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Sample records for aerobic methane oxidation

  1. Light-Dependent Aerobic Methane Oxidation Reduces Methane Emissions from Seasonally Stratified Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Kirsten; Milucka, Jana; Brand, Andreas; Littmann, Sten; Wehrli, Bernhard; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Schubert, Carsten J.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes are a natural source of methane to the atmosphere and contribute significantly to total emissions compared to the oceans. Controls on methane emissions from lake surfaces, particularly biotic processes within anoxic hypolimnia, are only partially understood. Here we investigated biological methane oxidation in the water column of the seasonally stratified Lake Rotsee. A zone of methane oxidation extending from the oxic/anoxic interface into anoxic waters was identified by chemical profiling of oxygen, methane and δ13C of methane. Incubation experiments with 13C-methane yielded highest oxidation rates within the oxycline, and comparable rates were measured in anoxic waters. Despite predominantly anoxic conditions within the zone of methane oxidation, known groups of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea were conspicuously absent. Instead, aerobic gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs were identified as the active methane oxidizers. In addition, continuous oxidation and maximum rates always occurred under light conditions. These findings, along with the detection of chlorophyll a, suggest that aerobic methane oxidation is tightly coupled to light-dependent photosynthetic oxygen production both at the oxycline and in the anoxic bottom layer. It is likely that this interaction between oxygenic phototrophs and aerobic methanotrophs represents a widespread mechanism by which methane is oxidized in lake water, thus diminishing its release into the atmosphere. PMID:26193458

  2. Toxic effects of butyl elastomers on aerobic methane oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, Helge; Steinle, Lea I.; Blees, Jan H.; Krause, Stefan; Bussmann, Ingeborg; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Treude, Tina

    2013-04-01

    Large quantities of the potent greenhouse gas methane are liberated into the water column of marine and lacustrine environments where it may be consumed by aerobic methane oxidising bacteria before reaching the atmosphere.The reliable quantification of aerobic methane oxidation (MOx) rates is consequently of paramount importance for estimating methane budgets and to understand the controls on water column methane cycling. A widely used set of methods for measuring MOx rates is based on the incubation of water samples during which the consumption of methane is monitored, for instance with radio-tracer assays. Typically, incubation vessels are sealed with butyl rubber stoppers because these elastomers are essentially impermeable for gases at the relevant time scales. We tested the effect of different stopper materials (unmodified- and halogenated butyl rubber) on MOx activity in environmental samples and in cultures of methane oxidising bacteria. MOx rates in samples sealed with unmodified butyl rubber were > 75% lower compared to parallel incubations with halogenated butyl rubber seals, suggesting inhibiting/toxic effects associated with the use of unmodified butyl elastomers. To further explore the cause of these effects, we analysed aqueous extracts of the different stoppers. Halogenated butyl rubber stoppers appeared to bleed off comparably little amounts of organics. In stark contrast, extracts of unmodified butyl rubber were contaminated with various organic compounds including potential bactericides such as benzyltoluenes, phenylalkanes and benzuothiazoles. We also found tetramethylthiourea, a scavenger of active oxygen species, which may inhibit the MOx pathway.

  3. Environmental control on aerobic methane oxidation in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinle, Lea; Maltby, Johanna; Engbersen, Nadine; Zopfi, Jakob; Bange, Hermann; Elvert, Marcus; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Kock, Annette; Lehmann, Moritz; Treude, Tina; Niemann, Helge

    2016-04-01

    Large quantities of methane are produced in anoxic sediments of continental margins and may be liberated to the overlying water column, where some of it is consumed by aerobic methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB). Aerobic methane oxidation (MOx) in the water column is consequently the final sink for methane before its release to the atmosphere, where it acts as a potent greenhouse gas. In the context of the ocean's contribution to atmospheric methane, coastal seas are particularly important accounting >75% of global methane emission from marine systems. Coastal oceans are highly dynamic, in particular with regard to the variability of methane and oxygen concentrations as well as temperature and salinity, all of which are potential key environmental factors controlling MOx. To determine important environmental controls on the activity of MOBs in coastal seas, we conducted a two-year time-series study with measurements of physicochemical water column parameters, MOx activity and the composition of the MOB community in a coastal inlet in the Baltic Sea (Boknis Eck Time Series Station, Eckernförde Bay - E-Bay). In addition, we investigated the influence of temperature and oxygen on MOx during controlled laboratory experiments. In E-Bay, hypoxia developed in bottom waters towards the end of the stratification period. Constant methane liberation from sediments resulted in bottom water methane accumulations and supersaturation (with respect to the atmospheric equilibrium) in surface waters. Here, we will discuss the factors impacting MOx the most, which were (i) perturbations of the water column (ii) temperature and (iii) oxygen concentration. (i) Perturbations of the water column caused by storm events or seasonal mixing led to a decrease in MOx, probably caused by replacement of stagnant water with a high standing stock of MOB by 'new' waters with a lower abundance of methanotrophs. b) An increase in temperature generally led to higher MOx rates. c) Even though methane was

  4. Environmental Controls on Aerobic Methane Oxidation in Coastal Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinle, L.; Maltby, J.; Engbersen, N.; Zopfi, J.; Bange, H. W.; Elvert, M.; Hinrichs, K. U.; Kock, A.; Lehmann, M. F.; Treude, T.; Niemann, H.

    2015-12-01

    Large quantities of the greenhouse gas CH4 are produced in anoxic sediments of continental margins and may be liberated to the overlying water column, and later into the atmosphere. Indeed, coastal seas account for more than 75% of global oceanic CH4 emissions. Yet, aerobic CH4 oxidizing bacteria (MOB) consume an important part of CH4 in the water column, thus mitigating CH4 release to the atmosphere. Coastal oceans are highly dynamic systems, in particular with regard to the variability of temperature, salinity and oxygen concentrations, all of which are potential key environmental factors controlling MOx. To determine the most important controlling factors, we conducted a two-year time-series study with measurements of CH4, MOx, the composition of the MOB community, and physicochemical water column parameters in a coastal inlet in the Baltic Sea (Eckernförde(E-) Bay, Boknis Eck Time Series Station). In addition, we investigated the influence of temperature and oxygen on MOx during controlled laboratory experiments. In E-Bay, seasonal stratification leads to hypoxia in bottom waters towards the end of the stratification period. Methane is produced year-round in the sediments, resulting in accumulation of methane in bottom waters, and supersaturation (with respect to the atmospheric equilibrium) in surface waters. Here, we will discuss the factors impacting MOx the most, which were a) perturbations of the water column caused by storm events, currents or seasonal mixing, b) temperature and c) oxygen concentration. a) Perturbations of the water column led to a sharp decrease in MOx within hours, probably caused by replacement of 'old' water with a high standing stock of MOB by 'new' waters with a lower abundance of MOB. b) An increase in temperature generally led to higher MOx rates. c) Even though CH4 was abundant at all depths, MOx was highest in bottom waters (1-5 nM/d), which usually contain the lowest O2 concentrations. Lab-based experiments with adjusted O2

  5. High resolution and comprehensive techniques to analyze aerobic methane oxidation in mesocosm experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, E. W.; Kessler, J. D.; Redmond, M. C.; Shiller, A. M.; Arrington, E. C.; Valentine, D. L.; Colombo, F.

    2015-12-01

    Many studies of microbially mediated aerobic methane oxidation in oceanic environments have examined the many different factors that control the rates of oxidation. However, there is debate on how quickly methane is oxidized once a microbial population is established and what factor(s) are limiting in these types of environments. These factors include the availability of CH4, O2, trace metals, nutrients, and the density of cell population. Limits to these factors can also control the temporal aspects of a methane oxidation event. In order to look at this process in its entirety and with higher temporal resolution, a mesocosm incubation system was developed with a Dissolved Gas Analyzer System (DGAS) coupled with a set of analytical tools to monitor aerobic methane oxidation in real time. With the addition of newer laser spectroscopy techniques (cavity ringdown spectroscopy), stable isotope fractionation caused by microbial processes can also be examined on a real time and automated basis. Cell counting, trace metal, nutrient, and DNA community analyses have also been carried out in conjunction with these mesocosm samples to provide a clear understanding of the biology in methane oxidation dynamics. This poster will detail the techniques involved to provide insights into the chemical and isotopic kinetics controlling aerobic methane oxidation. Proof of concept applications will be presented from seep sites in the Hudson Canyon and the Sleeping Dragon seep field, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC 118). This system was used to conduct mesocosm experiments to examine methane consumption, O2 consumption, nutrient consumption, and biomass production.

  6. Geographic and seasonal variation of dissolved methane and aerobic methane oxidation in Alaskan lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Cruz, K.; Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Anthony, K. Walter; Thalasso, F.

    2015-08-01

    Methanotrophic bacteria play an important role oxidizing a significant fraction of methane (CH4) produced in lakes. Aerobic CH4 oxidation depends mainly on lake CH4 and oxygen (O2) concentrations, in such a manner that higher MO rates are usually found at the oxic/anoxic interface, where both molecules are present. MO also depends on temperature, and via methanogenesis, on organic carbon input to lakes, including from thawing permafrost in thermokarst (thaw)-affected lakes. Given the large variability in these environmental factors, CH4 oxidation is expected to be subject to large seasonal and geographic variations, which have been scarcely reported in the literature. In the present study, we measured CH4 oxidation rates in 30 Alaskan lakes along a north-south latitudinal transect during winter and summer with a new field laser spectroscopy method. Additionally, we measured dissolved CH4 and O2 concentrations. We found that in the winter, aerobic CH4 oxidation was mainly controlled by the dissolved O2 concentration, while in the summer it was controlled primarily by the CH4 concentration, which was scarce compared to dissolved O2. The permafrost environment of the lakes was identified as another key factor. Thermokarst (thaw) lakes formed in yedoma-type permafrost had significantly higher CH4 oxidation rates compared to other thermokarst and non-thermokarst lakes formed in non-yedoma permafrost environments. As thermokarst lakes formed in yedoma-type permafrost have been identified to receive large quantities of terrestrial organic carbon from thaw and subsidence of the surrounding landscape into the lake, confirming the strong coupling between terrestrial and aquatic habitats and its influence on CH4 cycling.

  7. Aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidation in terrestrial mud volcanoes in the Northern Apennines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrede, C.; Brady, S.; Rockstroh, S.; Dreier, A.; Kokoschka, S.; Heinzelmann, S. M.; Heller, C.; Reitner, J.; Taviani, M.; Daniel, R.; Hoppert, M.

    2012-07-01

    Methane oxidizing prokaryotes are ubiquitous in oxic and anoxic habitats wherever C1-compounds are present. Thus, methane saturated mud volcano fluids should be a preferred habitat of methane consuming prokaryotes, using the readily available electron donors. In order to understand the relevance of methane as a carbon and energy source in mud volcano communities, we investigate the diversity of prokaryotic organisms involved in oxidation of methane in fluid samples from the Salse di Nirano mud volcano field situated in the Northern Apennines. Cell counts were at approximately 0.7 × 106 microbial cells/ml. A fraction of the microbial biomass was identified as ANME (anaerobic methanotroph) archaea by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. They are associated in densely colonized flakes, of some tens of μm in diameter, embedded in a hyaline matrix. Diversity analysis based on the 16S rDNA genes, retrieved from amplified and cloned environmental DNA, revealed a high proportion of archaea, involved in anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Aerobic methane-oxidizing proteobacteria could be highly enriched from mud volcano fluids, indicating the presence of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria, which may contribute to methane oxidation, whenever oxygen is readily available. The results imply that biofilms, dominated by ANME archaea, colonize parts of the mud volcano venting system.

  8. A new intra-aerobic metabolism in the nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidizing bacterium Candidatus 'Methylomirabilis oxyfera'.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming L; Ettwig, Katharina F; Jetten, Mike S M; Strous, Marc; Keltjens, Jan T; van Niftrik, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Biological methane oxidation proceeds either through aerobic or anaerobic pathways. The newly discovered bacterium Candidatus 'Methylomirabilis oxyfera' challenges this dichotomy. This bacterium performs anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification, but does so in a peculiar way. Instead of scavenging oxygen from the environment, like the aerobic methanotrophs, or driving methane oxidation by reverse methanogenesis, like the methanogenic archaea in sulfate-reducing systems, it produces its own supply of oxygen by metabolizing nitrite via nitric oxide into oxygen and dinitrogen gas. The intracellularly produced oxygen is then used for the oxidation of methane by the classical aerobic methane oxidation pathway involving methane mono-oxygenase. The present mini-review summarizes the current knowledge about this process and the micro-organism responsible for it.

  9. Evaluation of methyl fluoride and dimethyl ether as inhibitors of aerobic methane oxidation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Culbertson, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    Methyl fluoride (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) were effective inhibitors of aerobic methanotrophy in a variety of soils. MF and DME blocked consumption of CH4 as well as the oxidation of 14CH4 to 14CO2, but neither MF nor DME affected the oxidation of [14C]methanol or [14C]formate to 14CO2. Cooxidation of ethane and propane by methane-oxidizing soils was also inhibited by MF. Nitrification (ammonia oxidation) in soils was inhibited by both MF and DME. Production of N2O via nitrification was inhibited by MF; however, MF did not affect N2O production associated with denitrification. Methanogenesis was partially inhibited by MF but not by DME. Methane oxidation was ~100-fold more sensitive to MF than was methanogenesis, indicating that an optimum concentration could be employed to selectively block methanotrophy. MF inhibited methane oxidation by cell suspensions of Methylococcus capsulatus; however, DME was a much less effective inhibitor.

  10. Fractionation of the methane isotopologues 13CH4, 12CH3D, and 13CH3D during aerobic oxidation of methane by Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, David T.; Welander, Paula V.; Ono, Shuhei

    2016-11-01

    Aerobic oxidation of methane plays a major role in reducing the amount of methane emitted to the atmosphere from freshwater and marine settings. We cultured an aerobic methanotroph, Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) at 30 and 37 °C, and determined the relative abundance of 12CH4, 13CH4, 12CH3D, and 13CH3D (a doubly-substituted, or ;clumped; isotopologue of methane) to characterize the clumped isotopologue effect associated with aerobic methane oxidation. In batch culture, the residual methane became enriched in 13C and D relative to starting methane, with D/H fractionation a factor of 9.14 (Dε/13ε) larger than that of 13C/12C. As oxidation progressed, the Δ13CH3D value (a measure of the excess in abundance of 13CH3D relative to a random distribution of isotopes among isotopologues) of residual methane decreased. The isotopologue fractionation factor for 13CH3D/12CH4 was found to closely approximate the product of the measured fractionation factors for 13CH4/12CH4 and 12CH3D/12CH4 (i.e., 13C/12C and D/H). The results give insight into enzymatic reversibility in the aerobic methane oxidation pathway. Based on the experimental data, a mathematical model was developed to predict isotopologue signatures expected for methane in the environment that has been partially-oxidized by aerobic methanotrophy. Measurement of methane clumped isotopologue abundances can be used to distinguish between aerobic methane oxidation and alternative methane-cycling processes.

  11. Investigating the chemical and isotopic kinetics of aerobic methane oxidation in the Northern US Atlantic Margin, Hudson Canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, E. W.; Kessler, J. D.; Shiller, A. M.; Redmond, M. C.; Arrington, E. C.; Valentine, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Recent discoveries of methane seepage along the US Atlantic margin have led to speculation on the fate of the released methane. Here we examine the kinetics of aerobic methane oxidation to gain a fundamental understanding of this methane sink. In order to look at this process in its entirety, a unique mesocosm incubation system was developed with a Dissolved Gas Analyzer System (DGAS) to monitor in real time the chemical and isotopic changes involved with aerobic methane oxidation. This system measures changes in methane, carbon dioxide, and oxygen concentrations as well as the stable carbon isotopes of methane and carbon dioxide with time. In addition samples are strategically removed to characterize trace metals, nutrients, cell counts, and microbial community genetics. This presentation will detail the results obtained from samples collected inside the Hudson Canyon at the edge of the methane clathrate stability zone and outside the Hudson Canyon, not influenced by the methane seepage. These results show that in both environments along the Atlantic margin, methane was consumed aggressively but the timing of consumption varied based on location. In addition, these results are leading to insights into the chemical requirements needed for aerobic methane oxidation and the resulting isotopic fractionation.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Methylocystis sp. strain SC2, an aerobic methanotroph with high-affinity methane oxidation potential.

    PubMed

    Dam, Bomba; Dam, Somasri; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Liesack, Werner

    2012-11-01

    Methylocystis sp. strain SC2 is an aerobic type II methanotroph isolated from a highly polluted aquifer in Germany. A specific trait of the SC2 strain is the expression of two isozymes of particulate methane monooxygenase with different methane oxidation kinetics. Here we report the complete genome sequence of this methanotroph that contains not only a circular chromosome but also two large plasmids.

  13. Effect of selected monoterpenes on methane oxidation, denitrification, and aerobic metabolism by bacteria in pure culture.

    PubMed

    Amaral, J A; Ekins, A; Richards, S R; Knowles, R

    1998-02-01

    Selected monoterpenes inhibited methane oxidation by methanotrophs (Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, Methylobacter luteus), denitrification by environmental isolates, and aerobic metabolism by several heterotrophic pure cultures. Inhibition occurred to various extents and was transient. Complete inhibition of methane oxidation by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b with 1.1 mM (-)-alpha-pinene lasted for more than 2 days with a culture of optical density of 0.05 before activity resumed. Inhibition was greater under conditions under which particulate methane monooxygenase was expressed. No apparent consumption or conversion of monoterpenes by methanotrophs was detected by gas chromatography, and the reason that transient inhibition occurs is not clear. Aerobic metabolism by several heterotrophs was much less sensitive than methanotrophy was; Escherichia coli (optical density, 0.01), for example, was not affected by up to 7.3 mM (-)-alpha-pinene. The degree of inhibition was monoterpene and species dependent. Denitrification by isolates from a polluted sediment was not inhibited by 3.7 mM (-)-alpha-pinene, gamma-terpinene, or beta-myrcene, whereas 50 to 100% inhibition was observed for isolates from a temperate swamp soil. The inhibitory effect of monoterpenes on methane oxidation was greatest with unsaturated, cyclic hydrocarbon forms [e.g., (-)-alpha-pinene, (S)-(-)-limonene, (R)-(+)-limonene, and gamma-terpinene]. Lower levels of inhibition occurred with oxide and alcohol derivatives [(R)-(+)-limonene oxide, alpha-pinene oxide, linalool, alpha-terpineol] and a noncyclic hydrocarbon (beta-myrcene). Isomers of pinene inhibited activity to different extents. Given their natural sources, monoterpenes may be significant factors affecting bacterial activities in nature.

  14. The effect of widespread early aerobic marine ecosystems on methane cycling and the Great Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daines, Stuart J.; Lenton, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    The balance of evidence suggests that oxygenic photosynthesis had evolved by 3.0-2.7 Ga, several hundred million years prior to the Great Oxidation ≈2.4 Ga. Previous work has shown that if oxygenic photosynthesis spread globally prior to the Great Oxidation, this could have supported widespread aerobic ecosystems in the surface ocean, without oxidising the atmosphere. Here we use a suite of models to explore the implications for carbon cycling and the Great Oxidation. We find that recycling of oxygen and carbon within early aerobic marine ecosystems would have restricted the balanced fluxes of methane and oxygen escaping from the ocean, lowering the atmospheric concentration of methane in the Great Oxidation transition and its aftermath. This in turn would have minimised any bi-stability of atmospheric oxygen, by weakening a stabilising feedback on oxygen from hydrogen escape to space. The result would have been a more reversible and probably episodic rise of oxygen at the Great Oxidation transition, consistent with existing geochemical evidence. The resulting drop in methane levels to ≈10 ppm is consistent with climate cooling at the time but adds to the puzzle of what kept the rest of the Proterozoic warm. A key test of the scenario of abundant methanotrophy in oxygen oases before the Great Oxidation is its predicted effects on the organic carbon isotope (δ13Corg) record. Our open ocean general circulation model predicts δC13org ≈ - 30 to -45‰ consistent with most data from 2.65 to 2.45 Ga. However, values of δC13org ≈ - 50 ‰ require an extreme scenario such as concentrated methanotroph production where shelf-slope upwelling of methane-rich water met oxic shelf water.

  15. Evaluation of Methyl Fluoride and Dimethyl Ether as Inhibitors of Aerobic Methane Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Culbertson, Charles W.

    1992-01-01

    Methyl fluoride (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) were effective inhibitors of aerobic methanotrophy in a variety of soils. MF and DME blocked consumption of CH4 as well as the oxidation of 14CH4 to 14CO2, but neither MF nor DME affected the oxidation of [14C]methanol or [14C]formate to 14CO2. Cooxidation of ethane and propane by methane-oxidizing soils was also inhibited by MF. Nitrification (ammonia oxidation) in soils was inhibited by both MF and DME. Production of N2O via nitrification was inhibited by MF; however, MF did not affect N2O production associated with denitrification. Methanogenesis was partially inhibited by MF but not by DME. Methane oxidation was ∼100-fold more sensitive to MF than was methanogenesis, indicating that an optimum concentration could be employed to selectively block methanotrophy. MF inhibited methane oxidation by cell suspensions of Methylococcus capsulatus; however, DME was a much less effective inhibitor. PMID:16348771

  16. Methane Emission From the Congo Deep Sea Fan and Subsequent Aerobic Oxidation in the Quaternary Tropical Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, L.; Cooke, M. P.; Talbot, H. M.; Wagner, T.

    2008-12-01

    The Congo Fan is a well-documented region of important methane (CH4) storage and gas seepage: gas hydrates abound at and just below the sediment surface as do large deeply-buried reservoirs of thermogenic methane linked with hydrocarbon source rocks. In the Congo Fan, both sources of methane are intimately connected through a complex network of faults, structuring this massive sediment wedge in a unique way. Methane release from both reservoirs has the potential to drive or respond to changes in local and global climate, thus causing changes in ocean chemical properties and biotic responses. Understanding these poorly-constrained mechanisms of methane emission and reconstructing the history of past emissions in the ocean is the main focus of our study. The ultimate fate of CH4 is, typically, its oxidation to CO2; this process can occur aerobically and anaerobically. Compared to anaerobic processes, aerobic methane oxidation, and its underlying mechanisms and possible feedbacks for the ocean-climate system, has received little attention. Here we present molecular evidence from Congo Fan sediments for aerobic methane oxidation and highlight how the process may play a previously unrecognised role in carbon cycling and oxygen availability in the water column. Bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs) are lipid membrane constituents and occur with a wide range of structural and functional variability in many bacteria. Amino-BHPs are produced in large abundances by methane-oxidising bacteria and the 35-aminobacteriohopane-30,31,32,33,34-pentol (aminopentol) is a highly specific biomarker for aerobic methane oxidation. The Congo Fan record (ODP Leg 175, Site 1075; 2996 m depth) spans the last 1 Myr and reveals remarkable organic biomarker preservation, with a suite of 13 different BHPs identified in most sediment horizons, including aminopentol. Aminopentol abundance varies widely throughout the section and appears to do so cyclically, with markedly greater concentrations between ca

  17. Aerobic methane oxidation and methanotroph community composition during seasonal stratification in Mono Lake, California (USA).

    PubMed

    Carini, Stephen; Bano, Nasreen; LeCleir, Gary; Joye, Samantha B

    2005-08-01

    Patterns of aerobic methane (CH4) oxidation and associated methanotroph community composition were investigated during the development of seasonal stratification in Mono Lake, California (USA). CH4 oxidation rates were measured using a tritiated CH4 radiotracer technique. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequence analysis were used to characterize methanotroph community composition. A temporally shifting zone of elevated CH4 oxidation (59-123 nM day(-1)) was consistently associated with a suboxycline, microaerophilic zone that migrated upwards in the water column as stratification progressed. FISH analysis revealed stable numbers of type I (4.1-9.3 x 10(5) cells ml(-1)) and type II (1.4-3.4 x 10(5) cells ml(-1)) methanotrophs over depth and over time. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequence analysis indicated slight shifts in methanotroph community composition despite stable absolute cell numbers. Variable CH4 oxidation rates in the presence of a relatively stable methanotroph population suggested that zones of high CH4 oxidation resulted from an increase in activity of a subset of the existing methanotroph population. These results challenge existing paradigms suggesting that zones of elevated CH4 oxidation activity result from the accumulation of methanotrophic biomass and illustrate that type II methanotrophs may be an important component of the methanotroph population in saline and/or alkaline pelagic environments.

  18. Aerobic cometabolic degradation of trichloroethene by methane and ammonia oxidizing microorganisms naturally associated with Carex comosa roots.

    PubMed

    Powell, C L; Nogaro, G; Agrawal, A

    2011-06-01

    The degradation potential of trichloroethene by the aerobic methane- and ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms naturally associated with wetland plant (Carex comosa) roots was examined in this study. In bench-scale microcosm experiments with washed (soil free) Carex comosa roots, the activity of root-associated methane- and ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms, which were naturally present on the root surface and/or embedded within the roots, was investigated. Significant methane and ammonia oxidation were observed reproducibly in batch reactors with washed roots incubated in growth media, where methane oxidation developed faster (2 weeks) compared to ammonia oxidation (4 weeks) in live microcosms. After enrichment, the methane oxidizers demonstrated their ability to degrade 150 μg l(-1) TCE effectively at 1.9 mg l(-1) of aqueous CH(4). In contrast, ammonia oxidizers showed a rapid and complete inhibition of ammonia oxidation with 150 μg l(-1) TCE at 20 mg l(-1) of NH(4)(+)-N, which may be attributed to greater sensitivity of ammonia oxidizers to TCE or its degradation product. No such inhibitory effect of TCE degradation was detected on methane oxidation at the above experimental conditions. The results presented here suggest that microorganisms associated with wetland plant roots can assist in the natural attenuation of TCE in contaminated aquatic environments.

  19. Microbiology and potential applications of aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (AME-D) process: A review.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing; Wang, Qian; Yuan, Mengdong; Tan, Giin-Yu Amy; Sun, Faqian; Wang, Cheng; Wu, Weixiang; Lee, Po-Heng

    2016-03-01

    Aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (AME-D) is an important link between the global methane and nitrogen cycles. This mini-review updates discoveries regarding aerobic methanotrophs and denitrifiers, as a prelude to spotlight the microbial mechanism and the potential applications of AME-D. Until recently, AME-D was thought to be accomplished by a microbial consortium where denitrifying bacteria utilize carbon intermediates, which are excreted by aerobic methanotrophs, as energy and carbon sources. Potential carbon intermediates include methanol, citrate and acetate. This mini-review presents microbial thermodynamic estimations and postulates that methanol is the ideal electron donor for denitrification, and may serve as a trophic link between methanotrophic bacteria and denitrifiers. More excitingly, new discoveries have revealed that AME-D is not only confined to the conventional synergism between methanotrophic bacteria and denitrifiers. Specifically, an obligate aerobic methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomonas denitrificans FJG1, has been demonstrated to couple partial denitrification with methane oxidation, under hypoxia conditions, releasing nitrous oxide as a terminal product. This finding not only substantially advances the understanding of AME-D mechanism, but also implies an important but unknown role of aerobic methanotrophs in global climate change through their influence on both the methane and nitrogen cycles in ecosystems. Hence, further investigation on AME-D microbiology and mechanism is essential to better understand global climate issues and to develop niche biotechnological solutions. This mini-review also presents traditional microbial techniques, such as pure cultivation and stable isotope probing, and powerful microbial techniques, such as (meta-) genomics and (meta-) transcriptomics, for deciphering linked methane oxidation and denitrification. Although AME-D has immense potential for nitrogen removal from wastewater, drinking

  20. Dissimilatory perchlorate reduction linked to aerobic methane oxidation via chlorite dismutase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Baesman, S. M.; Miller, L. G.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of methane (CH4) in the atmosphere of Mars is controversial yet the evidence has aroused scientific interest, as CH4 could be a harbinger of extant or extinct microbial life. There are various oxidized compounds present on the surface of Mars that could serve as electron acceptors for the anaerobic oxidation of CH4, including perchlorate (ClO4-). We examined the role of perchlorate, chlorate (ClO3-) and chlorite (ClO2-) as oxidants linked to CH4 oxidation. Dissimilatory perchlorate reduction begins with reduction of ClO4- to ClO2- and ends with dismutation of chlorite to yield chloride (Cl-) and molecular oxygen (O2). We explored the potential for aerobic CH4 oxidizing bacteria to couple with oxygen derived from chlorite dismutation during dissimilatory perchlorate reduction. Methane (0.2 kPa) was completely removed within several days from the N2-flushed headspace above cell suspensions of methanotrophs (Methylobacter albus strain BG8) and perchlorate reducing bacteria (Dechloromonas agitata strain CKB) in the presence of 5 mM ClO2-. Similar rates of CH4 consumption were observed for these mixed cultures whether they were co-mingled or segregated under a common headspace, indicating that direct contact of cells was not required for methane consumption to occur. We also observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing dried soil (enriched in methanotrophs by CH4 additions over several weeks) and D. agitata CKB and in the presence of 10 mM ClO2-. This soil (seasonally exposed sediment) collected from the shoreline of a freshwater lake (Searsville Lake, CA) demonstrated endogenous CH4 uptake as well as perchlorate, chlorate and chlorite reduction/dismutation. However, these experiments required physical separation of soil from the aqueous bacterial culture to allow for the partitioning of O2 liberated from chlorite dismutation into the shared headspace. Although dissimilatory reduction of ClO4- and ClO3- could be inferred from the

  1. Effect of process design and operating parameters on aerobic methane oxidation in municipal WWTPs.

    PubMed

    Daelman, Matthijs R J; Van Eynde, Tamara; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Volcke, Eveline I P

    2014-12-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas and its emission from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) should be prevented. One way to do this is to promote the biological conversion of dissolved methane over stripping in aeration tanks. In this study, the well-established Activated Sludge Model n°1 (ASM1) and Benchmark Simulation Model n°1 (BSM1) were extended to study the influence of process design and operating parameters on biological methane oxidation. The aeration function used in BSM 1 was upgraded to more accurately describe gas-liquid transfer of oxygen and methane in aeration tanks equipped with subsurface aeration. Dissolved methane could be effectively removed in an aeration tank at an aeration rate that is in agreement with optimal effluent quality. Subsurface bubble aeration proved to be better than surface aeration, while a CSTR configuration was superior to plug flow conditions in avoiding methane emissions. The conversion of methane in the activated sludge tank benefits from higher methane concentrations in the WWTP's influent. Finally, if an activated sludge tank is aerated with methane containing off-gas, a limited amount of methane is absorbed and converted in the mixed liquor. This knowledge helps to stimulate the methane oxidizing capacity of activated sludge in order to abate methane emissions from wastewater treatment to the atmosphere.

  2. Molecular characterization of a microbial consortium involved in methane oxidation coupled to denitrification under micro-aerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingjing; Sun, Faqian; Wang, Liang; Ju, Xi; Wu, Weixiang; Chen, Yingxu

    2014-01-01

    Methane can be used as an alternative carbon source in biological denitrification because it is nontoxic, widely available and relatively inexpensive. A microbial consortium involved in methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (MOD) was enriched with nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors under micro-aerobic conditions. The 16S rRNA gene combined with pmoA phylogeny of methanotrophs and nirK phylogeny of denitrifiers were analysed to reveal the dominant microbial populations and functional microorganisms. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction results showed high numbers of methanotrophs and denitrifiers in the enriched consortium. The 16S rRNA gene clone library revealed that Methylococcaceae and Methylophilaceae were the dominant populations in the MOD ecosystem. Phylogenetic analyses of pmoA gene clone libraries indicated that all methanotrophs belonged to Methylococcaceae, a type I methanotroph employing the ribulose monophosphate pathway for methane oxidation. Methylotrophic denitrifiers of the Methylophilaceae that can utilize organic intermediates (i.e. formaldehyde, citrate and acetate) released from the methanotrophs played a vital role in aerobic denitrification. This study is the first report to confirm micro-aerobic denitrification and to make phylogenetic and functional assignments for some members of the microbial assemblages involved in MOD. PMID:24245852

  3. Field and experimental evidence for low-O2 affinity of aerobic methane oxidizers in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinle, Lea; Maltby, Johanna; Bange, Hermann; Kock, Annette; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Treude, Tina; Niemann, Helge

    2015-04-01

    The coastal ocean accounts for more than 75 % of the global oceanic methane emissions. An important process in mitigating methane emissions from the seawater to the atmosphere is aerobic methane oxidation (MOx). Coastal oceans are highly dynamic systems, in particular with regard to the variability of temperature, salinity, and oxygen concentrations, all of which are potential key environmental factors controlling MOx. We conducted a two-year time-series study of MOx measurements in the water column of a coastal inlet in the southwestern Baltic Sea (Eckernförde Bay, Boknis Eck Time Series Station, 54°31.823 N, 10°02.764 E, 28 m water depth; www.bokniseck.de). Physicochemical parameters at this station have been monitored since 1957. Seasonal stratification during summer/autumn leads to intermittent oxygen depletion (hypoxic to anoxic) in bottom waters in the later part of the stratification period. The duration of these low-oxygen events increased since the 1970s (Lennartz et al., 2014). Furthermore, the organic-rich seafloor continuously produces methane, which leads to gas ebullition followed by accumulation of dissolved methane in bottom waters (up to 470 nM) and supersaturation (with respect to the atmospheric equilibrium) in surface waters (up to 27 nM). MOx communities were most active in bottom waters (1-5 nM/day), which usually contain the lowest oxygen concentrations (sometimes below the in situ detection limit of ~1 µM). In order to better understand the effect of low oxygen concentrations, and thus of hypoxic and suboxic events, on MOx in coastal systems, we conducted lab-based experiments, during which we adjusted oxygen concentrations to values between 0.2 - 220 µM in methane-rich (~100 nM) Eckernförde Bay waters. These samples were then incubated with trace amounts of tritium-labeled methane to assess first order rate constants of methane oxidation. Highest MOx rates were detected at oxygen concentrations of ~0.5 µM (considerably higher than at

  4. Methane oxidation in a crude oil contaminated aquifer: Delineation of aerobic reactions at the plume fringes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amos, R.T.; Bekins, B.A.; Delin, G.N.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Blowes, D.W.; Kirshtein, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    High resolution direct-push profiling over short vertical distances was used to investigate CH4 attenuation in a petroleum contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota. The contaminant plume was delineated using dissolved gases, redox sensitive components, major ions, carbon isotope ratios in CH4 and CO2, and the presence of methanotrophic bacteria. Sharp redox gradients were observed near the water table. Shifts in ??13CCH4 from an average of - 57.6??? (?? 1.7???) in the methanogenic zone to - 39.6??? (?? 8.7???) at 105 m downgradient, strongly suggest CH4 attenuation through microbially mediated degradation. In the downgradient zone the aerobic/anaerobic transition is up to 0.5 m below the water table suggesting that transport of O2 across the water table is leading to aerobic degradation of CH4 at this interface. Dissolved N2 concentrations that exceeded those expected for water in equilibrium with the atmosphere indicated bubble entrapment followed by preferential stripping of O2 through aerobic degradation of CH4 or other hydrocarbons. Multivariate and cluster analysis were used to distinguish between areas of significant bubble entrapment and areas where other processes such as the infiltration of O 2 rich recharge water were important O2 transport mechanisms. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Variability in aerobic methane oxidation over the past 1.2 Myrs recorded in microbial biomarker signatures from Congo fan sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, Helen M.; Handley, Luke; Spencer-Jones, Charlotte L.; Dinga, Bienvenu Jean; Schefuß, Enno; Mann, Paul J.; Poulsen, John R.; Spencer, Robert G. M.; Wabakanghanzi, Jose N.; Wagner, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Methane (CH4) is a strong greenhouse gas known to have perturbed global climate in the past, especially when released in large quantities over short time periods from continental or marine sources. It is therefore crucial to understand and, if possible, quantify the individual and combined response of these variable methane sources to natural climate variability. However, past changes in the stability of greenhouse gas reservoirs remain uncertain and poorly constrained by geological evidence. Here, we present a record from the Congo fan of a highly specific bacteriohopanepolyol (BHP) biomarker for aerobic methane oxidation (AMO), 35-aminobacteriohopane-30,31,32,33,34-pentol (aminopentol), that identifies discrete periods of increased AMO as far back as 1.2 Ma. Fluctuations in the concentration of aminopentol, and other 35-aminoBHPs, follow a pattern that correlates with late Quaternary glacial-interglacial climate cycles, with highest concentrations during warm periods. We discuss possible sources of aminopentol, and the methane consumed by the precursor methanotrophs, within the context of the Congo River setting, including supply of methane oxidation markers from terrestrial watersheds and/or marine sources (gas hydrate and/or deep subsurface gas reservoir). Compound-specific carbon isotope values of -30‰ to -40‰ for BHPs in ODP 1075 and strong similarities between the BHP signature of the core and surface sediments from the Congo estuary and floodplain wetlands from the interior of the Congo River Basin, support a methanotrophic and likely terrigenous origin of the 35-aminoBHPs found in the fan sediments. This new evidence supports a causal connection between marine sediment BHP records of tropical deep sea fans and wetland settings in the feeding river catchments, and thus tropical continental hydrology. Further research is needed to better constrain the different sources and pathways of methane emission. However, this study identifies the large potential

  6. Constraints in the colonization of natural and engineered subterranean igneous rock aquifers by aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria inferred by culture analysis.

    PubMed

    Chi Fru, E

    2008-08-01

    The aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) are suggested to be important for the removal of oxygen from subterranean aquifers that become oxygenated by natural and engineering processes. This is primarily because MOB are ubiquitous in the environment and in addition reduce oxygen efficiently. The biogeochemical factors that will control the success of the aerobic MOB in these kinds of underground aquifers remain unknown. In this study, viable and cultivable MOB occurring at natural and engineered deep granitic aquifers targeted for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in the Fennoscandian Shield (approximately 3-1000 m) were enumerated. The numbers were correlated with in situ salinity, methane concentrations, conductivity, pH, and depth. A mixed population habiting freshwater aquifers (approximately 3-20 m), a potential source for the inoculation of MOB into the deeper aquifers was tested for tolerance to NaCl, temperature, pH, and an ability to produce cysts and exospores. Extrapolations show that due to changing in situ parameters (salinity, conductivity, and pH), the numbers of MOB in the aquifers dropped quickly with depth. A positive correlation between the most probable numbers of MOB and methane concentrations was observed. Furthermore, the tolerance-based tests of cultured strains indicated that the MOB in the shallow aquifers thrived best in mesophilic and neutrophilic conditions as opposed to the hyperthermophilic and alkaliphilic conditions expected to develop in an engineered subterranean SNF repository. Overall, the survival of the MOB both quantitatively and physiologically in the granitic aquifers was under the strong influence of biogeochemical factors that are strongly depth-dependent.

  7. The regulation of methane oxidation in soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancinelli, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    The atmospheric concentration of methane, a greenhouse gas, has more than doubled during the past 200 years. Consequently, identifying the factors influencing the flux of methane into the atmosphere is becoming increasingly important. Methanotrophs, microaerophilic organisms widespread in aerobic soils and sediments, oxidize methane to derive energy and carbon for biomass. In so doing, they play an important role in mitigating the flux of methane into the atmosphere. Several physico-chemical factors influence rates of methane oxidation in soil, including soil diffusivity; water potential; and levels of oxygen, methane, ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, and copper. Most of these factors exert their influence through interactions with methane monooxygenase (MMO), the enzyme that catalyzes the reaction converting methane to methanol, the first step in methane oxidation. Although biological factors such as competition and predation undoubtedly play a role in regulating the methanotroph population in soils, and thereby limit the amount of methane consumed by methanotrophs, the significance of these factors is unknown. Obtaining a better understanding of the ecology of methanotrophs will help elucidate the mechanisms that regulate soil methane oxidation.

  8. Carbon isotope fractionation during microbial methane oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, James F.; Fritz, Peter

    1981-09-01

    Methane, a common trace constituent of groundwaters, occasionally makes up more than 20% of the total carbon in groundwaters1,2. In aerobic environments CH4-rich waters can enable microbial food chain supporting a mixed culture of bacteria with methane oxidation as the primary energy source to develop3. Such processes may influence the isotopic composition of the residual methane and because 13C/12C analyses have been used to characterize the genesis of methanes found in different environments, an understanding of the magnitude of such effects is necessary. In addition, carbon dioxide produced by the methane-utilizing bacteria can be added to the inorganic carbon pool of affected groundwaters. We found carbon dioxide experimentally produced by methane-utilizing bacteria to be enriched in 12C by 5.0-29.6‰, relative to the residual methane. Where methane-bearing groundwaters discharged into aerobic environments microbial methane oxidation occurred, with the residual methane becoming progressively enriched in 13C. Various models have been proposed to explain the 13C/12C and 14C content of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of groundwaters in terms of additions or losses during flow in the subsurface4,5. The knowledge of both stable carbon isotope ratios in various pools and the magnitude of carbon isotope fractionation during various processes allows geochemists to use the 13C/12C ratio of the DIC along with water chemistry to estimate corrected 14C groundwater ages4,5. We show here that a knowledge of the carbon isotope fractionation between CH4 and CO2 during microbial methane-utilization could modify such models for application to groundwaters affected by microbial methane oxidation.

  9. Enzymatic Oxidation of Methane

    SciTech Connect

    Sirajuddin, S; Rosenzweig, AC

    2015-04-14

    Methane monooxygenases (MMOs) are enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. As potential targets for new gas-to-liquid methane bioconversion processes, MMOs have attracted intense attention in recent years. There are two distinct types of MMO, a soluble, cytoplasmic MMO (sMMO) and a membrane-bound, particulate MMO (pMMO). Both oxidize methane at metal centers within a complex, multisubunit scaffold, but the structures, active sites, and chemical mechanisms are completely different. This Current Topic review article focuses on the overall architectures, active site structures, substrate reactivities, proteinprotein interactions, and chemical mechanisms of both MMOs, with an emphasis on fundamental aspects. In addition, recent advances, including new details of interactions between the sMMO components, characterization of sMMO intermediates, and progress toward understanding the pMMO metal centers are highlighted. The work summarized here provides a guide for those interested in exploiting MMOs for biotechnological applications.

  10. Non-linear dynamics of stable carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures based on a biological kinetic model of aerobic enzymatic methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Vavilin, Vasily A; Rytov, Sergey V; Shim, Natalia; Vogt, Carsten

    2016-06-01

    The non-linear dynamics of stable carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures during methane oxidation by the methanotrophic bacteria Methylosinus sporium strain 5 (NCIMB 11126) and Methylocaldum gracile strain 14 L (NCIMB 11912) under copper-rich (8.9 µM Cu(2+)), copper-limited (0.3 µM Cu(2+)) or copper-regular (1.1 µM Cu(2+)) conditions has been described mathematically. The model was calibrated by experimental data of methane quantities and carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures of methane measured previously in laboratory microcosms reported by Feisthauer et al. [ 1 ] M. gracile initially oxidizes methane by a particulate methane monooxygenase and assimilates formaldehyde via the ribulose monophosphate pathway, whereas M. sporium expresses a soluble methane monooxygenase under copper-limited conditions and uses the serine pathway for carbon assimilation. The model shows that during methane solubilization dominant carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation occurs. An increase of biomass due to growth of methanotrophs causes an increase of particulate or soluble monooxygenase that, in turn, decreases soluble methane concentration intensifying methane solubilization. The specific maximum rate of methane oxidation υm was proved to be equal to 4.0 and 1.3 mM mM(-1) h(-1) for M. sporium under copper-rich and copper-limited conditions, respectively, and 0.5 mM mM(-1) h(-1) for M. gracile. The model shows that methane oxidation cannot be described by traditional first-order kinetics. The kinetic isotope fractionation ceases when methane concentrations decrease close to the threshold value. Applicability of the non-linear model was confirmed by dynamics of carbon isotope signature for carbon dioxide that was depleted and later enriched in (13)C. Contrasting to the common Rayleigh linear graph, the dynamic curves allow identifying inappropriate isotope data due to inaccurate substrate concentration analyses. The non-linear model pretty adequately described experimental

  11. Methane oxidation coupled to oxygenic photosynthesis in anoxic waters.

    PubMed

    Milucka, Jana; Kirf, Mathias; Lu, Lu; Krupke, Andreas; Lam, Phyllis; Littmann, Sten; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Schubert, Carsten J

    2015-09-01

    Freshwater lakes represent large methane sources that, in contrast to the Ocean, significantly contribute to non-anthropogenic methane emissions to the atmosphere. Particularly mixed lakes are major methane emitters, while permanently and seasonally stratified lakes with anoxic bottom waters are often characterized by strongly reduced methane emissions. The causes for this reduced methane flux from anoxic lake waters are not fully understood. Here we identified the microorganisms and processes responsible for the near complete consumption of methane in the anoxic waters of a permanently stratified lake, Lago di Cadagno. Interestingly, known anaerobic methanotrophs could not be detected in these waters. Instead, we found abundant gamma-proteobacterial aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria active in the anoxic waters. In vitro incubations revealed that, among all the tested potential electron acceptors, only the addition of oxygen enhanced the rates of methane oxidation. An equally pronounced stimulation was also observed when the anoxic water samples were incubated in the light. Our combined results from molecular, biogeochemical and single-cell analyses indicate that methane removal at the anoxic chemocline of Lago di Cadagno is due to true aerobic oxidation of methane fuelled by in situ oxygen production by photosynthetic algae. A similar mechanism could be active in seasonally stratified lakes and marine basins such as the Black Sea, where light penetrates to the anoxic chemocline. Given the widespread occurrence of seasonally stratified anoxic lakes, aerobic methane oxidation coupled to oxygenic photosynthesis might have an important but so far neglected role in methane emissions from lakes.

  12. Methane oxidation coupled to oxygenic photosynthesis in anoxic waters

    PubMed Central

    Milucka, Jana; Kirf, Mathias; Lu, Lu; Krupke, Andreas; Lam, Phyllis; Littmann, Sten; Kuypers, Marcel MM; Schubert, Carsten J

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater lakes represent large methane sources that, in contrast to the Ocean, significantly contribute to non-anthropogenic methane emissions to the atmosphere. Particularly mixed lakes are major methane emitters, while permanently and seasonally stratified lakes with anoxic bottom waters are often characterized by strongly reduced methane emissions. The causes for this reduced methane flux from anoxic lake waters are not fully understood. Here we identified the microorganisms and processes responsible for the near complete consumption of methane in the anoxic waters of a permanently stratified lake, Lago di Cadagno. Interestingly, known anaerobic methanotrophs could not be detected in these waters. Instead, we found abundant gamma-proteobacterial aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria active in the anoxic waters. In vitro incubations revealed that, among all the tested potential electron acceptors, only the addition of oxygen enhanced the rates of methane oxidation. An equally pronounced stimulation was also observed when the anoxic water samples were incubated in the light. Our combined results from molecular, biogeochemical and single-cell analyses indicate that methane removal at the anoxic chemocline of Lago di Cadagno is due to true aerobic oxidation of methane fuelled by in situ oxygen production by photosynthetic algae. A similar mechanism could be active in seasonally stratified lakes and marine basins such as the Black Sea, where light penetrates to the anoxic chemocline. Given the widespread occurrence of seasonally stratified anoxic lakes, aerobic methane oxidation coupled to oxygenic photosynthesis might have an important but so far neglected role in methane emissions from lakes. PMID:25679533

  13. Regulation of Methane Oxidation in a Freshwater Wetland by Water Table Changes and Anoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roslev, Peter; King, Gary M.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of water table fluctuations and anoxia on methane emission and methane oxidation were studied in a freshwater marsh. Seasonal aerobic methane oxidation rates varied between 15% and 76% of the potential diffusive methane flux (diffusive flux in the absence of aerobic oxidation). On an annual basis, approximately 43% of the methane diffusing into the oxic zone was oxidized before reaching the atmosphere. The highest methane oxidation was observed when the water table was below the peat surface. This was confirmed in laboratory experiments where short-term decreases in water table levels increased methane oxidation but also net methane emission. Although methane emission was generally not observed during the winter, stems of soft rush (Juncus effusus) emitted methane when the marsh was ice covered. Indigenous methanotrophic bacteria from the wetiand studied were relatively anoxia tolerant. Surface peat incubated under anoxic conditions maintained 30% of the initial methane oxidation capacity after 32 days of anoxia. Methanotrophs from anoxic peat initiated aerobic methane oxidation relatively quickly after oxygen addition (1-7 hours). These results were supported by culture experiments with the methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. This organism maintained a greater capacity for aerobic methane oxidation when starved under anoxic compared to oxic conditions. Anoxic incubation of M. trichosporium OB3b in the presence of sulfide (2 mM) and a low redox potential (-110 mV) did not decrease the capacity for methane oxidation relative to anoxic cultures incubated without sulfide. The results suggest that aerobic methane oxidation was a major regulator of seasonal methane emission front the investigated wetland. The observed water table fluctuations affected net methane oxidation presumably due to associated changes in oxygen gradients. However, changes from oxic to anoxic conditions in situ had relatively little effect on survival of the methanotrophic

  14. Aerobic methane production from organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigano, I.

    2010-01-01

    Methane, together with H2O, CO2 and N2O, is an important greenhouse gas in th e Earth’s atmosphere playing a key role in the radiative budget. It has be en known for decades that the production of the reduced compound CH4 is possible almost exclusively in anoxic environments per opera of one of the most importan t class of microorganisms which form the Archaea reign. Methane can be produced also from incomplete combustion of organic material. The generation of CH4 in an oxygenated environment under near-ambient conditions is a new discovery made in 2006 by Keppler et. al where surprisingly they measured emissions of this green house gas from plants incubated in chambers with air containing 20% of oxygen. A lthough the estimates on a global scale are still object of an intensive debate, the results presented in this thesis clearly show the existence of methane prod uction under oxic conditions for non living plant material. Temperature and UV l ight are key factors that drive the generation of CH4 from plant matter in a wel l oxygenated environment.

  15. Potential methane production and methane oxidation rates in peatland ecosystems of the Appalachian Mountains, United States

    SciTech Connect

    Yavitt, J.B.; Lang, G.E.; Downey, D.M. )

    1988-09-01

    Potential rates of methane production and carbon dioxide production were measured on 11 dates in 1986 in peat from six plant communities typical of moss-dominated peatlands in the Appalachian Mountains. Annual methane production ranged from 2.7 to 17.5 mol/sq m, and annual carbon dioxide production ranged from 30.6 to 79.0 mol/sq m. The wide range in methane production values among the communities found within a single peatland indicates that obtaining one production value for a peatland may not be appropriate. Low temperature constrained the potential for methane production in winter, while the chemical quality of the peat substrate appears to control methane production in the summer. Methane oxidation was measured throughout the peat profile to a depth of 30 cm. Values for methane oxidation ranged from 0.08 to 18.7 microM/hr among the six plant communities. Aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria probably mediated most of the activity. On a daily basis during the summer, between 11 and 100% of the methane produced is susceptible to oxidation within the peat column. Pools of dissolved methane and dissolved carbon dioxide in pore waters were less than 0.2 and less than 1.0 mol/sq m, respectively, indicating that methane does not accumulate in the pore waters. Peatlands have been considered as an important source of biologically produced methane. Despite the high rates of methane production, the high rates of methane oxidation dampen the potential emission of methane to the atmosphere. 41 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Methane formation by oxidation of ascorbic acid using iron minerals and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Althoff, Frederik; Jugold, Alke; Keppler, Frank

    2010-06-01

    The possibility of methane formation in an oxidative environment has been intensely debated, especially since the discovery of methane generation by living plants. However, recent studies with animal tissue suggested that under specific conditions aerobic methane formation is also possible. Here, we investigated the generation of methane in an abiotic model system using bioavailable substances. We show formation of methane in a highly oxidative media, using ascorbic acid, ferrihydrite and hydrogen peroxide as reagents. Methane production was shown to be related to reagent ratio, reaction volume and pH. A 2:1 ratio of hydrogen peroxide to ascorbic acid, catalytic amounts of ferrihydrite and acidic conditions (pH 3) enhanced formation of methane. We further show that gaseous oxygen has a strong influence with higher levels found to inhibit methane formation. This study is a first step towards providing an insight for the reaction mechanism of methane formation that would be applicable to aerobic environments.

  17. Analysis of methane monooxygenase genes in mono lake suggests that increased methane oxidation activity may correlate with a change in methanotroph community structure.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ju-Ling; Joye, Samantha B; Scholten, Johannes C M; Schäfer, Hendrik; McDonald, Ian R; Murrell, J Colin

    2005-10-01

    Mono Lake is an alkaline hypersaline lake that supports high methane oxidation rates. Retrieved pmoA sequences showed a broad diversity of aerobic methane oxidizers including the type I methanotrophs Methylobacter (the dominant genus), Methylomicrobium, and Methylothermus, and the type II methanotroph Methylocystis. Stratification of Mono Lake resulted in variation of aerobic methane oxidation rates with depth. Methanotroph diversity as determined by analysis of pmoA using new denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis primers suggested that variations in methane oxidation activity may correlate with changes in methanotroph community composition.

  18. The Bacteriohopanepolyol Inventory of Novel Aerobic Methane Oxidising Bacteria Reveals New Biomarker Signatures of Aerobic Methanotrophy in Marine Systems.

    PubMed

    Rush, Darci; Osborne, Kate A; Birgel, Daniel; Kappler, Andreas; Hirayama, Hisako; Peckmann, Jörn; Poulton, Simon W; Nickel, Julia C; Mangelsdorf, Kai; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina; Sidgwick, Frances R; Talbot, Helen M

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic methane oxidation (AMO) is one of the primary biologic pathways regulating the amount of methane (CH4) released into the environment. AMO acts as a sink of CH4, converting it into carbon dioxide before it reaches the atmosphere. It is of interest for (paleo)climate and carbon cycling studies to identify lipid biomarkers that can be used to trace AMO events, especially at times when the role of methane in the carbon cycle was more pronounced than today. AMO bacteria are known to synthesise bacteriohopanepolyol (BHP) lipids. Preliminary evidence pointed towards 35-aminobacteriohopane-30,31,32,33,34-pentol (aminopentol) being a characteristic biomarker for Type I methanotrophs. Here, the BHP compositions were examined for species of the recently described novel Type I methanotroph bacterial genera Methylomarinum and Methylomarinovum, as well as for a novel species of a Type I Methylomicrobium. Aminopentol was the most abundant BHP only in Methylomarinovum caldicuralii, while Methylomicrobium did not produce aminopentol at all. In addition to the expected regular aminotriol and aminotetrol BHPs, novel structures tentatively identified as methylcarbamate lipids related to C-35 amino-BHPs (MC-BHPs) were found to be synthesised in significant amounts by some AMO cultures. Subsequently, sediments and authigenic carbonates from methane-influenced marine environments were analysed. Most samples also did not contain significant amounts of aminopentol, indicating that aminopentol is not a useful biomarker for marine aerobic methanotophic bacteria. However, the BHP composition of the marine samples do point toward the novel MC-BHPs components being potential new biomarkers for AMO.

  19. The Bacteriohopanepolyol Inventory of Novel Aerobic Methane Oxidising Bacteria Reveals New Biomarker Signatures of Aerobic Methanotrophy in Marine Systems

    PubMed Central

    Birgel, Daniel; Kappler, Andreas; Hirayama, Hisako; Peckmann, Jörn; Poulton, Simon W.; Nickel, Julia C.; Mangelsdorf, Kai; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina; Sidgwick, Frances R.; Talbot, Helen M.

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic methane oxidation (AMO) is one of the primary biologic pathways regulating the amount of methane (CH4) released into the environment. AMO acts as a sink of CH4, converting it into carbon dioxide before it reaches the atmosphere. It is of interest for (paleo)climate and carbon cycling studies to identify lipid biomarkers that can be used to trace AMO events, especially at times when the role of methane in the carbon cycle was more pronounced than today. AMO bacteria are known to synthesise bacteriohopanepolyol (BHP) lipids. Preliminary evidence pointed towards 35-aminobacteriohopane-30,31,32,33,34-pentol (aminopentol) being a characteristic biomarker for Type I methanotrophs. Here, the BHP compositions were examined for species of the recently described novel Type I methanotroph bacterial genera Methylomarinum and Methylomarinovum, as well as for a novel species of a Type I Methylomicrobium. Aminopentol was the most abundant BHP only in Methylomarinovum caldicuralii, while Methylomicrobium did not produce aminopentol at all. In addition to the expected regular aminotriol and aminotetrol BHPs, novel structures tentatively identified as methylcarbamate lipids related to C-35 amino-BHPs (MC-BHPs) were found to be synthesised in significant amounts by some AMO cultures. Subsequently, sediments and authigenic carbonates from methane-influenced marine environments were analysed. Most samples also did not contain significant amounts of aminopentol, indicating that aminopentol is not a useful biomarker for marine aerobic methanotophic bacteria. However, the BHP composition of the marine samples do point toward the novel MC-BHPs components being potential new biomarkers for AMO. PMID:27824887

  20. Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-27

    distribution is unlimited. Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report...2211 diamond nanocrystals, REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) ARO 8. PERFORMING...Room 254, Mail Code 8725 New York, NY 10027 -7922 ABSTRACT Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals Report Title We investigate

  1. Methane formation and methane oxidation by methanogenic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Zehnder, A J; Brock, T D

    1979-01-01

    Methanogenic bacteria were found to form and oxidize methane at the same time. As compared to the quantity of methane formed, the amount of methane simultaneously oxidized varied between 0.3 and 0.001%, depending on the strain used. All the nine tested strains of methane producers (Methanobacterium ruminantium, Methanobacterium strain M.o.H., M. formicicum, M. thermoautotrophicum, M. arbophilicum, Methanobacterium strain AZ, Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanospirillum hungatii, and the "acetate organism") reoxidized methane to carbon dioxide. In addition, they assimilated a small part of the methane supplied into cell material. Methanol and acetate also occurred as oxidation products in M. barkeri cultures. Acetate was also formed by the "acetate organism," a methane bacterium unable to use methanogenic substrates other than acetate. Methane was the precursor of the methyl group of the acetate synthesized in the course of methane oxidation. Methane formation and its oxidation were inhibited equally by 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid. Short-term labeling experiments with M. thermoautotrophicum and M. hungatii clearly suggest that the pathway of methane oxidation is not identical with a simple back reaction of the methane formation process. Images PMID:762019

  2. Assessing the Efficacy of the Aerobic Methanotrophic Biofilter in Methane Hydrate Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, David

    2012-09-30

    In October 2008 the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) initiated investigations of water column methane oxidation in methane hydrate environments, through a project funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) entitled: assessing the efficacy of the aerobic methanotrophic biofilter in methane hydrate environments. This Final Report describes the scientific advances and discoveries made under this award as well as the importance of these discoveries in the broader context of the research area. Benthic microbial mats inhabit the sea floor in areas where reduced chemicals such as sulfide reach the more oxidizing water that overlies the sediment. We set out to investigate the role that methanotrophs play in such mats at locations where methane reaches the sea floor along with sulfide. Mats were sampled from several seep environments and multiple sets were grown in-situ at a hydrocarbon seep in the Santa Barbara Basin. Mats grown in-situ were returned to the laboratory and used to perform stable isotope probing experiments in which they were treated with 13C-enriched methane. The microbial community was analyzed, demonstrating that three or more microbial groups became enriched in methane?s carbon: methanotrophs that presumably utilize methane directly, methylotrophs that presumably consume methanol excreted by the methanotrophs, and sulfide oxidizers that presumably consume carbon dioxide released by the methanotrophs and methylotrophs. Methanotrophs reached high relative abundance in mats grown on methane, but other bacterial processes include sulfide oxidation appeared to dominate mats, indicating that methanotrophy is not a dominant process in sustaining these benthic mats, but rather a secondary function modulated by methane availability. Methane that escapes the sediment in the deep ocean typically dissolved into the overlying water where it is available to methanotrophic bacteria. We set out to better understand the efficacy of this

  3. Methane oxidation in Saanich Inlet during summer stratification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, B. B.; Kilpatrick, K. A.; Wopat, A. E.; Minnich, E. C.; Lidstrom, M. E.

