteria and Archaea, and it is the most common mechanism involved in bacterial programmed cell death or apoptosis. Recently, MazF, the toxin component of the toxin-antitoxin module, has been categorized as an endoribonuclease, or it may have a function similar to that of a RNA interference enzyme. Results In this paper, with comparative data and phylogenetic analyses, we are able to identify several potential MazF-conserved motifs in limited subsets of foodborne pathogens and probiotic strains and further provide a molecular basis for the development of engineered/synthetic probiotic strains for the mitigation of foodborne illnesses. Our findings also show that some probiotic strains, as fit as many bacterial foodborne pathogens, can be genetically categorized into three major groups based on phylogenetic analysis of MazF. In each group, potential functional motifs are conserved in phylogenetically distant species, including foodborne pathogens and probiotic strains. Conclusion These data provide important knowledge for the identification and computational prediction of functional motifs related to programmed cell death. Potential implications of these findings include the use of engineered probiotic interventions in food or use of a natural probiotic cocktail with specificity for controlling targeted foodborne pathogens. PMID:23186337

  13. Insights from the Genome Sequence of Acidovorax citrulli M6, a Group I Strain of the Causal Agent of Bacterial Fruit Blotch of Cucurbits

    PubMed Central

    Eckshtain-Levi, Noam; Shkedy, Dafna; Gershovits, Michael; Da Silva, Gustavo M.; Tamir-Ariel, Dafna; Walcott, Ron; Pupko, Tal; Burdman, Saul

    2016-01-01

    Acidovorax citrulli is a seedborne bacterium that causes bacterial fruit blotch of cucurbit plants including watermelon and melon. A. citrulli strains can be divided into two major groups based on DNA fingerprint analyses and biochemical properties. Group I strains have been generally isolated from non-watermelon cucurbits, while group II strains are closely associated with watermelon. In the present study, we report the genome sequence of M6, a group I model A. citrulli strain, isolated from melon. We used comparative genome analysis to investigate differences between the genome of strain M6 and the genome of the group II model strain AAC00-1. The draft genome sequence of A. citrulli M6 harbors 139 contigs, with an overall approximate size of 4.85 Mb. The genome of M6 is ∼500 Kb shorter than that of strain AAC00-1. Comparative analysis revealed that this size difference is mainly explained by eight fragments, ranging from ∼35–120 Kb and distributed throughout the AAC00-1 genome, which are absent in the M6 genome. In agreement with this finding, while AAC00-1 was found to possess 532 open reading frames (ORFs) that are absent in strain M6, only 123 ORFs in M6 were absent in AAC00-1. Most of these M6 ORFs are hypothetical proteins and most of them were also detected in two group I strains that were recently sequenced, tw6 and pslb65. Further analyses by PCR assays and coverage analyses with other A. citrulli strains support the notion that some of these fragments or significant portions of them are discriminative between groups I and II strains of A. citrulli. Moreover, GC content, effective number of codon values and cluster of orthologs’ analyses indicate that these fragments were introduced into group II strains by horizontal gene transfer events. Our study reports the genome sequence of a model group I strain of A. citrulli, one of the most important pathogens of cucurbits. It also provides the first comprehensive comparison at the genomic level between

  14. Insights from the Genome Sequence of Acidovorax citrulli M6, a Group I Strain of the Causal Agent of Bacterial Fruit Blotch of Cucurbits.

    PubMed

    Eckshtain-Levi, Noam; Shkedy, Dafna; Gershovits, Michael; Da Silva, Gustavo M; Tamir-Ariel, Dafna; Walcott, Ron; Pupko, Tal; Burdman, Saul

    2016-01-01

    Acidovorax citrulli is a seedborne bacterium that causes bacterial fruit blotch of cucurbit plants including watermelon and melon. A. citrulli strains can be divided into two major groups based on DNA fingerprint analyses and biochemical properties. Group I strains have been generally isolated from non-watermelon cucurbits, while group II strains are closely associated with watermelon. In the present study, we report the genome sequence of M6, a group I model A. citrulli strain, isolated from melon. We used comparative genome analysis to investigate differences between the genome of strain M6 and the genome of the group II model strain AAC00-1. The draft genome sequence of A. citrulli M6 harbors 139 contigs, with an overall approximate size of 4.85 Mb. The genome of M6 is ∼500 Kb shorter than that of strain AAC00-1. Comparative analysis revealed that this size difference is mainly explained by eight fragments, ranging from ∼35-120 Kb and distributed throughout the AAC00-1 genome, which are absent in the M6 genome. In agreement with this finding, while AAC00-1 was found to possess 532 open reading frames (ORFs) that are absent in strain M6, only 123 ORFs in M6 were absent in AAC00-1. Most of these M6 ORFs are hypothetical proteins and most of them were also detected in two group I strains that were recently sequenced, tw6 and pslb65. Further analyses by PCR assays and coverage analyses with other A. citrulli strains support the notion that some of these fragments or significant portions of them are discriminative between groups I and II strains of A. citrulli. Moreover, GC content, effective number of codon values and cluster of orthologs' analyses indicate that these fragments were introduced into group II strains by horizontal gene transfer events. Our study reports the genome sequence of a model group I strain of A. citrulli, one of the most important pathogens of cucurbits. It also provides the first comprehensive comparison at the genomic level between the

  15. Assessment of the relevance of the antibiotic 2-amino-3-(oxirane-2,3-dicarboxamido)-propanoyl-valine from Pantoea agglomerans biological control strains against bacterial plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sammer, Ulrike F; Reiher, Katharina; Spiteller, Dieter; Wensing, Annette; Völksch, Beate

    2012-12-01

    The epiphyte Pantoea agglomerans 48b/90 (Pa48b) is a promising biocontrol strain against economically important bacterial pathogens such as Erwinia amylovora. Strain Pa48b produces the broad-spectrum antibiotic 2-amino-3-(oxirane-2,3-dicarboxamido)-propanoyl-valine (APV) in a temperature-dependent manner. An APV-negative mutant still suppressed the E. amylovora population and fire blight disease symptoms in apple blossom experiments under greenhouse conditions, but was inferior to the Pa48b wild-type indicating the influence of APV in the antagonism. In plant experiments with the soybean pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea both, Pa48b and the APV-negative mutant, successfully suppressed the pathogen. Our results demonstrate that the P. agglomerans strain Pa48b is an efficient biocontrol organism against plant pathogens, and we prove its ability for fast colonization of plant surfaces over a wide temperature range. PMID:23233458

  16. Effectiveness of Polyvalent Bacterial Lysate and Autovaccines Against Upper Respiratory Tract Bacterial Colonization by Potential Pathogens: A Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Zagólski, Olaf; Stręk, Paweł; Kasprowicz, Andrzej; Białecka, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background Polyvalent bacterial lysate (PBL) is an oral immunostimulating vaccine consisting of bacterial standardized lysates obtained by lysis of different strains of bacteria. Autovaccines are individually prepared based on the results of smears obtained from the patient. Both types of vaccine can be used to treat an ongoing chronic infection. This study sought to determine which method is more effective against nasal colonization by potential respiratory tract pathogens. Material/Methods We enrolled 150 patients with aerobic Gram stain culture and count results indicating bacterial colonization of the nose and/or throat by potential pathogens. The participants were randomly assigned to each of the following groups: 1. administration of PBL, 2. administration of autovaccine, and 3. no intervention (controls). Results Reduction of the bacterial count in Streptococcus pneumoniae-colonized participants was significant after the autovaccine (p<0.001) and PBL (p<0.01). Reduction of the bacterial count of other β-hemolytic streptococcal strains after treatment with the autovaccine was significant (p<0.01) and was non-significant after PBL. In Haemophilus influenzae colonization, significant reduction in the bacterial count was noted in the PBL group (p<0.01). Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization did not respond to either treatment. Conclusions The autovaccine is more effective than PBL for reducing bacterial count of Streptococcus pneumoniae and β-hemolytic streptococci, while PBL was more effective against Haemophilus influenzae colonization. PMID:26434686

  17. Effect of specific binding of human albumin, fibrinogen, and immunoglobulin G on surface characteristics of bacterial strains as revealed by partition experiments in polymer phase systems.

    PubMed Central

    Miörner, H; Myhre, E; Björck, L; Kronvall, G

    1980-01-01

    Four strains of gram-positive cocci with different combinations of positive binding of human proteins were investigated with respect to changes in physicochemical surface properties after specific protein binding. Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I, two group A beta-hemolytic streptococci, and one group G streptococcal strain were studied; they represented three different combinations of reactivity for human serum albumin, human immunoglobulin G, and fibrinogen. Using single-tube partition of bacterial cells in a dextran-polyethylene glycol system of constant polymer concentration but varying ionic compositions, it was possible to detect changes in the partition of bacteria after specific protein binding. There was a correlation between the binding of radiolabled human proteins to the bacterial strains and the effect of human proteins on the partition of the bacteria in the phase systems. Thus, the specific binding of proteins to the bacteria changes their physicochemical surface properties. These types of bacteria-protein interactions may play an important role in modulating host-parasite relationships. PMID:7429636

  18. Application of a Vital Fluorescent Staining Method for Simultaneous, Near-Real-Time Concentration Monitoring of Two Bacterial Strains in an Atlantic Coastal Plain Aquifer in Oyster, Virginia

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Mark E.; Mailloux, Brian J.; Streger, Sheryl H.; Hall, James A.; Zhang, Pengfei; Kovacik, William P.; Vainberg, Simon; Johnson, William P.; Onstott, Tullis C.; DeFlaun, Mary F.

    2004-01-01

    Two differentially labeled bacterial strains were monitored in near-real time during two field-scale bacterial transport experiments in a shallow aquifer in July 2000 and July 2001. Comamonas sp. strain DA001 and Acidovorax sp. strain OY-107 were grown and labeled with the vital fluorescent stain TAMRA/SE (5 [and -6]-carboxytetramethylrhodamine, succinimidyl ester) or CFDA/SE (5 [and -6]-carboxyfluorescein diacetate, succinimidyl ester). Fluorescently labeled cells and a conservative bromide tracer were introduced into a suboxic superficial aquifer, followed by groundwater collection from down-gradient multilevel samplers. Cells were enumerated in the field by microplate spectrofluorometry, with confirmatory analyses for selected samples done in the laboratory by epifluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, and ferrographic capture. There was general agreement in the results from all of the vital-stain-based enumeration methods, with differences ranging from <10% up to 40% for the analysis of identical samples between different tracking methods. Field analysis by microplate spectrofluorometry was robust and efficient, allowing thousands of samples to be analyzed in quadruplicate for both of the injected strains. The near-real-time data acquisition allowed adjustments to the predetermined sampling schedule to be made. The microplate spectrofluorometry data sets for the July 2000 and July 2001 experiments allowed the transport of the injected cells to be related to the site hydrogeology and injection conditions and enabled the assessment of differences in the transport of the two strains. This near-real-time method should prove effective for a number of microbial ecology applications. PMID:15006793

  19. Thermal resistance of thirty strains of Salmonella in liquid whole egg: are the optimal bacterial strains being used in challenge studies?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Bacterial inactivation studies are conducted to determine the survival of a target pathogen, such as Salmonella, to any number of intervention treatments (e.g., high pressure, antimicrobials, UV light, gamma irradiation, heat, etc.). Resistance of a species of pathogen, such as Salmo...

  20. Basic vaginal pH, bacterial vaginosis and aerobic vaginitis: prevalence in early pregnancy and risk of spontaneous preterm delivery, a prospective study in a low socioeconomic and multiethnic South American population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV) increases the risk of spontaneous preterm deliveries (PD) in developed countries. Its prevalence varies with ethnicity, socioeconomic conditions and gestational age. Aerobic vaginitis (AV) has also been implicated with spontaneous PD. The present study aimed to estimate the prevalence of asymptomatic BV, the accuracy of vaginal pH level to predict BV and to estimate the risk of spontaneous PD <34 and <37 weeks’ gestation of BV and AV. Methods Women attending prenatal public services in Rio de Janeiro were screened to select asymptomatic pregnant women, < 20 weeks’ gestation, with no indication for elective PD and without risk factors of spontaneous PD. Vaginal smears of women with vaginal pH > = 4.5 were collected to determine the Nugent score; a sample of those smears was also classified according to a modified Donders’ score. Primary outcomes were spontaneous PD < 34 and <37 weeks’ gestation and abortion. Results Prevalence of asymptomatic BV was estimated in 28.1% (n = 1699); 42.4% of the smears were collected before 14 weeks’ gestation. After an 8-week follow up, nearly 40% of the initially BV positive women became BV negative. The prevalence of BV among white and black women was 28.1% (95% CI: 24.6%-32.0%) and 32.5% (95% CI: 28.2%-37.2%), respectively. The sensitivity of vaginal pH= > 4.5 and = > 5.0 to predict BV status was 100% and 82%, correspondingly; the 5.0 cutoff value doubled the specificity, from 41% to 84%. The incidence of < 37 weeks’ spontaneous PDs among BV pregnant women with a pH= > 4.5 was 3.8%. The RR of spontaneous PD < 34 and <37 weeks among BV women with pH > =4.5, as compared with those with intermediate state, were 1.24 and 1.86, respectively (Fisher’s exact test, p value = 1; 0.52, respectively, both ns). No spontaneous case of PD or abortion was associated with severe or moderate AV. Conclusions A high prevalence of asymptomatic BV was

  1. Remote detection of laser-induced autofluorescence on pure cultures of fungal and bacterial strains and their analysis with multivariate techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondi, Valentina; Palombi, Lorenzo; Cecchi, Giovanna; Lognoli, David; Trambusti, Massimo; Gomoiu, Ioana

    2007-05-01

    Remotely sensed laser-induced autofluorescence spectra of pure cultures of fungal strains ( Aureobasidium pullulans, Verticillium sp.) and of bacterial strains ( Bacillus sp., Pseudomonas sp.) are presented. The strains were isolated from samples collected in a Roman archaeological site ( Tropaeum Traiani) near Constanta, Romania. The fluorescence spectra were detected in vivo from a distance of 25 m in the outdoor, using a high spectral resolution fluorescence LIDAR featuring a UV laser (XeCl@308 nm) as an excitation source. All the examined strains, except for the A. pullulans, showed fluorescence features such to allow their characterisation by processing data with multivariate techniques. Both Principal Component Analysis and Cluster Analysis were applied to the data set and compared to discriminate between the examined strains. Results demonstrate the feasibility of fluorescence-based detection and characterisation of fungi and bacteria in the outdoor with a high spectral resolution fluorescence LIDAR. In addition, they show that the proposed processing methods offer a means to discriminate between the fluorescence features due to the investigated samples and that of a fluorescence background of a known spectral shape, as that of the culture medium. This can be exploited for the remote fluorescence mapping of heterotrophic organisms on stone surfaces when the latter show a typical broad fluorescence band.

