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Sample records for aerobic bacterium pseudomonas

  1. Interaction of Cadmium With the Aerobic Bacterium Pseudomonas Mendocina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, P. J.; Haack, E. A.; Maurice, P. A.

    2006-05-01

    The fate of toxic metals in the environment can be heavily influenced by interaction with bacteria in the vadose zone. This research focuses on the interactions of cadmium with the strict aerobe Pseudomonas mendocina. P. mendocina is a gram-negative bacterium that has shown potential in the bioremediation of recalcitrant organic compounds. Cadmium is a common environmental contaminant of wide-spread ecological consequence. In batch experiments P. mendocina shows typical bacterial growth curves, with an initial lag phase followed by an exponential phase and a stationary to death phase; concomitant with growth was an increase in pH from initial values of 7 to final values at 96 hours of 8.8. Cd both delays the onset of the exponential phase and decreases the maximum population size, as quantified by optical density and microscopic cell counts (DAPI). The total amount of Cd removed from solution increases over time, as does the amount of Cd removed from solution normalized per bacterial cell. Images obtained with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the production of a cadmium, phosphorus, and iron containing precipitate that was similar in form and composition to precipitates formed abiotically at elevated pH. However, by late stationary phase, the precipitate had been re-dissolved, perhaps by biotic processes in order to obtain Fe. Stressed conditions are suggested by TEM images showing the formation of pili, or nanowires, when 20ppm Cd was present and a marked decrease in exopolysaccharide and biofilm material in comparison to control cells (no cadmium added).

  2. Pseudomonas sp. strain 273, and aerobic {alpha},{omega}-dichloroalkane-degrading bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Wischnak, C.; Mueller, R.; Loeffler, F.E. |; Li, J.; Urbance, J.W.

    1998-09-01

    A gram-negative, aerobic bacterium was isolated from soil; this bacterium grew in 50% (vol/vol) suspensions of 1,10-dichlorodecane (1,10-DCD) as the sole source of carbon and energy. Phenotypic and small-subunit ribosomal RNA characterizations identified the organism, designated strain 273, as a member of the genus Pseudomonas. After induction with 1,10-DCD, Pseudomonas sp. strain 273 released stoichiometric amounts of chloride from C{sub 5} to C{sub 12} {alpha},{omega}-dichloroalkanes in the presence of oxygen. No dehalogenation occurred under anaerobic conditions. The best substrates for dehalogenation and growth were C{sub 9} to C{sub 12} chloroalkanes. The isolate also grew with nonhalogenated aliphatic compounds, and decane-grown cells dechlorinated 1,10-DCD without a lag phase. In addition, cells grown on decane dechlorinated 1,10-DCD in the presence of chloramphenicol, indicating that the 1,10-DCD-dechlorinating enzyme system was also induced by decane. Other known alkane-degrading Pseudomonas species did not grow with 1,10-DCD as a carbon source. Dechlorination of 1,10-DCD was demonstrated in cell extracts of Pseudomonas sp. strain 273. Cell-free activity was strictly oxygen dependent, and NADH stimulated dechlorination, whereas EDTA had an inhibitory effect.

  3. Simultaneous heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification by the marine origin bacterium Pseudomonas sp. ADN-42.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ruofei; Liu, Tianqi; Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti; Huang, Jianyu; Wang, Aijie

    2015-02-01

    Recent research has highlighted the existence of some bacteria that are capable of performing heterotrophic nitrification and have a phenomenal ability to denitrify their nitrification products under aerobic conditions. A high-salinity-tolerant strain ADN-42 was isolated from Hymeniacidon perleve and found to display high heterotrophic ammonium removal capability. This strain was identified as Pseudomonas sp. via 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Gene cloning and sequencing analysis indicated that the bacterial genome contains N2O reductase function (nosZ) gene. NH3-N removal rate of ADN-42 was very high. And the highest removal rate was 6.52 mg/L · h in the presence of 40 g/L NaCl. Under the condition of pure oxygen (DO >8 mg/L), NH3-N removal efficiency was 56.9 %. Moreover, 38.4 % of oxygen remained in the upper gas space during 72 h without greenhouse gas N2O production. Keeping continuous and low level of dissolved oxygen (DO <3 mg/L) was helpful for better denitrification performance. All these results indicated that the strain has heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification abilities, which guarantee future application in wastewater treatment.

  4. Simultaneous heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification by the marine origin bacterium Pseudomonas sp. ADN-42.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ruofei; Liu, Tianqi; Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti; Huang, Jianyu; Wang, Aijie

    2015-02-01

    Recent research has highlighted the existence of some bacteria that are capable of performing heterotrophic nitrification and have a phenomenal ability to denitrify their nitrification products under aerobic conditions. A high-salinity-tolerant strain ADN-42 was isolated from Hymeniacidon perleve and found to display high heterotrophic ammonium removal capability. This strain was identified as Pseudomonas sp. via 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Gene cloning and sequencing analysis indicated that the bacterial genome contains N2O reductase function (nosZ) gene. NH3-N removal rate of ADN-42 was very high. And the highest removal rate was 6.52 mg/L · h in the presence of 40 g/L NaCl. Under the condition of pure oxygen (DO >8 mg/L), NH3-N removal efficiency was 56.9 %. Moreover, 38.4 % of oxygen remained in the upper gas space during 72 h without greenhouse gas N2O production. Keeping continuous and low level of dissolved oxygen (DO <3 mg/L) was helpful for better denitrification performance. All these results indicated that the strain has heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification abilities, which guarantee future application in wastewater treatment. PMID:25432342

  5. Respiration and respiratory enzyme activity in aerobic and anaerobic cultures of the marine denitrifying bacterium, Pseudomonas perfectomarinus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packard, T. T.; Garfield, P. C.; Martinez, R.

    1983-03-01

    Oxygen consumption, nitrate reduction, respiratory electron transport activity, and nitrate reductase activity were measured in aerobic and anaerobic cultures of the marine bacterium, Pseudomonas perfectomarinus. The respiratory electron transport activity was closely correlated with oxygen consumption ( r = 0.98) in aerobic cultures and nearly as well correlated with nitrate reductase activity ( r = 0.91) and nitrate reduction ( r = 0.85) in anaerobic cultures. It was also well correlated with biomass in both aerobic ( r = 0.99) and anaerobic ( r = 0.94) cultures supporting the use of tetrazolium reduction as an index of living biomass. Time courses of nitrate and nitrate in the anaerobic cultures demonstrated that at nitrate concentrations above 1 mM, denitrification proceeds stepwise. Time courses of pH in anaerobic cultures revealed a rise from 7 to 8.5 during nitrite reduction indicating net proton utilization. This proton utilization is predicted by the stoichiometry of denitrification. Although the experiments were not under 'simulated in situ' conditions, the results are relevant to studies of denitrification, to bacterial ATP production, and to the respiratory activity of marine plankton in the ocean.

  6. Engineering mediator-based electroactivity in the obligate aerobic bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Simone; Nies, Salome; Wierckx, Nick; Blank, Lars M.; Rosenbaum, Miriam A.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida strains are being developed as microbial production hosts for production of a range of amphiphilic and hydrophobic biochemicals. P. putida's obligate aerobic growth thereby can be an economical and technical challenge because it requires constant rigorous aeration and often causes reactor foaming. Here, we engineered a strain of P. putida KT2440 that can produce phenazine redox-mediators from Pseudomonas aeruginosa to allow partial redox balancing with an electrode under oxygen-limited conditions. P. aeruginosa is known to employ its phenazine-type redox mediators for electron exchange with an anode in bioelectrochemical systems (BES). We transferred the seven core phenazine biosynthesis genes phzA-G and the two specific genes phzM and phzS required for pyocyanin synthesis from P. aeruginosa on two inducible plasmids into P. putida KT2440. The best clone, P. putida pPhz, produced 45 mg/L pyocyanin over 25 h of growth, which was visible as blue color formation and is comparable to the pyocyanin production of P. aeruginosa. This new strain was then characterized under different oxygen-limited conditions with electrochemical redox control and changes in central energy metabolism were evaluated in comparison to the unmodified P. putida KT2440. In the new strain, phenazine synthesis with supernatant concentrations up to 33 μg/mL correlated linearly with the ability to discharge electrons to an anode, whereby phenazine-1-carboxylic acid served as the dominating redox mediator. P. putida pPhz sustained strongly oxygen-limited metabolism for up to 2 weeks at up to 12 μA/cm2 anodic current density. Together, this work lays a foundation for future oxygen-limited biocatalysis with P. putida strains. PMID:25914687

  7. Removal of nitrogen by heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification of a phosphate accumulating bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri YG-24.

    PubMed

    Li, Chune; Yang, Jinshui; Wang, Xin; Wang, Entao; Li, Baozhen; He, Ruoxue; Yuan, Hongli

    2015-04-01

    Phosphate accumulating bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri YG-24 exhibited efficient heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification ability. Single factor experiments showed that both heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification occurred with sodium citrate as carbon source and lower C/N ratio of 8. High average NH4(+)-N, NO2(-)-N and NO3(-)-N removal rates of 8.75, 7.51 and 7.73 mg L(-1)h(-1) were achieved. The application of strain YG-24 in wastewater samples resulted in TN, NH4(+)-N, NO2(-)-N, NO3(-)-N and P removal efficiencies of 85.28%, 88.13%, 86.15%, 70.83% and 51.21%. Sequencing and quantitative amplification by real-time PCR of napA, nirS and ppk showed that nitrogen removal pathway of strain YG-24 was achieved through heterotrophic ammonium nitrification coupled with fast nitrite denitrification (NH4(+)-N to NO2(-)-N and then to gaseous nitrogen) directly. These results demonstrated the strain as a suitable candidate to simultaneously remove both nitrogen and phosphate in wastewater treatment.

  8. Acquisition of Fe from Natural Organic Matter by an Aerobic Pseudomonas Bacterium: Siderophores and Cellular Fe Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, K.; Dehner, C.; Dubois, J.; Maurice, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    Aerobic microorganisms have evolved various strategies to acquire nutrient Fe, including release of Fe-chelating siderophores. The potential importance of siderophores in Fe acquisition from natural organic matter (NOM) (reverse osmosis, RO; and XAD-8 samples with naturally associated Fe) was investigated using a wild type strain (WT) of aerobic Pseudomonas mendocina that produces siderophore(s) and an engineered mutant that cannot. Microbial growth under Fe-limited batch conditions was monitored via optical density, and a β-galactosidase biosensor assay was used to quantify cellular Fe status. Both WT and mutant strains acquired Fe from NOM. Fe ‘stress’ in the presence of the RO sample decreased with increasing [Fe] (as determined by different [DOC]s) and was consistently less for the WT. For both WT and mutant, maximum growth in the presence of RO sample increased as: 1 mgC/L (0.2μM Fe) < 100 mgC/L (20μM Fe) < 10 mgC/L (2μM Fe). Comparison of XAD-8 and RO samples ([DOC] varied to give 2μM [Fe]total for each), showed that although there were no apparent differences in internal Fe status, growth was better on the XAD-8 sample. Chelex treatment to partially remove metals associated with the RO sample increased Fe stress but did not substantially affect growth. Results demonstrated that: (1) siderophores are useful but not necessary for Fe acquisition from NOM by P. mendocina and (2) NOM may have complex effects on microbial growth, related not just to Fe content but potentially to the presence of other (trace)metals such as Al and/or to effects on biofilm development.

  9. Potential application of aerobic denitrifying bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PCN-2 in nitrogen oxides (NOx) removal from flue gas.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Maosheng; Li, Can; Liu, Shufeng; Gui, Mengyao; Ni, Jinren

    2016-11-15

    Conventional biological removal of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from flue gas has been severely restricted by the presence of oxygen. This paper presents an efficient alternative for NOx removal at varying oxygen levels using the newly isolated bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa PCN-2 which was capable of aerobic and anoxic denitrification. Interestingly, nitric oxide (NO), as the obligatory intermediate, was negligibly accumulated during nitrate and nitrite reduction. Moreover, normal nitrate reduction with decreasing NO accumulation was realized under O2 concentration ranging from 0 to 100%. Reverse transcription and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis revealed that high efficient NO removal was attributed to the coordinate regulation of gene expressions including napA (for periplasmic nitrate reductase), nirS (for cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase) and cnorB (for NO reductase). Further batch experiments demonstrated the immobilized strain PCN-2 possessed high capability of removing NO and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) at O2 concentration of 0-10%. A biotrickling filter established with present strain achieved high NOx removal efficiencies of 91.94-96.74% at inlet NO concentration of 100-500ppm and O2 concentration of 0-10%, which implied promising potential applications in purifying NOx contaminated flue gas.

  10. Potential application of aerobic denitrifying bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PCN-2 in nitrogen oxides (NOx) removal from flue gas.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Maosheng; Li, Can; Liu, Shufeng; Gui, Mengyao; Ni, Jinren

    2016-11-15

    Conventional biological removal of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from flue gas has been severely restricted by the presence of oxygen. This paper presents an efficient alternative for NOx removal at varying oxygen levels using the newly isolated bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa PCN-2 which was capable of aerobic and anoxic denitrification. Interestingly, nitric oxide (NO), as the obligatory intermediate, was negligibly accumulated during nitrate and nitrite reduction. Moreover, normal nitrate reduction with decreasing NO accumulation was realized under O2 concentration ranging from 0 to 100%. Reverse transcription and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis revealed that high efficient NO removal was attributed to the coordinate regulation of gene expressions including napA (for periplasmic nitrate reductase), nirS (for cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase) and cnorB (for NO reductase). Further batch experiments demonstrated the immobilized strain PCN-2 possessed high capability of removing NO and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) at O2 concentration of 0-10%. A biotrickling filter established with present strain achieved high NOx removal efficiencies of 91.94-96.74% at inlet NO concentration of 100-500ppm and O2 concentration of 0-10%, which implied promising potential applications in purifying NOx contaminated flue gas. PMID:27469045

  11. Adaptation of Aerobically Growing Pseudomonas aeruginosa to Copper Starvation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Frangipani, Emanuela; Slaveykova, Vera I.; Reimmann, Cornelia; Haas, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    Restricted bioavailability of copper in certain environments can interfere with cellular respiration because copper is an essential cofactor of most terminal oxidases. The global response of the metabolically versatile bacterium and opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa to copper limitation was assessed under aerobic conditions. Expression of cioAB (encoding an alternative, copper-independent, cyanide-resistant ubiquinol oxidase) was upregulated, whereas numerous iron uptake functions (including the siderophores pyoverdine and pyochelin) were expressed at reduced levels, presumably reflecting a lower demand for iron by respiratory enzymes. Wild-type P. aeruginosa was able to grow aerobically in a defined glucose medium depleted of copper, whereas a cioAB mutant did not grow. Thus, P. aeruginosa relies on the CioAB enzyme to cope with severe copper deprivation. A quadruple cyo cco1 cco2 cox mutant, which was deleted for all known heme-copper terminal oxidases of P. aeruginosa, grew aerobically, albeit more slowly than did the wild type, indicating that the CioAB enzyme is capable of energy conservation. However, the expression of a cioA′-′lacZ fusion was less dependent on the copper status in the quadruple mutant than in the wild type, suggesting that copper availability might affect cioAB expression indirectly, via the function of the heme-copper oxidases. PMID:18708503

  12. Adaptation of aerobically growing Pseudomonas aeruginosa to copper starvation.

    PubMed

    Frangipani, Emanuela; Slaveykova, Vera I; Reimmann, Cornelia; Haas, Dieter

    2008-10-01

    Restricted bioavailability of copper in certain environments can interfere with cellular respiration because copper is an essential cofactor of most terminal oxidases. The global response of the metabolically versatile bacterium and opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa to copper limitation was assessed under aerobic conditions. Expression of cioAB (encoding an alternative, copper-independent, cyanide-resistant ubiquinol oxidase) was upregulated, whereas numerous iron uptake functions (including the siderophores pyoverdine and pyochelin) were expressed at reduced levels, presumably reflecting a lower demand for iron by respiratory enzymes. Wild-type P. aeruginosa was able to grow aerobically in a defined glucose medium depleted of copper, whereas a cioAB mutant did not grow. Thus, P. aeruginosa relies on the CioAB enzyme to cope with severe copper deprivation. A quadruple cyo cco1 cco2 cox mutant, which was deleted for all known heme-copper terminal oxidases of P. aeruginosa, grew aerobically, albeit more slowly than did the wild type, indicating that the CioAB enzyme is capable of energy conservation. However, the expression of a cioA'-'lacZ fusion was less dependent on the copper status in the quadruple mutant than in the wild type, suggesting that copper availability might affect cioAB expression indirectly, via the function of the heme-copper oxidases. PMID:18708503

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas frederiksbergensis SI8, a Psychrotrophic Aromatic-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lisa M.; Striebich, Richard C.; Mueller, Susan S.; Gunasekera, Thusitha S.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas frederiksbergensis strain SI8 is a psychrotrophic bacterium capable of efficient aerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons. The draft genome of P. frederiksbergensis SI8 is 6.57 Mb in size, with 5,904 coding sequences and 60.5% G+C content. The isopropylbenzene (cumene) degradation pathway is predicted to be present in P. frederiksbergensis SI8. PMID:26184950

  14. Dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides by an Aerobic Bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Maurice, P.

    2004-12-13

    This project investigated the effects of an aerobic Pseudomonas mendocina bacterium on the dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides. The research is important because metals and radionuclides that adsorb to Fe(III)(hydr)oxides could potentially be remobilized by dissolving bacteria. We showed that P. mendocina is capable of dissolving Fe-bearing minerals by a variety of mechanisms, including production of siderophores, pH changes, and formation of reductants. The production of siderophores by P. mendocina was quantified under a variety of growth conditions. Finally, we demonstrated that microbial siderophores may adsorb to and enhance dissolution of clay minerals.

  15. Regulation of dissolved oxygen from accumulated nitrite during the heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification of Pseudomonas stutzeri T13.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yilu; Li, Ang; Zhang, Xuening; Ma, Fang

    2015-04-01

    The nitrogen-removing characteristics of Pseudomonas stutzeri T13, a heterotrophic nitrifying-aerobic denitrifying bacterium, were investigated. The ammonium and nitrate removal of the bacterium was found to reach nearly 100 % at 15 h. However, the total nitrogen (TN) removal rate reached only about 23.47 % because of the dramatic accumulation of nitrite at a high dissolved oxygen (DO) level (160 rpm). The process of nitrite reduction was found to be the bottleneck for the efficiency of aerobic denitrification. Decreasing the shaking speed from 160 to 50 rpm to lower the DO concentration during cultivation was an effective method of improving nitrite utilization because nitrite removal increased from 62.37 to 100 %. The 99.21 % capability of simultaneous heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification with TN removal was achieved at a relatively low DO level (50 rpm). PMID:25417744

  16. Mechanism of biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids in Pseudomonas sp. strain E-3, a psychrotrophic bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.; Fukunaga, N.; Sasaki, S. )

    1989-08-01

    Biosynthesis of palmitic, palmitoleic, and cis-vaccenic acids in Pseudomonas sp. strain E-3 was investigated with in vitro and in vivo systems. (1-{sup 14}C)palmitic acid was aerobically converted to palmitoleate and cis-vaccenate, and the radioactivities on their carboxyl carbons were 100 and 43%, respectively, of the total radioactivity in the fatty acids. Palmitoyl coenzyme A desaturase activity was found in the membrane fraction. (1-{sup 14}C)stearic acid was converted to octadecenoate and C16 fatty acids. The octadecenoate contained oleate and cis-vaccenate, but only oleate was produced in the presence of cerulenin. (1-{sup 14}C)lauric acid was aerobically converted to palmitate, palmitoleate, and cis-vaccenate. Under anaerobic conditions, palmitate (62%), palmitoleate (4%), and cis-vaccenate (34%) were produced from (1-{sup 14}C)acetic acid, while they amounted to 48, 39, and 14%, respectively, under aerobic conditions. In these incorporation experiments, 3 to 19% of the added radioactivity was detected in released {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, indicating that part of the added fatty acids were oxidatively decomposed. Partially purified fatty acid synthetase produced saturated and unsaturated fatty acids with chain lengths of C10 to C18. These results indicated that both aerobic and anaerobic mechanisms for the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acid are operating in this bacterium.

  17. Factors Affecting Zebra Mussel Kill by the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2004-02-24

    The specific purpose of this research project was to identify factors that affect zebra mussel kill by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Test results obtained during this three-year project identified the following key variables as affecting mussel kill: treatment concentration, treatment duration, mussel siphoning activity, dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperature, and naturally suspended particle load. Using this latter information, the project culminated in a series of pipe tests which achieved high mussel kill inside power plants under once-through conditions using service water in artificial pipes.

  18. Aerobic biodegradation of 4-methylquinoline by a soil bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, S D; Pfaller, S L; Shann, J R; Warshawsky, D; Kinkle, B K; Vestal, J R

    1996-01-01

    Methylquinolines and related N-heterocyclic aromatic compounds are common contaminants associated with the use of hydrocarbons in both coal gasification and wood treatment processes. These compounds have been found in groundwater, and many are known mutagens. A stable, five-member bacterial consortium able to degrade 4-methylquinoline was established by selective enrichment using soil collected from an abandoned coal gasification site. The consortium was maintained for 5 years by serial transfer in a medium containing 4-methylquinoline. A gram-negative soil bacterium, strain Lep1, was isolated from the consortium and shown to utilize 4-methylquinoline as a source of carbon and energy during growth in liquid medium. A time course experiment demonstrated that both the isolate Lep1 and the consortium containing Lep1 were able to degrade 4-methylquinoline under aerobic conditions. Complete degradation of 4-methylquinoline by either strain Lep1 alone or the consortium was characterized by the production and eventual disappearance of 2-hydroxy-4-methylquinoline, followed by the appearance and persistence of a second metabolite tentatively identified as a hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin. Currently, there is no indication that 4-methylquinoline degradation proceeds differently in the consortium culture compared with Lep1 alone. This is the first report of 4-methylquinoline biodegradation under aerobic conditions. PMID:8702284

  19. Anaerobic metabolism of phthalate and other aromatic compounds by a denitrifying bacterium. [Pseudomonas sp

    SciTech Connect

    Nozawa, T.; Maruyama, Y. )

    1988-12-01

    The anaerobic metabolism of phthalate and other aromatic compounds by the denitrifying bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain P136 was studied. Benzoate, cyclohex-1-ene-carboxylate, 2-hydroxycyclohexanecarboxylate, and pimelate were detected as predominant metabolic intermediates during the metabolism of three isomers of phthalate, m-hydroxybenzoate, p-hydroxybenzoate, and cyclohex-3-ene-carboxylate. Inducible acyl-coeznyme A synthetase activities for phthalates, benzoate, cyclohex-1-ene-carboxylate, and cyclohex-3-ene-carboxylate were detected in the cells grown on aromatic compounds. Simultaneous adaptation to these aromatic compounds also occurred. A similar phenomenon was observed in the aerobic metabolism of aromatic compounds by this strain. A new pathway for the anaerobic metabolism of phthalate and a series of other aromatic compounds by this strain was proposed. Some properties of the regulation of this pathway were also discussed.

  20. [Characteristics of Nitrogen Removal by a Heterotrophic Nitrification-Aerobic Denitrification Bacterium YL].

    PubMed

    Liang, Xian; Ren, Yong-xiang; Yang, Lei; Zhao, Si-qi; Xia, Zhi-hong

    2015-05-01

    Traditional process of autotrophic nitrification-anaerobic denitrification usually has problems of long procedure and low efficiency. To overcome these problems, a heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterium YL was isolated from a domesticated mature SBR reactor with efficient simultaneous nitrification and denitrification ability, and was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa YL. Meanwhile, the characteristics of the nitrogen removal of strain YL was investigated through single-factor experiments and an orthogonal experiment. The results showed that the preferred conditions were: succinate as the carbon source, C/N ratio of 10, pH of 7.0, temperature of 30°C, and the shaking speed of 160-200 r · min(-1), while the removal rate of ammonia oxidation was 5. 05 mg · (g · h)(-1), the transformation rate of TOC was 45.95 mg · (g · h)(-1), and the removal rates of nitrogen and TOC were 100% and 90.8%, respectively. Nitrite, nitrate and hydroxylamine could also be metabolized by strain YL, and the removal rates were 92.7%, 93.6% and 94.8%, respectively. The most important influencing factor on aerobic denitrification of strain YL was C/N ratio. Under the optimal conditions (C/N = 10, T = 30°C , r = 200 r · min(-1), pH = 7), the removal rates of nitrate and total nitrogen were 94.6% and 76.3%, respectively. Hence, strain YL could remove nitrogen by heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification independently, quickly, and effectively.

  1. Genome Sequence of the Mycorrhizal Helper Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8

    PubMed Central

    Gross, H.; Morin, E.; Karpinets, T.; Utturkar, S.; Mehnaz, S.; Martin, F.; Frey-Klett, P.; Labbé, J.

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of the mycorrhizal helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain BBc6R8. This is the first genome of a mycorrhizal helper bacterium. The draft genome contains 6,952,353 bp and is predicted to encode 6,317 open reading frames. Comparative genomic analyses will help to identify helper traits. PMID:24407649

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain RB, a Bacterium Capable of Synthesizing Cadmium Selenide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ayano, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Masashi; Soda, Satoshi; Ike, Michihiko

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RB is a bacterium capable of synthesizing cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles and was isolated from a soil sample. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa strain RB. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a draft genome of a CdSe-synthesizing bacterium.

  3. Effect of tannic acid on the transcriptome of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tannins are plant-produced organic compounds that are found in soils, are able to sequester iron, and have antimicrobial properties. We studied the effect of tannic acid on the molecular physiology of the soil-inhabiting biocontrol bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (formerly Pseudomonas fluoresce...

  4. Trace Metal Sequestration by the Manganese Oxidizing Bacterium Pseudomonas putida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, B.; Manceau, A.; Marcus, M. A.; Sposito, G.

    2002-12-01

    Bacterial cells are an important source of chemically reactive surfaces in freshwater and soil environments. Pseudomonas putida strain MnB1 cells, like many gram negative bacteria, present an outer membrane studded with phosphate groups and carbohydrates as well as a billowing biofilm of extracellular polysaccharides to the surrounding microenvironment. The cell outer membrane and the biofilm possess functional groups that complex trace metals. During certain growth phases P. putida is also a manganese oxidizing bacterium, causing the cells to coat themselves in Mn(IV) oxide. Therefore, in addition to the cell outer membrane and associated biofilm, trace metals may sorb to the biogenic Mn oxide. To explore the relative contributions to trace metal sorption by the bacterial cells and biogenic Mn oxide, zinc and nickel were added to suspensions of bacterial cells with three different conditions: cells in the absence of Mn, cells in the process of Mn oxidation and cells with preformed biogenic Mn oxide. Adsorption isotherms were measured to quantify Zn and Ni sorption to P. putida in the presence and absence of biogenic Mn oxide. Zinc and Ni K-edge EXAFS spectra were measured to determine how and where the metals were binding to the bacterial cells and biogenic Mn oxide. The Zn and Ni adsorption isotherms exhibited two plateaus. The metal complexation was dependent on concentration with Zn having a higher affinity for phosphate and Ni for carboxyl functional groups. The preformed biogenic Mn oxide has high affinity for Zn and Ni and the bacterial surface contributed little to metal removal from solution under these conditions. However, if the metal is present in solution while Mn oxidation is occurring the bacterial cell surface influences greatly the overall removal of metal. Manganese oxidizing bacteria such as P. putida contribute to environmental metal sequestration by catalyzing the production of Mn oxide minerals, and the bacterial cells are themselves reactive

  5. Denitrification by a soil bacterium with phthalate and other aromatic compounds as substrates. [Pseudomonas sp. strain P136

    SciTech Connect

    Nozawa, T.; Maruyama, Y.

    1988-06-01

    A soil bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. strain P136, was isolated by selective enrichment for anaerobic utilization of o-phthalate through nitrate respiration. o-Phthalate, m-phthalate, p-phthalate, benzoate, cyclohex-1-ene-carboxylate, and cyclohex-3-ene-carboxylate were utilized by this strain under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. m-Hydroxybenzoate and p-hydroxybenzoate were utilized only under anaerobic conditions. Cells grown anaerobically on one of these aromatic compounds also utilized all other aromatic compounds as substrates for denitrification without a lag period. On the other hand, cells grown on succinate utilized aromatic compounds after a lag period. Anaerobic growth on these substrates was dependent on the presence of nitrate and accompanied by the production of molecular nitrogen. The reduction of nitrite to nitrous oxide and the reduction of nitrous oxide to molecular nitrogen were also supported by anaerobic utilization of these aromatic compounds in this strain. Aerobically grown cells showed a lag period in denitrification with all substrates tested. Cells grown anaerobically on aromatic compounds also consumed oxygen. No lag period was observed for oxygen consumption during the transition period from anaerobic to aerobic conditions. Cells grown aerobically on one of these aromatic compounds were also adapted to utilize other aromatic compounds as substrates for respiration. However, cells grown on succinate showed a lag period during respiration with aromatic compounds.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of the p-Nitrophenol-Degrading Bacterium Pseudomonas putida DLL-E4

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaojun; Wang, Jue; Wang, Fei; Chen, Qiongzhen; Huang, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The first complete genome sequence of a p-nitrophenol (PNP)-degrading bacterium is reported here. Pseudomonas putida DLL-E4, a Gram-negative bacterium isolated from methyl-parathion-polluted soil, can utilize PNP as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. P. putida DLL-E4 has a 6,484,062 bp circular chromosome that contains 5,894 genes, with a G+C content of 62.46%. PMID:24948765

  7. PSEUDOMONAS NATRIEGENS, A MARINE BACTERIUM WITH A GENERATION TIME OF LESS THAN 10 MINUTES

    PubMed Central

    Eagon, R. G.

    1962-01-01

    Eagon, R. G. (University of Georgia, Athens). Pseudomonas natriegens, a marine bacterium with a generation time of less than 10 minutes. J. Bacteriol. 83:736–737. 1962.—Pseudomonas natriegens, a marine microorganism, was demonstrated to have a generation time of 9.8 min. This is the shortest generation time reported to date. Optimal growth occurred at 37 C in brain heart infusion broth supplemented with 1.5% sea salt. PMID:13888946

  8. Genome sequence of the mycorrhizal helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8

    SciTech Connect

    Deveau, Aurelie; Grob, Harald; Morin, Emmanuelle; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Utturkar, Sagar M; Mehnaz, Samina; Kurz, Sven; Martin, Francis; Frey-Klett, Pascale; Labbe, Jessy L

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of the mycorrhiza helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain BBc6R8 . Several traits which could be involved in the mycorrhiza helper ability of the bacterial strain such as multiple secretion systems, auxin metabolism and phosphate mobilization were evidenced in the genome.

  9. Aerobic Degradation of N-Methyl-4-Nitroaniline (MNA) by Pseudomonas sp. Strain FK357 Isolated from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fazlurrahman; Vyas, Bhawna; Pal, Deepika; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    N-Methyl-4-nitroaniline (MNA) is used as an additive to lower the melting temperature of energetic materials in the synthesis of insensitive explosives. Although the biotransformation of MNA under anaerobic condition has been reported, its aerobic microbial degradation has not been documented yet. A soil microcosms study showed the efficient aerobic degradation of MNA by the inhabitant soil microorganisms. An aerobic bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. strain FK357, able to utilize MNA as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source, was isolated from soil microcosms. HPLC and GC-MS analysis of the samples obtained from growth and resting cell studies showed the formation of 4-nitroaniline (4-NA), 4-aminophenol (4-AP), and 1, 2, 4-benzenetriol (BT) as major metabolic intermediates in the MNA degradation pathway. Enzymatic assay carried out on cell-free lysates of MNA grown cells confirmed N-demethylation reaction is the first step of MNA degradation with the formation of 4-NA and formaldehyde products. Flavin-dependent transformation of 4-NA to 4-AP in cell extracts demonstrated that the second step of MNA degradation is a monooxygenation. Furthermore, conversion of 4-AP to BT by MNA grown cells indicates the involvement of oxidative deamination (release of NH2 substituent) reaction in third step of MNA degradation. Subsequent degradation of BT occurs by the action of benzenetriol 1, 2-dioxygenase as reported for the degradation of 4-nitrophenol. This is the first report on aerobic degradation of MNA by a single bacterium along with elucidation of metabolic pathway. PMID:24116023

  10. Engineering the Soil Bacterium Pseudomonas putida for Arsenic Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Qin, Jie; Zhu, Yong-Guan; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of arsenic has potential health risks through consumption of food. Here, we inserted the arsenite [As(III)] S-adenosylmethionine methyltransferase (ArsM) gene into the chromosome of Pseudomonas putida KT2440. Recombinant bacteria methylate inorganic arsenic into less toxic organoarsenicals. This has the potential for bioremediation of environmental arsenic and reducing arsenic contamination in food. PMID:23645194

  11. Pseudomonas prosekii sp. nov., a novel psychrotrophic bacterium from Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Kosina, Marcel; Barták, Miloš; Mašlaňová, Ivana; Pascutti, Andrea Vávrová; Sedo, Ondrej; Lexa, Matej; Sedláček, Ivo

    2013-12-01

    During Czech expeditions at James Ross Island, Antarctica, in the years 2007-2009, the bacterial diversity of the genus Pseudomonas was studied. Twelve fluorescent Pseudomonas strains were isolated from various samples and were subjected to a detailed taxonomic study. A polyphasic approach included genotypic and phenotypic analyses. The genotypic analysis involved sequencing of rrs, rpoB and rpoD genes, DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) studies as well as manual ribotyping using HindIII endonuclease. The phenotypic characterization included conventional tests as well as biotyping using the Biolog system, protein profiling by SDS-PAGE, and MALDI-TOF MS analysis. Our taxonomic study revealed that all isolates belonged to the same Pseudomonas species with psychrotrophic growth not exceeding 37 °C. The cultures showed a unique position among the phylogenetically related pseudomonads. DDH experiment between the proposed type strain of the antarctic isolates and the closest neighbour P. arsenicoxydans CCM 8423(T) showed only 40.9-50.1 % similarity, thus confirming that the characterized strains do not belong to the P. arsenicoxydans species. According to the results obtained we propose the name P. prosekii sp. nov. for this novel Pseudomonas taxon with type strain AN/28/1(T) (=CCM 7990(T) and LMG 26867(T)). PMID:23794042

  12. [Heterotrophic Nitrification and Aerobic Denitrification of the Hypothermia Aerobic Denitrification Bacterium: Arthrobacter arilaitensis].

    PubMed

    He, Teng-xia; Ni, Jiu-pai; Li, Zhen-lun; Sun, Quan; Ye Qing; Xu, Yi

    2016-03-15

    High concentrations of ammonium, nitrate and nitrite nitrogen were employed to clarify the abilities of heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification of Arthrobacter arilaitensis strain Y-10. Meanwhile, by means of inoculating the strain suspension into the mixed ammonium and nitrate, ammonium and nitrite nitrogen simulated wastewater, we studied the simultaneous nitrification and denitrification ability of Arthrobacter arilaitensis strain Y-10. In addition, cell optical density was assayed in each nitrogen removal process to analyze the relationship of cell growth and nitrogen removal efficiency. The results showed that the hypothermia denitrification strain Arthrobacter arilaitensis Y-10 exhibited high nitrogen removal efficiency during heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification. The ammonium, nitrate and nitrite removal rates were 65.0%, 100% and 61.2% respectively when strain Y-10 was cultivated for 4 d at 15°C with initial ammonium, nitrate and nitrite nitrogen concentrations of 208.43 mg · L⁻¹, 201.16 mg · L⁻¹ and 194.33 mg · L⁻¹ and initial pH of 7.2. Nitrite nitrogen could only be accumulated in the medium containing nitrate nitrogen during heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification process. Additionally, the ammonium nitrogen was mainly removed in the inorganic nitrogen mixed synthetic wastewater. In short, Arthrobacter arilaitensis Y-10 could conduct nitrification and denitrification effectively under aerobic condition and the ammonium nitrogen removal rate was more than 80.0% in the inorganic nitrogen mixed synthetic wastewater. PMID:27337904

  13. Aerobic Reduction of Arsenate by a Bacterium Isolated From Activated Sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozai, N.; Ohnuki, T.; Hanada, S.; Nakamura, K.; Francis, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    Microlunatus phosphovorus strain NM-1 is a polyphosphate-accumulating bacterium isolated from activated sludge. This bacterium takes up a large amount of polyphosphate under aerobic conditions and release phosphate ions by hydrolysis of polyphosphate to orthophosphate under anaerobic conditions to derive energy for taking up substrates. To understand the nature of this strain, especially, influence of potential contaminants in sewage and wastewater on growth, we have been investigating behavior of this bacterium in media containing arsenic. The present paper mainly reports reduction of arsenate by this bacterium under aerobic conditions. The strain NM-1 (JCM 9379) was aerobically cultured at 30 °C in a nutrient medium containing 2.5 g/l peptone, 0.5 g/l glucose, 1.5 g/l yeast extract, and arsenic [Na2HAsO4 (As(V)) or Na3AsO3 (As(III))] at concentrations between 0 and 50 mM. The cells collected from arsenic-free media were dispersed in buffer solutions containing 2mM HEPES, 10mM NaCl, prescribed concentrations of As(V), and 0-0.2 percent glucose. Then, this cell suspension was kept at 20 °C under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. The speciation of arsenic was carried out by ion chromatography and ICP-MS. The growth of the strain under aerobic conditions was enhanced by the addition of As(V) at the concentration between 1 and 10 mM. The maximum optical density of the culture in the medium containing 5mM As(V) was 1.4 times greater than that of the control culture. Below the As(V) concentration of 10mM, most of the As(V) was reduced to As(III). The growth of the strain under anaerobic conditions has not been observed so far. The cells in the buffer solutions reduced As(V) under aerobic condition. The reduction was enhanced by the addition of glucose. However, the cell did not reduce As(V) under anaerobic conditions. The strain NM-1 showed high resistance to As(V) and As(III). The maximum optical density of the culture grown in a medium containing 50 mM As(V) was only

  14. Differential Isotopic Fractionation during Cr(VI) Reduction by an Aquifer-Derived Bacterium under Aerobic versus Denitrifying Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Han, R.; Qin, L.; Brown, S. T.; Christensen, J. N.; Beller, H. R.

    2012-01-27

    We studied Cr isotopic fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain RCH2. Finally, despite the fact that strain RCH2 reduces Cr(VI) cometabolically under both aerobic and denitrifying conditions and at similar specific rates, fractionation was markedly different under these two conditions (ε was ~2‰ aerobically and ~0.4‰ under denitrifying conditions).

  15. Effect of tannic acid on the transcriptome of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chee Kent; Penesyan, Anahit; Hassan, Karl A; Loper, Joyce E; Paulsen, Ian T

    2013-05-01

    Tannins are a diverse group of plant-produced, polyphenolic compounds with metal-chelating and antimicrobial properties that are prevalent in many soils. Using transcriptomics, we determined that tannic acid, a form of hydrolysable tannin, broadly affects the expression of genes involved in iron and zinc homeostases, sulfur metabolism, biofilm formation, motility, and secondary metabolite biosynthesis in the soil- and rhizosphere-inhabiting bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5.

  16. Effect of Tannic Acid on the Transcriptome of the Soil Bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chee Kent; Penesyan, Anahit; Hassan, Karl A.

    2013-01-01

    Tannins are a diverse group of plant-produced, polyphenolic compounds with metal-chelating and antimicrobial properties that are prevalent in many soils. Using transcriptomics, we determined that tannic acid, a form of hydrolysable tannin, broadly affects the expression of genes involved in iron and zinc homeostases, sulfur metabolism, biofilm formation, motility, and secondary metabolite biosynthesis in the soil- and rhizosphere-inhabiting bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5. PMID:23435890

  17. Isolation and biological characteristics of aerobic marine magnetotactic bacterium YSC-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jun; Pan, Hongmiao; Yue, Haidong; Song, Tao; Zhao, Yong; Chen, Guanjun; Wu, Longfei; Xiao, Tian

    2006-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria have become a hot spot of research in microbiology attracting intensive interest of researchers in multiple disciplinary fields. However, the studies were limited in few fastidious bacteria. The objective of this study aims at isolating new marine magnetic bacteria and better comprehension of magnetotactic bacteria. In this study, an aerobic magnetotactic bacterium YSC-1 was isolated from sediments in the Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass (YSCWM). In TEM, magnetic cells have one or several circular magnetosomes in diameter of 100nm, and consist of Fe and Co shown on energy dispersive X-ray spectrum. The biological and physiological characteristics of this bacterium were also described. The colour of YSC-1 colony is white in small rod. The gram stain is negative. Results showed that Strain YSC-1 differs from microaerophile magnetotactic bacteria MS-1 and WD-1 in biology.

  18. Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, a halophilic bacterium producing acetone, butanol, and ethanol under aerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Hamid; Azarbaijani, Reza; Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Abolhassan; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Hosseini Salekdeh, Ghasem; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2016-01-01

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, which was isolated from Aran-Bidgol Lake (Iran), has the ability to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) as well as acetic and butyric acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This result is the first report of ABE production with a wild microorganism from a family other than Clostridia and also the first halophilic species shown to produce butanol under aerobic cultivation. The cultivation of Nesterenkonia sp. strain F under anaerobic conditions with 50 g/l of glucose for 72 h resulted in the production of 105 mg/l of butanol, 122 mg/l of acetone, 0.2 g/l of acetic acid, and 2.5 g/l of butyric acid. Furthermore, the strain was cultivated on media with different glucose concentrations (20, 50, and 80 g/l) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Through fermentation with a 50 g/l initial glucose concentration under aerobic conditions, 66 mg/l of butanol, 125 mg/l of acetone, 291 mg/l of ethanol, 5.9 g/l of acetic acid, and 1.2 g/l of butyric acid were produced. The enzymes pertaining to the fermentation pathway in the strain were compared with the enzymes of Clostridium spp., and the metabolic pathway of fermentation used by Nesterenkonia sp. strain F was investigated. PMID:26725518

  19. Siderophore cooperation of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens in soil

    PubMed Central

    Luján, Adela M.; Gómez, Pedro; Buckling, Angus

    2015-01-01

    While social interactions play an important role for the evolution of bacterial siderophore production in vitro, the extent to which siderophore production is a social trait in natural populations is less clear. Here, we demonstrate that siderophores act as public goods in a natural physical environment of Pseudomonas fluorescens: soil-based compost. We show that monocultures of siderophore producers grow better than non-producers in soil, but non-producers can exploit others' siderophores, as shown by non-producers' ability to invade populations of producers when rare. Despite this rare advantage, non-producers were unable to outcompete producers, suggesting that producers and non-producers may stably coexist in soil. Such coexistence is predicted to arise from the spatial structure associated with soil, and this is supported by increased fitness of non-producers when grown in a shaken soil–water mix. Our results suggest that both producers and non-producers should be observed in soil, as has been observed in marine environments and in clinical populations. PMID:25694506

  20. Siderophore cooperation of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens in soil.

    PubMed

    Luján, Adela M; Gómez, Pedro; Buckling, Angus

    2015-02-01

    While social interactions play an important role for the evolution of bacterial siderophore production in vitro, the extent to which siderophore production is a social trait in natural populations is less clear. Here, we demonstrate that siderophores act as public goods in a natural physical environment of Pseudomonas fluorescens: soil-based compost. We show that monocultures of siderophore producers grow better than non-producers in soil, but non-producers can exploit others' siderophores, as shown by non-producers' ability to invade populations of producers when rare. Despite this rare advantage, non-producers were unable to outcompete producers, suggesting that producers and non-producers may stably coexist in soil. Such coexistence is predicted to arise from the spatial structure associated with soil, and this is supported by increased fitness of non-producers when grown in a shaken soil-water mix. Our results suggest that both producers and non-producers should be observed in soil, as has been observed in marine environments and in clinical populations. PMID:25694506

  1. Evaluation of nitrate removal by continuous culturing of an aerobic denitrifying bacterium, Paracoccus pantotrophus.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa-Kurisu, K; Otani, Y; Hanaki, K

    2006-01-01

    Nitrate removal under aerobic conditions was investigated using pure cultures of Paracoccus pantotrophus, which is a well-known aerobic-denitrifying (AD) bacterium. When a high concentration of cultures with a high carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio was preserved at the beginning of batch experiments, subsequently added nitrate was completely removed. When continuous culturing was perpetuated, a high nitrate removal rate (66.5%) was observed on day 4 post-culture, although gradual decreases in AD ability with time were observed. The attenuation in AD ability was probably caused by carbon limitation, because when carbon concentration of inflow water was doubled, nitrate removal efficiency improved from 18.1% to 59.6%. Bacterial community analysis using the polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) method showed that P. pantotrophus disappeared in the suspended medium on day 8 post-culture, whereas other bacterial communities dominated by Acidovorax sp. appeared. Interestingly, this replaced bacterial community also showed AD ability. As P. pantotrophus was detected as attached colonies around the membrane and bottom of the reactor, this bacterium can therefore be introduced in a fixed form for treatment of wastewater containing nitrate with a high C/N ratio. PMID:17163031

  2. Complete genome sequence of the cyanide-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344.

    PubMed

    Wibberg, Daniel; Luque-Almagro, Víctor M; Igeño, Ma Isabel; Bremges, Andreas; Roldán, Ma Dolores; Merchán, Faustino; Sáez, Lara P; Guijo, Ma Isabel; Manso, Ma Isabel; Macías, Daniel; Cabello, Purificación; Becerra, Gracia; Ibáñez, Ma Isabel; Carmona, Ma Isabel; Escribano, Ma María Paz; Castillo, Francisco; Sczyrba, Alexander; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado; Blasco, Rafael; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas

    2014-04-10

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344, a Gram-negative bacterium isolated from the Guadalquir River (Córdoba, Spain), is able to utilize different cyano-derivatives. Here, the complete genome sequence of P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 harboring a 4,686,340bp circular chromosome encoding 4513 genes and featuring a GC-content of 62.34% is reported. Necessarily, remaining gaps in the genome had to be closed by assembly of few long reads obtained from PacBio single molecule real-time sequencing. Here, the first complete genome sequence for the species P. pseudoalcaligenes is presented. PMID:24553071

  3. Aerobic biodegradation pathway for Remazol Orange by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Sarayu, K; Sandhya, S

    2010-02-01

    Removal of azo dyes from effluent generated by textile industries is rather difficult. Azo dyes represent a major class of synthetic colorants that are mutagenic and carcinogenic. Pseudomonas aeruginosa grew well in the presence of Remazol Orange (RO) and was able to decolorize and degrade it. In the present study, the decolorization and degradation efficiency using single culture P. aeruginosa with RO and textile wastewaters is studied. The elucidation of decolorization pathway for P. aeruginosa is of special interest. The degradation pathway and the metabolic products formed during the degradation were also predicted with the help of high performance liquid chromatography, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis. The data show the cleavage of the azo dye RO to form both methyl metanilic acid and 4-aminobenzoic acid after decolorization and finally to oxidation forms benzoic acid, alkenes, aldehydes, and alkynes. The organism was able to decolorize the dye RO and wastewater effectively to the maximum of 82.4% and 62%, respectively.

  4. Metabolism of 2-Methylpropene (Isobutylene) by the Aerobic Bacterium Mycobacterium sp. Strain ELW1

    PubMed Central

    Kottegoda, Samanthi; Waligora, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    An aerobic bacterium (Mycobacterium sp. strain ELW1) that utilizes 2-methylpropene (isobutylene) as a sole source of carbon and energy was isolated and characterized. Strain ELW1 grew on 2-methylpropene (growth rate = 0.05 h−1) with a yield of 0.38 mg (dry weight) mg 2-methylpropene−1. Strain ELW1 also grew more slowly on both cis- and trans-2-butene but did not grow on any other C2 to C5 straight-chain, branched, or chlorinated alkenes tested. Resting 2-methylpropene-grown cells consumed ethene, propene, and 1-butene without a lag phase. Epoxyethane accumulated as the only detected product of ethene oxidation. Both alkene consumption and epoxyethane production were fully inhibited in cells exposed to 1-octyne, suggesting that alkene oxidation is initiated by an alkyne-sensitive, epoxide-generating monooxygenase. Kinetic analyses indicated that 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane is rapidly consumed during 2-methylpropene degradation, while 2-methyl-2-propen-1-ol is not a significant metabolite of 2-methylpropene catabolism. Degradation of 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane by 2-methylpropene-grown cells led to the accumulation and further degradation of 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate, two sequential metabolites previously identified in the aerobic microbial metabolism of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). Growth of strain ELW1 on 2-methylpropene, 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane, 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol, and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate was fully inhibited when cobalt ions were omitted from the growth medium, while growth on 3-hydroxybutyrate and other substrates was unaffected by the absence of added cobalt ions. Our results suggest that, like aerobic MTBE- and TBA-metabolizing bacteria, strain ELW1 utilizes a cobalt/cobalamin-dependent mutase to transform 2-hydroxyisobutyrate. Our results have been interpreted in terms of their impact on our understanding of the microbial metabolism of alkenes and ether oxygenates. PMID:25576605

  5. Physiological factors affecting carbon tetrachloride dehalogenation by the denitrifying bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain KC.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, T A; Crawford, R L

    1993-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain KC was grown on a medium with a low content of transition metals in order to examine the conditions for carbon tetrachloride (CT) transformation. Several carbon sources, including acetate, glucose, glycerol, and glutamate, were able to support CT transformation. The chelators 2,2'-dipyridyl and 1,10-phenanthroline stimulated CT transformation in a rich medium that otherwise did not support this activity. Low (< 10 microM) additions of dissolved iron(II), iron(III), and cobalt(II), as well as an insoluble iron(III) compound, ferric oxyhydroxide, inhibited CT transformation. The addition of 50 microM iron to actively growing cultures resulted in delayed inhibition of CT transformation. CT transformation was seen in aerobic cultures of KC, but with reduced efficiency compared with denitrifying cultures. Inhibition of CT transformation by iron was also seen in aerobically grown cultures. Optimal conditions were used in searching for effective CT transformation activity among denitrifying enrichments grown from samples of aquifer material. No activity comparable to that of Pseudomonas sp. strain KC was found among 16 samples tested. PMID:8517754

  6. The complete genome sequence of the plant growth-promoting bacterium Pseudomonas sp. UW4.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jin; Jiang, Wei; Cheng, Zhenyu; Heikkila, John J; Glick, Bernard R

    2013-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Pseudomonas sp. UW4, previously isolated from the rhizosphere of common reeds growing on the campus of the University of Waterloo, promotes plant growth in the presence of different environmental stresses, such as flooding, high concentrations of salt, cold, heavy metals, drought and phytopathogens. In this work, the genome sequence of UW4 was obtained by pyrosequencing and the gaps between the contigs were closed by directed PCR. The P. sp. UW4 genome contains a single circular chromosome that is 6,183,388 bp with a 60.05% G+C content. The bacterial genome contains 5,423 predicted protein-coding sequences that occupy 87.2% of the genome. Nineteen genomic islands (GIs) were predicted and thirty one complete putative insertion sequences were identified. Genes potentially involved in plant growth promotion such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis, trehalose production, siderophore production, acetoin synthesis, and phosphate solubilization were determined. Moreover, genes that contribute to the environmental fitness of UW4 were also observed including genes responsible for heavy metal resistance such as nickel, copper, cadmium, zinc, molybdate, cobalt, arsenate, and chromate. Whole-genome comparison with other completely sequenced Pseudomonas strains and phylogeny of four concatenated "housekeeping" genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD) of 128 Pseudomonas strains revealed that UW4 belongs to the fluorescens group, jessenii subgroup. PMID:23516524

  7. Hydroxybutyrate prevents protein aggregation in the halotolerant bacterium Pseudomonas sp. CT13 under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Soto, Gabriela; Setten, Lorena; Lisi, Christian; Maurelis, Camila; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Angeletti, Mauro; Ayub, Nicolás Daniel

    2012-05-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), a typical carbon and energy storage compound, is widely found in Bacteria and Archae domains. This polymer is produced in response to conditions of physiological stress. PHB is composed of repeating units of β-hydroxybutyrate (R-3HB). It has been previously shown that R-3HB functions as an osmolyte in extremophile strains. In this study, Pseudomonas sp. CT13, a halotolerant bacterium, and its PHB synthase-minus mutant (phaC) were used to analyze the chaperone role of R-3HB. The production of this compound was found to be essential to salt stress resistance and positively correlated with salt concentration, suggesting that PHB monomer acts as a compatible solute in Pseudomonas sp. CT13. R-3HB accumulation was also associated with the prevention of protein aggregation under combined salt and thermal stresses in Pseudomonas sp. CT13. Physiological concentrations of R-3HB efficiently reduced citrate synthase (CS) aggregation and stabilized the enzymatic activities of CS during thermal stress. Docking analysis of the CS/R-3HB interaction predicted the stability of this complex under physiological concentrations of R-3HB. Thus, in vivo, in vitro and in silico analyses suggest that R-3HB can act as a chemical chaperone. PMID:22527039

  8. The complete genome sequence of the plant growth-promoting bacterium Pseudomonas sp. UW4.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jin; Jiang, Wei; Cheng, Zhenyu; Heikkila, John J; Glick, Bernard R

    2013-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Pseudomonas sp. UW4, previously isolated from the rhizosphere of common reeds growing on the campus of the University of Waterloo, promotes plant growth in the presence of different environmental stresses, such as flooding, high concentrations of salt, cold, heavy metals, drought and phytopathogens. In this work, the genome sequence of UW4 was obtained by pyrosequencing and the gaps between the contigs were closed by directed PCR. The P. sp. UW4 genome contains a single circular chromosome that is 6,183,388 bp with a 60.05% G+C content. The bacterial genome contains 5,423 predicted protein-coding sequences that occupy 87.2% of the genome. Nineteen genomic islands (GIs) were predicted and thirty one complete putative insertion sequences were identified. Genes potentially involved in plant growth promotion such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis, trehalose production, siderophore production, acetoin synthesis, and phosphate solubilization were determined. Moreover, genes that contribute to the environmental fitness of UW4 were also observed including genes responsible for heavy metal resistance such as nickel, copper, cadmium, zinc, molybdate, cobalt, arsenate, and chromate. Whole-genome comparison with other completely sequenced Pseudomonas strains and phylogeny of four concatenated "housekeeping" genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD) of 128 Pseudomonas strains revealed that UW4 belongs to the fluorescens group, jessenii subgroup.

  9. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium Pseudomonas sp. UW4

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jin; Jiang, Wei; Cheng, Zhenyu; Heikkila, John J.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2013-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Pseudomonas sp. UW4, previously isolated from the rhizosphere of common reeds growing on the campus of the University of Waterloo, promotes plant growth in the presence of different environmental stresses, such as flooding, high concentrations of salt, cold, heavy metals, drought and phytopathogens. In this work, the genome sequence of UW4 was obtained by pyrosequencing and the gaps between the contigs were closed by directed PCR. The P. sp. UW4 genome contains a single circular chromosome that is 6,183,388 bp with a 60.05% G+C content. The bacterial genome contains 5,423 predicted protein-coding sequences that occupy 87.2% of the genome. Nineteen genomic islands (GIs) were predicted and thirty one complete putative insertion sequences were identified. Genes potentially involved in plant growth promotion such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis, trehalose production, siderophore production, acetoin synthesis, and phosphate solubilization were determined. Moreover, genes that contribute to the environmental fitness of UW4 were also observed including genes responsible for heavy metal resistance such as nickel, copper, cadmium, zinc, molybdate, cobalt, arsenate, and chromate. Whole-genome comparison with other completely sequenced Pseudomonas strains and phylogeny of four concatenated “housekeeping” genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD) of 128 Pseudomonas strains revealed that UW4 belongs to the fluorescens group, jessenii subgroup. PMID:23516524

  10. Chemotactic Motility of Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 under Aerobic and Denitrification Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; Rivilla, Rafael; Martín, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The sequence of the genome of Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 has shown the presence of multiple traits relevant for rhizosphere colonization and plant growth promotion. Among these traits are denitrification and chemotactic motility. Besides aerobic growth, F113 is able to grow anaerobically using nitrate and nitrite as final electron acceptors. F113 is able to perform swimming motility under aerobic conditions and under anaerobic conditions when nitrate is used as the electron acceptor. However, nitrite can not support swimming motility. Regulation of swimming motility is similar under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, since mutants that are hypermotile under aerobic conditions, such as gacS, sadB, kinB, algU and wspR, are also hypermotile under anaerobic conditions. However, chemotactic behavior is different under aerobic and denitrification conditions. Unlike most pseudomonads, the F113 genome encode three complete chemotaxis systems, Che1, Che2 and Che3. Mutations in each of the cheA genes of the three Che systems has shown that the three systems are functional and independent. Mutation of the cheA1 gene completely abolished swimming motility both under aerobic and denitrification conditions. Mutation of the cheA2 gene, showed only a decrease in swimming motility under both conditions, indicating that this system is not essential for chemotactic motility but is necessary for optimal motility. Mutation of the cheA3 gene abolished motility under denitrification conditions but only produced a decrease in motility under aerobic conditions. The three Che systems proved to be implicated in competitive rhizosphere colonization, being the cheA1 mutant the most affected. PMID:26161531

  11. Deciphering the genetic determinants for aerobic nicotinic acid degradation: the nic cluster from Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, José I; Canales, Angeles; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Rychlewski, Leszek; García, José L; Díaz, Eduardo

    2008-08-12

    The aerobic catabolism of nicotinic acid (NA) is considered a model system for degradation of N-heterocyclic aromatic compounds, some of which are major environmental pollutants; however, the complete set of genes as well as the structural-functional relationships of most of the enzymes involved in this process are still unknown. We have characterized a gene cluster (nic genes) from Pseudomonas putida KT2440 responsible for the aerobic NA degradation in this bacterium and when expressed in heterologous hosts. The biochemistry of the NA degradation through the formation of 2,5-dihydroxypyridine and maleamic acid has been revisited, and some gene products become the prototype of new types of enzymes with unprecedented molecular architectures. Thus, the initial hydroxylation of NA is catalyzed by a two-component hydroxylase (NicAB) that constitutes the first member of the xanthine dehydrogenase family whose electron transport chain to molecular oxygen includes a cytochrome c domain. The Fe(2+)-dependent dioxygenase (NicX) converts 2,5-dihydroxypyridine into N-formylmaleamic acid, and it becomes the founding member of a new family of extradiol ring-cleavage dioxygenases. Further conversion of N-formylmaleamic acid to formic and maleamic acid is catalyzed by the NicD protein, the only deformylase described so far whose catalytic triad is similar to that of some members of the alpha/beta-hydrolase fold superfamily. This work allows exploration of the existence of orthologous gene clusters in saprophytic bacteria and some pathogens, where they might stimulate studies on their role in virulence, and it provides a framework to develop new biotechnological processes for detoxification/biotransformation of N-heterocyclic aromatic compounds.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas putida JLR11, a Facultative Anaerobic 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene Biotransforming Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Javier; Udaondo, Zulema; Molina, Lazaro; Segura, Ana; Esteve-Núñez, Abraham; Caballero, Antonio; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan Luis; van Dillewijn, Pieter

    2015-09-03

    We report the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas putida JLR11, a facultative anaerobic bacterium that has been studied in detail for its capacity to use the explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) as a nitrogen source. The sequence confirms the mechanisms used by this versatile strain to reduce and assimilate nitrogen from TNT.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas putida JLR11, a Facultative Anaerobic 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene Biotransforming Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Javier; Udaondo, Zulema; Molina, Lazaro; Segura, Ana; Esteve-Núñez, Abraham; Caballero, Antonio; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas putida JLR11, a facultative anaerobic bacterium that has been studied in detail for its capacity to use the explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) as a nitrogen source. The sequence confirms the mechanisms used by this versatile strain to reduce and assimilate nitrogen from TNT. PMID:26337875

  14. Degradation of vinyl acetate by soil, sewage, sludge, and the newly isolated aerobic bacterium V2.

    PubMed Central

    Nieder, M; Sunarko, B; Meyer, O

    1990-01-01

    Vinyl acetate is subject to microbial degradation in the environment and by pure cultures. It was hydrolyzed by samples of soil, sludge, and sewage at rates of up to 6.38 and 1 mmol/h per g (dry weight) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. Four yeasts and thirteen bacteria that feed aerobically on vinyl acetate were isolated. The pathway of vinyl acetate degradation was studied in bacterium V2. Vinyl acetate was degraded to acetate as follows: vinyl acetate + NAD(P)+----2 acetate + NAD(P)H + H+. The acetate was then converted to acetyl coenzyme A and oxidized through the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the glyoxylate bypass. The key enzyme of the pathway is vinyl acetate esterase, which hydrolyzed the ester to acetate and vinyl alcohol. The latter isomerized spontaneously to acetaldehyde and was then converted to acetate. The acetaldehyde was disproportionated into ethanol and acetate. The enzymes involved in the metabolism of vinyl acetate were studied in extracts. Vinyl acetate esterase (Km = 6.13 mM) was also active with indoxyl acetate (Km = 0.98 mM), providing the basis for a convenient spectrophotometric test. Substrates of aldehyde dehydrogenase were formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, and butyraldehyde. The enzyme was equally active with NAD+ or NADP+. Alcohol dehydrogenase was active with ethanol (Km = 0.24 mM), 1-propanol (Km = 0.34 mM), and 1-butanol (Km = 0.16 mM) and was linked to NAD+. The molecular sizes of aldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase were 145 and 215 kilodaltons, respectively. PMID:2285314

  15. Draft whole genome sequence of the cyanide-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344.

    PubMed

    Luque-Almagro, Víctor M; Acera, Felipe; Igeño, Ma Isabel; Wibberg, Daniel; Roldán, Ma Dolores; Sáez, Lara P; Hennig, Magdalena; Quesada, Alberto; Huertas, Ma José; Blom, Jochen; Merchán, Faustino; Escribano, Ma Paz; Jaenicke, Sebastian; Estepa, Jessica; Guijo, Ma Isabel; Martínez-Luque, Manuel; Macías, Daniel; Szczepanowski, Rafael; Becerra, Gracia; Ramirez, Silvia; Carmona, Ma Isabel; Gutiérrez, Oscar; Manso, Isabel; Pühler, Alfred; Castillo, Francisco; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado; Schlüter, Andreas; Blasco, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 is a Gram-negative bacterium able to tolerate cyanide and to use it as the sole nitrogen source. We report here the first draft of the whole genome sequence of a P. pseudoalcaligenes strain that assimilates cyanide. Three aspects are specially emphasized in this manuscript. First, some generalities of the genome are shown and discussed in the context of other Pseudomonadaceae genomes, including genome size, G + C content, core genome and singletons among other features. Second, the genome is analysed in the context of cyanide metabolism, describing genes probably involved in cyanide assimilation, like those encoding nitrilases, and genes related to cyanide resistance, like the cio genes encoding the cyanide insensitive oxidases. Finally, the presence of genes probably involved in other processes with a great biotechnological potential like production of bioplastics and biodegradation of pollutants also is discussed. PMID:22998548

  16. Genome sequence of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Erythrobacter sp. JL475, isolated from the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qiang; Liu, Yanting; Sun, Jia; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2015-06-01

    Erythrobacter sp. JL475 is a bacteriochlorophyll a-containing aerobic anoxygenic photo-heterotrophic bacterium. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Erythrobacter sp. JL475 isolated from the South China Sea. It comprises ~3.26Mbp in 7 contigs with the G+C content of 61.7%. A total of 3042 protein-coding genes were obtained, and one complete photosynthetic gene cluster (~38Kbp) was found.

  17. Aerobic and anaerobic degradation of a range of alkyl sulfides by a denitrifying marine bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Visscher, P.T.; Taylor, B.F.

    1993-01-01

    A pure culture of a bacterium was obtained from a marine microbial mat by using an anoxic medium containing dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and nitrate. The isolate grew aerobically or anaerobically as a denitrifier on alkyl sulfides, including DMS, dimethyl disulfide, diethyl sulfide (DES), ethyl methyl sulfide, dipropyl sulfide, dibutyl sulfide, and dibutyl disulfide. Cells grown on an alkyl sulfide or disulfide also oxidized the corresponding thiols, namely, methanethiol, ethanethiol, propanethiol, or butanethiol. Alkyl sulfides were metabolized by induced or derepressed cells with oxygen, nitrate, or nitrite as electron acceptor. Cells grown on DMS immediately metabolized DMS, but there was a lag before DES was consumed; with DES-grown cells, DES was immediately used but DMS was used only after a lag. Chloramphenicol prevented the eventual use of DES by DMS-grown cells and DMS use by DES-grown cells, respectively, indicating separate enzymes for the metabolism of methyl and ethyl groups. Growth was rapid on formate, acetate, propionate, and butyrate but slow on methanol. The organism also grew chemolithotrophically on thiosulfate with a decrease in pH; growth required carbonate in the medium. Growth on sulfide was also carbonate dependent but slow. The isolate was identified as a Thiobacillus sp. and designated strain ASN-1. It may have utility for removing alkyl sulfides, and also nitrate, nitrite, and sulfide, from wastewaters.

  18. Aerobic and anaerobic degradation of a range of alkyl sulfides by a denitrifying marine bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Visscher, P T; Taylor, B F

    1993-01-01

    A pure culture of a bacterium was obtained from a marine microbial mat by using an anoxic medium containing dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and nitrate. The isolate grew aerobically or anaerobically as a denitrifier on alkyl sulfides, including DMS, dimethyl disulfide, diethyl sulfide (DES), ethyl methyl sulfide, dipropyl sulfide, dibutyl sulfide, and dibutyl disulfide. Cells grown on an alkyl sulfide or disulfide also oxidized the corresponding thiols, namely, methanethiol, ethanethiol, propanethiol, or butanethiol. Alkyl sulfides were metabolized by induced or derepressed cells with oxygen, nitrate, or nitrite as electron acceptor. Cells grown on DMS immediately metabolized DMS, but there was a lag before DES was consumed; with DES-grown cells, DES was immediately used but DMS was used only after a lag. Chloramphenicol prevented the eventual use of DES by DMS-grown cells and DMS use by DES-grown cells, respectively, indicating separate enzymes for the metabolism of methyl and ethyl groups. Growth was rapid on formate, acetate, propionate, and butyrate but slow on methanol. The organism also grew chemolithotrophically on thiosulfate with a decrease in pH; growth required carbonate in the medium. Growth on sulfide was also carbonate dependent but slow. The isolate was identified as a Thiobacillus sp. and designated strain ASN-1. It may have utility for removing alkyl sulfides, and also nitrate, nitrite, and sulfide, from wastewaters. PMID:8285707

  19. Biodegradation of bisphenol A and other bisphenols by a gram-negative aerobic bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Lobos, J.H.; Leib, T.K. ); Tahmun Su )

    1992-06-01

    A novel bacterium designated strain MV1 was isolated from a sludge enrichmet takes from the wastewater treatment plant at a plastics manufacturing facility and shown to degrade 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)propane (4,4[prime]-isopropylidenediphenol or bisphenol A). Strain MV1 is a gram-negative, aerobic bacillus that grows on bisphenol A as a sole source of carbon and energy. Total carbon analysis for bisphenol A degradation demonstrated that 60% of the carbon was mineralized to CO[sub 2], 20% was associated with the bacterial cells, and 20% was converted to soluble organic compounds. Metabolic intermediates detected in the culture medium during growth on bisphenol A were identified as 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, 4-hydroxyacetophenone, 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1-propanol, and 2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1,2-propanediol. Most of the bisphenol A degraded by strain MV1 is cleaved in some way to form 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and 4-hydroxyacetophenone, which are subsequently mineralized or assimilated into cell carbon. In addition, about 20% of the bisphenol A is hydroxylated to form 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1-propanol, which is slowly biotransformed to 2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1,2-propanediol. Cells that were grown on bisphenol A degraded a variety of bisphenol alkanes, hydroxylated benzoic acids, and hydroxylated acetophenones during resting-cell assays. Transmission electron microscopy of cells grown on bisphenol A revealed lipid storage granules and intracytoplasmic membranes.

  20. Anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) substance from the marine bacterium Pseudomonas sp. UJ-6.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Sung; Eom, Sung-Hwan; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Shin, Hee Jae; Je, Jae-Young; Lee, Eun-Woo; Chung, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Young-Mog; Kang, Chang-Keun; Lee, Myung-Suk

    2013-03-01

    A multivalent approach to discover a novel antibiotic substance against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a marine bacterium, UJ-6, exhibiting an antibacterial activity against MRSA was isolated from seawater. The isolated strain was identified to be Pseudomonas sp. by the morphology, biochemical, and genetical analyses. The ethyl acetate extract of Pseudomonas sp. UJ-6 culture showed significant ant-MRSA activity. Bioassay-guided isolation of the extract using a growth inhibitory assay led to the isolation and identification of an active compound exhibiting anti-MRSA activity. Based on the analyses of the physicochemical and spectroscopic data including nuclear magnetic resonance and mass, the compound was identified to be 1-acetyl-beta-carboline. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the compound was determined to be in a range of 32-128 μg/ml against MRSA strains. The MIC values against MRSA were superior or equal to those of other natural compounds such as catechins, suggesting that 1-acetyl-beta-carboline would be a good candidate in applications of the treatment of MRSA infection.

  1. Cold stress promoting a psychrotolerant bacterium Pseudomonas fragi P121 producing trehaloase.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yan-Zhen; Huang, Peng-Wei; Liu, Yang; He, Wei; Fang, Wen-Wan

    2016-08-01

    A newly isolated Pseudomonas fragi P121 strain in a soil sample taken from the Arctic Circle is able to produce trehalose. The P121 strain was able to grow at temperatures ranging from 4 to 25 °C, had an optimum pH of 6.5, and an optimum salt concentration of 2 %. The P121 strain had a survival rate of 29.1 % after being repeatedly frozen and thawed five times, and a survival rate of 78.9 % when placed in physiological saline for 15 days at 20 °C after cold shock, which is far higher than the type strain Pseudomonas fragi ATCC 4973. The P121 strain could produce 2.89 g/L trehalose, which was 18.6 % of dry cell weight within 52 h in a 25 L fermention tank using the malt extract prepared from barley as medium at 15 °C, while only 11.8 % of dry cell weight at 20 °C. These results suggested that cold stress promoted the strain producing trehalose. It is the first reported cold-tolerant bacterium that produces trehalose, which may protect cells against the cold environment. PMID:27339315

  2. Pseudomonas yamanorum sp. nov., a psychrotolerant bacterium isolated from a subantarctic environment.

    PubMed

    Arnau, Víctor Gonzalo; Sánchez, Leandro Arturo; Delgado, Osvaldo Daniel

    2015-02-01

    A psychrotolerant strain, 8H1(T), was isolated from soil samples collected in Isla de los Estados, Ushuaia, Argentina. Cells were Gram-negative, aerobic, straight rods, occurring singly or in pairs, non-spore-forming and motile by means of two polar flagella. The isolate was able to grow in the range 4-35 °C, with optimum growth at 28 °C. The predominant cellular fatty acids were summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω6c and/or C16 : 1ω7c), C16 : 0 and summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω6c and/or C18 : 1ω7c). The polar lipid pattern of strain 8H1(T) comprised phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and an unknown phospholipid. Ubiquinone 9 (Q-9) was the predominant lipoquinone. The DNA G+C content was 59.8 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence-based phylogeny suggested the affiliation of strain 8H1(T) to the 'Pseudomonas fluorescens group', displaying ≥98.5 % sequence similarity to 29 type strains. A multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) study performed by concatenating 16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoD and rpoB gene sequences showed that isolate 8H1(T) could be discriminated from closely related species of the genus Pseudomonas and placed in the 'Pseudomonas gessardii subgroup', including the species with the highest MLSA sequence similarities: Pseudomonas brenneri (96.2 %), P. gessardii (96.1 %), P. proteolytica (96.0 %), P. meridiana (96.0 %) and P. mucidolens (95.4 %). DNA-DNA hybridization analysis between 8H1(T) and the type strains of these closely related species revealed relatedness values of 27.0, 8.8, 41.2, 39.7 and 46.1 %, respectively. These results, together with differences in several phenotypic features, support the classification of a novel species, for which the name Pseudomonas yamanorum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 8H1(T) ( = DSM 26522(T) = CCUG 63249(T) = LMG 27247(T)).