    1989-01-01

    Saanich Inlet, British Columbia, an fjord on the southeast coast of Vancouver Island, typically stratifies in summer, leading to the formation of an oxic-anoxic interface in the water column and accumulation of methane in the deep water. The results of methane concentration measurements in the water column of the inlet at various times throughout the summer months in 1983 are presented. Methane gradients and calculated diffusive fluxes across the oxic-anoxic interface increased as the summer progressed. Methane distribution and consumption in Saanich Inlet were studied in more detail during August 1986. At this time, a typical summer stratification with an oxic-anoxic interface around 140 m was present. At the interface, steep gradients in nutrient concentrations, bacterial abundance and methane concentration were observed. Methane oxidation was detected in the aerobic surface waters and in the anaerobic deep layer, but highest rates occurred in a narrow layer at the oxic-anoxic interface. Estimated methane oxidation rates were suffcient to consume 100 percent of the methane provided by diffusive flux from the anoxic layer. Methane oxidation is thus a mechanism whereby atmospheric flux from anoxic waters is minimized.

  4. Molecular and isotopic insights into methane oxidation in Lake Kivu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zigah, P. K.; Wehrli, B.; Schubert, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Lake Kivu is a meromictic lake in the East African Rift Valley, located between the Republic of Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo. The hypolimnion is permanently stratified and contain an unusually high amount of dissolved methane (CH4; ~ 60 km3) and carbon dioxide (CO2; ~300 km3) at standard temperature and pressure. While microbial-mediated methane oxidation is an important sink of methane in the lake, little is known about the distribution of microbes involved in the methane oxidation. To provide insights into methanotrophy in the lake, we analyzed depth profile of CH4, δ13C-CH4 and δ13C-DIC, δ13C-POC and the biomarkers of methanotrophic archaea and bacteria and their stable carbon isotopic composition from suspended particulate matter isolated from the lake water column. Our preliminary data show enhanced methane oxidation in oxic-anoxic transition zone in the water column. Depth distribution of diagnostic methanotrophic archaeal biomarkers such as archaeol and hydroxyarchaeol suggest archaea might be involved in anaerobic methane oxidation. Phospholipid fatty acids and diplopterol distribution and carbon isotopic signatures indicate bacteria-mediated anaerobic (and aerobic) methane oxidation in the lake.

  5. Microbial Methane Oxidation Rates in Guandu Wetland of northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zih-Huei; Wang, Pei-Ling; Lin, Li-Hung

    2016-04-01

    Wetland is one of the major sources of atmospheric methane. The exact magnitude of methane emission is essentially controlled by microbial processes. Besides of methanogenesis, methanotrophy oxidizes methane with the reduction of various electron acceptors under oxic or anoxic conditions. The interplay of these microbial activities determines the final methane flux under different circumstances. In a tidal wetland, the cyclic flooding and recession of tide render oxygen and sulfate the dominant electron acceptors for methane oxidation. However, the details have not been fully examined, especially for the linkage between potential methane oxidation rates and in situ condition. In this study, a sub-tropical wetland in northern Taiwan, Guandu, was chosen to examine the tidal effect on microbial methane regulation. Several sediment cores were retrieved during high tide and low tide period and their geochemical profiles were characterized to demonstrate in situ microbial activities. Incubation experiments were conducted to estimate potential aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidation rates in surface and core sediments. Sediment cores collected in high tide and low tide period showed different geochemical characteristics, owning to tidal inundation. Chloride and sulfate concentration were lower during low tide period. A spike of enhanced sulfate at middle depth intervals was sandwiched by two sulfate depleted zones above and underneath. Methane was accumulated significantly with two methane depletion zones nearly mirroring the sulfate spike zone identified. During the high tide period, sulfate decreased slightly with depth with methane production inhibited at shallow depths. However, a methane consumption zone still occurred near the surface. Potential aerobic methane oxidation rates were estimated between 0.7 to 1.1 μmole/g/d, showing no difference between the samples collected at high tide or low tide period. However, a lag phase was widely observed and the lag phase

  6. Light quality and quantity regulate aerobic methane emissions from plants.

    PubMed

    Martel, Ashley B; Qaderi, Mirwais M

    2017-03-01

    Studies have been mounting in support of the finding that plants release aerobic methane (CH4 ), and that these emissions are increased by both short-term and long-term environmental stress. It remains unknown whether or not they are affected by variation in light quantity and quality, whether emissions change over time, and whether they are influenced by physiological parameters. Light is the primary energy source of plants, and therefore an important regulator of plant growth and development. Both shade-intolerant sunflower and shade-tolerant chrysanthemum were investigated for the release of aerobic CH4 emissions, using either low or high light intensity, and varying light quality, including control, low or normal red:far-red ratio (R:FR), and low or high levels of blue, to discern the relationship between light and CH4 emissions. It was found that low levels of light act as an environmental stress, facilitating CH4 release from both species. R:FR and blue lights increased emissions under low light, but the results varied with species, providing evidence that both light quantity and quality regulate CH4 emissions. Emission rates of 6.79-41.13 ng g(-1) DW h(-1) and 18.53-180.25 ng g(-1) DW h(-1) were observed for sunflower and chrysanthemum, respectively. Moreover, emissions decreased with age as plants acclimated to environmental conditions. Since effects were similar in both species, there may be a common trend among a number of shade-tolerant and shade-intolerant species. Light quantity and quality are influenced by factors including cloud covering, so it is important to know how plants will be affected in the context of aerobic CH4 emissions.

  7. Dark aerobic methane emission associated to leaf factors of two Acacia and five Eucalyptus species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Makoto; Watanabe, Yoko; Kim, Yong Suk; Koike, Takayoshi

    2012-07-01

    We sought the biological factors determining variations in the methane emission rates from leaves of different plant species under aerobic conditions. Accordingly, we studied relations between the methane emission rate and leaf traits of two Acacia and five Eucalyptus species. We grew seedlings of each species in a glasshouse and measured the methane emission rate of the detached leaves under dark conditions at 30 °C. At the same time we measured the leaf mass per area (LMA), water content, and concentrations of carbon and nitrogen. There was no correlation between the leaf nitrogen concentration and the methane emission rate. This is consistent with previous findings that enzymatic processes do not influence methane emission. We found a significant negative correlation between LMA and the methane emission rate. Our results suggest that leaf structure is primarily responsible for differences in the rates of aerobic methane emission from leaves of different species.

  8. Metal Oxide Reduction Linked to Anaerobic Methane Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Oni, Oluwatobi E; Friedrich, Michael W

    2017-02-01

    Microbial methanotrophy is important in mitigating methane emissions to the atmosphere. Geochemical evidence suggests the occurrence of anaerobic methane oxidation with metal oxides in natural environments. A study has now identified, for the first time, novel freshwater archaea of the order Methanosarcinales that can oxidize methane with Fe(III) and Mn(IV) minerals as electron acceptors.

  9. Microbial production and oxidation of methane in deep subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotelnikova, Svetlana

    2002-10-01

    microbially to carbon dioxide. Microbial methane oxidation is a biogeochemical process that limits the release of methane, a greenhouse gas from anaerobic environments. Anaerobic methane oxidation plays an important role in marine sediments. Similar processes may take place in deep subsurface and thus fuel the deep microbial community. Organisms or consortia responsible for anaerobic methane oxidation have not yet been cultured, although diverse aerobic methanotrophs have been isolated from a variety of underground niches. The presence of aerobic methanotrophs in the anoxic subsurface remains to be explained. The presence of methane in the deep subsurface have been shown all over the world. The flux of gases between the deep subsurface and the atmosphere is driven by the concentration gradient from depth to the atmosphere. However, methane is consumed by methanotrophs on the way of its evolution in oxidized environments and is transformed to organic form, available for further microbial processing. When the impact of subsurface environments to global warming is estimated, it is necessary to take into account the activity of methane-producing Archaea and methane-oxidizing biofilters in groundwater. Microbial production and oxidation of methane is involved in the carbon cycle in the deep subsurface environments.

  10. Aerobic Methane Generation From Plants (AMP)? Yes, Mostly!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiticar, M. J.; Ednie, A. C.

    2007-12-01

    In 2006, Keppler et al. (K) published an intriguing and revolutionary idea that aerobic methane is produced in plants (AMP) and released to the atmosphere. Their initial scaling calculations estimated the amount of AMP fluxing from living plants to range from 62-236 Tg/y and 1-7 Tg/y for plant litter. Houweling et al. (2006) (H) refined this flux to ca. 85 Tg/y PIH and 125 Tg/y present day. More recently, Dueck et al. (2007) (D) challenged the claim of AMP from intact plants. Their experiments cited "...No evidence for substantial aerobic methane emission by terrestrial plants..." (max. 0.4 ng/g h-1). Due to the significance of AMP in understanding present and palaeo-atmospheric budgets (e.g., Whiticar and Schaefer, 2007), we conducted a wide range of experiments to confirm or refute the existence and magnitude of AMP. For explanation, experiments of K were time-series batch samples measured by gas chromatography on purged and ambient samples, whereas D used continuous-flow cuvettes and measured by optical PAS with time series single injections. Our longer-term experiments with corn, wheat, tomato, red cedar, chestnut, moss and lichen (3-97 h, 32 °C) used a plant chamber, flow-through system with a GYRO, an optical spectrometer that enables continuous 1 Hz CH4 measurements with a precision of ca. 1 ppbv. We conducted over 100 chamber experiments on sterilized and non-sterilized (Cs-137 radiation) samples of: 1) intact living plants (IP), 2) fresh leaves (FL) and 3) dried leaves (DL); under both 1) high and 2) low light conditions (HL, LL), and with 1) ambient CH4 (AM, ca. 1.92 ppmv) and 2) purged methane (PM, 10 and 96 ppbv) levels. Our results demonstrate that IP-AMs have CH4 flux rates of 0.74-3.48 ng/g h-1. In contrast, IP-PMs show intense CH4 uptake rates of -28.5 to -57.9 ng/g h-1 (substantially different than K's reported emissions of 12-370 ng/g h-1 values). Our FL-AM-LL have CH4 flux rates of 0.36-2.05 ng/g h-1, whereas FL-AM-HL have significant CH4

  11. [Copper in methane oxidation: a review].

    PubMed

    Su, Yao; Kong, Jiao-Yan; Zhang, Xuan; Xia, Fang-Fang; He, Ruo

    2014-04-01

    Methane bio-oxidation plays an important role in the global methane balance and warming mitigation, while copper has a crucial function in methane bio-oxidation. On one side, copper is known to be a key factor in regulating the expression of the genes encoding the two forms of methane monooxygenases (MMOs) and is the essential metal element of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). On the other side, the content and fractionation of copper in the environment have great effects on the distribution of methanotrophs and their metabolic capability of methane and non-methane organic compounds, as well as on the copper-specific uptake systems in methanotrophs. Thus, it is meaningful to know the role of copper in methane bio-oxidation for comprehensive understanding of this process and is valuable for guiding the application of methanotrophs in greenhouse gas removal and pollution remediation. In this paper, the roles of copper in methane oxidation were reviewed, including the effect of copper on methanotrophic community structure and activity, the expression and activity of MMOs as well as the copper uptake systems in methanotrophs. The future studies of copper and methane oxidation were also discussed.

  12. Methane oxidation linked to chlorite dismutation

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Laurence G.; Baesman, Shaun M.; Carlström, Charlotte I.; Coates, John D.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the potential for CH4 oxidation to be coupled with oxygen derived from the dissimilatory reduction of perchlorate, chlorate, or via chlorite (ClO−2) dismutation. Although dissimilatory reduction of ClO−4 and ClO−3 could be inferred from the accumulation of chloride ions either in spent media or in soil slurries prepared from exposed freshwater lake sediment, neither of these oxyanions evoked methane oxidation when added to either anaerobic mixed cultures or soil enriched in methanotrophs. In contrast, ClO−2 amendment elicited such activity. Methane (0.2 kPa) was completely removed within several days from the headspace of cell suspensions of Dechloromonas agitata CKB incubated with either Methylococcus capsulatus Bath or Methylomicrobium album BG8 in the presence of 5 mM ClO−2. We also observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing soil enriched in methanotrophs when co-incubated with D. agitata CKB and 10 mM ClO−2. However, to be effective these experiments required physical separation of soil from D. agitata CKB to allow for the partitioning of O2 liberated from chlorite dismutation into the shared headspace. Although a link between ClO−2 and CH4 consumption was established in soils and cultures, no upstream connection with either ClO−4 or ClO−3 was discerned. This result suggests that the release of O2 during enzymatic perchlorate reduction was negligible, and that the oxygen produced was unavailable to the aerobic methanotrophs. PMID:24987389

  13. Methane oxidation linked to chlorite dismutation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Laurence G.; Baesman, Shaun M.; Carlström, Charlotte I.; Coates, John D.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the potential for CH4 oxidation to be coupled with oxygen derived from the dissimilatory reduction of perchlorate, chlorate, or via chlorite (ClO−2) dismutation. Although dissimilatory reduction of ClO−4 and ClO−3 could be inferred from the accumulation of chloride ions either in spent media or in soil slurries prepared from exposed freshwater lake sediment, neither of these oxyanions evoked methane oxidation when added to either anaerobic mixed cultures or soil enriched in methanotrophs. In contrast, ClO−2 amendment elicited such activity. Methane (0.2 kPa) was completely removed within several days from the headspace of cell suspensions of Dechloromonas agitata CKB incubated with either Methylococcus capsulatus Bath or Methylomicrobium album BG8 in the presence of 5 mM ClO−2. We also observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing soil enriched in methanotrophs when co-incubated with D. agitata CKB and 10 mM ClO−2. However, to be effective these experiments required physical separation of soil from D. agitata CKB to allow for the partitioning of O2 liberated from chlorite dismutation into the shared headspace. Although a link between ClO−2 and CH4 consumption was established in soils and cultures, no upstream connection with either ClO−4 or ClO−3 was discerned. This result suggests that the release of O2 during enzymatic perchlorate reduction was negligible, and that the oxygen produced was unavailable to the aerobic methanotrophs.

  14. Nitrous oxide production and methane oxidation by different ammonia-oxidizing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Q.Q.; Bakken, L.R.

    1999-06-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) are thought to contribute significantly to N{sub 2}O production and methane oxidation in soils. Most knowledge derives from experiments with Nitrosomonas europaea, which appears to be of minor importance in most soils compared to Nitrosospira spp. The authors have conducted a comparative study of levels of aerobic N{sub 2}O production in six phylogenetically different Nitrosospira strains newly isolated from soils and in two N. europaea and Nitrosospira multiformis type strains. The fraction of oxidized ammonium released as N{sub 2}O during aerobic growth was remarkably constant for all the Nitrosospira strains, irrespective of the substrate supply (urea versus ammonium), the pH, or substrate limitation. N. europaea and Nitrosospira multiformis released similar fractions of N{sub 2}O when they were supplied with ample amounts of substrates, but the fractions rose sharply when they were restricted by a low pH or substrate limitation. Phosphate buffer doubled the N{sub 2}O release for all types of AOB. No detectable oxidation of atmospheric methane was detected. Calculations based on detection limits as well as data in the literature on CH{sub 4} oxidation by AOB bacteria prove that none of the tested strains contribute significantly to the oxidation of atmospheric CH{sub 4} in soils.

  15. Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation during nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation by Methylomirabilis oxyfera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasigraf, Olivia; Vogt, Carsten; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Ettwig, Katharina F.

    2012-07-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to nitrite reduction is a recently discovered methane sink of as yet unknown global significance. The bacteria that have been identified to carry out this process, Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera, oxidize methane via the known aerobic pathway involving the monooxygenase reaction. In contrast to aerobic methanotrophs, oxygen is produced intracellularly and used for the activation of methane by a phylogenetically distinct particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). Here we report the fractionation factors for carbon and hydrogen during methane oxidation by an enrichment culture of M. oxyfera bacteria. In two separate batch incubation experiments with different absolute biomass and methane contents, the specific methanotrophic activity was similar and the progressive isotope enrichment identical. Headspace methane was consumed up to 98% with rates showing typical first order reaction kinetics. The enrichment factors determined by Rayleigh equations were -29.2 ± 2.6‰ for δ13C (εC) and -227.6 ± 13.5‰ for δ2H (εH), respectively. These enrichment factors were in the upper range of values reported so far for aerobic methanotrophs. In addition, two-dimensional specific isotope analysis (Λ = ( α H - 1 - 1)/( α C - 1 - 1)) was performed and also the determined Λ value of 9.8 was within the range determined for other aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophs. The results showed that in contrast to abiotic processes biological methane oxidation exhibits a narrow range of fractionation factors for carbon and hydrogen irrespective of the underlying biochemical mechanisms. This work will therefore facilitate the correct interpretation of isotopic composition of atmospheric methane with implications for modeling of global carbon fluxes.

  16. Methane oxidation and methanotrophs: resistance and resilience against model perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, A.; Frenzel, P.

    2009-04-01

    Biodiversity is claimed to be essential for ecosystem functioning. However, most experiments on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning (BEF) have been made on higher plants, while only few studies have dealt with microbial communities. Overall microbial diversity may be very high, and general functions like aerobic carbon mineralization are assumed to be supported by highly redundant communities. Therefore, we focused on methane oxidation, a microbial process of global importance mitigating methane emissions from wetland, rice fields, and landfills. We used a rice paddy as our model system, where >90% of potentially emitted methane may be oxidized in the oxic surface layer. This community is presumed to consist of 10-20 taxa more or less equivalent to species. We focused on the ability of methanotrophs to recover from a disturbance causing a significant die-off of all microbial populations. This was simulated by mixing native with sterile soil in two ratios (1:4 and 1:40). Microcosms were incubated and the temporal shift of the methanotrophic communities was followed by pmoA-based Terminal Restriction Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP), qPCR, and a pmoA-based diagnostic microarray. We consistently observed distinctive temporal shifts between Methylocystaceaea and Methylococcacea, a rapid population growth leading to the same or even higher cell numbers as in microcosms made from native soil alone, but no effect on the amount of methane oxidized. The ratio of different methanotrophs changed with treatment, while the number of taxa stayed nearly the same. Overall, methanotrophs showed a remarkable resilience compensating for die-offs. It has to be noted, however, that our experiment focused on methanotrophs adapted to and living at high methane fluxes. Quite different, methanotrophs living in upland soils do not mitigate methane emissions, but are the only biological sink to atmospheric methane. These microbes are severely substrate limited, and will be much more

  17. Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Wolcott, Abraham; Schiros, Theanne; Trusheim, Matthew E; Chen, Edward H; Nordlund, Dennis; Diaz, Rosa E; Gaathon, Ophir; Englund, Dirk; Owen, Jonathan S

    2014-11-20

    We investigate the aerobic oxidation of high-pressure, high-temperature nanodiamonds (5-50 nm dimensions) using a combination of carbon and oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption, wavelength-dependent X-ray photoelectron, and vibrational spectroscopies. Oxidation at 575 °C for 2 h eliminates graphitic carbon contamination (>98%) and produces nanocrystals with hydroxyl functionalized surfaces as well as a minor component (<5%) of carboxylic anhydrides. The low graphitic carbon content and the high crystallinity of HPHT are evident from Raman spectra acquired using visible wavelength excitation (λexcit = 633 nm) as well as carbon K-edge X-ray absorption spectra where the signature of a core-hole exciton is observed. Both spectroscopic features are similar to those of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond but differ significantly from the spectra of detonation nanodiamond. The importance of these findings to the functionalization of nanodiamond surfaces for biological labeling applications is discussed.

  18. Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the aerobic oxidation of high-pressure, high-temperature nanodiamonds (5–50 nm dimensions) using a combination of carbon and oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption, wavelength-dependent X-ray photoelectron, and vibrational spectroscopies. Oxidation at 575 °C for 2 h eliminates graphitic carbon contamination (>98%) and produces nanocrystals with hydroxyl functionalized surfaces as well as a minor component (<5%) of carboxylic anhydrides. The low graphitic carbon content and the high crystallinity of HPHT are evident from Raman spectra acquired using visible wavelength excitation (λexcit = 633 nm) as well as carbon K-edge X-ray absorption spectra where the signature of a core–hole exciton is observed. Both spectroscopic features are similar to those of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond but differ significantly from the spectra of detonation nanodiamond. The importance of these findings to the functionalization of nanodiamond surfaces for biological labeling applications is discussed. PMID:25436035

  19. Manganese Dependent Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beal, E.; House, C.

    2007-12-01

    Understanding the anaerobic oxidation is not only important for understanding hydrocarbon degradation but it also important for understanding the global carbon cycle. The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is a large sink for methane consuming 5-20% of today's methane flux (Valentine and Reeburgh, 2000), yet the requirements for this process are not well understood. It has been suggested that no other electron acceptors other than sulfate can be used in the AOM (Nauhaus, 2005). However, our new data suggests that manganese, in the form of birnessite, can be used as an electron acceptor instead of sulfate (Beal et al., in prep). Methane seep sediment from the Eel River Basin, CA was incubated with methane, 13C-labeled methane, and carbon dioxide. Because the net result of the AOM is the production of carbon dioxide from methane, the rate of the AOM in each of the incubations can be determined by measuring the incorporation of 13C in the carbon dioxide. Using this method, it was found that cultures incubated with nitrate showed inhibition of the AOM, while cultures incubated with iron gave inconclusive results. The only positive results that were found for alternate electron acceptors are the incubations that were given manganese and no sulfate, which showed methane oxidation. Further, when more manganese was injected into these incubations, the rate of AOM increased. Preliminary analysis of the microbial population using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) targeting the mcr gene showed an unidentified organism in these cultures. Future work with TRFLP, as well as clone libraries, will help to identify the organisms responsible for this process. Nauhaus, K., 2005, Environmental regulation of the anaerobic oxidation of methane: a comparison of ANME-I and ANME-II communities: Environmental microbiology, v. 7, p. 98. Valentine, D.L., and Reeburgh, W.S., 2000, New perspectives on anaerobic methane oxidation: Environmental Microbiology, v. 2, p

  20. Stable carbon isotopic evidence for methane oxidation in plumes above Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Oregon Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Nicholas J.; Whiticar, Michael J.

    2002-12-01

    The transport and consumption of methane in the water column in the vicinity of the cold seeps of Hydrate Ridge on the Cascadia Oregon Margin were characterized using measurements of the stable carbon isotope composition of methane. The δ13C-CH4 values measured in the water column ranged from approximately -65 to -16‰, PDB. The combination of measured methane concentration data and the stable carbon isotope values from the same depths support the hypothesis of biogenically produced methane which enters the water column from dissolving bubbles released from cold seepages, likely as a consequence of destabilized methane hydrate (δ13C-CH4 = -65‰, PDB). Kinetic fractionation factors, α, associated with aerobic bacterial methane oxidation in the water column were calculated using a Rayleigh distillation equation applied to a subset of the data. Fractionation factors ranged from 1.002 to 1.013 (mean = 1.008) and were in the lower end of the range of those reported in the literature, a result likely due to the influence of temperature and mixing in plume waters. The fraction of methane remaining after oxidation calculated using the same Rayleigh model approach suggests that the aerobic oxidation of methane in the water column over Hydrate Ridge is nearly quantitative.

  1. News from the "blowout", a man-made methane pockmark in the North Sea: chemosynthetic communities and microbial methane oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinle, Lea I.; Wilfert, Philipp; Schmidt, Mark; Bryant, Lee; Haeckel, Matthias; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Linke, Peter; Sommer, Stefan; Treude, Tina; Niemann, Helge

    2013-04-01

    The accidental penetration of a base-Quaternary shallow gas pocket by a drilling rig in 1990 caused a "blowout" in the British sector of the North Sea (57°55.29' N, 01°37.86' E). Large quantities of methane have been seeping out of this man-made pockmark ever since. As the onset of gas seepage is well constrained, this site can be used as a natural laboratory to gain information on the development of methane oxidizing microbial communities at cold seeps. During an expedition with the R/V Celtic Explorer in July and August 2012, we collected sediments by video-guided push-coring with an ROV (Kiel 6000) along a gradient from inside the crater (close to where a jet of methane bubbles enters the water column) outwards. We also sampled the water column in a grid above the blowout at three different depths. In this presentation, we provide evidence for the establishment of methanotrophic communities in the sediment (AOM communities) on a time scale of decades. Furthermore, we will report data on methane concentrations and anaerobic methane oxidation rates in the sediment. Finally, we will also discuss the spatial distribution of methane and aerobic methane oxidation rates in the water column.

  2. Biogenic Methane from Coal: The Oxidation Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, L. K.; Glossner, A. W.; Landkamer, L.; Figueroa, L. A.; Mandernack, K. W.; Munakata Marr, J.

    2011-12-01

    Vast reserves of coal represent an untapped resource that can be used to produce methane gas, a cleaner energy alternative compared to standard fossil fuels. Microorganisms have demonstrated the ability to utilize coal as a carbon source, producing biogenic methane. With increasing demand for cleaner energy resources, understanding and enhancing biogenic methane production has become an area of active research. The conversion of coal to methane by microorganisms has been demonstrated experimentally by a number of research groups, but the state of the coal used as a substrate has not always been reported and may impact biogenic methane production. Microcosm experiments were designed in order to assess how the oxidation state of coal might influence methane production (e.g. as in a dewatered coal-bed natural gas system). Oxidized and un-oxidized coal samples from the Powder River Basin were incubated in microcosms inoculated with an enrichment culture that was derived from coal. Microcosms were characterized by headspace gas analysis, organic acid production, functional gene abundance (qPCR), and pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Although the microbial consortium demonstrated the ability to utilize both oxidized and un-oxidized coal as a sole carbon source to generate methane, it was produced in higher quantities from the un-oxidized coal. This microbial community was dominated by Methanobacteriaceae (45%), epsilon-Proteobacteria (32%) and delta-Proteobacteria (13%). The results of this study provide a basis to develop strategies to enhance biogenic methane production from coal, as well as demonstrate the need for careful substrate preparation for inter-study comparisons.

  3. Methane oxidation and methane fluxes in the ocean surface layer and deep anoxic waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, B. B.; Kilpatrick, K. A.; Novelli, P. C.; Scranton, M. I.

    1987-01-01

    Measured biological oxidation rates of methane in near-surface waters of the Cariaco Basin are compared with the diffusional fluxes computed from concentration gradients of methane in the surface layer. Methane fluxes and oxidation rates were investigated in surface waters, at the oxic/anoxic interface, and in deep anoxic waters. It is shown that the surface-waters oxidation of methane is a mechanism which modulates the flux of methane from marine waters to the atmosphere.

  4. Inhibitory effects of sulfur compounds on methane oxidation by a methane-oxidizing consortium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Moon, Kyung-Eun; Kim, Tae Gwan; Lee, Sang-Don; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2015-12-01

    Kinetic and enzymatic inhibition experiments were performed to investigate the effects of methanethiol (MT) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on methane oxidation by a methane-oxidizing consortium. In the coexistence of MT and H2S, the oxidation of methane was delayed until MT and H2S were completely degraded. MT and H2S could be degraded, both with and without methane. The kinetic analysis revealed that the methane-oxidizing consortium showed a maximum methane oxidation rate (Vmax) of 3.7 mmol g-dry cell weight (DCW)(-1) h(-1) and a saturation constant (Km) of 184.1 μM. MT and H2S show competitive inhibition on methane oxidation, with inhibition values (Ki) of 1504.8 and 359.8 μM, respectively. MT was primary removed by particulate methane monooxygenases (pMMO) of the consortium, while H2S was degraded by the other microorganisms or enzymes in the consortium. DNA and mRNA transcript levels of the pmoA gene expressions were decreased to ∼10(6) and 10(3)pmoA gene copy number g-DCW(-1) after MT and H2S degradation, respectively; however, both the amount of the DNA and mRNA transcript recovered their initial levels of ∼10(7) and 10(5)pmoA gene copy number g-DCW(-1) after methane oxidation, respectively. The gene expression results indicate that the pmoA gene could be rapidly reproducible after methane oxidation. This study provides comprehensive information of kinetic interactions between methane and sulfur compounds.

  5. Seasonal Oxygen Dynamics in a Thermokarst Bog in Interior Alaska: Implications for Rates of Methane Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, R. B.; Moorberg, C.; Wong, A.; Waldrop, M. P.; Turetsky, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, and wetlands represent the largest natural source of methane to the atmosphere. However, much of the methane generated in anoxic wetlands never gets emitted to the atmosphere; up to >90% of generated methane can get oxidized to carbon dioxide. Thus, oxidation is an important methane sink and changes in the rate of methane oxidation can affect wetland methane emissions. Most methane is aerobically oxidized at oxic-anoxic interfaces where rates of oxidation strongly depend on methane and oxygen concentrations. In wetlands, oxygen is often the limiting substrate. To improve understanding of belowground oxygen dynamics and its impact on methane oxidation, we deployed two planar optical oxygen sensors in a thermokarst bog in interior Alaska. Previous work at this site indicated that, similar to other sites, rates of methane oxidation decrease over the growing season. We used the sensors to track spatial and temporal patterns of oxygen concentrations over the growing season. We coupled these in-situ oxygen measurements with periodic oxygen injection experiments performed against the sensor to quantify belowground rates of oxygen consumption. We found that over the season, the thickness of the oxygenated water layer at the peatland surface decreased. Previous research has indicated that in sphagnum-dominated peatlands, like the one studied here, rates of methane oxidation are highest at or slightly below the water table. It is in these saturated but oxygenated locations that both methane and oxygen are available. Thus, a seasonal reduction in the thickness of the oxygenated water layer could restrict methane oxidation. The decrease in thickness of the oxygenated layer coincided with an increase in the rate of oxygen consumption during our oxygen injection experiments. The increase in oxygen consumption was not explained by temperature; we infer it was due to an increase in substrate availability for oxygen consuming reactions and

  6. Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wolcott, Abraham; Schiros, Theanne; Trusheim, Matthew E.; Chen, Edward H.; Nordlund, Dennis; Diaz, Rosa E.; Gaaton, Ophir; Englund, Dirk; Owen, Jonathan S.

    2014-10-27

    Here we investigate the aerobic oxidation of high-pressure, high-temperature nanodiamonds (5–50 nm dimensions) using a combination of carbon and oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption, wavelength-dependent X-ray photoelectron, and vibrational spectroscopies. Oxidation at 575 °C for 2 h eliminates graphitic carbon contamination (>98%) and produces nanocrystals with hydroxyl functionalized surfaces as well as a minor component (<5%) of carboxylic anhydrides. The low graphitic carbon content and the high crystallinity of HPHT are evident from Raman spectra acquired using visible wavelength excitation (λexcit = 633 nm) as well as carbon K-edge X-ray absorption spectra where the signature of a core–hole exciton is observed. Both spectroscopic features are similar to those of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond but differ significantly from the spectra of detonation nanodiamond. Lastly, we discuss the importance of these findings to the functionalization of nanodiamond surfaces for biological labeling applications.

  7. Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals

    DOE PAGES

    Wolcott, Abraham; Schiros, Theanne; Trusheim, Matthew E.; ...

    2014-10-27

    Here we investigate the aerobic oxidation of high-pressure, high-temperature nanodiamonds (5–50 nm dimensions) using a combination of carbon and oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption, wavelength-dependent X-ray photoelectron, and vibrational spectroscopies. Oxidation at 575 °C for 2 h eliminates graphitic carbon contamination (>98%) and produces nanocrystals with hydroxyl functionalized surfaces as well as a minor component (<5%) of carboxylic anhydrides. The low graphitic carbon content and the high crystallinity of HPHT are evident from Raman spectra acquired using visible wavelength excitation (λexcit = 633 nm) as well as carbon K-edge X-ray absorption spectra where the signature of a core–hole exciton is observed.more » Both spectroscopic features are similar to those of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond but differ significantly from the spectra of detonation nanodiamond. Lastly, we discuss the importance of these findings to the functionalization of nanodiamond surfaces for biological labeling applications.« less

  8. Growth of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria by aerobic hydrogen oxidation.

    PubMed

    Koch, Hanna; Galushko, Alexander; Albertsen, Mads; Schintlmeister, Arno; Gruber-Dorninger, Christiane; Lücker, Sebastian; Pelletier, Eric; Le Paslier, Denis; Spieck, Eva; Richter, Andreas; Nielsen, Per H; Wagner, Michael; Daims, Holger

    2014-08-29

    The bacterial oxidation of nitrite to nitrate is a key process of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria are considered a highly specialized functional group, which depends on the supply of nitrite from other microorganisms and whose distribution strictly correlates with nitrification in the environment and in wastewater treatment plants. On the basis of genomics, physiological experiments, and single-cell analyses, we show that Nitrospira moscoviensis, which represents a widely distributed lineage of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, has the genetic inventory to utilize hydrogen (H2) as an alternative energy source for aerobic respiration and grows on H2 without nitrite. CO2 fixation occurred with H2 as the sole electron donor. Our results demonstrate a chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria outside the nitrogen cycle, suggesting greater ecological flexibility than previously assumed.

  9. Effects of exogenous aerobic bacteria on methane production and biodegradation of municipal solid waste in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Ge, Sai; Liu, Lei; Xue, Qiang; Yuan, Zhiming

    2016-09-01

    Landfill is the most common and efficient ways of municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal and the landfill biogas, mostly methane, is currently utilized to generate electricity and heat. The aim of this work is to study the effects and the role of exogenous aerobic bacteria mixture (EABM) on methane production and biodegradation of MSW in bioreactors. The results showed that the addition of EABM could effectively enhance hydrolysis and acidogenesis processes of MSW degradation, resulting in 63.95% reduction of volatile solid (VS), the highest methane production rate (89.83Lkg(-1) organic matter) ever recorded and a threefold increase in accumulative methane production (362.9L) than the control (127.1L). In addition, it is demonstrated that white-rot fungi (WRF) might further promote the methane production through highly decomposing lignin, but the lower pH value in leachate and longer acidogenesis duration may cause methane production reduced. The data demonstrated that methane production and biodegradation of MSW in bioreactors could be significantly enhanced by EABM via enhanced hydrolysis and acidogenesis processes, and the results are of great economic importance for the future design and management of landfill.

  10. Field assessment of semi-aerobic condition and the methane correction factor for the semi-aerobic landfills provided by IPCC guidelines.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sangjae; Nam, Anwoo; Yi, Seung-Muk; Kim, Jae Young

    2015-02-01

    According to IPCC guidelines, a semi-aerobic landfill site produces one-half of the amount of CH4 produced by an equally-sized anaerobic landfill site. Therefore categorizing the landfill type is important on greenhouse gas inventories. In order to assess semi-aerobic condition in the sites and the MCF value for semi-aerobic landfill, landfill gas has been measured from vent pipes in five semi-aerobically designed landfills in South Korea. All of the five sites satisfied requirements of semi-aerobic landfills in 2006 IPCC guidelines. However, the ends of leachate collection pipes which are main entrance of air in the semi-aerobic landfill were closed in all five sites. The CH4/CO2 ratio in landfill gas, indicator of aerobic and anaerobic decomposition, ranged from 1.08 to 1.46 which is higher than the values (0.3-1.0) reported for semi-aerobic landfill sites and is rather close to those (1.0-2.0) for anaerobic landfill sites. The low CH4+CO2% in landfill gas implied air intrusion into the landfill. However, there was no evidence that air intrusion has caused by semi-aerobic design and operation. Therefore, the landfills investigated in this study are difficult to be classified as semi-aerobic landfills. Also MCF of 0.5 may significantly underestimate methane emissions compared to other researches. According to the carbon mass balance analyses, the higher MCF needs to be proposed for semi-aerobic landfills. Consequently, methane emission estimate should be based on field evaluation for the semi-aerobically designed landfills.

  11. Photocatalytic oxidation of methane over silver decorated zinc oxide nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuxing; Li, Yunpeng; Pan, Xiaoyang; Cortie, David; Huang, Xintang; Yi, Zhiguo

    2016-07-20

    The search for active catalysts that efficiently oxidize methane under ambient conditions remains a challenging task for both C1 utilization and atmospheric cleansing. Here, we show that when the particle size of zinc oxide is reduced down to the nanoscale, it exhibits high activity for methane oxidation under simulated sunlight illumination, and nano silver decoration further enhances the photo-activity via the surface plasmon resonance. The high quantum yield of 8% at wavelengths <400 nm and over 0.1% at wavelengths ∼470 nm achieved on the silver decorated zinc oxide nanostructures shows great promise for atmospheric methane oxidation. Moreover, the nano-particulate composites can efficiently photo-oxidize other small molecular hydrocarbons such as ethane, propane and ethylene, and in particular, can dehydrogenize methane to generate ethane, ethylene and so on. On the basis of the experimental results, a two-step photocatalytic reaction process is suggested to account for the methane photo-oxidation.

  12. Photocatalytic oxidation of methane over silver decorated zinc oxide nanocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuxing; Li, Yunpeng; Pan, Xiaoyang; Cortie, David; Huang, Xintang; Yi, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    The search for active catalysts that efficiently oxidize methane under ambient conditions remains a challenging task for both C1 utilization and atmospheric cleansing. Here, we show that when the particle size of zinc oxide is reduced down to the nanoscale, it exhibits high activity for methane oxidation under simulated sunlight illumination, and nano silver decoration further enhances the photo-activity via the surface plasmon resonance. The high quantum yield of 8% at wavelengths <400 nm and over 0.1% at wavelengths ∼470 nm achieved on the silver decorated zinc oxide nanostructures shows great promise for atmospheric methane oxidation. Moreover, the nano-particulate composites can efficiently photo-oxidize other small molecular hydrocarbons such as ethane, propane and ethylene, and in particular, can dehydrogenize methane to generate ethane, ethylene and so on. On the basis of the experimental results, a two-step photocatalytic reaction process is suggested to account for the methane photo-oxidation. PMID:27435112

  13. Synthesis of methylphosphonic acid by marine microbes: a source for methane in the aerobic ocean.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, William W; Griffin, Benjamin M; Cicchillo, Robert M; Gao, Jiangtao; Janga, Sarath Chandra; Cooke, Heather A; Circello, Benjamin T; Evans, Bradley S; Martens-Habbena, Willm; Stahl, David A; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2012-08-31

    Relative to the atmosphere, much of the aerobic ocean is supersaturated with methane; however, the source of this important greenhouse gas remains enigmatic. Catabolism of methylphosphonic acid by phosphorus-starved marine microbes, with concomitant release of methane, has been suggested to explain this phenomenon, yet methylphosphonate is not a known natural product, nor has it been detected in natural systems. Further, its synthesis from known natural products would require unknown biochemistry. Here we show that the marine archaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus encodes a pathway for methylphosphonate biosynthesis and that it produces cell-associated methylphosphonate esters. The abundance of a key gene in this pathway in metagenomic data sets suggests that methylphosphonate biosynthesis is relatively common in marine microbes, providing a plausible explanation for the methane paradox.

  14. Field assessment of semi-aerobic condition and the methane correction factor for the semi-aerobic landfills provided by IPCC guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Sangjae; Nam, Anwoo; Yi, Seung-Muk; Kim, Jae Young

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} + CO{sub 2}% are proposed as indices to evaluate semi-aerobic landfills. • A landfill which CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} > 1.0 is difficult to be categorized as semi-aerobic landfill. • Field conditions should be carefully investigated to determine landfill types. • The MCF default value for semi-aerobic landfills underestimates the methane emissions. - Abstract: According to IPCC guidelines, a semi-aerobic landfill site produces one-half of the amount of CH{sub 4} produced by an equally-sized anaerobic landfill site. Therefore categorizing the landfill type is important on greenhouse gas inventories. In order to assess semi-aerobic condition in the sites and the MCF value for semi-aerobic landfill, landfill gas has been measured from vent pipes in five semi-aerobically designed landfills in South Korea. All of the five sites satisfied requirements of semi-aerobic landfills in 2006 IPCC guidelines. However, the ends of leachate collection pipes which are main entrance of air in the semi-aerobic landfill were closed in all five sites. The CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} ratio in landfill gas, indicator of aerobic and anaerobic decomposition, ranged from 1.08 to 1.46 which is higher than the values (0.3–1.0) reported for semi-aerobic landfill sites and is rather close to those (1.0–2.0) for anaerobic landfill sites. The low CH{sub 4} + CO{sub 2}% in landfill gas implied air intrusion into the landfill. However, there was no evidence that air intrusion has caused by semi-aerobic design and operation. Therefore, the landfills investigated in this study are difficult to be classified as semi-aerobic landfills. Also MCF of 0.5 may significantly underestimate methane emissions compared to other researches. According to the carbon mass balance analyses, the higher MCF needs to be proposed for semi-aerobic landfills. Consequently, methane emission estimate should be based on field evaluation for the semi-aerobically designed landfills.

  15. Methane-Oxidizing Enzymes: An Upstream Problem in Biological Gas-to-Liquids Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Lawton, Thomas J.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2017-01-01

    Biological conversion of natural gas to liquids (Bio-GTL) represents an immense economic opportunity. In nature, aerobic methanotrophic bacteria and anaerobic archaea are able to selectively oxidize methane using methane monooxygenase (MMO) and methyl coenzyme M reductase (MCR) enzymes. Although significant progress has been made toward genetically manipulating these organisms for biotechnological applications, the enzymes themselves are slow, complex, and not recombinantly tractable in traditional industrial hosts. With turnover numbers of 0.16–13 s−1, these enzymes pose a considerable upstream problem in the biological production of fuels or chemicals from methane. Methane oxidation enzymes will need to be engineered to be faster to enable high volumetric productivities; however, efforts to do so and to engineer simpler enzymes have been minimally successful. Moreover, known methane-oxidizing enzymes have different expression levels, carbon and energy efficiencies, require auxiliary systems for biosynthesis and function, and vary considerably in terms of complexity and reductant requirements. The pros and cons of using each methane-oxidizing enzyme for Bio-GTL are considered in detail. The future for these enzymes is bright, but a renewed focus on studying them will be critical to the successful development of biological processes that utilize methane as a feedstock. PMID:27366961

  16. Oxidation of ammonia and methane in an alkaline, saline lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joye, S.B.; Connell, T.L.; Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.; Jellison, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    The oxidation of ammonia (NH3) and methane (CH4) was investigated in an alkaline saline lake, Mono Lake, California (U.S.A.). Ammonia oxidation was examined in April and July 1995 by comparing dark 14CO2 fixation rates in the presence or absence of methyl fluoride (MeF), an inhibitor of NH3 oxidation. Ammonia oxidizer-mediated dark 14CO2 fixation rates were similar in surface (5-7 m) and oxycline (11-15 m) waters, ranging between 70-340 and 89-186 nM d-1, respectively, or 1-7% of primary production by phytoplankton. Ammonia oxidation rates ranged between 580-2,830 nM d-1 in surface waters and 732-1,548 nM d-1 in oxycline waters. Methane oxidation was examined using a 14CH4 tracer technique in July 1994, April 1995, and July 1995. Methane oxidation rates were consistently higher in July, and rates in oxycline and anaerobic bottom waters (0.5-37 and 7-48 nM d-1, respectively) were 10-fold higher than those in aerobic surface waters (0.04-3.8 nM d-1). The majority of CH4 oxidation, in terms of integrated activity, occurred within anoxic bottom waters. Water column oxidation reduced the potential lake-atmosphere CH4 flux by a factor of two to three. Measured oxidation rates and water column concentrations were used to estimate the biological turnover times of NH3 and CH4. The NH3 pool turns over rapidly, on time scales of 0.8 d in surface waters and 10 d within the oxycline, while CH4 is cycled on 103-d time scales in surface waters and 102-d time scales within oxycline and bottom waters. Our data suggest an important role for NH3 oxidation in alkaline, saline lakes since the process converts volatile NH3 to soluble NO2-, thereby reducing loss via lake-atmosphere exchange and maintaining nitrogen in a form that is readily available to phytoplankton.

  17. Methane activation and oxidation in sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Goeppert, Alain; Dinér, Peter; Ahlberg, Per; Sommer, Jean

    2002-07-15

    The H/D exchange observed when methane is contacted with D(2)SO(4) at 270-330 degrees C shows that the alkane behaves as a sigma base and undergoes rapid and reversible protonation at this temperature. DFT studies of the hydrogen exchange between a monomer and a dimer of sulfuric acid and methane show that the transition states involved in the exchange are bifunctional, that is one hydrogen atom is transferred from a hydroxy group in sulfuric acid to methane, while one hydrogen atom is abstracted from methane by a non-hydroxy oxygen atom in sulfuric acid. All the transition states include a CH(5) moiety, which shows similarities to the methanium ion CH(5) (+). The calculated potential activation energy of the hydrogen exchange for the monomer is 174 kJ mol(-1), which is close to the experimental value (176 kJ mol(-1)). Solvation of the monomer and the transition state of the monomer with an extra sulfuric acid molecule, decrease the potential activation energy by 6 kJ mol(-1). The acid-base process is in competition, however, with an oxidative process involving methane and sulfuric acid which leads to CO(2), SO(2), and water, and thus to a decrease of acidity and loss of reactivity of the medium.

  18. Methane Oxidation and Molecular Characterization of Methanotrophs from a Former Mercury Mine Impoundment.

    PubMed

    Baesman, Shaun M; Miller, Laurence G; Wei, Jeremy H; Cho, Yirang; Matys, Emily D; Summons, Roger E; Welander, Paula V; Oremland, Ronald S

    2015-06-23

    The Herman Pit, once a mercury mine, is an impoundment located in an active geothermal area. Its acidic waters are permeated by hundreds of gas seeps. One seep was sampled and found to be composed of mostly CO₂ with some CH₄ present. The δ(13)CH₄ value suggested a complex origin for the methane: i.e., a thermogenic component plus a biological methanogenic portion. The relatively (12)C-enriched CO₂ suggested a reworking of the ebullitive methane by methanotrophic bacteria. Therefore, we tested bottom sediments for their ability to consume methane by conducting aerobic incubations of slurried materials. Methane was removed from the headspace of live slurries, and subsequent additions of methane resulted in faster removal rates. This activity could be transferred to an artificial, acidic medium, indicating the presence of acidophilic or acid-tolerant methanotrophs, the latter reinforced by the observation of maximum activity at pH = 4.5 with incubated slurries. A successful extraction of sterol and hopanoid lipids characteristic of methanotrophs was achieved, and their abundances greatly increased with increased sediment methane consumption. DNA extracted from methane-oxidizing enrichment cultures was amplified and sequenced for pmoA genes that aligned with methanotrophic members of the Gammaproteobacteria. An enrichment culture was established that grew in an acidic (pH 4.5) medium via methane oxidation.

  19. Methane Oxidation and Molecular Characterization of Methanotrophs from a Former Mercury Mine Impoundment

    PubMed Central

    Baesman, Shaun M.; Miller, Laurence G.; Wei, Jeremy H.; Cho, Yirang; Matys, Emily D.; Summons, Roger E.; Welander, Paula V.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    The Herman Pit, once a mercury mine, is an impoundment located in an active geothermal area. Its acidic waters are permeated by hundreds of gas seeps. One seep was sampled and found to be composed of mostly CO2 with some CH4 present. The δ13CH4 value suggested a complex origin for the methane: i.e., a thermogenic component plus a biological methanogenic portion. The relatively 12C-enriched CO2 suggested a reworking of the ebullitive methane by methanotrophic bacteria. Therefore, we tested bottom sediments for their ability to consume methane by conducting aerobic incubations of slurried materials. Methane was removed from the headspace of live slurries, and subsequent additions of methane resulted in faster removal rates. This activity could be transferred to an artificial, acidic medium, indicating the presence of acidophilic or acid-tolerant methanotrophs, the latter reinforced by the observation of maximum activity at pH = 4.5 with incubated slurries. A successful extraction of sterol and hopanoid lipids characteristic of methanotrophs was achieved, and their abundances greatly increased with increased sediment methane consumption. DNA extracted from methane-oxidizing enrichment cultures was amplified and sequenced for pmoA genes that aligned with methanotrophic members of the Gammaproteobacteria. An enrichment culture was established that grew in an acidic (pH 4.5) medium via methane oxidation. PMID:27682090

  20. Methane oxidation and molecular characterization of methanotrophs from a former mercury mine impoundment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baesman, Shaun; Miller, Laurence G.; Wei, Jeremy H.; Cho, Yirang; Matys, Emily D.; Summons, Roger E.; Welander, Paula V.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    The Herman Pit, once a mercury mine, is an impoundment located in an active geothermal area. Its acidic waters are permeated by hundreds of gas seeps. One seep was sampled and found to be composed of mostly CO2 with some CH4 present. The δ13CH4 value suggested a complex origin for the methane: i.e., a thermogenic component plus a biological methanogenic portion. The relatively 12C-enriched CO2 suggested a reworking of the ebullitive methane by methanotrophic bacteria. Therefore, we tested bottom sediments for their ability to consume methane by conducting aerobic incubations of slurried materials. Methane was removed from the headspace of live slurries, and subsequent additions of methane resulted in faster removal rates. This activity could be transferred to an artificial, acidic medium, indicating the presence of acidophilic or acid-tolerant methanotrophs, the latter reinforced by the observation of maximum activity at pH = 4.5 with incubated slurries. A successful extraction of sterol and hopanoid lipids characteristic of methanotrophs was achieved, and their abundances greatly increased with increased sediment methane consumption. DNA extracted from methane-oxidizing enrichment cultures was amplified and sequenced for pmoA genes that aligned with methanotrophic members of the Gammaproteobacteria. An enrichment culture was established that grew in an acidic (pH 4.5) medium via methane oxidation.

  1. Release of non-methane organic compounds during simulated landfilling of aerobically pretreated municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yue, Dongbei; Liu, Jianguo; Lu, Peng; Wang, Ying; Liu, Jing; Nie, Yongfeng

    2012-06-30

    Characteristics of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) emissions during the anaerobic decomposition of untreated (APD-0) and four aerobically pretreated (APD-20, APD-39, APD-49, and APD-63) samples of municipal solid waste (MSW) were investigated in laboratory. The cumulative mass of the NMOCs of APD-20, APD-39, APD-49, and APD-63 accounted for 15%, 9%, 16%, and 15% of that of APD-0, respectively. The intensities of the NMOC emissions calculated by dividing the cumulative NMOC emissions by the quantities of organic matter removed (Q(VS)) decreased from 4.1 mg/kg Q(VS) for APD-0 to 0.8-3.4 mg/kg Q(VS) for aerobically pretreated MSW. The lipid and starch contents might have significant impact on the intensity of the NMOC emissions. Alkanes dominated the NMOCs released from the aerobically pretreated MSW, while oxygenated compounds were the chief component of the NMOCs generated from untreated MSW. Aerobic pretreatment of MSW prior to landfilling reduces the organic content of the waste and the intensity of the NMOC emissions, and increases the odor threshold, thereby reducing the environmental impact of landfills.

  2. Nitric oxide reburning with methane

    SciTech Connect

    Kumpaty, S.K.; Subramanian, K.

    1996-12-31

    This paper deals with initial findings from the ongoing, three-year DOE program that began on 02/01/1995. The program involves computer simulation studies to aid in planning and conducting a series of experiments that will extend the knowledge of reburning process. The objective of this work is to find nitric oxide reduction effectiveness for various reburning fuels and identify both homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction mechanisms characterizing NO reduction.

  3. Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in Soils - revealed using 13C-labelled methane tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riekie, G. J.; Baggs, E. M.; Killham, K. S.; Smith, J. U.

    2008-12-01

    In marine sediments, anaerobic methane oxidation is a significant biogeochemical process limiting methane flux from ocean to atmosphere. To date, evidence for anaerobic methane oxidation in terrestrial environments has proved elusive, and its significance is uncertain. In this study, an isotope dilution method specifically designed to detect the process of anaerobic methane oxidation in methanogenic wetland soils is applied. Methane emissions of soils from three contrasting permanently waterlogged sites in Scotland are investigated in strictly anoxic microcosms to which 13C- labelled methane is added, and changes in the concentration and 12C/13C isotope ratios of methane and carbon dioxide are subsequently measured and used to calculate separate the separate components of the methane flux. The method used takes into account the 13C-methane associated with methanogenesis, and the amount of methane dissolved in the soil. The calculations make no prior assumptions about the kinetics of methane production or oxidation. The results indicate that methane oxidation can take place in anoxic soil environments. The clearest evidence for anaerobic methane oxidation is provided by soils from a minerotrophic fen site (pH 6.0) in Bin Forest underlain by ultra-basic and serpentine till. In the fresh soil anoxic microcosms, net consumption methane was observed, and the amount of headspace 13C-CO2 increased at a greater rate than the 12+13C-CO2, further proof of methane oxidation. A net increase in methane was measured in microcosms of soil from Murder Moss, an alkaline site, pH 6.5, with a strong calcareous influence. However, the 13C-CH4 data provided evidence of methane oxidation, both in the disappearance of C- CH4 and appearance of smaller quantities of 13C-CO2. The least alkaline (pH 5.5) microcosms, of Gateside Farm soil - a granitic till - exhibited net methanogenesis and the changes in 13C-CH4 and 13C-CO2 here followed the pattern expected if no methane is consumed

  4. The mechanism of the partial oxidation of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinev, Mikhail Yu; Korshak, V. N.; Krylov, Oleg V.

    1989-01-01

    The principal characteristics of the homogeneous and heterogeneous-catalytic conversion of methane into condensation products (C2 and C3 hydrocarbons) and partial oxidation products (methanol and formaldehyde) are considered. Data are presented concerning the most effective catalysts and data relating to the mechanism of the activation of methane on oxide and oxide halide catalysts, the nature of the active centres, and the kinetics of the partial oxidation of methane are analysed. It is shown that the oxidative condensation of methane in the presence of the catalysts considered is a heterogeneous-homogeneous process, which imposes special requirements in its practical realisation. The bibliography includes 118 references.

  5. Aerobic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria: Environmental selection and diversification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, D.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria oxidize reduced inorganic compounds to sulfuric acid. Lithotrophic sulfur oxidizer use the energy obtained from oxidation for microbial growth. Heterotrophic sulfur oxidizers obtain energy from the oxidation of organic compounds. In sulfur-oxidizing mixotrophs energy are derived either from the oxidation of inorganic or organic compounds. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are usually located within the sulfide/oxygen interfaces of springs, sediments, soil microenvironments, and the hypolimnion. Colonization of the interface is necessary since sulfide auto-oxidizes and because both oxygen and sulfide are needed for growth. The environmental stresses associated with the colonization of these interfaces resulted in the evolution of morphologically diverse and unique aerobic sulfur oxidizers.

  6. Methane Uptake in Forest Soils is Driven by Diffusivity and Methane Oxidizer Community Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, B. W.; Hart, S. C.; Kolb, T. E.

    2008-12-01

    Upland forest soils are the only known terrestrial biological sink of methane, but the mechanisms controlling methane uptake are poorly understood. Methane uptake is the result of bacterial and archaeal 'methane oxidizer' activity. Temperature, water content, and substrate availability have all been described as potential mechanisms governing methane uptake in soils. We measured methane uptake in soil across two ecological different gradients in an attempt to determine controls on methane uptake in semi-arid soils. We measured the uptake of atmospheric methane in situ across a gradient of northern Arizona, USA ponderosa pine forest disturbance. This gradient included an unthinned, unburned forest, a mechanically thinned forest, and a former forest site that completely burned 10 years prior to measurements. In laboratory incubations, we measured potential methane uptake across a soil chronosequence of basalt-cinder derived soils from 0.001 to 3 million years old by exposing soils to 10x ambient levels of methane. This chronosequence has a gradient of soil texture, which will influence the air filled pore space, and consequently methane diffusion. Both gradients experience distinct dry and wet seasons during the growing season. Our field measurements suggest that methane uptake is greatest when the forest floor is thinnest and the soil is most dry. Our laboratory incubations suggest that, during the dry season, potential methane uptake is driven by diffusion, but that during the wet season potential methane uptake is a function of methane oxidizer community size. Methane uptake patterns across both gradients demonstrates the importance of diffusion and methane oxidizer community size as codominant controlling factors.

