Science.gov

Sample records for aerobic blood cultures

  1. Reducing time to identification of aerobic bacteria and fastidious micro-organisms in positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Intra, J; Sala, M R; Falbo, R; Cappellini, F; Brambilla, P

    2016-12-01

    Rapid and early identification of micro-organisms in blood has a key role in the diagnosis of a febrile patient, in particular, in guiding the clinician to define the correct antibiotic therapy. This study presents a simple and very fast method with high performances for identifying bacteria by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) after only 4 h of incubation. We used early bacterial growth on PolyViteX chocolate agar plates inoculated with five drops of blood-broth medium deposited in the same point and spread with a sterile loop, followed by a direct transfer procedure on MALDI-TOF MS target slides without additional modification. Ninety-nine percentage of aerobic bacteria were correctly identified from 600 monomicrobial-positive blood cultures. This procedure allowed obtaining the correct identification of fastidious pathogens, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae that need complex nutritional and environmental requirements in order to grow. Compared to the traditional pathogen identification from blood cultures that takes over 24 h, the reliability of results, rapid performance and suitability of this protocol allowed a more rapid administration of optimal antimicrobial treatment in the patients.

  2. Evaluation of a plastic nonvented aerobic blood culture bottle for use with the BacT/ALERT microbial detection system.

    PubMed

    Snyder, J W; Munier, G K; Bostic, G D; Bozigar, P S; Hanna, R

    2002-12-01

    The current BacT/ALERT SA (BTA SA) aerobic blood culture bottle is made from glass, does not require venting, and contains a liquid emulsion sensor (LES). Its performance has been shown to be equivalent to that of the vented standard aerobic culture bottle. A further-improved version of the BTA SA bottle, designated the BacT/ALERT plastic SA (BTA PSA) culture bottle, is made from clear plastic to prevent breakage, does not require venting, and contains a modified LES (LES 2) to reduce the possibility of false positives. The BTA PSA provides a practical alternative to the current glass version of this bottle. The plastic bottle is also comparable to the current glass bottle in transparency and growth performance and additionally minimizes the exposure to infectious agents due to glass bottle breakage.

  3. Time-to-positivity-based discrimination between Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and strictly anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli in aerobic and anaerobic blood culture vials.

    PubMed

    Defrance, Gilles; Birgand, Gabriel; Ruppé, Etienne; Billard, Morgane; Ruimy, Raymond; Bonnal, Christine; Andremont, Antoine; Armand-Lefèvre, Laurence

    2013-05-01

    Time-to-positivity (TTP) of first positive blood cultures growing Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) was investigated. When anaerobic vials were positive first, TTP ≤ 18 h differentiated Enterobacteriaceae from strict anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli (PPV 98.8%). When the aerobic ones were first, TTP ≤ 13 h differentiated Enterobacteriaceae from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other GNB (PPV 80.8%).

  4. Blood culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - blood ... A blood sample is needed . The site where blood will be drawn is first cleaned with an antiseptic such ... organism from the skin getting into (contaminating) the blood sample and causing a false-positive result (see ...

  5. Modeling microbial ethanol production by E. coli under aerobic/anaerobic conditions: applicability to real postmortem cases and to postmortem blood derived microbial cultures.

    PubMed

    Boumba, Vassiliki A; Kourkoumelis, Nikolaos; Gousia, Panagiota; Economou, Vangelis; Papadopoulou, Chrissanthy; Vougiouklakis, Theodore

    2013-10-10

    The mathematical modeling of the microbial ethanol production under strict anaerobic experimental conditions for some bacterial species has been proposed by our research group as the first approximation to the quantification of the microbial ethanol production in cases where other alcohols were produced simultaneously with ethanol. The present study aims to: (i) study the microbial ethanol production by Escherichia coli under controlled aerobic/anaerobic conditions; (ii) model the correlation between the microbial produced ethanol and the other higher alcohols; and (iii) test their applicability in: (a) real postmortem cases that had positive BACs (>0.10 g/L) and co-detection of higher alcohols and 1-butanol during the original ethanol analysis and (b) postmortem blood derived microbial cultures under aerobic/anaerobic controlled experimental conditions. The statistical evaluation of the results revealed that the formulated models were presumably correlated to 1-propanol and 1-butanol which were recognized as the most significant descriptors of the modeling process. The significance of 1-propanol and 1-butanol as descriptors was so powerful that they could be used as the only independent variables to create a simple and satisfactory model. The current models showed a potential for application to estimate microbial ethanol - within an acceptable standard error - in various tested cases where ethanol and other alcohols have been produced from different microbes.

  6. Blood Culture (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Blood Culture KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Culture Print A A ... adjust the treatment choice. Why Do a Blood Culture? During some illnesses, certain infection-causing bacteria and ...

  7. Optimum detection times for bacteria and yeast species with the BACTEC 9120 aerobic blood culture system: evaluation for a 5-year period in a Turkish university hospital.

    PubMed

    Durmaz, Gül; Us, Tercan; Aydinli, Aydin; Kiremitci, Abdurrahman; Kiraz, Nuri; Akgün, Yurdanur

    2003-02-01

    We tracked and documented the time of positivity of blood cultures by using the BACTEC 9120 (Becton Dickinson Diagnostic Instrument Systems) blood culture system over a 5-year study period. A 7-day protocol of the incubation period was selected, and a total of 11156 blood cultures were evaluated. The clinically significant microorganisms (32.95%) were isolated in 3676 specimens. Gram-positive and -negative bacterial isolation rates were found to be 41.07 and 44.88%, respectively. Yeasts were found in 14.03% of all pathogens. Both the false-positivity and -negativity rates were very low (0.1 and 0.3%, respectively). The mean detection times for all of the pathogens were determined to be 19.45 h. Yeasts, nonfermentative gram-negative bacteria, and Brucella melitensis strains were isolated within 5 days. By taking these data into account, we decided to establish a 5-day-incubation protocol in our laboratory instead of the 7 days that are commonly used.

  8. Optimum Detection Times for Bacteria and Yeast Species with the BACTEC 9120 Aerobic Blood Culture System: Evaluation for a 5-Year Period in a Turkish University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Durmaz, Gül; Us, Tercan; Aydinli, Aydin; Kiremitci, Abdurrahman; Kiraz, Nuri; Akgün, Yurdanur

    2003-01-01

    We tracked and documented the time of positivity of blood cultures by using the BACTEC 9120 (Becton Dickinson Diagnostic Instrument Systems) blood culture system over a 5-year study period. A 7-day protocol of the incubation period was selected, and a total of 11,156 blood cultures were evaluated. The clinically significant microorganisms (32.95%) were isolated in 3,676 specimens. Gram-positive and -negative bacterial isolation rates were found to be 41.07 and 44.88%, respectively. Yeasts were found in 14.03% of all pathogens. Both the false-positivity and -negativity rates were very low (0.1 and 0.3%, respectively). The mean detection times for all of the pathogens were determined to be 19.45 h. Yeasts, nonfermentative gram-negative bacteria, and Brucella melitensis strains were isolated within 5 days. By taking these data into account, we decided to establish a 5-day-incubation protocol in our laboratory instead of the 7 days that are commonly used. PMID:12574291

  9. Blood culture contaminants.

    PubMed

    Dawson, S

    2014-05-01

    Blood cultures are an essential diagnostic tool. However, contamination may impact on patients' care and lead to increased patient stay, additional tests, and inappropriate antibiotic use. The aim of this study was to review the literature for factors that influence the rate of blood culture contamination. A comprehensive literature search was performed using Medline and CINAHL on blood culture contamination. Hospitals/units should have in place a protocol for staff on how to take blood cultures, incorporating use of an aseptic technique. Studies have shown that several key factors in the process may lower contamination rates such as adherence to a protocol, sampling by peripheral venepuncture route rather than via an intravascular catheter, use of sterile gloves, cleaning tops of blood culture bottles with antiseptics and inoculating blood culture bottles before other blood tubes, samples being taken by a phlebotomy team, monitoring contamination rates, and providing individual feedback and retraining for those with contaminants. Although skin antisepsis is advocated there is still debate on which antiseptic is most effective, as there is no conclusive evidence, only that there is benefit from alcohol-containing preparations. In conclusion, hospitals should aim to minimize their blood culture contamination rates. They should monitor their rate regularly and aim for a rate of ≤3%.

  10. Direct inoculation method using BacT/ALERT 3D and BD Phoenix System allows rapid and accurate identification and susceptibility testing for both Gram-positive cocci and Gram-negative rods in aerobic blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Yonetani, Shota; Okazaki, Mitsuhiro; Araki, Koji; Makino, Hiroshi; Fukugawa, Yoko; Okuyama, Takahiro; Ohnishi, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Takashi

    2012-06-01

    This study describes a direct inoculation method using the automated BacT/ALERT 3D and the BD Phoenix System in combination for identification and susceptibility testing of isolates from positive blood cultures. Organism identification and susceptibility results were compared with the conventional method for 211 positive aerobic blood cultures. Of 110 Gram-positive cocci (GPCs), 98 (89.1%) isolates were correctly identified to the species level. Of 101 Gram-negative rods (GNRs), 98 (97.0%) isolates were correctly identified to the species level. The overall categorical agreement in antimicrobial susceptibility testing among the 110 GPCs was 92.7%, with 0.04% very major and 0.7% major error rates. The overall categorical agreement among 78 isolates of enterobacteria and 23 isolates of nonfermenters in GNRs was 99.5% and 91.1%, respectively, with no major errors identified. We conclude that, compared with previously reported direct inoculation methods, our method is superior in identification and susceptibility testing of GPCs.

  11. Blood Culture (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding ... blood culture is a test that looks for germs such as bacteria or fungi in the blood. A doctor might order this test when a child has symptoms of ...

  12. Isolation of Leptospira from blood culture bottles.

    PubMed

    Girault, Dominique; Soupé-Gilbert, Marie-Estelle; Geroult, Sophie; Colot, Julien; Goarant, Cyrille

    2017-01-31

    With the increasing use of real-time PCR techniques, Leptospira isolation has mostly been abandoned for the diagnosis of human leptospirosis. However, there is a great value of collecting Leptospira isolates to better understand the epidemiology of this complex zoonosis and to provide the researchers with different isolates. In this study, we have successfully isolated different Leptospira strains from BacT/Alert aerobic blood culture bottles and suggest that this privileged biological material offers an opportunity to isolate leptospires.

  13. Haemoglobin, blood volume, cardiac function, and aerobic power.

    PubMed

    Gledhill, N; Warburton, D; Jamnik, V

    1999-02-01

    Alterations in [Hb], which are mediated through changes in arterial oxygen content, and alterations in BV, which are mediated through changes in cardiac output (Q), have a significant effect on both VO2max and aerobic performance. If BV is held constant, a decrease in [Hb] (anaemia) causes a decrease in VO2max and aerobic performance, while an increase in [Hb] (blood doping) causes an increase in VO2max and aerobic performance. If [Hb] is held constant, an increase in BV can cause and increase in both VO2max and aerobic performance, while a decrease in BV can cause a decrease in VO2max and aerobic performance. In addition, an increase in BV can compensate for moderate reductions in [Hb] through increase in Q, allowing VO2max to remain unchanged or even increase. Also, a large portion of the difference in the enhanced cardiovascular function of endurance athletes is due to their high BV and the resultant enhancement of diastolic function. Hence, optimizing both [Hb] and BV is a very important consideration for endurance performance.

  14. Diagnosis of brucellosis by using blood cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, J; Lorente, I; Pérez, J; Simarro, E; Martínez-Campos, L

    1997-01-01

    The performances of three blood culture systems, Hemoline performance diphasic medium (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France), Bactec Plus Aerobic/F* (Becton Dickinson, Paramus, N.J.), and Vital Aer (bioMérieux), were compared for the diagnosis of 17 cases of brucellosis. By using a 5-day incubation protocol, positive results were 52.9, 82.4, and 11.8%, respectively. When the protocol was extended to 7 days, the results were 76.5, 94.1, and 47.1%, respectively. Bactec was the fastest system (P < 0.05). PMID:9276429

  15. Technical improvements in culturing blood.

    PubMed

    Pardini, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Blood culture is a laboratory test where a blood specimen, taken from a patient, is inoculated into bottles containing culture media to determine if infection-causing microorganisms (bacteria or fungi) have invaded the patient's bloodstream. This test is an important investigation with major implications for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with bloodstream infections and possible sepsis. Moreover, blood culture will also provide the etiologic agent for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, enabling optimization of antibiotic therapy with significant impact on the outcome of the disease. Even if the potential benefices of blood culture are well known, critical factors mainly in pre- and post-analytical phases can reduce the clinical value of this test.

  16. Controlled clinical comparison of three commercial blood culture systems.

    PubMed

    Frank, U; Malkotsis, D; Mlangeni, D; Daschner, F D

    1999-04-01

    In a controlled clinical comparison, three commercial blood culture systems--the standard aerobic BacT/Alert bottle (STD), the aerobic BacT/Alert FAN bottle (FAN) and the Isolator system (ISO; Wampole Laboratories, USA) were compared for their ability to detect aerobic and facultatively anaerobic microorganisms. A total of 945 BacT/Alert (STD and FAN) blood culture sets were compared. Of these, 110 blood culture sets (11.6%) yielded growth of 116 clinically significant bacterial and fungal isolates. Microorganisms were recovered from 10.7% (101/945) of the FAN bottles compared to 8.9% (84/945) of the STD bottles. Of the significant isolates, 78 (67.2%) were recovered by both bottles, 29 (25%) by the FAN bottle only and nine (7.8%) by the STD bottle only (P<0.01). Along with 56.1% (530/945) of BacT/Alert blood culture sets, a concomitant ISO tube was obtained. Of the triple (STD + FAN + ISO) blood culture sets, 54 (10.2%) yielded growth of 59 clinically relevant isolates. Microorganisms were detected in 9.1% (48/530) of the FAN bottles, 8.3% (44/530) of the STD bottles and 4% (21/530) of the ISO tubes (P<0.001). Overall, the BacT/Alert system detected more clinically significant microorganisms than the ISO tube; the STD and the FAN bottle each recovered significantly more staphylococci (P<0.01 and P<0.001, respectively) and gram-negative rods (P<0.01, both). In conclusion, the BacT/Alert FAN bottle performed better than the BacT/Alert STD bottle; both BacT/Alert bottles, however, were superior to the ISO tube in terms of recovery of clinically significant microorganisms, including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

  17. Radiometric detection of yeasts in blood cultures of cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hopfer, R.L.; Orengo, A.; Chesnut, S.; Wenglar, M.

    1980-09-01

    During a 12-month period, 19,457 blood cultures were collected. Yeasts were isolated from 193 cultures derived from 76 cancer patients. Candida albicans or Candida tropicalis accounted for 79% of isolates. Of the three methods compared, the radiometric method required 2.9 days to become positive, blind subculture required 2.6 days, and Gram stains required 1 day. However, the radiometric method was clearly superior in detecting positive cultures, since 73% of all cultures were first detected radiometrically, 22% were detected by subculture, and only 5% were detected by Gram stain. Although 93% of the isolates were detected by aerobic culture, five (7%) isolates were obtained only from anaerobic cultures. Seven days of incubation appear to be sufficient for the radiometric detection of yeasts.

  18. Effect of Aerobic Exercise Training on Blood Pressure in Indians: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Punia, Vandana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. High blood pressure (BP) is one of the most important modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, which accounts for one in every eight deaths worldwide. It has been predicted that, by 2020, there would be 111% increase in cardiovascular deaths in India. Aerobic exercise in the form of brisk walking, jogging, running, and cycling would result in reduction in BP. Many meta-analytical studies from western world confirm this. However, there is no such review from Indian subcontinent. Objective. Our objective is to systematically review and report the articles from India in aerobic exercise on blood pressure. Methodology. Study was done in March 2016 in Google Scholar using search terms “Aerobic exercise” AND “Training” AND “Blood pressure” AND “India.” This search produced 3210 titles. Results. 24 articles were identified for this review based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Total of 1107 subjects participated with median of 25 subjects. Studies vary in duration from +3 weeks to 12 months with each session lasting 15–60 minutes and frequency varies from 3 to 8 times/week. The results suggest that there was mean reduction of −05.00 mmHg in SBP and −03.09 mmHg in DBP after aerobic training. Conclusion. Aerobic training reduces the blood pressure in Indians. PMID:27493989

  19. Inhibition of Salmonella Typhimurium by Cultures of Cecal Bacteria during Aerobic Incubation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two trials were conducted to examine the ability of cecal bacterial cultures from broilers to inhibit growth of Salmonella Typhimurium during aerobic incubation. Cecal broth media was inoculated with 10 µl of cecal contents from 6 week old broilers taken from 2 separate flocks. Cultures were incubat...

  20. Reducing effect of aerobic exercise on blood pressure of essential hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Hongwei; Wang, Lijuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The comprehensive meta-analysis aimed to explore the reductive effect of aerobic exercise on blood pressure of hypertensive patients. Methods: The related researches were selected from PubMed and Embase databases up to June 2016. Based on specific inclusive criteria, the eligible studies were selected, and the heterogeneities in their results were estimated by χ2-based Q-test and I2 statistics. Quantitative meta-analysis was assessed by R 3.12 software, and results were presented by standardized mean difference (SMD) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Outcome indicators were systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). The publication biases were estimated by Egger test. Besides, the “leave one out” method was used for sensitivity evaluations. Results: As a result, a total of 13 papers with 802 samples were included. Based on the meta-analysis results, there were no significant differences in SBP and DBP between aerobic and control groups before exercise (SMD = 0.15, 95%CI: −0.16–0.46; SMD = 0.16, 95% CI: −0.23–0.55). However, significant reductions were obviously in aerobic group after aerobics, compared with control (SMD = −0.79, 95% CI: −1.29 to −0.28; SMD = −0.63, 95% CI: −1.14 to −0.12). A significant publication bias was detected in SBP (t = −2.2314, P = 0.04549) but not in DBP (t = −1.4962, P = 0.1604). Additionally, the DBP result would be altered after the exclusion of 2 individual papers. Conclusion: Aerobic exercise may be a potential nonpharmacological treatment for blood pressure improvement in essential hypertensive patients. PMID:28296729

  1. Vertebrate blood cell volume increases with temperature: implications for aerobic activity

    PubMed Central

    Zenil-Ferguson, Rosana

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic activity levels increase with body temperature across vertebrates. Differences in these levels, from highly active to sedentary, are reflected in their ecology and behavior. Yet, the changes in the cardiovascular system that allow for greater oxygen supply at higher temperatures, and thus greater aerobic activity, remain unclear. Here we show that the total volume of red blood cells in the body increases exponentially with temperature across vertebrates, after controlling for effects of body size and taxonomy. These changes are accompanied by increases in relative heart mass, an indicator of aerobic activity. The results point to one way vertebrates may increase oxygen supply to meet the demands of greater activity at higher temperatures. PMID:24765580

  2. Isolation of Salmonella typhi from Standard Whole Blood Culture versus Blood-Clot Cultures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    The use of 10% oxgall and bile broth medium, both supplemented with freshly prepared 100 u/ml streptokinase, for isolating Salmonella typhi by clot...significantly better rate of isolation than the clot culture methods. Keywords: Cultures biology; Clot cultures; Salmonella typhi ; Isolation of S. typhi; Whole blood culture; Blood-clot culture; Reprints.

  3. Effect of 12-week-long aerobic training programme on body composition, aerobic capacity, complete blood count and blood lipid profile among young women

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Robert; Jastrzębski, Zbigniew; Zarębska, Aleksandra; Bichowska, Marta; Drobnik-Kozakiewicz, Izabela; Radzimiński, Łukasz; Leońska-Duniec, Agata; Ficek, Krzysztof; Cięszczyk, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Background Numerous data suggest that aerobic-type exercise improves lipoprotein-lipid profiles, cardiorespiratory fitness and body composition in young women. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biological response to high-low impact aerobic fitness among young women. Materials and methods Thirty-four young women aged 22 (19-24) years were divided into three groups: underweight (N = 10), normal weight (N = 12) and overweight (N = 12). Aerobic capacity, anthropometry and body composition together with complete blood count and lipid profile were determined before and after completion of a 12-week-long training period. Results The training programme caused a significant decrease in weight (by 4.3 kg, P = 0.003), body mass index (by 1.3 kg/m2, P = 0.003), free fat mass (by 2.1 kg, P = 0.002), total body water (by 0.4 kg, P = 0.036), percentage of fat (by 3 percent points, P = 0.002), all analyzed skinfolds thicknesses, as well as the lipid profile in overweight group, and no changes in normal weight group. Significant changes in weight (by 4.2 kg, P = 0.005), body mass index (by 0.9 kg/m2, P = 0.005), crus skinfold thickness (by 3.3 mm, P = 0.028), and in maximum oxygen uptake (by 2.49 mL/kg/min; P = 0.047) were observed among underweight women. No change in total blood count was observed in all groups. Conclusion Twelve-week-long fitness training programme of two alternating styles (low and high impact) has a beneficial effect on overweight young women. PMID:25672474

  4. Pediatric blood culture: time to positivity.

    PubMed

    Kara, Ateş; Kanra, Güler; Cengiz, A Bülent; Apiş, Menekşe; Gür, Deniz

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how long it takes blood culture to become positive using a blood culture system that can be monitored continuously in pediatric patients. Data were collected prospectively on 1,000 positive blood culture results from a tertiary pediatric university hospital from April 2000 to May 2002. The laboratory used the BACTEC 9120 fluorescent blood culture system. Patient's age ranged from less than a day to 20 years of age (mean 3 years). Five hundred and four cultures (50.4%) out of 1,000 yielded coagulase negative staphylococcus (CNS), 81 (8.1%) S. aureus, 53 (5.3%). Pseudomonas and 50 (5.0%) Klebsiella species. Of the 504 coagulase negative staphylococcal blood culture isolates, 314 (62.3% of CNS) were regarded as skin contaminants. Of the 1,000 cultures, 9.6% were reported as positive in the first day, 27.8% in the second day, 54.7% in the third day, 77.0% in the fourth and 89.4% in the fifth day. There was no association between previous antibiotic usage and the period required for isolate recovery. The clinician can expect to get results of positive blood cultures with susceptibility data, at a rate of 77.1% by day four and almost 90% by day five of sampling in the bacteriemic patient. Blood cultures yielding coagulase negative staphylococci in the first three days almost always show bacteremia with those microorganisms.

  5. Hemodynamic responses are reduced with aerobic compared with resistance blood flow restriction exercise.

    PubMed

    May, Anthony K; Brandner, Christopher R; Warmington, Stuart A

    2017-02-01

    The hemodynamics of light-load exercise with an applied blood-flow restriction (BFR) have not been extensively compared between light-intensity, BFR, and high-intensity forms of both resistance and aerobic exercise in the same participant population. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to use a randomized crossover design to examine the hemodynamic responses to resistance and aerobic BFR exercise in comparison with a common high-intensity and light-intensity non-BFR exercise. On separate occasions participants completed a leg-press (resistance) or treadmill (aerobic) trial. Each trial comprised a light-intensity bout (LI) followed by a light-intensity bout with BFR (80% resting systolic blood pressure (LI+BFR)), then a high-intensity bout (HI). To characterize the hemodynamic response, measures of cardiac output, stroke volume, heart rate and blood pressure were taken at baseline and exercise for each bout. Exercising hemodynamics for leg-press LI+BFR most often resembled those for HI and were greater than LI (e.g. for systolic blood pressure LI+BFR = 152 ± 3 mmHg; HI = 153 ± 3; LI = 143 ± 3 P < 0.05). However, exercising hemodynamics for treadmill LI+BFR most often resembled those for LI and were lower than HI (e.g. for systolic pressure LI+BFR = 124 ± 2 mmHg; LI = 123 ± 2; HI = 140 ± 3 P < 0.05). In conclusion, the hemodynamic response for light aerobic (walking) BFR exercise suggests this mode of BFR exercise may be preferential for chronic use to develop muscle size and strength, and other health benefits in certain clinical populations that are contraindicated to heavy-load resistance exercise.

  6. Mycobacterium and Aerobic Actinomycete Culture: Are Two Medium Types and Extended Incubation Times Necessary?

    PubMed

    Simner, Patricia J; Doerr, Kelly A; Steinmetz, Lory K; Wengenack, Nancy L

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterial cultures are historically performed using a liquid medium and a solid agar medium with an incubation period of up to 60 days. We performed a retrospective analysis of 21,494 mycobacterial and aerobic actinomycetes cultures performed over 10 months to determine whether two medium types remain necessary and to investigate whether culture incubation length can be shortened. Specimens were cultured using Bactec MGIT liquid medium and Middlebrook 7H11/S7H11 solid medium with incubation periods of 42 and 60 days, respectively. Time-to-positivity and the identity of isolates recovered from each medium were evaluated. A total of 1,205/21,494 cultures (6%) were positive on at least one medium. Of the 1,353 isolates recovered, 1,110 (82%) were nontuberculous mycobacteria, 145 (11%) were aerobic actinomycetes, and 98 (7%) wereMycobacterium tuberculosiscomplex. Assessing medium types, 1,121 isolates were recovered from solid medium cultures, 922 isolates were recovered from liquid medium cultures, and 690 isolates were recovered on both media. Liquid cultures were positive an average of 10 days before solid cultures when the two medium types were positive (P< 0.0001). Isolates detected on solid medium after 6 weeks of incubation included 65 (5%) nontuberculous mycobacteria, 4 (0.3%) aerobic actinomycetes, and 2 (0.2%) isolates from theM. tuberculosiscomplex. Medical chart review suggested that most of these later-growing isolates were insignificant, as the diagnosis was already known, or they were considered colonizers/contaminants. This study reaffirms the need for both liquid medium and solid medium for mycobacterial and aerobic actinomycetes culture and demonstrates that solid medium incubation times may be reduced to 6 weeks without significantly impacting sensitivity.

  7. Comparison of dry medium culture plates for mesophilic aerobic bacteria in milk, ice cream, ham, and codfish fillet products.

    PubMed

    Park, Junghyun; Kim, Myunghee

    2013-12-01

    This study was performed to compare the performance of Sanita-Kun dry medium culture plate with those of traditional culture medium and Petrifilm dry medium culture plate for the enumeration of the mesophilic aerobic bacteria in milk, ice cream, ham, and codfish fillet. Mesophilic aerobic bacteria were comparatively evaluated in milk, ice cream, ham, and codfish fillet using Sanita-Kun aerobic count (SAC), Petrifilm aerobic count (PAC), and traditional plate count agar (PCA) media. According to the results, all methods showed high correlations of 0.989~1.000 and no significant differences were observed for enumerating the mesophilic aerobic bacteria in the tested food products. SAC method was easier to perform and count colonies efficiently as compared to the PCA and PAC methods. Therefore, we concluded that the SAC method offers an acceptable alternative to the PCA and PAC methods for counting the mesophilic aerobic bacteria in milk, ice cream, ham, and codfish fillet products.

  8. Lower white blood cell counts in elite athletes training for highly aerobic sports.

    PubMed

    Horn, P L; Pyne, D B; Hopkins, W G; Barnes, C J

    2010-11-01

    White cell counts at rest might be lower in athletes participating in selected endurance-type sports. Here, we analysed blood tests of elite athletes collected over a 10-year period. Reference ranges were established for 14 female and 14 male sports involving 3,679 samples from 937 females and 4,654 samples from 1,310 males. Total white blood cell counts and counts of neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes were quantified. Each sport was scaled (1-5) for its perceived metabolic stress (aerobic-anaerobic) and mechanical stress (concentric-eccentric) by 13 sports physiologists. Substantially lower total white cell and neutrophil counts were observed in aerobic sports of cycling and triathlon (~16% of test results below the normal reference range) compared with team or skill-based sports such as water polo, cricket and volleyball. Mechanical stress of sports had less effect on the distribution of cell counts. The lower white cell counts in athletes in aerobic sports probably represent an adaptive response, not underlying pathology.

  9. Daily physical activity and blood lactate indices of aerobic fitness in children.

    PubMed Central

    Welsman, J R; Armstrong, N

    1992-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between daily physical activity and aerobic fitness in 11-16-year-olds. Habitual physical activity was assessed in 28 boys (mean(s.d.) age 13.6(1.3) years) and 45 girls (mean(s.d) age 13.7(1.3) years) from minute-by-minute heart rate monitoring during 3 school days. Aerobic fitness was assessed by determining the percentage peak VO2 at blood lactate reference values of 2.5 and 4.0 mmol l-1 during incremental treadmill running. The 4.0 mmol l-1 level occurred at a mean(s.d.) value of 89(7)% peak VO2 in both boys and girls and mean(s.d.) values at the 2.5 mmol l-1 level were 82(9)% peak VO2 in girls. Mean(s.d.) percentage time with heart rates at or above 140 beats min-1 was 6(3)% in boys and 5(3)% in girls. Corresponding values for percentage time at or above 160 beats min-1 were 3(2) for boys and 2(1) for girls. The number of 10- and 20-min periods of activity with the heart rate sustained above the 140 and 160 beats min-1 thresholds were also totalled over the 3 days. No significant relationships were identified between percentage peak VO2 at the 2.5 or 4.0 mmol l-1 blood lactate reference levels and either percentage time or number of 10- or 20-min periods above 140 or 160 beats min-1 (P > 0.05). These results support the hypothesis that daily physical activity levels in 11-16-year-old children do not stress aerobic metabolism sufficiently to influence aerobic fitness. PMID:1490213

  10. Update on blood culture-negative endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Tattevin, P; Watt, G; Revest, M; Arvieux, C; Fournier, P-E

    2015-01-01

    Blood culture-negative endocarditis is often severe, and difficult to diagnose. The rate of non-documented infective endocarditis has decreased with the advent of molecular biology - improved performance for the diagnosis of bacterial endocarditis with blood cultures sterilized by previous antibacterial treatment - and cardiac surgery - access to the main infected focus, the endocardium, for half of the patients. Blood culture-negative endocarditis are classified in 3 main categories: (i) bacterial endocarditis with blood cultures sterilized by previous antibacterial treatment (usually due to usual endocarditis-causing bacteria, i.e. streptococci, more rarely staphylococci, or enterococci); (ii) endocarditis related to fastidious microorganisms (e.g. HACEK bacteria; defective streptococci - Gemella, Granulicatella, and Abiotrophia sp. - Propionibacterium acnes, Candida sp.): in these cases, prolonged incubation will allow identifying the causative pathogen in a few days; (iii) and the "true" blood culture-negative endocarditis, due to intra-cellular bacteria that cannot be routinely cultured in blood with currently available techniques: in France, these are most frequently Bartonella sp., Coxiella burnetti (both easily diagnosed by ad hoc serological tests), and Tropheryma whipplei (usually diagnosed by PCR on excised cardiac valve tissue). Non-infective endocarditis is rare, mostly limited to marantic endocarditis, and the rare endocarditis related to systemic diseases (lupus, Behçet).

  11. A randomized 9-month study of blood pressure and body fat responses to aerobic training versus combined aerobic and resistance training in older men.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Nelson; Mendes, Romeu; Abrantes, Catarina; Sampaio, Jaime; Oliveira, José

    2013-08-01

    This randomized study evaluated the impact of different exercise training modalities on blood pressure and body fat responses in apparently healthy older men. Forty-eight elderly men (aged 65-75 years) were randomly assigned to an aerobic training group (ATG, n=15), a combined aerobic and resistance training group (CTG, n=16), or a control group (n=17). Both exercise training programs were moderate-to-vigorous intensity, three days/week for 9-months. Strength, aerobic endurance, body fat and blood pressure were measured on five different occasions. The data were analyzed using a mixed-model ANOVA, and the independence between systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and group was tested. A significant main effect of group (p<0.001) was observed in strength and aerobic endurance, with higher performance observed in the CTG. A significant main effect of group (p<0.001) and time (p=0.029) was observed in body fat percentage, with a 2.3% decrease in CTG. A significant main effect of time was observed in SBP (p=0.005) and in DBP (p=0.011) for both ATG and CTG. Mean decreases in SBP and DBP, respectively, were 15 and 6 mmHg for ATG and 24 and 12 mmHg for CTG. There was a significant association for SBP (p=0.008) and DBP (p=0.005) in the CTG, with significant individual BP profile modifications. Both exercise-training programs reduce resting blood pressure. However, only the combined exercise training was effective at reducing body fat percentage; consequently, there were larger changes in blood pressure, which result in a significant reduction in hypertensive subjects.

  12. Laboratory contamination of blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Spencer, R C; Savage, M A

    1975-12-01

    A prospective study of the use of a laminar flow cabinet, an exhaust-ventilated safety hood, and the open bench for the microbiological examination of blood is described. Blood samples from 1600 patients were subcultured on the open bench, 2700 in a safety hood, and 2607 in a laminar flow cabinet. Use of the laminar flow cabinet produced a significantly greater level of contamination than the other methods, and it is concluded that the exhaust-ventilated safety hood should be used for this procedure.

  13. Can aerobic exercise complement antihypertensive drugs to achieve blood pressure control in individuals with essential hypertension?

    PubMed

    Maruf, Fatai A; Salako, Babatunde L; Akinpelu, Aderonke O

    2014-06-01

    Achieving adequate blood pressure (BP) control with antihypertensive medication remains an elusive goal for many patients. The advances in knowledge of hypertension and the increasingly improved upon therapeutic strategies seem not to guarantee even sustainable control rates at the population level. In addition, patients who either discontinue their medications or are non-adherent to drug therapy run the risk of developing uncontrolled BP. Number of daily tablets more than two and number of daily drug administration at least three have been associated with poor adherence with drug therapy. However, BP control seems to go beyond adherence with drug therapy as there are other associated factors. Studies have demonstrated beneficial effect of aerobic exercise in the prevention and management of hypertension. It appears, however, that the majority of these studies failed to explore the possible additive or synergistic effect of aerobic exercise on antihypertensive drugs such that fewer drugs would be required to achieve BP control or that the BP control rate would be increased with the same number of drugs. This review presents the evidence for poor BP control in the general population, and the possible means and process of aerobic exercise complementing antihypertensive drug therapy in order to achieve higher BP control rates.

  14. Improved Diagnosis of Prosthetic Joint Infection by Culturing Periprosthetic Tissue Specimens in Blood Culture Bottles

    PubMed Central

    Peel, Trisha N.; Dylla, Brenda L.; Hughes, John G.; Lynch, David T.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Cheng, Allen C.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite known low sensitivity, culture of periprosthetic tissue specimens on agars and in broths is routine. Culture of periprosthetic tissue samples in blood culture bottles (BCBs) is potentially more convenient, but it has been evaluated in a limited way and has not been widely adopted. The aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of inoculation of periprosthetic tissue specimens into blood culture bottles with standard agar and thioglycolate broth culture, applying Bayesian latent class modeling (LCM) in addition to applying the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) criteria for prosthetic joint infection. This prospective cohort study was conducted over a 9-month period (August 2013 to April 2014) at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, and included all consecutive patients undergoing revision arthroplasty. Overall, 369 subjects were studied; 117 (32%) met IDSA criteria for prosthetic joint infection, and 82% had late chronic infection. Applying LCM, inoculation of tissues into BCBs was associated with a 47% improvement in sensitivity compared to the sensitivity of conventional agar and broth cultures (92.1 versus 62.6%, respectively); this magnitude of change was similar when IDSA criteria were applied (60.7 versus 44.4%, respectively; P = 0.003). The time to microorganism detection was shorter with BCBs than with standard media (P < 0.0001), with aerobic and anaerobic BCBs yielding positive results within a median of 21 and 23 h, respectively. Results of our study demonstrate that the semiautomated method of periprosthetic tissue culture in blood culture bottles is more sensitive than and as specific as agar and thioglycolate broth cultures and yields results faster. PMID:26733067

  15. Clinical implications of positive blood cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, C S

    1989-01-01

    Positive blood cultures can be classified according to their veracity (true-positive or false-positive culture), clinical severity (inconsequential or life threatening), place of origin (community acquired or nosocomial), source (primary or secondary), duration (transient, intermittent, or continuous), pattern of occurrence (single episode, persistent, or recurrent), or intensity (high or low grade). In general, however, positive blood cultures identify a patient population at high risk of death. In my studies, patients with positive blood cultures were 12 times more likely to die during hospitalization than patients without positive blood cultures. Many bacteremias and fungemias occur in complicated clinical settings, and it appears that only about one-half of the deaths among affected patients are due directly to infection. Hence, it is appropriate to speak of "crude mortality" and "attributable mortality." Among hospitalized patients, recent trends include rising incidences of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococcal and enterococcal bacteremias and a dramatic increase in the incidence of fungemias. The diagnostic and therapeutic implications of blood cultures positive for specific microorganisms continue to evolve and are the subject of a large and growing medical literature. PMID:2680055

  16. Effects of acute aerobic and anaerobic exercise on blood markers of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Bloomer, Richard J; Goldfarb, Allan H; Wideman, Laurie; McKenzie, Michael J; Consitt, Leslie A

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare oxidative modification of blood proteins, lipids, DNA, and glutathione in the 24 hours following aerobic and anaerobic exercise using similar muscle groups. Ten cross-trained men (24.3 +/- 3.8 years, [mean +/- SEM]) performed in random order 30 minutes of continuous cycling at 70% of Vo(2)max and intermittent dumbbell squatting at 70% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM), separated by 1-2 weeks, in a crossover design. Blood samples taken before, and immediately, 1, 6, and 24 hours postexercise were analyzed for plasma protein carbonyls (PC), plasma malondialdehyde (MDA), and whole-blood total (TGSH), oxidized (GSSG), and reduced (GSH) glutathione. Blood samples taken before and 24 hours postexercise were analyzed for serum 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). PC values were greater at 6 and 24 hours postexercise compared with pre-exercise for squatting, with greater PC values at 24 hours postexercise for squatting compared with cycling (0.634 +/- 0.053 vs. 0.359 +/- 0.018 nM.mg protein(-1)). There was no significant interaction or main effects for MDA or 8-OHdG. GSSG experienced a short-lived increase and GSH a transient decrease immediately following both exercise modes. These data suggest that 30 minutes of aerobic and anaerobic exercise performed by young, cross-trained men (a) can increase certain biomarkers of oxidative stress in blood, (b) differentially affect oxidative stress biomarkers, and (c) result in a different magnitude of oxidation based on the macromolecule studied. Practical applications: While protein and glutathione oxidation was increased following acute exercise as performed in this study, future research may investigate methods of reducing macromolecule oxidation, possibly through the use of antioxidant therapy.

  17. Acute blood pressure response in hypertensive elderly women immediately after water aerobics exercise: A crossover study.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Raphael Martins; Vilaça-Alves, José; Noleto, Marcelo Vasconcelos; Silva, Juliana Sá; Costa, Andressa Moura; Silva, Christoffer Novais Farias; Póvoa, Thaís Inácio Rolim; Lehnen, Alexandre Machado

    2017-01-01

    Water aerobics exercise is widely recommended for elderly people. However, little is known about the acute effects on hemodynamic variables. Thus, we assessed the effects of a water aerobic session on blood pressure in hypertensive elderly women. Fifty hypertensive elderly women aged 67.8 ± 4.1 years, 1.5 ± 0.6 m high and BMI 28.6 ± 3.9 kg/m(2), participated in a crossover clinical trial. The experiment consisted of a 45-minute water aerobics session (70%-75% HRmax adjusted for the aquatic environment) (ES) and a control session (no exercise for 45 minutes) (CS). Heart rate was monitored using a heart rate monitor and systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) measurements were taken using a semi-automatic monitor before and immediately after the sessions, and at 10, 20 and 30 minutes thereafter. It was using a generalized estimating equation (GEE) with Bonferroni's post-hoc test (p < 0.05). At the end of the experimental session, ES showed a rise in SBP of 17.4 mmHg (14.3%, p < 0.001) and DBP of 5.4 mmHg (7.8%, p < 0.001) compared to CS. At 10 minutes after exercise, BP declined in ES by a greater magnitude than in CS (SBP 7.5 mmHg, 6.2%, p = 0.005 and DBP 3.8 mmHg, 5.5%, p = 0.013). At 20 minutes after exercise and thereafter, SBP and DBP were similar in both ES and CS. In conclusion, BP returned to control levels within 10-20 minutes remaining unchanged until 30 minutes after exercise, and post-exercise hypotension was not observed. Besides, BP changed after exercise was a safe rise of small magnitude for hypertensive people.

  18. Flow microcalorimetry investigation of the influence of surfactants on a heterogeneous aerobic culture.

    PubMed Central

    Beaubien, A; Keita, L; Jolicoeur, C

    1987-01-01

    The influence of various surfactants on the biological activity of a mixed aerobic culture has been investigated by using flow microcalorimetry. The response of the culture to the addition of homologous n-alkylcarboxylates (C2 to C16) and n-alkylpyridinium bromides (C11 to C14) has been examined under endogenous and substrate saturation conditions, and inhibitory concentrations (MIC or the concentration which decreased the initial activity (heat flux) of the culture by 50%) were determined for each state. Under both conditions, the n-alkylpyridinium bromides were found to be more toxic than the n-alkylcarboxylates of identical chain length, thus confirming that the head group of the amphiphiles plays an important role in the microbial toxicity of surfactants. The relationship observed between the concentration at which 50% of the activity is lost and the chain length of the surfactant further confirms that cellular toxicity is also dependent on surfactant hydrophobicity. In relation to the biodegradability of surfactants in mixed aerobic cultures, the low concentration effects of n-alkylcarboxylates on endogenous culture were investigated in some detail. There appear to be compounded indications that these surfactants are rapidly metabolized by the microorganisms of the mixed culture, at least for homologs lower than C10. PMID:3426221

  19. CHRONIC AEROBIC EXERCISE IMPROVES BLOOD PRESSURE DIPPING STATUS IN AFRICAN AMERICAN NON-DIPPERS

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Chenyi; Diaz, Keith M.; Kretzschmar, Jan; Feairheller, Deborah L.; Sturgeon, Kathleen M.; Perkins, Amanda; Veerabhadrappa, Praveen; Williamson, Sheara T.; Lee, Hojun; Grimm, Heather; Babbitt, Dianne M.; Brown, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The effects of exercise training on nocturnal blood pressure (BP) dipping status remain unclear. African Americans have the highest prevalence of non-dippers compared to other racial/ethnic populations. In this 6-month study we tested the hypothesis that long-term aerobic exercise training would increase the levels of nocturnal BP dipping in African American non-dippers. Methods and Results We recruited African Americans who were non-diabetic, non-smoking and free of cardiovascular (CV) and renal disease. For this analysis, only African Americans with a non-dipping profile, defined as those with absence of a nocturnal decline in systolic or diastolic BP (< 10% of daytime values) which was determined by ambulatory BP monitoring. A pre-post design was employed with baseline and final evaluation including office blood pressure measurement, 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, fasted blood sampling, and graded exercise testing. Participants engaged in 6 months of supervised aerobic exercise training (AEXT). Following the AEXT intervention, there were significant increases in systolic BP dipping (baseline: 5.8 ± 3.9% vs. final: 9.4 ± 6.1%, p=0.0055) and pulse pressure dipping (Baseline: −3.1% ± 6.6% vs. final: 5.0% ± 12.8%, p=0.0109). Of the 18 participants with a non-dipping profile at baseline, 8 were non-classified as non-dippers after the AEXT intervention. There were no significant changes in office SBP/DBP following the AEXT intervention. Conclusions This study suggests that the non-dipping pattern of ambulatory BP can be improved by chronic AEXT in African American non-dippers and regardless of a change in 24-hr average BP. This finding may be clinically important because of the target organ implication of non-dipping nocturnal BP. PMID:25100263

  20. Evaluation of Verigene Blood Culture Test Systems for Rapid Identification of Positive Blood Cultures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Seok; Kang, Go-Eun; Kim, Han-Sung; Kim, Hyun Soo; Song, Wonkeun; Lee, Kyu Man

    2016-01-01

    The performance of molecular tests using the Verigene Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Blood Culture nucleic acid tests (BC-GP and BC-GN, resp.; Naosphere, Northbrook, IL, USA) was evaluated for the identification of microorganisms detected from blood cultures. Ninety-nine blood cultures containing Gram-positive bacteria and 150 containing Gram-negative bacteria were analyzed using the BC-GP and BC-GN assays, respectively. Blood cultures were performed using the Bactec blood culture system (BD Diagnostic Systems, Franklin Lakes, NJ, USA) and conventional identification and antibiotic-susceptibility tests were performed using a MicroScan system (Siemens, West Sacramento, CA, USA). When a single strain of bacteria was isolated from the blood culture, Verigene assays correctly identified 97.9% (94/96) of Gram-positive bacteria and 93.8% (137/146) of Gram-negative bacteria. Resistance genes mecA and vanA were correctly detected by the BC-GP assay, while the extended-spectrum β-lactamase CTX-M and the carbapenemase OXA resistance gene were detected from 30 cases cultures by the BC-GN assay. The BC-GP and BC-GN assays showed high agreement with conventional identification and susceptibility tests. These tests are useful for rapid identification of microorganisms and the detection of clinically important resistance genes from positive Bactec blood cultures.

  1. Aerobic microbiology and culture sensitivity of head and neck space infection of odontogenic origin

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amit; Ramola, Vikas; Nautiyal, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Context: Head and neck space infections source, age, gender, tooth involved, fascial spaces involved, microbiological study of aerobic flora, and antibiotic susceptibilities. Aims: The aim of the present study is to identify causative aerobic microorganisms responsible for deep fascial spaces of head and neck infections and evaluate the resistance of antibiotics used in the treatment of such. Settings and Design: Prospective study in 100 patients. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was conducted on 100 patients who reported in the outpatient department and fulfilled the inclusion criteria to study aerobic microbiology and antibiotic sensitivity in head and neck space infection of odontogenic origin. Pus sample was obtained either by aspiration or by swab stick from the involved spaces, and culture and sensitivity tests were performed. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square test and level of significance. Results: Result showed aerobic Gram-positive isolates were 73% and aerobic Gram-negative isolates were 18%. Nine percent cases showed no growth. Streptococcus viridans was the highest isolate in 47% cases among Gram-positive bacteria, and in Gram-negative, Klebsiella pneumoniae was the highest isolate of total cases 11%. Amoxicillin showed resistance (48.4%) as compared to other antibiotics such as ceftriaxone, carbenicillin, amikacin, and imipenem had significantly higher sensitivity. Conclusions: Amoxicillin with clavulanic acid showed (64.8%) efficacy for all organisms isolated, whereas ceftriaxone showed (82.4%) efficacy and could be used in odontogenic infections for both Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms. Substitution of third generation cephalosporin for amoxicillin in the empirical management of deep fascial space infections can also be used. Carbenicillin, amikacin, and imipenem showed (93.4%) sensitivity against all microorganisms and should be reserved for more severe infection. Newer and broad-spectrum antibiotics are more

  2. Exercise intensity modulates the change in cerebral blood flow following aerobic exercise in chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Andrew D; Crane, David E; Rajab, A Saeed; Swardfager, Walter; Marzolini, Susan; Shirzadi, Zahra; Middleton, Laura E; MacIntosh, Bradley J

    2015-08-01

    The mechanisms supporting functional improvement by aerobic exercise following stroke remain incompletely understood. This study investigated how cycling intensity and aerobic fitness influence cerebral blood flow (CBF) following a single exercise session. Thirteen community-living stroke survivors performed 20 min of semi-recumbent cycling at low and moderate intensities (40-50 and 60-70 % of heart rate reserve, respectively) as determined from an exercise stress test. CBF was quantified by arterial spin labeling MRI at baseline, as well as 30 and 50 min post-exercise. An intensity-dependent effect was observed in the right post-central and supramarginal gyri up to 50 min after exercise (uncorrected p < 0.005, cluster size ≥10). Regional CBF was increased 18 ± 17 % and reduced 8 ± 12 % following moderate- and low-intensity cycling, respectively. In contrast, CBF changes were similar between sessions in the right lentiform nucleus and mid-frontal gyrus, as well as the left temporal and parietal gyri. Aerobic fitness was directly related to posterior cingulate and thalamic CBF, and inversely related to precuneal CBF at rest (R (2) ≥ 0.75); however, no relationship between fitness and the post-exercise change in CBF was observed. Divergent changes in regional CBF were observed in the right parietal cortex following low- and moderate-intensity exercise, which suggests that intensity of prescribed exercise may be useful in optimizing rehabilitation.

  3. Effect of chlorate, molybdate, and shikimic acid on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in aerobic and anaerobic cultures.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Christy E; Beier, Ross C; Hume, Michael E; Horrocks, Shane M; Casey, Thomas A; Caton, Joel S; Nisbet, David J; Smith, David J; Krueger, Nathan A; Anderson, Robin C

    2010-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine factors that affect sensitivity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to sodium chlorate (5mM). In our first experiment, cultures grown without chlorate grew more rapidly than those with chlorate. An extended lag before logarithmic growth was observed in anaerobic but not aerobic cultures containing chlorate. Chlorate inhibition of growth during aerobic culture began later than that observed in anaerobic cultures but persisted once inhibition was apparent. Conversely, anaerobic cultures appeared to adapt to chlorate after approximately 10h of incubation, exhibiting rapid compensatory growth. In anaerobic chlorate-containing cultures, 20% of total viable counts were resistant to chlorate by 6h and had propagated to 100% resistance (>10(9)CFU mL(-1)) by 24h. In the aerobic chlorate-containing cultures, 12.9% of colonies had detectable resistance to chlorate by 6h, but only 1% retained detectable resistance at 24h, likely because these cultures had opportunity to respire on oxygen and were thus not enriched via the selective pressure of chlorate. In another study, treatment with shikimic acid (0.34 mM), molybdate (1mM) or their combination had little effect on aerobic or anaerobic growth of Salmonella in the absence of added chlorate. As observed in our earlier study, chlorate resistance was not detected in any cultures without added chlorate. Chlorate resistant Salmonella were recovered at equivalent numbers regardless of treatment after 8h of aerobic or anaerobic culture with added chlorate; however, by 24h incubation chlorate sensitivity was completely restored to aerobic but not anaerobic cultures treated with shikimic acid or molybdate but not their combination. Results indicate that anaerobic adaptation of S. Typhimurium to sodium chlorate during pure culture is likely due to the selective propagation of low numbers of cells exhibiting spontaneous resistance to chlorate and this resistance is not reversible by

  4. Culturing aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and mammalian cells with a microfluidic differential oxygenator.

    PubMed

    Lam, Raymond H W; Kim, Min-Cheol; Thorsen, Todd

    2009-07-15

    In this manuscript, we report on the culture of anaerobic and aerobic species within a disposable multilayer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device with an integrated differential oxygenator. A gas-filled microchannel network functioning as an oxygen-nitrogen mixer generates differential oxygen concentration. By controlling the relative flow rate of the oxygen and nitrogen input gases, the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in proximal microchannels filled with culture media are precisely regulated by molecular diffusion. Sensors consisting of an oxygen-sensitive dye embedded in the fluid channels permit dynamic fluorescence-based monitoring of the DO concentration using low-cost light-emitting diodes. To demonstrate the general utility of the platform for both aerobic and anaerobic culture, three bacteria with differential oxygen requirements (E. coli, A. viscosus, and F. nucleatum), as well as a model mammalian cell line (murine embryonic fibroblast cells (3T3)), were cultured. Growth characteristics of the selected species were analyzed as a function of eight discrete DO concentrations, ranging from 0 ppm (anaerobic) to 42 ppm (fully saturated).

  5. Predominance of Enterobacteriaceae isolates in early positive anaerobic blood culture bottles in BacT/Alert system.

    PubMed

    Chiueh, Tzong-Shi; Lee, Shih-Yi; Tang, Sheng-Hui; Lu, Jang-Jih; Sun, Jun-Ren

    2013-03-01

    We collected and analyzed the time to detection (TTD) of blood cultures in the BacT/Alert automated system from 2002 to 2007. Among the 10,893 monomicrobial isolates from a total of 133,735 blood culture sets, the recoveries of aerobic bottles were compared with those of anaerobic bottles in this study. Significantly more Gram-positive cocci (except Staphylococcus aureus and enterococci), glucose nonfermentative Gram-negative bacteria, and yeast were recovered from aerobic bottles than from anaerobic bottles. The average TTD was 19.0 hr and 20.1 hr for the aerobic and anaerobic bottles, respectively, and 96.8% of the microorganisms were detected within the first 72 hr. Of the 5,489 microorganisms recovered from both of the blood culture bottle pair, microbial growth was significantly more often detected first in the anaerobic bottles than the aerobic bottles for Enterobacteriaceae except Serratia marcescens, while S. aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were more often detected first in the aerobic bottles. According to these data, we conclude that the earlier positivity of anaerobic bottles is a useful marker for rapid presumptive identification of Enterobacteriaceae infection.

  6. Improved diagnosis of orthopedic implant-associated infection by inoculation of sonication fluid into blood culture bottles.

    PubMed

    Portillo, María Eugenia; Salvadó, Margarita; Trampuz, Andrej; Siverio, Ana; Alier, Albert; Sorli, Lluisa; Martínez, Santos; Pérez-Prieto, Daniel; Horcajada, Juan P; Puig-Verdie, Lluis

    2015-05-01

    Sonication improved the diagnosis of orthopedic implant-associated infections (OIAI). We investigated the diagnostic performance of sonication fluid inoculated into blood culture bottles in comparison with that of intraoperative tissue and sonication fluid cultures. Consecutive patients with removed orthopedic hardware were prospectively included and classified as having OIAI or aseptic failure (AF) according to standardized criteria. The diagnostic procedure included the collection of five intraoperative tissue cultures and sonication of the removed device, followed by conventional culture of the sonication fluid. Cultures were incubated for 7 days (aerobic) or 14 days (anaerobic). In addition, 10 ml of sonication fluid was inoculated into each aerobic and anaerobic BacT/Alert FAN blood culture bottle and incubated in the automated blood culture system for 5 days. Of 75 included patients, 39 had OIAI and 36 AF. The sensitivity of sonication fluid inoculated into blood culture bottles (100%) was higher than that of conventional sonication fluid (87%; P = 0.05) or intraoperative tissue cultures (59%; P < 0.01). Previous antibiotic therapy reduced the culture sensitivity of conventional sonication fluid to 77% and that of intraoperative tissue to 55%, while it remained 100% for blood culture-inoculated sonication fluid. The time to positivity was shorter in blood culture-inoculated sonication fluid, with detection of 72% of microorganisms after 1 day of incubation, than for intraoperative tissue and conventional sonication fluid cultures, with detection of 18% and 28% of microorganisms, respectively. In conclusion, compared to conventional sonication fluid and intraoperative tissue cultures, sonication fluid inoculated into blood culture bottles improved the diagnosis of OIAI and considerably reduced the time to culture positivity.

  7. Fat Distribution, Aerobic Fitness, Blood Lipids, and Insulin Sensitivity in African-American and European-American Women

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Gary R.; Chandler-Laney, Paula C.; Brock, David W.; Lara-Castro, Cristina; Fernandez, Jose R.; Gower, Barbara A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine independent relationships of intra-abdominal adipose tissue (IAAT), leg fat, and aerobic fitness with blood lipids and insulin sensitivity (Si) in European-American (EA) and African-American (AA) premenopausal women. Ninety-three EA and ninety-four AA with BMI between 27 and 30 kg/m2 had IAAT by computed tomography, total fat and leg fat by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, aerobic fitness by a graded exercise test, African admixture (AFADM) by ancestry informative markers, blood lipids by the Ektachem DT system, and Si by glucose tolerance test. Independent of age, aerobic fitness, AFADM, and leg fat, IAAT was positively related to low-density lipoprotein–cholesterol (LDL-C), cholesterol-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) ratio, triglycerides (TGs), and fasting insulin (standardized β varying 0.16–0.34) and negatively related to HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and Si (standardized β −0.15 and −0.25, respectively). In contrast, independent of age, aerobic fitness, AFADM, and IAAT, leg fat was negatively related to total cholesterol, LDL-C, cholesterol-HDL ratio, TGs, and fasting insulin (standardized β varying −0.15 to −0.21) and positively related to HDL-C and Si (standardized β 0.16 and 0.23). Age was not independently related to worsening of any blood lipid but was related to increased Si (standardized β for Si 0.25, insulin −0.31). With the exception of total cholesterol and LDL-C, aerobic fitness was independently related to worsened blood lipid profile and increased Si (standardized β varying 0.17 to −0.21). Maintenance of favorable fat distribution and aerobic fitness may be important strategies for healthy aging, at least in premenopausal EA and AA women. PMID:19661963

  8. Fat distribution, aerobic fitness, blood lipids, and insulin sensitivity in African-American and European-American women.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Gary R; Chandler-Laney, Paula C; Brock, David W; Lara-Castro, Cristina; Fernandez, Jose R; Gower, Barbara A

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine independent relationships of intra-abdominal adipose tissue (IAAT), leg fat, and aerobic fitness with blood lipids and insulin sensitivity (S(i)) in European-American (EA) and African-American (AA) premenopausal women. Ninety-three EA and ninety-four AA with BMI between 27 and 30 kg/m(2) had IAAT by computed tomography, total fat and leg fat by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, aerobic fitness by a graded exercise test, African admixture (AFADM) by ancestry informative markers, blood lipids by the Ektachem DT system, and S(i) by glucose tolerance test. Independent of age, aerobic fitness, AFADM, and leg fat, IAAT was positively related to low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), cholesterol-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) ratio, triglycerides (TGs), and fasting insulin (standardized beta varying 0.16-0.34) and negatively related to HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and S(i) (standardized beta -0.15 and -0.25, respectively). In contrast, independent of age, aerobic fitness, AFADM, and IAAT, leg fat was negatively related to total cholesterol, LDL-C, cholesterol-HDL ratio, TGs, and fasting insulin (standardized beta varying -0.15 to -0.21) and positively related to HDL-C and S(i) (standardized beta 0.16 and 0.23). Age was not independently related to worsening of any blood lipid but was related to increased S(i) (standardized beta for S(i) 0.25, insulin -0.31). With the exception of total cholesterol and LDL-C, aerobic fitness was independently related to worsened blood lipid profile and increased S(i) (standardized beta varying 0.17 to -0.21). Maintenance of favorable fat distribution and aerobic fitness may be important strategies for healthy aging, at least in premenopausal EA and AA women.

  9. Performance of Gram staining on blood cultures flagged negative by an automated blood culture system.

    PubMed

    Peretz, A; Isakovich, N; Pastukh, N; Koifman, A; Glyatman, T; Brodsky, D

    2015-08-01

    Blood is one of the most important specimens sent to a microbiology laboratory for culture. Most blood cultures are incubated for 5-7 days, except in cases where there is a suspicion of infection caused by microorganisms that proliferate slowly, or infections expressed by a small number of bacteria in the bloodstream. Therefore, at the end of incubation, misidentification of positive cultures and false-negative results are a real possibility. The aim of this work was to perform a confirmation by Gram staining of the lack of any microorganisms in blood cultures that were identified as negative by the BACTEC™ FX system at the end of incubation. All bottles defined as negative by the BACTEC FX system were Gram-stained using an automatic device and inoculated on solid growth media. In our work, 15 cultures that were defined as negative by the BACTEC FX system at the end of the incubation were found to contain microorganisms when Gram-stained. The main characteristic of most bacteria and fungi growing in the culture bottles that were defined as negative was slow growth. This finding raises a problematic issue concerning the need to perform Gram staining of all blood cultures, which could overload the routine laboratory work, especially laboratories serving large medical centers and receiving a large number of blood cultures.

  10. The Effects of 8-Weeks Aerobic Exercise Program on Blood Lipids and Cholesterol Profile of Smokers vs. Non Smokers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taifour, Akef; AL-Shishani, Ahmad; Khasawneh, Aman; AL-Nawaiseh, Ali; Bakeer, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of 8-week aerobic exercise program on blood lipids and cholesterol profile of smoker's vs. non-smokers. A total of 34 male subjects (18 non-smokers and 16 smokers) took part in this study. Both groups were pre- and post tested in their blood-lipids and cholesterol profile before and after the 8-week…

  11. Association between respiratory muscle strength and reduction of arterial blood pressure levels after aerobic training in hypertensive subjects

    PubMed Central

    Galdino, Giovane; Silva, Andreia Maria; Bogão, José Angelo; Braz de Oliveira, Marcos Paulo; Araújo, Hayslenne Andressa Gonçalves de Oliveira; Oliveira, Maísa Sodoco; Maldonado, Ana Clara Desiderio; Ulisses de Oliveira, Herick; Borges, Juliana Bassalobre Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of present study was associate the increase of respiratory muscle strength with blood pressure levels in hypertensive subjects who underwent an aerobic exercise program. [Subjects and Methods] 90 hypertensive subjects were divided in two groups: intervention and control. All participants had an interview with a physiotherapist and were evaluated by 6-minute walk test, maximal inspiratory pressure, maximal expiratory pressure, heart rate, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure, before and after the 8 weeks. In the intervention group, the subjects underwent aerobic exercise program, 2 times a week for 8 weeks [Results] After the program, the levels of blood pressure were significantly reduced and the distance walked in the 6-minute walk test and the respiratory muscle strength were increased, compared to pre intervention and control group values. However, there was no correlation between the results provided by 6-minute walk test, maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure with systolic arterial blood pressure levels. Nonetheless, the distance walked correlated with respiratory muscle strength values, in the intervention group. [Conclusion] The present study demonstrated that the aerobic training was effective in reducing the arterial blood pressure in hypertensive subjects associated with an improvement of physical conditioning and respiratory muscle strength. PMID:28174465

  12. Blood culture of the canine patient.

    PubMed

    Hirsh, D C; Jang, S S; Biberstein, E L

    1984-01-15

    Blood for bacteriologic culture was obtained from 581 sick dogs. Of these, 134 (23%) were considered to have bacteremia. The conditions most frequently associated with bacteremia were malignant neoplasms and infections of the skeletal, cardiovascular, and urogenital systems. The most frequently isolated bacteria were members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and coagulase-positive staphylococci, in sum accounting for more than 50% of the 150 isolates. Most of the dogs with bacteremia had high proportions of immature neutrophils, segmented neutrophils, and monocytes in blood. Dogs with bacteremia and osteomyelitis due to staphylococci had normal hemograms. Blood from dogs with bacteremia due to gram-negative bacteria was more likely to have a high proportion of immature and segmented neutrophil leukocytes than was blood from dogs with bacteremia due to a gram-positive species. Toxic neutrophils were observed more often in blood obtained from patients with bacteremia due to gram-negative bacteria. The development of fever correlated with the bacteremic state regardless of the species of bacteria in the blood.

  13. Culturable aerobic and facultative bacteria from the gut of the polyphagic dung beetle Thorectes lusitanicus.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Noemi; Escudero, José A; San Millán, Álvaro; González-Zorn, Bruno; Lobo, Jorge M; Verdú, José R; Suárez, Mónica

    2015-04-01

    Unlike other dung beetles, the Iberian geotrupid, Thorectes lusitanicus, exhibits polyphagous behavior; for example, it is able to eat acorns, fungi, fruits, and carrion in addition to the dung of different mammals. This adaptation to digest a wider diet has physiological and developmental advantages and requires key changes in the composition and diversity of the beetle's gut microbiota. In this study, we isolated aerobic, facultative anaerobic, and aerotolerant microbiota amenable to grow in culture from the gut contents of T. lusitanicus and resolved isolate identity to the species level by sequencing 16S rRNA gene fragments. Using BLAST similarity searches and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses, we were able to reveal that the analyzed fraction (culturable, aerobic, facultative anaerobic, and aerotolerant) of beetle gut microbiota is dominated by the phyla Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria. Among Proteobacteria, members of the order Enterobacteriales (Gammaproteobacteria) were the most abundant. The main functions associated with the bacteria found in the gut of T. lusitanicus would likely include nitrogen fixation, denitrification, detoxification, and diverse defensive roles against pathogens.

  14. Aerobic exercise attenuates blood pressure reactivity to cold pressor test in normotensive, young adult African-American women.

    PubMed

    Bond, V; Mills, R M; Caprarola, M; Vaccaro, P; Adams, R G; Blakely, R; Roltsch, M; Hatfield, B; Davis, G C; Franks, B D; Fairfax, J; Banks, M

    1999-01-01

    Exaggerated blood pressure reactivity to behavioral stress has been observed in the African-American population, and such a pressor response is believed to play a role in hypertension. Regular aerobic exercise has been shown to exert an anti-hypertensive effect, and this may alter the blood pressure hyperreactivity observed in African Americans. To test the hypothesis that aerobic exercise attenuates pressor reactivity in African Americans, we studied eight healthy aerobically-trained normotensive African-American females and five similar sedentary females. The stress stimuli consisted of the cold pressor test with the foot immersed in ice water for two minutes. The aerobic exercise training protocol consisted of six weeks of jogging at 60-70% of peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), three days/week for 35 min/exercise session. Systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, total peripheral resistance, and forearm blood flow were measured. Manifestation of a training effect was illustrated by a 24.1 +/- 0.2% increase in VO2peak (26.9 +/- 1.2 mL x kg(-1) min(-1) vs 35.4 +/- 1.6 mL x kg(-1) min(-1)) (P<.05). Within the exercise-trained group there was a 6.3 +/- .15% decrease in systolic pressure (129 +/- 4.6 mm Hg vs. 121 +/- 5.4 mm Hg) (P<.05), and a 5.0 +/- .05% decrement in mean arterial blood pressure (99 +/- 3.3 mm Hg vs 94 +/- 3.6 mm Hg) (P<.05) during the cold pressor test. Pressor reactivity to cold stress did not change in the untrained group. Measures of heart rate, cardiac output, total peripheral resistance, and forearm blood flow were unaltered during conditions of the cold pressor test. We conclude that aerobic exercise attenuates the blood pressure reactivity to behavioral stress in young, adult normotensive African-American females. A lifestyle change such as exercising may play a role in reducing the risk of hypertension in African-American women.

  15. Measurement of Microbial DNA Polymerase Activity Enables Detection and Growth Monitoring of Microbes from Clinical Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Zweitzig, Daniel R.; Riccardello, Nichol M.; Morrison, John; Rubino, Jason; Axelband, Jennifer; Jeanmonod, Rebecca; Sodowich, Bruce I.; Kopnitsky, Mark J.; O’Hara, S. Mark

    2013-01-01

    Surveillance of bloodstream infections (BSI) is a high priority within the hospital setting. Broth-based blood cultures are the current gold standard for detecting BSI, however they can require lengthy incubation periods prior to detection of positive samples. We set out to demonstrate the feasibility of using enzymatic template generation and amplification (ETGA)-mediated measurement of DNA polymerase activity to detect microbes from clinical blood cultures. In addition to routine-collected hospital blood cultures, one parallel aerobic blood culture was collected and immediately refrigerated until being transported for ETGA analysis. After refrigeration holding and transport, parallel-collected cultures were placed into a BACTEC incubator and ETGA time-course analysis was performed. Of the 308 clinical blood cultures received, 22 were BACTEC positive, and thus were initially selected for ETGA time course analysis. The ETGA assay detected microbial growth in all 22 parallel-positive blood cultures in less time than a BACTEC incubator and also yielded genomic DNA for qPCR-based organism identification. In summary, feasibility of detecting microbes from clinical blood culture samples using the ETGA blood culture assay was demonstrated. Additional studies are being considered towards development of clinically beneficial versions of this methodology. PMID:24155986

  16. Detection of Neisseria meningitidis from negative blood cultures and cerebrospinal fluid with the FilmArray blood culture identification panel.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Joe; Klinker, Kenneth P; Borgert, Samuel J; Butler, Brittany M; Rand, Kenneth H; Iovine, Nicole M

    2014-06-01

    The FilmArray blood culture identification (BCID) panel is a rapid molecular diagnostic test approved for use with positive blood culture material. We describe a fatal case of meningococcemia with central nervous system (CNS) involvement detected using the BCID test with culture-negative blood and cerebrospinal fluid.

  17. CLA supplementation and aerobic exercise lower blood triacylglycerol, but have no effect on peak oxygen uptake or cardiorespiratory fatigue thresholds.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Nathaniel D M; Buckner, Samuel L; Cochrane, Kristen C; Bergstrom, Haley C; Goldsmith, Jacob A; Weir, Joseph P; Housh, Terry J; Cramer, Joel T

    2014-09-01

    This study examined the effects of 6 weeks of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) supplementation and moderate aerobic exercise on peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak), the gas exchange threshold (GET), the respiratory compensation point (RCP), and serum concentrations of cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and glucose in humans. Thirty-four untrained to moderately trained men (mean ± SD; age = 21.5 ± 2.8 years; mass = 77.2 ± 9.5 kg) completed this double-blind, placebo controlled study and were randomly assigned to either a CLA (Clarinol A-80; n = 18) or placebo (PLA; sunflower oil; n = 16) group. Prior to and following 6 weeks of aerobic training (50% VO2 peak for 30 min, twice per week) and supplementation (5.63 g of total CLA isomers [of which 2.67 g was c9, t11 and 2.67 g was t10, c12] or 7.35 g high oleic sunflower oil per day), each participant completed an incremental cycle ergometer test to exhaustion to determine their [Formula: see text] peak, GET, and RCP and fasted blood draws were performed to measure serum concentrations of cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and glucose. Serum triacylglycerol concentrations were lower (p < 0.05) in the CLA than the PLA group. For VO2 peak and glucose, there were group × time interactions (p < 0.05), however, post hoc statistical tests did not reveal any differences (p > 0.05) between the CLA and PLA groups. GET and RCP increased (p < 0.05) from pre- to post-training for both the CLA and PLA groups. Overall, these data suggested that CLA and aerobic exercise may have synergistic, blood triacylglycerol lowering effects, although CLA may be ineffective for enhancing aerobic exercise performance in conjunction with a 6-week aerobic exercise training program in college-age men.

  18. Six weeks of aerobic dance exercise improves blood oxidative stress status and increases interleukin-2 in previously sedentary women.

    PubMed

    Leelarungrayub, Donrawee; Saidee, Kunteera; Pothongsunun, Prapas; Pratanaphon, Sainetee; YanKai, Araya; Bloomer, Richard J

    2011-07-01

    This study evaluated the change in blood oxidative stress, blood interleukin-2, and physical performance following 6 weeks of moderate intensity and duration aerobic dance exercise in 24 sedentary women. Blood samples were collected at rest twice before (baseline) and after the 6-week intervention for analysis of protein hydroperoxide (PrOOH), malondialdehyde (MDA), total anti-oxidant capacity (TAC), and interleukin-2 (IL-2) levels. Maximal treadmill run time (Time(max)) and maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2max)) were also measured. All variables were statistically analyzed with a repeated measurement ANOVA and Tukey post hoc. No differences were noted in any variable during the baseline period (p > 0.05). After aerobic dance exercise, VO(2max), Time(max), TAC and IL-2 were significantly increased, whereas MDA levels were decreased significantly (p < 0.05). PrOOH did not change either between baseline measures or after exercise. It can be concluded that aerobic dance exercise at a moderate intensity and duration can improve physical fitness, decrease MDA, and increase TAC and IL-2 in previously sedentary women.

  19. Effect of selected monoterpenes on methane oxidation, denitrification, and aerobic metabolism by bacteria in pure culture.

    PubMed

    Amaral, J A; Ekins, A; Richards, S R; Knowles, R

    1998-02-01

    Selected monoterpenes inhibited methane oxidation by methanotrophs (Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, Methylobacter luteus), denitrification by environmental isolates, and aerobic metabolism by several heterotrophic pure cultures. Inhibition occurred to various extents and was transient. Complete inhibition of methane oxidation by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b with 1.1 mM (-)-alpha-pinene lasted for more than 2 days with a culture of optical density of 0.05 before activity resumed. Inhibition was greater under conditions under which particulate methane monooxygenase was expressed. No apparent consumption or conversion of monoterpenes by methanotrophs was detected by gas chromatography, and the reason that transient inhibition occurs is not clear. Aerobic metabolism by several heterotrophs was much less sensitive than methanotrophy was; Escherichia coli (optical density, 0.01), for example, was not affected by up to 7.3 mM (-)-alpha-pinene. The degree of inhibition was monoterpene and species dependent. Denitrification by isolates from a polluted sediment was not inhibited by 3.7 mM (-)-alpha-pinene, gamma-terpinene, or beta-myrcene, whereas 50 to 100% inhibition was observed for isolates from a temperate swamp soil. The inhibitory effect of monoterpenes on methane oxidation was greatest with unsaturated, cyclic hydrocarbon forms [e.g., (-)-alpha-pinene, (S)-(-)-limonene, (R)-(+)-limonene, and gamma-terpinene]. Lower levels of inhibition occurred with oxide and alcohol derivatives [(R)-(+)-limonene oxide, alpha-pinene oxide, linalool, alpha-terpineol] and a noncyclic hydrocarbon (beta-myrcene). Isomers of pinene inhibited activity to different extents. Given their natural sources, monoterpenes may be significant factors affecting bacterial activities in nature.