  2. Opportunistic bacterial infections in breeding colonies of the NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NSG) mouse strain

    PubMed Central

    foreman, Oded; Kavirayani, Anoop M; Griffey, Stephen M; Reader, Rachel; Shultz, Leonard D

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous morbidity primarily affecting female breeders in three independent breeding colonies of NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NSG) mice prompted an investigation to uncover the cause of disease. Necropsies were performed on 264 (157 female and 107 male) spontaneously sick, experimentally unmanipulated NSG mice. 42 (15.9%) of the mice had acute or chronic renal inflammatory lesions. 12 of the mice with nephritis had concurrent histologic evidence of an ascending urinary tract infection. From 94 kidneys cultured for bacterial organisms, 23 (24.4%) grew Enterococcus species and 19 (20%) grew Klebsiella Oxytoca. Female mice were twice more likely to present with nephritis than males. These findings indicate that bacterial nephritis is a major contributor to morbidity in the NSG strain. PMID:20817888

  3. Comparison of biostimulation versus bioaugmentation with bacterial strain PM1 for treatment of groundwater contaminated with methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE).

    PubMed

    Smith, Amanda E; Hristova, Krassimira; Wood, Isaac; Mackay, Doug M; Lory, Ernie; Lorenzana, Dale; Scow, Kate M

    2005-03-01

    Widespread contamination of groundwater by methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) has triggered the exploration of different technologies for in situ removal of the pollutant, including biostimulation of naturally occurring microbial communities or bioaugmentation with specific microbial strains known to biodegrade the oxygenate. After laboratory studies revealed that bacterial strain PM1 rapidly and completely biodegraded MTBE in groundwater sediments, the organism was tested in an in situ field study at Port Hueneme Naval Construction Battalion Center in Oxnard, California. Two pilot test plots (A and B) in groundwater located down-gradient from an MTBE source were intermittently sparged with pure oxygen. Plot B was also inoculated with strain PM1. MTBE concentrations up-gradient from plots A and B initially varied temporally from 1.5 to 6 mg MTBE/L. Six months after treatment began, MTBE concentrations in monitoring wells down-gradient from the injection bed decreased substantially in the shallow zone of the groundwater in plots A and B, thus even in the absence of the inoculated strain PM1. In the deeper zone, downstream MTBE concentrations also decreased in plot A and to a lesser extent in plot B. Difficulties in delivery of oxygen to the deeper zone of plot B, evidenced by low dissolved oxygen concentrations, were likely responsible for low rates of MTBE removal at that location. We measured the survival and movement of strain PM1 in groundwater samples using two methods for detection of DNA sequences specific to strain PM1: TaqMan quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and internal transcribed spacer region analysis. A naturally occurring bacterial strain with > 99% 16S rDNA sequence similarity to strain PM1 was detected in groundwater collected at various locations at Port Hueneme, including outside the plots where the organism was inoculated. Addition of oxygen to naturally occurring microbial populations was sufficient to stimulate MTBE removal at this site

  4. Enzymes produced by halotolerant spore-forming gram-positive bacterial strains isolated from a resting habitat (Restinga de Jurubatiba) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: focus on proteases.

    PubMed

    D Santos, Anderson Fragoso; Pacheco, Clarissa Almeida; Valle, Roberta D Santos; Seldin, Lucy; D Santos, André Luis Souza

    2014-12-01

    The screening for hydrolases-producing, halotolerant, and spore-forming gram-positive bacteria from the root, rhizosphere, and non-rhizosphere soil of Blutaparon portulacoides, a plant found in the Restinga de Jurubatiba located at the northern region of Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, resulted in the isolation of 22 strains. These strains were identified as Halobacillus blutaparonensis (n = 2), Oceanobacillus picturae (n = 5), and Oceanobacillus iheyensis (n = 15), and all showed the ability to produce different extracellular enzymes. A total of 20 isolates (90.9 %) showed activity for protease, 5 (22.7 %) for phytase, 3 (13.6 %) for cellulase, and 2 (9.1 %) for amylase. Some bacterial strains were capable of producing three (13.6 %) or two (9.1 %) distinct hydrolytic enzymes. However, no bacterial strain with ability to produce esterase and DNase was observed. The isolate designated M9, belonging to the species H. blutaparonensis, was the best producer of protease and also yielded amylase and phytase. This strain was chosen for further studies regarding its protease activity. The M9 strain produced similar amounts of protease when grown either without or with different NaCl concentrations (from 0.5 to 10 %). A simple inspection of the cell-free culture supernatant by gelatin-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) revealed the presence of three major alkaline proteases of 40, 50, and 70 kDa, which were fully inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) (two classical serine protease inhibitors). The secreted proteases were detected in a wide range of temperature (from 4 to 45 °C) and their hydrolytic activities were stimulated by NaCl (up to 10 %). The serine proteases produced by the M9 strain cleaved gelatin, casein, albumin, and hemoglobin, however, in different extensions. Collectively, these results suggest the potential use of the M9 strain in biotechnological

  5. Importance of Rhodococcus strains in a bacterial consortium degrading a mixture of hydrocarbons, gasoline, and diesel oil additives revealed by metatranscriptomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Auffret, Marc D; Yergeau, Etienne; Labbé, Diane; Fayolle-Guichard, Françoise; Greer, Charles W

    2015-03-01

    A bacterial consortium (Mix3) composed of microorganisms originating from different environments (soils and wastewater) was obtained after enrichment in the presence of a mixture of 16 hydrocarbons, gasoline, and diesel oil additives. After addition of the mixture, the development of the microbial composition of Mix3 was monitored at three different times (35, 113, and 222 days) using fingerprinting method and dominant bacterial species were identified. In parallel, 14 bacteria were isolated after 113 days and identified. Degradation capacities for Mix3 and the isolated bacterial strains were characterized and compared. At day 113, we induced the expression of catabolic genes in Mix3 by adding the substrate mixture to resting cells and the metatranscriptome was analyzed. After addition of the substrate mixture, the relative abundance of Actinobacteria increased at day 222 while a shift between Rhodococcus and Mycobacterium was observed after 113 days. Mix3 was able to degrade 13 compounds completely, with partial degradation of isooctane and 2-ethylhexyl nitrate, but tert-butyl alcohol was not degraded. Rhodococcus wratislaviensis strain IFP 2016 isolated from Mix3 showed almost the same degradation capacities as Mix3: these results were not observed with the other isolated strains. Transcriptomic results revealed that Actinobacteria and in particular, Rhodococcus species, were major contributors in terms of total and catabolic gene transcripts while other species were involved in cyclohexane degradation. Not all the microorganisms identified at day 113 were active except R. wratislaviensis IFP 2016 that appeared to be a major player in the degradation activity observed in Mix3. PMID:25343979

  6. Acetate kinase Activity and Kinetic Properties of the Enzyme in Desulfovibrio piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9 Intestinal Bacterial Strains

    PubMed Central

    Kushkevych, Ivan V

    2014-01-01

    Activity of acetate kinase in cell-free extracts and individual fractions and the kinetic properties of the enzyme obtained from the Desulfovibrio piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9 intestinal bacterial strains were presented at the first time. The highest activity of the enzyme was measured in the cell-free extracts (1.52 ± 0.163 and 0.46 ± 0.044 U × mg-1 protein for D. piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9, respectively) compared to other fractions. The specific activity of acetate kinase in the extracts of both bacterial strains was determined at different temperature and pH. Analysis of the kinetic properties of the purified acetate kinase was carried out. The acetate kinase activity, initial (instantaneous) reaction rate (V0) and maximum rate of the acetate kinase reaction (Vmax) in D. piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9 intestinal bacterial strains were defined. Michaelis constants (KmAcetyl phosphate and KmADP) of the enzyme reaction (2.54 ± 0.26 and 2.39 ± 0.24 mM for D. piger Vib-7 as well as 2.68 ± 0.25 and 2.47 ± 0.27 mM for Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9, respectively) were calculated. The described results of acetate kinase, an important enzyme in the process of organic compounds oxidation and dissimilatory sulfate reduction would be perspective and useful for clarification of the etiological role of these bacteria in the development of inflammatory bowel diseases in humans and animals. PMID:25598851

  7. Aerobic biodegradation of trichloroethene without auxiliary substrates.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Kathrin R; Gaza, Sarah; Voropaev, Andrey; Ertl, Siegmund; Tiehm, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Trichloroethene (TCE) represents a priority pollutant and is among the most frequently detected contaminants in groundwater. The current bioremediation measures have certain drawbacks like e.g. the need for auxiliary substrates. Here, the aerobic biodegradation of TCE as the sole growth substrate is demonstrated. This new process of metabolic TCE degradation was first detected in groundwater samples. TCE degradation was stable in an enriched mixed bacterial culture in mineral salts medium for over five years and repeated transfers of the culture resulting in a 10(10) times dilution of the original groundwater. Aerobic TCE degradation resulted in stoichiometric chloride formation. Stable carbon isotope fractionation was observed providing a reliable analytical tool to assess this new biodegradation process at field sites. The results suggest that aerobic biodegradation of TCE without auxiliary substrate could be considered as an option for natural attenuation or engineered bioremediation of contaminated sites. PMID:24793109

  8. Aerobic and anaerobic microbial degradation of crude (4-methylcyclohexyl)methanol in river sediments.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Li; Zhi, Wei; Liu, Yangsheng; Smiley, Elizabeth; Gallagher, Daniel; Chen, Xi; Dietrich, Andrea; Zhang, Husen

    2016-03-15

    Cyclohexane and some of its derivatives have been a major concern because of their significant adverse human health effects and widespread occurrence in the environment. The 2014 West Virginia chemical spill has raised public attention to (4-methylcyclohexyl)methanol (4-MCHM), one cyclohexane derivative, which is widely used in coal processing but largely ignored. In particular, the environmental fate of its primary components, cis- and trans-4-MCHM, remains largely unexplored. This study aimed to investigate the degradation kinetics and mineralization of cis- and trans-4-MCHM by sediment microorganisms under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. We found the removal of cis- and trans-4-MCHM was mainly attributed to biodegradation with little contribution from sorption. A nearly complete aerobic degradation of 4-MCHM occurred within 14 days, whereas the anaerobic degradation was reluctant with residual percentages of 62.6% of cis-4-MCHM and 85.0% of trans-4-MCHM after 16-day incubation. The cis-4-MCHM was degraded faster than the trans under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, indicating an isomer-specific degradation could occur during the 4-MCHM degradation. Nitrate addition enhanced 4-MCHM mineralization by about 50% under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Both cis- and trans-4-MCHM fit well with the first-order kinetic model with respective degradation rates of 0.46-0.52 and 0.19-0.31 day(-)(1) under aerobic condition. Respective degradation rates of 0.041-0.095 and 0.013-0.052 day(-)(1) occurred under anaerobic condition. One bacterial strain capable of effectively degrading 4-MCHM isomers was isolated from river sediments and identified as Bacillus pumilus at the species level based on 16S rRNA gene sequence and 97% identity. Our findings will provide critical information for improving the prediction of the environmental fate of 4-MCHM and other cyclohexane derivatives with similar structure as well as enhancing the development of feasible treatment

  9. Biodegradation of furfural by Bacillus subtilis strain DS3.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dan; Bao, Jianguo; Lu, Jueming; Lv, Quanxi

    2015-07-01

    An aerobic bacterial strain DS3, capable of growing on furfural as sole carbon source, was isolated from actived sludge of wastewater treatment plant in a diosgenin factory after enrichment. Based on morphological physiological tests as well as 16SrDNA sequence and Biolog analyses it was identified as Bacillus subtilis. The study revealed that strain DS3 utilized furfural, as analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Under following conditions: pH 8.0, temperature 35 degrees C, 150 rpm and 10% inoculum, strain DS3 showed 31.2% furfural degradation. Furthermore, DS3 strain was found to tolerate furfural concentration as high as 6000 mg(-1). The ability of Bacillus subtilis strain DS3 to degrade furfural has been demonstrated for the first time in the present study. PMID:26387346

  10. The identification of a bacterial strain BGI-1 isolated from the intestinal flora of Blattella germanica, and its anti-entomopathogenic fungi activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y H; Wang, X J; Zhang, F; Huo, X B; Fu, R S; Liu, J J; Sun, W B; Kang, D M; Jing, X

    2013-02-01

    A bacterial strain BGI-1 was isolated from the gut of German cockroaches (Blattella germanica L.) and was identified as Bacillus subtilis based on 16S rDNA sequence and morphological, physiological, and biochemical characters. The strain BGI-1 inhibited the growth of Beauveria bassiana; the diameter of the inhibition zone exceeded 30 mm. Vesicles were observed in B. bassiana hyphae on the edge of the inhibition zone. Fermentation of BGI-1 reduced the conidial germination rate by 12%. Further studies demonstrated that B. bassiana infections in German cockroaches orally treated with the extracts of BGI-1 fermentation were significantly weakened. Cumulative mortality rate was 49.5% in the treatment group at the 20 d, while that of the control group was 62.3%. The study intends to understand the relationship between the intestinal flora and the cockroach. Those microbes with anti-entomopathogenic fungi activity might contribute to resisting the infection of pathogenic fungi. PMID:23448013

  11. Introduction of mercury resistant bacterial strains to Hg(II) amended soil microcosms increases the resilience of the natural microbial community to mercury stress

    SciTech Connect

    de Lipthay, Julia R.; Rasmussen, Lasse D.; Serensen, Soren J.

    2004-03-17

    Heavy metals are among the most important groups of pollutant compounds, and they are highly persistent in the soil environment. Techniques that can be used for the remediation of heavy metal contaminated environments thus need to be evolved. In the present study we evaluated the effect of introducing a Hg resistance plasmid in subsurface soil communities. This was done in microcosms with DOE subsurface soils amended with 5-10 ppm of HgCl2. Two microcosms were set up. In microcosm A we studied the effect of adding strain S03539 containing either the Hg resistance conjugative plasmid, pJORD 70, or the Hg resistance mobilizable plasmid, pPB117. In microcosm B we studied the effect of adding strain KT2442 with and without pJORD70. For both microcosms, the effect on the resilience of the indigenous bacterial community as well as the effect on the soil concentration of Hg was evaluated.