  7. Inhibition of methane oxidation by Methylococcus capsulatus with hydrochlorofluorocarbons and fluorinated methanes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matheson, L.J.; Jahnke, L.L.; Oremland, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    The inhibition of methane oxidation by cell suspensions of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) exposed to hydrochlorofluorocarbon 21 (HCFC-21; difluorochloromethane [CHF2Cl]), HCFC-22 (fluorodichloromethane [CHFCl2]), and various fluorinated methanes was investigated. HCFC-21 inhibited methane oxidation to a greater extent than HCFC-22, for both the particulate and soluble methane monooxygenases. Among the fluorinated methanes, both methyl fluoride (CH3F) and difluoromethane (CH2F2) were inhibitory while fluoroform (CHF3) and carbon tetrafluoride (CF4) were not. The inhibition of methane oxidation by HCFC-21 and HCFC-22 was irreversible, while that by methyl fluoride was reversible. The HCFCs also proved inhibitory to methanol dehydrogenase, which suggests that they disrupt other aspects of C1 catabolism in addition to methane monooxygenase activity.

  8. Biochemical methane potential from sewage sludge: Effect of an aerobic pretreatment and fly ash addition as source of trace elements.

    PubMed

    Huiliñir, César; Pinto-Villegas, Paula; Castillo, Alejandra; Montalvo, Silvio; Guerrero, Lorna

    2017-03-18

    The effect of aerobic pretreatment and fly ash addition on the production of methane from mixed sludge is studied. Three assays with pretreated and not pretreated mixed sludge in the presence of fly ash (concentrations of 0, 10, 25, 50, 250 and 500mg/L) were run at mesophilic condition. It was found that the combined use of aerobic pretreatment and fly ash addition increases methane production up to 70% when the fly ash concentrations were lower than 50mg/L, while concentrations higher than 250mg/L cause up to 11% decrease of methane production. For the anaerobic treatment of mixed sludge without pretreatment, the fly ash improved methane generation at all the concentrations studied, with a maximum of 56%. The removal of volatile solids does not show an improvement compared to the separate use of an aerobic pre-treatment and fly ash addition. Therefore, the combined use of the aerobic pre-treatment and fly ash addition improves only the production of methane.

  9. Complete oxidation of methane on palladium catalysts. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2003-07-17

    This is the final report for grant DE-FG02-00ER15026. It summarizes all the accomplishments in these 8 sections: (1) Adaptations on Existing Unit and Construction of New Unit; (2) Turnover Rate and Reaction Orders for the Complete Oxidation of Methane on a Palladium Foil in Excess Dioxygen; (3) Surface area increase on Pd foils after oxidation in excess methane; (4) UV Raman spectroscopic study of hydrogen bonding in gibbsite and bayerite between 93 and 453 K; (5) Coverage of Palladium Catalysts by Oxidized Silicon During Complete Oxidation of Methane; (6) Kinetics of Methane Oxidation under lean conditions over Pd and PdO; (7) An Explanation for the Hysteresis on the Oxidation of Methane; and (8) Structure of Pd(111) after oxidation in O{sub 2}.

  10. Root-Associated Methane Oxidation and Methanogenesis: Key Determinants of Wetland Methane Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    During the award period, we have assessed the extent and controls of methane oxidation in north temperate wetlands. It is evident that wetlands have been a major global source of atmospheric methane in the past, and are so at present. It is also evident that microbial methane oxidation consumes a variable fraction of total wetland methane production, perhaps 10%-90%. Methane oxidation is thus a potentially important control of wetland methane emission. Our efforts have been designed to determine the extent of the process, its controls, and possible relationships to changes that might be expected in wetlands as a consequence of anthropogenic or climate-related disturbances. Current work, has emphasized controls of methane oxidation associated with rooted aquatic plants. As for the sediment-water interface, we have observed that oxygen availability is a primary limiting factor. Our conclusion is based on several different lines of evidence obtained from in vitro and in situ analyses. First, we have measured the kinetics of methane oxidation by intact plant roots harboring methane-oxidizing bacteria, as well as the kinetics of the methanotrophs themselves. Values for the half-saturation constant (apparent K(sub m)) are approximately 5 microns. These values are roughly equivalent to, or much less than porewater methane concentrations, indicating that uptake is likely saturated with respect to methane, and that some other parameter must limit activity. Methane concentrations in the lacunar spaces at the base of plant stems are also comparable to the half-saturation constants (when expressed as equivalent dissolved concentrations), providing further support for limitation of uptake by parameters other than methane.

  11. Anaerobic methane oxidation in a landfill-leachate plume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grossman, Ethan L.; Cifuentes, Luis A.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2002-01-01

    The alluvial aquifer adjacent to Norman Landfill, OK, provides an excellent natural laboratory for the study of anaerobic processes impacting landfill-leachate contaminated aquifers. We collected groundwaters from a transect of seven multilevel wells ranging in depth from 1.3 to 11 m that were oriented parallel to the flow path. The center of the leachate plume was characterized by (1) high alkalinity and elevated concentrations of total dissolved organic carbon, reduced iron, and methane, and (2) negligible oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate concentrations. Methane concentrations and stable carbon isotope (δ13C) values suggest anaerobic methane oxidation was occurring within the plume and at its margins. Methane δ13C values increased from about −54‰ near the source to >−10‰ downgradient and at the plume margins. The isotopic fractionation associated with this methane oxidation was −13.6 ± 1.0‰. Methane 13C enrichment indicated that 80−90% of the original landfill methane was oxidized over the 210-m transect. First-order rate constants ranged from 0.06 to 0.23 per year, and oxidation rates ranged from 18 to 230 μM/y. Overall, hydrochemical data suggest that a sulfate reducer-methanogen consortium may mediate this methane oxidation. These results demonstrate that natural attenuation through anaerobic methane oxidation can be an important sink for landfill methane in aquifer systems.

  12. High rates of anaerobic methane oxidation in freshwater wetlands reduce potential atmospheric methane emissions.

    PubMed

    Segarra, K E A; Schubotz, F; Samarkin, V; Yoshinaga, M Y; Hinrichs, K-U; Joye, S B

    2015-06-30

    The role of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in wetlands, the largest natural source of atmospheric methane, is poorly constrained. Here we report rates of microbially mediated AOM (average rate=20 nmol cm(-3) per day) in three freshwater wetlands that span multiple biogeographical provinces. The observed AOM rates rival those in marine environments. Most AOM activity may have been coupled to sulphate reduction, but other electron acceptors remain feasible. Lipid biomarkers typically associated with anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea were more enriched in (13)C than those characteristic of marine systems, potentially due to distinct microbial metabolic pathways or dilution with heterotrophic isotope signals. On the basis of this extensive data set, AOM in freshwater wetlands may consume 200 Tg methane per year, reducing their potential methane emissions by over 50%. These findings challenge precepts surrounding wetland carbon cycling and demonstrate the environmental relevance of an anaerobic methane sink in ecosystems traditionally considered strong methane sources.

  13. Observations on the methane oxidation capacity of landfill soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field data and two independent models indicate that landfill cover methane (CH4) oxidation should not be considered as a constant 10% or any other single value. Percent oxidation is a decreasing exponential function of the total methane flux rate into the cover and is also dependent on climate and c...

  14. Transcriptomic evidence for net methane oxidation and net methane production in putative ANaerobic MEthanotrophic (ANME) archaea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, K. G.; Alperin, M. J.; Teske, A.

    2010-12-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation regulates methane emissions in marine sediments and is thought to be mediated by uncultured methanogen-like archaea collectively labeled ANME (for ANaerobic MEthanotrophs). ANME archaea are often assumed to be obligate methanotrophs that are incapable of net methanogenesis, and are therefore used as proxies for anaerobic methane oxidation in many environments in spite of uncertainty regarding their metabolic capabilities. We tested this assumption by detecting and quantifying methanogenic gene transcription of ANME archaea across clearly differentiated zones of methane oxidation vs. methane production in sediments from the White Oak River estuary, NC. ANME-1 archaea (a group of putative obligate methanotrophs) consistently transcribe 16S rRNA and mRNA of methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) the key gene for methanogenesis, up to 45 cm into methanogenic sediments. CARD-FISH shows that ANME-1 archaea exist as single rod-shaped cells or pairs of cells, and in very low numbers. Integrating normalized depth-distributions of 16S rDNA and rRNA (measured with qPCR and RT-qPCR, respectively) shows that 26-77 % of the rDNA proxy for ANME-1 cell numbers, and 18-74 % of the rRNA proxy for ANME-1 activity occurs within methane-producing sediments. mRNA transcripts of dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrAB) from sulfate reducing bacteria, the putative syntrophic partners of sulfate-dependent methane oxidation, were amplified consistently from methane-oxidizing sediments, and inconsistently from methane-producing sediments. These results change the perspective from ANME-1 archaea as obligate methane oxidizers to methanogens that are also capable of methane oxidation.

  15. Explicit Microbial Processes to Simulate Methane Production and Oxidation in Wetlands in the GFDL Land Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolander, S.; Sulman, B. N.; Shevliakova, E.

    2015-12-01

    Recent observational studies highlighted the need to include explicit treatment of the soil microbial processes into the next generation of Earth System Models (ESMs). These processes shape most soil biogeochemical cycles and control releases of the most potent greenhouses gases carbon dioxide and methane. Currently global ecosystem models usually parameterize methane production as a fraction of soil heterotrophic respiration. This lumps the pathways of several different functional groups of microbes into one production rate, possibly modified by a number of environmental factor multipliers. Methane oxidation is usually more explicitly modeled by Michaelis-Menten kinetics, but if the maximum rate, before environmental multipliers, is a constant parameter, this essentially implies a constant methanotrophic microbe population size. We present an explicit model for wetland soil microbial processes in an ESM context. We introduce a growth and decomposition model for four functional groups of microbes involved in methane production and oxidation, so microbial populations can grow when conditions are favorable and substrate is available. When soil conditions are anoxic, fermenting microbes transform available soil carbon into intermediate substrates, and two different kinds of methanogenic microbes live on their preferred substrates producing methane. Methane is transported through aerobic layers of the soil column, where methanotrophic microbes oxidize part of the methane, and the rest escapes to the atmosphere. We present initial simulations using the new model in the context of existing measurements of methane emissions and microbial populations at the site level, and discuss the implications of including these processes in an ESM. This explicit process model establishes a foundation for improving dynamic ecosystem-climate feedbacks in ESM simulations, and facilitates more detailed experimental verification of wetland biogeochemical processes.

  16. Microbiology, ecology, and application of the nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation process

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Li-Dong; He, Zhan-Fei; Zhu, Qun; Chen, Dong-Qing; Lou, Li-Ping; Xu, Xiang-Yang; Zheng, Ping; Hu, Bao-Lan

    2012-01-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo), which couples the anaerobic oxidation of methane to denitrification, is a recently discovered process mediated by “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera.” M. oxyfera is affiliated with the “NC10” phylum, a phylum having no members in pure culture. Based on the isotopic labeling experiments, it is hypothesized that M. oxyfera has an unusual intra-aerobic pathway for the production of oxygen via the dismutation of nitric oxide into dinitrogen gas and oxygen. In addition, the bacterial species has a unique ultrastructure that is distinct from that of other previously described microorganisms. M. oxyfera-like sequences have been recovered from different natural habitats, suggesting that the n-damo process potentially contributes to global carbon and nitrogen cycles. The n-damo process is a process that can reduce the greenhouse effect, as methane is more effective in heat-trapping than carbon dioxide. The n-damo process, which uses methane instead of organic matter to drive denitrification, is also an economical nitrogen removal process because methane is a relatively inexpensive electron donor. This mini-review summarizes the peculiar microbiology of M. oxyfera and discusses the potential ecological importance and engineering application of the n-damo process. PMID:22905032

  17. Microbiology, ecology, and application of the nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li-Dong; He, Zhan-Fei; Zhu, Qun; Chen, Dong-Qing; Lou, Li-Ping; Xu, Xiang-Yang; Zheng, Ping; Hu, Bao-Lan

    2012-01-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo), which couples the anaerobic oxidation of methane to denitrification, is a recently discovered process mediated by "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera." M. oxyfera is affiliated with the "NC10" phylum, a phylum having no members in pure culture. Based on the isotopic labeling experiments, it is hypothesized that M. oxyfera has an unusual intra-aerobic pathway for the production of oxygen via the dismutation of nitric oxide into dinitrogen gas and oxygen. In addition, the bacterial species has a unique ultrastructure that is distinct from that of other previously described microorganisms. M. oxyfera-like sequences have been recovered from different natural habitats, suggesting that the n-damo process potentially contributes to global carbon and nitrogen cycles. The n-damo process is a process that can reduce the greenhouse effect, as methane is more effective in heat-trapping than carbon dioxide. The n-damo process, which uses methane instead of organic matter to drive denitrification, is also an economical nitrogen removal process because methane is a relatively inexpensive electron donor. This mini-review summarizes the peculiar microbiology of M. oxyfera and discusses the potential ecological importance and engineering application of the n-damo process.

  18. Linking methane oxidation with perchlorate reduction: a microbial base for possible Martian life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. G.; Carlstrom, C.; Baesman, S. M.; Coates, J. D.; Oremland, R. S.

    2011-12-01

    Recent observations of methane (CH4) and perchlorate (ClO4-) within the atmosphere and surface of Mars, respectively, provide impetus for establishing a metabolic linkage between these compounds whereby CH4 acts as an electron donor and perchlorate acts as an electron acceptor. Direct linkage through anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) has not been observed. However, indirect syntrophic oxygenase-dependent oxidation of CH4 with an aerobic methane oxidizer is feasible. The pathway for anaerobic dissimilatory perchlorate reduction includes 3 steps. The first 2 are sequential reductions of (1) perchlorate to chlorate and (2) chlorate to chlorite, mediated by perchlorate reductase. The third step is disproportionation of chlorite to chloride and molecular oxygen, mediated by chlorite dismutase. Utilization of thusly derived oxygen by hydrocarbon-degrading organisms in anoxic environments was first demonstrated by Coates et. al. (1998)1, however the link to aerobic methane oxidation was not examined at that time. Here, we systematically explore the potential for several species of aerobic methanotrophs to couple with chlorite during dissimilatory perchlorate reduction. In one experiment, 0.5 kPa CH4 was completely removed in one day from the headspace of combined cell suspensions of Dechloromonas agitata strain CKB and Methylococcus capsulatus in the presence of 5 mM chlorite. Oxidation of labeled 14CH4 to 14CO2 under similar conditions was later confirmed. Another experiment demonstrated complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 over several days by Methylobacter albus strain BG8 with strain CKB in the presence of 5 mM chlorite. Finally, we observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing natural soil (enriched in methanotrophs by CH4 additions over several weeks) and strain CKB and in the presence of 10 mM chlorite. This soil, collected from a pristine lake shoreline, demonstrated endogenous methane, perchlorate, chlorate and chlorite uptake. Other soil and

  19. A novel thermophilic methane-oxidizing bacteria from thermal springs of Uzon volcano caldera, Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorianchikova, E.; Kizilova, A.; Kravchenko, I.; Galchenko, V.

    2012-04-01

    Methane is a radiatively active trace gas, contributing significantly to the greenhouse effect. It is 26 times more efficient in absorbing and re-emitting infrared radiation than carbon dioxide. Methanotrophs play an essential role in the global carbon cycle by oxidizing 50-75% of the biologically produced methane in situ, before it reaches the atmosphere. Methane-oxidizing bacteria are isolated from the various ecosystems and described at present. Their biology, processes of methane oxidation in fresh-water, marsh, soil and marine habitats are investigated quite well. Processes of methane oxidation in places with extreme physical and chemical conditions (high or low , salinity and temperature values) are studied in much smaller degree. Such ecosystems occupy a considerable part of the Earth's surface. The existence of aerobic methanotrophs inhabiting extreme environments has been verified so far by cultivation experiments and direct detection of methane monooxygenase genes specific to almost all aerobic methanotrophs. Thermophilic and thermotolerant methanotrophs have been isolated from such extreme environments and consist of the gammaproteobacterial (type I) genera Methylothermus, Methylocaldum, Methylococcus and the verrucomicrobial genus Methylacidiphilum. Uzon volcano caldera is a unique area, where volcanic processes still happen today. Hydrothermal springs of the area are extreme ecosystems which microbial communities represent considerable scientific interest of fundamental and applied character. A thermophilic aerobic methane-oxidising bacterium was isolated from a sediment sample from a hot spring (56.1; 5.3) of Uzon caldera. Strain S21 was isolated using mineral low salt medium. The headspace gas was composed of CH4, Ar, CO2, and O2 (40:40:15:5). The temperature of cultivation was 50, pH 5.5. Cells of strain S21 in exponential and early-stationary phase were coccoid bacilli, about 1 μm in diameter, and motile with a single polar flagellum. PCR and

  20. Methane oxidation over dual redox catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Sojka, Z.

    1989-06-01

    The objective of this research is to develop the scientific background for direct catalytic oxidation of methane over oxides that are doubly doped with transition metal ions. The desired process aims at employing of a double redox mechanism, where one redox couple is utilized for activation of oxygen and another for the conversion of CH{sub 3} radicals to carbocations via electron transfer reaction. The latter species can react with surface OH{sup {minus}} groups to form methanol or formaldehyde. To establish the foundations for such a process, two groups of the catalysts, one containing dispersed redox centers (Cu{sup I}/Fe{sup III}/ZnO and Cu{sup I}/Sn{sup IV}/ZnO) and a second of delafossite-type oxides containing concentrated redox centers (CuFeO{sub 2}, CuCoO{sub 2}) were synthesized and chemically analyzed for composition. For the sake of comparison, undoped ZnO treated in the same way as doped zinc oxide catalysts was also prepared. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, BET surface area measurements and preliminarily by scanning electron microscopy. A catalytic testing unit and reactor to study the title reaction were designed and constructed.

  1. A four-helix bundle stores copper for methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Vita, Nicolas; Platsaki, Semeli; Baslé, Arnaud; Allen, Stephen J; Paterson, Neil G; Crombie, Andrew T; Murrell, J Colin; Waldron, Kevin J; Dennison, Christopher

    2015-09-03

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) require large quantities of copper for the membrane-bound (particulate) methane monooxygenase. Certain methanotrophs are also able to switch to using the iron-containing soluble methane monooxygenase to catalyse methane oxidation, with this switchover regulated by copper. Methane monooxygenases are nature's primary biological mechanism for suppressing atmospheric levels of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Furthermore, methanotrophs and methane monooxygenases have enormous potential in bioremediation and for biotransformations producing bulk and fine chemicals, and in bioenergy, particularly considering increased methane availability from renewable sources and hydraulic fracturing of shale rock. Here we discover and characterize a novel copper storage protein (Csp1) from the methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b that is exported from the cytosol, and stores copper for particulate methane monooxygenase. Csp1 is a tetramer of four-helix bundles with each monomer binding up to 13 Cu(I) ions in a previously unseen manner via mainly Cys residues that point into the core of the bundle. Csp1 is the first example of a protein that stores a metal within an established protein-folding motif. This work provides a detailed insight into how methanotrophs accumulate copper for the oxidation of methane. Understanding this process is essential if the wide-ranging biotechnological applications of methanotrophs are to be realized. Cytosolic homologues of Csp1 are present in diverse bacteria, thus challenging the dogma that such organisms do not use copper in this location.

  2. Combined anaerobic ammonium and methane oxidation for nitrogen and methane removal.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Baoli; Sánchez, Jaime; van Alen, Theo A; Sanabria, Janeth; Jetten, Mike S M; Ettwig, Katharina F; Kartal, Boran

    2011-12-01

    Anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) is an environment-friendly and cost-efficient nitrogen-removal process currently applied to high-ammonium-loaded wastewaters such as anaerobic digester effluents. In these wastewaters, dissolved methane is also present and should be removed to prevent greenhouse gas emissions into the environment. Potentially, another recently discovered microbial pathway, n-damo (nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation) could be used for this purpose. In the present paper, we explore the feasibility of simultaneously removing methane and ammonium anaerobically, starting with granules from a full-scale anammox bioreactor. We describe the development of a co-culture of anammox and n-damo bacteria using a medium containing methane, ammonium and nitrite. The results are discussed in the context of other recent studies on the application of anaerobic methane- and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria for wastewater treatment.

  3. Methane oxidation by Nitrosococcus oceanus and Nitrosomonas europaea

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.D.; Morita, R.Y.

    1983-02-01

    Chemolithotrophic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria were examined as to their ability to oxidize methane in the absence of ammonium or nitrite. The addition of ammonium stimulated both CO/sub 2/ production and cellular incorporation of methane-carbon by N. oceanus and N. europaea. Less than 0.1 mM CH/sub 4/ in solution inhibited the oxidation of ammonium by N. oceanus by 87% but had no inhibitory effects on N. europaea. In the absence of NH/sub 4/-N, N. oceanus achieved a maximum methane oxidation rate of 2.20 x 10/sup -2/ ..mu..mol of CH/sub 4/ h/sup -1/ mg (dry weight) of cells/sup -1/, which remained constant as the methane concentration was increased. In the presence of NH/sub 4/-N (10 ppm (10 ..mu..g/ml)), its maximum rate was 26.4 x 10/sup -2/ ..mu..mol of CH/sub 4/ h/sup -1/ mg (dry weight) of cells/sup -1/ at a methane concentration of 1.19 x 10/sup -1/ mM. Increasing the methane concentrations above this level decreased CO/sub 2/ production, whereas cellular incorporation of methane-carbon continued to increase. N. europaea showed a linear response throughout the test range, with an activity of 196.0 x 10/sup -2/ ..mu..mol of CH/sub 4/ h/sup -1/ mg (dry weight) of cells/sup -1/ at a methane concentration of 1.38 x 10/sup -1/ mM. Both nitrite and nitrate stimulated the oxidation of methane. The pH range was similar to that for ammonium oxidation, but the points of maximum activity were at lower values for the oxidation of methane. (JMT)

  4. Anaerobic methane oxidation in low-organic content methane seep sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pohlman, John W.; Riedel, Michael; Bauer, James E.; Canuel, Elizabeth A.; Paull, Charles K.; Lapham, Laura; Grabowski, Kenneth S.; Coffin, Richard B.; Spence, George D.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfate-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is the key sedimentary microbial process limiting methane emissions from marine sediments and methane seeps. In this study, we investigate how the presence of low-organic content sediment influences the capacity and efficiency of AOM at Bullseye vent, a gas hydrate-bearing cold seep offshore of Vancouver Island, Canada. The upper 8 m of sediment contains 14C. A fossil origin for the DIC precludes remineralization of non-fossil OM present within the sulfate zone as a significant contributor to pore water DIC, suggesting that nearly all sulfate is available for anaerobic oxidation of fossil seep methane. Methane flux from the SMT to the sediment water interface in a diffusion-dominated flux region of Bullseye vent was, on average, 96% less than at an OM-rich seep in the Gulf of Mexico with a similar methane flux regime. Evidence for enhanced methane oxidation capacity within OM-poor sediments has implications for assessing how climate-sensitive reservoirs of sedimentary methane (e.g., gas hydrate) will respond to ocean warming, particularly along glacially-influenced mid and high latitude continental margins.

  5. Biomarker evidence for widespread anaerobic methane oxidation in Mediterranean sediments by a consortium of methanogenic archaea and bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Pancost, R.D.; Damste, J.S.S.; Lint, S. De; Maarel, M.J.E.C. van der; Gottschal, J.C.

    2000-03-01

    Although abundant geochemical data indicate that anaerobic methane oxidation occurs in marine sediments, the linkage to specific microorganisms remains unclear. In order to examine processes of methane consumption and oxidation, sediment samples from mud volcanoes at two distinct sites on the Mediterranean consumption and oxidation, sediment samples from mud volcanoes at two distinct sites on the Mediterranean Ridge were collected via the submersible Nautile. Geochemical data strongly indicate that methane is oxidized under aerobic conditions, and compound-specific carbon isotope analyses indicate that methane is oxidized under anaerobic conditions, and compound-specific carbon isotope analyses indicate that this reaction is facilitated by a consortium of archaea and bacteria. Specifically, these methane-rich sediments contain high abundances of methanogen-specific biomarkers that are significantly depleted in {sup 13}C ({delta}{sup 13}C values are as low as {minus}95%). Biomarkers inferred to derive from sulfate-reducing bacteria and other heterotrophic bacteria are similarly depleted. Consistent with previous work, such depletion can be explained by consumption of {sup 13}C-depleted methane by methanogens operating in reverse and as part a consortium of organisms in which sulfate serves as the terminal electron acceptor. Moreover, their results indicate that this process is widespread in Mediterranean mud volcanoes and in some localized settings in the predominant microbiological process.

  6. Environmental factors affecting methane distribution and bacterial methane oxidation in the German Bight (North Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osudar, Roman; Matoušů, Anna; Alawi, Mashal; Wagner, Dirk; Bussmann, Ingeborg

    2015-07-01

    River estuaries are responsible for high rates of methane emissions to the atmosphere. The complexity and diversity of estuaries require detailed investigation of methane sources and sinks, as well as of their spatial and seasonal variations. The Elbe river estuary and the adjacent North Sea were chosen as the study site for this survey, which was conducted from October 2010 to June 2012. Using gas chromatography and radiotracer techniques, we measured methane concentrations and methane oxidation (MOX) rates along a 60 km long transect from Cuxhaven to Helgoland. Methane distribution was influenced by input from the methane-rich mouth of the Elbe and gradual dilution by methane-depleted sea water. Methane concentrations near the coast were on average 30 ± 13 nmol L-1, while in the open sea, they were 14 ± 6 nmol L-1. Interestingly, the highest methane concentrations were repeatedly detected near Cuxhaven, not in the Elbe River freshwater end-member as previously reported. Though, we did not find clear seasonality we observed temporal methane variations, which depended on temperature and presumably on water discharge from the Elbe River. The highest MOX rates generally coincided with the highest methane concentrations, and varied from 2.6 ± 2.7 near the coast to 0.417 ± 0.529 nmol L-1 d-1 in the open sea. Turnover times varied from 3 to >1000 days. MOX rates were strongly affected by methane concentration, temperature and salinity. We ruled out the supposition that MOX is not an important methane sink in most of the Elbe estuary and adjacent German Bight.

  7. Electrochemical and partial oxidation of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rahul

    2008-10-01

    negligible coke formation on the novel fabricated anode by electroless plating process. Hydrogen is an environmentally cleaner source of energy. The recent increase in the demand of hydrogen as fuel for all types of fuel cells and petroleum refining process has boosted the need of production of hydrogen. Methane, a major component of natural gas is the major feedstock for production of hydrogen. The route of partial oxidation of methane to produce syngas (CO + H2) offers significant advantages over commercialized steam reforming process for higher efficiency and lower energy requirements. Partial oxidation of methane was studied by pulsing O2 into a CH4 flow over Rh/Al2O3 in a sequence of in situ infrared (IR) cell and fixed bed reactor at 773 K. The results obtained from the sequence of an IR cell followed by a fixed bed reactor show that (i) adsorbed CO produced possesses a long residence time, indicating that adsorbed oxygen leading to the formation of CO is significantly different from those leading to CO2 and (ii) CO2 is not an intermediate species for the formation of CO. In situ IR of pulse reaction coupled with alternating reactor sequence is an effective approach to study the primary and secondary reactions as well as the nature of their adsorbed species. As reported earlier, hydrogen remains to be the most effective fuel for fuel cells, the production of high purity hydrogen from naturally available resources such as coal, petroleum, and natural gas requires a number of energy-intensive steps, making fuel cell processes for stationary electric power generation prohibitively uneconomic. Direct use of coal or coal gas as the feed is a promising approach for low cost electricity generation. Coal gas solid oxide fuel cell was studied by pyrolyzing Ohio #5 coal to coal gas and transporting to a Cu anode solid oxide fuel cell to generate power. The study of coal-gas solid oxide fuel cell is divided into two sections, i.e., (i) understanding the composition of coal gas by

  8. Improvement of methane generation capacity by aerobic pre-treatment of organic waste with a cellulolytic Trichoderma viride culture.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Andreas Otto; Schwarzenauer, Thomas; Illmer, Paul

    2013-11-15

    Trichoderma viride is known as a potent cellulose decomposer and was successfully used to improve and accelerate the decomposition process of aerobic composting. In contrast, the role of fungi as pre-treatment organisms for anaerobic digestion is not clear, since the fast aerobic decomposition is thought to be responsible for a rapid depletion of easily available nutrients, leading to a lack of these for the anaerobic community. In the present study carried out in lab-scale, the application of T. viride for the aerobic pre-incubation of organic matter derived from the inlet port of a 750,000 L anaerobic digester led to an increase in total gas and methane production in a subsequent anaerobic digestion step. A high cellulase activity caused by the addition of T. viride seemed to be responsible for a better nutrient availability for anaerobic microorganisms. Therefore, aerobic pre-incubation of organic residues with T. viride for subsequent anaerobic digestion is a promising approach in order to increase methane yields.

  9. Co(salophen)-Catalyzed Aerobic Oxidation of p-Hydroquinone: Mechanism and Implications for Aerobic Oxidation Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Anson, Colin W.; Ghosh, Soumya; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2016-03-30

    Macrocyclic metal complexes and p-benzoquinones are commonly used as co-catalytic redox mediators in aerobic oxidation reactions. In an effort to gain insight into the mechanism and energetic efficiency of these reactions, we investigated Co(salophen)-catalyzed aerobic oxidation of p-hydroquinone. Kinetic and spectroscopic data suggest that the catalyst resting-state consists of an equilibrium between a CoII(salophen) complex, a CoIII-superoxide adduct, and a hydrogen-bonded adduct between the hydroquinone and the CoIII–O2 species. The kinetic data, together with density functional theory data, suggest that the turnover-limiting step features proton-coupled electron transfer from a semi-hydroquinone species and a CoIII-hydroperoxide intermediate. Additional experimental and computational data suggest that a coordinated H2O2 intermediate oxidizes a second equivalent of hydroquinone. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The NSF provided partial support for the EPR instrumentation (NSF CHE-0741901).

  10. Mechanism of copper(I)/TEMPO-catalyzed aerobic alcohol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Jessica M; Ryland, Bradford L; Stahl, Shannon S

    2013-02-13

    Homogeneous Cu/TEMPO catalyst systems (TEMPO = 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl) have emerged as some of the most versatile and practical catalysts for aerobic alcohol oxidation. Recently, we disclosed a (bpy)Cu(I)/TEMPO/NMI catalyst system (NMI = N-methylimidazole) that exhibits fast rates and high selectivities, even with unactivated aliphatic alcohols. Here, we present a mechanistic investigation of this catalyst system, in which we compare the reactivity of benzylic and aliphatic alcohols. This work includes analysis of catalytic rates by gas-uptake and in situ IR kinetic methods and characterization of the catalyst speciation during the reaction by EPR and UV-visible spectroscopic methods. The data support a two-stage catalytic mechanism consisting of (1) "catalyst oxidation" in which Cu(I) and TEMPO-H are oxidized by O(2) via a binuclear Cu(2)O(2) intermediate and (2) "substrate oxidation" mediated by Cu(II) and the nitroxyl radical of TEMPO via a Cu(II)-alkoxide intermediate. Catalytic rate laws, kinetic isotope effects, and spectroscopic data show that reactions of benzylic and aliphatic alcohols have different turnover-limiting steps. Catalyst oxidation by O(2) is turnover limiting with benzylic alcohols, while numerous steps contribute to the turnover rate in the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols.

  11. 2004 Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Manure Management in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Moeletsi, Mokhele Edmond; Tongwane, Mphethe Isaac

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary Livestock manure management is one of the main sources of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in South Africa producing mainly methane and nitrous oxide. The emissions from this sub-category are dependent on how manure is stored. Liquid-stored manure predominantly produces methane while dry-based manure enhances mainly production of nitrous oxide. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) guidelines were utilized at different tier levels in estimating GHG emissions from manure management. The results show that methane emissions are relatively higher than nitrous oxide emissions with 3104 Gg and 2272 Gg respectively in carbon dioxide global warming equivalent. Abstract Manure management in livestock makes a significant contribution towards greenhouse gas emissions in the Agriculture; Forestry and Other Land Use category in South Africa. Methane and nitrous oxide emissions are prevalent in contrasting manure management systems; promoting anaerobic and aerobic conditions respectively. In this paper; both Tier 1 and modified Tier 2 approaches of the IPCC guidelines are utilized to estimate the emissions from South African livestock manure management. Activity data (animal population, animal weights, manure management systems, etc.) were sourced from various resources for estimation of both emissions factors and emissions of methane and nitrous oxide. The results show relatively high methane emissions factors from manure management for mature female dairy cattle (40.98 kg/year/animal), sows (25.23 kg/year/animal) and boars (25.23 kg/year/animal). Hence, contributions for pig farming and dairy cattle are the highest at 54.50 Gg and 32.01 Gg respectively, with total emissions of 134.97 Gg (3104 Gg CO2 Equivalent). Total nitrous oxide emissions are estimated at 7.10 Gg (2272 Gg CO2 Equivalent) and the three main contributors are commercial beef cattle; poultry and small-scale beef farming at 1.80 Gg; 1.72 Gg and 1.69 Gg respectively. Mitigation options

  12. Biological methane oxidation: regulation, biochemistry, and active site structure of particulate methane monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Raquel L; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2004-01-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is a three-subunit integral membrane enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of methane to methanol. Although pMMO is the predominant methane oxidation catalyst in nature, it has proved difficult to isolate, and most questions regarding its molecular structure, active site composition, chemical mechanism, and genetic regulation remain unanswered. Copper ions are believed to play a key role in both pMMO regulation and catalysis, and there is some evidence that the enzyme contains iron as well. A number of research groups have solubilized and purified or partially purified pMMO. These preparations have been characterized by biochemical and biophysical methods. In addition, aspects of methane monooxygenase gene regulation and copper accumulation in methanotrophs have been studied. This review summarizes for the first time the often controversial pMMO literature, focusing on recent progress and highlighting unresolved issues.

  13. [Advances in biomolecular machine: methane monooxygenases].

    PubMed

    Lu, Jixue; Wang, Shizhen; Fang, Baishan

    2015-07-01

    Methane monooxygenases (MMO), regarded as "an amazing biomolecular machine", catalyze the oxidation of methane to methanol under aerobic conditions. MMO catalyze the oxidation of methane elaborately, which is a novel way to catalyze methane to methanol. Furthermore, MMO can inspire the biomolecular machine design. In this review, we introduced MMO including structure, gene and catalytic mechanism. The history and the taxonomy of MMO were also introduced.

  14. Atmospheric methane removal by methane-oxidizing bacteria immobilized on porous building materials.

    PubMed

    Ganendra, Giovanni; De Muynck, Willem; Ho, Adrian; Hoefman, Sven; De Vos, Paul; Boeckx, Pascal; Boon, Nico

    2014-04-01

    Biological treatment using methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) immobilized on six porous carrier materials have been used to mitigate methane emission. Experiments were performed with different MOB inoculated in building materials at high (~20 % (v/v)) and low (~100 ppmv) methane mixing ratios. Methylocystis parvus in autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) exhibited the highest methane removal rate at high (28.5 ± 3.8 μg CH₄ g⁻¹ building material h⁻¹) and low (1.7 ± 0.4 μg CH₄ g⁻¹ building material h⁻¹) methane mixing ratio. Due to the higher volume of pores with diameter >5 μm compared to other materials tested, AAC was able to adsorb more bacteria which might explain for the higher methane removal observed. The total methane and carbon dioxide-carbon in the headspace was decreased for 65.2 ± 10.9 % when M. parvus in Ytong was incubated for 100 h. This study showed that immobilized MOB on building materials could be used to remove methane from the air and also act as carbon sink.

  15. Degradation kinetics of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by methane oxidizers naturally-associated with wetland plant roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, C. L.; Goltz, M. N.; Agrawal, A.

    2014-12-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) are common groundwater contaminants that can be removed from the environment by natural attenuation processes. CAH biodegradation can occur in wetland environments by reductive dechlorination as well as oxidation pathways. In particular, CAH oxidation may occur in vegetated wetlands, by microorganisms that are naturally associated with the roots of wetland plants. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the cometabolic degradation kinetics of the CAHs, cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cisDCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1TCA), by methane-oxidizing bacteria associated with the roots of a typical wetland plant in soil-free system. Laboratory microcosms with washed live roots investigated aerobic, cometabolic degradation of CAHs by the root-associated methane-oxidizing bacteria at initial aqueous [CH4] ~ 1.9 mg L- 1, and initial aqueous [CAH] ~ 150 μg L- 1; cisDCE and TCE (in the presence of 1,1,1TCA) degraded significantly, with a removal efficiency of approximately 90% and 46%, respectively. 1,1,1TCA degradation was not observed in the presence of active methane oxidizers. The pseudo first-order degradation rate-constants of TCE and cisDCE were 0.12 ± 0.01 and 0.59 ± 0.07 d- 1, respectively, which are comparable to published values. However, their biomass-normalized degradation rate constants obtained in this study were significantly smaller than pure-culture studies, yet they were comparable to values reported for biofilm systems. The study suggests that CAH removal in wetland plant roots may be comparable to processes within biofilms. This has led us to speculate that the active biomass may be on the root surface as a biofilm. The cisDCE and TCE mass losses due to methane oxidizers in this study offer insight into the role of shallow, vegetated wetlands as an environmental sink for such xenobiotic compounds.

  16. Degradation kinetics of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by methane oxidizers naturally-associated with wetland plant roots.

    PubMed

    Powell, C L; Goltz, M N; Agrawal, A

    2014-12-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) are common groundwater contaminants that can be removed from the environment by natural attenuation processes. CAH biodegradation can occur in wetland environments by reductive dechlorination as well as oxidation pathways. In particular, CAH oxidation may occur in vegetated wetlands, by microorganisms that are naturally associated with the roots of wetland plants. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the cometabolic degradation kinetics of the CAHs, cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cisDCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1TCA), by methane-oxidizing bacteria associated with the roots of a typical wetland plant in soil-free system. Laboratory microcosms with washed live roots investigated aerobic, cometabolic degradation of CAHs by the root-associated methane-oxidizing bacteria at initial aqueous [CH4] ~1.9mgL(-1), and initial aqueous [CAH] ~150μgL(-1); cisDCE and TCE (in the presence of 1,1,1TCA) degraded significantly, with a removal efficiency of approximately 90% and 46%, respectively. 1,1,1TCA degradation was not observed in the presence of active methane oxidizers. The pseudo first-order degradation rate-constants of TCE and cisDCE were 0.12±0.01 and 0.59±0.07d(-1), respectively, which are comparable to published values. However, their biomass-normalized degradation rate constants obtained in this study were significantly smaller than pure-culture studies, yet they were comparable to values reported for biofilm systems. The study suggests that CAH removal in wetland plant roots may be comparable to processes within biofilms. This has led us to speculate that the active biomass may be on the root surface as a biofilm. The cisDCE and TCE mass losses due to methane oxidizers in this study offer insight into the role of shallow, vegetated wetlands as an environmental sink for such xenobiotic compounds.

  17. Clumped isotope effects during OH and Cl oxidation of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehill, Andrew R.; Joelsson, Lars Magnus T.; Schmidt, Johan A.; Wang, David T.; Johnson, Matthew S.; Ono, Shuhei

    2017-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out to determine the clumped (13CH3D) methane kinetic isotope effects during oxidation of methane by OH and Cl radicals, the major sink reactions for atmospheric methane. Experiments were performed in a 100 L quartz photochemical reactor, in which OH was produced from the reaction of O(1D) (from O3 photolysis) with H2O, and Cl was from photolysis of Cl2. Samples were taken from the reaction cell and analyzed for methane (12CH4, 12CH3D, 13CH4, 13CH3D) isotopologue ratios using tunable infrared laser direct absorption spectroscopy. Measured kinetic isotope effects for singly substituted species were consistent with previous experimental studies. For doubly substituted methane, 13CH3D, the observed kinetic isotope effects closely follow the product of the kinetic isotope effects for the 13C and deuterium substituted species (i.e., 13,2KIE = 13KIE × 2KIE). The deviation from this relationship is 0.3‰ ± 1.2‰ and 3.5‰ ± 0.7‰ for OH and Cl oxidation, respectively. This is consistent with model calculations performed using quantum chemistry and transition state theory. The OH and Cl reactions enrich the residual methane in the clumped isotopologue in open system reactions. In a closed system, however, this effect is overtaken by the large D/H isotope effect, which causes the residual methane to become anti-clumped relative to the initial methane. Based on these results, we demonstrate that oxidation of methane by OH, the predominant oxidant for tropospheric methane, will only have a minor (∼0.3‰) impact on the clumped isotope signature (Δ13CH3D, measured as a deviation from a stochastic distribution of isotopes) of tropospheric methane. This paper shows that Δ13CH3D will provide constraints on methane source strengths, and predicts that Δ12CH2D2 can provide information on methane sink strengths.

  18. Limits and dynamics of methane oxidation in landfill cover soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to understand the limits and dynamics of methane (CH4) oxidation in landfill cover soils, we investigated CH4 oxidation in daily, intermediate, and final cover soils from two California landfills as a function of temperature, soil moisture and CO2 concentration. The results indicate a signi...

  19. Compositional and functional stability of aerobic methane consuming communities in drained and rewetted peat meadows.

    PubMed

    Krause, Sascha; Niklaus, Pascal A; Badwan Morcillo, Sara; Meima Franke, Marion; Lüke, Claudia; Reim, Andreas; Bodelier, Paul L E

    2015-11-01

    The restoration of peatlands is an important strategy to counteract subsidence and loss of biodiversity. However, responses of important microbial soil processes are poorly understood. We assessed functioning, diversity and spatial organization of methanotrophic communities in drained and rewetted peat meadows with different water table management and agricultural practice. Results show that the methanotrophic diversity was similar between drained and rewetted sites with a remarkable dominance of the genus Methylocystis. Enzyme kinetics depicted no major differences, indicating flexibility in the methane (CH4) concentrations that can be used by the methanotrophic community. Short-term flooding led to temporary elevated CH4 emission but to neither major changes in abundances of methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) nor major changes in CH4 consumption kinetics in drained agriculturally used peat meadows. Radiolabeling and autoradiographic imaging of intact soil cores revealed a markedly different spatial arrangement of the CH4 consuming zone in cores exposed to near-atmospheric and elevated CH4. The observed spatial patterns of CH4 consumption in drained peat meadows with and without short-term flooding highlighted the spatial complexity and responsiveness of the CH4 consuming zone upon environmental change. The methanotrophic microbial community is not generally altered and harbors MOB that can cover a large range of CH4 concentrations offered due to water-table fluctuations, effectively mitigating CH4 emissions.

  20. Methane oxidation in water-spreading and compost biofilters.

    PubMed

    Powelson, David K; Chanton, Jeffery; Abichou, Tarek; Morales, Jose

    2006-12-01

    This study evaluated two biofilter designs to mitigate methane emissions from landfill vents. Water-spreading biofilters were designed to use the capillarity of coarse sand overlain by a finer sand to increase the active depth for methane oxidation. Compost biofilters consisted of 238-L barrels containing a 1:1 mixture (by volume) of compost to expanded polystyrene pellets. Two replicates of each type of biofilter were tested at an outdoor facility. Gas inflow consisted of an approximately 1:1 mixture (by volume) of CH4 and CO2. Methane output rates (J(out); g m(-2) day(-1)) were measured using the static chamber technique and the Pedersen et al. (2001) diffusion model. Methane oxidation rate (J(ox); g m(-2) day(-1)) and fraction of methane oxidized (f(ox)) were determined by mass balance. For methane inflow rates (J(in)) between 250 and 500 g m(-2) day(-1), the compost biofilter J(ox), 242 g m(-2) day(-1), was not significantly different (P = 0.0647) than the water-spreading biofilter J(ox), 203 g m(-2) day(-1); and the compost f(ox), 69%, was not significantly different (P = 0.7354) than water-spreading f(ox), 63%. The water-spreading biofilter was shown to generally perform as well as the compost biofilter, and it may be easier to implement at a landfill and require less maintenance.

  1. A laboratory study of anaerobic oxidation of methane in the presence of methane hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solem, R.; Bartlett, D.; Kastner, M.; Valentine, D.

    2003-12-01

    In order to mimic and study the process of anaerobic methane oxidation in methane hydrate regions we developed four high-pressure anaerobic bioreactors, designed to incubate environmental sediment samples, and enrich for populations of microbes associated with anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO). We obtained sediment inocula from a bacterial mat at the southern Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia, having cell counts approaching 1010 cells/cc. Ultimately, our goal is to produce an enriched culture of these microbes for characterization of the biochemical processes and chemical fluxes involved, as well as the unique adaptations required for, AMO. Molecular phylogenetic information along with results from fluorescent in situ hybridization indicate that consortia of Archaea and Bacteria are present which are related to those previously described for marine sediment AMO environments. Using a medium of enriched seawater and sediment in a 3:1 ratio, the system was incubated at 4° C under 43 atm of methane pressure; the temperature and pressure were kept constant. We have followed the reactions for seven months, particularly the vigorous consumption rates of dissolved sulfate and alkalinity production, as well as increases in HS-, and decreases in Ca concentrations. We also monitored the dissolved inorganic C (DIC) δ 13C values. The data were reproduced, and indicated that the process is extremely sensitive to changes in methane pressure. The rates of decrease in sulfate and increase in alkalinity concentrations were complimentary and showed considerable linearity with time. When the pressure in the reactor was decreased below the methane hydrate stability field, following the methane hydrate dissociation, sulfate reduction abruptly decreased. When the pressure was restored all the reactions returned to their previous rates. Much of the methane oxidation activity in the reactor is believed to occur in association with the methane hydrate. Upon the completion of one of the experiments

  2. Anaerobic Oxidization of Methane in a Minerotrophic Peatland: Enrichment of Nitrite-Dependent Methane-Oxidizing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Baoli; van Dijk, Gijs; Fritz, Christian; Smolders, Alfons J. P.; Pol, Arjan; Jetten, Mike S. M.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) as a methane sink in freshwater systems is largely unexplored, particularly in peat ecosystems. Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) was recently discovered and reported to be catalyzed by the bacterium “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera,” which is affiliated with the NC10 phylum. So far, several “Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera” enrichment cultures have been obtained using a limited number of freshwater sediments or wastewater treatment sludge as the inoculum. In this study, using stable isotope measurements and porewater profiles, we investigated the potential of n-damo in a minerotrophic peatland in the south of the Netherlands that is infiltrated by nitrate-rich ground water. Methane and nitrate profiles suggested that all methane produced was oxidized before reaching the oxic layer, and NC10 bacteria could be active in the transition zone where countergradients of methane and nitrate occur. Quantitative PCR showed high NC10 bacterial cell numbers at this methane-nitrate transition zone. This soil section was used to enrich the prevalent NC10 bacteria in a continuous culture supplied with methane and nitrite at an in situ pH of 6.2. An enrichment of nitrite-reducing methanotrophic NC10 bacteria was successfully obtained. Phylogenetic analysis of retrieved 16S rRNA and pmoA genes showed that the enriched bacteria were very similar to the ones found in situ and constituted a new branch of NC10 bacteria with an identity of less than 96 and 90% to the 16S rRNA and pmoA genes of “Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera,” respectively. The results of this study expand our knowledge of the diversity and distribution of NC10 bacteria in the environment and highlight their potential contribution to nitrogen and methane cycles. PMID:23042166

  3. Aerobic biotransformation of N-nitrosodimethylamine and N-nitrodimethylamine in methane and benzene amended soil columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidhaas, Jennifer; Dupont, R. Ryan

    2013-07-01

    Aerobic biotransformation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), an emerging contaminant of concern, and its structural analog N-nitrodimethylamine (DMN), was evaluated in benzene and methane amended groundwater passed through laboratory scale soil columns. Competitive inhibition models were used to model the kinetics for NDMA and DMN cometabolism accounting for the concurrent degradation of the growth and cometabolic substrates. Transformation capacities for NDMA and DMN with benzene (13 and 23 μg (mg cells)- 1) and methane (0.14 and 8.4 μg (mg cells)- 1) grown cultures, respectively are comparable to those presented in the literature, as were first order endogenous decay rates estimated to be 2.1 × 10- 2 ± 1.7 × 10- 3 d- 1 and 6.5 × 10- 1 ± 7.1 × 10- 1 d- 1 for the methane and benzene amended cultures, respectively. These studies highlight possible attenuation mechanisms and rates for NDMA and DMN biotransformation in aerobic aquifers undergoing active remediation, natural attenuation or managed aquifer recharge with treated wastewater (i.e., reclaimed water).

  4. Aerobic biotransformation of N-nitrosodimethylamine and N-nitrodimethylamine in methane and benzene amended soil columns.

    PubMed

    Weidhaas, Jennifer; Dupont, R Ryan

    2013-07-01

    Aerobic biotransformation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), an emerging contaminant of concern, and its structural analog N-nitrodimethylamine (DMN), was evaluated in benzene and methane amended groundwater passed through laboratory scale soil columns. Competitive inhibition models were used to model the kinetics for NDMA and DMN cometabolism accounting for the concurrent degradation of the growth and cometabolic substrates. Transformation capacities for NDMA and DMN with benzene (13 and 23μg (mgcells)(-1)) and methane (0.14 and 8.4μg (mgcells)(-1)) grown cultures, respectively are comparable to those presented in the literature, as were first order endogenous decay rates estimated to be 2.1×10(-2)±1.7×10(-3)d(-1) and 6.5×10(-1)±7.1×10(-1)d(-1) for the methane and benzene amended cultures, respectively. These studies highlight possible attenuation mechanisms and rates for NDMA and DMN biotransformation in aerobic aquifers undergoing active remediation, natural attenuation or managed aquifer recharge with treated wastewater (i.e., reclaimed water).

  5. Ageing well: methane oxidation and methane oxidizing bacteria along a chronosequence of 2000 years.

    PubMed

    Ho, Adrian; Lüke, Claudia; Cao, Zhihong; Frenzel, Peter

    2011-12-01

    Rice is the staple food for more than half of the world's growing population. While the area planted to wetland rice is expected to increase further, virtually nothing is known about the long-term development of the respective microbial communities, and how these might influence biogeochemistry. Focusing on methane oxidizing bacteria, we studied a chronosequence of paddy fields in China aged 50-2000 years. Potential methanotrophic activity increased substantially with age of soil. Community composition was relatively similar in all fields. However, growth and activity of one particular subgroup of methanotrophs correlated to soil age suggesting an intricate abiotic control on methanotrophs evolving with time. Our results demonstrate that continuous rice agriculture does not only shape the microbial community, but also modifies the micro-environment in a way enabling faster growth and higher activity of selected populations.

  6. Interactions between nitrogen cycling and methane oxidation in the pelagic waters of the Gulf of Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joye, S. B.; Weber, S.; Battles, J.; Montoya, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas that plays a critical role in climate variation. Although a variety of marine methane sources and sinks have been identified, key aspects of the fate of methane in the ocean remain poorly constrained. At cold seeps in the Gulf of Mexico and elsewhere, methane is introduced into the overlying water column via fluid escape from the seabed. We quantified the fate of methane in the water column overlying seafloor cold seeps, in a brine basin, and at several control sites. Our goals were to determine the factors that regulated methane consumption and assimilation and to explore how these controlling factors varied among and between sites. In particular, we examined the impact of nitrogen availability on methane oxidation and studied the ability of methane oxidizing bacteria to fix molecular nitrogen. Methane oxidation rates were highest in the methane rich bottom waters of natural hydrocabron seeps. At these sites, inorganic nitrogen addition stimulated methane oxidation in laboratory experiments. In vitro shipboard experiments revealed that rates of methane oxidation and nitrogen fixation were correlated strongly, suggesting that nitrogen fixation may have been mediated by methanotrophic bacteria. The highest rates of methane oxidation and nitrogen fixation were observed in the deepwater above at natural hydrocarbon seeps. Rates of methane oxidation were substantial along the chemocline of a brine basin but in these ammonium-rich brines, addition of inorganic nitrogen had little impact on methane oxidation suggesting that methanotrophy in these waters were not nitrogen limited. Control sites exhibited the lowest methane concentrations and methane oxidation rates but even these waters exhibited substantial potential for methane oxidation when methane and inorganic nitrogen concentrations were increased. Together, these data suggest that the availability of inorganic nitrogen plays a critical role in regulating methane oxidation in

  7. Alpha- and Gammaproteobacterial Methanotrophs Codominate the Active Methane-Oxidizing Communities in an Acidic Boreal Peat Bog

    PubMed Central

    Esson, Kaitlin C.; Lin, Xueju; Kumaresan, Deepak; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Murrell, J. Colin

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize metabolically active, aerobic methanotrophs in an ombrotrophic peatland in the Marcell Experimental Forest, in Minnesota. Methanotrophs were investigated in the field and in laboratory incubations using DNA-stable isotope probing (SIP), expression studies on particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA) genes, and amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Potential rates of oxidation ranged from 14 to 17 μmol of CH4 g dry weight soil−1 day−1. Within DNA-SIP incubations, the relative abundance of methanotrophs increased from 4% in situ to 25 to 36% after 8 to 14 days. Phylogenetic analysis of the 13C-enriched DNA fractions revealed that the active methanotrophs were dominated by the genera Methylocystis (type II; Alphaproteobacteria), Methylomonas, and Methylovulum (both, type I; Gammaproteobacteria). In field samples, a transcript-to-gene ratio of 1 to 2 was observed for pmoA in surface peat layers, which attenuated rapidly with depth, indicating that the highest methane consumption was associated with a depth of 0 to 10 cm. Metagenomes and sequencing of cDNA pmoA amplicons from field samples confirmed that the dominant active methanotrophs were Methylocystis and Methylomonas. Although type II methanotrophs have long been shown to mediate methane consumption in peatlands, our results indicate that members of the genera Methylomonas and Methylovulum (type I) can significantly contribute to aerobic methane oxidation in these ecosystems. PMID:26873322

  8. Alpha- and Gammaproteobacterial Methanotrophs Codominate the Active Methane-Oxidizing Communities in an Acidic Boreal Peat Bog.

    PubMed

    Esson, Kaitlin C; Lin, Xueju; Kumaresan, Deepak; Chanton, Jeffrey P; Murrell, J Colin; Kostka, Joel E

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize metabolically active, aerobic methanotrophs in an ombrotrophic peatland in the Marcell Experimental Forest, in Minnesota. Methanotrophs were investigated in the field and in laboratory incubations using DNA-stable isotope probing (SIP), expression studies on particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA) genes, and amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Potential rates of oxidation ranged from 14 to 17 μmol of CH4g dry weight soil(-1)day(-1) Within DNA-SIP incubations, the relative abundance of methanotrophs increased from 4% in situ to 25 to 36% after 8 to 14 days. Phylogenetic analysis of the(13)C-enriched DNA fractions revealed that the active methanotrophs were dominated by the genera Methylocystis(type II;Alphaproteobacteria),Methylomonas, and Methylovulum(both, type I;Gammaproteobacteria). In field samples, a transcript-to-gene ratio of 1 to 2 was observed for pmoA in surface peat layers, which attenuated rapidly with depth, indicating that the highest methane consumption was associated with a depth of 0 to 10 cm. Metagenomes and sequencing of cDNA pmoA amplicons from field samples confirmed that the dominant active methanotrophs were Methylocystis and Methylomonas Although type II methanotrophs have long been shown to mediate methane consumption in peatlands, our results indicate that members of the genera Methylomonas and Methylovulum(type I) can significantly contribute to aerobic methane oxidation in these ecosystems.

  9. Graphene oxide as an optimal candidate material for methane storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouhan, Rajiv K.; Ulman, Kanchan; Narasimhan, Shobhana

    2015-07-01

    Methane, the primary constituent of natural gas, binds too weakly to nanostructured carbons to meet the targets set for on-board vehicular storage to be viable. We show, using density functional theory calculations, that replacing graphene by graphene oxide increases the adsorption energy of methane by 50%. This enhancement is sufficient to achieve the optimal binding strength. In order to gain insight into the sources of this increased binding, that could also be used to formulate design principles for novel storage materials, we consider a sequence of model systems that progressively take us from graphene to graphene oxide. A careful analysis of the various contributions to the weak binding between the methane molecule and the graphene oxide shows that the enhancement has important contributions from London dispersion interactions as well as electrostatic interactions such as Debye interactions, aided by geometric curvature induced primarily by the presence of epoxy groups.

  10. Manganese- and iron-dependent marine methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Beal, Emily J; House, Christopher H; Orphan, Victoria J

    2009-07-10

    Anaerobic methanotrophs help regulate Earth's climate and may have been an important part of the microbial ecosystem on the early Earth. The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is often thought of as a sulfate-dependent process, despite the fact that other electron acceptors are more energetically favorable. Here, we show that microorganisms from marine methane-seep sediment in the Eel River Basin in California are capable of using manganese (birnessite) and iron (ferrihydrite) to oxidize methane, revealing that marine AOM is coupled, either directly or indirectly, to a larger variety of oxidants than previously thought. Large amounts of manganese and iron are provided to oceans from rivers, indicating that manganese- and iron-dependent AOM have the potential to be globally important.

