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Sample records for aerobic energy metabolism

  1. The Transition from Aerobic to Anaerobic Metabolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, James S.; McLellan, Thomas H.

    1980-01-01

    The transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism is discussed. More research is needed on different kinds of athletes and athletic activities and how they may affect aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms. (CJ)

  2. Growth and energy metabolism in aerobic fed-batch cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Simulation and model verification

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, H.T.B.; Larsson, G.; Enfors, S.O.

    1998-11-20

    Some yeast species are classified as being glucose sensitive, which means that they may produce ethanol also under aerobic conditions when the sugar concentration is high. A kinetic model of overflow metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used for simulation of aerobic fed-batch cultivations. An inhibitory effect of ethanol on the maximum respiration of the yeast was observed in the experiments and included in the model. The model predicts respiration, biomass, and ethanol formation and the subsequent ethanol consumption, and was experimentally validated in fed-batch cultivations. Oscillating sugar feed with resulting oscillating carbon dioxide production did not influence the maximum respiration rate, which indicates that the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is not involved as a bottleneck causing aerobic ethanol formation.

  3. Personality, Metabolic Rate and Aerobic Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Terracciano, Antonio; Schrack, Jennifer A.; Sutin, Angelina R.; Chan, Wayne; Simonsick, Eleanor M.; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Personality traits and cardiorespiratory fitness in older adults are reliable predictors of health and longevity. We examined the association between personality traits and energy expenditure at rest (basal metabolic rate) and during normal and maximal sustained walking. Personality traits and oxygen (VO2) consumption were assessed in 642 participants from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Results indicate that personality traits were mostly unrelated to resting metabolic rate and energy expenditure at normal walking pace. However, those who scored lower on neuroticism (r =  −0.12) and higher on extraversion (r = 0.11), openness (r = 0.13), and conscientiousness (r = 0.09) had significantly higher energy expenditure at peak walking pace. In addition to greater aerobic capacity, individuals with a more resilient personality profile walked faster and were more efficient in that they required less energy per meter walked. The associations between personality and energy expenditure were not moderated by age or sex, but were in part explained by the proportion of fat mass. In conclusion, differences in personality may matter the most during more challenging activities that require cardiorespiratory fitness. These findings suggest potential pathways that link personality to health outcomes, such as obesity and longevity. PMID:23372763

  4. Proteomic analysis reveals perturbed energy metabolism and elevated oxidative stress in hearts of rats with inborn low aerobic capacity

    PubMed Central

    Burniston, Jatin G.; Kenyani, Jenna; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Burant, Charles F.; Qi, Nathan R.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    Selection on running capacity has created rat phenotypes of high capacity runners (HCR) that have enhanced cardiac function and low capacity runners (LCR) that exhibit risk factors of metabolic syndrome. We analysed hearts of HCR and LCR from generation 22 of selection using DIGE and identified proteins from MS database searches. The running capacity of HCR was 6-fold greater than LCR. DIGE resolved 957 spots and proteins were unambiguously identified in 369 spots. Protein expression profiling detected 67 statistically significant (P<0.05; false discovery rate <10 %, calculated using q-values) differences between HCR and LCR. Hearts of HCR rats exhibited robust increases in the abundance of each enzyme of the beta-oxidation pathway. In contrast, LCR hearts were characterised by the modulation of enzymes associated with ketone body or amino acid metabolism. LCR also exhibited enhanced expression of antioxidant enzymes such as catalase and greater phosphorylation of alpha B-crystallin at serine 59, which is a common point of convergence in cardiac stress signalling. Thus proteomic analysis revealed selection on low running capacity is associated with perturbations in cardiac energy metabolism and provided the first evidence that the LCR cardiac proteome is exposed to greater oxidative stress. PMID:21751351

  5. Roles of triosephosphate isomerase and aerobic metabolism in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed Central

    Helfert, S; Estévez, A M; Bakker, B; Michels, P; Clayton, C

    2001-01-01

    Kinetoplastid protozoa compartmentalize the first seven enzymes of glycolysis and two enzymes of glycerol metabolism in a microbody, the glycosome. While in its mammalian host, Trypanosoma brucei depends entirely on glucose for ATP generation. Under aerobic conditions, most of the glucose is metabolized to pyruvate. Aerobic metabolism depends on the activities of glycosomal triosephosphate isomerase and a mitochondrial glycerophosphate oxidase, and on glycerophosphate<-->dihydroxyacetone phosphate exchange across the glycosomal membrane. Using a combination of genetics and computer modelling, we show that triosephosphate isomerase is probably essential for bloodstream trypanosome survival, but not for the insect-dwelling procyclics, which preferentially use amino acids as an energy source. When the enzyme level decreased to about 15% of that of the wild-type, the growth rate was halved. Below this level, a lethal rise in dihydroxyacetone phosphate was predicted. Expression of cytosolic triosephosphate isomerase inhibited cell growth. Attempts to knockout the trypanosome alternative oxidase genes (which are needed for glycerophosphate oxidase activity) were unsuccessful, but when we lowered the level of the corresponding mRNA by expressing a homologous double-stranded RNA, oxygen consumption was reduced fourfold and the rate of trypanosome growth was halved. PMID:11415442

  6. Anaerobic Metabolism: Linkages to Trace Gases and Aerobic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megonigal, J. P.; Hines, M. E.; Visscher, P. T.

    2003-12-01

    Life evolved and flourished in the absence of molecular oxygen (O2). As the O2 content of the atmosphere rose to the present level of 21% beginning about two billion years ago, anaerobic metabolism was gradually supplanted by aerobic metabolism. Anaerobic environments have persisted on Earth despite the transformation to an oxidized state because of the combined influence of water and organic matter. Molecular oxygen diffuses about 104 times more slowly through water than air, and organic matter supports a large biotic O2 demand that consumes the supply faster than it is replaced by diffusion. Such conditions exist in wetlands, rivers, estuaries, coastal marine sediments, aquifers, anoxic water columns, sewage digesters, landfills, the intestinal tracts of animals, and the rumen of herbivores. Anaerobic microsites are also embedded in oxic environments such as upland soils and marine water columns. Appreciable rates of aerobic respiration are restricted to areas that are in direct contact with air or those inhabited by organisms that produce O2.Rising atmospheric O2 reduced the global area of anaerobic habitat, but enhanced the overall rate of anaerobic metabolism (at least on an area basis) by increasing the supply of electron donors and acceptors. Organic carbon production increased dramatically, as did oxidized forms of nitrogen, manganese, iron, sulfur, and many other elements. In contemporary anaerobic ecosystems, nearly all of the reducing power is derived from photosynthesis, and most of it eventually returns to O2, the most electronegative electron acceptor that is abundant. This photosynthetically driven redox gradient has been thoroughly exploited by aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms for metabolism. The same is true of hydrothermal vents (Tunnicliffe, 1992) and some deep subsurface environments ( Chapelle et al., 2002), where thermal energy is the ultimate source of the reducing power.Although anaerobic habitats are currently a small fraction of Earth

  7. Regulation of Aerobic Energy Metabolism in Podospora anserina by Two Paralogous Genes Encoding Structurally Different c-Subunits of ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Sellem, Carole H.; di Rago, Jean-Paul; Lasserre, Jean-Paul; Ackerman, Sharon H.; Sainsard-Chanet, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Most of the ATP in living cells is produced by an F-type ATP synthase. This enzyme uses the energy of a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient to synthesize ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate. Proton movements across the membrane domain (FO) of the ATP synthase drive the rotation of a ring of 8–15 c-subunits, which induces conformational changes in the catalytic part (F1) of the enzyme that ultimately promote ATP synthesis. Two paralogous nuclear genes, called Atp9-5 and Atp9-7, encode structurally different c-subunits in the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina. We have in this study identified differences in the expression pattern for the two genes that correlate with the mitotic activity of cells in vegetative mycelia: Atp9-7 is transcriptionally active in non-proliferating (stationary) cells while Atp9-5 is expressed in the cells at the extremity (apex) of filaments that divide and are responsible for mycelium growth. When active, the Atp9-5 gene sustains a much higher rate of c-subunit synthesis than Atp9-7. We further show that the ATP9-7 and ATP9-5 proteins have antagonist effects on the longevity of P. anserina. Finally, we provide evidence that the ATP9-5 protein sustains a higher rate of mitochondrial ATP synthesis and yield in ATP molecules per electron transferred to oxygen than the c-subunit encoded by Atp9-7. These findings reveal that the c-subunit genes play a key role in the modulation of ATP synthase production and activity along the life cycle of P. anserina. Such a degree of sophistication for regulating aerobic energy metabolism has not been described before. PMID:27442014

  8. Environmental metabolomics reveal geographic variation in aerobic metabolism and metabolic substrates in Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus).

    PubMed

    Shi, Yao-Long; Chi, Qing-Sheng; Liu, Wei; Fu, He-Ping; Wang, De-Hua

    2015-06-01

    Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) have a large-scale distribution in northern China. Geographic physiological variations which related to energy and water metabolism are critical to animals' local adaptation and distribution. However, the underlying biochemical mechanism of such variation and its role in adaptation remains largely unknown. We used GC-MS metabolomics approach to investigate the biochemical adaptation of Mongolian gerbils from xeric (desert), transition (desert steppe) and mesic (typical steppe) environments. Gerbils in desert population had lower resting metabolic rate (RMR) and total evaporative water loss (TEWL) than mesic population. Serum metabolomics revealed that concentrations of five tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates (citrate, cis-aconitate, α-ketoglutarate, fumarate and malate) were lower in desert population than mesic population. Gastrocnemius metabolomics and citrate synthase activity analysis showed a lower concentration of citrate and lower citrate synthase activity in desert population. These findings suggest that desert dwelling gerbils decrease RMR and TEWL via down-regulation of aerobic respiration. Gastrocnemius metabolomics also revealed that there were higher concentrations of glucose and glycolytic intermediates, but lower concentrations of lipids, amino acids and urea in desert population than mesic population. This geographic variation in metabolic substrates may enhance metabolic water production per oxygen molecule for desert population while constraining aerobic respiration to reduce RMR and TEWL. PMID:25817427

  9. Cellular hallmarks reveal restricted aerobic metabolism at thermal limits

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Aitana; Busso, Coralie; Gönczy, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    All organisms live within a given thermal range, but little is known about the mechanisms setting the limits of this range. We uncovered cellular features exhibiting signature changes at thermal limits in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. These included changes in embryo size and shape, which were also observed in Caenorhabditis briggsae, indicating evolutionary conservation. We hypothesized that such changes could reflect restricted aerobic capacity at thermal limits. Accordingly, we uncovered that relative respiration in C. elegans embryos decreases at the thermal limits as compared to within the thermal range. Furthermore, by compromising components of the respiratory chain, we demonstrated that the reliance on aerobic metabolism is reduced at thermal limits. Moreover, embryos thus compromised exhibited signature changes in size and shape already within the thermal range. We conclude that restricted aerobic metabolism at the thermal limits contributes to setting the thermal range in a metazoan organism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04810.001 PMID:25929283

  10. Transcriptional Regulation of Aerobic Metabolism in Pichia pastoris Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Biao; Li, Baizhi; Chen, Dai; Zong, Jie; Sun, Fei; Qu, Huixin; Liang, Chongyang

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the classical fermentation process in Pichia pastoris based on transcriptomics. We utilized methanol in pichia yeast cell as the focus of our study, based on two key steps: limiting carbon source replacement (from glycerol to methonal) and fermentative production of exogenous proteins. In the former, the core differential genes in co-expression net point to initiation of aerobic metabolism and generation of peroxisome. The transmission electron microscope (TEM) results showed that yeast gradually adapted methanol induction to increased cell volume, and decreased density, via large number of peroxisomes. In the fermentative production of exogenous proteins, the Gene Ontology (GO) mapping results show that PAS_chr2-1_0582 played a vital role in regulating aerobic metabolic drift. In order to confirm the above results, we disrupted PAS_chr2-1_0582 by homologous recombination. Alcohol consumption was equivalent to one fifth of the normal control, and fewer peroxisomes were observed in Δ0582 strain following methanol induction. In this study we determined the important core genes and GO terms regulating aerobic metabolic drift in Pichia, as well as developing new perspectives for the continued development within this field. PMID:27537181

  11. Transcriptional Regulation of Aerobic Metabolism in Pichia pastoris Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Biao; Li, Baizhi; Chen, Dai; Zong, Jie; Sun, Fei; Qu, Huixin; Liang, Chongyang

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the classical fermentation process in Pichia pastoris based on transcriptomics. We utilized methanol in pichia yeast cell as the focus of our study, based on two key steps: limiting carbon source replacement (from glycerol to methonal) and fermentative production of exogenous proteins. In the former, the core differential genes in co-expression net point to initiation of aerobic metabolism and generation of peroxisome. The transmission electron microscope (TEM) results showed that yeast gradually adapted methanol induction to increased cell volume, and decreased density, via large number of peroxisomes. In the fermentative production of exogenous proteins, the Gene Ontology (GO) mapping results show that PAS_chr2-1_0582 played a vital role in regulating aerobic metabolic drift. In order to confirm the above results, we disrupted PAS_chr2-1_0582 by homologous recombination. Alcohol consumption was equivalent to one fifth of the normal control, and fewer peroxisomes were observed in Δ0582 strain following methanol induction. In this study we determined the important core genes and GO terms regulating aerobic metabolic drift in Pichia, as well as developing new perspectives for the continued development within this field. PMID:27537181

  12. Metabolomics of aerobic metabolism in mice selected for increased maximal metabolic rate

    PubMed Central

    Wone, Bernard; Donovan, Edward R.; Hayes, Jack P.

    2014-01-01

    Maximal aerobic metabolic rate (MMR) is an important physiological and ecological variable that sets an upper limit to sustained, vigorous activity. How the oxygen cascade from the external environment to the mitochondria may affect MMR has been the subject of much interest, but little is known about the metabolic profiles that underpin variation in MMR. We tested how seven generations of artificial selection for high mass-independent MMR affected metabolite profiles of two skeletal muscles (gastrocnemius and plantaris) and the liver. MMR was 12.3% higher in mass selected for high MMR than in controls. Basal metabolic rate was 3.5% higher in selected mice than in controls. Artificial selection did not lead to detectable changes in the metabolic profiles from plantaris muscle, but in the liver amino acids and tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) metabolites were lower in high-MMR mice than in controls. In gastrocnemius, amino acids and TCA cycle metabolites were higher in high-MMR mice than in controls, indicating elevated amino acid and energy metabolism. Moreover, in gastrocnemius free fatty acids and triacylglycerol fatty acids were lower in high-MMR mice than in controls. Because selection for high MMR was associated with changes in the resting metabolic profile of both liver and gastrocnemius, the result suggests a possible mechanistic link between resting metabolism and MMR. In addition, it is well established that diet and exercise affect the composition of fatty acids in muscle. The differences that we found between control lines and lines selected for high MMR demonstrate that the composition of fatty acids in muscle is also affected by genetic factors. PMID:21982590

  13. Energy metabolism in nuclear reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Folmes, Clifford D L; Nelson, Timothy J; Terzic, Andre

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear reprogramming with stemness factors enables resetting of somatic differentiated tissue back to the pluripotent ground state. Recent evidence implicates mitochondrial restructuring and bioenergetic plasticity as key components underlying execution of orchestrated dedifferentiation and derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells. Aerobic to anaerobic transition of somatic oxidative energy metabolism into a glycolytic metabotype promotes proficient reprogramming, establishing a novel regulator of acquired stemness. Metabolomic profiling has further identified specific metabolic remodeling traits defining lineage redifferentiation of pluripotent cells. Therefore, mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism comprise a vital axis for biomarker discovery, intimately reflecting the molecular dynamics fundamental for the resetting and redirection of cell fate. PMID:22103608

  14. Energy metabolism in nuclear reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Folmes, Clifford DL; Nelson, Timothy J; Terzic, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming with stemness factors enables resetting of somatic differentiated tissue back to the pluripotent ground state. Recent evidence implicates mitochondrial restructuring and bioenergetic plasticity as key components underlying execution of orchestrated dedifferentiation and derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells. Aerobic to anaerobic transition of somatic oxidative energy metabolism into a glycolytic metabotype promotes proficient reprogramming, establishing a novel regulator of acquired stemness. Metabolomic profiling has further identified specific metabolic remodeling traits defining lineage redifferentiation of pluripotent cells. Therefore, mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism comprise a vital axis for biomarker discovery, intimately reflecting the molecular dynamics fundamental for the resetting and redirection of cell fate. PMID:22103608

  15. Efficient utilization of aerobic metabolism helps Tibetan locusts conquer hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Responses to hypoxia have been investigated in many species; however, comparative studies between conspecific geographical populations at different altitudes are rare, especially for invertebrates. The migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, is widely distributed around the world, including on the high-altitude Tibetan Plateau (TP) and the low-altitude North China Plain (NP). TP locusts have inhabited Tibetan Plateau for over 34,000 years and thus probably have evolved superior capacity to cope with hypoxia. Results Here we compared the hypoxic responses of TP and NP locusts from morphological, behavioral, and physiological perspectives. We found that TP locusts were more tolerant of extreme hypoxia than NP locusts. To evaluate why TP locusts respond to extreme hypoxia differently from NP locusts, we subjected them to extreme hypoxia and compared their transcriptional responses. We found that the aerobic metabolism was less affected in TP locusts than in NP locusts. RNAi disruption of PDHE1β, an entry gene from glycolysis to TCA cycle, increased the ratio of stupor in TP locusts and decreased the ATP content of TP locusts in hypoxia, confirming that aerobic metabolism is critical for TP locusts to maintain activity in hypoxia. Conclusions Our results indicate that TP and NP locusts have undergone divergence in hypoxia tolerance. These findings also indicate that insects can adapt to hypoxic pressure by modulating basic metabolic processes. PMID:24047108

  16. Impact of salinity on the aerobic metabolism of phosphate-accumulating organisms.

    PubMed

    Welles, L; Lopez-Vazquez, C M; Hooijmans, C M; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Brdjanovic, D

    2015-04-01

    The use of saline water in urban areas for non-potable purposes to cope with fresh water scarcity, intrusion of saline water, and disposal of industrial saline wastewater into the sewerage lead to elevated salinity levels in wastewaters. Consequently, saline wastewater is generated, which needs to be treated before its discharge into surface water bodies. The objective of this research was to study the effects of salinity on the aerobic metabolism of phosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO), which belong to the microbial populations responsible for enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) in activated sludge systems. In this study, the short-term impact (hours) of salinity (as NaCl) was assessed on the aerobic metabolism of a PAO culture, enriched in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). All aerobic PAO metabolic processes were drastically affected by elevated salinity concentrations. The aerobic maintenance energy requirement increased, when the salinity concentration rose up to a threshold concentration of 2 % salinity (on a W/V basis as NaCl), while above this concentration, the maintenance energy requirements seemed to decrease. All initial rates were affected by salinity, with the NH4- and PO4-uptake rates being the most sensitive. A salinity increase from 0 to 0.18 % caused a 25, 46, and 63 % inhibition of the O2, PO4, and NH4-uptake rates. The stoichiometric ratios of the aerobic conversions confirmed that growth was the process with the highest inhibition, followed by poly-P and glycogen formation. The study indicates that shock loads of 0.18 % salt, which corresponds to the use or intrusion of about 5 % seawater may severely affect the EBPR process already in wastewater treatment plants not exposed regularly to high salinity concentrations. PMID:25524698

  17. Aerobic exercise training reduces arterial stiffness in metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Donley, David A.; Fournier, Sara B.; Reger, Brian L.; DeVallance, Evan; Bonner, Daniel E.; Olfert, I. Mark; Frisbee, Jefferson C.

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with a threefold increase risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality partly due to increased arterial stiffening. We compared the effects of aerobic exercise training on arterial stiffening/mechanics in MetS subjects without overt CVD or type 2 diabetes. MetS and healthy control (Con) subjects underwent 8 wk of exercise training (ExT; 11 MetS and 11 Con) or remained inactive (11 MetS and 10 Con). The following measures were performed pre- and postintervention: radial pulse wave analysis (applanation tonometry) was used to measure augmentation pressure and index, central pressures, and an estimate of myocardial efficiency; arterial stiffness was assessed from carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity (cfPWV, applanation tonometry); carotid thickness was assessed from B-mode ultrasound; and peak aerobic capacity (gas exchange) was performed in the seated position. Plasma matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and CVD risk (Framingham risk score) were also assessed. cfPWV was reduced (P < 0.05) in MetS-ExT subjects (7.9 ± 0.6 to 7.2 ± 0.4 m/s) and Con-ExT (6.6 ± 1.8 to 5.6 ± 1.6 m/s). Exercise training reduced (P < 0.05) central systolic pressure (116 ± 5 to 110 ± 4 mmHg), augmentation pressure (9 ± 1 to 7 ± 1 mmHg), augmentation index (19 ± 3 to 15 ± 4%), and improved myocardial efficiency (155 ± 8 to 168 ± 9), but only in the MetS group. Aerobic capacity increased (P < 0.05) in MetS-ExT (16.6 ± 1.0 to 19.9 ± 1.0) and Con-ExT subjects (23.8 ± 1.6 to 26.3 ± 1.6). MMP-1 and -7 were correlated with cfPWV, and both MMP-1 and -7 were reduced post-ExT in MetS subjects. These findings suggest that some of the pathophysiological changes associated with MetS can be improved after aerobic exercise training, thereby lowering their cardiovascular risk. PMID:24744384

  18. Little left in the tank: metabolic scaling in marine teleosts and its implications for aerobic scope

    PubMed Central

    Killen, Shaun S; Costa, Isabel; Brown, Joseph A; Gamperl, A. Kurt

    2006-01-01

    Fish larvae are the world's smallest vertebrates, and their high rates of mortality may be partially owing to a very limited aerobic scope. Unfortunately, however, no complete empirical dataset exists on the relationship between minimal and maximal metabolism (and thus aerobic scope) for any fish species throughout ontogeny, and thus such an association is hard to delineate. We measured standard and maximal metabolism in three marine fish species over their entire life history, and show that while aerobic scope depends greatly on body size and developmental trajectory, it is extremely small during the early life stages (factorial aerobic scope≤1.5). Our findings strongly suggest that limited scope for aerobic activity early in life is likely to constrain physiological function and ultimately impact behaviour and possibly survival. Furthermore, our results have important implications for ecological models that incorporate metabolic scaling, and provide additional evidence against the existence of ‘universal’ scaling exponents. PMID:17164208

  19. Synergistic mechanism for tetrandrine on fluconazole against Candida albicans through the mitochondrial aerobic respiratory metabolism pathway.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui; Xie, Si Ming; Li, Shui Xiu; Song, Yan Jun; Lv, Xia Lin; Zhang, Hong

    2014-07-01

    We found that tetrandrine (TET) can reverse the resistance of Candida albicans to fluconazole (FLC) and that this interaction is associated with the inhibition of drug efflux pumps. Mitochondrial aerobic respiration, which plays a major role in C. albicans metabolism, is the primary source of ATP for cellular processes, including the activation of efflux pumps. However, it was unclear if TET exerts its synergistic action against C. albicans via its impact on the mitochondrial aerobic respiratory metabolism. To investigate this mechanism, we examined the impact of FLC in the presence or absence of TET on two C. albicans strains obtained from a single parental source (FLC-sensitive strain CA-1 and FLC-resistant strain CA-16). We analysed key measures of energy generation and conversion, including the activity of respiration chain complexes I and III (CI and CIII), ATP synthase (CV) activity, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and studied intracellular ATP levels and the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), which has a critical impact on energy transport. Mitochondrial morphology was observed by confocal microscopy. Our functional analyses revealed that, compared with strains treated only with FLC, TET+FLC increased the ATP levels and decreased ΔΨm in CA-1, but decreased ATP levels and increased ΔΨm in CA-16 (P<0.05). Additionally, CI, CIII and CV activity decreased by 23-48%. The production of ROS increased by two- to threefold and mitochondrial morphology was altered in both strains. Our data suggested that TET impacted mitochondrial aerobic respiratory metabolism by influencing the generation and transport of ATP, reducing the utilization of ATP, and resulting in the inhibition of drug efflux pump activity. This activity contributed to the synergistic action of TET on FLC against C. albicans. PMID:24790082

  20. Functional characterization of Yersinia pestis aerobic glycerol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Willias, Stephan P; Chauhan, Sadhana; Motin, Vladimir L

    2014-11-01

    Yersinia pestis biovar Orientalis isolates have lost the capacity to ferment glycerol. Herein we provide experimental validation that a 93 bp in-frame deletion within the glpD gene encoding the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase present in all biovar Orientalis strains is sufficient to disrupt aerobic glycerol fermentation. Furthermore, the inability to ferment glycerol is often insured by a variety of additional mutations within the glpFKX operon which prevents glycerol internalization and conversion to glycerol-3-phosphate. The physiological impact of functional glpFKX in the presence of dysfunctional glpD was assessed. Results demonstrate no change in growth kinetics at 26 °C and 37 °C. Mutants deficient in glpD displayed decreased intracellular accumulation of glycerol-3-phosphate, a characterized inhibitor of cAMP receptor protein (CRP) activation. Since CRP is rigorously involved in global regulation Y. pestis virulence, we tested a possible influence of a single glpD mutation on virulence. Nonetheless, subcutaneous and intranasal murine challenge was not impacted by glycerol metabolism. As quantified by crystal violet assay, biofilm formation of the glpD-deficient KIM6+ mutant was mildly repressed; whereas, chromosomal restoration of glpD in CO92 resulted in a significant increase in biofilm formation. PMID:25220241

  1. Metabolism of 2-Methylpropene (Isobutylene) by the Aerobic Bacterium Mycobacterium sp. Strain ELW1

    PubMed Central

    Kottegoda, Samanthi; Waligora, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    An aerobic bacterium (Mycobacterium sp. strain ELW1) that utilizes 2-methylpropene (isobutylene) as a sole source of carbon and energy was isolated and characterized. Strain ELW1 grew on 2-methylpropene (growth rate = 0.05 h−1) with a yield of 0.38 mg (dry weight) mg 2-methylpropene−1. Strain ELW1 also grew more slowly on both cis- and trans-2-butene but did not grow on any other C2 to C5 straight-chain, branched, or chlorinated alkenes tested. Resting 2-methylpropene-grown cells consumed ethene, propene, and 1-butene without a lag phase. Epoxyethane accumulated as the only detected product of ethene oxidation. Both alkene consumption and epoxyethane production were fully inhibited in cells exposed to 1-octyne, suggesting that alkene oxidation is initiated by an alkyne-sensitive, epoxide-generating monooxygenase. Kinetic analyses indicated that 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane is rapidly consumed during 2-methylpropene degradation, while 2-methyl-2-propen-1-ol is not a significant metabolite of 2-methylpropene catabolism. Degradation of 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane by 2-methylpropene-grown cells led to the accumulation and further degradation of 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate, two sequential metabolites previously identified in the aerobic microbial metabolism of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). Growth of strain ELW1 on 2-methylpropene, 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane, 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol, and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate was fully inhibited when cobalt ions were omitted from the growth medium, while growth on 3-hydroxybutyrate and other substrates was unaffected by the absence of added cobalt ions. Our results suggest that, like aerobic MTBE- and TBA-metabolizing bacteria, strain ELW1 utilizes a cobalt/cobalamin-dependent mutase to transform 2-hydroxyisobutyrate. Our results have been interpreted in terms of their impact on our understanding of the microbial metabolism of alkenes and ether oxygenates. PMID:25576605

  2. The effect of chlorpyrifos on thermogenic capacity of bank voles selected for increased aerobic exercise metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dheyongera, Geoffrey; Grzebyk, Katherine; Rudolf, Agata M; Sadowska, Edyta T; Koteja, Paweł

    2016-04-01

    Agro-chemicals potentially cause adverse effects in non-target organisms. The rate of animal energy metabolism can influence their susceptibility to pesticides by influencing food consumption, biotransformation and elimination rates of toxicants. We used experimental evolution to study the effects of inherent differences in energy metabolism rate and exposure to the organophosphate insecticide, chlorpyrifos (CPF) on thermogenic capacity in a wild rodent, the bank vole (Myodes = Clethrionomys glareolus). The voles were sampled from four replicate lines selected for high swim-induced aerobic metabolism (A) and four unselected control (C) lines. Thermogenic capacity, measured as the maximum cold-induced rate of oxygen consumption (VO2cold), was higher in the A - than C lines, and it decreased after continuous exposure to CPF via food or after a single dose administered via oral gavage, but only when measured shortly after exposure. VO2cold measured 24 h after repeated exposure was not affected. In addition, gavage with a single dose led to decreased food consumption and loss in body mass. Importantly, the adverse effects of CPF did not differ between the selected and control lines. Therefore, exposure to CPF has adverse effects on thermoregulatory performance and energy balance in this species. The effects are short-lived and their magnitude is not associated with the inherent level of energy metabolism. Even without severe symptoms of poisoning, fitness can be compromised under harsh environmental conditions, such as cold and wet weather. PMID:26878110

  3. The HMGB1 protein induces a metabolic type of tumour cell death by blocking aerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Gdynia, Georg; Sauer, Sven W; Kopitz, Jürgen; Fuchs, Dominik; Duglova, Katarina; Ruppert, Thorsten; Miller, Matthias; Pahl, Jens; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Enders, Markus; Mairbäurl, Heimo; Kamiński, Marcin M; Penzel, Roland; Zhang, Christine; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C; Benner, Axel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann; Hoffmeister, Michael; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Schirmacher, Peter; Roth, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    The high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein has a central role in immunological antitumour defense. Here we show that natural killer cell-derived HMGB1 directly eliminates cancer cells by triggering metabolic cell death. HMGB1 allosterically inhibits the tetrameric pyruvate kinase isoform M2, thus blocking glucose-driven aerobic respiration. This results in a rapid metabolic shift forcing cells to rely solely on glycolysis for the maintenance of energy production. Cancer cells can acquire resistance to HMGB1 by increasing glycolysis using the dimeric form of PKM2, and employing glutaminolysis. Consistently, we observe an increase in the expression of a key enzyme of glutaminolysis, malic enzyme 1, in advanced colon cancer. Moreover, pharmaceutical inhibition of glutaminolysis sensitizes tumour cells to HMGB1 providing a basis for a therapeutic strategy for treating cancer. PMID:26948869

  4. CYB5R3: a key player in aerobic metabolism and aging?

    PubMed

    de Cabo, Rafael; Siendones, Emilio; Minor, Robin; Navas, Plácido

    2010-01-01

    Aging results from a complex and not completely understood chain of processes that are associated with various negative metabolic consequences and ultimately leads to senescence and death. The intracellular ratio of pyridine nucleotides (NAD(+)/NADH), has been proposed to be at the center stage of age-related biochemical changes in organisms, and may help to explain the observed influence of calorie restriction and energy-sensitive proteins on lifespan in model organisms. Indeed, the NAD(+)/NADH ratios affect the activity of a number of proteins, including sirtuins, which have gained prominence in the aging field as potential mediators of the beneficial effects of calorie restriction and mediating lifespan. Here we review the activities of a redox enzyme (NQR1 in yeast and CYB5R3 in mammals) that also influences the NAD(+)/NADH ratio and may play a regulatory role that connects aerobic metabolism with aging. PMID:20228936

  5. The HMGB1 protein induces a metabolic type of tumour cell death by blocking aerobic respiration

    PubMed Central

    Gdynia, Georg; Sauer, Sven W.; Kopitz, Jürgen; Fuchs, Dominik; Duglova, Katarina; Ruppert, Thorsten; Miller, Matthias; Pahl, Jens; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Enders, Markus; Mairbäurl, Heimo; Kamiński, Marcin M.; Penzel, Roland; Zhang, Christine; Fuller, Jonathan C.; Wade, Rebecca C.; Benner, Axel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann; Hoffmeister, Michael; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Schirmacher, Peter; Roth, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    The high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein has a central role in immunological antitumour defense. Here we show that natural killer cell-derived HMGB1 directly eliminates cancer cells by triggering metabolic cell death. HMGB1 allosterically inhibits the tetrameric pyruvate kinase isoform M2, thus blocking glucose-driven aerobic respiration. This results in a rapid metabolic shift forcing cells to rely solely on glycolysis for the maintenance of energy production. Cancer cells can acquire resistance to HMGB1 by increasing glycolysis using the dimeric form of PKM2, and employing glutaminolysis. Consistently, we observe an increase in the expression of a key enzyme of glutaminolysis, malic enzyme 1, in advanced colon cancer. Moreover, pharmaceutical inhibition of glutaminolysis sensitizes tumour cells to HMGB1 providing a basis for a therapeutic strategy for treating cancer. PMID:26948869

  6. Schistosoma mansoni: effects of in vitro serotonin (5-HT) on aerobic and anaerobic carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M S; Mettrick, D F; Podesta, R B

    1985-08-01

    The effect of Serotonin on carbohydrate metabolism, excreted end products, and adenine nucleotide pools in Schistosoma mansoni was determined following 60 min in vitro incubations under air (= 21% O2) and anaerobic (95% N2:5% CO2) conditions. In the presence of 0.25 mM Serotonin, glucose uptake increased by 82-84% and lactate excretion increased by 77-78%; levels of excreted lactate were significantly higher under aerobic than under anaerobic conditions. The tissue pools of glucose, hexosephosphates, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, pyruvate, and lactate were significantly increased under anaerobic conditions compared to air incubation; the presence of Serotonin decreased tissue glucose pools and increased the size of the pyruvate and lactate tissue pools. The glycolytic carbon pool was significantly greater under anaerobic than under aerobic conditions, irrespective of Serotonin. Serotonin increased adenosine 5'-diphosphate and adenosine 5'-monophosphate levels under aerobic conditions; neither Serotonin nor gas phase significantly affected total adenine nucleotide levels or the adenylate energy charge. Serotonin increased energy requirements by S. mansoni due to increased muscle contractions; demand was met by enhanced rates of carbohydrate metabolism. Irrespective of gas phase, 74-78% of available carbohydrate was converted to lactate. In the presence of Serotonin, conversion of glucose to lactate was reduced to 63-67%. In view of the requirements by S. mansoni for an abundant supply of glycoprotein and glycolipid precursors for surface membrane renewal, it is suggested that carbohydrate (glucose and glycogen) that was not converted to lactate may have been incorporated into biosynthetic processes leading to membrane synthesis. PMID:4018216

  7. The interplay between aerobic metabolism and antipredator performance: vigilance is related to recovery rate after exercise

    PubMed Central

    Killen, Shaun S.; Reid, Donald; Marras, Stefano; Domenici, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    When attacked by a predator, fish respond with a sudden fast-start motion away from the threat. Although this anaerobically-powered swimming necessitates a recovery phase which is fueled aerobically, little is known about links between escape performance and aerobic traits such as aerobic scope (AS) or recovery time after exhaustive exercise. Slower recovery ability or a reduced AS could make some individuals less likely to engage in a fast-start response or display reduced performance. Conversely, increased vigilance in some individuals could permit faster responses to an attack but also increase energy demand and prolong recovery after anaerobic exercise. We examined how AS and the ability to recover from anaerobic exercise relates to differences in fast-start escape performance in juvenile golden gray mullet at different acclimation temperatures. Individuals were acclimated to either 18, 22, or 26°C, then measured for standard and maximal metabolic rates and AS using intermittent flow respirometry. Anaerobic capacity and the time taken to recover after exercise were also assessed. Each fish was also filmed during a simulated attack to determine response latency, maximum speed and acceleration, and turning rate displayed during the escape response. Across temperatures, individuals with shorter response latencies during a simulated attack are those with the longest recovery time after exhaustive anaerobic exercise. Because a short response latency implies high preparedness to escape, these results highlight the trade-off between the increased vigilance and metabolic demand, which leads to longer recovery times in fast reactors. These results improve our understanding of the intrinsic physiological traits that generate inter-individual variability in escape ability, and emphasize that a full appreciation of trade-offs associated with predator avoidance and energy balance must include energetic costs associated with vigilance and recovery from anaerobic exercise

  8. Aerobic vinyl chloride metabolism in Mycobacterium aurum L1

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmans, S.; Bont, J.A.M. de )

    1992-04-01

    Mycobacterium aurum L1, capable of growth on vinyl chloride as a sole carbon and energy source, was previously isolated from soil contaminated with vinyl chloride. The initial step in vinyl chloride metabolism in strain L1 is catalyzed by alkene monooxygenase, transforming vinyl chloride into the reactive epoxide chlorooxirane. The enzyme responsible for chlorooxirane degradation appeared to be very unstable and thus hampered the characterization of the second step in vinyl chloride metabolism. Dichloroethenes are also oxidized by vinyl chloride-grown cells of strain L1, but they are not utilized as growth substrates. Three additional bacterial strains which utilize vinyl chloride as a sole carbon and energy source were isolated from environments with no known vinyl chloride contamination. The three new isolates were similar to strain L1 and were also identified as Mycobacterium aurum.

  9. Metabolic cost of aerobic dance bench stepping at varying cadences and bench heights.

    PubMed

    Grier, Tamara D; Lloyd, Lisa K; Walker, John L; Murray, Tinker D

    2002-05-01

    To determine the metabolic and cardiovascular responses of aerobic dance bench stepping (ADBS) at commonly used cadences and bench heights, 30 women (19-47 years of age) performed a graded maximal treadmill test and four 8-minute submaximal ADBS routines. Subjects followed identical videotape sequences of basic ADBS movements at cadences of 125 and 130 beats.min(-1) at bench heights of 6 and 8 in. Physiological measurements were taken during each minute of each test. Mean values calculated from the last 3 minutes were used for data analysis. Although there were no physiological differences between ADBS at the 2 cadences, there were significant physiological differences between ADBS at the 2 bench heights. On average, a 2-in. increase in bench height, increased heart rate, VO2, and rating of perceived exertion by 10 beats.min(-1), 3.09 ml.kg(-1) min(-1), and 1.53, respectively. In conclusion, it appears that bench height is more of a factor than cadence in increasing metabolic cost of ADBS. Results from this study provide information about the energy cost of ADBS at the common bench heights and cadences used in this study and, therefore, may be used to help aerobic participants select the proper bench height and cadence combination to control body weight and develop cardiorespiratory fitness safely and effectively. PMID:11991777

  10. STRATEGIES FOR THE AEROBIC CO-METABOLISM OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS. (R825689C019)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Recent field and laboratory studies have evaluated the potential for aerobic co-metabolism of chlorinated solvents. Different co-metabolic substrates and different methods of application have been tried, including growing indigenous microbes in situ, an...

  11. Aerobic metabolism during predation by a boid snake.

    PubMed

    Canjani, Camila; Andrade, Denis V; Cruz-Neto, Ariovaldo P; Abe, Augusto S

    2002-11-01

    We quantified the oxygen uptake rates (VO(2)) and time spent, during the constriction, inspection, and ingestion of prey of different relative sizes, by the prey-constricting boid snake Boa constrictor amarali. Time spent in prey constriction varied from 7.6 to 16.3 min, and VO(2) during prey constriction increased 6.8-fold above resting values. This was the most energy expensive predation phase but neither time spent nor metabolic rate during this phase were correlated with prey size. Similarly, prey size did not affect the VO(2) or duration of prey inspection. Prey ingestion time, on the other hand, increased linearly with prey size although VO(2) during this phase, which increased 4.9-fold above resting levels, was not affected by prey size. The increase in mechanical difficulty of ingesting larger prey, therefore, was associated with longer ingestion times rather than proportional increases in the level of metabolic effort. The data indicate that prey constriction and ingestion are largely sustained by glycolysis and the intervening phase of prey inspection may allow recovery between these two predatory phases with high metabolic demands. The total amount of energy spent by B. c. amarali to constrict, inspect, and ingest prey of sizes varying from 5 to 40% of snake body mass varied inversely from 0.21 to 0.11% of the energy assimilated from the prey, respectively. Thus, prey size was not limited by the energetic cost of predation. On the contrary, snakes feeding on larger prey were rewarded with larger energetic returns, in accordance with explanations of the evolution of snake feeding specializations. PMID:12443908

  12. Separation of metabolic supply and demand: aerobic glycolysis as a normal physiological response to fluctuating energetic demands in the membrane

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer cells, and a variety of normal cells, exhibit aerobic glycolysis, high rates of glucose fermentation in the presence of normal oxygen concentrations, also known as the Warburg effect. This metabolism is considered abnormal because it violates the standard model of cellular energy production that assumes glucose metabolism is predominantly governed by oxygen concentrations and, therefore, fermentative glycolysis is an emergency back-up for periods of hypoxia. Though several hypotheses have been proposed for the origin of aerobic glycolysis, its biological basis in cancer and normal cells is still not well understood. Results We examined changes in glucose metabolism following perturbations in membrane activity in different normal and tumor cell lines and found that inhibition or activation of pumps on the cell membrane led to reduction or increase in glycolysis, respectively, while oxidative phosphorylation remained unchanged. Computational simulations demonstrated that these findings are consistent with a new model of normal physiological cellular metabolism in which efficient mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation supplies chronic energy demand primarily for macromolecule synthesis and glycolysis is necessary to supply rapid energy demands primarily to support membrane pumps. A specific model prediction was that the spatial distribution of ATP-producing enzymes in the glycolytic pathway must be primarily localized adjacent to the cell membrane, while mitochondria should be predominantly peri-nuclear. The predictions were confirmed experimentally. Conclusions Our results show that glycolytic metabolism serves a critical physiological function under normoxic conditions by responding to rapid energetic demand, mainly from membrane transport activities, even in the presence of oxygen. This supports a new model for glucose metabolism in which glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation supply different types of energy demand. Cells use efficient but

  13. Resistance to Aerobic Exercise Training Causes Metabolic Dysfunction and Reveals Novel Exercise-Regulated Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, Sarah J.; Rivas, Donato A.; Alves-Wagner, Ana B.; Hirshman, Michael F.; Gallagher, Iain J.; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Atkins, Ryan; Greenhaff, Paul L.; Qi, Nathan R.; Gustafsson, Thomas; Fielding, Roger A.; Timmons, James A.; Britton, Steven L.; Koch, Lauren G.; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2013-01-01

    Low aerobic exercise capacity is a risk factor for diabetes and a strong predictor of mortality, yet some individuals are “exercise-resistant” and unable to improve exercise capacity through exercise training. To test the hypothesis that resistance to aerobic exercise training underlies metabolic disease risk, we used selective breeding for 15 generations to develop rat models of low and high aerobic response to training. Before exercise training, rats selected as low and high responders had similar exercise capacities. However, after 8 weeks of treadmill training, low responders failed to improve their exercise capacity, whereas high responders improved by 54%. Remarkably, low responders to aerobic training exhibited pronounced metabolic dysfunction characterized by insulin resistance and increased adiposity, demonstrating that the exercise-resistant phenotype segregates with disease risk. Low responders had impaired exercise-induced angiogenesis in muscle; however, mitochondrial capacity was intact and increased normally with exercise training, demonstrating that mitochondria are not limiting for aerobic adaptation or responsible for metabolic dysfunction in low responders. Low responders had increased stress/inflammatory signaling and altered transforming growth factor-β signaling, characterized by hyperphosphorylation of a novel exercise-regulated phosphorylation site on SMAD2. Using this powerful biological model system, we have discovered key pathways for low exercise training response that may represent novel targets for the treatment of metabolic disease. PMID:23610057

  14. Rats Bred for Low Aerobic Capacity Become Promptly Fatigued and Have Slow Metabolic Recovery after Stimulated, Maximal Muscle Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Torvinen, Sira; Silvennoinen, Mika; Piitulainen, Harri; Närväinen, Johanna; Tuunanen, Pasi; Gröhn, Olli; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Kainulainen, Heikki

    2012-01-01

    AIM Muscular fatigue is a complex phenomenon affected by muscle fiber type and several metabolic and ionic changes within myocytes. Mitochondria are the main determinants of muscle oxidative capacity which is also one determinant of muscle fatigability. By measuring the concentrations of intracellular stores of high-energy phosphates it is possible to estimate the energy production efficiency and metabolic recovery of the muscle. Low intrinsic aerobic capacity is known to be associated with reduced mitochondrial function. Whether low intrinsic aerobic capacity also results in slower metabolic recovery of skeletal muscle is not known. Here we studied the influence of intrinsic aerobic capacity on in vivo muscle metabolism during maximal, fatiguing electrical stimulation. METHODS Animal subjects were genetically heterogeneous rats selectively bred to differ for non–trained treadmill running endurance, low capacity runners (LCRs) and high capacity runners (HCRs) (n = 15–19). We measured the concentrations of major phosphorus compounds and force parameters in a contracting triceps surae muscle complex using 31P-Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) combined with muscle force measurement from repeated isometric twitches. RESULTS Our results demonstrated that phosphocreatine re-synthesis after maximal muscle stimulation was significantly slower in LCRs (p<0.05). LCR rats also became promptly fatigued and maintained the intramuscular pH poorly compared to HCRs. Half relaxation time (HRT) of the triceps surae was significantly longer in LCRs throughout the stimulation protocol (p≤0.05) and maximal rate of torque development (MRTD) was significantly lower in LCRs compared to HCRs from 2 min 30 s onwards (p≤0.05). CONCLUSION We observed that LCRs are more sensitive to fatigue and have slower metabolic recovery compared to HCRs after maximal muscle contractions. These new findings are associated with reduced running capacity and with previously found lower

  15. Aerobic fitness ecological validity in elite soccer players: a metabolic power approach.

    PubMed

    Manzi, Vincenzo; Impellizzeri, Franco; Castagna, Carlo

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between match metabolic power (MP) categories and aerobic fitness in elite-level male soccer players. Seventeen male professional soccer players were tested for VO2max, maximal aerobic speed (MAS), VO2 at ventilatory threshold (VO2VT and %VO2VT), and speed at a selected blood lactate concentration (4 mmol·L(-1), V(L4)). Aerobic fitness tests were performed at the end of preseason and after 12 and 24 weeks during the championship. Aerobic fitness and MP variables were considered as mean of all seasonal testing and of 16 Championship home matches for all the calculations, respectively. Results showed that VO2max (from 0.55 to 0.68), MAS (from 0.52 to 0.72), VO2VT (from 0.72 to 0.83), %VO2maxVT (from 0.62 to 0.65), and V(L4) (from 0.56 to 0.73) were significantly (p < 0.05 to 0.001) large to very large associated with MP variables. These results provide evidence to the ecological validity of aerobic fitness in male professional soccer. Strength and conditioning professionals should consider aerobic fitness in their training program when dealing with professional male soccer players. The MP method resulted an interesting approach for tracking external load in male professional soccer players. PMID:24345968

  16. Measuring maximum and standard metabolic rates using intermittent-flow respirometry: a student laboratory investigation of aerobic metabolic scope and environmental hypoxia in aquatic breathers.

    PubMed

    Rosewarne, P J; Wilson, J M; Svendsen, J C

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic rate is one of the most widely measured physiological traits in animals and may be influenced by both endogenous (e.g. body mass) and exogenous factors (e.g. oxygen availability and temperature). Standard metabolic rate (SMR) and maximum metabolic rate (MMR) are two fundamental physiological variables providing the floor and ceiling in aerobic energy metabolism. The total amount of energy available between these two variables constitutes the aerobic metabolic scope (AMS). A laboratory exercise aimed at an undergraduate level physiology class, which details the appropriate data acquisition methods and calculations to measure oxygen consumption rates in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, is presented here. Specifically, the teaching exercise employs intermittent flow respirometry to measure SMR and MMR, derives AMS from the measurements and demonstrates how AMS is affected by environmental oxygen. Students' results typically reveal a decline in AMS in response to environmental hypoxia. The same techniques can be applied to investigate the influence of other key factors on metabolic rate (e.g. temperature and body mass). Discussion of the results develops students' understanding of the mechanisms underlying these fundamental physiological traits and the influence of exogenous factors. More generally, the teaching exercise outlines essential laboratory concepts in addition to metabolic rate calculations, data acquisition and unit conversions that enhance competency in quantitative analysis and reasoning. Finally, the described procedures are generally applicable to other fish species or aquatic breathers such as crustaceans (e.g. crayfish) and provide an alternative to using higher (or more derived) animals to investigate questions related to metabolic physiology. PMID:26768978

  17. Impact of early fructose intake on metabolic profile and aerobic capacity of rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome is a disease that today affects millions of people around the world. Therefore, it is of great interest to implement more effective procedures for preventing and treating this disease. In search of a suitable experimental model to study the role of exercise in prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome, this study examined the metabolic profile and the aerobic capacity of rats kept early in life on a fructose-rich diet, a substrate that has been associated with metabolic syndrome. Methods We used adult female Wistar rats fed during pregnancy and lactation with two diets: balanced or fructose-rich 60%. During breastfeeding, the pups were distributed in small (4/mother) or adequate (8/mother) litters. At 90 days of age, they were analyzed with respect to: glucose tolerance, peripheral insulin sensitivity, aerobic capacity and serum glucose, insulin, triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and HDL cholesterol concentrations as well as measures of glycogen synthesis and glucose oxidation by the soleus muscle. Results It was found that the fructose rich diet led the animals to insulin resistance. The fructose fed rats kept in small litters also showed dyslipidemia, with increased serum concentrations of total cholesterol and triglycerides. Conclusion Neither the aerobic capacity nor the glucose oxidation rates by the skeletal muscle were altered by fructose-rich diet, indicating that the animal model evaluated is potentially interesting for the study of the role of exercise in metabolic syndrome. PMID:21223589

  18. Female rats selectively bred for high intrinsic aerobic fitness are protected from ovariectomy-associated metabolic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Jaume; Park, Young-Min; Welly, Rebecca J.; Scroggins, Rebecca J.; Britton, Steven L.; Koch, Lauren G.; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Crissey, Jacqueline M.; Zidon, Terese; Morris, E. Matthew; Meers, Grace M. E.; Thyfault, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Ovariectomized rodents model human menopause in that they rapidly gain weight, reduce spontaneous physical activity (SPA), and develop metabolic dysfunction, including insulin resistance. How contrasting aerobic fitness levels impacts ovariectomy (OVX)-associated metabolic dysfunction is not known. Female rats selectively bred for high and low intrinsic aerobic fitness [high-capacity runners (HCR) and low-capacity runners (LCR), respectively] were maintained under sedentary conditions for 39 wk. Midway through the observation period, OVX or sham (SHM) operations were performed providing HCR-SHM, HCR-OVX, LCR-SHM, and LCR-OVX groups. Glucose tolerance, energy expenditure, and SPA were measured before and 4 wk after surgery, while body composition via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and adipose tissue distribution, brown adipose tissue (BAT), and skeletal muscle phenotype, hepatic lipid content, insulin resistance via homeostatic assessment model of insulin resistance and AdipoIR, and blood lipids were assessed at death. Remarkably, HCR were protected from OVX-associated increases in adiposity and insulin resistance, observed only in LCR. HCR rats were ∼30% smaller, had ∼70% greater spontaneous physical activity (SPA), consumed ∼10% more relative energy, had greater skeletal muscle proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1-alpha, and ∼40% more BAT. OVX did not increase energy intake and reduced SPA to the same extent in both HCR and LCR. LCR were particularly affected by an OVX-associated reduction in resting energy expenditure and experienced a reduction in relative BAT; resting energy expenditure correlated positively with BAT across all animals (r = 0.6; P < 0.001). In conclusion, despite reduced SPA following OVX, high intrinsic aerobic fitness protects against OVX-associated increases in adiposity and insulin resistance. The mechanism may involve preservation of resting energy expenditure. PMID:25608751

  19. Temperature acclimation rate of aerobic scope and feeding metabolism in fishes: implications in a thermally extreme future.

    PubMed

    Sandblom, Erik; Gräns, Albin; Axelsson, Michael; Seth, Henrik

    2014-11-01

    Temperature acclimation may offset the increased energy expenditure (standard metabolic rate, SMR) and reduced scope for activity (aerobic scope, AS) predicted to occur with local and global warming in fishes and other ectotherms. Yet, the time course and mechanisms of this process is little understood. Acclimation dynamics of SMR, maximum metabolic rate, AS and the specific dynamic action of feeding (SDA) were determined in shorthorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius) after transfer from 10°C to 16°C. SMR increased in the first week by 82% reducing AS to 55% of initial values, while peak postprandial metabolism was initially greater. This meant that the estimated AS during peak SDA approached zero, constraining digestion and leaving little room for additional aerobic processes. After eight weeks at 16°C, SMR was restored, while AS and the estimated AS during peak SDA recovered partly. Collectively, this demonstrated a considerable capacity for metabolic thermal compensation, which should be better incorporated into future models on organismal responses to climate change. A mathematical model based on the empirical data suggested that phenotypes with fast acclimation rates may be favoured by natural selection as the accumulated energetic cost of a slow acclimation rate increases in a warmer future with exacerbated thermal variations. PMID:25232133

  20. Coordinated Metabolic Transitions During Drosophila Embryogenesis and the Onset of Aerobic Glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Tennessen, Jason M.; Bertagnolli, Nicolas M.; Evans, Janelle; Sieber, Matt H.; Cox, James; Thummel, Carl S.

    2014-01-01

    Rapidly proliferating cells such as cancer cells and embryonic stem cells rely on a specialized metabolic program known as aerobic glycolysis, which supports biomass production from carbohydrates. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster also utilizes aerobic glycolysis to support the rapid growth that occurs during larval development. Here we use singular value decomposition analysis of modENCODE RNA-seq data combined with GC-MS-based metabolomic analysis to analyze the changes in gene expression and metabolism that occur during Drosophila embryogenesis, spanning the onset of aerobic glycolysis. Unexpectedly, we find that the most common pattern of co-expressed genes in embryos includes the global switch to glycolytic gene expression that occurs midway through embryogenesis. In contrast to the canonical aerobic glycolytic pathway, however, which is accompanied by reduced mitochondrial oxidative metabolism, the expression of genes involved in the tricarboxylic cycle (TCA cycle) and the electron transport chain are also upregulated at this time. Mitochondrial activity, however, appears to be attenuated, as embryos exhibit a block in the TCA cycle that results in elevated levels of citrate, isocitrate, and α-ketoglutarate. We also find that genes involved in lipid breakdown and β-oxidation are upregulated prior to the transcriptional initiation of glycolysis, but are downregulated before the onset of larval development, revealing coordinated use of lipids and carbohydrates during development. These observations demonstrate the efficient use of nutrient stores to support embryonic development, define sequential metabolic transitions during this stage, and demonstrate striking similarities between the metabolic state of late-stage fly embryos and tumor cells. PMID:24622332

  1. A combined continuous and interval aerobic training improves metabolic syndrome risk factors in men

    PubMed Central

    Sari-Sarraf, Vahid; Aliasgarzadeh, Akbar; Naderali, Mohammad-Mahdi; Esmaeili, Hamid; Naderali, Ebrahim K

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with metabolic syndrome have significantly higher risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes leading to premature death mortality. Metabolic syndrome has a complex etiology; thus, it may require a combined and multi-targeted aerobic exercise regimen to improve risk factors associated with it. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of combined continuous and interval aerobic training on patients with metabolic syndrome. Thirty adult male with metabolic syndrome (54±8 years) were randomly divided into two groups: test training group (TTG; n=15) and control group (CG; n=15). Subjects in TTG performed combined continuous and interval aerobic training using a motorized treadmill three times per week for 16 weeks. Subjects in CG were advised to continue with their normal activities of life. Twenty-two men completed the study (eleven men in each group). At the end of the study, in TTG, there were significant (for all, P<0.05) reductions in total body weight (−3.2%), waist circumference (−3.43 cm), blood pressure (up to −12.7 mmHg), and plasma insulin, glucose, and triacylglyceride levels. Moreover, there were significant (for all, P<0.05) increases VO2max (−15.3%) and isometric strength of thigh muscle (28.1%) and high-density lipoprotein in TTG. None of the above indices were changed in CG at the end of 16-week study period. Our study suggests that adoption of a 16-week combined continuous and interval aerobic training regimen in men with metabolic syndrome could significantly reduce cardiovascular risk factors in these patients. PMID:26056487

  2. Aerobic glycolysis during brain activation: adrenergic regulation and influence of norepinephrine on astrocytic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dienel, Gerald A; Cruz, Nancy F

    2016-07-01

    Aerobic glycolysis occurs during brain activation and is characterized by preferential up-regulation of glucose utilization compared with oxygen consumption even though oxygen level and delivery are adequate. Aerobic glycolysis is a widespread phenomenon that underlies energetics of diverse brain activities, such as alerting, sensory processing, cognition, memory, and pathophysiological conditions, but specific cellular functions fulfilled by aerobic glycolysis are poorly understood. Evaluation of evidence derived from different disciplines reveals that aerobic glycolysis is a complex, regulated phenomenon that is prevented by propranolol, a non-specific β-adrenoceptor antagonist. The metabolic pathways that contribute to excess utilization of glucose compared with oxygen include glycolysis, the pentose phosphate shunt pathway, the malate-aspartate shuttle, and astrocytic glycogen turnover. Increased lactate production by unidentified cells, and lactate dispersal from activated cells and lactate release from the brain, both facilitated by astrocytes, are major factors underlying aerobic glycolysis in subjects with low blood lactate levels. Astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttling with local oxidation is minor. Blockade of aerobic glycolysis by propranolol implicates adrenergic regulatory processes including adrenal release of epinephrine, signaling to brain via the vagus nerve, and increased norepinephrine release from the locus coeruleus. Norepinephrine has a powerful influence on astrocytic metabolism and glycogen turnover that can stimulate carbohydrate utilization more than oxygen consumption, whereas β-receptor blockade 're-balances' the stoichiometry of oxygen-glucose or -carbohydrate metabolism by suppressing glucose and glycogen utilization more than oxygen consumption. This conceptual framework may be helpful for design of future studies to elucidate functional roles of preferential non-oxidative glucose utilization and glycogen turnover during brain

  3. Evolution of Molybdenum Nitrogenase during the Transition from Anaerobic to Aerobic Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Eric S.; Costas, Amaya M. Garcia; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Mus, Florence

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Molybdenum nitrogenase (Nif), which catalyzes the reduction of dinitrogen to ammonium, has modulated the availability of fixed nitrogen in the biosphere since early in Earth's history. Phylogenetic evidence indicates that oxygen (O2)-sensitive Nif emerged in an anaerobic archaeon and later diversified into an aerobic bacterium. Aerobic bacteria that fix N2 have adapted a number of strategies to protect Nif from inactivation by O2, including spatial and temporal segregation of Nif from O2 and respiratory consumption of O2. Here we report the complement of Nif-encoding genes in 189 diazotrophic genomes. We show that the evolution of Nif during the transition from anaerobic to aerobic metabolism was accompanied by both gene recruitment and loss, resulting in a substantial increase in the number of nif genes. While the observed increase in the number of nif genes and their phylogenetic distribution are strongly correlated with adaptation to utilize O2 in metabolism, the increase is not correlated with any of the known O2 protection mechanisms. Rather, gene recruitment appears to have been in response to selective pressure to optimize Nif synthesis to meet fixed N demands associated with aerobic productivity and to more efficiently regulate Nif under oxic conditions that favor protein turnover. Consistent with this hypothesis, the transition of Nif from anoxic to oxic environments is associated with a shift from posttranslational regulation in anaerobes to transcriptional regulation in obligate aerobes and facultative anaerobes. Given that fixed nitrogen typically limits ecosystem productivity, our observations further underscore the dynamic interplay between the evolution of Earth's oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon biogeochemical cycles. IMPORTANCE Molybdenum nitrogenase (Nif), which catalyzes the reduction of dinitrogen to ammonium, has modulated the availability of fixed nitrogen in the biosphere since early in Earth's history. Nif emerged in an anaerobe and

  4. Metabolic and hormonal responses to low-impact aerobic dance during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    McMurray, R G; Hackney, A C; Guion, W K; Katz, V L

    1996-01-01

    This study examined the plasma glucose, free fatty acids (NEFA), lactate, triglyceride, cortisol, and insulin responses of pregnant women (22-28 wk) to a 40-min aerobic dance program and 40-min treadmill walking at similar heart rate intensities. The heart rates during exercise averaged 135 +/- 5 bt.min-1 for both trials. Immediate post-exercise plasma glucose levels were lower than resting levels for both exercise trials (P < 0.05), and remained below resting levels 20 min after exercise. Plasma triglycerides and NEFA were increased immediately post-exercise (P < 0.05), and returned toward rest 20 min after exercise. The NEFA responses at the end of the walking trials were significantly greater than at the end of the aerobic dance trials (P < 0.05). For both trials, immediate post-exercise plasma insulin levels were below resting levels (P < 0.05) and remained attenuated 20 min post-exercise. Plasma cortisol concentrations were unchanged throughout the aerobic dance trial. However, a mean increase of 105 nmol.l-1 immediately post-exercise was evident during the walking trials (P < 0.05). The results suggest that 40 min of walking or aerobic dance reduces blood glucose but does not cause hypoglycemia. Further, the results suggest that 40 min of walking or aerobic dance does not expose the mother to serious metabolic consequences that might adversely affect the fetus. PMID:8775353

  5. A new model for the aerobic metabolism of yeast allows the detailed analysis of the metabolic regulation during glucose pulse.

    PubMed

    Kesten, Duygu; Kummer, Ursula; Sahle, Sven; Hübner, Katrin

    2015-11-01

    The onset of aerobic fermentation (the so-called Crabtree effect) in yeast has long been of interest. However, the underlying mechanisms at the metabolic level are not yet fully understood. We developed a detailed kinetic model of the aerobic central metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae comprising glycolysis, TCA cycle and major transport reactions across the mitochondrial membrane to investigate this phenomenon. It is the first one of this extent in the literature. The model is able to reproduce experimental steady state fluxes and time-course behavior after a glucose pulse. Due to the lack of parameter identifiability in the model, we analyze a model ensemble consisting of a set of differently parameterized models for robust findings. The model predicts that the cooperativity of pyruvate decarboxylase with respect to pyruvate and the capacity difference between alcohol dehydrogenase and the pyruvate dehydrogenase bypass play a major role for the onset of the Crabtree effect. PMID:26176974

  6. Effect of Moderate Aerobic Training on Bone Metabolism Indices among Adult Humans

    PubMed Central

    Alghadir, Ahmad H.; Aly, Farag A.; Gabr, Sami A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed the osteogenic effect (T-Score) and changes in bone markers in healthy subjects by 12-weeks of aerobic training. Methods: Total 65 healthy subjects (36 males, 29 females), their age ranged between 30 and 60 years with normal body mass index, were recruited to participate in this study and they were selected among healthy subjects who do not have any metabolic disorders and were not receiving any medication that could affect the bone turnover. Standardized physical examination and collection of serum samples were performed at base line and after 12 weeks of moderate aerobic training to measure bone formation markers (osteocalcin (OC) and bone specific alkaline Phosphatase (BAP) and bone resorption marker Deoxypyridinoline (DPD), and serum calcium. Each subject participated in exercise training program for 12 weeks, three times per week. Results: The results showed that the 12 weeks of moderate aerobic training produced a significant improvement in all bone metabolism indices including Serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, serum osteocalcin, serum free Calcium and bone mineral density among all subjects. Conclusion : Moderate intensity of aerobic training exerts significant positive effects on bone formation marker and bone density associated with a significant decrease in the rate of bone resorption that could assist in preventing or decelerating osteoporosis. PMID:25097528

  7. Effects of muscular and aqua aerobic combined exercise on metabolic indices in elderly women with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yong-Kwon; Kim, Soo-Keun; Song, Min-Sun

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of muscle strengthening exercise using elastic thera-band and aquatic aerobic combined exercise on metabolic syndrome index in elderly with metabolic syndrome. Fifty-four were assigned to muscle strengthening exercise group (n = 19), aquatic aerobic exercise group (n = 19), and combined exercise group (n = 16). The muscle strength exercise, aquatic aerobic exercise and combined exercise were provided three times a week for 12 weeks. Metabolic syndrome indices[Fasting blood glucose, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and waist circumference] were measured before and after the program. One-way ANOVA, paired t-test and two-way repeated ANOVA were used with the SPSS program for data analysis. There was a significant difference in triglyceride (p < .001), HDL-C (p = .010) and waist circumference (p = .016). Triglyceride and waist circumference was significantly decreased in combined group than muscle strength exercise group and aquatic exercise group. HDL-C was significantly increased in combined group than muscle strength exercise group. The results indicate that combined exercise was more effective in the improvement of dyslipidemia and abdominal obesity. PMID:25566424

  8. Heart rate and aerobic metabolism in Humboldt penguins, Spheniscus humboldti, during voluntary dives.

    PubMed

    Butler, P J; Woakes, A J

    1984-01-01

    Heart rate and aerobic metabolism have been recorded from three Humboldt penguins, Spheniscus humboldti, freely diving on a freshwater pond (9 X 4.6 X 2.7 m deep), using an implanted radiotransmitter and an open circuit respirometer. Oxygen uptake at mean dive duration (46.2s) was 26% greater than the resting value, but the difference was not statistically significant. Heart rate was also similar to the resting value. It is concluded that voluntary dives of penguins are completely aerobic and that oxygen stores are sufficient to allow metabolism to continue at the rate estimated in the present study for 2.27 min during voluntary submersion. This is longer than that calculated for tufted ducks, probably because the penguins are more efficient at underwater locomotion and because they are almost neutrally buoyant. PMID:6423763

  9. Exploration and comparison of inborn capacity of aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for microbial electrical current production

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Longfei; Verwoerd, Wynand S

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae possesses numerous advantageous biological features, such as being robust, easily handled, mostly non-pathogenic and having high catabolic rates, etc., which can be considered as merits for being used as a promising biocatalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for electricity generation. Previous studies have developed efficient MFC configurations to convert metabolic electron shuttles, such as cytoplasmic NADH, into usable electric current. However, no studies have elucidated the maximum potential of S. cerevisiae for current output and the underlying metabolic pathways, resulting from the interaction of thousands of reactions inside the cell during MFC operation. To address these two key issues, this study used in silico metabolic engineering techniques, flux balance analysis (FBA), and flux variability analysis with target flux minimization (FATMIN), to model the metabolic perturbation of S. cerevisiae under the MFC-energy extraction. The FBA results showed that, in the cytoplasmic NADH-dependent mediated electron transfer (MET) mode, S. cerevisiae had a potential to produce currents at up to 5.781 A/gDW for the anaerobic and 6.193 A/gDW for the aerobic environments. The FATMIN results showed that the aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms are resilient, relying on six and five contributing reactions respectively for high current production. Two reactions, catalyzed by glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD) (EC 1.4.1.3) and methylene tetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (NAD) (EC 1.5.1.5), were shared in both current-production modes and contributed to over 80% of the identified maximum current outputs. It is also shown that the NADH regeneration was much less energy costly than biomass production rate. Taken together, our finding suggests that S. cerevisiae should receive more research effort for MFC electricity production. PMID:23969939

  10. Energy and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Raul K

    2012-10-01

    Although firmly grounded in metabolic biochemistry, the study of energy metabolism has gone well beyond this discipline and become integrative and comparative as well as ecological and evolutionary in scope. At the cellular level, ATP is hydrolyzed by energy-expending processes and resynthesized by pathways in bioenergetics. A significant development in the study of bioenergetics is the realization that fluxes through pathways as well as metabolic rates in cells, tissues, organs, and whole organisms are "system properties." Therefore, studies of energy metabolism have become, increasingly, experiments in systems biology. A significant challenge continues to be the integration of phenomena over multiple levels of organization. Body mass and temperature are said to account for most of the variation in metabolic rates found in nature. A mechanistic foundation for the understanding of these patterns is outlined. It is emphasized that evolution, leading to adaptation to diverse lifestyles and environments, has resulted in a tremendous amount of deviation from popularly accepted scaling "rules." This is especially so in the deep sea which constitutes most of the biosphere. PMID:23720257

  11. The effect of aerobic exercise and starvation on growth performance and postprandial metabolic response in juvenile southern catfish (Silurus meridionalis).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Ming; Liu, Li; Yuan, Jian-Ming; Xiao, Yuan-Yuan; Fu, Shi-Jian; Zhang, Yao-Guang

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the effects of aerobic exercise and starvation on growth performance, postprandial metabolic response and their interaction in a sedentary fish species, either satiation-fed or starved juvenile southern catfish (Silurus meridionalis) were exercised at 25 °C under three water velocities, i.e., nearly still water (control), 1 body length (bl) s(-1) and 2 bl s(-1), for eight weeks. Then, the feed intake (FI), food conversion efficiency (FCE), specific growth rate (SGR), morphological parameters, resting ṀO2 (ṀO2rest) and postprandial ṀO2 responses of the experimental fish were measured. Exercise at a low velocity (1 bl s(-1)) showed no effect on any growth performance parameter, whereas exercise at a high velocity (2 bl s(-1)) exhibited higher FI but similar SGR due to the extra energy expenditure from swimming and consequent decreased FCE. Starvation led to a significant body mass loss, whereas the effect intensified in both exercise groups. Exercise resulted in improved cardio-respiratory capacity, as indicated by increased gill and heart indexes, whereas it exhibited no effect on resting and postprandial metabolism in S. meridionalis. The starved fish displayed significantly larger heart, gill and digestive tract indexes compared with the feeding fish, suggesting selective maintenance of cardio-respiratory and digestive function in this fish species during starvation. However, starved fish still exhibited impaired digestive performance, as evidenced by the prolonged duration and low postprandial metabolic increase, and this effect was further exacerbated in both the 1 and 2 bl s(-1) exercise groups. These data suggest the following: (1) aerobic exercise produced no improvement in growth performance but may have led to the impairment of growth under insufficient food conditions; (2) the mass of different organs and tissues responded differently to aerobic exercise and starvation due to the different physiological roles they play; and (3

  12. The importance of aerobic metabolism in the renal concentrating process

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Edward; Manitius, Andrzej; Epstein, Franklin H.

    1969-01-01

    The extent to which the concentrating function of the kidney depends on oxidative processes was investigated by infusing cyanide into one renal artery of dogs undergoing mild mannitol diuresis while receiving an infusion of vasopressin. This produced an abrupt fall in concentrating capacity (TcH2O) that was reversed when the cyanide infusion was stopped. The change could not be accounted for by the accompanying solute diuresis, since it was not reproduced by increasing the rate of mannitol infusion. The reduction in TcH2O induced by cyanide did not result from increased delivery of dilute urine to the collecting ducts, since free water clearance (CH2O), studied in other dogs during water diuresis, was unchanged or decreased by cyanide. Cyanide produced renal vasodilatation, as did intraarterial acetylcholine, but in contrast to the striking reduction in concentrating capacity evoked by cyanide, TcH2O was not significantly changed by acetylcholine. The data indicate that concentrating ability is closely tied to oxidative metabolism in the kidney, and it is suggested that the region where this is critically important is the red medulla and the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop. PMID:5822590

  13. Micromotors working in water through artificial aerobic metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, D.; Takada, T.; Tachibana, M.; Iijima, Y.; Shioi, A.; Yoshikawa, K.

    2015-07-01

    Most catalytic micro/nanomotors that have been developed so far use hydrogen peroxide as fuel, while some use hydrazine. These fuels are difficult to apply because they can cause skin irritation, and often form and store disruptive bubbles. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel catalytic Pt micromotor that does not produce bubbles, and is driven by the oxidation of stable, non-toxic primary alcohols and aldehydes with dissolved oxygen. This use of organic oxidation mirrors living systems, and lends this new motor essentially the same characteristics, including decreased motility in low oxygen environments and the direct isothermal conversion of chemical energy into mechanical energy. Interestingly, the motility direction is reversed by replacing the reducing fuels with hydrogen peroxide. Therefore, these micromotors not only provide a novel system in nanotechnology, but also help in further revealing the underlining mechanisms of motility of living organisms.Most catalytic micro/nanomotors that have been developed so far use hydrogen peroxide as fuel, while some use hydrazine. These fuels are difficult to apply because they can cause skin irritation, and often form and store disruptive bubbles. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel catalytic Pt micromotor that does not produce bubbles, and is driven by the oxidation of stable, non-toxic primary alcohols and aldehydes with dissolved oxygen. This use of organic oxidation mirrors living systems, and lends this new motor essentially the same characteristics, including decreased motility in low oxygen environments and the direct isothermal conversion of chemical energy into mechanical energy. Interestingly, the motility direction is reversed by replacing the reducing fuels with hydrogen peroxide. Therefore, these micromotors not only provide a novel system in nanotechnology, but also help in further revealing the underlining mechanisms of motility of living organisms. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  14. Hindlimb muscle fibre size and glycogen stores in bank voles with increased aerobic exercise metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jaromin, Ewa; Wyszkowska, Julia; Labecka, Anna Maria; Sadowska, Edyta Teresa; Koteja, Paweł

    2016-02-01

    To test hypotheses concerning physiological factors limiting the rate of aerobic exercise metabolism, we used a unique experimental evolution model: lines of bank voles selected for high swim-induced aerobic metabolism (A) and unselected, control lines (C). We investigated putative adaptations that result in the increased performance of the hindlimb muscle (gastrocnemius joined with plantaris). The body mass-adjusted muscle mass was higher in A-lines (0.093 g) than in C-lines (0.083 g; P=0.01). However, selection did not affect mean muscle fibre cross-sectional area (P=0.34) or glycogen content assessed with a histochemical periodic acid-Schiff reaction (PAS; P=0.82). The results suggest that the increased aerobic performance is achieved by an increase of total muscle mass, without major qualitative changes in the muscle fibre architecture. However, such a conclusion should be treated with caution, because other modifications, such as increased density of capillaries or mitochondria, could occur. PMID:26685167

  15. Aerobic fitness does not modulate protein metabolism in response to increased exercise: a controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: This study examined how a sudden increase in exercise energy expenditure affected whole body protein turnover and nitrogen balance in people of differing aerobic fitness. We hypothesized that whole-body protein turnover would be attenuated, and nitrogen balance would be preserved, in aerobi...