  3. Halopeptonella vilamensis gen. nov, sp. nov., a halophilic strictly aerobic bacterium of the family Ectothiorhodospiraceae.

    PubMed

    Menes, Rodolfo Javier; Viera, Claudia Elizabeth; Farías, María Eugenia; Seufferheld, Manfredo J

    2016-01-01

    A Gram-negative, halophilic, heterotrophic, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming bacterium (SV525T) was isolated from the sediment of a hypersaline lake located at 4600 m above sea level (Laguna Vilama, Argentina). Strain SV525T was strictly aerobic and formed pink-to-magenta colonies. Growth occurred at 10–35 °C (optimum 25–30 °C), at pH levels 6.0–8.5 (optimum 7.0) and at NaCl concentrations of 7.5–25 % (w/v) with an optimum at 10–15 % (w/v). The strain required sodium and magnesium but not potassium ions for growth. Grows with tryptone, or Bacto Peptone as sole carbon and energy source and requires yeast extract for growth. It produced catalase and oxidase. The predominant ubiquinone was Q-8 and the major fatty acids comprised C18:1 ω7c, C16:0 and C18:0. The DNA G+C content was 60.4 mol% and its polar lipids consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and a phosphoglycolipid. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene indicated that strain SV525T belongs to the family Ectothiorhodospiraceae within the class Gammaproteobacteria. On the basis of phylogenetic and phenotypic data, SV525T represents a novel genus and species, for which the name Halopeptonella vilamensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SV525T (=DSM 21056T =JCM 16388T =NCIMB 14596T). PMID:26475627

  4. Methylopila musalis sp. nov., an aerobic, facultatively methylotrophic bacterium isolated from banana fruit.

    PubMed

    Doronina, Nina V; Kaparullina, Elena N; Bykova, Tatjana V; Trotsenko, Yuri A

    2013-05-01

    A newly isolated, facultatively methylotrophic bacterium (strain MUSA(T)) was investigated. The isolate was strictly aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, asporogenous, motile, rod-shaped and multiplied by binary fission. The strain utilized methanol, methylamine and an apparently narrow range of multi-carbon compounds, but not methane, dichloromethane or CO2/H2, as the carbon and energy sources. Growth occurred at pH 5.5-9.5 (optimum, pH 7.0) and 16-40 °C (optimum, 28-30 °C). The major fatty acids of methanol-grown cells were C18 : 1ω7c, C18 : 0 and 11-methyl-C18 : 1ω7c . The predominant phospholipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine. The major ubiquinone was Q-10. The strain had methanol and methylamine dehydrogenases as well as the enzymes of the N-methylglutamate pathway (lyases of γ-glutamylmethylamide and N-methylglutamate). C1 assimilation occurs via the isocitrate lyase-negative serine pathway. Ammonium was assimilated by glutamate dehydrogenase and the glutamate cycle (glutamate synthase/glutamine synthetase). The DNA G+C content of the strain was 64.5 mol% (determined from the melting temperature). Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (97.0-98.9 %) and DNA-DNA relatedness (36-38 %) with representatives of the genus Methylopila (Methylopila capsulata IM1(T) and Methylopila jiangsuensis JZL-4(T)) the isolate was classified as a novel species of the genus Methylopila, for which the name Methylopila musalis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MUSA(T) ( = VKM B-2646(T) = DSM 24986(T) = CCUG 61696(T)). PMID:22984139

  5. Expression and localization of an ice nucleating protein from a soil bacterium, Pseudomonas borealis.

    PubMed

    Vanderveer, Tara L; Choi, Julie; Miao, Denian; Walker, Virginia K

    2014-08-01

    An ice nucleating protein (INP) coding region with 66% sequence identity to the INP of Pseudomonas syringae was previously cloned from P. borealis, a plant beneficial soil bacterium. Ice nucleating activity (INA) in the P. borealis DL7 strain was highest after transfer of cultures to temperatures just above freezing. The corresponding INP coding sequence (inaPb or ina) was used to construct recombinant plasmids, with recombinant expression visualized using a green fluorescent protein marker (gfp encoding GFP). Although the P. borealis strain was originally isolated by ice-affinity, bacterial cultures with membrane-associated INP-GFP did not adsorb to pre-formed ice. Employment of a shuttle vector allowed expression of ina-gfp in both Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas cells. At 27 °C, diffuse fluorescence appeared throughout the cells and was associated with low INA. However, after transfer of cultures to 4 °C, the protein localized to the poles coincident with high INA. Transformants with truncated INP sequences ligated to either gfp, or an antifreeze protein-gfp fusion showed that the repetitive ice-nucleation domain was not necessary for localization. Such localization is consistent with the flanking residues of the INP associating with a temperature-dependent secretion apparatus. A polar location would facilitate INP-INP interactions resulting in the formation of larger aggregates, serving to increase INA. Expression of INPs by P. borealis could function as an efficient atmospheric dispersal mechanism for these soil bacteria, which are less likely to use these proteins for nutrient procurement, as has been suggested for P. syringae. PMID:24930584

  6. Role of RpoS in stress tolerance and environmental fitness of the phyllosphere bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain 122.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Virginia O; Hockett, Kevin; Loper, Joyce E

    2009-06-01

    Bacteria living epiphytically on aerial plant surfaces encounter severe and rapidly fluctuating environmental conditions, and their capacity to withstand environmental stress contributes to epiphytic fitness. The stationary phase sigma factor RpoS is a key determinant in stress response of gram-negative bacteria, including Pseudomonas spp. This study focused on the role of RpoS in stress response and epiphytic fitness of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain 122 on aerial plant surfaces. RpoS had a significant role in the response of the phyllosphere bacterium P. fluorescens 122 to stresses imposed by desiccation, UV irradiation, starvation, and an oxidative environment. While significant, the difference in stress response between an rpoS mutant and the parental strain was less for strain 122 than for the rhizosphere bacterium P. fluorescens Pf-5. No consistent influence of RpoS on epiphytic population size of strain 122 on pear or apple flowers or leaves was observed in field trials. These data may indicate that P. fluorescens occupies protected microsites on aerial plant surfaces where the bacteria escape exposure to environmental stress, or that redundant stress-response mechanisms are operating in this bacterium, thereby obscuring the role of RpoS in epiphytic fitness of the bacterium.

  7. Degradation of Reactive Black 5 dye by a newly isolated bacterium Pseudomonas entomophila BS1.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sana; Malik, Abdul

    2016-03-01

    The textile and dye industries are considered as one of the major sources of environmental pollution. The present study was conducted to investigate the degradation of the azo dye Reactive Black 5 (RB 5) using a bacterium isolated from soil samples collected around a textile industry. The bacterial strain BS1 capable of degrading RB 5 was isolated and identified as Pseudomonas entomophila on the basis of 16S rDNA sequencing. The effects of different parameters on the degradation of RB 5 were studied to find out the optimal conditions required for maximum degradation, which was 93% after 120 h of incubation. Static conditions with pH in the range of 5-9 and a temperature of 37 °C were found to be optimum for degrading RB 5. Enzyme assays demonstrated that P. entomophila possessed azoreductase, which played an important role in degradation. The enzyme was dependent on flavin mononucleotide and NADH for its activity. Furthermore, a possible degradation pathway of the dye was proposed through gas chromatography - mass spectrometry analysis, which revealed that the metabolic products were naphthalene-1,2-diamine and 4-(methylsulfonyl) aniline. Thus the ability of this indigenous bacterial isolate for simultaneous decolorization and degradation of the azo dye signifies its potential application for treatment of industrial wastewaters containing azo dyes.

  8. Three Alginate Lyases from Marine Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens HZJ216: Purification and Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Liyan, Li; Jiang, Xiaolu; Wang, Peng; Guan, Huashi; Guo, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Three alginate lyases (A, B, and C) from an alginate-degrading marine bacterium strain HZJ216 isolated from brown seaweed in the Yellow Sea of China and identified preliminarily as Pseudomonas fluorescens are purified, and their biochemical properties are described. Molecular masses of the three enzymes are determined by SDS-PAGE to be 60.25, 36, and 23 kDa with isoelectric points of 4, 4.36, and 4.59, respectively. Investigations of these enzymes at different pH and temperatures show that they are most active at pH 7.0 and 35 C. Alginate lyases A and B are stable in the pH range of 5.0 9.0, while alginate lyase C is stable in the pH range of 5.0 7.0. Among the metal ions tested, additions of Na+, K+, and Mg2+ ions can enhance the enzyme activities while Fe2+, Fe3+, Ba2+, and Zn2+ ions show inhibitory effects. The substrate specificity results demonstrate that alginate lyase C has the specificity for G block while alginate lyases A and B have the activities for both M and G blocks. It is the first report about extracellular alginate lyases with high alginate-degrading activity from P. fluorescens.

  9. Biodegradation of acephate and methamidophos by a soil bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain Is-6.

    PubMed

    Ramu, Sasikala; Seetharaman, Barathi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize a new acephate-degrading bacteria from agricultural soil and to investigate its biodegradation ability and pathway of degradation. A bacterial strain Is-6, isolated from agriculture soil could completely degrade and utilize acephate as the sole carbon, phosphorus and energy sources for growth in M9 medium. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence and phenotypic analysis suggested that the strain Is-6 was belonging to the genus Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Strain Is-6 could completely degrade acephate (50 mg L(-1)) and its metabolites within 96 h were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and electron spray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) analyses. When exposed to the higher concentration, the strain Is-6 showed 92% degradation of acephate (1000 mg L(-1)) within 7 days of incubation. It could also utilize dimethoate, parathion, methyl parathion, chlorpyrifos and malathion. The inoculation of strain Is-6 (10(7) cells g(-1)) to acephate (50 mg Kg(-1))-treated soil resulted in higher degradation rate than in noninoculated soils. These results highlight the potential of this bacterium to be used in the cleanup of contaminated pesticide waste in the environment.

  10. Co-evolutionary dynamics between public good producers and cheats in the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kümmerli, R; Santorelli, L A; Granato, E T; Dumas, Z; Dobay, A; Griffin, A S; West, S A

    2015-12-01

    The production of beneficial public goods is common in the microbial world, and so is cheating--the exploitation of public goods by nonproducing mutants. Here, we examine co-evolutionary dynamics between cooperators and cheats and ask whether cooperators can evolve strategies to reduce the burden of exploitation, and whether cheats in turn can improve their exploitation abilities. We evolved cooperators of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, producing the shareable iron-scavenging siderophore pyoverdine, together with cheats, defective in pyoverdine production but proficient in uptake. We found that cooperators managed to co-exist with cheats in 56% of all replicates over approximately 150 generations of experimental evolution. Growth and competition assays revealed that co-existence was fostered by a combination of general adaptions to the media and specific adaptions to the co-evolving opponent. Phenotypic screening and whole-genome resequencing of evolved clones confirmed this pattern, and suggest that cooperators became less exploitable by cheats because they significantly reduced their pyoverdine investment. Cheats, meanwhile, improved exploitation efficiency through mutations blocking the costly pyoverdine-signalling pathway. Moreover, cooperators and cheats evolved reduced motility, a pattern that likely represents adaptation to laboratory conditions, but at the same time also affects social interactions by reducing strain mixing and pyoverdine sharing. Overall, we observed parallel evolution, where co-existence of cooperators and cheats was enabled by a combination of adaptations to the abiotic and social environment and their interactions. PMID:26348785

  11. Activation of accumulated nitrite reduction by immobilized Pseudomonas stutzeri T13 during aerobic denitrification.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fang; Sun, Yilu; Li, Ang; Zhang, Xuening; Yang, Jixian

    2015-01-01

    The excellent removal efficiency of nitrate by the aerobic denitrifier, Pseudomonas stutzeri T13, was achieved in free cells system. However, poor nitrite reduction prevents efficient aerobic denitrification because of the nitrite accumulation. This problem could be conquered by immobilizing the cells on supports. In this study, strain T13 was immobilized by mycelial pellets (MPs), polyurethane foam cubes (PFCs) and sodium alginate beads (SABs). Higher removal percentages of TN in MP (43.78%), PFC (42.31%) and SAB (57.25%) systems were achieved compared with the free cell system (29.7%). Furthermore, the optimal condition for immobilized cell systems was as follows: 30°C, 100rpm shaking speed and pH 7. The shock-resistance of SAB system was relatively poor, which could collapse under either alkaline (pH=9) or high rotating (200rpm) conditions. The recycling experiments demonstrated that the high steady TN removal rate could be maintained for seven cycles in both MP and PFC systems. PMID:25827250

  12. Antibacterial Action of Nitric Oxide-Releasing Chitosan Oligosaccharides against Pseudomonas aeruginosa under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Reighard, Katelyn P.

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan oligosaccharides were modified with N-diazeniumdiolates to yield biocompatible nitric oxide (NO) donor scaffolds. The minimum bactericidal concentrations and MICs of the NO donors against Pseudomonas aeruginosa were compared under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Differential antibacterial activities were primarily the result of NO scavenging by oxygen under aerobic environments and not changes in bacterial physiology. Bacterial killing was also tested against nonmucoid and mucoid biofilms and compared to that of tobramycin. Smaller NO payloads were required to eradicate P. aeruginosa biofilms under anaerobic versus aerobic conditions. Under oxygen-free environments, the NO treatment was 10-fold more effective at killing biofilms than tobramycin. These results demonstrate the potential utility of NO-releasing chitosan oligosaccharides under both aerobic and anaerobic environments. PMID:26239983

  13. Effects of an algicidal bacterium Pseudomonas mendocina on the growth and antioxidant system of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shunyu; Tang, Dongshan; Liu, Yongding

    2009-08-01

    Evident effect of an algicidal bacterium Pseudomonas mendocina on the growth and antioxidant system of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae was detected in this experiment. Seven parameters including the chlorophyll a contents, Fv/Fm values, reactive oxygen species (ROS), malonaldehyde (MDA), catalase (CAT), peroxide dismutase (POD), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were tested in the cyanobacterium A. flos-aquae cells after inoculation with the algicidal bacterium Pseudomonas mendocina DC10. It was shown from the experiment that the growth of the treated cyanobacterium A. flos-aquae was significantly restrained, which was expressed as great reductions in the chlorophyll a contents and Fv/Fm values. At the same time, the treated cyanobacterial cells exhibited an obvious increase in the production of ROS and MDA compared with the control. CAT and POD activities in the treated group kept at high level, however, they both reduced significantly on day 6. SOD activities in the treated A. flos-aquae showed obvious declines after inoculation, and great augmentations on day 3 and 4, thereafter, they kept in a declining tendency. The results showed the oxidative stresses induced by the bacterium could be a killing agent of the cyanobacterium A. flos-aquae cells.

  14. Characteristics of a Novel Aerobic Denitrifying Bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae Strain HNR.

    PubMed

    Guo, Long-Jie; Zhao, Bin; An, Qiang; Tian, Meng

    2016-03-01

    A novel aerobic denitrifier strain HNR, isolated from activated sludge, was identified as Enterobacter cloacae by16S rRNA sequencing analysis. Glucose was considered as the most favorable C-source for strain HNR. The logistic equation well described the bacterial growth, yielding a maximum growth rate (μmax) of 0.283 h(-1) with an initial NO3 (-)-N concentration of 110 mg/L. Almost all NO3 (-)-N was removed aerobically within 30 h with an average removal rate of 4.58 mg N L(-1) h(-1). Nitrogen balance analysis revealed that proximately 70.8 % of NO3 (-)-N was removed as gas products and only 20.7 % was transformed into biomass. GC-MS result indicates that N2 was the end product of aerobic denitrification. The enzyme activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, which are related to the process of aerobic denitrification, were 0.0688 and 0.0054 U/mg protein, respectively. Thus, the aerobic denitrification of reducing NO3 (-) to N2 by strain HNR was demonstrated. The optimal conditions for nitrate removal were C/N ratio 13, pH value 8, shaking speed 127 rpm and temperature 30 °C. These findings show that E. cloacae strain HNR has a potential application on wastewater treatment to achieve nitrate removal under aerobic conditions.

  15. Recombineering and stable integration of the Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae 61 hrp/hrc cluster into the genome of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1.

    PubMed

    Thomas, William J; Thireault, Caitlin A; Kimbrel, Jeffrey A; Chang, Jeff H

    2009-12-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use a type III secretion system (T3SS) to establish associations with their hosts. The T3SS is a conduit for direct injection of type-III effector proteins into host cells, where they manipulate the host for the benefit of the infecting bacterium. For plant-associated pathogens, the variations in number and amino acid sequences of type-III effectors, as well as their functional redundancy, make studying type-III effectors challenging. To mitigate this challenge, we developed a stable delivery system for individual or defined sets of type-III effectors into plant cells. We used recombineering and Tn5-mediated transposition to clone and stably integrate, respectively, the complete hrp/hrc region from Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae 61 into the genome of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1. We describe our development of Effector-to-Host Analyzer (EtHAn), and demonstrate its utility for studying effectors for their in planta functions.

  16. Complete genome sequence of the petroleum-emulsifying bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri SLG510A3-8.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bing; Nie, Yong; Geng, Shuang; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2015-10-10

    Pseudomonas stutzeri SLG510A3-8, isolated from oil-contaminated soil in Shengli Oilfield, China, has the potential to be applied for microbial enhanced oil recovery. Here, we reported the complete genome sequence of this bacterium. It has a 4,650,155bp circular chromosome encoding 4450 genes, and the genome consists of genes that are involved in denitrification, chemotaxis, benzoate degradation, molecule transportation, and other functions. The genome contains a complete set of genes for type I secretion system in comparison with sequences of other P. stutzeri strains. PMID:26144046

  17. Aerobic mineralization of vinyl chlorides by a bacterium of the order Actinomycetales

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, T.J.; Malachowsky, K.; Schram, R.M. ); White, D.C. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1991-04-01

    A gram-positive branched bacterium isolated from a trichloroethylene-degrading consortium mineralized vinyl chloride in growing cultures and cell suspensions. Greater than 67% of the (1,2-{sup 14}C)vinyl chloride was mineralized to carbon dioxide, with approximately 10% of the radioactivity appearing in {sup 14}C-aqueous-phase products.

  18. A novel heterotrophic nitrifying and aerobic denitrifying bacterium, Zobellella taiwanensis DN-7, can remove high-strength ammonium.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yu; Wang, Yangqing; Liu, Hongjie; Xi, Chuanwu; Song, Liyan

    2016-05-01

    A novel heterotrophic bacterium capable of heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification was isolated from ammonium contaminated landfill leachate and physiochemical and phylogenetically identified as Zobellella taiwanensis DN-7. DN-7 converted nitrate, nitrate, and ammonium to N2 as the primary end product. Single factor experiments suggested that the optimal conditions for ammonium removal were trisodium citrate as carbon source, C/N ratio 8, pH 8.0-10.0, salinity less than 3 %, temperature 30 °C, and rotation speed more than 150 rpm. Specifically, DN-7 could remove 1000.0 and 2000.0 mg/L NH4 (+)-N completely within 96 and 216 h, with maximum removal rates of 19.6 and 17.3 mg L(-1) h(-1), respectively. These results demonstrated that DN-7 is a promising candidate for application of high-strength ammonium wastewater treatments.

  19. [Photosynthetic activity and components of the electron transport chain in the aerobic bacteriochlorophyll A-containing bacterium Roseinatronobacter thiooxidans].

    PubMed

    Stadnichuk, I N; Ianiushin, M F; Boĭchenko, V A; Lukashev, E P; Boldareva, E N; Solov'ev, A A; Gorlenko, V M

    2009-01-01

    Bioenergetics of the aerobic bacteriochlorophyll a-containing (BCl a) bacterium (ABC bacterium) Roseinatronobacter thiooxidans is a combination of photosynthesis, oxygen respiration, and oxidation of sulfur compounds under alkaliphilic conditions. The photosynthetic activity of Rna. thiooxidans cells was established by the photoinhibition of cell respiration and reversible photobleaching discoloration of the BCl a of reaction centers (RC), connected by the chain of electron transfer with cytochrome c551 oxidation. The species under study, like many purple bacteria and some of the known ABC bacteria, possesses a light-harvesting pigment-protein (LHI) complex with the average number of 30 molecules of antenna BCl a per one photosynthetic RC. Under microaerobic growth conditions, the cells contained bc1 complex and two terminal oxidases: cbb3-cytochrome oxidase and the alternative cytochrome oxidase of the a3 type. Besides, Rna. thiooxidans was shown to have several different soluble low- and high-potential cytochromes c, probably associated with the ability of utilizing sulfur compounds as additional electron donors.

  20. Isolation, identification, and algicidal activity of aerobic denitrifying bacterium R11 and its effect on Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Su, Jun-feng; Shao, Si-cheng; Huang, Ting-lin; Ma, Fang; Zhang, Kai; Wen, Gang; Zheng, Sheng-chen

    2016-01-01

    Recently, algicidal bacteria have attracted attention as possible agents for the inhibition of algal water blooms. In this study, an aerobic denitrifying bacterium, R11, with high algicidal activity against the toxic Microcystis aeruginosa was isolated from lake sediments. Based on its physiological characteristics and 16S rRNA gene sequence, it was identified as Raoultella, indicating that the bacterium R11 has a good denitrifying ability at 30 °C and can reduce the concentration of nitrate-N completely within 36 h. Additionally, different algicidal characteristics against Microcystis aeruginosa were tested. The results showed that the initial bacterial cell density and algal cell densities strongly influence the removal rates of chlorophyll a. Algicidal activity increased with an increase in the bacterial cell density. With densities of bacterial culture at over 2.4 × 10(5) cell/mL, algicidal activity of up to 80% was obtained in 4 days. We have demonstrated that, with the low initial algal cell density (OD680 less than 0.220), the algicidal activity reached was higher than 90% after 6 days. PMID:27232395

  1. Characterization of a halophilic heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterium and its application on treatment of saline wastewater.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jinming; Fang, Hongda; Su, Bing; Chen, Jinfang; Lin, Jinmei

    2015-03-01

    A novel halophilic bacterium capable of heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification was isolated from marine sediments and identified as Vibrio diabolicus SF16. It had ability to remove 91.82% of NH4(+)-N (119.77 mg/L) and 99.71% of NO3(-)-N (136.43 mg/L). The nitrogen balance showed that 35.83% of initial NH4(+)-N (119.77 mg/L) was changed to intracellular nitrogen, and 53.98% of the initial NH4(+)-N was converted to gaseous denitrification products. The existence of napA gene further proved the aerobic denitrification ability of strain SF16. The optimum culture conditions were salinity 1-5%, sodium acetate as carbon source, C/N 10, and pH 7.5-9.5. When an aerated biological filter system inoculated with strain SF16 was employed to treat saline wastewater, the average removal efficiency of NH4(+)-N and TN reached 97.14% and 73.92%, respectively, indicating great potential of strain SF16 for future full-scale applications. PMID:25557251

  2. Isolation and Characterization of a Facultatively Aerobic Bacterium That Reductively Dehalogenates Tetrachloroethene to cis-1,2-Dichloroethene

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, P. K.; McCarty, P. L.

    1996-01-01

    A rapidly-growing facultatively aerobic bacterium that transforms tetrachloroethene (PCE) via trichloroethene (TCE) to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-1,2-DCE) at high rates in a defined medium was isolated from a contaminated site. Metabolic characterization, cellular fatty acid analysis, and partial sequence analysis of 16S rRNA showed that the new isolate, strain MS-1, has characteristics matching those of the members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Strain MS-1 can oxidize about 58 substrates including many carbohydrates, short-chain fatty acids, amino acids, purines, and pyrimidines. It can transform up to 1 mM PCE (aqueous) at a rate of about 0.5 (mu)mol of PCE(middot) h(sup-1)(middot)mg (dry weight) of cell(sup-1). PCE transformation occurs following growth on or with the addition of single carbon sources such as glucose, pyruvate, formate, lactate, or acetate or with complex nutrient sources such as yeast extract or a mixture of amino acids. PCE dehalogenation requires the absence of oxygen, nitrate, and high concentrations of fermentable compounds such as glucose. Enterobacter agglomerans biogroup 5 (ATCC 27993), a known facultative bacterium that is closely related to strain MS-1, also reductively dehalogenated PCE to cis-1,2-DCE. To our knowledge, this is the first report on isolation of a facultative bacterium that can reductively transform PCE to cis-1,2-DCE under defined physiological conditions. Also, this is the first report of the ability of E. agglomerans to dehalogenate PCE. PMID:16535267

  3. The characteristics of a novel heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterium, Bacillus methylotrophicus strain L7.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Ling; Liu, Ying; Ai, Guo-Min; Miao, Li-Li; Zheng, Hai-Yan; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2012-03-01

    Bacillus methylotrophicus strain L7, exhibited efficient heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification ability, with maximum NH(4)(+)-N and NO(2)(-)-N removal rate of 51.58 mg/L/d and 5.81 mg/L/d, respectively. Strain L7 showed different gaseous emitting patterns from those strains ever described. When (15)NH(4)Cl, or Na(15)NO(2), or K(15)NO(3) was used, results of GC-MS indicated that N(2)O was emitted as the intermediate of heterotrophic nitrification or aerobic denitrification, while GC-IRMS results showed that N(2) was produced as end product when nitrite was used. Single factor experiments suggested that the optimal conditions for heterotrophic nitrification were sodium succinate as carbon source, C/N 6, pH 7-8, 0 g/L NaCl, 37 °C and a wide range of NH(4)(+)-N from 80 to 1000 mg/L. Orthogonal tests showed that the optimal conditions for aerobic denitrification were C/N 20, pH 7-8, 10 g/L NaCl and DO 4.82 mg/L (shaking speed 50 r/min) when nitrite was served as substrate.

  4. Taxonomic characterization of the cellulose-degrading bacterium NCIB 10462

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, C.; Ringleberg, D.; Scott, T.C.; Phelps, T.

    1994-06-01

    The gram negative cellulase-producing bacterium NCIB 10462 has been previously named Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. or var. cellulosa. Since there is renewed interest in cellulose-degrading bacteria for use in bioconversion of cellulose to chemical feed stocks and fuels, we re-examined the characteristics of this microorganism to determine its proper taxonomic characterization and to further define it`s true metabolic potential. Metabolic and physical characterization of NCIB 10462 revealed that this was an alkalophilic, non-fermentative, gram negative, oxidase positive, motile, cellulose-degrading bacterium. The aerobic substrate utilization profile of this bacterium was found to have few characteristics consistent with a classification of P. fluorescens with a very low probability match with the genus Sphingomonas. Total lipid analysis did not reveal that any sphingolipid bases are produced by this bacterium. NCIB 10462 was found to grow best aerobically but also grows well in complex media under reducing conditions. NCIB 10462 grew slowly under full anaerobic conditions on complex media but growth on cellulosic media was found only under aerobic conditions. Total fatty acid analysis (MIDI) of NCIB 10462 failed to group this bacterium with a known pseudomonas species. However, fatty acid analysis of the bacteria when grown at temperatures below 37{degrees}C suggest that the organism is a pseudomonad. Since a predominant characteristic of this bacterium is it`s ability to degrade cellulose, we suggest it be called Pseudomonas cellulosa.

  5. Physiology of Resistant Deinococcus geothermalis Bacterium Aerobically Cultivated in Low-Manganese Medium

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, Minna; Bernhardt, Jörg; Neubauer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This dynamic proteome study describes the physiology of growth and survival of Deinococcus geothermalis, in conditions simulating paper machine waters being aerobic, warm, and low in carbon and manganese. The industrial environment of this species differs from its natural habitats, geothermal springs and deep ocean subsurfaces, by being highly exposed to oxygen. Quantitative proteome analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and bioinformatic tools showed expression change for 165 proteins, from which 47 were assigned to a function. We propose that D. geothermalis grew and survived in aerobic conditions by channeling central carbon metabolism to pathways where mainly NADPH rather than NADH was retrieved from the carbon source. A major part of the carbon substrate was converted into succinate, which was not a fermentation product but likely served combating reactive oxygen species (ROS). Transition from growth to nongrowth resulted in downregulation of the oxidative phosphorylation observed as reduced expression of V-type ATPase responsible for ATP synthesis in D. geothermalis. The battle against oxidative stress was seen as upregulation of superoxide dismutase (Mn dependent) and catalase, as well as several protein repair enzymes, including FeS cluster assembly proteins of the iron-sulfur cluster assembly protein system, peptidylprolyl isomerase, and chaperones. Addition of soluble Mn reinitiated respiration and proliferation with concomitant acidification, indicating that aerobic metabolism was restricted by access to manganese. We conclude that D. geothermalis prefers to combat ROS using manganese-dependent enzymes, but when manganese is not available central carbon metabolism is used to produce ROS neutralizing metabolites at the expense of high utilization of carbon substrate. PMID:22228732

  6. Siderophore-mediated iron acquisition in the entomopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas entomophila L48 and its close relative Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Matthijs, Sandra; Laus, Georges; Meyer, Jean-Marie; Abbaspour-Tehrani, Kourosch; Schäfer, Mathias; Budzikiewicz, Herbert; Cornelis, Pierre

    2009-12-01

    Pseudomonas entomophila L48 is a recently identified entomopathogenic bacterium which, upon ingestion, kills Drosophila melanogaster, and is closely related to P. putida. The complete genome of this species has been sequenced and therefore a genomic, genetic and structural analysis of the siderophore-mediated iron acquisition was undertaken. P. entomophila produces two siderophores, a structurally new and unique pyoverdine and the secondary siderophore pseudomonine, already described in P. fluorescens species. Structural analysis of the pyoverdine produced by the closely related P. putida KT2440 showed that this strain produces an already characterised pyoverdine, but different from P. entomophila, and no evidence was found for the production of a second siderophore. Growth stimulation assays with heterologous pyoverdines demonstrated that P. entomophila is able to utilize a large variety of structurally distinct pyoverdines produced by other Pseudomonas species. In contrast, P. putida KT2440 is able to utilize only its own pyoverdine and the pyoverdine produced by P. syringae LMG 1247. Our data suggest that although closely related, P. entomophila is a more efficient competitor for iron than P. putida. PMID:19459056

  7. cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidases, aerobic respiratory enzymes, impact the anaerobic life of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Masakaze; Toyofuku, Masanori; Miyano, Tomoki; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2014-11-01

    For bacteria, many studies have focused on the role of respiratory enzymes in energy conservation; however, their effect on cell behavior is poorly understood. Pseudomonas aeruginosa can perform both aerobic respiration and denitrification. Previous studies demonstrated that cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidases that support aerobic respiration are more highly expressed in P. aeruginosa under anoxic conditions than are other aerobic respiratory enzymes. However, little is known about their role under such conditions. In this study, it was shown that cbb3 oxidases of P. aeruginosa PAO1 alter anaerobic growth, the denitrification process, and cell morphology under anoxic conditions. Furthermore, biofilm formation was promoted by the cbb3 oxidases under anoxic conditions. cbb3 oxidases led to the accumulation of nitric oxide (NO), which is produced during denitrification. Cell elongation induced by NO accumulation was reported to be required for robust biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1 under anoxic conditions. Our data show that cbb3 oxidases promote cell elongation by inducing NO accumulation during the denitrification process, which further leads to robust biofilms. Our findings show that cbb3 oxidases, which have been well studied as aerobic respiratory enzymes, are also involved in denitrification and influence the lifestyle of P. aeruginosa PAO1 under anoxic conditions.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas brassicacearum LBUM300, a Disease-Suppressive Bacterium with Antagonistic Activity toward Fungal, Oomycete, and Bacterial Plant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Novinscak, Amy; Gadkar, Vijay J.; Joly, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas brassicacearum LBUM300, a plant rhizosphere-inhabiting bacterium, produces 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol and hydrogen cyanide and has shown antagonistic activity against the plant pathogens Verticillium dahliae, Phytophthora cactorum, and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of P. brassicacearum LBUM300. PMID:26823582

  9. Selenite reduction by the obligate aerobic bacterium Comamonas testosteroni S44 isolated from a metal-contaminated soil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element in most organisms but has to be carefully handled since there is a thin line between beneficial and toxic concentrations. Many bacteria have the ability to reduce selenite (Se(IV)) and (or) selenate (Se(VI)) to red elemental selenium that is less toxic. Results A strictly aerobic bacterium, Comamonas testosteroni S44, previously isolated from metal(loid)-contaminated soil in southern China, reduced Se(IV) to red selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) with sizes ranging from 100 to 200 nm. Both energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX or EDS) and EDS Elemental Mapping showed no element Se and SeNPs were produced inside cells whereas Se(IV) was reduced to red-colored selenium in the cytoplasmic fraction in presence of NADPH. Tungstate inhibited Se(VI) but not Se(IV) reduction, indicating the Se(IV)-reducing determinant does not contain molybdenum as co-factor. Strain S44 was resistant to multiple heavy and transition metal(loid)s such as Se(IV), As(III), Cu(II), and Cd(II) with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 100 mM, 20 mM, 4 mM, and 0.5 mM, respectively. Disruption of iscR encoding a transcriptional regulator negatively impacted cellular growth and subsequent resistance to multiple heavy metal(loid)s. Conclusions C. testosteroni S44 could be very useful for bioremediation in heavy metal(loid) polluted soils due to the ability to both reduce toxic Se(VI) and Se(IV) to non-toxic Se (0) under aerobic conditions and to tolerate multiple heavy and transition metals. IscR appears to be an activator to regulate genes involved in resistance to heavy or transition metal(loid)s but not for genes responsible for Se(IV) reduction. PMID:25098921

  10. Crystal structures of complexes of NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase from methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 with formate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippova, E. V.; Polyakov, K. M.; Tikhonova, T. V.; Stekhanova, T. N.; Boiko, K. M.; Sadykhov, I. G.; Tishkov, V. I.; Popov, V. O.; Labru, N.

    2006-07-01

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) from the methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 catalyzes oxidation of formate to NI2 with the coupled reduction of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). The three-dimensional structures of the apo form (the free enzyme) and the holo form (the ternary FDH-NAD+-azide complex) of FDH have been established earlier. In the present study, the structures of FDH complexes with formate are solved at 2.19 and 2.28 Å resolution by the molecular replacement method and refined to the R factors of 22.3 and 20.5%, respectively. Both crystal structures contain four protein molecules per asymmetric unit. These molecules form two dimers identical to the dimer of the apo form of FDH. Two possible formatebinding sites are found in the active site of the FDH structure. In the complexes the sulfur atom of residue Cys354 exists in the oxidized state.

  11. Crystal structures of complexes of NAD{sup +}-dependent formate dehydrogenase from methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 with formate

    SciTech Connect

    Filippova, E. V. Polyakov, K. M.; Tikhonova, T. V.; Stekhanova, T. N.; Boiko, K. M.; Sadykhov, I. G.; Tishkov, V. I.; Popov, V. O.; Labru, N.

    2006-07-15

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) from the methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 catalyzes oxidation of formate to NI{sub 2} with the coupled reduction of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}). The three-dimensional structures of the apo form (the free enzyme) and the holo form (the ternary FDH-NAD{sup +}-azide complex) of FDH have been established earlier. In the present study, the structures of FDH complexes with formate are solved at 2.19 and 2.28 A resolution by the molecular replacement method and refined to the R factors of 22.3 and 20.5%, respectively. Both crystal structures contain four protein molecules per asymmetric unit. These molecules form two dimers identical to the dimer of the apo form of FDH. Two possible formatebinding sites are found in the active site of the FDH structure. In the complexes the sulfur atom of residue Cys354 exists in the oxidized state.

  12. Further characterization of o-nitrobenzaldehyde degrading bacterium Pseudomonas sp. ONBA-17 and deduction on its metabolic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fang-Bo; Li, Xiao-Dan; Ali, Shinawar Waseem; Shan, Sheng-Dao; Luo, Lin-Ping; Guan, Li-Bo

    2014-01-01

    A previously reported o-nitrobenzaldehyde (ONBA) degrading bacterium Pseudomonas sp. ONBA-17 was further identified and characterized. Based on results of DNA base composition and DNA-DNA hybridization, the strain was identified as P. putida. Its degradation effect enhanced with increase of inoculum amount and no lag phase was observed. Higher removal rate was achieved under shaking conditions. All tested ONBA with different initial concentrations could be completely degraded within 5 d. In addition, degradative enzyme(s) involved was confirmed as intra-cellular distributed and constitutively expressed. Effects of different compounds on relative activity of degradative enzyme(s) within cell-free extract were also evaluated. Finally, 2-nitrobenzoic acid and 2, 3-dihydroxybenzoic acid were detected as metabolites of ONBA degradation by P. putida ONBA-17, and relevant metabolic pathway was preliminary proposed. This study might help with future research in better understanding of nitroaromatics biodegradation. PMID:25763034

  13. Nocardioides, Sediminibacterium, Aquabacterium, Variovorax, and Pseudomonas linked to carbon uptake during aerobic vinyl chloride biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Fernanda Paes; Liu, Xikun; Mattes, Timothy E; Cupples, Alison M

    2016-10-01

    Vinyl chloride (VC) is a frequent groundwater contaminant and a known human carcinogen. Bioremediation is a potential cleanup strategy for contaminated sites; however, little is known about the bacteria responsible for aerobic VC degradation in mixed microbial communities. In attempts to address this knowledge gap, the microorganisms able to assimilate labeled carbon ((13)C) from VC within a mixed culture capable of rapid VC degradation (120 μmol in 7 days) were identified using stable isotope probing (SIP). For this, at two time points during VC degradation (days 3 and 7), DNA was extracted from replicate cultures initially supplied with labeled or unlabeled VC. The extracted DNA was ultracentrifuged, fractioned, and the fractions of greater buoyant density (heavy fractions, 1.758 to 1.780 g mL(-1)) were subject to high-throughput sequencing. Following this, specific primers were designed for the most abundant phylotypes in the heavy fractions. Then, quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used across the buoyant density gradient to confirm label uptake by these phylotypes. From qPCR and/or sequencing data, five phylotypes were found to be dominant in the heavy fractions, including Nocardioides (∼40 %), Sediminibacterium (∼25 %), Aquabacterium (∼17 %), Variovorax (∼6 %), and Pseudomonas (∼1 %). The abundance of two functional genes (etnC and etnE) associated with VC degradation was also investigated in the SIP fractions. Peak shifts of etnC and etnE gene abundance toward heavier fractions were observed, indicating uptake of (13)C into the microorganisms harboring these genes. Analysis of the total microbial community indicated a significant dominance of Nocardioides over the other label-enriched phylotypes. Overall, the data indicate Nocardioides is primarily responsible for VC degradation in this mixed culture, with the other putative VC degraders generating a small growth benefit from VC degradation. The specific primers designed toward the putative VC

  14. Rapid biodegradation and decolorization of Direct Orange 39 (Orange TGLL) by an isolated bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain BCH.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Jyoti P; Phugare, Swapnil S; Dhanve, Rhishikesh S; Jadhav, Shekhar B

    2010-06-01

    A newly isolated novel bacterium from sediments contaminated with dyestuff was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain BCH by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The bacterium was extraordinarily active and operative over a wide rage of temperature (10-60 degrees C) and salinity (5-6%), for decolorization of Direct Orange 39 (Orange TGLL) at optimum pH 7. This strain was capable of decolorizing Direct Orange 39; 50 mg l(-1) within 45 +/- 5 min, with 93.06% decolorization, while maximally it could decolorize 1.5 g l(-1) of dye within 48 h with 60% decolorization. Analytical studies as, UV-Vis spectroscopy, FTIR, HPLC were employed to confirm the biodegradation of dye and formation of new metabolites. Induction in the activities of lignin peroxidases, DCIP reductase as well as tyrosinase was observed, indicating the significant role of these enzymes in biodegradation of Direct Orange 39. Toxicity studies with Phaseolus mungo and Triticum aestivum revealed the non-toxic nature of degraded metabolites.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Se(IV)-Reducing Bacterium Pseudomonas migulae ES3-33

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuanji; Kot, Witold; Wang, Dan; Zheng, Shixue; Wang, Gejiao; Hansen, Lars H.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas migulae ES3-33 is a Gram-negative strain that strongly reduces Se(IV) and was isolated from a selenium mining area in Enshi, southwest China. Here we present the draft genome of this strain containing potential genes involved in selenite reduction and a large number of genes encoding resistances to copper and antibiotics. PMID:25953191

  16. Description of Pseudomonas gregormendelii sp. nov., a Novel Psychrotrophic Bacterium from James Ross Island, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Kosina, Marcel; Švec, Pavel; Černohlávková, Jitka; Barták, Miloš; Snopková, Kateřina; De Vos, Paul; Sedláček, Ivo

    2016-07-01

    During the microbiological research performed within the scope of activities of Czech expeditions based at the Johann Gregor Mendel Station at James Ross Island, Antarctica, two psychrotrophic gram-stain negative non-fluorescent strains CCM 8506T and CCM 8507 from soil were extensively characterized using genotypic and phenotypic methods. Initial characterization using ribotyping with HindIII restriction endonuclease and phenotyping implies that both isolates belong to a single Pseudomonas species. Sequencing of rrs, rpoB, rpoD and glnA genes of strain CCM 8506(T) confirmed affiliation of investigated strains within the genus Pseudomonas. Further investigation using automated ribotyping with EcoRI (RiboPrinter(®) Microbial Characterisation System), whole-cell protein profiling using the Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer system, extensive biochemical testing and DNA-DNA hybridization experiments confirmed that both investigated strains are members of a single taxon which is clearly separated from all hitherto described Pseudomonas spp. Based on all findings, we describe a novel species Pseudomonas gregormendelii sp. nov. with the type strain CCM 8506(T) (=LMG 28632T).

  17. Description of Pseudomonas gregormendelii sp. nov., a Novel Psychrotrophic Bacterium from James Ross Island, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Kosina, Marcel; Švec, Pavel; Černohlávková, Jitka; Barták, Miloš; Snopková, Kateřina; De Vos, Paul; Sedláček, Ivo

    2016-07-01

    During the microbiological research performed within the scope of activities of Czech expeditions based at the Johann Gregor Mendel Station at James Ross Island, Antarctica, two psychrotrophic gram-stain negative non-fluorescent strains CCM 8506T and CCM 8507 from soil were extensively characterized using genotypic and phenotypic methods. Initial characterization using ribotyping with HindIII restriction endonuclease and phenotyping implies that both isolates belong to a single Pseudomonas species. Sequencing of rrs, rpoB, rpoD and glnA genes of strain CCM 8506(T) confirmed affiliation of investigated strains within the genus Pseudomonas. Further investigation using automated ribotyping with EcoRI (RiboPrinter(®) Microbial Characterisation System), whole-cell protein profiling using the Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer system, extensive biochemical testing and DNA-DNA hybridization experiments confirmed that both investigated strains are members of a single taxon which is clearly separated from all hitherto described Pseudomonas spp. Based on all findings, we describe a novel species Pseudomonas gregormendelii sp. nov. with the type strain CCM 8506(T) (=LMG 28632T). PMID:27032403

  18. Humitalea rosea gen. nov., sp. nov., an aerobic bacteriochlorophyll-containing bacterium of the family Acetobacteraceae isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Margesin, Rosa; Zhang, De-Chao

    2013-04-01

    A Gram-staining-negative, pale-pink-pigmented, non-motile, obligately aerobic and rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain W37(T), was isolated from soil and subjected to a taxonomic investigation using a polyphasic approach. The strain grew at 1-30 °C, oxidized thiosulfate and accumulated polyhydroxyalkanoates. Photosynthetic pigments were represented by bacteriochlorophyll a and carotenoids. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain W37(T) was most closely related to members of the genera Roseococcus and Rubritepida (with sequence similarities of <92.8 %) but formed a distinct lineage in the family Acetobacteraceae. The polar lipid profile comprised diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, three unidentified aminolipids and one other unidentified lipid. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C18 : 1ω7c and summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or iso-C15 : 0 2-OH). The DNA G+C content of strain W37(T) was 68.2 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic characteristics and phylogenetic analysis, strain W37(T) represents a novel species of a new genus in the family Acetobacteraceae, for which the name Humitalea rosea gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is W37(T) ( = CIP 110261(T) = LMG 26243(T)).

  19. A novel heterotrophic nitrifying and aerobic denitrifying bacterium, Zobellella taiwanensis DN-7, can remove high-strength ammonium.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yu; Wang, Yangqing; Liu, Hongjie; Xi, Chuanwu; Song, Liyan

    2016-05-01

    A novel heterotrophic bacterium capable of heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification was isolated from ammonium contaminated landfill leachate and physiochemical and phylogenetically identified as Zobellella taiwanensis DN-7. DN-7 converted nitrate, nitrate, and ammonium to N2 as the primary end product. Single factor experiments suggested that the optimal conditions for ammonium removal were trisodium citrate as carbon source, C/N ratio 8, pH 8.0-10.0, salinity less than 3 %, temperature 30 °C, and rotation speed more than 150 rpm. Specifically, DN-7 could remove 1000.0 and 2000.0 mg/L NH4 (+)-N completely within 96 and 216 h, with maximum removal rates of 19.6 and 17.3 mg L(-1) h(-1), respectively. These results demonstrated that DN-7 is a promising candidate for application of high-strength ammonium wastewater treatments. PMID:26762390

  20. Removal of nitrogen by heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification of a novel metal resistant bacterium Cupriavidus sp. S1.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiyi; Lv, Yongkang; Liu, Yuxiang; Ren, Ruipeng

    2016-11-01

    A novel heterotrophic nitrifying and metal resistant bacterium was isolated and identified as Cupriavidus sp. S1. The utilization of ammonium, nitrate and nitrite as well as the production of N2 proved the heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification ability of S1. The ammonium, nitrate and nitrite removal efficiencies were 99.68%, 98.03% and 99.81%, with removal rates of 10.43, 8.64 and 8.36mg/L/h, respectively. A multiple regression equation well described the relationship between carbon source utilization, cell growth and nitrification. Keeping the shaking speed at 120rpm was beneficial for denitrification. Moreover, different forms of nitrogen source could be utilize in simultaneous nitrification and denitrification. Additionally, the efficient removal of ammonium occurred at 20.0mg/LZn(2+), or 10.0mg/LNi(2+) or 8.0mg/LCu(2+) or 5.0mg/LCr(6+), 33.35mmol/L sodium pyruvate, C/N 12-28. These findings demonstrate that S1 was effective for nitrogen removal in industrial wastewater containing heavy metal. PMID:27566522

  1. Reducing NO and N₂O emission during aerobic denitrification by newly isolated Pseudomonas stutzeri PCN-1.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Maosheng; He, Da; Ma, Tao; Chen, Qian; Liu, Sitong; Ahmad, Muhammad; Gui, Mengyao; Ni, Jinren

    2014-06-01

    As two obligatory intermediates of denitrification, both NO and N2O had harmful environmental and biological impacts. An aerobic denitrifying bacterial strain PCN-1 was newly isolated and identified as Pseudomonas stutzeri, which was capable of high efficient nitrogen removal under aerobic condition with maximal NO and N2O accumulation as low as 0.003% and 0.33% of removed NO3(-)-N, respectively. Further experiment taking nitrite as denitrifying substrate indicated similar low NO and N2O emission of 0.006% and 0.29% of reduced NO2(-)-N, respectively. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that the coordinate expression of denitrification gene nirS (for cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase), cnorB (for NO reductase) and nosZ (for N2O reductase) was the fundamental reason of low NO and N2O accumulation. Activated sludge system bioaugmented by strain PCN-1 demonstrated a significant reduction of NO and N2O emission from wastewater during aerobic denitrification, implied great potential of PCN-1 in practical applications.

  2. Small-molecule inhibition of choline catabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other aerobic choline-catabolizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimmons, Liam F; Flemer, Stevenson; Wurthmann, A Sandy; Deker, P Bruce; Sarkar, Indra Neil; Wargo, Matthew J

    2011-07-01

    Choline is abundant in association with eukaryotes and plays roles in osmoprotection, thermoprotection, and membrane biosynthesis in many bacteria. Aerobic catabolism of choline is widespread among soil proteobacteria, particularly those associated with eukaryotes. Catabolism of choline as a carbon, nitrogen, and/or energy source may play important roles in association with eukaryotes, including pathogenesis, symbioses, and nutrient cycling. We sought to generate choline analogues to study bacterial choline catabolism in vitro and in situ. Here we report the characterization of a choline analogue, propargylcholine, which inhibits choline catabolism at the level of Dgc enzyme-catalyzed dimethylglycine demethylation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We used genetic analyses and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance to demonstrate that propargylcholine is catabolized to its inhibitory form, propargylmethylglycine. Chemically synthesized propargylmethylglycine was also an inhibitor of growth on choline. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that there are genes encoding DgcA homologues in a variety of proteobacteria. We examined the broader utility of propargylcholine and propargylmethylglycine by assessing growth of other members of the proteobacteria that are known to grow on choline and possess putative DgcA homologues. Propargylcholine showed utility as a growth inhibitor in P. aeruginosa but did not inhibit growth in other proteobacteria tested. In contrast, propargylmethylglycine was able to inhibit choline-dependent growth in all tested proteobacteria, including Pseudomonas mendocina, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida, Burkholderia cepacia, Burkholderia ambifaria, and Sinorhizobium meliloti. We predict that chemical inhibitors of choline catabolism will be useful for studying this pathway in clinical and environmental isolates and could be a useful tool to study proteobacterial choline catabolism in situ.

  3. Physiological factors affecting carbon tetrachloride dehalogenation by the denitrifying bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain KC

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, T.A.; Crawford, R.L. )

    1993-05-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CT) is a carcinogenic, ozone-depleting, toxic, xenobiotic compound found in ground water, listed as a priority pollutant by the US EPA. In aqueous solution, CT is not readily hydrolyzed and has an estimated half-life of 7,000 years. Since CT resists spontaneous degradation, conditions favorable for dehalogenation must be created to effect remediation of CT contamination. This paper describes studies of CT transformation aimed at determining the potential of Pseudomonas sp. strain KC as a bioaugmentation strain and describes a search for KC-type CT transformation activity in samples from regional aquifers. 11 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Biodegradation of reactive textile dye Red BLI by an isolated bacterium Pseudomonas sp. SUK1.

    PubMed

    Kalyani, D C; Patil, P S; Jadhav, J P; Govindwar, S P

    2008-07-01

    A novel bacterial strain capable of decolorizing reactive textile dye Red BLI is isolated from the soil sample collected from contaminated sites of textile industry from Solapur, India. The bacterial isolate was identified as Pseudomonas sp. SUK1 on the basis of 16S rDNA analysis. The Pseudomonas sp. SUK1 decolorized Red BLI (50 mg l(-1)) 99.28% within 1h under static anoxic condition at pH range from 6.5 to 7.0 and 30 degrees C. This strain has ability to decolorize various reactive textile dyes. UV-Vis spectroscopy, FTIR and TLC analysis of samples before and after dye decolorization in culture medium confirmed decolorization of Red BLI. A significant increase in the activities of aminopyrine N-demethylase and NADH-DCIP reductase in cells obtained after decolorization indicates involvement of these enzymes in the decolorization process. Phytotoxicity testing with the seeds of Sorghum vulgare and Phaseolus mungo, showed more sensitivity towards the dye, while the products obtained after dye decolorization does not have any inhibitory effects.

  5. Bioactive lipopeptides of ice-nucleating snow bacterium Pseudomonas syringae strain 31R1.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Alberto; Mannina, Luisa; Sobolev, Anatoli P; Salzano, Anna Maria; Scaloni, Andrea; Grgurina, Ingeborg; Fullone, Maria Rosaria; Gallo, Monica; Swasey, Camille; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Takemoto, Jon Y

    2008-09-01

    The production of secondary metabolite lipopeptides by ice-nucleating Pseudomonas syringae strain 31R1 was investigated. Pseudomonas syringae strain 31R1 is a rifampicin-resistant derivative of P. syringae no. 31 used for the commercial production of snow. It is shown that P. syringae strain 31R1 produces antifungal lipodepsipeptides, syringomycins E and G, and, in addition, a novel and unique lipopeptide, peptin31. Spectroscopic and spectrometric analyses revealed that peptin31 is a linear undecalipopeptide with sequence identities to N- and C-terminal portions but lacking 11 amino acids of known lipodepsipeptide syringopeptin SPPhv. Peptin31 displayed antifungal activities against Rhodotorula pilimanae, Rhizoctonia solani, and Trichoderma harzianum and also hemolytic and antibacterial activities. Extracts of P. syringae strain 31R1 grown in medium with chloride were fungicidal, but not when grown without chloride. The latter extracts lacked peptin 31 and contained des-chloro forms of syringomycins E and G with low antifungal activities. Thus, the three lipopeptides account for the fungicidal properties of P. syringae 31R1 extracts. The occurrence of these bioactive metabolites should be considered when P. syringae no. 31 and its derivatives are used in products for making artificial snow.

  6. Does S-metolachlor affect the performance of Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP as bioaugmentation bacterium for atrazine-contaminated soils?

    PubMed

    Viegas, Cristina A; Costa, Catarina; André, Sandra; Viana, Paula; Ribeiro, Rui; Moreira-Santos, Matilde

    2012-01-01

    Atrazine (ATZ) and S-metolachlor (S-MET) are two herbicides widely used, often as mixtures. The present work examined whether the presence of S-MET affects the ATZ-biodegradation activity of the bioaugmentation bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP in a crop soil. S-MET concentrations were selected for their relevance in worst-case scenarios of soil contamination by a commercial formulation containing both herbicides. At concentrations representative of application of high doses of the formulation (up to 50 µg g(-1) of soil, corresponding to a dose approximately 50× higher than the recommended field dose (RD)), the presence of pure S-MET significantly affected neither bacteria survival (~10(7) initial viable cells g(-1) of soil) nor its ATZ-mineralization activity. Consistently, biodegradation experiments, in larger soil microcosms spiked with 20× or 50 × RD of the double formulation and inoculated with the bacterium, revealed ATZ to be rapidly (in up to 5 days) and extensively (>96%) removed from the soil. During the 5 days, concentration of S-MET decreased moderately to about 60% of the initial, both in inoculated and non-inoculated microcosms. Concomitantly, an accumulation of the two metabolites S-MET ethanesulfonic acid and S-MET oxanilic acid was found. Despite the dissipation of almost all the ATZ from the treated soils, the respective eluates were still highly toxic to an aquatic microalgae species, being as toxic as those from the untreated soil. We suggest that this high toxicity may be due to the S-MET and/or its metabolites remaining in the soil.

  7. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the cold-inducible hutU gene from the antarctic psychrotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Janiyani, Kamala L; Ray, M K

    2002-01-01

    A promoter-fusion study with a Tn 5-based promoter probe vector had earlier found that the hutU gene which encodes the enzyme urocanase for the histidine utilization pathway is upregulated at a lower temperature (4 degrees C) in the Antarctic psychrotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae. To examine the characteristics of the urocanase gene and its promoter elements from the psychrotroph, the complete hutU and its upstream region from P. syringae were cloned, sequenced, and analyzed in the present study. Northern blot and primer extension analyses suggested that the hutU gene is inducible upon a downshift of temperature (22 to 4 degrees C) and that there is more than one transcription initiation site. One of the initiation sites was specific to the cells grown at 4 degrees C, which was different from the common initiation sites observed at both 4 and 22 degrees C. Although no typical promoter consensus sequences were observed in the flanking region of the transcription initiation sites, there was a characteristic CAAAA sequence at the -10 position of the promoters. Additionally, the location of the transcription and translation initiation sites suggested that the hutU mRNA contains a long 5'-untranslated region, a characteristic feature of many cold-inducible genes of mesophilic bacteria. A comparison of deduced amino acid sequences of urocanase from various bacteria, including the mesophilic and psychrotrophic Pseudomonas spp., suggests that there is a high degree of similarity between the enzymes. The enzyme sequence contains a signature motif (GXGX(2)GX(10)G) of the Rossmann fold for dinucleotide (NAD(+)) binding and two conserved cysteine residues in and around the active site. The psychrotrophic enzyme, however, has an extended N-terminal end.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of the Sugar Cane Endophyte Pseudomonas aurantiaca PB-St2, a Disease-Suppressive Bacterium with Antifungal Activity toward the Plant Pathogen Colletotrichum falcatum

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Judith S.

    2014-01-01

    The endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas aurantiaca PB-St2 exhibits antifungal activity and represents a biocontrol agent to suppress red rot disease of sugar cane. Here, we report the completely sequenced 6.6-Mb genome of P. aurantiaca PB-St2. The sequence contains a repertoire of biosynthetic genes for secondary metabolites that putatively contribute to its antagonistic activity and its plant-microbe interactions. PMID:24459254

  9. Toxic effect of environmentally relevant concentration of silver nanoparticles on environmentally beneficial bacterium Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Khan, S Sudheer; Ghouse, Syed Shabin; Chandran, Preethy

    2015-07-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are being increasingly used in many consumer products owing to their excellent antimicrobial properties. The continuous use of Ag NPs in consumer products will lead to environmental release. The present study evaluated the toxic effects and the possible underlying mechanism of Ag NPs on Pseudomonas putida. Ag NP exposure inhibited growth of the cells. Increased lipid peroxidation occurred coincident with suppression of the antioxidant defense system. Ag NP exposure caused reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, glutathione depletion and inactivation of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione reductase. The addition of superoxide dismutase or pretreatment of P. putida with N-acetyl cysteine that quenches ROS reduced toxicity of the NPs. PMID:25627470

  10. Interaction of Cr(VI) reduction and denitrification by strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa PCN-2 under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    He, Da; Zheng, Maosheng; Ma, Tao; Li, Can; Ni, Jinren

    2015-06-01

    Inhibition of efficient denitrification in presence of toxic heavy metals is one of the current problems encountered in municipal wastewater treatment plants. This paper presents how to remove hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and nitrate simultaneously by the novel strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa PCN-2 under aerobic conditions. The capability of strain PCN-2 for Cr(VI) and nitrate reduction was confirmed by PCR analysis of gene ChrR, napA, nirS, cnorB, nosZ, while Cr(VI) reduction was proved via an initial single-electron transfer through Cr(V) detection using electron paramagnetic resonance. Experimental results demonstrated that Cr(VI) and nitrate reduction by strain PCN-2 was much faster at pH 8-9 and higher initial cell concentration. However, increasing Cr(VI) concentration would inhibit aerobic denitrification process and result in an significant delay of nitrate reduction or N2O accumulation, which was attributed to competition between three electron acceptors, i.e., Cr(VI), O2 and nitrate in the electron transport chain.

  11. Strategies developed by the marine bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BA3SM1 to resist metals: A proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Isabelle; Hammann, Philippe; Kuhn, Lauriane; Bertrand, Martine

    2013-03-15

    A global proteomic evaluation of the response of the marine bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BA3SM1 to Cd, Zn and Cu was performed by two dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry. When stressed with Cd, the most toxic metal for P. fluorescens BA3SM1, cell growth is rapidly affected and the number of proteins up-regulated (sixteen for 0.4 mM Cd) remains low in comparison with results obtained for Zn and Cu (twenty eight for 1.5mM Zn and forty four for 1.5 mM Cu). The changes in protein expression indicate that the cell adapts to metals by inducing essentially seven defense mechanisms: cell aggregation/biofilm formation (Zn=Cu>Cd); modification of envelope properties to increase the extracellular metal biosorption and/or control the uptake of metal (Cu>Zn); metal export (Cd=Zn and probably Cu); responses to oxidative stress (Cu>Zn>Cd); intracellular metal sequestration (Zn=Cu and probably Cd); hydrolysis of abnormally folded proteins (Cd=Cu), and the over-synthesis of proteins inhibited by metal (Cd>Cu>Zn). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing that a marine P. fluorescens is able to acquire a metal-resistant phenotype, making the strain BA3SM1 a promising agent for bioremediation processes.

  12. Isolation, plant colonization potential, and phenanthrene degradation performance of the endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. Ph6-gfp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kai; Liu, Juan; Gao, Yanzheng; Jin, Li; Gu, Yujun; Wang, Wanqing

    2014-06-01

    This investigation provides a novel method of endophyte-aided removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from plant bodies. A phenanthrene-degrading endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. Ph6 was isolated from clover (Trifolium pratense L.) grown in a PAH-contaminated site. After being marked with the GFP gene, the colonization and distribution of strain Ph6-gfp was directly visualized in plant roots, stems, and leaves for the first time. After ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) roots inoculation, strain Ph6-gfp actively and internally colonized plant roots and transferred vertically to the shoots. Ph6-gfp had a natural capacity to cope with phenanthrene in vitro and in planta. Ph6-gfp degraded 81.1% of phenanthrene (50 mg.L-1) in a culture solution within 15 days. The inoculation of plants with Ph6-gfp reduced the risks associated with plant phenanthrene contamination based on observations of decreased concentration, accumulation, and translocation factors of phenanthrene in ryegrass. Our results will have important ramifications in the assessment of the environmental risks of PAHs and in finding ways to circumvent plant PAH contamination.

  13. Characterization and biodegradation kinetics of a new cold-adapted carbamazepine-degrading bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. CBZ-4.

    PubMed

    Li, Ang; Cai, Rui; Di, Cui; Qiu, Tian; Pang, Changlong; Yang, Jixian; Ma, Fang; Ren, Nanqi

    2013-11-01

    Carbamazepine is frequently detected in waters and hardly eliminated during conventional wastewater treatment processes due to its complicated chemical structure and resistance to biodegradation. A carbamazepine-degrading bacterium named CBZ-4 was isolated at a low temperature (10 degreeC) from activated sludge in a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Strain CBZ-4, which can use carbamazepine as its sole source of carbon and energy, was identified as Pseudomonas sp. by the 16S rRNA gene sequence. The composition and percentage of fatty acids, which can reveal the cold-adaptation mechanism of strain CBZ-4, were determined. Strain CBZ-4 can effectively degrade carbamazepine at optimal conditions: pH 7.0, 10 degreeC, 150 r/min rotation speed, and 13% inoculation volume. The average removal rate of carbamazepine was 46.6% after 144 hr of incubation. The biodegradation kinetics of carbamazepine by CBZ-4 was fitted via the Monod model. Vmax and Ks were found to be 0.0094 hr-1 and 32.5 mg/L, respectively. PMID:24552057

  14. Novel rhamnolipid biosurfactants produced by a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain NY3

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Maiqian; Yin, Xihou; Ren, Chunyan; Wang, Yang; Xu, Feng; Shen, Qirong

    2014-01-01

    A novel rhamnolipid biosurfactant-producing and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain NY3 was isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil samples. Strain NY3 was characterized by its extraordinary capacity to produce structurally diverse rhamnolipids. A total of 25 rhamnolipid components and 37 different parent molecular ions, representing various metal ion adducts (Na+, 2Na+ and K+), were detected by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Among these compounds are ten new rhamnolipids. In addition to its biosurfactant production, strain NY3 was shown to be capable of efficient degradation of PAHs as well as synergistic improvement in the degradation of high molecular weight PAHs by its biosurfactant. These findings have added novel members to the rhamnolipid group and expanded current knowledge regarding the diversity and productive capability of rhamnolipid biosurfactants from a single specific strain with variation of only one carbon source. Additionally, this paper lays the foundation for improvement in the yield of NY3BS and study of the degradation pathway(s) of PAHs in P. aeruginosa strain NY3. PMID:20580808

  15. Purification and characterization of a novel cold-regulated protein from an ice-nucleating bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens KUIN-1.

    PubMed

    Obata, H; Ishigaki, H; Kawahara, H; Yamade, K

    1998-11-01

    The psychrotrophic ice-nucleating bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens KUIN-1 respond to a decrease in temperature with the induction of proteins that are classified as cold shock proteins (CSPs). We found the function of a 26-kDa protein of the CSPs in the strain KUIN-1. In strain KUIN-1, a cold shock from 18 to 4 degrees C induced the synthesis of the 26-kDa protein. By analysis with SDS-PAGE, it was then demonstrated that the 26-kDa protein was produced by the cells after treatment at 4 degrees C. The 26-kDa protein was purified to apparent homogeneity by (NH4)2SO4 precipitation and some chromatographies (QA52, phenyl Superose, Superose 12, and Mono Q). The purified 26-kDa protein is composed of 6 subunits of 26.5-kDa with a molecular mass of approximately 159-kDa according to gel filtration and SDS-PAGE. The N-terminal sequence of the 26-kDa protein was Gln-Ala-Ala-Tyr-Tyr-Pro-Ala-His-His-His-Gln- Gln-Val-Gln-Gln-His-Trp-Gly-His-His-. Specifically, 26-kDa protein of the CSPs of strain KUIN-1 was very effective in protecting the cold-labile enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase against denaturation by freezing. The characteristics of 26-kDa protein are analogous to the cold-regulated protein of the plants. PMID:9972230

  16. Inoculating plants with the endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. Ph6-gfp to reduce phenanthrene contamination.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai; Liu, Juan; Gao, Yanzheng; Sheng, Yuehui; Kang, Fuxing; Waigi, Michael Gatheru

    2015-12-01

    Plant organic contamination poses a serious threat to the safety of agricultural products and human health worldwide, and the association of endophytic bacteria with host plants may decrease organic pollutants in planta. In this study, we firstly determined the growth response and biofilm formation of endophytic Pseudomonas sp. Ph6-gfp, and then systematically evaluated the performance of different plant colonization methods (seed soaking (SS), root soaking (RS), leaf painting (LP)) for circumventing the risk of plant phenanthrene (PHE) contamination. After inoculation for 48 h, strain Ph6-gfp grew efficiently with PHE, oxalic acid, or malic acid as the sole sources of carbon and energy. Moreover, strain Ph6-gfp could form robust biofilms in LB medium. In greenhouse hydroponic experiments, strain Ph6-gfp could actively colonize inoculated plants internally, and plants colonized with Ph6-gfp showed a higher capacity for PHE removal. Compared with the Ph6-gfp-free treatment, the accumulations of PHE in Ph6-gfp-colonized plants via SS, RS, and LP were 20.1, 33.1, and 7.1 %, respectively, lower. Our results indicate that inoculating plants with Ph6-gfp could lower the risk of plant PHE contamination. RS was most efficient for improving PHE removal in whole plant bodies by increasing the cell numbers of Ph6-gfp in plant roots. The findings in this study provide an optimized method to strain Ph6-gfp reduce plant PAH residues, which may be applied to agricultural production in PAH-contaminated soil.

  17. Impact of a Recombinant Biocontrol Bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens pc78, on Microbial Community in Tomato Rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Kong, Hyun Gi; Kim, Nam Hee; Lee, Seung Yeup; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2016-04-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens pc78 is an effective biocontrol agent for soil-borne fungal diseases. We previously constructed a P43-gfp tagged biocontrol bacteria P. fluorescens pc78-48 to investigate bacterial traits in natural ecosystem and the environmental risk of genetically modified biocontrol bacteria in tomato rhizosphere. Fluctuation of culturable bacteria profile, microbial community structure, and potential horizontal gene transfer was investigated over time after the bacteria treatment to the tomato rhizosphere. Tagged gene transfer to other organisms such as tomato plants and bacteria cultured on various media was examined by polymerase chain reaction, using gene specific primers. Transfer of chromosomally integrated P43-gfp from pc78 to other organisms was not apparent. Population and colony types of culturable bacteria were not significantly affected by the introduction of P. fluorescens pc78 or pc78-48 into tomato rhizosphere. Additionally, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles were investigated to estimate the influence on the microbial community structure in tomato rhizosphere between non-treated and pc78-48-treated samples. Interestingly, rhizosphere soil treated with strain pc78-48 exhibited a significantly different bacterial community structure compared to that of non-treated rhizosphere soil. Our results suggest that biocontrol bacteria treatment influences microbial community in tomato rhizosphere, while the chromosomally modified biocontrol bacteria may not pose any specific environmental risk in terms of gene transfer. PMID:27147933

  18. Impact of a Recombinant Biocontrol Bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens pc78, on Microbial Community in Tomato Rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Kong, Hyun Gi; Kim, Nam Hee; Lee, Seung Yeup; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2016-04-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens pc78 is an effective biocontrol agent for soil-borne fungal diseases. We previously constructed a P43-gfp tagged biocontrol bacteria P. fluorescens pc78-48 to investigate bacterial traits in natural ecosystem and the environmental risk of genetically modified biocontrol bacteria in tomato rhizosphere. Fluctuation of culturable bacteria profile, microbial community structure, and potential horizontal gene transfer was investigated over time after the bacteria treatment to the tomato rhizosphere. Tagged gene transfer to other organisms such as tomato plants and bacteria cultured on various media was examined by polymerase chain reaction, using gene specific primers. Transfer of chromosomally integrated P43-gfp from pc78 to other organisms was not apparent. Population and colony types of culturable bacteria were not significantly affected by the introduction of P. fluorescens pc78 or pc78-48 into tomato rhizosphere. Additionally, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles were investigated to estimate the influence on the microbial community structure in tomato rhizosphere between non-treated and pc78-48-treated samples. Interestingly, rhizosphere soil treated with strain pc78-48 exhibited a significantly different bacterial community structure compared to that of non-treated rhizosphere soil. Our results suggest that biocontrol bacteria treatment influences microbial community in tomato rhizosphere, while the chromosomally modified biocontrol bacteria may not pose any specific environmental risk in terms of gene transfer.

  19. Impact of a Recombinant Biocontrol Bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens pc78, on Microbial Community in Tomato Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Hyun Gi; Kim, Nam Hee; Lee, Seung Yeup; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens pc78 is an effective biocontrol agent for soil-borne fungal diseases. We previously constructed a P43-gfp tagged biocontrol bacteria P. fluorescens pc78-48 to investigate bacterial traits in natural ecosystem and the environmental risk of genetically modified biocontrol bacteria in tomato rhizosphere. Fluctuation of culturable bacteria profile, microbial community structure, and potential horizontal gene transfer was investigated over time after the bacteria treatment to the tomato rhizosphere. Tagged gene transfer to other organisms such as tomato plants and bacteria cultured on various media was examined by polymerase chain reaction, using gene specific primers. Transfer of chromosomally integrated P43-gfp from pc78 to other organisms was not apparent. Population and colony types of culturable bacteria were not significantly affected by the introduction of P. fluorescens pc78 or pc78-48 into tomato rhizosphere. Additionally, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles were investigated to estimate the influence on the microbial community structure in tomato rhizosphere between non-treated and pc78-48-treated samples. Interestingly, rhizosphere soil treated with strain pc78-48 exhibited a significantly different bacterial community structure compared to that of non-treated rhizosphere soil. Our results suggest that biocontrol bacteria treatment influences microbial community in tomato rhizosphere, while the chromosomally modified biocontrol bacteria may not pose any specific environmental risk in terms of gene transfer. PMID:27147933

  20. Physiological responses of Microcystis aeruginosa against the algicidal bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Su; Yin, Hua; Tang, Shaoyu; Peng, Hui; Yin, Donggao; Yang, Yixuan; Liu, Zehua; Dang, Zhi

    2016-05-01

    Proliferation of cyanobacteria in aquatic ecosystems has caused water security problems throughout the world. Our preliminary study has showed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa can inhibit the growth of cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa. In order to explore the inhibitory mechanism of P. aeruginosa on the cell growth and synthesis of intracellular substances of M. aeruginosa, concentrations of Chlorophyll-a, intracellular protein, carbohydrate, enzyme activities and ion metabolism of M. aeruginosa, were investigated. The results indicated that 83.84% algicidal efficiency of P. aeruginosa was achieved after treatment for 7 days. The strain inhibited the reproduction of M. aeruginosa by impeding the synthesis of intracellular protein and carbohydrate of cyanobacterium, and only a very small part of intracellular protein and carbohydrate was detected after exposure to P. aeruginosa for 5 days. P. aeruginosa caused the alteration of intracellular antioxidant enzyme activity of M. aeruginosa, such as catalase, peroxidase. The accumulation of malondialdehyde aggravated membrane injury after treatment for 3 days. P. aeruginosa also affected the ion metabolism of cyanobacteria. The release of Na(+) and Cl(-) was significantly enhanced while the uptake of K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), NO3(-) and SO4(2)(-) decreased. Surface morphology and intracellular structure of cyanobacteria and bacterial cells changed dramatically over time as evidenced by electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. These results revealed that the algicidal activity of P. aeruginosa was primarily due to the fermentation liquid of P. aeruginosa that impeded the synthesis of intracellular protein and carbohydrate, and damaged the cell membrane through membrane lipid peroxidation.