  11. Graphene oxide as an optimal candidate material for methane storage.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, Rajiv K; Ulman, Kanchan; Narasimhan, Shobhana

    2015-07-28

    Methane, the primary constituent of natural gas, binds too weakly to nanostructured carbons to meet the targets set for on-board vehicular storage to be viable. We show, using density functional theory calculations, that replacing graphene by graphene oxide increases the adsorption energy of methane by 50%. This enhancement is sufficient to achieve the optimal binding strength. In order to gain insight into the sources of this increased binding, that could also be used to formulate design principles for novel storage materials, we consider a sequence of model systems that progressively take us from graphene to graphene oxide. A careful analysis of the various contributions to the weak binding between the methane molecule and the graphene oxide shows that the enhancement has important contributions from London dispersion interactions as well as electrostatic interactions such as Debye interactions, aided by geometric curvature induced primarily by the presence of epoxy groups.

  12. Exopolysaccharide control of methane oxidation in landfill cover soil

    SciTech Connect

    Hilger, H.A.; Liehr, S.K.; Barlaz, M.A.

    1999-12-01

    The study objective was to examine whether a relationship exists between the accumulation of exopolymeric substances (EPS) in landfill cover soil and the gradual decline in biotic methane oxidation observed in laboratory soil columns sparged with synthetic landfill gas. A mathematical model that combined multicomponent gas diffusion along the vertical axis of the columns with biotic methane oxidation was used to predict vertical gas gradients in the columns. An initial trial assumed methane oxidizers were embedded in a thin base layer of biofilm coating the soil, and the model predictions fit experimental data from soil columns early in their operating period. A second trial modeled the same system with a thick EPS layer coating the base biofilm and limiting diffusion of gases into and out of the cells. Predictions from the alter trials fit experimental data from soil columns later in their operating period when lower methane consumption rates were observed. The model results suggest that EPS accumulation may regulate methane oxidation rates in landfill covers.

  13. A Metagenomics-Based Metabolic Model of Nitrate-Dependent Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane by Methanoperedens-Like Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Arslan; Speth, Daan R.; de Graaf, Rob M.; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Welte, Cornelia U.

    2015-01-01

    Methane oxidation is an important process to mitigate the emission of the greenhouse gas methane and further exacerbating of climate forcing. Both aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms have been reported to catalyze methane oxidation with only a few possible electron acceptors. Recently, new microorganisms were identified that could couple the oxidation of methane to nitrate or nitrite reduction. Here we investigated such an enrichment culture at the (meta) genomic level to establish a metabolic model of nitrate-driven anaerobic oxidation of methane (nitrate-AOM). Nitrate-AOM is catalyzed by an archaeon closely related to (reverse) methanogens that belongs to the ANME-2d clade, tentatively named Methanoperedens nitroreducens. Methane may be activated by methyl-CoM reductase and subsequently undergo full oxidation to carbon dioxide via reverse methanogenesis. All enzymes of this pathway were present and expressed in the investigated culture. The genome of the archaeal enrichment culture encoded a variety of enzymes involved in an electron transport chain similar to those found in Methanosarcina species with additional features not previously found in methane-converting archaea. Nitrate reduction to nitrite seems to be located in the pseudoperiplasm and may be catalyzed by an unusual Nar-like protein complex. A small part of the resulting nitrite is reduced to ammonium which may be catalyzed by a Nrf-type nitrite reductase. One of the key questions is how electrons from cytoplasmically located reverse methanogenesis reach the nitrate reductase in the pseudoperiplasm. Electron transport in M. nitroreducens probably involves cofactor F420 in the cytoplasm, quinones in the cytoplasmic membrane and cytochrome c in the pseudoperiplasm. The membrane-bound electron transport chain includes F420H2 dehydrogenase and an unusual Rieske/cytochrome b complex. Based on genome and transcriptome studies a tentative model of how central energy metabolism of nitrate-AOM could work is

  14. Alkane Oxidation: Methane Monooxygenases, Related Enzymes, and Their Biomimetics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Vincent C-C; Maji, Suman; Chen, Peter P-Y; Lee, Hung Kay; Yu, Steve S-F; Chan, Sunney I

    2017-02-16

    Methane monooxygenases (MMOs) mediate the facile conversion of methane into methanol in methanotrophic bacteria with high efficiency under ambient conditions. Because the selective oxidation of methane is extremely challenging, there is considerable interest in understanding how these enzymes carry out this difficult chemistry. The impetus of these efforts is to learn from the microbes to develop a biomimetic catalyst to accomplish the same chemical transformation. Here, we review the progress made over the past two to three decades toward delineating the structures and functions of the catalytic sites in two MMOs: soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). sMMO is a water-soluble three-component protein complex consisting of a hydroxylase with a nonheme diiron catalytic site; pMMO is a membrane-bound metalloenzyme with a unique tricopper cluster as the site of hydroxylation. The metal cluster in each of these MMOs harnesses O2 to functionalize the C-H bond using different chemistry. We highlight some of the common basic principles that they share. Finally, the development of functional models of the catalytic sites of MMOs is described. These efforts have culminated in the first successful biomimetic catalyst capable of efficient methane oxidation without overoxidation at room temperature.

  15. Elimination of methane in exhaust gas from biogas upgrading process by immobilized methane-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ya-Min; Yang, Jing; Fan, Xiao-Lei; Fu, Shan-Fei; Sun, Meng-Ting; Guo, Rong-Bo

    2017-01-13

    Biogas upgrading is essential for the comprehensive utilization of biogas as substitute of natural gas. However, the methane in the biogas can be fully recovered during the upgrading process of biogas, and the exhaust gas produced during biogas upgrading may contain a very low concentration of methane. If the exhaust gas with low concentration methane releases to atmosphere, it will be harmful to environment. In addition, the utilization of large amounts of digestate produced from biogas plant is another important issue for the development of biogas industry. In this study, solid digestate was used to produce active carbon, which was subsequently used as immobilized material for methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) in biofilter. Biofilter with MOB immobilized on active carbon was used to eliminate the methane in exhaust gas from biogas upgrading process. Results showed porous active carbon was successfully made from solid digestate. The final methane elimination capacity of immobilized MOB reached about 13molh(-1)m(-3), which was more 4 times higher than that of MOB without immobilization.

  16. Microbial methane oxidation processes and technologies for mitigation of landfill gas emissions.

    PubMed

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter; Bogner, Jean E; De Visscher, Alex; Gebert, Julia; Hilger, Helene A; Huber-Humer, Marion; Spokas, Kurt

    2009-08-01

    Landfill gas containing methane is produced by anaerobic degradation of organic waste. Methane is a strong greenhouse gas and landfills are one of the major anthropogenic sources of atmospheric methane. Landfill methane may be oxidized by methanotrophic microorganisms in soils or waste materials utilizing oxygen that diffuses into the cover layer from the atmosphere. The methane oxidation process, which is governed by several environmental factors, can be exploited in engineered systems developed for methane emission mitigation. Mathematical models that account for methane oxidation can be used to predict methane emissions from landfills. Additional research and technology development is needed before methane mitigation technologies utilizing microbial methane oxidation processes can become commercially viable and widely deployed.

  17. Catalytic Aerobic Dehydrogenation of Nitrogen Heterocycles Using Heterogeneous Cobalt Oxide Supported on Nitrogen-Doped Carbon.

    PubMed

    Iosub, Andrei V; Stahl, Shannon S

    2015-09-18

    Dehydrogenation of (partially) saturated heterocycles provides an important route to heteroaromatic compounds. A heterogeneous cobalt oxide catalyst, previously employed for aerobic oxidation of alcohols and amines, is shown to be effective for aerobic dehydrogenation of various 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinolines to the corresponding quinolines. The reactions proceed in good yields under mild conditions. Other N-heterocycles are also successfully oxidized to their aromatic counterparts.

  18. Methane and nitrous oxide in the ice core record.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Eric; Spahni, Renato

    2007-07-15

    Polar ice cores contain, in trapped air bubbles, an archive of the concentrations of stable atmospheric gases. Of the major non-CO2 greenhouse gases, methane is measured quite routinely, while nitrous oxide is more challenging, with some artefacts occurring in the ice and so far limited interpretation. In the recent past, the ice cores provide the only direct measure of the changes that have occurred during the industrial period; they show that the current concentration of methane in the atmosphere is far outside the range experienced in the last 650,000 years; nitrous oxide is also elevated above its natural levels. There is controversy about whether changes in the pre-industrial Holocene are natural or anthropogenic in origin. Changes in wetland emissions are generally cited as the main cause of the large glacial-interglacial change in methane. However, changing sinks must also be considered, and the impact of possible newly described sources evaluated. Recent isotopic data appear to finally rule out any major impact of clathrate releases on methane at these time-scales. Any explanation must take into account that, at the rapid Dansgaard-Oeschger warmings of the last glacial period, methane rose by around half its glacial-interglacial range in only a few decades. The recent EPICA Dome C (Antarctica) record shows that methane tracked climate over the last 650,000 years, with lower methane concentrations in glacials than interglacials, and lower concentrations in cooler interglacials than in warmer ones. Nitrous oxide also shows Dansgaard-Oeschger and glacial-interglacial periodicity, but the pattern is less clear.

  19. Anaerobic methane oxidation in two tropical freshwater systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Fleur; Darchambeau, François; Crowe, Sean A.; Borges, Alberto V.

    2014-05-01

    Lake Kivu is one of the East African Great Lakes. It is located at the border between Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is a deep meromictic lake characterized by huge amounts of methane (CH4) (60 km3 at 0° C and 1 atm) dissolved in its deep waters. Two thirds of the CH4 originates from anoxic bacterial reduction of dissolved carbon dioxide and one third from anaerobic degradation of settling organic material. CH4 then diffuses slowly from the monimolimnion to surface waters where many is oxidised by methanotrophic microorganisms. In Lake Kivu, this biological oxidation of CH4 could occur with different final electron acceptors: oxygen (aerobic oxidation) but also nitrate (NO3-), nitrite, sulfate (SO42-), iron (Fe) or manganese (Mn) in anaerobic conditions. If the anaerobic oxidation of CH4 (AOM) is generally coupled to SO42- reduction in marine waters, electron acceptors of the AOM were rarely investigated in freshwater systems. Five field campaigns were conducted from 2011 to 2013 during periods with contrasted ventilations of the upper water column. The dry season is characterized by a deeper mixing of surface waters ended by a steep gradient of physico-chemical conditions at the redox interface, while during the rainy season the mixed layer is shallower and ended at its deeper part by a NO3- accumulation zone. Sampling was conducted in the main basin of Lake Kivu but also in a particular sub-basin located northeast of the lake, the Kabuno Bay. Both systems are meromictic but differ in terms of morphometry and geochemistry with a shallower permanent chemocline and higher concentrations of CH4, Fe and Mn in the anoxic waters in Kabuno Bay compared to the main lake. Samples were collected for the measurements of CH4 concentrations and the various potential electron acceptors of the AOM. CH4 oxidation rates were measured along vertical profiles at 5 m and 0.5 m depth intervals respectively in the main basin and Kabuno bay water columns. Results

  20. 40 CFR Table Hh-4 to Subpart Hh of... - Landfill Methane Oxidation Fractions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Landfill Methane Oxidation Fractions.... 98, Subpt. HH, Table HH-4 Table HH-4 to Subpart HH of Part 98—Landfill Methane Oxidation Fractions... soil prior to any oxidation and is calculated as follows: ER29NO13.024 Where: MF = Methane flux...

  1. Carbon isotope equilibration during sulphate-limited anaerobic oxidation of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, Marcos Y.; Holler, Thomas; Goldhammer, Tobias; Wegener, Gunter; Pohlman, John W.; Brunner, Benjamin; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Elvert, Marcus

    2014-03-01

    Collectively, marine sediments comprise the largest reservoir of methane on Earth. The flux of methane from the sea bed to the overlying water column is mitigated by the sulphate-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane by marine microbes within a discrete sedimentary horizon termed the sulphate-methane transition zone. According to conventional isotope systematics, the biological consumption of methane leaves a residue of methane enriched in 13C (refs , , ). However, in many instances the methane within sulphate-methane transition zones is depleted in 13C, consistent with the production of methane, and interpreted as evidence for the intertwined anaerobic oxidation and production of methane. Here, we report results from experiments in which we incubated cultures of microbial methane consumers with methane and low levels of sulphate, and monitored the stable isotope composition of the methane and dissolved inorganic carbon pools over time. Residual methane became progressively enriched in 13C at sulphate concentrations above 0.5 mM, and progressively depleted in 13C below this threshold. We attribute the shift to 13C depletion during the anaerobic oxidation of methane at low sulphate concentrations to the microbially mediated carbon isotope equilibration between methane and carbon dioxide. We suggest that this isotopic effect could help to explain the 13C-depletion of methane in subseafloor sulphate-methane transition zones.

  2. Oxidation of methane by a biological dicopper centre.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Ramakrishnan; Smith, Stephen M; Rawat, Swati; Yatsunyk, Liliya A; Stemmler, Timothy L; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2010-05-06

    Vast world reserves of methane gas are underutilized as a feedstock for the production of liquid fuels and chemicals owing to the lack of economical and sustainable strategies for the selective oxidation of methane to methanol. Current processes to activate the strong C-H bond (104 kcal mol(-1)) in methane require high temperatures, are costly and inefficient, and produce waste. In nature, methanotrophic bacteria perform this reaction under ambient conditions using metalloenzymes called methane monooxygenases (MMOs). MMOs thus provide the optimal model for an efficient, environmentally sound catalyst. There are two types of MMO. Soluble MMO (sMMO) is expressed by several strains of methanotroph under copper-limited conditions and oxidizes methane with a well-characterized catalytic di-iron centre. Particulate MMO (pMMO) is an integral membrane metalloenzyme produced by all methanotrophs and is composed of three subunits, pmoA, pmoB and pmoC, arranged in a trimeric alpha(3)beta(3)gamma(3) complex. Despite 20 years of research and the availability of two crystal structures, the metal composition and location of the pMMO metal active site are not known. Here we show that pMMO activity is dependent on copper, not iron, and that the copper active site is located in the soluble domains of the pmoB subunit rather than within the membrane. Recombinant soluble fragments of pmoB (spmoB) bind copper and have propylene and methane oxidation activities. Disruption of each copper centre in spmoB by mutagenesis indicates that the active site is a dicopper centre. These findings help resolve the pMMO controversy and provide a promising new approach to developing environmentally friendly C-H oxidation catalysts.

  3. Response of Atmospheric-Methane Oxidation to Methane-Flux Manipulation in a Laboratory Soil-Column Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroth, M. H.; Mignola, I.; Henneberger, R.

    2015-12-01

    Upland soils are an important sink for atmospheric methane (CH4). Uptake of atmospheric CH4 in soils is generally diffusion limited, and is mediated by aerobic CH4 oxidizing bacteria (MOB) that possess a high-affinity form of a key enzyme, allowing CH4 consumption at near-atmospheric concentrations (≤ 1.9 µL/L). As cultivation attempts for these high-affinity MOB have shown little success, there remains much speculation regarding their functioning in different environments. For example, it is frequently assumed that they are highly sensitive to physical disturbance, but their response in activity and abundance to changes in substrate availability remains largely unknown. We present results of a laboratory column experiment conducted to investigate the response in activity and abundance of high-affinity MOB to an increase in CH4 flux. Intact soil cores, collected at a field site where atmospheric CH4 oxidation activity is frequently quantified, were transferred into two 1-m-long, 12-cm-dia. columns. The columns were operated at constant temperature in the dark, their headspace being continuously flushed with air. Diffusive gas-transport conditions were maintained in the reference column, whereas CH4 flux was increased in several steps in the treatment column by inducing advective gas flow using a diaphragm pump. Soil-gas samples periodically collected from ports installed along the length of the columns were analyzed for CH4 content. Together with measurements of soil-water content, atmospheric CH4 oxidation was quantified using the soil-profile method. First results indicate that atmospheric CH4 oxidation activity comparable with the field was maintained in the reference column throughout the experiment. Moreover, high-affinity MOB quickly adjusted to an increase in CH4 flux in the treatment column, efficiently consuming CH4. Quantification of MOB abundance is currently ongoing. Our data provide new insights into controls on atmospheric CH4 oxidation in soils.

  4. Links between methane flux and transcriptional activities of methanogens and methane oxidizers in a blanket peat bog.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Thomas E; Toet, Sylvia; Ineson, Phil; Prosser, James I

    2010-07-01

    The relationship between biogeochemical process rates and microbial functional activity was investigated by analysis of the transcriptional dynamics of the key functional genes for methanogenesis (methyl coenzyme M reductase; mcrA) and methane oxidation (particulate methane monooxygenase; pmoA) and in situ methane flux at two peat soil field sites with contrasting net methane-emitting and -oxidizing characteristics. qPCR was used to quantify the abundances of mcrA and pmoA genes and transcripts at two soil depths. Total methanogen and methanotroph transcriptional dynamics, calculated from mcrA and pmoA gene : transcript abundance ratios, were similar at both sites and depths. However, a linear relationship was demonstrated between surface mcrA and pmoA transcript dynamics and surface flux rates at the methane-emitting and methane-oxidizing sites, respectively. Results indicate that methanotroph activity was at least partially substrate-limited at the methane-emitting site and by other factors at the methane-oxidizing site. Soil depth also contributed to the control of surface methane fluxes, but to a lesser extent. Small differences in the soil water content may have contributed to differences in methanogen and methanotroph activities. This study therefore provides a first insight into the regulation of in situ, field-level surface CH(4) flux at the molecular level by an accurate reflection of gene : transcript abundance ratios for the key genes in methane generation and consumption.

  5. Nitrogen oxides and methane treatment by non-thermal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva, E.; Pacheco, M.; Colín, A.; Sánchez, V.; Pacheco, J.; Valdivia, R.; Soria, G.

    2015-03-01

    Non thermal plasma was used to treat nitrogen oxides (NOx) and methane (CH4), since they are important constituents of hydrocarbon combustion emissions processes and, both gases, play a key role in the formation of tropospheric ozone. These gases are involved in environmental problems like acid rain and some diseases such as bronchitis and pneumonia. In the case of methane is widely known its importance in the global climate change, and currently accounts for 30% of global warming. There is a growing concern for methane leaks, associated with a rapid expansion of unconventional oil and gas extraction techniques as well as a large-scale methane release from Arctic because of ice melting and the subsequent methane production of decaying organic matter. Therefore, methane mitigation is a key to avoid dangerous levels of global warming. The research, here reported, deals about the generation of non-thermal plasma with a double dielectric barrier (2DBD) at atmospheric pressure with alternating current (AC) for NOx and CH4 treatment. The degradation efficiencies and their respective power consumption for different reactor configurations (cylindrical and planar) are also reported. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of gases degradation are reported before and after treatment with cold plasma. Experimental and theoretical results are compared obtaining good removal efficiencies, superior to 90% and to 20% respectively for NOx and CH4.

  6. Activity, distribution, and abundance of methane-oxidizing bacteria in the near surface soils of onshore oil and gas fields.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kewei; Tang, Yuping; Ren, Chun; Zhao, Kebin; Wang, Wanmeng; Sun, Yongge

    2013-09-01

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) have long been used as an important biological indicator for oil and gas prospecting, but the ecological characteristics of MOB in hydrocarbon microseep systems are still poorly understood. In this study, the activity, distribution, and abundance of aerobic methanotrophic communities in the surface soils underlying an oil and gas field were investigated using biogeochemical and molecular ecological techniques. Measurements of potential methane oxidation rates and pmoA gene copy numbers showed that soils inside an oil and gas field are hot spots of methane oxidation and MOB abundance. Correspondingly, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses in combination with cloning and sequencing of pmoA genes also revealed considerable differences in the methanotrophic community composition between oil and gas fields and the surrounding soils. Principal component analysis ordination furthermore indicated a coincidence between elevated CH4 oxidation activity and the methanotrophic community structure with type I methanotrophic Methylococcus and Methylobacter, in particular, as indicator species of oil and gas fields. Collectively, our results show that trace methane migrated from oil and gas reservoirs can considerably influence not only the quantity but also the structure of the methanotrophic community.

  7. Performance evaluation of micro-aerobic hydrolysis of mixed sludge: Optimum aeration and effect on its biochemical methane potential.

    PubMed

    Montalvo, Silvio; Ojeda, Felipe; Huiliñir, César; Guerrero, Lorna; Borja, Rafael; Castillo, Alejandra

    2016-12-05

    This study evaluated the performance of a micro-aerobic hydrolysis of mixed sludge and its influence as a pretreatment of this waste for its subsequent anaerobic digestion. Three experimental series were carried out to evaluate the optimum micro-aeration levels in the range from 0.1 to 0.5 air volume/min.reactor volume (vvm) and operation times within the range of 24-60 h. The maximum methane yield [35 mL CH4/g volatile suspended solids (VSS) added] was obtained for an aeration level of 0.35 vvm. This methane yield value increased 114% with respect to that obtained with the non-aerated sludge. In the micro-aeration process carried out at an aeration level of 0.35 vvm, increases in soluble proteins and total sugars concentrations of 185% and 192% with respect to their initial values were found, respectively, after 48 h of aeration. At the above micro-aerobic conditions, soluble chemical oxygen demand (CODS) augmented 150%, whereas VSS content decreased until 40% of their initial respective values. Higher COD increases and VSS decreases were found at 60 h of micro-aeration, but the above parameters did not vary significantly with respect to the values found at 48 h.

  8. Semi-aerobic fermentation as a novel pre-treatment to obtain VFA and increase methane yield from primary sludge.

    PubMed

    Peces, M; Astals, S; Clarke, W P; Jensen, P D

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing trend to consider organic wastes as potential sources of renewable energy and value-add products. Fermentation products have emerged as attractive value-add option due to relative easy production and broad application range. However, pre-fermentation and extraction of soluble products may impact down-stream treatment processes, particularly energy recovery by anaerobic digestion. This paper investigates primary sludge pre-fermentation at different temperatures (20, 37, 55, and 70°C), treatment times (12, 24, 48, and 72h), and oxygen availability (semi-aerobic, anaerobic); and its impact on anaerobic digestion. Pre-fermentation at 20 and 37°C succeeded for VFA production with acetate and propionate being major products. Pre-fermentation at 37, 55, and 70°C resulted in higher solubilisation yield but it reduced sludge methane potential by 20%. Under semi-aerobic conditions, pre-fermentation allowed both VFA recovery (43gCODVFAkg(-1)VS) and improved methane potential. The latter phenomenon was linked to fungi that colonised the sludge top layer during pre-fermentation.

  9. Anaerobic oxidation of methane in the Concepción Methane Seep Area, Chilean continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steeb, P.; Linke, P.; Scholz, F.; Schmidt, M.; Liebetrau, V.; Treude, T.

    2012-04-01

    Within subduction zones of active continental margins, large amounts of methane can be mobilized by dewatering processes and transported to the seafloor along migration pathways. A recently discovered seep area located off Concepción (Chile) at water depth between 600 to 1100 mbsl is characterized by active methane vent sites as well as massive carbonates boulders and plates which probably are related to methane seepage in the past. During the SO210 research expedition "Chiflux" (Sept-Oct 2010), sediment from the Concepción Methane Seep Area (CSMA) at the fore arc of the Chilean margin was sampled to study microbial activity related to methane seepage. We sampled surface sediments (0-30cm) from sulfur bacteria mats, as well as clam, pogonophoran, and tubeworm fields with push cores and a TV-guided multicorer system. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and sulfate reduction rates were determined using ex-situ radioisotope tracer techniques. Additionally, porewater chemistry of retrieved cores as well as isotopic composition and age record of surrounding authigenic carbonates were analyzed. The shallowest sulfate-methane-transition zone (SMTZ) was identified at 4 cm sediment depth hinting to locally strong fluid fluxes. However, a lack of Cl- anomalies in porewater profiles indicates a shallow source of these fluids, which is supported by the biogenic origin of the methane (δ13C -70‰ PDB). Sulfide and alkalinity was relatively high (up to 20 mM and 40 mEq, respectively). Rates of AOM and sulfate reduction within this area reached magnitudes typical for seeps with variation between different habitat types, indicating a diverse methane supply, which is affecting the depths of the SMTZ. Rates were highest at sulfur a bacteria mats (20 mmol m-2 d-1) followed by a large field of dead clams, a pogonophoran field, a black sediment spot, and a carbonate rich clam field. Lowest rates (0.2 mmol m-2 d-1) were measured in close vicinity to these hot spots. Abundant massive

  10. Importance of methane-oxidizing bacteria in the methane budget as revealed by the use of a specific inhibitor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Culbertson, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    METHANE is a greenhouse gas whose concentration in the atmosphere is increasing1-3 Much of this methane is derived from the metabolism of methane-generating (methanogenic) bacteria4,5, and over the past two decades much has been learned about the ecology of methanogens; specific inhibitors of methanogenesis, such as 2-bromoethanesulphonic acid, have proved useful in this regard6. In contrast, although much is known about the biochemistry of methane-oxidizing (methanotrophic) bacteria7, ecological investigations have been hampered by the lack of an analogous specific inhibitor6. Methanotrophs limit the flux of methane to the atmosphere from sediments8,9 and consume atmospheric methane10, but the quantitative importance of methanotrophy in the global methane budget is not well known5. Methylfluoride (CH3F) is known to inhibit oxygen consumption by Methylococcus capsulatus11, and to inhibit the oxidation of 14CH4 to 14CO2 by endosymbionts in mussel gill tissues12. Here we report that methylfluoride (MF) inhibits the oxidation of methane by methane monooxygenase, and by using methylfluoride in field investigations, we find that methanotrophic bacteria can consume more than 90% of the methane potentially available.

  11. The effect of coal bed dewatering and partial oxidation on biogenic methane potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Elizabeth J.P.; Harris, Steve H.; Barnhart, Elliott P.; Orem, William H.; Clark, Arthur C.; Corum, Margo D.; Kirshtein, Julie D.; Varonka, Matthew S.; Voytek, Mary A.

    2013-01-01

    Coal formation dewatering at a site in the Powder River Basin was associated with enhanced potential for secondary biogenic methane determined by using a bioassay. We hypothesized that dewatering can stimulate microbial activity and increase the bioavailability of coal. We analyzed one dewatered and two water-saturated coals to examine possible ways in which dewatering influences coal bed natural gas biogenesis by looking at differences with respect to the native coal microbial community, coal-methane organic intermediates, and residual coal oxidation potential. Microbial biomass did not increase in response to dewatering. Small Subunit rRNA sequences retrieved from all coals sampled represented members from genera known to be aerobic, anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic. A Bray Curtis similarity analysis indicated that the microbial communities in water-saturated coals were more similar to each other than to the dewatered coal, suggesting an effect of dewatering. There was a higher incidence of long chain and volatile fatty acid intermediates in incubations of the dewatered coal compared to the water-saturated coals, and this could either be due to differences in microbial enzymatic activities or to chemical oxidation of the coal associated with O2 exposure. Dilute H2O2 treatment of two fractions of structural coal (kerogen and bitumen + kerogen) was used as a proxy for chemical oxidation by O2. The dewatered coal had a low residual oxidation potential compared to the water-saturated coals. Oxidation with 5% H2O2 did increase the bioavailability of structural coal, and the increase in residual oxidation potential in the water saturated coals was approximately equivalent to the higher methanogenic potential measured in the dewatered coal. Evidence from this study supports the idea that coal bed dewatering could stimulate biogenic methanogenesis through partial oxidation of the structural organics in coal once anaerobic conditions are restored.

  12. A mild oxidative aryl radical addition into alkenes by aerobic oxidation of arylhydrazines.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Tsuyoshi; Zaimoku, Hisaaki; Ishibashi, Hiroyuki

    2011-04-04

    A mild and practical oxyarylation of alkenes by oxidative radical addition has been developed by using aerobic oxidation of hydrazine compounds. The use of a catalytic amount of potassium ferrocyanide trihydrate (K(4)[Fe(CN)(6)]⋅3H(2)O) and water accelerated this radical reaction to give peroxides or alcohols from simple alkenes in good yields. The environmentally friendly and economical radical reactions were achieved at room temperature in the presence of iron catalyst, oxygen gas, and water. A method involving aniline as a radical precursor is also described.

  13. Methane oxidation over dual redox catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Sojka, Z.

    1989-03-01

    Review and analysis of the literature data on electron transfer itself and electron transfer oxidation of alkyl radicals was done in order to understand the mechanism by which methyl radical can be oxidized to CH{sub 3}{sup +} and further substituted by OH{sup {minus}} to form methanol. This allowed to compare and classify the various possible reaction patterns, understand the mechanism and circumstances of operation of each of them and select those which can be involved in oxidation of methyl radical. As a result an approach that is complementary to catalytic test studies was proposed. It consists of investigation of a set of partial reactions which reproduce a whole catalytic cycle in order to prove the reaction mechanism. Synthesis of new oxide catalysts of the delafossite type, containing concentrated double redox sites, were designed. Synthesis of hydrozincite as a starting material for the preparation of doubly doped zinc oxide was performed.

  14. A four-helix bundle stores copper for methane oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Vita, Nicolas; Platsaki, Semeli; Baslé, Arnaud; Allen, Stephen J.; Paterson, Neil G.; Crombie, Andrew T.; Murrell, J. Colin; Waldron, Kevin J.; Dennison, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Methane-oxidising bacteria (methanotrophs) require large quantities of copper for the membrane-bound (particulate) methane monooxygenase (pMMO)1,2. Certain methanotrophs are also able to switch to using the iron-containing soluble MMO (sMMO) to catalyse methane oxidation, with this switchover regulated by copper3,4. MMOs are Nature’s primary biological mechanism for suppressing atmospheric levels of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Furthermore, methanotrophs and MMOs have enormous potential in bioremediation and for biotransformations producing bulk and fine chemicals, and in bioenergy, particularly considering increased methane availability from renewable sources and hydraulic fracturing of shale rock5,6. We have discovered and characterised a novel copper storage protein (Csp1) from the methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b that is exported from the cytosol, and stores copper for pMMO. Csp1 is a tetramer of 4-helix bundles with each monomer binding up to 13 Cu(I) ions in a previously unseen manner via mainly Cys residues that point into the core of the bundle. Csp1 is the first example of a protein that stores a metal within an established protein-folding motif. This work provides a detailed insight into how methanotrophs accumulate copper for the oxidation of methane. Understanding this process is essential if the wide-ranging biotechnological applications of methanotrophs are to be realised. Cytosolic homologues of Csp1 are present in diverse bacteria thus challenging the dogma that such organisms do not use copper in this location. PMID:26308900

  15. Methane Sensitivity to Perturbations in Tropospheric Oxidizing Capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yegorova, Elena; Duncan, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and has a 25 times greater global warming potential than CO2 on a century timescale. Yet there are considerable uncertainties in the magnitude and variability of its sources and sinks. The response of the coupled non-linear methane-carbon monoxide-hydroxyl radical (OH) system is important in determining the tropospheric oxidizing capacity. Using the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) chemistry climate model, we study the response of methane to perturbations of OH and wetland emissions. We use a computationally-efficient option of the GEOS-5 CCM that includes an OH parameterization that accurately represents OH predicted by a full chemical mechanism. The OH parameterization allows for studying non-linear CH4-CO-OH feedbacks in computationally fast sensitivity experiments. We compare our results with surface observations (GMD) and discuss the range of uncertainty in OH and wetland emissions required to bring modeling results in better agreement with surface observations. Our results can be used to improve projections of methane emissions and methane growth.

  16. Constraints on methane oxidation in ice-covered boreal lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denfeld, Blaize A.; Ricão Canelhas, Monica; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.; Bertilsson, Stefan; Eiler, Alexander; Bastviken, David

    2016-07-01

    Boreal lakes can be ice covered for a substantial portion of the year at which time methane (CH4) can accumulate below ice. The amount of CH4 emitted at ice melt is partially determined by the interplay between CH4 production and CH4 oxidation, performed by methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB). Yet the balance between oxidation and emission and the potential for CH4 oxidation in various lakes during winter is largely unknown. To address this, we performed incubations at 2°C to screen for wintertime CH4 oxidation potential in seven lakes. Results showed that CH4 oxidation was restricted to three lakes, where the phosphate concentrations were highest. Molecular analyses revealed that MOB were initially detected in all lakes, although an increase in type I MOB only occurred in the three lake water incubations where oxidation could be observed. Accordingly, the increase in CO2 was on average 5 times higher in these three lake water incubations. For one lake where no oxidation was measured, we tested if temperature and CH4 availability could trigger CH4 oxidation. However, regardless of incubation temperatures and CH4 concentrations, ranging from 2 to 20°C and 1-500 μM, respectively, no oxidation was observed. Our study indicates that some lakes with active wintertime CH4 oxidation may have low emissions during ice melt, while other and particularly nutrient poor lakes may accumulate large amounts of CH4 below ice that, in the absence of CH4 oxidation, will be emitted following ice melt. This variability in CH4 oxidation rates between lakes needs to be accounted for in large-scale CH4 emission estimates.

  17. Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to nitrite reduction can be a potential methane sink in coastal environments.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li-Dong; Hu, Bao-Lan; Liu, Shuai; Chai, Xiao-Ping; He, Zhan-Fei; Ren, Hong-Xing; Liu, Yan; Geng, Sha; Wang, Wei; Tang, Jing-Liang; Wang, Yi-Ming; Lou, Li-Ping; Xu, Xiang-Yang; Zheng, Ping

    2016-08-01

    In the current study, we investigated nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (N-DAMO) as a potential methane sink in the Hangzhou Bay and the adjacent Zhoushan sea area. The potential activity of the N-DAMO process was primarily observed in Hangzhou Bay by means of (13)C-labeling experiments, whereas very low or no potential N-DAMO activity could be detected in the Zhoushan sea area. The measured potential N-DAMO rates ranged from 0.2 to 1.3 nmol (13)CO2 g(-1) (dry sediment) day(-1), and the N-DAMO potentially contributed 2.0-9.4 % to the total microbial methane oxidation in the examined sediments. This indicated that the N-DAMO process may be an alternative pathway in the coastal methane cycle. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed the presence of Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera-like bacteria in all the examined sediments, while the group A members (the dominant bacteria responsible for N-DAMO) were found mainly in Hangzhou Bay. Quantitative PCR showed that the 16S rRNA gene abundance of Candidatus M. oxyfera-like bacteria varied from 5.4 × 10(6) to 5.0 × 10(7) copies g(-1) (dry sediment), with a higher abundance observed in Hangzhou Bay. In addition, the overlying water NO3 (-) concentration and salinity were identified as the most important factors influencing the abundance and potential activity of Candidatus M. oxyfera-like bacteria in the examined sediments. This study showed the evidence of N-DAMO in coastal environments and indicated the importance of N-DAMO as a potential methane sink in coastal environments.

  18. Variable carbon isotope fractionation expressed by aerobic CH 4-oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, Alexis S.; Chu, Kung-Hui; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa; Conrad, Mark E.

    2006-04-01

    Carbon isotope fractionation factors reported for aerobic bacterial oxidation of CH 4(α) range from 1.003 to 1.039. In a series of experiments designed to monitor changes in the carbon isotopic fractionation of CH 4 by Type I and Type II methanotrophic bacteria, we found that the magnitude of fractionation was largely due to the first oxidation step catalyzed by methane monooxygenase (MMO). The most important factor that modulates the (α) is the fraction of the total CH 4 oxidized per unit time, which strongly correlates to the cell density of the growth cultures under constant flow conditions. At cell densities of less than 0.1 g/L, fractionation factors greater than 1.03 were observed, whereas at cell densities greater than 0.5 g/L the fractionation factors decreased to as low as 1.002. At low cell densities, low concentrations of MMO limit the amount of CH 4 oxidized, while at higher cell densities, the overall rates of CH 4 oxidation increase sufficiently that diffusion of CH 4 from the gaseous to dissolved state and into the cells is likely the rate-determining step. Thus, the residual CH 4 is more fractionated at low cell densities, when only a small fraction of the total CH 4 has been oxidized, than at high cell densities, when up to 40% of the influent CH 4 has been utilized. Therefore, since Rayleigh distillation behavior is not observed, δ 13C values of the residual CH 4 cannot be used to infer the amount oxidized in either laboratory or field-studies. The measured (α) was the same for both Type I and Type II methanotrophs expressing particulate or soluble MMO. However, large differences in the δ 13C values of biomass produced by the two types of methanotrophs were observed. Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b (Type II) produced biomass with δ 13C values about 15‰ higher than the dissimilated CO 2, whereas Methylomonas methanica (Type I) produced biomass with δ 13C values only about 6‰ higher than the CO 2. These effects were independent of the

  19. Methane production and oxidation patterns along a hydrological gradient in Luther Bog, Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praetzel, Leandra; Berger, Sina; Blodau, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Methane emissions from natural peatlands contribute significantly to the global budget of atmospheric CH4. In the northern hemisphere, where climate models predict rising temperatures and precipitation rates, these emissions are likely to rise. So far, little is known about the change of processes of methane production and oxidation, which influence the total amount of methane emissions, in peatland soils under warmer and wetter climate conditions. Our work focuses on anaerobic CH4 production and aerobic CH4 oxidation processes along a hydrological gradient in an ombotrophic bog in Ontario, Canada that was induced by creation of a reservoir in 1952. Along this transect, four sites were established differing in hydrologic conditions and vegetation patterns. We examined depth profiles of CO2 and CH4 concentrations and delta 13C isotope ratios in the peat using silicon samplers, dialysis chambers and multi-level piezometers. Chamber flux measurements were used to determine carbon fluxes. Isotope mass balances were calculated based on 13C isotope ratios and concentration profiles. By this approach the contribution of anaerobic CH4 and CO2 production to the total ER flux and the amount of oxidised CH4 can be determined. In addition meteorological data, soil temperatures, moisture and water table levels were recorded. By raising data at different sites and dates and with the help of the additionally recorded parameters, we will be able to make predictions about changing CH4 production and oxidation processes due to changing climate conditions. Preliminary results show that CH4 concentrations in the soil profile are higher at the sites which are exposed to stronger water table fluctuations, whereas CO2 concentration levels are lower at these sites. At all sites, CO2 concentrations in the peat are increasing but CH4 profiles are fairly stable. Moreover, isotopic signatures of 13CH4 indicate that the importance of the production pathway changes with depth from acetoclastic

  20. Quantifying the flux and fate of methane into the Hudson Canyon at the edge of methane clathrate hydrate stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, J. D.; Leonte, M.; Garcia-Tigreros Kodovska, F.; Chan, E. W.; Valentine, D. L.; Kellermann, M. Y.; Arrington, E. C.; Navarrete, L. C.; Weinstein, A.; Chepigin, A.; Weber, T.; Ruppel, C. D.; Scranton, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    Methane seeps were investigated in the Hudson Canyon, along the northern US Atlantic Margin on the R/V Endeavor in July 2014. These seeps are located along the upper feather-edge of the methane clathrate hydrate stability zone. Water column samples were collected guided by the acoustic identification of bubble streams in a 32 km2 region. This presentation details the measurements of dissolved methane concentration, natural stable isotopes, potential methane oxidation rates, and current velocity which were used in chemical and isotopic models to quantify (1) the total emission of methane to the water column in this region and (2) the extent of aerobic methane oxidation. In addition, the timing, efficiency, and kinetics of aerobic methane oxidation were investigated with mesocosm incubations of seawater in a unique experimental design that enabled high temporal resolution data acquisition. Finally, the ultimate fate of methane carbon was assessed with high precision measurements of pH.

  1. Hydrogen production from methane through catalytic partial oxidation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freni, S.; Calogero, G.; Cavallaro, S.

    This paper reviews recent developments in syn-gas production processes used for partial methane oxidation with and/or without steam. In particular, we examined different process charts (fixed bed, fluidised bed, membrane, etc.), kinds of catalysts (powders, foams, monoliths, etc.) and catalytically active phases (Ni, Pt, Rh, etc.). The explanation of the various suggested technical solutions accounted for the reaction mechanism that may selectively lead to calibrated mixtures of CO and H 2 or to the unwanted formation of products of total oxidation (CO 2 and H 2O) and pyrolysis (coke). Moreover, the new classes of catalysts allow the use of small reactors to treat large amounts of methane (monoliths) or separate hydrogen in situ from the other reaction products (membrane). This leads to higher conversions and selectivity than could have been expected thermodynamically. Although catalysts based on Rh are extremely expensive, they can be used to minimise H 2O formation by maximising H 2 yield.

  2. Optical sorting and cultivation of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation archaea

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xiaoqiong; Carberry, David M.; Cai, Chen; Hu, Shihu; Yuan, Zhiguo; Dunlop, Halin Rubinsztein; Guo, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    Denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidizing (DAMO) microorganisms play an important role in the global carbon and nitrogen cycles as they are able to mediate methane oxidation using nitrite/nitrate under anoxic conditions. However, the physiological properties of DAMO microorganisms remain poorly understood, partially since the organisms are difficult to isolate or cultivate in pure culture and partially because of their long cultivation time. In this study, DAMO cell sorting has been conducted by integrating optical tweezers within enclosed microfluidic chips. This integrated cell sorting method has high purity, low infection rates, and causes no discernable harm to cell viability. The purity of the sorted cells was controlled by the microfluidic chip structure design and operation, while the cell viability was verified by imaging the cultured DAMO archaea after 420 days. PMID:28270994

  3. OXIDATIVE COUPLING OF METHANE USING INORGANIC MEMBRANE REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Y.H. Ma; Dr. W.R. Moser; Dr. A.G. Dixon; Dr. A.M. Ramachandra; Dr. Y. Lu; C. Binkerd

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this research is to study the oxidative coupling of methane in catalytic inorganic membrane reactors. A specific target is to achieve conversion of methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at very high selectivity and higher yields than in conventional non-porous, co-feed, fixed bed reactors by controlling the oxygen supply through the membrane. A membrane reactor has the advantage of precisely controlling the rate of delivery of oxygen to the catalyst. This facility permits balancing the rate of oxidation and reduction of the catalyst. In addition, membrane reactors minimize the concentration of gas phase oxygen thus reducing non selective gas phase reactions, which are believed to be a main route for the formation of CO{sub x} products. Such gas phase reactions are a cause of decreased selectivity in the oxidative coupling of methane in conventional flow reactors. Membrane reactors could also produce higher product yields by providing better distribution of the reactant gases over the catalyst than the conventional plug flow reactors. Membrane reactor technology also offers the potential for modifying the membranes both to improve catalytic properties as well as to regulate the rate of the permeation/diffusion of reactants through the membrane to minimize by-product generation. Other benefits also exist with membrane reactors, such as the mitigation of thermal hot-spots for highly exothermic reactions such as the oxidative coupling of methane. The application of catalytically active inorganic membranes has potential for drastically increasing the yield of reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity.

  4. Complete oxidation of methane over Ag- and Cu-modified cerium and zirconium oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundakovic, Ljiljana

    Low temperature oxidation of methane is an area in catalysis that, despite the large number of catalytic systems studied, does not yet have an adequate solution. The exhaust gas from natural gas burning devices (gas turbines and natural gas vehicles), contains unconverted methane which is emitted into the atmosphere (currently unregulated). Methane is the most refractory of all hydrocarbons, and its activation requires temperatures higher than the typical exhaust temperatures (350-400sp°C). In this work, ceria- and zirconia-supported Ag and CuO catalysts were studied for the complete oxidation of methane. Catalysts were typically tested under excess oxygen and high space velocity (72,000 hsp{-1}). The reaction kinetics were measured over selected catalysts. Hsb2- and CHsb4- TPR and oxygen uptake measurements were used to characterize the catalyst reduction properties. XRD, STEM/EDX and HRTEM were used to characterize the catalyst structure. The oxidation state of various active species present was identified by XPS and UV-VIS DR spectrometry. Ceria- and zirconia-supported Ag and CuO catalysts are very active and stable catalysts for the complete oxidation of carbon monoxide and methane. When ceria is used as an active catalyst support, its activity depends strongly on its structure. Nanocrystalline ceria, stabilized by dopants such as La or Zr, is highly reducible and structurally defective. Our results indicate that surface oxygen species present under reaction conditions are the active sites for methane activation. Activity in the complete oxidation of methane is related to ceria crystal size and reducibility of surface oxygen species. The addition of a transition metal (Ag) or a metal oxide (CuO) in low amounts increases the low temperature reducibility of ceria and enhances the catalyst oxidation activity. On the other hand, both Ag and CuO are active catalysts for the complete oxidation of methane. These were studied separately on inert zirconia support. A

  5. Oxidative mitigation of aquatic methane emissions in large Amazonian rivers.

    PubMed

    Sawakuchi, Henrique O; Bastviken, David; Sawakuchi, André O; Ward, Nicholas D; Borges, Clovis D; Tsai, Siu M; Richey, Jeffrey E; Ballester, Maria Victoria R; Krusche, Alex V

    2016-03-01

    The flux of methane (CH4 ) from inland waters to the atmosphere has a profound impact on global atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) levels, and yet, strikingly little is known about the dynamics controlling sources and sinks of CH4 in the aquatic setting. Here, we examine the cycling and flux of CH4 in six large rivers in the Amazon basin, including the Amazon River. Based on stable isotopic mass balances of CH4 , inputs and outputs to the water column were estimated. We determined that ecosystem methane oxidation (MOX) reduced the diffusive flux of CH4 by approximately 28-96% and varied depending on hydrologic regime and general geochemical characteristics of tributaries of the Amazon River. For example, the relative amount of MOX was maximal during high water in black and white water rivers and minimal in clear water rivers during low water. The abundance of genetic markers for methane-oxidizing bacteria (pmoA) was positively correlated with enhanced signals of oxidation, providing independent support for the detected MOX patterns. The results indicate that MOX in large Amazonian rivers can consume from 0.45 to 2.07 Tg CH4 yr(-1) , representing up to 7% of the estimated global soil sink. Nevertheless, climate change and changes in hydrology, for example, due to construction of dams, can alter this balance, influencing CH4 emissions to atmosphere.

  6. Oxidative coupling of methane using inorganic membrane reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Y.H.; Moser, W.R.; Dixon, A.G.

    1995-12-31

    The goal of this research is to improve the oxidative coupling of methane in a catalytic inorganic membrane reactor. A specific target is to achieve conversion of methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at very high selectivity and relatively higher yields than in fixed bed reactors by controlling the oxygen supply through the membrane. A membrane reactor has the advantage of precisely controlling the rate of delivery of oxygen to the catalyst. This facility permits balancing the rate of oxidation and reduction of the catalyst. In addition, membrane reactors minimize the concentration of gas phase oxygen thus reducing non selective gas phase reactions, which are believed to be a main route for formation of CO{sub x} products. Such gas phase reactions are a cause for decreased selectivity in oxidative coupling of methane in conventional flow reactors. Membrane reactors could also produce higher product yields by providing better distribution of the reactant gases over the catalyst than the conventional plug flow reactors. Modeling work which aimed at predicting the observed experimental trends in porous membrane reactors was also undertaken in this research program.

  7. Aerobic condition increases carotenoid production associated with oxidative stress tolerance in Enterococcus gilvus.

    PubMed

    Hagi, Tatsuro; Kobayashi, Miho; Nomura, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Although it is known that a part of lactic acid bacteria can produce carotenoid, little is known about the regulation of carotenoid production. The objective of this study was to determine whether aerobic growth condition influences carotenoid production in carotenoid-producing Enterococcus gilvus. Enterococcus gilvus was grown under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Its growth was slower under aerobic than under anaerobic conditions. The decrease in pH levels and production of lactic acid were also lower under aerobic than under anaerobic conditions. In contrast, the amount of carotenoid pigments produced by E. gilvus was significantly higher under aerobic than under anaerobic conditions. Further, real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR revealed that the expression level of carotenoid biosynthesis genes crtN and crtM when E. gilvus was grown under aerobic conditions was 2.55-5.86-fold higher than when it was grown under anaerobic conditions. Moreover, after exposure to 16- and 32-mM H2O2, the survival rate of E. gilvus grown under aerobic conditions was 61.5- and 72.5-fold higher, respectively, than when it was grown under anaerobic conditions. Aerobic growth conditions significantly induced carotenoid production and the expression of carotenoid biosynthesis genes in E. gilvus, resulting in increased oxidative stress tolerance.

  8. Energy Metabolism during Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in ANME Archaea.

    PubMed

    McGlynn, Shawn E

    2017-03-17

    Anaerobic methane oxidation in archaea is often presented to operate via a pathway of "reverse methanogenesis". However, if the cumulative reactions of a methanogen are run in reverse there is no apparent way to conserve energy. Recent findings suggest that chemiosmotic coupling enzymes known from their use in methylotrophic and acetoclastic methanogens-in addition to unique terminal reductases-biochemically facilitate energy conservation during complete CH4 oxidation to CO2. The apparent enzyme modularity of these organisms highlights how microbes can arrange their energy metabolisms to accommodate diverse chemical potentials in various ecological niches, even in the extreme case of utilizing "reverse" thermodynamic potentials.

  9. Energy Metabolism during Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in ANME Archaea

    PubMed Central

    McGlynn, Shawn E.

    2017-01-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation in archaea is often presented to operate via a pathway of “reverse methanogenesis”. However, if the cumulative reactions of a methanogen are run in reverse there is no apparent way to conserve energy. Recent findings suggest that chemiosmotic coupling enzymes known from their use in methylotrophic and acetoclastic methanogens—in addition to unique terminal reductases—biochemically facilitate energy conservation during complete CH4 oxidation to CO2. The apparent enzyme modularity of these organisms highlights how microbes can arrange their energy metabolisms to accommodate diverse chemical potentials in various ecological niches, even in the extreme case of utilizing “reverse” thermodynamic potentials. PMID:28321009

  10. Microbial oxidation of methane from old landfills in biofilters

    SciTech Connect

    Streese, J.; Stegmann, R

    2003-07-01

    Landfill gas emissions are among the largest sources of the greenhouse gas methane. For this reason, the possibilities of microbial methane degradation in biofilters were investigated. Different filter materials were tested in two experimental plants, a bench-scale plant (total filter volume 51 l) and a pilot plant (total filter volume 4 m{sup 3}). Three months after the beginning of the experiment, very high degradation rates of up to 63 g CH{sub 4}/(m{sup 3}h) were observed in the bench-scale plant at mean methane concentrations of 2.5% v/v and with fine-grained compost as biofilter material. However, the degradation rates of the compost biofilter decreased in the fifth month of the experiment, probably due to the accumulation of exopolymeric substances formed by the microorganisms. A mixture of compost, peat, and wood fibers showed stable and satisfactory degradation rates around 20 g/(m{sup 3}h) at mean concentrations of 3% v/v over a period of one year. In this material, the wood fibers served as a structural material and prevented clogging of the biofilter. Extrapolation of the experimental data indicates that biofilters for methane oxidation have to be at least 100 times the volume of biofilters for odor control to obtain the same cleaning efficiency per unit volume flow of feed gas.

  11. Field-Scale Inhibition and Recovery of Atmospheric-Methane Oxidation in Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroth, M. H.; Dax, A.; Genter, F.; Henneberger, R.

    2015-12-01

    Aerobic methane (CH4) oxidation in upland soils is the only known terrestrial sink for atmospheric CH4. It is mediated by methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) that possess a high-affinity form of the enzyme methane monooxygenase (MMO), allowing utilization of CH4 at near-atmospheric, low concentrations (≤ 1.9 µL/L). As cultivation attempts for high-affinity MOB have shown little success to date, there remains much speculation regarding their functioning in different environmental systems. For quantification of microbial functions at the field scale, inhibition experiments are often used as a control and to verify that observed substrate turnover is microbially mediated. Targeting MMO, several compounds have been proposed as inhibitors of CH4 oxidation. However, previous inhibition experiments were mostly conducted in systems dominated by low-affinity MOB, which mediate CH4 oxidation at elevated CH4 concentrations. On the contrary, inhibition experiments targeting high-affinity MOB are scare, particularly at the field scale. We present results of field-scale experiments to investigate effectiveness of and recovery from inhibition of atmospheric CH4 oxidation using the competitive inhibitors CH3F and CH2F2, as well as the non-competitive inhibitor C2H2. The latter is of particular interest, because C2H2 irreversibly binds to MMO, requiring de-novo synthesis of MMO for recovery of CH4 oxidation activity. Experiments were conducted during both winter and summer seasons in a sandy soil. Atmospheric CH4 oxidation was quantified in regular intervals at reference and treatment locations using the soil-profile method with concurrent measurements of soil-water contents and -temperature. Whereas C2H2 inhibition was highly effective in both seasons, the time required for recovery to the level of the reference location was much shorter during the summer experiment (~1 mo compared with 4 mo during winter). Our data provide new insights into the physiology of high-affinity MOB.

  12. Aerobic organocatalytic oxidation of aryl aldehydes: flavin catalyst turnover by Hantzsch's ester.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuai; Foss, Frank W

    2012-10-05

    The first Dakin oxidation fueled by molecular oxygen as the terminal oxidant is reported. Flavin and NAD(P)H coenzymes, from natural enzymatic redox systems, inspired the use of flavin organocatalysts and a Hantzsch ester to perform transition-metal-free, aerobic oxidations. Catechols and electron-rich phenols are achieved with as low as a 0.1 mol % catalyst loading, 1 equiv of Hantzsch ester, and O(2) or air as the stoichiometric oxidant source.

  13. Complete combustion of methane over indium tin oxides catalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Junhua; Fu, Huijing; Fu, Lixin; Hao, Jiming

    2006-10-15

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) catalysts with different In/Sn ratios have been prepared by the co-precipitation method. The catalysts were evaluated for methane combustion at different temperatures (673-873 K) with a space velocity of 30 000 h(-1). The results showed that methane could be completely oxidized at 873 K with ITO catalysts. Doping an appropriate amount of tin into In2O3 could greatly improve its activity, while the performances of Indium-doped tin oxides were worse than that of SnO2. A significant improvement of the activity was obtained on the catalyst In8Sn2, which contains 80 wt. % of indium oxide and 20 wt. % of tin oxide. Crystal defection and the amount of oxygen vacancy caused by doping were the main factors that would affect catalytic activity of ITO catalysts. The catalytic activity is strongly inhibited by the presence of a large amount of water vapor at the entire temperature range, while only the activity at low temperature (under 823 K) decreased in the presence of sulfur dioxide. By doping Sn into In2O3, its tolerance to SO2 could be enhanced due to the higher resistance of SnO2.

  14. Base-catalyzed efficient tandem [3 + 3] and [3 + 2 + 1] annulation-aerobic oxidative benzannulations.

    PubMed

    Diallo, Aboubacar; Zhao, Yu-Long; Wang, He; Li, Sha-Sha; Ren, Chuan-Qing; Liu, Qun

    2012-11-16

    An efficient synthesis of substituted benzenes via a base-catalyzed [3 + 3] aerobic oxidative aromatization of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds with dimethyl glutaconate was reported. All the reactions were carried out under mild, metal-free conditions to afford the products in high to excellent yields with molecular oxygen as the sole oxidant and water as the sole byproduct. Furthermore, a more convenient tandem [3 + 2 + 1] aerobic oxidative aromatization reaction was developed through the in situ generation of the α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds from aldehydes and ketones.

  15. Iron oxides stimulate sulfate-driven anaerobic methane oxidation in seeps

    PubMed Central

    Sivan, Orit; Antler, Gilad; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Marlow, Jeffrey J.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2014-01-01

    Seep sediments are dominated by intensive microbial sulfate reduction coupled to the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Through geochemical measurements of incubation experiments with methane seep sediments collected from Hydrate Ridge, we provide insight into the role of iron oxides in sulfate-driven AOM. Seep sediments incubated with 13C-labeled methane showed co-occurring sulfate reduction, AOM, and methanogenesis. The isotope fractionation factors for sulfur and oxygen isotopes in sulfate were about 40‰ and 22‰, respectively, reinforcing the difference between microbial sulfate reduction in methane seeps versus other sedimentary environments (for example, sulfur isotope fractionation above 60‰ in sulfate reduction coupled to organic carbon oxidation or in diffusive sedimentary sulfate–methane transition zone). The addition of hematite to these microcosm experiments resulted in significant microbial iron reduction as well as enhancing sulfate-driven AOM. The magnitude of the isotope fractionation of sulfur and oxygen isotopes in sulfate from these incubations was lowered by about 50%, indicating the involvement of iron oxides during sulfate reduction in methane seeps. The similar relative change between the oxygen versus sulfur isotopes of sulfate in all experiments (with and without hematite addition) suggests that oxidized forms of iron, naturally present in the sediment incubations, were involved in sulfate reduction, with hematite addition increasing the sulfate recycling or the activity of sulfur-cycling microorganisms by about 40%. These results highlight a role for natural iron oxides during bacterial sulfate reduction in methane seeps not only as nutrient but also as stimulator of sulfur recycling. PMID:25246590

  16. Reaction-driven surface restructuring and selectivity control in allylic alcohol catalytic aerobic oxidation over Pd.

    PubMed

    Lee, Adam F; Ellis, Christine V; Naughton, James N; Newton, Mark A; Parlett, Christopher M A; Wilson, Karen

    2011-04-20

    Synchronous, time-resolved DRIFTS/MS/XAS cycling studies of the vapor-phase selective aerobic oxidation of crotyl alcohol over nanoparticulate Pd have revealed surface oxide as the desired catalytically active phase, with dynamic, reaction-induced Pd redox processes controlling selective versus combustion pathways.

  17. Respirometric characterization of aerobic sulfide, thiosulfate and elemental sulfur oxidation by S-oxidizing biomass.