  16. Metabolic reprogramming during neuronal differentiation from aerobic glycolysis to neuronal oxidative phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xinde; Boyer, Leah; Jin, Mingji; Mertens, Jerome; Kim, Yongsung; Ma, Li; Ma, Li; Hamm, Michael; Gage, Fred H; Hunter, Tony

    2016-01-01

    How metabolism is reprogrammed during neuronal differentiation is unknown. We found that the loss of hexokinase (HK2) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDHA) expression, together with a switch in pyruvate kinase gene splicing from PKM2 to PKM1, marks the transition from aerobic glycolysis in neural progenitor cells (NPC) to neuronal oxidative phosphorylation. The protein levels of c-MYC and N-MYC, transcriptional activators of the HK2 and LDHA genes, decrease dramatically. Constitutive expression of HK2 and LDHA during differentiation leads to neuronal cell death, indicating that the shut-off aerobic glycolysis is essential for neuronal survival. The metabolic regulators PGC-1α and ERRγ increase significantly upon neuronal differentiation to sustain the transcription of metabolic and mitochondrial genes, whose levels are unchanged compared to NPCs, revealing distinct transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes in the proliferation and post-mitotic differentiation states. Mitochondrial mass increases proportionally with neuronal mass growth, indicating an unknown mechanism linking mitochondrial biogenesis to cell size. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13374.001 PMID:27282387

  17. Exosomes from human mesenchymal stem cells conduct aerobic metabolism in term and preterm newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Panfoli, Isabella; Ravera, Silvia; Podestà, Marina; Cossu, Claudia; Santucci, Laura; Bartolucci, Martina; Bruschi, Maurizio; Calzia, Daniela; Sabatini, Federica; Bruschettini, Matteo; Ramenghi, Luca Antonio; Romantsik, Olga; Marimpietri, Danilo; Pistoia, Vito; Ghiggeri, Gianmarco; Frassoni, Francesco; Candiano, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    Exosomes are secreted nanovesicles that are able to transfer RNA and proteins to target cells. The emerging role of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) exosomes as promoters of aerobic ATP synthesis restoration in damaged cells, prompted us to assess whether they contain an extramitochondrial aerobic respiration capacity. Exosomes were isolated from culture medium of human MSCs from umbilical cord of ≥37-wk-old newborns or between 28- to 30-wk-old newborns (i.e.,term or preterm infants). Characterization of samples was conducted by cytofluorometry. Oxidative phosphorylation capacity was assessed by Western blot analysis, oximetry, and luminometric and fluorometric analyses. MSC exosomes express functional respiratory complexes I, IV, and V, consuming oxygen. ATP synthesis was only detectable in exosomes from term newborns, suggestive of a specific mechanism that is not completed at an early gestational age. Activities are outward facing and comparable to those detected in mitochondria isolated from term MSCs. MSC exosomes display an unsuspected aerobic respiratory ability independent of whole mitochondria. This may be relevant for their ability to rescue cell bioenergetics. The differential oxidative metabolism of pretermvs.term exosomes sheds new light on the preterm newborn's clinical vulnerability. A reduced ability to repair damaged tissue and an increased capability to cope with anoxic environment for preterm infants can be envisaged.-Panfoli, I., Ravera, S., Podestà, M., Cossu, C., Santucci, L., Bartolucci, M., Bruschi, M., Calzia, D., Sabatini, F., Bruschettini, M., Ramenghi, L. A., Romantsik, O., Marimpietri, D., Pistoia, V., Ghiggeri, G., Frassoni, F., Candiano, G. Exosomes from human mesenchymal stem cells conduct aerobic metabolism in term and preterm newborn infants. PMID:26655706

  18. Aerobic Degradation of Trichloroethylene by Co-Metabolism Using Phenol and Gasoline as Growth Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Li, Bing; Wang, Cui-Ping; Fan, Jun-Zhao; Sun, Hong-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a common groundwater contaminant of toxic and carcinogenic concern. Aerobic co-metabolic processes are the predominant pathways for TCE complete degradation. In this study, Pseudomonas fluorescens was studied as the active microorganism to degrade TCE under aerobic condition by co-metabolic degradation using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates. Operating conditions influencing TCE degradation efficiency were optimized. TCE co-metabolic degradation rate reached the maximum of 80% under the optimized conditions of degradation time of 3 days, initial OD600 of microorganism culture of 0.14 (1.26 × 107 cell/mL), initial phenol concentration of 100 mg/L, initial TCE concentration of 0.1 mg/L, pH of 6.0, and salinity of 0.1%. The modified transformation capacity and transformation yield were 20 μg (TCE)/mg (biomass) and 5.1 μg (TCE)/mg (phenol), respectively. Addition of nutrient broth promoted TCE degradation with phenol as growth substrate. It was revealed that catechol 1,2-dioxygenase played an important role in TCE co-metabolism. The dechlorination of TCE was complete, and less chlorinated products were not detected at the end of the experiment. TCE could also be co-metabolized in the presence of gasoline; however, the degradation rate was not high (28%). When phenol was introduced into the system of TCE and gasoline, TCE and gasoline could be removed at substantial rates (up to 59% and 69%, respectively). This study provides a promising approach for the removal of combined pollution of TCE and gasoline. PMID:24857922

  19. Aerobic degradation of trichloroethylene by co-metabolism using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Bing; Wang, Cui-Ping; Fan, Jun-Zhao; Sun, Hong-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a common groundwater contaminant of toxic and carcinogenic concern. Aerobic co-metabolic processes are the predominant pathways for TCE complete degradation. In this study, Pseudomonas fluorescens was studied as the active microorganism to degrade TCE under aerobic condition by co-metabolic degradation using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates. Operating conditions influencing TCE degradation efficiency were optimized. TCE co-metabolic degradation rate reached the maximum of 80% under the optimized conditions of degradation time of 3 days, initial OD600 of microorganism culture of 0.14 (1.26×10⁷ cell/mL), initial phenol concentration of 100 mg/L, initial TCE concentration of 0.1 mg/L, pH of 6.0, and salinity of 0.1%. The modified transformation capacity and transformation yield were 20 μg (TCE)/mg (biomass) and 5.1 μg (TCE)/mg (phenol), respectively. Addition of nutrient broth promoted TCE degradation with phenol as growth substrate. It was revealed that catechol 1,2-dioxygenase played an important role in TCE co-metabolism. The dechlorination of TCE was complete, and less chlorinated products were not detected at the end of the experiment. TCE could also be co-metabolized in the presence of gasoline; however, the degradation rate was not high (28%). When phenol was introduced into the system of TCE and gasoline, TCE and gasoline could be removed at substantial rates (up to 59% and 69%, respectively). This study provides a promising approach for the removal of combined pollution of TCE and gasoline. PMID:24857922

  20. Effect of creatine on aerobic and anaerobic metabolism in skeletal muscle in swimmers.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, C H; Kemp, G J; Sanderson, A L; Dixon, R M; Styles, P; Taylor, D J; Radda, G K

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of a relatively low dose of creatine on skeletal muscle metabolism and oxygen supply in a group of training athletes. METHODS: 31P magnetic resonance and near-infrared spectroscopy were used to study calf muscle metabolism in a group of 10 female members of a university swimming team. Studies were performed before and after a six week period of training during which they took either 2 g creatine daily or placebo. Calf muscle metabolism and creatine/choline ratios were studied in resting muscle, during plantar flexion exercise (10-15 min), and during recovery from exercise. RESULTS: There was no effect of creatine on metabolite ratios at rest or on metabolism during exercise and recovery from exercise. Muscle oxygen supply and exercise performance were not improved by creatine if compared to placebo treated subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Oral creatine supplementation at 2 g daily has no effect on muscle creatine concentration, muscle oxygen supply or muscle aerobic or anaerobic metabolism during endurance exercise. PMID:8889115

  1. Twelve weeks of moderate aerobic exercise without dietary intervention or weight loss does not affect 24-h energy expenditure in lean and obese adolescents.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exercise might have a persistent effect on energy expenditure and fat oxidation, resulting in increased fat loss. However, even without weight loss, exercise results in positive metabolic effects. The effect of an aerobic exercise program on 24-h total energy expenditure (TEE), and its components-ba...

  2. Effects of Exhaustive Aerobic Exercise on Tryptophan-Kynurenine Metabolism in Trained Athletes.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Barbara; Geiger, Daniela; Schauer, Markus; Gatterer, Hannes; Burtscher, Martin; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Exhaustive exercise can cause a transient depression of immune function. Data indicate significant effects of immune activation cascades on the biochemistry of monoamines and amino acids such as tryptophan. Tryptophan can be metabolized through different pathways, a major route being the kynurenine pathway, which is often systemically up-regulated when the immune response is activated. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of exhaustive aerobic exercise on biomarkers of immune activation and tryptophan metabolism in trained athletes. After a standardized breakfast 2 h prior to exercise, 33 trained athletes (17 women, 16 men) performed an incremental cycle ergometer exercise test at 60 rpm until exhaustion. After a 20 min rest phase, the participants performed a 20 min maximal time-trial on a cycle ergometer (RBM Cyclus 2, Germany). During the test, cyclists were strongly encouraged to choose a maximal pedalling rate that could be maintained for the respective test duration. Serum concentrations of amino acids tryptophan, kynurenine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine were determined by HPLC and immune system biomarker neopterin by ELISA at rest and immediately post exercise. Intense exercise was associated with a strong increase in neopterin concentrations (p<0.001), indicating increased immune activation following intense exercise. Exhaustive exercise significantly reduced tryptophan concentrations by 12% (p<0.001) and increased kynurenine levels by 6% (p = 0.022). Also phenylalanine to tyrosine ratios were lower after exercise as compared with baseline (p<0.001). The kynurenine to tryptophan ratio correlated with neopterin (r = 0.560, p<0.01). Thus, increased tryptophan catabolism by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase appears likely. Peak oxygen uptake correlated with baseline tryptophan and kynurenine concentrations (r = 0.562 and r = 0.511, respectively, both p<0.01). Findings demonstrate that exhaustive aerobic exercise is associated with increased immune

  3. Severe Obesity Shifts Metabolic Thresholds but Does Not Attenuate Aerobic Training Adaptations in Zucker Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Thiago S.; Simões, Herbert G.; Rogero, Marcelo M.; Moraes, Milton R.; Denadai, Benedito S.; Arida, Ricardo M.; Andrade, Marília S.; Silva, Bruno M.

    2016-01-01

    Severe obesity affects metabolism with potential to influence the lactate and glycemic response to different exercise intensities in untrained and trained rats. Here we evaluated metabolic thresholds and maximal aerobic capacity in rats with severe obesity and lean counterparts at pre- and post-training. Zucker rats (obese: n = 10, lean: n = 10) were submitted to constant treadmill bouts, to determine the maximal lactate steady state, and an incremental treadmill test, to determine the lactate threshold, glycemic threshold and maximal velocity at pre and post 8 weeks of treadmill training. Velocities of the lactate threshold and glycemic threshold agreed with the maximal lactate steady state velocity on most comparisons. The maximal lactate steady state velocity occurred at higher percentage of the maximal velocity in Zucker rats at pre-training than the percentage commonly reported and used for training prescription for other rat strains (i.e., 60%) (obese = 78 ± 9% and lean = 68 ± 5%, P < 0.05 vs. 60%). The maximal lactate steady state velocity and maximal velocity were lower in the obese group at pre-training (P < 0.05 vs. lean), increased in both groups at post-training (P < 0.05 vs. pre), but were still lower in the obese group at post-training (P < 0.05 vs. lean). Training-induced increase in maximal lactate steady state, lactate threshold and glycemic threshold velocities was similar between groups (P > 0.05), whereas increase in maximal velocity was greater in the obese group (P < 0.05 vs. lean). In conclusion, lactate threshold, glycemic threshold and maximal lactate steady state occurred at similar exercise intensity in Zucker rats at pre- and post-training. Severe obesity shifted metabolic thresholds to higher exercise intensity at pre-training, but did not attenuate submaximal and maximal aerobic training adaptations. PMID:27148063

  4. Effects of Exhaustive Aerobic Exercise on Tryptophan-Kynurenine Metabolism in Trained Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, Barbara; Geiger, Daniela; Schauer, Markus; Gatterer, Hannes; Burtscher, Martin; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Exhaustive exercise can cause a transient depression of immune function. Data indicate significant effects of immune activation cascades on the biochemistry of monoamines and amino acids such as tryptophan. Tryptophan can be metabolized through different pathways, a major route being the kynurenine pathway, which is often systemically up-regulated when the immune response is activated. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of exhaustive aerobic exercise on biomarkers of immune activation and tryptophan metabolism in trained athletes. After a standardized breakfast 2 h prior to exercise, 33 trained athletes (17 women, 16 men) performed an incremental cycle ergometer exercise test at 60 rpm until exhaustion. After a 20 min rest phase, the participants performed a 20 min maximal time-trial on a cycle ergometer (RBM Cyclus 2, Germany). During the test, cyclists were strongly encouraged to choose a maximal pedalling rate that could be maintained for the respective test duration. Serum concentrations of amino acids tryptophan, kynurenine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine were determined by HPLC and immune system biomarker neopterin by ELISA at rest and immediately post exercise. Intense exercise was associated with a strong increase in neopterin concentrations (p<0.001), indicating increased immune activation following intense exercise. Exhaustive exercise significantly reduced tryptophan concentrations by 12% (p<0.001) and increased kynurenine levels by 6% (p = 0.022). Also phenylalanine to tyrosine ratios were lower after exercise as compared with baseline (p<0.001). The kynurenine to tryptophan ratio correlated with neopterin (r = 0.560, p<0.01). Thus, increased tryptophan catabolism by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase appears likely. Peak oxygen uptake correlated with baseline tryptophan and kynurenine concentrations (r = 0.562 and r = 0.511, respectively, both p<0.01). Findings demonstrate that exhaustive aerobic exercise is associated with increased immune

  5. Metabolic effects of glycerol supplementation and aerobic physical training on Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Eric Francelino; Lobato, Raquel Vieira; Araújo, Ticiana Vasques; Orlando, Débora Ribeiro; Gomes, Núbia Ferreira; Alvarenga, Renata Ribeiro; Rogatto, Gustavo Puggina; Zangeronimo, Márcio Gilberto; Pereira, Luciano José

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated the effects of oral glycerol supplementation on trained rats fed a normal diet. Wistar rats were distributed among 6 groups in a completely randomized 2 × 3 factorial design. The animals were subjected to 6 weeks of aerobic training. In the last 4 weeks, the animals' diet was supplemented with saline, glucose, or glycerol. Data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by a Student-Newmann-Keuls test, with values for P < 0.05 considered statistically significant. The change in body mass was lower in the trained groups, and their food and water consumption were higher. Glycerol supplementation resulted in an increase in the levels of triacylglycerol (TAG) and total cholesterol, as well as in the area and diameter of adipocytes. When associated with training, these parameters were similar to those of other trained groups. Levels of low-density lipoprotein + very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased in the trained animals that received glycerol compared with the non-trained ones. Glycerol consumption caused a reduction in food intake and increased the villous:crypt (V:C) ratio. No changes in glycemia, high density lipoproteins, or density of adipocytes were observed. Supplementation with glycerol together with aerobic physical training promoted beneficial metabolic effects. However, in non-trained rats glycerol increased the diameter and area of adipocytes, as well as the levels of TAG and total cholesterol. PMID:25105723

  6. mTOR/HIF1α-mediated aerobic glycolysis as metabolic basis for trained immunity

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shih-Chin; Quintin, Jessica; Cramer, Robert A.; Shepardson, Kelly M.; Saeed, Sadia; Kumar, Vinod; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Martens, Joost H.A.; Rao, Nagesha Appukudige; Aghajanirefah, Ali; Manjeri, Ganesh R.; Li, Yang; Ifrim, Daniela C.; Arts, Rob J.W.; van der Meer, Brian M.J.W.; Deen, Peter M.T.; Logie, Colin; O’Neill, Luke A.; Willems, Peter; van de Veerdonk, Frank L.; van der Meer, Jos W.M.; Ng, Aylwin; Joosten, Leo A.B.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Netea, Mihai G.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic reprogramming of myeloid cells by infection or vaccination, termed trained immunity, confers non-specific protection from secondary infections. We characterized genome-wide transcriptome and histone modification profiles of human monocytes trained with β-glucan and identified induced expression of genes involved in glucose metabolism. Trained monocytes display high glucose consumption, lactate production, and NAD+/NADH ratio, reflecting a shift in the metabolism of trained monocytes with an increase in glycolysis dependent on the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) through a dectin-1/Akt/HIF1α pathway. Inhibition of Akt, mTOR, or HIF1α blocked monocyte induction of trained immunity, whereas the AMPK activator metformin inhibited the innate immune response to fungal infection. Finally, mice with a myeloid cell-specific defect in HIF1α were unable to mount trained immunity against bacterial sepsis. In conclusion, Akt/mTOR/HIF1α-dependent induction of aerobic glycolysis represents the metabolic basis of trained immunity. PMID:25258083

  7. Inhibition of aerobic metabolic cis-1,2-di-chloroethene biodegradation by other chloroethenes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, He-Ping; Schmidt, Kathrin R; Tiehm, Andreas

    2010-04-01

    The presence of other chloroethenes influences aerobic metabolic biodegradation of cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE). A new metabolically cDCE degrading enrichment culture was identified as also being capable of degrading vinyl chloride (VC), but not 1,1-dichloroethene (1,1DCE), trans-1,2-dichloroethene (tDCE), trichloroethene (TCE), or tetrachloroethene (PCE). The fastest degradation of cDCE was observed in the absence of any other chloroethene. In the presence of a second chloroethene (40-90 microM), the rate of cDCE (60 microM) degradation decreased in the following order: cDCE (+PCE) > cDCE (+tDCE) > cDCE (+VC)>cDCE (+1,1DCE) approximately cDCE (+TCE). With increasing concentrations of VC, ranging from 10 to 110 microM, the rate of cDCE (60 microM) degradation decreased. This study demonstrates that the inhibiting effects of chloroethene mixtures have to be considered during laboratory studies and bioremediation approaches based on metabolic cDCE degradation. PMID:20079512

  8. Effects of cadmium exposure on critical temperatures of aerobic metabolism in eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin, 1791).

    PubMed

    Bagwe, Rita; Beniash, Elia; Sokolova, Inna M

    2015-10-01

    Cadmium (Cd) and elevated temperatures are common stressors in estuarine and coastal environments. Elevated temperature can sensitize estuarine organisms to the toxicity of metals such as Cd and vice versa, but the physiological mechanisms of temperature-Cd interactions are not well understood. We tested a hypothesis that interactive effects of elevated temperature and Cd stress involve Cd-induced reduction of the aerobic scope of an organism thereby narrowing the thermal tolerance window of oysters. We determined the effects of prolonged Cd exposure (50 μg Cd l(-1)for 30 days) on the upper critical temperature of aerobic metabolism (assessed by accumulation of anaerobic end products L-alanine, succinate and acetate), cellular energy status (assessed by the tissue levels of adenylates, phosphagen/aphosphagen and glycogen and lipid reserves) and oxidative damage during acute temperature rise (20-36 °C) in the eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica. The upper critical temperature (TcII) was shifted to lower values (from 28 to 24 °C) in Cd-exposed oysters in spring and was lower in both control and Cd-exposed groups in winter (24 and <20 °C, respectively). This indicates a reduction of thermal tolerance of Cd-exposed oysters associated with a decrease of the aerobic scope of the organism and early transition to partial anaerobiosis. Acute warming had no negative effects on tissue energy reserves or parameters of cellular energy status of oysters (except a decrease in adenylate content at the extreme temperature of 36 °C) but led to an increase in oxidative lesions of proteins at extreme temperatures. These data show that transition to partial anaerobiosis (indicated by the accumulation of anaerobic end products) is the most sensitive biomarker of temperature-induced transition to energetically non-sustainable state in oysters, whereas disturbances in the cellular energy status (i.e. decline in adenylate and phosphagen levels) and oxidative stress ensue at

  9. Restriction of Aerobic Metabolism by Acquired or Innate Arylsulfatase B Deficiency: A New Approach to the Warburg Effect

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Feferman, Leo; Tobacman, Joanne K.

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic respiration is required for optimal efficiency of metabolism in mammalian cells. Under circumstances when oxygen utilization is impaired, cells survive by anerobic metabolism. The malignant cell has cultivated the use of anerobic metabolism in an aerobic environment, the Warburg effect, but the explanation for this preference is not clear. This paper presents evidence that deficiency of the enzyme arylsulfatase B (ARSB; N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase), either innate or acquired, helps to explain the Warburg phenomenon. ARSB is the enzyme that removes 4-sulfate groups from the non-reducing end of chondroitin 4-sulfate and dermatan sulfate. Previous reports indicated reduced ARSB activity in malignancy and replication of the effects of hypoxia by decline in ARSB. Hypoxia reduced ARSB activity, since molecular oxygen is needed for post-translational modification of ARSB. In this report, studies were performed in human HepG2 cells and in hepatocytes from ARSB-deficient and normal C57BL/6J control mice. Decline of ARSB, in the presence of oxygen, profoundly reduced the oxygen consumption rate and increased the extracellular acidification rate, indicating preference for aerobic glycolysis. Specific study findings indicate that decline in ARSB activity enhanced aerobic glycolysis and impaired normal redox processes, consistent with a critical role of ARSB and sulfate reduction in mammalian metabolism. PMID:27605497

  10. Restriction of Aerobic Metabolism by Acquired or Innate Arylsulfatase B Deficiency: A New Approach to the Warburg Effect.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Feferman, Leo; Tobacman, Joanne K

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic respiration is required for optimal efficiency of metabolism in mammalian cells. Under circumstances when oxygen utilization is impaired, cells survive by anerobic metabolism. The malignant cell has cultivated the use of anerobic metabolism in an aerobic environment, the Warburg effect, but the explanation for this preference is not clear. This paper presents evidence that deficiency of the enzyme arylsulfatase B (ARSB; N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase), either innate or acquired, helps to explain the Warburg phenomenon. ARSB is the enzyme that removes 4-sulfate groups from the non-reducing end of chondroitin 4-sulfate and dermatan sulfate. Previous reports indicated reduced ARSB activity in malignancy and replication of the effects of hypoxia by decline in ARSB. Hypoxia reduced ARSB activity, since molecular oxygen is needed for post-translational modification of ARSB. In this report, studies were performed in human HepG2 cells and in hepatocytes from ARSB-deficient and normal C57BL/6J control mice. Decline of ARSB, in the presence of oxygen, profoundly reduced the oxygen consumption rate and increased the extracellular acidification rate, indicating preference for aerobic glycolysis. Specific study findings indicate that decline in ARSB activity enhanced aerobic glycolysis and impaired normal redox processes, consistent with a critical role of ARSB and sulfate reduction in mammalian metabolism. PMID:27605497

  11. Intraspecific correlations of basal and maximal metabolic rates in birds and the aerobic capacity model for the evolution of endothermy.

    PubMed

    Swanson, David L; Thomas, Nathan E; Liknes, Eric T; Cooper, Sheldon J

    2012-01-01

    The underlying assumption of the aerobic capacity model for the evolution of endothermy is that basal (BMR) and maximal aerobic metabolic rates are phenotypically linked. However, because BMR is largely a function of central organs whereas maximal metabolic output is largely a function of skeletal muscles, the mechanistic underpinnings for their linkage are not obvious. Interspecific studies in birds generally support a phenotypic correlation between BMR and maximal metabolic output. If the aerobic capacity model is valid, these phenotypic correlations should also extend to intraspecific comparisons. We measured BMR, M(sum) (maximum thermoregulatory metabolic rate) and MMR (maximum exercise metabolic rate in a hop-flutter chamber) in winter for dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis), American goldfinches (Carduelis tristis; M(sum) and MMR only), and black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus; BMR and M(sum) only) and examined correlations among these variables. We also measured BMR and M(sum) in individual house sparrows (Passer domesticus) in both summer, winter and spring. For both raw metabolic rates and residuals from allometric regressions, BMR was not significantly correlated with either M(sum) or MMR in juncos. Moreover, no significant correlation between M(sum) and MMR or their mass-independent residuals occurred for juncos or goldfinches. Raw BMR and M(sum) were significantly positively correlated for black-capped chickadees and house sparrows, but mass-independent residuals of BMR and M(sum) were not. These data suggest that central organ and exercise organ metabolic levels are not inextricably linked and that muscular capacities for exercise and shivering do not necessarily vary in tandem in individual birds. Why intraspecific and interspecific avian studies show differing results and the significance of these differences to the aerobic capacity model are unknown, and resolution of these questions will require additional studies of potential mechanistic

  12. Effects of Simultaneous or Sequential Weight Loss Diet and Aerobic Interval Training on Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mora-Rodriguez, R; Ortega, J F; Guio de Prada, V; Fernández-Elías, V E; Hamouti, N; Morales-Palomo, F; Martinez-Vizcaino, V; Nelson, R K

    2016-04-01

    Our purpose in this study was to investigate efficient and sustainable combinations of exercise and diet-induced weight loss (DIET), in order to combat obesity in metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients. We examined the impact of aerobic interval training (AIT), followed by or concurrent to a DIET on MetS components. 36 MetS patients (54±9 years old; 33±4 BMI; 27 males and 9 females) underwent 16 weeks of AIT followed by another 16 weeks without exercise from the fall of 2013 to the spring of 2014. Participants were randomized to AIT without DIET (E CON, n=12), AIT followed by DIET (E-then-D, n=12) or AIT concurrent with DIET (E+D, n=12) groups. Body weight decreased below E CON similarly in the E-then-D and E+D groups (~5%). Training improved blood pressure and cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2peak) in all groups with no additional effect of concurrent weight loss. However, E+D improved insulin sensitivity (HOMA) and lowered plasma triglycerides and blood cholesterol below E CON and E-then-D (all P<0.05). Weight loss in E-then-D in the 16 weeks without exercise lowered HOMA to the E+D levels and maintained blood pressure at trained levels. Our data suggest that a new lifestyle combination consisting of aerobic interval training followed by weight loss diet is similar, or even more effective on improving metabolic syndrome factors than concurrent exercise plus diet. PMID:26667921

  13. Effect of selected monoterpenes on methane oxidation, denitrification, and aerobic metabolism by bacteria in pure culture.

    PubMed

    Amaral, J A; Ekins, A; Richards, S R; Knowles, R

    1998-02-01

    Selected monoterpenes inhibited methane oxidation by methanotrophs (Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, Methylobacter luteus), denitrification by environmental isolates, and aerobic metabolism by several heterotrophic pure cultures. Inhibition occurred to various extents and was transient. Complete inhibition of methane oxidation by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b with 1.1 mM (-)-alpha-pinene lasted for more than 2 days with a culture of optical density of 0.05 before activity resumed. Inhibition was greater under conditions under which particulate methane monooxygenase was expressed. No apparent consumption or conversion of monoterpenes by methanotrophs was detected by gas chromatography, and the reason that transient inhibition occurs is not clear. Aerobic metabolism by several heterotrophs was much less sensitive than methanotrophy was; Escherichia coli (optical density, 0.01), for example, was not affected by up to 7.3 mM (-)-alpha-pinene. The degree of inhibition was monoterpene and species dependent. Denitrification by isolates from a polluted sediment was not inhibited by 3.7 mM (-)-alpha-pinene, gamma-terpinene, or beta-myrcene, whereas 50 to 100% inhibition was observed for isolates from a temperate swamp soil. The inhibitory effect of monoterpenes on methane oxidation was greatest with unsaturated, cyclic hydrocarbon forms [e.g., (-)-alpha-pinene, (S)-(-)-limonene, (R)-(+)-limonene, and gamma-terpinene]. Lower levels of inhibition occurred with oxide and alcohol derivatives [(R)-(+)-limonene oxide, alpha-pinene oxide, linalool, alpha-terpineol] and a noncyclic hydrocarbon (beta-myrcene). Isomers of pinene inhibited activity to different extents. Given their natural sources, monoterpenes may be significant factors affecting bacterial activities in nature. PMID:9464387

  14. Metabolic energy required for flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, H. W.; Gretebeck, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews data available from U.S. and U.S.S.R. studies on energy metabolism in the microgravity of space flight. Energy utilization and energy availability in space seem to be similar to those on Earth. However, negative nitrogen balances in space in the presence of adequate energy and protein intakes and in-flight exercise, suggest that lean body mass decreases in space. Metabolic studies during simulated (bed rest) and actual microgravity have shown changes in blood glucose, fatty acids, and insulin levels, suggesting that energy metabolism may be altered during flight. Future research should focus on the interactions of lean body mass, diet, and exercise in spaced and their roles in energy metabolism during space flight.

  15. The metabolic cost of two ranges of arm position height with and without hand weights during low impact aerobic dance.

    PubMed

    Carroll, M W; Otto, R M; Wygand, J

    1991-12-01

    To determine the energy cost of low impact aerobic dance while varying arm movement height and the use of hand weights, 10 adults volunteered to participate in four choreographed trials. All trials consisted of identical leg movements. Arm movements, however, were performed above shoulder level both with and without 0.9-kg hand weights and below shoulder level both with and without 0.9-kg hand weights. Open circuit spirometry was employed throughout the 10-min videotape guided trials, and heart rate was measured by telemetry. Neither the use of hand weights nor the change in arm position height significantly altered the energy cost of low impact aerobic dance. However, heart rate responses were significantly different. Caution should be observed by aerobics instructors and participants as to the use of heart rate as an indicator of intensity for low impact aerobic dance. PMID:1780565

  16. Stoichiometry and kinetics of poly-{beta}-hydroxybutyrate metabolism in aerobic, slow growing, activated sludge cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Beun, J.J.; Paletta, F.; Loosdrecht, M.C.M. Van; Heijnen, J.J.

    2000-02-20

    This paper discusses the poly-{beta}-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) metabolism in aerobic, slow growing, activated sludge cultures, based on experimental data and on a metabolic model. The dynamic conditions which occur in activated sludge processes were simulated in a 2-L sequencing batch reactor (SBR) by subjecting a mixed microbial population to successive periods of external substrate availability (feast period) and no external substrate availability (famine period). Under these conditions intracellular storage and consumption of PHB was observed. It appeared that in the feast period, 66% to almost 100% of the substrate consumed is used for storage of PHB, the remainder is used for growth and maintenance processes. Furthermore, it appeared that at high sludge retention time (SRT) the growth rate in the feast and famine periods was the same. With decreasing SRT the growth rate in the feast period increased relative to the growth rate in the famine period. Acetate consumption and PHB production in the feast period both proceeded with a zero-order rate in acetate and PHB concentration respectively. PHB consumption in the famine period could best be described kinetically with a nth order degradation equation in PHB concentration. The obtained results are discussed in the context of the general activated sludge models.

  17. Anaerobic-aerobic sequencing bioreactors improve energy efficiency for treatment of personal care product industry wastes.

    PubMed

    Ahammad, S Z; Bereslawski, J L; Dolfing, J; Mota, C; Graham, D W

    2013-07-01

    Personal care product (PCP) industry liquid wastes contain shampoo residues, which are usually treated by aerobic activated sludge (AS). Unfortunately, AS is expensive for PCP wastes because of high aeration and energy demands, whereas potentially energy-positive anaerobic designs cannot meet effluent targets. Therefore, combined anaerobic-aerobic systems may be the best solution. Seven treatment systems were assessed in terms of energy and treatment performance for shampoo wastes, including one aerobic, three anaerobic (HUASB, AHR and AnCSTR) and three anaerobic-aerobic reactor designs. COD removals were highest in the HUASB-aerobic (87.9 ± 0.4%) and AHR-aerobic (86.8±0.5%) systems, which used 69.2% and 62.5% less energy than aerobic AS. However, actual methane production rates were low relative to theoretical in the UASB and AHR units (∼10% methane/COD removed) compared with the AnCSTR unit (∼70%). Anaerobic-aerobic sequence reactors show promise for treating shampoo wastes, but optimal designs depend upon whether methane production or COD removal is most important to operations. PMID:23639409

  18. Mammalian Sirtuins and Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoling; Kazgan, Nevzat

    2011-01-01

    Sirtuins are highly conserved NAD+-dependent protein deacetylases and/or ADP-ribosyltransferases that can extend the lifespan of several lower model organisms including yeast, worms and flies. The seven mammalian sirtuins, SIRT1 to SIRT7, have emerged as key metabolic sensors that directly link environmental signals to mammalian metabolic homeostasis and stress response. Recent studies have shed light on the critical roles of sirtuins in mammalian energy metabolism in response to nutrient signals. This review focuses on the involvement of two nuclear sirtuins, SIRT1 and SIRT6, and three mitochondrial sirtuins, SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5, in regulation of diverse metabolic processes. PMID:21614150

  19. Metabolism of 2-Chloro-4-Nitroaniline via Novel Aerobic Degradation Pathway by Rhodococcus sp. Strain MB-P1

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fazlurrahman; Pal, Deepika; Vikram, Surendra; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    2-chloro-4-nitroaniline (2-C-4-NA) is used as an intermediate in the manufacture of dyes, pharmaceuticals, corrosion inhibitor and also used in the synthesis of niclosamide, a molluscicide. It is marked as a black-listed substance due to its poor biodegradability. We report biodegradation of 2-C-4-NA and its pathway characterization by Rhodococcus sp. strain MB-P1 under aerobic conditions. The strain MB-P1 utilizes 2-C-4-NA as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. In the growth medium, the degradation of 2-C-4-NA occurs with the release of nitrite ions, chloride ions, and ammonia. During the resting cell studies, the 2-C-4-NA-induced cells of strain MB-P1 transformed 2-C-4-NA stoichiometrically to 4-amino-3-chlorophenol (4-A-3-CP), which subsequently gets transformed to 6-chlorohydroxyquinol (6-CHQ) metabolite. Enzyme assays by cell-free lysates prepared from 2-C-4-NA-induced MB-P1 cells, demonstrated that the first enzyme in the 2-C-4-NA degradation pathway is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes the stoichiometric removal of nitro group and production of 4-A-3-CP. Oxygen uptake studies on 4-A-3-CP and related anilines by 2-C-4-NA-induced MB-P1 cells demonstrated the involvement of aniline dioxygenase in the second step of 2-C-4-NA degradation. This is the first report showing 2-C-4-NA degradation and elucidation of corresponding metabolic pathway by an aerobic bacterium. PMID:23614030

  20. Metabolism of 2-chloro-4-nitroaniline via novel aerobic degradation pathway by Rhodococcus sp. strain MB-P1.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fazlurrahman; Pal, Deepika; Vikram, Surendra; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    2-chloro-4-nitroaniline (2-C-4-NA) is used as an intermediate in the manufacture of dyes, pharmaceuticals, corrosion inhibitor and also used in the synthesis of niclosamide, a molluscicide. It is marked as a black-listed substance due to its poor biodegradability. We report biodegradation of 2-C-4-NA and its pathway characterization by Rhodococcus sp. strain MB-P1 under aerobic conditions. The strain MB-P1 utilizes 2-C-4-NA as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. In the growth medium, the degradation of 2-C-4-NA occurs with the release of nitrite ions, chloride ions, and ammonia. During the resting cell studies, the 2-C-4-NA-induced cells of strain MB-P1 transformed 2-C-4-NA stoichiometrically to 4-amino-3-chlorophenol (4-A-3-CP), which subsequently gets transformed to 6-chlorohydroxyquinol (6-CHQ) metabolite. Enzyme assays by cell-free lysates prepared from 2-C-4-NA-induced MB-P1 cells, demonstrated that the first enzyme in the 2-C-4-NA degradation pathway is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes the stoichiometric removal of nitro group and production of 4-A-3-CP. Oxygen uptake studies on 4-A-3-CP and related anilines by 2-C-4-NA-induced MB-P1 cells demonstrated the involvement of aniline dioxygenase in the second step of 2-C-4-NA degradation. This is the first report showing 2-C-4-NA degradation and elucidation of corresponding metabolic pathway by an aerobic bacterium. PMID:23614030

  1. Transport and metabolism of fumaric acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in aerobic glucose-limited chemostat culture.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mihir V; van Mastrigt, Oscar; Heijnen, Joseph J; van Gulik, Walter M

    2016-04-01

    Currently, research is being focused on the industrial-scale production of fumaric acid and other relevant organic acids from renewable feedstocks via fermentation, preferably at low pH for better product recovery. However, at low pH a large fraction of the extracellular acid is present in the undissociated form, which is lipophilic and can diffuse into the cell. There have been no studies done on the impact of high extracellular concentrations of fumaric acid under aerobic conditions in S. cerevisiae, which is a relevant issue to study for industrial-scale production. In this work we studied the uptake and metabolism of fumaric acid in S. cerevisiae in glucose-limited chemostat cultures at a cultivation pH of 3.0 (pH < pK). Steady states were achieved with different extracellular levels of fumaric acid, obtained by adding different amounts of fumaric acid to the feed medium. The experiments were carried out with the wild-type S. cerevisiae CEN.PK 113-7D and an engineered S. cerevisiae ADIS 244 expressing a heterologous dicarboxylic acid transporter (DCT-02) from Aspergillus niger, to examine whether it would be capable of exporting fumaric acid. We observed that fumaric acid entered the cells most likely via passive diffusion of the undissociated form. Approximately two-thirds of the fumaric acid in the feed was metabolized together with glucose. From metabolic flux analysis, an increased ATP dissipation was observed only at high intracellular concentrations of fumarate, possibly due to the export of fumarate via an ABC transporter. The implications of our results for the industrial-scale production of fumaric acid are discussed. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26683700

  2. Genetic variances and covariances of aerobic metabolic rates in laboratory mice

    PubMed Central

    Wone, Bernard; Sears, Michael W.; Labocha, Marta K.; Donovan, Edward R.; Hayes, Jack P.

    2009-01-01

    The genetic variances and covariances of traits must be known to predict how they may respond to selection and how covariances among them might affect their evolutionary trajectories. We used the animal model to estimate the genetic variances and covariances of basal metabolic rate (BMR) and maximal metabolic rate (MMR) in a genetically heterogeneous stock of laboratory mice. Narrow-sense heritability (h2) was approximately 0.38 ± 0.08 for body mass, 0.26 ± 0.08 for whole-animal BMR, 0.24 ± 0.07 for whole-animal MMR, 0.19 ± 0.07 for mass-independent BMR, and 0.16 ± 0.06 for mass-independent MMR. All h2 estimates were significantly different from zero. The phenotypic correlation of whole animal BMR and MMR was 0.56 ± 0.02, and the corresponding genetic correlation was 0.79 ± 0.12. The phenotypic correlation of mass-independent BMR and MMR was 0.13 ± 0.03, and the corresponding genetic correlation was 0.72 ± 0.03. The genetic correlations of metabolic rates were significantly different from zero, but not significantly different from one. A key assumption of the aerobic capacity model for the evolution of endothermy is that BMR and MMR are linked. The estimated genetic correlation between BMR and MMR is consistent with that assumption, but the genetic correlation is not so high as to preclude independent evolution of BMR and MMR. PMID:19656796

  3. Effects of aerobic exercise on the resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness of female patients with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seol-Jung; Kim,, Eon-ho; Ko, Kwang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aerobic exercise on the resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness or female patients with metabolic syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were randomly assigned to an exercise group (n=12) or a control group (n=11). Subjects in the exercise group performed aerobic exercise at 60–80% of maximum heart rate for 40 min 5 times a week for 12 weeks. The changes in metabolic syndrome risk factors, resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness were measured and analyzed before and after initiation of the exercise program to determine the effect of exercise. Arterial stiffness was assessed based on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV). [Results] Compared to the control group; The metabolic syndrome risk factors (weight, % body fat, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and HDL-Cholesterol) were significantly improved in the exercise: resting heart rate was significantly decreased; VO2max, muscle strength and muscle endurance were significantly increased; and ba-PWV was significantly decreased. [Conclusion] Aerobic exercise had beneficial effects on the resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness of patients with metabolic syndrome. PMID:27390411

  4. Effects of aerobic exercise on the resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness of female patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seol-Jung; Kim, Eon-Ho; Ko, Kwang-Jun

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aerobic exercise on the resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness or female patients with metabolic syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were randomly assigned to an exercise group (n=12) or a control group (n=11). Subjects in the exercise group performed aerobic exercise at 60-80% of maximum heart rate for 40 min 5 times a week for 12 weeks. The changes in metabolic syndrome risk factors, resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness were measured and analyzed before and after initiation of the exercise program to determine the effect of exercise. Arterial stiffness was assessed based on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV). [Results] Compared to the control group; The metabolic syndrome risk factors (weight, % body fat, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and HDL-Cholesterol) were significantly improved in the exercise: resting heart rate was significantly decreased; VO2max, muscle strength and muscle endurance were significantly increased; and ba-PWV was significantly decreased. [Conclusion] Aerobic exercise had beneficial effects on the resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness of patients with metabolic syndrome. PMID:27390411

  5. Robustness of an aerobic metabolically vinyl chloride degrading bacterial enrichment culture.

    PubMed

    Zhao, He-Ping; Schmidt, Kathrin R; Lohner, Svenja; Tiehm, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Degradation of the lower chlorinated ethenes is crucial to the application of natural attenuation or in situ bioremediation on chlorinated ethene contaminated sites. Recently, within mixtures of several chloroethenes as they can occur in contaminated groundwater inhibiting effects on aerobic chloroethene degradation have been shown. The current study demonstrated that metabolic vinyl chloride (VC) degradation by an enrichment culture originating from groundwater was not affected by an equimolar concentration (50 μM) of cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE). Only cDCE concentrations at a ratio of 2.4:1 (initial cDCE to VC concentration) caused minor inhibition of VC degradation. Furthermore, the degradation of VC was not affected by the presence of trans-1,2-dichloroethene (tDCE), 1,1-dichloroethene (1,1-DCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and tetrachloroethene (PCE) in equimolar concentrations (50 μM). Only cDCE and tDCE were cometabolically degraded in small amounts. The VC-degrading culture demonstrated a broad pH tolerance from 5 to 9 with an optimum between 6 and 7. Results also showed that the culture could degrade VC concentrations up to 1,800 μM (110 mg/L). PMID:22020471

  6. Aerobic metabolism of diclosulam on U.S. and South American soils.

    PubMed

    Yoder, R N; Huskin, M A; Kennard, L M; Zabik, J M

    2000-09-01

    Degradation of the sulfonanilide herbicide diclosulam was studied on nine soils from three countries to determine the rates and products of aerobic metabolism. Diclosulam was applied to four agricultural soils from the United States, three from Argentina, and two from Brazil at a rate of 0.1 ppm, equivalent to approximately twice the maximum field application rate of 52 g of active ingredient/ha. U.S. and Brazilian soils were incubated in the dark at 25 degrees C at 75% 0.3 bar moisture; Argentinean soils were incubated in the dark at 20 degrees C and 45% moisture holding capacity. Samples were analyzed up to one year after treatment. Two-compartment DT(50) and DT(90) values averaged 28 +/- 12 and 190 +/- 91 days, respectively. Three soil metabolites reached levels of >10% of applied in at least one soil and were identified as the 5-hydroxy analogue of diclosulam (5-OH-diclosulam), aminosulfonyl triazolopyrimidine (ASTP), and the 8-chloro-5-hydroxy analogue of diclosulam (8-Cl-diclosulam). The terminal products of diclosulam soil metabolism were mineralization to CO(2) and bound soil residues. Apparent sorption coefficients (K(d)) were determined on a subset of samples by extraction with a 0. 01 M CaCl(2) solution followed by an acidified acetone extraction. Initial sorption coefficients were similar to those obtained in a batch equilibrium study and averaged 1.1 L/kg for the six soils tested. K(d) coefficients for the metabolites, when available, tended to be slightly lower than that for diclosulam. Sorptivity of diclosulam and degradates increased with time. PMID:10995360

  7. Aerobic metabolism of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid in Archaea via an unusual pathway involving an intramolecular migration (NIH shift).

    PubMed

    Fairley, D J; Boyd, D R; Sharma, N D; Allen, C C R; Morgan, P; Larkin, M J

    2002-12-01

    A novel haloarchaeal strain, Haloarcula sp. strain D1, grew aerobically on 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (4HBA) as a sole carbon and energy source and is the first member of the domain Archaea reported to do so. Unusually, D1 metabolized 4HBA via gentisic acid rather than via protocatechuic acid, hydroquinone, or catechol. Gentisate was detected in 4HBA-grown cultures, and gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase activity was induced in 4HBA-grown cells. Stoichiometric accumulation of gentisate from 4HBA was demonstrated in 4HBA-grown cell suspensions containing 2,2'-dipyridyl (which strongly inhibits gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase). To establish whether initial 1-hydroxylation of 4HBA with concomitant 1,2-carboxyl group migration to yield gentisate occurred, 2,6-dideutero-4HBA was synthesized and used as a substrate. Deuterated gentisate was recovered from cell suspensions and identified as 3-deutero-gentisate, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This structural isomer would be expected only if a 1,2-carboxyl group migration had taken place, and it provides compelling evidence that the 4HBA pathway in Haloarcula sp. strain D1 involves a hydroxylation-induced intramolecular migration. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a pathway which involves such a transformation (called an NIH shift) in the domain Archaea. PMID:12450849

  8. Metabolism of Glycogen and Neutral Lipids by Aphelenchus avenae and Caenorhabditis sp. in Aerobic, Microaerobic and Anaerobic Environments.

    PubMed

    Cooper, A F; Van Gundy, S D

    1970-10-01

    Starving Aphelenchus avenae survived 3-4 weeks in microaerobic and anaerobic environments, but Caenorhabditis sp. survived less than 80 hr. Aerobically, both nematodes metabolize neutral lipid reserves: there was no microaerobic ( <5% O) or anaerobic neutral lipid catabolism. Early in anaerobiosis both nematodes utilized endogenous glycogen. Caenorhabditis sp. depleted the glycogen and died. A. avenae under oxygen stress longer than 120 hr entered cryptobiosis, during which there was neither measurable O uptake nor glycogen or neutral lipid utilization, Only when re-aerated, did A. avenae recover and resume "'normal" metabolism. PMID:19322317

  9. Energy Metabolism in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Liangyou

    2014-01-01

    The liver is an essential metabolic organ, and its metabolic activity is tightly controlled by insulin and other metabolic hormones. Glucose is metabolized into pyruvate through glycolysis in the cytoplasm, and pyruvate is completely oxidized to generate ATP through the TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria. In the fed state, glycolytic products are used to synthesize fatty acids through de novo lipogenesis. Long-chain fatty acids are incorporated into triacylglycerol, phospholipids, and cholesterol esters in hepatocytes, and these complex lipids are stored in lipid droplets and membrane structures, or secreted into the circulation as VLDL particles. In the fasted state, the liver secretes glucose through both breakdown of glycogen (glycogenolysis) and de novo glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis). During pronged fasting, hepatic gluconeogenesis is the primary source of endogenous glucose production. Fasting also promotes lipolysis in adipose tissue to release nonesterified fatty acids which are converted into ketone bodies in the liver though mitochondrial β oxidation and ketogenesis. Ketone bodies provide a metabolic fuel for extrahepatic tissues. Liver metabolic processes are tightly regulated by neuronal and hormonal systems. The sympathetic system stimulates, whereas the parasympathetic system suppresses, hepatic gluconeogenesis. Insulin stimulates glycolysis and lipogenesis, but suppresses gluconeogenesis; glucagon counteracts insulin action. Numerous transcription factors and coactivators, including CREB, FOXO1, ChREBP, SREBP, PGC-1α, and CRTC2, control the expression of the enzymes which catalyze the rate-limiting steps of liver metabolic processes, thus controlling liver energy metabolism. Aberrant energy metabolism in the liver promotes insulin resistance, diabetes, and nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD). PMID:24692138

  10. Hepatic and systemic metabolic responses to aerobic and anaerobic intra-abdominal abscesses in a highly reproducible chronic rat model.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, T; Sato, T; Marzella, L; Hirai, F; Trump, B F; Siegel, J H

    1984-01-01

    A single, uniform abscess was formed in 100% of the animals inoculated with a fecal pellet made of sterile rat feces, agar, and a known number and strain of bacteria. The effects of monoclonal Escherichia coli abscess (83 rats) were compared to those of sterile abscess (34 rats) and sham operation (35 rats without abscess). Bacteroides fragilis was added to the sterile pellet to study the effect of an anaerobic monoclonal abscess (16 rats) or of a biclonal abscess containing both aerobes and anaerobes (32 rats). After inoculation, a peritonitis stage with leucopenia, hypoglycemia, body weight loss, and slight fever was followed by the abscess stage with leucocytosis and a slight hyperglycemia. Mild hepatic energy charge deficiency and hepatic lactic acidosis were observed in sterile abscess rats, and slightly enhanced energy charge was seen in monoclonal E. coli abscess rats. The addition of B. fragilis to the sterile pellet, alone or together with E. coli, produced hepatic energy charge deficiency and hepatic lactic acidosis, which were significantly enhanced compared with the monoclonal E. coli abscess rats. The greatest effect was seen in the biclonal E. coli plus B. fragilis abscess, suggesting that anaerobic or combined aerobe and anaerobe abscesses may produce a greater hepatic injury than an aerobic organism abscess alone. This may account for the apparent synergic interaction between aerobic and anaerobic organisms. PMID:6380793

  11. Aerobic Vinyl Chloride Metabolism in Groundwater Microcosms by Methanotrophic and Etheneotrophic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Findlay, Margaret; Smoler, Donna F; Fogel, Samuel; Mattes, Timothy E

    2016-04-01

    Vinyl chloride (VC) is a carcinogen generated in groundwater by reductive dechlorination of chloroethenes. Under aerobic conditions, etheneotrophs oxidize ethene and VC, while VC-assimilators can use VC as their sole source of carbon and energy. Methanotrophs utilize only methane but can oxidize ethene to epoxyethane and VC to chlorooxirane. Microcosms were constructed with groundwater from the Carver site in MA containing these three native microbial types. Methane, ethene, and VC were added to the microcosms singly or as mixtures. In the absence of VC, ethene degraded faster when methane was also present. We hypothesized that methanotroph oxidation of ethene to epoxyethane competed with their use of methane, and that epoxyethane stimulated the activity of starved etheneotrophs by inducing the enzyme alkene monooxygenase. We then developed separate enrichment cultures of Carver methanotrophs and etheneotrophs, and demonstrated that Carver methanotrophs can oxidize ethene to epoxyethane, and that starved Carver etheneotrophs exhibit significantly reduced lag time for ethene utilization when epoxyethane is added. In our groundwater microcosm tests, when all three substrates were present, the rate of VC removal was faster than with either methane or ethene alone, consistent with the idea that methanotrophs stimulate etheneotroph destruction of VC. PMID:26918370

  12. Brain magnetic resonance imaging, aerobic power, and metabolic parameters among 30 asymptomatic scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Tripodi, D; Dupas, B; Potiron, M; Louvet, S; Geraut, C

    2004-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the presence of cerebral lesions in asymptomatic scuba divers and explain the causes of them: potential risk factors associating cardiovascular risk factors, low aerobic capacity, or characteristics of diving (maximum depth, ascent rate). Experienced scuba divers, over 40 years of age, without any decompression sickness (DCS) history were included. We studied 30 scuba divers (instructors) without any clinical symptoms. For all of them, we carried out a clinical examination with fatty body mass determination and we questioned them about their diving habits. A brain Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI), an assessment of maximal oxygen uptake, glycemia, triglyceridemia, and cholesterolemia were systematically carried out. Cerebral spots of high intensity were found at 33 % in the scuba diving group and 30 % in the control group. In the diving group, abnormalities were related to unsafe scuba-diving or metabolic abnormalities. In our study, we did not find a significant relationship between the lesions of the central nervous system, and the age, depth of the dives, number of dives, and ergometric performances (maximal oxygen uptake, V.O (2max), serum level of blood lactate). Nevertheless, we found a significant relationship between the lesions of the central nervous system and ascent rate faster than 10 meters per minute (r = 0.57; p = 0.003) or presence of high level of cholesterolemia (r = 0.6; p = 0.001). We found concordant results using the Cochran's Test: meaningful link between the number of brain lesions and the speed of decompression (Uexp = 14 < Utable = 43; alpha = 0.05, p < 0.01). We concluded that hyperintensities can be explained by preformed nitrogen gas microbubbles and particularly in presence of cholesterol, when the ascent rate is up to 10 meters per minute. So, it was remarkable to note that asymptomatic patients practicing scuba diving either professionally or recreationally, presented lesions of the central nervous

  13. Combined Aerobic/Strength Training and Energy Expenditure in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Gary R.; Bickel, C. Scott; Fisher, Gordon; Neumeier, William; McCarthy, John

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To examine the effects of three different frequencies of combined resistance and aerobic training on total energy expenditure (TEE) and activity related energy expenditure (AEE) in a group of older adults. Methods Seventy-two women, 60 – 74 years old, were randomly assigned to one of three groups: 1 day/week of aerobic and 1 day/week of resistance (1+1); 2 days/week of aerobic and 2 days/week resistance (2+2); or 3 days/week aerobic and 3 days/week resistance (3+3). Body composition (DXA), feeling of fatigue, depression, and vigor (questionnaire), strength (1RM), serum cytokines (ELISA), maximal oxygen uptake (progressive treadmill test), resting energy expenditure, and TEE were measured before and after 16 weeks of training. Aerobic training consisted of 40 minutes of aerobic exercise at 80% maximum heart rate and resistance training consisted of 2 sets of 10 repetitions for 10 different exercises at 80% of one repetition maximum. Results All groups increased fat free mass, strength and aerobic fitness and decreased fat mass. No changes were observed in cytokines or perceptions of fatigue/depression. No time by group interaction was found for any fitness/body composition variable. TEE and AEE increased with the 2+2 group but not with the other two groups. Non-exercise training AEE (NEAT) increased significantly in the 2+2 group (+200 kcal/day), group 1×1 showed a trend for an increase (+68 kcal/day) and group 3+3 decreased significantly (−150 kcal/day). Conclusion Results indicate that 3+3 training may inhibit NEAT by being too time consuming and does not induce superior training adaptations to 1+1 and 2+2 training. Key words: physical activity, older adults, total energy expenditure, maximum oxygen uptake. PMID:23774582

  14. Change in energy expenditure and physical activity in response to aerobic and resistance exercise programs.

    PubMed

    Drenowatz, Clemens; Grieve, George L; DeMello, Madison M

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is considered an important component of a healthy lifestyle but there remains controversy on effects of exercise on non-exercise physical activity (PA). The present study examined the prospective association of aerobic and resistance exercise with total daily energy expenditure and PA in previously sedentary, young men. Nine men (27.0 ± 3.3 years) completed two 16-week exercise programs (3 exercise sessions per week) of aerobic and resistance exercise separated by a minimum of 6 weeks in random order. Energy expenditure and PA were measured with the SenseWear Mini Armband prior to each intervention as well as during week 1, week 8 and week 16 of the aerobic and resistance exercise program. Body composition was measured via dual x-ray absorptiometry. Body composition did not change in response to either exercise intervention. Total daily energy expenditure on exercise days increased by 443 ± 126 kcal/d and 239 ± 152 kcal/d for aerobic and resistance exercise, respectively (p < 0.01). Non-exercise moderate-to-vigorous PA, however, decreased on aerobic exercise days (-148 ± 161 kcal/d; p = 0.03). There was no change in total daily energy expenditure and PA on non-exercise days with aerobic exercise while resistance exercise was associated with an increase in moderate-to-vigorous PA during non-exercise days (216 ± 178 kcal/d, p = 0.01). Results of the present study suggest a compensatory reduction in PA in response to aerobic exercise. Resistance exercise, on the other hand, appears to facilitate non-exercise PA, particularly on non-exercise days, which may lead to more sustainable adaptations in response to an exercise program. PMID:26702387

  15. Aerobic and anaerobic metabolism of 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecan-2-one by a denitrifying bacterium isolated from marine sediments.

    PubMed Central

    Rontani, J F; Gilewicz, M J; Michotey, V D; Zheng, T L; Bonin, P C; Bertrand, J C

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the metabolism of 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecan-2-one by a denitrifying bacterium (Marinobacter sp. strain CAB) isolated from marine sediments. Under aerobic and denitrifying conditions, this strain efficiently degraded this ubiquitous isoprenoid ketone. Several bacterial metabolites, 4,8,12-trimethyl-tridecan-1-ol, 4,8,12-trimethyltridecanal, 4,8,12-trimethyltridecanoic acid, Z-3,7-dimethylocten-2-oic acid, Z-3,7,11-trimethyldodecen-2-oic acid, and 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecan-2-ol, were formally identified, and different pathways were proposed to explain the formation of such isoprenoid compounds. PMID:9023941

  16. Iron metabolism in aerobes: managing ferric iron hydrolysis and ferrous iron autoxidation

    PubMed Central

    Kosman, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Aerobes and anaerobes alike express a plethora of essential iron enzymes; in the resting state, the iron atom(s) in these proteins are in the ferrous state. For aerobes, ferric iron is the predominant environmental valence form which, given ferric iron’s aqueous chemistry, occurs as ‘rust’, insoluble, bio-inert polymeric ferric oxide that results from the hydrolysis of [Fe(H2O)6]3+. Mobilizing this iron requires bio-ferrireduction which in turn requires managing the rapid autoxidation of the resulting FeII which occurs at pH > 6. This review examines the aqueous redox chemistry of iron and the mechanisms evolved in aerobes to suppress the ‘rusting out’ of FeIII and the ROS-generating autoxidation of FeII so as to make this metal ion available as the most ubiquitous prosthetic group in metallobiology. PMID:23264695

  17. WWOX loss activates aerobic glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Remaileh, Muhannad; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells undergo reprogramming of glucose metabolism to limit energy production to glycolysis—a state known as “aerobic glycolysis.” Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1α) is a transcription factor that regulates many genes responsible for this switch. As discussed here, new data suggest that the tumor suppressor WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) modulates HIF1α, thereby regulating this metabolic state. PMID:27308416

  18. Biochemistry and Evolution of Anaerobic Energy Metabolism in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Miklós; Mentel, Marek; van Hellemond, Jaap J.; Henze, Katrin; Woehle, Christian; Gould, Sven B.; Yu, Re-Young; van der Giezen, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Major insights into the phylogenetic distribution, biochemistry, and evolutionary significance of organelles involved in ATP synthesis (energy metabolism) in eukaryotes that thrive in anaerobic environments for all or part of their life cycles have accrued in recent years. All known eukaryotic groups possess an organelle of mitochondrial origin, mapping the origin of mitochondria to the eukaryotic common ancestor, and genome sequence data are rapidly accumulating for eukaryotes that possess anaerobic mitochondria, hydrogenosomes, or mitosomes. Here we review the available biochemical data on the enzymes and pathways that eukaryotes use in anaerobic energy metabolism and summarize the metabolic end products that they generate in their anaerobic habitats, focusing on the biochemical roles that their mitochondria play in anaerobic ATP synthesis. We present metabolic maps of compartmentalized energy metabolism for 16 well-studied species. There are currently no enzymes of core anaerobic energy metabolism that are specific to any of the six eukaryotic supergroup lineages; genes present in one supergroup are also found in at least one other supergroup. The gene distribution across lineages thus reflects the presence of anaerobic energy metabolism in the eukaryote common ancestor and differential loss during the specialization of some lineages to oxic niches, just as oxphos capabilities have been differentially lost in specialization to anoxic niches and the parasitic life-style. Some facultative anaerobes have retained both aerobic and anaerobic pathways. Diversified eukaryotic lineages have retained the same enzymes of anaerobic ATP synthesis, in line with geochemical data indicating low environmental oxygen levels while eukaryotes arose and diversified. PMID:22688819

  19. Fatty Acids in Energy Metabolism of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Orynbayeva, Zulfiya; Vavilin, Valentin; Lyakhovich, Vyacheslav

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we analyze the current hypotheses regarding energy metabolism in the neurons and astroglia. Recently, it was shown that up to 20% of the total brain's energy is provided by mitochondrial oxidation of fatty acids. However, the existing hypotheses consider glucose, or its derivative lactate, as the only main energy substrate for the brain. Astroglia metabolically supports the neurons by providing lactate as a substrate for neuronal mitochondria. In addition, a significant amount of neuromediators, glutamate and GABA, is transported into neurons and also serves as substrates for mitochondria. Thus, neuronal mitochondria may simultaneously oxidize several substrates. Astrocytes have to replenish the pool of neuromediators by synthesis de novo, which requires large amounts of energy. In this review, we made an attempt to reconcile β-oxidation of fatty acids by astrocytic mitochondria with the existing hypothesis on regulation of aerobic glycolysis. We suggest that, under condition of neuronal excitation, both metabolic pathways may exist simultaneously. We provide experimental evidence that isolated neuronal mitochondria may oxidize palmitoyl carnitine in the presence of other mitochondrial substrates. We also suggest that variations in the brain mitochondrial metabolic phenotype may be associated with different mtDNA haplogroups. PMID:24883315

  20. Computational Approaches for Understanding Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shestov, Alexander A; Barker, Brandon; Gu, Zhenglong; Locasale, Jason W

    2013-01-01

    There has been a surge of interest in understanding the regulation of metabolic networks involved in disease in recent years. Quantitative models are increasingly being used to i nterrogate the metabolic pathways that are contained within this complex disease biology. At the core of this effort is the mathematical modeling of central carbon metabolism involving glycolysis and the citric acid cycle (referred to as energy metabolism). Here we discuss several approaches used to quantitatively model metabolic pathways relating to energy metabolism and discuss their formalisms, successes, and limitations. PMID:23897661

  1. Marrow fat metabolism is linked to the systemic energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lecka-Czernik, Beata

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding the role of bone in the systemic regulation of energy metabolism indicate that bone marrow cells, adipocytes and osteoblasts, are involved in this process. Marrow adipocytes store significant quantities of fat and produce adipokines, leptin and adiponectin, which are known for their role in the regulation of energy metabolism, whereas osteoblasts produce osteocalcin, a bone-specific hormone that has a potential to regulate insulin production in the pancreas and adiponectin production in fat tissue. Both osteoblasts and marrow adipocytes express insulin receptor and respond to insulin-sensitizing anti-diabetic TZDs in a manner, which tightly links bone with the energy metabolism system. Metabolic profile of marrow fat resembles that of both, white and brown fat, which is reflected by its plasticity in acquiring different functions including maintenance of bone micro-environment. Marrow fat responds to physiologic and pathologic changes in energy metabolism status by changing volume and metabolic activity. This review summarizes available information on the metabolic function of marrow fat and provides hypothesis that this fat depot may acquire multiple roles depending on the local and perhaps systemic demands. These functions may include a role in bone energy maintenance and endocrine activities to serve osteogenesis during bone remodeling and bone healing. PMID:21757043

  2. Fermentation and aerobic metabolism of cellodextrins by yeasts. [Candida wickerhamii; C. guiliermondii; C. molischiana; Debaryomyces polymorphus; Pichia guilliermondii; Clavispora lusitaniae; Kluyveromyces lactis; Brettanomyces claussenii; Rhodotorula minuta; Dekkera intermedia

    SciTech Connect

    Freer, S.N. )

    1991-03-01

    The fermentation and aerobic metabolism of cellodextrins by 14 yeast species or strains was monitored. When grown aerobically, Candida wickerhamii, C. guilliermondii, and C. molischiana metabolized cellodextrins of degree of polymerization 3 to 6. C. wicherhamii and C. molischiana also fermented these substrates, while C. guilliermondii fermented only cellodextrins of degree of polymerization {<=} 3. Debaryomyces polymorphus, Pichia guilliermondii, Clavispora lusitaniae, and one of two strains of Kluyveromyces lactis metabolized glucose, cellobiose, and cellotriose when grown aerobically. These yeasts also fermented these substrates, except for K. lactis, which fermented only glucose and cellobiose. The remaining species/strains tested, K. lactis, Brettanomyces claussenii, Brettanomyces anomalus, Kluyveromyces dobzhanskii, Rhodotorula minuta, and Dekkera intermedia, both fermented and aerobically metabolized glucose and cellobiose. Crude enzyme preparations from all 14 yeast species or strains were tested for ability to hydrolyze cellotriose and cellotretose. Most of the yeasts produced an enzyme(s) capable of hydrolyzing cellotriose. However, with two exceptions, R. minuta and P. guilliermondii, only the yeasts that metabolized cellodextrins of degree of polymerization >3 produced an enzyme(s) that hydrolyzed cellotretose.

  3. Energy flows, metabolism and translation

    PubMed Central

    Pascal, Robert; Boiteau, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Thermodynamics provides an essential approach to understanding how living organisms survive in an organized state despite the second law. Exchanges with the environment constantly produce large amounts of entropy compensating for their own organized state. In addition to this constraint on self-organization, the free energy delivered to the system, in terms of potential, is essential to understand how a complex chemistry based on carbon has emerged. Accordingly, the amount of free energy brought about through discrete events must reach the strength needed to induce chemical changes in which covalent bonds are reorganized. The consequence of this constraint was scrutinized in relation to both the development of a carbon metabolism and that of translation. Amino acyl adenylates involved as aminoacylation intermediates of the latter process reach one of the higher free energy levels found in biochemistry, which may be informative on the range in which energy was exchanged in essential early biochemical processes. The consistency of this range with the amount of energy needed to weaken covalent bonds involving carbon may not be accidental but the consequence of the abovementioned thermodynamic constraints. This could be useful in building scenarios for the emergence and early development of translation. PMID:21930587

  4. Global gene expression analysis of glucose overflow metabolism in Escherichia coli and reduction of aerobic acetate formation.

