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Sample records for aerobic dive limits

  1. High diving metabolism results in a short aerobic dive limit for Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus).

    PubMed

    Gerlinsky, Carling D; Rosen, David A S; Trites, Andrew W

    2013-07-01

    The diving capacity of marine mammals is typically defined by the aerobic dive limit (ADL) which, in lieu of direct measurements, can be calculated (cADL) from total body oxygen stores (TBO) and diving metabolic rate (DMR). To estimate cADL, we measured blood oxygen stores, and combined this with diving oxygen consumption rates (VO2) recorded from 4 trained Steller sea lions diving in the open ocean to depths of 10 or 40 m. We also examined the effect of diving exercise on O2 stores by comparing blood O2 stores of our diving animals to non-diving individuals at an aquarium. Mass-specific blood volume of the non-diving individuals was higher in the winter than in summer, but there was no overall difference in blood O2 stores between the diving and non-diving groups. Estimated TBO (35.9 ml O2 kg(-1)) was slightly lower than previously reported for Steller sea lions and other Otariids. Calculated ADL was 3.0 min (based on an average DMR of 2.24 L O2 min(-1)) and was significantly shorter than the average 4.4 min dives our study animals performed when making single long dives-but was similar to the times recorded during diving bouts (a series of 4 dives followed by a recovery period on the surface), as well as the dive times of wild animals. Our study is the first to estimate cADL based on direct measures of VO2 and blood oxygen stores for an Otariid and indicates they have a much shorter ADL than previously thought.

  2. Aerobic dive limit does not decline in an aging pinniped.

    PubMed

    Hindle, Allyson G; Mellish, Jo-Ann E; Horning, Markus

    2011-11-01

    Apneustic hunters such as diving mammals exploit body oxygen stores while submerged; therefore, any decline in oxygen handling at advanced life stages could critically impair foraging ability. We calculated the aerobic dive limit (cADL = 17.9 ± 4.4  min SD) from blood and muscle oxygen stores and published metabolic rates of Weddell seals within (9-16 years, n = 24) and beyond peak-reproductive age (17-27 years, n = 26), to investigate (1) senescent constraints in apneustic hunting, and (2) whether mass or age primarily determines oxygen stores and ADL in older seals. We compared cADL with behavioral ADL from 5,275 free-ranging dives (bADL = 24.0 ± 5.3 min, n = 18 females). We observed no changes in Weddell seal oxygen stores, its determinants, or in ADLs late in life. Oxygen stores were better predicted by mass than age, consistent with published findings for young adults. Hematological panels (n = 6) were consistent across mass and age, though hematocrit (females > males, 6% elevation) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin content (females < males, 8% reduction) varied by sex. Whole blood viscosity was decreased with increasing mass in females and was higher than in males overall (+18%). This was largely due to elevated hematocrit in females, although plasma viscosity also varied under some conditions. Females had higher blood volume and elevated blood oxygen stores (vol% body mass), which did not translate into significantly higher cADL (18.1 vs. 17.1 min for males). Neither cADL nor bADL were mass- or age-dependent.

  3. Constraint lines and performance envelopes in behavioral physiology: the case of the aerobic dive limit.

    PubMed

    Horning, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Constraint lines-the boundaries that delimit point clouds in bivariate scattergrams-have been applied in macro-ecology to quantify the effects of limiting factors on response variables, but have not been applied to the behavioral performance and physiological ecology of individual vertebrates. I propose that behavioral scattergrams of air-breathing, diving vertebrates contain informative edges that convey insights into physiological constraints that shape the performance envelopes of divers. In the classic example of repeated cycles of apnea and eupnea in diving, air-breathing vertebrates, the need to balance oxygen consumption, and intake should differentially constrain recovery for dives within or exceeding the aerobic dive limit (ADL). However, the bulk of variance observed in recovery versus dive duration scattergrams originates from undetermined behavioral variables, and deviations from overall stasis may become increasingly apparent at progressively smaller scales of observation. As shown on dive records from 79 Galápagos fur seals, the selection of appropriate time scales of integration yields two distinct recovery boundaries for dive series within and beyond the estimated ADL. An analysis of the corresponding constraint lines is independent of central tendencies in data and avoids violating parametric assumptions for large data sets where variables of interest account for only a small portion of observed variance. I hypothesize that the intercept between these constraint lines represents the effective ADL, and present physiological and ecological considerations to support this hypothesis.

  4. Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) have greater blood volumes, higher diving metabolic rates and a longer aerobic dive limit when nutritionally stressed.

    PubMed

    Gerlinsky, Carling D; Trites, Andrew W; Rosen, David A S

    2014-03-01

    Marine mammal foraging behaviour inherently depends on diving ability. Declining populations of Steller sea lions may be facing nutritional stress that could affect their diving ability through changes in body composition or metabolism. Our objective was to determine whether nutritional stress (restricted food intake resulting in a 10% decrease in body mass) altered the calculated aerobic dive limit (cADL) of four captive sea lions diving in the open ocean, and how this related to changes in observed dive behaviour. We measured diving metabolic rate (DMR), blood O2 stores, body composition and dive behaviour prior to and while under nutritional restriction. We found that nutritionally stressed sea lions increased the duration of their single long dives, and the proportion of time they spent at the surface during a cycle of four dives. Nutritionally stressed sea lions lost both lipid and lean mass, resulting in potentially lower muscle O2 stores. However, total body O2 stores increased due to rises in blood O2 stores associated with having higher blood volumes. Nutritionally stressed sea lions also had higher mass-specific metabolic rates. The greater rise in O2 stores relative to the increase in mass-specific DMR resulted in the sea lions having a longer cADL when nutritionally stressed. We conclude that there was no negative effect of nutritional stress on the diving ability of sea lions. However, nutritional stress did lower foraging efficiency and require more foraging time to meet energy requirements due to increases in diving metabolic rates and surface recovery times.

  5. High feeding costs limit dive time in the largest whales.

    PubMed

    Acevedo-Gutiérrez, A; Croll, D A; Tershy, B R

    2002-06-01

    Large body size usually extends dive duration in air-breathing vertebrates. However, the two largest predators on earth, the blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) and the fin whale (B. physalus), perform short dives for their size. Here, we test the hypothesis that the foraging behavior of these two species (lunge-feeding) is energetically expensive and limits their dive duration. We estimated the cost of lunge-feeding in both species using an approach that combined attaching time/depth recorders to seven blue whales and eight fin whales and comparing the collected dive information with predictions made by optimality models of dive behavior. We show that the rate at which whales recovered from a foraging dive was twice that of a non-foraging dive and that the cost of foraging relative to the cost of travel to and from the prey patch was 3.15 in blue whales (95 % CI 2.58-3.72) and 3.60 in fin whales (95 % CI 2.35-4.85). Whales foraged in small areas (<1 km(2)) and foraging bouts lasted more than one dive, indicating that prey did not disperse and thus that prey dispersal could not account for the limited dive durations of the whales. Despite the enormous size of blue whales and fin whales, the high energetic costs of lunge-feeding confine them to short durations of submergence and to areas with dense prey aggregations. As a corollary, because of their limited foraging time under water, these whales may be particularly vulnerable to perturbations in prey abundance.

  6. Thermal substitution and aerobic efficiency: measuring and predicting effects of heat balance on endotherm diving energetics.

    PubMed

    Lovvorn, J R

    2007-11-29

    For diving endotherms, modelling costs of locomotion as a function of prey dispersion requires estimates of the costs of diving to different depths. One approach is to estimate the physical costs of locomotion (Pmech) with biomechanical models and to convert those estimates to chemical energy needs by an aerobic efficiency (eta=Pmech/Vo2) based on oxygen consumption (Vo2) in captive animals. Variations in eta with temperature depend partly on thermal substitution, whereby heat from the inefficiency of exercising muscles or the heat increment of feeding (HIF) can substitute for thermogenesis. However, measurements of substitution have ranged from lack of detection to nearly complete use of exercise heat or HIF. This inconsistency may reflect (i) problems in methods of calculating substitution, (ii) confounding mechanisms of thermoregulatory control, or (iii) varying conditions that affect heat balance and allow substitution to be expressed. At present, understanding of how heat generation is regulated, and how heat is transported among tissues during exercise, digestion, thermal challenge and breath holding, is inadequate for predicting substitution and aerobic efficiencies without direct measurements for conditions of interest. Confirming that work rates during exercise are generally conserved, and identifying temperatures at those work rates below which shivering begins, may allow better prediction of aerobic efficiencies for ecological models.

  7. Deep-Diving California Sea Lions: Are they Pushing their Physiological Limit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    during descent of deep dives to values less than 10 beats min-1 (Fig.1). Such a low heart rate also limits the absorption and distribution of both...maintain arterial hemoglobin saturation above 90% during deep dives as long as 7 minutes (McDonald and Ponganis 2012; McDonald and Ponganis 2013). In...system, experiences significant hypoxemia with routine arterial hemoglobin desaturation to 10 to 20% (Meir et al. 2009). However, similar to the sea

  8. Cellular hallmarks reveal restricted aerobic metabolism at thermal limits

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Aitana; Busso, Coralie; Gönczy, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    All organisms live within a given thermal range, but little is known about the mechanisms setting the limits of this range. We uncovered cellular features exhibiting signature changes at thermal limits in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. These included changes in embryo size and shape, which were also observed in Caenorhabditis briggsae, indicating evolutionary conservation. We hypothesized that such changes could reflect restricted aerobic capacity at thermal limits. Accordingly, we uncovered that relative respiration in C. elegans embryos decreases at the thermal limits as compared to within the thermal range. Furthermore, by compromising components of the respiratory chain, we demonstrated that the reliance on aerobic metabolism is reduced at thermal limits. Moreover, embryos thus compromised exhibited signature changes in size and shape already within the thermal range. We conclude that restricted aerobic metabolism at the thermal limits contributes to setting the thermal range in a metazoan organism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04810.001 PMID:25929283

  9. Summer diving behavior of male walruses in Bristol Bay, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jay, C.V.; Farley, Sean D.; Garner, G.W.

    2001-01-01

    Pacific walruses (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) make trips from ice or land haul-out sites to forage for benthic prey. We describe dive and trip characteristics from time-depth-recorder data collected over a one-month period during summer from four male Pacific walruses in Bristol Bay, Alaska. Dives were classified into four types. Shallow (4 m), short (2.7 min), square-shaped dives accounted for 11% of trip time, and many were probably associated with traveling. Shallow (2 m) and very short (0.5 min) dives composed only 1% of trip time. Deep (41 m), long (7.2 min), square-shaped dives accounted for 46% of trip time and were undoubtedly associated with benthic foraging. V-shaped dives ranged widely in depth, were of moderate duration (4.7 min), and composed 3% of trip time. These dives may have been associated with navigation or exploration of the seafloor for potential prey habitat. Surface intervals between dives were similar among dive types, and generally lasted 1-2 min. Total foraging time was strongly correlated with trip duration and there was no apparent diel pattern of diving in any dive type among animals. We found no correlation between dive duration and postdive surface interval within dive types, suggesting that diving occurred within aerobic dive limits. Trip duration varied considerably within and among walruses (0.3-9.4 d), and there was evidence that some of the very short trips were unrelated to foraging. Overall, walruses were in the water for 76.6% of the time, of which 60.3% was spent diving.

  10. Repeated parallel evolution reveals limiting similarity in subterranean diving beetles.

    PubMed

    Vergnon, Remi; Leijs, Remko; van Nes, Egbert H; Scheffer, Marten

    2013-07-01

    The theory of limiting similarity predicts that co-occurring species must be sufficiently different to coexist. Although this idea is a staple of community ecology, convincing empirical evidence has been scarce. Here we examine 34 subterranean beetle communities in arid inland Australia that share the same habitat type but have evolved in complete isolation over the past 5 million years. Although these communities come from a range of phylogenetic origins, we find that they have almost invariably evolved to share a similar size structure. The relative positions of coexisting species on the body size axis were significantly more regular across communities than would be expected by chance, with a size ratio, on average, of 1.6 between coexisting species. By contrast, species' absolute body sizes varied substantially from one community to the next. This suggests that self-organized spacing according to limiting-similarity theory, as opposed to evolution toward preexisting fixed niches, shaped the communities. Using a model starting from random sets of founder species, we demonstrate that the patterns are indeed consistent with evolutionary self-organization. For less isolated habitats, the same model predicts the coexistence of multiple species in each regularly spaced functional group. Limiting similarity, therefore, may also be compatible with the coexistence of many redundant species.

  11. Locomotion in diving elephant seals: physical and physiological constraints.

    PubMed

    Davis, Randall W; Weihs, Daniel

    2007-11-29

    To better understand how elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) use negative buoyancy to reduce energy metabolism and prolong dive duration, we modelled the energetic cost of transit and deep foraging dives in an elephant seal. A numerical integration technique was used to model the effects of swim speed, descent and ascent angles, and modes of locomotion (i.e. stroking and gliding) on diving metabolic rate, aerobic dive limit, vertical displacement (maximum dive depth) and horizontal displacement (maximum horizontal distance along a straight line between the beginning and end locations of the dive) for aerobic transit and foraging dives. Realistic values of the various parameters were taken from previous experimental data. Our results indicate that there is little energetic advantage to transit dives with gliding descent compared with horizontal swimming beneath the surface. Other factors such as feeding and predator avoidance may favour diving to depth during migration. Gliding descent showed variable energy savings for foraging dives. Deep mid-water foraging dives showed the greatest energy savings (approx. 18%) as a result of gliding during descent. In contrast, flat-bottom foraging dives with horizontal swimming at a depth of 400m showed less of an energetic advantage with gliding descent, primarily because more of the dive involved stroking. Additional data are needed before the advantages of gliding descent can be fully understood for male and female elephant seals of different age and body composition. This type of data will require animal-borne instruments that can record the behaviour, three-dimensional movements and locomotory performance of free-ranging animals at depth.

  12. Deep-Diving California Sea Lions: Are They Pushing Their Physiological Limit?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    bradycardia during descent occurs in deep-diving emperor penguins (Wright et al. 2014), and in deep-diving bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus...potential for vascular bubble formation in a repetitively diving dolphin . J Exp Biol 213: 52-62. Kooyman, G.L., E.A. Wahrenbrock, M.A. Castellini...Experimental Biology 210: 278-289. Williams, T.M., J.E. Haun and W.A. Friedl. 1999. The diving physiology of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). I

  13. Blood Oxygen Depletion in Diving California Sea Lions: How Close to the Limit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    often calculated (cADL) on the basis of total body O2 stores and an estimated diving metabolic rate , has become an essential concept in the...interpretation of diving behavior and foraging ecology (Kooyman and Ponganis 1998); however, the actual rate and magnitude of O2 store depletion during dives...has not been determined in any otariid. This project will document the rate and magnitude of blood O2 store depletion during diving in California sea

  14. O2 store management in diving emperor penguins

    PubMed Central

    Ponganis, P. J.; Stockard, T. K.; Meir, J. U.; Williams, C. L.; Ponganis, K. V.; Howard, R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary In order to further define O2 store utilization during dives and understand the physiological basis of the aerobic dive limit (ADL, dive duration associated with the onset of post-dive blood lactate accumulation), emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri) were equipped with either a blood partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) recorder or a blood sampler while they were diving at an isolated dive hole in the sea ice of McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. Arterial PO2 profiles (57 dives) revealed that (a) pre-dive PO2 was greater than that at rest, (b) PO2 transiently increased during descent and (c) post-dive PO2 reached that at rest in 1.92±1.89 min (N=53). Venous PO2 profiles (130 dives) revealed that (a) pre-dive venous PO2 was greater than that at rest prior to 61% of dives, (b) in 90% of dives venous PO2 transiently increased with a mean maximum PO2 of 53±18 mmHg and a mean increase in PO2 of 11±12 mmHg, (c) in 78% of dives, this peak venous PO2 occurred within the first 3 min, and (d) post-dive venous PO2 reached that at rest within 2.23±2.64 min (N=84). Arterial and venous PO2 values in blood samples collected 1–3 min into dives were greater than or near to the respective values at rest. Blood lactate concentration was less than 2 mmol l–1 as far as 10.5 min into dives, well beyond the known ADL of 5.6 min. Mean arterial and venous PN2 of samples collected at 20–37 m depth were 2.5 times those at the surface, both being 2.1±0.7 atmospheres absolute (ATA; N=3 each), and were not significantly different. These findings are consistent with the maintenance of gas exchange during dives (elevated arterial and venous PO2 and PN2 during dives), muscle ischemia during dives (elevated venous PO2, lack of lactate washout into blood during dives), and arterio-venous shunting of blood both during the surface period (venous PO2 greater than that at rest) and during dives (arterialized venous PO2 values during descent, equivalent arterial and venous PN2 values during

  15. Proof of Concept to Isolate and Culture Primary Muscle Cells from Northern Elephant Seals to Study the Mechanisms that Maintain Aerobic Metabolism Under the Hypoxic Conditions of Breath-hold Diving

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    Cells from Northern Elephant Seals to Study the Mechanisms that Maintain Aerobic Metabolism Under the Hypoxic Conditions of Breath-hold Diving...To isolate and culture primary muscle cells from the swimming muscles of northern elephant seals . OBJECTIVES Objective 1. To test the...Proof of Concept to Isolate and Culture Primary Muscle Cells from Northern Elephant Seals to Study the Mechanisms that Maintain Aerobic Metabolism Under

  16. Blood Oxygen Depletion in Diving California Sea Lions: How Close to the Limit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    appropriate surrogate model for further investigation of blood N2 uptake during diving. RELATED PROJECTS Deep-diving California sea lions: Are they... reservoir in the collapsed lungs serves to supplement blood O2 levels during ascent. Conclusions: Although California sea lions have extreme hypoxemic...Elsner et al. 1998) and f) the basic assumptions of many recent computer models of the uptake and distribution of N2 during diving (Fahlman et al. 2009

  17. Blood Oxygen Depletion in Diving California Sea Lions: How Close to the Limit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    accumulation). The ADL, which is often calculated (cADL) on the basis of total body O2 stores and an estimated diving metabolic rate , has become an essential...concept in the interpretation of diving behavior and foraging ecology (Kooyman and Ponganis 1998); however, the actual rate and magnitude of O2 store...depletion during dives has not been determined in any otariid. This project will document the rate and magnitude of blood O2 store depletion during

  18. The diving behavior of blue and fin whales: is dive duration shorter than expected based on oxygen stores?

    PubMed

    Croll, D A; Acevedo-Gutiérrez, A; Tershy, B R; Urbán-Ramírez, J

    2001-07-01

    Many diving seabirds and marine mammals have been found to regularly exceed their theoretical aerobic dive limit (TADL). No animals have been found to dive for durations that are consistently shorter than their TADL. We attached time-depth recorders to 7 blue whales and 15 fin whales (family Balaenopteridae). The diving behavior of both species was similar, and we distinguished between foraging and traveling dives. Foraging dives in both species were deeper, longer in duration and distinguished by a series of vertical excursions where lunge feeding presumably occurred. Foraging blue whales lunged 2.4 (+/-1.13) times per dive, with a maximum of six times and average vertical excursion of 30.2 (+/-10.04) m. Foraging fin whales lunged 1.7 (+/-0.88) times per dive, with a maximum of eight times and average vertical excursion of 21.2 (+/-4.35) m. The maximum rate of ascent of lunges was higher than the maximum rate of descent in both species, indicating that feeding lunges occurred on ascent. Foraging dives were deeper and longer than non-feeding dives in both species. On average, blue whales dived to 140.0 (+/-46.01) m and 7.8 (+/-1.89) min when foraging, and 67.6 (+/-51.46) m and 4.9 (+/-2.53) min when not foraging. Fin whales dived to 97.9 (+/-32.59) m and 6.3 (+/-1.53) min when foraging and to 59.3 (+/-29.67) m and 4.2 (+/-1.67) min when not foraging. The longest dives recorded for both species, 14.7 min for blue whales and 16.9 min for fin whales, were considerably shorter than the TADL of 31.2 and 28.6 min, respectively. An allometric comparison of seven families diving to an average depth of 80-150 m showed a significant relationship between body mass and dive duration once Balaenopteridae whales, with a mean dive duration of 6.8 min, were excluded from the analysis. Thus, the short dive durations of blue whales and fin whales cannot be explained by the shallow distribution of their prey. We propose instead that short duration diving in large whales results from

  19. Novel locomotor muscle design in extreme deep-diving whales.

    PubMed

    Velten, B P; Dillaman, R M; Kinsey, S T; McLellan, W A; Pabst, D A

    2013-05-15

    Most marine mammals are hypothesized to routinely dive within their aerobic dive limit (ADL). Mammals that regularly perform deep, long-duration dives have locomotor muscles with elevated myoglobin concentrations that are composed of predominantly large, slow-twitch (Type I) fibers with low mitochondrial volume densities (V(mt)). These features contribute to extending ADL by increasing oxygen stores and decreasing metabolic rate. Recent tagging studies, however, have challenged the view that two groups of extreme deep-diving cetaceans dive within their ADLs. Beaked whales (including Ziphius cavirostris and Mesoplodon densirostris) routinely perform the deepest and longest average dives of any air-breathing vertebrate, and short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) perform high-speed sprints at depth. We investigated the locomotor muscle morphology and estimated total body oxygen stores of several species within these two groups of cetaceans to determine whether they (1) shared muscle design features with other deep divers and (2) performed dives within their calculated ADLs. Muscle of both cetaceans displayed high myoglobin concentrations and large fibers, as predicted, but novel fiber profiles for diving mammals. Beaked whales possessed a sprinter's fiber-type profile, composed of ~80% fast-twitch (Type II) fibers with low V(mt). Approximately one-third of the muscle fibers of short-finned pilot whales were slow-twitch, oxidative, glycolytic fibers, a rare fiber type for any mammal. The muscle morphology of beaked whales likely decreases the energetic cost of diving, while that of short-finned pilot whales supports high activity events. Calculated ADLs indicate that, at low metabolic rates, both beaked and short-finned pilot whales carry sufficient onboard oxygen to aerobically support their dives.

  20. A Review of Physiological and Performance Limits in Saturation Diving: 1968-1983.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    1983 are listed in Table IA. These multiple diving series were developed to extend both bottom time and maximal depth in exploration dives ( PHYSALIE I...include the intermediate stages ( PHYSALIE IV, SAGITTAIRE and III), or exponential (i.e., decreasing rate of compression with increasing depth) compression...profiles (JANUS IIIA and SAGITTAIRE II), or both (JANUS IIIB, . PHYSALIE V and VI, SAGITTAIRF. VI, DRET 79/131, ENTREX V AND VIII) (Fructus & Rostain

  1. Ontogeny of diving behaviour in the Australian sea lion: trials of adolescence in a late bloomer.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Shannon L; Costa, Daniel P; Arnould, John P Y; Gales, Nicholas J; Kuhn, Carey E

    2006-03-01

    1. Foraging behaviours of the Australian sea lion (Neophoca cinerea) reflect an animal working hard to exploit benthic habitats. Lactating females demonstrate almost continuous diving, maximize bottom time, exhibit elevated field metabolism and frequently exceed their calculated aerobic dive limit. Given that larger animals have disproportionately greater diving capabilities, we wanted to examine how pups and juveniles forage successfully. 2. Time/depth recorders were deployed on pups, juveniles and adult females at Seal Bay Conservation Park, Kangaroo Island, South Australia. Ten different mother/pup pairs were equipped at three stages of development (6, 15 and 23 months) to record the diving behaviours of 51 (nine instruments failed) animals. 3. Dive depth and duration increased with age. However, development was slow. At 6 months, pups demonstrated minimal diving activity and the mean depth for 23-month-old juveniles was only 44 +/- 4 m, or 62% of adult mean depth. 4. Although pups and juveniles did not reach adult depths or durations, dive records for young sea lions indicate benthic diving with mean bottom times (2.0 +/- 0.2 min) similar to those of females (2.1 +/- 0.2 min). This was accomplished by spending higher proportions of each dive and total time at sea on or near the bottom than adults. Immature sea lions also spent a higher percentage of time at sea diving. 5. Juveniles may have to work harder because they are weaned before reaching full diving capability. For benthic foragers, reduced diving ability limits available foraging habitat. Furthermore, as juveniles appear to operate close to their physiological maximum, they would have a difficult time increasing foraging effort in response to reductions in prey. Although benthic prey are less influenced by seasonal fluctuations and oceanographic perturbations than epipelagic prey, demersal fishery trawls may impact juvenile survival by disrupting habitat and removing larger size classes of prey. These

  2. Blood Oxygen Depletion in Diving California Sea Lions: How Close to the Limit?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    N000141010514 LONG-TERM GOALS The management and depletion of O2 stores underlie the dive capacities of marine mammals and are fundamental to the...values (7.5, 7.4, 7.3 & 7.2) from blood samples obtained from sea lions at Sea World’s Rehabilitation Program (n = 7) and the National Marine Mammal ...provides the groundwork to apply this technology to other otariids, and possibly other marine mammals , including dolphins. Development of such

  3. Niche overlap, threshold food densities, and limits to prey depletion for a diving duck assemblage in an estuarine bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovvorn, James R.; De La Cruz, Susan; Takekawa, John Y.; Shaskey, Laura E.; Richman, Samantha E.

    2013-01-01

    Planning for marine conservation often requires estimates of the amount of habitat needed to support assemblages of interacting species. During winter in subtidal San Pablo Bay, California, the 3 main diving duck species are lesser scaup Aythya affinis (LESC), greater scaup A. marila (GRSC), and surf scoter Melanitta perspicillata (SUSC), which all feed almost entirely on the bivalve Corbula amurensis. Decreased body mass and fat, increased foraging effort, and major departures of these birds appeared to result from food limitation. Broad overlap in prey size, water depth, and location suggested that the 3 species responded similarly to availability of the same prey. However, an energetics model that accounts for differing body size, locomotor mode, and dive behavior indicated that each species will become limited at different stages of prey depletion in the order SUSC, then GRSC, then LESC. Depending on year, 35 to 66% of the energy in Corbula standing stocks was below estimated threshold densities for profitable foraging. Ectothermic predators, especially flounders and sturgeons, could reduce excess carrying capacity for different duck species by 4 to 10%. A substantial quantity of prey above profitability thresholds was not exploited before most ducks left San Pablo Bay. Such pre-depletion departure has been attributed in other taxa to foraging aggression. However, in these diving ducks that showed no overt aggression, this pattern may result from high costs of locating all adequate prey patches, resulting reliance on existing flocks to find food, and propensity to stay near dense flocks to avoid avian predation. For interacting species assemblages, modeling profitability thresholds can indicate the species most vulnerable to food declines. However, estimates of total habitat needed require better understanding of factors affecting the amount of prey above thresholds that is not depleted before the predators move elsewhere.

  4. 29 CFR 1910.424 - SCUBA diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false SCUBA diving. 1910.424 Section 1910.424 Labor Regulations... SCUBA diving. (a) General. Employers engaged in SCUBA diving shall comply with the following requirements, unless otherwise specified. (b) Limits. SCUBA diving shall not be conducted: (1) At depths...

  5. 29 CFR 1910.424 - SCUBA diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false SCUBA diving. 1910.424 Section 1910.424 Labor Regulations... SCUBA diving. (a) General. Employers engaged in SCUBA diving shall comply with the following requirements, unless otherwise specified. (b) Limits. SCUBA diving shall not be conducted: (1) At depths...

  6. 29 CFR 1910.424 - SCUBA diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false SCUBA diving. 1910.424 Section 1910.424 Labor Regulations... SCUBA diving. (a) General. Employers engaged in SCUBA diving shall comply with the following requirements, unless otherwise specified. (b) Limits. SCUBA diving shall not be conducted: (1) At depths...

  7. 29 CFR 1910.424 - SCUBA diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false SCUBA diving. 1910.424 Section 1910.424 Labor Regulations... SCUBA diving. (a) General. Employers engaged in SCUBA diving shall comply with the following requirements, unless otherwise specified. (b) Limits. SCUBA diving shall not be conducted: (1) At depths...

  8. 29 CFR 1910.424 - SCUBA diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false SCUBA diving. 1910.424 Section 1910.424 Labor Regulations... SCUBA diving. (a) General. Employers engaged in SCUBA diving shall comply with the following requirements, unless otherwise specified. (b) Limits. SCUBA diving shall not be conducted: (1) At depths...

  9. Condition and mass impact oxygen stores and dive duration in adult female northern elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Hassrick, J L; Crocker, D E; Teutschel, N M; McDonald, B I; Robinson, P W; Simmons, S E; Costa, D P

    2010-02-15

    The range of foraging behaviors available to deep-diving, air-breathing marine vertebrates is constrained by their physiological capacity to breath-hold dive. We measured body oxygen stores (blood volume and muscle myoglobin) and diving behavior in adult female northern elephant seals, Mirounga angustirostris, to investigate age-related effects on diving performance. Blood volume averaged 74.4+/-17.0 liters in female elephant seals or 20.2+/-2.0% of body mass. Plasma volume averaged 32.2+/-7.8 liters or 8.7+/-0.7% of body mass. Absolute plasma volume and blood volume increased independently with mass and age. Hematocrit decreased weakly with mass but did not vary with age. Muscle myoglobin concentration, while higher than previously reported (7.4+/-0.7 g%), did not vary with mass or age. Pregnancy status did not influence blood volume. Mean dive duration, a proxy for physiological demand, increased as a function of how long seals had been at sea, followed by mass and hematocrit. Strong effects of female body mass (range, 218-600 kg) on dive duration, which were independent of oxygen stores, suggest that larger females had lower diving metabolic rates. A tendency for dives to exceed calculated aerobic limits occurred more frequently later in the at-sea migration. Our data suggest that individual physiological state variables and condition interact to determine breath-hold ability and that both should be considered in life-history studies of foraging behavior.

  10. Insights from venous oxygen profiles: oxygen utilization and management in diving California sea lions.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Birgitte I; Ponganis, Paul J

    2013-09-01

    The management and depletion of O2 stores underlie the aerobic dive capacities of marine mammals. The California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) presumably optimizes O2 store management during all dives, but approaches its physiological limits during deep dives to greater than 300 m depth. Blood O2 comprises the largest component of total body O2 stores in adult sea lions. Therefore, we investigated venous blood O2 depletion during dives of California sea lions during maternal foraging trips to sea by: (1) recording venous partial pressure of O2 (P(O2)) profiles during dives, (2) characterizing the O2-hemoglobin (Hb) dissociation curve of sea lion Hb and (3) converting the P(O2) profiles into percent Hb saturation (S(O2)) profiles using the dissociation curve. The O2-Hb dissociation curve was typical of other pinnipeds (P50=28±2 mmHg at pH 7.4). In 43% of dives, initial venous S(O2) values were greater than 78% (estimated resting venous S(O2)), indicative of arterialization of venous blood. Blood O2 was far from depleted during routine shallow dives, with minimum venous S(O2) values routinely greater than 50%. However, in deep dives greater than 4 min in duration, venous S(O2) reached minimum values below 5% prior to the end of the dive, but then increased during the last 30-60 s of ascent. These deep dive profiles were consistent with transient venous blood O2 depletion followed by partial restoration of venous O2 through pulmonary gas exchange and peripheral blood flow during ascent. These differences in venous O2 profiles between shallow and deep dives of sea lions reflect distinct strategies of O2 store management and suggest that underlying cardiovascular responses will also differ.

  11. The effects of experimentally induced hyperthyroidism on the diving physiology of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina)

    PubMed Central

    Weingartner, Gundula M.; Thornton, Sheila J.; Andrews, Russel D.; Enstipp, Manfred R.; Barts, Agnieszka D.; Hochachka, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    Many phocid seals are expert divers that remain submerged longer than expected based on estimates of oxygen storage and utilization. This discrepancy is most likely due to an overestimation of diving metabolic rate. During diving, a selective redistribution of blood flow occurs, which may result in reduced metabolism in the hypoperfused tissues and a possible decline in whole-body metabolism to below the resting level (hypometabolism). Thyroid hormones are crucial in regulation of energy metabolism in vertebrates and therefore their control might be an important part of achieving a hypometabolic state during diving. To investigate the effect of thyroid hormones on diving physiology of phocid seals, we measured oxygen consumption, heart rate, and post-dive lactate concentrations in five harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) conducting 5 min dives on command, in both euthyroid and experimentally induced hyperthyroid states. Oxygen consumption during diving was significantly reduced (by 25%) in both euthyroid and hyperthyroid states, confirming that metabolic rate during diving falls below resting levels. Hyperthyroidism increased oxygen consumption (by 7–8%) when resting in water and during diving, compared with the euthyroid state, illustrating the marked effect of thyroid hormones on metabolic rate. Consequently, post-dive lactate concentrations were significantly increased in the hyperthyroid state, suggesting that the greater oxygen consumption rates forced seals to make increased use of anaerobic metabolic pathways. During diving, hyperthyroid seals also exhibited a more profound decline in heart rate than seals in the euthyroid state, indicating that these seals were pushed toward their aerobic limit and required a more pronounced cardiovascular response. Our results demonstrate the powerful role of thyroid hormones in metabolic regulation and support the hypothesis that thyroid hormones play a role in modulating the at-sea metabolism of phocid seals. PMID:23060807

  12. Diving Related Changes in the Blood Oxygen Stores of Rehabilitating Harbor Seal Pups (Phoca vitulina).

    PubMed

    Thomas, Amber; Ono, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) pups begin diving within hours of birth, stimulating the development of the blood oxygen (O2) stores necessary to sustain underwater aerobic metabolism. Since harbor seals experience a brief nursing period, the early-life development of these blood O2 stores is necessary for successful post-weaning foraging. If mothers and pups become prematurely separated, the pup may be transported to a wildlife rehabilitation center for care. Previous studies suggest that the shallow pools and lack of diving in rehabilitation facilities may lead to under-developed blood O2 stores, but diving behavior during rehabilitation has not been investigated. This study aimed to simultaneously study the diving behaviors and blood O2 store development of rehabilitating harbor seal pups. Standard hematology measurements (Hct, Hb, RBC, MCV, MCH, MCHC) were taken to investigate O2 storage capacity and pups were equipped with time-depth recorders to investigate natural diving behavior while in rehabilitation. Linear mixed models of the data indicate that all measured blood parameters changed with age; however, when compared to literature values for wild harbor seal pups, rehabilitating pups have smaller red blood cells (RBCs) that can store less hemoglobin (Hb) and subsequently, less O2, potentially limiting their diving capabilities. Wild pups completed longer dives at younger ages (maximum reported <25 days of age: 9 min) in previous studies than the captive pups in this study (maximum <25 days of age: 2.86 min). However, captivity may only affect the rate of development, as long duration dives were observed (maximum during rehabilitation: 13.6 min at 89 days of age). Further, this study suggests that there may be a positive relationship between RBC size and the frequency of long duration dives. Thus, rehabilitating harbor seal pups should be encouraged to make frequent, long duration dives to prepare themselves for post-release foraging.

  13. Diving Related Changes in the Blood Oxygen Stores of Rehabilitating Harbor Seal Pups (Phoca vitulina)

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Amber; Ono, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) pups begin diving within hours of birth, stimulating the development of the blood oxygen (O2) stores necessary to sustain underwater aerobic metabolism. Since harbor seals experience a brief nursing period, the early-life development of these blood O2 stores is necessary for successful post-weaning foraging. If mothers and pups become prematurely separated, the pup may be transported to a wildlife rehabilitation center for care. Previous studies suggest that the shallow pools and lack of diving in rehabilitation facilities may lead to under-developed blood O2 stores, but diving behavior during rehabilitation has not been investigated. This study aimed to simultaneously study the diving behaviors and blood O2 store development of rehabilitating harbor seal pups. Standard hematology measurements (Hct, Hb, RBC, MCV, MCH, MCHC) were taken to investigate O2 storage capacity and pups were equipped with time-depth recorders to investigate natural diving behavior while in rehabilitation. Linear mixed models of the data indicate that all measured blood parameters changed with age; however, when compared to literature values for wild harbor seal pups, rehabilitating pups have smaller red blood cells (RBCs) that can store less hemoglobin (Hb) and subsequently, less O2, potentially limiting their diving capabilities. Wild pups completed longer dives at younger ages (maximum reported <25 days of age: 9 min) in previous studies than the captive pups in this study (maximum <25 days of age: 2.86 min). However, captivity may only affect the rate of development, as long duration dives were observed (maximum during rehabilitation: 13.6 min at 89 days of age). Further, this study suggests that there may be a positive relationship between RBC size and the frequency of long duration dives. Thus, rehabilitating harbor seal pups should be encouraged to make frequent, long duration dives to prepare themselves for post-release foraging. PMID:26061662

  14. Extreme hypoxemic tolerance and blood oxygen depletion in diving elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Meir, Jessica U; Champagne, Cory D; Costa, Daniel P; Williams, Cassondra L; Ponganis, Paul J

    2009-10-01

    Species that maintain aerobic metabolism when the oxygen (O(2)) supply is limited represent ideal models to examine the mechanisms underlying tolerance to hypoxia. The repetitive, long dives of northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have remained a physiological enigma as O(2) stores appear inadequate to maintain aerobic metabolism. We evaluated hypoxemic tolerance and blood O(2) depletion by 1) measuring arterial and venous O(2) partial pressure (Po(2)) during dives with a Po(2)/temperature recorder on elephant seals, 2) characterizing the O(2)-hemoglobin (O(2)-Hb) dissociation curve of this species, 3) applying the dissociation curve to Po(2) profiles to obtain %Hb saturation (So(2)), and 4) calculating blood O(2) store depletion during diving. Optimization of O(2) stores was achieved by high venous O(2) loading and almost complete depletion of blood O(2) stores during dives, with net O(2) content depletion values up to 91% (arterial) and 100% (venous). In routine dives (>10 min) Pv(O(2)) and Pa(O(2)) values reached 2-10 and 12-23 mmHg, respectively. This corresponds to So(2) of 1-26% and O(2) contents of 0.3 (venous) and 2.7 ml O(2)/dl blood (arterial), demonstrating remarkable hypoxemic tolerance as Pa(O(2)) is nearly equivalent to the arterial hypoxemic threshold of seals. The contribution of the blood O(2) store alone to metabolic rate was nearly equivalent to resting metabolic rate, and mean temperature remained near 37 degrees C. These data suggest that elephant seals routinely tolerate extreme hypoxemia during dives to completely utilize the blood O(2) store and maximize aerobic dive duration.

  15. Diving medicine.

    PubMed

    Bove, Alfred A

    2014-06-15

    Exposure to the undersea environment has unique effects on normal physiology and can result in unique disorders that require an understanding of the effects of pressure and inert gas supersaturation on organ function and knowledge of the appropriate therapies, which can include recompression in a hyperbaric chamber. The effects of Boyle's law result in changes in volume of gas-containing spaces when exposed to the increased pressure underwater. These effects can cause middle ear and sinus injury and lung barotrauma due to lung overexpansion during ascent from depth. Disorders related to diving have unique presentations, and an understanding of the high-pressure environment is needed to properly diagnose and manage these disorders. Breathing compressed air underwater results in increased dissolved inert gas in tissues and organs. On ascent after a diving exposure, the dissolved gas can achieve a supersaturated state and can form gas bubbles in blood and tissues, with resulting tissue and organ damage. Decompression sickness can involve the musculoskeletal system, skin, inner ear, brain, and spinal cord, with characteristic signs and symptoms. Usual therapy is recompression in a hyperbaric chamber following well-established protocols. Many recreational diving candidates seek medical clearance for diving, and healthcare providers must be knowledgeable of the environmental exposure and its effects on physiologic function to properly assess individuals for fitness to dive. This review provides a basis for understanding the diving environment and its accompanying disorders and provides a basis for assessment of fitness for diving.

  16. Diving birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clanet, Christophe; Masson, Lucien; McKinley, Gareth; Cohen, Robert; Ecole polytechnique Collaboration; MIT Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Many seabirds (gannets, pelicans, gulls, albatrosses) dive into water at high speeds (25 m/s) in order to capture underwater preys. Diving depths of 20 body lengths are reported in the literature. This value is much larger than the one achieved by men, which is of the order of 5. We study this difference by comparing the impact of slender vs bluff bodies. We show that, contrary to bluff bodies, the penetration depth of slender bodies presents a maximum value for a specific impact velocity that we connect to the velocity of diving birds.

  17. Coming up for air: thermal dependence of dive behaviours and metabolism in sea snakes.

    PubMed

    Udyawer, Vinay; Simpfendorfer, Colin A; Heupel, Michelle R; Clark, Timothy D

    2016-11-01

    Cutaneous gas exchange allows some air-breathing diving ectotherms to supplement their pulmonary oxygen uptake, which may allow prolongation of dives and an increased capacity to withstand anthropogenic and natural threatening processes that increase submergence times. However, little is known of the interplay between metabolism, bimodal oxygen uptake and activity levels across thermal environments in diving ectotherms. Here, we show in two species of sea snake (spine-bellied sea snake, Hydrophis curtus; and elegant sea snake, Hydrophis elegans) that increasing temperature elevates surfacing rate, increases total oxygen consumption and decreases dive duration. The majority of dives observed in both species remained within estimated maximal aerobic limits. While cutaneous gas exchange accounted for a substantial proportion of total oxygen consumption (up to 23%), unexpectedly it was independent of water temperature and activity levels, suggesting a diffusion-limited mechanism. Our findings demonstrate that rising water temperature and a limited capability to up-regulate cutaneous oxygen uptake may compromise the proficiency with which sea snakes perform prolonged dives. This may hinder their capacity to withstand ongoing anthropogenic activities like trawl fishing, and increase their susceptibility to surface predation as their natural environments continue to warm.

  18. Quantitative determinants of aerobic glycolysis identify flux through the enzyme GAPDH as a limiting step.

    PubMed

    Shestov, Alexander A; Liu, Xiaojing; Ser, Zheng; Cluntun, Ahmad A; Hung, Yin P; Huang, Lei; Kim, Dongsung; Le, Anne; Yellen, Gary; Albeck, John G; Locasale, Jason W

    2014-07-09

    Aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg Effect (WE) is characterized by the increased metabolism of glucose to lactate. It remains unknown what quantitative changes to the activity of metabolism are necessary and sufficient for this phenotype. We developed a computational model of glycolysis and an integrated analysis using metabolic control analysis (MCA), metabolomics data, and statistical simulations. We identified and confirmed a novel mode of regulation specific to aerobic glycolysis where flux through GAPDH, the enzyme separating lower and upper glycolysis, is the rate-limiting step in the pathway and the levels of fructose (1,6) bisphosphate (FBP), are predictive of the rate and control points in glycolysis. Strikingly, negative flux control was found and confirmed for several steps thought to be rate-limiting in glycolysis. Together, these findings enumerate the biochemical determinants of the WE and suggest strategies for identifying the contexts in which agents that target glycolysis might be most effective.

  19. Rate limiting factors in trichloroethylene co-metabolic degradation by phenol-grown aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Tay, Joo Hwa

    2014-04-01

    The potential of aerobic granular sludge in co-metabolic removal of recalcitrant substances was evaluated using trichloroethylene (TCE) as the model compound. Aerobic granules cultivated in a sequencing batch reactor with phenol as the growth substrate exhibited TCE and phenol degradation activities lower than previously reported values. Depletion of reducing energy and diffusion limitation within the granules were investigated as the possible rate limiting factors. Sodium formate and citrate were supplied to the granules in batch studies as external electron sources. No significant enhancing effect was observed on the instant TCE transformation rates, but 10 mM formate could improve the ultimate transformation capacity by 26 %. Possible diffusion barrier was studied by sieving the biomass into five size fractions, and determining their specific TCE and phenol degradation rates and capacities. Biomass in the larger size fractions generally showed lower activities. Large granules of >700 μm diameter exhibited only 22 % of the flocs' TCE transformation capacity and 35 % of its phenol dependent SOUR, indicating the possible occurrence of diffusion limitation in larger biomass. However, the highest specific TCE transformation rate was observed with the fraction that mostly consisted of small granules (150-300 μm), suggesting an optimal size range while applying aerobic granules in TCE co-metabolic removal.

  20. Receivers limit the prevalence of deception in humans: evidence from diving behaviour in soccer players.

    PubMed

    David, Gwendolyn K; Condon, Catriona H; Bywater, Candice L; Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel; Wilson, Robbie S

    2011-01-01

    Deception remains a hotly debated topic in evolutionary and behavioural research. Our understanding of what impedes or facilitates the use and detection of deceptive signals in humans is still largely limited to studies of verbal deception under laboratory conditions. Recent theoretical models of non-human behaviour have suggested that the potential outcome for deceivers and the ability of receivers to discriminate signals can effectively maintain their honesty. In this paper, we empirically test these predictions in a real-world case of human deception, simulation in soccer. In support of theoretical predictions in signalling theory, we show that cost-free deceit by soccer players decreases as the potential outcome for the signaller becomes more costly. We further show that the ability of receivers (referees) to detect deceptive signals may limit the prevalence of deception by soccer players. Our study provides empirical support to recent theoretical models in signalling theory, and identifies conditions that may facilitate human deception and hinder its detection.

  1. Blood temperature profiles of diving elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Meir, Jessica U; Ponganis, Paul J

    2010-01-01

    Hypothermia-induced reductions in metabolic rate have been proposed to suppress metabolism and prolong the duration of aerobic metabolism during dives of marine mammals and birds. To determine whether core hypothermia might contribute to the repetitive long-duration dives of the northern elephant seal Mirounga angustirostris, blood temperature profiles were obtained in translocated juvenile elephant seals equipped with a thermistor and backpack recorder. Representative temperature (the y-intercept of the mean temperature vs. dive duration relationship) was 37.2 degrees C +/- 0.6 degrees C (n=3 seals) in the extradural vein, 38.1 degrees C +/- 0.7 degrees C (n = 4 seals) in the hepatic sinus, and 38.8 degrees +/- 1.6 degrees C (n = 6 deals) in the aorta. Mean temperature was significantly though weakly negatively related to dive duration in all but one seal. Mean venous temperatures of all dives of individual seals ranged between 36 degrees and 38 degrees C, while mean arterial temperatures ranged between 35 degrees and 39 degrees C. Transient decreases in venous and arterial temperatures to as low as 30 degrees -33 degrees C occurred in some dives >30 min (0.1% of dives in the study). The lack of significant core hypothermia during routine dives (10-30 min) and only a weak negative correlation of mean temperature with dive duration do not support the hypothesis that a cold-induced Q(10) effect contributes to metabolic suppression of central tissues during dives. The wide range of arterial temperatures while diving and the transient declines in temperature during long dives suggest that alterations in blood flow patterns and peripheral heat loss contribute to thermoregulation during diving.

  2. Ontogeny of Oxygen Storage Capacity and Diving Ability in the Southern Sea Otter (Enhydra lutris nereis): Costs and Benefits of Large Lungs.

    PubMed

    Thometz, Nicole M; Murray, Michael J; Williams, Terrie M

    2015-01-01

    Small body size, large lungs, and dense pelage contribute to the unique challenges faced by diving sea otters (Enhydra lutris) when compared to other marine mammals. Here we determine the consequences of large lungs on the development of diving ability in southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) by examining the ontogeny of blood, muscle, and lung oxygen stores and calculating aerobic dive limits (cADL) for immature and mature age classes. Total oxygen storage capacity matures rapidly in sea otters, reaching adult levels by 2 mo postpartum. But this result is driven by exceptional lung capacity at birth, followed by a decrease in mass-specific lung volume with age. Blood and muscle oxygen stores remain well below adult values before weaning, with large pups exhibiting 74% and 54% of adult values, respectively. Slow muscle development limits the capacity of immature sea otters to dive against high positive buoyancy due to comparatively large lungs. Immature sea otters diving with total lung capacity (TLC) experience up to twice the mass-specific positive buoyancy as adults diving with TLC but can reduce these forces to comparable adult levels by using a smaller diving lung volume (DLV). The cADL of a juvenile with DLV is 3.62 min, while the cADL of an adult with TLC is 4.82 min. We find that the magnitude of positive buoyancy experienced by sea otters changes markedly with age and strongly influences the ontogeny of diving ability in this species.

  3. Diving medicine.

    PubMed

    Benton, P J; Glover, M A

    2006-01-01

    Recreational diving developed in the late 1940s when self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) first became available for civilian use. At the same time the development of the commercial airliner, in particular the jet airliner, made possible the concept of international travel for pleasure as opposed to business. Over the past 50 years the number of international tourists has increased by over 2500% from a mere 25 million in 1950 to over 700 million in 2002 (Treadwell TL. Trends in travel. In: Zuckerman JN, editor. Principles and practice of travel medicine, 2001; p. 2-6). The popularity of recreational diving has also increased over the same period from an activity experienced by a small number of individuals in the early 1950s to an activity today enjoyed by many millions. The combination of increased international travel and the means by which to enter and explore the underwater world has led to diving becoming increasingly popular as a tourist activity.

  4. Diving at altitude: from definition to practice.

    PubMed

    Egi, S Murat; Pieri, Massimo; Marroni, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Diving above sea level has different motivations for recreational, military, commercial and scientific activities. Despite the apparently wide practice of inland diving, there are three major discrepancies about diving at altitude: threshold elevation that requires changes in sea level procedures; upper altitude limit of the applicability of these modifications; and independent validation of altitude adaptation methods of decompression algorithms. The first problem is solved by converting the normal fluctuation in barometric pressure to an altitude equivalent. Based on the barometric variations recorded from a meteorological center, it is possible to suggest 600 meters as a threshold for classifying a dive as an "altitude" dive. The second problem is solved by proposing the threshold altitude of aviation (2,400 meters) to classify "high" altitude dives. The DAN (Divers Alert Network) Europe diving database (DB) is analyzed to solve the third problem. The database consists of 65,050 dives collected from different dive computers. A total of 1,467 dives were found to be classified as altitude dives. However, by checking the elevation according to the logged geographical coordinates, 1,284 dives were disqualified because the altitude setting had been used as a conservative setting by the dive computer despite the fact that the dive was made at sea level. Furthermore, according to the description put forward in this manuscript, 72 dives were disqualified because the surface level elevation is lower than 600 meters. The number of field data (111 dives) is still very low to use for the validation of any particular method of altitude adaptation concerning decompression algorithms.

  5. The epidemiology of injury in scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Buzzacott, Peter L

    2012-01-01

    The epidemiology of injury associated with recreational scuba diving is reviewed. A search of electronic databases and reference lists identified pertinent research. Barotrauma, decompression sickness and drowning-related injuries were the most common morbidities associated with recreational scuba diving. The prevalence of incidents ranged from 7 to 35 injuries per 10,000 divers and from 5 to 152 injuries per 100,000 dives. Recreational scuba diving fatalities account for 0.013% of all-cause mortality aged ≥ 15 years. Drowning was the most common cause of death. Among treated injuries, recovery was complete in the majority of cases. Dive injuries were associated with diver-specific factors such as insufficient training and preexisting medical conditions. Environmental factors included air temperature and flying after diving. Dive-specific factors included loss of buoyancy control, rapid ascent and repetitive deep diving. The most common event to precede drowning was running out of gas (compressed air). Though diving injuries are relatively rare prospective, longitudinal studies are needed to quantify the effects of known risk factors and, indeed, asymptomatic injuries (e.g. brain lesions). Dive injury health economics data also remains wanting. Meanwhile, health promotion initiatives should continue to reinforce adherence to established safe diving practices such as observing depth/time limits, safety stops and conservative ascent rates. However, there is an obvious lack of evaluated diving safety interventions.

  6. Effects of Rate-Limited Mass Transfer on Modeling Vapor Intrusion with Aerobic Biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiming; Hou, Deyi; Lu, Chunhui; Spain, Jim C; Luo, Jian

    2016-09-06

    Most of the models for simulating vapor intrusion accept the local equilibrium assumption for multiphase concentration distributions, that is, concentrations in solid, liquid and vapor phases are in equilibrium. For simulating vapor transport with aerobic biodegradation controlled by counter-diffusion processes, the local equilibrium assumption combined with dual-Monod kinetics and biomass decay may yield near-instantaneous behavior at steady state. The present research investigates how predicted concentration profiles and fluxes change as interphase mass transfer resistances are increased for vapor intrusion with aerobic biodegradation. Our modeling results indicate that the attenuation coefficients for cases with and without mass transfer limitations can be significantly different by orders of magnitude. Rate-limited mass transfer may lead to larger overlaps of contaminant vapor and oxygen concentrations, which cannot be simulated by instantaneous reaction models with local equilibrium mass transfer. In addition, the contaminant flux with rate-limited mass transfer is much smaller than that with local equilibrium mass transfer, indicating that local equilibrium mass transfer assumption may significantly overestimate the biodegradation rate and capacity for mitigating vapor intrusion through the unsaturated zone. Our results indicate a strong research need for field tests to examine the validity of local equilibrium mass transfer, a widely accepted assumption in modeling vapor intrusion.

  7. Bioenergetics and diving activity of internesting leatherback turtles Dermochelys coriacea at Parque Nacional Marino Las Baulas, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Bryan P; Williams, Cassondra L; Paladino, Frank V; Morreale, Stephen J; Lindstrom, R Todd; Spotila, James R

    2005-10-01

    Physiology, environment and life history demands interact to influence marine turtle bioenergetics and activity. However, metabolism and diving behavior of free-swimming marine turtles have not been measured simultaneously. Using doubly labeled water, we obtained the first field metabolic rates (FMRs; 0.20-0.74 W kg(-1)) and water fluxes (16-30% TBW day(-1), where TBW=total body water) for free-ranging marine turtles and combined these data with dive information from electronic archival tags to investigate the bioenergetics and diving activity of reproductive adult female leatherback turtles Dermochelys coriacea. Mean dive durations (7.8+/-2.4 min (+/-1 s.d.), bottom times (2.7+/-0.8 min), and percentage of time spent in water temperatures (Tw) < or =24 degrees C (9.5+/-5.7%) increased with increasing mean maximum dive depths (22.6+/-7.1 m; all P< or =0.001). The FMRs increased with longer mean dive durations, bottom times and surface intervals and increased time spent in Tw< or =24 degrees C (all r2> or =0.99). This suggests that low FMRs and activity levels, combined with shuttling between different water temperatures, could allow leatherbacks to avoid overheating while in warm tropical waters. Additionally, internesting leatherback dive durations were consistently shorter than aerobic dive limits calculated from our FMRs (11.7-44.3 min). Our results indicate that internesting female leatherbacks maintained low FMRs and activity levels, thereby spending relatively little energy while active at sea. Future studies should incorporate data on metabolic rate, dive patterns, water temperatures, and body temperatures to develop further the relationship between physiological and life history demands and marine turtle bioenergetics and activity.

  8. Diving and foraging patterns of Marbled Murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus): Testing predictions from optimal-breathing models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jodice, Patrick G.; Collopy, M.W.

    1999-01-01

    The diving behavior of Marbled Murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) was studied using telemetry along the Oregon coast during the 1995 and 1996 breeding seasons and examined in relation to predictions from optimal-breathing models. Duration of dives, pauses, dive bouts, time spent under water during dive bouts, and nondiving intervals between successive dive bouts were recorded. Most diving metrics differed between years but not with oceanographic conditions or shore type. There was no effect of water depth on mean dive time or percent time spent under water even though dive bouts occurred in depths from 3 to 36 m. There was a significant, positive relationship between mean dive time and mean pause time at the dive-bout scale each year. At the dive-cycle scale, there was a significant positive relationship between dive time and preceding pause time in each year and a significant positive relationship between dive time and ensuing pause time in 1996. Although it appears that aerobic diving was the norm, there appeared to be an increase in anaerobic diving in 1996. The diving performance of Marbled Murrelets in this study appeared to be affected by annual changes in environmental conditions and prey resources but did not consistently fit predictions from optimal-breathing models.

  9. Introduction to Scuba Diving. Diver Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somers, Lee H.

    Scuba diving is often referred to as a "recreational sport." However, the term "sport" sometimes implies erroneous connotations and limits understanding. Scuba diving can be an avocation or a vocation. It is a pastime, a pursuit, or even a lifestyle, that can be as limited or extensive as one makes it. A persons level of commitment, degree of…

  10. Deep-diving foraging behaviour of sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus).

    PubMed

    Watwood, Stephanie L; Miller, Patrick J O; Johnson, Mark; Madsen, Peter T; Tyack, Peter L

    2006-05-01

    1. Digital tags were used to describe diving and vocal behaviour of sperm whales during 198 complete and partial foraging dives made by 37 individual sperm whales in the Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico and the Ligurian Sea. 2. The maximum depth of dive averaged by individual differed across the three regions and was 985 m (SD = 124.3), 644 m (123.4) and 827 m (60.3), respectively. An average dive cycle consisted of a 45 min (6.3) dive with a 9 min (3.0) surface interval, with no significant differences among regions. On average, whales spent greater than 72% of their time in foraging dive cycles. 3. Whales produced regular clicks for 81% (4.1) of a dive and 64% (14.6) of the descent phase. The occurrence of buzz vocalizations (also called 'creaks') as an indicator of the foraging phase of a dive showed no difference in mean prey capture attempts per dive between regions [18 buzzes/dive (7.6)]. Sperm whales descended a mean of 392 m (144) from the start of regular clicking to the first buzz, which supports the hypothesis that regular clicks function as a long-range biosonar. 4. There were no significant differences in the duration of the foraging phase [28 min (6.0)] or percentage of the dive duration in the foraging phase [62% (7.3)] between the three regions, with an overall average proportion of time spent actively encountering prey during dive cycles of 0.53 (0.05). Whales maintained their time in the foraging phase by decreasing transit time for deeper foraging dives. 5. Similarity in foraging behaviour in the three regions and high diving efficiencies suggest that the success of sperm whales as mesopelagic predators is due in part to long-range echolocation of deep prey patches, efficient locomotion and a large aerobic capacity during diving.