  12. Comparative Analysis of the Effects of Two Probiotic Bacterial Strains on Metabolism and Innate Immunity in the RAW 264.7 Murine Macrophage Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Biswaranjan; Guha, Dipanjan; Ray, Pratikshya; Das, Debashmita; Aich, Palok

    2016-06-01

    Probiotic and potential probiotic bacterial strains are routinely prescribed and used as supplementary therapy for a variety infectious diseases, including enteric disorders among a wide range of individuals. While there are an increasing number of studies defining the possible mechanisms of probiotic activity, a great deal remains unknown regarding the diverse modes of action attributed to these therapeutic agents. More precise information is required to support the appropriate application of probiotics. To address this objective, we selected two probiotics strains, Lactobacillus acidophilus MTCC-10307 (LA) and Bacillus clausii MTCC-8326 (BC) that are frequently prescribed for the treatment of intestinal disorders and investigated their effects on the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line. Our results reveal that LA and BC are potent activators of both metabolic activity and innate immune responses in these cells. We also observed that LA and BC possessed similar activity in preventing infection simulated in vitro in murine macrophages by Salmonella typhimurium serovar enterica. PMID:27038159

  13. Polyester production by halophilic and halotolerant bacterial strains obtained from mangrove soil samples located in Northern Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Van-Thuoc, Doan; Huu-Phong, Tran; Thi-Binh, Nguyen; Thi-Tho, Nguyen; Minh-Lam, Duong; Quillaguamán, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    This research article reports halophilic and halotolerant bacteria isolated from mangrove forests located in Northern Vietnam. Several of these bacteria were able to synthesize polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). PHAs are polyesters stored by microorganisms under the presence of considerable amounts of a carbon source and deficiency of other essential nutrient such as nitrogen or phosphorous. Mangrove forests in Northern Vietnam are saline coastal habitats that have not been microbiologically studied. Mangrove ecosystems are, in general, rich in organic matter, but deficient in nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus. We have found about 100 microorganisms that have adapted to mangrove forests by accumulating PHAs. The production of polyesters might therefore be an integral part of the carbon cycle in mangrove forests. Three of the strains (ND153, ND97, and QN194) isolated from the Vietnamese forests were identified as Bacillus species, while other five strains (QN187, ND199, ND218, ND240, and QN271) were phylogenetically close related to the α-proteobacterium Yangia pacifica. These strains were found to accumulate PHAs in noticeable amounts. Polymer inclusions and chemical structure were studied by transmission electron microscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy analyses, respectively. Strains ND153, ND97, QN194, QN187, ND240, and QN271 synthesized poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) from glucose, whereas strains ND199 and ND218 synthesized poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) from this carbohydrate. With the exception of strain QN194, the strains accumulated PHBV when a combination of glucose and propionate was included in the culture medium. The polymer yields and cell growth reached by one Bacillus isolate, strain ND153, and one Gram-negative bacterium, strain QN271, were high and worth to be researched further. For experiments performed in shake flasks, strain ND153 reached a maximum PHBV yield of 71 wt% and a cell dry weight

  14. Polyester production by halophilic and halotolerant bacterial strains obtained from mangrove soil samples located in Northern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Van-Thuoc, Doan; Huu-Phong, Tran; Thi-Binh, Nguyen; Thi-Tho, Nguyen; Minh-Lam, Duong; Quillaguamán, Jorge

    2012-12-01

    This research article reports halophilic and halotolerant bacteria isolated from mangrove forests located in Northern Vietnam. Several of these bacteria were able to synthesize polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). PHAs are polyesters stored by microorganisms under the presence of considerable amounts of a carbon source and deficiency of other essential nutrient such as nitrogen or phosphorous. Mangrove forests in Northern Vietnam are saline coastal habitats that have not been microbiologically studied. Mangrove ecosystems are, in general, rich in organic matter, but deficient in nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus. We have found about 100 microorganisms that have adapted to mangrove forests by accumulating PHAs. The production of polyesters might therefore be an integral part of the carbon cycle in mangrove forests. Three of the strains (ND153, ND97, and QN194) isolated from the Vietnamese forests were identified as Bacillus species, while other five strains (QN187, ND199, ND218, ND240, and QN271) were phylogenetically close related to the α-proteobacterium Yangia pacifica. These strains were found to accumulate PHAs in noticeable amounts. Polymer inclusions and chemical structure were studied by transmission electron microscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy analyses, respectively. Strains ND153, ND97, QN194, QN187, ND240, and QN271 synthesized poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) from glucose, whereas strains ND199 and ND218 synthesized poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) from this carbohydrate. With the exception of strain QN194, the strains accumulated PHBV when a combination of glucose and propionate was included in the culture medium. The polymer yields and cell growth reached by one Bacillus isolate, strain ND153, and one Gram-negative bacterium, strain QN271, were high and worth to be researched further. For experiments performed in shake flasks, strain ND153 reached a maximum PHBV yield of 71 wt% and a cell dry weight

  15. Rapid, absolute, and simultaneous quantification of specific pathogenic strain and total bacterial cells using an ultrasensitive dual-color flow cytometer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lingling; Wu, Lina; Zhu, Shaobin; Long, Yao; Hang, Wei; Yan, Xiaomei

    2010-02-01

    This paper describes a rapid and sensitive strategy for the absolute and simultaneous quantification of specific pathogenic strain and total bacterial cells in a mixture. A laboratory-built compact, high-sensitivity, dual channel flow cytometer (HSDCFCM) was modified to enable dual fluorescence detection. A bacterial cell mixture comprising heat-killed pathogenic Escherichia coli E. coli O157:H7 and harmless E. coli DH5alpha was used as a model system. Pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 cells were selectively labeled by red fluorescent probe via antibody-antigen interaction, and all bacterial cells were stained with membrane-permeable nucleic acid dye that fluoresces green. When each individual bacterium passes through the interrogating laser beam, E. coli O157:H7 emits both red and green fluorescence, while E. coli DH5alpha exhibits only green fluorescence. Because the fluorescence burst generated from each individual bacterial cell was easily distinguished from the background, accurate enumeration and consequently absolute quantification were achieved for both pathogenic and total bacterial cells. By using this strategy, accurate counting of bacteria at a density above 1.0 x 10(5) cells/mL can be accomplished with 1 min of data acquisition time after fluorescent staining. Excellent correlation between the concentrations measured by the HSDCFCM and the conventional plate-counting method were obtained for pure-cultured E. coli O157:H7 (R(2) = 0.9993) and E. coli DH5alpha (R(2) = 0.9998). Bacterial cell mixtures with varying proportions of E. coli O157:H7 and E. coli DH5alpha were measured with good ratio correspondence. We applied the established approach to detecting artificially contaminated drinking water samples; E. coli O157:H7 of 1.0 x 10(2) cells/mL were accurately quantified upon sample enrichment. It is believed that the proposed method will find wide applications in many fields demanding bacterial identification and quantification. PMID:20039721

  16. Isolation and characterization of a potential paraffin-wax degrading thermophilic bacterial strain Geobacillus kaustophilus TERI NSM for application in oil wells with paraffin deposition problems.

    PubMed

    Sood, Nitu; Lal, Banwari

    2008-02-01

    Paraffin deposition problems, that have plagued the oil industry, are currently remediated by mechanical and chemical means. However, since these methods are problematic, a microbiological approach has been considered. The bacteria, required for the mitigation of paraffin deposition problems, should be able to survive the high temperatures of oil wells and degrade the paraffins under low oxygen and nutrient conditions while sparing the low carbon chain paraffins. In this study, a thermophilic paraffinic wax degrading bacterial strain was isolated from a soil sample contaminated with paraffinic crude oil. The selected strain, Geobacillus TERI NSM, could degrade 600mg of paraffinic wax as the sole carbon source in 1000ml minimal salts medium in 7d at 55 degrees C. This strain was identified as Geobacillus kaustophilus by fatty acid methyl esters analysis and 16S rRNA full gene sequencing. G. kaustophilus TERI NSM showed 97% degradation of eicosane, 85% degradation of pentacosane and 77% degradation of triacontane in 10d when used as the carbon source. The strain TERI NSM could also degrade the paraffins of crude oil collected from oil wells that had a history of paraffin deposition problems. PMID:17942139

  17. Simultaneous heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification by the marine origin bacterium Pseudomonas sp. ADN-42.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ruofei; Liu, Tianqi; Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti; Huang, Jianyu; Wang, Aijie

    2015-02-01

    Recent research has highlighted the existence of some bacteria that are capable of performing heterotrophic nitrification and have a phenomenal ability to denitrify their nitrification products under aerobic conditions. A high-salinity-tolerant strain ADN-42 was isolated from Hymeniacidon perleve and found to display high heterotrophic ammonium removal capability. This strain was identified as Pseudomonas sp. via 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Gene cloning and sequencing analysis indicated that the bacterial genome contains N2O reductase function (nosZ) gene. NH3-N removal rate of ADN-42 was very high. And the highest removal rate was 6.52 mg/L · h in the presence of 40 g/L NaCl. Under the condition of pure oxygen (DO >8 mg/L), NH3-N removal efficiency was 56.9 %. Moreover, 38.4 % of oxygen remained in the upper gas space during 72 h without greenhouse gas N2O production. Keeping continuous and low level of dissolved oxygen (DO <3 mg/L) was helpful for better denitrification performance. All these results indicated that the strain has heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification abilities, which guarantee future application in wastewater treatment. PMID:25432342

  18. The Inflammatory Response of Primary Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells to Staphylococcus aureus Strains Is Linked to the Bacterial Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Zbinden, Christina; Stephan, Roger; Johler, Sophia; Borel, Nicole; Bünter, Julia; Bruckmaier, Rupert M.; Wellnitz, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major mastitis-causing pathogen in dairy cows. The latex agglutination-based Staphaurex test allows bovine S. aureus strains to be grouped into Staphaurex latex agglutination test (SLAT)-negative [SLAT(−)] and SLAT-positive [SLAT(+)] isolates. Virulence and resistance gene profiles within SLAT(−) isolates are highly similar, but differ largely from those of SLAT(+) isolates. Notably, specific genetic changes in important virulence factors were detected in SLAT(−) isolates. Based on the molecular data, it is assumed that SLAT(+) strains are more virulent than SLAT(−) strains. The objective of this study was to investigate if SLAT(−) and SLAT(+) strains can differentially induce an immune response with regard to their adhesive capacity to epithelial cells in the mammary gland and in turn, could play a role in the course of mastitis. Primary bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMEC) were challenged with suspensions of heat inactivated SLAT(+) (n = 3) and SLAT(−) (n = 3) strains isolated from clinical bovine mastitis cases. After 1, 6, and 24 h, cells were harvested and mRNA expression of inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, RANTES, SAA, lactoferrin, GM-CSF, COX-2, and TLR-2) was evaluated by reverse transcription and quantitative PCR. Transcription (ΔΔCT) of most measured factors was induced in challenged bMEC for 6 and 24 h. Interestingly, relative mRNA levels were higher (P<0.05) in response to SLAT(+) compared to SLAT(−) strains. In addition, adhesion assays on bMEC also showed significant differences between SLAT(+) and SLAT(−) strains. The present study clearly shows that these two S. aureus strain types cause a differential immune response of bMEC and exhibit differences in their adhesion capacity in vitro. This could reflect differences in the severity of mastitis that the different strain types may induce. PMID:24498088

  19. In-vitro activity of newer quinolones against aerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Auckenthaler, R; Michéa-Hamzehpour, M; Pechère, J C

    1986-04-01

    Nalidixic and five newer 4-quinolones, ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin and pefloxacin were tested against 576 recent clinical aerobic bacterial isolates. The 4-quinolones were regularly active (MIC90 less than 4 mg/l) against the following bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, S. saprophyticus, different Enterobacteriaceae, Haemophilus influenzae, Campylobacter jejuni, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Agrobacter spp., Aeromonas spp., Plesiomonas spp., Neisseria meningitidis. Other bacteria were usually intermediately susceptible or resistant: different streptococci, Listeria monocytogenes, Nocardia asteroides, P. maltophilia, Achromobacter xylosoxydans and Alcaligenes denitrificans. Ciprofloxacin was the most potent compound, followed by ofloxacin and pefloxacin, norfloxacin and enoxacin being less active. All the 4-quinolones were much more active than nalidixic acid. The MBC/MIC ratios of the 4-quinolones were between 1 and 2 with a majority of strains, and between 2 and 3 with Streptococcus agalactiae, Str. faecalis and L. monocytogenes. A two- to eight-fold increase of MIC was observed by increasing the inoculum 10,000-fold with most of the strains tested. Susceptible bacterial population of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia marcescens and P. aeruginosa contained more clones resistant to nalidixic acid (10(4) to 10(8) at four times the MIC) than to 4-quinolones (10(5) to 10(9) at four times the MIC). Supplementing the media with MgSO4 produced smaller inhibition zone diameters with a disc diffusion method than those obtained with non-supplemented agar, with all quinolone or strains. Less regular effect, or no effect was obtained after supplementation with ZnSO4 or Ca(NO3)2. PMID:2940214

  20. [Heterotrophic Nitrification and Aerobic Denitrification of the Hypothermia Aerobic Denitrification Bacterium: Arthrobacter arilaitensis].

    PubMed

    He, Teng-xia; Ni, Jiu-pai; Li, Zhen-lun; Sun, Quan; Ye Qing; Xu, Yi

    2016-03-15

    High concentrations of ammonium, nitrate and nitrite nitrogen were employed to clarify the abilities of heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification of Arthrobacter arilaitensis strain Y-10. Meanwhile, by means of inoculating the strain suspension into the mixed ammonium and nitrate, ammonium and nitrite nitrogen simulated wastewater, we studied the simultaneous nitrification and denitrification ability of Arthrobacter arilaitensis strain Y-10. In addition, cell optical density was assayed in each nitrogen removal process to analyze the relationship of cell growth and nitrogen removal efficiency. The results showed that the hypothermia denitrification strain Arthrobacter arilaitensis Y-10 exhibited high nitrogen removal efficiency during heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification. The ammonium, nitrate and nitrite removal rates were 65.0%, 100% and 61.2% respectively when strain Y-10 was cultivated for 4 d at 15°C with initial ammonium, nitrate and nitrite nitrogen concentrations of 208.43 mg · L⁻¹, 201.16 mg · L⁻¹ and 194.33 mg · L⁻¹ and initial pH of 7.2. Nitrite nitrogen could only be accumulated in the medium containing nitrate nitrogen during heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification process. Additionally, the ammonium nitrogen was mainly removed in the inorganic nitrogen mixed synthetic wastewater. In short, Arthrobacter arilaitensis Y-10 could conduct nitrification and denitrification effectively under aerobic condition and the ammonium nitrogen removal rate was more than 80.0% in the inorganic nitrogen mixed synthetic wastewater. PMID:27337904

  1. Cloning of a very virulent plus, 686 strain of Marek’s disease virus as a bacterial artificial chromosome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vectors were first developed to facilitate propagation and manipulation of large DNA fragments. This technology was later used to clone full-length genomes of large DNA viruses to study viral gene function. Marek’s disease virus (MDV) is a highly oncogenic herpe...