    PubMed

    Veit, Andrea; Polen, Tino; Wendisch, Volker F

    2007-02-01

    During aerobic growth on glucose, Escherichia coli produces acetate in the so-called overflow metabolism. DNA microarray analysis was used to determine the global gene expression patterns of chemostat cultivations of E. coli MG1655 that were characterized by different acetate formation rates during aerobic growth on glucose. A correlation analysis identified that expression of ten genes (sdhCDAB, sucB, sucC, acnB, lpdA, fumC and mdh) encoding the TCA cycle enzymes succinate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinyl-CoA synthetase, aconitase, fumarase and malate dehydrogenase, respectively, and of the acs-yjcH-actP operon for acetate utilization correlated negatively with acetate formation. Relieving transcriptional control of the sdhCDAB-b0725-sucABCD operon by chromosomal promoter exchange mutagenesis yielded a strain with increased specific activities of the TCA cycle enzymes succinate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and succinyl-CoA synthetase, which are encoded by this operon. The resulting strain produced less acetate and directed more carbon towards carbon dioxide formation than the parent strain MG1655 while maintaining high growth and glucose consumption rates. PMID:17273855

  5. Aerobic Capacity, Physical Activity and Metabolic Risk Factors in Firefighters Compared with Police Officers and Sedentary Clerks

    PubMed Central

    Leischik, Roman; Foshag, Peter; Strauß, Markus; Littwitz, Henning; Garg, Pankaj; Dworrak, Birgit; Horlitz, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background This study examined the association between the physical work environment and physiological performance measures, physical activity levels and metabolic parameters among German civil servants. A main focus in this study was to examine the group differences rather than measuring the absolute values in an occupational group. Methods We prospectively examined 198 male German civil servants (97 firefighters [FFs], 55 police officers [POs] and 46 sedentary clerks [SCs]). For each parameter, the groups were compared using a linear regression adjusted for age. Results The 97 FFs showed a similar maximal aerobic power (VO2max l/min) of 3.17±0.44 l/min compared with the POs, who had a maximal aerobic power of 3.13±0.62 l/min (estimated difference, POs vs. FFs: 0.05, CI: -0.12-0.23, p=0.553). The maximal aerobic power of the FFs was slightly higher than that of the SCs, who had a maximal aerobic power of 2.85±0.52 l/min (-0.21, CI: -0.39-0.04, p=0.018 vs. FFs). The average physical activity (in metabolic equivalents [METS]/week) of the FFs was 3818.8±2843.5, whereas those of the POs and SCs were 2838.2±2871.9 (-808.2, CI: 1757.6-141.2, p=0.095) and 2212.2±2292.8 (vs. FFs: -1417.1, CI: -2302-531.88, p=0.002; vs. POs: -2974.4, CI: -1611.2-393.5, p=0.232), respectively. For the FFs, the average body fat percentage was 17.7%±6.2, whereas it was 21.4%±5.6 for the POs (vs. FFs: 2.75, CI: 0.92-4.59, p=0.004) and 20.8%±6.5 for the SCs (vs. FFs: 1.98, CI: -0.28-4.25, p=0.086; vs. POs: -0.77, CI: 3.15-1.61, p=0.523). The average waist circumference was 89.8 cm±10.0 for the FFs, 97.8 cm±12.4 (5.63, CI: 2.10-9.15, p=0.002) for the POs, and 97.3±11.7 (vs. FFs: -4.89, CI: 1.24-8.55, p=0.009; vs. POs: -0.73, CI: -5.21-3.74, p=0.747) for the SCs. Conclusions The FFs showed significantly higher physical activity levels compared with the SCs. The PO group had the highest cardiovascular risk of all of the groups because it included more participants with metabolic

  6. Metabolic crosstalk between choline/1-carbon metabolism and energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zeisel, Steven H

    2013-03-01

    There are multiple identified mechanisms involved in energy metabolism, insulin resistance and adiposity, but there are here-to-fore unsuspected metabolic factors that also influence these processes. Studies in animal models suggest important links between choline/1-carbon metabolism and energy homeostasis. Rodents fed choline deficient diets become hypermetabolic. Mice with deletions in one of several different genes of choline metabolism have phenotypes that include increased metabolic rate, decreased body fat/lean mass ratio, increased insulin sensitivity, decreased ATP production by mitochondria, or decreased weight gain on a high fat diet. In addition, farmers have recognized that the addition of a metabolite of choline (betaine) to cattle and swine feed reduces body fat/lean mass ratio. Choline dietary intake in humans varies over a > three-fold range, and genetic variation exists that modifies individual requirements for this nutrient. Although there are some epidemiologic studies in humans suggesting a link between choline/1-carbon metabolism and energy metabolism, there have been no controlled studies in humans that were specifically designed to examine this relationship. PMID:23072856

  7. Metabolic crosstalk between choline/1-carbon metabolism and energy homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zeisel, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    There are multiple identified mechanisms involved in energy metabolism, insulin resistance and adiposity, but there are here-to-fore unsuspected metabolic factors that also influence these processes. Studies in animal models suggest important links between choline/1-carbon metabolism and energy homeostasis. Rodents fed choline deficient diets become hypermetabolic. Mice with deletions in one of several different genes of choline metabolism have phenotypes that include increased metabolic rate, decreased body fat/lean mass ratio, increased insulin sensitivity, decreased ATP production by mitochondria, or decreased weight gain on a high fat diet. In addition, farmers have recognized that the addition of a metabolite of choline (betaine) to cattle and swine feed reduces body fat/lean mass ratio. Choline dietary intake in humans varies over a >three-fold range, and genetic variation exists that modifies individual requirements for this nutrient. Although there are some epidemiologic studies in humans suggesting a link between choline/1-carbon metabolism and energy metabolism, there have been no controlled studies in humans that were specifically designed to examine this relationship. PMID:23072856

  8. Modification of the metabolism and cytotoxicity of bioreductive alkylating agents by dicoumarol in aerobic and hypoxic murine tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Keyes, S R; Rockwell, S; Sartorelli, A C

    1989-06-15

    We have demonstrated previously that dicoumarol (DIC) increased the generation of reactive metabolites from mitomycin C (MC) in EMT6 cells under hypoxic conditions in vitro. This increased reaction rate was associated with an increased toxicity of MC to hypoxic EMT6 cells. In contrast, aerobic cells treated with DIC in vitro were protected from MC toxicity. We now demonstrate that DIC sensitizes EMT6 cells to two MC analogues, porfiromycin (POR) and the 7-N-dimethylaminomethylene analogue of mitomycin C (BMY-25282), in hypoxia and protects cells from these agents in air, despite the fact that POR is preferentially toxic to hypoxic cells and BMY-25282 is preferentially toxic to aerobic cells. In contrast, DIC increases menadione cytotoxicity in both air and hypoxia and has no effect on the cytotoxicity of Adriamycin. We have also shown previously that the preferential toxicity of POR to hypoxic cells is associated with an increased rate of drug uptake. In the present study, DIC had no measurable effect on the uptake of [3H]POR but increased the extent of efflux of this agent. MC-induced DNA cross-links, which have been proposed as the lesions responsible for the lethality of MC, are decreased by DIC in air and increased by DIC in hypoxia, in concert with the observed modifications of MC cytotoxicity by DIC. However, in aerobic cells treated with DIC and MC, the decrease in DNA interstrand cross-links is not directly associated with a decrease in cytotoxicity. L1210 cells, which have no measurable quinone reductase activity, demonstrate increased toxicity when treated with DIC and MC in hypoxia, as observed with EMT6 cells. Unlike EMT6 cells, however, L1210 cells are not protected by DIC from MC toxicity in air. Taken together, these findings suggest that DIC is altering the intracellular metabolism of MC and that quinone reductase or another, unidentified, enzyme sensitive to DIC may be involved in activating MC to a toxic product in aerobic EMT6 cells. PMID:2470504

  9. Glucagon regulation of energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Heppner, Kristy M; Habegger, Kirk M; Day, Jonathan; Pfluger, Paul T; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Ward, Brian; Gelfanov, Vasily; Woods, Steve C; DiMarchi, Richard; Tschöp, Matthias

    2010-07-14

    Glucagon has long been known as a counter-regulatory hormone to insulin of fundamental importance to glucose homeostasis. Its prominent ability to stimulate glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis, has historically cast this peptide as one hormone where the metabolic consequences of increasing blood glucose levels, especially in obesity, are viewed largely as being deleterious. This perspective may be changing in light of emerging data and reconsideration of historic studies, which suggest that glucagon has beneficial effects on body fat mass, food intake, and energy expenditure. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of glucagon-mediated body weight regulation as well as possible novel therapeutic approaches in the treatment of obesity and glucose intolerance that may arise from these findings. The paper represents an invited review by a symposium, award winner or keynote speaker at the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior [SSIB] Annual Meeting in Portland, July 2009. PMID:20381509

  10. Metatranscriptomic analysis of a high-sulfide aquatic spring reveals insights into sulfur cycling and unexpected aerobic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Spain, Anne M; Elshahed, Mostafa S; Najar, Fares Z; Krumholz, Lee R

    2015-01-01

    Zodletone spring is a sulfide-rich spring in southwestern Oklahoma characterized by shallow, microoxic, light-exposed spring water overlaying anoxic sediments. Previously, culture-independent 16S rRNA gene based diversity surveys have revealed that Zodletone spring source sediments harbor a highly diverse microbial community, with multiple lineages putatively involved in various sulfur-cycling processes. Here, we conducted a metatranscriptomic survey of microbial populations in Zodletone spring source sediments to characterize the relative prevalence and importance of putative phototrophic, chemolithotrophic, and heterotrophic microorganisms in the sulfur cycle, the identity of lineages actively involved in various sulfur cycling processes, and the interaction between sulfur cycling and other geochemical processes at the spring source. Sediment samples at the spring's source were taken at three different times within a 24-h period for geochemical analyses and RNA sequencing. In depth mining of datasets for sulfur cycling transcripts revealed major sulfur cycling pathways and taxa involved, including an unexpected potential role of Actinobacteria in sulfide oxidation and thiosulfate transformation. Surprisingly, transcripts coding for the cyanobacterial Photosystem II D1 protein, methane monooxygenase, and terminal cytochrome oxidases were encountered, indicating that genes for oxygen production and aerobic modes of metabolism are actively being transcribed, despite below-detectable levels (<1 µM) of oxygen in source sediment. Results highlight transcripts involved in sulfur, methane, and oxygen cycles, propose that oxygenic photosynthesis could support aerobic methane and sulfide oxidation in anoxic sediments exposed to sunlight, and provide a viewpoint of microbial metabolic lifestyles under conditions similar to those seen during late Archaean and Proterozoic eons. PMID:26417542

  11. Metatranscriptomic analysis of a high-sulfide aquatic spring reveals insights into sulfur cycling and unexpected aerobic metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Elshahed, Mostafa S.; Najar, Fares Z.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2015-01-01

    Zodletone spring is a sulfide-rich spring in southwestern Oklahoma characterized by shallow, microoxic, light-exposed spring water overlaying anoxic sediments. Previously, culture-independent 16S rRNA gene based diversity surveys have revealed that Zodletone spring source sediments harbor a highly diverse microbial community, with multiple lineages putatively involved in various sulfur-cycling processes. Here, we conducted a metatranscriptomic survey of microbial populations in Zodletone spring source sediments to characterize the relative prevalence and importance of putative phototrophic, chemolithotrophic, and heterotrophic microorganisms in the sulfur cycle, the identity of lineages actively involved in various sulfur cycling processes, and the interaction between sulfur cycling and other geochemical processes at the spring source. Sediment samples at the spring’s source were taken at three different times within a 24-h period for geochemical analyses and RNA sequencing. In depth mining of datasets for sulfur cycling transcripts revealed major sulfur cycling pathways and taxa involved, including an unexpected potential role of Actinobacteria in sulfide oxidation and thiosulfate transformation. Surprisingly, transcripts coding for the cyanobacterial Photosystem II D1 protein, methane monooxygenase, and terminal cytochrome oxidases were encountered, indicating that genes for oxygen production and aerobic modes of metabolism are actively being transcribed, despite below-detectable levels (<1 µM) of oxygen in source sediment. Results highlight transcripts involved in sulfur, methane, and oxygen cycles, propose that oxygenic photosynthesis could support aerobic methane and sulfide oxidation in anoxic sediments exposed to sunlight, and provide a viewpoint of microbial metabolic lifestyles under conditions similar to those seen during late Archaean and Proterozoic eons. PMID:26417542

  12. High muscle mitochondrial volume and aerobic capacity in a small marsupial (Sminthopsis crassicaudata) reveals flexible links between energy-use levels in mammals.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Terence J; Webster, Koa N; Lee, Enhua; Buttemer, William A

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the muscle structure-function relationships that underlie the aerobic capacity of an insectivorous, small (~15 g) marsupial, Sminthopsis crassicaudata (Family: Dasyuridae), to obtain further insight into energy use patterns in marsupials relative to those in placentals, their sister clade within the Theria (advanced mammals). Disparate hopping marsupials (Suborder Macropodiformes), a kangaroo (Macropus rufus) and a rat-kangaroo (Bettongia penicillata), show aerobic capabilities as high as those of 'athletic' placentals. Equivalent muscle mitochondrial volumes and cardiovascular features support these capabilities. We examined S. crassicaudata to determine whether highly developed aerobic capabilities occur elsewhere in marsupials, rather than being restricted to the more recently evolved Macropodiformes. This was the case. Treadmill-trained S. crassicaudata attained a maximal aerobic metabolic rate ( or MMR) of 272 ml O2 min(-1) kg(-1) (N=8), similar to that reported for a small (~20 g), 'athletic' placental, Apodemus sylvaticus, 264 ml O2 min(-1) kg(-1). Hopping marsupials have comparable aerobic levels when body mass variation is considered. Sminthopsis crassicaudata has a basal metabolic rate (BMR) about 75% of placental values but it has a notably large factorial aerobic scope (fAS) of 13; elevated fAS also features in hopping marsupials. The of S. crassicaudata was supported by an elevated total muscle mitochondrial volume, which was largely achieved through high muscle mitochondrial volume densities, Vv(mt,f), the mean value being 14.0±1.33%. These data were considered in relation to energy use levels in mammals, particularly field metabolic rate (FMR). BMR is consistently lower in marsupials, but this is balanced by a high fAS, such that marsupial MMR matches that of placentals. However, FMR shows different mass relationships in the two clades, with the FMR of small (<125 g) marsupials, such as S. crassicaudata, being higher than that in

  13. Energy intake and appetite-related hormones following acute aerobic and resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Balaguera-Cortes, Liliana; Wallman, Karen E; Fairchild, Timothy J; Guelfi, Kym J

    2011-12-01

    Previous research has shown that resistance and aerobic exercise have differing effects on perceived hunger and circulating levels of appetite-related hormones. However, the effect of resistance and aerobic exercise on actual energy intake has never been compared. This study investigated the effect of an acute bout of resistance exercise, compared with aerobic exercise, on subsequent energy intake and appetite-regulating hormones. Ten active men completed 3 trials in a counterbalanced design: 45 min of resistance exercise (RES; free and machine weights), aerobic exercise (AER; running), or a resting control trial (CON). Following exercise or CON, participants had access to a buffet-style array of breakfast foods and drinks to consume ad libitum. Plasma concentrations of a range of appetite-regulating hormones were measured throughout each trial. Despite significantly higher energy expenditure with AER compared with RES (p < 0.05), there was no difference in total energy intake from the postexercise meal between trials (p = 0.779). Pancreatic polypeptide was significantly higher prior to the meal after both RES and AER compared with CON. In contrast, active ghrelin was lower following RES compared with both CON and AER (p ≤ 0.05), while insulin was higher following RES compared with CON (p = 0.013). In summary, the differential response of appetite-regulating hormones to AER and RES does not appear to influence energy intake in the postexercise meal. However, given the greater energy expenditure associated with AER compared with RES, AER modes of exercise may be preferable for achieving short-term negative energy balance. PMID:22111518

  14. Impaired cardiac energy metabolism in embryos lacking adrenergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Baker, Candice N; Gidus, Sarah A; Price, George F; Peoples, Jessica N R; Ebert, Steven N

    2015-03-01

    As development proceeds from the embryonic to fetal stages, cardiac energy demands increase substantially, and oxidative phosphorylation of ADP to ATP in mitochondria becomes vital. Relatively little, however, is known about the signaling mechanisms regulating the transition from anaerobic to aerobic metabolism that occurs during the embryonic period. The main objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that adrenergic hormones provide critical stimulation of energy metabolism during embryonic/fetal development. We examined ATP and ADP concentrations in mouse embryos lacking adrenergic hormones due to targeted disruption of the essential dopamine β-hydroxylase (Dbh) gene. Embryonic ATP concentrations decreased dramatically, whereas ADP concentrations rose such that the ATP/ADP ratio in the adrenergic-deficient group was nearly 50-fold less than that found in littermate controls by embryonic day 11.5. We also found that cardiac extracellular acidification and oxygen consumption rates were significantly decreased, and mitochondria were significantly larger and more branched in adrenergic-deficient hearts. Notably, however, the mitochondria were intact with well-formed cristae, and there was no significant difference observed in mitochondrial membrane potential. Maternal administration of the adrenergic receptor agonists isoproterenol or l-phenylephrine significantly ameliorated the decreases in ATP observed in Dbh-/- embryos, suggesting that α- and β-adrenergic receptors were effective modulators of ATP concentrations in mouse embryos in vivo. These data demonstrate that adrenergic hormones stimulate cardiac energy metabolism during a critical period of embryonic development. PMID:25516547

  15. Interplay between oxidant species and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Quijano, Celia; Trujillo, Madia; Castro, Laura; Trostchansky, Andrés

    2016-08-01

    It has long been recognized that energy metabolism is linked to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and critical enzymes allied to metabolic pathways can be affected by redox reactions. This interplay between energy metabolism and ROS becomes most apparent during the aging process and in the onset and progression of many age-related diseases (i.e. diabetes, metabolic syndrome, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative diseases). As such, the capacity to identify metabolic pathways involved in ROS formation, as well as specific targets and oxidative modifications is crucial to our understanding of the molecular basis of age-related diseases and for the design of novel therapeutic strategies. Herein we review oxidant formation associated with the cell's energetic metabolism, key antioxidants involved in ROS detoxification, and the principal targets of oxidant species in metabolic routes and discuss their relevance in cell signaling and age-related diseases. PMID:26741399

  16. Interplay between oxidant species and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Quijano, Celia; Trujillo, Madia; Castro, Laura; Trostchansky, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    It has long been recognized that energy metabolism is linked to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and critical enzymes allied to metabolic pathways can be affected by redox reactions. This interplay between energy metabolism and ROS becomes most apparent during the aging process and in the onset and progression of many age-related diseases (i.e. diabetes, metabolic syndrome, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative diseases). As such, the capacity to identify metabolic pathways involved in ROS formation, as well as specific targets and oxidative modifications is crucial to our understanding of the molecular basis of age-related diseases and for the design of novel therapeutic strategies. Herein we review oxidant formation associated with the cell's energetic metabolism, key antioxidants involved in ROS detoxification, and the principal targets of oxidant species in metabolic routes and discuss their relevance in cell signaling and age-related diseases. PMID:26741399

  17. Randomized controlled trial of the efficacy of aerobic exercise in reducing metabolic risk in healthy older people: The Hertfordshire Physical Activity Trial

    PubMed Central

    Finucane, Francis M; Horton, Jessica; Purslow, Lisa R; Savage, David B; Brage, Soren; Besson, Hervé; Horton, Kenneth; Rolfe, Ema De Lucia; Sleigh, Alison; Sharp, Stephen J; Martin, Helen J; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Cooper, Cyrus; Ekelund, Ulf; Griffin, Simon J; Wareham, Nicholas J

    2009-01-01

    Background While there are compelling observational data confirming that individuals who exercise are healthier, the efficacy of aerobic exercise interventions to reduce metabolic risk and improve insulin sensitivity in older people has not been fully elucidated. Furthermore, while low birth weight has been shown to predict adverse health outcomes later in life, its influence on the response to aerobic exercise is unknown. Our primary objective is to assess the efficacy of a fully supervised twelve week aerobic exercise intervention in reducing clustered metabolic risk in healthy older adults. A secondary objective is to determine the influence of low birth weight on the response to exercise in this group. Methods/Design We aim to recruit 100 participants born between 1931–1939, from the Hertfordshire Cohort Study and randomly assign them to no intervention or to 36 fully supervised one hour sessions on a cycle ergometer, over twelve weeks. Each participant will undergo detailed anthropometric and metabolic assessment pre- and post-intervention, including muscle biopsy, magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy, objective measurement of physical activity and sub-maximal fitness testing. Discussion Given the extensive phenotypic characterization, this study will provide valuable insights into the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of aerobic exercise as well as the efficacy, feasibility and safety of such interventions in this age group. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN60986572 PMID:19545359

  18. Metabolic myopathies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, A.; Haller, R. G.; Barohn, R.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Metabolic myopathies are disorders of muscle energy production that result in skeletal muscle dysfunction. Cardiac and systemic metabolic dysfunction may coexist. Symptoms are often intermittent and provoked by exercise or changes in supply of lipid and carbohydrate fuels. Specific disorders of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in muscle are reviewed. Evaluation often requires provocative exercise testing. These tests may include ischemic forearm exercise, aerobic cycle exercise, and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy with exercise.

  19. A comparative meta-analysis of maximal aerobic metabolism of vertebrates: implications for respiratory and cardiovascular limits to gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Stanley S; Hancock, Thomas V; Hedrick, Michael S

    2013-02-01

    Maximal aerobic metabolic rates (MMR) in vertebrates are supported by increased conductive and diffusive fluxes of O(2) from the environment to the mitochondria necessitating concomitant increases in CO(2) efflux. A question that has received much attention has been which step, respiratory or cardiovascular, provides the principal rate limitation to gas flux at MMR? Limitation analyses have principally focused on O(2) fluxes, though the excess capacity of the lung for O(2) ventilation and diffusion remains unexplained except as a safety factor. Analyses of MMR normally rely upon allometry and temperature to define these factors, but cannot account for much of the variation and often have narrow phylogenetic breadth. The unique aspect of our comparative approach was to use an interclass meta-analysis to examine cardio-respiratory variables during the increase from resting metabolic rate to MMR among vertebrates from fish to mammals, independent of allometry and phylogeny. Common patterns at MMR indicate universal principles governing O(2) and CO(2) transport in vertebrate cardiovascular and respiratory systems, despite the varied modes of activities (swimming, running, flying), different cardio-respiratory architecture, and vastly different rates of metabolism (endothermy vs. ectothermy). Our meta-analysis supports previous studies indicating a cardiovascular limit to maximal O(2) transport and also implicates a respiratory system limit to maximal CO(2) efflux, especially in ectotherms. Thus, natural selection would operate on the respiratory system to enhance maximal CO(2) excretion and the cardiovascular system to enhance maximal O(2) uptake. This provides a possible evolutionary explanation for the conundrum of why the respiratory system appears functionally over-designed from an O(2) perspective, a unique insight from previous work focused solely on O(2) fluxes. The results suggest a common gas transport blueprint, or Bauplan, in the vertebrate clade. PMID

  20. Development of aerobic and anaerobic metabolism in cardiac and skeletal muscles from harp and hooded seals.

    PubMed

    Burns, J M; Skomp, N; Bishop, N; Lestyk, K; Hammill, M

    2010-03-01

    In diving animals, skeletal muscle adaptations to extend underwater time despite selective vasoconstriction include elevated myoglobin (Mb) concentrations, high acid buffering ability (beta) and high aerobic and anaerobic enzyme activities. However, because cardiac muscle is perfused during dives, it may rely less heavily on Mb, beta and anaerobic pathways to support contractile activity. In addition, because cardiac tissue must sustain contractile activity even before birth, it may be more physiologically mature at birth and/or develop faster than skeletal muscles. To test these hypotheses, we measured Mb levels, beta and the activities of citrate synthase (CS), beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HOAD) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in cardiac and skeletal muscle samples from 72 harp and hooded seals, ranging in age from fetuses to adults. Results indicate that in adults cardiac muscle had lower Mb levels (14.7%), beta (55.5%) and LDH activity (36.2%) but higher CS (459.6%) and HOAD (371.3%) activities (all P<0.05) than skeletal muscle. In addition, while the cardiac muscle of young seals had significantly lower [Mb] (44.7%) beta (80.7%) and LDH activity (89.5%) than adults (all P<0.05), it was relatively more mature at birth and weaning than skeletal muscle. These patterns are similar to those in terrestrial species, suggesting that seal hearts do not exhibit unique adaptations to the challenges of an aquatic existence. PMID:20154189

  1. Pressure and temperature interactions on aerobic metabolism of migrating European silver eel.

    PubMed

    Scaion, D; Belhomme, M; Sébert, P

    2008-12-31

    During their migration for reproduction, European eels have to cope with many environmental factors changes. The main changes concern hydrostatic pressure and temperature that are important environmental and physiological factors when considering life in the deep sea. We focus on the consequences of pressure (from 0.1 to 12.1MPa by 1MPa steps) and temperature (9, 15, 22 degrees C) shifts on the oxygen consumption (MO(2)) at the whole animal level. Because of their morphological differences, we are also interested in males and females to evaluate the best conditions for migration. Firstly, whatever temperature, males present higher aerobic capacities than females at atmospheric pressure. Secondly, an increase in temperature increases the pressure effects in males (synergy) but decreases them in females (opposite effects). We raise the hypothesis that two different migration strategies could be used in the water column in order to reach the breeding area: males could tend to privilege pressure and cold waters (deep water) and females, on the other hand, could opt for warmer temperature surface waters. PMID:18762282

  2. Spermatozoa: models for studying regulatory aspects of energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kamp, G; Büsselmann, G; Lauterwein, J

    1996-05-15

    Spermatozoa are highly specialized cells, and they offer advantages for studying several basic aspects of metabolic control such as the role of adenosine triphosphate-(ATP)-homeostasis for cell function, the mechanisms of fatigue and metabolic depression, the metabolic channelling through the cytoplasm and the organization and regulation of glycolytic enzymes. Spermatozoa of four species with different reproductive modes are introduced and the first results are presented: Spermatozoa of the marine worm Arenicola marina are well adapted to external fertilization in sea water with fluctuating oxygen tension: they are motile for several hours in oxygen-free sea water, even when the ATP level is dramatically reduced. Anaerobic ATP production occurs by alanine, acetate and propionate fermentation probably by the same pathways known from somatic cells of this species. Under aerobic conditions the phosphagen system might function like a shuttle for energy-rich phosphate from mitochondria to the dynein-ATPases. Storage of turkey and carp spermatozoa for several hours without exogenous substrates and oxygen results in the degradation of phosphocreatine and ATP to inorganic phosphate and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), respectively. Despite low energy charges, stored spermatozoa of both species are capable of progressive movements. In carp spermatozoa fatigue of motility is not accompanied by the dramatic acidosis one discusses as an important effect in muscle fatigue. Energy metabolism of boar spermatozoa is typically based on glycolysis consuming extracellular carbohydrates and producing lactate and protons. The sperm seem to tolerate low intracellular pH (< 6.5). The lack of a phosphagen system (no energy shuttle from mitochondria to the distal dynein-ATPases) is probably compensated by a high glycolytic ATP-production in the mitochondria-free piece of the flagellum. PMID:8641386

  3. Effects of high-energy electron irradiation of chicken meat on Salmonella and aerobic plate count

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, J.L.; Owens, S.L.; Tesch, S.; Hannah, K.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Four experiments were used to determine the effects of high-energy irradiation on the number of aerobic microorganisms and Salmonella on broiler breasts and thighs. Irradiation ranging from 100 to 700 kilorads (krads) was provided by a commercial-scale, electron-beam accelerator. Irradiation of broiler breast and thigh pieces with electron beams at levels of 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, and 600 krads showed that levels as low as 100 krads would eliminate Salmonella. When 33 thighs were tested after irradiation at 200 krads, only one thigh tested presumptive positive. The total number of aerobic organisms was reduced by 2 to 3 log10 cycles at irradiation levels of 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, and 700 krads. Increasing the dose above 100 krads gave little if any additional benefit.

  4. Managing for Improved Aerobic Stability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aerobic deterioration or spoilage of silage is the result of aerobic microorganisms metabolizing components of the silage using oxygen. In the almost 40 years over which these silage conferences have been held, we have come to recognize the typical pattern of aerobic microbial development by which s...

  5. Energy expenditure during tennis play: a preliminary video analysis and metabolic model approach.

    PubMed

    Botton, Florent; Hautier, Christophe; Eclache, Jean-Paul

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate, using video analysis, what proportion of the total energy expenditure during a tennis match is accounted for by aerobic and anaerobic metabolism, respectively. The method proposed involved estimating the metabolic power (MP) of 5 activities, which are inherent to tennis: walking, running, hitting the ball, serving, and sitting down to rest. The energy expenditure concerned was calculated by sequencing the activity by video analysis. A bioenergetic model calculated the aerobic energy expenditure (EEO2mod) in terms of MP, and the anaerobic energy expenditure was calculated by subtracting this (MP - EEO2mod). Eight tennis players took part in the experiment as subjects (mean ± SD: age 25.2 ± 1.9 years, weight 79.3 ± 10.8 kg, VO2max 54.4 ± 5.1 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)). The players started off by participating in 2 games while wearing the K4b2, with their activity profile measured by the video analysis system, and then by playing a set without equipment but with video analysis. There was no significant difference between calculated and measured oxygen consumptions over the 16 games (p = 0.763), and these data were strongly related (r = 0.93, p < 0.0001). The EEO2mod was quite weak over all the games (49.4 ± 4.8% VO2max), whereas the MP during points was up to 2 or 3 times the VO2max. Anaerobic metabolism reached 32% of the total energy expenditure across all the games 67% for points and 95% for hitting the ball. This method provided a good estimation of aerobic energy expenditure and made it possible to calculate the anaerobic energy expenditure. This could make it possible to estimate the metabolic intensity of training sessions and matches using video analysis. PMID:21904239

  6. Responses by fishes to environmental hypoxia: integration through Fry's concept of aerobic metabolic scope.

    PubMed

    Claireaux, G; Chabot, D

    2016-01-01

    The problem of understanding the effect of the environment on fish activities and performance, in any generalized way, remains intractable. Solving this issue is, however, a key to addressing contemporary environmental concerns. As suggested 20 years ago by W. H. Neill, the authors returned to the drawing board, using as a background the conceptual scheme initially proposed by F. E. J. Fry. They revisited the effect of ambient oxygen availability upon fish metabolism and clarified the definitions of limiting, critical and incipient lethal oxygen (ILO) levels. The concepts of oxy-conformer and oxy-regulator are revisited, and P. W. Hochachka's idea of scope for survival is explored. Finally, how the cardiovascular system contributes to the capacity of fishes to respond to the reduced oxygen availability is considered. Various hands-on recommendations and software (R scripts) are provided for researchers interested in investigating these concepts. PMID:26768976

  7. Activation of aerobic metabolism by Amaranth oil improves heart rate variability both in athletes and patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yelisyeyeva, Olha; Semen, Khrystyna; Zarkovic, Neven; Kaminskyy, Danylo; Lutsyk, Olexander; Rybalchenko, Volodymyr

    2012-05-01

    The aim of present research was to study the effects of Amaranth oil (AmO) supplementation on aerobic metabolism and heart rate variability (HRV) in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and in athletes. Several parameters of aerobic metabolism and HRV were assessed. Supplementation with AmO caused mild pro-oxidant activity resulting in improved uptake of oxidative destruction products and modulation of catalase and SOD activity with subsequent development of an antioxidant effect. These findings were very distinct in athletes but less pronounced in diabetics. Redistribution of haemoglobin ligands in athletes indicates involvement of haemoproteins in free radical reactions during AmO supplementation. Improvement in HRV by daily consumption of AmO as observed in both study groups suggested increased production of endogenous oxygen and enhancement of the cardio-respiratory function. The advantage of activation of aerobic metabolism in OS-related disorders resulting in improved self-organization of the living system and hormetic reaction mechanisms are discussed. PMID:22393897

  8. Metabolic scaling theory in plant biology and the three oxygen paradoxa of aerobic life.

    PubMed

    Kutschera, Ulrich; Niklas, Karl J

    2013-12-01

    Alfred Russell Wallace was a field naturalist with a strong interest in general physiology. In this vein, he wrote that oxygen (O2), produced by green plants, is "the food of protoplasm, without which it cannot continue to live". Here we summarize current models relating body size to respiration rates (in the context of the metabolic scaling theory) and show that oxygen-uptake activities, measured at 21 vol.% O2, correlate closely with growth patterns at the level of specific organs within the same plant. Thus, whole plant respiration can change ontogenetically, corresponding to alterations in the volume fractions of different tissues. Then, we describe the evolution of cyanobacterial photosynthesis during the Paleoarchean, which changed the world forever. By slowly converting what was once a reducing atmosphere to an oxidizing one, microbes capable of O2-producing photosynthesis modified the chemical nature and distribution of the element iron (Fe), slowly drove some of the most ancient prokaryotes to extinction, created the ozone (O3) layer that subsequently shielded the first terrestrial plants and animals from harmful UV radiation, but also made it possible for Earth's forest to burn, sometimes with catastrophic consequences. Yet another paradox is that the most abundant protein (i.e., the enzyme Rubisco, Ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) has a greater affinity for oxygen than for carbon dioxide (CO2), even though its function is to bind with the latter rather than the former. We evaluate this second "oxygen paradox" within the context of photorespiratory carbon loss and crop yield reduction in C3 vs. C4 plants (rye vs. maize). Finally, we analyze the occurrence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as destructive by-products of cellular metabolism, and discuss the three "O2-paradoxa" with reference to A. R. Wallace's speculations on "design in nature". PMID:23982798

  9. Vampires, Pasteur and reactive oxygen species. Is the switch from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism a preventive antioxidant defence in blood-feeding parasites?

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Pedro L; Oliveira, Marcus F

    2002-08-14

    Several species of parasites show a reduction of their respiratory activity along their developmental cycles after they start to feed on vertebrate blood, relying on anaerobic degradation of carbohydrates to achieve their energy requirements. Usually, these parasites choose not to breathe despite of living in an environment of high oxygen availability such as vertebrate blood. Absence of the 'Pasteur effect' in most of these parasites has been well documented. Interestingly, together with the switch from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism in these parasites, there is clear evidence pointing to an increase in their antioxidant defences. As the respiratory chain in mitochondria is a major site of production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we propose here that the arrest of respiration constitutes an adaptation to avoid the toxic effects of ROS. This situation would be especially critical for blood-feeding parasites because ROS produced in mitochondria would interact with pro-oxidant products of blood digestion, such as haem and/or iron, and increase the oxidative damage to the parasite's cells. PMID:12163151

  10. Aerobic metabolism and swimming energetics of the painted turtle, Chrysemys picta.

    PubMed

    Lowell, W R

    1990-01-01

    Oxygen consumption rates (VO2) were measured for painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) swimming in a respirometer at controlled speeds. Sustained specific swimming speeds ranged from 0.75 to 1.52 body lengths (L) per s. Over most of this range endurance exceeded 30 min. VO2 increased curvillinearly with swimming speed (U) and the maximum active rate was 9 times resting (0.26 ml O2/min), and 3 times routine (0.64 ml O2/min). Mass specific metabolic scope was 228 ml O2/(kg.h), similar to that reported for other active chelonians. Cost of transport increased from 3.86 to 5.72 J/(kg.m) over the speed range tested. Swimming costs for rowing painted turtles are greater than those for marine reptiles utilizing anguilliform or lift-producing hydrofoil propulsion. The increased swimming cost for the amphibious painted turtle suggests that morphological specializations permitting effective terrestrial transport, increase energetic expenditures during swimming. PMID:2365028

  11. High Intrinsic Aerobic Capacity Protects against Ethanol-Induced Hepatic Injury and Metabolic Dysfunction: Study Using High Capacity Runner Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Szary, Nicholas; Rector, R Scott; Uptergrove, Grace M; Ridenhour, Suzanne E; Shukla, Shivendra D; Thyfault, John P; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2015-01-01

    Rats artificially selected over several generations for high intrinsic endurance/aerobic capacity resulting in high capacity runners (HCR) has been developed to study the links between high aerobic fitness and protection from metabolic diseases (Wisloff et al., Science, 2005). We have previously shown that the HCR strain have elevated hepatic mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity. In this study, we tested if the elevated hepatic mitochondrial content in the HCR rat would provide "metabolic protection" from chronic ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis and injury. The Leiber-Decarli liquid diet with ethanol (7% v/v; HCR-E) and without (HCR-C) was given to HCR rats (n = 8 per group) from 14 to 20 weeks of age that were weight matched and pair-fed to assure isocaloric intake. Hepatic triglyceride (TG) content and macro- and microvesicular steatosis were significantly greater in HCR-E compared with HCR-C (p < 0.05). In addition, hepatic superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione levels were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in the HCR-E rats. This hepatic phenotype also was associated with reduced total hepatic fatty acid oxidation (p = 0.03) and β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity (p = 0.01), and reductions in microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and apoB-100 protein content (p = 0.01) in HCR-E animals. However, despite these documented hepatic alterations, ethanol ingestion failed to induce significant hepatic liver injury, including no changes in hepatic inflammation, or serum alanine amino transferase (ALTs), free fatty acids (FFAs), triglycerides (TGs), insulin, or glucose. High intrinsic aerobic fitness did not reduce ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis, but protected against ethanol-induced hepatic injury and systemic metabolic dysfunction in a high aerobic capacity rat model. PMID:26610588

  12. [Assessment of main metabolic substrates utilization during aerobic phase of physical exercises in patients with first diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus and in healthy persons].

    PubMed

    Demidov, Iu I

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to study influence of first diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus (FDDM-1), including metabolic consequences of diabetic ketoacidosis, on utilization of main nutritious substrates under conditions of aerobic exercise. 48 patients with FDDM-1 (15females and 33 males) and 36 healthy volunteers, composing the control group, had a protocol of bicycle ergometry test with slowly growing load. Patients with FDDM-1 were divided into 2 subgroups in line with clinical characteristic of endocrinopathy debut. Subgroup 1 consisted of 15 patients, who had diabetic precoma, subgroup 2 was composed of 33 patients who did not have diabetic ketoacidosis in onset of disease. Aerobic load in patients with FDDM-1 was realized in stable condition of the main disease subcompensation, and in 1 month under condition of FDDM-1 compensation. Lipid and carbohydrate consumption percentage was estimated by the method of indirect colorimetry. Patients with FDDM-1 in stage of subcompensation did not have metabolism transformation with dominating consumption of lipids, which was noticed in healthy persons. When increase intensity of physical exercise, the reliably higher rate of carbohydrate sources consumption for supply of muscular contractions was noticed in patients with FDDM-1, especially in subgroup 2. After FDDM-1 compensation the structure of metabolic substrates consumption in warm-up period in both subgroups of patients with FDDM-1 did not have reliable differences in comparison with control group, but all further levels of aerobic exercise were characterized by significant increase of carbohydrate sources oxidation in comparison with such oxidation in healthy persons. Patients with FDDM-1 had decreased muscular tissue ability to utilize lipids in the aerobic stage of physical exercise, which can cause decrease of tolerance to physical work as a result of disorder lipid and carbohydrate participation in motion activity. PMID:18441702

  13. High Intrinsic Aerobic Capacity Protects against Ethanol-Induced Hepatic Injury and Metabolic Dysfunction: Study Using High Capacity Runner Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Szary, Nicholas; Rector, R. Scott; Uptergrove, Grace M.; Ridenhour, Suzanne E.; Shukla, Shivendra D.; Thyfault, John P.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Ibdah, Jamal A.

    2015-01-01

    Rats artificially selected over several generations for high intrinsic endurance/aerobic capacity resulting in high capacity runners (HCR) has been developed to study the links between high aerobic fitness and protection from metabolic diseases (Wisloff et al., Science, 2005). We have previously shown that the HCR strain have elevated hepatic mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity. In this study, we tested if the elevated hepatic mitochondrial content in the HCR rat would provide “metabolic protection” from chronic ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis and injury. The Leiber-Decarli liquid diet with ethanol (7% v/v; HCR-E) and without (HCR-C) was given to HCR rats (n = 8 per group) from 14 to 20 weeks of age that were weight matched and pair-fed to assure isocaloric intake. Hepatic triglyceride (TG) content and macro- and microvesicular steatosis were significantly greater in HCR-E compared with HCR-C (p < 0.05). In addition, hepatic superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione levels were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in the HCR-E rats. This hepatic phenotype also was associated with reduced total hepatic fatty acid oxidation (p = 0.03) and β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity (p = 0.01), and reductions in microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and apoB-100 protein content (p = 0.01) in HCR-E animals. However, despite these documented hepatic alterations, ethanol ingestion failed to induce significant hepatic liver injury, including no changes in hepatic inflammation, or serum alanine amino transferase (ALTs), free fatty acids (FFAs), triglycerides (TGs), insulin, or glucose. High intrinsic aerobic fitness did not reduce ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis, but protected against ethanol-induced hepatic injury and systemic metabolic dysfunction in a high aerobic capacity rat model. PMID:26610588

  14. Targeting mitochondrial energy metabolism with TSPO ligands.

    PubMed

    Gut, Philipp

    2015-08-01

    The translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO) resides on the outer mitochondrial membrane where it is believed to participate in cholesterol transport and steroid hormone synthesis. Although it is almost ubiquitously expressed, what TSPO does in non-steroidogenic tissues is largely unexplored. Recent studies report changes in glucose homoeostasis and cellular energy production when TSPO function is modulated by selective ligands or by genetic loss-of-function. This review summarizes findings that connect TSPO function with the regulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. The juxtaposition of TSPO at the cytosolic/mitochondrial interface and the existence of endogenous ligands that are regulated by metabolism suggest that TSPO functions to adapt mitochondrial to cellular metabolism. From a pharmacological perspective the specific up-regulation of TSPO in neuro-inflammatory and injury-induced conditions make TSPO an interesting, druggable target of mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:26551690

  15. Energy Balance and Metabolism after Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tonorezos, Emily S.; Jones, Lee W.

    2013-01-01

    Unfavorable physiological, biological, and behavioral alterations during and following treatment for cancer may lead to chronic energy imbalance predisposing to a myriad of deleterious health conditions including obesity, dyslipidemia, and the metabolic syndrome. In addition to the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal effects of these conditions, energy imbalance and metabolic changes after cancer treatment can also affect cancer-related morbidity and mortality. To this end, lifestyle interventions such as diet and physical activity are especially relevant to mitigate the deleterious impact of chronic energy imbalance in cancer survivors. PMID:24331194

  16. Eight-Week Training Cessation Suppresses Physiological Stress but Rapidly Impairs Health Metabolic Profiles and Aerobic Capacity in Elite Taekwondo Athletes.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yi-Hung; Sung, Yu-Chi; Chou, Chun-Chung; Chen, Chung-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Changes in an athlete's physiological and health metabolic profiles after detraining have not been studied in elite Taekwondo (TKD) athletes. To enable a better understanding of these physiological changes to training cessation, this study examined the effects of 8-weeks detraining on the aerobic capacity, body composition, inflammatory status and health metabolic profile in elite TKD athletes. Sixteen elite TKD athletes (age: 21.0 ± 0.8 yrs, BMI: 22.4 ± 3.9 kg/m2; Mean ± SD; 11 males and 5 females) participated in this study. Physical activity level assessment using computerized physical activity logs was performed during the competitive preparation season (i.e. one-week before national competition) and at two week intervals throughout the detraining period. Participant aerobic capacity, body fat, and blood biomarkers were measured before and after detraining, and the blood biomarker analyses included leukocyte subpopulations, blood glucose, insulin, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S), and cortisol. Eight-week detraining increased DHEA-S/cortisol ratio (+57.3%, p = 0.004), increased insulin/cortisol ratio (+59.9%, p = 0.004), reduced aerobic power (-2.43%, p = 0.043), increased body fat accumulation (body fat%: +21.3%, p < 0.001), decreased muscle mass (muscle mass%: -4.04%, p < 0.001), and elevated HOMA-IR (the biomarker of systemic insulin resistance; +34.2%, p = 0.006). The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), a systemic inflammatory index, increased by 48.2% (p = 0.005). The change in aerobic capacity was correlated with the increased fat mass (r = -0.429, p = 0.049) but not with muscle loss. An increase in the NLR was correlated to the changes in HOMA-IR (r = 0.44, p = 0.044) and aerobic capacity (r = -0.439, p = 0.045). We demonstrate that 8-week detraining suppresses physiological stress but rapidly results in declines in athletic performance and health metabolic profiles, including reduced aerobic capacity, increased body fat, muscle loss, insulin

  17. Eight-Week Training Cessation Suppresses Physiological Stress but Rapidly Impairs Health Metabolic Profiles and Aerobic Capacity in Elite Taekwondo Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yi-Hung; Sung, Yu-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Changes in an athlete’s physiological and health metabolic profiles after detraining have not been studied in elite Taekwondo (TKD) athletes. To enable a better understanding of these physiological changes to training cessation, this study examined the effects of 8-weeks detraining on the aerobic capacity, body composition, inflammatory status and health metabolic profile in elite TKD athletes. Sixteen elite TKD athletes (age: 21.0 ± 0.8 yrs, BMI: 22.4 ± 3.9 kg/m2; Mean ± SD; 11 males and 5 females) participated in this study. Physical activity level assessment using computerized physical activity logs was performed during the competitive preparation season (i.e. one-week before national competition) and at two week intervals throughout the detraining period. Participant aerobic capacity, body fat, and blood biomarkers were measured before and after detraining, and the blood biomarker analyses included leukocyte subpopulations, blood glucose, insulin, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S), and cortisol. Eight-week detraining increased DHEA-S/cortisol ratio (+57.3%, p = 0.004), increased insulin/cortisol ratio (+59.9%, p = 0.004), reduced aerobic power (–2.43%, p = 0.043), increased body fat accumulation (body fat%: +21.3%, p < 0.001), decreased muscle mass (muscle mass%: –4.04%, p < 0.001), and elevated HOMA-IR (the biomarker of systemic insulin resistance; +34.2%, p = 0.006). The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), a systemic inflammatory index, increased by 48.2% (p = 0.005). The change in aerobic capacity was correlated with the increased fat mass (r = –0.429, p = 0.049) but not with muscle loss. An increase in the NLR was correlated to the changes in HOMA-IR (r = 0.44, p = 0.044) and aerobic capacity (r = –0.439, p = 0.045). We demonstrate that 8-week detraining suppresses physiological stress but rapidly results in declines in athletic performance and health metabolic profiles, including reduced aerobic capacity, increased body fat, muscle

  18. Myocardial Po2 does not limit aerobic metabolism in the postischemic heart.

    PubMed

    Chung, Youngran

    2016-01-15

    Reperfused hypertrophic hearts are prone to develop reflow abnormalities, which are likely to impair O2 return to the myocardium. Yet, reflow deficit may not be the only factor determining postischemic oxygenation in the hypertrophic heart. Altered O2 demand may also contribute to hypoxia. In addition, the extent to which myocardial Po2 dictates energy and functional recovery in the reperfused heart remains uncertain. In the present study, moderately hypertrophied hearts from spontaneously hypertensive rats were subjected to ischemia-reperfusion, and the recovery time courses of pH and high-energy phosphates were followed by (31)P NMR. (1)H NMR measurement of intracellular myoglobin assessed tissue O2 levels. The present study found that the exacerbation of hypoxia in the postischemic spontaneously hypertensive rat heart arises mostly from impaired microvascular supply of O2. However, postischemic myocardial Po2, at least when it exceeds ∼18% of the preischemic level, does not limit mitochondrial respiration and high-energy phosphate resynthesis. It only passively reflects changes in the O2 supply-demand balance. PMID:26589325

  19. Energy metabolism of the visual system

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Riley, Margaret T.T.

    2012-01-01

    The visual system is one of the most energetically demanding systems in the brain. The currency of energy is ATP, which is generated most efficiently from oxidative metabolism in the mitochondria. ATP supports multiple neuronal functions. Foremost is repolarization of the membrane potential after depolarization. Neuronal activity, ATP generation, blood flow, oxygen consumption, glucose utilization, and mitochondrial oxidative metabolism are all interrelated. In the retina, phototransduction, neurotransmitter utilization, and protein/organelle transport are energy-dependent, yet repolarization-after-depolarization consumes the bulk of the energy. Repolarization in photoreceptor inner segments maintains the dark current. Repolarization by all neurons along the visual pathway following depolarizing excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission preserves cellular integrity and permits reactivation. The higher metabolic activity in the magno- versus the parvo-cellular pathway, the ON- versus the OFF-pathway in some (and the reverse in other) species, and in specialized functional representations in the visual cortex all reflect a greater emphasis on the processing of specific visual attributes. Neuronal activity and energy metabolism are tightly coupled processes at the cellular and even at the molecular levels. Deficiencies in energy metabolism, such as in diabetes, mitochondrial DNA mutation, mitochondrial protein malfunction, and oxidative stress can lead to retinopathy, visual deficits, neuronal degeneration, and eventual blindness. PMID:23226947

  20. Initial Molecular-Level Response to Artificial Selection for Increased Aerobic Metabolism Occurs Primarily through Changes in Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Konczal, Mateusz; Babik, Wiesław; Radwan, Jacek; Sadowska, Edyta T; Koteja, Paweł

    2015-06-01

    Experimental evolution combined with genome or transcriptome resequencing (Evolve and Resequence) represents a promising approach for advancing our understanding of the genetic basis of adaptation. Here, we applied this strategy to investigate the effect of selection on a complex trait in lines derived from a natural population of a small mammal. We analyzed the liver and heart transcriptomes of bank voles (Myodes [=Clethrionomys] glareolus) that had been selected for increased aerobic metabolism. The organs were sampled from 13th generation voles; at that point, the voles from four replicate selected lines had 48% higher maximum rates of oxygen consumption than those from four control lines. At the molecular level, the response to selection was primarily observed in gene expression: Over 300 genes were found to be differentially expressed between the selected and control lines and the transcriptome-wide pattern of expression distinguished selected lines from controls. No evidence for selection-driven changes of allele frequencies at coding sites was found: No single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) changed frequency more than expected under drift alone and frequency changes aggregated over all SNPs did not separate selected and control lines. Nevertheless, among genes which showed highest differentiation in allele frequencies between selected and control lines we identified, using information about gene functions and the biology of the selected phenotype, plausible targets of selection; these genes, together with those identified in expression analysis, have been prioritized for further studies. Because our selection lines were derived from a natural population, the amount and the spectrum of variation available for selection probably closely approximated that typically found in populations of small mammals. Therefore, our results are relevant to the understanding of the molecular basis of complex adaptations occurring in natural vertebrate populations. PMID:25739734

  1. Intermediate Energy Metabolism of Leptospira

    PubMed Central

    Baseman, J. B.; Cox, C. D.

    1969-01-01

    Metabolic studies were performed on three representative serotypes of Leptospira: a water isolate designated B16 and two pathogenic serotypes, pomona and schueffneri. Examination of whole cells of B16 for their ability to oxidize various substrates revealed that oleate significantly stimulated oxygen uptake. The respiratory quotient of 0.7 implied that oleate was degraded to carbon dioxide and water. Other substrates, such as carbohydrates, alcohols, intermediates of the citric acid cycle, and short-chain acids, including selected amino acids, did not stimulate endogenous respiration of whole cells. No oxygen uptake could be measured when cell-free extracts were tested with the substrates used with whole cells. Enzymatic analyses of cell-free extracts of the three strains demonstrated enzymes of the citric acid cycle, enzymes of the glycolytic and pentose pathways, and the general acyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase required for β-oxidation of fatty acids. Strain B16 and the two pathogenic serotypes appeared to possess similar metabolic capabilities. Enzymatic data might also explain the apparent inability of B16 to oxidize other substrates; kinases necessary for activation of common nonphosphorylated compounds were not detected in leptospiral extracts. These findings emphasized the dependence of leptospiral growth upon long-chain fatty acids. PMID:5776541

  2. Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism and Thyroid Cancers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junguee; Chang, Joon Young; Kang, Yea Eun; Yi, Shinae; Lee, Min Hee; Joung, Kyong Hye; Kim, Kun Soon; Shong, Minho

    2015-06-01

    Primary thyroid cancers including papillary, follicular, poorly differentiated, and anaplastic carcinomas show substantial differences in biological and clinical behaviors. Even in the same pathological type, there is wide variability in the clinical course of disease progression. The molecular carcinogenesis of thyroid cancer has advanced tremendously in the last decade. However, specific inhibition of oncogenic pathways did not provide a significant survival benefit in advanced progressive thyroid cancer that is resistant to radioactive iodine therapy. Accumulating evidence clearly shows that cellular energy metabolism, which is controlled by oncogenes and other tumor-related factors, is a critical factor determining the clinical phenotypes of cancer. However, the role and nature of energy metabolism in thyroid cancer remain unclear. In this article, we discuss the role of cellular energy metabolism, particularly mitochondrial energy metabolism, in thyroid cancer. Determining the molecular nature of metabolic remodeling in thyroid cancer may provide new biomarkers and therapeutic targets that may be useful in the management of refractory thyroid cancers. PMID:26194071

  3. CKM Gene G (Ncoi-) Allele Has a Positive Effect on Maximal Oxygen Uptake in Caucasian Women Practicing Sports Requiring Aerobic and Anaerobic Exercise Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gronek, Piotr; Holdys, Joanna; Kryściak, Jakub; Stanisławski, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The search for genes with a positive influence on physical fitness is a difficult process. Physical fitness is a trait determined by multiple genes, and its genetic basis is then modified by numerous environmental factors. The present study examines the effects of the polymorphism of creatine kinase (CKM) gene on VO2max – a physiological index of aerobic capacity of high heritability. The study sample consisted of 154 men and 85 women, who were students of the University School of Physical Education in Poznań and athletes practicing various sports, including members of the Polish national team. The study revealed a positive effect of a rare G (NcoI−) allele of the CKM gene on maximal oxygen uptake in Caucasian women practicing sports requiring aerobic and anaerobic exercise metabolism. Also a tendency was noted in individuals with NcoI−/− (GG) and NcoI−/+ (GA) genotypes to reach higher VO2max levels. PMID:24511349

  4. Degradation of IF1 controls energy metabolism during osteogenic differentiation of stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Aragó, María; García-Bermúdez, Javier; Martínez-Reyes, Inmaculada; Santacatterina, Fulvio; Cuezva, José M

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) requires the rewiring of energy metabolism. Herein, we demonstrate that the ATPase inhibitory factor 1 (IF1) is expressed in hMSCs and in prostate and colon stem cells but is not expressed in the differentiated cells. IF1 inhibits oxidative phosphorylation and regulates the activity of aerobic glycolysis in hMSCs. Silencing of IF1 in hMSCs mimics the metabolic changes observed in osteocytes and accelerates cellular differentiation. Activation of IF1 degradation acts as the switch that regulates energy metabolism during differentiation. We conclude that IF1 is a stemness marker important for maintaining the quiescence state. PMID:23722655

  5. High-intensity interval training and β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyric free acid improves aerobic power and metabolic thresholds

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous research combining Calcium β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (CaHMB) and running high-intensity interval training (HIIT) have shown positive effects on aerobic performance measures. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyric free acid (HMBFA) and cycle ergometry HIIT on maximal oxygen consumption (VO2peak), ventilatory threshold (VT), respiratory compensation point (RCP) and time to exhaustion (Tmax) in college-aged men and women. Methods Thirty-four healthy men and women (Age: 22.7 ± 3.1 yrs ; VO2peak: 39.3 ± 5.0 ml · kg-1 · min-1) volunteered to participate in this double-blind, placebo-controlled design study. All participants completed a series of tests prior to and following treatment. A peak oxygen consumption test was performed on a cycle ergometer to assess VO2peak, Tmax, VT, and RCP. Twenty-six participants were randomly assigned into either a placebo (PLA-HIIT) or 3 g per day of HMBFA (BetaTor™) (HMBFA-HIIT) group. Eight participants served as controls (CTL). Participants in the HIIT groups completed 12 HIIT (80-120% maximal workload) exercise sessions consisting of 5–6 bouts of a 2:1 minute cycling work to rest ratio protocol over a four-week period. Body composition was measured with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Outcomes were assessed by ANCOVA with posttest means adjusted for pretest differences. Results The HMBFA-HIIT intervention showed significant (p < 0.05) gains in VO2peak, and VT, versus the CTL and PLA-HIIT group. Both PLA-HIIT and HMBFA-HIIT treatment groups demonstrated significant (p < 0.05) improvement over CTL for Tmax, and RCP with no significant difference between the treatment groups. There were no significant differences observed for any measures of body composition. An independent-samples t-test confirmed that there were no significant differences between the training volumes for the PLA-HIIT and HMBFA-HIIT groups. Conclusions Our

  6. Bone Remodeling and Energy Metabolism: New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Francisco J. A.; Rosen, Clifford J.

    2013-01-01

    Bone mineral, adipose tissue and energy metabolism are interconnected by a complex and multilevel series of networks. Calcium and phosphorus are utilized for insulin secretion and synthesis of high energy compounds. Adipose tissue store lipids and cholecalciferol, which, in turn, can influence calcium balance and energy expenditure. Hormones long-thought to solely modulate energy and mineral homeostasis may influence adipocytic function. Osteoblasts are a target of insulin action in bone. Moreover, endocrine mediators, such as osteocalcin, are synthesized in the skeleton but regulate carbohydrate disposal and insulin secretion. Finally, osteoblasts and adipocytes originate from the same mesenchymal progenitor. The mutual crosstalk between osteoblasts and adipocytes within the bone marrow microenvironment plays a crucial role in bone remodeling. In the present review we provide an overview of the reciprocal control between bone and energy metabolism and its clinical implications. PMID:26273493

  7. Sodium signaling and astrocyte energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chatton, Jean-Yves; Magistretti, Pierre J; Barros, L Felipe

    2016-10-01

    The Na(+) gradient across the plasma membrane is constantly exploited by astrocytes as a secondary energy source to regulate the intracellular and extracellular milieu, and discard waste products. One of the most prominent roles of astrocytes in the brain is the Na(+) -dependent clearance of glutamate released by neurons during synaptic transmission. The intracellular Na(+) load collectively generated by these processes converges at the Na,K-ATPase pump, responsible for Na(+) extrusion from the cell, which is achieved at the expense of cellular ATP. These processes represent pivotal mechanisms enabling astrocytes to increase the local availability of metabolic substrates in response to neuronal activity. This review presents basic principles linking the intracellular handling of Na(+) following activity-related transmembrane fluxes in astrocytes and the energy metabolic pathways involved. We propose a role of Na(+) as an energy currency and as a mediator of metabolic signals in the context of neuron-glia interactions. We further discuss the possible impact of the astrocytic syncytium for the distribution and coordination of the metabolic response, and the compartmentation of these processes in cellular microdomains and subcellular organelles. Finally, we illustrate future avenues of investigation into signaling mechanisms aimed at bridging the gap between Na(+) and the metabolic machinery. GLIA 2016;64:1667-1676. PMID:27027636

  8. Metabolic energy from arsenite oxidation in Alcaligenes faecalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, G. L.; Love, M.; Zeider, B. K.

    2003-05-01

    The aerobic soil bacterium, Alcaligenes faecalis, survives in cultures containing greater than 10 g/L of aqueous arsenic. Toleration of arsenite occurs by the enzymatic oxidation of arsenite (As^III), to the less toxic arsenate (As^V). In defined media, the bacterium grows faster in the presence of arsenite than in its absence. This suggests that the bacterium uses the redox potential of arsenite oxidation as metabolic energy. The oxidation occurs via periplasmic arsenite oxidase, azurin, and cytochrome c [11] which presumably pass electron equivalents through an electron transport chain involving cytochrome c oxidase aud oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor. The associated proton translocation would allow synthesis of ATP and provide a useful means of harnessing the redox potential of arsenite oxidation. Arsenite and arsenate assays of the media during bacterial growth indicate that arsenite is depleted during the exponential growth phase and occurs concomitantly with the expression of arsenite oxidase. These results suggest that arsenite is detoxified to arsenate during bacterial growth and are inconsistent with previous reported interpretations of growth data. Alcaligenes faecalis is dependent on organic carbon sources and is therefore not chemolithoautotrophic. The relationship between succinate and arsenite utilisation provides evidence for the use of arsenite as a supplemental energy source. Because Alcaligenes faecalis not only tolerates, but thrives, in very high concentrations of arsenic has important implications in bioremediation of environments contaminated by aqueous arsenic.

  9. NF-κB controls energy homeostasis and metabolic adaptation by upregulating mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Claudio; Leow, Shi Chi; Anso, Elena; Rocha, Sonia; Thotakura, Anil K; Tornatore, Laura; Moretti, Marta; De Smaele, Enrico; Beg, Amer A; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Chandel, Navdeep S; Franzoso, Guido

    2011-10-01

    Cell proliferation is a metabolically demanding process. It requires active reprogramming of cellular bioenergetic pathways towards glucose metabolism to support anabolic growth. NF-κB/Rel transcription factors coordinate many of the signals that drive proliferation during immunity, inflammation and oncogenesis, but whether NF-κB regulates the metabolic reprogramming required for cell division during these processes is unknown. Here, we report that NF-κB organizes energy metabolism networks by controlling the balance between the utilization of glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. NF-κB inhibition causes cellular reprogramming to aerobic glycolysis under basal conditions and induces necrosis on glucose starvation. The metabolic reorganization that results from NF-κB inhibition overcomes the requirement for tumour suppressor mutation in oncogenic transformation and impairs metabolic adaptation in cancer in vivo. This NF-κB-dependent metabolic pathway involves stimulation of oxidative phosphorylation through upregulation of mitochondrial synthesis of cytochrome c oxidase 2 (SCO2; ref. ). Our findings identify NF-κB as a physiological regulator of mitochondrial respiration and establish a role for NF-κB in metabolic adaptation in normal cells and cancer. PMID:21968997

  10. Spatial control of the energy metabolism of yeast cells through electrolytic generation of oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnke, Christian; Mair, Thomas; Witte, Hartmut; Reiher, Antje; Hauser, Marcus J. B.; Krost, Alois

    2009-12-01

    The metabolic dynamics of yeast cells is controlled by electric pulses delivered through a spatially extended yeast cell/Au electrode interface. Concomitant with voltage pulses, oxygen is generated electrolytically at the electrode surface and delivered to the cells. The generation of oxygen was investigated in dependence of the applied voltage, width of the voltage pulses and temperature of the electrolytic solution. The local oxygen pulses at the electrodes lead to a transient activation of the aerobic energy metabolism of the yeast cells causing a perturbation in their energy balance. The effect of these local perturbations on the temporal dynamics of glycolysis in yeast cells is quantified in dependence of the energy state of cells.

  11. Aerobic fitness level does not modulate changes in whole-body protein turnover produced by unaccustomed increases in energy expenditure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of a sudden increase in energy expenditure (EE) on whole-body protein turnover vary between studies, and the possibility that fitness level modulates those responses has not been fully investigated. We hypothesized that aerobically trained individuals may exhibit adaptations that protec...

  12. Energy metabolism in neuroblastoma and Wilms tumor

    PubMed Central

    Aminzadeh, Sepideh; Vidali, Silvia; Sperl, Wolfgang; Feichtinger, René G.

    2015-01-01

    To support high proliferation, the majority of cancer cells undergo fundamental metabolic changes such as increasing their glucose uptake and shifting to glycolysis for ATP production at the expense of far more efficient mitochondrial energy production by oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), which at first glance is a paradox. This phenomenon is known as the Warburg effect. However, enhanced glycolysis is necessary to provide building blocks for anabolic growth. Apart from the generation of ATP, intermediates of glycolysis serve as precursors for a variety of biosynthetic pathways essential for cell proliferation. In the last 10-15 years the field of tumor metabolism has experienced an enormous boom in interest. It is now well established that tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes often play a central role in the regulation of cellular metabolism. Therefore, they significantly contribute to the manifestation of the Warburg effect. While much attention has focused on adult solid tumors, so far there has been comparatively little effort directed at elucidation of the mechanism responsible for the Warburg effect in childhood cancers. In this review we focus on metabolic pathways in neuroblastoma (NB) and Wilms tumor (WT), the two most frequent solid tumors in children. Both tumor types show alterations of the OXPHOS system and glycolytic features. Chromosomal alterations and activation of oncogenes like MYC or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes like TP53 can in part explain the changes of energy metabolism in these cancers. The strict dependence of cancer cells on glucose metabolism is a fairly common feature among otherwise biologically diverse types of cancer. Therefore, inhibition of glycolysis or starvation of cancer cells through glucose deprivation via a high-fat low-carbohydrate diet may be a promising avenue for future adjuvant therapeutic strategies. PMID:26835356

  13. Aerobic Production and Utilization of Lactate Satisfy Increased Energy Demands Upon Neuronal Activation in Hippocampal Slices and Provide Neuroprotection Against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Schurr, Avital; Gozal, Evelyne

    2012-01-01

    Ever since it was shown for the first time that lactate can support neuronal function in vitro as a sole oxidative energy substrate, investigators in the field of neuroenergetics have been debating the role, if any, of this glycolytic product in cerebral energy metabolism. Our experiments employed the rat hippocampal slice preparation with electrophysiological and biochemical methodologies. The data generated by these experiments (a) support the hypothesis that lactate, not pyruvate, is the end-product of cerebral aerobic glycolysis; (b) indicate that lactate plays a major and crucial role in affording neural tissue to respond adequately to glutamate excitation and to recover unscathed post-excitation; (c) suggest that neural tissue activation is accompanied by aerobic lactate and NADH production, the latter being produced when the former is converted to pyruvate by mitochondrial lactate dehydrogenase (mLDH); (d) imply that NADH can be utilized as an endogenous scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to provide neuroprotection against ROS-induced neuronal damage. PMID:22275901

  14. Changes in gut hormone levels and negative energy balance during aerobic exercise in obese young males.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Shin-ya; Yoshikawa, Takahiro; Katsura, Yoshihiro; Usui, Tatsuya; Nakao, Hayato; Fujimoto, Shigeo

    2009-04-01

    We examined whether changes in gut hormone levels due to a single bout of aerobic exercise differ between obese young males and normal controls, and attempted to determine the involvement of hormonal changes during exercise in the regulation of energy balance (EB) in these obese subjects. Seven obese and seven age-matched subjects of normal weight participated in exercise and rest sessions. Subjects consumed a standardized breakfast that was followed by constant cycling exercise at 50% VO(2max) or rest for 60 min. At lunch, a test meal was presented, and energy intake (EI) and relative energy intake (REI) were calculated. Blood samples were obtained at 30 min intervals during both sessions for measurement of glucose, insulin, glucagon, ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Plasma levels of PYY and GLP-1 were increased by exercise, whereas plasma ghrelin levels were unaffected by exercise. The areas under the curve (AUC) of the time courses of PYY and GLP-1 levels did not significantly differ between the two groups. In contrast, EI and REI were decreased by exercise in both groups, and energy deficit was significantly larger in obese subjects than in normal controls. The present findings suggest that short-term EB during a single exercise session might be regulated not by increased amounts of these gut hormones per se. PMID:19158129

  15. Do the noncaffeine ingredients of energy drinks affect metabolic responses to heavy exercise?

    PubMed

    Pettitt, Robert W; Niemeyer, JoLynne D; Sexton, Patrick J; Lipetzky, Amanda; Murray, Steven R

    2013-07-01

    Energy drinks (EDs) such as Red Bull (RB) are marketed to enhance metabolism. Secondary ingredients of EDs (e.g., taurine) have been purported to improve time trial performance; however, little research exists on how such secondary ingredients affect aerobic metabolism during heavy exercise. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the secondary ingredients of RB on aerobic metabolism during and subsequent to heavy exercise. In double-blind, counterbalanced, and crossover fashion, 8 recreationally trained individuals completed a graded exercise test to determine the gas exchange threshold (GET). Subjects returned on 2 separate occasions and ingested either a 245 ml serving of RB or a control (CTRL) drink with the equivalent caffeine before engaging in two 10-minute constant-load cycling bouts, at an intensity equivalent to GET, with 3 minutes of rest between bouts. Accumulated liters of O2 (10 minutes) were higher for the first bout (17.1 ± 3.5 L) vs. the second bout (16.7 ± 3.5 L) but did not differ between drinks. Similarly, excess postexercise oxygen consumption was higher after the initial bout (RB mean, 2.6 ± 0.85 L; CTRL mean, 2.9 ± 0.90 L) vs. the second bout (RB mean, 1.5 ± 0.85 L; CTRL mean, 1.9 ± 0.87 L) but did not differ between drinks. No differences occurred between drinks for measures of heart rate or rating of perceived exertion. These results indicate that the secondary ingredients contained in a single serving of RB do not augment aerobic metabolism during or subsequent to heavy exercise. PMID:23037611

  16. A 12 week aerobic exercise program improves fitness, hepatic insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in obese Hispanic adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rise in obesity related morbidity in children and adolescents requires urgent prevention and treatment strategies. Strictly controlled exercise programs might be useful tools to improve insulin sensitivity and glucose kinetics. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that a 12-wk aerobic exerci...

  17. A model-driven quantitative metabolomics analysis of aerobic and anaerobic metabolism in E. coli K-12 MG1655 that is biochemically and thermodynamically consistent.

    PubMed

    McCloskey, Douglas; Gangoiti, Jon A; King, Zachary A; Naviaux, Robert K; Barshop, Bruce A; Palsson, Bernhard O; Feist, Adam M

    2014-04-01

    The advent of model-enabled workflows in systems biology allows for the integration of experimental data types with genome-scale models to discover new features of biology. This work demonstrates such a workflow, aimed at establishing a metabolomics platform applied to study the differences in metabolomes between anaerobic and aerobic growth of Escherichia coli. Constraint-based modeling was utilized to deduce a target list of compounds for downstream method development. An analytical and experimental methodology was developed and tailored to the compound chemistry and growth conditions of interest. This included the construction of a rapid sampling apparatus for use with anaerobic cultures. The resulting genome-scale data sets for anaerobic and aerobic growth were validated by comparison to previous small-scale studies comparing growth of E. coli under the same conditions. The metabolomics data were then integrated with the E. coli genome-scale metabolic model (GEM) via a sensitivity analysis that utilized reaction thermodynamics to reconcile simulated growth rates and reaction directionalities. This analysis highlighted several optimal network usage inconsistencies, including the incorrect use of the beta-oxidation pathway for synthesis of fatty acids. This analysis also identified enzyme promiscuity for the pykA gene, that is critical for anaerobic growth, and which has not been previously incorporated into metabolic models of E coli. PMID:24249002

  18. The effect of chronic exposure to high palmitic acid concentrations on the aerobic metabolism of human endothelial EA.hy926 cells.

    PubMed

    Broniarek, Izabela; Koziel, Agnieszka; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2016-09-01

    A chronic elevation of circulating free fatty acids (FFAs) is associated with diseases like obesity or diabetes and can lead to lipotoxicity. The goals of this study were to assess the influence of chronic exposure to high palmitic acid (PAL) levels on mitochondrial respiratory functions in endothelial cells and isolated mitochondria. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EA.hy926 line) were grown for 6 days in a medium containing either 100 or 150 μM PAL. Growth at high PAL concentrations induced a considerable increase in fatty acid-supplied respiration and a reduction of mitochondrial respiration during carbohydrate and glutamine oxidation. High PAL levels elevated intracellular and mitochondrial superoxide generation; increased inflammation marker, acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenase, uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), and superoxide dismutase 2 expression; and decreased hexokinase I and pyruvate dehydrogenase expression. No change in aerobic respiration capacity was observed, while fermentation was decreased. In mitochondria isolated from high PAL-treated cells, an increase in the oxidation of palmitoylcarnitine, a decrease in the oxidation of pyruvate, and an increase in UCP2 activity were observed. Our results demonstrate that exposure to high PAL levels induces a shift in endothelial aerobic metabolism toward the oxidation of fatty acids. Increased levels of PAL caused impairment and uncoupling of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system. Our data indicate that FFAs significantly affect endothelial oxidative metabolism, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, and cell viability and, thus, might contribute to endothelial and vascular dysfunction. PMID:27417103

  19. Why are chlorinated pollutants so difficult to degrade aerobically? Redox stress limits 1,3-dichloprop-1-ene metabolism by Pseudomonas pavonaceae

    PubMed Central

    Nikel, Pablo I.; Pérez-Pantoja, Danilo; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2013-01-01

    Chlorinated pollutants are hardly biodegradable under oxic conditions, but they can often be metabolized by anaerobic bacteria through organohalide respiration reactions. In an attempt to identify bottlenecks limiting aerobic catabolism of 1,3-dichloroprop-1-ene (1,3-DCP; a widely used organohalide) in Pseudomonas pavonaceae, the possible physiological restrictions for this process were surveyed. Flow cytometry and a bioluminescence reporter of metabolic state revealed that cells treated with 1,3-DCP experienced an intense stress that could be traced to the endogenous production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the metabolism of the compound. Cells exposed to 1,3-DCP also manifested increased levels of d-glucose-6-P 1-dehydrogenase activity (G6PDH, an enzyme key to the synthesis of reduced NADPH), observed under both glycolytic and gluconeogenic growth regimes. The increase in G6PDH activity, as well as cellular hydroperoxide levels, correlated with the generation of ROS. Additionally, the high G6PDH activity was paralleled by the accumulation of d-glucose-6-P, suggesting a metabolic flux shift that favours the production of NADPH. Thus, G6PDH and its cognate substrate seem to play an important role in P. pavonaceae under redox stress caused by 1,3-DCP, probably by increasing the rate of NADPH turnover. The data suggest that oxidative stress associated with the biodegradation of 1,3-DCP reflects a significant barrier for the evolution of aerobic pathways for chlorinated compounds, thereby allowing for the emergence of anaerobic counterparts. PMID:23479756

  20. Energy Metabolism and Human Dosimetry of Tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Galeriu, D.; Takeda, H.; Melintescu, A.; Trivedi, A

    2005-07-15

    In the frame of current revision of human dosimetry of {sup 14}C and tritium, undertaken by the International Commission of Radiological Protection, we propose a novel approach based on energy metabolism and a simple biokinetic model for the dynamics of dietary intake (organic {sup 14}C, tritiated water and Organically Bound Tritium-OBT). The model predicts increased doses for HTO and OBT comparing to ICRP recommendations, supporting recent findings.

  1. Myocardial mechanical dysfunction following endotoxemia: role of changes in energy substrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Soraya, Hamid; Masoud, Waleed G T; Gandhi, Manoj; Garjani, Alireza; Clanachan, Alexander S

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular depression due to endotoxemia remains a major cause of mortality in intensive care patients. To determine whether drug-induced alterations in cardiac metabolism may be a viable strategy to reduce endotoxemia-mediated cardiac dysfunction, we assessed endotoxemia-induced changes in glucose and fatty acid metabolism under aerobic and post-ischemic conditions. Endotoxemia was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by lipopolysaccharide (Escherichia coli 0111:B4c, 4 mg/kg, i.p.) 6 h prior to heart removal for ex vivo assessment of left ventricular (LV) work and rates of glucose metabolism (glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis, glycolysis and glucose oxidation) and palmitate oxidation. Under aerobic conditions, endotoxemic hearts had impaired LV function as judged by echocardiography in vivo (% ejection fraction, 66.0 ± 3.2 vs 78.0 ± 2.1, p < 0.05) or by LV work ex vivo (2.14 ± 0.16 vs 3.28 ± 0.16, Joules min(-1) g dry wt(-1), p < 0.05). However, rates of glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis, glycolysis, and glucose oxidation were not altered. Palmitate oxidation was lower in endotoxemic hearts in proportion to the decreased workload, thus metabolic efficiency was unaffected. In hearts reperfused following global ischemia, untreated hearts had impaired recovery of LV work (52.3 ± 9.4 %) whereas endotoxemic hearts had significantly higher recovery (105.6 ± 11.3 %, p < 0.05). During reperfusion, fatty acid oxidation, acetyl CoA production and metabolic efficiency were similar in both groups. As impaired cardiac function appeared unrelated to depression of energy substrate oxidation, it is unlikely that drug-induced acceleration of fatty acid oxidation will improve mechanical function. The beneficial repartitioning of glucose metabolism in reperfused endotoxemic hearts may contribute to the cardioprotected phenotype. PMID:26926341

  2. Determination of reaction rates and activation energy in aerobic composting processes for yard waste.

    PubMed

    Uma, R N; Manjula, G; Meenambal, T

    2007-04-01

    The reaction rates and activation energy in aerobic composting processes for yard waste were determined using specifically designed reactors. Different mixture ratios were fixed before the commencement of the process. The C/N ratio was found to be optimum for a mixture ratio of 1:6 containing one part of coir pith to six parts of other waste which included yard waste, yeast sludge, poultry yard waste and decomposing culture (Pleurotosis). The path of stabilization of the wastes was continuously monitored by observing various parameters such as temperature, pH, Electrical Conductivity, C.O.D, VS at regular time intervals. Kinetic analysis was done to determine the reaction rates and activation energy for the optimum mixture ratio under forced aeration condition. The results of the analysis clearly indicated that the temperature dependence of the reaction rates followed the Arrhenius equation. The temperature coefficients were also determined. The degradation of the organic fraction of the yard waste could be predicted using first order reaction model. PMID:18476403

  3. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea use the most energy-efficient aerobic pathway for CO2 fixation.

    PubMed

    Könneke, Martin; Schubert, Daniel M; Brown, Philip C; Hügler, Michael; Standfest, Sonja; Schwander, Thomas; Schada von Borzyskowski, Lennart; Erb, Tobias J; Stahl, David A; Berg, Ivan A

    2014-06-01

    Archaea of the phylum Thaumarchaeota are among the most abundant prokaryotes on Earth and are widely distributed in marine, terrestrial, and geothermal environments. All studied Thaumarchaeota couple the oxidation of ammonia at extremely low concentrations with carbon fixation. As the predominant nitrifiers in the ocean and in various soils, ammonia-oxidizing archaea contribute significantly to the global nitrogen and carbon cycles. Here we provide biochemical evidence that thaumarchaeal ammonia oxidizers assimilate inorganic carbon via a modified version of the autotrophic hydroxypropionate/hydroxybutyrate cycle of Crenarchaeota that is far more energy efficient than any other aerobic autotrophic pathway. The identified genes of this cycle were found in the genomes of all sequenced representatives of the phylum Thaumarchaeota, indicating the environmental significance of this efficient CO2-fixation pathway. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of proteins of this pathway suggests that the hydroxypropionate/hydroxybutyrate cycle emerged independently in Crenarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota, thus supporting the hypothesis of an early evolutionary separation of both archaeal phyla. We conclude that high efficiency of anabolism exemplified by this autotrophic cycle perfectly suits the lifestyle of ammonia-oxidizing archaea, which thrive at a constantly low energy supply, thus offering a biochemical explanation for their ecological success in nutrient-limited environments. PMID:24843170

  4. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea use the most energy-efficient aerobic pathway for CO2 fixation

    PubMed Central

    Könneke, Martin; Schubert, Daniel M.; Brown, Philip C.; Hügler, Michael; Standfest, Sonja; Schwander, Thomas; Schada von Borzyskowski, Lennart; Erb, Tobias J.; Stahl, David A.; Berg, Ivan A.