  1. Physiological responses of Microcystis aeruginosa against the algicidal bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Su; Yin, Hua; Tang, Shaoyu; Peng, Hui; Yin, Donggao; Yang, Yixuan; Liu, Zehua; Dang, Zhi

    2016-05-01

    Proliferation of cyanobacteria in aquatic ecosystems has caused water security problems throughout the world. Our preliminary study has showed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa can inhibit the growth of cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa. In order to explore the inhibitory mechanism of P. aeruginosa on the cell growth and synthesis of intracellular substances of M. aeruginosa, concentrations of Chlorophyll-a, intracellular protein, carbohydrate, enzyme activities and ion metabolism of M. aeruginosa, were investigated. The results indicated that 83.84% algicidal efficiency of P. aeruginosa was achieved after treatment for 7 days. The strain inhibited the reproduction of M. aeruginosa by impeding the synthesis of intracellular protein and carbohydrate of cyanobacterium, and only a very small part of intracellular protein and carbohydrate was detected after exposure to P. aeruginosa for 5 days. P. aeruginosa caused the alteration of intracellular antioxidant enzyme activity of M. aeruginosa, such as catalase, peroxidase. The accumulation of malondialdehyde aggravated membrane injury after treatment for 3 days. P. aeruginosa also affected the ion metabolism of cyanobacteria. The release of Na(+) and Cl(-) was significantly enhanced while the uptake of K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), NO3(-) and SO4(2)(-) decreased. Surface morphology and intracellular structure of cyanobacteria and bacterial cells changed dramatically over time as evidenced by electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. These results revealed that the algicidal activity of P. aeruginosa was primarily due to the fermentation liquid of P. aeruginosa that impeded the synthesis of intracellular protein and carbohydrate, and damaged the cell membrane through membrane lipid peroxidation. PMID:26866757

  2. Inoculating plants with the endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. Ph6-gfp to reduce phenanthrene contamination.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai; Liu, Juan; Gao, Yanzheng; Sheng, Yuehui; Kang, Fuxing; Waigi, Michael Gatheru

    2015-12-01

    Plant organic contamination poses a serious threat to the safety of agricultural products and human health worldwide, and the association of endophytic bacteria with host plants may decrease organic pollutants in planta. In this study, we firstly determined the growth response and biofilm formation of endophytic Pseudomonas sp. Ph6-gfp, and then systematically evaluated the performance of different plant colonization methods (seed soaking (SS), root soaking (RS), leaf painting (LP)) for circumventing the risk of plant phenanthrene (PHE) contamination. After inoculation for 48 h, strain Ph6-gfp grew efficiently with PHE, oxalic acid, or malic acid as the sole sources of carbon and energy. Moreover, strain Ph6-gfp could form robust biofilms in LB medium. In greenhouse hydroponic experiments, strain Ph6-gfp could actively colonize inoculated plants internally, and plants colonized with Ph6-gfp showed a higher capacity for PHE removal. Compared with the Ph6-gfp-free treatment, the accumulations of PHE in Ph6-gfp-colonized plants via SS, RS, and LP were 20.1, 33.1, and 7.1 %, respectively, lower. Our results indicate that inoculating plants with Ph6-gfp could lower the risk of plant PHE contamination. RS was most efficient for improving PHE removal in whole plant bodies by increasing the cell numbers of Ph6-gfp in plant roots. The findings in this study provide an optimized method to strain Ph6-gfp reduce plant PAH residues, which may be applied to agricultural production in PAH-contaminated soil. PMID:26263885

  3. Novel Essential Role of Ethanol Oxidation Genes at Low Temperature Revealed by Transcriptome Analysis in the Antarctic Bacterium Pseudomonas extremaustralis

    PubMed Central

    Tribelli, Paula M.; Solar Venero, Esmeralda C.; Ricardi, Martiniano M.; Gómez-Lozano, Maria; Raiger Iustman, Laura J.; Molin, Søren; López, Nancy I.

    2015-01-01

    Temperature is one of the most important factors for bacterial growth and development. Cold environments are widely distributed on earth, and psychrotolerant and psychrophilic microorganisms have developed different adaptation strategies to cope with the stress derived from low temperatures. Pseudomonas extremaustralis is an Antarctic bacterium able to grow under low temperatures and to produce high amounts of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). In this work, we analyzed the genome-wide transcriptome by RNA deep-sequencing technology of early exponential cultures of P. extremaustralis growing in LB (Luria Broth) supplemented with sodium octanoate to favor PHA accumulation at 8°C and 30°C. We found that genes involved in primary metabolism, including tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) related genes, as well as cytochromes and amino acid metabolism coding genes, were repressed at low temperature. Among up-regulated genes, those coding for transcriptional regulatory and signal transduction proteins were over-represented at cold conditions. Remarkably, we found that genes involved in ethanol oxidation, exaA, exaB and exaC, encoding a pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent ethanol dehydrogenase, the cytochrome c550 and an aldehyde dehydrogenase respectively, were up-regulated. Along with RNA-seq experiments, analysis of mutant strains for pqqB (PQQ biosynthesis protein B) and exaA were carried out. We found that the exaA and pqqB genes are essential for growth under low temperature in LB supplemented with sodium octanoate. Additionally, p-rosaniline assay measurements showed the presence of alcohol dehydrogenase activity at both 8°C and 30°C, while the activity was abolished in a pqqB mutant strain. These results together with the detection of ethanol by gas chromatography in P. extremaustralis cultures grown at 8°C support the conclusion that this pathway is important under cold conditions. The obtained results have led to the identification of novel components involved

  4. Novel Essential Role of Ethanol Oxidation Genes at Low Temperature Revealed by Transcriptome Analysis in the Antarctic Bacterium Pseudomonas extremaustralis.

    PubMed

    Tribelli, Paula M; Solar Venero, Esmeralda C; Ricardi, Martiniano M; Gómez-Lozano, Maria; Raiger Iustman, Laura J; Molin, Søren; López, Nancy I

    2015-01-01

    Temperature is one of the most important factors for bacterial growth and development. Cold environments are widely distributed on earth, and psychrotolerant and psychrophilic microorganisms have developed different adaptation strategies to cope with the stress derived from low temperatures. Pseudomonas extremaustralis is an Antarctic bacterium able to grow under low temperatures and to produce high amounts of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). In this work, we analyzed the genome-wide transcriptome by RNA deep-sequencing technology of early exponential cultures of P. extremaustralis growing in LB (Luria Broth) supplemented with sodium octanoate to favor PHA accumulation at 8°C and 30°C. We found that genes involved in primary metabolism, including tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) related genes, as well as cytochromes and amino acid metabolism coding genes, were repressed at low temperature. Among up-regulated genes, those coding for transcriptional regulatory and signal transduction proteins were over-represented at cold conditions. Remarkably, we found that genes involved in ethanol oxidation, exaA, exaB and exaC, encoding a pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent ethanol dehydrogenase, the cytochrome c550 and an aldehyde dehydrogenase respectively, were up-regulated. Along with RNA-seq experiments, analysis of mutant strains for pqqB (PQQ biosynthesis protein B) and exaA were carried out. We found that the exaA and pqqB genes are essential for growth under low temperature in LB supplemented with sodium octanoate. Additionally, p-rosaniline assay measurements showed the presence of alcohol dehydrogenase activity at both 8°C and 30°C, while the activity was abolished in a pqqB mutant strain. These results together with the detection of ethanol by gas chromatography in P. extremaustralis cultures grown at 8°C support the conclusion that this pathway is important under cold conditions. The obtained results have led to the identification of novel components involved

  5. Pyoverdine synthesis by the Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium Pseudomonas putida GB-1

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Dorothy L.; Lee, Sung-Woo; Geszvain, Kati; Davis, Richard E.; Gruffaz, Christelle; Meyer, Jean-Marie; Torpey, Justin W.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2014-01-01

    When iron-starved, the Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria Pseudomonas putida strains GB-1 and MnB1 produce pyoverdines (PVDGB-1 and PVDMnB1), siderophores that both influence iron uptake and inhibit manganese(II) oxidation by these strains. To explore the properties and genetics of a PVD that can affect manganese oxidation, LC-MS/MS, and various siderotyping techniques were used to identify the peptides of PVDGB-1 and PVDMnB1 as being (for both PVDs): chromophore-Asp-Lys-OHAsp-Ser-Gly-aThr-Lys-cOHOrn, resembling a structure previously reported for P. putida CFML 90-51, which does not oxidize Mn. All three strains also produced an azotobactin and a sulfonated PVD, each with the peptide sequence above, but with unknown regulatory or metabolic effects. Bioinformatic analysis of the sequenced genome of P. putida GB-1 suggested that a particular non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), coded by the operon PputGB1_4083-4086, could produce the peptide backbone of PVDGB-1. To verify this prediction, plasmid integration disruption of PputGB1_4083 was performed and the resulting mutant failed to produce detectable PVD. In silico analysis of the modules in PputGB1_4083-4086 predicted a peptide sequence of Asp-Lys-Asp-Ser-Ala-Thr-Lsy-Orn, which closely matches the peptide determined by MS/MS. To extend these studies to other organisms, various Mn(II)-oxidizing and non-oxidizing isolates of P. putida, P. fluorescens, P. marincola, P. fluorescens-syringae group, P. mendocina-resinovorans group, and P. stutzerii group were screened for PVD synthesis. The PVD producers (12 out of 16 tested strains) were siderotyped and placed into four sets of differing PVD structures, some corresponding to previously characterized PVDs and some to novel PVDs. These results combined with previous studies suggested that the presence of OHAsp or the flexibility of the pyoverdine polypeptide may enable efficient binding of Mn(III). PMID:24847318

  6. Pyoverdine synthesis by the Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium Pseudomonas putida GB-1.

    PubMed

    Parker, Dorothy L; Lee, Sung-Woo; Geszvain, Kati; Davis, Richard E; Gruffaz, Christelle; Meyer, Jean-Marie; Torpey, Justin W; Tebo, Bradley M

    2014-01-01

    When iron-starved, the Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria Pseudomonas putida strains GB-1 and MnB1 produce pyoverdines (PVDGB-1 and PVDMnB1), siderophores that both influence iron uptake and inhibit manganese(II) oxidation by these strains. To explore the properties and genetics of a PVD that can affect manganese oxidation, LC-MS/MS, and various siderotyping techniques were used to identify the peptides of PVDGB-1 and PVDMnB1 as being (for both PVDs): chromophore-Asp-Lys-OHAsp-Ser-Gly-aThr-Lys-cOHOrn, resembling a structure previously reported for P. putida CFML 90-51, which does not oxidize Mn. All three strains also produced an azotobactin and a sulfonated PVD, each with the peptide sequence above, but with unknown regulatory or metabolic effects. Bioinformatic analysis of the sequenced genome of P. putida GB-1 suggested that a particular non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), coded by the operon PputGB1_4083-4086, could produce the peptide backbone of PVDGB-1. To verify this prediction, plasmid integration disruption of PputGB1_4083 was performed and the resulting mutant failed to produce detectable PVD. In silico analysis of the modules in PputGB1_4083-4086 predicted a peptide sequence of Asp-Lys-Asp-Ser-Ala-Thr-Lsy-Orn, which closely matches the peptide determined by MS/MS. To extend these studies to other organisms, various Mn(II)-oxidizing and non-oxidizing isolates of P. putida, P. fluorescens, P. marincola, P. fluorescens-syringae group, P. mendocina-resinovorans group, and P. stutzerii group were screened for PVD synthesis. The PVD producers (12 out of 16 tested strains) were siderotyped and placed into four sets of differing PVD structures, some corresponding to previously characterized PVDs and some to novel PVDs. These results combined with previous studies suggested that the presence of OHAsp or the flexibility of the pyoverdine polypeptide may enable efficient binding of Mn(III). PMID:24847318

  7. The biocontrol endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7 induces systemic defense responses in aerial tissues upon colonization of olive roots

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Lama Cabanás, Carmen; Schilirò, Elisabetta; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7, a native olive root endophyte and effective biocontrol agent (BCA) against Verticillium wilt of olive, is able to trigger a broad range of defense responses in root tissues of this woody plant. In order to elucidate whether strain PICF7 also induces systemic defense responses in above-ground organs, aerial tissues of olive plants grown under non-gnotobiotic conditions were collected at different time points after root bacterization with this endophytic BCA. A suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library, enriched in up-regulated genes, was generated. This strategy enabled the identification of 376 ESTs (99 contigs and 277 singlets), many of them related to response to different stresses. Five ESTs, involved in defense responses, were selected to carry out time-course quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) experiments aiming to: (1) validate the induction of these genes, and (2) shed light on their expression pattern along time (from 1 to 15 days). Induction of olive genes potentially coding for lipoxygenase 2, catalase, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase, and phenylananine ammonia-lyase was thus confirmed at some time points. Computational analysis also revealed that different transcription factors were up-regulated in olive aerial tissues (i.e., JERF, bHLH, WRKY), as previously reported for roots. Results confirmed that root colonization by this endophytic bacterium does not only trigger defense responses in this organ but also mounts a wide array of systemic defense responses in distant tissues (stems, leaves). This sheds light on how olive plants respond to the “non-hostile” colonization by a bacterial endophyte and how induced defense response can contribute to the biocontrol activity of strain PICF7. PMID:25250017

  8. Effect of the heterotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas reactans on olivine dissolution kinetics and implications for CO2 storage in basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirokova, L. S.; Bénézeth, P.; Pokrovsky, O. S.; Gerard, E.; Ménez, B.; Alfredsson, H.

    2012-03-01

    This work is aimed at quantification of forsteritic olivine (Fo92) dissolution kinetics in batch and mixed-flow reactors in the presence of aerobic gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas reactans HK 31.3) isolated from an instrumented well located within a basaltic aquifer in Iceland. The release rate of mineral constituents was measured as a function of time in the presence of live and dead cells in constant-pH (4-9), bicarbonate-buffered (0.001-0.05 M), nutrient-rich and nutrient-free media in batch reactors at 0-30 atm of CO2 partial pressure (pCO2). In batch reactors at 30 atm pCO2, 0.1 M NaCl and 0.05 M NaHCO3 the rates were weakly affected by the presence of bacteria. In nutrient media, the SEM observation of reacted grains revealed the presence of biofilm-like surface coverage that does not modify Mg and Si release rate at the earlier stages of reaction but significantly decreased the dissolution after prolonged exposure. Olivine dissolution rates measured in flow-through reactors are not affected by the presence of dead and live bacteria at pH ⩾9 in 0.01 M NaHCO3 solutions. In circumneutral, CO2-free solutions at pH close to 6, both live and dead bacteria increase the dissolution rate, probably due to surface complexation of exudates and lysis products. In most studied conditions, the dissolution was stoichiometric with respect to Mg and Si release and no formation of secondary phases was evidenced by microscopic examination of post-reacted grains. Obtained results are consistent with known molecular mechanism of olivine dissolution and its surface chemistry. Overall, this work demonstrates negligible effect of P. reactans on olivine reactivity under conditions of CO2 storage in the wide range of aqueous fluid composition.

  9. Studies on microbial chromate reduction by Pseudomonas sp. in aerobic continuous suspended growth cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalan, R.; Veeramani, H. . Centre for Environmental Science and Engineering)

    1994-03-15

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium was studied in three bench-scale continuous stirred tank reactors. The inoculum was a culture of Pseudomonas sp., capable of giving 83% to 87% chromate reduction in 72-h batch assays with 60 mg Cr(6) L[sup [minus]1] in synthetic medium. The continuous culture studies were conducted for about 100 days using synthetic feed containing different levels of chromate at 28 to 30 C and pH 6.8. The feed rate was varied over the range 0.5 to 1 L d[sup [minus]1] to obtain hydraulic retention time of 36 to 72 h. Chromate reduction efficiency was 81% to 91% and 100% for influent (Cr(6)) concentrations of 15 to 124 and 5 mg L[sup [minus]1], respectively, with a hydraulic retention time of 72 h.

  10. Biodegradation of malachite green by Pseudomonas sp. strain DY1 under aerobic condition: characteristics, degradation products, enzyme analysis and phytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Du, Lin-Na; Wang, Sheng; Li, Gang; Wang, Bing; Jia, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Yu-Hua; Chen, Yun-Long

    2011-03-01

    Malachite green (MG), a widely-used and recalcitrant dye, has been confirmed to be carcinogenic and mutagenic against many organisms. The main objective of this study is to investigate the capability of Pseudomonas sp. strain DY1 to decolorize MG, and to explore the possible mechanism. The results showed that this strain demonstrated high decolorizing capability (90.3-97.2%) at high concentrations of MG (100-1,000 mg/l) under shaking condition within 24 h. In static conditions, lower but still effective decolorization (78.9-84.3%) was achieved. The optimal pH and temperature for the decolorization was pH 6.6 and 28-30°C, respectively. Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) (1 mM) were observed to significantly enhance the decolorization. The intermediates of the MG degradation under aerobic condition identified by UV-visible, GC-MS and LC-MS analysis included malachite green carbinol, (dimethyl amino-phenyl)-phenyl-methanone, N,N-dimethylaniline, (methyl amino-phenyl)-phenyl-methanone, (amino phenyl)-phenyl methanone and di-benzyl methane. The enzyme analysis indicated that Mn-peroxidase, NADH-DCIP and MG reductase were involved in the biodegradation of MG. Moreover, phytotoxicity of MG and detoxification for MG by the strain were observed. Therefore, this strain could be potentially used for bioremediation of MG.

  11. Effective selenium volatilization under aerobic conditions and recovery from the aqueous phase by Pseudomonas stutzeri NT-I.

    PubMed

    Kagami, Tsubasa; Narita, Takanobu; Kuroda, Masashi; Notaguchi, Emi; Yamashita, Mitsuo; Sei, Kazunari; Soda, Satoshi; Ike, Michihiko

    2013-03-01

    Selenium is an important rare metal and its recovery from waste and wastewater is necessary for its sustainable utilization. Microbial selenium volatilization is suitable for selenium recovery from industrial wastewater because volatile selenium can be recovered in recyclable forms free from other chemicals. We found that Pseudomonas stutzeri NT-I can aerobically transform selenate, selenite, and biogenic elemental selenium into dimethyldiselenide as well as dimethylselenide; these were temporarily accumulated in the aqueous phase and then transferred into the gaseous phase. The rate of selenium volatilization using strain NT-I ranged 6.5-7.6 μmol/L/h in flask experiments and was much higher than the rates reported previously for other microbes. The selenium volatilization rate accelerated to 14 μmol/L/h in a jar fermenter. Furthermore, 82% of the selenium volatilized using strain NT-I was recovered with few impurities within 48 h in a simple gas trap with nitric acid, demonstrating that strain NT-I is a promising biocatalyst for selenium recovery through biovolatilization from the aqueous phase.

  12. Anoxybacillus kamchatkensis sp. nov., a novel thermophilic facultative aerobic bacterium with a broad pH optimum from the Geyser valley, Kamchatka.

    PubMed

    Kevbrin, Vadim V; Zengler, Karsten; Lysenko, Anatolii M; Wiegel, Juergen

    2005-10-01

    A facultative aerobic, moderately thermophilic, spore forming bacterium, strain JW/VK-KG4 was isolated from an enrichment culture obtained from the Geyser valley, a geo-thermally heated environment located in the Kamchatka peninsula (Far East region of Russia). The cells were rod shaped, motile, peritrichous flagellated stained Gram positive and had a Gram positive type cell wall. Aerobically, the strain utilized a range of carbohydrates including glucose, fructose, trehalose, proteinuous substrates, and pectin as well. Anaerobically, only carbohydrates are utilized. When growing on carbohydrates, the strain required yeast extract and vitamin B(12). Anaerobically, glucose was fermented to lactate as main product and acetate, formate, ethanol as minor products. Aerobically, even in well-aerated cultures (agitated at 500 rpm), glucose oxidation was incomplete and lactate and acetate were found in culture supernatants as by-products. Optimal growth of the isolate was observed at pH(25 C) 6.8-8.5 and 60 degrees C. The doubling times on glucose at optimal growth conditions were 34 min (aerobically) and 40 min (anaerobically). The G+C content was 42.3 mol% as determined by T(m) assay. Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene indicated an affiliation of strain JW/VK-KG4 with Anoxybacillus species. Based on its morphology, physiology, phylogenetic relationship and its low DNA-DNA homology with validly published species of Anoxybacillus, it is proposed that strain JW/VK-KG4 represents a new species in the genus Anoxybacillus as A. kamchatkensis sp. nov. The type strain for the novel species is JW/VK-KG4(T) (=DSM 14988, =ATCC BAA-549). The GenBank accession number for the 16S rDNA sequence is AF510985.

  13. Anoxybacillus kamchatkensis sp. nov., a novel thermophilic facultative aerobic bacterium with a broad pH optimum from the Geyser valley, Kamchatka.

    PubMed

    Kevbrin, Vadim V; Zengler, Karsten; Lysenko, Anatolii M; Wiegel, Juergen

    2005-10-01

    A facultative aerobic, moderately thermophilic, spore forming bacterium, strain JW/VK-KG4 was isolated from an enrichment culture obtained from the Geyser valley, a geo-thermally heated environment located in the Kamchatka peninsula (Far East region of Russia). The cells were rod shaped, motile, peritrichous flagellated stained Gram positive and had a Gram positive type cell wall. Aerobically, the strain utilized a range of carbohydrates including glucose, fructose, trehalose, proteinuous substrates, and pectin as well. Anaerobically, only carbohydrates are utilized. When growing on carbohydrates, the strain required yeast extract and vitamin B(12). Anaerobically, glucose was fermented to lactate as main product and acetate, formate, ethanol as minor products. Aerobically, even in well-aerated cultures (agitated at 500 rpm), glucose oxidation was incomplete and lactate and acetate were found in culture supernatants as by-products. Optimal growth of the isolate was observed at pH(25 C) 6.8-8.5 and 60 degrees C. The doubling times on glucose at optimal growth conditions were 34 min (aerobically) and 40 min (anaerobically). The G+C content was 42.3 mol% as determined by T(m) assay. Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene indicated an affiliation of strain JW/VK-KG4 with Anoxybacillus species. Based on its morphology, physiology, phylogenetic relationship and its low DNA-DNA homology with validly published species of Anoxybacillus, it is proposed that strain JW/VK-KG4 represents a new species in the genus Anoxybacillus as A. kamchatkensis sp. nov. The type strain for the novel species is JW/VK-KG4(T) (=DSM 14988, =ATCC BAA-549). The GenBank accession number for the 16S rDNA sequence is AF510985. PMID:16142505

  14. Description of a novel indole-oxidizing bacterium Pseudomonas indoloxydans sp. nov., isolated from a pesticide-contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Manickam, Natesan; Ghosh, Anuradha; Jain, Rakesh K; Mayilraj, Shanmugam

    2008-06-01

    A Gram-negative, deep brown-pigmented Gammaproteobacteria, strain IPL-1(T), capable of oxidizing indole was isolated from a lindane-contaminated site and subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. Most of the physiological and biochemical properties, major fatty acids (C(18:1)omega7c, C(16:1)omega7c/iso C(15:0) 2OH and C(16:0)), estimated DNA G+C content (67.2mol%) and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that strain IPL-1(T) belonged to the genus Pseudomonas. Strain IPL-1(T) exhibited highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes (99.0%), followed by Pseudomonas alcaliphila (98.7%), Pseudomonas oleovorans (98.3%), Pseudomonas nitroreducens (98.0%), Pseudomonas mendocina (97.6%) and Pseudomonas stutzeri (97.4%). However, the DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain IPL-1(T) and the closely related taxa were between 22% and 61%. On the basis of differential phenotypic characteristics and genotypic distinctiveness, strain IPL-1(T) should be classified within the genus Pseudomonas as a novel species, for which the name Pseudomonas indoloxydans is proposed. The type strain is IPL-1(T) (=MTCC 8062(T)=JCM 14246(T)). PMID:18406094

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. Strain BMS12, a Plant Growth-Promoting and Protease-Producing Bacterium, Isolated from the Rhizosphere Sediment of Phragmites karka of Chilika Lake, India

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Samir R.; Panda, Ananta Narayan; Ray, Lopamudra; Sahu, Neha; Mishra, Gayatri; Jadhao, Sudhir; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Adhya, Tapan Kumar; Rastogi, Gurdeep; Pattnaik, Ajit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    We report the 4.51 Mb draft genome of Pseudomonas sp. strain BMS12, a Gram-negative bacterium in the class of Gammaproteobacteria, isolated from the rhizospheric sediment of Phragmites karka, an invasive weed in Chilika Lake, Odisha, India. The Pseudomonas sp. strain BMS12 is capable of producing proteases and is also an efficient plant growth promoter that can be useful for various phytoremedial and industrial applications. PMID:27365340

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. Strain BMS12, a Plant Growth-Promoting and Protease-Producing Bacterium, Isolated from the Rhizosphere Sediment of Phragmites karka of Chilika Lake, India.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Samir R; Panda, Ananta Narayan; Ray, Lopamudra; Sahu, Neha; Mishra, Gayatri; Jadhao, Sudhir; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Adhya, Tapan Kumar; Rastogi, Gurdeep; Pattnaik, Ajit Kumar; Raina, Vishakha

    2016-01-01

    We report the 4.51 Mb draft genome of Pseudomonas sp. strain BMS12, a Gram-negative bacterium in the class of Gammaproteobacteria, isolated from the rhizospheric sediment of Phragmites karka, an invasive weed in Chilika Lake, Odisha, India. The Pseudomonas sp. strain BMS12 is capable of producing proteases and is also an efficient plant growth promoter that can be useful for various phytoremedial and industrial applications. PMID:27365340

  17. Significant reduction in toxicity, BOD, and COD of textile dyes and textile industry effluent by a novel bacterium Pseudomonas sp. LBC1.

    PubMed

    Telke, Amar A; Kim, Seon-Won; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2012-03-01

    The 16S rRNA sequence analysis and biochemical characteristics were confirmed that the isolated bacterium is Pseudomonas sp. LBC1. The commonly used textile dye, Direct Brown MR has been used to study the fate of biodegradation. Pseudomonas sp. LBC1 showed 90% decolorization of Direct Brown MR (100 mg/L) and textile industry effluent with significant reduction in COD and BOD. The optimum condition for decolorization was 7.0 pH and 40°C. Significant increase in a activity of extracellular laccase suggested their possible involvement in decolorization of Direct Brown MR. Biodegradation metabolites viz. 3,6-dihydroxy benzoic acid, 2-hydroxy-7-aminonaphthol-3-sulfonic acid, and p-dihydroperoxybenzene were identified on the basis of mass spectra and using the 1.10 beta Shimadzu NIST GC-MS library. The Direct Brown MR and textile industry effluent were toxic to Sorghum bicolor and Vigna radiata plants as compared to metabolites obtained after decolorization. The Pseudomonas sp. LBC1 could be useful strain for decolorization and detoxification of textile dyes as well as textile industry effluent.

  18. Biodegradation of Reactive blue 13 in a two-stage anaerobic/aerobic fluidized beds system with a Pseudomonas sp. isolate.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jun; Zhang, Xingwang; Li, Zhongjian; Lei, Lecheng

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain L1 capable of degrading the azo textile dye Reactive blue 13, was isolated from activated sludge in a sequencing batch reactor. A continuous two-stage anaerobic/aerobic biological fluidized bed system was used to decolorize and mineralize Reactive blue 13. The key factors affecting decolorization were investigated and the efficiency of degradation was also optimized. An overall color removal of 83.2% and COD removal of 90.7% was achieved at pH 7, a residence time of 70 h and a glucose concentration of 2 g/L, HRT=70 h and C(glucose)=2000 mg/L. Oxygen was contributing to blocking the azo bond cleavage. Consequently, decolorization occurred in the anaerobic reactor while partial mineralization was achieved in the aerobic reactor. A possible degradation pathway based on the analysis of intermediates and involving azoreduction, desulfonation, deamination and further oxidation reactions is presented.

  19. Isolation, molecular characterization and growth-promotion activities of a cold tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas sp. NARs9 (MTCC9002) from the Indian Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Pankaj K; Mishra, Smita; Bisht, Shekhar C; Selvakumar, G; Kundu, S; Bisht, J K; Gupta, Hari Shankar

    2009-01-01

    A bacterium that grows and expresses plant growth promotion traits at 4 degrees C was isolated from the rhizospheric soil of Amaranth, cultivated at a high altitude location in the North Western Indian Himalayas. The isolate was Gram negative and the cells appeared as rods (2.91 x 0.71 microm in size). It grew at temperatures ranging from 4 to 30 degrees C, with a growth optimum at 28 degrees C. It exhibited tolerance to a wide pH range (5-10; optimum 8.0) and salt concentrations up to 6% (wt/vol). Although it was sensitive to Rifampicin (R 20 microg mi-1), Gentamicin (G 3 microg mi-1), and Streptomycin (S 5 microg mi-1), it showed resistance to higher concentrations of Ampicillin (A 500 microg mi-1), Penicillin (P 300 microg mi-1), Polymixin B sulphate (Pb 100 microg mi-1) and Chloramphenicol (C 200 microg mi-1). The 16S rRNA sequence analysis revealed maximum identity with Pseudomonas lurida. The bacterium produced indole Acetic Acid (IAA) and solubilizes phosphate at 4, 15 and 28 degrees C. It also retained its ability to produce rhamnolipids and siderophores at 15 degrees C. Seed bacterization with the isolate enhanced the germination, shoot and root lengths of thirty-day-old wheat seedlings by 19.2, 30.0 & 22.9% respectively, as compared to the un-inoculated controls. PMID:19915739

  20. Isolation of a selenite-reducing and cadmium-resistant bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain RB for microbial synthesis of CdSe nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ayano, Hiroyuki; Miyake, Masaki; Terasawa, Kanako; Kuroda, Masashi; Soda, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Toshifumi; Ike, Michihiko

    2014-05-01

    Bacteria capable of synthesizing CdSe from selenite and cadmium ion were enriched from a soil sample. After repeated transfer of the soil-derived bacterial cultures to a new medium containing selenite and cadmium ion 42 times (during 360 days), an enrichment culture that can simultaneously remove selenite and cadmium ion (1 mM each) from the liquid phase was obtained. The culture's color became reddish-brown, indicating CdSe nanoparticle production, as confirmed by energy-dispersive x-ray spectra (EDS). As a result of isolation operations, the bacterium that was the most responsible for synthesizing CdSe, named Pseudomonas sp. RB, was obtained. Transmission electron microscopy and EDS revealed that this strain accumulated nanoparticles (10-20 nm) consisting of selenium and cadmium inside and on the cells when cultivated in the same medium for the enrichment culture. This report is the first describing isolation of a selenite-reducing and cadmium-resistant bacterium. It is useful for CdSe nanoparticle synthesis in the simple one-vessel operation.

  1. Isolation of a selenite-reducing and cadmium-resistant bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain RB for microbial synthesis of CdSe nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ayano, Hiroyuki; Miyake, Masaki; Terasawa, Kanako; Kuroda, Masashi; Soda, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Toshifumi; Ike, Michihiko

    2014-05-01

    Bacteria capable of synthesizing CdSe from selenite and cadmium ion were enriched from a soil sample. After repeated transfer of the soil-derived bacterial cultures to a new medium containing selenite and cadmium ion 42 times (during 360 days), an enrichment culture that can simultaneously remove selenite and cadmium ion (1 mM each) from the liquid phase was obtained. The culture's color became reddish-brown, indicating CdSe nanoparticle production, as confirmed by energy-dispersive x-ray spectra (EDS). As a result of isolation operations, the bacterium that was the most responsible for synthesizing CdSe, named Pseudomonas sp. RB, was obtained. Transmission electron microscopy and EDS revealed that this strain accumulated nanoparticles (10-20 nm) consisting of selenium and cadmium inside and on the cells when cultivated in the same medium for the enrichment culture. This report is the first describing isolation of a selenite-reducing and cadmium-resistant bacterium. It is useful for CdSe nanoparticle synthesis in the simple one-vessel operation. PMID:24216457

  2. First Case of Human Infection Due to Pseudomonas fulva, an Environmental Bacterium Isolated from Cerebrospinal Fluid ▿

    PubMed Central

    Almuzara, Marisa N.; Vazquez, Miryam; Tanaka, Naoto; Turco, Marisa; Ramirez, Maria S.; Lopez, Eduardo L.; Pasteran, Fernando; Rapoport, Melina; Procopio, Adriana; Vay, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    We report the first case of human infection due to Pseudomonas fulva. P. fulva caused acute meningitis following the placement of a drainage system in a 2-year-old female. Additionally, the isolate displayed a VIM-2 carbapenemase in a class 1 integron context. PMID:20032258

  3. A functional gene cluster for toxoflavin biosynthesis in the genome of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoflavin is a broad-spectrum toxin best known for its role in virulence of Burkholderia glumae, which causes panicle blight of rice. A gene cluster containing homologs of toxoflavin biosynthesis genes (toxA-E) of B. glumae is present in the genome of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5, a biological contr...

  4. [Analysis of the Microbial Community Structure in Continuous Flow Reactor Enhanced by Heterotrophic Nitrification and Aerobic Denitrification Bacterium Burkholderia sp. YX02].

    PubMed

    Shao, Ji-lun; Cao, Gang; Li, Zi-hui; Huang, Zheng-zheng; Luo, Kai; Mo, Ce-hui

    2016-02-15

    To reveal the dynamic succession of microbial community structure along with time in bio-denitrification reactor, a continuous flow reactor containing immobilized heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterium Burkholderia sp. YX02 was taken as a model. The microbial community structure in the bioreactor was analyzed by PCR-DCGE, and its correlations with environmental factors such as pH, NH4+ -N, NO2- -N, NO3- -N and COD were simultaneously investigated. The results showed that the microbial community was relatively rich during the early stage of 18 days. The similarity of community structure in different stages was not orderly declining with the operation. In addition, the structural similarity in adjacent stages firstly increased, then decreased, and eventually tended to be stable. Shannon-Wiener index firstly descended significantly, and then ascended with new microbial community emerging at the later stage. UPGMA clustering analysis roughly divided the process into three periods with certain relationship. Principal component analysis showed that during the operation of the bioreactor predominant bacterial community formed steadily and new microbial community dominated by Burkholderia sp. YX02 emerged at the later stage of the operation. Canonical correspondence analysis certificated that the structure of microbial community was most obviously affected by NO2- -N, followed by NO3- -N, NH4+ -N and COD, and pH had the least effect. PMID:27363154

  5. Hydroxylamine metabolism in Pseudomonas PB16: involvement of a novel hydroxylamine oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Jetten, M S; de Bruijn, P; Kuenen, J G

    1997-02-01

    Pseudomonas strain PB16, a Gram-negative heterotrophic nitrifying bacterium closely related to Pseudomonas azalaica on the basis of 16 S rDNA analysis, was able to use hydroxylamine as an additional energy source during growth in acetate limited chemostat cultures giving an increased biomass yield. In aerobically growing cells of Pseudomonas PB16 only 50% of supplemented hydroxylamine could be recovered as nitrite. In addition to nitrite, N2O could be detected in the chemostat off-gas, indicating combined heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification. The maximum specific hydroxylamine oxidizing activity observed was 450 nmol per min per mg dry weight, with a Ks of approximately 40 microM. Upon addition of hydroxylamine to the medium, Pseudomonas PB16 induced a soluble 132 KDa dimeric hydroxylamine oxidoreductase. The enzyme had a pH optimum of 9, and did not contain spectroscopic features typical for cytochromes, which is in contrast to hydroxylamine oxidoreductases found in autotrophic bacteria.

  6. Genome mining and metabolic profiling of the rhizosphere bacterium Pseudomonas sp. SH-C52 for antimicrobial compounds

    PubMed Central

    Van Der Voort, Menno; Meijer, Harold J. G.; Schmidt, Yvonne; Watrous, Jeramie; Dekkers, Ester; Mendes, Rodrigo; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Gross, Harald; Raaijmakers, Jos M.

    2015-01-01

    The plant microbiome represents an enormous untapped resource for discovering novel genes and bioactive compounds. Previously, we isolated Pseudomonas sp. SH-C52 from the rhizosphere of sugar beet plants grown in a soil suppressive to the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani and showed that its antifungal activity is, in part, attributed to the production of the chlorinated 9-amino-acid lipopeptide thanamycin (Mendes et al., 2011). To get more insight into its biosynthetic repertoire, the genome of Pseudomonas sp. SH-C52 was sequenced and subjected to in silico, mutational and functional analyses. The sequencing revealed a genome size of 6.3 Mb and 5579 predicted ORFs. Phylogenetic analysis placed strain SH-C52 within the Pseudomonas corrugata clade. In silico analysis for secondary metabolites revealed a total of six non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene clusters, including the two previously described NRPS clusters for thanamycin and the 2-amino acid antibacterial lipopeptide brabantamide. Here we show that thanamycin also has activity against an array of other fungi and that brabantamide A exhibits anti-oomycete activity and affects phospholipases of the late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Most notably, mass spectrometry led to the discovery of a third lipopeptide, designated thanapeptin, with a 22-amino-acid peptide moiety. Seven structural variants of thanapeptin were found with varying degrees of activity against P. infestans. Of the remaining four NRPS clusters, one was predicted to encode for yet another and unknown lipopeptide with a predicted peptide moiety of 8-amino acids. Collectively, these results show an enormous metabolic potential for Pseudomonas sp. SH-C52, with at least three structurally diverse lipopeptides, each with a different antimicrobial activity spectrum. PMID:26217324

  7. Genome mining and metabolic profiling of the rhizosphere bacterium Pseudomonas sp. SH-C52 for antimicrobial compounds.

    PubMed

    Van Der Voort, Menno; Meijer, Harold J G; Schmidt, Yvonne; Watrous, Jeramie; Dekkers, Ester; Mendes, Rodrigo; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Gross, Harald; Raaijmakers, Jos M

    2015-01-01

    The plant microbiome represents an enormous untapped resource for discovering novel genes and bioactive compounds. Previously, we isolated Pseudomonas sp. SH-C52 from the rhizosphere of sugar beet plants grown in a soil suppressive to the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani and showed that its antifungal activity is, in part, attributed to the production of the chlorinated 9-amino-acid lipopeptide thanamycin (Mendes et al., 2011). To get more insight into its biosynthetic repertoire, the genome of Pseudomonas sp. SH-C52 was sequenced and subjected to in silico, mutational and functional analyses. The sequencing revealed a genome size of 6.3 Mb and 5579 predicted ORFs. Phylogenetic analysis placed strain SH-C52 within the Pseudomonas corrugata clade. In silico analysis for secondary metabolites revealed a total of six non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene clusters, including the two previously described NRPS clusters for thanamycin and the 2-amino acid antibacterial lipopeptide brabantamide. Here we show that thanamycin also has activity against an array of other fungi and that brabantamide A exhibits anti-oomycete activity and affects phospholipases of the late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Most notably, mass spectrometry led to the discovery of a third lipopeptide, designated thanapeptin, with a 22-amino-acid peptide moiety. Seven structural variants of thanapeptin were found with varying degrees of activity against P. infestans. Of the remaining four NRPS clusters, one was predicted to encode for yet another and unknown lipopeptide with a predicted peptide moiety of 8-amino acids. Collectively, these results show an enormous metabolic potential for Pseudomonas sp. SH-C52, with at least three structurally diverse lipopeptides, each with a different antimicrobial activity spectrum. PMID:26217324

  8. Alkanindiges illinoisensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an obligately hydrocarbonoclastic, aerobic squalane-degrading bacterium isolated from oilfield soils.

    PubMed

    Bogan, Bill W; Sullivan, Wendy R; Kayser, Kevin J; Derr, K D; Aldrich, Henry C; Paterek, J Robert

    2003-09-01

    An alkane-degrading bacterium, designated GTI MVAB Hex1(T), was isolated from chronically crude oil-contaminated soil from an oilfield in southern Illinois. The isolate grew very weakly or not at all in minimal or rich media without hydrocarbons. Straight-chain aliphatic hydrocarbons, such as hexadecane and heptadecane, greatly stimulated growth; shorter-chain (

  9. Decolorization and detoxification of Congo red and textile industry effluent by an isolated bacterium Pseudomonas sp. SU-EBT.

    PubMed

    Telke, Amar A; Joshi, Swati M; Jadhav, Sheetal U; Tamboli, Dhawal P; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2010-04-01

    The 16S rRNA sequence and biochemical characteristics revealed the isolated organism as Pseudomonas sp. SU-EBT. This strain showed 97 and 90% decolorization of a recalcitrant dye, Congo red (100 mg l(-1)) and textile industry effluent with 50% reduction in COD within 12 and 60 h, respectively. The optimum pH and temperature for the decolorization was 8.0 and 40 degrees C, respectively. Pseudomonas sp. SU-EBT was found to tolerate the dye concentration up to 1.0 g l(-1). Significant induction in the activity of intracellular laccase suggested its involvement in the decolorization of Congo red. The metabolites formed after decolorization of Congo red, such as p-dihydroxy biphenyl, 8-amino naphthol 3-sulfonic acid and 3-hydroperoxy 8-nitrosonaphthol were characterized using FTIR and GC-MS. Phytotoxicity study revealed nontoxic nature of the degradation metabolites to Sorghum bicolor, Vigna radiata, Lens culinaris and Oryza sativa plants as compared to Congo red and textile industry effluent. Pseudomonas sp. SU-EBT decolorized several individual textile dyes, dye mixtures and textile industry effluent, thus it is a useful strain for the development of effluent treatment methods in textile processing industries.

  10. Genetic Responses Induced in Olive Roots upon Colonization by the Biocontrol Endophytic Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7

    PubMed Central

    Schilirò, Elisabetta; Ferrara, Massimo; Nigro, Franco; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge on the genetic basis underlying interactions between beneficial bacteria and woody plants is still very limited, and totally absent in the case of olive. We aimed to elucidate genetic responses taking place during the colonization of olive roots by the native endophyte Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7, an effective biocontrol agent against Verticillium wilt of olive. Roots of olive plants grown under non-gnotobiotic conditions were collected at different time points after PICF7 inoculation. A Suppression Subtractive Hybridization cDNA library enriched in induced genes was generated. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis validated the induction of selected olive genes. Computational analysis of 445 olive ESTs showed that plant defence and response to different stresses represented nearly 45% of genes induced in PICF7-colonized olive roots. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis confirmed induction of lipoxygenase, phenylpropanoid, terpenoids and plant hormones biosynthesis transcripts. Different classes of transcription factors (i.e., bHLH, WRKYs, GRAS1) were also induced. This work highlights for the first time the ability of an endophytic Pseudomonas spp. strain to mount a wide array of defence responses in an economically-relevant woody crop such as olive, helping to explain its biocontrol activity. PMID:23144916

  11. Effect of complexing ligands on the surface adsorption, internalization, and bioresponse of copper and cadmium in a soil bacterium, Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    McLean, Joan E; Pabst, Mindy W; Miller, Charles D; Dimkpa, Christian O; Anderson, Anne J

    2013-04-01

    Environmental quality criteria for metals toxic to soil and water organisms, using the free ion activity model or the biotic ligand model, are based on the concept that the major form of the metal available to the organism is the free metal ion, yet various metal complexes are bioavailable to a variety of soil and water organisms. We test here whether neutral copper or cadmium sulfates, negatively-charged copper or cadmium citrates and positively-charged copper acetate and cadmium chloride are bioavailable to a soil bacterium, Pseudomonas putida. Adsorption onto the cell surface and uptake into the periplasm and cytoplasm of this Gram-negative root colonizing bacterium was studied by adding a single concentration of Cu or Cd and varying the concentration of the ligands to complex 10-100% of the metal. Metal association from the complexes on and within the cell was defined using selective extraction procedures and compared with free ion controls using the Langmuir isotherm. Cellular responses also were assessed using a P. putida biosensor. Both uptake and bioresponse methodologies showed that P. putida was sensitive to the metal complexes. In particular, the bioresponse to Cu and Cd supplied as a citrate complex occurred with activities of free metal ions two orders of magnitude lower than for the control. We concluded that the tested metal complexes for Cu and Cd are taken up into the cell, where they trigger a bioresponse. We also discuss the implications of these findings on interactions between soil and water organisms and nanoparticles that release metal ions.

  12. Involvement of quorum sensing genes in biofilm development and degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by a marine bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa N6P6.

    PubMed

    Mangwani, Neelam; Kumari, Supriya; Das, Surajit

    2015-12-01

    Biofilm-forming and acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) synthase-positive Pseudomonas aeruginosa N6P6 was isolated from seawater after selective enrichment with two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), viz. phenanthrene and pyrene. AHL synthesis was detected qualitatively using bioreporter strains. This marine bacterium putatively synthesized N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone and N-butyryl-L-homoserine lactone, which were identified by TLC, GC-MS, and HPLC. Two quorum sensing (QS) genes coding for AHL synthase, i.e., lasI and rhlI, were identified in the bacterium. lasI and rhlI gene expression was studied during biofilm mode of growth at different phases using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The expression of lasI increased with increase in biofilm growth. In contrast, the expression of rhlI decreased during log phase of biofilm growth. The changes in lasI/rhlI expression level had significant effects (P<0.05) on biofilm architecture and subsequent PAH degradation rate. Degradation of phenanthrene and pyrene by P. aeruginosa N6P6 was affected by biofilm growth and lasI expression. The respective phenanthrene degradation for 15, 24, 48, and 72 h old biofilm after 7 days was 21.5, 54.2, 85.6, and 85.7%. However, the corresponding pyrene degradation was 15, 18.28, 47.56, and 46.48%, respectively, after 7 days. A significant positive correlation (P<0.05) was observed between lasI expression and PAHs degradation. However, in the presence of tannic acid, a QS inhibitor (QSI), PAHs degradation, biofilm formation, and pyocyanin production reduced significantly which confirmed the pivotal role of QS in biodegradation of PAHs. The findings suggest that AHLs play a pivotal role during biofilm development and subsequent bioremediation of PAHs.

  13. Characterization of a ferric uptake regulator (Fur)-mutant of the cyanotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Gracia; Merchán, Faustino; Blasco, Rafael; Igeño, M Isabel

    2014-11-20

    The Fur protein is the main sensor of cellular iron status in bacteria. In the present study, we inactivated the fur gene of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 and characterized the resulting mutant. Our findings provide experimental evidence that, cyanide generates an intracellular signal equivalent to that triggered by iron deprivation, as witnessed by the induction of prrF and fiuA (ferrichrome receptor) expression in the presence of cyanide. The fur mutant also displayed slow growth, especially in minimal culture medium, increased sensitivity to cyanide in LB medium and as expected, resistance to manganese ions. Moreover, the mutant exhibited enhanced iron accumulation and increased sensitivity to streptonigrin, as well as to some inducers of oxidative stress, such as paraquat and menadione, yet it remained resistant to hydrogen peroxide. Surprisingly, neither the wild type strain nor the fur mutant strain produced siderophores that could be detected using the universal CAS-agar method.

  14. Structural characterization of the O-chain polysaccharide from an environmentally beneficial bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens strain M71.

    PubMed

    Pieretti, Giuseppina; Puopolo, Gerardo; Carillo, Sara; Zoina, Astolfo; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Evidente, Antonio; Corsaro, Maria Michela

    2011-12-13

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens strain M71 was isolated from the root of a tomato plant and it was able to control in vivo Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici responsible for the tomato crown and root rot. Recently, strain M71 was evaluated even for its efficacy in controlling Seiridium cardinale, the causal agent of bark canker of common cypress (Cupressus sempervirens L.). Strain M71 ability to persist on the tomato rhizosphere and on the aerial part of cypress plants could be related to the nature of the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) present on the outer membrane and in particular to the O-specific polysaccharide. A neutral O-specific polysaccharide was obtained by mild acid hydrolysis of the lipopolysaccharide from P. chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens strain M71. By means of compositional analyses and NMR spectroscopy, the chemical repeating unit of the polymer was identified as the following linear trisaccharide.

  15. Cloning and heterologous overexpression of three gap genes encoding different glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases from the plant pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000.

    PubMed

    Elkhalfi, Bouchra; Araya-Garay, José Miguel; Rodríguez-Castro, Jorge; Rey-Méndez, Manuel; Soukri, Abdelaziz; Serrano Delgado, Aurelio

    2013-06-01

    The gammaproteobacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 is the causal agent of bacterial speck, a common disease of tomato. The mode of infection of this pathogen is not well understood, but according to molecular biological, genomic and proteomic data it produces a number of proteins that may promote infection and draw nutrients from the plant. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a major enzyme of carbon metabolism that was reported to be a surface antigen and virulence factor in other pathogenic microorganisms, but its possible role in the infection process of P. syringae has so far not been studied. Whole-genome sequence analyses revealed the occurrence in this phytopathogenic bacterium of three paralogous gap genes encoding distinct GAPDHs, namely two class I enzymes having different molecular mass subunits and one class III bifunctional D-erythrose-4-phosphate dehydrogenase/GAPDH enzyme. By using genome bioinformatics data, as well as alignments of both DNA and deduced protein sequences, the three gap genes of P. syringae were one-step cloned with a His-Tag in pET21a vector using a PCR-based strategy, and its expression optimized in Escherichia coli BL21 to achieve high yield of the heterologous proteins. In accordance with their distinct molecular phylogenies, these bacterial gap genes encode functional GAPDHs of diverse molecular masses and nicotinamide-coenzyme specificities, suggesting specific metabolic and/or cellular roles. PMID:23507306

  16. Production, optimization, and partial purification of lipase from Pseudomonas sp. strain BUP6, a novel rumen bacterium characterized from Malabari goat.

    PubMed

    Priji, Prakasan; Unni, Kizhakkepowathial Nair; Sajith, Sreedharan; Binod, Parameswaran; Benjamin, Sailas

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces a novel bacterium-Pseudomonas sp. strain BUP6-isolated from the rumen of the Malabari goat with efficiency for producing lipase. It showed significant production of lipase when grown in a newly designed basal medium, supplemented with vegetable oil. Suitability of five vegetable oils such as groundnut oil, coconut oil, olive oil, sunflower oil, and palm oil as inducer for the production of lipase was examined, and groundnut oil supported the highest production of lipase (96.15 U/mL). Various physical parameters required for the maximum production of lipase were statistically optimized. Plackett-Burmann design was employed to study the interactive effects of physical parameters and found that temperature, agitation, and pH effected the production of lipase significantly. The optimum conditions for lipase production (37 °C, 200 rpm, and pH 6.9) were detected by Box-Behnken design and response surface methodology, which resulted in the 0.3-fold increase (i.e., 126 U/mL) of the lipase activity over the unoptimized condition. The apparent molecular mass of partially purified lipase was 35 kDa, as judged by SDS-PAGE; the activity of lipase was also confirmed by native PAGE. Thus, this study focuses on the need for the exploitation of rumen microbes for the production of industrially significant and human-friendly biomolecules to meet the future needs. PMID:24773509

  17. [Quorum sensing systems of regulation, synthesis of phenazine antibiotics, and antifungal (corrected) activity in rhizospheric bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis 449].

    PubMed

    Veselova, M a; Klein, Sh; Bass, I A; Lipasova, V A; Metlitskaia, A Z; Ovadis, M I; Chernin, L S; Khmel', I A

    2008-12-01

    Strain Pseudomonas chlororaphis 449, an antagonist of a broad spectrum of phytopathogenic microorganisms isolated from the maize rhizosphere, was shown to produce three phenazine antibiotics: phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), 2-hydroxylphenazine-1-carboxylic acid (2-OH-PCA), and 2-hydroxylphenazine (2-OH-PHZ). Two Quorum Sensing (QS) systems of regulation were identified: PhzIR and CsaI/R. Genes phzI and csaI were cloned and sequenced. Cells of strain 449 synthesize at least three types of AHL: N-butanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C4-AHL), N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-AHL), and N-(3-oxo-hexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (30C6-AHL). Transposon mutagenesis was used to generate mutants of strain 449 deficient in synthesis of phenazines, which carried inactivated phzA and phzB genes of the phenazine operon and gene phzO. Mutations phzA- and phzB-caused a drastic reduction in the antagonistic activity of bacteria toward phytopathogenic fungi. Both mutants lost the ability to protect cucumber and leguminous plants against phytopathogenic fungi Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. These results suggest a significant role of phenazines in the antagonistic activity of P. chlororaphis 449. PMID:19178080

  18. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles from deep sea bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa JQ989348 for antimicrobial, antibiofilm, and cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, V; Rajaram, R; PremKumar, C; Santhanam, P; Dhinesh, P; Vinothkumar, S; Kaleshkumar, K

    2014-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (JQ989348) was isolated from deep sea water sample and used for synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). AgNPs were confirmed by analyzing surface plasmon resonance using UV-visible spectrophotometer at 420 nm. Further scanning electron microscope analysis confirmed the range of particle size between 13 and 76 nm and XRD pattern authorizes the anisotropic crystalline nature of AgNPs. Fourier transform infrared spectrum endorsed the presence of high amount of proteins and other secondary metabolites in synthesized AgNPs influence the reduction process and stabilization of nanoparticles. The inhibitory activity of AgNPs was tested against human pathogens showed high activity against Eschericia coli, Vibrio cholerae, Aeromonas sp., and Cornebacterium sp. demonstrating its antimicrobial value against pathogenic diseases. Additionally, biologically synthesized AgNPs have notable anti-biofilm activity against primary biofilm forming bacteria P. aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. The MTT assay method was evaluated using human cervical cancer cells exposed the AgNPs have excellent cytotoxic activity. PMID:24136453

  19. Aerobic biodegradation of Azo dye by Bacillus cohnii MTCC 3616; an obligately alkaliphilic bacterium and toxicity evaluation of metabolites by different bioassay systems.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A S Arun; Rao, K V Bhaskara

    2013-08-01

    An obligate alkaliphilic bacterium Bacillus cohnii MTCC 3616 aerobically decolorized a textile azo dye Direct Red-22 (5,000 mg l⁻¹) with 95 % efficiency at 37 °C and pH 9 in 4 h under static conditions. The decolorization of Direct Red-22 (DR-22) was possible through a broad pH (7-11), temperature (10-45 °C), salinity (1-7 %), and dye concentration (5-10 g l⁻¹) range. Decolorization of dye was assessed by UV-vis spectrophotometer with reduction of peak intensity at 549 nm (λ(max)). Biodegradation of dye was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The FTIR spectrum revealed that B. cohnii specifically targeted azo bond (N=N) at 1,614.42 cm⁻¹ to break down Direct Red-22. Formation of metabolites with different retention times in HPLC analysis further confirmed the degradation of dye. The phytotoxicity test with 5,000 mg l⁻¹ of untreated dye showed 80 % germination inhibition in Vigna mungo, 70 % in Sorghum bicolor and 80 % in Vigna radiata. No germination inhibition was noticed in all three plants by DR-22 metabolites at 5,000 mg l⁻¹. Biotoxicity test with Artemia salina proved the lethality of the azo dye at LC₅₀ of 4 and 8 % for degraded metabolites by causing death of its nauplii compared to its less toxic-degraded metabolites. Bioaccumulation of dye was observed in the mid-gut of A. salina. The cytogenotoxicity assay on the meristematic root tip cells of Allium cepa further confirmed the cytotoxic nature of azo dye (DR-22) with decrease in mitotic index (0.5 % at 500 ppm) and increase in aberrant index (4.56 %) over 4-h exposure period. Genotoxic damages (lagging chromosome, metaphase cluster, chromosome bridges, and dye accumulation in cytoplasm) were noticed at different stages of cell cycle. The degraded metabolites had negligible cytotoxic and genotoxic effects.

  20. Biodegradation and metabolic pathway of sulfamethoxazole by Pseudomonas psychrophila HA-4, a newly isolated cold-adapted sulfamethoxazole-degrading bacterium.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Benchao; Li, Ang; Cui, Di; Cai, Rui; Ma, Fang; Wang, Yingning

    2014-05-01

    Sulfamethoxazole is a common antibiotic that is frequently detected in wastewater and surface water. This study investigated the biodegradation and metabolic pathway of sulfamethoxazole by Pseudomonas psychrophila HA-4, a cold-adapted bacterium. Strain HA-4, which uses sulfamethoxazole as its sole source of carbon and energy, was isolated at a low temperature (10 °C) and identified as P. psychrophila by physico-biochemical characterization and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Strain HA-4 removed sulfamethoxazole at temperatures ranging from 5.0 °C to 30 °C, with the maximal removal rate at 10 °C. The maximal removal rate of sulfamethoxazole by strain HA-4 was 34.30 % after 192 h at 10 °C. The highest percentage of unsaturated fatty acid was determined to be 23.03 % at 10 °C, which adheres to the characteristic for cold-adapted psychrophiles and psychrotrophs. At low concentrations of sulfamethoxazole, the growth kinetics correlated well with the Haldane model. The single-substrate parameter values of sulfamethoxazole on cell growth were determined to be μ max = 0.01 h(-1), K s = 20.91 mg/l and K i = 170.60 mg/l. Additionally, the major intermediates from sulfamethoxazole biodegradation by strain HA-4, including aniline, 3-amino-5-methylisoxazole, 4-aminothiophenol and sulfanilamide, were identified by GC-MS and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS) analysis. The results demonstrate that strain HA-4 has the potential to degrade sulfamethoxazole at low temperatures. PMID:24522726

  1. Biodegradation and metabolic pathway of sulfamethoxazole by Pseudomonas psychrophila HA-4, a newly isolated cold-adapted sulfamethoxazole-degrading bacterium.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Benchao; Li, Ang; Cui, Di; Cai, Rui; Ma, Fang; Wang, Yingning

    2014-05-01

    Sulfamethoxazole is a common antibiotic that is frequently detected in wastewater and surface water. This study investigated the biodegradation and metabolic pathway of sulfamethoxazole by Pseudomonas psychrophila HA-4, a cold-adapted bacterium. Strain HA-4, which uses sulfamethoxazole as its sole source of carbon and energy, was isolated at a low temperature (10 °C) and identified as P. psychrophila by physico-biochemical characterization and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Strain HA-4 removed sulfamethoxazole at temperatures ranging from 5.0 °C to 30 °C, with the maximal removal rate at 10 °C. The maximal removal rate of sulfamethoxazole by strain HA-4 was 34.30 % after 192 h at 10 °C. The highest percentage of unsaturated fatty acid was determined to be 23.03 % at 10 °C, which adheres to the characteristic for cold-adapted psychrophiles and psychrotrophs. At low concentrations of sulfamethoxazole, the growth kinetics correlated well with the Haldane model. The single-substrate parameter values of sulfamethoxazole on cell growth were determined to be μ max = 0.01 h(-1), K s = 20.91 mg/l and K i = 170.60 mg/l. Additionally, the major intermediates from sulfamethoxazole biodegradation by strain HA-4, including aniline, 3-amino-5-methylisoxazole, 4-aminothiophenol and sulfanilamide, were identified by GC-MS and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS) analysis. The results demonstrate that strain HA-4 has the potential to degrade sulfamethoxazole at low temperatures.

  2. A novel L-aspartate dehydrogenase from the mesophilic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1: molecular characterization and application for L-aspartate production.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinxia; Kawakami, Norika; Ogola, Henry Joseph Oduor; Ashida, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shibata, Hitoshi; Sawa, Yoshihiro

    2011-06-01

    L-aspartate dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.21; L: -AspDH) is a rare member of amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily and so far, two thermophilic enzymes have been reported. In our study, an ORF PA3505 encoding for a putative L-AspDH in the mesophilic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was identified, cloned, and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The homogeneously purified enzyme (PaeAspDH) was a dimeric protein with a molecular mass of about 28 kDa exhibiting a very high specific activity for L-aspartate (L-Asp) and oxaloacetate (OAA) of 127 and 147 U mg(-1), respectively. The enzyme was capable of utilizing both nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) as coenzyme. PaeAspDH showed a T (m) value of 48°C for 20 min that was improved to approximately 60°C by the addition of 0.4 M NaCl or 30% glycerol. The apparent K (m) values for OAA, NADH, and ammonia were 2.12, 0.045, and 10.1 mM, respectively; comparable results were observed with NADPH. The L-Asp production system B consisting of PaeAspDH, Bacillus subtilis malate dehydrogenase and E. coli fumarase, achieved a high level of L-Asp production (625 mM) from fumarate in fed-batch process with a molar conversion yield of 89.4%. Furthermore, the fermentative production system C released 33 mM of L-Asp after 50 h by using succinate as carbon source. This study represented an extensive characterization of the mesophilic AspDH and its potential applicability for efficient and attractive production of L-Asp. Our novel production systems are also hopeful for developing the new processes for other compounds production.

  3. Assessment of the metabolic capacity and adaptability of aromatic hydrocarbon degrading strain Pseudomonas putida CSV86 in aerobic chemostat culture.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Anshul; Phale, Prashant S; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2012-06-01

    Pseudomonas putida CSV86 utilizes aromatic compounds preferentially over sugars and co-metabolizes aromatics along with organic acids. In the present study, the metabolic capacity and adaptability of strain CSV86 were assessed in a chemostat at benzyl alcohol concentrations ranging from 1 g l(-1) to 3 g l(-1) and in the presence of glucose and succinate by systematically varying the dilution rate. Complete removal of benzyl alcohol was achieved for loadings up to 640 mg l(-1) h(-1) in presence of benzyl alcohol alone. The strain responded within 1 min towards step changes in substrate loading as indicated by an increase in the oxygen uptake rate, presumably as a result of excess metabolic capacity. These results suggest that CSV86 exhibits considerable metabolic elasticity upon increase in substrate load. Metabolic elasticity of the microorganism is an important parameter in wastewater treatment plants due to the changing substrate loads. PMID:22494573

  4. Protection of Tomato Seedlings against Infection by Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tomato by Using the Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium Azospirillum brasilense†

    PubMed Central

    Bashan, Yoav; de-Bashan, Luz E.

    2002-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, the causal agent of bacterial speck of tomato, and the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense were inoculated onto tomato plants, either alone, as a mixed culture, or consecutively. The population dynamics in the rhizosphere and foliage, the development of bacterial speck disease, and their effects on plant growth were monitored. When inoculated onto separate plants, the A. brasilense population in the rhizosphere of tomato plants was 2 orders of magnitude greater than the population of P. syringae pv. tomato (107 versus 105 CFU/g [dry weight] of root). Under mist chamber conditions, the leaf population of P. syringae pv. tomato was 1 order of magnitude greater than that of A. brasilense (107 versus 106 CFU/g [dry weight] of leaf). Inoculation of seeds with a mixed culture of the two bacterial strains resulted in a reduction of the pathogen population in the rhizosphere, an increase in the A. brasilense population, the prevention of bacterial speck disease development, and improved plant growth. Inoculation of leaves with the mixed bacterial culture under mist conditions significantly reduced the P. syringae pv. tomato population and significantly decreased disease severity. Challenge with P. syringae pv. tomato after A. brasilense was established in the leaves further reduced both the population of P. syringae pv. tomato and disease severity and significantly enhanced plant development. Both bacteria maintained a large population in the rhizosphere for 45 days when each was inoculated separately onto tomato seeds (105 to 106 CFU/g [dry weight] of root). However, P. syringae pv. tomato did not survive in the rhizosphere in the presence of A. brasilense. Foliar inoculation of A. brasilense after P. syringae pv. tomato was established on the leaves did not alleviate bacterial speck disease, and A. brasilense did not survive well in the phyllosphere under these conditions, even in a mist chamber. Several applications

  5. A Putative ABC Transporter Permease Is Necessary for Resistance to Acidified Nitrite and EDTA in Pseudomonas aeruginosa under Aerobic and Anaerobic Planktonic and Biofilm Conditions

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Cameron; Su, Shengchang; Panmanee, Warunya; Lau, Gee W.; Browne, Tristan; Cox, Kevin; Paul, Andrew T.; Ko, Seung-Hyun B.; Mortensen, Joel E.; Lam, Joseph S.; Muruve, Daniel A.; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an important airway pathogen of cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive disease patients. Multiply drug resistant PA is becoming increasing prevalent and new strategies are needed to combat such insidious organisms. We have previously shown that a mucoid, mucA22 mutant PA is exquisitely sensitive to acidified nitrite (A-NO2−, pH 6.5) at concentrations that are well tolerated in humans. Here, we used a transposon mutagenesis approach to identify PA mutants that are hypersensitive to A-NO2−. Among greater than 10,000 mutants screened, we focused on PA4455, in which the transposon was found to disrupt the production of a putative cytoplasmic membrane-spanning ABC transporter permease. The PA4455 mutant was not only highly sensitive to A-NO2−, but also the membrane perturbing agent, EDTA and the antibiotics doxycycline, tigecycline, colistin, and chloramphenicol, respectively. Treatment of bacteria with A-NO2− plus EDTA, however, had the most dramatic and synergistic effect, with virtually all bacteria killed by 10 mM A-NO2−, and EDTA (1 mM, aerobic, anaerobic). Most importantly, the PA4455 mutant was also sensitive to A-NO2− in biofilms. A-NO2− sensitivity and an anaerobic growth defect was also noted in two mutants (rmlC and wbpM) that are defective in B-band LPS synthesis, potentially indicating a membrane defect in the PA4455 mutant. Finally, this study describes a gene, PA4455, that when mutated, allows for dramatic sensitivity to the potential therapeutic agent, A-NO2− as well as EDTA. Furthermore, the synergy between the two compounds could offer future benefits against antibiotic resistant PA strains. PMID:27064218

  6. [Isolation and characterization of a facultative anaerobic aniline-degrading bacterium].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guo-Qu; Ren, Sui-Zhou; Cao, Wei; Hu, Jin-Cai; Lin, Lu-Jing; Sun, Guo-Ping

    2006-08-01

    An aniline-degrading bacterium (designated strain AN29) was isolated from dyeing wastewater process (anaerobic baffled reactor, ABR) with the capability of utilizing aniline as sole carbon source and nitrogen source. It was identified as Pseudomonas sp. based upon the phenotypic properties and a partial analysis of the 16S rDNA. The strain could degrade aniline under the aerobic and anaerobic conditions, the optimal initial pH 6.5 - 8.0, a temperature of 37 degrees C, and initial aniline concentrations of 500 - 2 000 mg/L with maximum concentration of 4 000 mg/L respectively.

  7. Use of trinitrobenzene as a nitrogen source by Pseudomonas vesicularis isolated from soil

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, E.P.; Boopathy, R.; Manning, J.

    1997-12-31

    An aerobic Gram-negative bacterium identified as Pseudomonas vesicularis was isolated from soil contaminated with 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB). This bacterium used TNB as the sole source of nitrogen. The TNB was metabolized within 80 h of incubation. The major metabolites produced were dinitroaniline, dinitrobenzene (DNB), nitroaniline, nitrobenzene (NB), and ammonia. The concentrations of DNB and NB produced in the culture medium were nearly stoichiometric. The ammonia concentration in the culture medium increased during the course of incubation. The end product of TNB metabolism was NB, which did not undergo further degradation even after long incubation time. This bacterium could be used in a syntrophic culture system with other NB-degrading bacteria to remove TNB completely from soil and water at contaminated sites.

  8. [New Strains of an Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacterium Porphyrobacter donghaensis Isolated from a Siberian Thermal Spring and a Low-Mineralization Lake].

    PubMed

    Nuyanzina-Boldareva, E N; Akimova, V N; Takaiche, S; Gorlenko, V M

    2016-01-01

    A strain of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (AAPB) isolated from the surface of a cyano- bacterial mat of an Eastern Siberian thermal spring (40 C) and designated Se 4 was identified as Porphyro- bacter donghaensis according to its 16S rRNA gene sequence. A DNA-DNA hybridization level of 95% was determined between strain Se-4 and the type strain of this species; SW-132@T. The isolate was an obligate aerobe,. forming orange round colonies on solid media, which turn red in the course of growth. The cells were motile rods capable of branching. The cells divided by uniform fission by constriction. Optimal growth was observed at pH 7.5 and NaCl concentrations from 0 to 1 g/L. The pigments present were carotenoids and bacteriochlorophyll a. Another Porphyrobacter donghaensis strain, Noj- 1, isolated from a purple mat developing on the surface of a coastal set-up in a steppe low-mineralization (1.5 g/L) soda lake Nozhii (Eastern Siberia) possessed similar characteristics. Thus, the AAPB species Porphyrobacter donghaensis was shown to-occur, apart from its known habitat, marine environments, in low-mineralization soda lakes and freshwater thermal springs. Description of the species Porphyrobacter donghaensis was amended. PMID:27301129

  9. Genes expressed by the biological control bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 on seed surfaces under the control of the global regulators GacA and RpoS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The GacA/Rsm signal transduction system and the stationary phase sigma factor RpoS have both been shown to affect secondary metabolite production and biological control in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 and related strains. Microarray analysis of Pf-5 grown on pea seed surfaces showed that 595 genes ar...

  10. A marine inducible prophage vB_CibM-P1 isolated from the aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Citromicrobium bathyomarinum JL354

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiang; Zhang, Rui; Xu, Yongle; , Richard Allen White, III; Wang, Yu; Luo, Tingwei; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2014-11-01

    A prophage vB_CibM-P1 was induced by mitomycin C from the epipelagic strain Citromicrobium bathyomarinum JL354, a member of the alpha-IV subcluster of marine aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (AAPB). The induced bacteriophage vB_CibM-P1 had Myoviridae-like morphology and polyhedral heads (approximately capsid 60-100 nm) with tail fibers. The vB_CibM-P1 genome is ~38 kb in size, with 66.0% GC content. The genome contains 58 proposed open reading frames that are involved in integration, DNA packaging, morphogenesis and bacterial lysis. VB_CibM-P1 is a temperate phage that can be directly induced in hosts. In response to mitomycin C induction, virus-like particles can increase to 7 × 109 per ml, while host cells decrease an order of magnitude. The vB_CibM-P1 bacteriophage is the first inducible prophage from AAPB.

  11. High quality draft genome sequence of the type strain of Pseudomonas lutea OK2(T), a phosphate-solubilizing rhizospheric bacterium.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Yunyoung; Park, Gun-Seok; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas lutea OK2(T) (=LMG 21974(T), CECT 5822(T)) is the type strain of the species and was isolated from the rhizosphere of grass growing in Spain in 2003 based on its phosphate-solubilizing capacity. In order to identify the functional significance of phosphate solubilization in Pseudomonas Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria, we describe here the phenotypic characteristics of strain OK2(T) along with its high-quality draft genome sequence, its annotation, and analysis. The genome is comprised of 5,647,497 bp with 60.15 % G + C content. The sequence includes 4,846 protein-coding genes and 95 RNA genes. PMID:27555890

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of the Bacterium Pseudomonas putida CBB5, Which Can Utilize Caffeine as a Sole Carbon and Nitrogen Source

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, Erik M.; Summers, Ryan M.; Subramanian, Mani V.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida CBB5 was isolated from soil by enriching for growth on caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine). The draft genome of this strain is 6.9 Mb, with 5,941 predicted coding sequences. It includes the previously studied Alx gene cluster encoding alkylxanthine N-demethylase enzymes and other genes that enable the degradation of purine alkaloids. PMID:26067973

  13. Identification of a novel ice-nucleating bacterium of Antarctic origin and its ice nucleation properties.

    PubMed

    Obata, H; Muryoi, N; Kawahara, H; Yamade, K; Nishikawa, J

    1999-03-01

    A novel ice-nucleating bacterium (INB) was isolated from Ross Island, Antarctica. INBs could be isolated more frequently than was generally thought. INB strain IN-74 was found in the white colony group. Strain IN-74 was identified from its taxonomic characteristics as a novel INB, Pseudomonas antarctica IN-74. When strain IN-74 was cultured aerobically in a medium consisting of the ice-nucleating broth (pH 7.0) for 6 days at 4 degrees C, the ice-nucleating activity of strain IN-74 cells was obtained. Strain IN-74 cells produced ice nuclei only at extremely low growth temperatures. The nuclei appeared to be less thermolabile than those of INB Pseudomonas fluorescens KUIN-1. The freezing difference spectra in D2O and H2O at ice-nucleating temperature for strain IN-74 cells and conventional INBs (Pseudomonas fluorescens KUIN-1, Pseudomonas viridiflava KUIN-2, and Pseudomonas syringae C-9) exhibited different curves. PMID:10191036

  14. Involvement of NarK1 and NarK2 Proteins in Transport of Nitrate and Nitrite in the Denitrifying Bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vandana; Noriega, Chris E.; Rowe, John J.