  20. [A case with Abiotrophia defectiva isolated from postoperative blood culture of a patient with diffuse peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Tanamachi, Chiyoko; Hashimoto, Kouji; Oyama, Nana; Horita, Rie; Yano, Tomomi; Tashiro, Naotaka; Fuyuta, Syuhei; Sakamoto, Teruo; Nakashima, Osamu

    2012-08-01

    We have recently detected Abiotrophia defectiva (A. defectiva) from postoperative blood culture of a patient with diffuse peritonitis. Pleomorphic Gram positive rod appearance and no growth on a standard sheep blood agar led us to suspect aerotolerant anaerobe. From the test results of simplified identification kit for anaerobes, we tentatively reported Clostridium tertium (C. tertium) to the clinician. However, the analysis of 16SrRNA sequence proved it to be A. defectiva. When Gram positive coccus or pleomorphic Gram positive rod are observed on blood culture, it is recommended to incubate Brucella HK (RS) blood agar plates for 24 hours at 35 degrees C both aerobically and anaerobically. The growth both aerobically and anaerobically suggests A. defectiva and Satellitism test and Rapid ID 32 STREP(SYSMEX) testing should be performed to identify the responsible bacteria. A. defectiva is Gram positive streptococcus and requires pyridoxal hydrochloride or L-cysteine to grow. It could be unidentified or misidentified and its particularity often leads incomplete report to the clinician. Our study shows that more careful examination will increase the detection of A. defectiva.

  1. An initial investigation into the ecology of culturable aerobic postmortem bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chun, Lauren P; Miguel, Marcus J; Junkins, Emily N; Forbes, Shari L; Carter, David O

    2015-12-01

    Postmortem microorganisms are increasingly recognized for their potential to serve as physical evidence. Yet, we still understand little about the ecology of postmortem microbes, particularly those associated with the skin and larval masses. We conducted an experiment to characterize microbiological and chemical properties of decomposing swine (Sus scrofa domesticus) carcasses on the island of Oahu, Hawaii, USA, during June 2013. Bacteria were collected from the head, limb, and larval mass during the initial 145h of decomposition. We also measured the pH, temperature, and oxidation-reduction potential of larval masses in situ. Bacteria were cultured aerobically on Standard Nutrient Agar at 22°C and identified using protein or genetic signals. Carcass decomposition followed a typical sigmoidal pattern and associated bacterial communities differed by sampling location and time since death, although all communities were dominated by phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria. Larval masses were reducing environments (~-200mV) of neutral pH (6.5-7.5) and high temperature (35°C-40°C). We recommend that culturable postmortem and larval mass microbiology and chemistry be investigated in more detail, as it has potential to complement culture-independent studies and serve as a rapid estimate of PMI.

  2. Benzoate-induced stress enhances xylitol yield in aerobic fed-batch culture of Candida mogii TISTR 5892.

    PubMed

    Wannawilai, Siwaporn; Sirisansaneeyakul, Sarote; Chisti, Yusuf

    2015-01-20

    Production of the natural sweetener xylitol from xylose via the yeast Candida mogii TISTR 5892 was compared with and without the growth inhibitor sodium benzoate in the culture medium. Sodium benzoate proved to be an uncompetitive inhibitor in relatively poorly oxygenated shake flask aerobic cultures. In a better controlled aerobic environment of a bioreactor, the role of sodium benzoate could equally well be described as competitive, uncompetitive or noncompetitive inhibitor of growth. In intermittent fed-batch fermentations under highly aerobic conditions, the presence of sodium benzoate at 0.15gL(-1) clearly enhanced the xylitol titer relative to the control culture without the sodium benzoate. The final xylitol concentration and the average xylitol yield on xylose were nearly 50gL(-1) and 0.57gg(-1), respectively, in the presence of sodium benzoate. Both these values were substantially higher than reported for the same fermentation under microaerobic conditions. Therefore, a fed-batch aerobic fermentation in the presence of sodium benzoate is promising for xylitol production using C. mogii.

  3. Direct Isolation of Candida spp. from Blood Cultures on the Chromogenic Medium CHROMagar Candida

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Lynn L.; Hospenthal, Duane R.; Murray, Clinton K.; Dooley, David P.

    2003-01-01

    CHROMagar Candida is a selective and differential chromogenic medium that has been shown to be useful for identification of Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida tropicalis, and perhaps Candida glabrata. Colony morphology and color have been well defined when CHROMagar Candida has been used to isolate yeast directly from clinical specimens, including stool, urine, respiratory, vaginal, oropharyngeal, and esophageal sources. Direct isolation of yeast on CHROMagar Candida from blood cultures has not been evaluated. We evaluated whether the color and colony characteristics produced by Candida spp. on CHROMagar Candida were altered when yeasts were isolated directly from blood cultures. Fifty clinical isolates of Candida were inoculated into aerobic and anaerobic blood culture bottles and incubated at 35°C in an automated blood culture system. When growth was detected, an aliquot was removed and plated onto CHROMagar Candida. As a control, CHROMagar Candida plates were inoculated with the same isolate of yeast grown on Sabouraud dextrose agar simultaneously. No significant difference was detected in color or colony morphology between the blood and control isolates in any of the tested organisms. All C. albicans (n = 12), C. tropicalis (n = 12), C. glabrata (n = 9), and C. krusei (n = 5) isolates exhibited the expected species-specific colony characteristics and color, whether isolated directly from blood or from control cultures. CHROMagar Candida can be reliably used for direct isolation of yeast from blood cultures. Direct isolation could allow mycology laboratories to more rapidly identify Candida spp., enable clinicians to more quickly make antifungal agent selections, and potentially decrease patient morbidity and mortality. PMID:12791890

  4. Effect of aerobic fitness on capillary blood volume and diffusing membrane capacity responses to exercise

    PubMed Central

    Tedjasaputra, Vincent; Bouwsema, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Endurance trained athletes exhibit enhanced cardiovascular function compared to non‐athletes, although it is considered that exercise training does not enhance lung structure and function.An increased pulmonary capillary blood volume at rest is associated with a higher V˙O2 max .In the present study, we compared the diffusion capacity, pulmonary capillary blood volume and diffusing membrane capacity responses to exercise in endurance‐trained males compared to non‐trained males.Exercise diffusion capacity was greater in athletes, secondary to an increased membrane diffusing capacity, and not pulmonary capillary blood volume.Endurance‐trained athletes appear to have differences within the pulmonary membrane that facilitate the increased O2 demand needed for high‐level exercise. Abstract Endurance‐trained athletes exhibit enhanced cardiovascular function compared to non‐athletes, allthough it is generally accepted that exercise training does not enhance lung structure and function. Recent work has shown that an increased resting pulmonary capillary blood volume (V C) is associated with a higher maximum oxygen consumption (V˙O2 max ), although there have been no studies to date examining how aerobic fitness affects the V C response to exercise. Based on previous work, we hypothesized that endurance‐trained athletes will have greater V C compared to non‐athletes during cycling exercise. Fifteen endurance‐trained athletes (HI: V˙O2 max 64.6 ± 1.8 ml kg−1 min−1) and 14 non‐endurance trained males (LO: V˙O2 max 45.0 ± 1.2 ml kg−1 min−1) were matched for age and height. Haemoglobin‐corrected diffusion capacity (DLCO), V C and diffusing membrane capacity (D M) were determined using the Roughton and Forster (1957) multiple fraction of inspired O2 (FIO2)‐DLCO method at baseline and during incremental cycle exercise up to 90% of peak O2 consumption. During exercise, both groups exhibited increases in DLCO, D M and V C

  5. Altered extracellular ATP, ADP, and AMP hydrolysis in blood serum of sedentary individuals after an acute, aerobic, moderate exercise session.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Cesar Eduardo Jacintho; Teixeira, Bruno Costa; Rockenbach, Liliana; Reischak-Oliveira, Alvaro; Casali, Emerson André; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2017-02-01

    Nucleotidases participate in the regulation of physiological and pathological events, such as inflammation and coagulation. Exercise promotes distinct adaptations, and can influence purinergic signaling. In the present study, we investigated soluble nucleotidase activities in the blood serum of sedentary young male adults at pre- and post-acute moderate aerobic exercise. In addition, we evaluated how this kind of exercise could influence adenine nucleotide concentrations in the blood serum. Sedentary individuals were submitted to moderate aerobic exercise on a treadmill; blood samples were collected pre- and post-exercise, and serum was separated for analysis. Results showed increases in ATP, ADP, and AMP hydrolysis post-exercise, compared to pre-exercise values. The ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase was also evaluated, showing an increased activity post-exercise, compared to pre-exercise. Purine levels were analyzed by HPLC in the blood serum, pre- and post-exercise. Decreased levels of ATP and ADP were found post-exercise, in contrast with pre-exercise values. Conversely, post-exercise levels of adenosine and inosine increased compared to pre-exercise levels. Our results indicate an influence of acute exercise on ATP metabolism, modifying enzymatic behavior to promote a protective biological environment.

  6. Coordination of Metabolism and Virulence Factors Expression of Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli Purified from Blood Cultures of Patients with Sepsis *

    PubMed Central

    Pettersen, Veronika Kuchařová; Mosevoll, Knut Anders; Lindemann, Paul Christoffer; Wiker, Harald G.

    2016-01-01

    One of the trademarks of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli is adaptation of metabolism and basic physiology to diverse host sites. However, little is known how this common human pathogen adapts to permit survival and growth in blood. We used label-free quantitative proteomics to characterize five E. coli strains purified from clinical blood cultures associated with sepsis and urinary tract infections. Further comparison of proteome profiles of the clinical strains and a reference uropathogenic E. coli strain 536 cultivated in blood culture and on two different solid media distinguished cellular features altered in response to the pathogenically relevant condition. The analysis covered nearly 60% of the strains predicted proteomes, and included quantitative description based on label-free intensity scores for 90% of the detected proteins. Statistical comparison of anaerobic and aerobic blood cultures revealed 32 differentially expressed proteins (1.5% of the shared proteins), mostly associated with acquisition and utilization of metal ions critical for anaerobic or aerobic respiration. Analysis of variance identified significantly altered amounts of 47 proteins shared by the strains (2.7%), including proteins involved in vitamin B6 metabolism and virulence. Although the proteomes derived from blood cultures were fairly similar for the investigated strains, quantitative proteomic comparison to the growth on solid media identified 200 proteins with substantially changed levels (11% of the shared proteins). Blood culture was characterized by up-regulation of anaerobic fermentative metabolism and multiple virulence traits, including cell motility and iron acquisition. In a response to the growth on solid media there were increased levels of proteins functional in aerobic respiration, catabolism of medium-specific carbon sources and protection against oxidative and osmotic stresses. These results demonstrate on the expressed proteome level that expression of

  7. Bartonella henselae Infective Endocarditis Detected by a Prolonged Blood Culture.

    PubMed

    Mito, Tsutomu; Hirota, Yusuke; Suzuki, Shingo; Noda, Kazutaka; Uehara, Takanori; Ohira, Yoshiyuki; Ikusaka, Masatomi

    A 65-year-old Japanese man was admitted with a 4-month history of fatigue and exertional dyspnea. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a vegetation on the aortic valve and severe aortic regurgitation. Accordingly, infective endocarditis and heart failure were diagnosed. Although a blood culture was negative on day 7 after admission, a prolonged blood culture with subculture was performed according to the patient's history of contact with cats. Consequently, Bartonella henselae was isolated. Bartonella species are fastidious bacteria that cause blood culture-negative infective endocarditis. This case demonstrates that B. henselae may be detected by prolonged incubation of blood cultures.

  8. Bartonella henselae Infective Endocarditis Detected by a Prolonged Blood Culture

    PubMed Central

    Mito, Tsutomu; Hirota, Yusuke; Suzuki, Shingo; Noda, Kazutaka; Uehara, Takanori; Ohira, Yoshiyuki; Ikusaka, Masatomi

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old Japanese man was admitted with a 4-month history of fatigue and exertional dyspnea. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a vegetation on the aortic valve and severe aortic regurgitation. Accordingly, infective endocarditis and heart failure were diagnosed. Although a blood culture was negative on day 7 after admission, a prolonged blood culture with subculture was performed according to the patient's history of contact with cats. Consequently, Bartonella henselae was isolated. Bartonella species are fastidious bacteria that cause blood culture-negative infective endocarditis. This case demonstrates that B. henselae may be detected by prolonged incubation of blood cultures. PMID:27746451

  9. [Clinical consideration of coagulase negative Staphylococci isolated in blood culture].

    PubMed

    Oshitani, Yohei; Ishikawa, Tomoyuki; Murata, Ken; Aoyagi, Yoshiki; Yabe, Yasuyo; Aoshima, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    Despite blood culture's usefulness in antimicrobial therapy, fewer blood cultures and the infrequency of more than 1 set in cultures appear to be problems in Japan. Since June 2007 infection control team (ICT) recommended more than 1 set in blood sampling and intervention in positive blood culture, coagulase negative Staphylococci (CNS) has frequently been isolated from blood culture and its clinical significance is often difficult to judge. To determine the effect of ICT intervention, we evaluated the number of blood culture specimens, the frequency of more than 1 set in all blood culture specimens, and decision-making on antimicrobial treatment for CNS isolated retrospectively from blood. The study was divided into term I in August 2007 to July 2008, term II in August 2008 to July 2009, and term III in August 2009 to February 2010. We also analyzed how physicians treated infection or its suspicion after CNS and its drug susceptibility. The monthly number of blood culture specimens increased from 40.3 to 51.6 between terms I and III. The frequency of more than 1 set in a single blood culture session rose significantly from 67% to 89% between these terms (p < 0.001). The number of indeterminate also dropped cases significantly during these 2 terms from 27% to 6% (p = 0.017). Infection or suspected infection cases--45 of 49--had central vein catheter implantation. Inappropriate treatment by physicians in these cases also dropped significantly from 85% (11/13) to 45% (5/11) (p = 0.043) during the same 2 terms. ICT Intervention may thus increase the number of blood culture specimens, enable more than 1 set in blood sampling, make it easier to judge the presence of infection, and increase appropriate treatment by physicians. We thus believe that the quality of antimicrobial treatment could be improved through education such as ICT action.

  10. Quantitative proteome and transcriptome analysis of the archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum cultured under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Na; Pan, Cuiping; Nickell, Stephan; Mann, Matthias; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Nagy, István

    2010-09-03

    A comparative proteome and transcriptome analysis of Thermoplasma acidophilum cultured under aerobic and anaerobic conditions has been performed. One-thousand twenty-five proteins were identified covering 88% of the cytosolic proteome. Using a label-free quantitation method, we found that approximately one-quarter of the identified proteome (263 proteins) were significantly induced (>2 fold) under anaerobic conditions. Thirty-nine macromolecular complexes were identified, of which 28 were quantified and 15 were regulated under anaerobiosis. In parallel, a whole genome cDNA microarray analysis was performed showing that the expression levels of 445 genes were influenced by the absence of oxygen. Interestingly, more than 40% of the membrane protein-encoding genes (145 out of 335 ORFs) were up- or down-regulated at the mRNA level. Many of these proteins are functionally associated with extracellular protein or peptide degradation or ion and amino acid transport. Comparison of the transcriptome and proteome showed only a weak positive correlation between mRNA and protein expression changes, which is indicative of extensive post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in T. acidophilum. Integration of transcriptomics and proteomics data generated hypotheses for physiological adaptations of the cells to anaerobiosis, and the quantitative proteomics data together with quantitative analysis of protein complexes provide a platform for correlation of MS-based proteomics studies with cryo-electron tomography-based visual proteomics approaches.

  11. A quasi-universal medium to break the aerobic/anaerobic bacterial culture dichotomy in clinical microbiology.

    PubMed

    Dione, N; Khelaifia, S; La Scola, B; Lagier, J C; Raoult, D

    2016-01-01

    In the mid-19th century, the dichotomy between aerobic and anaerobic bacteria was introduced. Nevertheless, the aerobic growth of strictly anaerobic bacterial species such as Ruminococcus gnavus and Fusobacterium necrophorum, in a culture medium containing antioxidants, was recently demonstrated. We tested aerobically the culture of 623 bacterial strains from 276 bacterial species including 82 strictly anaerobic, 154 facultative anaerobic, 31 aerobic and nine microaerophilic bacterial species as well as ten fungi. The basic culture medium was based on Schaedler agar supplemented with 1 g/L ascorbic acid and 0.1 g/L glutathione (R-medium). We successively optimized this media, adding 0.4 g/L uric acid, using separate autoclaving of the component, or adding haemin 0.1 g/L or α-ketoglutarate 2 g/L. In the basic medium, 237 bacterial species and ten fungal species grew but with no growth of 36 bacterial species, including 22 strict anaerobes. Adding uric acid allowed the growth of 14 further species including eight strict anaerobes, while separate autoclaving allowed the growth of all tested bacterial strains. To extend its potential use for fastidious bacteria, we added haemin for Haemophilus influenzae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae and Eikenella corrodens and α-ketoglutarate for Legionella pneumophila. This medium allowed the growth of all tested strains with the exception of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis. Testing primoculture and more fastidious species will constitute the main work to be done, but R-medium coupled with a rapid identification method (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry) will facilitate the anaerobic culture in clinical microbiology laboratories.

  12. Effects of aerobic exercise intensity on 24-h ambulatory blood pressure in individuals with type 2 diabetes and prehypertension

    PubMed Central

    Karoline de Morais, Pâmella; Sales, Marcelo Magalhães; Alves de Almeida, Jeeser; Motta-Santos, Daisy; Victor de Sousa, Caio; Simões, Herbert Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To verify the effects of different intensities of aerobic exercise on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (BP) responses in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) and prehypertension. [Subjects and Methods] Ten individuals with T2D and prehypertension (55.8 ± 7.7 years old; blood glucose 133.0 ± 36.7 mg·dL−1 and awake BP 130.6 ± 1.6/ 80.5 ± 1.8 mmHg) completed three randomly assigned experiments: non-exercise control (CON) and exercise at moderate (MOD) and maximal (MAX) intensities. Heart rate (HR), BP, blood lactate concentrations ([Lac]), oxygen uptake (VO2), and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured at rest, during the experimental sessions, and during the 60 min recovery period. After this period, ambulatory blood pressure was monitored for 24 h. [Results] The results indicate that [Lac] (MAX: 6.7±2.0 vs. MOD: 3.8±1.2 mM), RPE (MAX: 19±1.3 vs. MOD: 11±2.3) and VO2peak (MAX: 20.2±4.1 vs. MOD: 14.0±3.0 mL·kg−1·min−1) were highest following the MAX session. Compared with CON, only MAX elicited post-exercise BP reduction that lasted for 8 h after exercise and during sleep. [Conclusion] A single session of aerobic exercise resulted in 24 h BP reductions in individuals with T2D, especially while sleeping, and this reduction seems to be dependent on the intensity of the exercise performed. PMID:25642036

  13. Time course of radiometric detection of positive blood cultures in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Meadow, W.L.; Schwartz, I.K.

    1986-05-01

    We have determined the time course of radiometric detection of microbial growth in 2348 positive blood culture specimens obtained at Wyler Children's Hospital during a 5-year interval. Overall 72 and 88% of isolates were detected within 48 and 72 hours after sampling, respectively. For pathogenic organisms aerobic detection was generally more rapid and more inclusive than anaerobic detection. At 48 hours of incubation the detection of six potential pathogens (Salmonella sp., Haemophilus influenzae, Group D streptococci, Neisseria meningitidis, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Candida sp.) was significantly delayed compared with detection of other pathogenic organisms recovered from blood. At 72 hours of incubation the detection rates remained less than 95% for H. influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella sp., coagulase-negative staphylococci, Group D streptococci and Candida sp. These data should assist clinical decisions regarding duration of antibiotic therapy for the presumptive diagnosis of bacteremia in children.

  14. Transport and metabolism of fumaric acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in aerobic glucose-limited chemostat culture.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mihir V; van Mastrigt, Oscar; Heijnen, Joseph J; van Gulik, Walter M

    2016-04-01

    Currently, research is being focused on the industrial-scale production of fumaric acid and other relevant organic acids from renewable feedstocks via fermentation, preferably at low pH for better product recovery. However, at low pH a large fraction of the extracellular acid is present in the undissociated form, which is lipophilic and can diffuse into the cell. There have been no studies done on the impact of high extracellular concentrations of fumaric acid under aerobic conditions in S. cerevisiae, which is a relevant issue to study for industrial-scale production. In this work we studied the uptake and metabolism of fumaric acid in S. cerevisiae in glucose-limited chemostat cultures at a cultivation pH of 3.0 (pH < pK). Steady states were achieved with different extracellular levels of fumaric acid, obtained by adding different amounts of fumaric acid to the feed medium. The experiments were carried out with the wild-type S. cerevisiae CEN.PK 113-7D and an engineered S. cerevisiae ADIS 244 expressing a heterologous dicarboxylic acid transporter (DCT-02) from Aspergillus niger, to examine whether it would be capable of exporting fumaric acid. We observed that fumaric acid entered the cells most likely via passive diffusion of the undissociated form. Approximately two-thirds of the fumaric acid in the feed was metabolized together with glucose. From metabolic flux analysis, an increased ATP dissipation was observed only at high intracellular concentrations of fumarate, possibly due to the export of fumarate via an ABC transporter. The implications of our results for the industrial-scale production of fumaric acid are discussed.

  15. Evaluation of the FilmArray Blood Culture Identification Panel: Results of a Multicenter Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Salimnia, Hossein; Lephart, Paul R.; Schreckenberger, Paul; DesJarlais, Sharon M.; Johnson, J. Kristie; Robinson, Gwen; Carroll, Karen C.; Greer, Amy; Morgan, Margie; Chan, Raymond; Loeffelholz, Michael; Valencia-Shelton, Frances; Jenkins, Stephen; Schuetz, Audrey N.; Daly, Judy A.; Barney, Trenda; Hemmert, Andrew; Kanack, Kristen J.

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of morbidity, mortality, and increased medical expense. Rapid diagnosis improves outcomes and reduces costs. The FilmArray blood culture identification panel (BioFire Diagnostics LLC, Salt Lake City, UT), a highly multiplexed PCR assay, can identify 24 etiologic agents of sepsis (8 Gram-positive, 11 Gram-negative, and 5 yeast species) and three antimicrobial resistance genes (mecA, vanA/B, and blaKPC) from positive blood culture bottles. It provides results in about 1 h with 2 min for assay setup. We present the results of an eight-center trial comparing the sensitivity and specificity of the panel with those of the laboratories' standard phenotypic identification techniques, as well as with molecular methods used to distinguish Acinetobacter baumannii from other members of the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex and to detect antimicrobial resistance genes. Testing included 2,207 positive aerobic blood culture samples, 1,568 clinical and 639 seeded. Samples were tested fresh or were frozen for later testing within 8 h after the bottles were flagged as positive by an automated blood culture system. At least one organism was detected by the panel in 1,382 (88.1%) of the positive clinical specimens. The others contained primarily off-panel organisms. The panel reported multiple organisms in 81 (5.86%) positive clinical specimens. The unresolved blood culture identification sensitivity for all target detections exceeded 96%, except for Klebsiella oxytoca (92.2%), which achieved 98.3% sensitivity after resolution of an unavoidable phenotypic error. The sensitivity and specificity for vanA/B and blaKPC were 100%; those for mecA were 98.4 and 98.3%, respectively. PMID:26739158

  16. High prevalence of Kingella kingae in joint fluid from children with septic arthritis revealed by the BACTEC blood culture system.

    PubMed

    Yagupsky, P; Dagan, R; Howard, C W; Einhorn, M; Kassis, I; Simu, A

    1992-05-01

    In an effort to improve detection of fastidious organisms, joint fluid aspirates of pediatric patients were inoculated into BACTEC 460 aerobic blood culture bottles, in addition to cultures on solid media. Culture records for the 1988 to 1991 period were reviewed to compare the performance of both methods for the recovery of pathogens. Overall, 216 children underwent a diagnostic joint tap, and 63 specimens grew significant organisms, including Kingella kingae in 14. While both methods were comparable for recovery of usual pathogens, with a single exception, K. kingae isolates were detected by the BACTEC system only. K. kingae appears to be a more common cause of septic arthritis in children than has been previously recognized. The BACTEC blood culture system enhances the recovery of K. kingae from joint fluid and improves bacteriologic diagnosis of pediatric septic arthritis.

  17. [Blood culture positivity: is it pathogen or contaminant?].

    PubMed

    Balıkçı, Ahmet; Belas, Zeliha; Eren Topkaya, Aynur

    2013-01-01

    Blood culture is the gold standard for diagnosis of bloodstream infections. Many studies have shown that rapid isolation and identification of the microorganisms in blood culture and initiation of early antimicrobial therapy are critically important to reduce the mortality rate. It was found that the rate of contamination in blood cultures is increasing with automated systems developed to facilitate the growth of microorganism and tracking positivity. It is more difficult to interpret a positive blood culture result especially in the case of having only one sample bottle. In this study the effect of growth time observed in the automated blood culture systems was evaluated in terms of interpretation of blood culture results as being pathogens or contaminants. A total of 1201 blood cultures tested in BACTEC 9120 (Becton Dickinson, USA) system in Maltepe University Hospital Medical Microbiology Laboratory, Istanbul, Turkey during one-year period were included in the study and growth times were recorded for positive bottles. The decision about the growth as being a pathogen or contamination was made by considering the clinical condition of the patient, the number of positive blood cultures and the results of inflammation markers (white blood cell counts, procalsitonin and CRP levels). Of the blood cultures 290 (24%) yielded positive results and 73% (212/290) of them were evaluated as pathogens, while 27% (78/290) were identified as contaminants. The mean detection time for clinically significant isolates was 17.87 hours and for contaminants was 40.56 hours. The difference between the growth time of pathogens and contaminants was found statistically significant (p< 0.0001). With regard to all positive results, it was detected that 66% of the bacteria grew within the first 24 hours. While 29.6% of the pathogens grew within 12 hours, none of the contaminants grew during that time. The evaluation of growth time among staphylococci in terms of methicillin resistance

  18. Controlled clinical comparison of plastic versus glass bottles of BacT/ALERT PF medium for culturing blood from children.

    PubMed

    Petti, Cathy A; Mirrett, Stanley; Woods, Christopher W; Reller, L Barth

    2005-01-01

    The plastic pediatric BacT/ALERT (bioMérieux, Durham, N.C.) PF (PPF) is a new nonvented aerobic culture medium in a clear plastic bottle designed to prevent breakage. We compared the performance of the new PPF bottle to that of the present glass BacT/ALERT PF bottle for the recovery of microorganisms as well as for the time to detection of growth in samples of blood obtained for culture from children. We found that the PPF and PF bottles were comparable for recovery of microorganisms and that the safety advantage of plastic bottles can be achieved without compromising performance.

  19. Combined effects of aerobic exercise and l-arginine ingestion on blood pressure in normotensive postmenopausal women: A crossover study.

    PubMed

    Puga, Guilherme M; de P Novais, Iane; Katsanos, Christos S; Zanesco, Angelina

    2016-04-15

    After menopause the incidence of cardiovascular diseases increases in women. A decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability has been pointed out to play a major role in this phenomenon. Since it is believed that l-arginine administration could improve NO bioavailability, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of acute l-arginine administration associated with aerobic exercise on blood pressure (BP), redox state and inflammatory biomarkers in normotensive postmenopausal women (NPW). Sixteen volunteers (57±6yr) were subjected to four experimental sessions (crossover design): arginine+exercise (A-E); arginine (ARG); exercise+placebo (EXE); control (CON). Each session was initiated with either 9g of l-arginine ingestion (ARG or A-E days), placebo (EXE day), or nothing (CON day). The participants performed 30min of aerobic exercise (A-E and EXE days) or sitting rest (CON and ARG days). Blood samples were collected before each session and 45min after the intervention. Office BP and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) were evaluated. NO/cGMP pathway, redox state and inflammatory biomarkers were measured. Systolic BP decreased during the 24-hour in A-E and EXE sessions. However, diastolic BP reduced only in A-E session. No changes were found in the biomarkers concentrations. In conclusion, the association was effective in lowering diastolic BP in NPW. Additionally, physical exercise alone promoted a long lasting effect on systolic BP measured by ABPM in this population, although this beneficial effect was not associated with changes in the cardio-inflammatory biomarkers. Possibly, other factors such as neural influences could be mediating this effect.

  20. Reducing blood culture contamination by a simple informational intervention.

    PubMed

    Roth, A; Wiklund, A E; Pålsson, A S; Melander, E Z; Wullt, M; Cronqvist, J; Walder, M; Sturegård, E

    2010-12-01

    Compared to truly negative cultures, false-positive blood cultures not only increase laboratory work but also prolong lengths of patient stay and use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, both of which are likely to increase antibiotic resistance and patient morbidity. The increased patient suffering and surplus costs caused by blood culture contamination motivate substantial measures to decrease the rate of contamination, including the use of dedicated phlebotomy teams. The present study evaluated the effect of a simple informational intervention aimed at reducing blood culture contamination at Skåne University Hospital (SUS), Malmö, Sweden, during 3.5 months, focusing on departments collecting many blood cultures. The main examined outcomes of the study were pre- and postintervention contamination rates, analyzed with a multivariate logistic regression model adjusting for relevant determinants of contamination. A total of 51,264 blood culture sets were drawn from 14,826 patients during the study period (January 2006 to December 2009). The blood culture contamination rate preintervention was 2.59% and decreased to 2.23% postintervention (odds ratio, 0.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.76 to 0.98). A similar decrease in relevant bacterial isolates was not found postintervention. Contamination rates at three auxiliary hospitals did not decrease during the same period. The effect of the intervention on phlebotomists' knowledge of blood culture routines was also evaluated, with a clear increase in level of knowledge among interviewed phlebotomists postintervention. The present study shows that a relatively simple informational intervention can have significant effects on the level of contaminated blood cultures, even in a setting with low rates of contamination where nurses and auxiliary nurses conduct phlebotomies.

  1. Reducing blood-culture contamination through an education program.

    PubMed

    Robert, Ruth R

    2011-01-01

    A blood culture is the cornerstone of an established etiological diagnosis of septicemia. Although it is not currently possible to eliminate blood-culture contamination, many interventions have been shown to reduce contamination rates. Retrospective data analysis through an initial audit with major departments at one hospital, including the intensive care unit and emergency department, showed that the blood-culture contamination rate was 4.8%, which is more than the set standard (ie, less than 3%). A decrease in blood-culture contamination rates from the initial 4.8% to less than 3% was obtained with a supervised training and evaluation program through collaborative efforts of the nursing and laboratory departments.

  2. Bacteriological culture of blood from critically ill neonatal calves.

    PubMed Central

    Fecteau, G; Van Metre, D C; Paré, J; Smith, B P; Higgins, R; Holmberg, C A; Jang, S; Guterbock, W

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of bacteremia in critically ill, neonatal calves with severe diarrhea or depression, and to describe the variety of bacteria involved. Two studies were conducted in the summers of 1991 and 1993 involving 190 neonatal calves, 1-day to 19-days-old. Bacteremia was detected by blood culture in 31% (28/90) of calves in study 1, and in 24% (19/79) of ill calves and 0% (0/21) of control calves in study 2. Bacteria cultured from blood included Escherichia coli (51% of all isolates), other gram-negative enterics (25.5%), gram-negative anaerobes (5.9%), gram-positive cocci (11.8%), and gram-positive rods (5.9%). Among clinically ill calves, the average age was significantly lower in the blood culture-negative group (5.5 d) than in the blood culture-positive group (7.5 d) (P = 0.004). Mean serum IgG concentration was significantly (P = 0.0001) lower in blood culture-positive calves (1.146 g/L) than in blood culture-negative calves (3.077 g/L). The mortality rate was significantly (P < 0.0001) higher in the blood culture-positive group (57.4%) than in the blood culture-negative group (15.1%). Bacteremia appeared to be a frequent entity in this particular rearing situation. Early recognition of the problem, as well as appropriate treatment, may be beneficial in increasing survival rates. Results also support the need to address the failure of passive transfer of maternal antibodies to prevent bacteremia in calves. Images Figure 1. PMID:9028592

  3. A survey of culturable aerobic and anaerobic marine bacteria in de novo biofilm formation on natural substrates in St. Andrews Bay, Scotland.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, Lucy; Garcia-Melgares, Manuel; Gmerek, Tomasz; Huddleston, W Ryan; Palmer, Alexander; Robertson, Andrew; Shapiro, Sarah; Unkles, Shiela E

    2011-10-01

    This study reports a novel study of marine biofilm formation comprising aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Samples of quartz and feldspar, minerals commonly found on the earth, were suspended 5 m deep in the North Sea off the east coast of St. Andrews, Scotland for 5 weeks. The assemblage of organisms attached to these stones was cultivated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the laboratory. Bacteria isolated on Marine Agar 2216 were all Gram-negative and identified to genus level by sequencing the gene encoding 16S rRNA. Colwellia, Maribacter, Pseudoaltermonas and Shewanella were observed in aerobically-grown cultures while Vibrio was found to be present in both aerobic and anaerobic cultures. The obligate anaerobic bacterium Psychrilyobacter atlanticus, a recently defined genus, was identified as a close relative of isolates grown anaerobically. The results provide valuable information as to the main players that attach and form de novo biofilms on common minerals in sea water.

  4. The performance of 4 different supplements and 5 blood culture bottles types in detection of bacteria and Candida spp. in simulated sterile body fluid cultures.

    PubMed

    Nylén, Therese; Saeedi, Baharak; Borg, Camilla; Ullberg, Måns; Özenci, Volkan

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the performance of 4 supplements: horse blood, fastidious organisms supplement (FOS), haemin isovitalex albumine (HIA), and brain heart infusion-haemin isovitalex albumine (BHI-HIA) and 5 blood culture bottles: Bactec Mycosis IC/F, Plus Aerobic/F, Peds Plus/F from the Bactec 9240 system, and BacT/Alert FA and BacT/Alert PF from the BacT/Alert 3D system, in detection of bacteria and Candida spp. in simulated sterile body fluids other than blood models. In total, 8 reference strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, Listeria monocytogenes, Candida albicans, and Candida parapsilosis) and 11 clinical bacteria and yeast isolates (6 isolates from cerebrospinal fluid and 5 isolates from blood) were included in this study. Horse blood, FOS, and HIA were significantly better than no supplements (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0002, and P = 0.05, respectively) in detection of bacteria. Interestingly, there was no significant difference between BHI-HIA and bottles without any supplements. Sixty bottles analyzed of which 59 (98.33%) bottles with horse blood, 53 (88.33%) with FOS, 45 (75.00%) with HIA, and 43 (71.67%) with BHI-HIA signaled positive. The positivity rates with horse blood were significantly higher than with HIA and BHI-HIA (P < 0.0005 and P < 0.0001, respectively). Similarly, the blood culture bottles with horse blood had shorter time to detection (TTD) compared to bottles with FOS and HIA (P < 0.05 and P < 0.0001, respectively). When yeasts were analyzed, almost all (124/125) blood culture bottles with Candida spp. signaled positive even in the absence of supplements. Bactec Mycosis IC/F had significantly shorter TTD compared to Bactec Peds Plus/F, Bactec Plus Aerobic/F, BacT/Alert FA, and BacT/Alert PF bottles in detection of Candida spp. (P < 0.005, P < 0.05, P < 0.001, and P < 0.001, respectively). The present study showed that

  5. Culturable Aerobic and Facultative Anaerobic Intestinal Bacterial Flora of Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) in Southern Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Junaid; Sagheer, Mehwish; Tabassum, Nazneen; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Using morphological analysis and biochemical testing, here for the first time, we determined the culturable gut bacterial flora (aerobes and facultative anaerobes) in the venomous Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) from South Asia. The findings revealed that these snakes inhabit potentially pathogenic bacteria including Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shewanella putrefaciens, Aeromonas hydrophila, Salmonella sp., Moraxella sp., Bacillus sp., Ochrobactrum anthropi, and Providencia rettgeri. These findings are of concern, as injury from snake bite can result in wound infections and tissue necrosis leading to sepsis/necrotizing fasciitis and/or expose consumers of snake meat/medicine in the community to infections. PMID:25002979

  6. Do maximal aerobic power and blood lactate concentration affect Specific Judo Fitness Test performance in female judo athletes?

    PubMed Central

    Garbouj, H; Selmi, MA; Sassi, R Haj; Yahmed, M Haj; Chamari, K

    2016-01-01

    The Special Judo Fitness Test (SJFT) has become the test most widely used by coaches and physical trainers for assessment of competitors’ judo-specific physical aptitude and training programme prescription. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the SJFT performance indices and both maximal aerobic power and the level of blood lactate concentrations in female judo athletes. Seventeen female judokas (age: 21.9±1.6 years, body mass: 74.6±27.4 kg, height: 164.5±8.6 cm; BMI: 27.1±8.0 kg · m-2) took part in this study. All participants performed the SJFT, 20 m multi-stage shuttle run test (MSRT), and 30 m straight sprint test (SST), from which we calculated both acceleration (10 m) and the maximal anaerobic speed (MAnS: flying 20 m sprint). A blood sample was taken 3 min after the SJFT. The number of throws was significantly correlated with estimated VO2max (r=0.795, p=0.0001) and both acceleration (r=0.63, p =0.006) and MAnS (r=0.76, p=0.0004). Peak blood lactate recorded after the SJFT was 13.90±1.39 mmol · l-1. No significant correlation was found between blood lactate concentration and the SJFT performance indices. The lack of significant correlation between blood lactate and SJFT performance suggests that lactic anaerobic metabolism has no effect on this type of judo-specific supra-maximal exercise. The observed results can provide coaches and strength and conditioning professionals with relevant information for the interpretation of SJFT performance and the prescription of specific training programmes for female judo athletes. PMID:28090141

  7. The Bactec FX Blood Culture System Detects Brucella melitensis Bacteremia in Adult Patients within the Routine 1-Week Incubation Period.

    PubMed

    Sagi, Moshe; Nesher, Lior; Yagupsky, Pablo

    2017-03-01

    The performance of the Bactec FX blood culture system for detecting Brucella bacteremia within the routine 1-week incubation period was assessed in a prospective study conducted in an area in southern Israel in which Brucella melitensis is endemic. Aerobic vials (BD Bactec Plus Aerobic/F medium) inoculated with blood specimens obtained from adult patients with positive Rose-Bengal screening test results were monitored for 4 consecutive weeks, and blind subcultures of negative vials were performed on solid media on days 7 and 28. During a 16-month period, a total of 31 (35.2%) of 88 cultures, obtained from 19 (38.0%) of 50 patients, were positive for Brucella melitensis The blood culture instrument identified 30 (96.8%) of 31 positive vials within 7 days of incubation; the single positive vial that was missed by the automated readings was detected only by the blind subculture performed on day 28. It is concluded that the Bactec FX system is able to detect the vast majority of episodes of Brucella bacteremia within the 1-week incubation protocol instituted in most clinical microbiology laboratories and without the need to perform blind subcultures of negative vials, enabling early diagnosis and saving labor and incubation time and space.

  8. Rapid Identification of Pathogens from Pediatric Blood Cultures by Use of the FilmArray Blood Culture Identification Panel

    PubMed Central

    Polanco, Wanda; Carter, Donna; Shulman, Stanford

    2014-01-01

    The performance of the FilmArray blood culture identification (BCID) panel has been studied in adult patients. We describe here an evaluation of this assay for the rapid identification of pathogens in Bactec Peds Plus/F and Bactec standard anaerobic/F bottles that contained blood samples from pediatric patients at a tertiary care children's hospital. PMID:25274998

  9. [Utility of prolonged incubation and terminal subcultures of blood cultures from immunocompromised patients].

    PubMed

    Soloaga, R; Procopio, A; Manganello, S; Ivanovic, V; Romay, N; Pirosanto, Y; Fernández, A; Zudiker, R; Echeverría, A; Nagel, C; del Castillo, M; López, E; Gutfraind, Z; Tokumoto, M; Guelfand, L

    2001-01-01

    The value of blind terminal subcultures (7 and 30 days) and prolonged incubation (30 days) of blood cultures from immunosuppressed patients was analyzed in the Fundación Favaloro, the Fundación para la Lucha contra las Enfermedades Neurológicas de la Infancia and the Hospital de Niños Ricardo Gutiérrez. A total of 2707 blood cultures and 369 patients were included (transplantation of solid organs 154, oncohematologic disorders 106 and solid tumors 109). Bact-Alert bottles were incubated at 35 degrees C for 30 days in the Bact-Alert System. Bottles with positive signals were routinely removed, and aliquots of the broth were Gram stained and subcultured aerobically in chocolate agar and Sabouraud agar. A total of 136 bacteremic episodes were obtained. The positivization time of blood cultures was 81.6% at 24 h, 93.3% at 48 h, 94.5% at 72 h and 97.7% within 7 days. Only 3 (2.2%) episodes were positive by blind terminal subcultures and 1 (0.75%) by prolonged incubation (14 days). The median time and range of positivization in hours were 13.8 and 2.2-168, respectively. The microorganisms isolated were coagulase negative staphylococci (n = 24), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 22), Staphylococcus aureus (n = 21), Escherichia coli (n = 18), Acinetobacter spp (n = 9), Candida spp (n = 8), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 6), Enterobacter cloacae (n = 5), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (n = 5), Enterococcus faecalis, Salmonella spp and Capnocytophaga sputigena (n = 2), Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterococcus faecium, Citrobacter diversus, Candida albicans, Klebsiella oxytoca, Chryseomonas luteola, Serratia marcescens, Abiotrophia spp, Campylobacter jejuni, Moraxella catarrhalis, Moraxella urethralis, Neisseria sicca, beta hemolytic group G streptococci, Rhodococcus equi, Micrococcus spp, Cryptococcus neoformans and Streptococcus mitis (n = 1). In our experience, blind terminal subcultures and prolonged incubation of blood cultures from immunosuppressed patients are unnecessary and

  10. Quality assurance in blood culture: A retrospective study of blood culture contamination rate in a tertiary hospital in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Chukwuemeka, Iregbu Kenneth; Samuel, Yakubu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Blood culture is a critical tool for diagnosing septicaemia. Quite frequently, contamination of blood sample poses a great challenge to accurate diagnosis. This study evaluated the rate of blood culture contamination in our hospital over a one-year period. Materials and Methods: It was a retrospective study of 1032 blood cultures carried out in a clinical laboratory of a tertiary hospital in North Central part of Nigeria between 2010 and 2011. Results: There were 730 blood cultures from paediatric and 302 adult patients. The overall yield was 22%; 107 out of the 730 were contaminated giving a contamination rate of 10.4%. Contamination rate was higher in children than in adult (11% vs 8%) specimen. These rates were much higher than the acceptable benchmark of 2-3%. The main contaminants were coagulase negative Staphylococcus, Bacillus species, Diphtheroids and Enterococcus species. Conclusion: Contamination rate is high, and mainly due to normal skin flora, suggesting aseptic collection challenges as the main cause. We recommend a review of the entire process of blood collection for culture and analysis with a view to instituting appropriate quality assurance measures to reduce the contamination rate. PMID:25013249

  11. "Bacillus hackensackii" sp. nov., a novel carbon dioxide sensitive bacterium isolated from blood culture.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tao; Heibler, Nueda; Tang, Y i-Wei

    2003-02-01

    An endospore-forming, gram-positive bacillus was isolated from a patient's blood culture. This bacillus did not grow in the presence of 5% carbon dioxide although it grew well in ambient air at 37 degrees C. Although the organism thus is an aerobic bacterium, its sensitivity to increased carbon dioxide concentration places it in a distinct category of gaseous atmospheric requirement: capnophobic. Based on its morphology, growth characteristics, biochemical reactions and a complete 16S rRNA gene nucleotide sequence analysis, this microorganism represents a novel Bacillus species. The clinical significance of this isolate is unknown. It is proposed that the bacterium be classified in the genus Bacillus as "Bacillus hackensackii".

  12. Rapid Detection of Polymyxin-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae from Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Jayol, Aurélie; Dubois, Véronique; Poirel, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Enterobacterial strains resistant to polymyxins are being increasingly reported worldwide. The conventional methods for detection of colistin-resistant isolates such as broth microdilution remain time-consuming (24 to 48 h), and methods such as disc diffusion and Etest are not reliable. Recently, the rapid polymyxin NP test was developed for rapid identification of polymyxin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. This test is based on the detection of glucose metabolism related to bacterial growth in the presence of a defined concentration of colistin (or polymyxin B). The formation of acid metabolites is evidenced by a color change of a pH indicator (red phenol) in less than 2 h. In this study, the polymyxin NP test was evaluated for detection of colistin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae directly from blood cultures. The test was performed with 73 blood culture sets (either spiked or clinical blood cultures) with various enterobacterial species. The test exhibited excellent discrimination between polymyxin-resistant and polymyxin-susceptible enterobacterial isolates, and results are obtained from blood cultures within 4 h. It is easy to perform and requires neither subculture nor a centrifugation step. This test is rapid, specific, and sensitive and allows early identification of polymyxin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae directly from blood cultures. PMID:27307457

  13. Effects of Aerobic Fitness and Adiposity on Coagulation Biomarkers in Men vs. Women with Elevated Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kathleen L.; Tomfohr, Lianne; Edwards, Kate; Knott, Cindy; Hong, Suzi; Redwine, Laura; Calfas, Karen; Rock, Cheryl L.; von Känel, Roland; Mills, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    A hypercoagulable state is a potential mechanism linking elevated blood pressure (BP), adiposity and a sedentary lifestyle to development of coronary heart disease (CHD). We examined relationships among aerobic fitness and adiposity in 76 sedentary subjects with elevated BP. Blood levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), D-dimer, von Willebrand factor (vWF) and thrombomodulin were assessed as biomarkers of coagulation. In individuals with elevated BP, percent body fat and fitness were associated with biomarkers indicative of a hypercoagulable state, even after demographic and metabolic factors were considered. D-dimer was positively associated with percent body fat (beta=0.37, p=0.003). PAI-1 was higher in men than in women (beta=−0.31, p=0.015) and associated with lower VO2peak (beta=−0.35, p=0.024). Thrombomodulin was positively associated with VO2peak (beta=0.56, p< 0.01). vWF was not significantly associated with fitness or adiposity. Our results emphasise that both percent body fat and physical fitness are important in the maintenance of haemostatic balance. PMID:23105963

  14. Factors affecting Brucella spp. blood cultures positivity in children.

    PubMed

    Apa, Hurşit; Devrim, Ilker; Memur, Seyma; Günay, Ilker; Gülfidan, Gamze; Celegen, Mehmet; Bayram, Nuri; Karaarslan, Utku; Bağ, Ozlem; Işgüder, Rana; Oztürk, Aysel; Inan, Seyhan; Unal, Nurrettin

    2013-03-01

    Brucella infections have a wide spectrum of symptoms especially in children, making the diagnosis a complicated process. The gold standard for the final diagnosis for brucellosis is to identify the Brucella spp. isolated from blood or bone marrow cultures. The main purpose of this work was to evaluate the factors affecting the isolation of Brucella spp. from blood cultures. In our study, the ratio of fever, presence of hepatomegaly, and splenomegaly were found to be higher in the bacteremic group. In addition, C-reactive protein levels and liver function enzymes were found to be higher in the bacteremic group. In our opinion, while evaluating the febrile child with suspected Brucella infection, we highly recommend sampling blood cultures regardless of the history of previous antimicrobial therapy and duration of the symptoms.

  15. Controlled clinical comparison of plastic and glass bottles of BacT/ALERT FA medium for culturing organisms from blood of adult patients.

    PubMed

    Petti, Cathy A; Mirrett, Stanley; Woods, Christopher W; Reller, L Barth

    2005-04-01

    A new, clear-plastic nonvented aerobic FA bottle, designed to prevent breakage, has been developed for the BacT/ALERT blood culture system. We assessed the new plastic FA bottle by comparing its performance with that of the current glass FA bottle for recovery of microorganisms and time to detection of growth in blood samples obtained for culture from adult patients with suspected bloodstream infections. We conclude that the BacT/ALERT plastic and glass FA bottles are comparable for recovery of microorganisms and that the safety advantage of plastic bottles can be achieved without compromising performance.

  16. Direct blood culturing on solid medium outperforms an automated continuously monitored broth-based blood culture system in terms of time to identification and susceptibility testing

    PubMed Central

    Idelevich, E.A.; Grünastel, B.; Peters, G.; Becker, K.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) should be available as soon as possible for patients with bloodstream infections. We investigated whether a lysis-centrifugation (LC) blood culture (BC) method, combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) identification and Vitek 2 AST, provides a time advantage in comparison with the currently used automated broth-based BC system. Seven bacterial reference strains were added each to 10 mL human blood in final concentrations of 100, 10 and 1 CFU/mL. Inoculated blood was added to the Isolator 10 tube and centrifuged at 3000 g for 30 min, then 1.5 mL sediment was distributed onto five 150-mm agar plates. Growth was observed hourly and microcolonies were subjected to MALDI-TOF MS and Vitek 2 as soon as possible. For comparison, seeded blood was introduced into an aerobic BC bottle and incubated in the BACTEC 9240 automated BC system. For all species/concentration combinations except one, successful identification and Vitek 2 inoculation were achieved even before growth detection by BACTEC. The fastest identification and inoculation for AST were achieved with Escherichia coli in concentrations of 100 CFU/mL and 10 CFU/mL (after 7 h each, while BACTEC flagged respective samples positive after 9.5 h and 10 h). Use of the LC-BC method allows skipping of incubation in automated BC systems and, used in combination with rapid diagnostics from microcolonies, provides a considerable advantage in time to result. This suggests that the usefulness of direct BC on solid medium should be re-evaluated in the era of rapid microbiology. PMID:26909155

  17. Real-time PCR assays compared to culture-based approaches for identification of aerobic bacteria in chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Melendez, J H; Frankel, Y M; An, A T; Williams, L; Price, L B; Wang, N-Y; Lazarus, G S; Zenilman, J M

    2010-12-01

    Chronic wounds cause substantial morbidity and disability. Infection in chronic wounds is clinically defined by routine culture methods that can take several days to obtain a final result, and may not fully describe the community of organisms or biome within these wounds. Molecular diagnostic approaches offer promise for a more rapid and complete assessment. We report the development of a suite of real-time PCR assays for rapid identification of bacteria directly from tissue samples. The panel of assays targets 14 common, clinically relevant, aerobic pathogens and demonstrates a high degree of sensitivity and specificity using a panel of organisms commonly associated with chronic wound infection. Thirty-nine tissue samples from 29 chronic wounds were evaluated and the results compared with those obtained by culture. As revealed by culture and PCR, the most common organisms were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) followed by Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The sensitivities of the PCR assays were 100% and 90% when quantitative and qualitative culture results were used as the reference standard, respectively. The assays allowed the identification of bacterial DNA from ten additional organisms that were not revealed by quantitative or qualitative cultures. Under optimal conditions, the turnaround time for PCR results is as short as 4-6 h. Real-time PCR is a rapid and inexpensive approach that can be easily introduced into clinical practice for detection of organisms directly from tissue samples. Characterization of the anaerobic microflora by real-time PCR of chronic wounds is warranted.

  18. Prolonged exposure of mixed aerobic cultures to low temperature and benzalkonium chloride affect the rate and extent of nitrification.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jeongwoo; Tezel, Ulas; Li, Kexun; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2015-03-01

    The combined effect of benzalkonium chloride (BAC) and prolonged exposure to low temperature on nitrification was investigated. Ammonia oxidation at 22-24°C by an enriched nitrifying culture was inhibited at increasing BAC concentrations and ceased at 15 mg BAC/L. The non-competitive inhibition coefficient was 1.5±0.9 mg BAC/L. Nitrification tests were conducted without and with BAC at 5mg/L using an aerobic, mixed heterotrophic/nitrifying culture maintained at a temperature range of 24-10°C. Maintaining this culture at 10°C for over one month in the absence of BAC, resulted in slower nitrification kinetics compared to those measured when the culture was first exposed to 10°C. BAC was degraded by the heterotrophic population, but its degradation rate decreased significantly as the culture temperature decreased to 10°C. These results confirm the negative impact of quaternary ammonium compounds on the nitrification process, which is further exacerbated by prolonged, low temperature conditions.

  19. Can a Single Session of a Community-Based Group Exercise Program Combining Step Aerobics and Bodyweight Resistance Exercise Acutely Reduce Blood Pressure?

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Romeu; Sousa, Nelson; Garrido, Nuno; Cavaco, Braulio; Quaresma, Luís; Reis, Victor Machado

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the acute effects of a single session of a community-based group exercise program combining step aerobics and bodyweight resistance exercise on blood pressure in healthy young adult women. Twenty-three healthy young adult women (aged 31.57 ± 7.87 years) participated in two experimental sessions (exercise and control) in a crossover study design. Blood pressure was monitored before, immediately after and at 10, 20 and 30 min of recovery. The exercise session consisted of four phases: 1) a warm-up (5 min of dance aerobics); 2) aerobic exercise training (30 min of step aerobics); 3) resistance exercise training (six sets of 12 repetitions of three bodyweight exercises in a circuit mode, 10 min); and 4) a cool-down (5 min of breathing and flexibility exercises); totaling 50 min of duration. Systolic blood pressure after exercise was significantly lower compared to control at the 10th min (−10.83 ± 2.13 vs. −2.6 ± 2.13 mmHg; p = 0.009), 20th min (−11.26 ± 2.13 vs. −3.04 ± 2.13 mmHg; p = 0.009) and 30th min of recovery (−10.87 ± 2.39 vs. −0.48 ± 2.39 mmHg; p = 0.004). A single session of a community-based group exercise program combining step aerobics and bodyweight resistance exercise was effective in inducing significant post-exercise hypotension in healthy young adult women. This type of low-cost exercise interventions may have an important role in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and in community health promotion. PMID:25713644

  20. Effect of cycle time on polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) production in aerobic mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Sebnem; Akman, Dilek; Cirik, Kevser; Cinar, Ozer

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cycle time on polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) production under aerobic dynamic feeding system. The acetate-fed feast and famine sequencing batch reactor was used to enrich PHB accumulating microorganism. Sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was operated in four different cycle times (12, 8, 4, and 2 h) fed with a synthetic wastewater. The system performance was determined by monitoring total dissolved organic carbon, dissolved oxygen, oxidation-reduction potential, and PHB concentration. In this study, under steady-state conditions, the feast period of the SBR was found to allow the PHB storage while a certain part of stored PHB was used for continued growth in famine period. The percentage PHB storages by aerobic microorganism were at 16, 18, 42, and 55% for the 12, 8, 4, and 2-h cycle times, respectively. The PHB storage was increased as the length of the cycle time was decreased, and the ratio of the feast compared to the total cycle length was increased from around 13 to 33% for the 12 and 2-h cycle times, respectively.

  1. [Pantothenic acid levels in blood of athletes at rest and after aerobic exercise].

    PubMed

    Rokitzki, L; Sagredos, A; Reuss, F; Petersen, G; Keul, J

    1993-12-01

    Ninety-six high-performance athletes of various disciplines were available for this investigation. All athletes had many years of training and competition experience. The pantothenic acid contents in the blood were determined by means of microbiological measurements. In addition to the pantothenic acid level at rest, measurements were made resp. physical exertion in 14 marathon runners and nine body builders. Blood was collected for determination of pantothenic acid before (a), after (b) and 2 h after exercise. Compared to the reference values for untrained persons (1.34 +/- 0.13 nmol/mL), the marathon runners with 0.76 (0.31-0.94) nmol/mL and soccer players with 1.19 (0.37-2.64) nmol/mL were below the reference values. According to relative frequencies, more than 30% of all athletes were below the lower limit (< 1.20 nmol/mL). The values in body builders/racing cyclists differed significantly from those in marathon racers (p < 0.001), which is presumably due to unallowed supplementation. During exercise, there was a significant increase in the pantothenic acid level in marathon runners (p < 0.01).

  2. Clinical significance of Bacillus species isolated from blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Weber, D J; Saviteer, S M; Rutala, W A; Thomann, C A

    1989-06-01

    To determine the clinical significance of blood isolates of Bacillus, we reviewed all blood cultures obtained at North Carolina Memorial Hospital between 1981 and 1985. Over the five-year study period the number of patients (incidence per 10,000 hospital admissions) from whom Bacillus was isolated increased from 4.97 in 1981 to 12.5 in 1985. The incidence per 1,000 blood cultures also increased from 1.12 in 1981 to 2.33 in 1985. Review of the medical records of 78 of the 95 patients (82%) with positive cultures allowed retrospective classification of five isolates (6.4%) as clinically significant, 33 isolates (42.3%) as possibly significant, and 40 isolates (51.3%) as nonsignificant. Underlying diseases in patients with clinically significant Bacillus bacteremia included burn trauma in two, leukemia in one, carcinoma in one, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage in one. All isolates judged to be clinically significant and the majority of possibly significant isolates were B cereus. We conclude that the isolation of Bacillus species from blood cultures is clinically significant in 5% to 10% of cases, that the incidence of Bacillus bacteremia is increasing, and that burn trauma should be added to the list of conditions known to predispose to clinically significant Bacillus bacteremia.

  3. PCR evaluation of false-positive signals from two automated blood-culture systems.

    PubMed

    Karahan, Z Ceren; Mumcuoglu, Ipek; Guriz, Haluk; Tamer, Deniz; Balaban, Neriman; Aysev, Derya; Akar, Nejat

    2006-01-01

    Rapid detection of micro-organisms from blood is one of the most critical functions of a diagnostic microbiology laboratory. Automated blood-culture systems reduce the time needed to detect positive cultures, and reduce specimen handling. The false-positive rate of such systems is 1-10%. In this study, the presence of pathogens in 'false-positive' bottles obtained from BACTEC 9050 (Becton Dickinson) and BacT/Alert (Biomérieux) systems was investigated by eubacterial and fungal PCR. A total of 169 subculture-negative aerobic blood-culture bottles (104 BacT/Alert and 65 BACTEC) were evaluated. Both fungal and eubacterial PCRs were negative for all BACTEC bottles. Fungal PCR was also negative for the BacT/Alert system, but 10 bottles (9.6%) gave positive results by eubacterial PCR. Sequence analysis of the positive PCR amplicons indicated the presence of the following bacteria (number of isolates in parentheses): Pasteurella multocida (1), Staphylococcus epidermidis (2), Staphylococcus hominis (1), Micrococcus sp. (1), Streptococcus pneumoniae (1), Corynebacterium spp. (2), Brachibacterium sp. (1) and Arthrobacter/Rothia sp. (1). Antibiotic usage by the patients may be responsible for the inability of the laboratory to grow these bacteria on subcultures. For patients with more than one false-positive bottle, molecular methods can be used to evaluate the microbial DNA in these bottles. False positives from the BACTEC system may be due to elevated patient leukocyte counts or the high sensitivity of the system to background increases in CO(2) concentration.

  4. Improved blood culture identification by FilmArray in cultures from regional hospitals compared with teaching hospital cultures.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Timothy J J; Bzdyl, Nicole; Chua, I-Ly Joanna; Urosevic, Nadezda M; Leung, Michael J; Geelhoed, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Rapid identification of bacteria isolated from blood cultures by direct matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is now in wide spread use in major centres but is not yet feasible in smaller hospital laboratories. A FilmArray multiplex PCR panel for blood culture isolate identification (BCID) provides an alternative approach to near point-of-care microbial identification in regional hospitals. We assessed the accuracy and time to identification of the BCID FilmArray in a consecutive series of 149 blood cultures from 143 patients in a teaching hospital and smaller regional hospitals, currently identified by direct MALDI-TOF and proprietary molecular methods. The BCID FilmArray contained 18 of 34 species and 20 of 23 species isolated from teaching and regional hospital, respectively. Overall, 85 % of the teaching hospital and 100 % of the regional hospital monomicrobial blood cultures were identified, compared with 60 and 68 %, respectively, for direct MALDI-TOF on the same cultures. There were no incorrect results from blood cultures containing Staphylococcus aureus, streptococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Enterobacteriaceae. The three discrepant results were all in mixed cultures. The mean reduction in time to identification of blood culture isolates was 53 h, which did not include the time required to transport cultures from regional centres to a central laboratory. The overall performance of the BCID FilmArray is stronger in blood cultures from smaller regional hospitals that encounter a narrower range of bacterial species dominated by the commonest species. This approach is more suited to smaller clinical laboratories than the MALDI-TOF direct method.

  5. Orange juice improved lipid profile and blood lactate of overweight middle-aged women subjected to aerobic training

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the influence of regular consumption of orange juice associated with aerobic exercise on the lipid profile of middle aged women, previously sedentary. Twenty-six women, 30 to 55 years old, volunteered to consume orange juice daily for 3 months and participate in an aerobic train...

  6. Differences in central systolic blood pressure and aortic stiffness between aerobically trained and sedentary individuals.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Pierre; Marenco, Patrice; Castagna, Olivier; Smulyan, Harold; Blacher, Jacques; Safar, Michel E

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate central (carotid) artery blood pressure (BP) in endurance athletes. Carotid-femoral (= aortic) pulse wave velocity (PWV) together with radial and carotid tonometry and pulse wave analysis were performed at rest in 30 endurance athletes and 30 sedentary controls, all males matched for age, height, brachial systolic BP (SBP), and diastolic BP. Whereas brachial BP was similar in the two groups, carotid SBP and pulse pressure (PP) were higher in endurance athletes than in controls irrespective of age (123.1 ± 2.17 vs. 110.2 ± 1.29 mm Hg, and 50.9 ± 1.95 vs. 34.1 ± 1.01 mm Hg; P < .0001 for both). PP amplification evaluated from the brachial/carotid PP ratio was lower in athletes than in controls (1.05 ± 0.04 vs. 1.40 ± 0.02; P < .0001). When compared with controls, athletes had lower PWV (7.81 ± 0.17 vs. 9.8 ± 0.23 m/second; P < .0001), higher reflected wave transit time/left ventricular ejection time ratio (P = .02), and lower heart rate (52.03 ± 1.54 vs. 68.9 ± 1.72 beats/minute; P < .0001). When matched for brachial BP, central SBP and PP were higher in endurance athletes than in sedentary controls. The possible negative pathophysiological impact of increased central BP on the overall favorable effects of training deserves further study.

  7. Quantitation of Candida CFU in initial positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Christopher D; Samsa, Gregory P; Schell, Wiley A; Reller, L Barth; Perfect, John R; Alexander, Barbara D

    2011-08-01

    One potential limitation of DNA-based molecular diagnostic tests for Candida bloodstream infection (BSI) is organism burden, which is not sufficiently characterized. We hypothesized that the number of CFU per milliliter (CFU/ml) present in an episode of Candida BSI is too low for reliable DNA-based diagnostics. In this study, we determined Candida burden in the first positive blood culture and explored factors that affect organism numbers and patient outcomes. We reviewed records of consecutive patients with a positive blood culture for Candida in the lysis-centrifugation blood culture system (Isolator, Wampole Laboratories, Cranbury, NJ) from 1987 to 1991. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were performed. One hundred fifty-two episodes of Candida BSI were analyzed. Patient characteristics included adult age (72%), indwelling central venous catheters (83%), recent surgery (29%), neutropenia (24%), transplant (14%), and other immune suppression (21%). Rates of treatment success and 30-day mortality for candidemia were each 51%. The median CFU/ml was 1 (mode 0.1, range 0.1 to >1,000). In the multivariate analysis, pediatric patients were more likely than adults to have high organism burdens (odds ratio [OR], 10.7; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 4.3 to 26.5). Initial organism density did not affect patient outcome. Candida CFU/ml in the first positive blood culture of a BSI episode varies greatly; >50% of cultures had ≤1 CFU/ml, a concentration below the experimental yeast cell threshold for reliable DNA-based diagnostics. DNA-based diagnostics for Candida BSI will be challenged by low organism density and the need for sufficient specimen volume; future research on alternate targets is warranted.

  8. Ability of Cecal Cultures to Inhibit Growth of Salmonella Typhimurium during Aerobic Incubation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Poultry can serve as reservoirs for Salmonella; however, chicks provided cultures of cecal bacteria develop resistance to colonization by Salmonella. Research has indicated that cecal bacteria metabolize organic acids to produce substances that inhibit Salmonella growth. Purpose: The...

  9. A transient elevated irisin blood concentration in response to prolonged, moderate aerobic exercise in young men and women.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, R R; Shockett, P; Webb, N D; Shah, U; Castracane, V D

    2014-02-01

    Irisin, a newly discovered, PGC-1α dependent myokine, has recently been shown to increase in circulation in response to sprint exercise. This study examined the effect of prolonged exercise on irisin concentrations in young men (n=7) as well as in young women (n=5) during different stages of the menstrual cycle. Seven young men completed 90 min of treadmill exercise at 60% of VO2max and a resting control trial. Five women completed the same exercise protocol in two different trials: during the early follicular phase and mid-luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Blood samples were collected and analyzed for irisin concentrations immediately before exercise, at 54 and 90 min of exercise, and at 20 min of recovery (R20). Findings revealed that by 54 min of a 90 min treadmill exercise protocol at 60% of VO2max, irisin concentrations significantly increased 20.4% in young men and 20.3% as well as 24.6% in young women during the early follicular and mid-luteal phases of the menstrual cycle, respectively. However, by 90 min of exercise as well as R20, irisin concentrations were no longer elevated. Stage of the menstrual cycle did not affect responses in young women. Findings indicate that prolonged aerobic exercise produces a transient increase in irisin concentrations during the first hour of exercise for both genders and suggest that this form of moderate exercise may be helpful in improving fat metabolism.

  10. Evaluation of a Novel Dry Sheet Culture Method for Rapid Enumeration of Total Aerobic Count in Foods.

    PubMed

    Teramura, Hajime; Iwasaki, Mihoko; Ushiyama, Masashi; Ogihara, Hirokazu

    2015-10-01

    A novel dry sheet culture method (Sanita-kun ACplus; SkACp) for rapid enumeration of total viable count has been developed. This rehydrated plate system comprises an adhesive sheet, nonwoven fabric coated with nutrients, and two types of water absorption polymers. In addition, SkACp facilitates methods for both rapid count (rapid mode: 24-h incubation) and accurate enumeration (standard mode: 48-h incubation) because it not only contains conventional 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride but also contains two kinds of new tetrazolium salts for rapid and accurate enumeration of total aerobic count. When SkACp was assessed with 91 microorganisms, 87 strains (95.6%), excluding lactic acid and psychrotrophic bacteria, formed red-colored colonies within 24 h, whereas all microorganisms tested formed colonies within 48 h. The SkACp method, with both 24 and 48 h of incubation, was compared with plate count agar (PCA) and 3M Petrifilm AC (PAC) by using 107 naturally contaminated foods. For all foods tested (n = 107), the linear correlation coefficients of 48-h counts on SkACp compared with PCA and PAC were 0.98 and 0.75, respectively, while the 24-h counts on SkACp compared with PCA and PAC were 0.77 and 0.96, respectively. For foods tested, excluding yogurt and lactic beverages ( n = 101), the linear correlation coefficients of 48-h counts on SkACp compared with PCA and PAC were 0.98 and 0.96, respectively, while the 24-h counts on SkACp compared with PCA and PAC were 0.96 and 0.95, respectively. These results demonstrated that SkACp (48 h) is a useful alternative for the enumeration of the total aerobic count for all foods, whereas SkACp (24 h) was also an effective method for rapid enumeration in foods, excluding yogurt and lactic beverages.

  11. First Report of Clostridium lavalense Isolated in Human Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Bourque, Christine; Thibault, Louise; Côté, Jean-Charles; Domingo, Marc-Christian

    2016-01-01

    An 88-year-old man was admitted to the hospital with worsening malaise, fever, and weakness. Anaerobic blood culture bottles revealed the presence of an anaerobic, Gram-positive sporulated bacillus. Empirical antibiotherapy with intravenous piperacillin-tazobactam was initiated. The patient defervesced after four days and was switched to oral amoxicillin on his 6th day of antibiotic therapy and later discharged from the hospital. Four months later, he had recovered. The bacterium was initially identified as Clostridium butyricum using anaerobic manual identification panel. 16S rRNA gene sequence and phylogenetic analysis showed the bacterium to be Clostridium lavalense, a recently described species with no previously published case of isolation in human diagnostic samples so far. This is the first report of Clostridium lavalense isolation from human blood cultures. Further studies are needed in order to elucidate the role of Clostridium lavalense in human disease and its virulence factors. PMID:27478446

  12. Quantitative proteomics and transcriptomics of anaerobic and aerobic yeast cultures reveals post-transcriptional regulation of key cellular processes.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Marco J L; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale; van Breukelen, Bas; Knijnenburg, Theo A; de Hulster, Erik A F; Reinders, Marcel J T; Pronk, Jack T; Heck, Albert J R; Slijper, Monique

    2007-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is unique among yeasts in its ability to grow rapidly in the complete absence of oxygen. S. cerevisiae is therefore an ideal eukaryotic model to study physiological adaptation to anaerobiosis. Recent transcriptome analyses have identified hundreds of genes that are transcriptionally regulated by oxygen availability but the relevance of this cellular response has not been systematically investigated at the key control level of the proteome. Therefore, the proteomic response of S. cerevisiae to anaerobiosis was investigated using metabolic stable-isotope labelling in aerobic and anaerobic glucose-limited chemostat cultures, followed by relative quantification of protein expression. Using independent replicate cultures and stringent statistical filtering, a robust dataset of 474 quantified proteins was generated, of which 249 showed differential expression levels. While some of these changes were consistent with previous transcriptome studies, many of the responses of S. cerevisiae to oxygen availability were, to our knowledge, previously unreported. Comparison of transcriptomes and proteomes from identical cultivations yielded strong evidence for post-transcriptional regulation of key cellular processes, including glycolysis, amino-acyl-tRNA synthesis, purine nucleotide synthesis and amino acid biosynthesis. The use of chemostat cultures provided well-controlled and reproducible culture conditions, which are essential for generating robust datasets at different cellular information levels. Integration of transcriptome and proteome data led to new insights into the physiology of anaerobically growing yeast that would not have been apparent from differential analyses at either the mRNA or protein level alone, thus illustrating the power of multi-level studies in yeast systems biology.

  13. Enterococcus spp. in a single blood culture: bacteremia or contamination?

    PubMed

    Khatib, R; Labalo, V; Sharma, M; Johnson, L B; Riederer, K

    2017-03-01

    We retrospectively evaluated adult cases with Enterococcus spp. in 1 blood culture (BC) (1/1/2010-12/31/2015; n=294) and stratified them into bacteremia or contamination. Contamination frequency was similar in community versus hospital-onset, E. faecalis versus E. faecium, and number of BC drawn per day. Contamination predictors were vancomycin-resistance, ampicillin-resistance, commensal organism copresence, and nonurinary/abdominal sources.

  14. Rapid Detection of ESBL-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Dortet, Laurent; Poirel, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    We rapidly identified extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producers prospectively among 245 gram-negative bacilli–positive cultured blood specimens using the Rapid ESBL Nordmann/Dortet/Poirel test and direct bacterial identification using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. This combination identified ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae within 30 min and had high predictive values. PMID:25695535

  15. Comparative Effects of Vigorous-Intensity and Low-Intensity Blood Flow Restricted Cycle Training and Detraining on Muscle Mass, Strength, and Aerobic Capacity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daeyeol; Singh, Harshvardhan; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Thiebaud, Robert S; Fahs, Christopher A; Rossow, Lindy M; Young, Kaelin; Seo, Dong-Il; Bemben, Debra A; Bemben, Michael G

    2016-05-01

    Traditional high-intensity aerobic training has been shown to improve muscle protein synthesis and aerobic capacity; however, recent research indicates that low-intensity aerobic training with blood flow restriction (BFR) may have similar effects. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of vigorous-intensity (VI) cycling vs. low-intensity cycling with BFR (LI-BFR) on muscle mass, strength, and aerobic capacity after training and subsequent detraining. Thirty-one physically active subjects were assigned to one of 3 groups: VI (n = 10, 60-70% heart rate reserve [HRR]), LI-BFR (n = 11, 30% HRR with BFR at 160-180 mm Hg), and no exercise control (n = 10, no exercise). Subjects in VI and LI-BFR cycled 3 times per week for 6 weeks (total 18 sessions). Body composition, muscle mass, strength, and aerobic capacity were measured pre, post, and after 3 weeks of detraining. A group × time interaction (p = 0.019) effect for both knee flexion and leg lean mass was found. For both VI and LI-BFR groups, knee flexion strength was significantly increased between pre and post (p = 0.024, p = 0.01) and between pre and 3 week-post (p = 0.039, p = 0.003), respectively. For the LI-BFR group, leg lean mass was significantly increased between pre and 3 week-post (p = 0.024) and between post and 3 week-post (p = 0.013). However, there were no significant differences between groups for any variables. The LI-BFR elicits an increase in the knee flexion muscle strength over time similar to the VI. An increase in the leg lean mass over time was seen in the LI-BFR, but not in VI and CON.