  2. Enhanced bacterial metabolism of a Pseudomonas strain in response to the addition of culture filtrate of a bacteriophagous amoeba.

    PubMed

    Levrat, P; Pussard, M; Alabouvette, C

    1992-02-21

    In a previous work, Levrat et al. [21] showed an enhancement of the production of pyoverdin (siderophore) by Pseudomonas putida in the presence of amoeba. To explain the mechanism of stimulation, the hypothesis of production of stimulatory factors by amoeba was proposed. Filtrates of both mixed culture of bacteria and amoeba (Pseudomonas putida + Acanthamoeba castellanii) and of axenic culture of amoeba were added to the culture medium of Pseudomonas. The production of pyoverdin was increased in the presence of the filtrates. The maximum stimulation was observed with a 6 to 8 day old mixed culture filtrate at 2% final concentration. A higher amount of filtrate did not enhance the stimulation. General metabolisms like ammonium production or respiration were also enhanced in the presence of filtrate of mixed cultures. Filtrates of axenic culture of amoeba were also able to stimulate the production of pyoverdin by Pseudomonas. This stimulation of the bacterial metabolism was not correlated with a higher growth of the bacterial population. Then, the enhancement of the bacterial metabolic activity was not due to a rapid recycling of the bacterial biomass but rather to a production of stimulatory factors by amoeba. PMID:23194985

  3. A peptide identification-free, genome sequence-independent shotgun proteomics workflow for strain-level bacterial differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Wenguang; Zhang, Min; Lam, Henry; Lau, Stanley C. K.

    2015-01-01

    Shotgun proteomics is an emerging tool for bacterial identification and differentiation. However, the identification of the mass spectra of peptides to genome-derived peptide sequences remains a key issue that limits the use of shotgun proteomics to bacteria with genome sequences available. In this proof-of-concept study, we report a novel bacterial fingerprinting method that enjoys the resolving power and accuracy of mass spectrometry without the burden of peptide identification (i.e. genome sequence-independent). This method uses a similarity-clustering algorithm to search for mass spectra that are derived from the same peptide and merge them into a unique consensus spectrum as the basis to generate proteomic fingerprints of bacterial isolates. In comparison to a traditional peptide identification-based shotgun proteomics workflow and a PCR-based DNA fingerprinting method targeting the repetitive extragenic palindromes elements in bacterial genomes, the novel method generated fingerprints that were richer in information and more discriminative in differentiating E. coli isolates by their animal sources. The novel method is readily deployable to any cultivable bacteria, and may be used for several fields of study such as environmental microbiology, applied microbiology, and clinical microbiology. PMID:26395646

  4. A peptide identification-free, genome sequence-independent shotgun proteomics workflow for strain-level bacterial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wenguang; Zhang, Min; Lam, Henry; Lau, Stanley C K

    2015-01-01

    Shotgun proteomics is an emerging tool for bacterial identification and differentiation. However, the identification of the mass spectra of peptides to genome-derived peptide sequences remains a key issue that limits the use of shotgun proteomics to bacteria with genome sequences available. In this proof-of-concept study, we report a novel bacterial fingerprinting method that enjoys the resolving power and accuracy of mass spectrometry without the burden of peptide identification (i.e. genome sequence-independent). This method uses a similarity-clustering algorithm to search for mass spectra that are derived from the same peptide and merge them into a unique consensus spectrum as the basis to generate proteomic fingerprints of bacterial isolates. In comparison to a traditional peptide identification-based shotgun proteomics workflow and a PCR-based DNA fingerprinting method targeting the repetitive extragenic palindromes elements in bacterial genomes, the novel method generated fingerprints that were richer in information and more discriminative in differentiating E. coli isolates by their animal sources. The novel method is readily deployable to any cultivable bacteria, and may be used for several fields of study such as environmental microbiology, applied microbiology, and clinical microbiology. PMID:26395646

  5. Construction and evaluation of an exopolysaccharide-producing engineered bacterial strain by protoplast fusion for microbial enhanced oil recovery.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shanshan; Luo, Yijing; Cao, Siyuan; Li, Wenhong; Zhang, Zhongzhi; Jiang, Lingxi; Dong, Hanping; Yu, Li; Wu, Wei-Min

    2013-09-01

    Enterobacter cloacae strain JD, which produces water-insoluble biopolymers at optimal temperature of 30°C, and a thermophilic Geobacillus strain were used to construct an engineered strain for exopolysaccharide production at high temperatures by protoplast fusion. The obtained fusant strain ZR3 produced exopolysaccharides at up to 45°C with optimal growth temperature at 35°C. The fusant produced exopolysaccharides of approximately 7.5 g/L or more at pH between 7.0 and 9.0. The feasibility of the enhancement of crude oil recovery with the fusant was tested in a sand-packed column at 40°C. The results demonstrated that bioaugmentation of the fusant was promising approach for MEOR. Mass growth of the fusant was confirmed in fermentor tests. PMID:23856587

  6. Application of potential phosphate-solubilizing bacteria and organic acids on phosphate solubilization from phosphate rock in aerobic rice.

    PubMed

    Panhwar, Qurban Ali; Jusop, Shamshuddin; Naher, Umme Aminun; Othman, Radziah; Razi, Mohd Ismail

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted at Universiti Putra Malaysia to determine the effect of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) and organic acids (oxalic & malic) on phosphate (P) solubilization from phosphate rock (PR) and growth of aerobic rice. Four rates of each organic acid (0, 10, 20, and 30 mM), and PSB strain (Bacillus sp.) were applied to aerobic rice. Total bacterial populations, amount of P solubilization, P uptake, soil pH, and root morphology were determined. The results of the study showed significantly high P solubilization in PSB with organic acid treatments. Among the two organic acids, oxalic acid was found more effective compared to malic acid. Application of oxalic acid at 20 mM along with PSB16 significantly increased soluble soil P (28.39 mg kg(-1)), plant P uptake (0.78 P pot(-1)), and plant biomass (33.26 mg). Addition of organic acids with PSB and PR had no influence on soil pH during the planting period. A higher bacterial population was found in rhizosphere (8.78 log10 cfu g(-1)) compared to the nonrhizosphere and endosphere regions. The application of organic acids along with PSB enhanced soluble P in the soil solution, improved root growth, and increased plant biomass of aerobic rice seedlings without affecting soil pH. PMID:24288473

  7. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citrumelo F1, Which Causes Citrus Bacterial Spot Disease, and Related Strains Provides Insights into Virulence and Host Specificity ▿ #

    PubMed Central

    Jalan, Neha; Aritua, Valente; Kumar, Dibyendu; Yu, Fahong; Jones, Jeffrey B.; Graham, James H.; Setubal, João C.; Wang, Nian

    2011-01-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citrumelo is a citrus pathogen causing citrus bacterial spot disease that is geographically restricted within the state of Florida. Illumina, 454 sequencing, and optical mapping were used to obtain a complete genome sequence of X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo strain F1, 4.9 Mb in size. The strain lacks plasmids, in contrast to other citrus Xanthomonas pathogens. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this pathogen is very close to the tomato bacterial spot pathogen X. campestris pv. vesicatoria 85-10, with a completely different host range. We also compared X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo to the genome of citrus canker pathogen X. axonopodis pv. citri 306. Comparative genomic analysis showed differences in several gene clusters, like those for type III effectors, the type IV secretion system, lipopolysaccharide synthesis, and others. In addition to pthA, effectors such as xopE3, xopAI, and hrpW were absent from X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo while present in X. axonopodis pv. citri. These effectors might be responsible for survival and the low virulence of this pathogen on citrus compared to that of X. axonopodis pv. citri. We also identified unique effectors in X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo that may be related to the different host range as compared to that of X. axonopodis pv. citri. X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo also lacks various genes, such as syrE1, syrE2, and RTX toxin family genes, which were present in X. axonopodis pv. citri. These may be associated with the distinct virulences of X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo and X. axonopodis pv. citri. Comparison of the complete genome sequence of X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo to those of X. axonopodis pv. citri and X. campestris pv. vesicatoria provides valuable insights into the mechanism of bacterial virulence and host specificity. PMID:21908674

  8. Comparative genomic analysis of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citrumelo F1, which causes citrus bacterial spot disease, and related strains provides insights into virulence and host specificity.

    PubMed

    Jalan, Neha; Aritua, Valente; Kumar, Dibyendu; Yu, Fahong; Jones, Jeffrey B; Graham, James H; Setubal, João C; Wang, Nian

    2011-11-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citrumelo is a citrus pathogen causing citrus bacterial spot disease that is geographically restricted within the state of Florida. Illumina, 454 sequencing, and optical mapping were used to obtain a complete genome sequence of X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo strain F1, 4.9 Mb in size. The strain lacks plasmids, in contrast to other citrus Xanthomonas pathogens. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this pathogen is very close to the tomato bacterial spot pathogen X. campestris pv. vesicatoria 85-10, with a completely different host range. We also compared X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo to the genome of citrus canker pathogen X. axonopodis pv. citri 306. Comparative genomic analysis showed differences in several gene clusters, like those for type III effectors, the type IV secretion system, lipopolysaccharide synthesis, and others. In addition to pthA, effectors such as xopE3, xopAI, and hrpW were absent from X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo while present in X. axonopodis pv. citri. These effectors might be responsible for survival and the low virulence of this pathogen on citrus compared to that of X. axonopodis pv. citri. We also identified unique effectors in X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo that may be related to the different host range as compared to that of X. axonopodis pv. citri. X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo also lacks various genes, such as syrE1, syrE2, and RTX toxin family genes, which were present in X. axonopodis pv. citri. These may be associated with the distinct virulences of X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo and X. axonopodis pv. citri. Comparison of the complete genome sequence of X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo to those of X. axonopodis pv. citri and X. campestris pv. vesicatoria provides valuable insights into the mechanism of bacterial virulence and host specificity. PMID:21908674

  9. Taxonomy of Aerobic Marine Eubacteria

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Linda; Baumann, Paul; Mandel, M.; Allen, Richard D.

    1972-01-01

    Two hundred and eighteen strains of nonfermentative marine bacteria were submitted to an extensive morphological, physiological, and nutritional characterization. All the strains were gram-negative, straight or curved rods which were motile by means of polar or peritrichous flagella. A wide variety of organic substrates served as sole sources of carbon and energy. The strains differed extensively in their nutritional versatility, being able to utilize from 11 to 85 carbon compounds. Some strains had an extracellular amylase, gelatinase, lipase, or chitinase and were able to utilize n-hexadecane and to denitrify. None of the strains had a yellow, cell-associated pigment or a constitutive arginine dihydrolase system, nor were they able to hydrolyze cellulose or agar. The results of the physiological and nutritional characterization were submitted to a numerical analysis which clustered the strains into 22 groups on the basis of phenotypic similarities. The majority of these groups were separable by a large number of unrelated phenotypic traits. Analysis of the moles per cent guanine plus cytosine (GC) content in the deoxyribonucleic acid of representative strains indicated that the peritrichously flagellated groups had a GC content of 53.7 to 67.8 moles%; polarly flagellated strains had a GC content of 30.5 to 64.7 moles%. The peritrichously flagellated groups were assigned to the genus Alcaligenes. The polarly flagellated groups, which had a GC content of 43.2 to 48.0 moles%, were placed into a newly created genus, Alteromonas; groups which had a GC content of 57.8 to 64.7 moles% were placed into the genus Pseudomonas; and the remaining groups were left unassigned. Twelve groups were given the following designations: Alteromonas communis, A. vaga, A. macleodii, A. marinopraesens, Pseudomonas doudoroffi, P. marina, P. nautica, Alcaligenes pacificus, A. cupidus, A. venustus, and A. aestus. The problems of assigning species of aerobic marine bacteria to genera are

  10. Taxonomy of aerobic marine eubacteria.

    PubMed

    Baumann, L; Baumann, P; Mandel, M; Allen, R D

    1972-04-01

    Two hundred and eighteen strains of nonfermentative marine bacteria were submitted to an extensive morphological, physiological, and nutritional characterization. All the strains were gram-negative, straight or curved rods which were motile by means of polar or peritrichous flagella. A wide variety of organic substrates served as sole sources of carbon and energy. The strains differed extensively in their nutritional versatility, being able to utilize from 11 to 85 carbon compounds. Some strains had an extracellular amylase, gelatinase, lipase, or chitinase and were able to utilize n-hexadecane and to denitrify. None of the strains had a yellow, cell-associated pigment or a constitutive arginine dihydrolase system, nor were they able to hydrolyze cellulose or agar. The results of the physiological and nutritional characterization were submitted to a numerical analysis which clustered the strains into 22 groups on the basis of phenotypic similarities. The majority of these groups were separable by a large number of unrelated phenotypic traits. Analysis of the moles per cent guanine plus cytosine (GC) content in the deoxyribonucleic acid of representative strains indicated that the peritrichously flagellated groups had a GC content of 53.7 to 67.8 moles%; polarly flagellated strains had a GC content of 30.5 to 64.7 moles%. The peritrichously flagellated groups were assigned to the genus Alcaligenes. The polarly flagellated groups, which had a GC content of 43.2 to 48.0 moles%, were placed into a newly created genus, Alteromonas; groups which had a GC content of 57.8 to 64.7 moles% were placed into the genus Pseudomonas; and the remaining groups were left unassigned. Twelve groups were given the following designations: Alteromonas communis, A. vaga, A. macleodii, A. marinopraesens, Pseudomonas doudoroffi, P. marina, P. nautica, Alcaligenes pacificus, A. cupidus, A. venustus, and A. aestus. The problems of assigning species of aerobic marine bacteria to genera are

  11. Tributyl phosphate biodegradation to butanol and phosphate and utilization by a novel bacterial isolate, Sphingobium sp. strain RSMS.