    PubMed

    Mora, Mabel; López, Luis R; Lafuente, Javier; Pérez, Julio; Kleerebezem, Robbert; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Gamisans, Xavier; Gabriel, David

    2016-02-01

    Respirometry was used to reveal the mechanisms involved in aerobic biological sulfide oxidation and to characterize the kinetics and stoichiometry of a microbial culture obtained from a desulfurizing biotrickling filter. Physical-chemical processes such as stripping and chemical oxidation of hydrogen sulfide were characterized since they contributed significantly to the conversions observed in respirometric tests. Mass transfer coefficient for hydrogen sulfide and the kinetic parameters for chemical oxidation of sulfide with oxygen were estimated. The stoichiometry of the process was determined and the different steps in the sulfide oxidation process were identified. The conversion scheme proposed includes intermediate production of elemental sulfur and thiosulfate and the subsequent oxidation of both compounds to sulfate. A kinetic model describing each of the reactions observed during sulfide oxidation was calibrated and validated. The product selectivity was found to be independent of the dissolved oxygen to hydrogen sulfide concentration ratio in the medium at sulfide concentrations ranging from 3 to 30 mg S L(-1). Sulfide was preferentially consumed (SOURmax = 49.2 mg DO g(-1) VSS min(-1)) and oxidized to elemental sulfur at dissolved oxygen concentrations above 0.8 mg DO L(-1). Substrate inhibition of sulfide oxidation was observed (K(i,S(2-))= 42.4 mg S L(-1)). Intracellular sulfur accumulation also affected negatively the sulfide oxidation rate. The maximum fraction of elemental sulfur accumulated inside cells was estimated (25.6% w/w) and a shrinking particle equation was included in the kinetic model to describe elemental sulfur oxidation. The microbial diversity obtained through pyrosequencing analysis revealed that Thiothrix sp. was the main species present in the culture (>95%).

  18. The Leeuwenhoek Lecture 2000 The natural and unnatural history of methane-oxidizing bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Howard

    2005-01-01

    Methane gas is produced from many natural and anthropogenic sources. As such, methane gas plays a significant role in the Earth's climate, being 25 times more effective as a greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. As with nearly all other naturally produced organic molecules on Earth, there are also micro-organisms capable of using methane as their sole source of carbon and energy. The microbes responsible (methanotrophs) are ubiquitous and, for the most part, aerobic. Although anaerobic methanotrophs are believed to exist, so far, none have been isolated in pure culture. Methanotrophs have been known to exist for over 100 years; however, it is only in the last 30 years that we have begun to understand their physiology and biochemistry. Their unique ability to use methane for growth is attributed to the presence of a multicomponent enzyme system—methane monooxygenase (MMO)—which has two distinct forms: soluble (sMMO) and membrane-associated (pMMO); however, both convert methane into the readily assimilable product, methanol. Our understanding of how bacteria are capable of effecting one of the most difficult reactions in chemistry—namely, the controlled oxidation of methane to methanol—has been made possible by the isolation, in pure form, of the enzyme components. The mechanism by which methane is activated by sMMO involves abstraction of a hydrogen atom from methane by a high-valence iron species (FeIV or possibly FeV) in the hydroxylase component of the MMO complex to form a methyl radical. The radical combines with a captive oxygen atom from dioxygen to form the reaction product, methanol, which is further metabolized by the cell to produce multicarbon intermediates. Regulation of the sMMO system relies on the remarkable properties of an effector protein, protein B. This protein is capable of facilitating component interactions in the presence of substrate, modifying the redox potential of the diiron species at the active site. These interactions permit

  19. The Leeuwenhoek Lecture 2000 the natural and unnatural history of methane-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Howard

    2005-06-29

    Methane gas is produced from many natural and anthropogenic sources. As such, methane gas plays a significant role in the Earth's climate, being 25 times more effective as a greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. As with nearly all other naturally produced organic molecules on Earth, there are also micro-organisms capable of using methane as their sole source of carbon and energy. The microbes responsible (methanotrophs) are ubiquitous and, for the most part, aerobic. Although anaerobic methanotrophs are believed to exist, so far, none have been isolated in pure culture. Methanotrophs have been known to exist for over 100 years; however, it is only in the last 30 years that we have begun to understand their physiology and biochemistry. Their unique ability to use methane for growth is attributed to the presence of a multicomponent enzyme system-methane monooxygenase (MMO)-which has two distinct forms: soluble (sMMO) and membrane-associated (pMMO); however, both convert methane into the readily assimilable product, methanol. Our understanding of how bacteria are capable of effecting one of the most difficult reactions in chemistry-namely, the controlled oxidation of methane to methanol-has been made possible by the isolation, in pure form, of the enzyme components.The mechanism by which methane is activated by sMMO involves abstraction of a hydrogen atom from methane by a high-valence iron species (FeIV or possibly FeV) in the hydroxylase component of the MMO complex to form a methyl radical. The radical combines with a captive oxygen atom from dioxygen to form the reaction product, methanol, which is further metabolized by the cell to produce multicarbon intermediates. Regulation of the sMMO system relies on the remarkable properties of an effector protein, protein B. This protein is capable of facilitating component interactions in the presence of substrate, modifying the redox potential of the diiron species at the active site. These interactions permit access of

  20. Microbial diversity in sediments associated with a shallow methane seep in the tropical Timor Sea of Australia reveals a novel aerobic methanotroph diversity.

    PubMed

    Wasmund, Kenneth; Kurtböke, D Ipek; Burns, Kathryn A; Bourne, David G

    2009-05-01

    This study examined the diversity of Bacteria, Archaea and in particular aerobic methanotrophs associated with a shallow (84 m) methane seep in the tropical Timor Sea, Australia. Seepage of thermogenic methane was associated with a large carbonate hardground covered in coarse carbonate-rich sediments and various benthic organisms such as solitary corals. The diversity of Bacteria and Archaea was studied by analysis of cloned 16S rRNA genes, while aerobic methanotrophic bacteria were quantified using real-time PCR targeting the alpha-subunit of particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA) genes and diversity was studied by analysis of cloned pmoA genes. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes revealed diverse and mostly novel phylotypes related to sequences previously recovered from marine sediments. A small number of bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences were related to aerobic methanotrophs distantly related to the genera Methylococcus and Methylocaldum. Real-time PCR targeting pmoA genes showed that the highest numbers of methanotrophs were present in surface sediments associated with the seep area. Phylogenetic analysis of pmoA sequences revealed that all phylotypes were novel and fell into two large clusters comprised of only marine sequences distantly related to the genera Methylococcus and Methylocaldum that were clearly divergent from terrestrial phylotypes. This study provides evidence for the existence of a novel microbial diversity and diverse aerobic methanotrophs that appear to constitute marine specialized lineages.

  1. Dynamics of atmospheric-methane oxidation in glacier-forefield soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiri, Eleonora; Nauer, Philipp A.; Rainer, Edda-Marie; Henneberger, Ruth; Zeyer, Josef; Schroth, Martin H.

    2015-04-01

    Mature upland soils are currently considered the sole terrestrial sink for atmospheric methane (CH4). But little is known about CH4 dynamics in young, developing soil ecosystems such as glacier forefields formed by progressive glacial retreat. Glacier forefields are situated on diverse bedrock types, exhibit a continuum of soil age (chronosequence), and are comprised of various geomorphological landforms, which may differ in physicochemical properties. These features may affect activity and community structure of aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) catalyzing atmospheric CH4 oxidation. Moreover, MOB activity and community structure may be affected by environmental parameters subject to seasonal variability such as soil temperature, water content, and nutrient availability. The aim of this study was to assess spatial and seasonal variability in atmospheric CH4 oxidation in glacier-forefield soils derived from siliceous and calcareous bedrock. Specifically, we quantified soil-atmosphere CH4 flux and CH4 oxidation activity using the soil-gas-profile method and static flux chambers in soils of different age and belonging to different landforms. In these soils MOB abundance and variation in community structure were assessed by targeting the functional gene pmoA using quantitative PCR, TRFLP-based cluster analysis, and high-throughput DNA-sequencing technology. Seasonal variability in atmospheric CH4 oxidation was assessed based on the same attributes measured with high temporal resolution throughout one snow-free season. Most glacier-forefield soils acted as a sink for atmospheric CH4 regardless of bedrock type, and CH4 flux (-0.082 to -2.2 mg CH4 m-2 d-1) and MOB abundance (2.4×103 to 5.5×105 pmoA genecopies (g soil w.w.)-1) increased significantly with soil age. Cluster analysis revealed variations in MOB community composition related to bedrock type rather than soil age, suggesting that distinct MOB communities provided a similar ecosystem service in soils on

  2. Partial oxidation of methane by pulsed corona discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeben, W. F. L. M.; Boekhoven, W.; Beckers, F. J. C. M.; van Heesch, E. J. M.; Pemen, A. J. M.

    2014-09-01

    Pulsed corona-induced partial oxidation of methane in humid oxygen or carbon dioxide atmospheres has been investigated for future fuel synthesis applications. The obtained product spectrum is wide, i.e. saturated, unsaturated and oxygen-functional hydrocarbons. The generally observed methane conversion levels are 6-20% at a conversion efficiency of about 100-250 nmol J-1. The main products are ethane, ethylene and acetylene. Higher saturated hydrocarbons up to C6 have been detected. The observed oxygen-functional hydrocarbons are methanol, ethanol and lower concentrations of aldehydes, ketones, dimethylether and methylformate. Methanol seems to be exclusively produced with CH4/O2 mixtures at a maximum production efficiency of 0.35 nmol J-1. CH4/CO2 mixtures appear to yield higher hydrocarbons. Carboxylic acids appear to be mainly present in the aqueous reactor phase, possibly together with higher molecular weight species.

  3. Iron oxide reduction in deep Baltic Sea sediments: the potential role of anaerobic oxidation of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, Matthias; Slomp, Caroline P.; Dijkstra, Nikki; Sapart, Célia J.; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kasten, Sabine; Riedinger, Natascha; Barker Jørgensen, Bo

    2015-04-01

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and its emission from marine sediments to the atmosphere is largely controlled by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Traditionally, sulfate is considered to be the most important electron acceptor for AOM in marine sediments. However, recent studies have shown that AOM may also be coupled to the reduction of iron (Fe) oxides (Beal et al., 2009; Riedinger et al., 2014; Egger et al., 2014). In the Baltic Sea, the transition from the Ancylus freshwater phase to the Littorina brackish/marine phase (A/L-transition) ca. 9-7 ka ago (Zillén et al., 2008) resulted in the accumulation of methanogenic brackish/marine sediments overlying Fe-oxide rich lacustrine deposits. The downward diffusion of methane from the brackish/marine sediments into the lake sediments leads to an ideal diagenetic system to study a potential coupling between Fe oxide reduction and methane oxidation. Here, we use porewater and sediment geochemical data obtained at sites M0063 and M0065 during the IODP Baltic Sea Paleoenvironment Expedition 347 in 2013 to identify the potential mechanisms responsible for the apparent Fe oxide reduction in the non-sulfidic limnic sediments below the A/L transition. In this presentation, we will review the various explanations for the elevated ferrous Fe in the porewater in the lake sediments and we will specifically address the potential role of the reaction of methane with Fe-oxides. References: Beal E. J., House C. H. and Orphan V. J. (2009) Manganese- and iron-dependent marine methane oxidation. Science 325, 184-187. Egger M., Rasigraf O., Sapart C. J., Jilbert T., Jetten M. S. M., Röckmann T., van der Veen C., Banda N., Kartal B., Ettwig K. F. and Slomp C. P. (2014) Iron-mediated anaerobic oxidation of methane in brackish coastal sediments. Environ. Sci. Technol. 49, 277-283. Riedinger N., Formolo M. J., Lyons T. W., Henkel S., Beck A. and Kasten S. (2014) An inorganic geochemical argument for coupled anaerobic oxidation of

  4. Characterization of Methane Degradation and Methane-Degrading Microbes in Alaska Coastal Water

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchman, David L.

    2012-03-29

    The net flux of methane from methane hydrates and other sources to the atmosphere depends on methane degradation as well as methane production and release from geological sources. The goal of this project was to examine methane-degrading archaea and organic carbon oxidizing bacteria in methane-rich and methane-poor sediments of the Beaufort Sea, Alaska. The Beaufort Sea system was sampled as part of a multi-disciplinary expedition (Methane in the Arctic Shelf or MIDAS) in September 2009. Microbial communities were examined by quantitative PCR analyses of 16S rRNA genes and key methane degradation genes (pmoA and mcrA involved in aerobic and anaerobic methane degradation, respectively), tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to determine the taxonomic make up of microbes in these sediments, and sequencing of all microbial genes (metagenomes ). The taxonomic and functional make-up of the microbial communities varied with methane concentrations, with some data suggesting higher abundances of potential methane-oxidizing archaea in methane-rich sediments. Sequence analysis of PCR amplicons revealed that most of the mcrA genes were from the ANME-2 group of methane oxidizers. According to metagenomic data, genes involved in methane degradation and other degradation pathways changed with sediment depth along with sulfate and methane concentrations. Most importantly, sulfate reduction genes decreased with depth while the anaerobic methane degradation gene (mcrA) increased along with methane concentrations. The number of potential methane degradation genes (mcrA) was low and inconsistent with other data indicating the large impact of methane on these sediments. The data can be reconciled if a small number of potential methane-oxidizing archaea mediates a large flux of carbon in these sediments. Our study is the first to report metagenomic data from sediments dominated by ANME-2 archaea and is one of the few to examine the entire microbial assemblage potentially involved in

  5. The influence of methane oxidation on the stable isotopic composition of methane emitted from Florida swamp forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Happell, James D.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Showers, William S.

    1994-10-01

    This study reports the first measurements of the δ 13C of CH 4 emitted from seasonally flooded swamp forests in the southeastern United States. The seasonally averaged δ 13C of CH 4 emitted from a north Florida swamp forest located in the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge was -52.7 ± 6.11%. (error is ± one standard deviation throughout, n = 28), a value 13C-enriched, relative to typical wetland emissions. In an Everglades cypress dome, the average δ 13C of emitted CH 4 was -52.5 ± 6.7%.( n = 3). Consistent with attenuation of CH 4 emission by CH 4 oxidation in these environments, CH 4 emitted via diffusion from the St. Marks swamp forest was enriched in 13C by 6.4 ± 5.8%. ( n = 28) and D by 57 ± 36%. ( n = 6) relative to sedimentary CH 4. Methane emitted from the cypress dome had also been altered by oxidation, as it was enriched in 13C by 12.1 ± 4.3%. relative to sedimentary CH 4. Emission experiments, performed in situ with inhibitors of aerobic CH 4 oxidizing bacteria, were used to calculate the fractionation factors (α) for stable carbon and hydrogen isotopes of CH 4 undergoing transport and oxidation. Values ranged from 1.003 to 1.021 and 1.050 to 1.129, respectively. The best estimates for carbon and hydrogen α values were 1.020 and 1.068, respectively. The δ values of produced (sedimentary) CH 4 were relatively constant in the St. Marks subtropical swamp forest. Additionally, because the transport of CH 4 to the atmosphere was dominated by molecular diffusion, variations in the magnitude of CH 4 oxidation appeared to be the primary factor controlling the δ values of emitted CH 4. This contrasts with systems dominated by bubble ebullition, where variations in CH 4 production mechanisms have been hypothesized to be the primary factor controlling the δ values of emitted CH 4.

  6. Thermophilic anaerobic oxidation of methane by marine microbial consortia.

    PubMed

    Holler, Thomas; Widdel, Friedrich; Knittel, Katrin; Amann, Rudolf; Kellermann, Matthias Y; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Teske, Andreas; Boetius, Antje; Wegener, Gunter

    2011-12-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate controls the emission of the greenhouse gas methane from the ocean floor. AOM is performed by microbial consortia of archaea (ANME) associated with partners related to sulfate-reducing bacteria. In vitro enrichments of AOM were so far only successful at temperatures ≤25 °C; however, energy gain for growth by AOM with sulfate is in principle also possible at higher temperatures. Sequences of 16S rRNA genes and core lipids characteristic for ANME as well as hints of in situ AOM activity were indeed reported for geothermally heated marine environments, yet no direct evidence for thermophilic growth of marine ANME consortia was obtained to date. To study possible thermophilic AOM, we investigated hydrothermally influenced sediment from the Guaymas Basin. In vitro incubations showed activity of sulfate-dependent methane oxidation between 5 and 70 °C with an apparent optimum between 45 and 60 °C. AOM was absent at temperatures ≥75 °C. Long-term enrichment of AOM was fastest at 50 °C, yielding a 13-fold increase of methane-dependent sulfate reduction within 250 days, equivalent to an apparent doubling time of 68 days. The enrichments were dominated by novel ANME-1 consortia, mostly associated with bacterial partners of the deltaproteobacterial HotSeep-1 cluster, a deeply branching phylogenetic group previously found in a butane-amended 60 °C-enrichment culture of Guaymas sediments. The closest relatives (Desulfurella spp.; Hippea maritima) are moderately thermophilic sulfur reducers. Results indicate that AOM and ANME archaea could be of biogeochemical relevance not only in cold to moderate but also in hot marine habitats.

  7. Field-scale tracking of active methane-oxidizing communities in a landfill cover soil reveals spatial and seasonal variability.

    PubMed

    Henneberger, Ruth; Chiri, Eleonora; Bodelier, Paul E L; Frenzel, Peter; Lüke, Claudia; Schroth, Martin H

    2015-05-01

    Aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) in soils mitigate methane (CH4 ) emissions. We assessed spatial and seasonal differences in active MOB communities in a landfill cover soil characterized by highly variable environmental conditions. Field-based measurements of CH4 oxidation activity and stable-isotope probing of polar lipid-derived fatty acids (PLFA-SIP) were complemented by microarray analysis of pmoA genes and transcripts, linking diversity and function at the field scale. In situ CH4 oxidation rates varied between sites and were generally one order of magnitude lower in winter compared with summer. Results from PLFA-SIP and pmoA transcripts were largely congruent, revealing distinct spatial and seasonal clustering. Overall, active MOB communities were highly diverse. Type Ia MOB, specifically Methylomonas and Methylobacter, were key drivers for CH4 oxidation, particularly at a high-activity site. Type II MOB were mainly active at a site showing substantial fluctuations in CH4 loading and soil moisture content. Notably, Upland Soil Cluster-gamma-related pmoA transcripts were also detected, indicating concurrent oxidation of atmospheric CH4 . Spatial separation was less distinct in winter, with Methylobacter and uncultured MOB mediating CH4 oxidation. We propose that high diversity of active MOB communities in this soil is promoted by high variability in environmental conditions, facilitating substantial removal of CH4 generated in the waste body.

  8. Bioinspired Aerobic Oxidation of Secondary Amines and Nitrogen Heterocycles with a Bifunctional Quinone Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Wendlandt, Alison E.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2014-01-01

    Copper amine oxidases are a family of enzymes with quinone cofactors that oxidize primary amines to aldehydes. The native mechanism proceeds via an iminoquinone intermediate that promotes high selectivity for reactions with primary amines, thereby constraining the scope of potential biomimetic synthetic applications. Here, we report a novel bioinspired quinone catalyst system, consisting of 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione/ZnI2, that bypasses these constraints via an abiological pathway involving a hemiaminal intermediate. Efficient aerobic dehydrogenation of non-native secondary amine substrates, including pharmaceutically relevant nitrogen heterocycles, is demonstrated. The ZnI2 cocatalyst activates the quinone toward amine oxidation and provides a source of iodide, which plays an important redox-mediator role to promote aerobic catalytic turnover. These findings provide a valuable foundation for broader development of aerobic oxidation reactions employing quinone-based catalysts. PMID:24328193

  9. Development of Safe and Scalable Continuous-Flow Methods for Palladium-Catalyzed Aerobic Oxidation Reactions†

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xuan; Diao, Tianning

    2010-01-01

    Summary The synthetic scope and utility of Pd-catalyzed aerobic oxidation reactions has advanced significantly over the past decade, and these reactions have potential to address important green-chemistry challenges in the pharmaceutical industry. This potential has been unrealized, however, because safety concerns and process constraints hinder large-scale applications of this chemistry. These limitations are addressed by the development of a continuous-flow tube reactor, which has been demonstrated on several scales in the aerobic oxidation of alcohols. Use of a dilute oxygen gas source (8% O2 in N2) ensures that the oxygen/organic mixture never enters the explosive regime, and efficient gas-liquid mixing in the reactor minimizes decomposition of the homogeneous catalyst into inactive Pd metal. These results provide the basis for large-scale implementation of palladium-catalyzed (and other) aerobic oxidation reactions for pharmaceutical synthesis. PMID:20694169

  10. Oxygen as Intermediate in Anoxic Environments: Nitrite-Dependent Methane Oxidation and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettwig, K. F.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years the known diversity of hydrocarbon activation mechanisms under anaerobic conditions has been extended by intra-aerobic denitrification, a process in which oxygen is derived from NO and used for substrate activation. For two phylogenetically unrelated bacterial species, the freshwater NC10 phylum bacterium Methylomirabilis oxyfera [1] and the marine γ-proteobacterial strain HdN1 [2] it has been shown that, under anoxic conditions with nitrate and/or nitrite, mono-oxygenases are used for methane and hexadecane oxidation, respectively. No degradation was observed with nitrous oxide (N2O) only. In the anaerobic methanotroph M. oxyfera, which lacks apparent nitrous oxide reductase in its genome, substrate activation in the presence of nitrite was directly associated with both O2 and N2 formation. These findings strongly argue for the role of nitric oxide (NO), or an oxygen species derived from it, in the activation reaction of methane. Although intracellular oxygen generation has been experimentally documented and elegantly explains the utilization of 'aerobic' pathways under anoxic conditions, research about the underlying molecular mechanism has just started. The proposed candidate enzymes for oxygen (or possibly another another reactive intermediate) production from NO, an NO dismutase (NOD) [3], related to quinol-dependent NO reductases (qNORs), is present and highly expressed in both M. oxyfera and strain HdN1. Besides that, several recently sequenced species from the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group harbor Nod/Nor genes, but experimential evidence is needed to show if these have NOD activity, are unusual but functional qNORs, or represent transition states between the two. Additionally, for several anaerobic hydrocarbon-degrading organisms the biochemical mechanism of substrate activation has not been elucidated yet: whereas signature genes of anaerobic degradation are missing, monooxygenase genes are present. Also these microorganisms

  11. Autotrophy as a predominant mode of carbon fixation in anaerobic methane-oxidizing microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Kellermann, Matthias Y; Wegener, Gunter; Elvert, Marcus; Yoshinaga, Marcos Yukio; Lin, Yu-Shih; Holler, Thomas; Mollar, Xavier Prieto; Knittel, Katrin; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2012-11-20

    The methane-rich, hydrothermally heated sediments of the Guaymas Basin are inhabited by thermophilic microorganisms, including anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (mainly ANME-1) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (e.g., HotSeep-1 cluster). We studied the microbial carbon flow in ANME-1/ HotSeep-1 enrichments in stable-isotope-probing experiments with and without methane. The relative incorporation of (13)C from either dissolved inorganic carbon or methane into lipids revealed that methane-oxidizing archaea assimilated primarily inorganic carbon. This assimilation is strongly accelerated in the presence of methane. Experiments with simultaneous amendments of both (13)C-labeled dissolved inorganic carbon and deuterated water provided further insights into production rates of individual lipids derived from members of the methane-oxidizing community as well as their carbon sources used for lipid biosynthesis. In the presence of methane, all prominent lipids carried a dual isotopic signal indicative of their origin from primarily autotrophic microbes. In the absence of methane, archaeal lipid production ceased and bacterial lipid production dropped by 90%; the lipids produced by the residual fraction of the metabolically active bacterial community predominantly carried a heterotrophic signal. Collectively our results strongly suggest that the studied ANME-1 archaea oxidize methane but assimilate inorganic carbon and should thus be classified as methane-oxidizing chemoorganoautotrophs.

  12. Application of the GRI 1.2 methane oxidation model to methane and methanol oxidation in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, S.F.

    1996-05-01

    The GRI 1.2 mechanism is used to predict the oxidation rates of methane and methanol by oxygen in supercritical water at 250 bar and temperatures ranging from 420--630 C. Using the Chemkin II computational package which assumes an ideal gas equation of state, the GRI model does very well in representing the available experimental results on methane over a wide temperature and concentration rate. However, the model may lack key CH{sub 3}O{sub 2} reactions needed for a complete description in the < 450 C region. The oxidation of methanol and formation of formaldehyde is not well represented by the GRI mechanism when left unchanged. If two important modifications are made to the reactivity of HO{sub 2}, good agreement with the methanol oxidation results is achieved. This paper illustrates that the carefully-assembled GRI 1.2 mechanism, although designed for conventional combustion conditions, can be successfully extended with very little modification to much lower temperature and extreme pressure conditions. The purpose of this study is to understand the operative chemical kinetics of supercritical water oxidation required for the more efficient application of this technology to treatment of hazardous wastes, obsolete munitions, rocket motors, and chemical warfare agents.

  13. Copper-catalyzed aerobic oxidative coupling: From ketone and diamine to pyrazine

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kun; Huang, Zhiliang; Qi, Xiaotian; Li, Yingzi; Zhang, Guanghui; Liu, Chao; Yi, Hong; Meng, Lingkui; Bunel, Emilio E.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Pao, Chih-Wen; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Lan, Yu; Lei, Aiwen

    2015-01-01

    Copper-catalyzed aerobic oxidative C–H/N–H coupling between simple ketones and diamines was developed toward the synthesis of a variety of pyrazines. Various substituted ketones were compatible for this transformation. Preliminary mechanistic investigations indicated that radical species were involved. X-ray absorption fine structure experiments elucidated that the Cu(II) species 5 coordinated by two N atoms at a distance of 2.04 Å and two O atoms at a shorter distance of 1.98 Å was a reactive one for this aerobic oxidative coupling reaction. Density functional theory calculations suggested that the intramolecular coupling of cationic radicals was favorable in this transformation. PMID:26601302

  14. Effect of landfill cover layer modification on methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lifang; Long, Yuyang

    2016-12-01

    Levels of methane (CH4) oxidation in materials used for landfill cover attained in the laboratory are not often replicated in the field due to effects from the surrounding environment. This study investigates the three dominant factors affecting CH4 oxidation in the cover layer, namely, the thickness of cover layer, the methanotroph spraying manner, and the osmotic coefficient of the cover material. Results show that improved CH4 emission performance of the cover layer can be realized if methanotroph are introduced, meaning that a thinner cover layer is required. The highest CH4 emission reduction can be realized by spraying methanotroph into the top, middle, and bottom layers of a 30-cm thick cover layer with an osmotic coefficient of 7.76 × 10(-5) cm s(-1). Comparing results on cover layer thickness, methane monooxygenase (MMO) activity was much lower with increasing thickness meaning that the thicker cover could reduce O2 availability, thus inhibiting MMO activity. This suggests that MMO may be responsible for differences in CH4 emission reduction and/or oxidation making the osmotic coefficient an important factor for cover layer material.

  15. Partial oxidation of methane (POM) assisted solid oxide co-electrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Fanglin; Wang, Yao

    2017-02-21

    Methods for simultaneous syngas generation by opposite sides of a solid oxide co-electrolysis cell are provided. The method can comprise exposing a cathode side of the solid oxide co-electrolysis cell to a cathode-side feed stream; supplying electricity to the solid oxide co-electrolysis cell such that the cathode side produces a product stream comprising hydrogen gas and carbon monoxide gas while supplying oxygen ions to an anode side of the solid oxide co-electrolysis cell; and exposing the anode side of the solid oxide co-electrolysis cell to an anode-side feed stream. The cathode-side feed stream comprises water and carbon dioxide, and the anode-side feed stream comprises methane gas such that the methane gas reacts with the oxygen ions to produce hydrogen and carbon monoxide. The cathode-side feed stream can further comprise nitrogen, hydrogen, or a mixture thereof.

  16. Combination of ozonation with conventional aerobic oxidation for distillery wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Sangave, Preeti C; Gogate, Parag R; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2007-05-01

    Laboratory-scale experiments were conducted in order to investigate the effect of ozone as pre-aerobic treatment and post-aerobic treatment for the treatment of the distillery wastewater. The degradation of the pollutants present in distillery spent wash was carried out by ozonation, aerobic biological degradation processes alone and by using the combinations of these two processes to investigate the synergism between the two modes of wastewater treatment and with the aim of reducing the overall treatment costs. Pollutant removal efficiency was followed by means of global parameters directly related to the concentration of organic compounds in those effluents: chemical oxygen demand (COD) and the color removal efficiency in terms of absorbance of the sample at 254 nm. Ozone was found to be effective in bringing down the COD (up to 27%) during the pretreatment step itself. In the combined process, pretreatment of the effluent led to enhanced rates of subsequent biological oxidation step, almost 2.5 times increase in the initial oxidation rate has been observed. Post-aerobic treatment with ozone led to further removal of COD along with the complete discoloration of the effluent. The integrated process (ozone-aerobic oxidation-ozone) achieved approximately 79% COD reduction along with discoloration of the effluent sample as compared to 34.9% COD reduction for non-ozonated sample, over a similar treatment period.

  17. Methane oxidation associated to submerged brown-mosses buffers methane emissions from Siberian polygonal peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebner, Susanne; Zeyer, Josef; Knoblauch, Christian

    2010-05-01

    Circumpolar peatlands store roughly 18 % of the globally stored carbon in soils [based on 1, 2]. Also, northern wetlands and tundra are a net source of methane (CH4), an effective greenhouse gas (GHG), with an estimated annual CH4 release of 7.2% [3] or 8.1% [4] of the global total CH4 emission. Although it is definite that Arctic tundra significantly contributes to the global methane emissions in general, regional variations in GHG fluxes are enormous. CH4 fluxes of polygonal tundra within the Siberian Lena Delta, for example, were reported to be low [5, 6], particularly at open water polygonal ponds and small lakes [7] which make up around 10 % of the delta's surface. Low methane emissions from polygonal ponds oppose that Arctic permafrost thaw ponds are generally known to emit large amounts of CH4 [8]. Combining tools of biogeochemistry and molecular microbiology, we identified sinks of CH4 in polygonal ponds from the Lena Delta that were not considered so far in GHG studies from Arctic wetlands. Pore water CH4 profiling in polygonal ponds on Samoylov, a small island in the central part of the Lena Delta, revealed a pronounced zone of CH4 oxidation near the vegetation surface in submerged layers of brown-mosses. Here, potential CH4 oxidation was an order of magnitude higher than in non-submerged mosses and in adjacent bulk soil. We could additionally show that this moss associated methane oxidation (MAMO) is hampered when exposure of light is prevented. Shading of plots with submerged Scorpidium scorpioides inhibited MAMO leading to higher CH4 concentrations and an increase in CH4 fluxes by a factor of ~13. Compared to non-submerged mosses, the submerged mosses also showed significantly lower δ13C values indicating that they use carbon dioxide derived from methane oxidation for photosynthesis. Applying stable isotope probing of DNA, type II methanotrophs were identified to be responsible for the oxidation of CH4 in the submerged Scorpidium scorpioides. Our

  18. Understanding complete oxidation of methane on spinel oxides at a molecular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Shan, Jun-Jun; Nguyen, Luan; Wang, Ziyun; Zhang, Shiran; Zhang, Li; Wu, Zili; Huang, Weixin; Zeng, Shibi; Hu, P.

    2015-08-01

    It is crucial to develop a catalyst made of earth-abundant elements highly active for a complete oxidation of methane at a relatively low temperature. NiCo2O4 consisting of earth-abundant elements which can completely oxidize methane in the temperature range of 350-550 °C. Being a cost-effective catalyst, NiCo2O4 exhibits activity higher than precious-metal-based catalysts. Here we report that the higher catalytic activity at the relatively low temperature results from the integration of nickel cations, cobalt cations and surface lattice oxygen atoms/oxygen vacancies at the atomic scale. In situ studies of complete oxidation of methane on NiCo2O4 and theoretical simulations show that methane dissociates to methyl on nickel cations and then couple with surface lattice oxygen atoms to form -CH3O with a following dehydrogenation to -CH2O a following oxidative dehydrogenation forms CHO; CHO is transformed to product molecules through two different sub-pathways including dehydrogenation of OCHO and CO oxidation.

  19. Understanding complete oxidation of methane on spinel oxides at a molecular level.

    PubMed

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Shan, Jun-Jun; Nguyen, Luan; Wang, Ziyun; Zhang, Shiran; Zhang, Li; Wu, Zili; Huang, Weixin; Zeng, Shibi; Hu, P

    2015-08-04

    It is crucial to develop a catalyst made of earth-abundant elements highly active for a complete oxidation of methane at a relatively low temperature. NiCo2O4 consisting of earth-abundant elements which can completely oxidize methane in the temperature range of 350-550 °C. Being a cost-effective catalyst, NiCo2O4 exhibits activity higher than precious-metal-based catalysts. Here we report that the higher catalytic activity at the relatively low temperature results from the integration of nickel cations, cobalt cations and surface lattice oxygen atoms/oxygen vacancies at the atomic scale. In situ studies of complete oxidation of methane on NiCo2O4 and theoretical simulations show that methane dissociates to methyl on nickel cations and then couple with surface lattice oxygen atoms to form -CH3O with a following dehydrogenation to -CH2O; a following oxidative dehydrogenation forms CHO; CHO is transformed to product molecules through two different sub-pathways including dehydrogenation of OCHO and CO oxidation.

  20. Understanding complete oxidation of methane on spinel oxides at a molecular level

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Shan, Jun-jun; Nguyen, Luan; Wang, Ziyun; Zhang, Shiran; Zhang, Li; Wu, Zili; Huang, Weixin; Zeng, Shibi; Hu, P.

    2015-08-04

    It is crucial to develop a catalyst made of earth-abundant elements highly active for a complete oxidation of methane at a relatively low temperature. NiCo2O4 consisting of earth-abundant elements which can completely oxidize methane in the temperature range of 350-550 °C. Being a cost-effective catalyst, NiCo2O4 exhibits activity higher than precious-metal-based catalysts. Here we report that the higher catalytic activity at the relatively low temperature results from the integration of nickel cations, cobalt cations and surface lattice oxygen atoms/oxygen vacancies at the atomic scale. Finally, in situ studies of complete oxidation of methane on NiCo2O4 and theoretical simulations show that methane dissociates to methyl on nickel cations and then couple with surface lattice oxygen atoms to form -CH3O with a following dehydrogenation to -CH2O; a following oxidative dehydrogenation forms CHO; CHO is transformed to product molecules through two different sub-pathways including dehydrogenation of OCHO and CO oxidation.

  1. Understanding complete oxidation of methane on spinel oxides at a molecular level

    DOE PAGES

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Shan, Jun-jun; Nguyen, Luan; ...

    2015-08-04

    It is crucial to develop a catalyst made of earth-abundant elements highly active for a complete oxidation of methane at a relatively low temperature. NiCo2O4 consisting of earth-abundant elements which can completely oxidize methane in the temperature range of 350-550 °C. Being a cost-effective catalyst, NiCo2O4 exhibits activity higher than precious-metal-based catalysts. Here we report that the higher catalytic activity at the relatively low temperature results from the integration of nickel cations, cobalt cations and surface lattice oxygen atoms/oxygen vacancies at the atomic scale. Finally, in situ studies of complete oxidation of methane on NiCo2O4 and theoretical simulations show thatmore » methane dissociates to methyl on nickel cations and then couple with surface lattice oxygen atoms to form -CH3O with a following dehydrogenation to -CH2O; a following oxidative dehydrogenation forms CHO; CHO is transformed to product molecules through two different sub-pathways including dehydrogenation of OCHO and CO oxidation.« less

  2. Phylogenetic and enzymatic diversity of deep subseafloor aerobic microorganisms in organics- and methane-rich sediments off Shimokita Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tohru; Koide, Osamu; Mori, Kozue; Shimamura, Shigeru; Matsuura, Takae; Miura, Takeshi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Morono, Yuki; Nunoura, Takuro; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Inagaki, Fumio; Takai, Ken; Horikoshi, Koki

    2008-07-01

    "A meta-enzyme approach" is proposed as an ecological enzymatic method to explore the potential functions of microbial communities in extreme environments such as the deep marine subsurface. We evaluated a variety of extra-cellular enzyme activities of sediment slurries and isolates from a deep subseafloor sediment core. Using the new deep-sea drilling vessel "Chikyu", we obtained 365 m of core sediments that contained approximately 2% organic matter and considerable amounts of methane from offshore the Shimokita Peninsula in Japan at a water depth of 1,180 m. In the extra-sediment fraction of the slurry samples, phosphatase, esterase, and catalase activities were detected consistently throughout the core sediments down to the deepest slurry sample from 342.5 m below seafloor (mbsf). Detectable enzyme activities predicted the existence of a sizable population of viable aerobic microorganisms even in deep subseafloor habitats. The subsequent quantitative cultivation using solid media represented remarkably high numbers of aerobic, heterotrophic microbial populations (e.g., maximally 4.4x10(7) cells cm(-3) at 342.5 mbsf). Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the predominant cultivated microbial components were affiliated with the genera Bacillus, Shewanella, Pseudoalteromonas, Halomonas, Pseudomonas, Paracoccus, Rhodococcus, Microbacterium, and Flexibacteracea. Many of the predominant and scarce isolates produced a variety of extra-cellular enzymes such as proteases, amylases, lipases, chitinases, phosphatases, and deoxyribonucleases. Our results indicate that microbes in the deep subseafloor environment off Shimokita are metabolically active and that the cultivable populations may have a great potential in biotechnology.

  3. A TEMPO-free copper-catalyzed aerobic oxidation of alcohols.

    PubMed

    Xu, Boran; Lumb, Jean-Philip; Arndtsen, Bruce A

    2015-03-27

    The copper-catalyzed aerobic oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols without an external N-oxide co-oxidant is described. The catalyst system is composed of a Cu/diamine complex inspired by the enzyme tyrosinase, along with dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) or N-methylimidazole (NMI). The Cu catalyst system works without 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-l-piperidinoxyl (TEMPO) at ambient pressure and temperature, and displays activity for un-activated secondary alcohols, which remain a challenging substrate for catalytic aerobic systems. Our work underscores the importance of finding alternative mechanistic pathways for alcohol oxidation, which complement Cu/TEMPO systems, and demonstrate, in this case, a preference for the oxidation of activated secondary over primary alcohols.

  4. Isolation of an aerobic sulfur oxidizer from the SUP05/Arctic96BD-19 clade.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Katharine T; Morris, Robert M

    2013-02-01

    Bacteria from the uncultured SUP05/Arctic96BD-19 clade of gamma proteobacterial sulfur oxidizers (GSOs) have the genetic potential to oxidize reduced sulfur and fix carbon in the tissues of clams and mussels, in oxygen minimum zones and throughout the deep ocean (>200 m). Here, we report isolation of the first cultured representative from this GSO clade. Closely related cultures were obtained from surface waters in Puget Sound and from the deep chlorophyll maximum in the North Pacific gyre. Pure cultures grow aerobically on natural seawater media, oxidize sulfur, and reach higher final cell densities when glucose and thiosulfate are added to the media. This suggests that aerobic sulfur oxidation enhances organic carbon utilization in the oceans. The first isolate from the SUP05/Arctic96BD-19 clade was given the provisional taxonomic assignment 'Candidatus: Thioglobus singularis', alluding to the clade's known role in sulfur oxidation and the isolate's planktonic lifestyle.

  5. Methane-derived carbon flows through methane-oxidizing bacteria to higher trophic levels in aquatic systems.

    PubMed

    Deines, Peter; Bodelier, Paul L E; Eller, Gundula

    2007-05-01

    Recent investigations have shown that biogenic methane can be a carbon source for macro invertebrates in freshwater food webs. Stable carbon isotopic signatures, used to infer an organism's food source, indicated that methane can play a major role in the nutrition of chironomid larvae. However, the pathway of methane-derived carbon into invertebrate biomass is still not confirmed. It has been proposed that chironomid larvae ingest methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB), but this has not been experimentally demonstrated to date. Using (13)C-labelled methane we could show for the first time that chironomid larvae assimilate methane-derived carbon through MOB. Chironomid larval biomass was significantly (13)C-enriched after dwelling for 10 days in lake sediment enriched with labelled methane. Moreover, phospholipid fatty acids diagnostic for MOB were detected in larval tissue and were significantly (13)C-enriched, which encompasses the (13)C-uptake predicted for a methane-based nutrition. Additionally, chironomid larvae fed on sediment and water-column derived MOB biomass.

  6. Iron-mediated anaerobic oxidation of methane in brackish coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Egger, Matthias; Rasigraf, Olivia; Sapart, Célia J; Jilbert, Tom; Jetten, Mike S M; Röckmann, Thomas; van der Veen, Carina; Bândă, Narcisa; Kartal, Boran; Ettwig, Katharina F; Slomp, Caroline P

    2015-01-06

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and its biological conversion in marine sediments, largely controlled by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), is a crucial part of the global carbon cycle. However, little is known about the role of iron oxides as an oxidant for AOM. Here we provide the first field evidence for iron-dependent AOM in brackish coastal surface sediments and show that methane produced in Bothnian Sea sediments is oxidized in distinct zones of iron- and sulfate-dependent AOM. At our study site, anthropogenic eutrophication over recent decades has led to an upward migration of the sulfate/methane transition zone in the sediment. Abundant iron oxides and high dissolved ferrous iron indicate iron reduction in the methanogenic sediments below the newly established sulfate/methane transition. Laboratory incubation studies of these sediments strongly suggest that the in situ microbial community is capable of linking methane oxidation to iron oxide reduction. Eutrophication of coastal environments may therefore create geochemical conditions favorable for iron-mediated AOM and thus increase the relevance of iron-dependent methane oxidation in the future. Besides its role in mitigating methane emissions, iron-dependent AOM strongly impacts sedimentary iron cycling and related biogeochemical processes through the reduction of large quantities of iron oxides.

  7. Challenges in polyoxometalate-mediated aerobic oxidation catalysis: catalyst development meets reactor design.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Manuel; Güttel, Robert; Streb, Carsten

    2016-11-14

    Selective catalytic oxidation is one of the most widely used chemical processes. Ideally, highly active and selective catalysts are used in combination with molecular oxygen as oxidant, leading to clean, environmentally friendly process conditions. For homogeneous oxidation catalysis, molecular metal oxide anions, so-called polyoxometalates (POMs) are ideal prototypes which combine high reactivity and stability with chemical tunability on the molecular level. Typically, POM-mediated aerobic oxidations are biphasic, using gaseous O2 and liquid reaction mixtures. Therefore, the overall efficiency of the reaction is not only dependent on the chemical components, but requires chemical engineering insight to design reactors with optimized productivity. This Perspective shows that POM-mediated aerobic liquid-phase oxidations are ideal reactions to be carried out in microstructured flow reactors as they enable facile mass and energy transfer, provide large gas-liquid interfaces and can be easily upscaled. Recent advances in POM-mediated aerobic catalytic oxidations are therefore summarized with a focus on technological importance and mechanistic insight. The principles of reactor design are discussed from a chemical engineering point of view with a focus on homogeneous oxidation catalysis using O2 in microfluidic systems. Further, current limitations to catalytic activity are identified and future directions based on combined chemistry and chemical engineering approaches are discussed to show that this approach could lead to sustainable production methods in industrial chemistry based on alternative energy sources and chemical feedstocks.

  8. Catalytic partial oxidation of methane on Ni-YSZ cermet anode of solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, H.; Tada, K.; Kishimoto, M.; Saito, M.; Yoshida, H.

    2016-09-01

    The effects of oxygen addition to the methane fuels directly supplied to solid oxide fuel cells were investigated. Fundamental experiments were conducted using Ni-YSZ cermet as a typical anode material. The Ni-YSZ catalysts having different streamwise lengths were fabricated on the YSZ flat plates. Premixed gas of methane, oxygen, nitrogen and stream was supplied to the test catalyst set in a rectangular test channel. The exhaust gas compositions and the surface temperature distributions of the test catalyst were measured. It was found that the oxidation of methane prominently proceeded near the upstream edge of the catalyst followed by steam/dry reforming reactions downstream. It resulted in a formation of the high temperature region leading a large temperature gradient in the streamwise direction.

  9. Tuning graphitic oxide for initiator- and metal-free aerobic epoxidation of linear alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Pattisson, Samuel; Nowicka, Ewa; Gupta, Upendra N.; Shaw, Greg; Jenkins, Robert L.; Morgan, David J.; Knight, David W.; Hutchings, Graham J.

    2016-01-01

    Graphitic oxide has potential as a carbocatalyst for a wide range of reactions. Interest in this material has risen enormously due to it being a precursor to graphene via the chemical oxidation of graphite. Despite some studies suggesting that the chosen method of graphite oxidation can influence the physical properties of the graphitic oxide, the preparation method and extent of oxidation remain unresolved for catalytic applications. Here we show that tuning the graphitic oxide surface can be achieved by varying the amount and type of oxidant. The resulting materials differ in level of oxidation, surface oxygen content and functionality. Most importantly, we show that these graphitic oxide materials are active as unique carbocatalysts for low-temperature aerobic epoxidation of linear alkenes in the absence of initiator or metal. An optimum level of oxidation is necessary and materials produced via conventional permanganate-based methods are far from optimal. PMID:27687877

  10. Trace Metal Requirements for Microbial Enzymes Involved in the Production and Consumption of Methane and Nitrous Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Jennifer B.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2011-01-01

    Fluxes of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere are heavily influenced by microbiological activity. Microbial enzymes involved in the production and consumption of greenhouse gases often contain metal cofactors. While extensive research has examined the influence of Fe bioavailability on microbial CO2 cycling, fewer studies have explored metal requirements for microbial production and consumption of the second- and third-most abundant greenhouse gases, methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O). Here we review the current state of biochemical, physiological, and environmental research on transition metal requirements for microbial CH4 and N2O cycling. Methanogenic archaea require large amounts of Fe, Ni, and Co (and some Mo/W and Zn). Low bioavailability of Fe, Ni, and Co limits methanogenesis in pure and mixed cultures and environmental studies. Anaerobic methane oxidation by anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) likely occurs via reverse methanogenesis since ANME possess most of the enzymes in the methanogenic pathway. Aerobic CH4 oxidation uses Cu or Fe for the first step depending on Cu availability, and additional Fe, Cu, and Mo for later steps. N2O production via classical anaerobic denitrification is primarily Fe-based, whereas aerobic pathways (nitrifier denitrification and archaeal ammonia oxidation) require Cu in addition to, or possibly in place of, Fe. Genes encoding the Cu-containing N2O reductase, the only known enzyme capable of microbial N2O conversion to N2, have only been found in classical denitrifiers. Accumulation of N2O due to low Cu has been observed in pure cultures and a lake ecosystem, but not in marine systems. Future research is needed on metalloenzymes involved in the production of N2O by enrichment cultures of ammonia oxidizing archaea, biological mechanisms for scavenging scarce metals, and possible links between metal bioavailability and greenhouse gas fluxes in anaerobic environments where metals may be limiting due to sulfide

  11. Treatment of real industrial wastewater using the combined approach of advanced oxidation followed by aerobic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ramteke, Lokeshkumar P; Gogate, Parag R

    2016-05-01

    Fenton oxidation and ultrasound-based pretreatment have been applied to improve the treatment of real industrial wastewater based on the use of biological oxidation. The effect of operating parameters such as Fe(2+) loading, contact time, initial pH, and hydrogen peroxide loading on the extent of chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction and change in biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5)/COD ratio has been investigated. The optimum operating conditions established for the pretreatment were initial pH of 3.0, Fe(2+) loading of 2.0, and 2.5 g L(-1) for the US/Fenton/stirring and Fenton approach, respectively, and temperature of 25 °C with initial H2O2 loading of 1.5 g L(-1). The use of pretreatment resulted in a significant increase in the BOD5/COD ratio confirming the production of easily digestible intermediates. The effect of the type of sludge in the aerobic biodegradation was also investigated based on the use of primary activated sludge (PAS), modified activated sludge (MAS), and activated sludge (AS). Enhanced removal of the pollutants as well as higher biomass yield was observed for MAS as compared to PAS and AS. The use of US/Fenton/stirring pretreatment under the optimized conditions followed by biological oxidation using MAS resulted in maximum COD removal at 97.9 %. The required hydraulic retention time for the combined oxidation system was also significantly lower as compared to only biological oxidation operation. Kinetic studies revealed that the reduction in the COD followed a first-order kinetic model for advanced oxidation and pseudo first-order model for biodegradation. The study clearly established the utility of the combined technology for the effective treatment of real industrial wastewater.

  12. Effect of aerobic pre-treatment on hydrogen and methane production in a two-stage anaerobic digestion process using food waste with different compositions.

    PubMed

    Rafieenia, Razieh; Girotto, Francesca; Peng, Wei; Cossu, Raffaello; Pivato, Alberto; Raga, Roberto; Lavagnolo, Maria Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Aerobic pre-treatment was applied prior to two-stage anaerobic digestion process. Three different food wastes samples, namely carbohydrate rich, protein rich and lipid rich, were prepared as substrates. Effect of aerobic pre-treatment on hydrogen and methane production was studied. Pre-aeration of substrates showed no positive impact on hydrogen production in the first stage. All three categories of pre-aerated food wastes produced less hydrogen compared to samples without pre-aeration. In the second stage, methane production increased for aerated protein rich and carbohydrate rich samples. In addition, the lag phase for carbohydrate rich substrate was shorter for aerated samples. Aerated protein rich substrate yielded the best results among substrates for methane production, with a cumulative production of approximately 351ml/gVS. With regard to non-aerated substrates, lipid rich was the best substrate for CH4 production (263ml/gVS). Pre-aerated P substrate was the best in terms of total energy generation which amounted to 9.64kJ/gVS. This study revealed aerobic pre-treatment to be a promising option for use in achieving enhanced substrate conversion efficiencies and CH4 production in a two-stage AD process, particularly when the substrate contains high amounts of proteins.

  13. Circadian Variability in Methane Oxidation Activity in the Root Zone of Rice Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroth, M. H.; Cho, R.; Zeyer, J.

    2009-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas with a warming potential about 20 times stronger than that of carbon dioxide. A main source of biogenic methane are rice-paddy soils. Methane is produced in flooded rice fields under anaerobic conditions. Conversely, methanotrophic microorganisms oxidize methane to carbon dioxide in the root zone of rice plants in the presence of molecular oxygen supplied to the roots through the plants’ aerenchyma, thus reducing overall methane emissions to the atmosphere. To quantify methane oxidation we adapted push-pull tests (PPTs), a technique originally developed for aquifer testing, in combination with a suitable microbial inhibitor for application in the root zone of rice plants. During a PPT, 70 ml of a test solution containing dissolved substrates (methane, oxygen), nonreactive tracers (argon, chloride) and the methanogenesis inhibitor 2-Bromoethane sulfonate was injected into the plant’s root zone, and after a rest period of two hours extracted from the same location. Reaction rate constants were calculated from extraction-phase breakthrough curves of substrates and tracers. We conducted a set of three different laboratory PPTs to quantify methane oxidation at day time, directly after dawn, and at night in the root zone of four different potted rice plants each. High diurnal methane oxidation rate constants (up to 23 h-1) were obtained for all rice plants. Methane oxidation potential decreased soon after nightfall. At night, rate constants were usually below 1 h-1. Methane oxidation rates were apparently independent of additional oxygen supplied via the injected test solutions, but strongly dependent on photosynthetically produced oxygen transported to the roots through the plants’ aerenchyma. Additional PPTs utilizing 13C-labeled methane are currently being conducted to corroborate these findings. Ultimately, this novel tool shall support efforts to quantitatively understand the controlling mechanisms of methane turnover in

  14. A field-validated model for landfill methane emissions inclusive of seasonal methane oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogner, J. E.; Spokas, K.; Chanton, J.

    2010-12-01

    In addition to natural wetlands, atmospheric methane (CH4) has multiple anthropogenic sources with high uncertainties, including rice production, ruminant animals, natural gas leakages, biomass burning, and landfills. For an improved IPCC Tier III methodology for landfill CH4 emissions in California, we have developed a new science-based, field-validated inventory model which decouples emissions from a historical reliance on a theoretical first order kinetic model for CH4 generation potential. The model (CALMIM, CAlifornia Landfill Methane Inventory Model) is a freely-available JAVA tool which estimates net CH4 emissions to the atmosphere for any landfill cover soil over a typical annual cycle, including (1) the effect of engineered gas extraction; (2) the physical effects of daily, intermediate, and final cover materials to retard emissions; and (3) seasonal soil moisture and temperature effects on both gaseous transport and methanotrophic CH4 oxidation. Linking site-specific data with existing globally-validated USDA models for annual climate and soil microclimate (Global TempSim; Global RainSim; Solarcalc; STM2), this model relies on 1-D diffusion as the major driver for emissions. Importantly, unlike current inventory methods based on modeled generation, the driving force for emissions (e.g., the CH4 concentration gradient) can be directly compared to field data. Methane oxidation is scaled to maximum rates over the full range of moisture and temperature conditions based on extensive supporting laboratory studies using California landfill cover soils. Field validation included meteorological data, soil moisture/temperature measurements, and seasonal (wet/dry) CH4 emissions & oxidation measurements for daily, intermediate, and final cover soils over two annual cycles at a northern (Monterey County) and southern California (Los Angeles County) landfill. The model accurately predicted soil temperature and moisture trends for individual cover materials with

  15. Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts. Quarterly report, September 1 - November 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, Kamil; Herman, R.G.; Wang, C.B.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this research is the selective oxidation of methane to C{sub 2}H{sub 4} hydrocarbons and to oxygenates, in particular formaldehyde and methanol. Air, oxygen, or carbon dioxide rather than nitrous oxide, are utilized as the oxidizing gas at high gas hourly space velocity but mild reaction conditions (500-700{degrees}C, 1 atm total pressure). All the investigated processes are catalytic, aiming at minimizing gas phase reactions that are difficult to control. During this quarter, solid state {sup 51}V NMR and double catalyst bed experiments were conducted to demonstrate the unfavorable effect of the presence of bulk crystalline V{sub 2}O{sub 5} in V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-SiO{sub 2} xerogel catalysts on selective oxidation of methane to methanol and formaldehyde. Results are discussed.

  16. Cu-ZSM-5: A biomimetic inorganic model for methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Vanelderen, Pieter; Hadt, Ryan G; Smeets, Pieter J; Solomon, Edward I; Schoonheydt, Robert A; Sels, Bert F

    2011-12-01

    The present work highlights recent advances in elucidating the methane oxidation mechanism of inorganic Cu-ZSM-5 biomimic and in identifying the reactive intermediates that are involved. Such molecular understanding is important in view of upgrading abundantly available methane, but also to comprehend the working mechanism of genuine Cu-containing oxidation enzymes.

  17. The partial catalytic oxidation of methane to give oxygen-containing compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylov, Oleg V.

    1992-11-01

    The three principal paths of the partial oxidation of methane, to give methanol, formaldehyde, and synthesis gas, have been reviewed. The kinetics and mechanism of the processes have been described. The possible oxidation of methane using different oxidising agents — oxygen and carbon dioxide — has been examined. The bibliography includes 139 references.

  18. Microbial Methane Oxidation Processes and Technologies for Mitigation of Landfill Gas Emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this paper is to review the present knowledge regarding the microbial methane oxidation in natural or engineered landfill environments with focus on process understanding, engineering experiences and modeling. This review includes seven sections. First, the methane oxidation is put in con...

  19. Activation of methane and ethane and their selective oxidation to the alcohols in protic media

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, A.; Benvenuto, M.A.; Lin, M.; Hutson, A.C.; Basickes, N. )

    1994-02-09

    The selective oxidation of methane and ethane to the alcohols in solvents ranging from strong acids to neutral aqueous medium has been studied. In 98% sulfuric acid, methane is oxidized to CH[sub 3]OSO[sub 3]H by a variety of 1e[sup [minus

  20. Performance of green waste biocovers for enhancing methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Mei, Changgen; Yazdani, Ramin; Han, Byunghyun; Mostafid, M Erfan; Chanton, Jeff; VanderGheynst, Jean; Imhoff, Paul

    2015-05-01

    Green waste aged 2 and 24months, labeled "fresh" and "aged" green waste, respectively, were placed in biocover test cells and evaluated for their ability to oxidize methane (CH4) under high landfill gas loading over a 15-month testing period. These materials are less costly to produce than green waste compost, yet satisfied recommended respiration requirements for landfill compost covers. In field tests employing a novel gas tracer to correct for leakage, both green wastes oxidized CH4 at high rates during the first few months of operation - 140 and 200g/m(2)/day for aged and fresh green waste, respectively. Biocover performance degraded during the winter and spring, with significant CH4 generated from anaerobic regions in the 60-80cm thick biocovers. Concurrently, CH4 oxidation rates decreased. Two previously developed empirical models for moisture and temperature dependency of CH4 oxidation in soils were used to test their applicability to green waste. Models accounted for 68% and 79% of the observed seasonal variations in CH4 oxidation rates for aged green waste. Neither model could describe similar seasonal changes for the less stable fresh green waste. This is the first field application and evaluation of these empirical models using media with high organic matter. Given the difficulty of preventing undesired CH4 generation, green waste may not be a viable biocover material for many climates and landfill conditions.