  11. Rapid maturation of the muscle biochemistry that supports diving in Pacific walruses (Odobenus rosmarus divergens).

    PubMed

    Noren, Shawn R; Jay, Chadwick V; Burns, Jennifer M; Fischbach, Anthony S

    2015-10-01

    Physiological constraints dictate animals' ability to exploit habitats. For marine mammals, it is important to quantify physiological limits that influence diving and their ability to alter foraging behaviors. We characterized age-specific dive limits of walruses by measuring anaerobic (acid-buffering capacity) and aerobic (myoglobin content) capacities of the muscles that power hind (longissimus dorsi) and fore (supraspinatus) flipper propulsion. Mean buffering capacities were similar across muscles and age classes (a fetus, five neonatal calves, a 3 month old and 20 adults), ranging from 41.31 to 54.14 slykes and 42.00 to 46.93 slykes in the longissimus and supraspinatus, respectively. Mean myoglobin in the fetus and neonatal calves fell within a narrow range (longissimus: 0.92-1.68 g 100 g(-1) wet muscle mass; supraspinatus: 0.88-1.64 g 100 g(-1) wet muscle mass). By 3 months post-partum, myoglobin in the longissimus increased by 79%, but levels in the supraspinatus remained unaltered. From 3 months post-partum to adulthood, myoglobin increased by an additional 26% in the longissimus and increased by 126% in the supraspinatus; myoglobin remained greater in the longissimus compared with the supraspinatus. Walruses are unique among marine mammals because they are born with a mature muscle acid-buffering capacity and attain mature myoglobin content early in life. Despite rapid physiological development, small body size limits the diving capacity of immature walruses and extreme sexual dimorphism reduces the diving capacity of adult females compared with adult males. Thus, free-ranging immature walruses likely exhibit the shortest foraging dives while adult males are capable of the longest foraging dives.

  12. Rapid maturation of the muscle biochemistry that supports diving in Pacific walruses (Odobenus rosmarus divergens)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norem, Shawn R.; Jay, Chadwick V.; Burns, Jennifer M.; Fischbach, Anthony S.

    2015-01-01

    Physiological constraints dictate animals’ ability to exploit habitats. For marine mammals, it is important to quantify physiological limits that influence diving and their ability to alter foraging behaviors. We characterized age-specific dive limits of walruses by measuring anaerobic (acid-buffering capacity) and aerobic (myoglobin content) capacities of the muscles that power hind (longissimus dorsi) and fore (supraspinatus) flipper propulsion. Mean buffering capacities were similar across muscles and age classes (a fetus, five neonatal calves, a 3 month old and 20 adults), ranging from 41.31 to 54.14 slykes and 42.00 to 46.93 slykes in the longissimus and supraspinatus, respectively. Mean myoglobin in the fetus and neonatal calves fell within a narrow range (longissimus: 0.92–1.68 g 100 g−1 wet muscle mass; supraspinatus: 0.88–1.64 g 100 g−1 wet muscle mass). By 3 months post-partum, myoglobin in the longissimus increased by 79%, but levels in the supraspinatus remained unaltered. From 3 months post-partum to adulthood, myoglobin increased by an additional 26% in the longissimus and increased by 126% in the supraspinatus; myoglobin remained greater in the longissimus compared with the supraspinatus. Walruses are unique among marine mammals because they are born with a mature muscle acid-buffering capacity and attain mature myoglobin content early in life. Despite rapid physiological development, small body size limits the diving capacity of immature walruses and extreme sexual dimorphism reduces the diving capacity of adult females compared with adult males. Thus, free-ranging immature walruses likely exhibit the shortest foraging dives while adult males are capable of the longest foraging dives.

  13. Aerobic rice genotypes displayed greater adaptation to water-limited cultivation and tolerance to polyethyleneglycol-6000 induced stress.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Nitika; Jain, Sunita; Battan, K R; Jain, R K

    2012-01-01

    Water scarcity and drought have seriously threatened traditional rice cultivation practices in several parts of the world including India. In the present investigation, experiments were conducted to see if the water-efficient aerobic rice genotypes developed at UAS, Bangalore (MAS25, MAS26 and MAS109) and IRRI, Philippines (MASARB25 and MASARB868), are endowed with drought tolerance or not. A set of these aerobic and five lowland high-yielding (HKR47 and PAU201, Taraori Basmati, Pusa1121 and Pusa1460) indica rice genotypes were evaluated for: (i) yield and yield components under submerged and aerobic conditions in field, (ii) root morphology and biomass under aerobic conditions in pots in the nethouse, (iii) PEG-6000 (0, -1, -2 and -3 bar) induced drought stress at vegetative stage using a hydroponic culture system and (iv) polymorphism for three SSR markers associated with drought resistance traits. Under submerged conditions, the yield of aerobic rice genotypes declined by 13.4-20.1 % whereas under aerobic conditions the yield of lowland indica/Basmati rice varieties declined by 23-27 %. Under water-limited conditions in pots, aerobic rice genotypes had 54-73.8 % greater root length and 18-60 % higher fresh root biomass compared to lowland indica rice varieties. Notably, root length of MASARB25 was 35 % shorter than MAS25 whereas fresh and dry root biomass of MASARB25 was 10 % and 64 % greater than MAS25. The lowland indica were more sensitive to PEG-stress with a score of 5.9-7.6 for Basmati and 6.1-6.7 for non-aromatic indica rice varieties, than the aerobic rice genotypes (score 2.7-3.3). A set of three microsatellite DNA markers (RM212, RM302 and RM3825) located on chromosome 1 which has been shown to be associated with drought resistance was investigated in the present study. Two of these markers (RM212 and RM302) amplified a specific allele in all the aerobic rice genotypes which were absent in lowland indica rice genotypes.

  14. Polar Diving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    3 July 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layers exposed by erosion in a trough within the north polar residual cap of Mars, diving beneath a younger covering of polar materials. The layers have, since the Mariner 9 mission in 1972, been interpreted to be composed of a combination of dust and ice in unknown proportions. In this scene, a layer of solid carbon dioxide, which was deposited during the previous autumn and winter, blankets the trough as well as the adjacent terrain. Throughout northern spring, the carbon dioxide will be removed; by summer, the layers will be frost-free.

    Location near: 81.4oN, 352.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Spring

  15. 29 CFR 1910.426 - Mixed-gas diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... fsw or when the dive involves inwater decompression time of greater than 120 minutes, except when... depths greater than 300 fsw, except when diving is conducted in physically confining spaces. (c... for dives deeper than 100 fsw or outside the no-decompression limits. (8) When a closed bell is...

  16. 29 CFR 1910.426 - Mixed-gas diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... fsw or when the dive involves inwater decompression time of greater than 120 minutes, except when... depths greater than 300 fsw, except when diving is conducted in physically confining spaces. (c... for dives deeper than 100 fsw or outside the no-decompression limits. (8) When a closed bell is...

  17. 29 CFR 1910.426 - Mixed-gas diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... fsw or when the dive involves inwater decompression time of greater than 120 minutes, except when... depths greater than 300 fsw, except when diving is conducted in physically confining spaces. (c... for dives deeper than 100 fsw or outside the no-decompression limits. (8) When a closed bell is...

  18. 29 CFR 1910.426 - Mixed-gas diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... fsw or when the dive involves inwater decompression time of greater than 120 minutes, except when... depths greater than 300 fsw, except when diving is conducted in physically confining spaces. (c... for dives deeper than 100 fsw or outside the no-decompression limits. (8) When a closed bell is...

  19. 29 CFR 1910.426 - Mixed-gas diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... fsw or when the dive involves inwater decompression time of greater than 120 minutes, except when... depths greater than 300 fsw, except when diving is conducted in physically confining spaces. (c... for dives deeper than 100 fsw or outside the no-decompression limits. (8) When a closed bell is...

  20. Growth of Aerobic Ripening Bacteria at the Cheese Surface Is Limited by the Availability of Iron

    PubMed Central

    Back, Alexandre; Irlinger, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    The microflora on the surface of smear-ripened cheeses is composed of various species of bacteria and yeasts that contribute to the production of the desired organoleptic properties. The objective of the present study was to show that iron availability is a limiting factor in the growth of typical aerobic ripening bacteria in cheese. For that purpose, we investigated the effect of iron or siderophore addition in model cheeses that were coinoculated with a yeast and a ripening bacterium. Both iron and the siderophore desferrioxamine B stimulated the growth of ripening bacteria belonging to the genera Arthrobacter, Corynebacterium, and Brevibacterium. The extent of stimulation was strain dependent, and generally, the effect of desferrioxamine B was greater than that of iron. Measurements of the expression of genes related to the metabolism of iron by Arthrobacter arilaitensis Re117 by real-time reverse transcription-PCR showed that these genes were transcribed during growth in cheese. The addition of desferrioxamine B increased the expression of two genes encoding iron-siderophore ABC transport binding proteins. The addition of iron decreased the expression of siderophore biosynthesis genes and of part of the genes encoding iron-siderophore ABC transport components. It was concluded that iron availability is a limiting factor in the growth of typical cheese surface bacteria. The selection of strains with efficient iron acquisition systems may be useful for the development of defined-strain surface cultures. Furthermore, the importance of iron metabolism in the microbial ecology of cheeses should be investigated since it may result in positive or negative microbial interactions. PMID:22367081

  1. Growth of aerobic ripening bacteria at the cheese surface is limited by the availability of iron.

    PubMed

    Monnet, Christophe; Back, Alexandre; Irlinger, Françoise

    2012-05-01

    The microflora on the surface of smear-ripened cheeses is composed of various species of bacteria and yeasts that contribute to the production of the desired organoleptic properties. The objective of the present study was to show that iron availability is a limiting factor in the growth of typical aerobic ripening bacteria in cheese. For that purpose, we investigated the effect of iron or siderophore addition in model cheeses that were coinoculated with a yeast and a ripening bacterium. Both iron and the siderophore desferrioxamine B stimulated the growth of ripening bacteria belonging to the genera Arthrobacter, Corynebacterium, and Brevibacterium. The extent of stimulation was strain dependent, and generally, the effect of desferrioxamine B was greater than that of iron. Measurements of the expression of genes related to the metabolism of iron by Arthrobacter arilaitensis Re117 by real-time reverse transcription-PCR showed that these genes were transcribed during growth in cheese. The addition of desferrioxamine B increased the expression of two genes encoding iron-siderophore ABC transport binding proteins. The addition of iron decreased the expression of siderophore biosynthesis genes and of part of the genes encoding iron-siderophore ABC transport components. It was concluded that iron availability is a limiting factor in the growth of typical cheese surface bacteria. The selection of strains with efficient iron acquisition systems may be useful for the development of defined-strain surface cultures. Furthermore, the importance of iron metabolism in the microbial ecology of cheeses should be investigated since it may result in positive or negative microbial interactions.

  2. Transport and metabolism of fumaric acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in aerobic glucose-limited chemostat culture.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mihir V; van Mastrigt, Oscar; Heijnen, Joseph J; van Gulik, Walter M

    2016-04-01

    Currently, research is being focused on the industrial-scale production of fumaric acid and other relevant organic acids from renewable feedstocks via fermentation, preferably at low pH for better product recovery. However, at low pH a large fraction of the extracellular acid is present in the undissociated form, which is lipophilic and can diffuse into the cell. There have been no studies done on the impact of high extracellular concentrations of fumaric acid under aerobic conditions in S. cerevisiae, which is a relevant issue to study for industrial-scale production. In this work we studied the uptake and metabolism of fumaric acid in S. cerevisiae in glucose-limited chemostat cultures at a cultivation pH of 3.0 (pH < pK). Steady states were achieved with different extracellular levels of fumaric acid, obtained by adding different amounts of fumaric acid to the feed medium. The experiments were carried out with the wild-type S. cerevisiae CEN.PK 113-7D and an engineered S. cerevisiae ADIS 244 expressing a heterologous dicarboxylic acid transporter (DCT-02) from Aspergillus niger, to examine whether it would be capable of exporting fumaric acid. We observed that fumaric acid entered the cells most likely via passive diffusion of the undissociated form. Approximately two-thirds of the fumaric acid in the feed was metabolized together with glucose. From metabolic flux analysis, an increased ATP dissipation was observed only at high intracellular concentrations of fumarate, possibly due to the export of fumarate via an ABC transporter. The implications of our results for the industrial-scale production of fumaric acid are discussed.

  3. Deep-diving sea lions exhibit extreme bradycardia in long-duration dives.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Birgitte I; Ponganis, Paul J

    2014-05-01

    Heart rate and peripheral blood flow distribution are the primary determinants of the rate and pattern of oxygen store utilisation and ultimately breath-hold duration in marine endotherms. Despite this, little is known about how otariids (sea lions and fur seals) regulate heart rate (fH) while diving. We investigated dive fH in five adult female California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) during foraging trips by instrumenting them with digital electrocardiogram (ECG) loggers and time depth recorders. In all dives, dive fH (number of beats/duration; 50±9 beats min(-1)) decreased compared with surface rates (113±5 beats min(-1)), with all dives exhibiting an instantaneous fH below resting (<54 beats min(-1)) at some point during the dive. Both dive fH and minimum instantaneous fH significantly decreased with increasing dive duration. Typical instantaneous fH profiles of deep dives (>100 m) consisted of: (1) an initial rapid decline in fH resulting in the lowest instantaneous fH of the dive at the end of descent, often below 10 beats min(-1) in dives longer than 6 min in duration; (2) a slight increase in fH to ~10-40 beats min(-1) during the bottom portion of the dive; and (3) a gradual increase in fH during ascent with a rapid increase prior to surfacing. Thus, fH regulation in deep-diving sea lions is not simply a progressive bradycardia. Extreme bradycardia and the presumed associated reductions in pulmonary and peripheral blood flow during late descent of deep dives should (a) contribute to preservation of the lung oxygen store, (b) increase dependence of muscle on the myoglobin-bound oxygen store, (c) conserve the blood oxygen store and (d) help limit the absorption of nitrogen at depth. This fH profile during deep dives of sea lions may be characteristic of deep-diving marine endotherms that dive on inspiration as similar fH profiles have been recently documented in the emperor penguin, another deep diver that dives on inspiration.

  4. Diving and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Camporesi, E M

    1996-08-01

    Scuba diving during pregnancy has increased in incidence as a result of substantial growth in the number of young females attracted to sport diving. This review summarizes the physiological changes induced by immersion, diving and decompression, on male and female divers. Furthermore, it extends to literature review, in animal models, of the susceptibility of a pregnant animal to diving decompression injury. Publications regarding reports of diving injury in pregnant humans are also reviewed, comprising very recent material from the sport diving community. It is concluded that there is no countraindication to diving for the normal, healthy, nonpregnant female. However, pregnant females should refrain from diving, because the fetus is not protected from decompression problems and is at risk of malformation and gas embolism after decompression disease. It is prudent to advise pregnant patients of the increased risk of diving problems for the fetus during pregnancy. However, should a woman have completed a dive during early pregnancy because she was unaware she was pregnant, the present evidence is not to recommend an abortion, because several normal pregnancies have been documented even if diving is continued. Snorkeling can still be practiced during pregnancy, but scuba diving should be discontinued until after the birth period.

  5. How seabirds plunge-dive without injuries.

    PubMed

    Chang, Brian; Croson, Matthew; Straker, Lorian; Gart, Sean; Dove, Carla; Gerwin, John; Jung, Sunghwan

    2016-10-25

    In nature, several seabirds (e.g., gannets and boobies) dive into water at up to 24 m/s as a hunting mechanism; furthermore, gannets and boobies have a slender neck, which is potentially the weakest part of the body under compression during high-speed impact. In this work, we investigate the stability of the bird's neck during plunge-diving by understanding the interaction between the fluid forces acting on the head and the flexibility of the neck. First, we use a salvaged bird to identify plunge-diving phases. Anatomical features of the skull and neck were acquired to quantify the effect of beak geometry and neck musculature on the stability during a plunge-dive. Second, physical experiments using an elastic beam as a model for the neck attached to a skull-like cone revealed the limits for the stability of the neck during the bird's dive as a function of impact velocity and geometric factors. We find that the neck length, neck muscles, and diving speed of the bird predominantly reduce the likelihood of injury during the plunge-dive. Finally, we use our results to discuss maximum diving speeds for humans to avoid injury.

  6. Experimental Limiting Oxygen Concentrations for Nine Organic Solvents at Temperatures and Pressures Relevant to Aerobic Oxidations in the Pharmaceutical Industry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Applications of aerobic oxidation methods in pharmaceutical manufacturing are limited in part because mixtures of oxygen gas and organic solvents often create the potential for a flammable atmosphere. To address this issue, limiting oxygen concentration (LOC) values, which define the minimum partial pressure of oxygen that supports a combustible mixture, have been measured for nine commonly used organic solvents at elevated temperatures and pressures. The solvents include acetic acid, N-methylpyrrolidone, dimethyl sulfoxide, tert-amyl alcohol, ethyl acetate, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran, methanol, acetonitrile, and toluene. The data obtained from these studies help define safe operating conditions for the use of oxygen with organic solvents. PMID:26622165

  7. Preparing Muscles for Diving: Age-Related Changes in Muscle Metabolic Profiles in Harp (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and Hooded (Cystophora cristata) Seals.

    PubMed

    Burns, J M; Lestyk, K; Freistroffer, D; Hammill, M O

    2015-01-01

    In adult marine mammals, muscles can sustain aerobic metabolism during dives in part because they contain large oxygen (O2) stores and metabolic rates are low. However, young pups have significantly lower tissue O2 stores and much higher mass-specific metabolic rates. To investigate how these differences may influence muscle function during dives, we measured the activities of enzymes involved in aerobic and anaerobic metabolic pathways (citrate synthase [CS], β-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase [HOAD], lactate dehydrogenase [LDH]) and the LDH isoform profile in six muscles from 41 harp (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and 30 hooded (Cystophora cristata) seals ranging in age from fetal to adult. All neonatal muscles had significantly higher absolute but lower metabolically scaled CS and HOAD activities than adults (∼ 70% and ∼ 85% lower, respectively). Developmental increases in LDH activity lagged that of aerobic enzymes and were not accompanied by changes in isozyme profile, suggesting that changes in enzyme concentration rather than structure determine activity levels. Biochemical maturation proceeded faster in the major locomotory muscles. In combination, findings suggest that pup muscles are unable to support strenuous aerobic exercise or rely heavily on anaerobic metabolism during early diving activities and that pups' high mass-specific metabolic rates may play a key role in limiting the ability of their muscles to support underwater foraging.

  8. Regional heterothermy and conservation of core temperature in emperor penguins diving under sea ice.

    PubMed

    Ponganis, P J; Van Dam, R P; Levenson, D H; Knower, T; Ponganis, K V; Marshall, G

    2003-07-01

    extension of aerobic dive time in emperor penguins diving at the isolated dive hole. Such high temperatures within the body and the observed decreases in limb, anterior abdomen, subcutaneous and sub-feather temperatures are consistent with preservation of core temperature and cooling of an outer body shell secondary to peripheral vasoconstriction, decreased insulation of the feather layer, and conductive/convective heat loss to the water environment during the diving of these emperor penguins.

  9. [Lungs et diving].

    PubMed

    Héritier, F; Avanzi, P; Nicod, L

    2014-11-19

    Whilst underwater, the body is submitted to significant variations of the surrounding pressure according to the depth. These conditions modify the hemodynamic and the ventilatory mechanics considerably. Some repercussions, like pulmonary barotrauma, are related to simple physical phenomena. Others, like decompression sickness, are due to more com- plex processes. Breath-hold diving disrupts haematosis and can be complicated by alveolar haemorrhage and loss of consciousness. Acute pulmonary oedema during scuba-diving, breath-hold diving and swimming has been reported more recently. In case of pulmonary disorders scuba-diving is contraindicated most of the time. It is therefore highly recommended to seek medical advice to prevent problems.

  10. High altitude diving depths.

    PubMed

    Paulev, Poul-Erik; Zubieta-Calleja, Gustavo

    2007-01-01

    In order to make any sea level dive table usable during high altitude diving, a new conversion factor is created. We introduce the standardized equivalent sea depth (SESD), which allows conversion of the actual lake diving depth (ALDD) to an equivalent sea dive depth. SESD is defined as the sea depth in meters or feet for a standardized sea dive, equivalent to a mountain lake dive at any altitude, such that [image omitted] [image omitted] [image omitted] Mountain lakes contain fresh water with a relative density that can be standardized to 1,000 kg m(-3), and sea water can likewise be standardized to a relative density of 1,033 kg m(-3), at the general gravity of 9.80665 m s(-2). The water density ratio (1,000/1,033) refers to the fresh lake water and the standardized sea water densities. Following calculation of the SESD factor, we recommend the use of our simplified diving table or any acceptable sea level dive table with two fundamental guidelines: 1. The classical decompression stages (30, 20, and 10 feet or 9, 6, and 3 m) are corrected to the altitude lake level, dividing the stage depth by the SESD factor. 2. Likewise, the lake ascent rate during diving is equal to the sea ascent rate divided by the SESD factor.

  11. High-altitude diving in river otters: coping with combined hypoxic stresses.

    PubMed

    Crait, Jamie R; Prange, Henry D; Marshall, Noah A; Harlow, Henry J; Cotton, Clark J; Ben-David, Merav

    2012-01-15

    River otters (Lontra canadensis) are highly active, semi-aquatic mammals indigenous to a range of elevations and represent an appropriate model for assessing the physiological responses to diving at altitude. In this study, we performed blood gas analyses and compared blood chemistry of river otters from a high-elevation (2357 m) population at Yellowstone Lake with a sea-level population along the Pacific coast. Comparisons of oxygen dissociation curves (ODC) revealed no significant difference in hemoglobin-oxygen (Hb-O(2)) binding affinity between the two populations - potentially because of demands for tissue oxygenation. Instead, high-elevation otters had greater Hb concentrations (18.7 g dl(-1)) than sea-level otters (15.6 g dl(-1)). Yellowstone otters displayed higher levels of the vasodilator nitric oxide (NO), and half the concentration of the serum protein albumin, possibly to compensate for increased blood viscosity. Despite compensation in several hematological and serological parameters, theoretical aerobic dive limits (ADL) were similar between high-elevation and sea-level otters because of the lower availability of O(2) at altitude. Our results suggest that recent disruptions to the Yellowstone Lake food web could be detrimental to otters because at this high elevation, constraints on diving may limit their ability to switch to prey in a deep-water environment.

  12. High-altitude diving in river otters: coping with combined hypoxic stresses

    PubMed Central

    Crait, Jamie R.; Prange, Henry D.; Marshall, Noah A.; Harlow, Henry J.; Cotton, Clark J.; Ben-David, Merav

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY River otters (Lontra canadensis) are highly active, semi-aquatic mammals indigenous to a range of elevations and represent an appropriate model for assessing the physiological responses to diving at altitude. In this study, we performed blood gas analyses and compared blood chemistry of river otters from a high-elevation (2357 m) population at Yellowstone Lake with a sea-level population along the Pacific coast. Comparisons of oxygen dissociation curves (ODC) revealed no significant difference in hemoglobin-oxygen (Hb-O2) binding affinity between the two populations - potentially because of demands for tissue oxygenation. Instead, high-elevation otters had greater Hb concentrations (18.7 g dl-1) than sea-level otters (15.6 g dl-1). Yellowstone otters displayed higher levels of the vasodilator nitric oxide (NO), and half the concentration of the serum protein albumin, possibly to compensate for increased blood viscosity. Despite compensation in several hematological and serological parameters, theoretical aerobic dive limits (ADL) were similar between high-elevation and sea-level otters because of the lower availability of O2 at altitude. Our results suggest that recent disruptions to the Yellowstone Lake food web could be detrimental to otters because at this high elevation, constraints on diving may limit their ability to switch to prey in a deep-water environment. PMID:22189769

  13. Deep-diving dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayman, John

    2012-08-01

    Dysbaric bone necrosis demonstrated in ichthyosaurs may be the result of prolonged deep diving rather than rapid ascent to escape predators. The bone lesions show structural and anatomical similarity to those that may occur in human divers and in the deep diving sperm whale, Physeter macrocephalus.

  14. Recreational technical diving part 1: an introduction to technical diving methods and activities.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Simon J; Doolette, David J

    2013-06-01

    Technical divers use gases other than air and advanced equipment configurations to conduct dives that are deeper and/or longer than typical recreational air dives. The use of oxygen-nitrogen (nitrox) mixes with oxygen fractions higher than air results in longer no-decompression limits for shallow diving, and faster decompression from deeper dives. For depths beyond the air-diving range, technical divers mix helium, a light non-narcotic gas, with nitrogen and oxygen to produce 'trimix'. These blends are tailored to the depth of intended use with a fraction of oxygen calculated to produce an inspired oxygen partial pressure unlikely to cause cerebral oxygen toxicity and a nitrogen fraction calculated to produce a tolerable degree of nitrogen narcosis. A typical deep technical dive will involve the use of trimix at the target depth with changes to gases containing more oxygen and less inert gas during the decompression. Open-circuit scuba may be used to carry and utilise such gases, but this is very wasteful of expensive helium. There is increasing use of closed-circuit 'rebreather' devices. These recycle expired gas and potentially limit gas consumption to a small amount of inert gas to maintain the volume of the breathing circuit during descent and the amount of oxygen metabolised by the diver. This paper reviews the basic approach to planning and execution of dives using these methods to better inform physicians of the physical demands and risks.

  15. Advanced dive monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Sternberger, W I; Goemmer, S A

    1999-01-01

    The US Navy supports deep diving operations with a variety of mixed-gas life support systems. A systems engineering study was conducted for the Naval Experimental Dive Unit (Panama City, FL) to develop a concept design for an advanced dive monitoring system. The monitoring system is intended primarily to enhance diver safety and secondarily to support diving medicine research. Distinct monitoring categories of diver physiology, life support system, and environment are integrated in the monitoring system. A system concept is proposed that accommodates real-time and quantitative measurements, noninvasive physiological monitoring, and a flexible and expandable implementation architecture. Human factors and ergonomic design considerations have been emphasized to assure that there is no impact on the diver's primary mission. The Navy has accepted the resultant system requirements and the basic design concept. A number of monitoring components have been implemented and successfully support deep diving operations.

  16. First records of dive durations for a hibernating sea turtle.

    PubMed

    Hochscheid, Sandra; Bentivegna, Flegra; Hays, Graeme C

    2005-03-22

    The first published record, from the early 1970s, of hibernation in sea turtles is based on the reports of the indigenous Indians and fishermen from Mexico, who hunted dormant green turtles (Chelonia mydas) in the Gulf of California. However, there were no successful attempts to investigate the biology of this particular behaviour further. Hence, data such as the exact duration and energetic requirements of dormant winter submergences are lacking. We used new satellite relay data loggers to obtain the first records of up to 7h long dives of a loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) overwintering in Greek waters. These represent the longest dives ever reported for a diving marine vertebrate. There is strong evidence that the dives were aerobic, because the turtle surfaced only for short intervals and before the calculated oxygen stores were depleted. This evidence suggests that the common belief that sea turtles hibernate underwater, as some freshwater turtles do, is incorrect.

  17. First records of dive durations for a hibernating sea turtle

    PubMed Central

    Hochscheid, Sandra; Bentivegna, Flegra; Hays, Graeme C

    2005-01-01

    The first published record, from the early 1970s, of hibernation in sea turtles is based on the reports of the indigenous Indians and fishermen from Mexico, who hunted dormant green turtles (Chelonia mydas) in the Gulf of California. However, there were no successful attempts to investigate the biology of this particular behaviour further. Hence, data such as the exact duration and energetic requirements of dormant winter submergences are lacking. We used new satellite relay data loggers to obtain the first records of up to 7 h long dives of a loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) overwintering in Greek waters. These represent the longest dives ever reported for a diving marine vertebrate. There is strong evidence that the dives were aerobic, because the turtle surfaced only for short intervals and before the calculated oxygen stores were depleted. This evidence suggests that the common belief that sea turtles hibernate underwater, as some freshwater turtles do, is incorrect. PMID:17148134

  18. Diving and swimming performance of white whales, Delphinapterus leucas: an assessment of plasma lactate and blood gas levels and respiratory rates.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, S A; Costa, D P; Williams, T M; Ridgway, S H

    1997-12-01

    The white whale Delphinapterus leucas is an exceptional diver, yet we know little about the physiology that enables this species to make prolonged dives. We studied trained white whales with the specific goal of assessing their diving and swimming performance. Two adult whales performed dives to a test platform suspended at depths of 5-300 m. Behavior was monitored for 457 dives with durations of 2.2-13.3 min. Descent rates were generally less than 2 m s-1 and ascent rates averaged 2.2-3 m s-1. Post-dive plasma lactate concentration increased to as much as 3.4 mmol l-1 (4-5 times the resting level) after dives of 11 min. Mixed venous PO2 measured during voluntary breath-holds decreased from 79 to 20 mmHg within 10 min; however, maximum breath-hold duration was 17 min. Swimming performance was examined by training the whales to follow a boat at speeds of 1.4-4.2 m s-1. Respiratory rates ranged from 1.6 breaths min-1 at rest to 5.5 breaths min-1 during exercise and decreased with increasing swim speed. Post-exercise plasma lactate level increased to 1.8 mmol l-1 (2-3 times the resting level) following 10 min exercise sessions at swimming speeds of 2.5-2.8 m s-1. The results of this study are consistent with the calculated aerobic dive limit (O2 store/metabolic rate) of 9-10 min. In addition, white whales are not well adapted for high-speed swimming compared with other small cetaceans.

  19. Decompression sickness following breath-hold diving.

    PubMed

    Schipke, J D; Gams, E; Kallweit, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Despite convincing evidence of a relationship between breath-hold diving and decompression sickness (DCS), the causal connection is only slowly being accepted. Only the more recent textbooks have acknowledged the risks of repetitive breath-hold diving. We compare four groups of breath-hold divers: (1) Japanese and Korean amas and other divers from the Pacific area, (2) instructors at naval training facilities, (3) spear fishers, and (4) free-dive athletes. While the number of amas is likely decreasing, and Scandinavian Navy training facilities recorded only a few accidents, the number of spear fishers suffering accidents is on the rise, in particular during championships or using scooters. Finally, national and international associations (e.g., International Association of Free Drives [IAFD] or Association Internationale pour Le Developpment De L'Apnee [AIDA]) promote free-diving championships including deep diving categories such as constant weight, variable weight, and no limit. A number of free-diving athletes, training for or participating in competitions, are increasingly accident prone as the world record is presently set at a depth of 171 m. This review presents data found after searching Medline and ISI Web of Science and using appropriate Internet search engines (e.g., Google). We report some 90 cases in which DCS occurred after repetitive breath-hold dives. Even today, the risk of suffering from DCS after repetitive breath-hold diving is often not acknowledged. We strongly suggest that breath-hold divers and their advisors and physicians be made aware of the possibility of DCS and of the appropriate therapeutic measures to be taken when DCS is suspected. Because the risk of suffering from DCS increases depending on depth, bottom time, rate of ascent, and duration of surface intervals, some approaches to assess the risks are presented. Regrettably, none of these approaches is widely accepted. We propose therefore the development of easily manageable

  20. Physiological Monitoring in Diving Mammals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Physiological Monitoring in Diving Mammals Andreas...large, freely diving whales. We wanted to study physiological responses during diving in free-ranging, deep diving cetaceans. The idea was to measure...contain a sensor to be implanted into the muscle. The logger will collect physiological data from muscle tissue in freely diving marine mammals. The

  1. 29 CFR 1910.423 - Post-dive procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... no-decompression limits, deeper than 100 fsw or using mixed gas as a breathing mixture, the employer... the surface to a minimum of 165 fsw (6 ATA) shall be available at the dive location for: (i) Surface-supplied air diving to depths deeper than 100 fsw and shallower than 220 fsw; (ii) Mixed gas...

  2. 29 CFR 1910.423 - Post-dive procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... no-decompression limits, deeper than 100 fsw or using mixed gas as a breathing mixture, the employer... the surface to a minimum of 165 fsw (6 ATA) shall be available at the dive location for: (i) Surface-supplied air diving to depths deeper than 100 fsw and shallower than 220 fsw; (ii) Mixed gas...

  3. 29 CFR 1910.423 - Post-dive procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... no-decompression limits, deeper than 100 fsw or using mixed gas as a breathing mixture, the employer... the surface to a minimum of 165 fsw (6 ATA) shall be available at the dive location for: (i) Surface-supplied air diving to depths deeper than 100 fsw and shallower than 220 fsw; (ii) Mixed gas...

  4. 29 CFR 1910.423 - Post-dive procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... no-decompression limits, deeper than 100 fsw or using mixed gas as a breathing mixture, the employer... the surface to a minimum of 165 fsw (6 ATA) shall be available at the dive location for: (i) Surface-supplied air diving to depths deeper than 100 fsw and shallower than 220 fsw; (ii) Mixed gas...

  5. 29 CFR 1910.423 - Post-dive procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... no-decompression limits, deeper than 100 fsw or using mixed gas as a breathing mixture, the employer... the surface to a minimum of 165 fsw (6 ATA) shall be available at the dive location for: (i) Surface-supplied air diving to depths deeper than 100 fsw and shallower than 220 fsw; (ii) Mixed gas...

  6. Travelers' Health: Scuba Diving

    MedlinePlus

    ... TS, Bennett PB, Elliott DH. Bennett and Elliott’s Physiology and Medicine of Diving. 5th ed. London: Saunders; ... 2004. p. 195–223. Neuman TS, Thom SR. Physiology and medicine of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  7. Diving dynamics of seabirds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sunghwan; Chang, Brian; Croson, Matt; Straker, Lorian; Dove, Carla

    2015-03-01

    Diving is the activity of falling from air into water, which is somewhat dangerous due to the impact. Humans dive for entertainments less than 20 meters high, however seabirds dive as a hunting mechanism from more than 20 meters high. Moreover, most birds including seabirds have a slender and long neck compared to many other animals, which can potentially be the weakest part of the body upon axial impact compression. Motivated by the diving dynamics, we investigate the effect of surface and geometric configurations on structures consisting of a beak-like cone and a neck-like elastic beam. A transition from non-buckling to buckling is characterized and understood through physical experiments and an analytical model.

  8. Formation of ethyl acetate by Kluyveromyces marxianus on whey during aerobic batch cultivation at specific trace element limitation.

    PubMed

    Urit, Thanet; Stukert, Anton; Bley, Thomas; Löser, Christian

    2012-12-01

    Kluyveromyces marxianus is able to transform lactose into ethyl acetate as a bulk product which offers a chance for an economical reuse of whey-borne sugar. Ethyl acetate is highly volatile and allows its process-integrated recovery by stripping from the aerated bioreactor. Extensive formation of ethyl acetate by K. marxianus DSM 5422 required restriction of yeast growth by a lack of trace elements. Several aerobic batch processes were done in a 1-L stirred reactor using whey-borne culture medium supplemented with an individual trace element solution excluding Mn, Mo, Fe, Cu, or Zn for identifying the trace element(s) crucial for the observed ester synthesis. Only a lack of Fe, Cu, or Zn restricted yeast growth while exclusion of Mn and Mo did not exhibit any effect due to a higher amount of the latter in the used whey. Limitation of growth by Fe or Cu caused significant production of ethyl acetate while limitation by Zn resulted in formation of ethanol. A lack of Fe or Cu obviously makes the respiratory chain inefficient resulting in an increased mitochondrial NADH level followed by a reduced metabolic flux of acetyl-SCoA into the citrate cycle. Synthesis of ethyl acetate from acetyl-SCoA and ethanol by alcoholysis is thus interpreted as an overflow metabolism.

  9. Gait switches in deep-diving beaked whales: biomechanical strategies for long-duration dives.

    PubMed

    Martín López, Lucía Martina; Miller, Patrick J O; Aguilar de Soto, Natacha; Johnson, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Diving animals modulate their swimming gaits to promote locomotor efficiency and so enable longer, more productive dives. Beaked whales perform extremely long and deep foraging dives that probably exceed aerobic capacities for some species. Here, we use biomechanical data from suction-cup tags attached to three species of beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris, N=10; Ziphius cavirostris, N=9; and Hyperoodon ampullatus, N=2) to characterize their swimming gaits. In addition to continuous stroking and stroke-and-glide gaits described for other diving mammals, all whales produced occasional fluke-strokes with distinctly larger dorso-ventral acceleration, which we termed 'type-B' strokes. These high-power strokes occurred almost exclusively during deep dive ascents as part of a novel mixed gait. To quantify body rotations and specific acceleration generated during strokes we adapted a kinematic method combining data from two sensors in the tag. Body rotations estimated with high-rate magnetometer data were subtracted from accelerometer data to estimate the resulting surge and heave accelerations. Using this method, we show that stroke duration, rotation angle and acceleration were bi-modal for these species, with B-strokes having 76% of the duration, 52% larger body rotation and four times more surge than normal strokes. The additional acceleration of B-strokes did not lead to faster ascents, but rather enabled brief glides, which may improve the overall efficiency of this gait. Their occurrence towards the end of long dives leads us to propose that B-strokes may recruit fast-twitch fibres that comprise ∼80% of swimming muscles in Blainville's beaked whales, thus prolonging foraging time at depth.

  10. A comparative meta-analysis of maximal aerobic metabolism of vertebrates: implications for respiratory and cardiovascular limits to gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Stanley S; Hancock, Thomas V; Hedrick, Michael S

    2013-02-01

    Maximal aerobic metabolic rates (MMR) in vertebrates are supported by increased conductive and diffusive fluxes of O(2) from the environment to the mitochondria necessitating concomitant increases in CO(2) efflux. A question that has received much attention has been which step, respiratory or cardiovascular, provides the principal rate limitation to gas flux at MMR? Limitation analyses have principally focused on O(2) fluxes, though the excess capacity of the lung for O(2) ventilation and diffusion remains unexplained except as a safety factor. Analyses of MMR normally rely upon allometry and temperature to define these factors, but cannot account for much of the variation and often have narrow phylogenetic breadth. The unique aspect of our comparative approach was to use an interclass meta-analysis to examine cardio-respiratory variables during the increase from resting metabolic rate to MMR among vertebrates from fish to mammals, independent of allometry and phylogeny. Common patterns at MMR indicate universal principles governing O(2) and CO(2) transport in vertebrate cardiovascular and respiratory systems, despite the varied modes of activities (swimming, running, flying), different cardio-respiratory architecture, and vastly different rates of metabolism (endothermy vs. ectothermy). Our meta-analysis supports previous studies indicating a cardiovascular limit to maximal O(2) transport and also implicates a respiratory system limit to maximal CO(2) efflux, especially in ectotherms. Thus, natural selection would operate on the respiratory system to enhance maximal CO(2) excretion and the cardiovascular system to enhance maximal O(2) uptake. This provides a possible evolutionary explanation for the conundrum of why the respiratory system appears functionally over-designed from an O(2) perspective, a unique insight from previous work focused solely on O(2) fluxes. The results suggest a common gas transport blueprint, or Bauplan, in the vertebrate clade.

  11. Diving fatality investigations: recent changes.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Carl; Caruso, James

    2014-06-01

    Modifications to the investigation procedures in diving fatalities have been incorporated into the data acquisition by diving accident investigators. The most germane proposal for investigators assessing diving fatalities is to delay the drawing of conclusions until all relevant diving information is known. This includes: the accumulation and integration of the pathological data; the access to dive computer information; re-enactments of diving incidents; post-mortem CT scans and the interpretation of intravascular and tissue gas detected. These are all discussed, with reference to the established literature and recent publications.

  12. Navigating under sea ice promotes rapid maturation of diving physiology and performance in beluga whales.

    PubMed

    Noren, Shawn R; Suydam, Robert

    2016-09-15

    Little is known about the postnatal development of the physiological characteristics that support breath-hold in cetaceans, despite their need to swim and dive at birth. Arctic species have the additional demand of avoiding entrapment while navigating under sea ice, where breathing holes are patchily distributed and ephemeral. This is the first investigation of the ontogeny of the biochemistry of the locomotor muscle in a year-round Arctic-dwelling cetacean (beluga whale, Delphinapterus leucas). Compared with what we know about other cetaceans, belugas are born with high myoglobin content (1.56±0.02 g 100 g(-1) wet muscle mass, N=2) that matures rapidly. Myoglobin increased by 452% during the first year after birth and achieved adult levels (6.91±0.35 g 100 g(-1) wet muscle mass, N=9) by 14 months postpartum. Buffering capacity was 48.88±0.69 slykes (N=2) at birth; adult levels (84.31±1.38 slykes, N=9) were also achieved by 14 months postpartum. As the oxygen stores matured, calculated aerobic dive limit more than doubled over the first year of life, undoubtedly facilitating the movements of calves under sea ice. Nonetheless, small body size theoretically continues to constrain the diving ability of newly weaned 2 year olds, as they only had 74% and 69% of the aerobic breath-hold capacity of larger adult female and male counterparts. These assessments enhance our knowledge of the biology of cetaceans and provide insight into age-specific flexibility to alter underwater behaviors, as may be required with the ongoing alterations in the Arctic marine ecosystem associated with climate change and increased anthropogenic activities.

  13. 46 CFR 197.410 - Dive procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Operations § 197.410 Dive procedures. (a) The diving supervisor shall insure that— (1) Before commencing diving operations, dive team members are briefed on— (i... safety of the diving operation; and (iii) Any modifications to the operations manual or...

  14. 46 CFR 197.430 - SCUBA diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false SCUBA diving. 197.430 Section 197.430 Shipping COAST... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Specific Diving Mode Procedures § 197.430 SCUBA diving. The diving supervisor shall insure that— (a) SCUBA diving is not conducted— (1) Outside the...

  15. 46 CFR 197.430 - SCUBA diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false SCUBA diving. 197.430 Section 197.430 Shipping COAST... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Specific Diving Mode Procedures § 197.430 SCUBA diving. The diving supervisor shall insure that— (a) SCUBA diving is not conducted— (1) Outside the...

  16. 46 CFR 197.410 - Dive procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Operations § 197.410 Dive procedures. (a) The diving supervisor shall insure that— (1) Before commencing diving operations, dive team members are briefed on— (i... safety of the diving operation; and (iii) Any modifications to the operations manual or...

  17. 46 CFR 197.430 - SCUBA diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false SCUBA diving. 197.430 Section 197.430 Shipping COAST... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Specific Diving Mode Procedures § 197.430 SCUBA diving. The diving supervisor shall insure that— (a) SCUBA diving is not conducted— (1) Outside the...

  18. 46 CFR 197.410 - Dive procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Operations § 197.410 Dive procedures. (a) The diving supervisor shall insure that— (1) Before commencing diving operations, dive team members are briefed on— (i... safety of the diving operation; and (iii) Any modifications to the operations manual or...

  19. 46 CFR 197.430 - SCUBA diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false SCUBA diving. 197.430 Section 197.430 Shipping COAST... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Specific Diving Mode Procedures § 197.430 SCUBA diving. The diving supervisor shall insure that— (a) SCUBA diving is not conducted— (1) Outside the...

  20. 46 CFR 197.410 - Dive procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Operations § 197.410 Dive procedures. (a) The diving supervisor shall insure that— (1) Before commencing diving operations, dive team members are briefed on— (i... safety of the diving operation; and (iii) Any modifications to the operations manual or...

  1. 46 CFR 197.430 - SCUBA diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false SCUBA diving. 197.430 Section 197.430 Shipping COAST... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Specific Diving Mode Procedures § 197.430 SCUBA diving. The diving supervisor shall insure that— (a) SCUBA diving is not conducted— (1) Outside the...

  2. 46 CFR 197.410 - Dive procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Operations § 197.410 Dive procedures. (a) The diving supervisor shall insure that— (1) Before commencing diving operations, dive team members are briefed on— (i... safety of the diving operation; and (iii) Any modifications to the operations manual or...

  3. 46 CFR 197.460 - Diving equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Diving equipment. 197.460 Section 197.460 Shipping COAST... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Periodic Tests and Inspections of Diving Equipment § 197.460 Diving equipment. The diving supervisor shall insure that the diving equipment designated for...

  4. Diving in a warming world: the thermal sensitivity and plasticity of diving performance in juvenile estuarine crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus).

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Essie M; Schwartz, Jonathon J; Franklin, Craig E

    2015-01-01

    Air-breathing, diving ectotherms are a crucial component of the biodiversity and functioning of aquatic ecosystems, but these organisms may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change on submergence times. Ectothermic dive capacity is thermally sensitive, with dive durations significantly reduced by acute increases in water temperature; it is unclear whether diving performance can acclimate/acclimatize in response to long-term exposure to elevated water temperatures. We assessed the thermal sensitivity and plasticity of 'fright-dive' capacity in juvenile estuarine crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus; n = 11). Crocodiles were exposed to one of three long-term thermal treatments, designed to emulate water temperatures under differing climate change scenarios (i.e. current summer, 28°C; 'moderate' climate warming, 31.5°C; 'high' climate warming, 35°C). Dive trials were conducted in a temperature-controlled tank across a range of water temperatures. Dive durations were independent of thermal acclimation treatment, indicating a lack of thermal acclimation response. Acute increases in water temperature resulted in significantly shorter dive durations, with mean submergence times effectively halving with every 3.5°C increase in water temperature (Q 10 0.17, P < 0.001). Maximal dive performances, however, were found to be thermally insensitive across the temperature range of 28-35°C. These results suggest that C. porosus have a limited or non-existent capacity to thermally acclimate sustained 'fright-dive' performance. If the findings here are applicable to other air-breathing, diving ectotherms, the functional capacity of these organisms will probably be compromised under climate warming.

  5. The consequences of misinterpreting dive computers: three case studies.

    PubMed

    Sayer, Martin Dj; Wilson, Colin M; Laden, Gerard; Lonsdale, Phillip

    2008-03-01

    Three cases are presented where there is a direct link between how the divers used their dive computers and the eventual requirement for their therapeutic recompression. The first case involves a diver with a previous history of decompression incidents making adjustments to their dive computer without understanding the outcomes of those alterations. The second case involves two divers running out of air and surfacing having missed significant amounts of decompression, caused by the dive computer not reducing their decompression obligation in actual time. This effect and performance differences between three models of computers were demonstrated in subsequent compression chamber trials reported here. The final case involves a diver who completed their dive within the indicated limits of their dive computer but subsequently developed serious neurological decompression sickness that left severe permanent residua. Compression chamber trials suggested that a combination of poor measurement accuracy and outdated decompression management in the computer used could have contributed to the diver's eventual poor outcome.

  6. Physiological Monitoring in Diving Mammals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    and Neurobiology, 2009. 165(28-39). 4. Fahlman, A., et al., Deep diving mammals : Dive behavior and circulatory adjustments contribute to bends...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Physiological Monitoring in Diving Mammals Peter L...NGO) scrutiny of the complex relationship between ocean noise, bubble injury and marine mammal strandings (http://www.awionline.org/oceans/Noise

  7. Functional properties of myoglobins from five whale species with different diving capacities.

    PubMed

    Helbo, Signe; Fago, Angela

    2012-10-01

    Whales show an exceptionally wide range of diving capabilities and many express high amounts of the O(2) carrier protein myoglobin (Mb) in their muscle tissues, which increases their aerobic diving capacity. Although previous studies have mainly focused on the muscle Mb concentration and O(2) carrying capacity as markers of diving behavior in whales, it still remains unexplored whether whale Mbs differ in their O(2) affinities and nitrite reductase and peroxidase enzymatic activities, all functions that could contribute to differences in diving capacities. In this study, we have measured the functional properties of purified Mbs from five toothed whales and two baleen whales and have examined their correlation with average dive duration. Results showed that some variation in functional properties exists among whale Mbs, with toothed whale Mbs having higher O(2) affinities and nitrite reductase activities (similar to those of horse Mb) compared with baleen whale Mbs. However, these differences did not correlate with average dive duration. Instead, a significant correlation was found between whale Mb concentration and average duration and depth of dives, and between O(2) affinity and nitrite reductase activity when including horse Mb. Despite the fact that the functional properties showed little species-specific differences in vitro, they may still contribute to enhancing diving capacity as a result of the increased muscle Mb concentration found in extreme divers. In conclusion, Mb concentration rather than specific functional reactivities may support whale diving performance.

  8. The Physics of Diving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzgraber, Helmut

    2007-10-01

    The underwater world, and in particular our oceans, represent a final frontier of exploration. In the past, studying the underwater fauna and flora used to be a dangerous undertaking reserved to professional divers. Technological advances over the last 50 years have given sports divers the opportunity to explore this fascinating world using self-contained underwater breathing apparatuses (SCUBA). Despite these technological advances humans have to cope with an unusual environment: perception is different underwater and there is always a risk of decompression illness due to the ambient pressure. After a brief overview of SCUBA diving, some physical phenomena particular to diving will be presented.

  9. Scuba Diving Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... font-size:14px;}h1,.impact-text,.impact-text-large{font-family:"Source Sans Pro";line-height:34px; ... and Scuba Schools International (SSI). Basic courses involve classroom instruction, training pools and open-water settings. Diving ...

  10. Dive into Scuba

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coelho, Jeffrey; Fielitz, Lynn R.

    2006-01-01

    Scuba is a unique physical education activity that middle school and high school students can experience in physical education to provide them with the basic skills needed to enjoy the sport for many years to come. This article describes the basic scuba diving equipment, proper training and certification for instructors and students, facilities,…

  11. Neurology and diving.

    PubMed

    Massey, E Wayne; Moon, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Diving exposes a person to the combined effects of increased ambient pressure and immersion. The reduction in pressure when surfacing can precipitate decompression sickness (DCS), caused by bubble formation within tissues due to inert gas supersaturation. Arterial gas embolism (AGE) can also occur due to pulmonary barotrauma as a result of breath holding during ascent or gas trapping due to disease, causing lung hyperexpansion, rupture and direct entry of alveolar gas into the blood. Bubble disease due to either DCS or AGE is collectively known as decompression illness. Tissue and intravascular bubbles can induce a cascade of events resulting in CNS injury. Manifestations of decompression illness can vary in severity, from mild (paresthesias, joint pains, fatigue) to severe (vertigo, hearing loss, paraplegia, quadriplegia). Particularly as these conditions are uncommon, early recognition is essential to provide appropriate management, consisting of first aid oxygen, targeted fluid resuscitation and hyperbaric oxygen, which is the definitive treatment. Less common neurologic conditions that do not require hyperbaric oxygen include rupture of a labyrinthine window due to inadequate equalization of middle ear pressure during descent, which can precipitate vertigo and hearing loss. Sinus and middle ear overpressurization during ascent can compress the trigeminal and facial nerves respectively, causing temporary facial hypesthesia and lower motor neuron facial weakness. Some conditions preclude safe diving, such as seizure disorders, since a convulsion underwater is likely to be fatal. Preventive measures to reduce neurologic complications of diving include exclusion of individuals with specific medical conditions and safe diving procedures, particularly related to descent and ascent.

  12. Human Simulated Diving Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, David S.; Speck, Dexter F.

    1979-01-01

    This report details several simulated divinq experiments on the human. These are suitable for undergraduate or graduate laboratories in human or environmental physiology. The experiment demonstrates that a diving reflex is precipitated by both facial cooling and apnea. (Author/RE)

  13. ASSESSMENT OF PLUME DIVING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation presents an assessment of plume diving. Observations included: vertical plume delineation at East Patchogue, NY showed BTEX and MTBE plumes sinking on either side of a gravel pit; Lake Druid TCE plume sank beneath unlined drainage ditch; and aquifer recharge/dis...

  14. Toppling Techniques in Diving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Barry D.

    1977-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that in a toppling dive (1) a 1:1 ratio exists between the rotational speed of the diver immediately before and after the take-off and (2) the take-off angle as defined by Page is approximately 50 percent. (Author)

  15. Diving into Oceans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Diving Into Oceans." Contents are organized into the following…

  16. Physiological constraints and energetic costs of diving behaviour in marine mammals: a review of studies using trained Steller sea lions diving in the open ocean.

    PubMed

    Rosen, David A S; Hindle, Allyson G; Gerlinsky, Carling D; Goundie, Elizabeth; Hastie, Gordon D; Volpov, Beth L; Trites, Andrew W

    2017-01-01

    Marine mammals are characterized as having physiological specializations that maximize the use of oxygen stores to prolong time spent under water. However, it has been difficult to undertake the requisite controlled studies to determine the physiological limitations and trade-offs that marine mammals face while diving in the wild under varying environmental and nutritional conditions. For the past decade, Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) trained to swim and dive in the open ocean away from the physical confines of pools participated in studies that investigated the interactions between diving behaviour, energetic costs, physiological constraints, and prey availability. Many of these studies measured the cost of diving to understand how it varies with behaviour and environmental and physiological conditions. Collectively, these studies show that the type of diving (dive bouts or single dives), the level of underwater activity, the depth and duration of dives, and the nutritional status and physical condition of the animal affect the cost of diving and foraging. They show that dive depth, dive and surface duration, and the type of dive result in physiological adjustments (heart rate, gas exchange) that may be independent of energy expenditure. They also demonstrate that changes in prey abundance and nutritional status cause sea lions to alter the balance between time spent at the surface acquiring oxygen (and offloading CO2 and other metabolic by-products) and time spent at depth acquiring prey. These new insights into the physiological basis of diving behaviour further our understanding of the potential scope for behavioural responses of marine mammals to environmental changes, the energetic significance of these adjustments, and the consequences of approaching physiological limits.

  17. Diving methods and decompression sickness incidence of Miskito Indian underwater harvesters.

    PubMed

    Dunford, R G; Mejia, E B; Salbador, G W; Gerth, W A; Hampson, N B

    2002-01-01

    Diving conditions, dive profiles, and symptoms of decompression sickness (DCS) in a group of Miskito Indian underwater seafood harvesters are described. Dive profiles for 5 divers were recorded with dive computers, and DCS symptoms were assessed by neurological examination and interview. Divers averaged 10 dives a day over a 7-day period with a mean depth of 67 +/- 7 FSW (306 +/- 123 kPa) and average in-water time of 20.6 +/- 6.3 minutes. Limb pain was reported on 10 occasions during 35 man-days of diving. Symptoms were typically managed with analgesic medication rather than recompression. Indices of the decompression stress were estimated from the recorded profiles using a probabilistic model. We conclude that the dives were outside the limits of standard air decompression tables and that DCS symptoms were common. The high frequency of limb pain suggests the potential for dysbaric bone necrosis for these divers.

  18. The silent witness: using dive computer records in diving fatality investigations.

    PubMed

    Sayer, Martin D J; Azzopardi, Elaine

    2014-09-01

    Downloaded data from diving computers can offer invaluable insights into diving incidents resulting in fatalities. Such data form an essential part of subsequent investigations or in legal actions related to the diving incident. It is often tempting to accept the information being displayed from a computer download without question. However, there is a large variability between the makes and models of dive computer in how the data are recorded, stored and re-displayed and caution must be employed in the interpretation of the evidence. In reporting on downloaded data, investigators should be fully aware of the limitations in the data retrieved. They should also know exactly how to interpret parameters such as: the accuracy of the dive profile; the effects of different mode settings; the precision of displayed water temperatures; the potential for misrepresenting breathing rates where there are data from integrated monitoring systems, and be able to challenge some forms of displayed information either through re-modelling based on the pressure/time profiles or by testing the computers in standardised conditions.