    PubMed

    Rangu, Shyam Sunder; Muralidharan, Bindu; Tripathi, S C; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2014-03-01

    A Sphingobium sp. strain isolated from radioactive solid waste management site (RSMS) completely degraded 7.98 g/L of tributyl phosphate (TBP) from TBP containing suspensions in 3 days. It also completely degraded 20 mM dibutyl phosphate (DBP) within 2 days. The strain tolerated high levels of TBP and showed excellent stability with respect to TBP degradation over several repeated subcultures. On solid minimal media or Luria Bertani media supplemented with TBP, the RSMS strain showed a clear zone of TBP degradation around the colony. Gas chromatography and spectrophotometry analyses identified DBP as the intermediate and butanol and phosphate as the products of TBP biodegradation. The RSMS strain utilized both TBP and DBP as the sole source of carbon and phosphorous for its growth. The butanol released was completely utilized by the strain as a carbon source thereby leaving no toxic residue in the medium. Degradation of TBP or DBP was found to be suppressed by high concentration of glucose which also inhibited TBP or DBP dependent growth. The results highlight the potential of Sphingobium sp. strain RSMS for bioremediation of TBP and for further molecular investigation. PMID:23963271

  12. Comparative Analysis of Lacinutrix Genomes and Their Association with Bacterial Habitat

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yung Mi; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Ahn, Do Hwan; Kim, Han-Woo; Park, Hyun; Shin, Seung Chul

    2016-01-01

    The genus Lacinutrix, which belongs to the family Flavobacteriaceae, consists of seven bacterial species that were mainly isolated from marine life and sediments. As most bacteria in the family Flavobacteriaceae favor aerobic conditions, the seven bacterial species in the genus Lacinutrix also showed aerobic growth. We selected four monophyletic bacterial species living in a polar environment. Two of these species were isolated from sediment and two types were isolated from algae. In a comparative analysis, we investigated how these different environments were related to genomic features of these four species in the genus Lacinutrix. We found that the gene sets for glycolysis, the Krebs cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation were conserved in these four type strains. However, the presence of nitrous oxide reductase for denitrification and the absence of essential components related to thiamin biosynthesis for aerobic respiration were only found in isolates from sediment. Elevated bacterial metabolism on the surface of marine sediments might limit the oxygen penetration into sediment, and such an environment might affect the genomes of bacteria isolated from these habitats. PMID:26882010

  13. Comparative Analysis of Lacinutrix Genomes and Their Association with Bacterial Habitat.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung Mi; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Ahn, Do Hwan; Kim, Han-Woo; Park, Hyun; Shin, Seung Chul

    2016-01-01

    The genus Lacinutrix, which belongs to the family Flavobacteriaceae, consists of seven bacterial species that were mainly isolated from marine life and sediments. As most bacteria in the family Flavobacteriaceae favor aerobic conditions, the seven bacterial species in the genus Lacinutrix also showed aerobic growth. We selected four monophyletic bacterial species living in a polar environment. Two of these species were isolated from sediment and two types were isolated from algae. In a comparative analysis, we investigated how these different environments were related to genomic features of these four species in the genus Lacinutrix. We found that the gene sets for glycolysis, the Krebs cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation were conserved in these four type strains. However, the presence of nitrous oxide reductase for denitrification and the absence of essential components related to thiamin biosynthesis for aerobic respiration were only found in isolates from sediment. Elevated bacterial metabolism on the surface of marine sediments might limit the oxygen penetration into sediment, and such an environment might affect the genomes of bacteria isolated from these habitats. PMID:26882010

  14. Comparison of aerobic denitrifying activity among three cultural species with various carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Otani, Y; Hasegawa, K; Hanaki, K

    2004-01-01

    Abilities of three aerobic denitrifiers such as Alcaligenes faecalis, Microvirgula aerodenitrificans and Paracoccus pantotrophus were compared from the viewpoints of nitrate removal efficiency and organic matter utilization. First, the effect of carbon source was investigated. Although nitrate reduction was observed in all strains under aerobic conditions, a change of carbon source considerably affected the denitrification ability. In the case of P. pantotrophus, nitrate and nitrite were completely removed in three days under sodium acetate or leucine as a carbon source. In the case of A. faecalis, sufficient nitrate removal was observed only when sodium acetate or ethanol was added. P. pantotrophus and A. faecalis showed a higher ability of nitrate removal than that of M. aerodenitrificans. Therefore, P. pantotrophus was selected in order to investigate the effects of concentration and repetitive addition of carbon. Sodium acetate was used as a sole carbon source. Nitrate was not reduced when the carbon concentration was below 500 mgC/L. However, when carbon source was added repeatedly, nitrate was reduced under 100 mgC/L after the optical density of the bacterium reached above 1.0. This result indicated that a high enough level of bacterial density was necessary to express aerobic denitrification activity. PMID:15566182

  15. Denitrification characteristics of a marine origin psychrophilic aerobic denitrifying bacterium.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haiyan; Liu, Ying; Sun, Guangdong; Gao, Xiyan; Zhang, Qingling; Liu, Zhipei

    2011-01-01

    A psychrophilic aerobic denitrifying bacterium, strain S1-1, was isolated from a biological aerated filter conducted for treatment of recirculating water in a marine aquaculture system. Strain S1-1 was preliminarily identified as Psychrobacter sp. based on the analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence, which showed 100% sequence similarity to that of Psychrobacter sp. TSBY-70. Strain S1-1 grew well either in high nitrate or high nitrite conditions with a removal of 100% nitrate or 63.50% nitrite, and the total nitrogen removal rates could reach to 46.48% and 31.89%, respectively. The results indicated that nitrate was mainly reduced in its logarithmic growth phase with a very low level accumulation of nitrite, suggesting that the aerobic denitrification process of strain S1-1 occurred mainly in this phase. The GC-MS results showed that N2O was formed as the major intermediate during the aerobic denitrifying process of strain S1-1. Finally, factors affecting the growth of strain S1-1 and its aerobic denitrifying ability were also investigated. Results showed that the optimum aerobic denitrification conditions for strain S1-1 were sodium succinate as carbon source, C/N ratio15, salinity 10 g/L NaCl, incubation temperature 20 degrees C and initial pH 6.5. PMID:22432315

  16. Soil Type Dependent Rhizosphere Competence and Biocontrol of Two Bacterial Inoculant Strains and Their Effects on the Rhizosphere Microbial Community of Field-Grown Lettuce

    PubMed Central

    Schreiter, Susanne; Sandmann, Martin; Smalla, Kornelia; Grosch, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Rhizosphere competence of bacterial inoculants is assumed to be important for successful biocontrol. Knowledge of factors influencing rhizosphere competence under field conditions is largely lacking. The present study is aimed to unravel the effects of soil types on the rhizosphere competence and biocontrol activity of the two inoculant strains Pseudomonas jessenii RU47 and Serratia plymuthica 3Re4-18 in field-grown lettuce in soils inoculated with Rhizoctonia solani AG1-IB or not. Two independent experiments were carried out in 2011 on an experimental plot system with three soil types sharing the same cropping history and weather conditions for more than 10 years. Rifampicin resistant mutants of the inoculants were used to evaluate their colonization in the rhizosphere of lettuce. The rhizosphere bacterial community structure was analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified from total community DNA to get insights into the effects of the inoculants and R. solani on the indigenous rhizosphere bacterial communities. Both inoculants showed a good colonization ability of the rhizosphere of lettuce with more than 106 colony forming units per g root dry mass two weeks after planting. An effect of the soil type on rhizosphere competence was observed for 3Re4-18 but not for RU47. In both experiments a comparable rhizosphere competence was observed and in the presence of the inoculants disease symptoms were either significantly reduced, or at least a non-significant trend was shown. Disease severity was highest in diluvial sand followed by alluvial loam and loess loam suggesting that the soil types differed in their conduciveness for bottom rot disease. Compared to effect of the soil type of the rhizosphere bacterial communities, the effects of the pathogen and the inoculants were less pronounced. The soil types had a surprisingly low influence on rhizosphere competence and biocontrol activity while they significantly affected

  17. Identification of an Endophytic Antifungal Bacterial Strain Isolated from the Rubber Tree and Its Application in the Biological Control of Banana Fusarium Wilt.

    PubMed

    Tan, Deguan; Fu, Lili; Han, Bingyin; Sun, Xuepiao; Zheng, Peng; Zhang, Jiaming

    2015-01-01

    Banana Fusarium wilt (also known as Panama disease) is one of the most disastrous plant diseases. Effective control methods are still under exploring. The endophytic bacterial strain ITBB B5-1 was isolated from the rubber tree, and identified as Serratia marcescens by morphological, biochemical, and phylogenetic analyses. This strain exhibited a high potential for biological control against the banana Fusarium disease. Visual agar plate assay showed that ITBB B5-1 restricted the mycelial growth of the pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense race 4 (FOC4). Microscopic observation revealed that the cell wall of the FOC4 mycelium close to the co-cultured bacterium was partially decomposed, and the conidial formation was prohibited. The inhibition ratio of the culture fluid of ITBB B5-1 against the pathogenic fungus was 95.4% as estimated by tip culture assay. Chitinase and glucanase activity was detected in the culture fluid, and the highest activity was obtained at Day 2 and Day 3 of incubation for chitinase and glucanase, respectively. The filtrated cell-free culture fluid degraded the cell wall of FOC4 mycelium. These results indicated that chitinase and glucanase were involved in the antifungal mechanism of ITBB B5-1. The potted banana plants that were inoculated with ITBB B5-1 before infection with FOC4 showed 78.7% reduction in the disease severity index in the green house experiments. In the field trials, ITBB B5-1 showed a control effect of approximately 70.0% against the disease. Therefore, the endophytic bacterial strain ITBB B5-1 could be applied in the biological control of banana Fusarium wilt. PMID:26133557

  18. Identification of an Endophytic Antifungal Bacterial Strain Isolated from the Rubber Tree and Its Application in the Biological Control of Banana Fusarium Wilt

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xuepiao; Zheng, Peng; Zhang, Jiaming

    2015-01-01

    Banana Fusarium wilt (also known as Panama disease) is one of the most disastrous plant diseases. Effective control methods are still under exploring. The endophytic bacterial strain ITBB B5-1 was isolated from the rubber tree, and identified as Serratia marcescens by morphological, biochemical, and phylogenetic analyses. This strain exhibited a high potential for biological control against the banana Fusarium disease. Visual agar plate assay showed that ITBB B5-1 restricted the mycelial growth of the pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense race 4 (FOC4). Microscopic observation revealed that the cell wall of the FOC4 mycelium close to the co-cultured bacterium was partially decomposed, and the conidial formation was prohibited. The inhibition ratio of the culture fluid of ITBB B5-1 against the pathogenic fungus was 95.4% as estimated by tip culture assay. Chitinase and glucanase activity was detected in the culture fluid, and the highest activity was obtained at Day 2 and Day 3 of incubation for chitinase and glucanase, respectively. The filtrated cell-free culture fluid degraded the cell wall of FOC4 mycelium. These results indicated that chitinase and glucanase were involved in the antifungal mechanism of ITBB B5-1. The potted banana plants that were inoculated with ITBB B5-1 before infection with FOC4 showed 78.7% reduction in the disease severity index in the green house experiments. In the field trials, ITBB B5-1 showed a control effect of approximately 70.0% against the disease. Therefore, the endophytic bacterial strain ITBB B5-1 could be applied in the biological control of banana Fusarium wilt. PMID:26133557

  19. Biomimetic Synthesis of Selenium Nanospheres by Bacterial Strain JS-11 and Its Role as a Biosensor for Nanotoxicity Assessment: A Novel Se-Bioassay

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; AlKhedhairy, Abdulaziz A.; Ahamed, Maqusood; Musarrat, Javed

    2013-01-01

    Selenium nanoparticles (Se-NPs) were synthesized by green technology using the bacterial isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain JS-11. The bacteria exhibited significant tolerance to selenite (SeO32−) up to 100 mM concentration with an EC50 value of 140 mM. The spent medium (culture supernatant) contains the potential of reducing soluble and colorless SeO32− to insoluble red elemental selenium (Se0) at 37°C. Characterization of red Se° product by use of UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectrum (EDX) analysis revealed the presence of stable, predominantly monodispersed and spherical selenium nanoparticles (Se-NPs) of an average size of 21 nm. Most likely, the metabolite phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) released by strain JS-11 in culture supernatant along with the known redox agents like NADH and NADH dependent reductases are responsible for biomimetic reduction of SeO32− to Se° nanospheres. Based on the bioreduction of a colorless solution of SeO32− to elemental red Se0, a high throughput colorimetric bioassay (Se-Assay) was developed for parallel detection and quantification of nanoparticles (NPs) cytotoxicity in a 96 well format. Thus, it has been concluded that the reducing power of the culture supernatant of strain JS-11 could be effectively exploited for developing a simple and environmental friendly method of Se-NPs synthesis. The results elucidated that the red colored Se° nanospheres may serve as a biosensor for nanotoxicity assessment, contemplating the inhibition of SeO32− bioreduction process in NPs treated bacterial cell culture supernatant, as a toxicity end point. PMID:23483909

  20. Drying and recovery of aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianjun; Zhang, Quanguo; Chen, Yu-You; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-10-01

    To dehydrate aerobic granules to bone-dry form was proposed as a promising option for long-term storage of aerobic granules. This study cultivated aerobic granules with high proteins/polysaccharide ratio and then dried these granules using seven protocols: drying at 37°C, 60°C, 4°C, under sunlight, in dark, in a flowing air stream or in concentrated acetone solutions. All dried granules experienced volume shrinkage of over 80% without major structural breakdown. After three recovery batches, although with loss of part of the volatile suspended solids, all dried granules were restored most of their original size and organic matter degradation capabilities. The strains that can survive over the drying and storage periods were also identified. Once the granules were dried, they can be stored over long period of time, with minimal impact yielded by the applied drying protocols. PMID:27392096

  1. Identification of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae strains causing bacterial canker of kiwifruit in the Anhui Province of China, and determination of their streptomycin sensitivities.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Yi, X-K; Chen, Y; Zhang, A-F; Zhang, J-Y; Gao, Z-H; Qi, Y-J; Xu, Y-L

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial canker, caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae, is one of the most severe diseases of kiwifruit. It has become an international pandemic and threatens the sustainable development of kiwifruit production in all main kiwi-growing regions worldwide. Streptomycin has been the major bactericide for the control of kiwifruit canker, especially in Anhui Province, one of the main kiwifruit production regions in China. However, until now, no studies on the baseline sensitivity to streptomycin of field isolates of P. syringae pv. actinidiae from China have been available. During 2012-2013, a total of 102 single-colony P. syringae pv. actinidiae strains were isolated: 36, 12, 13, 26, and 15 strains from Yuexi, Jinzhai, Huoshan, Qianshan, and Taihu counties, respectively. All strains were confirmed by production of a 280-bp fragment using the specific primers PsaF1/R2 upon polymerase chain reaction amplification, followed by an assay for confirmation of pathogenicity to fulfill Koch's postulates. In this study, the streptomycin sensitivity of the 102 isolated strains was determined. The half-maximal effective concentration values for inhibition of growth by streptomycin were 0.03-0.42 μg/mL (average 0.12 ± 0.06 μg/mL). The baseline sensitivity curve was unimodal, representing range-of-variation factors of 14.0. No resistant subpopulation was identified among the strains used in the study. Thus, these sensitivity data could be used as a baseline for monitoring the shift in sensitivity of P. syringae pv. actinidiae populations to streptomycin in Anhui Province. Continuous resistance monitoring should be carried out, as streptomycin is an at-risk bactericide agent. PMID:26345745