  1. Assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of compacted soils intended for use as landfill cover materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rachor, Ingke; Gebert, Julia; Groengroeft, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2011-05-15

    The microbial oxidation of methane in engineered cover soils is considered a potent option for the mitigation of emissions from old landfills or sites containing wastes of low methane generation rates. A laboratory column study was conducted in order to derive design criteria that enable construction of an effective methane oxidising cover from the range of soils that are available to the landfill operator. Therefore, the methane oxidation capacity of different soils was assessed under simulated landfill conditions. Five sandy potential landfill top cover materials with varying contents of silt and clay were investigated with respect to methane oxidation and corresponding soil gas composition over a period of four months. The soils were compacted to 95% of their specific proctor density, resulting in bulk densities of 1.4-1.7 g cm{sup -3}, reflecting considerably unfavourable conditions for methane oxidation due to reduced air-filled porosity. The soil water content was adjusted to field capacity, resulting in water contents ranging from 16.2 to 48.5 vol.%. The investigated inlet fluxes ranged from 25 to about 100 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, covering the methane load proposed to allow for complete oxidation in landfill covers under Western European climate conditions and hence being suggested as a criterion for release from aftercare. The vertical distribution of gas concentrations, methane flux balances as well as stable carbon isotope studies allowed for clear process identifications. Higher inlet fluxes led to a reduction of the aerated zone, an increase in the absolute methane oxidation rate and a decline of the relative proportion of oxidized methane. For each material, a specific maximum oxidation rate was determined, which varied between 20 and 95 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1} and which was positively correlated to the air-filled porosity of the soil. Methane oxidation efficiencies and gas profile data imply a strong link between oxidation capacity

  2. Treatment of high salt oxidized modified starch waste water using micro-electrolysis, two-phase anaerobic aerobic and electrolysis for reuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Xuenong; Wang, Yulin

    2016-08-01

    A combined process of micro-electrolysis, two-phase anaerobic, aerobic and electrolysis was investigated for the treatment of oxidized modified starch wastewater (OMSW). Optimum ranges for important operating variables were experimentally determined and the treated water was tested for reuse in the production process of corn starch. The optimum hydraulic retention time (HRT) of micro-electrolysis, methanation reactor, aerobic process and electrolysis process were 5, 24, 12 and 3 h, respectively. The addition of iron-carbon fillers to the acidification reactor was 200 mg/L while the best current density of electrolysis was 300 A/m2. The biodegradability was improved from 0.12 to 0.34 by micro-electrolysis. The whole treatment was found to be effective with removal of 96 % of the chemical oxygen demand (COD), 0.71 L/day of methane energy recovery. In addition, active chlorine production (15,720 mg/L) was obtained by electrolysis. The advantage of this hybrid process is that, through appropriate control of reaction conditions, effect from high concentration of salt on the treatment was avoided. Moreover, the process also produced the material needed in the production of oxidized starch while remaining emission-free and solved the problem of high process cost.

  3. Trace metal pyritization variability in response to mangrove soil aerobic and anaerobic oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Machado, W; Borrelli, N L; Ferreira, T O; Marques, A G B; Osterrieth, M; Guizan, C

    2014-02-15

    The degree of iron pyritization (DOP) and degree of trace metal pyritization (DTMP) were evaluated in mangrove soil profiles from an estuarine area located in Rio de Janeiro (SE Brazil). The soil pH was negatively correlated with redox potential (Eh) and positively correlated with DOP and DTMP of some elements (Mn, Cu and Pb), suggesting that pyrite oxidation generated acidity and can affect the importance of pyrite as a trace metal-binding phase, mainly in response to spatial variability in tidal flooding. Besides these aerobic oxidation effects, results from a sequential extraction analyses of reactive phases evidenced that Mn oxidized phase consumption in reaction with pyrite can be also important to determine the pyritization of trace elements. Cumulative effects of these aerobic and anaerobic oxidation processes were evidenced as factors affecting the capacity of mangrove soils to act as a sink for trace metals through pyritization processes.

  4. Microbial community structure in a thermophilic aerobic digester used as a sludge pretreatment process for the mesophilic anaerobic digestion and the enhancement of methane production.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun Min; Park, Sang Kyu; Ha, Jeong Hyub; Park, Jong Moon

    2013-10-01

    An effective two-stage sewage sludge digestion process, consisting of thermophilic aerobic digestion (TAD) followed by mesophilic anaerobic digestion (MAD), was developed for efficient sludge reduction and methane production. Using TAD as a biological pretreatment, the total volatile suspended solid reduction (VSSR) and methane production rate (MPR) in the MAD reactor were significantly improved. According to denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, the results indicated that the dominant bacteria species such as Ureibacillus thermophiles and Bacterium thermus in TAD were major routes for enhancing soluble organic matter. TAD pretreatment using a relatively short SRT of 1 day showed highly increased soluble organic products and positively affected an increment of bacteria populations which performed interrelated microbial metabolisms with methanogenic species in the MAD; consequently, a quantitative real-time PCR indicated greatly increased Methanosarcinales (acetate-utilizing methanogens) in the MAD, resulting in enhanced methane production.

  5. Experimental study of incomplete oxidation of methane in a ring channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. V.; Vitovsky, O. V.; Gasenko, O. A.

    2007-09-01

    Chemical transformations at incomplete methane oxidation in the air medium were studied experimentally at reaction activation on the wall of an annular microchannel. Methane was oxidized incompletely on a rhodium catalyst deposited on an inner wall of the channel. Concentrations of the products of chemical transformations were measured in the outlet gas mixture for different reactor temperatures and stay times. We have determined the range of channel wall temperatures and stay times of the mixture corresponding to an increase in the portion of hydrogen and carbon dioxide indicating transition from predominant methane combustion to cascade chemical reactions with activation of steam and carbon dioxide methane conversions. It is shown that the kinetic model of chemical transformations of methane in the air medium depends significantly on the temperature of channel walls and stay time of the mixture. The effect of outer diffusion deceleration on the rate of chemical transformations at incomplete methane oxidation under the strained conditions is determined.

  6. Modeling sulfate reduction in methane hydrate-bearing continental margin sediments: Does a sulfate-methane transition require anaerobic oxidation of methane?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malinverno, A.; Pohlman, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    The sulfate-methane transition (SMT), a biogeochemical zone where sulfate and methane are metabolized, is commonly observed at shallow depths (1-30 mbsf) in methane-bearing marine sediments. Two processes consume sulfate at and above the SMT, anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and organoclastic sulfate reduction (OSR). Differentiating the relative contribution of each process is critical to estimate methane flux into the SMT, which, in turn, is necessary to predict deeper occurrences of gas hydrates in continental margin sediments. To evaluate the relative importance of these two sulfate reduction pathways, we developed a diagenetic model to compute the pore water concentrations of sulfate, methane, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). By separately tracking DIC containing 12C and 13C, the model also computes ??13C-DIC values. The model reproduces common observations from methane-rich sediments: a well-defined SMT with no methane above and no sulfate below and a ??13C-DIC minimum at the SMT. The model also highlights the role of upward diffusing 13C-enriched DIC in contributing to the carbon isotope mass balance of DIC. A combination of OSR and AOM, each consuming similar amounts of sulfate, matches observations from Site U1325 (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 311, northern Cascadia margin). Without AOM, methane diffuses above the SMT, which contradicts existing field data. The modeling results are generalized with a dimensional analysis to the range of SMT depths and sedimentation rates typical of continental margins. The modeling shows that AOM must be active to establish an SMT wherein methane is quantitatively consumed and the ??13C-DIC minimum occurs. The presence of an SMT generally requires active AOM. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. In situ measurement of methane oxidation in groundwater by using natural-gradient tracer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Howes, B.L.; Garabedian, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    Methane oxidation was measured in an unconfined sand and gravel aquifer (Cape Cod, Mass.) by using in situ natural-gradient tracer tests at both a pristine, oxygenated site and an anoxic, sewage-contaminated site. The tracer sites were equipped with multilevel sampling devices to create target grids of sampling points; the injectate was prepared with groundwater from the tracer site to maintain the same geochemical conditions. Methane oxidation was calculated from breakthrough curves of methane relative to halide and inert gas (hexafluoroethane) tracers and was confirmed by the appearance of 13C-enriched carbon dioxide in experiments in which 13C-enriched methane was used as the tracer. A V(max) for methane oxidation could be calculated when the methane concentration was sufficiently high to result in zero-order kinetics throughout the entire transport interval. Methane breakthrough curves could be simulated by modifying a one-dimensional advection-dispersion transport model to include a Michaelis-Menten-based consumption term for methane oxidation. The K(m) values for methane oxidation that gave the best match for the breakthrough curve peaks were 6.0 and 9.0 ??M for the uncontaminated and contaminated sites, respectively. Natural-gradient tracer tests are a promising approach for assessing microbial processes and for testing in situ bioremediation potential in groundwater systems.

  8. Practical Aerobic Oxidations of Alcohols and Amines with Homogeneous Cu/TEMPO and Related Catalyst Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ryland, Bradford L.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol and amine oxidations are common reactions in laboratory and industrial synthesis of organic molecules. Aerobic oxidation methods have long been sought for these transformations, but few practical methods exist that offer advantages over traditional oxidation methods. Recently developed homogeneous Cu/TEMPO (TEMPO = 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-N-oxyl) and related catalyst systems appear to fill this void. The reactions exhibit high levels of chemoselectivity and broad functional-group tolerance, and they often operate efficiently at room temperature with ambient air as the oxidant. These advances, together with their historical context and recent applications, are highlighted in this minireview. PMID:25044821

  9. Nitrous oxide production by Alcaligenes faecalis under transient and dynamic aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Otte, S.; Grobben, N.G.; Robertson, L.A.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Kuenen, J.G.

    1996-07-01

    Nitrous oxide production contributes to both greenhouse effect and ozone depletion in the stratosphere. A significant part of the global N2O emission can be attributed to microbial processes, especially nitrification and denitrification, used in biological wastewater treatment systems. This study looks at the efficiency of denitrification and the enzymes involved, with the emphasis on N2O production during the transient phase from aerobic to anaerobic conditions and vice versa. The effect of repetitive changing aerobic-anaerobic conditions on N2O was also studied. Alcaligenes faecalis was used as the model denitrofing organism. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Characterizing nano-scale electrocatalysis during partial oxidation of methane

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daehee; Kim, Dongha; Kim, Joosun; Moon, Jooho

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical analysis allows in situ characterization of solid oxide electrochemical cells (SOCs) under operating conditions. However, the SOCs that have been analyzed in this way have ill-defined or uncommon microstructures in terms of porosity and tortuosity. Therefore, the nano-scale characterization of SOCs with respect to three-phase boundaries has been hindered. We introduce novel in situ electrochemical analysis for SOCs that uses combined solid electrolyte potentiometry (SEP) and impedance measurements. This method is employed to investigate the oscillatory behavior of a porous Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) anode during the partial oxidation of methane under ambient pressure at 800°C. The cyclic oxidation and reduction of nickel induces the oscillatory behavior in the impedance and electrode potential. The in situ characterization of the nickel surface suggests that the oxidation of the nickel occurs predominantly at the two-phase boundaries, whereas the nickel at the three-phase boundaries remains in the metallic state during the cyclic redox reaction. PMID:24487242

  11. Mechanism of Copper/Azodicarboxylate-Catalyzed Aerobic Alcohol Oxidation: Evidence for Uncooperative Catalysis.

    PubMed

    McCann, Scott D; Stahl, Shannon S

    2016-01-13

    Cooperative catalysis between Cu(II) and redox-active organic cocatalysts is a key feature of important chemical and enzymatic aerobic oxidation reactions, such as alcohol oxidation mediated by Cu/TEMPO and galactose oxidase. Nearly 20 years ago, Markó and co-workers reported that azodicarboxylates, such as di-tert-butyl azodicarboxylate (DBAD), are effective redox-active cocatalysts in Cu-catalyzed aerobic alcohol oxidation reactions [Markó, I. E., et al. Science 1996, 274, 2044], but the nature of the cooperativity between Cu and azodicarboxylates is not well understood. Here, we report a mechanistic study of Cu/DBAD-catalyzed aerobic alcohol oxidation. In situ infrared spectroscopic studies reveal a burst of product formation prior to steady-state catalysis, and gas-uptake measurements show that no O2 is consumed during the burst. Kinetic studies reveal that the anaerobic burst and steady-state turnover have different rate laws. The steady-state rate does not depend on [O2] or [DBAD]. These results, together with other EPR and in situ IR spectroscopic and kinetic isotope effect studies, reveal that the steady-state mechanism consists of two interdependent catalytic cycles that operate in sequence: a fast Cu(II)/DBAD pathway, in which DBAD serves as the oxidant, and a slow Cu(II)-only pathway, in which Cu(II) is the oxidant. This study provides significant insight into the redox cooperativity, or lack thereof, between Cu and redox-active organic cocatalysts in aerobic oxidation reactions.

  12. Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts. Topical report, September 8, 1992--September 7, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this research was to selectively oxidize methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons and to oxygenates, in particular formaldehyde and methanol, in high space time yields using air at the oxidant under milder reaction conditions that heretofore employed over industrially practical oxide catalysts. The research carried out under this US DOE-METC contract was divided into the following three tasks: Task 1, maximizing selective methane oxidation to C{sub 2}{sup +} products over promoted SrO/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts; Task 2, selective methane oxidation to oxygenates; and Task 3, catalyst characterization and optimization. Principal accomplishments include the following: the 1 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}/SrO/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} promoted catalyst developed here produced over 2 kg of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons/kg catalyst/hr at 550 C; V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} catalysts have been prepared that produce up to 1.5 kg formaldehyde/kg catalyst/hr at 630 C with low CO{sub 2} selectivities; and a novel dual bed catalyst system has been designed and utilized to produce over 100 g methanol/kg catalyst/hr at 600 C with the presence of steam in the reactant mixture.

  13. Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts. Quarterly report, March--May 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Wang, Chaun-Bao; Shi, Chunlei; Sun, Qun

    1995-08-01

    The objective of this research is the selective oxidative coupling of methane to C{sub 2}H{sub 4} hydrocarbons and oxygenates, in particular formaldehyde and methanol. Air, oxygen or carbon dioxide, rather than nitrous oxide will be utilized as the oxidizing gas at high gas hourly space velocity, but mild reaction conditions (500-700 {degrees}C, 1 atm total pressure). All the investigated processes are catalytic, aiming at minimizing gas phase reactions that are difficult to control. The research is divided into the following three tasks: (1) maximizing selective methane oxidation to C{sub 2}H{sub 4} products over promoted Sr/La{sub 2}O{sub 3}; (2) selective methane oxidation to oxygenates; and (3) catalyst characterization and optimization. Task 1 dealt with the preparation, testing, and optimization of acidic promoted lanthana-based catalysts for the synthesis of C{sub 2}H{sub 4} hydrocarbons and is essentially completed. Task 2 aims at the formation and optimization of promoted catalysts for the synthesis of oxygenates, in particular formaldehyde and methanol. Task 3 involves characterization of the most promising catalysts so that optimization can be achieved under Task 2. Accomplishments for this period are presented.

  14. Temporal resilience and dynamics of anaerobic methane-oxidizing microbial communities to short-term changes in methane partial pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klasek, S.; Tiantian, Y.; Torres, M. E.; Colwell, F. S.; Wang, F.; Liang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Marine sediments produce tens to hundreds of teragrams of methane annually, which is released from the seabed at thousands of cold seeps distributed globally along continental margins. Around 80-90% of this methane is consumed in shallower sediment layers before reaching the hydrosphere, in a microbially-mediated process known as anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) However, cold seeps appear to exhibit temporal variation in gas flux intensity, and AOM filter efficiency at cold seeps generally decreases with fluid flow rate. To our knowledge, the degree to which temporal heterogeneity in subsurface methane flux stimulates AOM community growth and adaptation to increased methane concentrations has not been investigated. Static high-pressure bioreactors were used to incubate sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) and methanogenic zone sediments underlying a Mediterranean mud volcano gas flare under in situ temperature and pressure at 8 MPa methane. Sulfide production rates of 0.4 μmol/cm3/day in both sediment regimes after 4 months of incubation suggested the resilience of the marine subsurface methane filter may extend well below the SMTZ (40 cm). Similar incubations of SMTZ samples from below a gas flare off Svalbard at saturating (3.8 MPa) and 0.2 MPa methane are being sampled after 1 week, 4 weeks, and 4 months; sulfide production rates of 8-18 nmol/cm3/day were first observed after 4 weeks of incubation. Sediment samples at all specified time points for both sets of incubations were collected for nucleic acid extraction and cell fixation. Anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are expected dominant taxa in enriched and non-enriched communities. 16S rDNA community analysis is expected to reveal additional microbial players involved in the short-term adaptation to higher methane partial pressures in the marine subsurface. Increased AOM community activity (RNA/DNA ratio) and copy numbers of methane cycling transcripts (mcr

  15. Anaerobic oxidation of methane in hypersaline cold seep sediments.

    PubMed

    Maignien, Loïs; Parkes, R John; Cragg, Barry; Niemann, Helge; Knittel, Katrin; Coulon, Stephanie; Akhmetzhanov, Andrey; Boon, Nico

    2013-01-01

    Life in hypersaline environments is typically limited by bioenergetic constraints. Microbial activity at the thermodynamic edge, such as the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulphate reduction (SR), is thus unlikely to thrive in these environments. In this study, carbon and sulphur cycling was investigated in the extremely hypersaline cold seep sediments of Mercator mud volcano. AOM activity was partially inhibited but still present at salinity levels of 292 g L(-1) (c. eightfold sea water concentration) with rates of 2.3 nmol cm(-3) day(-1) and was even detectable under saturated conditions. Methane and evaporite-derived sulphate comigrated in the ascending geofluids, which, in combination with a partial activity inhibition, resulted in AOM activity being spread over unusually wide depth intervals. Up to 79% of total cells in the AOM zone were identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as anaerobic methanotrophs of the ANME-1. Most ANME-1 cells formed monospecific chains without any attached partner. At all sites, AOM activity co-occurred with SR activity and sometimes significantly exceeded it. Possible causes of these unexpected results are discussed. This study demonstrates that in spite of a very low energy yield of AOM, microorganisms carrying this reaction can thrive in salinity up to halite saturation.

  16. Use of 16S rRNA gene based clone libraries to assess microbial communities potentially involved in anaerobic methane oxidation in a Mediterranean cold seep.

    PubMed

    Heijs, Sander K; Haese, Ralf R; van der Wielen, Paul W J J; Forney, Larry J; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2007-04-01

    This study provides data on the diversities of bacterial and archaeal communities in an active methane seep at the Kazan mud volcano in the deep Eastern Mediterranean sea. Layers of varying depths in the Kazan sediments were investigated in terms of (1) chemical parameters and (2) DNA-based microbial population structures. The latter was accomplished by analyzing the sequences of directly amplified 16S rRNA genes, resulting in the phylogenetic analysis of the prokaryotic communities. Sequences of organisms potentially associated with processes such as anaerobic methane oxidation and sulfate reduction were thus identified. Overall, the sediment layers revealed the presence of sequences of quite diverse bacterial and archaeal communities, which varied considerably with depth. Dominant types revealed in these communities are known as key organisms involved in the following processes: (1) anaerobic methane oxidation and sulfate reduction, (2) sulfide oxidation, and (3) a range of (aerobic) heterotrophic processes. In the communities in the lowest sediment layer sampled (22-34 cm), sulfate-reducing bacteria and archaea of the ANME-2 cluster (likely involved in anaerobic methane oxidation) were prevalent, whereas heterotrophic organisms abounded in the top sediment layer (0-6 cm). Communities in the middle layer (6-22 cm) contained organisms that could be linked to either of the aforementioned processes. We discuss how these phylogeny (sequence)-based findings can support the ongoing molecular work aimed at unraveling both the functioning and the functional diversities of the communities under study.

  17. Conventional methanotrophs are responsible for atmospheric methane oxidation in paddy soils

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yuanfeng; Zheng, Yan; Bodelier, Paul L. E.; Conrad, Ralf; Jia, Zhongjun

    2016-01-01

    Soils serve as the biological sink of the potent greenhouse gas methane with exceptionally low concentrations of ∼1.84 p.p.m.v. in the atmosphere. The as-yet-uncultivated methane-consuming bacteria have long been proposed to be responsible for this ‘high-affinity' methane oxidation (HAMO). Here we show an emerging HAMO activity arising from conventional methanotrophs in paddy soil. HAMO activity was quickly induced during the low-affinity oxidation of high-concentration methane. Activity was lost gradually over 2 weeks, but could be repeatedly regained by flush-feeding the soil with elevated methane. The induction of HAMO activity occurred only after the rapid growth of methanotrophic populations, and a metatranscriptome-wide association study suggests that the concurrent high- and low-affinity methane oxidation was catalysed by known methanotrophs rather than by the proposed novel atmospheric methane oxidizers. These results provide evidence of atmospheric methane uptake in periodically drained ecosystems that are typically considered to be a source of atmospheric methane. PMID:27248847

  18. Conventional methanotrophs are responsible for atmospheric methane oxidation in paddy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yuanfeng; Zheng, Yan; Bodelier, Paul L. E.; Conrad, Ralf; Jia, Zhongjun

    2016-06-01

    Soils serve as the biological sink of the potent greenhouse gas methane with exceptionally low concentrations of ~1.84 p.p.m.v. in the atmosphere. The as-yet-uncultivated methane-consuming bacteria have long been proposed to be responsible for this `high-affinity' methane oxidation (HAMO). Here we show an emerging HAMO activity arising from conventional methanotrophs in paddy soil. HAMO activity was quickly induced during the low-affinity oxidation of high-concentration methane. Activity was lost gradually over 2 weeks, but could be repeatedly regained by flush-feeding the soil with elevated methane. The induction of HAMO activity occurred only after the rapid growth of methanotrophic populations, and a metatranscriptome-wide association study suggests that the concurrent high- and low-affinity methane oxidation was catalysed by known methanotrophs rather than by the proposed novel atmospheric methane oxidizers. These results provide evidence of atmospheric methane uptake in periodically drained ecosystems that are typically considered to be a source of atmospheric methane.

  19. A fully coupled model for water-gas-heat reactive transport with methane oxidation in landfill covers.

    PubMed

    Ng, C W W; Feng, S; Liu, H W

    2015-03-01

    Methane oxidation in landfill covers is a complex process involving water, gas and heat transfer as well as microbial oxidation. The coupled phenomena of microbial oxidation, water, gas, and heat transfer are not fully understood. In this study, a new model is developed that incorporates water-gas-heat coupled reactive transport in unsaturated soil with methane oxidation. Effects of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat are included. The model is calibrated using published data from a laboratory soil column test. Moreover, a series of parametric studies are carried out to investigate the influence of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat, initial water content on methane oxidation efficiency. Computed and measured results of gas concentration and methane oxidation rate are consistent. It is found that the coupling effects between water-gas-heat transfer and methane oxidation are significant. Ignoring microbial oxidation-generated water and heat can result in a significant difference in methane oxidation efficiency by 100%.

  20. Methane/steam reforming kinetics for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achenbach, E.; Riensche, E.

    Experiments have been carried out to determine the kinetics of the methane/steam reforming process at anode materials of a solid oxide fuel cell. A nickel cermet was applied consisting of 80 wt.% ZrO 2 and 20 wt.% Ni. The temperature was varied from 700 to 940 °C, the CH 4 partial pressure from 0.11 to 0.33 bar, and the system pressure from 1.1 to 2.8 bar. The influence of the ratio H 2O/CH 4 was studied, in particular, by increasing this quantity from 2.6 to 8. The tests showed that, within the accuracy of the data, no effect of the H 2O partial pressure on the catalytic reforming process could be observed. Due to the high conversion rates of CH 4 at high temperatures, however, mass-transfer effects occurred, that must be taken into account when evaluating the steam-reforming data.

  1. Catalysis by Nanostructures: Methane, Ethylene Oxide, and Propylene Oxide Synthesis on Ag, Cu or Au Nanoclusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-07

    GRANT NUMBER Propylene Oxide Synthesis on Ag , Cu or Au nanoclusters F49620-01-1-0459 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Horia...Nanostructures: Methane, Ethylene Oxide, and Propylene Oxide Synthesis on Ag , Cu or Au nanoclusters, F49620-01-1-0459 Final Performance Report (for the period 07...andthe mobility of Ag clusters and Au clusters on TiO 2(1 10) have been published " . We found that Au atoms are very mobile and form large clusters at

  2. Selective aerobic oxidation mediated by TiO(2) photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Lang, Xianjun; Ma, Wanhong; Chen, Chuncheng; Ji, Hongwei; Zhao, Jincai

    2014-02-18

    TiO2 is one of the most studied metal oxide photocatalysts and has unparal-leled efficiency and stability. This cheap, abundant, and non-toxic material has the potential to address future environmental and energy concerns. Understanding about the photoinduced interfacial redox events on TiO2 could have profound effect on the degradation of organic pollutants, splitting of H2O into H2 and O2, and selective redox organic transformations. Scientists traditionally accept that for a semiconductor photocatalyst such as TiO2 under the illumination of light with energy larger than its band gap, two photocarriers will be created to carry out their independent reduction and oxidation processes. However, our recent discoveries indicate that it is the concerted rather than independent effect of both photocarriers of valence band hole (hvb(+)) and conduction band electron (ecb(-)) that dictate the product formation during interfacial oxidation event mediated by TiO2 photocatalysis. In this Account, we describe our recent findings on the selective oxidation of organic substrates with O2 mediated by TiO2 photocatalysis. The transfer of O-atoms from O2 to the corresponding products dominates the selective oxidation of alcohols, amines, and alkanes mediated by TiO2 photocatalysis. We ascribe this to the concerted effect of both hvb(+) and ecb(-) of TiO2 in contribution to the oxidation products. These findings imply that O2 plays a unique role in its transfer into the products rather than independent role of ecb(-) scavenger. More importantly, ecb(-) plays a crucial role to ensure the high selectivity for the oxygenation of organic substrates. We can also use the half reactions such as those of the conduction band electron of TiO2 for efficient oxidation reactions with O2. To this end, efficient selective oxidation of organic substrates such as alcohols, amines, and aromatic alkanes with O2 mediated by TiO2 photocatalysis under visible light irradiation has been achieved. In

  3. Combination of aerobic and vacuum packaging to control lipid oxidation and off-odor volatiles of irradiated raw turkey breast.

    PubMed

    Nam, K C; Ahn, D U

    2003-03-01

    Effects of the combination of aerobic and anaerobic packaging on color, lipid oxidation, and volatile production were determined to establish a modified packaging method to control quality changes in irradiated raw turkey meat. Lipid oxidation was the major problem with aerobically packaged irradiated turkey breast, while retaining characteristic irradiation off-odor volatiles such as dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, and dimethyl trisulfide was the concern for vacuum-packaged breast during the 10-day refrigerated storage. Vacuum packaging of aerobically packaged irradiated turkey breast meat at 1 or 3 days of storage lowered the amounts of S-volatiles and lipid oxidation products compared with vacuum- and aerobically packaged meats, respectively. Irradiation increased the a-value of raw turkey breast, but exposing the irradiated meat to aerobic conditions alleviated the intensity of redness.

  4. Methane oxidation in a landfill cover with capillary barrier.

    PubMed

    Berger, J; Fornés, L V; Ott, C; Jager, J; Wawra, B; Zanke, U

    2005-01-01

    The methane oxidation potential of a landfill cover with capillary barrier was investigated in an experimental plant (4.8 m x 0.8 m x 2.1m). The cover soil consisted of two layers, a mixture of compost plus sand (0.3 m) over a layer of loamy sand (0.9 m). Four different climatic conditions (summer, winter, spring and fall) were simulated. In and outgoing fluxes were measured. Gas composition, temperature, humidity, matrix potential and gas pressure were monitored in two profiles. CH4 oxidation rate within the investigated top cover ranged from 98% to 57%. The minimum was observed for a short time after irrigation. Temperature distribution, gas concentration profiles and lab-scaled batch experiments indicate that before irrigation the highest oxidising activity took place in a depth of about 30 cm. After irrigation the oxidising horizon seemed to migrate upwards since methanotrophic bacteria develop better there due to an adequate supply with oxygen. It can be assumed that the absence of oxygen is one of the most important limiting factors for the CH4 oxidation process. Abrupt cross-overs between horizons of different soil material may lead to zones of increased water saturation and decreased soil respiration.

  5. Stabilisation of composite LSFCO-CGO based anodes for methane oxidation in solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sin, A.; Kopnin, E.; Dubitsky, Y.; Zaopo, A.; Aricò, A. S.; Gullo, L. R.; Rosa, D. La; Antonucci, V.

    A La 0.6Sr 0.4Fe 0.8Co 0.2O 3-Ce 0.8Gd 0.2O 1.9 (LSFCO-CGO) composite anode material was investigated for the direct electrochemical oxidation of methane in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs). A maximum power density of 0.17 W cm -2 at 800 °C was obtained with a methane-fed ceria electrolyte-supported SOFC. A progressive increase of performance was recorded during 140 h operation with dry methane. The anode did not show any structure degradation after the electrochemical testing. Furthermore, no formation of carbon deposits was detected by electron microscopy and elemental analysis. Alternatively, this perovskite material showed significant chemical and structural modifications after high temperature treatment in a dry methane stream in a packed-bed reactor. It is derived that the continuous supply of mobile oxygen anions from the electrolyte to the LSFCO anode, promoted by the mixed conductivity of CGO electrolyte at 800 °C, stabilises the perovskite structure near the surface under SOFC operation and open circuit conditions.

  6. Scientific basis for process and catalyst design in the selective oxidation of methane to formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Arena, Francesco; Parmaliana, Adolfo

    2003-12-01

    The mechanism and kinetics of the gas-phase selective oxidation of methane to formaldehyde (MPO) are revised in the general context of catalytic oxidations. In agreement with ab initio calculations of the energy barrier for the activation of methane on transition metal oxide complexes, a formal Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model is proposed which accounts for the "steady-state" conditions and activity-selectivity pattern of MPO catalysts, providing an original support to process design and catalyst development.

  7. Urban sources and emissions of nitrous oxide and methane in southern California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend-Small, A.; Pataki, D.; Tyler, S. C.; Czimczik, C. I.; Xu, X.; Christensen, L. E.

    2012-12-01

    Anthropogenic activities have resulted in increasing levels of greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. While global and regional emissions sources of carbon dioxide are relatively well understood, methane and nitrous oxide are less constrained, particularly at regional scales. Here we present the results of an investigation of sources and emissions of methane and nitrous oxide in Los Angeles, California, USA, one of Earth's largest urban areas. The original goal of the project was to determine whether isotopes are useful tracers of agricultural versus urban nitrous oxide and methane sources. For methane, we found that stable isotopes (carbon-13 and deuterium) and radiocarbon are good tracers of biogenic versus fossil fuel sources. High altitude observations of methane concentration, measured continuously using tunable laser spectroscopy, and isotope ratios, measured on discrete flask samples using mass spectrometry, indicate that the predominant methane source in Los Angeles is from fossil fuels, likely from "fugitive" emissions from geologic formations, natural gas pipelines, oil refining, or power plants. We also measured nitrous oxide emissions and isotope ratios from urban (landscaping and wastewater treatment) and agricultural sources (corn and vegetable fields). There was no difference in nitrous oxide isotope ratios between the different types of sources, although stable isotopes did differ between nitrous oxide produced in oxic and anoxic wastewater treatment tanks. Our nitrous oxide flux data indicate that landscaped turfgrass emits nitrous oxide at rates equivalent to agricultural systems, indicating that ornamental soils should not be disregarded in regional nitrous oxide budgets. However, we also showed that wastewater treatment is a much greater source of nitrous oxide than soils regionally. This work shows that global nitrous oxide and methane budgets are not easily downscaled to regional, urban settings, which has

  8. Low-level 14C methane oxidation rate measurements modified for remote field settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, M. A.; Pohlman, J.; Ruppel, C. D.; Xu, X.

    2012-12-01

    Aerobic methane oxidation limits atmospheric methane emissions from degraded subsea permafrost and dissociated methane hydrates in high latitude oceans. Methane oxidation rate measurements are a crucial tool for investigating the efficacy of this process, but are logistically challenging when working on small research vessels in remote settings. We modified a low-level 14C-CH4 oxidation rate measurement for use in the Beaufort Sea above hydrate bearing sediments during August 2012. Application of the more common 3H-CH4 rate measurement that uses 106 times more radioactivity was not practical because the R/V Ukpik cannot accommodate a radiation van. The low-level 14C measurement does not require a radiation van, but careful isolation of the 14C-label is essential to avoid contaminating natural abundance 14C measurements. We used 14C-CH4 with a total activity of 1.1 μCi, which is far below the 100 μCi permitting level. In addition, we modified field procedures to simplify and shorten sample processing. The original low-level 14C-CH4 method requires 6 steps in the field: (1) collect water samples in glass serum bottles, (2) inject 14C-CH4 into bottles, (3) incubate for 24 hours, (4) filter to separate the methanotrophic bacterial cells from the aqueous sample, (5) kill the filtrate with sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and (6) purge with nitrogen to remove unused 14C-CH4. Onshore, the 14C-CH4 respired to carbon dioxide or incorporated into cell material by methanotrophic bacteria during incubation is quantified by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We conducted an experiment to test the possibility of storing samples for purging and filtering back onshore (steps 4 and 6). We subjected a series of water samples to steps 1-3 & 5, and preserved with mercuric chloride (HgCl2) instead of NaOH because HgCl2 is less likely to break down cell material during storage. The 14C-content of the carbon dioxide in samples preserved with HgCl2 and stored for up to 2 weeks was stable

  9. Characteristics of methane and nitrous oxide emissions from the wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kum-Lok; Bang, Cheon-Hee; Zoh, Kyung-Duk

    2016-08-01

    The nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) emissions were measured from a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) using a flux chamber to determine the emission factors. The WWTP treats sewage using both the activated-sludge treatment and anaerobic/anoxic/aerobic (A(2)O) methods. Measurements were performed in the first settling, aeration, and secondary settling basins, as well as in the sludge thickener, sludge digestion tank, and A(2)O basins. The total emission factors of N2O and CH4 from the activated-sludge treatment were 1.256gN2O/kg total nitrogen (TN) and 3.734gCH4/kg biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), respectively. Those of the advanced treatment (A(2)O) were 1.605gN2O/kg TN and 4.022gCH4/kgBOD5, respectively. These values are applicable as basic data to estimate greenhouse gas emissions.

  10. Global Change Simulations Affect Potential Methane Oxidation in Upland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blankinship, J. C.; Hungate, B. A.

    2004-12-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of methane (CH4) are higher now than they have ever been during the past 420,000 years. However, concentrations have remained stable since 1999. Emissions associated with livestock husbandry are unlikely to have changed, so some combination of reduced production in wetlands, more efficient capture by landfills, or increased consumption by biological CH4 oxidation in upland soils may be responsible. Methane oxidizing bacteria are ubiquitous in upland soils and little is known about how these bacteria respond to anthropogenic global change, and how they will influence - or already are influencing - the radiative balance of the atmosphere. Might ongoing and future global changes increase biological CH4 oxidation? Soils were sampled from two field experiments to assess changes in rates of CH4 oxidation in response to global change simulations. Potential activities of CH4 oxidizing bacterial communities were measured through laboratory incubations under optimal temperature, soil moisture, and atmospheric CH4 concentrations (~18 ppm, or 10x ambient). The ongoing 6-year multifactorial Jasper Ridge Global Change Experiment (JRGCE) simulates warming, elevated precipitation, elevated atmospheric CO2, elevated atmospheric N deposition, and increased wildfire frequency in an annual grassland in a Mediterranean-type climate in central California. The ongoing 1-year multifactorial Merriam Climate Change Experiment (MCCE) simulates warming, elevated precipitation, and reduced precipitation in four different types of ecosystems along an elevational gradient in a semi-arid climate in northern Arizona. The high desert grassland, pinyon-juniper woodland, ponderosa pine forest, and mixed conifer forest ecosystems range in annual precipitation from 100 to 1000 mm yr-1, and from productivity being strongly water limited to strongly temperature limited. Among JRGCE soils, elevated atmospheric CO2 increased potential CH4 oxidation rates (p=0.052) and wildfire

  11. Are termite mounds biofilters for methane? - Challenges and new approaches to quantify methane oxidation in termite mounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauer, Philipp A.; Hutley, Lindsay B.; Bristow, Mila; Arndt, Stefan K.

    2015-04-01

    Methane emissions from termites contribute around 3% to global methane in the atmosphere, although the total source estimate for termites is the most uncertain among all sources. In tropical regions, the relative source contribution of termites can be far higher due to the high biomass and relative importance of termites in plant decomposition. Past research focused on net emission measurements and their variability, but little is known about underlying processes governing these emissions. In particular, microbial oxidation of methane (MOX) within termite mounds has rarely been investigated. In well-studied ecosystems featuring an oxic matrix above an anoxic methane-producing habitat (e.g. landfills or sediments), the fraction of oxidized methane (fox) can reach up to 90% of gross production. However, conventional mass-balance approaches to apportion production and consumption processes can be challenging to apply in the complex-structured and almost inaccessible environment of a termite mound. In effect, all field-based data on termite-mound MOX is based on one study that measured isotopic shifts in produced and emitted methane. In this study a closed-system isotope fractionation model was applied and estimated fox ranged from 10% to almost 100%. However, it is shown here that by applying an open-system isotope-pool model, the measured isotopic shifts can also be explained by physical transport of methane alone. Different field-based methods to quantify MOX in termite mounds are proposed which do not rely on assumptions of physical gas transport. A simple approach is the use of specific inhibitors for MOX, e.g. difluoromethane (CH2F2), combined with chamber-based flux measurements before and after their application. Data is presented on the suitability of different inhibitors and first results of their application in the field. Alternatively, gas-tracer methods allow the quantification of methane oxidation and reaction kinetics without knowledge of physical gas

  12. Palladium nanoparticles in ionic liquids: reusable catalysts for aerobic oxidation of alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Arijit; Das, Amit; Adhikary, Bibhutosh; Mukherjee, Deb Kumar

    2014-04-01

    The search for more efficient catalytic systems that might combine the advantages of both homogenous (catalyst modulation) and heterogenous catalysis (catalyst recycling) is still the challenge of modern chemistry. With the advent of nanochemistry, it has been possible to prepare soluble analogues of heterogenous catalysts. These nanoparticles are generally stabilized against aggregation into larger less active particles by electrostatic or steric protection. In the present case, we demonstrate the use of room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) as effective agents of dispersion of palladium nanoparticles (prepared from palladium chloride with 5 ± 0.5 nm size distribution) that are recyclable catalysts for aerobic oxidation of alcohols under mild conditions. The particles suspended in ILs show no metal agglomeration or loss of catalytic activity even on prolonged use. An attempt has been made to elucidate the reaction mechanism of aerobic alcohol oxidation using a soluble palladium catalyst.

  13. Highly diastereoselective and regioselective copper-catalyzed nitrosoformate dearomatization reaction under aerobic-oxidation conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weibo; Huang, Long; Yu, Yang; Pflästerer, Daniel; Rominger, Frank; Hashmi, A Stephen K

    2014-04-01

    An unprecedented copper-catalyzed acylnitroso dearomatization reaction, which expands the traditional acylnitroso ene reaction and acylnitroso Diels-Alder reaction to a new type of transformation, has been developed under aerobic oxidation. Intermolecular and intra-/intermolecular reaction modes demonstrate an entirely different N- or O-acylnitroso selectivity. Hence, we can utilize this reaction as a highly diastereoselective access to a series of new pyrroloindoline derivatives, which are important structural motifs for natural-product synthesis.

  14. Anaerobic Methane Oxidation and the Formation of Dolomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. S.; Murray, R. W.; Kurtz, A. C.; Schrag, D. P.

    2003-12-01

    The environment and conditions necessary for the formation of dolomite has been a long standing problem in many scientific fields. In particular, the formation of organogenic dolomites and how they relate to the degradation of organic matter have been the focus of numerous studies. We examine the link between organic matter degradation, anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO), and sulfate depletion, and explore how these processes potentially influence dolomitization. We determined rates and depths of AMO and dolomite formation for a variety of organic-rich sites along the west African Margin at sites occupied during Ocean Drilling Program Leg 175. Our data set is porewater and gas data gathered during the cruise (alkalinity, sulfate, methane, Ca, and Mg), as well as postcruise analyses of δ 13C of DIC. We find that the rates of dolomite formation are relatively constant regardless of the depth at which it is forming, indicating that the diffusive fluxes of Mg and Ca are not limiting. Based upon the calculated log IAP values, log Ksp values for dolomite was found to narrowly range between -16.1 and -16.4. Dolomite formation is controlled in part by competition between AMO and methanogenesis, which controls the speciation of dissolved CO2. AMO increases the concentration of CO32- through sulfate reduction, favoring dolomite formation, while methanogenesis increases the pCO2 of the pore waters, inhibiting dolomite formation. By regulating the pCO2 and alkalinity, methanogenesis and AMO can regulate the formation of dolomite in organic-rich marine sediments. In addition to providing a mechanistic link between AMO and dolomite formation, our findings provide a method by which the stability constant of dolomite can be calculated in modern sediments, and allows prediction of regions and depth domains in which dolomite may be forming.

  15. Oxygen vacancy promoted methane partial oxidation over iron oxide oxygen carriers in the chemical looping process.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhuo; Qin, Lang; Guo, Mengqing; Xu, Mingyuan; Fan, Jonathan A; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2016-11-30

    We perform ab initio DFT+U calculations and experimental studies of the partial oxidation of methane to syngas on iron oxide oxygen carriers to elucidate the role of oxygen vacancies in oxygen carrier reactivity. In particular, we explore the effect of oxygen vacancy concentration on sequential processes of methane dehydrogenation, and oxidation with lattice oxygen. We find that when CH4 adsorbs onto Fe atop sites without neighboring oxygen vacancies, it dehydrogenates with CHx radicals remaining on the same site and evolves into CO2via the complete oxidation pathway. In the presence of oxygen vacancies, on the other hand, the formed methyl (CH3) prefers to migrate onto the vacancy site while the H from CH4 dehydrogenation remains on the original Fe atop site, and evolves into CO via the partial oxidation pathway. The oxygen vacancies created in the oxidation process can be healed by lattice oxygen diffusion from the subsurface to the surface vacancy sites, and it is found that the outward diffusion of lattice oxygen atoms is more favorable than the horizontal diffusion on the same layer. Based on the proposed mechanism and energy profile, we identify the rate-limiting steps of the partial oxidation and complete oxidation pathways. Also, we find that increasing the oxygen vacancy concentration not only lowers the barriers of CH4 dehydrogenation but also the cleavage energy of Fe-C bonds. However, the barrier of the rate-limiting step cannot further decrease when the oxygen vacancy concentration reaches 2.5%. The fundamental insight into the oxygen vacancy effect on CH4 oxidation with iron oxide oxygen carriers can help guide the design and development of more efficient oxygen carriers and CLPO processes.

  16. The Aerobic Oxidation of Bromide to Dibromine Catalyzed by Homogeneous Oxidation Catalysts and Initiated by Nitrate in Acetic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Partenheimer, Walt; Fulton, John L.; Sorensen, Christina M.; Pham, Van Thai; Chen, Yongsheng

    2014-06-01

    A small amount of nitrate, ~0.002 molal, initiates the Co/Mn catalyzed aerobic oxidation of bromide compounds (HBr,NaBr,LiBr) to dibromine in acetic acid at room temperature. At temperatures 40oC or less , the reaction is autocatalytic. Co(II) and Mn(II) themselves and mixed with ionic bromide are known homogeneous oxidation catalysts. The reaction was discovered serendipitously when a Co/Br and Co/Mn/Br catalyst solution was prepared for the aerobic oxidation of methyaromatic compounds and the Co acetate contained a small amount of impurity i.e. nitrate. The reaction was characterized by IR, UV-VIS, MALDI and EXAFS spectroscopies and the coordination chemistry is described. The reaction is inhibited by water and its rate changed by pH. The change in these variables, as well as others, are identical to those observed during homogeneous, aerobic oxidation of akylaromatics. A mechanism is proposed. Accidental addition of a small amount of nitrate compound into a Co/Mn/Br/acetic acid mixture in a large, commercial feedtank is potentially dangerous.

  17. An insight into the mechanism of the aerobic oxidation of aldehydes catalyzed by N-heterocyclic carbenes.

    PubMed

    Bortolini, O; Chiappe, C; Fogagnolo, M; Giovannini, P P; Massi, A; Pomelli, C S; Ragno, D

    2014-02-25

    N-Heterocyclic carbene catalysis for the aerobic oxidation and esterification of aromatic aldehydes was monitored by ESI-MS (MS/MS) and the key intermediates were intercepted and characterized using the charge-tag strategy.

  18. Identifying active methane-oxidizers in thawed Arctic permafrost by proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, C. M.; Stackhouse, B. T.; Chourey, K.; Hettich, R. L.; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Layton, A. C.; Mykytczuk, N. C.; Whyte, L.; Onstott, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    The rate of CH4 release from thawing permafrost in the Arctic has been regarded as one of the determining factors on future global climate. It is uncertain how indigenous microorganisms would interact with such changing environmental conditions and hence their impact on the fate of carbon compounds that are sequestered in the cryosol. Multitudinous studies of pristine surface cryosol (top 5 cm) and microcosm experiments have provided growing evidence of effective methanotrophy. Cryosol samples corresponding to active layer were sampled from a sparsely vegetated, ice-wedge polygon at the McGill Arctic Research Station at Axel Heiberg Island, Nunavut, Canada (N79°24, W90°45) before the onset of annual thaw. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene indicated the occurrence of methanotroph-containing bacterial families as minor components (~5%) in pristine cryosol including Bradyrhizobiaceae, Methylobacteriaceae and Methylocystaceae within alpha-Proteobacteria, and Methylacidiphilaceae within Verrucomicrobia. The potential of methanotrophy is supported by preliminary analysis of metagenome data, which indicated putative methane monooxygenase gene sequences relating to Bradyrhizobium sp. and Pseudonocardia sp. are present. Proteome profiling in general yielded minute traces of proteins, which likely hints at dormant nature of the soil microbial consortia. The lack of specific protein database for permafrost posted additional challenge to protein identification. Only 35 proteins could be identified in the pristine cryosol and of which 60% belonged to Shewanella sp. Most of the identified proteins are known to be involved in energy metabolism or post-translational modification of proteins. Microcosms amended with sodium acetate exhibited a net methane consumption of ~65 ngC-CH4 per gram (fresh weight) of soil over 16 days of aerobic incubation at room temperature. The pH in microcosm materials remained acidic (decreased from initial 4.7 to 4.5). Protein extraction and

  19. Modelling of stable isotope fractionation by methane oxidation and diffusion in landfill cover soils

    SciTech Connect

    Mahieu, Koenraad De Visscher, Alex; Vanrolleghem, Peter A.; Van Cleemput, Oswald

    2008-07-01

    A technique to measure biological methane oxidation in landfill cover soils that is gaining increased interest is the measurement of stable isotope fractionation in the methane. Usually to quantify methane oxidation, only fractionation by oxidation is taken into account. Recently it was shown that neglecting the isotope fractionation by diffusion results in underestimation of the methane oxidation. In this study a simulation model was developed that describes gas transport and methane oxidation in landfill cover soils. The model distinguishes between {sup 12}CH{sub 4}, {sup 13}CH{sub 4}, and {sup 12}CH{sub 3}D explicitly, and includes isotope fractionation by diffusion and oxidation. To evaluate the model, the simulations were compared with column experiments from previous studies. The predicted concentration profiles and isotopic profiles match the measured ones very well, with a root mean square deviation (RMSD) of 1.7 vol% in the concentration and a RMSD of 0.8 per mille in the {delta}{sup 13}C value, with {delta}{sup 13}C the relative {sup 13}C abundance as compared to an international standard. Overall, the comparison shows that a model-based isotope approach for the determination of methane oxidation efficiencies is feasible and superior to existing isotope methods.

  20. Supplementation with vitamin A enhances oxidative stress in the lungs of rats submitted to aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Gasparotto, Juciano; Petiz, Lyvia Lintzmaier; Girardi, Carolina Saibro; Bortolin, Rafael Calixto; de Vargas, Amanda Rodrigues; Henkin, Bernardo Saldanha; Chaves, Paloma Rodrigues; Roncato, Sabrina; Matté, Cristiane; Zanotto-Filho, Alfeu; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca; Gelain, Daniel Pens

    2015-12-01

    Exercise training induces reactive oxygen species production and low levels of oxidative damage, which are required for induction of antioxidant defenses and tissue adaptation. This process is physiological and essential to improve physical conditioning and performance. During exercise, endogenous antioxidants are recruited to prevent excessive oxidative stress, demanding appropriate intake of antioxidants from diet or supplements; in this context, the search for vitamin supplements that enhance the antioxidant defenses and improve exercise performance has been continuously increasing. On the other hand, excess of antioxidants may hinder the pro-oxidant signals necessary for this process of adaptation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of vitamin A supplementation (2000 IU/kg, oral) upon oxidative stress and parameters of pro-inflammatory signaling in lungs of rats submitted to aerobic exercise (swimming protocol). When combined with exercise, vitamin A inhibited biochemical parameters of adaptation/conditioning by attenuating exercise-induced antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase) and decreasing the content of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products. Increased oxidative damage to proteins (carbonylation) and lipids (lipoperoxidation) was also observed in these animals. In sedentary animals, vitamin A decreased superoxide dismutase and increased lipoperoxidation. Vitamin A also enhanced the levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha and decreased interleukin-10, effects partially reversed by aerobic training. Taken together, the results presented herein point to negative effects associated with vitamin A supplementation at the specific dose here used upon oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines in lung tissues of rats submitted to aerobic exercise.

  1. Sulfur and oxygen isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction coupled to anaerobic oxidation of methane is dependent on methane concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deusner, Christian; Holler, Thomas; Arnold, Gail L.; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Formolo, Michael J.; Brunner, Benjamin

    2014-08-01

    Isotope signatures of sulfur compounds are key tools for studying sulfur cycling in the modern environment and throughout earth's history. However, for meaningful interpretations, the isotope effects of the processes involved must be known. Sulfate reduction coupled to the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM-SR) plays a pivotal role in sedimentary sulfur cycling and is the main process responsible for the consumption of methane in marine sediments - thereby efficiently limiting the escape of this potent greenhouse gas from the seabed to the overlying water column and atmosphere. In contrast to classical dissimilatory sulfate reduction (DSR), where sulfur and oxygen isotope effects have been measured in culture studies and a wide range of isotope effects has been observed, the sulfur and oxygen isotope effects by AOM-SR are unknown. This gap in knowledge severely hampers the interpretation of sulfur cycling in methane-bearing sediments, especially because, unlike DSR which is carried out by a single organism, AOM-SR is presumably catalyzed by consortia of archaea and bacteria that both contribute to the reduction of sulfate to sulfide. We studied sulfur and oxygen isotope effects by AOM-SR at various aqueous methane concentrations from 1.4±0.6 mM up to 58.8±10.5 mM in continuous incubation at steady state. Changes in the concentration of methane induced strong changes in sulfur isotope enrichment (εS34) and oxygen isotope exchange between water and sulfate relative to sulfate reduction (θO), as well as sulfate reduction rates (SRR). Smallest εS34 (21.9±1.9‰) and θO (0.5±0.2) as well as highest SRR were observed for the highest methane concentration, whereas highest εS34 (67.3±26.1‰) and θO (2.5±1.5) and lowest SRR were reached at low methane concentration. Our results show that εS34, θO and SRR during AOM-SR are very sensitive to methane concentration and thus also correlate with energy yield. In sulfate-methane transition zones, AOM-SR is likely

  2. Anaerobic oxidation of methane in sediments of two boreal lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissanen, Antti J.; Karvinen, Anu; Nykänen, Hannu; Mpamah, Promise; Peura, Sari; Tiirola, Marja; Kankaala, Paula

    2014-05-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is a considerable sink for methane (CH4) in marine systems, but very little is known about the occurrence and importance of the process in freshwater systems. In addition, much about the microbial communities involved in AOM is unclear. AOM coupled with sulfate reduction is the dominant AOM process in marine systems but the scarce existing data suggest that, in freshwater systems, AOM coupled with reduction of alternative electron acceptors (nitrate/nitrite, manganese, iron) is more important. In this study, potential for AOM coupled with metal reduction was studied in boreal lake sediments. Slurries of sediment samples collected from two sites in southeastern Finland, i.e. from Lake Orivesi, Heposelkä, an vegetated littoral site, dominated by Phragmites australis (Sample Sa, sediment layer 0 - 25 cm) and from the profundal zone of a mesotrophic Lake Ätäskö (Aa, 0 - 10 cm; Ab, 10 - 30 cm; Ac, 90 - 130 cm), were incubated in laboratory in anaerobic conditions at in situ temperatures for up to 5 months. The samples were amended either 1) with 13CH4, 2) 13CH4 + manganese(II) oxide (MnO) or 3) 13CH4 + iron(III) hydroxide (Fe(OH)3), and the processes were measured by following the 13C transfer to the carbon dioxide (CO2) pool and by concentration measurements of CH4 and CO2. Changes in microbial communities were studied from DNA extracted from sediment samples before and after incubation period by next-generation sequencing (Ion Torrent) of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) - amplified bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA and methyl coenzyme-M reductase gene (mcrA) amplicons. Increase in 13C of CO2 gas confirmed that AOM took place in sediments of both study lakes. In general, 13CO2 - production was significant both at the beginning (0 - 21 days) and at the end (84 - 151 days) of incubation period. Potential AOM rates (calculated based on 13CO2 - production) varied considerably and were much lower in deep sediment (Sample Ac), 0.1 - 0

  3. Catalyst-Controlled Regioselectivity in the Synthesis of Branched Conjugated Dienes via Aerobic Oxidative Heck Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Changwu; Wang, Dian; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2012-01-01

    Pd-catalyzed aerobic oxidative coupling of vinylboronic acids and electronically unbiased alkyl olefins provides regioselective access to 1,3-disubstituted conjugated dienes. Catalyst-controlled regioselectivity is achieved by using 2,9-dimethylphenanthroline as a ligand. The observed regioselectivity is opposite to that observed from a traditional (non-oxidative) Heck reaction between a vinyl bromide and an alkene. DFT computational studies reveal that steric effects of the 2,9-dimethylphenanthroline ligand promote C–C bond-formation at the internal position of the alkene. PMID:22998540

  4. Dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides by an Aerobic Bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Maurice, P.

    2004-12-13

    This project investigated the effects of an aerobic Pseudomonas mendocina bacterium on the dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides. The research is important because metals and radionuclides that adsorb to Fe(III)(hydr)oxides could potentially be remobilized by dissolving bacteria. We showed that P. mendocina is capable of dissolving Fe-bearing minerals by a variety of mechanisms, including production of siderophores, pH changes, and formation of reductants. The production of siderophores by P. mendocina was quantified under a variety of growth conditions. Finally, we demonstrated that microbial siderophores may adsorb to and enhance dissolution of clay minerals.

  5. Long-term aerobic exercise increases redox-active iron through nitric oxide in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Xiao, De-Sheng

    2014-01-30

    Adult hippocampus is highly vulnerable to iron-induced oxidative stress. Aerobic exercise has been proposed to reduce oxidative stress but the findings in the hippocampus are conflicting. This study aimed to observe the changes of redox-active iron and concomitant regulation of cellular iron homeostasis in the hippocampus by aerobic exercise, and possible regulatory effect of nitric oxide (NO). A randomized controlled study was designed in the rats with swimming exercise treatment (for 3 months) and/or an unselective inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS) (L-NAME) treatment. The results from the bleomycin-detectable iron assay showed additional redox-active iron in the hippocampus by exercise treatment. The results from nonheme iron content assay, combined with the redox-active iron content, showed increased storage iron content by exercise treatment. NOx (nitrate plus nitrite) assay showed increased NOx content by exercise treatment. The results from the Western blot assay showed decreased ferroportin expression, no changes of TfR1 and DMT1 expressions, increased IRP1 and IRP2 expression, increased expressions of eNOS and nNOS rather than iNOS. In these effects of exercise treatment, the increased redox-active iron content, storage iron content, IRP1 and IRP2 expressions were completely reversed by L-NAME treatment, and decreased ferroportin expression was in part reversed by L-NAME. L-NAME treatment completely inhibited increased NOx and both eNOS and nNOS expression in the hippocampus. Our findings suggest that aerobic exercise could increase the redox-active iron in the hippocampus, indicating an increase in the capacity to generate hydroxyl radicals through the Fenton reactions, and aerobic exercise-induced iron accumulation in the hippocampus might mainly result from the role of the endogenous NO.

  6. Features of non-oxidative conversion of methane into aromatic hydrocarbons over Mo-containing zeolite catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, A. A.; Korobitsyna, L. L.; Vosmerikov, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    The results of study of methane conversion under non-oxidative conditions over molybdenum containing zeolite catalysts prepared by solid-phase synthesis using nanosized molybdenum powder are presented. The kinetic mechanisms of the process behavior under different conditions of methane dehydroaromatization are determined. It is shown that nonoxidative conversion of methane can occur both in the external diffusion and kinetic regions, depending on the methane flow rate. It is found out, that the optimum temperature of the methane conversion is 750 °C. It is shown that increased methane conversion is observed at the feed space velocity of methane decreasing from 1500 to 500 h-1.

  7. Evidence for nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation as a previously overlooked microbial methane sink in wetlands.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bao-lan; Shen, Li-dong; Lian, Xu; Zhu, Qun; Liu, Shuai; Huang, Qian; He, Zhan-fei; Geng, Sha; Cheng, Dong-qing; Lou, Li-ping; Xu, Xiang-yang; Zheng, Ping; He, Yun-feng

    2014-03-25

    The process of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) was recently discovered and shown to be mediated by "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera" (M. oxyfera). Here, evidence for n-damo in three different freshwater wetlands located in southeastern China was obtained using stable isotope measurements, quantitative PCR assays, and 16S rRNA and particulate methane monooxygenase gene clone library analyses. Stable isotope experiments confirmed the occurrence of n-damo in the examined wetlands, and the potential n-damo rates ranged from 0.31 to 5.43 nmol CO2 per gram of dry soil per day at different depths of soil cores. A combined analysis of 16S rRNA and particulate methane monooxygenase genes demonstrated that M. oxyfera-like bacteria were mainly present in the deep soil with a maximum abundance of 3.2 × 10(7) gene copies per gram of dry soil. It is estimated that ∼0.51 g of CH4 m(-2) per year could be linked to the n-damo process in the examined wetlands based on the measured potential n-damo rates. This study presents previously unidentified confirmation that the n-damo process is a previously overlooked microbial methane sink in wetlands, and n-damo has the potential to be a globally important methane sink due to increasing nitrogen pollution.