  19. Behavioral inference of diving metabolic rate in free-ranging leatherback turtles.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Corey J A; McMahon, Clive R; Hays, Graeme C

    2007-01-01

    Good estimates of metabolic rate in free-ranging animals are essential for understanding behavior, distribution, and abundance. For the critically endangered leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea), one of the world's largest reptiles, there has been a long-standing debate over whether this species demonstrates any metabolic endothermy. In short, do leatherbacks have a purely ectothermic reptilian metabolic rate or one that is elevated as a result of regional endothermy? Recent measurements have provided the first estimates of field metabolic rate (FMR) in leatherback turtles using doubly labeled water; however, the technique is prohibitively expensive and logistically difficult and produces estimates that are highly variable across individuals in this species. We therefore examined dive duration and depth data collected for nine free-swimming leatherback turtles over long periods (up to 431 d) to infer aerobic dive limits (ADLs) based on the asymptotic increase in maximum dive duration with depth. From this index of ADL and the known mass-specific oxygen storage capacity (To(2)) of leatherbacks, we inferred diving metabolic rate (DMR) as To2/ADL. We predicted that if leatherbacks conform to the purely ectothermic reptilian model of oxygen consumption, these inferred estimates of DMR should fall between predicted and measured values of reptilian resting and field metabolic rates, as well as being substantially lower than the FMR predicted for an endotherm of equivalent mass. Indeed, our behaviorally derived DMR estimates (mean=0.73+/-0.11 mL O(2) min(-1) kg(-1)) were 3.00+/-0.54 times the resting metabolic rate measured in unrestrained leatherbacks and 0.50+/-0.08 times the average FMR for a reptile of equivalent mass. These DMRs were also nearly one order of magnitude lower than the FMR predicted for an endotherm of equivalent mass. Thus, our findings lend support to the notion that diving leatherback turtles are indeed ectothermic and do not demonstrate

  20. Sensitivity to hypercapnia and elimination of CO2 following diving in Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus).

    PubMed

    Gerlinsky, Carling D; Rosen, David A S; Trites, Andrew W

    2014-05-01

    The diving ability of marine mammals is a function of how they use and store oxygen and the physiological control of ventilation, which is in turn dependent on the accumulation of CO2. To assess the influence of CO2 on physiological control of dive behaviour, we tested how increasing levels of inspired CO2 (hypercarbia) and decreasing inspired O2 (hypoxia) affected the diving metabolic rate, submergence times, and dive recovery times (time to replenish O2 stores and eliminate CO2) of freely diving Steller sea lions. We also measured changes in breathing frequency of diving and non-diving individuals. Our findings show that hypercarbia increased breathing frequency (as low as 2 % CO2), but did not affect metabolic rate, or the duration of dives or surface intervals (up to 3 % CO2). Changes in breathing rates indicated respiratory drive was altered by hypercarbia at rest, but blood CO2 levels remained below the threshold that would alter normal dive behaviour. It took the sea lions longer to remove accumulated CO2 than it did for them to replenish their O2 stores following dives (whether breathing ambient air, hypercarbia, or hypoxia). This difference between O2 and CO2 recovery times grew with increasing dive durations, increasing hypercarbia, and was greater for bout dives, suggesting there could be a build-up of CO2 load with repeated dives. Although we saw no evidence of CO2 limiting dive behaviour, the longer time required to remove CO2 may eventually exhibit control over the overall time they can spend in apnoea and overall foraging duration.

  1. Diving in a warming world: the thermal sensitivity and plasticity of diving performance in juvenile estuarine crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus)

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Essie M.; Schwartz, Jonathon J.; Franklin, Craig E.

    2015-01-01

    Air-breathing, diving ectotherms are a crucial component of the biodiversity and functioning of aquatic ecosystems, but these organisms may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change on submergence times. Ectothermic dive capacity is thermally sensitive, with dive durations significantly reduced by acute increases in water temperature; it is unclear whether diving performance can acclimate/acclimatize in response to long-term exposure to elevated water temperatures. We assessed the thermal sensitivity and plasticity of ‘fright-dive’ capacity in juvenile estuarine crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus; n = 11). Crocodiles were exposed to one of three long-term thermal treatments, designed to emulate water temperatures under differing climate change scenarios (i.e. current summer, 28°C; ‘moderate’ climate warming, 31.5°C; ‘high’ climate warming, 35°C). Dive trials were conducted in a temperature-controlled tank across a range of water temperatures. Dive durations were independent of thermal acclimation treatment, indicating a lack of thermal acclimation response. Acute increases in water temperature resulted in significantly shorter dive durations, with mean submergence times effectively halving with every 3.5°C increase in water temperature (Q10 0.17, P < 0.001). Maximal dive performances, however, were found to be thermally insensitive across the temperature range of 28–35°C. These results suggest that C. porosus have a limited or non-existent capacity to thermally acclimate sustained ‘fright-dive’ performance. If the findings here are applicable to other air-breathing, diving ectotherms, the functional capacity of these organisms will probably be compromised under climate warming. PMID:27293738

  2. Repeated Six-Hour Dives 1.35 ATM Oxygen Partial Pressure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    hemoglobin and carboxyhemoglobin , visual refraction was tested, and pulmonary function was measured . Additionally, the divers completed the postdive...and single six-hour dives in water or in the dry chamber where divers breathed oxygen at a partial pressure of 1.6 atm.4 In all studies we measured ...bands for each variable, as the lower limits of normal. We did not measure visual refraction daily during the pairs of daily dives or five daily dives

  3. Identifying foraging events in deep diving southern elephant seals, Mirounga leonina, using acceleration data loggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallon, S.; Bailleul, F.; Charrassin, J.-B.; Guinet, C.; Bost, C.-A.; Handrich, Y.; Hindell, M.

    2013-04-01

    Southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) range widely throughout the Southern Ocean and are associated with important habitats (e.g., ice edges, shelf) where they accumulate energy to fuel their reproductive efforts on land. Knowledge of the fine scale foraging behaviour used to garner this energy, however, is limited. For the first time, acceleration loggers were deployed on three adult southern elephant seals during a translocation study at Kerguelen Island. The aims of the study were to (1) identify prey capture attempts using 2-D accelerometer tags deployed on the head of southern elephant seals, (2) compare the number of foraging dives identified by simple dive depth profiles and accelerometer profiles and (3) compare dive characteristics between prey encounter and non-prey encounter dives. The 2-D loggers recorded depth every second, surge and heave accelerations at 8 or 16 Hz and were carried for periods between 23 and 121 h. Rapid head movements were interpreted to be associated with prey encounter events. Acceleration data detected possible prey encounter events in 39-52% of dives whilst 67-80% of dives were classified as foraging dives when using dive depth profiles alone. Prey encounters occurred in successive dives during days and nights and lasted between tenths of a second and 7.6 min. Binomial linear mixed effect models showed that seals were diving significantly deeper and increased both descent rate and bottom duration when encountering prey. Dive duration, however, did not significantly increase during dives with prey encounters. These results are in accordance with optimal foraging theory, which predicts that deep divers should increase both their transit rates and the time spent at depth when a profitable prey patch is encountered. These findings indicate that this technique is promising as it more accurately detects possible prey encounter events compared with dive depth profiles alone and thus provides a better understanding of seal foraging

  4. Nutritional Assessment During a 14-d Saturation Dive: the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operation V Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. M.; Davis-Street, J. E.; Fesperman, J. V.; Smith, M. D.; Rice, B. L.; Zwart, S. R.

    2006-01-01

    Ground-based analogs of spaceflight are an important means of studying physiological and nutritional changes associated with space travel, particularly since exploration missions are anticipated, and flight research opportunities are limited. A clinical nutritional assessment of the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operation V (NEEMO) crew (4 M, 2 F) was conducted before, during, and after the 14-d saturation dive. Blood and urine samples were collected before (D-12 and D-1), during (MD 7 and MD 12), and after (R + 0 and R + 7) the dive. The foods were typical of the spaceflight food system. A number of physiological changes were reported both during the dive and post dive that are also commonly observed during spaceflight. Serum hemoglobin and hematocrit were decreased (P less than 0.05) post dive. Serum ferritin and ceruloplasmin significantly increased during the dive, while transferring receptors tended to go down during the dive and were significantly decreased by the last day (R + 0). Along with significant hematological changes, there was also evidence for increased oxidative damage and stress during the dive. 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine was elevated (P less than 0.05) during the dive, while glutathione peroxidase and superoxide disrnutase activities were decreased (P less than 0.05) during the dive. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration also tended to increase during the dive, suggesting the presence of a stress-induced inflammatory response, Decreased leptin during the dive (P less than 0.05) may also be related to the increased stress. Similar to what is observed during spaceflight, subjects had decreased energy intake and weight loss during the dive. Together, these similarities to spaceflight provide a model to further define the physiological effects of spaceflight and investigate potential countermeasures.

  5. Exercise at depth alters bradycardia and incidence of cardiac anomalies in deep-diving marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Williams, Terrie M; Fuiman, Lee A; Kendall, Traci; Berry, Patrick; Richter, Beau; Noren, Shawn R; Thometz, Nicole; Shattock, Michael J; Farrell, Edward; Stamper, Andy M; Davis, Randall W

    2015-01-16

    Unlike their terrestrial ancestors, marine mammals routinely confront extreme physiological and physical challenges while breath-holding and pursuing prey at depth. To determine how cetaceans and pinnipeds accomplish deep-sea chases, we deployed animal-borne instruments that recorded high-resolution electrocardiograms, behaviour and flipper accelerations of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) diving from the surface to >200 m. Here we report that both exercise and depth alter the bradycardia associated with the dive response, with the greatest impacts at depths inducing lung collapse. Unexpectedly, cardiac arrhythmias occurred in >73% of deep, aerobic dives, which we attribute to the interplay between sympathetic and parasympathetic drivers for exercise and diving, respectively. Such marked cardiac variability alters the common view of a stereotypic 'dive reflex' in diving mammals. It also suggests the persistence of ancestral terrestrial traits in cardiac function that may help explain the unique sensitivity of some deep-diving marine mammals to anthropogenic disturbances.

  6. Visual Impairment does not Limit Training Effects in Development of Aerobic and Anaerobic Capacity in Tandem Cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Malwina, Kamelska Anna; Krzysztof, Mazurek; Piotr, Zmijewski

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the differences in the effects of 7-month training on aerobic and anaerobic capacity in tandem cycling athletes with and without visual impairment. In this study, Polish elite (n=13) and sub-elite (n=13) visually impaired (VI) (n=13; 40.8 ±12.8 years) and properly sighted (PS) (n=13; 36.7 ±12.2 years) tandem-cycling athletes participated voluntarily in 7-month routine training. The following pre-/post-training measurements were conducted on separate days: maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) was estimated with age correction using the Physical Working Capacity test on a bicycle ergometer according to the Astrand-Ryhming method. Maximal power output (Pmax) was evaluated using the Quebec test on a bicycle ergometer. At baseline, VO2max (47.8 ±14.1 vs 42.0 ±8.3 ml/kg/min, respectively) and Pmax (11.5 ±1.5 vs 11.5 ±1.0 W/kg) did not differ significantly between PS and VI cyclists. However, differences in aerobic capacity were considered as clinically significant. Two-way ANOVA revealed that after 7 month training, there were statistically significant increases in VO2max (p=0.003) and Pmax (p=0.009) among VI (VO2max, +9.1%; Pmax, +6.3%) and PS (VO2max, +9.1%; Pmax, +11.7%) cyclists, however, no time × visual impairment interaction effect was found (VO2max, p=0.467; Pmax, p=0.364). After training, VO2max (p=0.03), but not Pmax (p=0.13), was significantly greater in elite compared to sub-elite tandem cyclists. VI and PS tandem cyclists showed similar rates of improvement in VO2max and Pmax after 7-month training. VO2max was a significant determinant of success in tandem cycling. This is one of the first studies providing reference values for aerobic and anaerobic capacity in visually impaired cyclists. PMID:26834877

  7. 43 CFR 15.8 - Skin diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Skin diving. 15.8 Section 15.8 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.8 Skin diving. Diving with camera, or diving for observation and pleasure is permitted and encouraged within the Preserve....

  8. 43 CFR 15.8 - Skin diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Skin diving. 15.8 Section 15.8 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.8 Skin diving. Diving with camera, or diving for observation and pleasure is permitted and encouraged within...

  9. 43 CFR 15.8 - Skin diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Skin diving. 15.8 Section 15.8 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.8 Skin diving. Diving with camera, or diving for observation and pleasure is permitted and encouraged within...

  10. 43 CFR 15.8 - Skin diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Skin diving. 15.8 Section 15.8 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.8 Skin diving. Diving with camera, or diving for observation and pleasure is permitted and encouraged within...

  11. 43 CFR 15.8 - Skin diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Skin diving. 15.8 Section 15.8 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.8 Skin diving. Diving with camera, or diving for observation and pleasure is permitted and encouraged within...

  12. Diving decompression models and bubble metrics: modern computer syntheses.

    PubMed

    Wienke, B R

    2009-04-01

    A quantitative summary of computer models in diving applications is presented, underscoring dual phase dynamics and quantifying metrics in tissue and blood. Algorithms covered include the multitissue, diffusion, split phase gradient, linear-exponential, asymmetric tissue, thermodynamic, varying permeability, reduced gradient bubble, tissue bubble diffusion, and linear-exponential phase models. Defining relationships are listed, and diver staging regimens are underscored. Implementations, diving sectors, and correlations are indicated for models with a history of widespread acceptance, utilization, and safe application across recreational, scientific, military, research, and technical communities. Presently, all models are incomplete, but many (included above) are useful, having resulted in diving tables, underwater meters, and dive planning software. Those herein employ varying degrees of calibration and data tuning. We discuss bubble metrics in tissue and blood as a backdrop against computer models. The past 15 years, or so, have witnessed changes and additions to diving protocols and table procedures, such as shorter nonstop time limits, slower ascent rates, shallow safety stops, ascending repetitive profiles, deep decompression stops, helium based breathing mixtures, permissible reverse profiles, multilevel techniques, both faster and slower controlling repetitive tissue halftimes, smaller critical tensions, longer flying-after-diving surface intervals, and others. Stimulated by Doppler and imaging technology, table and decompression meter development, theory, statistics, chamber and animal testing, or safer diving consensus, these modifications affect a gamut of activity, spanning bounce to decompression, single to multiday, and air to mixed gas diving. As it turns out, there is growing support for many protocols on operational, experimental, and theoretical grounds, with bubble models addressing many concerns on plausible bases, but with further testing or

  13. Diving behavior and fishing performance: the case of lobster artisanal fishermen of the Yucatan coast, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Huchim-Lara, Oswaldo; Salas, Silvia; Chin, Walter; Montero, Jorge; Fraga, Julia

    2015-01-01

    An average of 209 cases of decompression sickness (DCS) have been reported every year among artisanal fishermen. divers of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. DCS is a major problem among fishermen divers worldwide. This paper explores how diving behavior and fishing techniques among fishermen relate to the probability of experiencing DCS (Pdcs). Fieldwork was conducted in two communities during the 2012-2013 fishing season. Fishermen were classified into three groups (two per group) according to their fishing performance and followed during their journeys. Dive profiles were recorded using Sensus Ultra dive recorders (Reefet Inc.). Surveys were used to record fishing yields from cooperative and individual fishermen along with fishing techniques and dive behavior. 120 dives were recorded. Fishermen averaged three dives/day, with an average depth of 47 ± 2 feet of sea water (fsw) and an average total bottom time (TBT) of 95 ± 11 minutes. 24% of dives exceeded the 2008 U.S. Navy no-decompression limit. The average ascent rate was 20 fsw/minute, and 5% of those exceeded 40 fsw/minute. Inadequate decompression was observed in all fishermen. Fishermen are diving outside the safety limits of both military and recreational standards. Fishing techniques and dive behavior were important factors in Pdcs. Fishermen were reluctant to seek treatment, and symptoms were relieved with analgesics.

  14. Body Heat Loss in Diving.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    is new is the severity of the thermal problem in deep excursion dives from a diving bell or habitat. A diver working from the surface expects to be...chilled, and if the water is extremely cold he may need hot water in free flooding suits. But in deep saturation diving, where the water is always cold...5 to 10 C(41 to 50 F) -- a diver badly needs a well-insulated suit and supplemental heat, neither of which is fully available yet. In such deep

  15. Unmanned Evaluation of Mares Abyss 22 Navy Open Circuit Scuba Regulator for Cold Water Diving

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-05

    scuba regulator was conducted, and the results were compared to the U.S. Navy performance limits and goals for use in cold water diving applications...resistive effort; work of breathing; unmanned evaluation; open circuit scuba regulator; cold water diving ; Mares Abyss 22 Navy; UBA; underwater

  16. Diving Medicine: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Diving Fin Foot Frontal Headaches Hand & Foot Edema Immersion Diuresis (Urge to Urinate) This underwater phenomenon ... and Depression Medications Respiratory Breathing Discomfort Immersion Pulmonary Edema Mechanism of Injury for Pulmonary Over-Inflation Syndrome ...

  17. Neurological complications of underwater diving.

    PubMed

    Rosińska, Justyna; Łukasik, Maria; Kozubski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The diver's nervous system is extremely sensitive to high ambient pressure, which is the sum of atmospheric and hydrostatic pressure. Neurological complications associated with diving are a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. They occur in both commercial and recreational diving and are connected with increasing interest in the sport of diving. Hence it is very important to know the possible complications associated with this kind of sport. Complications of the nervous system may result from decompression sickness, pulmonary barotrauma associated with cerebral arterial air embolism (AGE), otic and sinus barotrauma, high pressure neurological syndrome (HPNS) and undesirable effect of gases used for breathing. The purpose of this review is to discuss the range of neurological symptoms that can occur during diving accidents and also the role of patent foramen ovale (PFO) and internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection in pathogenesis of stroke in divers.

  18. Diving behaviour and decompression sickness among Galapagos underwater harvesters.

    PubMed

    Westin, A A; Asvall, J; Idrovo, G; Denoble, P; Brubakk, A O

    2005-01-01

    Diving conditions, dive profiles, vascular bubbles, and symptoms of decompression sickness (DCS) in a group of Galapagos commercial divers are described. They harvest sea cucumbers from small boats with surface supplied air (hookah). Dive profiles for 12 divers were recorded using dive loggers, and bubble formation was measured in the pulmonary artery. DCS symptoms were assessed by interview. A total of 380 immersions were recorded over a nine day period. The divers did on average 6.3 immersions per day, in a yo-yo pattern. Mean overall depth was 34.5 FSW. Maximum recorded depth was 107 FSW. Average bottom time per day per diver was 175 minutes. 82 % of all ascents exceeded the recommended maximum ascent rate of 30 FSW/ min. High bubble grades were observed on six occasions, but the test was unreliable. Muscle and joint pain was reported on five occasions, in three different divers. Symptoms were typically managed by analgesics, in-water recompression or not at all. The divers were extremely reluctant to seek professional help for DCS symptoms, mostly due to the high costs of treatment. We conclude that the fishermen dive beyond standard no-decompression limits, and that DCS symptoms are common.

  19. Diving seabirds: the stability of a diving elastic beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Brian; Croson, Matthew; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we examine the buckling stability of a beam attached to a cone plunge diving into a bath of water, which is inspired by diving birds. This beam-cone system initially experiences an impact force before the cone is completely submerged, followed by a hydrodynamic drag force. Using high speed imaging techniques, it was observed that the soft elastic beam exhibits either buckling (unstable) or non-buckling (stable) behaviors upon impact and submergence. Large cone angles, long beams, and high impact velocities likely cause buckling in the beam. By varying geometric factors of the beam-cone system and changing the impact velocity, a transition from non-buckling to buckling is characterized through physical experiments and is verified by an analytical model. This study elucidates under which conditions diving birds may possibly get injured.

  20. In vivo analysis of NH4+ transport and central N-metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under aerobic N-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Cueto-Rojas, H F; Maleki Seifar, R; Ten Pierick, A; van Helmond, W; Pieterse M, M; Heijnen, J J; Wahl, S A

    2016-09-16

    Ammonium is the most common N-source for yeast fermentations. Although, its transport and assimilation mechanisms are well documented, there have been only few attempts to measure the in vivo intracellular concentration of ammonium and assess its impact on gene expression. Using an isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS)-based method we were able to measure the intracellular ammonium concentration in N-limited aerobic chemostat cultivations using three different N-sources (ammonium, urea and glutamate) at the same growth rate (0.05 h(-1)). The experimental results suggest that, at this growth rate, a similar concentration of intracellular ammonium, about 3.6 mmol NH4(+)/LIC, is required to supply the reactions in the central N-metabolism independent of the N-source. Based on the experimental results and different assumptions, the vacuolar and cytosolic ammonium concentrations were estimated. Furthermore, we identified a futile cycle caused by NH3 leakage to the extracellular space, which can cost up to 30% of the ATP production of the cell under N-limited conditions, and a futile redox cycle between reactions Gdh1 and Gdh2. Finally, using shotgun proteomics with labeled reference-relative protein expression, differences between the various environmental conditions were identified and correlated with previously identified N-compound sensing mechanisms.

  1. 29 CFR 1926.1084 - SCUBA diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false SCUBA diving. 1926.1084 Section 1926.1084 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Specific Operations Procedures § 1926.1084 SCUBA diving. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  2. 29 CFR 1926.1084 - SCUBA diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false SCUBA diving. 1926.1084 Section 1926.1084 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Specific Operations Procedures § 1926.1084 SCUBA diving. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  3. 29 CFR 1926.1084 - SCUBA diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false SCUBA diving. 1926.1084 Section 1926.1084 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Specific Operations Procedures § 1926.1084 SCUBA diving. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  4. 29 CFR 1926.1084 - SCUBA diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false SCUBA diving. 1926.1084 Section 1926.1084 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Specific Operations Procedures § 1926.1084 SCUBA diving. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  5. 29 CFR 1926.1084 - SCUBA diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false SCUBA diving. 1926.1084 Section 1926.1084 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Specific Operations Procedures § 1926.1084 SCUBA diving. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  6. Scuba diving activates vascular antioxidant system.

    PubMed

    Sureda, A; Batle, J M; Ferrer, M D; Mestre-Alfaro, A; Tur, J A; Pons, A

    2012-07-01

    The aim was to study the effects of scuba diving immersion on plasma antioxidant defenses, nitric oxide production, endothelin-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor levels. 9 male divers performed an immersion at 50 m depth for a total time of 35 min. Blood samples were obtained before diving at rest, immediately after diving, and 3 h after the diving session. Leukocyte counts, plasma 8oxoHG, malondialdehyde and nitrite levels significantly increased after recovery. Activities of lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, catalase and superoxide significantly increased immediately after diving and these activities remained high after recovery. Plasma myeloperoxidase activity and protein levels and extracellular superoxide dismutase protein levels increased after 3 h. Endothelin-1 concentration significantly decreased after diving and after recovery. Vascular endothelial growth factor concentration significantly increased after diving when compared to pre-diving values, returning to initial values after recovery. Scuba diving at great depth activated the plasma antioxidant system against the oxidative stress induced by elevated pO₂ oxygen associated with hyperbaria. The decrease in endothelin-1 levels and the increase in nitric oxide synthesis could be factors that contribute to post-diving vasodilation. Diving increases vascular endothelial growth factor plasma levels which can contribute to the stimulation of tissue resistance to diving-derived oxidative damage.

  7. 33 CFR 146.40 - Diving casualties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Diving casualties. 146.40 Section 146.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES OPERATIONS OCS Facilities § 146.40 Diving casualties. Diving related...

  8. Effects of diving and oxygen on autonomic nervous system and cerebral blood flow.

    PubMed

    Winklewski, Pawel J; Kot, Jacek; Frydrychowski, Andrzej F; Nuckowska, Magdalena K; Tkachenko, Yurii

    2013-09-01

    Recreational scuba diving is a popular leisure activity with the number of divers reaching several millions worldwide. Scuba diving represents a huge challenge for integrative physiology. In mammalian evolution, physiological reflexes developed to deal with lack of oxygen, rather than with an excess, which makes adaptations to scuba diving more difficult to describe and understand than those associated with breath-hold diving. The underwater environment significantly limits the use of equipment to register the organism's functions, so, in most instances, scientific theories are built on experiments that model real diving to some extent, like hyperbaric exposures, dive reflexes or water immersion. The aim of this review is to summarise the current knowledge related to the influence exerted by physiological conditions specific to diving on the autonomic nervous system and cerebral blood flow. The main factors regulating cerebral blood flow during scuba diving are discussed as follows: 1) increased oxygen partial pressure; 2) immersion-related trigemino-cardiac reflexes and 3) exposure to cold, exercise and stress. Also discussed are the potential mechanisms associated with immersion pulmonary oedema.

  9. Aerobic Tennis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Michael J.; Ahlschwede, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Increasing the aerobic nature of tennis drills in the physical education class may be necessary if tennis is to remain a part of the public school curriculum. This article gives two examples of drills that can be modified by teachers to increase activity level. (IAH)

  10. Scaling matters: incorporating body composition into Weddell seal seasonal oxygen store comparisons reveals maintenance of aerobic capacities.

    PubMed

    Shero, Michelle R; Costa, Daniel P; Burns, Jennifer M

    2015-10-01

    Adult Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) haul-out on the ice in October/November (austral spring) for the breeding season and reduce foraging activities for ~4 months until their molt in the austral fall (January/February). After these periods, animals are at their leanest and resume actively foraging for the austral winter. In mammals, decreased exercise and hypoxia exposure typically lead to decreased production of O2-carrying proteins and muscle wasting, while endurance training increases aerobic potential. To test whether similar effects were present in marine mammals, this study compared the physiology of 53 post-molt female Weddell seals in the austral fall to 47 pre-breeding females during the spring in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. Once body mass and condition (lipid) were controlled for, there were no seasonal changes in total body oxygen (TBO2) stores. Within each season, hematocrit and hemoglobin values were negatively correlated with animal size, and larger animals had lower mass-specific TBO2 stores. But because larger seals had lower mass-specific metabolic rates, their calculated aerobic dive limit was similar to smaller seals. Indicators of muscular efficiency, myosin heavy chain composition, myoglobin concentrations, and aerobic enzyme activities (citrate synthase and β-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase) were likewise maintained across the year. The preservation of aerobic capacity is likely critical to foraging capabilities, so that following the molt Weddell seals can rapidly regain body mass at the start of winter foraging. In contrast, muscle lactate dehydrogenase activity, a marker of anaerobic metabolism, exhibited seasonal plasticity in this diving top predator and was lowest after the summer period of reduced activity.

  11. Recreational technical diving part 2: decompression from deep technical dives.

    PubMed

    Doolette, David J; Mitchell, Simon J

    2013-06-01

    Technical divers perform deep, mixed-gas 'bounce' dives, which are inherently inefficient because even a short duration at the target depth results in lengthy decompression. Technical divers use decompression schedules generated from modified versions of decompression algorithms originally developed for other types of diving. Many modifications ostensibly produce shorter and/or safer decompression, but have generally been driven by anecdote. Scientific evidence relevant to many of these modifications exists, but is often difficult to locate. This review assembles and examines scientific evidence relevant to technical diving decompression practice. There is a widespread belief that bubble algorithms, which redistribute decompression in favour of deeper decompression stops, are more efficient than traditional, shallow-stop, gas-content algorithms, but recent laboratory data support the opposite view. It seems unlikely that switches from helium- to nitrogen-based breathing gases during ascent will accelerate decompression from typical technical bounce dives. However, there is evidence for a higher prevalence of neurological decompression sickness (DCS) after dives conducted breathing only helium-oxygen than those with nitrogen-oxygen. There is also weak evidence suggesting less neurological DCS occurs if helium-oxygen breathing gas is switched to air during decompression than if no switch is made. On the other hand, helium-to-nitrogen breathing gas switches are implicated in the development of inner-ear DCS arising during decompression. Inner-ear DCS is difficult to predict, but strategies to minimize the risk include adequate initial decompression, delaying helium-to-nitrogen switches until relatively shallow, and the use of the maximum safe fraction of inspired oxygen during decompression.

  12. Investigation of Diving Moments of a Pursuit Airplane in the Ames 16-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Albert L

    1942-01-01

    A pursuit type airplane encountered severe diving moments in high-speed dives which make recovery difficult. For the purpose of investigating these diving moments and finding means for their reduction, a 1/6-scale model of the airplane was tested in the 16-foot high-speed wind tunnel at Ames Aeronautical Laboratory. The test results indicate that up to a Mach number of at least 0.75, the limit of the tests, the dive-recovery difficulties can be alleviated and the longitudinal maneuverability improved by the substitution of a long symmetrical fuselage for the standard fuselage.

  13. Diving down the reefs? Intensive diving tourism threatens the reefs of the northern Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Hasler, Harald; Ott, Jörg A

    2008-10-01

    Intensive recreational SCUBA diving threatens coral reef ecosystems. The reefs at Dahab, South Sinai, Egypt, are among the world's most dived (>30,000 dives y(-1)). We compared frequently dived sites to sites with no or little diving. Benthic communities and condition of corals were examined by the point intercept sampling method in the reef crest zone (3m) and reef slope zone (12 m). Additionally, the abundance of corallivorous and herbivorous fish was estimated based on the visual census method. Sediments traps recorded the sedimentation rates caused by SCUBA divers. Zones subject to intensive SCUBA diving showed a significantly higher number of broken and damaged corals and significantly lower coral cover. Reef crest coral communities were significantly more affected than those of the reef slope: 95% of the broken colonies were branching ones. No effect of diving on the abundance of corallivorous and herbivorous fish was evident. At heavily used dive sites, diver-related sedimentation rates significantly decreased with increasing distance from the entrance, indicating poor buoyancy regulation at the initial phase of the dive. The results show a high negative impact of current SCUBA diving intensities on coral communities and coral condition. Corallivorous and herbivorous fishes are apparently not yet affected, but are endangered if coral cover decline continues. Reducing the number of dives per year, ecologically sustainable dive plans for individual sites, and reinforcing the environmental education of both dive guides and recreational divers are essential to conserve the ecological and the aesthetic qualities of these dive sites.

  14. Decompression sickness from saturation diving: a case control study of some diving exposure characteristics.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, G; Jacobsen, J E; Peterson, R E; McLellan, J H; Brooke, S T; Nome, T; Brubakk, A O

    1997-06-01

    A comprehensive computerized database of diving activity for a Norwegian offshore diving contractor [Stolt-Nielsen Seaway (SNS)] covering the years 1983-1990 has been established. The database contains detailed dive information about 12,087 surface-oriented and 2,622 saturation dives. During this period a majority of the divers were permanently employed. Preliminary analysis had suggested that decompression sickness (DCS) might be the result of exposure to factors causing pathophysiologic effects which accumulate over the course of a single dive or a series of dives. This concept evolved into the HADES (Highest Accumulated Decompression Score) theory which assumes that DCS is predictable once the underlying exposure factors are understood. The incidence of DCS among the SNS divers from saturation diving in the North Sea was studied by use of a "nested" case-control design. Twenty-one case dives (i.e., dives where DCS occurred) were compared with 41 randomly selected control dives. For these dives, several saturation dive characteristics were established. The relative pressure change between maximum and minimum storage depths was significantly greater among the cases. For each 1% increase in the relative pressure change there was a 5% increase in the probability of a saturation dive resulting in DCS. Significantly more cases than controls performed a saturation dive with more than one storage depth, and the data suggested that there were more and greater ascending and descending changes in storage depth conditions among the affected divers.

  15. Basic Scientific Principles of Diving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLean, Don

    1976-01-01

    Described are some of the physical and physiological scientific principles related to diving. The article is written as supplementary information for a teacher and includes suggested activities, a keyed test, and a bibliography. This article complements one on Sea Lab II in the same issue. (MA)

  16. Dynamic in vivo (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in glucose-limited chemostat culture during the aerobic-anaerobic shift.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, B; de Graaf, A; Renaud, M; Sahm, H

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to analyse in vivo the influence of sudden oxygen depletion on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, grown in glucose-limited chemostat culture, using a recently developed cyclone reactor coupled with (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Before, during and after the transition, intracellular and extracellular phosphorylated metabolites as well as the pHs in the different cellular compartments were monitored with a time resolution of 2.5 min. The employed integrated NMR bioreactor system allowed the defined glucose-limited continuous cultivation of yeast at a density of 75 g DW/l and a p(O(2)) of 30% air saturation. A purely oxidative metabolism was maintained at all times. In vivo (31)P NMR spectra obtained were of excellent quality and even allowed the detection of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). During the switch from aerobic to anaerobic conditions, a rapid, significant decrease of intracellular ATP and PEP levels was observed and the cytoplasmic pH decreased from 7.5 to 6.8. This change, which was accompanied by a transient influx of extracellular inorganic phosphate (P(i)), appeared to correlate linearly with the decrease of the ATP concentration, suggesting that the cause of the partial collapse of the plasma membrane pH gradient was a reduced availability of ATP. The complete phosphorous balance established from our measurement data showed that polyphosphate was not the source of the increased intracellular P(i). The derived intracellular P(i), ATP and ADP concentration data confirmed that the glycolytic flux at the level of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, 3-phosphoglycerate kinase and enolase enzymes is mainly controlled by thermodynamic constraints.

  17. 46 CFR 197.210 - Designation of diving supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Designation of diving supervisor. 197.210 Section 197... HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations General § 197.210 Designation of diving supervisor. The name of the diving supervisor for each commercial diving operation shall be— (a)...

  18. Investigation of Dive Brakes and a Dive-Recovery Flap on a High-Aspect-Ratio Wing in the Langley 8-Foot High-Speed Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattson, Axel T.

    1946-01-01

    The results of tests made to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a solid brake, a slotted brake, and a dive-recovery flap mounted on a high aspect ratio wing at high Mach numbers are presented. The data were obtained in the Langley 8-foot high-speed tunnel for corrected Mach numbers up to 0.940. The results have been analyzed with regard to the suitability of dive-control devices for a proposed high-speed airplane in limiting the airplane terminal Mach number by the use of dive brakes and in achieving favorable dive-recovery characteristics by the use of a dive-recovery flap. The analysis of the results indicated that the slotted brake would limit the proposed airplane terminal Mach number to values below 0.880 for altitudes up to 35,000 feet and a wing loading of 80 pounds per square foot and the dive-recovery flap would produce trim changes required for controlled pull-outs at 25,000 feet for a Mach number range from 0.800 to 0.900. Basic changes in spanwise loading are presented to aid in the evaluation of the wing strength requirements.

  19. DIVE Into Metadata With MMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiswender, C.; Bermudez, L.; Galbraith, N. R.; Graybeal, J.

    2007-12-01

    Within research environments, good, usable data is paramount to scientific success. However, extremely diverse data is often distributed across many institutions, collected in a variety of ways, and stored in dissimilar systems. Standards-based interoperability is the key to harnessing this variety into a strategic set of usable data. As a community collaboration, the Marine Metadata Interoperability project (MMI) exists to promote the exchange, integration and use of marine data through enhanced data publishing, discovery, documentation and accessibility. To accomplish these goals, MMI has established a collaborative web environment (http://marinemetadata.org), informative guides, workshops on current topics, vocabulary working groups, and interoperable projects (OOSTethys and the OGC Oceans Interoperability Experiment, http://www.oostethys.org/). In January 2008, MMI will launch a new initiative: the DIVE Strike Force. Called DIVE for Discover, Interrogate, Validate and Educate. The MMI strike force initiative will facilitate concentrated research into a specific area needed by the marine science community. Each focused team of scientists, technologists and data managers will work to comprehensively review and explain existing capabilities and best practices, comparing existing solutions for the community. For this first DIVE Strike Force, team efforts will be focused on metadata tools. The Tools Strike Force will: * Discover available tools for the creation and publication of metadata and metadata vocabularies; * Interrogate the community about each tool, assessing criteria to be agreed upon, for example the capabilities of each, strengths and weaknesses, level of adoption, and where each tool would best be used; * Validate the best and most applicable tools objectively; * Educate the wider marine metadata community using the MMI webpage, and other resources as appropriate. Participants in each DIVE will be solicited from throughout the community, and

  20. Scuba decompression illness and diving fatalities in an overseas military community.

    PubMed

    Arness, M K

    1997-04-01

    A retrospective study of scuba decompression illness (DCI) and fatalities in the U.S. military community on Okinawa Island, Japan, was performed for 1989-95. Some 94 cases of diving DCI, including 10 cases of cerebral air-gas embolism (CAGE), and 9 diving fatalities were reported, for an annual incidence of 13.4 DCI events and 1.3 fatalities per 100,000 dives. The overall estimated incidence of scuba DCI was estimated to be 1/7400 dives, with an annual incidence of undeserved DCI of 1/37,300, and a fatality rate of 1/76,900. A review of treatment dives revealed a 10% overdiagnosis rate in cases treated for presumed DCI. A bimodal distribution of DCI accidents was observed for depths deeper or shallower than 24.6m/80FSW (feet of sea water). Increased risk of DCI in diving deeper than 24.6m/80FSW was associated with violations of no-decompression limits (NDL), while other risk factors were associated with diving to less than 24.6m/80FSW. NDL violations accounted for only 24/94 (26%) of all DCI accidents. Treatment of divers with hyperbaric oxygen (HBOT) led to complete recovery in 91% of cases, but of those divers requiring retreatment with HBOT, 67% had chronic residua of DCI. Selected illustrative and interesting cases are discussed.

  1. Physiological Monitoring in Diving Mammals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    isobestic point, the point where the spectra cross over (see below). Data from 5 marine mammal species (killer whale , 5 beluga whale , pilot whale ...spectra of HbO2 and HbR in several species of marine mammals (orcas, short-finned pilot whales , belugas , and northern elephant seals) and compare these...large, freely diving whales . We intend to use this data logger to measure muscle O2 saturation and determine how blood flow to muscle is altered during

  2. Nitrogen Uptake During Air Diving

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-10

    depth. The measurement system was attached to a syringe pump and air was added to the closed-circuit system during compression. Gas was circulated...with the syringe pump until pre-dive temperatures and oxygen sensor output stabilized (oxygen sensor output varied with temperature). This equilibration...provided voltage output to the computer. The spirometer was calibrated with a 3 liter syringe (Collins, Model M-20). A temperature probe (YSI, Model

  3. Shallow Water Diving - The NASA Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, Daniel; Kelsey-Seybold

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the problems and solutions that personnel have experienced during sessions in the Neutral Bu0yancy Lab (NBL). It reviews the standard dive that occurs at the NBL, Boyles and Henry's laws as they relate to the effects of diving. It then reviews in depth some of the major adverse physiologic events that happen during a diving session: Ear and Sinus Barotrauma, Decompression Sickness, (DCS), Pulmonary Barotrauma (i.e., Arterial Gas Embolism (AGE). Mediastinal Emphysema, Subcutaneous Emphysema, and Pneumothorax) Oxygen Toxicity and Hypothermia. It includes information about the pulmonary function in NBL divers. Also included is recommendations about flying after diving.

  4. Persistent (patent) foramen ovale (PFO): implications for safe diving.

    PubMed

    Germonpré, Peter

    2015-06-01

    order to reduce the incidence of VGE. It has been convincingly shown that conservative dive profiles reduce DCI incidence even in divers with large PFOs, just as PFO closure does not protect completely from DCI if the dive profiles are aggressive. Prospective studies should not only focus on the reduction of DCI incidence after closure, but should take into account the costs and side effects of the procedure, as has been done in the cardiology and neurology studies. Imagine lung transplants becoming a routine operation, costly but with a high success rate; imagine also a longterm smoker suffering from a mild form of obstructive lung disease and exercise-limiting dyspnoea. Which of two options would you recommend: having a lung transplant and continue smoking as before, or quit smoking and observe a progressive improvement of pulmonary and cardiac pathology? As opposed to patients with thrombotic disease and migraine, divers can choose to reduce DCI risk. In fact, all it takes is acceptance that some types of diving carry too high a health risk - whether it is because of a PFO or another 'natural' factor. It would be unethical to promote PFO closure in divers solely on the basis of its efficacy of shunt reduction. Unfortunately, at least one device manufacturer has already done so in the past, citing various publications to specifically target recreational divers. Some technical diving organizations even have recommended preventive PFO closure in order to undertaking high-risk dive training. As scientists, we must not allow ourselves to be drawn into intuitive diver fears and beliefs. Nor should we let ourselves be blinded by the ease and seemingly low risk of the procedure. With proper and objective information provided by their diving medicine specialist, divers could make an informed decision, rather than focus on the simplistic idea that they need 'to get it fixed' in order to continue diving. A significant relationship between PFO and cerebral damage, in the absence

  5. Swimming and diving energetics in dolphins: a stroke-by-stroke analysis for predicting the cost of flight responses in wild odontocetes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Terrie M; Kendall, Traci L; Richter, Beau P; Ribeiro-French, Courtney R; John, Jason S; Odell, Kim L; Losch, Barbara A; Feuerbach, David A; Stamper, M Andrew

    2017-03-15

    Exponential increases in hydrodynamic drag and physical exertion occur when swimmers move quickly through water, and underlie the preference for relatively slow routine speeds by marine mammals regardless of body size. Because of this and the need to balance limited oxygen stores when submerged, flight (escape) responses may be especially challenging for this group. To examine this, we used open-flow respirometry to measure the energetic cost of producing a swimming stroke during different levels of exercise in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). These data were then used to model the energetic cost of high-speed escape responses by other odontocetes ranging in mass from 42 to 2738 kg. The total cost per stroke during routine swimming by dolphins, 3.31±0.20 J kg(-1) stroke(-1), was doubled during maximal aerobic performance. A comparative analysis of locomotor costs (LC; in J kg(-1) stroke(-1)), representing the cost of moving the flukes, revealed that LC during routine swimming increased with body mass (M) for odontocetes according to LC=1.46±0.0005M; a separate relationship described LC during high-speed stroking. Using these relationships, we found that continuous stroking coupled with reduced glide time in response to oceanic noise resulted in a 30.5% increase in metabolic rate in the beaked whale, a deep-diving odontocete considered especially sensitive to disturbance. By integrating energetics with swimming behavior and dive characteristics, this study demonstrates the physiological consequences of oceanic noise on diving mammals, and provides a powerful tool for predicting the biological significance of escape responses by cetaceans facing anthropogenic disturbances.

  6. Seasonal, Oceanographic and Atmospheric Drivers of Diving Behaviour in a Temperate Seal Species Living in the High Arctic.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Marie-Anne; Lydersen, Christian; Ims, Rolf A; Kovacs, Kit M

    2015-01-01

    The harbour seal (Phoca vitulina) population in Svalbard marks the northernmost limit of the species' range. This small population experiences environmental extremes in sea and air temperatures, sea ice cover and also in light regime for this normally temperate species. This study deployed Conductivity Temperature Depth Satellite Relay Data Loggers (CTD-SRDLs) on 30 adult and juvenile harbour seals in 2009 and 2010 to study their foraging behaviour across multiple seasons. A total of 189,104 dives and 16,640 CTD casts (mean depth 72 m ± 59) were recorded. Individuals dove to a mean depth of 41 m ± 24 with a maximum dive depth range of 24 - 403 m. Dives lasted on average 204 sec ± 120 with maximum durations ranging between 240 - 2,220 sec. Average daily depth and duration of dives, number of dives, time spent diving and dive time/surface time were influenced by date, while sex, age, sea-ice concentration and their interactions were not particularly influential. Dives were deeper (~150 m), longer (~480 sec), less numerous (~250 dives/day) and more pelagic during the winter/early spring compared to the fall and animals spent proportionally less time at the bottom of their dives during the winter. Influxes of warm saline water, corresponding to Atlantic Water characteristics, were observed intermittently at depths ~100 m during both winters in this study. The seasonal changes in diving behaviour were linked to average weekly wind stresses from the north or north-east, which induced upwelling events onto the shelf through offshore Ekman transport. During these events the shelf became flooded with AW from the West Spitsbergen Current, which presumably brought Atlantic fish species close to shore and within the seals' foraging depth-range. Predicted increased in the influx of AW in this region are likely going to favour the growth and geographic expansion of this harbour seal population in the future.

  7. Seasonal, Oceanographic and Atmospheric Drivers of Diving Behaviour in a Temperate Seal Species Living in the High Arctic

    PubMed Central

    Blanchet, Marie-Anne; Lydersen, Christian; Ims, Rolf A.; Kovacs, Kit M.

    2015-01-01

    The harbour seal (Phoca vitulina) population in Svalbard marks the northernmost limit of the species’ range. This small population experiences environmental extremes in sea and air temperatures, sea ice cover and also in light regime for this normally temperate species. This study deployed Conductivity Temperature Depth Satellite Relay Data Loggers (CTD-SRDLs) on 30 adult and juvenile harbour seals in 2009 and 2010 to study their foraging behaviour across multiple seasons. A total of 189,104 dives and 16,640 CTD casts (mean depth 72 m ± 59) were recorded. Individuals dove to a mean depth of 41 m ± 24 with a maximum dive depth range of 24 – 403 m. Dives lasted on average 204 sec ± 120 with maximum durations ranging between 240 – 2,220 sec. Average daily depth and duration of dives, number of dives, time spent diving and dive time/surface time were influenced by date, while sex, age, sea-ice concentration and their interactions were not particularly influential. Dives were deeper (~150 m), longer (~480 sec), less numerous (~250 dives/day) and more pelagic during the winter/early spring compared to the fall and animals spent proportionally less time at the bottom of their dives during the winter. Influxes of warm saline water, corresponding to Atlantic Water characteristics, were observed intermittently at depths ~100 m during both winters in this study. The seasonal changes in diving behaviour were linked to average weekly wind stresses from the north or north-east, which induced upwelling events onto the shelf through offshore Ekman transport. During these events the shelf became flooded with AW from the West Spitsbergen Current, which presumably brought Atlantic fish species close to shore and within the seals’ foraging depth-range. Predicted increased in the influx of AW in this region are likely going to favour the growth and geographic expansion of this harbour seal population in the future. PMID:26196289

  8. Teaching Persons with Disabilities to SCUBA Diving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankowski, Louis W.

    This booklet is designed to sensitize and inform the scuba diving instructor on appropriate attitudes and successful methods for teaching scuba diving to persons with physical disability. It addresses misconceptions about people with disabilities and the importance of effective two-way communication and mutual respect between instructors and…

  9. Rotation, Translation, and Trajectory in Diving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stroup, Francis; Bushnell, David L.

    1969-01-01

    The fundamental techniques of diving such as the approach, arm swing, hurdle, lift, body positions, and entrance form are relatively stable and can be reduced largely to habit. However, after a diver has mastered them, there remains the problem of partitioning the energy exerted in a dive between translation and rotation. (CK)

  10. The Physics of Breath-Hold Diving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilella, Vicente; Aguilella-Arzo, Marcelo

    1996-01-01

    Analyzes physical features of breath-hold diving. Considers the diver's descent and the initial surface dive and presents examples that show the diver's buoyancy equilibrium varying with depth, the driving force supplied by finning, and the effect of friction between the water and the diver. (Author/JRH)

  11. Wind-Tunnel Investigations of Diving Brakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fucha, D.

    1942-01-01

    Unduly high diving speeds can be effectively controlled by diving brakes but their employment involves at the same time a number of disagreeable features: namely, rotation of zero lift direction, variation of diviving moment, and, the creation of a potent dead air region.

  12. [Medical aspects of diving in the tropics].

    PubMed

    Muth, C M; Müller, P; Kemmer, A

    2005-07-07

    Scuba diving vacations in tropical surroundings belong to the repertoire of most divers. In addition to carefully making travel plans and taking care of the necessary vaccinations and appropriate malaria prophylaxis, the following points also must be observed. The flight itself affects diving safety. In particular, a too short time interval between diving and the return flight can lead to decompression problems. Because most of the diving areas are reached by ship, many divers need a prophylaxis against motion sickness. Moreover, external otitis occurs more frequently while diving in the tropics. Finally, there is potential danger from the sea inhabitants, primarily from scorpion fishes, Portuguese Man-of-Wars, box jellyfishes as well as cone snails.

  13. The cardiovascular system and diving risk.

    PubMed

    Bove, Alfred A

    2011-01-01

    Recreational scuba diving is a sport that requires a certain physical capacity, in addition to consideration of the environmental stresses produced by increased pressure, low temperature and inert gas kinetics in tissues of the body. Factors that may influence ability to dive safely include age, physical conditioning, tolerance of cold, ability to compensate for central fluid shifts induced by water immersion, and ability to manage exercise demands when heart disease might compromise exercise capacity. Patients with coronary heart disease, valvular heart disease, congenital heart disease and cardiac arrhythmias are capable of diving, but consideration must be given to the environmental factors that might interact with the cardiac disorder. Understanding of the interaction of the diving environment with various cardiac disorders is essential to providing a safe diving environment to individual divers with known heart disease.

  14. Advanced deep sea diving equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danesi, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Design requirements are generated for a deep sea heavy duty diving system to equip salvage divers with equipment and tools that permit work of the same quality and in times approaching that done on the surface. The system consists of a helmet, a recirculator for removing carbon dioxide, and the diver's dress. The diver controls the inlet flow by the recirculatory control valve and is able to change closed cycle operation to open cycle if malfunction occurs. Proper function of the scrubber in the recirculator minimizes temperature and humidity effects as it filters the returning air.

  15. Sleep, mood, and fatigue during a 14-day He-O2 open-sea saturation dive to 850 fsw with excursions to 950 fsw.

    PubMed

    Townsend, R E; Hall, D A

    1978-06-01

    To obtain information on sleep, mood, and performance of divers and surface support personnel during deep dives in the open sea, 12 divers and 12 surface support personnel were monitored during a 14-day open-sea saturation dive using the U.S. Navy Deep Diving System, Mark 2, Mod O. Divers lived in the deck decompression chambers at 850 fsw equivalent and made 5 days of excursion wet dives to approximately 950 fsw via the Personnel Transfer Capsule. Electroencephalographic and self-report measures of sleep, and measures of mood, anxiety, and 4-choice reaction time performance were obtained during a predive base-line period and throughout the dive and decompression. Results suggested that, unless personnel are rotated, there are limitations to the practical duration of very deep open-sea saturation dives caused by the accumulation of sleep debt, fatigue, and loss of psychological vigor.

  16. 46 CFR 197.404 - Responsibilities of the diving supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Responsibilities of the diving supervisor. 197.404... SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Operations § 197.404 Responsibilities of the diving supervisor. (a) The diving supervisor shall— (1) Be fully cognizant of...

  17. 29 CFR 1910.410 - Qualifications of dive team.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... aid (American Red Cross standard course or equivalent). (4) Dive team members who are exposed to or... 29 Labor 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Qualifications of dive team. 1910.410 Section 1910.410... Requirements § 1910.410 Qualifications of dive team. (a) General. (1) Each dive team member shall have...

  18. 29 CFR 1910.410 - Qualifications of dive team.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... aid (American Red Cross standard course or equivalent). (4) Dive team members who are exposed to or... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Qualifications of dive team. 1910.410 Section 1910.410... Requirements § 1910.410 Qualifications of dive team. (a) General. (1) Each dive team member shall have...

  19. 29 CFR 1910.410 - Qualifications of dive team.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... aid (American Red Cross standard course or equivalent). (4) Dive team members who are exposed to or... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Qualifications of dive team. 1910.410 Section 1910.410... Requirements § 1910.410 Qualifications of dive team. (a) General. (1) Each dive team member shall have...

  20. 29 CFR 1910.410 - Qualifications of dive team.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... aid (American Red Cross standard course or equivalent). (4) Dive team members who are exposed to or... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Qualifications of dive team. 1910.410 Section 1910.410... Requirements § 1910.410 Qualifications of dive team. (a) General. (1) Each dive team member shall have...

  1. 29 CFR 1910.421 - Pre-dive procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... fitness of dive team members (including any impairment known to the employer); (7) Repetitive dive... current state of physical fitness, and indicate to the dive team member the procedure for reporting physical problems or adverse physiological effects during and after the dive. (g) Equipment inspection....

  2. 29 CFR 1910.421 - Pre-dive procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... fitness of dive team members (including any impairment known to the employer); (7) Repetitive dive... current state of physical fitness, and indicate to the dive team member the procedure for reporting physical problems or adverse physiological effects during and after the dive. (g) Equipment inspection....

  3. 29 CFR 1910.421 - Pre-dive procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... fitness of dive team members (including any impairment known to the employer); (7) Repetitive dive... current state of physical fitness, and indicate to the dive team member the procedure for reporting physical problems or adverse physiological effects during and after the dive. (g) Equipment inspection....

  4. 29 CFR 1910.421 - Pre-dive procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... fitness of dive team members (including any impairment known to the employer); (7) Repetitive dive... current state of physical fitness, and indicate to the dive team member the procedure for reporting physical problems or adverse physiological effects during and after the dive. (g) Equipment inspection....

  5. Recreational scuba diving, patent foramen ovale and their associated risks.

    PubMed

    Schwerzmann, M; Seiler, C

    2001-06-30

    Scuba diving has become a popular leisure time activity with distinct risks to health owing to its physical characteristics. Knowledge of the behaviour of any mixture of breathable gases under increased ambient pressure is crucial for safe diving and gives clues as to the pathophysiology of compression or decompression related disorders. Immersion in cold water augments cardiac pre- and afterload due to an increase of intrathoracic blood volume and peripheral vasoconstriction. In very rare cases, the vasoconstrictor response can lead to pulmonary oedema. Immersion of the face in cold water is associated with bradycardia mediated by increased vagal tone. In icy water, the bradycardia can be so pronounced, that syncope results. For recreational dives, compressed air (i.e., 4 parts nitrogen and 1 part oxygen) is the preferred breathing gas. Its use is limited for diving to 40 to 50 m, otherwise nitrogen narcosis ("rapture of the deep") reduces a diver's cognitive function and increases the risk of inadequate reactions. At depths of 60 to 70 m oxygen toxicity impairs respiration and at higher partial pressures also functioning of the central nervous system. The use of special nitrogen-oxygen mixtures ("nitrox", 60% nitrogen and 40% oxygen as the typical example) decreases the probability of nitrogen narcosis and probably bubble formation, at the cost of increased risk of oxygen toxicity. Most of the health hazards during dives are consequences of changes in gas volume and formation of gas bubbles due to reduction of ambient pressure during a diver's ascent. The term barotrauma encompasses disorders related to over expansion of gas filled body cavities (mainly the lung and the inner ear). Decompression sickness results from the growth of gas nuclei in predominantly fatty tissue. Arterial gas embolism describes the penetration of such gas bubbles into the systemic circulation, either due to pulmonary barotrauma, transpulmonary passage after massive bubble formation

  6. Ecological carrying capacity assessment of diving site: A case study of Mabul Island, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Ye; Chung, Shan-Shan; Qiu, Jian-Wen

    2016-12-01

    Despite considered a non-consumptive use of the marine environment, diving-related activities can cause damages to coral reefs. It is imminent to assess the maximum numbers of divers that can be accommodated by a diving site before it is subject to irreversible deterioration. This study aimed to assess the ecological carrying capacity of a diving site in Mabul Island, Malaysia. Photo-quadrat line transect method was used in the benthic survey. The ecological carrying capacity was assessed based on the relationship between the number of divers and the proportion of diver damaged hard corals in Mabul Island. The results indicated that the proportion of diver damaged hard corals occurred exponentially with increasing use. The ecological carrying capacity of Mabul Island is 15,600-16,800 divers per diving site per year at current levels of diver education and training with a quarterly threshold of 3900-4200 per site. Our calculation shows that management intervention (e.g. limiting diving) is justified at 8-14% of hard coral damage. In addition, the use of coral reef dominated diving sites should be managed according to their sensitivity to diver damage and the depth of the reefs.

  7. The death of buddy diving?

    PubMed

    Cooper, P David

    2011-12-01

    Dear Editor, By focussing on the details of the Watson case, I believe Bryan Walpole has missed the thrust of my earlier letter. I agree this was a complex case, which is why I deliberately avoided the murky specifics in order to consider the 'big-picture' ramifications of the judgement. My concerns relate to the potential consequences of the unintended interplay between unrelated developments in the medical and legal arenas. Taken together, I believe these developments threaten the very institution of buddy diving. I have been unable to verify Dr Walpole's claim that the statute under which Mr Watson was convicted has not been used previously in a criminal trial. I must, however, refute his assertion that this legislation is some sort of idiosyncratic historical hangover or legal curiosity unique to Queensland. Although the original legislation pre-dates Australian federation, this statute has survived intact through 110 years of reviews and amendments to the Queensland Criminal Code. The application of this 19th century law to the Watson case now provides a direct, post-federation, 21st century relevance. Nor is Queensland alone in having such a statute on its books. Section 151 of the Criminal Code Act in Dr Walpole's home state of Tasmania states "When a person undertakes to do any act, the omission to do which is or may be dangerous to human life or health, it is his duty to do that act." Similar statutes can also be found in the legislation of other Australian states and as far afield as New Zealand and Canada. The phrasing of the relevant sections is, in many cases, almost identical to Queensland's, reflecting the common judicial heritage of these places. Even if this ruling's reach extended no further than the Queensland border its ramifications would be immense. Tourism statistics reveal that over 1.2 million visitors perform nearly 3.5 million dives/snorkels in Queensland each year. An estimated 93% of international divers visiting Australia stopover in

  8. Dive and discover: Expeditions to the seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayers Lawrence, Lisa

    The Dive and Discover Web site is a virtual treasure chest of deep sea science and classroom resources. The goals of Dive and Discover are to engage students, teachers, and the general public in the excitement of ocean disco very through an interactive educational Web site. You can follow scientists on oceanographic research cruises by reading their daily cruise logs, viewing photos and video clips of the discoveries, and even e-mailing questions to the scientists and crew. WHOI has also included an "Educator's Companion" section with teaching strategies, activities, and assessments, making Dive and Discover an excellent resource for the classroom.