    2006-01-01

    Two transmembrane proteins were tentatively classified as NarK1 and NarK2 in the Pseudomonas genome project and hypothesized to play an important physiological role in nitrate/nitrite transport in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The narK1 and narK2 genes are located in a cluster along with the structural genes for the nitrate reductase complex. Our studies indicate that the transcription of all these genes is initiated from a single promoter and that the gene complex narK1K2GHJI constitutes an operon. Utilizing an isogenic narK1 mutant, a narK2 mutant, and a narK1K2 double mutant, we explored their effect on growth under denitrifying conditions. While the ΔnarK1::Gm mutant was only slightly affected in its ability to grow under denitrification conditions, both the ΔnarK2::Gm and ΔnarK1K2::Gm mutants were found to be severely restricted in nitrate-dependent, anaerobic growth. All three strains demonstrated wild-type levels of nitrate reductase activity. Nitrate uptake by whole-cell suspensions demonstrated both the ΔnarK2::Gm and ΔnarK1K2::Gm mutants to have very low yet different nitrate uptake rates, while the ΔnarK1::Gm mutant exhibited wild-type levels of nitrate uptake. Finally, Escherichia coli narK rescued both the ΔnarK2::Gm and ΔnarK1K2::Gm mutants with respect to anaerobic respiratory growth. Our results indicate that only the NarK2 protein is required as a nitrate/nitrite transporter by Pseudomonas aeruginosa under denitrifying conditions. PMID:16391109

  15. Interaction between the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CHA0, its genetic derivatives and vermiculite: Effects on chemical, mineralogical and mechanical properties of vermiculite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Using bacteria of the strain Pseudomonas fluorescens wild type CHA0 and its genetic derivative strains CHA77, CHA89, CHA400, CHA631 and CHA661 (which differ in one gene only) the changes in chemical, mineralogical and rheological properties of the clay mineral vermiculite affected by microbial activity were studied in order to test whether the individually different production of metabolites by the genetically engineered strains may alter the clay mineral vermiculite in distinct ways. With the novel strategy of working with living wild type bacteria, their genetic derivatives and clay, the following properties of the mineral altered by the various strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens were determined: grain size, X-Ray diffraction pattern, intercrystalline swelling with glycerol, layer charge, CEC, BET surface and uptake of trace elements. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to determine the changes in major, minor and trace elements of the clay vermiculite affected by microbial activity. Among all analyzed trace elements, Fe, Mn and Cu are the most interesting. Fe and Mn are taken up from the clay mineral by all bacterial strains whereas Cu is only removed from vermiculite by strains CHA0, CHA77, CHA400 and CHA661. The latter mentioned strains all produce the antibiotics 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol and monoacetylphloroglucinol which can complex Cu efficiently. Therefore the alteration of only one gene of the bacteria is causing significant effects on the clay mineral.

  16. Production of Indole-3-Acetic Acid via the Indole-3-Acetamide Pathway in the Plant-Beneficial Bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 Is Inhibited by ZnO Nanoparticles but Enhanced by CuO Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jia; McLean, Joan E.; Britt, David W.; Zhan, Jixun; Anderson, Anne J.

    2012-01-01

    The beneficial bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 produces indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), a plant growth regulator. However, the pathway involved in IAA production in this bacterium has not been reported. In this paper we describe the involvement of the indole-3-acetamide (IAM) pathway in IAA production in P. chlororaphis O6 and the effects of CuO and ZnO nanoparticles (NPs). Sublethal levels of CuO and ZnO NPs differentially affected the levels of IAA secreted in medium containing tryptophan as the precursor. After 15 h of growth, CuO NP-exposed cells had metabolized more tryptophan than the control and ZnO NP-challenged cells. The CuO NP-treated cells produced higher IAA levels than control cultures lacking NPs. In contrast, ZnO NPs inhibited IAA production. Mixing of CuO and ZnO NPs resulted in an intermediate level of IAA production relative to the levels in the separate CuO and ZnO NP treatments. The effect of CuO NPs on IAA levels could be duplicated by ions at the concentrations released from the NPs. However, ion release did not account for the inhibition caused by the ZnO NPs. The mechanism underlying changes in IAA levels cannot be accounted for by effects on transcript accumulation from genes encoding a tryptophan permease or the IAM hydrolase in 15-h cultures. These findings raise the issue of whether sublethal doses of NPs would modify the beneficial effects of association between plants and bacteria. PMID:22210218

  17. Isolation of a non-fermentative bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, using intracellular carbon for denitrification and phosphorus-accumulation and relevant metabolic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Wang, Qin; Sun, Yanfu; Zhou, Kangqun; Liu, Wen; Lu, Qian; Ming, Caibing; Feng, Xidan; Du, Jianjun; Jia, Xiaoshan; Li, Jun

    2016-07-01

    A newly designed pilot-scale system was developed to enrich denitrifying phosphate-accumulating organisms (DNPAOs) for nitrogen and phosphorus nutrient removal synchronously. A strain of DNPAOs was isolated and its biochemical characteristics and metabolic mechanisms of this bacterial strain were analyzed. The results showed that compared with previously reported system, this newly designed system has higher removal rates of nutrients. Removal efficiencies of NH3-N, TN, TP, and COD in actual wastewater were 82.64%, 79.62%, 87.22%, and 90.41%, respectively. Metabolic activity of DNPAOs after anoxic stage in this study even reached 94.64%. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a strain of non-fermentative DNPAOs with strong nitrogen and phosphorus removal abilities. Study on the metabolic mechanisms suggested that intracellular PHB of P. aeruginosa plays dual roles, supplying energy for phosphorus accumulation and serving as a major carbon source for denitrification. PMID:26995616

  18. Modicisalibacter tunisiensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an aerobic, moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from an oilfield-water injection sample, and emended description of the family Halomonadaceae Franzmann et al. 1989 emend Dobson and Franzmann 1996 emend. Ntougias et al. 2007.

    PubMed

    Ben Ali Gam, Zouhaier; Abdelkafi, Slim; Casalot, Laurence; Tholozan, Jean Luc; Oueslati, Ridha; Labat, Marc

    2007-10-01

    An aerobic, moderately halophilic, Gram-negative, motile, non-sporulating bacterium, strain LIT2(T), was isolated from an oilfield-water injection after enrichment on crude oil. Strain LIT2(T) grew between 15 and 45 degrees C and optimally at 37 degrees C. It grew in the presence of 1-25 % (w/v) NaCl, with an optimum at 10 % (w/v) NaCl. Predominant fatty acids were C(16 : 0) (26.9 %), C(18 : 1)omega7c (22.6 %), C(16 : 1)omega7c (20.4 %) C(19 : 0) cyclo omega8c (10.9 %) and C(17 : 0) (8 %). Interestingly, the relative percentages of these last two fatty acids were intermediate compared with most species among the family Halomonadaceae for which fatty acid composition has been determined. The DNA G+C content was 53.7 mol%, which is very low among the family Halomonadaceae. Strain LIT2(T) exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values of 94.06-95.15 % to members of the genus Chromohalobacter, 94.21-94.65 % to members of the genus Halomonas and 93.57 % with the single species representative of the genus Cobetia. Based on the phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence presented in this paper, we propose the name Modicisalibacter tunisiensis gen. nov., sp. nov. to accommodate strain LIT2(T). The type strain of Modicisalibacter tunisiensis is LIT2(T) (=CCUG 52917(T) =CIP 109206(T)). A reassignment of the descriptive 16S rRNA signature characteristics of the family Halomonadaceae permitted placement of the new genus Modicisalibacter into the family.

  19. Oligoflexus tunisiensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a Gram-negative, aerobic, filamentous bacterium of a novel proteobacterial lineage, and description of Oligoflexaceae fam. nov., Oligoflexales ord. nov. and Oligoflexia classis nov.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Ryosuke; Nishijima, Miyuki; Tazato, Nozomi; Handa, Yutaka; Karray, Fatma; Sayadi, Sami; Isoda, Hiroko; Naganuma, Takeshi

    2014-10-01

    A phylogenetically novel proteobacterium, strain Shr3(T), was isolated from sand gravels collected from the eastern margin of the Sahara Desert. The isolation strategy targeted bacteria filterable through 0.2-µm-pore-size filters. Strain Shr3(T) was determined to be a Gram-negative, aerobic, non-motile, filamentous bacterium. Oxidase and catalase reactions were positive. Strain Shr3(T) showed growth on R2A medium, but poor or no growth on nutrient agar, trypticase soy agar and standard method agar. The major isoprenoid quinone was menaquinone-7. The dominant cellular fatty acids detected were C16:1ω5c and C16:0, and the primary hydroxy acid present was C12:0 3-OH. The DNA G+C content was 54.0 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain Shr3(T) was affiliated with an uncultivated lineage of the phylum Proteobacteria; the nearest known type strain, with 83% sequence similarity, was Desulfomicrobium orale DSM 12838(T) in the class Deltaproteobacteria. The isolate and closely related environmental clones formed a novel class-level clade in the phylum Proteobacteria with high bootstrap support (96-99%). Based on these results, the novel class Oligoflexia classis nov. in the phylum Proteobacteria and the novel genus and species Oligoflexus tunisiensis gen. nov., sp. nov. are proposed for strain Shr3(T), the first cultivated representative of the Oligoflexia. The type strain of Oligoflexus tunisiensis is Shr3(T) ( = JCM 16864(T) = NCIMB 14846(T)). We also propose the subordinate taxa Oligoflexales ord. nov. and Oligoflexaceae fam. nov. in the class Oligoflexia.

  20. Oligoflexus tunisiensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a Gram-negative, aerobic, filamentous bacterium of a novel proteobacterial lineage, and description of Oligoflexaceae fam. nov., Oligoflexales ord. nov. and Oligoflexia classis nov.

    PubMed Central

    Nakai, Ryosuke; Nishijima, Miyuki; Tazato, Nozomi; Handa, Yutaka; Karray, Fatma; Sayadi, Sami; Isoda, Hiroko

    2014-01-01

    A phylogenetically novel proteobacterium, strain Shr3T, was isolated from sand gravels collected from the eastern margin of the Sahara Desert. The isolation strategy targeted bacteria filterable through 0.2-µm-pore-size filters. Strain Shr3T was determined to be a Gram-negative, aerobic, non-motile, filamentous bacterium. Oxidase and catalase reactions were positive. Strain Shr3T showed growth on R2A medium, but poor or no growth on nutrient agar, trypticase soy agar and standard method agar. The major isoprenoid quinone was menaquinone-7. The dominant cellular fatty acids detected were C16 : 1ω5c and C16 : 0, and the primary hydroxy acid present was C12 : 0 3-OH. The DNA G+C content was 54.0 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain Shr3T was affiliated with an uncultivated lineage of the phylum Proteobacteria; the nearest known type strain, with 83 % sequence similarity, was Desulfomicrobium orale DSM 12838T in the class Deltaproteobacteria. The isolate and closely related environmental clones formed a novel class-level clade in the phylum Proteobacteria with high bootstrap support (96–99 %). Based on these results, the novel class Oligoflexia classis nov. in the phylum Proteobacteria and the novel genus and species Oligoflexus tunisiensis gen. nov., sp. nov. are proposed for strain Shr3T, the first cultivated representative of the Oligoflexia. The type strain of Oligoflexus tunisiensis is Shr3T ( = JCM 16864T = NCIMB 14846T). We also propose the subordinate taxa Oligoflexales ord. nov. and Oligoflexaceae fam. nov. in the class Oligoflexia. PMID:25013226

  1. The algT gene of Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea and new insights into the transcriptional organization of the algT-muc gene cluster.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea infects soybean plants and causes bacterial blight. In addition to P. syringae, the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the soil bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii produce the exopolysaccharide alginate, copolymer of D-mannuronic a...

  2. Inhibition of Aspergillus fumigatus and Its Biofilm by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Dependent on the Source, Phenotype and Growth Conditions of the Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Jose A G; Penner, John C; Moss, Richard B; Haagensen, Janus A J; Clemons, Karl V; Spormann, Alfred M; Nazik, Hasan; Cohen, Kevin; Banaei, Niaz; Carolino, Elisabete; Stevens, David A

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus (Af) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) are leading fungal and bacterial pathogens, respectively, in many clinical situations. Relevant to this, their interface and co-existence has been studied. In some experiments in vitro, Pa products have been defined that are inhibitory to Af. In some clinical situations, both can be biofilm producers, and biofilm could alter their physiology and affect their interaction. That may be most relevant to airways in cystic fibrosis (CF), where both are often prominent residents. We have studied clinical Pa isolates from several sources for their effects on Af, including testing involving their biofilms. We show that the described inhibition of Af is related to the source and phenotype of the Pa isolate. Pa cells inhibited the growth and formation of Af biofilm from conidia, with CF isolates more inhibitory than non-CF isolates, and non-mucoid CF isolates most inhibitory. Inhibition did not require live Pa contact, as culture filtrates were also inhibitory, and again non-mucoid>mucoid CF>non-CF. Preformed Af biofilm was more resistant to Pa, and inhibition that occurred could be reproduced with filtrates. Inhibition of Af biofilm appears also dependent on bacterial growth conditions; filtrates from Pa grown as biofilm were more inhibitory than from Pa grown planktonically. The differences in Pa shown from these different sources are consistent with the extensive evolutionary Pa changes that have been described in association with chronic residence in CF airways, and may reflect adaptive changes to life in a polymicrobial environment.

  3. Toxicity of fungal-generated silver nanoparticles to soil-inhabiting Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a rhizospheric bacterium responsible for plant protection and bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Indarchand R; Anderson, Anne J; Rai, Mahendra

    2015-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles have attracted considerable attention due to their beneficial properties. But toxicity issues associated with them are also rising. The reports in the past suggested health hazards of silver nanoparticles at the cellular, molecular, or whole organismal level in eukaryotes. Whereas, there is also need to examine the exposure effects of silver nanoparticle to the microbes, which are beneficial to humans as well as environment. The available literature suggests the harmful effects of physically and chemically synthesised silver nanoparticles. The toxicity of biogenically synthesized nanoparticles has been less studied than physically and chemically synthesised nanoparticles. Hence, there is a greater need to study the toxic effects of biologically synthesised silver nanoparticles in general and mycosynthesized nanoparticles in particular. In the present study, attempts have been made to assess the risk associated with the exposure of mycosynthesized silver nanoparticles on a beneficial soil microbe Pseudomonas putida. KT2440. The study demonstrates mycosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and their characterisation by UV-vis spectrophotometry, FTIR, X-ray diffraction, nanosight LM20--a particle size distribution analyzer and TEM. Silver nanoparticles obtained herein were found to exert the hazardous effect at the concentration of 0.4 μg/ml, which warrants further detailed investigations concerning toxicity. PMID:25562807

  4. Toxicity of fungal-generated silver nanoparticles to soil-inhabiting Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a rhizospheric bacterium responsible for plant protection and bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Indarchand R; Anderson, Anne J; Rai, Mahendra

    2015-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles have attracted considerable attention due to their beneficial properties. But toxicity issues associated with them are also rising. The reports in the past suggested health hazards of silver nanoparticles at the cellular, molecular, or whole organismal level in eukaryotes. Whereas, there is also need to examine the exposure effects of silver nanoparticle to the microbes, which are beneficial to humans as well as environment. The available literature suggests the harmful effects of physically and chemically synthesised silver nanoparticles. The toxicity of biogenically synthesized nanoparticles has been less studied than physically and chemically synthesised nanoparticles. Hence, there is a greater need to study the toxic effects of biologically synthesised silver nanoparticles in general and mycosynthesized nanoparticles in particular. In the present study, attempts have been made to assess the risk associated with the exposure of mycosynthesized silver nanoparticles on a beneficial soil microbe Pseudomonas putida. KT2440. The study demonstrates mycosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and their characterisation by UV-vis spectrophotometry, FTIR, X-ray diffraction, nanosight LM20--a particle size distribution analyzer and TEM. Silver nanoparticles obtained herein were found to exert the hazardous effect at the concentration of 0.4 μg/ml, which warrants further detailed investigations concerning toxicity.

  5. Isolation and characterization of a novel paraffin wax-degrading bacterium, Pseudomonas sp strain PW-1, from petroleum-contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y L; Liu, Z; Liu, T

    2016-06-10

    An isolate capable of degrading paraffin wax was isolated from petroleum-contaminated sites in Daqing, China, and identified as Pseudomonas sp strain PW-1 by analyzing the 16S rDNA sequence (GenBank accession No.: KF529529) as well as the biochemical and physiological characteristics. The optimized degradation conditions of the isolate were as follows: FeSO4 metal ion concentration of 0.01 g, temperature of 30°C, (NH4)2SO4 nitrogen source concentration of 1.5 g/L, and a carbon: nitrogen ratio of 10:1. Response surface methodology-based analysis of the culture time, inoculation amount, and initial pH of the medium revealed that the optimal theoretical conditions were a culture time of 11.16 days, inoculation amount of 3.13%, and an initial pH of 9.29. The theoretical degradation rate was up to 54.68% under the optimal conditions. Taking into account the experimental conditions of a laboratory, 11.2 days of cultivating time, 3% inoculum, and a medium initial pH of 9.3 were used in practical settings. Experimental results showed that the degradation rate of paraffin wax was 52.85%, which demonstrated that this strain could degrade 1050 mg paraffin wax, using it as the sole carbon source, in a 1000-mL minimal salts medium. These results indicate that the strain PW1 can be used for application in oil wells with paraffin deposition problems in order to enhance oil recovery.

  6. Isolation and characterization of a novel paraffin wax-degrading bacterium, Pseudomonas sp strain PW-1, from petroleum-contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y L; Liu, Z; Liu, T

    2016-01-01

    An isolate capable of degrading paraffin wax was isolated from petroleum-contaminated sites in Daqing, China, and identified as Pseudomonas sp strain PW-1 by analyzing the 16S rDNA sequence (GenBank accession No.: KF529529) as well as the biochemical and physiological characteristics. The optimized degradation conditions of the isolate were as follows: FeSO4 metal ion concentration of 0.01 g, temperature of 30°C, (NH4)2SO4 nitrogen source concentration of 1.5 g/L, and a carbon: nitrogen ratio of 10:1. Response surface methodology-based analysis of the culture time, inoculation amount, and initial pH of the medium revealed that the optimal theoretical conditions were a culture time of 11.16 days, inoculation amount of 3.13%, and an initial pH of 9.29. The theoretical degradation rate was up to 54.68% under the optimal conditions. Taking into account the experimental conditions of a laboratory, 11.2 days of cultivating time, 3% inoculum, and a medium initial pH of 9.3 were used in practical settings. Experimental results showed that the degradation rate of paraffin wax was 52.85%, which demonstrated that this strain could degrade 1050 mg paraffin wax, using it as the sole carbon source, in a 1000-mL minimal salts medium. These results indicate that the strain PW1 can be used for application in oil wells with paraffin deposition problems in order to enhance oil recovery. PMID:27323173

  7. Pseudomonas granadensis sp. nov., a new bacterial species isolated from the Tejeda, Almijara and Alhama Natural Park, Granada, Spain.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Javier; García-López, Marina; Bills, Gerald F; Genilloud, Olga

    2015-02-01

    During the course of screening bacterial isolates as sources of as-yet unknown bioactive compounds with pharmaceutical applications, a chemo-organotrophic, Gram-negative bacterium was isolated from a soil sample taken from the Tejeda, Almijara and Alhama Natural Park, Granada, Spain. Strain F-278,770(T) was oxidase- and catalase-positive, aerobic, with a respiratory type of metabolism with oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor, non-spore-forming and motile by one polar flagellum, although some cells had two polar flagella. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD genes revealed that strain F-278,770(T) belongs to the Pseudomonas koreensis subgroup (Pseudomonas fluorescens lineage), with Pseudomonas moraviensis, P. koreensis, P. baetica and P. helmanticensis as its closest relatives. Chemotaxonomic traits such as polar lipid and fatty acid compositions and G+C content of genomic DNA corroborated the placement of strain F-278,770(T) in the genus Pseudomonas. DNA-DNA hybridization assays and phenotypic traits confirmed that this strain represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas granadensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is F-278,770(T) ( = DSM 28040(T) = LMG 27940(T)).

  8. Sequence and Role in Virulence of the Three Plasmid Complement of the Model Tumor-Inducing Bacterium Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335

    PubMed Central

    Bardaji, Leire; Pérez-Martínez, Isabel; Rodríguez-Moreno, Luis; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo; Sundin, George W.; Ramos, Cayo; Murillo, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335 is a model for the study of the molecular basis of disease production and tumor formation in woody hosts, and its draft genome sequence has been recently obtained. Here we closed the sequence of the plasmid complement of this strain, composed of three circular molecules of 78,357 nt (pPsv48A), 45,220 nt (pPsv48B), and 42,103 nt (pPsv48C), all belonging to the pPT23A-like family of plasmids widely distributed in the P. syringae complex. A total of 152 coding sequences were predicted in the plasmid complement, of which 38 are hypothetical proteins and seven correspond to putative virulence genes. Plasmid pPsv48A contains an incomplete Type IVB secretion system, the type III secretion system (T3SS) effector gene hopAF1, gene ptz, involved in cytokinin biosynthesis, and three copies of a gene highly conserved in plant-associated proteobacteria, which is preceded by a hrp box motif. A complete Type IVA secretion system, a well conserved origin of transfer (oriT), and a homolog of the T3SS effector gene hopAO1 are present in pPsv48B, while pPsv48C contains a gene with significant homology to isopentenyl-diphosphate delta-isomerase, type 1. Several potential mobile elements were found on the three plasmids, including three types of MITE, a derivative of IS801, and a new transposon effector, ISPsy30. Although the replication regions of these three plasmids are phylogenetically closely related, their structure is diverse, suggesting that the plasmid architecture results from an active exchange of sequences. Artificial inoculations of olive plants with mutants cured of plasmids pPsv48A and pPsv48B showed that pPsv48A is necessary for full virulence and for the development of mature xylem vessels within the knots; we were unable to obtain mutants cured of pPsv48C, which contains five putative toxin-antitoxin genes. PMID:22022435

  9. Denitrification by a soil bacterium with phthalate and other aromatic compounds as substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Nozawa, T; Maruyama, Y

    1988-01-01

    A soil bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. strain P136, was isolated by selective enrichment for anaerobic utilization of o-phthalate through nitrate respiration. o-Phthalate, m-phthalate, p-phthalate, benzoate, cyclohex-1-ene-carboxylate, and cyclohex-3-ene-carboxylate were utilized by this strain under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. m-Hydroxybenzoate and p-hydroxybenzoate were utilized only under anaerobic conditions. Protocatechuate and catechol were neither utilized nor detected as metabolic intermediates during the metabolism of these aromatic compounds under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Cells grown anaerobically on one of these aromatic compounds also utilized all other aromatic compounds as substrates for denitrification without a lag period. On the other hand, cells grown on succinate utilized aromatic compounds after a lag period. Anaerobic growth on these substrates was dependent on the presence of nitrate and accompanied by the production of molecular nitrogen. The reduction of nitrite to nitrous oxide and the reduction of nitrous oxide to molecular nitrogen were also supported by anaerobic utilization of these aromatic compounds in this strain. Aerobically grown cells showed a lag period in denitrification with all substrates tested. Cells grown anaerobically on aromatic compounds also consumed oxygen. No lag period was observed for oxygen consumption during the transition period from anaerobic to aerobic conditions. Cells grown aerobically on one of these aromatic compounds were also adapted to utilize other aromatic compounds as substrates for respiration. However, cells grown on succinate showed a lag period during respiration with aromatic compounds. Some other characteristic properties on metabolism and regulation of this strain are also discussed for their physiological aspects. PMID:3372476

  10. Biodegradation of sulfanilic acid by Pseudomonas paucimobilis.

    PubMed

    Perei, K; Rákhely, G; Kiss, I; Polyák, B; Kovács, K L

    2001-01-01

    An aerobic bacterium, isolated from a contaminated site, was able to degrade sulfanilic acid (4-aminobenzenesulfonic acid) and was identified as Pseudomonas paucimobilis. The isolate could grow on sulfanilic acid (SA) as its sole carbon and nitrogen source and metabolized the target compound to biomass. The bioconversion capacity depended on the sulfanilic acid concentration; greater than 98% elimination of the hazardous compound was achieved at low (10 mM) sulfanilic acid concentration, and the yield was greater than 70% at 50 mM concentration of the contaminant. The maximum conversion rate was 1.5 mmol sulfanilic acid/h per mg wet cells at 30 degrees C. Ca-alginate-phytagel proved a good matrix for immobilization of P. paucimobilis, with essentially unaltered biodegradation activity. Removal of sulfanilic acid from contaminated industrial waste water was demonstrated. SDS-PAGE analysis of the crude extract revealed novel proteins appearing upon induction with sulfanilic acid and related compounds, which indicated alternative degradation mechanisms involving various inducible enzymes.

  11. A Mathematical model to investigate quorum sensing regulation and its heterogenecity in pseudomonas syringae on leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bacterium Pseudomonas syringae is a plant-pathogen, which through quorum sensing (QS), controls virulence. In this paper, by means of mathematical modeling, we investigate QS of this bacterium when living on leaf surfaces. We extend an existing stochastic model for the formation of Pseudomonas s...

  12. Substrate interactions during the biodegradation of BTEX and THF mixtures by Pseudomonas oleovorans DT4.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu-Yang; Chen, Dong-Zhi; Zhu, Run-Ye; Chen, Jian-Meng

    2011-06-01

    The efficient tetrahydrofuran (THF)-degrading bacterium, Pseudomonas oleovorans DT4 was used to investigate the substrate interactions during the aerobic biotransformation of THF and BTEX mixtures. Benzene and toluene could be utilized as growth substrates by DT4, whereas cometabolism of m-xylene, p-xylene and ethylbenzene occurred with THF. In binary mixtures, THF degradation was delayed by xylene, ethylbenzene, toluene and benzene in descending order of inhibitory effects. Conversely, benzene (or toluene) degradation was greatly enhanced by THF leading to a higher degradation rate of 39.68 mg/(h g dry weight) and a shorter complete degradation time about 21 h, possibly because THF acted as an "energy generator". Additionally, the induction experiments suggested that BTEX and THF degradation was initiated by independent and inducible enzymes. The transient intermediate hydroquinone was detected in benzene biodegradation with THF while catechol in the process without THF, suggesting that P. oleovorans DT4 possessed two distinguished benzene pathways. PMID:21511464

  13. Pseudomonas Exotoxin A: optimized by evolution for effective killing

    PubMed Central

    Michalska, Marta; Wolf, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas Exotoxin A (PE) is the most toxic virulence factor of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This review describes current knowledge about the intoxication pathways of PE. Moreover, PE represents a remarkable example for pathoadaptive evolution, how bacterial molecules have been structurally and functionally optimized under evolutionary pressure to effectively impair and kill their host cells. PMID:26441897

  14. Aerobic catabolism of phenylacetic acid in Pseudomonas putida U: biochemical characterization of a specific phenylacetic acid transport system and formal demonstration that phenylacetyl-coenzyme A is a catabolic intermediate.

    PubMed Central

    Schleissner, C; Olivera, E R; Fernández-Valverde, M; Luengo, J M

    1994-01-01

    The phenylacetic acid transport system (PATS) of Pseudomonas putida U was studied after this bacterium was cultured in a chemically defined medium containing phenylacetic acid (PA) as the sole carbon source. Kinetic measurement was carried out, in vivo, at 30 degrees C in 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.0). Under these conditions, the uptake rate was linear for at least 3 min and the value of Km was 13 microM. The PATS is an active transport system that is strongly inhibited by 2,4-dinitrophenol, 4-nitrophenol (100%), KCN (97%), 2-nitrophenol (90%), or NaN3 (80%) added at a 1 mM final concentration (each). Glucose or D-lactate (10 mM each) increases the PATS in starved cells (140%), whereas arsenate (20 mM), NaF, or N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (1 mM) did not cause any effect. Furthermore, the PATS is insensitive to osmotic shock. These data strongly suggest that the energy for the PATS is derived only from an electron transport system which causes an energy-rich membrane state. The thiol-containing compounds mercaptoethanol, glutathione, and dithiothreitol have no significant effect on the PATS, whereas thiol-modifying reagents such as N-ethylmaleimide and iodoacetate strongly inhibit uptake (100 and 93%, respectively). Molecular analogs of PA with a substitution (i) on the ring or (ii) on the acetyl moiety or those containing (iii) a different ring but keeping the acetyl moiety constant inhibit uptake to different extents. None of the compounds tested significantly increase the PA uptake rate except adipic acid, which greatly stimulates it (163%). The PATS is induced by PA and also, gratuitously, by some phenyl derivatives containing an even number of carbon atoms on the aliphatic moiety (4-phenyl-butyric, 6-phenylhexanoic, and 8-phenyloctanoic acids). However, similar compounds with an odd number of carbon atoms (benzoic, 3-phenylpropionic, 5-phenylvaleric, 7-phenylheptanoic, and 9-phenylnonanoic acids) as well as many other PA derivatives do not induce the system

  15. Pseudomonas sp. strain CA5 (a selenite-reducing bacterium) 16S rRNA gene complete sequence. National Institute of Health, National Center for Biotechnology Information, GenBank sequence. Accession FJ422810.1.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study used 1321 base pair 16S rRNA gene sequence methods to confirm the phylogenetic position of a soil isolate as a bacterium belonging to the genus Pesudomonas sp. Morphological, biochemical characteristics, and fatty acid profiles are consistent with the 16S rRNA gene sequence identification...

  16. Characterization of a novel extremely alkalophilic bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Souza, K. A.; Deal, P. H.

    1977-01-01

    A new alkalophilic bacterium, isolated from a natural spring of high pH is characterized. It is a Gram-positive, non-sporulating, motile rod requiring aerobic and alkaline conditions for growth. The characteristics of this organism resemble those of the coryneform group of bacteria; however, there are no accepted genera within this group with which this organism can be closely matched. Therefore, a new genus may be warranted.

  17. Isolation of a novel amylase and lipase-producing Pseudomonas luteola strain: study of amylase production conditions.

    PubMed

    Khannous, Lamia; Jrad, Mouna; Dammak, Mouna; Miladi, Ramzi; Chaaben, Nour; Khemakhem, Bassem; Gharsallah, Néji; Fendri, Imen

    2014-01-01

    An amylase and lipase producing bacterium (strain C2) was enriched and isolated from soil regularly contaminated with olive washing wastewater in Sfax, Tunisia. Cell was aerobic, mesophilic, Gram-negative, motile, non-sporulating bacterium, capable of growing optimally at pH 7 and 30°C and tolerated maximally 10% (W/V) NaCl. The predominant fatty acids were found to be C(18:1)ω7c (32.8%), C(16:1)ω7c (27.3%) and C16:0 (23.1%). Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that this strain belonging to the genus Pseudomonas. Strain C2 was found to be closely related to Pseudomonas luteola with more than 99% of similarity. Amylase optimization extraction was carried out using Box Behnken Design (BBD). Its maximal activity was found when the pH and temperature ranged from 5.5 to 6.5 and from 33 to 37°C, respectively. Under these conditions, amylase activity was found to be about 9.48 U/ml. PMID:24405763

  18. Isolation of a novel amylase and lipase-producing Pseudomonas luteola strain: study of amylase production conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    An amylase and lipase producing bacterium (strain C2) was enriched and isolated from soil regularly contaminated with olive washing wastewater in Sfax, Tunisia. Cell was aerobic, mesophilic, Gram-negative, motile, non-sporulating bacterium, capable of growing optimally at pH 7 and 30°C and tolerated maximally 10% (W/V) NaCl. The predominant fatty acids were found to be C18:1ω7c (32.8%), C16:1ω7c (27.3%) and C16:0 (23.1%). Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that this strain belonging to the genus Pseudomonas. Strain C2 was found to be closely related to Pseudomonas luteola with more than 99% of similarity. Amylase optimization extraction was carried out using Box Behnken Design (BBD). Its maximal activity was found when the pH and temperature ranged from 5.5 to 6.5 and from 33 to 37°C, respectively. Under these conditions, amylase activity was found to be about 9.48 U/ml. PMID:24405763

  19. Isolation of a novel amylase and lipase-producing Pseudomonas luteola strain: study of amylase production conditions.

    PubMed

    Khannous, Lamia; Jrad, Mouna; Dammak, Mouna; Miladi, Ramzi; Chaaben, Nour; Khemakhem, Bassem; Gharsallah, Néji; Fendri, Imen

    2014-01-09

    An amylase and lipase producing bacterium (strain C2) was enriched and isolated from soil regularly contaminated with olive washing wastewater in Sfax, Tunisia. Cell was aerobic, mesophilic, Gram-negative, motile, non-sporulating bacterium, capable of growing optimally at pH 7 and 30°C and tolerated maximally 10% (W/V) NaCl. The predominant fatty acids were found to be C(18:1)ω7c (32.8%), C(16:1)ω7c (27.3%) and C16:0 (23.1%). Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that this strain belonging to the genus Pseudomonas. Strain C2 was found to be closely related to Pseudomonas luteola with more than 99% of similarity. Amylase optimization extraction was carried out using Box Behnken Design (BBD). Its maximal activity was found when the pH and temperature ranged from 5.5 to 6.5 and from 33 to 37°C, respectively. Under these conditions, amylase activity was found to be about 9.48 U/ml.

  20. Kinetic study of trichloroethylene and toluene degradation by a bioluminescent reporter bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C.J.; Sanseverino, J.; Bienkowski, P.R.; Sayler, G.S.

    1995-12-31

    A constructed bioluminescent reporter bacterium, Pseudomonas putida B2, is very briefly described in this paper. The bacterium degrades toluene and trichloroethylene (TCE), and produces light in the presence of toluene. The light response is an indication of cellular viability and expression of the genes encoding toluene and TCE degrading enzymes.

  1. Unique features revealed by the genome sequence of Acinetobacter sp. ADP1, a versatile and naturally transformation competent bacterium.

    PubMed

    Barbe, Valérie; Vallenet, David; Fonknechten, Nuria; Kreimeyer, Annett; Oztas, Sophie; Labarre, Laurent; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Robert, Catherine; Duprat, Simone; Wincker, Patrick; Ornston, L Nicholas; Weissenbach, Jean; Marlière, Philippe; Cohen, Georges N; Médigue, Claudine

    2004-01-01

    Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1 is a nutritionally versatile soil bacterium closely related to representatives of the well-characterized Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida. Unlike these bacteria, the Acinetobacter ADP1 is highly competent for natural transformation which affords extraordinary convenience for genetic manipulation. The circular chromosome of the Acinetobacter ADP1, presented here, encodes 3325 predicted coding sequences, of which 60% have been classified based on sequence similarity to other documented proteins. The close evolutionary proximity of Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas species, as judged by the sequences of their 16S RNA genes and by the highest level of bidirectional best hits, contrasts with the extensive divergence in the GC content of their DNA (40 versus 62%). The chromosomes also differ significantly in size, with the Acinetobacter ADP1 chromosome <60% of the length of the Pseudomonas counterparts. Genome analysis of the Acinetobacter ADP1 revealed genes for metabolic pathways involved in utilization of a large variety of compounds. Almost all of these genes, with orthologs that are scattered in other species, are located in five major 'islands of catabolic diversity', now an apparent 'archipelago of catabolic diversity', within one-quarter of the overall genome. Acinetobacter ADP1 displays many features of other aerobic soil bacteria with metabolism oriented toward the degradation of organic compounds found in their natural habitat. A distinguishing feature of this genome is the absence of a gene corresponding to pyruvate kinase, the enzyme that generally catalyzes the terminal step in conversion of carbohydrates to pyruvate for respiration by the citric acid cycle. This finding supports the view that the cycle itself is centrally geared to the catabolic capabilities of this exceptionally versatile organism. PMID:15514110

  2. Genome sequence of Citrobacter sp. strain A1, a dye-degrading bacterium.

    PubMed

    Chan, Giek Far; Gan, Han Ming; Rashid, Noor Aini Abdul

    2012-10-01

    Citrobacter sp. strain A1, isolated from a sewage oxidation pond, is a facultative aerobe and mesophilic dye-degrading bacterium. This organism degrades azo dyes efficiently via azo reduction and desulfonation, followed by the successive biotransformation of dye intermediates under an aerobic environment. Here we report the draft genome sequence of Citrobacter sp. A1.

  3. Biology of Pseudomonas stutzeri

    PubMed Central

    Lalucat, Jorge; Bennasar, Antoni; Bosch, Rafael; García-Valdés, Elena; Palleroni, Norberto J.

    2006-01-01

    Pseudomonas stutzeri is a nonfluorescent denitrifying bacterium widely distributed in the environment, and it has also been isolated as an opportunistic pathogen from humans. Over the past 15 years, much progress has been made in elucidating the taxonomy of this diverse taxonomical group, demonstrating the clonality of its populations. The species has received much attention because of its particular metabolic properties: it has been proposed as a model organism for denitrification studies; many strains have natural transformation properties, making it relevant for study of the transfer of genes in the environment; several strains are able to fix dinitrogen; and others participate in the degradation of pollutants or interact with toxic metals. This review considers the history of the discovery, nomenclatural changes, and early studies, together with the relevant biological and ecological properties, of P. stutzeri. PMID:16760312

  4. A Pseudomonas putida Strain Genetically Engineered for 1,2,3-Trichloropropane Bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Samin, Ghufrana; Pavlova, Martina; Arif, M. Irfan; Postema, Christiaan P.; Damborsky, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    1,2,3-Trichloropropane (TCP) is a toxic compound that is recalcitrant to biodegradation in the environment. Attempts to isolate TCP-degrading organisms using enrichment cultivation have failed. A potential biodegradation pathway starts with hydrolytic dehalogenation to 2,3-dichloro-1-propanol (DCP), followed by oxidative metabolism. To obtain a practically applicable TCP-degrading organism, we introduced an engineered haloalkane dehalogenase with improved TCP degradation activity into the DCP-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas putida MC4. For this purpose, the dehalogenase gene (dhaA31) was cloned behind the constitutive dhlA promoter and was introduced into the genome of strain MC4 using a transposon delivery system. The transposon-located antibiotic resistance marker was subsequently removed using a resolvase step. Growth of the resulting engineered bacterium, P. putida MC4-5222, on TCP was indeed observed, and all organic chlorine was released as chloride. A packed-bed reactor with immobilized cells of strain MC4-5222 degraded >95% of influent TCP (0.33 mM) under continuous-flow conditions, with stoichiometric release of inorganic chloride. The results demonstrate the successful use of a laboratory-evolved dehalogenase and genetic engineering to produce an effective, plasmid-free, and stable whole-cell biocatalyst for the aerobic bioremediation of a recalcitrant chlorinated hydrocarbon. PMID:24973068

  5. Lipoproteins binding malachite green to slow the decolorization of malachite green in Pseudomonas sp. JT-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Li, Liguan; Du, Hongwei; Jiang, Lijuan; Zhang, Qiong; Wei, Zhongbo; Wang, Xiaolin; Xiao, Lin; Yang, Liuyan

    2011-01-01

    Lipoproteins of a malachite green (MG)-decolorizing bacterium Pseudomonas sp. JT-1 could bind MG to form green MG-Lipoproteins complexes, which prevented the decolorization of MG by triphenylmethane reductase.

  6. Mining Genomes of Biological Control Strains of Pseudomonas spp.: Unexpected Gems and Tailings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biocontrol bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 suppresses numerous soilborne plant diseases and produces an array of structurally-characterized secondary metabolites that are toxic to plant pathogenic bacteria, fungi and Oomycetes. Biosynthetic gene clusters for these metabolites compose nea...

  7. The biocontrol bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp strain affects the pathogenesis-related gene expression of the take-all fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici on wheat roots

    PubMed Central

    Daval, Stéphanie; Lebreton, Lionel; Gazengel, Kévin; Boutin, Morgane; Guillerm-Erckelboudt, Anne-Yvonne; Sarniguet, Alain

    2011-01-01

    The main effects of antagonistic rhizobacteria on plant pathogenic fungi are antibiosis, fungistasis or an indirect constraint through the induction of a plant defence response. To explore different biocontrol mechanisms, an in vitro confrontation assay was conducted with the rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp as a biocontrol agent of the fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt) on wheat roots. In parallel with the assessment of disease extension, together with the bacterial and fungal root colonization rates, the transcript levels of candidate fungal pathogenicity and plant-induced genes were monitored during the 10-day infection process. The bacterial inoculation of wheat roots with the Pf29Arp strain reduced the development of Ggt-induced disease expressed as attack frequency and necrosis length. The growth rates of Ggt and Pf29Arp, monitored through quantitative polymerase chain reaction of DNA amounts with a part of the Ggt 18S rDNA gene and a specific Pf29Arp strain detection probe, respectively, increased throughout the interactions. Bacterial antagonism and colonization had no significant effect on root colonization by Ggt. The expression of fungal and plant genes was quantified in planta by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction during the interactions thanks to the design of specific primers and an innovative universal reference system. During the early stages of the tripartite interaction, several of the fungal genes assayed were down-regulated by Pf29Arp, including two laccases, a β-1,3-exoglucanase and a mitogen-activated protein kinase. The plant host glutathione-S-transferase gene was induced by Ggt alone and up-regulated by Pf29Arp bacteria in interaction with the pathogen. We conclude that Pf29Arp antagonism acts through the alteration of fungal pathogenesis and probably through the activation of host defences. PMID:21726382

  8. Comparative analysis of defence responses induced by the endophytic plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN and the non-host bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. pisi in grapevine cell suspensions.

    PubMed

    Bordiec, Sophie; Paquis, Sandra; Lacroix, Hélène; Dhondt, Sandrine; Ait Barka, Essaïd; Kauffmann, Serge; Jeandet, Philippe; Mazeyrat-Gourbeyre, Florence; Clément, Christophe; Baillieul, Fabienne; Dorey, Stéphan

    2011-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are beneficial microorganisms that colonize the rhizosphere of many plant species and confer beneficial effects, such as an increase in plant growth. PGPR are also well known as inducers of systemic resistance to pathogens in plants. However, the molecular mechanisms involved locally after direct perception of these bacteria by plant cells still remain largely unknown. Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN is an endophytic PGPR that colonizes grapevine and protects the plant against the grey mould disease caused by Botrytis cinerea. This report focuses on local defence events induced by B. phytofirmans PsJN after perception by the grapevine cells. It is demonstrated that, after addition to cell suspension cultures, the bacteria were tightly attaching to plant cells in a way similar to the grapevine non-host bacteria Pseudomonas syringae pv. pisi. B. phytofirmans PsJN perception led to a transient and monophasic extracellular alkalinization but no accumulation of reactive oxygen species or cell death were detected. By contrast, challenge with P. syringae pv. pisi induced a sustained and biphasic extracellular alkalinization, a two phases oxidative burst, and a HR-like response. Perception of the PGPR also led to the production of salicylic acid (SA) and the expression of a battery of defence genes that was, however, weaker in intensity compared with defence gene expression triggered by the non-host bacteria. Some defence genes up-regulated after B. phytofirmans PsJN challenge are specifically induced by exogenous treatment with SA or jasmonic acid, suggesting that both signalling pathways are activated by the PGPR in grapevine.

  9. Impairment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Resistance to Antibiotics by Combining the Drugs with a New Quorum-Sensing Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Lajoie, Barbora; El Hage, Salome; Baziard, Genevieve; Roques, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays an important role in chronic lung infections among patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) through its ability to form antibiotic-resistant biofilms. In P. aeruginosa, biofilm development and the production of several virulence factors are mainly regulated by the rhl and las quorum-sensing (QS) systems, which are controlled by two N-acyl-homoserine lactone signal molecules. In a previous study, we discovered an original QS inhibitor, N-(2-pyrimidyl)butanamide, called C11, based on the structure of C4-homoserine lactone, and found that it is able to significantly inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. However, recent data indicate that P. aeruginosa grows under anaerobic conditions and forms biofilms in the lungs of CF patients that are denser and more robust than those formed under aerobic conditions. Our confocal microscopy observations of P. aeruginosa biofilms developed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions confirmed that the biofilms formed under these two conditions have radically different architectures. C11 showed significant dose-dependent antibiofilm activity on biofilms grown under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, with a greater inhibitory effect being seen under conditions of anaerobiosis. Gene expression analyses performed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR showed that C11 led to the significant downregulation of rhl QS regulatory genes but also to the downregulation of both las QS regulatory genes and QS system-regulated virulence genes, rhlA and lasB. Furthermore, the activity of C11 in combination with antibiotics against P. aeruginosa biofilms was tested, and synergistic antibiofilm activity between C11 and ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, and colistin was obtained under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This study demonstrates that C11 may increase the efficacy of treatments for P. aeruginosa infections by increasing the susceptibility of biofilms to antibiotics and by attenuating the pathogenicity of the

  10. Impairment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Resistance to Antibiotics by Combining the Drugs with a New Quorum-Sensing Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Furiga, Aurelie; Lajoie, Barbora; El Hage, Salome; Baziard, Genevieve; Roques, Christine

    2016-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays an important role in chronic lung infections among patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) through its ability to form antibiotic-resistant biofilms. In P. aeruginosa, biofilm development and the production of several virulence factors are mainly regulated by the rhl and las quorum-sensing (QS) systems, which are controlled by two N-acyl-homoserine lactone signal molecules. In a previous study, we discovered an original QS inhibitor, N-(2-pyrimidyl)butanamide, called C11, based on the structure of C4-homoserine lactone, and found that it is able to significantly inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. However, recent data indicate that P. aeruginosa grows under anaerobic conditions and forms biofilms in the lungs of CF patients that are denser and more robust than those formed under aerobic conditions. Our confocal microscopy observations of P. aeruginosa biofilms developed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions confirmed that the biofilms formed under these two conditions have radically different architectures. C11 showed significant dose-dependent antibiofilm activity on biofilms grown under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, with a greater inhibitory effect being seen under conditions of anaerobiosis. Gene expression analyses performed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR showed that C11 led to the significant downregulation of rhl QS regulatory genes but also to the downregulation of both las QS regulatory genes and QS system-regulated virulence genes, rhlA and lasB. Furthermore, the activity of C11 in combination with antibiotics against P. aeruginosa biofilms was tested, and synergistic antibiofilm activity between C11 and ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, and colistin was obtained under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This study demonstrates that C11 may increase the efficacy of treatments for P. aeruginosa infections by increasing the susceptibility of biofilms to antibiotics and by attenuating the pathogenicity of the

  11. pA506: A conjugative plasmid of the plant epiphyte Pseudomonas fluorescens A506

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens A506 is an plant-epiphytic bacterium that is used commercially in the United States for the biological control of fire blight disease of pear and apple. Here, we demonstrate that A506 has a 57 kB conjugative plasmid that can transfer to other strains of Pseudomonas spp. and ...

  12. Pseudomonas chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Sampedro, Inmaculada; Parales, Rebecca E; Krell, Tino; Hill, Jane E

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonads sense changes in the concentration of chemicals in their environment and exhibit a behavioral response mediated by flagella or pili coupled with a chemosensory system. The two known chemotaxis pathways, a flagella-mediated pathway and a putative pili-mediated system, are described in this review. Pseudomonas shows chemotaxis response toward a wide range of chemicals, and this review includes a summary of them organized by chemical structure. The assays used to measure positive and negative chemotaxis swimming and twitching Pseudomonas as well as improvements to those assays and new assays are also described. This review demonstrates that there is ample research and intellectual space for future investigators to elucidate the role of chemotaxis in important processes such as pathogenesis, bioremediation, and the bioprotection of plants and animals.

  13. Teaching Aerobic Fitness Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Allan N.; Ratliffe, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to teach aerobic fitness concepts to elementary students. Some of the K-2 activities include location, size, and purpose of the heart and lungs; the exercise pulse; respiration rate; and activities to measure aerobic endurance. Some of the 3-6 activities include: definition of aerobic endurance; heart disease risk factors;…

  14. Pseudomonas songnenensis sp. nov., isolated from saline and alkaline soils in Songnen Plain, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Pan, Yuanyuan; Wang, Kaibiao; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Shuang; Fu, Xiaowei; Zhang, Cheng; Jiang, Juquan

    2015-03-01

    The strain NEAU-ST5-5(T) was isolated from the saline and alkaline soil in Songnen Plain, North East of China. The bacterium was found to be aerobic, Gram-stain negative, rod-shaped and motile by means of several polar flagella. It forms yellow-orange colonies with a radial wrinkled surface. Phylogenetic analyses based on the separate 16S rRNA gene sequences and concatenated 16S rRNA, gyrB and rpoD gene sequences indicated that it belongs to the genus Pseudomonas in the class Gammaproteobacteria. Strain NEAU-ST5-5(T) shows gene sequence similarities of 98.8-97.1 % for 16S rRNA, 90.5-78.4 % for gyrB and 90.4-71.1 % for rpoD with type strains of the closely related species of the genus Pseudomonas, respectively. DNA-DNA hybridization relatedness between strain NEAU-ST5-5(T) and type strains of the most closely related species, Pseudomonas stutzeri DSM 5190(T), P. xanthomarina DSM 18231(T), P. kunmingensis CGMCC 1.12273(T), P. alcaliphila DSM 17744(T) and P. oleovorans subsp. lubricantis DSM 21016(T) were 43 ± 1 to 25 ± 2 %. The major fatty acids (>10 %) were determined to be C18:1 ω7c/C18:1 ω6c, C16:1 ω7c/C16:1 ω6c and C16:0, the predominant respiratory quinone was identified as ubiquinone 9 and polar lipids were found to consist of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, one unknown phospholipid, one unidentified aminophospholipid and one unknown lipid. The genotypic, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic analysis indicated that strain NEAU-ST5-5(T) represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas songnenensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NEAU-ST5-5(T) (=ACCC 06361(T) = DSM 27560(T)). PMID:25550067

  15. Degradation of TCE using sequential anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapatwala, Kirit D.; Babu, G. R. V.; Baresi, Larry; Trunzo, Richard M.

    1995-01-01

    Bacteria capable of degrading trichloroethylene (TCE) were isolated from contaminated wastewaters and soil sites. The aerobic cultures were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (four species) and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The optimal conditions for the growth of aerobic cultures were determined. The minimal inhibitory concentration values of TCE for Pseudomonas sps. were also determined. The aerobic cells were immobilized in calcium alginate in the form of beads. Degradation of TCE by the anaerobic and dichloroethylene (DCE) by aerobic cultures was studied using dual reactors - anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor. The minimal mineral salt (MMS) medium saturated with TCE was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the anaerobic reactor. The MMS medium saturated with DCE and supplemented with xylenes and toluene (3 ppm each) was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the fluidized air-uplift-type reactor containing the immobilized aerobic cells. The concentrations of TCE and DCE and the metabolites formed during their degradation by the anaerobic and aerobic cultures were monitored by GC. The preliminary study suggests that the anaerobic and aerobic cultures of our isolates can degrade TCE and DCE.

  16. Degradation of TCE using sequential anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapatwala, Kirit D.; Babu, G. R. V.; Baresi, Larry; Trunzo, Richard M.

    1995-03-01

    Bacteria capable of degrading trichloroethylene (TCE) were isolated from contaminated wastewaters and soil sites. The aerobic cultures were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (four species) and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The optimal conditions for the growth of aerobic cultures were determined. The minimal inhibitory concentration values of TCE for Pseudomonas sps. were also determined. The aerobic cells were immobilized in calcium alginate in the form of beads. Degradation of TCE by the anaerobic and dichloroethylene (DCE) by aerobic cultures was studied using dual reactors - anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor. The minimal mineral salt (MMS) medium saturated with TCE was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the anaerobic reactor. The MMS medium saturated with DCE and supplemented with xylenes and toluene (3 ppm each) was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the fluidized air-uplift-type reactor containing the immobilized aerobic cells. The concentrations of TCE and DCE and the metabolites formed during their degradation by the anaerobic and aerobic cultures were monitored by GC. The preliminary study suggests that the anaerobic and aerobic cultures of our isolates can degrade TCE and DCE.

  17. Trichloroethylene Biodegradation by a Methane-Oxidizing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Little, C. Deane; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Herbes, Stephen E.; Lidstrom, Mary E.; Tyndall, Richard L.; Gilmer, Penny J.

    1988-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), a common groundwater contaminant, is a suspected carcinogen that is highly resistant to aerobic biodegradation. An aerobic, methane-oxidizing bacterium was isolated that degrades TCE in pure culture at concentrations commonly observed in contaminated groundwater. Strain 46-1, a type I methanotrophic bacterium, degraded TCE if grown on methane or methanol, producing CO2 and water-soluble products. Gas chromatography and 14C radiotracer techniques were used to determine the rate, methane dependence, and mechanism of TCE biodegradation. TCE biodegradation by strain 46-1 appears to be a cometabolic process that occurs when the organism is actively metabolizing a suitable growth substrate such as methane or methanol. It is proposed that TCE biodegradation by methanotrophs occurs by formation of TCE epoxide, which breaks down spontaneously in water to form dichloroacetic and glyoxylic acids and one-carbon products. Images PMID:16347616

  18. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas chlororaphis Strain PA23

    PubMed Central

    Loewen, Peter C.; Villenueva, Jacylyn; Fernando, W. G. Dilantha

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain PA23 is a plant-beneficial bacterium that is able to suppress disease caused by the fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum through a process known as biological control. Here we present a 7.1-Mb assembly of the PA23 genome. PMID:25035328

  19. Pseudomonas guguanensis sp. nov., a gammaproteobacterium isolated from a hot spring.

    PubMed

    Liu, You-Cheng; Young, Li-Sen; Lin, Shih-Yao; Hameed, Asif; Hsu, Yi-Han; Lai, Wei-An; Shen, Fo-Ting; Young, Chiu-Chung

    2013-12-01

    An aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped bacterium (designated strain CC-G9A(T)), motile by a polar-flagellum, was isolated from a hot spring water sample in Taiwan. Strain CC-G9A(T) could grow at 20-42 °C, pH 6.0-10.0 and tolerate up to 7% (w/v) NaCl. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of strain CC-G9A(T) showed pairwise sequence similarity to Pseudomonas mendocina LMG 1223(T) (97.7%), Pseudomonas alcaligenes ATCC 14909(T) (97.8 %), Pseudomonas alcaliphila DSM 17744(T) (97.8 %), Pseudomonas toyotomiensis JCM 15604(T) (97.6 %), Pseudomonas oleovorans subsp. lubricantis DSM 21016(T) (97.6 %) and Pseudomonas argentinensis BCRC 17807(T) (97.5 %), and lower sequence similarity to other species of the genus Pseudomonas. According to DNA-DNA association analysis, the relatedness of strain CC-G9A(T) to P. mendocina BCRC 10458(T), P. alcaliphila DSM 17744(T), P. alcaligenes BCRC 11893(T), P. oleovorans subsp. lubricantis DSM 21016(T), P. argentinensis BCRC 17807(T) and P. oleovorans subsp. oleovorans BCRC 11902 was 55.1±3.1, 13.7±1.5, 14.1±1.8, 58.5±1.1, 28.9±2.0 and 28.6±1.8 %, respectively. The evolutionary trees reconstructed based on 16S rRNA, gyrB and rpoB gene sequences revealed varying phylogenetic neighbourhoods of strain CC-G9A(T) with regard to the most closely related type strains. The predominant quinone system was ubiquinone (Q-9) and the DNA G+C content was 64.3±1.3 mol%. The major fatty acids were C10 : 0 3-OH, C12 : 0, C12 : 0 3-OH, C16 : 0 and summed features 3 and 8 consisting of C16 : 1ω7c/C16 : 1ω6c and C18 : 1ω7c/C18 : 1ω6c, respectively. The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol. According to distinct phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic features, strain CC-G9A(T) is proposed to represent a novel species within the genus Pseudomonas for which the name Pseudomonas guguanensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type

  20. The chlorocatechol-catabolic transposon Tn5707 of Alcaligenes eutrophus NH9, carrying a gene cluster highly homologous to that in the 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain P51, confers the ability to grow on 3-chlorobenzoate

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Naoto; Miyashita, Kiyotaka

    1999-02-01

    Alcaligenes eutrophus (Ralstonia eutropha) NH9, isolated in Japan, utilizes 3-chlorobenzoate as its sole source of carbon and energy. Sequencing of the relevant region of plasmid pENH91 from strain NH9 revealed that the genes for the catabolic enzymes were homologous to the genes of the modified ortho-cleavage pathway. The genes from strain NH9 (cbnR-ABCD) showed the highest homology to the tcbR-CDEF genes on plasmid pP51 of the 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain P51, which was isolated in The Netherlands. The structure of the operon, including the lengths of open reading frames and intervening sequences, was completely conserved between the cbn and tcb genes. Most nucleotide substitutions were localized within and proximal to the cbnB (tcbD) gene. The difference in the chloroaromatics that the two strains could use as growth substrates seemed to be due to differences in enzymes that convert substrates to chlorocatechols. The restriction map of plasmid pENH91 was clearly different from that of pP51 except in the regions that contained the cbnR-ABCD and tcbR-CDEF genes, respectively, suggesting that the chlorocatechol gene clusters might have been transferred as units. Two homologous sequences, present as direct repeats in both flanking regions of the cbnR-ABCD genes on pENH91, were found to be identical insertion sequences (ISs), designated IS1600, which formed a composite transposon designated Tn5707. Although the tcbR-CDEF genes were not associated with similar ISs, a DNA fragment homologous to IS/1600 was cloned from the chromosome of strain P51. The sequence of the fragment suggested that it might be a remnant of an IS. The two sequences, together with IS1326 and nmoT, formed a distinct cluster on a phylogenetic tree of the IS21 family. The diversity of the sources of these IS or IS-like elements suggests the prevalence of ISs of this type.

  1. Aerobic Denitrifying Bacteria That Produce Low Levels of Nitrous Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Takaya, Naoki; Catalan-Sakairi, Maria Antonina B.; Sakaguchi, Yasushi; Kato, Isao; Zhou, Zhemin; Shoun, Hirofumi

    2003-01-01

    Most denitrifiers produce nitrous oxide (N2O) instead of dinitrogen (N2) under aerobic conditions. We isolated and characterized novel aerobic denitrifiers that produce low levels of N2O under aerobic conditions. We monitored the denitrification activities of two of the isolates, strains TR2 and K50, in batch and continuous cultures. Both strains reduced nitrate (NO3−) to N2 at rates of 0.9 and 0.03 μmol min−1 unit of optical density at 540 nm−1 at dissolved oxygen (O2) (DO) concentrations of 39 and 38 μmol liter−1, respectively. At the same DO level, the typical denitrifier Pseudomonas stutzeri and the previously described aerobic denitrifier Paracoccus denitrificans did not produce N2 but evolved more than 10-fold more N2O than strains TR2 and K50 evolved. The isolates denitrified NO3− with concomitant consumption of O2. These results indicated that strains TR2 and K50 are aerobic denitrifiers. These two isolates were taxonomically placed in the β subclass of the class Proteobacteria and were identified as P. stutzeri TR2 and Pseudomonas sp. strain K50. These strains should be useful for future investigations of the mechanisms of denitrifying bacteria that regulate N2O emission, the single-stage process for nitrogen removal, and microbial N2O emission into the ecosystem. PMID:12788710

  2. Disruption of transporters affiliated with enantio-pyochelin biosynthesis gene cluster of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 has pleiotropic effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (formerly Pseudomonas fluorescens) is a biocontrol bacterium that produces the siderophore enantio-pyochelin under conditions of iron starvation in a process that is often accompanied by the secretion of its biosynthesis intermediates, salicylic acid and dihydroaeruginoic ...

  3. Isolation of amylolytic, xylanolytic, and cellulolytic microorganisms extracted from the gut of the termite Reticulitermes santonensis by means of a micro-aerobic atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Tarayre, Cédric; Brognaux, Alison; Bauwens, Julien; Brasseur, Catherine; Mattéotti, Christel; Millet, Catherine; Destain, Jacqueline; Vandenbol, Micheline; Portetelle, Daniel; De Pauw, Edwin; Eric, Haubruge; Francis, Frédéric; Thonart, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work was to isolate enzyme-producing microorganisms from the tract of the termite Reticulitermes santonensis. The microorganisms were extracted from the guts and anaerobic (CO₂ or CO₂/H₂) and micro-aerobic atmospheres were used to stimulate growth. Three different strategies were tried out. First, the sample was spread on Petri dishes containing solid media with carboxymethylcellulose, microcrystalline cellulose or cellobiose. This technique allowed us to isolate two bacteria: Streptomyces sp. strain ABGxAviA1 and Pseudomonas sp. strain ABGxCellA. The second strategy consisted in inoculating a specific liquid medium containing carboxymethylcellulose, microcrystalline cellulose, or cellobiose. The samples were then spread on Petri dishes with the same specific medium containing carboxymethylcellulose, microcrystalline cellulose, or cellobiose. This led to the isolation of the mold Aspergillus sp. strain ABGxAviA2. Finally, the third strategy consisted in heating the first culture and spreading samples on agar plates containing rich medium. This led to the isolation of the bacterium Bacillus subtilis strain ABGx. All those steps were achieved in controlled atmospheres. The four enzyme-producing strains which were isolated were obtained by using a micro-aerobic atmosphere. Later, enzymatic assays were performed on the four strains. Streptomyces sp. strain ABGxAviA1 was found to produce only amylase, while Pseudomonas sp. strain ABGxCellA was found to produce β-glucosidase as well. Aspergillus sp. strain ABGxAviA2 showed β-glucosidase, amylase, cellulase, and xylanase activities. Finally, B. subtilis strain ABGx produced xylanase and amylase.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of the Endophytic Strain Rhodococcus kyotonensis KB10, a Potential Biodegrading and Antibacterial Bacterium Isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chi Eun; Jo, Sung Hee

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus kyotonensis KB10 is an endophytic bacterium isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana. The organism showed mild antibacterial activity against the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. This study reports the genome sequence of R. kyotonensis KB10. This bacterium contains an ectoine biosynthesis gene cluster and has the potential to degrade nitroaromatic compounds. The identified bacterium may be a suitable biocontrol agent and degrader of environmental pollutants. PMID:27389269

  5. Formation of isoamylase by Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Harada, T; Yokobayashi, K; Misaki, A

    1968-10-01

    We have isolated a Pseudomonas sp. (strain SB15) which produces an isoamylase (EC 3.2.1.9). Highest yields of this enzyme were obtained when the bacterium was grown in shaken culture in a medium containing maltose, dextrin, starch, or isomaltose. Specific carbon and nitrogen sources were required for growth. The most satisfactory medium consisted of 2% maltose, 0.4% sodium glutamate, 0.3% diammonium hydrogen phosphate, and other inorganic salts. The optimal pH for enzyme production was 5 to 6. The enzyme is stable between pH 3 and 6 but is extremely labile above pH 7. It splits amylopectin completely by combined action with beta-amylase but does not attack pullulan. PMID:5684197

  6. Contribution of cell elongation to the biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mi Young; Lee, Kang-Mu; Park, Yongjin; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2011-01-18

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a gram-negative bacterium of clinical importance, forms more robust biofilm during anaerobic respiration, a mode of growth presumed to occur in abnormally thickened mucus layer lining the cystic fibrosis (CF) patient airway. However, molecular basis behind this anaerobiosis-triggered robust biofilm formation is not clearly defined yet. Here, we identified a morphological change naturally accompanied by anaerobic respiration in P. aeruginosa and investigated its effect on the biofilm formation in vitro. A standard laboratory strain, PAO1 was highly elongated during anaerobic respiration compared with bacteria grown aerobically. Microscopic analysis demonstrated that cell elongation likely occurred as a consequence of defective cell division. Cell elongation was dependent on the presence of nitrite reductase (NIR) that reduces nitrite (NO(2) (-)) to nitric oxide (NO) and was repressed in PAO1 in the presence of carboxy-PTIO, a NO antagonist, demonstrating that cell elongation involves a process to respond to NO, a spontaneous byproduct of the anaerobic respiration. Importantly, the non-elongated NIR-deficient mutant failed to form biofilm, while a mutant of nitrate reductase (NAR) and wild type PAO1, both of which were highly elongated, formed robust biofilm. Taken together, our data reveal a role of previously undescribed cell biological event in P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and suggest NIR as a key player involved in such process.

  7. BTEX biodegradation and its nitrogen removal potential by a newly isolated Pseudomonas thivervalensis MAH1.

    PubMed

    Qu, Dan; Zhao, Yongsheng; Sun, Jiaqiang; Ren, Hejun; Zhou, Rui

    2015-09-01

    Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) are of great environmental concern because of their widespread occurrence in groundwater and soil, posing an increasing threat to human health. The aerobic denitrifying BTEX-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas thivervalensis MAH1 was isolated from BTEX-contaminated sediment under nitrate-reducing conditions. The degradation rates of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene by strain MAH1 were 4.71, 6.59, 5.64, and 2.59 mg·L⁻¹day⁻¹, respectively. The effects of sodium citrate, nitrate, and NaH2PO4 on improving BTEX biodegradation were investigated, and their optimum concentrations were 0.5 g·L⁻¹, 100 mg·L⁻¹, and 0.8 mmol·L⁻¹, respectively. Moreover, MAH1, which has nirS and nosZ genes, removed ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite at 2.49 mg NH(4)(+)-N·L⁻¹·h⁻¹, 1.50 mg NO(3)(-)-N·L⁻¹·h⁻¹, and 0.83 mg NO(2)(-)-N·L⁻¹·h⁻¹, respectively. MAH1 could help in mitigating the pollution caused by nitrogen amendments for biostimulation. This study highlighted the feasibility of using MAH1 for the bioremediation of BTEX-contaminated sites.

  8. Agrobacterium tumefaciens Is a Diazotrophic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Kanvinde, Lalita; Sastry, G. R. K.

    1990-01-01

    This is the first report that Agrobacterium tumefaciens can fix nitrogen in a free-living condition as shown by its abilities to grow on nitrogen-free medium, reduce acetylene to ethylene, and incorporate 15N supplied as 15N2. As with most other well-characterized diazotrophic bacteria, the presence of NH4+ in the medium and aerobic conditions repress nitrogen fixation by A. tumefaciens. The system requires molybdenum. No evidence for nodulation was found with pea, peanut, or soybean plants. Further understanding of the nitrogen-fixing ability of this bacterium, which has always been considered a pathogen, should cast new light on the evolution of a pathogenic versus symbiotic relationship. Images PMID:16348237

  9. Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a diazotrophic bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Kanvinde, L.; Sastry, G.R.K. )

    1990-07-01

    This is the first report that Agrobacterium tumefaciens can fix nitrogen in a free-living condition as shown by its abilities to grown on nitrogen-free medium, reduce acetylene to ethylene, and incorporate {sup 15}N supplied as {sup 15}N{sub 2}. As with most other well-characterized diazotrophic bacteria, the presence of NH{sub 4}{sup +} in the medium and aerobic conditions repress nitrogen fixation by A. tumefaciens. The system requires molybdenum. No evidence for nodulation was found with pea, peanut, or soybean plants. Further understanding of the nitrogen-fixing ability of this bacterium, which has always been considered a pathogen, should cast new light on the evolution of a pathogenic versus symbiotic relationship.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of the Novel Agar-Digesting Marine Bacterium HQM9▿

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zongjun; Zhang, Zhewen; Miao, Tingting; Wu, Jiayan; Lü, Guoqiang; Yu, Jun; Xiao, Jingfa; Chen, Guanjun

    2011-01-01

    Strain HQM9, an aerobic, rod-shaped marine bacterium from red algae, can produce agarases and liquefy solid plating media efficiently when agar is used as a coagulant. Here we report the draft genome sequence and the initial findings from a preliminary analysis of strain HQM9, which should be a novel species of Flavobacteriaceae. PMID:21725015

  11. [Isolation, Identification and Nitrogen Removal Characteristics of a Heterotrophic Nitrification-Aerobic Denitrification Strain y3 Isolated from Marine Environment].

    PubMed

    Sun, Qing-hua; Yu, De-shuang; Zhang, Pei-yu; Lin, Xue-zheng; Xu, Guang-yao; Li, Jin

    2016-03-15

    A heterotrophic nitrification--aerobic denitrification bacterium named y3 was isolated from the sludge of Jiaozhou Bay using the enrichment medium with seawater as the matrix. It was identified as Pseudomonas sp. based on the morphological observation, physiological experiments and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA. The experiment results showed that the optimal carbon resource was sodium citrate, the optimal pH was 7.0, and the optimal C/N was 13. The strain could use NH₄Cl, NaNO₂ and KNO₃ as sole nitrogen source, and the removal efficiencies were 98.69%, 78.38% and 72.95% within 20 hours, respectively. There was no nitrate and nitrite accumulation during the heterotrophic nitrification process. Within 20 hours, the nitrogen removal efficiencies were 99.56%, 99.75% and 99.41%, respectively, in the mixed system with NO₃⁻-N: NO²⁻-N of 2:1, 1:1 and 1:2. When the NH₄⁺-N: NO₃⁻-N ratios were 2: 1 , 1: 1 , 1: 2, the nitrogen removal efficiencies were all 100% . When the NH₄⁺-N:NO₂⁻-N ratios were 2:1,1:1,1:2, the nitrogen removal efficiencies were 90.43%, 92.79% and 99.96%, respectively. They were higher than those with single nitrogen source. As a result, strain y3 had good nitrogen removal performance in high saline wastewater treatment.

  12. [Isolation, Identification and Nitrogen Removal Characteristics of a Heterotrophic Nitrification-Aerobic Denitrification Strain y3 Isolated from Marine Environment].

    PubMed

    Sun, Qing-hua; Yu, De-shuang; Zhang, Pei-yu; Lin, Xue-zheng; Xu, Guang-yao; Li, Jin

    2016-03-15

    A heterotrophic nitrification--aerobic denitrification bacterium named y3 was isolated from the sludge of Jiaozhou Bay using the enrichment medium with seawater as the matrix. It was identified as Pseudomonas sp. based on the morphological observation, physiological experiments and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA. The experiment results showed that the optimal carbon resource was sodium citrate, the optimal pH was 7.0, and the optimal C/N was 13. The strain could use NH₄Cl, NaNO₂ and KNO₃ as sole nitrogen source, and the removal efficiencies were 98.69%, 78.38% and 72.95% within 20 hours, respectively. There was no nitrate and nitrite accumulation during the heterotrophic nitrification process. Within 20 hours, the nitrogen removal efficiencies were 99.56%, 99.75% and 99.41%, respectively, in the mixed system with NO₃⁻-N: NO²⁻-N of 2:1, 1:1 and 1:2. When the NH₄⁺-N: NO₃⁻-N ratios were 2: 1 , 1: 1 , 1: 2, the nitrogen removal efficiencies were all 100% . When the NH₄⁺-N:NO₂⁻-N ratios were 2:1,1:1,1:2, the nitrogen removal efficiencies were 90.43%, 92.79% and 99.96%, respectively. They were higher than those with single nitrogen source. As a result, strain y3 had good nitrogen removal performance in high saline wastewater treatment. PMID:27337905

  13. Pseudomonas 2007 Meeting Review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas is an important genus of bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the third most common nosocomial pathogen in our society, associated with chronic and eventually fatal lung disease in cystic fibrosis patients, while Pseudomonas syringae species are prominent plant pathogens. The fluorescen...