  16. Decreased mortality associated with prompt Gram staining of blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Barenfanger, Joan; Graham, Donald R; Kolluri, Lavanya; Sangwan, Gaurav; Lawhorn, Jerry; Drake, Cheryl A; Verhulst, Steven J; Peterson, Ryan; Moja, Lauren B; Ertmoed, Matthew M; Moja, Ashley B; Shevlin, Douglas W; Vautrain, Robert; Callahan, Charles D

    2008-12-01

    Gram stains of positive blood cultures are the most important factor influencing appropriate therapy. The sooner appropriate therapy is initiated, the better. Therefore, it is reasonable to expect that the sooner Gram stains are performed, the better. To determine the value of timely Gram stains and whether improvement in Gram stain turnaround time (TAT) is feasible, we compared data for matched pairs of patients with cultures processed promptly (<1 hour TAT) with data for patients with cultures not processed promptly (> or =1 hour TAT) and then monitored TAT by control charting.In 99 matched pairs, average difference in time to detection of positive blood cultures within a pair of patients was less than 0.1 hour. For the less than 1 hour TAT group, the average TAT and crude mortality were 0.1 hour and 10.1%, respectively; for the 1 hour or longer TAT group, they were 3.3 hours and 19.2%, respectively (P < .0001 and P = .0389, respectively). After multifaceted efforts, we achieved significant improvement in the TAT for Gram stains.

  17. Multicenter evaluation of the Verigene Gram-negative blood culture nucleic acid test for rapid detection of bacteria and resistance determinants in positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Uno, Naoki; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Yamakawa, Hiromi; Yamada, Maiko; Yaguchi, Yuji; Notake, Shigeyuki; Tamai, Kiyoko; Yanagisawa, Hideji; Misawa, Shigeki; Yanagihara, Katsunori

    2015-12-01

    The Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Nucleic Acid Test (BC-GN) is a microarray-based assay that enables rapid detection of 9 common Gram-negative bacteria and 6 resistance determinants directly from positive blood cultures. We compared the performance of BC-GN with currently used automated systems, testing 141 clinical blood cultures and 205 spiked blood cultures. For identification of BC-GN target organisms in clinical and spiked blood cultures, the BC-GN assay showed 98.5% (130/132) and 98.9% (182/184) concordance, respectively. Of 140 resistance genes positively detected in clinical and spiked blood cultures with the BC-GN test, 139 (99.3%) were confirmed by PCR, and the detection results were consistent with the resistance phenotypes observed. The BC-GN assay, thus, can potentially improve care for sepsis patients by enabling timely detection and targeted antimicrobial therapy.

  18. The effects of altitude/hypoxic training on oxygen delivery capacity of the blood and aerobic exercise capacity in elite athletes – a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hun-young; Hwang, Hyejung; Park, Jonghoon; Lee, Seongno; Lim, Kiwon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was designed as a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing effectiveness of altitude/hypoxic training (experimental) versus sea-level training (control) on oxygen delivery capacity of the blood and aerobic exercise capacity of elite athletes in Korea. [Methods] Databases (Research Information Service System, Korean studies Information Service System, National Assembly Library) were for randomized controlled trials comparing altitude/hypoxic training versus sea-level training in elite athletes. Studies published in Korea up to December 2015 were eligible for inclusion. Oxygen delivery capacity of the blood was quantified by red blood cell (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), erythropoietin (EPO); and aerobic exercise capacity was quantified by maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max). RBC, Hb, Hct, VO2max represented heterogeneity and compared post-intervention between altitude/hypoxic training and sea-level training in elite athletes by a random effect model meta-analysis. EPO represented homogeneity and meta-analysis performed by a fixed effect model. Eight independent studies with 156 elite athletes (experimental: n = 82, control: n = 74) were included in the metaanalysis. [Results] RBC (4.499×105 cell/ul, 95 % CI: 2.469 to 6.529), Hb (5.447 g/dl, 95 % CI: 3.028 to 7.866), Hct (3.639 %, 95 % CI: 1.687 to 5.591), EPO (0.711 mU/mL, 95% CI: 0.282 to 1.140), VO2max (1.637 ml/kg/min, 95% CI: 0.599 to 1.400) showed significantly greater increase following altitude/hypoxic training, as compared with sea-level training. [Conclusion] For elite athletes in Korea, altitude/ hypoxic training appears more effective than sea-level training for improvement of oxygen delivery capacity of the blood and aerobic exercise capacity. PMID:27298808

  19. Development of subsequent bloodstream infection in patients with positive Hickman catheter blood cultures and negative peripheral blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki-Ho; Cho, Oh-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Oh; Choi, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun Hee; Kim, Mi-Na; Kim, Dae-Young; Lee, Jung-Hee; Lee, Je-Hwan; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung; Lee, Dae Ho; Suh, Cheolwon; Kim, Sung-Han

    2011-05-01

    There are limited data on the incidence of subsequent bloodstream infection (BSI) and the effect of systemic antibiotics in patients who had positive catheter-drawn blood cultures (CBC) and negative peripheral blood cultures (PBC). We retrospectively reviewed all paired blood cultures from patients with Hickman catheter in the hematology-oncology ward between January 1997 and December 2008. There were 112 episodes with positive CBC and negative PBC. Nine episodes (8.0%; 95% CI, 3.0-13.1%) led to subsequent BSI within 28 days. Subsequent BSI developed in 6 of 31 episodes (19%) where empiric antibiotics were inappropriate but in 3 of 81 episodes (4%) where empiric antibiotics were appropriate (P = 0.01). Subsequent candidemia (50%, 2 of 4) was more common than subsequent bacteremia (6%, 7 of 108) (P = 0.03). In conclusion, for patients with positive CBC and negative PBC, the overall incidence of subsequent BSI was 8.0%, and inappropriate empiric antibiotics was associated with subsequent BSI.

  20. Study on optimization of proportion between fermented liquid and traditional cultural medium of bioflocculant production and its flocculant performance considering the aerobic fermentation of rice straw as substrate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhen; Wei, Li; Li, Chun-Ying; Wang, Zhe; Hu, Yi-Wen; Liu, Chang-Chao; Ma, Fang

    2014-11-01

    High cost of traditional culture medium of flocculant is the key element to limit the bioflocculant production. It's therefore much crucial to seek the economic production materials. In this research, part of the traditional culture medium of bioflocculant is replaced by the fermented liquid of rice straw to conduct the discussion on fermentation matching, optimization of fermentation condition and ability of flocculant production. The optimal proportion of aerobic saccharification liquid and traditional cultural medium of flocculant production is 1: 3. The flocculant rates of the economic culture medium of flocculant production are the highest, 65.49% and 71.24%, which are combined by 67d and 109d fermented saccharification liquid and the traditional cultural medium of flocculant production. The growth of flocculant production bacterium is in better situation for composite culture medium of flocculant production. The amount of bioflocculant is 40kg from per ton. The fermentation cost of flocculant saves by 25% comparing with the traditional culture medium. The simple aerobic fermentation technique opens up a new road for low-cost culture medium of flocculant production.

  1. Direct identification and susceptibility testing of positive blood cultures using high speed cold centrifugation and Vitek II system.

    PubMed

    Bazzi, Ali M; Rabaan, Ali A; Fawarah, Mahmoud M; Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A

    2016-06-13

    Compared to routine isolated colony-based methods, direct testing of bacterial pellets from positive blood cultures reduces turnaround time for reporting of antibiotic susceptibility. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy, and precision, of a rapid method for direct identification and susceptibility testing of blood cultures with the routine method used in our laboratory, using Vitek 2. A total of 60 isolates were evaluated using the candidate and the routine method. The candidate method had 100% accuracy for the identification of Gram negative bacteria, Staphylococcus and Enterococcus, 50% for Streptococcus and 33.3% for Corynebacterium species. Susceptibility testing of Gram negative isolates yielded 98-100% essential agreement. For Staphylococcus and Enterococcus isolates, essential agreement was 100% for 17 antibiotics except for moxifloxacin. Direct testing of blood culture samples with Vitek 2 produced reliable identification and susceptibility results 18-24h sooner for aerobic/anaerobic facultative Gram-negative bacteria and Gram-positive Staphylococcus and Enterococcus strains.

  2. Clinical Impact of Blood Culture Results in Acutely Ill Hospitalized Adult Patients With Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Vender, Robert J.; Vender, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Blood cultures are obtained clinically to confirm site and source of acute infection as well as to guide effective antibiotic therapies. Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at risk for blood stream infection (BSI) as identified from positive blood culture results. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed of 190 adult CF patients from January 1, 2001 through December 1, 2015. All positive blood culture results were identified as to clinical relevance and source of BSI. Results There were a total of 3,053 blood cultures. One hundred fifty-one positive blood cultures were considered pathogenic and clinically significant. Venous access device-related BSI was identified in 31 evaluable patients and 106 blood cultures. Nineteen patients and 45 positive blood cultures were attributable to organ-specific sources. Conclusion Two patterns of BSI were identified: 1) venous access device infections without causal mortality and 2) organ-specific site infections with associated 26% mortality. PMID:27829951

  3. Preferential Use of Carbon Sources in Culturable Aerobic Mesophilic Bacteria of Coptotermes curvignathus's (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) Gut and Its Foraging Area.

    PubMed

    Wong, W Z; H'ng, P S; Chin, K L; Sajap, Ahmad Said; Tan, G H; Paridah, M T; Othman, Soni; Chai, E W; Go, W Z

    2015-10-01

    The lower termite, Coptotermes curvignathus, is one of the most prominent plantation pests that feed upon, digest, and receive nourishment from exclusive lignocellulose diets. The objective of this study was to examine the utilization of sole carbon sources by isolated culturable aerobic bacteria among communities from the gut and foraging pathway of C. curvignathus. We study the bacteria occurrence from the gut of C. curvignathus and its surrounding feeding area by comparing the obtained phenotypic fingerprint with Biolog's extensive species library. A total of 24 bacteria have been identified mainly from the family Enterobacteriaceae from the identification of Biolog Gen III. Overall, the bacteria species in the termite gut differ from those of foraging pathway within a location, except Acintobacter baumannii, which was the only bacteria species found in both habitats. Although termites from a different study area do not have the same species of bacteria in the gut, they do have a bacterial community with similar role in degrading certain carbon sources. Sugars were preferential in termite gut isolates, while nitrogen carbon sources were preferential in foraging pathway isolates. The preferential use of specific carbon sources by these two bacterial communities reflects the role of bacteria for regulation of carbon metabolism in the termite gut and foraging pathway.

  4. A change of culture: reducing blood culture contamination rates in an Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Bentley, James; Thakore, Shobhan; Muir, L; Baird, Alastair; Lee, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Blood cultures are an important investigation to help tailor effective management for patients with severe sepsis. Frequent contaminated samples increase laboratory workload and can delay or cause incorrect changes to patient management. This can prolong patient hospitalisation, increase the risk of harm and increase cost to health boards. Current guidelines advocate a contamination rate of 2-3%. From January 2013 to November 2014 inclusive, the contamination rate was 4.74% in our Emergency Department, responsible for initial management and investigation of over 40 cases of sepsis per month. A Quality Improvement team was created to try to reduce contamination rates to the recommended target. An initial baseline survey of local staff showed good understanding of when to obtain a blood culture but there was variability in the methods and equipment used. A project was then conducted which focused on rationalising and standardising equipment and technique for blood culture sampling along with staff education to support this change. A simple department target of 30 days free from a contaminated blood culture was created which, if achieved, would ensure a contamination rate of less than 3%. This was supported by ongoing surveillance of contamination rates and investigation of contaminated sample cases. We were able to then identify high risk patients and factors which increased the chance of blood culture contamination. This allowed us to formulate solutions to help reduce the risks of contamination. Department achievements and learning points to help prevent further contamination were fed back positively to all staff. This project operated for 12-months and successfully reduced local contamination rates to 2.0%.

  5. Bioaugmentation of an Aerobic Culture Capable of Chlorinated Solvent Cometabolism to a Subsurface Test Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, M. E.; Semprini, L.; McCarty, P. L.; Hopkins, G.

    2002-12-01

    A butane-utilizing culture able to cometabolize chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) was bioaugmented into an aquifer test zone at Moffett Federal Airfield, CA. Microcosm bioaugmentation tests conducted with groundwater and aquifer solids collected from the test site indicated a strong potential for viability of the bioaugmented culture in the site subsurface. Microcosms bioaugmented with the butane-utilizing culture were able to degrade aqueous concentrations of 1,1-dichloroethylene (1,1-DCE) up to 1 mg/L and could successfully transform mixtures of 1,1-DCE, 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) and 1,1-dichloroethane (DCA) when fed butane. T-RFLP analyses showed the presence of bioaugmented organisms within the microcosms throughout the 10-month test period. An isolate from the butane-utilizing culture was grown in batch bottles containing mineral media and a butane-in-air headspace. Approximately 4 g dry weight of culture was harvested and bioaugmented to the field site. The site consisted of two parallel well legs, each with an injection well, two fully penetrating monitoring wells containing solid support media, three groundwater monitoring wells and an extraction well. One well leg was bioaugmented with the isolate and the other was used as an indigenous control leg. A mixture of 1,1-DCE, TCA and DCA (~50 ug/L, 135 ug/L and 150 ug/L respectively) was continuously pumped through both well legs with alternate pulses of dissolved oxygen and butane. Fifty percent removal of 1,1-DCE occurred within one day in the bioaugmented leg; however, it took about 6 days to achieve complete butane utilization and 1,1-DCE removal to below 2 ug/L. During this period DCA and TCA were reduced by 70- 90 percent and 30-50 percent respectively. When the butane/oxygen pulses were changed from a 1-hr cycle to a 24-hr cycle 1,1-DCE removal fell to 50 percent and DCA and TCA concentrations increased to influent levels. Upon returning to short pulse cycles, 1,1-DCE removal efficiency

  6. Monitoring infection: from blood culture to polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Book, Malte; Lehmann, Lutz Eric; Zhang, XiangHong; Stüber, Frank

    2013-06-01

    In patients with sepsis, diagnosis of blood stream infection (BSI) is a key concern to the therapist. Direct verification of pathogens in the blood stream executed by blood cultures (BC) still is regarded as the gold standard up to date. The quickest possible initiation of an appropriate antimicrobial therapy is a cornerstone of an effective therapy. Moreover, in this view BC can also serve to identify antimicrobial agents to target the pathogen. However, when employing BC the time needed until microbiological results are available ranges from 24 up to 72 h. Moreover, infections caused by multiple pathogens often remain undetected and concurrent antibiotic therapy may lower the overall sensitivity. Alternative pathogen characterization can be performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based amplification methods. Results using PCR can be obtained within 6-8 h. Therefore, the time delay until an appropriate therapy can be reduced enormously. Moreover, these methods have the potential to enhance the sensitivity in the diagnosis of blood stream infections. Therefore, PCR based methods might be a valuable adjunct to present procedures of diagnosing bacteraemia.

  7. The cultural gradient: culture moderates the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and ambulatory blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Patrick R

    2006-12-01

    A social gradient has been consistently demonstrated in Western countries with higher socioeconomic status (SES) related to lower blood pressure (BP). In non-Western countries, however, the social gradient is not always evident, with some countries appearing to show a reversed social gradient. It was hypothesized that culture moderates the social gradient, with the relationship between SES and BP differing as a function of culture. To investigate the idea of a "cultural gradient" a sample of Hispanic immigrants and Whites was studied. A total of 79 participants (30 Hispanic immigrant, 49 White) wore ambulatory blood pressure monitors for 24 h. The Hispanic immigrants also completed the Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans- II. Hispanic immigrants had lower SES and lower BP compared to Whites. A cultural gradient moderating the social gradient was evident with Hispanic immigrants displaying a positive relationship between SES and BP and Whites displaying a negative relationship. Among Hispanic immigrants, increased acculturation to Western culture decreased the positive relationship between SES and BP. Just as there is a social gradient with increasing socioeconomic status related to better cardiovascular health, there appears to be a cultural gradient with increasing acculturation to Western society related to worse cardiovascular health.

  8. Detection of Blood Culture Bacterial Contamination using Natural Language Processing

    PubMed Central

    Matheny, Michael E.; FitzHenry, Fern; Speroff, Theodore; Hathaway, Jacob; Murff, Harvey J.; Brown, Steven H.; Fielstein, Elliot M.; Dittus, Robert S.; Elkin, Peter L.

    2009-01-01

    Microbiology results are reported in semi-structured formats and have a high content of useful patient information. We developed and validated a hybrid regular expression and natural language processing solution for processing blood culture microbiology reports. Multi-center Veterans Affairs training and testing data sets were randomly extracted and manually reviewed to determine the culture and sensitivity as well as contamination results. The tool was iteratively developed for both outcomes using a training dataset, and then evaluated on the test dataset to determine antibiotic susceptibility data extraction and contamination detection performance. Our algorithm had a sensitivity of 84.8% and a positive predictive value of 96.0% for mapping the antibiotics and bacteria with appropriate sensitivity findings in the test data. The bacterial contamination detection algorithm had a sensitivity of 83.3% and a positive predictive value of 81.8%. PMID:20351890

  9. Influence of ammonium on the accumulation of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) in aerobic open mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Katja; Kleerebezem, Robbert; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2010-05-17

    Mixed microbial cultures enriched in feast-famine sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) can accumulate large amounts of the bioplastic PHB under conditions of ammonium starvation. If waste streams are to be used as a substrate, nutrient starvation may not always be achievable. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of ammonium on PHB production in the PHB production stage of the process. The biomass was enriched in an acetate-fed (carbon limited) feast-famine SBR operated at 30 degrees C, 1-d sludge residence time and with a cycle length of 12h. The biomass was used in three fed-batch experiments with medium C/N ratios of infinity (ammonium starvation), 40 Cmol Nmol(-1) (ammonium limitation) and 8 Cmol Nmol(-1) (ammonium excess) and acetate as the carbon source. Under conditions of ammonium starvation the biomass reached a maximum PHB content of 89 wt% after 7.6h, under ammonium limitation 77 wt% after 9.3h and under ammonium excess 69 wt% after 4.4h. PHB contents decreased after these maxima were reached. PHB production slowed down more with time with larger ammonium availability. Growth led to a dilution of the PHB pool after the maximum PHB content was reached. Nutrient starvation seems thus to be the best strategy for maximal PHB production.

  10. Molecular detection of antibiotic resistance genes from positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Hindiyeh, Musa Y; Smollan, Gill; Gefen-Halevi, Shiraz; Mendelson, Ella; Keller, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Rapid detection of the bacterial causative agent causing sepsis must be coupled with rapid identification of the antibiotic resistant mechanism that the pathogen might possess. Real-time PCR (qPCR)-based assays have been extensively utilized in the clinical microbiology field as diagnostic tools for the rapid detection of specific nucleic acid (NA) targets. In this chapter, we will discuss the technical aspects of using an internally controlled qPCR assay for the rapid detection of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase gene (bla KPC) in positive Bactec blood culture bottles. The multiplex qPCR (bla KPC/RNase P) utilizes specific primers and probes for the detection of the bacterial carbapenem resistance mechanism, bla KPC gene, and the internal control RNase P. The internal control of the qPCR assay is vital for detecting any inhibitors that are well known to be present in the blood culture bottles. Rapid detection of the antibiotic resistant mechanism present in the bacterial pathogen causing sepsis can help in better managing patients' infection.

  11. Proof of Concept to Isolate and Culture Primary Muscle Cells from Northern Elephant Seals to Study the Mechanisms that Maintain Aerobic Metabolism Under the Hypoxic Conditions of Breath-hold Diving

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    Cells from Northern Elephant Seals to Study the Mechanisms that Maintain Aerobic Metabolism Under the Hypoxic Conditions of Breath-hold Diving...To isolate and culture primary muscle cells from the swimming muscles of northern elephant seals . OBJECTIVES Objective 1. To test the...Proof of Concept to Isolate and Culture Primary Muscle Cells from Northern Elephant Seals to Study the Mechanisms that Maintain Aerobic Metabolism Under

  12. Pneumococcal pneumonia: differences according to blood culture results

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacteremia by Streptococcus pneumoniae has been traditionally associated with poor outcomes in patients with pneumonia; however, data on its impact on outcomes are limited and are sometimes contradictory. Methods We performed a prospective study in two hospitals in northern Spain in which cases diagnosed with pneumococcal pneumonia were selected from a cohort of hospitalized patients with pneumonia between January 2001 and July 2009. We compared patients with pneumococcal bacteremic pneumonia with those with pneumococcal non-bacteremic pneumonia. Results We compared 492 patients with negative blood culture and 399 with positive culture results. Host related factors were very similar in both groups. Severity of illness on admission measured by CURB-65 score was similar in both groups. Adjusted analysis showed a greater likelihood of septic shock during in-hospital course among patients with pneumococcal bacteremia (OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.2–3.5; P = 0.006). Likewise, patients with positive blood culture had greater in-hospital mortality (OR 2.1; 95% CI, 1.1 - -3.9; P = 0.02), 15-day mortality (OR 3.6; 95% CI, 1.7 - 7.4; P = 0.0006), and 30-day mortality (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.5 - 5; P = 0.002). Conclusions Although host related factors and severity on admission were very similar in the two groups, bacteremic patients had worse in-hospital course and outcomes. Bacteraemia in pneumococcal pneumonia is of prognostic significance. PMID:25096919

  13. What proportion of Salmonella Typhi cases are detected by blood culture? A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Mogasale, Vittal; Ramani, Enusa; Mogasale, Vijayalaxmi V; Park, JuYeon

    2016-05-17

    Blood culture is often used in definitive diagnosis of typhoid fever while, bone marrow culture has a greater sensitivity and considered reference standard. The sensitivity of blood culture measured against bone marrow culture results in measurement bias because both tests are not fully sensitive. Here we propose a combination of the two cultures as a reference to define true positive S. Typhi cases. Based on a systematic literature review, we identified ten papers that had performed blood and bone marrow culture for S. Typhi in same subjects. We estimated the weighted mean of proportion of cases detected by culture measured against true S. Typhi positive cases using a random effects model. Of 529 true positive S. Typhi cases, 61 % (95 % CI 52-70 %) and 96 % (95 % CI 93-99 %) were detected by blood and bone marrow cultures respectively. Blood culture sensitivity was 66 % (95 % CI 56-75 %) when compared with bone marrow culture results. The use of blood culture sensitivity as a proxy measure to estimate the proportion of typhoid fever cases detected by blood culture is likely to be an underestimate. As blood culture sensitivity is used as a correction factor in estimating typhoid disease burden, epidemiologists and policy makers should account for the underestimation.

  14. Bacillus cereus from blood cultures: virulence genes, antimicrobial susceptibility and risk factors for blood stream infection.

    PubMed

    Horii, Toshinobu; Notake, Shigeyuki; Tamai, Kiyoko; Yanagisawa, Hideji

    2011-11-01

    We characterized the profiles of virulence genes and antimicrobial susceptibility of Bacillus cereus isolates from blood cultures as well as the risk factors for blood stream infections (BSIs). The diversity of virulence gene patterns was found to be wide among 15 B. cereus isolates from BSIs and also among 11 isolates from contaminated blood cultures. The MicroScan broth microdilution method yielded results corresponding with those of the agar dilution (reference) method for levofloxacin, linezolid, and vancomycin, while the Etest results were consistent with the reference results for clindamycin, gentamicin, imipenem, levofloxacin, and linezolid. Compared with the reference values, however, some isolates showed marked differences of the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for ampicillin and clindamycin when determined using the MicroScan method, or the MICs for ampicillin, meropenem, and vancomycin when determined using the Etest method. Significantly more patients were treated with antimicrobials for more than 3 days during the 3-month period before isolation in the BSI group. Prior antimicrobial therapy may be a risk factor for BSIs due to B. cereus.

  15. Cardiac autonomic and haemodynamic recovery after a single session of aerobic exercise with and without blood flow restriction in older adults.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Marina Lívia Venturini; Sardeli, Amanda Veiga; Souza, Giovana Vergínia De; Bonganha, Valéria; Santos, Lucas Do Carmo; Castro, Alex; Cavaglieri, Cláudia Regina; Chacon-Mikahil, Mara Patrícia Traina

    2016-12-28

    This study investigated the autonomic and haemodynamic responses to different aerobic exercise loads, with and without blood flow restriction (BFR). In a crossover study, 21 older adults (8 males and 13 females) completed different aerobic exercise sessions: low load without BFR (LL) (40% VO2max), low load with BFR (LL-BFR) (40% VO2max + 50% BFR) and high load without BFR (HL) (70% VO2max). Heart rate variability and haemodynamic responses were recorded during rest and throughout 30 min of recovery. HL reduced R-R interval, the root mean square of successive difference of R-R intervals and high frequency during 30 min of recovery at a greater magnitude compared with LL and LL-BFR. Sympathetic-vagal balance increased the values for HL during 30 min of recovery at a greater magnitude when compared with LL and LL-BFR. Post-exercise haemodynamic showed reduced values of double product at 30 min of recovery compared to rest in LL-BFR, while HL showed higher values compared to rest, LL-BFR and LL. Reduced systolic blood pressure was observed for LL-BFR (30 min) compared to rest. Autonomic and haemodynamic responses indicate lower cardiovascular stress after LL-BFR compared to HL, being this method, besides the functional adaptations, a potential choice to attenuate the cardiovascular stress after exercise in older adults.

  16. Naturally Occurring Culturable Aerobic Gut Flora of Adult Phlebotomus papatasi, Vector of Leishmania major in the Old World

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Jaba; Braig, Henk R.; Rowton, Edgar D.; Ghosh, Kashinath

    2012-01-01

    Background Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a neglected, vector-borne parasitic disease and is responsible for persistent, often disfiguring lesions and other associated complications. Leishmania, causing zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) in the Old World are mainly transmitted by the predominant sand fly vector, Phlebotomus papatasi. To date, there is no efficient control measure or vaccine available for this widespread insect-borne infectious disease. Methodology/Principal Findings A survey was carried out to study the abundance of different natural gut flora in P. papatasi, with the long-term goal of generating a paratransgenic sand fly that can potentially block the development of Leishmania in the sand fly gut, thereby preventing transmission of leishmania in endemic disease foci. Sand flies, in particular, P. papatasi were captured from different habitats of various parts of the world. Gut microbes were cultured and identified using 16S ribosomal DNA analysis and a phylogenetic tree was constructed. We found variation in the species and abundance of gut flora in flies collected from different habitats. However, a few Gram-positive, nonpathogenic bacteria including Bacillus flexus and B. pumilus were common in most of the sites examined. Conclusion/Significance Our results indicate that there is a wide range of variation of aerobic gut flora inhabiting sand fly guts, which possibly reflect the ecological condition of the habitat where the fly breeds. Also, some species of bacteria (B. pumilus, and B. flexus) were found from most of the habitats. Important from an applied perspective of dissemination, our results support a link between oviposition induction and adult gut flora. PMID:22629302

  17. Effects of Aerobic Exercise on Serum Retinol Binding Protein4, Insulin Resistance and Blood Lipids in Obese Women

    PubMed Central

    TAGHIAN, Farzaneh; ZOLFAGHARI, Maryam; HEDAYATI, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Retinol binding protein4 (RBP4) is a type of adipokine which transports vitamin A to serum. RBP4 could be a bridge between obesity and insulin resistance. This study aimed to investigate the effects of aerobic exercises on RBP4 serum’s concentration and metabolic syndrome risk factors in obese women. Methods Twenty obese women with body max index 35.81±3.67Kg/m2, fat percentage 43.98±4.02, and waist to hip ratio 1.03±0.05 were included and were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. The experimental group received aerobic exercises for a period of 12 weeks each three sessions on treadmill workout. The treadmill speed were based on a 60-65 and 80-85 maximal heart rate percentage and duration of 15-20 and 45-50 minutes, at the beginning and the end of exercise, respectively. Body composition, serum glucose, insulin, TG, LDL-C, HDL-C, total cholesterol, and RBP4, were measured in both groups before and after the treatment by ELISA method. Insulin resistance was measured by HOMA-IR. To compare within group differences and between group comparisons t-correlated and t-independent tests were used, respectively. Results After 12 week aerobic exercises; weight, fat percentage, WHR, and BMI in the experimental group was significantly decreased (P<0.05). RBP4, insulin, insulin resistance, TG and HDL-C had significant differences between two groups. The cholesterol level, LDL-C and glucose did not have any significant changes. Conclusion The aerobic exercises can decrease body composition, insulin resistance, TG, and RBP4, so it can be beneficial for obese women’s health, because it. PMID:26060767

  18. Blood Culture Bottle and Standard Culture Bottle Methods for Detection of Bacterial Pathogens in Parapneumonic Pleural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Charoentunyarak, Surapan; Kananuraks, Sarassawan; Chindaprasirt, Jarin; Limpawattana, Panita; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacterial parapneumonic pleural effusions (PPEs) have high morbidity. The accurate identification of pathogens is vital for initiating the appropriate treatment. A previous study suggested that the use of blood culture bottles might improve the bacterial yield in PPEs. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the culture positivity rate by the blood culture bottles and the standard culture bottles in bacterial PPEs. Patients and Methods: Patients diagnosed with PPEs at the Khon Kaen Hospital, Khon Kaen, Thailand, which is an endemic area of melioidosis, were enrolled consecutively and prospectively. The study period was from June first, 2012 to December 31st, 2013. The inclusion criteria were adult patients aged > 18 years, with exudative, neutrophilic parapneumonic effusion. Of the pleural fluid samples, 5 mL from all the eligible patients were collected in both blood culture bottles and the standard culture bottles. Patient baseline characteristics, laboratory results, and culture results were collected and analyzed. Results: During the study period, 129 patients met the study criteria. The bacteria-positive rate of pleural fluid culture using the standard culture bottle was 14.0%, whereas the positive rate using blood culture bottles was 24.0% (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The blood culture bottle method is more effective than the standard culture bottle method for the detection of bacterial pathogens in PPE. PMID:26587217

  19. Can We Reduce Negative Blood Cultures With Clinical Scores and Blood Markers? Results From an Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Laukemann, Svenja; Kasper, Nina; Kulkarni, Prasad; Steiner, Deborah; Rast, Anna Christina; Kutz, Alexander; Felder, Susan; Haubitz, Sebastian; Faessler, Lukas; Huber, Andreas; Fux, Christoph A.; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Only a small proportion of blood cultures routinely performed in emergency department (ED) patients is positive. Multiple clinical scores and biomarkers have previously been examined for their ability to predict bacteremia. Conclusive clinical validation of these scores and biomarkers is essential. This observational cohort study included patients with suspected infection who had blood culture sampling at ED admission. We assessed 5 clinical scores and admission concentrations of procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP), lymphocyte and white blood cell counts, the neutrophil-lymphocyte count ratio (NLCR), and the red blood cell distribution width (RDW). Two independent physicians assessed true blood culture positivity. We used logistic regression models with area under the curve (AUC) analysis. Of 1083 patients, 104 (9.6%) had positive blood cultures. Of the clinical scores, the Shapiro score performed best (AUC 0.729). The best biomarkers were PCT (AUC 0.803) and NLCR (AUC 0.700). Combining the Shapiro score with PCT levels significantly increased the AUC to 0.827. Limiting blood cultures only to patients with either a Shapiro score of ≥4 or PCT > 0.1 μg/L would reduce negative sampling by 20.2% while still identifying 100% of positive cultures. Similarly, a Shapiro score ≥3 or PCT >0.25 μg/L would reduce cultures by 41.7% and still identify 96.1% of positive blood cultures. Combination of the Shapiro score with admission levels of PCT can help reduce unnecessary blood cultures with minimal false negative rates. The study was registered on January 9, 2013 at the ‘ClinicalTrials.gov’ registration web site (NCT01768494). PMID:26656373

  20. Can We Reduce Negative Blood Cultures With Clinical Scores and Blood Markers? Results From an Observational Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Laukemann, Svenja; Kasper, Nina; Kulkarni, Prasad; Steiner, Deborah; Rast, Anna Christina; Kutz, Alexander; Felder, Susan; Haubitz, Sebastian; Faessler, Lukas; Huber, Andreas; Fux, Christoph A; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2015-12-01

    Only a small proportion of blood cultures routinely performed in emergency department (ED) patients is positive. Multiple clinical scores and biomarkers have previously been examined for their ability to predict bacteremia. Conclusive clinical validation of these scores and biomarkers is essential.This observational cohort study included patients with suspected infection who had blood culture sampling at ED admission. We assessed 5 clinical scores and admission concentrations of procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP), lymphocyte and white blood cell counts, the neutrophil-lymphocyte count ratio (NLCR), and the red blood cell distribution width (RDW). Two independent physicians assessed true blood culture positivity. We used logistic regression models with area under the curve (AUC) analysis.Of 1083 patients, 104 (9.6%) had positive blood cultures. Of the clinical scores, the Shapiro score performed best (AUC 0.729). The best biomarkers were PCT (AUC 0.803) and NLCR (AUC 0.700). Combining the Shapiro score with PCT levels significantly increased the AUC to 0.827. Limiting blood cultures only to patients with either a Shapiro score of ≥4 or PCT > 0.1 μg/L would reduce negative sampling by 20.2% while still identifying 100% of positive cultures. Similarly, a Shapiro score ≥3 or PCT >0.25 μg/L would reduce cultures by 41.7% and still identify 96.1% of positive blood cultures.Combination of the Shapiro score with admission levels of PCT can help reduce unnecessary blood cultures with minimal false negative rates.The study was registered on January 9, 2013 at the 'ClinicalTrials.gov' registration web site (NCT01768494).

  1. Differential label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of Shewanella oneidensis cultured under aerobic and suboxic conditions by accurate mass and time tag approach.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ruihua; Elias, Dwayne A; Monroe, Matthew E; Shen, Yufeng; McIntosh, Martin; Wang, Pei; Goddard, Carrie D; Callister, Stephen J; Moore, Ronald J; Gorby, Yuri A; Adkins, Joshua N; Fredrickson, Jim K; Lipton, Mary S; Smith, Richard D

    2006-04-01

    We describe the application of LC-MS without the use of stable isotope labeling for differential quantitative proteomic analysis of whole cell lysates of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cultured under aerobic and suboxic conditions. LC-MS/MS was used to initially identify peptide sequences, and LC-FTICR was used to confirm these identifications as well as measure relative peptide abundances. 2343 peptides covering 668 proteins were identified with high confidence and quantified. Among these proteins, a subset of 56 changed significantly using statistical approaches such as statistical analysis of microarrays, whereas another subset of 56 that were annotated as performing housekeeping functions remained essentially unchanged in relative abundance. Numerous proteins involved in anaerobic energy metabolism exhibited up to a 10-fold increase in relative abundance when S. oneidensis was transitioned from aerobic to suboxic conditions.

  2. Differential Label-free Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Cultured under Aerobic and Suboxic Conditions by Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Ruihua; Elias, Dwayne A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Shen, Yufeng; McIntosh, Martin; Wang, Pei; Goddard, Carrie D.; Callister, Stephen J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-04-01

    We describe the application of liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC/MS) without the use of stable isotope labeling for differential quantitative proteomics analysis of whole cell lysates of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cultured under aerobic and sub-oxic conditions. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to initially identify peptide sequences, and LC coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LC-FTICR) was used to confirm these identifications, as well as measure relative peptide abundances. 2343 peptides, covering 668 proteins were identified with high confidence and quantified. Among these proteins, a subset of 56 changed significantly using statistical approaches such as SAM, while another subset of 56 that were annotated as performing housekeeping functions remained essentially unchanged in relative abundance. Numerous proteins involved in anaerobic energy metabolism exhibited up to a 10-fold increase in relative abundance when S. oneidensis is transitioned from aerobic to sub-oxic conditions.

  3. Identification of Gram-Negative Bacteria and Genetic Resistance Determinants from Positive Blood Culture Broths by Use of the Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Multiplex Microarray-Based Molecular Assay.

    PubMed

    Ledeboer, Nathan A; Lopansri, Bert K; Dhiman, Neelam; Cavagnolo, Robert; Carroll, Karen C; Granato, Paul; Thomson, Richard; Butler-Wu, Susan M; Berger, Heather; Samuel, Linoj; Pancholi, Preeti; Swyers, Lettie; Hansen, Glen T; Tran, Nam K; Polage, Christopher R; Thomson, Kenneth S; Hanson, Nancy D; Winegar, Richard; Buchan, Blake W

    2015-08-01

    Bloodstream infection is a serious condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The outcome of these infections can be positively affected by the early implementation of effective antibiotic therapy based on the identification of the infecting organism and genetic markers associated with antibiotic resistance. In this study, we evaluated the microarray-based Verigene Gram-negative blood culture (BC-GN) assay in the identification of 8 genus or species targets and 6 genetic resistance determinants in positive blood culture broths. A total of 1,847 blood cultures containing Gram-negative organisms were tested using the BC-GN assay. This comprised 729 prospective fresh, 781 prospective or retrospective frozen, and 337 simulated cultures representing 7 types of aerobic culture media. The results were compared to those with standard bacterial culture and biochemical identification with nucleic acid sequence confirmation of the resistance determinants. Among monomicrobial cultures, the positive percent agreement (PPA) of the BC-GN assay with the reference method was as follows; Escherichia coli, 100%; Klebsiella pneumoniae, 92.9%; Klebsiella oxytoca, 95.5%; Enterobacter spp., 99.3%; Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 98.9%; Proteus spp., 100%; Acinetobacter spp., 98.4%; and Citrobacter spp., 100%. All organism identification targets demonstrated >99.5% negative percent agreement (NPA) with the reference method. Of note, 25/26 cultures containing K. pneumoniae that were reported as not detected by the BC-GN assay were subsequently identified as Klebsiella variicola. The PPA for identification of resistance determinants was as follows; blaCTX-M, 98.9%; blaKPC, 100%; blaNDM, 96.2%; blaOXA, 94.3%; blaVIM, 100%; and blaIMP, 100%. All resistance determinant targets demonstrated >99.9% NPA. Among polymicrobial specimens, the BC-GN assay correctly identified at least one organism in 95.4% of the broths and correctly identified all organisms present in 54.5% of the broths

  4. Identification of Gram-Negative Bacteria and Genetic Resistance Determinants from Positive Blood Culture Broths by Use of the Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Multiplex Microarray-Based Molecular Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ledeboer, Nathan A.; Lopansri, Bert K.; Dhiman, Neelam; Cavagnolo, Robert; Carroll, Karen C.; Granato, Paul; Thomson, Richard; Butler-Wu, Susan M.; Berger, Heather; Samuel, Linoj; Pancholi, Preeti; Swyers, Lettie; Hansen, Glen T.; Tran, Nam K.; Polage, Christopher R.; Thomson, Kenneth S.; Hanson, Nancy D.; Winegar, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Bloodstream infection is a serious condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The outcome of these infections can be positively affected by the early implementation of effective antibiotic therapy based on the identification of the infecting organism and genetic markers associated with antibiotic resistance. In this study, we evaluated the microarray-based Verigene Gram-negative blood culture (BC-GN) assay in the identification of 8 genus or species targets and 6 genetic resistance determinants in positive blood culture broths. A total of 1,847 blood cultures containing Gram-negative organisms were tested using the BC-GN assay. This comprised 729 prospective fresh, 781 prospective or retrospective frozen, and 337 simulated cultures representing 7 types of aerobic culture media. The results were compared to those with standard bacterial culture and biochemical identification with nucleic acid sequence confirmation of the resistance determinants. Among monomicrobial cultures, the positive percent agreement (PPA) of the BC-GN assay with the reference method was as follows; Escherichia coli, 100%; Klebsiella pneumoniae, 92.9%; Klebsiella oxytoca, 95.5%; Enterobacter spp., 99.3%; Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 98.9%; Proteus spp., 100%; Acinetobacter spp., 98.4%; and Citrobacter spp., 100%. All organism identification targets demonstrated >99.5% negative percent agreement (NPA) with the reference method. Of note, 25/26 cultures containing K. pneumoniae that were reported as not detected by the BC-GN assay were subsequently identified as Klebsiella variicola. The PPA for identification of resistance determinants was as follows; blaCTX-M, 98.9%; blaKPC, 100%; blaNDM, 96.2%; blaOXA, 94.3%; blaVIM, 100%; and blaIMP, 100%. All resistance determinant targets demonstrated >99.9% NPA. Among polymicrobial specimens, the BC-GN assay correctly identified at least one organism in 95.4% of the broths and correctly identified all organisms present in 54.5% of the broths

  5. Vampires, Pasteur and reactive oxygen species. Is the switch from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism a preventive antioxidant defence in blood-feeding parasites?

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Pedro L; Oliveira, Marcus F

    2002-08-14

    Several species of parasites show a reduction of their respiratory activity along their developmental cycles after they start to feed on vertebrate blood, relying on anaerobic degradation of carbohydrates to achieve their energy requirements. Usually, these parasites choose not to breathe despite of living in an environment of high oxygen availability such as vertebrate blood. Absence of the 'Pasteur effect' in most of these parasites has been well documented. Interestingly, together with the switch from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism in these parasites, there is clear evidence pointing to an increase in their antioxidant defences. As the respiratory chain in mitochondria is a major site of production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we propose here that the arrest of respiration constitutes an adaptation to avoid the toxic effects of ROS. This situation would be especially critical for blood-feeding parasites because ROS produced in mitochondria would interact with pro-oxidant products of blood digestion, such as haem and/or iron, and increase the oxidative damage to the parasite's cells.

  6. Diagnostic yield of blood clot culture in the accurate diagnosis of enteric fever and human brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Mantur, Basappa G; Bidari, Laxman H; Akki, Aravind S; Mulimani, Mallanna S; Tikare, Nitin V

    2007-01-01

    Culture of blood is the most frequent, accurate means of diagnosing bacteremia in enteric fever and brucellosis. However, conventional blood culturing is slow in isolating bacteria causing these diseases. In this work, we evaluated the performance of blood clot culture and conventional whole blood cultures in the accurate diagnosis of enteric fever (253 cases) and human brucellosis (71cases). The blood clot culture was found to be much more sensitive for both Salmonella (more by 34.4%, P< 0.001) and Brucella (more by 22.6%, P<0.001) than whole blood culture. Bacterial growth was significantly faster in cultures of blood clot compared to whole blood (1.1 versus 2.6 days for Salmonella, 3.1 versus 8.2 days for Brucella melitensis, respectively). The rapid confirmation of the etiological agent would facilitate an early institution of appropriate antimicrobial therapy, thereby reducing clinical morbidity especially in an endemic population. It is worthwile practicing blood clot culture for the accurate diagnosis of enteric fever and brucellosis in developing countries where diagnostic facilities by advanced technologies like automated culture systems and PCR are not available.

  7. Blood pressure and culture. The contribution of cross-cultural comparisons to psychosomatics.

    PubMed

    Murphy, H B

    1982-01-01

    It is well known that mean blood pressure levels tend to be low in non-westernized tribal peoples and that these levels tend to rise, particularly in the older age groups, among persons of the same origins who come into more contact with modern Western life-styles. That tendency can be attributed to many factors - increased salt intake, increased obesity, acculturation anxiety, information overload, increased competitiveness, envious resentment, etc. Disentangling these various hypothesized factors is virtually impossible when studying patients or population samples from a single sociocultural group, but cross-cultural comparisons may under favorable circumstances permit some such disentangling. Using data from Micronesia, Polynesia, and East Africa, an attempt will be made to assess which types of psychological stress are most likely to conduce to hypertension, and how certain traditional cultures may have been reducing these stresses.

  8. Gas-liquid chromatography in routine processing of blood cultures for detecting anaerobic bacteraemia.

    PubMed Central

    Reig, M; Molina, D; Loza, E; Ledesma, M A; Meseguer, M A

    1981-01-01

    Gas-liquid chromatography was performed on 233 positive blood cultures and findings were compared with culture results. Obligate anaerobic bacteria were recovered from 78 out of 79 blood cultures containing butyric or iso-valeric acids, or both; from 28 out of 69 blood cultures containing succinic acid; and from only one out of 41 blood cultures containing succinic but not butyric or iso-valeric acid. Good correlations (88%) were found for the recovery of anaerobic bacteria and the detection of butyric and/or iso-valeric acids. Detecting volatile fatty acids by gas-liquid chromatography performed on blood cultures at the first signs of growth can therefore provide an early and reliable indication of the presence of anaerobic bacteria. PMID:7014645

  9. Improvement of methane generation capacity by aerobic pre-treatment of organic waste with a cellulolytic Trichoderma viride culture.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Andreas Otto; Schwarzenauer, Thomas; Illmer, Paul

    2013-11-15

    Trichoderma viride is known as a potent cellulose decomposer and was successfully used to improve and accelerate the decomposition process of aerobic composting. In contrast, the role of fungi as pre-treatment organisms for anaerobic digestion is not clear, since the fast aerobic decomposition is thought to be responsible for a rapid depletion of easily available nutrients, leading to a lack of these for the anaerobic community. In the present study carried out in lab-scale, the application of T. viride for the aerobic pre-incubation of organic matter derived from the inlet port of a 750,000 L anaerobic digester led to an increase in total gas and methane production in a subsequent anaerobic digestion step. A high cellulase activity caused by the addition of T. viride seemed to be responsible for a better nutrient availability for anaerobic microorganisms. Therefore, aerobic pre-incubation of organic residues with T. viride for subsequent anaerobic digestion is a promising approach in order to increase methane yields.

  10. Feasibility of implementing an automated culture system for bacteria screening in platelets in the blood bank routine.

    PubMed

    Castro, E; Bueno, J L; Barea, L; González, R

    2005-06-01

    Bacterial contamination of blood components is the principal infectious complication linked to transfusion. The aim of the study was to evaluate the applicability of an automated culture system for platelets. 10 141 platelet concentrates were cultured individually and in pools of five on storage days 1 and 7 using Bact/Alert system aerobic bottles. A modified collection bag was used for improved sampling. Five-millilitre samples were cultured at 37 degrees C for 7 days. Only those samples where the same bacteria were identified in reculture were considered true positives (TP). Homogeneity of proportions was tested by Fisher's exact test. The rate of TP was 30 per 100 000 (95% CI, 6.1-86.4) sampling on day 1; 33 per 100 000 (95% CI, 7-96) on day 7; and 40 per 100 000 (95% CI, 1.28-122.4) if the screening was based on taking both samples (day 1 and 7). Only one TP was detected in the pool testing. The time for detection among TPs on day 1 ranged between 30 and 134 h. The system is not considered practical for use as a routine screening method, as the time for detection is too long. Pool testing is insensitive. Faster screening methods or pathogen-inactivation systems are needed.

  11. Effect of plasma donation and blood donation on aerobic and anaerobic responses in exhaustive, severe-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Hill, David W; Vingren, Jakob L; Burdette, Samantha D

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the immediate and delayed effects of plasma donation and blood donation on responses in exhaustive, severe-intensity exercise. Nineteen young men and women performed exhaustive cycle ergometer tests at ∼3.3 W·kg(-1) before and then 2 h, 2 days, and 7 days after withdrawal of either 8-10 mL·kg(-1) (∼700 mL) of plasma (n = 10) or 1 unit (450 mL) of whole blood (n = 9). Time to exhaustion was significantly (p < 0.05) decreased after the removal of plasma (-11% after 2 h) and after the removal of blood (-19% after 2 h and -7% after 2 days). Maximal oxygen uptake (.VO(2max)) was not affected by plasma donation, but .VO(2max) was reduced following blood withdrawal (-15% after 2 h, -10% after 2 days, and -7% after 7 days) presumably because of effects on blood volume, total haemoglobin content, and haemoglobin concentration. The kinetics of the oxygen uptake (.VO2) response was not affected by either intervention. Two measures of anaerobic capacity, postexercise blood lactate concentration, and maximal accumulated oxygen deficit were reduced (-14%, -15%, respectively) 2 h after plasma donation, but neither was affected by blood donation. Removal of plasma and removal of blood have different effects on blood constituency, on the .VO2 response, and on performance. Plasma donation appears to affect exercise performance because of reduced anaerobic capacity, whereas blood donation affects performance because of lowered .VO(2max).

  12. Culture-independent analysis of bacterial fuel contamination provides insight into the level of concordance with the standard industry practice of aerobic cultivation.

    PubMed

    White, Judith; Gilbert, Jack; Hill, Graham; Hill, Edward; Huse, Susan M; Weightman, Andrew J; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2011-07-01

    Bacterial diversity in contaminated fuels has not been systematically investigated using cultivation-independent methods. The fuel industry relies on phenotypic cultivation-based contaminant identification, which may lack accuracy and neglect difficult-to-culture taxa. By the use of industry practice aerobic cultivation, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and strain genotyping, a collection of 152 unique contaminant isolates from 54 fuel samples was assembled, and a dominance of Pseudomonas (21%), Burkholderia (7%), and Bacillus (7%) was demonstrated. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 15 samples revealed Proteobacteria and Firmicutes to be the most abundant phyla. When 16S rRNA V6 gene pyrosequencing of four selected fuel samples (indicated by "JW") was performed, Betaproteobacteria (42.8%) and Gammaproteobacteria (30.6%) formed the largest proportion of reads; the most abundant genera were Marinobacter (15.4%; JW57), Achromobacter (41.6%; JW63), Burkholderia (80.7%; JW76), and Halomonas (66.2%; JW78), all of which were also observed by DGGE. However, the Clostridia (38.5%) and Deltaproteobacteria (11.1%) identified by pyrosequencing in sample JW57 were not observed by DGGE or aerobic culture. Genotyping revealed three instances where identical strains were found: (i) a Pseudomonas sp. strain recovered from 2 different diesel fuel tanks at a single industrial site; (ii) a Mangroveibacter sp. strain isolated from 3 biodiesel tanks at a single refinery site; and (iii) a Burkholderia vietnamiensis strain present in two unrelated automotive diesel samples. Overall, aerobic cultivation of fuel contaminants recovered isolates broadly representative of the phyla and classes present but lacked accuracy by overrepresenting members of certain groups such as Pseudomonas.

  13. Culture-Independent Analysis of Bacterial Fuel Contamination Provides Insight into the Level of Concordance with the Standard Industry Practice of Aerobic Cultivation ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    White, Judith; Gilbert, Jack; Hill, Graham; Hill, Edward; Huse, Susan M.; Weightman, Andrew J.; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial diversity in contaminated fuels has not been systematically investigated using cultivation-independent methods. The fuel industry relies on phenotypic cultivation-based contaminant identification, which may lack accuracy and neglect difficult-to-culture taxa. By the use of industry practice aerobic cultivation, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and strain genotyping, a collection of 152 unique contaminant isolates from 54 fuel samples was assembled, and a dominance of Pseudomonas (21%), Burkholderia (7%), and Bacillus (7%) was demonstrated. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 15 samples revealed Proteobacteria and Firmicutes to be the most abundant phyla. When 16S rRNA V6 gene pyrosequencing of four selected fuel samples (indicated by “JW”) was performed, Betaproteobacteria (42.8%) and Gammaproteobacteria (30.6%) formed the largest proportion of reads; the most abundant genera were Marinobacter (15.4%; JW57), Achromobacter (41.6%; JW63), Burkholderia (80.7%; JW76), and Halomonas (66.2%; JW78), all of which were also observed by DGGE. However, the Clostridia (38.5%) and Deltaproteobacteria (11.1%) identified by pyrosequencing in sample JW57 were not observed by DGGE or aerobic culture. Genotyping revealed three instances where identical strains were found: (i) a Pseudomonas sp. strain recovered from 2 different diesel fuel tanks at a single industrial site; (ii) a Mangroveibacter sp. strain isolated from 3 biodiesel tanks at a single refinery site; and (iii) a Burkholderia vietnamiensis strain present in two unrelated automotive diesel samples. Overall, aerobic cultivation of fuel contaminants recovered isolates broadly representative of the phyla and classes present but lacked accuracy by overrepresenting members of certain groups such as Pseudomonas. PMID:21602386

  14. Evaluation of an intervention to improve blood culture practices: a cluster randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Pavese, P; Maillet, M; Vitrat-Hincky, V; Recule, C; Vittoz, J-P; Guyomard, A; Seigneurin, A; François, P

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate an intervention to improve blood culture practices. A cluster randomised trial in two parallel groups was performed at the Grenoble University Hospital, France. In October 2009, the results of a practices audit and the guidelines for the optimal use of blood cultures were disseminated to clinical departments. We compared two types of information dissemination: simple presentation or presentation associated with an infectious diseases (ID) specialist intervention. The principal endpoint was blood culture performance measured by the rate of patients having one positive blood culture and the rate of positive blood cultures. The cases of 130 patients in the "ID" group and 119 patients in the "simple presentation" group were audited during the second audit in April 2010. The rate of patients with one positive blood culture increased in both groups (13.62 % vs 9.89 % for the ID group, p = 0.002, 15.90 % vs 13.47 % for the simple presentation group, p = 0.009). The rate of positive blood cultures improved in both groups (6.68 % vs 5.96 % for the ID group, p = 0.003, 6.52 % vs 6.21 % for the simple presentation group, p = 0.017). The blood culture indication was significantly less often specified in the request form in the simple presentation group, while it remained stable in the ID group (p = 0.04). The rate of positive blood cultures and the rate of patients having one positive blood culture improved in both groups. The ID specialist intervention did not have more of an impact on practices than a simple presentation of audit feedback and guidelines.

  15. Diagnostic assays for identification of microorganisms and antimicrobial resistance determinants directly from positive blood culture broth.

    PubMed

    Pence, Morgan A; McElvania TeKippe, Erin; Burnham, Carey-Ann D

    2013-09-01

    The detection of blood stream infections is one of the most important functions of the clinical microbiology laboratory. Sepsis is a clinical emergency, and mortality increases if commencement of appropriate antimicrobial therapy is delayed. Automated blood culture systems are the most sensitive approach for detection of the causative agent of sepsis. Several laboratory methods have been developed to expedite identification of organisms directly from positive blood culture broth. The principle and analytical performance characteristics of these methods are described in this review.

  16. Clinical evaluation of the FilmArray blood culture identification panel in identification of bacteria and yeasts from positive blood culture bottles.

    PubMed

    Altun, Osman; Almuhayawi, Mohammed; Ullberg, Måns; Ozenci, Volkan

    2013-12-01

    The FilmArray platform (FA; BioFire, Salt Lake City, UT) is a closed diagnostic system allowing high-order multiplex PCR analysis with automated readout of results directly from positive blood cultures in 1 h. In the present study, we evaluated the clinical performance of the FilmArray blood culture identification (BCID) panel, which includes 19 bacteria, five yeasts, and three antibiotic resistance genes. In total, 206 blood culture bottles were included in the study. The FilmArray could identify microorganisms in 153/167 (91.6%) samples with monomicrobial growth. Thirteen of the 167 (7.8%) microorganisms were not covered by the FilmArray BCID panel. In 6/167 (3.6%) samples, the FilmArray detected an additional microorganism compared to blood culture. When polymicrobial growth was analyzed, the FilmArray could detect all target microorganisms in 17/24 (71%) samples. Twelve blood culture bottles that yielded a positive signal but showed no growth were also negative by FilmArray. In 3/206 (1.5%) bottles, the FilmArray results were invalid. The results of the FilmArray were reproducible, as demonstrated by the testing and retesting of five bottles in the same day and a longitudinal follow-up of five other blood cultures up to 4 weeks. The present study shows that the FilmArray is a rapid identification method with high performance in direct identification of bacteria and yeasts from positive blood culture bottles.

  17. Inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandins, but not endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factors, reduces blood flow and aerobic energy turnover in the exercising human leg.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Stefan P; González-Alonso, José; Damsgaard, Rasmus; Saltin, Bengt; Hellsten, Ylva

    2007-06-01

    Prostaglandins, nitric oxide (NO) and endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs) are substances that have been proposed to be involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow during physical activity. We measured haemodynamics, plasma ATP at rest and during one-legged knee-extensor exercise (19 +/- 1 W) in nine healthy subjects with and without intra-arterial infusion of indomethacin (Indo; 621 +/- 17 microg min(-1)), Indo + N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA; 12.4 +/- 0.3 mg min(-1)) (double blockade) and Indo + L-NMMA + tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA; 12.4 +/- 0.3 mg min(-1)) (triple blockade). Double and triple blockade lowered leg blood flow (LBF) at rest (P<0.05), while it remained unchanged with Indo. During exercise, LBF and vascular conductance were 2.54 +/- 0.10 l min(-1) and 25 +/- 1 mmHg, respectively, in control and they were lower with double (33 +/- 3 and 36 +/- 4%, respectively) and triple (26 +/- 4 and 28 +/- 3%, respectively) blockade (P<0.05), while there was no difference with Indo. The lower LBF and vascular conductance with double and triple blockade occurred in parallel with a lower O(2) delivery, cardiac output, heart rate and plasma [noradrenaline] (P<0.05), while blood pressure remained unchanged and O(2) extraction and femoral venous plasma [ATP] increased. Despite the increased O(2) extraction, leg was 13 and 17% (triple and double blockade, respectively) lower than control in parallel to a lower femoral venous temperature and lactate release (P<0.05). These results suggest that NO and prostaglandins play important roles in skeletal muscle blood flow regulation during moderate intensity exercise and that EDHFs do not compensate for the impaired formation of NO and prostaglandins. Moreover, inhibition of NO and prostaglandin formation is associated with a lower aerobic energy turnover and increased concentration of vasoactive ATP in plasma.

  18. Effects of moderate-intensity aerobic cycling and swim exercise on post-exertional blood pressure in healthy young untrained and triathlon-trained men and women.

    PubMed

    Lakin, Robert; Notarius, Catherine; Thomas, Scott; Goodman, Jack

    2013-12-01

    Aerobic exercises such as running, walking and cycling are known to elicit a PEH (post-exercise hypotensive) response in both trained and UT (untrained) subjects. However, it is not known whether swim exercise produces a similar effect in normotensive individuals. The complex acute physiological responses to water immersion suggest swimming may affect BP (blood pressure) differently than other forms of aerobic exercises. We tested the hypothesis that an acute bout of swimming would fail to elicit a PEH BP response compared with an equivalent bout of stationary cycling, regardless of training state. We studied 11 UT and ten triathlon-trained young healthy normotensive [SBP/DBP (systolic BP/diastolic BP) <120/80 mmHg)] men and women (age 23±1 years) who underwent 30 min of intensity-matched cycling and swimming sessions to assess changes in BP during a 75-min seated recovery. CO (cardiac output), SV (stroke volume), TPR (total peripheral resistance), HR (heart rate), HRV (HR variability) and core and skin temperature were also assessed. In UT subjects, PEH was similar between cycling (-3.1±1 mmHg) and swimming (-5.8±1 mmHg), with the greater magnitude of PEH following swimming, reflecting a significant fall in SV between modalities (P<0.05). Trained individuals did not exhibit a PEH response following swimming (0.3±1 mmHg), yet had a significant fall in SBP at 50 min post-cycling exercise (-3.7±1 mmHg) (P<0.05). The absence of PEH after swimming in the trained group may reflect a higher cardiac sympathetic outflow [as indicated by the LF (low-frequency) spectral component of HRV) (25 and 50 min) (P<0.05)] and a slower return of vagal tone, consistent with a significant increase in HR between modalities at all time points (P<0.05). These results suggest that training may limit the potential for an effective post-exertional hypotensive response to aerobic swimming.

  19. Comparative recovery of microorganisms from BacT/ALERT plastic and glass FA and FN blood culture bottles.

    PubMed

    Riley, J A; Heiter, B J; Bourbeau, P P

    2005-07-01

    bioMerieux, Inc., has recently introduced plastic bottles to replace glass bottles for use in the BacT/ALERT blood culture system. We compared the performance of the plastic to the glass bottles in a large clinical evaluation. Two blood cultures were collected from each patient, one using glass FA (aerobic) and FN (anaerobic) bottles and one using plastic FA and FN bottles. Of the 4,040 sets of four bottles collected, 3,110 contained the recommended 8 to 12 ml of blood, yielding 524 microorganisms with 359 judged to be clinically significant. Of the 359 significant organisms, 255 were recovered in either one or two bottles from both pairs of bottles in a set while 56 organisms were recovered only from the glass bottles and 48 were recovered only from the plastic bottles (P, not significant [NS]). Of the 286 significant organisms recovered only in the FA bottles (glass and plastic), 180 were recovered in both bottles, 57 in the plastic bottles only, and 49 in the glass bottles only (P, NS). Of the 303 significant organisms recovered in the FN bottles only (glass and plastic), 212 were recovered in both bottles, 46 in the plastic bottles only, and 45 in the glass bottles only (P, NS). For individual organisms, the only significant difference in recovery was obtained for Escherichia coli, with more isolates recovered in the FN plastic than in the FN glass bottles (P = 0.02). These data suggest that recovery of microorganisms with plastic FA/FN bottles is at least equal to that with glass FA/FN bottles while offering greater safety for users.

  20. Growth of nutritionally variant streptococci on common laboratory and 10 commercial blood culture media.

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, L G; Reller, L B

    1981-01-01

    Nutritionally variant streptococci fail to grow on routine sheep blood agar plates. Moreover, these strains are a recognized cause of culture-negative endocarditis. We tested the ability of chocolate and brucella blood agars, sheep blood agar with a staphylococcal streak, sheep blood agar with 0.001% pyridoxal, and 10 commercial blood culture media from two manufactures to grow these bacteria. Of the original 25 strains tested, 16 were recovered on chocolate agar, 21 were recovered on brucella blood agar and 21 were recovered on sheep blood agar with a staphylococcal streak. Sheep blood agar with pyridoxal grew all 22 strains tested. Supplemented peptone, thioglycolate, and thiol broths grew all strains, but brain heart infusion and three tryptic soy broths supported five or fewer strains. The addition of 5 ml of human blood improved recovery to 100% in all media except tryptic soy broths. Unless supplemented wih pyridoxal, common laboratory agars were inadequate for recovering all strains of variant streptococci upon subculture of blood culture bottles. As used clinically, the blood culture media that we studied other than tryptic soy broths should reliably grow these bacteria. PMID:7287889

  1. Potential Impact of Rapid Blood Culture Testing for Gram-Positive Bacteremia in Japan with the Verigene Gram-Positive Blood Culture Test

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Mari; Iguchi, Shigekazu; Mizutani, Tomonori; Hiramatsu, Keiichi; Tega-Ishii, Michiru; Sansaka, Kaori; Negishi, Kenta; Shimada, Kimie; Umemura, Jun; Notake, Shigeyuki; Yanagisawa, Hideji; Yabusaki, Reiko; Araoka, Hideki; Yoneyama, Akiko

    2017-01-01

    Background. Early detection of Gram-positive bacteremia and timely appropriate antimicrobial therapy are required for decreasing patient mortality. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the performance of the Verigene Gram-positive blood culture assay (BC-GP) in two special healthcare settings and determine the potential impact of rapid blood culture testing for Gram-positive bacteremia within the Japanese healthcare delivery system. Furthermore, the study included simulated blood cultures, which included a library of well-characterized methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) isolates reflecting different geographical regions in Japan. Methods. A total 347 BC-GP assays were performed on clinical and simulated blood cultures. BC-GP results were compared to results obtained by reference methods for genus/species identification and detection of resistance genes using molecular and MALDI-TOF MS methodologies. Results. For identification and detection of resistance genes at two clinical sites and simulated blood cultures, overall concordance of BC-GP with reference methods was 327/347 (94%). The time for identification and antimicrobial resistance detection by BC-GP was significantly shorter compared to routine testing especially at the cardiology hospital, which does not offer clinical microbiology services on weekends and holidays. Conclusion. BC-GP generated accurate identification and detection of resistance markers compared with routine laboratory methods for Gram-positive organisms in specialized clinical settings providing more rapid results than current routine testing. PMID:28316631

  2. Comparative evaluation of the role of single and multiple blood specimens in the outcome of blood cultures using BacT/ALERT 3D (automated) blood culture system in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Elantamilan, D.; Lyngdoh, Valarie Wihiwot; Khyriem, Annie B.; Rajbongshi, Jyotismita; Bora, Ishani; Devi, Surbala Thingujam; Bhattacharyya, Prithwis; Barman, Himesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Bloodstream infection (BSI) is a leading cause of mortality in critically ill patients. The mortality directly attributable to BSI has been estimated to be around 16% and 40% in general hospital population and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) population, respectively. The detection rate of these infections increases with the number of blood samples obtained for culture. The newer continuous monitoring automated blood culture systems with enhanced culture media show increased yield and sensitivity. Hence, we aimed at studying the role of single and multiple blood specimens from different sites at the same time in the outcome of automated blood culture system. Materials and Methods and Results: A total of 1054 blood culture sets were analyzed over 1 year, the sensitivity of one, two, and three samples in a set was found to be 85.67%, 96.59%, and 100%, respectively, which showed a statistically significant difference (P < 0.0001). Similar findings were seen in few more studies, however, among individual organisms in contrast to other studies, the isolation rates of Gram-positive bacteria were less than that of Gram-negative Bacilli with one (or first) sample in a blood culture set. In our study, despite using BacT/ALERT three-dimensional continuous culture monitoring system with FAN plus culture bottles, 15% of positive cultures would have been missed if only a single sample was collected in a blood culture set. Conclusion: The variables like the volume of blood and number of samples collected from different sites still play a major role in the outcome of these automated blood culture systems. PMID:27688629

  3. Comparison of PCR, Wright agglutination test and blood culture for diagnosis of brucellosis in suspected patients.

    PubMed

    Hekmatimoghaddam, Seyedhosssein; Sadeh, Maryam; Khalili, Mohammad Bagher; Mollaabedin, Mansour; Sazmand, Alireza

    2013-11-15

    Brucellosis has long been prevalent in Iran, with considerable medical and economic importance. Timely diagnosis is needed for early management and effective prevention of its consequences in human beings and animals. Current diagnostic methods impose peculiar challenges in terms of analytical method performance. This study compares diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, predictive Value of Positive (PVP) and Predictive Value of Negative (PVN) for Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), Wright agglutination test and blood culture used for patients suspected of brucellosis. In 120 patients clinically suspected of brucellosis and referred by physicians to the Yazd central Medical Laboratory, some relevant demographic, occupational, nutritional and clinical data were collected. Also, venous blood samples were drawn for diagnosis of brucellosis using PCR, Wright agglutination test and blood culture techniques. The most frequent symptom of patients was arthralgia (82 cases, 68.3%). PCR was positive in 25 cases (20.8%), wright test in 21 patients (17.5%) and blood culture in 6 cases (5%). In 20 out of 21 wright-positive cases, PCR was positive and all of the culture-positive patients had positive PCR. Sensitivity, specificity, PVP and PVN of blood culture compared to PCR (as the gold standard test) were 24, 100, 100 and 86%, respectively, but the above parameters when PCR is compared with blood culture (as gold standard) were 100, 83, 24 and 95%, respectively. PCR has better analytical performances than blood culture for diagnosis of brucellosis and is suitable for confirmation of Wright-positive cases.

  4. Factors associated with positive blood cultures in outpatients with suspected bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Wildi, K; Tschudin-Sutter, S; Dell-Kuster, S; Frei, R; Bucher, H C; Nüesch, R

    2011-12-01

    Blood cultures are routinely taken in outpatients with fever and suspected bacterial infections. However, in the majority of cases, they are not informative and of limited value for clinical decision making. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate factors associated with positive blood cultures in outpatients presenting to an outpatient clinic and emergency room. This was a case-control study of all outpatients with positive blood cultures from January 1, 2006 to October 31, 2007 and matched control patients with negative blood cultures in the same time period. Microbiology results and medical charts were reviewed to determine factors associated with positive blood cultures. The presence of a systemic inflammation response syndrome (SIRS) (OR 2.7, 95% Cl 1.0-7.2) and increased C-reactive protein (CRP) (OR 1.1 per 10 mg/l, 95% Cl 1.0-1.2) were the most powerful predictive values for the development of positive blood cultures. In positive cases serum albumin was lower (35 mg/l versus 39 mg/l) than in controls. SIRS, increasing CRP and low albumin were associated with positive blood cultures in outpatients. With simple clinical assessment and few laboratory tests indicative of infection, it is possible to define a group at higher risk for bacteremia in outpatients.

  5. Effects of aerobic exercise on the blood pressure, oxidative stress and eNOS gene polymorphism in pre-hypertensive older people.

    PubMed

    Zago, Anderson Saranz; Park, Joon-Young; Fenty-Stewart, Nicola; Silveira, Leonardo Reis; Kokubun, Eduardo; Brown, Michael D

    2010-11-01

    The polymorphisms of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) are associated with reduced eNOS activity. Aerobic exercise training (AEX) may influence resting nitric oxide (NO) production, oxidative stress and blood pressure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of AEX on the relationship among blood pressure, eNOS gene polymorphism and oxidative stress in pre-hypertensive older people. 118 pre-hypertensive subjects (59 ± 6 years) had blood samples collected after a 12 h overnight fast for assessing plasma NO metabolites (NOx) assays, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (T-BARS) and superoxide dismutase activity (ecSOD). eNOS polymorphism (T-786C and G-894T) was done by standard PCR methods. All people were divided according to the genotype results (G1: TT/GG, G2: TT/GT + TT, G3: TC + CC/GG, G4: TC + CC/GT + TT). All parameters were measured before and after 6 months of AEX (70% of VO(2 max)). At baseline, no difference was found in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, ecSOD and T-BARS activity. Plasma NOx levels were significantly different between G1 (19 ± 1 μM) and G4 (14.2 ± 0.6 μM) and between G2 (20.1 ± 1.7 μM) and G4 (14.2 ± 0.6 μM). Therefore, reduced NOx concentration in G4 group occurred only when the polymorphisms were associated, suggesting that these results are more related to genetic factors than NO-scavenging effect. After AEX, the G4 increased NOx values (17.2 ± 1.2 μM) and decreased blood pressure. G1, G3 and G4 decreased T-BARS levels. These results suggest the AEX can modulate the NOx concentration, eNOS activity and the relationship among eNOS gene polymorphism, oxidative stress and blood pressure especially in C (T-786C) and T (G-894T) allele carriers.

  6. A retrospective study of factors which determine a negative blood culture in Cambodian children diagnosed with enteric fever

    PubMed Central

    Bousfield, Rachel; Thyl, Miliya; Samol, Orng; Rithea, Loet; Sona, Soeng; Chhat, Hor Put; Poda, Sar; Moore, Cartin E.; Chheng, Kheng; Kumar, Varun; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Parry, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Blood cultures are used to confirm a diagnosis of enteric fever but reported sensitivities can be as low as 40%. Aims: To determine the factors associated with a negative blood culture in Cambodian children with suspected enteric fever. Methods: In a retrospective study of hospitalised Cambodian children given a discharge diagnosis of enteric fever, the following factors associated with a negative blood culture were analysed: age, blood culture volume, prior antibiotic therapy, duration of illness and disease severity. Results: In 227 hospitalised Cambodian children with a discharge diagnosis of enteric fever, it was confirmed in 70% by a positive blood culture. There was no association between a negative blood culture and younger age, lower blood volumes for culture, prior antibiotic therapy, a late presentation or milder disease. Conclusions: Although blood culture sensitivity was higher than expected, alternative simple, rapid and sensitive tests are needed for diagnosing enteric fever. PMID:25845519

  7. Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) have greater blood volumes, higher diving metabolic rates and a longer aerobic dive limit when nutritionally stressed.