  9. Dive and discover: Expeditions to the seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Lisa Ayers

    The Dive and Discover Web site is a virtual treasure chest of deep sea science and classroom resources. The goals of Dive and Discover are to engage students, teachers, and the general public in the excitement of ocean disco very through an interactive educational Web site. You can follow scientists on oceanographic research cruises by reading their daily cruise logs, viewing photos and video clips of the discoveries, and even e-mailing questions to the scientists and crew. WHOI has also included an “Educator's Companion” section with teaching strategies, activities, and assessments, making Dive and Discover an excellent resource for the classroom.

  10. Dive Operator Use Patterns in the Designated No-Take Zones of the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS).

    PubMed

    Shivlani; Suman

    2000-06-01

    / The Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS), created by Congress in 1990, addressed the issue of resource protection partly by proposing 26 "no-take" zones. These areas, discussed in the 1995 Draft Management Plan, disallowed all extractive activities, and four of the zones also prohibited diving and snorkeling. Furthermore, the Draft Management Plan considered recreational carrying capacity, proposing that use densities be studied and eventually limited in high-use and sensitive areas. Conducted with 62 commercial dive operators from the Florida Keys in 1995-96, this study uses geographic information systems (GIS) to determine the extent of FKNMS zone use by dive operators, assess the regional importance of FKNMS zones to operators, and compare management strategies by which to allow use while minimizing impacts to the coral reef resource. Dive operators took almost 70% of their total trips and 77% of their total divers to FKNMS zones in 1995. Although zone use is generally related to the proximity of dive locations, dive operators do rely disproportionately on single sites in certain regions. The resulting profiles demonstrate that management strategies need to consider disproportionate use, as well as the average number of users per trip, to effectively protect the region's environmental resources. In addition to implementing a carrying capacity plan, the FKNMS should consider a limited-entry system for dive operators.

  11. Seasonal and diel dive performance and behavioral ecology of the bimodally respiring freshwater turtle Myuchelys bellii of eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Fielder, Darren P

    2012-02-01

    Freshwater turtles have an extraordinary physiological ability to endure dive times that can range from days to months using aquatic respiration. In cryptodires (e.g., white-lipped mud turtle Kinosternon leucostomum) aquatic respiration is via buccal or cutaneous routes whereas in pleurodires (e.g., Fitzroy River turtle Rheodytes leukops), it is achieved primarily via specialized cloacal bursae. This study records the voluntary diving performance of the western sawshelled turtle Myuchelys bellii in Bald Rock Creek from the temperate zone of the Murray-Darling Basin of Australia. Myuchelys bellii has a moderately specialized cloacal bursae morphology compared to other pleurodiran turtles and displays impressive dive durations spanning more than 15 days during the winter months. This is attributed to its ability to maintain aerobic dives via its cloacal bursae and low water temperatures in winter. Myuchelys bellii seasonal and diel diving performance, including its crepuscular habit, is comparable to R. leukops and Elseya albagula. This study also recorded the first aquatic hibernation at depth (>3 m) for any freshwater turtle; and only the second pleurodire to demonstrate aquatic hibernation as an overwintering strategy. Observed thermoregulation behavior in M. bellii is believed to provide multiple life history benefits.

  12. Lower limb loading in step aerobic dance.

    PubMed

    Wu, H-W; Hsieh, H-M; Chang, Y-W; Wang, L-H

    2012-11-01

    Participation in aerobic dance is associated with a number of lower extremity injuries, and abnormal joint loading seems to be a factor in these. However, information on joint loading is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate the kinetics of the lower extremity in step aerobic dance and to compare the differences of high-impact and low-impact step aerobic dance in 4 aerobic movements (mambo, kick, L step and leg curl). 18 subjects were recruited for this study. High-impact aerobic dance requires a significantly greater range of motion, joint force and joint moment than low-impact step aerobic dance. The peak joint forces and moments in high-impact step aerobic dance were found to be 1.4 times higher than in low-impact step aerobic dance. Understanding the nature of joint loading may help choreographers develop dance combinations that are less injury-prone. Furthermore, increased knowledge about joint loading may be helpful in lowering the risk of injuries in aerobic dance instructors and students.

  13. Recreational Diving Impacts on Coral Reefs and the Adoption of Environmentally Responsible Practices within the SCUBA Diving Industry.

    PubMed

    Roche, Ronan C; Harvey, Chloe V; Harvey, James J; Kavanagh, Alan P; McDonald, Meaghan; Stein-Rostaing, Vivienne R; Turner, John R

    2016-07-01

    Recreational diving on coral reefs is an activity that has experienced rapidly growing levels of popularity and participation. Despite providing economic activity for many developing coastal communities, the potential role of dive impacts in contributing to coral reef damage is a concern at heavily dived locations. Management measures to address this issue increasingly include the introduction of programmes designed to encourage environmentally responsible practices within the dive industry. We examined diver behaviour at several important coral reef dive locations within the Philippines and assessed how diver characteristics and dive operator compliance with an environmentally responsible diving programme, known as the Green Fins approach, affected reef contacts. The role of dive supervision was assessed by recording dive guide interventions underwater, and how this was affected by dive group size. Of the 100 recreational divers followed, 88 % made contact with the reef at least once per dive, with a mean (±SE) contact rate of 0.12 ± 0.01 per min. We found evidence that the ability of dive guides to intervene and correct diver behaviour in the event of a reef contact decreases with larger diver group sizes. Divers from operators with high levels of compliance with the Green Fins programme exhibited significantly lower reef contact rates than those from dive operators with low levels of compliance. The successful implementation of environmentally responsible diving programmes, which focus on influencing dive industry operations, can contribute to the management of human impacts on coral reefs.

  14. Recreational Diving Impacts on Coral Reefs and the Adoption of Environmentally Responsible Practices within the SCUBA Diving Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Ronan C.; Harvey, Chloe V.; Harvey, James J.; Kavanagh, Alan P.; McDonald, Meaghan; Stein-Rostaing, Vivienne R.; Turner, John R.

    2016-07-01

    Recreational diving on coral reefs is an activity that has experienced rapidly growing levels of popularity and participation. Despite providing economic activity for many developing coastal communities, the potential role of dive impacts in contributing to coral reef damage is a concern at heavily dived locations. Management measures to address this issue increasingly include the introduction of programmes designed to encourage environmentally responsible practices within the dive industry. We examined diver behaviour at several important coral reef dive locations within the Philippines and assessed how diver characteristics and dive operator compliance with an environmentally responsible diving programme, known as the Green Fins approach, affected reef contacts. The role of dive supervision was assessed by recording dive guide interventions underwater, and how this was affected by dive group size. Of the 100 recreational divers followed, 88 % made contact with the reef at least once per dive, with a mean (±SE) contact rate of 0.12 ± 0.01 per min. We found evidence that the ability of dive guides to intervene and correct diver behaviour in the event of a reef contact decreases with larger diver group sizes. Divers from operators with high levels of compliance with the Green Fins programme exhibited significantly lower reef contact rates than those from dive operators with low levels of compliance. The successful implementation of environmentally responsible diving programmes, which focus on influencing dive industry operations, can contribute to the management of human impacts on coral reefs.

  15. Neurological long term consequences of deep diving.

    PubMed Central

    Todnem, K; Nyland, H; Skeidsvoll, H; Svihus, R; Rinck, P; Kambestad, B K; Riise, T; Aarli, J A

    1991-01-01

    Forty commercial saturation divers, mean age 34.9 (range 24-49) years, were examined one to seven years after their last deep dive (190-500 metres of seawater). Four had by then lost their divers' licence because of neurological problems. Twenty seven (68%) had been selected by neurological examination and electroencephalography before the deep dives. The control group consisted of 100 men, mean age 34.0 (range 22-48) years. The divers reported significantly more symptoms from the nervous system. Concentration difficulties and paraesthesia in feet and hands were common. They had more abnormal neurological findings by neurological examination compatible with dysfunction in the lumbar spinal cord or roots. They also had a larger proportion of abnormal electroencephalograms than the controls. The neurological symptoms and findings were highly significantly correlated with exposure to deep diving (depth included), but even more significantly correlated to air and saturation diving and prevalence of decompression sickness. Visual evoked potentials, brainstem auditory evoked potentials, and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain did not show more abnormal findings in the divers. Four (10%) divers had had episodes of cerebral dysfunction during or after the dives; two had had seizures, one had had transitory cerebral ischaemia and one had had transitory global amnesia. It is concluded that deep diving may have a long term effect on the nervous system of the divers. PMID:2025592

  16. SCUBA Diving and Asthma: Clinical Recommendations and Safety.

    PubMed

    Coop, Christopher A; Adams, Karla E; Webb, Charles N

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this article is to review the available studies regarding asthma and SCUBA (self-contained underwater breathing apparatus) diving. A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE to identify peer-reviewed articles related to asthma and SCUBA diving using the following keywords: asthma, allergy, and SCUBA diving. SCUBA diving is a popular sport with more than 9 million divers in the USA. SCUBA diving can be a dangerous sport. Bronchospasm can develop in asthmatic patients and cause airway obstruction. Airway obstruction may be localized to the distal airway which prevents gas elimination. Uncontrolled expansion of the distal airway may result in pulmonary barotrauma. There is also the risk of a gas embolism. Asthmatic divers can also aspirate seawater which may induce bronchospasm. Pollen contamination of their oxygen tank may exacerbate atopic asthma in patients. Diving may be hazardous to the lung function of patients with asthma. Despite the risks of SCUBA diving, many asthmatic individuals can dive without serious diving events. Diving evaluations for asthmatic patients have focused on a thorough patient history, spirometry, allergy testing, and bronchial challenges. For patients that wish to dive, their asthma should be well controlled without current chest symptoms. Patients should have a normal spirometry. Some diving societies recommend that an asthmatic patient should successfully pass a bronchial provocation challenge. Recommendations also state that exercise-, emotion-, and cold-induced asthmatics should not dive. Asthmatic patients requiring rescue medication within 48 h should not dive.

  17. Can diving-induced tissue nitrogen supersaturation increase the chance of acoustically driven bubble growth in marine mammals?

    PubMed

    Houser, D S; Howard, R; Ridgway, S

    2001-11-21

    The potential for acoustically mediated causes of stranding in cetaceans (whales and dolphins) is of increasing concern given recent stranding events associated with anthropogenic acoustic activity. We examine a potentially debilitating non-auditory mechanism called rectified diffusion. Rectified diffusion causes gas bubble growth, which in an insonified animal may produce emboli, tissue separation and high, localized pressure in nervous tissue. Using the results of a dolphin dive study and a model of rectified diffusion for low-frequency exposure, we demonstrate that the diving behavior of cetaceans prior to an intense acoustic exposure may increase the chance of rectified diffusion. Specifically, deep diving and slow ascent/descent speed contributes to increased gas-tissue saturation, a condition that amplifies the likelihood of rectified diffusion. The depth of lung collapse limits nitrogen uptake per dive and the surface interval duration influences the amount of nitrogen washout from tissues between dives. Model results suggest that low-frequency rectified diffusion models need to be advanced, that the diving behavior of marine mammals of concern needs to be investigated to identify at-risk animals, and that more intensive studies of gas dynamics within diving marine mammals should be undertaken.

  18. Teaching Aerobic Fitness Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Allan N.; Ratliffe, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to teach aerobic fitness concepts to elementary students. Some of the K-2 activities include location, size, and purpose of the heart and lungs; the exercise pulse; respiration rate; and activities to measure aerobic endurance. Some of the 3-6 activities include: definition of aerobic endurance; heart disease risk factors;…

  19. A forensic diving medicine examination of a highly publicised scuba diving fatality.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Carl

    2012-12-01

    A high-profile diving death occurred in 2003 at the site of the wreck of the SS Yongala off the Queensland coast. The victim's buddy, her husband, was accused of her murder and found guilty of manslaughter in an Australian court. A detailed analysis of all the evidence concerning this fatality suggests alternative medical reasons for her death. The value of decompression computers in determining the diving details and of CT scans in clarifying autopsy findings is demonstrated. The victim was medically, physically and psychologically unfit to undertake the fatal dive. She was inexperienced and inadequately supervised. She was over-weighted and exposed for the first time to difficult currents. The analysis of the dive demonstrates how important it is to consider the interaction of all factors and to not make deductions from individual items of information. It also highlights the importance of early liaison between expert divers, technicians, diving clinicians and pathologists, if inappropriate conclusions are to be avoided.

  20. First long-term behavioral records from Cuvier's beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris) reveal record-breaking dives.

    PubMed

    Schorr, Gregory S; Falcone, Erin A; Moretti, David J; Andrews, Russel D

    2014-01-01

    Cuvier's beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris) are known as extreme divers, though behavioral data from this difficult-to-study species have been limited. They are also the species most often stranded in association with Mid-Frequency Active (MFA) sonar use, a relationship that remains poorly understood. We used satellite-linked tags to record the diving behavior and locations of eight Ziphius off the Southern California coast for periods up to three months. The effort resulted in 3732 hr of dive data with associated regional movements--the first dataset of its kind for any beaked whale--and included dives to 2992 m depth and lasting 137.5 min, both new mammalian dive records. Deep dives had a group mean depth of 1401 m (s.d. = 137.8, n = 1142) and duration of 67.4 min (s.d. = 6.9). The group mean time between deep dives was 102.3 min (s.d. = 30.8, n = 783). While the previously described stereotypic pattern of deep and shallow dives was apparent, there was considerable inter- and intra-individual variability in most parameters. There was significant diel behavioral variation, including increased time near the surface and decreased shallow diving at night. However, maximum depth and the proportion of time spent on deep dives (presumed foraging), varied little from day to night. Surprisingly, tagged whales were present within an MFA sonar training range for 38% of days locations were received, and though comprehensive records of sonar use during tag deployments were not available, we discuss the effects frequent acoustic disturbance may have had on the observed behaviors. These data better characterize the true behavioral range of this species, and suggest caution should be exercised when drawing conclusions about behavior using short-term datasets.

  1. First Long-Term Behavioral Records from Cuvier’s Beaked Whales (Ziphius cavirostris) Reveal Record-Breaking Dives

    PubMed Central

    Schorr, Gregory S.; Falcone, Erin A.; Moretti, David J.; Andrews, Russel D.

    2014-01-01

    Cuvier’s beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris) are known as extreme divers, though behavioral data from this difficult-to-study species have been limited. They are also the species most often stranded in association with Mid-Frequency Active (MFA) sonar use, a relationship that remains poorly understood. We used satellite-linked tags to record the diving behavior and locations of eight Ziphius off the Southern California coast for periods up to three months. The effort resulted in 3732 hr of dive data with associated regional movements – the first dataset of its kind for any beaked whale – and included dives to 2992 m depth and lasting 137.5 min, both new mammalian dive records. Deep dives had a group mean depth of 1401 m (s.d. = 137.8, n = 1142) and duration of 67.4 min (s.d. = 6.9). The group mean time between deep dives was 102.3 min (s.d. = 30.8, n = 783). While the previously described stereotypic pattern of deep and shallow dives was apparent, there was considerable inter- and intra-individual variability in most parameters. There was significant diel behavioral variation, including increased time near the surface and decreased shallow diving at night. However, maximum depth and the proportion of time spent on deep dives (presumed foraging), varied little from day to night. Surprisingly, tagged whales were present within an MFA sonar training range for 38% of days locations were received, and though comprehensive records of sonar use during tag deployments were not available, we discuss the effects frequent acoustic disturbance may have had on the observed behaviors. These data better characterize the true behavioral range of this species, and suggest caution should be exercised when drawing conclusions about behavior using short-term datasets. PMID:24670984

  2. Training rats to voluntarily dive underwater: investigations of the mammalian diving response.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Paul F

    2014-11-12

    Underwater submergence produces autonomic changes that are observed in virtually all diving animals. This reflexly-induced response consists of apnea, a parasympathetically-induced bradycardia and a sympathetically-induced alteration of vascular resistance that maintains blood flow to the heart, brain and exercising muscles. While many of the metabolic and cardiorespiratory aspects of the diving response have been studied in marine animals, investigations of the central integrative aspects of this brainstem reflex have been relatively lacking. Because the physiology and neuroanatomy of the rat are well characterized, the rat can be used to help ascertain the central pathways of the mammalian diving response. Detailed instructions are provided on how to train rats to swim and voluntarily dive underwater through a 5 m long Plexiglas maze. Considerations regarding tank design and procedure room requirements are also given. The behavioral training is conducted in such a way as to reduce the stressfulness that could otherwise be associated with forced underwater submergence, thus minimizing activation of central stress pathways. The training procedures are not technically difficult, but they can be time-consuming. Since behavioral training of animals can only provide a model to be used with other experimental techniques, examples of how voluntarily diving rats have been used in conjunction with other physiological and neuroanatomical research techniques, and how the basic training procedures may need to be modified to accommodate these techniques, are also provided. These experiments show that voluntarily diving rats exhibit the same cardiorespiratory changes typically seen in other diving animals. The ease with which rats can be trained to voluntarily dive underwater, and the already available data from rats collected in other neurophysiological studies, makes voluntarily diving rats a good behavioral model to be used in studies investigating the central aspects of the

  3. Pulmonary gas exchange in diving.

    PubMed

    Moon, R E; Cherry, A D; Stolp, B W; Camporesi, E M

    2009-02-01

    Diving-related pulmonary effects are due mostly to increased gas density, immersion-related increase in pulmonary blood volume, and (usually) a higher inspired Po(2). Higher gas density produces an increase in airways resistance and work of breathing, and a reduced maximum breathing capacity. An additional mechanical load is due to immersion, which can impose a static transrespiratory pressure load as well as a decrease in pulmonary compliance. The combination of resistive and elastic loads is largely responsible for the reduction in ventilation during underwater exercise. Additionally, there is a density-related increase in dead space/tidal volume ratio (Vd/Vt), possibly due to impairment of intrapulmonary gas phase diffusion and distribution of ventilation. The net result of relative hypoventilation and increased Vd/Vt is hypercapnia. The effect of high inspired Po(2) and inert gas narcosis on respiratory drive appear to be minimal. Exchange of oxygen by the lung is not impaired, at least up to a gas density of 25 g/l. There are few effects of pressure per se, other than a reduction in the P50 of hemoglobin, probably due to either a conformational change or an effect of inert gas binding.

  4. A field study of the ventilatory response to ambient temperature and pressure in sport diving.

    PubMed Central

    Muller, F L

    1995-01-01

    This study reports on the relationship between minute ventilation (VE) and environmental variables of temperature (T) and pressure (P) during open water diving. The author conducted a total of 38 dives involving either a light (20 dives) or a moderate (18 dives) level of physical activity. Within each of these groups, P and T taken together accounted for about two thirds of the variance in the VE data. A very significant increase in VE was observed as T decreased (1 < T(degrees C) < 22), and the magnitude of this increase at a given pressure level was similar in the 'light' and the 'moderate' data sets. A second order observation, particularly notable at lower temperature, was the decrease in VE with increasing pressure under conditions of light work. Empirical functions of the from VE = A+B/P n[1 + exp(T - 8)/10], where A, B, and n are adjustable variables, could accommodate both data sets over the whole range of T and P. These results are the first obtained under actual diving conditions to provide evidence for interactions between P, T, and VE. Understanding the physiological mechanisms by which these interactions occur would assist in appreciation of the limitations imposed on scuba divers by the environmental conditions as they affect their ventilatory responses. PMID:8800853

  5. Blood oxygen depletion is independent of dive function in a deep diving vertebrate, the northern elephant seal.

    PubMed

    Meir, Jessica U; Robinson, Patrick W; Vilchis, L Ignacio; Kooyman, Gerald L; Costa, Daniel P; Ponganis, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Although energetics is fundamental to animal ecology, traditional methods of determining metabolic rate are neither direct nor instantaneous. Recently, continuous blood oxygen (O2) measurements were used to assess energy expenditure in diving elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris), demonstrating that an exceptional hypoxemic tolerance and exquisite management of blood O2 stores underlie the extraordinary diving capability of this consummate diver. As the detailed relationship of energy expenditure and dive behavior remains unknown, we integrated behavior, ecology, and physiology to characterize the costs of different types of dives of elephant seals. Elephant seal dive profiles were analyzed and O2 utilization was classified according to dive type (overall function of dive: transit, foraging, food processing/rest). This is the first account linking behavior at this level with in vivo blood O2 measurements in an animal freely diving at sea, allowing us to assess patterns of O2 utilization and energy expenditure between various behaviors and activities in an animal in the wild. In routine dives of elephant seals, the blood O2 store was significantly depleted to a similar range irrespective of dive function, suggesting that all dive types have equal costs in terms of blood O2 depletion. Here, we present the first physiological evidence that all dive types have similarly high blood O2 demands, supporting an energy balance strategy achieved by devoting one major task to a given dive, thereby separating dive functions into distinct dive types. This strategy may optimize O2 store utilization and recovery, consequently maximizing time underwater and allowing these animals to take full advantage of their underwater resources. This approach may be important to optimizing energy expenditure throughout a dive bout or at-sea foraging trip and is well suited to the lifestyle of an elephant seal, which spends > 90% of its time at sea submerged making diving its most "natural

  6. Blood Oxygen Depletion Is Independent of Dive Function in a Deep Diving Vertebrate, the Northern Elephant Seal

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Jessica U.; Robinson, Patrick W.; Vilchis, L. Ignacio; Kooyman, Gerald L.; Costa, Daniel P.; Ponganis, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Although energetics is fundamental to animal ecology, traditional methods of determining metabolic rate are neither direct nor instantaneous. Recently, continuous blood oxygen (O2) measurements were used to assess energy expenditure in diving elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris), demonstrating that an exceptional hypoxemic tolerance and exquisite management of blood O2 stores underlie the extraordinary diving capability of this consummate diver. As the detailed relationship of energy expenditure and dive behavior remains unknown, we integrated behavior, ecology, and physiology to characterize the costs of different types of dives of elephant seals. Elephant seal dive profiles were analyzed and O2 utilization was classified according to dive type (overall function of dive: transit, foraging, food processing/rest). This is the first account linking behavior at this level with in vivo blood O2 measurements in an animal freely diving at sea, allowing us to assess patterns of O2 utilization and energy expenditure between various behaviors and activities in an animal in the wild. In routine dives of elephant seals, the blood O2 store was significantly depleted to a similar range irrespective of dive function, suggesting that all dive types have equal costs in terms of blood O2 depletion. Here, we present the first physiological evidence that all dive types have similarly high blood O2 demands, supporting an energy balance strategy achieved by devoting one major task to a given dive, thereby separating dive functions into distinct dive types. This strategy may optimize O2 store utilization and recovery, consequently maximizing time underwater and allowing these animals to take full advantage of their underwater resources. This approach may be important to optimizing energy expenditure throughout a dive bout or at-sea foraging trip and is well suited to the lifestyle of an elephant seal, which spends > 90% of its time at sea submerged making diving its most

  7. Use of a mobile diving support vessel, Offshore California

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, J.P.

    1983-03-01

    The Blue Dolphin is a converted workboat with a one-atmosphere manipulator bell diving system. It provides diving support for Chevron's offshore drilling program. This support includes underwater inspection, repair and salvage.

  8. Foul or dive? Motor contributions to judging ambiguous foul situations in football.

    PubMed

    Renden, Peter G; Kerstens, Sander; Oudejans, Raôul R D; Cañal-Bruland, Rouwen

    2014-01-01

    Football (soccer) referees frequently face situations in which they have to distinguish dives and fouls. Yet, little is known about the contributing factors that characterise the ability to judge these ambiguous situations correctly. To this end, in the current article we tested the hypothesis that motor experience of observers contributes to the visual identification of deceptive actions. Thereto, we asked skilled football referees, skilled football players, wheelchair bounded football fans (thus with limited motor experience) and novices to judge whether potential tackle situations in football were either fouls or dives. Results revealed that the referees (accuracy 72.2%, s=6.2) and players (accuracy 72.0%, s=6.4) were better at discriminating fouls and dives than the fans (accuracy 61.1%, s=7.2) and the novices (accuracy 57.4%, s=7.0) (P < 0.001). The results seem to point to an added value of motor experience in detecting deceptive movements.

  9. The physiology and pathophysiology of human breath-hold diving.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, Peter; Lundgren, Claes E G

    2009-01-01

    This is a brief overview of physiological reactions, limitations, and pathophysiological mechanisms associated with human breath-hold diving. Breath-hold duration and ability to withstand compression at depth are the two main challenges that have been overcome to an amazing degree as evidenced by the current world records in breath-hold duration at 10:12 min and depth of 214 m. The quest for even further performance enhancements continues among competitive breath-hold divers, even if absolute physiological limits are being approached as indicated by findings of pulmonary edema and alveolar hemorrhage postdive. However, a remarkable, and so far poorly understood, variation in individual disposition for such problems exists. Mortality connected with breath-hold diving is primarily concentrated to less well-trained recreational divers and competitive spearfishermen who fall victim to hypoxia. Particularly vulnerable are probably also individuals with preexisting cardiac problems and possibly, essentially healthy divers who may have suffered severe alternobaric vertigo as a complication to inadequate pressure equilibration of the middle ears. The specific topics discussed include the diving response and its expression by the cardiovascular system, which exhibits hypertension, bradycardia, oxygen conservation, arrhythmias, and contraction of the spleen. The respiratory system is challenged by compression of the lungs with barotrauma of descent, intrapulmonary hemorrhage, edema, and the effects of glossopharyngeal insufflation and exsufflation. Various mechanisms associated with hypoxia and loss of consciousness are discussed, including hyperventilation, ascent blackout, fasting, and excessive postexercise O(2) consumption. The potential for high nitrogen pressure in the lungs to cause decompression sickness and N(2) narcosis is also illuminated.

  10. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  11. Effects of scuba diving on vascular repair mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Culic, Vedrana Cikes; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline; Muzinic, Nikolina Rezic; Ljubkovic, Marko; Marinovic, Jasna; Conraads, Viviane; Dujic, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    A single air dive causes transient endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and circulating angiogenic cells (CAC) contribute synergistically to endothelial repair. In this study (1) the acute effects of diving on EPC numbers and CAC migration and (2) the influence of the gas mixture (air/nitrox-36) was investigated. Ten divers performed two dives to 18 meters on Day (D) 1 and D3, using air. After 15 days, dives were repeated with nitrox-36. Blood sampling took place before and immediately after diving. Circulating EPCs were quantified by flow cytometry, CAC migration of culture was assessed on D7. When diving on air, a trend for reduced EPC numbers is observed post-dive, which is persistent on D1 and D3. CAC migration tends to improve acutely following diving. These effects are more pronounced with nitrox-36 dives. Diving acutely affects EPC numbers and CAC function, and to a larger extent when diving with nitrox-36. The diving-induced oxidative stress may influence recruitment or survival of EPC. The functional improvement of CAC could be a compensatory mechanism to maintain endothelial homeostasis.

  12. 29 CFR 1915.6 - Commerical diving operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Commerical diving operations. 1915.6 Section 1915.6 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Commerical diving operations. Commerical diving operations shall be subject to subpart T of part...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.1086 - Mixed-gas diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mixed-gas diving. 1926.1086 Section 1926.1086 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Specific Operations Procedures § 1926.1086 Mixed-gas diving. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section...

  14. 46 CFR 197.334 - Open diving bells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Open diving bells. 197.334 Section 197.334 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.334 Open diving bells. Each open...

  15. 46 CFR 56.50-110 - Diving support systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Diving support systems. 56.50-110 Section 56.50-110... APPURTENANCES Design Requirements Pertaining to Specific Systems § 56.50-110 Diving support systems. (a) In addition to the requirements of this part, piping for diving installations which is permanently...

  16. Techniques for Diving Deeper Than 1,500 Feet,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    Divinr X. Fructus English: Abstract This is a summary of our chamber dives ( Physalie an" Sagittaire) and sea dives (Janus I, II and IV), which...between 1400 to 1800 ft. The recent results are perhaps a little worse than the first British dives to 1500 ft in 1970 and the early French Physalie and

  17. 29 CFR 1910.421 - Pre-dive procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reserves); (4) Thermal protection; (5) Diving equipment and systems; (6) Dive team assignments and physical... designation or residual inert gas status of dive team members; (8) Decompression and treatment procedures... breathing gas supply system including reserve breathing gas supplies, masks, helmets, thermal...

  18. 29 CFR 1910.425 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-supplied air diving shall not be conducted at depths deeper than 190 fsw, except that dives with bottom times of 30 minutes or less may be conducted to depths of 220 fsw. (2) A decompression chamber shall be... fsw. (3) A bell shall be used for dives with an inwater decompression time greater than 120...

  19. 29 CFR 1910.425 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-supplied air diving shall not be conducted at depths deeper than 190 fsw, except that dives with bottom times of 30 minutes or less may be conducted to depths of 220 fsw. (2) A decompression chamber shall be... fsw. (3) A bell shall be used for dives with an inwater decompression time greater than 120...

  20. 29 CFR 1910.425 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-supplied air diving shall not be conducted at depths deeper than 190 fsw, except that dives with bottom times of 30 minutes or less may be conducted to depths of 220 fsw. (2) A decompression chamber shall be... fsw. (3) A bell shall be used for dives with an inwater decompression time greater than 120...

  1. 46 CFR 197.432 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... at depths less than 190 fsw, except that dives with bottom times of 30 minutes or less may be conducted to depths of 220 fsw; (b) Each diving operation has a primary breathing gas supply; (c) Each diver... deeper than 130 fsw or outside the no-decompression limits— (1) Each diving operation has a...

  2. 29 CFR 1910.425 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-supplied air diving shall not be conducted at depths deeper than 190 fsw, except that dives with bottom times of 30 minutes or less may be conducted to depths of 220 fsw. (2) A decompression chamber shall be... fsw. (3) A bell shall be used for dives with an inwater decompression time greater than 120...

  3. 46 CFR 197.432 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... at depths less than 190 fsw, except that dives with bottom times of 30 minutes or less may be conducted to depths of 220 fsw; (b) Each diving operation has a primary breathing gas supply; (c) Each diver... deeper than 130 fsw or outside the no-decompression limits— (1) Each diving operation has a...

  4. 29 CFR 1910.425 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-supplied air diving shall not be conducted at depths deeper than 190 fsw, except that dives with bottom times of 30 minutes or less may be conducted to depths of 220 fsw. (2) A decompression chamber shall be... fsw. (3) A bell shall be used for dives with an inwater decompression time greater than 120...

  5. 46 CFR 197.432 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... at depths less than 190 fsw, except that dives with bottom times of 30 minutes or less may be conducted to depths of 220 fsw; (b) Each diving operation has a primary breathing gas supply; (c) Each diver... deeper than 130 fsw or outside the no-decompression limits— (1) Each diving operation has a...

  6. 46 CFR 197.432 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... at depths less than 190 fsw, except that dives with bottom times of 30 minutes or less may be conducted to depths of 220 fsw; (b) Each diving operation has a primary breathing gas supply; (c) Each diver... deeper than 130 fsw or outside the no-decompression limits— (1) Each diving operation has a...

  7. 46 CFR 197.432 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... at depths less than 190 fsw, except that dives with bottom times of 30 minutes or less may be conducted to depths of 220 fsw; (b) Each diving operation has a primary breathing gas supply; (c) Each diver... deeper than 130 fsw or outside the no-decompression limits— (1) Each diving operation has a...

  8. 29 CFR 1910.410 - Qualifications of dive team.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... control the exposure of others to hyperbaric conditions shall be trained in diving-related physics and... dive team member. (2) The employer shall not require a dive team member to be exposed to hyperbaric... hyperbaric conditions for the duration of any temporary physical impairment or condition which is known...

  9. Otologic Hazards Related to Scuba Diving

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Tiffany A.; Telian, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Context: As of 2015, more than 23 million scuba diver certifications have been issued across the globe. Given the popularity of scuba diving, it is incumbent on every physician to know and understand the specific medical hazards and conditions associated with scuba diving. Evidence Acquisition: Sources were obtained from PubMed, MEDLINE, and EBSCO databases from 1956 onward and ranged from diverse fields including otologic reviews and wilderness medicine book chapters. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Otologic hazards can be categorized into barotrauma-related injuries or decompression sickness. Conclusion: When combined with a high index of suspicion, the physician can recognize these disorders and promptly initiate proper treatment of the potentially hazardous and irreversible conditions related to scuba diving. PMID:26857731

  10. WWOX loss activates aerobic glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Abu-Remaileh, Muhannad; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells undergo reprogramming of glucose metabolism to limit energy production to glycolysis-a state known as "aerobic glycolysis." Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1α) is a transcription factor that regulates many genes responsible for this switch. As discussed here, new data suggest that the tumor suppressor WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) modulates HIF1α, thereby regulating this metabolic state.

  11. WWOX loss activates aerobic glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Remaileh, Muhannad; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells undergo reprogramming of glucose metabolism to limit energy production to glycolysis—a state known as “aerobic glycolysis.” Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1α) is a transcription factor that regulates many genes responsible for this switch. As discussed here, new data suggest that the tumor suppressor WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) modulates HIF1α, thereby regulating this metabolic state. PMID:27308416

  12. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  13. [Scuba diving and the heart. Cardiac aspects of sport scuba diving].

    PubMed

    Muth, Claus-Martin; Tetzlaff, Kay

    2004-06-01

    Diving with self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba) has become a popular recreational sports activity throughout the world. A high prevalence of cardiovascular disorders among the population makes it therefore likely that subjects suffering from cardiovascular problems may want to start scuba diving. Although scuba diving is not a competitive sport requiring athletic health conditions, a certain medical fitness is recommended because of the physical peculiarities of the underwater environment. Immersion alone will increase cardiac preload by central blood pooling with a rise in both cardiac output and blood pressure, counteracted by increased diuresis. Exposure to cold and increased oxygen partial pressure during scuba diving will additionally increase afterload by vasoconstrictive effects and may exert bradyarryhthmias in combination with breath-holds. Volumes of gas-filled body cavities will be affected by changing pressure (Figure 1), and inert gas components of the breathing gas mixture such as nitrogen in case of air breathing will dissolve in body tissues and venous blood with increasing alveolar inert gas pressure. During decompression a free gas phase may form in supersaturated tissues, resulting in the generation of inert gas microbubbles that are eliminated by the venous return to the lungs under normal circumstances. Certain cardiovascular conditions may have an impact on these physiological changes and pose the subject at risk of suffering adverse events from scuba diving. Arterial hypertension may be aggravated by underwater exercise and immersion. Symptomatic coronary artery disease and symptomatic heart rhythm disorders preclude diving. The occurrence of ventricular extrasystoles according to Lown classes I and II, and the presence of atrial fibrillation are considered relative contraindications in the absence of an aggravation following exercise. Asymptomatic subjects with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome may be allowed to dive, but in

  14. Persistence of critical flicker fusion frequency impairment after a 33 mfw SCUBA dive: evidence of prolonged nitrogen narcosis?

    PubMed

    Balestra, C; Lafère, P; Germonpré, P

    2012-12-01

    One of the possible risks incurred while diving is inert gas narcosis (IGN), yet its mechanism of action remains a matter of controversy. Although providing insights in the basic mechanisms of IGN, research has been primarily limited to animal studies. A human study, in real diving conditions, was needed. Twenty volunteers within strict biometrical criteria (male, age 30-40 years, BMI 20-23, non smoker) were selected. They performed a no-decompression dive to a depth of 33 mfw for 20 min and were assessed by the means of critical flicker fusion frequency (CFFF) measurement before the dive, during the dive upon arriving at the bottom, 5 min before the ascent, and 30 min after surfacing. After this late measurement, divers breathed oxygen for 15 min and were assessed a final time. Compared to the pre-dive value the mean value of each measurement was significantly different (p < 0.001). An increase of CFFF to 104 ± 5.1 % upon arriving to the bottom is followed by a decrease to 93.5 ± 4.3 %. This impairment of CFFF persisted 30 min after surfacing, still decreased to 96.3 ± 8.2 % compared to pre-dive CFFF. Post-dive measures made after 15 min of oxygen were not different from control (without nitrogen supersaturation), 124.4 ± 10.8 versus 124.2 ± 3.9 %. This simple study suggests that IGN (at least partially) depends on gas-protein interactions and that the cerebral impairment persists for at least 30 min after surfacing. This could be an important consideration in situations where precise and accurate judgment or actions are essential.

  15. Negative neurofunctional effects of frequency, depth and environment in recreational scuba diving: the Geneva "memory dive" study

    PubMed Central

    Slosman, D; de Ribaupierre, S; Chicherio, C; Ludwig, C; Montandon, M; Allaoua, M; Genton, L; Pichard, C; Grousset, A; Mayer, E; Annoni, J; de Ribaupierre, A

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To explore relationships between scuba diving activity, brain, and behaviour, and more specifically between global cerebral blood flow (CBF) or cognitive performance and total, annual, or last 6 months' frequencies, for standard dives or dives performed below 40 m, in cold water or warm sea geographical environments. Methods: A prospective cohort study was used to examine divers from diving clubs around Lac Léman and Geneva University Hospital. The subjects were 215 healthy recreational divers (diving with self-contained underwater breathing apparatus). Main outcome measures were: measurement of global CBF by 133Xe SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography); psychometric and neuropsychological tests to assess perceptual-motor abilities, spatial discrimination, attentional resources, executive functioning, and memory; evaluation of scuba diving activity by questionnaire focusing on number and maximum depth of dives and geographical site of the diving activity (cold water v warm water); and body composition analyses (BMI). Results: (1) A negative influence of depth of dives on CBF and its combined effect with BMI and age was found. (2) A specific diving environment (more than 80% of dives in lakes) had a negative effect on CBF. (3) Depth and number of dives had a negative influence on cognitive performance (speed, flexibility and inhibition processing in attentional tasks). (4) A negative effect of a specific diving environment on cognitive performance (flexibility and inhibition components) was found. Conclusions: Scuba diving may have long-term negative neurofunctional effects when performed in extreme conditions, namely cold water, with more than 100 dives per year, and maximal depth below 40 m. PMID:15039241

  16. Serum levels of S-100B after recreational scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Stavrinou, L C; Kalamatianos, T; Stavrinou, P; Papasilekas, T; Psachoulia, C; Tzavara, C; Stranjalis, G

    2011-12-01

    Recreational scuba diving is a sport of increasing popularity. Previous studies indicating subtle brain injury in asymptomatic divers imply a cumulative effect of minor neural insults in association with diving for professional and/or recreational purposes, over the long-term. This is the first study to investigate putative neural tissue burden during recreational scuba diving by measuring circulating levels of S-100B, a sensitive biomarker of brain injury. 5 male divers performed 3 consecutive dives under conservative recreational diving settings (maximum depth 15 m, duration of dive 56 min, ascend rate 1.15 m/min) with an interval of 12 h between each session. Although a small increase in serum S-100B levels after each dive was apparent, this increase did not quite reach statistical significance (p=0.057). Moreover, no abnormal S-100B values were recorded (mean baseline: 0.06 μg/L, mean post-dive: 0.086 μg/L) and no effect of the 3 consecutive dives on changes in S-100B levels was detected. These results suggest that under the experimental conditions tested, diving does not seem to have a discernible and/or cumulative impact on central nervous system integrity. The extent to which variable diving settings and practices as well as individual susceptibility factors underlie putative neural tissue burden in asymptomatic divers, remains to be established.

  17. Influence of repeated daily diving on decompression stress.

    PubMed

    Zanchi, J; Ljubkovic, M; Denoble, P J; Dujic, Z; Ranapurwala, S; Pollock, N W

    2014-06-01

    Acclimatization (an adaptive change in response to repeated environmental exposure) to diving could reduce decompression stress. A decrease in post-dive circulating venous gas emboli (VGE or bubbles) would represent positive acclimatization. The purpose of this study was to determine whether four days of daily diving alter post-dive bubble grades. 16 male divers performed identical no-decompression air dives on 4 consecutive days to 18 meters of sea water for 47 min bottom times. VGE monitoring was performed with transthoracic echocardiography every 20 min for 120 min post-dive. Completion of identical daily dives resulted in progressively decreasing odds (or logit risk) of having relatively higher grade bubbles on consecutive days. The odds on Day 4 were half that of Day 1 (OR 0.50, 95% CI: 0.34, 0.73). The odds ratio for a >III bubble grade on Day 4 was 0.37 (95% CI: 0.20, 0.70) when compared to Day 1. The current study indicates that repetitive daily diving may reduce bubble formation, representing a positive (protective) acclimatization to diving. Further work is required to evaluate the impact of additional days of diving and multiple dive days and to determine if the effect is sufficient to alter the absolute risk of decompression sickness.

  18. Agreement among High School Diving Judges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Michael J.; Blair, William O.

    1982-01-01

    Raters' agreement and the relative consistency of diving judges at a boy's competition were analyzed using intraclass correlations within 16 position x type combinations. Judges' variance was significant for 5 of the 16 combinations. Point estimates were generally greater for consistency than for raters' agreement about scores. (Author/CM)

  19. DeepDive: Declarative Knowledge Base Construction

    PubMed Central

    De Sa, Christopher; Ratner, Alex; Ré, Christopher; Shin, Jaeho; Wang, Feiran; Wu, Sen; Zhang, Ce

    2016-01-01

    The dark data extraction or knowledge base construction (KBC) problem is to populate a SQL database with information from unstructured data sources including emails, webpages, and pdf reports. KBC is a long-standing problem in industry and research that encompasses problems of data extraction, cleaning, and integration. We describe DeepDive, a system that combines database and machine learning ideas to help develop KBC systems. The key idea in DeepDive is that statistical inference and machine learning are key tools to attack classical data problems in extraction, cleaning, and integration in a unified and more effective manner. DeepDive programs are declarative in that one cannot write probabilistic inference algorithms; instead, one interacts by defining features or rules about the domain. A key reason for this design choice is to enable domain experts to build their own KBC systems. We present the applications, abstractions, and techniques of DeepDive employed to accelerate construction of KBC systems. PMID:28344371

  20. Effect of Diving and Diving Hoods on the Bacterial Flora of the External Ear Canal and Skin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    NAVAL MEDICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE BETHESDA, MARYLAND 82-22 EFFECT OF DIVING AND DIVING HOODS ON THE BACTERIAL FLORA OF THE EXTERNAL EAR CANAL AND SKIN...Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPeRT & PERIOD COVERED EFFECT OF DIVING AND DIVING HOODS ON THE BACTERIAL - PROGRESS FLORA OF THE EXTERNAL EAR CANAL AND SKIN MEDICAL...bacterial flora of the external ear canals and posterior auricular skin surface was investigated’in a group of 26 divers after 25 dry-suit dives in harbor

  1. Calling under pressure: short-finned pilot whales make social calls during deep foraging dives

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Frants H.; Perez, Jacobo Marrero; Johnson, Mark; Soto, Natacha Aguilar; Madsen, Peter T.

    2011-01-01

    Toothed whales rely on sound to echolocate prey and communicate with conspecifics, but little is known about how extreme pressure affects pneumatic sound production in deep-diving species with a limited air supply. The short-finned pilot whale (Globicephala macrorhynchus) is a highly social species among the deep-diving toothed whales, in which individuals socialize at the surface but leave their social group in pursuit of prey at depths of up to 1000 m. To investigate if these animals communicate acoustically at depth and test whether hydrostatic pressure affects communication signals, acoustic DTAGs logging sound, depth and orientation were attached to 12 pilot whales. Tagged whales produced tonal calls during deep foraging dives at depths of up to 800 m. Mean call output and duration decreased with depth despite the increased distance to conspecifics at the surface. This shows that the energy content of calls is lower at depths where lungs are collapsed and where the air volume available for sound generation is limited by ambient pressure. Frequency content was unaffected, providing a possible cue for group or species identification of diving whales. Social calls may be important to maintain social ties for foraging animals, but may be impacted adversely by vessel noise. PMID:21345867

  2. [Hyperbaric therapy and diving medicine - diving medicine - present state and prospects].

    PubMed

    Winkler, Bernd; Muth, Claus-Martin; Piepho, Tim

    2015-10-01

    The diving accident (decompression incident, DCI) occurs in the decompression phase of dives. The DCI can either be caused by an arterial gas embolism (AGE) subsequent to a pulmonary barotrauma or by the formation of inert gas bubbles subsequent to a reduction of ambient pressure during the ascent from depth. In contrast to the traditional assumption that decompression incidents only occur if decompression rules are neglected, recent data indicate that a vast amount of diving accidents occur even though divers adhered to the rules. Hence, there is a large inter- and intraindividual variability in the predisposition for diving accidents. Within the past few years, the molecular understanding of the pathophysiology of diving accidents has improved considerably. It is now well accepted that pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulatory mechanisms play a central role. Moreover, microparticles are increasingly discussed in the pathogenesis of diving accidents. These new molecular findings have not yet resulted in new therapeutic approaches. However, new approaches of preconditioning before the dive have been developed which are intended to reduce the risk of diving accidents. The symptoms of a diving accident show a large variability and range. They reach from pruritus over tension in the female breast, marbled skin and pain in the joints to severe neurological disability like paraplegia or hemiplegia. Furthermore, pulmonary symptoms can be a result of a pulmonary gas embolism and/or a tension pneumothorax. Extreme cases can also manifest as generalized, difficult-to-treat seizures, loss of consciousness or even death. The evidence-based therapy of diving accidents consists of an immediate application of 100% inspiratory O2. This can be performed via a demand valve, face mask with reservoir bag or ventilation bag connected to a reservoir bag. Fluid substitution is performed by i. v. infusion of 500-1000ml/h of cristalloids. If consciousness is not impaired, the diver is

  3. Navigating uncertain waters: a critical review of inferring foraging behaviour from location and dive data in pinnipeds.

    PubMed

    Carter, Matt Ian Daniel; Bennett, Kimberley A; Embling, Clare B; Hosegood, Philip J; Russell, Debbie J F

    2016-01-01

    In the last thirty years, the emergence and progression of biologging technology has led to great advances in marine predator ecology. Large databases of location and dive observations from biologging devices have been compiled for an increasing number of diving predator species (such as pinnipeds, sea turtles, seabirds and cetaceans), enabling complex questions about animal activity budgets and habitat use to be addressed. Central to answering these questions is our ability to correctly identify and quantify the frequency of essential behaviours, such as foraging. Despite technological advances that have increased the quality and resolution of location and dive data, accurately interpreting behaviour from such data remains a challenge, and analytical methods are only beginning to unlock the full potential of existing datasets. This review evaluates both traditional and emerging methods and presents a starting platform of options for future studies of marine predator foraging ecology, particularly from location and two-dimensional (time-depth) dive data. We outline the different devices and data types available, discuss the limitations and advantages of commonly-used analytical techniques, and highlight key areas for future research. We focus our review on pinnipeds - one of the most studied taxa of marine predators - but offer insights that will be applicable to other air-breathing marine predator tracking studies. We highlight that traditionally-used methods for inferring foraging from location and dive data, such as first-passage time and dive shape analysis, have important caveats and limitations depending on the nature of the data and the research question. We suggest that more holistic statistical techniques, such as state-space models, which can synthesise multiple track, dive and environmental metrics whilst simultaneously accounting for measurement error, offer more robust alternatives. Finally, we identify a need for more research to elucidate the role of

  4. Meeting reproductive demands in a dynamic upwelling system: Foraging strategies of a pursuit-diving seabird, the marbled murrelet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peery, M.Z.; Newman, S.H.; Storlazzi, C.D.; Beissinger, S.R.

    2009-01-01

    Seabirds maintain plasticity in their foraging behavior to cope with energy demands and foraging constraints that vary over the reproductive cycle, but behavioral studies comparing breeding and nonbreeding individuals are rare. Here we characterize how Marbled Murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) adjust their foraging effort in response to changes in reproductive demands in an upwelling system in central California. We radio-marked 32 murrelets of known reproductive status (9 breeders, 12 potential breeders, and 11 nonbreeders) and estimated both foraging ranges and diving rates during the breeding season. Murrelets spent more time diving during upwelling than oceanographic relaxation, increased their foraging ranges as the duration of relaxation grew longer, and reduced their foraging ranges after transitions to upwelling. When not incubating, murrelets moved in a circadian pattern, spending nighttime hours resting near flyways used to reach nesting habitat and foraging during the daytime an average of 5.7 km (SD 6.7 km) from nighttime locations. Breeders foraged close to nesting habitat once they initiated nesting and nest attendance was at a maximum, and then resumed traveling longer distances following the completion of nesting. Nonbreeders had similar nighttime and daytime distributions and tended to be located farther from inland flyways. Breeders increased the amount of time they spent diving by 71-73% when they had an active nest by increasing the number of dives rather than by increasing the frequency of anaerobiosis. Thus, to meet reproductive demands during nesting, murrelets adopted a combined strategy of reducing energy expended commuting to foraging sites and increasing aerobic dive rates. ?? 2009 by The Cooper Ornithological Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Diving dentistry: a review of the dental implications of scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Zadik, Y; Drucker, S

    2011-09-01

    In light of the overwhelming popularity of self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving, general dental practitioners should be prepared to address complications arising as a result of diving and to provide patients with accurate information. The aim of this article was to introduce the concepts of diving medicine and dentistry to the dentist, and to supply the dental practitioner with some diagnostic tools as well as treatment guidelines. The literature was reviewed to address diving barotrauma (pressure-induced injury related to an air space) to the head, face and oral regions, as well as scuba mouthpiece-related oral conditions. The relevant conditions for dentists who treat divers include diving-associated headache (migraine, tension-type headache), barosinusitis and barotitis-media (sinus and middle ear barotrauma, respectively), neuropathy, trigeminal (CN V) or facial (CN VII) nerve baroparesis (pressure-induced palsy), dental barotrauma (barometric-related tooth injury), barodontalgia (barometric-related dental pain), mouthpiece-associated herpes infection, pharyngeal gag reflex and temporomandibular joint disorder (dysfunction). For each condition, a theoretical description is followed by practical recommendations for the dental practitioner for the prevention and management of the condition.

  6. Deadly diving? Physiological and behavioural management of decompression stress in diving mammals

    PubMed Central

    Hooker, S. K.; Fahlman, A.; Moore, M. J.; Aguilar de Soto, N.; Bernaldo de Quirós, Y.; Brubakk, A. O.; Costa, D. P.; Costidis, A. M.; Dennison, S.; Falke, K. J.; Fernandez, A.; Ferrigno, M.; Fitz-Clarke, J. R.; Garner, M. M.; Houser, D. S.; Jepson, P. D.; Ketten, D. R.; Kvadsheim, P. H.; Madsen, P. T.; Pollock, N. W.; Rotstein, D. S.; Rowles, T. K.; Simmons, S. E.; Van Bonn, W.; Weathersby, P. K.; Weise, M. J.; Williams, T. M.; Tyack, P. L.

    2012-01-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS; ‘the bends’) is a disease associated with gas uptake at pressure. The basic pathology and cause are relatively well known to human divers. Breath-hold diving marine mammals were thought to be relatively immune to DCS owing to multiple anatomical, physiological and behavioural adaptations that reduce nitrogen gas (N2) loading during dives. However, recent observations have shown that gas bubbles may form and tissue injury may occur in marine mammals under certain circumstances. Gas kinetic models based on measured time-depth profiles further suggest the potential occurrence of high blood and tissue N2 tensions. We review evidence for gas-bubble incidence in marine mammal tissues and discuss the theory behind gas loading and bubble formation. We suggest that diving mammals vary their physiological responses according to multiple stressors, and that the perspective on marine mammal diving physiology should change from simply minimizing N2 loading to management of the N2 load. This suggests several avenues for further study, ranging from the effects of gas bubbles at molecular, cellular and organ function levels, to comparative studies relating the presence/absence of gas bubbles to diving behaviour. Technological advances in imaging and remote instrumentation are likely to advance this field in coming years. PMID:22189402

  7. Diving pattern and work schedule of construction well divers in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, K L; Lee, H C; Huang, G B; Lin, T F; Niu, K C; Liou, S H; Lin, Y C

    1998-01-01

    Construction well divers in Taiwan reportedly suffer a high prevalence of dysbaric osteonecrosis. We studied five divers working at the same construction site. We recorded their diving methods, diving depths, bottom times, work patterns, water temperatures, and heart rates. We also monitored gas bubbles in the subclavian vein in selected dives. A crude but effective hot-water system protected divers against hypothermia and allowed them to work in 24 degrees-27 degrees C water. Divers worked approximately 6.6 h a day and progressed approximately 3.0 m a day while excavating an average of 148 buckets of sand and rock each weighing 49.5 kg. The divers sustained a heart rate increase of 49%. Sixty percent of their equivalent single dive bottom times exceeded the U.S. Navy's no-decompression limits. Two cases of venous bubbles were detected, and one of these divers showed symptoms of decompression sickness. The prolonged bottom time and lack of a decompression schedule probably contributed to a risk of decompression sickness and dysbaric osteonecrosis.

  8. Enriched Air Nitrox Breathing Reduces Venous Gas Bubbles after Simulated SCUBA Diving: A Double-Blind Cross-Over Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Souday, Vincent; Koning, Nick J.; Perez, Bruno; Grelon, Fabien; Mercat, Alain; Boer, Christa; Seegers, Valérie; Radermacher, Peter; Asfar, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis whether enriched air nitrox (EAN) breathing during simulated diving reduces decompression stress when compared to compressed air breathing as assessed by intravascular bubble formation after decompression. Methods Human volunteers underwent a first simulated dive breathing compressed air to include subjects prone to post-decompression venous gas bubbling. Twelve subjects prone to bubbling underwent a double-blind, randomized, cross-over trial including one simulated dive breathing compressed air, and one dive breathing EAN (36% O2) in a hyperbaric chamber, with identical diving profiles (28 msw for 55 minutes). Intravascular bubble formation was assessed after decompression using pulmonary artery pulsed Doppler. Results Twelve subjects showing high bubble production were included for the cross-over trial, and all completed the experimental protocol. In the randomized protocol, EAN significantly reduced the bubble score at all time points (cumulative bubble scores: 1 [0–3.5] vs. 8 [4.5–10]; P < 0.001). Three decompression incidents, all presenting as cutaneous itching, occurred in the air versus zero in the EAN group (P = 0.217). Weak correlations were observed between bubble scores and age or body mass index, respectively. Conclusion EAN breathing markedly reduces venous gas bubble emboli after decompression in volunteers selected for susceptibility for intravascular bubble formation. When using similar diving profiles and avoiding oxygen toxicity limits, EAN increases safety of diving as compared to compressed air breathing. Trial Registration ISRCTN 31681480 PMID:27163253

  9. What Is Aerobic Dancing?

    MedlinePlus

    ... aerobics can reach up to six times the force of gravity, which is transmitted to each of the 26 bones in the foot. Because of the many side-to-side motions, shoes need an arch design that will compensate ...

  10. Sphenoid sinus barotrauma after scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Hyeok; Kim, Kuk; Cho, Seok Hyun; Kim, Kyung Rae

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of an 18-year-old male patient operated on for sphenoid sinus barotrauma after scuba diving. The patient attended our emergency department because of intractable headache but did not improve with conservative treatment. After computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging examination, he was diagnosed with sphenoid sinusitis that extended to the nasal septum. He therefore underwent surgery for sinus ventilation and abscess drainage.

  11. Carbon dioxide absorbents for rebreather diving.

    PubMed

    Pennefather, John

    2016-09-01

    Firstly I would like to thank SPUMS members for making me a Life Member of SPUMS; I was surprised and greatly honoured by the award. I also want to confirm and expand on the findings on carbon dioxide absorbents reported by David Harvey et al. For about 35 years, I was the main player in deciding which absorbent went into Australian Navy and Army diving sets. On several occasions, suppliers of absorbents to the anaesthesia market tried to supply the Australian military market. On no occasion did they provide absorbent that came close to the minimum absorbent capacity required, generally being 30-40% less efficient than diving-grade absorbents. Because I regard lives as being more important than any likely dollar saving, the best absorbent was always selected unless two suppliers provided samples with the same absorbent capacity. On almost every occasion, there was a clear winner and cost was never considered. I suggest the same argument for the best absorbent should be used by members and their friends who dive using rebreather sets. I make this point because of my findings on a set that was brought to me after the death of its owner. The absorbent was not the type or grain size recommended by the manufacturer of the set and did not resemble any of the diving grade absorbents I knew of. I suspected by its appearance that it was anaesthetic grade absorbent. When I tested the set, the absorbent system failed very quickly so it is likely that carbon dioxide toxicity contributed to his death. The death was not the subject of an inquest and I have no knowledge of how the man obtained the absorbent. Possibly there was someone from an operating theatre staff who unintentionally caused their friend's death by supplying him with 'borrowed absorbent'. I make this point as I would like to discourage members from making a similar error.