    2014-01-01

    Archaea of the phylum Thaumarchaeota are among the most abundant prokaryotes on Earth and are widely distributed in marine, terrestrial, and geothermal environments. All studied Thaumarchaeota couple the oxidation of ammonia at extremely low concentrations with carbon fixation. As the predominant nitrifiers in the ocean and in various soils, ammonia-oxidizing archaea contribute significantly to the global nitrogen and carbon cycles. Here we provide biochemical evidence that thaumarchaeal ammonia oxidizers assimilate inorganic carbon via a modified version of the autotrophic hydroxypropionate/hydroxybutyrate cycle of Crenarchaeota that is far more energy efficient than any other aerobic autotrophic pathway. The identified genes of this cycle were found in the genomes of all sequenced representatives of the phylum Thaumarchaeota, indicating the environmental significance of this efficient CO2-fixation pathway. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of proteins of this pathway suggests that the hydroxypropionate/hydroxybutyrate cycle emerged independently in Crenarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota, thus supporting the hypothesis of an early evolutionary separation of both archaeal phyla. We conclude that high efficiency of anabolism exemplified by this autotrophic cycle perfectly suits the lifestyle of ammonia-oxidizing archaea, which thrive at a constantly low energy supply, thus offering a biochemical explanation for their ecological success in nutrient-limited environments. PMID:24843170

  5. Energy metabolic dysfunction as a carcinogenic factor in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongyan; Shi, Zhenhua; Lian, Huiyong; Cai, Peng

    2016-12-01

    Cancer, as a leading cause of death, has attracted enormous public attention. Reprogramming of cellular energy metabolism is deemed to be one of the principal hallmarks of cancer. In this article, we reviewed the mutual relationships among environmental pollution factors, energy metabolic dysfunction, and various cancers. We found that most environmental pollution factors could induce cancers mainly by disturbing the energy metabolism. By triggering microenvironment alteration, energy metabolic dysfunction can be treated as a factor in carcinogenesis. Thus, we put forward that energy metabolism might be as a key point for studying carcinogenesis and tumor development to propose new methods for cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:27053249

  6. Circulating follistatin in relation to energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jakob Schiøler; Plomgaard, Peter

    2016-09-15

    Recently, substantial evidence has emerged that the liver contributes significantly to the circulating levels of follistatin and that circulating follistatin is tightly regulated by the glucagon-to-insulin ratio. Both observations are based on investigations of healthy subjects. These novel findings challenge the present view of circulating follistatin in human physiology, being that circulating follistatin is a result of spill-over from para/autocrine actions in various tissues and cells. Follistatin as a liver-derived protein under the regulation of glucagon-to-insulin ratio suggests a relation to energy metabolism. In this narrative review, we attempt to reconcile the existing findings on circulating follistatin with the novel concept that circulating follistatin is a liver-derived molecule regulated by the glucagon-to-insulin ratio. The picture emerging is that conditions associated with elevated levels of circulating follistatin have a metabolic denominator with decreased insulin sensitivity and/or hyperglucagoneimia. PMID:27264073

  7. Impact of combined resistance and aerobic exercise training on branched-chain amino acid turnover, glycine metabolism and insulin sensitivity in overweight humans

    PubMed Central

    Glynn, Erin L.; Piner, Lucy W.; Huffman, Kim M.; Slentz, Cris A.; Elliot-Penry, Lorraine; AbouAssi, Hiba; White, Phillip J.; Bain, James R.; Muehlbauer, Michael J.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Stevens, Robert D.; Porter Starr, Kathryn N.; Bales, Connie W.; Volpi, Elena; Brosnan, M. Julia; Trimmer, Jeff K.; Rolph, Timothy P.

    2016-01-01

    Aims/hypotheses Obesity is associated with decreased insulin sensitivity (IS) and elevated plasma branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs). The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between BCAA metabolism and IS in overweight (OW) individuals during exercise intervention. Methods Whole-body leucine turnover, IS by hyperinsulinaemic–euglycaemic clamp, and circulating and skeletal muscle amino acids, branched-chain α-keto acids and acylcarnitines were measured in ten healthy controls (Control) and nine OW, untrained, insulin-resistant individuals (OW-Untrained). OW-Untrained then underwent a 6 month aerobic and resistance exercise programme and repeated testing (OW-Trained). Results IS was higher in Control vs OW-Untrained and increased significantly following exercise. IS was lower in OW-Trained vs Control expressed relative to body mass, but was not different from Control when normalised to fat-free mass (FFM). Plasma BCAAs and leucine turnover (relative to FFM) were higher in OW-Untrained vs Control, but did not change on average with exercise. Despite this, within individuals, the decrease in molar sum of circulating BCAAs was the best metabolic predictor of improvement in IS. Circulating glycine levels were higher in Control and OW-Trained vs OW-Untrained, and urinary metabolic profiling suggests that exercise induces more efficient elimination of excess acyl groups derived from BCAA and aromatic amino acid (AA) metabolism via formation of urinary glycine adducts. Conclusions/interpretation A mechanism involving more efficient elimination of excess acyl groups derived from BCAA and aromatic AA metabolism via glycine conjugation in the liver, rather than increased BCAA disposal through oxidation and turnover, may mediate interactions between exercise, BCAA metabolism and IS. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01786941 PMID:26254576

  8. Glycolysis in energy metabolism during seizures.

    PubMed

    Yang, Heng; Wu, Jiongxing; Guo, Ren; Peng, Yufen; Zheng, Wen; Liu, Ding; Song, Zhi

    2013-05-15

    Studies have shown that glycolysis increases during seizures, and that the glycolytic metabolite lactic acid can be used as an energy source. However, how lactic acid provides energy for seizures and how it can participate in the termination of seizures remains unclear. We reviewed possible mechanisms of glycolysis involved in seizure onset. Results showed that lactic acid was involved in seizure onset and provided energy at early stages. As seizures progress, lactic acid reduces the pH of tissue and induces metabolic acidosis, which terminates the seizure. The specific mechanism of lactic acid-induced acidosis involves several aspects, which include lactic acid-induced inhibition of the glycolytic enzyme 6-diphosphate kinase-1, inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, activation of the acid-sensitive 1A ion channel, strengthening of the receptive mechanism of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-minobutyric acid, and changes in the intra- and extracellular environment. PMID:25206426

  9. Thermodynamic analysis of the energy recovery from the aerobic bioconversion of solid urban waste organic fraction.

    PubMed

    Di Maria, Francesco; Benavoli, Manuel; Zoppitelli, Mirco

    2008-01-01

    Waste management is of the utmost importance for many countries and especially for highly developed ones due to its implications on society. In particular, proper treatment before disposal of the solid urban waste organic fraction is one of the main issues that is addressed in waste management. In fact, the organic fraction is particularly reactive and if disposed in sanitary landfills without previous adequate treatment, a large amount of dangerous and polluting gaseous, liquid and solid substances can be produced. Some waste treatment processes can also present an opportunity to produce other by-products like energy, recycled materials and other products with both economic and environmental benefits. In this paper, the aerobic treatment of the organic fraction of solid urban waste, performed in a biocell plant with the possibility of recovering heat for civil or industrial needs, was examined from the thermodynamic point of view. A theoretical model was proposed both for the biological process of the organic fraction, as well as for the heat recovery system. The most significant results are represented and discussed. PMID:17512716

  10. Aerobic glycolysis in the primate brain: reconsidering the implications for growth and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Bauernfeind, Amy L; Barks, Sarah K; Duka, Tetyana; Grossman, Lawrence I; Hof, Patrick R; Sherwood, Chet C

    2014-07-01

    Glucose metabolism produces, by oxidative phosphorylation, more than 15 times the amount of energy generated by aerobic glycolysis. Nonetheless, aerobic glycolysis remains a prevalent metabolic pathway in the brain. Here we review evidence suggesting that this pathway contributes essential molecules to the biomass of the brain. Aerobic metabolism is the dominant metabolic pathway during early postnatal development when lipids and proteins are needed for the processes of axonal elongation, synaptogenesis, and myelination. Furthermore, aerobic metabolism may continue into adulthood to supply biomolecules for activity-related changes at the synapse and turnover of constituent structural components of neurons. Conversely, oxidative phosphorylation appears to be the main metabolic support for synaptic transmission, and, therefore, this pathway seems to be more dominant in brain structures and at time points in the lifespan that are characterized by increased synaptic density. We present the case for differing relationships between aerobic glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation across primates in association with species-specific variation in neurodevelopmental trajectories. In doing so, we provide an alternative interpretation for the assessment of radiolabeled glucose positron emission tomography studies that regularly attribute increases in glucose uptake to neural activity alone, and propose a new model for the contribution of metabolic pathways for energetic demand and neural tissue growth. We conclude that comparative studies of metabolic appropriation in the brain may contribute to the discussion of human cognitive evolution and to the understanding of human-specific aging and the etiology of neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:24185460

  11. A universal molecular clock of protein folds and its power in tracing the early history of aerobic metabolism and planet oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minglei; Jiang, Ying-Ying; Kim, Kyung Mo; Qu, Ge; Ji, Hong-Fang; Mittenthal, Jay E; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    The standard molecular clock describes a constant rate of molecular evolution and provides a powerful framework for evolutionary timescales. Here, we describe the existence and implications of a molecular clock of folds, a universal recurrence in the discovery of new structures in the world of proteins. Using a phylogenomic structural census in hundreds of proteomes, we build phylogenies and time lines of domains at fold and fold superfamily levels of structural complexity. These time lines correlate approximately linearly with geological timescales and were here used to date two crucial events in life history, planet oxygenation and organism diversification. We first dissected the structures and functions of enzymes in simulated metabolic networks. The placement of anaerobic and aerobic enzymes in the time line revealed that aerobic metabolism emerged about 2.9 billion years (giga-annum; Ga) ago and expanded during a period of about 400 My, reaching what is known as the Great Oxidation Event. During this period, enzymes recruited old and new folds for oxygen-mediated enzymatic activities. Remarkably, the first fold lost by a superkingdom disappeared in Archaea 2.6 Ga ago, within the span of oxygen rise, suggesting that oxygen also triggered diversification of life. The implications of a molecular clock of folds are many and important for the neutral theory of molecular evolution and for understanding the growth and diversity of the protein world. The clock also extends the standard concept that was specific to molecules and their timescales and turns it into a universal timescale-generating tool. PMID:20805191

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Response Regulators, DevR and NarL, Interact in Vivo and Co-regulate Gene Expression during Aerobic Nitrate Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Vandana; Agrawal, Ruchi; Duncan, Tammi R.; Saini, Deepak. K.; Clark-Curtiss, Josephine E.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes Rv0844c/Rv0845 encoding the NarL response regulator and NarS histidine kinase are hypothesized to constitute a two-component system involved in the regulation of nitrate metabolism. However, there is no experimental evidence to support this. In this study, we established M. tuberculosis NarL/NarS as a functional two-component system and identified His241 and Asp61 as conserved phosphorylation sites in NarS and NarL, respectively. Transcriptional profiling between M. tuberculosis H37Rv and a ΔnarL mutant strain during exponential growth in broth cultures with or without nitrate defined an ∼30-gene NarL regulon that exhibited significant overlap with DevR-regulated genes, thereby implicating a role for the DevR response regulator in the regulation of nitrate metabolism. Notably, expression analysis of a subset of genes common to NarL and DevR regulons in M. tuberculosis ΔdevR, ΔdevSΔdosT, and ΔnarL mutant strains revealed that in response to nitrite produced during aerobic nitrate metabolism, the DevRS/DosT regulatory system plays a primary role that is augmented by NarL. Specifically, NarL itself was unable to bind to the narK2, acg, and Rv3130c promoters in phosphorylated or unphosphorylated form; however, its interaction with DevR∼P resulted in cooperative binding, thereby enabling co-regulation of these genes. These findings support the role of physiologically derived nitrite as a metabolic signal in mycobacteria. We propose NarL-DevR binding, possibly as a heterodimer, as a novel mechanism for co-regulation of gene expression by the DevRS/DosT and NarL/NarS regulatory systems. PMID:25659431

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis response regulators, DevR and NarL, interact in vivo and co-regulate gene expression during aerobic nitrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Vandana; Agrawal, Ruchi; Duncan, Tammi R; Saini, Deepak K; Clark-Curtiss, Josephine E

    2015-03-27

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes Rv0844c/Rv0845 encoding the NarL response regulator and NarS histidine kinase are hypothesized to constitute a two-component system involved in the regulation of nitrate metabolism. However, there is no experimental evidence to support this. In this study, we established M. tuberculosis NarL/NarS as a functional two-component system and identified His(241) and Asp(61) as conserved phosphorylation sites in NarS and NarL, respectively. Transcriptional profiling between M. tuberculosis H37Rv and a ΔnarL mutant strain during exponential growth in broth cultures with or without nitrate defined an ∼30-gene NarL regulon that exhibited significant overlap with DevR-regulated genes, thereby implicating a role for the DevR response regulator in the regulation of nitrate metabolism. Notably, expression analysis of a subset of genes common to NarL and DevR regulons in M. tuberculosis ΔdevR, ΔdevSΔdosT, and ΔnarL mutant strains revealed that in response to nitrite produced during aerobic nitrate metabolism, the DevRS/DosT regulatory system plays a primary role that is augmented by NarL. Specifically, NarL itself was unable to bind to the narK2, acg, and Rv3130c promoters in phosphorylated or unphosphorylated form; however, its interaction with DevR∼P resulted in cooperative binding, thereby enabling co-regulation of these genes. These findings support the role of physiologically derived nitrite as a metabolic signal in mycobacteria. We propose NarL-DevR binding, possibly as a heterodimer, as a novel mechanism for co-regulation of gene expression by the DevRS/DosT and NarL/NarS regulatory systems. PMID:25659431

  14. Metabolic Restructuring during Energy-Limited States: Insights from Artemia franciscana Embryos and Other Animals

    PubMed Central

    Hand, Steven C.; Menze, Michael A.; Borcar, Apu; Patil, Yuvraj; Covi, Joseph A.; Reynolds, Julie A.; Toner, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Many life history stages of animals that experience environmental insults enter developmental arrested states that are characterized by reduced cellular proliferation, with or without a concurrent reduction in overall metabolism. In the case of the most profound metabolic arrest reported in invertebrates, i.e., anaerobic quiescence in Artemia franciscana embryos, acidification of the intracellular milieu is a major factor governing catabolic and anabolic downregulation. Release of ion gradients from intracellular compartments is the source for approximately 50% of the proton equivalents needed for the 1.5 unit acidification that is observed. Recovery from the metabolic arrest requires re-sequestration of the protons with a vacuolar-type ATPase (V-ATPase). The remarkable facet of this mechanism is the ability of embryonic cells to survive the dissipation of intracellular ion gradients. Across many diapause-like states, the metabolic reduction and subsequent matching of energy demand is accomplished by shifting energy metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis. Molecular pathways that are activated to induce these resilient hypometabolic states include stimulation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and insulin signaling via suite of daf (dauer formation) genes for diapause-like states in nematodes and insects. Contributing factors for other metabolically-depressed states involve hypoxia-inducible factor-1 and downregulation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. Metabolic similarities between natural states of stasis and some cancer phenotypes are noteworthy. Reduction of flux through oxidative phosphorylation helps prevent cell death in certain cancer types, similar to the way it increases viability of dauer stages in Caenorhabditis elegans. Mechanisms that underlie natural stasis are being used to precondition mammalian cells prior to cell biostabilization and storage. PMID:21335009

  15. Differential modeling of anaerobic and aerobic metabolism in the 800-m and 1,500-m run.

    PubMed

    Billat, Véronique; Hamard, Laurence; Koralsztein, Jean Pierre; Morton, R Hugh

    2009-08-01

    This study examined the hypothesis that running speed over 800- and 1,500-m races is regulated by the prevailing anaerobic (oxygen independent) store (ANS) at each instant of the race up until the all-out phase of the race over the last several meters. Therefore, we hypothesized that the anaerobic power that allows running above the speed at maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) is regulated by ANS, and as a consequence the time limit at the anaerobic power (tlim PAN=ANS/PAN) is constant until the final sprint. Eight 800-m and seven 1,500-m male runners performed an incremental test to measure VO2max and the minimal velocity associated with the attainment of VO2max (vVO2max), referred to as maximal aerobic power, and ran the 800-m or 1,500-m race with the intent of achieving the lowest time possible. Anaerobic power (PAN) was measured as the difference between total power and aerobic power, and instantaneous ANS as the difference between end-race and instantaneous accumulated oxygen deficits. In 800 m and 1,500 m, tlim PAN was constant during the first 70% of race time in both races. Furthermore, the 1,500-m performance was significantly correlated with tlim PAN during this period (r=-0.92, P<0.01), but the 800-m performance was not (r=-0.05, P=0.89), although it was correlated with the end-race oxygen deficit (r=-0.70, P=0.05). In conclusion, this study shows that in middle-distance races over both 800 m and 1,500 m, the speed variations during the first 70% of the race time serve to maintain constant the time to exhaustion at the instantaneous anaerobic power. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that at any instant running speed is controlled by the ANS remaining. PMID:19478190

  16. Diversity of cultivated and metabolically active aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanthon, C.; Boeuf, D.; Dahan, O.; Le Gall, F.; Garczarek, L.; Bendif, E. M.; Lehours, A.-C.

    2011-07-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria play significant roles in the bacterioplankton productivity and biogeochemical cycles of the surface ocean. In this study, we applied both cultivation and mRNA-based molecular methods to explore the diversity of AAP bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea in early summer 2008. Colony-forming units obtained on three different agar media were screened for the production of bacteriochlorophyll-a (BChl-a), the light-harvesting pigment of AAP bacteria. BChl-a-containing colonies represented a low part of the cultivable fraction. In total, 54 AAP strains were isolated and the phylogenetic analyses based on their 16S rRNA and pufM genes showed that they were all affiliated to the Alphaproteobacteria. The most frequently isolated strains belonged to Citromicrobium bathyomarinum, and Erythrobacter and Roseovarius species. Most other isolates were related to species not reported to produce BChl-a and/or may represent novel taxa. Direct extraction of RNA from seawater samples enabled the analysis of the expression of pufM, the gene coding for the M subunit of the reaction centre complex of aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis. Clone libraries of pufM gene transcripts revealed that most phylotypes were highly similar to sequences previously recovered from the Mediterranean Sea and a large majority (~94 %) was affiliated to the Gammaproteobacteria. The most abundantly detected phylotypes occurred in the western and eastern Mediterranean basins. However, some were exclusively detected in the eastern basin, reflecting the highest diversity of pufM transcripts observed in this ultra-oligotrophic region. To our knowledge, this is the first study to document extensively the diversity of AAP isolates and to unveil the active AAP community in an oligotrophic marine environment. By pointing out the discrepancies between culture-based and molecular methods, this study highlights the existing gaps in the understanding

  17. Diversity of cultivated and metabolically active aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanthon, C.; Boeuf, D.; Dahan, O.; Le Gall, F.; Garczarek, L.; Bendif, E. M.; Lehours, A.-C.

    2011-05-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria play significant roles in the bacterioplankton productivity and biogeochemical cycles of the surface ocean. In this study, we applied both cultivation and mRNA-based molecular methods to explore the diversity of AAP bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea in early summer 2008. Colony-forming units obtained on three different agar media were screened for the production of bacteriochlorophyll-a (BChl-a), the light-harvesting pigment of AAP bacteria. BChl-a-containing colonies represented a low part of the cultivable fraction. In total, 52 AAP strains were isolated and the phylogenetic analyses based on their 16S rRNA and pufM genes showed that they were all affiliated to the Alphaproteobacteria. The most frequently isolated strains belonged to Citromicrobium bathyomarinum, and Erythrobacter and Roseovarius species. Most other isolates were related to species not reported to produce BChl-a and/or may represent novel taxa. Direct extraction of RNA from seawater samples enabled the analysis of the expression of pufM, the gene coding for the M subunit of the reaction centre complex of aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis. Clone libraries of pufM gene transcripts revealed that most phylotypes were highly similar to sequences previously recovered from the Mediterranean Sea and a large majority (~94%) was affiliated with the Gammaproteobacteria. The most abundantly detected phylotypes occurred in the western and eastern Mediterranean basins. However, some were exclusively detected in the eastern basin, reflecting the highest diversity of pufM transcripts observed in this ultra-oligotrophic region. To our knowledge, this is the first study to document extensively the diversity of AAP isolates and to unveil the active AAP community in an oligotrophic marine environment. By pointing out the discrepancies between culture-based and molecular methods, this study highlights the existing gaps in the understanding

  18. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes in the body that convert or use energy, ... Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Metabolism. In: Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Principles of Anatomy and Physiology . 14th ed. Hoboken, NJ: John H Wiley and Sons; 2013: ...

  19. Energy metabolism in the acquisition and maintenance of stemness.

    PubMed

    Folmes, Clifford D L; Terzic, Andre

    2016-04-01

    Energy metabolism is traditionally considered a reactive homeostatic system addressing stage-specific cellular energy needs. There is however growing appreciation of metabolic pathways in the active control of vital cell functions. Case in point, the stem cell lifecycle--from maintenance and acquisition of stemness to lineage commitment and specification--is increasingly recognized as a metabolism-dependent process. Indeed, metabolic reprogramming is an early contributor to the orchestrated departure from or reacquisition of stemness. Recent advances in metabolomics have helped decipher the identity and dynamics of metabolic fluxes implicated in fueling cell fate choices by regulating the epigenetic and transcriptional identity of a cell. Metabolic cues, internal and/or external to the stem cell niche, facilitate progenitor pool restitution, long-term tissue renewal or ensure adoption of cytoprotective behavior. Convergence of energy metabolism with stem cell fate regulation opens a new avenue in understanding primordial developmental biology principles with future applications in regenerative medicine practice. PMID:26868758

  20. Calcineurin Links Mitochondrial Elongation with Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pfluger, Paul T; Kabra, Dhiraj G; Aichler, Michaela; Schriever, Sonja C; Pfuhlmann, Katrin; García, Verónica Casquero; Lehti, Maarit; Weber, Jon; Kutschke, Maria; Rozman, Jan; Elrod, John W; Hevener, Andrea L; Feuchtinger, Annette; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Walch, Axel; Rollmann, Stephanie M; Aronow, Bruce J; Müller, Timo D; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Jastroch, Martin; De Luca, Maria; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2015-11-01

    Canonical protein phosphatase 3/calcineurin signaling is central to numerous physiological processes. Here we provide evidence that calcineurin plays a pivotal role in controlling systemic energy and body weight homeostasis. Knockdown of calcineurin in Drosophila melanogaster led to a decrease in body weight and energy stores, and increased energy expenditure. In mice, global deficiency of catalytic subunit Ppp3cb, and tissue-specific ablation of regulatory subunit Ppp3r1 from skeletal muscle, but not adipose tissue or liver, led to protection from high-fat-diet-induced obesity and comorbid sequelæ. Ser637 hyperphosphorylation of dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) in skeletal muscle of calcineurin-deficient mice was associated with mitochondrial elongation into power-cable-shaped filaments and increased mitochondrial respiration, but also with attenuated exercise performance. Our data suggest that calcineurin acts as highly conserved pivot for the adaptive metabolic responses to environmental changes such as high-fat, high-sugar diets or exercise. PMID:26411342

  1. Role of carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP) in generating an aerobic metabolic phenotype and in breast cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Airley, R E; McHugh, P; Evans, A R; Harris, B; Winchester, L; Buffa, F M; Al-Tameemi, W; Leek, R; Harris, A L

    2014-01-01

    Background: The lipogenic transcription factor carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP) may play a key role in malignant progression of breast cancer by allowing metabolic adaptations to take place in response to changes in oxygenation. Methods: Immunohistochemical analysis of ChREBP was carried out in human breast tumour tissue microarrays representative of malignant progression from normal breast through to metastatic cancer. The ChREBP protein and mRNA expressions were then analysed in a series of breast cancers for correlative analysis with common and breast-specific hypoxia signatures, and survival. Results: In invasive ductal carcinoma, ChREBP correlated significantly with mean ‘downregulated' hypoxia scores (r=0.3, P<0.015, n=67) and in two distinct breast progression arrays, ChREBP protein also increased with malignant progression (P<0.001). However, bioinformatic analysis of a large data set (2136 cases) revealed an apparent reversal in the relationship between ChREBP mRNA level and clinical outcome – not only being significantly correlated with increased survival (log rank P<0.001), but also downregulated in malignant tissue compared with adjacent normal tissue. Conclusion: The ChREBP expression may be reflective of an aerobic metabolic phenotype that may conflict with hypoxia-induced signalling but provide a mechanism for growth at the oxygenated edge of the tumours. PMID:24366300

  2. Physiological and functional diversity of phenol degraders isolated from phenol-grown aerobic granules: Phenol degradation kinetics and trichloroethylene co-metabolic activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Tay, Joo Hwa

    2016-03-15

    Aerobic granule is a novel form of microbial aggregate capable of degrading toxic and recalcitrant substances. Aerobic granules have been formed on phenol as the growth substrate, and used to co-metabolically degrade trichloroethylene (TCE), a synthetic solvent not supporting aerobic microbial growth. Granule formation process, rate limiting factors and the comprehensive toxic effects of phenol and TCE had been systematically studied. To further explore their potential at the level of microbial population and functions, phenol degraders were isolated and purified from mature granules in this study. Phenol and TCE degradation kinetics of 15 strains were determined, together with their TCE transformation capacities and other physiological characteristics. Isolation in the presence of phenol and TCE exerted stress on microbial populations, but the procedure was able to preserve their diversity. Wide variation was found with the isolates' kinetic behaviors, with the parameters often spanning 3 orders of magnitude. Haldane kinetics described phenol degradation well, and the isolates exhibited actual maximum phenol-dependent oxygen utilization rates of 9-449 mg DO g DW(-1) h(-1), in phenol concentration range of 4.8-406 mg L(-1). Both Michaelis-Menten and Haldane types were observed for TCE transformation, with the actual maximum rate of 1.04-21.1 mg TCE g DW(-1) h(-1) occurring between TCE concentrations of 0.42-4.90 mg L(-1). The TCE transformation capacities and growth yields on phenol ranged from 20-115 mg TCE g DW(-1) and 0.46-1.22 g DW g phenol(-1), respectively, resulting in TCE transformation yields of 10-70 mg TCE g phenol(-1). Contact angles of the isolates were between 34° and 82°, suggesting both hydrophobic and hydrophilic cell surface. The diversity in the isolates is a great advantage, as it enables granules to be versatile and adaptive under different operational conditions. PMID:26720328

  3. Respiration, respiratory metabolism and energy consumption under weightless conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasyan, I. I.; Makarov, G. F.

    1975-01-01

    Changes in the physiological indices of respiration, respiratory metabolism and energy consumption in spacecrews under weightlessness conditions manifest themselves in increased metabolic rates, higher pulmonary ventilation volume, oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide elimination, energy consumption levels in proportion to reduction in neuroemotional and psychic stress, adaptation to weightlessness and work-rest cycles, and finally in a relative stabilization of metabolic processes due to hemodynamic shifts.

  4. Metabolic energy requirements for space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.

    1992-01-01

    The international space community, including the USSR, Japan, Germany, the European Space Agency, and the US, is preparing for extended stays in space. Much of the research planned for space will be tended by humans, thus, maintaining adequate nutritional status during long stays in space has lately become an issue of much interest. Historically, it appears that minimum nutritional requirements are being met during stays in space. Thus far, crewmembers have been able to consume food adequate for maintaining nominal performance in microgravity. The physiological data obtained from ground-based and flight research that may enable us to understand the biochemical alterations that effect energy utilization and performance. Focus is on energy utilization during the Apollo lunar missions, Skylab's extended space lab missions, and Space Shuttle flights. Available data includes those recorded during intra- and extravehicular activities as well as during microgravity simulation (bed rest). Data on metabolism during flight and during bed rest are discussed, with a follow-up on human gastrointestinal function.

  5. Energy Metabolism of Human Neutrophils during Phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Borregaard, Niels; Herlin, Troels

    1982-01-01

    Detailed quantitative studies were performed on the generation and utilization of energy by resting and phagocytosing human neutrophils. The ATP content was 1.9 fmol/cell, was constant during rest, and was not influenced by the presence or absence of glucose in the medium. The intracellular content of phosphocreatine was less than 0.2 fmol/cell. In the presence of glucose, ATP was generated almost exclusively from lactate produced from glucose taken up from the surrounding medium. The amount of lactate produced could account for 85% of the glucose taken up by the cells, and the intracellular glycosyl store, glycogen, was not drawn upon. The rate of ATP generation as calculated from the rate of lactate production was 1.3 fmol/cell/min. During phagocytosis, there was no measurable increase in glucose consumption or lactate production, and the ATP content fell rapidly to 0.8 fmol/cell. This disappearance of ATP was apparently irreversible since no corresponding increase in ADP or AMP was observed. It therefore appears that this phagocytosis-induced fall in ATP concentration represents all the extra energy utilized in human neutrophils in the presence of glucose. In the absence of glucose, the rate of ATP generation in the resting cell was considerably smaller, 0.75 fmol/cell per min, as calculated from the rate of glycolysis, which is sustained exclusively by glycogenolysis. Under this condition, however, phagocytosis induces significant enhancement of glycogenolysis and the rate of lactate production is increased by 60%, raising the rate of ATP generation to 1.2 fmol/cell per min. Nonetheless, the ATP content drops significantly from 1.9 to 1.0 fmol/cell. Neutrophils from patients with chronic granulomatous disease have the same rate of glycolysis and the same ATP content as normal cells, thus confirming that the defective respiration of these cells does not affect their energy metabolism. PMID:7107894

  6. Performance evaluation of an anaerobic/aerobic landfill-based digester using yard waste for energy and compost production

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdani, Ramin; Barlaz, Morton A.; Augenstein, Don; Kayhanian, Masoud; Tchobanoglous, George

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biochemical methane potential decreased by 83% during the two-stage operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Net energy produced was 84.3 MWh or 46 kWh per million metric tons (Mg). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average removal efficiency of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was 96-99%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average removal efficiency of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) was 68-99%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two-stage batch digester proved to be simple to operate and cost-effective. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to evaluate a new alternative for yard waste management by constructing, operating and monitoring a landfill-based two-stage batch digester (anaerobic/aerobic) with the recovery of energy and compost. The system was initially operated under anaerobic conditions for 366 days, after which the yard waste was aerated for an additional 191 days. Off gas generated from the aerobic stage was treated by biofilters. Net energy recovery was 84.3 MWh, or 46 kWh per million metric tons of wet waste (as received), and the biochemical methane potential of the treated waste decreased by 83% during the two-stage operation. The average removal efficiencies of volatile organic compounds and non-methane organic compounds in the biofilters were 96-99% and 68-99%, respectively.

  7. Effects of environmental hypoxia on cardiac energy metabolism and performance in tilapia.

    PubMed

    Speers-Roesch, Ben; Sandblom, Erik; Lau, Gigi Y; Farrell, Anthony P; Richards, Jeffrey G

    2010-01-01

    The ability of an animal to depress ATP turnover while maintaining metabolic energy balance is important for survival during hypoxia. In the present study, we investigated the responses of cardiac energy metabolism and performance in the hypoxia-tolerant tilapia (Oreochromis hybrid sp.) during exposure to environmental hypoxia. Exposure to graded hypoxia (> or =92% to 2.5% air saturation over 3.6 +/- 0.2 h) followed by exposure to 5% air saturation for 8 h caused a depression of whole animal oxygen consumption rate that was accompanied by parallel decreases in heart rate, cardiac output, and cardiac power output (CPO, analogous to ATP demand of the heart). These cardiac parameters remained depressed by 50-60% compared with normoxic values throughout the 8-h exposure. During a 24-h exposure to 5% air saturation, cardiac ATP concentration was unchanged compared with normoxia and anaerobic glycolysis contributed to ATP supply as evidenced by considerable accumulation of lactate in the heart and plasma. Reductions in the provision of aerobic substrates were apparent from a large and rapid (in <1 h) decrease in plasma nonesterified fatty acids concentration and a modest decrease in activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase. Depression of cardiac ATP demand via bradycardia and an associated decrease in CPO appears to be an integral component of hypoxia-induced metabolic rate depression in tilapia and likely contributes to hypoxic survival. PMID:19864337

  8. Reprogramming of energy metabolism as a driver of aging

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhaoyang; Berger, Nathan A.; Trubitsyn, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Aging is characterized by progressive loss of cellular function and integrity. It has been thought to be driven by stochastic molecular damage. However, genetic and environmental maneuvers enhancing mitochondrial function or inhibiting glycolysis extend lifespan and promote healthy aging in many species. In post-fertile Caenorhabditis elegans, a progressive decline in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase with age, and a reciprocal increase in pyruvate kinase shunt energy metabolism from oxidative metabolism to anaerobic glycolysis. This reduces the efficiency and total of energy generation. As a result, energy-dependent physical activity and other cellular functions decrease due to unmatched energy demand and supply. In return, decrease in physical activity accelerates this metabolic shift, forming a vicious cycle. This metabolic event is a determinant of aging, and is retarded by caloric restriction to counteract aging. In this review, we summarize these and other evidence supporting the idea that metabolic reprogramming is a driver of aging. We also suggest strategies to test this hypothesis PMID:26919253

  9. Reprogramming of energy metabolism as a driver of aging.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhaoyang; Hanson, Richard W; Berger, Nathan A; Trubitsyn, Alexander

    2016-03-29

    Aging is characterized by progressive loss of cellular function and integrity. It has been thought to be driven by stochastic molecular damage. However, genetic and environmental maneuvers enhancing mitochondrial function or inhibiting glycolysis extend lifespan and promote healthy aging in many species. In post-fertile Caenorhabditis elegans, a progressive decline in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase with age, and a reciprocal increase in pyruvate kinase shunt energy metabolism from oxidative metabolism to anaerobic glycolysis. This reduces the efficiency and total of energy generation. As a result, energy-dependent physical activity and other cellular functions decrease due to unmatched energy demand and supply. In return, decrease in physical activity accelerates this metabolic shift, forming a vicious cycle. This metabolic event is a determinant of aging, and is retarded by caloric restriction to counteract aging. In this review, we summarize these and other evidence supporting the idea that metabolic reprogramming is a driver of aging. We also suggest strategies to test this hypothesis. PMID:26919253

  10. Analysis of metabolic energy utilization in the Skylab astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, J. I.

    1977-01-01

    Skylab biomedical data regarding man's metabolic processes for extended periods of weightlessness is presented. The data was used in an integrated metabolic balance analysis which included analysis of Skylab water balance, electrolyte balance, evaporative water loss, and body composition. A theoretical analysis of energy utilization in man is presented. The results of the analysis are presented in tabular and graphic format.

  11. Energy metabolism of the developing brain

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, R.M.; Hutchison, A.A.

    1985-04-01

    Cerebral metabolism in utero and in the neonatal period remains incompletely understood. A major investigative technique uses /sup 14/C deoxyglucose. Species differences, behavioral states and gestational age all have an impact. Hormonal and sensory stimuli have potential influences. The use of this new investigative technique in the human will allow detailed study of the effects of a variety of pathophysiologic events and possibly of drug therapy on cerebral glucose metabolism.

  12. Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yurkov, Vladimir V.; Beatty, J. Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are a relatively recently discovered bacterial group. Although taxonomically and phylogenetically heterogeneous, these bacteria share the following distinguishing features: the presence of bacteriochlorophyll a incorporated into reaction center and light-harvesting complexes, low levels of the photosynthetic unit in cells, an abundance of carotenoids, a strong inhibition by light of bacteriochlorophyll synthesis, and the inability to grow photosynthetically under anaerobic conditions. Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are classified in two marine (Erythrobacter and Roseobacter) and six freshwater (Acidiphilium, Erythromicrobium, Erythromonas, Porphyrobacter, Roseococcus, and Sandaracinobacter) genera, which phylogenetically belong to the α-1, α-3, and α-4 subclasses of the class Proteobacteria. Despite this phylogenetic information, the evolution and ancestry of their photosynthetic properties are unclear. We discuss several current proposals for the evolutionary origin of aerobic phototrophic bacteria. The closest phylogenetic relatives of aerobic phototrophic bacteria include facultatively anaerobic purple nonsulfur phototrophic bacteria. Since these two bacterial groups share many properties, yet have significant differences, we compare and contrast their physiology, with an emphasis on morphology and photosynthetic and other metabolic processes. PMID:9729607

  13. Enhancing of Women Functional Status with Metabolic Syndrome by Cardioprotective and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Combined Aerobic and Resistance Training

    PubMed Central

    Alsamir Tibana, Ramires; da Cunha Nascimento, Dahan; Frade de Sousa, Nuno Manuel; de Souza, Vinicius Carolino; Durigan, João; Vieira, Amilton; Bottaro, Martim; de Toledo Nóbrega, Otávio; de Almeida, Jeeser Alves; Navalta, James Wilfred; Franco, Octavio Luiz; Prestes, Jonato

    2014-01-01

    These data describe the effects of combined aerobic plus resistance training (CT) with regards to risk factors of metabolic syndrome (MetS), quality of life, functional capacity, and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in women with MetS. In this context, thirteen women (35.4±6.2 yr) completed 10 weeks of CT consisting of three weekly sessions of ∼60 min aerobic training (treadmill at 65–70% of reserve heart rate, 30 min) and resistance training (3 sets of 8–12 repetitions maximum for main muscle groups). Dependent variables were maximum chest press strength; isometric hand-grip strength; 30 s chair stand test; six minute walk test; body mass; body mass index; body adiposity index; waist circumference; systolic (SBP), diastolic and mean blood pressure (MBP); blood glucose; HDL-C; triglycerides; interleukins (IL) 6, 10 and 12, osteoprotegerin (OPG) and serum nitric oxide metabolite (NOx); quality of life (SF-36) and Z-Score of MetS. There was an improvement in muscle strength on chest press (p = 0.009), isometric hand-grip strength (p = 0.03) and 30 s chair stand (p = 0.007). There was a decrease in SBP (p = 0.049), MBP (p = 0.041), Z-Score of MetS (p = 0.046), OPG (0.42±0.26 to 0.38±0.19 ng/mL, p<0.05) and NOx (13.3±2.3 µmol/L to 9.1±2.3 µmol/L; p<0.0005). IL-10 displayed an increase (13.6±7.5 to 17.2±12.3 pg/mL, p<0.05) after 10 weeks of training. Combined training also increased the perception of physical capacity (p = 0.011). This study endorses CT as an efficient tool to improve blood pressure, functional capacity, quality of life and reduce blood markers of inflammation, which has a clinical relevance in the prevention and treatment of MetS. Trial Registration Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry (ReBec) - RBR-6gdyvz - http://www.ensaiosclinicos.gov.br/rg/?q=RBR-6gdyvz PMID:25379699

  14. Hippocampal structure, metabolism, and inflammatory response after a 6-week intense aerobic exercise in healthy young adults: a controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Gerd; Herbsleb, Marco; de la Cruz, Feliberto; Schumann, Andy; Brünner, Franziska; Schachtzabel, Claudia; Gussew, Alexander; Puta, Christian; Smesny, Stefan; Gabriel, Holger W; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Bär, Karl-Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Interventional studies suggest that changes in physical fitness affect brain function and structure. We studied the influence of high intensity physical exercise on hippocampal volume and metabolism in 17 young healthy male adults during a 6-week exercise program compared with matched controls. We further aimed to relate these changes to hypothesized changes in exercised-induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). We show profound improvement of physical fitness in most subjects and a positive correlation between the degree of fitness improvement and increased BDNF levels. We unexpectedly observed an average volume decrease of about 2%, which was restricted to right hippocampal subfields CA2/3, subiculum, and dentate gyrus and which correlated with fitness improvement and increased BDNF levels negatively. This result indicates that mainly those subjects who did not benefit from the exercise program show decreased hippocampal volume, reduced BDNF levels, and increased TNF-α concentrations. While spectroscopy results do not indicate any neuronal loss (unchanged N-acetylaspartate levels) decreased glutamate-glutamine levels were observed in the right anterior hippocampus in the exercise group only. Responder characteristics need to be studied in more detail. Our results point to an important role of the inflammatory response after exercise on changes in hippocampal structure. PMID:26082010

  15. Modelling chronotaxicity of cellular energy metabolism to facilitate the identification of altered metabolic states

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Gemma; Suprunenko, Yevhen F.; Jenkins, Kirsten; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2016-01-01

    Altered cellular energy metabolism is a hallmark of many diseases, one notable example being cancer. Here, we focus on the identification of the transition from healthy to abnormal metabolic states. To do this, we study the dynamics of energy production in a cell. Due to the thermodynamic openness of a living cell, the inability to instantaneously match fluctuating supply and demand in energy metabolism results in nonautonomous time-varying oscillatory dynamics. However, such oscillatory dynamics is often neglected and treated as stochastic. Based on experimental evidence of metabolic oscillations, we show that changes in metabolic state can be described robustly by alterations in the chronotaxicity of the corresponding metabolic oscillations, i.e. the ability of an oscillator to resist external perturbations. We also present a method for the identification of chronotaxicity, applicable to general oscillatory signals and, importantly, apply this to real experimental data. Evidence of chronotaxicity was found in glycolytic oscillations in real yeast cells, verifying that chronotaxicity could be used to study transitions between metabolic states. PMID:27483987

  16. Modelling chronotaxicity of cellular energy metabolism to facilitate the identification of altered metabolic states.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Gemma; Suprunenko, Yevhen F; Jenkins, Kirsten; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2016-01-01

    Altered cellular energy metabolism is a hallmark of many diseases, one notable example being cancer. Here, we focus on the identification of the transition from healthy to abnormal metabolic states. To do this, we study the dynamics of energy production in a cell. Due to the thermodynamic openness of a living cell, the inability to instantaneously match fluctuating supply and demand in energy metabolism results in nonautonomous time-varying oscillatory dynamics. However, such oscillatory dynamics is often neglected and treated as stochastic. Based on experimental evidence of metabolic oscillations, we show that changes in metabolic state can be described robustly by alterations in the chronotaxicity of the corresponding metabolic oscillations, i.e. the ability of an oscillator to resist external perturbations. We also present a method for the identification of chronotaxicity, applicable to general oscillatory signals and, importantly, apply this to real experimental data. Evidence of chronotaxicity was found in glycolytic oscillations in real yeast cells, verifying that chronotaxicity could be used to study transitions between metabolic states. PMID:27483987

  17. Perturbed Energy Metabolism and Neuronal Circuit Dysfunction in Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Mattson, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Epidemiological, neuropathological and functional neuroimaging evidence implicates global and regional derangements in brain metabolism and energetics in the pathogenesis of cognitive impairment. Nerve cell microcircuits are modified adaptively by excitatory and inhibitory synaptic activity and neurotrophic factors. Aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) cause perturbations in cellular energy metabolism, level of excitation/inhibition and neurotrophic factor release that overwhelm compensatory mechanisms and result in neuronal microcircuit and brain network dysfunction. A prolonged positive energy balance impairs the ability of neurons to respond adaptively to oxidative and metabolic stress. Experimental studies in animals demonstrate how derangements related to chronic positive energy balance, such as diabetes, set the stage for accelerated cognitive aging and AD. Therapeutic interventions to allay cognitive dysfunction that target energy metabolism and adaptive stress responses (such as neurotrophin signaling) have shown efficacy in animal models and preliminary studies in humans. PMID:21147038

  18. Micromanaging metabolism-a role for miRNAs in teleost energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mennigen, Jan A

    2016-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-protein coding RNA sequences, which are found in most eukaryotes. Since their initial discovery, miRNAs have emerged as important regulators of many biological processes. One of the most important processes profoundly regulated by miRNAs is energy metabolism. Traditionally, metabolic functions of miRNAs have been studied in genome-sequenced mammalian organisms, especially the mouse model. However, partially driven by commercial interest in aquaculture, increasingly feasible large-scale molecular techniques have resulted in the characterization of miRNA repertoires, and importantly, several genome sequences of several (commercially important) teleost species, which also hold important roles as research models in the comparative physiology of energy metabolism. This review aims to introduce the recent advances in miRNA research in teleost fish and to describe the current knowledge of miRNA function in teleost energy metabolism. The most pressing research needs and questions to determine metabolic roles of miRNAs in teleost models are presented, as well as applicable technical approaches and current bottlenecks. Rainbow trout, which possess the advantages of newly available molecular tools and a long history as comparative research model in teleost energy metabolism, are discussed as a promising research model to address these questions. PMID:26384523

  19. Sex differences in substrate metabolism and energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Cortright, R N; Koves, T R

    2000-08-01

    Females differ remarkably from males in the mechanisms that regulate substrate utilization and energy homeostasis. Females appear to be less affected in terms of growth and loss of body tissues when subjected to chronic periods of negative energy balance. The physiological trade-off appears to be a stronger propensity toward retention of fat mass during times of energy surfeit. The mechanism(s) that account for sex differences in energy metabolism are not known but most likely involve the sex steroids. Recent discoveries in the areas of endocrinology and metabolism may provide new insights into differences in the control of food intake and energy conservation between the sexes. Finally, the study of the mechanism(s) involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle lipid metabolism represents a new frontier in skeletal muscle bioenergetics, and new discoveries may provide further explanations for the observed sex differences in substrate utilization and response(s) to alterations in energy homeostasis. PMID:10953067

  20. Reconstruction of a charge balanced genome-scale metabolic model to study the energy-uncoupled growth of Zymomonas mobilis ZM1.

    PubMed

    Motamedian, E; Saeidi, M; Shojaosadati, S A

    2016-04-01

    Zymomonas mobilis is an ethanologenic bacterium and is known to be an example microorganism with energy-uncoupled growth. A genome-scale metabolic model could be applicable for understanding the characteristics of Z. mobilis with rapid catabolism and inefficient energy conversion. In this study, a charge balanced genome-scale metabolic model (iEM439) of Z. mobilis ATCC 10988 (ZM1) including 439 genes, 692 metabolic reactions and 658 metabolites was reconstructed based on genome annotation and previously published information. The model presents a much better prediction for biomass and ethanol concentrations in a batch culture by using dynamic flux balance analysis compared with the two previous genome-scale metabolic models. Furthermore, intracellular flux distribution obtained from the model was consistent with the fluxes for glucose fermentation determined by (13)C NMR. The model predicts that there is no difference in growth rates of Z. mobilis under aerobic and anaerobic conditions whereas ethanol production is decreased and production of other metabolites including acetate and acetoin is increased under aerobic conditions. Experimental data confirm the predicted differences between the aerobic and anaerobic growth of Z. mobilis. Finally, the model was used to study the energy-uncoupled growth of Z. mobilis and to predict its effect on flux distribution in the central metabolism. Flux distribution obtained from the model indicates that coupling growth and energy reduces ethanol secretion and changes the flux distribution to produce more biomass. This coupling is also associated with a significant increase in the proton uptake rate based on the prediction of the charge balanced model. Hence, resistance to intracellular pH reduction could be the main reason for uncoupled growth and Z. mobilis uses ATPase to pump out the proton. Experimental observations are in accordance with the predicted relationship between growth, ATP dissipation and proton exchange. PMID

  1. Acute Effects of Aerobic Exercise on Feelings of Energy in Relation to Age and Sex.

    PubMed

    Legrand, Fabien D; Bertucci, William M; Hudson, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    A crossover experiment was performed to determine whether age and sex, or their interaction, affect the impact of acute aerobic exercise on vigor-activity (VA). We also tested whether changes in VA mediated exercise effects on performance on various cognitive tasks. Sixty-eight physically inactive volunteers participated in exercise and TV-watching control conditions. They completed the VA subscale of the Profile of Mood States immediately before and 2 min after the intervention in each condition. They also performed the Trail Making Test 3 min after the intervention in each condition. Statistical analyses produced a condition . age . sex interaction characterized by a higher mean VA gain value in the exercise condition (compared with the VA gain value in the TV-watching condition) for young female participants only. In addition, the mediational analyses revealed that changes in VA fully mediated the effects of exercise on TMT-Part A performance. PMID:25880874

  2. Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy after Aerobic Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Adam R.; Harber, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Current dogma suggests aerobic exercise training has minimal effect on skeletal muscle size. We and others have demonstrated that aerobic exercise acutely and chronically alters protein metabolism and induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy. These findings promote an antithesis to the status quo by providing novel perspective on skeletal muscle mass regulation and insight into exercise-countermeasures for populations prone to muscle loss. PMID:24508740

  3. Energy metabolism and energy-sensing pathways in mammalian embryonic and adult stem cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Rafalski, Victoria A.; Mancini, Elena; Brunet, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Summary Metabolism is influenced by age, food intake, and conditions such as diabetes and obesity. How do physiological or pathological metabolic changes influence stem cells, which are crucial for tissue homeostasis? This Commentary reviews recent evidence that stem cells have different metabolic demands than differentiated cells, and that the molecular mechanisms that control stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are functionally connected to the metabolic state of the cell and the surrounding stem cell niche. Furthermore, we present how energy-sensing signaling molecules and metabolism regulators are implicated in the regulation of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. Finally, we discuss the emerging literature on the metabolism of induced pluripotent stem cells and how manipulating metabolic pathways might aid cellular reprogramming. Determining how energy metabolism regulates stem cell fate should shed light on the decline in tissue regeneration that occurs during aging and facilitate the development of therapies for degenerative or metabolic diseases. PMID:23420198

  4. Inborn Errors of Energy Metabolism Associated with Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anibh M.; Steuerwald, Ulrike; Illsinger, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Inherited neuromuscular disorders affect approximately one in 3,500 children. Structural muscular defects are most common; however functional impairment of skeletal and cardiac muscle in both children and adults may be caused by inborn errors of energy metabolism as well. Patients suffering from metabolic myopathies due to compromised energy metabolism may present with exercise intolerance, muscle pain, reversible or progressive muscle weakness, and myoglobinuria. In this review, the physiology of energy metabolism in muscle is described, followed by the presentation of distinct disorders affecting skeletal and cardiac muscle: glycogen storage diseases types III, V, VII, fatty acid oxidation defects, and respiratory chain defects (i.e., mitochondriopathies). The diagnostic work-up and therapeutic options in these disorders are discussed. PMID:20589068

  5. [Consequences of intravesical obstruction on detrusor muscle energy metabolism].

    PubMed

    Dahmani, Laurent; Bruyère, Franck; Ouaki, Frédéric; Pires, Christophe; Irani, Jacques; Doré, Bertrand

    2002-09-01

    Alteration of the emptying function of the bladder observed during the natural history of benign prostatic hyperplasia may be related to a biochemical disorder, more specifically a disorder of energy metabolism. Under conditions of obstruction, the bladder is no longer able to contract effectively as it is unable to produce a sufficient quantity of energy. This energy dysfunction is induced by anaerobic diversion of glucose metabolism. The key element of this disturbance is the mitochondrion. Morphological studies have demonstrated degeneration of this organelle controlling energy metabolism. This intracellular alteration is also reflected by functional changes. Disturbances of the various mitochondrial energy producing cycles appear to be responsible for detrusor dysfunction. Further investigations are necessary, especially clinical studies to corroborate these experimental findings. A better knowledge of the pathophysiology of vesical functional consequences of BPH would allow the use of new therapeutic categories of drugs. PMID:12463112

  6. Energy Metabolism Disorder as a Contributing Factor of Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Comparative Proteomic and Metabolomic Study

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guifeng; Zou, Hai; Wang, Jian Min; Lin, Yao Yao; Chuka, Chifundo Martha; Ge, Ren Shan; Zhai, Weitao; Wang, Jian Guang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the different metabolites were screened in synovial fluid by metabolomics. Methods Synovial fluid from 25 RA patients and 10 normal subjects were analyzed by GC/TOF MS analysis so as to give a broad overview of synovial fluid metabolites. The metabolic profiles of RA patients and normal subjects were compared using multivariate statistical analysis. Different proteins were verified by qPCR and western blot. Different metabolites were verified by colorimetric assay kit in 25 inactive RA patients, 25 active RA patients and 20 normal subjects. The influence of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α pathway on catabolism was detected by HIF-1α knockdown. Results A subset of 58 metabolites was identified, in which the concentrations of 7 metabolites related to energy metabolism were significantly different as shown by importance in the projection (VIP) (VIP≥1) and Student’s t-test (p<0.05). In the 7 metabolites, the concentration of glucose was decreased, and the concentration of lactic acid was increased in the synovial fluid of RA patients than normal subjects verified by colorimetric assay Kit. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis shows that the concentration of glucose and lactic acid in synovial fluid could be used as dependable biomarkers for the diagnosis of active RA, provided an AUC of 0.906 and 0.922. Sensitivity and specificity, which were determined by cut-off points, reached 84% and 96% in sensitivity and 95% and 85% in specificity, respectively. The verification of different proteins identified in our previous proteomic study shows that the enzymes of anaerobic catabolism were up-regulated (PFKP and LDHA), and the enzymes of aerobic oxidation and fatty acid oxidation were down-regulated (CS, DLST, PGD, ACSL4, ACADVL and HADHA) in RA patients. The expression of HIF-1α and the enzymes of aerobic oxidation and fatty acid oxidation were decreased and the enzymes of anaerobic

  7. Aerobic Capacity, Activity Levels and Daily Energy Expenditure in Male and Female Adolescents of the Kenyan Nandi Sub-Group

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Alexander R.; Ojiambo, Robert; Konstabel, Kenn; Lieberman, Daniel E.; Reilly, John J.; Speakman, John R.; Pitsiladis, Yannis P.

    2013-01-01

    The relative importance of genetic and socio-cultural influences contributing to the success of east Africans in endurance athletics remains unknown in part because the pre-training phenotype of this population remains incompletely assessed. Here cardiopulmonary fitness, physical activity levels, distance travelled to school and daily energy expenditure in 15 habitually active male (13.9±1.6 years) and 15 habitually active female (13.9±1.2) adolescents from a rural Nandi primary school are assessed. Aerobic capacity () was evaluated during two maximal discontinuous incremental exercise tests; physical activity using accelerometry combined with a global positioning system; and energy expenditure using the doubly labelled water method. The of the male and female adolescents were 73.9±5.7 ml. kg−1. min−1 and 61.5±6.3 ml. kg−1. min−1, respectively. Total time spent in sedentary, light, moderate and vigorous physical activities per day was 406±63 min (50% of total monitored time), 244±56 min (30%), 75±18 min (9%) and 82±30 min (10%). Average total daily distance travelled to and from school was 7.5±3.0 km (0.8–13.4 km). Mean daily energy expenditure, activity-induced energy expenditure and physical activity level was 12.2±3.4 MJ. day−1, 5.4±3.0 MJ. day−1 and 2.2±0.6. 70.6% of the variation in was explained by sex (partial R2 = 54.7%) and body mass index (partial R2 = 15.9%). Energy expenditure and physical activity variables did not predict variation in once sex had been accounted for. The highly active and energy-demanding lifestyle of rural Kenyan adolescents may account for their exceptional aerobic fitness and collectively prime them for later training and athletic success. PMID:23805234

  8. Metabolic compensation during high energy output in fasting, lactating grey seals (Halichoerus grypus): metabolic ceilings revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Mellish, J A; Iverson, S J; Bowen, W D

    2000-01-01

    Lactation is the most energetically expensive period for female mammals and is associated with some of the highest sustained metabolic rates (SusMR) in vertebrates (reported as total energy throughput). Females typically deal with this energy demand by increasing food intake and the structure of the alimentary tract may act as the central constraint to ceilings on SusMR at about seven times resting or standard metabolic rate (SMR). However, demands of lactation may also be met by using a form of metabolic compensation such as reducing locomotor activities or entering torpor. In some phocid seals, cetaceans and bears, females fast throughout lactation and thus cannot offset the high energetic costs of lactation through increased food intake. We demonstrate that fasting grey seal females sustain, for several weeks, one of the highest total daily energy expenditures (DEE; 7.4 x SMR) reported in mammals, while progressively reducing maintenance metabolic expenditures during lactation through means not explained by reduction in lean body mass or behavioural changes. Simultaneously, the energy-exported in milk is progressively increased, associated with increased lipoprotein lipase activity in the mammary gland, resulting in greater offspring growth. Our results suggest that females use compensatory mechanisms to help meet the extraordinary energetic costs of lactation. Additionally, although the concepts of SusMR and ceilings on total DEE may be somewhat different in fasting lactating species, our data on phocid seals demonstrate that metabolic ceilings on milk energy output, in general, are not constrained by the same kind of peripheral limitations as are other energy-consuming tissues. In phocid seals, the high ceilings on DEE during lactation, coupled with metabolic compensation, are undoubtedly important factors enabling shortened lactation. PMID:10902691

  9. Dissecting Leishmania infantum Energy Metabolism - A Systems Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Abhishek; Jhawar, Jitesh; Sarkar, Ram Rup

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania infantum, causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis in humans, illustrates a complex lifecycle pertaining to two extreme environments, namely, the gut of the sandfly vector and human macrophages. Leishmania is capable of dynamically adapting and tactically switching between these critically hostile situations. The possible metabolic routes ventured by the parasite to achieve this exceptional adaptation to its varying environments are still poorly understood. In this study, we present an extensively reconstructed energy metabolism network of Leishmania infantum as an attempt to identify certain strategic metabolic routes preferred by the parasite to optimize its survival in such dynamic environments. The reconstructed network consists of 142 genes encoding for enzymes performing 237 reactions distributed across five distinct model compartments. We annotated the subcellular locations of different enzymes and their reactions on the basis of strong literature evidence and sequence-based detection of cellular localization signal within a protein sequence. To explore the diverse features of parasite metabolism the metabolic network was implemented and analyzed as a constraint-based model. Using a systems-based approach, we also put forth an extensive set of lethal reaction knockouts; some of which were validated using published data on Leishmania species. Performing a robustness analysis, the model was rigorously validated and tested for the secretion of overflow metabolites specific to Leishmania under varying extracellular oxygen uptake rate. Further, the fate of important non-essential amino acids in L. infantum metabolism was investigated. Stage-specific scenarios of L. infantum energy metabolism were incorporated in the model and key metabolic differences were outlined. Analysis of the model revealed the essentiality of glucose uptake, succinate fermentation, glutamate biosynthesis and an active TCA cycle as driving forces for parasite energy metabolism

  10. Dissecting Leishmania infantum Energy Metabolism - A Systems Perspective.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Abhishek; Jhawar, Jitesh; Sarkar, Ram Rup

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania infantum, causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis in humans, illustrates a complex lifecycle pertaining to two extreme environments, namely, the gut of the sandfly vector and human macrophages. Leishmania is capable of dynamically adapting and tactically switching between these critically hostile situations. The possible metabolic routes ventured by the parasite to achieve this exceptional adaptation to its varying environments are still poorly understood. In this study, we present an extensively reconstructed energy metabolism network of Leishmania infantum as an attempt to identify certain strategic metabolic routes preferred by the parasite to optimize its survival in such dynamic environments. The reconstructed network consists of 142 genes encoding for enzymes performing 237 reactions distributed across five distinct model compartments. We annotated the subcellular locations of different enzymes and their reactions on the basis of strong literature evidence and sequence-based detection of cellular localization signal within a protein sequence. To explore the diverse features of parasite metabolism the metabolic network was implemented and analyzed as a constraint-based model. Using a systems-based approach, we also put forth an extensive set of lethal reaction knockouts; some of which were validated using published data on Leishmania species. Performing a robustness analysis, the model was rigorously validated and tested for the secretion of overflow metabolites specific to Leishmania under varying extracellular oxygen uptake rate. Further, the fate of important non-essential amino acids in L. infantum metabolism was investigated. Stage-specific scenarios of L. infantum energy metabolism were incorporated in the model and key metabolic differences were outlined. Analysis of the model revealed the essentiality of glucose uptake, succinate fermentation, glutamate biosynthesis and an active TCA cycle as driving forces for parasite energy metabolism

  11. Physiology of leptin: energy homeostasis, neuroendocrine function and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeong-Kyu; Ahima, Rexford S.

    2014-01-01

    Leptin is secreted by adipose tissue and regulates energy homeostasis, neuroendocrine function, metabolism, immune function and other systems through its effects on the central nervous system and peripheral tissues. Leptin administration has been shown to restore metabolic and neuroendocrine abnormalities in individuals with leptin-deficient states, including hypothalamic amenorrhea and lipoatrophy. In contrast, obese individuals are resistant to leptin. Recombinant leptin is beneficial in patients with congenital leptin deficiency or generalized lipodystrophy. However, further research on molecular mediators of leptin resistance is needed for the development of targeted leptin sensitizing therapies for obesity and related metabolic diseases. PMID:25199978

  12. TISSUE METABOLOMICS OF HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA: TUMOR ENERGY METABOLISM AND THE ROLE OF TRANSCRIPTOMIC CLASSIFICATION

    PubMed Central

    Beyoğlu, Diren; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Maurhofer, Olivier; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Dufour, Jean-François; Idle, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the commonest causes of death from cancer. A plethora of metabolomic investigations of HCC have yielded molecules in biofluids that are both up- and downregulated but no real consensus has emerged regarding exploitable biomarkers for early detection of HCC. We report here a different approach, a combined transcriptomics and metabolomics study of energy metabolism in HCC. A panel of 31 pairs of HCC tumors and corresponding non-tumor liver tissues from the same patients was investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS) based metabolomics. HCC was characterized by approximately two-fold depletion of glucose, glycerol 3- and 2-phosphate, malate, alanine, myo-inositol, and linoleic acid. Data are consistent with a metabolic remodeling involving a four-fold increase in glycolysis over mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. A second panel of 59 HCC that had been typed by transcriptomics and classified in G1 to G6 subgroups was also subjected to GCMS tissue metabolomics. No differences in glucose, lactate, alanine, glycerol 3-phosphate, malate, myo-inositol or stearic acid tissue concentrations were found, suggesting that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway activated by CTNNB1 mutation in subgroups G5 and G6 did not exhibit specific metabolic remodeling. However, subgroup G1 had markedly reduced tissue concentrations of 1-stearoylglycerol, 1-palmitoylglycerol, and palmitic acid, suggesting that the high serum α-fetoprotein phenotype of G1, associated with the known overexpression of lipid catabolic enzymes, could be detected through metabolomics as increased lipid catabolism. Conclusion Tissue metabolomics yielded precise biochemical information regarding HCC tumor metabolic remodeling from mitochondrial oxidation to aerobic glycolysis and the impact of molecular subtypes on this process. PMID:23463346

  13. Intrinsic aerobic capacity impacts susceptibility to acute high-fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Matthew Morris, E.; Jackman, Matthew R.; Johnson, Ginger C.; Liu, Tzu-Wen; Lopez, Jordan L.; Kearney, Monica L.; Fletcher, Justin A.; Meers, Grace M. E.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Stephen L.; Scott Rector, R.; Ibdah, Jamal A.; MacLean, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic capacity/fitness significantly impacts susceptibility for fatty liver and diabetes, but the mechanisms remain unknown. Herein, we utilized rats selectively bred for high (HCR) and low (LCR) intrinsic aerobic capacity to examine the mechanisms by which aerobic capacity impacts metabolic vulnerability for fatty liver following a 3-day high-fat diet (HFD). Indirect calorimetry assessment of energy metabolism combined with radiolabeled dietary food was employed to examine systemic metabolism in combination with ex vivo measurements of hepatic lipid oxidation. The LCR, but not HCR, displayed increased hepatic lipid accumulation in response to the HFD despite both groups increasing energy intake. However, LCR rats had a greater increase in energy intake and demonstrated greater daily weight gain and percent body fat due to HFD compared with HCR. Additionally, total energy expenditure was higher in the larger LCR. However, controlling for the difference in body weight, the LCR has lower resting energy expenditure compared with HCR. Importantly, respiratory quotient was significantly higher during the HFD in the LCR compared with HCR, suggesting reduced whole body lipid utilization in the LCR. This was confirmed by the observed lower whole body dietary fatty acid oxidation in LCR compared with HCR. Furthermore, LCR liver homogenate and isolated mitochondria showed lower complete fatty acid oxidation compared with HCR. We conclude that rats bred for low intrinsic aerobic capacity show greater susceptibility for dietary-induced hepatic steatosis, which is associated with a lower energy expenditure and reduced whole body and hepatic mitochondrial lipid oxidation. PMID:24961240

  14. Aerobic scope explains individual variation in feeding capacity

    PubMed Central

    Auer, Sonya K.; Salin, Karine; Anderson, Graeme J.; Metcalfe, Neil B.

    2015-01-01

    Links between metabolism and components of fitness such as growth, reproduction and survival can depend on food availability. A high standard metabolic rate (SMR; baseline energy expenditure) or aerobic scope (AS; the difference between an individual's maximum and SMR) is often beneficial when food is abundant or easily accessible but can be less important or even disadvantageous when food levels decline. While the mechanisms underlying these context-dependent associations are not well understood, they suggest that individuals with a higher SMR or AS are better able to take advantage of high food abundance. Here we show that juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta) with a higher AS were able to consume more food per day relative to individuals with a lower AS. These results help explain why a high aerobic capacity can improve performance measures such as growth rate at high but not low levels of food availability. PMID:26556902

  15. Aerobic scope explains individual variation in feeding capacity.

    PubMed

    Auer, Sonya K; Salin, Karine; Anderson, Graeme J; Metcalfe, Neil B

    2015-11-01

    Links between metabolism and components of fitness such as growth, reproduction and survival can depend on food availability. A high standard metabolic rate (SMR; baseline energy expenditure) or aerobic scope (AS; the difference between an individual's maximum and SMR) is often beneficial when food is abundant or easily accessible but can be less important or even disadvantageous when food levels decline. While the mechanisms underlying these context-dependent associations are not well understood, they suggest that individuals with a higher SMR or AS are better able to take advantage of high food abundance. Here we show that juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta) with a higher AS were able to consume more food per day relative to individuals with a lower AS. These results help explain why a high aerobic capacity can improve performance measures such as growth rate at high but not low levels of food availability. PMID:26556902

  16. Energy metabolism of a thermoacidophilic archaebacterium,Sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakagi, Takayoshi; Oshima, Tairo

    1987-09-01

    To elucidate the phylogenic status of the archaebacterium and mechanisms of acidophily, membrane bound ATPase, cytochromes and NADH dehydrogenase of a thermoacidophilic archaebacterium,Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, were studied. Typea cytochrome was found in the membrane. The organism was sensitive to cyanide and azide, and though cytochromec is lacking in this organism, these respiratory poisons inhibited a terminal oxidase, when assayed with cytochromec from other sources. NADH dehydrogenase was highly purified from the crude extract of the cells. The enzyme was able to transfer electrons from NADH to caldariellaquinone, a unique benzothiophenequinone in the genusSulfolobus. Thus, the enzyme is a possible member of the respiratory chain. Membrane fraction contained two types of ATPase, one was active at neutral pH and slightly activated by sulfate; the other was an acid apyrase and inhibited by sulfate. Typical characteristics of F0F1ATPase could not be found in these enzymes. These results suggest that (1) the thermoacidophilic archaebacteria are phylogenically distant from both eubacteria and eukaryotes, (2) the archaebacterial thermoacidophiles can be classified in a different subgroup from methanogens and extreme halophiles, and (3) in spite of the aerobic nature of the organism, the energy yielding mechanisms appear quite unique, when compared to those of other aerobes and mitochondria.

  17. Carotenoid charge transfer states and their role in energy transfer processes in LH1-RC complexes from aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs.

    PubMed

    Šlouf, Václav; Fuciman, Marcel; Dulebo, Alexander; Kaftan, David; Koblížek, Michal; Frank, Harry A; Polívka, Tomáš

    2013-09-26

    Light-harvesting complexes ensure necessary flow of excitation energy into photosynthetic reaction centers. In the present work, transient absorption measurements were performed on LH1-RC complexes isolated from two aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs (AAPs), Roseobacter sp. COL2P containing the carotenoid spheroidenone, and Erythrobacter sp. NAP1 which contains the carotenoids zeaxanthin and bacteriorubixanthinal. We show that the spectroscopic data from the LH1-RC complex of Roseobacter sp. COL2P are very similar to those previously reported for Rhodobacter sphaeroides, including the transient absorption spectrum originating from the intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) state of spheroidenone. Although the ICT state is also populated in LH1-RC complexes of Erythrobacter sp. NAP1, its appearance is probably related to the polarity of the bacteriorubixanthinal environment rather than to the specific configuration of the carotenoid, which we hypothesize is responsible for populating the ICT state of spheroidenone in LH1-RC of Roseobacter sp. COL2P. The population of the ICT state enables efficient S1/ICT-to-bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) energy transfer which would otherwise be largely inhibited for spheroidenone and bacteriorubixanthinal due to their low energy S1 states. In addition, the triplet states of these carotenoids appear well-tuned for efficient quenching of singlet oxygen or BChl-a triplets, which is of vital importance for oxygen-dependent organisms such as AAPs. PMID:23130956

  18. Evolution of energy metabolism and its compartmentation in Kinetoplastida

    PubMed Central

    Hannaert, Véronique; Bringaud, Frédéric; Opperdoes, Fred R; Michels, Paul AM

    2003-01-01

    Kinetoplastida are protozoan organisms that probably diverged early in evolution from other eukaryotes. They are characterized by a number of unique features with respect to their energy and carbohydrate metabolism. These organisms possess peculiar peroxisomes, called glycosomes, which play a central role in this metabolism; the organelles harbour enzymes of several catabolic and anabolic routes, including major parts of the glycolytic and pentosephosphate pathways. The kinetoplastid mitochondrion is also unusual with regard to both its structural and functional properties. In this review, we describe the unique compartmentation of metabolism in Kinetoplastida and the metabolic properties resulting from this compartmentation. We discuss the evidence for our recently proposed hypothesis that a common ancestor of Kinetoplastida and Euglenida acquired a photosynthetic alga as an endosymbiont, contrary to the earlier notion that this event occurred at a later stage of evolution, in the Euglenida lineage alone. The endosymbiont was subsequently lost from the kinetoplastid lineage but, during that process, some of its pathways of energy and carbohydrate metabolism were sequestered in the kinetoplastid peroxisomes, which consequently became glycosomes. The evolution of the kinetoplastid glycosomes and the possible selective advantages of these organelles for Kinetoplastida are discussed. We propose that the possession of glycosomes provided metabolic flexibility that has been important for the organisms to adapt easily to changing environmental conditions. It is likely that metabolic flexibility has been an important selective advantage for many kinetoplastid species during their evolution into the highly successful parasites today found in many divergent taxonomic groups. Also addressed is the evolution of the kinetoplastid mitochondrion, from a supposedly pluripotent organelle, attributed to a single endosymbiotic event that resulted in all mitochondria and

  19. Effects of high-intensity interval versus continuous moderate-intensity aerobic exercise on apoptosis, oxidative stress and metabolism of the infarcted myocardium in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kai; Wang, Li; Wang, Changying; Yang, Yuan; Hu, Dayi; Ding, Rongjing

    2015-08-01

    The optimal aerobic exercise training (AET) protocol for patients following myocardial infarction (MI) has remained under debate. The present study therefore aimed to compare the effects of continuous moderate-intensity training (CMT) and high-intensity interval training (HIT) on cardiac functional recovery, and to investigate the potential associated mechanisms in a post-MI rat model. Female Sprague Dawley rats (8-10 weeks old) undergoing MI or sham surgery were subsequently submitted to CMT or HIT, or kept sedentary for eight weeks. Prior to and following AET, echocardiographic parameters and exercise capacity of the rats were measured. Western blotting was used to evaluate the levels of apoptosis and associated signaling pathway protein expression. The concentrations of biomarkers of oxidative stress were also determined by ELISA assay. Messenger (m)RNA levels and activity of the key enzymes for glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation, as well as the rate of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis, were also measured. Compared with the MI group, exercise capacity and cardiac function were significantly improved following AET, particularly following HIT. Left ventricular ejection fraction and fraction shortening were further improved in the MI-HIT group in comparison to that of the MI-CMT group. The two forms of AET almost equally attenuated apoptosis of the post-infarction myocardium. CMT and HIT also alleviated oxidative stress by decreasing the concentration of malondialdehyde and increasing the concentration of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). In particular, HIT induced a greater increase in the concentration of GPx than that of CMT. AET, and HIT in particular, significantly increased the levels of mRNA and the maximal activity of phosphofructokinase-1 and carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1, as well as the maximal ratio of ATP synthesis. In addition, compared with the MI group, the expression of signaling proteins PI3K, Akt, p38mapk and AMPK

  20. [Energy metabolism and myocardial function in myocardiodystrophy].

    PubMed

    Temirova, K V; Kurlygina, L A; Zavodskaia, I S; Novikova, N A

    1976-09-01

    A total of 92 patients with chronic tonsilitis and cardiovascular changes were subjected to clinical observations, ECG analysis, potassium and nitroglycerine tests, and studies of the lactic acid level and creatinekinase activity as indces of myocardial metabolism. The examinations were conducted prior to and following tonsillectomy. In a majority of patients a correlation was revealed between the degree of ECG changes and the serum lactic acid level, as well as between the ECG improvement and a reduction of the lactic acid level following tonsillectomy. Three stages of tonsillogenic myocardiodystrophy were distinguished. The obtained data indicate the rationale of the used tests for the evaluation of the myocardial meabolism alterations and of the efficacy of treatment of chronic tonsillitis patients. PMID:1011536

  1. Effects of monocrotaline on energy metabolism in the rat liver.

    PubMed

    Mingatto, Fábio Erminio; Maioli, Marcos Antonio; Bracht, Adelar; Ishii-Iwamoto, Emy Luiza

    2008-11-10

    Monocrotaline (MCT) is a pyrrolizidine alkaloid present in the plants of the Crotalaria species that causes cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in animals and humans, and it is hepatically metabolized to the alkylating agent dehydromonocrotaline by cytochrome P-450. The exact cellular and molecular mechanisms of MCT-induced tissue injury remain unclear. We previously demonstrated that dehydromonocrotaline, but not monocrotaline, inhibits the activity of NADH-dehydrogenase at micromolar concentrations in isolated liver mitochondria, an effect associated with significantly reduced ATP synthesis. Impairment of energy metabolism is expected to lead to several alterations in cell metabolism. In this work, the action of different concentrations of monocrotaline (250, 500, and 750microM) on energy metabolism-linked parameters was investigated in isolated perfused rat livers. In the fed state, monocrotaline increased glycogenolysis and glycolysis, whereas in the livers of fasted rats, it decreased gluconeogenesis and urea synthesis from l-alanine. These metabolic alterations were only found in livers of phenobarbital-treated rats, indicating that active metabolites including dehydromonocrotaline were responsible for the observed activity. Our findings indicate that hepatic metabolic changes may be implicated, partly at least, in the hepatotoxicity of monocrotaline in animals and humans. PMID:18835426

  2. Protective effects of aerobic swimming training on high-fat diet induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: regulation of lipid metabolism via PANDER-AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Jin, Meihua; Han, Donghe; Zhou, Mingsheng; Mei, Xifan; Guan, Youfei; Liu, Chang

    2015-03-20

    This study aimed to investigate the mechanism by which aerobic swimming training prevents high-fat-diet-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Forty-two male C57BL/6 mice were randomized into normal-diet sedentary (ND; n = 8), ND exercised (n = 8), high-fat diet sedentary (HFD; n = 13), and HFD exercised groups (n = 13). After 2 weeks of training adaptation, the mice were subjected to an aerobic swimming protocol (60 min/day) 5 days/week for 10 weeks. The HFD group exhibited significantly higher mRNA levels of fatty acid transport-, lipogenesis-, and β-oxidation-associated gene expressions than the ND group. PANDER and FOXO1 expressions increased, whereas AKT expression decreased in the HFD group. The aerobic swimming program with the HFD reversed the effects of the HFD on the expressions of thrombospondin-1 receptor, liver fatty acid-binding protein, long-chain fatty-acid elongase-6, Fas cell surface death receptor, and stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase-1, as well as PANDER, FOXO1, and AKT. In the HFD exercised group, PPARα and AOX expressions were much higher. Our findings suggest that aerobic swimming training can prevent NAFLD via the regulation of fatty acid transport-, lipogenesis-, and β-oxidation-associated genes. In addition, the benefits from aerobic swimming training were achieved partly through the PANDER-AKT-FOXO1 pathway. PMID:25701781

  3. Energy metabolism of Macaca mulatta during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Stein, T. P.; Dotsenko, M. A.; Korolkov, V. I.; Fuller, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    The mean daily energy expenditure rates of two rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were determined during spaceflight on the joint U.S./Russian Bion 11 mission by the doubly labeled water (DLW, 2H218O) method. Control values were obtained from two studies performed under flight-like conditions (n = 4). The mean inflight energy expenditure for the two Bion 11 monkeys was 81.3 kcal/kg/day, which was higher than that seen previously. The average energy expenditure (77.6 +/- 4.4 kcal/kg/day) for the four ground control monkeys was slightly lower than had been measured previously.