    PubMed

    Gerlinsky, Carling D; Trites, Andrew W; Rosen, David A S

    2014-03-01

    Marine mammal foraging behaviour inherently depends on diving ability. Declining populations of Steller sea lions may be facing nutritional stress that could affect their diving ability through changes in body composition or metabolism. Our objective was to determine whether nutritional stress (restricted food intake resulting in a 10% decrease in body mass) altered the calculated aerobic dive limit (cADL) of four captive sea lions diving in the open ocean, and how this related to changes in observed dive behaviour. We measured diving metabolic rate (DMR), blood O2 stores, body composition and dive behaviour prior to and while under nutritional restriction. We found that nutritionally stressed sea lions increased the duration of their single long dives, and the proportion of time they spent at the surface during a cycle of four dives. Nutritionally stressed sea lions lost both lipid and lean mass, resulting in potentially lower muscle O2 stores. However, total body O2 stores increased due to rises in blood O2 stores associated with having higher blood volumes. Nutritionally stressed sea lions also had higher mass-specific metabolic rates. The greater rise in O2 stores relative to the increase in mass-specific DMR resulted in the sea lions having a longer cADL when nutritionally stressed. We conclude that there was no negative effect of nutritional stress on the diving ability of sea lions. However, nutritional stress did lower foraging efficiency and require more foraging time to meet energy requirements due to increases in diving metabolic rates and surface recovery times.

  8. Culture-Based Screening of Aerobic Microbiome in Diabetic Foot Subjects and Developing Non-healing Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Saba; Ahmad, Jamal; Parwez, Iqbal; Ozair, Maaz

    2016-01-01

    The study was carried on diabetic foot patients to deduce clinical attributes, the occurrence of the range of aerobic microbial flora and to assess their comparative in vitro susceptibility to the customarily used antimicrobials. We also studied the potential risk factors involved in the development of non-healing ulcers. A total of 87 organisms were isolated from 70 specimens, including Escherichia coli (19.5%) among the Gram-negative and Staphylococcus aureus (18.4%) among the Gram-positive as the predominant aerobes explored. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and E. coli were predominant isolates of non-healing ulcers. The antimicrobial sensitivity pattern revealed that vancomycin (100%) and amikacin (90.4%) exhibited highest sensitivity to Gram-positive cocci, while all strains of P. aeruginosa were sensitive toward imipenem (100%). The prevalent uncontrolled glycemic status, altered lipid spectra, the existence of neuropathy, and peripheral vascular disease, suggested predisposition toward the development of non-healing lesions. The study has underlined the need for continuous surveillance of bacteria and their antimicrobial sensitivity blueprints to provide the basis for empirical therapy and to minimize the risk of complications. Further, stringent clinical evaluation, and medical history will help in revealing the risk of developing non-healing status in diabetic foot ulcers. PMID:27920754

  9. Reducing Blood Culture Contamination in the Emergency Department: An Interrupted Time Series Quality Improvement Study

    PubMed Central

    Self, Wesley H.; Speroff, Theodore; Grijalva, Carlos G.; McNaughton, Candace D.; Ashburn, Jacki; Liu, Dandan; Arbogast, Patrick G.; Russ, Stephan; Storrow, Alan B.; Talbot, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Blood culture contamination is a common problem in the emergency department (ED) that leads to unnecessary patient morbidity and health care costs. The study objective was to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of a quality improvement (QI) intervention for reducing blood culture contamination in an ED. Methods The authors developed a QI intervention to reduce blood culture contamination in the ED and then evaluated its effectiveness in a prospective interrupted times series study. The QI intervention involved changing the technique of blood culture specimen collection from the traditional clean procedure, to a new sterile procedure, with standardized use of sterile gloves and a new materials kit containing a 2% chlorhexidine skin antisepsis device, a sterile fenestrated drape, a sterile needle, and a procedural checklist. The intervention was implemented in a university-affiliated ED and its effect on blood culture contamination evaluated by comparing the biweekly percentages of blood cultures contaminated during a 48-week baseline period (clean technique), and 48-week intervention period (sterile technique), using segmented regression analysis with adjustment for secular trends and first-order autocorrelation. The goal was to achieve and maintain a contamination rate below 3%. Results During the baseline period, 321 out of 7,389 (4.3%) cultures were contaminated, compared to 111 of 6,590 (1.7%) during the intervention period (p < 0.001). In the segmented regression model, the intervention was associated with an immediate 2.9% (95% CI = 2.2% to 3.2%) absolute reduction in contamination. The contamination rate was maintained below 3% during each biweekly interval throughout the intervention period. Conclusions A QI assessment of ED blood culture contamination led to development of a targeted intervention to convert the process of blood culture collection from a clean to a fully sterile procedure. Implementation of this intervention led to an immediate

  10. Aerobic Tennis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Michael J.; Ahlschwede, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Increasing the aerobic nature of tennis drills in the physical education class may be necessary if tennis is to remain a part of the public school curriculum. This article gives two examples of drills that can be modified by teachers to increase activity level. (IAH)

  11. Recent Progress in the Diagnosis of Pathogenic Candida Species in Blood Culture.

    PubMed

    Phoompoung, Pakpoom; Chayakulkeeree, Methee

    2016-06-01

    Candidemia has become an emerging invasive fungal disease. Prompt treatment with appropriate antifungal agent is crucial to reduce the mortality of candidemia. The conventional blood culture method, which is considered the gold standard for candidemia diagnosis, has a low sensitivity and is time-consuming to perform. Recently, several novel advanced diagnostic methods that have a higher sensitivity and a shorter turnaround time than the conventional blood culture method have been developed for the early detection of Candida in blood samples or in blood culture broth. Most of these newer methods were developed using various molecular techniques, such as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization, and a number of DNA-based techniques including in-house and commercial polymerase chain reactions. In this article, we review and summarize the novel molecular methods that have been recently used for the detection and identification of Candida organisms in blood specimens.

  12. Blood Culture Testing via a Mobile App That Uses a Mobile Phone Camera: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Yong Pil; Jang, Seongsoo; Kim, Mi Na; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Woo Sung

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate patients with fever of unknown origin or those with suspected bacteremia, the precision of blood culture tests is critical. An inappropriate step in the test process or error in a parameter could lead to a false-positive result, which could then affect the direction of treatment in critical conditions. Mobile health apps can be used to resolve problems with blood culture tests, and such apps can hence ensure that point-of-care guidelines are followed and processes are monitored for blood culture tests. Objective In this pilot project, we aimed to investigate the feasibility of using a mobile blood culture app to manage blood culture test quality. We implemented the app at a university hospital in South Korea to assess the potential for its utilization in a clinical environment by reviewing the usage data among a small group of users and by assessing their feedback and the data related to blood culture sampling. Methods We used an iOS-based blood culture app that uses an embedded camera to scan the patient identification and sample number bar codes. A total of 4 medical interns working at 2 medical intensive care units (MICUs) participated in this project, which spanned 3 weeks. App usage and blood culture sampling parameters (including sampler, sampling site, sampling time, and sample volume) were analyzed. The compliance of sampling parameter entry was also measured. In addition, the participants’ opinions regarding patient safety, timeliness, efficiency, and usability were recorded. Results In total, 356/644 (55.3%) of all blood culture samples obtained at the MICUs were examined using the app, including 254/356 (71.3%) with blood collection volumes of 5-7 mL and 256/356 (71.9%) with blood collection from the peripheral veins. The sampling volume differed among the participants. Sampling parameters were completely entered in 354/356 cases (99.4%). All the participants agreed that the app ensured good patient safety, disagreed on its

  13. Rapid Identification of Pathogens from Positive Blood Cultures by Multiplex PCR using the FilmArray System

    PubMed Central

    Blaschke, Anne J.; Heyrend, Caroline; Byington, Carrie L.; Fisher, Mark A.; Barker, Elizabeth; Garrone, Nicholas F.; Thatcher, Stephanie A.; Pavia, Andrew T.; Barney, Trenda; Alger, Garrison D.; Daly, Judy A.; Ririe, Kirk M.; Ota, Irene; Poritz, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of death. Rapid and accurate identification of pathogens and antimicrobial resistance directly from blood culture could improve patient outcomes. The FilmArray® (FA; Idaho Technology, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT) Blood Culture (BC) panel can identify > 25 pathogens and 4 antibiotic resistance genes from positive blood cultures in 1 hour. We compared a development version of the panel to conventional culture and susceptibility testing on 102 archived blood cultures from adults and children with bacteremia. Of 109 pathogens identified by culture, 95% were identified by FA. Among 111 prospectively collected blood cultures, the FA identified 84 of 92 pathogens (91%) covered by the panel. Among 25 Staphylococcus aureus and 21 Enterococcus species detected, FA identified all culture-proven MRSA and VRE. The FA BC panel is an accurate method for the rapid identification of pathogens and resistance genes from blood culture. PMID:22999332

  14. Comparative effects of three 48-week community-based physical activity and exercise interventions on aerobic capacity, total cholesterol and mean arterial blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Steven; Jimenez, Alfonso; Domone, Sarah; Beedie, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Aim Insufficient research examines the treatment effectiveness of real-world physical activity (PA) interventions. Purpose We investigated the effects of 3 interventions on directly measured cardiovascular variables. All treatments and measures were administered in community settings by fitness centre staff. Methods Participants were sedentary individuals receiving no medication to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk (n=369, age 43 ±5 years). In a semirandomised design, participants were allocated to a structured gym exercise programme (STRUC), unstructured gym exercise (FREE), physical activity counselling (PAC) or a measurement-only control condition (CONT). Measures were: predicted aerobic capacity (VO2: mL kg min), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP: mm Hg) and total cholesterol (TC: mmol/L), and were taken at baseline and 48 weeks. Results Data analysis indicated a statistically significant deterioration in TC in CONT (0.8%, SD=0.5, p=0.005), and a statistically significant improvement in MAP in STRUC (2.5%, SD=8.3, p=0.004). Following a median split by baseline VO2, paired-sample t tests indicated significant improvements in VO2 among low-fit participants in STRUC (3.5%, SD=4.8, p=0.003), PAC (3.3%, SD=7.7, p=0.050) and FREE (2.6%, SD=4.8, p=0.006), and significant deterioration of VO2 among high-fit participants in FREE (−2.0%, SD=5.6, p=0.037), and PAC (−3.2%, SD=6.4, p=0.031). Conclusions Several forms of PA may offset increased cholesterol resulting from inactivity. Structured PA (exercise) might be more effective than either unstructured PA or counselling in improving blood pressure, and community-based PA interventions might be more effective in improving VO2 among low-fit than among high-fit participants. PMID:27900172

  15. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for early identification of bacteria grown in blood culture bottles.

    PubMed

    Zabbe, Jean-Benoît; Zanardo, Laura; Mégraud, Francis; Bessède, Emilie

    2015-08-01

    This note reports an interesting way to rapidly identify bacteria grown from blood culture bottles. Chocolate agar plates were inoculated with 1 drop of the positive blood bottle medium. After a 3-hour incubation, the growth veil was submitted to MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry: 77% of the bacteria present have been correctly identified.

  16. Effect of Aerobic Training on Glucose Control and Blood Pressure in T2DDM East African Males

    PubMed Central

    Prista, Antonio; Ranadive, Sushant M.; Damasceno, Albertino; Caupers, Paula; Kanaley, Jill A.; Fernhall, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Background. Exercise training intervention is underused in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in East Africa. Methods. 41 physically-active males with type 2 diabetes mellitus living in Mozambique were recruited and randomly assigned to 12 weeks of supervised exercise of low intensity exercise (LEX), vigorous intensity exercise (VEX), or to a control group (CON). Since there were no differences for any outcome variables between the exercise groups, VEX and LEX were combined into one exercise group (EX). Results. Age and baseline body weight were similar between EX and CON. Plasma glucose at 120 min following glucose load (Glu 120) was significantly reduced in the EX group after training (Glu 120 : 17.3 mmol/L to 15.0 mmol/L, P < 0.05), whereas Glu 120 remained unchanged in the CON (Glu 120 : 16.6 mmol/L to 18.7 mmol/L). After controlling for baseline blood pressure (BP), posttraining systolic BP and diastolic BP were lower in the EX group than in the CON group (EX: 129/77 mm Hg, CON: 152/83 mm Hg, P < 0.05). Conclusion. Adding exercise to already active African men with type 2 diabetes improved glucose control and BP levels without concomitant changes in weight. PMID:24729886

  17. Aerobic Physical Exercise Improved the Cognitive Function of Elderly Males but Did Not Modify Their Blood Homocysteine Levels

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Hanna Karen M.; De Mello, Marco Túlio; de Aquino Lemos, Valdir; Santos-Galduróz, Ruth Ferreira; Camargo Galdieri, Luciano; Amodeo Bueno, Orlando Francisco; Tufik, Sergio; D'Almeida, Vânia

    2015-01-01

    Background Physical exercise influences homocysteine (Hcy) concentrations, cognitive function and the metabolic profile. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of regular physical exercise on Hcy levels, the metabolic profile and cognitive function in healthy elderly males before and after an endurance exercise program. Methods Forty-five healthy and sedentary volunteers were randomized into 2 groups: (1) a control group asked not to change their normal everyday activities and not to start any regular physical exercise program and (2) an experimental group trained at a heart rate intensity corresponding to ventilatory threshold 1 (VT-1) for 60 min/day 3 times weekly on alternate days for 6 months using a cycle ergometer. All volunteers underwent cognitive evaluations, blood sample analyses and ergospirometric assessments. Results A significant improvement in cognitive function was observed in the experimental group compared with the control group (p < 0.05). No significant changes in Hcy levels were observed in the experimental group (p > 0.05), but there was a significant increase in peak oxygen consumption and workload at VT-1 as well as a significant improvement in cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, glucose, alkaline phosphatase, urea, T3, T4 and prostate-specific antigen compared with the control group (p < 0.05). Conclusion The data suggest that a physical exercise program does not reduce Hcy levels in healthy elderly males, although it improves the cardiovascular and metabolic profile as well as cognitive function. PMID:25759715

  18. [Culture and differentiation of obligatory aerobic gram-negative rods from human material; a scheme for application in routine diagnosis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    von Graevenitz, A; Grehn, M

    1976-12-01

    The diagnosis of obligately aerobic Gram-negative rods in the clinical laboratory may encounter difficulties since media used for Enterobacteriacae are only partially usable for the diagnosis of this group of bacteria (Psuedomonas, Xanthomonas, Alcaligenes, Achromobacter, Brucella, Bordetella, Flavobacterium, Moraxella, Acinetobacter, and some still unnamed taxa). We have developed a diagnostic scheme, based on recent publications in the field and representing an extension of earlier tables from this and other laboratories, which attempts to classify a maximal number of obligately aerobic Gram-negative rods with a minimal number of tests. The scheme, employed on 4051 strains, used blood agar and MacConkey Agar as isolation media. Growth characteristics on these media and microscopic morphology may be of help, but only the type of growth on Triple Sugar Iron (or Kligler's) Agar is characteristic for the group as a whole (no growth in the butt, alkalinization or no pH change on the slant). A primary identification series employs tests for oxidase (Kovacs), oxidation of glucose and xylose (in OF medium), deoxyribonuclease and indole (in DNase Test Agar with Methyl Green), nitrate reduction (in Indole Nitrite Medium), motility (hanging drop), and fluorescein production (on Flo Agar). Results of Kirby-Bauer antimicrobial sensitivity testing serve as additional (colistin) or confirmatory criteria. Incubation is at 30 degrees C for 24-48 hrs. If a diagnosis is not possible than, a secondary series, including tests for lysine decarboxylase (tablets), 4 hr urease, esculin hydrolysis, growth at 42 C and on SS Agar, gelatin liquefaction, and flagellar staining may have to be used, and read after 4-24 hrs at 30 degrees C. Five tables, drawn up according to oxidase, glucose, and xylose reactions, serve to identify the species or taxa. Biotypes cannot be differentiated. The scheme will need updating as more knowledge of these bacteria will become available.

  19. Reduced length of hospital stay through a point of care placed automated blood culture instrument.

    PubMed

    Bruins, M J; Egbers, M J; Israel, T M; Diepeveen, S H A; Wolfhagen, M J H M

    2017-04-01

    Early appropriate antimicrobial treatment of patients with sepsis has a large impact on clinical outcome. To enable prompt and efficient processing of blood cultures, the inoculated vials should be placed into an automated continuously monitoring blood culture system immediately after sampling. We placed an extra BACTEC FX instrument at the emergency department of our hospital and validated the twice-daily re-entering of ongoing vials from this instrument into the BACTEC FX at the laboratory. We subsequently assessed the benefits of shortening the transport time between sampling and monitored incubation of blood culture vials by comparing the turnaround times of positive blood cultures from emergency department patients with a historical control group. Re-entering ongoing vials within 2 h raised no technical problems with the BACTEC FX and did not increase the risk of false-negative culture results. The decreased transport time resulted in significantly earlier available Gram stain results for a large proportion of patients in the intervention group and a significant shortening of the median total turnaround time to less than 48 h. The median length of hospital stay shortened by 1 day. Immediate entering of blood culture vials into a point of care placed BACTEC FX instrument and subsequent efficient processing enables earlier decision-making regarding antimicrobial treatment, preventing the development of antimicrobial resistance and reducing healthcare costs.

  20. Rapid Identification of microbes in positive blood cultures by use of the vitek MS matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry system.

    PubMed

    Foster, Arnold G W

    2013-11-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of death worldwide among nonhospitalized people and hospitalized patients. A wide range of pathogens are involved, and the correct identification and correct antimicrobial therapy are critical to ensure optimal clinical outcomes. With the recent introduction of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), rapid identification of bacteria and fungi is now possible. The purpose of this study was to develop a rapid technique for identifying organisms in positive blood cultures using the Vitek MS system (bioMérieux). This technique is a lysis centrifugation method which involves a four-step washing and centrifugation procedure. A total of 253 positive monomicrobial blood cultures (Bactec Plus aerobic, anaerobic, and pediatric bottles) were tested using the Vitek MS system (KnowledgeBase version 2.0), with 92.1% and 88.1% of organisms overall being identified to the genus level and the species level, respectively. Of 161 Gram-positive bacterial isolates, 95.7% and 90.1% were identified to the genus level and the species level, respectively; of 92 Gram-negative bacterial isolates, 84.7% and 83.7% were identified to the genus level and the species level, respectively. The results obtained using this method demonstrate that the Vitek MS system can be used for rapid and effective identification of bacteria from positive blood cultures within 30 to 45 min after the positive signal has been provided by the Bactec FX blood culture system (Becton, Dickinson). This will lead to faster administration of the appropriate antimicrobial therapy and increase the chances for optimal clinical outcomes for patients.

  1. Reconstitution activity of hypoxic cultured human cord blood CD34-positive cells in NOG mice

    SciTech Connect

    Shima, Haruko; Takubo, Keiyo; Iwasaki, Hiroko; Yoshihara, Hiroki; Gomei, Yumiko; Hosokawa, Kentaro; Arai, Fumio; Takahashi, Takao; Suda, Toshio

    2009-01-16

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in hypoxic areas of the bone marrow. However, the role of hypoxia in the maintenance of HSCs has not been fully characterized. We performed xenotransplantation of human cord blood cells cultured in hypoxic or normoxic conditions into adult NOD/SCID/IL-2R{gamma}{sup null} (NOG) mice. Hypoxic culture (1% O{sub 2}) for 6 days efficiently supported the maintenance of HSCs, although cell proliferation was suppressed compared to the normoxic culture. In contrast, hypoxia did not affect in vitro colony-forming ability. Upregulation of a cell cycle inhibitor, p21, was observed in hypoxic culture. Immunohistochemical analysis of recipient bone marrow revealed that engrafted CD34{sup +}CD38{sup -} cord blood HSCs were hypoxic. Taken together, these results demonstrate the significance of hypoxia in the maintenance of quiescent human cord blood HSCs.

  2. Constraints in the colonization of natural and engineered subterranean igneous rock aquifers by aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria inferred by culture analysis.

    PubMed

    Chi Fru, E

    2008-08-01

    The aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) are suggested to be important for the removal of oxygen from subterranean aquifers that become oxygenated by natural and engineering processes. This is primarily because MOB are ubiquitous in the environment and in addition reduce oxygen efficiently. The biogeochemical factors that will control the success of the aerobic MOB in these kinds of underground aquifers remain unknown. In this study, viable and cultivable MOB occurring at natural and engineered deep granitic aquifers targeted for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in the Fennoscandian Shield (approximately 3-1000 m) were enumerated. The numbers were correlated with in situ salinity, methane concentrations, conductivity, pH, and depth. A mixed population habiting freshwater aquifers (approximately 3-20 m), a potential source for the inoculation of MOB into the deeper aquifers was tested for tolerance to NaCl, temperature, pH, and an ability to produce cysts and exospores. Extrapolations show that due to changing in situ parameters (salinity, conductivity, and pH), the numbers of MOB in the aquifers dropped quickly with depth. A positive correlation between the most probable numbers of MOB and methane concentrations was observed. Furthermore, the tolerance-based tests of cultured strains indicated that the MOB in the shallow aquifers thrived best in mesophilic and neutrophilic conditions as opposed to the hyperthermophilic and alkaliphilic conditions expected to develop in an engineered subterranean SNF repository. Overall, the survival of the MOB both quantitatively and physiologically in the granitic aquifers was under the strong influence of biogeochemical factors that are strongly depth-dependent.

  3. Blood culture series benefit may be limited to selected clinical conditions: time to reassess.

    PubMed

    Khatib, R; Simeunovic, G; Sharma, M; Fakih, M G; Johnson, L B; Briski, L; Lebar, W

    2015-04-01

    Blood cultures are often submitted as series (two to three sets per 24 hours) to maximize sample recovery. We assessed the actual benefit of additional sets. Blood cultures submitted from adults (≥ 18 years old) over 1 year (1 February 2012 to 31 January 2013) were examined. The medical records of patients with positive cultures were reviewed. Cultures with commensal organisms were considered contamination in the absence of a source and clinical findings. The impact of additional sets on antibiotic therapy was estimated. We evaluated 15,394 blood cultures. They were submitted as two to five sets per 24 hours in 12,236 (79.5%) instances. Pathogens were detected in 1227 sets, representing 741 bacteremias, of which 618 (83.4%) were detected in the first set and 123 (16.6%) in the additional sets. Pathogens missed in the first set were recovered from patients receiving antibiotics (n = 72; 58.5%) and after undergoing a procedure (n = 54; 43.9%). The additional sets' results could have influenced antibiotic therapy in 76/6235 (1.2%) instances, including 40 (0.6%) antibiotic switches and 36 (0.6%) possible extensions of therapy. The potential impact of the detection of missed pathogens on antibiotic therapy was not apparent in patients who had an endovascular infection (26/27, 96.3%) and those who lacked an obvious source of pathogens (10/10, 100%). These findings suggest that one blood culture is probably adequate in patients with an obvious source of pathogens. Blood culture series are beneficial in patients without an obvious source of pathogens and in those with endovascular infections. It is time to reassess the benefit of blood culture series, perhaps limiting them to selected conditions.

  4. Evaluation of three rapid diagnostic methods for direct identification of microorganisms in positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Raquel M; Bauerle, Elizabeth R; Fang, Ferric C; Butler-Wu, Susan M

    2014-07-01

    The identification of organisms from positive blood cultures generally takes several days. However, recently developed rapid diagnostic methods offer the potential for organism identification within only a few hours of blood culture positivity. In this study, we evaluated the performance of three commercial methods to rapidly identify organisms directly from positive blood cultures: QuickFISH (AdvanDx, Wolburn, MA), Verigene Gram-Positive Blood Culture (BC-GP; Nanosphere, Northbrook, IL), and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) with Sepsityper processing (Bruker Daltonics, Billerica, MA). A total of 159 blood cultures (VersaTREK Trek Diagnostic Systems, Cleveland, OH) positive for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as yeast were analyzed with QuickFISH and MALDI-TOF MS. In all, 102 blood cultures were analyzed using the BC-GP assay. For monomicrobial cultures, we observed 98.0% concordance with routine methods for both QuickFISH (143/146) and the BC-GP assay (93/95). MALDI-TOF MS demonstrated 80.1% (117/146) and 87.7% (128/146) concordance with routine methods to the genus and species levels, respectively. None of the methods tested were capable of consistently identifying polymicrobial cultures in their entirety or reliably differentiating Streptococcus pneumoniae from viridans streptococci. Nevertheless, the methods evaluated in this study are convenient and accurate for the most commonly encountered pathogens and have the potential to dramatically reduce turnaround time for the provision of results to the treating physician.

  5. Aerobic glucose fermentation by Trypanosoma cruzi axenic culture amastigote-like forms during growth and differentiation to epimastigotes.

    PubMed

    Engel, J C; Franke de Cazzulo, B M; Stoppani, A O; Cannata, J J; Cazzulo, J J

    1987-11-01

    Axenic culture amastigote-like forms of Trypanosoma cruzi, grown at 28 degrees C, reach a stationary phase after two generations, and differentiate to epimastigotes, which then resume growth. Axenic culture amastigotes readily ferment glucose to succinate and acetate, and do not excrete NH3; they have high activities of hexokinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and very low citrate synthase activity; cytochrome o is absent, and cytochrome b-like is present at a very low level. Epimastigotes catabolize glucose and produce succinate and acetate at a considerably lower rate; they exhibit lower levels of hexokinase and carboxykinase, and much higher levels of citrate synthase and cytochromes o and b-like. They catabolize amino acids, as shown by excretion of NH3 to the medium. The results suggest that axenic culture amastigotes have an essentially glycolytic metabolism, and they acquire the ability to oxidize substrates such as amino acids only after differentiation to epimastigotes.

  6. Analysis of Anaerobic Blood Cultures in Burned Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    34 3 (9.0) Escherichia coli 14 (4.1) 17 (2.8) – – Enterobacter cloacae 13 (3.8) 24 (3.9) 18 2 (11.1) Enterobacter aerogenes 13 (3.8) 18 (2.9...cultures: patient characteristics and potential risk factors. Clin Chem Lab Med 2003;41(3):293–7. [10] James PA, Al-Shafi KM. Clinical value of anaerobic

  7. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization Allows Rapid Identification of Microorganisms in Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Volkhard A. J.; Trebesius, Karlheinz; Autenrieth, Ingo B.

    2000-01-01

    Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with rRNA-targeted fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes, pathogens were rapidly detected and identified in positive blood culture bottles without cultivation and biotyping. In this study, 115 blood cultures with a positive growth index as determined by a continuous-reading automated blood culture system were examined by both conventional laboratory methods and FISH. For this purpose, oligonucleotide probes that allowed identification of approximately 95% of those pathogens typically associated with bacteremia were produced. The sensitivity and specificity of these probes were 100%. From all 115 blood cultures, microorganisms were grown after 1 day and identification to the family, genus, or species level was achieved after 1 to 3 days while 111 samples (96.5%) were similarly identified by FISH within 2.5 h. Staphylococci were identified in 62 of 62 samples, streptococci and enterococci were identified in 19 of 20 samples, gram-negative rods were identified in 28 of 30 samples, and fungi were identified in two of two samples. Thus, FISH is an appropriate method for identification of pathogens grown in blood cultures from septicemic patients. PMID:10655393

  8. Effect of cord blood serum on ex vivo human limbal epithelial cell culture.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Anindita; Dutta, Jayanta; Das, Sumantra; Datta, Himadri

    2012-12-01

    Limbal cell transplantation is an efficacious procedure for rehabilitation of visual acuity in patients with severe ocular surface disorders. Cultivation of limbal epithelial stem cell with fetal bovine serum for transplantation has been a promising treatment for reconstructing the ocular surface in severe limbal stem cell deficiency caused by Steven Johnson syndrome, chemical or thermal injury. This technique of "cell therapy" has been accepted worldwide but the cost of cultivating the cells for transplantation is high. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of cord blood serum in place of fetal bovine serum on the growth of human limbal epithelial cell culture. Our group has experimented with human cord blood serum which was obtained free of cost from willing donors. The use of human cord blood serum in place of fetal bovine serum for ex vivo culture of limbal stem cell has helped us in reducing the cost of culture. Fresh human limbal tissues from donor cadavers were cultured on intact and denuded amniotic membrane. Cells were proliferated in vitro with cell culture media containing human cord blood serum. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence cytochemistry of cultured human limbal epithelial stem cell was done for characterization of the cells.

  9. Enzyme capture assay for rapid identification of Escherichia coli in blood cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, S W; Wu, J J; Chang, T C

    1994-01-01

    An enzyme capture assay (ECA) for rapid identification of Escherichia coli in blood cultures by using beta-D-glucuronidase as a marker was developed. Microdilution plates coated with antiglucuronidase were used to capture this enzyme from the cell lysates of blood cultures which showed growth of gram-negative bacteria. The assay, using 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucuronide as a fluorogenic substrate, had a detection limit of 0.1 ng/ml (3 x 10(-13) M) for the enzyme; this was approximately equal to a cell concentration of 10(6) CFU of E. coli per ml. Among 212 blood cultures showing growth of gram-negative bacteria, 77 specimens were found to contain E. coli by conventional culture procedures and 73 samples were positive by ECA. Among the 135 blood cultures from which E. coli was not isolated, ECA gave one false-positive (Salmonella enteritidis) reaction. Thus, the sensitivity and specificity for the identification of E. coli in blood cultures by ECA were 94.8% (73/77) and 99.3% (134/135), respectively. From the finding of positive growth in the culture bottle, the assay can be completed within 4 h. In view of the high rate of isolation of E. coli from bacteremic patients, the test can be performed in parallel with conventional culture protocols; this may shorten the identification time for E. coli, and proper antimicrobial treatments may be started 24 h earlier than when results of conventional identification systems are used. PMID:8077387

  10. A Multicenter Evaluation of Blood Culture Practices, Contamination Rates, and the Distribution of Causative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Altindis, Mustafa; Koroglu, Mehmet; Demiray, Tayfur; Dal, Tuba; Ozdemir, Mehmet; Sengil, Ahmet Zeki; Atasoy, Ali Riza; Doğan, Metin; Cicek, Aysegul Copur; Ece, Gulfem; Kaya, Selcuk; Iraz, Meryem; Gultepe, Bilge Sumbul; Temiz, Hakan; Kandemir, Idris; Aksaray, Sebahat; Cetinkol, Yeliz; Sahin, Idris; Guducuoglu, Huseyin; Kilic, Abdullah; Kocoglu, Esra; Gulhan, Baris; Karabay, Oguz

    2016-01-01

    Background: The prognostic value of blood culture testing in the diagnosis of bacteremia is limited by contamination. Objectives: In this multicenter study, the aim was to evaluate the contamination rates of blood cultures as well as the parameters that affect the culture results. Materials and Methods: Sample collection practices and culture data obtained from 16 university/research hospitals were retrospectively evaluated. A total of 214,340 blood samples from 43,254 patients admitted to the centers in 2013 were included in this study. The blood culture results were evaluated based on the three phases of laboratory testing: the pre-analytic, the analytic, and the post-analytic phase. Results: Blood samples were obtained from the patients through either the peripheral venous route (64%) or an intravascular catheter (36%). Povidone-iodine (60%) or alcohol (40%) was applied to disinfect the skin. Of the 16 centers, 62.5% have no dedicated phlebotomy team, 68.7% employed a blood culture system, 86.7% conducted additional studies with pediatric bottles, and 43.7% with anaerobic bottles. One center maintained a blood culture quality control study. The average growth rate in the bottles of blood cultures during the defined period (1259 - 26,400/year) was 32.3%. Of the growing microorganisms, 67% were causative agents, while 33% were contaminants. The contamination rates of the centers ranged from 1% to 17%. The average growth time for the causative bacteria was 21.4 hours, while it was 36.3 hours for the contaminant bacteria. The most commonly isolated pathogens were Escherichia coli (22.45%) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) (20.11%). Further, the most frequently identified contaminant bacteria were CoNS (44.04%). Conclusions: The high contamination rates were remarkable in this study. We suggest that the hospitals’ staff should be better trained in blood sample collection and processing. Sterile glove usage, alcohol usage for disinfection, the presence of

  11. [Confusion Over the Term "Contamination Rate" as It Pertains to Blood Cultures].

    PubMed

    Morii, Daiichi; Yokozawa, Takayuki; Ichinose, Naoki; Oda, Toshimi

    2016-05-01

    The blood culture contamination rate is often used to validate specimen-collection procedures. CUMITECH has set its optimal target to be 2% to 3%. However, the term "contamination rate" has been defined in many ways, limiting its generalizability. The definitions used in earlier studies can be divided into two categories; definitions based on clinical judgements, and those based on preset rules. According to each principle, the equation must be composed of a defined numerator and denominator. The problem with clinical definitions is that the decision is inevitably subjective, and the process is too cumbersome. Also, if the number of positive cultures is used as the denominator, the value would be equivalent to the positive predictive value, given that contamination is regarded as a "positive case." Thus, the value would not be useful for validating a procedure. On the other hand, when the preset algorithm was adopted, true infection would, to some degree, inevitably be classified as contamination. Also, if the algorithm adopted the number of blood culture sets as the denominator and contamination was defined as the identification of 1 or more specified organisms in only 1 of multiple sets of blood cultures, its theoretical maximum value would not be 100%. This is a problem because the value is a mixture of several numbers with different scales. In other words, whether the blood cultures are collected once, twice, or thrice or more a day would affect the result. The study cited by CUMITECH aimed to evaluate the equivalence between the clinical definition and the laboratory definition with preset rules, rather than to establish a benchmark for the contamination rate. It is undesirable for the number to be perceived as a benchmark. "A Guide to Blood Culture" (2013) by the Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology introduced a calculation for the contamination rate, but the definition of the term "number of specimens" in the formula is ambiguous. In addition, the

  12. Blood culture-based diagnosis of bacteraemia: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Opota, O; Croxatto, A; Prod'hom, G; Greub, G

    2015-04-01

    Blood culture remains the best approach to identify the incriminating microorganisms when a bloodstream infection is suspected, and to guarantee that the antimicrobial treatment is adequate. Major improvements have been made in the last years to increase the sensitivity and specificity and to reduce the time to identification of microorganisms recovered from blood cultures. Among other factors, the introduction in clinical microbiology laboratories of the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry technology revolutionized the identification of microorganisms whereas the introduction of nucleic-acid-based methods, such as DNA hybridization or rapid PCR-based test, significantly reduce the time to results. Together with traditional antimicrobial susceptibility testing, new rapid methods for the detection of resistance mechanisms respond to major epidemiological concerns such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, extended-spectrum β-lactamase or carbapenemases. This review presents and discusses the recent developments in microbial diagnosis of bloodstream infections based on blood cultures.

  13. Preliminary evaluation of a new clinical algorithm to interpret blood cultures growing coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Schnell, David; Lécuyer, Hervé; Geeraerts, Thomas; Dumenil, Anne-Sylvie; Bille, Emmanuelle; Mercier, Frédéric J; Benhamou, Dan; Zahar, Jean-Ralph

    2013-07-01

    Evaluating the clinical significance of blood cultures positive for coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) is of critical importance since these microorganisms represent both the first contaminants of blood cultures and one of the leading causes of bloodstream infection (BSI). This prospective 2-centre study aimed to compare a previously reported algorithm to a clinical algorithm based on our experience. We identified 84 patients with CoNS-positive blood cultures. Twenty-seven (32%) were considered to have BSI according to our study algorithm. Thirty-seven (44%) patients were considered to have CoNS BSI according to the previously reported algorithm. The 2 algorithms isolated patients with similar rates of recurrences and hospital mortality. Our algorithm seemed to result in less diagnoses of CoNS BSI without harmful consequences compared to the previously reported algorithm. The impact on patient outcome and the inappropriate use of antibiotics deserves further investigation.

  14. [Quality indicators for blood culture: three years of monitoring at a university hospital in Chile].

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Ana María; Sánchez, Tomás; de la Barra, Ricardo

    2012-08-01

    Blood culture is considered the "gold standard" for the diagnosis of bacteremia, critical condition with high morbidity and mortality. Because of its importance, it is estimated that the blood culture is a critical test that requires close monitoring on the quality with which the process is performed. The objective of this work is to show the results of the monitoring carried out during the past three years, of 5 quality indicators of blood cultures in the laboratory of the Hospital Clínico de la Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, considering pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical aspects. In the 3 years monitored the mean contamination was 0,7%, 46% of adult bottles had adequate volume, match between Gram stain with final identification was 99.4%, 100% of correct participations were achieved in surveys of external quality control and Gram staining notification before 1 hour was 88.7%. With regard to proposed aims, in 2011 the laboratory complies with all, except the percentage of bottles with appropriate volume of blood inoculated. This indicator is very low and should be corrected as soon as possible since it is known that it is an important condition for optimum performance of blood cultures.

  15. Use of BBL CHROMagar MRSA Medium for Identification of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Directly from Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Pape, John; Wadlin, Jill; Nachamkin, Irving

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of BBL CHROMagar MRSA medium (Becton Dickinson, Sparks, MD) to identify methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) directly upon subculture from positive blood culture bottles. There were 124 MRSA isolates recovered from blood cultures in the study. BBL CHROMagar MRSA medium was highly sensitive (97.6% [121/124] at 18 to 24 h of incubation and 100% [124/124] at 48 h) and 99.9% specific for identifying MRSA from positive blood cultures. PMID:16825383

  16. Effects of carbon sources on the enrichment of halophilic polyhydroxyalkanoate-storing mixed microbial culture in an aerobic dynamic feeding process

    PubMed Central

    Cui, You-Wei; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Lu, Peng-Fei; Peng, Yong-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Microbial polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production serves as a substitute for petroleum-based plastics. Enriching mixed microbial cultures (MMCs) with the capacity to store PHA is a key precursor for low-cost PHA production. This study investigated the impact of carbon types on enrichment outcomes. Three MMCs were separately fed by acetate sodium, glucose, and starch as an enriching carbon source, and were exposed to long-term aerobic dynamic feeding (ADF) periods. The PHA production capacity, kinetics and stoichiometry of the enrichments, the PHA composition, and the microbial diversity and community composition were explored to determine carbon and enrichment correlations. After 350-cycle enriching periods under feast-famine (F-F) regimes, the MMCs enriched by acetate sodium and glucose contained a maximum PHA content of 64.7% and 60.5% cell dry weight (CDW). The starch-enriched MMC only had 27.3% CDW of PHA. High-throughput sequencing revealed that non-PHA bacteria survived alongside PHA storing bacteria, even under severe F-F selective pressure. Genus of Pseudomonas and Stappia were the possible PHA accumulating bacteria in acetate-enriched MMC. Genus of Oceanicella, Piscicoccus and Vibrio were found as PHA accumulating bacteria in glucose-enriched MMC. Vibrio genus was the only PHA accumulating bacteria in starch-enriched MMC. The community diversity and composition were regulated by the substrate types. PMID:27485896

  17. Faster identification of pathogens in positive blood cultures by fluorescence in situ hybridization in routine practice.

    PubMed

    Peters, Remco P H; Savelkoul, Paul H M; Simoons-Smit, Alberdina M; Danner, Sven A; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; van Agtmael, Michiel A

    2006-01-01

    Rapid identification of microorganisms in blood cultures is required to optimize empirical treatment at an early stage. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can reduce the time to identification of microorganisms in growth-positive blood cultures. In this study, we evaluated the performance, time to identification, and potential clinical benefits of FISH compared to those of conventional culture methods in routine practice. After Gram staining, blood culture fluids were simultaneously further identified with FISH and with conventional culture methods. Results and points in time of FISH and culture identification (provisional and final identifications) were collected and compared. For 91% of microorganisms, the genus or family name was identified, and for 79%, the species name could be attributed. The sensitivity and specificity of the individual probes exceeded 95%, except for the Enterobacteriaceae probe (sensitivity, 89%). Cross-hybridization was obtained with the Klebsiella pneumoniae probe for Klebsiella oxytoca. The time gains of FISH and final culture identification were more than 18 h for bacteria and 42 h for yeasts. With FISH, Staphylococcus aureus was differentiated from coagulase-negative staphylococci 1.4 h faster than by provisional identification (P < 0.001). In conclusion, FISH allows rapid and reliable identification of the majority of microorganisms in growth-positive blood cultures. The substantial time gain of identification with FISH may allow same-day adjustment of antimicrobial therapy, and FISH is especially useful if no provisional identification is obtained. With further extension of the number of probes and a reduction in turnaround time, FISH will become a very useful diagnostic tool in the diagnosis of bloodstream infections.

  18. Effects of carbon sources on the enrichment of halophilic polyhydroxyalkanoate-storing mixed microbial culture in an aerobic dynamic feeding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, You-Wei; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Lu, Peng-Fei; Peng, Yong-Zhen

    2016-08-01

    Microbial polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production serves as a substitute for petroleum-based plastics. Enriching mixed microbial cultures (MMCs) with the capacity to store PHA is a key precursor for low-cost PHA production. This study investigated the impact of carbon types on enrichment outcomes. Three MMCs were separately fed by acetate sodium, glucose, and starch as an enriching carbon source, and were exposed to long-term aerobic dynamic feeding (ADF) periods. The PHA production capacity, kinetics and stoichiometry of the enrichments, the PHA composition, and the microbial diversity and community composition were explored to determine carbon and enrichment correlations. After 350-cycle enriching periods under feast-famine (F-F) regimes, the MMCs enriched by acetate sodium and glucose contained a maximum PHA content of 64.7% and 60.5% cell dry weight (CDW). The starch-enriched MMC only had 27.3% CDW of PHA. High-throughput sequencing revealed that non-PHA bacteria survived alongside PHA storing bacteria, even under severe F-F selective pressure. Genus of Pseudomonas and Stappia were the possible PHA accumulating bacteria in acetate-enriched MMC. Genus of Oceanicella, Piscicoccus and Vibrio were found as PHA accumulating bacteria in glucose-enriched MMC. Vibrio genus was the only PHA accumulating bacteria in starch-enriched MMC. The community diversity and composition were regulated by the substrate types.

  19. Measurement of Blood Coagulation Factor Synthesis in Cultures of Human Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Stefan; Braspenning, Joris

    2015-01-01

    An important function of the liver is the synthesis and secretion of blood coagulation factors. Within the liver, hepatocytes are involved in the synthesis of most blood coagulation factors, such as fibrinogen, prothrombin, factor V, VII, IX, X, XI, XII, as well as protein C and S, and antithrombin, whereas liver sinusoidal endothelial cells produce factor VIII and von Willebrand factor. Here, we describe methods for the detection and quantification of most blood coagulation factors in hepatocytes in vitro. Hepatocyte cultures indeed provide a valuable tool to study blood coagulation factors. In addition, the generation and expansion of hepatocytes or hepatocyte-like cells may be used in future for cell-based therapies of liver diseases, including blood coagulation factor deficiencies.

  20. PCR identification of bacteria in blood culture does not fit the daily workflow of a routine microbiology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Karumaa, Santra; Kärpänoja, Pauliina; Sarkkinen, Hannu

    2012-03-01

    We have evaluated the GenoType blood culture assay (Hain Lifescience, Nehren, Germany) for the identification of bacteria in 233 positive blood cultures and assessed its suitability in the workflow of a routine microbiology laboratory. In 68/233 (29.2%) samples, the culture result could not be confirmed by the GenoType assay due to a lack of primers in the test, multiple organisms in the sample, or inconsistency with respect to the identification by culture. Although the GenoType blood culture assay gives satisfactory results for bacteria for which primers are available, there are difficulties in applying the test in the routine microbiology laboratory.

  1. Comparative usefulness of inflammatory markers to indicate bacterial infection-analyzed according to blood culture results and related clinical factors.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Hirokazu; Shirano, Michinori; Kasamatsu, Yu; Morimura, Ayumi; Iida, Ko; Kishi, Tomomi; Goto, Tetsushi; Okamoto, Saki; Ehara, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    To assess relationships of inflammatory markers and 2 related clinical factors with blood culture results, we retrospectively investigated inpatients' blood culture and blood chemistry findings that were recorded from January to December 2014 using electronic medical records and analyzed the data of 852 subjects (426 culture-positive and 426 culture-negative). Results suggested that the risk of positive blood culture statistically increased as inflammatory marker levels and the number of related factors increased. Concerning the effectiveness of inflammatory markers, when the outcome definition was also changed for C-reactive protein (CRP), the odds ratio had a similar value, whereas when the outcome definition of blood culture positivity was used for procalcitonin (PCT), the greatest effectiveness of that was detected. Therefore, the current results suggest that PCT is more useful than CRP as an auxiliary indication of bacterial infection.

  2. Multiplex blood PCR in combination with blood cultures for improvement of microbiological documentation of infection in febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Lamoth, F; Jaton, K; Prod'hom, G; Senn, L; Bille, J; Calandra, T; Marchetti, O

    2010-10-01

    The frequent lack of microbiological documentation of infection by blood cultures (BC) has a major impact on clinical management of febrile neutropenic patients, especially in cases of unexplained persistent fever. We assessed the diagnostic utility of the LightCycler SeptiFast test (SF), a multiplex blood PCR, in febrile neutropenia. Blood for BC and SF was drawn at the onset of fever and every 3 days of persistent fever. SF results were compared with those of BC, clinical documentation of infection, and standard clinical, radiological, and microbiological criteria for invasive fungal infections (IFI). A total of 141 febrile neutropenic episodes in 86 hematological patients were studied: 44 (31%) microbiologically and 49 (35%) clinically documented infections and 48 (34%) unexplained fevers. At the onset of fever, BC detected 44 microorganisms in 35/141 (25%) episodes. Together, BC and SF identified 78 microorganisms in 61/141 (43%) episodes (P = 0.002 versus BC or SF alone): 12 were detected by BC and SF, 32 by BC only, and 34 by SF only. In 19/52 (37%) episodes of persistent fever, SF detected 28 new microorganisms (7 Gram-positive bacterial species, 15 Gram-negative bacterial species, and 6 fungal species [89% with a clinically documented site of infection]) whereas BC detected only 4 pathogens (8%) (P = 0.001). While BC did not detect fungi, SF identified 5 Candida spp. and 1 Aspergillus sp. in 5/7 probable or possible cases of IFI. Using SeptiFast PCR combined with blood cultures improves microbiological documentation in febrile neutropenia, especially when fever persists and invasive fungal infection is suspected. Technical adjustments may enhance the efficiency of this new molecular tool in this specific setting.

  3. Western Culture in Japanese Film: Kurosawa's "Throne of Blood" and "Ran."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Peter E.

    Akira Kurosawa, the most popular Asian film maker with audiences in the United States, has found in William Shakespeare's plays themes and plots that resonate within Japanese culture. While the translations of "Macbeth" into "Throne of Blood" and "King Lear" into "Ran" are quite direct and literal with only…

  4. Rapid Intrinsic Fluorescence Method for Direct Identification of Pathogens in Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, John D.; Hyman, Jay M.; Borzhemskaya, Larisa; Bowen, Ann; McKellar, Caroline; Ullery, Michael; Mathias, Erin; Ronsick, Christopher; Link, John; Wilson, Mark; Clay, Bradford; Robinson, Ron; Thorpe, Thurman; van Belkum, Alex; Dunne, W. Michael

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT A positive blood culture is a critical result that requires prompt identification of the causative agent. This article describes a simple method to identify microorganisms from positive blood culture broth within the time taken to perform a Gram stain (<20 min). The method is based on intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy (IFS) of whole cells and required development of a selective lysis buffer, aqueous density cushion, optical microcentrifuge tube, and reference database. A total of 1,121 monomicrobial-positive broth samples from 751 strains were analyzed to build a database representing 37 of the most commonly encountered species in bloodstream infections or present as contaminants. A multistage algorithm correctly classified 99.6% of unknown samples to the Gram level, 99.3% to the family level, and 96.5% to the species level. There were no incorrect results given at the Gram or family classification levels, while 0.8% of results were discordant at the species level. In 8/9 incorrect species results, the misidentified isolate was assigned to a species of the same genus. This unique combination of selective lysis, density centrifugation, and IFS can rapidly identify the most common microbial species present in positive blood cultures. Faster identification of the etiologic agent may benefit the clinical management of sepsis. Further evaluation is now warranted to determine the performance of the method using clinical blood culture specimens. PMID:24255123

  5. [Rapid identification of microorganisms by mass spectrometry in a blood culture system. Comparison of two procedures].

    PubMed

    Cattani, María E; Posse, Tamara; Hermes, Ricardo L; Kaufman, Sara C

    2015-01-01

    Rapid identification of microorganisms is critical in hospitalized infected patients. Blood culture is currently the gold standard for detecting and identifying microorganisms causing bacteremia or sepsis. The introduction of mass spectrometry by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF MS) in microbiology laboratories, especially in microorganisms growing in blood culture bottles, provides rapid identification. This study evaluates the performance of the Maldi Sepsityper Biotyper procedure (hereinafter, MS) compared to that of an in-home method (hereinafter, HF). Eight hundred and forty (840) positive blood culture bottles were processed using the HF procedure, 542 of which were also processed using MS. The organisms were identified in 670 (79.76%) and 391 (72.14%) bottles respectively (p = 0,0013). This study demonstrates the effectiveness of both procedures for identifying microorganisms directly from positive blood culture bottles. However, the HF procedure proved to be more effective than MS, especially in the presence of Gram positive organisms.

  6. Preparation of positive blood cultures for direct MALDI-ToF MS identification.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Andrew M; Ussher, James E

    2016-08-01

    MALDI-ToF MS can be used to identify microorganisms directly from blood cultures. This study compared two methods of sample preparation. Similar levels of genus- (91% vs 90%) and species-level identifications (79% vs 74%) were obtained with differential centrifugation and SDS methods. The SDS method is faster and requires minimal handling.

  7. Molecular Characterization of a Catalase-Negative Staphylococcus aureus Blood Culture Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Kum, Steven; Jureen, Roland; Lin, Raymond T. P.

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a catalase-negative methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus isolate collected from a blood culture. Sequencing through the gene encoding catalase, katA, demonstrated a 2-bp insertion. The resulting frameshift mutation generates a protein that has lost 26 amino acids (aa) at its C-terminal domain. PMID:26354811

  8. Carbapenem resistance via the blaKPC-2 gene in Enterobacter cloacae blood culture isolate.

    PubMed

    Lo, Andy; Verrall, Rosemary; Williams, John; Stratton, Charles; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2010-05-01

    An Enterobacter cloacae blood culture isolate expressing carbapenem resistance via the Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase KPC-2 gene is reported. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a nosocomial isolate with carbapenemase-mediated resistance causing infection in a patient from Tennessee.

  9. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry identifies 90% of bacteria directly from blood culture vials.

    PubMed

    Moussaoui, W; Jaulhac, B; Hoffmann, A-M; Ludes, B; Kostrzewa, M; Riegel, P; Prévost, G

    2010-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is now widely used for marker/multi-biomarker detection in medical diagnosis. We tested a new protocol for bacterial identification from blood culture broths in hospital routine by using collection tubes with separator gels on 503 included samples examined over 3 months, where 1.5 mL was injected by a syringe into BD Vacutainer tubes from BACTEC-positive bottles, before processing for bacterial protein extraction. Samples were loaded in duplicate onto the MALDI MS target, allowing a series of 12 samples to be processed in duplicate within 80 min by using Biflex III and BioTyper 2.0 software (Bruker). Including polymicrobial samples, 193 of 213 of Gram-negative bacteria (91.08%) and 284 of 319 of Gram-positive bacteria (89.02%) were correctly identified at the species level. Enterobacteriaceae constituted 35.15% of all species found, Staphylococaceae 37.96%, Streptococaceae and Enterococaceae 20.85%, Pseudomonadaceae 1.69%, and anaerobes 2.44%. In most of the polymicrobial samples, one of the species present was identified (80.9%). Seven isolates remained misidentified as Streptococcus pneumoniae, all belonging to Streptococcus mitis. Staphylococcus aureus was identified better when grown on anaero-aerobic medium, and MALDI BioTyper identification scores as low as 1.4 were pertinent, provided that four successive proposals of the same species were given. This new protocol correlates with conventional microbiology procedures by up to 90%, and by >95% for only monomicrobial samples, and provides a decreased turn-around time for identification of bacteria isolated from blood cultures, making this technology suitable also for blood cultures, with less delay and cost decreases in bacterial diagnostics, and favouring better care of patients.

  10. Exposure to high glutamate concentration activates aerobic glycolysis but inhibits ATP-linked respiration in cultured cortical astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yao; Tian, Yueyang; Shi, Xiaojie; Yang, Jianbo; Ouyang, Li; Gao, Jieqiong; Lu, Jianxin

    2014-08-01

    Astrocytes play a key role in removing the synaptically released glutamate from the extracellular space and maintaining the glutamate below neurotoxic level in the brain. However, high concentration of glutamate leads to toxicity in astrocytes, and the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether energy metabolism disorder, especially impairment of mitochondrial respiration, is involved in the glutamate-induced gliotoxicity. Exposure to 10-mM glutamate for 48 h stimulated glycolysis and respiration in astrocytes. However, the increased oxygen consumption was used for proton leak and non-mitochondrial respiration, but not for oxidative phosphorylation and ATP generation. When the exposure time extended to 72 h, glycolysis was still activated for ATP generation, but the mitochondrial ATP-linked respiration of astrocytes was reduced. The glutamate-induced astrocyte damage can be mimicked by the non-metabolized substrate d-aspartate but reversed by the non-selective glutamate transporter inhibitor TBOA. In addition, the glutamate toxicity can be partially reversed by vitamin E. These findings demonstrate that changes of bioenergetic profile occur in cultured cortical astrocytes exposed to high concentration of glutamate and highlight the role of mitochondria respiration in glutamate-induced gliotoxicity in cortical astrocytes.

  11. Evaluating the culture of fetal erythroblasts from maternal blood for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Griffin, D K; Jestice, K; Hackett, G; Cooper, J; Ferguson-Smith, M A

    1998-09-01

    Fetal erythroblasts circulating in maternal blood are important candidate cells for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis. We have cultured erythroblasts from 16 maternal blood samples, both with and without prior enrichment by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS), in a semi-solid medium containing growth factors. Individual colonies were examined by PCR with sex chromosome-specific primers and microsatellite marker primers. No conclusive Y-chromosome specific amplification could be demonstrated in any of the 16 cases, even when the mother was confirmed to be carrying a male fetus. All colonies tested by microsatellite marker PCR were of maternal origin. Our results suggest that the probability of obtaining fetal colonies from fetal erythroblasts circulating in maternal blood is very low and that approaches for culturing fetal erythroblasts in vitro cannot yet be used reliably for prenatal diagnosis using current methods for fetal cell enrichment.

  12. Preparation of a blood culture pellet for rapid bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Croxatto, Antony; Prod'hom, Guy; Durussel, Christian; Greub, Gilbert

    2014-10-15

    Bloodstream infections and sepsis are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The successful outcome of patients suffering from bacteremia depends on a rapid identification of the infectious agent to guide optimal antibiotic treatment. The analysis of Gram stains from positive blood culture can be rapidly conducted and already significantly impact the antibiotic regimen. However, the accurate identification of the infectious agent is still required to establish the optimal targeted treatment. We present here a simple and fast bacterial pellet preparation from a positive blood culture that can be used as a sample for several essential downstream applications such as identification by MALDI-TOF MS, antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) by disc diffusion assay or automated AST systems and by automated PCR-based diagnostic testing. The performance of these different identification and AST systems applied directly on the blood culture bacterial pellets is very similar to the performance normally obtained from isolated colonies grown on agar plates. Compared to conventional approaches, the rapid acquisition of a bacterial pellet significantly reduces the time to report both identification and AST. Thus, following blood culture positivity, identification by MALDI-TOF can be reported within less than 1 hr whereas results of AST by automated AST systems or disc diffusion assays within 8 to 18 hr, respectively. Similarly, the results of a rapid PCR-based assay can be communicated to the clinicians less than 2 hr following the report of a bacteremia. Together, these results demonstrate that the rapid preparation of a blood culture bacterial pellet has a significant impact on the identification and AST turnaround time and thus on the successful outcome of patients suffering from bloodstream infections.

  13. Preparation of a Blood Culture Pellet for Rapid Bacterial Identification and Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing

    PubMed Central

    Croxatto, Antony; Prod'hom, Guy; Durussel, Christian; Greub, Gilbert

    2014-01-01

    Bloodstream infections and sepsis are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The successful outcome of patients suffering from bacteremia depends on a rapid identification of the infectious agent to guide optimal antibiotic treatment. The analysis of Gram stains from positive blood culture can be rapidly conducted and already significantly impact the antibiotic regimen. However, the accurate identification of the infectious agent is still required to establish the optimal targeted treatment. We present here a simple and fast bacterial pellet preparation from a positive blood culture that can be used as a sample for several essential downstream applications such as identification by MALDI-TOF MS, antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) by disc diffusion assay or automated AST systems and by automated PCR-based diagnostic testing. The performance of these different identification and AST systems applied directly on the blood culture bacterial pellets is very similar to the performance normally obtained from isolated colonies grown on agar plates. Compared to conventional approaches, the rapid acquisition of a bacterial pellet significantly reduces the time to report both identification and AST. Thus, following blood culture positivity, identification by MALDI-TOF can be reported within less than 1 hr whereas results of AST by automated AST systems or disc diffusion assays within 8 to 18 hr, respectively. Similarly, the results of a rapid PCR-based assay can be communicated to the clinicians less than 2 hr following the report of a bacteremia. Together, these results demonstrate that the rapid preparation of a blood culture bacterial pellet has a significant impact on the identification and AST turnaround time and thus on the successful outcome of patients suffering from bloodstream infections. PMID:25350577

  14. Evaluation of blood cultures in a children’s hospital located in Southeastern Anatolia

    PubMed Central

    Yiş, Reyhan

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Bloodstream infections in hospitalized patients are one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality despite antimicrobial therapy. Early diagnosis and treatment of these infections is crucial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution and antibiotic susceptibility of bacteria isolated from blood cultures in a children’s hospital in the Southeastern Anatolia during an 18-month period. Material and Methods: 7 040 blood cultures which were sent from hospitalized patients in Gaziantep Children’s Hospital between 01.07.2010 and 01.01.2012 were evaluated. Results: A total of 7 040 blood cultures were evaluated in this study. Microbial growth was detected in 2075 (29.47%) blood cultures. The most frequently isolated bacteria were coagulase-negative staphylococci (%45.97) which were followed by Salmonella spp. (%7.8). 12.12% of enterococcal isolates were resistant to glycopeptide antibiotics. The most frequently isolated gram negative bacterium was Salmonella spp. 15.43% of Salmonella spp. showed decreased susceptibility against quinolones. The ESBL positivity rate of E. coli and K. pneumoniae strains was found to be 35.08% and 57.14%, respectively. The imipenem resistance rate of P. aeruginosa was found to be 33.33%. The most common nonfermentative bacterium was S. maltophilia. Conclusions: The distribution of bacteria isolated from blood cultures and antibiotic resistance rates differ among different regions of Turkey. Different results obtained in our study may be related with regional tendencies to infections and patient population. Distribution of infectious agents and antibiotic resistance rates should be evaluated at regular intervals. This will lead to establishment of proper antibiotic usage policies in our country. PMID:26265894

  15. Molecular Detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae on Dried Blood Spots from Febrile Nigerian Children Compared to Culture

    PubMed Central

    Iroh Tam, Pui-Ying; Hernandez-Alvarado, Nelmary; Schleiss, Mark R.; Hassan-Hanga, Fatimah; Onuchukwu, Chuma; Umoru, Dominic; Obaro, Stephen K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Nigeria has one of the highest burdens of pneumococcal disease in the world, but accurate surveillance is lacking. Molecular detection of infectious pathogens in dried blood spots (DBS) is an ideal method for surveillance of infections in resource-limited settings because of its low cost, minimal blood volumes involved, and ease of storage at ambient temperature. Our study aim was to evaluate a Streptococcus pneumoniae real-time polymerase chain reaction (rt-PCR) assay on DBS from febrile Nigerian children on Whatman 903 and FTA filter papers, compared to the gold standard of culture. Methods Between September 2011 to May 2015, blood was collected from children 5 years of age or under who presented to six hospital study sites throughout northern and central Nigeria with febrile illness, and inoculated into blood culture bottles or spotted onto Whatman 903 or FTA filter paper. Culture and rt-PCR were performed on all samples. Results A total of 537 DBS specimens from 535 children were included in the study, of which 15 were culture-positive for S. pneumoniae. The rt-PCR assay detected S. pneumoniae in 12 DBS specimens (2.2%). One positive rt-PCR result was identified in a culture-negative specimen from a high-risk subject, and two positive rt-PCR results were negative on repeat testing. Six culture-confirmed cases of S. pneumoniae bacteremia were missed. Compared to culture, the overall sensitivities of Whatman 903 and FTA DBS for detection of S. pneumoniae were 57.1% (95% CI 18.4–90.1%) and 62.5% (95% CI 24.5–91.5%), respectively. Nonspecific amplification was noted in an additional 22 DBS (4.1%). Among these, six were positive for a non-S. pneumoniae pathogen on culture. Conclusions Rt-PCR was able to detect S. pneumoniae from clinical DBS specimens, including from a culture-negative specimen. Our findings show promise of this approach as a surveillance diagnostic, but also raise important cautionary questions. Several DBS specimens were detected as

  16. [Identification of staphylococci directly from positive blood culture bottles by MALDI-TOF MS system].

    PubMed

    Kilic, Abdullah; Baysallar, Mehmet

    2014-07-01

    Bloodstream infections are substantial causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Staphylococcus species are the most commonly isolated microorganisms from blood cultures in clinical microbiology laboratories. MALDI-TOF MS (Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time- of- Flight Mass Spectrometry) system allows the identification of microorganisms directly from positive blood culture bottles. The aim of this study was to evaluate the MALDI-TOF MS system for the identification of staphylococci directly from the positive blood culture bottles which revealed the presence of gram-positive cocci by staining. A total of 96 positive blood culture bottles that yielded gram-positive cocci by Gram stain were evaluated. These blood cultures were obtained from 69 patients between December 2013-February 2014. Conventional methods and BD Phoenix™ automated bacterial identification system (Becton Dickinson, USA) were used for routine identification. The strains were also identified by real-time Taqman PCR (qPCR) which was considered as the reference method. In MALDI-TOF MS method, MALDI Sepsityper™ Kit was used for the bacterial identification and all measurements were carried out by using Microflex LT instrument and FlexControl 3.0 software (Bruker Daltonics, USA). Of 96 culture bottles positive for gram-positive cocci, 90 were correctly identified as staphylococci at genus level with all the three study methods (qPCR, BD Phoenix, Bruker MALDI-TOF MS). The other six samples were identified as Enterococcus faecium (n= 4) and Streptococcus pyogenes (n= 2) by both Phoenix and the MALDI-TOF systems. Of the 90 samples, 87 were identified at the species level (15 S.aureus, 33 S.epidermidis, 29 S.hominis, 10 S.haemolyticus) and three at the genus level by the reference qPCR method. When comparing the results obtained by qPCR and Bruker MALDI-TOF MS, incompatibility was detected for three isolates. Those isolates were identified as S.hominis by qPCR, however two of them were

  17. Dynamic in vivo (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in glucose-limited chemostat culture during the aerobic-anaerobic shift.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, B; de Graaf, A; Renaud, M; Sahm, H

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to analyse in vivo the influence of sudden oxygen depletion on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, grown in glucose-limited chemostat culture, using a recently developed cyclone reactor coupled with (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Before, during and after the transition, intracellular and extracellular phosphorylated metabolites as well as the pHs in the different cellular compartments were monitored with a time resolution of 2.5 min. The employed integrated NMR bioreactor system allowed the defined glucose-limited continuous cultivation of yeast at a density of 75 g DW/l and a p(O(2)) of 30% air saturation. A purely oxidative metabolism was maintained at all times. In vivo (31)P NMR spectra obtained were of excellent quality and even allowed the detection of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). During the switch from aerobic to anaerobic conditions, a rapid, significant decrease of intracellular ATP and PEP levels was observed and the cytoplasmic pH decreased from 7.5 to 6.8. This change, which was accompanied by a transient influx of extracellular inorganic phosphate (P(i)), appeared to correlate linearly with the decrease of the ATP concentration, suggesting that the cause of the partial collapse of the plasma membrane pH gradient was a reduced availability of ATP. The complete phosphorous balance established from our measurement data showed that polyphosphate was not the source of the increased intracellular P(i). The derived intracellular P(i), ATP and ADP concentration data confirmed that the glycolytic flux at the level of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, 3-phosphoglycerate kinase and enolase enzymes is mainly controlled by thermodynamic constraints.

  18. Effects of transforming growth factor-beta on long-term human cord blood monocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Orcel, P.; Bielakoff, J.; De Vernejoul, M.C. )

    1990-02-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) modulates growth and differentiation in many cell types and is abundant in bone matrix. We recently showed that human cord blood monocytes cultured in the presence of 1,25(OH)2D3 acquire some features of osteoclast precursors. Since TGF-beta has been shown to influence bone resorption in organ culture, we have studied the effect of TGF-beta (1-1,000 pg/ml) on cord blood monocyte cultures. These cells were cultured on plastic substrate during 3 weeks in the presence of 20% horse serum and 10(-9) M 1,25(OH)2D3. TGF-beta, from a concentration of 10 pg/ml in the culture medium, decreased in a dose dependent manner the formation of multinucleated cells. At a concentration of TGF-beta of 1 ng/ml, the multinucleated cells were reduced to 2.1% +/- 0.3%, compared to 19.3% +/- 1.5% in control cultures. TGF-beta inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the proliferation of cord blood monocytes as assessed by 3H-thymidine incorporation at 7 and 14 days of culture. The fusion index was also decreased by 3 weeks of treatment with TGF-beta. Indomethacin did not reverse the inhibitory effects of TGF-beta. The expression of the osteoclastic phenotype was assessed using two different antibodies: 23C6, a monoclonal antibody directed against the vitronectin receptor, which is highly expressed by osteoclasts but not by adult monocytes, and an antibody to HLA-DR, which is not present on osteoclast. TGF-beta decreased the expression of HLA-DR and increased in a dose-dependent manner the proportion of 23C6-labeled cells; these results suggest that TGF-beta could modulate a differentiation effect to the osteoclastic phenotype. However, when cord blood monocytes were cultured on devitalized rat calvariae prelabeled with 45Ca, TGF-beta did not induce any 45Ca release from bone cultured with monocytes.

  19. Comparison of acridine orange, methylene blue, and Gram stains for blood cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Mirrett, S; Lauer, B A; Miller, G A; Reller, L B

    1982-01-01

    Direct microscopic screening of blood cultures by Gram stain or methylene blue stain is time consuming and frequently insensitive. Therefore, we evaluated a fluorescent-staining procedure that uses acridine orange (AO) at pH 3.5 and compared it with the methylene blue and Gram stain procedures. All smears were prepared within 24 h of receiving the culture, fixed with methanol, and examined without the results of the companion smears being known. AO-stained smears were examined with incident-light fluorescence at 600 x magnification and confirmed at 1,500x magnification. All bottles macroscopically positive within 24 h were excluded from the study. Of 2,946 cultures entered into the study, 204 (6.9%) were positive within 3 days. The sensitivity and specificity of AO based on these culture results were 52 and 98%, respectively, compared with 38% sensitivity and 99% specificity by methylene blue and Gram stains. The AO staining procedure is a simple, sensitive, screening technique for the early detection of positive blood cultures. PMID:6175656

  20. Rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility profiling of Gram-positive cocci in blood cultures with the Vitek 2 system.

    PubMed

    Lupetti, A; Barnini, S; Castagna, B; Capria, A-L; Nibbering, P H

    2010-01-01

    Rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility profiling of the bacteria in blood cultures can result in clinical and financial benefits. Addition of saponin to the fluid from blood culture bottles promotes the recovery of the bacteria and thus may shorten the turnaround time of the microbiological analyses. In this study we compared the identification and susceptibility profiles of saponin-treated and untreated (standard method) blood cultures monomicrobial for Gram-positive cocci using Vitek 2. We concordantly identified 49 (89%) of 55 monobacterial cultures using the results with the standard method as reference. Complete categorical agreement between the susceptibility profiles with the new and the standard method was found for 26 (53%) of 49 isolates, while discrepancies were seen for 23 (47%) cultures. E-tests indicated that the new method resulted in a correct susceptibility profile for 8 (35%) of these 23 blood cultures. Therefore, 34 (69%) of 49 cultures showed a concordant/correct susceptibility profile for all antimicrobials with an overall error rate of 2.3%. Thus, addition of saponin to the fluid from blood culture bottles of the Bactec 9240 leads to the rapid (results available >or=12 hours earlier) and reliable identification and susceptibility profiling of Gram-positive cocci in blood cultures with Vitek 2.

  1. A pilot study on the effects of magnesium supplementation with high and low habitual dietary magnesium intake on resting and recovery from aerobic and resistance exercise and systolic blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Kass, Lindsy S; Skinner, Philip; Poeira, Filipe

    2013-01-01

    The effects of magnesium supplementation on blood pressure (BP) have been studied for over 25 years and results have been inconsistent. Blood pressure reductions in randomized studies have varied from 12 mmHg reductions to no reduction. The objective of this pilot intervention was to investigate the effect of magnesium supplementation on systolic blood pressure whilst resting and during recovery from aerobic and resistance exercise and on performance. A further objective was to see whether the effect of a high vs low habitual dietary magnesium intake affected these results. Sixteen male volunteers were randomly assigned to either a 300 mg·d(-1) magnesium oxide supplementation (MO) or a control group (CG) for 14 days. Resting blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were measured before subjects performed a maximal 30 minute cycle, immediately followed by three x 5 second isometric bench press, both at baseline and after the intervention. Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded immediately post exercise and after five minutes recovery. A 3 day food diary was recorded for all subjects to measure dietary magnesium intake. At the end of the intervention, the supplemented group, had a reduction in mean resting systolic BP by 8.9 mmHg (115.125 ± 9.46 mmHg, p = 0.01) and post exercise by 13 mmHg (122.625 ± 9. 88 mmHg, p = 0.01). Recovery BP was 11.9 mmHg lower in the intervention group compared to control (p = 0.006) and HR decreased by 7 beats per minute in the experimental group (69.0 ± 11.6 bpm, p = 0. 02). Performance indicators did not change within and between the groups. Habitual dietary magnesium intake affected both resting and post exercise systolic BP and the subsequent effect of the magnesium supplementation. These results have an implication in a health setting and for health and exercise but not performance. Key pointsMagnesium supplementation will have an effect on resting and recovery systolic blood pressure with aerobic exercise

  2. Blood Culture Collection through Peripheral Intravenous Catheters Increases the Risk of Specimen Contamination among Adult Emergency Department Patients

    PubMed Central

    Self, Wesley H.; Speroff, Theodore; McNaughton, Candace D.; Wright, Patty W.; Miller, Geraldine; Johnson, James G.; Daniels, Titus L.; Talbot, Thomas R.

    2017-01-01

    Five hundred five blood cultures collected through a peripheral intravenous catheter (PIV) in an emergency department were matched to cultures obtained by dedicated venipuncture from the same patient within 10 minutes. The relative risk of contamination for cultures collected through PIVs compared with dedicated venipuncture was 1.83 (95% confidence interval, 1.08–3.11). PMID:22476282

  3. Blood culture collection through peripheral intravenous catheters increases the risk of specimen contamination among adult emergency department patients.

    PubMed

    Self, Wesley H; Speroff, Theodore; McNaughton, Candace D; Wright, Patty W; Miller, Geraldine; Johnson, James G; Daniels, Titus L; Talbot, Thomas R

    2012-05-01

    Five hundred five blood cultures collected through a peripheral intravenous catheter (PIV) in an emergency department were matched to cultures obtained by dedicated venipuncture from the same patient within 10 minutes. The relative risk of contamination for cultures collected through PIVs compared with dedicated venipuncture was 1.83 (95% confidence interval, 1.08-3.11).

  4. Bacterial and fungal DNA extraction from positive blood culture bottles: a manual and an automated protocol.

    PubMed

    Mäki, Minna

    2015-01-01

    When adapting a gene amplification-based method in a routine sepsis diagnostics using a blood culture sample as a specimen type, a prerequisite for a successful and sensitive downstream analysis is the efficient DNA extraction step. In recent years, a number of in-house and commercial DNA extraction solutions have become available. Careful evaluation in respect to cell wall disruption of various microbes and subsequent recovery of microbial DNA without putative gene amplification inhibitors should be conducted prior selecting the most feasible DNA extraction solution for the downstream analysis used. Since gene amplification technologies have been developed to be highly sensitive for a broad range of microbial species, it is also important to confirm that the used sample preparation reagents and materials are bioburden-free to avoid any risks for false-positive result reporting or interference of the diagnostic process. Here, one manual and one automated DNA extraction system feasible for blood culture samples are described.