  12. Diving in Contaminated Water: Health Risk Matrix

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    health effects if they are present in high concentrations. Some of the metals are insoluble ( mercury , lead) and are associated with particles. Therefore...risk associated with that parameter is really low (for example, copper and mercury ). However, divers have to keep in mind that they may encounter higher...levels if they dive in special areas (areas severely affected by mining activities in the case of copper and mercury ). As research and monitoring

  13. Project Review of the Experimental Diving Unit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    by CF along with 2 proto- type Surface Supplied CUMA (SS CUMA) from Fullerton Sherwood Engineering Ltd. A SS CUMA would provide longer dive endurance...were purchased from Exotemp Systems. - 16- Nil repo. PROJECTIONS The glov and batery evaluation will continue during CUMA decompression table development... type of apparatus and it would be difficult to relate results from this test to those from other countries. Therefore, a new test method and acceptable

  14. Diel Variation in Beaked Whale Diving Behavior

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    finned pilot whales (G. macrorhynchus) off the Canary Islands spent more time foraging at night near the surface, based on acoustic tags recording...dive data from two species, Cuvier’s and Blainville’s beaked whales, tagged with time-depth recorders off the west coast of the island of Hawai‘i...Methods Field work was undertaken off the west side of the island of Hawai‘i in each year from 2002 through 2007. Methods have been

  15. 46 CFR 197.434 - Surface-supplied mixed-gas diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... bell is used for dives deeper than 220 fsw or when the dive involves in-water decompression times... physically confining space; (d) A closed bell is used for dives at depths greater than 300 fsw, except...

  16. 46 CFR 197.434 - Surface-supplied mixed-gas diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... bell is used for dives deeper than 220 fsw or when the dive involves in-water decompression times... physically confining space; (d) A closed bell is used for dives at depths greater than 300 fsw, except...

  17. 46 CFR 197.434 - Surface-supplied mixed-gas diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... bell is used for dives deeper than 220 fsw or when the dive involves in-water decompression times... physically confining space; (d) A closed bell is used for dives at depths greater than 300 fsw, except...

  18. 46 CFR 197.434 - Surface-supplied mixed-gas diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... bell is used for dives deeper than 220 fsw or when the dive involves in-water decompression times... physically confining space; (d) A closed bell is used for dives at depths greater than 300 fsw, except...

  19. 46 CFR 197.434 - Surface-supplied mixed-gas diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... bell is used for dives deeper than 220 fsw or when the dive involves in-water decompression times... physically confining space; (d) A closed bell is used for dives at depths greater than 300 fsw, except...

  20. The epidemiology of murder and suicide involving scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Buzzacott, Peter; Denoble, Petar

    2012-01-01

    Murder and suicide in involving scuba are extremely rare. A systematic search identified 19 published studies describing 4,339 recreational diving fatalities occurring between 1956 and 2011. Case vignettes identified three possible murders and eight likely suicides. These are summarised and the victims' demography described. Prevalences of 69 murders per 105 diving fatalities and 184 suicides per 105 diving fatalities are lower than found among all cause mortality in the USA and Australia.

  1. Fabrication of a custom diving mouthpiece using a thermoforming material.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Ryosuke; Ueno, Toshiaki; Ohyama, Takashi

    2004-10-01

    Scuba divers may suffer from temporomandibular joint dysfunction and related problems associated with the use of commercially available diving mouthpieces. Several authors have recommended that custom diving mouthpieces be fabricated for relieving the symptoms of diver's mouth syndrome. The lost wax technique is commonly used for this purpose but may be time-consuming and is technically complicated. This article describes a simplified technique using thermoforming material for fabricating a custom diving mouthpiece.

  2. Dive behaviour can predict metabolic expenditure in Steller sea lions

    PubMed Central

    Goundie, Elizabeth T.; Rosen, David A. S.; Trites, Andrew W.

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of costs associated with foraging contributes to understanding the energetic impact that changes in prey availability have on the energy balance of an animal and the fitness of populations. However, estimating the costs of foraging is difficult for breath-hold divers, such as Steller sea lions, that feed underwater. We developed models parameterized with data from free-diving captive Steller sea lions to estimate the costs incurred by wild animals while foraging. We measured diving metabolic rate of trained sea lions performing four types of dives to 10 and 40 m in the open ocean and estimated the separate costs of different dive components: surface time; bottom time; and transiting to and from depth. We found that the sea lions' diving metabolic rates were higher while transiting (20.5 ± 13.0 ml O2 min−1 kg−1) than while swimming at depth (13.5 ± 4.1 ml O2 min−1 kg−1), and both were higher than metabolism at the surface (9.2 ± 1.6 ml O2 min−1 kg−1). These values were incorporated into an energetic model that accurately predicted oxygen consumption for dives only (within 9.5%) and dive cycles (within 7.7%), although it consistently overestimated costs by 5.9% for dives and 21.8% for dive cycles. Differences in the costs of individual components of dives also explained differences in the efficiency of different dive strategies. Single dives were energetically less costly than bout dives; however, sea lions were more efficient at replenishing oxygen stores after bout dives and could therefore spend a greater portion of their time foraging than when undertaking single dives. The metabolic rates we measured for the different behavioural components of diving can be applied to time–depth recordings from wild Steller sea lions to estimate the energy expended while foraging. In turn, this can be used to understand how changes in prey availability affect energy balance and the health of individuals in

  3. SCUBA medicine: a first-responder's guide to diving injuries.

    PubMed

    Salahuddin, Moin; James, Laurie A; Bass, Evan Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving is an ever-growing sport, and despite a myriad of technological advances to improve safety, it remains dangerous. Providers of medical care for SCUBA divers must have an understanding of diving physiology and potential medical problems that can occur. SCUBA diving also can take participants to remote areas, so being properly prepared for potential emergencies can make a significant difference. The following is a review of diving physiology and the medical problems that can occur in SCUBA divers, along with some suggestions as to how to prepare for a SCUBA excursion.

  4. Dive behaviour can predict metabolic expenditure in Steller sea lions.

    PubMed

    Goundie, Elizabeth T; Rosen, David A S; Trites, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of costs associated with foraging contributes to understanding the energetic impact that changes in prey availability have on the energy balance of an animal and the fitness of populations. However, estimating the costs of foraging is difficult for breath-hold divers, such as Steller sea lions, that feed underwater. We developed models parameterized with data from free-diving captive Steller sea lions to estimate the costs incurred by wild animals while foraging. We measured diving metabolic rate of trained sea lions performing four types of dives to 10 and 40 m in the open ocean and estimated the separate costs of different dive components: surface time; bottom time; and transiting to and from depth. We found that the sea lions' diving metabolic rates were higher while transiting (20.5 ± 13.0 ml O2 min(-1) kg(-1)) than while swimming at depth (13.5 ± 4.1 ml O2 min(-1) kg(-1)), and both were higher than metabolism at the surface (9.2 ± 1.6 ml O2 min(-1) kg(-1)). These values were incorporated into an energetic model that accurately predicted oxygen consumption for dives only (within 9.5%) and dive cycles (within 7.7%), although it consistently overestimated costs by 5.9% for dives and 21.8% for dive cycles. Differences in the costs of individual components of dives also explained differences in the efficiency of different dive strategies. Single dives were energetically less costly than bout dives; however, sea lions were more efficient at replenishing oxygen stores after bout dives and could therefore spend a greater portion of their time foraging than when undertaking single dives. The metabolic rates we measured for the different behavioural components of diving can be applied to time-depth recordings from wild Steller sea lions to estimate the energy expended while foraging. In turn, this can be used to understand how changes in prey availability affect energy balance and the health of individuals in

  5. 29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart T to... - Guidelines for Scientific Diving

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... project using scientific diving is the advancement of science; therefore, information and data resulting... are not included within scientific diving. 4. Scientific divers, based on the nature of...

  6. 29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart T of... - Guidelines for Scientific Diving

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... project using scientific diving is the advancement of science; therefore, information and data resulting... are not included within scientific diving. 4. Scientific divers, based on the nature of...

  7. Physiological Monitoring in Diving Mammals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    and Marine and Ocean Science 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES... ocean noise, bubble injury and marine mammal strandings (http://www.awionline.org/ oceans /Noise/IONC/index.htm). During a workshop held in Baltimore...fiber optic approach. Deoxygenated blood at various dilutions was used to test that the response was linear over the physiological range. y= 00957K

  8. Diving through the thermal window: implications for a warming world

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Hamish A.; Dwyer, Ross G.; Gordos, Matthew; Franklin, Craig E.

    2010-01-01

    Population decline and a shift in the geographical distribution of some ectothermic animals have been attributed to climatic warming. Here, we show that rises in water temperature of a few degrees, while within the thermal window for locomotor performance, may be detrimental to diving behaviour in air-breathing ectotherms (turtles, crocodilians, marine iguanas, amphibians, snakes and lizards). Submergence times and internal and external body temperature were remotely recorded from freshwater crocodiles (Crocodylus johnstoni) while they free-ranged throughout their natural habitat in summer and winter. During summer, the crocodiles' mean body temperature was 5.2 ± 0.1°C higher than in winter and the largest proportion of total dive time was composed of dive durations approximately 15 min less than in winter. Diving beyond 40 min during summer required the crocodiles to exponentially increase the time they spent on the surface after the dive, presumably to clear anaerobic debt. The relationship was not as significant in winter, even though a greater proportion of dives were of a longer duration, suggesting that diving lactate threshold (DLT) was reduced in summer compared with winter. Additional evidence for a reduced DLT in summer was derived from the stronger influence body mass exerted upon dive duration, compared to winter. The results demonstrate that the higher summer body temperature increased oxygen demand during the dive, implying that thermal acclimatization of the diving metabolic rate was inadequate. If the study findings are common among air-breathing diving ectotherms, then long-term warming of the aquatic environment may be detrimental to behavioural function and survivorship. PMID:20610433

  9. Yet More Visualized JAMSTEC Cruise and Dive Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiyama, T.; Hase, H.; Fukuda, K.; Saito, H.; Kayo, M.; Matsuda, S.; Azuma, S.

    2014-12-01

    Every year, JAMSTEC performs about a hundred of research cruises and numerous dive surveys using its research vessels and submersibles. JAMSTEC provides data and samples obtained during these cruises and dives to international users through a series of data sites on the Internet. The "DARWIN (http://www.godac.jamstec.go.jp/darwin/e)" data site disseminates cruise and dive information. On DARWIN, users can search interested cruises and dives with a combination search form or an interactive tree menu, and find lists of observation data as well as links to surrounding databases. Document catalog, physical sample databases, and visual archive of dive surveys (e. g. in http://www.godac.jamstec.go.jp/jmedia/portal/e) are directly accessible from the lists. In 2014, DARWIN experienced an update, which was arranged mainly for enabling on-demand data visualization. Using login users' functions, users can put listed data items into the virtual basket and then trim, plot and download the data. The visualization tools help users to quickly grasp the quality and characteristics of observation data. Meanwhile, JAMSTEC launched a new data site named "JDIVES (http://www.godac.jamstec.go.jp/jdives/e)" to visualize data and sample information obtained by dive surveys. JDIVES shows tracks of dive surveys on the "Google Earth Plugin" and diagrams of deep-sea environmental data such as temperature, salinity, and depth. Submersible camera images and links to associated databases are placed along the dive tracks. The JDVIES interface enables users to perform so-called virtual dive surveys, which can help users to understand local geometries of dive spots and geological settings of associated data and samples. It is not easy for individual researchers to organize a huge amount of information recovered from each cruise and dive. The improved visibility and accessibility of JAMSTEC databases are advantageous not only for second-hand users, but also for on-board researchers themselves.

  10. Effect of recreational diving on Patagonian rocky reefs.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Gonzalo; Márquez, Federico; Marzinelli, Ezequiel M; Mendez, María M; Bigatti, Gregorio

    2015-03-01

    Tourism has grown considerably in the last decades, promoting activities such as recreational SCUBA diving that may affect marine benthic communities. In Puerto Madryn, Patagonia Argentina, sub-aquatic tourism areas (STA) receive about 7,000 divers per year. Diving is concentrated on a few small rocky reefs and 50% of the dives occur in summer. In this work, we evaluated the effect of recreational diving activities on benthic communities and determined whether diving causes a press (long-term) or a pulse (short-term) response. We quantified the percentage cover of benthic organisms and compared benthic assemblage structure and composition between two sites with contrasting usage by divers, 'highly disturbed' and 'moderately disturbed' sites, and two 'control' sites with similar physical characteristics but no diving activity, twice before and after the diving peak in summer. We found differences in benthic assemblage structure (identity and relative abundance of taxa) and composition (identity only) among diving sites and controls. These differences were consistent before and after the peak of diving in summer, suggesting that recreational diving may produce a press impact on overall benthic assemblage structure and composition in these STA. At the moderately disturbed site, however, covers of specific taxa, such as some key habitat-forming or highly abundant species, usually differed from those in controls only immediately after summer, after which they begun to resemble controls, suggesting a pulse impact. Thus, STA in Golfo Nuevo seem to respond differently to disturbances of diving depending on the usage of the sites. This information is necessary to develop sound management strategies in order to preserve local biodiversity.

  11. Diving through the thermal window: implications for a warming world.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Hamish A; Dwyer, Ross G; Gordos, Matthew; Franklin, Craig E

    2010-12-22

    Population decline and a shift in the geographical distribution of some ectothermic animals have been attributed to climatic warming. Here, we show that rises in water temperature of a few degrees, while within the thermal window for locomotor performance, may be detrimental to diving behaviour in air-breathing ectotherms (turtles, crocodilians, marine iguanas, amphibians, snakes and lizards). Submergence times and internal and external body temperature were remotely recorded from freshwater crocodiles (Crocodylus johnstoni) while they free-ranged throughout their natural habitat in summer and winter. During summer, the crocodiles' mean body temperature was 5.2±0.1°C higher than in winter and the largest proportion of total dive time was composed of dive durations approximately 15 min less than in winter. Diving beyond 40 min during summer required the crocodiles to exponentially increase the time they spent on the surface after the dive, presumably to clear anaerobic debt. The relationship was not as significant in winter, even though a greater proportion of dives were of a longer duration, suggesting that diving lactate threshold (DLT) was reduced in summer compared with winter. Additional evidence for a reduced DLT in summer was derived from the stronger influence body mass exerted upon dive duration, compared to winter. The results demonstrate that the higher summer body temperature increased oxygen demand during the dive, implying that thermal acclimatization of the diving metabolic rate was inadequate. If the study findings are common among air-breathing diving ectotherms, then long-term warming of the aquatic environment may be detrimental to behavioural function and survivorship.

  12. Respiratory Heat Loss Limits in Helium-Oxygen Saturation Diving

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    STATEMENT (of te obstrol eaterdin Bleek #iferen f mim fier ee) WS SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES It. KEY WORDS (Contm nu F ewfer aie It nl*OOWY Mel D*UtltY or...THIS PASS 3Be a 3M 20. (CONTINUED) neutral skin temperature in a hot water suit. This level of respiratory heat loss is predicted to allow an average...respiratory heat loss from the ventilatory response to the exercise, will be dissipated through the diver’s skin as he adjusts his hot water flow and

  13. Development of Dive Capacity in Northern Elephant Seals (Mirounga angustirostris): Reduced Body Reserves at Weaning Are Associated with Elevated Body Oxygen Stores during the Postweaning Fast.

    PubMed

    Somo, Derek A; Ensminger, David C; Sharick, Jeffrey T; Kanatous, Shane B; Crocker, Daniel E

    2015-01-01

    Developmental increases in dive capacity have been reported in numerous species of air-breathing marine vertebrates. Previous studies in juvenile phocid seals suggest that increases in physiological dive capacity during the postweaning fast (PWF) are critical to support independent aquatic foraging. Although there is a strong relationship between size at weaning and PWF duration and body reserves at weaning vary considerably, few studies have considered whether such variation in body reserve magnitude promotes phenotypic modulation of dive capacity development during the PWF. Phenotypic modulation, a form of developmental plasticity in which rates and degrees of expression of the developmental program are modulated by environmental factors, may enhance diving capacity in weanlings with reduced PWF durations due to smaller body reserves at weaning if reduced body reserves promote accelerated development of dive capacity. We longitudinally measured changes in blood and muscle oxygen stores and muscle metabolic enzymes over the first 8 wk of the PWF in northern elephant seals and determined whether rates of change in these parameters varied with body reserves at weaning. We assessed whether erythropoietin (EPO), thyroid hormones, serum nonesterified fatty acid levels, and iron status influenced blood and muscle oxygen store development or were influenced by body reserves at weaning. Although mass-specific plasma volume and blood volume were relatively stable across the fast, both were elevated in animals with reduced body reserves. Surprisingly, hemoglobin and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentrations declined over the PWF while hematocrit remained stable, and these variables were not associated with body reserves or EPO. Swimming muscle myoglobin and serum iron levels increased rapidly early in the PWF and were not related to body reserves. Patterns in maximal activities of muscle enzymes suggested a decline in total aerobic and anaerobic metabolic capacity over the

  14. Joint position statement on persistent foramen ovale (PFO) and diving. South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society (SPUMS) and the United Kingdom Sports Diving Medical Committee (UKSDMC).

    PubMed

    Smart, David; Mitchell, Simon; Wilmshurst, Peter; Turner, Mark; Banham, Neil

    2015-06-01

    This consensus statement is the result of a workshop at the SPUMS Annual Scientific Meeting 2014 with representatives of the UK Sports Diving Medical Committee (UKSDMC) present, and subsequent discussions including the entire UKSDMC. Right-to-left shunt across a persistent or patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a risk factor for some types of decompression illness. It was agreed that routine screening for PFO is not currently justifiable, but certain high risk sub-groups can be identified. Divers with a history of cerebral, spinal, inner-ear or cutaneous decompression illness, migraine with aura, a family history of PFO or atrial septal defect and those with other forms of congenital heart disease are considered to be at higher risk. For these individuals, screening should be considered. If screening is undertaken it should be by bubble contrast transthoracic echocardiography with provocative manoeuvres, including Valsalva release and sniffing. Appropriate quality control is important. If a shunt is present, advice should be provided by an experienced diving physician taking into account the clinical context and the size of shunt. Reduction in gas load by limiting depth, repetitive dives and avoiding lifting and straining may all be appropriate. Divers may consider transcatheter device closure of the PFO in order to return to normal diving. If transcatheter PFO closure is undertaken, repeat bubble contrast echocardiography must be performed to confirm adequate reduction or abolition of the right-to-left shunt, and the diver should have stopped taking potent anti-platelet therapy (aspirin is acceptable).

  15. Inhibition of shivering in hypothermic seals during diving.

    PubMed

    Kvadsheim, Petter H; Folkow, Lars P; Blix, Arnoldus Schytte

    2005-08-01

    The mammalian response to hypothermia is increased metabolic heat production, usually by way of muscular activity, such as shivering. Seals, however, have been reported to respond to diving with hypothermia, which in other mammals under other circumstances would have elicited vigorous shivering. In the diving situation, shivering could be counterproductive, because it obviously would increase oxygen consumption and therefore reduce diving capacity. We have measured the electromyographic (EMG) activity of three different muscles and the rectal and brain temperature of hooded seals (Cystophora cristata) while they were exposed to low ambient temperatures in a climatic chamber and while they performed a series of experimental dives in cold water. In air, the seals had a normal mammalian shivering response to cold. Muscles were recruited in a sequential manner until body temperature stopped dropping. Shivering was initiated when rectal temperature fell below 35.3 +/- 0.6 degrees C (n = 6). In the hypothermic diving seal, however, the EMG activity in all of the muscles that had been shivering vigorously before submergence was much reduced, or stopped altogether, whereas it increased again upon emergence but was again reduced if diving was repeated. We conclude that shivering is inhibited during diving to allow a decrease in body temperature whereby oxygen consumption is decreased and diving capacity is extended.

  16. Are the Risks of Sport Scuba Diving Being Underestimated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roos, Robert

    1989-01-01

    A lawsuit has challenged the safety of the tables widely used in scuba diving. Other concerns also have emerged: A condition known as patent foramen ovale may increase the risk of decompression sickness, and studies are raising questions about the long-term effects of diving. (Author/JD)

  17. Scuba Diving and Kinesiology: Development of an Academic Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacs, Christopher R.; Walter, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The use of scuba diving as a recreational activity within traditional university instructional programs has been well established. Departments focusing on kinesiology, physical education, or exercise science have often provided scuba diving lessons as part of their activity-based course offerings. However, few departments have developed an…

  18. Scuba diving is possible and safe for patients with haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Schved, J F; De Haro, M; Drapeau, M; Schved, M

    2012-01-01

    For a long time, physical activities have been contraindicated in haemophiliacs or were restricted to few activities. Sports are nowadays advocated for haemophiliacs. Although various lists of physical activities have been proposed, scuba diving is never mentioned. Thus, with a group of haemophilic volunteers, a study was launched on whether, with strict medical follow-up, scuba diving could be allowed for patients with haemophilia. All the participants followed a training program including theory and assessment. In 6 years, a total of 517 dives were performed by 20 patients with congenital bleeding disorders. Nine were under prophylaxis for haemophilia, and nine received on-demand treatment. Two patients had type I von Willebrand's disease. Among the 20 patients, 12 made 12-153 dives, whereas six made eight dives each. No incident was noted during or after the dives. Thus, scuba diving can be authorized for PWH, if they have none of the specific medical contraindications for diving and if they have received medical training allowing them to manage their disease themselves.

  19. 29 CFR 1926.1076 - Qualifications of dive team.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 1926.1076 Qualifications of dive team. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Qualifications of dive team. 1926.1076 Section 1926.1076 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH...

  20. Fatal diving accidents in western Norway 1983-2007.

    PubMed

    Ramnefjell, M P; Morild, I; Mørk, S J; Lilleng, P K

    2012-11-30

    Despite efforts to reduce their number, fatal diving accidents still occur. The circumstances and post-mortem findings in 40 fatal diving accidents in western Norway from 1983 through 2007 were investigated. Diving experience, medical history and toxicology reports were retrieved. The material consisted of recreational divers, professional saturation divers and professional divers without experience with saturation. In 33 cases the diving equipment was examined as part of the forensic investigation. In 27 cases defects in the diving equipment were found. For six divers such defects were responsible for the fatal accidents. Eighteen divers died on the surface or less than 10 m below surface. Five divers reached below 100 msw, and two of them died at this depth. The fatalities were not season-dependent. However, wave-height and strength of currents were influential factors in some cases. Twelve divers were diving alone. Twenty divers had one buddy, 9 of these divers were alone at the time of death. The cause of death was drowning in 31 out of 40 divers; one of them had a high blood-ethanol concentration, in two other divers ethanol was found in the urine, indicating previous ethanol consumption. Nine divers died from sudden decompression, pulmonary barotraumas, underwater trauma and natural causes. The study shows that most of the fatal diving accidents could be avoided if adequate diving safety procedures had been followed.

  1. 29 CFR 1926.1082 - Procedures during dive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedures during dive. 1926.1082 Section 1926.1082 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving General Operations Procedures §...

  2. 29 CFR 1926.1083 - Post-dive procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Post-dive procedures. 1926.1083 Section 1926.1083 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving General Operations Procedures §...

  3. Recent modifications to the investigation of diving related deaths.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Carl; Caruso, James

    2014-03-01

    The investigation of deaths that involve diving using a compressed breathing gas (SCUBA diving) is a specialized area of forensic pathology. Diving related deaths occur more frequently in certain jurisdictions, but any medical examiner or coroner's office may be faced with performing this type of investigation. In order to arrive at the correct conclusion regarding the cause and manner of death, forensic pathologists and investigators need to have a basic understanding of diving physiology, and should also utilize more recently developed technology and ancillary techniques. In the majority of diving related deaths, the cause of death is drowning, but this more often represents a final common pathway due to a water environment. The chain of events leading to the death is just as important to elucidate if similar deaths are to be minimized in the future. Re-enactment of accident scenarios, interrogation of dive computers, postmortem radiographic imaging, and slight alterations in autopsy technique may allow some of these diving related deaths to the better characterized. The amount and location of gas present in the body at the time of autopsy may be very meaningful or may simply represent a postmortem artifact. Medical examiners, coroners, and forensic investigators should consider employing select ancillary techniques to more thoroughly investigate the factors contributing a death associated with SCUBA diving.

  4. 29 CFR 1926.1081 - Pre-dive procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pre-dive procedures. 1926.1081 Section 1926.1081 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving General Operations Procedures §...

  5. 29 CFR 1926.1076 - Qualifications of dive team.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... § 1926.1076 Qualifications of dive team. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Qualifications of dive team. 1926.1076 Section 1926.1076 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH...

  6. Supportive Evidence for Altered Platelet Function in the Dived Rat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-11-01

    decompression in animals, as well as in man. Among the effec Is of diving on various cellular and molecular blood components either in the presence or...rat is a suitable laboratory model for investigating the effects of diving on blood components and should provide the means for pursuing future

  7. 29 CFR 1926.1085 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1926.1085 Section 1926.1085 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Procedures § 1926.1085 Surface-supplied air diving. Note: The requirements applicable to construction...

  8. Swimming & Diving: Special Olympics Sports Skills Instructional Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. Foundation, Washington, DC.

    One of five parts of the Special Olympics' Sports Skills Instructional Program, the booklet addresses ways to teach swimming and diving to mentally retarded students. Short term objectives of the program encompass warmup, basic swimming and diving skills, safety, and good sportsmanship. The long term goal focuses on acquisition of basic skills,…

  9. Dance--Aerobic and Anaerobic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlette

    1984-01-01

    This article defines and explains aerobic exercise and its effects on the cardiovascular system. Various studies on dancers are cited indicating that dance is an anaerobic activity with some small degree of aerobic benefit. (DF)

  10. Implementation of Aerobic Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (AAHPERD).

    This information is intended for health professionals interested in implementing aerobic exercise programs in public schools, institutions of higher learning, and business and industry workplaces. The papers are divided into three general sections. The introductory section presents a basis for adhering to a health fitness lifestyle, using…

  11. Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yurkov, Vladimir V.; Beatty, J. Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are a relatively recently discovered bacterial group. Although taxonomically and phylogenetically heterogeneous, these bacteria share the following distinguishing features: the presence of bacteriochlorophyll a incorporated into reaction center and light-harvesting complexes, low levels of the photosynthetic unit in cells, an abundance of carotenoids, a strong inhibition by light of bacteriochlorophyll synthesis, and the inability to grow photosynthetically under anaerobic conditions. Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are classified in two marine (Erythrobacter and Roseobacter) and six freshwater (Acidiphilium, Erythromicrobium, Erythromonas, Porphyrobacter, Roseococcus, and Sandaracinobacter) genera, which phylogenetically belong to the α-1, α-3, and α-4 subclasses of the class Proteobacteria. Despite this phylogenetic information, the evolution and ancestry of their photosynthetic properties are unclear. We discuss several current proposals for the evolutionary origin of aerobic phototrophic bacteria. The closest phylogenetic relatives of aerobic phototrophic bacteria include facultatively anaerobic purple nonsulfur phototrophic bacteria. Since these two bacterial groups share many properties, yet have significant differences, we compare and contrast their physiology, with an emphasis on morphology and photosynthetic and other metabolic processes. PMID:9729607

  12. Aerobic Dance in Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiles, Barbara Ann; Moore, Suzanne

    1981-01-01

    Aerobic dance offers a challenging workout in a social atmosphere. Though some physical education instructors tend to exclude dance units from the curriculum, most could teach aerobic dance if they had a basic knowledge of aerobic routines. The outline for a unit to be used in the class is presented. (JN)

  13. Empirical evaluation of diving wet suit material heat transfer and thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    West, P.B.

    1993-10-01

    This wet suit material testing program provides a quantitative thermal conductivity and heat transfer analysis, and comparison of various materials used in skin diving and SCUBA diving. Thermal resistance represents the primary subject examined, but due to compressibility of the baseline materials and its effect on heat transfer, this program also examines compression at simulated depth. This article reports the empirical heat transfer coefficients for both thermal conductivity and convection. Due to the limitations of the test apparatus, this analysis must restrict the convection evaluation to an approximately 20-cm-height, free-convection model. As a consequence, this model best simulates the overall heat transfer coefficient of a diver hovering in a horizontal position. This program also includes evaluations of some nonstandard materials in an effort to identify alternative wet suit materials.

  14. Field Evaluation of Topside Decompression Monitor (TDM) During Ships Husbandary Diving at SWRMC-NI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-31

    information was entered for all attending SWRMC–NI divers. Supplied with gas from a scuba cylinder as a pressure controller to simulate dive profiles, the...Navy Experimental Diving Unit TA 09-04 321 Bullfinch Rd. NEDU TR 11...TDM) DURING SHIPS HUSBANDRY DIVING AT SWRMC-NI Navy Experimental Diving Unit Authors: K. A

  15. A Method for Identification of Some Components of Judging Springboard Diving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, James H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    This study identifies critical elements of the front dive half-twist that judges are likely to look for when they score springboard diving competitions. Videotapes of divers at a 1979 intercollegiate diving meet were made and analyzed, using grid scoring procedures, to isolate components of the dives that would help predict judges' scores.…

  16. Sequential effects in Olympic synchronized diving scores

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    When judging performances in a sequence, the current score is often influenced by the preceding score. Where athletes are perceived to be similar, a judgement is assimilated towards the previous one. However, if judges focus on the differences between the two athletes, this will result in a contrasting influence on their scores. Here, I investigate sequential effects during synchronized diving events at the 2012 and 2016 Olympic Games. Although previous research found assimilation in scores of gymnasts, the current data showed contrast effects—current scores benefited from following a poor performance but were at a disadvantage if they followed a high-scoring performance. One explanation may be that the processes involved in judging synchronized pairs results in a focus on the differences between athletes, producing a contrast effect across dives. That the specific direction of this sequential bias may depend on the particular sport has implications for how judges might approach their roles in a context-dependent manner, as well as how such biases should be addressed. PMID:28280583

  17. Sports-related lung injury during breath-hold diving.

    PubMed

    Mijacika, Tanja; Dujic, Zeljko

    2016-12-01

    The number of people practising recreational breath-hold diving is constantly growing, thereby increasing the need for knowledge of the acute and chronic effects such a sport could have on the health of participants. Breath-hold diving is potentially dangerous, mainly because of associated extreme environmental factors such as increased hydrostatic pressure, hypoxia, hypercapnia, hypothermia and strenuous exercise.In this article we focus on the effects of breath-hold diving on pulmonary function. Respiratory symptoms have been reported in almost 25% of breath-hold divers after repetitive diving sessions. Acutely, repetitive breath-hold diving may result in increased transpulmonary capillary pressure, leading to noncardiogenic oedema and/or alveolar haemorrhage. Furthermore, during a breath-hold dive, the chest and lungs are compressed by the increasing pressure of water. Rapid changes in lung air volume during descent or ascent can result in a lung injury known as pulmonary barotrauma. Factors that may influence individual susceptibility to breath-hold diving-induced lung injury range from underlying pulmonary or cardiac dysfunction to genetic predisposition.According to the available data, breath-holding does not result in chronic lung injury. However, studies of large populations of breath-hold divers are necessary to firmly exclude long-term lung damage.

  18. Characteristics of diving in radio-marked Xantus's Murrelets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, C.D.; Golightly, R.T.; Takekawa, J.Y.

    2005-01-01

    We monitored diving activity of radio-marked Xantus's Murrelets Synthliboramphus hypoleucus near Anacapa Island, California, during the breeding season. Thirteen radio-marked murrelets were remotely monitored from Anacapa Island with a handheld antenna and radio receiver for 29 hours in three sample periods in April and May 2003. Mean dive durations in the sample periods were 18 s ?? 2 s, 28 s ?? 2 s, and 24 s ?? 4 s, suggesting that dives were less than 21 m from the surface. Dive duration and subsequent time on the surface differed between the sample periods. Dive duration and subsequent time on the surface were not correlated in observations stratified by individual bird or by sample period. Further, dive duration and subsequent time on the surface were not correlated within foraging bouts. Dive characteristics measured near Anacapa Island suggested that Xantus's Murrelets have the ability to capture prey found at varying depths, but will feed on prey that is most available near the surface of the water.

  19. Sympathetic nerve activity and simulated diving in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Shamsuzzaman, Abu; Ackerman, Michael J; Kuniyoshi, Fatima Sert; Accurso, Valentina; Davison, Diane; Amin, Raouf S; Somers, Virend K

    2014-04-01

    The goal of our study was to develop a simple and practical method for simulating diving in humans using facial cold exposure and apnea stimuli to measure neural and circulatory responses during the stimulated diving reflex. We hypothesized that responses to simultaneous facial cold exposure and apnea (simulated diving) would be synergistic, exceeding the sum of responses to individual stimuli. We studied 56 volunteers (24 female and 32 male), average age of 39 years. All subjects were healthy, free of cardiovascular and other diseases, and on no medications. Although muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), blood pressure, and vascular resistance increased markedly during both early and late phases of simulated diving, significant reductions in heart rate were observed only during the late phase. Total MSNA during simulated diving was greater than combined MSNA responses to the individual stimuli. We found that simulated diving is a powerful stimulus to sympathetic nerve traffic with significant bradycardia evident in the late phase of diving and eliciting synergistic sympathetic and parasympathetic responses. Our data provide insight into autonomic triggers that could help explain catastrophic cardiovascular events that may occur during asphyxia or swimming, such as in patients with obstructive sleep apnea or congenital long QT syndrome.

  20. Early diving behaviour in juvenile penguins: improvement or selection processes

    PubMed Central

    Weimerskirch, Henri; Bost, Charles-André

    2016-01-01

    The early life stage of long-lived species is critical to the viability of population, but is poorly understood. Longitudinal studies are needed to test whether juveniles are less efficient foragers than adults as has been hypothesized. We measured changes in the diving behaviour of 17 one-year-old king penguins Aptenodytes patagonicus at Crozet Islands (subantartic archipelago) during their first months at sea, using miniaturized tags that transmitted diving activity in real time. We also equipped five non-breeder adults with the same tags for comparison. The data on foraging performance revealed two groups of juveniles. The first group made shallower and shorter dives that may be indicative of early mortality while the second group progressively increased their diving depths and durations, and survived the first months at sea. This surviving group of juveniles required the same recovery durations as adults, but typically performed shallower and shorter dives. There is thereby a relationship between improved diving behaviour and survival in young penguins. This long period of improving diving performance in the juvenile life stage is potentially a critical period for the survival of deep avian divers and may have implications for their ability to adapt to environmental change. PMID:27484650

  1. [Diagnosis and treatment of diving accidents. New German guidelines for diving accidents 2014-2017].

    PubMed

    Jüttner, B; Wölfel, C; Liedtke, H; Meyne, K; Werr, H; Bräuer, T; Kemmerer, M; Schmeißer, G; Piepho, T; Müller, O; Schöppenthau, H

    2015-06-01

    In 2015 the German Society for Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine (GTÜM) and the Swiss Underwater and Hyperbaric Medical Society (SUHMS) published the updated guidelines on diving accidents 2014-2017. These multidisciplinary guidelines were developed within a structured consensus process by members of the German Interdisciplinary Association for Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine (DIVI), the Sports Divers Association (VDST), the Naval Medical Institute (SchiffMedInst), the Social Accident Insurance Institution for the Building Trade (BG BAU), the Association of Hyperbaric Treatment Centers (VDD) and the Society of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (DGAUM). This consensus-based guidelines project (development grade S2k) with a representative group of developers was conducted by the Association of Scientific Medical Societies in Germany. It provides information and instructions according to up to date evidence to all divers and other lay persons for first aid recommendations to physician first responders and emergency physicians as well as paramedics and all physicians at therapeutic hyperbaric chambers for the diagnostics and treatment of diving accidents. To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose and the following key action statements: on-site 100% oxygen first aid treatment, still patient positioning and fluid administration are recommended. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) recompression remains unchanged the established treatment in severe cases with no therapeutic alternatives. The basic treatment scheme recommended for diving accidents is hyperbaric oxygenation at 280 kPa. For quality management purposes there is a need in the future for a nationwide register of hyperbaric therapy.

  2. U S Navy Diving Manual. Volume 2. Mixed-Gas Diving. Revision 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    systems (port and starboard) with a common cated of welded HY80 steel and has an outside diam- helium recovery system. The diving system is not eter of 84...board Manuf. Co. batteries) 28v, DC Material HY80 Steel C02 scrubbers- Construction Welded -Number 2 Dimensions- - Type Absorbent -Outside diameter at...the MK not normally use any breathing device, although sev- I Chariot Dress quickly discovered that the steel oxy- eral models existed. Other groups

  3. [Medical certification for high altitude travel and scuba diving].

    PubMed

    Wuillemin, Timothée; Dos Santos Bragança, Angel; Ziltener, Jean-Luc; Berney, Jean-Yves; Lanier, Cédric

    2014-09-24

    People are more and more looking for adventures and discovery of unusual locations. Journeys to high altitude and scuba diving are part of these activities and their access has become easier for a lot of people not necessarily experienced with their dangers. The general practitioner will have to be able to deliver some advices and recommendations to his patients about the risks related to these activities and their ability to practice them. He will also have to deliver some certificates of medical fitness to dive. This paper proposes a brief review of the most important medical aspects to know about high altitude and scuba diving.

  4. Alveolar hemorrhage after scuba diving: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Ju; Tsai, Mee-Sun; Tsai, Ying-Ming; Lien, Chi-Tun; Hwang, Jhi-Jhu; Huang, Ming-Shyan

    2010-07-01

    Self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba) diving is increasingly popular in Taiwan. There are few references in the literature regarding pulmonary hemorrhage as the sole manifestation of pulmonary barotrauma in scuba divers, and no study from Taiwan was found in the literature. We present the case of a 25-year-old man who suffered alveolar hemorrhage related to pulmonary barotrauma as a complication of scuba diving. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a Taiwanese subject suffering from non-fatal pulmonary hemorrhage after scuba diving.

  5. Energy cost and optimisation in breath-hold diving.

    PubMed

    Trassinelli, M

    2016-05-07

    We present a new model for calculating locomotion costs in breath-hold divers. Starting from basic mechanics principles, we calculate the work that the diver must provide through propulsion to counterbalance the action of drag, the buoyant force and weight during immersion. Compared to those in previous studies, the model presented here accurately analyses breath-hold divers which alternate active swimming with prolonged glides during the dive (as is the case in mammals). The energy cost of the dive is strongly dependent on these prolonged gliding phases. Here we investigate the length and impacts on energy cost of these glides with respect to the diver characteristics, and compare them with those observed in different breath-hold diving species. Taking into account the basal metabolic rate and chemical energy to propulsion transformation efficiency, we calculate optimal swim velocity and the corresponding total energy cost (including metabolic rate) and compare them with observations. Energy cost is minimised when the diver passes through neutral buoyancy conditions during the dive. This generally implies the presence of prolonged gliding phases in both ascent and descent, where the buoyancy (varying with depth) is best used against the drag, reducing energy cost. This is in agreement with past results (Miller et al., 2012; Sato et al., 2013) where, when the buoyant force is considered constant during the dive, the energy cost was minimised for neutral buoyancy. In particular, our model confirms the good physical adaption of dolphins for diving, compared to other breath-hold diving species which are mostly positively buoyant (penguins for example). The presence of prolonged glides implies a non-trivial dependency of optimal speed on maximal depth of the dive. This extends previous findings (Sato et al., 2010; Watanabe et al., 2011) which found no dependency of optimal speed on dive depth for particular conditions. The energy cost of the dive can be further

  6. Reduced taxonomic richness of lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera) in diving birds.

    PubMed

    Felsõ, B; Rózsa, L

    2006-08-01

    Avian lice occupy different habitats in the host plumage that the physical environment outside the host body may affect in several ways. Interactions between host plumage and water may be an important source of such effects. Here, we use a comparative approach to examine the effect of a host's diving behavior on the taxonomic richness of its lice. Louse genera richness was significantly lower in clades of diving birds than on their nondiving sister clades. Species richness of host and body mass did not differ significantly between these clades; thus, these factors did not bias our results. This study suggests that the hosts' diving behavior can effectively influence ectoparasite communities.

  7. Orbital subperiosteal hematoma from scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Rosenberry, Clark; Angelidis, Matthew; Devita, Diane

    2010-09-01

    Only a few cases of nontraumatic orbital subperiosteal hematoma due to scuba diving have been reported, and this is the first of such cases that underwent surgical intervention. This injury results from negative pressure within the face mask, suctioning orbital tissues into the mask after incomplete equilibration of pressure on descent. Valsalva maneuver is a second mechanism implicated in the etiology of this injury. Recognition of this injury is of the utmost importance because vision loss is a possible complication if there is compression of the optic nerve or increased intraocular pressure. In many cases of nontraumatic orbital hematoma, conservative management is adequate; however, this case was an exception due to worsening exam findings. Divers may be able to prevent this injury by frequent and gentle equilibration of mask pressure on descent.

  8. Effects of successive air and nitrox dives on human vascular function.

    PubMed

    Marinovic, Jasna; Ljubkovic, Marko; Breskovic, Toni; Gunjaca, Grgo; Obad, Ante; Modun, Darko; Bilopavlovic, Nada; Tsikas, Dimitrios; Dujic, Zeljko

    2012-06-01

    SCUBA diving is regularly associated with asymptomatic changes in cardiac, pulmonary and vascular function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in vascular/endothelial function following SCUBA diving and to assess the potential difference between two breathing gases: air and nitrox 36 (36% oxygen and 64% nitrogen). Ten divers performed two 3-day diving series (no-decompression dive to 18 m with 47 min bottom time with air and nitrox, respectively), with 2 weeks pause in between. Arterial/endothelial function was assessed using SphygmoCor and flow-mediated dilation measurements, and concentration of nitrite before and after diving was determined in venous blood. Production of nitrogen bubbles post-dive was assessed by ultrasonic determination of venous gas bubble grade. Significantly higher bubbling was found after all air dives as compared to nitrox dives. Pulse wave velocity increased slightly (~6%), significantly after both air and nitrox diving, indicating an increase in arterial stiffness. However, augmentation index became significantly more negative after diving indicating smaller wave reflection. There was a trend for post-dive reduction of FMD after air dives; however, only nitrox diving significantly reduced FMD. No significant differences in blood nitrite before and after the dives were found. We found that nitrox diving affects systemic/vascular function more profoundly than air diving by reducing FMD response, most likely due to higher oxygen load. Both air and nitrox dives increased arterial stiffness, but decreased wave reflection suggesting a decrease in peripheral resistance due to exercise during diving. These effects of nitrox and air diving were not followed by changes in plasma nitrite.

  9. Decompression from He-N2-O2 (TRIMIX) Bounce Dives Is Not More Efficient Than From He-O2 (HELIOX) Bounce Dives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-28

    hyperbaric or hypobaric exposure for a minimum of 48 hours before and following any experimental dive. These restrictions were to avoid alterations ...pressure” decompression table,f states that longer times were required at deeper decompression stops for heliox diving than for nitrogen-based diving.39...The report provides no experimental evidence to support this statement; although the executive summary states that nearly 700 man- dives at depths up

  10. 23. VIEW, FROM EAST, SHOWING DIVING AND MAIN POOLS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW, FROM EAST, SHOWING DIVING AND MAIN POOLS AND WEST ELEVATION OF OFFICE AND FIRST AID BUILDING - Glen Echo Park, Crystal Swimming Pool, 7300 McArthur Boulevard, Glen Echo, Montgomery County, MD

  11. The risks of scuba diving: a focus on Decompression Illness.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jennifer

    2014-11-01

    Decompression Illness includes both Decompression Sickness (DCS) and Pulmonary Overinflation Syndrome (POIS), subsets of diving-related injury related to scuba diving. DCS is a condition in which gas bubbles that form while diving do not have adequate time to be resorbed or "off-gassed," resulting in entrapment in specific regions of the body. POIS is due to an overly rapid ascent to the surface resulting in the rupture of alveoli and subsequent extravasation of air bubbles into tissue planes or even the cerebral circulation. Divers must always be cognizant of dive time and depth, and be trained in the management of decompression. A slow and controlled ascent, plus proper control of buoyancy can reduce the dangerous consequences of pulmonary barotrauma. The incidence of adverse effects can be diminished with safe practices, allowing for the full enjoyment of this adventurous aquatic sport.

  12. SCUBA Diving for Blind and Visually Impaired People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Candela, Anthony R.

    1982-01-01

    The author, a trained scuba (self-contained underwater breathing apparatus) diver who is severely visually impaired provides an orientation to scuba diving as a leisure and career activity. (Author/SB)

  13. The Risks of Scuba Diving: A Focus on Decompression Illness

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Decompression Illness includes both Decompression Sickness (DCS) and Pulmonary Overinflation Syndrome (POIS), subsets of diving-related injury related to scuba diving. DCS is a condition in which gas bubbles that form while diving do not have adequate time to be resorbed or “off-gassed,” resulting in entrapment in specific regions of the body. POIS is due to an overly rapid ascent to the surface resulting in the rupture of alveoli and subsequent extravasation of air bubbles into tissue planes or even the cerebral circulation. Divers must always be cognizant of dive time and depth, and be trained in the management of decompression. A slow and controlled ascent, plus proper control of buoyancy can reduce the dangerous consequences of pulmonary barotrauma. The incidence of adverse effects can be diminished with safe practices, allowing for the full enjoyment of this adventurous aquatic sport. PMID:25478296

  14. Surgical removal of right-to-left cardiac shunt in the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) causes ventricular enlargement but does not alter apnoea or metabolism during diving.

    PubMed

    Eme, John; Gwalthney, June; Blank, Jason M; Owerkowicz, Tomasz; Barron, Gildardo; Hicks, James W

    2009-11-01

    Crocodilians have complete anatomical separation between the ventricles, similar to birds and mammals, but retain the dual aortic arch system found in all non-avian reptiles. This cardiac anatomy allows surgical modification that prevents right-to-left (R-L) cardiac shunt. A R-L shunt is a bypass of the pulmonary circulation and recirculation of oxygen-poor blood back to the systemic circulation and has often been observed during the frequent apnoeic periods of non-avian reptiles, particularly during diving in aquatic species. We eliminated R-L shunt in American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) by surgically occluding the left aorta (LAo; arising from right ventricle) upstream and downstream of the foramen of Panizza (FoP), and we tested the hypotheses that this removal of R-L shunt would cause afterload-induced cardiac remodelling and adversely affect diving performance. Occlusion of the LAo both upstream and downstream of the FoP for approximately 21 months caused a doubling of RV pressure and significant ventricular enlargement (average approximately 65%) compared with age-matched, sham-operated animals. In a separate group of recovered, surgically altered alligators allowed to dive freely in a dive chamber at 23 degrees C, occlusion of the LAo did not alter oxygen consumption or voluntary apnoeic periods relative to sham animals. While surgical removal of R-L shunt causes considerable changes in cardiac morphology similar to aortic banding in mammals, its removal does not affect the respiratory pattern or metabolism of alligators. It appears probable that the low metabolic rate of reptiles, rather than pulmonary circulatory bypass, allows for normal aerobic dives.

  15. Surgical removal of right-to-left cardiac shunt in the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) causes ventricular enlargement but does not alter apnoea or metabolism during diving

    PubMed Central

    Eme, John; Gwalthney, June; Blank, Jason M.; Owerkowicz, Tomasz; Barron, Gildardo; Hicks, James W.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Crocodilians have complete anatomical separation between the ventricles, similar to birds and mammals, but retain the dual aortic arch system found in all non-avian reptiles. This cardiac anatomy allows surgical modification that prevents right-to-left (R–L) cardiac shunt. A R–L shunt is a bypass of the pulmonary circulation and recirculation of oxygen-poor blood back to the systemic circulation and has often been observed during the frequent apnoeic periods of non-avian reptiles, particularly during diving in aquatic species. We eliminated R–L shunt in American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) by surgically occluding the left aorta (LAo; arising from right ventricle) upstream and downstream of the foramen of Panizza (FoP), and we tested the hypotheses that this removal of R–L shunt would cause afterload-induced cardiac remodelling and adversely affect diving performance. Occlusion of the LAo both upstream and downstream of the FoP for ∼21 months caused a doubling of RV pressure and significant ventricular enlargement (average ∼65%) compared with age-matched, sham-operated animals. In a separate group of recovered, surgically altered alligators allowed to dive freely in a dive chamber at 23°C, occlusion of the LAo did not alter oxygen consumption or voluntary apnoeic periods relative to sham animals. While surgical removal of R–L shunt causes considerable changes in cardiac morphology similar to aortic banding in mammals, its removal does not affect the respiratory pattern or metabolism of alligators. It appears probable that the low metabolic rate of reptiles, rather than pulmonary circulatory bypass, allows for normal aerobic dives. PMID:19837897

  16. Selective brain cooling and its vascular basis in diving seals.

    PubMed

    Blix, Arnoldus Schytte; Walløe, Lars; Messelt, Edward B; Folkow, Lars P

    2010-08-01

    Brain (T(brain)), intra-aorta (T(aorta)), latissimus dorsi muscle (T(m)) and rectal temperature (T(r)) were measured in harp (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and hooded (Cystophora cristata) seals during experimental dives in 4 degrees C water. The median brain cooling was about 1 degrees C during 15 min diving, but in some cases it was as much as 2.5 degrees C. Cooling rates were slow for the first couple of minutes, but increased significantly after about 5 min of diving. The onset of cooling sometimes occurred before the start of the dive, confirming that the cooling is under cortical control, like the rest of the diving responses. T(aorta) also fell significantly, and was always lower than T(brain), while T(m) was fairly stable during dives. Detailed studies of the vascular anatomy of front flippers revealed that brachial arterial blood can be routed either through flipper skin capillaries for nutritive purposes and return through sophisticated vascular heat exchangers to avoid heat loss to the environment, or, alternatively, through numerous arterio-venous shunts in the skin and return by way of large superficial veins, which then carry cold blood to the heart. In the latter situation the extent to which the brain is cooled is determined by the ratio of carotid to brachial arterial blood flow, and water temperature, and the cooling is selective in that only those organs that are circulated will be cooled. It is concluded that T(brain) is actively down-regulated during diving, sometimes by as much as 2.5 degrees C, whereby cerebral oxygen requirements may be reduced by as much as 25% during extended dives.

  17. The Mammalian Diving Response: An Enigmatic Reflex to Preserve Life?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian diving response is a remarkable behavior that overrides basic homeostatic reflexes. It is most studied in large aquatic mammals but is seen in all vertebrates. Pelagic mammals have developed several physiological adaptations to conserve intrinsic oxygen stores, but the apnea, bradycardia, and vasoconstriction is shared with those terrestrial and is neurally mediated. The adaptations of aquatic mammals are reviewed here as well as the neural control of cardiorespiratory physiology during diving in rodents. PMID:23997188

  18. Developing an effective diving program for a hydro maintenance project

    SciTech Connect

    Stasch, E.

    1997-08-01

    A trash problem at the Fort Randall hydropower project threatened to affect operations and cause potential machinery damage. When traditional approaches to clean away the trash were judged unfeasible, US Army Corps of Engineers managers developed a combined mechanical cleanup and underwater diving program. A contractor successfully removed 500 tons of debris at a cost of about $302,000. The dive plan and problems experienced during the project are detailed in the article.

  19. Nitrogen narcosis and alcohol consumption--a scuba diving fatality.

    PubMed

    Michalodimitrakis, E; Patsalis, A

    1987-07-01

    Nitrogen narcosis can cause death among experienced scuba divers. Nitrogen under pressure affects the brain by acting as an anesthetic agent. Furthermore, the consumption of ethanol along with diving will cause the symptoms of nitrogen narcosis to occur at depths less than 30 m. Our case deals with an experienced diver who drank alcoholic beverages before diving and developed symptoms of nitrogen narcosis at a shallow depth. These two conditions contributed to his death by drowning.

  20. Should children be SCUBA diving?: Cerebral arterial gas embolism in a swimming pool.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Valerie; Adkinson, Cheryl; Bowen, Mariya; Ortega, Henry

    2012-04-01

    Cerebral arterial gas embolism (CAGE) is a well-known serious complication of self-contained breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving. Most serious complications of SCUBA diving occur in adults because most of SCUBA divers are adults. However, young age is an independent risk factor for injury in SCUBA diving and shallow-water SCUBA diving is the riskiest environment for CAGE. We present a case of a 10-year-old boy who developed CAGE while taking SCUBA diving lessons in a university swimming pool. This case illustrates the potential danger of SCUBA diving for children who lack understanding of the physics of diving as well as the often unappreciated risk of shallow-water SCUBA diving. Our intent is to educate providers of primary care to children, so that they may appropriately advise parents about SCUBA diving, and to educate providers of emergency care to children, so that they will recognize this uncommon but serious emergency condition.

  1. Acute ischemic colitis secondary to air embolism after diving

    PubMed Central

    Payor, Austin Daniel; Tucci, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic colitis (IC) secondary to air embolism from decompression sickness or barotrauma during diving is an extremely rare condition. After extensive review of the available literature, we found that there has been only one reported case of IC secondary to air embolism from diving. Although air embolization from diving and the various medical complications that follow have been well documented, the clinical manifestation of IC from an air embolism during diving is very rare and thus far unstudied. Common symptoms of IC include abdominal pain, bloody or non-bloody diarrhea or nausea or vomiting or any combination. Emergency physicians and Critical Care specialists should consider IC as a potential diagnosis for a patient with the above-mentioned symptoms and a history of recent diving. We report a case of IC from air embolism after a routine dive to 75 feet below sea level in a 53-year-old White female who presented to a community Emergency Department complaining of a 2-day history of diffuse abdominal pain and nausea. She was diagnosed by colonoscopy with biopsies and treated conservatively with antibiotics, bowel rest, and a slow advancement in diet. PMID:22096777

  2. Extracting Databases from Dark Data with DeepDive.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ce; Shin, Jaeho; Ré, Christopher; Cafarella, Michael; Niu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    DeepDive is a system for extracting relational databases from dark data: the mass of text, tables, and images that are widely collected and stored but which cannot be exploited by standard relational tools. If the information in dark data - scientific papers, Web classified ads, customer service notes, and so on - were instead in a relational database, it would give analysts a massive and valuable new set of "big data." DeepDive is distinctive when compared to previous information extraction systems in its ability to obtain very high precision and recall at reasonable engineering cost; in a number of applications, we have used DeepDive to create databases with accuracy that meets that of human annotators. To date we have successfully deployed DeepDive to create data-centric applications for insurance, materials science, genomics, paleontologists, law enforcement, and others. The data unlocked by DeepDive represents a massive opportunity for industry, government, and scientific researchers. DeepDive is enabled by an unusual design that combines large-scale probabilistic inference with a novel developer interaction cycle. This design is enabled by several core innovations around probabilistic training and inference.

  3. Function of head-bobbing behavior in diving little grebes.

    PubMed

    Gunji, Megu; Fujita, Masaki; Higuchi, Hiroyoshi

    2013-08-01

    Most birds show a characteristic head movement that consists of head stabilization and quick displacement. In this movement, which is analogous to saccadic eye movement in mammals, head stabilization plays an important role in stabilizing the retinal image. This head movement, called "head bobbing", is particularly pronounced during walking. Previous studies focusing on anatomical and behavioral features have pointed out that visual information is also important for diving birds, indicating its significance in the head movements of diving birds. In the present study, the kinematic and behavioral features of head bobbing in diving little grebes were described by motion analysis to identify the head movement in diving birds. The results showed that head-bobbing stroke (HBS) consisted of a thrust phase and a hold phase as is typical for head bobbing during walking birds. This suggests that HBS is related to visual stabilization under water. In HBS, grebes tended to dive with longer stroke length and smaller stroke frequency than in non-bobbing stroke. This suggests that the behavior, which is related to vision, affects the kinematic stroke parameters. This clarification of underwater head movement will help in our understanding not only of vision, but also of the kinematic strategy of diving birds.

  4. Pulmonary function in children after a single scuba dive.

    PubMed

    Lemaître, F; Tourny-Chollet, C; Hamidouche, V; Lemouton, M C

    2006-11-01

    This study evaluated the respiratory effects of a single dive in children. Eighteen young divers and 18 controls participated in our study (age range: 9 - 13 years). Volumes and expiratory flow rates were measured 20 minutes before and 10 minutes after one air dive (3 meters, 25 minutes). Before the dive, no differences were noted regarding pulmonary parameters. Ten minutes after the dive, decreases were noted in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and maximal voluntary ventilation (- 8 %, - 5.3 %, respectively; p < 0.01), peak expiratory flow, maximal expiratory flow rates at 50 % of FVC (MEF(50 %)) and MEF(25 %), forced mid-expiratory flow rate (FEF(25 - 75 %)), and FEV1/FVC(- 5.9 %, - 14.3 %, - 21.4 %, - 4.2 %, - 3.5 %, respectively; p < 0.05). The respiratory pattern observed 10 minutes after a single dive to three meters indicated airway narrowing. However, no association between diving experience and lung function was obtained.