  14. Aerobic Conditioning Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Neil R.

    1980-01-01

    An aerobic exercise class that focuses on the conditioning of the cardiovascular and muscular systems is presented. Students complete data cards on heart rate, pulse, and exercises to be completed during the forty minute course. (CJ)

  15. Arsenic redox transformation by Pseudomonas sp. HN-2 isolated from arsenic-contaminated soil in Hunan, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhennan; Yin, Naiyi; Cai, Xiaolin; Wang, Zhenzhou; Cui, Yanshan

    2016-09-01

    A mesophilic, Gram-negative, arsenite[As(III)]-oxidizing and arsenate[As(V)]-reducing bacterial strain, Pseudomonas sp. HN-2, was isolated from an As-contaminated soil. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicated that the strain was closely related to Pseudomonas stutzeri. Under aerobic conditions, this strain oxidized 92.0% (61.4μmol/L) of arsenite to arsenate within 3hr of incubation. Reduction of As(V) to As(III) occurred in anoxic conditions. Pseudomonas sp. HN-2 is among the first soil bacteria shown to be capable of both aerobic As(III) oxidation and anoxic As(V) reduction. The strain, as an efficient As(III) oxidizer and As(V) reducer in Pseudomonas, has the potential to impact arsenic mobility in both anoxic and aerobic environments, and has potential application in As remediation processes. PMID:27593283

  16. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Proteome during Anaerobic Growth‡

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Manhong; Guina, Tina; Brittnacher, Mitchell; Nguyen, Hai; Eng, Jimmy; Miller, Samuel I.

    2005-01-01

    Isotope-coded affinity tag analysis and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by tandem mass spectrometry were used to identify Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteins expressed during anaerobic growth. Out of the 617 proteins identified, 158 were changed in abundance during anaerobic growth compared to during aerobic growth, including proteins whose increased expression was expected based on their role in anaerobic metabolism. These results form the basis for future analyses of alterations in bacterial protein content during growth in various environments, including the cystic fibrosis airway. PMID:16291692

  17. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Arivett, Brock A; Ream, Dave C; Fiester, Steven E; Kidane, Destaalem; Actis, Luis A

    2016-08-11

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes severe hospital-acquired infections, is grouped as an ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogen because of its extensive drug resistance phenotypes and effects on human health worldwide. Five multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated in this work.

  18. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Arivett, Brock A.; Ream, Dave C.; Fiester, Steven E.; Kidane, Destaalem

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes severe hospital-acquired infections, is grouped as an ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogen because of its extensive drug resistance phenotypes and effects on human health worldwide. Five multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated in this work. PMID:27516516

  19. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Wounded Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Arivett, Brock A; Ream, Dave C; Fiester, Steven E; Kidane, Destaalem; Actis, Luis A

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes severe hospital-acquired infections, is grouped as an ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogen because of its extensive drug resistance phenotypes and effects on human health worldwide. Five multidrug resistant P. aeruginosa strains isolated from wounded military personnel were sequenced and annotated in this work. PMID:27516516

  20. A genomic view of methane oxidation by aerobic bacteria and anaerobic archaea

    PubMed Central

    Chistoserdova, Ludmila; Vorholt, Julia A; Lidstrom, Mary E

    2005-01-01

    Recent sequencing of the genome and proteomic analysis of a model aerobic methanotrophic bacterium, Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) has revealed a highly versatile metabolic potential. In parallel, environmental genomics has provided glimpses into anaerobic methane oxidation by certain archaea, further supporting the hypothesis of reverse methanogenesis. PMID:15693955

  1. Genomic plasticity and catabolic potential of Pseudomonas cepacia

    SciTech Connect

    Lessie, T.G.

    1996-04-01

    The primary goal of this project was to gain information about the size and organization of the genome of Burkholderia cepacia (formerly Pseudomonas cepacia), a microbe which continues to attract attention because of its extraordinary degradative abilities and potential as an agent of bioremediation. This bacterium is no longer considered to be a member of genus Pseudomonas nor does it belong in the gamma-subclass of the proteobacteria, in which the authentic pseudomonads are grouped. It belongs in the less well characterized beta-subclass of the proteobacteria. Technology for manipulation of large DNA fragments developed by Cantor was used to demonstrate that chromosomal multiplicity, a characteristic yet to be observed in a gamma-subclass bacterium, is common among B. cepacia strains. A derivative of Tn5 suitable for determining the chromosomal locations of various B. cepacia genes was also constructed.

  2. Effects of Iron Limitation on the Degradation of Toluene by Pseudomonas Strains Carrying the TOL (pWWO) Plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Dinkla, Inez J. T.; Gabor, Esther M.; Janssen, Dick B.

    2001-01-01

    Most aerobic biodegradation pathways for hydrocarbons involve iron-containing oxygenases. In iron-limited environments, such as the rhizosphere, this may influence the rate of degradation of hydrocarbon pollutants. We investigated the effects of iron limitation on the degradation of toluene by Pseudomonas putida mt2 and the transconjugant rhizosphere bacterium P. putida WCS358(pWWO), both of which contain the pWWO (TOL) plasmid that harbors the genes for toluene degradation. The results of continuous-culture experiments showed that the activity of the upper-pathway toluene monooxygenase decreased but that the activity of benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase was not affected under iron-limited conditions. In contrast, the activities of three meta-pathway (lower-pathway) enzymes were all found to be reduced when iron concentrations were decreased. Additional experiments in which citrate was used as a growth substrate and the pathways were induced with the gratuitous inducer o-xylene showed that expression of the TOL genes increased the iron requirement in both strains. Growth yields were reduced and substrate affinities decreased under iron-limited conditions, suggesting that iron availability can be an important parameter in the oxidative breakdown of hydrocarbons. PMID:11472911

  3. Growth of Pseudomonas sp. TX1 on a wide range of octylphenol polyethoxylate concentrations and the formation of dicarboxylated metabolites.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Wen; Guo, Gia-Luen; Hsieh, Hsiao-Cheng; Huang, Shir-Ly

    2010-04-01

    Pseudomonas sp. TX1, is able to use octylphenol polyethoxylates (OPEO(n), or Triton X-100; average n = 9.5) as a sole carbon source. It can grow on 0.05-20% of OPEO(n) with a specific growth rate of 0.34-0.44 h(-1). High-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometer analysis of OPEO(n) degraded metabolites revealed that strain TX1 was able to shorten the ethoxylate chain and produce octylphenol (OP). Furthermore, formation of the short carboxylate metabolites, such as carboxyoctylphenol polyethoxylates (COPEO(n), n = 2, 3) and carboxyoctylphenol polyethoxycarboxylates (COPEC(n), n = 2, 3) began at the log stage, while octylphenol polyethoxycarboxylates (OPEC(n), n = 1-3) was formed at the stationary phase. All the short-ethoxylated metabolites, OPEO(n), OPEC(n), COPEO(n), and COPEC(n), accumulated when the cells were in the stationary phase. This study is the first to demonstrate the formation of COPEO(n) and COPEC(n) from OPEO(n) by an aerobic bacterium. PMID:20044249

  4. Dance--Aerobic and Anaerobic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlette

    1984-01-01

    This article defines and explains aerobic exercise and its effects on the cardiovascular system. Various studies on dancers are cited indicating that dance is an anaerobic activity with some small degree of aerobic benefit. (DF)

  5. Chemical and metabolic aspects of antimetabolite toxins produced by Pseudomonas syringae pathovars.

    PubMed

    Arrebola, Eva; Cazorla, Francisco M; Perez-García, Alejandro; de Vicente, Antonio

    2011-09-01

    Pseudomonas syringae is a phytopathogenic bacterium present in a wide variety of host plants where it causes diseases with economic impact. The symptoms produced by Pseudomonas syringae include chlorosis and necrosis of plant tissues, which are caused, in part, by antimetabolite toxins. This category of toxins, which includes tabtoxin, phaseolotoxin and mangotoxin, is produced by different pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae. These toxins are small peptidic molecules that target enzymes of amino acids' biosynthetic pathways, inhibiting their activity and interfering in the general nitrogen metabolism. A general overview of the toxins' chemistry, biosynthesis, activity, virulence and potential applications will be reviewed in this work.

  6. Cr(VI) reduction under aerobic and denitrifying conditions by an aquifer-derived Pseudomonad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, H. R.; Han, R.; Geller, J. T.

    2009-12-01

    Chromium contamination of groundwater is widespread within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. For example, at DOE’s Hanford 100 Area in Washington state, the volume of Cr-contaminated groundwater is estimated to be 1.5 billion gallons. Bioremediation (in situ reductive immobilization) studies involving injection of a lactate-containing polymer have been conducted in the Hanford 100H area, where we have observed sequential use of the dissolved electron acceptors present in groundwater, namely, oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate. As part of an effort to explore Cr(VI) reduction under relevant electron-accepting conditions and with relevant bacteria, we have conducted studies with strain RCH2, a denitrifying bacterium similar to Pseudomonas stutzeri that was isolated from the Hanford 100H aquifer. Cell suspension studies with lactate demonstrated that Cr(VI) reduction could occur under either denitrifying or aerobic conditions (at comparable rates), and that reduction was much more rapid when the terminal electron acceptor (i.e., nitrate or O2) was present. It appears that, under both aerobic and denitrifying conditions, the chromate reductase gene(s) are not inducible by Cr; this conclusion is based on the fact that these cell suspension studies were conducted with cells grown in the absence of Cr and resuspended in a buffer that included chloramphenicol, which inhibits protein synthesis. As our studies indicate that anaerobic Cr(VI) reduction by strain RCH2 is much more rapid in the presence of nitrate (i.e., during denitrification) than in its absence, we explored molecular methods that could readily assess in situ denitrification. Specifically, we investigated whether the gene and transcript copy number of diagnostic denitrification genes (nirS and narG) in groundwater could be used to estimate in situ denitrification rates. Continuous culture (chemostat) studies showed strong correlations (r2 values > 0.93) between denitrification rate and either nirS or nar

  7. Pseudomonas screening assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margalit, Ruth (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method for the detection of Pseudomonas bacteria is described where an Azurin-specific antibody is employed for detecting the presence of Azurin in a test sample. The detection of the presence of Azurin in the sample is a conclusive indicator of the presence of the Pseudomonas bacteria since the Azurin protein is a specific marker for this bacterial strain.

  8. Recombineering Pseudomonas syringae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we report the identification of functions that promote genomic recombination of linear DNA introduced into Pseudomonas cells by electroporation. The genes encoding these functions were identified in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a based on similarity to the lambda Red Exo/Beta and RecE...

  9. Genome Sequence of Virgibacillus pantothenticus DSM 26T (ATCC 14576), a Mesophilic and Halotolerant Bacterium Isolated from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie-ping; Liu, Guo-hong; Chen, De-ju; Zhu, Yu-jing; Chen, Zheng; Che, Jian-mei

    2015-01-01

    Virgibacillus pantothenticus DSM 26T is a Gram-positive, spore-forming, aerobic, mesophilic, and halotolerant bacterium. Here, we report its 4.76-Mb draft genome sequence, which is the first genome information of V. pantothenticus and will promote biological research and biotechnological application for the species. PMID:26383648

  10. Genome Sequence of Virgibacillus pantothenticus DSM 26T (ATCC 14576), a Mesophilic and Halotolerant Bacterium Isolated from Soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie-Ping; Liu, Bo; Liu, Guo-Hong; Chen, De-Ju; Zhu, Yu-Jing; Chen, Zheng; Che, Jian-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Virgibacillus pantothenticus DSM 26(T) is a Gram-positive, spore-forming, aerobic, mesophilic, and halotolerant bacterium. Here, we report its 4.76-Mb draft genome sequence, which is the first genome information of V. pantothenticus and will promote biological research and biotechnological application for the species. PMID:26383648

  11. The small RNA transcriptome of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato DC3000

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are regarded as important global regulators in prokaryotes and play critical roles in a variety of metabolic and cellular processes. Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato strain DC3000 (DC3000) is an important plant pathogenic bacterium that causes bacterial speck of to...

  12. Pseudomonas seleniipraecipitatus sp. nov.: A selenite reducing -proteobacteria isolated from soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract: A Gram-negative, yellow pigmented bacterium designated strain CA5 that reduced selenite to elemental red selenium (Se0) was isolated from soil. 16S rRNA gene sequence alignment identified the isolate as a novel Pseudomonas sp. with P. argentinensis, P. flavescens and P. straminea as its c...

  13. Transformation of dibenzo-p-dioxin by pseudomonas sp. strain HH69

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, H.; Wittich, R.M. ); Sinnwell, V.; Meyer, H.; Fortnagel, P.; Francke, W. )

    1990-04-01

    Dibenzo-p-dioxin was oxidatively cleaved by the dibenzofuran-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain HH69 to produce minor amounts of 1-hydroxydibenzo-p-dioxin and catechol, while a 2-phenoxy derivative of muconic acid was formed as the major product. Upon acidic methylation, the latter yielded the dimethylester of cis,trans-2-(2-hydroxyphenoxy)-muconic acid.

  14. Global survey of Fur binding refines the iron responsive regulon of Pseudomonas syringae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas syringae must sense and respond to a variety of environmental signals and understanding how the bacterium integrates these signals into a physiological response is central to our understanding of this plant pathogen. One important micronutrient for all biological organisms is iron. Pre...

  15. Genomics-guided discovery of secondary metabolites and their regulation in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a well-characterized rhizosphere bacterium known for its production of a diverse spectrum of secondary metabolites and its capacity to suppress plant diseases caused by soilborne fungal, bacterial and oomycete pathogens. Metabolites produced by Pf-5 include 2,4-...

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of a Diazotrophic, Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium of the Pseudomonas syringae Complex.

    PubMed

    Patten, Cheryl L; Jeong, Haeyoung; Blakney, Andrew J C; Wallace, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas syringae GR12-2, a nitrogen-fixing, plant growth-promoting bacterium, isolated from the rhizosphere of an Arctic grass. The 6.6-Mbp genome contains 5,676 protein-coding genes, including a nitrogen-fixation island similar to that in P. stutzeri. PMID:27660794

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of a Diazotrophic, Plant Growth–Promoting Rhizobacterium of the Pseudomonas syringae Complex

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Haeyoung; Blakney, Andrew J. C.; Wallace, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas syringae GR12-2, a nitrogen-fixing, plant growth–promoting bacterium, isolated from the rhizosphere of an Arctic grass. The 6.6-Mbp genome contains 5,676 protein-coding genes, including a nitrogen-fixation island similar to that in P. stutzeri. PMID:27660794

  18. TonB-Dependent outer-membrane proteins and siderophore utilization in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 produces two siderophores, a pyoverdine and enantio-pyochelin, and its proteome includes 45 TonB-dependent outer-membrane proteins, which commonly function in uptake of siderophores and other substrates from the environment. The 45 proteins share the ...

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain Able To Decompose N,N-Dimethyl Formamide

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ming; Xu, Lin; Wei, Li; Zhang, Liting

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium, which uses a variety of organic chemicals as carbon sources. Here, we report the genome sequence of the Cu1510 isolate from wastewater containing a high concentration of N,N-dimethyl formamide. PMID:26847883

  20. Ferric-pyoverdine recognition by Fpv outer-membrane proteins of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (previously called P. fluorescens Pf-5) produces two siderophores, enantio-pyochelin and a compound in the large and diverse pyoverdine family. Using high-resolution mass spectroscopy, we determined the structure of the pyoverdine produced by Pf-5. In ad...

  1. Phloroglucinol functions as an intercellular chemical messenger with broad transcriptional effects in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteria can be both highly communicative and highly competitive in the rhizosphere and antibiotics play a role in both of these processes. Among the large spectrum of antibiotics produced by the rhizosphere bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5, two—pyoluteorin and 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG)...

  2. Phloroglucinol functions as an intracellular and intercellular chemical messenger influencing gene expression in Pseudomonas protegens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteria can be both highly communicative and highly competitive in natural habitats and antibiotics are thought to play a role in both of these processes. The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 produces a spectrum of antibiotics, two of which, pyoluteorin and 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAP...

  3. The rare codon AGA is involved in regulation of pyoluteorin biosynthesis in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 can colonize root and seed surfaces of many plants, protecting them from infection by plant pathogenic fungi and oomycetes. This capacity to suppress disease is attributed in part to Pf-5’s production of a large spectrum of antibiotics, which is controll...

  4. Pseudomonas grimontii sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Baïda, Nader; Yazourh, Asmae; Singer, Elisabeth; Izard, Daniel

    2002-09-01

    The vernacular name 'fluorescent Pseudomonas group 97-514' was coined for a group of 43 strains isolated from two French natural mineral waters. All these strains were gram-negative, rod-shaped and motile by means of a single polar flagellum. They produced fluorescent pigment (pyoverdin) on King B medium, catalase and cytochrome oxidase. They were capable of respiratory but not fermentative metabolism. They were not able to accumulate poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate and possessed an arginine dihydrolase system. DNA-DNA relatedness studies (S1 nuclease method) showed that the 43 strains of 'fluorescent Pseudomonas group 97-514' formed a genetically homogeneous group (DNA-DNA relatedness ranged from 70 to 100%). A total of 76 strains representing well-known or partially characterized species of the genus Pseudomonas sensu stricto had 7-56% DNA hybridization with strain CFML 97-514T. The highest DNA binding values were found with Pseudomonas veronii CIP 104663T (52%), Pseudomonas rhodesiae CIP 104664T (56%), Pseudomonas marginalis ATCC 10844T (56%), Pseudomonas gessardii CIP 105469T (53%) and Pseudomonas cedrella CIP 105541T (52%). Their unrelatedness was confirmed by deltaTm values greater than 7 degrees C. On the basis of the results of phenotypic and DNA-DNA hybridization studies, a novel Pseudomonas species, Pseudomonas grimontii sp. nov., is proposed for the 43 strains of 'fluorescent Pseudomonas group 97-514'. The type strain is strain CFML 97-514T (= CIP 106645T = ATCC BAA-140T). The G+C content of the DNA of the type strain was 58 mol%. A comparison of the complete 16S rRNA gene sequence of the type strain CFML 97-514T and the sequence of other strains of the genus Pseudomonas revealed that the novel species fell within the 'Pseudomonas fluorescens intrageneric cluster'. Members of P. grimontii grew at 4 degrees C but not at 41 degrees C. They were able to use D-xylose, alpha-L-rhamnose, alpha-aminobutyrate, meso-erythritol and itaconate as sole sources of carbon

  5. Oleiphilaceae fam. nov., to include Oleiphilus messinensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel marine bacterium that obligately utilizes hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Golyshin, Peter N; Chernikova, Tatiana N; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Timmis, Kenneth N; Yakimov, Michail M

    2002-05-01

    A bacterial isolate, ME102T, was obtained from an n-hexadecane enrichment culture of seawater/sediment samples collected in the harbour of Messina (Italy). This gram-negative, aerobic, motile, rod-shaped bacterium used a narrow spectrum of organic compounds, including aliphatic hydrocarbons, alkanoates and alkanoles, as carbon and energy sources. None of the sugars, organic acids or amino acids tested was used. During cultivation on n-alkanes as the sole source of carbon and energy, the cells formed a biofilm on the surface of the alkane droplets. Large-scale (sometimes >50% of the cell mass) intracellular accumulation of alkanoates occurred in cells adsorbed on the alkane surface and under nitrogen-limiting conditions. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that this isolate represents a distinct lineage in the gamma-Proteobacteria and has about 91% sequence identity to members of Marinobacter and Alcanivorax, the closest genera. Four different types of polar lipid could be detected, phosphatidyl glycerol, phosphatidyl ethylamine, phosphatidyl dimethylethylamine and lipids belonging to an unknown type of phospholipid (m/z between 861 and 879). The principal fatty acids in the polar lipid fatty acid profile were 16:0 and 16:1. The putative gene encoding the key enzyme of alkane catabolism, alkane hydroxylase (AlkB), has been cloned. The protein sequence of the putative AlkB of the isolate ME102T was related to the AlkB of Pseudomonas oleovorans and Alcanivorax borkumensis, showing about 60% sequence identity. On the basis of physiological studies and taking into account the distant phylogenetic position of isolate ME102T relative to previously described organisms, a novel genus and species is proposed, Oleiphilus messinensis gen. nov., sp. nov., within a new family, Oleiphilaceae fam. nov. Strain ME102T (= DSM 13489T = LMG 20357T) is the type and only strain of O. messinensis. PMID:12054256

  6. Aerobic biotransformation and mineralization of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, B.H.; Autenrieth, R.L.; Bonner, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    Respirometric mineralization studies of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) were conducted with microorganisms isolated from a site contaminated with munitions waste in Illinois. Nine aerobic bacterial species were isolated under a carbon- and nitrogen-limited condition and tentatively identified as: one Pseudomonas species; one Enterobacter species; and seven Alcaligenes species. Experiments were performed using each of the nine organisms individually and with a consortium of all nine bacterial species. The aerobic microorganisms were cultured in a sterile nutrient solution with glucose and 20 mg/L TNT. Mineralization was determined using uniformly ring-labeled {sup 14}C-TNT in a respirometer that trapped the evolved CO{sub 2}. Biodegradation behavior was characterized based on oxygen consumption, distribution of {sup 14}C activity, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of TNT and its transformation products.

  7. [Oropharyngeal aerobic flora in patients hospitalized in an ORL department].

    PubMed

    Dumont, Y; Borderon, E; Farcy, M C; Penot, J C

    1986-01-01

    As patients with E.N.T. carcinoma have relative frequent infectious complications of E.N.T. area, we have carried out a study or oropharyngeal colonization by aerobic bacteria and fungi in 84 hospitalized patients. The results of the tests are analysed according to different parameters, essentially the presence or the absence of neoplasia and antibiotherapy. The presence of one of these two factors does not substantially modify oropharyngeal flora of patients. However their association coincides with a height percentage of colonies of enterobacteriaceae, of pseudomonas and of fungi.

  8. Interaction of Pseudomonas fluorescens with Eu(III) and Ce(IV) - Desferrioxamine Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Ozaki, T.; Ohnuki, T.; Francis, A.

    2002-12-01

    Naturally occurring chelating agents-, such as siderophores, are able to form complexes with actinides and enhance their solubility and mobility in the environment. Adsorption and/or biodegradation of chelated actinides by microorganisms are important processes which regulate their mobility in the natural environment. In this study, association of Eu(III), Ce(IV), and Fe(III) - desferrioxamine B (DFO) complexes with aerobic bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens (ATCC 55241), was investigated-, Eu(III) and Ce(IV) were used as analogues to trivalent and tetravalent actinides, respectively. When 20 μM of 1:1 Eu(III) - and Ce(IV) - DFO complexes were incubated with P. fluorescens in 0.1 M Tris-HCl buffer (pH = 7.3), the metals were removed from solution, with no change in DFO in solution. With decreasing metal/DFO molar ratio from 1 to 0.01, the accumulation of Eu(III) and Ce(IV) by P. fluorescens decreased. Kinetics study showed that accumulation of Eu(III) reached the maximum within 30 minutes, and then it decreased slightly with time. On the other hand, Ce(IV) accumulation proceeded in a parabolic process where the kinetics was slower than that of Eu(III) accumulation. In comparison to Eu(III) and Ce(IV), the removal of Fe(III) added as a DFO complex by P. fluorescens was not observed. The formation constants (log K) of Eu(III) - DFO and Fe(III) - DFO are reported to be 15 and 30.6, respectively. These results suggest that Eu(III) - DFO complex was dissociated in the presence of bacteria cells and was readily biosorbed.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Gordonia sihwensis Strain 9, a Branched Alkane-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lisa M.; Gunasekera, Thusitha S.; Striebich, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Gordonia sihwensis strain 9 is a Gram-positive bacterium capable of efficient aerobic degradation of branched and normal alkanes. The draft genome of G. sihwensis S9 is 4.16 Mb in size, with 3,686 coding sequences and 68.1% G+C content. Alkane monooxygenase and P-450 cytochrome genes required for alkane degradation are predicted in G. sihwensis S9. PMID:27340079

  10. Sequence heterogeneity of the ferripyoverdine uptake (fpvA), but not the ferric uptake regulator (fur), genes among strains of the fluorescent pseudomonads Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas aureofaciens, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Thupvong, T; Wiideman, A; Dunn, D; Oreschak, K; Jankowicz, B; Doering, J; Castignetti, D

    1999-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas aureofaciens, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida are of importance to medicine, agriculture and biocycling. These microbes acquire ferric ion via the use of the siderophores pyochelin and the family known as the pyoverdines or pseudobactins. The ferric uptake regulator (fur) gene is responsible, at least in part, for the regulation of siderophore synthesis and uptake in P. aeruginosa. To determine whether the organisms contain single or multiple homologues of the siderophore-related genes fpvA (ferripyoverdine uptake) and fur, and whether these homologues displayed sequence heterogeneity, their chromosomal DNAs were probed with fur and fpvA sequences. As a representative of a non-fluorescent pseudomonad, the bacterium Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia was also examined. The pseudomonads all contained fpvA- and fur-like homologues, and heterogeneity was observed among the different species. The presence of two or more fpvA-like genes is indicated in all of the fluorescent pseudomonads surveyed. In contrast, B. cepacia DNA either did not hybridize to these probes, or did so only very weakly, suggesting that fur- and fpvA-like homologues are either absent or significantly different in B. cepacia compared to the fluorescent pseudomonads examined.

  11. Indicator For Pseudomonas Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margalit, Ruth

    1990-01-01

    Characteristic protein extracted and detected. Natural protein marker found in Pseudomonas bacteria. Azurin, protein containing copper readily extracted, purified, and used to prepare antibodies. Possible to develop simple, fast, and accurate test for marker carried out in doctor's office.

  12. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    DOEpatents

    Hudgins, Mark P; Bessette, Bernard J; March, John C; McComb, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention includes a system of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  13. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    DOEpatents

    Hudgins, Mark P; Bessette, Bernard J; March, John; McComb, Scott T.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  14. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, M.P.; Bessette, B.J.; March, J.; McComb, S.T.

    2000-02-15

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120 F and 140 F in steady state.

  15. Glycopeptide dendrimers as Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Jean-Louis; Bergmann, Myriam; Darbre, Tamis

    2013-06-01

    Synthetic glycopeptide dendrimers composed of a branched oligopeptide tree structure appended with glycosidic groups at its multiple N-termini were investigated for binding to the Pseudomonas aeruginosa lectins LecB and LecA. These lectins are partly responsible for the formation of antibiotic resistant biofilms in the human pathogenic bacterium P. aeruginosa, which causes lethal airway infections in immune-compromised and cystic fibrosis patients. Glycopeptide dendrimers with high affinity to the lectins were identified by screening of combinatorial libraries. Several of these dendrimers, in particular the LecB specific glycopeptide dendrimers FD2 and D-FD2 and the LecA specific glycopeptide dendrimers GalAG2 and GalBG2, also efficiently block P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and induce biofilm dispersal in vitro. Structure-activity relationship and structural studies are reviewed, in particular the observation that multivalency is essential to the anti-biofilm effect in these dendrimers.

  16. Low-Impact Aerobics: Better than Traditional Aerobic Dance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koszuta, Laurie Einstein

    1986-01-01

    A form of dance exercise called low-impact aerobics is being touted as a misery-free form of aerobic dance. Because this activity is relatively new, the exact kinds and frequencies of injuries are not known and the fitness benefits have not been examined. (MT)

  17. Transcriptional profile of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121 in response to tissue extracts from a susceptible Phaseolus vulgaris L. cultivar

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola is a Gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacterium that causes "halo blight" disease of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). This disease affects both foliage and pods, and is a major problem in temperate areas of the world. Although several bacterial genes have been determined as participants in pathogenesis, the overall process still remains poorly understood, mainly because the identity and function of many of the genes are largely unknown. In this work, a genomic library of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121 was constructed and PCR amplification of individual fragments was carried out in order to print a DNA microarray. This microarray was used to identify genes that are differentially expressed when bean leaf extracts, pod extracts or apoplastic fluid were added to the growth medium. Results Transcription profiles show that 224 genes were differentially expressed, the majority under the effect of bean leaf extract and apoplastic fluid. Some of the induced genes were previously known to be involved in the first stages of the bacterial-plant interaction and virulence. These include genes encoding type III secretion system proteins and genes involved in cell-wall degradation, phaseolotoxin synthesis and aerobic metabolism. On the other hand, most repressed genes were found to be involved in the uptake and metabolism of iron. Conclusion This study furthers the understanding of the mechanisms involved, responses and the metabolic adaptation that occurs during the interaction of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola with a susceptible host plant. PMID:20003402

  18. Single Bacterium Detection Using Sers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Baikova, T. V.; Alushin, M. V.; Svistunova, T. S.; Minaeva, S. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Saraeva, I. N.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    This work is devoted to the study of a single Staphylococcus aureus bacterium detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and resonant Raman spectroscopy (RS). It was shown that SERS allows increasing sensitivity of predominantly low frequency lines connected with the vibrations of Amide, Proteins and DNA. At the same time the lines of carotenoids inherent to this kind of bacterium are well-detected due to the resonance Raman scattering mechanism. The reproducibility and stability of Raman spectra strongly depend on the characteristics of nanostructured substrate, and molecular structure and size of the tested biological object.

  19. Aerobic Fitness and School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkle, J. Scott

    1997-01-01

    Provides school counselors with information on aerobic exercise (specifically running) and the psychological, behavioral, and physical benefits children obtained by participating in fitness programs. Recommends collaboration between school counselors and physical education teachers and gives a preliminary discussion of aerobic running and its…

  20. Aerobic Fitness and School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkle, J. Scott

    1992-01-01

    Provides school counselors with information regarding aerobic exercise (specifically running), and the psychological, behavioral, and physical benefits children obtain by participating in fitness programs. Presents methods of collaboration between school counselors and physical education teachers. Offers preliminary discussion of aerobic running…

  1. Exercise, Animal Aerobics, and Interpretation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Valerie

    1996-01-01

    Describes an aerobic activity set to music for children that mimics animal movements. Example exercises include walking like a penguin or jumping like a cricket. Stresses basic aerobic principles and designing the program at the level of children's motor skills. Benefits include reaching people who normally don't visit nature centers, and bridging…

  2. Hot Tub Rash (Pseudomonas Folliculitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Hot Tub Rash ( Pseudomonas Folliculitis) Information for adults A ... the skin and small pus-filled lesions. Overview Hot tub rash ( Pseudomonas folliculitis) is an infection of ...

  3. Polymicrobial Ventriculitis Involving Pseudomonas fulva

    PubMed Central

    Rebolledo, Paulina A.; Vu, Catphuong Cathy L.; Carlson, Renee Donahue; Kraft, Colleen S.; Anderson, Evan J.

    2014-01-01

    Infections due to Pseudomonas fulva remain a rare but emerging concern. A case of ventriculitis due to Enterobacter cloacae and Pseudomonas fulva following placement of an external ventricular drain is described. Similar to other reports, the organism was initially misidentified as Pseudomonas putida. The infection was successfully treated with levofloxacin. PMID:24648556

  4. Pseudomonas psychrotolerans sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Elke; Kämpfer, Peter; Busse, Hans-Jürgen

    2004-09-01

    Three yellow-pigmented, Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming bacterial strains, C36T, C37 and C39, were isolated in the Medical Clinic for Small Animals and Ungulates at the University for Veterinary Medicine in Vienna, Austria. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain C36T was shown to belong to the genus Pseudomonas; Pseudomonas oleovorans DSM 1045T was the nearest relative (99.5 % sequence similarity). Other Pseudomonas species shared <97 % sequence similarity with strain C36T. The presence of Q-9 as the major ubiquinone, the predominance of putrescine and spermidine in its polyamine patterns and its fatty acid profile [i.e. the predominance of C(16 : 0), summed feature 3 (C(16 : 1)omega7c and/or 2-OH C(15 : 0) iso), C(18 : 1)omega7c and the presence of 3-OH C(10 : 0), 3-OH C(12 : 0) and 2-OH C(12 : 0)] were in agreement with identification of this strain as a member of the genus Pseudomonas. Physiological and biochemical characteristics and the results of genomic fingerprinting clearly differentiated strain C36T from its phylogenetic relative P. oleovorans DSM 1045T. Results from DNA-DNA hybridization showed that strain C36T represents a species that is distinct from P. oleovorans DSM 1045T. These data demonstrate that strain C36T represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas psychrotolerans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is C36T (= LMG 21977T = DSM 15758T). Additionally, physiological, biochemical, chemotaxonomic and genomic fingerprints indicate that P. oleovorans ATCC 29347 may not be a member of the species P. oleovorans sensu stricto. PMID:15388721

  5. Rhizoxin analogs, orfamide A and chitinase production contribute to the toxicity of Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 to Drosophila melanogaster

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a soil bacterium that was first described for its activity in biological control of plant diseases and has since been shown to be lethal to certain insects. Among these is the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, a well-established model organism for studies evalu...

  6. Draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas mosselii Gil3, isolated from catfish and antagonistic against hypervirulent Aeromonas hydrophila

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas mosselii Gil3 was isolated from a catfish that survived from lethal challenge with hypervirulent Aeromonas hydrophila (vAh). When assayed in vitro, the bacterium showed antagonism against vAh. Sequence analysis revealed that the genome of P. mosselii Gil3 encodes numerous aromatic metabo...

  7. Agricultural plants and soil as a reservoir for Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Green, S K; Schroth, M N; Cho, J J; Kominos, S K; Vitanza-jack, V B

    1974-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was detected in 24% of the soil samples but in only 0.13% of the vegetable samples from various agricultural areas of California. The distribution of pyocin types of soil and vegetable isolates was similar to that of clinical strains, and three of the soil isolates were resistant to carbenicillin. Pseudomonas aeruginosa multiplied in lettuce and bean under conditions of high temperature and high relative humidity (27 C and 80-95% relative humidity) but declined when the temperature and humidity were lowered (16 C, 55-75% relative humidity). The results suggest that soil is a reservior for P. aeruginosa and that the bacterium has the capacity to colonize plants during favorable conditions of temperature and moisture. PMID:4217591

  8. Alkaline cyanide biodegradation by Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344.

    PubMed

    Luque-Almagro, V M; Blasco, R; Huertas, M J; Martínez-Luque, M; Moreno-Vivián, C; Castillo, F; Roldán, M D

    2005-02-01

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 uses cyanide, cyanate, beta-cyanoalanine, and other cyanoderivatives as nitrogen sources under alkaline conditions, which prevents volatile HCN (pK(a) 9.2) formation. The cyanide consumed by this strain is stoichiometrically converted into ammonium. In addition, this bacterium grows with the heavy metal, cyanide-containing waste water generated by the jewellery industry, and is also a cyanide-resistant strain which induces an alternative oxidase and a siderophore-based mechanism for iron acquisition in the presence of cyanide. The detection of cyanase and beta-cyanoalanine nitrilase activities in cyanide-induced cells suggests their implication in the cyanide degradation pathway.

  9. Degradation of triclosan under aerobic, anoxic, and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Gangadharan Puthiya Veetil, Prajeesh; Vijaya Nadaraja, Anupama; Bhasi, Arya; Khan, Sudheer; Bhaskaran, Krishnakumar

    2012-07-01

    Triclosan (2, 4, 4'-trichloro-2'-hydroxyl diphenyl ether) is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent present in a number of house hold consumables. Aerobic and anaerobic enrichment cultures tolerating triclosan were developed and 77 bacterial strains tolerating triclosan at different levels were isolated from different inoculum sources. Biodegradation of triclosan under aerobic, anoxic (denitrifying and sulphate reducing conditions), and anaerobic conditions was studied in batch cultures with isolated pure strains and enrichment consortium developed. Under aerobic conditions, the isolated strains tolerated triclosan up to 1 g/L and degraded the compound in inorganic-mineral-broth and agar media. At 10 mg/L level triclosan, 95 ± 1.2% was degraded in 5 days, producing phenol, catechol and 2, 4-dichlorophenol as the degradation products. The strains were able to metabolize triclosan and its degradation products in the presence of monooxygenase inhibitor 1-pentyne. Under anoxic/anaerobic conditions highest degradation (87%) was observed in methanogenic system with acetate as co-substrate and phenol, catechol, and 2, 4-dichlorophenol were among the products. Three of the isolated strains tolerating 1 g/L triclosan were identified as Pseudomonas sp. (BDC 1, 2, and 3).

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Geobacillus subterraneus Strain K, a Hydrocarbon-Oxidizing Thermophilic Bacterium Isolated from a Petroleum Reservoir in Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Poltaraus, Andrey B; Sokolova, Diyana S; Grouzdev, Denis S; Ivanov, Timophey M; Malakho, Sophia G; Korshunova, Alena V; Tourova, Tatiyana P; Nazina, Tamara N

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of Geobacillus subterraneus strain K, a thermophilic aerobic oil-oxidizing bacterium isolated from production water of the Uzen high-temperature oil field in Kazakhstan, is presented here. The genome is annotated for elucidation of the genomic and phenotypic diversity of thermophilic alkane-oxidizing bacteria. PMID:27491973

  11. Savagea faecisuis gen. nov., sp. nov., a tylosin- and tetracycline-resistant bacterium isolated from a swine-manure storage pit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A polyphasic taxonomic study using morphological, biochemical, chemotaxonomic and molecular methods was performed on three strains of an unknown Gram-positive staining, nonspore-forming, motile aerobic rod-shaped bacterium resistant to tetracycline and tylosin isolated from a swine-manure storage pi...

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Geobacillus subterraneus Strain K, a Hydrocarbon-Oxidizing Thermophilic Bacterium Isolated from a Petroleum Reservoir in Kazakhstan

    PubMed Central

    Poltaraus, Andrey B.; Sokolova, Diyana S.; Grouzdev, Denis S.; Ivanov, Timophey M.; Malakho, Sophia G.; Korshunova, Alena V.; Tourova, Tatiyana P.

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of Geobacillus subterraneus strain K, a thermophilic aerobic oil-oxidizing bacterium isolated from production water of the Uzen high-temperature oil field in Kazakhstan, is presented here. The genome is annotated for elucidation of the genomic and phenotypic diversity of thermophilic alkane-oxidizing bacteria. PMID:27491973

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Aeribacillus pallidus Strain 8m3, a Thermophilic Hydrocarbon-Oxidizing Bacterium Isolated from the Dagang Oil Field (China)

    PubMed Central

    Poltaraus, Andrey B.; Sokolova, Diyana S.; Grouzdev, Denis S.; Ivanov, Timophey M.; Malakho, Sophia G.; Korshunova, Alena V.; Rozanov, Aleksey S.; Tourova, Tatiyana P.

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of Aeribacillus pallidus strain 8m3, a thermophilic aerobic oil-oxidizing bacterium isolated from production water from the Dagang high-temperature oil field, China, is presented here. The genome is annotated to provide insights into the genomic and phenotypic diversity of the genus Aeribacillus. PMID:27284131

  14. Quantifying factors limiting aerobic degradation during aerobic bioreactor landfilling.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Ramin; Mostafid, M Erfan; Han, Byunghyun; Imhoff, Paul T; Chiu, Pei; Augenstein, Don; Kayhanian, Masoud; Tchobanoglous, George

    2010-08-15

    A bioreactor landfill cell at Yolo County, California was operated aerobically for six months to quantify the extent of aerobic degradation and mechanisms limiting aerobic activity during air injection and liquid addition. The portion of the solid waste degraded anaerobically was estimated and tracked through time. From an analysis of in situ aerobic respiration and gas tracer data, it was found that a large fraction of the gas-filled pore space was in immobile zones where it was difficult to maintain aerobic conditions, even at relatively moderate landfill cell-average moisture contents of 33-36%. Even with the intentional injection of air, anaerobic activity was never less than 13%, and sometimes exceeded 65%. Analyses of gas tracer and respiration data were used to quantify rates of respiration and rates of mass transfer to immobile gas zones. The similarity of these rates indicated that waste degradation was influenced significantly by rates of oxygen transfer to immobile gas zones, which comprised 32-92% of the gas-filled pore space. Gas tracer tests might be useful for estimating the size of the mobile/immobile gas zones, rates of mass transfer between these regions, and the difficulty of degrading waste aerobically in particular waste bodies. PMID:20704218

  15. Polysaccharide degradation systems of the saprophytic bacterium Cellvibrio japonicus

    DOE PAGES

    Gardner, Jeffrey G.

    2016-06-04

    Study of recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation by bacterial systems is critical for understanding biological processes such as global carbon cycling, nutritional contributions of the human gut microbiome, and the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. One bacterium that has a robust ability to degrade polysaccharides is the Gram-negative saprophyte Cellvibrio japonicus. A bacterium with a circuitous history, C. japonicus underwent several taxonomy changes from an initially described Pseudomonas sp. Most of the enzymes described in the pre-genomics era have also been renamed. Furthermore, this review aims to consolidate the biochemical, structural, and genetic data published on C. japonicus and its remarkablemore » ability to degrade cellulose, xylan, and pectin substrates. Initially, C. japonicus carbohydrate-active enzymes were studied biochemically and structurally for their novel polysaccharide binding and degradation characteristics, while more recent systems biology approaches have begun to unravel the complex regulation required for lignocellulose degradation in an environmental context. Also included is a discussion for the future of C. japonicus as a model system, with emphasis on current areas unexplored in terms of polysaccharide degradation and emerging directions for C. japonicus in both environmental and biotechnological applications.« less

  16. Molybdate Reduction to Molybdenum Blue by an Antarctic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, S. A.; Shukor, M. Y.; Shamaan, N. A.; Mac Cormack, W. P.; Syed, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    A molybdenum-reducing bacterium from Antarctica has been isolated. The bacterium converts sodium molybdate or Mo6+ to molybdenum blue (Mo-blue). Electron donors such as glucose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose supported molybdate reduction. Ammonium sulphate was the best nitrogen source for molybdate reduction. Optimal conditions for molybdate reduction were between 30 and 50 mM molybdate, between 15 and 20°C, and initial pH between 6.5 and 7.5. The Mo-blue produced had a unique absorption spectrum with a peak maximum at 865 nm and a shoulder at 710 nm. Respiratory inhibitors such as antimycin A, sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and rotenone failed to inhibit the reducing activity. The Mo-reducing enzyme was partially purified using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The partially purified enzyme showed optimal pH and temperature for activity at 6.0 and 20°C, respectively. Metal ions such as cadmium, chromium, copper, silver, lead, and mercury caused more than 95% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity at 0.1 mM. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY1 based on partial 16s rDNA molecular phylogenetic assessment and the Biolog microbial identification system. The characteristics of this strain would make it very useful in bioremediation works in the polar and temperate countries. PMID:24381945

  17. Molybdate reduction to molybdenum blue by an Antarctic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, S A; Shukor, M Y; Shamaan, N A; Mac Cormack, W P; Syed, M A

    2013-01-01

    A molybdenum-reducing bacterium from Antarctica has been isolated. The bacterium converts sodium molybdate or Mo⁶⁺ to molybdenum blue (Mo-blue). Electron donors such as glucose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose supported molybdate reduction. Ammonium sulphate was the best nitrogen source for molybdate reduction. Optimal conditions for molybdate reduction were between 30 and 50 mM molybdate, between 15 and 20°C, and initial pH between 6.5 and 7.5. The Mo-blue produced had a unique absorption spectrum with a peak maximum at 865 nm and a shoulder at 710 nm. Respiratory inhibitors such as antimycin A, sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and rotenone failed to inhibit the reducing activity. The Mo-reducing enzyme was partially purified using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The partially purified enzyme showed optimal pH and temperature for activity at 6.0 and 20°C, respectively. Metal ions such as cadmium, chromium, copper, silver, lead, and mercury caused more than 95% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity at 0.1 mM. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY1 based on partial 16s rDNA molecular phylogenetic assessment and the Biolog microbial identification system. The characteristics of this strain would make it very useful in bioremediation works in the polar and temperate countries. PMID:24381945

  18. Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation As a Tool to Identify Aerobic and Anaerobic PAH Biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Kümmel, Steffen; Starke, Robert; Chen, Gao; Musat, Florin; Richnow, Hans H; Vogt, Carsten

    2016-03-15

    Aerobic and anaerobic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) biodegradation was characterized by compound specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) of the carbon and hydrogen isotope effects of the enzymatic reactions initiating specific degradation pathways, using naphthalene and 2-methylnaphtalene as model compounds. Aerobic activation of naphthalene and 2-methylnaphthalene by Pseudomonas putida NCIB 9816 and Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17483 containing naphthalene dioxygenases was associated with moderate carbon isotope fractionation (εC = -0.8 ± 0.1‰ to -1.6 ± 0.2‰). In contrast, anaerobic activation of naphthalene by a carboxylation-like mechanism by strain NaphS6 was linked to negligible carbon isotope fractionation (εC = -0.2 ± 0.2‰ to -0.4 ± 0.3‰). Notably, anaerobic activation of naphthalene by strain NaphS6 exhibited a normal hydrogen isotope fractionation (εH = -11 ± 2‰ to -47 ± 4‰), whereas an inverse hydrogen isotope fractionation was observed for the aerobic strains (εH = +15 ± 2‰ to +71 ± 6‰). Additionally, isotope fractionation of NaphS6 was determined in an overlaying hydrophobic carrier phase, resulting in more reliable enrichment factors compared to immobilizing the PAHs on the bottle walls without carrier phase. The observed differences especially in hydrogen fractionation might be used to differentiate between aerobic and anaerobic naphthalene and 2-methylnaphthalene biodegradation pathways at PAH-contaminated field sites.

  19. Metabolism of chlorofluorocarbons and polybrominated compounds by Pseudomonas putida G786(pHG-2) via an engineered metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Hur, H G; Sadowsky, M J; Wackett, L P

    1994-11-01

    The recombinant bacterium Pseudomonas putida G786(pHG-2) metabolizes pentachloroethane to glyoxylate and carbon dioxide, using cytochrome P-450CAM and toluene dioxygenase to catalyze consecutive reductive and oxidative dehalogenation reactions (L.P. Wackett, M.J. Sadowsky, L.N. Newman, H.-G. Hur, and S. Li, Nature [London] 368:627-629, 1994). The present study investigated metabolism of brominated and chlorofluorocarbon compounds by the recombinant strain. Under anaerobic conditions, P. putida G786(pHG-2) reduced 1,1,2,2-tetrabromoethane, 1,2-dibromo-1,2-dichloroethane, and 1,1,1,2-tetrachloro-2,2-difluoroethane to products bearing fewer halogen substituents. Under aerobic conditions, P. putida G786(pHG-2) oxidized cis- and trans-1,2-dibromoethenes, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-difluoroethene, and 1,2-dichloro-1-fluoroethene. Several compounds were metabolized by sequential reductive and oxidative reactions via the constructed metabolic pathway. For example, 1,1,2,2-tetrabromoethane was reduced by cytochrome P-450CAM to 1,2-dibromoethenes, which were subsequently oxidized by toluene dioxygenase. The same pathway metabolized 1,1,1,2-tetrachloro-2,2-difluoroethane to oxalic acid as one of the final products. The results obtained in this study indicate that P. putida G786(pHG-2) metabolizes polyfluorinated, chlorinated, and brominated compounds and further demonstrates the value of using a knowledge of catabolic enzymes and recombinant DNA technology to construct useful metabolic pathways.

  20. The fate of a nitrobenzene-degrading bacterium in pharmaceutical wastewater treatment sludge.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yuan; Yang, Juan; Chen, Shaoyi

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the fate of a nitrobenzene-degrading bacterium, Klebsiella oxytoca NBA-1, which was isolated from a pharmaceutical wastewater treatment facility. The 90-day survivability of strain NBA-1 after exposure to sludge under anaerobic and aerobic conditions was investigated. The bacterium was inoculated into sludge amended with glucose and p-chloronitrobenzene (p-CNB) to compare the bacterial community variations between the modified sludge and nitrobenzene amendment. The results showed that glucose had no obvious effect on nitrobenzene biodegradation in the co-metabolism process, regardless of the presence/absence of oxygen. When p-CNB was added under anaerobic conditions, the biodegradation rate of nitrobenzene remained unchanged although p-CNB inhibited the production of aniline. The diversity of the microbial community increased and NBA-1 continued to be one of the dominant strains. Under aerobic conditions, the degradation rate of both nitrobenzene and p-CNB was only 20% of that under anaerobic conditions. p-CNB had a toxic effect on the microorganisms in the sludge so that most of the DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) bands, including that of NBA-1, began to disappear under aerobic conditions after 90days of exposure. These data show that the bacterial community was stable under anaerobic conditions and the microorganisms, including NBA-1, were more resistant to the adverse environment. PMID:26086561

  1. Biodegradation and detoxification of reactive textile dye by isolated Pseudomonas sp. SUK1.

    PubMed

    Kalyani, Dayanad C; Telke, Amar A; Govindwar, Sanjay P; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2009-03-01

    An isolated bacterium from a textile disposal site, Pseudomonas sp. SUK1, has the ability to decolorize the reactive textile dyes and methyl orange. This bacterium showed the potential to decolorize the textile dye Reactive Blue 59 at a high concentration (5 g/L(-1)), which is frequently used in the textile industry of Solapur, India. Induction in the activities of lignin peroxidase, azoreductase, and dichlorophenol indophenol reductase was observed during the decolorization of Methyl Orange and Reactive Blue 59. Methyl Orange (as model azo dye) was used to understand the mechanism of biodegradation by Pseudomonas sp. SUK1. The final product was identified as 1,4-benzenediamine, N, N-dimethyl by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Microbial and phytotoxicity studies revealed the nontoxic nature of the products of Reactive Blue 59.

  2. A coniferyl aldehyde dehydrogenase gene from Pseudomonas sp. strain HR199 enhances the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Adeboye, Peter Temitope; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    The conversion of coniferyl aldehyde to cinnamic acids by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under aerobic growth conditions was previously observed. Bacteria such as Pseudomonas have been shown to harbor specialized enzymes for converting coniferyl aldehyde but no comparable enzymes have been identified in S. cerevisiae. CALDH from Pseudomonas was expressed in S. cerevisiae. An acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (Ald5) was also hypothesized to be actively involved in the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde under aerobic growth conditions in S. cerevisiae. In a second S. cerevisiae strain, the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALD5) was deleted. A prototrophic control strain was also engineered. The engineered S. cerevisiae strains were cultivated in the presence of 1.1mM coniferyl aldehyde under aerobic condition in bioreactors. The results confirmed that expression of CALDH increased endogenous conversion of coniferyl aldehyde in S. cerevisiae and ALD5 is actively involved with the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde in S. cerevisiae. PMID:27070284

  3. Pseudomonas zhaodongensis sp. nov., isolated from saline and alkaline soils.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Pan, Yuanyuan; Wang, Kaibiao; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Shuang; Fu, Xiaowei; Jiang, Juquan

    2015-03-01

    Strain NEAU-ST5-21(T) was isolated from saline and alkaline soils in Zhaodong City, Heilongjiang Province, China. It was aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped and motile with a polar flagellum. It produced yellow-orange colonies with a smooth surface, and grew in the presence of 0-5 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 0 %, w/v), at temperatures of 20-40 °C (optimum 28 °C) and at pH 7-11 (optimum pH 7). Phylogenetic analyses based on the separate 16S rRNA gene sequences and concatenated 16S rRNA, gyrB and rpoD gene sequences indicated that strain NEAU-ST5-21(T) belongs to the genus Pseudomonas in the class Gammaproteobacteria. The most closely related species is Pseudomonas xanthomarina, whose type strain (KMM 1447(T)) showed gene sequence similarities of 99.0 % for 16S rRNA, 81.8 % for gyrB and 85.0 % for rpoD with strain NEAU-ST5-21(T). DNA-DNA hybridization values between strain NEAU-ST5-21(T) and P. xanthomarina DSM 18231(T), Pseudomonas kunmingensis CGMCC 1.12273(T), Pseudomonas stutzeri DSM 5190(T), Pseudomonas oleovorans subsp. lubricantis DSM 21016(T), Pseudomomas chengduensis CGMCC 2318(T), Pseudomonas alcaliphila DSM 17744(T) and Pseudomonas toyotomiensis DSM 26169(T) were 52±0 % to 25±2 %. The DNA G+C content of strain NEAU-ST5-21(T) was 65 mol%. The major fatty acids (>10 %) were C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c, C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c and C16 : 0, the predominant respiratory quinone was ubiquinone 9, and polar lipids consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, one unknown phospholipid, phosphatidylglycerol, one unknown aminolipid, one unknown lipid and a glycolipid. The proposed name is Pseudomonas zhaodongensis sp. nov., NEAU-ST5-21(T) ( = ACCC 06362(T) = DSM 27559(T)) being the type strain. PMID:25574037

  4. Isolation and evaluation of potent Pseudomonas species for bioremediation of phorate in amended soil.

    PubMed

    Jariyal, Monu; Gupta, V K; Jindal, Vikas; Mandal, Kousik

    2015-12-01

    Use of phorate as a broad spectrum pesticide in agricultural crops is finding disfavor due to persistence of both the principal compound as well as its toxic residues in soil. Three phorate utilizing bacterial species (Pseudomonas sp. strain Imbl 4.3, Pseudomonas sp. strain Imbl 5.1, Pseudomonas sp. strain Imbl 5.2) were isolated from field soils. Comparative phorate degradation analysis of these species in liquid cultures identified Pseudomonas sp. strain Imbl 5.1 to cause complete metabolization of phorate during seven days as compared to the other two species in 13 days. In soils amended with phorate at different levels (100, 200, 300 mg kg(-1) soil), Pseudomonas sp. strain Imbl 5.1 resulted in active metabolization of phorate by between 94.66% and 95.62% establishing the same to be a potent bacterium for significantly relieving soil from phorate residues. Metabolization of phorate to these phorate residues did not follow the first order kinetics. This study proves that Pseudomonas sp. strain Imbl 5.1 has huge potential for active bioremediation of phorate both in liquid cultures and agricultural soils.

  5. The acylase PvdQ has a conserved function among fluorescent Pseudomonas spp.

    PubMed

    Koch, Gudrun; Nadal Jimenez, Pol; Muntendam, Remco; Chen, Yixi; Papaioannou, Evelina; Heeb, Stephan; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul; Cool, Robbert H; Quax, Wim J

    2010-06-01

    Pyoverdine biosynthesis in fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. and especially in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been extensively studied. The acylase PvdQ is required for a maturation step in pyoverdine biosynthesis but also has been proven to be effective in degrading long-chain N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). These molecules are used as quorum-sensing molecules by Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonads themselves. Interestingly, the pvdQ gene is part of a pyoverdine cluster in P. aeruginosa and P. syringae but not in other fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. In this study we have compared the activities of PvdQ orthologues from various species and provide evidence for conserved functions in Pseudomonas fluorescens PfO-1, P. putida KT2440 and P. aeruginosa PA14. Despite large differences in genomic organization, expression of each of these pvdQ orthologues is regulated by iron availability. Moreover, PvdQ and its orthologues have conserved substrate specificity for AHLs and play a role in pyoverdine production in all tested Pseudomonas species. These data strongly suggest that the role of PvdQ in pyoverdine biosynthesis is conserved among Pseudomonas spp., while the control that PvdQ exerts in P. aeruginosa over its own quorum-sensing signals seems to be unique to this bacterium. PMID:23766117

  6. Toluene and ethylbenzene oxidation by purified naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.; Gibson, D.T.

    1996-09-01

    Naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) catalyzes the first reaction in the aerobic catabolism of naphthalene by Pseudomonas sp strain NCIB 9816-4. Studies suggest that the enzyme may oxidize aromatic hydrocarbons such as toluene and ethylbenzene at the alkyl substituents rather than the aromatic nucleus. This paper reports on multiple pathways for the oxidation of the methyl and thyl groups of toluene and ethylbenzene by NDO. 47 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. The Regulatory Network of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important bacterial model due to its metabolic and pathogenic abilities, which allow it to interact and colonize a wide range of hosts, including plants and animals. In this work we compile and analyze the structure and organization of an experimentally supported regulatory network in this bacterium. Results The regulatory network consists of 690 genes and 1020 regulatory interactions between their products (12% of total genes: 54% sigma and 16% of transcription factors). This complex interplay makes the third largest regulatory network of those reported in bacteria. The entire network is enriched for activating interactions and, peculiarly, self-activation seems to occur more prominent for transcription factors (TFs), which contrasts with other biological networks where self-repression is dominant. The network contains a giant component of 650 genes organized into 11 hierarchies, encompassing important biological processes, such as, biofilms formation, production of exopolysaccharide alginate and several virulence factors, and of the so-called quorum sensing regulons. Conclusions The study of gene regulation in P. aeruginosa is biased towards pathogenesis and virulence processes, all of which are interconnected. The network shows power-law distribution -input degree -, and we identified the top ten global regulators, six two-element cycles, the longest paths have ten steps, six biological modules and the main motifs containing three and four elements. We think this work can provide insights for the design of further studies to cover the many gaps in knowledge of this important bacterial model, and for the design of systems strategies to combat this bacterium. PMID:22587778

  8. Isolation and characterization of a Pseudomonas diesel-degrading strain from Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Shukor, M Y; Hassan, N A A; Jusoh, A Z; Perumal, N; Shamaan, N A; MacCormack, W P; Syed, M A

    2009-01-01

    A diesel-degrading bacterium from Antarctica has been isolated. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRYJ3 based on partial 16S rDNA molecular phylogeny and Biolog GN microplate panels and Microlog database. Growth on diesel was supported optimally by ammonium sulphate, nitrate and nitrite. The bacterium grew optimally in between 10 and 15 degrees C, pH 7.0 and 3.5% (v/v) diesel. The biodegradation of diesel oil by the strain increased in efficiency from the second to the sixth day of incubation from 1.4 to 18.8% before levelling off on the eighth day n-alkane oxidizing and aldehyde reductase activities were detected in the crude enzyme preparation suggesting the existence of terminal n-alkane oxidizing activity in this bacterium.

  9. Die aerobe Glykolyse der Tumorzelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Friedhelm

    1981-01-01

    A high aerobic glycolysis (aerobic lactate production) is the most significant feature of the energy metabolism of rapidly growing tumor cells. Several mechanisms, which may be different in different cell lines, seem to be involved in this characteristic of energy metabolism of the tumor cell. Changes in the cell membrane leading to increased uptake and utilization of glucose, a high level of fetal types of isoenzymes, a decreased number of mitochondria and a reduced capacity to metabolize pyruvate are some factors which must be taken into consideration. It is not possible to favour one of them at the present time.

  10. Exoelectrogenic bacterium phylogenetically related to Citrobacter freundii, isolated from anodic biofilm of a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianjian; Zhu, Nengwu; Cao, Yanlan; Peng, Yue; Wu, Pingxiao; Dong, Wenhao

    2015-02-01

    An electrogenic bacterium, named Citrobacter freundii Z7, was isolated from the anodic biofilm of microbial fuel cell (MFC) inoculated with aerobic sewage sludge. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) analysis exhibited that the strain Z7 had relatively high electrochemical activity. When the strain Z7 was inoculated into MFC, the maximum power density can reach 204.5 mW/m(2) using citrate as electron donor. Series of substrates including glucose, glycerol, lactose, sucrose, and rhammose could be utilized to generate power. CV tests and the addition of anode solution as well as AQDS experiments indicated that the strain Z7 might transfer electrons indirectly via secreted mediators.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of the Filamentous Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Barry, Kerrie; Chertkov, Olga; Dalin, Eileen; Han, Cliff; Hauser, Loren John; Honchak, Barbara M; Karbach, Lauren E; Land, Miriam L; Lapidus, Alla L.; Larimer, Frank W; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pitluck, Sam; Pierson, Beverly K

    2011-01-01

    Chloroflexus aurantiacus is a thermophilic filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic (FAP) bacterium, and can grow phototrophically under anaerobic conditions or chemotrophically under aerobic and dark conditions. According to 16S rRNA analysis, Chloroflexi species are the earliest branching bacteria capable of photosynthesis, and Cfl. aurantiacus has been long regarded as a key organism to resolve the obscurity of the origin and early evolution of photosynthesis. Cfl. aurantiacus contains a chimeric photosystem that comprises some characters of green sulfur bacteria and purple photosynthetic bacteria, and also has some unique electron transport proteins compared to other photosynthetic bacteria.

  12. The Transition from Aerobic to Anaerobic Metabolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, James S.; McLellan, Thomas H.

    1980-01-01

    The transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism is discussed. More research is needed on different kinds of athletes and athletic activities and how they may affect aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms. (CJ)

  13. Pseudomonas genomes: diverse and adaptable.

    PubMed

    Silby, Mark W; Winstanley, Craig; Godfrey, Scott A C; Levy, Stuart B; Jackson, Robert W

    2011-07-01

    Members of the genus Pseudomonas inhabit a wide variety of environments, which is reflected in their versatile metabolic capacity and broad potential for adaptation to fluctuating environmental conditions. Here, we examine and compare the genomes of a range of Pseudomonas spp. encompassing plant, insect and human pathogens, and environmental saprophytes. In addition to a large number of allelic differences of common genes that confer regulatory and metabolic flexibility, genome analysis suggests that many other factors contribute to the diversity and adaptability of Pseudomonas spp. Horizontal gene transfer has impacted the capability of pathogenic Pseudomonas spp. in terms of disease severity (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and specificity (Pseudomonas syringae). Genome rearrangements likely contribute to adaptation, and a considerable complement of unique genes undoubtedly contributes to strain- and species-specific activities by as yet unknown mechanisms. Because of the lack of conserved phenotypic differences, the classification of the genus has long been contentious. DNA hybridization and genome-based analyses show close relationships among members of P. aeruginosa, but that isolates within the Pseudomonas fluorescens and P. syringae species are less closely related and may constitute different species. Collectively, genome sequences of Pseudomonas spp. have provided insights into pathogenesis and the genetic basis for diversity and adaptation.

  14. Membrane thickening aerobic digestion processes.

    PubMed

    Woo, Bryen

    2014-01-01

    Sludge management accounts for approximately 60% of the total wastewater treatment plant expenditure and laws for sludge disposal are becoming increasingly stringent, therefore much consideration is required when designing a solids handling process. A membrane thickening aerobic digestion process integrates a controlled aerobic digestion process with pre-thickening waste activated sludge using membrane technology. This process typically features an anoxic tank, an aerated membrane thickener operating in loop with a first-stage digester followed by second-stage digestion. Membrane thickening aerobic digestion processes can handle sludge from any liquid treatment process and is best for facilities obligated to meet low total phosphorus and nitrogen discharge limits. Membrane thickening aerobic digestion processes offer many advantages including: producing a reusable quality permeate with minimal levels of total phosphorus and nitrogen that can be recycled to the head works of a plant, protecting the performance of a biological nutrient removal liquid treatment process without requiring chemical addition, providing reliable thickening up to 4% solids concentration without the use of polymers or attention to decanting, increasing sludge storage capacities in existing tanks, minimizing the footprint of new tanks, reducing disposal costs, and providing Class B stabilization.

  15. Pseudomonas guangdongensis sp. nov., isolated from an electroactive biofilm, and emended description of the genus Pseudomonas Migula 1894.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guiqin; Han, Luchao; Wen, Junlin; Zhou, Shungui

    2013-12-01

    A Gram-negative, straight to slightly curved rod-shaped bacterium, motile with peritrichous flagella, designated SgZ-6(T), was isolated from an electroactive biofilm and was characterized by means of a polyphasic approach. Growth occurred with 0-5.0 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 1 %), at pH 6.0-10.0 (optimum pH 7.0) and at 10-42 °C (optimum 30 °C) in trypticase soya broth. Phylogenetic analyses based on the 16S rRNA and gyrB genes identified the isolate as a member of a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas. Strain SgZ-6(T) exhibited the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to 'Pseudomonas linyingensis' CGMCC 1.10701 (97.5 %), followed by Pseudomonas sagittaria JCM 18195(T) (97.4 %), P. oleovorans subsp. lubricantis DSM 21016(T) (96.6 %), P. tuomuerensis JCM 14085(T) (96.5 %) and P. alcaliphila JCM 10630(T) (96.4 %). Strain SgZ-6(T) showed the highest gyrB gene sequence similarity of 93.7 % to 'P. linyingensis' CGMCC 1.10701 among all type strains of genus Pseudomonas. DNA-DNA pairing studies showed that strain SgZ-6(T) displayed 47.1 and 40.3 % relatedness to 'P. linyingensis' CGMCC 1.10701 and P. sagittaria JCM 18195(T), respectively. The major isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone 9 (Q-9). The whole-cell fatty acids consisted mainly of summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω6c and/or C16 : 1ω7c), C16 : 0 and summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω6c and/or C18 : 1ω7c). The DNA G+C content of the genomic DNA was 68.1 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, strain SgZ-6(T) is proposed to represent a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas guangdongensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SgZ-6(T) ( = CCTCC AB 2012022(T) = KACC 16606(T)). An emended description of the genus Pseudomonas is also proposed. PMID:23918787

  16. Arthritis and Aerobic Exercise: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ike, Robert W.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Arthritic patients who regularly do aerobic exercise make significant gains in aerobic and functional status, and in subjective areas like pain tolerance and mood. Still, they are often advised to curtail physical activity. Guidelines are presented for physicians prescribing aerobic exercise. An exercise tolerance test is recommended. (SM)

  17. Population structure and diversity of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid producing fluorescent pseudomonas spp. from dryland cereal fields of central Washington State (U.S.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Certain strains of the rhizosphere bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens contain the phenazine biosynthesis operon (phzABCEDF) and produce redox-active phenazine antibiotics that suppress a wide variety of soilborne plant pathogens. In 2007 and 2008 we isolated 412 phenazine-producing (Phz+) fluorescent...

  18. High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of an Endophytic Pseudomonas viridiflava Strain with Herbicidal Properties against Its Host, the Weed Lepidium draba L.

    PubMed Central

    Samad, Abdul; Antonielli, Livio; Compant, Stéphane; Sessitsch, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas viridiflava strain CDRTc14 a pectinolytic bacterium showing herbicidal activity, isolated from the root of Lepidium draba L. growing as a weed in an Austrian vineyard. The availability of this genome sequence allows us to investigate the genetic basis of plant–microbe interactions. PMID:27795282

  19. Cultivar-Dependent Transcript Accumulation in Wheat Roots Colonized by Pseudomonas fluorescens Q8r1-96 Wild Type and Mutant Strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Triticum aestivum L. (wheat), the root-colonizing bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain Q8r1-96 produces the antifungal metabolite 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG), suppresses damage caused by soilborne root pathogens, and modulates multiple stress or defense pathways in wheat roots. To test...

  20. An inter-species signaling system mediated by fusaric acid has parallel effects on antifungal metabolite production by Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 and antibiosis of Fusarium spp.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a rhizosphere bacterium that acts as a biocontrol agent of soilborne plant diseases, and produces at least seven different secondary metabolites with antifungal properties. We derived site-directed mutants of Pf-5 with single and multiple mutations in the biosynt...

  1. Pseudomonas hunanensis sp. nov., isolated from soil subjected to long-term manganese pollution.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian; Li, Bai-Yuan; Wang, Hai-Hua; Liu, Zhi-Qiang

    2014-07-01

    A Gram-negative, polar flagella, rod-shaped bacterium LV (T) was isolated from a soil sample subjected to long-term manganese pollution in Hunan Province, China. Cells grow optimally on Luria-Bertani agar medium at 30 °C in the presence of 0-5.0 % (w/v) NaCl and pH 7-8. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain LV (T) belonged to the genus Pseudomonas, with sequence similarity values of 98.6, 98.2, 98.7, and 97.3 % to Pseudomonas monteilii BCRC 17520 (T) , Pseudomonas putida BCRC 10459 (T) , Pseudomonas plecoglossicida BCRC 17517 (T) , and Pseudomonas asplenii BCRC 17131 (T) , respectively. The level of DNA-DNA relatedness between the five strains was <30 %. The DNA G+C content of strain LV (T) is 68.8 mol%. Chemotaxonomic data revealed that the strain LV(T) possesses ubiquinone Q-9. The polar lipid profile of strain LV (T) contained diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, and phosphatidylethanolamine. The major cellular fatty acids present are C10:03-OH (12.33 %), C16:0 (23.99 %), summed feature 3(C16:1ω7c and/or C16:1ω6c), and summed feature 8(C18:1 ω7c and C18:1 ω6c). Based on the genotypic, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic data, strain LV (T) is distinguishable from related members of the genus Pseudomonas. Thus, strain LV (T) represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas hunanensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LV (T) (=CICC 10558(T) = NCCB 100446(T)).

  2. Aerobic biodegradation of propylene glycol by soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Giuseppe; Cavalca, Lucia; Letizia Colarieti, M; Scelza, Rosalia; Scotti, Riccardo; Rao, Maria A; Andreoni, Vincenza; Ciccazzo, Sonia; Greco, Guido

    2013-09-01

    Propylene glycol (PG) is a main component of aircraft deicing fluids and its extensive use in Northern airports is a source of soil and groundwater contamination. Bacterial consortia able to grow on PG as sole carbon and energy source were selected from soil samples taken along the runways of Oslo Airport Gardermoen site (Norway). DGGE analysis of enrichment cultures showed that PG-degrading populations were mainly composed by Pseudomonas species, although Bacteroidetes were found, as well. Nineteen bacterial strains, able to grow on PG as sole carbon and energy source, were isolated and identified as different Pseudomonas species. Maximum specific growth rate of mixed cultures in the absence of nutrient limitation was 0.014 h(-1) at 4 °C. Substrate C:N:P molar ratios calculated on the basis of measured growth yields are in good agreement with the suggested values for biostimulation reported in literature. Therefore, the addition of nutrients is suggested as a suitable technique to sustain PG aerobic degradation at the maximum rate by autochthonous microorganisms of unsaturated soil profile.

  3. Bioremediation of textile azo dyes by aerobic bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Senan, Resmi C; Abraham, T Emilia

    2004-08-01

    An aerobic bacterial consortium consisting of two isolated strains (BF1, BF2) and a strain of Pseudomonas putida (MTCC1194) was developed for the aerobic degradation of a mixture of textile azodyes and individual azodyes at alkaline pH (9-10.5) and salinity (0.9-3.68 g/l) at ambient temperature (28 +/- 2 degrees C). The degradation efficiency of the strains in different media (mineral media and in the Simulated textile effluent (STE)) and at different dye concentrations were studied. The presence of a H2O2 independent oxidase-laccase (26.5 IU/ml) was found in the culture filtrate of the organism BF2. The analysis of the degraded products by TLC and HPLC, after the microbial treatment of the dyes showed the absence of amines and the presence of low molecular weight oxidative degradation products. The enzymes present in the crude supernatant was found to be reusable for the dye degradation.

  4. Genome sequence of the aerobic bacterium Bacillus sp. strain FJAT-13831.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guohong; Liu, Bo; Lin, Naiquan; Tang, Weiqi; Tang, Jianyang; Lin, Yingzhi

    2012-12-01

    Bacillus sp. strain FJAT-13831 was isolated from the no. 1 pit soil of Emperor Qin's Terracotta Warriors in Xi'an City, People's Republic of China. The isolate showed a close relationship to the Bacillus cereus group. The draft genome sequence of Bacillus sp. FJAT-13831 was 4,425,198 bp in size and consisted of 5,567 genes (protein-coding sequences [CDS]) with an average length of 782 bp and a G+C value of 36.36%.