  4. Energy Expenditure and Metabolic Changes of Free-Flying Migrating Northern Bald Ibis.

    PubMed

    Bairlein, Franz; Fritz, Johannes; Scope, Alexandra; Schwendenwein, Ilse; Stanclova, Gabriela; van Dijk, Gertjan; Meijer, Harro A J; Verhulst, Simon; Dittami, John

    2015-01-01

    Many migrating birds undertake extraordinary long flights. How birds are able to perform such endurance flights of over 100-hour durations is still poorly understood. We examined energy expenditure and physiological changes in Northern Bald Ibis Geronticus eremite during natural flights using birds trained to follow an ultra-light aircraft. Because these birds were tame, with foster parents, we were able to bleed them immediately prior to and after each flight. Flight duration was experimentally designed ranging between one and almost four hours continuous flights. Energy expenditure during flight was estimated using doubly-labelled-water while physiological properties were assessed through blood chemistry including plasma metabolites, enzymes, electrolytes, blood gases, and reactive oxygen compounds. Instantaneous energy expenditure decreased with flight duration, and the birds appeared to balance aerobic and anaerobic metabolism, using fat, carbohydrate and protein as fuel. This made flight both economic and tolerable. The observed effects resemble classical exercise adaptations that can limit duration of exercise while reducing energetic output. There were also in-flight benefits that enable power output variation from cruising to manoeuvring. These adaptations share characteristics with physiological processes that have facilitated other athletic feats in nature and might enable the extraordinary long flights of migratory birds as well. PMID:26376193

  5. Energy Expenditure and Metabolic Changes of Free-Flying Migrating Northern Bald Ibis

    PubMed Central

    Bairlein, Franz; Fritz, Johannes; Scope, Alexandra; Schwendenwein, Ilse; Stanclova, Gabriela; van Dijk, Gertjan; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Verhulst, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Many migrating birds undertake extraordinary long flights. How birds are able to perform such endurance flights of over 100-hour durations is still poorly understood. We examined energy expenditure and physiological changes in Northern Bald Ibis Geronticus eremite during natural flights using birds trained to follow an ultra-light aircraft. Because these birds were tame, with foster parents, we were able to bleed them immediately prior to and after each flight. Flight duration was experimentally designed ranging between one and almost four hours continuous flights. Energy expenditure during flight was estimated using doubly-labelled-water while physiological properties were assessed through blood chemistry including plasma metabolites, enzymes, electrolytes, blood gases, and reactive oxygen compounds. Instantaneous energy expenditure decreased with flight duration, and the birds appeared to balance aerobic and anaerobic metabolism, using fat, carbohydrate and protein as fuel. This made flight both economic and tolerable. The observed effects resemble classical exercise adaptations that can limit duration of exercise while reducing energetic output. There were also in-flight benefits that enable power output variation from cruising to manoeuvring. These adaptations share characteristics with physiological processes that have facilitated other athletic feats in nature and might enable the extraordinary long flights of migratory birds as well. PMID:26376193

  6. Effects of ingesting JavaFit Energy Extreme functional coffee on aerobic and anaerobic fitness markers in recreationally-active coffee consumers.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Michael D; Taylor, Lemuel W; Wismann, Jennifer A; Wilborn, Colin D; Kreider, Richard B; Willoughby, Darryn S

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of ingesting JavaFittrade mark Energy Extreme (JEE) on aerobic and anaerobic performance measures in recreationally-active male and female coffee drinkers. Five male (27.6 +/- 4.2 yrs, 93.2 +/- 11.7 kg, 181.6 +/- 6.9 cm) and five female (29 +/- 4.6 yrs, 61.5 +/- 9.2 kg, 167.6 +/- 6.9 cm) regular coffee drinkers (i.e., 223.9 +/- 62.7 mg.d-1 of caffeine) participated in this study. In a cross-over, randomized design, participants performed a baseline (BASELINE) graded treadmill test (GXT) for peak VO2 assessment and a Wingate test for peak power. Approximately 3-4 d following BASELINE testing, participants returned to the lab for the first trial and ingested 354 ml of either JEE or decaffeinated coffee (DECAF), after which they performed a GXT and Wingate test. Criterion measures during the GXT included an assessment of peakVO2 at maximal exercise, as well as VO2 at 3 minutes and 10 minutes post-exercise. Additionally, time-to-exhaustion (TTE), maximal RPE, mean heart rate (HR), mean systolic pressure (SBP), and mean diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured during each condition. Criterion measures for the Wingate included mean HR, SBP, DBP, peak power, and time to peak power (TTP). Participants then returned to the lab approximately one week later to perform the second trial under the same conditions as the first, except consuming the remaining coffee. Data were analyzed using a one way ANOVA (p < 0.05). Our results indicate that JEE significantly increased VO2 at 3 minutes post-exercise when compared to BASELINE (p = 0.04) and DECAF (p = 0.02) values, which may be beneficial in enhancing post-exercise fat metabolism. PMID:18067677

  7. Mitochondria-Mediated Energy Adaption in Cancer: The H+-ATP Synthase-Geared Switch of Metabolism in Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Aragó, María; Formentini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Since the signing of the National Cancer Act in 1971, cancer still remains a major cause of death despite significant progresses made in understanding the biology and treatment of the disease. After many years of ostracism, the peculiar energy metabolism of tumors has been recognized as an additional phenotypic trait of the cancer cell. Recent Advances: While the enhanced aerobic glycolysis of carcinomas has already been translated to bedside for precise tumor imaging and staging of cancer patients, accepting that an impaired bioenergetic function of mitochondria is pivotal to understand energy metabolism of tumors and in its progression is debated. However, mitochondrial bioenergetics and cell death are tightly connected. Critical Issues: Recent clinical findings indicate that H+-ATP synthase, a core component of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, is repressed at both the protein and activity levels in human carcinomas. This review summarizes the relevance that mitochondrial function has to understand energy metabolism of tumors and explores the connection between the bioenergetic function of the organelle and the activity of mitochondria as tumor suppressors. Future Directions: The reversible nature of energy metabolism in tumors highlights the relevance that the microenvironment has for tumor progression. Moreover, the stimulation of mitochondrial activity or the inhibition of glycolysis suppresses tumor growth. Future research should elucidate the mechanisms promoting the silencing of oxidative phosphorylation in carcinomas. The aim is the development of new therapeutic strategies tackling energy metabolism to eradicate tumors or at least, to maintain tumor dormancy and transform cancer into a chronic disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 285–298. PMID:22901241

  8. Therapeutic Implications of Targeting Energy Metabolism in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sakharkar, Meena K.; Shashni, Babita; Sharma, Karun; Dhillon, Sarinder K.; Ranjekar, Prabhakar R.; Sakharkar, Kishore R.

    2013-01-01

    PPARs are ligand activated transcription factors. PPARγ agonists have been reported as a new and potentially efficacious treatment of inflammation, diabetes, obesity, cancer, AD, and schizophrenia. Since cancer cells show dysregulation of glycolysis they are potentially manageable through changes in metabolic environment. Interestingly, several of the genes involved in maintaining the metabolic environment and the central energy generation pathway are regulated or predicted to be regulated by PPARγ. The use of synthetic PPARγ ligands as drugs and their recent withdrawal/restricted usage highlight the lack of understanding of the molecular basis of these drugs, their off-target effects, and their network. These data further underscores the complexity of nuclear receptor signalling mechanisms. This paper will discuss the function and role of PPARγ in energy metabolism and cancer biology in general and its emergence as a promising therapeutic target in breast cancer. PMID:23431283

  9. Inorganic Polyphosphate and Energy Metabolism in Mammalian Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Evgeny; Aschar-Sobbi, Roozbeh; Campanella, Michelangelo; Turner, Raymond J.; Gómez-García, María R.; Abramov, Andrey Y.

    2010-01-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (poly P) is a polymer made from as few as 10 to several hundred phosphate molecules linked by phosphoanhydride bonds similar to ATP. Poly P is ubiquitous in all mammalian organisms, where it plays multiple physiological roles. The metabolism of poly P in mammalian organisms is not well understood. We have examined the mechanism of poly P production and the role of this polymer in cell energy metabolism. Poly P levels in mitochondria and intact cells were estimated using a fluorescent molecular probe, 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole. Poly P levels were dependent on the metabolic state of the mitochondria. Poly P levels were increased by substrates of respiration and in turn reduced by mitochondrial inhibitor (rotenone) or an uncoupler (carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone). Oligomycin, an inhibitor of mitochondrial ATP-synthase, blocked the production of poly P. Enzymatic depletion of poly P from cells significantly altered the rate of ATP metabolism. We propose the existence of a feedback mechanism where poly P production and cell energy metabolism regulate each other. PMID:20124409

  10. Adipose Tissue Remodeling: Its Role in Energy Metabolism and Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Choe, Sung Sik; Huh, Jin Young; Hwang, In Jae; Kim, Jong In; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-01-01

    The adipose tissue is a central metabolic organ in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis. The white adipose tissue functions as a key energy reservoir for other organs, whereas the brown adipose tissue accumulates lipids for cold-induced adaptive thermogenesis. Adipose tissues secrete various hormones, cytokines, and metabolites (termed as adipokines) that control systemic energy balance by regulating appetitive signals from the central nerve system as well as metabolic activity in peripheral tissues. In response to changes in the nutritional status, the adipose tissue undergoes dynamic remodeling, including quantitative and qualitative alterations in adipose tissue-resident cells. A growing body of evidence indicates that adipose tissue remodeling in obesity is closely associated with adipose tissue function. Changes in the number and size of the adipocytes affect the microenvironment of expanded fat tissues, accompanied by alterations in adipokine secretion, adipocyte death, local hypoxia, and fatty acid fluxes. Concurrently, stromal vascular cells in the adipose tissue, including immune cells, are involved in numerous adaptive processes, such as dead adipocyte clearance, adipogenesis, and angiogenesis, all of which are dysregulated in obese adipose tissue remodeling. Chronic overnutrition triggers uncontrolled inflammatory responses, leading to systemic low-grade inflammation and metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance. This review will discuss current mechanistic understandings of adipose tissue remodeling processes in adaptive energy homeostasis and pathological remodeling of adipose tissue in connection with immune response. PMID:27148161

  11. Adipose Tissue Remodeling: Its Role in Energy Metabolism and Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Sung Sik; Huh, Jin Young; Hwang, In Jae; Kim, Jong In; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-01-01

    The adipose tissue is a central metabolic organ in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis. The white adipose tissue functions as a key energy reservoir for other organs, whereas the brown adipose tissue accumulates lipids for cold-induced adaptive thermogenesis. Adipose tissues secrete various hormones, cytokines, and metabolites (termed as adipokines) that control systemic energy balance by regulating appetitive signals from the central nerve system as well as metabolic activity in peripheral tissues. In response to changes in the nutritional status, the adipose tissue undergoes dynamic remodeling, including quantitative and qualitative alterations in adipose tissue-resident cells. A growing body of evidence indicates that adipose tissue remodeling in obesity is closely associated with adipose tissue function. Changes in the number and size of the adipocytes affect the microenvironment of expanded fat tissues, accompanied by alterations in adipokine secretion, adipocyte death, local hypoxia, and fatty acid fluxes. Concurrently, stromal vascular cells in the adipose tissue, including immune cells, are involved in numerous adaptive processes, such as dead adipocyte clearance, adipogenesis, and angiogenesis, all of which are dysregulated in obese adipose tissue remodeling. Chronic overnutrition triggers uncontrolled inflammatory responses, leading to systemic low-grade inflammation and metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance. This review will discuss current mechanistic understandings of adipose tissue remodeling processes in adaptive energy homeostasis and pathological remodeling of adipose tissue in connection with immune response. PMID:27148161

  12. Operating aerobic wastewater treatment at very short sludge ages enables treatment and energy recovery through anaerobic sludge digestion.

    PubMed

    Ge, Huoqing; Batstone, Damien J; Keller, Jurg

    2013-11-01

    Conventional abattoir wastewater treatment processes for carbon and nutrient removal are typically designed and operated with a long sludge retention time (SRT) of 10-20 days, with a relatively high energy demand and physical footprint. The process also generates a considerable amount of waste activated sludge that is not easily degradable due to the long SRT. In this study, an innovative high-rate sequencing batch reactor (SBR) based wastewater treatment process with short SRT and hydraulic retention time (HRT) is developed and characterised. The high-rate SBR process was shown to be most effective with SRT of 2-3 days and HRT of 0.5-1 day, achieving >80% reduction in chemical oxygen demand (COD) and phosphorus and approximately 55% nitrogen removal. A majority of carbon removal (70-80%) was achieved by biomass assimilation and/or accumulation, rather than oxidation. Anaerobic degradability of the sludge generated in the high-rate SBR process was strongly linked to SRT, with measured degradability extent being 85% (2 days SRT), 73% (3 days), and 63% (4 days), but it was not influenced by digestion temperature. However, the rate of degradation for 3 and 4 days SRT sludge was increased by 45% at thermophilic conditions compared to mesophilic conditions. Overall, the treatment process provides a very compact and energy efficient treatment option for highly degradable wastewaters such as meat and food processing, with a substantial space reduction by using smaller reactors and a considerable net energy output through the reduced aerobic oxidation and concurrent increased methane production potential through the efficient sludge digestion. PMID:24045213

  13. Nitric oxide and platelet energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tomasiak, Marian; Stelmach, Halina; Rusak, Tomasz; Wysocka, Jolanta

    2004-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether nitric oxide (NO) can affect platelet responses through the inhibition of energy production. It was found that NO donors: S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicyllamine, SNAP, (5-50 microM) and sodium nitroprusside, SNP, (5-100 microM) inhibited collagen- and ADP-induced aggregation of porcine platelets. The corresponding IC50 values for SNAP and SNP varied from 5 to 30 microM and from 9 to 75 microM, respectively. Collagen- and thrombin-induced platelet secretion was inhibited by SNAP (IC50 = 50 microM) and by SNP (IC50 = 100 microM). SNAP (20-100 microM), SNP (10-200 microM) and collagen (20 microg/ml) stimulated glycolysis in intact platelets. The degree of glycolysis stimulation exerted by NO donors was similar to that produced by respiratory chain inhibitors (cyanide and antimycin A) or uncouplers (2,4-dinitrophenol). Neither the NO donors nor the respiratory chain blockers affected glycolysis in platelet homogenate. SNAP (20-100 microM) and SNP (50-200 microM) inhibited oxygen consumption by platelets. The effect of SNP and SNAP on glycolysis and respiration was not reduced by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, a selective inhibitor of NO-stimulated guanylate cyclase. SNAP (5-100 microM) and SNP (10-300 microM) inhibited the activity of platelet cytochrome oxidase and had no effect on NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase and succinate dehydrogenase. Blocking of the mitochondrial energy production by antimycin A slightly affected collagen-evoked aggregation and strongly inhibited platelet secretion. The results indicate that: 1) in porcine platelets NO is able to diminish mitochondrial energy production through the inhibition of cytochrome oxidase, 2) the inhibitory effect of NO on platelet secretion (but not aggregation) can be attributed to the reduction of mitochondrial energy production. PMID:15448739

  14. Investigation of oxidative phosphorylation in continuous cultures. A non-equilibrium thermodynamic approach to energy transduction for Escherichia coli in aerobic condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafuri, Mohazabeh; Nosrati, Mohsen; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2015-03-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in living cells is very important. Different researches have shown that in terms of mathematical modeling, the domain of these investigations is essentially restricted. Recently the thermodynamic models have been suggested for calculation of the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation process and rate of energy loss in animal cells using chemiosmotic theory and non-equilibrium thermodynamics equations. In our previous work, we developed a mathematical model for mitochondria of animal cells. In this research, according to similarities between oxidative phosphorylation process in microorganisms and animal cells, Golfar's model was developed to predict the non-equilibrium thermodynamic behavior of the oxidative phosphorylation process for bacteria in aerobic condition. With this model the rate of energy loss, P/O ratio, and efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation were calculated for Escherichia coli in aerobic condition. The results then were compared with experimental data given by other authors. The thermodynamic model had an acceptable agreement with the experimental data.

  15. Targeting energy metabolism in brain cancer: review and hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Seyfried, Thomas N; Mukherjee, Purna

    2005-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors are a significant health problem in children and adults and are often unmanageable. As a metabolic disorder involving the dysregulation of glycolysis and respiration, malignant brain cancer is potentially manageable through changes in metabolic environment. A radically different approach to brain cancer management is proposed that combines metabolic control analysis with the evolutionarily conserved capacity of normal cells to survive extreme shifts in physiological environment. In contrast to malignant brain tumors that are largely dependent on glycolysis for energy, normal neurons and glia readily transition to ketone bodies (β-hydroxybutyrate) for energy in vivo when glucose levels are reduced. The bioenergetic transition from glucose to ketone bodies metabolically targets brain tumors through integrated anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic, and pro-apoptotic mechanisms. The approach focuses more on the genomic flexibility of normal cells than on the genomic defects of tumor cells and is supported from recent studies in orthotopic mouse brain tumor models and in human pediatric astrocytoma treated with dietary energy restriction and the ketogenic diet. PMID:16242042

  16. Analysis of the metatranscriptome of microbial communities of an alkaline hot sulfur spring revealed different gene encoding pathway enzymes associated with energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Swetaleena; Padhi, Soumesh Kumar; Mohanty, Sriprakash; Samanta, Mrinal; Maiti, Nikhil Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Alkaline sulfur hot springs notable for their specialized and complex ecosystem powered by geothermal energy are abundantly rich in different chemotrophic and phototrophic thermophilic microorganisms. Survival and adaptation of these organisms in the extreme environment is specifically related to energy metabolism. To gain a better understanding of survival mechanism of the organisms in these ecosystems, we determined the different gene encoding enzymes associated with anaerobic pathways of energy metabolism by applying the metatranscriptomics approach. The analysis of the microbial population of hot sulfur spring revealed the presence of both aerobic and anaerobic organisms indicating dual mode of lifestyle of the community members. Proteobacteria (28.1 %) was the most dominant community. A total of 988 reads were associated with energy metabolism, out of which 33.7 % of the reads were assigned to nitrogen, sulfur, and methane metabolism based on KEGG classification. The major lineages of hot spring communities were linked with the anaerobic pathways. Different gene encoding enzymes (hao, nir, nar, cysH, cysI, acs) showed the involvement of microbial members in nitrification, denitrification, dissimilatory sulfate reduction, and methane generation. This study enhances our understanding of important gene encoding enzymes involved in energy metabolism, required for the survival and adaptation of microbial communities in the hot spring. PMID:27290724

  17. III. Cellular ultrastructures in situ as key to understanding tumor energy metabolism: biological significance of the Warburg effect

    PubMed Central

    Witkiewicz, Halina

    2013-01-01

    Despite the universality of metabolic pathways, malignant cells were found to have their metabolism reprogrammed to generate energy by glycolysis even under normal oxygen concentrations (the Warburg effect). Therefore, the pathway energetically 18 times less efficient than oxidative phosphorylation was implicated to match increased energy requirements of growing tumors. The paradox was explained by an abnormally high rate of glucose uptake, assuming unlimited availability of substrates for tumor growth in vivo. However, ultrastructural analysis of tumor vasculature morphogenesis showed that the growing tissue regions did not have continuous blood supply and intermittently depended on autophagy for survival. Erythrogenic autophagy, and resulting ATP generation by glycolysis, appeared critical to initiating vasculature formation where it was missing. This study focused on ultrastructural features that reflected metabolic switch from aerobic to anaerobic. Morphological differences between and within different types of cells were evident in tissue sections. In cells undergoing nucleo-cytoplasmic conversion into erythrosomes (erythrogenesis), gradual changes led to replacing mitochondria with peroxisomes, through an intermediate form connected to endoplasmic reticulum. Those findings related to the issue of peroxisome biogenesis and to the phenomenon of hemogenic endothelium. Mitochondria were compacted also during mitosis. In vivo, cells that lost and others that retained capability to use oxygen coexisted side-by-side; both types were important for vasculature morphogenesis and tissue growth. Once passable, the new vasculature segment could deliver external oxygen and nutrients. Nutritional and redox status of microenvironment had similar effect on metabolism of malignant and non-malignant cells demonstrating the necessity to maintain structure-energy equivalence in all living cells. The role of glycolysis in initiating vasculature formation, and in progression of

  18. PPARs Integrate the Mammalian Clock and Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lihong; Yang, Guangrui

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are a group of nuclear receptors that function as transcription factors regulating the expression of numerous target genes. PPARs play an essential role in various physiological and pathological processes, especially in energy metabolism. It has long been known that metabolism and circadian clocks are tightly intertwined. However, the mechanism of how they influence each other is not fully understood. Recently, all three PPAR isoforms were found to be rhythmically expressed in given mouse tissues. Among them, PPARα and PPARγ are direct regulators of core clock components, Bmal1 and Rev-erbα, and, conversely, PPARα is also a direct Bmal1 target gene. More importantly, recent studies using knockout mice revealed that all PPARs exert given functions in a circadian manner. These findings demonstrated a novel role of PPARs as regulators in correlating circadian rhythm and metabolism. In this review, we summarize advances in our understanding of PPARs in circadian regulation. PMID:24693278

  19. Broad defects in the energy metabolism of leukocytes underlie immunoparalysis in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shih-Chin; Scicluna, Brendon P; Arts, Rob J W; Gresnigt, Mark S; Lachmandas, Ekta; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Kox, Matthijs; Manjeri, Ganesh R; Wagenaars, Jori A L; Cremer, Olaf L; Leentjens, Jenneke; van der Meer, Anne J; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Bonten, Marc J; Schultz, Marcus J; Willems, Peter H G M; Pickkers, Peter; Joosten, Leo A B; van der Poll, Tom; Netea, Mihai G

    2016-04-01

    The acute phase of sepsis is characterized by a strong inflammatory reaction. At later stages in some patients, immunoparalysis may be encountered, which is associated with a poor outcome. By transcriptional and metabolic profiling of human patients with sepsis, we found that a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis was an important component of initial activation of host defense. Blocking metabolic pathways with metformin diminished cytokine production and increased mortality in systemic fungal infection in mice. In contrast, in leukocytes rendered tolerant by exposure to lipopolysaccharide or after isolation from patients with sepsis and immunoparalysis, a generalized metabolic defect at the level of both glycolysis and oxidative metabolism was apparent, which was restored after recovery of the patients. Finally, the immunometabolic defects in humans were partially restored by therapy with recombinant interferon-γ, which suggested that metabolic processes might represent a therapeutic target in sepsis. PMID:26950237

  20. During intense exercise, obese women rely more than lean women on aerobic energy.

    PubMed

    Ardévol, A; Adán, C; Franco, L; García-Lorda, P; Rubio, F; Remesar, X; Fernández-López, J A; Salas-Salvadó, J; Alemany, M

    1998-03-01

    A series of untrained, healthy, obese women (body mass index 32.5 +/- 0.9 kg.m-2) were subjected to a protocol of intense exercise on a cycloergometer and compared with lean controls (body mass index 20. 9 +/- 0.5 kg.m-2). Physiological parameters, blood lactate, bicarbonate, plasma metabolites, oxygen consumption and CO2 production were measured. Impedance-derived extracellular water and plasma changes in lactate and bicarbonate were used to determine changes in bicarbonate pools and lactate-displaced CO2. From these and respiratory gases, the respiratory quotient was calculated and thence overall fuel consumption. Anaerobic energy during exercise accounted for about 1.8% of all energy consumed in the lean but only 0.7% in the obese. Obese women fatigued at lower workloads and energy expenditure levels than did the lean, and their lactate buildup was similar when compared on the basis of fat-free mass. The data support the postulation of fatigue being triggered by a combination of factors: stretched cardiovascular work would be the main factor for obese women, in part limiting lactate production. For lean women, the triggering factor for fatigue could be the loss of buffering capacity; but it is the combination of stretching cardiovascular capacity, exhaustion of glycogen and available glucose and increase in lactate/loss of bicarbonate buffer that determines the onset of fatigue. PMID:9446696

  1. 13C NMR spectroscopy applications to brain energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Tiago B.; Valette, Julien; Bouzier-Sore, Anne-Karine

    2013-01-01

    13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the method of choice for studying brain metabolism. Indeed, the most convincing data obtained to decipher metabolic exchanges between neurons and astrocytes have been obtained using this technique, thus illustrating its power. It may be difficult for non-specialists, however, to grasp thefull implication of data presented in articles written by spectroscopists. The aim of the review is, therefore, to provide a fundamental understanding of this topic to facilitate the non-specialists in their reading of this literature. In the first part of this review, we present the metabolic fate of 13C-labeled substrates in the brain in a detailed way, including an overview of some general neurochemical principles. We also address and compare the various spectroscopic strategies that can be used to study brain metabolism. Then, we provide an overview of the 13C NMR experiments performed to analyze both intracellular and intercellular metabolic fluxes. More particularly, the role of lactate as a potential energy substrate for neurons is discussed in the light of 13C NMR data. Finally, new perspectives and applications offered by 13C hyperpolarization are described. PMID:24367329

  2. Energy metabolism, enzymatic flux capacities, and metabolic flux rates in flying honeybees.

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, R K; Lighton, J R; Joos, B; Roberts, S P; Harrison, J F

    1996-01-01

    Honeybees rely primarily on the oxidation of hexose sugars to provide the energy required for flight. Measurement of VCO2 (equal to VO2, because VCO2/VO2 = 1.0 during carbohydrate oxidation) during flight allowed estimation of steady-state flux rates through pathways of flight muscle energy metabolism. Comparison of Vmax values for flight muscle hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, citrate synthase, and cytochrome c oxidase with rates of carbon and O2 flux during flight reveal that these enzymes operate closer to Vmax in the flight muscles of flying honeybees than in other muscles previously studied. Possible mechanistic and evolutionary implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:8901631

  3. Leptin regulates energy metabolism in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Blanquer-Rosselló, Maria del Mar; Oliver, Jordi; Sastre-Serra, Jorge; Valle, Adamo; Roca, Pilar

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is known to be a poorer prognosis factor for breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Among the diverse endocrine factors associated to obesity, leptin has received special attention since it promotes breast cancer cell growth and invasiveness, processes which force cells to adapt their metabolism to satisfy the increased demands of energy and biosynthetic intermediates. Taking this into account, our aim was to explore the effects of leptin in the metabolism of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Polarographic analysis revealed that leptin increased oxygen consumption rate and cellular ATP levels were more dependent on mitochondrial oxidative metabolism in leptin-treated cells compared to the more glycolytic control cells. Experiments with selective inhibitors of glycolysis (2-DG), fatty acid oxidation (etomoxir) or aminoacid deprivation showed that ATP levels were more reliant on fatty acid oxidation. In agreement, levels of key proteins involved in lipid catabolism (FAT/CD36, CPT1, PPARα) and phosphorylation of the energy sensor AMPK were increased by leptin. Regarding glucose, cellular uptake was not affected by leptin, but lactate release was deeply repressed. Analysis of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and pyruvate carboxylase (PC) together with the pentose-phosphate pathway enzyme glucose-6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) revealed that leptin favors the use of glucose for biosynthesis. These results point towards a role of leptin in metabolic reprogramming, consisting of an enhanced use of glucose for biosynthesis and lipids for energy production. This metabolic adaptations induced by leptin may provide benefits for MCF-7 growth and give support to the reverse Warburg effect described in breast cancer. PMID:26772821

  4. Energy metabolism of hyperthyroid gilthead sea bream Sparus aurata L.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Chacoff, Luis; Ruiz-Jarabo, Ignacio; Arjona, Francisco J; Laiz-Carrión, Raúl; Flik, Gert; Klaren, Peter H M; Mancera, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormones, in particular 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine or T3, are involved in multiple physiological processes in mammals such as protein, fat and carbohydrate metabolism. However, the metabolic actions of T3 in fish are still not fully elucidated. We therefore tested the effects of T3 on Sparus aurata energy metabolism and osmoregulatory system, a hyperthyroid-induced model that was chosen. Fish were implanted with coconut oil depots (containing 0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0μg T3/g body weight) and sampled at day 3 and 6 post-implantation. Plasma levels of free T3 as well as glucose, lactate and triglyceride values increased with increasing doses of T3 at days 3 and 6 post-implantation. Changes in plasma and organ metabolite levels (glucose, glycogen, triglycerides, lactate and total α amino acid) and enzyme activities related to carbohydrate, lactate, amino acid and lipid pathways were detected in organs involved in metabolism (liver) and osmoregulation (gills and kidney). Our data implicate that the liver uses amino acids as an energy source in response to the T3 treatment, increasing protein catabolism and gluconeogenic pathways. The gills, the most important extruder of ammonia, are fuelled not only by amino acids, but also by lactate. The kidney differs significantly in its substrate preference from the gills, as it obtained metabolic energy from lactate but also from lipid oxidation processes. We conclude that in S. aurata lipid catabolism and protein turnover are increased as a consequence of experimentally induced hyperthyroidism, with secondary osmoregulatory effects. PMID:26419695

  5. Mechanistic modeling of aberrant energy metabolism in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Sangar, Vineet; Eddy, James A.; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Price, Nathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Dysfunction in energy metabolism—including in pathways localized to the mitochondria—has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide array of disorders, ranging from cancer to neurodegenerative diseases to type II diabetes. The inherent complexities of energy and mitochondrial metabolism present a significant obstacle in the effort to understand the role that these molecular processes play in the development of disease. To help unravel these complexities, systems biology methods have been applied to develop an array of computational metabolic models, ranging from mitochondria-specific processes to genome-scale cellular networks. These constraint-based (CB) models can efficiently simulate aspects of normal and aberrant metabolism in various genetic and environmental conditions. Development of these models leverages—and also provides a powerful means to integrate and interpret—information from a wide range of sources including genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and enzyme kinetics. Here, we review a variety of mechanistic modeling studies that explore metabolic functions, deficiency disorders, and aberrant biochemical pathways in mitochondria and related regions in the cell. PMID:23112774

  6. Slight chronic elevation of C-reactive protein is associated with lower aerobic fitness but does not impair meal-induced stimulation of muscle protein metabolism in healthy old men

    PubMed Central

    Buffière, Caroline; Mariotti, François; Savary-Auzeloux, Isabelle; Migné, Carole; Meunier, Nathalie; Hercberg, Serge; Cano, Noel; Rémond, Didier; Duclos, Martine; Dardevet, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Ageing impairs the muscle anabolic effect of food intake, which may explain muscle loss and an increased risk of sarcopenia. Ageing is also associated with low grade inflammation (LGI), which has been negatively correlated with muscle mass and strength. In rodents, the muscle anabolic resistance observed during ageing and sarcopenia has been ascribed to the development of the LGI. We aimed to investigate this relationship in humans. We studied protein metabolism and physical fitness in healthy elderly volunteers with slight chronic C-reactive protein. Two groups of healthy elderly volunteers were selected on the presence (or not) of a chronic, slight, elevation of CRP (Control: <1; CRP+: >2 mg l−1 and <10 mg l−1, for 2 months). Body composition, short performance battery test, aerobic fitness and muscle strength were assessed. Whole body and muscle protein metabolism and the splanchnic extraction of amino acids were assessed using [13C]leucine and [2H]leucine infusion. The anabolic effect of food intake was measured by studying the volunteers both at the post-absorptive and post-prandial states. Slight chronic CRP elevation resulted in neither an alteration of whole body, nor skeletal muscle protein metabolism at both the post-absorptive and the post-prandial states. However, CRP+ presented a reduction of physical fitness, increased abdominal fat mass and post-prandial insulin resistance. Plasma cytokines (interleukin-1, interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor α) and markers of endothelial inflammation (intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule, selectins) were similar between groups. An isolated elevated CRP in healthy older population does not indicate an impaired skeletal muscle anabolism after food intake, nor an increased risk of skeletal muscle wasting. We propose that a broader picture of LGI (notably with elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines) is required to impact muscle metabolism and mass. However, an isolated chronic CRP

  7. Oligodendroglial NMDA Receptors Regulate Glucose Import and Axonal Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Saab, Aiman S; Tzvetavona, Iva D; Trevisiol, Andrea; Baltan, Selva; Dibaj, Payam; Kusch, Kathrin; Möbius, Wiebke; Goetze, Bianka; Jahn, Hannah M; Huang, Wenhui; Steffens, Heinz; Schomburg, Eike D; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Pérez-Cerdá, Fernando; Bakhtiari, Davood; Matute, Carlos; Löwel, Siegrid; Griesinger, Christian; Hirrlinger, Johannes; Kirchhoff, Frank; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2016-07-01

    Oligodendrocytes make myelin and support axons metabolically with lactate. However, it is unknown how glucose utilization and glycolysis are adapted to the different axonal energy demands. Spiking axons release glutamate and oligodendrocytes express NMDA receptors of unknown function. Here we show that the stimulation of oligodendroglial NMDA receptors mobilizes glucose transporter GLUT1, leading to its incorporation into the myelin compartment in vivo. When myelinated optic nerves from conditional NMDA receptor mutants are challenged with transient oxygen-glucose deprivation, they show a reduced functional recovery when returned to oxygen-glucose but are indistinguishable from wild-type when provided with oxygen-lactate. Moreover, the functional integrity of isolated optic nerves, which are electrically silent, is extended by preincubation with NMDA, mimicking axonal activity, and shortened by NMDA receptor blockers. This reveals a novel aspect of neuronal energy metabolism in which activity-dependent glutamate release enhances oligodendroglial glucose uptake and glycolytic support of fast spiking axons. PMID:27292539

  8. Energy metabolism in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough: insights from transcriptome analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Patricia M.; He, Qiang; Valente, Filipa M.A.; Xavier, Antonio V.; Zhou, Jizhong; Pereira, Ines A.C.; Louro, Ricardo O.

    2007-11-01

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria are important players in the global sulphur and carbon cycles, with considerable economical and ecological impact. However, the process of sulphate respiration is still incompletely understood. Several mechanisms of energy conservation have been proposed, but it is unclear how the different strategies contribute to the overall process. In order to obtain a deeper insight into the energy metabolism of sulphate-reducers whole-genome microarrays were used to compare the transcriptional response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough grown with hydrogen/sulphate, pyruvate/sulphate, pyruvate with limiting sulphate, and lactate/thiosulphate, relative to growth in lactate/sulphate. Growth with hydrogen/sulphate showed the largest number of differentially expressed genes and the largest changes in transcript levels. In this condition the most up-regulated energy metabolism genes were those coding for the periplasmic [NiFeSe]hydrogenase, followed by the Ech hydrogenase. The results also provide evidence for the involvement of formate cycling and the recently proposed ethanol pathway during growth in hydrogen. The pathway involving CO cycling is relevant during growth on lactate and pyruvate, but not during growth in hydrogen as the most down-regulated genes were those coding for the CO-induced hydrogenase. Growth on lactate/thiosulphate reveals a down-regulation of several energymetabolism genes similar to what was observed in the presence of nitrite. This study identifies the role of several proteins involved in the energy metabolism of D. vulgaris and highlights several novel genes related to this process, revealing a more complex bioenergetic metabolism than previously considered.

  9. Microbial catabolic activities are naturally selected by metabolic energy harvest rate.

    PubMed

    González-Cabaleiro, Rebeca; Ofiţeru, Irina D; Lema, Juan M; Rodríguez, Jorge

    2015-12-01

    The fundamental trade-off between yield and rate of energy harvest per unit of substrate has been largely discussed as a main characteristic for microbial established cooperation or competition. In this study, this point is addressed by developing a generalized model that simulates competition between existing and not experimentally reported microbial catabolic activities defined only based on well-known biochemical pathways. No specific microbial physiological adaptations are considered, growth yield is calculated coupled to catabolism energetics and a common maximum biomass-specific catabolism rate (expressed as electron transfer rate) is assumed for all microbial groups. Under this approach, successful microbial metabolisms are predicted in line with experimental observations under the hypothesis of maximum energy harvest rate. Two microbial ecosystems, typically found in wastewater treatment plants, are simulated, namely: (i) the anaerobic fermentation of glucose and (ii) the oxidation and reduction of nitrogen under aerobic autotrophic (nitrification) and anoxic heterotrophic and autotrophic (denitrification) conditions. The experimentally observed cross feeding in glucose fermentation, through multiple intermediate fermentation pathways, towards ultimately methane and carbon dioxide is predicted. Analogously, two-stage nitrification (by ammonium and nitrite oxidizers) is predicted as prevailing over nitrification in one stage. Conversely, denitrification is predicted in one stage (by denitrifiers) as well as anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation). The model results suggest that these observations are a direct consequence of the different energy yields per electron transferred at the different steps of the pathways. Overall, our results theoretically support the hypothesis that successful microbial catabolic activities are selected by an overall maximum energy harvest rate. PMID:26161636

  10. [Dynamics of parameters of energy metabolism at adaptation to diving in human].

    PubMed

    Baranova, T I; Kovalenko, R I; Mitrofanova, A V; Ianvareva, I N

    2010-01-01

    Studies of the diving reaction in the comparative-evolutionary aspect have shown that a complex of reactions providing the oxygen-saving effect during diving is inherent in human like in the secondary-aquatic mammals. This is confirmed by results of study of peculiarities of energy metabolism during imitation of diving (hold-up of respiration with immersion of face into the cold water--the cold-hypoxic-hypercapnic action) (CHHA). Data of gas analysis have shown that during the diving imitation the oxygen consumption rate is statistically significantly lower than during the usual hold-up of respiration (Genche's test). As shown by the study, this is due to the greater degree to vasoconstriction of peripheral vessels and selective redistribution of blood flow than to slowing down of the blood flow caused by reflex bradycardia during diving. It has been revealed that under effect of adaptation to CHHA, on the background of a decrease of the total energy consumption by the organism there occurs some increase of contribution of aerobic processes to its energy provision. Adaptation to CHHA has been shown to be accompanied by a decrease of reactivity of the parasympathetic chain of regulation of the heart chronotropic function and by an increase of duration of apnea. The duration of apnea is directly correlated with level of insulin--the hormone stimulating the anaerobic pathway of energy provision. Under effect of adaptation to CHHA there has been established an increase of the organism resistance to stress actions, which is confirmed by the lower levels of cortisol and thyroid hormones in representatives of the experimental group as compared with the control one. PMID:21061652

  11. Endocrine regulation of energy metabolism by the skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Na Kyung; Sowa, Hideaki; Hinoi, Eiichi; Ferron, Mathieu; Ahn, Jong Deok; Confavreux, Cyrille; Dacquin, Romain; Mee, Patrick J.; McKee, Marc D.; Jung, Dae Young; Zhang, Zhiyou; Kim, Jason K.; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck; Ducy, Patricia; Karsenty, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY The regulation of bone remodeling by an adipocyte-derived hormone implies that bone may exert a feedback control of energy homeostasis. To test this hypothesis we looked for genes expressed in osteoblasts, encoding signaling molecules and affecting energy metabolism. We show here that mice lacking the protein tyrosine phosphatase OST-PTP are hypoglycemic and protected from obesity and glucose intolerance because of an increase in β-cell proliferation, insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. In contrast, mice lacking the osteoblast-secreted molecule osteocalcin display decreased β-cell proliferation, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Removing one Osteocalcin allele from OST-PTP-deficient mice corrects their metabolic phenotype. Ex vivo, osteocalcin can stimulate CyclinD1 and Insulin expression in β-cells and Adiponectin, an insulin-sensitizing adipokine, in adipocytes; in vivo osteocalcin can improve glucose tolerance. By revealing that the skeleton exerts an endocrine regulation of sugar homeostasis this study expands the biological importance of this organ and our understanding of energy metabolism. PMID:17693256

  12. Metabolic regulation and energy homeostasis through the primary cilium

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Edwin C.; Vasanth, Shivakumar; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes represent a significant healthcare concern. In contrast to genome-wide association studies that, some exceptions notwithstanding, have offered modest clues about pathomechanism, the dissection of rare disorders in which obesity represents a core feature have highlighted key molecules and structures critical to energy regulation. Here we focus on the primary cilium, an organelle whose roles in energy homeostasis have been underscored by the high incidence of obesity and type II diabetes in patients and mouse mutants with compromised ciliary function. We discuss recent evidence linking ciliary dysfunction to metabolic defects and we explore the contribution of neuronal and non-neuronal cilia to these phenotypes. PMID:25543293

  13. Validated Predictions of Metabolic Energy Consumption for Submaximal Effort Movement

    PubMed Central

    Tsianos, George A.; MacFadden, Lisa N.

    2016-01-01

    Physical performance emerges from complex interactions among many physiological systems that are largely driven by the metabolic energy demanded. Quantifying metabolic demand is an essential step for revealing the many mechanisms of physical performance decrement, but accurate predictive models do not exist. The goal of this study was to investigate if a recently developed model of muscle energetics and force could be extended to reproduce the kinematics, kinetics, and metabolic demand of submaximal effort movement. Upright dynamic knee extension against various levels of ergometer load was simulated. Task energetics were estimated by combining the model of muscle contraction with validated models of lower limb musculotendon paths and segment dynamics. A genetic algorithm was used to compute the muscle excitations that reproduced the movement with the lowest energetic cost, which was determined to be an appropriate criterion for this task. Model predictions of oxygen uptake rate (VO2) were well within experimental variability for the range over which the model parameters were confidently known. The model's accurate estimates of metabolic demand make it useful for assessing the likelihood and severity of physical performance decrement for a given task as well as investigating underlying physiologic mechanisms. PMID:27248429

  14. Energy intake and basal metabolic rate during maintenance chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bond, S A; Han, A M; Wootton, S A; Kohler, J A

    1992-02-01

    Energy intakes and basal metabolic rates were determined in 26 children receiving chemotherapy in remission from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia or solid tumours and 26 healthy controls matched for age and sex. Body weight and height on the two groups were comparable, although one patient was stunted (height for age) and three others wasted (weight for height). Energy intake in the patients at 7705 kJ/day (1842 kcal) and controls at 7773 kJ/day (1866 kcal)) and basal metabolic rate (BMR) in the patients at 4873 kJ/day (1172 kcal) and controls 4987 kJ/day (1196 kcal) for the two groups were not significantly different. Although the energy intake:BMR ratio for both groups was 1.59, the range of values for the patient group was large (0.96-2.73) and appeared to be greater than that observed in the control group (1.23-2.46). These results demonstrated that during this period of chemotherapy there was no evidence of raised energy expenditure at rest or reduced energy intake in the patient group. No indication of undernutrition in the patients as a group was evident, although some individuals might require further clinical nutritional assessment. PMID:1543386

  15. Energy intake and basal metabolic rate during maintenance chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Bond, S A; Han, A M; Wootton, S A; Kohler, J A

    1992-01-01

    Energy intakes and basal metabolic rates were determined in 26 children receiving chemotherapy in remission from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia or solid tumours and 26 healthy controls matched for age and sex. Body weight and height on the two groups were comparable, although one patient was stunted (height for age) and three others wasted (weight for height). Energy intake in the patients at 7705 kJ/day (1842 kcal) and controls at 7773 kJ/day (1866 kcal)) and basal metabolic rate (BMR) in the patients at 4873 kJ/day (1172 kcal) and controls 4987 kJ/day (1196 kcal) for the two groups were not significantly different. Although the energy intake:BMR ratio for both groups was 1.59, the range of values for the patient group was large (0.96-2.73) and appeared to be greater than that observed in the control group (1.23-2.46). These results demonstrated that during this period of chemotherapy there was no evidence of raised energy expenditure at rest or reduced energy intake in the patient group. No indication of undernutrition in the patients as a group was evident, although some individuals might require further clinical nutritional assessment. PMID:1543386

  16. Metabolic Constraints on the Eukaryotic Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Rodrick

    2009-04-01

    Mutualism, obligate mutualism, symbiosis, and the eukaryotic ‘fusion’ of Serial Endosymbiosis Theory represent progressively more rapid and less distorted real-time communication between biological structures instantiating information sources. Such progression in accurate information transmission requires, in turn, progressively greater channel capacity that, through the homology between information source uncertainty and free energy density, requires ever more energetic metabolism. The eukaryotic transition, according to this model, may have been entrained by an ecosystem resilience shift from anaerobic to aerobic metabolism.

  17. Interaction among Skeletal Muscle Metabolic Energy Systems during Intense Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Julien S.; McCormick, Marie Clare; Robergs, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    High-intensity exercise can result in up to a 1,000-fold increase in the rate of ATP demand compared to that at rest (Newsholme et al., 1983). To sustain muscle contraction, ATP needs to be regenerated at a rate complementary to ATP demand. Three energy systems function to replenish ATP in muscle: (1) Phosphagen, (2) Glycolytic, and (3) Mitochondrial Respiration. The three systems differ in the substrates used, products, maximal rate of ATP regeneration, capacity of ATP regeneration, and their associated contributions to fatigue. In this exercise context, fatigue is best defined as a decreasing force production during muscle contraction despite constant or increasing effort. The replenishment of ATP during intense exercise is the result of a coordinated metabolic response in which all energy systems contribute to different degrees based on an interaction between the intensity and duration of the exercise, and consequently the proportional contribution of the different skeletal muscle motor units. Such relative contributions also determine to a large extent the involvement of specific metabolic and central nervous system events that contribute to fatigue. The purpose of this paper is to provide a contemporary explanation of the muscle metabolic response to different exercise intensities and durations, with emphasis given to recent improvements in understanding and research methodology. PMID:21188163

  18. Molecular links between early energy metabolism alterations and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Pedros, Ignacio; Patraca, Ivan; Martinez, Nohora; Petrov, Dmitry; Sureda, Francesc X; Auladell, Carme; Beas-Zarate, Carlos; Folch, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the neurobiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology could not be explained solely by an increase in beta-amyloid levels. In fact, success with potential therapeutic drugs that inhibit the generation of beta amyloid has been low. Therefore, due to therapeutic failure in recent years, the scientists are looking for alternative hypotheses to explain the causes of the disease and the cognitive loss. Accordingly, alternative hypothesis propose a link between AD and peripheral metabolic alteration. Then, we review in depth changes related to insulin signalling and energy metabolism in the context of the APPSwe/PS1dE9 (APP/PS1) mice model of AD. We show an integrated view of the changes that occur in the early stages of the amyloidogenic process in the APP/PS1 double transgenic mice model. These early changes affect several key metabolic processes related to glucose uptake and insulin signalling, cellular energy homeostasis, mitochondrial biogenesis and increased Tau phosphorylation by kinase molecules like mTOR and Cdk5. PMID:26709757

  19. [Modifications in myocardial energy metabolism in diabetic patients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grynberg, A.

    2001-01-01

    The capacity of cardiac myocyte to regulate ATP production to face any change in energy demand is a major determinant of cardiac function. Because FA is the main heart fuel (although the most expensive one in oxygen, and prompt to induce deleterious effects), this process is based on a balanced fatty acid (FA) metabolism. Several pathological situations are associated with an accumulation of FA or derivatives, or with an excessive b-oxidation. The diabetic cardiomyocyte is characterised by an over consumption of FA. The control of the FA/glucose balance clearly appears as a new strategy for cytoprotection, particularly in diabetes and requires a reduced FA contribution to ATP production. Cardiac myocytes can control FA mitochondrial entry, but display weak ability to control FA uptake, thus the fate of non beta-oxidized FA appear as a new impairment for the cell. Both the trigger and the regulation of cardiac contraction result from membrane activity, and the other major FA function in the myocardium is their role in membrane homeostasis, through the phospholipid synthesis and remodeling pathways. Sudden death, hypercatecholaminemia, diabetes and heart failure have been associated with an altered PUFA content in cardiac membranes. Experimental data suggest that the 2 metabolic pathways involved in membrane homeostasis may represent therapeutic targets for cytoprotection. The drugs that increase cardiac phospholipid turnover (trimetazidine, ranolazine,...) display anti-ischemic non hemodynamic effect. This effect is based on a redirection of FA utilization towards phospholipid synthesis, which decrease their availability for energy production. A nutritional approach gave also promising results. Besides its anti-arrhythmic effect, the dietary docosahexaenoic acid is able to reduce FA energy consumption and hence oxygen demand. The cardiac metabolic pathways involving FA should be considered as a whole, precariously balanced. The diabetic heart being characterised by

  20. Polyphosphate - an ancient energy source and active metabolic regulator

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    There are a several molecules on Earth that effectively store energy within their covalent bonds, and one of these energy-rich molecules is polyphosphate. In microbial cells, polyphosphate granules are synthesised for both energy and phosphate storage and are degraded to produce nucleotide triphosphate or phosphate. Energy released from these energetic carriers is used by the cell for production of all vital molecules such as amino acids, nucleobases, sugars and lipids. Polyphosphate chains directly regulate some processes in the cell and are used as phosphate donors in gene regulation. These two processes, energetic metabolism and regulation, are orchestrated by polyphosphate kinases. Polyphosphate kinases (PPKs) can currently be categorized into three groups (PPK1, PPK2 and PPK3) according their functionality; they can also be divided into three groups according their homology (EcPPK1, PaPPK2 and ScVTC). This review discusses historical information, similarities and differences, biochemical characteristics, roles in stress response regulation and possible applications in the biotechnology industry of these enzymes. At the end of the review, a hypothesis is discussed in view of synthetic biology applications that states polyphosphate and calcium-rich organelles have endosymbiotic origins from ancient protocells that metabolized polyphosphate. PMID:21816086

  1. Energy metabolism and the high-altitude environment.

    PubMed

    Murray, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    At high altitude the barometric pressure falls, challenging oxygen delivery to the tissues. Thus, whilst hypoxia is not the only physiological stress encountered at high altitude, low arterial P(O2) is a sustained feature, even after allowing adequate time for acclimatization. Cardiac and skeletal muscle energy metabolism is altered in subjects at, or returning from, high altitude. In the heart, energetic reserve falls, as indicated by lower phosphocreatine-to-ATP ratios. The underlying mechanism is unknown, but in the hypoxic rat heart fatty acid oxidation and respiratory capacity are decreased, whilst pyruvate oxidation is also lower after sustained hypoxic exposure. In skeletal muscle, there is not a consensus. With prolonged exposure to extreme high altitude (>5500 m) a loss of muscle mitochondrial density is seen, but this was not observed in a simulated ascent of Everest in hypobaric chambers. At more moderate high altitude, decreased respiratory capacity may occur without changes in mitochondrial volume density, and fat oxidation may be downregulated, although this is not seen in all studies. The underlying mechanisms, including the possible role of hypoxia-signalling pathways, remain to be resolved, particularly in light of confounding factors in the high-altitude environment. In high-altitude-adapted Tibetan natives, however, there is evidence of natural selection centred around the hypoxia-inducible factor pathway, and metabolic features in this population (e.g. low cardiac phosphocreatine-to-ATP ratios, increased cardiac glucose uptake and lower muscle mitochondrial densities) share similarities with those in acclimatized lowlanders, supporting a possible role for the hypoxia-inducible factor pathway in the metabolic response of cardiac and skeletal muscle energy metabolism to high altitude. PMID:26315373

  2. An obligately aerobic soil bacterium activates fermentative hydrogen production to survive reductive stress during hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Berney, Michael; Greening, Chris; Conrad, Ralf; Jacobs, William R.; Cook, Gregory M.

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen availability is a major factor and evolutionary force determining the metabolic strategy of bacteria colonizing an environmental niche. In the soil, conditions can switch rapidly between oxia and anoxia, forcing soil bacteria to remodel their energy metabolism accordingly. Mycobacterium is a dominant genus in the soil, and all its species are obligate aerobes. Here we show that an obligate aerobe, the soil actinomycete Mycobacterium smegmatis, adopts an anaerobe-type strategy by activating fermentative hydrogen production to adapt to hypoxia. This process is controlled by the two-component system DosR-DosS/DosT, an oxygen and redox sensor that is well conserved in mycobacteria. We show that DosR tightly regulates the two [NiFe]-hydrogenases: Hyd3 (MSMEG_3931-3928) and Hyd2 (MSMEG_2719-2718). Using genetic manipulation and high-sensitivity GC, we demonstrate that Hyd3 facilitates the evolution of H2 when oxygen is depleted. Combined activity of Hyd2 and Hyd3 was necessary to maintain an optimal NAD+/NADH ratio and enhanced adaptation to and survival of hypoxia. We demonstrate that fermentatively-produced hydrogen can be recycled when fumarate or oxygen become available, suggesting Mycobacterium smegmatis can switch between fermentation, anaerobic respiration, and aerobic respiration. Hydrogen metabolism enables this obligate aerobe to rapidly meet its energetic needs when switching between microoxic and anoxic conditions and provides a competitive advantage in low oxygen environments. PMID:25049411

  3. An obligately aerobic soil bacterium activates fermentative hydrogen production to survive reductive stress during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Berney, Michael; Greening, Chris; Conrad, Ralf; Jacobs, William R; Cook, Gregory M

    2014-08-01

    Oxygen availability is a major factor and evolutionary force determining the metabolic strategy of bacteria colonizing an environmental niche. In the soil, conditions can switch rapidly between oxia and anoxia, forcing soil bacteria to remodel their energy metabolism accordingly. Mycobacterium is a dominant genus in the soil, and all its species are obligate aerobes. Here we show that an obligate aerobe, the soil actinomycete Mycobacterium smegmatis, adopts an anaerobe-type strategy by activating fermentative hydrogen production to adapt to hypoxia. This process is controlled by the two-component system DosR-DosS/DosT, an oxygen and redox sensor that is well conserved in mycobacteria. We show that DosR tightly regulates the two [NiFe]-hydrogenases: Hyd3 (MSMEG_3931-3928) and Hyd2 (MSMEG_2719-2718). Using genetic manipulation and high-sensitivity GC, we demonstrate that Hyd3 facilitates the evolution of H2 when oxygen is depleted. Combined activity of Hyd2 and Hyd3 was necessary to maintain an optimal NAD(+)/NADH ratio and enhanced adaptation to and survival of hypoxia. We demonstrate that fermentatively-produced hydrogen can be recycled when fumarate or oxygen become available, suggesting Mycobacterium smegmatis can switch between fermentation, anaerobic respiration, and aerobic respiration. Hydrogen metabolism enables this obligate aerobe to rapidly meet its energetic needs when switching between microoxic and anoxic conditions and provides a competitive advantage in low oxygen environments. PMID:25049411

  4. Teaching Aerobic Fitness Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Allan N.; Ratliffe, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to teach aerobic fitness concepts to elementary students. Some of the K-2 activities include location, size, and purpose of the heart and lungs; the exercise pulse; respiration rate; and activities to measure aerobic endurance. Some of the 3-6 activities include: definition of aerobic endurance; heart disease risk factors;…

  5. Experimental ocean acidification alters the allocation of metabolic energy.

    PubMed

    Pan, T-C Francis; Applebaum, Scott L; Manahan, Donal T

    2015-04-14

    Energy is required to maintain physiological homeostasis in response to environmental change. Although responses to environmental stressors frequently are assumed to involve high metabolic costs, the biochemical bases of actual energy demands are rarely quantified. We studied the impact of a near-future scenario of ocean acidification [800 µatm partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2)] during the development and growth of an important model organism in developmental and environmental biology, the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Size, metabolic rate, biochemical content, and gene expression were not different in larvae growing under control and seawater acidification treatments. Measurements limited to those levels of biological analysis did not reveal the biochemical mechanisms of response to ocean acidification that occurred at the cellular level. In vivo rates of protein synthesis and ion transport increased ∼50% under acidification. Importantly, the in vivo physiological increases in ion transport were not predicted from total enzyme activity or gene expression. Under acidification, the increased rates of protein synthesis and ion transport that were sustained in growing larvae collectively accounted for the majority of available ATP (84%). In contrast, embryos and prefeeding and unfed larvae in control treatments allocated on average only 40% of ATP to these same two processes. Understanding the biochemical strategies for accommodating increases in metabolic energy demand and their biological limitations can serve as a quantitative basis for assessing sublethal effects of global change. Variation in the ability to allocate ATP differentially among essential functions may be a key basis of resilience to ocean acidification and other compounding environmental stressors. PMID:25825763

  6. Experimental ocean acidification alters the allocation of metabolic energy

    PubMed Central

    Pan, T.-C. Francis; Applebaum, Scott L.; Manahan, Donal T.

    2015-01-01

    Energy is required to maintain physiological homeostasis in response to environmental change. Although responses to environmental stressors frequently are assumed to involve high metabolic costs, the biochemical bases of actual energy demands are rarely quantified. We studied the impact of a near-future scenario of ocean acidification [800 µatm partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2)] during the development and growth of an important model organism in developmental and environmental biology, the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Size, metabolic rate, biochemical content, and gene expression were not different in larvae growing under control and seawater acidification treatments. Measurements limited to those levels of biological analysis did not reveal the biochemical mechanisms of response to ocean acidification that occurred at the cellular level. In vivo rates of protein synthesis and ion transport increased ∼50% under acidification. Importantly, the in vivo physiological increases in ion transport were not predicted from total enzyme activity or gene expression. Under acidification, the increased rates of protein synthesis and ion transport that were sustained in growing larvae collectively accounted for the majority of available ATP (84%). In contrast, embryos and prefeeding and unfed larvae in control treatments allocated on average only 40% of ATP to these same two processes. Understanding the biochemical strategies for accommodating increases in metabolic energy demand and their biological limitations can serve as a quantitative basis for assessing sublethal effects of global change. Variation in the ability to allocate ATP differentially among essential functions may be a key basis of resilience to ocean acidification and other compounding environmental stressors. PMID:25825763

  7. Primary cilia in energy balance signaling and metabolic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hankyu; Song, Jieun; Jung, Joo Hyun; Ko, Hyuk Wan

    2015-01-01

    Energy homeostasis in our body system is maintained by balancing the intake and expenditure of energy. Excessive accumulation of fat by disrupting the balance system causes overweight and obesity, which are increasingly becoming global health concerns. Understanding the pathogenesis of obesity focused on studying the genes related to familial types of obesity. Recently, a rare human genetic disorder, ciliopathy, links the role for genes regulating structure and function of a cellular organelle, the primary cilium, to metabolic disorder, obesity and type II diabetes. Primary cilia are microtubule based hair-like membranous structures, lacking motility and functions such as sensing the environmental cues, and transducing extracellular signals within the cells. Interestingly, the subclass of ciliopathies, such as Bardet-Biedle and Alström syndrome, manifest obesity and type II diabetes in human and mouse model systems. Moreover, studies on genetic mouse model system indicate that more ciliary genes affect energy homeostasis through multiple regulatory steps such as central and peripheral actions of leptin and insulin. In this review, we discuss the latest findings in primary cilia and metabolic disorders, and propose the possible interaction between primary cilia and the leptin and insulin signal pathways which might enhance our understanding of the unambiguous link of a cell’s antenna to obesity and type II diabetes. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(12): 647-654] PMID:26538252

  8. [Lipids composition and speed of energy metabolism in gastropods].

    PubMed

    Arakelova, E S

    2008-01-01

    Lipid composition of digestive gland and pedal muscle of two northern freshwater pulmonate snails Lymnaea stagnalis and Lymnaea ovata and three marine prosobranch gastropods Littorina obtusata, Littorina littorea, Buccinum undatum from the White Sea was studied. The species differ in ecology, particularly in trophic nabits and motor activity. The content of triacilglycerides both in digestive gland and pedal was higher in littoral dwellers Littorina the activity of which depends on the tide level. The phospholipids content in digestive gland does not differ in quantity in all cases and does not relate to type of feeding or resource quality. In a pedal muscle of marine species the quantity of common phospholipids is higher in comparison with the freshwater ones. The amount of total phospholipids in pedal muscle correlates with mass of metabolic inert formation which constitutes a part of whole mass of snails. The presence of massive shell enhances demands in energy needed for supporting movement and activity. Because the intensity of energy metabolism is related to quantity of total phospholipids, mitochondria and activity of their oxidizing ferments, the presence of thick shell in marine snails together with motor activity costs more in terms of energy than in freshwater snails with thin shell. This hypothesis is supported by the higher specific rate of oxygen consumption in marine snails than in freshwaters. PMID:19140337

  9. Intestinal triacylglycerol synthesis in fat absorption and systemic energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chi-Liang Eric; Nelson, David W; Yen, Mei-I

    2015-03-01

    The intestine plays a prominent role in the biosynthesis of triacylglycerol (triglyceride; TAG). Digested dietary TAG is repackaged in the intestine to form the hydrophobic core of chylomicrons, which deliver metabolic fuels, essential fatty acids, and other lipid-soluble nutrients to the peripheral tissues. By controlling the flux of dietary fat into the circulation, intestinal TAG synthesis can greatly impact systemic metabolism. Genes encoding many of the enzymes involved in TAG synthesis have been identified. Among TAG synthesis enzymes, acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 and acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT)1 are highly expressed in the intestine. Their physiological functions have been examined in the context of whole organisms using genetically engineered mice and, in the case of DGAT1, specific inhibitors. An emerging theme from recent findings is that limiting the rate of TAG synthesis in the intestine can modulate gut hormone secretion, lipid metabolism, and systemic energy balance. The underlying mechanisms and their implications for humans are yet to be explored. Pharmacological inhibition of TAG hydrolysis in the intestinal lumen has been employed to combat obesity and associated disorders with modest efficacy and unwanted side effects. The therapeutic potential of inhibiting specific enzymes involved in intestinal TAG synthesis warrants further investigation. PMID:25231105

  10. Intestinal triacylglycerol synthesis in fat absorption and systemic energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Chi-Liang Eric; Nelson, David W.; Yen, Mei-I

    2015-01-01

    The intestine plays a prominent role in the biosynthesis of triacylglycerol (triglyceride; TAG). Digested dietary TAG is repackaged in the intestine to form the hydrophobic core of chylomicrons, which deliver metabolic fuels, essential fatty acids, and other lipid-soluble nutrients to the peripheral tissues. By controlling the flux of dietary fat into the circulation, intestinal TAG synthesis can greatly impact systemic metabolism. Genes encoding many of the enzymes involved in TAG synthesis have been identified. Among TAG synthesis enzymes, acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 and acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT)1 are highly expressed in the intestine. Their physiological functions have been examined in the context of whole organisms using genetically engineered mice and, in the case of DGAT1, specific inhibitors. An emerging theme from recent findings is that limiting the rate of TAG synthesis in the intestine can modulate gut hormone secretion, lipid metabolism, and systemic energy balance. The underlying mechanisms and their implications for humans are yet to be explored. Pharmacological inhibition of TAG hydrolysis in the intestinal lumen has been employed to combat obesity and associated disorders with modest efficacy and unwanted side effects. The therapeutic potential of inhibiting specific enzymes involved in intestinal TAG synthesis warrants further investigation. PMID:25231105

  11. Metabolic alterations in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Brunelli, Matteo; Piva, Francesco; Modena, Alessandra; Bimbatti, Davide; Fantinel, Emanuela; Santini, Daniele; Cheng, Liang; Cascinu, Stefano; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2015-11-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a metabolic disease, being characterized by the dysregulation of metabolic pathways involved in oxygen sensing (VHL/HIF pathway alterations and the subsequent up-regulation of HIF-responsive genes such as VEGF, PDGF, EGF, and glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT4, which justify the RCC reliance on aerobic glycolysis), energy sensing (fumarate hydratase-deficient, succinate dehydrogenase-deficient RCC, mutations of HGF/MET pathway resulting in the metabolic Warburg shift marked by RCC increased dependence on aerobic glycolysis and the pentose phosphate shunt, augmented lipogenesis, and reduced AMPK and Krebs cycle activity) and/or nutrient sensing cascade (deregulation of AMPK-TSC1/2-mTOR and PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathways). We analyzed the key metabolic abnormalities underlying RCC carcinogenesis, highlighting those altered pathways that may represent potential targets for the development of more effective therapeutic strategies. PMID:26169313

  12. Modular organization of cardiac energy metabolism: energy conversion, transfer and feedback regulation

    PubMed Central

    Guzun, R.; Kaambre, T.; Bagur, R.; Grichine, A.; Usson, Y.; Varikmaa, M.; Anmann, T.; Tepp, K.; Timohhina, N.; Shevchuk, I.; Chekulayev, V.; Boucher, F.; Santos, P. Dos; Schlattner, U.; Wallimann, T.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Dzeja, P.; Aliev, M.; Saks, V.

    2014-01-01

    To meet high cellular demands, the energy metabolism of cardiac muscles is organized by precise and coordinated functioning of intracellular energetic units (ICEUs). ICEUs represent structural and functional modules integrating multiple fluxes at sites of ATP generation in mitochondria and ATP utilization by myofibrillar, sarcoplasmic reticulum and sarcolemma ion-pump ATPases. The role of ICEUs is to enhance the efficiency of vectorial intracellular energy transfer and fine tuning of oxidative ATP synthesis maintaining stable metabolite levels to adjust to intracellular energy needs through the dynamic system of compartmentalized phosphoryl transfer networks. One of the key elements in regulation of energy flux distribution and feedback communication is the selective permeability of mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) which represents a bottleneck in adenine nucleotide and other energy metabolite transfer and microcompartmentalization. Based on the experimental and theoretical (mathematical modelling) arguments, we describe regulation of mitochondrial ATP synthesis within ICEUs allowing heart workload to be linearly correlated with oxygen consumption ensuring conditions of metabolic stability, signal communication and synchronization. Particular attention was paid to the structure–function relationship in the development of ICEU, and the role of mitochondria interaction with cytoskeletal proteins, like tubulin, in the regulation of MOM permeability in response to energy metabolic signals providing regulation of mitochondrial respiration. Emphasis was given to the importance of creatine metabolism for the cardiac energy homoeostasis. PMID:24666671

  13. Metabolic effects of dark chocolate consumption on energy, gut microbiota, and stress-related metabolism in free-living subjects.

    PubMed

    Martin, Francois-Pierre J; Rezzi, Serge; Peré-Trepat, Emma; Kamlage, Beate; Collino, Sebastiano; Leibold, Edgar; Kastler, Jürgen; Rein, Dietrich; Fay, Laurent B; Kochhar, Sunil

    2009-12-01

    Dietary preferences influence basal human metabolism and gut microbiome activity that in turn may have long-term health consequences. The present study reports the metabolic responses of free living subjects to a daily consumption of 40 g of dark chocolate for up to 14 days. A clinical trial was performed on a population of 30 human subjects, who were classified in low and high anxiety traits using validated psychological questionnaires. Biological fluids (urine and blood plasma) were collected during 3 test days at the beginning, midtime and at the end of a 2 week study. NMR and MS-based metabonomics were employed to study global changes in metabolism due to the chocolate consumption. Human subjects with higher anxiety trait showed a distinct metabolic profile indicative of a different energy homeostasis (lactate, citrate, succinate, trans-aconitate, urea, proline), hormonal metabolism (adrenaline, DOPA, 3-methoxy-tyrosine) and gut microbial activity (methylamines, p-cresol sulfate, hippurate). Dark chocolate reduced the urinary excretion of the stress hormone cortisol and catecholamines and partially normalized stress-related differences in energy metabolism (glycine, citrate, trans-aconitate, proline, beta-alanine) and gut microbial activities (hippurate and p-cresol sulfate). The study provides strong evidence that a daily consumption of 40 g of dark chocolate during a period of 2 weeks is sufficient to modify the metabolism of free living and healthy human subjects, as per variation of both host and gut microbial metabolism. PMID:19810704

  14. Hypocarnitinaemia induced by sodium pivalate in the rat is associated with left ventricular dysfunction and impaired energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Tom L

    2006-01-01

    Carnitine is a naturally occurring compound that is essential in energy metabolism of the mammalian heart. In addition to its essential role in facilitating beta-oxidation, carnitine eliminates excess toxic acyl residues and regulates the mitochondrial acetyl coenzyme A (CoA)/CoA ratio. Thus, it is not surprising that patients with carnitine deficiency syndromes exhibit defects in energy metabolism and in some cases demonstrate left ventricular dysfunction. Pivalic acid is commonly used to create prodrugs, such as pivampicillin and pivmecillinam, to facilitate enteral absorption and increase oral bioavailability. Pivalic acid released from the drug following absorption readily forms an ester with carnitine, which is then excreted as pivaloylcarnitine. Sustained loss of carnitine in the form of this ester induces a state of carnitine deficiency, exemplified by low plasma and tissue carnitine content. This review examines the effects in the rat of short- and long-term sodium pivalate treatment on: (1) cardiac carnitine content; (2) in vitro mechanical function; (3) markers of glycolytic and fatty acid metabolism; and (4) energy substrate metabolism. Treatment with sodium pivalate induces a gradual loss of cardiac carnitine content for up to 12 weeks. Doubling the duration of treatment is not associated with any further decrease in cardiac carnitine content. While heart function following short-term treatment (2 weeks) is normal under aerobic conditions, impaired recovery of function following ischaemia is seen. In contrast, long-term treatment (11-28 weeks) is associated with impaired heart function, which is dependent on workload and substrate availability. Impaired heart function is also associated with reductions in activity of 3-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase and rates of fatty acid oxidation. However, to maintain adenosine triphosphate production, glucose metabolism, expressed as hexokinase activity and glucose oxidation, is increased in carnitine

  15. Endocrine Regulation of Bone and Energy Metabolism in Hibernating Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Alison H.; Florant, Gregory L.; Donahue, Seth W.

    2014-01-01

    Precise coordination among organs is required to maintain homeostasis throughout hibernation. This is particularly true in balancing bone remodeling processes (bone formation and resorption) in hibernators experiencing nutritional deprivation and extreme physical inactivity, two factors normally leading to pronounced bone loss in non-hibernating mammals. In recent years, important relationships between bone, fat, reproductive, and brain tissues have come to light. These systems share interconnected regulatory mechanisms of energy metabolism that potentially protect the skeleton during hibernation. This review focuses on the endocrine and neuroendocrine regulation of bone/fat/energy metabolism in hibernators. Hibernators appear to have unique mechanisms that protect musculoskeletal tissues while catabolizing their abundant stores of fat. Furthermore, the bone remodeling processes that normally cause disuse-induced bone loss in non-hibernators are compared to bone remodeling processes in hibernators, and possible adaptations of the bone signaling pathways that protect the skeleton during hibernation are discussed. Understanding the biological mechanisms that allow hibernators to survive the prolonged disuse and fasting associated with extreme environmental challenges will provide critical information regarding the limit of convergence in mammalian systems and of skeletal plasticity, and may contribute valuable insight into the etiology and treatment of human diseases. PMID:24556365

  16. Metabolic energy requirements during manned orbital Skylab missions.

    PubMed

    Rambaut, P C; Leach, C S; Whedon, G D

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the metabolic cost of life in space. Energy intake was determined throughout the 28-, 59- and 84-day flights for each of the nine Skylab astronauts. Metabolic excretions were quantitatively collected and analyzed for a variety of biochemical constituents. Body mass was determined each day and body volume was ascertained by stereophotogrammetric means immediately pre- and post-flight. A ground-based control period of at least 3 weeks preceded each flight, and one of at least 18 days followed each flight. Examination of the data reveals that all crew members lost mass in flight, and that this loss did not result in a net increase in density. Elevated urinary and blood nitrogen, a net negative calcium and nitrogen balance and a decrease in the radiographic density of certain bones support the conclusion that lean body mass decreased. That the loss was primarily proteinaceous in nature is evidenced by the comparatively small net change in total body water and by a decrease in total body potassium each measured by isotopic dilution techniques. These changes in body composition, despite a constant caloric intake in flight and on the ground, suggest that the body's demand for exogenous nutrient energy is not measurably changed by exposure to null gravity flight up to 84 days in duration. PMID:11958214

  17. Selenocysteine, Pyrrolysine, and the Unique Energy Metabolism of Methanogenic Archaea

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rother, Michael; Krzycki, Joseph A.