  8. Genomic markers of ancient anaerobic microbial pathways: sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, and methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Teske, Andreas; Dhillon, Ashita; Sogin, Mitchell L

    2003-04-01

    Genomic markers for anaerobic microbial processes in marine sediments-sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, and anaerobic methane oxidation-reveal the structure of sulfate-reducing, methanogenic, and methane-oxidizing microbial communities (including uncultured members); they allow inferences about the evolution of these ancient microbial pathways; and they open genomic windows into extreme microbial habitats, such as deep subsurface sediments and hydrothermal vents, that are analogs for the early Earth and for extraterrestrial microbiota.

  9. Scaling methane oxidation: from laboratory incubation experiments to landfill cover field conditions.

    PubMed

    Abichou, Tarek; Mahieu, Koenraad; Chanton, Jeff; Romdhane, Mehrez; Mansouri, Imane

    2011-05-01

    Evaluating field-scale methane oxidation in landfill cover soils using numerical models is gaining interest in the solid waste industry as research has made it clear that methane oxidation in the field is a complex function of climatic conditions, soil type, cover design, and incoming flux of landfill gas from the waste mass. Numerical models can account for these parameters as they change with time and space under field conditions. In this study, we developed temperature, and water content correction factors for methane oxidation parameters. We also introduced a possible correction to account for the different soil structure under field conditions. These parameters were defined in laboratory incubation experiments performed on homogenized soil specimens and were used to predict the actual methane oxidation rates to be expected under field conditions. Water content and temperature corrections factors were obtained for the methane oxidation rate parameter to be used when modeling methane oxidation in the field. To predict in situ measured rates of methane with the model it was necessary to set the half saturation constant of methane and oxygen, K(m), to 5%, approximately five times larger than laboratory measured values. We hypothesize that this discrepancy reflects differences in soil structure between homogenized soil conditions in the lab and actual aggregated soil structure in the field. When all of these correction factors were re-introduced into the oxidation module of our model, it was able to reproduce surface emissions (as measured by static flux chambers) and percent oxidation (as measured by stable isotope techniques) within the range measured in the field.

  10. Scaling methane oxidation: From laboratory incubation experiments to landfill cover field conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Abichou, Tarek; Mahieu, Koenraad; Chanton, Jeff; Romdhane, Mehrez; Mansouri, Imane

    2011-05-15

    Evaluating field-scale methane oxidation in landfill cover soils using numerical models is gaining interest in the solid waste industry as research has made it clear that methane oxidation in the field is a complex function of climatic conditions, soil type, cover design, and incoming flux of landfill gas from the waste mass. Numerical models can account for these parameters as they change with time and space under field conditions. In this study, we developed temperature, and water content correction factors for methane oxidation parameters. We also introduced a possible correction to account for the different soil structure under field conditions. These parameters were defined in laboratory incubation experiments performed on homogenized soil specimens and were used to predict the actual methane oxidation rates to be expected under field conditions. Water content and temperature corrections factors were obtained for the methane oxidation rate parameter to be used when modeling methane oxidation in the field. To predict in situ measured rates of methane with the model it was necessary to set the half saturation constant of methane and oxygen, K{sub m}, to 5%, approximately five times larger than laboratory measured values. We hypothesize that this discrepancy reflects differences in soil structure between homogenized soil conditions in the lab and actual aggregated soil structure in the field. When all of these correction factors were re-introduced into the oxidation module of our model, it was able to reproduce surface emissions (as measured by static flux chambers) and percent oxidation (as measured by stable isotope techniques) within the range measured in the field.

  11. Spatial variability of soil gas concentration and methane oxidation capacity in landfill covers.

    PubMed

    Röwer, Inga Ute; Geck, Christoph; Gebert, Julia; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2011-05-01

    In order to devise design criteria for biocovers intended to enhance the microbial oxidation of landfill methane it is critical to understand the factors influencing gas migration and methane oxidation in landfill cover soils. On an old municipal solid waste landfill in north-western Germany soil gas concentrations (10, 40, 90 cm depth), topsoil methane oxidation capacity and soil properties were surveyed at 40 locations along a 16 m grid. As soil properties determine gas flow patterns it was hypothesized that the variability in soil gas composition and the subsequent methanotrophic activity would correspond to the variability of soil properties. Methanotrophic activity was found to be subject to high spatial variability, with values ranging between 0.17 and 9.80 g CH(4)m(-2)h(-1)(.) Considering the current gas production rate of 0.03 g CH(4)m(-2)h(-1), the oxidation capacity at all sampled locations clearly exceeded the flux to the cover, and can be regarded as an effective instrument for mitigating methane fluxes. The methane concentration in the cover showed a high spatial heterogeneity with values between 0.01 and 0.32 vol.% (10 cm depth), 22.52 vol.% (40 cm), and 36.85 vol.% (90 cm). The exposure to methane raised the oxidation capacity, suggested by a statistical correlation to an increase in methane concentration at 90 cm depth. Methane oxidation capacity was further affected by the methanotroph bacteria pH optimum and nutrient availability, and increased with decreasing pH towards neutrality, and increased with soluble ion concentration). Soil methane and carbon dioxide concentration increased with lower flow resistance of the cover, as represented by the soil properties of a reduced bulk density, increase in air capacity and in relative ground level.

  12. A unique isotopic fingerprint during sulfate-driven anaerobic oxidation of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antler, G.; Turchyn, A. V.; Herut, B.; Sivan, O.

    2014-12-01

    Bacterial sulfate reduction is responsible for the majority of anaerobic methane oxidation in modern marine sediments. This sulfate-driven AOM can often metabolize all the methane produced within marine sediments, preventing any from reaching the overlying ocean. In certain areas, however, methane concentrations are high enough to form bubbles, which can reach the seafloor, only partially metabolized through sulfate-driven AOM; these areas where methane bubbles into the ocean are called cold seeps, or methane seeps. We use the sulfur and oxygen isotopes of sulfate (d34SSO4 and d18OSO4) in locations where sulfate-driven AOM is occurring both in methane seeps as well as lower flux methane transition zones to show that in methane seeps, the d34SSO4 and d18OSO4 data during the coupled sulfate reduction fall into a very narrow range and with a close to linear relationship (slope 0.37± 0.01 (R^2= 0.98, n=52, 95% confidence interval). In the studied environments, considerably different physical properties exist, excluding the possibility that this linear relationship can be attributed to physical processes such as diffusion, advection or mixing of two end-members. This unique isotopic signature emerges during bacterial sulfate reduction by methane in 'cold' seeps and differs when sulfate is reduced by either organic matter oxidation or by a slower, diffusive flux of methane within marine sediments. We show also that this unique isotope fingerprint is preserved in the rock record in authigenic build-ups of carbonates and barite associated with methane seeps, and may serve as a powerful tool for identifying catastrophic methane release in the geological record.

  13. Ecophysiological Characteristics of Obligate Methanotrophic Bacteria and Methane Oxidation In Situ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Gary M.

    1993-01-01

    Most of the obligate methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) described to date are neutrophilic mesophiles that grow optimally in dilute media. Kinetic analyses generally indicate that bacterial methane uptake occurs by transport systems with a K(sub m) greater than l micronM. These and other properties of MOB are inconsistent with characteristics of methane oxidation in situ. The inconsistencies indicate a need for greater attention to the ecophysiological characteristics of isolates and the design of enrichment and isolation schemes which emphasize ecologically relevant parameters (e.g., low temperature, limited and diverse substrate availability, low water potential).

  14. Extreme (13)C depletion of carbonates formed during oxidation of biogenic methane in fractured granite.

    PubMed

    Drake, Henrik; Åström, Mats E; Heim, Christine; Broman, Curt; Åström, Jan; Whitehouse, Martin; Ivarsson, Magnus; Siljeström, Sandra; Sjövall, Peter

    2015-05-07

    Precipitation of exceptionally 13C-depleted authigenic carbonate is a result of, and thus a tracer for, sulphate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation, particularly in marine sediments. Although these carbonates typically are less depleted in 13C than in the source methane, because of incorporation of C also from other sources, they are far more depleted in 13C (δ13C as light as -69‰ V-PDB) than in carbonates formed where no methane is involved. Here we show that oxidation of biogenic methane in carbon-poor deep groundwater in fractured granitoid rocks has resulted in fracture-wall precipitation of the most extremely 13C-depleted carbonates ever reported, δ13C down to -125‰ V-PDB. A microbial consortium of sulphate reducers and methane oxidizers has been involved, as revealed by biomarker signatures in the carbonates and S-isotope compositions of co-genetic sulphide. Methane formed at shallow depths has been oxidized at several hundred metres depth at the transition to a deep-seated sulphate-rich saline water. This process is so far an unrecognized terrestrial sink of methane.

  15. [Acclimatization and characteristics of microbial community in sulphate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation].

    PubMed

    Xi, Jing-Ru; Liu, Su-Qin; Li, Lin; Liu, Jun-Xin

    2014-12-01

    The greenhouse effect of methane is 26 times worse than that of carbon dioxide, and wastewater containing high concentrations of sulfate is harmful to water, soil and plants. Therefore, anaerobic oxidation of methane driven by sulfate is one of the effective ways for methane reduction. In this paper, with sulfate as the electron accepter, a microbial consortium capable of oxidating methane under anaerobic condition was cultured. The diversity and characteristics of bacterial and archaeal community were investigated by PCR-DGGE, and phylogenetic analysis of the dominant microorganisms was also carried out. The DGGE fingerprints showed that microbial community structure changed distinctly, and the abundance of methane-oxidizing archea and sulfate-reducing bacteria increased in the acclimatization system added sulfate. After acclimatization, the bacterial diversity increased, while archaea diversity decreased slightly. The representative bands in the DGGE profiles were excised and sequenced. Results indicated that the dominant species in the acclimatization system were Spirochaetes, Desulfuromonadales, Methanosarcinales, Methanosaeta. Methane converted into carbon dioxide while sulfate transformed into hydrogen sulfide and sulfur in the process of anaerobic methane oxidation accompanied by sulphate reduction.

  16. Extreme 13C depletion of carbonates formed during oxidation of biogenic methane in fractured granite

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Henrik; Åström, Mats E.; Heim, Christine; Broman, Curt; Åström, Jan; Whitehouse, Martin; Ivarsson, Magnus; Siljeström, Sandra; Sjövall, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Precipitation of exceptionally 13C-depleted authigenic carbonate is a result of, and thus a tracer for, sulphate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation, particularly in marine sediments. Although these carbonates typically are less depleted in 13C than in the source methane, because of incorporation of C also from other sources, they are far more depleted in 13C (δ13C as light as −69‰ V-PDB) than in carbonates formed where no methane is involved. Here we show that oxidation of biogenic methane in carbon-poor deep groundwater in fractured granitoid rocks has resulted in fracture-wall precipitation of the most extremely 13C-depleted carbonates ever reported, δ13C down to −125‰ V-PDB. A microbial consortium of sulphate reducers and methane oxidizers has been involved, as revealed by biomarker signatures in the carbonates and S-isotope compositions of co-genetic sulphide. Methane formed at shallow depths has been oxidized at several hundred metres depth at the transition to a deep-seated sulphate-rich saline water. This process is so far an unrecognized terrestrial sink of methane. PMID:25948095

  17. Extreme 13C depletion of carbonates formed during oxidation of biogenic methane in fractured granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Henrik; Åström, Mats E.; Heim, Christine; Broman, Curt; Åström, Jan; Whitehouse, Martin; Ivarsson, Magnus; Siljeström, Sandra; Sjövall, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Precipitation of exceptionally 13C-depleted authigenic carbonate is a result of, and thus a tracer for, sulphate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation, particularly in marine sediments. Although these carbonates typically are less depleted in 13C than in the source methane, because of incorporation of C also from other sources, they are far more depleted in 13C (δ13C as light as -69‰ V-PDB) than in carbonates formed where no methane is involved. Here we show that oxidation of biogenic methane in carbon-poor deep groundwater in fractured granitoid rocks has resulted in fracture-wall precipitation of the most extremely 13C-depleted carbonates ever reported, δ13C down to -125‰ V-PDB. A microbial consortium of sulphate reducers and methane oxidizers has been involved, as revealed by biomarker signatures in the carbonates and S-isotope compositions of co-genetic sulphide. Methane formed at shallow depths has been oxidized at several hundred metres depth at the transition to a deep-seated sulphate-rich saline water. This process is so far an unrecognized terrestrial sink of methane.

  18. Selective inhibition of nitrite oxidation by chlorate dosing in aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guangjing; Xu, Xiaochen; Yang, Fenglin; Liu, Sitong

    2011-01-15

    Partial nitrification was successfully achieved with addition of 5mM KClO(3) in the aerobic granules system. Batch tests demonstrated that KClO(3) selectively inhibited nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) but not ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). During stable partial nitrification, the influent pH was kept at 7.8-8.2, while the DO and temperature were not controlled in the SBR. When the NH(4)-N and COD levels were kept at 100mg/l and 400mg/l in the influent, the NH(4)-N and COD removal efficiencies reached 98.93% and 78.65%, respectively. The NO(2)-N accounted for 92.95% of the NO(χ)-N (NO(2)-N+NO(3)-N) in the effluent. Furthermore, about 90% of the chlorate was reduced to nontoxic chloride, thus it would not cause environmental problem. SEM showed that the main composition of the aerobic granules was bacilli and coccus bacteria. FISH analysis revealed that AOB became the dominant nitrifying bacteria, whereas NOB were detected only in low abundance. Chlorate could be used to control the development and maintenance of aerobic granules sludge for partial nitrification.

  19. High reactivity of nanosized niobium oxide cluster cations in methane activation: A comparison with vanadium oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Xun-Lei E-mail: chemzyx@iccas.ac.cn; Wang, Dan; Wu, Xiao-Nan; Li, Zi-Yu; Zhao, Yan-Xia E-mail: chemzyx@iccas.ac.cn; He, Sheng-Gui

    2015-09-28

    The reactions between methane and niobium oxide cluster cations were studied and compared to those employing vanadium oxides. Hydrogen atom abstraction (HAA) reactions were identified over stoichiometric (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub N}{sup +} clusters for N as large as 14 with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The reactivity of (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub N}{sup +} clusters decreases as the N increases, and it is higher than that of (V {sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub N}{sup +} for N ≥ 4. Theoretical studies were conducted on (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub N}{sup +} (N = 2–6) by density functional calculations. HAA reactions on these clusters are all favorable thermodynamically and kinetically. The difference of the reactivity with respect to the cluster size and metal type (Nb vs V) was attributed to thermodynamics, kinetics, the electron capture ability, and the distribution of the unpaired spin density. Nanosized Nb oxide clusters show higher HAA reactivity than V oxides, indicating that niobia may serve as promising catalysts for practical methane conversion.

  20. Nitrous oxide and methane emissions from cryptogamic covers.

    PubMed

    Lenhart, Katharina; Weber, Bettina; Elbert, Wolfgang; Steinkamp, Jörg; Clough, Tim; Crutzen, Paul; Pöschl, Ulrich; Keppler, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Cryptogamic covers, which comprise some of the oldest forms of terrestrial life on Earth (Lenton & Huntingford, ), have recently been found to fix large amounts of nitrogen and carbon dioxide from the atmosphere (Elbert et al., ). Here we show that they are also greenhouse gas sources with large nitrous oxide (N2 O) and small methane (CH4 ) emissions. Whilst N2 O emission rates varied with temperature, humidity, and N deposition, an almost constant ratio with respect to respiratory CO2 emissions was observed for numerous lichens and bryophytes. We employed this ratio together with respiration data to calculate global and regional N2 O emissions. If our laboratory measurements are typical for lichens and bryophytes living on ground and plant surfaces and scaled on a global basis, we estimate a N2 O source strength of 0.32-0.59 Tg year(-1) for the global N2 O emissions from cryptogamic covers. Thus, our emission estimate might account for 4-9% of the global N2 O budget from natural terrestrial sources. In a wide range of arid and forested regions, cryptogamic covers appear to be the dominant source of N2 O. We suggest that greenhouse gas emissions associated with this source might increase in the course of global change due to higher temperatures and enhanced nitrogen deposition.

  1. Methanobactin and the Link between Copper and Bacterial Methane Oxidation.

    PubMed

    DiSpirito, Alan A; Semrau, Jeremy D; Murrell, J Colin; Gallagher, Warren H; Dennison, Christopher; Vuilleumier, Stéphane

    2016-06-01

    Methanobactins (mbs) are low-molecular-mass (<1,200 Da) copper-binding peptides, or chalkophores, produced by many methane-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs). These molecules exhibit similarities to certain iron-binding siderophores but are expressed and secreted in response to copper limitation. Structurally, mbs are characterized by a pair of heterocyclic rings with associated thioamide groups that form the copper coordination site. One of the rings is always an oxazolone and the second ring an oxazolone, an imidazolone, or a pyrazinedione moiety. The mb molecule originates from a peptide precursor that undergoes a series of posttranslational modifications, including (i) ring formation, (ii) cleavage of a leader peptide sequence, and (iii) in some cases, addition of a sulfate group. Functionally, mbs represent the extracellular component of a copper acquisition system. Consistent with this role in copper acquisition, mbs have a high affinity for copper ions. Following binding, mbs rapidly reduce Cu(2+) to Cu(1+). In addition to binding copper, mbs will bind most transition metals and near-transition metals and protect the host methanotroph as well as other bacteria from toxic metals. Several other physiological functions have been assigned to mbs, based primarily on their redox and metal-binding properties. In this review, we examine the current state of knowledge of this novel type of metal-binding peptide. We also explore its potential applications, how mbs may alter the bioavailability of multiple metals, and the many roles mbs may play in the physiology of methanotrophs.

  2. Methanobactin and the Link between Copper and Bacterial Methane Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Semrau, Jeremy D.; Murrell, J. Colin; Gallagher, Warren H.; Dennison, Christopher; Vuilleumier, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Methanobactins (mbs) are low-molecular-mass (<1,200 Da) copper-binding peptides, or chalkophores, produced by many methane-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs). These molecules exhibit similarities to certain iron-binding siderophores but are expressed and secreted in response to copper limitation. Structurally, mbs are characterized by a pair of heterocyclic rings with associated thioamide groups that form the copper coordination site. One of the rings is always an oxazolone and the second ring an oxazolone, an imidazolone, or a pyrazinedione moiety. The mb molecule originates from a peptide precursor that undergoes a series of posttranslational modifications, including (i) ring formation, (ii) cleavage of a leader peptide sequence, and (iii) in some cases, addition of a sulfate group. Functionally, mbs represent the extracellular component of a copper acquisition system. Consistent with this role in copper acquisition, mbs have a high affinity for copper ions. Following binding, mbs rapidly reduce Cu2+ to Cu1+. In addition to binding copper, mbs will bind most transition metals and near-transition metals and protect the host methanotroph as well as other bacteria from toxic metals. Several other physiological functions have been assigned to mbs, based primarily on their redox and metal-binding properties. In this review, we examine the current state of knowledge of this novel type of metal-binding peptide. We also explore its potential applications, how mbs may alter the bioavailability of multiple metals, and the many roles mbs may play in the physiology of methanotrophs. PMID:26984926

  3. Revealing the halide effect on the kinetics of the aerobic oxidation of Cu(I) to Cu(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Yi; Zhang, Guanghui; Qi, Xiaotian; Liu, Chao; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Kropf, A. Jeremy; Bunel, Emilio E.; Lan, Yu; Lei, Aiwen

    2015-01-01

    In situ infrared (IR) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopic investigations reveal that different halide ligands have distinct effects on the aerobic oxidation of Cu(I) to Cu(II) in the presence of TMEDA (tetramethylethylenediamine). The iodide ligand gives the lowest rate and thus leads to the lowest catalytic reaction rate of aerobic oxidation of hydroquinone to benzoquinone. Further DFT calculations suggest that oxidation of CuI–TMEDA involves a side-on transition state, while oxidation of CuCl–TMEDA involves an end-on transition state which has a lower activation energy.

  4. Oxidation of methane in biotrickling filters inoculated with methanotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, Manuel; Dorado, Antonio D; Gentina, Juan C; Aroca, Germán

    2016-07-01

    The oxidation of methane (CH4) using biofilters has been proposed as an alternative to mitigate anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions with a low concentration of CH4 that cannot be used as a source of energy. However, conventional biofilters utilize organic packing materials that have a short lifespan, clogging problems, and are commonly inoculated with non-specific microorganisms leading to unpredictable CH4 elimination capacities (EC) and removal efficiencies (RE). The main objective of this work was to characterize the oxidation of CH4 in two biotrickling filters (BTFs) packed with polyethylene rings and inoculated with two methanotrophic bacteria, Methylomicrobium album and Methylocystis sp., in order to determine EC and CO2 production (pCO2) when using a specific inoculum. The repeatability of the results in both BTFs was determined when they operated at the same inlet load of CH4. A dynamic mathematical model that describes the CH4 abatement in the BTFs was developed and validated using mass transfer and kinetic parameters estimated independently. The results showed that EC and pCO2 of the BTFs are not identical but very similar for all the conditions tested. The use of specific inoculum has shown a faster startup and higher EC per unit area (0.019 gCH4 m(-2) h(-1)) in comparison to most of the previous studies at the same CH4 load rate (23.2 gCH4 m(-3) h(-1)). Global mass balance showed that the maximum reduction of CO2 equivalents was 98.5 gCO2eq m(-3) h(-1). The developed model satisfactorily described CH4 abatement in BTFs for a wide range of conditions.

  5. Induction of E. coli oh8Gua endonuclease by oxidative stress: its significance in aerobic life.

    PubMed

    Kim, H S; Park, Y W; Kasai, H; Nishimura, S; Park, C W; Choi, K H; Chung, M H

    1996-06-12

    The induction of 8-hydroxyguanine (oh8Gua) endonuclease, a DNA repair enzyme for an oxidatively modified guanine, oh8Gua was studied in various growth conditions in Escherichia coli (AB1157). Anaerobically grown E. coli were found to have a very low activity of this enzyme while aerobically grown cells showed activity about 20 times that of the anaerobic level. Under the same condition, superoxide dismutase (SOD) showed about 6-fold increase in activity. A shift in growth conditions from anaerobic to aerobic resulted in rapid induction of this enzyme, and this induction was blocked (but not completely) by chloramphenicol. It is indicated that molecular oxygen is an effective stimulator to the induction of this enzyme and its induction depends partly on protein synthesis. Superoxide-producing compounds such as paraquat and menadione also increased the activity of endonuclease as well as SOD, but H2O2 showed no effect. Thus, superoxides are also implied as a stimulator. In contrast, hyperoxia induced only SOD not the endonuclease. This induction of the endonuclease by hyperoxia was only observed in a SOD-deficient strain (QC774). The aerobic activity of the endonuclease in QC774 was the same as that of wild types (AB1157, GC4468). It is implied that the responsiveness of oh8Gua endonuclease to superoxides is less sensitive than that of SOD. The endonuclease was also induced by a temperature shift from 30 to 43 degrees C and treatment with nalidixic acid. Among the stimuli used, molecular oxygen seems to be most effective for its induction. The inducible nature of this enzyme will serve as an important mechanism for the protection of oxidative DNA damage in the aerobic environment.

  6. Oxidative Coupling of Methane over Li/MgO: Catalyst and Nanocatalyst Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsi, Ali; Moradi, Ali; Ghader, Sattar; Shadravan, Vahid

    2011-02-01

    The Li/MgO catalyst and nanocatalyst were prepared by the incipient wetness impregnation and sol-gel method, respectively. The catalytic performance of the Li/MgO catalyst and nanocatalyst on oxidative coupling of methane was compared. The catalysts prepared in two ways were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface and transmission electron microscope. The catalyst was tested at temperature of 973-1073 K with constant total pressure of 101 kPa. Experimental results showed that Li/MgO nanocatalyst in the oxidative coupling of methane would result in higher conversion of methane, higher selectivity, and higher yield of main products (ethane and ethylene) compared to ordinary catalyst. The results show the improved influence of nanoscale Li/MgO catalyst performance on oxidative coupling of methane.

  7. Authigenic carbonate mounds from active methane seeps on the southern Aquitaine Shelf (Bay of Biscay, France): Evidence for anaerobic oxidation of biogenic methane and submarine groundwater discharge during formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, Catherine; Demange, Jérome; Blanc-Valleron, Marie-Madeleine; Dupré, Stéphanie

    2017-02-01

    The widespread methane emissions that were discovered in 2013 on the Aquitaine Shelf at water depth between 140 and 220 m are associated with authigenic carbonate crusts that cover meter-high subcircular reliefs of 10-100 m in diameter. These authigenic carbonates are primarily aragonite plus calcite and dolomite, which cement the fine- to medium-grained sandy sediment. The carbonate cement is often pierced by numerous circular cavities of 5-10 μm in diameter that are considered to be moulds of gas bubbles. Conversely, micron-sized cavities in the aragonite crystals are attributed to dissolution features, in relation to the production of CO2 during the aerobic oxidation of methane. The oxygen isotopic compositions of bulk carbonate (+1.7 to +3.7‰) and aragonite cements obtained from microsampling (-0.1 to +1.4‰) indicate that these carbonates were precipitated in mixtures of seawater and freshwater, i.e., in the context of submarine groundwater discharge at the seafloor. The carbon isotopic compositions of authigenic carbonates (-51.9 to -38.1‰) and of aragonite cements (-49.9 to -29.3‰) show that the dissolved inorganic carbon of pore fluids was mostly produced by the anaerobic oxidation of biogenic methane and also partly from the groundwater system.

  8. Nitrous oxide emissions from an aerobic granular sludge system treating low-strength ammonium wastewater.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingming; Yang, Sen; Wang, Mingyu; Wang, Xin-Hua

    2016-11-01

    Aerobic granular sludge is a promising technology in wastewater treatment process. Its special microorganism structure could make the emissions of greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) more complicated. This study investigated the N2O emissions from a batch-fed aerobic granular sludge system during nitrification of low-strength synthetic ammonium wastewater. The N2O emission was 2.72 ± 0.52% of the oxidized ammonium during the whole anoxic-oxic sequencing batch reactor (SBR) cycle. Under nitrification batch test with sole ammonium substrate (50 mg N/L), N2O emission factor was 1.82% (N2ON/NH4(+)-Nox) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was the responsible microorganism. The presence of high ammonium concentration (or high ammonium oxidation rate (AOR)) and accumulation of nitrite would lead to significant N2O emissions. AOB denitrification pathway was speculated to contribute more to the N2O emissions under nitrification conditions. While under simultaneous nitrification and denitrification condition with carbon source of 500 mg COD/L, the N2O emission factor increased to 2.76%. Both AOB and heterotrophic denitrifiers were responsible for N2O emission and heterotrophic denitrification enhances N2O emission. Step feeding of organic carbon source declined N2O emission factor to 1.60%, which underlined the role of storage substance consumption in N2O generation during denitrification.

  9. Shock-tube and modeling study of methane pyrolysis and oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Hidaka, Yoshiaki; Sato, Kazutaka; Henmi, Yusuke; Tanaka, Hiroya; Inami, Koji

    1999-08-01

    Methane pyrolysis and oxidation were studied behind reflected shock waves in the temperature range 1350--2400 K at pressures of 1.6 to 4.4 atm. Methane decay in both the pyrolysis and oxidation reactions was measured by using time-resolved infrared (IR) laser absorption at 3.39 {micro}m. CO{sub 2} production was also measured by time-resolved IR emission at 4.24 {micro}m. The production yields were also studied using a single-pulse method. The pyrolysis and oxidation of methane were modeled using a kinetic reaction mechanism including the most recent mechanism for formaldehyde, ketene, acetylene, ethylene, and ethane oxidations. The present and earlier shock tube data is reproduced by the proposed mechanism with 157 reaction steps and 48 species. The reactions and the rate constants, which were important to predict these and earlier shock tube data for methane pyrolysis and the oxidation with mixtures of wide composition from methane-rich to methane-lean, are discussed in detail.

  10. Assessment of methane generation, oxidation, and emission in a subtropical landfill test cell.

    PubMed

    Moreira, João M L; Candiani, Giovano

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents results of a methane balance assessment in a test cell built in a region with a subtropical climate near São Paulo, Brazil. Measurements and calculations were carried out to obtain the total methane emission to the atmosphere, the methane oxidation rate in the cover, and the total methane generation rate in the test cell. The oxidation rate was obtained through a calculation scheme based on a vertical one-dimensional methane transport in the cover region. The measured maximum and mean methane fluxes to the atmosphere were 124.4 and 15.87 g m(-2) d(-1), respectively. The total methane generation rate obtained for the test cell was 0.0380 ± 0.0075 mol s(-1). The results yielded that 69 % of the emitted methane occurred through the central well and 31 % through the cover interface with the atmosphere. The evaluations of the methane oxidation fraction for localized conditions in the lateral embankment of the test cell yielded 0.36 ± 0.11, while for the whole test cell yielded 0.15 ± 0.10. These results conciliate localized and overall evaluations reported in the literature. The specific methane generation rate obtained for the municipal solid waste with an age of 410 days was 317 ± 62 mol year(-1) ton(-1). This result from the subtropical São Paulo region is lower than reported figures for tropical climates and higher than reported figures for temperate climates.

  11. Bio-tarp alternative daily cover prototypes for methane oxidation atop open landfill cells.

    PubMed

    Adams, Bryn L; Besnard, Fabien; Bogner, Jean; Hilger, Helene

    2011-05-01

    Final landfill covers are highly engineered to prevent methane release into the atmosphere. However, methane production begins soon after waste placement and is an unaddressed source of emissions. The methane oxidation capacity of methanotrophs embedded in a "bio-tarp" was investigated as a means to mitigate methane release from open landfill cells. The bio-tarp would also serve as an alternative daily cover during routine landfill operation. Evaluations of nine synthetic geotextiles identified two that would likely be suitable bio-tarp components. Pilot tarp prototypes were tested in continuous flow systems simulating landfill gas conditions. Multilayered bio-tarp prototypes consisting of alternating layers of the two geotextiles were found to remove 16% of the methane flowing through the bio-tarp. The addition of landfill cover soil, compost, or shale amendments to the bio-tarp increased the methane removal up to 32%. With evidence of methane removal in a laboratory bioreactor, prototypes were evaluated at a local landfill using flux chambers installed atop intermediate cover at a landfill. The multilayered bio-tarp and amended bio-tarp configurations were all found to decrease landfill methane flux; however, the performance efficacy of bio-tarps was not significantly different from controls without methanotrophs. Because highly variable methane fluxes at the field site likely confounded the test results, repeat field testing is recommended under more controlled flux conditions.

  12. [Depth Profiles of Methane Oxidation Kinetics and the Related Methanotrophic Community in a Simulated Landfill Cover].

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhi-lin; Zhao, Tian-tao; Gao, Yan-hui; He, Zhi; Yang, Xu; Peng, Xu-ya

    2015-11-01

    Simulated landfill cover with real time online monitoring system was developed using cover soils. Then the system started and the concentrations of bio-gas in various depths were continuously monitored, and it was found that the system ran continually and stably after 2-3 h when methane flux changed. After that, the relationship between regularity of methane oxidation and methane flux in landfill cover was analyzed. The results indicated that concentration of oxygen decreased with increasing methane flux when the depth was deeper than 20 cm, and no obvious correlation between oxygen concentration in landfill cover surface and methane flux, however, methane oxidation rate showed positive correlation with methane flux in various depths (range of R2 was 0.851-0.999). Kinetics of CH4 oxidation in landfill cover was fitted by CH4 -O2 dual-substrate model (range of R2 was 0.902-0.955), the half-saturation constant K(m) increasing with depth was 0.157-0.729 in dynamic condition. Finally, methanotrophs community structure in original cover soil sample and that in simulated landfill cover were investigated by high-throughout sequencing technology, and the statistics indicated that the abundance and species of methanotrophs in simulated landfill cover significantly increased compared with those in original cover soil sample, and type I methanotrophs including Methylobacter and Methylophilaceae and type II methanotrophs Methylocystis were dominant species.

  13. Assimilation of acetate by the putative atmospheric methane oxidizers belonging to the USCα clade.

    PubMed

    Pratscher, Jennifer; Dumont, Marc G; Conrad, Ralf

    2011-10-01

    Forest soils are a major biological sink for atmospheric methane, yet the identity and physiology of the microorganisms responsible for this process remain unclear. Although members of the upland soil cluster α (USCα) are assumed to represent methanotrophic bacteria adapted to the oxidation of the trace level of methane in the atmosphere and to be an important sink of this greenhouse gas, so far they have resisted isolation. In particular, the question of whether the atmospheric methane oxidizers are able to obtain all their energy and carbon solely from atmospheric methane still waits to be answered. In this study, we performed stable-isotope probing (SIP) of RNA and DNA to investigate the assimilation of (13) C-methane and (13) C-acetate by USCα in an acidic forest soil. RNA-SIP showed that pmoA mRNA of USCα was not labelled by (13) C of supplemented (13) C methane, although catalysed reporter deposition - fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) targeting pmoA mRNA of USCα detected its expression in the incubated soil. In contrast, incorporation of (13) C-acetate into USCαpmoA mRNA was observed. USCαpmoA genes were not labelled, indicating that they had not grown during the incubation. Our results indicate that the contribution of alternative carbon sources, such as acetate, to the metabolism of the putative atmospheric methane oxidizers in upland forest soils might be substantial.

  14. An inorganic geochemical argument for coupled anaerobic oxidation of methane and iron reduction in marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Riedinger, N; Formolo, M J; Lyons, T W; Henkel, S; Beck, A; Kasten, S

    2014-03-01

    Here, we present results from sediments collected in the Argentine Basin, a non-steady state depositional marine system characterized by abundant oxidized iron within methane-rich layers due to sediment reworking followed by rapid deposition. Our comprehensive inorganic data set shows that iron reduction in these sulfate and sulfide-depleted sediments is best explained by a microbially mediated process-implicating anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to iron reduction (Fe-AOM) as the most likely major mechanism. Although important in many modern marine environments, iron-driven AOM may not consume similar amounts of methane compared with sulfate-dependent AOM. Nevertheless, it may have broad impact on the deep biosphere and dominate both iron and methane cycling in sulfate-lean marine settings. Fe-AOM might have been particularly relevant in the Archean ocean, >2.5 billion years ago, known for its production and accumulation of iron oxides (in iron formations) in a biosphere likely replete with methane but low in sulfate. Methane at that time was a critical greenhouse gas capable of sustaining a habitable climate under relatively low solar luminosity, and relationships to iron cycling may have impacted if not dominated methane loss from the biosphere.

  15. Anaerobic oxidation of methane associated with sulfate reduction in a natural freshwater gas source

    PubMed Central

    Timmers, Peer HA; Suarez-Zuluaga, Diego A; van Rossem, Minke; Diender, Martijn; Stams, Alfons JM; Plugge, Caroline M

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and trace methane oxidation (TMO) was investigated in a freshwater natural gas source. Sediment samples were taken and analyzed for potential electron acceptors coupled to AOM. Long-term incubations with 13C-labeled CH4 (13CH4) and different electron acceptors showed that both AOM and TMO occurred. In most conditions, 13C-labeled CO2 (13CO2) simultaneously increased with methane formation, which is typical for TMO. In the presence of nitrate, neither methane formation nor methane oxidation occurred. Net AOM was measured only with sulfate as electron acceptor. Here, sulfide production occurred simultaneously with 13CO2 production and no methanogenesis occurred, excluding TMO as a possible source for 13CO2 production from 13CH4. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene analysis showed the highest presence of ANME-2a/b (ANaerobic MEthane oxidizing archaea) and AAA (AOM Associated Archaea) sequences in the incubations with methane and sulfate as compared with only methane addition. Higher abundance of ANME-2a/b in incubations with methane and sulfate as compared with only sulfate addition was shown by qPCR analysis. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis showed the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria belonging to SEEP-SRB1. This is the first report that explicitly shows that AOM is associated with sulfate reduction in an enrichment culture of ANME-2a/b and AAA methanotrophs and SEEP-SRB1 sulfate reducers from a low-saline environment. PMID:26636551

  16. Effects of acute aerobic and anaerobic exercise on blood markers of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Bloomer, Richard J; Goldfarb, Allan H; Wideman, Laurie; McKenzie, Michael J; Consitt, Leslie A

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare oxidative modification of blood proteins, lipids, DNA, and glutathione in the 24 hours following aerobic and anaerobic exercise using similar muscle groups. Ten cross-trained men (24.3 +/- 3.8 years, [mean +/- SEM]) performed in random order 30 minutes of continuous cycling at 70% of Vo(2)max and intermittent dumbbell squatting at 70% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM), separated by 1-2 weeks, in a crossover design. Blood samples taken before, and immediately, 1, 6, and 24 hours postexercise were analyzed for plasma protein carbonyls (PC), plasma malondialdehyde (MDA), and whole-blood total (TGSH), oxidized (GSSG), and reduced (GSH) glutathione. Blood samples taken before and 24 hours postexercise were analyzed for serum 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). PC values were greater at 6 and 24 hours postexercise compared with pre-exercise for squatting, with greater PC values at 24 hours postexercise for squatting compared with cycling (0.634 +/- 0.053 vs. 0.359 +/- 0.018 nM.mg protein(-1)). There was no significant interaction or main effects for MDA or 8-OHdG. GSSG experienced a short-lived increase and GSH a transient decrease immediately following both exercise modes. These data suggest that 30 minutes of aerobic and anaerobic exercise performed by young, cross-trained men (a) can increase certain biomarkers of oxidative stress in blood, (b) differentially affect oxidative stress biomarkers, and (c) result in a different magnitude of oxidation based on the macromolecule studied. Practical applications: While protein and glutathione oxidation was increased following acute exercise as performed in this study, future research may investigate methods of reducing macromolecule oxidation, possibly through the use of antioxidant therapy.

  17. Climatic thresholds for pedogenic iron oxides under aerobic conditions: Processes and their significance in paleoclimate reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Xiaoyong; Ji, Junfeng; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José

    2016-10-01

    Iron oxides are widely distributed across the surface of the Earth as a result of the aerobic weathering of primary Fe-bearing minerals. Pedogenic iron oxides which consist mainly of hematite (Hm), goethite (Gt), maghemite (Mgh), are often concentrated synchronously in aerobic soils under low to moderate rainfall regimes. Magnetic susceptibility (χ) and redness, which respectively reflect the content of Mgh and Hm in soils, are considered reasonable pedogenic and climatic indicators in soil taxonomy and paleorainfall reconstruction. However, under high rainfall regimes, the grain growth of Mgh and transformation to Hm, combined with the prior formation of Gt under conditions of high relative humidity (RH), can result in magnetic reduction and dramatic yellowing of soils and sediments, which explains the existence of rainfall thresholds for Mgh and Hm at a large scale even before the pedogenic environment turns anaerobic. In order to capture the rainfall thresholds for Mgh and Hm occurring under aerobic conditions, we explored a tropical transect across a granitic region where the soil color turned from red to yellow under a wide rainfall range of 900-2200 mm/yr and a corresponding mean annual RH range of 77%-85%. We observed a lower rainfall threshold of ∼1500 mm/yr and a corresponding RH ∼80% for Mgh and Hm along this transect, as well as a higher rainfall threshold of ∼1700 mm/yr and a corresponding RH of ∼81% for Gt and total pedogenic iron oxides (citrate/bicarbonate/dithionite-extractable Fe, Fed). Cross-referencing with comparable studies in temperate and subtropical regions, we noted that the rainfall or RH thresholds for Fed and Hm or Mgh likewise increase with temperature. Moreover, the different thresholds for total and individual iron oxide phase indicates that a negative correlation between chemical weathering intensity and redness or χ in sediment sequences can occur under the prevalent climate regime just between their thresholds. Finally

  18. Evidence of sulfate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The rapid development of unconventional gas resources has been accompanied by an increase in public awareness regarding the potential effects of drilling operations on drinking water sources. Incidents have been reported involving blowouts (e.g., Converse County, WY; Lawrence Township, PA; Aliso Canyon, CA) and home/property explosions (e.g., Bainbridge Township, OH; Dimock, PA; Huerfano County, CO) caused by methane migration in the subsurface within areas of natural gas development. We evaluated water quality characteristics in the northern Raton Basin of Colorado and documented the response of the Poison Canyon aquifer system several years after upward migration of methane gas occurred from the deeper Vermejo Formation coalbed production zone. Results show persistent secondary water quality impacts related to the biodegradation of methane. We identify four distinct characteristics of groundwater methane attenuation in the Poison Canyon aquifer: (i) consumption of methane and sulfate and production of sulfide and bicarbonate, (ii) methane loss coupled to production of higher-molecular-weight (C2+) gaseous hydrocarbons, (iii) patterns of 13C enrichment and depletion in methane and dissolved inorganic carbon, and (iv) a systematic shift in sulfur and oxygen isotope ratios of sulfate, indicative of microbial sulfate reduction. We also show that the biogeochemical response of the aquifer system has not mobilized naturally occurring trace metals, including arsenic,

  19. Mitigation of methane and nitrous oxide emissions from drained irrigated rice fields.

    PubMed

    Towprayoon, S; Smakgahn, K; Poonkaew, S

    2005-06-01

    One of the important cultural practices that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from tropical rice plantations is the water drainage system. While drainage can reduce methane emissions, it can also increase nitrous oxide emissions, as well as reduce yields. In this experiment, four different water drainage systems were compared in a rice field in central Thailand including: (1) continuous flooding, (2) mid-season drainage, (3) multiple drainage and (4) a local method (drainage was done according to local cultural practice) in order to find a system of drainage that would optimize yields while simultaneously limiting methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Methane and nitrous oxide emission were observed and compared with rice yield and physical changes of rice plants. It was found that drainage during the flowering period could reduce methane emission. Interestingly, nitrous oxide emission was related to number of drain days rather than the frequency of draining. Fewer drain days can help reduce nitrous oxide emission. The mid-season drainage and the multiple drainage, with 6.9% and 11.4% reduction in rice yield, respectively, had an average methane emission per crop 27% and 35% lower when compared to the local method. Draining with fewer drain days during the flowering period was recommended as a compromise between emissions and yield. The field drainage can be used as an option to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice fields with acceptable yield reduction. Mid-season drainage during the rice flowering period, with a shortened drainage period (3 days), is suggested as a compromise between the need to reduce global warming and current socio-economic realities.

  20. Closing the Gaps in the Budgets of Methane and Nitrous Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Aslam; Rice, Andrew; Rasmussen, Reinhold

    2013-11-22

    Together methane and nitrous oxide contribute almost 40% of the estimated increase in radiative forcing caused by the buildup of greenhouse gases during the last 250 years (IPCC, 2007). These increases are attributed to human activities. Since the emissions of these gases are from biogenic sources and closely associated with living things in the major terrestrial ecosystems of the world, climate change is expected to cause feedbacks that may further increase emissions even from systems normally classified as natural. Our results support the idea that while past increases of methane were driven by direct emissions from human activities, some of these have reached their limits and that the future of methane changes may be determined by feedbacks from warming temperatures. The greatly increased current focus on the arctic and the fate of the carbon frozen in its permafrost is an example of such a feedback that could exceed the direct increases caused by future human activities (Zimov et al. 2006). Our research was aimed at three broad areas to address open questions about the global budgets of methane and nitrous oxide. These areas of inquiry were: The processes by which methane and nitrous oxide are emitted, new sources such as trees and plants, and integration of results to refine the global budgets both at present and of the past decades. For the process studies the main research was to quantify the effect of changes in the ambient temperature on the emissions of methane and nitrous oxide from rice agriculture. Additionally, the emissions of methane and nitrous oxide under present conditions were estimated using the experimental data on how fertilizer applications and water management affect emissions. Rice was chosen for detailed study because it is a prototype system of the wider terrestrial source, its role in methane emissions is well established, it is easy to cultivate and it represents a major anthropogenic source. Here we will discuss the highlights of the

  1. Comparative Analysis of Methane-Oxidizing Archaea and Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Anoxic Marine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Orphan, V. J.; Hinrichs, K.-U.; Ussler, W.; Paull, C. K.; Taylor, L. T.; Sylva, S. P.; Hayes, J. M.; Delong, E. F.

    2001-01-01

    The oxidation of methane in anoxic marine sediments is thought to be mediated by a consortium of methane-consuming archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria. In this study, we compared results of rRNA gene (rDNA) surveys and lipid analyses of archaea and bacteria associated with methane seep sediments from several different sites on the Californian continental margin. Two distinct archaeal lineages (ANME-1 and ANME-2), peripherally related to the order Methanosarcinales, were consistently associated with methane seep marine sediments. The same sediments contained abundant 13C-depleted archaeal lipids, indicating that one or both of these archaeal groups are members of anaerobic methane-oxidizing consortia. 13C-depleted lipids and the signature 16S rDNAs for these archaeal groups were absent in nearby control sediments. Concurrent surveys of bacterial rDNAs revealed a predominance of δ-proteobacteria, in particular, close relatives of Desulfosarcina variabilis. Biomarker analyses of the same sediments showed bacterial fatty acids with strong 13C depletion that are likely products of these sulfate-reducing bacteria. Consistent with these observations, whole-cell fluorescent in situ hybridization revealed aggregations of ANME-2 archaea and sulfate-reducing Desulfosarcina and Desulfococcus species. Additionally, the presence of abundant 13C-depleted ether lipids, presumed to be of bacterial origin but unrelated to ether lipids of members of the order Desulfosarcinales, suggests the participation of additional bacterial groups in the methane-oxidizing process. Although the Desulfosarcinales and ANME-2 consortia appear to participate in the anaerobic oxidation of methane in marine sediments, our data suggest that other bacteria and archaea are also involved in methane oxidation in these environments. PMID:11282650

  2. Subsurface characterization of methane production and oxidation from a New Hampshire wetland.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, J K; Schrag, D P

    2010-06-01

    We measured the carbon isotopic composition of pore water carbon dioxide from Sallie's Fen, a New Hampshire poor fen. The isotope profiles are used in combination with a one-dimensional diffusion-reaction model to calculate rates of methane production, oxidation and transport over an annual cycle. We show how the rates vary with depth over a seasonal cycle, with methane produced deeper during the winter months and at progressively shallower depths into the summer season. The rates of methane production, constrained by the measured delta(13)C(dic) profiles, cannot explain high methane emission during the summer. We suggest that much of the methane produced during this time comes either from the unsaturated peat, or from the top 1-3 cm of saturated peat where episodic exchange with the atmosphere makes it invisible to our method.

  3. Perovskite-supported palladium for methane oxidation - structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Eyssler, Arnim; Lu, Ye; Matam, Santhosh Kumar; Weidenkaff, Anke; Ferri, Davide

    2012-01-01

    Palladium is the precious metal of choice for methane oxidation and perovskite-type oxides offer the possibility to stabilize it as PdO, considered crucial for catalytic activity. Pd can adopt different oxidation and coordination states when associated with perovskite-type oxides. Here, we review our work on the effect of perovskite composition on the oxidation and coordination states of Pd and its influence on catalytic activity for methane oxidation in the case of typical Mn, Fe and Co perovskite-based oxidation catalysts. Especially X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy is shown to be crucial to fingerprint the different coordination states of Pd. Pd substitutes Fe and Co in the octahedral sites but without modifying catalytic activity with respect to the Pd-free perovskite. On LaMnO(3) palladium is predominantly exposed at the surface thus bestowing catalytic activity for methane oxidation. However, the occupancy of B-cation sites of the perovskite structure by Pd can be exploited to cyclically activate Pd and to protect it from particle growth. This is explicitly demonstrated for La(Fe, Pd)O(3), where catalytic activity for methane oxidation is enhanced under oscillating redox conditions at 500 °C, therefore paving the way to the practical application in three-way catalysts for stoichiometric natural gas engines.

  4. Survey on Atmospheric Methane Oxidation in Young Glacier-Forefield Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroth, M. H.; Nauer, P.; Zeyer, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    The capacity of soils to act as a sink for atmospheric methane has been observed in a variety of environments. Atmospheric methane oxidation is mediated by thus far uncultivated methanotrophic bacteria, commonly termed “high-affinity” methanotrophs. Despite their ubiquity, relatively little is known about their activity and abundance in pioneer ecosystems and their role in primary succession. In alpine environments, receding glaciers provide a unique opportunity to investigate soil development and establishment of microbial communities. In a field survey we assayed the forefields of several Swiss glaciers for activity and abundance of high-affinity methanotrophs. The forefields differed in exposition, altitude, local climate and specific physical and geochemical parameters. At each forefield, sampling was performed at locations without vegetation cover where glacier retreat occurred less than 20 years ago. At each location we obtained a soil-air profile and collected soil for molecular-biological and chemical analyses. In addition, we quantified soil bulk density and water content to estimate the effective gas-diffusion coefficient of methane. Using this value we quantified rate coefficients of methane oxidation by fitting a diffusion-consumption model to soil-methane concentration data. At selected locations, we applied surface gas push-pull tests (GPPTs) to independently estimate first-order rate coefficients of methane oxidation. A top-closed steel cylinder previously emplaced in the soil was employed to allow for sufficiently long reaction times during GPPTs. To further increase the GPPTs’ sensitivity at locations with low activity, we injected 13C-methane and measured the evolution of δ13C of extracted carbon dioxide. We will present results from soil-methane concentration profiles and GPPTs, which indicated little methane oxidation activity in forefields on siliceous bedrock, but generally higher activity in forefields on calcareous bedrock, as well as

  5. A mercury-catalyzed, high-yield system for the oxidation of methane to methanol.

    PubMed

    Periana, R A; Taube, D J; Evitt, E R; Löffler, D G; Wentrcek, P R; Voss, G; Masuda, T

    1993-01-15

    A homogeneous system for the selective, catalytic oxidation of methane to methanol via methyl bisulfate is reported. The net reaction catalyzed by mercuric ions, Hg(II), is the oxidation of methane by concentrated sulfuric acid to produce methyl bisulfate, water, and sulfur dioxide. The reaction is efficient. At a methane conversion of 50 percent, 85 percent selectivity to methyl bisulfate ( approximately 43 percent yield; the major side product is carbon dioxide) was achieved at a molar productivity of 10(-7) mole per cubic centimeter per second and Hg(II) turnover frequency of 10(-3) per second. Separate hydrolysis of methyl bisulfate and reoxidation of the sulfur dioxide with air provides a potentially practical scheme for the oxidation of methane to methanol with molecular oxygen. The primary steps of the Hg(II)-catalyzed reaction were individually examined and the essential elements of the mechanism were identified. The Hg(II) ion reacts with methane by an electrophilic displacement mechanism to produce an observable species, CH(3)HgOSO(3)H, 1. Under the reaction conditions, 1 readily decomposes to CH(3)OSO(3)H and the reduced mercurous species, Hg(2)(2+) The catalytic cycle is completed by the reoxidation of Hg(2)(2+) with H(2)SO(4) to regenerate Hg(II) and byproducts SO(2) and H(2)O. Thallium(III), palladium(II), and the cations of platinum and gold also oxidize methane to methyl bisulfate in sulfuric acid.

  6. A Mercury-Catalyzed, High-Yield System for the Oxidation of Methane to Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periana, Roy A.; Taube, Douglas J.; Evitt, Eric R.; Loffler, Daniel G.; Wentrcek, Paul R.; Voss, George; Masuda, Toshihiko

    1993-01-01

    A homogeneous system for the selective, catalytic oxidation of methane to methanol via methyl bisulfate is reported. The net reaction catalyzed by mercuric ions, Hg(II), is the oxidation of methane by concentrated sulfuric acid to produce methyl bisulfate, water, and sulfur dioxide. The reaction is efficient. At a methane conversion of 50 percent, 85 percent selectivity to methyl bisulfate (~43 percent yield; the major side product is carbon dioxide) was achieved at a molar productivity of 10-7 mole per cubic centimeter per second and Hg(II) turnover frequency of 10-3 per second. Separate hydrolysis of methyl bisulfate and reoxidation of the sulfur dioxide with air provides a potentially practical scheme for the oxidation of methane to methanol with molecular oxygen. The primary steps of the Hg(II)-catalyzed reaction were individually examined and the essential elements of the mechanism were identified. The Hg(II) ion reacts with methane by an electrophilic displacement mechanism to produce an observable species, CH_3HgOSO_3H, 1. Under the reaction conditions, 1 readily decomposes to CH_3OSO_3H and the reduced mercurous species, Hg_22+. The catalytic cycle is completed by the reoxidation of Hg_22+ with H_2SO_4 to regenerate Hg(II) and byproducts SO_2 and H_2O. Thallium(III), palladium(II), and the cations of platinum and gold also oxidize methane to methyl bisulfate in sulfuric acid.

  7. Hydrogen generator, via catalytic partial oxidation of methane for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recupero, Vincenzo; Pino, Lidia; Di Leonardo, Raffaele; Lagana', Massimo; Maggio, Gaetano

    It is well known that the most acknowledged process for generation of hydrogen for fuel cells is based upon the steam reforming of methane or natural gas. A valid alternative could be a process based on partial oxidation of methane, since the process is mildly exothermic and therefore not energy intensive. Consequently, great interest is expected from conversion of methane into syngas, if an autothermal, low energy intensive, compact and reliable process could be developed. This paper covers the activities, performed by the CNR Institute of Transformation and Storage of Energy (CNR-TAE), on theoretical and experimental studies for a compact hydrogen generator, via catalytic selective partial oxidation of methane, integrated with second generation fuel cells (EC-JOU2 contract). In particular, the project focuses the attention on methane partial oxidation via heterogeneous selective catalysts, in order to: demonstrate the basic catalytic selective partial oxidation of methane (CSPOM) technology in a subscale prototype, equivalent to a nominal output of 5 kWe; develop the CSPOM technology for its application in electric energy production by means of fuel cells; assess, by a balance of plant analysis, and a techno-economic evaluation, the potential benefits of the CSPOM for different categories of fuel cells.

  8. Methane and nitrous oxide exchange over a managed hay meadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörtnagl, L.; Wohlfahrt, G.

    2014-12-01

    The methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) exchange of a temperate mountain grassland near Neustift, Austria, was measured during 2010-2012 over a time period of 22 months using the eddy covariance method. Exchange rates of both compounds at the site were low, with 97% of all half-hourly CH4 and N2O fluxes ranging between ±200 and ±50 ng m-2 s-1, respectively. The meadow acted as a sink for both compounds during certain time periods, but was a clear source of CH4 and N2O on an annual timescale. Therefore, both gases contributed to an increase of the global warming potential (GWP), effectively reducing the sink strength in terms of CO2 equivalents of the investigated grassland site. In 2011, our best guess estimate showed a net greenhouse gas (GHG) sink of -32 g CO2 equ. m-2 yr-1 for the meadow, whereby 55% of the CO2 sink strength of -71 g CO2 m-2 yr-1 was offset by CH4 (N2O) emissions of 7 (32) g CO2 equ. m-2 yr-1. When all data were pooled, the ancillary parameters explained 27 (42)% of observed CH4 (N2O) flux variability, and up to 62 (76)% on shorter timescales in-between management dates. In the case of N2O fluxes, we found the highest emissions at intermediate soil water contents and at soil temperatures close to 0 or above 14 °C. In comparison to CO2, H2O and energy fluxes, the interpretation of CH4 and N2O exchange was challenging due to footprint heterogeneity regarding their sources and sinks, uncertainties regarding post-processing and quality control. Our results emphasize that CH4 and N2O fluxes over supposedly well-aerated and moderately fertilized soils cannot be neglected when evaluating the GHG impact of temperate managed grasslands.

  9. Methane and nitrous oxide exchange over a managed hay meadow.

    PubMed

    Hörtnagl, L; Wohlfahrt, G

    2014-12-17

    The methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) exchange of a temperate mountain grassland near Neustift, Austria, was measured during 2010-2012 over a time period of 22 months using the eddy covariance method. Exchange rates of both compounds at the site were low, with 97% of all half-hourly CH4 and N2O fluxes ranging between ±200 and ±50 ng m(-2) s(-1), respectively. The meadow acted as a sink for both compounds during certain time periods, but was a clear source of CH4 and N2O on an annual timescale. Therefore, both gases contributed to an increase of the global warming potential (GWP), effectively reducing the sink strength in terms of CO2 equivalents of the investigated grassland site. In 2011, our best guess estimate showed a net greenhouse gas (GHG) sink of -32 g CO2 equ. m(-2) yr(-1) for the meadow, whereby 55% of the CO2 sink strength of -71 g CO2m(-2) yr(-1) was offset by CH4 (N2O) emissions of 7 (32) g CO2 equ. m(-2) yr(-1). When all data were pooled, the ancillary parameters explained 27 (42)% of observed CH4 (N2O) flux variability, and up to 62 (76)% on shorter timescales in-between management dates. In the case of N2O fluxes, we found the highest emissions at intermediate soil water contents and at soil temperatures close to 0 or above 14 °C. In comparison to CO2, H2O and energy fluxes, the interpretation of CH4 and N2O exchange was challenging due to footprint heterogeneity regarding their sources and sinks, uncertainties regarding post-processing and quality control. Our results emphasize that CH4 and N2O fluxes over supposedly well-aerated and moderately fertilized soils cannot be neglected when evaluating the GHG impact of temperate managed grasslands.

  10. Anaerobic methane oxidation and the formation of dolomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. S.; Murray, R. W.; Kurtz, A. C.; Schrag, D. P.