  5. Genome Sequence of the Aerobic Bacterium Bacillus sp. Strain FJAT-13831

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guohong; Lin, Naiquan; Tang, Weiqi; Tang, Jianyang; Lin, Yingzhi

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus sp. strain FJAT-13831 was isolated from the no. 1 pit soil of Emperor Qin's Terracotta Warriors in Xi'an City, People's Republic of China. The isolate showed a close relationship to the Bacillus cereus group. The draft genome sequence of Bacillus sp. FJAT-13831 was 4,425,198 bp in size and consisted of 5,567 genes (protein-coding sequences [CDS]) with an average length of 782 bp and a G+C value of 36.36%. PMID:23144388

  6. Genome Sequence of Chthoniobacter flavus Ellin428, an aerobic heterotrophic soil bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Kant, Ravi; Van Passel, Mark W.J.; Palva, Airi; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, A; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Larimer, Frank W; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; De Vos, Willem M.; Janssen, Peter H.; Smidt, Hauke

    2011-01-01

    Chthoniobacter flavusis Ellin428 is the first isolate from subdivision 2 of the bacterial phylum Verrucomicrobia. C. flavusis Ellin428 can metabolize many of the saccharide components of plant biomass but does not grow with amino acids or organic acids other than pyruvate.

  7. Pseudomonas aestusnigri sp. nov., isolated from crude oil-contaminated intertidal sand samples after the Prestige oil spill.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, David; Mulet, Magdalena; Rodríguez, Ana C; David, Zoyla; Lalucat, Jorge; García-Valdés, Elena

    2014-03-01

    Strains VGXO14(T) and Vi1 were isolated from the Atlantic intertidal shore from Galicia, Spain, after the Prestige oil spill. Both strains were Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria with one polar inserted flagellum, strictly aerobic, and able to grow at 18-37°C, pH 6-10 and 2-10% NaCl. A preliminary analysis of the 16S rRNA and the partial rpoD gene sequences indicated that these strains belonged to the Pseudomonas genus but were distinct from any known Pseudomonas species. A polyphasic taxonomic approach including phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic, phenotypic and genotypic data confirmed that the strains belonged to the Pseudomonas pertucinogena group. In a multilocus sequence analysis, the similarity of VGXO14(T) and Vi1 to the closest type strain of the group, Pseudomonas pachastrellae, was 90.4%, which was lower than the threshold of 97% established to discriminate species in the Pseudomonas genus. The DNA-DNA hybridisation similarity between strains VGXO14(T) and Vi1 was 79.6%, but below 70% with the type strains in the P. pertucinogena group. Therefore, the strains should be classified within the genus Pseudomonas as a novel species, for which the name Pseudomonas aestusnigri is proposed. The type strain is VGXO14(T) (=CCUG 64165(T)=CECT 8317(T)).

  8. Expression and surface display of Cellulomonas endoglucanase in the ethanologenic bacterium Zymobacter palmae.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Motoki; Akahoshi, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Kenji; Yanase, Hideshi

    2012-11-01

    In order to reduce the cost of bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass, we developed a tool for cell surface display of cellulolytic enzymes on the ethanologenic bacterium Zymobacter palmae. Z. palmae is a novel ethanol-fermenting bacterium capable of utilizing a broad range of sugar substrates, but not cellulose. Therefore, to express and display heterologous cellulolytic enzymes on the Z. palmae cell surface, we utilized the cell-surface display motif of the Pseudomonas ice nucleation protein Ina. The gene encoding Ina from Pseudomonas syringae IFO3310 was cloned, and its product was comprised of three functional domains: an N-terminal domain, a central domain with repeated amino acid residues, and a C-terminal domain. The N-terminal domain of Ina was shown to function as the anchoring motif for a green fluorescence protein fusion protein in Escherichia coli. To express a heterologous cellulolytic enzyme extracellularly in Z. palmae, we fused the N-terminal coding sequence of Ina to the coding sequence of an N-terminal-truncated Cellulomonas endoglucanase. Z. palmae cells carrying the fusion endoglucanase gene were shown to degrade carboxymethyl cellulose. Although a portion of the expressed fusion endoglucanase was released from Z. palmae cells into the culture broth, we confirmed the display of the protein on the cell surface by immunofluorescence microscopy. The results indicate that the N-terminal anchoring motif of Ina from P. syringae enabled the translocation and display of the heterologous cellulase on the cell surface of Z. palmae.

  9. Aerobic microbial enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Torsvik, T.; Gilje, E.; Sunde, E.

    1995-12-31

    In aerobic MEOR, the ability of oil-degrading bacteria to mobilize oil is used to increase oil recovery. In this process, oxygen and mineral nutrients are injected into the oil reservoir in order to stimulate growth of aerobic oil-degrading bacteria in the reservoir. Experiments carried out in a model sandstone with stock tank oil and bacteria isolated from offshore wells showed that residual oil saturation was lowered from 27% to 3%. The process was time dependent, not pore volume dependent. During MEOR flooding, the relative permeability of water was lowered. Oxygen and active bacteria were needed for the process to take place. Maximum efficiency was reached at low oxygen concentrations, approximately 1 mg O{sub 2}/liter.

  10. Protein Network of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Denitrification Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Borrero-de Acuña, José Manuel; Rohde, Manfred; Wissing, Josef; Jänsch, Lothar; Schobert, Max; Molinari, Gabriella; Timmis, Kenneth N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oxidative phosphorylation using multiple-component, membrane-associated protein complexes is the most effective way for a cell to generate energy. Here, we systematically investigated the multiple protein-protein interactions of the denitrification apparatus of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. During denitrification, nitrate (Nar), nitrite (Nir), nitric oxide (Nor), and nitrous oxide (Nos) reductases catalyze the reaction cascade of NO3− → NO2− → NO → N2O → N2. Genetic experiments suggested that the nitric oxide reductase NorBC and the regulatory protein NosR are the nucleus of the denitrification protein network. We utilized membrane interactomics in combination with electron microscopy colocalization studies to elucidate the corresponding protein-protein interactions. The integral membrane proteins NorC, NorB, and NosR form the core assembly platform that binds the nitrate reductase NarGHI and the periplasmic nitrite reductase NirS via its maturation factor NirF. The periplasmic nitrous oxide reductase NosZ is linked via NosR. The nitrate transporter NarK2, the nitrate regulatory system NarXL, various nitrite reductase maturation proteins, NirEJMNQ, and the Nos assembly lipoproteins NosFL were also found to be attached. A number of proteins associated with energy generation, including electron-donating dehydrogenases, the complete ATP synthase, almost all enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and the Sec system of protein transport, among many other proteins, were found to interact with the denitrification proteins. This deduced nitrate respirasome is presumably only one part of an extensive cytoplasmic membrane-anchored protein network connecting cytoplasmic, inner membrane, and periplasmic proteins to mediate key activities occurring at the barrier/interface between the cytoplasm and the external environment. IMPORTANCE The processes of cellular energy generation are catalyzed by large multiprotein enzyme complexes

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings

    MedlinePlus

    ... becoming more difficult to treat because of increasing antibiotic resistance. Selecting the right antibiotic usually requires that a ... to help educate people about Pseudomonas infections, and antibiotic resistance, and to encourage prevention activities and healthy behaviors ...

  12. Methods to determine aerobic endurance.

    PubMed

    Bosquet, Laurent; Léger, Luc; Legros, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Physiological testing of elite athletes requires the correct identification and assessment of sports-specific underlying factors. It is now recognised that performance in long-distance events is determined by maximal oxygen uptake (V(2 max)), energy cost of exercise and the maximal fractional utilisation of V(2 max) in any realised performance or as a corollary a set percentage of V(2 max) that could be endured as long as possible. This later ability is defined as endurance, and more precisely aerobic endurance, since V(2 max) sets the upper limit of aerobic pathway. It should be distinguished from endurance ability or endurance performance, which are synonymous with performance in long-distance events. The present review examines methods available in the literature to assess aerobic endurance. They are numerous and can be classified into two categories, namely direct and indirect methods. Direct methods bring together all indices that allow either a complete or a partial representation of the power-duration relationship, while indirect methods revolve around the determination of the so-called anaerobic threshold (AT). With regard to direct methods, performance in a series of tests provides a more complete and presumably more valid description of the power-duration relationship than performance in a single test, even if both approaches are well correlated with each other. However, the question remains open to determine which systems model should be employed among the several available in the literature, and how to use them in the prescription of training intensities. As for indirect methods, there is quantitative accumulation of data supporting the utilisation of the AT to assess aerobic endurance and to prescribe training intensities. However, it appears that: there is no unique intensity corresponding to the AT, since criteria available in the literature provide inconsistent results; and the non-invasive determination of the AT using ventilatory and heart rate

  13. Measurement of soil bacterial colony temperatures and isolation of a high heat-producing bacterium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The cellular temperatures of microorganisms are considered to be the same as those of their surroundings because the cellular volume is too small to maintain a cellular temperature that is different from the ambient temperature. However, by forming a colony or a biofilm, microorganisms may be able to maintain a cellular temperature that is different from the ambient temperature. In this study, we measured the temperatures of bacterial colonies isolated from soils using an infrared imager and investigated the thermogenesis by a bacterium that increases its colony temperature. Results The temperatures of some colonies were higher or lower than that of the surrounding medium. A bacterial isolate with the highest colony temperature was identified as Pseudomonas putida. This bacterial isolate had an increased colony temperature when it grew at a temperature suboptimal for its growth. Measurements of heat production using a microcalorimeter showed that the temperature of this extraordinary, microcalorimetrically determined thermogenesis corresponded with the thermographically observed increase in bacterial colony temperature. When investigating the effects of the energy source on this thermal behavior, we found that heat production by this bacterium increased without additional biomass production at a temperature suboptimal for its growth. Conclusions We found that heat production by bacteria affected the bacterial colony temperature and that a bacterium identified as Pseudomonas putida could maintain a cellular temperature different from the ambient temperature, particularly at a sub-optimal growth temperature. The bacterial isolate P. putida KT1401 increased its colony temperature by an energy-spilling reaction when the incubation temperature limited its growth. PMID:23497132

  14. Characterization of a novel Pseudomonas sp. that mineralizes high concentrations of pentachlorophenol.

    PubMed Central

    Radehaus, P M; Schmidt, S K

    1992-01-01

    A pentachlorophenol (PCP)-mineralizing bacterium was isolated from polluted soil and identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain RA2. In batch cultures, Pseudomonas sp. strain RA2 used PCP as its sole source of carbon and energy and was capable of completely degrading this compound as indicated by radiotracer studies, stoichiometric release of chloride, and biomass formation. Pseudomonas sp. strain RA2 was able to mineralize a higher concentration of PCP (160 mg liter-1) than any previously reported PCP-degrading pseudomonad. At a PCP concentration of 200 mg liter-1, cell growth was completely inhibited and PCP was not degraded, although an active population of Pseudomonas sp. RA2 was still present in these cultures after 2 weeks. The inhibitory effect of PCP was partially attributable to its effect on the growth rate of Pseudomonas sp. strain RA2. The highest specific growth rate (mu = 0.09 h-1) was reached at a PCP concentration of 40 mg liter-1 but decreased at higher or lower PCP concentrations, with the lowest mu (0.05 h-1) occurring at 150 mg liter-1. Despite this reduction in growth rate, total biomass production was proportional to PCP concentration at all PCP concentrations degraded by Pseudomonas sp. RA2. In contrast, final cell density was reduced to below expected values at PCP concentrations greater than 100 mg liter-1. These results indicate that, in addition to its effect as an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation, PCP may also inhibit cell division in Pseudomonas sp. strain RA2.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1444401

  15. Characterization of a novel Pseudomonas sp. that mineralizes high concentrations of pentachlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Radehaus, P M; Schmidt, S K

    1992-09-01

    A pentachlorophenol (PCP)-mineralizing bacterium was isolated from polluted soil and identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain RA2. In batch cultures, Pseudomonas sp. strain RA2 used PCP as its sole source of carbon and energy and was capable of completely degrading this compound as indicated by radiotracer studies, stoichiometric release of chloride, and biomass formation. Pseudomonas sp. strain RA2 was able to mineralize a higher concentration of PCP (160 mg liter-1) than any previously reported PCP-degrading pseudomonad. At a PCP concentration of 200 mg liter-1, cell growth was completely inhibited and PCP was not degraded, although an active population of Pseudomonas sp. RA2 was still present in these cultures after 2 weeks. The inhibitory effect of PCP was partially attributable to its effect on the growth rate of Pseudomonas sp. strain RA2. The highest specific growth rate (mu = 0.09 h-1) was reached at a PCP concentration of 40 mg liter-1 but decreased at higher or lower PCP concentrations, with the lowest mu (0.05 h-1) occurring at 150 mg liter-1. Despite this reduction in growth rate, total biomass production was proportional to PCP concentration at all PCP concentrations degraded by Pseudomonas sp. RA2. In contrast, final cell density was reduced to below expected values at PCP concentrations greater than 100 mg liter-1. These results indicate that, in addition to its effect as an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation, PCP may also inhibit cell division in Pseudomonas sp. strain RA2.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1444401

  16. Gracilibacillus kimchii sp. nov., a halophilic bacterium isolated from kimchi.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Joon; Lee, Hae-Won; Lim, Seul Ki; Kwon, Min-Sung; Lee, Jieun; Jang, Ja-Young; Park, Hae Woong; Nam, Young-Do; Seo, Myung-Ji; Choi, Hak-Jong

    2016-09-01

    A novel halophilic bacterium, strain K7(T), was isolated from kimchi, a traditional Korean fermented food. The strain is Gram-positive, motile, and produces terminal endospores. The isolate is facultative aerobic and grows at salinities of 0.0-25.0% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 10-15% NaCl), pH 5.5-8.5 (optimum pH 7.0-7.5), and 15-42°C (optimum 37°C). The predominant isoprenoid quinone in the strain is menaquinone-7 and the peptidoglycan of the strain is meso-diaminopimelic acid. The major fatty acids of the strain are anteisio-C15:0, iso-C15:0, and, C16:0 (other components were < 10.0%), while the major polar lipids are diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, and three unidentified lipids. A phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity showed that the isolated strain was a cluster of the genus Gracilibacillus. High levels of gene sequence similarity were observed between strain K7(T) and Gracilibacillus orientalis XH-63(T) (96.5%), and between the present strain and Gracilibacillus xinjiangensis (96.5%). The DNA G+C content of this strain is 37.7 mol%. Based on these findings, strain K7(T) is proposed as a novel species: Gracilibacillus kimchii sp. nov. The type strain is K7(T) (KACC 18669(T); JCM 31344(T)).

  17. Gracilibacillus kimchii sp. nov., a halophilic bacterium isolated from kimchi.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Joon; Lee, Hae-Won; Lim, Seul Ki; Kwon, Min-Sung; Lee, Jieun; Jang, Ja-Young; Park, Hae Woong; Nam, Young-Do; Seo, Myung-Ji; Choi, Hak-Jong

    2016-09-01

    A novel halophilic bacterium, strain K7(T), was isolated from kimchi, a traditional Korean fermented food. The strain is Gram-positive, motile, and produces terminal endospores. The isolate is facultative aerobic and grows at salinities of 0.0-25.0% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 10-15% NaCl), pH 5.5-8.5 (optimum pH 7.0-7.5), and 15-42°C (optimum 37°C). The predominant isoprenoid quinone in the strain is menaquinone-7 and the peptidoglycan of the strain is meso-diaminopimelic acid. The major fatty acids of the strain are anteisio-C15:0, iso-C15:0, and, C16:0 (other components were < 10.0%), while the major polar lipids are diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, and three unidentified lipids. A phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity showed that the isolated strain was a cluster of the genus Gracilibacillus. High levels of gene sequence similarity were observed between strain K7(T) and Gracilibacillus orientalis XH-63(T) (96.5%), and between the present strain and Gracilibacillus xinjiangensis (96.5%). The DNA G+C content of this strain is 37.7 mol%. Based on these findings, strain K7(T) is proposed as a novel species: Gracilibacillus kimchii sp. nov. The type strain is K7(T) (KACC 18669(T); JCM 31344(T)). PMID:27572507

  18. Effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived pyocyanin and 1-hydroxyphenazine on pulmonary mucociliary clearance monitored scintigraphically in the baboon model.

    PubMed

    Dormehl, I; Ras, G; Taylor, G; Hugo, N

    1991-01-01

    The effect of products of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa on mucociliary lung clearance has been monitored in vivo in the baboon model by scintigraphy. Clearance was found to be inhibited by both 1-hydroxyphenazine and pyocyanin, and a dose-effect was illustrated by the former. This confirms previous in vitro results as well as results from work on guinea-pigs, and holds good prospects for the use of the baboon model under anesthesia in such investigations.

  19. Chlorinated phenol-induced physiological antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Muller, Jocelyn Fraga; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Ikuma, Kaoru; Stevens, Ann M; Love, Nancy G

    2015-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous environmental bacterium and an opportunistic pathogen with the ability to rapidly develop multidrug resistance under selective pressure. Previous work demonstrated that upon exposure to the environmental contaminant pentachlorophenol (PCP), P. aeruginosa PAO1 increases expression of multiple multidrug efflux pumps, including the MexAB-OprM pump. The current study describes increases in the antibiotic resistance of PAO1 upon exposure to PCP and other chlorinated organics, including triclosan. Only exposure to chlorinated phenols induced the mexAB-oprM-mediated antibiotic-resistant phenotype. Thus, chlorinated phenols have the potential to contribute to transient phenotypic increases of antibiotic resistance that are relevant when both compounds are present in the environment.

  20. Nitrogen Mineralization by Acanthamoeba polyphaga in Grazed Pseudomonas paucimobilis Populations

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, James L.; McClellan, J. Forbes; Coleman, David C.

    1981-01-01

    Nitrogen mineralization was studied in a simple grazing system in which the protozoan Acanthamoeba polyphaga was grown with the bacterium Pseudomonas paucimobilis (two soil organisms isolated from the shortgrass prairie in northern Colorado). In different experiments, either carbon or nitrogen was adjusted to be in limiting amounts. When carbon was limiting, grazers were almost entirely responsible for nitrogen mineralization, with bacteria themselves contributing little. When nitrogen was limiting, nitrogen mineralization by grazers permitted continued growth by the grazed bacteria and a greater bacterial biomass production. The increased growth of the grazed bacteria did not result in an increased total amount of carbon used, but the grazed bacteria used carbon more efficiently than the ungrazed bacteria. PMID:16345864

  1. Evolution of plant pathogenesis in Pseudomonas syringae: a genomics perspective.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Heath E; Thakur, Shalabh; Guttman, David S

    2011-01-01

    The phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae causes serious diseases in a wide range of important crop plants, with recent severe outbreaks on the New Zealand kiwifruit crop and among British horse chestnut trees. Next-generation genome sequencing of over 25 new strains has greatly broadened our understanding of how this species adapts to a diverse range of plant hosts. Not unexpectedly, the genomes were found to be highly dynamic, and extensive polymorphism was found in the distribution of type III secreted effectors (T3SEs) and other virulence-associated genes, even among strains within the same pathovar. An underexplored area brought to light by these data is the specific metabolic adaptations required for growth on woody hosts. These studies provide a tremendous wealth of candidates for more refined functional characterization, which is greatly enhancing our ability to disentangle the web of host-pathogen interactions that determine disease outcomes.

  2. Isolation of an iron-binding compound from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, C D; Graham, R

    1979-01-01

    An iron-binding compound was isolated from ethyl acetate extracts of culture supernatant fluids of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and was purified by successive paper and thin-layer chromatographic procedures. The purified compound was characterized by UV, visible, infrared, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The compound possesses phenolic characteristics, with little or no similarity to dihydroxybenzoates and no indication of a hydroxamate group. P. aeruginosa synthesized the compound during active growth in culture media containing less than 5 X 10(-6) M added FeCl3. When added to iron-poor cultures of P. aeruginosa, the compound promoted the growth of the bacterium and also reversed growth inhibition by the iron chelator ethylenediamine-di-(o-hydroxyphenylacetic acid). PMID:104968

  3. Aerobic granular processes: Current research trends.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quanguo; Hu, Jianjun; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-06-01

    Aerobic granules are large biological aggregates with compact interiors that can be used in efficient wastewater treatment. This mini-review presents new researches on the development of aerobic granular processes, extended treatments for complicated pollutants, granulation mechanisms and enhancements of granule stability in long-term operation or storage, and the reuse of waste biomass as renewable resources. A discussion on the challenges of, and prospects for, the commercialization of aerobic granular process is provided. PMID:26873285

  4. Multiple transcription factors of the FNR family in denitrifying Pseudomonas stutzeri: characterization of four fnr-like genes, regulatory responses and cognate metabolic processes.

    PubMed

    Vollack, K U; Härtig, E; Körner, H; Zumft, W G

    1999-03-01

    Pseudomonas stutzeri is a facultative anaerobic bacterium with the capability of denitrification. In searching for regulators that control the expression of this trait in response to oxygen withdrawal, we have found an unprecedented multiplicity of four genes encoding transcription factors of the FNR family. The fnrA gene encodes a genuine FNR-type regulator, which is expressed constitutively and controls the cytochrome cbb3-type terminal oxidase (the cco operon), cytochrome c peroxidase (the ccp gene) and the oxygen-independent coproporphyrinogen III oxidase (the hemN gene), in addition to its previously demonstrated role in arginine catabolism (the arc operon). The fnr homologues dnrD, dnrE and dnrS encode regulators of a new subgroup within the FNR family. Their main distinctive feature is the lack of cysteine residues for complexing the [4Fe-4S] centre of redox-active FNR-type regulators. However, they form a phylogenetic lineage separate from the FixK branch of FNR proteins, which also lack this cysteine signature. We have studied the expression of the dnr genes under aerobic, oxygen-limited and denitrifying conditions. DnrD is a key regulator of denitrification by selective activation of the genes for cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase and NO reductase. The dnrD gene is part of the 30 kb region carrying denitrification genes of P. stutzeri. Transcription of dnrD was activated in O2-limited cells and particularly strongly in denitrifying cells, but was not under the control of FnrA. In response to denitrifying growth conditions, dnrD was transcribed as part of an operon together with genes downstream and upstream of dnrD. dnrS was found about 9 kb upstream of dnrD, next to the nrdD gene for anaerobic ribonucleotide reductase. The transcription of dnrS required FnrA in O2-limited cells. Mutation of dnrS affected nrdD and the expression of ferredoxin I as an element of the oxidative stress response. The dnrE gene is part of the nar region encoding functions for

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Raoultella ornithinolytica Strain B6, a 2,3-Butanediol-Producing Bacterium Isolated from Oil-Contaminated Soil.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang Heum; Um, Youngsoon; Beak, Jeong Hun; Kim, Sehwan; Lee, Soojin; Oh, Min-Kyu; Kim, Young-Rok; Lee, Jinwon; Yang, Kap-Seok

    2013-06-27

    Here we report the full genome sequence of Raoultella ornithinolytica strain B6, a Gram-negative aerobic bacillus belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. This 2,3-butanediol-producing bacterium was isolated from oil-contaminated soil on Backwoon Mountain in South Korea. Strain B6 contains 5,398,151 bp with 4,909 protein-coding genes, 104 structural RNAs, and 55.88% G+C content.

  6. Lower limb loading in step aerobic dance.

    PubMed

    Wu, H-W; Hsieh, H-M; Chang, Y-W; Wang, L-H

    2012-11-01

    Participation in aerobic dance is associated with a number of lower extremity injuries, and abnormal joint loading seems to be a factor in these. However, information on joint loading is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate the kinetics of the lower extremity in step aerobic dance and to compare the differences of high-impact and low-impact step aerobic dance in 4 aerobic movements (mambo, kick, L step and leg curl). 18 subjects were recruited for this study. High-impact aerobic dance requires a significantly greater range of motion, joint force and joint moment than low-impact step aerobic dance. The peak joint forces and moments in high-impact step aerobic dance were found to be 1.4 times higher than in low-impact step aerobic dance. Understanding the nature of joint loading may help choreographers develop dance combinations that are less injury-prone. Furthermore, increased knowledge about joint loading may be helpful in lowering the risk of injuries in aerobic dance instructors and students.

  7. Aerobic organic carbon mineralization by sulfate-reducing bacteria in the oxygen-saturated photic zone of a hypersaline microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Jonkers, H M; Koh, I-O; Behrend, P; Muyzer, G; de Beer, D

    2005-02-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacterium strain SRB D2 isolated from the photic zone of a hypersaline microbial mat, from Lake Chiprana, NE Spain, respired pyruvate, alanine, and alpha-ketoglutarate but not formate, lactate, malate, succinate, and serine at significant rates under fully oxic conditions. Dehydrogenase enzymes of only the former substrates are likely oxygen-tolerant as all substrates supported anaerobic sulfate reduction. No indications were found, however, that aerobic respiration supported growth. Although strain SRB D2 appeared phylogenetically closely related to the oxygen-tolerant sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio oxyclinae, substrate spectra were markedly different. Most-probable-number (MPN) estimates of sulfate-reducing bacteria and aerobic heterotrophic bacteria indicated that the latter were numerically dominant in both the photic and aphotic zones of the mat. Moreover, substrate spectra of representative isolates showed that the aerobic heterotrophic bacteria are metabolically more diverse. These findings indicate that sulfate-reducing bacteria in the fully oxic photic zone of mats have to compete with aerobic heterotrophic bacteria for organic substrates. Porewater analysis revealed that total carbohydrates and low-molecular-weight carbon compounds (LMWC) made up substantial fractions of the total dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool and that nighttime degradation of the former was concomitant with increased concentration of the latter. Our findings indicate that aerobic respiration by sulfate-reducing bacteria contributes to organic carbon mineralization in the oxic zone of microbial mats as daytime porewater LMWC concentrations are above typical half-saturation constants.

  8. Aerobic organic carbon mineralization by sulfate-reducing bacteria in the oxygen-saturated photic zone of a hypersaline microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Jonkers, H M; Koh, I-O; Behrend, P; Muyzer, G; de Beer, D

    2005-02-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacterium strain SRB D2 isolated from the photic zone of a hypersaline microbial mat, from Lake Chiprana, NE Spain, respired pyruvate, alanine, and alpha-ketoglutarate but not formate, lactate, malate, succinate, and serine at significant rates under fully oxic conditions. Dehydrogenase enzymes of only the former substrates are likely oxygen-tolerant as all substrates supported anaerobic sulfate reduction. No indications were found, however, that aerobic respiration supported growth. Although strain SRB D2 appeared phylogenetically closely related to the oxygen-tolerant sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio oxyclinae, substrate spectra were markedly different. Most-probable-number (MPN) estimates of sulfate-reducing bacteria and aerobic heterotrophic bacteria indicated that the latter were numerically dominant in both the photic and aphotic zones of the mat. Moreover, substrate spectra of representative isolates showed that the aerobic heterotrophic bacteria are metabolically more diverse. These findings indicate that sulfate-reducing bacteria in the fully oxic photic zone of mats have to compete with aerobic heterotrophic bacteria for organic substrates. Porewater analysis revealed that total carbohydrates and low-molecular-weight carbon compounds (LMWC) made up substantial fractions of the total dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool and that nighttime degradation of the former was concomitant with increased concentration of the latter. Our findings indicate that aerobic respiration by sulfate-reducing bacteria contributes to organic carbon mineralization in the oxic zone of microbial mats as daytime porewater LMWC concentrations are above typical half-saturation constants. PMID:15965719

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa KUCD1, a possible candidate for cadmium bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Sangram; Mukherjee, Samir Kumar

    2009-01-01

    A cadmium (8 mM) resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain KUCd1 exhibiting high Cd accumulation under in vitro aerobic condition has been reported. The isolate showed a significant ability to remove more than 75% and 89% of the soluble cadmium during the active growth phase from the growth medium and from Cd-amended industrial wastewater under growth supportive condition. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) suggest the presence of Cd in the cells from mid stationary phase. The cell fractionation study revealed membrane and periplasm to be the major accumulating site in this strain. The chemical nature of the accumulated Cd was studied by X-ray powder diffraction analysis. PMID:24031411

  10. Biogenic Fenton-like Reaction Involvement in Cometabolic Degradation of Tetrabromobisphenol A by Pseudomonas sp. fz.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chen; Wang, Jing; Liu, Shasha; Liu, Guangfei; Lu, Hong; Jin, Ruofei

    2016-09-20

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is a widely used brominated flame retardant (BFR) that has frequently been detected in various environmental compartments. Although TBBPA biotransformation has been observed under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, knowledge of the detailed mechanism of direct aerobic TBBPA biodegradation still remains limited. In this study, the underlying mechanism of cometabolic degradation of TBBPA by Pseudomonas sp. fz under aerobic conditions was investigated. Two key degradation pathways (beta scission and debromination) were proposed based on triple quadrupole liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. TBBPA degradation by strain fz was demonstrated to be an extracellular process associated with the low-molecular-mass component (LMMC). Moreover, LMMC was preliminarily identified as oligopeptides, mainly consisting of glycine, proline, and alanine in a 2:1:1 molar ratio. Quenching studies suggested the involvement of hydroxyl radicals ((•)OH) in extracellular TBBPA degradation. To the best of our knowledge, we provide the first evidence that TBBPA was degraded by a biogenic Fenton-like reaction mediated via extracellular H2O2 and Fe(II)-oligopeptide complexes by the genus Pseudomonas. This study provides a new insight into the fate and biodegradation of TBBPA and other organic pollutants in natural and artificial bioremediation environments. PMID:27556415

  11. Biogenic Fenton-like Reaction Involvement in Cometabolic Degradation of Tetrabromobisphenol A by Pseudomonas sp. fz.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chen; Wang, Jing; Liu, Shasha; Liu, Guangfei; Lu, Hong; Jin, Ruofei

    2016-09-20

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is a widely used brominated flame retardant (BFR) that has frequently been detected in various environmental compartments. Although TBBPA biotransformation has been observed under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, knowledge of the detailed mechanism of direct aerobic TBBPA biodegradation still remains limited. In this study, the underlying mechanism of cometabolic degradation of TBBPA by Pseudomonas sp. fz under aerobic conditions was investigated. Two key degradation pathways (beta scission and debromination) were proposed based on triple quadrupole liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. TBBPA degradation by strain fz was demonstrated to be an extracellular process associated with the low-molecular-mass component (LMMC). Moreover, LMMC was preliminarily identified as oligopeptides, mainly consisting of glycine, proline, and alanine in a 2:1:1 molar ratio. Quenching studies suggested the involvement of hydroxyl radicals ((•)OH) in extracellular TBBPA degradation. To the best of our knowledge, we provide the first evidence that TBBPA was degraded by a biogenic Fenton-like reaction mediated via extracellular H2O2 and Fe(II)-oligopeptide complexes by the genus Pseudomonas. This study provides a new insight into the fate and biodegradation of TBBPA and other organic pollutants in natural and artificial bioremediation environments.

  12. A novel cryoprotective protein (CRP) with high activity from the ice-nucleating bacterium, Pantoea agglomerans IFO12686.

    PubMed

    Koda, N; Asaeda, T; Yamade, K; Kawahara, H; Obata, H

    2001-04-01

    The ice-nucleating bacterium, Pantoea agglomerans IFO12686, induces the cryoprotective protein (CRP) by cold acclimation at 12 degrees C. The CRP was purified to apparent homogeneity by various chromatographies. We found that the purified CRP was a monomer of approximately 29,000 according to gel filtration chromatography and SDS-PAGE, and was a heat-stable protein. The CRP could protect freeze-labile enzymes, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (iCDH), against freezing-thawing denaturation. The activity of the CRP was about 3.5 x 10(4) times more effective than bovine serum albumin (BSA) and 2 x 10(6) times than COR26 from the ice-nucleating bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens KUIN-1. We confirmed that the CRP was a novel protein, as judged by the a different molecule mass from the already-known cryoprotectants, and has an extremely high cryoprotective activity. PMID:11388469

  13. Coronatine Facilitates Pseudomonas syringae Infection of Arabidopsis Leaves at Night.

    PubMed

    Panchal, Shweta; Roy, Debanjana; Chitrakar, Reejana; Price, Lenore; Breitbach, Zachary S; Armstrong, Daniel W; Melotto, Maeli

    2016-01-01

    In many land plants, the stomatal pore opens during the day and closes during the night. Thus, periods of darkness could be effective in decreasing pathogen penetration into leaves through stomata, the primary sites for infection by many pathogens. Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 produces coronatine (COR) and opens stomata, raising an intriguing question as to whether this is a virulence strategy to facilitate bacterial infection at night. In fact, we found that (a) biological concentration of COR is effective in opening dark-closed stomata of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves, (b) the COR defective mutant Pst DC3118 is less effective in infecting Arabidopsis in the dark than under light and this difference in infection is reduced with the wild type bacterium Pst DC3000, and (c) cma, a COR biosynthesis gene, is induced only when the bacterium is in contact with the leaf surface independent of the light conditions. These findings suggest that Pst DC3000 activates virulence factors at the pre-invasive phase of its life cycle to infect plants even when environmental conditions (such as darkness) favor stomatal immunity. This functional attribute of COR may provide epidemiological advantages for COR-producing bacteria on the leaf surface. PMID:27446113

  14. Quorum sensing and policing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa social cheaters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meizhen; Schaefer, Amy L; Dandekar, Ajai A; Greenberg, E Peter

    2015-02-17

    The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that uses a quorum sensing signal cascade to activate expression of dozens of genes when sufficient population densities have been reached. Quorum sensing controls production of several key virulence factors, including secreted proteases such as elastase. Cooperating groups of bacteria growing on protein are susceptible to social cheating by quorum-sensing defective mutants. A possible way to restrict cheater emergence is by policing where cooperators produce costly goods to sanction or punish cheats. The P. aeruginosa LasR-LasI quorum sensing system controls genes including those encoding proteases and also those encoding a second quorum-sensing system, the RhlR-RhlI system, which controls numerous genes including those for cyanide production. By using RhlR quorum sensing mutants and cyanide synthesis mutants, we show that cyanide production is costly and cyanide-producing cooperators use cyanide to punish LasR-null social cheaters. Cooperators are less susceptible to cyanide than are LasR mutants. These experiments demonstrate policing in P. aeruginosa, provide a mechanistic understanding of policing, and show policing involves the cascade organization of the two quorum sensing systems in this bacterium.

  15. Coronatine Facilitates Pseudomonas syringae Infection of Arabidopsis Leaves at Night

    PubMed Central

    Panchal, Shweta; Roy, Debanjana; Chitrakar, Reejana; Price, Lenore; Breitbach, Zachary S.; Armstrong, Daniel W.; Melotto, Maeli

    2016-01-01

    In many land plants, the stomatal pore opens during the day and closes during the night. Thus, periods of darkness could be effective in decreasing pathogen penetration into leaves through stomata, the primary sites for infection by many pathogens. Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 produces coronatine (COR) and opens stomata, raising an intriguing question as to whether this is a virulence strategy to facilitate bacterial infection at night. In fact, we found that (a) biological concentration of COR is effective in opening dark-closed stomata of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves, (b) the COR defective mutant Pst DC3118 is less effective in infecting Arabidopsis in the dark than under light and this difference in infection is reduced with the wild type bacterium Pst DC3000, and (c) cma, a COR biosynthesis gene, is induced only when the bacterium is in contact with the leaf surface independent of the light conditions. These findings suggest that Pst DC3000 activates virulence factors at the pre-invasive phase of its life cycle to infect plants even when environmental conditions (such as darkness) favor stomatal immunity. This functional attribute of COR may provide epidemiological advantages for COR-producing bacteria on the leaf surface. PMID:27446113

  16. Interspecies Interaction between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Other Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Yosuke; Yawata, Yutaka; Toyofuku, Masanori; Uchiyama, Hiroo; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Microbes interact with each other in multicellular communities and this interaction enables certain microorganisms to survive in various environments. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a highly adaptable bacterium that ubiquitously inhabits diverse environments including soil, marine habitats, plants and animals. Behind this adaptivity, P. aeruginosa has abilities not only to outcompete others but also to communicate with each other to develop a multispecies community. In this review, we focus on how P. aeruginosa interacts with other microorganisms. P. aeruginosa secretes antimicrobial chemicals to compete and signal molecules to cooperate with other organisms. In other cases, it directly conveys antimicrobial enzymes to other bacteria using the Type VI secretion system (T6SS) or membrane vesicles (MVs). Quorum sensing is a central regulatory system used to exert their ability including antimicrobial effects and cooperation with other microbes. At least three quorum sensing systems are found in P. aeruginosa, Las, Rhl and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) systems. These quorum-sensing systems control the synthesis of extracellular antimicrobial chemicals as well as interaction with other organisms via T6SS or MVs. In addition, we explain the potential of microbial interaction analysis using several micro devices, which would bring fresh sensitivity to the study of interspecies interaction between P. aeruginosa and other organisms. PMID:23363620

  17. Adsorption of Pb(II) by a marine bacterium: the effect of cell concentration and pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lion, Leonard W.; Rochlin, Kevin L.

    1989-07-01

    Adsorption of Pb from synthetic seawater solution onto the marine bacterium Pseudomonas atlantica displayed many of the feature commonly encountered in studies of trace metal adsorption onto hydrous oxides. These included: (1) indication of multisite adsorption behaviour, and (2) 'particle effects' (indicated by decreased adsorption density with increasing surface concentration). For suspensions of P. atlantica this effect is attributed to the release of dissolved organic material which binds Pb in solution. Differences in Pb binding to P. atlantica relative to oxide surfaces includes: (1) relatively low fractional (%) adsorption over a wide range of solution pH, Pb, and cell concentrations, and (2) lack of a marked, pH-dependent, adsorption edge.

  18. Treatment of phenolics, aromatic hydrocarbons, and cyanide-bearing wastewater in individual and combined anaerobic, aerobic, and anoxic bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Naresh K; Philip, Ligy

    2015-01-01

    Studies were conducted on a mixture of pollutants commonly found in coke oven wastewater (CWW) to evaluate the biodegradation of various pollutants under anaerobic, aerobic, and anoxic conditions. The removal of the pollutants was monitored during individual bioreactor operation and using a combination of bioreactors operating in anaerobic-aerobic-anoxic sequence. While studying the performance of individual reactors, it was observed that cyanide removal (83.3 %) was predominant in the aerobic bioreactor, while much of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) (69 %) was consumed in the anoxic bioreactor. With the addition of cyanide, the COD removal efficiency was affected in all the bioreactors, and several intermediates were detected. While treating synthetic CWW using the combined bioreactor system, the overall COD removal efficiency was 86.79 % at an OLR of 2.4 g COD/L/day and an HRT of 96 h. The removal efficiency of 3,5-xylenol and cyanide, with inlet concentration of 150 and 10 mg/L, was found to be 91.8 and 93.6 % respectively. It was found that the impact of xylenol on the performance of the bioreactors was less than cyanide toxicity. Molecular analysis using T-RFLP revealed the dominance of strictly aerobic, mesophilic proteobacterium, Bosea minatitlanensis, in the aerobic bioreactor. The anoxic bioreactor was dominant with Rhodococcus pyridinivorans, known for its remarkable aromatic decomposing activity, while an unclassified Myxococcales bacterium was identified as the predominant bacterial species in the anaerobic bioreactor.

  19. Marinobacter strain NNA5, a newly isolated and highly efficient aerobic denitrifier with zero N2O emission.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Ai, Guo-Min; Miao, Li-Li; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2016-04-01

    An efficient aerobic denitrification bacterium, strain NNA5, was isolated and identified as Marinobacter sp. NNA5. NNA5 did not perform heterotrophic nitrification. GC/IRMS analysis revealed that (15)N2 was produced from Na(15)NO2 and K(15)NO3. GC/MS and quantitative analyses showed that no N2O emission occurred when nitrite or nitrate was used as substrate. Single factor experiments indicated that optimal conditions for aerobic denitrification were: sodium succinate or sodium pyruvate as carbon source, temperature 35 °C, NaCl concentration 2-4%, C/N ratio 6-8, pH 7.5, rotation speed 150 rpm (giving dissolved oxygen concentration 6.08 mg/L), NO3(-)-N concentration ranging from 140 to 700 mg/L. NNA5 displayed highly efficient aerobic denitrifying ability, with maximal NO3(-)-N removal rate 112.8 mg/L/d. In view of its ability to perform aerobic denitrification with zero N2O emission, NNA5 has great potential for future application in aerobic denitrification processes in industrial and aquaculture wastewater treatment systems. PMID:26836845

  20. Genes expressed by the biological control bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 on seed surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Propagules of many fungal and oomycete plant pathogens can remain dormant in the soil for months or years but germinate quickly in response to seed exudates, producing germ tubes or mycelia that infect seeds. Consequently, the spermosphere is often the initial point of interaction between seed-infec...

  1. Aerobic salivary bacteria in wild and captive Komodo dragons.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Joel M; Gillespie, Don; Sastrawan, Putra; Fredeking, Terry M; Stewart, George L

    2002-07-01

    During the months of November 1996, August 1997, and March 1998, saliva and plasma samples were collected for isolation of aerobic bacteria from 26 wild and 13 captive Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis). Twenty-eight Gram-negative and 29 Gram-positive species of bacteria were isolated from the saliva of the 39 Komodo dragons. A greater number of wild than captive dragons were positive for both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The average number of bacterial species within the saliva of wild dragons was 46% greater than for captive dragons. While Escherichia coli was the most common bacterium isolated from the saliva of wild dragons, this species was not present in captive dragons. The most common bacteria isolated from the saliva of captive dragons were Staphylococcus capitis and Staphylococcus capitis and Staphylococcus caseolyticus, neither of which were found in wild dragons. High mortality was seen among mice injected with saliva from wild dragons and the only bacterium isolated from the blood of dying mice was Pasteurella multocida. A competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed the presence of anti-Pasteurella antibody in the plasma of Komodo dragons. Four species of bacteria isolated from dragon saliva showed resistance to one or more of 16 antimicrobics tested. The wide variety of bacteria demonstrated in the saliva of the Komodo dragon in this study, at least one species of which was highly lethal in mice and 54 species of which are known pathogens, support the observation that wounds inflicted by this animal are often associated with sepsis and subsequent bacteremia in prey animals.

  2. Aerobic salivary bacteria in wild and captive Komodo dragons.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Joel M; Gillespie, Don; Sastrawan, Putra; Fredeking, Terry M; Stewart, George L

    2002-07-01

    During the months of November 1996, August 1997, and March 1998, saliva and plasma samples were collected for isolation of aerobic bacteria from 26 wild and 13 captive Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis). Twenty-eight Gram-negative and 29 Gram-positive species of bacteria were isolated from the saliva of the 39 Komodo dragons. A greater number of wild than captive dragons were positive for both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The average number of bacterial species within the saliva of wild dragons was 46% greater than for captive dragons. While Escherichia coli was the most common bacterium isolated from the saliva of wild dragons, this species was not present in captive dragons. The most common bacteria isolated from the saliva of captive dragons were Staphylococcus capitis and Staphylococcus capitis and Staphylococcus caseolyticus, neither of which were found in wild dragons. High mortality was seen among mice injected with saliva from wild dragons and the only bacterium isolated from the blood of dying mice was Pasteurella multocida. A competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed the presence of anti-Pasteurella antibody in the plasma of Komodo dragons. Four species of bacteria isolated from dragon saliva showed resistance to one or more of 16 antimicrobics tested. The wide variety of bacteria demonstrated in the saliva of the Komodo dragon in this study, at least one species of which was highly lethal in mice and 54 species of which are known pathogens, support the observation that wounds inflicted by this animal are often associated with sepsis and subsequent bacteremia in prey animals. PMID:12238371

  3. [Virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: mechanisms and modes of regulation].

    PubMed

    Ben Haj Khalifa, Anis; Moissenet, Didier; Vu Thien, Hoang; Khedher, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a bacterium responsible for severe nosocomial infections, life-threatening infections in immunocompromised persons, and chronic infections in cystic fibrosis patients. The bacterium's virulence depends on a large number of cell-associated and extracellular factors. The virulence factors play an important pathological role in the colonization, the survival of the bacteria and the invasion of tissues. There are two types of virulence factors: (1) factors involved in the acute infection: these factors are either on the surface of P. aeruginosa, either secreted. The pili allow adherence to the epithelium. The exoenzyme S and other adhesins reinforce the adherence to epithelial cells. The exotoxin A is responsible of tissue necrosis. Phospholipase C is a thermolabile haemolysin. The pathogenic role of exoenzyme S is attributable to the disruption of normal cytoskeletal organization, the destruction of immunoglobulin G and A, leads to depolymerization of actin filaments and contributes to the resistance to macrophages. P. aeruginosa produces at least four proteases causing bleeding and tissue necrosis; (2) factors involved in the chronic infection: siderophores (pyoverdin and pyochelin), allow the bacteria to multiply in the absence of ferrous ions. The strains isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis have a pseudocapsule of alginate that protects the bacterium from phagocytosis, dehydration and antibiotics. Moreover, it improves adherence to epithelial cells forming a biofilm. Two different types of regulation systems control the expression of the majority of these virulence factors: the two-component transcriptional regulatory system and the quorum sensing system. These two mechanisms are necessary to the survival and the proliferation of this microorganism in the host. PMID:21896403

  4. Biodegradation and detoxification of textile azo dyes by bacterial consortium under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes

    PubMed Central

    Lade, Harshad; Kadam, Avinash; Paul, Diby; Govindwar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Release of textile azo dyes to the environment is an issue of health concern while the use of microorganisms has proved to be the best option for remediation. Thus, in the present study, a bacterial consortium consisting of Providencia rettgeri strain HSL1 and Pseudomonas sp. SUK1 has been investigated for degradation and detoxification of structurally different azo dyes. The consortium showed 98-99 % decolorization of all the selected azo dyes viz. Reactive Black 5 (RB 5), Reactive Orange 16 (RO 16), Disperse Red 78 (DR 78) and Direct Red 81 (DR 81) within 12 to 30 h at 100 mg L-1 concentration at 30 ± 0.2 °C under microaerophilic, sequential aerobic/microaerophilic and microaerophilic/aerobic processes. However, decolorization under microaerophilic conditions viz. RB 5 (0.26 mM), RO 16 (0.18 mM), DR 78 (0.20 mM) and DR 81 (0.23 mM) and sequential aerobic/microaerophilic processes viz. RB 5 (0.08 mM), RO 16 (0.06 mM), DR 78 (0.07 mM) and DR 81 (0.09 mM) resulted into the formation of aromatic amines. In distinction, sequential microaerophilic/ aerobic process doesn’t show the formation of amines. Additionally, 62-72 % reduction in total organic carbon content was observed in all the dyes decolorized broths under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes suggesting the efficacy of method in mineralization of dyes. Notable induction within the levels of azoreductase and NADH-DCIP reductase (97 and 229 % for RB 5, 55 and 160 % for RO 16, 63 and 196 % for DR 78, 108 and 258 % for DR 81) observed under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes suggested their critical involvements in the initial breakdown of azo bonds, whereas, a slight increase in the levels of laccase and veratryl alcohol oxidase confirmed subsequent oxidation of formed amines. Also, the acute toxicity assay with Daphnia magna revealed the nontoxic nature of the dye-degraded metabolites under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes. As biodegradation under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic

  5. Biodegradation and detoxification of textile azo dyes by bacterial consortium under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes.

    PubMed

    Lade, Harshad; Kadam, Avinash; Paul, Diby; Govindwar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Release of textile azo dyes to the environment is an issue of health concern while the use of microorganisms has proved to be the best option for remediation. Thus, in the present study, a bacterial consortium consisting of Providencia rettgeri strain HSL1 and Pseudomonas sp. SUK1 has been investigated for degradation and detoxification of structurally different azo dyes. The consortium showed 98-99 % decolorization of all the selected azo dyes viz. Reactive Black 5 (RB 5), Reactive Orange 16 (RO 16), Disperse Red 78 (DR 78) and Direct Red 81 (DR 81) within 12 to 30 h at 100 mg L(-1) concentration at 30 ± 0.2 °C under microaerophilic, sequential aerobic/microaerophilic and microaerophilic/aerobic processes. However, decolorization under microaerophilic conditions viz. RB 5 (0.26 mM), RO 16 (0.18 mM), DR 78 (0.20 mM) and DR 81 (0.23 mM) and sequential aerobic/microaerophilic processes viz. RB 5 (0.08 mM), RO 16 (0.06 mM), DR 78 (0.07 mM) and DR 81 (0.09 mM) resulted into the formation of aromatic amines. In distinction, sequential microaerophilic/ aerobic process doesn't show the formation of amines. Additionally, 62-72 % reduction in total organic carbon content was observed in all the dyes decolorized broths under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes suggesting the efficacy of method in mineralization of dyes. Notable induction within the levels of azoreductase and NADH-DCIP reductase (97 and 229 % for RB 5, 55 and 160 % for RO 16, 63 and 196 % for DR 78, 108 and 258 % for DR 81) observed under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes suggested their critical involvements in the initial breakdown of azo bonds, whereas, a slight increase in the levels of laccase and veratryl alcohol oxidase confirmed subsequent oxidation of formed amines. Also, the acute toxicity assay with Daphnia magna revealed the nontoxic nature of the dye-degraded metabolites under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes. As biodegradation under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic

  6. Alteromonas infernus sp. nov., a new polysaccharide-producing bacterium isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Raguénès, G H; Peres, A; Ruimy, R; Pignet, P; Christen, R; Loaec, M; Rougeaux, H; Barbier, G; Guezennec, J G

    1997-04-01

    A deep-sea, aerobic, mesophilic and heterotrophic new bacterium was isolated from a sample of fluid collected among a dense population of Riftia pachyptila, in the vicinity of an active hydrothermal vent of the Southern depression of the Guaymas basin (Gulf of California). On the basis of phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses and DNA/DNA relatedness, the strain GY785 was recognized as a new species of the genus Alteromonas and the name of Alteromonas infernus is proposed. During the stationary phase in batch cultures in the presence of glucose, this bacterium secreted two unusual polysaccharides. The water-soluble exopolysaccharide-1 produced contained glucose, galactose, galacturonic and glucuronic acids as monosaccharides. The gel-forming exopolysaccharide-2 was separated from the bacterial cells by dialysis against distilled water and partially characterized. PMID:9134716

  7. Aerobic rice mechanization: techniques for crop establishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusairy, K. M.; Ayob, H.; Chan, C. S.; Fauzi, M. I. Mohamed; Mohamad Fakhrul, Z. O.; Shahril Shah, G. S. M.; Azlan, O.; Rasad, M. A.; Hashim, A. M.; Arshad, Z.; E, E. Ibrahim; Saifulizan, M. N.

    2015-12-01

    Rice being the staple food crops, hundreds of land races in it makes the diversity of rice crops. Aerobic rice production was introduced which requires much less water input to safeguard and sustain the rice production and conserve water due to decreasing water resources, climatic changes and competition from urban and industrial users. Mechanization system plays an important role for the success of aerobic rice cultivation. All farming activities for aerobic rice production are run on aerobic soil conditions. Row seeder mechanization system is developed to replace conventional seeding technique on the aerobic rice field. It is targeted for small and the large scale aerobic rice farmers. The aero - seeder machine is used for the small scale aerobic rice field, while the accord - seeder is used for the large scale aerobic rice field. The use of this mechanization machine can eliminate the tedious and inaccurate seeding operations reduce labour costs and increases work rate. The machine is easy to operate and it can increase crop establishment rate. It reduce missing hill, increasing planting and crop with high yield can be produce. This machine is designed for low costs maintenance and it is easy to dismantle and assemble during maintenance and it is safe to be used.

  8. Aerobic Dancing--A Rhythmic Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Jacki

    Fitness programs now and in the future must offer built-in cardiovascular conditioning, variety, novelty, and change to meet the physical, mental, and emotional needs of our society. Aerobic dancing (dancing designed to train and strengthen the heart, lungs, and vascular system) is one of the first indoor group Aerobic exercise programs designed…

  9. Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy after Aerobic Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Adam R.; Harber, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Current dogma suggests aerobic exercise training has minimal effect on skeletal muscle size. We and others have demonstrated that aerobic exercise acutely and chronically alters protein metabolism and induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy. These findings promote an antithesis to the status quo by providing novel perspective on skeletal muscle mass regulation and insight into exercise-countermeasures for populations prone to muscle loss. PMID:24508740

  10. Involvement of Linear Plasmids in Aerobic Biodegradation of Vinyl Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    BRIGMON, ROBINL.

    2004-06-14

    Pseudomonas putida strain AJ and Ochrobactrum strain TD were isolated from hazardous waste sites based on their ability to use vinyl chloride (VC) as a sole source of carbon and energy under aerobic conditions. Strains AJ and TD also use ethene and ethylene oxide as growth substrates. Strain AJ contained a linear megaplasmid (approximately 260 kb) when grown on VC or ethene, but no circular plasmids. While growing on ethylene oxide, the size of the linear plasmid in strain AJ decreased to approximately 100 kb, although its ability to use VC as a substrate was retained. The linear plasmids in strain AJ were cured and its ability to consume VC, ethene, and ethylene oxide was lost following growth on a rich substrate (Luria-Bertani broth) through at least three transfers. Strain TD contained three linear plasmids, ranging in size from approximately 100 kb to 320 kb, when growing on VC or ethene. As with strain AJ, the linear plasmids in strain TD were cured following growth on Luria -Bertani broth and its ability to consume VC and ethene was lost. Further analysis of these linear plasmids may help reveal the pathway for VC biodegradation in strains AJ and TD and explain why this process occurs at many but not all sites where groundwater is contaminated with chloroethenes. Metabolism of VC and ethene by strains AJ and TD is initiated by an alkene monooxygenase. Their yields during growth on VC (0.15-0.20 mg total suspended solids per mg VC) are similar to the yields reported for other isolates i.e., Mycobacterium sp., Nocardioides sp., and Pseudomonas sp.

  11. Aerobic deconstruction of cellulosic biomass by an insect-associated Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Takasuka, Taichi E.; Book, Adam J.; Lewin, Gina R.; Currie, Cameron R.; Fox, Brian G.

    2013-01-01

    Streptomyces are best known for producing antimicrobial secondary metabolites, but they are also recognized for their contributions to biomass utilization. Despite their importance to carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems, our understanding of the cellulolytic ability of Streptomyces is currently limited to a few soil-isolates. Here, we demonstrate the biomass-deconstructing capability of Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E (ActE), an aerobic bacterium associated with the invasive pine-boring woodwasp Sirex noctilio. When grown on plant biomass, ActE secretes a suite of enzymes including endo- and exo-cellulases, CBM33 polysaccharide-monooxygenases, and hemicellulases. Genome-wide transcriptomic and proteomic analyses, and biochemical assays have revealed the key enzymes used to deconstruct crystalline cellulose, other pure polysaccharides, and biomass. The mixture of enzymes obtained from growth on biomass has biomass-degrading activity comparable to a cellulolytic enzyme cocktail from the fungus Trichoderma reesei, and thus provides a compelling example of high cellulolytic capacity in an aerobic bacterium. PMID:23301151

  12. Aerobic biotransformation of 3-methylindole to ring cleavage products by Cupriavidus sp. strain KK10.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Kimiko; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Kanaly, Robert A

    2015-09-01

    3-Methylindole, also referred to as skatole, is a pollutant of environmental concern due to its persistence, mobility and potential health impacts. Petroleum refining, intensive livestock production and application of biosolids to agricultural lands result in releases of 3-methylindole to the environment. Even so, little is known about the aerobic biodegradation of 3-methylindole and comprehensive biotransformation pathways have not been established. Using glycerol as feedstock, the soil bacterium Cupriavidus sp. strain KK10 biodegraded 100 mg/L of 3-methylindole in 24 h. Cometabolic 3-methylindole biodegradation was confirmed by the identification of biotransformation products through liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry analyses. In all, 14 3-methylindole biotransformation products were identified which revealed that biotransformation occurred through different pathways that included carbocyclic aromatic ring-fission of 3-methylindole to single-ring pyrrole carboxylic acids. This work provides first comprehensive evidence for the aerobic biotransformation mechanisms of 3-methylindole by a soil bacterium and expands our understanding of the biodegradative capabilities of members of the genus Cupriavidus towards heteroaromatic pollutants. PMID:26126873

  13. Aerobic biotransformation of 3-methylindole to ring cleavage products by Cupriavidus sp. strain KK10.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Kimiko; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Kanaly, Robert A

    2015-09-01

    3-Methylindole, also referred to as skatole, is a pollutant of environmental concern due to its persistence, mobility and potential health impacts. Petroleum refining, intensive livestock production and application of biosolids to agricultural lands result in releases of 3-methylindole to the environment. Even so, little is known about the aerobic biodegradation of 3-methylindole and comprehensive biotransformation pathways have not been established. Using glycerol as feedstock, the soil bacterium Cupriavidus sp. strain KK10 biodegraded 100 mg/L of 3-methylindole in 24 h. Cometabolic 3-methylindole biodegradation was confirmed by the identification of biotransformation products through liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry analyses. In all, 14 3-methylindole biotransformation products were identified which revealed that biotransformation occurred through different pathways that included carbocyclic aromatic ring-fission of 3-methylindole to single-ring pyrrole carboxylic acids. This work provides first comprehensive evidence for the aerobic biotransformation mechanisms of 3-methylindole by a soil bacterium and expands our understanding of the biodegradative capabilities of members of the genus Cupriavidus towards heteroaromatic pollutants.

  14. "Hot Tub Rash" and "Swimmer's Ear" (Pseudomonas)

    MedlinePlus

    Facts About “Hot Tub Rash” and “Swimmer’s Ear” (Pseudomonas) What is Pseudomonas and how can it affect me? Pseudomonas (sue-doh- ... a major cause of infections commonly known as “hot tub rash” and “swimmer’s ear.” This germ is ...

  15. Biodegradation of 2,4-dinitrotoluene by a Pseudomonas sp

    SciTech Connect

    Spanggord, R.J.; Mortelmans, K.E. ); Spain, J.C.; Nishino, S.F. )

    1991-11-01

    Previous studies of the biodegradation of nonpolar nitroaromatic compounds have suggested that microorganism can reduce the nitro groups but cannot cleave the aromatic ring. The authors report here the initial steps in a pathway for complete biodegradation of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) by a Pseudomonas sp. isolated from a four-member consortium enriched with DNT. The Pseudomonas sp. degraded DNT as the sole source of carbon and energy under aerobic conditions with stoichiometric release of nitrite. During induction of the enzymes required for growth on DNT, 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (MNC) accumulated transiently in the culture fluid when cells grown on acetate were transferred to medium containing DNT as the sole carbon and energy source. Conversion of DNT to MNC in the presence of {sup 18}O{sub 2} revealed the simultaneous incorporation of two atoms of molecular oxygen, which demonstrated that the reaction was catalyzed by a dioxygenase. Fully induced cells degraded MNC rapidly with stoichiometric release of nitrite. The results indicate an initial dioxygenase attack at the 4,5 position of DNT with the concomitant release of nitrite. Subsequent reactions lead to complete biodegradation and removal of the second nitro group as nitrite.

  16. Aerobic biodegradation of organic compounds in hydraulic fracturing fluids.

    PubMed

    Kekacs, Daniel; Drollette, Brian D; Brooker, Michael; Plata, Desiree L; Mouser, Paula J

    2015-07-01

    Little is known of the attenuation of chemical mixtures created for hydraulic fracturing within the natural environment. A synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluid was developed from disclosed industry formulas and produced for laboratory experiments using commercial additives in use by Marcellus shale field crews. The experiments employed an internationally accepted standard method (OECD 301A) to evaluate aerobic biodegradation potential of the fluid mixture by monitoring the removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from an aqueous solution by activated sludge and lake water microbial consortia for two substrate concentrations and four salinities. Microbial degradation removed from 57 % to more than 90 % of added DOC within 6.5 days, with higher removal efficiency at more dilute concentrations and little difference in overall removal extent between sludge and lake microbe treatments. The alcohols isopropanol and octanol were degraded to levels below detection limits while the solvent acetone accumulated in biological treatments through time. Salinity concentrations of 40 g/L or more completely inhibited degradation during the first 6.5 days of incubation with the synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluid even though communities were pre-acclimated to salt. Initially diverse microbial communities became dominated by 16S rRNA sequences affiliated with Pseudomonas and other Pseudomonadaceae after incubation with the synthetic fracturing fluid, taxa which may be involved in acetone production. These data expand our understanding of constraints on the biodegradation potential of organic compounds in hydraulic fracturing fluids under aerobic conditions in the event that they are accidentally released to surface waters and shallow soils.

  17. Aerobic biodegradation of organic compounds in hydraulic fracturing fluids.

    PubMed

    Kekacs, Daniel; Drollette, Brian D; Brooker, Michael; Plata, Desiree L; Mouser, Paula J

    2015-07-01

    Little is known of the attenuation of chemical mixtures created for hydraulic fracturing within the natural environment. A synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluid was developed from disclosed industry formulas and produced for laboratory experiments using commercial additives in use by Marcellus shale field crews. The experiments employed an internationally accepted standard method (OECD 301A) to evaluate aerobic biodegradation potential of the fluid mixture by monitoring the removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from an aqueous solution by activated sludge and lake water microbial consortia for two substrate concentrations and four salinities. Microbial degradation removed from 57 % to more than 90 % of added DOC within 6.5 days, with higher removal efficiency at more dilute concentrations and little difference in overall removal extent between sludge and lake microbe treatments. The alcohols isopropanol and octanol were degraded to levels below detection limits while the solvent acetone accumulated in biological treatments through time. Salinity concentrations of 40 g/L or more completely inhibited degradation during the first 6.5 days of incubation with the synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluid even though communities were pre-acclimated to salt. Initially diverse microbial communities became dominated by 16S rRNA sequences affiliated with Pseudomonas and other Pseudomonadaceae after incubation with the synthetic fracturing fluid, taxa which may be involved in acetone production. These data expand our understanding of constraints on the biodegradation potential of organic compounds in hydraulic fracturing fluids under aerobic conditions in the event that they are accidentally released to surface waters and shallow soils. PMID:26037076

  18. Filamentous bacteria existence in aerobic granular reactors.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, M; Val del Río, A; Campos, J L; Méndez, R; Mosquera-Corral, A

    2015-05-01

    Filamentous bacteria are associated to biomass settling problems in wastewater treatment plants. In systems based on aerobic granular biomass they have been proposed to contribute to the initial biomass aggregation process. However, their development on mature aerobic granular systems has not been sufficiently studied. In the present research work, filamentous bacteria were studied for the first time after long-term operation (up to 300 days) of aerobic granular systems. Chloroflexi and Sphaerotilus natans have been observed in a reactor fed with synthetic wastewater. These filamentous bacteria could only come from the inoculated sludge. Thiothrix and Chloroflexi bacteria were observed in aerobic granular biomass treating wastewater from a fish canning industry. Meganema perideroedes was detected in a reactor treating wastewater from a plant processing marine products. As a conclusion, the source of filamentous bacteria in these mature aerobic granular systems fed with industrial effluents was the incoming wastewater.

  19. pltM is important in the phloroglucinol-mediated crosstalk between biosynthetic gene clusters for the antibiotics 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol and pyoluteorin in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a well-characterized rhizosphere bacterium known for its production of a diverse spectrum of antimicrobial secondary metabolites. The production of two of these metabolites, 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG) and pyoluteorin, is coordinately regulated. Each of...

  20. Recurrent recovery of Pseudomonas oryzihabitans strains in a karstified chalk aquifer.

    PubMed

    Dussart-Baptista, L; Bodilis, J; Barray, S; Frébourg, N; Fournier, M; Dupont, J-P; Jouenne, T

    2007-01-01

    Pseudomonas oryzihabitans is an uncommon pathogen that may cause catheter-associated infections, particularly in immunocompromised patients. Although it has been isolated from environment, the source of human infection is not well documented. In the present study, 14 isolates of P. oryzihabitans were recovered over a 28-month period from a karstified chalk aquifer, allowing to advance that distributed natural water could be a source of contamination. Microbiological analyses showed that the bacterium was mainly associated with suspended particulate matters. To investigate the clonality of P. oryzihabitans environmental isolates, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, antibiogram and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) typings were performed. Results demonstrated (i) the presence of at least three clones within the aquifer and (ii) that the presence of the bacterium in groundwater is not only the result of a biofilm bloom but also of an exogenous contamination.

  1. Biofilm lifestyle enhances diesel bioremediation and biosurfactant production in the Antarctic polyhydroxyalkanoate producer Pseudomonas extremaustralis.

    PubMed

    Tribelli, Paula M; Di Martino, Carla; López, Nancy I; Raiger Iustman, Laura J

    2012-09-01

    Diesel is a widely distributed pollutant. Bioremediation of this kind of compounds requires the use of microorganisms able to survive and adapt to contaminated environments. Pseudomonas extremaustralis is an Antarctic bacterium with a remarkable survival capability associated to polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) production. This strain was used to investigate the effect of cell growth conditions--in biofilm versus shaken flask cultures--as well as the inocula characteristics associated with PHAs accumulation, on diesel degradation. Biofilms showed increased cell growth, biosurfactant production and diesel degradation compared with that obtained in shaken flask cultures. PHA accumulation decreased biofilm cell attachment and enhanced biosurfactant production. Degradation of long-chain and branched alkanes was observed in biofilms, while in shaken flasks only medium-chain length alkanes were degraded. This work shows that the PHA accumulating bacterium P. extremaustralis can be a good candidate to be used as hydrocarbon bioremediation agent, especially in extreme environments.

  2. Recurrent recovery of Pseudomonas oryzihabitans strains in a karstified chalk aquifer.

    PubMed

    Dussart-Baptista, L; Bodilis, J; Barray, S; Frébourg, N; Fournier, M; Dupont, J-P; Jouenne, T

    2007-01-01

    Pseudomonas oryzihabitans is an uncommon pathogen that may cause catheter-associated infections, particularly in immunocompromised patients. Although it has been isolated from environment, the source of human infection is not well documented. In the present study, 14 isolates of P. oryzihabitans were recovered over a 28-month period from a karstified chalk aquifer, allowing to advance that distributed natural water could be a source of contamination. Microbiological analyses showed that the bacterium was mainly associated with suspended particulate matters. To investigate the clonality of P. oryzihabitans environmental isolates, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, antibiogram and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) typings were performed. Results demonstrated (i) the presence of at least three clones within the aquifer and (ii) that the presence of the bacterium in groundwater is not only the result of a biofilm bloom but also of an exogenous contamination. PMID:17097713

  3. Inactivation of Mg chelatase during transition from anaerobic to aerobic growth in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Willows, Robert D; Lake, Vanessa; Roberts, Thomas Hugh; Beale, Samuel I

    2003-06-01

    The facultative photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus can adapt from an anaerobic photosynthetic mode of growth to aerobic heterotrophic metabolism. As this adaptation occurs, the cells must rapidly halt bacteriochlorophyll synthesis to prevent phototoxic tetrapyrroles from accumulating, while still allowing heme synthesis to continue. A likely control point is Mg chelatase, the enzyme that diverts protoporphyrin IX from heme biosynthesis toward the bacteriochlorophyll biosynthetic pathway by inserting Mg(2+) to form Mg-protoporphyrin IX. Mg chelatase is composed of three subunits that are encoded by the bchI, bchD, and bchH genes in R. capsulatus. We report that BchH is the rate-limiting component of Mg chelatase activity in cell extracts. BchH binds protoporphyrin IX, and BchH that has been expressed and purified from Escherichia coli is red in color due to the bound protoporphyrin IX. Recombinant BchH is rapidly inactivated by light in the presence of O(2), and the inactivation results in the formation of a covalent adduct between the protein and the bound protoporphyrin IX. When photosynthetically growing R. capsulatus cells are transferred to aerobic conditions, Mg chelatase is rapidly inactivated, and BchH is the component that is most rapidly inactivated in vivo when cells are exposed to aerobic conditions. The light- and O(2)-stimulated inactivation of BchH could account for the rapid inactivation of Mg chelatase in vivo and provide a mechanism for inhibiting the synthesis of bacteriochlorophyll during adaptation of photosynthetically grown cells to aerobic conditions while still allowing heme synthesis to occur for aerobic respiration.

  4. Complete genome of Zhongshania aliphaticivorans SM-2(T), an aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium isolated from tidal flat sediment.

    PubMed

    Jia, Baolei; Jeong, Hye Im; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Jeon, Che Ok

    2016-05-20

    Zhongshania aliphaticivorans SM-2(T), a degrader of aliphatic hydrocarbons, is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped, flagellated, facultatively aerobic bacterium. Here, we report the genome sequence of strain SM-2(T), which has a size of 4,204,359bp with 44 tRNAs, 9 rRNAs, and 3664 protein-coding genes. In addition, several genes encoding aliphatic hydrocarbon degraders (alkane 1-monooxygenase, haloalkane dehalogenase, and cytochrome P450) were detected in the genome shedding light on the function of pollutants degradation.

  5. Antifungal Activity of Selected Indigenous Pseudomonas and Bacillus from the Soybean Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    León, M.; Yaryura, P. M.; Montecchia, M. S.; Hernández, A. I.; Correa, O. S.; Pucheu, N. L.; Kerber, N. L.; García, A. F.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to isolate and select indigenous soil Pseudomonas and Bacillus bacteria capable of developing multiple mechanisms of action related to the biocontrol of phytopathogenic fungi affecting soybean crops. The screening procedure consisted of antagonism tests against a panel of phytopathogenic fungi, taxonomic identification, detection by PCR of several genes related to antifungal activity, in vitro detection of the antifungal products, and root colonization assays. Two isolates, identified and designated as Pseudomonas fluorescens BNM296 and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens BNM340, were selected for further studies. These isolates protected plants against the damping-off caused by Pythium ultimum and were able to increase the seedling emergence rate after inoculation of soybean seeds with each bacterium. Also, the shoot nitrogen content was higher in plants when seeds were inoculated with BNM296. The polyphasic approach of this work allowed us to select two indigenous bacterial strains that promoted the early development of soybean plants. PMID:20016811

  6. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by Pseudomonas veronii AS41G inhabiting Annona squamosa L.

    PubMed

    Baker, Syed; Satish, Sreedharamurthy

    2015-11-01

    Biogenic principles to nanotechnology have generated tremendous attention in recent past owing eco friendly benign process for synthesis of nanoparticles. Present investigation reports extracellular synthesis of gold nanoparticles using cell free supernatant of Pseudomonas veronii AS 41G, a novel endophyte isolated from Annona squamosa L. Gold nanoparticles formation was confirmed with UV-Visible spectrophotometer. FTIR analysis predicted various functional groups responsible for reduction of metal salts and stabilization of gold nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were crystalline in nature as shown in XRD pattern. TEM analysis revealed morphological characteristics of nanoparticles with different size. Thus the present study attributes for facile process for synthesis of gold nanoparticles as an alternative for conventional methods. The study also highlights the new role of novel bacterium Pseudomonas veronii AS41G which will be very valuable as a record for the researchers working on it.