    2010-01-01

    Methanogenic archaea are a group of strictly anaerobic microorganisms characterized by their strict dependence on the process of methanogenesis for energy conservation. Among the archaea, they are also the only known group synthesizing proteins containing selenocysteine or pyrrolysine. All but one of the known archaeal pyrrolysine-containing and all but two of the confirmed archaeal selenocysteine-containing protein are involved in methanogenesis. Synthesis of these proteins proceeds through suppression of translational stop codons but otherwise the two systems are fundamentally different. This paper highlights these differences and summarizes the recent developments in selenocysteine- and pyrrolysine-related research on archaea and aims to putmore » this knowledge into the context of their unique energy metabolism.« less

  18. Energy metabolism and hindbrain AMPK: regulation by estradiol.

    PubMed

    Briski, Karen P; Ibrahim, Baher A; Tamrakar, Pratistha

    2014-03-01

    Nerve cell energy status is screened within multiple classically defined hypothalamic and hindbrain components of the energy balance control network, including the hindbrain dorsal vagal complex (DVC). Signals of caudal DVC origin have a physiological role in glucostasis, e.g., maintenance of optimal supply of the critical substrate fuel, glucose, through control of motor functions such as fuel consumption and gluco-counterregulatory hormone secretion. A2 noradrenergic neurons are a likely source of these signals as combinatory laser microdissection/high-sensitivity Western blotting reveals expression of multiple biomarkers for metabolic sensing, including adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Hypoglycemia elicits estradiol-dependent sex differences in A2 AMPK activation as phospho-AMPK (pAMPK) expression is augmented in male and ovariectomized (OVX) female, but not estrogen-replaced, OVX rats. This dichotomy may reflect, in part, estradiol-mediated up-regulation of glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme expression during hypoglycemia. Our new model for short-term feeding abstinence has physiological relevance to planned (dieting) or unplanned (meal delay) interruption of consumption in modern life, which is negatively correlated with appetite control and obesity, and is useful for investigating how estrogen may mitigate the effects of disrupted fuel acquisition on energy balance via actions within the DVC. Estradiol reduces DVC AMPK activity after local delivery of the AMP mimic, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-riboside, or cessation of feeding for 12 h but elevates pAMPK expression when these treatments are combined. These data suggest that estrogen maintains cellular energy stability over periods of suspended fuel acquisition and yet optimizes, by DVC AMPK-dependent mechanisms, counter-regulatory responses to metabolic challenges that occur during short-span feeding abstinence. PMID:25372736

  19. Ethyl pyruvate protects against sepsis by regulating energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hongjun; Mao, Zhi; Zhao, Yan; Yin, Ting; Song, Qing; Pan, Liang; Hu, Xin; Hu, Jie; Zhou, Feihu

    2016-01-01

    Background Ethyl pyruvate (EP) is a derivative of pyruvic acid that has been demonstrated to be a potential scavenger of reactive oxygen species as well as an anti-inflammatory agent. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of EP and its role in regulating the energy metabolism in the livers of cecal-ligation-and-puncture-induced septic mice. Methods The animals were treated intraperitoneally with 0.2 mL of Ringer’s lactate solution or an equivalent volume of Ringer’s lactate solution containing EP immediately after cecal ligation and puncture. Each mouse in the Sham group was only subjected to a laparotomy. At 30-, 60-, 180-, and 360-minute time points, we measured the histopathological alterations of the intestines, and the plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-α, and the total antioxidative capacity, malondialdehyde content, and lactate and lactate/pyruvate levels in livers. Furthermore, we detected the levels of adenosine triphosphate, total adenylate, and energy charge in the livers. Results Our results demonstrated that the administration of EP significantly improved the survival rate and reduced intestinal histological alterations. EP inhibited the plasma levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α and increased the IL-10 level. EP significantly inhibited the elevation of the malondialdehyde, lactate, and lactate/pyruvate levels and enhanced the total antioxidative capacity levels in the liver tissues. The downregulation of the adenosine triphosphate, total adenylate, and energy charge levels in the liver tissues was reversed in the septic mice treated with EP. Conclusion The results suggest that EP administration effectively modulates the energy metabolism, which may be an important component in treatment of sepsis. PMID:26966369

  20. Extracellular glucose supports lactate production but not aerobic metabolism in cardiomyocytes from both normoglycemic Atlantic cod and low glycemic short-horned sculpin.

    PubMed

    Clow, Kathy A; Short, Connie E; Driedzic, William R

    2016-05-01

    Fish exhibit a wide range of species-specific blood glucose levels. How this relates to glucose utilization is yet to be fully realized. Here, we assessed glucose transport and metabolism in myocytes isolated from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and short-horned sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius), species with blood glucose levels of 3.7 and 0.57 mmol l(-1), respectively. Glucose metabolism was assessed by the production of (3)H2O from [2-(3)H]glucose. Glucose metabolism was 3.5- to 6-fold higher by myocytes from Atlantic cod than by those from short-horned sculpin at the same level of extracellular glucose. In Atlantic cod myocytes, glucose metabolism displayed what appears to be a saturable component with respect to extracellular glucose, and cytochalasin B inhibited glucose metabolism. These features revealed a facilitated glucose diffusion mechanism that accounts for between 30% and 55% of glucose entry at physiological levels of extracellular glucose. Facilitated glucose diffusion appears to be minimal in myocytes for short-horned sculpin. Glucose entry by simple diffusion occurs in both cell types with the same linear relationship between glucose metabolism and extracellular glucose concentration, presumably due to similarities in membrane composition. Oxygen consumption by myocytes incubated in medium containing physiological levels of extracellular glucose (Atlantic cod 5 mmol l(-1), short-horned sculpin 0.5 mmol l(-1)) was similar in the two species and was not decreased by cytochalasin B, suggesting that these cells have the capability of oxidizing alternative on-board metabolic fuels. Cells produced lactate at low rates but glycogen levels did not change during the incubation period. In cells from both species, glucose utilization assessed by both simple chemical analysis of glucose disappearance from the medium and (3)H2O production was half the rate of lactate production and as such extracellular glucose was not available for oxidative metabolism

  1. The Energetics of Aerobic versus Anaerobic Respiration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champion, Timothy D.; Schwenz, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    Background information, laboratory procedures, and a discussion of the results of an experiment designed to investigate the difference in energy gained from the aerobic and anaerobic oxidation of glucose are presented. Sample experimental and calculated data are included. (CW)

  2. Metabolic response to exercise.

    PubMed

    De Feo, P; Di Loreto, C; Lucidi, P; Murdolo, G; Parlanti, N; De Cicco, A; Piccioni, F; Santeusanio, F

    2003-09-01

    At the beginning, the survival of humans was strictly related to their physical capacity. There was the need to resist predators and to provide food and water for life. Achieving these goals required a prompt and efficient energy system capable of sustaining either high intensity or maintaining prolonged physical activity. Energy for skeletal muscle contraction is supplied by anaerobic and aerobic metabolic pathways. The former can allow short bursts of intense physical activity (60-90 sec) and utilizes as energetic source the phosphocreatine shuttle and anaerobic glycolysis. The aerobic system is the most efficient ATP source for skeletal muscle. The oxidative phosporylation of carbohydrates, fats and, to a minor extent, proteins, can sustain physical activity for many hours. Carbohydrates are the most efficient fuel for working muscle and their contribution to total fuel oxidation is positively related to the intensity of exercise. The first metabolic pathways of carbohydrate metabolism to be involved are skeletal muscle glycogenolysis and glycolysis. Later circulating glucose, formed through activated gluconeogenesis, becomes an important energetic source. Among glucose metabolites, lactate plays a primary role as either direct or indirect (gluconeogenesis) energy source for contracting skeletal muscle. Fat oxidation plays a primary role during either low-moderate intensity exercise or protracted physical activity (over 90-120 min). Severe muscle glycogen depletion results in increased rates of muscle proteolysis and branched chain amino acid oxidation. Endurance training ameliorates physical performance by improving cardiopulmonary efficiency and optimizing skeletal muscle supply and oxidation of substrates. PMID:14964437

  3. Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered for xylose metabolism requires gluconeogenesis and the oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway for aerobic xylose assimilation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saccharomyces strains engineered to ferment xylose using Scheffersomyces stipitis xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) genes appear to be limited by metabolic imbalances due to differing cofactor specificities of XR and XDH. The S. stipitis XR, which uses nicotinamide adenine dinucl...

  4. Triheptanoin improves brain energy metabolism in patients with Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Adanyeguh, Isaac Mawusi; Rinaldi, Daisy; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Caillet, Samantha; Valabregue, Romain; Durr, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Based on our previous work in Huntington disease (HD) showing improved energy metabolism in muscle by providing substrates to the Krebs cycle, we wished to obtain a proof-of-concept of the therapeutic benefit of triheptanoin using a functional biomarker of brain energy metabolism validated in HD. Methods: We performed an open-label study using 31P brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to measure the levels of phosphocreatine (PCr) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) before (rest), during (activation), and after (recovery) a visual stimulus. We performed 31P brain MRS in 10 patients at an early stage of HD and 13 controls. Patients with HD were then treated for 1 month with triheptanoin after which they returned for follow-up including 31P brain MRS scan. Results: At baseline, we confirmed an increase in Pi/PCr ratio during brain activation in controls—reflecting increased adenosine triphosphate synthesis—followed by a return to baseline levels during recovery (p = 0.013). In patients with HD, we validated the existence of an abnormal brain energy profile as previously reported. After 1 month, this profile remained abnormal in patients with HD who did not receive treatment. Conversely, the MRS profile was improved in patients with HD treated with triheptanoin for 1 month with the restoration of an increased Pi/PCr ratio during visual stimulation (p = 0.005). Conclusion: This study suggests that triheptanoin is able to correct the bioenergetic profile in the brain of patients with HD at an early stage of the disease. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that, for patients with HD, treatment with triheptanoin for 1 month restores an increased MRS Pi/PCr ratio during visual stimulation. PMID:25568297

  5. Sleep Apnea and Fatty Liver Are Coupled Via Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Arısoy, Ahmet; Sertoğullarından, Bunyamin; Ekin, Selami; Özgökçe, Mesut; Bulut, Mehmet Deniz; Huyut, Mehmet Tahir; Ölmez, Şehmus; Turan, Mahfuz

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep-related breathing disorder characterized by intermittent hypoxia. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between OSA and fatty liver. MATERIAL AND METHODS We enrolled 176 subjects to this study who underwent polysomnography (PSG) for suspected OSA. The control group included 42 simple snoring subjects. PSG, biochemical tests, and ultrasonographic examination were performed all subjects. RESULTS The simple snoring and mild, moderate, and severe OSA groups included 18/42 (42.86%), 33/52 (63.5%), 27/34 (79.4%), and 28/48 (79.2%) subjects with hepatosteatosis, respectively. There were significant differences in hepatosteatosis and hepatosteatosis grade between the simple snoring and the moderate and severe OSA groups. Logistic regression analysis showed that BMI and average desaturation were independently and significantly related to hepatic steatosis. CONCLUSIONS Our study shows that BMI and the average desaturation contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver in subjects with OSA. In this regard, sleep apnea may trigger metabolic mitochondrial energy associated processes thereby altering lipid metabolism and obesity as well. PMID:26993969

  6. Sleep Apnea and Fatty Liver Are Coupled Via Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Arısoy, Ahmet; Sertoğullarından, Bunyamin; Ekin, Selami; Özgökçe, Mesut; Bulut, Mehmet Deniz; Huyut, Mehmet Tahir; Ölmez, Şehmus; Turan, Mahfuz

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep-related breathing disorder characterized by intermittent hypoxia. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between OSA and fatty liver. Material/Methods We enrolled 176 subjects to this study who underwent polysomnography (PSG) for suspected OSA. The control group included 42 simple snoring subjects. PSG, biochemical tests, and ultrasonographic examination were performed all subjects. Results The simple snoring and mild, moderate, and severe OSA groups included 18/42 (42.86%), 33/52 (63.5%), 27/34 (79.4%), and 28/48 (79.2%) subjects with hepatosteatosis, respectively. There were significant differences in hepatosteatosis and hepatosteatosis grade between the simple snoring and the moderate and severe OSA groups. Logistic regression analysis showed that BMI and average desaturation were independently and significantly related to hepatic steatosis. Conclusions Our study shows that BMI and the average desaturation contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver in subjects with OSA. In this regard, sleep apnea may trigger metabolic mitochondrial energy associated processes thereby altering lipid metabolism and obesity as well. PMID:26993969

  7. Dependence of structure stability and integrity of aerobic granules on ATP and cell communication.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Liu, Yu

    2013-06-01

    Aerobic granules are dense and compact microbial aggregates with various bacterial species. Recently, aerobic granulation technology has been extensively explored for treatment of municipal and industrial wastewaters. However, little information is currently available with regard to their structure stability and integrity at levels of energy metabolism and cell communication. In the present study, a typical chemical uncoupler, 3,3',4',5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide with the power to dissipate proton motive force and subsequently inhibit adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generation, was used to investigate possible roles of ATP and cell communication in maintaining the structure stability and integrity of aerobic granules. It was found that inhibited ATP synthesis resulted in the reduced production of autoinducer-2 and N-acylhomoserine lactones essential for cell communication, while lowered extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) production was also observed. As a consequence, aerobic granules appeared to break up. This study showed that ATP-dependent quorum sensing and EPS were essential for sustaining the structure stability and integrity of aerobic granules. PMID:23011346

  8. Actions of juglone on energy metabolism in the rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Saling, Simoni Cristina; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Mito, Marcio Shigueaki; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar

    2011-12-15

    Juglone is a phenolic compound used in popular medicine as a phytotherapic to treat inflammatory and infectious diseases. However, it also acts as an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation in isolated liver mitochondria and, thus, may interfere with the hepatic energy metabolism. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of juglone on several metabolic parameters in the isolated perfused rat liver. Juglone, in the concentration range of 5 to 50 {mu}M, stimulated glycogenolysis, glycolysis and oxygen uptake. Gluconeogenesis from both lactate and alanine was inhibited with half-maximal effects at the concentrations of 14.9 and 15.7 {mu}M, respectively. The overall alanine transformation was increased by juglone, as indicated by the stimulated release of ammonia, urea, L-glutamate, lactate and pyruvate. A great increase (9-fold) in the tissue content of {alpha}-ketoglutarate was found, without a similar change in the L-glutamate content. The tissue contents of ATP were decreased, but those of ADP and AMP were increased. Experiments with isolated mitochondria fully confirmed previous notions about the uncoupling action of juglone. It can be concluded that juglone is active on metabolism at relatively low concentrations. In this particular it resembles more closely the classical uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol. Ingestion of high doses of juglone, thus, presents the same risks as the ingestion of 2,4-dinitrophenol which comprise excessive compromising of ATP production, hyperthermia and even death. Low doses, i.e., moderate consumption of natural products containing juglone, however, could be beneficial to health if one considers recent reports about the consequences of chronic mild uncoupling. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated how juglone acts on liver metabolism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The actions on hepatic gluconeogenesis, glycolysis and ureogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Juglone stimulates glycolysis and ureagenesis and

  9. Metagenomics of Hydrocarbon Resource Environments Indicates Aerobic Taxa and Genes to be Unexpectedly Common

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Oil in subsurface reservoirs is biodegraded by resident microbial communities. Water-mediated, anaerobic conversion of hydrocarbons to methane and CO2, catalyzed by syntrophic bacteria and methanogenic archaea, is thought to be one of the dominant processes. We compared 160 microbial community compositions in ten hydrocarbon resource environments (HREs) and sequenced twelve metagenomes to characterize their metabolic potential. Although anaerobic communities were common, cores from oil sands and coal beds had unexpectedly high proportions of aerobic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. Likewise, most metagenomes had high proportions of genes for enzymes involved in aerobic hydrocarbon metabolism. Hence, although HREs may have been strictly anaerobic and typically methanogenic for much of their history, this may not hold today for coal beds and for the Alberta oil sands, one of the largest remaining oil reservoirs in the world. This finding may influence strategies to recover energy or chemicals from these HREs by in situ microbial processes. PMID:23889694

  10. Adaptation of aerobically growing Pseudomonas aeruginosa to copper starvation.

    PubMed

    Frangipani, Emanuela; Slaveykova, Vera I; Reimmann, Cornelia; Haas, Dieter

    2008-10-01

    Restricted bioavailability of copper in certain environments can interfere with cellular respiration because copper is an essential cofactor of most terminal oxidases. The global response of the metabolically versatile bacterium and opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa to copper limitation was assessed under aerobic conditions. Expression of cioAB (encoding an alternative, copper-independent, cyanide-resistant ubiquinol oxidase) was upregulated, whereas numerous iron uptake functions (including the siderophores pyoverdine and pyochelin) were expressed at reduced levels, presumably reflecting a lower demand for iron by respiratory enzymes. Wild-type P. aeruginosa was able to grow aerobically in a defined glucose medium depleted of copper, whereas a cioAB mutant did not grow. Thus, P. aeruginosa relies on the CioAB enzyme to cope with severe copper deprivation. A quadruple cyo cco1 cco2 cox mutant, which was deleted for all known heme-copper terminal oxidases of P. aeruginosa, grew aerobically, albeit more slowly than did the wild type, indicating that the CioAB enzyme is capable of energy conservation. However, the expression of a cioA'-'lacZ fusion was less dependent on the copper status in the quadruple mutant than in the wild type, suggesting that copper availability might affect cioAB expression indirectly, via the function of the heme-copper oxidases. PMID:18708503

  11. Recent Advances in Targeting Tumor Energy Metabolism with Tumor Acidosis as a Biomarker of Drug Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Akhenblit, Paul J; Pagel, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells employ a deregulated cellular metabolism to leverage survival and growth advantages. The unique tumor energy metabolism presents itself as a promising target for chemotherapy. A pool of tumor energy metabolism targeting agents has been developed after several decades of efforts. This review will cover glucose and fatty acid metabolism, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, HIF-1 and glutamine pathways in tumor energy metabolism, and how they are being exploited for treatments and therapies by promising pre-clinical or clinical drugs being developed or investigated. Additionally, acidification of the tumor extracellular microenvironment is hypothesized to be the result of active tumor metabolism. This implies that tumor extracellular pH (pHe) can be a biomarker for assessing the efficacy of therapies that target tumor metabolism. Several translational molecular imaging methods (PET, MRI) for interrogating tumor acidification and its suppression are discussed as well. PMID:26962408

  12. Aerobic glycolysis: a novel target in kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Shuch, Brian; Linehan, W Marston; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad

    2013-06-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a heterogenous group of cancers that arise from the nephron. While there are distinct histologic subtypes associated with common genetic alterations, most forms of RCC are linked by a common pathway of dysregulated metabolism. Reliance on aerobic glycolysis, a feature of cancer first hypothesized by Warburg, is a common feature in sporadic and hereditary forms of kidney cancer. Two hereditary forms of RCC, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and hereditary leiomyomatosis and RCC (HLRCC), are characterized by mutations in Krebs cycle enzymes, rendering them dependent on glycolysis for energy requirements. The reliance on these pathways may make them vulnerable to novel metabolic strategies, including inhibition of glycolysis, glucose uptake and macromolecule biosynthesis. PMID:23773105

  13. Emerging role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Eun; Song, Do Kyeong; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence from genetic animal models suggests that the brain, particularly the hypothalamus, has a key role in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism. The brain integrates multiple metabolic inputs from the periphery through nutrients, gut-derived satiety signals and adiposity-related hormones. The brain modulates various aspects of metabolism, such as food intake, energy expenditure, insulin secretion, hepatic glucose production and glucose/fatty acid metabolism in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Highly coordinated interactions between the brain and peripheral metabolic organs are critical for the maintenance of energy and glucose homeostasis. Defective crosstalk between the brain and peripheral organs contributes to the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Here we comprehensively review the above topics, discussing the main findings related to the role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism. PMID:26964832

  14. Emerging role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Roh, Eun; Song, Do Kyeong; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence from genetic animal models suggests that the brain, particularly the hypothalamus, has a key role in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism. The brain integrates multiple metabolic inputs from the periphery through nutrients, gut-derived satiety signals and adiposity-related hormones. The brain modulates various aspects of metabolism, such as food intake, energy expenditure, insulin secretion, hepatic glucose production and glucose/fatty acid metabolism in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Highly coordinated interactions between the brain and peripheral metabolic organs are critical for the maintenance of energy and glucose homeostasis. Defective crosstalk between the brain and peripheral organs contributes to the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Here we comprehensively review the above topics, discussing the main findings related to the role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism. PMID:26964832

  15. A review of the multi-level adaptations for maximizing aerobic dive duration in marine mammals: from biochemistry to behavior.

    PubMed

    Davis, Randall W

    2014-01-01

    Marine mammals exhibit multi-level adaptations, from cellular biochemistry to behavior, that maximize aerobic dive duration. A dive response during aerobic dives enables the efficient use of blood and muscle oxygen stores, but it is exercise modulated to maximize the aerobic dive limit at different levels of exertion. Blood volume and concentrations of blood hemoglobin and muscle myoglobin are elevated and serve as a significant oxygen store that increases aerobic dive duration. However, myoglobin is not homogeneously distributed in the locomotory muscles and is highest in areas that produce greater force and consume more oxygen during aerobic swimming. Muscle fibers are primarily fast and slow twitch oxidative with elevated mitochondrial volume densities and enhanced oxidative enzyme activities that are highest in areas that produce more force generation. Most of the muscle mitochondria are interfibriller and homogeneously distributed. This reduces the diffusion distance between mitochondria and helps maintain aerobic metabolism under hypoxic conditions. Mitochondrial volume densities and oxidative enzyme activities are also elevated in certain organs such as liver, kidneys, and stomach. Hepatic and renal function along with digestion and assimilation continue during aerobic dives to maintain physiological homeostasis. Most ATP production comes from aerobic fat metabolism in carnivorous marine mammals. Glucose is derived mostly from gluconeogenesis and is conserved for tissues such as red blood cells and the central nervous system. Marine mammals minimize the energetic cost of swimming and diving through body streamlining, efficient, lift-based propulsive appendages, and cost-efficient modes of locomotion that reduce drag and take advantage of changes in buoyancy with depth. Most dives are within the animal's aerobic dive limit, which maximizes time underwater and minimizes recovery time at the surface. The result of these adaptations is increased breath

  16. Equine lamellar energy metabolism studied using tissue microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Medina-Torres, C E; Pollitt, C C; Underwood, C; Castro-Olivera, E M; Collins, S N; Allavena, R E; Richardson, D W; van Eps, A W

    2014-09-01

    Failure of lamellar energy metabolism may contribute to the pathophysiology of equine laminitis. Tissue microdialysis has the potential to dynamically monitor lamellar energy balance over time. The objectives of this study were to develop a minimally invasive lamellar microdialysis technique and use it to measure normal lamellar energy metabolite concentrations over 24 h. Microdialysis probes were placed (through the white line) into either the lamellar dermis (LAM) (n = 6) or the sublamellar dermis (SUBLAM) (n = 6) and perfused continuously over a 24 h study period. Probes were placed in the skin dermis (SKIN) for simultaneous comparison to LAM (n = 6). Samples were collected every 2 h and analysed for glucose, lactate, pyruvate, urea and glycerol concentrations. LAM was further compared with SUBLAM by simultaneous placement and sampling in four feet from two horses over 4 h. Horses were monitored for lameness, and either clinically evaluated for 1 month after probe removal (n = 4) or subjected to histological evaluation of the probe site (n = 10). There were no deleterious clinical effects of probe placement and the histological response was mild. Sample fluid recovery and metabolite concentrations were stable for 24 h. Glucose was lower (and lactate:glucose ratio higher) in LAM compared with SUBLAM and SKIN (P < 0.05). Pyruvate was lower in SUBLAM than SKIN and urea was lower in LAM than SKIN (P < 0.05). These differences suggest lower perfusion and increased glucose consumption in LAM compared with SUBLAM and SKIN. In conclusion, lamellar tissue microdialysis was well tolerated and may be useful for determining the contribution of energy failure in laminitis pathogenesis. PMID:24947715

  17. Growth states of catalytic reaction networks exhibiting energy metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Yohei; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2011-07-01

    All cells derive nutrition by absorbing some chemical and energy resources from the environment; these resources are used by the cells to reproduce the chemicals within them, which in turn leads to an increase in their volume. In this study we introduce a protocell model exhibiting catalytic reaction dynamics, energy metabolism, and cell growth. Results of extensive simulations of this model show the existence of four phases with regard to the rates of both the influx of resources and cell growth. These phases include an active phase with high influx and high growth rates, an inefficient phase with high influx but low growth rates, a quasistatic phase with low influx and low growth rates, and a death phase with negative growth rate. A mean field model well explains the transition among these phases as bifurcations. The statistical distribution of the active phase is characterized by a power law, and that of the inefficient phase is characterized by a nearly equilibrium distribution. We also discuss the relevance of the results of this study to distinct states in the existing cells.

  18. Growth states of catalytic reaction networks exhibiting energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yohei; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2011-07-01

    All cells derive nutrition by absorbing some chemical and energy resources from the environment; these resources are used by the cells to reproduce the chemicals within them, which in turn leads to an increase in their volume. In this study we introduce a protocell model exhibiting catalytic reaction dynamics, energy metabolism, and cell growth. Results of extensive simulations of this model show the existence of four phases with regard to the rates of both the influx of resources and cell growth. These phases include an active phase with high influx and high growth rates, an inefficient phase with high influx but low growth rates, a quasistatic phase with low influx and low growth rates, and a death phase with negative growth rate. A mean field model well explains the transition among these phases as bifurcations. The statistical distribution of the active phase is characterized by a power law, and that of the inefficient phase is characterized by a nearly equilibrium distribution. We also discuss the relevance of the results of this study to distinct states in the existing cells. PMID:21867233

  19. The plasma membrane as a capacitor for energy and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ray, Supriyo; Kassan, Adam; Busija, Anna R; Rangamani, Padmini; Patel, Hemal H

    2016-02-01

    When considering which components of the cell are the most critical to function and physiology, we naturally focus on the nucleus, the mitochondria that regulate energy and apoptotic signaling, or other organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, ribosomes, etc. Few people will suggest that the membrane is the most critical element of a cell in terms of function and physiology. Those that consider the membrane critical will point to its obvious barrier function regulated by the lipid bilayer and numerous ion channels that regulate homeostatic gradients. What becomes evident upon closer inspection is that not all membranes are created equal and that there are lipid-rich microdomains that serve as platforms of signaling and a means of communication with the intracellular environment. In this review, we explore the evolution of membranes, focus on lipid-rich microdomains, and advance the novel concept that membranes serve as "capacitors for energy and metabolism." Within this framework, the membrane then is the primary and critical regulator of stress and disease adaptation of the cell. PMID:26771520

  20. Light aerobic physical exercise in combination with leucine and/or glutamine-rich diet can improve the body composition and muscle protein metabolism in young tumor-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Salomão, Emilianne Miguel; Gomes-Marcondes, Maria Cristina Cintra

    2012-12-01

    Nutritional supplementation with some amino acids may influence host's responses and also certain mechanism involved in tumor progression. It is known that exercise influences body weight and muscle composition. Previous findings from our group have shown that leucine has beneficial effects on protein composition in cachectic rat model as the Walker 256 tumor. The main purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of light exercise and leucine and/or glutamine-rich diet in body composition and skeletal muscle protein synthesis and degradation in young tumor-bearing rats. Walker tumor-bearing rats were subjected to light aerobic exercise (swimming 30 min/day) and fed a leucine-rich (3%) and/or glutamine-rich (4%) diet for 10 days and compared to healthy young rats. The carcasses were analyzed as total water and fat body content and lean body mass. The gastrocnemious muscles were isolated and used for determination of total protein synthesis and degradation. The chemical body composition changed with tumor growth, increasing body water and reducing body fat content and total body nitrogen. After tumor growth, the muscle protein metabolism was impaired, showing that the muscle protein synthesis was also reduced and the protein degradation process was increased in the gastrocnemius muscle of exercised rats. Although short-term exercise (10 days) alone did not produce beneficial effects that would reduce tumor damage, host protein metabolism was improved when exercise was combined with a leucine-rich diet. Only total carcass nitrogen and protein were recovered by a glutamine-rich diet. Exercise, in combination with an amino acid-rich diet, in particular, leucine, had effects beyond reducing tumoral weight such as improving protein turnover and carcass nitrogen content in the tumor-bearing host. PMID:22460363

  1. Energy Metabolism and Leptin: Effects on Neuroendocrine Regulation of Reproduction in the Gilt and Sow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is well established that reproductive function is metabolically gated. However, the mechanisms whereby energy stores and metabolic cues influence appetite, energy homeostasis and fertility are yet to be completely understood. Adipose tissue is no longer considered as only a depot to store exces...

  2. Energy metabolism in Mycobacterium gilvum PYR-GCK: insights from transcript expression analyses following two states of induction.

    PubMed

    Badejo, Abimbola Comfort; Chung, Won Hyong; Kim, Nam Shin; Chai, Jin Choul; Lee, Young Seek; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Kim, Hyo Joon; Chai, Young Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium gilvum PYR-GCK, a pyrene degrading bacterium, has been the subject of functional studies aimed at elucidating mechanisms related to its outstanding pollutant bioremediation/biodegradation activities. Several studies have investigated energy production and conservation in Mycobacterium, however, they all focused on the pathogenic strains using their various hosts as induction sources. To gain greater insight into Mycobacterium energy metabolism, mRNA expression studies focused on respiratory functions were performed under two different conditions using the toxic pollutant pyrene as a test substrate and glucose as a control substrate. This was done using two transcriptomic techniques: global transcriptomic RNA-sequencing and quantitative Real-Time PCR. Growth in the presence of pyrene resulted in upregulated expression of genes associated with limited oxygen or anaerobiosis in M. gilvum PYR-GCK. Upregulated genes included succinate dehydrogenases, nitrite reductase and various electron donors including formate dehydrogenases, fumarate reductases and NADH dehydrogenases. Oxidative phosphorylation genes (with respiratory chain complexes I, III -V) were expressed at low levels compared to the genes coding for the second molecular complex in the bacterial respiratory chain (fumarate reductase); which is highly functional during microaerophilic or anaerobic bacterial growth. This study reveals a molecular adaptation to a hypoxic mode of respiration during aerobic pyrene degradation. This is likely the result of a cellular oxygen shortage resulting from exhaustion of the oxygenase enzymes required for these degradation activities in M. gilvum PYR-GCK. PMID:24927157

  3. Energy Metabolism in Mycobacterium gilvum PYR-GCK: Insights from Transcript Expression Analyses Following Two States of Induction

    PubMed Central

    Badejo, Abimbola Comfort; Chung, Won Hyong; Kim, Nam Shin; Chai, Jin Choul; Lee, Young Seek; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Kim, Hyo Joon; Chai, Young Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium gilvum PYR-GCK, a pyrene degrading bacterium, has been the subject of functional studies aimed at elucidating mechanisms related to its outstanding pollutant bioremediation/biodegradation activities. Several studies have investigated energy production and conservation in Mycobacterium, however, they all focused on the pathogenic strains using their various hosts as induction sources. To gain greater insight into Mycobacterium energy metabolism, mRNA expression studies focused on respiratory functions were performed under two different conditions using the toxic pollutant pyrene as a test substrate and glucose as a control substrate. This was done using two transcriptomic techniques: global transcriptomic RNA-sequencing and quantitative Real-Time PCR. Growth in the presence of pyrene resulted in upregulated expression of genes associated with limited oxygen or anaerobiosis in M.gilvum PYR-GCK. Upregulated genes included succinate dehydrogenases, nitrite reductase and various electron donors including formate dehydrogenases, fumarate reductases and NADH dehydrogenases. Oxidative phosphorylation genes (with respiratory chain complexes I, III –V) were expressed at low levels compared to the genes coding for the second molecular complex in the bacterial respiratory chain (fumarate reductase); which is highly functional during microaerophilic or anaerobic bacterial growth. This study reveals a molecular adaptation to a hypoxic mode of respiration during aerobic pyrene degradation. This is likely the result of a cellular oxygen shortage resulting from exhaustion of the oxygenase enzymes required for these degradation activities in M.gilvum PYR-GCK. PMID:24927157

  4. Body size, body composition, and metabolic profile explain higher energy expenditure in overweight children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lower relative rates of energy expenditure (EE), increased energetic efficiency, and altered fuel utilization purportedly associated with obesity have not been demonstrated indisputably in overweight children. We hypothesized that differences in energy metabolism between nonoverweight and overweight...

  5. Metabolomics analysis of Cistus monspeliensis leaf extract on energy metabolism activation in human intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Yoichi; Han, Junkyu; Kawada, Kiyokazu; Smaoui, Abderrazak; Isoda, Hiroko

    2012-01-01

    Energy metabolism is a very important process to improve and maintain health from the point of view of physiology. It is well known that the intracellular ATP production is contributed to energy metabolism in cells. Cistus monspeliensis is widely used as tea, spices, and medical herb; however, it has not been focusing on the activation of energy metabolism. In this study, C. monspeliensis was investigated as the food resources by activation of energy metabolism in human intestinal epithelial cells. C. monspeliensis extract showed high antioxidant ability. In addition, the promotion of metabolites of glycolysis and TCA cycle was induced by C. monspeliensis treatment. These results suggest that C. monspeliensis extract has an ability to enhance the energy metabolism in human intestinal cells. PMID:22523469

  6. Metabolomics Analysis of Cistus monspeliensis Leaf Extract on Energy Metabolism Activation in Human Intestinal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Yoichi; Han, Junkyu; Kawada, Kiyokazu; Smaoui, Abderrazak; Isoda, Hiroko

    2012-01-01

    Energy metabolism is a very important process to improve and maintain health from the point of view of physiology. It is well known that the intracellular ATP production is contributed to energy metabolism in cells. Cistus monspeliensis is widely used as tea, spices, and medical herb; however, it has not been focusing on the activation of energy metabolism. In this study, C. monspeliensis was investigated as the food resources by activation of energy metabolism in human intestinal epithelial cells. C. monspeliensis extract showed high antioxidant ability. In addition, the promotion of metabolites of glycolysis and TCA cycle was induced by C. monspeliensis treatment. These results suggest that C. monspeliensis extract has an ability to enhance the energy metabolism in human intestinal cells. PMID:22523469

  7. Management of aerobic vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Tempera, Gianna; Furneri, Pio Maria

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic vaginitis is a new nonclassifiable pathology that is neither specific vaginitis nor bacterial vaginosis. The diversity of this microbiological peculiarity could also explain several therapeutic failures when patients were treated for infections identified as bacterial vaginosis. The diagnosis 'aerobic vaginitis' is essentially based on microscopic examinations using a phase-contrast microscope (at ×400 magnification). The therapeutic choice for 'aerobic vaginitis' should take into consideration an antibiotic characterized by an intrinsic activity against the majority of bacteria of fecal origin, bactericidal effect and poor/absent interference with the vaginal microbiota. Regarding the therapy for aerobic vaginitis when antimicrobial agents are prescribed, not only the antimicrobial spectrum but also the presumed ecological disturbance on the anaerobic and aerobic vaginal and rectal microbiota should be taken into a consideration. Because of their very low impact on the vaginal microbiota, kanamycin or quinolones are to be considered a good choice for therapy. PMID:21051843

  8. Changes in protein expression in the salt marsh mussel Geukensia demissa: evidence for a shift from anaerobic to aerobic metabolism during prolonged aerial exposure

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Peter A.; Eurich, Chris; Gao, William L.; Cela, Bekim

    2014-01-01

    During aerial exposure (emersion), most sessile intertidal invertebrates experience cellular stress caused by hypoxia, and the amount and types of hypoxia-induced stress will differ as exposure time increases, likely leading to altered metabolic responses. We examined proteomic responses to increasing emersion times and decreasing recovery (immersion) times in the mussel Geukensia demissa, which occurs in salt marshes along the east coast of North America. Individuals are found above mean tide level, and can be emersed for over 18 h during spring tides. We acclimated mussels to full immersion at 15°C for 4 weeks, and compared changes in gill protein expression between groups of mussels that were continually immersed (control), were emersed for 6 h and immersed during recovery for 18 h (6E/18R), were emersed for 12 h and recovered for 12 h (12E/12R), or were emersed for 18 h with a 6 h recovery (18E/6R). We found clear differences in protein expression patterns among the treatments. Proteins associated with anaerobic fermentation increased in abundance in 6E/18R but not in 12E/12R or 18E/6R. Increases in oxidative stress proteins were most apparent in 12E/12R, and in 18E/6R changes in cytoskeletal protein expression predominated. We conclude that G. demissa alters its strategy for coping with emersion stress over time, relying on anaerobic metabolism for short- to medium-duration exposure, but switching to an air-gaping strategy for long-term exposure, which reduces hypoxia stress but may cause structural damage to gill tissue. PMID:24501137

  9. Erythropoietin, a Novel Versatile Player Regulating Energy Metabolism beyond the Erythroid System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Di, Lijun; Noguchi, Constance Tom

    2014-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO), the required cytokine for promoting the proliferation and differentiation of erythroid cells to stimulate erythropoiesis, has been reported to act as a pleiotropic cytokine beyond hematopoietic system. The various activities of EPO are determined by the widespread distribution of its cell surface EPO receptor (EpoR) in multiple tissues including endothelial, neural, myoblasts, adipocytes and other cell types. EPO activity has been linked to angiogenesis, neuroprotection, cardioprotection, stress protection, anti-inflammation and especially the energy metabolism regulation that is recently revealed. The investigations of EPO activity in animals and the expression analysis of EpoR provide more insights on the potential of EPO in regulating energy metabolism and homeostasis. The findings of crosstalk between EPO and some important energy sensors and the regulation of EPO in the cellular respiration and mitochondrial function further provide molecular mechanisms for EPO activity in metabolic activity regulation. In this review, we will summarize the roles of EPO in energy metabolism regulation and the activity of EPO in tissues that are tightly associated with energy metabolism. We will also discuss the effects of EPO in regulating oxidative metabolism and mitochondrial function, the interactions between EPO and important energy regulation factors, and the protective role of EPO from stresses that are related to metabolism, providing a brief overview of previously less appreciated EPO biological function in energy metabolism and homeostasis. PMID:25170305

  10. Rh2E2, a novel metabolic suppressor, specifically inhibits energy-based metabolism of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Li-Ping; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Guo, Yue; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; Wang, Rui; Kam, Richard Kin Ting; Law, Betty Yuen Kwan; Hsiao, Wendy Wen Luen; Chan, Ka Man; Wang, Jingrong; Chan, Rick Wai Kit; Guo, Jianru; Zhang, Wei; Yen, Feng Gen; Zhou, Hua; Leung, Elaine Lai Han; Yu, Zhiling; Liu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Energy metabolism in cancer cells is often increased to meet their higher proliferative rate and biosynthesis demands. Suppressing cancer cell metabolism using agents like metformin has become an attractive strategy for treating cancer patients. We showed that a novel ginsenoside derivative, Rh2E2, is as effective as aspirin in preventing the development of AOM/DSS-induced colorectal cancer and suppresses tumor growth and metastasis in a LLC-1 xenograft. A sub-chronic and acute toxicity LD50 test of Rh2E2 showed no harmful reactions at the maximum oral dosage of 5000 mg/kg body weight in mice. Proteomic profiling revealed that Rh2E2 specifically inhibited ATP production in cancer cells via down-regulation of metabolic enzymes involving glycolysis, fatty acid β-oxidation and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, leading to specific cytotoxicity and S-phase cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. Those findings suggest that Rh2E2 possesses a novel and safe anti-metabolic agent for cancer patients by specific reduction of energy-based metabolism in cancer cells. PMID:26799418

  11. Rh2E2, a novel metabolic suppressor, specifically inhibits energy-based metabolism of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, Vincent Kam Wai; Dong, Hang; Liang, Xu; Bai, Li-Ping; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Guo, Yue; Kong, Ah Ng Tony; Wang, Rui; Kam, Richard Kin Ting; Law, Betty Yuen Kwan; Hsiao, Wendy Wen Luen; Chan, Ka Man; Wang, Jingrong; Chan, Rick Wai Kit; Guo, Jianru; Zhang, Wei; Yen, Feng Gen; Zhou, Hua; Leung, Elaine Lai Han; Yu, Zhiling; Liu, Liang

    2016-03-01

    Energy metabolism in cancer cells is often increased to meet their higher proliferative rate and biosynthesis demands. Suppressing cancer cell metabolism using agents like metformin has become an attractive strategy for treating cancer patients. We showed that a novel ginsenoside derivative, Rh2E2, is as effective as aspirin in preventing the development of AOM/DSS-induced colorectal cancer and suppresses tumor growth and metastasis in a LLC-1 xenograft. A sub-chronic and acute toxicity LD50 test of Rh2E2 showed no harmful reactions at the maximum oral dosage of 5000 mg/kg body weight in mice. Proteomic profiling revealed that Rh2E2 specifically inhibited ATP production in cancer cells via down-regulation of metabolic enzymes involving glycolysis, fatty acid β-oxidation and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, leading to specific cytotoxicity and S-phase cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. Those findings suggest that Rh2E2 possesses a novel and safe anti-metabolic agent for cancer patients by specific reduction of energy-based metabolism in cancer cells. PMID:26799418

  12. Regulation of Mitochondrial Function and Cellular Energy Metabolism by Protein Kinase C-λ/ι: A Novel Mode of Balancing Pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Mahato, Biraj; Home, Pratik; Rajendran, Ganeshkumar; Paul, Arindam; Saha, Biswarup; Ganguly, Avishek; Ray, Soma; Roy, Nairita; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Paul, Soumen

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) contain functionally immature mitochondria and rely upon high rates of glycolysis for their energy requirements. Thus, altered mitochondrial function and promotion of aerobic glycolysis is key to maintain and induce pluripotency. However, signaling mechanisms that regulate mitochondrial function and reprogram metabolic preferences in self-renewing vs. differentiated PSC populations are poorly understood. Here, using murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) as a model system, we demonstrate that atypical protein kinase C isoform, PKC lambda/iota (PKCλ/ι), is a key regulator of mitochondrial function in ESCs. Depletion of PKCλ/ι in ESCs maintains their pluripotent state as evident from germline offsprings. Interestingly, loss of PKCλ/ι in ESCs leads to impairment in mitochondrial maturation, organization and a metabolic shift toward glycolysis under differentiating condition. Our mechanistic analyses indicate that a PKCλ/ι-HIF1α-PGC1α axis regulates mitochondrial respiration and balances pluripotency in ESCs. We propose that PKCλ/ι could be a crucial regulator of mitochondrial function and energy metabolism in stem cells and other cellular contexts. PMID:25142417

  13. Aerobic biodegradation of trichloroethene without auxiliary substrates.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Kathrin R; Gaza, Sarah; Voropaev, Andrey; Ertl, Siegmund; Tiehm, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Trichloroethene (TCE) represents a priority pollutant and is among the most frequently detected contaminants in groundwater. The current bioremediation measures have certain drawbacks like e.g. the need for auxiliary substrates. Here, the aerobic biodegradation of TCE as the sole growth substrate is demonstrated. This new process of metabolic TCE degradation was first detected in groundwater samples. TCE degradation was stable in an enriched mixed bacterial culture in mineral salts medium for over five years and repeated transfers of the culture resulting in a 10(10) times dilution of the original groundwater. Aerobic TCE degradation resulted in stoichiometric chloride formation. Stable carbon isotope fractionation was observed providing a reliable analytical tool to assess this new biodegradation process at field sites. The results suggest that aerobic biodegradation of TCE without auxiliary substrate could be considered as an option for natural attenuation or engineered bioremediation of contaminated sites. PMID:24793109

  14. Carbon and energy metabolism of atp mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P R; Michelsen, O

    1992-12-01

    The membrane-bound H(+)-ATPase plays a key role in free-energy transduction of biological systems. We report how the carbon and energy metabolism of Escherichia coli changes in response to deletion of the atp operon that encodes this enzyme. Compared with the isogenic wild-type strain, the growth rate and growth yield were decreased less than expected for a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis alone as a source of ATP. Moreover, the respiration rate of a atp deletion strain was increased by 40% compared with the wild-type strain. This result is surprising, since the atp deletion strain is not able to utilize the resulting proton motive force for ATP synthesis. Indeed, the ratio of ATP concentration to ADP concentration was decreased from 19 in the wild type to 7 in the atp mutant, and the membrane potential of the atp deletion strain was increased by 20%, confirming that the respiration rate was not controlled by the magnitude of the opposing membrane potential. The level of type b cytochromes in the mutant cells was 80% higher than the level in the wild-type cells, suggesting that the increased respiration was caused by an increase in the expression of the respiratory genes. The atp deletion strain produced twice as much by-product (acetate) and exhibited increased flow through the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the glycolytic pathway. These three changes all lead to an increase in substrate level phosphorylation; the first two changes also lead to increased production of reducing equivalents. We interpret these data as indicating that E. coli makes use of its ability to respire even if it cannot directly couple this ability to ATP synthesis; by respiring away excess reducing equivalents E. coli enhances substrate level ATP synthesis. PMID:1447134

  15. Carbon and energy metabolism of atp mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, P R; Michelsen, O

    1992-01-01

    The membrane-bound H(+)-ATPase plays a key role in free-energy transduction of biological systems. We report how the carbon and energy metabolism of Escherichia coli changes in response to deletion of the atp operon that encodes this enzyme. Compared with the isogenic wild-type strain, the growth rate and growth yield were decreased less than expected for a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis alone as a source of ATP. Moreover, the respiration rate of a atp deletion strain was increased by 40% compared with the wild-type strain. This result is surprising, since the atp deletion strain is not able to utilize the resulting proton motive force for ATP synthesis. Indeed, the ratio of ATP concentration to ADP concentration was decreased from 19 in the wild type to 7 in the atp mutant, and the membrane potential of the atp deletion strain was increased by 20%, confirming that the respiration rate was not controlled by the magnitude of the opposing membrane potential. The level of type b cytochromes in the mutant cells was 80% higher than the level in the wild-type cells, suggesting that the increased respiration was caused by an increase in the expression of the respiratory genes. The atp deletion strain produced twice as much by-product (acetate) and exhibited increased flow through the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the glycolytic pathway. These three changes all lead to an increase in substrate level phosphorylation; the first two changes also lead to increased production of reducing equivalents. We interpret these data as indicating that E. coli makes use of its ability to respire even if it cannot directly couple this ability to ATP synthesis; by respiring away excess reducing equivalents E. coli enhances substrate level ATP synthesis. PMID:1447134

  16. Energy Metabolism of the Brain, Including the Cooperation between Astrocytes and Neurons, Especially in the Context of Glycogen Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Falkowska, Anna; Gutowska, Izabela; Goschorska, Marta; Nowacki, Przemysław; Chlubek, Dariusz; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen metabolism has important implications for the functioning of the brain, especially the cooperation between astrocytes and neurons. According to various research data, in a glycogen deficiency (for example during hypoglycemia) glycogen supplies are used to generate lactate, which is then transported to neighboring neurons. Likewise, during periods of intense activity of the nervous system, when the energy demand exceeds supply, astrocyte glycogen is immediately converted to lactate, some of which is transported to the neurons. Thus, glycogen from astrocytes functions as a kind of protection against hypoglycemia, ensuring preservation of neuronal function. The neuroprotective effect of lactate during hypoglycemia or cerebral ischemia has been reported in literature. This review goes on to emphasize that while neurons and astrocytes differ in metabolic profile, they interact to form a common metabolic cooperation. PMID:26528968

  17. Energy Metabolism of the Brain, Including the Cooperation between Astrocytes and Neurons, Especially in the Context of Glycogen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Falkowska, Anna; Gutowska, Izabela; Goschorska, Marta; Nowacki, Przemysław; Chlubek, Dariusz; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen metabolism has important implications for the functioning of the brain, especially the cooperation between astrocytes and neurons. According to various research data, in a glycogen deficiency (for example during hypoglycemia) glycogen supplies are used to generate lactate, which is then transported to neighboring neurons. Likewise, during periods of intense activity of the nervous system, when the energy demand exceeds supply, astrocyte glycogen is immediately converted to lactate, some of which is transported to the neurons. Thus, glycogen from astrocytes functions as a kind of protection against hypoglycemia, ensuring preservation of neuronal function. The neuroprotective effect of lactate during hypoglycemia or cerebral ischemia has been reported in literature. This review goes on to emphasize that while neurons and astrocytes differ in metabolic profile, they interact to form a common metabolic cooperation. PMID:26528968

  18. Aerobic microbial mineralization of dichloroethene as sole carbon substrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2000-01-01

    Microorganisms indigenous to the bed sediments of a black- water stream utilized 1,2-dichloroethene (1,2-DCE) as a sole carbon substrate for aerobic metabolism. Although no evidence of growth was observed in the minimal salts culture media used in this study, efficient aerobic microbial mineralization of 1,2-DCE as sole carbon substrate was maintained through three sequential transfers (107 final dilution) of the original environmental innoculum. These results indicate that 1,2-DCE can be utilized as a primary substrate to support microbial metabolism under aerobic conditions.Microorganisms indigenous to the bed sediments of a black-water stream utilized 1,2-dichloroethene (1,2-DCE) as a sole carbon substrate for aerobic metabolism. Although no evidence of growth was observed in the minimal salts culture media used in this study, efficient aerobic microbial mineralization of 1,2-DCE as sole carbon substrate was maintained through three sequential transfers (107 final dilution) of the original environmental innoculum. These results indicate that 1,2-DCE can be utilized as a primary substrate to support microbial metabolism under aerobic conditions.

  19. NAD+ metabolism and the control of energy homeostasis - a balancing act between mitochondria and the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Cantó, Carles; Menzies, Keir; Auwerx, Johan

    2015-01-01

    NAD+ has emerged as a vital cofactor that can rewire metabolism, activate sirtuins and maintain mitochondrial fitness through mechanisms such as the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. This improved understanding of NAD+ metabolism revived interest in NAD+ boosting strategies to manage a wide spectrum of diseases, ranging from diabetes to cancer. In this review, we summarize how NAD+ metabolism links energy status with adaptive cellular and organismal responses and how this knowledge can be therapeutically exploited. PMID:26118927

  20. Can you boost your metabolism?

    MedlinePlus

    Resting metabolism rate (RMR); Total daily energy expenditure (TDEE); Non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT); Weight loss - metabolism; Overweight - metabolism; Obesity - metabolism; Diet - metabolism

  1. Anaerobic and aerobic transformation of TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Kulpa, C.F.; Boopathy, R.; Manning, J.

    1996-12-31

    Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds have used pure cultures of aerobic microorganisms. In many cases, attempts to degrade nitroaromatics under aerobic conditions by pure cultures result in no mineralization and only superficial modifications of the structure. However, mixed culture systems properly operated result in the transformation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and in some cases mineralization of TNT occurs. In this paper, the mixed culture system is described with emphasis on intermediates and the characteristics of the aerobic microbial process including the necessity for a co-substrate. The possibility of removing TNT under aerobic/anoxic conditions is described in detail. Another option for the biodegradation of TNT and nitroaromatics is under anaerobic, sulfate reducing conditions. In this instance, the nitroaromatic compounds undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. TNT under sulfate reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene presumably by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of nitro groups from TNT is achieved by a series of reductive reactions with the formation of ammonia and toluene by Desulfovibrio sp. (B strain). These metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. The data supporting the anaerobic transformation of TNT under different growth condition are reviewed in this report.

  2. Teaching Aerobic Lifestyles: New Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrick, G. Ken; Iammarino, Nicholas K.

    1982-01-01

    New approaches to teaching aerobic life-styles in secondary schools are suggested, focusing on three components: (1) the psychological benefits of aerobic activity; (2) alternative aerobic programs at nonschool locations; and (3) the development of an aerobics curriculum to help maintain an active life-style after graduation. (JN)

  3. Impact of ocean acidification on energy metabolism of oyster, Crassostrea gigas--changes in metabolic pathways and thermal response.

    PubMed

    Lannig, Gisela; Eilers, Silke; Pörtner, Hans O; Sokolova, Inna M; Bock, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Climate change with increasing temperature and ocean acidification (OA) poses risks for marine ecosystems. According to Pörtner and Farrell, synergistic effects of elevated temperature and CO₂-induced OA on energy metabolism will narrow the thermal tolerance window of marine ectothermal animals. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of an acute temperature rise on energy metabolism of the oyster, Crassostrea gigas chronically exposed to elevated CO₂ levels (partial pressure of CO₂ in the seawater ~0.15 kPa, seawater pH ~ 7.7). Within one month of incubation at elevated PCo₂ and 15 °C hemolymph pH fell (pH(e) = 7.1 ± 0.2 (CO₂-group) vs. 7.6 ± 0.1 (control)) and P(e)CO₂ values in hemolymph increased (0.5 ± 0.2 kPa (CO₂-group) vs. 0.2 ± 0.04 kPa (control)). Slightly but significantly elevated bicarbonate concentrations in the hemolymph of CO₂-incubated oysters ([HCO₃⁻](e) = 1.8 ± 0.3 mM (CO₂-group) vs. 1.3 ± 0.1 mM (control)) indicate only minimal regulation of extracellular acid-base status. At the acclimation temperature of 15 °C the OA-induced decrease in pH(e) did not lead to metabolic depression in oysters as standard metabolism rates (SMR) of CO₂-exposed oysters were similar to controls. Upon acute warming SMR rose in both groups, but displayed a stronger increase in the CO₂-incubated group. Investigation in isolated gill cells revealed a similar temperature dependence of respiration between groups. Furthermore, the fraction of cellular energy demand for ion regulation via Na+/K+-ATPase was not affected by chronic hypercapnia or temperature. Metabolic profiling using ¹H-NMR spectroscopy revealed substantial changes in some tissues following OA exposure at 15 °C. In mantle tissue alanine and ATP levels decreased significantly whereas an increase in succinate levels was observed in gill tissue. These findings suggest shifts in metabolic pathways following OA-exposure. Our study confirms that OA affects energy

  4. Impact of Ocean Acidification on Energy Metabolism of Oyster, Crassostrea gigas—Changes in Metabolic Pathways and Thermal Response

    PubMed Central

    Lannig, Gisela; Eilers, Silke; Pörtner, Hans O.; Sokolova, Inna M.; Bock, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Climate change with increasing temperature and ocean acidification (OA) poses risks for marine ecosystems. According to Pörtner and Farrell [1], synergistic effects of elevated temperature and CO2-induced OA on energy metabolism will narrow the thermal tolerance window of marine ectothermal animals. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of an acute temperature rise on energy metabolism of the oyster, Crassostrea gigas chronically exposed to elevated CO2 levels (partial pressure of CO2 in the seawater ~0.15 kPa, seawater pH ~ 7.7). Within one month of incubation at elevated Pco2 and 15 °C hemolymph pH fell (pHe = 7.1 ± 0.2 (CO2-group) vs. 7.6 ± 0.1 (control)) and Peco2 values in hemolymph increased (0.5 ± 0.2 kPa (CO2-group) vs. 0.2 ± 0.04 kPa (control)). Slightly but significantly elevated bicarbonate concentrations in the hemolymph of CO2-incubated oysters ([HCO− 3]e = 1.8 ± 0.3 mM (CO2-group) vs. 1.3 ± 0.1 mM (control)) indicate only minimal regulation of extracellular acid-base status. At the acclimation temperature of 15 °C the OA-induced decrease in pHe did not lead to metabolic depression in oysters as standard metabolism rates (SMR) of CO2-exposed oysters were similar to controls. Upon acute warming SMR rose in both groups, but displayed a stronger increase in the CO2-incubated group. Investigation in isolated gill cells revealed a similar temperaturedependence of respiration between groups. Furthermore, the fraction of cellular energy demand for ion regulation via Na+/K+-ATPase was not affected by chronic hypercapnia or temperature. Metabolic profiling using 1H-NMR spectroscopy revealed substantial changes in some tissues following OA exposure at 15 °C. In mantle tissue alanine and ATP levels decreased significantly whereas an increase in succinate levels was observed in gill tissue. These findings suggest shifts in metabolic pathways following OA-exposure. Our study confirms that OA affects energy metabolism in oysters and

  5. Aerobic Conditioning Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Neil R.

    1980-01-01

    An aerobic exercise class that focuses on the conditioning of the cardiovascular and muscular systems is presented. Students complete data cards on heart rate, pulse, and exercises to be completed during the forty minute course. (CJ)

  6. Estrogen-related receptor gamma modulates energy metabolism target genes in human trophoblast.

    PubMed

    Poidatz, D; Dos Santos, E; Brulé, A; De Mazancourt, P; Dieudonné, M N

    2012-09-01

    Placenta growth and functions depend on correct trophoblast migration, proliferation, and differentiation. The placenta has a critical role in gas and nutrient transport. To accomplish these numerous functions, the placenta depends on a highly efficient energy metabolism control. Recent studies showed that the orphan nuclear receptor Estrogen-Related Receptor gamma (ERRγ) is highly expressed in human placentas. As ERRγ has been described as a major energy metabolism regulator, we investigated ERRγ expression and putative roles on energy homeostasis in human trophoblast from first trimester placentas. First, we showed that ERRγ expression level increased during pregnancy and that ERRγ was more abundant in villous than in extravillous trophoblasts. We also observed that ERRγ expression increased during trophoblast differentiation. Second, we demonstrated that mitochondrial biogenesis and expression of some energy metabolism target genes decreased when ERRγ expression was impaired. Altogether, these results suggest that ERRγ could be implicated in the energy metabolism regulation of human trophoblasts. PMID:22763271

  7. Energy Metabolism and Drug Efflux in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Black, Philippa A.; Warren, Robin M.; Louw, Gail E.; van Helden, Paul D.; Victor, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    The inherent drug susceptibility of microorganisms is determined by multiple factors, including growth state, the rate of drug diffusion into and out of the cell, and the intrinsic vulnerability of drug targets with regard to the corresponding antimicrobial agent. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), remains a significant source of global morbidity and mortality, further exacerbated by its ability to readily evolve drug resistance. It is well accepted that drug resistance in M. tuberculosis is driven by the acquisition of chromosomal mutations in genes encoding drug targets/promoter regions; however, a comprehensive description of the molecular mechanisms that fuel drug resistance in the clinical setting is currently lacking. In this context, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that active extrusion of drugs from the cell is critical for drug tolerance. M. tuberculosis encodes representatives of a diverse range of multidrug transporters, many of which are dependent on the proton motive force (PMF) or the availability of ATP. This suggests that energy metabolism and ATP production through the PMF, which is established by the electron transport chain (ETC), are critical in determining the drug susceptibility of M. tuberculosis. In this review, we detail advances in the study of the mycobacterial ETC and highlight drugs that target various components of the ETC. We provide an overview of some of the efflux pumps present in M. tuberculosis and their association, if any, with drug transport and concomitant effects on drug resistance. The implications of inhibiting drug extrusion, through the use of efflux pump inhibitors, are also discussed. PMID:24614376

  8. [Research advances in aerobic denitrifiers].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Cai, Zu-cong; Zhong, Wen-hui; Wang, Guo-xiang

    2007-11-01

    This paper reviewed the varieties and characteristics of aerobic denitrifiers, their action mechanisms, and the factors affecting aerobic denitrification. Aerobic denitrifiers mainly include Pseudomonas, Alcaligenes, Paracoccus and Bacillus, which are either aerobic or facultative aerobic, and heterotrophic. They can denitrify under aerobic conditions, with the main product being N2O. They can also convert NH4+ -N to gas product. The nitrate reductase which catalyzes the denitrification is periplasmic nitrate reductase rather than membrane-bound nitrate reductase. Dissolved oxygen concentration and C/N ratio are the main factors affecting aerobic denitrification. The main methods for screening aerobic denitrifiers, such as intermittent aeration and selected culture, were also introduced. The research advances in the application of aerobic denitrifiers in aquaculture, waste water processing, and bio-degradation of organic pollutants, as well as the contributions of aerobic denitrifiers to soil nitrogen emission were summarized. PMID:18260473

  9. Effects of Intracerebroventricular Administration of Neuropeptide Y on Metabolic Gene Expression and Energy Metabolism in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Su, Yan; Foppen, Ewout; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2016-08-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an important neurotransmitter in the control of energy metabolism. Several studies have shown that obesity is associated with increased levels of NPY in the hypothalamus. We hypothesized that the central release of NPY has coordinated and integrated effects on energy metabolism in different tissues, resulting in increased energy storage and decreased energy expenditure (EE). We first investigated the acute effects of an intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of NPY on gene expression in liver, brown adipose tissue, soleus muscle, and sc and epididymal white adipose tissue (WAT). We found increased expression of genes involved in gluconeogenesis and triglyceride secretion in the liver already 2-hour after the start of the NPY administration. In brown adipose tissue, the expression of thermogenic genes was decreased. In sc WAT, the expression of genes involved in lipogenesis was increased, whereas in soleus muscle, the expression of lipolytic genes was decreased after ICV NPY. These findings indicate that the ICV infusion of NPY acutely and simultaneously increases lipogenesis and decreases lipolysis in different tissues. Subsequently, we investigated the acute effects of ICV NPY on locomotor activity, respiratory exchange ratio, EE, and body temperature. The ICV infusion of NPY increased locomotor activity, body temperature, and EE as well as respiratory exchange ratio. Together, these results show that an acutely increased central availability of NPY results in a shift of metabolism towards lipid storage and an increased use of carbohydrates, while at the same time increasing activity, EE, and body temperature. PMID:27267712

  10. High incubation temperatures enhance mitochondrial energy metabolism in reptile embryos

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bao-Jun; Li, Teng; Gao, Jing; Ma, Liang; Du, Wei-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Developmental rate increases exponentially with increasing temperature in ectothermic animals, but the biochemical basis underlying this thermal dependence is largely unexplored. We measured mitochondrial respiration and metabolic enzyme activities of turtle embryos (Pelodiscus sinensis) incubated at different temperatures to identify the metabolic basis of the rapid development occurring at high temperatures in reptile embryos. Developmental rate increased with increasing incubation temperatures in the embryos of P. sinensis. Correspondingly, in addition to the thermal dependence of mitochondrial respiration and metabolic enzyme activities, high-temperature incubation further enhanced mitochondrial respiration and COX activities in the embryos. This suggests that embryos may adjust mitochondrial respiration and metabolic enzyme activities in response to developmental temperature to achieve high developmental rates at high temperatures. Our study highlights the importance of biochemical investigations in understanding the proximate mechanisms by which temperature affects embryonic development. PMID:25749301

  11. Energy metabolism and hematology of white-tailed deer fawns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rawson, R.E.; DelGiudice, G.D.; Dziuk, H.E.; Mech, L.D.

    1992-01-01

    Resting metabolic rates, weight gains and hematologic profiles of six newborn, captive white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) fawns (four females, two males) were determined during the first 3 mo of life. Estimated mean daily weight gain of fawns was 0.2 kg. The regression equation for metabolic rate was: Metabolic rate (kcal/kg0.75/day) = 56.1 +/- 1.3 (age in days), r = 0.65, P less than 0.001). Regression equations were also used to relate age to red blood cell count (RBC), hemoglobin concentration (Hb), packed cell volume, white blood cell count, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), and mean corpuscular hemoglobin. The age relationships of Hb, MCHC, and smaller RBC's were indicative of an increasing and more efficient oxygen-carrying and exchange capacity to fulfill the increasing metabolic demands for oxygen associated with increasing body size.

  12. Teaching Energy Metabolism Using Scientific Articles: Implementation of a Virtual Learning Environment for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Espindola, Marina Bazzo; El-Bacha, Tatiana; Giannella, Tais Rabetti; Struchiner, Miriam; da Silva, Wagner S.; Da Poian, Andrea T.

    2010-01-01

    This work describes the use of a virtual learning environment (VLE) applied to the biochemistry class for undergraduate, first-year medical students at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. The course focused on the integration of energy metabolism, exploring metabolic adaptations in different physiological or pathological states such as…

  13. Regulation of hepatic energy metabolism by the nuclear receptor PXR.

    PubMed

    Hakkola, Jukka; Rysä, Jaana; Hukkanen, Janne

    2016-09-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a nuclear receptor that is traditionally thought to be specialized for sensing xenobiotic exposure. In concurrence with this feature PXR was originally identified to regulate drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. During the last ten years it has become clear that PXR harbors broader functions. Evidence obtained both in experimental animals and humans indicate that ligand-activated PXR regulates hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism and affects whole body metabolic homeostasis. Currently, the consequences of PXR activation on overall metabolic health are not yet fully understood and varying results on the effect of PXR activation or knockout on metabolic disorders and weight gain have been published in mouse models. Rifampicin and St. John's wort, the prototypical human PXR agonists, impair glucose tolerance in healthy volunteers. Chronic exposure to PXR agonists could potentially represent a risk factor for diabetes and metabolic syndrome. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie. PMID:27041449

  14. Effect of desipramine and fluoxetine on energy metabolism of cerebral mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Villa, Roberto Federico; Ferrari, Federica; Gorini, Antonella; Brunello, Nicoletta; Tascedda, Fabio

    2016-08-25

    Brain bioenergetic abnormalities in mood disorders were detected by neuroimaging in vivo studies in humans. Because of the increasing importance of mitochondrial pathogenetic hypothesis of Depression, in this study the effects of sub-chronic treatment (21days) with desipramine (15mg/kg) and fluoxetine (10mg/kg) were evaluated on brain energy metabolism. On mitochondria in vivo located in neuronal soma (somatic) and on mitochondria of synapses (synaptic), the catalytic activities of regulatory enzymes of mitochondrial energy-yielding metabolic pathways were assayed. Antidepressants in vivo treatment modified the activities of selected enzymes of different mitochondria, leading to metabolic modifications in the energy metabolism of brain cortex: (a) the enhancement of cytochrome oxidase activity on somatic mitochondria; (b) the decrease of malate, succinate dehydrogenase and glutamate-pyruvate transaminase activities of synaptic mitochondria; (c) the selective effect of fluoxetine on enzymes related to glutamate metabolism. These results overcome the conflicting data so far obtained with antidepressants on brain energy metabolism, because the enzymatic analyses were made on mitochondria with diversified neuronal in vivo localization, i.e. on somatic and synaptic. This research is the first investigation on the pharmacodynamics of antidepressants studied at subcellular level, in the perspective of (i) assessing the role of energy metabolism of cerebral mitochondria in animal models of mood disorders, and (ii) highlighting new therapeutical strategies for antidepressants targeting brain bioenergetics. PMID:27268280

  15. Thyroid hormones correlate with resting metabolic rate, not daily energy expenditure, in two charadriiform seabirds

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Kyle H.; Welcker, Jorg; Gaston, Anthony J.; Hatch, Scott A.; Palace, Vince; Hare, James F.; Speakman, John R.; Anderson, W. Gary

    2013-01-01

    Summary Thyroid hormones affect in vitro metabolic intensity, increase basal metabolic rate (BMR) in the lab, and are sometimes correlated with basal and/or resting metabolic rate (RMR) in a field environment. Given the difficulty of measuring metabolic rate in the field—and the likelihood that capture and long-term restraint necessary to measure metabolic rate in the field jeopardizes other measurements—we examined the possibility that circulating thyroid hormone levels were correlated with RMR in two free-ranging bird species with high levels of energy expenditure (the black-legged kittiwake, Rissa tridactyla, and thick-billed murre, Uria lomvia). Because BMR and daily energy expenditure (DEE) are purported to be linked, we also tested for a correlation between thyroid hormones and DEE. We examined the relationships between free and bound levels of the thyroid hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) with DEE and with 4-hour long measurements of post-absorptive and thermoneutral resting metabolism (resting metabolic rate; RMR). RMR but not DEE increased with T3 in both species; both metabolic rates were independent of T4. T3 and T4 were not correlated with one another. DEE correlated with body mass in kittiwakes but not in murres, presumably owing to the larger coefficient of variation in body mass during chick rearing for the more sexually dimorphic kittiwakes. We suggest T3 provides a good proxy for resting metabolism but not DEE in these seabird species. PMID:23789108

  16. Transcriptional Factors Mediating Retinoic Acid Signals in the Control of Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yueqiao; Li, Rui; Chen, Guoxun

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), an active metabolite of vitamin A (VA), is important for many physiological processes including energy metabolism. This is mainly achieved through RA-regulated gene expression in metabolically active cells. RA regulates gene expression mainly through the activation of two subfamilies in the nuclear receptor superfamily, retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs). RAR/RXR heterodimers or RXR/RXR homodimers bind to RA response element in the promoters of RA target genes and regulate their expressions upon ligand binding. The development of metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes is often associated with profound changes in the expressions of genes involved in glucose and lipid metabolism in metabolically active cells. RA regulates some of these gene expressions. Recently, in vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated that status and metabolism of VA regulate macronutrient metabolism. Some studies have shown that, in addition to RARs and RXRs, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α, chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II, and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor β/δ may function as transcriptional factors mediating RA response. Herein, we summarize current progresses regarding the VA metabolism and the role of nuclear receptors in mediating RA signals, with an emphasis on their implication in energy metabolism. PMID:26110391

  17. Transcriptional Factors Mediating Retinoic Acid Signals in the Control of Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yueqiao; Li, Rui; Chen, Guoxun

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), an active metabolite of vitamin A (VA), is important for many physiological processes including energy metabolism. This is mainly achieved through RA-regulated gene expression in metabolically active cells. RA regulates gene expression mainly through the activation of two subfamilies in the nuclear receptor superfamily, retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs). RAR/RXR heterodimers or RXR/RXR homodimers bind to RA response element in the promoters of RA target genes and regulate their expressions upon ligand binding. The development of metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes is often associated with profound changes in the expressions of genes involved in glucose and lipid metabolism in metabolically active cells. RA regulates some of these gene expressions. Recently, in vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated that status and metabolism of VA regulate macronutrient metabolism. Some studies have shown that, in addition to RARs and RXRs, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α, chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II, and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor β/δ may function as transcriptional factors mediating RA response. Herein, we summarize current progresses regarding the VA metabolism and the role of nuclear receptors in mediating RA signals, with an emphasis on their implication in energy metabolism. PMID:26110391

  18. The effectiveness of aerobic training, cognitive behavioural therapy, and energy conservation management in treating MS-related fatigue: the design of the TREFAMS-ACE programme

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background TREFAMS is an acronym for TReating FAtigue in Multiple Sclerosis, while ACE refers to the rehabilitation treatment methods under study, that is, Aerobic training, Cognitive behavioural therapy, and Energy conservation management. The TREFAMS-ACE research programme consists of four studies and has two main objectives: (1) to assess the effectiveness of three different rehabilitation treatment strategies in reducing fatigue and improving societal participation in patients with MS; and (2) to study the neurobiological mechanisms of action that underlie treatment effects and MS-related fatigue in general. Methods/Design Ambulatory patients (n = 270) suffering from MS-related fatigue will be recruited to three single-blinded randomised clinical trials (RCTs). In each RCT, 90 patients will be randomly allocated to the trial-specific intervention or to a low-intensity intervention that is the same for all RCTs. This low-intensity intervention consists of three individual consultations with a specialised MS-nurse. The trial-specific interventions are Aerobic Training, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, and Energy Conservation Management. These interventions consist of 12 individual therapist-supervised sessions with additional intervention-specific home exercises. The therapy period lasts 16 weeks. All RCTs have the same design and the same primary outcome measures: fatigue - measured with the Checklist Individual Strength, and participation - measured with the Impact on Participation and Autonomy questionnaire. Outcomes will be assessed 1 week prior to, and at 0, 8, 16, 26 and 52 weeks after randomisation. The assessors will be blinded to allocation. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in serum, salivary cortisol, physical fitness, physical activity, coping, self-efficacy, illness cognitions and other determinants will be longitudinally measured in order to study the neurobiological mechanisms of action. Discussion The TREFAMS-ACE programme is unique in its aim to

  19. Metaboloepigenetics: Interrelationships between energy metabolism and epigenetic control of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Donohoe, Dallas R.; Bultman, Scott J.

    2012-01-01

    Diet and energy metabolism affect gene expression, which influences human health and disease. Here, we discuss the role of epigenetics as a mechanistic link between energy metabolism and control of gene expression. A number of key energy metabolites including SAM, acetyl-CoA, NAD+, and ATP serve as essential co-factors for many, perhaps most, epigenetic enzymes that regulate DNA methylation, posttranslational histone modifications, and nucleosome position. The relative abundance of these energy metabolites allows a cell to sense its energetic state. And as co-factors, energy metabolites act as rheostats to modulate the activity of epigenetic enzymes and upregulate/downregulate transcription as appropriate to maintain homeostasis. PMID:22261928

  20. Bone: from a reservoir of minerals to a regulator of energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Confavreux, Cyrille B

    2011-04-01

    Besides locomotion, organ protection, and calcium-phosphorus homeostasis, the three classical functions of the skeleton, bone remodeling affects energy metabolism through uncarboxylated osteocalcin, a recently discovered hormone secreted by osteoblasts. This review traces how energy metabolism affects osteoblasts through the central control of bone mass involving leptin, serotoninergic neurons, the hypothalamus, and the sympathetic nervous system. Next, the role of osteocalcin (insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity, and pancreas β-cell proliferation) in the regulation of energy metabolism is described. Then, the connections between insulin signaling on osteoblasts and the release of uncarboxylated osteocalcin during osteoclast bone resorption through osteoprotegerin are reported. Finally, the understanding of this new bone endocrinology will provide some insights into bone, kidney, and energy metabolism in patients with chronic kidney disease. PMID:21346725

  1. Bone: from a reservoir of minerals to a regulator of energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Confavreux, Cyrille B

    2011-04-01

    Besides locomotion, organ protection, and calcium-phosphorus homeostasis, the three classical functions of the skeleton, bone remodeling affects energy metabolism through uncarboxylated osteocalcin, a recently discovered hormone secreted by osteoblasts. This review traces how energy metabolism affects osteoblasts through the central control of bone mass involving leptin, serotoninergic neurons, the hypothalamus, and the sympathetic nervous system. Next, the role of osteocalcin (insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity, and pancreas β-cell proliferation) in the regulation of energy metabolism is described. Then, the connections between insulin signaling on osteoblasts and the release of uncarboxylated osteocalcin during osteoclast bone resorption through osteoprotegerin are reported. Finally, the understanding of this new bone endocrinology will provide some insights into bone, kidney, and energy metabolism in patients with chronic kidney disease. PMID:26746856

  2. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... digestive system called enzymes break proteins down into amino acids, fats into fatty acids, and carbohydrates into simple ... for example, glucose). In addition to sugar, both amino acids and fatty acids can be used as energy ...