  5. Extracting Databases from Dark Data with DeepDive

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ce; Shin, Jaeho; Ré, Christopher; Cafarella, Michael; Niu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    DeepDive is a system for extracting relational databases from dark data: the mass of text, tables, and images that are widely collected and stored but which cannot be exploited by standard relational tools. If the information in dark data — scientific papers, Web classified ads, customer service notes, and so on — were instead in a relational database, it would give analysts a massive and valuable new set of “big data.” DeepDive is distinctive when compared to previous information extraction systems in its ability to obtain very high precision and recall at reasonable engineering cost; in a number of applications, we have used DeepDive to create databases with accuracy that meets that of human annotators. To date we have successfully deployed DeepDive to create data-centric applications for insurance, materials science, genomics, paleontologists, law enforcement, and others. The data unlocked by DeepDive represents a massive opportunity for industry, government, and scientific researchers. DeepDive is enabled by an unusual design that combines large-scale probabilistic inference with a novel developer interaction cycle. This design is enabled by several core innovations around probabilistic training and inference. PMID:28316365

  6. Activation of Brainstem Neurons by Underwater Diving in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Panneton, W. Michael; Gan, Qi; Le, Jason; Livergood, Robert S.; Clerc, Philip; Juric, Rajko

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian diving response is a powerful autonomic adjustment to underwater submersion greatly affecting heart rate, arterial blood pressure, and ventilation. The bradycardia is mediated by the parasympathetic nervous system, arterial blood pressure is mediated via the sympathetic system and still other circuits mediate the respiratory changes. In the present study we investigate the cardiorespiratory responses and the brainstem neurons activated by voluntary diving of trained rats, and, compare them to control and swimming animals which did not dive. We show that the bradycardia and increase in arterial blood pressure induced by diving were significantly different than that induced by swimming. Neuronal activation was calculated after immunohistochemical processing of brainstem sections for Fos protein. Labeled neurons were counted in the caudal pressor area, the medullary dorsal horn, subnuclei of the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS), the nucleus raphe pallidus (RPa), the rostroventrolateral medulla, the A5 area, the nucleus locus coeruleus, the Kölliker–Fuse area, and the external lateral and superior lateral subnuclei of the parabrachial nucleus. All these areas showed significant increases in Fos labeling when data from voluntary diving rats were compared to control rats and all but the commissural subnucleus of the NTS, A5 area, and RPa were significantly different from swimming rats. These data provide a substrate for more precise experiments to determine the role of these nuclei in the reflex circuits driving the diving response. PMID:22563319

  7. Development of Aerobic Fitness in Young Team Sport Athletes.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Craig B; Gill, Nicholas D; Kinugasa, Taisuke; Kilding, Andrew E

    2015-07-01

    The importance of a high level of aerobic fitness for team sport players is well known. Previous research suggests that aerobic fitness can be effectively increased in adults using traditional aerobic conditioning methods, including high-intensity interval and moderate-intensity continuous training, or more recent game-based conditioning that involves movement and skill-specific tasks, e.g. small-sided games. However, aerobic fitness training for youth team sport players has received limited attention and is likely to differ from that for adults due to changes in maturation. Given young athletes experience different rates of maturation and technical skill development, the most appropriate aerobic fitness training modes and loading parameters are likely to be specific to the developmental stage of a player. Therefore, we analysed studies that investigated exercise protocols to enhance aerobic fitness in young athletes, relative to growth and maturation, to determine current best practice and limitations. Findings were subsequently used to guide an evidence-based model for aerobic fitness development. During the sampling stage (exploration of multiple sports), regular participation in moderate-intensity aerobic fitness training, integrated into sport-specific drills, activities and skill-based games, is recommended. During the specialisation stage (increased commitment to a chosen sport), high-intensity small-sided games should be prioritised to provide the simultaneous development of aerobic fitness and technical skills. Once players enter the investment stage (pursuit of proficiency in a chosen sport), a combination of small-sided games and high-intensity interval training is recommended.

  8. Dive patterns of tagged right whales in the Great South Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winn, Howard E.; Goodyear, Jeffrey D.; Kenney, Robert D.; Petricig, Richard O.

    Right whales were tagged in 1988 and 1989 with radio and sonic telemetry tags as part of a multidisciplinary investigation of right whales and their habitat in the Great South Channel region east of Cape Cod. The tags yielded data on the durations of 6456 dives and 6482 surfacings, as well as 23,538 measurements of the depth of a diving whale. Log-survivorship analysis of the 1988 data showed a clear separation between the durations of dives between blows within a single surfacing sequence or bout (intea-bout dives) and longer dives between surfacing sequences (interbout dives) at 27 s, which was also applied to the 1989 data. Inter-bout dives averaged 127.3 s, and were significantly longer in 1988 than in 1989. Inter-bout dives were significantly longer during the day than night in 1988, and longer at night in 1989. The average intea-bout dive duration was 11.8 s, with 1989 dives longer than those in 1988. Surface durations averaged 6.2 s, and were also significantly longer in 1989. Dive depths were recorded only in 1989. Mean dive depth was 7.3 m, and only 12 dives went deeper than 30 m. The typical right whale dive pattern in 1988 included relatively short surfacings, long dives during the day, and shorter dives at night. This correlated with strong diel vertical migration by the dense zooplankton patches on which they were presumed to be feeding based on indirect evidence-from near the surface at night to near the bottom during the day. The 1989 pattern included longer dives during the night, as well as some exceptionally long surfacings. Zooplankton in 1989 did not migrate vertically, and remained near the surface day and night in right whale feeding areas. Right whale dive patterns in the Great South Channel are closely correlated with the horizontal and vertical distributions and movements of dense patches of their zooplankton prey.

  9. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, Mark P; Bessette, Bernard J; March, John; McComb, Scott T.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  10. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, Mark P; Bessette, Bernard J; March, John C; McComb, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention includes a system of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  11. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, M.P.; Bessette, B.J.; March, J.; McComb, S.T.

    2000-02-15

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120 F and 140 F in steady state.

  12. Speciation of Iberian diving beetles in Pleistocene refugia (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae).

    PubMed

    Ribera, Ignacio; Vogler, Alfried P

    2004-01-01

    The Mediterranean basin is an area of high diversity and endemicity, but the age and origin of its fauna are still largely unknown. Here we use species-level phylogenies based on approximately 1300 base pairs of the genes 16S rRNA and cytochrome oxidase I to establish the relationships of 27 of the 34 endemic Iberian species of diving beetles in the family Dytiscidae, and to investigate their level of divergence. Using a molecular clock approach, 18-19 of these species were estimated to be of Pleistocene origin, with four to six of them from the Late Pleistocene ( approximately 100 000 years). A second, lower speciation frequency peak was assigned to Late Miocene or Early Pliocene. Analysis of the distributional ranges showed that endemic species placed in the tip nodes of the trees are significantly more likely to be allopatric with their sisters than endemic species at lower node levels. Allopatric sister species are also significantly younger than sympatric clades, in agreement with an allopatric mode of speciation and limited subsequent range movement. These results strongly suggest that for some taxa Iberian populations were isolated during the Pleistocene long enough to speciate, and apparently did not expand their ranges to recolonize areas north of the Pyrenees. This is in contradiction to observations from fossil beetles in areas further north, which document large range movements associated with the Pleistocene glacial cycles hypothesized to suppress population isolation and allopatric speciation.

  13. Incidence of Decompression Illness and Other Diving Related Medical Problems Amongst Royal Navy Divers 1995-1999

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    diving apparatus used with the semiclosed Diving Set Self Contained Clearance Diving (DSSCCD) being replaced by the closed circuit Clearance Diving... closed circuit Long Endurance Breathing Apparatus (Mixed Gas) (LEBA (MG)) diving apparatus, which uses oxygen in nitrogen breathing mixtures, was...using surface supplied open circuit 20% oxygen in helium (855/100,000) with 3 cases occurring after 60 msw dives of short duration using CDBA (252

  14. Exercise, Animal Aerobics, and Interpretation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Valerie

    1996-01-01

    Describes an aerobic activity set to music for children that mimics animal movements. Example exercises include walking like a penguin or jumping like a cricket. Stresses basic aerobic principles and designing the program at the level of children's motor skills. Benefits include reaching people who normally don't visit nature centers, and bridging…

  15. Determinants of arterial gas embolism after scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Ljubkovic, Marko; Zanchi, Jaksa; Breskovic, Toni; Marinovic, Jasna; Lojpur, Mihajlo; Dujic, Zeljko

    2012-01-01

    Scuba diving is associated with breathing gas at increased pressure, which often leads to tissue gas supersaturation during ascent and the formation of venous gas emboli (VGE). VGE crossover to systemic arteries (arterialization), mostly through the patent foramen ovale, has been implicated in various diving-related pathologies. Since recent research has shown that arterializations frequently occur in the absence of cardiac septal defects, our aim was to investigate the mechanisms responsible for these events. Divers who tested negative for patent foramen ovale were subjected to laboratory testing where agitated saline contrast bubbles were injected in the cubital vein at rest and exercise. The individual propensity for transpulmonary bubble passage was evaluated echocardiographically. The same subjects performed a standard air dive followed by an echosonographic assessment of VGE generation (graded on a scale of 0-5) and distribution. Twenty-three of thirty-four subjects allowed the transpulmonary passage of saline contrast bubbles in the laboratory at rest or after a mild/moderate exercise, and nine of them arterialized after a field dive. All subjects with postdive arterialization had bubble loads reaching or exceeding grade 4B in the right heart. In individuals without transpulmonary passage of saline contrast bubbles, injected either at rest or after an exercise bout, no postdive arterialization was detected. Therefore, postdive VGE arterialization occurs in subjects that meet two criteria: 1) transpulmonary shunting of contrast bubbles at rest or at mild/moderate exercise and 2) VGE generation after a dive reaches the threshold grade. These findings may represent a novel concept in approach to diving, where diving routines will be tailored individually.

  16. Lift-based paddling in diving grebe.

    PubMed

    Johansson, L C; Lindhe Norberg, U M

    2001-05-01

    To examine the hydrodynamic propulsion mechanism of a diving great crested grebe (Podiceps cristatus), the three-dimensional kinematics was determined by digital analysis of sequential video images of dorsal and lateral views. During the acceleration phase of this foot-propelled bird, the feet move through an arc in a plane nearly normal to the bird's line of motion through the water, i.e. the toes move dorsally and medially but not caudally relative to the water. The kinematics of the grebe's lobed feet is different from that in anseriforms, whose feet move in a plane mostly parallel to the bird's line of progress through the water. Our results suggest that the foot-propelled locomotor mechanism of grebes is based primarily on a lift-producing leg and foot stroke, in contrast to the drag-based locomotion assumed previously. We suggest that the lift-based paddling of grebes considerably increases both maximum swimming speed and energetic efficiency over drag-based propulsion. Furthermore, the results implicate a new interpretation of the functional morphology of these birds, with the toes serving as a self-stabilizing multi-slotted hydrofoil during the power phase.

  17. The Lester-Jones tube and scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Mani, Navin; de Carpentier, John

    2009-01-01

    Insertion of a Lester-Jones tube remains the standard treatment for epiphora secondary to canalicular obstruction. We report on a patient requiring removal of his correctly working Lester-Jones tube to allow him to continue his hobby of scuba diving. This particular complication of the Lester-Jones tube has never previously been reported in the literature. Patients with Lester-Jones tubes are unable to perform the valsalva manoeuvre. The valsalva manoeuvre involves blowing the nose against occluded nostrils resulting in a raised pressure in the nose and post-nasal space which is transmitted via the eustachian tubes to the middle ear. The ability to perform a successful valsalva manoeuvre is a prerequisite of scuba diving to equalise middle ear pressure. Inability to equalise middle ear pressure can lead to barotrauma, including pain, rupture of the tympanic membrane and labyrinthine fistula. We recommend that when planning the insertion of a Lester-Jones tube it is wise to enquire whether the patient undertakes scuba diving. If the patient prefers to scuba dive raher than have control of their epiphora, the surgery should be deferred until the patient gives up diving.

  18. Diving bradycardia is not correlated to the oculocardiac reflex.

    PubMed

    Folgering, H; Wijnheymer, P; Geeraedts, L

    1983-08-01

    Both facial immersion in cold water and pressure on the eyeball cause reflex bradycardia. These reflexes are called diving reflex and oculocardiac reflex, respectively. The latter is sometimes used in diving medicine to estimate the risk of severe diving bradycardia. The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of both reflexes on heart rate in 15 subjects. All subjects performed four tests: (1) breath-holding (2) breath-holding and facial immersion in water of 10 degrees, 15 degrees, and 20 degrees C; (3) facial immersion in water and snorkeling; (4) application of pressure of 30, 50, and 70 mmHg on the eyeball. In seven subjects an additional test was done: (5) eyeball pressures during breath-holding. It was shown that the intensity of the oculocardiac reflex is not a good indication of the bradycardia that can be expected during diving. It is proposed that breath-holding with facial immersion in water of 20 degrees C or colder during at least 10 s is a more appropriate test to assess the possibility of severe diving bradycardia and cardiac arrhythmias.

  19. Three-Hour Dives with Exercise While Breathing Oxygen Partial Pressure of 1.3 ATM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    intervals, were tested for accumulation of pulmonary oxygen toxicity. We measured pulmonary function (flow-volume loopsand diffusing capacity for carbon...accumulated over five days of three-hour dives when half of the dive time was spent exercising. We measured changes in pulmonary function and...dives, 7 we also measured visual refraction when we tested pulmonary function. METHODS GENERAL The dives were identical to those for the four-hour

  20. Dive and Explore: An Interactive Web Visualization that Simulates Making an ROV Dive to an Active Submarine Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, C.; Chadwick, W. W.

    2004-12-01

    Several years ago we created an exciting and engaging multimedia exhibit for the Hatfield Marine Science Center that lets visitors simulate making a dive to the seafloor with the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) named ROPOS. The exhibit immerses the user in an interactive experience that is naturally fun but also educational. The public display is located at the Hatfield Marine Science Visitor Center in Newport, Oregon. We are now completing a revision to the project that will make this engaging virtual exploration accessible to a much larger audience. With minor modifications we will be able to put the exhibit onto the world wide web so that any person with internet access can view and learn about exciting volcanic and hydrothermal activity at Axial Seamount on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The modifications address some cosmetic and logistic ISSUES confronted in the museum environment, but will mainly involve compressing video clips so they can be delivered more efficiently over the internet. The web version, like the museum version, will allow users to choose from 1 of 3 different dives sites in the caldera of Axial Volcano. The dives are based on real seafloor settings at Axial seamount, an active submarine volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (NE Pacific) that is also the location of a seafloor observatory called NeMO. Once a dive is chosen, then the user watches ROPOS being deployed and then arrives into a 3-D computer-generated seafloor environment that is based on the real world but is easier to visualize and navigate. Once on the bottom, the user is placed within a 360 degree panorama and can look in all directions by manipulating the computer mouse. By clicking on markers embedded in the scene, the user can then either move to other panorama locations via movies that travel through the 3-D virtual environment, or they can play video clips from actual ROPOS dives specifically related to that scene. Audio accompanying the video clips informs the user where they are

  1. Fatiguing upper body aerobic exercise impairs balance.

    PubMed

    Douris, Peter C; Handrakis, John P; Gendy, Joseph; Salama, Mina; Kwon, Dae; Brooks, Richard; Salama, Nardine; Southard, Veronica

    2011-12-01

    Douris, PC, Handrakis, JP, Gendy, J, Salama, M, Kwon, D, Brooks, R, Salama, N, and Southard, V. Fatiguing upper body aerobic exercise impairs balance. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3299-3305, 2011-There are many studies that have examined the effects of selectively fatiguing lower extremity muscle groups with various protocols, and they have all shown to impair balance. There is limited research regarding the effect of fatiguing upper extremity exercise on balance. Muscle fiber-type recruitment patterns may be responsible for the difference between balance impairments because of fatiguing aerobic and anaerobic exercise. The purpose of our study was to investigate the effect that aerobic vs. anaerobic fatigue, upper vs. lower body fatigue will have on balance, and if so, which combination will affect balance to a greater degree. Fourteen healthy subjects, 7 men and 7 women (mean age 23.5 ± 1.7 years) took part in this study. Their mean body mass index was 23.6 ± 3.2. The study used a repeated-measures design. The effect on balance was documented after the 4 fatiguing conditions: aerobic lower body (ALB), aerobic upper body (AUB), anaerobic lower body, anaerobic upper body (WUB). The aerobic conditions used an incremental protocol performed to fatigue, and the anaerobic used the Wingate protocol. Balance was measured as a single-leg stance stability score using the Biodex Balance System. A stability score for each subject was recorded immediately after each of the 4 conditions. A repeated-measures analysis of variance with the pretest score as a covariate was used to analyze the effects of the 4 fatiguing conditions on balance. There were significant differences between the 4 conditions (p = 0.001). Post hoc analysis revealed that there were significant differences between the AUB, mean score 4.98 ± 1.83, and the WUB, mean score 4.09 ± 1.42 (p = 0.014) and between AUB and ALB mean scores 4.33 ± 1.40 (p = 0.029). Normative data for single-leg stability testing for

  2. 33 CFR 150.825 - Reporting a diving-related casualty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting a diving-related casualty. 150.825 Section 150.825 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Reporting a diving-related casualty. Deaths and injuries related to diving within the safety zone of...

  3. 29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart Y of... - Guidelines for Scientific Diving

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guidelines for Scientific Diving B Appendix B to Subpart Y... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Pt. 1926, Subpt. Y, App. B Appendix B to Subpart Y of Part 1926—Guidelines for Scientific Diving Note:...

  4. Hidden Markov models reveal complexity in the diving behaviour of short-finned pilot whales

    PubMed Central

    Quick, Nicola J.; Isojunno, Saana; Sadykova, Dina; Bowers, Matthew; Nowacek, Douglas P.; Read, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Diving behaviour of short-finned pilot whales is often described by two states; deep foraging and shallow, non-foraging dives. However, this simple classification system ignores much of the variation that occurs during subsurface periods. We used multi-state hidden Markov models (HMM) to characterize states of diving behaviour and the transitions between states in short-finned pilot whales. We used three parameters (number of buzzes, maximum dive depth and duration) measured in 259 dives by digital acoustic recording tags (DTAGs) deployed on 20 individual whales off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, USA. The HMM identified a four-state model as the best descriptor of diving behaviour. The state-dependent distributions for the diving parameters showed variation between states, indicative of different diving behaviours. Transition probabilities were considerably higher for state persistence than state switching, indicating that dive types occurred in bouts. Our results indicate that subsurface behaviour in short-finned pilot whales is more complex than a simple dichotomy of deep and shallow diving states, and labelling all subsurface behaviour as deep dives or shallow dives discounts a significant amount of important variation. We discuss potential drivers of these patterns, including variation in foraging success, prey availability and selection, bathymetry, physiological constraints and socially mediated behaviour. PMID:28361954

  5. The Risk of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss During Simulated Dives in Canadian Forces Hyperbaric Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    The risk of noise-induced hearing loss during simulated dives in Canadian Forces hyperbaric facilities Sharon M...2012-084 October 2012 The risk of noise-induced hearing loss during simulated dives in Canadian Forces hyperbaric ...transferred into the dive chamber of a hyperbaric facility. The mechanism is audible and sufficiently high in level in adjacent areas to warrant the

  6. Foraging dives by post-breeding northern pintails

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Michael R.

    1983-01-01

    Dabbling ducks (Anatini), including Northern Pintails (Anas acuta), typically feed by “tipping-up” (Bellrose, Ducks, Geese, and Swans of North America, Stackpole Books, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, 1976) in shallow water. Pintails are not as adapted for diving as members of Aythyini or Oxyurini (Catlett and Johnston, Comp. Biochem. Physiol. 47A:925-931, 1974); however, incidents of foraging dives by small numbers of pintails have been reported (Chapman et al., Br. Birds 52:60, 1959; Bourget and Chapdelaine, Wildfowl 26:55-57, 1975). This paper reports on forage diving by a flock of several hundred pintails. Ecological explanations are suggested to account for the behavior and comparisons with tip-up feeding are presented.

  7. Early genetic responses in rat vascular tissue after simulated diving.

    PubMed

    Eftedal, Ingrid; Jørgensen, Arve; Røsbjørgen, Ragnhild; Flatberg, Arnar; Brubakk, Alf O

    2012-12-18

    Diving causes a transient reduction of vascular function, but the mechanisms behind this are largely unknown. The aim of this study was therefore to analyze genetic reactions that may be involved in acute changes of vascular function in divers. Rats were exposed to 709 kPa of hyperbaric air (149 kPa Po(2)) for 50 min followed by postdive monitoring of vascular bubble formation and full genome microarray analysis of the aorta from diving rats (n = 8) and unexposed controls (n = 9). Upregulation of 23 genes was observed 1 h after simulated diving. The differential gene expression was characteristic of cellular responses to oxidative stress, with functions of upregulated genes including activation and fine-tuning of stress-responsive transcription, cytokine/cytokine receptor signaling, molecular chaperoning, and coagulation. By qRT-PCR, we verified increased transcription of neuron-derived orphan receptor-1 (Nr4a3), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (Serpine1), cytokine TWEAK receptor FN14 (Tnfrsf12a), transcription factor class E basic helix-loop-helix protein 40 (Bhlhe40), and adrenomedullin (Adm). Hypoxia-inducible transcription factor HIF1 subunit HIF1-α was stabilized in the aorta 1 h after diving, and after 4 h there was a fivefold increase in total protein levels of the procoagulant plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI1) in blood plasma from diving rats. The study did not have sufficient power for individual assessment of effects of hyperoxia and decompression-induced bubbles on postdive gene expression. However, differential gene expression in rats without venous bubbles was similar to that of all the diving rats, indicating that elevated Po(2) instigated the observed genetic reactions.

  8. Methods of deep dives in whole ice cover conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagalevich, A. M.

    2016-05-01

    The essence of methodological and engineering questions solved during the preparation and implementation of historic dives of the manned submersibles Mir-1 and Mir-2, allowing humans to see the bottom of the North Pole at a depth of 4300 m, are described together with innovative developments in underwater navigation, as well as the Mir's propulsion, ballast, and other systems that ensured the safety of the dives. These innovative methods have opened up the Arctic's underice space for scientific research and practical exploration for minerals with the direct participation of scientists and specialists.

  9. Provisional Crown Dislodgement during Scuba Diving: A Case of Barotrauma

    PubMed Central

    Gulve, Meenal Nitin; Gulve, Nitin Dilip

    2013-01-01

    Changes in ambient pressure, for example, during flying, diving, or hyperbaric oxygen therapy, can lead to barotrauma. Although it may seem that this issue was neglected in dental education and research in recent decades, familiarity with and understanding of these facts may be of importance for dental practitioners. We report the case of a patient who experienced barotrauma involving dislodgement of a provisional crown during scuba diving. Patients who are exposed to pressure changes as a part of their jobs or hobbies and their dentists should know the causes of barotrauma. In addition, the clinician must be aware of the possible influence of pressure changes on the retention of dental components. PMID:23984113

  10. Dive Angle Sensitivity Analysis for Flight Test Safety and Efficiency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    These points develop into high- speed dives and require an accurate predictive model to prevent possible testing accidents. As a flight test is...Looking back at this concept and approach, Equation 2.1 and 2.4 are combined to obtain Equation 2.5.  dh V V dVT D dt W g dt...number of attempts at each test point as well as prevent possible accidents and crashes from data that is misrepresented. The analysis took a Dive

  11. Effect of repetitive SCUBA diving on humoral markers of endothelial and central nervous system integrity.

    PubMed

    Bilopavlovic, Nada; Marinovic, Jasna; Ljubkovic, Marko; Obad, Ante; Zanchi, Jaksa; Pollock, Neal W; Denoble, Petar; Dujic, Zeljko

    2013-07-01

    During SCUBA diving decompression, there is a significant gas bubble production in systemic veins, with rather frequent bubble crossover to arterial side even in asymptomatic divers. The aim of the current study was to investigate potential changes in humoral markers of endothelial and brain damage (endothelin-1, neuron-specific enolase and S-100β) after repetitive SCUBA diving with concomitant assessment of venous gas bubble production and subsequent arterialization. Sixteen male divers performed four open-water no-decompression dives to 18 msw (meters of sea water) lasting 49 min in consecutive days during which they performed moderate-level exercise. Before and after dives 1 and 4 blood was drawn, and bubble production and potential arterialization were echocardiographically evaluated. In addition, a control dive to 5 msw was performed with same duration, water temperature and exercise load. SCUBA diving to 18 msw caused significant bubble production with arterializations in six divers after dive 1 and in four divers after dive 4. Blood levels of endothelin-1 and neuron-specific enolase did not change after diving, but levels of S-100β were significantly elevated after both dives to 18 msw and a control dive. Creatine kinase activity following a control dive was also significantly increased. Although serum S-100β levels were increased after diving, concomitant increase of creatine kinase during control, almost bubble-free, dive suggests the extracranial release of S-100β, most likely from skeletal muscles. Therefore, despite the significant bubble production and sporadic arterialization after open-water dives to 18 msw, the current study found no signs of damage to neurons or the blood-brain barrier.

  12. Seabird diving behaviour reveals the functional significance of shelf-sea fronts as foraging hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Miller, P. I.; Embling, C. B.; Bicknell, A. W. J.; Hosegood, P. J.; Morgan, G.; Ingram, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    Oceanic fronts are key habitats for a diverse range of marine predators, yet how they influence fine-scale foraging behaviour is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the dive behaviour of northern gannets Morus bassanus in relation to shelf-sea fronts. We GPS (global positioning system) tracked 53 breeding birds and examined the relationship between 1901 foraging dives (from time-depth recorders) and thermal fronts (identified via Earth Observation composite front mapping) in the Celtic Sea, Northeast Atlantic. We (i) used a habitat-use availability analysis to determine whether gannets preferentially dived at fronts, and (ii) compared dive characteristics in relation to fronts to investigate the functional significance of these oceanographic features. We found that relationships between gannet dive probabilities and fronts varied by frontal metric and sex. While both sexes were more likely to dive in the presence of seasonally persistent fronts, links to more ephemeral features were less clear. Here, males were positively correlated with distance to front and cross-front gradient strength, with the reverse for females. Both sexes performed two dive strategies: shallow V-shaped plunge dives with little or no active swim phase (92% of dives) and deeper U-shaped dives with an active pursuit phase of at least 3 s (8% of dives). When foraging around fronts, gannets were half as likely to engage in U-shaped dives compared with V-shaped dives, independent of sex. Moreover, V-shaped dive durations were significantly shortened around fronts. These behavioural responses support the assertion that fronts are important foraging habitats for marine predators, and suggest a possible mechanistic link between the two in terms of dive behaviour. This research also emphasizes the importance of cross-disciplinary research when attempting to understand marine ecosystems. PMID:27703698

  13. The cardiovascular and endocrine responses to voluntary and forced diving in trained and untrained rats

    PubMed Central

    DiNovo, Karyn. M.; Connolly, Tiffanny M.

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian diving response, consisting of apnea, bradycardia, and increased total peripheral resistance, can be modified by conscious awareness, fear, and anticipation. We wondered whether swim and dive training in rats would 1) affect the magnitude of the cardiovascular responses during voluntary and forced diving, and 2) whether this training would reduce or eliminate any stress due to diving. Results indicate Sprague-Dawley rats have a substantial diving response. Immediately upon submersion, heart rate (HR) decreased by 78%, from 453 ± 12 to 101 ± 8 beats per minute (bpm), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) decreased 25%, from 143 ± 1 to 107 ± 5 mmHg. Approximately 4.5 s after submergence, MAP had increased to a maximum 174 ± 3 mmHg. Blood corticosterone levels indicate trained rats find diving no more stressful than being held by a human, while untrained rats find swimming and diving very stressful. Forced diving is stressful to both trained and untrained rats. The magnitude of bradycardia was similar during both voluntary and forced diving, while the increase in MAP was greater during forced diving. The diving response of laboratory rats, therefore, appears to be dissimilar from that of other animals, as most birds and mammals show intensification of diving bradycardia during forced diving compared with voluntary diving. Rats may exhibit an accentuated antagonism between the parasympathetic and sympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system, such that in the autonomic control of HR, parasympathetic activity overpowers sympathetic activity. Additionally, laboratory rats may lack the ability to modify the degree of parasympathetic outflow to the heart during an intense cardiorespiratory response (i.e., the diving response). PMID:19923359

  14. Seabird diving behaviour reveals the functional significance of shelf-sea fronts as foraging hotspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, S. L.; Miller, P. I.; Embling, C. B.; Scales, K. L.; Bicknell, A. W. J.; Hosegood, P. J.; Morgan, G.; Ingram, S. N.; Votier, S. C.

    2016-09-01

    Oceanic fronts are key habitats for a diverse range of marine predators, yet how they influence fine-scale foraging behaviour is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the dive behaviour of northern gannets Morus bassanus in relation to shelf-sea fronts. We GPS (global positioning system) tracked 53 breeding birds and examined the relationship between 1901 foraging dives (from time-depth recorders) and thermal fronts (identified via Earth Observation composite front mapping) in the Celtic Sea, Northeast Atlantic. We (i) used a habitat-use availability analysis to determine whether gannets preferentially dived at fronts, and (ii) compared dive characteristics in relation to fronts to investigate the functional significance of these oceanographic features. We found that relationships between gannet dive probabilities and fronts varied by frontal metric and sex. While both sexes were more likely to dive in the presence of seasonally persistent fronts, links to more ephemeral features were less clear. Here, males were positively correlated with distance to front and cross-front gradient strength, with the reverse for females. Both sexes performed two dive strategies: shallow V-shaped plunge dives with little or no active swim phase (92% of dives) and deeper U-shaped dives with an active pursuit phase of at least 3 s (8% of dives). When foraging around fronts, gannets were half as likely to engage in U-shaped dives compared with V-shaped dives, independent of sex. Moreover, V-shaped dive durations were significantly shortened around fronts. These behavioural responses support the assertion that fronts are important foraging habitats for marine predators, and suggest a possible mechanistic link between the two in terms of dive behaviour. This research also emphasizes the importance of cross-disciplinary research when attempting to understand marine ecosystems.

  15. A red orange extract modulates the vascular response to a recreational dive: a pilot study on the effect of anthocyanins on the physiological consequences of scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Balestra, C; Cimino, F; Theunissen, S; Snoeck, T; Provyn, S; Canali, R; Bonina, A; Virgili, F

    2016-09-01

    Nutritional antioxidants have been proposed as an expedient strategy to counter the potentially deleterious effects of scuba diving on endothelial function, flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and heart function. Sixteen volunteers performing a single standard dive (20 min at 33 m) according to US Navy diving procedures were randomly assigned to two groups: one was administered with two doses of 200 mg of an anthocyanins (AC)-rich extract from red oranges, 12 and 4 h before diving. Anthocyanins supplementation significantly modulated the effects of diving on haematocrit, body water distribution and FMD. AC administration significantly reduces the potentially harmful endothelial effects of a recreational single dive. The lack of any significant effect on the most common markers of plasma antioxidant capacity suggests that the mechanism underlying this protective activity is independent of the putative antioxidant effect of AC and possibly involves cellular signalling modulation of the response to high oxygen.

  16. The assessment and management of inner ear barotrauma in divers and recommendations for returning to diving.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Elizabeth J; Smart, David R

    2014-12-01

    Inner ear barotrauma (IEBt) constitutes a spectrum of pressure-related pathology in the inner ear, with antecedent middle ear barotrauma (MEBt) common. IEBt includes perilymph fistula, intralabyrinthine membrane tear, inner ear haemorrhage and other rarer pathologies. Following a literature search, the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of IEBt in divers and best-practice recommendations for returning to diving were reviewed. Sixty-nine papers/texts were identified and 54 accessed. Twenty-five case series (majority surgical) provided guidance on diagnostic pathways; nine solely reported divers. IEBt in divers may be difficult to distinguish from inner ear decompression sickness (IEDCS), and requires dive-risk stratification and careful interrogation regarding diving-related ear events, clinical assessment, pure tone audiometry, a fistula test and electronystagmography (ENG). Once diagnosed, conservative management is the recommended first line therapy for IEBt. Recompression does not appear to cause harm if the diagnosis (IEBt vs IEDCS) is doubtful (limited case data). Exploratory surgery is indicated for severe or persisting vestibular symptoms or hearing loss, deterioration of symptoms, or lack of improvement over 10 days indicating significant pathology. Steroids are used, but without high-level evidence. It may be possible for divers to return to subaquatic activity after stakeholder risk acceptance and informed consent, provided: (1) sensorineural hearing loss is stable and not severe; (2) there is no vestibular involvement (via ENG); (3) high-resolution computed tomography has excluded anatomical predilection to IEBt and (4) education on equalising techniques is provided. There is a need for a prospective data registry and controlled trials to better evaluate diagnostic and treatment algorithms.

  17. Perceptions amongst Tasmanian recreational scuba divers of the value of a diving medical.

    PubMed

    Baines, Carol

    2013-12-01

    An online survey was offered to recreational divers in Tasmania to ascertain if they have an understanding of how pressure affects their health and if they considered an annual dive medical necessary. A total of 98 recreational divers completed the survey, five of these had never had a dive medical while 74 felt that if they passed their dive medical they do not have any potential illness. Sixty five saw the dive medical as a comprehensive health check. This project provided an insight to Tasmanian recreational divers' understanding of and attitude towards the value of a dive medical.

  18. DECOMPRESSION FROM He-N2-O2 (TRIMIX) BOUNCE DIVES IS NOT MORE EFFICIENT THAN FROM He-O2 (HELIOX) BOUNCE DIVES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-28

    Experimental Diving Unit who made these experiments possible. 1 INTRODUCTION Nitrogen and oxygena (nitrox) breathing mixtures are impractical for deep...diving because gas mixtures with a high partial pressure of nitrogen are narcotic and dense, which results in mental impairment and increased work of...helium is not narcotic and is less dense than nitrogen . However, a longer decompression obligation is thought to accrue during a heliox bounce dive

  19. Diving bradycardia of elderly Korean women divers, haenyeo, in cold seawater: a field report

    PubMed Central

    LEE, Joo-Young; LEE, Hyo-Hyun; KIM, Siyeon; JANG, Young-Joon; BAEK, Yoon-Jeong; KANG, Kwon-Yong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present field study was to explore diving patterns and heart rate of elderly Korean women divers (haenyeo) while breath-hold diving in cold seawater. We hypothesized that the decreasing rate in heart rate of elderly haenyeos during breath-hold diving was greater and total diving time was shorter than those of young haenyeos from previous studies. Nine haenyeos participated in a field study [68 ± 10 yr in age, ranged from 56 to 83 yr] at a seawater temperature of 10 to 13 °C. Average total diving time including surface swimming time between dives was 253 ± 73 min (155–341 min). Total frequency of dives was 97 ± 28 times and they dived 23 ± 8 times per hour. All haenyeos showed diving bradycardia with a decreased rate of 20 ± 8% at the bottom time (101 ± 20 bpm) when compared to surface swimming time (125 ± 16 bpm) in the sea. Older haenyeos among the nine elderly haenyeos had shorter diving time, less diving frequencies, and lower heart rate at work (p<0.05). These reductions imply that haenyeos voluntarily adjust their workload along with advancing age and diminished cardiovascular functions. PMID:26632118

  20. Diving bradycardia of elderly Korean women divers, haenyeo, in cold seawater: a field report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo-Young; Lee, Hyo-Hyun; Kim, Siyeon; Jang, Young-Joon; Baek, Yoon-Jeong; Kang, Kwon-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present field study was to explore diving patterns and heart rate of elderly Korean women divers (haenyeo) while breath-hold diving in cold seawater. We hypothesized that the decreasing rate in heart rate of elderly haenyeos during breath-hold diving was greater and total diving time was shorter than those of young haenyeos from previous studies. Nine haenyeos participated in a field study [68 ± 10 yr in age, ranged from 56 to 83 yr] at a seawater temperature of 10 to 13 °C. Average total diving time including surface swimming time between dives was 253 ± 73 min (155-341 min). Total frequency of dives was 97 ± 28 times and they dived 23 ± 8 times per hour. All haenyeos showed diving bradycardia with a decreased rate of 20 ± 8% at the bottom time (101 ± 20 bpm) when compared to surface swimming time (125 ± 16 bpm) in the sea. Older haenyeos among the nine elderly haenyeos had shorter diving time, less diving frequencies, and lower heart rate at work (p<0.05). These reductions imply that haenyeos voluntarily adjust their workload along with advancing age and diminished cardiovascular functions.

  1. Aerobic and anaerobic cellulase production by Cellulomonas uda.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Henrik Vestergaard; Willink, Fillip Wolfgang; Ingvorsen, Kjeld

    2016-10-01

    Cellulomonas uda (DSM 20108/ATCC 21399) is one of the few described cellulolytic facultative anaerobes. Based on these characteristics, we initiated a physiological study of C. uda with the aim to exploit it for cellulase production in simple bioreactors with no or sporadic aeration. Growth, cellulase activity and fermentation product formation were evaluated in different media under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and in experiments where C. uda was exposed to alternating aerobic/anaerobic growth conditions. Here we show that C. uda behaves as a true facultative anaerobe when cultivated on soluble substrates such as glucose and cellobiose, but for reasons unknown cellulase activity is only induced under aerobic conditions on insoluble cellulosic substrates and not under anaerobic conditions. These findings enhance knowledge on the limited number of described facultative cellulolytic anaerobes, and in addition it greatly limits the utility of C. uda as an 'easy to handle' cellulase producer with low aeration demands.

  2. Diving behaviour of whale sharks in relation to a predictable food pulse.

    PubMed

    Graham, Rachel T; Roberts, Callum M; Smart, James C R

    2006-02-22

    We present diving data for four whale sharks in relation to a predictable food pulse (reef fish spawn) and an analysis of the longest continuous fine-resolution diving record for a planktivorous shark. Fine-resolution pressure data from a recovered pop-up archival satellite tag deployed for 206 days on a whale shark were analysed using the fast Fourier Transform method for frequency domain analysis of time-series. The results demonstrated that a free-ranging whale shark displays ultradian, diel and circa-lunar rhythmicity of diving behaviour. Whale sharks dive to over 979.5 m and can tolerate a temperature range of 26.4 degrees C. The whale sharks made primarily diurnal deep dives and remained in relatively shallow waters at night. Whale shark diving patterns are influenced by a seasonally predictable food source, with shallower dives made during fish spawning periods.

  3. Aerobic exercise increases peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity in sedentary adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data are limited on the effects of controlled aerobic exercise programs (without weight loss) on insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in children and adolescents. To determine whether a controlled aerobic exercise program (without weight loss) improves peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivi...

  4. Beginning Skin and Scuba Diving, Physical Education: 5551.69.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Millie

    This course outline is a guide for teaching the principles and basic fundamentals of beginning skin and scuba diving in grades 7-12. The course format includes lectures, skills practice, films, and tests that focus on mastery of skills and understanding correct usage of skin and scuba equipment. Course content includes the following: (a) history,…

  5. Descriptive Analysis of the Rip Entry in Competitive Diving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Janet G.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Different types of diving entries were filmed both above water and underwater to help identify factors which enable divers to enter the water without apparent splash. Anthropometric measures of subjects were taken to determine body streamlining. Results are presented. (Author/DF)

  6. Longitudinal Health Risks Among Graduates and Disenrollees from Diving School.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    ntpa- tient medical care (Berghage, 1976; Pullen et al., 1979). For at least one diving condition, dysbaric osteonecrosis , the disorder typically has a...Davidson, 1981). The difficulty in determining the prevalence ot dysbaric osteonecrosis is underscored by Hunter, Biersner, Sphar, and Harvey (1978) who... osteonecrosis , vertigo, dyspnea, immersion diuresis, hyperbaric .,rthralyga, hvpercaplia, oxygen toxicity, nitrogen narcosis, venomous bite or sting

  7. 29 CFR 1910.422 - Procedures during dive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... applicable to each diving operation unless otherwise specified. (b) Water entry and exit. (1) A means capable of supporting the diver shall be provided for entering and exiting the water. (2) The means provided for exiting the water shall extend below the water surface. (3) A means shall be provided to assist...

  8. A Measurement of "g" Using Alexander's Diving Bell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quiroga, M.; Martinez, S.; Otranto, S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a very simple exercise using an inverted test tube pushed straight down into a column of water to determine the free-fall acceleration "g". The exercise employs the ideal gas law and only involves the measurement of the displacement of the bottom of the "diving bell" and the water level inside the tube with respect to the…

  9. OVERVIEW OF DIVE TRAINER SIMULATOR AT SECOND FLOOR LEVEL SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF DIVE TRAINER SIMULATOR AT SECOND FLOOR LEVEL SHOWING CONTROL CENTER CAB. VIEW FACING WEST/NORTHWEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. OVERVIEW OF DIVE TRAINER SIMULATOR FROM FIRST FLOOR LEVEL SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF DIVE TRAINER SIMULATOR FROM FIRST FLOOR LEVEL SHOWING HYDRAULIC EQUIPMENT, SUPPORTS AND FOUNDATION BLOCKS. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. Pulmonary mechanical function and diffusion capacity after deep saturation dives.

    PubMed Central

    Thorsen, E; Segadal, K; Myrseth, E; Påsche, A; Gulsvik, A

    1990-01-01

    To assess the effects of deep saturation dives on pulmonary function, static and dynamic lung volumes, transfer factor for carbon monoxide (T1CO), delta-N2, and closing volume (CV) were measured before and after eight saturation dives to pressures of 3.1-4.6 MPa. The atmospheres were helium-oxygen mixtures with partial pressures of oxygen of 40-60 kPa. The durations of the dives were 14-30 days. Mean rate of decompression was 10.5-13.5 kPa/hour. A total of 43 divers were examined, six of whom took part in two dives, the others in one only. Dynamic lung volumes did not change significantly but total lung capacity (TLC) increased significantly by 4.3% and residual volume (RV) by 14.8% (p less than 0.05). CV was increased by 16.7% (p less than 0.01). The T1CO was reduced from 13.0 +/- 1.6 to 11.8 +/- 1.7 mmol/min/kPa (p less than 0.01) when corrected to a haemoglobin concentration of 146 g/l. Effective alveolar volume was unchanged. The increase in TLC and decrease in T1CO were correlated (r = -0.574, p less than 0.02). A control examination of 38 of the divers four to six weeks after the dives showed a partial normalisation of the changes. The increase in TLC, RV, and CV, and the decrease in T1CO, could be explained by a loss of pulmonary elastic tissue caused by inflammatory reactions induced by oxygen toxicity or venous gas emboli. PMID:2337532

  12. Diving-flight aerodynamics of a peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus).

    PubMed

    Ponitz, Benjamin; Schmitz, Anke; Fischer, Dominik; Bleckmann, Horst; Brücker, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the aerodynamics of the falcon Falco peregrinus while diving. During a dive peregrines can reach velocities of more than 320 km h⁻¹. Unfortunately, in freely roaming falcons, these high velocities prohibit a precise determination of flight parameters such as velocity and acceleration as well as body shape and wing contour. Therefore, individual F. peregrinus were trained to dive in front of a vertical dam with a height of 60 m. The presence of a well-defined background allowed us to reconstruct the flight path and the body shape of the falcon during certain flight phases. Flight trajectories were obtained with a stereo high-speed camera system. In addition, body images of the falcon were taken from two perspectives with a high-resolution digital camera. The dam allowed us to match the high-resolution images obtained from the digital camera with the corresponding images taken with the high-speed cameras. Using these data we built a life-size model of F. peregrinus and used it to measure the drag and lift forces in a wind-tunnel. We compared these forces acting on the model with the data obtained from the 3-D flight path trajectory of the diving F. peregrinus. Visualizations of the flow in the wind-tunnel uncovered details of the flow structure around the falcon's body, which suggests local regions with separation of flow. High-resolution pictures of the diving peregrine indicate that feathers pop-up in the equivalent regions, where flow separation in the model falcon occurred.

  13. EPO modulation in a 14-days undersea scuba dive.

    PubMed

    Revelli, L; Vagnoni, S; D'Amore, A; Di Stasio, E; Lombardi, C P; Storti, G; Proietti, R; Balestra, C; Ricerca, B M

    2013-10-01

    Erythropoiesis is affected during deep saturation dives. The mechanism should be related to a downregulation of serum Erythropoietin (s-EPO) concentration or to a toxic effect of the hyperbaric hyperoxia. We evaluated s-EPO and other haematological parameters in 6 scuba divers before, during and after a 14-days guinness saturation dive (8-10 m). Athletes were breathing air at 1.8-2 ATA, under the control of a team of physicians. Serum parameters were measured before diving (T0) and: 7 days (T1), 14 days (T2) after the beginning of the dive and 2 h (T3) and 24 h (T4) after resurfacing. Hgb, and many other haematological parameters did not change whereas Ht, s-EPO, the ratio between s-EPO predicted and that observed and reticulocytes (absolute, percent) declined progressively from T0 to T3. At T4 a significant rise in s-EPO was observed. Hgb did not vary but erythropoiesis seemed to be affected as s-EPO and reticulocyte counts showed. All these changes were statistically significant. The experiment, conducted in realistic conditions of dive length, oxygen concentration and pressure, allows us to formulate some hypotheses about the role of prolonged hyperbarism on erythropoiesis. The s-EPO rise, 24 h after resurfacing, is clearly documented and related to the "Normobaric Oxygen Paradox". This evidence suggests interesting hypotheses for new clinical applications such as modulation of s-EPO production and Hgb content triggered by appropriate O₂ administration in pre-surgical patients or in some anemic disease.

  14. Partial retraction of Lawrence CHD, Chen IYD. The effect of scuba diving on airflow obstruction in divers with asthma. Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine. 2016 March;46(1):11-14.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Christopher Hd; Chen, Isobel Yd

    2016-12-01

    Consistent with the Committee on Publication Ethics guidelines, we the above authors are initiating a partial retraction of our paper: Lawrence CHD, Chen IYD. The effect of scuba diving on airflow obstruction in divers with asthma. Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine. 2016 March;46(1):11-14. We wish to make the following statement: "Following independent statistical review of our paper we would like to withdraw the following: all subgroup statistical analysis including Table 1 and the statement "∗ P 〈 0.05, non-asthmatic controls vs Group A3 asthmatics" in the legend of Figure 2; the discussion statement: "We hope that these data will provide practitioners assessing and risk stratifying people with asthma prior to diving with a modest evidence basis on which to advise them of their relative risk of airflow obstruction compared to the normal population." The reason for this is that, following publication, it was identified that the scientific method for comparing between groups was inappropriate for the study design. We are extremely disappointed that our statistical method for calculating significance when comparing groups was inadequate but equally grateful to the journal editors and readers for their input in rectifying this and maintaining scientific integrity. We would like to make absolutely clear that at no point did we seek to mislead or misguide the journal or any other group. We have learnt a valuable lesson in study design and the limitations of statistics. The observational data as published looking at airflow obstruction in divers with asthma in real-world conditions remain valid and in the context of diving and asthma still have value in addition to what is already in the scientific domain. We hope that this can serve as a foundation for future studies in this field".

  15. Biotransformation of phytosterols under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Dykstra, Christy M; Giles, Hamilton D; Banerjee, Sujit; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2014-07-01

    Phytosterols are plant-derived sterols present in pulp and paper wastewater and have been implicated in the endocrine disruption of aquatic species. Bioassays were performed to assess the effect of an additional carbon source and/or solubilizing agent on the aerobic biotransformation of a mixture of three common phytosterols (β-sitosterol, stigmasterol and campesterol). The aerobic biotransformation of the phytosterol mixture by a mixed culture developed from a pulp and paper wastewater treatment system was examined under three separate conditions: with phytosterols as the sole added carbon source, with phytosterols and dextrin as an additional carbon source, and with phytosterols added with ethanol as an additional carbon source and solubilizing agent. Significant phytosterol removal was not observed in assays set up with phytosterol powder, either with or without an additional carbon source. In contrast, all three phytosterols were aerobically degraded when added as a dissolved solution in ethanol. Thus, under the experimental conditions of this study, the bioavailability of phytosterols was limited without the presence of a solubilizing agent. The total phytosterol removal rate was linear for the first six days before re-spiking, with a rate of 0.47 mg/L-d (R(2) = 0.998). After the second spiking, the total phytosterol removal rate was linear for seven days, with a rate of 0.32 mg/L-d (R(2) = 0.968). Following the 7th day, the phytosterol removal rate markedly accelerated, suggesting two different mechanisms are involved in phytosterol biotransformation, more likely related to the production of enzyme(s) involved in phytosterol degradation, induced under different cell growth conditions. β-sitosterol was preferentially degraded, as compared to stigmasterol and campesterol, although all three phytosterols fell below detection limits by the 24th day of incubation.

  16. Swimming: An Introduction to Swimming, Diving, and SCUBA Diving for Blind and Physically Handicapped Individuals. Leisure Pursuit Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cylke, Frank Kurt, Ed.

    The annotated guide lists information sources available from the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped in print, disc, cassette, and braille formats concerning swimming and diving with special reference to blind swimmers. The guide begins with a brief sketch of a champion swimmer who is also legally blind and an…

  17. General review of maximal aerobic velocity measurement at laboratory. Proposition of a new simplified protocol for maximal aerobic velocity assessment.

    PubMed

    Berthon, P; Fellmann, N

    2002-09-01

    The maximal aerobic velocity concept developed since eighties is considered as either the minimal velocity which elicits the maximal aerobic consumption or as the "velocity associated to maximal oxygen consumption". Different methods for measuring maximal aerobic velocity on treadmill in laboratory conditions have been elaborated, but all these specific protocols measure V(amax) either during a maximal oxygen consumption test or with an association of such a test. An inaccurate method presents a certain number of problems in the subsequent use of the results, for example in the elaboration of training programs, in the study of repeatability or in the determination of individual limit time. This study analyzes 14 different methods to understand their interests and limits in view to propose a general methodology for measuring V(amax). In brief, the test should be progressive and maximal without any rest period and of 17 to 20 min total duration. It should begin with a five min warm-up at 60-70% of the maximal aerobic power of the subjects. The beginning of the trial should be fixed so that four or five steps have to be run. The duration of the steps should be three min with a 1% slope and an increasing speed of 1.5 km x h(-1) until complete exhaustion. The last steps could be reduced at two min for a 1 km x h(-1) increment. The maximal aerobic velocity is adjusted in relation to duration of the last step.

  18. Osteological histology of the Pan-Alcidae (Aves, Charadriiformes): correlates of wing-propelled diving and flightlessness.

    PubMed

    Smith, N Adam; Clarke, Julia A

    2014-02-01

    Although studies of osteological morphology, gross myology, myological histology, neuroanatomy, and wing-scaling have all documented anatomical modifications associated with wing-propelled diving, the osteohistological study of this highly derived method of locomotion has been limited to penguins. Herein we present the first osteohistological study of the derived forelimbs and hind limbs of wing-propelled diving Pan-Alcidae (Aves, Charadriiformes). In addition to detailing differences between wing-propelled diving charadriiforms and nondiving charadriiforms, microstructural modifications to the humeri, ulnae and femora of extinct flightless pan-alcids are contrasted with those of volant alcids. Histological thin-sections of four species of pan-alcids (Alca torda, †Alca grandis, †Pinguinus impennis, †Mancalla cedrosensis) and one outgroup charadriiform (Stercorarius longicaudus) were compared. The forelimb bones of wing-propelled diving charadriiforms were found to have significantly thicker (∼22%) cortical bone walls. Additionally, as in penguins, the forelimbs of flightless pan-alcids are found to be osteosclerotic. However, unlike the pattern documented in penguins that display thickened cortices in both forelimbs and hind limbs, the forelimb and hind limb elements of pan-alcids display contrasting microstructural morphologies with thickened forelimb cortices and relatively thinner femoral cortices. Additionally, the identification of medullary bone in the sampled †Pinguinus impennis specimen suggests that further osteohistological investigation could provide an answer to longstanding questions regarding sexual dimorphism of Great Auks. Finally, these results suggest that it is possible to discern volant from flightless wing-propelled divers from fragmentary fossil remains.

  19. Aerobic Capacities of Early College High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loflin, Jerry W.

    2014-01-01

    The Early College High School Initiative (ECHSI) was introduced in 2002. Since 2002, limited data, especially student physical activity data, have been published pertaining to the ECHSI. The purpose of this study was to examine the aerobic capacities of early college students and compare them to state and national averages. Early college students…

  20. Habitat-mediated dive behavior in free-ranging grey seals.

    PubMed

    Jessopp, Mark; Cronin, Michelle; Hart, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the links between foraging behaviour and habitat use of key species is essential to addressing fundamental questions about trophic interactions and ecosystem functioning. Eight female grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) were equipped with time-depth recorders linked to Fastloc GPS tags following the annual moult in southwest Ireland. Individual dives were coupled with environmental correlates to investigate the habitat use and dive behaviour of free-ranging seals. Dives were characterised as either pelagic, benthic, or shallow (where errors in location and charted water depth made differentiating between pelagic and benthic dives unreliable). Sixty-nine percent of dives occurring in water >50 m were benthic. Pelagic dives were more common at night than during the day. Seals performed more pelagic dives over fine sediments (mud/sand), and more benthic dives when foraging over more three-dimensionally complex rock substrates. We used Markov chain analysis to determine the probability of transiting between dive states. A low probability of repeat pelagic dives suggests that pelagic prey were encountered en route to the seabed. This approach could be applied to make more accurate predictions of habitat use in data-poor areas, and investigate contentious issues such as resource overlap and competition between top predators and fisheries, essential for the effective conservation of these key marine species.

  1. Competitive apnea diving sessions induces an adaptative antioxidant response in mononucleated blood cells.

    PubMed

    Sureda, A; Batle, J M; Tur, J A; Pons, A

    2015-09-01

    The aim was evaluating the effects of hypoxia/reoxygenation repetitive episodes during 5 days of apnea diving (3-day training/2-day competition) on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) antioxidant defenses, oxidative damage, and plasma xanthine oxidase activity. Blood samples, from seven professional apnea divers, were taken under basal conditions the previous morning to the first training session (pre-diving basal), 4 h after ending the competition (4 h post-diving) and the following morning (15 h after last dive) in basal conditions (post-diving basal). Glucose levels significantly decreased whereas triglycerides increased at 4 h post-diving, both returning to basal values at post-diving basal. Glutathione reductase and catalase activity significantly increased after 4 h post-diving remaining elevated at post-diving basal. Glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities and catalase protein levels progressively increased after diving with significant differences respect to initial values at post-diving basal. No significant differences were observed in circulating PBMCs and oxidative damage markers. Plasma xanthine oxidase activity and nitrite levels, but not the inducible nitric oxide synthetase, significantly increased 4 h post-diving, returning to the basal values after 15 h. In conclusion, chronic and repetitive episodes of diving apnea during five consecutive days increased plasma xanthine oxidase activity and nitric oxide production which could enhance the signalling role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species for PBMCs antioxidant adaptation against hypoxia/reoxygenation.

  2. Argon used as dry suit insulation gas for cold-water diving

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cold-water diving requires good thermal insulation because hypothermia is a serious risk. Water conducts heat more efficiently compared to air. To stay warm during a dive, the choice of thermal protection should be based on physical activity, the temperature of the water, and the duration of exposure. A dry suit, a diving suit filled with gas, is the most common diving suit in cold water. Air is the traditional dry suit inflation gas, whereas the thermal conductivity of argon is approximately 32% lower compared to that of air. This study evaluates the benefits of argon, compared to air, as a thermal insulation gas for a dry suit during a 1-h cold-water dive by divers of the Royal Netherlands Navy. Methods Seven male Special Forces divers made (in total) 19 dives in a diving basin with water at 13°C at a depth of 3 m for 1 h in upright position. A rubber dry suit and woollen undergarment were used with either argon (n = 13) or air (n = 6) (blinded to the divers) as suit inflation gas. Core temperature was measured with a radio pill during the dive. Before, halfway, and after the dive, subjective thermal comfort was recorded using a thermal comfort score. Results No diver had to abort the test due to cold. No differences in core temperature and thermal comfort score were found between the two groups. Core temperature remained unchanged during the dives. Thermal comfort score showed a significant decrease in both groups after a 60-min dive compared to baseline. Conclusions In these tests the combination of the dry suit and undergarment was sufficient to maintain core temperature and thermal comfort for a dive of 1 h in water at 13°C. The use of argon as a suit inflation gas had no added value for thermal insulation compared to air for these dives. PMID:24438580

  3. Investigating annual diving behaviour by hooded seals (Cystophora cristata) within the Northwest Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Julie M; Skern-Mauritzen, Mette; Boehme, Lars; Wiersma, Yolanda F; Rosing-Asvid, Aqqalu; Hammill, Mike O; Stenson, Garry B

    2013-01-01

    With the exception of relatively brief periods when they reproduce and moult, hooded seals, Cystophora cristata, spend most of the year in the open ocean where they undergo feeding migrations to either recover or prepare for the next fasting period. Valuable insights into habitat use and diving behaviour during these periods have been obtained by attaching Satellite Relay Data Loggers (SRDLs) to 51 Northwest (NW) Atlantic hooded seals (33 females and 18 males) during ice-bound fasting periods (2004-2008). Using General Additive Models (GAMs) we describe habitat use in terms of First Passage Time (FPT) and analyse how bathymetry, seasonality and FPT influence the hooded seals' diving behaviour described by maximum dive depth, dive duration and surface duration. Adult NW Atlantic hooded seals exhibit a change in diving activity in areas where they spend >20 h by increasing maximum dive depth, dive duration and surface duration, indicating a restricted search behaviour. We found that male and female hooded seals are spatially segregated and that diving behaviour varies between sexes in relation to habitat properties and seasonality. Migration periods are described by increased dive duration for both sexes with a peak in May, October and January. Males demonstrated an increase in dive depth and dive duration towards May (post-breeding/pre-moult) and August-October (post-moult/pre-breeding) but did not show any pronounced increase in surface duration. Females dived deepest and had the highest surface duration between December and January (post-moult/pre-breeding). Our results suggest that the smaller females may have a greater need to recover from dives than that of the larger males. Horizontal segregation could have evolved as a result of a resource partitioning strategy to avoid sexual competition or that the energy requirements of males and females are different due to different energy expenditure during fasting periods.