  7. Inhibition of the phytopathogenic fungus Fusarium proliferatum by volatile compounds produced by Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Paula; Príncipe, Analía; Jofré, Edgardo; Mori, Gladys; Fischer, Sonia

    2014-11-01

    The Fusarium head blight of grain cereals is a significant disease worldwide. In Argentina, high levels of contamination with Fusarium proliferatum have been found in crops. Many strains of the Pseudomonas genus antagonize the growth of fungi by different mechanisms, such as the production of antibiotics, siderophores, volatiles, and extracellular enzymes. In this work, we have designed a new system for studying the growth inhibition of F. proliferatum-namely by volatile compounds produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens MGR12. In both rich and minimal media, the bacterium released volatiles that negatively affected the mycelial growth of that phytopathogenic fungus. These bacterial compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, but only a few could be identified by comparing their mass spectra with the libraries of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology MS search. PMID:25085617

  8. [Research advances on regulation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation and its therapeutic strategies].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-min; Xu, Zhi-hao

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important pathogenic bacterium of nosocomial infections. The microbe easily produce biofilm which brings us much difficulties in clinical treatment. The formation processes of biofilm, including the stages of early bacteria planting, mushroom-like structure forming and extracellular matrix producing, are regulated by a series of molecules and genes. And quorum sensing system of the microbe is responsible for regulation of the whole process of biofilm formation. According to the process of biofilm formation and the mimitat associated regulation mechanism, several anti-biofilm therapeutic strategies have been applied in clinical medicine, and some novel drugs and methods are developed. PMID:20175245

  9. Synthesis and biological properties of thiazole-analogues of pyochelin, a siderophore of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Noël, Sabrina; Hoegy, Françoise; Rivault, Freddy; Rognan, Didier; Schalk, Isabelle J; Mislin, Gaëtan L A

    2014-01-01

    Pyochelin is a siderophore common to all strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilized by this Gram-negative bacterium to acquire iron(III). FptA is the outer membrane transporter responsible of ferric-pyochelin uptake in P. aeruginosa. We describe in this Letter the synthesis and the biological properties ((55)Fe uptake, binding to FptA) of several thiazole analogues of pyochelin. Among them we report in this Letter the two first pyochelin analogues able to bind FptA without promoting any iron uptake in P. aeruginosa. PMID:24332092

  10. Identification and Characterization of a Pseudomonas Strain Capable of Metabolizing Phenoxybenzoates †

    PubMed Central

    Topp, Edward; Akhtar, M. Humayoun

    1991-01-01

    3-Phenoxybenzoate is a transient metabolite from the breakdown of a number of pyrethroid insecticides in soil. In this study, we identified and characterized a bacterium which could grow on 3-phenoxybenzoate, converting it to phenol. On the basis of morphological and biochemical features, the 3-phenoxybenzoatedegrading isolate was determined to be a Pseudomonas species, probably a strain of Pseudomonas delafieldii, now designated Pseudomonas strain ET1. Pseudomonas strain ET1 grew on 3-phenoxybenzoate with a generation time of 3 h and a specific rate of metabolism of (2.6 ± 0.9) × 10-13 g of 3-phenoxybenzoate consumed cell-1 h-1. The Km for 3-phenoxybenzoate metabolism was 1.4 ± 0.8 μM. The metabolism of 3-phenoxybenzoate was constitutive and not subject to catabolite repression. The metabolism of a variety of substituted diaryl ether compounds was examined. 3- and 4-Phenoxybenzoates were metabolized, but 2-phenoxybenzoate was not. Phenoxy-substituted benzyl aldehyde was metabolized, but phenoxy-substituted benzyl alcohol, benzene, phenol, and aniline were not. Derivatives of 3-phenoxybenzoate substituted in the 4′ position with hydroxyl, methyl, or chlorine were metabolized, yielding the corresponding 4-substituted phenol. 3-(2-Hydroxyphenoxy)benzoate was not metabolized, but 3-phenoxy-4-fluorobenzoate was. These results indicate that the metabolism of the tested diaryl ether compounds was restricted to 4-phenoxybenzoate, 3-phenoxybenzyl aldehyde, and 3-phenoxybenzoate derivatives without a substitution in the 2′ position. PMID:16348477

  11. Degradation of 4-chloro-3-nitrophenol via a novel intermediate, 4-chlororesorcinol by Pseudomonas sp. JHN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Pankaj Kumar; Srivastava, Alok; Singh, Vijay Pal

    2014-03-01

    A 4-chloro-3-nitrophenol (4C3NP)-mineralizing bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. JHN was isolated from a waste water sample collected from a chemically-contaminated area, India by an enrichment method. Pseudomonas sp. JHN utilized 4C3NP as a sole carbon and energy source and degraded it with the release of stoichiometric amounts of chloride and nitrite ions. Gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detected 4-chlororesorcinol as a major metabolite of the 4C3NP degradation pathway. Inhibition studies using 2,2'-dipyridyl showed that 4-chlororesorcinol is a terminal aromatic compound in the degradation pathway of 4C3NP. The activity for 4C3NP-monooxygenase was detected in the crude extracts of the 4C3NP-induced JHN cells that confirmed the formation of 4-chlororesorcinol from 4C3NP. The capillary assay showed that Pseudomonas sp. JHN exhibited chemotaxis toward 4C3NP. The bioremediation capability of Pseudomonas sp. JHN was monitored to carry out the microcosm experiments using sterile and non-sterile soils spiked with 4C3NP. Strain JHN degraded 4C3NP in sterile and non-sterile soil with same degradation rates. This is the first report of (i) bacterial degradation and bioremediation of 4C3NP, (ii) formation of 4-chlororesorcinol in the degradation pathway of 4C3NP, (iii) bacterial chemotaxis toward 4C3NP.

  12. Network-assisted investigation of virulence and antibiotic-resistance systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Chan Yeong; Ji, Sun-Gou; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Hanhae; Yang, Sunmo; Kim, Hye Jin; Cho, Ara; Yoon, Sang Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium of clinical significance. Although the genome of PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, has been extensively studied, approximately one-third of the functional genome remains unknown. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibiotic and anti-virulence strategies, which may be facilitated by an approach that explores P. aeruginosa gene function in systems-level models. Here, we present a genome-wide functional network of P. aeruginosa genes, PseudomonasNet, which covers 98% of the coding genome, and a companion web server to generate functional hypotheses using various network-search algorithms. We demonstrate that PseudomonasNet-assisted predictions can effectively identify novel genes involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance. Moreover, an antibiotic-resistance network based on PseudomonasNet reveals that P. aeruginosa has common modular genetic organisations that confer increased or decreased resistance to diverse antibiotics, which accounts for the pervasiveness of cross-resistance across multiple drugs. The same network also suggests that P. aeruginosa has developed mechanism of trade-off in resistance across drugs by altering genetic interactions. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of a genome-scale functional network to investigate pathogenic systems in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27194047

  13. Network-assisted investigation of virulence and antibiotic-resistance systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Chan Yeong; Ji, Sun-Gou; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Hanhae; Yang, Sunmo; Kim, Hye Jin; Cho, Ara; Yoon, Sang Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2016-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium of clinical significance. Although the genome of PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, has been extensively studied, approximately one-third of the functional genome remains unknown. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibiotic and anti-virulence strategies, which may be facilitated by an approach that explores P. aeruginosa gene function in systems-level models. Here, we present a genome-wide functional network of P. aeruginosa genes, PseudomonasNet, which covers 98% of the coding genome, and a companion web server to generate functional hypotheses using various network-search algorithms. We demonstrate that PseudomonasNet-assisted predictions can effectively identify novel genes involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance. Moreover, an antibiotic-resistance network based on PseudomonasNet reveals that P. aeruginosa has common modular genetic organisations that confer increased or decreased resistance to diverse antibiotics, which accounts for the pervasiveness of cross-resistance across multiple drugs. The same network also suggests that P. aeruginosa has developed mechanism of trade-off in resistance across drugs by altering genetic interactions. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of a genome-scale functional network to investigate pathogenic systems in P. aeruginosa.

  14. Degradation of 4-chloro-3-nitrophenol via a novel intermediate, 4-chlororesorcinol by Pseudomonas sp. JHN

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pankaj Kumar; Srivastava, Alok; Singh, Vijay Pal

    2014-01-01

    A 4-chloro-3-nitrophenol (4C3NP)-mineralizing bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. JHN was isolated from a waste water sample collected from a chemically-contaminated area, India by an enrichment method. Pseudomonas sp. JHN utilized 4C3NP as a sole carbon and energy source and degraded it with the release of stoichiometric amounts of chloride and nitrite ions. Gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detected 4-chlororesorcinol as a major metabolite of the 4C3NP degradation pathway. Inhibition studies using 2,2′-dipyridyl showed that 4-chlororesorcinol is a terminal aromatic compound in the degradation pathway of 4C3NP. The activity for 4C3NP-monooxygenase was detected in the crude extracts of the 4C3NP-induced JHN cells that confirmed the formation of 4-chlororesorcinol from 4C3NP. The capillary assay showed that Pseudomonas sp. JHN exhibited chemotaxis toward 4C3NP. The bioremediation capability of Pseudomonas sp. JHN was monitored to carry out the microcosm experiments using sterile and non-sterile soils spiked with 4C3NP. Strain JHN degraded 4C3NP in sterile and non-sterile soil with same degradation rates. This is the first report of (i) bacterial degradation and bioremediation of 4C3NP, (ii) formation of 4-chlororesorcinol in the degradation pathway of 4C3NP, (iii) bacterial chemotaxis toward 4C3NP. PMID:24667329

  15. Ferric-Pyoverdine Recognition by Fpv Outer Membrane Proteins of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    PubMed Central

    Hartney, Sierra L.; Mazurier, Sylvie; Girard, Maëva K.; Mehnaz, Samina; Davis, Edward W.; Gross, Harald; Lemanceau, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (previously called P. fluorescens Pf-5) produces two siderophores, enantio-pyochelin and a compound in the large and diverse pyoverdine family. Using high-resolution mass spectroscopy, we determined the structure of the pyoverdine produced by Pf-5. In addition to producing its own siderophores, Pf-5 also utilizes ferric complexes of some pyoverdines produced by other strains of Pseudomonas spp. as sources of iron. Previously, phylogenetic analysis of the 45 TonB-dependent outer membrane proteins in Pf-5 indicated that six are in a well-supported clade with ferric-pyoverdine receptors (Fpvs) from other Pseudomonas spp. We used a combination of phylogenetics, bioinformatics, mutagenesis, pyoverdine structural determinations, and cross-feeding bioassays to assign specific ferric-pyoverdine substrates to each of the six Fpvs of Pf-5. We identified at least one ferric-pyoverdine that was taken up by each of the six Fpvs of Pf-5. Functional redundancy of the Pf-5 Fpvs was also apparent, with some ferric-pyoverdines taken up by all mutants with a single Fpv deletion but not by a mutant having deletions in two of the Fpv-encoding genes. Finally, we demonstrated that phylogenetically related Fpvs take up ferric complexes of structurally related pyoverdines, thereby establishing structure-function relationships that can be employed in the future to predict the pyoverdine substrates of Fpvs in other Pseudomonas spp. PMID:23222724

  16. Ferric-pyoverdine recognition by Fpv outer membrane proteins of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5.

    PubMed

    Hartney, Sierra L; Mazurier, Sylvie; Girard, Maëva K; Mehnaz, Samina; Davis, Edward W; Gross, Harald; Lemanceau, Philippe; Loper, Joyce E

    2013-02-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (previously called P. fluorescens Pf-5) produces two siderophores, enantio-pyochelin and a compound in the large and diverse pyoverdine family. Using high-resolution mass spectroscopy, we determined the structure of the pyoverdine produced by Pf-5. In addition to producing its own siderophores, Pf-5 also utilizes ferric complexes of some pyoverdines produced by other strains of Pseudomonas spp. as sources of iron. Previously, phylogenetic analysis of the 45 TonB-dependent outer membrane proteins in Pf-5 indicated that six are in a well-supported clade with ferric-pyoverdine receptors (Fpvs) from other Pseudomonas spp. We used a combination of phylogenetics, bioinformatics, mutagenesis, pyoverdine structural determinations, and cross-feeding bioassays to assign specific ferric-pyoverdine substrates to each of the six Fpvs of Pf-5. We identified at least one ferric-pyoverdine that was taken up by each of the six Fpvs of Pf-5. Functional redundancy of the Pf-5 Fpvs was also apparent, with some ferric-pyoverdines taken up by all mutants with a single Fpv deletion but not by a mutant having deletions in two of the Fpv-encoding genes. Finally, we demonstrated that phylogenetically related Fpvs take up ferric complexes of structurally related pyoverdines, thereby establishing structure-function relationships that can be employed in the future to predict the pyoverdine substrates of Fpvs in other Pseudomonas spp. PMID:23222724

  17. Network-assisted investigation of virulence and antibiotic-resistance systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Chan Yeong; Ji, Sun-Gou; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Hanhae; Yang, Sunmo; Kim, Hye Jin; Cho, Ara; Yoon, Sang Sun; Lee, Insuk

    2016-05-19

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium of clinical significance. Although the genome of PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, has been extensively studied, approximately one-third of the functional genome remains unknown. With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibiotic and anti-virulence strategies, which may be facilitated by an approach that explores P. aeruginosa gene function in systems-level models. Here, we present a genome-wide functional network of P. aeruginosa genes, PseudomonasNet, which covers 98% of the coding genome, and a companion web server to generate functional hypotheses using various network-search algorithms. We demonstrate that PseudomonasNet-assisted predictions can effectively identify novel genes involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance. Moreover, an antibiotic-resistance network based on PseudomonasNet reveals that P. aeruginosa has common modular genetic organisations that confer increased or decreased resistance to diverse antibiotics, which accounts for the pervasiveness of cross-resistance across multiple drugs. The same network also suggests that P. aeruginosa has developed mechanism of trade-off in resistance across drugs by altering genetic interactions. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of a genome-scale functional network to investigate pathogenic systems in P. aeruginosa.

  18. Detection of extended spectrum β-lactamase in Pseudomonas spp. isolated from two tertiary care hospitals in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Extended spectrum ß-lactamases (ESBLs) represent a major group of lactamases responsible for resistance, mostly produced by gram-negative bacteria, to newer generations of ß-lactam drugs currently being identified in large numbers worldwide. The present study was undertaken to see the frequency of ESBL producing Pseudomonas spp. isolated from six hundred clinical specimens (wound, pus, aural, urine, sputum, throat and other swabs) collected over a period of three years from two tertiary care hospitals in Bangladesh. Findings Aerobic bacterial culture was performed on aseptically collected swabs and only growth of Pseudomonas was considered for further species identification and ESBL production along with serotyping of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was carried out using the Kirby-Bauer agar diffusion method and ESBL production was detected on Mueller Hinton agar by double-disk synergy technique using Amoxicillin-Clavulanic acid with Ceftazidime, Cefotaxime, Ceftriaxone and Aztreonam. Culture yielded 120 Pseudomonas spp. and 82 of them were biochemically characterized for species. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found to be the predominant (90.2%) species. Of 82 isolates tested for ESBL, 31 (37.8%) were ESBL positive with 29 (93.5%) as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the remaining 2 (6.5%) were Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Ralstonia pickettii. Antibiogram revealed Imipenem as the most effective drug (93.3%) among all antimicrobials used against Pseudomonas spp. followed by Aminoglycosides (63.7%). Conclusion ESBL producing Pseudomonas spp. was found to be a frequent isolate from two tertiary care hospitals in Bangladesh, showing limited susceptibility to antimicrobials and decreased susceptibility to Imipenem in particular, which is a matter of great concern. PMID:23289861

  19. Use of Antimicrobial Food Additives as Potential Dipping Solutions to Control Pseudomonas spp. Contamination in the Frankfurters and Ham

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Mi-Hwa; Park, Beom-Young; Choi, Kyoung-Hee

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of sodium diacetate and sodium lactate solutions for reducing the cell count of Pseudomonas spp. in frankfurters and hams. A mixture of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (NCCP10338, NCCP10250, and NCCP11229), and Pseudomonas fluorescens (KACC10323 and KACC10326) was inoculated on cooked frankfurters and ham. The inoculated samples were immersed into control (sterile distilled water), sodium diacetate (5 and 10%), sodium lactate (5 and 10%), 5% sodium diacetate + 5% sodium lactate, and 10% sodium diacetate + 10% sodium lactate for 0-10 min. Inoculated frankfurters and ham were also immersed into acidified (pH 3.0) solutions such as acidified sodium diacetate (5 and 10%), and acidified sodium lactate (5 and 10%) in addition to control (acidified distilled water) for 0-10 min. Total aerobic plate counts for Pseudomonas spp. were enumerated on Cetrimide agar. Significant reductions (ca. 2 Log CFU/g) in Pseudomonas spp. cells on frankfurters and ham were observed only for a combination treatment of 10% sodium lactate + 10% sodium diacetate. When the solutions were acidified to pH 3.0, the total reductions of Pseudomonas spp. were 1.5-4.0 Log CFU/g. The order of reduction amounts of Pseudomonas spp. cell counts was 10% sodium lactate > 5% sodium lactate ≥ 10% sodium diacetate > 5% sodium diacetate > control for frankfurters, and 10% sodium lactate > 5% sodium lactate > 10% sodium diacetate > 5% sodium diacetate > control for ham. The results suggest that using acidified food additive antimicrobials, as dipping solutions, should be useful in reducing Pseudomonas spp. on frankfurters and ham. PMID:26761492

  20. Fit women are not able to use the whole aerobic capacity during aerobic dance.

    PubMed

    Edvardsen, Elisabeth; Ingjer, Frank; Bø, Kari

    2011-12-01

    Edvardsen, E, Ingjer, F, and Bø, K. Fit women are not able to use the whole aerobic capacity during aerobic dance. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3479-3485, 2011-This study compared the aerobic capacity during maximal aerobic dance and treadmill running in fit women. Thirteen well-trained female aerobic dance instructors aged 30 ± 8.17 years (mean ± SD) exercised to exhaustion by running on a treadmill for measurement of maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2)max) and peak heart rate (HRpeak). Additionally, all subjects performed aerobic dancing until exhaustion after a choreographed videotaped routine trying to reach the same HRpeak as during maximal running. The p value for statistical significance between running and aerobic dance was set to ≤0.05. The results (mean ± SD) showed a lower VO(2)max in aerobic dance (52.2 ± 4.02 ml·kg·min) compared with treadmill running (55.9 ± 5.03 ml·kg·min) (p = 0.0003). Further, the mean ± SD HRpeak was 182 ± 9.15 b·min in aerobic dance and 192 ± 9.62 b·min in treadmill running, giving no difference in oxygen pulse between the 2 exercise forms (p = 0.32). There was no difference in peak ventilation (aerobic dance: 108 ± 10.81 L·min vs. running: 113 ± 11.49 L·min). In conclusion, aerobic dance does not seem to be able to use the whole aerobic capacity as in running. For well endurance-trained women, this may result in a lower total workload at maximal intensities. Aerobic dance may therefore not be as suitable as running during maximal intensities in well-trained females.

  1. Effect of Mn2+ augmentation on reinforcing aerobic sludge granulation in a sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lihui; Yang, Tao; Wang, Weiliang; Zhang, Bo; Sun, Yuanyuan

    2012-03-01

    Two sequencing batch reactors were synchronously operated to investigate the effect of manganese (II) (Mn(2+)) augmentation on aerobic granulation. Reactor 1 (R1) was added with 10 mg/L Mn(2+), while there was no Mn(2+) augmentation in reactor 2 (R2). Results showed that R1 had a faster granulation process than R2 and R1 performed better in chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonium nitrogen (NH(4)(+)-N) removal efficiencies. Moreover, the mature granules augmented with Mn(2+) behaved better on their physical characteristics and size distributions, and they also had higher production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) content. The result of three-dimensional excitation and emission matrix fluorescence showed that Mn(2+) had the function of causing organic material diversity (especially proteins diversity) in EPS fraction from granules. Polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis techniques were employed to analyze the microbial and genetic characteristics in mature granules. The results exhibited that Mn(2+) augmentation was mainly responsible for the higher microbial diversity of granules from R1 compared with that from R2. Uncultured sludge bacterium A16 (AF234726) and Rhodococcus sp. WTZ-R2 (HM004214) were the major species in R1, while only uncultured sludge bacterium A16 (AF234726) in R2. Moreover, there were eight species of organisms found in both two aerobic granules, and three species were found only in aerobic granules from R1. It could be concluded that Mn(2+) could enhance the sludge granulation process and have a key effect role on the biological properties during the sludge granulation. PMID:21894480

  2. Aerobic bioreduction of nickel(II) to elemental nickel with concomitant biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Guoqiang; Li, Daping; Zhang, Liang

    2012-10-01

    Although microorganisms have the potential to reduce metals, products with elementary forms are unusual. In the present study, a strain of Pseudomonas sp. MBR was tested for its ability to reduce metal ions to their elementary forms coupled to biomineralization under aerobic conditions. The Pseudomonas sp. MBR strain was able to reduce metals such as Fe(III), Mn(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), Cd(II), Co(II), Al(III), Se(IV), and Te(IV) as electron acceptors to elementary forms using citrate, lactate, pyruvate, succinate, malate, glucose, or ethanol as electron donors. Growth and reduction during biomineralization occurred within the pH range of 6.0 to 11.0 and temperature range of 4 to 40 °C, with an optimum growth temperature of 28 °C. The resistance of Ni(II) varied from 0.5 to 5 mM. Ni(II) reduction was still observed when nitrate was present in addition to oxygen as a potential electron acceptor. The Ni(II) reduction efficiency was related with the molar ratio of the electron donor to Ni(II). Unlike other dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria, which oxidizes organic matter with Fe(III) or Mn(IV) as the sole electron acceptor coupled to energy production under facultative anaerobic conditions, this strain used oxygen as an electron acceptor combined with metal reduction. The aerobic metal reduction may relate to a co-metabolic reduction. Transmission electron microscopy images demonstrated that the cells had the ability to accumulate heavy metals, and that the detoxicity mechanism was intracellular metal reduction. These results suggested that the use of Pseudomonas sp. MBR could be promising for toxic heavy metal bioremediation and biological metallurgy. PMID:22215072

  3. Characterization of Two Efficient Aerobic Denitrifying Strains Isolated from Shallow Aquifers in Suzhou City, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, X.; Zhu, X.; Sun, H.; Li, M.

    2010-12-01

    Sixty two stains that can utilize nitrate as source of nitrogen under aerobic conditions were isolated from shallow aquifer samples in Suzhou city, China. Two of the strains, XK42 and PJ21, can convert nitrate into nitrogen gas efficiently without obvious accumulation of nitite. According to morphological, biochemical/biophysical and 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis, XK42 and PJ21 were identified as Pseudomonas Stutzeri and Pseudomonas Mendocica, respectively. The generation time, optimum pH value range and optimum growth temperature range were 4.64h, 6.5˜8.0, 25˜35°C for XK42 and 8.39h, 6.5˜8.5, 25˜35°C for PJ21. Under aerobic conditions (DO=6.9˜7.8 mg/L), the nitrate concentrations in the medium inoculated with XK42 and PJ21 decreased to 42.35 mg/L and 35.69 mg/L with initial nitrate concentration of 276.25 mg/L within 12 hours, respectively. The nitrite concentrations reached to 3.06 mg/L and 3.70 mg/L, and their nitrate removal rates reached 18.24 mg/L●h and 17.51 mg/L●h. The total nitrogen loss through denitrification of XK42 and PJ21 were 70.9% and 66.3%, respectively. The nitrate reduction efficiencies within 60 hours was up to 95.13% (strain XK42) and 95.55% (strain PJ21). The results indicate that the isolated strians XK42 and PJ21 are aerobic denitrifiers with high nitrogen removal efficiency, and can be used for in-situ bioremediation of nitrogen-contaminated shallow groundwater and biotreatment of wasterwater.

  4. Antimicrobial effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on survivability and recovery of Campylobacter jejuni on poultry products.

    PubMed

    Davis, M A; Conner, D E

    2007-04-01

    Three types of poultry products representing differences in skin coverage were tested to determine the ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to inhibit growth of Campylobacter jejuni. Processed ready-to-cook poultry carcasses were obtained from the Poultry Research Unit at Auburn University and were not subjected to any treatment to reduce or eliminate the native microflora on the carcasses. Carcasses were cut into wing sections (drumette, flat, tip), split breast pieces (with and without bone), and boneless, skinless breast pieces. Equal numbers of the 3 product types were subjected to 1 of 6 treatments: 1) uninoculated, 2) C. jejuni only, 3) P. aeruginosa type 1 only, 4) P. aeruginosa type 2 only, 5) C. jejuni + P. aeruginosa type 1, or 6) C. jejuni + P. aeruginosa type 2. Products were inoculated at 10(4) to 10(5) cfu. Postinoculation, equal numbers of product type were also subjected to the following: 1) aerobic or vacuum packaging, 2) storage temperature of 4 or 10 degrees C, and 3) storage of 0, 1, 2, 3, or 4 d. Products were sampled after storage duration to determine the population of C. jejuni and P. aeruginosa. Individual pieces were rinsed with 50 mL of buffered peptone water. The recovered rinse was used to make appropriate dilutions and spiral plated onto Campy-Cefex and Pseudomonas P agars. Campy-Cefex plates were incubated microaerophilically at 42 degrees C for 48 h, whereas Pseudomonas P plates were incubated aerobically at 37 degrees C for 24 to 48 h. Random suspect colonies on Campy-Cefex plates were confirmed by cell morphology when viewed under microscopic examination. Suspect colonies on Pseudomonas P plates produced a blue color in the medium indicative of glycerol reduction. At both 4 and 10 degrees C, neither type of P. aeruginosa inhibited the growth or survival of C. jejuni compared to plates that were inoculated with C. jejuni only. PMID:17369550

  5. Novel Waddlia Intracellular Bacterium in Artibeus intermedius Fruit Bats, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Morales, Cirani Obregón; Martínez, Leonardo Perea; Ceballos, Nidia Aréchiga; Rivero, Juan José Pérez; Díaz, Osvaldo López; Brayton, Kelly A.

    2015-01-01

    An intracellular bacterium was isolated from fruit bats (Artibeus intermedius) in Cocoyoc, Mexico. The bacterium caused severe lesions in the lungs and spleens of bats and intracytoplasmic vacuoles in cell cultures. Sequence analyses showed it is related to Waddlia spp. (order Chlamydiales). We propose to call this bacterium Waddlia cocoyoc. PMID:26583968

  6. Novel Waddlia Intracellular Bacterium in Artibeus intermedius Fruit Bats, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Morales, Cirani Obregón; Martínez, Leonardo Perea; Ceballos, Nidia Aréchiga; Rivero, Juan José Pérez; Díaz, Osvaldo López; Brayton, Kelly A; Setién, Alvaro Aguilar

    2015-12-01

    An intracellular bacterium was isolated from fruit bats (Artibeus intermedius) in Cocoyoc, Mexico. The bacterium caused severe lesions in the lungs and spleens of bats and intracytoplasmic vacuoles in cell cultures. Sequence analyses showed it is related to Waddlia spp. (order Chlamydiales). We propose to call this bacterium Waddlia cocoyoc.

  7. Cytochrome P450 enzymes from the metabolically diverse bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Stephen G. . E-mail: stephen.bell@chem.ox.ac.uk; Hoskins, Nicola; Xu Feng; Caprotti, Domenico; Rao Zihe; Wong, L.-L. . E-mail: luet.wong@chem.ox.ac.uk

    2006-03-31

    Four (CYP195A2, CYP199A2, CYP203A1, and CYP153A5) of the seven P450 enzymes, and palustrisredoxin A, a ferredoxin associated with CYP199A2, from the metabolically diverse bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris have been expressed and purified. A range of substituted benzenes, phenols, benzaldehydes, and benzoic acids was shown to bind to the four P450 enzymes. Monooxygenase activity of CYP199A2 was reconstituted with palustrisredoxin A and putidaredoxin reductase of the P450cam system from Pseudomonas putida. We found that 4-ethylbenzoate and 4-methoxybenzoate were oxidized to single products, and 4-methoxybenzoate was demethylated to form 4-hydroxybenzoate. Crystals of substrate-free CYP199A2 which diffracted to {approx}2.0 A have been obtained.

  8. Volatile dimethyl polonium produced by aerobic marine microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Bahrou, Andrew S; Ollivier, Patrick R L; Hanson, Thomas E; Tessier, Emmanuel; Amouroux, David; Church, Thomas M

    2012-10-16

    The production of volatile polonium (Po(v)), a naturally occurring radioactive element, by pure cultures of aerobic marine tellurite-resistant microorganisms was investigated. Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, a carotogenic yeast, and a Bacillus sp. strain, a Gram-positive bacterium, generated approximately one and 2 orders of magnitude, respectively, greater amounts of Po(v) compared to the other organisms tested. Gas chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (GC-ICP-MS) analysis identified dimethyl polonide (DMPo) as the predominant volatile Po compound in culture headspace of the yeast. This species assignment is based on the exact relation between GC retention times and boiling points of this and other Group VI B analogues (S, Se, and Te). The extent of the biotic Po(v) production correlates exponentially with elevated particulate Po (Po(p)): dissolved Po (Po(aq)) ratios in the cultures, consistent with efficient Po bioaccumulation. Further experimentation demonstrated that some abiotic Po(v) generation is possible. However, high-level Po(v) generation in these cultures is predominantly biotic.

  9. Sulfobacillus thermotolerans sp. nov., a thermotolerant, chemolithotrophic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, Tat'yana I; Tsaplina, Iraida A; Kondrat'eva, Tamara F; Duda, Vitalii I; Suzina, Natalya E; Melamud, Vitalii S; Tourova, Tat'yana P; Karavaiko, Grigorii I

    2006-05-01

    A thermotolerant, Gram-positive, aerobic, endospore-forming, acidophilic bacterium (strain Kr1T) was isolated from the pulp of a gold-containing sulfide concentrate processed at 40 degrees C in a gold-recovery plant (Siberia). Cells of strain Kr1(T) were straight to slightly curved rods, 0.8-1.2 microm in diameter and 1.5-4.5 microm in length. Strain Kr1T formed spherical and oval, refractile, subterminally located endospores. The temperature range for growth was 20-60 degrees C, with an optimum at 40 degrees C. The pH range for growth on medium containing ferrous iron was 1.2-2.4, with an optimum at pH 2.0; the pH range for growth on medium containing S0 was 2.0-5.0, with an optimum at pH 2.5. Strain Kr1T was mixotrophic, oxidizing ferrous iron, S0, tetrathionate or sulfide minerals as energy sources in the presence of 0.02 % yeast extract or other organic substrates. The G+C content of the DNA of strain Kr1T was 48.2+/-0.5 mol%. Strain Kr1T showed a low level of DNA-DNA reassociation with the known Sulfobacillus species (11-44 %). 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that Kr1T formed a separate phylogenetic group with a high degree of similarity between the nucleotide sequences (98.3-99.6 %) and 100 % bootstrap support within the phylogenetic Sulfobacillus cluster. On the basis of its physiological properties and the results of phylogenetic analyses, strain Kr1T can be affiliated to a novel species of the genus Sulfobacillus, for which the name Sulfobacillus thermotolerans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Kr1T (=VKM B-2339T=DSM 17362T).

  10. Energy coupling to K+ transport in a marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    Sedgwick, E G; MacLeod, R A

    1980-10-01

    Cells of the marine bacterium Alteromonas haloplanktis 214 ATCC 19855 (previously referred to as marine pseudomonad B-16) were depleted of K+ by washing with 0.1 M MgSO4. Washing with 0.05 M MgSO4 lowered the Vmax for K+ transport compared with washing with 0.1 M with 0.05 but did not change the Km, while washing with lower concentrations of MgSO4 caused loss of ultraviolet-absorbing material from the cells. K+ uptake was a strictly aerobic process and was accompanied by proton release. When an anaerobic suspension of cells was added to incubation mixtures containing increasing amounts of O2, intracellular ATP concentrations increased as the O2 concentration increased and reached near maximum values before K+ transport began. The O2 concentration initiating K+ transport caused transport to proceed at its maximum rate. For these experiments A. haloplanktis was depleted of ATP by incubating under anaerobic conditions. Incubating with either N,N'-dicyclohexyl carbodiimide (DCCD) or arsenate failed to deplete intact cells of ATP or prevent K+ transport. The inhibitory activity of DCCD for ATPase in membrane preparations was higher at 5 mM than at other MgSO4 concentrations and increased with time. Cyanide and the uncoupling agents tetrachloro-salicylanide (TCS) and carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) prevented K+ uptake while TSC and FCCP though not cyanide caused K+ to be released from K+-containing cells. It is concluded that the driving force for K+ transport in these cells is likely to be the membrane potential and that K+ transport may be gated.

  11. Idiomarina maris sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from sediment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Jiao; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Zhao, Hui-Lin; Zhou, Ming-Yang; Li, Hui-Juan; Gao, Zhao-Ming; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Dang, Hong-Yue; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2012-02-01

    A protease-producing marine bacterium, designated CF12-14(T), was isolated from sediment of the South China Sea. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain CF12-14(T) formed a separate lineage within the genus Idiomarina (Gammaproteobacteria). The isolate showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Idiomarina salinarum ISL-52(T) (94.7 %), Idiomarina seosinensis CL-SP19(T) (94.6 %) and other members of the genus Idiomarina (91.9-94.6 %). Cells were gram-negative, aerobic, flagellated, straight or slightly curved, and often formed buds and prosthecae. Strain CF12-14(T) grew at 4-42 °C (optimum 30-35 °C) and with 0.1-15 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 2-3 %). The isolate reduced nitrate to nitrite and hydrolysed DNA, but did not produce acids from sugars. The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0) (27.4 %), iso-C(17 : 0) (16.0 %) and iso-C(17 : 1)ω9c (15.8 %). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol. The major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone 8. The DNA G+C content was 50.4 mol%. The phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic data supported the conclusion that CF12-14(T) represents a novel species of the genus Idiomarina, for which the name Idiomarina maris sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CF12-14(T) ( = CCTCC AB 208166(T) = KACC 13974(T)).

  12. Ammonium removal by Agrobacterium sp. LAD9 capable of heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Ni, Jinren

    2012-05-01

    Characteristics of ammonium removal by a newly isolated heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterium Agrobacterium sp. LAD9 were systematically investigated. Succinate and acetate were found to be the most favorable carbon sources for LAD9. Response surface methodology (RSM) analysis demonstrated that maximum removal of ammonium occurred under the conditions with an initial pH of 8.46, C/N ratio of 8.28, temperature of 27.9°C and shaking speed of 150rpm, where temperature and shaking speed produced the largest effect. Further nitrogen balance analysis revealed that 50.1% of nitrogen was removed as gas products and 40.8% was converted to the biomass. Moreover, the occurrence of aerobic denitrification was evidenced by the utilization of nitrite and nitrate as nitrogen sources, and the successful amplifications of membrane bound nitrate reductase and cytochrome cd(1) nitrite reductase genes from strain LAD9. Thus, the nitrogen removal in strain LAD9 was speculated to comply with the mechanism of heterotrophic nitrification coupled with aerobic denitrification (NH(4)(+)-NH(2)OH-NO(2)(-)-N(2)O-N(2)), in which also accompanied with the mutual transformation of nitrite and nitrate. The findings can help in applying appropriate controls over operational parameters in systems involving the use of this kind of strain.

  13. Comparison of aerobic denitrifying activity among three cultural species with various carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Otani, Y; Hasegawa, K; Hanaki, K

    2004-01-01

    Abilities of three aerobic denitrifiers such as Alcaligenes faecalis, Microvirgula aerodenitrificans and Paracoccus pantotrophus were compared from the viewpoints of nitrate removal efficiency and organic matter utilization. First, the effect of carbon source was investigated. Although nitrate reduction was observed in all strains under aerobic conditions, a change of carbon source considerably affected the denitrification ability. In the case of P. pantotrophus, nitrate and nitrite were completely removed in three days under sodium acetate or leucine as a carbon source. In the case of A. faecalis, sufficient nitrate removal was observed only when sodium acetate or ethanol was added. P. pantotrophus and A. faecalis showed a higher ability of nitrate removal than that of M. aerodenitrificans. Therefore, P. pantotrophus was selected in order to investigate the effects of concentration and repetitive addition of carbon. Sodium acetate was used as a sole carbon source. Nitrate was not reduced when the carbon concentration was below 500 mgC/L. However, when carbon source was added repeatedly, nitrate was reduced under 100 mgC/L after the optical density of the bacterium reached above 1.0. This result indicated that a high enough level of bacterial density was necessary to express aerobic denitrification activity. PMID:15566182

  14. Aerobic Microbial Cometabolism of Benzothiophene and 3-Methylbenzothiophene

    PubMed Central

    Fedorak, Phillip M.; Grbić-Galić, Dunja

    1991-01-01

    A culture enriched by growth on 1-methylnaphthalene was used to study the aerobic biotransformations of benzothiophene and 3-methylbenzothiophene. Neither of the sulfur heterocyclic compounds would support growth, but they were transformed by the culture growing on 1-methylnaphthalene or glucose or peptone. Cometabolism of benzothiophene yielded benzothiophene-2,3-dione, whereas that of 3-methylbenzothiophene yielded 3-methylbenzothiophene sulfoxide and the corresponding sulfone. The identities of the dione and sulfone were verified by comparison with authentic standards. The identity of the sulfoxide was surmised from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography- Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results. Oxidation preferentially occurred at carbons 2 and 3 in benzothiophene, but when carbon 3 was substituted with a methyl group, as in 3-methylbenzothiophene, the sulfur atom was oxygenated. The predominant microorganism in the enrichment culture was a Pseudomonas strain, designated BT1, which mineralized aromatic but not aliphatic hydrocarbons. This isolate cometabolized benzothiophene and 3-methylbenzothiophene. There was no evidence that it could metabolize 3-methylbenzothiophene sulfone. When 3-methylbenzothiophene was added to Prudhoe Bay crude oil, the sulfur heterocycle was oxidized to its sulfoxide and sulfone by strain BT1 as it grew on the aromatic hydrocarbons in the crude oil. Benzothiophene-2,3-dione was found to be chemically unstable when incubated with Prudhoe Bay crude oil. Thus its formation from benzothiophene in the presence of crude oil could not be determined. PMID:16348471

  15. Aerobic cyanide degradation by bacterial isolates from cassava factory wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Sujatha; Dananjeyan, Balachandar; Krishnamurthy, Kumar; Benckiser, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains that utilize cyanide (CN) as a nitrogen source were isolated from cassava factory wastewater after enrichment in a liquid media containing sodium cyanide (1 mM) and glucose (0.2% w/v). The strains could tolerate and grow in cyanide concentrations of up to 5 mM. Increased cyanide levels in the media caused an extension of lag phase in the bacterial growth indicating that they need some period of acclimatisation. The rate of cyanide removal by the strains depends on the initial cyanide and glucose concentrations. When initial cyanide and glucose concentrations were increased up to 5 mM, cyanide removal rate increased up to 63 and 61 per cent by Bacillus pumilus and Pseudomonas putida. Metabolic products such as ammonia and formate were detected in culture supernatants, suggesting a direct hydrolytic pathway without an intermediate formamide. The study clearly demonstrates the potential of aerobic treatment with cyanide degrading bacteria for cyanide removal in cassava factory wastewaters. PMID:26413045

  16. Aerobic cyanide degradation by bacterial isolates from cassava factory wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Sujatha; Dananjeyan, Balachandar; Krishnamurthy, Kumar; Benckiser, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains that utilize cyanide (CN) as a nitrogen source were isolated from cassava factory wastewater after enrichment in a liquid media containing sodium cyanide (1 mM) and glucose (0.2% w/v). The strains could tolerate and grow in cyanide concentrations of up to 5 mM. Increased cyanide levels in the media caused an extension of lag phase in the bacterial growth indicating that they need some period of acclimatisation. The rate of cyanide removal by the strains depends on the initial cyanide and glucose concentrations. When initial cyanide and glucose concentrations were increased up to 5 mM, cyanide removal rate increased up to 63 and 61 per cent by Bacillus pumilus and Pseudomonas putida. Metabolic products such as ammonia and formate were detected in culture supernatants, suggesting a direct hydrolytic pathway without an intermediate formamide. The study clearly demonstrates the potential of aerobic treatment with cyanide degrading bacteria for cyanide removal in cassava factory wastewaters. PMID:26413045

  17. Aerobic cyanide degradation by bacterial isolates from cassava factory wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Sujatha; Dananjeyan, Balachandar; Krishnamurthy, Kumar; Benckiser, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains that utilize cyanide (CN) as a nitrogen source were isolated from cassava factory wastewater after enrichment in a liquid media containing sodium cyanide (1 mM) and glucose (0.2% w/v). The strains could tolerate and grow in cyanide concentrations of up to 5 mM. Increased cyanide levels in the media caused an extension of lag phase in the bacterial growth indicating that they need some period of acclimatisation. The rate of cyanide removal by the strains depends on the initial cyanide and glucose concentrations. When initial cyanide and glucose concentrations were increased up to 5 mM, cyanide removal rate increased up to 63 and 61 per cent by Bacillus pumilus and Pseudomonas putida. Metabolic products such as ammonia and formate were detected in culture supernatants, suggesting a direct hydrolytic pathway without an intermediate formamide. The study clearly demonstrates the potential of aerobic treatment with cyanide degrading bacteria for cyanide removal in cassava factory wastewaters.

  18. Evolution of Molybdenum Nitrogenase during the Transition from Anaerobic to Aerobic Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Eric S.; Costas, Amaya M. Garcia; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Mus, Florence

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Molybdenum nitrogenase (Nif), which catalyzes the reduction of dinitrogen to ammonium, has modulated the availability of fixed nitrogen in the biosphere since early in Earth's history. Phylogenetic evidence indicates that oxygen (O2)-sensitive Nif emerged in an anaerobic archaeon and later diversified into an aerobic bacterium. Aerobic bacteria that fix N2 have adapted a number of strategies to protect Nif from inactivation by O2, including spatial and temporal segregation of Nif from O2 and respiratory consumption of O2. Here we report the complement of Nif-encoding genes in 189 diazotrophic genomes. We show that the evolution of Nif during the transition from anaerobic to aerobic metabolism was accompanied by both gene recruitment and loss, resulting in a substantial increase in the number of nif genes. While the observed increase in the number of nif genes and their phylogenetic distribution are strongly correlated with adaptation to utilize O2 in metabolism, the increase is not correlated with any of the known O2 protection mechanisms. Rather, gene recruitment appears to have been in response to selective pressure to optimize Nif synthesis to meet fixed N demands associated with aerobic productivity and to more efficiently regulate Nif under oxic conditions that favor protein turnover. Consistent with this hypothesis, the transition of Nif from anoxic to oxic environments is associated with a shift from posttranslational regulation in anaerobes to transcriptional regulation in obligate aerobes and facultative anaerobes. Given that fixed nitrogen typically limits ecosystem productivity, our observations further underscore the dynamic interplay between the evolution of Earth's oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon biogeochemical cycles. IMPORTANCE Molybdenum nitrogenase (Nif), which catalyzes the reduction of dinitrogen to ammonium, has modulated the availability of fixed nitrogen in the biosphere since early in Earth's history. Nif emerged in an anaerobe and

  19. [The phylogenetic diversity of aerobic organotrophic bacteria from the Dagan high-temperature oil field].

    PubMed

    Nazina, T N; Sokolova, D Sh; Shestakova, N M; Grigor'ian, A A; Mikhaĭlova, E M; Babich, T L; Lysenko, A M; Turova, T P; Poltaraus, A B; Feng, Tsin'syan; Ni, Fangtian; Beliaev, S S

    2005-01-01

    The distribution and species diversity of aerobic organotrophic bacteria in the Dagan high-temperature oil field (China), which is exploited via flooding, have been studied. Twenty-two strains of the most characteristic thermophilic and mesophilic aerobic organotrophic bacteria have been isolated from the oil stratum. It has been found that, in a laboratory, the mesophilic and thermophilic isolates grow in the temperature, pH, and salinity ranges characteristic of the injection well near-bottom zones or of the oil stratum, respectively, and assimilate a wide range of hydrocarbons, fatty acids, lower alcohols, and crude oil, thus exhibiting adaptation to the environment. Using comparative phylogenetic 16S rRNA analysis, the taxonomic affiliation of the isolates has been established. The aerobic microbial community includes gram-positive bacteria with a high and low G+C content of DNA, and gamma and beta subclasses of Proteobacteria. The thermophilic bacteria belong to the genera Geobacillus and Thermoactinomyces, and the mesophilic strains belong to the genera Bacillus, Micrococcus, Cellulomonas, Pseudomonas, and Acinetobacter. The microbial community of the oil stratum is dominated by known species of the genus Geobacillus (G. subterraneus, G. stearothermophilus, and G. thermoglucosidasius) and a novel species "Geobacillus jurassicus." A number of novel thermophilic oil-oxidizing bacilli have been isolated.

  20. Systematic investigation and microbial community profile of indole degradation processes in two aerobic activated sludge systems

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiao; Qu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xuwang; Liu, Ziyan; Li, Huijie; Zhang, Zhaojing; Wang, Jingwei; Shen, Wenli; Zhou, Jiti

    2015-01-01

    Indole is widely spread in various environmental matrices. Indole degradation by bacteria has been reported previously, whereas its degradation processes driven by aerobic microbial community were as-yet unexplored. Herein, eight sequencing batch bioreactors fed with municipal and coking activated sludges were constructed for aerobic treatment of indole. The whole operation processes contained three stages, i.e. stage I, glucose and indole as carbon sources; stage II, indole as carbon source; and stage III, indole as carbon and nitrogen source. Indole could be completely removed in both systems. Illumina sequencing revealed that alpha diversity was reduced after indole treatment and microbial communities were significantly distinct among the three stages. At genus level, Azorcus and Thauera were dominant species in stage I in both systems, while Alcaligenes, Comamonas and Pseudomonas were the core genera in stage II and III in municipal sludge system, Alcaligenes and Burkholderia in coking sludge system. In addition, four strains belonged to genera Comamonas, Burkholderia and Xenophilus were isolated using indole as sole carbon source. Burkholderia sp. IDO3 could remove 100 mg/L indole completely within 14 h, the highest degradation rate to date. These findings provide novel information and enrich our understanding of indole aerobic degradation processes. PMID:26657581

  1. [The phylogenetic diversity of aerobic organotrophic bacteria from the Dagan high-temperature oil field].

    PubMed

    Nazina, T N; Sokolova, D Sh; Shestakova, N M; Grigor'ian, A A; Mikhaĭlova, E M; Babich, T L; Lysenko, A M; Turova, T P; Poltaraus, A B; Feng, Tsin'syan; Ni, Fangtian; Beliaev, S S

    2005-01-01

    The distribution and species diversity of aerobic organotrophic bacteria in the Dagan high-temperature oil field (China), which is exploited via flooding, have been studied. Twenty-two strains of the most characteristic thermophilic and mesophilic aerobic organotrophic bacteria have been isolated from the oil stratum. It has been found that, in a laboratory, the mesophilic and thermophilic isolates grow in the temperature, pH, and salinity ranges characteristic of the injection well near-bottom zones or of the oil stratum, respectively, and assimilate a wide range of hydrocarbons, fatty acids, lower alcohols, and crude oil, thus exhibiting adaptation to the environment. Using comparative phylogenetic 16S rRNA analysis, the taxonomic affiliation of the isolates has been established. The aerobic microbial community includes gram-positive bacteria with a high and low G+C content of DNA, and gamma and beta subclasses of Proteobacteria. The thermophilic bacteria belong to the genera Geobacillus and Thermoactinomyces, and the mesophilic strains belong to the genera Bacillus, Micrococcus, Cellulomonas, Pseudomonas, and Acinetobacter. The microbial community of the oil stratum is dominated by known species of the genus Geobacillus (G. subterraneus, G. stearothermophilus, and G. thermoglucosidasius) and a novel species "Geobacillus jurassicus." A number of novel thermophilic oil-oxidizing bacilli have been isolated. PMID:16119855

  2. Cellulomonas xylanilytica sp. nov., a cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacterium isolated from a decayed elm tree.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Raúl; Trujillo, Martha E; Mateos, P F; Martínez-Molina, E; Velázquez, Encarna

    2004-03-01

    A Gram-positive, aerobic, non-motile bacterium was isolated from a decayed elm tree. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequences revealed 99.0 % similarity to Cellulomonas humilata. Chemotaxonomic data that were determined for this isolate included cell-wall composition, fatty acid profiles and polar lipids; the results supported the placement of strain XIL11(T) in the genus Cellulomonas. The DNA G+C content was 73 mol%. The results of DNA-DNA hybridization with C. humilata ATCC 25174(T), in combination with chemotaxonomic and physiological data, demonstrated that isolate XIL11(T) should be classified as a novel Cellulomonas species. The name Cellulomonas xylanilytica sp. nov. is proposed, with strain XIL11(T) (=LMG 21723(T)=CECT 5729(T)) as the type strain.

  3. The Energetics of Aerobic versus Anaerobic Respiration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champion, Timothy D.; Schwenz, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    Background information, laboratory procedures, and a discussion of the results of an experiment designed to investigate the difference in energy gained from the aerobic and anaerobic oxidation of glucose are presented. Sample experimental and calculated data are included. (CW)

  4. Neuromodulation of Aerobic Exercise—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Heijnen, Saskia; Hommel, Bernhard; Kibele, Armin; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2016-01-01

    Running, and aerobic exercise in general, is a physical activity that increasingly many people engage in but that also has become popular as a topic for scientific research. Here we review the available studies investigating whether and to which degree aerobic exercise modulates hormones, amino acids, and neurotransmitters levels. In general, it seems that factors such as genes, gender, training status, and hormonal status need to be taken into account to gain a better understanding of the neuromodular underpinnings of aerobic exercise. More research using longitudinal studies and considering individual differences is necessary to determine actual benefits. We suggest that, in order to succeed, aerobic exercise programs should include optimal periodization, prevent overtraining and be tailored to interindividual differences, including neuro-developmental and genetically-based factors. PMID:26779053

  5. Neuromodulation of Aerobic Exercise-A Review.

    PubMed

    Heijnen, Saskia; Hommel, Bernhard; Kibele, Armin; Colzato, Lorenza S

    2015-01-01

    Running, and aerobic exercise in general, is a physical activity that increasingly many people engage in but that also has become popular as a topic for scientific research. Here we review the available studies investigating whether and to which degree aerobic exercise modulates hormones, amino acids, and neurotransmitters levels. In general, it seems that factors such as genes, gender, training status, and hormonal status need to be taken into account to gain a better understanding of the neuromodular underpinnings of aerobic exercise. More research using longitudinal studies and considering individual differences is necessary to determine actual benefits. We suggest that, in order to succeed, aerobic exercise programs should include optimal periodization, prevent overtraining and be tailored to interindividual differences, including neuro-developmental and genetically-based factors. PMID:26779053

  6. Conditioning and Aerobics for Older Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Joyce

    1980-01-01

    A class designed for the maintenance and gradual improvement of senior citizens' physical fitness includes relaxation training, flexibility and stretching exercises, interval training activities (designed as a link between less strenuous exercise and more strenuous activities), and aerobic exercises. (CJ)

  7. Evidence of Carbon Fixation Pathway in a Bacterium from Candidate Phylum SBR1093 Revealed with Genomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiping; Guo, Feng; Liu, Lili; Zhang, Tong

    2014-01-01

    Autotrophic CO2 fixation is the most important biotransformation process in the biosphere. Research focusing on the diversity and distribution of relevant autotrophs is significant to our comprehension of the biosphere. In this study, a draft genome of a bacterium from candidate phylum SBR1093 was reconstructed with the metagenome of an industrial activated sludge. Based on comparative genomics, this autotrophy may occur via a newly discovered carbon fixation path, the hydroxypropionate-hydroxybutyrate (HPHB) cycle, which was demonstrated in a previous work to be uniquely possessed by some genera from Archaea. This bacterium possesses all of the thirteen enzymes required for the HPHB cycle; these enzymes share 30∼50% identity with those in the autotrophic species of Archaea that undergo the HPHB cycle and 30∼80% identity with the corresponding enzymes of the mixotrophic species within Bradyrhizobiaceae. Thus, this bacterium might have an autotrophic growth mode in certain conditions. A phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene reveals that the phylotypes within candidate phylum SBR1093 are primarily clustered into 5 clades with a shallow branching pattern. This bacterium is clustered with phylotypes from organically contaminated environments, implying a demand for organics in heterotrophic metabolism. Considering the types of regulators, such as FnR, Fur, and ArsR, this bacterium might be a facultative aerobic mixotroph with potential multi-antibiotic and heavy metal resistances. This is the first report on Bacteria that may perform potential carbon fixation via the HPHB cycle, thus may expand our knowledge of the distribution and importance of the HPHB cycle in the biosphere. PMID:25310003

  8. A highly infective plant-associated bacterium influences reproductive rates in pea aphids

    PubMed Central

    Hendry, Tory A.; Clark, Kelley J.; Baltrus, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Pea aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum, have the potential to increase reproduction as a defence against pathogens, though how frequently this occurs or how infection with live pathogens influences this response is not well understood. Here we determine the minimum infective dose of an environmentally common bacterium and possible aphid pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, to determine the likelihood of pathogenic effects to pea aphids. Additionally, we used P. syringae infection to investigate how live pathogens may alter reproductive rates. We found that oral bacterial exposure decreased subsequent survival of aphids in a dose-dependent manner and we estimate that ingestion of less than 10 bacterial cells is sufficient to increase aphid mortality. Pathogen dose was positively related to aphid reproduction. Aphids exposed to low bacterial doses showed decreased, although statistically indistinguishable, fecundity compared to controls. Aphids exposed to high doses reproduced significantly more than low dose treatments and also more, but not significantly so, than controls. These results are consistent with previous studies suggesting that pea aphids may use fecundity compensation as a response to pathogens. Consequently, even low levels of exposure to a common plant-associated bacterium may therefore have significant effects on pea aphid survival and reproduction. PMID:26998321

  9. Biogenesis of antibacterial silver nanoparticles using the endophytic bacterium Bacillus cereus isolated from Garcinia xanthochymus

    PubMed Central

    Sunkar, Swetha; Nachiyar, C Valli

    2012-01-01

    Objective To synthesize the ecofriendly nanoparticles, which is viewed as an alternative to the chemical method which initiated the use of microbes like bacteria and fungi in their synthesis. Methods The current study uses the endophytic bacterium Bacillus cereus isolated from the Garcinia xanthochymus to synthesize the silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The AgNPs were synthesized by reduction of silver nitrate solution by the endophytic bacterium after incubation for 3-5 d at room temperature. The synthesis was initially observed by colour change from pale white to brown which was confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The AgNPs were further characterized using FTIR, SEM-EDX and TEM analyses. Results The synthesized nanoparticles were found to be spherical with the size in the range of 20-40 nm which showed a slight aggregation. The energy-dispersive spectra of the nanoparticle dispersion confirmed the presence of elemental silver. The AgNPs were found to have antibacterial activity against a few pathogenic bacteria like Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Conclusions The endophytic bacteria identified as Bacillus cereus was able to synthesize silver nanoparticles with potential antibacterial activity. PMID:23593575

  10. Data supporting functional diversity of the marine bacterium Cobetia amphilecti KMM 296.

    PubMed

    Balabanova, Larissa; Nedashkovskaya, Olga; Podvolotskaya, Anna; Slepchenko, Lubov; Golotin, Vasily; Belik, Alexey; Shevchenko, Ludmila; Son, Oksana; Rasskazov, Valery

    2016-09-01

    Data is presented in support of functionality of hyper-diverse protein families encoded by the Cobetia amphilecti KMM 296 (formerly Cobetia marina KMM 296) genome ("The genome of the marine bacterium Cobetia marina KMM 296 isolated from the mussel Crenomytilus grayanus (Dunker, 1853)" [1]) providing its nutritional versatility, adaptability and biocontrol that could be the basis of the marine bacterium evolutionary and application potential. Presented data include the information of growth and biofilm-forming properties of the food-associated isolates of Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Listeria, Salmonella and Staphylococcus under the conditions of their co-culturing with C. amphilecti KMM 296 to confirm its high inter-species communication and anti-microbial activity. Also included are the experiments on the crude petroleum consumption by C. amphilecti KMM 296 as the sole source of carbon in the presence of sulfate or nitrate to ensure its bioremediation capacity. The multifunctional C. amphilecti KMM 296 genome is a promising source for the beneficial psychrophilic enzymes and essential secondary metabolites. PMID:27508225

  11. A highly infective plant-associated bacterium influences reproductive rates in pea aphids.

    PubMed

    Hendry, Tory A; Clark, Kelley J; Baltrus, David A

    2016-02-01

    Pea aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum, have the potential to increase reproduction as a defence against pathogens, though how frequently this occurs or how infection with live pathogens influences this response is not well understood. Here we determine the minimum infective dose of an environmentally common bacterium and possible aphid pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, to determine the likelihood of pathogenic effects to pea aphids. Additionally, we used P. syringae infection to investigate how live pathogens may alter reproductive rates. We found that oral bacterial exposure decreased subsequent survival of aphids in a dose-dependent manner and we estimate that ingestion of less than 10 bacterial cells is sufficient to increase aphid mortality. Pathogen dose was positively related to aphid reproduction. Aphids exposed to low bacterial doses showed decreased, although statistically indistinguishable, fecundity compared to controls. Aphids exposed to high doses reproduced significantly more than low dose treatments and also more, but not significantly so, than controls. These results are consistent with previous studies suggesting that pea aphids may use fecundity compensation as a response to pathogens. Consequently, even low levels of exposure to a common plant-associated bacterium may therefore have significant effects on pea aphid survival and reproduction.

  12. Metabolic Engineering of an Aerobic Sulfate Reduction Pathway and Its Application to Precipitation of Cadmium on the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Clifford L.; Maratukulam, Priya D.; Lum, Amy M.; Clark, Douglas S.; Keasling, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    The conversion of sulfate to an excess of free sulfide requires stringent reductive conditions. Dissimilatory sulfate reduction is used in nature by sulfate-reducing bacteria for respiration and results in the conversion of sulfate to sulfide. However, this dissimilatory sulfate reduction pathway is inhibited by oxygen and is thus limited to anaerobic environments. As an alternative, we have metabolically engineered a novel aerobic sulfate reduction pathway for the secretion of sulfides. The assimilatory sulfate reduction pathway was redirected to overproduce cysteine, and excess cysteine was converted to sulfide by cysteine desulfhydrase. As a potential application for this pathway, a bacterium was engineered with this pathway and was used to aerobically precipitate cadmium as cadmium sulfide, which was deposited on the cell surface. To maximize sulfide production and cadmium precipitation, the production of cysteine desulfhydrase was modulated to achieve an optimal balance between the production and degradation of cysteine. PMID:11010904

  13. Fructose metabolism of the purple non-sulfur bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum: effect of carbon dioxide on growth, and production of bacteriochlorophyll and organic acids.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Christiane; Grammel, Hartmut

    2012-04-01

    During fermentative metabolism, carbon dioxide fixation plays a key role in many bacteria regarding growth and production of organic acids. The present contribution, dealing with the facultative photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum, reveals not only the strong influence of ambient carbon dioxide on the fermentative break-down of fructose but also a high impact on aerobic growth with fructose as sole carbon source. Both growth rates and biomass yield increased with increasing carbon dioxide supply in chemoheterotrophic aerobic cultures. Furthermore, intracellular metabolite concentration measurements showed almost negligible concentrations of the tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates succinate, fumarate and malate under aerobic growth, in contrast to several metabolites of the glycolysis. In addition, we present a dual phase fed-batch process, where an aerobic growth phase is followed by an anaerobic production phase. The biosynthesis of bacteriochlorophyll and the secretion of organic acids were both affected by the carbon dioxide supply, the pH value and by the cell density at the time of switching from aerobic to anaerobic conditions. The formation of pigmented photosynthetic membranes and the amount of bacteriochlorophyll were inversely correlated to the secretion of succinate. Accounting the high biotechnological potential of R. rubrum, optimization of carbon dioxide supply is important because of the favored application of fructose-containing fermentable feedstock solutions in bio-industrial processes.

  14. Bioconversion of 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene to a novel metabolite under anoxic and aerobic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gilcrease, P.C.; Murphy, V.G.

    1995-12-01

    Under nitrate-reducing, nongrowth conditions, a Pseudomonas fluorescens species reduced 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene to aminodinitrotoluenes, which were then further reduced to diaminonitrotoluenes. 2,4-Diamino-6-nitrotoluene (2,4-DANT) was further transformed to a novel metabolite, 4-N-acetylamino-2-amino-6-nitrotoluene (4-N-AcANT), while 2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene (2,6-DANT) was persistent. Efforts to further degrade 2,4-DANT and 2,6-DANT under aerobic, nitrogen-limited conditions were unsuccessful; 2,6-DANT remained persistent, and 2,4-DANT was again transformed to the 4-N-AcANT compound.

  15. Bioconversion of 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene to a novel metabolite under anoxic and aerobic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Gilcrease, P C; Murphy, V G

    1995-01-01

    Under nitrate-reducing, nongrowth conditions, a Pseudomonas fluorescens species reduced 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene to aminodinitrotoluenes, which were then further reduced to diaminonitrotoluenes. 2,4-Diamino-6-nitrotoluene (2,4-DANT) was further transformed to a novel metabolite, 4-N-acetylamino-2-amino-6-nitrotoluene (4-N-AcANT), while 2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene (2,6-DANT) was persistent. Efforts to further degrade 2,4-DANT and 2,6-DANT under aerobic, nitrogen-limited conditions were unsuccessful; 2,6-DANT remained persistent, and 2,4-DANT was again transformed to the 4-N-AcANT compound. PMID:8534088

  16. Culturable Aerobic and Facultative Anaerobic Intestinal Bacterial Flora of Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) in Southern Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Junaid; Sagheer, Mehwish; Tabassum, Nazneen; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Using morphological analysis and biochemical testing, here for the first time, we determined the culturable gut bacterial flora (aerobes and facultative anaerobes) in the venomous Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) from South Asia. The findings revealed that these snakes inhabit potentially pathogenic bacteria including Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shewanella putrefaciens, Aeromonas hydrophila, Salmonella sp., Moraxella sp., Bacillus sp., Ochrobactrum anthropi, and Providencia rettgeri. These findings are of concern, as injury from snake bite can result in wound infections and tissue necrosis leading to sepsis/necrotizing fasciitis and/or expose consumers of snake meat/medicine in the community to infections. PMID:25002979

  17. Culturable Aerobic and Facultative Anaerobic Intestinal Bacterial Flora of Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) in Southern Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Junaid; Sagheer, Mehwish; Tabassum, Nazneen; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Using morphological analysis and biochemical testing, here for the first time, we determined the culturable gut bacterial flora (aerobes and facultative anaerobes) in the venomous Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) from South Asia. The findings revealed that these snakes inhabit potentially pathogenic bacteria including Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shewanella putrefaciens, Aeromonas hydrophila, Salmonella sp., Moraxella sp., Bacillus sp., Ochrobactrum anthropi, and Providencia rettgeri. These findings are of concern, as injury from snake bite can result in wound infections and tissue necrosis leading to sepsis/necrotizing fasciitis and/or expose consumers of snake meat/medicine in the community to infections. PMID:25002979

  18. Phylogenomics and systematics in Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    Gomila, Margarita; Peña, Arantxa; Mulet, Magdalena; Lalucat, Jorge; García-Valdés, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The genus Pseudomonas currently contains 144 species, making it the genus of Gram-negative bacteria that contains the largest number of species. Currently, multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) is the preferred method for establishing the phylogeny between species and genera. Four partial gene sequences of housekeeping genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB, and rpoD) were obtained from 112 complete or draft genomes of strains related to the genus Pseudomonas that were available in databases. These genes were analyzed together with the corresponding sequences of 133 Pseudomonas type strains of validly published species to assess their correct phylogenetic assignations. We confirmed that 30% of the sequenced genomes of non-type strains were not correctly assigned at the species level in the accepted taxonomy of the genus and that 20% of the strains were not identified at the species level. Most of these strains had been isolated and classified several years ago, and their taxonomic status has not been updated by modern techniques. MLSA was also compared with indices based on the analysis of whole-genome sequences that have been proposed for species delineation, such as tetranucleotide usage patterns (TETRA), average nucleotide identity (ANIm, based on MUMmer and ANIb, based on BLAST) and genome-to-genome distance (GGDC). TETRA was useful for discriminating Pseudomonas from other genera, whereas ANIb and GGDC clearly separated strains of different species. ANIb showed the strongest correlation with MLSA. The correct species classification is a prerequisite for most diversity and evolutionary studies. This work highlights the necessity for complete genomic sequences of type strains to build a phylogenomic taxonomy and that all new genome sequences submitted to databases should be correctly assigned to species to avoid taxonomic inconsistencies. PMID:26074881

  19. Chromium reduction in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Y; Cervantes, C; Silver, S

    1990-01-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium (chromate) to less-toxic trivalent chromium was studied by using cell suspensions and cell-free supernatant fluids from Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. Chromate reductase activity was associated with soluble protein and not with the membrane fraction. The crude enzyme activity was heat labile and showed a Km of 40 microM CrO4(2-). Neither sulfate nor nitrate affected chromate reduction either in vitro or with intact cells. PMID:2389940

  20. Extreme furfural tolerance of a soil bacterium Enterobacter cloacae GGT036.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun Young; Gong, Gyeongtaek; Park, Hong-Sil; Um, Youngsoon; Sim, Sang Jun; Woo, Han Min

    2015-01-10

    Detoxification process of cellular inhibitors including furfural is essential for production of bio-based chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. Here we isolated an extreme furfural-tolerant bacterium Enterobacter cloacae GGT036 from soil sample collected in Mt. Gwanak, Republic of Korea. Among isolated bacteria, only E. cloacae GGT036 showed cell growth with 35 mM furfural under aerobic culture. Compared to the maximal half inhibitory concentration (IC50) of well-known industrial strains Escherichia coli (24.9 mM furfural) and Corynebacterium glutamicum (10 mM furfural) based on the cell density, IC50 of E. cloacae GGT036 (47.7 mM) was significantly higher after 24 h, compared to E. coli and C. glutamicum. Since bacterial cell growth was exponentially inhibited depending on linearly increased furfural concentrations in the medium, we concluded that E. cloacae GGT036 is an extreme furfural-tolerant bacterium. Recently, the complete genome sequence of E. cloacae GGT036 was announced and this could provide an insight for engineering of E. cloacae GGT036 itself or other industrially relevant bacteria.

  1. Polaribacter butkevichii sp. nov., a novel marine mesophilic bacterium of the family Flavobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Nedashkovskaya, Olga I; Kim, Seung Bum; Lysenko, Anatoly M; Kalinovskaya, Nataliya I; Mikhailov, Valery V; Kim, In Seop; Bae, Kyung Sook

    2005-12-01

    A novel heterotrophic, yellow pigmented, aerobic, Gram-negative, nonmotile, oxidase- and catalase-positive bacterium KMM 3,938(T) was isolated from sea water collected in the Sea of Japan, Russia. The strain grew at mesophilic temperature range, and required the presence of NaCl for growth. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain KMM 3,938(T) is a member of the family Flavobacteriaceae. The predominant fatty acids were C13:0 iso, C14:0 iso, C15:0 iso, C15:0, C15:1Delta6, 3OH-C15:0:3 iso, and 3OH-C15:0. The G + C content of the DNA of KMM 3938(T) was 32.4 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, genotypic, and phylogenetic characteristics, the novel bacterium was assigned to the genus Polaribacter as Polaribacter butkevichii sp. nov. The type strain is KMM 3938(T )(= KCTC 12100(T) = CCUG 48005(T)).

  2. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis IL1403

    PubMed Central

    Bolotin, Alexander; Wincker, Patrick; Mauger, Stéphane; Jaillon, Olivier; Malarme, Karine; Weissenbach, Jean; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Sorokin, Alexei

    2001-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a nonpathogenic AT-rich gram-positive bacterium closely related to the genus Streptococcus and is the most commonly used cheese starter. It is also the best-characterized lactic acid bacterium. We sequenced the genome of the laboratory strain IL1403, using a novel two-step strategy that comprises diagnostic sequencing of the entire genome and a shotgun polishing step. The genome contains 2,365,589 base pairs and encodes 2310 proteins, including 293 protein-coding genes belonging to six prophages and 43 insertion sequence (IS) elements. Nonrandom distribution of IS elements indicates that the chromosome of the sequenced strain may be a product of recent recombination between two closely related genomes. A complete set of late competence genes is present, indicating the ability of L. lactis to undergo DNA transformation. Genomic sequence revealed new possibilities for fermentation pathways and for aerobic respiration. It also indicated a horizontal transfer of genetic information from Lactococcus to gram-negative enteric bacteria of Salmonella-Escherichia group. [The sequence data described in this paper has been submitted to the GenBank data library under accession no. AE005176.] PMID:11337471

  3. Removal of arsenic from groundwater by using a native isolated arsenite-oxidizing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Kao, An-Chieh; Chu, Yu-Ju; Hsu, Fu-Lan; Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination of groundwater is a significant public health concern. In this study, the removal of arsenic from groundwater using biological processes was investigated. The efficiency of arsenite (As(III)) bacterial oxidation and subsequent arsenate (As(V)) removal from contaminated groundwater using bacterial biomass was examined. A novel As(III)-oxidizing bacterium (As7325) was isolated from the aquifer in the blackfoot disease (BFD) endemic area in Taiwan. As7325 oxidized 2300μg/l As(III) using in situ As(III)-contaminated groundwater under aerobic conditions within 1d. After the oxidation of As(III) to As(V), As(V) removal was further examined using As7325 cell pellets. The results showed that As(V) could be adsorbed efficiently by lyophilized As7325 cell pellets, the efficiency of which was related to lyophilized cell pellet concentration. Our study conducted the examination of an alternative technology for the removal of As(III) and As(V) from groundwater, indicating that the oxidation of As(III)-contaminated groundwater by native isolated bacterium, followed by As(V) removal using bacterial biomass is a potentially effective technology for the treatment of As(III)-contaminated groundwater.

  4. Formation of Aerobic Granular Sludge in Sequencing Batch Reactor: Comparison of Different Divalent Metal Ions as Cofactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lin; Gao, Dawen; Zhang, Min

    2010-11-01

    The two sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) were operated to investigate the different effect of Ca2+ and Mg2+ augmentation on aerobic granulation. R1 was augmented with Ca2+ at 40 mg/L, while Mg+ was added to R2 with 40 mg/L. Results indicated that R1 had a faster granulation process, and aerobic granulation reached the steady state after 60 cycles in R1 but 80 cycles in R2. The mean diameter of the mature granules in R1 was 1.6 mm which was consistently larger than that (0.8 mm) in R2, and aerobic granules in R1 also showed a higher physical strength. However, the mature granules in R2 had the higher production yield of polysaccharides and proteins, and aerobic granules in R2 experienced a faster substrate biodegradation. Microbial and genetic characteristics in mature granules were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) techniques. The results revealed that Mg2+ addition led to higher microbial diversity in mature granules. In addition, the uncultured bacterium (AB447697) was major specie in R1, and β-proteobacterium was dominant in R2.