  3. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... digestive system called enzymes break proteins down into amino acids, fats into fatty acids, and carbohydrates into simple ... e.g., glucose). In addition to sugar, both amino acids and fatty acids can be used as energy ...

  4. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... convert or use energy, such as: Breathing Circulating blood Controlling body temperature Contracting muscles Digesting food and nutrients Eliminating waste through urine and feces Functioning of the brain and nerves

  5. The Central Carbon and Energy Metabolism of Marine Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Obata, Toshihiro; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano

    2013-01-01

    Diatoms are heterokont algae derived from a secondary symbiotic event in which a eukaryotic host cell acquired an eukaryotic red alga as plastid. The multiple endosymbiosis and horizontal gene transfer processes provide diatoms unusual opportunities for gene mixing to establish distinctive biosynthetic pathways and metabolic control structures. Diatoms are also known to have significant impact on global ecosystems as one of the most dominant phytoplankton species in the contemporary ocean. As such their metabolism and growth regulating factors have been of particular interest for many years. The publication of the genomic sequences of two independent species of diatoms and the advent of an enhanced experimental toolbox for molecular biological investigations have afforded far greater opportunities than were previously apparent for these species and re-invigorated studies regarding the central carbon metabolism of diatoms. In this review we discuss distinctive features of the central carbon metabolism of diatoms and its response to forthcoming environmental changes and recent advances facilitating the possibility of industrial use of diatoms for oil production. Although the operation and importance of several key pathways of diatom metabolism have already been demonstrated and determined, we will also highlight other potentially important pathways wherein this has yet to be achieved. PMID:24957995

  6. Fatty acids from diet and microbiota regulate energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Alcock, Joe; Lin, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    A high-fat diet and elevated levels of free fatty acids are known risk factors for metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and visceral obesity. Although these disease associations are well established, it is unclear how different dietary fats change the risk of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. Here, we review emerging evidence that insulin resistance and fat storage are linked to changes in the gut microbiota. The gut microbiota and intestinal barrier function, in turn, are highly influenced by the composition of fat in the diet. We review findings that certain fats (for example, long-chain saturated fatty acids) are associated with dysbiosis, impairment of intestinal barrier function, and metabolic endotoxemia. In contrast, other fatty acids, including short-chain and certain unsaturated fatty acids, protect against dysbiosis and impairment of barrier function caused by other dietary fats. These fats may promote insulin sensitivity by inhibiting metabolic endotoxemia and dysbiosis-driven inflammation. During dysbiosis, the modulation of metabolism by diet and microbiota may represent an adaptive process that compensates for the increased fuel demands of an activated immune system. PMID:27006755

  7. Deciphering the roles of the constitutive androstane receptor in energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jiong; Chen, Baian; Lu, Jing; Xie, Wen

    2015-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is initially defined as a xenobiotic nuclear receptor that protects the liver from injury. Detoxification of damaging chemicals is achieved by CAR-mediated induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. More recent research has implicated CAR in energy metabolism, suggesting a therapeutic potential for CAR in metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and obesity. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which CAR regulates energy metabolism will allow us to take advantage of its effectiveness while avoiding its side effects. This review summarizes the current progress on the regulation of CAR nuclear translocation, upstream modulators of CAR activity, and the crosstalk between CAR and other transcriptional factors, with the aim of elucidating how CAR regulates glucose and lipid metabolism. PMID:25500869

  8. Deciphering the roles of the constitutive androstane receptor in energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jiong; Chen, Baian; Lu, Jing; Xie, Wen

    2015-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is initially defined as a xenobiotic nuclear receptor that protects the liver from injury. Detoxification of damaging chemicals is achieved by CAR-mediated induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. More recent research has implicated CAR in energy metabolism, suggesting a therapeutic potential for CAR in metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and obesity. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which CAR regulates energy metabolism will allow us to take advantage of its effectiveness while avoiding its side effects. This review summarizes the current progress on the regulation of CAR nuclear translocation, upstream modulators of CAR activity, and the crosstalk between CAR and other transcriptional factors, with the aim of elucidating how CAR regulates glucose and lipid metabolism. PMID:25500869

  9. Understanding metabolic alterations in space flight using quantitative models: fluid and energy balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, J. I.

    1986-01-01

    This report summarizes many of the results obtained during the Skylab program, on metabolic changes during weightlessness. The examination of the data was conducted following an integrated multi-disciplinary and multi-experimental approach. Emphasis is given on several major aspects of metabolic adaptation to space flight: fluid-electrolyte regulation, mechanisms of hormone disturbances, energy balance and etiology of weight loss. The aim is to obtain a composite picture of the fluid, electrolyte and energy response to weightlessness.

  10. Sexual dimorphism in primate aerobic capacity: a phylogenetic test.

    PubMed

    Lindenfors, Patrik; Revell, L J; Nunn, C L

    2010-06-01

    Male intrasexual competition should favour increased male physical prowess. This should in turn result in greater aerobic capacity in males than in females (i.e. sexual dimorphism) and a correlation between sexual dimorphism in aerobic capacity and the strength of sexual selection among species. However, physiological scaling laws predict that aerobic capacity should be lower per unit body mass in larger than in smaller animals, potentially reducing or reversing the sex difference and its association with measures of sexual selection. We used measures of haematocrit and red blood cell (RBC) counts from 45 species of primates to test four predictions related to sexual selection and body mass: (i) on average, males should have higher aerobic capacity than females, (ii) aerobic capacity should be higher in adult than juvenile males, (iii) aerobic capacity should increase with increasing sexual selection, but also that (iv) measures of aerobic capacity should co-vary negatively with body mass. For the first two predictions, we used a phylogenetic paired t-test developed for this study. We found support for predictions (i) and (ii). For prediction (iii), however, we found a negative correlation between the degree of sexual selection and aerobic capacity, which was opposite to our prediction. Prediction (iv) was generally supported. We also investigated whether substrate use, basal metabolic rate and agility influenced physiological measures of oxygen transport, but we found only weak evidence for a correlation between RBC count and agility. PMID:20406346

  11. Myocardial Energy Substrate Metabolism in Heart Failure : from Pathways to Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Arata; Milner, Kenneth; Gupta, Abhishek; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in therapy, heart failure remains a major cause of mortality and morbidity and is a growing healthcare burden worldwide. Alterations in myocardial energy substrate metabolism are a hallmark of heart failure, and are associated with an energy deficit in the failing heart. Previous studies have shown that a metabolic shift from mitochondrial oxidative metabolism to glycolysis, as well as an uncoupling between glycolysis and glucose oxidation, plays a crucial role in the development of cardiac inefficiency and functional impairment in heart failure. Therefore, optimizing energy substrate utilization, particularly by increasing mitochondrial glucose oxidation, can be a potentially promising approach to decrease the severity of heart failure by improving mechanical cardiac efficiency. One approach to stimulating myocardial glucose oxidation is to inhibit fatty acid oxidation. This review will overview the physiological regulation of both myocardial fatty acid and glucose oxidation in the heart, and will discuss what alterations in myocardial energy substrate metabolism occur in the failing heart. Furthermore, lysine acetylation has been recently identified as a novel post-translational pathway by which mitochondrial enzymes involved in all aspects of cardiac energy metabolism can be regulated. Thus, we will also discuss the effect of acetylation of metabolic enzymes on myocardial energy substrate preference in the settings of heart failure. Finally, we will focus on pharmacological interventions that target enzymes involved in fatty acid uptake, fatty acid oxidation, transcriptional regulation of fatty acid oxidation, and glucose oxidation to treat heart failure. PMID:26166604

  12. Methods to determine aerobic endurance.

    PubMed

    Bosquet, Laurent; Léger, Luc; Legros, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Physiological testing of elite athletes requires the correct identification and assessment of sports-specific underlying factors. It is now recognised that performance in long-distance events is determined by maximal oxygen uptake (V(2 max)), energy cost of exercise and the maximal fractional utilisation of V(2 max) in any realised performance or as a corollary a set percentage of V(2 max) that could be endured as long as possible. This later ability is defined as endurance, and more precisely aerobic endurance, since V(2 max) sets the upper limit of aerobic pathway. It should be distinguished from endurance ability or endurance performance, which are synonymous with performance in long-distance events. The present review examines methods available in the literature to assess aerobic endurance. They are numerous and can be classified into two categories, namely direct and indirect methods. Direct methods bring together all indices that allow either a complete or a partial representation of the power-duration relationship, while indirect methods revolve around the determination of the so-called anaerobic threshold (AT). With regard to direct methods, performance in a series of tests provides a more complete and presumably more valid description of the power-duration relationship than performance in a single test, even if both approaches are well correlated with each other. However, the question remains open to determine which systems model should be employed among the several available in the literature, and how to use them in the prescription of training intensities. As for indirect methods, there is quantitative accumulation of data supporting the utilisation of the AT to assess aerobic endurance and to prescribe training intensities. However, it appears that: there is no unique intensity corresponding to the AT, since criteria available in the literature provide inconsistent results; and the non-invasive determination of the AT using ventilatory and heart rate

  13. The marine mammal dive response is exercise modulated to maximize aerobic dive duration.

    PubMed

    Davis, Randall W; Williams, Terrie M

    2012-08-01

    When aquatically adapted mammals and birds swim submerged, they exhibit a dive response in which breathing ceases, heart rate slows, and blood flow to peripheral tissues and organs is reduced. The most intense dive response occurs during forced submersion which conserves blood oxygen for the brain and heart, thereby preventing asphyxiation. In free-diving animals, the dive response is less profound, and energy metabolism remains aerobic. However, even this relatively moderate bradycardia seems diametrically opposed to the normal cardiovascular response (i.e., tachycardia and peripheral vasodilation) during physical exertion. As a result, there has been a long-standing paradox regarding how aquatic mammals and birds exercise while submerged. We hypothesized based on cardiovascular modeling that heart rate must increase to ensure adequate oxygen delivery to active muscles. Here, we show that heart rate (HR) does indeed increase with flipper or fluke stroke frequency (SF) during voluntary, aerobic dives in Weddell seals (HR = 1.48SF - 8.87) and bottlenose dolphins (HR = 0.99SF + 2.46), respectively, two marine mammal species with different evolutionary lineages. These results support our hypothesis that marine mammals maintain aerobic muscle metabolism while swimming submerged by combining elements of both dive and exercise responses, with one or the other predominating depending on the level of exertion. PMID:22585422

  14. Do altered energy metabolism or spontaneous locomotion 'mediate' decelerated senescence?

    PubMed

    Arum, Oge; Dawson, John Alexander; Smith, Daniel Larry; Kopchick, John J; Allison, David B; Bartke, Andrzej

    2015-06-01

    That one or multiple measures of metabolic rate may be robustly associated with, or possibly even causative of, the progression of aging-resultant phenotypes such as lifespan is a long-standing, well-known mechanistic hypothesis. To broach this hypothesis, we assessed metabolic function and spontaneous locomotion in two genetic and one dietary mouse models for retarded aging, and subjected the data to mediation analyses to determine whether any metabolic or locomotor trait could be identified as a mediator of the effect of any of the interventions on senescence. We do not test the hypothesis of causality (which would require some experiments), but instead test whether the correlation structure of certain variables is consistent with one possible pathway model in which a proposed mediating variable has a causal role. Results for metabolic measures, including oxygen consumption and respiratory quotient, failed to support this hypothesis; similar negative results were obtained for three behavioral motion metrics. Therefore, our mediation analyses did not find support that any of these correlates of decelerated senescence was a substantial mediator of the effect of either of these genetic alterations (with or without caloric restriction) on longevity. Further studies are needed to relate the examined phenotypic characteristics to mechanisms of aging and control of longevity. PMID:25720347

  15. Substrate availability regulates energy metabolism via transcriptional mechanism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study investigated the mechanisms by which enhanced substrate availability regulates cardiac metabolism and function. Chronic elevation of intracellular glucose levels were achieved by overexpressing GLUT1 in mouse hearts (TG), while chronic elevation of fatty acids (FA) availability wer...

  16. Methodological and metabolic considerations in the study of caffeine-containing energy drinks.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Jane

    2014-10-01

    Caffeine-containing energy drinks are popular and widely available beverages. Despite large increases in consumption, studies documenting the nutritional, metabolic, and health implications of these beverages are limited. This review provides some important methodological considerations in the examination of these drinks and highlights their potential impact on the gastrointestinal system, liver, and metabolic health. The gastrointestinal system is important as it comes into contact with the highest concentration of energy drink ingredients and initiates a chain of events to communicate with peripheral tissues. Although energy drinks have diverse compositions, including taurine, ginseng, and carnitine, the most metabolically deleterious ingredients appear to be simple sugars (such as glucose and fructose) and caffeine. In combination, these last two ingredients have the greatest metabolic impact and potential influence on overall health. PMID:25293552

  17. Impaired cellular energy metabolism contributes to bluetongue-virus-induced autophagy.

    PubMed

    Lv, Shuang; Xu, Qingyuan; Sun, Encheng; Zhang, Jikai; Wu, Donglai

    2016-10-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) has been found to trigger autophagy to favor its replication, but the underlying mechanisms have not been clarified. Here, we show that cellular energy metabolism is involved in BTV-induced autophagy. Cellular ATP synthesis was impaired by BTV1 infection, causing metabolic stress, which was responsible for activation of autophagy, since the conversion of LC3 and aggregation of GFP-LC3 (autophagy markers) were suppressed when infection-caused energy depletion was reversed via MP (metabolic substrate) treatment. The reduced virus yields with MP further supported this view. Overall, our findings suggest that BTV1-induced disruption of cellular energy metabolism contributes to autophagy, and this provides new insights into BTV-host interactions. PMID:27379971

  18. Natural compounds regulate energy metabolism by the modulating the activity of lipid-sensing nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Obesity causes excess fat accumulation in various tissues, most notoriously in the adipose tissue, along with other insulin-responsive organs such as skeletal muscle and the liver, which predisposes an individual to the development of metabolic abnormalities. The molecular mechanisms underlying obesity-induced metabolic abnormalities have not been completely elucidated; however, in recent years, the search for therapies to prevent the development of obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders has increased. It is known that several nuclear receptors, when activated by specific ligands, regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism at the transcriptional level. The expression of lipid metabolism-related enzymes is directly regulated by the activity of various nuclear receptors via their interaction with specific response elements in promoters of those genes. Many natural compounds act as ligands of nuclear receptors and regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism by regulating the activities of these nuclear receptors. In this review, we describe our current knowledge of obesity, the role of lipid-sensing nuclear receptors in energy metabolism, and several examples of food factors that act as agonists or antagonists of nuclear receptors, which may be useful for the management of obesity and the accompanying energy metabolism abnormalities. PMID:23180608

  19. Tributyltin disrupts feeding and energy metabolism in the goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiliang; Sun, Ping; Yang, Fan; Kong, Tao; Zhang, Ruichen

    2016-06-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) can induce obesogen response. However, little is known about the adverse effects of TBT on food intake and energy metabolism. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of TBT, at environmental concentrations of 2.44 and 24.4 ng/L (1 and 10 ng/L as Sn), on feeding and energy metabolism in goldfish (Carassius auratus). After exposure for 54 d, TBT increased the weight gain and food intake in fish. The patterns of brain neuropeptide genes expression were in line with potential orexigenic effects, with increased expression of neuropeptide Y and apelin, and decreased expression of pro-opiomelanocortin, ghrelin, cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript, and corticotropin-releasing factor. Interestingly, the energy metabolism indicators (oxygen consumption, ammonia exertion and swimming activity) and the serum thyroid hormones were all significantly increased at the 2.44 ng/L TBT group in fish. However, no changes of energy metabolism indicators or a decrease of thyroid hormones was found at the 24.4 ng/L TBT group, which indicated a complex disrupting effect on metabolism of TBT. In short, TBT can alter feeding and energy metabolism in fish, which might promote the obesogenic responses. PMID:26971175

  20. Effects of Excess Energy Intake on Glucose and Lipid Metabolism in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiuqing; Cui, Ju; Gong, Huan; Zhang, Tiemei

    2016-01-01

    Excess energy intake correlates with the development of metabolic disorders. However, different energy-dense foods have different effects on metabolism. To compare the effects of a high-fat diet, a high-fructose diet and a combination high-fat/high-fructose diet on glucose and lipid metabolism, male C57BL/6 mice were fed with one of four different diets for 3 months: standard chow; standard diet and access to fructose water; a high fat diet; and a high fat diet with fructose water. After 3 months of feeding, the high-fat and the combined high-fat/high-fructose groups showed significantly increased body weights, accompanied by hyperglycemia and insulin resistance; however, the high-fructose group was not different from the control group. All three energy-dense groups showed significantly higher visceral fat weights, total cholesterol concentrations, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations compared with the control group. Assays of basal metabolism showed that the respiratory quotient of the high-fat, the high-fructose, and the high-fat/high-fructose groups decreased compared with the control group. The present study confirmed the deleterious effect of high energy diets on body weight and metabolism, but suggested that the energy efficiency of the high-fructose diet was much lower than that of the high-fat diet. In addition, fructose supplementation did not worsen the detrimental effects of high-fat feeding alone on metabolism in C57BL/6 mice. PMID:26745179

  1. Mechanisms Linking Energy Substrate Metabolism to the Function of the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Carley, Andrew N.; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Lewandowski, E. Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic signaling mechanisms are increasingly recognized to mediate the cellular response to alterations in workload demand, as a consequence of physiological and pathophysiological challenges. Thus, an understanding of the metabolic mechanisms coordinating activity in the cytosol with the energy-providing pathways in the mitochondrial matrix becomes critical for deepening our insights into the pathogenic changes that occur in the stressed cardiomyocyte. Processes that exchange both metabolic intermediates and cations between the cytosol and mitochondria enable transduction of dynamic changes in contractile state to the mitochondrial compartment of the cell. Disruption of such metabolic transduction pathways has severe consequences for the energetic support of contractile function in the heart and is implicated in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Deficiencies in metabolic reserve and impaired metabolic transduction in the cardiomyocyte can result from inherent deficiencies in metabolic phenotype or maladaptive changes in metabolic enzyme expression and regulation in the response to pathogenic stress. This review examines both current and emerging concepts of the functional linkage between the cytosol and the mitochondrial matrix with a specific focus on metabolic reserve and energetic efficiency. These principles of exchange and transport mechanisms across the mitochondrial membrane are reviewed for the failing heart from the perspectives of chronic pressure overload and diabetes mellitus. PMID:24526677

  2. Enzymes and genes involved in aerobic alkane degradation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wanpeng; Shao, Zongze

    2013-01-01

    Alkanes are major constituents of crude oil. They are also present at low concentrations in diverse non-contaminated because many living organisms produce them as chemo-attractants or as protecting agents against water loss. Alkane degradation is a widespread phenomenon in nature. The numerous microorganisms, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic, capable of utilizing alkanes as a carbon and energy source, have been isolated and characterized. This review summarizes the current knowledge of how bacteria metabolize alkanes aerobically, with a particular emphasis on the oxidation of long-chain alkanes, including factors that are responsible for chemotaxis to alkanes, transport across cell membrane of alkanes, the regulation of alkane degradation gene and initial oxidation. PMID:23755043

  3. [The metabolic effects of the neurotropic action of actovegin during hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Boiarinov, G A; Penkovich, A A; Mukhina, I V

    1999-01-01

    Recent data on the mechanisms of the effect of aktovegin on the brain in hypoxia are systematized. It is shown that the drug improves the transport and utilization of oxygen and glucose, activates the aerobic routes of energy metabolism and, as a result, improves the functional state of the central nervous system cells. PMID:10340134

  4. Oxalic acid alleviates chilling injury in peach fruit by regulating energy metabolism and fatty acid contents.

    PubMed

    Jin, Peng; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Lei; Shan, Timin; Zheng, Yonghua

    2014-10-15

    The effects of postharvest oxalic acid (OA) treatment on chilling injury, energy metabolism and membrane fatty acid content in 'Baifeng' peach fruit stored at 0°C were investigated. Internal browning was significantly reduced by OA treatment in peaches. OA treatment markedly inhibited the increase of ion leakage and the accumulation of malondialdehyde. Meanwhile, OA significantly increased the contents of adenosine triphosphate and energy charge in peach fruit. Enzyme activities of energy metabolism including H(+)-adenosine triphosphatase, Ca(2+)-adenosine triphosphatase, succinic dehydrogenase and cytochrome C oxidase were markedly enhanced by OA treatment. The ratio of unsaturated/saturated fatty acid in OA-treated fruit was significantly higher than that in control fruit. These results suggest that the alleviation in chilling injury by OA may be due to enhanced enzyme activities related to energy metabolism and higher levels of energy status and unsaturated/saturated fatty acid ratio. PMID:24837925

  5. Specificity of aerobic and anaerobic work capacities and powers.

    PubMed

    Boulay, M R; Lortie, G; Simoneau, J A; Hamel, P; Leblanc, C; Bouchard, C

    1985-12-01

    Thirty-three untrained subjects of both sexes, 18-31 years of age, performed several tests on cycle ergometers. Maximal aerobic power (MAP) was obtained in a progressive work test. Maximal aerobic capacity (MAC) was measured in a 90-min maximal test and was computed as the total work output during that period. Two all-out cycle ergometer work tests lasting 10 s and 90 s were used to estimate the anaerobic alactic capacity (AAC) and lactic capacity (ALC). Anaerobic alactic power (AAP) was computed as the highest output in 1 s in the AAC test and anaerobic lactic power (ALP) was obtained as the mean output during the last 5 s in an all-out test of 30 s. Correlation coefficients were computed between all measurements of capacity and power expressed per kg of body weight as well as with scores adjusted for sex differences. Common variances (r2 X 100) between measurements of power were either low (MAP-AAP, 40%) or moderate (MAP-ALP, 61%; AAP-ALP, 62%) while common variances between measurements of capacity were sometimes low (MAC-AAC, 49%) or higher (MAC-ALC, 76%; AAC-ALC, 77%). The common variances between tests of power and capacity reached high values when calculated with metabolic criteria of the same class (MAP-MAC, 81%; AAP-AAC, 92%). These results provide quantitative evidence to support the notion of specificity between the aerobic and the anaerobic work performances and support the distinction between capacity and power of the three energy systems. PMID:4077360

  6. Metabolomic Analysis Reveals Increased Aerobic Glycolysis and Amino Acid Deficit in a Cellular Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Valbuena, Gabriel N; Rizzardini, Milena; Cimini, Sara; Siskos, Alexandros P; Bendotti, Caterina; Cantoni, Lavinia; Keun, Hector C

    2016-05-01

    Defects in energy metabolism are potential pathogenic mechanisms in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a rapidly fatal disease with no cure. The mechanisms through which this occurs remain elusive and their understanding may prove therapeutically useful. We used metabolomics and stable isotope tracers to examine metabolic changes in a well-characterized cell model of familial ALS, the motor neuronal NSC-34 line stably expressing human wild-type Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (wtSOD1) or mutant G93A (G93ASOD1). Our findings indicate that wt and G93ASOD1 expression both enhanced glucose metabolism under serum deprivation. However, in wtSOD1 cells, this phenotype increased supply of amino acids for protein and glutathione synthesis, while in G93ASOD1 cells it was associated with death, aerobic glycolysis, and a broad dysregulation of amino acid homeostasis. Aerobic glycolysis was mainly due to induction of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1. Our study thus provides novel insight into the role of deranged energy metabolism as a cause of poor adaptation to stress and a promoter of neural cell damage in the presence of mutant SOD1. Furthermore, the metabolic alterations we report may help explain why mitochondrial dysfunction and impairment of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response are frequently seen in ALS. PMID:25963727

  7. Atmospheric Constraints on the Evolution of Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, James C. G.

    1980-06-01

    Earth's early history may have been characterized by coevolution of microbial metabolism and atmospheric composition. Metabolic developments affected the composition of the atmosphere and the resultant changes in the atmosphere stimulated the evolution of new metabolic capabilities. The first organisms were presumably fermenting heterotrophs, exploiting organic molecules abiotically synthesized. These organisms multiplied, developing new biosynthetic capabilities to overcome deficiencies in the abiotic supply of particular compounds, until their growth was limited by the energy source provided by abiotic synthesis of fermentable organic compounds. Further growth required a new energy source, which may have been the chemical energy represented by the mixture of carbon dioxide and hydrogen in the primitive atmosphere. Chemotrophic organisms resembling methane bacteria may have evolved to exploit this source. They would have flourished, along with the heterotrophs that fed on them, until they had decreased the level of atmospheric hydrogen to the point where further extraction of chemical energy from the atmosphere was not possible. Once again, the expansion of life was limited by the availability of energy. The origin of bacterial photosynthesis overcame the second energy crisis. Photosynthetic bacteria could exploit the abundant energy of sunlight while using atmospheric hydrogen and reduced compounds derived from it only as electron donors. Life flourished again, drawing atmospheric hydrogen (replenished only by volcanoes) down to levels so low as to limit even bacterial photosynthesis. Before the full potential of photosynthesis could be exploited the evolution of the metabolic apparatus to process an electron donor of unlimited abundance was necessary. This donor, of course, was water, and the new metabolic process was algal photosynthesis. The oxygen released changed the world from anaerobic to aerobic and made possible the last great advance in energy

  8. Ontogeny of Hepatic Energy Metabolism Genes in Mice as Revealed by RNA-Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, Helen J.; Cui, Yue Julia; Lu, Hong; Zhong, Xiao-bo; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2014-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in metabolic homeostasis by coordinating synthesis, storage, breakdown, and redistribution of nutrients. Hepatic energy metabolism is dynamically regulated throughout different life stages due to different demands for energy during growth and development. However, changes in gene expression patterns throughout ontogeny for factors important in hepatic energy metabolism are not well understood. We performed detailed transcript analysis of energy metabolism genes during various stages of liver development in mice. Livers from male C57BL/6J mice were collected at twelve ages, including perinatal and postnatal time points (n = 3/age). The mRNA was quantified by RNA-Sequencing, with transcript abundance estimated by Cufflinks. One thousand sixty energy metabolism genes were examined; 794 were above detection, of which 627 were significantly changed during at least one developmental age compared to adult liver. Two-way hierarchical clustering revealed three major clusters dependent on age: GD17.5–Day 5 (perinatal-enriched), Day 10–Day 20 (pre-weaning-enriched), and Day 25–Day 60 (adolescence/adulthood-enriched). Clustering analysis of cumulative mRNA expression values for individual pathways of energy metabolism revealed three patterns of enrichment: glycolysis, ketogenesis, and glycogenesis were all perinatally-enriched; glycogenolysis was the only pathway enriched during pre-weaning ages; whereas lipid droplet metabolism, cholesterol and bile acid metabolism, gluconeogenesis, and lipid metabolism were all enriched in adolescence/adulthood. This study reveals novel findings such as the divergent expression of the fatty acid β-oxidation enzymes Acyl-CoA oxidase 1 and Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a, indicating a switch from mitochondrial to peroxisomal β-oxidation after weaning; as well as the dynamic ontogeny of genes implicated in obesity such as Stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 and Elongation of very long chain fatty acids-like 3

  9. Higher Total Protein Intake and Change in Total Protein Intake Affect Body Composition but Not Metabolic Syndrome Indexes in Middle-Aged Overweight and Obese Adults Who Perform Resistance and Aerobic Exercise for 36 Weeks123

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Wayne W; Kim, Jung Eun; Amankwaah, Akua F; Gordon, Susannah L; Weinheimer-Haus, Eileen M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Studies assessing the effects of protein supplementation on changes in body composition (BC) and health rarely consider the impact of total protein intake (TPro) or the change in TPro (CTPro) from participants’ usual diets. Objective: This secondary data analysis assessed the impact of TPro and CTPro on changes in BC and metabolic syndrome (MetS) indexes in overweight and obese middle-aged adults who participated in an exercise training program. Methods: Men and women [n = 117; age: 50 ± 0.7 y, body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2): 30.1 ± 0.3; means ± SEs] performed resistance exercise 2 d/wk and aerobic exercise 1 d/wk and consumed an unrestricted diet along with 200-kcal supplements (0, 10, 20, or 30 g whey protein) twice daily for 36 wk. Protein intake was assessed via 4-d food records. Multiple linear regression model and stratified analysis were applied for data analyses. Results: Among all subjects, TPro and CTPro were inversely associated (P < 0.05) with changes in body mass, fat mass (FM), and BMI. Changes in BC were different (P < 0.05) among groups that consumed <1.0 (n = 43) vs. ≥1.0 to <1.2 (n = 29) vs. ≥1.2 g · kg−1 · d−1 (n = 45). The TPro group with ≥1.0 to <1.2 g · kg−1 · d−1 reduced FM and %FM and increased percentage of LM (%LM) compared with the lowest TPro group, whereas the TPro group with ≥1.2 g · kg−1 · d−1 presented intermediate responses on changes in FM, %FM, and %LM. The gain in LM was not different among groups. In addition, MetS indexes were not influenced by TPro and CTPro. Conclusions: In conjunction with exercise training, higher TPro promoted positive changes in BC but not in MetS indexes in overweight and obese middle-aged adults. Changes in TPro from before to during the intervention also influenced BC responses and should be considered in future research when different TPro is achieved via diet or supplements. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00812409. PMID:26246322

  10. [Optimization of energy metabolism in patients with chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Korzh, A N

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays particular interest of clinicians is attracted by metabolic therapy of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of complex therapy with addition of Vasonat on the dynamics of remodeling indexes of left ventricle and functional class of CHF on classification of NYHA. It has been shown that application of metabolic modulator Vasonat in addition to conventional therapy of CHF facilitated the clinical improvement and significant decline of functional class. Vasonat use resulted in the meaningful improvement of the contractive function of myocardium and increase of tolerance to the physical exercise. Moreover, high efficiency of Vasonat has been demonstrated in the control of the syndrome of oxidizing stress, by decrease in intensity of free-radical processes and activation of the antioxidant defense system. PMID:21265120

  11. The Effects of Cholera Toxin on Cellular Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Rachel M.; McKenzie, Jennifer R.; Kraft, Lewis; Kozlov, Eugene; Wikswo, John P.; Cliffel, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Multianalyte microphysiometry, a real-time instrument for simultaneous measurement of metabolic analytes in a microfluidic environment, was used to explore the effects of cholera toxin (CTx). Upon exposure of CTx to PC-12 cells, anaerobic respiration was triggered, measured as increases in acid and lactate production and a decrease in the oxygen uptake. We believe the responses observed are due to a CTx-induced activation of adenylate cyclase, increasing cAMP production and resulting in a switch to anaerobic respiration. Inhibitors (H-89, brefeldin A) and stimulators (forskolin) of cAMP were employed to modulate the CTx-induced cAMP responses. The results of this study show the utility of multianalyte microphysiometry to quantitatively determine the dynamic metabolic effects of toxins and affected pathways. PMID:22069603

  12. Environmental Endocrine Disruption of Energy Metabolism and Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Kirkley, Andrew G.; Sargis, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Rates of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases have increased at an astounding rate in recent decades. While poor diet and physical inactivity are central drivers, these lifestyle changes alone fail to fully account for the magnitude and rapidity of the epidemic. Thus, attention has turned to identifying novel risk factors, including the contribution of environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals. Epidemiological and preclinical data support a role for various contaminants in the pathogenesis of diabetes. In addition to the vascular risk associated with dysglycemia, emerging evidence implicates multiple pollutants in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Reviewed herein are studies linking endocrine disruptors to these key diseases that drive significant individual and societal morbidity and mortality. Identifying chemicals associated with metabolic and cardiovascular disease as well as their mechanisms of action is critical for developing novel treatment strategies and public policy to mitigate the impact of these diseases on human health. PMID:24756343

  13. Nutrient-sensing pathways and metabolic regulation in stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ochocki, Joshua D; Simon, M Celeste

    2013-10-14

    Stem cells exert precise regulation to maintain a balance of self-renewal and differentiation programs to sustain tissue homeostasis throughout the life of an organism. Recent evidence suggests that this regulation is modulated, in part, via metabolic changes and modifications of nutrient-sensing pathways such as mTOR and AMPK. It is becoming increasingly clear that stem cells inhibit oxidative phosphorylation in favor of aerobic glycolysis for energy production. Recent progress has detailed the molecular mechanisms of this metabolic phenotype and has offered insight into new metabolic pathways that may be involved in stem cell homeostasis. PMID:24127214

  14. Energy metabolism in neuronal/glial induction and in iPSC models of brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Mlody, Barbara; Lorenz, Carmen; Inak, Gizem; Prigione, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    The metabolic switch associated with the reprogramming of somatic cells to pluripotency has received increasing attention in recent years. However, the impact of mitochondrial and metabolic modulation on stem cell differentiation into neuronal/glial cells and related brain disease modeling still remains to be fully addressed. Here, we seek to focus on this aspect by first addressing brain energy metabolism and its inter-cellular metabolic compartmentalization. We then review the findings related to the mitochondrial and metabolic reconfiguration occurring upon neuronal/glial specification from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). Finally, we provide an update of the PSC-based models of mitochondria-related brain disorders and discuss the challenges and opportunities that may exist on the road to develop a new era of brain disease modeling and therapy. PMID:26877213

  15. Interrelationships between mitochondrial fusion, energy metabolism and oxidative stress during development in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Kayo; Hartman, Philip S.; Ishii, Takamasa; Suda, Hitoshi; Akatsuka, Akira; Shoyama, Tetsuji; Miyazawa, Masaki; Ishii, Naoaki

    2011-01-21

    Research highlights: {yields} Growth and development of a fzo-1 mutant defective in the fusion process of mitochondria was delayed relative to the wild type of Caenorhabditis elegans. {yields} Oxygen sensitivity during larval development, superoxide production and carbonyl protein accumulation of the fzo-1 mutant were similar to wild type. {yields} fzo-1 animals had significantly lower metabolism than did N2 and mev-1 overproducing superoxide from mitochondrial electron transport complex II. {yields} Mitochondrial fusion can profoundly affect energy metabolism and development. -- Abstract: Mitochondria are known to be dynamic structures with the energetically and enzymatically mediated processes of fusion and fission responsible for maintaining a constant flux. Mitochondria also play a role of reactive oxygen species production as a byproduct of energy metabolism. In the current study, interrelationships between mitochondrial fusion, energy metabolism and oxidative stress on development were explored using a fzo-1 mutant defective in the fusion process and a mev-1 mutant overproducing superoxide from mitochondrial electron transport complex II of Caenorhabditis elegans. While growth and development of both single mutants was slightly delayed relative to the wild type, the fzo-1;mev-1 double mutant experienced considerable delay. Oxygen sensitivity during larval development, superoxide production and carbonyl protein accumulation of the fzo-1 mutant were similar to wild type. fzo-1 animals had significantly lower metabolism than did N2 and mev-1. These data indicate that mitochondrial fusion can profoundly affect energy metabolism and development.

  16. Interleukin-6 and leptin as markers of energy metabolic changes in advanced ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Macciò, Antonio; Madeddu, Clelia; Massa, Daniela; Astara, Giorgio; Farci, Daniele; Melis, Gian Benedetto; Mantovani, Giovanni

    2009-09-01

    The progression of the neoplastic disease is characterized by specific alterations of energy metabolism and by symptoms like fatigue, anorexia, nausea, anaemia, immunodepression and poor performance status (PS). The main cause of these symptoms and metabolic abnormalities is the chronic action of proinflammatory cytokines released both by tumour and immune cells. The present study aimed to assess the relationship between markers of inflammation (C-Reactive Protein, Fibrinogen, proinflammatory cytokines) and energy metabolic status (BMI, leptin, oxidative stress) according to clinical parameters in 104 ovarian cancer patients at different stage and, moreover, to evaluate prospectively the changes of these parameters in accordance to tumour response in a subgroup of 70 advanced stage ovarian cancer patients. Advanced stage and poor PS were associated to high-grade inflammation and impaired energy metabolism. Among inflammatory mediators, interleukin (IL)-6 had a central role as predictive factor of leptin, reactive oxygen species and glutathione peroxidase. In turn, leptin considered the key marker of the nutritional status and energy metabolism, was independently determined from stage and IL-6, not only from BMI. Moreover, the evaluation of the changes of these parameters during the course of the neoplastic disease in the subgroup of advanced ovarian cancer patients clearly unveils the central role of IL-6 and leptin as early markers of the metabolic alterations and symptoms associated to disease progression in advanced stage ovarian cancer. Their assessment should be included in monitoring disease outcome, especially when cancer is no longer curable and quality of life becomes the primary endpoint. PMID:18624749

  17. Energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along the crypt-villus axis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huansheng; Wang, Xiaocheng; Xiong, Xia; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells continuously migrate and mature along crypt-villus axis (CVA), while the changes in energy metabolism during maturation are unclear in neonates. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that the energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells would be changed during maturation along CVA in neonates. Eight 21-day-old suckling piglets were used. Intestinal epithelial cells were isolated sequentially along CVA, and proteomics was used to analyze the changes in proteins expression in epithelial cells along CVA. The identified differentially expressed proteins were mainly involved in cellular process, metabolic process, biological regulation, pigmentation, multicellular organizational process and so on. The energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells of piglets was increased from the bottom of crypt to the top of villi. Moreover, the expression of proteins related to the metabolism of glucose, most of amino acids, and fatty acids was increased in intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along CVA, while the expression of proteins related to glutamine metabolism was decreased from crypt to villus tip. The expression of proteins involved in citrate cycle was also increased intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along CVA. Moreover, dietary supplementation with different energy sources had different effects on intestinal structure of weaned piglets. PMID:27558220

  18. Energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along the crypt-villus axis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huansheng; Wang, Xiaocheng; Xiong, Xia; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells continuously migrate and mature along crypt-villus axis (CVA), while the changes in energy metabolism during maturation are unclear in neonates. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that the energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells would be changed during maturation along CVA in neonates. Eight 21-day-old suckling piglets were used. Intestinal epithelial cells were isolated sequentially along CVA, and proteomics was used to analyze the changes in proteins expression in epithelial cells along CVA. The identified differentially expressed proteins were mainly involved in cellular process, metabolic process, biological regulation, pigmentation, multicellular organizational process and so on. The energy metabolism in intestinal epithelial cells of piglets was increased from the bottom of crypt to the top of villi. Moreover, the expression of proteins related to the metabolism of glucose, most of amino acids, and fatty acids was increased in intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along CVA, while the expression of proteins related to glutamine metabolism was decreased from crypt to villus tip. The expression of proteins involved in citrate cycle was also increased intestinal epithelial cells during maturation along CVA. Moreover, dietary supplementation with different energy sources had different effects on intestinal structure of weaned piglets. PMID:27558220

  19. Dance--Aerobic and Anaerobic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlette

    1984-01-01

    This article defines and explains aerobic exercise and its effects on the cardiovascular system. Various studies on dancers are cited indicating that dance is an anaerobic activity with some small degree of aerobic benefit. (DF)

  20. The Gut Microbiota Modulates Energy Metabolism in the Hibernating Brown Bear Ursus arctos.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Felix; Ståhlman, Marcus; Ilkayeva, Olga; Arnemo, Jon M; Kindberg, Jonas; Josefsson, Johan; Newgard, Christopher B; Fröbert, Ole; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2016-02-23

    Hibernation is an adaptation that helps many animals to conserve energy during food shortage in winter. Brown bears double their fat depots during summer and use these stored lipids during hibernation. Although bears seasonally become obese, they remain metabolically healthy. We analyzed the microbiota of free-ranging brown bears during their active phase and hibernation. Compared to the active phase, hibernation microbiota had reduced diversity, reduced levels of Firmicutes and Actinobacteria, and increased levels of Bacteroidetes. Several metabolites involved in lipid metabolism, including triglycerides, cholesterol, and bile acids, were also affected by hibernation. Transplantation of the bear microbiota from summer and winter to germ-free mice transferred some of the seasonal metabolic features and demonstrated that the summer microbiota promoted adiposity without impairing glucose tolerance, suggesting that seasonal variation in the microbiota may contribute to host energy metabolism in the hibernating brown bear. PMID:26854221

  1. Aerobic Dance in Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiles, Barbara Ann; Moore, Suzanne

    1981-01-01

    Aerobic dance offers a challenging workout in a social atmosphere. Though some physical education instructors tend to exclude dance units from the curriculum, most could teach aerobic dance if they had a basic knowledge of aerobic routines. The outline for a unit to be used in the class is presented. (JN)

  2. Metabolic adaptation to decreases in energy intake due to changes in the energy cost of low energy expenditure regimen.

    PubMed

    Garby, L

    1990-01-01

    (1) The energy content in food is used in the human body for three main purposes. The first is to maintain the dissipative structures. Most of the structures of the body are of this kind, i.e. they represent stationary non-equilibrium states, or (generalized) stationary potentials, and are inherently unstable. The second is to maintain a body temperature independent of and usually higher than that of the surroundings. The third is to provide energy for performance of external work. The functional structure of the system providing these results consists of a large number of coupled processes (chemical reactions and translocations), in series and in parallel, whose general nature is well understood but whose quantitative extents are mainly unknown. The coupled processes are driven by the spontaneous reaction of the main substrates with oxygen. Energy flows through the system and is converted to heat (and external work) with simultaneous creation of stationary generalized potentials. For each potential there is an associated flow of energy and the relation between the two is an expression of the efficiency with which the potential is maintained. The processes giving rise to the potentials are likely to be controlled with respect to the efficiency with which the potentials are maintained. The control is partly provided through feedback from the potentials themselves: the potentials are regulated. In this way, the system can respond in a non-linear fashion to perturbations in the energy intake (or energy expenditure): the potentials are maintained at constant, or nearly constant, values. The concept of metabolic adaptation implies that control of the efficiency by feedback from the potentials is an important element in the overall regulation of the potentials, including that of the body temperature. (2) The concept of metabolic adaptation can be framed in such a way that it becomes operational. Quantities such as maintained potentials and efficiency can be revealed in

  3. Dietary energy density is associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome in U.S. adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rising obesity rates have been linked to the consumption of energy-dense diets. We examined whether dietary energy density was associated with obesity and related disorders, including insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. We conducted a cross-sectional study using nationally representative ...

  4. An Integrative Approach to Energy Carbon and Redox Metabolism In Cyanobacterium Synechocystis

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ross Overbeek

    2003-06-30

    The main objectives for the first year were to produce a detailed metabolic reconstruction of synechocystis sp.pcc6803 especially in interrelated arrears of photosynthesis respiration and central carbon metabolism to support a more complete understanding and modeling of this organism. Additionally, IG, Inc. provided detailed bioinformatic analysis of selected functional systems related to carbon and energy generation and utilization, and of the corresponding pathways functional roles and individual genes to support wet lab experiments by collaborators.

  5. Adenylate Kinase and AMP Signaling Networks: Metabolic Monitoring, Signal Communication and Body Energy Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Dzeja, Petras; Terzic, Andre

    2009-01-01

    Adenylate kinase and downstream AMP signaling is an integrated metabolic monitoring system which reads the cellular energy state in order to tune and report signals to metabolic sensors. A network of adenylate kinase isoforms (AK1-AK7) are distributed throughout intracellular compartments, interstitial space and body fluids to regulate energetic and metabolic signaling circuits, securing efficient cell energy economy, signal communication and stress response. The dynamics of adenylate kinase-catalyzed phosphotransfer regulates multiple intracellular and extracellular energy-dependent and nucleotide signaling processes, including excitation-contraction coupling, hormone secretion, cell and ciliary motility, nuclear transport, energetics of cell cycle, DNA synthesis and repair, and developmental programming. Metabolomic analyses indicate that cellular, interstitial and blood AMP levels are potential metabolic signals associated with vital functions including body energy sensing, sleep, hibernation and food intake. Either low or excess AMP signaling has been linked to human disease such as diabetes, obesity and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Recent studies indicate that derangements in adenylate kinase-mediated energetic signaling due to mutations in AK1, AK2 or AK7 isoforms are associated with hemolytic anemia, reticular dysgenesis and ciliary dyskinesia. Moreover, hormonal, food and antidiabetic drug actions are frequently coupled to alterations of cellular AMP levels and associated signaling. Thus, by monitoring energy state and generating and distributing AMP metabolic signals adenylate kinase represents a unique hub within the cellular homeostatic network. PMID:19468337

  6. Energy metabolism and metabolic sensors in stem cells: the metabostem crossroads of aging and cancer.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Javier A; Joven, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    We are as old as our adult stem cells are; therefore, stem cell exhaustion is considered a hallmark of aging. Our tumors are as aggressive as the number of cancer stem cells (CSCs) they bear because CSCs can survive treatments with hormones, radiation, chemotherapy, and molecularly targeted drugs, thus increasing the difficulty of curing cancer. Not surprisingly, interest in stem cell research has never been greater among members of the public, politicians, and scientists. But how can we slow the rate at which our adult stem cells decline over our lifetime, reducing the regenerative potential of tissues, while efficiently eliminating the aberrant, life-threatening activity of "selfish", immortal, and migrating CSCs? Frustrated by the gene-centric limitations of conventional approaches to aging diseases, our group and other groups have begun to appreciate that bioenergetic metabolism, i.e., the production of fuel & building blocks for growth and division, and autophagy/mitophagy, i.e., the quality-control, self-cannibalistic system responsible for "cleaning house" and "recycling the trash", can govern the genetic and epigenetic networks that facilitate stem cell behaviors. Indeed, it is reasonable to suggest the existence of a "metabostem" infrastructure that operates as a shared hallmark of aging and cancer, thus making it physiologically plausible to maintain or even increase the functionality of adult stem cells while reducing the incidence of cancer and extending the lifespan. This "metabostemness" property could lead to the discovery of new drugs that reprogram cell metabotypes to increase the structural and functional integrity of adult stem cells and positively influence their lineage determination, while preventing the development and aberrant function of stem cells in cancer tissues. While it is obvious that the antifungal antibiotic rapamycin, the polyphenol resveratrol, and the biguanide metformin already belong to this new family of metabostemness

  7. Rhodanese functions as sulfur supplier for key enzymes in sulfur energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Aussignargues, Clément; Giuliani, Marie-Cécile; Infossi, Pascale; Lojou, Elisabeth; Guiral, Marianne; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Ilbert, Marianne

    2012-06-01

    How microorganisms obtain energy is a challenging topic, and there have been numerous studies on the mechanisms involved. Here, we focus on the energy substrate traffic in the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. This bacterium can use insoluble sulfur as an energy substrate and has an intricate sulfur energy metabolism involving several sulfur-reducing and -oxidizing supercomplexes and enzymes. We demonstrate that the cytoplasmic rhodanese SbdP participates in this sulfur energy metabolism. Rhodaneses are a widespread family of proteins known to transfer sulfur atoms. We show that SbdP has also some unusual characteristics compared with other rhodaneses; it can load a long sulfur chain, and it can interact with more than one partner. Its partners (sulfur reductase and sulfur oxygenase reductase) are key enzymes of the sulfur energy metabolism of A. aeolicus and share the capacity to use long sulfur chains as substrate. We demonstrate a positive effect of SbdP, once loaded with sulfur chains, on sulfur reductase activity, most likely by optimizing substrate uptake. Taken together, these results lead us to propose a physiological role for SbdP as a carrier and sulfur chain donor to these key enzymes, therefore enabling channeling of sulfur substrate in the cell as well as greater efficiency of the sulfur energy metabolism of A. aeolicus. PMID:22496367

  8. Inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandins, but not endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factors, reduces blood flow and aerobic energy turnover in the exercising human leg.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Stefan P; González-Alonso, José; Damsgaard, Rasmus; Saltin, Bengt; Hellsten, Ylva

    2007-06-01

    Prostaglandins, nitric oxide (NO) and endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs) are substances that have been proposed to be involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow during physical activity. We measured haemodynamics, plasma ATP at rest and during one-legged knee-extensor exercise (19 +/- 1 W) in nine healthy subjects with and without intra-arterial infusion of indomethacin (Indo; 621 +/- 17 microg min(-1)), Indo + N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA; 12.4 +/- 0.3 mg min(-1)) (double blockade) and Indo + L-NMMA + tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA; 12.4 +/- 0.3 mg min(-1)) (triple blockade). Double and triple blockade lowered leg blood flow (LBF) at rest (P<0.05), while it remained unchanged with Indo. During exercise, LBF and vascular conductance were 2.54 +/- 0.10 l min(-1) and 25 +/- 1 mmHg, respectively, in control and they were lower with double (33 +/- 3 and 36 +/- 4%, respectively) and triple (26 +/- 4 and 28 +/- 3%, respectively) blockade (P<0.05), while there was no difference with Indo. The lower LBF and vascular conductance with double and triple blockade occurred in parallel with a lower O(2) delivery, cardiac output, heart rate and plasma [noradrenaline] (P<0.05), while blood pressure remained unchanged and O(2) extraction and femoral venous plasma [ATP] increased. Despite the increased O(2) extraction, leg was 13 and 17% (triple and double blockade, respectively) lower than control in parallel to a lower femoral venous temperature and lactate release (P<0.05). These results suggest that NO and prostaglandins play important roles in skeletal muscle blood flow regulation during moderate intensity exercise and that EDHFs do not compensate for the impaired formation of NO and prostaglandins. Moreover, inhibition of NO and prostaglandin formation is associated with a lower aerobic energy turnover and increased concentration of vasoactive ATP in plasma. PMID:17347273

  9. Control of mitochondrial metabolism and systemic energy homeostasis by microRNAs 378 and 378*

    PubMed Central

    Carrer, Michele; Liu, Ning; Grueter, Chad E.; Williams, Andrew H.; Frisard, Madlyn I.; Hulver, Matthew W.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and deranged regulation of metabolic genes. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1β (PGC-1β) is a transcriptional coactivator that regulates metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis through stimulation of nuclear hormone receptors and other transcription factors. We report that the PGC-1β gene encodes two microRNAs (miRNAs), miR-378 and miR-378*, which counterbalance the metabolic actions of PGC-1β. Mice genetically lacking miR-378 and miR-378* are resistant to high-fat diet-induced obesity and exhibit enhanced mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism and elevated oxidative capacity of insulin-target tissues. Among the many targets of these miRNAs, carnitine O-acetyltransferase, a mitochondrial enzyme involved in fatty acid metabolism, and MED13, a component of the Mediator complex that controls nuclear hormone receptor activity, are repressed by miR-378 and miR-378*, respectively, and are elevated in the livers of miR-378/378* KO mice. Consistent with these targets as contributors to the metabolic actions of miR-378 and miR-378*, previous studies have implicated carnitine O-acetyltransferase and MED13 in metabolic syndrome and obesity. Our findings identify miR-378 and miR-378* as integral components of a regulatory circuit that functions under conditions of metabolic stress to control systemic energy homeostasis and the overall oxidative capacity of insulin target tissues. Thus, these miRNAs provide potential targets for pharmacologic intervention in obesity and metabolic syndrome. PMID:22949648

  10. Aerobic Requirements for Moving Handweights through Various Ranges of Motion While Walking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auble, Thomas E.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Comparison of the aerobic metabolic requirements of normal walking with and without 1-, 2-, and 3-pound handweights among nine adult males indicated that walking while moving handweights through large ranges of motion provides a combined upper and lower body aerobic stimulus that is sufficient for endurance training for persons with poor to…

  11. Aerobic exercise increases peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity in sedentary adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data are limited on the effects of controlled aerobic exercise programs (without weight loss) on insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in children and adolescents. To determine whether a controlled aerobic exercise program (without weight loss) improves peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivi...

  12. Altered Metabolic Homeostasis in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Mechanisms of Energy Imbalance and Contribution to Disease Progression.

    PubMed

    Ioannides, Zara A; Ngo, Shyuan T; Henderson, Robert D; McCombe, Pamela A; Steyn, Frederik J

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the death of motor neurones, which leads to paralysis and death in an average of 3 years following diagnosis. The cause of ALS is unknown, but there is substantial evidence that metabolic factors, including nutritional state and body weight, affect disease progression and survival. This review provides an overview of the characteristics of metabolic dysregulation in ALS focusing on mechanisms that lead to disrupted energy supply (at a whole-body and cellular level) and altered energy expenditure. We discuss how a decrease in energy supply occurs in parallel with an increase in energy demand and leads to a state of chronic energy deficit which has a negative impact on disease outcome in ALS. We conclude by presenting potential and tested strategies to compensate for, or correct this energy imbalance, and speculate on promising areas for further research. PMID:27400276

  13. Altered feeding differentially regulates circadian rhythms and energy metabolism in liver and muscle of rats.

    PubMed

    Reznick, Jane; Preston, Elaine; Wilks, Donna L; Beale, Susan M; Turner, Nigel; Cooney, Gregory J

    2013-01-01

    Energy metabolism follows a diurnal pattern responding to the light/dark cycle and food availability. This study investigated the impact of restricting feeding to the daylight hours and feeding a high fat diet on circadian clock (bmal1, dbp, tef and e4bp4) and metabolic (pepck, fas, ucp3, pdk4) gene expression and markers of energy metabolism in muscle and liver of rats. The results show that in chow-fed rats switched to daylight feeding, the peak diurnal expression of genes in liver was shifted by 6-12h while expression of these genes in muscle remained in a similar phase to rats feeding ad libitum. High fat feeding during the daylight hours had limited effect on clock gene expression in liver or muscle but shifted the peak expression of metabolic genes (pepck, fas) in liver by 6-12h. The differential effects of daylight feeding on gene and protein expression in muscle and liver were accompanied by an 8% reduction in whole body energy expenditure, a 20-30% increased glycogen content during the light phase in muscle of day-fed rats and increased adipose tissue deposition per gram food consumed. These data demonstrate that a mismatch of feeding and light/dark cycle disrupts tissue metabolism in muscle with significant consequences for whole body energy homeostasis. PMID:22952003

  14. Disrupting proton dynamics and energy metabolism for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Parks, Scott K; Chiche, Johanna; Pouysségur, Jacques

    2013-09-01

    Intense interest in the 'Warburg effect' has been revived by the discovery that hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) reprogrammes pyruvate oxidation to lactic acid conversion; lactic acid is the end product of fermentative glycolysis. The most aggressive and invasive cancers, which are often hypoxic, rely on exacerbated glycolysis to meet the increased demand for ATP and biosynthetic precursors and also rely on robust pH-regulating systems to combat the excessive generation of lactic and carbonic acids. In this Review, we present the key pH-regulating systems and synthesize recent advances in strategies that combine the disruption of pH control with bioenergetic mechanisms. We discuss the possibility of exploiting, in rapidly growing tumours, acute cell death by 'metabolic catastrophe'. PMID:23969692

  15. Effect of simulated weightlessness on energy metabolism in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J. P.; Sykes, H. A.; Crownover, J. C.; Schatte, C. L.; Simmons, J. B., II; Jordan, D. P.

    1982-01-01

    Results of measurements of food uptake and body weight changes occurring in rats suspended from a harness so that the antigravity muscles were not used for locomotion are presented. The rats were tested in pairs, with both in a harness but only one suspended off its hind legs; this section lasted 7 days. A second phase of the experiment involved feeding the nonsuspended rat the same amount of food the experimental rat had consumed the previous day. All rats experienced decreased in body weight and food intake in the first stage, while in the second stage the suspended rat lost more weight. The total oxygen uptake, CO2 output, and rate of C-14O2 production were depressed in the suspended rats, then returned to normal levels once the rats were back on the ground. It is concluded that the gross metabolic processes are unaffected by simulated weightlessness.

  16. Role of Energy Metabolism in the Brown Fat Gene Program

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Minwoo; Cooper, Marcus P.

    2015-01-01

    In murine and human brown adipose tissue (BAT), mitochondria are powerful generators of heat that safely metabolize fat, a feature that has great promise in the fight against obesity and diabetes. Recent studies suggest that the actions of mitochondria extend beyond their conventional role as generators of heat. There is mounting evidence that impaired mitochondrial respiratory capacity is accompanied by attenuated expression of Ucp1 and other BAT-selective genes, implying that mitochondria exert transcriptional control over the brown fat gene program. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of brown fat mitochondria, their potential role in transcriptional control of the brown fat gene program, and potential strategies to treat obesity in humans by leveraging thermogenesis in brown adipocytes. PMID:26175716

  17. HypoxamiRs: regulators of cardiac hypoxia and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Azzouzi, Hamid El; Leptidis, Stefanos; Doevendans, Pieter A; De Windt, Leon J

    2015-09-01

    Hypoxia and its intricate regulation are at the epicenter of cardiovascular research. Mediated by hypoxia-inducible factors as well as by several microRNAs, recently termed 'hypoxamiRs', hypoxia affects several cardiac pathophysiological processes. Hypoxia is the driving force behind the regulation of the characteristic metabolic switch from predominant fatty acid oxidation in the healthy heart to glucose utilization in the failing myocardium, but also instigates reactivation of the fetal gene program, induces the cardiac hypertrophy response, alters extracellular matrix composition, influences mitochondrial biogenesis, and impacts upon myocardial contractility. HypoxamiR regulation adds a new level of complexity to this multitude of hypoxia-mediated effects, rendering the understanding of the hypoxic response a fundamental piece in solving the cardiovascular disease puzzle. PMID:26197955

  18. Gold nanoparticles alter parameters of oxidative stress and energy metabolism in organs of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Gabriela Kozuchovski; Cardoso, Eria; Vuolo, Francieli Silva; Michels, Monique; Zanoni, Elton Torres; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Gomes, Lara Mezari; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Rezin, Gislaine Tezza; Streck, Emilio L; Paula, Marcos Marques da Silva

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated the parameters of oxidative stress and energy metabolism after the acute and long-term administration of gold nanoparticles (GNPs, 10 and 30 nm in diameter) in different organs of rats. Adult male Wistar rats received a single intraperitoneal injection or repeated injections (once daily for 28 days) of saline solution, GNPs-10 or GNPs-30. Twenty-four hours after the last administration, the animals were killed, and the liver, kidney, and heart were isolated for biochemical analysis. We demonstrated that acute administration of GNPs-30 increased the TBARS levels, and that GNPs-10 increased the carbonyl protein levels. The long-term administration of GNPs-10 increased the TBARS levels, and the carbonyl protein levels were increased by GNPs-30. Acute administration of GNPs-10 and GNPs-30 increased SOD activity. Long-term administration of GNPs-30 increased SOD activity. Acute administration of GNPs-10 decreased the activity of CAT, whereas long-term administration of GNP-10 and GNP-30 altered CAT activity randomly. Our results also demonstrated that acute GNPs-30 administration decreased energy metabolism, especially in the liver and heart. Long-term GNPs-10 administration increased energy metabolism in the liver and decreased energy metabolism in the kidney and heart, whereas long-term GNPs-30 administration increased energy metabolism in the heart. The results of our study are consistent with other studies conducted in our research group and reinforce the fact that GNPs can lead to oxidative damage, which is responsible for DNA damage and alterations in energy metabolism. PMID:26583437

  19. Rethinking energy in parkinsonian motor symptoms: a potential role for neural metabolic deficits.

    PubMed

    Amano, Shinichi; Kegelmeyer, Deborah; Hong, S Lee

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized as a chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disorder that results in a variety of debilitating symptoms, including bradykinesia, resting tremor, rigidity, and postural instability. Research spanning several decades has emphasized basal ganglia dysfunction, predominantly resulting from dopaminergic (DA) cell loss, as the primarily cause of the aforementioned parkinsonian features. But, why those particular features manifest themselves remains an enigma. The goal of this paper is to develop a theoretical framework that parkinsonian motor features are behavioral consequence of a long-term adaptation to their inability (inflexibility or lack of capacity) to meet energetic demands, due to neural metabolic deficits arising from mitochondrial dysfunction associated with PD. Here, we discuss neurophysiological changes that are generally associated with PD, such as selective degeneration of DA neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), in conjunction with metabolic and mitochondrial dysfunction. We then characterize the cardinal motor symptoms of PD, bradykinesia, resting tremor, rigidity and gait disturbance, reviewing literature to demonstrate how these motor patterns are actually energy efficient from a metabolic perspective. We will also develop three testable hypotheses: (1) neural metabolic deficits precede the increased rate of neurodegeneration and onset of behavioral symptoms in PD; (2) motor behavior of persons with PD are more sensitive to changes in metabolic/bioenergetic state; and (3) improvement of metabolic function could lead to better motor performance in persons with PD. These hypotheses are designed to introduce a novel viewpoint that can elucidate the connections between metabolic, neural and motor function in PD. PMID:25610377

  20. Metabolic disruption in context: Clinical avenues for synergistic perturbations in energy homeostasis by endocrine disrupting chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Sargis, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    The global epidemic of metabolic disease is a clear and present danger to both individual and societal health. Understanding the myriad factors contributing to obesity and diabetes is essential for curbing their decades-long expansion. Emerging data implicate environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. The phenylsulfamide fungicide and anti-fouling agent tolylfluanid (TF) was recently added to the list of EDCs promoting metabolic dysfunction. Dietary exposure to this novel metabolic disruptor promoted weight gain, increased adiposity, and glucose intolerance as well as systemic and cellular insulin resistance. Interestingly, the increase in body weight and adipose mass was not a consequence of increased food consumption; rather, it may have resulted from disruptions in diurnal patterns of energy intake, raising the possibility that EDCs may promote metabolic dysfunction through alterations in circadian rhythms. While these studies provide further evidence that EDCs may promote the development of obesity and diabetes, many questions remain regarding the clinical factors that modulate patient-specific consequences of EDC exposure, including the impact of genetics, diet, lifestyle, underlying disease, pharmacological treatments, and clinical states of fat redistribution. Currently, little is known regarding the impact of these factors on an individual’s susceptibility to environmentally-mediated metabolic disruption. Advances in these areas will be critical for translating EDC science into the clinic to enable physicians to stratify an individual’s risk of developing EDC-induced metabolic disease and to provide direction for treating exposed patients. PMID:27011951

  1. Metabolism of acetyl-L-carnitine for energy and neurotransmitter synthesis in the immature rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Scafidi, Susanna; Fiskum, Gary; Lindauer, Steven L.; Bamford, Penelope; Shi, Da; Hopkins, Irene; McKenna, Mary C.

    2016-01-01

    Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) is an endogenous metabolic intermediate that facilitates the influx and efflux of acetyl groups across the mitochondrial inner membrane. Exogenously administered ALCAR has been used as a nutritional supplement and also as an experimental drug with reported neuroprotective properties and effects on brain metabolism. The aim of this study was to determine oxidative metabolism of ALCAR in the immature rat forebrain. Metabolism was studied in 21 day old rat brain at 15, 60 and 120 minutes after an intraperitoneal injection of [2-13C]acetyl-L-carnitine. The amount, pattern, and fractional enrichment of 13C-labeled metabolites were determined by ex vivo 13C-NMR spectroscopy. Metabolism of the acetyl moiety from [2-13C]ALCAR via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle led to incorporation of label into the C4, C3 and C2 positions of glutamate (GLU), glutamine (GLN) and GABA. Labeling patterns indicated that [2-13C]ALCAR was metabolized by both neurons and glia; however, the percent enrichment was higher in GLN and GABA than in GLU, demonstrating high metabolism in astrocytes and GABAergic neurons. Incorporation of label into the C3 position of alanine, both C3 and C2 of lactate, and the C1 and C5 positions of glutamate and glutamine demonstrated that [2-13C]ALCAR was actively metabolized via the pyruvate recycling pathway. The enrichment of metabolites with 13C from metabolism of ALCAR was highest in alanine C3 (10%) and lactate C3 (9%), with considerable enrichment in GABA C4 (8%), GLN C3 (~4%) and GLN C5 (5%). Overall, our 13C-NMR studies reveal that the acetyl moiety of ALCAR is metabolized for energy in both astrocytes and neurons and the label incorporated into the neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA. Cycling ratios showed prolonged cycling of carbon from the acetyl moiety of ALCAR in the TCA cycle. Labeling of compounds formed from metabolism of [2-13C]ALCAR via the pyruvate recycling pathway was higher than values reported for other

  2. Effects of mitoxantrone and doxorubicin on energy metabolism of the rat heart.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, E; Weber, E; Zbinden, G

    1987-04-01

    In animal models anthracyclines and anthracenediones show similar antineoplastic activity but somewhat different cardiotoxicity. The effects of doxorubicin and the free base of mitoxantrone (NSC-279836) on the energy metabolism of the rat heart were compared. Both compounds not only reduced oxygen consumption in heart mitochondria ex vivo, but also uncoupled oxidative phosphorylation, inhibited creatine phosphate kinase, and damaged the semipermeability of the inner mitochondrial membrane (measured as creatine influx). The effects on the myocyte membrane activities, calcium transport, and Na/K, Mg, and Ca ATPases were slightly different for the two compounds. Cardiotoxicity of the two compounds may have its origin in their interference with heart cell energy metabolism. PMID:3829012

  3. Influence of NO-containing gas flow on various parameters of energy metabolism in erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Martusevich, A K; Solov'yova, A G; Peretyagin, S P; Karelin, V I; Selemir, V D

    2014-11-01

    We studied the influence of NO-containing gas phase on some parameters of energy metabolism in human erythrocytes. Whole blood samples were aerated with gas flows from the Plazon instrument (NO concentrations 800 and 80 ppm) and from the experimental generator (75 ppm). Activity of lactate dehydrogenase in direct and reverse reactions, lactate level, and a number of derived coefficients were estimated. Treatment of blood with 800 ppm NO inhibited erythrocyte energy metabolism, and its 10-fold dilution attenuated the effect. The use of ROS-free gas flow containing 75 ppm of NO promoted optimization of the process under investigation. PMID:25403392

  4. Early life origins of metabolic disease: Developmental programming of hypothalamic pathways controlling energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Dearden, Laura; Ozanne, Susan E

    2015-10-01

    A wealth of animal and human studies demonstrate that perinatal exposure to adverse metabolic conditions - be it maternal obesity, diabetes or under-nutrition - results in predisposition of offspring to develop obesity later in life. This mechanism is a contributing factor to the exponential rise in obesity rates. Increased weight gain in offspring exposed to maternal obesity is usually associated with hyperphagia, implicating altered central regulation of energy homeostasis as an underlying cause. Perinatal development of the hypothalamus (a brain region key to metabolic regulation) is plastic and sensitive to metabolic signals during this critical time window. Recent research in non-human primate and rodent models has demonstrated that exposure to adverse maternal environments impairs the development of hypothalamic structure and consequently function, potentially underpinning metabolic phenotypes in later life. This review summarizes our current knowledge of how adverse perinatal environments program hypothalamic development and explores the mechanisms that could mediate these effects. PMID:26296796

  5. Short photoperiod increases energy intake, metabolic thermogenesis and organ mass in silky starlings Sturnus sericeus

    PubMed Central

    WANG, Jia-Qi; WANG, Jia-Jia; WU, Xu-Jian; ZHENG, Wei-Hong; LIU, Jin-Song

    2016-01-01

    Environmental cues play important roles in the regulation of an animal’s physiology and behavior. One such cue, photoperiod, plays an important role in the seasonal acclimatization of birds. It has been demonstrated that an animal’s body mass, basal metabolic rate (BMR), and energy intake, are all affected by photoperiod. The present study was designed to examine photoperiod induced changes in the body mass, metabolism and metabolic organs of the silky starling, Sturnus sericeus. Captive silky starlings increased their body mass and BMR during four weeks of acclimation to a short photoperiod. Birds acclimated to a short photoperiod also increased the mass of certain organs (liver, gizzard and small intestine), and both gross energy intake (GEI) and digestible energy intake (DEI), relative to those acclimated to a long photoperiod. Furthermore, BMR was positively correlated with body mass, liver mass, GEI and DEI. These results suggest that silky starlings increase metabolic thermogenesis when exposed to a short photoperiod by increasing their body and metabolic organ mass, and their GEI and DEI. These findings support the hypothesis that bird species from temperate climates typically display high phenotypic flexibility in thermogenic capacity. PMID:27029864

  6. Quantification of correlational selection on thermal physiology, thermoregulatory behavior, and energy metabolism in lizards

    PubMed Central

    Artacho, Paulina; Saravia, Julia; Ferrandière, Beatriz Decencière; Perret, Samuel; Le Galliard, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic selection is widely accepted as the primary cause of adaptive evolution in natural populations, but selection on complex functional properties linking physiology, behavior, and morphology has been rarely quantified. In ectotherms, correlational selection on thermal physiology, thermoregulatory behavior, and energy metabolism is of special interest because of their potential coadaptation. We quantified phenotypic selection on thermal sensitivity of locomotor performance (sprint speed), thermal preferences, and resting metabolic rate in captive populations of an ectothermic vertebrate, the common lizard, Zootoca vivipara. No correlational selection between thermal sensitivity of performance, thermoregulatory behavior, and energy metabolism was found. A combination of high body mass and resting metabolic rate was positively correlated with survival and negatively correlated with fecundity. Thus, different mechanisms underlie selection on metabolism in lizards with small body mass than in lizards with high body mass. In addition, lizards that selected the near average preferred body temperature grew faster that their congeners. This is one of the few studies that quantifies significant correlational selection on a proxy of energy expenditure and stabilizing selection on thermoregulatory behavior. PMID:26380689

  7. Short photoperiod increases energy intake, metabolic thermogenesis and organ mass in silky starlings Sturnus sericeus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Qi; Wang, Jia-Jia; Wu, Xu-Jian; Zheng, Wei-Hong; Liu, Jin-Song

    2016-03-18

    Environmental cues play important roles in the regulation of an animal's physiology and behavior. One such cue, photoperiod, plays an important role in the seasonal acclimatization of birds. It has been demonstrated that an animal's body mass, basal metabolic rate (BMR), and energy intake, are all affected by photoperiod. The present study was designed to examine photoperiod induced changes in the body mass, metabolism and metabolic organs of the silky starling, Sturnus sericeus. Captive silky starlings increased their body mass and BMR during four weeks of acclimation to a short photoperiod. Birds acclimated to a short photoperiod also increased the mass of certain organs (liver, gizzard and small intestine), and both gross energy intake (GEI) and digestible energy intake (DEI), relative to those acclimated to a long photoperiod. Furthermore, BMR was positively correlated with body mass, liver mass, GEI and DEI. These results suggest that silky starlings increase metabolic thermogenesis when exposed to a short photoperiod by increasing their body and metabolic organ mass, and their GEI and DEI. These findings support the hypothesis that bird species from temperate climates typically display high phenotypic flexibility in thermogenic capacity. PMID:27029864

  8. Altered Energy Metabolism Pathways in the Posterior Cingulate in Young Adult Apolipoprotein E ɛ4 Carriers.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Michelle; Wolf, Andrew B; Chavira, Bernardo; Shonebarger, Daniel; Meckel, J P; Leung, Lana; Ballina, Lauren; Ly, Sarah; Saini, Aman; Jones, T Bucky; Vallejo, Johana; Jentarra, Garilyn; Valla, Jon

    2016-04-23

    The APOE gene, encoding apolipoprotein E, is the primary genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). Apolipoprotein E ɛ4 allele (APOE4) carriers have alterations in brain structure and function (as measured by brain imaging) even as young adults. Examination of this population is valuable in further identifying details of these functional changes and their association with vulnerability to AD decades later. Previous work demonstrates functional declines in mitochondrial activity in the posterior cingulate cortex, a key region in the default mode network, which appears to be strongly associated with functional changes relevant to AD risk. Here, we demonstrate alterations in the pathways underlying glucose, ketone, and mitochondrial energy metabolism. Young adult APOE4 carriers displayed upregulation of specific glucose (GLUT1 & GLUT3) and monocarboxylate (MCT2) transporters, the glucose metabolism enzyme hexokinase, the SCOT & AACS enzymes involved in ketone metabolism, and complexes I, II, and IV of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The monocarboxylate transporter (MCT4) was found to be downregulated in APOE4 carriers. These data suggest that widespread dysregulation of energy metabolism in this at-risk population, even decades before possible disease onset. Therefore, these findings support the idea that alterations in brain energy metabolism may contribute significantly to the risk that APOE4 confers for AD. PMID:27128370

  9. Altered Energy Metabolism Pathways in the Posterior Cingulate in Young Adult Apolipoprotein E ɛ4 Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Michelle; Wolf, Andrew B.; Chavira, Bernardo; Shonebarger, Daniel; Meckel, J.P.; Leung, Lana; Ballina, Lauren; Ly, Sarah; Saini, Aman; Jones, T. Bucky; Vallejo, Johana; Jentarra, Garilyn; Valla, Jon

    2016-01-01

    The APOE gene, encoding apolipoprotein E, is the primary genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Apolipoprotein E ɛ4 allele (APOE4) carriers have alterations in brain structure and function (as measured by brain imaging) even as young adults. Examination of this population is valuable in further identifying details of these functional changes and their association with vulnerability to AD decades later. Previous work demonstrates functional declines in mitochondrial activity in the posterior cingulate cortex, a key region in the default mode network, which appears to be strongly associated with functional changes relevant to AD risk. Here, we demonstrate alterations in the pathways underlying glucose, ketone, and mitochondrial energy metabolism. Young adult APOE4 carriers displayed upregulation of specific glucose (GLUT1 & GLUT3) and monocarboxylate (MCT2) transporters, the glucose metabolism enzyme hexokinase, the SCOT & AACS enzymes involved in ketone metabolism, and complexes I, II, and IV of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The monocarboxylate transporter (MCT4) was found to be downregulated in APOE4 carriers. These data suggest that widespread dysregulation of energy metabolism in this at-risk population, even decades before possible disease onset. Therefore, these findings support the idea that alterations in brain energy metabolism may contribute significantly to the risk that APOE4 confers for AD. PMID:27128370

  10. Energy metabolism in developing chicken lymphocytes is altered during the embryonic to posthatch transition.

    PubMed

    Rudrappa, Shashidhara G; Humphrey, Brooke D

    2007-02-01

    Adequate energy status in lymphocytes is vital for their development. The ability of developing chicken lymphocytes to acquire and metabolize energy substrates was determined during embryonic days (e) and neonatal days (d) of life when primary-energy substrate metabolism is altered at the whole-animal level. In 3 experiments, bursacytes and thymocytes were isolated on e17, e20, d1, d3, d7, or d14 to analyze markers associated with glucose, glutamine, and lipid metabolism. Bursacyte glucose transporter-3 (Glut-3) mRNA abundance increased from d1 to d14 and hexokinase-1 (HK-1) mRNA abundance was maximum on e20 (P<0.05). Thymocyte Glut-1, Glut-3, and HK-1 mRNA abundance increased from e17 to d14 (P<0.05). HK enzyme activity increased from e20 to d3 in bursacytes and d3 to d7 in thymocytes (P<0.05). Glucose uptake by bursacytes and thymocytes was greater on d14 compared to d1 and d7 (P<0.05). Bursacyte and thymocyte sodium coupled neutral amino acid transporter-2 and glutaminase (GA) mRNA abundance increased from e20 to d7 (P<0.05). GA enzyme activity increased from e20 to d7 in bursacytes (P<0.05) and did not change in thymocytes. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase enzyme activity did not change over time in either cell type. These studies suggest that developing B and T lymphocytes adapt their metabolism during the first 2 wk after hatch. Developing lymphocytes increase glucose metabolism with no change in fatty acid metabolism and bursacytes, but not thymocytes, increase glutamine metabolism. Understanding the factors that regulate lymphocyte development in neonatal chicks may help promote their adaptive immune responses to pathogens in early life. PMID:17237322

  11. Identification of serum analytes and metabolites associated with aerobic capacity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies aimed at identifying serum markers of cellular metabolism (biomarkers) that are associated at baseline with aerobic capacity (V02 max) in young, healthy individuals have yet to be reported. Therefore, the goal of the present study was to use the standard chemistry screen and untargeted mass ...