  2. Adaptive acid tolerance response of Vibrio parahaemolyticus as affected by acid adaptation conditions, growth phase, and bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Ming-Lun; Chou, Cheng-Chun; Chen, Hsi-Chia; Tseng, Yu-Ting; Chen, Ming-Ju

    2012-08-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain 690 was isolated from gastroenteritis patients. Its thermal and ethanol stress responses have been reported in our previous studies. In this study, we further investigated the effects of various acid adaptation conditions including pH (5.0-6.0) and time (30-90 min) on the acid tolerance in different growth phases of V. parahaemolyticus 690. Additionally, the adaptive acid tolerance among different V. parahaemolyticus strains was compared. Results indicated that the acid tolerance of V. parahaemolyticus 690 was significantly increased after acid adaptation at pH 5.5 and 6.0 for 30-90 min. Among the various acid adaptation conditions examined, V. parahaemolyticus 690 acid-adapted at pH 5.5 for 90 min exhibited the highest acid tolerance. The acid adaptation also influenced the acid tolerance of V. parahaemolyticus 690 in different growth phases with late-exponential phase demonstrating the greatest acid tolerance response (ATR) than other phases. Additionally, the results also showed that the induction of adaptive ATR varied with different strains of V. parahaemolyticus. An increase in acid tolerance of V. parahaemolyticus was observed after prior acid adaptation in five strains (556, 690, BCRC 13023, BCRC 13025, and BCRC 12864), but not in strains 405 and BCRC 12863. PMID:22827515

  3. Calcium Carbonate Precipitation by Bacillus and Sporosarcina Strains Isolated from Concrete and Analysis of the Bacterial Community of Concrete.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Eom, Hyo Jung; Park, Chulwoo; Jung, Jaejoon; Shin, Bora; Kim, Wook; Chung, Namhyun; Choi, In-Geol; Park, Woojun

    2016-03-01

    Microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (CCP) is a long-standing but re-emerging environmental engineering process for production of self-healing concrete, bioremediation, and long-term storage of CO2. CCP-capable bacteria, two Bacillus strains (JH3 and JH7) and one Sporosarcina strain (HYO08), were isolated from two samples of concrete and characterized phylogenetically. Calcium carbonate crystals precipitated by the three strains were morphologically distinct according to field emission scanning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry mapping confirmed biomineralization via extracellular calcium carbonate production. The three strains differed in their physiological characteristics: growth at alkali pH and high NaCl concentrations, and urease activity. Sporosarcina sp. HYO08 and Bacillus sp. JH7 were more alkali- and halotolerant, respectively. Analysis of the community from the same concrete samples using barcoded pyrosequencing revealed that the relative abundance of Bacillus and Sporosarcina species was low, which indicated low culturability of other dominant bacteria. This study suggests that calcium carbonate crystals with different properties can be produced by various CCP-capable strains, and other novel isolates await discovery. PMID:26699752

  4. Inhibition of adhesion of enteroinvasive pathogens to human intestinal Caco-2 cells by Lactobacillus acidophilus strain LB decreases bacterial invasion.

    PubMed

    Coconnier, M H; Bernet, M F; Kernéis, S; Chauvière, G; Fourniat, J; Servin, A L

    1993-07-01

    Salmonella typhimurium and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) were found to adhere to the brush border of differentiated human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells in culture, whereas Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Listeria monocytogenes adhered to the periphery of undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. All these enterovirulent strains invaded the Caco-2 cells. Using a heat-killed human Lactobacillus acidophilus (strain LB) which strongly adheres both to undifferentiated and differentiated Caco-2 cells, we have studied inhibition of cell association with and invasion within Caco-2 cells by enterovirulent bacteria. Living and heat-killed Lactobacillus acidophilus strain LB inhibited both cell association and invasion of Caco-2 cells by enterovirulent bacteria in a concentration-dependent manner. The mechanism of inhibition of both adhesion and invasion appears to be due to steric hindrance of human enterocytic pathogen receptors by whole-cell lactobacilli rather than to a specific blockade of receptors. PMID:8354463

  5. Transfer between an Algerian and a French hospital of four multi-drug resistant bacterial strains together via a single patient

    PubMed Central

    Moissenet, Didier; Richard, Patrick; Granados, Maria; Mérens, Audrey; Fournier, Damien; Fines-Guyon, Marguerite; Arlet, Guillaume; Vu-Thien, Hoang

    2015-01-01

    A 5 years-old girl, seriously burnt with fire, was first hospitalized during four days in an hospital at Alger, and then transferred to our hospital at Paris. Admitted in our intensive care burns unit, she was third degree burnt on 78% of total body surface area, already treated with imipenem and vancomycin at her arrival. Clinical aggravation was rapidly observed and death occurred within 24 hours. Cultures of blood and multiple wound swabs yielded 3 multi-drug resistant bacterial strains: Acinetobacter baumannii with carbapenemase OXA-23, Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotype O11 with metallo-ß-lactamase VIM-4 and Klebsiella pneumoniae with CTX-M-15 extended-spectrum ß-lactamase. Culture of a rectal swab showed colonization by Enterococcus faecium with vanA glycopeptides resistance. Patients colonized with one or two multi-drug-resistant strains were not rare in our burns unit, especially those transferred from Algeria, but this case of a single patient harboring four multi-drug-resistant strains is exceptional. PMID:26550534

  6. Reducing NO and N₂O emission during aerobic denitrification by newly isolated Pseudomonas stutzeri PCN-1.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Maosheng; He, Da; Ma, Tao; Chen, Qian; Liu, Sitong; Ahmad, Muhammad; Gui, Mengyao; Ni, Jinren

    2014-06-01

    As two obligatory intermediates of denitrification, both NO and N2O had harmful environmental and biological impacts. An aerobic denitrifying bacterial strain PCN-1 was newly isolated and identified as Pseudomonas stutzeri, which was capable of high efficient nitrogen removal under aerobic condition with maximal NO and N2O accumulation as low as 0.003% and 0.33% of removed NO3(-)-N, respectively. Further experiment taking nitrite as denitrifying substrate indicated similar low NO and N2O emission of 0.006% and 0.29% of reduced NO2(-)-N, respectively. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that the coordinate expression of denitrification gene nirS (for cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase), cnorB (for NO reductase) and nosZ (for N2O reductase) was the fundamental reason of low NO and N2O accumulation. Activated sludge system bioaugmented by strain PCN-1 demonstrated a significant reduction of NO and N2O emission from wastewater during aerobic denitrification, implied great potential of PCN-1 in practical applications. PMID:24747385

  7. Comparing the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase pathways in arabinose and xylose fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    PubMed Central

    Bettiga, Maurizio; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie F

    2008-01-01

    Background Ethanolic fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass is a sustainable option for the production of bioethanol. This process would greatly benefit from recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains also able to ferment, besides the hexose sugar fraction, the pentose sugars, arabinose and xylose. Different pathways can be introduced in S. cerevisiae to provide arabinose and xylose utilisation. In this study, the bacterial arabinose isomerase pathway was combined with two different xylose utilisation pathways: the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase pathways, respectively, in genetically identical strains. The strains were compared with respect to aerobic growth in arabinose and xylose batch culture and in anaerobic batch fermentation of a mixture of glucose, arabinose and xylose. Results The specific aerobic arabinose growth rate was identical, 0.03 h-1, for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase strain. The xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain displayed higher aerobic growth rate on xylose, 0.14 h-1, and higher specific xylose consumption rate in anaerobic batch fermentation, 0.09 g (g cells)-1 h-1 than the xylose isomerase strain, which only reached 0.03 h-1 and 0.02 g (g cells)-1h-1, respectively. Whereas the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain produced higher ethanol yield on total sugars, 0.23 g g-1 compared with 0.18 g g-1 for the xylose isomerase strain, the xylose isomerase strain achieved higher ethanol yield on consumed sugars, 0.41 g g-1 compared with 0.32 g g-1 for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain. Anaerobic fermentation of a mixture of glucose, arabinose and xylose resulted in higher final ethanol concentration, 14.7 g l-1 for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain compared with 11.8 g l-1 for the xylose isomerase strain, and in higher specific ethanol productivity, 0.024 g (g cells)-1 h-1 compared with 0.01 g (g cells)-1 h-1 for the xylose reductase

  8. Teaching Aerobic Lifestyles: New Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrick, G. Ken; Iammarino, Nicholas K.

    1982-01-01

    New approaches to teaching aerobic life-styles in secondary schools are suggested, focusing on three components: (1) the psychological benefits of aerobic activity; (2) alternative aerobic programs at nonschool locations; and (3) the development of an aerobics curriculum to help maintain an active life-style after graduation. (JN)

  9. Aerobic Conditioning Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Neil R.

    1980-01-01

    An aerobic exercise class that focuses on the conditioning of the cardiovascular and muscular systems is presented. Students complete data cards on heart rate, pulse, and exercises to be completed during the forty minute course. (CJ)

  10. [Research advances in aerobic denitrifiers].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Cai, Zu-cong; Zhong, Wen-hui; Wang, Guo-xiang

    2007-11-01

    This paper reviewed the varieties and characteristics of aerobic denitrifiers, their action mechanisms, and the factors affecting aerobic denitrification. Aerobic denitrifiers mainly include Pseudomonas, Alcaligenes, Paracoccus and Bacillus, which are either aerobic or facultative aerobic, and heterotrophic. They can denitrify under aerobic conditions, with the main product being N2O. They can also convert NH4+ -N to gas product. The nitrate reductase which catalyzes the denitrification is periplasmic nitrate reductase rather than membrane-bound nitrate reductase. Dissolved oxygen concentration and C/N ratio are the main factors affecting aerobic denitrification. The main methods for screening aerobic denitrifiers, such as intermittent aeration and selected culture, were also introduced. The research advances in the application of aerobic denitrifiers in aquaculture, waste water processing, and bio-degradation of organic pollutants, as well as the contributions of aerobic denitrifiers to soil nitrogen emission were summarized. PMID:18260473

  11. Deposition of extreme-tolerant bacterial strains isolated during different phases of phoenix spacecraft assembly in a public culture collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extreme-tolerant bacteria (82 strains; 67 species) isolated during various assembly phases of the Phoenix spacecraft were permanently archived within the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service Culture Collection in Peoria, Illinois. This represents the first microbial collect...

  12. Effects of ruminal dosing of Holstein cows with Megasphaera elsdenii on milk fat production, ruminal chemistry, and bacterial strain persistence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Megasphaera elsdenii (Me) is a lactate-utilizing bacterium whose ruminal abundance has been shown to be greatly elevated during milk fat depression (MFD). To further examine this association, a total of 25 cannulated multiparous Holstein cows were examined in three studies in which strains of Me wer...

  13. Control of foodborne pathogens and soft-rot bacteria on bell pepper by three strains of bacterial antagonists

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forty-two representative strains of native bacteria associated with fresh peeled baby carrots were isolated and characterized. Two of them identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens AG3A (Pf AG3A) and Bacillus YD1 were evaluated in conjunction with another known antagonist, P. fluorescens 2-79 (Pf 2-79)...

  14. Cloning of a very virulent plus, 686 strain of Marek’s disease virus as a bacterial artificial chromosome.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) is a highly oncogenic herpesvirus that induces rapid onset of T-cell lymphomas in chicken. It has been well established that MDV strains increase in virulence over time, possibly due to the widespread use of vaccination to control Marek’s disease. One of the most pathoge...

  15. Genomic Insights into Aquimarina sp. Strain EL33, a Bacterial Symbiont of the Gorgonian Coral Eunicella labiata.

    PubMed

    Keller-Costa, Tina; Silva, Rúben; Lago-Lestón, Asunción; Costa, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    To address the metabolic potential of symbiotic Aquimarina spp., we report here the genome sequence of Aquimarina sp. strain EL33, a bacterium isolated from the gorgonian coral Eunicella labiata This first-described (to our knowledge) animal-associated Aquimarina genome possesses a sophisticated repertoire of genes involved in drug/antibiotic resistance and biosynthesis. PMID:27540075

  16. Genomic Insights into Aquimarina sp. Strain EL33, a Bacterial Symbiont of the Gorgonian Coral Eunicella labiata

    PubMed Central

    Keller-Costa, Tina; Silva, Rúben; Lago-Lestón, Asunción

    2016-01-01

    To address the metabolic potential of symbiotic Aquimarina spp., we report here the genome sequence of Aquimarina sp. strain EL33, a bacterium isolated from the gorgonian coral Eunicella labiata. This first-described (to our knowledge) animal-associated Aquimarina genome possesses a sophisticated repertoire of genes involved in drug/antibiotic resistance and biosynthesis. PMID:27540075

  17. Aerobic Denitrifying Bacteria That Produce Low Levels of Nitrous Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Takaya, Naoki; Catalan-Sakairi, Maria Antonina B.; Sakaguchi, Yasushi; Kato, Isao; Zhou, Zhemin; Shoun, Hirofumi

    2003-01-01

    Most denitrifiers produce nitrous oxide (N2O) instead of dinitrogen (N2) under aerobic conditions. We isolated and characterized novel aerobic denitrifiers that produce low levels of N2O under aerobic conditions. We monitored the denitrification activities of two of the isolates, strains TR2 and K50, in batch and continuous cultures. Both strains reduced nitrate (NO3−) to N2 at rates of 0.9 and 0.03 μmol min−1 unit of optical density at 540 nm−1 at dissolved oxygen (O2) (DO) concentrations of 39 and 38 μmol liter−1, respectively. At the same DO level, the typical denitrifier Pseudomonas stutzeri and the previously described aerobic denitrifier Paracoccus denitrificans did not produce N2 but evolved more than 10-fold more N2O than strains TR2 and K50 evolved. The isolates denitrified NO3− with concomitant consumption of O2. These results indicated that strains TR2 and K50 are aerobic denitrifiers. These two isolates were taxonomically placed in the β subclass of the class Proteobacteria and were identified as P. stutzeri TR2 and Pseudomonas sp. strain K50. These strains should be useful for future investigations of the mechanisms of denitrifying bacteria that regulate N2O emission, the single-stage process for nitrogen removal, and microbial N2O emission into the ecosystem. PMID:12788710