  5. [PCR rDNA 16S used for the etiological diagnosis of blood culture negative endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Baty, G; Lanotte, P; Hocqueloux, L; Prazuck, T; Bret, L; Romano, M; Mereghetti, L

    2010-06-01

    We report the case of a 55 year-old man presenting with a double aortic and mitral endocarditis for which resected valve culture was repeatedly negative. Specific PCR made on valves because of highly positive blood tests for Bartonella henselae remained negative. A molecular approach was made with 16S rDNA PCR, followed by sequencing. Bartonella quintana was identified as the etiology of endocarditis. B. quintana, "fastidious" bacteria, even if hard to identify in a laboratory, is often reported as a blood culture negative endocarditis (BCNE) agent. Molecular biology methods have strongly improved the diagnosis of BCNE. We propose a review of the literature focusing on the interest of broad-spectrum PCR on valve for the etiological diagnosis of BCNE.

  6. Clinical significance of Staphylococcus saprophyticus identified on blood culture in a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sang-Ho; Woo, Jun Hee; Jeong, Jin-Yong; Kim, Nam Joong; Kim, Mi-Na; Kim, Yang Soo; Ryu, Jiso

    2006-11-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a well-known cause of acute uncomplicated urinary tract infection in young women. However, the clinical significance of this organism isolated from blood culture has not been determined. We assessed the clinical significance and characteristics of S. saprophyticus identified on blood culture. A total of 24 patients were identified, and 7 patients (29.2%) were considered to have clinically significant bacteremia. Of the 7 patients with clinically significant bacteremia, hematologic malignancy was the most common underlying illness (5 patients), and tunneled-central venous catheter was the most common portal of entry (4 patients). In no case did S. saprophyticus bacteremia originate from the urinary tract. One patient died during hospitalization. However, the death was not directly related to bacteremia. In conclusion, our data suggest that bacteremia caused by S. saprophyticus is most commonly associated with tunneled-central venous catheter in patients with hematologic malignancies and may be associated with a lower risk of mortality.

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility profile of Acinetobacter species isolated from blood cultures in two Japanese university hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kishii, Kozue; Kikuchi, Ken; Yoshida, Atsushi; Okuzumi, Katsuko; Uetera, Yushi; Yasuhara, Hiroshi; Moriya, Kyoji

    2014-02-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has rapidly spread worldwide. This study investigated antibiotic susceptibility and genotypic resistance of 123 consecutive blood culture isolates of Acinetobacter species collected between 2003 and 2011 in two Japanese hospitals. The isolates were assigned to 13 species. Carbapenem resistance was detected in four isolates. Only one A. baumannii isolate had blaOXA-23 together with ISAba1; the remaining three isolates had IMP-1 metallo-β-lactamase. Quinolone resistance was detected in five isolates that had point mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region. The predominance of various non-A. baumannii species and low prevalence of carbapenem resistance among blood culture isolates of Acinetobacter species in two Japanese hospitals were confirmed.

  8. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... The liquid part, called plasma, is made of water, salts, and protein. Over half of your blood is plasma. The solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red ...

  9. Extensive proliferative capacity of single isolated CD34 human cord blood cells in suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Xiao, M; Broxmeyer, H E; Horie, M; Grigsby, S; Lu, L

    1994-01-01

    Nonadherent, low-density T-lymphocyte-depleted (NALT-) CD34 cells from normal human cord blood were assessed in suspension culture for the effects of recombinant cytokines on their proliferation, differentiation, and generation of myeloid progenitor cells. In this cell population, 82% of cells expressed c-kit protein as assessed by in situ hybridization, and their cloning efficiency was 85% when cells were plated at low cell numbers with combinations of growth factors. CD34 cells were sorted as 1, 5, or 10 cell(s) per well and also at 5000 cells per dish to initiate stromal-free suspension cultures in the presence of steel factor (SLF), interleukin (IL)-1 alpha, and IL-3. Forty-eight percent of the wells started with a single CD34 cell were positive for growth after 14 days, and the wells contained greater than 5 x 10(3) cells by 21-28 days. Progenitors were assayed weekly with cultures initiated with 1 or 5000 cells. While the fold expansion of nucleated cells was greater in cultures initiated with one cell per well (> 5000 compared to 791-fold expansion for 5000 cells), the fold expansion of progenitors was greater than 5000 cells were used to initiate cultures. Under optimal conditions, there was, respectively, a 160-, 164-, and 57-fold output of high proliferative potential colony-forming cells, granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units, and erythroid burst-forming units/granulocyte erythroid macrophage megakaryocyte colony-forming units within 1-3 weeks for cultures initiated with 5000 CD34 cells compared with respective fold increases of 29, 16, and 1, for single-initiated cultures. These results demonstrate the expansion capacity of single CD34 cord blood cells and demonstrate that factors in addition to SLF, IL-1 alpha, and IL-3 are necessary for optimal expansion of progenitors from single isolated CD34 cells.

  10. Detection of the Dimorphic Phases of Mucor circinelloides in Blood Cultures from an Immunosuppressed Female

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Miguel A.; Schmitt, Bryan H.; Davis, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Mucormycosis fungemia is rarely documented since blood cultures are nearly always negative. We describe a case of Mucor circinelloides fungemia in a patient with a history of a sinus infection, sarcoidosis, and IgG deficiency. The identity of the isolate was supported by its microscopic morphology and its ability to convert into yeast forms under anaerobic conditions. The early detection, initiation of liposomal amphotericin B treatment, and reversal of underlying predisposing risk factors resulted in a good outcome. PMID:27777804

  11. Human whole-blood culture system for ex vivo characterization of designer-cell function.

    PubMed

    Schukur, Lina; Geering, Barbara; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Encapsulated designer cells implanted into mice are currently used to validate the efficacy of therapeutic gene networks for the diagnosis and treatment of various human diseases in preclinical research. Because many human conditions cannot be adequately replicated by animal models, complementary and alternative procedures to test future treatment strategies are required. Here we describe a novel approach utilizing an ex vivo human whole-blood culture system to validate synthetic biology-inspired designer cell-based treatment strategies. The viability and functionality of transgenic mammalian designer cells co-cultured with primary human immune cells were characterized. We demonstrated that transgenic mammalian designer cells required adequate insulation from the human blood microenvironment to maintain viability and functionality. The biomaterial alginate-(poly-l-lysine)-alginate used to encapsulate the transgenic designer cells did neither affect the viability of primary granulocytes and lymphocytes nor the functionality of lymphocytes. Additionally, alginate-encapsulated transgenic designer cells remained responsive to the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) from the whole-blood culture upon exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). TNF diffused into the alginate capsules, bound to the specific TNF receptors on the transgenic designer cells' surface and triggered the expression of the reporter gene SEAP (human placental secreted alkaline phosphatase) that was rewired to the TNF-specific signaling cascade. Human whole-blood culture systems can therefore be considered as valuable complementary assays to animal models for the validation of synthetic circuits in genetically modified mammalian cells and may speed up preclinical research in a world of personalized medicine.

  12. [Evaluation of rapid genotype assay for the identification of gram-positive cocci from blood cultures and detection of mecA and van genes].

    PubMed

    Gülhan, Barış; Atmaca, Selahattin; Ozekinci, Tuncer; Suay, Adnan

    2011-10-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of bacterial pathogens grown in blood cultures of patients with sepsis is crucial for prompt initiation of appropriate therapy in order to decrease related morbidity and mortality rates. Although current automated blood culture systems led to a significant improvement in bacterial detection time, more rapid identification systems are still needed to optimise the establishment of treatment. Novel genotype technology which is developed for the rapid diagnosis of sepsis, is a molecular genetic assay based on DNA multiplex amplification with biotinylated primers followed by hybridization to membrane bound probes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of "Genotype® BC gram-positive” test for the identification of gram-positive cocci grown in blood cultures and rapid detection of mecA and van genes. This test uses DNA.STRIP® technology which includes a panel of probes for identification of 17 gram-positive bacterial species and is able to determinate the methicillin and vancomycin resistance mediating genes (mecA and vanA, vanB, vanC1, vanC2/C3) simultaneously, in a single test run. A total of 55 positive blood cultures from BACTECTM Plus/F (Becton Dickinson, USA) aerobic and pediatric blood culture vials were included in the study. The isolates which exhibit gram-positive coccus morphology by Gram staining were identified by Genotype ® BC gram-positive test (Hain Life Science, Germany). All of the samples were also identified with the use of Phoenix PMIC/ID Panel (Becton Dickinson, USA) and antibiotic susceptibilities were determined. Of the 55 blood culture isolates, 17 were identified as Staphylococcus epidermidis [all were methicillin-resistant (MR)], 9 were S.aureus (one was MR), 18 were S.hominis (10 were MR), 4 were E.faecalis, 3 were E. faecium (one was vanconycin-resistant), 2 were S.saprophyticus (one was MR), 1 was S.warneri and 1 was S.haemolyticus, by Phoenix automated system. Genotype® BC gram

  13. Sample taking during orthopedic surgery: sensitivity and specificity using the BACTEC blood culture system.

    PubMed

    Podleska, L E; Lendemans, S; Schmid, E; Hussmann, B; Nast-Kolb, D; Taeger, G

    2012-02-01

    The use of blood culture systems for sterile body fluids other than blood has proven to be superior to routine culture methods. This study was conducted in order to assess the performance of the BACTEC blood culture system compared to swab/tissue sample collection for the detection of infection from intraoperative samples taken during surgical procedures. Sensitivity was determined by taking samples (BACTEC and swab/tissue samples) from patients with clinically evident infection (Infection group). Specificity was tested by taking the same sample sets from patients who had aseptic operations with no history of infection (Control group). The sensitivity was found to be much higher for the BACTEC group (50 isolates from 56 samples, sensitivity: 89%) compared to the swab/tissue samples (29 isolates out of 56 samples, sensitivity: 52%). The specificity was lower in the BACTEC group (32 isolates out of 44 samples, specificity: 27%) compared to the swab/tissue samples (1 isolate out of 44 samples, specificity: 98%). We conclude that BACTEC is useful for intraoperative sample collection in cases of low-grade infection. However, it is less specific and there is always the possibility for contamination. Therefore, it is advisable to use this technique in combination with regular tissue samples.

  14. [Effectiveness of intervention by the infection control team for cancer patients with a positive blood culture].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomoyuki; Suzuki, Kaoru; Ohi, Yukimasa; Kawanishi, Fumiko; Shibata, Yuriko; Hosomi, Makoto; Goto, Emi; Nishihara, Masami; Katsumata, Takahiro; Ukimura, Akira

    2013-11-01

    Cancer patients at a high risk of acquiring infectious diseases should be maintained in a facility where good infection control practices are followed. At our hospital, the infection control team(ICT)provides expertise, education, and support to the staff, helping them maintain proper standards, thereby minimizing the risks of infection. The ICT(established in 2004)has implemented infection control programs by employing an appropriate number of staff members after the revision of medical treatment fees in 2011. Our intervention program includes 2 general policies, namely, ordering and collection of blood cultures and intervention for the medical care of patients with positive blood cultures. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of our intervention for cancer patients with a positive blood culture. During the surveillance period(April 2011 to July 2012), 42 positive cases were determined to be infectious. ICT intervention was required in 37 cases. Our suggestions were accepted in 92%(34/37)of the cases, and improved outcome was estimated in 65%(22/34)of the cases. The results of our study contribute to the scientific bases on which routine clinical practices could be promoted in the future.

  15. Coagulase-negative staphylococci strains resistant to oxacillin isolated from neonatal blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Valéria Cataneli; Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza da

    2013-11-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are the microorganisms most frequently isolated from clinical samples and are commonly found in neonatal blood cultures. Oxacillin is an alternative treatment of choice for CoNS infections; however, resistance to oxacillin can have a substantial impact on healthcare by adversely affecting morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to detect and characterise oxacillin-resistant CoNS strains in blood cultures of newborns hospitalised at the neonatal ward of the University Hospital of the Faculty of Medicine of Botucatu. One hundred CoNS strains were isolated and the mecA gene was detected in 69 of the CoNS strains, including 73.2% of Staphylococcus epidermidis strains, 85.7% of Staphylococcus haemolyticus strains, 28.6% of Staphylococcus hominis strains and 50% of Staphylococcus lugdunensis strains. Among these oxacillin-resistant CoNS strains, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type I was identified in 24.6%, type II in 4.3%, type III in 56.5% and type IV in 14.5% of the strains. The data revealed an increase in the percentage of CoNS strains isolated from blood cultures from 1991-2009. Furthermore, a predominant SCCmec profile of the oxacillin-resistant CoNS strains isolated from neonatal intensive care units was identified with a prevalence of SCCmec types found in hospital-acquired strains.

  16. Multi-Probe Real-Time PCR Identification of Common Mycobacterium Species in Blood Culture Broth

    PubMed Central

    Foongladda, Suporn; Pholwat, Suporn; Eampokalap, Boonchuay; Kiratisin, Pattarachai; Sutthent, Ruengpung

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, M. avium, and M. intracellulare are the most common causes of systemic bacterial infection in AIDS patients. To identify these mycobacterial isolates in primary blood culture broths, we developed a multiple hybridization probe-based real-time PCR assay using the LightCycler system. The primers were designed to amplify a 320-bp fragment of Mycobacterium 16S rRNA genes. Reaction specificity was evaluated using PCR amplification curves along with specific melting temperatures of probes on DNA extracted from 13 Mycobacterium species. In this study, results showed 100% accuracy for the selected bacterial panel. Detection limits were 350, 600, and 650 colony-forming unit (CFU)/ml blood culture broths for M. tuberculosis complex, M. avium, and M. intracellulare, respectively (1 to 2 CFU/reaction). To evaluate clinical applicability, 341 acid-fast bacilli in blood culture broths were analyzed. In total, 327 (96%) were positively identified: 54.5% M. tuberculosis complex, 37.5% M. avium, and 3.8% M. intracellulare. Results can be available within 3 hours of receiving a broth sample, which makes this rapid and simple assay an attractive diagnostic tool for clinical use. PMID:19095775

  17. Acoustic trapping for bacteria identification in positive blood cultures with MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Hammarström, Björn; Nilson, Bo; Laurell, Thomas; Nilsson, Johan; Ekström, Simon

    2014-11-04

    Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is currently changing the clinical routine for identification of microbial pathogens. One important application is the rapid identification of bacteria for the diagnosis of bloodstream infections (BSI). A novel approach based on acoustic trapping and an integrated selective enrichment target (ISET) microchip that improves the sample preparation step for this type of analysis is presented. The method is evaluated on clinically relevant samples in the form of Escherichia coli infected blood cultures. It is shown that noncontact acoustic trapping enables capture, enrichment, and washing of bacteria directly from the complex background of crude blood cultures. The technology replaces centrifugation-based separation with a faster and highly automated sample preparation method that minimizes manual handling of hazardous pathogens. The presented method includes a solid phase extraction step that was optimized for enrichment of the bacterial proteins and peptides that are used for bacterial identification. The acoustic trapping-based assay provided correct identification in 12 out 12 cases of E. coli positive blood cultures with an average score of 2.19 ± 0.09 compared to 1.98 ± 0.08 when using the standard assay. This new technology opens up the possibility to automate and speed up an important and widely used diagnostic assay for bloodstream infections.

  18. [Disseminated mycobacterial infections in patients with HIV/AIDS. Evaluation of blood cultures].

    PubMed

    Coitinho, C; Brandes, E; Pardiñas, M; Rivas, C

    2005-01-01

    One thousand-forty blood cultures corresponding to 451 Uruguayan patients with AIDS and clinic diagnosis of disseminated mycobacterial infection were evaluated between 1999 and 2003. Samples were processed in the National Reference Center for Mycobacteria (Montevideo, Uruguay), using the automated blood culture system for mycobacteria MB-BacT (BioMérieux). Forty-five positive samples were detected (4.3%) corresponding to 26 patients with AIDS (average 2.3 samples per patient). In 10/26 patients M. avium complex (MAC) was identified and in 13/26 the isolated germ was M. tuberculosis. The average time of incubation was of 12.4 days (range 6-19 days) for MAC and of 22.6 days (range 7-35 days) for M. tuberculosis. Blood culture has demonstrated to be the best sample for the bacteriological confirmation of the disseminated mycobacterial infections when at least 2 samples by patient are studied. The frequency of isolates of M. tuberculosis and MAC in AIDS patients is according with a moderate prevalence of tuberculosis in Uruguay.

  19. Sterility testing of a total nutrient admixture with a biphasic blood-culture system.

    PubMed

    Murray, P R; Sandrock, M J

    1991-11-01

    The ability of a biphasic blood-culture system to detect microbial contamination of a total nutrient admixture (TNA) was studied. A TNA consisting of amino acids, dextrose, lipid emulsion, electrolytes, and trace elements was prepared under aseptic conditions. Septi-Chek blood-culture bottles were then injected with a TNA sample and with one of various dilutions of five bacterial or fungal suspensions, and an agar slide unit was attached to each bottle. One bottle was injected only with a TNA sample. The bottles were incubated and examined once daily. Each bottle was inverted immediately after inoculation and at each observation time to allow the broth to wash over the agar slide unit. Because the lipid contained in the TNA caused the broth in all bottles to become turbid, it was impossible to determine whether microbial growth was present in the broth. Microbial growth, however, became evident in 24-72 hours on all slide units except the one attached to the bottle that had been injected only with TNA. The Septi-Chek biphasic blood-culture system appears to be useful in evaluating the sterility of TNAs.

  20. Clinical laboratory comparison of lysis-centrifugation and BACTEC radiometric blood culture techniques.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, J C; Hamilton, P; Scholes, J V; Bartlett, R C

    1983-11-01

    The lysis-centrifugation technique (ISOLATOR; E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Wilmington, Del.) and the radiometric blood culture technique (BACTEC; Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Cockeysville, Md.) were compared on 1,000 blood cultures. A total of 16 ml of blood was distributed: 8 ml into an ISOLATOR 7.5 microbial tube and 4 ml each into BACTEC 7C and 8B bottles. The concentrate from the ISOLATOR tubes was inoculated under a laminar-flow hood onto two sheep blood agar plates (one incubated in CO2 and one incubated anaerobically), one chocolate agar plate, and one brain heart infusion agar plate. Of 91 blood specimens obtained that yielded clinically significant organisms, 52 were positive by both systems, 27 were positive by the ISOLATOR system only, and 12 were positive by the BACTEC system only. From the positive blood specimens, 97 clinically significant organisms were isolated: 57 by both systems, 27 by the ISOLATOR system only, and 13 by the BACTEC system only. Of the 57 organisms detected by both systems, 28 were detected simultaneously, 13 were detected earlier by the ISOLATOR system, and 16 were detected earlier by the BACTEC system. Isolated colonies were obtained earlier by the ISOLATOR system in 40 cases and by the BACTEC system in 5 cases. Organisms determined to be contaminants by thorough chart review were isolated from 138 ISOLATOR tubes. In 98 instances, these were represented by one colony of Staphylococcus epidermidis, alpha-hemolytic streptococci, or diphtheroids. The ability to determine CFU per milliliter with the ISOLATOR system did not help differentiate clinically significant organisms from contaminants.

  1. Verification of false-positive blood culture results generated by the BACTEC 9000 series by eubacterial 16S rDNA and panfungal 18S rDNA directed polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Daxboeck, Florian; Dornbusch, Hans Jürgen; Krause, Robert; Assadian, Ojan; Wenisch, Christoph

    2004-01-01

    A small but significant proportion of blood cultures processed by the BACTEC 9000 series systems is signaled positive, while subsequent Gram's stain and culture on solid media yield no pathogens. In this study, 15 "false-positive" vials (7 aerobes, 8 anaerobes) from 15 patients were investigated for the presence of bacteria and fungi by eubacterial 16S rDNA and panfungal 18S rDNA amplification, respectively. All samples turned out negative by both methods. Most patients (7) had neutropenia, which does not support the theory that high leukocyte counts enhance the generation of false-positive results. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that false-negative results generated by the BACTEC 9000 series are inherent to the automated detection and not due to the growth of fastidious organisms.

  2. Rapid detection of positive blood cultures with the BACTEC NR-660 does not require first-day subculturing.

    PubMed Central

    Levi, M H; Gialanella, P; Motyl, M R; McKitrick, J C

    1988-01-01

    An analysis of blood culture data was performed to determine whether subculturing within the first 24 h of incubation decreased the time to detection of positive blood cultures when compared with the routine use of the BACTEC NR-660 system (Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Towson, Md.). During a 9-month period (June 1985 to February 1986), 17,913 blood cultures were received in our laboratory, of which 1,463 (8.2%) became positive. Of the positive cultures, 97% were detected with equal or greater rapidity by the NR-660 system than by visual inspection and first-day blind subculturing. There were 37 delayed positive cultures from which only one isolate (0.07%) was not eventually detected by the NR-660 system. Coagulase-negative staphylococcus was the most frequent isolate among the delayed positive cultures, but only 3 of 15 isolates were known to be clinically significant isolates. The longest delay in detection by the NR-660 system was 6 days for one isolate of Cryptococcus neoformans and one isolate of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Although subculturing may decrease the time to detection of a few cultures, the majority of positive blood cultures were detected faster or with equal speed by the NR-660 system. When the data were evaluated, routine use of the NR-660 system was sufficient for the detection of positive blood cultures and was cost-effective. PMID:3069859

  3. Performance of the Verigene Gram-negative blood culture assay for rapid detection of bacteria and resistance determinants.

    PubMed

    Dodémont, Magali; De Mendonça, Ricardo; Nonhoff, Claire; Roisin, Sandrine; Denis, Olivier

    2014-08-01

    Nonduplicate blood cultures that were positive for Gram-negative bacilli (n = 125) were tested by the Verigene Gram-negative blood culture (BC-GN) assay; 117 (90.7%) isolates were members of the panel. For identification and resistance markers, the agreements with routine methods were 97.4% (114/117) and 92.3% (12/13). The BC-GN assay is a rapid and accurate tool for the detection of pathogens from blood cultures and could be integrated alongside conventional systems to enable faster patient management, but the clinical benefits should be further evaluated.

  4. Effects of Culture Conditions and Tuberculin Source on Interferon-gamma production in Whole Blood Cultures from Mycobacterium bovis Infected Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The BOVIGAM® interferon (IFN) - gamma assay constitutes an ante-mortem, in vitro laboratory-based tuberculosis test and is used complementary to the tuberculin skin test. The assay is performed in two stages: firstly, whole blood is cultured with antigens stimulating blood leucocytes to produce IFN...

  5. Effects of Culture Conditions and Tuberculin Source on Interferon-gamma Production in Whole Blood Cultures from Mycobacterium bovis Infected Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The BOVIGAM® interferon (IFN) - gamma assay constitutes an ante-mortem, in vitro laboratory-based tuberculosis test and is used complementary to the tuberculin skin test. The assay is performed in two stages: firstly, whole blood is cultured with antigens stimulating blood leucocytes to produce IFN-...

  6. Teaching Aerobic Fitness Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Allan N.; Ratliffe, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to teach aerobic fitness concepts to elementary students. Some of the K-2 activities include location, size, and purpose of the heart and lungs; the exercise pulse; respiration rate; and activities to measure aerobic endurance. Some of the 3-6 activities include: definition of aerobic endurance; heart disease risk factors;…

  7. Acceleration of antimicrobial susceptibility testing of positive blood cultures by inoculation of Vitek 2 cards with briefly incubated solid medium cultures.

    PubMed

    Idelevich, Evgeny A; Schüle, Isabel; Grünastel, Barbara; Wüllenweber, Jörg; Peters, Georg; Becker, Karsten

    2014-11-01

    Briefly incubated agar cultures from positive blood cultures were used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) by Vitek 2. The cultivation time until inoculation was 3.8 h for Gram-positive cocci and 2.4 h for Gram-negative rods. The error rates were low, providing early and reliable AST without additional time or cost expenditure.

  8. [Stimulation of cell cultures recovery after cryopreservation by the cattle cord blood FRACTION (below 5 kDa) or Actovegin].

    PubMed

    Gulevskiĭ, A K; Trifonova, A V; Lavrik, A A

    2013-01-01

    The capacities of the cattle cord blood low-molecular fraction (below 5 kDa) and Actovegin (the vealer blood fraction (below 5 kDa)) for recovering functions of cell cultures after cryopreservation compared. Their influence proliferation of the flozen-thawed cell cultures, certain stages of their growth, cell attachment, rate of cell spreading, and mitotic regiment has been studied. Both the cord blood low-molecular fraction and Actovegin were shown to stimulate growth of the cell cultures after cryopreservation more efficiently at the concentration of 224 μg/ml. However, despite the stimulating effect discovered, their application did not bring proliferative indices on the 1st passage after cryopreservation to the values of the native culture. The effects of the cord blood low-molecular fraction and Actovegin on the human fibroblast culture were identical by the following parameters: cell attachment, rates of cell spreading and proliferation. In culture BHK-21 clone 13/04 the efficiency of Actovegin was low, while the cord blood low-molecular fraction has a conspicuous stimulating effect on its adhesion and proliferation. The investigations carried out can serve as a basis for the development of regenerative media containing the cattle cord blood low-molecular fraction (below 5 kDa) or Actovegin as active components at the concentration of 224 μg/ml with the purpose of fast recovery of culture prolifetative properties after cryopreservation.

  9. Performance of the FilmArray® blood culture identification panel utilized by non-expert staff compared with conventional microbial identification and antimicrobial resistance gene detection from positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Morgan H; Relich, Ryan F; Davis, Thomas E; Schmitt, Bryan H

    2016-07-01

    Utilization of commercially available rapid platforms for microbial identification from positive blood cultures is useful during periods of, or in laboratories with, limited expert staffing. We compared the results of the FilmArray® BCID Panel performed by non-expert technologists to those of conventional methods for organism identification performed by skilled microbiologists. Within 8 h of signalling positive by a continuous monitoring blood culture system, positive bottles were analysed by the FilmArray BCID Panel. Data from these analyses were compared to standard-of-care testing, which included conventional and automated methods. To gauge the ease of use of the BCID Panel by non-expert staff, technologists unfamiliar with diagnostic bacteriology performed the testing without prior knowledge of the Gram stain results, or even whether organisms were detected. Identifications of 172/200 (86 %) positive blood cultures using the BCID Panel were consistent with identifications provided by standard-of-care methods. Standard-of-care testing identified organisms in 20 positive blood cultures, which were not represented on the BCID Panel. Seven (3.5 %) blood cultures demonstrated a discrepancy between the methods, which could not be attributed to either a lack of representation on the panel or unclear separate detection of organisms in a mixed blood culture of a shared genus or grouping of organisms, e.g. Staphylococcus or Enterobacteriaceae . One (0.5 %) blood culture yielded invalid results on two separate panels, so it was eliminated from the study. The easy-to-use FilmArray® technology shows good correlation with blood culture identification and antibiotic resistance detection performed by conventional methods. This technology may be particularly useful in laboratories with limited staffing or limited technical expertise.

  10. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... that die or are lost from the body. White Blood Cells White blood cells (WBCs, and also ... of severe pain. previous continue Diseases of the White Blood Cells Neutropenia (pronounced: new-truh-PEE-nee- ...

  11. Ability of procalcitonin to diagnose bacterial infection and bacteria types compared with blood culture findings.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yuji; Oikawa, Nozomi; Hariu, Maya; Fuke, Ryota; Seki, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein serve as biomarkers of infection in patients with sepsis/bacteremia. The present study assessed the clinical characteristics of 280 patients with suspected sepsis who were admitted to Tohoku Medical and Pharmaceutical University Hospital between January 2012 and December 2013. Among the patients, 133 and 147 were positive and negative for PCT, respectively. Patients who were PCT positive were older and more frequently male, had reduced levels of platelets and albumin, and increased levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and C-reactive protein. Patients who were PCT positive had significantly higher blood culture positivity compared with those who were PCT negative, and the sensitivity and specificity of PCT for detecting positive blood cultures were 74.5% and 59.1%, respectively. Escherichia coli was detected in PCT-positive patients, whereas Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus lugdunensis were frequently detected in PCT-negative patients. Levels of PCT were higher in the patients infected with gram-negative rods than those with gram-positive cocci. Furthermore, extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria cases showed higher levels of PCT than those of non-ESBL cases. These results suggest that PCT may be a useful biomarker of sepsis, and it might serve as a strong tool to detect patients with severe gram-negative rod bacteremia including ESBL-producing bacteria cases early due to its relative high sensitivity.

  12. Ability of procalcitonin to diagnose bacterial infection and bacteria types compared with blood culture findings

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yuji; Oikawa, Nozomi; Hariu, Maya; Fuke, Ryota; Seki, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein serve as biomarkers of infection in patients with sepsis/bacteremia. The present study assessed the clinical characteristics of 280 patients with suspected sepsis who were admitted to Tohoku Medical and Pharmaceutical University Hospital between January 2012 and December 2013. Among the patients, 133 and 147 were positive and negative for PCT, respectively. Patients who were PCT positive were older and more frequently male, had reduced levels of platelets and albumin, and increased levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and C-reactive protein. Patients who were PCT positive had significantly higher blood culture positivity compared with those who were PCT negative, and the sensitivity and specificity of PCT for detecting positive blood cultures were 74.5% and 59.1%, respectively. Escherichia coli was detected in PCT-positive patients, whereas Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus lugdunensis were frequently detected in PCT-negative patients. Levels of PCT were higher in the patients infected with gram-negative rods than those with gram-positive cocci. Furthermore, extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria cases showed higher levels of PCT than those of non-ESBL cases. These results suggest that PCT may be a useful biomarker of sepsis, and it might serve as a strong tool to detect patients with severe gram-negative rod bacteremia including ESBL-producing bacteria cases early due to its relative high sensitivity. PMID:27757046

  13. Revisiting the Diego Blood Group System in Amerindians: Evidence for Gene-Culture Comigration

    PubMed Central

    Bégat, Christophe; Bailly, Pascal; Chiaroni, Jacques; Mazières, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Six decades ago the DI*A allele of the Diego blood group system was instrumental in proving Native American populations originated from Siberia. Since then, it has received scant attention. The present study was undertaken to reappraise distribution of the DI*A allele in 144 Native American populations based on current knowledge. Using analysis of variance tests, frequency distribution was studied according to geographical, environmental, and cultural parameters. Frequencies were highest in Amazonian populations. In contrast, DI*A was undetectable in subarctic, Fuegian, Panamanian, Chaco and Yanomama populations. Closer study revealed a correlation that this unequal distribution was correlated with language, suggesting that linguistic divergence was a driving force in the expansion of DI*A among Native Americans. The absence of DI*A in circumpolar Eskimo-Aleut and Na-Dene speakers was consistent with a late migratory event confined to North America. Distribution of DI*A in subtropical areas indicated that gene and culture exchanges were more intense within than between ecozones. Bolstering the utility of classical genetic markers in biological anthropology, the present study of the expansion of Diego blood group genetic polymorphism in Native Americans shows strong evidence of gene-culture comigration. PMID:26148209

  14. Reducing time to identification of positive blood cultures with MALDI-TOF MS analysis after a 5-h subculture.

    PubMed

    Verroken, A; Defourny, L; Lechgar, L; Magnette, A; Delmée, M; Glupczynski, Y

    2015-02-01

    Speeding up the turn-around time of positive blood culture identifications is essential in order to optimize the treatment of septic patients. Several sample preparation techniques have been developed allowing direct matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) identification of positive blood cultures. Yet, the hands-on time restrains their routine workflow. In this study, we evaluated an approach whereby MALDI-TOF MS identification without any additional steps was carried out on short subcultured colonies from positive blood bottles with the objective of allowing results reporting on the day of positivity detection. Over a 7-month period in 2012, positive blood cultures detected by 9 am with an automated system were inoculated onto a Columbia blood agar and processed after a 5-h incubation on a MALDI-TOF MicroFlex platform (Bruker Daltonik GmbH). Single-spotted colonies were covered with 1 μl formic acid and 1 μl matrix solution. The results were compared to the validated identification techniques. A total of 925 positive blood culture bottles (representing 470 bacteremic episodes) were included. Concordant identification was obtained in 727 (81.1 %) of the 896 monomicrobial blood cultures, with failure being mostly observed with anaerobes and yeasts. In 17 episodes of polymicrobic bacteremia, the identification of one of the two isolates was achieved in 24/29 (82.7 %) positive cultures. Routine implementation of MALDI-TOF MS identification on young positive blood subcultures provides correct results to the clinician in more than 80 % of the bacteremic episodes and allows access to identification results on the day of blood culture positivity detection, potentially accelerating the implementation of targeted clinical treatments.

  15. Comparison of outcomes between patients with single versus multiple positive blood cultures for Enterococcus: Infection versus illusion?

    PubMed

    Claeys, Kimberly C; Zasowski, Evan J; Lagnf, Abdalhamid M; Rybak, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Enterococci represent one of the most common causative pathogens of bloodstream infections (BSIs). There is debate in the literature regarding the clinical importance of single versus multiple positive blood cultures for Enterococci. This single-center retrospective study found that patients with multiple positive blood cultures experienced increased inpatient mortality and a shorter median survival. Additionally, BSIs >6.7 days resulted in approximately 20% increased mortality. These results are preliminary and require further exploration.

  16. The Optimization of Molecular Detection of Clinical Isolates of Brucella in Blood Cultures by eryD Transcriptase Gene for Confirmation of Culture-Negative Samples

    PubMed Central

    Tabibnejad, Mahsa; Alikhani, Mohammad Yousef; Arjomandzadegan, Mohammad; Hashemi, Seyed Hamid; Naseri, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background Brucellosis is a zoonosis disease which is widespread across the world. Objectives The aim of the present study is the evaluation of culture-negative blood samples. Materials and Methods A total of 100 patients with suspected brucellosis were included in this experimental study and given positive serological tests. Diagnosis was performed on patients with clinical symptoms of the disease, followed by the detection of a titer that was equal to or more than 1:160 (in endemic areas) by the standard tube agglutination method. Blood samples were cultured by a BACTEC 9050 system, and subsequently by Brucella agar. At the same time, DNA from all blood samples was extracted by Qiagen Kit Company (Qia Amp Mini Kit). A molecular assay of blood samples was carried out by detection of eryD transcriptase and bcsp 31 genes in specific double PCR reactions. The specificity of the primers was evaluated by DNA from pure and approved Brucella colonies found in the blood samples, by DNA from other bacteria, and by ordinary PCR. DNA extraction from the pure colonies was carried out by both Qiagen Kit and Chelex 100 methods; the two were compared. Results 39 cases (39%) had positive results when tested by the BACTEC system, and 61 cases (61%) became negative. 23 culture-positive blood samples were randomly selected for PCR reactions; all showed 491 bp for the eryD gene and 223 bp for the bcsp 31 gene. Interestingly, out of 14 culture-negative blood samples, 13 cases showed positive bonds in PCR. The specificity of the PCR method was equal to 100%. DNA extraction from pure cultures was done by both Chelex 100 and Qiagen Kit; these showed the same results for all samples. Conclusions The results prove that the presented double PCR method could be used to detect positive cases from culture-negative blood samples. The Chelex 100 method is simpler and safer than the use of Qiagen Kit for DNA extraction. PMID:27330831

  17. Performance of Two Resin-Containing Blood Culture Media in Detection of Bloodstream Infections and in Direct Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) Broth Assays for Isolate Identification: Clinical Comparison of the BacT/Alert Plus and Bactec Plus Systems

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, Barbara; D'Inzeo, Tiziana; Di Florio, Viviana; De Maio, Flavio; De Angelis, Giulia; Giaquinto, Alessia; Campana, Lara; Tanzarella, Eloisa; Tumbarello, Mario; Antonelli, Massimo; Spanu, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    We compared the clinical performances of the BacT/Alert Plus (bioMérieux) and Bactec Plus (Becton Dickinson) aerobic and anaerobic blood culture (BC) media with adsorbent polymeric beads. Patients ≥16 years old with suspected bloodstream infections (BSIs) were enrolled in intensive care units and infectious disease wards. A single 40-ml blood sample was collected from each and used to inoculate (10 ml/bottle) one set of BacT/Alert Plus cultures and one set of Bactec Plus cultures, each set consisting of one aerobic and one anaerobic bottle. Cultures were incubated ≤5 days in the BacT/Alert 3D and Bactec FX instruments, respectively. A total of 128 unique BSI episodes were identified based on the recovery of clinically significant growth in 212 aerobic cultures (106 BacT/Alert and 106 Bactec) and 151 anaerobic cultures (82 BacT/Alert and 69 Bactec). The BacT/Alert aerobic medium had higher recovery rates for Gram-positive cocci (P = 0.024), whereas the Bactec aerobic medium was superior for recovery of Gram-negative bacilli (P = 0.006). BacT/Alert anaerobic medium recovery rates exceeded those of the Bactec anaerobic medium for total organisms (P = 0.003), Gram-positive cocci (P = 0.013), and Escherichia coli (P = 0.030). In terms of capacity for diagnosing the 128 septic episodes, the BacT/Alert and Bactec sets were comparable, although the former sets diagnosed more BSIs caused by Gram-positive cocci (P = 0.008). They also allowed earlier identification of coagulase-negative staphylococcal growth (mean, 2.8 h; P = 0.003) and growth in samples from patients not on antimicrobial therapy that yielded positive results (mean, 1.3 h; P < 0.001). Similarly high percentages of microorganisms in BacT/Alert and Bactec cultures (93.8% and 93.3%, respectively) were identified by direct matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry assay of BC broths. The BacT/Alert Plus media line appears to be a reliable, timesaving tool for routine

  18. Transfer of opiorphin through a blood-brain barrier culture model.

    PubMed

    Bocsik, Alexandra; Darula, Zsuzsanna; Tóth, Géza; Deli, Mária A; Wollemann, Mária

    2015-08-01

    Opioid peptides are potent analgesics with therapeutic potential in the treatment of acute and chronic pain. Their efficacy is limited by peptidases (enkephalinases). Opiorphin pentapeptide (QRFSR) is the first characterized human endogenous inhibitor of enkephalinases. The peptide is able to increase the binding and affinity of endogenous opiates to mu opioid receptors; thus, the mechanism of opiorphin may provide a new therapeutic approach in pain management. The analgesic effect of opiorphin was proven in several earlier published in vitro and in vivo studies. Our aim was to test the transfer of opiorphin through a blood-brain barrier model for the first time. The flux of opiorphin was tested on a blood-brain barrier culture model consisting of rat brain endothelial, glial and pericyte cells. Brain endothelial cells in this triple co-culture model form tight monolayers characterized by transendothelial electrical resistance measurement. Relative quantity of the peptide was estimated by mass spectrometry. The transfer of opiorphin through the blood-brain barrier model was estimated to be ∼3%, whereas the permeability coefficient was 0.53 ± 1.36 × 10(-6) cm/s (n = 4). We also observed rapid conversion of N-terminal glutamine into pyroglutamic acid during the transfer experiments. Our results indicate that opiorphin crosses cultured brain endothelial cells in the absence of serum factors in a significant amount. This is in agreement with previous in vivo data showing potentiation of enkephalin-mediated antinociception. We suggest that opiorphin may have a potential as a centrally acting novel drug to treat pain.

  19. Effects of an artificial gravity countermeasure on orthostatic tolerance, blood volumes and aerobic power after short-term bed rest (BR-AG1).

    PubMed

    Linnarsson, Dag; Hughson, Richard L; Fraser, Katelyn S; Clément, Gilles; Karlsson, Lars L; Mulder, Edwin; Paloski, William H; Rittweger, Jörn; Wuyts, Floris L; Zange, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to artificial gravity (AG) in a short-arm centrifuge has potential benefits for maintaining human performance during long-term space missions. Eleven subjects were investigated during three campaigns of 5 days head-down bed rest: 1) bed rest without countermeasures (control), 2) bed rest and 30 min of AG (AG1) daily, and 3) bed rest and six periods of 5 min AG (AG2) daily. During centrifugation, the supine subjects were exposed to AG in the head-to-feet direction with 1 G at the center of mass. Subjects participated in the three campaigns in random order. The cardiovascular effects of bed rest and countermeasures were determined from changes in tolerance to a head-up tilt test with superimposed lower body negative pressure (HUT), from changes in plasma volume (PV) and from changes in maximum aerobic power (V̇o2 peak) during upright work on a cycle ergometer. Complete data sets were obtained in eight subjects. After bed rest, HUT tolerance times were 36, 64, and 78% of pre-bed rest baseline during control, AG1 and AG2, respectively, with a significant difference between AG2 and control. PV and V̇o2 peak decreased to 85 and 95% of pre-bed rest baseline, respectively, with no differences between the treatments. It was concluded that the AG2 countermeasure should be further investigated during future long-term bed rest studies, especially as it was better tolerated than AG1. The superior effect of AG2 on orthostatic tolerance could not be related to concomitant changes in PV or aerobic power.

  20. Direct identification of bacteria in blood culture samples using an electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Trincavelli, Marco; Coradeschi, Silvia; Loutfi, Amy; Söderquist, Bo; Thunberg, Per

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we introduce a method for identification of bacteria in human blood culture samples using an electronic nose. The method uses features, which capture the static (steady state) and dynamic (transient) properties of the signal from the gas sensor array and proposes a means to ensemble results from consecutive samples. The underlying mechanism for ensembling is based on an estimation of posterior probability, which is extracted from a support vector machine classifier. A large dataset representing ten different bacteria cultures has been used to validate the presented methods. The results detail the performance of the proposed algorithm and show that through ensembling decisions on consecutive samples, significant reliability in classification accuracy can be achieved.

  1. Investigation of oxidative phosphorylation in continuous cultures. A non-equilibrium thermodynamic approach to energy transduction for Escherichia coli in aerobic condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafuri, Mohazabeh; Nosrati, Mohsen; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2015-03-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in living cells is very important. Different researches have shown that in terms of mathematical modeling, the domain of these investigations is essentially restricted. Recently the thermodynamic models have been suggested for calculation of the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation process and rate of energy loss in animal cells using chemiosmotic theory and non-equilibrium thermodynamics equations. In our previous work, we developed a mathematical model for mitochondria of animal cells. In this research, according to similarities between oxidative phosphorylation process in microorganisms and animal cells, Golfar's model was developed to predict the non-equilibrium thermodynamic behavior of the oxidative phosphorylation process for bacteria in aerobic condition. With this model the rate of energy loss, P/O ratio, and efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation were calculated for Escherichia coli in aerobic condition. The results then were compared with experimental data given by other authors. The thermodynamic model had an acceptable agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Nurses' competency in drawing blood cultures and educational intervention to reduce the contamination rate.

    PubMed

    Al-Hamad, Arif; Al-Ibrahim, Maha; Alhajhouj, Eman; Al-Alshaikh Jaffer, Waseelah; Altowaileb, Jaffar; Alfaraj, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Compared with truly negative cultures, false positive blood cultures (BCs) not only increase laboratory work but also prolong the lengths of patient stays, which are likely to increase patient morbidity and costs. The present study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a hospital-wide educational intervention on BC contamination rates. Nurses performed all phlebotomies; therefore, educational workshops were offered to all nurses twice a week over a 3-month period. The workshops consisted of a questionnaire, PowerPoint presentation, video show, demonstration of the different materials used to collect BCs, and question session. Data from the questionnaires and laboratory culture results were compared between the 6-month pre- and post-intervention periods. Of the 503 eligible nurses, 216 (42.9%) attended the workshops. The survey identified areas for improvement, which included time of disinfectant application, volume of blood to be cultured, and disinfection of BC bottle tops. Of the 9903 BC sets that were drawn from 3649 patients during the study period, 676 (6.8%) were contaminated. The monthly BC contamination rates for the 6-month pre- and post-intervention periods were 8.1% and 5.2%, respectively, representing a 36% reduction (P=0.008). Only three wards had an acceptable contamination rate of ≤3% before the intervention, compared with eight wards after the intervention. While contamination of BCs can never be completely eliminated, there is evidence that adherence to best practice BC collection techniques can minimize BC contamination, which might be best achieved with a dedicated phlebotomy team.

  3. Relating Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Effects to Reaction Mechanisms during Aerobic or Anaerobic Degradation of RDX (Hexahydro-1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5-Triazine) by Pure Bacterial Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Heraty, Linnea; Condee, Charles W.; Vainberg, Simon; Sturchio, Neil C.; Böhlke, J. K.; Hatzinger, Paul B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kinetic isotopic fractionation of carbon and nitrogen during RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine) biodegradation was investigated with pure bacterial cultures under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Relatively large bulk enrichments in 15N were observed during biodegradation of RDX via anaerobic ring cleavage (ε15N = −12.7‰ ± 0.8‰) and anaerobic nitro reduction (ε15N = −9.9‰ ± 0.7‰), in comparison to smaller effects during biodegradation via aerobic denitration (ε15N = −2.4‰ ± 0.2‰). 13C enrichment was negligible during aerobic RDX biodegradation (ε13C = −0.8‰ ± 0.5‰) but larger during anaerobic degradation (ε13C = −4.0‰ ± 0.8‰), with modest variability among genera. Dual-isotope ε13C/ε15N analyses indicated that the three biodegradation pathways could be distinguished isotopically from each other and from abiotic degradation mechanisms. Compared to the initial RDX bulk δ15N value of +9‰, δ15N values of the NO2− released from RDX ranged from −7‰ to +2‰ during aerobic biodegradation and from −42‰ to −24‰ during anaerobic biodegradation. Numerical reaction models indicated that N isotope effects of NO2− production were much larger than, but systematically related to, the bulk RDX N isotope effects with different bacteria. Apparent intrinsic ε15N-NO2− values were consistent with an initial denitration pathway in the aerobic experiments and more complex processes of NO2− formation associated with anaerobic ring cleavage. These results indicate the potential for isotopic analysis of residual RDX for the differentiation of degradation pathways and indicate that further efforts to examine the isotopic composition of potential RDX degradation products (e.g., NOx) in the environment are warranted. IMPORTANCE This work provides the first systematic evaluation of the isotopic fractionation of carbon and nitrogen in the organic explosive RDX during degradation by different pathways. It also

  4. Filter-cultured ARPE-19 cells as outer blood-retinal barrier model.

    PubMed

    Mannermaa, Eliisa; Reinisalo, Mika; Ranta, Veli-Pekka; Vellonen, Kati-Sisko; Kokki, Heidi; Saarikko, Anni; Kaarniranta, Kai; Urtti, Arto

    2010-07-11

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) regulates drug transfer between posterior eye segment and blood circulation, but there is no established RPE cell model for drug delivery studies. We evaluated ARPE-19 filter culture model for this purpose. Passive permeability of 6-carboxyfluorescein, betaxolol and FITC-dextran (40kDa) and active transport of 6-carboxyfluorescein, sodium fluorescein, rhodamine 123, cyclosporine A and digoxin in ARPE-19 model were investigated and compared with isolated bovine RPE-choroid tissue. In addition, barrier properties, and mRNA expression of RPE-specific and melanogenesis-related genes (RPE65, VMD2, CRALBP, OTX-2, MITF-A, TRP-1, tyrosinase) were measured in various culture conditions. The filter grown ARPE-19 cell model showed reasonable barrier properties (TER close to 100Omegacm(2)), but its permeability was slightly higher than that of isolated bovine RPE/choroid specimens. In active transport studies the ARPE-19 model mimics qualitatively the permeability profile of bovine RPE-choroid, but ARPE-19 model underestimates the importance of active transport relative to passive diffusion. Long-term filter-cultured ARPE-19 cells expressed various RPE-specific and melanogenesis-related genes at higher levels than the ARPE-19 cells cultured short-term in flasks. ARPE-19 model can be used to study drug permeation processes in the RPE.

  5. Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) Control of Secreted Factors for Blood Stem Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Julia; Wang, Weijia; Zandstra, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical use of umbilical cord blood has typically been limited by the need to expand hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) ex vivo. This expansion is challenging due to the accumulation of secreted signaling factors in the culture that have a negative regulatory effect on HSPC output. Strategies for global regulation of these factors through dilution have been developed, but do not accommodate the dynamic nature or inherent variability of hematopoietic cell culture. We have developed a mathematical model to simulate the impact of feedback control on in vitro hematopoiesis, and used it to design a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control algorithm. This algorithm was implemented with a fed-batch bioreactor to regulate the concentrations of secreted factors. Controlling the concentration of a key target factor, TGF-β1, through dilution limited the negative effect it had on HSPCs, and allowed global control of other similarly-produced inhibitory endogenous factors. The PID control algorithm effectively maintained the target soluble factor at the target concentration. We show that feedback controlled dilution is predicted to be a more cost effective dilution strategy compared to other open-loop strategies, and can enhance HSPC expansion in short term culture. This study demonstrates the utility of secreted factor process control strategies to optimize stem cell culture systems, and motivates the development of multi-analyte protein sensors to automate the manufacturing of cell therapies. PMID:26348930

  6. 3D cultured immortalized human hepatocytes useful to develop drugs for blood-borne HCV

    SciTech Connect

    Aly, Hussein Hassan; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Hijikata, Makoto

    2009-02-06

    Due to the high polymorphism of natural hepatitis C virus (HCV) variants, existing recombinant HCV replication models have failed to be effective in developing effective anti-HCV agents. In the current study, we describe an in vitro system that supports the infection and replication of natural HCV from patient blood using an immortalized primary human hepatocyte cell line cultured in a three-dimensional (3D) culture system. Comparison of the gene expression profile of cells cultured in the 3D system to those cultured in the existing 2D system demonstrated an up-regulation of several genes activated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}) signaling. Furthermore, using PPAR{alpha} agonists and antagonists, we also analyzed the effect of PPAR{alpha} signaling on the modulation of HCV replication using this system. The 3D in vitro system described in this study provides significant insight into the search for novel anti-HCV strategies that are specific to various strains of HCV.

  7. Combined education and skin antisepsis intervention for persistently high blood-culture contamination rates in neonatal intensive care.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, C; Philip, R K; Powell, J; Slevin, B; Quinn, C; Power, L; O'Connell, N H; Dunne, C P

    2016-05-01

    Contaminated blood cultures represent challenges regarding diagnosis, duration of hospitalization, antimicrobial use, pharmacy and laboratory costs. Facing problematic neonatal blood culture contamination (3.8%), we instigated a successful intervention combining skin antisepsis using sterile applicators with 2% chlorhexidine gluconate in 70% isopropanol prior to phlebotomy (replacing 70% isopropanol) and staff education. In the six months prior to intervention, 364 neonatal peripheral blood samples were collected. Fourteen (3.8%) were contaminated. In the post-intervention six months, 314 samples were collected. Three (0.96%) were contaminated, representing significant improvement (Fisher's exact test: P = 0.0259). No dermatological sequelae were observed. The improvement has been sustained.

  8. Bacterial Wound Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  9. Vancomycin MIC creep in MRSA blood culture isolates from Germany: a regional problem?

    PubMed

    Kehrmann, J; Kaase, M; Szabados, F; Gatermann, S G; Buer, J; Rath, P-M; Steinmann, J

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the vancomycin MIC distribution for MRSA blood culture isolates over a period of six years in Germany. The study examined 287 MRSA isolates from blood cultures collected at several hospitals in two German cities between 2004 and 2009. The vancomycin MIC was determined by Etest. Genotypic features of the MRSA strains with vancomycin MIC ≥ 1 mg/L were determined by semiautomated repetitive-sequence-based polymerase chain reaction. The range of vancomycin MIC as determined by Etest was 0.25 to 2.0 mg/L. The geometric mean MIC increased by 1.34-fold in city A over the study period (p < 0.05), but there was no meaningful change in city B (a 1.09-fold increase, p > 0.05). Furthermore, in city A a shift in vancomycin MICs occurred as an increase in the percentage of isolates with MIC ≥ 1 mg/L from period one (2004-2006) to period two (2007-2009) (p < 0.0001). Typing results showed that in city A a single clone was predominant (55% of the creep isolates). In this study, the creep phenomenon seems to be a regional problem. We suggest that all hospitals should monitor their local status of elevated vancomycin MICs in invasive MRSA isolates.

  10. Shortened Time to Identify Staphylococcus Species from Blood Cultures and Methicillin Resistance Testing Using CHROMAgar

    PubMed Central

    Chihara, Shingo; Hayden, Mary K.; Minogue-Corbett, Eileen; Singh, Kamaljit

    2009-01-01

    The ability to rapidly differentiate coagulase-negative staphylococcus (CoNS) from Staphylococcus aureus and to determine methicillin resistance is important as it affects the decision to treat empiric antibiotic selection. The objective of this study was to evaluate CHROMagar S. aureus and CHROMagar MRSA (Becton Dickinson) for rapid identification of Staphylococcus spp. directly from blood cultures. Consecutive blood culture bottles (BacT Alert 3D SA and SN, bioMérieux) growing gram-positive cocci in clusters were evaluated. An aliquot was plated onto CHROMagar MRSA (C-MRSA) and CHROMagar S. aureus (C-SA) plates, which were read at 12 to 16 hours. C-SA correctly identified 147/147 S. aureus (100% sensitivity); 2 CoNS were misidentified as S. aureus (98% specificity). C-MRSA correctly identified 74/77 MRSA (96% sensitivity). None of the MSSA isolates grew on C-MRSA (100% specificity). In conclusion, CHROMagar is a rapid and sensitive method to distinguish MRSA, MSSA, and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus and may decrease time of reporting positive results. PMID:20016679

  11. Prevalence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolated from blood cultures in Africa.

    PubMed

    Sangare, S A; Maiga, A I; Guindo, I; Maiga, A; Camara, N; Savadogo, S; Diallo, S; Bougoudogo, F; Armand-Lefevre, L; Andremont, A; Maiga, I I

    2015-09-01

    Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae have been isolated from many regions of the world. Epidemiological studies are being conducted in Europe, North America, and Asia. No study has however been conducted in Africa to determine the prevalence and distribution of ESBLs on the continent. This literature review aimed at describing the prevalence of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolated from blood cultures, as well as the ESBL genes involved at the international level. Our focus was mainly on Africa. We conducted a literature review on PubMed. Articles related to our study field and published between 1996 and 2014 were reviewed and entirely read for most of them, while we only focused on the abstracts of some other articles. Relevant articles to our study were then carefully reviewed and included in the review. The prevalence of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae differs from one country to another. The results of our literature review however indicate that class A ESBLs prevail over the other types. We took into consideration articles focusing on various types of samples to assess the prevalence of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae, but information on isolates from blood cultures is limited. The worldwide prevalence of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae has increased over time. Evidence of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae can be found in all regions of the world. Studies conducted in Africa mainly focused on the Northern and Eastern parts of the continent, while only rare studies were carried out in the rest of the continent.

  12. Case series of Bartonella quintana blood culture-negative endocarditis in Washington, DC

    PubMed Central

    Ghidey, Fisseha Y.; Mills, Kristin; Lai, Leon; Woods, Christian; Ruiz, Maria E.; Fishbein, Dawn; Sampath, Rahul; Lowery, Robert; Wortmann, Glenn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Prior studies (predominantly from Europe) have demonstrated blood culture-negative endocarditis due to Bartonella. Our objective was to describe three cases of Bartonella quintana endocarditis identified within one year at a large hospital in Washington, DC, USA. Case presentation: We constructed a descriptive case series from a retrospective review of medical records from April to December 2013 at an 800-bed urban hospital. All three patients (ages: 52, 55 and 57 years) were undomiciled/homeless men with a history of alcoholism. Although they had negative blood cultures, echocardiography demonstrated aortic/mitral valve perforation and regurgitation in one patient, aortic/mitral valve vegetation with mitral regurgitation in the second patient, and aortic valve vegetation with regurgitation in the third patient. The patients had positive Bartonella quintana serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) with negative immunoglobulin M (IgM). PCR on DNA extracted from cardiac valves was positive for Bartonella, and DNA sequencing of PCR amplicons identified Bartonella quintana. Patients received treatment with doxycycline/rifampin or doxycycline/gentamicin. Conclusion: Clinicians should consider Bartonella endocarditis as a differential diagnosis in patients who fit elements of the Duke Criteria, as well as having a history of homelessness and alcoholism. PMID:28348772

  13. The Clinical Impact of Rapid, Direct MALDI-ToF Identification of Bacteria from Positive Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    French, Kathryn; Evans, Jason; Gossain, Savita; Hussain, Abid

    2016-01-01

    Background Faster identification of bacterial isolates from blood cultures can enable earlier clinical intervention for patients with sepsis. We evaluated the clinical impact of direct identification of micro-organisms from positive blood cultures using MALDI-ToF. Method Positive blood cultures with organisms seen on Gram stain were included over a four week period. For each patient case, comparison was made between the clinical advice given on day one with only a Gram stain result, and the follow up advice given on day two with the benefit of organism identification. Culture results were then compared with direct MALDI-ToF identification. Results For 73 of 115 cases (63.5%), direct organism identification was obtained by MALDI-ToF. Of those 73, 70 (95.5%) had a result concordant with that of the plate culture. In 28 of the 115 cases (24.3%) direct MALDI-ToF identification on day one would have had a clear clinical benefit. In 11 cases it would have helped to identify the potential source of bacteraemia. In 11 cases it would have indicated a different antibiotic regimen on day one, with five patients receiving appropriate antibiotics 24 hours earlier. For 14 cases the blood culture isolate could have been designated as unlikely to be clinically significant. Conclusion We have demonstrated that organism identification on day one of blood culture positivity can have a direct clinical impact. Faster identification using MALDI-ToF assists the clinician in assessing the significance of a blood culture isolate on day one. It can allow earlier appropriate choice of antimicrobial agent, even in the absence of susceptibility testing, and help narrow down the potential source of infection providing a focus for further investigation in a more timely way than conventional techniques alone. PMID:28036369

  14. Nanobacteria from blood: the smallest culturable autonomously replicating agent on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajander, E. Olavi; Kuronen, Ilpo; Akerman, Kari K.; Pelttari, Alpo; Ciftcioglu, Neva

    1997-07-01

    Nanobacteria are the first mineral forming bacteria isolated from blood and blood products. They are coccoid cell-walled organisms with a size of 0.08 - 0.5 micrometers in EM, occure in clusters, produce a biofilm containing carbonate or hydroxyl apatite, and are highly resistant to heat, gamma-irradiation and antibiotics. Their growth rate is about one hundredth that of ordinary bacteria and they divide via several mechanisms. Taq polymerase was able to use their nontraditional nucleic acid as a template. 16S rRNA gene sequence results positioned them into the alpha-2 subgroup of Proteobacteria. Nanobacteria are smallest cell-walled bacteria since they can pass through 0.07 micrometers pores. In low-serum cultures, they form even smaller elementary particles or tubular units. How can blood be infected with such slow growing, heat and radio-resistant bacteria? The answer may lie in their phylogeny: alpha-2 subgroup has organisms from soil exposed to radiation and heat, that can penetrate into eukaryotic cells. Nanobacteria grow so slowly that they require a niche `cleaned' with heat, radiation or immunodefence. For survival they cloak themselves in apatite, a normal constituent of mammalian body. This may link nanobacteria to nannobacteria discovered from sedimentary rocks by Dr. Folk. Both have similar size, size variation, clustering and mineral deposits. They may resemble the probable ancient bacterial fossils in the Martian meteorite ALH84001.

  15. Therapeutic aspects of aerobic dance participation.

    PubMed

    Estivill, M

    1995-01-01

    An ethnographic analysis of aerobic dance exercise culture was conducted to determine the impact of the culture on the mind-body connection. After a review of the predominant theories on the relationship between vigorous exercise and elevated mood, aerobic dance participants' experiences are reported to illustrate how cognitive experience and self-esteem may be influenced. Interviews revealed that some participants achieved a pleasantly altered state of consciousness and respite from depression and stress. The relationship of the work ethic to achievement of participant satisfaction is underscored.

  16. Comparison of Aryl Hydrocarbon Hydroxylase Induction in Cultured Blood Lymphocytes and Pulmonary Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    McLemore, Theodore L.; Martin, R. Russell; Toppell, Kenneth L.; Busbee, David L.; Cantrell, Elroy T.

    1977-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase induction was studied in cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes and pulmonary alveolar macrophages from 15 smokers and 8 nonsmokers with a variety of pulmonary diseases. Enzyme levels in lymphocytes from cigarette smokers cultured in medium without an inducing agent were 57±6 mU/106 cells (mean±SEM), while enzyme levels in lymphocytes from nonsmokers were 20±2 mU/106 cells (P < 0.001). When lymphocytes were cultured in the presence of the inducing agent, benzo-(a)anthracene, enzyme activity was increased to 168±23 mU/106 cells in smokers' cells and 99±22 mU/106 cells in lymphocytes from nonsmokers (P < 0.04). When noninduced enzyme values in cultured macrophages were compared, smokers' cells had enzyme levels of 45±5 mU/106 cells, whereas nonsmokers had enzyme activity of 24±2 mU/106 cells (P < 0.002). However, pulmonary macrophages from smokers or nonsmokers, cultured in the presence of benzo(a)-anthracene, had similar levels of induced enzyme activity (P > 0.1). A positive correlation was observed for nonsmokers (r = 0.596, P > 0.1 <0.2) or smokers (r = 0.640, P < 0.04), when enzyme values for noninduced cultures of macrophages and lymphocytes from individual patients were simultaneously compared. Enzyme values for macrophages and lymphocytes cultured in the presence of an inducer also revealed a positive correlation for individual smokers (r = 0.801, P < 0.001) or nonsmokers (r = 0.785, P < 0.01). Inducibility (expressed as fold-induction) for macrophages and lymphocytes from individual patients was also positively correlated (r = 0.889, P < 0.001 for nonsmokers and r = 0.942, P < 0.001 for smokers). These results indicate that the capacity for aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase induction is similar whether tested in lymphocytes or pulmonary macrophages from this group of pulmonary disease patients. PMID:908748

  17. Induction of vascular endothelial phenotype and cellular proliferation from human cord blood stem cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Brian; Z-M Wan, Jim; Abley, Doris; Akabutu, John

    2005-05-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that stem cells derived from adult hematopoietic tissues are capable of trans-differentiation into non-hematopoietic cells, and that the culture in microgravity ( μg) may modulate the proliferation and differentiation. We investigated the application of μg to human umbilical cord blood stem cells (CBSC) in the induction of vascular endothelial phenotype expression and cellular proliferation. CD34+ mononuclear cells were isolated from waste human umbilical cord blood samples and cultured in simulated μg for 14 days. The cells were seeded in rotary wall vessels (RWV) with or without microcarrier beads (MCB) and vascular endothelial growth factor was added during culture. Controls consisted of culture in 1 G. The cell cultures in RWV were examined by inverted microscopy. Cell counts, endothelial cell and leukocyte markers performed by flow-cytometry and FACS scan were assayed at days 1, 4, 7 and at the termination of the experiments. Culture in RWV revealed significantly increased cellular proliferation with three-dimensional (3D) tissue-like aggregates. At day 4, CD34+ cells cultured in RWV bioreactor without MCB developed vascular tubular assemblies and exhibited endothelial phenotypic markers. These data suggest that CD34+ human umbilical cord blood progenitors are capable of trans-differentiation into vascular endothelial cell phenotype and assemble into 3D tissue structures. Culture of CBSC in simulated μg may be potentially beneficial in the fields of stem cell biology and somatic cell therapy.

  18. Variability in CO2, O2, and pH levels in blood culture bottles from five different manufacturers.

    PubMed

    Welch, W D; Porschen, R K; Zarifi, S Z

    1984-11-01

    The CO2, O2, and pH levels of commercially available blood culture bottles with tryptic soy broth medium from five different manufacturers were compared. Ranges of 1.3 to 6.9% for CO2, 1.1 to 6.0% for O2, and pH 6.94 to 7.26 were found. Different venting procedures revealed that blood culture bottles from which the rubber diaphragm was removed equilibrated the most rapidly (24 h) to the atmosphere (10, 5, and 2.5% CO2) they were incubated in. In contrast, blood culture bottles vented with cotton-plugged needles required 48 h to achieve similar CO2 levels in the medium. The ability of these venting procedures to support bacterial growth was confirmed by measuring the growth of a CO2-dependent Escherichia coli isolate in such vented bottles; blood culture bottles that showed rapid atmospheric (5 and 10% CO2) equilibration had the fastest growth curves. Our results suggest that the differences in the recovery of certain microorganism from blood culture bottles may be due in part to the large variability seen in CO2 and O2 concentrations and the use of various venting procedures.

  19. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization with Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Rapid Identification of Candida albicans Directly from Blood Culture Bottles

    PubMed Central

    Rigby, Susan; Procop, Gary W.; Haase, Gerhard; Wilson, Deborah; Hall, Geraldine; Kurtzman, Cletus; Oliveira, Kenneth; Von Oy, Sabina; Hyldig-Nielsen, Jens J.; Coull, James; Stender, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    A new fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method that uses peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for identification of Candida albicans directly from positive-blood-culture bottles in which yeast was observed by Gram staining (herein referred to as yeast-positive blood culture bottles) is described. The test (the C. albicans PNA FISH method) is based on a fluorescein-labeled PNA probe that targets C. albicans 26S rRNA. The PNA probe is added to smears made directly from the contents of the blood culture bottle and hybridized for 90 min at 55°C. Unhybridized PNA probe is removed by washing of the mixture (30 min), and the smears are examined by fluorescence microscopy. The specificity of the method was confirmed with 23 reference strains representing phylogenetically related yeast species and 148 clinical isolates covering the clinically most significant yeast species, including C. albicans (n = 72), C. dubliniensis (n = 58), C. glabrata (n = 5), C. krusei (n = 2), C. parapsilosis (n = 4), and C. tropicalis (n = 3). The performance of the C. albicans PNA FISH method as a diagnostic test was evaluated with 33 routine and 25 simulated yeast-positive blood culture bottles and showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. It is concluded that this 2.5-h method for the definitive identification of C. albicans directly from yeast-positive blood culture bottles provides important information for optimal antifungal therapy and patient management. PMID:12037084

  20. Same-day identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing on positive blood cultures: a simple and inexpensive procedure.

    PubMed

    Maelegheer, K; Nulens, E

    2016-11-26

    Fast diagnostic tools are becoming a hot topic in microbiology, especially in the case of septic patients. Therefore, we attempted to develop a fast, inexpensive, accurate and easy method to identify bacteria and perform an antibiotic susceptibility test directly on positive blood cultures that could be used in a routine laboratory. A procedure based on centrifugation and washing steps was performed on 110 non-duplicated (including nine seeded) positive blood culture bottles. Direct identification (DID) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) was conducted on the pellet with the MALDI Biotyper and Phoenix, respectively. Identification (ID) to the species level was correct in 44/45 (97%) cases for Gram-negative bacteria and 44/56 (79%) cases for Gram-positive bacteria. In total, 98.9% of the AST results were identical to the routine laboratory result. No very major errors, four major errors and eight minor errors were detected. A reliable identification and a high AST agreement were obtained from blood cultures seeded with multi-resistant bacteria. We simulated the timeline of DID and demonstrated an identification and AST result within 24 h using Escherichia coli- and Staphylococcus aureus-positive blood cultures as examples. We developed an easy, fast and cheap method to generate reliable ID and AST results. Moreover, this method may be used to obtain results within 24 h after incubating the blood culture bottles in the microbiology lab.

  1. Bovine whole-blood culture as a tool for the measurement of endotoxin activities in Gram-negative bacterial vaccines.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Saiki; Nakamizo, Mari; Kawanishi, Michiko; Nakajima, Nao; Yamamoto, Kinya; Uchiyama, Mariko; Hirano, Fumiya; Nagai, Hidetaka; Kijima, Mayumi; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Mekata, Hirohisa; Murata, Shiro; Konnai, Satoru; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2013-05-15

    In order to analyze bovine immune reactions against the Gram-negative bacterial vaccine, bovine whole-blood culture was used to investigate the pro-inflammatory cytokine responses stimulated with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) extracted from Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. We also examined the interaction between LPS and aluminum hydroxide gel for endotoxin activity and pro-inflammatory cytokine responses of whole bovine blood. Alteration in the mRNA concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-10 in whole-blood culture at 4h after stimulation with different doses of LPS was observed and determined by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The mRNA concentrations of TNF-α and IL-1β changed in a dose-dependent manner and differed depending on the type of LPS. Limulus test revealed that endotoxin activity was remarkably reduced when aluminum hydroxide gel was added to LPS. In contrast, the mRNA concentration of TNF-α in whole bovine blood was enhanced by LPS mixed with aluminum hydroxide gel. These results suggest that bovine whole-blood culture can be utilized to detect endotoxin activity of Gram-negative bacterial vaccines. In addition, whole-blood culture offers several advantages, such as ease of performance, few preparation artifacts, and a physiological cell environment, for investigating bovine immune response compared with the Limulus test.

  2. Evaluation and comparison of different blood culture techniques for bacteriological isolation of Salmonella typhi and Brucella abortus.

    PubMed Central

    Gaviria-Ruiz, M M; Cardona-Castro, N M

    1995-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to evaluate and compare various noncommercial methods of blood culture for the isolation of Salmonella typhi and Brucella abortus from fresh human blood samples that had been artificially inoculated with 1 to 50 microorganisms per ml of blood. The methods compared included the Ruiz-Castañeda blood culture, broth blood culture, leukocyte lysis and direct plating on agar (WBL-P), leukocyte lysis and filtration, Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation and filtration, Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation, and Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation and leukocyte lysis methods. Results with the WBL-P technique showed that S. typhi was isolated in 18 h, and its recovery rate was 36.6% (calculated from the number of CFU recovered per milliliter versus the number inoculated). B. abortus was isolated in 48 h by the same technique, and its recovery rate was 48.8%. The isolation times for the other blood culture techniques were between 36 and 44 h for S. typhi and 66 h for B. abortus. The techniques which relied on filtering systems for the recovery of S. typhi and B. abortus performed poorly. The WBL-P technique for the isolation of S. typhi and B. abortus is faster than the other methods tested. PMID:7790452

  3. Usefulness of Blood Cultures and Radiologic Imaging Studies in the Management of Patients with Community-Acquired Acute Pyelonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Mi-Ran; Kim, Seong-Jong; Kim, Jieun; Wie, Seong-Heon; Cho, Yong Kyun; Lim, Seung-Kwan; Lee, Jin Seo; Kwon, Ki Tae; Lee, Hyuck; Cheong, Hee Jin; Park, Dae Won; Ryu, Seong Yeol; Chung, Moon-Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to examine the usefulness of blood cultures and radiologic imaging studies for developing therapeutic strategies in community-acquired acute pyelonephritis (CA-APN) patients. Materials and Methods We prospectively collected the clinical data of CA-APN patients who visited 11 hospitals from March 2010 to February 2011. Results Positive urine and blood cultures were obtained in 69.3% (568/820) and 42.7% (277/648), respectively, of a total of 827 CA-APN patients. Blood culture identified the urinary pathogen in 60 of 645 (9.3%) patients for whom both urine and blood cultures were performed; the organisms isolated from urine were inconsistent with those from blood in 11 and only blood cultures were positive in 49 patients. Final clinical failure was more common in the bacteremic patients than the non-bacteremic ones (8.0% vs. 2.7%, P = 0.003), as was hospital mortality (3.6% vs. 0.3%, P = 0.003). Likewise, durations of hospitalization and fever were significantly longer. Bacteremia was independent risk factor for mortality (OR 9.290, 1.145-75.392, P = 0.037). With regard to radiologic studies, the detection rate of APN was 84.4% (445/527) by abdominal computed tomography and 40% (72/180) by abdominal ultrasonography. Eighty-one of 683 patients (11.9%) were found to have renal abscess, perinephric abscess, urolithiasis, hydronephorosis/hydroureter or emphysematous cystitis, which could potentially impact on clinical management. Patients with Pitt score ≥ 1, flank pain or azotemia were significantly more likely to have such structural abnormalities. Conclusion Blood cultures are clinically useful for diagnosis of CA-APN, and bacteremia is predictive factor for hospital mortality. Early radiologic imaging studies should be considered for CA-APN patients with Pitt scores ≥1, flank pain or azotemia. PMID:28271650

  4. Rapid Differentiation of Fermentative from Nonfermentative Gram-Negative Bacilli in Positive Blood Cultures by an Impedance Method

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tsung Chain; Huang, Ay Huey

    2000-01-01

    Rapid differentiation of fermentative gram-negative bacilli (fermenters) from nonfermentative gram-negative bacilli (nonfermenters) in positive blood cultures may help physicians to narrow the choice of appropriate antibiotics for empiric treatment. An impedance method for direct differentiation of fermenters from nonfermenters was investigated. The bacterial suspensions (or positive culture broths containing gram-negative bacteria) were inoculated into the module wells of a Bactometer (bioMérieux, Inc., Hazelwood, Mo.) containing 1 ml of Muller-Hinton broth. The inoculated modules were incubated at 35°C, and the change in impedance in each well was continuously monitored. The amount of time required to cause a series of significant deviations from baseline impedance values was defined as the detection time (DT). The percent change of impedance was defined as the change of impedance at the time interval from DT to DT plus 1 h. After testing 857 strains of pure cultures (586 strains of fermenters and 271 strains of nonfermenters), a breakpoint (2.98%) of impedance change was obtained by discriminant analysis. Strains displaying impedance changes of greater than 2.98% were classified as fermenters; the others were classified as nonfermenters. By using this breakpoint, 98.6% (340 of 345) of positive blood cultures containing fermenters and 98% (98 of 100) of positive blood cultures containing nonfermenters were correctly classified. The impedance method was simple, and the results were normally available within 2 to 4 h after direct inoculation of positive blood culture broths. PMID:11015369

  5. Enumeration of total aerobic microorganisms in foods by SimPlate Total Plate Count-Color Indicator methods and conventional culture methods: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Feldsine, Philip T; Leung, Stephanie C; Lienau, Andrew H; Mui, Linda A; Townsend, David E

    2003-01-01

    The relative efficacy of the SimPlate Total Plate Count-Color Indicator (TPC-CI) method (SimPlate 35 degrees C) was compared with the AOAC Official Method 966.23 (AOAC 35 degrees C) for enumeration of total aerobic microorganisms in foods. The SimPlate TPC-CI method, incubated at 30 degrees C (SimPlate 30 degrees C), was also compared with the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 4833 method (ISO 30 degrees C). Six food types were analyzed: ground black pepper, flour, nut meats, frozen hamburger patties, frozen fruits, and fresh vegetables. All foods tested were naturally contaminated. Nineteen laboratories throughout North America and Europe participated in the study. Three method comparisons were conducted. In general, there was <0.3 mean log count difference in recovery among the SimPlate methods and their corresponding reference methods. Mean log counts between the 2 reference methods were also very similar. Repeatability (Sr) and reproducibility (SR) standard deviations were similar among the 3 method comparisons. The SimPlate method (35 degrees C) and the AOAC method were comparable for enumerating total aerobic microorganisms in foods. Similarly, the SimPlate method (30 degrees C) was comparable to the ISO method when samples were prepared and incubated according to the ISO method.