  12. Human longevity is characterised by high thyroid stimulating hormone secretion without altered energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, S. W.; Akintola, A. A.; Roelfsema, F.; van der Spoel, E.; Cobbaert, C. M.; Ballieux, B. E.; Egri, P.; Kvarta-Papp, Z.; Gereben, B.; Fekete, C.; Slagboom, P. E.; van der Grond, J.; Demeneix, B. A.; Pijl, H.; Westendorp, R. G. J.; van Heemst, D.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have included subjects with the propensity to reach old age in good health, with the aim to disentangle mechanisms contributing to staying healthier for longer. The hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis maintains circulating levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid hormone (TH) in an inverse relationship. Greater longevity has been associated with higher TSH and lower TH levels, but mechanisms underlying TSH/TH differences and longevity remain unknown. The HPT axis plays a pivotal role in growth, development and energy metabolism. We report that offspring of nonagenarians with at least one nonagenarian sibling have increased TSH secretion but similar bioactivity of TSH and similar TH levels compared to controls. Healthy offspring and spousal controls had similar resting metabolic rate and core body temperature. We propose that pleiotropic effects of the HPT axis may favour longevity without altering energy metabolism. PMID:26089239

  13. Energy metabolism targeted drugs synergize with photodynamic therapy to potentiate breast cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaolan; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Pan; Liu, Quanhong; Wang, Xiaobing

    2014-12-01

    Malignant cells are highly dependent on aerobic glycolysis, which differs significantly from normal cells (the Warburg effect). Interference of this metabolic process has been considered as an innovative method for developing selective cancer therapy. A recent study demonstrated that the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) can potentiate PDT efficacy, whereas the possible mechanisms have not been carefully investigated. This study firstly proved the general potentiation of PDT efficacy by 2-DG and 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, and carefully elucidated the underlying mechanism in the process. Our results showed that both 2-DG and 3-BP could significantly promote a PDT-induced cell cytotoxic effect when compared with either monotherapy. Synergistic potentiation of mitochondria- and caspase-dependent cell apoptosis was observed, including a mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) drop, Bax translocation, and caspase-3 activation. Besides, ROS generation and the expression of oxidative stress related proteins such as P38 MAPK phosphorylation and JNK phosphorylation were notably increased after the combined treatments. Moreover, when pretreated with the ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC), the ROS generation, the MMP drop, cell apoptosis and cytotoxicity were differently inhibited, suggesting that ROS was vertical in the pro-apoptotic process induced by 2-DG/3-BP combined with PDT treatment. These results indicate that the combination of glycolytic antagonists and PDT may be a promising therapeutic strategy to effectively kill cancer cells. PMID:25363473

  14. Reversible acetylation of PGC-1: Connecting energy sensors and effectors to guarantee metabolic flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Jeninga, Ellen Helena; Schoonjans, Kristina; Auwerx, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Organisms adapt their metabolism to meet ever changing environmental conditions. This metabolic adaptation involves at a cellular level the fine-tuning of mitochondrial function, which is mainly under the control of the transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α. Changes in PGC-1α activity coordinate a transcriptional response, that boosts mitochondrial activity in times of energy needs and attenuates it when energy demands are low. Reversible acetylation has emerged as a key way to alter PGC-1α activity. Although it is well-established that PGC-1α is deacetylated and activated by Sirt1 and acetylated and inhibited by GCN5, less is known about how these enzymes themselves are regulated. Recently, it became clear that the energy sensor, AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) translates the effects of energy stress into altered Sirt1 activity by regulating the intracellular level of its co-substrate NAD+. Conversely, the enzyme ATP citrate lyase (ACL), relates energy balance to GCN5, through the control of the nuclear production of acetyl-CoA, the substrate for GCN5’s acetyltransferase activity. We review here how these metabolic signalling pathways, affecting GCN5 and Sirt1 activity, allow the reversible acetylation/deacetylation of PGC-1α and the adaptation of mitochondrial energy homeostasis to energy levels. PMID:20531298

  15. Adipose tissue lipolysis and energy metabolism in early cancer cachexia in mice.

    PubMed

    Kliewer, Kara L; Ke, Jia-Yu; Tian, Min; Cole, Rachel M; Andridge, Rebecca R; Belury, Martha A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is a progressive metabolic disorder that results in depletion of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. A growing body of literature suggests that maintaining adipose tissue mass in cachexia may improve quality-of-life and survival outcomes. Studies of lipid metabolism in cachexia, however, have generally focused on later stages of the disorder when severe loss of adipose tissue has already occurred. Here, we investigated lipid metabolism in adipose, liver and muscle tissues during early stage cachexia - before severe fat loss - in the colon-26 murine model of cachexia. White adipose tissue mass in cachectic mice was moderately reduced (34-42%) and weight loss was less than 10% of initial body weight in this study of early cachexia. In white adipose depots of cachectic mice, we found evidence of enhanced protein kinase A - activated lipolysis which coincided with elevated total energy expenditure and increased expression of markers of brown (but not white) adipose tissue thermogenesis and the acute phase response. Total lipids in liver and muscle were unchanged in early cachexia while markers of fatty oxidation were increased. Many of these initial metabolic responses contrast with reports of lipid metabolism in later stages of cachexia. Our observations suggest intervention studies to preserve fat mass in cachexia should be tailored to the stage of cachexia. Our observations also highlight a need for studies that delineate the contribution of cachexia stage and animal model to altered lipid metabolism in cancer cachexia and identify those that most closely mimic the human condition. PMID:25457061

  16. Effects of transgenic expression of HIV-1 Vpr on lipid and energy metabolism in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    HIV infection is associated with abnormal lipid metabolism, body fat redistribution, and altered energy expenditure. The pathogenesis of these complex abnormalities is unclear. Viral protein R (Vpr), an HIV-1 accessory protein, can regulate gene transcription mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor ...

  17. The cancer cell 'energy grid': TGF-β1 signaling coordinates metabolism for migration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Deberardinis, Ralph; Boothman, David A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells have an increased reliance on lipogenesis, which is required for uncontrolled cell division. We recently reported transcriptional and functional 'reprogramming' of the cellular energy grid, allowing cancer cells to divert metabolism from biosynthesis to bioenergetic pathways and thus supplying enhanced mobility during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induced by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β1) (Fig. 1). PMID:27308459

  18. EFFECTS OF CONTINUOUS-WAVE, PULSED, AND SINUSOIDAL-AMPLITUDE-MODULATED MICROWAVES ON BRAIN ENERGY METABOLISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comparison of the effects of continuous wave, sinusoidal-amplitude modulated, and pulsed square-wave-modulated 591-MHz microwave exposures on brain energy metabolism was made in male Sprague Dawley rats (175-225g). Brain NADH fluorescence, adensine triphosphate (ATP) concentrat...

  19. CHANGES IN THE PHYSIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE AND ENERGY METABOLISM OF AN ESTUARINE MYSID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measures of physiological performance and energy metabolism were made on an estuarine mysid (Mysidopsis bahia) exposed throughout a life cycle to the defoliant DEF. EF concentrations > 0.246 ug/l reduced survival through release of the first brood. oung production was completely ...

  20. [Improving of muscle mass and force in rehabilitation of heart-lung patients. Aerobic interval training, resistance-exercises, excentric exercises, vibration].

    PubMed

    Apor, Péter; Tihanyi, József; Borka, Péter

    2005-09-18

    Improvement of muscle mass and force which got depleted by inactivity or pathological processes is one of the aims and also a prerequisite of a rehabilitative intervention. Metabolically active larger and stronger muscles diminish the cardiovascular risk, permit the aerobic preventive and rehabilitative activities and enables a higher quality of life. Interval forms of aerobic exercise improves also the muscles. The resistance training plays an important part in rehabilitation. Beside the traditional dynamic strength training with weights, gym machines, body weight etc. the excentric type of muscle activity potentiates higher muscle load with lesser energy consumption, therefore it is suitable in the case of smaller performance ability. Vibration of the whole body or parts of it by machines improves the co-activity of the motor units and results in force development with small metabolic involvement. PMID:16238250

  1. Hepatic ERK activity plays a role in energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Ping; Feng, Bin; Li, Yujie; He, Qin; Xu, Haiyan

    2013-08-15

    Mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs), such as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and P38, have been reported to play important roles in energy homeostasis. In this study, we show that the activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is increased in the livers of diet induced and genetically obese mice. Activation of ERK in the livers of lean mice by over-expressing the constitutively active MAPK kinase 1 (MEK CA) results in decreased energy expenditure, lowered expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation, increases fasting hyperglycemia and causes systemic insulin resistance. Interestingly, hepatic glycogen content is markedly increased and expression of G6Pase gene is decreased in mice over-expressing MEK CA compared to control mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP), therefore hepatic glucose output is not likely the major contributor of hyperglycemia. One potential mechanism of decreased expression of G6Pase gene by MEK CA is likely due to ERK mediated phosphorylation and cytosolic retention of FOXO1. Adipocytes isolated from MEK CA mice display increased lipolysis. Circulating levels of free fatty acids (FFAs) in these mice are also increased, which possibly contribute to systemic insulin resistance and subsequent hyperglycemia. Consistent with these results, knocking down ERK expression in the liver of diet induced obese (DIO) mice improves systemic insulin and glucose tolerance. These results indicate that increased hepatic ERK activity in DIO mice may contribute to increased liver glycogen content and decreased energy expenditure in obesity. PMID:23732116

  2. Eyeless Mexican cavefish save energy by eliminating the circadian rhythm in metabolism.

    PubMed

    Moran, Damian; Softley, Rowan; Warrant, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    The eyed surface form and eyeless cave form of the Mexican tetra Astyanax mexicanus experience stark differences in the daily periodicities of light, food and predation, factors which are likely to have a profound influence on metabolism. We measured the metabolic rate of Pachón cave and surface fish at a fixed swimming speed under light/dark and constant dark photoperiods. In constant darkness surface forms exhibited a circadian rhythm in metabolism with an increase in oxygen demand during the subjective daytime, whereas cave forms did not. The lack of circadian rhythm in metabolism leads to a 27% energy savings for Pachón cave fish compared to surface fish when comparing both forms in their natural photoperiods. When surface forms were tested under constant dark conditions they expended 38% more energy than cave forms under equivalent conditions. Elimination of the circadian rhythm in metabolism may be a general feature of animals that live in perpetually dark food-limited environments such as caves or the deep sea. PMID:25251018

  3. Eyeless Mexican Cavefish Save Energy by Eliminating the Circadian Rhythm in Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Damian; Softley, Rowan; Warrant, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    The eyed surface form and eyeless cave form of the Mexican tetra Astyanax mexicanus experience stark differences in the daily periodicities of light, food and predation, factors which are likely to have a profound influence on metabolism. We measured the metabolic rate of Pachón cave and surface fish at a fixed swimming speed under light/dark and constant dark photoperiods. In constant darkness surface forms exhibited a circadian rhythm in metabolism with an increase in oxygen demand during the subjective daytime, whereas cave forms did not. The lack of circadian rhythm in metabolism leads to a 27% energy savings for Pachón cave fish compared to surface fish when comparing both forms in their natural photoperiods. When surface forms were tested under constant dark conditions they expended 38% more energy than cave forms under equivalent conditions. Elimination of the circadian rhythm in metabolism may be a general feature of animals that live in perpetually dark food-limited environments such as caves or the deep sea. PMID:25251018

  4. Energy metabolism during larval development of green and white abalone, Haliotis fulgens and H. sorenseni.

    PubMed

    Moran, Amy L; Manahan, Donal T

    2003-06-01

    An understanding of the biochemical and physiological energetics of lecithotrophic development is useful for interpreting patterns of larval development, dispersal potential, and life-history evolution. This study investigated the metabolic rates and use of biochemical reserves in two species of abalone, Haliotis fulgens (the green abalone) and H. sorenseni (the white abalone). Larvae of H. fulgens utilized triacylglycerol as a primary source of endogenous energy reserves for development ( approximately 50% depletion from egg to metamorphic competence). Amounts of phospholipid remained constant, and protein dropped by about 30%. After embryogenesis, larvae of H. fulgens had oxygen consumption rates of 81.7 +/- 5.9 (SE) pmol larva(-1) h(-1) at 15 degrees C through subsequent development. The loss of biochemical reserves fully met the needs of metabolism, as measured by oxygen consumption. Larvae of H. sorenseni were examined during later larval development and were metabolically and biochemically similar to H. fulgens larvae at a comparable stage. Metabolic rates of both species were very similar to previous data for a congener, H. rufescens, suggesting that larval metabolism and energy utilization may be conserved among closely related species that also share similar developmental morphology and feeding modes. PMID:12807704

  5. Synaptosomal lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme composition is shifted toward aerobic forms in primate brain evolution.

    PubMed

    Duka, Tetyana; Anderson, Sarah M; Collins, Zachary; Raghanti, Mary Ann; Ely, John J; Hof, Patrick R; Wildman, Derek E; Goodman, Morris; Grossman, Lawrence I; Sherwood, Chet C

    2014-01-01

    With the evolution of a relatively large brain size in haplorhine primates (i.e. tarsiers, monkeys, apes, and humans), there have been associated changes in the molecular machinery that delivers energy to the neocortex. Here we investigated variation in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) expression and isoenzyme composition of the neocortex and striatum in primates using quantitative Western blotting and isoenzyme analysis of total homogenates and synaptosomal fractions. Analysis of isoform expression revealed that LDH in synaptosomal fractions from both forebrain regions shifted towards a predominance of the heart-type, aerobic isoform LDH-B among haplorhines as compared to strepsirrhines (i.e. lorises and lemurs), while in the total homogenate of the neocortex and striatum there was no significant difference in LDH isoenzyme composition between the primate suborders. The largest increase occurred in synapse-associated LDH-B expression in the neocortex, with an especially remarkable elevation in the ratio of LDH-B/LDH-A in humans. The phylogenetic variation in the ratio of LDH-B/LDH-A was correlated with species-typical brain mass but not the encephalization quotient. A significant LDH-B increase in the subneuronal fraction from haplorhine neocortex and striatum suggests a relatively higher rate of aerobic glycolysis that is linked to synaptosomal mitochondrial metabolism. Our results indicate that there is a differential composition of LDH isoenzymes and metabolism in synaptic terminals that evolved in primates to meet increased energy requirements in association with brain enlargement. PMID:24686273

  6. SYNAPTOSOMAL LACTATE DEHYDROGENASE ISOENZYME COMPOSITION IS SHIFTED TOWARD AEROBIC FORMS IN PRIMATE BRAIN EVOLUTION

    PubMed Central

    Duka, Tetyana; Anderson, Sarah M.; Collins, Zachary; Raghanti, Mary Ann; Ely, John J.; Hof, Patrick R.; Wildman, Derek E.; Goodman, Morris; Grossman, Lawrence I.; Sherwood, Chet C.

    2014-01-01

    With the evolution of a relatively large brain size in haplorhine primates (i.e., tarsiers, monkeys, apes and humans), there have been associated changes in the molecular machinery that delivers energy to the neocortex. Here we investigated variation in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) expression and isoenzyme composition of the neocortex and striatum in primates using quantitative Western blotting and isoenzyme analysis of total homogenates and synaptosomal fractions. Analysis of isoform expression revealed that LDH in the synaptosomal fraction from both forebrain regions shifted towards a predominance of the heart-type, aerobic isoforms, LDHB, among haplorhines as compared to strepsirrhines (i.e., lorises and lemurs), while in total homogenate of neocortex and striatum there was no significant difference in the LDH isoenzyme composition between the primate suborders. The largest increase occurred in synapse-associated LDH-B expression in the neocortex, displaying an especially remarkable elevation in the ratio of LDH-B to LDH-A in humans. The phylogenetic variation in LDH-B to LDH-A ratio was correlated with species typical brain mass, but not encephalization quotient. A significant LDHB increase in the sub-neuronal fraction from haplorhine neocortex and striatum suggests a relatively higher rate of aerobic glycolysis that is linked to synaptosomal mitochondrial metabolism. Our results indicate that there is differential composition of LDH isoenzymes and metabolism in synaptic terminals that evolved in primates to meet increased energy requirements in association with brain enlargement. PMID:24686273

  7. Understanding metabolic alterations in space flight using quantitative models - Fluid and energy balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, J. I.

    1985-01-01

    The results of an integrated multidisciplinary and multiexperimental investigation, using data from the Skylab program, of metabolic adaptation to space flight are summarized and discussed. The effects of space flight on fluid-electrolyte regulation, mechanisms of hormone disturbances, energy balance, and the etiology of weight loss are emphasized. A composite picture of the fluid, electrolyte, and energy response to weightlessness, based primarily on data gathered from the nine Skylab crewmen, is presented.

  8. Aerobic fitness is associated with greater hippocampal cerebral blood flow in children.

    PubMed

    Chaddock-Heyman, Laura; Erickson, Kirk I; Chappell, Michael A; Johnson, Curtis L; Kienzler, Caitlin; Knecht, Anya; Drollette, Eric S; Raine, Lauren B; Scudder, Mark R; Kao, Shih-Chun; Hillman, Charles H; Kramer, Arthur F

    2016-08-01

    The present study is the first to investigate whether cerebral blood flow in the hippocampus relates to aerobic fitness in children. In particular, we used arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion MRI to provide a quantitative measure of blood flow in the hippocampus in 73 7- to 9-year-old preadolescent children. Indeed, aerobic fitness was found to relate to greater perfusion in the hippocampus, independent of age, sex, and hippocampal volume. Such results suggest improved microcirculation and cerebral vasculature in preadolescent children with higher levels of aerobic fitness. Further, aerobic fitness may influence how the brain regulates its metabolic demands via blood flow in a region of the brain important for learning and memory. To add specificity to the relationship of fitness to the hippocampus, we demonstrate no significant association between aerobic fitness and cerebral blood flow in the brainstem. Our results reinforce the importance of aerobic fitness during a critical period of child development. PMID:27419884

  9. Anaerobic digestion of dairy cattle manure autoheated by aerobic pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Achkari-Begdouri, A.

    1989-01-01

    A novel way to heat anaerobic digesters was investigated. Dairy cattle manure was autoheated by an aerobic pretreatment process and then fed to the anaerobic digester. Important physical properties of the dairy cattle manure were determined. These included bulk density, specific heat, thermal conductivity and the rheological properties; consistency coefficient, behavior index and apparent viscosity. These parameters were used to calculate the overall heat transfer coefficients, and to estimate the heat losses from the aerobic reactor to the outside environment. The total energy balance of the aerobic treatment system was then established. An optimization study of the main parameters influencing the autoheating process showed that the total solids, the air flow rate and the stirring speed for operation of the aerobic pretreatment should be approximately 7%, 70 L/H and 1,400 rpm respectively. Temperatures as high as 65C were reached in 40 hours of aerobic treatment. At the above recommended levels of total solids, the air flow rate and the stirring speed, there was little difference in the energy requirements for heating the influent by aeration and heating the influent by a conventional heating system. In addition to the temperature increase, the aerobic pretreatment assisted in balancing the anaerobic digestion process and increased the methanogenesis of the dairy cattle manure. Despite the 8% decomposition of organic matter that occurred during the aerobic pretreatment process, methane production of the digester started with the aerobically heated manure was significantly higher (at least 20% higher) than of the digester started with conventionally heated manure. The aerobic system successfully autoheated the dairy cattle manure with an energy cost equal to that of conventionally heated influent.

  10. Metabolic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body ... that produce the energy. You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or ...

  11. Interactive effect of galanin-like peptide (GALP) and spontaneous exercise on energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazuo; Kageyama, Haruaki; Hirako, Satoshi; Wang, Lihua; Takenoya, Fumiko; Ogawa, Tetsuro; Shioda, Seiji

    2013-11-01

    Galanin-like peptide (GALP) is a neuropeptide involved in energy metabolism. The interactive effect of GALP and exercise on energy metabolism has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to determine if energy metabolism in spontaneously exercising mice could be promoted by intracerebroventricular (ICV) GALP administration. Changes in respiratory exchange ratio in response to GALP ICV administration indicated that lipids were primarily consumed followed by a continuous consumption of glucose throughout the dark period in non-exercising mice. In mice permitted to spontaneously exercise on a running-wheel, GALP ICV administration increased the consumed oxygen volume and heat production level from 5 to 11h after administration. These effects occurred independently from the total running distance. The interaction between GALP ICV administration and spontaneous exercise decreased body weight within 24h (F(1,16)=5.772, p<0.05), with no significant interaction observed regarding food and water intake or total distance. Energy metabolism-related enzymes were assessed in liver and skeletal muscle samples, with a significant interaction on mRNA expression between GALP ICV administration and spontaneous exercise observed in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (F(1,16)=18.602, p<0.001) that regulates gluconeogenesis and glucose transporter-4 (F(1,16)=21.092, p<0.001). GALP significantly decreased the mRNA expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (p<0.05) that regulates fatty acid synthesis regardless of spontaneous exercise with no changes to acetyl-CoA carboxylase a and fatty acid synthetase. These results indicate the GALP ICV administration can further promote energy metabolism when administered to spontaneously exercising mice. PMID:24055807

  12. The mechanistic basis of aerobic performance variation in red junglefowl.

    PubMed

    Hammond, K A; Chappell, M A; Cardullo, R A; Lin, R; Johnsen, T S

    2000-07-01

    We examined aerobic performance, organ and muscle mass and enzymatic activity in red junglefowl (Gallus gallus). We tested three models of performance limitation (central limits, peripheral limits, symmorphosis) and explored relationships between basal metabolic rate (BMR), aerobic capacity ( V (O2max)) and social rank. Males had a lower BMR, a higher V (O2max) and a greater aerobic scope than females. Females possessed larger peritoneal and reproductive organs, while males had larger hearts, lungs and leg muscles. In females, BMR was correlated with spleen mass and V (O2max) was correlated with hematocrit and large intestine mass. Male BMR was correlated with intestinal tract and lung mass, and V (O2max) was correlated with heart and pectoralis mass. Male citrate synthase activity averaged 57 % higher than that of females and was correlated with V (O2max) (this correlation was not significant in females). Female social status was not correlated with any variable, but male dominance was associated with higher aerobic scope, larger heart and lungs, smaller peritoneal organs and greater leg citrate synthase activity. We conclude that aerobic capacity is controlled by system-wide limitations (symmorphosis) in males, while in females it is controlled by central organs. In neither sex is elevated aerobic capacity associated with increased maintenance costs. PMID:10851122

  13. Maternal and fetal responses to low-impact aerobic dance.

    PubMed

    McMurray, R G; Katz, V L; Poe, M P; Hackney, A C

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the physiologic responses to low-impact aerobics using treadmill walking as a control. Ten pregnant women between 21 and 28 weeks of gestation completed 40 minutes of low-impact aerobic dance. The maternal and fetal responses were then compared to 40 minutes of walking at the same heart rate. The aerobics program consisted of a 10-minute warm-up, 20 minutes of high-intensity exercise, and 10 minutes of decreasing intensity. Heart rates were recorded every 5 minutes, and oxygen uptake (VO2) and fetal response (real-time ultrasound) were obtained every 10 minutes. The maternal heart rates were similar during both trials (overall, 133 +/- 6 beat/min). VO2 values during walking were about 4 mL/kg/min greater than during aerobic dance (p < or = 0.003). Minute ventilation (VE) was also greater during walking (28.7 +/- 6.4 versus 24.1 +/- 3.4 L/min, p < or = 0.001). Respiratory exchange ratios and the ventilatory equivalents for oxygen (VE/VO2) were similar for both trials. Aerobic dance caused greater fetal heart rates than walking (p < or = 0.001), differences being as high as 25 beat/min. The fetal rates had returned toward rest within 5 minutes following exercise. Low-impact aerobic dance, compared with walking at similar heart rates, results in a lower maternal metabolic rate and increases the transient stress on the fetus. PMID:7575837

  14. Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism and Redox Signaling in Brain Aging and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Fei; Boveris, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The mitochondrial energy-transducing capacity is essential for the maintenance of neuronal function, and the impairment of energy metabolism and redox homeostasis is a hallmark of brain aging, which is particularly accentuated in the early stages of neurodegenerative diseases. Recent Advances: The communications between mitochondria and the rest of the cell by energy- and redox-sensitive signaling establish a master regulatory device that controls cellular energy levels and the redox environment. Impairment of this regulatory devise is critical for aging and the early stages of neurodegenerative diseases. Critical Issues: This review focuses on a coordinated metabolic network—cytosolic signaling, transcriptional regulation, and mitochondrial function—that controls the cellular energy levels and redox status as well as factors which impair this metabolic network during brain aging and neurodegeneration. Future Directions: Characterization of mitochondrial function and mitochondria-cytosol communications will provide pivotal opportunities for identifying targets and developing new strategies aimed at restoring the mitochondrial energy-redox axis that is compromised in brain aging and neurodegeneration. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 353–371. PMID:22793257

  15. Mitochondrial Mg2+ homeostasis decides cellular energy metabolism and vulnerability to stress

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Ryu; Tabata, Sho; Shindo, Yutaka; Hotta, Kohji; Suzuki, Koji; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Oka, Kotaro

    2016-01-01

    Cellular energy production processes are composed of many Mg2+ dependent enzymatic reactions. In fact, dysregulation of Mg2+ homeostasis is involved in various cellular malfunctions and diseases. Recently, mitochondria, energy-producing organelles, have been known as major intracellular Mg2+ stores. Several biological stimuli alter mitochondrial Mg2+ concentration by intracellular redistribution. However, in living cells, whether mitochondrial Mg2+ alteration affect cellular energy metabolism remains unclear. Mg2+ transporter of mitochondrial inner membrane MRS2 is an essential component of mitochondrial Mg2+ uptake system. Here, we comprehensively analyzed intracellular Mg2+ levels and energy metabolism in Mrs2 knockdown (KD) cells using fluorescence imaging and metabolome analysis. Dysregulation of mitochondrial Mg2+ homeostasis disrupted ATP production via shift of mitochondrial energy metabolism and morphology. Moreover, Mrs2 KD sensitized cellular tolerance against cellular stress. These results indicate regulation of mitochondrial Mg2+ via MRS2 critically decides cellular energy status and cell vulnerability via regulation of mitochondrial Mg2+ level in response to physiological stimuli. PMID:27458051

  16. Mitochondrial Mg(2+) homeostasis decides cellular energy metabolism and vulnerability to stress.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Ryu; Tabata, Sho; Shindo, Yutaka; Hotta, Kohji; Suzuki, Koji; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Oka, Kotaro

    2016-01-01

    Cellular energy production processes are composed of many Mg(2+) dependent enzymatic reactions. In fact, dysregulation of Mg(2+) homeostasis is involved in various cellular malfunctions and diseases. Recently, mitochondria, energy-producing organelles, have been known as major intracellular Mg(2+) stores. Several biological stimuli alter mitochondrial Mg(2+) concentration by intracellular redistribution. However, in living cells, whether mitochondrial Mg(2+) alteration affect cellular energy metabolism remains unclear. Mg(2+) transporter of mitochondrial inner membrane MRS2 is an essential component of mitochondrial Mg(2+) uptake system. Here, we comprehensively analyzed intracellular Mg(2+) levels and energy metabolism in Mrs2 knockdown (KD) cells using fluorescence imaging and metabolome analysis. Dysregulation of mitochondrial Mg(2+) homeostasis disrupted ATP production via shift of mitochondrial energy metabolism and morphology. Moreover, Mrs2 KD sensitized cellular tolerance against cellular stress. These results indicate regulation of mitochondrial Mg(2+) via MRS2 critically decides cellular energy status and cell vulnerability via regulation of mitochondrial Mg(2+) level in response to physiological stimuli. PMID:27458051

  17. Recent advances in telemetry for estimating the energy metabolism of wild fishes.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, J D; Wright, S; Tudorache, C; Wilson, R P

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic rate is a critical factor in animal biology and ecology, providing an objective measure that can be used in attributing a cost to different activities and to assessing what animals do against some optimal behaviour. Ideally, metabolic rate would be estimated directly by measuring heat output but, until recently, this has not been easily tractable with fishes so instead metabolic rate is usually estimated using indirect methods. In the laboratory, oxygen consumption rate is the indirect method most frequently used for estimating metabolic rate, but technical requirements preclude the measurement of either heat output or oxygen consumption rate in free-ranging fishes. There are other field methods for estimating metabolic rate that can be used with mammals and birds but, again, these cannot be used with fishes. Here, the use of electronic devices that record body acceleration in three dimensions (accelerometry) is considered. Accelerometry is a comparatively new telemetric method for assessing energy metabolism in animals. Correlations between dynamic body acceleration (DBA) and oxygen consumption rate demonstrate that this will be a useful proxy for estimating activity-specific energy expenditure from fishes in mesocosm or field studies over extended periods where other methods (e.g. oxygen consumption rate) are not feasible. DBA therefore has potential as a valuable tool for attributing cost to different activities. This could help in gaining a full picture of how fishes make energy-based trade-offs between different levels of activity when faced with conflicting or competing demands arising from increased and combined environmental stressors. PMID:26592370

  18. SU-E-J-102: Separation of Metabolic Supply and Demand: From Power Grid Economics to Cancer Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, T; Xu, L; Gillies, R; Gatenby, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study a new model of glucose metabolism which is primarily governed by the timescale of the energetic demand and not by the oxygen level, and its implication on cancer metabolism (Warburg effect) Methods: 1) Metabolic profiling of membrane transporters activity in several cell lines, which represent the spectrum from normal breast epithelium to aggressive, metastatic cancer, using Seahorse XF reader.2) Spatial localization of oxidative and non-oxidative metabolic components using immunocytochemical imaging of the glycolytic ATP-producing enzyme, pyruvate kinase and mitochondria. 3) Finite element simulations of coupled partial differential equations using COMSOL and MATLAB. Results: Inhibition or activation of pumps on the cell membrane led to reduction or increase in aerobic glycolysis, respectively, while oxidative phosphorylation remained unchanged. These results were consistent with computational simulations of changes in short-timescale demand for energy by cell membrane processes. A specific model prediction was that the spatial distribution of ATP-producing enzymes in the glycolytic pathway must be primarily localized adjacent to the cell membrane, while mitochondria should be predominantly peri-nuclear. These predictions were confirmed experimentally. Conclusion: The results in this work support a new model for glucose metabolism in which glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation supply different types of energy demand. Similar to power grid economics, optimal metabolic control requires the two pathways, even in normoxic conditions, to match two different types of energy demands. Cells use aerobic metabolism to meet baseline, steady energy demand and glycolytic metabolism to meet short-timescale energy demands, mainly from membrane transport activities, even in the presence of oxygen. This model provides a mechanism for the origin of the Warburg effect in cancer cells. Here, the Warburg effect emerges during carcinogenesis is a physiological

  19. C4-Dicarboxylate Utilization in Aerobic and Anaerobic Growth.

    PubMed

    Unden, Gottfried; Strecker, Alexander; Kleefeld, Alexandra; Kim, Ok Bin

    2016-06-01

    C4-dicarboxylates and the C4-dicarboxylic amino acid l-aspartate support aerobic and anaerobic growth of Escherichia coli and related bacteria. In aerobic growth, succinate, fumarate, D- and L-malate, L-aspartate, and L-tartrate are metabolized by the citric acid cycle and associated reactions. Because of the interruption of the citric acid cycle under anaerobic conditions, anaerobic metabolism of C4-dicarboxylates depends on fumarate reduction to succinate (fumarate respiration). In some related bacteria (e.g., Klebsiella), utilization of C4-dicarboxylates, such as tartrate, is independent of fumarate respiration and uses a Na+-dependent membrane-bound oxaloacetate decarboxylase. Uptake of the C4-dicarboxylates into the bacteria (and anaerobic export of succinate) is achieved under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by different sets of secondary transporters. Expression of the genes for C4-dicarboxylate metabolism is induced in the presence of external C4-dicarboxylates by the membrane-bound DcuS-DcuR two-component system. Noncommon C4-dicarboxylates like l-tartrate or D-malate are perceived by cytoplasmic one-component sensors/transcriptional regulators. This article describes the pathways of aerobic and anaerobic C4-dicarboxylate metabolism and their regulation. The citric acid cycle, fumarate respiration, and fumarate reductase are covered in other articles and discussed here only in the context of C4-dicarboxylate metabolism. Recent aspects of C4-dicarboxylate metabolism like transport, sensing, and regulation will be treated in more detail. This article is an updated version of an article published in 2004 in EcoSal Plus. The update includes new literature, but, in particular, the sections on the metabolism of noncommon C4-dicarboxylates and their regulation, on the DcuS-DcuR regulatory system, and on succinate production by engineered E. coli are largely revised or new. PMID:27415771

  20. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    DOEpatents

    Hudgins, Mark P; Bessette, Bernard J; March, John C; McComb, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention includes a system of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  1. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    DOEpatents

    Hudgins, Mark P; Bessette, Bernard J; March, John; McComb, Scott T.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  2. Multimodal optical imaging system for in vivo investigation of cerebral oxygen delivery and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Gorczynska, Iwona; Fujimoto, James G.; Boas, David A.; Sakadžić, Sava

    2015-01-01

    Improving our understanding of brain function requires novel tools to observe multiple physiological parameters with high resolution in vivo. We have developed a multimodal imaging system for investigating multiple facets of cerebral blood flow and metabolism in small animals. The system was custom designed and features multiple optical imaging capabilities, including 2-photon and confocal lifetime microscopy, optical coherence tomography, laser speckle imaging, and optical intrinsic signal imaging. Here, we provide details of the system’s design and present in vivo observations of multiple metrics of cerebral oxygen delivery and energy metabolism, including oxygen partial pressure, microvascular blood flow, and NADH autofluorescence. PMID:26713212

  3. Multimodal optical imaging system for in vivo investigation of cerebral oxygen delivery and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yaseen, Mohammad A; Srinivasan, Vivek J; Gorczynska, Iwona; Fujimoto, James G; Boas, David A; Sakadžić, Sava

    2015-12-01

    Improving our understanding of brain function requires novel tools to observe multiple physiological parameters with high resolution in vivo. We have developed a multimodal imaging system for investigating multiple facets of cerebral blood flow and metabolism in small animals. The system was custom designed and features multiple optical imaging capabilities, including 2-photon and confocal lifetime microscopy, optical coherence tomography, laser speckle imaging, and optical intrinsic signal imaging. Here, we provide details of the system's design and present in vivo observations of multiple metrics of cerebral oxygen delivery and energy metabolism, including oxygen partial pressure, microvascular blood flow, and NADH autofluorescence. PMID:26713212

  4. A Comparative Genomic Analysis of Energy Metabolism in Sulfate Reducing Bacteria and Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Inês A. Cardoso; Ramos, Ana Raquel; Grein, Fabian; Marques, Marta Coimbra; da Silva, Sofia Marques; Venceslau, Sofia Santos

    2011-01-01

    The number of sequenced genomes of sulfate reducing organisms (SRO) has increased significantly in the recent years, providing an opportunity for a broader perspective into their energy metabolism. In this work we carried out a comparative survey of energy metabolism genes found in 25 available genomes of SRO. This analysis revealed a higher diversity of possible energy conserving pathways than classically considered to be present in these organisms, and permitted the identification of new proteins not known to be present in this group. The Deltaproteobacteria (and Thermodesulfovibrio yellowstonii) are characterized by a large number of cytochromes c and cytochrome c-associated membrane redox complexes, indicating that periplasmic electron transfer pathways are important in these bacteria. The Archaea and Clostridia groups contain practically no cytochromes c or associated membrane complexes. However, despite the absence of a periplasmic space, a few extracytoplasmic membrane redox proteins were detected in the Gram-positive bacteria. Several ion-translocating complexes were detected in SRO including H+-pyrophosphatases, complex I homologs, Rnf, and Ech/Coo hydrogenases. Furthermore, we found evidence that cytoplasmic electron bifurcating mechanisms, recently described for other anaerobes, are also likely to play an important role in energy metabolism of SRO. A number of cytoplasmic [NiFe] and [FeFe] hydrogenases, formate dehydrogenases, and heterodisulfide reductase-related proteins are likely candidates to be involved in energy coupling through electron bifurcation, from diverse electron donors such as H2, formate, pyruvate, NAD(P)H, β-oxidation, and others. In conclusion, this analysis indicates that energy metabolism of SRO is far more versatile than previously considered, and that both chemiosmotic and flavin-based electron bifurcating mechanisms provide alternative strategies for energy conservation. PMID:21747791

  5. Consequences of complex environments: Temperature and energy intake interact to influence growth and metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    Stahlschmidt, Zachary R; Jodrey, Alicia D; Luoma, Rachel L

    2015-09-01

    The field of comparative physiology has a rich history of elegantly examining the effects of individual environmental factors on performance traits linked to fitness (e.g., thermal performance curves for locomotion). However, animals live in complex environments wherein multiple environmental factors co-vary. Thus, we investigated the independent and interactive effects of temperature and energy intake on the growth and metabolic rate of juvenile corn snakes (Pantherophis guttatus) in the context of shifts in complex environments. Unlike previous studies that imposed constant or fluctuating temperature regimes, we manipulated the availability of preferred thermal microclimates (control vs. relatively warm regimes) for eight weeks and allowed snakes to behaviorally thermoregulate among microclimates. By also controlling for energy intake, we demonstrate an interactive effect of temperature and energy on growth-relevant temperature shifts had no effect on snakes' growth when energy intake was low and a positive effect on growth when energy intake was high. Thus, acclimation to relatively warm thermal options can result in increased rates of growth when food is abundant in a taxon in which body size confers fitness advantages. Temperature and energy also interactively influenced metabolic rate-snakes in the warmer temperature regime exhibited reduced metabolic rate (O2 consumption rate at 25 °C and 30 °C) if they had relatively high energy intake. Although we advocate for continued investigation into the effects of complex environments on other traits, our results indicate that warming may actually benefit important life history traits in some taxa and that metabolic shifts may underlie thermal acclimation. PMID:25899738

  6. Energy metabolism and glutamate-glutamine cycle in the brain: a stoichiometric modeling perspective

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The energetics of cerebral activity critically relies on the functional and metabolic interactions between neurons and astrocytes. Important open questions include the relation between neuronal versus astrocytic energy demand, glucose uptake and intercellular lactate transfer, as well as their dependence on the level of activity. Results We have developed a large-scale, constraint-based network model of the metabolic partnership between astrocytes and glutamatergic neurons that allows for a quantitative appraisal of the extent to which stoichiometry alone drives the energetics of the system. We find that the velocity of the glutamate-glutamine cycle (Vcyc) explains part of the uncoupling between glucose and oxygen utilization at increasing Vcyc levels. Thus, we are able to characterize different activation states in terms of the tissue oxygen-glucose index (OGI). Calculations show that glucose is taken up and metabolized according to cellular energy requirements, and that partitioning of the sugar between different cell types is not significantly affected by Vcyc. Furthermore, both the direction and magnitude of the lactate shuttle between neurons and astrocytes turn out to depend on the relative cell glucose uptake while being roughly independent of Vcyc. Conclusions These findings suggest that, in absence of ad hoc activity-related constraints on neuronal and astrocytic metabolism, the glutamate-glutamine cycle does not control the relative energy demand of neurons and astrocytes, and hence their glucose uptake and lactate exchange. PMID:24112710

  7. Riboflavin supplementation improves energy metabolism in mice exposed to acute hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y P; Wei, J Y; Yang, J J; Gao, W N; Wu, J Q; Guo, C J

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of riboflavin on energy metabolism in hypoxic mice. Kunming mice were fed diets containing riboflavin at doses of 6, 12, 24 and 48 mg/kg, respectively for 2 weeks before exposure to a simulated altitude of 6000 m for 8 h. Changes of riboflavin status and energy metabolism were assessed biochemically. Simultaneously, a (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based metabolomic technique was used to track the changes of plasma metabolic profiling. It was found that the content of hepatic riboflavin was decreased and erythrocyte glutathione activation coefficient was elevated significantly under hypoxic condition. Meanwhile, increased plasma pyruvate, lactate, beta-hydroxybutyrate and urea, as well as decreased plasma carnitine were observed. Riboflavin supplementation improved riboflavin status remarkably in hypoxic mice and decreased plasma levels of pyruvate, free fatty acids and beta-hydroxybutyrate significantly. Plasma carnitine was increased in response to riboflavin supplementation. Results obtained from (1)H NMR analysis were basically in line with the data from biochemical assays and remarkable changes in plasma taurine, choline and some other metabolites were also indicated. It was concluded that riboflavin requirement was increased under acute hypoxic condition and riboflavin supplementation was effective in improving energy metabolism in hypoxic mice. PMID:24564599

  8. Impact of hypothalamic reactive oxygen species in the regulation of energy metabolism and food intake

    PubMed Central

    Drougard, Anne; Fournel, Audren; Valet, Philippe; Knauf, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamus is a key area involved in the control of metabolism and food intake via the integrations of numerous signals (hormones, neurotransmitters, metabolites) from various origins. These factors modify hypothalamic neurons activity and generate adequate molecular and behavioral responses to control energy balance. In this complex integrative system, a new concept has been developed in recent years, that includes reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a critical player in energy balance. ROS are known to act in many signaling pathways in different peripheral organs, but also in hypothalamus where they regulate food intake and metabolism by acting on different types of neurons, including proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and agouti-related protein (AgRP)/neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons. Hypothalamic ROS release is under the influence of different factors such as pancreatic and gut hormones, adipokines (leptin, apelin,…), neurotransmitters and nutrients (glucose, lipids,…). The sources of ROS production are multiple including NADPH oxidase, but also the mitochondria which is considered as the main ROS producer in the brain. ROS are considered as signaling molecules, but conversely impairment of this neuronal signaling ROS pathway contributes to alterations of autonomic nervous system and neuroendocrine function, leading to metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. In this review we focus our attention on factors that are able to modulate hypothalamic ROS release in order to control food intake and energy metabolism, and whose deregulations could participate to the development of pathological conditions. This novel insight reveals an original mechanism in the hypothalamus that controls energy balance and identify hypothalamic ROS signaling as a potential therapeutic strategy to treat metabolic disorders. PMID:25759638

  9. [Effect of dinitrosyl iron complexes on erythrocyte energy metabolism under thermal trauma conditions].

    PubMed

    Martusevich, A K; Solov'eva, A G; Peretiagin, S P; Vanin, A F

    2014-01-01

    The effect of dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC) on the energy metabolism of erythrocytes under combined thermal trauma conditions has been studied on a group of 30 Wistar rats, which was divided into 3 groups: intact (n = 10), control (n = 10), and main (n = 10). Combined thermal trauma (skin burn + thermoinhalation damage) was modeled in animals of the control and main groups. Rats of control group received infusions of sodium chloride solution (n = 10) every day. Rats of the main group obtained infusions of DNIC solution in sodium chloride. Rat blood samples were characterized by the activity of lactate dehydrogenase in direct and reverse reaction, lactate level, and coefficients of the substrate provision and energy reactions balance. It was stated, that DNIC clearly normalized the energy metabolism of erythrocytes beginning with the third day after thermal trauma onset. PMID:24791335

  10. Water-energy links in cities: the urban metabolism of London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mijic, A.; Ruiz Cazorla, J.; Keirstead, J.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid urbanisation results in increased water consumption in cities, requiring improved tools for understanding adaptive measures for water resources management under climate change. The energy sector is facing the same challenges and requires equally comprehensive solutions. More frequent water shortages due to climate and land use changes and potential limits on CO2 emissions from fossil fuels that science demands indicate clearly that the next step in the sustainable city development will be to look for the most efficient use of these highly interdependent resources. One of the concepts that could be used for quantifying fundamental flows in an urban environment such as water and energy is the urban metabolism framework. This paper will examine the concept of urban metabolism by quantifying amounts and trends of water and energy consumed in London by four main sectors: residential, industrial, commercial and public. Key data requirements at the sector level will be identified and initial mapping of critical factors for urban sustainability will be provided. Finally, the work will examine the potential of urban metabolism framework to provide data and information for implementing water, energy and greenhouse emissions trade-off 'fit-for-purpose' strategy for water supply security. The paper is a part of the Panta Rhei Research Initiative of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) under the working group of Energy and Food Impacts on Water.

  11. Altered energy metabolism in an irradiated population of lizards at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, K.A.; Medica, P.A.

    1985-07-01

    Field metabolic rates (via doubly labeled water), body compartmentalization of energy stores, and energy assimilation efficiencies were measured to assess all avenues of energy utilization in Uta stansburiana living in a low-level ..gamma..-irradiated plot in Rock Valley, Nevada. Comparison of energy budgets for radiation-sterilized females with those of nonirradiated control lizards revealed several substantial differences. Sterile females were heavier, mainly because they had extraordinarily large energy (fat) storage depots. Sterile females had much lower rates of energy expenditure via respiration and lower rates of energy intake by feeding. These differences are interpreted as indirect responses to radiation-induced sterility. There is little evidence of direct radiation effects on physiological functions other than reproduction.

  12. DJ-1 links muscle ROS production with metabolic reprogramming and systemic energy homeostasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Sally Yu; Lu, Shun-Yan; Sivasubramaniyam, Tharini; Revelo, Xavier S; Cai, Erica P; Luk, Cynthia T; Schroer, Stephanie A; Patel, Prital; Kim, Raymond H; Bombardier, Eric; Quadrilatero, Joe; Tupling, A Russell; Mak, Tak W; Winer, Daniel A; Woo, Minna

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been linked to a wide variety of pathologies, including obesity and diabetes, but ROS also act as endogenous signalling molecules, regulating numerous biological processes. DJ-1 is one of the most evolutionarily conserved proteins across species, and mutations in DJ-1 have been linked to some cases of Parkinson's disease. Here we show that DJ-1 maintains cellular metabolic homeostasis via modulating ROS levels in murine skeletal muscles, revealing a role of DJ-1 in maintaining efficient fuel utilization. We demonstrate that, in the absence of DJ-1, ROS uncouple mitochondrial respiration and activate AMP-activated protein kinase, which triggers Warburg-like metabolic reprogramming in muscle cells. Accordingly, DJ-1 knockout mice exhibit higher energy expenditure and are protected from obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes in the setting of fuel surplus. Our data suggest that promoting mitochondrial uncoupling may be a potential strategy for the treatment of obesity-associated metabolic disorders. PMID:26077864

  13. DJ-1 links muscle ROS production with metabolic reprogramming and systemic energy homeostasis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Sally Yu; Lu, Shun-Yan; Sivasubramaniyam, Tharini; Revelo, Xavier S.; Cai, Erica P.; Luk, Cynthia T.; Schroer, Stephanie A.; Patel, Prital; Kim, Raymond H.; Bombardier, Eric; Quadrilatero, Joe; Tupling, A. Russell; Mak, Tak W.; Winer, Daniel A.; Woo, Minna

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been linked to a wide variety of pathologies, including obesity and diabetes, but ROS also act as endogenous signalling molecules, regulating numerous biological processes. DJ-1 is one of the most evolutionarily conserved proteins across species, and mutations in DJ-1 have been linked to some cases of Parkinson's disease. Here we show that DJ-1 maintains cellular metabolic homeostasis via modulating ROS levels in murine skeletal muscles, revealing a role of DJ-1 in maintaining efficient fuel utilization. We demonstrate that, in the absence of DJ-1, ROS uncouple mitochondrial respiration and activate AMP-activated protein kinase, which triggers Warburg-like metabolic reprogramming in muscle cells. Accordingly, DJ-1 knockout mice exhibit higher energy expenditure and are protected from obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes in the setting of fuel surplus. Our data suggest that promoting mitochondrial uncoupling may be a potential strategy for the treatment of obesity-associated metabolic disorders. PMID:26077864

  14. Genome-scale estimate of the metabolic turnover of E. Coli from the energy balance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Martino, D.

    2016-02-01

    In this article the notion of metabolic turnover is revisited in the light of recent results of out-of-equilibrium thermodynamics. By means of Monte Carlo methods we perform an exact sampling of the enzymatic fluxes in a genome scale metabolic network of E. Coli in stationary growth conditions from which we infer the metabolites turnover times. However the latter are inferred from net fluxes, and we argue that this approximation is not valid for enzymes working nearby thermodynamic equilibrium. We recalculate turnover times from total fluxes by performing an energy balance analysis of the network and recurring to the fluctuation theorem. We find in many cases values one of order of magnitude lower, implying a faster picture of intermediate metabolism.

  15. Rethinking energy in parkinsonian motor symptoms: a potential role for neural metabolic deficits

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Shinichi; Kegelmeyer, Deborah; Hong, S. Lee

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized as a chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disorder that results in a variety of debilitating symptoms, including bradykinesia, resting tremor, rigidity, and postural instability. Research spanning several decades has emphasized basal ganglia dysfunction, predominantly resulting from dopaminergic (DA) cell loss, as the primarily cause of the aforementioned parkinsonian features. But, why those particular features manifest themselves remains an enigma. The goal of this paper is to develop a theoretical framework that parkinsonian motor features are behavioral consequence of a long-term adaptation to their inability (inflexibility or lack of capacity) to meet energetic demands, due to neural metabolic deficits arising from mitochondrial dysfunction associated with PD. Here, we discuss neurophysiological changes that are generally associated with PD, such as selective degeneration of DA neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), in conjunction with metabolic and mitochondrial dysfunction. We then characterize the cardinal motor symptoms of PD, bradykinesia, resting tremor, rigidity and gait disturbance, reviewing literature to demonstrate how these motor patterns are actually energy efficient from a metabolic perspective. We will also develop three testable hypotheses: (1) neural metabolic deficits precede the increased rate of neurodegeneration and onset of behavioral symptoms in PD; (2) motor behavior of persons with PD are more sensitive to changes in metabolic/bioenergetic state; and (3) improvement of metabolic function could lead to better motor performance in persons with PD. These hypotheses are designed to introduce a novel viewpoint that can elucidate the connections between metabolic, neural and motor function in PD. PMID:25610377

  16. Constrained Total Energy Expenditure and Metabolic Adaptation to Physical Activity in Adult Humans.

    PubMed

    Pontzer, Herman; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon; Dugas, Lara R; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Bovet, Pascal; Forrester, Terrence E; Lambert, Estelle V; Cooper, Richard S; Schoeller, Dale A; Luke, Amy

    2016-02-01

    Current obesity prevention strategies recommend increasing daily physical activity, assuming that increased activity will lead to corresponding increases in total energy expenditure and prevent or reverse energy imbalance and weight gain [1-3]. Such Additive total energy expenditure models are supported by exercise intervention and accelerometry studies reporting positive correlations between physical activity and total energy expenditure [4] but are challenged by ecological studies in humans and other species showing that more active populations do not have higher total energy expenditure [5-8]. Here we tested a Constrained total energy expenditure model, in which total energy expenditure increases with physical activity at low activity levels but plateaus at higher activity levels as the body adapts to maintain total energy expenditure within a narrow range. We compared total energy expenditure, measured using doubly labeled water, against physical activity, measured using accelerometry, for a large (n = 332) sample of adults living in five populations [9]. After adjusting for body size and composition, total energy expenditure was positively correlated with physical activity, but the relationship was markedly stronger over the lower range of physical activity. For subjects in the upper range of physical activity, total energy expenditure plateaued, supporting a Constrained total energy expenditure model. Body fat percentage and activity intensity appear to modulate the metabolic response to physical activity. Models of energy balance employed in public health [1-3] should be revised to better reflect the constrained nature of total energy expenditure and the complex effects of physical activity on metabolic physiology. PMID:26832439

  17. Compensatory elevation of voluntary activity in mouse mutants with impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lapointe, Jérôme; G. Hughes, Bryan; Bigras, Eve; Hekimi, Siegfried

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondria play a crucial role in determining whole‐body metabolism and exercise capacity. Genetic mouse models of mild mitochondrial dysfunction provide an opportunity to understand how mitochondrial function affects these parameters. MCLK1 (a.k.a. Coq7) is an enzyme implicated in the biosynthesis of ubiquinone (UQ; Coenzyme Q). Low levels of MCLK1 in Mclk1+/− heterozygous mutants lead to abnormal sub‐mitochondrial distribution of UQ, impaired mitochondrial function, elevated mitochondrial oxidative stress, and increased lifespan. Here, we report that young Mclk1+/− males, but not females, show a significant decrease in whole‐body metabolic rate as measured by indirect calorimetry. Such a sex‐specific effect of mitochondrial dysfunction on energy metabolism has also been reported for heterozygous mice carrying a mutation for the gene encoding the “Rieske” protein of mitochondrial complex III (RISP+/P224S). We find that both Mclk1+/− and RISP+/P224S males are capable of restoring their defective metabolic rates by making significantly more voluntary use of a running wheel compared to wild type. However, this increase in voluntary activity does not reflect their exercise capacity, which we found to be impaired as revealed by a shorter treadmill distance run before exhaustion. In contrast to what is observed in Mclk1+/− and RISP+/P224S mutants, Sod2+/− mice with elevated oxidative stress and major mitochondrial dysfunction did not increase voluntary activity. Our study reveals a sex‐specific effect on how impaired mitochondrial function impacts whole‐body energy metabolism and locomotory behavior, and contributes to the understanding of the metabolic and behavioral consequences of mitochondrial disorders. PMID:25413331

  18. Refined Analysis of Brain Energy Metabolism Using In Vivo Dynamic Enrichment of 13C Multiplets

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani M., Masoumeh; Duarte, João M. N.; Kunz, Nicolas; Gruetter, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in combination with the infusion of 13C-labeled precursors is a unique approach to study in vivo brain energy metabolism. Incorporating the maximum information available from in vivo localized 13C spectra is of importance to get broader knowledge on cerebral metabolic pathways. Metabolic rates can be quantitatively determined from the rate of 13C incorporation into amino acid neurotransmitters such as glutamate and glutamine using suitable mathematical models. The time course of multiplets arising from 13C-13C coupling between adjacent carbon atoms was expected to provide additional information for metabolic modeling leading to potential improvements in the estimation of metabolic parameters. The aim of the present study was to extend two-compartment neuronal/glial modeling to include dynamics of 13C isotopomers available from fine structure multiplets in 13C spectra of glutamate and glutamine measured in vivo in rats brain at 14.1 T, termed bonded cumomer approach. Incorporating the labeling time courses of 13C multiplets of glutamate and glutamine resulted in elevated precision of the estimated fluxes in rat brain as well as reduced correlations between them. PMID:26969691

  19. Reprograming of gut microbiome energy metabolism by the FUT2 Crohn's disease risk polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Maomeng; McHardy, Ian; Ruegger, Paul; Goudarzi, Maryam; Kashyap, Purna C; Haritunians, Talin; Li, Xiaoxiao; Graeber, Thomas G; Schwager, Emma; Huttenhower, Curtis; Fornace, Albert J; Sonnenburg, Justin L; McGovern, Dermot PB; Borneman, James; Braun, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Fucosyltransferase 2 (FUT2) is an enzyme that is responsible for the synthesis of the H antigen in body fluids and on the intestinal mucosa. The H antigen is an oligosaccharide moiety that acts as both an attachment site and carbon source for intestinal bacteria. Non-secretors, who are homozygous for the loss-of-function alleles of FUT2 gene (sese), have increased susceptibility to Crohn's disease (CD). To characterize the effect of FUT2 polymorphism on the mucosal ecosystem, we profiled the microbiome, meta-proteome and meta-metabolome of 75 endoscopic lavage samples from the cecum and sigmoid of 39 healthy subjects (12 SeSe, 18 Sese and 9 sese). Imputed metagenomic analysis revealed perturbations of energy metabolism in the microbiome of non-secretor and heterozygote individuals, notably the enrichment of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, cofactor and vitamin metabolism and glycan biosynthesis and metabolism-related pathways, and the depletion of amino-acid biosynthesis and metabolism. Similar changes were observed in mice bearing the FUT2−/− genotype. Metabolomic analysis of human specimens revealed concordant as well as novel changes in the levels of several metabolites. Human metaproteomic analysis indicated that these functional changes were accompanied by sub-clinical levels of inflammation in the local intestinal mucosa. Therefore, the colonic microbiota of non-secretors is altered at both the compositional and functional levels, affecting the host mucosal state and potentially explaining the association of FUT2 genotype and CD susceptibility. PMID:24781901

  20. Impairment of carbon metabolism induced by the herbicide glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Orcaray, Luis; Zulet, Amaia; Zabalza, Ana; Royuela, Mercedes

    2012-01-01

    The herbicide glyphosate reduces plant growth and causes plant death by inhibiting the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids. The objective of this work was to determine whether glyphosate-treated plants show a carbon metabolism pattern comparable to that of plants treated with herbicides that inhibit branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis. Glyphosate-treated plants showed impaired carbon metabolism with an accumulation of carbohydrates in the leaves and roots. The growth inhibition detected after glyphosate treatment suggested impaired metabolism that impedes the utilization of available carbohydrates or energy at the expected rate. These effects were common to both types of amino acid biosynthesis inhibitors. Under aerobic conditions, ethanolic fermentative metabolism was enhanced in the roots of glyphosate-treated plants. This fermentative response was not related to changes in the respiratory rate or to a limitation of the energy charge. This response, which was similar for both types of herbicides, might be considered a general response to stress conditions. PMID:21944839

  1. Metabolic consequences of resistive-type exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    This brief review concerns acute and chronic metabolic responses to resistive-type exercise (RTE) (i.e., Olympic/power weight lifting and bodybuilding). Performance of RTE presents power output substantially greater (10-15-fold) than that evident with endurance-type exercise. Accordingly, RTE relies heavily on the anaerobic enzyme machinery of skeletal muscle for energy supply, with alterations in the rate of aerobic metabolism being modest. Hydrolysis of high energy phosphate compounds (PC, ATP), glycogenolysis, and glycolysis are evident during an acute bout of RTE as indicated by metabolic markers in mixed fiber type skeletal muscle samples. The type of RTE probably influences the magnitude of these responses since the increase in blood lactate is much greater during a typical "bodybuilding" than "power lifting" session. The influence of RTE training on acute metabolic responses to RTE has received little attention. An individual's inherent metabolic characteristics are apparently sufficient to meet the energy demands of RTE as training of this type does not increase VO2max or substantially alter the content of marker enzymes in mixed fiber type skeletal muscle. Analyses of pools of fast- vs slow-twitch fibers, however, indicate that RTE-induced changes may be fiber type specific. Future studies should better delineate the metabolic responses to RTE and determine whether these are related to the enhanced performance associated with such training.

  2. Aerobic Fitness and School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkle, J. Scott

    1997-01-01

    Provides school counselors with information on aerobic exercise (specifically running) and the psychological, behavioral, and physical benefits children obtained by participating in fitness programs. Recommends collaboration between school counselors and physical education teachers and gives a preliminary discussion of aerobic running and its…

  3. Aerobic Fitness and School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkle, J. Scott

    1992-01-01

    Provides school counselors with information regarding aerobic exercise (specifically running), and the psychological, behavioral, and physical benefits children obtain by participating in fitness programs. Presents methods of collaboration between school counselors and physical education teachers. Offers preliminary discussion of aerobic running…

  4. Exercise, Animal Aerobics, and Interpretation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Valerie

    1996-01-01

    Describes an aerobic activity set to music for children that mimics animal movements. Example exercises include walking like a penguin or jumping like a cricket. Stresses basic aerobic principles and designing the program at the level of children's motor skills. Benefits include reaching people who normally don't visit nature centers, and bridging…

  5. A bioassay to measure energy metabolism in mouse colonic crypts, organoids, and sorted stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yang-Yi; Davidson, Laurie A; Callaway, Evelyn S; Wright, Gus A; Safe, Stephen; Chapkin, Robert S

    2015-07-01

    Evidence suggests that targeting cancer cell energy metabolism might be an effective therapeutic approach for selective ablation of malignancies. Using a Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer, we have demonstrated that select environmental agents can alter colonic mitochondrial function by increasing respiration-induced proton leak, thereby inducing apoptosis, a marker of colon cancer risk. To further probe bioenergetics in primary intestinal cells, we developed methodology that can be modified and adapted to measure the bioenergetic profiles of colonic crypts, the basic functional unit of the colon, and colonic organoids, an ex vivo 3D culture of colonic crypts. Furthermore, in combination with the MoFlo Astrios High-Speed Cell Sorter, we were able to measure the bioenergetic profiles of colonic adult stem and daughter cells from Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-creER(T2) transgenic mice. We examined the effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a full arylhydrocarbon receptor agonist, known to affect gastrointestinal function and cancer risk, on the bioenergetic profiles of intestinal epithelial cells. Mouse colonic crypts, organoids, or sorted single cells were seeded onto Matrigel-precoated Seahorse XF24 microplates for extracellular flux analysis. Temporal analyses revealed distinct energy metabolic profiles in crypts and organoids challenged with TCDD. Furthermore, sorted Lgr5(+) stem cells exhibited a Warburg-like metabolic profile. This is noteworthy because perturbations in stem cell dynamics are generally believed to represent the earliest step toward colon tumorigenesis. We propose that our innovative methodology may facilitate future in vivo/ex vivo metabolic studies using environmental agents affecting colonocyte energy metabolism. PMID:25977509

  6. A bioassay to measure energy metabolism in mouse colonic crypts, organoids, and sorted stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yang-Yi; Davidson, Laurie A.; Callaway, Evelyn S.; Wright, Gus A.; Safe, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that targeting cancer cell energy metabolism might be an effective therapeutic approach for selective ablation of malignancies. Using a Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer, we have demonstrated that select environmental agents can alter colonic mitochondrial function by increasing respiration-induced proton leak, thereby inducing apoptosis, a marker of colon cancer risk. To further probe bioenergetics in primary intestinal cells, we developed methodology that can be modified and adapted to measure the bioenergetic profiles of colonic crypts, the basic functional unit of the colon, and colonic organoids, an ex vivo 3D culture of colonic crypts. Furthermore, in combination with the MoFlo Astrios High-Speed Cell Sorter, we were able to measure the bioenergetic profiles of colonic adult stem and daughter cells from Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-creERT2 transgenic mice. We examined the effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a full arylhydrocarbon receptor agonist, known to affect gastrointestinal function and cancer risk, on the bioenergetic profiles of intestinal epithelial cells. Mouse colonic crypts, organoids, or sorted single cells were seeded onto Matrigel-precoated Seahorse XF24 microplates for extracellular flux analysis. Temporal analyses revealed distinct energy metabolic profiles in crypts and organoids challenged with TCDD. Furthermore, sorted Lgr5+ stem cells exhibited a Warburg-like metabolic profile. This is noteworthy because perturbations in stem cell dynamics are generally believed to represent the earliest step toward colon tumorigenesis. We propose that our innovative methodology may facilitate future in vivo/ex vivo metabolic studies using environmental agents affecting colonocyte energy metabolism. PMID:25977509

  7. Short- and medium-chain fatty acids in energy metabolism: the cellular perspective.

    PubMed

    Schönfeld, Peter; Wojtczak, Lech

    2016-06-01

    Short- and medium-chain fatty acids (SCFAs and MCFAs), independently of their cellular signaling functions, are important substrates of the energy metabolism and anabolic processes in mammals. SCFAs are mostly generated by colonic bacteria and are predominantly metabolized by enterocytes and liver, whereas MCFAs arise mostly from dietary triglycerides, among them milk and dairy products. A common feature of SCFAs and MCFAs is their carnitine-independent uptake and intramitochondrial activation to acyl-CoA thioesters. Contrary to long-chain fatty acids, the cellular metabolism of SCFAs and MCFAs depends to a lesser extent on fatty acid-binding proteins. SCFAs and MCFAs modulate tissue metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids, as manifested by a mostly inhibitory effect on glycolysis and stimulation of lipogenesis or gluconeogenesis. SCFAs and MCFAs exert no or only weak protonophoric and lytic activities in mitochondria and do not significantly impair the electron transport in the respiratory chain. SCFAs and MCFAs modulate mitochondrial energy production by two mechanisms: they provide reducing equivalents to the respiratory chain and partly decrease efficacy of oxidative ATP synthesis. PMID:27080715

  8. Effect of fipronil on energy metabolism in the perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    de Medeiros, Hyllana Catarine Dias; Constantin, Jorgete; Ishii-Iwamoto, Emy Luiza; Mingatto, Fábio Erminio

    2015-07-01

    Fipronil is an insecticide used to control pests in animals and plants that can causes hepatotoxicity in animals and humans, and it is hepatically metabolized to fipronil sulfone by cytochrome P-450. The present study aimed to characterize the effects of fipronil (10-50μM) on energy metabolism in isolated perfused rat livers. In fed animals, there was increased glucose and lactate release from glycogen catabolism, indicating the stimulation of glycogenolysis and glycolysis. In the livers of fasted animals, fipronil inhibited glucose and urea production from exogenous l-alanine, whereas ammonia and lactate production were increased. In addition, fipronil at 50μM concentration inhibited the oxygen uptake and increased the cytosolic NADH/NAD⁺ ratio under glycolytic conditions. The metabolic alterations were found both in livers from normal or proadifen-pretreated rats revealing that fipronil and its reactive metabolites contributed for the observed activity. The effects on oxygen uptake indicated that the possible mechanism of toxicity of fipronil involves impairment on mitochondrial respiratory activity, and therefore, interference with energy metabolism. The inhibitory effects on oxygen uptake observed at the highest concentration of 50μM was abolished by pretreatment of the rats with proadifen indicating that the metabolites of fipronil, including fipronil sulfone, acted predominantly as inhibitors of respiratory chain. The hepatoxicity of both the parent compound and its reactive metabolites was corroborated by the increase in the activity of lactate dehydrogenase in the effluent perfusate in livers from normal or proadifen-pretreated rats. PMID:25943759

  9. Global Profiling of Protein Lysine Malonylation in Escherichia coli Reveals Its Role in Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lili; Nie, Litong; Chen, Ming; Liu, Ping; Zhu, Jun; Zhai, Linhui; Tao, Sheng-Ce; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhao, Yingming; Tan, Minjia

    2016-06-01

    Protein lysine malonylation is a recently identified post-translational modification (PTM), which is evolutionarily conserved from bacteria to mammals. Although analysis of lysine malonylome in mammalians suggested that this modification was related to energy metabolism, the substrates and biological roles of malonylation in prokaryotes are still poorly understood. In this study, we performed qualitative and quantitative analyses to globally identify lysine malonylation substrates in Escherichia coli. We identified 1745 malonylation sites in 594 proteins in E. coli, representing the first and largest malonylome data set in prokaryotes up to date. Bioinformatic analyses showed that lysine malonylation was significantly enriched in protein translation, energy metabolism pathways and fatty acid biosynthesis, implying the potential roles of protein malonylation in bacterial physiology. Quantitative proteomics by fatty acid synthase inhibition in both auxotrophic and prototrophic E. coli strains revealed that lysine malonylation is closely associated with E. coli fatty acid metabolism. Protein structural analysis and mutagenesis experiment suggested malonylation could impact enzymatic activity of citrate synthase, a key enzyme in citric acid (TCA) cycle. Further comparative analysis among lysine malonylome, succinylome and acetylome data showed that these three modifications could participate in some similar enriched metabolism pathways, but they could also possibly play distinct roles such as in fatty acid synthesis. These data expanded our knowledge of lysine malonylation in prokaryotes, providing a resource for functional study of lysine malonylation in bacteria. PMID:27183143

  10. Clinical Neurochemistry of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Toward Predicting Individual Outcomes via Biomarkers of Brain Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tholance, Yannick; Barcelos, Gleicy; Dailler, Frederic; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Renaud, Bernard

    2015-12-16

    The functional outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage is difficult to predict at the individual level. The monitoring of brain energy metabolism has proven to be useful in improving the pathophysiological understanding of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Nonetheless, brain energy monitoring has not yet clearly been included in official guidelines for the management of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients, likely because previous studies compared only biological data between two groups of patients (unfavorable vs favorable outcomes) and did not determine decision thresholds that could be useful in clinical practice. Therefore, this Viewpoint discusses recent findings suggesting that monitoring biomarkers of brain energy metabolism at the level of individuals can be used to predict the outcomes of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients. Indeed, by taking into account specific neurochemical patterns obtained by local or global monitoring of brain energy metabolism, it may become possible to predict routinely, and with sufficient sensitivity and specificity, the individual outcomes of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients. Moreover, combining both local and global monitoring improves the overall performance of individual outcome prediction. Such a combined neurochemical monitoring approach may become, after prospective clinical validation, an important component in the management of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients to adapt individualized therapeutic interventions. PMID:26595414

  11. Simulating the physiology of athletes during endurance sports events: modelling human energy conversion and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, Johannes H. G. M.; Supandi, Farahaniza; Gavai, Anand K.; de Graaf, Albert A.; Binsl, Thomas W.; Hettling, Hannes

    2011-01-01

    The human physiological system is stressed to its limits during endurance sports competition events. We describe a whole body computational model for energy conversion during bicycle racing. About 23 per cent of the metabolic energy is used for muscle work, the rest is converted to heat. We calculated heat transfer by conduction and blood flow inside the body, and heat transfer from the skin by radiation, convection and sweat evaporation, resulting in temperature changes in 25 body compartments. We simulated a mountain time trial to Alpe d'Huez during the Tour de France. To approach the time realized by Lance Armstrong in 2004, very high oxygen uptake must be sustained by the simulated cyclist. Temperature was predicted to reach 39°C in the brain, and 39.7°C in leg muscle. In addition to the macroscopic simulation, we analysed the buffering of bursts of high adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis by creatine kinase during cyclical muscle activity at the biochemical pathway level. To investigate the low oxygen to carbohydrate ratio for the brain, which takes up lactate during exercise, we calculated the flux distribution in cerebral energy metabolism. Computational modelling of the human body, describing heat exchange and energy metabolism, makes simulation of endurance sports events feasible. PMID:21969677

  12. Metabolic Myopathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscles. Metabolic refers to chemical reactions that provide energy, nutrients and substances necessary for health and growth. ... occur when muscle cells don’t get enough energy. Without enough energy, the muscle lacks enough fuel ...

  13. Constraints on Energy Intake in Fish: The Link between Diet Composition, Energy Metabolism, and Energy In