  18. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    PubMed

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists. PMID:27474242

  19. Glycerol Dehydratases: Biochemical Structures, Catalytic Mechanisms, and Industrial Applications in 1,3-Propanediol Production by Naturally Occurring and Genetically Engineered Bacterial Strains.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Zhong; Xu, Wu; Chistoserdov, Andrei; Bajpai, Rakesh K

    2016-07-01

    To date, two types of glycerol dehydratases have been reported: coenzyme B12-dependent and coenzyme B12-independent glycerol dehydratases. The three-dimensional structure of the former is a dimer of αβγ heterotrimer, while that of the latter is a homodimer. Their mechanisms of reaction are typically enzymatic radical catalysis. Functional radical in both the glycerol dehydratases is the adenosyl radical. However, the adenosyl radical in the former originates from coenzyme B12 by homolytic cleavage, and that in the latter from S-adenosyl-methionine. Until some years ago, Clostridium butyricum VPI 1718 was the only microorganism known to possess B12-independent glycerol dehydratase, but since then, several other bacteria with this unique capability have been identified. This article focuses on the glycerol dehydratases and on 1,3-propanediol production from glycerol by naturally occurring and genetically engineered bacterial strains containing glycerol dehydratase. PMID:27033090

  20. Pathogenesis of Streptococcus urinary tract infection depends on bacterial strain and β-hemolysin/cytolysin that mediates cytotoxicity, cytokine synthesis, inflammation and virulence.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Sophie Y; Sullivan, Matthew J; Ipe, Deepak S; Smith, Joshua P; Cripps, Allan W; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae can cause urinary tract infection (UTI) including cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU). The early host-pathogen interactions that occur during S. agalactiae UTI and subsequent mechanisms of disease pathogenesis are poorly defined. Here, we define the early interactions between human bladder urothelial cells, monocyte-derived macrophages, and mouse bladder using uropathogenic S. agalactiae (UPSA) 807 and ABU-causing S. agalactiae (ABSA) 834 strains. UPSA 807 adhered, invaded and killed bladder urothelial cells more efficiently compared to ABSA 834 via mechanisms including low-level caspase-3 activation, and cytolysis, according to lactate dehydrogenase release measures and cell viability. Severe UPSA 807-induced cytotoxicity was mediated entirely by the bacterial β-hemolysin/cytolysin (β-H/C) because an β-H/C-deficient UPSA 807 isogenic mutant, UPSA 807ΔcylE, was not cytotoxic in vitro; the mutant was also significantly attenuated for colonization in the bladder in vivo. Analysis of infection-induced cytokines, including IL-8, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in vitro and in vivo revealed that cytokine and chemokine responses were dependent on expression of β-H/C that also elicited severe bladder neutrophilia. Thus, virulence of UPSA 807 encompasses adhesion to, invasion of and killing of bladder cells, pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine responses that elicit neutrophil infiltration, and β-H/C-mediated subversion of innate immune-mediated bacterial clearance from the bladder. PMID:27383371

  1. Pathogenesis of Streptococcus urinary tract infection depends on bacterial strain and β-hemolysin/cytolysin that mediates cytotoxicity, cytokine synthesis, inflammation and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, Sophie Y.; Sullivan, Matthew J.; Ipe, Deepak S.; Smith, Joshua P.; Cripps, Allan W.; Ulett, Glen C.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae can cause urinary tract infection (UTI) including cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU). The early host-pathogen interactions that occur during S. agalactiae UTI and subsequent mechanisms of disease pathogenesis are poorly defined. Here, we define the early interactions between human bladder urothelial cells, monocyte-derived macrophages, and mouse bladder using uropathogenic S. agalactiae (UPSA) 807 and ABU-causing S. agalactiae (ABSA) 834 strains. UPSA 807 adhered, invaded and killed bladder urothelial cells more efficiently compared to ABSA 834 via mechanisms including low-level caspase-3 activation, and cytolysis, according to lactate dehydrogenase release measures and cell viability. Severe UPSA 807-induced cytotoxicity was mediated entirely by the bacterial β-hemolysin/cytolysin (β-H/C) because an β-H/C-deficient UPSA 807 isogenic mutant, UPSA 807ΔcylE, was not cytotoxic in vitro; the mutant was also significantly attenuated for colonization in the bladder in vivo. Analysis of infection-induced cytokines, including IL-8, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in vitro and in vivo revealed that cytokine and chemokine responses were dependent on expression of β-H/C that also elicited severe bladder neutrophilia. Thus, virulence of UPSA 807 encompasses adhesion to, invasion of and killing of bladder cells, pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine responses that elicit neutrophil infiltration, and β-H/C-mediated subversion of innate immune-mediated bacterial clearance from the bladder. PMID:27383371

  2. Change in hydrophilicity of penicillins during advanced oxidation by radiolytically generated OH compromises the elimination of selective pressure on bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Szabó, László; Tóth, Tünde; Engelhardt, Tekla; Rácz, Gergely; Mohácsi-Farkas, Csilla; Takács, Erzsébet; Wojnárovits, László

    2016-05-01

    Advanced oxidation processes are promising technologies for removal of antibiotic residues from wastewater in terms of their high efficacy. However, recent studies have reported the remaining antibacterial activity of the products at early-stages of treatment. The present study investigates the effect of such products of model β-lactams (amoxicillin, ampicillin, cloxacillin) on bacteria introducing structure-based, and biological approaches involving Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. Chemical analysis revealed the destruction of the β-lactam pharmacophore in competition with the reaction at the aromatic ring. Multisite attack occurs on the penicillin skeleton producing OH-substituted products. The enhanced hydrophilicity confers higher diffusion rate through the porin channels of Gram-negative bacteria and through the hydrophilic cell wall of Gram-positive species. Accordingly, an increase in acute toxicity of treated samples was observed at the beginning of the treatment. The same tendency was observed for target-specific antimicrobial activity investigated with antibiotic susceptibility testing (agar-diffusion, bacterial growth). Prolonged treatments yielded products, e.g. polyhydroxylated phenolic compounds, being also deleterious for bacteria. Therefore, the advanced oxidation process should be judiciously optimized. PMID:26881730

  3. Evaluation of microbial transport during aerobic bioaugmentation of an RDX-contaminated aquifer.

    PubMed

    Crocker, Fiona H; Indest, Karl J; Jung, Carina M; Hancock, Dawn E; Fuller, Mark E; Hatzinger, Paul B; Vainberg, Simon; Istok, Jonathan D; Wilson, Edward; Michalsen, Mandy M

    2015-11-01

    In situ bioaugmentation with aerobic hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX)-degrading bacteria is being considered for treatment of explosives-contaminated groundwater at Umatilla Chemical Depot, Oregon (UMCD). Two forced-gradient bacterial transport tests of site groundwater containing chloride or bromide tracer and either a mixed culture of Gordonia sp. KTR9 (xplA (+)Km(R)), Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 (pGKT2 transconjugant; xplA (+)Km(R)) and Pseudomonas fluorescens I-C (xenB (+)), or a single culture of Gordonia sp. KTR9 (xplA (+); i.e. wild-type) were conducted at UMCD. Groundwater monitoring evaluated cell viability and migration in the injection well and downgradient monitoring wells. Enhanced degradation of RDX was not evaluated in these demonstrations. Quantitative PCR analysis of xplA, the kanamycin resistance gene (aph), and xenB indicated that the mixed culture was transported at least 3 m within 2 h of injection. During a subsequent field injection of bioaugmented groundwater, strain KTR9 (wild-type) migrated up to 23-m downgradient of the injection well within 3 days. Thus, the three RDX-degrading strains were effectively introduced and transported within the UMCD aquifer. This demonstration represents an innovative application of bioaugmentation to potentially enhance RDX biodegradation in aerobic aquifers. PMID:26438043

  4. Biological Control Activities of Rice-Associated Bacillus sp. Strains against Sheath Blight and Bacterial Panicle Blight of Rice.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Bishnu K; Karki, Hari Sharan; Groth, Donald E; Jungkhun, Nootjarin; Ham, Jong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Potential biological control agents for two major rice diseases, sheath blight and bacterial panicle blight, were isolated from rice plants in this study. Rice-associated bacteria (RABs) isolated from rice plants grown in the field were tested for their antagonistic activities against the rice pathogens, Rhizoctonia solani and Burkholderia glumae, which cause sheath blight and bacterial panicle blight, respectively. Twenty-nine RABs were initially screened based on their antagonistic activities against both R. solani and B. glumae. In follow-up retests, 26 RABs of the 29 RABs were confirmed to have antimicrobial activities, but the rest three RABs did not reproduce any observable antagonistic activity against R. solani or B. glumae. According to16S rDNA sequence identity, 12 of the 26 antagonistic RABs were closest to Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, while seven RABs were to B. methylotrophicus and B, subtilis, respectively. The 16S rDNA sequences of the three non-antagonistic RABs were closest to Lysinibacillus sphaericus (RAB1 and RAB12) and Lysinibacillus macroides (RAB5). The five selected RABs showing highest antimicrobial activities (RAB6, RAB9, RAB16, RAB17S, and RAB18) were closest to B. amyloliquefaciens in DNA sequence of 16S rDNA and gyrB, but to B. subtilis in that of recA. These RABs were observed to inhibit the sclerotial germination of R. solani on potato dextrose agar and the lesion development on detached rice leaves by artificial inoculation of R. solani. These antagonistic RABs also significantly suppressed the disease development of sheath blight and bacterial panicle blight in a field condition, suggesting that they can be potential biological control agents for these rice diseases. However, these antagonistic RABs showed diminished disease suppression activities in the repeated field trial conducted in the following year probably due to their reduced antagonistic activities to the pathogens during the long-term storage in -70C, suggesting that

  5. Biological Control Activities of Rice-Associated Bacillus sp. Strains against Sheath Blight and Bacterial Panicle Blight of Rice

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Bishnu K.; Karki, Hari Sharan; Groth, Donald E.; Jungkhun, Nootjarin; Ham, Jong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Potential biological control agents for two major rice diseases, sheath blight and bacterial panicle blight, were isolated from rice plants in this study. Rice-associated bacteria (RABs) isolated from rice plants grown in the field were tested for their antagonistic activities against the rice pathogens, Rhizoctonia solani and Burkholderia glumae, which cause sheath blight and bacterial panicle blight, respectively. Twenty-nine RABs were initially screened based on their antagonistic activities against both R. solani and B. glumae. In follow-up retests, 26 RABs of the 29 RABs were confirmed to have antimicrobial activities, but the rest three RABs did not reproduce any observable antagonistic activity against R. solani or B. glumae. According to16S rDNA sequence identity, 12 of the 26 antagonistic RABs were closest to Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, while seven RABs were to B. methylotrophicus and B, subtilis, respectively. The 16S rDNA sequences of the three non-antagonistic RABs were closest to Lysinibacillus sphaericus (RAB1 and RAB12) and Lysinibacillus macroides (RAB5). The five selected RABs showing highest antimicrobial activities (RAB6, RAB9, RAB16, RAB17S, and RAB18) were closest to B. amyloliquefaciens in DNA sequence of 16S rDNA and gyrB, but to B. subtilis in that of recA. These RABs were observed to inhibit the sclerotial germination of R. solani on potato dextrose agar and the lesion development on detached rice leaves by artificial inoculation of R. solani. These antagonistic RABs also significantly suppressed the disease development of sheath blight and bacterial panicle blight in a field condition, suggesting that they can be potential biological control agents for these rice diseases. However, these antagonistic RABs showed diminished disease suppression activities in the repeated field trial conducted in the following year probably due to their reduced antagonistic activities to the pathogens during the long-term storage in -70C, suggesting that

  6. Aerobic Degradation of Sulfadiazine by Arthrobacter spp.: Kinetics, Pathways, and Genomic Characterization.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yu; Mao, Yanping; Li, Bing; Yang, Chao; Zhang, Tong

    2016-09-01

    Two aerobic sulfadiazine (SDZ) degrading bacterial strains, D2 and D4, affiliated with the genus Arthrobacter, were isolated from SDZ-enriched activated sludge. The degradation of SDZ by the two isolates followed first-order decay kinetics. The half-life time of complete SDZ degradation was 11.3 h for strain D2 and 46.4 h for strain D4. Degradation kinetic changed from nongrowth to growth-linked when glucose was introduced as the cosubstrate, and accelerated biodegradation rate was observed after the adaption period. Both isolates could degrade SDZ into 12 biodegradation products via 3 parallel pathways, of which 2-amino-4-hydroxypyrimidine was detected as the principal intermediate product toward the pyrimidine ring cleavage. Compared with five Arthrobacter strains reported previously, D2 and D4 were the only Arthrobacter strains which could degrade SDZ as the sole carbon source. The draft genomes of D2 and D4, with the same completeness of 99.7%, were compared to other genomes of related species. Overall, these two isolates shared high genomic similarities with the s-triazine-degrading Arthrobacter sp. AK-YN10 and the sulfonamide-degrading bacteria Microbacterium sp. C448. In addition, the two genomes contained a few significant regions of difference which may carry the functional genes involved in sulfonamide degradation. PMID:27477918

  7. Penetration barrier contributes to bacterial biofilm-associated resistance against only select antibiotics, and exhibits genus-, strain- and antibiotic-specific differences.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rachna; Sahore, Simmi; Kaur, Preetinder; Rani, Alka; Ray, Pallab

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial biofilms are implicated in a wide range of implant-based and chronic infections. These infections are often associated with adverse therapeutic outcomes, owing to the decreased antibiotic susceptibility of biofilms compared with their planktonic counterparts. This altered biofilm susceptibility has been attributed to multiple factors, including a reduced antibiotic penetration. Although several studies have addressed the role of penetration barrier in biofilm-associated drug resistance, it remains inconclusive. This study was done to elucidate antibiotic penetration through biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, using an agar disk diffusion assay. Penetration capacity of six antimicrobial drugs from different classes (β-lactams, aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, phenicols, fluoroquinolones and glycopeptides) through biofilms formed by standard strains and clinical isolates from catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) was elucidated by measuring their growth-inhibition zones in lawn cultures on Mueller-Hinton agar, following diffusion of an antibiotic from an overlying disk through their biofilm to the agar medium. Penetration of only select antimicrobials (vancomycin and chloramphenicol) was hindered through biofilms. There was considerable variation in biofilm-permeating capacity depending upon the genus, strain/CRBSI isolate and antibiotic tested. Furthermore, antibiotics failed to kill the biofilm cells independent of penetration, indicating that other factors contributed substantially to biofilm resistance. PMID:27402781