  5. Volatiles released by endophytic Pseudomonas fluorescens promoting the growth and volatile oil accumulation in Atractylodes lancea.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia-Yu; Li, Xia; Zheng, Jiao-Yan; Dai, Chuan-Chao

    2016-04-01

    Atractylodes lancea is a well-known, but endangered, Chinese medicinal plant whose volatile oils are its main active components. As the volatile oil content in cultivated A. lancea is much lower than that in the wild herb, the application of microbes or related elicitors to promote growth and volatile oil accumulation in the cultivated herb is an important area of research. This study demonstrates that the endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens ALEB7B isolated from the geo-authentic A. lancea can release several nitrogenous volatiles, such as formamide and N,N-dimethyl-formamide, which significantly promote the growth of non-infected A. lancea. Moreover, the main bacterial volatile benzaldehyde significantly promotes volatile oil accumulation in non-infected A. lancea via activating plant defense responses. Notably, the bacterial nitrogenous volatiles cannot be detected in the A. lancea - Pseudomonas fluorescens symbiont while the benzaldehyde can be detected, indicating the nitrogenous volatiles or their precursors may have been consumed by the host plant. This study firstly demonstrates that the interaction between plant and endophytic bacterium is not limited to the commonly known physical contact, extending the ecological functions of endophyte in the phytosphere and deepening the understandings about the symbiotic interaction. PMID:26874622

  6. Isolation and identification of Pseudomonas syringae facilitated by a PCR targeting the whole P. syringae group.

    PubMed

    Guilbaud, Caroline; Morris, Cindy E; Barakat, Mohamed; Ortet, Philippe; Berge, Odile

    2016-01-01

    We present a reliable PCR-based method to avoid the biases related to identification based on the conventional phenotypes currently used in the identification of Pseudomonas syringae sensu lato, a ubiquitous environmental bacterium including plant pathogens. We identified a DNA target suitable for this purpose by applying a comparative genomic pipeline to Pseudomonas genomes. We designed primers and developed PCR conditions that led to a clean and strong PCR product from 97% of the 185 strains of P. syringae strains tested and gave a clear negative result for the 31 non-P. syringae strains tested. The sensitivity of standard PCR was determined with pure strains to be 10(6) bacteria mL(-1) or 0.4 ng of DNA μL(-1). Sensitivity could be improved with the touchdown method. The new PCR-assisted isolation of P. syringae was efficient when deployed on an environmental sample of river water as compared to the isolation based on phenotypes. This innovation eliminates the need for extensive expertise in isolating P. syringae colonies, was simpler, faster and very reliable. It will facilitate discovery of more diversity of P. syringae and research on emergence, dispersion and evolution to understand the varied functions of this environmental bacterium. PMID:26610434

  7. Aerobic methanotrophic communities at the Red Sea brine-seawater interface

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Rehab Z.; Adel, Mustafa; Ouf, Amged; Sayed, Ahmed; Ghazy, Mohamed A.; Alam, Intikhab; Essack, Magbubah; Lafi, Feras F.; Bajic, Vladimir B.; El-Dorry, Hamza; Siam, Rania

    2014-01-01

    The central rift of the Red Sea contains 25 brine pools with different physicochemical conditions, dictating the diversity and abundance of the microbial community. Three of these pools, the Atlantis II, Kebrit and Discovery Deeps, are uniquely characterized by a high concentration of hydrocarbons. The brine-seawater interface, described as an anoxic-oxic (brine-seawater) boundary, is characterized by a high methane concentration, thus favoring aerobic methane oxidation. The current study analyzed the aerobic free–living methane-oxidizing bacterial communities that potentially contribute to methane oxidation at the brine-seawater interfaces of the three aforementioned brine pools, using metagenomic pyrosequencing, 16S rRNA pyrotags and pmoA library constructs. The sequencing of 16S rRNA pyrotags revealed that these interfaces are characterized by high microbial community diversity. Signatures of aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria were detected in the Atlantis II Interface (ATII-I) and the Kebrit Deep Upper (KB-U) and Lower (KB-L) brine-seawater interfaces. Through phylogenetic analysis of pmoA, we further demonstrated that the ATII-I aerobic methanotroph community is highly diverse. We propose four ATII-I pmoA clusters. Most importantly, cluster 2 groups with marine methane seep methanotrophs, and cluster 4 represent a unique lineage of an uncultured bacterium with divergent alkane monooxygenases. Moreover, non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) based on the ordination of putative enzymes involved in methane metabolism showed that the Kebrit interface layers were distinct from the ATII-I and DD-I brine-seawater interfaces. PMID:25295031

  8. [Identification and denitrification characteristics of a psychrotolerant facultative basophilic aerobic denitrifier].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-Yang; Chen, Guo-Yao; Jiang, Ke; Xu, Pei-Ya

    2014-06-01

    An aerobic denitrifier was isolated from the activated sludge of landfill leachate through traditional microbiological methods. Based on its morphological feature, physiological and biochemical properties, and 16S rDNA sequence analysis, this strain was identified as Pseudomonas sp., named as GL19 with an accession number of KC710974 in GenBank. Its aerobic denitrification characteristics and nitrification function were studied to show that the factors including carbon source, C/N, pH and cultivation temperature were important for denitrification. The optimized condition for aerobic denitrification was as follows: sodium citrate as the carbon resource, C/N no less than 15, pH of 6-10, DO of 4.8-7.7 mg x L(-1), culture temperature of 15-34 degrees C and the initial nitrate nitrogen of 140 mg x L(-1). Combining these conditions, the removal rate of nitrate nitrogen and average removal rate of TN reached 100% and 96.5%, respectively, without the accumulation of nitrite nitrogen. The strain had the capability to utilize nitrite nitrogen or ammonia nitrogen to achieve high nitrogen removal efficiency: the nitrite nitrogen removal rate reached 100% in 20 hours with an initial nitrite nitrogen of 140 mg x L(-1); the ammonia nitrogen was efficiently removed from 280 mg x L(-1) to 3.11 mg x L(-1) in 28 hours with the removal rate of up to 98.9%. These results suggested that strain GL19 with the function of cold resistance and highly effective aerobic denitrification could achieve simultaneous nitrification and denitrification. Hence, GL19 could have high potential in practical wastewater treatment in winter of south area. PMID:25158516

  9. Enhanced bactericidal potency of nanoliposomes by modification of the fusion activity between liposomes and bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yufan; Wang, Zhao; Zhao, Wen; Lu, Tingli; Wang, Rutao; Mei, Qibing; Chen, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a good model of antibiotic resistance. These organisms have an outer membrane with a low level of permeability to drugs that is often combined with multidrug efflux pumps, enzymatic inactivation of the drug, or alteration of its molecular target. The acute and growing problem of antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas to conventional antibiotics made it imperative to develop new liposome formulations to overcome these mechanisms, and investigate the fusion between liposome and bacterium. Methods The rigidity, stability and charge properties of phospholipid vesicles were modified by varying the cholesterol, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), and negatively charged lipids 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol sodium salt (DMPG), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phopho-L-serine sodium salt (DMPS), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate monosodium salt (DMPA), nature phosphatidylserine sodium salt from brain and nature phosphatidylinositol sodium salt from soybean concentrations in liposomes. Liposomal fusion with intact bacteria was monitored using a lipid-mixing assay. Results It was discovered that the fluid liposomes-bacterium fusion is not dependent on liposomal size and lamellarity. A similar degree of fusion was observed for liposomes with a particle size from 100 to 800 nm. The fluidity of liposomes is an essential pre-request for liposomes fusion with bacteria. Fusion was almost completely inhibited by incorporation of cholesterol into fluid liposomes. The increase in the amount of negative charges in fluid liposomes reduces fluid liposomes-bacteria fusion when tested without calcium cations due to electric repulsion, but addition of calcium cations brings the fusion level of fluid liposomes to similar or higher levels. Among the negative phospholipids examined, DMPA gave the highest degree of fusion, DMPS and DMPG had intermediate fusion levels, and PI resulted in the lowest degree of fusion

  10. Aerobic Excercise and Research Opportunities to Benefit Impaired Children. (Project AEROBIC). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho Univ., Moscow.

    The final report summarizes accomplishments of Project AEROBIC (Aerobic Exercise and Research Opportunities to Benefit Impaired Children), which provided a physical education exercise program for severely, profoundly, and multiply handicapped children aged 10-21. Activities are outlined for the 3 year period and include modification of exercise…

  11. Pseudomonas toyotomiensis sp. nov., a psychrotolerant facultative alkaliphile that utilizes hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Kikue; Yamahira, Keiko; Nakajima, Kenji; Nodasaka, Yoshinobu; Okuyama, Hidetoshi; Yumoto, Isao

    2011-08-01

    A psychrotolerant, facultatively alkaliphilic strain, HT-3(T), was isolated from a sample of soil immersed in hot-spring water containing hydrocarbons in Toyotomi, Hokkaido, Japan. 16S rRNA gene sequence-based phylogeny suggested that strain HT-3(T) is a member of the genus Pseudomonas and belongs to the Pseudomonas oleovorans group. Cells of the isolate were Gram-negative, aerobic, straight rods, motile by a single polar flagellum. The strain grew at 4-42 °C, with optimum growth at 35 °C at pH 7, and at pH 6-10. It hydrolysed Tweens 20, 40, 60 and 80, but not casein, gelatin, starch or DNA. Its major isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone-9 (Q-9) and the DNA G+C content was 65.1 mol%. The whole-cell fatty acid profile consisted mainly of C(16 : 0), C(16 : 1)ω9c and C(18 : 1)ω9c. Phylogenetic analyses based on gyrB, rpoB and rpoD sequences revealed that the isolate could be discriminated from Pseudomonas species that exhibited more than 97 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity and phylogenetic neighbours belonging to the P. oleovorans group including the closest relative of the isolate, Pseudomonas alcaliphila. DNA-DNA hybridization with P. alcaliphila AL15-21(T) revealed 51 ± 5 % relatedness. Owing to differences in phenotypic properties and phylogenetic analyses based on multilocus gene sequence analysis and DNA-DNA relatedness data, the isolate merits classification in a novel species, for which the name Pseudomonas toyotomiensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is HT-3(T) ( = JCM 15604(T)  = NCIMB 14511(T)). PMID:20817837

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Cellulophaga sp. E6, a Marine Algal Epibiont That Produces a Quorum-Sensing Inhibitory Compound Active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Lafleur, J. E.; Costa, S. K.; Bitzer, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    The genus Cellulophaga is composed of obligate aerobic Gram-negative bacteria commonly found in association with marine algae. We report the approximately 4.42-Mbp draft genome sequence of Cellulophaga sp. E6, which inhibits N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL)–mediated quorum sensing (QS), lasB transcription, and biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:25676769

  13. Anaerobic arsenite oxidation by an autotrophic arsenite-oxidizing bacterium from an arsenic-contaminated paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Wuxian; Liu, Bingbing; He, Jian; Shen, Qirong; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2015-05-19

    Microbe-mediated arsenic (As) redox reactions play an important role in the biogeochemical cycling of As. Reduction of arsenate [As(V)] generally leads to As mobilization in paddy soils and increased As availability to rice plants, whereas oxidation of arsenite [As(III)] results in As immobilization. A novel chemoautotrophic As(III)-oxidizing bacterium, designated strain SY, was isolated from an As-contaminated paddy soil. The isolate was able to derive energy from the oxidation of As(III) to As(V) under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions using O2 or NO3(-) as the respective electron acceptor. Inoculation of the washed SY cells into a flooded soil greatly enhanced As(III) oxidation to As(V) both in the solution and adsorbed phases of the soil. Strain SY is phylogenetically closely related to Paracoccus niistensis with a 16S rRNA gene similarity of 96.79%. The isolate contains both the denitrification and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase gene clusters, underscoring its ability to denitrify and to fix CO2 while coupled to As(III) oxidation. Deletion of the aioA gene encoding the As(III) oxidase subunit A abolished the As(III) oxidation ability of strain SY and led to increased sensitivity to As(III), suggesting that As(III) oxidation is a detoxification mechanism in this bacterium under aerobic and heterotrophic growth conditions. Analysis of the aioA gene clone library revealed that the majority of the As(III)-oxidizing bacteria in the soil were closely related to the genera Paracoccus of α-Proteobacteria. Our results provide direct evidence for As(III) oxidation by Paracoccus species and suggest that these species may play an important role in As(III) oxidation in paddy soils under both aerobic and denitrifying conditions. PMID:25905768

  14. Biodegradation of toluene and xylenes under microaerophilic and denitrifying conditions by Pseudomonas maltophilia

    SciTech Connect

    Su, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    Aerobic biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons has been well studied. Under aerobic conditions, aerobes or facultative anaerobes can utilize aromatic hydrocarbons as sole carbon and energy sources by using oxygen as the cosubstrate of oxygenase enzymes for the initial attack of the aromatic ring and as the terminal electron acceptor for aerobic respiration. However, some facultative or obligate anaerobes can degrade these hydrocarbons by using alternate electron acceptors, such as nitrate, sulfate, carbon dioxide, or iron for anaerobic respiration. Among the potential alternate electron acceptors available, nitrate is the most common one used by microorganisms under oxygen-limited conditions. The first objective of this project was to explore hydrocarbon utilization under anoxic or low oxygen conditions. A microorganism that can utilize the petroleum hydrocarbons, toluene and xylene, as sole carbon and energy sources under microaerophilic (2% oxygen) and denitrifying conditions was isolated and characterized. Since oxygen may repress microbial denitrification, it was of interest to monitor the effects of low oxygen levels on aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation coupled to denitrification. We isolated a Gram-negative rod, Pseudomonas maltophilia from anaerobic sewage digester sludge. The patterns of biodegradations of toluene and two isomers of xylenes, m- and p-xylene, were very similar under either microaerophilic or anaerobic conditions. Nitrate reduction was also observed during time course experiments under aerobic conditions. The final objective was to test the feasibility of an immobilized cell reactor to treat waste streams. Therefore, a bench-scale bioreactor was built to treat a waste stream contaminated with both toluene and nitrate without aeration. The utilization of toluene and nitrate was monitored periodically in a continuous system under anaerobic conditions.

  15. The Multiple Signaling Systems Regulating Virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Nadal Jimenez, Pol; Koch, Gudrun; Thompson, Jessica A.; Xavier, Karina B.; Cool, Robbert H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Cell-to-cell communication is a major process that allows bacteria to sense and coordinately react to the fluctuating conditions of the surrounding environment. In several pathogens, this process triggers the production of virulence factors and/or a switch in bacterial lifestyle that is a major determining factor in the outcome and severity of the infection. Understanding how bacteria control these signaling systems is crucial to the development of novel antimicrobial agents capable of reducing virulence while allowing the immune system of the host to clear bacterial infection, an approach likely to reduce the selective pressures for development of resistance. We provide here an up-to-date overview of the molecular basis and physiological implications of cell-to-cell signaling systems in Gram-negative bacteria, focusing on the well-studied bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All of the known cell-to-cell signaling systems in this bacterium are described, from the most-studied systems, i.e., N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), the 4-quinolones, the global activator of antibiotic and cyanide synthesis (GAC), the cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) and cyclic AMP (cAMP) systems, and the alarmones guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) and guanosine pentaphosphate (pppGpp), to less-well-studied signaling molecules, including diketopiperazines, fatty acids (diffusible signal factor [DSF]-like factors), pyoverdine, and pyocyanin. This overview clearly illustrates that bacterial communication is far more complex than initially thought and delivers a clear distinction between signals that are quorum sensing dependent and those relying on alternative factors for their production. PMID:22390972

  16. Genomic Analysis of Melioribacter roseus, Facultatively Anaerobic Organotrophic Bacterium Representing a Novel Deep Lineage within Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi Group

    PubMed Central

    Kadnikov, Vitaly V.; Mardanov, Andrey V.; Podosokorskaya, Olga A.; Gavrilov, Sergey N.; Kublanov, Ilya V.; Beletsky, Alexey V.; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A.; Ravin, Nikolai V.

    2013-01-01

    Melioribacter roseus is a moderately thermophilic facultatively anaerobic organotrophic bacterium representing a novel deep branch within Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group. To better understand the metabolic capabilities and possible ecological functions of M. roseus and get insights into the evolutionary history of this bacterial lineage, we sequenced the genome of the type strain P3M-2T. A total of 2838 open reading frames was predicted from its 3.30 Mb genome. The whole proteome analysis supported phylum-level classification of M. roseus since most of the predicted proteins had closest matches in Bacteriodetes, Proteobacteria, Chlorobi, Firmicutes and deeply-branching bacterium Caldithrix abyssi, rather than in one particular phylum. Consistent with the ability of the bacterium to grow on complex carbohydrates, the genome analysis revealed more than one hundred glycoside hydrolases, glycoside transferases, polysaccharide lyases and carbohydrate esterases. The reconstructed central metabolism revealed pathways enabling the fermentation of complex organic substrates, as well as their complete oxidation through aerobic and anaerobic respiration. Genes encoding the photosynthetic and nitrogen-fixation machinery of green sulfur bacteria, as well as key enzymes of autotrophic carbon fixation pathways, were not identified. The M. roseus genome supports its affiliation to a novel phylum Ignavibateriae, representing the first step on the evolutionary pathway from heterotrophic ancestors of Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group towards anaerobic photoautotrophic Chlorobi. PMID:23301019

  17. [Degradation characteristics of naphthalene with a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from soil contaminated by diesel].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Chao; Wu, Bin-Bin; Li, Xiao-Sen; Lu, Dian-Nan; Liu, Yong-Min

    2015-02-01

    Abstract: A naphthalene-degrading bacterium (referred as HD-5) was isolated from the diesel-contaminated soil and was assigned to Pseudomonas aeruginosa according to 16S rDNA sequences analysis. Gene nah, which encodes naphthalene dioxygenase, was identified from strain HD-5 by PCR amplification. Different bioremediation approaches, including nature attenuation, bioaugmentation with strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa, biostimulation, and an integrated degradation by bioaugmentation and biostimulation, were evaluated for their effectiveness in the remediating soil containing 5% naphthalene. The degradation rates of naphthalene in the soil were compared among the different bioremediation approaches, the FDA and dehydrogenase activity in bioremediation process were measured, and the gene copy number of 16S rRNA and nah in soil were dynamically monitored using real-time PCR. It was shown that the naphthalene removal rate reached 71.94%, 62.22% and 83.14% in approaches of bioaugmentation (B), biostimulation(S) and integrated degradation composed of bioaugmentation and biostimulation (BS), respectively. The highest removal rate of naphthalene was achieved by using BS protocol, which also gives the highest FDA and dehydrogenase activity. The gene copy number of 16S rRNA and nah in soil increased by about 2.67 x 10(11) g(-1) and 8.67 x 10(8) g(-1) after 31 days treatment using BS protocol. Above-mentioned results also demonstrated that the screened bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, could grow well in naphthalene-contaminated soil and effectively degrade naphthalene, which is of fundamental importance for bioremediation of naphthalene-contaminated soil.

  18. The Genomic Sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5: Insights Into Biological Control.

    PubMed

    Loper, Joyce E; Kobayashi, Donald Y; Paulsen, Ian T

    2007-02-01

    ABSTRACT The complete sequence of the 7.07 Mb genome of the biological control agent Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 is now available, providing a new opportunity to advance knowledge of biological control through genomics. P. fluorescens Pf-5 is a rhizosphere bacterium that suppresses seedling emergence diseases and produces a spectrum of antibiotics toxic to plant-pathogenic fungi and oomycetes. In addition to six known secondary metabolites produced by Pf-5, three novel secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters identified in the genome could also contribute to biological control. The genomic sequence provides numerous clues as to mechanisms used by the bacterium to survive in the spermosphere and rhizosphere. These features include broad catabolic and transport capabilities for utilizing seed and root exudates, an expanded collection of efflux systems for defense against environmental stress and microbial competition, and the presence of 45 outer membrane receptors that should allow for the uptake of iron from a wide array of siderophores produced by soil microorganisms. As expected for a bacterium with a large genome that lives in a rapidly changing environment, Pf-5 has an extensive collection of regulatory genes, only some of which have been characterized for their roles in regulation of secondary metabolite production or biological control. Consistent with its commensal lifestyle, Pf-5 appears to lack a number of virulence and pathogenicity factors found in plant pathogens. PMID:18944380

  19. Biodefluorination and biotransformation of fluorotelomer alcohols by two alkane-degrading Pseudomonas strains.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung Hee; Wang, Ning; McDonald, Thomas; Chu, Kung-Hui

    2012-12-01

    Fluorotelomer alcohols [FTOHs, F(CF(2))(n) CH(2)CH(2)OH, n = 4, 6, and 8] are emerging environmental contaminants. Biotransformation of FTOHs by mixed bacterial cultures has been reported; however, little is known about the microorganisms responsible for the biotransformation. Here we reported biotransformation of FTOHs by two well-studied Pseudomonas strains: Pseudomonas butanovora (butane oxidizer) and Pseudomonas oleovorans (octane oxidizer). Both strains could defluorinate 4:2, 6:2, and 8:2 FTOHs, with a higher degree of defluorination for 4:2 FTOH. According to the identified metabolites, P. oleovorans transformed FTOHs via two pathways I and II. The pathway I led to the production of x:2 ketone [dominant metabolite, F(CF(2))(x)C(O)CH(3); x = n - 1, n = 6 or 8], x:2 sFTOH [F(CF(2))(x)CH(OH)CH(3)], and perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs, perfluorohexanoic, or perfluorooctanoic acid). The pathway II resulted in the formation of x:3 polyfluorinated acid [F(CF(2))(x) C(2)CH(2) COOH] and relatively minor shorter-chain PFCAs (perfluorobutyric or perfluorohexanoic acid). Conversely, P. butanovora transformed FTOHs by using the pathway I, leading to the production of x:2 ketone, x:2 sFTOH, and PFCAs. This is the first study to show that individual bacterium can bio-transform FTOHs via different or preferred transformation pathways to remove multiple --CF(2) -- groups from FTOHs to form shorter-chain PFCAs. PMID:22614340

  20. Heavy metals resistant plasmid-mediated utilization of solar by Pseudomonas aeruginosa AA301.

    PubMed

    Abo-Amer, Aly E; Mohamed, Rehab M

    2006-01-01

    Solar-degrading bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, were isolated from Egyptian soil by Mineral Salt Medium (MSM) supplemented with Solar (motor fuel) from different oil-contaminated sites in Sohag province. The strain AA301 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed appreciable growth in MSM medium containing high concentrations of Solar ranging from 0.5 to 3% (v/v), with optimum concentration at 1.5%. Solar was used as a sole carbon source and a source of energy by the bacterium. The ability to degrade Solar was found to be associated with a single 60-kb plasmid designated pSOL15. The plasmid-cured variant, which was obtained by culturing in LB broth with kanamycin, lost the plasmid indicative the ability to degrade Solar must depend on this plasmid. The wild type isolate, Pseudomonas aeruginosa AA301 and transformant strain, have maximum growth (OD600 = approximately 2) on Solar, however the plasmid-cured variant did not have any significant growth on Solar. Moreover, resistance to a wide range of heavy metals such as Mn2+, Hg2+, Mg2+, Cd2+, Zn2+, and Ni2+ was also 60-kb plasmid-mediated. Therefore, the strain AA301 could be good candidate for remediation of some heavy metals and oil hydrocarbons in heavily polluted sites.

  1. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by Vitexin: A combinatorial study with azithromycin and gentamicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Manash C.; Sandhu, Padmani; Gupta, Priya; Rudrapaul, Prasenjit; de, Utpal C.; Tribedi, Prosun; Akhter, Yusuf; Bhattacharjee, Surajit

    2016-03-01

    Microbial biofilm are communities of surface-adhered cells enclosed in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Extensive use of antibiotics to treat biofilm associated infections has led to the emergence of multiple drug resistant strains. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is recognised as a model biofilm forming pathogenic bacterium. Vitexin, a polyphenolic group of phytochemical with antimicrobial property, has been studied for its antibiofilm potential against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin. Vitexin shows minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) at 260 μg/ml. It’s antibiofilm activity was evaluated by safranin staining, protein extraction, microscopy methods, quantification of EPS and in vivo models using several sub-MIC doses. Various quorum sensing (QS) mediated phenomenon such as swarming motility, azocasein degrading protease activity, pyoverdin and pyocyanin production, LasA and LasB activity of the bacteria were also evaluated. Results showed marked attenuation in biofilm formation and QS mediated phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in presence of 110 μg/ml vitexin in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin separately. Molecular docking of vitexin with QS associated LuxR, LasA, LasI and motility related proteins showed high and reasonable binding affinity respectively. The study explores the antibiofilm potential of vitexin against P. aeruginosa which can be used as a new antibiofilm agent against microbial biofilm associated pathogenesis.

  2. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by Vitexin: A combinatorial study with azithromycin and gentamicin

    PubMed Central

    Das, Manash C.; Sandhu, Padmani; Gupta, Priya; Rudrapaul, Prasenjit; De, Utpal C.; Tribedi, Prosun; Akhter, Yusuf; Bhattacharjee, Surajit

    2016-01-01

    Microbial biofilm are communities of surface-adhered cells enclosed in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Extensive use of antibiotics to treat biofilm associated infections has led to the emergence of multiple drug resistant strains. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is recognised as a model biofilm forming pathogenic bacterium. Vitexin, a polyphenolic group of phytochemical with antimicrobial property, has been studied for its antibiofilm potential against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin. Vitexin shows minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) at 260 μg/ml. It’s antibiofilm activity was evaluated by safranin staining, protein extraction, microscopy methods, quantification of EPS and in vivo models using several sub-MIC doses. Various quorum sensing (QS) mediated phenomenon such as swarming motility, azocasein degrading protease activity, pyoverdin and pyocyanin production, LasA and LasB activity of the bacteria were also evaluated. Results showed marked attenuation in biofilm formation and QS mediated phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in presence of 110 μg/ml vitexin in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin separately. Molecular docking of vitexin with QS associated LuxR, LasA, LasI and motility related proteins showed high and reasonable binding affinity respectively. The study explores the antibiofilm potential of vitexin against P. aeruginosa which can be used as a new antibiofilm agent against microbial biofilm associated pathogenesis. PMID:27000525

  3. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by Vitexin: A combinatorial study with azithromycin and gentamicin.

    PubMed

    Das, Manash C; Sandhu, Padmani; Gupta, Priya; Rudrapaul, Prasenjit; De, Utpal C; Tribedi, Prosun; Akhter, Yusuf; Bhattacharjee, Surajit

    2016-01-01

    Microbial biofilm are communities of surface-adhered cells enclosed in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Extensive use of antibiotics to treat biofilm associated infections has led to the emergence of multiple drug resistant strains. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is recognised as a model biofilm forming pathogenic bacterium. Vitexin, a polyphenolic group of phytochemical with antimicrobial property, has been studied for its antibiofilm potential against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin. Vitexin shows minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) at 260 μg/ml. It's antibiofilm activity was evaluated by safranin staining, protein extraction, microscopy methods, quantification of EPS and in vivo models using several sub-MIC doses. Various quorum sensing (QS) mediated phenomenon such as swarming motility, azocasein degrading protease activity, pyoverdin and pyocyanin production, LasA and LasB activity of the bacteria were also evaluated. Results showed marked attenuation in biofilm formation and QS mediated phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in presence of 110 μg/ml vitexin in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin separately. Molecular docking of vitexin with QS associated LuxR, LasA, LasI and motility related proteins showed high and reasonable binding affinity respectively. The study explores the antibiofilm potential of vitexin against P. aeruginosa which can be used as a new antibiofilm agent against microbial biofilm associated pathogenesis. PMID:27000525

  4. Controlling the catalytic aerobic oxidation of phenols.

    PubMed

    Esguerra, Kenneth Virgel N; Fall, Yacoub; Petitjean, Laurène; Lumb, Jean-Philip

    2014-05-28

    The oxidation of phenols is the subject of extensive investigation, but there are few catalytic aerobic examples that are chemo- and regioselective. Here we describe conditions for the ortho-oxygenation or oxidative coupling of phenols under copper (Cu)-catalyzed aerobic conditions that give rise to ortho-quinones, biphenols or benzoxepines. We demonstrate that each product class can be accessed selectively by the appropriate choice of Cu(I) salt, amine ligand, desiccant and reaction temperature. In addition, we evaluate the effects of substituents on the phenol and demonstrate their influence on selectivity between ortho-oxygenation and oxidative coupling pathways. These results create an important precedent of catalyst control in the catalytic aerobic oxidation of phenols and set the stage for future development of catalytic systems and mechanistic investigations. PMID:24784319

  5. Drying and recovery of aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianjun; Zhang, Quanguo; Chen, Yu-You; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-10-01

    To dehydrate aerobic granules to bone-dry form was proposed as a promising option for long-term storage of aerobic granules. This study cultivated aerobic granules with high proteins/polysaccharide ratio and then dried these granules using seven protocols: drying at 37°C, 60°C, 4°C, under sunlight, in dark, in a flowing air stream or in concentrated acetone solutions. All dried granules experienced volume shrinkage of over 80% without major structural breakdown. After three recovery batches, although with loss of part of the volatile suspended solids, all dried granules were restored most of their original size and organic matter degradation capabilities. The strains that can survive over the drying and storage periods were also identified. Once the granules were dried, they can be stored over long period of time, with minimal impact yielded by the applied drying protocols. PMID:27392096

  6. Pseudomonas blight discovered on raspberry in Watsonville

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the winter (February) of 2013, a field of raspberries in Watsonville was discovered to be infected with Pseudomonas syringae, the causal agent of Pseudomonas blight disease. This was the first documentation of this disease on raspberry in our region. The infection of raspberry plants is manifeste...

  7. Detection of Salmonella bacterium in drinking water using microring resonator.

    PubMed

    Bahadoran, Mahdi; Noorden, Ahmad Fakhrurrazi Ahmad; Mohajer, Faeze Sadat; Abd Mubin, Mohamad Helmi; Chaudhary, Kashif; Jalil, Muhammad Arif; Ali, Jalil; Yupapin, Preecha

    2016-01-01

    A new microring resonator system is proposed for the detection of the Salmonella bacterium in drinking water, which is made up of SiO2-TiO2 waveguide embedded inside thin film layer of the flagellin. The change in refractive index due to the binding of the Salmonella bacterium with flagellin layer causes a shift in the output signal wavelength and the variation in through and drop port's intensities, which leads to the detection of Salmonella bacterium in drinking water. The sensitivity of proposed sensor for detecting of Salmonella bacterium in water solution is 149 nm/RIU and the limit of detection is 7 × 10(-4)RIU.

  8. Bromoalkane-degrading Pseudomonas strains

    SciTech Connect

    Shochat, E.; Hermoni, I.; Cohen, Z.; Abeliovich, A.; Belkin, S. )

    1993-05-01

    Many of the xenobiotic compounds extensively used in agriculture and industry, particularly the chlorinated halogenated compounds, have been extensively studied. Brominated organics, also used worldwide in, for example, flame retardants, pesticides, industrial biocides, intermediates in the polymer industry, have received far less attention. Investigations into the biodegradative pathways of aliphatic bromides in particular is very limited. This paper reports the isolation and preliminary characterization of two Pseudomonas strains capable of utilizing a broad range of bromoalkanes as single carbon and energy sources, and describes the emulsification and dehalogenation of hydrophobic bromoakanes by these strains. 37 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Pseudomonas--an opportunistic foe.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    An honest account of some of the lessons learned in how to protect patients, staff, and visitors, against waterborne Pseudomonas aeruginosa by effectively monitoring a large healthcare facility's water supply, identifying potential 'trigger points', harnessing the expertise of a multidisciplinary team, encouraging all staff to 'go the extra mile' preventatively, and above all, 'going beyond compliance', was provided by George McCracken, head of Estates Risk and Environment at the Belfast Health and Social Care Trust--in whose Royal Jubilee Maternity Hospital three young babies died after an outbreak of the bacteraemia in early 2012--at a recent Water Management Society conference. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, reports. PMID:24516937

  10. Ferrofluid effect on Pseudomonas pyoverdine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poiata, Antoniea; Vlahovici, Al.; Creanga, Dorina-Emilia

    2005-03-01

    The magnetic fluid effect on some pigmented pathogen germs has been investigated. The fluorescence of the pyoverdine pigment obtained from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain, cultivated in the presence of different magnetic fluid concentrations, was enhanced by magnetic fluid concentrations of 0.0015-1 ml/l. The antimicrobial activity of pyoverdine, when tested by means of agar diffusimetric method against Sarcina lutea, was found increased for relatively high concentrations of magnetic fluid; in the case of Staphylococcus aureus the pyoverdine antimicrobial activity was not dependent on the magnetic fluid concentration.

  11. Biofuel components change the ecology of bacterial volatile petroleum hydrocarbon degradation in aerobic sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Elazhari-Ali, Abdulmagid; Singh, Arvind K; Davenport, Russell J; Head, Ian M; Werner, David

    2013-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the biodegradation of volatile petroleum hydrocarbons (VPHs) in aerobic sandy soil is affected by the blending with 10 percent ethanol (E10) or 20 percent biodiesel (B20). When inorganic nutrients were scarce, competition between biofuel and VPH degraders temporarily slowed monoaromatic hydrocarbon degradation. Ethanol had a bigger impact than biodiesel, reflecting the relative ease of ethanol compared to methyl ester biodegradation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of bacterial 16S rRNA genes revealed that each fuel mixture selected for a distinct bacterial community, each dominated by Pseudomonas spp. Despite lasting impacts on soil bacterial ecology, the overall effects on VHP biodegradation were minor, and average biomass yields were comparable between fuel types, ranging from 0.40 ± 0.16 to 0.51 ± 0.22 g of biomass carbon per gram of fuel carbon degraded. Inorganic nutrient availability had a greater impact on petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation than fuel composition. PMID:23202642

  12. Biofuel components change the ecology of bacterial volatile petroleum hydrocarbon degradation in aerobic sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Elazhari-Ali, Abdulmagid; Singh, Arvind K; Davenport, Russell J; Head, Ian M; Werner, David

    2013-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the biodegradation of volatile petroleum hydrocarbons (VPHs) in aerobic sandy soil is affected by the blending with 10 percent ethanol (E10) or 20 percent biodiesel (B20). When inorganic nutrients were scarce, competition between biofuel and VPH degraders temporarily slowed monoaromatic hydrocarbon degradation. Ethanol had a bigger impact than biodiesel, reflecting the relative ease of ethanol compared to methyl ester biodegradation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of bacterial 16S rRNA genes revealed that each fuel mixture selected for a distinct bacterial community, each dominated by Pseudomonas spp. Despite lasting impacts on soil bacterial ecology, the overall effects on VHP biodegradation were minor, and average biomass yields were comparable between fuel types, ranging from 0.40 ± 0.16 to 0.51 ± 0.22 g of biomass carbon per gram of fuel carbon degraded. Inorganic nutrient availability had a greater impact on petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation than fuel composition.

  13. Aerobic digestion of tannery wastewater in a sequential batch reactor by salt-tolerant bacterial strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durai, G.; Rajasimman, M.; Rajamohan, N.

    2011-09-01

    Among the industries generating hyper saline effluents, tanneries are prominent in India. Hyper saline wastewater is difficult to treat by conventional biological treatment methods. Salt-tolerant microbes can adapt to these conditions and degrade the organics in hyper saline wastewater. In this study, the performance of a bench scale aerobic sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was investigated to treat the tannery wastewater by the salt-tolerant bacterial strains namely Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus flexus, Exiguobacterium homiense and Styphylococcus aureus. The study was carried out under different operating conditions by changing the hydraulic retention time, organic loading rate and initial substrate concentration. From the results it was found that a maximum COD reduction of 90.4% and colour removal of 78.6% was attained. From this study it was found that the salt-tolerant microorganisms could improve the reduction efficiency of COD and colour of the tannery wastewater.

  14. Model based evaluation of a contaminant plume development under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in 2D bench-scale tank experiments.

    PubMed

    Ballarini, E; Beyer, C; Bauer, R D; Griebler, C; Bauer, S

    2014-06-01

    The influence of transverse mixing on competitive aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation of a hydrocarbon plume was investigated using a two-dimensional, bench-scale flow-through laboratory tank experiment. In the first part of the experiment aerobic degradation of increasing toluene concentrations was carried out by the aerobic strain Pseudomonas putida F1. Successively, ethylbenzene (injected as a mixture of unlabeled and fully deuterium-labeled isotopologues) substituted toluene; nitrate was added as additional electron acceptor and the anaerobic denitrifying strain Aromatoleum aromaticum EbN1 was inoculated to study competitive degradation under aerobic /anaerobic conditions. The spatial distribution of anaerobic degradation was resolved by measurements of compound-specific stable isotope fractionation induced by the anaerobic strain as well as compound concentrations. A fully transient numerical reactive transport model was employed and calibrated using measurements of electron donors, acceptors and isotope fractionation. The aerobic phases of the experiment were successfully reproduced using a double Monod kinetic growth model and assuming an initial homogeneous distribution of P. putida F1. Investigation of the competitive degradation phase shows that the observed isotopic pattern cannot be explained by transverse mixing driven biodegradation only, but also depends on the inoculation process of the anaerobic strain. Transient concentrations of electron acceptors and donors are well reproduced by the model, showing its ability to simulate transient competitive biodegradation. PMID:24122285

  15. FTIR Spectroscopic Study of Mn(II) Oxidizing Pseudomonas putida GB1 Biofilms on ZnSe, Ge, and CdTe Crystal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, S. J.; Gilbert, H. L.; Conklin, M. H.; Chorover, J.

    2003-12-01

    Pseudomonas putida strain GB1 is an aerobic, gram-negative bacterium capable of gaining energy from the biological oxidation of Mn(II). The increased kinetics of Mn(II) oxidation resulting from this microbial catalysis is known to contribute to the formation of Mn(IV) oxides in natural waters. Environmental conditions, including aqueous and surface chemistry, greatly affect the macromolecular composition and surface adhesion behavior of bacteria. For example, the chemistry of GB1 biofilms forming on crystal surfaces is expected to vary with Mn(II) concentration in solution. We used Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to probe the formation of GB1 biofilms on the surfaces of negatively-charged IR transparent ZnSe, Ge, and CdTe crystal windows. Bacterial adhesion experiments were carried out both in the presence and absence of Mn(II)(aq) with FTIR windows suspended in a bioreactor comprising GB1 cells in a mineral growth medium at pH 7.6 and 30° C. After 85 h, windows were removed from the reactor and IR spectra were collected. Oxidation of Mn(II) was confirmed via leucoberbelin blue (LBB) indicator and the appearance of Mn-O stretches in biofilm IR spectra. Transmission FTIR spectra do not reveal detectable effects of crystal type on biofilm composition, but do indicate changes in chemistry resulting from introduction of Mn(II). In the presence of Mn(II), spectra of biofilms show higher relative intensity in the carbohydrate region (specifically 1160, 1052 cm-1). A down frequency shift in the P=O absorbance was also observed (1240 to 1222 cm-1). These results indicate a modification of bacterial cell/biofilm composition resulting during biological oxidation of Mn(II). The CdTe transmission window permits measurements to low wavenumbers (<600 cm-1) and a peak at 588 cm-1 was observed when bacteria were surface-adhered in the presence of Mn(II). This peak, which has been attributed to Mn-O stretching vibrations, may provide an index of Mn oxide crystal

  16. Bioactivities by a crude extract from the Greenlandic Pseudomonas sp. In5 involves the nonribosomal peptides, nunamycin and nunapeptin

    PubMed Central

    Venditto, Vincent J.; Hennessy, Rosanna C.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Bioactive microbial metabolites provide a successful source of novel compounds with pharmaceutical potentials. The bacterium Pseudomonas sp. In5 is a biocontrol strain isolated from a plant disease suppressive soil in Greenland, which produces two antimicrobial nonribosomal peptides (NRPs), nunapeptin and nunamycin. Methods. In this study, we used in vitro antimicrobial and anticancer bioassays to evaluate the potential bioactivities of both a crude extract derived from Pseudomonas sp. In5 and NRPs purified from the crude extract. Results. We verified that the crude extract derived from Pseudomonas sp. In5 showed suppressive activity against the basidiomycete Rhizoctonia solani by inducing a mitochondrial stress-response. Furthermore, we confirmed suppressive activity against the oomycete Pythium aphanidermatum by the Pseudomonas sp. In5 crude extract, and that the purified nunamycin and nunapeptin displayed distinct antimicrobial activities. In addition to the antimicrobial activity, we found that treatment of the cancer cell lines, Jurkat T-cells, Granta cells, and melanoma cells, with the Pseudomonas sp. In5 crude extract increased staining with the apoptotic marker Annexin V while no staining of healthy normal cells, i.e., naïve or activated CD4 T-cells, was observed. Treatment with either of the NRPs alone did not increase Annexin V staining of the Jurkat T-cells, despite individually showing robust antimicrobial activity, whereas an anticancer activity was detected when nunamycin and nunapeptin were used in combination. Discussion. Our results suggest that the bioactivity of a crude extract derived from Pseudomonas sp. In5 involves the presence of both nunamycin and nunapeptin and highlight the possibility of synergy between multiple microbial metabolites. PMID:26734508

  17. Biodegradation of nicotine by a newly isolated Pseudomonas stutzeri JZD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petricevic, Jelena; Gujanicic, Vera; Radic, Danka; Jovicic Petrovic, Jelena; Jovic, Jelena; Raicevic, Vera

    2013-04-01

    The tobacco-manufacturing process and all activities that use tobacco, produce solid or liquid wastes with high concentrations of nicotine. Nicotine is a significant toxic waste product in tobacco industry. This waste is classified as 'toxic and hazardous' by European Union regulations when the nicotine content exceeds 500 milligrams per kilogram dry weight. Therefore, there is a major environmental requirement to remove nicotine from tobacco wastes. Bioremediation techniques which involve nicotine degradation by microorganisms have attracted attention during the last years, because microorganisms have the potential to reduce nicotine levels in tobacco and to detoxify tobacco wastes. The aim of this study is isolation and identification of nicotine degraded bacteria and optimization of nicotine degradation in laboratory conditions. An aerobic bacterial strain capable of effectively degrading nicotine was isolated from the tobacco industry waste, Serbia. After isolation, the liquid culture was spread onto the solid plates of the nicotine inorganic salt medium using the dilution plate method. Cell morphology of strain was observed by a light microscope and physiological characteristics were determined by Api technique and sequence analyzes of 16S rDNA. This isolate was identified as Pseudomonas stutzeri based on morphology, physiological characteristics, and Apiweb technique. Comparison with sequences available in data library showed the 99% similarity with 16S rDNA gene sequence of the species Pseudomonas stutzeri ( GenBank Acc. No. CP003725). We analyzed the effect of initial nicotine concentration (1g/L, 1.5 g/L, 2.5 g/L) on microbial activity in aim to optimize biodegradation. The effect of cultivation temperature (25°C; 30°C; 37°C) on nicotine degradation by P. stutzeri was evaluated after 24 h of cultivation, with 1.5 g/L nicotine added as the sole carbon source. Effect of biodegradation has depended on initial concentration. During incubation, number of

  18. 5,7-Diamino-5,7,9-trideoxynon-2-ulosonic acid: a novel sugar from a phytopathogenic Pseudomonas lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Maria Michela; Evidente, Antonio; Lanzetta, Rosa; Lavermicocca, Paola; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Ummarino, Salvatore

    2002-05-13

    Preliminary results on the structure of a novel sugar from a lipopolysaccharide from Pseudomonas corrugata, a plant pathogenic bacterium whose several aspects of phytopathogenic mechanism are under investigation, are described. This is a 5,7-diamino-5,7,9-trideoxynon-2-ulosonic acid, isolated as an O-glycoside from the Smith degradation of the O-chain. The structure was obtained both with NMR and MS methodologies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of 3-hydroxylated non-2-ulosonic acid.

  19. Risk assessment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in water.

    PubMed

    Mena, Kristina D; Gerba, Charles P

    2009-01-01

    P. aeruginosa is part of a large group of free-living bacteria that are ubiquitous in the environment. This organism is often found in natural waters such as lakes and rivers in concentrations of 10/100 mL to >1,000/100 mL. However, it is not often found in drinking water. Usually it is found in 2% of samples, or less, and at concentrations up to 2,300 mL(-1) (Allen and Geldreich 1975) or more often at 3-4 CFU/mL. Its occurrence in drinking water is probably related more to its ability to colonize biofilms in plumbing fixtures (i.e., faucets, showerheads, etc.) than its presence in the distribution system or treated drinking water. P. aeruginosa can survive in deionized or distilled water (van der Jooij et al. 1982; Warburton et al. 1994). Hence, it may be found in low nutrient or oligotrophic environments, as well as in high nutrient environments such as in sewage and in the human body. P. aeruginosa can cause a wide range of infections, and is a leading cause of illness in immunocompromised individuals. In particular, it can be a serious pathogen in hospitals (Dembry et al. 1998). It can cause endocarditis, osteomyelitis, pneumonia, urinary tract infections, gastrointestinal infections, and meningitis, and is a leading cause of septicemia. P. aeruginosa is also a major cause of folliculitis and ear infections acquired by exposure to recreational waters containing the bacterium. In addition, it has been recognized as a serious cause of keratitis, especially in patients wearing contact lenses. P. aeruginosa is also a major pathogen in burn and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and causes a high mortality rate in both populations (MOlina et al. 1991; Pollack 1995). P. aeruginosa is frequently found in whirlpools and hot tubs, sometimes in 94-100% of those tested at concenrations of <1 to 2,400 CFU/mL. The high concentrations found probably result from the relatively high temperatures of whirlpools, which favor the growth of P. aeruginosa, and the aeration which also

  20. ANAEROBIC AND AEROBIC TREATMENT OF CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biological degradation of 12 chlorinated aliphatic compounds (CACs) was assessed in bench-top reactors and in serum bottle tests. Three continuously mixed daily batch-fed reactor systems were evaluated: anaerobic, aerobic, and sequential-anaerobic-aerobic (sequential). Glucose,...

  1. Degradation of 3-phenoxybenzoic acid in soil by Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes POB310(pPOB) and two modified Pseudomonas strains

    SciTech Connect

    Halden, R.U.; Tepp, S.M.; Halden, B.G.; Dwyer, D.F.

    1999-08-01

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes POB310(pPOB) and Pseudomonas sp. strains B13-D5(pD30.9) and B13-ST1 (pPOB) were introduced into soil microcosms containing 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-POB) in order to evaluate and compare bacterial survival, degradation of 3-POB, and transfer of plasmids to a recipient bacterium. Strain POB310 was isolated for its ability to use 3-POB as a growth substrate; degradation is initiated by POB-dioxygenase, an enzyme encoded on pPOB. Strain B13-D5 contains pD30.9, a cloning vector harboring the genes encoding POB-dioxygenase; strain B13-ST1 contains pPOB. Degradation of 3-POB in soil by strain POB310 was incomplete, and bacterial densities decreased even under the most favorable conditions. Strains B13-D5 and B13-ST1 degraded 3-POB to concentrations of < 50 ppb with concomitant increases in density from 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 8} CFU/g of soil. Thus, in contrast to strain POB310, the modified strains had the following two features that are important for in situ bioremediation: survival in soil and growth concurrent with removal of an environmental contaminant. Strains B13-D5 and B13-ST1 also completely degraded 3-POB when the inoculum was only 30 CFU/g of soil. This suggests that in situ bioremediation may be effected, in some cases, with low densities of introduced bacterial. In pure culture, transfer of pPOB from strains POB310 and B13-ST1 to Pseudomonas sp. strain B13 occurred at frequencies of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} and 10{sup {minus}1} transconjugant per donor, respectively. Transfer of pPOB from strain B13-ST1 to strain B13 was observed in autoclaved soil but not in nonautoclaved soil; formation of transconjugant bacteria was more rapid in soil containing clay and organic matter than in sandy soil. Transfer of pPOB from strain POB310 to strain B13 in soil was never observed.

  2. Degradation of 3-Phenoxybenzoic Acid in Soil by Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes POB310(pPOB) and Two Modified Pseudomonas Strains

    PubMed Central

    Halden, Rolf U.; Tepp, Sandra M.; Halden, Barbara G.; Dwyer, Daryl F.

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes POB310(pPOB) and Pseudomonas sp. strains B13-D5(pD30.9) and B13-ST1(pPOB) were introduced into soil microcosms containing 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-POB) in order to evaluate and compare bacterial survival, degradation of 3-POB, and transfer of plasmids to a recipient bacterium. Strain POB310 was isolated for its ability to use 3-POB as a growth substrate; degradation is initiated by POB-dioxygenase, an enzyme encoded on pPOB. Strain B13-D5 contains pD30.9, a cloning vector harboring the genes encoding POB-dioxygenase; strain B13-ST1 contains pPOB. Degradation of 3-POB in soil by strain POB310 was incomplete, and bacterial densities decreased even under the most favorable conditions (100 ppm of 3-POB, supplementation with P and N, and soil water-holding capacity of 90%). Strains B13-D5 and B13-ST1 degraded 3-POB (10 to 100 ppm) to concentrations of <50 ppb with concomitant increases in density from 106 to 108 CFU/g (dry weight) of soil. Thus, in contrast to strain POB310, the modified strains had the following two features that are important for in situ bioremediation: survival in soil and growth concurrent with removal of an environmental contaminant. Strains B13-D5 and B13-ST1 also completely degraded 3-POB when the inoculum was only 30 CFU/g (dry weight) of soil. This suggests that in situ bioremediation may be effected, in some cases, with low densities of introduced bacteria. In pure culture, transfer of pPOB from strains POB310 and B13-ST1 to Pseudomonas sp. strain B13 occurred at frequencies of 5 × 10−7 and 10−1 transconjugant per donor, respectively. Transfer of pPOB from strain B13-ST1 to strain B13 was observed in autoclaved soil but not in nonautoclaved soil; formation of transconjugant bacteria was more rapid in soil containing clay and organic matter than in sandy soil. Transfer of pPOB from strain POB310 to strain B13 in soil was never observed. PMID:10427019

  3. Bioaugmentation of aerobic sludge granules with a plasmid donor strain for enhanced degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Quan, Xiang-chun; Tang, Hua; Xiong, Wei-cong; Yang, Zhi-feng

    2010-07-15

    Aerobic sludge granules pre-grown on glucose were bioaugmented with a plasmid pJP4 carrying strain Pseudomonas putida SM1443 in a fed-batch microcosm system and a lab-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) to enhance their degradation capacity to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). The fed-batch test results showed that the bioaugmented aerobic granule system gained 2,4-D degradation ability faster and maintained a more stable microbial community than the control in the presence of 2,4-D. 2,4-D at the initial concentration of about 160 mg/L was nearly completely removed by the bioaugmented granule system within 62 h, while the control system only removed 26% within 66 h. In the bioaugmented SBR which had been operated for 90 days, the seeded aerobic granules pre-grown on glucose successfully turned into 2,4-D degrading granules through bioaugmentation and stepwise increase of 2,4-D concentration from 8 to 385 mg/L. The granules showed a compact structure and good settling ability with the mean diameter of about 450 microm. The degradation kinetics of 2,4-D by the aerobic granules can be described with the Haldane kinetics model with V(max)=31.1 mg 2,4-D/gVSS h, K(i)=597.9 mg/L and K(s)=257.3 mg/L, respectively. This study shows that plasmid mediated bioaugmentation is a feasible strategy to cultivate aerobic granules degrading recalcitrant pollutants.

  4. Monitoring of growth and physiological activities of biofilm during succession on polystyrene from activated sludge under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Naz, Iffat; Batool, Syeda Ain-ul; Ali, Naeem; Khatoon, Nazia; Atiq, Niama; Hameed, Abdul; Ahmed, Safia

    2013-08-01

    The present research work monitored the successive biofilm development and its catabolic role in the degradation of polystyrene (PS). PS material was artificially colonized with biofilm by incubating it with activated sludge under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Biofilm formation was monitored by gravimetric weight analysis, spectrophotometric absorbance technique, heterotrophic plate count, and scanning electron microscopy under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The wet weight (1.59 and 1.17 g) and dry weight (0.41 and 0.08 g) of a biofilm showed a significant constant increase under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively, from first till 9 weeks of incubation. Plate count of the selected bacteria (Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Shigella dysenteriae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) considerably declined (90-99 %) in the biofilm after seventh and fifth weeks of incubation under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively, indicating a positive shift from pathogenic to beneficial microbial community. While most probable number index of fecal coliforms and E. coli in the sludge showed more reduction (98 and 99 %) under aerobic as compare to anaerobic conditions (86 and 91 %) after 9 weeks of biofilm formation on PS cubes. Correspondingly, the decreasing levels of chemical oxygen demand and biochemical oxygen demand (up to 73 %) showed signs of sludge digestion. Scanning electron microscope coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope revealed nature of PS media containing high carbon content. However, biofilm development proved to be involved in the biochemical transformation of the PS medium as indicated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  5. Regulation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa chemotaxis by the nitrogen source.

    PubMed Central

    Craven, R; Montie, T C

    1985-01-01

    The regulation of amino acid chemotaxis by nitrogen was investigated in the gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The quantitative capillary tube technique was used to measure chemotactic responses of bacteria to spatial gradients of amino acids and other attractants. Chemotaxis toward serine, arginine, and alpha-aminoisobutyrate was sharply dependent on the form in which nitrogen was presented to the bacteria. Bacteria grown on mineral salts-succinate with potassium nitrate gave responses to amino acids that were 2 to 3 times those of cells grown on ammonium sulfate and 10 to 20 times those of cells grown in mineral salts-succinate with Casamino Acids as the nitrogen source. A combination of ammonium sulfate and glutamate was as effective as Casamino Acids in depressing serine taxis. The threshold concentration for alpha-aminoisobutyrate taxis was consistently lower in nitrate-grown bacteria than in ammonia-grown bacteria. Responsiveness to sodium succinate, however, was not subject to regulation by nitrogen, and glucose chemotaxis was inhibited, rather than enhanced, in nitrate-grown bacteria. These results indicate that chemotaxis of P. aeruginosa toward amino acids is subject to regulation by nitrogen and that this regulation probably is expressed at the level of the chemoreceptors or transducers. PMID:3932326

  6. Identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phenazines that Kill Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Cezairliyan, Brent; Vinayavekhin, Nawaporn; Grenfell-Lee, Daniel; Yuen, Grace J.; Saghatelian, Alan; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic microbes employ a variety of methods to overcome host defenses, including the production and dispersal of molecules that are toxic to their hosts. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium, is a pathogen of a diverse variety of hosts including mammals and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study, we identify three small molecules in the phenazine class that are produced by P. aeruginosa strain PA14 that are toxic to C. elegans. We demonstrate that 1-hydroxyphenazine, phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, and pyocyanin are capable of killing nematodes in a matter of hours. 1-hydroxyphenazine is toxic over a wide pH range, whereas the toxicities of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and pyocyanin are pH-dependent at non-overlapping pH ranges. We found that acidification of the growth medium by PA14 activates the toxicity of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, which is the primary toxic agent towards C. elegans in our assay. Pyocyanin is not toxic under acidic conditions and 1-hydroxyphenazine is produced at concentrations too low to kill C. elegans. These results suggest a role for phenazine-1-carboxylic acid in mammalian pathogenesis because PA14 mutants deficient in phenazine production have been shown to be defective in pathogenesis in mice. More generally, these data demonstrate how diversity within a class of metabolites could affect bacterial toxicity in different environmental niches. PMID:23300454

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Kills Caenorhabditis elegans by Cyanide Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Larry A.; Manoil, Colin

    2001-01-01

    In this report we describe experiments to investigate a simple virulence model in which Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 rapidly paralyzes and kills the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Our results imply that hydrogen cyanide is the sole or primary toxic factor produced by P. aeruginosa that is responsible for killing of the nematode. Four lines of evidence support this conclusion. First, a transposon insertion mutation in a gene encoding a subunit of hydrogen cyanide synthase (hcnC) eliminated nematode killing. Second, the 17 avirulent mutants examined all exhibited reduced cyanide synthesis, and the residual production levels correlated with killing efficiency. Third, exposure to exogenous cyanide alone at levels comparable to the level produced by PAO1 killed nematodes with kinetics similar to those observed with bacteria. The killing was not enhanced if hcnC mutant bacteria were present during cyanide exposure. And fourth, a nematode mutant (egl-9) resistant to P. aeruginosa was also resistant to killing by exogenous cyanide in the absence of bacteria. A model for nematode killing based on inhibition of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase is presented. The action of cyanide helps account for the unusually broad host range of virulence of P. aeruginosa and may contribute to the pathogenesis in opportunistic human infections due to the bacterium. PMID:11591663

  8. A dynamic and intricate regulatory network determines Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Deepak; Schneper, Lisa; Kumari, Hansi; Mathee, Kalai

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically versatile bacterium that is found in a wide range of biotic and abiotic habitats. It is a major human opportunistic pathogen causing numerous acute and chronic infections. The critical traits contributing to the pathogenic potential of P. aeruginosa are the production of a myriad of virulence factors, formation of biofilms and antibiotic resistance. Expression of these traits is under stringent regulation, and it responds to largely unidentified environmental signals. This review is focused on providing a global picture of virulence gene regulation in P. aeruginosa. In addition to key regulatory pathways that control the transition from acute to chronic infection phenotypes, some regulators have been identified that modulate multiple virulence mechanisms. Despite of a propensity for chaotic behaviour, no chaotic motifs were readily observed in the P. aeruginosa virulence regulatory network. Having a ‘birds-eye’ view of the regulatory cascades provides the forum opportunities to pose questions, formulate hypotheses and evaluate theories in elucidating P. aeruginosa pathogenesis. Understanding the mechanisms involved in making P. aeruginosa a successful pathogen is essential in helping devise control strategies. PMID:23143271

  9. Fructooligosacharides reduce Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 pathogenicity through distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ortega-González, Mercedes; Sánchez de Medina, Fermín; Molina-Santiago, Carlos; López-Posadas, Rocío; Pacheco, Daniel; Krell, Tino; Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Abdelali, Daddaoua

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is ubiquitously present in the environment and acts as an opportunistic pathogen on humans, animals and plants. We report here the effects of the prebiotic polysaccharide inulin and its hydrolysed form FOS on this bacterium. FOS was found to inhibit bacterial growth of strain PAO1, while inulin did not affect growth rate or yield in a significant manner. Inulin stimulated biofilm formation, whereas a dramatic reduction of the biofilm formation was observed in the presence of FOS. Similar opposing effects were observed for bacterial motility, where FOS inhibited the swarming and twitching behaviour whereas inulin caused its stimulation. In co-cultures with eukaryotic cells (macrophages) FOS and, to a lesser extent, inulin reduced the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α. Western blot experiments indicated that the effects mediated by FOS in macrophages are associated with a decreased activation of the NF-κB pathway. Since FOS and inulin stimulate pathway activation in the absence of bacteria, the FOS mediated effect is likely to be of indirect nature, such as via a reduction of bacterial virulence. Further, this modulatory effect is observed also with the highly virulent ptxS mutated strain. Co-culture experiments of P. aeruginosa with IEC18 eukaryotic cells showed that FOS reduces the concentration of the major virulence factor, exotoxin A, suggesting that this is a possible mechanism for the reduction of pathogenicity. The potential of these compounds as components of antibacterial and anti-inflammatory cocktails is discussed.

  10. A Network Biology Approach to Denitrification in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Arat, Seda; Bullerjahn, George S.; Laubenbacher, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically flexible member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Under anaerobic conditions and the presence of nitrate, P. aeruginosa can perform (complete) denitrification, a respiratory process of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrogen gas via nitrite (NO2), nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O). This study focuses on understanding the influence of environmental conditions on bacterial denitrification performance, using a mathematical model of a metabolic network in P. aeruginosa. To our knowledge, this is the first mathematical model of denitrification for this bacterium. Analysis of the long-term behavior of the network under changing concentration levels of oxygen (O2), nitrate (NO3), and phosphate (PO4) suggests that PO4 concentration strongly affects denitrification performance. The model provides three predictions on denitrification activity of P. aeruginosa under various environmental conditions, and these predictions are either experimentally validated or supported by pertinent biological literature. One motivation for this study is to capture the effect of PO4 on a denitrification metabolic network of P. aeruginosa in order to shed light on mechanisms for greenhouse gas N2O accumulation during seasonal oxygen depletion in aquatic environments such as Lake Erie (Laurentian Great Lakes, USA). Simulating the microbial production of greenhouse gases in anaerobic aquatic systems such as Lake Erie allows a deeper understanding of the contributing environmental effects that will inform studies on, and remediation strategies for, other hypoxic sites worldwide. PMID:25706405

  11. Effects of norspermidine on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation and eradication.

    PubMed

    Qu, Lin; She, Pengfei; Wang, Yangxia; Liu, Fengxia; Zhang, Di; Chen, Lihua; Luo, Zhen; Xu, Huan; Qi, Yong; Wu, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Biofilms are defined as aggregation of single cell microorganisms and associated with over 80% of all the microbial infections. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen capable of leading to various infections in immunocompromised people. Recent studies showed that norspermidine, a kind of polyamine, prevented and disrupted biofilm formation by some Gram-negative bacterium. In this study, the effects of norspermidine on P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and eradication were tested. Microtiter plate combined with crystal violet staining was used to study the effects of norspermidine on P. aeruginosa initial attachment, then we employed SEM (scanning electron microscope), qRT-PCR, and QS-related virulence factor assays to investigate how norspermidine prevent biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. We reported that high-dose norspermidine had bactericide effect on P. aeruginosa, and norspermidine began to inhibit biofilm formation and eradicate 24-h mature biofilm at concentration of 0.1 and 1 mmol/L, respectively, probably by preventing cell-surface attachment, inhibiting swimming motility, and downregulating QS-related genes expression. To investigate the potential utility of norspermidine in preventing device-related infections, we found that catheters immersed with norspermidine were effective in eradicating mature biofilm. These results suggest that norspermidine could be a potent antibiofilm agent for formulating strategies against P. aeruginosa biofilm. PMID:26817804

  12. Global Pseudomonas aeruginosa biodiversity as reflected in a Belgian river.

    PubMed

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Matthijs, Sandra; Colak, Huri; Chablain, Patrice; Bilocq, Florence; Van Eldere, Johan; De Vos, Daniel; Zizi, Martin; Triest, Ludwig; Cornelis, Pierre

    2005-07-01

    The biodiversity of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an aquatic environment (the Woluwe River, Brussels, Belgium) was analysed. Surface water was sampled bimonthly over a 1-year period (2000-2001) at seven sites evenly dispersed over the river. Total bacterial counts were performed and P. aeruginosa strains were isolated on a selective medium. A weighed out sample of 100 randomly chosen presumptive P. aeruginosa isolates was further analysed. A set of data consisting of the nucleotide sequence of the oprL gene, a DNA-based fingerprint (amplified fragment length polymorphism, AFLP), serotype, pyoverdine type and antibiogram (MICs of 21 clinically relevant antibiotics) was assembled. These data were integrated with those previously obtained for 73 P. aeruginosa clinical and environmental isolates collected across the world. The combined results were analysed and compared using biological data analysis software. Our findings indicate a positive relationship between the extent of pollution and the prevalence of P. aeruginosa. Surprisingly, the Woluwe River P. aeruginosa community was almost as diverse as the global P. aeruginosa population. Indeed, the Woluwe River harboured members of nearly all successful clonal complexes. With the exception of one multidrug-resistant (MDR) strain, belonging to a ubiquitous and clinically relevant serotype O11 clone, antibiotic resistance levels were relatively low. These findings illustrate the significance of river water as a reservoir and source of distribution of potentially pathogenic P. aeruginosa strains and could have repercussions on antinosocomial infection strategies.

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: assessment of risk from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Hardalo, C; Edberg, S C

    1997-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an ubiquitous environmental bacterium. It can be recovered, often in high numbers, in common food, especially vegetables. Moreover, it can be recovered in low numbers in drinking water. A small percentage of clones of P. aeruginosa possesses the required number of virulence factors to cause infection. However, P. aeruginosa will not proliferate on normal tissue but requires previously organs. Further narrowing the risk to human health is that only certain specific hosts are at risk, including patients with profound neutropenia, cystic fibrosis, severe burns, and those subject to foreign device installation. Other than these very well-defined groups, the general population is refractory to infection with P. aeruginosa. Because of its ubiquitous nature, it is not only not practical to eliminate P. aeruginosa from our food and drinking water, but attempts to do so would produce disinfection byproducts more hazardous than the species itself. Moreover, because there is no readily available sensitive and specific means to detect and identify P. aeruginosa available in the field, any potential regulation governing its control would not have a defined laboratory test measure of outcome. Accordingly, attempts to regulate P. aeruginosa in drinking water would not yield public health protection benefits and could, in fact, be counterproductive in this regard.

  14. Siderophore-promoted dissolution of smectite by fluorescent Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Ferret, Claire; Sterckeman, Thibault; Cornu, Jean-Yves; Gangloff, Sophie; Schalk, Isabelle J; Geoffroy, Valérie A

    2014-10-01

    Siderophores are organic chelators produced by microorganisms to fulfil their iron requirements. Siderophore-promoted dissolution of iron-bearing minerals has been clearly documented for some siderophores, but few studies have addressed metabolizing siderophore-producing bacteria. We investigated iron acquisition from clays by fluorescent Pseudomonads, bacteria that are ubiquitous in the environment. We focused on the interactions between smectite and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a bacterium producing two structurally different siderophores: pyoverdine and pyochelin. The presence of smectite in iron-limited growth media promoted planktonic growth of P. aeruginosa and biofilm surrounding the smectite aggregates. Chemical analysis of the culture media indicated increases in the dissolved silicon, iron and aluminium concentrations following smectite supplementation. The use of P. aeruginosa mutants unable to produce either one or both of the two siderophores indicated that pyoverdine, the siderophore with the higher affinity for iron, was involved in iron and aluminium solubilization by the wild-type strain. However, in the absence of pyoverdine, pyochelin was also able to solubilize iron but with a twofold lower efficiency. In conclusion, pyoverdine and pyochelin, two structurally different siderophores, can solubilize structural iron from smectite and thereby make it available for bacterial growth. PMID:25646536

  15. Production of Poly-β-Hydroxyalkanoic Acid by Pseudomonas cepacia

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Bruce A.; Ramsay, Juliana A.; Cooper, David G.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of using the nutritionally versatile bacterium Pseudomonas cepacia to produce poly-β-hydroxyalkanoic acid was evaluated. Chemostat culture showed that growth of P. cepacia became nitrogen limited when the molar carbon-to-nitrogen ratio of the medium fed into the fermentor was above 15. When grown under nitrogen limitation in batch culture with fructose as the sole source of carbon, P. cepacia accumulated poly-β-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB) in excess of 50% of the dry weight of its biomass. In batch culture, almost no PHB was produced until the onset of nitrogen limitation. After this point, PHB was produced at a linear rate of 0.12 g liter−1 h−1 (from a constant value of 1.6 g of cellular protein liter−1). PHB produced by P. cepacia had a weight-average molecular weight of 5.37 × 105 g mol−1 and a polydispersivity index of 3.9. Poly(β-hydroxybutyric acid-β-hydroxyvaleric acid) copolymer was produced with a poly-β-hydroxybutyric acid-poly-β-hydroxyvaleric acid ratio of up to 30% by weight when propionic acid was added to the medium. PMID:16347867

  16. EXAFS Study of Uranyl Complexation at Pseudomonas fluorescens Cell Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencheikh, R.; Bargar, J. R.; Tebo, B. M.

    2002-12-01

    Little is known about the roles of microbial biomass as a sink and source for uranium in contaminated aquifers, nor of the impact of bacterial biochemistry on uranium speciation in the subsurface. A significant role is implied by the high affinities of both Gram positive and Gram negative cells for binding uranyl (UO2{ 2+}). In the present study, Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was used to identify membrane functional groups involved in uranyl binding to the Gram negative bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens from pH 3 to pH 8. Throughout this pH-range, EXAFS spectra can be described primarily in terms of coordination of carboxylic groups to uranyl. U-C distances characteristic of 4-, 5- and 8- membered rings were observed, as well as the possibility of phosphato groups. Both shell-by-shell fits and principle component analyses indicate that the functional groups involved in binding of uranyl to the cell surface do not vary systematically across the pH range investigated. This result contrasts with EXAFS results of uranyl sorbed to Gram positive bacteria, and suggests an important role for long-chain carboxylate-terminated membrane functional groups in binding uranyl.

  17. Pseudomonas toxin pyocyanin triggers autophagy: Implications for pathoadaptive mutations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Shan; Ma, Lan-Qing; Zhu, Kun; Yan, Jin-Yuan; Bian, Li; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Zou, Cheng-Gang

    2016-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can establish life-long chronic infection in patients with cystic fibrosis by generating genetic loss-of-function mutations, which enhance fitness of the bacterium in the airways. However, the precise role of the pathoadaptive mutations in persistence in chronic airways infection remains largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that pyocyanin, a well-described P. aeruginosa virulence factor that plays an important role in the initial infection, promotes autophagy in bronchial epithelial cells. Disruption of phzM, which is required for pyocyanin biosynthesis, leads to a significant reduction in autophagy in Beas-2B cells and lung tissues. Pyocyanin-induced autophagy is mediated by the EIF2AK4/GCN2-EIF2S1/eIF2α-ATF4 pathway. Interestingly, rats infected with the phzMΔ mutant strain have high mortality rate and numbers of colony-forming units, compared to those infected with wild-type (WT) P. aeruginosa PA14 strain, during chronic P. aeruginosa infection. In addition, the phzMΔ mutant strain induces more extensive alveolar wall thickening than the WT strain in the pulmonary airways of rats. As autophagy plays an essential role in suppressing bacterial burden, our findings provide a detailed understanding of why reduction of pyocyanin production in P. aeruginosa in chronic airways infections has been associated with better host adaptation and worse outcomes in cystic fibrosis. PMID:27159636

  18. A network biology approach to denitrification in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DOE PAGES

    Arat, Seda; Bullerjahn, George S.; Laubenbacher, Reinhard

    2015-02-23

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically flexible member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Under anaerobic conditions and the presence of nitrate, P. aeruginosa can perform (complete) denitrification, a respiratory process of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrogen gas via nitrite (NO₂), nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N₂O). This study focuses on understanding the influence of environmental conditions on bacterial denitrification performance, using a mathematical model of a metabolic network in P. aeruginosa. To our knowledge, this is the first mathematical model of denitrification for this bacterium. Analysis of the long-term behavior of the network under changing concentration levels of oxygen (O₂), nitrate (NO₃),more » and phosphate (PO₄) suggests that PO₄ concentration strongly affects denitrification performance. The model provides three predictions on denitrification activity of P. aeruginosa under various environmental conditions, and these predictions are either experimentally validated or supported by pertinent biological literature. One motivation for this study is to capture the effect of PO₄ on a denitrification metabolic network of P. aeruginosa in order to shed light on mechanisms for greenhouse gas N₂O accumulation during seasonal oxygen depletion in aquatic environments such as Lake Erie (Laurentian Great Lakes, USA). Simulating the microbial production of greenhouse gases in anaerobic aquatic systems such as Lake Erie allows a deeper understanding of the contributing environmental effects that will inform studies on, and remediation strategies for, other hypoxic sites worldwide.« less

  19. Pseudomonas siderophores in the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lois W; Reid, David W; Sharples, Katrina J; Lamont, Iain L

    2011-12-01

    The lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis become chronically infected with the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which heralds progressive lung damage and a decline in health. Iron is a crucial micronutrient for bacteria and its acquisition is a key factor in infection. P. aeruginosa can acquire this element by secreting pyoverdine and pyochelin, iron-chelating compounds (siderophores) that scavenge iron and deliver it to the bacteria. Siderophore-mediated iron uptake is generally considered a key factor in the ability of P. aeruginosa to cause infection. We have investigated the amounts of pyoverdine in 148 sputum samples from 36 cystic fibrosis patients (30 infected with P. aeruginosa and 6 as negative controls). Pyoverdine was present in 93 samples in concentrations between 0.30 and 51 μM (median 4.6 μM) and there was a strong association between the amount of pyoverdine and the number of P. aeruginosa present. However, pyoverdine was not present, or below the limits of detection (~0.3 μM), in 21 sputum samples that contained P. aeruginosa. Pyochelin was also absent, or below the limits of detection (~1 μM), in samples from P. aeruginosa-infected patients with little or no detectable pyoverdine. Our data show that pyoverdine is an important iron-scavenging molecule for P. aeruginosa in many cystic fibrosis patients, but other P. aeruginosa iron-uptake systems must be active in some patients to satisfy the bacterial need for iron. PMID:21643731

  20. Magnetic fields suppress Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and enhance ciprofloxacin activity.

    PubMed

    Bandara, H M H N; Nguyen, D; Mogarala, S; Osiñski, M; Smyth, H D C

    2015-01-01

    Due to the refractory nature of pathogenic microbial biofilms, innovative biofilm eradication strategies are constantly being sought. Thus, this study addresses a novel approach to eradicate Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNP), ciprofloxacin (Cipro), and magnetic fields were systematically evaluated in vitro for their relative anti-biofilm contributions. Twenty-four-hour biofilms exposed to aerosolized MNPs, Cipro, or a combination of both, were assessed in the presence or absence of magnetic fields (Static one-sided, Static switched, Oscillating, Static + oscillating) using changes in bacterial metabolism, biofilm biomass, and biofilm imaging. The biofilms exposed to magnetic fields alone exhibited significant metabolic and biomass reductions (p < 0.05). When biofilms were treated with a MNP/Cipro combination, the most significant metabolic and biomass reductions were observed when exposed to static switched magnetic fields (p < 0.05). The exposure of P. aeruginosa biofilms to a static switched magnetic field alone, or co-administration with MNP/Cipro/MNP + Cipro appears to be a promising approach to eradicate biofilms of this bacterium.