  4. Die aerobe Glykolyse der Tumorzelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Friedhelm

    1981-01-01

    A high aerobic glycolysis (aerobic lactate production) is the most significant feature of the energy metabolism of rapidly growing tumor cells. Several mechanisms, which may be different in different cell lines, seem to be involved in this characteristic of energy metabolism of the tumor cell. Changes in the cell membrane leading to increased uptake and utilization of glucose, a high level of fetal types of isoenzymes, a decreased number of mitochondria and a reduced capacity to metabolize pyruvate are some factors which must be taken into consideration. It is not possible to favour one of them at the present time.

  5. Cardiovascular responses during free-diving in the sea.

    PubMed

    Marongiu, E; Crisafulli, A; Ghiani, G; Olla, S; Roberto, S; Pinna, M; Pusceddu, M; Palazzolo, G; Sanna, I; Concu, A; Tocco, F

    2015-04-01

    Cardiac output has never been assessed during free-diving diving in the sea. Knowledge of human diving response in this setting is therefore scarce. 3 immersions were performed by 7 divers: at depths of 10 m, 20 m and 30 m. Each test consisted of 3 apnea phases: descent, static and ascent. An impedance cardiograph provided data on stroke volume, heart rate and cardiac output. Mean blood pressure, arterial O2 saturation and blood lactate values were also collected. Starting from a resting value of 4.5±1.6 L∙min(-1), cardiac output at 10 m showed an increase up to 7.1±2.2 L∙min(-1) (p<0.01) during the descent, while conditions during the static and ascent phases remained unchanged. At 20 m cardiac output values were 7.3±2.4 L∙min(-1) and 6.7(±1).2 L∙min(-1) during ascent and descent, respectively (p<0.01), and 4.3±0.9 L∙min(-1) during static phase. At 30 m cardiac output values were 6.5±1.8 L∙min(-1) and 7.5±2 L∙min(-1) during descent and ascent, respectively (p<0.01), and 4.7±2.1 L∙min(-1) during static phase. Arterial O2 saturation decreased with increasing dive depth, reaching 91.1±3.4% (p<0.001 vs. rest) upon emergence from a depth of 30 m. Blood lactate values increased to 4.1±1.2 mmol∙L(-1) at the end of the 30 m dive (p<0.001 vs. rest). Results seem to suggest that simultaneous activation of exercise and diving response could lead to an absence of cardiac output reduction aimed at an oxygen-conserving effect.

  6. The Transition from Aerobic to Anaerobic Metabolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, James S.; McLellan, Thomas H.

    1980-01-01

    The transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism is discussed. More research is needed on different kinds of athletes and athletic activities and how they may affect aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms. (CJ)

  7. Comparative histology of muscle in free ranging cetaceans: shallow versus deep diving species

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, E.; Fernández, A.; Espinosa de los Monteros, A.; Díaz-Delgado, J.; Bernaldo de Quirós, Y.; García-Álvarez, N.; Arbelo, M.; Herráez, P.

    2015-01-01

    Different marine mammal species exhibit a wide range of diving behaviour based on their breath-hold diving capabilities. They are classically categorized as long duration, deep-diving and short duration, shallow-diving species. These abilities are likely to be related to the muscle characteristics of each species. Despite the increasing number of publications on muscle profile in different cetacean species, very little information is currently available concerning the characteristics of other muscle components in these species. In this study, we examined skeletal muscle fiber type, fiber size (cross sectional area and lesser diameter), intramuscular substrates, and perimysium-related structures, by retrospective study in 146 stranded cetaceans involving 15 different species. Additionally, we investigated diving profile-specific histological features. Our results suggest that deep diving species have higher amount of intramyocyte lipid droplets, and evidence higher percentage of intramuscular adipose tissue, and larger fibre sizes in this group of animals. PMID:26514564

  8. A suspended dive-net technique for catching territorial divers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Uher-Koch, Brian D.; Rizzolo, Daniel; Wright, Kenneth G.; Schmutz, Joel A.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of methods such as night-lighting and lift nets have been used to catch divers (Gavidae), although 24-hour daylight in the Arctic summer and the remote nature of field sites can make the use of these traditional methods impossible. Our research required capture of adult divers at remote locations in northern Alaska. Here we describe a suspended dive-net technique that we used to safely capture territorial White-billed Gavia adamsii and Pacific Divers G. pacifica and that is lightweight and easy to set up. We also were able to capture divers with chicks, and failed breeders, and suggest that this method could be used to catch other territorial aquatic diving birds, especially other diver species.

  9. Implementation of the submarine diving simulation in a distributed environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Sol; Cha, Ju-Hwan; Roh, Myung-Il; Lee, Kyu-Yeul

    2012-09-01

    To implement a combined discrete event and discrete time simulation such as submarine diving simulation in a distributed environment, e.g., in the High Level Architecture (HLA)/Run-Time Infrastructure (RTI), a HLA interface, which can easily connect combined models with the HLA/RTI, was developed in this study. To verify the function and performance of the HLA interface, it was applied to the submarine dive scenario in a distributed environment, and the distributed simulation shows the same results as the stand-alone simulation. Finally, by adding a visualization model to the simulation and by editing this model, we can confirm that the HLA interface can provide user-friendly functions such as adding new model and editing a model.

  10. James Cameron discusses record dive and science concerns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy; Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-12-01

    James Cameron, the explorer and filmmaker, led a 4 December panel at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco to discuss his daring dive on 26 March to the bottom of the ocean in a one-person vertical "torpedo" submarine, the Deepsea Challenger, and to present some initial science findings from expedition samples and data. The dive touched the bottom of the Challenger Deep, a valley in the floor of the nearly 11-kilometer-deep Mariana Trench in the western Pacific Ocean. The vessel landed close to the same depth and at a location similar to where Don Walsh and Jacques Piccard descended in the Trieste bathyscaphe on 23 January 1960 at a then record-setting depth of 10,911 meters.

  11. Ultraviolet vision and foraging in dip and plunge diving birds

    PubMed Central

    Håstad, Olle; Ernstdotter, Emma; Ödeen, Anders

    2005-01-01

    Many fishes are sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) light and display UV markings during courtship. As UV scatters more than longer wavelengths of light, these signals are only effective at short distances, reducing the risk of detection by swimming predators. Such underwater scattering will be insignificant for dip and plunge diving birds, which prey on fishes just below the water surface. One could therefore expect to find adaptations in the eyes of dip and plunge diving birds that tune colour reception to UV signals. We used a molecular method to survey the colour vision tuning of five families of dip or plunge divers and compared the results with those from sister taxa of other foraging methods. We found evidence of extended UV vision only in gulls (Laridae). Based on available evidence, it is more probable that this trait is associated with their terrestrial foraging habits rather than piscivory. PMID:17148194

  12. Ultraviolet vision and foraging in dip and plunge diving birds.

    PubMed

    Håstad, Olle; Ernstdotter, Emma; Odeen, Anders

    2005-09-22

    Many fishes are sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) light and display UV markings during courtship. As UV scatters more than longer wavelengths of light, these signals are only effective at short distances, reducing the risk of detection by swimming predators. Such underwater scattering will be insignificant for dip and plunge diving birds, which prey on fishes just below the water surface. One could therefore expect to find adaptations in the eyes of dip and plunge diving birds that tune colour reception to UV signals. We used a molecular method to survey the colour vision tuning of five families of dip or plunge divers and compared the results with those from sister taxa of other foraging methods. We found evidence of extended UV vision only in gulls (Laridae). Based on available evidence, it is more probable that this trait is associated with their terrestrial foraging habits rather than piscivory.

  13. Arthritis and Aerobic Exercise: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ike, Robert W.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Arthritic patients who regularly do aerobic exercise make significant gains in aerobic and functional status, and in subjective areas like pain tolerance and mood. Still, they are often advised to curtail physical activity. Guidelines are presented for physicians prescribing aerobic exercise. An exercise tolerance test is recommended. (SM)

  14. Effect of Exercise on Bubble Activity during Diving

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADPO 11088 TITLE: Effect of Exercise on Bubble Activity during Diving...following component part numbers comprise the compilation report: ADPO11059 thru ADP011100 UNCLASSIFIED 34-1 Effect of Exercise on Bubble Activity ...York, Ontario M3M 3B9 CANADA Exercise Science Department, Concordia University and Department of Physical Education, McGill University Montreal

  15. Assessment of Thermal Protection Afforded by Hot Water Diving Suits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-03

    Assessment of Thermal Protect! " Afforded by Hot Water Diving Suits A AA L. A. Kuehn Diver thermal comfort in cold water is presently only...with proper control oj inlet suit water flow% and temperature, as well as heating of inspired gas, this suit technology suffices for thermal comfort for...technology provides in part to the convective heat loss that it prpsents, sustained long-term thermal comfort in cold water, Webb (W) has defined a

  16. Operational Considerations for the Standby Diver in CUMA Dives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    004 Vol 4 Book 2 ( Canadian Underwater Minecountermeasures Apparatus Version 2) Department of National Defence, Canada . [2] Nishi RY and Warlow MRN...Defence R&D Canada Technical Memorandum DRDC Toronto TM 2010-082 November 2010 Operational...Considerations for the Standby Diver in CUMA Dives R.Y. Nishi A.J. Ward D.J. Eaton Defence R&D Canada – Toronto

  17. Beaked Whale Group Deep Dive Behavior from Passive Acoustic Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Acoustic Monitoring Len Thomas, Tiago Marques Centre for Research into Ecological and Environmental Modelling University of St Andrews The...is to provide novel information on beaked whale group foraging dive behavior using Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM) at the Atlantic Undersea Test...method capable of utilizing passive acoustic data from the hydrophone array at AUTEC to track individual clicking beaked whales within group deep

  18. Pulmonary Oxygen Toxicity with Exercise: Single MK 25 Rebreather Dives or Split 6-Hour Exposures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    blood samples were taken and hemoglobin and carboxyhemoglobin concentrations measured (CO- oximeter, Instrumentation Laboratory; Lexington, MA) for...performance was measured in conjunction with the dives. Two sets of similar dives using the MK 20 UBA were then conducted with three days off between...sets. Physical performance and total plasma antioxidant potential were measured . After the single dives, the incidence of respiratory symptoms (23%) or

  19. Converting chemical energy into electricity through a functionally cooperating device with diving-surfacing cycles.

    PubMed

    Song, Mengmeng; Cheng, Mengjiao; Ju, Guannan; Zhang, Yajun; Shi, Feng

    2014-11-05

    A smart device that can dive or surface in aqueous medium has been developed by combining a pH-responsive surface with acid-responsive magnesium. The diving-surfacing cycles can be used to convert chemical energy into electricity. During the diving-surfacing motion, the smart device cuts magnetic flux lines and produces a current, demonstrating that motional energy can be realized by consuming chemical energy of magnesium, thus producing electricity.

  20. Intrapulmonary shunt and SCUBA diving: another risk factor?

    PubMed

    Madden, Dennis; Ljubkovic, Marko; Dujic, Zeljko

    2015-02-01

    Laboratory and field investigations have demonstrated that intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses (IPAVA) may provide an additional means for venous gas emboli (VGE) to cross over to the arterial circulation due to their larger diameter compared to pulmonary microcirculation. Once thought to be the primary cause of decompression sickness (DCS), it has been demonstrated that, even in large quantities, their presence does not always result in injury. Normally, VGE are trapped in the site of gas exchange in the lungs and eliminated via diffusion. When VGE crossover takes place in arterial circulation, they have the potential to cause more harm as they are redistributed to the brain, spinal column, and other sensitive tissues. The patent foramen ovale (PFO) was once thought to be the only risk factor for an increase in arterialization; however, IPAVAs represent another pathway for this crossover to occur. The opening of IPAVAs is associated with exercise and hypoxic gas mixtures, both of which divers may encounter. The goal of this review is to describe how IPAVAs may impact diving physiology, specifically during decompression, and what this means for the individual diver as well as the future of commercial and recreational diving. Future research must continue on the relationship between IPAVAs and the environmental and physiological circumstances that lead to their opening and closing, as well as how they may contribute to diving injuries such as DCS.

  1. Incremental Knowledge Base Construction Using DeepDive

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jaeho; Wu, Sen; Wang, Feiran; De Sa, Christopher; Zhang, Ce; Ré, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Populating a database with unstructured information is a long-standing problem in industry and research that encompasses problems of extraction, cleaning, and integration. Recent names used for this problem include dealing with dark data and knowledge base construction (KBC). In this work, we describe DeepDive, a system that combines database and machine learning ideas to help develop KBC systems, and we present techniques to make the KBC process more efficient. We observe that the KBC process is iterative, and we develop techniques to incrementally produce inference results for KBC systems. We propose two methods for incremental inference, based respectively on sampling and variational techniques. We also study the tradeoff space of these methods and develop a simple rule-based optimizer. DeepDive includes all of these contributions, and we evaluate Deep-Dive on five KBC systems, showing that it can speed up KBC inference tasks by up to two orders of magnitude with negligible impact on quality. PMID:27144081

  2. A comparison of auditory brainstem responses across diving bird species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowell, Sara E.; Berlin, Alicia; Carr, Catherine E; Olsen, Glenn H.; Therrien, Ronald E; Yannuzzi, Sally E; Ketten, Darlene R

    2015-01-01

    There is little biological data available for diving birds because many live in hard-to-study, remote habitats. Only one species of diving bird, the black-footed penguin (Spheniscus demersus), has been studied in respect to auditory capabilities (Wever et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 63:676–680, 1969). We, therefore, measured in-air auditory threshold in ten species of diving birds, using the auditory brainstem response (ABR). The average audiogram obtained for each species followed the U-shape typical of birds and many other animals. All species tested shared a common region of the greatest sensitivity, from 1000 to 3000 Hz, although audiograms differed significantly across species. Thresholds of all duck species tested were more similar to each other than to the two non-duck species tested. The red-throated loon (Gavia stellata) and northern gannet (Morus bassanus) exhibited the highest thresholds while the lowest thresholds belonged to the duck species, specifically the lesser scaup (Aythya affinis) and ruddy duck (Oxyura jamaicensis). Vocalization parameters were also measured for each species, and showed that with the exception of the common eider (Somateria mollisima), the peak frequency, i.e., frequency at the greatest intensity, of all species' vocalizations measured here fell between 1000 and 3000 Hz, matching the bandwidth of the most sensitive hearing range.

  3. Energetics of the yo-yo dives of predatory sharks.

    PubMed

    Iosilevskii, Gil; Papastamatiou, Yannis P; Meyer, Carl G; Holland, Kim N

    2012-02-07

    Sharks zigzag vertically through the water in a series of alternating ascending and descending segments, changing depth by a few tens of meters over a period of a few hundred seconds. This 'yo-yo' like behavior has several characteristic patterns, identifiable by the way the swimming and vertical velocities vary along the dive. We suggest that these patterns represent different optimal strategies minimizing the cost of locomotion under different constraints; moreover, these constraints can be inferred by matching the pattern of a dive with a (standard) optimal swimming strategy for which the constraints are known. We used three sets of constraints and two definitions of the 'cost of locomotion' to analytically generate four standard optimal strategies; we have used high resolution tracking data from four tiger sharks to identify two different yo-yo diving patterns. These patterns seem to match two of the standard strategies: one that maximizes range, given an alternating power supply (e.g., swimming actively on ascents and lazily on descents); and the other that maximizes range, given an alternating vertical velocity (implying an 'intentional' up-and-down motion).

  4. A comparison of auditory brainstem responses across diving bird species.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Sara E; Wells-Berlin, Alicia M; Carr, Catherine E; Olsen, Glenn H; Therrien, Ronald E; Yannuzzi, Sally E; Ketten, Darlene R

    2015-08-01

    There is little biological data available for diving birds because many live in hard-to-study, remote habitats. Only one species of diving bird, the black-footed penguin (Spheniscus demersus), has been studied in respect to auditory capabilities (Wever et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 63:676-680, 1969). We, therefore, measured in-air auditory threshold in ten species of diving birds, using the auditory brainstem response (ABR). The average audiogram obtained for each species followed the U-shape typical of birds and many other animals. All species tested shared a common region of the greatest sensitivity, from 1000 to 3000 Hz, although audiograms differed significantly across species. Thresholds of all duck species tested were more similar to each other than to the two non-duck species tested. The red-throated loon (Gavia stellata) and northern gannet (Morus bassanus) exhibited the highest thresholds while the lowest thresholds belonged to the duck species, specifically the lesser scaup (Aythya affinis) and ruddy duck (Oxyura jamaicensis). Vocalization parameters were also measured for each species, and showed that with the exception of the common eider (Somateria mollisima), the peak frequency, i.e., frequency at the greatest intensity, of all species' vocalizations measured here fell between 1000 and 3000 Hz, matching the bandwidth of the most sensitive hearing range.

  5. Optimal diving maneuver strategy considering guidance accuracy for hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianwen; Liu, Luhua; Tang, Guojian; Bao, Weimin

    2014-11-01

    An optimal maneuver strategy considering terminal guidance accuracy for hypersonic vehicle in dive phase is investigated in this paper. First, it derives the complete three-dimensional nonlinear coupled motion equation without any approximations based on diving relative motion relationship directly, and converts it into linear decoupled state space equation with the same relative degree by feedback linearization. Second, the diving guidance law is designed based on the decoupled equation to meet the terminal impact point and falling angle constraints. In order to further improve the interception capability, it constructs maneuver control model through adding maneuver control item to the guidance law. Then, an integrated performance index consisting of maximum line-of-sight angle rate and minimum energy consumption is designed, and optimal control is employed to obtain optimal maneuver strategy when the encounter time is determined and undetermined, respectively. Furthermore, the performance index and suboptimal strategy are reconstructed to deal with the control capability constraint and the serous influence on terminal guidance accuracy caused by maneuvering flight. Finally, the approach is tested using the Common Aero Vehicle-H model. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed strategy can achieve high precision guidance and effective maneuver at the same time, and the indices are also optimized.

  6. Relative decompression risk of dry and wet chamber air dives.

    PubMed

    Weathersby, P K; Survanshi, S S; Nishi, R Y

    1990-07-01

    The difference in risk of decompression sickness (DCS) between dry chamber subjects and wet, working divers is unknown and a direct test of the difference would be large and expensive. We used probabilistic models and maximum likelihood estimation to examine 797 dry (and generally resting and comfortable) and 244 wet (and generally working and cold) chamber dives from the Defence and Civil Institute of Environmental Medicine, supplemented with 483 wet (working, cold) dives from the Navy Experimental Diving Unit. Several analyses considered whether dry and wet data were distinguishable using several models, whether models obtained from one set of exposure conditions would correctly predict the occurrence of DCS in the other condition, and whether a single wet-dry risk difference parameter was different from zero. Although the two conditions may not produce identical risks, immersion appears to change relative risk of DCS by less than 30% and certainly involves less than a doubling of DCS risk. Uncontrolled differences in exercise and temperature stresses unavoidably complicate interpretation. Several methods are presented to extrapolate results from dry-test subjects in decompression trials to expected at-sea performance.

  7. A comparison of auditory brainstem responses across diving bird species

    PubMed Central

    Crowell, Sara E.; Wells-Berlin, Alicia M.; Carr, Catherine E.; Olsen, Glenn H.; Therrien, Ronald E.; Yannuzzi, Sally E.; Ketten, Darlene R.

    2015-01-01

    There is little biological data available for diving birds because many live in hard-to-study, remote habitats. Only one species of diving bird, the black-footed penguin (Spheniscus demersus), has been studied in respect to auditory capabilities (Wever et al. 1969). We therefore measured in-air auditory threshold in ten species of diving birds, using the auditory brainstem response (ABR). The average audiogram obtained for each species followed the U-shape typical of birds and many other animals. All species tested shared a common region of greatest sensitivity, from 1000 to 3000 Hz, although audiograms differed significantly across species. Thresholds of all duck species tested were more similar to each other than to the two non-duck species tested. The red-throated loon (Gavia stellata) and northern gannet (Morus bassanus) exhibited the highest thresholds while the lowest thresholds belonged to the duck species, specifically the lesser scaup (Aythya affinis) and ruddy duck (Oxyura jamaicensis). Vocalization parameters were also measured for each species, and showed that with the exception of the common eider (Somateria mollisima), the peak frequency, i.e. frequency at the greatest intensity, of all species’ vocalizations measured here fell between 1000 and 3000 Hz, matching the bandwidth of the most sensitive hearing range. PMID:26156644

  8. Repeated Four-Hour Dives With PO2 = 1.35 ATM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    Navy Experimental Diving Unit TA 02-22 321 Bullfinch Rd. NEDU TR 04-29 Panama City, FL 32407-7015 July 2004 REPEATED FOUR-HOUR DIVES WITH P0 2 =1.35...Experimental Diving Unit 6c. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) 7b. ADDRESS (City, State, and Zip Code) 321 Bullfinch Road, Panama City, FL 32407-7015 8a...referred to the optometry clinic at Tyndall Air Force Base for complete eye examinations during the week before diving and during the week following

  9. [A CASE OF NATTOU (FERMENTED-SOYBEAN)-INDUCED LATE-ONSET ANAPHYLAXIS FOLLOWING SCUBA DIVING].

    PubMed

    Nagakura, Toshikazu; Tanaka, Katsuichirou; Horikawa, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    We here report a 34-years old male who had nattou-(fermented-soybean) induced late-onset anaphylaxis following SCUBA diving to about 20 m in the ocean off a small remote Japanese island (Kuroshima, Okinawa). He had eaten nattou for breakfast at 7:30 am. He traveled by boat to the dive site, dove twice and then ate lunch at 12:30 on the diving boat (no nattou at lunch). After lunch at 14:30 he dove again (third dive of the day) during which time itchiness started. Back on the diving boat, urticarial was noticed. At 15:30, while washing his diving gear at the diving shop near the harbor, he fainted. A physician arrived on the scene at 15:45. Chest sound was clear and SpO2 was 98%, and blood pressure was 60/- mmHg. Intra-venous hydrocortisone was given, however, his recovery was not satisfactory. Then he was transferred to the Yaeyama Hospital by helicopter at 17:45. The examination of diving computer analysis reveals no sign of increased residual nitrogen, denying the possibility of decompression syndrome. Prick to prick test shows a strongly positive response to nattou. Nattou-induced late-onset anaphylaxis following SCUBA diving was suspected.

  10. Epilepsy, scuba diving and risk assessment. Near misses and the need for ongoing vigilance.

    PubMed

    Smart, David; Lippmann, John

    2013-03-01

    There is ongoing debate about the safety of scuba diving for individuals with a history of epilepsy. An in-water seizure is highly likely to be fatal. Recommendations for fitness to dive vary with some regarding epilepsy as an absolute contraindication to diving (South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society) and others permitting diving under strict criteria (United Kingdom Sport Diving Medical Committee) with diving to be postponed for a period of three to five years without seizures. Long-term follow up of people with epilepsy shows that at least one-third will have a recurrence and that the risk remains elevated for many years. We present three cases where individuals with a history of epilepsy (or likely epilepsy) almost fell through the cracks of health risk assessment, two with near-fatal consequences. These cases inform the on-going debate about fitness to dive for those with current or past epilepsy, and highlight the importance of education for doctors, dive professionals and divers about the risks associated with epilepsy and diving.

  11. Decompression syndrome and the evolution of deep diving physiology in the Cetacea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beatty, Brian Lee; Rothschild, Bruce M.

    2008-09-01

    Whales repetitively dive deep to feed and should be susceptible to decompression syndrome, though they are not known to suffer the associated pathologies. Avascular osteonecrosis has been recognized as an indicator of diving habits of extinct marine amniotes. Vertebrae of 331 individual modern and 996 fossil whales were subjected to macroscopic and radiographic examination. Avascular osteonecrosis was found in the Oligocene basal odontocetes (Xenorophoidea) and in geologically younger mysticetes, such as Aglaocetus [a sister taxon to Balaenopteridae + (Balaenidae + Eschrichtiidae) clade]. These are considered as early “experiments” in repetitive deep diving, indicating that they independently converged on their similar specialized diving physiologies.

  12. Determination of Flight Paths of an SBD-1 Airplane in Simulated Diving Attacks, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Harold I.

    1943-01-01

    An investigation has been made to determine the motions of and the flight paths describe by a Navy dive-bombing airplane in simulated diving attacks. The data necessary to evaluate these items, with the exception of the atmospheric wind data, were obtained from automatic recording instruments installed entirely within the airplane. The atmospheric wind data were obtained from the ground by the balloon-theodolite method. The results of typical dives at various dive angles are presented in the form of time histories of the motion of the airplane as well as flight paths calculated with respect to still air and with respect to the ground.

  13. High altitude dives from 7000 to 14,200 feet in the Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Sahni, T K; John, M J; Dhall, A; Chatterjee, A K

    1991-07-01

    Indian Navy divers carried out no-decompression dives at altitudes of 7000 to 14,200 ft (2134-4328 m) in the Nilgiris and Himalayas from May to July 1988. Seventy-eight dives on air and 22 dives on oxygen were carried out at various altitudes. The final dives were at Lake Pangong Tso (4328 m) in Ladakh, Himalayas, to a maximum of 140 feet of sea water (fsw) [42.6 meters of sea water (msw)] equivalent ocean depth in minimum water temperature of 2 degrees C. Oxygen diving at 14,200 ft (4328 m) was not successful. Aspects considered were altitude adaptation, diminished air pressure diving, hypothermia, and remote area survival. Depths at altitude were converted to depths at sea level and were applied to the Royal Navy air tables. Altitude-related manifestations, hypoxia, hypothermia, suspected oxygen toxicity, and equipment failure were observed. It is concluded that stress is due to effects of altitude and cold on man and equipment, as well as changes in diving procedures when diving at high altitudes. Equivalent air depths when applied to Royal Navy tables could be considered a safe method for diving at altitudes.

  14. Time Variation of the Distance Separating Bomb and Dive Bomber Subsequent to Bomb Release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, Charles W.

    1952-01-01

    A study has been made of the variation of the distance separating bomb and aircraft with time after release as applied to dive-bombing operations, Separation distances determined from this study are presented in terms of two variables only, dive angle and maximum airplane accelerometer reading; the values of separation distance include the effects of delay in initiation of the pull-out and lag in attainment of the maximum normal acceleration.Contains analysis and calculations of the separation distances between bomb and dive bomber following bomb release, Separation distances as determined by the dive angle and the maximum airplane accelerometer reading are presented in a single chart.

  15. 29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart T to... - Guidelines for Scientific Diving

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... project using scientific diving is the advancement of science; therefore, information and data resulting... data gatherer. Construction and trouble-shooting tasks traditionally associated with commercial...

  16. The Effect of 20 Minutes Scuba Diving on Cognitive Function of Professional Scuba Divers

    PubMed Central

    Pourhashemi, Seyedeh Faezeh; Sahraei, Hedayat; Meftahi, Gholam Hossein; Hatef, Boshra; Gholipour, Bahareh

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical activity increases the performance of the nervous system by stimulating the body’s metabolism and improving the efficiency of the ATP production system. Objectives In the present study, the effect of twenty minutes scuba diving in high depth (10m) on cognitive function and stress system activity was investigated. Methods Twelve professional scuba divers with a mean age of 23 ± 1 year, weight of 80 ± 2.5 kg and height of 1.79 ± 3.5 cm resident in the city of Mashhad participated in the test. Their cognitive functions were measured 60 min before and 20 min after diving and the data were evaluated using the PASAT software. In the present study, parameters such as general mental health, sustained attention, average response speed, and mental fatigue were measured. Moreover, in order to determine the activity of the stress system, their salivary cortisol was collected before and after diving. Results Results revealed that, the general mental health of these scuba divers was normal and it did not undergo a remarkable change after diving. Their average response speed and sustained attention had a significant decrease after scuba diving. Mental fatigue after diving increased. Also, salivary cortisol level significantly increased after diving. Conclusions According to our data, it seems that scuba diving as stress stimulant increases cortisol level and therefore reduces cognitive performance after diving. PMID:27826405

  17. A Navy Diving Supervisor’s Guide to the Nontechnical Skills Required for Safe and Productive Diving Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    in the near future.Ř Models of situation awareness generally propose the following three levels (see Figure Level 1: Basic. An awareness of the key...reacted to the situation. QUESTIONS TO CALIBRATE SITUATION AWARENESS It is suggested that periodically during a dive, you ask the following questions of...diagnosed, you need only to follow a series of rules. Therefore, you do not need to be an expert or to understand every step. Positives Negatives You

  18. DHA system mediating aerobic and anaerobic dissimilation of glycerol in Klebsiella pneumoniae NCIB 418.

    PubMed Central

    Forage, R G; Lin, E C

    1982-01-01

    In Klebsiella pneumoniae NCIB 418, the pathways normally responsible for aerobic growth on glycerol and sn-glycerol 3-phosphate (the glp system) are superrepressed. However, aerobic growth on glycerol can take place by the intervention of the NAD-linked glycerol dehydrogenase and the ATP-dependent dihydroxyacetone kinase of the dha system normally inducible only anaerobically by glycerol or dihydroxyacetone. Conclusive evidence that the dha system is responsible for both aerobic and anaerobic dissimilation of glycerol was provided by a Tn5 insertion mutant lacking dihydroxyacetone kinase. An enzymatically coupled assay specific for this enzyme was devised. Spontaneous reactivation of the glp system was achieved by selection for aerobic growth on sn-glycerol 3-phosphate or on limiting glycerol as the sole carbon and energy source. However, the expression of this system became constitutive. Aerobic operation of the glp system highly represses synthesis of the dha system enzymes by catabolite repression. Images PMID:6284704

  19. Deep Dive Topic: Approach to ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O. A.; Kline, J. L.; Meezan, N.; Mackinnon, A.

    2015-07-14

    The current high-foot and related implosions have adequate CR and implosion velocity to ignite, but require improved finesse particularly in, but not limited to, implosion symmetry. This is being pursued. The challenge of controlling drive symmetry is also motivating lower convergence ratio designs. These require higher velocity implosions and are also being pursued.

  20. Pedestrian locomotion energetics and gait characteristics of a diving bird, the great cormorant, Phalacrocorax carbo.

    PubMed

    White, Craig R; Martin, Graham R; Butler, Patrick J

    2008-08-01

    Great cormorants Phalacrocorax carbo are foot propelled diving birds that seem poorly suited to locomotion on land. They have relatively short legs, which are presumably adapted for the generation of high forces during the power stroke of aquatic locomotion, and walk with a pronounced "clumsy waddle". We hypothesise (1) that the speed, independent minimum cost of locomotion (C min, ml O2 m(-1)) will be high for cormorants during treadmill exercise, and (2) that cormorants will have a relatively limited speed range in comparison to more cursorial birds. We measured the rate of oxygen consumption (V02) of cormorants during pedestrian locomotion on a treadmill, and filmed them to determine duty factor (the fraction of stride period that the foot is in contact with the ground), foot contact time (tc), stride frequency (f), swing phase duration and stride length. C min was 2.1-fold higher than that predicted by their body mass and phylogenetic position, but was not significantly different from the C min of runners (Galliformes and Struthioniformes). The extrapolated gamma-intercept of the relationship between V02 and speed was 1.9-fold higher than that predicted by allometry. Again, cormorants were not significantly different from runners. Contrary to our hypothesis, we therefore conclude that cormorants do not have high pedestrian transport costs. Cormorants were observed to use a grounded gait with two double support phases at all speeds measured, and showed an apparent gait transition between 0.17 and 0.25 m s(-1). This transition occurs at a Froude number between 0.016 and 0.037, which is lower than the value of approximately 0.5 observed for many other species. However, despite the use of a limited speed range, and a gait transition at relatively low speed, we conclude that the pedestrian locomotion of these foot propelled diving birds is otherwise generally similar to that of cursorial birds at comparable relative velocities.

  1. Modeling of vapor intrusion from hydrocarbon-contaminated sources accounting for aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verginelli, Iason; Baciocchi, Renato

    2011-11-01

    A one-dimensional steady state vapor intrusion model including both anaerobic and oxygen-limited aerobic biodegradation was developed. The aerobic and anaerobic layer thickness are calculated by stoichiometrically coupling the reactive transport of vapors with oxygen transport and consumption. The model accounts for the different oxygen demand in the subsurface required to sustain the aerobic biodegradation of the compound(s) of concern and for the baseline soil oxygen respiration. In the case of anaerobic reaction under methanogenic conditions, the model accounts for the generation of methane which leads to a further oxygen demand, due to methane oxidation, in the aerobic zone. The model was solved analytically and applied, using representative parameter ranges and values, to identify under which site conditions the attenuation of hydrocarbons migrating into indoor environments is likely to be significant. Simulations were performed assuming a soil contaminated by toluene only, by a BTEX mixture, by Fresh Gasoline and by Weathered Gasoline. The obtained results have shown that for several site conditions oxygen concentration below the building is sufficient to sustain aerobic biodegradation. For these scenarios the aerobic biodegradation is the primary mechanism of attenuation, i.e. anaerobic contribution is negligible and a model accounting just for aerobic biodegradation can be used. On the contrary, in all cases where oxygen is not sufficient to sustain aerobic biodegradation alone (e.g. highly contaminated sources), anaerobic biodegradation can significantly contribute to the overall attenuation depending on the site specific conditions.

  2. Modeling of vapor intrusion from hydrocarbon-contaminated sources accounting for aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Verginelli, Iason; Baciocchi, Renato

    2011-11-01

    A one-dimensional steady state vapor intrusion model including both anaerobic and oxygen-limited aerobic biodegradation was developed. The aerobic and anaerobic layer thickness are calculated by stoichiometrically coupling the reactive transport of vapors with oxygen transport and consumption. The model accounts for the different oxygen demand in the subsurface required to sustain the aerobic biodegradation of the compound(s) of concern and for the baseline soil oxygen respiration. In the case of anaerobic reaction under methanogenic conditions, the model accounts for the generation of methane which leads to a further oxygen demand, due to methane oxidation, in the aerobic zone. The model was solved analytically and applied, using representative parameter ranges and values, to identify under which site conditions the attenuation of hydrocarbons migrating into indoor environments is likely to be significant. Simulations were performed assuming a soil contaminated by toluene only, by a BTEX mixture, by Fresh Gasoline and by Weathered Gasoline. The obtained results have shown that for several site conditions oxygen concentration below the building is sufficient to sustain aerobic biodegradation. For these scenarios the aerobic biodegradation is the primary mechanism of attenuation, i.e. anaerobic contribution is negligible and a model accounting just for aerobic biodegradation can be used. On the contrary, in all cases where oxygen is not sufficient to sustain aerobic biodegradation alone (e.g. highly contaminated sources), anaerobic biodegradation can significantly contribute to the overall attenuation depending on the site specific conditions.

  3. An atypical distribution of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes in the hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) brain may reflect a biochemical adaptation to diving.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Mariana Leivas Müller; Fabrizius, Andrej; Folkow, Lars P; Burmester, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    The brains of some diving mammals can withstand periods of severe hypoxia without signs of deleterious effects. This may in part be due to an enhanced cerebral capacity for anaerobic energy production. Here, we have tested this hypothesis by comparing various parameters of the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the brain of the hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) with those in the brains of the ferret (Mustela putorius furo) and mouse (Mus musculus). We found that mRNA and protein expression of lactate dehydrogenase a (LDHA) and lactate dehydrogenase b (LDHB), and also the LDH activity were significantly higher in the ferret brain than in brains of the hooded seal and the mouse (p < 0.0001). No conspicuous differences in the LDHA and LDHB sequences were observed. There was also no difference in the buffering capacities of the brains. Thus, an enhanced capacity for anaerobic energy production likely does not explain the higher hypoxia tolerance of the seal brain. However, the brain of the hooded seal had higher relative levels of LDHB isoenzymes (LDH1 and LDH2) compared to the non-diving mammals. Moreover, immunofluorescence studies showed more pronounced co-localization of LDHB and glial fibrillary acidic protein in the cortex of the hooded seal. Since LDHB isoenzymes primarily catalyze the conversion of lactate to pyruvate, this finding suggests that the contribution of astrocytes to the brain aerobic metabolism is higher in the hooded seal than in non-diving species. The cerebral tolerance of the hooded seal to hypoxia may therefore partly rely on different LDH isoenzymes distribution.

  4. Dive behaviour impacts the ability of heart rate to predict oxygen consumption in Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) foraging at depth.

    PubMed

    Young, Beth L; Rosen, David A S; Hindle, Allyson G; Haulena, Martin; Trites, Andrew W

    2011-07-01

    The predictive relationship between heart rate (f(H)) and oxygen consumption (VO2) has been derived for several species of marine mammals swimming horizontally or diving in tanks to shallow depths. However, it is unclear how dive activity affects the f(H):VO2 relationship and whether the existing equations apply to animals diving to deeper depths. We investigated these questions by simultaneously measuring the f(H) and VO2 of Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) under different activity states (surface resting or diving), types of dives (single dives or dive bouts), and depths (10 or 40 m). We examined the relationship over dives only and also over dive cycles (dive + surface interval). We found that f(H) could only predict VO2 over a complete single dive cycle or dive bout cycle (i.e. surface intervals had to be included). The predictive equation derived for sea lions resting on the surface did not differ from that for single dive cycles. However, the equation derived over dive bout cycles (multiple dives + surface intervals) differed from those for single dive cycles or surface resting, with similar f(H) for multiple dive bout equations yielding higher predicted VO2 than that for single dive bout cycles (or resting). The f(H):VO2 relationships were not significantly affected by dive duration, dive depth, water temperature or cumulative food consumed under the conditions tested. Ultimately, our results demonstrate that f(H) can be used to predict activity-specific metabolic rates of diving Steller sea lions, but only over complete dive cycles that include a post-dive surface recovery period.

  5. Acute and potentially persistent effects of scuba diving on the blood transcriptome of experienced divers.

    PubMed

    Eftedal, Ingrid; Ljubkovic, Marko; Flatberg, Arnar; Jørgensen, Arve; Brubakk, Alf O; Dujic, Zeljko

    2013-10-16

    During scuba diving, the circulatory system is stressed by an elevated partial pressure of oxygen while the diver is submerged and by decompression-induced gas bubbles on ascent to the surface. This diving-induced stress may trigger decompression illness, but the majority of dives are asymptomatic. In this study we have mapped divers' blood transcriptomes with the aim of identifying genes, biological pathways, and cell types perturbed by the physiological stress in asymptomatic scuba diving. Ten experienced divers abstained from diving for >2 wk before performing a 3-day series of daily dives to 18 m depth for 47 min while breathing compressed air. Blood for microarray analysis was collected before and immediately after the first and last dives, and 10 matched nondivers provided controls for predive stationary transcriptomes. MetaCore GeneGo analysis of the predive samples identified stationary upregulation of genes associated with apoptosis, inflammation, and innate immune responses in the divers, most significantly involving genes in the TNFR1 pathway of caspase-dependent apoptosis, HSP60/HSP70 signaling via TLR4, and NF-κB-mediated transcription. Diving caused pronounced shifts in transcription patterns characteristic of specific leukocytes, with downregulation of genes expressed by CD8+ T lymphocytes and NK cells and upregulation of genes expressed by neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages. Antioxidant genes were upregulated. Similar transient responses were observed after the first and last dive. The results indicate that sublethal oxidative stress elicits the myeloid innate immune system in scuba diving and that extensive diving may cause persistent change in pathways controlling apoptosis, inflammation, and innate immune responses.

  6. How man-made interference might cause gas bubble emboli in deep diving whales

    PubMed Central

    Fahlman, Andreas; Tyack, Peter L.; Miller, Patrick J. O.; Kvadsheim, Petter H.

    2014-01-01

    Recent cetacean mass strandings in close temporal and spatial association with sonar activity has raised the concern that anthropogenic sound may harm breath-hold diving marine mammals. Necropsy results of the stranded whales have shown evidence of bubbles in the tissues, similar to those in human divers suffering from decompression sickness (DCS). It has been proposed that changes in behavior or physiological responses during diving could increase tissue and blood N2 levels, thereby increasing DCS risk. Dive data recorded from sperm, killer, long-finned pilot, Blainville's beaked and Cuvier's beaked whales before and during exposure to low- (1–2 kHz) and mid- (2–7 kHz) frequency active sonar were used to estimate the changes in blood and tissue N2 tension (PN2). Our objectives were to determine if differences in (1) dive behavior or (2) physiological responses to sonar are plausible risk factors for bubble formation. The theoretical estimates indicate that all species may experience high N2 levels. However, unexpectedly, deep diving generally result in higher end-dive PN2 as compared with shallow diving. In this focused review we focus on three possible explanations: (1) We revisit an old hypothesis that CO2, because of its much higher diffusivity, forms bubble precursors that continue to grow in N2 supersaturated tissues. Such a mechanism would be less dependent on the alveolar collapse depth but affected by elevated levels of CO2 following a burst of activity during sonar exposure. (2) During deep dives, a greater duration of time might be spent at depths where gas exchange continues as compared with shallow dives. The resulting elevated levels of N2 in deep diving whales might also make them more susceptible to anthropogenic disturbances. (3) Extended duration of dives even at depths beyond where the alveoli collapse could result in slow continuous accumulation of N2 in the adipose tissues that eventually becomes a liability. PMID:24478724

  7. Calcium precipitate induced aerobic granulation.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chunli; Lee, Duu-Jong; Yang, Xue; Wang, Yayi; Wang, Xingzu; Liu, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic granulation is a novel biotechnology for wastewater treatment. This study refined existing aerobic granulation mechanisms as a sequencing process including formation of calcium precipitate under alkaline pH to form inorganic cores, followed by bacterial attachment and growth on these cores to form the exopolysaccharide matrix. Mature granules comprised an inner core and a matrix layer and a rim layer with enriched microbial strains. The inorganic core was a mix of different crystals of calcium and phosphates. Functional strains including Sphingomonas sp., Paracoccus sp. Sinorhizobium americanum strain and Flavobacterium sp. attached onto the cores. These functional strains promote c-di-GMP production and the expression by Psl and Alg genes for exopolysaccharide production to enhance formation of mature granules.

  8. Aerobic microbial enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Torsvik, T.; Gilje, E.; Sunde, E.

    1995-12-31

    In aerobic MEOR, the ability of oil-degrading bacteria to mobilize oil is used to increase oil recovery. In this process, oxygen and mineral nutrients are injected into the oil reservoir in order to stimulate growth of aerobic oil-degrading bacteria in the reservoir. Experiments carried out in a model sandstone with stock tank oil and bacteria isolated from offshore wells showed that residual oil saturation was lowered from 27% to 3%. The process was time dependent, not pore volume dependent. During MEOR flooding, the relative permeability of water was lowered. Oxygen and active bacteria were needed for the process to take place. Maximum efficiency was reached at low oxygen concentrations, approximately 1 mg O{sub 2}/liter.

  9. 76 FR 67480 - Standard on Commercial Diving Operations; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Standard on Commercial Diving Operations; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of Information Collection (Paperwork) Requirements AGENCY... requirements specified in the Commercial Diving Operations Standard (29 CFR part 1910, subpart T)....

  10. Aerobic Metabolism of Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Mickelson, M. N.

    1967-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae cultures possess an aerobic pathway for glucose oxidation that is strongly inhibited by cyanide. The products of glucose oxidation by aerobically grown cells of S. agalactiae 50 are lactic and acetic acids, acetylmethylcarbinol, and carbon dioxide. Glucose degradation products by aerobically grown cells, as percentage of glucose carbon, were 52 to 61% lactic acid, 20 to 23% acetic acid, 5.5 to 6.5% acetylmethylcarbinol, and 14 to 16% carbon dioxide. There was no evidence for a pentose cycle or a tricarboxylic acid cycle. Crude cell-free extracts of S. agalactiae 50 possessed a strong reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH2) oxidase that is also cyanide-sensitive. Dialysis or ultrafiltration of the crude, cell-free extract resulted in loss of NADH2 oxidase activity. Oxidase activity was restored to the inactive extract by addition of the ultrafiltrate or by addition of menadione or K3Fe(CN)6. Noncytochrome iron-containing pigments were present in cell-free extracts of S. agalactiae. The possible participation of these pigments in the respiration of S. agalactiae is presently being studied. PMID:4291090

  11. Resistance Training for Rescue Divers in the Sport Scuba Diving Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mier, Constance M.; Kegeles, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Asserts that the need for certified rescue divers increases as the diving industry grows. Rescue divers must be physically prepared to perform several dives in one day and to carry equipment on and off the boat. Physical recovery is also important, as they must be alert at all times to potential emergency situations. This require high levels of…

  12. Safety Practices for Commercial Diving. Module SH-43. Safety and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This student module on safety practices for commercial diving is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module provides a brief orientation to safety considerations for commercial diving. Following the introduction, nine objectives (each keyed to a page in the text) the student is expected to accomplish are listed (e.g., Name…

  13. Competitive Swimming and Diving. Official Rules, Officating. August 1983-August 1984. NAGWS Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, Reston, VA. National Association for Girls and Women in Sport.

    Arranged in three sections, this pamphlet details the rules, officiating techniques, and official records for girls' and womens' competitive swimming and diving. Section 1 lists members of the national rules committee, major rule changes for 1983-84, and official rules for swimming and diving competition. Section 2 contains officiating tips,…

  14. Scientific Diving Training Course. Red Sea & Gulf of Aden Programme (PERSGA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arab Organization for Education and Science, Cairo (Egypt).

    This document presents the scientific diving training course organized by the Arab League Educational, Cultural and Scientific Organization (ALECSO) for the Program for Environmental Studies, Red Sea and Gulf of Aden (PERSGA). This course of six weeks duration aims to produce a person who is capable of carrying out scientific diving tasks in the…

  15. 36 CFR 3.18 - May I snorkel or underwater dive in park waters?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I snorkel or underwater dive in park waters? 3.18 Section 3.18 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR BOATING AND WATER USE ACTIVITIES § 3.18 May I snorkel or underwater dive in...

  16. 36 CFR 3.18 - May I snorkel or underwater dive in park waters?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May I snorkel or underwater dive in park waters? 3.18 Section 3.18 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR BOATING AND WATER USE ACTIVITIES § 3.18 May I snorkel or underwater dive in...

  17. Using Stimulation of the Diving Reflex in Humans to Teach Integrative Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choate, Julia K.; Denton, Kate M.; Evans, Roger G.; Hodgson, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    During underwater submersion, the body responds by conserving O[subscript 2] and prioritizing blood flow to the brain and heart. These physiological adjustments, which involve the nervous, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems, are known as the diving response and provide an ideal example of integrative physiology. The diving reflex can be…

  18. [Underwater dive in fresh water complicated by a cardiorespiratory arrest on obstructive shock].

    PubMed

    Bourmanne, E; Jacobs, D; Caldow, M; El Kaissi, M

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a french patient who dived in fresh water in Lac de l'Eau d'Heure on 8 December 2014. The 35 meters deep diving was complicated by an obstructive shock resulting from lung overpressure and decompression illness.

  19. 29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart Y of... - Guidelines for Scientific Diving

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Guidelines for Scientific Diving B Appendix B to Subpart Y of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH..., Subpt. Y, App. B Appendix B to Subpart Y of Part 1926—Guidelines for Scientific Diving Note:...

  20. 29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart Y of... - Guidelines for Scientific Diving

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Guidelines for Scientific Diving B Appendix B to Subpart Y of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH..., Subpt. Y, App. B Appendix B to Subpart Y of Part 1926—Guidelines for Scientific Diving Note:...

  1. 29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart Y of... - Guidelines for Scientific Diving

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Guidelines for Scientific Diving B Appendix B to Subpart Y..., Subpt. Y, App. B Appendix B to Subpart Y of Part 1926—Guidelines for Scientific Diving Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this appendix B are identical to those set forth at...

  2. 29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart Y of... - Guidelines for Scientific Diving

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Guidelines for Scientific Diving B Appendix B to Subpart Y..., Subpt. Y, App. B Appendix B to Subpart Y of Part 1926—Guidelines for Scientific Diving Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this appendix B are identical to those set forth at...

  3. 29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart T to... - Guidelines for Scientific Diving

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guidelines for Scientific Diving B Appendix B to Subpart T to Part 1910 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH.... 1910, Subpt. T, App. B Appendix B to Subpart T to Part 1910—Guidelines for Scientific Diving...

  4. Changes in dive behavior during naval sonar exposure in killer whales, long-finned pilot whales, and sperm whales.

    PubMed

    Sivle, L D; Kvadsheim, P H; Fahlman, A; Lam, F P A; Tyack, P L; Miller, P J O

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic underwater sound in the environment might potentially affect the behavior of marine mammals enough to have an impact on their reproduction and survival. Diving behavior of four killer whales (Orcinus orca), seven long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas), and four sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) was studied during controlled exposures to naval sonar [low frequency active sonar (LFAS): 1-2 kHz and mid frequency active sonar (MFAS): 6-7 kHz] during three field seasons (2006-2009). Diving behavior was monitored before, during and after sonar exposure using an archival tag placed on the animal with suction cups. The tag recorded the animal's vertical movement, and additional data on horizontal movement and vocalizations were used to determine behavioral modes. Killer whales that were conducting deep dives at sonar onset changed abruptly to shallow diving (ShD) during LFAS, while killer whales conducting deep dives at the onset of MFAS did not alter dive mode. When in ShD mode at sonar onset, killer whales did not change their diving behavior. Pilot and sperm whales performed normal deep dives (NDD) during MFAS exposure. During LFAS exposures, long-finned pilot whales mostly performed fewer deep dives and some sperm whales performed shallower and shorter dives. Acoustic recording data presented previously indicates that deep diving (DD) is associated with feeding. Therefore, the observed changes in dive behavior of the three species could potentially reduce the foraging efficiency of the affected animals.

  5. Changes in dive behavior during naval sonar exposure in killer whales, long-finned pilot whales, and sperm whales

    PubMed Central

    Sivle, L. D.; Kvadsheim, P. H.; Fahlman, A.; Lam, F. P. A.; Tyack, P. L.; Miller, P. J. O.

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic underwater sound in the environment might potentially affect the behavior of marine mammals enough to have an impact on their reproduction and survival. Diving behavior of four killer whales (Orcinus orca), seven long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas), and four sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) was studied during controlled exposures to naval sonar [low frequency active sonar (LFAS): 1–2 kHz and mid frequency active sonar (MFAS): 6–7 kHz] during three field seasons (2006–2009). Diving behavior was monitored before, during and after sonar exposure using an archival tag placed on the animal with suction cups. The tag recorded the animal's vertical movement, and additional data on horizontal movement and vocalizations were used to determine behavioral modes. Killer whales that were conducting deep dives at sonar onset changed abruptly to shallow diving (ShD) during LFAS, while killer whales conducting deep dives at the onset of MFAS did not alter dive mode. When in ShD mode at sonar onset, killer whales did not change their diving behavior. Pilot and sperm whales performed normal deep dives (NDD) during MFAS exposure. During LFAS exposures, long-finned pilot whales mostly performed fewer deep dives and some sperm whales performed shallower and shorter dives. Acoustic recording data presented previously indicates that deep diving (DD) is associated with feeding. Therefore, the observed changes in dive behavior of the three species could potentially reduce the foraging efficiency of the affected animals. PMID:23087648

  6. Diving Response in Rats: Role of the Subthalamic Vasodilator Area

    PubMed Central

    Golanov, Eugene V.; Shiflett, James M.; Britz, Gavin W.

    2016-01-01

    Diving response (DR) is a powerful integrative response targeted toward survival of the hypoxic/anoxic conditions. Being present in all animals and humans, it allows to survive adverse conditions like diving. Earlier, we discovered that forehead stimulation affords neuroprotective effect, decreasing infarction volume triggered by permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in rats. We hypothesized that cold stimulation of the forehead induces DR in rats, which, in turn, exerts neuroprotection. We compared autonomic [AP, heart rate (HR), cerebral blood flow (CBF)] and EEG responses to the known DR-triggering stimulus, ammonia stimulation of the nasal mucosa, cold stimulation of the forehead, and cold stimulation of the glabrous skin of the tail base in anesthetized rats. Responses in AP, HR, CBF, and EEG to cold stimulation of the forehead and ammonia vapors instillation into the nasal cavity were comparable and differed significantly from responses to the cold stimulation of the tail base. Excitotoxic lesion of the subthalamic vasodilator area (SVA), which is known to participate in CBF regulation and to afford neuroprotection upon excitation, failed to affect autonomic components of the DR evoked by forehead cold stimulation or nasal mucosa ammonia stimulation. We conclude that cold stimulation of the forehead triggers physiological response comparable to the response evoked by ammonia vapor instillation into nasal cavity, which is considered as stimulus triggering protective DR. These observations may explain the neuroprotective effect of the forehead stimulation. Data demonstrate that SVA does not directly participate in the autonomic adjustments accompanying DR; however, it is involved in diving-evoked modulation of EEG. We suggest that forehead stimulation can be employed as a stimulus capable of triggering oxygen-conserving DR and can be used for neuroprotective therapy. PMID:27708614

  7. Tumor vessel normalization after aerobic exercise enhances chemotherapeutic efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Schadler, Keri L.; Thomas, Nicholas J.; Galie, Peter A.; Bhang, Dong Ha; Roby, Kerry C.; Addai, Prince; Till, Jacob E.; Sturgeon, Kathleen; Zaslavsky, Alexander; Chen, Christopher S.; Ryeom, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapies aimed at tumor vasculature are utilized in combination with chemotherapy to improve drug delivery and efficacy after tumor vascular normalization. Tumor vessels are highly disorganized with disrupted blood flow impeding drug delivery to cancer cells. Although pharmacologic anti-angiogenic therapy can remodel and normalize tumor vessels, there is a limited window of efficacy and these drugs are associated with severe side effects necessitating alternatives for vascular normalization. Recently, moderate aerobic exercise has been shown to induce vascular normalization in mouse models. Here, we provide a mechanistic explanation for the tumor vascular normalization induced by exercise. Shear stress, the mechanical stimuli exerted on endothelial cells by blood flow, modulates vascular integrity. Increasing vascular shear stress through aerobic exercise can alter and remodel blood vessels in normal tissues. Our data in mouse models indicate that activation of calcineurin-NFAT-TSP1 signaling in endothelial cells plays a critical role in exercise-induced shear stress mediated tumor vessel remodeling. We show that moderate aerobic exercise with chemotherapy caused a significantly greater decrease in tumor growth than chemotherapy alone through improved chemotherapy delivery after tumor vascular normalization. Our work suggests that the vascular normalizing effects of aerobic exercise can be an effective chemotherapy adjuvant. PMID:27589843

  8. Proteome analysis of aerobically and anaerobically grown Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Bruckmann, Astrid; Hensbergen, Paul J; Balog, Crina I A; Deelder, André M; Brandt, Raymond; Snoek, I S Ishtar; Steensma, H Yde; van Heusden, G Paul H

    2009-01-30

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to grow under aerobic as well as anaerobic conditions. We and others previously found that transcription levels of approximately 500 genes differed more than two-fold when cells from anaerobic and aerobic conditions were compared. Here, we addressed the effect of anaerobic growth at the post-transcriptional level by comparing the proteomes of cells isolated from steady-state glucose-limited anaerobic and aerobic cultures. Following two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry we identified 110 protein spots, corresponding to 75 unique proteins, of which the levels differed more than two-fold between aerobically and anaerobically-grown cells. For 21 of the 110 spots, the intensities decreased more than two-fold whereas the corresponding mRNA levels increased or did not change significantly under anaerobic conditions. The intensities of the other 89 spots changed in the same direction as the mRNA levels of the corresponding genes, although to different extents. For some genes of glycolysis a small increase in mRNA levels, 1.5-2 fold, corresponded to a 5-10 fold increase in protein levels. Extrapolation of our results suggests that transcriptional regulation is the major but not exclusive mechanism for adaptation of S. cerevisiae to anaerobic growth conditions.

  9. 'Diving reflex' in man - Its relation to isometric and dynamic exercise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, S. A., Jr.; Campbell, J. K.; Wildenthal, K.