  8. Microcystin-degrading activity of an indigenous bacterial strain Stenotrophomonas acidaminiphila MC-LTH2 isolated from Lake Taihu.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fei; Zhou, Yuanlong; Yin, Lihong; Zhu, Guangcan; Liang, Geyu; Pu, Yuepu

    2014-01-01

    Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) and microcystin-RR (MC-RR) produced by harmful cyanobacterial blooms (HCBs) pose substantial threats to the ecosystem and public health due to their potential hepatotoxicity. Degradation of microcystins (MCs) by indigenous bacteria represents a promising method for removing MCs from fresh water without harming the aquatic environment, but only a few microcystin (MC)-degrading bacteria have been isolated and had their mechanisms reported. This study aimed to isolate indigenous bacteria from Lake Taihu, and investigate the capability and mechanism of MC degradation by these bacteria. During a Microcystis bloom, an indigenous MC-degrading bacterium designated MC-LTH2 was successfully isolated from Lake Taihu, and identified as Stenotrophomonas acidaminiphila based on phylogenetic analysis. In the presence of MC-LR together with MC-RR, the strain MC-LTH2 was capable of totally degrading both simultaneously in 8 days, at rates of 3.0 mg/(L⋅d) and 5.6 mg/(L⋅d), respectively. The degradation rates of MCs were dependent on temperature, pH, and initial MC concentration. Adda (3-amino-9-methoxy-2, 6, 8-trimethyl-10-phenyldeca-4, 6-dienoic acid) was detected as an intermediate degradation product of MCs using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-TOF-MS). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of Stenotrophomonas acidaminiphila capable of degrading two MC analogues and other compounds containing Adda residue completely under various conditions, although the mlrA gene in the strain was not detected. These results indicate the Stenotrophomonas acidaminiphila strain MC-LTH2 possesses a significant potential to be used in bioremediation of water bodies contaminated by MC-LR and MC-RR, and is potentially involved in the degradation of MCs during the disappearance of the HCBs in Lake Taihu. PMID:24416455

  9. Biosurfactant production from marine hydrocarbon-degrading consortia and pure bacterial strains using crude oil as carbon source

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Eleftheria; Fodelianakis, Stilianos; Korkakaki, Emmanouela; Kalogerakis, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Biosurfactants (BSs) are “green” amphiphilic molecules produced by microorganisms during biodegradation, increasing the bioavailability of organic pollutants. In this work, the BS production yield of marine hydrocarbon degraders isolated from Elefsina bay in Eastern Mediterranean Sea has been investigated. The drop collapse test was used as a preliminary screening test to confirm BS producing strains or mixed consortia. The community structure of the best consortia based on the drop collapse test was determined by 16S-rDNA pyrotag screening. Subsequently, the effect of incubation time, temperature, substrate and supplementation with inorganic nutrients, on BS production, was examined. Two types of BS – lipid mixtures were extracted from the culture broth; the low molecular weight BS Rhamnolipids and Sophorolipids. Crude extracts were purified by silica gel column chromatography and then identified by thin layer chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results indicate that BS production yield remains constant and low while it is independent of the total culture biomass, carbon source, and temperature. A constant BS concentration in a culture broth with continuous degradation of crude oil (CO) implies that the BS producing microbes generate no more than the required amount of BSs that enables biodegradation of the CO. Isolated pure strains were found to have higher specific production yields than the complex microbial marine community-consortia. The heavy oil fraction of CO has emerged as a promising substrate for BS production (by marine BS producers) with fewer impurities in the final product. Furthermore, a particular strain isolated from sediments, Paracoccus marcusii, may be an optimal choice for bioremediation purposes as its biomass remains trapped in the hydrocarbon phase, not suffering from potential dilution effects by sea currents. PMID:25904907

  10. Parallel pathways of ethoxylated alcohol biodegradation under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Zembrzuska, Joanna; Budnik, Irena; Lukaszewski, Zenon

    2016-07-01

    Non-ionic surfactants (NS) are a major component of the surfactant flux discharged into surface water, and alcohol ethoxylates (AE) are the major component of this flux. Therefore, biodegradation pathways of AE deserve more thorough investigation. The aim of this work was to investigate the stages of biodegradation of homogeneous oxyethylated dodecanol C12E9 having 9 oxyethylene subunits, under aerobic conditions. Enterobacter strain Z3 bacteria were chosen as biodegrading organisms under conditions with C12E9 as the sole source of organic carbon. Bacterial consortia of river water were used in a parallel test as an inoculum for comparison. The LC-MS technique was used to identify the products of biodegradation. Liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate was selected for the isolation of C12E9 and metabolites from the biodegradation broth. The LC-MS/MS technique operating in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode was used for quantitative determination of C12E9, C12E8, C12E7 and C12E6. Apart from the substrate, the homologues C12E8, C12E7 and C12E6, being metabolites of C12E9 biodegradation by shortening of the oxyethylene chain, as well as intermediate metabolites having a carboxyl end group in the oxyethylene chain (C12E8COOH, C12E7COOH, C12E6COOH and C12E5COOH), were identified. Poly(ethylene glycols) (E) having 9, 8 and 7 oxyethylene subunits were also identified, indicating parallel central fission of C12E9 and its metabolites. Similar results were obtained with river water as inoculum. It is concluded that AE, under aerobic conditions, are biodegraded via two parallel pathways: by central fission with the formation of PEG, and by Ω-oxidation of the oxyethylene chain with the formation of carboxylated AE and subsequent shortening of the oxyethylene chain by a single unit. PMID:27037882

  11. The T6SSs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain PAO1 and Their Effectors: Beyond Bacterial-Cell Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Sana, Thibault G.; Berni, Benjamin; Bleves, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for many diseases such as chronic lung colonization in cystic fibrosis patients and acute infections in hospitals. The capacity of P. aeruginosa to be pathogenic toward several hosts is notably due to different secretion systems. Amongst them, P. aeruginosa encodes three Type Six Secretion Systems (T6SS), named H1- to H3-T6SS, that act against either prokaryotes and/or eukaryotic cells. They are independent from each other and inject diverse toxins that interact with different components in the host cell. Here we summarize the roles of these T6SSs in the PAO1 strain, as well as the toxins injected and their targets. While H1-T6SS is only involved in antiprokaryotic activity through at least seven different toxins, H2-T6SS and H3-T6SS are also able to target prokaryotic as well as eukaryotic cells. Moreover, recent studies proposed that H2- and H3-T6SS have a role in epithelial cells invasion by injecting at least three different toxins. The diversity of T6SS effectors is astounding and other effectors still remain to be discovered. In this review, we present a table with other putative P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 T6SS-dependent effectors. Altogether, the T6SSs of P. aeruginosa are important systems that help fight other bacteria for their ecological niche, and are important in the pathogenicity process. PMID:27376031

  12. Decolourisation of Acid Orange 7 recalcitrant auto-oxidation coloured by-products using an acclimatised mixed bacterial culture.

    PubMed

    Bay, Hui Han; Lim, Chi Kim; Kee, Thuan Chien; Ware, Ismail; Chan, Giek Far; Shahir, Shafinaz; Ibrahim, Zaharah

    2014-03-01

    This study focuses on the biodegradation of recalcitrant, coloured compounds resulting from auto-oxidation of Acid Orange 7 (AO7) in a sequential facultative anaerobic-aerobic treatment system. A novel mixed bacterial culture, BAC-ZS, consisting of Brevibacillus panacihumi strain ZB1, Lysinibacillus fusiformis strain ZB2, and Enterococcus faecalis strain ZL bacteria were isolated from environmental samples. The acclimatisation of the mixed culture was carried out in an AO7 decolourised solution. The acclimatised mixed culture showed 98 % decolourisation within 2 h of facultative anaerobic treatment using yeast extract and glucose as co-substrate. Subsequent aerobic post treatment caused auto-oxidation reaction forming dark coloured compounds that reduced the percentage decolourisation to 73 %. Interestingly, further agitations of the mixed culture in the solution over a period of 48 h significantly decolourise the coloured compounds and increased the decolourisation percentage to 90 %. Analyses of the degradation compounds using UV-visible spectrophotometer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) showed complete degradation of recalcitrant AO7 by the novel BAC-ZS. Phytotoxicity tests using Cucumis sativus confirmed the dye solution after post aerobic treatment were less toxic compared to the parent dye. The quantitative real-time PCR revealed that E. faecalis strain ZL was the dominant strain in the acclimatised mix culture. PMID:24293297

  13. [Changes of bacterial flora from hindguts of piglets after oral administration of lactobacillus amylovorus S1 as a probiotic strain].

    PubMed

    Su, Yong; Yao, Wen; Zhu, Wei-yun

    2006-12-01

    Changes of bacterial flora from hindguts of piglets from 7 to 35 days of age (two weeks after weaning) were studied after oral administration of L. amylovorus S1, using molecular techniques based on 16S rDNA gene. Six litters of neonatal piglets were divided randomly into control group and treatment group. At 7, 9, 11 days of age, piglets in treatment group received 1, 2 and 3mL preparation of S1 (5 x 10(9) CFU/mL) through oral administration, respectively. On D 7, 14, 21, 24 and 35, one piglet from each litter was slaughtered and samples of hindguts were collected for analysis. The results showed that high G + C mol% bacteria in hindguts of piglets disappeared after weaning and restored gradually two weeks later. Sequencing analysis indicated that most of these high G + C mol% bacteria blonged to Lactobacillus spp. . Statistical analysis showed that treatment with S1 had no marked effect on diversity index of predominant bacteria from hindguts in piglets. By comparing the bands in DGGE profiles between two groups, a specific band in treatment group was found in profiles from piglets at 14 days of age, sequence matched with that showed 95 % similarity to Clostridium disporicum. At 35 days of age, another specific band appeared in control group, which was identified to be Streptococcus suis (99% ). PMID:17302162

  14. In vitro bactericidal activity of recombinant human beta-defensin-3 against pathogenic bacterial strains in human tooth root canal.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Shi, Yong; Xiao, Mingzhen; Lu, Hong; Qu, Tiejun; Li, Ping; Wu, Gang; Tian, Yu

    2009-03-01

    Human beta-defensin-3 (HBD3), an endogenous antimicrobial peptide, has strong broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. This study aimed to obtain recombinant HBD3 (rHBD3) and to test the hypothesis that the antimicrobial characteristics of HBD3 may offer an advantage over conventional medicine in reducing intracanal bacteria. Genetic engineering was used to obtain active rHBD3 and analysis revealed that it exhibited a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity at low micromolar concentrations against not only Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli but also against some critical pathogenic microbes in infected root canals, including Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella melaninogenica, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces naeslundii, Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans. In an in vitro antibacterial experiment, rHBD3 significantly eliminated pathogenic bacteria in root canals. The ratio of bacterial death was up to 98%. We conclude that HBD3 has the potential to eliminate bacteria effectively and rapidly in the local microenvironment of the root canal system and that it may contribute to successful endodontic treatment. PMID:18775647

  15. Isolation of Minicircular Deoxyribonucleic Acids from Wild Strains of Escherichia coli and their Relationship to other Bacterial Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, Werner; Schrempf, Hildgund

    1972-01-01

    Supercoiled minicircular deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules with molecular weights of 1.8 × 106 and 2.3 × 106 have been isolated from two wild strains of Escherichia coli. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments indicate that these DNA molecules share extended homologies with the minicircular DNA of E. coli 15. The DNA of the colicinogenic factor E1 (ColE1) also hybridizes to a large extent with minicircular DNA of E. coli 15. In contrast, no hybridization could be detected with various large extrachromosomal DNA elements such as the colicinogenic factor V (ColV), the beta-hemolytic factor (Hly), or the P1-like DNA of E. coli 15. Two different insertion DNA species of E. coli integrated into λdg-DNA (λdg UPin 128, λdg UPin 308) do not show any annealing with minicircular DNA of E. coli 15. Images PMID:4340922

  16. Bacterial strains isolated from eggs and their resistance to currently used antibiotics: is there a health hazard for consumers?

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, C; Dimitriou, D; Levidiotou, S; Gessouli, H; Panagiou, A; Golegou, S; Antoniades, G

    1997-01-01

    In order to study the putative transfer of antibiotic resistance from poultry to humans, hens' eggs were examined for the presence of various pathogens. Staphylococcus, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Proteus and Pseudomonas spp. were the most frequently isolated genera. Sensitivity tests, performed with the Kirby-Bauer technique, showed the presence of resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (to penicillin-G, tetracycline, erythromycin, clindamycin, cefalosporins, oxacillin, gentamycin, chloramphenicol and tobramycin), Enterococcus faecalis (to ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, gentamycin and tetracyclin), Escherichia coli (to tetracycline, erythromycin, ampicillin and cefalosporins), Enterobacter cloacae (to ampicillin, amoxycillin plus clavunalic acid, erythromycin and tetracycline), Pseudomonas stutzeri (to erythromycin and chlorampenicol) and Citrobacter freundii (to ampicillin, amoxycillin plus clavunalic acid, cefalosporins and co-trimoxazole). PMID:9023039

  17. External Bacterial Flora and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Staphylococcus spp. and Pseudomonas spp. Isolated from Two Household Cockroaches, Blattella germanica and Blatta orientalis.

    PubMed

    Menasria, Taha; Tine, Samir; Mahcene, Djaouida; Benammar, Leyla; Megri, Rochdi; Boukoucha, Mourad; Debabza, Manel

    2015-04-01

    A study was performed to estimate the prevalence of the external bacterial flora of two domestic cockroaches (Blattella germanica and Blatta orientalis) collected from households in Tebessa (northeast Algeria). Three major bacterial groups were cultured (total aerobic, enterobacteria, and staphylococci) from 14 specimens of cockroaches, and antibiotic susceptibility was tested for both Staphylococcus and Pseudomonas isolates. Culturing showed that the total bacterial load of cockroaches from different households were comparable (P<0.001) and enterobacteria were the predominant colonizers of the insect surface, with a bacterial load of (2.1 × 10⁵ CFU/insect), whereas the staphylococci group was the minority. Twenty-eight bacterial species were isolated, and susceptibility patterns showed that most of the staphylococci isolates were highly susceptible to chloramphenicol, gentamycin, pristinamycin, ofloxacin, clindamycin, and vancomycin; however, Pseudomonas strains exhibited resistance to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, imipenem, and the second-generation antibiotic cephalosporin cefuroxime. PMID:25966760

  18. Dance--Aerobic and Anaerobic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlette

    1984-01-01

    This article defines and explains aerobic exercise and its effects on the cardiovascular system. Various studies on dancers are cited indicating that dance is an anaerobic activity with some small degree of aerobic benefit. (DF)

  19. Anaerobic and aerobic transformation of TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Kulpa, C.F.; Boopathy, R.; Manning, J.

    1996-12-