  6. Identification of bacterial and fungal pathogens from positive blood culture bottles: a microarray-based approach.

    PubMed

    Raich, Teresa; Powell, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Rapid identification and characterization of bacterial and fungal pathogens present in the bloodstream are essential for optimal patient management and are associated with improved patient outcomes, improved antimicrobial stewardship, improved infection control, and reduced healthcare costs. Microarrays serve as reliable platforms for the identification of these bloodstream pathogens and their associated antimicrobial resistance genes, if present. Nanosphere's (Nanosphere, Inc., Northbrook, IL, USA) Verigene Gram-Positive Blood Culture Nucleic-Acid Test (BC-GP) is one such microarray-based approach for the detection of bacteria that cause bloodstream infection. Here, we describe the design of the microarray-based Verigene BC-GP Test, the steps necessary for performing the test, and the different components of the test including nucleic acid extraction and hybridization of target nucleic acid to a microarray.

  7. Microorganisms Isolated from Blood Cultures of Febrile Neutropenic Patients in ‹bn-i Sina Hospital.

    PubMed

    Arıkan Akan, Özay

    2003-12-05

    Patients with profound neutropenia have increased risk of septicemia associated with significant morbidity. To provide the appropriate broad-spectrum antimicrobial cover, documentation of causative agents and their antimicrobial susceptibilities should be established in each hospital. During 2001 in Ibn-i Sina Hospital Hematology unit, among 125 isolates from blood cultures of febrile neutropenic patients, gram-negative bacteria was prevalent (56.8%). Among the gram-positives (34.4% of isolates) coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) were the predominant bacteria (15/43) followed by Staphylococcus aureus (12/43). Escherichia coli (23/71) and Klebsiella spp. (15/71) were the most common species among 71 gram-negative bacteria. Nonfermentative gram-negative bacilli were 21.6% of the isolates. Increase in the isolation rate of Acinetobacter baumannii (7 strains) and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (6 strains) was noticed.

  8. Tackling the problem of blood culture contamination in the intensive care unit using an educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Alahmadi, Y M; McElnay, J C; Kearney, M P; Aldeyab, M A; Magee, F A; Hanley, J; Bailie, R; Donaldson, W; Johnston, K; Kinoulty, S; Doherty, A; Tate, A; Scott, M G

    2015-07-01

    Blood culture contamination (BCC) has been associated with unnecessary antibiotic use, additional laboratory tests and increased length of hospital stay thus incurring significant extra hospital costs. We set out to assess the impact of a staff educational intervention programme on decreasing intensive care unit (ICU) BCC rates to <3% (American Society for Microbiology standard). BCC rates during the pre-intervention period (January 2006-May 2011) were compared with the intervention period (June 2011-December 2012) using run chart and regression analysis. Monthly ICU BCC rates during the intervention period were reduced to a mean of 3.7%, compared to 9.5% during the baseline period (P < 0.001) with an estimated potential annual cost savings of about £250,100. The approach used was simple in design, flexible in delivery and efficient in outcomes, and may encourage its translation into clinical practice in different healthcare settings.

  9. Impact of yeast-bacteria coinfection on the detection of Candida sp. in an automated blood culture system.

    PubMed

    Cateau, Estelle; Cognee, Anne-Sophie; Tran, Tri Cong; Vallade, Elodie; Garcia, Magali; Belaz, Sorya; Kauffmann-Lacroix, Catherine; Rodier, Marie-Helene

    2012-04-01

    Invasive candidiasis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality. It is now well known that an early diagnosis contributes to the patients' outcome. Blood cultures, which are the first-line test in case of bloodstream infection suspicion, can be carried out using fungus-selective medium (containing antibiotics) or standard microorganism medium allowing both bacterial and fungal growth. Some patients can suffer from polymicrobial sepsis involving bacteria and yeasts, so we decided to investigate in blood cultures the influence of the presence of bacteria on fungal development. Simulated blood cultures were performed using Candida albicans or C. glabrata coincubated with Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus at different concentrations. The results showed that, in a standard microorganism medium, bacterial growth could hide the fungal development. Thus, in patients at risk of invasive candidiasis, the use of a specific fungal medium could improve the diagnosis and allow an earlier efficient antifungal treatment.

  10. Aerobic Metabolism of Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Mickelson, M. N.

    1967-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae cultures possess an aerobic pathway for glucose oxidation that is strongly inhibited by cyanide. The products of glucose oxidation by aerobically grown cells of S. agalactiae 50 are lactic and acetic acids, acetylmethylcarbinol, and carbon dioxide. Glucose degradation products by aerobically grown cells, as percentage of glucose carbon, were 52 to 61% lactic acid, 20 to 23% acetic acid, 5.5 to 6.5% acetylmethylcarbinol, and 14 to 16% carbon dioxide. There was no evidence for a pentose cycle or a tricarboxylic acid cycle. Crude cell-free extracts of S. agalactiae 50 possessed a strong reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH2) oxidase that is also cyanide-sensitive. Dialysis or ultrafiltration of the crude, cell-free extract resulted in loss of NADH2 oxidase activity. Oxidase activity was restored to the inactive extract by addition of the ultrafiltrate or by addition of menadione or K3Fe(CN)6. Noncytochrome iron-containing pigments were present in cell-free extracts of S. agalactiae. The possible participation of these pigments in the respiration of S. agalactiae is presently being studied. PMID:4291090

  11. Autologous red blood cells potentiate antibody synthesis by unfractionated human mononuclear cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Rugeles, M T; La Via, M; Goust, J M; Kilpatrick, J M; Hyman, B; Virella, G

    1987-08-01

    We have tried to determine the most favourable conditions for the in vitro induction of specific antibody (Ab) responses to tetanus toxoid (TT) and keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH). Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) were obtained from normal volunteers and stimulated with PWM, TT, KLH, and mixtures of PWM and antigens in the presence or absence of autologous red blood cells (RBC) (1:50 ratio of PBMNC/RBC). The cultures were harvested on day 11; immunoglobulins were determined immunonephelometrically and Ab levels by ELISA with human antibodies used for calibration. While anti-TT responses were easy to induce with PBMNC from recently boosted individuals, the production of anti-TT from PBMNC obtained from non-recently boosted individuals was only possible when PBMNC were stimulated with TT and PWM in the presence of autologous RBC. Similarly, anti-KLH responses were easier to induce with PBMNC from an immune donor; maximal response was observed after stimulation with PWM + KLH in the presence of autologous RBC. Stimulation of primary anti-KLH responses with PBMNC from non-immune donors was only successful when the cells were stimulated with KLH + PWM in the presence of autologous RBC. The potentiation of human B-cell responses with autologous RBC can be abrogated by pretreatment of PBMNC with anti-CD2 antibodies and is associated with increased expression of IL-2 receptors and increased production of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). However, addition of IFN-gamma in different doses and at different times to PWM-stimulated PBMNC cultures was not as effective as addition of RBC in enhancing the production of immunoglobulin and antibody.

  12. Antimicrobial resistance trends in blood culture positive Salmonella Typhi isolates from Pondicherry, India, 2005-2009.

    PubMed

    Menezes, G A; Harish, B N; Khan, M A; Goessens, W H F; Hays, J P

    2012-03-01

    Typhoid fever is caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, a major public health concern in developing countries. Recently, there has been an upsurge in the occurrence of bacterial isolates that are resistant to ciprofloxacin, and the emergence of broad spectrum β-lactamases in typhoidal salmonellae constitutes a new challenge for the clinician. A total of 337 blood culture isolates of S. Typhi, isolated from Pondicherry, India, between January 2005 and December 2009, were investigated using phenotypic, molecular and serological methods. Of the 337 isolates, 74 (22%) were found to be multidrug resistant (MDR) and 264 (78%) nalidixic acid resistant (NAR). Isolates with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin possessed single mutations in the gyrA gene. A high rate of resistance (8%) was found to ciprofloxacin. All isolates with a ciprofloxacin MIC ≥ 4 mg/L possessed both double mutations in the QRDR of the gyrA gene and a single mutation in the parC gene. Active efflux pump mechanisms were also found to be involved in ciprofloxacin resistance. Finally, a large number of PFGE patterns (non-clonal genotypes) were observed among the S. Typhi isolates. In conclusion, a high rate of ciprofloxacin resistance was observed in comparison to other endemic areas in blood culture isolates of S. Typhi from Pondicherry, India, with steadily increasing NAR but decreasing MDR isolations over the study period. This is most likely to be due to an increased use of ciprofloxacin as a first-line drug of choice over more traditional antimicrobial agents for the treatment of typhoid fever.

  13. Utility of direct susceptibility testing on blood cultures: is it still worthwhile?

    PubMed

    Menon, Vidthiya; Lahanas, Sophie; Janto, Catherine; Lee, Andie

    2016-06-01

    Earlier targeted therapy for bacteraemia optimizes patient outcomes and reduces broad spectrum antibiotic use. Standardized susceptibility testing results are available at 36-48 h. Direct disc susceptibility testing from blood culture broth reduces time to results but the inoculum is not standardized. No studies have looked at the clinical utility of direct susceptibility results. This retrospective cohort study aimed to assess the correlation between direct and formal testing methods as well as the clinical utility of direct susceptibility results. 160 episodes of bacteraemia with paired direct and formal susceptibility testing were studied. Direct disc testing was performed on blood culture broth. Formal testing was performed on isolates, using automated broth microdilution or Etests. The rate of error was 9.0 % (95 % CI 7.0-11.6 %). In 10 cases (6.3 %, 95 % CI 3.0-11.2 %), inappropriate antibiotics were used due to direct susceptibility results, including two cases with ineffective (as opposed to too broad) antibiotics being used. Antibiotics were changed in 28.1 % of cases once direct susceptibility data was available. There was a decreased time to effective antibiotics in 9.3 % (95 % CI 5.3-15.0 %), and a decreased time to a targeted antibiotics in 14.3 % (95 % CI 9.3-20.8 %) of cases. Despite the error rate, the advantages of earlier times to effective and targeted antibiotics justifies continuing direct testing in bacteraemia episodes with Gram-negative rods. In the Gram-positive group, given the contamination rate, the availability of adjunctive PCR, and the fact that early identification of the isolate could equally influence antibiotic choices, direct susceptibility testing may no longer be warranted.

  14. [A retrospective study of the relationship between bacterial numbers from central venous catheter tip cultures and blood cultures for evaluating central line-associated bloodstream infections].

    PubMed

    Ohtaki, Hirofumi; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Nakayama, Asami; Yonetamari, Jun; Ando, Kohei; Miyazaki, Takashi; Ohta, Hirotoshi; Furuta, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Tamayo; Ito, Hiroyasu; Murakami, Nobuo; Seishima, Mitsuru

    2014-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is an infectious disease requiring special attention. It is a common cause of nosocomial infections; catheter insertion into the central veins particularly increases the risk of infection (CLA-BSI: central line-associated bloodstream infection). We examined the relationship between the number of bacterial colonies cultured from shredded central venous catheter (CVC) tips and from blood cultures in our hospital from 2011 to 2012. Coagulase-negative staphylococci topped the list of microbe isolated from the CVC tip culture, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida spp. S. aureus and Candida spp., with growth of over 15 colony-forming units in the CVC tip culture, were also detected at high rates in the blood culture. However, gramnegative bacilli (Enterobacteriaceae and P. aeruginosa) did not show a similar increase in colony number in the CVC tip culture. Because microbes adhering to shredded catheter tips are readily detected by culture, this method is useful as a routine diagnostic test. In addition, prompt clinical reporting of the bacterial number of serious CLA-BSI-causing S. aureus and Candida spp. isolated from CVC tips could contribute to earlier CLA-BSI diagnosis.

  15. Clinical characteristics of bacteremia caused by Helicobacter cinaedi and time required for blood cultures to become positive.

    PubMed

    Araoka, Hideki; Baba, Masaru; Kimura, Muneyoshi; Abe, Masahiro; Inagawa, Hiroko; Yoneyama, Akiko

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the clinical characteristics of patients with Helicobacter cinaedi bacteremia and the time required for blood cultures to become positive. The medical records of all patients with H. cinaedi bacteremia at Toranomon Hospital and Toranomon Hospital Kajigaya between March 2009 and March 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Sixty-three patients, 34 men and 29 women with a median age of 67 years (range, 37 to 88 years), were diagnosed with H. cinaedi bacteremia. A total of 51,272 sets of blood cultures were obtained during the study period, of which 5,769 sets of blood cultures were positive for some organism and 126 sets were H. cinaedi positive. The time required for blood cultures to become positive for H. cinaedi was ≤5 days in 69 sets (55%) and >5 days in 57 sets (45%). Most patients had an underlying disease, including chronic kidney disease (21 cases), solid tumor (19 cases), hematological malignancy (13 cases), diabetes mellitus (8 cases), chronic liver disease (6 cases), and postorthopedic surgery (3 cases). Only 1 patient had no apparent underlying disease. The clinical symptoms included cellulitis in 24 cases, colitis in 7 cases, and fever only in 27 cases, including 7 cases of febrile neutropenia. The 30-day mortality rate of H. cinaedi bacteremia was 6.3%. In conclusion, most cases of H. cinaedi bacteremia occurred in immunocompromised patients. We might have overlooked nearly half of the H. cinaedi bacteremia cases if the duration of monitored blood culture samples had been within 5 days. Therefore, when clinicians suspect H. cinaedi bacteremia, the observation period for blood cultures should be extended.

  16. Human Umbilical Cord Blood Serum: Effective Substitute of Fetal Bovine Serum for Culturing of Human Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Yu A; Balashova, E E; Volgina, N E; Kabaeva, N V; Dugina, T N; Sukhikh, G T

    2017-02-01

    Optimal conditions for culturing of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in the presence of pooled umbilical cord blood serum were determined. It was found that umbilical cord blood serum in a concentration range of 1-10% effectively supported high viability and proliferative activity of cells with unaltered phenotype and preserved multilineage differentiation capacity. The proposed approach allows avoiding the use of xenogenic animal sera for culturing of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells and creates prerequisites for designing and manufacturing safe cellular and/or acellular products for medical purposes.

  17. Identification of blood culture isolates directly from positive blood cultures by use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and a commercial extraction system: analysis of performance, cost, and turnaround time.

    PubMed

    Lagacé-Wiens, Philippe R S; Adam, Heather J; Karlowsky, James A; Nichol, Kimberly A; Pang, Paulette F; Guenther, Jodi; Webb, Amanda A; Miller, Crystal; Alfa, Michelle J

    2012-10-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry represents a revolution in the rapid identification of bacterial and fungal pathogens in the clinical microbiology laboratory. Recently, MALDI-TOF has been applied directly to positive blood culture bottles for the rapid identification of pathogens, leading to reductions in turnaround time and potentially beneficial patient impacts. The development of a commercially available extraction kit (Bruker Sepsityper) for use with the Bruker MALDI BioTyper has facilitated the processing required for identification of pathogens directly from positive from blood cultures. We report the results of an evaluation of the accuracy, cost, and turnaround time of this method for 61 positive monomicrobial and 2 polymicrobial cultures representing 26 species. The Bruker MALDI BioTyper with the Sepsityper gave a valid (score, >1.7) identification for 85.2% of positive blood cultures with no misidentifications. The mean reduction in turnaround time to identification was 34.3 h (P < 0.0001) in the ideal situation where MALDI-TOF was used for all blood cultures and 26.5 h in a more practical setting where conventional identification or identification from subcultures was required for isolates that could not be directly identified by MALDI-TOF. Implementation of a MALDI-TOF-based identification system for direct identification of pathogens from blood cultures is expected to be associated with a marginal increase in operating costs for most laboratories. However, the use of MALDI-TOF for direct identification is accurate and should result in reduced turnaround time to identification.

  18. Differential sensitivity of aerobic gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms to 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) leads to dissimilar growth and TNT transformation: Results of soil and pure culture studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, M.E.; Manning, J.F. Jr.

    1996-07-30

    The effects of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) on indigenous soil populations and pure bacterial cultures were examined. The number of colony-forming units (CFU) appearing when TNT-contaminated soil was spread on 0.3% molasses plates decreased by 50% when the agar was amended with 67 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1}, whereas a 99% reduction was observed when uncontaminated soil was plated. Furthermore, TNT-contaminated soil harbored a greater number of organisms able to grow on plates amended with greater than 10 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1}. The percentage of gram-positive isolates was markedly less in TNT-contaminated soil (7%; 2 of 30) than in uncontaminated soil (61%; 20 of 33). Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas corrugate, Pseudomonasfluorescens and Alcaligenes xylosoxidans made up the majority of the gram-negative isolates from TNT-contaminated soil. Gram-positive isolates from both soils demonstrated marked growth inhibition when greater than 8-16 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1} was present in the culture media. Most pure cultures of known aerobic gram-negative organisms readily degraded TNT and evidenced net consumption of reduced metabolites. However, pure cultures of aerobic gram-positive bacteria were sensitive to relatively low concentrations of TNT as indicated by the 50% reduction in growth and TNT transformation which was observed at approximately 10 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1}. Most non-sporeforming gram-positive organisms incubated in molasses media amended with 80 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1} or greater became unculturable, whereas all strains tested remained culturable when incubated in mineral media amended with 98 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1}, indicating that TNT sensitivity is likely linked to cell growth. These results indicate that gram-negative organisms are most likely responsible for any TNT transformation in contaminated soil, due to their relative insensitivity to high TNT concentrations and their ability to transform TNT.

  19. Anaerobic and aerobic transformation of TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Kulpa, C.F.; Boopathy, R.; Manning, J.

    1996-12-31

    Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds have used pure cultures of aerobic microorganisms. In many cases, attempts to degrade nitroaromatics under aerobic conditions by pure cultures result in no mineralization and only superficial modifications of the structure. However, mixed culture systems properly operated result in the transformation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and in some cases mineralization of TNT occurs. In this paper, the mixed culture system is described with emphasis on intermediates and the characteristics of the aerobic microbial process including the necessity for a co-substrate. The possibility of removing TNT under aerobic/anoxic conditions is described in detail. Another option for the biodegradation of TNT and nitroaromatics is under anaerobic, sulfate reducing conditions. In this instance, the nitroaromatic compounds undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. TNT under sulfate reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene presumably by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of nitro groups from TNT is achieved by a series of reductive reactions with the formation of ammonia and toluene by Desulfovibrio sp. (B strain). These metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. The data supporting the anaerobic transformation of TNT under different growth condition are reviewed in this report.

  20. Enumeration of bacteria in clinically significant blood cultures in neutropenic and non-neutropenic patients using a pour plate method.

    PubMed

    Rice, P; Spencer, R C

    1991-03-01

    A 3-year review of clinically significant positive blood cultures was undertaken to assess any differences in the blood bacterial count between haematological neutropenic and other non-neutropenic patients. The pour-plate method was used. In Gram-positive infections the pour plate contained colonies in 61% of haematological patients and in 41% of others. In Gram-negative infection the figures were 54% and 25% respectively. The mean numbers of bacteria per ml of blood were increased in haematological patients compared with the others for both groups of organisms.

  1. How to Optimize the Use of Blood Cultures for the Diagnosis of Bloodstream Infections? A State-of-the Art

    PubMed Central

    Lamy, Brigitte; Dargère, Sylvie; Arendrup, Maiken C.; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Tattevin, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Bloodstream infection (BSI) is a major cause of death in developed countries and the detection of microorganisms is essential in managing patients. Despite major progress has been made to improve identification of microorganisms, blood culture (BC) remains the gold standard and the first line tool for detecting BSIs. Consensus guidelines are available to ensure optimal BSI procedures, but BC practices often deviate from the recommendations. This review provides an update on clinical and technical issues related to blood collection and to BC performance, with a special focus on the blood sample strategy to optimize the sensitivity and specificity of BCs. PMID:27242721

  2. How to Optimize the Use of Blood Cultures for the Diagnosis of Bloodstream Infections? A State-of-the Art.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Brigitte; Dargère, Sylvie; Arendrup, Maiken C; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Tattevin, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Bloodstream infection (BSI) is a major cause of death in developed countries and the detection of microorganisms is essential in managing patients. Despite major progress has been made to improve identification of microorganisms, blood culture (BC) remains the gold standard and the first line tool for detecting BSIs. Consensus guidelines are available to ensure optimal BSI procedures, but BC practices often deviate from the recommendations. This review provides an update on clinical and technical issues related to blood collection and to BC performance, with a special focus on the blood sample strategy to optimize the sensitivity and specificity of BCs.

  3. Identification of Brucella by MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry. Fast and Reliable Identification from Agar Plates and Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Laura; Vega Castaño, Silvia; Sánchez-Juanes, Fernando; González-Cabrero, Sandra; Menegotto, Fabiola; Orduña-Domingo, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Background MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS) is a reliable method for bacteria identification. Some databases used for this purpose lack reference profiles for Brucella species, which is still an important pathogen in wide areas around the world. We report the creation of profiles for MALDI-TOF Biotyper 2.0 database (Bruker Daltonics, Germany) and their usefulness for identifying brucellae from culture plates and blood cultures. Methodology/Principal Findings We created MALDI Biotyper 2.0 profiles for type strains belonging to B. melitensis biotypes 1, 2 and 3; B. abortus biotypes 1, 2, 5 and 9; B. suis, B. canis, B ceti and B. pinnipedialis. Then, 131 clinical isolates grown on plate cultures were used in triplicate to check identification. Identification at genus level was always correct, although in most cases the three replicates reported different identification at species level. Simulated blood cultures were performed with type strains belonging to the main human pathogenic species (B. melitensis, B. abortus, B. suis and B. canis), and studied by MALDI-TOF MS in triplicate. Identification at genus level was always correct. Conclusions/Significance MALDI-TOF MS is reliable for Brucella identification to the genus level from culture plates and directly from blood culture bottles. PMID:21151913

  4. Evaluation of a PCR method to determine the clinical significance of blood cultures with Staphylococcus epidermidis in patients with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ahlstrand, Erik; Bäckman, Anders; Persson, Lennart; Mölling, Paula; Tidefelt, Ulf; Söderquist, Bo

    2014-06-01

    The aim was to investigate whether the detection and quantification of Staphylococcus epidermidis DNA in blood could distinguish S. epidermidis blood stream infections (BSIs) from blood culture contaminations in patients with hematological malignancies. The hld gene was chosen to identify S. epidermidis DNA and DNA in blood samples was detected by real-time PCR. Blood samples were obtained simultaneously with blood cultures positive for S. epidermidis (n = 30), during blood culture-negative episodes (n = 10) and episodes of bacteremia with other bacteria than S. epidermidis (n = 4) and from healthy blood donors (n = 10). In addition, DNA from S. epidermidis and a selection of other bacterial species were analyzed. Three different sets of criteria were used to classify episodes with positive blood cultures with S. epidermidis as BSIs or contaminations. All DNA preparations from S. epidermidis (n = 48) were hld-positive, but other bacterial species (n = 13) were negative. Sixteen (53%) of 30 blood samples from patients with blood cultures positive for S. epidermidis were hld-positive, but none of the controls. There was no clear association between a positive hld PCR and episodes interpreted as BSIs. In conclusion, hld PCR failed to distinguish S. epidermidis BSIs from blood culture contaminations in patients with hematological malignancies.

  5. Performance Evaluation of the Verigene Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Blood Culture Test for Direct Identification of Bacteria and Their Resistance Determinants from Positive Blood Cultures in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Gilman K. H.; Chen, Jonathan H. K.; Ng, T. K.; Lee, Rodney A.; Fung, Kitty S. C.; To, Sabrina W. C.; Wong, Barry K. C.; Cheung, Sherman; Wong, Ivan W. F.; Tam, Marble M. P.; Lee, Swing S. W.; Yam, W. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background A multicenter study was conducted to evaluate the diagnostic performance and the time to identifcation of the Verigene Blood Culture Test, the BC-GP and BC-GN assays, to identify both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and their drug resistance determinants directly from positive blood cultures collected in Hong Kong. Methods and Results A total of 364 blood cultures were prospectively collected from four public hospitals, in which 114 and 250 cultures yielded Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and were tested with the BC-GP and BC-GN assay respectively. The overall identification agreement for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were 89.6% and 90.5% in monomicrobial cultures and 62.5% and 53.6% in polymicrobial cultures, respectively. The sensitivities for most genus/species achieved at least 80% except Enterococcus spp. (60%), K.oxytoca (0%), K.pneumoniae (69.2%), whereas the specificities for all targets ranged from 98.9% to 100%. Of note, 50% (7/14) cultures containing K.pneumoniae that were missed by the BC-GN assay were subsequently identified as K.variicola. Approximately 5.5% (20/364) cultures contained non-target organisms, of which Aeromonas spp. accounted for 25% and are of particular concern. For drug resistance determination, the Verigene test showed 100% sensitivity for identification of MRSA, VRE and carbapenem resistant Acinetobacter, and 84.4% for ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae based on the positive detection of mecA, vanA, blaOXA and blaCTXM respectively. Conclusion Overall, the Verigene test provided acceptable accuracy for identification of bacteria and resistance markers with a range of turnaround time 40.5 to 99.2 h faster than conventional methods in our region. PMID:26431434

  6. Long-term culture of chicken primordial germ cells isolated from embryonic blood and production of germline chimaeric chickens.

    PubMed

    Naito, Mitsuru; Harumi, Takashi; Kuwana, Takashi

    2015-02-01

    Production of germline chimaeric chickens by the transfer of cultured primordial germ cells (PGC) is a useful system for germline manipulation. A novel culture system was developed for chicken PGC isolated from embryonic blood. The isolated PGC were cultured on feeder cells derived from chicken embryonic fibroblast. The cultured PGC formed colonies and they proliferated about 300-times during the first 30 days. The cultured PGC retained the ability to migrate to recipient gonads and were also chicken VASA homologue (CVH)-positive. Female PGC were present in the mixed-sex PGC populations cultured for more than 90 days and gave rise to viable offspring efficiently via germline chimaeric chickens. Male cultured PGC were transferred to recipient embryos and produced putative chimaeric chickens. The DNA derived from the cultured PGC was detected in the sperm samples of male putative chimaeric chickens, but no donor derived offspring were obtained. Donor-derived offspring were also obtained from germline chimaeric chickens by the transfer of frozen-thawed cultured PGC. The culture method for PGC developed in the present study is useful for manipulation of the germline in chickens, such as preservation of genetic resources and gene transfer.

  7. Impact of Pre-Analytical Time on the Recovery of Pathogens from Blood Cultures: Results from a Large Retrospective Survey

    PubMed Central

    Borsari, Lucia; Aggazzotti, Gabriella; Busani, Stefano; Mussini, Cristina; Rumpianesi, Fabio; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Girardis, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Background Prompt identification of bloodstream pathogens is essential for optimal management of patients. Significant changes in analytical methods have improved the turnaround time for laboratory diagnosis. Less attention has been paid to the time elapsing from blood collection to incubation and to its potential effect on recovery of pathogens. We evaluated the performance of blood cultures collected under typical hospital conditions in relation to the length of their pre-analytical time. Methods We carried out a large retrospective study including 50,955 blood cultures collected, over a 30-month period, from 7,035 adult septic patients. Cultures were accepted by the laboratory only during opening time (Mon-Fri: 8am–4pm; Sat: 8am–2pm). Samples collected outside laboratory hours were stored at room temperature at clinical wards. All cultures were processed by automated culture systems. Day and time of blood collection and of culture incubation were known for all samples. Results A maximum pre-analytical interval of 2 hours is recommended by guidelines. When the laboratory was open, 57% of cultures were processed within 2 h. When the laboratory was closed, 4.9% of cultures were processed within 2 h (P<0.001). Samples collected when the laboratory was closed showed pre-analytical times significantly longer than those collected when laboratory was open (median time: 13 h and 1 h, respectively, P<0.001). The prevalence of positive cultures was significantly lower for samples collected when the laboratory was closed compared to open (11% vs 13%, P<0.001). The probability of a positive result decreased of 16% when the laboratory was closed (OR:0.84; 95%CI:0.80–0.89, P<0.001). Further, each hour elapsed from blood collection to incubation resulted associated with a decrease of 0.3% (OR:0.997; 95%CI:0.994–0.999, P<0.001) in the probability of a positive result. Discussion Delayed insertions of cultures into automated systems was associated with lower detection

  8. Blood cell oxidative stress precedes hemolysis in whole blood-liver slice co-cultures of rat, dog, and human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Vickers, Alison E.M.; Sinclair, John R.; Fisher, Robyn L.; Morris, Stephen R.; Way, William

    2010-05-01

    A novel in vitro model to investigate time-dependent and concentration-dependent responses in blood cells and hemolytic events is studied for rat, dog, and human tissues. Whole blood is co-cultured with a precision-cut liver slice. Methimazole (MMI) was selected as a reference compound, since metabolism of its imidazole thione moiety is linked with hematologic disorders and hepatotoxicity. An oxidative stress response occurred in all three species, marked by a decline in blood GSH levels by 24 h that progressed, and preceded hemolysis, which occurred at high MMI concentrations in the presence of a liver slice with rat (>= 1000 muM at 48 h) and human tissues (>= 1000 muM at 48 h, >= 750 muM at 72 h) but not dog. Human blood-only cultures exhibited a decline of GSH levels but minimal to no hemolysis. The up-regulation of liver genes for heme degradation (Hmox1 and Prdx1), iron cellular transport (Slc40a1), and GSH synthesis and utilization (mGST1 and Gclc) were early markers of the oxidative stress response. The up-regulation of the Kupffer cell lectin Lgals3 gene expression indicated a response to damaged red blood cells, and Hp (haptoglobin) up-regulation is indicative of increased hemoglobin uptake. Up-regulation of liver IL-6 and IL-8 gene expression suggested an activation of an inflammatory response by liver endothelial cells. In summary, MMI exposure led to an oxidative stress response in blood cells, and an up-regulation of liver genes involved with oxidative stress and heme homeostasis, which was clearly separate and preceded frank hemolysis.

  9. Prospective study of the clinical performance of three BACTEC media in a modern emergency department: Plus Aerobic/F, Plus Anaerobic/F, and Anaerobic Lytic/F.

    PubMed

    Rocchetti, Andrea; Di Matteo, Luigi; Bottino, Paolo; Foret, Benjamin; Gamalero, Elisa; Calabresi, Alessandra; Guido, Gianluca; Casagranda, Ivo

    2016-11-01

    The performance of 3 blood culture bottles (BACTEC Plus Aerobic/F, Plus Anaerobic/F, and Anaerobic Lytic/F) were analyzed with clinical specimens collected from 688 Emergency Department patients. A total of 270 strains belonging to 33 species were identified, with E. coli and S. aureus as the most frequently detected. Overall recovery rate (RR) of bacteria and yeast was equivalent in the Plus Aerobic/F vials (208 of 270 isolates; 77.0%) and Anaerobic Lytic/F vials (206 isolates; 76.3%) and significantly better than in the Plus Anaerobic/F vials (189 isolates; 70.0%). Median time to detection (TTD) was earliest with the Anaerobic Lytic/F vials (12.0h) compared with the Plus Aerobic/F (14.6h) and Plus Anaerobic/F vials (15.4h). Positivity rate (PR) was similar for Anaerobic Lytic/F vials (76.9%) and Plus Aerobic/F vials (76.5%), but better if compared with Plus Anaerobic/F vials (69.4%). The PR and TTD for the combination of Plus Aerobic/F with Anaerobic Lytic/F (94.5% and 12.3h, respectively) was significantly better than with Plus Aerobic/F with Plus Anaerobic/F (87.8% and 14.1h).

  10. Evaluation of real-time PCR and pyrosequencing for screening incubating blood culture bottles from adults with suspected bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    McCann, Chase D; Moore, Miranda S; May, Larissa S; McCarroll, Matthew G; Jordan, Jeanne A

    2015-03-01

    Several molecular platforms can identify bacteria associated with bloodstream infections but require positive culture bottles as starting material. Here, we describe results of screening 1140 blood cultures at 8h postinoculation, from 918 eligible adults being evaluated for bloodstream infection. DNA was extracted and analyzed by 16S and/or 23S rRNA real-time PCR/pyrosequencing. Compared to culture, PCR/pyrosequencing displayed 90.9% sensitivity, 99.6% specificity, 95.7% positive predictive value, and 99.1% negative predictive value. Overall concordance rate was 98.9% (1127/1140). In 4 cases with molecular-positive/culture-negative results, medical chart reviews provided evidence of identical bacteria from subsequent blood or concomitant urine/sputum cultures. Nine culture-positive/molecular-negative cases were associated with either polymicrobial growth, grew only in the anaerobic bottle of the clinical pair, and/or were detected by PCR/pyrosequencing after 8h. In summary, this approach accurately detected and identified bacteria in ~91% of culture-confirmed cases significantly sooner than the phenotypic identification was available, having the potential to improve antibiotic stewardship.

  11. Evaluation of Real-time PCR and Pyrosequencing for Screening Incubating Blood Culture Bottles from Adults with Suspected Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Chase D.; Moore, Miranda S.; May, Larissa S.; McCarroll, Matthew; Jordan, Jeanne A.

    2015-01-01

    Several molecular platforms can identify bacteria associated with bloodstream infections, but require positive culture bottles as starting material. Here we describe results of screening 1140 blood cultures at 8 hours post-inoculation, from 918 eligible adults being evaluated for bloodstream infection. DNA was extracted and analyzed by 16S and/or 23S rRNA real-time PCR/Pyrosequencing. Compared to culture, PCR/Pyrosequencing displayed 90.9% sensitivity, 99.6% specificity, 95.7% PPV, and 99.1% NPV. Overall concordance rate was 98.9% (1127/1140). In four cases with molecular-positive/culture-negative results, medical chart reviews provided evidence of identical bacteria from subsequent blood or concomitant urine/sputum cultures. Nine culture-positive/molecular-negative cases were associated with either polymicrobial growth, grew only in the anaerobic bottle of the clinical pair, and/or were detected by PCR/Pyrosequencing after 8 hours. In summary, this approach accurately detected and identified bacteria in ~91% of culture-confirmed cases significantly sooner than the phenotypic identification was available, having the potential to improve antibiotic stewardship. PMID:25534615

  12. Universal Probe Library based real-time PCR for rapid detection of bacterial pathogens from positive blood culture bottles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lingxiang; Shen, Ding-Xia; Zhou, Qiming; Liu, Chao-Jun; Li, Zexia; Fang, Xiangdong; Li, Quan-Zhen

    2014-03-01

    A set of real-time PCR based assays using the locked nucleic acid probes from Roche Universal ProbeLibrary were developed for rapid detection of eight bacterial species from positive blood culture bottles. Four duplex real-time PCR reactions targeting to one Gram-positive bacterium and one Gram-negative bacterium were optimized for species identification according to Gram stain results. We also included mecA-specific primers and probes in the assays to indicate the presence of methicillin resistance in the bacterial species. The analytical sensitivity was in the range of 1-10 CFU per PCR reaction mixture. The specificity and cross reactivity of the assay was validated by 28 ATCC reference strains and 77 negative blood culture specimens. No cross-reactivity was observed in these samples thus demonstrating 100 % specificity. 72 previously characterized clinical isolates were tested by the real-time PCR assay and validated the accuracy and feasibility of the real-time PCR assay. Furthermore, 55 positive blood culture samples were tested using real-time PCR and 50 (90.9 %) of them were identified as the same species as judged by biochemical analysis. In total, real-time PCR showed 98.2 % consistent to that of traditional methods. Real-time PCR can be used as a supplement for early detection of the frequently-occurred pathogens from the positive blood cultures.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of a New Bacterium Named Rappaport israeli, gen. nov., sp. nov., Isolated from a Blood Culture

    PubMed Central

    Waldman Ben-Asher, Hiba; Yerushalmi, Rebecca; Wachtel, Chaim; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the draft genome sequence of a Gram-negative microbe found in a blood culture (B08008) from a patient. The organism was proposed to be from a new unknown genus and species. This publication will increase worldwide microbial knowledge and may improve microbial identification and antibiotic treatment for patients. PMID:28183765

  14. Colorimetric Sensor Array Allows Fast Detection and Simultaneous Identification of Sepsis-Causing Bacteria in Spiked Blood Culture

    PubMed Central

    Mix, Samantha; Xu, Zeyu; Taba, Brian; Budvytiene, Indre; Berliner, Anders N.; Queralto, Nuria; Churi, Yair S.; Huang, Richard S.; Eiden, Michael; Martino, Raymond A.; Rhodes, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a medical emergency demanding early diagnosis and tailored antimicrobial therapy. Every hour of delay in initiating effective therapy measurably increases patient mortality. Blood culture is currently the reference standard for detecting bloodstream infection, a multistep process which may take one to several days. Here, we report a novel paradigm for earlier detection and the simultaneous identification of pathogens in spiked blood cultures by means of a metabolomic “fingerprint” of the volatile mixture outgassed by the organisms. The colorimetric sensor array provided significantly faster detection of positive blood cultures than a conventional blood culture system (12.1 h versus 14.9 h, P < 0.001) while allowing for the identification of 18 bacterial species with 91.9% overall accuracy within 2 h of growth detection. The colorimetric sensor array also allowed for discrimination between unrelated strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, indicating that the metabolomic fingerprint has the potential to track nosocomial transmissions. Altogether, the colorimetric sensor array is a promising tool that offers a new paradigm for diagnosing bloodstream infections. PMID:24478493

  15. Validation of performance of plastic versus glass bottles for culturing anaerobes from blood in BacT/ALERT SN medium.

    PubMed

    Mirrett, Stanley; Joyce, Maria J; Reller, L Barth

    2005-12-01

    To validate performance, we compared the new plastic BacT/ALERT (bioMérieux, Durham, NC) SN bottle to the current glass SN bottle with samples of blood obtained for culture from adults and found them comparable for both recovery and speed of detection of microorganisms. We conclude that the safety advantage of plastic bottles can be achieved without compromising performance.

  16. Colorimetric sensor array allows fast detection and simultaneous identification of sepsis-causing bacteria in spiked blood culture.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung H; Mix, Samantha; Xu, Zeyu; Taba, Brian; Budvytiene, Indre; Berliner, Anders N; Queralto, Nuria; Churi, Yair S; Huang, Richard S; Eiden, Michael; Martino, Raymond A; Rhodes, Paul; Banaei, Niaz

    2014-02-01

    Sepsis is a medical emergency demanding early diagnosis and tailored antimicrobial therapy. Every hour of delay in initiating effective therapy measurably increases patient mortality. Blood culture is currently the reference standard for detecting bloodstream infection, a multistep process which may take one to several days. Here, we report a novel paradigm for earlier detection and the simultaneous identification of pathogens in spiked blood cultures by means of a metabolomic "fingerprint" of the volatile mixture outgassed by the organisms. The colorimetric sensor array provided significantly faster detection of positive blood cultures than a conventional blood culture system (12.1 h versus 14.9 h, P < 0.001) while allowing for the identification of 18 bacterial species with 91.9% overall accuracy within 2 h of growth detection. The colorimetric sensor array also allowed for discrimination between unrelated strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, indicating that the metabolomic fingerprint has the potential to track nosocomial transmissions. Altogether, the colorimetric sensor array is a promising tool that offers a new paradigm for diagnosing bloodstream infections.

  17. [MLST types of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium strains isolated from blood cultures].

    PubMed

    Arslan, Uğur; Demir, Esra; Oryaşin, Erman; Türk Dağı, Hatice; Tuncer, Inci; Fındık, Duygu; Bozdoğan, Bülent

    2013-07-01

    Enterococci, particularly vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), are important nosocomial pathogens with limited treatment options. Enterococci have low-level resistance to penicillins and aminoglycosides and are intrinsically resistant to cephalosporins. In addition, they can acquire high-level resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, aminoglycosides and glycopeptides. The aim of this study was to determine glycopeptide resistance mechanisms and genetic relationships of vancomycin-resistant E.faecium strains isolated from blood cultures between 2003-2009 years by molecular epidemiologic methods. A total of 38 VRE strains isolated from blood cultures were included in this study. The isolates were identified by conventional methods and Phoenix 100 BD automated system (Becton Dickinson Diagnostic Systems, USA) and confirmed by sequence analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method accor-ding to the CLSI standards. MIC values of vancomycin were determined in vancomycin resistant strains by E-test (AB Biodisk, Sweden) method. Vancomycin resistance genes included vanA, vanB, vanC, and vanD were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Clonal relationship between strains was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Sequence analysis was performed for examples selected for multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of each pulsotype and subtype. Thirty eight strains of enterococci isolated from blood cultures were defined as E.faecium by phenotypic methods and confirmed by 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Vancomycin MIC values of strains were determined as > 256 µg/ml by E test. The vanA gene was detected in all isolates. Clonal relationship of 38 isolates E.faecium carrying the vanA gene was determined by PFGE and MLST methods. PFGE detected four pulsotypes (A-D) and one sporadic isolate. Twenty nine strains belonged to A pulsotype, three strains belonged to B pulsotype, two strains

  18. Evaluation of canine and feline leishmaniasis by the association of blood culture, immunofluorescent antibody test and polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the occurrence of Leishmania spp. in dogs and cats from Botucatu, São Paulo state, and Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul state, Brazil, by the association of three diagnostic tests: blood culture in liver infusion tryptose medium, immunofluorescent antibody test and polymerase chain reaction. Fifty blood samples of dogs and cats from the Center for Zoonosis Control in Campo Grande, an area endemic for canine visceral leishmaniasis, were collected randomly, as well as canine and feline blood samples from the Municipal Kennel and Animal Protection Association in Botucatu, currently considered a transmission-free, non-endemic area. Results Of the 50 dog blood cultures from Botucatu, three (6%) were positive and of the 50 cats, two (4%) were positive. In Campo Grande, 29 dog blood cultures (58%) were positive and all (100%) cats negative by this test. Polymerase chain reaction detected Leishmania spp. in 100% of dog and cat samples from Botucatu but found all the cats from Campo Grande to be negative. On the other hand, 36 dogs from Campo Grande were positive (72%) by the same technique. Immunofluorescent antibody test in Botucatu found 100% of dogs and cats non-reactive, while in Campo Grande, it detected positivity in 32 dogs (64%) and 15 cats (30%). Conclusions The results show the importance of not only continuous epidemiological surveillance in areas not endemic for leishmaniasis, but also research for accurate diagnosis of this zoonosis. PMID:24565284

  19. What Is Aerobic Dancing?

    MedlinePlus

    ... aerobics can reach up to six times the force of gravity, which is transmitted to each of the 26 bones in the foot. Because of the many side-to-side motions, shoes need an arch design that will compensate ...

  20. High skin temperature and hypohydration impair aerobic performance.

    PubMed

    Sawka, Michael N; Cheuvront, Samuel N; Kenefick, Robert W

    2012-03-01

    This paper reviews the roles of hot skin (>35°C) and body water deficits (>2% body mass; hypohydration) in impairing submaximal aerobic performance. Hot skin is associated with high skin blood flow requirements and hypohydration is associated with reduced cardiac filling, both of which act to reduce aerobic reserve. In euhydrated subjects, hot skin alone (with a modest core temperature elevation) impairs submaximal aerobic performance. Conversely, aerobic performance is sustained with core temperatures >40°C if skin temperatures are cool-warm when euhydrated. No study has demonstrated that high core temperature (∼40°C) alone, without coexisting hot skin, will impair aerobic performance. In hypohydrated subjects, aerobic performance begins to be impaired when skin temperatures exceed 27°C, and even warmer skin exacerbates the aerobic performance impairment (-1.5% for each 1°C skin temperature). We conclude that hot skin (high skin blood flow requirements from narrow skin temperature to core temperature gradients), not high core temperature, is the 'primary' factor impairing aerobic exercise performance when euhydrated and that hypohydration exacerbates this effect.

  1. CHROMagar Candida Medium for Direct Susceptibility Testing of Yeast from Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Grace L.; Peterson, Ellena M.

    2005-01-01

    An evaluation was performed on 95 blood cultures positive for Candida spp. to determine the correlation of direct susceptibility testing of fluconazole versus both standardized disk diffusion and MIC methods. For direct testing, an aliquot taken from BD BACTEC Plus and/or BD BACTEC Lytic/10 bottles (Becton Dickinson [BD], Sparks, MD) positive by gram stain for yeast was subcultured to CHROMagar Candida (BD), and a 25-μg fluconazole disk (BD) was placed on the plate. The area of growth inhibition surrounding the disk was measured at 24 and 48 h. In addition, a subculture of the isolate was tested by a microdilution MIC using YeastOne (TREK Diagnostics Systems Inc., OH) and disk diffusion (NCCLS M44-A) using a standardized inoculum plated onto CHROMagar Candida as well as Mueller-Hinton agar to which 2% glucose and 0.5 μg/ml methylene blue dye was added (MH-GMB). The categorical interpretation derived from the MIC was used as the reference to which the disk diffusion results were compared. There were a total of 41 Candida albicans, 23 Candida glabrata, 20 Candida parapsilosis, 9 Candida tropicalis, and 1 each of Candida krusei and Candida lusitaniae tested. At 24 h there was full agreement among the methods for all C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. lusitaniae, and C. krusei isolates. For the C. parapsilosis isolates at 24 h there was one very major discrepancy using the direct CHROMagar and one major error with the standardized MH-GMB. The majority of the errors were seen at 24 h with the C. glabrata isolates. Of the 23 C. glabrata isolates at 24 h by direct CHROMagar, there were 10 minor and 1 very major error; by MH-GMB there were 12 minor and 2 very major errors; and by standardized CHROMagar Candida there were 13 minor and 2 major errors. There were no very major errors with C. glabrata when all plates were read at 48 h. At 24 h by the direct and standardized CHROMagar the majority of C. glabrata isolates were more resistant, whereas by MH-GMB they were more

  2. CHROMagar Candida medium for direct susceptibility testing of yeast from blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Tan, Grace L; Peterson, Ellena M

    2005-04-01

    An evaluation was performed on 95 blood cultures positive for Candida spp. to determine the correlation of direct susceptibility testing of fluconazole versus both standardized disk diffusion and MIC methods. For direct testing, an aliquot taken from BD BACTEC Plus and/or BD BACTEC Lytic/10 bottles (Becton Dickinson [BD], Sparks, MD) positive by gram stain for yeast was subcultured to CHROMagar Candida (BD), and a 25-microg fluconazole disk (BD) was placed on the plate. The area of growth inhibition surrounding the disk was measured at 24 and 48 h. In addition, a subculture of the isolate was tested by a microdilution MIC using YeastOne (TREK Diagnostics Systems Inc., OH) and disk diffusion (NCCLS M44-A) using a standardized inoculum plated onto CHROMagar Candida as well as Mueller-Hinton agar to which 2% glucose and 0.5 microg/ml methylene blue dye was added (MH-GMB). The categorical interpretation derived from the MIC was used as the reference to which the disk diffusion results were compared. There were a total of 41 Candida albicans, 23 Candida glabrata, 20 Candida parapsilosis, 9 Candida tropicalis, and 1 each of Candida krusei and Candida lusitaniae tested. At 24 h there was full agreement among the methods for all C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. lusitaniae, and C. krusei isolates. For the C. parapsilosis isolates at 24 h there was one very major discrepancy using the direct CHROMagar and one major error with the standardized MH-GMB. The majority of the errors were seen at 24 h with the C. glabrata isolates. Of the 23 C. glabrata isolates at 24 h by direct CHROMagar, there were 10 minor and 1 very major error; by MH-GMB there were 12 minor and 2 very major errors; and by standardized CHROMagar Candida there were 13 minor and 2 major errors. There were no very major errors with C. glabrata when all plates were read at 48 h. At 24 h by the direct and standardized CHROMagar the majority of C. glabrata isolates were more resistant, whereas by MH-GMB they were more

  3. Cultures and co-cultures of human blood mononuclear cells and endothelial cells for the biocompatibility assessment of surface modified AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Stio, Maria; Martinesi, Maria; Treves, Cristina; Borgioli, Francesca

    2016-12-01

    Samples of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel were subjected either to grinding and polishing procedure, or to grinding and then low temperature glow-discharge nitriding treatment, or to grinding, nitriding and subsequently coating with collagen-I. Nitrided samples, even if only ground, show a higher corrosion resistance in PBS solution, in comparison with ground and polished AISI 316L. Biocompatibility was evaluated in vitro by incubating the samples with either peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), tested separately or in co-culture. HUVEC-PBMC co-culture and co-incubation of HUVEC with PBMC culture medium, after the previous incubation of PBMC with metallic samples, allowed to determine whether the incubation of PBMC with the different samples might affect HUVEC behaviour. Many biological parameters were considered: cell proliferation, release of cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and sICAM-1, gelatinolytic activity of MMPs, and ICAM-1 protein expression. Nitriding treatment, with or without collagen coating of the samples, is able to ameliorate some of the biological parameters taken into account. The obtained results point out that biocompatibility may be successfully tested in vitro, using cultures of normal human cells, as blood and endothelial cells, but more than one cell line should be used, separately or in co-culture, and different parameters should be determined, in particular those correlated with inflammatory phenomena.

  4. Isolation of Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis from Blood Cultures by Plasma Purification and Immunomagnetic Separation Accelerates Antibiotic Susceptibility Determination

    PubMed Central

    Aloni-Grinstein, Ronit; Schuster, Ofir; Yitzhaki, Shmuel; Aftalion, Moshe; Maoz, Sharon; Steinberger-Levy, Ida; Ber, Raphael

    2017-01-01

    The early symptoms of tularemia and plague, which are caused by Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis infection, respectively, are common to other illnesses, resulting in a low index of suspicion among clinicians. Moreover, because these diseases can be treated only with antibiotics, rapid isolation of the bacteria and antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) are preferable. Blood cultures of patients may serve as a source for bacteria isolation. However, due to the slow growth rates of F. tularensis and Y. pestis on solid media, isolation by plating blood culture samples on proper agar plates may require several days. Thus, improving the isolation procedure prior to antibiotic susceptibility determination is a major clinically relevant need. In this study, we developed a rapid, selective procedure for the isolation of F. tularensis and Y. pestis from blood cultures. We examined drop-plating and plasma purification followed by immunomagnetic separation (IMS) as alternative isolation methods. We determined that replacing the classical isolation method with drop-plating is advantageous with respect to time at the expense of specificity. Hence, we also examined isolation by IMS. Sub-localization of F. tularensis within blood cultures of infected mice has revealed that the majority of the bacteria are located within the extracellular fraction, in the plasma. Y. pestis also resides within the plasma. Therefore, the plasma fraction was isolated from blood cultures and subjected to an IMS procedure using polyclonal anti-F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) or anti-Y. pestis antibodies conjugated to 50-nm nano-beads. The time required to reach an inoculum of sufficient bacteria for AST was shortest when using the plasma and IMSs for both bacteria, saving up to 2 days of incubation for F. tularensis and 1 day for Y. pestis. Our isolation procedure provides a proof of concept for the clinical relevance of rapid isolation for AST from F. tularensis- and Y. pestis

  5. Number of positive blood cultures, biofilm formation, and adhesin genes in differentiating true coagulase-negative staphylococci bacteremia from contamination.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou-Olivgeri, I; Giormezis, N; Papadimitriou-Olivgeris, M; Zotou, A; Kolonitsiou, F; Koutsileou, K; Fligou, F; Marangos, M; Anastassiou, E D; Spiliopoulou, I

    2016-01-01

    The significance of the number of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS)-positive blood cultures remains obscure in regards to determining true bacteremia versus contamination. The goal of this study was to determine the predictors of real CNS bloodstream infection among intensive care unit (ICU) patients. ICU patients with at least one CNS-positive blood culture were identified from the microbiology database. Biofilm formation was tested by glass tube and microtiter plate assay. mecA gene, ica operon genes (icaA, icaB, icaD), and adhesin genes (aap, bap, atlE, fbe, fnbA) were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). CNS were recovered from 120 septic episodes, 20 of which were true CNS bacteremias, whereas from the remaining 100 episodes, the isolated CNS were characterized as contaminants. The number of positive blood cultures was significantly associated with true CNS bacteremia. Nineteen true bacteremic Staphylococcus epidermidis strains were compared to 38 contaminants. Biofilm synthesis was documented in 37 isolates associated with the presence of the ica operon (p = 0.048). There were 39, 26, 38, 21, and 10 strains positive for the presence of atlE, bap, fbe, aap, and fnbA genes, respectively. Rifampicin resistance, absence of severe sepsis, number of S. epidermidis-positive blood cultures, and absence of the bap gene were independently associated with true S. epidermidis bacteremia as compared to contaminant strains. The number of positive blood cultures is associated with true CNS bacteremia. The presence of adhesin genes may play a role in differentiating true infection from contamination, whereas absence of the bap gene is associated with true S. epidermidis bacteremia.

  6. Microbial identification and automated antibiotic susceptibility testing directly from positive blood cultures using MALDI-TOF MS and VITEK 2.

    PubMed

    Wattal, C; Oberoi, J K

    2016-01-01

    The study addresses the utility of Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation Time-Of-Flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) using VITEK MS and the VITEK 2 antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) system for direct identification (ID) and timely AST from positive blood culture bottles using a lysis-filtration method (LFM). Between July and December 2014, a total of 140 non-duplicate mono-microbial blood cultures were processed. An aliquot of positive blood culture broth was incubated with lysis buffer before the bacteria were filtered and washed. Micro-organisms recovered from the filter were first identified using VITEK MS and its suspension was used for direct AST by VITEK 2 once the ID was known. Direct ID and AST results were compared with classical methods using solid growth. Out of the 140 bottles tested, VITEK MS resulted in 70.7 % correct identification to the genus and/ or species level. For the 103 bottles where identification was possible, there was agreement in 97 samples (94.17 %) with classical culture. Compared to the routine method, the direct AST resulted in category agreement in 860 (96.5 %) of 891 bacteria-antimicrobial agent combinations tested. The results of direct ID and AST were available 16.1 hours before those of the standard approach on average. The combined use of VITEK MS and VITEK 2 directly on samples from positive blood culture bottles using a LFM technique can result in rapid and reliable ID and AST results in blood stream infections to result in early institution of targeted treatment. The combination of LFM and AST using VITEK 2 was found to expedite AST more reliably.

  7. Diversity of bacteria cultured from the blood of lesser electric rays caught in the northern gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhen; Bullard, Stephen A; Arias, Cova R

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence and taxonomic diversity of bacteria cultured from the blood of apparently healthy Lesser Electric Rays Narcine bancroftii captured from open beach habitat in the north-central Gulf of Mexico are reported herein. The blood of 9 out of 10 Lesser Electric Rays was positive for bacteria, and bacterial isolates (n = 83) were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The majority of the isolates belonged to the phylum Proteobacteria (91.5%). Vibrio spp. comprised 53% of all isolates and were recovered from all Lesser Electric Rays with culture-positive blood. Among them, V. harveyi (n = 14) and V. campbellii (n = 11) were most common, followed by a group of unidentified Vibrio sp. (n = 10) related to V. nigripulchritudo. Isolates representing other species of Proteobacteria included Pseudoalteromonas (n = 13), Shewanella (n = 5), Amphritea (n = 3), Nautella (n = 3), and Arenibacter (n = 1). Higher bacterial diversity was observed in blood cultured on marine agar relative to blood agar, but gram-positive bacteria were isolated from the latter only. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of bacterial isolates were compared phylogenetically to those from related type strains. Most isolates were identified to the level of species, but some clustered independently from reference strains, likely representing new species of Vibrio, Amphritea, Shewanella, and Tenacibaculum. The present study is the first record of any bacterium from this ray species and reveals a taxonomically and phylogenetically diverse microbiota associated with its blood. Moreover, these data document that the presence of bacteria in elasmobranch blood is not coincident with clinical signs of disease, thereby rejecting the paradigm of septicemia indicating a disease condition in aquatic vertebrates.

  8. Effects of aerobic training intensity on resting, exercise and post-exercise blood pressure, heart rate and heart-rate variability.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, V A; Verheyden, B; Aubert, A E; Fagard, R H

    2010-03-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of endurance training intensity (1) on systolic blood pressure (SBP) and heart rate (HR) at rest before exercise, and during and after a maximal exercise test; and (2) on measures of HR variability at rest before exercise and during recovery from the exercise test, in at least 55-year-old healthy sedentary men and women. A randomized crossover study comprising three 10-week periods was performed. In the first and third period, participants exercised at lower or higher intensity (33% or 66% of HR reserve) in random order, with a sedentary period in between. Training programmes were identical except for intensity, and were performed under supervision thrice for 1 h per week. The results show that in the three conditions, that is, at rest before exercise, during exercise and during recovery, we found endurance training at lower and higher intensity to reduce SBP significantly (P<0.05) and to a similar extent. Further, SBP during recovery was, on average, not lower than at rest before exercise, and chronic endurance training did not affect the response of SBP after an acute bout of exercise. The effect of training on HR at rest, during exercise and recovery was more pronounced (P<0.05) with higher intensity. Finally, endurance training had no significant effect on sympathovagal balance. In conclusion, in participants at higher age, both training programmes exert similar effects on SBP at rest, during exercise and during post-exercise recovery, whereas the effects on HR are more pronounced after higher intensity training.

  9. Opioid-mediated suppression of interferon-gamma production by cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, P K; Sharp, B; Gekker, G; Brummitt, C; Keane, W F

    1987-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that opiate addiction and stress are associated with impaired cell-mediated immunity. We tested the hypothesis that morphine and the endogenous opioid beta-endorphin (beta-END), a pituitary peptide released in increased concentrations during stress, can suppress the production of the key macrophage-activating lymphokine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) by cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC). Using a radioimmunoassay to measure IFN-gamma, we found that exposure of PBMNC to biologically relevant concentrations of both opioids significantly inhibited IFN-gamma generation by cells stimulated with concanavalin A and varicella zoster virus. Studies of the mechanism of suppression revealed (a) a classical opioid receptor is involved (suppression was antagonized by naloxone and was specific for the NH2 terminus of beta-END), (b) monocytes are the primary target cell for opioids (monocyte-depleted lymphocyte preparations showed little suppression), and (c) reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) and prostaglandin E2 are important mediators (scavengers of ROI and indomethacin eliminated the suppression). Based on these findings we suggest that opioid-triggered release of inhibitory monocyte metabolites may play a role in the immunodeficiency associated with narcotic addiction and stress. Images PMID:3040807

  10. Selective suppression of cytokine secretion in whole blood cell cultures of patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Lahm, H.; Schindel, M.; Frikart, L.; Cerottini, J. P.; Yilmaz, A.; Givel, J. C.; Fischer, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the secretion of interferon alpha (IFN-alpha), IFN-gamma, interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), IL-1beta, IL-2 and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in whole blood cell cultures (WBCCs) of colorectal cancer patients upon mitogen stimulation. Whereas the values for IL-1beta and TNF-alpha remained virtually unchanged in comparison with healthy control subjects, WBCCs of colorectal cancer patients secreted significantly lower amounts of IFN-alpha (P < 0.005), IFN-gamma (P < 0.0001), IL-1alpha (P < 0.0001) and IL-2 (P < 0.05). This reduction correlated with the progression of the disease. The total leucocyte and monocyte population were almost identical in both groups. In contrast, a dramatic depletion of lymphocytes was observed in colorectal cancer patients, which affected both lymphocyte counts (P < 0.0005) and their distribution (P < 0.0001). Our results suggest a selective suppression of cytokines in colorectal cancer patients that is related to tumour burden. Several mechanisms might account for this phenomenon, one of which might be lymphocyte depletion. PMID:9792144

  11. Determination of clinical significance of coagulase-negative staphylococci in blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Karakullukçu, Asiye; Kuşkucu, Mert Ahmet; Ergin, Sevgi; Aygün, Gökhan; Midilli, Kenan; Küçükbasmaci, Ömer

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the criteria used to distinguish coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) bacteremia from contamination. We evaluated 162 adult patients with CoNS-positive blood cultures (BCs). Of the 162 patients, 35 (21.6%) had at least 2 positive BCs and 127 (78.4%) had a single positive BC. According to the Laboratory-Confirmed Bloodstream Infection (LCBI) criteria, 24 (14.8%) patients with the same species of CoNS had true bacteremia, and 138 (85.2%) patients had contaminants. Despite the detection of the same CoNS species, 9 of the 24 patients had different CoNS genotypes. Using clinical assessments, only 20 patients were diagnosed with true bacteremia, 8 of them had a single positive BC. We concluded that only using the LCBI criteria or clinical evaluations of a patient were not sufficient to distinguish CoNS bacteremia from contamination. Molecular identification should also be performed as a diagnostic laboratory parameter for CoNS bacteremia.

  12. Soluble antigens from group B streptococci induce cytokine production in human blood cultures.

    PubMed Central

    von Hunolstein, C; Totolian, A; Alfarone, G; Mancuso, G; Cusumano, V; Teti, G; Orefici, G

    1997-01-01

    Group B streptococcal antigens stimulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6 production in human blood cultures in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion. The minimal concentrations of type-specific polysaccharides, lipoteichoic acid, and group-specific polysaccharide required to produce these effects were, respectively, 0.01, 1, and 10 microg/ml. Cell separation experiments indicated that monocytes were the cell type mainly responsible for cytokine production. Time course studies indicated that TNF-alpha was released before the other cytokines. TNF-alpha, however, did not appear to directly induce IL-1beta, as shown by blockade experiments with anti-TNF-alpha antibodies. IL-6 levels were moderately but significantly decreased by anti-TNF-alpha. These data indicate that several products from group B streptococci are able to directly stimulate human monocytes to release TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6. These findings may be clinically relevant, since proinflammatory cytokines can mediate pathophysiologic changes during sepsis. PMID:9317001

  13. Summary report on the aerobic degradation of diesel fuel and the degradation of toluene under aerobic, denitrifying and sulfate reducing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Coyne, P.; Smith, G.

    1995-08-15

    This report contains a number of studies that were performed to better understand the technology of the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. Topics of investigation include the following: diesel fuel degradation by Rhodococcus erythropolis; BTEX degradation by soil isolates; aerobic degradation of diesel fuel-respirometry; aerobic degradation of diesel fuel-shake culture; aerobic toluene degradation by A3; effect of HEPES, B1, and myo-inositol addition on the growth of A3; aerobic and anaerobic toluene degradation by contaminated soils; denitrifying bacteria MPNs; sulfate-reducing bacteria MPNs; and aerobic, DNB and SRB enrichments.

  14. Controlled Evaluation of the New BacT/Alert Virtuo Blood Culture System for Detection and Time to Detection of Bacteria and Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Almuhayawi, Mohammed; Lüthje, Petra; Taha, Rubina; Ullberg, Måns; Özenci, Volkan

    2016-01-01

    We compared the newly approved BacT/Alert Virtuo blood culture system to the BacT/Alert 3D system using 115 clinical bacterial and fungal isolates in 784 simulated blood culture bottles. The time to detection was reduced by roughly 20% in the Virtuo system (P < 0.0001) while the detection rate did not differ. PMID:26842707

  15. Multiplex real-time PCR assay for rapid detection of methicillin-resistant staphylococci directly from positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hye-Young; Kim, Sunghyun; Kim, Jungho; Park, Soon-Deok; Uh, Young; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2014-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most prevalent cause of bloodstream infections (BSIs) and is recognized as a major nosocomial pathogen. This study aimed to evaluate a newly designed multiplex real-time PCR assay capable of the simultaneous detection of mecA, S. aureus, and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) in blood culture specimens. The Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays (M&D, Republic of Korea) use the TaqMan probes 16S rRNA for Staphylococcus spp., the nuc gene for S. aureus, and the mecA gene for methicillin resistance. The detection limit of the multiplex real-time PCR assay was 10(3) CFU/ml per PCR for each gene target. The multiplex real-time PCR assay was evaluated using 118 clinical isolates from various specimen types and a total of 350 positive blood cultures from a continuous monitoring blood culture system. The results obtained with the multiplex real-time PCR assay for the three targets were in agreement with those of conventional identification and susceptibility testing methods except for one organism. Of 350 positive bottle cultures, the sensitivities of the multiplex real-time PCR kit were 100% (166/166 cultures), 97.2% (35/36 cultures), and 99.2% (117/118 cultures) for the 16S rRNA, nuc, and mecA genes, respectively, and the specificities for all three targets were 100%. The Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays are very useful for the rapid accurate diagnosis of staphylococcal BSIs. In addition, the Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays could have an important impact on the choice of appropriate antimicrobial therapy, based on detection of the mecA gene.

  16. Isopropyl alcohol compared with isopropyl alcohol plus povidone-iodine as skin preparation for prevention of blood culture contamination.

    PubMed

    Kiyoyama, Tomonori; Tokuda, Yasuharu; Shiiki, Soichi; Hachiman, Teruyuki; Shimasaki, Teppei; Endo, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    Despite a number of studies on the efficacies of antiseptics for the prevention of blood culture contamination, it still remains unclear which antiseptic should be used. Although the combination of povidone-iodine and isopropyl alcohol has been traditionally used in many institutions, the application of povidone-iodine needs extra time, and there is little evidence that this combination could have an additive effect in reducing contamination rates. To elucidate the additive efficacy of povidone-iodine, we compared two antiseptics, 70% isopropyl alcohol only and 70% isopropyl alcohol plus povidone-iodine, in a prospective, nonrandomized, and partially blinded study in a community hospital in Japan between 1 October 2007 and 21 March 2008. All blood samples for culture were drawn by first-year residents who received formal training on collection techniques. Skin antisepsis was performed with 70% isopropyl alcohol plus povidone-iodine on all inpatient wards and with only 70% isopropyl alcohol in the emergency department. For the group of specimens from inpatient wards cultured, 13 (0.46%) of 2,797 cultures were considered contaminated. For the group of specimens from the emergency department cultured, 12 (0.42%) of 2,856 cultures were considered contaminated. There was no significant difference in the contamination rates between the two groups (relative risk, 0.90; 95% confidence interval, 0.41 to 1.98; P = 0.80). In conclusion, the use of a single application of 70% isopropyl alcohol is a sufficient and a more cost- and time-effective method of obtaining blood samples for culture than the use of a combination of isopropyl alcohol and povidone-iodine. The extremely low contamination rates in both groups suggest that the type of antiseptic used may not be as important as the use of proper technique.

  17. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... increased red blood cell destruction can affect teens: G6PD deficiency. G6PD is an enzyme that helps to protect ... can cause red cells to hemolyze, or burst. G6PD deficiency is a common hereditary disease among people of ...

  18. Affinity hemodialysis for antiviral therapy. I. Removal of HIV-1 from cell culture supernatants, plasma, and blood.

    PubMed

    Tullis, Richard H; Duffin, R Paul; Zech, Marvin; Ambrus, Julian L

    2002-06-01

    We tested an affinity hemodialysis technique designed to efficiently remove HIV and toxic viral proteins from blood. Miniature polyethersulfone hollow-fiber dialysis cartridges (200-500 nm pore) were packed with anti-HIV antibodies covalently coupled to agarose beads and sealed inside the cartridge. Cell culture fluids, plasma, or infected blood (7-15 ml) containing HIV-1 were circulated over the cartridge at 0.7-10 ml/min and the rate of removal of HIV measured by PCR and p24 ELISA. The technique removed up to 98% of HIV-1 particles from cell culture supernatants. Affinity hemodialysis also efficiently captured cultured HIV from human blood plasma (90%) and native HIV from infected blood (83% to 100%). Viral capture followed first-order kinetics (t(1/2) = 2.8 h). Variations in antibody type, matrix linkage (protein G versus direct coupling), bead pore size, and temperature of operation (25-37 degrees C) had only small effects. Although some binding was nonspecific, direct binding to the immobilized antibodies appeared to be the predominant mechanism.

  19. Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Serum for Culturing the Supportive Feeder Cells of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Rungsiwiwut, Ruttachuk; Ingrungruanglert, Praewphan; Numchaisrika, Pranee; Virutamasen, Pramuan; Phermthai, Tatsanee; Pruksananonda, Kamthorn

    2016-01-01

    Although human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can proliferate robustly on the feeder-free culture system, genetic instability of hPSCs has been reported in such environment. Alternatively, feeder cells enable hPSCs to maintain their pluripotency. The feeder cells are usually grown in a culture medium containing fetal bovine serum (FBS) prior to coculture with hPSCs. The use of FBS might limit the clinical application of hPSCs. Recently, human cord blood-derived serum (hUCS) showed a positive effect on culture of mesenchymal stem cells. It is interesting to test whether hUCS can be used for culture of feeder cells of hPSCs. This study was aimed to replace FBS with hUCS for culturing the human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) prior to feeder cell preparation. The results showed that HFFs cultured in hUCS-containing medium (HFF-hUCS) displayed fibroblastic features, high proliferation rates, short population doubling times, and normal karyotypes after prolonged culture. Inactivated HFF-hUCS expressed important genes, including Activin A, FGF2, and TGFβ1, which have been implicated in the maintenance of hPSC pluripotency. Moreover, hPSC lines maintained pluripotency, differentiation capacities, and karyotypic stability after being cocultured for extended period with inactivated HFF-hUCS. Therefore, the results demonstrated the benefit of hUCS for hPSCs culture system.