    1972-01-01

    To test the influence of physical activity on the diving reflex, 10 normal men held their breath with their faces immersed in 15 C water during rest, bicycle exercise, and sustained isometric handgrip contraction. At all conditions, a slight but statistically significant elevation of blood pressure and a marked decrease in heart rate occurred during each dive. During moderate bicycle exercise heart rate fell more rapidly than at rest and the final level of bradycardia approached that achieved at rest, despite the fact that predive heart rates were much higher during exercise. When diving occurred in combination with isometric exercise, bradycardia was less severe than during resting dives and final heart rates could be represented as the sum of the expected responses to each intervention alone. In all conditions apnea without face immersion caused bradycardia that was less severe than during wet dives.

  10. Diving experience and emotional factors related to the psychomotor effects of nitrogen narcosis.

    PubMed

    Biersner, R J; Hall, D A; Linaweaver, P G; Neuman, T S

    1978-08-01

    Simple and complex psychomotor performance were tested among 21 Navy divers under normal conditions and during nitrogen narcosis in simulated dives to 170 ft of sea water. Complex psychomotor performance was impaired significantly during narcosis, while simple psychomotor performance remained essentially normal. Differences between baseline scores for complex psychomotor performance (pre- and post-dive combined) and scores obtained from the two combined testing sessions administered during narcosis were correlated with official Navy records of diving experience and self-reported moods. None of the diving experience measures was associated significantly with these difference scores. The moods of Fatigue and Happiness were, however, correlated significantly with impairment. These results indicate that, although previous experience with nitrogen narcosis and diving tasks do not mediate the performance effects of nitrogen narcosis, the complex psychomotor effects nitrogen narcosis are related to emotional traits.

  11. Respiration and deep diving in the bottlenose porpoise.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, S H; Scronce, B L; Kanwisher, J

    1969-12-26

    A bottlenose porpoise was trained to dive untethered in the open ocean and to exhale into an underwater collecting funnel before surfacing from prescribed depths down to 300 meters. The animal was also taught to hold its breath for periods up to 4 minutes at the surface and then blow in the funnel. Alveolar collapse is probably complete at around 100 meters, and little pulmonary respiratory exchange occurs below that depth. Thoracic collapse was observ visually at 10 to 50 meters and by underwater television to 300 meters.

  12. Consensus guidelines for the use of ultrasound for diving research.

    PubMed

    Møllerløkken, Andreas; Blogg, S Lesley; Doolette, David J; Nishi, Ronald Y; Pollock, Neal W

    2016-03-01

    The International Meeting on Ultrasound for Diving Research produced expert consensus recommendations for ultrasound detection of vascular gas bubbles and the analysis, interpretation and reporting of such data. Recommendations for standardization of techniques to allow comparison between studies included bubble monitoring site selection, frequency and duration of monitoring, and use of the Spencer, Kisman-Masurel or Eftedal-Brubakk scales. Recommendations for reporting of results included description of subject posture and provocation manoeuvres during monitoring, reporting of untransformed data and the appropriate use of statistics. These guidelines are available from www.dhmjournal.com.

  13. Dynamics of ultralight aircraft: Dive recovery of hang gliders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1977-01-01

    Longitudinal control of a hang glider by weight shift is not always adequate for recovery from a vertical dive. According to Lanchester's phugoid theory, recovery from rest to horizontal flight ought to be possible within a distance equal to three times the height of fall needed to acquire level flight velocity. A hang glider, having a wing loading of 5 kg sq m and capable of developing a lift coefficient of 1.0, should recover to horizontal flight within a vertical distance of about 12 m. The minimum recovery distance can be closely approached if the glider is equipped with a small all-moveable tail surface having sufficient upward deflection.

  14. The effect of O2 and CO2 on the dive behavior and heart rate of lesser scaup ducks (Aythya affinis): quantification of the critical PaO2 that initiates a diving bradycardia.

    PubMed

    Borg, Kim A; Milsom, William K; Jones, David R

    2004-12-15

    Lesser scaup ducks were trained to dive for short and long durations following exposure to various gas concentrations to determine the influence of oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) on diving behavior and heart rate. Compared with normoxia, hyperoxia (50% O2) significantly increased the duration of long dives, whereas severe hypoxia (9% O2) significantly decreased the duration of both short and long dives. Hypercapnia (5% CO2) had no effect on dive duration. Surface intervals were not significantly altered by the oxygen treatments, but significantly increased following CO2 exposure. Heart rate during diving was unaffected by hyperoxia and hypercapnia, but gradually declined in long dives after severe hypoxia. Thus, our results suggest that during the majority of dives, O2 and CO2 levels in lesser scaup ducks are managed through changes in diving behavior without any major cardiovascular adjustments, but below a threshold PaO2, a bradycardia is evoked to conserve the remaining oxygen for hypoxia sensitive tissues. A model of oxygen store utilization during voluntary diving was developed to estimate the critical PaO2 below which bradycardia is initiated (approximately 26 mmHg) and predicted that this critical PaO2 would be reached 19s into a dive after exposure to severe hypoxia, which corresponded exactly with the time of initiation of bradycardia in the severe hypoxia trials.

  15. Dive Europa: a search-for-life initiative.

    PubMed

    Naganuma, T; Uematsu, H

    1998-06-01

    Liquid water, underwater volcanoes and possibly life forms have been suggested to be present beneath the estimated 10 km-thick ice shell of Europa the Jovian satellite J2. Europa's possible ocean is estimated to be 100-200km deep. Despite the great depth of the Europa's ocean, hydrostatic pressure at the seafloor would be 130-260 MPa, corresponding to 13-26 km depth of a theoretical Earth's ocean. The hydrostatic pressure is not beyond the edge of existing deep-sea technology. Here we propose exploration of Europa's deep-sea by the use of current technologies, taking a symbolic example of a deep submergence vehicle Shinkai 6500 which dives to a depth of 6.5 km deep (50 km depth of Europa's ocean). Shinkai 6500 is embarkable in the payload bay of the Space Shuttles in terms of size and weight for the transportation to a Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Secondary boost is needed for interplanetary flight from the LEO. On-orbit assembly of the secondary booster is a technological challenge. The International Space Station (ISS) and ISS-related technologies will facilitate the secondary boost. Also, ice shell drilling is a challenge and is needed before the dive into Europa's ocean. These challenges should be overcome during a certain leading time for matured experience in the ISS operation.

  16. Dive and beak movement patterns in leatherback turtles Dermochelys coriacea during internesting intervals in French Guiana.

    PubMed

    Fossette, Sabrina; Gaspar, Philippe; Handrich, Yves; Le Maho, Yvon; Georges, Jean-Yves

    2008-03-01

    1. Investigating the foraging patterns of free-ranging species is essential to estimate energy/time budgets for assessing their real reproductive strategy. Leatherback turtles Dermochelys coriacea (Vandelli 1761), commonly considered as capital breeders, have been reported recently to prospect actively during the breeding season in French Guiana, Atlantic Ocean. In this study we investigate the possibility of this active behaviour being associated with foraging, by studying concurrently diving and beak movement patterns in gravid females equipped with IMASEN (Inter-MAndibular Angle SENsor). 2. Four turtles provided data for periods varying from 7.3 to 56.1 h while exhibiting continuous short and shallow benthic dives. Beak movement ('b-m') events occurred in 34% of the dives, on average 1.8 +/- 1.4 times per dive. These b-m events lasted between 1.5 and 20 s and occurred as isolated or grouped (two to five consecutive beak movements) events in 96.0 +/- 4.0% of the recorded cases, and to a lesser extent in series (> five consecutive beak movements). 3. Most b-m events occurred during wiggles at the bottom of U- and W-shaped dives and at the beginning and end of the bottom phase of the dives. W-shaped dives were associated most frequently with beak movements (65% of such dives) and in particular with grouped beak movements. 4. Previous studies proposed wiggles to be indicator of predatory activity, U- and W-shaped dives being putative foraging dives. Beak movements recorded in leatherbacks during the first hours of their internesting interval in French Guiana may be related to feeding attempts. 5. In French Guiana, leatherbacks show different mouth-opening patterns for different dive patterns, suggesting that they forage opportunistically on occasional prey, with up to 17% of the dives appearing to be successful feeding dives. 6. This study highlights the contrasted strategies adopted by gravid leatherbacks nesting on the Pacific coasts of Costa Rica, in the deep

  17. Effects of dominant somatotype on aerobic capacity trainability

    PubMed Central

    Chaouachi, M; Chaouachi, A; Chamari, K; Chtara, M; Feki, Y; Amri, M; Trudeau, F

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the association between dominant somatotype and the effect on aerobic capacity variables of individualised aerobic interval training. Methods: Forty one white North African subjects (age 21.4±1.3 years; V·o2max = 52.8±5.7 ml kg–1 min–1) performed three exercise tests 1 week apart (i) an incremental test on a cycle ergometer to determine V·o2max and V·o2 at the second ventilatory threshold (VT2); (ii) a VAM-EVAL track test to determine maximal aerobic speed (vV·o2max); and (iii) an exhaustive constant velocity test to determine time limit performed at 100% vV·o2max (tlim100). Subjects were divided into four somatometric groups: endomorphs-mesomorphs (Endo-meso; n = 9), mesomorphs (Meso; n = 11), mesomorphs-ectomorphs (Meso-ecto; n = 12), and ectomorphs (Ecto; n = 9). Subjects followed a 12 week training program (two sessions/week). Each endurance training session consisted of the maximal number of successive fractions for each subject. Each fraction consisted of one period of exercise at 100% of vV·o2max and one of active recovery at 60% of vV·o2max. The duration of each period was equal to half the individual tlim100 duration (153.6±39.7 s). After the training program, all subjects were re-evaluated for comparison with pre-test results. Results: Pre- and post-training data were grouped by dominant somatotype. Two way ANOVA revealed significant somatotype-aerobic training interaction effects (p<0.001) for improvements in vV·o2max, V·o2max expressed classically and according to allometric scaling, and V·o2 at VT2. There were significant differences among groups post-training: the Meso-ecto and the Meso groups showed the greatest improvements in aerobic capacity. Conclusion: The significant somatotype-aerobic training interaction suggests different trainability with intermittent and individualised aerobic training according to somatotype. PMID:16306506

  18. Dive and Explore: An Interactive Exhibit That Simulates Making an ROV Dive to a Submarine Volcano, Hatfield Marine Science Visitor Center, Newport, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, C.; Chadwick, W. W.; Hanshumaker, W.; Osis, V.; Hamilton, C.

    2002-12-01

    We have created a new interactive exhibit in which the user can sit down and simulate that they are making a dive to the seafloor with the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) named ROPOS. The exhibit immerses the user in an interactive experience that is naturally fun but also educational. This new public display is located at the Hatfield Marine Science Visitor Center in Newport, Oregon. The exhibit is designed to look like the real ROPOS control console and includes three video monitors, a PC, a DVD player, an overhead speaker, graphic panels, buttons, lights, dials, and a seat in front of a joystick. The dives are based on real seafloor settings at Axial seamount, an active submarine volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (NE Pacific) that is also the location of a seafloor observatory called NeMO. The user can choose between 1 of 3 different dives sites in the caldera of Axial Volcano. Once a dive is chosen, then the user watches ROPOS being deployed and then arrives into a 3-D computer-generated seafloor environment that is based on the real world but is easier to visualize and navigate. Once on the bottom, the user is placed within a 360 degree panorama and can look in all directions by manipulating the joystick. By clicking on markers embedded in the scene, the user can then either move to other panorama locations via movies that travel through the 3-D virtual environment, or they can play video clips from actual ROPOS dives specifically related to that scene. Audio accompanying the video clips informs the user where they are going or what they are looking at. After the user is finished exploring the dive site they end the dive by leaving the bottom and watching the ROV being recovered onto the ship at the surface. The user can then choose a different dive or make the same dive again. Within the three simulated dives there are a total of 6 arrival and departure movies, 7 seafloor panoramas, 12 travel movies, and 23 ROPOS video clips. The exhibit software was created

  19. Performance of sequential anaerobic/aerobic digestion applied to municipal sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Tomei, M Concetta; Rita, Sara; Mininni, Giuseppe

    2011-07-01

    A promising alternative to conventional single phase processing, the use of sequential anaerobic-aerobic digestion, was extensively investigated on municipal sewage sludge from a full scale wastewater treatment plant. The objective of the work was to evaluate sequential digestion performance by testing the characteristics of the digested sludge in terms of volatile solids (VS), Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) and nitrogen reduction, biogas production, dewaterability and the content of proteins and polysaccharides. VS removal efficiencies of 32% in the anaerobic phase and 17% in the aerobic one were obtained, and similar COD removal efficiencies (29% anaerobic and 21% aerobic) were also observed. The aerobic stage was also efficient in nitrogen removal providing a decrease of the nitrogen content in the supernatant attributable to nitrification and simultaneous denitrification. Moreover, in the aerobic phase an additional marked removal of proteins and polysaccharides produced in the anaerobic phase was achieved. The sludge dewaterability was evaluated by determining the Optimal Polymer Dose (OPD) and the Capillary Suction Time (CST) and a significant positive effect due to the aerobic stage was observed. Biogas production was close to the upper limit of the range of values reported in the literature in spite of the low anaerobic sludge retention time of 15 days. From a preliminary analysis it was found that the energy demand of the aerobic phase was significantly lower than the recovered energy in the anaerobic phase and the associated additional cost was negligible in comparison to the saving derived from the reduced amount of sludge to be disposed.

  20. Repetitive Diving in Trained Rats Still Increases Fos Production in Brainstem Neurons after Bilateral Sectioning of the Anterior Ethmoidal Nerve

    PubMed Central

    McCulloch, Paul F.; Warren, Erik A.; DiNovo, Karyn M.

    2016-01-01

    This research was designed to investigate the role of the anterior ethmoidal nerve (AEN) during repetitive trained diving in rats, with specific attention to activation of afferent and efferent brainstem nuclei that are part of this reflexive response. The AEN innervates the nose and nasal passages and is thought to be an important component of the afferent limb of the diving response. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (N = 24) were trained to swim and dive through a 5 m underwater maze. Some rats (N = 12) had bilateral sectioning of the AEN, others a Sham surgery (N = 12). Twelve rats (6 AEN cut and 6 Sham) had 24 post-surgical dive trials over 2 h to activate brainstem neurons to produce Fos, a neuronal activation marker. Remaining rats were non-diving controls. Diving animals had significantly more Fos-positive neurons than non-diving animals in the caudal pressor area, ventral medullary dorsal horn, ventral paratrigeminal nucleus, nucleus tractus solitarius, rostral ventrolateral medulla, Raphe nuclei, A5, Locus Coeruleus, and Kölliker-Fuse area. There were no significant differences in brainstem Fos labeling in rats diving with and without intact AENs. Thus, the AENs are not required for initiation of the diving response. Other nerve(s) that innervate the nose and nasal passages, and/or suprabulbar activation of brainstem neurons, may be responsible for the pattern of neuronal activation observed during repetitive trained diving in rats. These results help define the central neuronal circuitry of the mammalian diving response. PMID:27148082

  1. Nutritional status changes in humans during a 14-day saturation dive: the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations V project.

    PubMed

    Smith, Scott M; Davis-Street, Janis E; Fesperman, J Vernell; Smith, Myra D; Rice, Barbara L; Zwart, Sara R

    2004-07-01

    Ground-based analogs of spaceflight are an important means of studying physiologic and nutritional changes associated with space travel, and the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations V (NEEMO) is such an analog. To determine whether saturation diving has nutrition-related effects similar to those of spaceflight, we conducted a clinical nutritional assessment of the NEEMO crew (4 men, 2 women) before, during, and after their 14-d saturation dive. Blood and urine samples were collected before, during, and after the dive. The foods consumed by the crew were typical of the spaceflight food system. A number of physiologic changes were observed, during and after the dive, that are also commonly observed during spaceflight. Hemoglobin and hematocrit were lower (P < 0.05) after the dive. Transferrin receptors were significantly lower immediately after the dive. Serum ferritin increased significantly during the dive. There was also evidence indicating that oxidative damage and stress increased during the dive. Glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase decreased during and after the dive (P < 0.05). Decreased leptin during the dive (P < 0.05) may have been related to the increased stress. Subjects had decreased energy intake and weight loss during the dive, similar to what is observed during spaceflight. Together, these similarities to spaceflight provide a model to use in further defining the physiologic effects of spaceflight and investigating potential countermeasures.

  2. Nutritional status changes in humans during a 14-day saturation dive: the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations V project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Davis-Street, Janis E.; Fesperman, J. Vernell; Smith, Myra D.; Rice, Barbara L.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2004-01-01

    Ground-based analogs of spaceflight are an important means of studying physiologic and nutritional changes associated with space travel, and the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations V (NEEMO) is such an analog. To determine whether saturation diving has nutrition-related effects similar to those of spaceflight, we conducted a clinical nutritional assessment of the NEEMO crew (4 men, 2 women) before, during, and after their 14-d saturation dive. Blood and urine samples were collected before, during, and after the dive. The foods consumed by the crew were typical of the spaceflight food system. A number of physiologic changes were observed, during and after the dive, that are also commonly observed during spaceflight. Hemoglobin and hematocrit were lower (P < 0.05) after the dive. Transferrin receptors were significantly lower immediately after the dive. Serum ferritin increased significantly during the dive. There was also evidence indicating that oxidative damage and stress increased during the dive. Glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase decreased during and after the dive (P < 0.05). Decreased leptin during the dive (P < 0.05) may have been related to the increased stress. Subjects had decreased energy intake and weight loss during the dive, similar to what is observed during spaceflight. Together, these similarities to spaceflight provide a model to use in further defining the physiologic effects of spaceflight and investigating potential countermeasures.

  3. Abdominally implanted transmitters with percutaneous antennas affect the dive performance of Common Eiders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Abby N.; Latty, Christopher J.; Hollmén, Tuula E.; Petersen, Margaret R.; Andrews, Russel D.

    2010-01-01

    Implanted transmitters have become an important tool for studying the ecology of sea ducks, but their effects remain largely undocumented. To address this, we assessed how abdominally implanted transmitters with percutaneous antennas affect the vertical dive speeds, stroke frequencies, bottom time, and dive duration of captive Common Eiders (Somateria mollissima). To establish baselines, we recorded video of six birds diving 4.9 m prior to surgery, implanted them with 38- to 47-g platform transmitter terminals, and then recorded their diving for 3.5 months after surgery to determine effects. Descent speeds were 16–25% slower and ascent speeds were 17–44% slower after surgery, and both remained below baseline at the end of the study. Dive durations were longer than baseline until day 22. On most days between 15 and 107 days after surgery, foot-stroke frequencies of birds foraging on the bottom were slower. Foot- and wing-stroke frequencies during descent and bottom time did not differ across the time series. If birds that rely on benthic invertebrates for sustenance dive slower and stay submerged longer after being implanted with a satellite transmitter, their foraging energetics may be affected. Researchers considering use of implanted transmitters with percutaneous antennas should be mindful of these effects and the possibility of concomitant alterations in diving behavior, foraging success, and migratory behavior compared to those of unmarked conspecifics.

  4. Recreational scuba diving: negative or positive effects of oxidative and cardiovascular stress?

    PubMed

    Perovic, Antonija; Unic, Adriana; Dumic, Jerka

    2014-01-01

    Environmental conditions and increased physical activity during scuba diving are followed by increased production of free radicals and disturbed redox balance. Redox balance disorder is associated with damage of cellular components, changes of cellular signaling pathways and alterations of gene expression. Oxidative stress leads to increased expression of sirtuins (SIRTs), molecules which play an important role in the antioxidant defense, due to their sensitivity to the changes in the redox status and their ability to regulate redox homeostasis. These facts make SIRTs interesting to be considered as molecules affected by scuba diving and in that sense, as potential biomarkers of oxidative status or possible drug targets in reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. In addition, SIRTs effects through currently known targets make them intriguing molecules which can act positively on health in general and whose expression can be induced by scuba diving.A demanding physical activity, as well as other circumstances present in scuba diving, has the greatest load on the cardiovascular function (CV). The mechanisms of CV response during scuba diving are still unclear, but diving-induced oxidative stress and the increase in SIRTs expression could be an important factor in CV adaptation. This review summarizes current knowledge on scuba diving-induced oxidative and CV stress and describes the important roles of SIRTs in the (patho)physiological processes caused by the redox balance disorder.

  5. The comparative biology of diving in two genera of European Dytiscidae (Coleoptera).

    PubMed

    Calosi, P; Bilton, D T; Spicer, J I; Verberk, W C E P; Atfield, A; Garland, T

    2012-02-01

    Surfacing behaviour is fundamental in the ecology of aquatic air-breathing organisms; however, it is only in vertebrates that the evolutionary ecology of diving has been well characterized. Here, we explore the diving behaviour of dytiscid beetles, a key group of surface-exchanging freshwater invertebrates, by comparing the dive responses of 25 taxa (Deronectes and Ilybius spp.) acclimated at two temperatures. The allometric slopes of dive responses in these dytiscids appear similar to those of vertebrate ectotherms, supporting the notion that metabolic mode shapes the evolution of diving performance. In both genera, beetles spend more time submerged than on the surface, and surface time does not vary with the temperature of acclimation. However, presumably in order to meet increased oxygen demand at higher temperatures, Deronectes species increase surfacing frequency, whereas Ilybius species decrease dive time, an example of 'multiple solutions.' Finally, widespread northern species appear to possess higher diving performances than their geographically restricted southern relatives, something which may have contributed to their range expansion ability.

  6. Dive characteristics can predict foraging success in Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus) as validated by animal-borne video

    PubMed Central

    Volpov, Beth L.; Rosen, David A. S.; Hoskins, Andrew J.; Lourie, Holly J.; Dorville, Nicole; Baylis, Alastair M. M.; Wheatley, Kathryn E.; Marshall, Greg; Abernathy, Kyler; Semmens, Jayson; Hindell, Mark A.; Arnould, John P. Y.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dive characteristics and dive shape are often used to infer foraging success in pinnipeds. However, these inferences have not been directly validated in the field with video, and it remains unclear if this method can be applied to benthic foraging animals. This study assessed the ability of dive characteristics from time-depth recorders (TDR) to predict attempted prey capture events (APC) that were directly observed on animal-borne video in Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus, n=11). The most parsimonious model predicting the probability of a dive with ≥1 APC on video included only descent rate as a predictor variable. The majority (94%) of the 389 total APC were successful, and the majority of the dives (68%) contained at least one successful APC. The best model predicting these successful dives included descent rate as a predictor. Comparisons of the TDR model predictions to video yielded a maximum accuracy of 77.5% in classifying dives as either APC or non-APC or 77.1% in classifying dives as successful verses unsuccessful. Foraging intensity, measured as either total APC per dive or total successful APC per dive, was best predicted by bottom duration and ascent rate. The accuracy in predicting total APC per dive varied based on the number of APC per dive with maximum accuracy occurring at 1 APC for both total (54%) and only successful APC (52%). Results from this study linking verified foraging dives to dive characteristics potentially opens the door to decades of historical TDR datasets across several otariid species. PMID:26873950

  7. Microparticle production, neutrophil activation, and intravascular bubbles following open-water SCUBA diving.

    PubMed

    Thom, Stephen R; Milovanova, Tatyana N; Bogush, Marina; Bhopale, Veena M; Yang, Ming; Bushmann, Kim; Pollock, Neal W; Ljubkovic, Marko; Denoble, Petar; Dujic, Zeljko

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate annexin V-positive microparticles (MPs) and neutrophil activation in humans following decompression from open-water SCUBA diving with the hypothesis that changes are related to intravascular bubble formation. Sixteen male volunteer divers followed a uniform profile of four daily SCUBA dives to 18 m of sea water for 47 min. Blood was obtained prior to and at 80 min following the first and fourth dives to evaluate the impact of repetitive diving, and intravascular bubbles were quantified by trans-thoracic echocardiography carried out at 20-min intervals for 2 h after each dive. MPs increased by 3.4-fold after each dive, neutrophil activation occurred as assessed by surface expression of myeloperoxidase and the CD18 component of β(2)-integrins, and there was an increased presence of the platelet-derived CD41 protein on the neutrophil surface indicating interactions with platelet membranes. Intravascular bubbles were detected in all divers. Surprisingly, significant inverse correlations were found among postdiving bubble scores and MPs, most consistently at 80 min or more after the dive on the fourth day. There were significant positive correlations between MPs and platelet-neutrophil interactions after the first dive and between platelet-neutrophil interactions and neutrophil activation documented as an elevation in β(2)-integrin expression after the fourth dive. We conclude that MPs- and neutrophil-related events in humans are consistent with findings in an animal decompression model. Whether there are causal relationships among bubbles, MPs, platelet-neutrophil interactions, and neutrophil activation remains obscure and requires additional study.

  8. A New Method to Quantify within Dive Foraging Behaviour in Marine Predators

    PubMed Central

    Heerah, Karine; Hindell, Mark; Guinet, Christophe; Charrassin, Jean-Benoît

    2014-01-01

    Studies on diving behaviour classically divide a dive into three phases: the descent, bottom and ascent phases, with foraging assumed to occur during the bottom phase. The greater complexity of dive revealed through modern, high resolution data highlights the need to re-assess this approach and to consider a larger number of phases within individual dives. Two southern elephant seals (SES) were fitted with a head mounted Time Depth Recorder (TDR) and an accelerometer from which prey capture attempts were estimated. A Weddell seal was also fitted with a TDR. TDRs for both species recorded depth once per second. We quantified the within dive behaviour using an automated broken stick algorithm identifying the optimal number of segments within each dive. The vertical sinuosity of the segments was used to infer two types of behaviours, with highly sinuous segments indicating "hunting" and less sinuous segments indicating "transiting". Using the broken stick method the seals alternated between "hunting" and "transit" modes with an average of 6±2 and 7±0.02 behavioural phases within each dive for the Weddell seal and SES, respectively. In SES, 77% of prey capture attempts (identified from the acceleration data) occurred in highly sinuous phases (“hunting”) as defined by our new approach. SES spent more time in transit mode within a dive, and hunting mostly occurred during the bottom phase. Conversely the Weddell seal spent more time in hunting mode which also occurred during bottom phase but occurred mostly at shallower depths. Such differences probably reflect different foraging tactics and habitat use. For both species, hunting time differs significantly from bottom time previously used as a proxy for the time spent foraging in a dive. The hunting time defined by our method therefore provides a more accurate fine-scale description of the seals' foraging behaviour. PMID:24922323

  9. Diving behaviour of harbour seal Phoca vitulina pups from nursing to independent feeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekkby, T.; Bjørge, A.

    2000-12-01

    To study the diving activity of harbour seal ( Phoca vitulina) from nursing to independent feeding, we VHF radio tagged and tracked seven pups. The pups gradually developed the diving skills necessary to obtain enough food after weaning and to avoid natural and man-made dangers. The maximum dive duration remained unchanged with pup age, indicating that pups have considerable breath-holding capacity already from an early age. However, mean dive duration increased with age, from 0.92 min in pups ≤25 days old to 2.55 min in 1-2 month olds, and 3.09 min in 2-3 month olds. The increase continued for weeks after the assumed weaning, and indicates that the capacity to perform long-lasting dives steadily increases as the pups grow older. Mean and maximum surface duration remained unchanged with pup age. Mean surface duration was 0.32 min with a maximum value of 6.10 min. An increase in mean surface duration with mean dive duration was found when the pups were ≤25 days old, but not when they were older. This may indicate that young pups need to rest more after diving than older ones. No relationship was found between dive duration and the subsequent surface interval. The proportion of time spent submerged increased with age, from 71% when the pups were ≤25 days old to 86% when they were older. The pups hauled-out less frequently as they grew older. The pups were never recorded outside the study area (defined by the 30-km station range). Time of day, tidal height and weather conditions seemed not to influence the diving behaviour of the pups.

  10. Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy after Aerobic Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Adam R.; Harber, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Current dogma suggests aerobic exercise training has minimal effect on skeletal muscle size. We and others have demonstrated that aerobic exercise acutely and chronically alters protein metabolism and induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy. These findings promote an antithesis to the status quo by providing novel perspective on skeletal muscle mass regulation and insight into exercise-countermeasures for populations prone to muscle loss. PMID:24508740

  11. Aerobic rice mechanization: techniques for crop establishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusairy, K. M.; Ayob, H.; Chan, C. S.; Fauzi, M. I. Mohamed; Mohamad Fakhrul, Z. O.; Shahril Shah, G. S. M.; Azlan, O.; Rasad, M. A.; Hashim, A. M.; Arshad, Z.; E, E. Ibrahim; Saifulizan, M. N.

    2015-12-01

    Rice being the staple food crops, hundreds of land races in it makes the diversity of rice crops. Aerobic rice production was introduced which requires much less water input to safeguard and sustain the rice production and conserve water due to decreasing water resources, climatic changes and competition from urban and industrial users. Mechanization system plays an important role for the success of aerobic rice cultivation. All farming activities for aerobic rice production are run on aerobic soil conditions. Row seeder mechanization system is developed to replace conventional seeding technique on the aerobic rice field. It is targeted for small and the large scale aerobic rice farmers. The aero - seeder machine is used for the small scale aerobic rice field, while the accord - seeder is used for the large scale aerobic rice field. The use of this mechanization machine can eliminate the tedious and inaccurate seeding operations reduce labour costs and increases work rate. The machine is easy to operate and it can increase crop establishment rate. It reduce missing hill, increasing planting and crop with high yield can be produce. This machine is designed for low costs maintenance and it is easy to dismantle and assemble during maintenance and it is safe to be used.

  12. Aerobic Fitness for the Moderately Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Dan

    1981-01-01

    Intended for physical education teachers, the booklet offers ideas for incorporating aerobic conditioning into programs for moderately mentally retarded students. An explanation of aerobic fitness and its benefits is followed by information on initiating a fitness program with evaluation of height, weight, body fat, resting heart rate, and…

  13. Aerobic Dancing--A Rhythmic Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Jacki

    Fitness programs now and in the future must offer built-in cardiovascular conditioning, variety, novelty, and change to meet the physical, mental, and emotional needs of our society. Aerobic dancing (dancing designed to train and strengthen the heart, lungs, and vascular system) is one of the first indoor group Aerobic exercise programs designed…

  14. Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and recreational scuba diving in Australia.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rebecca

    2016-09-01

    Dive medicine bodies worldwide recognise that, with comprehensive screening and careful management, people with insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM) can dive safely. Despite this, people with IDDM in Australia are generally denied access to dive training, an out-dated status quo that is not acceptable to the Australian diabetes community. This paper reflects upon the important advocacy work that has been done to progress this issue, and what is still required to open up access and bring Australia into line with more flexible and supportive international standards.

  15. Aerobic biotransformation and mineralization of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, B.H.; Autenrieth, R.L.; Bonner, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    Respirometric mineralization studies of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) were conducted with microorganisms isolated from a site contaminated with munitions waste in Illinois. Nine aerobic bacterial species were isolated under a carbon- and nitrogen-limited condition and tentatively identified as: one Pseudomonas species; one Enterobacter species; and seven Alcaligenes species. Experiments were performed using each of the nine organisms individually and with a consortium of all nine bacterial species. The aerobic microorganisms were cultured in a sterile nutrient solution with glucose and 20 mg/L TNT. Mineralization was determined using uniformly ring-labeled {sup 14}C-TNT in a respirometer that trapped the evolved CO{sub 2}. Biodegradation behavior was characterized based on oxygen consumption, distribution of {sup 14}C activity, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of TNT and its transformation products.

  16. A broad-scale comparison of aerobic activity levels in vertebrates: endotherms versus ectotherms.

    PubMed

    Gillooly, James F; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Mavrodiev, Evgeny V

    2017-02-22

    Differences in the limits and range of aerobic activity levels between endotherms and ectotherms remain poorly understood, though such differences help explain basic differences in species' lifestyles (e.g. movement patterns, feeding modes, and interaction rates). We compare the limits and range of aerobic activity in endotherms (birds and mammals) and ectotherms (fishes, reptiles, and amphibians) by evaluating the body mass-dependence of VO2 max, aerobic scope, and heart mass in a phylogenetic context based on a newly constructed vertebrate supertree. Contrary to previous work, results show no significant differences in the body mass scaling of minimum and maximum oxygen consumption rates with body mass within endotherms or ectotherms. For a given body mass, resting rates and maximum rates were 24-fold and 30-fold lower, respectively, in ectotherms than endotherms. Factorial aerobic scope ranged from five to eight in both groups, with scope in endotherms showing a modest body mass-dependence. Finally, maximum consumption rates and aerobic scope were positively correlated with residual heart mass. Together, these results quantify similarities and differences in the potential for aerobic activity among ectotherms and endotherms from diverse environments. They provide insights into the models and mechanisms that may underlie the body mass-dependence of oxygen consumption.

  17. Differences in foraging activity of deep sea diving odontocetes in the Ligurian Sea as determined by passive acoustic recorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorli, Giacomo; Au, Whitlow W. L.; Neuheimer, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the trophic roles of deep-diving odontocete species and how they vary in space and time is challenged by our ability to observe foraging behavior. Though sampling methods are limited, foraging activity of deep-diving odontocetes can be monitored by recording their biosonar emissions. Daily occurrence of echolocation clicks was monitored acoustically for five months (July-December 2011) in the Ligurian Sea (Mediterranean Sea) using five passive acoustic recorders. Detected odontocetes included Cuvier's beaked whales (Zipuhius cavirostris), sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus), Risso's dolphins (Grampus griseus), and long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas). The results indicated that the foraging strategies varied significantly over time, with sperm whales switching to nocturnal foraging in late September whereas Risso's dolphins and pilot whales foraged mainly at night throughout the sampling period. In the study area, winter nights are about five hours longer than summer nights and an analysis showed that pilot whales and Risso's dolphins adjusted their foraging activity with the length of the night, foraging longer during the longer winter nights. This is the first study to show that marine mammals exhibit diurnal foraging patterns closely correlated to sunrise and sunset.

  18. Passive flooding of paranasal sinuses and middle ears as a method of equalisation in extreme breath-hold diving.

    PubMed

    Germonpré, Peter; Balestra, Costantino; Musimu, Patrick

    2011-06-01

    Breath-hold diving is both a recreational activity, performed by thousands of enthusiasts in Europe, and a high-performance competitive sport. Several 'disciplines' exist, of which the 'no-limits' category is the most spectacular: using a specially designed heavy 'sled,' divers descend to extreme depths on a cable, and then reascend using an inflatable balloon, on a single breath. The current world record for un-assisted descent stands at more than 200 m of depth. Equalising air pressure in the paranasal sinuses and middle-ear cavities is a necessity during descent to avoid barotraumas. However, this requires active insufflations of precious air, which is thus unavailable in the pulmonary system. The authors describe a diver who, by training, is capable of allowing passive flooding of the sinuses and middle ear with (sea) water during descent, by suppressing protective (parasympathetic) reflexes during this process. Using this technique, he performed a series of extreme-depth breath-hold dives in June 2005, descending to 209 m of sea water on one breath of air.

  19. Assessing the congruence of thermal niche estimations derived from distribution and physiological data. A test using diving beetles.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Fernández, David; Aragón, Pedro; Bilton, David T; Lobo, Jorge M

    2012-01-01

    A basic aim of ecology is to understand the determinants of organismal distribution, the niche concept and species distribution models providing key frameworks to approach the problem. As temperature is one of the most important factors affecting species distribution, the estimation of thermal limits is crucially important for inferring range constraints. It is expectable that thermal physiology data derived from laboratory experiments and species' occurrences may express different aspects of the species' niche. However, there is no study systematically testing this prediction in a given taxonomic group while controlling by potential phylogenetic inertia. We estimate the thermal niches of twelve Palaearctic diving beetles species using physiological data derived from experimental analyses in order to examine the extent to which these coincided with those estimated from distribution models based on observed occurrences. We found that thermal niche estimates derived from both approaches lack general congruence, and these results were similar before and after controlling by phylogeny. The congruence between potential distributions obtained from the two different procedures was also explored, and we found again that the percentage of agreement were not very high (~60%). We confirm that both thermal niche estimates derived from geographical and physiological data are likely to misrepresent the true range of climatic variation that these diving beetles are able to tolerate, and so these procedures could be considered as incomplete but complementary estimations of an inaccessible reality.

  20. Assessing the Congruence of Thermal Niche Estimations Derived from Distribution and Physiological Data. A Test Using Diving Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Fernández, David; Aragón, Pedro; Bilton, David T.; Lobo, Jorge M.

    2012-01-01

    A basic aim of ecology is to understand the determinants of organismal distribution, the niche concept and species distribution models providing key frameworks to approach the problem. As temperature is one of the most important factors affecting species distribution, the estimation of thermal limits is crucially important for inferring range constraints. It is expectable that thermal physiology data derived from laboratory experiments and species' occurrences may express different aspects of the species' niche. However, there is no study systematically testing this prediction in a given taxonomic group while controlling by potential phylogenetic inertia. We estimate the thermal niches of twelve Palaearctic diving beetles species using physiological data derived from experimental analyses in order to examine the extent to which these coincided with those estimated from distribution models based on observed occurrences. We found that thermal niche estimates derived from both approaches lack general congruence, and these results were similar before and after controlling by phylogeny. The congruence between potential distributions obtained from the two different procedures was also explored, and we found again that the percentage of agreement were not very high (∼60%). We confirm that both thermal niche estimates derived from geographical and physiological data are likely to misrepresent the true range of climatic variation that these diving beetles are able to tolerate, and so these procedures could be considered as incomplete but complementary estimations of an inaccessible reality. PMID:23133560

  1. Ontogenetic changes in tracheal structure facilitate deep dives and cold water foraging in adult leatherback sea turtles.

    PubMed

    Davenport, John; Fraher, John; Fitzgerald, Ed; McLaughlin, Patrick; Doyle, Tom; Harman, Luke; Cuffe, Tracy; Dockery, Peter

    2009-11-01

    Adult leatherbacks are large animals (300-500 kg), overlapping in size with marine pinniped and cetacean species. Unlike marine mammals, they start their aquatic life as 40-50 g hatchlings, so undergo a 10,000-fold increase in body mass during independent existence. Hatchlings are limited to the tropics and near-surface water. Adults, obligate predators on gelatinous plankton, encounter cold water at depth (<1280 m) or high latitude and are gigantotherms that maintain elevated core body temperatures in cold water. This study shows that there are great ontogenetic changes in tracheal structure related to diving and exposure to cold. Hatchling leatherbacks have a conventional reptilian tracheal structure with circular cartilaginous rings interspersed with extensive connective tissue. The adult trachea is an almost continuous ellipsoidal cartilaginous tube composed of interlocking plates, and will collapse easily in the upper part of the water column during dives, thus avoiding pressure-related structural and physiological problems. It is lined with an extensive, dense erectile vascular plexus that will warm and humidify cold inspired air and possibly retain heat on expiration. A sub-luminal lymphatic plexus is also present. Mammals and birds have independently evolved nasal turbinates to fulfil such a respiratory thermocontrol function; for them, turbinates are regarded as diagnostic of endothermy. This is the first demonstration of a turbinate equivalent in a living reptile.

  2. Aerobic fitness testing: an update.

    PubMed

    Stevens, N; Sykes, K

    1996-12-01

    This study confirms that all three tests are reliable tools for the assessment of cardiorespiratory fitness and the prediction of aerobic capacity. While this particular study consisted of active, youthful subjects, subsequent studies at University College Chester have found similar findings with larger databases and a wider cross-section of subjects. The Astrand cycle test and Chester step test are submaximal tests with error margins of 5-15 per cent and therefore, not as precise as maximal testing. However, they still give a reasonably accurate reflection of an individual's fitness without the cost, time, effort and risk on the part of the subject. The bleep test is a low-cost maximal test designed for well-motivated, active individuals who are used to running to physical exhaustion. Used on other groups, results will not accurately reflect cardiorespiratory fitness values. While all three tests have inherent advantages and disadvantages, perhaps the most important factors are the knowledge and skills of the tester. Without a sound understanding of the physiological principles underlying these tests, and the ability to conduct an accurate assessment and evaluation of results in a knowledgeable and meaningful way, then the credibility of the tests and the results become suspect. However, used correctly, aerobic capacity tests can provide valuable baseline data about the fitness levels of individuals and data from which exercise programmes may be developed. The tests also enable fitness improvements to be monitored, help to motivate participants by establishing reasonable and achievable goals, assist in risk stratification and facilitate participants' education about the importance of physical fitness for work and for life. Since this study was completed, further tests have been repeated on 140 subjects of a wider age and ability range. This large database confirms the results found in this study.

  3. Aerobic glycolysis and lymphocyte transformation

    PubMed Central

    Hume, David A.; Radik, Judith L.; Ferber, Ernst; Weidemann, Maurice J.

    1978-01-01

    1. The role of enhanced aerobic glycolysis in the transformation of rat thymocytes by concanavalin A has been investigated. Concanavalin A addition doubled [U-14C]glucose uptake by rat thymocytes over 3h and caused an equivalent increased incorporation into protein, lipids and RNA. A disproportionately large percentage of the extra glucose taken up was converted into lactate, but concanavalin A also caused a specific increase in pyruvate oxidation, leading to an increase in the percentage contribution of glucose to the respiratory fuel. 2. Acetoacetate metabolism, which was not affected by concanavalin A, strongly suppressed pyruvate oxidation in the presence of [U-14C]glucose, but did not prevent the concanavalin A-induced stimulation of this process. Glucose uptake was not affected by acetoacetate in the presence or absence of concanavalin A, but in each case acetoacetate increased the percentage of glucose uptake accounted for by lactate production. 3. [3H]Thymidine incorporation into DNA in concanavalin A-treated thymocyte cultures was sensitive to the glucose concentration in the medium in a biphasic manner. Very low concentrations of glucose (25μm) stimulated DNA synthesis half-maximally, but maximum [3H]thymidine incorporation was observed only when the glucose concentration was raised to 1mm. Lactate addition did not alter the sensitivity of [3H]-thymidine uptake to glucose, but inosine blocked the effect of added glucose and strongly inhibited DNA synthesis. 4. It is suggested that the major function of enhanced aerobic glycolysis in transforming lymphocytes is to maintain higher steady-state amounts of glycolytic intermediates to act as precursors for macromolecule synthesis. PMID:310305

  4. The Adventures of the Diving-Bell Spider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thevenin, Raphaele; Dupeux, Guillaume; Piroird, Keyvan; Clanet, Christophe; Quere, David; Interfaces; Co. Team

    2012-11-01

    The Argyroneta Aquatica is a unique spider that has every features of a usual terrestrial spider, but constantly lives under water. To however still be able to breath oxygen, it builds an underwater bell of air (hence its other name ``the diving-bell spider''): using its superhydrophobic abdomen, it pulls an air bubble at the surface by leaving the latter very rapidly. It then enters the bell formed under aquatic plants or under its under-water web, and leaves it more slowly so as to entrain the least air possible. We study these dynamics that take place at the air/water interfaces. We reduce the spider to two beads, one for the hydrophobic abdomen, one for the hydrophilic head, and measure and model the air entrainment according to the size and surface properties of the abdomen and to the velocity of motion.

  5. Course Outline for a SCUBA Diving Speciality "UNDERWATER Survey DIVER"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitriou, K.

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline a course for the training of divers with a special interest in underwater surveying (e.g. surveyors, archaeologists, biologists, geologists, photographers/videographers). This outline presents: i) the Courses' Standards ii) the Learning Objectives for the related Knowledge Development, iii) the Skills that have to be conducted, iv) the Performance Requirements for the students and v) the Open Water Considerations for the Training Dives. It is expected that the resulting course outline will be used as a reference for the training of certified divers who want to become underwater surveyors, providing them basic knowledge and skills to survey adequate data for the detailed documentation of submerged features. Moreover the combination of knowledge (what) and the skills (how) that are presented during the proposed course attempt to define a protocol for the recording of underwater features in favor of mapping and 3D modeling.

  6. Path analysis of self-efficacy and diving performance revisited.

    PubMed

    Feltz, Deborah L; Chow, Graig M; Hepler, Teri J

    2008-06-01

    The Feltz (1982) path analysis of the relationship between diving efficacy and performance showed that, over trials, past performance was a stronger predictor than self-efficacy of performance. Bandura (1997) criticized the study as statistically "overcontrolling" for past performance by using raw past performance scores along with self-efficacy as predictors of performance. He suggests residualizing past performance by regressing the raw scores on self-efficacy and entering them into the model to remove prior contributions of self-efficacy imbedded in past performance scores. To resolve this controversy, we reanalyzed the Feltz data using three statistical models: raw past performance, residual past performance, and a method that residualizes past performance and self-efficacy. Results revealed that self-efficacy was a stronger predictor of performance in both residualized models than in the raw past performance model. Furthermore, the influence of past performance on future performance was weaker when the residualized methods were conducted.

  7. Virtual Diving in the Underwater Archaeological Site of Cala Minnola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, F.; Lagudi, A.; Barbieri, L.; Muzzupappa, M.; Mangeruga, M.; Pupo, F.; Cozza, M.; Cozza, A.; Ritacco, G.; Peluso, R.; Tusa, S.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents the application of the technologies and methods defined in the VISAS project for the case study of the underwater archaeological site of Cala Minnola located in the island of Levanzo, in the archipelago of the Aegadian Islands (Sicily, Italy). The VISAS project (http://visas-project.eu) aims to improve the responsible and sustainable exploitation of the Underwater Cultural Heritage by means the development of new methods and technologies including an innovative virtual tour of the submerged archaeological sites. In particular, the paper describes the 3D reconstruction of the underwater archaeological site of Cala Minnola and focus on the development of the virtual scene for its visualization and exploitation. The virtual dive of the underwater archaeological site allows users to live a recreational and educational experience by receiving historical, archaeological and biological information about the submerged exhibits, the flora and fauna of the place.

  8. Regional variability in diving physiology and behavior in a widely distributed air-breathing marine predator, the South American sea lion (Otaria byronia).

    PubMed

    Hückstädt, Luis A; Tift, Michael S; Riet-Sapriza, Federico; Franco-Trecu, Valentina; Baylis, Alastair M M; Orben, Rachael A; Arnould, John P Y; Sepulveda, Maritza; Santos-Carvallo, Macarena; Burns, Jennifer M; Costa, Daniel P

    2016-08-01

    Our understanding of how air-breathing marine predators cope with environmental variability is limited by our inadequate knowledge of their ecological and physiological parameters. Because of their wide distribution along both coasts of the sub-continent, South American sea lions (Otaria byronia) provide a valuable opportunity to study the behavioral and physiological plasticity of a marine predator in different environments. We measured the oxygen stores and diving behavior of South American sea lions throughout most of its range, allowing us to demonstrate that diving ability and behavior vary across its range. We found no significant differences in mass-specific blood volumes of sea lions among field sites and a negative relationship between mass-specific oxygen storage and size, which suggests that exposure to different habitats and geographical locations better explains oxygen storage capacities and diving capability in South American sea lions than body size alone. The largest animals in our study (individuals from Uruguay) were the shallowest and shortest duration divers, and had the lowest mass-specific total body oxygen stores, while the deepest and longest duration divers (individuals from southern Chile) had significantly larger mass-specific oxygen stores, despite being much smaller animals. Our study suggests that the physiology of air-breathing diving predators is not fixed, but that it can be adjusted, to a certain extent, depending on the ecological setting and or habitat. These adjustments can be thought of as a 'training effect': as the animal continues to push its physiological capacity through greater hypoxic exposure, its breath-holding capacity increases.

  9. Fit women are not able to use the whole aerobic capacity during aerobic dance.

    PubMed

    Edvardsen, Elisabeth; Ingjer, Frank; Bø, Kari

    2011-12-01

    Edvardsen, E, Ingjer, F, and Bø, K. Fit women are not able to use the whole aerobic capacity during aerobic dance. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3479-3485, 2011-This study compared the aerobic capacity during maximal aerobic dance and treadmill running in fit women. Thirteen well-trained female aerobic dance instructors aged 30 ± 8.17 years (mean ± SD) exercised to exhaustion by running on a treadmill for measurement of maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2)max) and peak heart rate (HRpeak). Additionally, all subjects performed aerobic dancing until exhaustion after a choreographed videotaped routine trying to reach the same HRpeak as during maximal running. The p value for statistical significance between running and aerobic dance was set to ≤0.05. The results (mean ± SD) showed a lower VO(2)max in aerobic dance (52.2 ± 4.02 ml·kg·min) compared with treadmill running (55.9 ± 5.03 ml·kg·min) (p = 0.0003). Further, the mean ± SD HRpeak was 182 ± 9.15 b·min in aerobic dance and 192 ± 9.62 b·min in treadmill running, giving no difference in oxygen pulse between the 2 exercise forms (p = 0.32). There was no difference in peak ventilation (aerobic dance: 108 ± 10.81 L·min vs. running: 113 ± 11.49 L·min). In conclusion, aerobic dance does not seem to be able to use the whole aerobic capacity as in running. For well endurance-trained women, this may result in a lower total workload at maximal intensities. Aerobic dance may therefore not be as suitable as running during maximal intensities in well-trained females.

  10. Growing Evidence about the Relationship between Vessel Dissection and Scuba Diving.

    PubMed

    Brajkovic, Simona; Riboldi, Giulietta; Govoni, Alessandra; Corti, Stefania; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Carotid and vertebral artery dissection are relatively frequent and risky conditions. In the last decade, different patients with extracranial (and in 1 case also intracranial) dissections associated with the practice of scuba diving were reported. The connection between the two conditions has not been fully explained so far. In the present article, we report the case of a patient presenting with Claude Bernard-Horner syndrome and homolateral XII cranial nerve palsy, manifesting a few days after diving in the cold water of a lake. The patient ended up having internal carotid artery dissection associated with the formation of a pseudoaneurysm. Here, we offer a summary of all cases reported in the literature about scuba diving and arterial dissection, and provide a critical discussion about which scuba diving-related factors can trigger the dissection of cervical vessels.

  11. Facial baroparesis: a critical differential diagnosis for scuba diving accidents--case report.

    PubMed

    Iakovlev, E V; Iakovlev, V V

    2014-01-01

    Facial nerve baroparesis is a rare and potentially under-reported complication of scuba diving. A diver, after surfacing from a shallow dive, developed isolated left-sided facial palsy accompanied by pain and decreased hearing in the left ear. No other signs or symptoms attributable to a scuba diving accident were detected. Forty minutes later, he heard a "pop" in the affected ear, after which all symptoms quickly resolved. Repeat neurological and ear examinations were normal. He showed no residual or new symptoms 24 hours later. The differential diagnosis of facial neurological deficit after diving includes decompression sickness, cerebral air embolism due to pulmonary barotrauma, facial nerve barotrauma and common conditions such as stroke and Bell's palsy. It is important to recognize the condition since recompression treatment can further damage the facial nerve.

  12. New records of predaceous diving beetles (Coleoptera:Dytiscidae) in Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boobar, L.R.; Gibbs, K.E.; Longcore, J.R.; Perillo, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Locations, habitat descriptions, and collection dates are listed for new records of 4 genera and 12 species of predaceous diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) in Maine. Previously, 17 genera and 53 species of the aquatic beetle were reported from Maine.

  13. Seal Lungs Collapse during Free Diving: Evidence from Arterial Nitrogen Tensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falke, Konrad J.; Hill, Roger D.; Qvist, Jesper; Schneider, Robert C.; Guppy, Michael; Liggins, Graham C.; Hochachka, Peter W.; Elliott, Richard E.; Zapol, Warren M.

    1985-08-01

    Arterial blood nitrogen tensions of free-diving Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddelli) were measured by attaching a microprocessor-controlled blood pump and drawing samples at depth to determine how these marine mammals dive to great depths and ascend rapidly without developing decompression sickness. Forty-seven samples of arterial blood were obtained from four Weddell seals during free dives lasting up to 23 minutes to depths of 230 meters beneath the sea ice of McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. Peak arterial blood nitrogen tensions of between 2000 and 2500 millimeters of mercury were recorded at depths of 40 to 80 meters during descent, indicating that the seal's lung collapses by 25 to 50 meters. Then arterial blood nitrogen tensions slowly decreased to about 1500 millimeters of mercury at the surface. In a single dive, alveolar collapse and redistribution of blood nitrogen allow the seal to avoid nitrogen narcosis and decompression sickness.

  14. Increase of pulmonary arterial pressure in subjects with venous gas emboli after uncomplicated recreational SCUBA diving.

    PubMed

    Marabotti, Claudio; Scalzini, Alessandro; Chiesa, Ferruccio

    2013-04-01

    The presence of circulating gas bubbles has been repeatedly reported after uncomplicated SCUBA dives. The clinical and pathophysiological relevance of this phenomenon is still under debate but some experimental data suggest that silent bubbles may have a damaging potential on pulmonary endothelial cells. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible hemodynamic effect on pulmonary circulation of post-dive circulating gas bubbles. To this aim, 16 experienced divers were studied by Doppler-echocardiography in basal conditions and 2.0 ± 0.15 h after an uncomplicated, unrestricted recreational SCUBA dive. At the post-dive examination, circulating bubbles were present in 10/16 subjects (62.5%). Divers with circulating bubbles showed a significant post-dive increase of pulmonary systolic arterial pressure (evaluated by the maximal velocity of the physiological tricuspid regurgitation; P < 0.01)) and right ventricular internal dimension (P < 0.05). Divers without circulating bubbles showed no significant change in cardiac anatomy and pulmonary arterial pressure. Both groups showed a significant post-dive decrease of transmitral E/A ratio (index of left ventricular diastolic function: subjects with bubbles P < 0.01; subjects without bubbles P < 0.05). These results seem to indicate that circulating gas bubbles may lead to a hemodynamically relevant increase of pulmonary arterial pressure, able to induce an acute right ventricular dilation. Post-dive diastolic function changes, observed in both groups, may be explained by a preload reduction due to immersion natriuresis. The results of the present study add some evidence that post-dive circulating bubbles, although symptomless, have an easily detectable pathogenetic potential, inducing unfavorable hemodynamic changes in the lesser circulation.

  15. Four-Hour Dives with Exercise While Breathing Oxygen Partial Pressure of 1.3 ATM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    carboxyhemoglobin and hemoglobin concentrations, 8 and the samples were chosen to ensure that the analyzer signal was stable when measurements were...exercise to four-hour resting dives where divers breathed oxygen underwater, we measured pulmonary function (flow-volume loops and diffusing capacity... measured changes in pulmonary function and assessed symptoms immediately and for several days after diving exposures. The pulmonary function variables

  16. Pulmonary Effects of Eight-Hour MK 16 MOD 1 Dives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    carboxyhemoglobin and hemoglobin concentrations,5 and the samples were chosen to ensure that the analyzer signal was stable when measurements were recorded.6...chose eight-hour dives for testing. We measured changes in pulmonary function and assessed symptoms immediately and for several days after diving...occasional,1 Respiratory allergies, pollen or other (#): 1 (not allergy season) Medication use (#): Anti-inflammatory: 1 To measure pulmonary function, at

  17. Development and Testing of a Datalogging Device for Physiological Measurements of Deep-diving Odontocetes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    target species (such as melon-headed whales and false killer whales ) for some of these other projects were unusually low in 2013, so that there were...Science Center is supporting research on false killer whale movements in Hawaiian waters, and the Naval Postgraduate School (with funding from N45) is...determine the normal cardiovascular dive response of deep-diving odontocetes like beaked whales , and to examine how that response might be altered

  18. Predaceous diving beetles in Maine: Faunal list and keys to subfamilies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boobar, L.R.; Spangler, P.J.; Gibbs, K.E.; Longcore, J.R.; Hopkins, K.M.

    1998-01-01

    Records of predaceous diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) collected in Maine are summarized. These records are augmented by field surveys of beetles in Aroostook Co., Maine during 1993-95. Keys to subfamilies are presented with color plates for selected species. A list of diving beetles that have been collected near Maine (state or province) is presented so that investigators will know what additional species might be expected in Maine. Basic taxonomy is presented to facilitate use of keys.

  19. Evaluating the Effects of Stressors on Immune Function during Simulated Dives in Marine Mammals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    effects of simulated dive exposures on cellular immune function in beluga whales 2) To evaluate the effects of simulated dive exposures on cellular...immune function following a known stressor event 3) To collect biological samples from wild belugas to compare with aquarium whales and 4) To compare the...exposures will be obtained from beluga whales resident at the Mystic Aquarium. Cells of the immune system will be exposed to increased pressure

  20. An elastic body impacting the water surface; inspired by diving birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sunghwan; Ochs, Alex; Gart, Sean

    2013-11-01

    We investigate how a soft elastic body responds to water-entry impact analogous to a bird diving into water to catch prey. Dumbbell shaped objects made of two acrylic spheres connected by an elastic rod are dropped into water. A buckling threshold was found by varying impact force and elastic rod stiffness. This threshold may have implication as to how birds are able to safely dive into water at high speeds and avoid any neck-injury.