  20. A Novel Microfluidic Assay for Rapid Phenotypic Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing of Bacteria Detected in Clinical Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Spaak, Johanna; Cars, Otto; Tängdén, Thomas; Lagerbäck, Pernilla

    2016-01-01

    Background Appropriate antibiotic therapy is critical in the management of severe sepsis and septic shock to reduce mortality, morbidity and health costs. New methods for rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing are needed because of increasing resistance rates to standard treatment. Aims The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of a novel microfluidic method and the potential to directly apply this method on positive blood cultures. Methods Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime, tigecycline and/or vancomycin for Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus were determined using a linear antibiotic concentration gradient in a microfluidic assay. Bacterial growth along the antibiotic gradient was monitored using automated time-lapse photomicrography and growth inhibition was quantified by measuring greyscale intensity changes in the images. In addition to pure culture MICs, vancomycin MICs were determined for S. aureus from spiked and clinical blood cultures following a short centrifugation step. The MICs were compared with those obtained with the Etest and for S. aureus and vancomycin also with macrodilution. Results The MICs obtained with the microfluidic assay showed good agreement internally as well as with the Etest and macrodilution assays, although some minor differences were noted between the methods. The time to possible readout was within the range of 2 to 5 h. Conclusions The examined microfluidic assay has the potential to provide rapid and accurate MICs using samples from positive clinical blood cultures and will now be tested using other bacterial species and antibiotics. PMID:27974860

  1. Comparison of EBV DNA viral load in whole blood, plasma, B-cells and B-cell culture supernatant.

    PubMed

    Ouedraogo, David Eric; Bollore, Karine; Viljoen, Johannes; Foulongne, Vincent; Reynes, Jacques; Cartron, Guillaume; Vendrell, Jean-Pierre; Van de Perre, Philippe; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2014-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome quantitation in whole blood is used widely for therapeutic monitoring of EBV-associated disorders in immunosuppressed individuals and in patients with EBV-associated lymphoma. However, the most appropriate biological material to be used for EBV DNA quantitation remains a subject of debate. This study compare the detection rate and levels of EBV DNA from whole blood, plasma, enriched B-cells, and B-cell short-term culture supernatant using quantitative real-time PCR. Samples were collected from 33 subjects with either HIV infection or B-cell lymphoma. Overall, EBV DNA was detected in 100% of enriched B-cell samples, in 82% of B-cell culture supernatants, in 57% of plasma, and 42% of whole blood samples. A significant correlation for EBV viral load was found between enriched B-cell and B-cell culture supernatant material (ρ = 0.92; P < 0.0001), but no significant correlation existed between EBV DNA levels in whole blood and enriched B-cells (ρ = -0.02; P = 0.89), whole blood and plasma (ρ = 0.24; P = 0.24), or enriched B-cells and plasma (ρ = 0.08; P = 0.77). Testing of enriched B-cells appeared to be the most sensitive method for detection of EBV DNA as well as for exploration of the cellular reservoir. Quantitation of EBV DNA in plasma and B-cell culture supernatant may be of interest to assess EBV reactivation dynamics and response to treatment as well as to decipher EBV host-pathogen interactions in various clinical scenarios.

  2. [Influence of different gelatin concentration and lymphocyte isolation liquid on primary culture of umbilical cord blood derived adhesive cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Xing-Hua; Zhang, Xi; Gao, Lei; Kong, Pei-Yan; Liu, Hong; Liang, Xue; Peng, Xian-Gui; Wang, Qing-Yu

    2008-12-01

    In order to study the influence of different gelatin concentrations, and lymphocyte isolation liquid on primary culture of umbilical cord blood-derived adhesive cells (hCBACs), the red blood cells of umbilical cord blood was separated by 3% and 6 % gelatin for detecting the effectiveness of sedimentation, then the adhesion rate at 48 hours, the day of initial expansion and the rate of culture success were detected for hCBACs cultured with CD34(+) cells after the mononuclear cells were separated by 6% gelatin followed by Ficoll and Percoll, and the morphological characteristics and growth status were observed by invert microscopy. Cytochemistry stain for nonspecific esterase stain (NSE), peroxidase (POX), periodic acid Schiff reaction (PAS) and alkali phosphatase (ALP) and immunocytochemistry labeling for CD31, CD45, CD68 and fibronectin (Fn) were detected. The results showed that 6 % gelatin was better than that 3% gelatin for red blood sedimentation. The Percoll was predominant over Ficoll in adhesion rate at 48 hours, the day of initial expansion, the time of initial formation of adhesive cell colony units, the time of maximal numbers of adhesive cell colony units, the the cell fusion time and ratio of culture success. 60% fibroblast-liked cells, 36% macrophage liked cells and 4% small-round cells were observed in cells isolated by both isolated methods. The cytochemistry stain for NSE, POX, PAS and ALP was similar in two groups, the difference was not statistically significant between these two groups. The immunocytochemistry labeling for CD31, CD45, CD68 and Fn was also similar in both groups and the difference was also not statistically significant between these two groups. It is concluded that the combination of 6% gelatin with Percoll is an ideal separation method for primary culture of hCBACs, which provides basic information for clinical application.

  3. Post-Thaw Non-Cultured and Post-Thaw Cultured Equine Cord Blood Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Equally Suppress Lymphocyte Proliferation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lynn B.; Tessier, Laurence; Koenig, Judith B.; Koch, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are receiving increased attention for their non-progenitor immunomodulatory potential. Cryopreservation is commonly used for long-term storage of MSC. Post-thaw MSC proliferation is associated with a lag-phase in vitro. How this lag-phase affect MSC immunomodulatory properties is unknown. We hypothesized that in vitro there is no difference in lymphocyte suppression potential between quick-thawed cryopreserved equine cord blood (CB) MSC immediately included in mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) and same MSC allowed post-thaw culture time prior to inclusion in MLR. Cryopreserved CB-MSC from five unrelated foals were compared using two-way MLR. For each of the five unrelated MSC cultures, paired MLR assays of MSC allowed five days of post-thaw culture and MSC included in MLR assay immediately post-thawing were evaluated. We report no difference in the suppression of lymphocyte proliferation by CB-MSC that had undergone post-thaw culture and MSC not cultured post-thaw (p<0.0001). Also, there was no inter-donor variability between the lymphocyte suppressive properties of MSC harvested from the five different donors (p = 0.13). These findings suggest that cryopreserved CB-MSC may have clinical utility immediately upon thawing. One implication hereof is the possibility of using cryopreserved CB-MSC at third party locations without the need for cell culture equipment or competencies. PMID:25438145

  4. The combined rapid detection and species-level identification of yeasts in simulated blood culture using a colorimetric sensor array

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung H.; Wilson, Deborah A.; SalasVargas, Ana Victoria; Churi, Yair S.; Rhodes, Paul A.; Mazzone, Peter J.; Procop, Gary W.

    2017-01-01

    Background A colorimetric sensor array (CSA) has been demonstrated to rapidly detect and identify bacteria growing in blood cultures by obtaining a species-specific “fingerprint” of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during growth. This capability has been demonstrated in prokaryotes, but has not been reported for eukaryotic cells growing in culture. The purpose of this study was to explore if a disposable CSA could differentially identify 7 species of pathogenic yeasts growing in blood culture. Methods Culture trials of whole blood inoculated with a panel of clinically important pathogenic yeasts at four different microorganism loads were performed. Cultures were done in both standard BacT/Alert and CSA-embedded bottles, after adding 10 mL of spiked blood to each bottle. Color changes in the CSA were captured as images by an optical scanner at defined time intervals. The captured images were analyzed to identify the yeast species. Time to detection by the CSA was compared to that in the BacT/Alert system. Results One hundred sixty-two yeast culture trials were performed, including strains of several species of Candida (Ca. albicans, Ca. glabrata, Ca. parapsilosis, and Ca. tropicalis), Clavispora (synonym Candida) lusitaniae, Pichia kudriavzevii (synonym Candida krusei) and Cryptococcus neoformans, at loads of 8.2 × 105, 8.3 × 103, 8.5 × 101, and 1.7 CFU/mL. In addition, 8 negative trials (no yeast) were conducted. All negative trials were correctly identified as negative, and all positive trials were detected. Colorimetric responses were species-specific and did not vary by inoculum load over the 500000-fold range of loads tested, allowing for accurate species-level identification. The mean sensitivity for species-level identification by CSA was 74% at detection, and increased with time, reaching almost 95% at 4 hours after detection. At an inoculum load of 1.7 CFU/mL, mean time to detection with the CSA was 6.8 hours (17%) less than with the

  5. Rapid identification of bacteria from positive blood culture bottles by MALDI-TOF MS following short-term incubation on solid media.

    PubMed

    Altun, Osman; Botero-Kleiven, Silvia; Carlsson, Sarah; Ullberg, Måns; Özenci, Volkan

    2015-11-01

    Rapid identification of bacteria from blood cultures enables early initiation of appropriate antibiotic treatment in patients with bloodstream infections (BSI). The objective of the present study was to evaluate the use of matrix-associated laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) MS after a short incubation on solid media for rapid identification of bacteria from positive blood culture bottles. MALDI-TOF MS was performed after 2.5 and 5.5 h plate incubation of samples from positive blood cultures. Identification scores with values ≥ 1.7 were accepted as successful identification if the results were confirmed by conventional methods. Conventional methods included MALDI-TOF MS, Vitek 2, and diverse biochemical and agglutination tests after overnight culture. In total, 515 positive blood cultures with monomicrobial bacterial growth representing one blood culture per patient were included in the study. There were 229/515 (44.5%) and 286/515 (55.5%) blood culture bottles with Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) and Gram-positive bacteria (GPB), respectively. MALDI-TOF MS following short-term culture could accurately identify 300/515 (58.3%) isolates at 2.5 h, GNB being identified in greater proportion (180/229; 78.6%) than GPB (120/286; 42.0%). In an additional 124/515 bottles (24.1%), identification was successful at 5.5 h, leading to accurate identification of bacteria from 424/515 (82.3%) blood cultures after short-term culture. Interestingly, 11/24 of the isolated anaerobic bacteria could be identified after 5.5 h. The present study demonstrates, in a large number of clinical samples, that MALDI-TOF MS following short-term culture on solid medium is a reliable and rapid method for identification of bacteria from blood culture bottles with monomicrobial bacterial growth.

  6. Performance of two blood culture systems to detect anaerobic bacteria. Is there any difference?

    PubMed

    Mueller-Premru, Manica; Jeverica, Samo; Papst, Lea; Nagy, Elisabeth

    2017-03-07

    We studied the performance characteristics of two blood culture (BC) bottles/systems, (i) BacT/ALERT-FN Plus/3D (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Étoile, France) and (ii) BACTEC-Lytic/9000 (Becton Dickinson, Sparks, USA) for detection of growth and time-to-positivity (TTP) against a balanced and diverse collection of anaerobic bacterial strains (n = 48) that included reference strains (n = 19) and clinical isolates (n = 29) of 32 species (15 Gram-negative and 17 Gram-positive). Standard suspension of bacteria was inoculated to each bottle in duplicates and incubated in the corresponding system. Overall, 62.5% (n = 30) of strains were detected by both BC bottle types. Comparing the two, 70.8% (n = 34) and 79.2% (n = 38) of strains were detected by BacT/ALERT-FN Plus and BACTEC-Lytic bottles, respectively (p = 0.38). Among Gram-negative anaerobes (n = 25) the detection rate was 76.0% (n = 19) vs. 92.0% (n = 23) (p = 0.22), respectively. Among Gram-positive anaerobes (n = 23) the detection rate was 65.2% (n = 15) in both bottles (p = 1). The average TTP per bottle was calculated only for the strains detected by both systems (n = 30) and was 40.85 h and 28.08 h for BacT/ALERT-FN Plus and BACTEC-Lytic, respectively (p < 0.001). The mean difference was 12.76 h (95% CI: 6.21-19-31 h). Six anaerobic strains were not detected by any system, including Gram-negative Porphyromonas gingivalis, and five Gram-positive strains: Finegoldia magna, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Propionibacterium acnes, Clostridium novyi and Clostridium clostridioforme. Furthermore, Eggerthella lenta and Prevotella bivia were detected only by BacT/ALERT-FN Plus, while Prevotella disiens and Prevotella intermedia were detected only by BACTEC-Lytic bottles. There were no major differences in detection rate among clinical and reference strains. Anaerobic bacteria represent a minority of BC isolates, however, far from ideal detection rate was observed in this study for both

  7. Rapid detection of Enterococcus spp. direct from blood culture bottles using Enterococcus QuickFISH method: a multicenter investigation.

    PubMed

    Deck, Melissa K; Anderson, Erica S; Buckner, Rebecca J; Colasante, Georgia; Davis, Thomas E; Coull, James M; Crystal, Benjamin; Latta, Phyllis Della; Fuchs, Martin; Fuller, Deanna; Harris, Will; Hazen, Kevin; Klimas, Lisa L; Lindao, Daniel; Meltzer, Michelle C; Morgan, Margie; Shepard, Janeen; Stevens, Sharon; Wu, Fann; Fiandaca, Mark J

    2014-04-01

    The performance of a diagnostic method for detection and identification of Enterococcus spp. directly from positive blood culture was evaluated in a clinical study. The method, Enterococcus QuickFISH BC, is a second-generation peptide nucleic acid (PNA) fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) test, which uses a simplified, faster assay procedure. The test uses fluorescently labeled PNA probes targeting 16S rRNA to differentiate Enterococcus faecalis from other Enterococcus spp. by the color of the cellular fluorescence. Three hundred fifty-six routine blood culture samples were tested; only 2 discordant results were recorded. The sensitivities for detection of Enterococcus faecalis and non-faecalis Enterococcus were 100% (106/106) and 97.0% (65/67), respectively, and the combined specificity of the assay was 100%. The combined positive and negative predictive values of the assay were 100% (171/171) and 98.9% (185/187), respectively.

  8. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Gram-positive and -negative bacterial isolates directly from spiked blood culture media with Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dekter, H E; Orelio, C C; Morsink, M C; Tektas, S; Vis, B; Te Witt, R; van Leeuwen, W B

    2017-01-01

    Patients suffering from bacterial bloodstream infections have an increased risk of developing systematic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), which can result in rapid deterioration of the patients' health. Diagnostic methods for bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility tests are time-consuming. The aim of this study was to investigate whether Raman spectroscopy would be able to rapidly provide an antimicrobial susceptibility profile from bacteria isolated directly from positive blood cultures. First, bacterial strains (n = 133) were inoculated in tryptic soy broth and incubated in the presence or absence of antibiotics for 5 h. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. Subsequently, a selection of strains was isolated from blood cultures and analyzed similarly. VITEK®2 technology and broth dilution were used as the reference methods. Raman spectra from 67 antibiotic-susceptible strains showed discriminatory spectra in the absence or at low concentrations of antibiotics as compared to high antibiotic concentrations. For 66 antibiotic-resistant strains, no antimicrobial effect was observed on the bacterial Raman spectra. Full concordance with VITEK®2 data and broth dilution was obtained for the antibiotic-susceptible strains, 68 % and 98 %, respectively, for the resistant strains. Discriminative antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) profiles were obtained for all bacterial strains isolated from blood cultures, resulting in full concordance with the VITEK®2 data. It can be concluded that Raman spectroscopy is able to detect the antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial species isolated from a positive blood culture bottle within 5 h. Although Raman spectroscopy is cheap and rapid, further optimization is required, to fulfill a great promise for future AST profiling technology development.

  9. Benefits of Adding a Rapid PCR-Based Blood Culture Identification Panel to an Established Antimicrobial Stewardship Program

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that the combination of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASP) and rapid organism identification improves outcomes in bloodstream infections (BSI) but have not controlled for the incremental contribution of the individual components. Hospitalized adult patients with blood culture pathogens on a rapid, multiplex PCR-based blood culture identification panel (BCID) that included 19 bacterial species, 5 Candida spp., and 4 antimicrobial resistance genes were studied over sequential time periods in a pre-post quasiexperimental study in 3 groups in the following categories: conventional organism identification (controls), conventional organism identification with ASP (AS), and BCID with ASP (BCID). Clinical and economic outcomes were compared between groups. There were 783 patients with positive blood cultures; of those patients, 364 (115 control, 104 AS, and 145 BCID) met inclusion criteria. The time from blood culture collection to organism identification was shorter in the BCID group (17 h; P < 0.001) than in the control group (57 h) or the AS group (54 h). The BCID group had a shorter time to effective therapy (5 h; P < 0.001) than the control group (15 h) or AS group (13 h). The AS (57%) and BCID (52%) groups had higher rates of antimicrobial de-escalation than the control group (34%), with de-escalation occurring sooner in the BCID group (48 h; P = 0.034) than in the AS group (61 h) or the control group (63 h). No difference between the control group, AS group, and BCID group was seen with respect to mortality, 30-day readmission, intensive care unit length of stay (LOS), postculture LOS, or costs. In patients with BSI, ASP alone improved antimicrobial utilization. Addition of BCID to an established ASP shortened the time to effective therapy and further improved antimicrobial use compared to ASP alone, even in a setting of low antimicrobial resistance rates. PMID:27487951

  10. A responsive human triple-culture model of the air-blood barrier: incorporation of different macrophage phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Jennifer Y; Hermanns, Maria I; Unger, Ronald E; Kirkpatrick, C James

    2015-06-15

    Current pulmonary research underlines the relevance of the alveolar macrophage (AM) integrated in multicellular co-culture-systems of the respiratory tract to unravel, for example, the mechanisms of tissue regeneration. AMs demonstrate a specific functionality, as they inhabit a unique microenvironment with high oxygen levels and exposure to external hazards. Healthy AMs display an anti-inflammatory phenotype, prevent hypersensitivity to normally innocuous contaminants and maintain tissue homeostasis in the alveolus. To mirror the actual physiological function of the AM, we developed three different polarized [classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2wh , wound-healing; M2reg , regulatory)] macrophage models using a mixture of differentiation mediators, as described in the current literature. To test their immunological impact, these distinct macrophage phenotypes were seeded on to the epithelial layer of an established in vitro air-blood barrier co-culture, consisting of alveolar epithelial cells A549 or H441 and microvascular endothelial cells ISO-HAS-1 on the opposite side of a Transwell filter-membrane. IL-8 and sICAM release were measured as functionality parameters after LPS challenge. The M1 model itself already provoked a severe inflammatory-like response of the air-blood barrier co-culture, thus demonstrating its potential as a useful in vitro model for inflammatory lung diseases. The two M2 models represent a 'non-inflammatory' phenotype but still showed the ability to trigger inflammation following LPS challenge. Hence, the latter could be used to establish a quiescent, physiological in vitro air-blood model. Thus, the more complex differentiation protocol developed in the present study provides a responsive in vitro triple-culture model of the air-blood-barrier that mimics AM features as they occur in vivo. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Cell differentiation mediated by co-culture of human umbilical cord blood stem cells with murine hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Stecklum, Maria; Wulf-Goldenberg, Annika; Purfürst, Bettina; Siegert, Antje; Keil, Marlen; Eckert, Klaus; Fichtner, Iduna

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, purified human cord blood stem cells were co-cultivated with murine hepatic alpha mouse liver 12 (AML12) cells to compare the effect on endodermal stem cell differentiation by either direct cell-cell interaction or by soluble factors in conditioned hepatic cell medium. With that approach, we want to mimic in vitro the situation of preclinical transplantation experiments using human cells in mice. Cord blood stem cells, cultivated with hepatic conditioned medium, showed a low endodermal differentiation but an increased connexin 32 (Cx32) and Cx43, and cytokeratin 8 (CK8) and CK19 expression was monitored by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Microarray profiling indicated that in cultivated cord blood cells, 604 genes were upregulated 2-fold, with the highest expression for epithelial CK19 and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin). On ultrastructural level, there were no major changes in the cellular morphology, except a higher presence of phago(ly)some-like structures observed. Direct co-culture of AML12 cells with cord blood cells led to less incisive differentiation with increased sex-determining region Y-box 17 (SOX17), Cx32 and Cx43, as well as epithelial CK8 and CK19 expressions. On ultrastructural level, tight cell contacts along the plasma membranes were revealed. FACS analysis in co-cultivated cells quantified dye exchange on low level, as also proved by time relapse video-imaging of labelled cells. Modulators of gap junction formation influenced dye transfer between the co-cultured cells, whereby retinoic acid increased and 3-heptanol reduced the dye transfer. The study indicated that the cell-co-cultured model of human umbilical cord blood cells and murine AML12 cells may be a suitable approach to study some aspects of endodermal/hepatic cell differentiation induction.

  12. Dance--Aerobic and Anaerobic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlette

    1984-01-01

    This article defines and explains aerobic exercise and its effects on the cardiovascular system. Various studies on dancers are cited indicating that dance is an anaerobic activity with some small degree of aerobic benefit. (DF)

  13. Development of a xeno-free autologous culture system for endothelial progenitor cells derived from human umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Sun-Mi; Park, Soon-Jung; Kim, Hojin; Bae, Daekyeong; Choi, Yong-Soo; Chung, Hyung-Min

    2013-01-01

    Despite promising preclinical outcomes in animal models, a number of challenges remain for human clinical use. In particular, expanding a large number of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in vitro in the absence of animal-derived products is the most critical hurdle remaining to be overcome to ensure the safety and efficiency of human therapy. To develop in vitro culture conditions for EPCs derived from human cord blood (hCB-EPCs), we isolated extracts (UCE) and collagen (UC-collagen) from umbilical cord tissue to replace their animal-derived counterparts. UC-collagen and UCE efficiently supported the attachment and proliferation of hCB-EPCs in a manner comparable to that of animal-derived collagen in the conventional culture system. Our developed autologous culture system maintained the typical characteristics of hCB-EPCs, as represented by the expression of EPC-associated surface markers. In addition, the therapeutic potential of hCB-EPCs was confirmed when the transplantation of hCB-EPCs cultured in this autologous culture system promoted limb salvage in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia and was shown to contribute to attenuating muscle degeneration and fibrosis. We suggest that the umbilical cord represents a source for autologous biomaterials for the in vitro culture of hCB-EPCs. The main characteristics and therapeutic potential of hCB-EPCs were not compromised in developed autologous culture system. The absence of animal-derived products in our newly developed in vitro culture removes concerns associated with secondary contamination. Thus, we hope that this culture system accelerates the realization of therapeutic applications of autologous hCB-EPCs for human vascular diseases.

  14. PRIMARY CULTURE OF CHOROIDAL EPITHELIAL CELLS: CHARACTERIZATION OF AN IN VITRO MODEL OF BLOOD-CSF BARRIER

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, WEI; ZHAO, QIUQU; GRAZIANO, JOSEPH H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary A primary rat choroidal epithelial cell culture system was developed to investigate mechanisms of heavy metal toxicity on the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier. Epithelial cells were dissociated from choroidal tissue by pronase digestion and cultured in standard DMEM culture media supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and 10 ng epithelial growth factor per ml. The procedure yielded 2–5 × 104 cells from pooled plexuses of three to four rats, and a viability of 77–85%. The cultures displayed a dominant polygonal type of epithelial cells, with a population doubling time of 2–3 d. The cultures were of distinct choroidal epithelial origins. For example, immunocytochemical studies using monospecific rabbit anti-rat TTR polyclonal antibody revealed a strong positive stain of transthyretin (TTR), a thyroxine transport protein exclusively produced by the choroidal epithelia. Also, reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed the presence of specific TTR mRNA in the cultures. The cultures were further adapted to grow on a freely permeable membrane sandwiched between two culture chambers. The formation of an impermeable confluent monolayer occurred within 5 d after seeding and was verified by the presence of a steady electrical resistance across the membrane (80 ± 10 ohm per cm2). The epithelial barriers appeared to actively transport [125I]-thyroxine from the basal to apical chamber. These results suggest that this primary cell culture system possesses typical choroidal epithelial characteristics and appears to be a suitable model for in vitro mechanistic investigations of blood–CSF barrier. PMID:9542634

  15. Identification of bacteria in blood culture broths using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization Sepsityper™ and time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kok, Jen; Thomas, Lee C; Olma, Thomas; Chen, Sharon C A; Iredell, Jonathan R

    2011-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a novel method for the direct identification of bacteria from blood culture broths. We evaluate for the first time, the performance of the MALDI Sepsityper™ Kit and MS for the identification of bacteria compared to standard phenotypic methods using the manufacturer's specified bacterial identification criteria (spectral scores ≥1.700-1.999 and ≥2.000 indicated identification to genus and species level, respectively). Five hundred and seven positive blood culture broths were prospectively examined, of which 379 (74.8%; 358 monomicrobial, 21 polymicrobial) were identified by MALDI-TOF MS; 195 (100%) and 132 (67.7%) of 195 gram-positive; and 163 (100%) and 149 (91.4%) of 163 gram-negative organisms from monomicrobial blood cultures were correctly identified to genus and species level, respectively. Spectral scores <1.700 (no identification) were obtained in 128/507 (25.2%) positive blood culture broths, including 31.6% and 32.3% of gram-positive and polymicrobial blood cultures, respectively. Significantly more gram-negative organisms were identified compared to gram-positive organisms at species level (p<0.0001). Five blood cultures were misidentified, but at species level only; including four monomicrobial blood cultures with Streptococcus oralis/mitis that were misidentified as Streptococcus pneumoniae. Positive predictive values for the direct identification of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria from monomicrobial blood culture broths to genus level were 100%. A diagnostic algorithm for positive blood culture broths that incorporates gram staining and MALDI-TOF MS should identify the majority of pathogens, particularly to genus level.

  16. Dioxidine-induced changes in genome-wide DNA methylation in a culture of peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Smirnikhina, S A; Voronina, E S; Lavrov, A V; Bochkov, N P

    2013-06-01

    We studied the effect of dioxidine on genome-wide methylation in short-term cultures of peripheral blood lymphocytes derived from healthy donors. Methylation was evaluated in lymphocytes before culturing, after 25 h in culture, and 1 h after addition of dioxidine in two concentrations (0.1 and 0.01 mg/ml). The total time in culture was 25 h. The level of methylation was assessed using methyl-sensitive single-cell gel electrophoresis ("comet assay") with additional restriction with HpaII amd MspI. Significant individual differences were found in the levels of methylation in both native cells and in cells treated with dioxidine in both concentrations. Mean group indicators of methylation did not differ before culturing and after 25 h in culture (45.28 and 44.80%, respectively). The mean group rate of methylation increased to 46.14% (p<0.001) after dioxidine treatment in a concentration of 0.01 mg/ml. Dioxidine in 0.1 mg/ml reduced the level of methylation (mean group rate 42.31%; p<0.001).

  17. [Comparison of human cord blood mesenchymal stem cell culture between using human umbilical cord plasma and using fetal bovine serum].

    PubMed

    Ding, Yan; Lu, Zhiyong; Yuan, Yahong; Wang, Xiaoli; Li, Dongsheng; Zeng, Yi

    2013-12-01

    To investigate whether human umbilical cord plasma (HUP) can be used to culture human cord blood mesenchymal stem cells (HUCMSCs), we collected 20 surplus HUP. After being treated with salting out and diasysis, the HUP were used to culture HUCMSCs as 10% volume, and compared with fetal bovine serum (FBS). Morphological characteristics, growth curve and reproductive activity of HUCMSCs cells were observed. The concentration of bFGF and noggin secreted by HUCMSCs cultured with HUP and FBS medium were detected by ELISA. It was found that compared to FBS, the morphology, reproductive activity and characteristic of HUCMSCs cell cultured with HUP were not distinctively different from FBS. The concentration of bFGF in HUP group was significantly higher than that of FBS group, and the concentration of noggin was also different in the two groups. So we concluded that HUP could be used to culture HUCMSCs for a long-time, and the HUP mediumcoild could be more suitable for the culture of human embryonic stem cell (hESC).

  18. Implementation of Aerobic Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (AAHPERD).

    This information is intended for health professionals interested in implementing aerobic exercise programs in public schools, institutions of higher learning, and business and industry workplaces. The papers are divided into three general sections. The introductory section presents a basis for adhering to a health fitness lifestyle, using…

  19. Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yurkov, Vladimir V.; Beatty, J. Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are a relatively recently discovered bacterial group. Although taxonomically and phylogenetically heterogeneous, these bacteria share the following distinguishing features: the presence of bacteriochlorophyll a incorporated into reaction center and light-harvesting complexes, low levels of the photosynthetic unit in cells, an abundance of carotenoids, a strong inhibition by light of bacteriochlorophyll synthesis, and the inability to grow photosynthetically under anaerobic conditions. Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are classified in two marine (Erythrobacter and Roseobacter) and six freshwater (Acidiphilium, Erythromicrobium, Erythromonas, Porphyrobacter, Roseococcus, and Sandaracinobacter) genera, which phylogenetically belong to the α-1, α-3, and α-4 subclasses of the class Proteobacteria. Despite this phylogenetic information, the evolution and ancestry of their photosynthetic properties are unclear. We discuss several current proposals for the evolutionary origin of aerobic phototrophic bacteria. The closest phylogenetic relatives of aerobic phototrophic bacteria include facultatively anaerobic purple nonsulfur phototrophic bacteria. Since these two bacterial groups share many properties, yet have significant differences, we compare and contrast their physiology, with an emphasis on morphology and photosynthetic and other metabolic processes. PMID:9729607

  20. Aerobic Dance in Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiles, Barbara Ann; Moore, Suzanne

    1981-01-01

    Aerobic dance offers a challenging workout in a social atmosphere. Though some physical education instructors tend to exclude dance units from the curriculum, most could teach aerobic dance if they had a basic knowledge of aerobic routines. The outline for a unit to be used in the class is presented. (JN)

  1. Randomized Trial of Rapid Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction–Based Blood Culture Identification and Susceptibility Testing

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Ritu; Teng, Christine B.; Cunningham, Scott A.; Ihde, Sherry M.; Steckelberg, James M.; Moriarty, James P.; Shah, Nilay D.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Patel, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Background. The value of rapid, panel-based molecular diagnostics for positive blood culture bottles (BCBs) has not been rigorously assessed. We performed a prospective randomized controlled trial evaluating outcomes associated with rapid multiplex PCR (rmPCR) detection of bacteria, fungi, and resistance genes directly from positive BCBs. Methods. A total of 617 patients with positive BCBs underwent stratified randomization into 3 arms: standard BCB processing (control, n = 207), rmPCR reported with templated comments (rmPCR, n = 198), or rmPCR reported with templated comments and real-time audit and feedback of antimicrobial orders by an antimicrobial stewardship team (rmPCR/AS, n = 212). The primary outcome was antimicrobial therapy duration. Secondary outcomes were time to antimicrobial de-escalation or escalation, length of stay (LOS), mortality, and cost. Results. Time from BCB Gram stain to microorganism identification was shorter in the intervention group (1.3 hours) vs control (22.3 hours) (P < .001). Compared to the control group, both intervention groups had decreased broad-spectrum piperacillin-tazobactam (control 56 hours, rmPCR 44 hours, rmPCR/AS 45 hours; P = .01) and increased narrow-spectrum β-lactam (control 42 hours, rmPCR 71 hours, rmPCR/AS 85 hours; P = .04) use, and less treatment of contaminants (control 25%, rmPCR 11%, rmPCR/AS 8%; P = .015). Time from Gram stain to appropriate antimicrobial de-escalation or escalation was shortest in the rmPCR/AS group (de-escalation: rmPCR/AS 21 hours, control 34 hours, rmPCR 38 hours, P < .001; escalation: rmPCR/AS 5 hours, control 24 hours, rmPCR 6 hours, P = .04). Groups did not differ in mortality, LOS, or cost. Conclusions. rmPCR reported with templated comments reduced treatment of contaminants and use of broad-spectrum antimicrobials. Addition of antimicrobial stewardship enhanced antimicrobial de-escalation. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01898208. PMID:26197846

  2. Differential fluorescent staining method for detection of bacteria in blood cultures, cerebrospinal fluid and other clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Fazii, P; Ciancaglini, E; Riario Sforza, G

    2002-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a differential staining method to distinguish gram-positive from gram-negative bacteria in fluorescence. The method is based on two fluorochromes, one acting in the wavelength of red, i.e. the acridine orange, and another acting in the wavelength of green, i.e. the fluorescein. With this method, gram-positive bacteria appear yellow and gram-negative bacteria appear green. In view of the importance of a rapid aetiological diagnosis in cases of septicaemia, the differential staining method in fluorescence was compared with Gram stain for the detection of bacteria in blood. Of 5,820 blood cultures entered into the study and identified by the Bactec 9120 fluorescent series instrument (Becton Dickinson Europe, France), 774 were positive. Of the 774 positive cultures, 689 yielded only a single organism. The differential staining method in fluorescence detected 626 of the 689 cultures, while Gram stain detected 468. On the basis of these results, the sensitivity of the differential staining method in fluorescence was 90.9%, while that of Gram stain was 67.9%. The difference between the two methods was statistically significant ( P<0.001). The differential fluorescent staining method was more sensitive than Gram stain in the detection of bacteria in blood cultures during the incubation period. This technique provides a rapid, simple and highly sensitive staining method that can be used in conjunction with subculture methods. Whereas subculture requires an incubation period of 18-24 h, the fluorescent staining technique can detect bacteria on the same day that smears are prepared and examined. The differential fluorescent staining method was also evaluated for its ability to detect microorganisms in cerebrospinal fluid and other clinical specimens. The microorganisms were easily detected, even when bacterial counts in the specimens were low.

  3. Identification of bacteria directly from positive blood culture samples by DNA pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Motoshima, Maiko; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Matsuda, Junichi; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Kohno, Shigeru; Kamihira, Shimeru

    2012-11-01

    Rapid identification of the causative bacteria of sepsis in patients can contribute to the selection of appropriate antibiotics and improvement of patients' prognosis. Genotypic identification is an emerging technology that may provide an alternative method to, or complement, established phenotypic identification procedures. We evaluated a rapid protocol for bacterial identification based on PCR and pyrosequencing of the V1 and V3 regions of the 16S rRNA gene using DNA extracted directly from positive blood culture samples. One hundred and two positive blood culture bottles from 68 patients were randomly selected and the bacteria were identified by phenotyping and pyrosequencing. The results of pyrosequencing identification displayed 84.3 and 64.7 % concordance with the results of phenotypic identification at the genus and species levels, respectively. In the monomicrobial samples, the concordance between the results of pyrosequencing and phenotypic identification at the genus level was 87.0 %. Pyrosequencing identified one isolate in 60 % of polymicrobial samples, which were confirmed by culture analysis. Of the samples identified by pyrosequencing, 55.7 % showed consistent results in V1 and V3 targeted sequencing; other samples were identified based on the results of V1 (12.5 %) or V3 (31.8 %) sequencing alone. One isolate was erroneously identified by pyrosequencing due to high sequence similarity with another isolate. Pyrosequencing identified one isolate that was not detected by phenotypic identification. The process of pyrosequencing identification can be completed within ~4 h. The information provided by DNA-pyrosequencing for the identification of micro-organisms in positive blood culture bottles is accurate and could prove to be a rapid and useful tool in standard laboratory practice.

  4. The IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay: Rapid, Sensitive and Culture-Independent Identification of Bacteria and Candida in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, Richard E.; Peterson, Stephen; Carroll, Karen C.; Zhang, Sean X.; Avornu, Gideon D.; Rounds, Megan A.; Carolan, Heather E.; Toleno, Donna M.; Moore, David; Hall, Thomas A.; Massire, Christian; Richmond, Gregory S.; Gutierrez, Jose R.; Sampath, Rangarajan; Ecker, David J.; Blyn, Lawrence B.

    2016-01-01

    Bloodstream infection (BSI) and sepsis are rising in incidence throughout the developed world. The spread of multi-drug resistant organisms presents increasing challenges to treatment. Surviving BSI is dependent on rapid and accurate identification of causal organisms, and timely application of appropriate antibiotics. Current culture-based methods used to detect and identify agents of BSI are often too slow to impact early therapy and may fail to detect relevant organisms in many positive cases. Existing methods for direct molecular detection of microbial DNA in blood are limited in either sensitivity (likely the result of small sample volumes) or in breadth of coverage, often because the PCR primers and probes used target only a few specific pathogens. There is a clear unmet need for a sensitive molecular assay capable of identifying the diverse bacteria and yeast associated with BSI directly from uncultured whole blood samples. We have developed a method of extracting DNA from larger volumes of whole blood (5 ml per sample), amplifying multiple widely conserved bacterial and fungal genes using a mismatch- and background-tolerant PCR chemistry, and identifying hundreds of diverse organisms from the amplified fragments on the basis of species-specific genetic signatures using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS). We describe the analytical characteristics of the IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay and compare its pre-clinical performance to current standard-of-care methods in a collection of prospectively collected blood specimens from patients with symptoms of sepsis. The assay generated matching results in 80% of culture-positive cases (86% when common contaminants were excluded from the analysis), and twice the total number of positive detections. The described method is capable of providing organism identifications directly from uncultured blood in less than 8 hours. Disclaimer: The IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay is not available in the United States. PMID:27384540

  5. Aerobic and anaerobic cecal bacterial flora of commercially processed broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences in the bacterial flora of aerobic and anaerobic cultures of broiler ceca collected from a commercial poultry processing facility were determined. Bacterial isolates from cecal cultures were selected based on the ability of the bacteria to grow in media supplemented with lactate and succ...

  6. Quantitative blood cultures for diagnosis and management of catheter-related sepsis in pediatric hematology and oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Douard, M C; Arlet, G; Leverger, G; Paulien, R; Waintrop, C; Clementi, E; Eurin, B; Schaison, G

    1991-01-01

    Paired quantitative blood cultures collected simultaneously via catheter and peripheral vein in Isolator 1.5 ml tubes, were performed in 50 febrile hematology children. Samples were taken to diagnose catheter-related sepsis (CRS) without catheter removal and to monitor the therapeutic efficiency of antimicrobials administered through the infected device by infusion and/or by the antibiotic lock technique (ALT). In 7 children (14%) the colony counts from catheter blood samples were 30-fold higher than the colony counts from peripheral samples, suggesting CRS; in 7 other patients (14%), identical colony counts in both samples suggested sepsis was not catheter-related. One patient (2%) had septicemia caused by E. coli found in the urinary tract; only the peripheral blood cultures were positive. In 6 patients (12%), the Isolator system was not effective for diagnosing bacteremia or CRS; in 29 patients (58%) the febrile episode was not microbiologically documented. All episodes of CRS were cured whatever the treatment was: infusion or ALT.

  7. Comparative evaluation of Oxoid Signal and BACTEC radiometric blood culture systems for the detection of bacteremia and fungemia

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, M.P.; Mirrett, S.; Reller, L.B.

    1988-05-01

    The Oxoid Signal blood culture system is a newly described, innovative method for visually detecting growth of microorganisms. We did 5,999 paired comparisons of equal volumes (10 ml) of blood in the Oxoid Signal and BACTEC radiometric blood culture systems at two university hospitals that use identical methods of obtaining and processing specimens. Overall, more microorganisms were detected in the BACTEC system (P less than 0.001), in particular, streptococci (P less than 0.01), fungi (P less than 0.001), and nonfermentative gram-negative rods, especially Acinetobacter species (P less than 0.001). Trends favoring the BACTEC system for detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Haemophilus species, and Neisseria species were noted. There were no differences in the yield of staphylococci, members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, and anaerobic bacteria. When both systems detected sepsis, the BACTEC did so earlier (P less than 0.001). This advantage was most notable at 24 h (70% of BACTEC positives detected versus 48% of Oxoid positives). The proportion of positives detected after 48 h, however, was similar (BACTEC, 84%; Oxoid, 78%). Revisions in the Oxoid Signal system itself or in the processing of Oxoid bottles appear to be necessary to improve its performance in detecting certain microorganism groups, especially fungi.

  8. Multi-probe real-time PCR identification of four common Candida species in blood culture broth.

    PubMed

    Foongladda, Suporn; Mongkol, Nanthanida; Petlum, Pornphan; Chayakulkeeree, Methee

    2014-06-01

    We developed a single-tube real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay with multiple hybridization probes for detecting Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, C. glabrata, and C. parapsilosis. Primers were designed to amplify 18S rRNA gene of the genus Candida, and DNA probes were designed to hybridize two areas of the amplicons. The amplification curves and specific melting peaks of the probes hybridized with PCR product were used for definite species identifications. The reaction specificity was 100 % when evaluating the assay using DNA samples from 21 isolates of fungal and bacterial species. The assay was further evaluated in 129 fungal blood culture broth samples which were culture positive for fungus. Of the 129 samples, 119 were positively identified as: C. albicans (39), C. tropicalis (30), C. parapsilosis (23), C. glabrata (20), Candida spp. (5), and two samples containing mixed C. glabrata/C. albicans and C. glabrata/C. tropicalis. The five Candida spp. were identified by sequencing analysis as C. krusei, C. dubliniensis, C. aquaetextoris, and two isolates of C. athensensis. Of the ten samples which showed negative PCR results, six were Cryptococcus neoformans, and the others were Trichosporon sp., Rhodotorula sp., Fusarium sp., and Penicillium marneffei. Our findings show that the assay was highly effective in identifying the four medically important Candida species. The results can be available within 3 h after positivity of a blood culture broth sample.

  9. Functionalized arrays of Raman-enhancing nanoparticles for capture and culture-free analysis of bacteria in human blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting-Yu; Tsai, Kun-Tong; Wang, Huai-Hsien; Chen, Yu; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Chao, Yuan-Chun; Chang, Hsuan-Hao; Lin, Chi-Hung; Wang, Juen-Kai; Wang, Yuh-Lin

    2011-11-01

    Detecting bacteria in clinical samples without using time-consuming culture processes would allow rapid diagnoses. Such a culture-free detection method requires the capture and analysis of bacteria from a body fluid, which are usually of complicated composition. Here we show that coating Ag-nanoparticle arrays with vancomycin (Van) can provide label-free analysis of bacteria via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), leading to a ~1,000-fold increase in bacteria capture, without introducing significant spectral interference. Bacteria from human blood can be concentrated onto a microscopic Van-coated area while blood cells are excluded. Furthermore, a Van-coated substrate provides distinctly different SERS spectra of Van-susceptible and Van-resistant Enterococcus, indicating its potential use for drug-resistance tests. Our results represent a critical step towards the creation of SERS-based multifunctional biochips for rapid culture- and label-free detection and drug-resistant testing of microorganisms in clinical samples.

  10. Vascular lipoxygenase activity: synthesis of 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid from arachidonic acid by blood vessels and cultured vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Takayama, H; Gimbrone, M A; Schafer, A I

    1987-03-15

    Although indirect pharmacologic evidence has suggested the presence of a lipoxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism in blood vessels, direct biochemical evidence has been difficult to demonstrate. We have investigated lipoxygenase metabolism in both fresh vessel preparations and cultured vascular cells from various sources and species. Lipoxygenase-derived [3H] HETE (composed of 12-HETE, 15-HETE and 5-HETE), which was abolished by ETYA but not by aspirin, was formed when [3H]AA was incubated with fresh sections of rat aorta. Lipoxygenase activity was lost following deendothelialization. A single peak of [3H] 15-HETE was produced by cultured bovine aortic and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EC) in response to exogenous [3H]AA or from [3H]AA released by ionophore A23187 from endogenous EC membrane phospholipid pools. Cultured bovine, rabbit or rat aorta smooth muscle cells had no detectable 15-lipoxygenase activity. [14C] Linoleic acid was converted by EC to its 15-lipoxygenase metabolite, [14C] 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid. These results indicate that blood vessels from different sources and species have a 15-lipoxygenase system, and this activity resides predominantly in the endothelial cells.

  11. Direct identification of bacteria in positive blood cultures: comparison of two rapid methods, FilmArray and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rand, Kenneth H; Delano, John P

    2014-07-01

    We evaluated the accuracy and performance of the FilmArray Direct from Positive Blood Culture system (BCID) (BioFire Diagnostics, Salt Lake City, UT, USA) and the VITEK Mass Spectrometry System (Vitek MS; bioMerieux, Durham, NC, USA) to identify bacterial isolates from 161 positive blood culture bottles. The BCID uses multiplex PCR to identify 90-95% of common isolates to the genus or species/complex level as well as mecA, Van A/B, and bla(KPC) genes in approximately 1 hour. Of 151 monomicrobic isolates, the FilmArray correctly identified 48/49 (98%) to the genus and 84/84 (100%) to the species/complex level, while 18/151 (12%) gave no identification, as expected from the database. Mass spectrometry correctly identified 142/151 (94%) monomicrobic cultures to the genus level, 137/151 (91%) to the species level, with only 8/151(5%) giving no identification. Although mass spectrometry has a much larger database, the filtration system was cumbersome in contrast to the 3-5 minutes hands-on-time for the BCID.

  12. A Triple Culture Model of the Blood-Brain Barrier Using Porcine Brain Endothelial cells, Astrocytes and Pericytes.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Burkhart, Annette; Moos, Torben

    2015-01-01

    In vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) models based on primary brain endothelial cells (BECs) cultured as monoculture or in co-culture with primary astrocytes and pericytes are useful for studying many properties of the BBB. The BECs retain their expression of tight junction proteins and efflux transporters leading to high trans-endothelial electric resistance (TEER) and low passive paracellular permeability. The BECs, astrocytes and pericytes are often isolated from small rodents. Larger species as cows and pigs however, reveal a higher yield, are readily available and have a closer resemblance to humans, which make them favorable high-throughput sources for cellular isolation. The aim of the present study has been to determine if the preferable combination of purely porcine cells isolated from the 6 months old domestic pigs, i.e. porcine brain endothelial cells (PBECs) in co-culture with porcine astrocytes and pericytes, would compare with PBECs co-cultured with astrocytes and pericytes isolated from newborn rats with respect to TEER value and low passive permeability. The astrocytes and pericytes were grown both as contact and non-contact co-cultures as well as in triple culture to examine their effects on the PBECs for barrier formation as revealed by TEER, passive permeability, and expression patterns of tight junction proteins, efflux transporters and the transferrin receptor. This syngenic porcine in vitro BBB model is comparable to triple cultures using PBECs, rat astrocytes and rat pericytes with respect to TEER formation, low passive permeability, and expression of hallmark proteins signifying the brain endothelium (tight junction proteins claudin 5 and occludin, the efflux transporters P-glycoprotein (PgP) and breast cancer related protein (BCRP), and the transferrin receptor).

  13. Efficient Generation of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Umbilical Cord Blood in Stroma-Free Liquid Culture

    PubMed Central

    van den Broek, Maries; Nuvolone, Mario; Dannenmann, Stefanie; Stieger, Bruno; Rapold, Reto; Konrad, Daniel; Rubin, Arnold; Bertino, Joseph R.; Aguzzi, Adriano; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Knuth, Alexander K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Haematopoiesis is sustained by haematopoietic (HSC) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). HSC are the precursors for blood cells, whereas marrow, stroma, bone, cartilage, muscle and connective tissues derive from MSC. The generation of MSC from umbilical cord blood (UCB) is possible, but with low and unpredictable success. Here we describe a novel, robust stroma-free dual cell culture system for long-term expansion of primitive UCB-derived MSC. Methods and Findings UCB-derived mononuclear cells (MNC) or selected CD34+ cells were grown in liquid culture in the presence of serum and cytokines. Out of 32 different culture conditions that have been tested for the efficient expansion of HSC, we identified one condition (DMEM, pooled human AB serum, Flt-3 ligand, SCF, MGDF and IL-6; further denoted as D7) which, besides supporting HSC expansion, successfully enabled long-term expansion of stromal/MSC from 8 out of 8 UCB units (5 MNC-derived and 3 CD34+ selected cells). Expanded MSC displayed a fibroblast-like morphology, expressed several stromal/MSC-related antigens (CD105, CD73, CD29, CD44, CD133 and Nestin) but were negative for haematopoietic cell markers (CD45, CD34 and CD14). MSC stemness phenotype and their differentiation capacity in vitro before and after high dilution were preserved throughout long-term culture. Even at passage 24 cells remained Nestin+, CD133+ and >95% were positive for CD105, CD73, CD29 and CD44 with the capacity to differentiate into mesodermal lineages. Similarly we show that UCB derived MSC express pluripotency stem cell markers despite differences in cell confluency and culture passages. Further, we generated MSC from peripheral blood (PB) MNC of 8 healthy volunteers. In all cases, the resulting MSC expressed MSC-related antigens and showed the capacity to form CFU-F colonies. Conclusions This novel stroma-free liquid culture overcomes the existing limitation in obtaining MSC from UCB and PB enabling so far unmet therapeutic

  14. Melatonin suppression of aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect), survival signalling and metastasis in human leiomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Mao, Lulu; Dauchy, Robert T; Blask, David E; Dauchy, Erin M; Slakey, Lauren M; Brimer, Samantha; Yuan, Lin; Xiang, Shulin; Hauch, Adam; Smith, Kara; Frasch, Tripp; Belancio, Victoria P; Wren, Melissa A; Hill, Steven M

    2016-03-01

    Leiomyosarcoma (LMS) represents a highly malignant, rare soft tissue sarcoma with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Previously, we demonstrated that tissue-isolated human LMS xenografts perfused in situ are highly sensitive to the direct anticancer effects of physiological nocturnal blood levels of melatonin which inhibited tumour cell proliferative activity, linoleic acid (LA) uptake and metabolism to 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (13-HODE). Here, we show the effects of low pharmacological blood concentrations of melatonin following oral ingestion of a melatonin supplement by healthy adult human female subjects on tumour proliferative activity, aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect) and LA metabolic signalling in tissue-isolated LMS xenografts perfused in situ with this blood. Melatonin markedly suppressed aerobic glycolysis and induced a complete inhibition of tumour LA uptake, 13-HODE release, as well as significant reductions in tumour cAMP levels, DNA content and [(3) H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA. Furthermore, melatonin completely suppressed the phospho-activation of ERK 1/2, AKT, GSK3β and NF-kB (p65). The addition of S20928, a nonselective melatonin antagonist, reversed these melatonin inhibitory effects. Moreover, in in vitro cell culture studies, physiological concentrations of melatonin repressed cell proliferation and cell invasion. These results demonstrate that nocturnal melatonin directly inhibited tumour growth and invasion of human LMS via suppression of the Warburg effect, LA uptake and other related signalling mechanisms. An understanding of these novel signalling pathway(s) and their association with aerobic glycolysis and LA metabolism in human LMS may lead to new circadian-based therapies for the prevention and treatment of LMS and potentially other mesenchymally derived solid tumours.

  15. [Differences in antibiotic sensitivity in biofilm-positive and biofilm-negative strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated from blood cultures].

    PubMed

    Holá, V; Růzicka, F; Votava, M

    2004-01-01

    The adhering capability and biofilm growth facilitate staphylococcal colonization of surfaces of damaged tissues and foreign bodies. Biofilm-forming bacteria are more resistant to immune system activities, mechanical effects of blood flow and other adverse effects, e.g. those due to antibiotics. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were compared for two groups of Staphylococcus epidermidis strains isolated from blood cultures. Group 1 included biofilm positive strains whose biofilm-forming potential was revealed by both phenotypic and genotypic methods. Group 2 included strains without biofilm-forming potential. The comparison of MICs for selected antibiotics showed higher resistance of biofilm positive compared to biofilm negative strains. The difference was evident particularly for oxacillin, tetracycline, co-trimoxazole and gentamicin.

  16. Expression of Surface Molecules in Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Co-Cultured with Nucleated Umbilical Cord Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Yu A; Balashova, E E; Volgina, N E; Kabaeva, N V; Dugina, T N; Sukhikh, G T

    2017-02-01

    We studied the expression of different classes of surface molecules (CD13, CD29, CD40, CD44, CD54, CD71, CD73, CD80, CD86, CD90, CD105, CD106, CD146, HLA-I, and HLA-DR) in mesenchymal stromal cells from human umbilical cord and bone marrow during co-culturing with nucleated umbilical cord blood cells. Expression of the majority of surface markers in both types of mesenchymal stromal cells was stable and did not depend on the presence of the blood cells. Significant differences were found only for cell adhesion molecules CD54 (ICAM-1) and CD106 (VCAM-1) responsible for direct cell-cell contacts with leukocytes and only for bone marrow derived cells.

  17. Aerobic glycolysis and lymphocyte transformation

    PubMed Central

    Hume, David A.; Radik, Judith L.; Ferber, Ernst; Weidemann, Maurice J.

    1978-01-01

    1. The role of enhanced aerobic glycolysis in the transformation of rat thymocytes by concanavalin A has been investigated. Concanavalin A addition doubled [U-14C]glucose uptake by rat thymocytes over 3h and caused an equivalent increased incorporation into protein, lipids and RNA. A disproportionately large percentage of the extra glucose taken up was converted into lactate, but concanavalin A also caused a specific increase in pyruvate oxidation, leading to an increase in the percentage contribution of glucose to the respiratory fuel. 2. Acetoacetate metabolism, which was not affected by concanavalin A, strongly suppressed pyruvate oxidation in the presence of [U-14C]glucose, but did not prevent the concanavalin A-induced stimulation of this process. Glucose uptake was not affected by acetoacetate in the presence or absence of concanavalin A, but in each case acetoacetate increased the percentage of glucose uptake accounted for by lactate production. 3. [3H]Thymidine incorporation into DNA in concanavalin A-treated thymocyte cultures was sensitive to the glucose concentration in the medium in a biphasic manner. Very low concentrations of glucose (25μm) stimulated DNA synthesis half-maximally, but maximum [3H]thymidine incorporation was observed only when the glucose concentration was raised to 1mm. Lactate addition did not alter the sensitivity of [3H]-thymidine uptake to glucose, but inosine blocked the effect of added glucose and strongly inhibited DNA synthesis. 4. It is suggested that the major function of enhanced aerobic glycolysis in transforming lymphocytes is to maintain higher steady-state amounts of glycolytic intermediates to act as precursors for macromolecule synthesis. PMID:310305

  18. A dedicated fungal culture medium is useful in the diagnosis of fungemia: a retrospective cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shuwei; Ng, Tong Yong; Li, Huihua; Tan, Ai Ling; Tan, Thuan Tong; Tan, Ban Hock

    2016-01-01

    Background Mortality for candidemia ranges from 15% to 35%. Current guidelines recommend inoculating blood into three aerobic and three anaerobic blood culture bottles when candidemia is suspected, without mention of a fungal blood culture bottle. Objective To determine the value of the BACTEC Myco/F Lytic blood culture media in the diagnosis of fungemia. Methods A two-year retrospective cross-sectional study was performed for patients who had fungemia with submitted BACTEC Plus Aerobic/F (Aer), BACTEC Plus Anaerobic/F (Anaer) or Myco/F Lytic (Myco) blood culture bottles. Results The detection rate of fungemia was 77.4% in 93 patients with contemporaneously submitted blood culture bottles when limited to only Aer/Anaer culture results. The detection rate improved significantly with the addition of the Myco culture bottle results (p<0.0001). A logistic regression model showed that Myco culture bottle submissions were less useful for patients with appropriate anti-fungal therapy administered within 48 hours [OR = 0.18, 95% CI = (0.06, 0.49), p = 0.001] and those with fungal growth detected within 48 hours [OR = 0.33, 95% CI = (0.12, 0.89), p = 0.001]. Among a subset of patients with concordant blood culture results, those with Myco culture bottles submission allowed earlier fungal detection and speciation by at least one day in 27.5% and 25.0% of the cases respectively. Conclusion Our study highlights the importance of a dedicated fungal blood culture when fungemia is clinically suspected. Nearly a quarter of fungemias may be missed if a fungal blood culture is not performed. PMID:27736956

  19. Aerobic microbial mineralization of dichloroethene as sole carbon substrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2000-01-01

    Microorganisms indigenous to the bed sediments of a black- water stream utilized 1,2-dichloroethene (1,2-DCE) as a sole carbon substrate for aerobic metabolism. Although no evidence of growth was observed in the minimal salts culture media used in this study, efficient aerobic microbial mineralization of 1,2-DCE as sole carbon substrate was maintained through three sequential transfers (107 final dilution) of the original environmental innoculum. These results indicate that 1,2-DCE can be utilized as a primary substrate to support microbial metabolism under aerobic conditions.Microorganisms indigenous to the bed sediments of a black-water stream utilized 1,2-dichloroethene (1,2-DCE) as a sole carbon substrate for aerobic metabolism. Although no evidence of growth was observed in the minimal salts culture media used in this study, efficient aerobic microbial mineralization of 1,2-DCE as sole carbon substrate was maintained through three sequential transfers (107 final dilution) of the original environmental innoculum. These results indicate that 1,2-DCE can be utilized as a primary substrate to support microbial metabolism under aerobic conditions.

  20. Evaluation of a microarray-based assay for rapid identification of Gram-positive organisms and resistance markers in positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Linoj P; Tibbetts, Robert J; Agotesku, Adam; Fey, Margaret; Hensley, Rhonda; Meier, Frederick A

    2013-04-01

    Rapid identification of pathogens directly from positive blood cultures can play a major role in reducing patient mortality rates. We evaluated the performance of the Verigene Gram-Positive Blood Culture (BC-GP) assay (Nanosphere Inc., Northbrook, IL) for detection of commonly isolated Gram-positive organisms as well as associated resistance markers from positive blood cultures. Positive blood cultures (VersaTREK; Trek Diagnostic Systems, Independence, OH) from 203 patients with Gram-positive organism infections were analyzed using the BC-GP assay within 12 h for the detection of 12 different organisms, including staphylococci, streptococci, and enterococci, as well as for the presence of 3 resistance markers (mecA, vanA, and vanB). Results were compared to those of routine laboratory methods for identification and susceptibility testing. For identification of organisms and detection of resistance markers in 178 monomicrobial positive blood cultures, the BC-GP assay showed 94% and 97% concordance, respectively, with routine methods. After 25 polymicrobial cultures were included, the results showed 92% and 96% agreement for identification and resistance markers, respectively, for a total of 203 positive cultures. In 6/25 polymicrobial cultures, at least 1 isolate was not detected. Concordance levels for detection of major pathogens such Staphylococcus aureus (n = 45) and enterococci (n = 19) were 98% and 95%, respectively. Agreement levels for detection of resistance markers such as mecA and vanA/B were 92% and 100%, respectively. The BC-GP assay is capable of providing rapid identification of Gram-positive cocci as well as detection of resistance markers directly from positive blood cultures at least 24 to 48 h earlier than conventional methods.

  1. Degradation of TCE using sequential anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapatwala, Kirit D.; Babu, G. R. V.; Baresi, Larry; Trunzo, Richard M.

    1995-01-01

    Bacteria capable of degrading trichloroethylene (TCE) were isolated from contaminated wastewaters and soil sites. The aerobic cultures were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (four species) and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The optimal conditions for the growth of aerobic cultures were determined. The minimal inhibitory concentration values of TCE for Pseudomonas sps. were also determined. The aerobic cells were immobilized in calcium alginate in the form of beads. Degradation of TCE by the anaerobic and dichloroethylene (DCE) by aerobic cultures was studied using dual reactors - anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor. The minimal mineral salt (MMS) medium saturated with TCE was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the anaerobic reactor. The MMS medium saturated with DCE and supplemented with xylenes and toluene (3 ppm each) was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the fluidized air-uplift-type reactor containing the immobilized aerobic cells. The concentrations of TCE and DCE and the metabolites formed during their degradation by the anaerobic and aerobic cultures were monitored by GC. The preliminary study suggests that the anaerobic and aerobic cultures of our isolates can degrade TCE and DCE.

  2. Assaying the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as a mitogen of immature cells in fetal blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Costa, D; Borrell, A; Jou, J M; Besón, I; Soler, A; Carrió, A; Margarit, E; Caballín, R; Ballesta, F; Fortuny, A

    1999-01-01

    Based on the presence of immature cells in fetal blood, and in an attempt to shorten the cytogenetic reporting time, three simultaneous one-day culture regimes were established in 23 fetal blood samples: (a) the standard phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated lymphocytes culture, (b) a culture using the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as an alternative mitogen, and (c) an unstimulated culture. Diagnostic success rates achieved by these three methods were as follows: 43 per cent (95 per cent CI: 23-64) (GM-CSF), 30 per cent (95 per cent CI: 12-49) (PHA) and 9 per cent (unstimulated). These three regimes were also assayed in three-day cultures giving 100 per cent diagnostic success rate for the PHA and GM-CSF, and 62 per cent (95 per cent CI: 41-83) for the unstimulated. A moderate correlation was found between the initial concentration of cultured erythroblasts and the metaphase count in one-day GM-CSF-stimulated (r=0.43, p=0.01) and unstimulated (r=0.35, p=0.05) cultures, suggesting that erythroblasts may be in part responsible for the mitotic index observed in these two regime cultures. In conclusion, our experience suggests that immature cells in fetal blood may be successfully cultured for diagnostic purposes.

  3. Effectiveness of practices to reduce blood culture contamination: A Laboratory Medicine Best Practices systematic review and meta-analysis☆

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Susan R.; Favoretto, Alessandra M.; Baetz, Rich Ann; Derzon, James H.; Madison, Bereneice M.; Mass, Diana; Shaw, Colleen S.; Layfield, Christopher D.; Christenson, Robert H.; Liebow, Edward B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This article is a systematic review of the effectiveness of three practices for reducing blood culture contamination rates: venipuncture, phlebotomy teams, and prepackaged preparation/collection (prep) kits. Design and methods The CDC-funded Laboratory Medicine Best Practices Initiative systematic review methods for quality improvement practices were used. Results Studies included as evidence were: 9 venipuncture (vs. versus intravenous catheter), 5 phlebotomy team; and 7 prep kit. All studies for venipuncture and phlebotomy teams favored these practices, with meta-analysis mean odds ratios for venipuncture of 2.69 and phlebotomy teams of 2.58. For prep kits 6 studies’ effect sizes were not statistically significantly different from no effect (meta-analysis mean odds ratio 1.12). Conclusions Venipuncture and the use of phlebotomy teams are effective practices for reducing blood culture contamination rates in diverse hospital settings and are recommended as evidence-based “best practices” with high overall strength of evidence and substantial effect size ratings. No recommendation is made for or against prep kits based on uncertain improvement. PMID:22709932

  4. Rapid identification of moulds and arthroconidial yeasts from positive blood cultures by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, João N; Sztajnbok, Jaques; da Silva, Afonso Rafael; Vieira, Vinicius Adriano; Galastri, Anne Layze; Bissoli, Leandro; Litvinov, Nadia; Del Negro, Gilda Maria Barbaro; Motta, Adriana Lopes; Rossi, Flávia; Benard, Gil

    2016-11-01

    Moulds and arthroconidial yeasts are potential life-threatening agents of fungemia in immunocompromised patients. Fast and accurate identification (ID) of these pathogens hastens initiation of targeted antifungal therapy, thereby improving the patients' prognosis. We describe a new strategy that enabled the identification of moulds and arthroconidial yeasts directly from positive blood cultures by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS). Positive blood cultures (BCs) with Gram staining showing hyphae and/or arthroconidia were prospectively selected and submitted to an in-house protein extraction protocol. Mass spectra were obtained by Vitek MS™ system, and identifications were carried out with in the research use only (RUO) mode with an extended database (SARAMIS™ [v.4.12] plus in-house database). Fusarium solani, Fusarium verticillioides, Exophiala dermatitidis, Saprochaete clavata, and Trichosporon asahii had correct species ID by MALDI-TOF MS analysis of positive BCs. All cases were related to critically ill patients with high mortality fungemia and direct ID from positive BCs was helpful for rapid administration of targeted antifungal therapy.

  5. An extraction method of positive blood cultures for direct identification of Candida species by Vitek MS matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, Rose-Anne; Chauvin, Pamela; Valentin, Alexis; Fillaux, Judith; Roques-Malecaze, Christine; Arnaud, Sylvie; Menard, Sandie; Magnaval, Jean-François; Berry, Antoine; Cassaing, Sophie; Iriart, Xavier

    2013-08-01

    Candida spp. are an important cause of nosocomial bloodstream infections. Currently, complete identification of yeasts with conventional methods takes several days. We report here the first evaluation of an extraction method associated with the Vitek MS matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry for direct identification of Candida species from positive blood cultures. We evaluated this protocol with blood cultures that were inoculated with reference and routine isolates (eight reference strains, 30 patients isolates and six mixed cultures containing two strains of different Candida species), or from patients with candidemia (28 isolates). This method performed extremely well (97% correct identification) with blood cultures of single Candida spp. and significantly reduced the time of diagnosis. Nevertheless, subculture remains indispensable to test fungal resistance and to detect mixed infections.

  6. Direct Identification of Bacteria in Positive Blood Culture Bottles by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier

    2009-01-01

    Background With long delays observed between sampling and availability of results, the usefulness of blood cultures in the context of emergency infectious diseases has recently been questioned. Among methods that allow quicker bacterial identification from growing colonies, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry was demonstrated to accurately identify bacteria routinely isolated in a clinical biology laboratory. In order to speed up the identification process, in the present work we attempted bacterial identification directly from blood culture bottles detected positive by the automate. Methodology/Principal Findings We prospectively analysed routine MALDI-TOF identification of bacteria detected in blood culture by two different protocols involving successive centrifugations and then lysis by trifluoroacetic acid or formic acid. Of the 562 blood culture broths detected as positive by the automate and containing one bacterial species, 370 (66%) were correctly identified. Changing the protocol from trifluoroacetic acid to formic acid improved identification of Staphylococci, and overall correct identification increased from 59% to 76%. Lack of identification was observed mostly with viridans streptococci, and only one false positive was observed. In the 22 positive blood culture broths that contained two or more different species, only one of the species was identified in 18 samples, no species were identified in two samples and false species identifications were obtained in two cases. The positive predictive value of bacterial identification using this procedure was 99.2%. Conclusions/Significance MALDI-TOF MS is an efficient method for direct routine identification of bacterial isolates in blood culture, with the exception of polymicrobial samples and viridans streptococci. It may replace routine identification performed on colonies, provided improvement for the specificity of blood culture broths growing viridans

  7. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, Mark P; Bessette, Bernard J; March, John; McComb, Scott T.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  8. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, Mark P; Bessette, Bernard J; March, John C; McComb, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention includes a system of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  9. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, M.P.; Bessette, B.J.; March, J.; McComb, S.T.

    2000-02-15

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120 F and 140 F in steady state.

  10. An appropriately performed conventional blood culture can facilitate choice of therapy in resource-constrained settings-comparison with BACTEC 9050

    PubMed Central

    Surase, PV; Nataraj, G; Pattamadai, K; Mehta, PR; Pazare, AR; Agarwal, MC; Nanavati, RN

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Comparison of conventional blood culture with BACTEC 9050 for rate and time to detection of microorganisms. Settings and Design: A prospective study was carried out in a multispecialty tertiary care teaching hospital. Subjects and Methods: A total of 835 paired specimens (797 blood and 38 nonblood specimens) were collected and processed according to standard microbiological procedures by both conventional method as well as by BACTEC 9050 automated culture system. Clinical details of patients were recorded. Data were analyzed for time to detection and isolation rate by the two systems and compared. Results: Overall culture positivity for BACTEC 9050 and the conventional system was 32% and 19.88%, respectively. Eighty-five demonstrated concordant growth, 136 specimens were culture positive by BACTEC only, and 38 specimens were culture positive by conventional only. Twelve contaminants in BACTEC and nine contaminants in conventional system were detected. Using BACTEC 9050, higher isolation was observed for Acinetobacter spp., coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., and Candida spp. A total of 410 patients were on antimicrobial treatment and culture positivity was significantly higher with BACTEC 9050 (P < 0.0001). There was a significant difference in the mean time to detection with BACTEC 9050 recovering 86.8% of isolates within 48 h (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: Although BACTEC 9050 demonstrated a significantly higher recovery of microorganisms from blood, an appropriately performed conventional blood culture can facilitate the choice of therapy. PMID:27763479

  11. Induction of chromosome aberrations by Fusarium T-2 toxin in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes and Chinese hamster fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, C.C.; Gao, Y.; Wu, J.L.; Tzian, B.

    1986-01-01

    T-2 toxin is an important representative of trichothecenes produced by various species of imperfect fungi, mainly Fusarium genus. No definite data demonstrating the carcinogenic potential of T-2 toxin had been reported up to now. The authors demonstrated that T-2 toxin reproducibly induced chromosomal structural aberrations both in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes as well as in V/sub 79/ Chinese hamster fibroblasts. The mean percentage of cells with aberration of human lymphocytes from normal individuals induced by T-2 toxin is 49-fold (9.8%) of the mean percentage of corresponding control cultures without T-2 toxin (0.2%). T-2 toxin induced chromosome type (76%) as well as chromatid type (24%) of aberrations; among them, acentric fragment (46%) was the most common type, and chromatid gap, deletion, and chromosome gap were the next most common. T-2 toxin can induce aberrations in cells at different phases of the cell cycle. There are definite dose-effect relationships within a certain range of dosage of T-2 toxin in experiments with both human peripheral blood lymphocytes and V/sub 79/ cells. T-2 toxin exhibited three types of effects on cells, namely, mitogenic at lowest concentration, clastogenic (chromosome aberration) at median concentration, and cytotoxic at higher concentration. The dose-effect curves of these three effects are partly overlapping. Sex or age effect was not observed. The results suggest that T-2 toxin has carcinogenic potentials. The dosage of aflatoxin that can induce chromosomal aberration of human peripheral blood lymphocytes is thousands-fold of the dosage of T-2 toxin as shown in this report.

  12. Evaluation of a simple Theileria annulata culture protocol from experimentally infected bovine whole blood.

    PubMed

    Gharbi, M; Latrach, R; Sassi, L; Darghouth, M A

    2012-08-01

    We have evaluated a new simple technique using whole blood from experimentally infected cattle for the isolation and cultivation of Theileria annulata. The study was carried out on 20 Holstein-Frisian bovines that had been experimentally infected with a virulent lethal dose of Theileria annulata. This technique has been compared to the classical peripheral blood monocyte isolation with Ficoll carried out on 22 experimentally infected Holstein-Friesian calves. The effectiveness of the reference technique was estimated to 86.4%, whilst the effectiveness of the new technique was 100%. Moreover, this new technique leads to time and money saving estimated to € 3.06 per sample. It decreases the contamination risks by reducing the steps of sample manipulation.

  13. Comprehensive characterization of chondrocyte cultures in plasma and whole blood biomatrices for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Ronny M; Haberhauer, Marcus; Zernia, Göran; Pösel, Claudia; Thümmler, Christian; Somerson, Jeremy S; Huster, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Many synthetic polymers and biomaterials have been used as matrices for 3D chondrocyte seeding and transplantation in the field of cartilage tissue engineering. To develop a fully autologous carrier for chondrocyte cultivation, we examined the feasibility of allogeneic plasma and whole blood-based matrices and compared them to agarose constructs. Primary articular chondrocytes isolated from 12-month-old pigs were embedded into agarose, plasma and whole blood matrices and cultivated under static-free swelling conditions for up to four weeks. To evaluate the quality of the synthesized extracellular matrix (ECM), constructs were subjected to weekly examinations using histological staining, spectrophotometry, immunohistochemistry and biochemical analysis. In addition, gene expression of cartilage-specific markers such as aggrecan, Sox9 and collagen types I, II and X was determined by RT-PCR. Chondrocyte morphology was assessed via scanning electron microscopy and viability staining, including proliferation and apoptosis assays. Finally, (13)  C NMR spectroscopy provided further evidence of synthesis of ECM components. It was shown that chondrocyte cultivation in allogeneic plasma and whole-blood matrices promoted sufficient chondrocyte viability and differentiation behaviour, resulting in neo-formation of a hyaline-like cartilage matrix.

  14. The aerobic activity of metronidazole against anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dione, Niokhor; Khelaifia, Saber; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Raoult, Didier

    2015-05-01

    Recently, the aerobic growth of strictly anaerobic bacteria was demonstrated using antioxidants. Metronidazole is frequently used to treat infections caused by anaerobic bacteria; however, to date its antibacterial activity was only tested in anaerobic conditions. Here we aerobically tested using antioxidants the in vitro activities of metronidazole, gentamicin, doxycycline and imipenem against 10 common anaerobic and aerobic bacteria. In vitro susceptibility testing was performed by the disk diffusion method, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by Etest. Aerobic culture of the bacteria was performed at 37°C using Schaedler agar medium supplemented with 1mg/mL ascorbic acid and 0.1mg/mL glutathione; the pH was adjusted to 7.2 by 10M KOH. Growth of anaerobic bacteria cultured aerobically using antioxidants was inhibited by metronidazole after 72h of incubation at 37°C, with a mean inhibition diameter of 37.76mm and an MIC of 1μg/mL; however, strains remained non-sensitive to gentamicin. No growth inhibition of aerobic bacteria was observed after 24h of incubation at 37°C with metronidazole; however, inhibition was observed with doxycycline and imipenem used as controls. These results indicate that bacterial sensitivity to metronidazole is not related to the oxygen tension but is a result of the sensitivity of the micro-organism. In future, both culture and antibiotic susceptibility testing of strictly anaerobic bacteria will be performed in an aerobic atmosphere using antioxidants in clinical microbiology laboratories.

  15. Histamine Induces Alzheimer's Disease-Like Blood Brain Barrier Breach and Local Cellular Responses in Mouse Brain Organotypic Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Sedeyn, Jonathan C.; Wu, Hao; Hobbs, Reilly D.; Levin, Eli C.; Nagele, Robert G.; Venkataraman, Venkat

    2015-01-01

    Among the top ten causes of death in the United States, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the only one that cannot be cured, prevented, or even slowed down at present. Significant efforts have been exerted in generating model systems to delineate the mechanism as well as establishing platforms for drug screening. In this study, a promising candidate model utilizing primary mouse brain organotypic (MBO) cultures is reported. For the first time, we have demonstrated that the MBO cultures exhibit increased blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability as shown by IgG leakage into the brain parenchyma, astrocyte activation as evidenced by increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neuronal damage-response as suggested by increased vimentin-positive neurons occur upon histamine treatment. Identical responses—a breakdown of the BBB, astrocyte activation, and neuronal expression of vimentin—were then demonstrated in brains from AD patients compared to age-matched controls, consistent with other reports. Thus, the histamine-treated MBO culture system may provide a valuable tool in combating AD. PMID:26697497

  16. Syzygium cumini (Jamun) reduces the radiation-induced DNA damage in the cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath

    2002-06-07

    The effects of various concentrations (0.0, 1.56, 3.125, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50 and 100 microg/ml) of the leaf extract of Syzygium cumini Linn. or Eugenia cumini (SC; black plum, Jamun, family Myrtaceae) was studied on the alteration in the radiation-induced micronuclei formation in the cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Treatment of lymphocytes to various concentrations of SC resulted in a dose dependent increase in the micronuclei-induction, especially after 25-100 microg/ml extract. The exposure of human lymphocytes to various concentrations of SC extract before 3 Gy gamma-irradiation resulted in a significant decline in the micronuclei-induction at all the drug doses when compared with the non-drug treated irradiated cultures. A nadir in MNBNC frequency was observed for 12.5 microg/ml drug concentration, where the MNBNC frequency was approximately fourfold lower than that of the non-drug treated irradiated cultures. Therefore, this dose may be considered as an optimum dose for radiation protection. Our study demonstrates that the leaf extract of S. cumini, a plant traditionally used to treat diabetic disorders protects against the radiation-induced DNA damage.

  17. Bacteriological Profile and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern of Blood Culture Isolates among Septicemia Suspected Children in Selected Hospitals Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Negussie, Adugna; Mulugeta, Gebru; Bedru, Ahmed; Ali, Ibrahim; Shimeles, Damte; Lema, Tsehaynesh; Aseffa, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Background Blood stream infections are major cause of morbidity and mortality in children in developing countries. The emerging of causative agents and resistance to various antimicrobial agents are increased from time to time. The main aim of this study was to determine the bacterial agents and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns among children suspected of having septicemia. Methods A cross sectional study involved about 201 pediatric patients (≤ 12 years) was conducted from October 2011 to February 2012 at pediatric units of TikurAnbessa Specialized Hospital and Yekatit 12 Hospital. Standard procedure was followed for blood sample collection, isolate identifications and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Results Among 201 study subjects 110 (54.7%) were males. Majority 147 (73.1%) of them were neonates (≤ 28 days). The mean length of hospital stay before sampling was 4.29 days. Out of the 201 tested blood samples, blood cultures were positive in 56 (27.9%).Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria constituted 29(51.8%) and 26(46.4%), respectively. The most frequent pathogen found was Staphylococcus aureus 13 (23.2%), followed by Serratia marcescens 12(21.4%), CoNS 11(19.6%), klebsiella spp 9(16%) and Salmonella spp 3(5.4%). Majority of bacterial isolates showed high resistance to Ampicillin, Penicillin, Co-trimoxazole, Gentamicin and Tetracycline which commonly used in the study area. Conclusion Majority of the isolates were multidrug resistant. These higher percentages of multi-drug resistant emerged isolates urge us to take infection prevention measures and to conduct other large studies for appropriate empiric antibiotic choice. PMID:26997847

  18. Aerobic Fitness for the Severely and Profoundly Mentally Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Dan

    1981-01-01

    The booklet discusses the aerobic fitness capacities of severely/profoundly retarded students and discusses approaches for improving their fitness. An initial section describes a method for determining the student's present fitness level on the basis of computations of height, weight, blood pressure, resting pulse, and Barach Index and Crampton…

  19. Exercise, Animal Aerobics, and Interpretation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Valerie

    1996-01-01

    Describes an aerobic activity set to music for children that mimics animal movements. Example exercises include walking like a penguin or jumping like a cricket. Stresses basic aerobic principles and designing the program at the level of children's motor skills. Benefits include reaching people who normally don't visit nature centers, and bridging…

  20. Anaerobic and aerobic treatment of chlorinated, aliphatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J.L.; Stensel, H.D.; Ferguson, J.F.; Strand, S.E.; Ongerth, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    Biological degradation of 12 chlorinated aliphatic compounds (CACs) was assessed in bench-top reactors and in serum bottle tests. Three continuously mixed daily batch-fed reactor systems were evaluated: anaerobic, aerobic, and sequential-anaerobic-aerobic (sequential). The anaerobic culture degraded seven of the feed CACs. The specialized aerobic cultures degraded all but three of the highly chlorinated CACs. The sequential system outperformed either of the other systems alone by degrading 10 of the feed CACs: chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, 1,1-dichloroethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, hexachloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethylene, trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, and 1,2,3-trichloropropane, plus the anaerobic metabolites: dichloromethane and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene.

  1. Aerobic biodegradation of selected monoterpenes.

    PubMed

    Misra, G; Pavlostathis, S G; Perdue, E M; Araujo, R

    1996-07-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to assess the biotransformation potential of four hydrocarbon monoterpenes (d-limonene, alpha-pinene, gamma-terpinene, and terpinolene) and four alcohols (arbanol, linalool, plinol, and alpha-terpineol) under aerobic conditions at 23 degrees C. Both forest-soil extract and enriched cultures were used as inocula for the biodegradation experiments conducted first without, then with prior microbial acclimation to the monoterpenes tested. All four hydrocarbons and two alcohols were readily degraded. The increase in biomass and headspace CO2 concentrations paralleled the depletion of monoterpenes, thus confirming that terpene disappearance was the result of biodegradation accompanied by microbial growth and mineralization. Plinol resisted degradation in assays using inocula from diverse sources, while arbanol degraded very slowly. A significant fraction of d-limonene-derived carbon was accounted for as non-extractable, dissolved organic carbon, whereas terpineol exhibited a much higher degree of utilization. The rate and extent of monoterpene biodegradation were not significantly affected by the presence of dissolved natural organic matter.

  2. Aerobic catabolism of bile acids.

    PubMed Central

    Leppik, R A; Park, R J; Smith, M G

    1982-01-01

    Seventy-eight stable cultures obtained by enrichment on media containing ox bile or a single bile acid were able to utilize one or more bile acids, as well as components of ox bile, as primary carbon sources for growth. All isolates were obligate aerobes, and most (70) were typical (48) or atypical (22) Pseudomonas strains, the remainder (8) being gram-positive actinomycetes. Of six Pseudomonas isolates selected for further study, five produced predominantly acidic catabolites after growth on glycocholic acid, but the sixth, Pseudomonas sp. ATCC 31752, accumulated as the principal product a neutral steroid catabolite. Optimum growth of Pseudomonas sp. ATCC 31752 on ox bile occurred at pH 7 to 8 and from 25 to 30 degrees C. No additional nutrients were required to sustain good growth, but growth was stimulated by the addition of ammonium sulfate and yeast extract. Good growth was obtained with a bile solids content of 40 g/liter in shaken flasks. A near-theoretical yield of neutral steroid catabolites, comprising a major (greater than 50%) and three minor products, was obtained from fermentor growth of ATCC 31752 in 6.7 g of ox bile solids per liter. The possible commercial exploitation of these findings to produce steroid drug intermediates for the pharmaceutical industry is discussed. PMID:7149711

  3. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence-Based Identification of Bacteria in Automatically Incubated Blood Culture Materials from Tropical Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Norbert Georg; Hahn, Andreas; Boahen, Kennedy; Sarpong, Nimako; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Halbgewachs, Eva; Marks, Florian; von Kalckreuth, Vera; Poppert, Sven; Loderstaedt, Ulrike; May, Jürgen; Hagen, Ralf Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Background The quality of microbiological diagnostic procedures depends on pre-analytic conditions. We compared the results of 16S rRNA gene PCR and sequencing from automatically incubated blood culture materials from tropical Ghana with the results of cultural growth after automated incubation. Methods Real-time 16S rRNA gene PCR and subsequent sequencing were applied to 1500 retained blood culture samples of Ghanaian patients admitted to a hospital with an unknown febrile illness after enrichment by automated culture. Results Out of all 1500 samples, 191 were culture-positive and 98 isolates were considered etiologically relevant. Out of the 191 culture-positive samples, 16S rRNA gene PCR and sequencing led to concordant results in 65 cases at species level and an additional 62 cases at genus level. PCR was positive in further 360 out of 1309 culture-negative samples, sequencing results of which suggested etiologically relevant pathogen detections in 62 instances, detections of uncertain relevance in 50 instances, and DNA contamination due to sample preparation in 248 instances. In two instances, PCR failed to detect contaminants from the skin flora that were culturally detectable. Pre-analytical errors caused many Enterobacteriaceae to be missed by culture. Conclusions Potentially correctable pre-analytical conditions and not the fastidious nature of the bacteria caused most of the discrepancies. Although 16S rRNA gene PCR and sequencing in addition to culture led to an increase in detections of presumably etiologically relevant blood culture pathogens, the application of this procedure to samples from the tropics was hampered by a high contamination rate. Careful interpretation of diagnostic results is required. PMID:26270631

  4. Broad-range PCR in the identification of bacterial and fungal pathogens from positive blood culture bottles: a sequencing approach.

    PubMed

    Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Yanagihara, Katsunori

    2015-01-01

    Rapid identification of causative bacteria in patients with sepsis can contribute to appropriate selection of antibiotics and improvement of patients' prognosis. Genotypic identification is an emerging technology that may provide an alternative method to, or complement, established phenotypic identification procedures.Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene is a widely accepted tool for molecular identification of bacteria. Pyrosequencing is a DNA sequencing technique that is based on the detection of pyrophosphate that is released during DNA synthesis. Pyrosequencing can provide sequence information rapidly by reading short sequences; therefore, it may contribute to a rapid identification and lead to a great help in improving the outcome of sepsis. The DNA pyrosequencing-based identification from positive blood culture samples basically consisted of the following four steps: (1) DNA extraction, (2) amplification of target genes, (3) DNA pyrosequencing, and (4) homology searching.

  5. Multiplex real-time PCR and blood culture for identification of bloodstream pathogens in patients with suspected sepsis.

    PubMed

    Westh, H; Lisby, G; Breysse, F; Böddinghaus, B; Chomarat, M; Gant, V; Goglio, A; Raglio, A; Schuster, H; Stuber, F; Wissing, H; Hoeft, A

    2009-06-01

    Severe sepsis is increasingly a cause of death. Rapid and correct initial antimicrobial treatment reduces mortality. The aetiological agent(s) cannot always be found in blood cultures (BCs). A novel multiplex PCR test (SeptiFast (alpha version)) that allows identification of 20 bacterial and fungal species directly from blood was used, comparatively with BC, in a multicentre trial of patients with suspected bacterial or fungal sepsis. Five hundred and fifty-eight paired samples from 359 patients were evaluated. The rate of positivity was 17% for BC and 26% for SeptiFast. Ninety-six microorganisms were isolated with BC, and 186 microorganisms were identified with SeptiFast; 231 microorganisms were found by combining the two tests. Of the 96 isolates identified with BC, 22 isolates were considered to be contaminants. Of the remaining 74 non-contaminant BC isolates available for comparison with SeptiFast, 50 were identified as a species identical to the species identified with SeptiFast in the paired sample. Of the remaining 24 BC isolates for which the species, identified in the BC, could not be detected in the paired SeptiFast sample, 18 BC isolates were identified as a species included in the SeptiFast master list, and six BC isolates were identified as a species not included in the SeptiFast master list. With SeptiFast, 186 microorganisms were identified, 12 of which were considered to be contaminants. Of the 174 clinically relevant microorganisms identified with SeptiFast, 50 (29%) were detected by BC. More than half of the remaining microorganisms identified with SeptiFast (but not isolated after BC) were also found in routine cultures of other relevant samples taken from the patients. Future clinical studies should assess whether the use of SeptiFast is of significant advantage in the detection of bloodstream pathogens.

  6. Low Utility of Pediatric Isolator Blood Culture System for Detection of Fungemia in Children: a 10-Year Review

    PubMed Central

    Campigotto, Aaron; Sebert, Michael; McElvania TeKippe, Erin; Chakravarty, Aparna; Doern, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    The use of the Wampole Isolator 1.5-ml pediatric blood culture tube for the detection of fungemia in children was assessed by a 10-year retrospective review at two pediatric hospitals, The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Canada, and the Children's Medical Center of Dallas, Texas. Over this period, a total of 9,442 pediatric Isolator specimens were processed, with yeast or yeast-like organisms recovered in 297 (3.1%) of the specimens (151 [1.6%] unique clinical episodes) and filamentous or dimorphic fungi recovered in 31 (0.3%) of the specimens (25 unique clinical episodes). Only 18 of the 151 clinical episodes of fungemia attributable to yeast were not detected by automated blood culture systems. The majority of isolated yeast were Candida spp., which were usually detected by automated systems, whereas the most common non-Candida yeast was Malassezia furfur, which the automated system failed to detect. Filamentous or dimorphic fungi were detected in 25 episodes, of which only 9 (36%) episodes were deemed clinically significant after chart review, indicating that in the majority of cases (16/25, 64%) fungal isolation represented contamination. In five of the nine clinically significant episodes, the isolated fungus (Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis/posadasii, Fusarium oxysporum, Aspergillus spp., and Bipolaris spp.) was also identified in other clinical specimens. Over the 10-year study period, the use of the pediatric Isolator system, at the discretion of the treating physician, only rarely provided useful clinical information for the diagnosis of fungemia in children, with the exception of M. furfur and possibly endemic mycoses. PMID:27307462

  7. MALDI-TOF MS Andromas strategy for the routine identification of bacteria, mycobacteria, yeasts, Aspergillus spp. and positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Bille, E; Dauphin, B; Leto, J; Bougnoux, M-E; Beretti, J-L; Lotz, A; Suarez, S; Meyer, J; Join-Lambert, O; Descamps, P; Grall, N; Mory, F; Dubreuil, L; Berche, P; Nassif, X; Ferroni, A

    2012-11-01

    All organisms usually isolated in our laboratory are now routinely identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) using the Andromas software. The aim of this study was to describe the use of this strategy in a routine clinical microbiology laboratory. The microorganisms identified included bacteria, mycobacteria, yeasts and Aspergillus spp. isolated on solid media or extracted directly from blood cultures. MALDI-TOF MS was performed on 2665 bacteria isolated on solid media, corresponding to all bacteria isolated during this period except Escherichia coli grown on chromogenic media. All acquisitions were performed without extraction. After a single acquisition, 93.1% of bacteria grown on solid media were correctly identified. When the first acquisition was not contributory, a second acquisition was performed either the same day or the next day. After two acquisitions, the rate of bacteria identified increased to 99.2%. The failures reported on 21 strains were due to an unknown profile attributed to new species (9) or an insufficient quality of the spectrum (12). MALDI-TOF MS has been applied to 162 positive blood cultures. The identification rate was 91.4%. All mycobacteria isolated during this period (22) were correctly identified by MALDI-TOF MS without any extraction. For 96.3% and 92.2% of yeasts and Aspergillus spp., respectively, the identification was obtained with a single acquisition. After a second acquisition, the overall identification rate was 98.8% for yeasts (160/162) and 98.4% (63/64) for Aspergillus spp. In conclusion, the MALDI-TOF MS strategy used in this work allows a rapid and efficient identification of all microorganisms isolated routinely.

  8. Rapid detection of enterobacteriaceae producing extended spectrum beta-lactamases directly from positive blood cultures by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oviaño, M; Fernández, B; Fernández, A; Barba, M J; Mouriño, C; Bou, G

    2014-11-01

    Bacteria that produce extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) are an increasing healthcare problem and their rapid detection is a challenge that must be overcome in order to optimize antimicrobial treatment and patient care. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to determine resistance to β-lactams, including carbapenems in Enterobacteriaceae, but the methodology has not been fully validated as it remains time-consuming. We aimed to assess whether MALDI-TOF can be used to detect ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae from positive blood culture bottles in clinical practice. In the assay, 141 blood cultures were tested, 13 of them were real bacteraemias and 128 corresponded to blood culture bottles seeded with bacterial clinical isolates. Bacteraemias were analysed by MALDI-TOF after a positive growth result and the 128 remaining blood cultures 24 h after the bacterial seeding. β-lactamase activity was determined through the profile of peaks associated with the antibiotics cefotaxime and ceftazidime and its hydrolyzed forms. Clavulanic acid was added to rule out the presence of non-ESBL mechanisms. Overall data show a 99% (103 out of 104) sensitivity in detecting ESBL in positive blood cultures. Data were obtained in 90 min (maximum 150 min). The proposed methodology has a great impact on the early detection of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae from positive blood cultures, being a rapid and efficient method and allowing early administration of an appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  9. Growth of Campylobacter Incubated Aerobically in Media Supplemented with Peptones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth of Campylobacter cultures incubated aerobically in media supplemented with peptones was studied, and additional experiments were conducted to compare growth of the bacteria in media supplemented with peptones to growth in media supplemented with fumarate-pyruvate-minerals-vitamins (FPMV). A b...

  10. Fast isolation and ex vivo culture of circulating tumor cells from the peripheral blood of lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wenjun, Wu; Zhihua, Wang; Zhuo, Wang; Yuliang, Deng; Qihui, Shi

    2017-01-20

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are free tumor cells shed from tumor site and enter into blood circulation. CTCs represent a reliable source of tumor cells for the molecular characteristics of the original tumor. However, the extraordinary rarity of CTCs makes the subsequent molecular and functional analysis technically challenging. Here, we describe a one-step microfludics-based immunomagnetic isolation method to isolate CTCs directly from the whole blood of lung adenocarcinoma patients. This method avoids harsh sample preparation and enrichment steps, and therefore preserves the viability (>90%) of CTCs during the in vitro isolation. The isolated CTCs are enriched in small volume (80 μL) and cultured ex vivo that leads to successful ex vivo expansion. The expanded CTCs can be frozen and thawed, which shows cell line property. Genetic sequencing on EGFR、KRAS、PIK3CA、TP53 and BRAF and metabolic assay (2-NBDG) are utilized to characterize the expanded CTCs. Our results demostrated that this method is suitable for ex vivo expansion of CTCs facilitates. The genomic, proteomic and metabolic analyses of CTCs have guiding significance in tumor precise treatment.

  11. The in vitro effects of artificial and natural sweeteners on the immune system using whole blood culture assays.

    PubMed

    Rahiman, F; Pool, E J

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the effects of commercially available artificial (aspartame, saccharin, sucralose) and natural sweeteners (brown sugar, white sugar, molasses) on the immune system. Human whole blood cultures were incubated with various sweeteners and stimulated in vitro with either phytohemagglutinin or endotoxin. Harvested supernatants were screened for cytotoxicity and cytokine release. Results showed that none of the artificial or natural sweeteners proved to be cytotoxic, indicating that no cell death was induced in vitro. The natural sweetener, sugar cane molasses (10 ug/mL), enhanced levels of the inflammatory biomarker IL-6 while all artificial sweeteners (10 ug/mL) revealed a suppressive effect on IL-6 secretion (P < 0.001). Exposure of blood cells to sucralose-containing sweeteners under stimulatory conditions reduced levels of the biomarker of humoral immunity, Interleukin-10 (P < 0.001). The cumulative suppression of Interleukin-6 and Interleukin-10 levels induced by sucralose may contribute to the inability in mounting an effective humoral response when posed with an exogenous threat.

  12. Comparative Study in Early Neonates with Septicemia by Blood Culture, Staining Techniques and C – Reactive Protein (CRP)

    PubMed Central

    Dhanalakshmi, V.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate the pathogenic bacteria in neo-natal septicemia by using various diagnostic techniques. Setting and Design: Our study was designed to evaluate a feasible method to diagnose neonatal septicemia even at primary health centre level. Materials and Methods: Blood samples were collected aseptically from 70 neonates. The specimens were inoculated into brain heart infusion broth and subcultures were performed with specific media. Antibiotic sensitivity pattern of isolates was studied by Modified Kirby Bauer Disc diffusion technique and differentiate the isolates by staining methods. C-reactive protein (CRP) was evaluated by using standard kit method. Results: Out of 70 cases of childhood septicemia of age group 1-30 days, 37 had positive CRP, 36 were positive for BCS and blood culture was positive only in 41 cases, where predominant organism being Klebsiella species (n=28, 68.29%) followed by Escherichia coli (n=4, 9.76%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=3,7.31%), Proteus mirabilis (n=2,4.88%) and Coagulase negative staphylococcus (n=4,9.76%). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that Klebsiella species as an important cause of neonatal septicemia. The isolated organisms were found to be highly sensitive to cefatoxime and amikacin. Hence, these antibiotics can be considered as the first drug of choice for neonatal septicemia. PMID:25954618

  13. L-arginine and arginine analogues: effects on isolated blood vessels and cultured endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, H. H.; Baeblich, S. E.; Zernikow, B. C.; Klein, M. M.; Böhme, E.

    1990-01-01

    1. The present study examined effects of arginine (Arg) and various Arg analogues on the vascular tone of rabbit and rat aortic rings, the release of nitrite from cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells and the metabolism of L-Arg in bovine and porcine endothelial cell homogenates. The respective D-enantiomers or N-alpha-benzoyl-L-arginine ethyl ester did not substitute for L-Arg. 2. In bovine aortic endothelial cells, the release of nitrite was only observed in the presence of L-Arg or L-Arg methyl ester in the cell culture medium. 3. In dialyzed homogenates of porcine and bovine aortic endothelial cells, L-Arg was metabolized independently of NADPH and Ca2+ to yield L-ornithine (L-Orn) and L-citrulline (L-Cit). No concomitant nitrite formation was detected. 4. Pretreatment of rabbit and rat aortic rings with L-canavanine (L-Can) or NG-monomethyl-L-Arg (L-NMMA) inhibited ATP- and acetylcholine-induced relaxations (endothelium-dependent) but not glyceryltrinitrate-induced relaxations (endothelium-independent). 5. In rabbit aortic rings, Arg and monomeric Arg analogues induced endothelium-independent relaxations. L-Arg methyl ester induced an endothelium-independent contraction, and L-NMMA induced a relaxation in the absence of endothelium and a contraction in the presence of endothelium. Polymeric basic amino acids such as poly L-Arg induced endothelium-dependent relaxations (inhibited by L-Can), a subsequent refractoriness to endothelium-dependent vasodilators (not prevented by L-Can) and endothelial cell death.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2282457

  14. Medical devices; immunology and microbiology devices; classification of multiplex nucleic acid assay for identification of microorganisms and resistance markers from positive blood cultures. Final order.

    PubMed

    2015-05-27

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying multiplex nucleic acid assay for identification of microorganisms and resistance markers from positive blood cultures into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to this device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the multiplex nucleic acid assay for identification of microorganisms and resistance markers from positive blood cultures. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  15. Evaluation of an Automated Rapid Diagnostic Assay for Detection of Gram-Negative Bacteria and Their Drug-Resistance Genes in Positive Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Tojo, Masayoshi; Fujita, Takahiro; Ainoda, Yusuke; Nagamatsu, Maki; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Mezaki, Kazuhisa; Sakurai, Aki; Masui, Yoshinori; Yazaki, Hirohisa; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Totsuka, Kyoichi; Kirikae, Teruo; Ohmagari, Norio

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of the Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Nucleic Acid Test (BC-GN; Nanosphere, Northbrook, IL, USA), an automated multiplex assay for rapid identification of positive blood cultures caused by 9 Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) and for detection of 9 genes associated with β-lactam resistance. The BC-GN assay can be performed directly from positive blood cultures with 5 minutes of hands-on and 2 hours of run time per sample. A total of 397 GNB positive blood cultures were analyzed using the BC-GN assay. Of the 397 samples, 295 were simulated samples prepared by inoculating GNB into blood culture bottles, and the remaining were clinical samples from 102 patients with positive blood cultures. Aliquots of the positive blood cultures were tested by the BC-GN assay. The results of bacterial identification between the BC-GN assay and standard laboratory methods were as follows: Acinetobacter spp. (39 isolates for the BC-GN assay/39 for the standard methods), Citrobacter spp. (7/7), Escherichia coli (87/87), Klebsiella oxytoca (13/13), and Proteus spp. (11/11); Enterobacter spp. (29/30); Klebsiella pneumoniae (62/72); Pseudomonas aeruginosa (124/125); and Serratia marcescens (18/21); respectively. From the 102 clinical samples, 104 bacterial species were identified with the BC-GN assay, whereas 110 were identified with the standard methods. The BC-GN assay also detected all β-lactam resistance genes tested (233 genes), including 54 blaCTX-M, 119 blaIMP, 8 blaKPC, 16 blaNDM, 24 blaOXA-23, 1 blaOXA-24/40, 1 blaOXA-48, 4 blaOXA-58, and 6 blaVIM. The data shows that the BC-GN assay provides rapid detection of GNB and β-lactam resistance genes in positive blood cultures and has the potential to contributing to optimal patient management by earlier detection of major antimicrobial resistance genes. PMID:24705449

  16. Evaluation of an automated rapid diagnostic assay for detection of Gram-negative bacteria and their drug-resistance genes in positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Tojo, Masayoshi; Fujita, Takahiro; Ainoda, Yusuke; Nagamatsu, Maki; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Mezaki, Kazuhisa; Sakurai, Aki; Masui, Yoshinori; Yazaki, Hirohisa; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Totsuka, Kyoichi; Kirikae, Teruo; Ohmagari, Norio

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of the Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Nucleic Acid Test (BC-GN; Nanosphere, Northbrook, IL, USA), an automated multiplex assay for rapid identification of positive blood cultures caused by 9 Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) and for detection of 9 genes associated with β-lactam resistance. The BC-GN assay can be performed directly from positive blood cultures with 5 minutes of hands-on and 2 hours of run time per sample. A total of 397 GNB positive blood cultures were analyzed using the BC-GN assay. Of the 397 samples, 295 were simulated samples prepared by inoculating GNB into blood culture bottles, and the remaining were clinical samples from 102 patients with positive blood cultures. Aliquots of the positive blood cultures were tested by the BC-GN assay. The results of bacterial identification between the BC-GN assay and standard laboratory methods were as follows: Acinetobacter spp. (39 isolates for the BC-GN assay/39 for the standard methods), Citrobacter spp. (7/7), Escherichia coli (87/87), Klebsiella oxytoca (13/13), and Proteus spp. (11/11); Enterobacter spp. (29/30); Klebsiella pneumoniae (62/72); Pseudomonas aeruginosa (124/125); and Serratia marcescens (18/21); respectively. From the 102 clinical samples, 104 bacterial species were identified with the BC-GN assay, whereas 110 were identified with the standard methods. The BC-GN assay also detected all β-lactam resistance genes tested (233 genes), including 54 bla(CTX-M), 119 bla(IMP), 8 bla(KPC), 16 bla(NDM), 24 bla(OXA-23), 1 bla(OXA-24/40), 1 bla(OXA-48), 4 bla(OXA-58), and 6 blaVIM. The data shows that the BC-GN assay provides rapid detection of GNB and β-lactam resistance genes in positive blood cultures and has the potential to contributing to optimal patient management by earlier detection of major antimicrobial resistance genes.

  17. [Blood cultures in the paediatric emergency department. Guidelines and recommendations on their indications, collection, processing and interpretation].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Bou, S; Álvarez Álvarez, C; Campo Fernández, M N; García Herrero, M A; Gené Giralt, A; Giménez Pérez, M; Piñeiro Pérez, R; Gómez Cortés, B; Velasco, R; Menasalvas Ruiz, A I; García García, J J; Rodrigo Gonzalo de Liria, C

    2016-05-01

    Blood culture (BC) is the gold standard when a bacteraemia is suspected, and is one of the most requested microbiological tests in paediatrics. Some changes have occurred in recent years: the introduction of new vaccines, the increasing number of patients with central vascular catheters, as well as the introduction of continuous monitoring BC systems. These changes have led to the review and update of different factors related to this technique in order to optimise its use. A practice guideline is presented with recommendations on BC, established by the Spanish Society of Paediatric Emergency Care and the Spanish Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases. After reviewing the available scientific evidence, several recommendations for each of the following aspects are presented: BC indications in the Emergency Department, how to obtain, transport and process cultures, special situations (indications and interpretation of results in immunosuppressed patients and/or central vascular catheter carriers, indications for anaerobic BC), differentiation between bacteraemia and contamination when a BC shows bacterial growth and actions to take with a positive BC in patients with fever of unknown origin.

  18. Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Cultured in Normal and Hyperglycemic Media in Simulated Microgravity Using NASA Bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, DeSales

    2003-01-01

    We sought answers to several questions this summer at NASA Johnson Space Center. Initial studies involved the in vitro culture of human peripheral blood mononuclear in cells in different conditioned culture media. Several human cancer clones were similarly studied to determine responses to aberrant glycosylation by the argon laser. The cells were grown at unit gravity in flasks and in simulated microgravity using NASA bioreactors. The cells in each instance were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cell cycle analysis was acquired by staining nuclear DNA with propidium iodide. Responses to the laser stimulation was measured by observing autofluorescence emitted in the green and red spectra after stimulation. Extent of glycosylation correlated with the intensity of the laser stimulated auto-fluorescence. Our particular study was to detect and monitor aberrant glycosylation and its role in etiopathogenesis. Comparisons were made between cells known to be neoplastic and normal cell controls using the same Laser Induced Autofluorescence technique. Studies were begun after extensive literature searches on using the antigen presenting potential of dendritic cells to induce proliferation of antigen specific cytotoxic T-cells. The Sendai virus served as the antigen. Our goal is to generate sufficient numbers of such cells in the simulated microgravity environment for use in autologous transplants of virally infected individuals including those positive for hepatitis and HIV.

  19. Enhanced cytotoxic function of natural killer and CD3+CD56+ cells in cord blood after culture.

    PubMed

    Tomchuck, Suzanne L; Leung, Wing H; Dallas, Mari H

    2015-01-01

    Rate of immune reconstitution directly correlates with the number of hematopoietic stem cells infused and is particularly delayed in patients undergoing cord blood (CB) transplantation (CBT). Methods to increase the number of CB natural killer (NK) cells have the potential to improve immune reconstitution after CBT. NK cells are the first lymphocyte population to recover after hematopoietic stem cells transplantation and are central to preventing early relapse and infection. CB NK cells are low in number and are known to be incomplete in maturation and require activation for effective function. Here, we report a clinically relevant ex vivo expansion method that increases the number of activated CB NK cells. We report a multilog increase in NK cell number when CB mononuclear cells are cocultured with IL-2 and IL-15. Furthermore, NK cells expressing activating receptors and adhesion molecules responsible for cytotoxicity increased throughout culture, whereas inhibitory receptor expression remained low. Additionally, cytotoxic function against various malignancies was significantly enhanced in cultured NK cells but not CD3(+)CD56(+) cells. These data suggest that ex vivo expansion and activation of CB NK cells is a clinically feasible and relevant approach to prevent early infection and relapse after CBT.

  20. An In-House Assay Is Superior to Sepsityper for Direct Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight (MALDI-TOF) Mass Spectrometry Identification of Yeast Species in Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Bidart, Marie; Bonnet, Isabelle; Hennebique, Aurélie; Kherraf, Zine Eddine; Pelloux, Hervé; Berger, François; Cornet, Muriel; Bailly, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    We developed an in-house assay for the direct identification, by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry, of yeasts in blood culture. Sixty-one representative strains from 12 species were analyzed in spiked blood cultures. Our assay accurately identified 95 of 107 (88.8%) positive blood cultures and outperformed the commercial Sepsityper kit (81.7% identification). PMID:25762771

  1. Comparative evaluation of Vitek 2 identification and susceptibility testing of Gram-negative rods directly and isolated from BacT/ALERT-positive blood culture bottles.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Dávila, M J; Yagüe, G; Albert, M; García-Lucas, T

    2012-05-01

    The performance of Vitek 2 was evaluated for the identification and susceptibility testing of Gram-negative bacilli directly from positive blood cultures bottles. Direct inoculation of the positive blood cultures with the Vitek cards ID-GN and AST-NO58 was compared with the standard inoculation method based on the sub-culture of the positive blood culture to agar. A total of 142 blood cultures were included in the study; of those, 119 were from patients' clinical samples, while 23 were artificially prepared with strains showing different mechanisms of resistance. A total of 136 (95.8%) strains were correctly identified to the species level, only 2 (1.4%) were mis-identified and 4 (2.8%) were not identified. Susceptibility results were available for all isolates tested against 17 antibiotics, thus, resulting in a total of 2,414 isolate/anti-microbial combinations. The error rate was 2.8% (67/2,414) overall; 0.6% (14/2,414) very major errors, 0.1% (3/2,414) major errors and 2.1% (50/2,414) minor errors. The direct method detected 88.5% (22/25) of the strains producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs). The susceptibility agreement among the added strains with ESBL, AMPc hyperproduction, resistance to ceftazidime, carbapenems and cefepime was very high. Direct identification and susceptibility testing gave rapid and reliable results, reducing by 24 h the turnaround time of the microbiology laboratory.

  2. Tumor vessel normalization after aerobic exercise enhances chemotherapeutic efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Schadler, Keri L.; Thomas, Nicholas J.; Galie, Peter A.; Bhang, Dong Ha; Roby, Kerry C.; Addai, Prince; Till, Jacob E.; Sturgeon, Kathleen; Zaslavsky, Alexander; Chen, Christopher S.; Ryeom, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapies aimed at tumor vasculature are utilized in combination with chemotherapy to improve drug delivery and efficacy after tumor vascular normalization. Tumor vessels are highly disorganized with disrupted blood flow impeding drug delivery to cancer cells. Although pharmacologic anti-angiogenic therapy can remodel and normalize tumor vessels, there is a limited window of efficacy and these drugs are associated with severe side effects necessitating alternatives for vascular normalization. Recently, moderate aerobic exercise has been shown to induce vascular normalization in mouse models. Here, we provide a mechanistic explanation for the tumor vascular normalization induced by exercise. Shear stress, the mechanical stimuli exerted on endothelial cells by blood flow, modulates vascular integrity. Increasing vascular shear stress through aerobic exercise can alter and remodel blood vessels in normal tissues. Our data in mouse models indicate that activation of calcineurin-NFAT-TSP1 signaling in endothelial cells plays a critical role in exercise-induced shear stress mediated tumor vessel remodeling. We show that moderate aerobic exercise with chemotherapy caused a significantly greater decrease in tumor growth than chemotherapy alone through improved chemotherapy delivery after tumor vascular normalization. Our work suggests that the vascular normalizing effects of aerobic exercise can be an effective chemotherapy adjuvant. PMID:27589843

  3. Aerobic microorganism for the degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Fliermans, Carl B.

    1989-01-01

    A chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading microorganism, having American Type Culture Collection accession numbers ATCC 53570 and 53571, in a biologically pure culture aseptically collected from a deep subsurface habitat and enhanced, mineralizes trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene to HCl, H.sub.2 O and Co.sub.2 under aerobic conditions stimulated by methane, acetate, methanol, tryptone-yeast extract, propane and propane-methane.

  4. Cross-Cultural Validation of the High Blood Pressure Health Literacy Scale in a Chinese Community

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinghua; Huang, Feifei; Liu, Zaoling; Zhang, Na; Mahapatra, Tanmay; Tang, Weiming; Lei, Yang; Dai, Yali; Tang, Songyuan; Zhang, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    Background Considering the importance of health literacy (HL) for the maximum yield from the hypertension control programs, development of a reliable and valid instrument of hypertension-related HL is critical. This study aimed to translate and validate the High Blood Pressure-Health Literacy Scale (HBP-HLS) into Chinese (C-HBP-HLS) and evaluate its psychometric properties in Chinese context. Method Between June 2013 and January 2014, a cross-sectional study was conducted among recruited hypertensive patients belonging to the Han and Kazakh-Chinese communities in Urumqi, Xinjiang, China. Results A pilot sample (n = 242) was selected for the exploratory factor analysis of the translated and modified instrument. Another sample (n = 308) was recruited for the confirmatory factor analysis. C-HBP-HLS consisted of five dimensions (Print Health Literacy, Medication Label, Understanding Ability, Newest Vital Sign Test, and Avoiding Food Allergy) containing 15 items, accounting for 77.7% of the total variance. The 5-factor model demonstrated a good overall fit. The scale-level content validity index was 0.85. Cronbach’s alpha of the overall scale was 0.78 and test-retest reliability was 0.96. Education level had a strong positive correlation with the scores for items Q1, Q2, and Q3(r = 0.481, 0.492, 0.475, respectively). Health Literacy scores among Kazakh patients were significantly lower than Han (7.13±7.90 vs. 30.10±13.42, Z = -14.573, P<0.001). Conclusion C-HBP-HLS demonstrated suitable factor structure and robust psychometric properties for measuring health literacy level among hypertensive patients in China. PMID:27116336

  5. Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    Twelve conference papers on cultural aspects of second language instruction include: "Towards True Multiculturalism: Ideas for Teachers" (Brian McVeigh); Comparing Cultures Through Critical Thinking: Development and Interpretations of Meaningful Observations" (Laurel D. Kamada); "Authority and Individualism in Japan and the…

  6. Acceleration of the direct identification of Staphylococcus aureus versus coagulase-negative staphylococci from blood culture material: a comparison of six bacterial DNA extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Loonen, A J M; Jansz, A R; Kreeftenberg, H; Bruggeman, C A; Wolffs, P F G; van den Brule, A J C

    2011-03-01

    To accelerate differentiation between Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), this study aimed to compare six different DNA extraction methods from two commonly used blood culture materials, i.e. BACTEC and BacT/ALERT. Furthermore, we analysed the effect of reduced blood culture incubation for the detection of staphylococci directly from blood culture material. A real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) duplex assay was used to compare the six different DNA isolation protocols on two different blood culture systems. Negative blood culture material was spiked with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Bacterial DNA was isolated with automated extractor easyMAG (three protocols), automated extractor MagNA Pure LC (LC Microbiology Kit M(Grade)), a manual kit MolYsis Plus and a combination of MolYsis Plus and the easyMAG. The most optimal isolation method was used to evaluate reduced bacterial incubation times. Bacterial DNA isolation with the MolYsis Plus kit in combination with the specific B protocol on the easyMAG resulted in the most sensitive detection of S. aureus, with a detection limit of 10 CFU/ml, in BacT/ALERT material, whereas using BACTEC resulted in a detection limit of 100 CFU/ml. An initial S. aureus or CNS load of 1 CFU/ml blood can be detected after 5 h of incubation in BacT/ALERT 3D by combining the sensitive isolation method and the tuf LightCycler assay.

  7. Characterization and aerobic biodegradation of selected monoterpenes

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, G.; Pavlostathis, S.G.; Li, J.; Purdue, E.M.

    1996-12-31

    Monoterpenes are biogenic chemicals and occur in abundance in nature. Large-scale industrial use of these chemicals has recently been initiated in an attempt to replace halogenated solvents and chlorofluorocarbons which have been implicated in the stratospheric depletion of ozone. This study examined four hydrocarbon monoterpenes (d-limonene, {alpha}-pinene, {gamma}-terpinene, and terpinolene) and four alcohols (arbanol, linalool, plinol, and {alpha}-terpineol). Water solubility, vapor pressure, and octanol/water partition coefficients were estimated. Aerobic biodegradability tests were conducted in batch reactors by utilizing forest soil extract and enriched cultures as inoculum. The hydrophobic nature and high volatility of the hydrocarbons restricted the investigation to relatively low aqueous concentrations. Each monoterpene was analyzed with a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector after extraction from the aqueous phase with isooctane. Terpene mineralization was tested by monitoring liquid-phase carbon, CO{sub 2} production and biomass growth. All four hydrocarbons and two alcohols readily degraded under aerobic conditions. Plinol resisted degradation in assays using inocula from diverse sources, while arbanol degraded very slowly. The intrinsic biokinetics coefficients for the degradation of d-limonene and {alpha}-terpineol were estimated by using cultures enriched with the respective monoterpenes. Monoterpene biodegradation followed Monod kinetics.

  8. Fast and reliable bacterial identification direct from positive blood culture using a new TFA sample preparation protocol and the Vitek® MS system.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Jussimara; Inoue, Fernanda Matsiko; Lobo, Ana Paula T; Sugawara, Eduardo K; Boaretti, Fabiana M; Tufik, Sergio

    2015-02-01

    A simple and reliable protocol using 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) was developed to identify bacteria directly from blood cultures on the Vitek® MS system. Results presented a correlation of 99% for Gram-negative bacteria at species level, and 86.3% and 82.3% of Gram-positive bacteria at the genus and species levels, respectively.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Parabacteroides goldsteinii with Putative Novel Metallo-β-Lactamases Isolated from a Blood Culture from a Human Patient

    PubMed Central

    Agergaard, Charlotte Nielsen; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Parabacteroides goldsteinii was isolated from a blood culture. Genomic DNA was sequenced using a MiSeq sequencer and assembled using the SPAdes genome assembler. The draft genome sequence was 6,851,868 bp, spanning 282 contigs of 5,253 coding sequences, 66 tRNAs, and 5 rRNAs. Several putative novel metallo-β-lactamases were discovered. PMID:26294633

  10. A randomized controlled trial of 1% aqueous chlorhexidine gluconate compared with 10% povidone-iodine for topical antiseptic in neonates: effects on blood culture contamination rates.

    PubMed

    Nuntnarumit, Pracha; Sangsuksawang, Nartsiri

    2013-04-01

    We conducted a randomized controlled trial in neonates with birth weight greater than or equal to 1,500 g that compared 1% aqueous chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) with 10% povidone-iodine (PI) as a topical antiseptic. We found 1% CHG to be more effective than 1% PI in reducing blood culture contamination rates, and no contact dermatitis was observed.

  11. Rapid identification of microorganisms from positive blood cultures by testing early growth on solid media using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Mark D; Weber, Carol J; Burnham, Carey-Ann D

    2016-06-01

    We performed a retrospective analysis of a simple modification to MALDI-TOF MS for microorganism identification to accurately improve the turnaround time (TAT) for identification of Enterobacteriaceae recovered in blood cultures. Relative to standard MALDI-TOF MS procedures, we reduced TAT from 28.3 (n=90) to 21.2h (n=107).

  12. Evaluation of a Semiquantitative Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Method for Rapid Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Positive Blood Cultures.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jette S; Hamacher, Christina; Gross, Birgit; Sparbier, Katrin; Lange, Christoph; Kostrzewa, Markus; Schubert, Sören

    2016-11-01

    With the increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, rapid identification of the pathogen and its individual antibiotic resistance is crucial to ensure adequate antiinfective treatment at the earliest time point. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry for the identification of bacteria directly from the blood culture bottle has been widely established; however, there is still an urgent need for new methods that permit rapid resistance testing. Recently, a semiquantitative MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry-based method for the prediction of antibiotic resistance was described. We evaluated this method for detecting nonsusceptibility against two β-lactam and two non-β-lactam antibiotics. A collection of 30 spiked blood cultures was tested for nonsusceptibility against gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. Furthermore, 99 patient-derived blood cultures were tested for nonsusceptibility against cefotaxime, piperacillin-tazobactam, and ciprofloxacin in parallel with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry identification from the blood culture fluid. The assay correctly classified all isolates tested for nonsusceptibility against gentamicin and cefotaxime. One misclassification for ciprofloxacin nonsusceptibility and five misclassifications for piperacillin-tazobactam nonsusceptibility occurred. Identification of the bacterium and prediction of nonsusceptibility was possible within approximately 4 h.

  13. Preparation of glycerol-enriched yeast culture and its effect on blood metabolites and ruminal fermentation in goats.

    PubMed

    Ye, Gengping; Zhu, Yongxing; Liu, Jin; Chen, Xingxiang; Huang, Kehe

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate a glycerol-producing yeast strain from nature to prepare glycerol-enriched yeast culture (GY), and preliminarily evaluate the effects of GY on blood metabolites and ruminal fermentation in goats. During the trial, six isolates were isolated from unprocessed honey, and only two isolates with higher glycerol yield were identified by analysis of 26S ribosomal DNA sequences. One of the two isolates was identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a direct-fed microbe permitted by the FDA. This isolate was used to prepare GY. The fermentation parameters were optimized through single-factor and orthogonal design methods to maximize the glycerol yield and biomass. The final GY contained 38.7±0.6 g/L glycerol and 12.6±0.5 g/L biomass. In vivo, eight castrated male goats with ruminal fistula were used in a replicated 4×4 Latin square experiment with four consecutive periods of 15 d. Treatments were as follows: control, LGY, MGY, and HGY with 0, 100, 200, and 300 mL GY per goat per day, respectively. The GY was added in two equal portions at 08∶00 and 17∶00 through ruminal fistula. Samples of blood and ruminal fluid were collected on the last one and two days of each period, respectively. Results showed that the plasma concentrations of triglyceride and total cholesterol were not affected by the supplemented GY. Compared with the control, goats supplemented with MGY and HGY had significantly higher (P<0.05) concentrations of plasma glucose and total protein, ruminal volatile fatty acid and molar proportion of propionate, and significantly lower (P<0.05) ruminal pH and ammonia nitrogen. These parameters changed linearly with increasing GY supplementation level (P<0.05). In conclusion, GY has great potential to be developed as a feed additive with dual effects of glycerol and yeast for ruminants.

  14. Malachite green toxicity assessed on Asian catfish primary cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells by a proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Pierrard, Marie-Aline; Kestemont, Patrick; Delaive, Edouard; Dieu, Marc; Raes, Martine; Silvestre, Frédéric

    2012-06-15

    The potential genotoxic and carcinogenic properties reported for malachite green (MG) and the frequent detection of MG residues in fish and fish products, despite the ban of MG, have recently generated great concern. Additional toxicological data are required for a better understanding of the mechanism of action and a more comprehensive risk assessment for the exposure of fish to this fungicide. To date, the use of fish peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has not been exploited as a tool in the assessment of the toxicity of chemicals. However, PBMCs are exposed to toxicants and can be easily collected by blood sampling. The present study aims at better understanding the effects of MG by a proteomic analysis of primary cultured PBMC from the Asian catfish, Pangasianodon hypophthalmus, exposed to MG. The two lowest concentrations of 1 and 10 ppb were selected based on the MTS (water soluble tetrazolium salts) cytotoxicity test. Using a proteomic analysis (2D-DIGE), we showed that 109 proteins displayed significant changes in abundance in PBMC exposed during 48 h to MG. Most of these proteins were successfully identified by nano LC-MS/MS and validated through the Peptide and Protein Prophet of Scaffold™ software, but only 19 different proteins were considered corresponding to a single identification per spot. Our data suggest that low concentrations of MG could affect the mitochondrial metabolic functions, impair some signal transduction cascades and normal cell division, stimulate DNA repair and disorganize the cytoskeleton. Altogether, these results confirm that the mitochondrion is a target of MG toxicity. Further studies on the identified proteins are needed to better understand the mechanisms of MG toxicity in fish produced for human consumption.

  15. Evaluation of loop-mediated isothermal amplification for the rapid identification of bacteria and resistance determinants in positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Rödel, J; Bohnert, J A; Stoll, S; Wassill, L; Edel, B; Karrasch, M; Löffler, B; Pfister, W

    2017-01-06

    The use of molecular assays to rapidly identify pathogens and resistance genes directly from positive blood cultures (BCs) contribute to shortening the time required for the diagnosis of bloodstream infections. In this work, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assays have been examined for their potential use in BC diagnosis. Three different assays were applied. The commercially available eazyplex® MRSA test detects Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, mecA, and mecC. Two in-house assays [Gram-positive (GP) and Gram-negative (GN)] have been developed for the detection of streptococci, enterococci, vanA, vanB, Pseudomonas spp., Enterobacteriaceae, and the bla CTX-M family. A total of 370 positive BCs were analyzed. LAMP test results were obtained within 30 min, including sample preparation. Amplification was measured by real-time fluorescence detection. The threshold time for fluorescence intensity values ranged from 6.25 to 13.75 min. The specificity and sensitivity of the assays varied depending on the target. Overall, from 87.7% of BCs, true-positive results were obtained, compared to routine standard diagnosis. Twenty-one tests were true-negative because of the lack of an appropriate target (5.7%). The concordance of positive test results for resistance genes with subsequent antibiotic susceptibility testing was 100%. From 15 BC bottles with mixed cultures, eazyplex® assays produced correct results in 73% of the cases. This study shows that LAMP assays are fast and cost-saving tools for rapid BC testing in order to expedite the diagnostic report and improve the antibiotic stewardship for sepsis patients.

  16. Saponin promotes rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility profiling of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in blood cultures with the Vitek 2 system.

    PubMed

    Lupetti, A; Barnini, S; Morici, P; Ghelardi, E; Nibbering, P H; Campa, M

    2013-04-01

    The rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of bacteria in clinical blood cultures is crucial to optimise antimicrobial therapy. A previous study involving small sample numbers revealed that the addition of saponin to blood cultures, further referred to as the new method, shortened considerably the turn-around time for the identification and AST of Gram-positive cocci as compared to the current method involving an overnight subculture. Here, we extend previous results and compare the identification and AST of blood cultures containing Gram-negative bacilli by the new and current methods. The identification and AST of 121 Gram-positive and 109 Gram-negative bacteria in clinical monomicrobial blood cultures by the new and current methods and, in the case of Gram-negative bacilli, by direct (no additions) inoculation into an automated system (rapid method) was assessed using the Vitek 2 system. Discrepancies between the results obtained with the different methods were solved by manual methods. The new method correctly identified 88 % of Gram-positive and 98 % of Gram-negative bacteria, and the rapid method correctly identified 94 % of Gram-negative bacteria. The AST for all antimicrobials by the new method were concordant with the current method for 55 % and correct for an additional 9 % of Gram-positive bacteria, and concordant with the current method for 62 % and correct for an additional 21 % of Gram-negative bacilli. The AST by the rapid method was concordant with the current method for 62 % and correct for an additional 12 % of Gram-negative bacilli. Together, saponin-treated monomicrobial blood cultures allow rapid and reliable identification and AST of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  17. Time to positivity of blood culture association with clinical presentation, prognosis and ESBL-production in Escherichia coli bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, R; Viñas-Castillo, L; Lepe-Jiménez, J A; García-Cabrera, E; Cisneros-Herreros, J M

    2012-09-01

    The time to positivity (TTP) of blood cultures has been associated with increased mortality in bacteremia caused by several microorganisms. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between TTP and prognosis, clinical presentation and extended spectrum B-lactamase (ESBL)-production in patients with Escherichia coli bacteremia. This is a retrospective observational study involving 226 adult patients with E. coli bacteremia. Data collected included underlying diseases, clinical presentation, prognosis factors, TTP, ESBL-production and outcome. Thirty-one (14%) patients had severe sepsis and 29 (13%) septic shock at presentation. Thirty-three (14%) strains were ESBL-producers. Thirty-nine (17%) patients died during admission and 17 (7.5%) within 48 hours. The median TTP was 8.3 hours (range, 0.42–76.5). It was significantly shorter in patients with septic shock (6.23 h, range 1.12–47.29 h vs. 8.51 h, range 0.42–76.50 h; p = 0.018). Rapid growth of E. coli, Pitt index >1.5, non-urinary source and Charlson score >2 were selected as independent risk factors of in-hospital mortality by the multivariate analysis. ESBL-production was not associated with modifications in TTP. Lower TTP is an independent risk factor for septic shock and poor outcome in episodes of E. coli bacteremia. The TTP in E. coli bacteremia is not significantly modified by ESBL-production.

  18. Reduced susceptibility to vancomycin and biofilm formation in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated from blood cultures

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Luiza; Brito, Carla Ivo; Pereira, Valéria Cataneli; de Oliveira, Adilson; Camargo, Carlos Henrique; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to correlate the presence of ica genes, biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance in 107 strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated from blood cultures. The isolates were analysed to determine their methicillin resistance, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type, ica genes and biofilm formation and the vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was measured for isolates and subpopulations growing on vancomycin screen agar. The mecA gene was detected in 81.3% of the S. epidermidis isolated and 48.2% carried SCCmec type III. The complete icaADBC operon was observed in 38.3% of the isolates; of these, 58.5% produced a biofilm. Furthermore, 47.7% of the isolates grew on vancomycin screen agar, with an increase in the MIC in 75.9% of the isolates. Determination of the MIC of subpopulations revealed that 64.7% had an MIC ≥ 4 μg mL-1, including 15.7% with an MIC of 8 μg mL-1 and 2% with an MIC of 16 μg mL-1. The presence of the icaADBC operon, biofilm production and reduced susceptibility to vancomycin were associated with methicillin resistance. This study reveals a high level of methicillin resistance, biofilm formation and reduced susceptibility to vancomycin in subpopulations of S. epidermidis. These findings may explain the selection of multidrug-resistant isolates in hospital settings and the consequent failure of antimicrobial treatment. PMID:25410990

  19. Evaluation of the BD BACTEC FX blood volume monitoring system as a continuous quality improvement measure.

    PubMed

    Coorevits, L; Van den Abeele, A-M

    2015-07-01

    The yield of blood cultures is proportional to the volume of blood cultured. We evaluated an automatic blood volume monitoring system, recently developed by Becton Dickinson within its BACTEC EpiCenter module, that calculates mean volumes of negative aerobic bottles and generates boxplots and histograms. First, we evaluated the filling degree of 339 aerobic glass blood cultures by calculating the weight-based volume for each bottle. A substantial amount of the bottles (48.3%) were inadequately filled. Evaluation of the accuracy of the monitoring system showed a mean bias of -1.4 mL (-15.4%). Additional evaluation, using the amended software on 287 aerobic blood culture bottles, resulted in an acceptable mean deviation of -0.3 mL (-3.3%). The new software version was also tested on 200 of the recently introduced plastic bottles, which will replace the glass bottles in the near future, showing a mean deviation of +2.8 mL (+26.7%). In conclusion, the mean calculated volumes can be used for the training of a single phlebotomist. However, filling problems appear to be masked when using them for phlebotomist groups or on wards. Here, visual interpretation of boxplots and histograms can serve as a useful tool to observe the spread of the filling degrees and to develop a continuous improvement program. Re-adjustment of the software has proven to be necessary for use with plastic bottles. Due to our findings, BD has developed further adjustments to the software for validated use with plastic bottles, which will be released soon.

  20. Value of surveillance blood culture for early diagnosis of occult bacteremia in patients on corticosteroid therapy following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chizuka, A; Kami, M; Kanda, Y; Murashige, N; Kishi, Y; Hamaki, T; Kim, S-W; Hori, A; Kojima, R; Mori, S-I; Tanosaki, R; Gomi, H; Takaue, Y

    2005-03-01

    Bloodstream infection (BSI) is a significant complication following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). Corticosteroids mask inflammatory responses, delaying the initiation of antibiotics. We reviewed medical records of 69 allo-SCT patients who had been on >0.5 mg/kg prednisolone to investigate the efficacy of weekly surveillance blood cultures. A total of 36 patients (52%) had positive cultures, 25 definitive BSI and 11 probable BSI. Pathogens in definitive BSI were Staphylococcus epidermidis (n=7), S. aureus (n=4), Entrococcus faecalis (n=3), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=5), Acenitobacter lwoffii (n=4), and others (n=10). The median interval from the initiation of corticosteroids to the first positive cultures was 24 days (range, 1-70). At the first positive cultures, 15 patients with definitive BSI were afebrile. Four of them remained afebrile throughout the period of positive surveillance cultures. Patients with afebrile BSI tended to be older (P=0.063), and had in-dwelling central venous catheters less frequently than febrile patients (P<0.0001). Bloodstream pathogens were directly responsible for death in two patients with afebrile BSI. This study demonstrates that cortisosteroid frequently masks inflammatory reactions in allo-SCT recipients given conrticosteroids, and that surveillance blood culture is only diagnostic clue for 'occult' BSI.

  1. Biotransformation of phytosterols under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Dykstra, Christy M; Giles, Hamilton D; Banerjee, Sujit; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2014-07-01

    Phytosterols are plant-derived sterols present in pulp and paper wastewater and have been implicated in the endocrine disruption of aquatic species. Bioassays were performed to assess the effect of an additional carbon source and/or solubilizing agent on the aerobic biotransformation of a mixture of three common phytosterols (β-sitosterol, stigmasterol and campesterol). The aerobic biotransformation of the phytosterol mixture by a mixed culture developed from a pulp and paper wastewater treatment system was examined under three separate conditions: with phytosterols as the sole added carbon source, with phytosterols and dextrin as an additional carbon source, and with phytosterols added with ethanol as an additional carbon source and solubilizing agent. Significant phytosterol removal was not observed in assays set up with phytosterol powder, either with or without an additional carbon source. In contrast, all three phytosterols were aerobically degraded when added as a dissolved solution in ethanol. Thus, under the experimental conditions of this study, the bioavailability of phytosterols was limited without the presence of a solubilizing agent. The total phytosterol removal rate was linear for the first six days before re-spiking, with a rate of 0.47 mg/L-d (R(2) = 0.998). After the second spiking, the total phytosterol removal rate was linear for seven days, with a rate of 0.32 mg/L-d (R(2) = 0.968). Following the 7th day, the phytosterol removal rate markedly accelerated, suggesting two different mechanisms are involved in phytosterol biotransformation, more likely related to the production of enzyme(s) involved in phytosterol degradation, induced under different cell growth conditions. β-sitosterol was preferentially degraded, as compared to stigmasterol and campesterol, although all three phytosterols fell below detection limits by the 24th day of incubation.

  2. Micropallet arrays for the capture, isolation and culture of circulating tumor cells from whole blood of mice engrafted with primary human pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gach, Philip C; Attayek, Peter J; Whittlesey, Rebecca L; Yeh, Jen Jen; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2014-04-15

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are important biomarkers of cancer progression and metastatic potential. The rarity of CTCs in peripheral blood has driven the development of technologies to isolate these tumor cells with high specificity; however, there are limited techniques available for isolating target CTCs following enumeration. A strategy is described to capture and isolate viable tumor cells from whole blood using an array of releasable microstructures termed micropallets. Specific capture of nucleated cells or cells expressing epithelial cell adhesion molecules (EpCAM) was achieved by functionalizing micropallet surfaces with either fibronectin, Matrigel or anti-EpCAM antibody. Surface grafting of poly(acrylic acid) followed by covalent binding of protein A/G enabled efficient capture of EpCAM antibody on the micropallet surface. MCF-7 cells, a human breast adenocarcinoma, were retained on the array surface with 90±8% efficiency when using an anti-EpCAM-coated array. To demonstrate the efficiency of tumor cell retention on micropallet arrays in the presence of blood, MCF-7 cells were mixed into whole blood and added to small arrays (71 mm(2)) coated with fibronectin, Matrigel or anti-EpCAM. These approaches achieved MCF-7 cell capture from ≤10 µL of whole blood with efficiencies greater than 85%. Furthermore, MCF-7 cells intermixed with 1 mL blood and loaded onto large arrays (7171 mm(2)) were captured with high efficiencies (≥97%), could be isolated from the array by a laser-based approach and were demonstrated to yield a high rate of colony formation (≥85%) after removal from the array. Clinical utility of this technology was shown through the capture, isolation and successful culture of CTCs from the blood of mice engrafted with primary human pancreatic tumors. Direct capture and isolation of living tumor cells from blood followed by analysis or culture will be a valuable tool for cancer cell characterization.

  3. Multicenter evaluation of the Portrait Staph ID/R blood culture panel for the rapid identification of Staphylococci and detection of mecA gene.

    PubMed

    Denys, Gerald A; Collazo-Velez, Vanessa; Young, Stephen; Daly, Judy A; Couturier, Marc Roger; Faron, Matthew L; Buchan, Blake W; Ledeboer, Nathan

    2017-01-25

    Blood stream infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States and are associated with increased healthcare cost. We evaluated the Portrait Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel (BCP) multiplex PCR assay (Great Basin Scientific, Salt Lake City, UT) for the rapid and simultaneous identification (ID) of Staphylococcus aureus, S. lugdunensis and Staphylococcus species to the genus level and the detection of mecA gene directly from a positive blood culture bottle. A total of 765 BACTEC® bottles demonstrating Gram positive cocci in singles or clusters were tested during the prospective trial at 3 clinical sites. The Portrait Staph ID/R BCP results were compared with conventional biochemical and cefoxitin disk methods performed at an independent laboratory. Discordant ID and mecA results were resolved by rpoB gene sequencing and mecA gene sequencing, respectively. A total of 658 Staphylococcus spp. (S. aureus 211, S. lugdunensis 3, and Staphylococcus spp. 444) were recovered from mono-microbial and 33 poly-microbial blood cultures. After discrepant analysis, the overall Portrait Staph ID/R BCP positive percent agreement and negative percent agreement for Staphylococcus ID was 99.4%/99.9% and mecA detection was 99.7%/99.2%.

  4. The expression of pluripotency genes and neuronal markers after neurodifferentiation in fibroblasts co-cultured with human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Marinowic, D R; Domingues, M F; Machado, D C; DaCosta, J C

    2015-01-01

    Human umbilical cord blood is an attractive source of stem cells; however, it has a heterogeneous cell population with few mesenchymal stem cells. Cell reprogramming induced by different methodologies can confer pluripotency to differentiated adult cells. The objective of this study was to evaluate the reprogramming of fibroblasts and their subsequent neural differentiation after co-culture with umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells. Cells were obtained from four human umbilical cords. The mononuclear cells were cultured for 7 d and subsequently co-cultured with mouse fibroblast NIH-3T3 cells for 6 d. The pluripotency of the cells was evaluated by RT-PCR using primers specific for pluripotency marker genes. The pluripotency was also confirmed by adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation. Neural differentiation of the reprogrammed cells was evaluated by immunofluorescence. All co-cultured cells showed adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation capacity. After co-cultivation, cells expressed the pluripotency gene KLF4. Statistically significant differences in cell area, diameter, optical density, and fractal dimension were observed by confocal microscopy in the neurally differentiated cells. Contact in the form of co-cultivation of fibroblasts with umbilical cord blood mononuclear fraction for 6 d promoted the reprogramming of these cells, allowing the later induction of neural differentiation.

  5. Comparative analysis of Gram's stain, PNA-FISH and Sepsityper with MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of yeast direct from positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Gorton, Rebecca L; Ramnarain, P; Barker, K; Stone, N; Rattenbury, S; McHugh, T D; Kibbler, C C

    2014-10-01

    Fungaemia diagnosis could be improved by reducing the time to identification of yeast from blood cultures. This study aimed to evaluate three rapid methods for the identification of yeast direct from blood cultures; Gram's stain analysis, the AdvanDX Peptide Nucleic Acid in Situ Hybridisation Yeast Traffic Light system (PNA-FISH YTL) and Bruker Sepsityper alongside matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Fifty blood cultures spiked with a known single yeast strain were analysed by blinded operators experienced in each method. Identifications were compared with MALDI-TOF MS CHROMagar Candida culture and ITS rRNA sequence-based identifications. On first attempt, success rates of 96% (48/50) and 76% (36/50) were achieved using PNA-FISH YTL and Gram's stain respectively. MALDI-TOF MS demonstrated a success rate of 56% (28/50) when applying manufacturer's species log score thresholds and 76% (38/50) using in-house parameters, including lowering the species log score threshold to >1.5. In conclusion, PNA-FISH YTL demonstrated a high success rate successfully identifying yeast commonly encountered in fungaemia. Sepsityper(™) with MALDI-TOF MS was accurate but increased sensitivity is required. Due to the misidentification of commonly encountered yeast Gram's stain analysis demonstrated limited utility in this setting.

  6. Evaluation of fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) for the detection of fungi directly from blood cultures and cerebrospinal fluid from patients with suspected invasive mycoses.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Roberto Moreira; Da Silva Neto, João Ricardo; Santos, Carla Silvana; Frickmann, Hagen; Poppert, Sven; Cruz, Kátia Santana; Koshikene, Daniela; De Souza, João Vicente Braga

    2015-01-31

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of in-house FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridisation) procedures for the direct identification of invasive fungal infections in blood cultures and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples and to compare these FISH results with those obtained using traditional microbiological techniques and PCR targeting of the ITS1 region of the rRNA gene. In total, 112 CSF samples and 30 positive blood cultures were investigated by microscopic examination, culture, PCR-RFLP and FISH. The sensitivity of FISH for fungal infections in CSF proved to be slightly better than that of conventional microscopy (India ink) under the experimental conditions, detecting 48 (instead of 46) infections in 112 samples. The discriminatory powers of traditional microbiology, PCR-RFLP and FISH for fungal bloodstream infections were equivalent, with the detection of 14 fungal infections in 30 samples. However, the mean times to diagnosis after the detection of microbial growth by automated blood culture systems were 5 hours, 20 hours and 6 days for FISH, PCR-RFLP and traditional microbiology, respectively. The results demonstrate that FISH is a valuable tool for the identification of invasive mycoses that can be implemented in the diagnostic routine of hospital laboratories.

  7. Human bone marrow and umbilical cord blood cells generate CD4+ and CD8+ single-positive T cells in murine fetal thymus organ culture.

    PubMed Central

    Yeoman, H; Gress, R E; Bare, C V; Leary, A G; Boyse, E A; Bard, J; Shultz, L D; Harris, D T; DeLuca, D

    1993-01-01

    Murine fetal thymus lobes isolated from both normal and scid/scid mice can be colonized by donor cells from either human bone marrow or human umbilical cord blood in vitro. Subsequent organ culture results in a transient production of a few CD4+ CD8+ (double-positive) cells and then the accumulation of CD4+ or CD8+ (single-positive) T cells. A significant number of immature T-cell intermediates (e.g., CD8low, CD3-/low cells) were present in early organ cultures, suggesting that these were progenitors of the mature CD3+/high single-positive T cells that dominated late cultures. Depletion of mature T cells from the donor-cell populations did not affect their ability to colonize thymus lobes. However, colonization depended on the presence of CD7+ progenitor T cells. Limiting dilution experiments using mature T-cell populations (human peripheral blood leukocytes, human bone marrow cells, and human umbilical cord blood cells) suggested that thymic organ culture supports the growth of progenitor T cells but does not support the growth of mature human T cells. Each of these donor populations produced single-positive populations with different CD4/CD8 ratios, suggesting that precursor cells from different sources differ qualitatively in their capacity to differentiate into T cells. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7902570

  8. Rapid detection of blaKPC carbapenemase genes by internally controlled real-time PCR assay using bactec blood culture bottles.

    PubMed

    Hindiyeh, Musa; Smollan, Gill; Grossman, Zehava; Ram, Daniela; Robinov, Jana; Belausov, Natasha; Ben-David, Debbie; Tal, Ilana; Davidson, Yehudit; Shamiss, Ari; Mendelson, Ella; Keller, Nathan

    2011-07-01

    Rapid detection of drug-resistant bacteria in clinical samples plays an instrumental role in patients' infection management and in implementing effective infection control policies. In the study described in this report, we validated a multiplex TaqMan real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for the detection of bla(KPC) genes and the human RNase P gene in Bactec blood culture bottles. The MagNA Pure LC (version 2.0) instrument was utilized to extract nucleic acids from the inoculated broth, while bovine serum albumin (BSA) was utilized as the PCR inhibitor reliever. The multiplex assay, which was specific for the detection of bla(KPC) genes, had a limit of detection of 19 CFU per reaction mixture with human blood-spiked Bactec bottles. Of the 323 Bactec blood culture sets evaluated, the same 55 (17%) blood cultures positive for carbapenem-resistant bacteria by culture were also positive by the validated qPCR assay. Thus, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the qPCR assay compared to the results of culture were all 100%. bla(KPC) genes were also detected from the same Bactec bottle broth after manual extraction with a QIAamp DNA minikit; however, there was an average 3-threshold-cycle delay in the qPCR readings. With the limited therapeutic options available, the accurate and rapid detection of bla(KPC)-possessing bacteria by the described bla(KPC)/RNase P assay will be a crucial first step in ensuring optimal clinical outcomes and infection control.

  9. Evaluation of the Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit for detecting microbial DNA in blood culture bottles using PCR-reverse blot hybridization assay.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungho; Wang, Hye-Young; Kim, Seoyong; Park, Soon Deok; Yu, Kwangmin; Kim, Hyo Youl; Uh, Young; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2016-09-01

    DNA extraction efficiency affects the success of PCR-based method applications. The Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit for extracting DNA by using paper chromatography is technically easy to use and requires just two reagents and only 10min to complete. The Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit could be offered as a rapid, accurate, and convenient method for extracting bacterial and fungal DNA from blood culture bottles. We compared the efficiencies of the commercial kit (Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit) and an in-house conventional boiling method with Chelex-100 resin for DNA extraction from blood culture bottles. The efficiency of the two DNA extraction methods was assessed by PCR-reverse blot hybridization assay (PCR-REBA, REBA Sepsis-ID) for detecting Gram positive (GP) bacteria, Gram negative (GN) bacteria, and Candida species with 196 positive and 200 negative blood culture bottles. The detection limits of the two DNA extraction methods were 10(3)CFU/mL for GP bacteria, 10(3)CFU/mL for GN bacteria, and 10(4)CFU/mL for Candida. The sensitivity and specificity of the Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit by REBA Sepsis-ID were 95.4% (187/196) and 100% (200/200), respectively. The overall agreement of the two DNA extraction methods was 98.9% (392/396). Three of four samples showing discrepant results between the two extraction methods were more accurately matched up with the Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit based on conventional culture methods. The results indicated that the Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit extracted bacterial and fungal DNA in blood culture bottles and allowed extracted DNA to be used in molecular assay.

  10. Blood Culture Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... other testing is also performed, such as a chemistry panel to evaluate the health status of a ... Health Professionals ©2001 - by American Association for Clinical Chemistry • Contact Us | Terms of Use | Privacy We comply ...

  11. Procalcitonin as a marker of Candida species detection by blood culture and polymerase chain reaction in septic patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of our study is to test procalcitonin (PCT) as surrogate marker of identification of Candida spp. by blood culture (BC) and real-time-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), whether alone or in association with bacteria, in septic patients. Methods We performed a single-centre retrospective study. We reviewed the clinical charts of patients with a diagnosis of severe sepsis or septic shock treated at our general intensive care unit from March 2009 to March 2013. We analysed all diagnostic episodes consisting of BC, real-time PCR assay and dosage of PCT. We registered age, sex, white blood count, sequential organ failure assessment score and type of admission between medical or surgical. When inclusion criteria were met more than once, we registered the new diagnostic episode as subsequent diagnostic episode. The diagnostic performance of PCT to predict Candida spp. identification alone or in mixed infections by either BC or PCR was tested using the receiver-operative characteristic curve. Logistic regression was constructed using presence of Candida spp. as the dependent variable. Results A total of 260 diagnostic episodes met the inclusion criteria. According to BC results classification, a significantly lower value of PCT was observed in Candida spp. BSI (0.99 ng/ml, 0.86 - 1.34) than in BSI caused by bacteria (16.7 ng/ml, 7.65 - 50.2) or in mixed infections (4.76 ng/ml, 2.98 - 6.08). Similar findings were observed considering PCR results. A cut-off of ≤ 6.08 ng/ml for PCT yielded a sensitivity of 86.8%, a specificity of 87.4%, a positive predictive value of 63.9%, a negative predictive value (NPV) of 96.3% and an area under the curve of 0.93 for Candida spp. identification by BC. A similar high NPV for a cut-off ≤ 6.78 ng/ml was observed considering the classification of diagnostic episodes according to PCR results, with an AUC of 0.85. A subsequent diagnostic episode was independently associated with Candida spp. detection either by

  12. Health-Promoting Effects of Serial vs. Integrated Combined Strength and Aerobic Training.

    PubMed

    Karatrantou, K; Gerodimos, V; Häkkinen, K; Zafeiridis, A

    2017-01-01

    Combined strength and aerobic training programs are widely used for improving markers of physical