    2004-12-01

    We examine the link between organic matter degradation, anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO), and sulfate depletion and explore how these processes potentially influence dolomitization. We determined rates and depths of AMO and dolomite formation for a variety of organic-rich sites along the west African Margin using data from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 175. Rates of AMO are calculated from the diffusive fluxes of CH 4 and SO 4, and rates of dolomite formation are calculated from the diffusive flux of Mg. We find that the rates of dolomite formation are relatively constant regardless of the depth at which it is forming, indicating that the diffusive fluxes of Mg and Ca are not limiting. Based upon the calculated log IAP values, log K sp values for dolomite were found to narrowly range between -16.1 and -16.4. Dolomite formation is controlled in part by competition between AMO and methanogenesis, which controls the speciation of dissolved CO 2. AMO increases the concentration of CO 32- through sulfate reduction, favoring dolomite formation, while methanogenesis increases the pCO 2 of the pore waters, inhibiting dolomite formation. By regulating the pCO 2 and alkalinity, methanogenesis and AMO can regulate the formation of dolomite in organic-rich marine sediments. In addition to providing a mechanistic link between AMO and dolomite formation, our findings provide a method by which the stability constant of dolomite can be calculated in modern sediments and allow prediction of regions and depth domains in which dolomite may be forming.

  11. Influence of thermophilic aerobic digestion as a sludge pre-treatment and solids retention time of mesophilic anaerobic digestion on the methane production, sludge digestion and microbial communities in a sequential digestion process.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun Min; Cho, Hyun Uk; Park, Sang Kyu; Ha, Jeong Hyub; Park, Jong Moon

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the changes in sludge reduction, methane production and microbial community structures in a process involving two-stage thermophilic aerobic digestion (TAD) and mesophilic anaerobic digestion (MAD) under different solid retention times (SRTs) between 10 and 40 days were investigated. The TAD reactor (RTAD) was operated with a 1-day SRT and the MAD reactor (RMAD) was operated at three different SRTs: 39, 19 and 9 days. For a comparison, control MAD (RCONTROL) was operated at three different SRTs of 40, 20 and 10 days. Our results reveal that the sequential TAD-MAD process has about 42% higher methane production rate (MPR) and 15% higher TCOD removal than those of RCONTROL when the SRT decreased from 40 to 20 days. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and real-time PCR results indicate that RMAD maintained a more diverse bacteria and archaea population compared to RCONTROL, due to the application of the biological TAD pre-treatment process. In RTAD, Ureibacillus thermophiles and Bacterium thermus were the major contributors to the increase in soluble organic matter. In contrast, Methanosaeta concilii, a strictly aceticlastic methanogen, showed the highest population during the operation of overall SRTs in RMAD. Interestingly, as the SRT decreased to 20 days, syntrophic VFA oxidizing bacteria, Clostridium ultunense sp., and a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, Methanobacterium beijingense were detected in RMAD and RCONTROL. Meanwhile, the proportion of archaea to total microbe in RMAD and RCONTROL shows highest values of 10.5 and 6.5% at 20-d SRT operation, respectively. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the increased COD removal and methane production at different SRTs in RMAD might be attributed to the increased synergism among microbial species by improving the hydrolysis of the rate limiting step in sludge with the help of the biological TAD pre-treatment.

  12. Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts. Quarterly report, March 1 - May 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Wang, C.-B.

    1996-12-31

    Series of catalysts consisting of MoO{sub 3}, V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, TiO{sub 2}, and SnO{sub 2} impregnated onto oxide supports consisting of SiO{sub 2} (Cab-O-Sil), TiO{sub 2} or SnO{sub 2} were previously prepared and tested for the selective oxidation of methane to oxygenates, and it was found that the V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} catalyst was the most active and most selective toward the formation of formaldehyde. These catalysts have been characterized by laser Raman spectroscopy after dehydration and during the methane oxidation reaction with a CH{sub 4}/02 = 10/1 reaction mixture at 500{degrees}C in a continuous flow in situ reaction cell. With the V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} catalyst (the most active catalyst among those studied), no significant structural changes were revealed by in situ Raman analyses, indicating that the fully oxidized surface sites were related to the high formaldehyde selectivivity. Over the V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/TiO{sub 2} and V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SnO{sub 2} catalysts, CO and CO{sub 2} were the principal products produced by oxidation of methane. For the first time, in situ Raman analysis clearly showed that for these latter catalysts, the surface vanadium(V) oxide species were partially reduced under the steady-state reaction conditions. The performance of the V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} catalyst was similar to that of the V{sub 2}O{sub 5}TiO{sub 2} catalyst, consistent with the earlier observation that vanadia was largely bound to the titania overlayer. It appears that formaldehyde selectivity decreased with increasing catalyst reducibility, but no direct correlation of catalyst activity with reductibility was observed.

  13. Oxidation of C1 Compounds by Particulate fractions from Methylococcus capsulatus: distribution and properties of methane-dependent reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidase (methane hydroxylase).

    PubMed Central

    Ribbons, D W

    1975-01-01

    Cell-free particulate fractions of extracts from the obligate methylotroph Methylococcus capsulatus catalyze the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and O2-dependent oxidation of methane (methane hydroxylase). The only oxidation product detected was formate. These preparations also catalyze the oxidation of methanol and formaldehyde to formate in the presence or absence of phenazine methosulphate with oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor. Methane hydroxylase activity cannot be reproducibly obtained from disintegrated cell suspensions even though the whole cells actively respired when methane was presented as a substrate. Varying the disintegration method or extraction medium had no significant effect on the activities obtained. When active particles were obtained, hydroxylase activity was stable at 0 C for days. Methane hydroxylase assays were made by measuring the methane-dependent oxidation of NADH by O2. In separate experiments, methane consumption and the accumulation of formate were also demonstrated. Formate is not oxidized by these particulate fractions. The effects of particle concentration, temperature, pH, and phosphate concentration on enzymic activity are described. Ethane is utilized in the presence of NADH and O2. The stoichiometric relationships of the reaction(s) with methane as substrate were not established since (i) the presumed initial product, methanol, is also oxidized to formate, and (ii) the contribution that NADH oxidase activity makes to the observed consumption of reactants could not be assessed in the presence of methane. Studies with known inhibitors of electron transport systems indicate that the path of electron flow from NADH to oxygen is different for the NADH oxidase, methane hydroxylase, and methanol oxidase activities. Images PMID:238946

  14. Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane in Sediments of Two Boreal Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiirola, M. A.; Rissanen, A. J.; Karvinen, A.; Nykänen, H.; Mpamah, P.; Peura, S.; Kankaala, P.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, potential for Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled with metal reduction was studied in boreal lake sediments. Slurries of sediment samples collected from two sites in southeastern Finland, i.e. from Lake Orivesi, Heposelkä, an vegetated littoral site, dominated by Phragmites australis (Sample Sa, sediment layer 0 - 25 cm) and from the profundal zone of a mesotrophic Lake Ätäskö (Aa, 0 - 10 cm; Ab, 10 - 30 cm; Ac, 90 - 130 cm), were incubated in laboratory in anaerobic conditions at in situ temperatures for up to 5 months. The samples were amended either 1) with 13CH4, 2) 13CH4 + manganese(IV) oxide (MnO2) or 3) 13CH4 + iron(III) hydroxide (Fe(OH)3), and the processes were measured by following the 13C transfer to the carbon dioxide (CO2) pool and by concentration measurements of CH4 and CO2. Changes in microbial communities were studied from DNA extracted from sediment samples before and after incubation period by next-generation sequencing (Ion Torrent) of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) - amplified bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA and methyl coenzyme-M reductase gene (mcrA) amplicons. AOM took place in every sample except in deepest sample (Ac) with potential rates up to 2.1 nmol CH4 d-1 g-1wetsedim (~2 nmol d-1 cm-3) which are considerably lower than previously reported metal-driven AOM in marine sediments (10-40 nmol d-1 cm-3) but within a range of NO3- -driven AOM in an oligotrophic lake (0.6-3.6 nmol d-1 cm-3). AOM took place without metal additions but addition of Mn4+ increased the potential rates and this increase was especially high in 10-30 cm layer (Ab) of the profundal site (5-fold increase). The structure of the bacterial and archaeal communities changed considerably during incubation. Communities incubated with Mn4+ were especially different from those incubated with Fe3+ or without metals which were more similar with each other. Surprisingly, anaerobic methanotrophic archaea detected, ANME-2D and AOM-associated archaea (AAA

  15. Modeling of simultaneous denitrification--anaerobic digestion--organic matter aerobic oxidation and nitrification in an anoxic-anaerobic-aerobic compact filter reactor.

    PubMed

    Moya, Jaime; Huiliñir, César; Peredo, Karol; Aspé, Estrella; Roeckel, Marlene

    2012-08-31

    A mathematical model was developed for a compact anoxic-anaerobic-aerobic filter reactor with liquid recirculation for the treatment of fishing effluents. The model includes denitrification, anaerobic digestion, aerobic carbon oxidation and nitrification steps, as well as an evaluation of the liquid gas mass transfer and pH. The model was calibrated using one experimental condition at a recycling ratio (R)=10, and was validated with R equal to 2 and 0, with an organic concentration of 554±24 mg TOCL(-1), salinity of 24 g L(-1) and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2 d. Carbon total removal is higher than 98%, while maximum nitrogen removal is 62% using total nitrification in the aerobic zone, due to a higher quantity of NO(x) produced which were recirculated to the anoxic zone. In the aerobic zone, simultaneous nitrification and denitrification processes occur, because the diffusion limitations cause a low oxygen penetration in the biofilm. In the anoxic-anaerobic zone, denitrification or methanogenesis inhibition by DO (caused by the recycled oxygen) is not observed.

  16. Oxidative coupling of methane over oxide-supported sodium-manganese catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dingjun; Rosynek, M.P.; Lunsford, J.H.

    1995-09-01

    The oxidative coupling of methane over Mn/Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, Mn/Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/MgO, and NaMnO{sub 4}/MgO catalysts was studied using both a cofeed flow system and a pulse reactor. At 800{degrees}C and 1 atm, and using a CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2} ratio of ca. 8/1, a methane conversion of 20% was achieved at a C{sub 2+} selectivity of {ge}80%, with no diluent in the reagents. The similar catalytic behaviors of the three catalysts suggest that a common active site, consisting of an Na-O-Mn species, may be involved. Results from a pulse reaction sequence (an O{sub 2} pulse followed by a series of pure CH{sub 4} pulses) indicate that the active species are not stable under reaction conditions unless gas phase O{sub 2} is present, and that bulk lattice oxygen does not participate in the methane coupling reaction when carried out in the cofeed mode. There is a linear relationship between the specific activity for CH{sub 4} conversion and the concentration of surface Mn, which is believed to be responsible for the activation of O{sub 2}. The resulting form of oxygen then abstracts a hydrogen atom from CH{sub 4}. Sodium is essential for preventing the complete oxidation of CH{sub 4}, perhaps by isolating the Mn ions. The tungstate ions appear to impart stability to the catalysts. 39 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Steam Methane Reformation Testing for Air-Independent Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mwara, Kamwana N.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, NASA has been looking into utilizing landers that can be propelled by LOX-CH (sub 4), to be used for long duration missions. Using landers that utilize such propellants, also provides the opportunity to use solid oxide fuel cells as a power option, especially since they are able to process methane into a reactant through fuel reformation. One type of reformation, called steam methane reformation, is a process to reform methane into a hydrogen-rich product by reacting methane and steam (fuel cell exhaust) over a catalyst. A steam methane reformation system could potentially use the fuel cell's own exhaust to create a reactant stream that is hydrogen-rich, and requires less internal reforming of the incoming methane. Also, steam reformation may hold some advantages over other types of reforming, such as partial oxidation (PROX) reformation. Steam reformation does not require oxygen, while up to 25 percent can be lost in PROX reformation due to unusable CO (sub 2) reformation. NASA's Johnson Space Center has conducted various phases of steam methane reformation testing, as a viable solution for in-space reformation. This has included using two different types of catalysts, developing a custom reformer, and optimizing the test system to find the optimal performance parameters and operating conditions.

  18. Soil fluxes of methane, nitrous oxide, and nitric oxide from aggrading forests in coastal Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, Heather E.; Perakis, Steven S.

    2014-01-01

    Soil exchanges of greenhouse and other gases are poorly known for Pacific Northwest forests where gradients in nutrient availability and soil moisture may contribute to large variations in fluxes. Here we report fluxes of methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), and nitric oxide (NO) over multiple seasons from three naturally N-rich, aggrading forests of coastal Oregon, USA. Mean methane uptake rates (3.2 mg CH4 m−2 d−1) were high compared with forests globally, negatively related to water-filled pore space (WFPS), but unrelated to N availability or temperature. Emissions of NO (6.0 μg NO–N m−2 h−1) exceeded N2O (1.4 μg N2O–N m−2 h−1), except when WFPS surpassed 55%. Spatial variation in NO fluxes correlated positively with soil nitrate concentrations (which generally exceeded ammonium concentrations, indicating the overall high N status for the sites) and negatively with soil pH, and at one site increased with basal area of N2-fixing red alder. Combined NO and N2O emissions were greatest from the site with highest annual net N mineralization and lowest needle litterfall C/N. Our findings of high CH4 uptake and NO/N2O ratios generally >1 most likely reflect the high porosity of the andic soils underlying the widespread regenerating forests in this seasonally wet region.

  19. Effect of acetylene and ammonia as reburn fuel additions to methane in nitric oxide reburning

    SciTech Connect

    Kumpaty, S.K.; Nokku, V.P.; Subramanian, K.

    1996-12-31

    Presented in this paper are the computational results of NO reburning with (a) a combination of methane and acetylene and (b) a combination of methane and ammonia. An updated reaction mechanism that was more comprehensive in terms of predicting the ammonia and isocyanic acid oxidation chemistry was employed to run the CKINTERP program. Using the binary file created by executing the above program and the input stoichiometric ratio conditions, the CHEMKIN package predicted the exit concentrations of various species involved in NO reburning.

  20. Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane at a Marine Methane Seep in a Forearc Sediment Basin off Sumatra, Indian Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Siegert, Michael; Krüger, Martin; Teichert, Barbara; Wiedicke, Michael; Schippers, Axel

    2011-01-01

    A cold methane seep was discovered in a forearc sediment basin off the island Sumatra, exhibiting a methane-seep adapted microbial community. A defined seep center of activity, like in mud volcanoes, was not discovered. The seep area was rather characterized by a patchy distribution of active spots. The relevance of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) was reflected by 13C-depleted isotopic signatures of dissolved inorganic carbon. The anaerobic conversion of methane to CO2 was confirmed in a 13C-labeling experiment. Methane fueled a vital microbial community with cell numbers of up to 4 × 109 cells cm−3 sediment. The microbial community was analyzed by total cell counting, catalyzed reporter deposition–fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD–FISH), quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). CARD–FISH cell counts and qPCR measurements showed the presence of Bacteria and Archaea, but only small numbers of Eukarya. The archaeal community comprised largely members of ANME-1 and ANME-2. Furthermore, members of the Crenarchaeota were frequently detected in the DGGE analysis. Three major bacterial phylogenetic groups (δ-Proteobacteria, candidate division OP9, and Anaerolineaceae) were abundant across the study area. Several of these sequences were closely related to the genus Desulfococcus of the family Desulfobacteraceae, which is in good agreement with previously described AOM sites. In conclusion, the majority of the microbial community at the seep consisted of AOM-related microorganisms, while the relevance of higher hydrocarbons as microbial substrates was negligible. PMID:22207865

  1. Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane at a Marine Methane Seep in a Forearc Sediment Basin off Sumatra, Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Siegert, Michael; Krüger, Martin; Teichert, Barbara; Wiedicke, Michael; Schippers, Axel

    2011-01-01

    A cold methane seep was discovered in a forearc sediment basin off the island Sumatra, exhibiting a methane-seep adapted microbial community. A defined seep center of activity, like in mud volcanoes, was not discovered. The seep area was rather characterized by a patchy distribution of active spots. The relevance of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) was reflected by (13)C-depleted isotopic signatures of dissolved inorganic carbon. The anaerobic conversion of methane to CO(2) was confirmed in a (13)C-labeling experiment. Methane fueled a vital microbial community with cell numbers of up to 4 × 10(9) cells cm(-3) sediment. The microbial community was analyzed by total cell counting, catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH), quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). CARD-FISH cell counts and qPCR measurements showed the presence of Bacteria and Archaea, but only small numbers of Eukarya. The archaeal community comprised largely members of ANME-1 and ANME-2. Furthermore, members of the Crenarchaeota were frequently detected in the DGGE analysis. Three major bacterial phylogenetic groups (δ-Proteobacteria, candidate division OP9, and Anaerolineaceae) were abundant across the study area. Several of these sequences were closely related to the genus Desulfococcus of the family Desulfobacteraceae, which is in good agreement with previously described AOM sites. In conclusion, the majority of the microbial community at the seep consisted of AOM-related microorganisms, while the relevance of higher hydrocarbons as microbial substrates was negligible.

  2. Nitrous oxide and methane emissions during storage of dewatered digested sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Willén, Agnes; Rodhe, Lena; Pell, Mikael; Jönsson, Håkan

    2016-12-15

    This study investigated the effect on greenhouse gas emissions during storage of digested sewage sludge by using a cover during storage or applying sanitisation measures such as thermophilic digestion or ammonia addition. In a pilot-scale storage facility, nitrous oxide and methane emissions were measured on average twice monthly for a year, using a closed chamber technique. The thermophilically digested sewage sludge (TC) had the highest cumulative emissions of nitrous oxide (1.30% of initial total N) followed by mesophilically digested sewage sludge stored without a cover (M) (0.34%) and mesophilically digested sewage sludge stored with a cover (MC) (0.19%). The mesophilically digested sewage sludge sanitised with ammonia and stored with a cover (MAC) showed negligible cumulative emissions of nitrous oxide. Emissions of methane were much lower from TC and MAC than from M and MC. These results indicate that sanitisation by ammonia treatment eliminates the production of nitrous oxide and reduces methane emissions from stored sewage sludge, and that thermophilic digestion has the potential to reduce the production of methane during storage compared with mesophilic digestion. The results also indicate a tendency for lower emissions of nitrous oxide and higher emissions of methane from covered sewage sludge compared with non-covered.

  3. Direct methane oxidation over a Bi 2O 3-GDC system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ta-Jen; Li, Jia-Fu

    A novel ceramic system was prepared by adding Bi 2O 3 to gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC). This Bi 2O 3-GDC system was characterized by temperature-programmed and fixed-temperature reaction of methane in the absence of gas-phase oxygen. It was found that adding Bi 2O 3 to GDC can promote the catalytic activity for direct methane oxidation. A Bi 2O 3 loading of 25 wt% in the Bi 2O 3-GDC system maximized the activity of direct methane oxidation. Possible carbon deposition after the reaction can be negligible. In the temperature range of an intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), pre-reduction promotes methane oxidation activity. At temperatures of about 600 °C or lower, only CO 2 and H 2O are produced. However, CO and H 2 can be produced only at a temperature of about 700 °C or higher. This Bi 2O 3-GDC system can be applied to design SOFC anode materials for complete methane oxidation and thus full electricity generation, without syngas cogeneration, at low temperature.

  4. [In-situ DRIFTS study of coupling partial oxidation of methane and carbon dioxide reforming].

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong-bing; Xu, Jian-hua; Xie, Jun-feng; Chen, Qing-lin

    2008-06-01

    8%Ru-5%Ce/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst exhibited excellent catalytic performance for low temperature activation of methane. Although the conversion rates of methane were 25.3% for exothermal partial oxidation of methane, and 0.8% for endothermal carbon dioxide reforming, whose activity was rather low, 38.8% of conversion rate of methane could be obtained for the obtained coupling reaction at 500 degrees C owing to the coupling intensification between endothermal carbon dioxide reforming reaction and exothermal partial oxidation of methane. The mechanism of coupling partial oxidation of methane and carbon dioxide reforming on supported Ru catalyst was investigated by in-situ DRIFTS. The adsorption of CO on 8%Ru-5%Ce/gamma-Al2O3 showed that two kinds of doublet peaks which were characteristic adsorption of the gaseous CO at 2167 cm(-1) (2118 cm(-1)) to form Ru(CO)2 at 2031 cm(-1) (2034 cm(-1)) to form Ce(CO)2 were observed. These CO adsorption species wee easy to be desorbed from the surface of the catalyst at high temperature. The results of in-situ DRIFTS showed that carbonate, formal (formate) and carbon monoxide formed on the surface of catalyst, and formal (formate) was intermediate for the methane partial oxidation. This intermediate was formed through the combination of the adsorption species of methane CHx and the lattice oxygen adsorption species on the surface of catalyst, and syngas was produced through the splitting of this intermediate. The DRIFTS researching on carbon dioxide reforming showed that there was no new adsorption species on the surface of the catalyst, which indicated that the mechanism for carbon dioxide reforming was through the dissociation of the adsorbed methane and carbon dioxide. During the reaction of the coupling of carbon dioxide reforming reaction and partial oxidation of methane, there was hydroxyl adsorption species on the surface of catalyst. The mechanism of coupling methane, carbon dioxide and oxygen might be composed of the above

  5. The key nickel enzyme of methanogenesis catalyses the anaerobic oxidation of methane.

    PubMed

    Scheller, Silvan; Goenrich, Meike; Boecher, Reinhard; Thauer, Rudolf K; Jaun, Bernhard

    2010-06-03

    Large amounts (estimates range from 70 Tg per year to 300 Tg per year) of the potent greenhouse gas methane are oxidized to carbon dioxide in marine sediments by communities of methanotrophic archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria, and thus are prevented from escaping into the atmosphere. Indirect evidence indicates that the anaerobic oxidation of methane might proceed as the reverse of archaeal methanogenesis from carbon dioxide with the nickel-containing methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) as the methane-activating enzyme. However, experiments showing that MCR can catalyse the endergonic back reaction have been lacking. Here we report that purified MCR from Methanothermobacter marburgensis converts methane into methyl-coenzyme M under equilibrium conditions with apparent V(max) (maximum rate) and K(m) (Michaelis constant) values consistent with the observed in vivo kinetics of the anaerobic oxidation of methane with sulphate. This result supports the hypothesis of 'reverse methanogenesis' and is paramount to understanding the still-unknown mechanism of the last step of methanogenesis. The ability of MCR to cleave the particularly strong C-H bond of methane without the involvement of highly reactive oxygen-derived intermediates is directly relevant to catalytic C-H activation, currently an area of great interest in chemistry.

  6. Determining the flux of methane into Hudson Canyon at the edge of methane clathrate hydrate stability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weinsten, A.; Navarrete, L; Ruppel, Carolyn D.; Weber, T.C.; Leonte, M.; Kellermann, M.; Arrington, E.; Valentine, D.L.; Scranton, M.L; Kessler, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Methane seeps were investigated in Hudson Canyon, the largest shelf-break canyon on the northern US Atlantic Margin. The seeps investigated are located at or updip of the nominal limit of methane clathrate hydrate stability. The acoustic identification of bubble streams was used to guide water column sampling in a 32 km2 region within the canyon's thalweg. By incorporating measurements of dissolved methane concentration with methane oxidation rates and current velocity into a steady-state box model, the total emission of methane to the water column in this region was estimated to be 12 kmol methane per day (range: 6 – 24 kmol methane per day). These analyses suggest this methane is largely retained inside the canyon walls below 300 m water depth, and that it is aerobically oxidized to near completion within the larger extent of Hudson Canyon. Based on estimated methane emissions and measured oxidation rates, the oxidation of this methane to dissolved CO2 is expected to have minimal influences on seawater pH. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Determining the flux of methane into Hudson Canyon at the edge of methane clathrate hydrate stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, Alexander; Navarrete, Luis; Ruppel, Carolyn; Weber, Thomas C.; Leonte, Mihai; Kellermann, Matthias Y.; Arrington, Eleanor C.; Valentine, David L.; Scranton, Mary I.; Kessler, John D.

    2016-10-01

    Methane seeps were investigated in Hudson Canyon, the largest shelf-break canyon on the northern U.S. Atlantic Margin. The seeps investigated are located at or updip of the nominal limit of methane clathrate hydrate stability. The acoustic identification of bubble streams was used to guide water column sampling in a 32 km2 region within the canyon's thalweg. By incorporating measurements of dissolved methane concentration with methane oxidation rates and current velocity into a steady state box model, the total emission of methane to the water column in this region was estimated to be 12 kmol methane per day (range: 6-24 kmol methane per day). These analyses suggest that the emitted methane is largely retained inside the canyon walls below 300 m water depth, and that it is aerobically oxidized to near completion within the larger extent of Hudson Canyon. Based on estimated methane emissions and measured oxidation rates, the oxidation of this methane to dissolved CO2 is expected to have minimal influences on seawater pH.

  8. Effect of trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene on methane oxidation and community structure of methanotrophic consortium.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun-Ah; Lee, Eun-Hee; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2013-01-01

    The methane oxidation rate and community structure of a methanotrophic consortium were analyzed to determine the effects of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) on methane oxidation. The maximum methane oxidation rate (Vmax ) of the consortium was 326.8 μmol·g-dry biomass(-1)·h(-1), and it had a half-saturation constant (Km ) of 143.8 μM. The addition of TCE or PCE resulted in decreased methane oxidation rates, which were decreased from 101.73 to 5.47-24.64 μmol·g-dry biomass(-1)·h(-1) with an increase in the TCE-to-methane ratio, and to 61.95-67.43 μmol·g-dry biomass(-1)·h(-1) with an increase in the PCE-to-methane ratio. TCE and PCE were non-competitive inhibitors for methane oxidation, and their inhibition constants (Ki ) were 33.4 and 132.0 μM, respectively. When the methanotrophic community was analyzed based on pmoA using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), the pmoA gene copy numbers were shown to decrease from 7.3 ± 0.7 × 10(8) to 2.1-5.0 × 10(7) pmoA gene copy number · g-dry biomass(-1) with an increase in the TCE-to-methane ratio and to 2.5-7.0 × 10(7) pmoA gene copy number · g-dry biomass(-1) with an increase in the PCE-to-methane ratio. Community analysis by microarray demonstrated that Methylocystis (type II methanotrophs) were the most abundant in the methanotrophic community composition in the presence of TCE. These results suggest that toxic effects caused by TCE and PCE change not only methane oxidation rates but also the community structure of the methanotrophic consortium.

  9. Cobalt nanoparticles as recyclable catalyst for aerobic oxidation of alcohols in liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Arijit; Mukherjee, Debkumar; Adhikary, Bibhutosh; Ahmed, Md Azharuddin

    2016-05-01

    Cobalt nanoparticles prepared at room temperature from cobalt sulphate and tetrabutyl ammonium bromide as surfactant have been found to be effective oxidation catalysts. Palladium and platinum nanoparticles (average size 4-6 nm) can also be prepared from PdCl2 and K2PtCl4, respectively, using the same surfactant but require high temperature ( 120 °C) and much longer preparation time. Agglomeration of nanoparticles prepared from metals like palladium and platinum in common solvents, however, restricts their use as catalysts. It is therefore our endeavour to find the right combination of catalyst and solvent that will be beneficial from industrial point of view. Magnetic property measurement of cobalt nanoclusters was made using SQUID to identify their reusability nature. Herein, we report the use of cobalt nanoparticles (average size 90-95 nm) in dichloromethane solvent as effective reusable catalysts for aerobic oxidation of a variety of alcohols.

  10. Anaerobic nitrite-dependent methane-oxidizing bacteria - novel participants in methane cycling of drained peatlands ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchenko, Irina; Sukhacheva, Marina; Menko, Ekaterina; Sirin, Andrey

    2014-05-01

    Northern peatlands are one of the key sources of atmospheric methane. Process-based studies of methane dynamic are based on the hypothesis of the balance between microbial methane production and oxidation, but this doesn't explain all variations in and constraints on peatland CH4 emissions. One of the reasons for this discrepancy could be anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) - the process which is still poorly studied and remained controversial. Very little is known about AOM in peatlands, where it could work as an important 'internal' sink for CH4. This lack of knowledge primarily originated from researchers who generally consider AOM quantitatively insignificant or even non-existent in northern peatland ecosystems. But not far ago, Smemo and Yavitt (2007) presented evidence for AOM in freshwater peatlands used indirect techniques including isotope dilution assays and selective methanogenic inhibitors. Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation NC10 group bacteria (n-damo) were detected in a minerotrophic peatland in the Netherlands that is infiltrated by nitrate-rich ground water (Zhu et al., 2012). Present study represents the first, to our knowledge, characterization of AOM in human disturbed peatlands, including hydrological elements of artificial drainage network. The experiments were conducted with samples of peat from drained peatlands, as well as of water and bottom sediments of ditches from drained Dubnensky mire massif, Moscow region (Chistotin et al., 2006; Sirin et al., 2012). This is the key testing area of our research group in European part of Russia for the long-term greenhouse gases fluxes measurements supported by testing physicochemical parameters, intensity and genomic diversity of CH4-cycling microbial communities. Only in sediments of drainage ditches the transition anaerobic zone was found, where methane and nitrate occurred, suggested the possible ecological niche for n-damo bacteria. The NC10 group methanotrophs were analyzed by PCR

  11. Determination of in Situ Rates of Methane Production and Oxidation From Terrestrial Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, J. K.; Schrag, D. P.

    2005-12-01

    Wetlands are responsible for over 70% of non-anthropogenic methane emissions. We present a method, using the δ13C of CO2 in pore water, to obtain the in situ rates of methanogenesis occurring beneath the wetland surface. This method allows us to distinguish methanogenesis from methane oxidation during escape, both of which contribute to the net methane flux. The δ13C of CO2(aq) - the dominant form of DIC in acidic natural waters - reflects the processes occurring at that location modified by transport of gas from surrounding depths. Methane production and oxidation are imprinted in the δ13C signature of the aqueous CO2 with heaviest values at depth resulting from the fractionation associated with methane production. We measured δ13C profiles with depth along with CO2 and CH4 concentrations from Sallie's Fen in Barrington, NH. Although the δ13C profiles varied considerably between locations and seasons, the logarithmic shape of the curves showed that methane production was restricted below a certain depth in the sediment - sometimes as shallow as 30 cm. Using a one-dimensional diffusion-reaction model, we are able to estimate rates of methane oxidation and successfully reproduce features present in the data's seasonal cycle. Features of the data not reproducible by the model indicate the importance of alternate gas transport routes such as ebullition and plant-mediated transport. The model also provides evidence for low-level oxygen availability during the winter-spring transition and narrow zones of very high productivity at depths of 60-70cm during the winter. We suggest that this method provides insight directly into the processes that determine methane fluxes from natural wetlands and has great potential for improving our understanding of the biogeochemistry of these systems.

  12. Quantification of methane and nitrous oxide emissions from various waste treatment facilities by tracer dilution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mønster, Jacob; Rella, Chris; Jacobson, Gloria; Kjeldsen, Peter; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2013-04-01

    Urban activities generate solid and liquid waste, and the handling and aftercare of the waste results in the emission of various compounds into the surrounding environment. Some of these compounds are emitted as gasses into the atmosphere, including methane and nitrous oxide. Methane and nitrous oxide are strong greenhouse gases and are considered to have 25 and 298 times the greenhouse gas potential of carbon dioxide on a hundred years term (Solomon et al. 2007). Global observations of both gasses have shown increasing concentrations that significantly contribute to the greenhouse gas effect. Methane and nitrous oxide are emitted from both natural and anthropogenic sources and inventories of source specific fugitive emissions from the anthropogenic sources of methane and nitrous oxide of are often estimated on the basis of modeling and mass balance. Though these methods are well-developed, actual measurements for quantification of the emissions is a very useful tool for verifying the modeling and mass balance as well as for validation initiatives done for lowering the emissions of methane and nitrous oxide. One approach to performing such measurements is the tracer dilution method (Galle et al. 2001, Scheutz et al. 2011), where the exact location of the source is located and a tracer gas is released at this source location at a known flow. The ratio of downwind concentrations of the tracer gas and the methane and nitrous oxide gives the emissions rates of the greenhouse gases. This tracer dilution method can be performed using both stationary and mobile measurements and in both cases, real-time measurements of both tracer and quantified gas are required, placing high demands on the analytical detection method. To perform the methane and nitrous oxide measurements, two robust instruments capable of real-time measurements were used, based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy and operating in the near-infrared spectral region. One instrument measured the methane and

  13. Methane and nitrous oxide emissions from municipal wastewater treatment - results from a long-term study.

    PubMed

    Daelman, M R J; van Voorthuizen, E M; van Dongen, L G J M; Volcke, E I P; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2013-01-01

    Methane and nitrous oxide emissions from a fully covered municipal wastewater treatment plant were measured on-line during 16 months. At the plant under study, nitrous oxide contributed three-quarters to the plant's carbon footprint, while the methane emission was slightly larger than the indirect carbon dioxide emission related to the plant's electricity and natural gas consumption. This contrasted with two other wastewater treatment plants, where more than 80% of the carbon footprint came from the indirect carbon dioxide emission. The nitrous oxide emission exhibited a seasonal dynamic, of which the cause remains unclear. Three types of air filter were investigated with regard to their effectiveness to remove methane from the off-gas.

  14. Effect of Co/Ni ratios in cobalt nickel mixed oxide catalysts on methane combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Tae Hwan; Cho, Sung June; Yang, Hee Sung; Engelhard, Mark H.; Kim, Do Heui

    2015-07-31

    A series of cobalt nickel mixed oxide catalysts with the varying ratios of Co to Ni, prepared by co-precipitation method, were applied to methane combustion. Among the various ratios, cobalt nickel mixed oxides having the ratios of Co to Ni of (50:50) and (67:33) demonstrate the highest activity for methane combustion. Structural analysis obtained from X-ray diffraction (XRD) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) evidently demonstrates that CoNi (50:50) and (67:33) samples consist of NiCo2O4and NiO phase and, more importantly, NiCo2O4spinel structure is largely distorted, which is attributed to the insertion of Ni2+ions into octahedral sites in Co3O4spinel structure. Such structural dis-order results in the enhanced portion of surface oxygen species, thus leading to the improved reducibility of the catalysts in the low temperature region as evidenced by temperature programmed reduction by hydrogen (H2TPR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) O 1s results. They prove that structural disorder in cobalt nickel mixed oxides enhances the catalytic performance for methane combustion. Thus, it is concluded that a strong relationship between structural property and activity in cobalt nickel mixed oxide for methane combustion exists and, more importantly, distorted NiCo2O4spinel structure is found to be an active site for methane combustion.

  15. Development of vanadium-phosphate catalysts for methanol production by selective oxidation of methane

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, R.L.; Jha, M.C.

    1993-03-04

    Amax R D will perform laboratory scale development of a promising, practical catalyst for the selective oxidation of methane to methanol. The primary component of this catalyst is vanadium-phosphate (VPO) which has shown good activity and selectivity in the partial oxidation of n-butane and propane but has not been studied in detail for methane oxidation. The goal of the project is to develop a catalyst which allows methane oxidation to methanol to be conducted at high conversion and selectivity. A low CH[sub 4]/O[sub 2] ratio will be employed with air as the source of oxygen. Temperatures below 600[degrees]C and pressures up to 20 atm are to be investigated. The use of steam in the feed gas will also be investigated. The catalyst development strategy will be to utilize promoters and supports to improve the activity and selectivity of the unmodified VPO catalyst. The catalyst testing reactor system was used to perform blank (empty) reactor runs over a wide range of temperatures, pressure, and flow rates. No methane conversion was observed at temperatures of 500[degrees]C or lower in any of the tests. At higher temperatures, significant methane conversion to carbon dioxide was observed. At 550[degrees]C, 300 psig, and the highest flow rate studied, reactor ignition was observed. Based on the results of these blank runs, we conclude that catalyst testing should be performed at temperatures not to exceed 500[degrees]C.

  16. Isotope fractionation effects by diffusion and methane oxidation in landfill cover soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Visscher, Alex; de Pourcq, Ingrid; Chanton, Jeffrey

    2004-09-01

    When the open system isotope method has been used to determine the methane oxidation efficiency of a landfill cover soil, it has been assumed that gas transport from the landfill is primarily driven by advection, a mechanism that is not associated with isotopic fractionation. A controlled laboratory experiment revealed that this approach underestimated the methane oxidation efficiency because it underestimated the importance of molecular diffusion during gas transport. In a worst-case scenario laboratory column experiment where diffusion was an important gas transport mode, a comparison between a mass balance and the open system isotope method revealed that the latter underestimated methane oxidation by a factor 2 to 4. The vertical profile of the δ13C value of methane in the column confirmed that isotope fractionation associated with gas transport occurred. Similar profiles were observed in the field, but the effect was less pronounced. It is concluded that the isotope method as currently applied produces a conservative estimate of methane oxidation by landfill cover soils.

  17. Antibacterial Action of Nitric Oxide-Releasing Chitosan Oligosaccharides against Pseudomonas aeruginosa under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Reighard, Katelyn P.

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan oligosaccharides were modified with N-diazeniumdiolates to yield biocompatible nitric oxide (NO) donor scaffolds. The minimum bactericidal concentrations and MICs of the NO donors against Pseudomonas aeruginosa were compared under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Differential antibacterial activities were primarily the result of NO scavenging by oxygen under aerobic environments and not changes in bacterial physiology. Bacterial killing was also tested against nonmucoid and mucoid biofilms and compared to that of tobramycin. Smaller NO payloads were required to eradicate P. aeruginosa biofilms under anaerobic versus aerobic conditions. Under oxygen-free environments, the NO treatment was 10-fold more effective at killing biofilms than tobramycin. These results demonstrate the potential utility of NO-releasing chitosan oligosaccharides under both aerobic and anaerobic environments. PMID:26239983

  18. Approach to construct polysubstituted 1,2-dihydronaphtho[2,1-b]furans and their aerobic oxidative aromatization.

    PubMed

    Huo, Congde; Xu, Xiaolan; An, Jinzhu; Jia, Xiaodong; Wang, Xicun; Wang, Cheng

    2012-09-21

    Triarylaminium salt was disclosed as an efficient initiator for the novel Friedel-Crafts alkylation/annulation cascade reaction between chalcone epoxides and 2-naphthols to construct polysubstituted 1,2-dihydronaphtho[2,1-b]furans. The DDQ/NaNO(2)/O(2) catalytic system was first applied to the aerobic oxidative aromatization of heterocycles, and a simple and efficient one-pot tandem FC alkylation/annulation/aerobic oxidative aromatization procedure was also developed for the synthesis of complex naphtho[2,1-b]furans.

  19. Combined Fenton oxidation and aerobic biological processes for treating a surfactant wastewater containing abundant sulfate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Jun; Song, Yang; Mai, Jun-Sheng

    2008-12-30

    The present study is to investigate the treatment of a surfactant wastewater containing abundant sulfate by Fenton oxidation and aerobic biological processes. The operating conditions have been optimized. Working at an initial pH value of 8, a Fe2+ dosage of 600mgL(-1) and a H2O2 dosage of 120mgL(-1), the chemical oxidation demand (COD) and linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) were decreased from 1500 and 490mgL(-1) to 230 and 23mgL(-1) after 40min of Fenton oxidation, respectively. Advanced oxidation pretreatment using Fenton reagent was very effective at enhancing the biodegradability of this kind of wastewater. The wastewater was further treated by a bio-chemical treatment process based on an immobilized biomass reactor with a hydraulic detention time (HRT) of 20h after Fenton oxidation pretreatment under the optimal operating conditions. It was found that the COD and LAS of the final effluent were less than 100 and 5mgL(-1), corresponding to a removal efficiencies of over 94% and 99%, respectively.

  20. Methane-induced Activation Mechanism of Fused Ferric Oxide-Alumina Catalysts during Methane Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Reddy Enakonda, Linga; Zhou, Lu; Saih, Youssef; Ould-Chikh, Samy; Lopatin, Sergei; Gary, Daniel; Del-Gallo, Pascal; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2016-08-09

    Activation of Fe2 O3 -Al2 O3 with CH4 (instead of H2 ) is a meaningful method to achieve catalytic methane decomposition (CMD). This reaction of CMD is more economic and simple against commercial methane steam reforming (MSR) as it produces COx -free H2 . In this study, for the first time, structure changes of the catalyst were screened during CH4 reduction with time on stream. The aim was to optimize the pretreatment conditions through understanding the activation mechanism. Based on results from various characterization techniques, reduction of Fe2 O3 by CH4 proceeds in three steps: Fe2 O3 →Fe3 O4 →FeO→Fe0. Once Fe0 is formed, it decomposes CH4 with formation of Fe3 C, which is the crucial initiation step in the CMD process to initiate formation of multiwall carbon nanotubes.

  1. Kinetics of biological methane oxidation in the presence of non-methane organic compounds in landfill bio-covers

    SciTech Connect

    Albanna, Muna; Warith, Mostafa; Fernandes, Leta

    2010-02-15

    In this experimental program, the effects of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) on the biological methane (CH{sub 4}) oxidation process were examined. The investigation was performed on compost experiments incubated with CH{sub 4} and selected NMOCs under different environmental conditions. The selected NMOCs had different concentrations and their effects were tested as single compounds and mixtures of compounds. The results from all experimental sets showed a decrease in CH{sub 4} oxidation capacity of the landfill bio-cover with the increase in NMOCs concentrations. For example, in the experiment using compost with 100% moisture content at 35 deg. C without any NMOCs the V{sub max} value was 35.0 mug CH{sub 4}h{sup -1}g{sub wetwt}{sup -1}. This value was reduced to 19.1 mug CH{sub 4}h{sup -1}g{sub wetwt}{sup -1} when mixed NMOCs were present in the batch reactors under the same environmental conditions. The experimental oxidation rates of CH{sub 4} in the presence of single and mixed NMOCs were modeled using the uncompetitive inhibition model and kinetic parameters, including the dissociation constants, were obtained. Additionally, the degradation rates of the NMOCs and co-metabolic abilities of methanotrophic bacteria were estimated.

  2. Effect of Nitrogen Source on Growth and Trichloroethylene Degradation by Methane-Oxidizing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Kung-Hui; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    1998-01-01

    The effect of nitrogen source on methane-oxidizing bacteria with respect to cellular growth and trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation ability were examined. One mixed chemostat culture and two pure type II methane-oxidizing strains, Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b and strain CAC-2, which was isolated from the chemostat culture, were used in this study. All cultures were able to grow with each of three different nitrogen sources: ammonia, nitrate, and molecular nitrogen. Both M. trichosporium OB3b and strain CAC-2 showed slightly lower net cellular growth rates and cell yields but exhibited higher methane uptake rates, levels of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) production, and naphthalene oxidation rates when grown under nitrogen-fixing conditions. The TCE-degrading ability of each culture was measured in terms of initial TCE oxidation rates and TCE transformation capacities (mass of TCE degraded/biomass inactivated), measured both with and without external energy sources. Higher initial TCE oxidation rates and TCE transformation capacities were observed in nitrogen-fixing mixed, M. trichosporium OB3b, and CAC-2 cultures than in nitrate- or ammonia-supplied cells. TCE transformation capacities were found to correlate with cellular PHB content in all three cultures. The results of this study suggest that the nitrogen-fixing capabilities of methane-oxidizing bacteria can be used to select for high-activity TCE degraders for the enhancement of bioremediation in fixed-nitrogen-limited environments. PMID:9726896

  3. Microcosm Approach to Understanding Methane-oxidizing Communities and the Role of Nitrogen Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistoserdova, L.; Hernandez, M. E.; Oshkin, I.

    2014-12-01

    We will report our observations on the dynamics of bacterial communities in response to methane and nitrate stimuli in laboratory microcosm incubations prepared with Lake Washington sediment samples. The experiments were designed to test our hypothesis of methane oxidation as a communal function, with the specific contents of the communities being determined by environmental factors such as oxygen concentration and the nature of the nitrogen source. We first measure taxonomic compositions of long-term oxygenated enrichment cultures and determine that, while dominated by Methylococcaceae bacteria, these cultures also contain accompanying types belonging to a limited number of bacterial taxa, both methylotrophs and non-methylotrophs. We then follow with the short-term community dynamics, under different oxygen tension regimens ('high' to 'low'), different nitrogen source regimens (added nitrate versus no nitrate) and different temperature ranges (10 to 30 oC). We observe rapid loss of species diversity in all incubations, but the composition of the communities depends on the specific environmental factors. Methylobacter represents the major methane-oxidizing partner in the communities incubated at low temperatures while Methylomonas and Methylocystis are more competitive at higher temperatures. All methanotrophs respond positively to nitrate. The non-methanotroph members of the communities reveal different trajectories in response to different oxygen tensions over time, with Methylotenera species persisting under 'low' and Methylophilus species persisting under 'high' oxygen tensions. Metagenomic sequencing reveals successions of different types of the major methane-oxidizing species as well as accompanying species. These types differ in their physiological details such as central carbon meand nitrate metabolism. A broad range of denitrifying capabilities in the organisms forming these stable methane-oxidizing communities is evident from genomic analysis. Our results

  4. Assessment of nitrous oxide and methane emissions for California agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwath, W. R.; Burger, M.; Assa, Y.; Wilson, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (AB 32) mandates comprehensive strategies to reduce nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) emissions. In agriculture crop production, sources of N2O are related to nitrogen fertilization while CH4 emission is associated with rice production. More than half the GHG emissions from agriculture are attributed to N2O production. Currently, baseline N2O emission data for most cropping systems in the State is lacking. Estimates of CH4 emission in rice have been established from previous studies, but a lack of information exists for its expansion into the San Joaquin Delta to address subsidence issues. The paucity of N2O emission data has hampered biogeochemical modeling efforts. The objectives of this assessment are to (1) measure annual N2O and CH4 emissions for major California crops (vineyards, almonds, tomato, wheat, alfalfa, lettuce, and rice) under typical management practices, (2) characterize the effects of environmental factors on the temporal profile of N2O and CH4 emissions, and (3) determine N2O emission factors. The growth of rice in Delta peat soils produced highly variable CH4 emissions depending on tillage intensity. In 2010, standard tillage produced 184 kg CH4-C/ha while in 2011 after deep plowing placing rice residue deeper into the soil, only 26 kg CH4-C/ha was observed. In processing tomato systems, an average 2.5 kg N2O-N/ha was emitted with standard fertilization (160 kg N / ha), similar to background emissions and those from a drip irrigated system, while 4.0 to 5.8 kg N2O-N /ha y-1 was emitted at fertilizer rates of 225 and 300 kg N /ha (see Fig. 1 for example of temporal sources of emissions). About half the annual emissions were emitted within 3 d after the first seasonal rainfall event. In other tomato studies, estimated losses of fertilizer N as N2O were 0.38 ± 0.03 kg/ha y-1 in a drip irrigated system and 1.79 ± 0.21 kg/ha y-1 in furrow irrigated system, which was equivalent to 0.19% and 0

  5. Methane-Oxidizing Bacteria Shunt Carbon to Microbial Mats at a Marine Hydrocarbon Seep

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Blair G.; Ding, Haibing; Bagby, Sarah C.; Kellermann, Matthias Y.; Redmond, Molly C.; Andersen, Gary L.; Valentine, David L.

    2017-01-01

    The marine subsurface is a reservoir of the greenhouse gas methane. While microorganisms living in water column and seafloor ecosystems are known to be a major sink limiting net methane transport from the marine subsurface to the atmosphere, few studies have assessed the flow of methane-derived carbon through the benthic mat communities that line the seafloor on the continental shelf where methane is emitted. We analyzed the abundance and isotope composition of fatty acids in microbial mats grown in the shallow Coal Oil Point seep field off Santa Barbara, CA, USA, where seep gas is a mixture of methane and CO2. We further used stable isotope probing (SIP) to track methane incorporation into mat biomass. We found evidence that multiple allochthonous substrates supported the rich growth of these mats, with notable contributions from bacterial methanotrophs and sulfur-oxidizers as well as eukaryotic phototrophs. Fatty acids characteristic of methanotrophs were shown to be abundant and 13C-enriched in SIP samples, and DNA-SIP identified members of the methanotrophic family Methylococcaceae as major 13CH4 consumers. Members of Sulfuricurvaceae, Sulfurospirillaceae, and Sulfurovumaceae are implicated in fixation of seep CO2. The mats’ autotrophs support a diverse assemblage of co-occurring bacteria and protozoa, with Methylophaga as key consumers of methane-derived organic matter. This study identifies the taxa contributing to the flow of seep-derived carbon through microbial mat biomass, revealing the bacterial and eukaryotic diversity of these remarkable ecosystems. PMID:28289403

  6. Stimulation by ammonium-based fertilizers of methane oxidation in soil around rice roots.

    PubMed

    Bodelier, P L; Roslev, P; Henckel, T; Frenzel, P

    2000-01-27

    Methane is involved in a number of chemical and physical processes in the Earth's atmosphere, including global warming. Atmospheric methane originates mainly from biogenic sources, such as rice paddies and natural wetlands; the former account for at least 30% of the global annual emission of methane to the atmosphere. As an increase of rice production by 60% is the most appropriate way to sustain the estimated increase of the human population during the next three decades, intensified global fertilizer application will be necessary: but it is known that an increase of the commonly used ammonium-based fertilizers can enhance methane emission from rice agriculture. Approximately 10-30% of the methane produced by methanogens in rice paddies is consumed by methane-oxidizing bacteria associated with the roots of rice; these bacteria are generally thought to be inhibited by ammonium-based fertilizers, as was demonstrated for soils and sediments. In contrast, we show here that the activity and growth of such bacteria in the root zone of rice plants are stimulated after fertilization. Using a combination of radioactive fingerprinting and molecular biology techniques, we identify the bacteria responsible for this effect. We expect that our results will make necessary a re-evaluation of the link between fertilizer use and methane emissions, with effects on global warming studies.

  7. Enrichment and characteristics of mixed methane-oxidizing bacteria from a Chinese coal mine.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Duan, Changhong; Luo, Mingfang; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2016-12-01

    In methane-rich environments, methane-oxidizing bacteria usually occur predominantly among consortia including other types of microorganisms. In this study, artificial coal bed gas and methane gas were used to enrich mixed methanotrophic cultures from the soil of a coal mine in China, respectively. The changes in microbial community structure and function during the enrichment were examined. The microbial diversity was reduced as the enrichment proceeded, while the capacity for methane oxidation was significantly enhanced by the increased abundance of methanotrophs. The proportion of type II methanotrophs increased greatly from 7.84 % in the sampled soil to about 50 % in the enrichment cultures, due to the increase of methane concentration. After the microbial community of the cultures got stable, Methylomonas and Methylocystis became the dominant type I and type II methanotrophs, while Methylophilus was the prevailing methylotroph. The sequences affiliated with pigment-producing strains, Methylomonas rubra, Hydrogenophaga sp. AH-24, and Flavobacterium cucumis, could explain the orange appearance of the cultures. Comparing the two cultures, the multi-carbon sources in the artificial coal bed gas caused more variety of non-methanotrophic bacteria, but did not help to maintain the diversity or to increase the quantity and activity of methanotrophs. The results could help to understand the succession and interaction of microbial community in a methane-driven ecosystem.

  8. Oxidative addition of methane and benzene C--H bonds to rhodium center: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Siwei; Zhang, Zhenwei; Zhu, Shufen

    2006-11-01

    A density functional theory study on mechanisms of the oxidative addition of methane and benzene C-H bonds to the rhodium center containing Cp and PMe 3 ligands has been performed. Our calculated results confirm that the C-H bond cleavage from a sigma complex to a hydride alkyl complex is the rate-determining step. Compared with the case of methane C-H bond, the oxidative addition of benzene C-H bond is more favorable kinetically and thermodynamically. Stronger backdonation from metal center to the σ ∗ antibonding orbital of benzene C-H bond is responsible for the observations.

  9. Biogeochemical Evidence that Thermophilic Archaea Mediate the Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane

    PubMed Central

    Schouten, Stefan; Wakeham, Stuart G.; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2003-01-01

    Distributions and isotopic analyses of lipids from sediment cores at a hydrothermally active site in the Guaymas Basin with a steep sedimentary temperature gradient revealed the presence of archaea that oxidize methane anaerobically. The presence of strongly 13C-depleted lipids at greater depths in the sediments suggests that microbes involved in anaerobic oxidation of methane are present and presumably active at environmental temperatures of >30°C, indicating that this process can occur not only at cold seeps but also at hydrothermal sites. The distribution of the membrane tetraether lipids of the methanotrophic archaea shows that these organisms have adapted their membrane composition to these high environmental temperatures. PMID:12620859

  10. BOREAS TGB-6 Soil Methane Oxidation and Production from NSA BP and Fen Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deck, Bruce; Wahlen, Martin; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Trace Gas Biogeochemistry (BOREAS TGB-6) team collected soil methane measurements at several sites in the Southern Study Area (SSA) and Northern Study Area (NSA). This data set contains soil methane consumption (bacterial CH4 oxidation) and associated C-13 fractionation effects in samples that were collected at various sites in 1994 and 1996 from enclosures (chambers). Methane C-13 data in soil gas samples from the NSA Young Jack Pine (YJP) and Old Jack Pine (OJP) sites for 1994 and 1996 are also given. Additional data on the isotopic composition of methane (carbon and hydrogen isotopes) produced in the NSA beaver ponds and fen bog in 1993 and 1994 are given as well. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  11. Monocopper active site for partial methane oxidation in Cu-exchanged 8MR zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Ambarish R.; Zhao, Zhi -Jian; Siahrostami, Samira; Nørskov, Jens K.; Studt, Felix

    2016-08-17

    Direct conversion of methane to methanol using oxygen is experiencing renewed interest owing to the availability of new natural gas resources. Copper-exchanged zeolites such as mordenite and ZSM-5 have shown encouraging results, and di- and tri-copper species have been suggested as active sites. Recently, small eight-membered ring (8MR) zeolites including SSZ-13, -16, and -39 have been shown to be active for methane oxidation, but the active sites and reaction mechanisms in these 8MR zeolites are not known. In this work, we use density functional theory (DFT) calculations to systematically evaluate monocopper species as active sites for the partial methane oxidation reaction in Cu-exchanged SSZ-13. On the basis of kinetic and thermodynamic arguments, we suggest that [CuIIOH]+ species in the 8MR are responsible for the experimentally observed activity. Furthermore, our results successfully explain the available spectroscopic data and experimental observations including (i) the necessity of water for methanol extraction and (ii) the effect of Si/Al ratio on the catalyst activity. Monocopper species have not yet been suggested as an active site for the partial methane oxidation reaction, and our results suggest that [CuIIOH]+ active site may provide complementary routes for methane activation in zeolites in addition to the known [Cu–O–Cu]2+ and Cu3O3 motifs.

  12. Anaerobic oxidation of methane by sulfate in hypersaline groundwater of the Dead Sea aquifer.

    PubMed

    Avrahamov, N; Antler, G; Yechieli, Y; Gavrieli, I; Joye, S B; Saxton, M; Turchyn, A V; Sivan, O

    2014-11-01

    Geochemical and microbial evidence points to anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) likely coupled with bacterial sulfate reduction in the hypersaline groundwater of the Dead Sea (DS) alluvial aquifer. Groundwater was sampled from nine boreholes drilled along the Arugot alluvial fan next to the DS. The groundwater samples were highly saline (up to 6300 mm chlorine), anoxic, and contained methane. A mass balance calculation demonstrates that the very low δ(13) CDIC in this groundwater is due to anaerobic methane oxidation. Sulfate depletion coincident with isotope enrichment of sulfur and oxygen isotopes in the sulfate suggests that sulfate reduction is associated with this AOM. DNA extraction and 16S amplicon sequencing were used to explore the microbial community present and were found to be microbial composition indicative of bacterial sulfate reducers associated with anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) driving AOM. The net sulfate reduction seems to be primarily controlled by the salinity and the available methane and is substantially lower as salinity increases (2.5 mm sulfate removal at 3000 mm chlorine but only 0.5 mm sulfate removal at 6300 mm chlorine). Low overall sulfur isotope fractionation observed ((34) ε = 17 ± 3.5‰) hints at high rates of sulfate reduction, as has been previously suggested for sulfate reduction coupled with methane oxidation. The new results demonstrate the presence of sulfate-driven AOM in terrestrial hypersaline systems and expand our understanding of how microbial life is sustained under the challenging conditions of an extremely hypersaline environment.

  13. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea use the most energy-efficient aerobic pathway for CO2 fixation.

    PubMed

    Könneke, Martin; Schubert, Daniel M; Brown, Philip C; Hügler, Michael; Standfest, Sonja; Schwander, Thomas; Schada von Borzyskowski, Lennart; Erb, Tobias J; Stahl, David A; Berg, Ivan A

    2014-06-03

    Archaea of the phylum Thaumarchaeota are among the most abundant prokaryotes on Earth and are widely distributed in marine, terrestrial, and geothermal environments. All studied Thaumarchaeota couple the oxidation of ammonia at extremely low concentrations with carbon fixation. As the predominant nitrifiers in the ocean and in various soils, ammonia-oxidizing archaea contribute significantly to the global nitrogen and carbon cycles. Here we provide biochemical evidence that thaumarchaeal ammonia oxidizers assimilate inorganic carbon via a modified version of the autotrophic hydroxypropionate/hydroxybutyrate cycle of Crenarchaeota that is far more energy efficient than any other aerobic autotrophic pathway. The identified genes of this cycle were found in the genomes of all sequenced representatives of the phylum Thaumarchaeota, indicating the environmental significance of this efficient CO2-fixation pathway. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of proteins of this pathway suggests that the hydroxypropionate/hydroxybutyrate cycle emerged independently in Crenarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota, thus supporting the hypothesis of an early evolutionary separation of both archaeal phyla. We conclude that high efficiency of anabolism exemplified by this autotrophic cycle perfectly suits the lifestyle of ammonia-oxidizing archaea, which thrive at a constantly low energy supply, thus offering a biochemical explanation for their ecological success in nutrient-limited environments.

  14. Oxidative stress and inflammation response following aerobic exercise: role of ethnicity.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, M J; Goldfarb, A; Garten, R S; Vervaecke, L

    2014-09-01

    African-Americans are at a significantly greater risk for developing several diseases and conditions. These conditions often have underlying oxidative stress mechanisms. Therefore the purpose of this investigation was to ascertain the post-exercise oxidative response to a single bout of aerobic exercise in African-American and Caucasian college-age females. A total of 10 African-American and 10 Caucasian females completed the study. Each subject had her VO2 max measured while exercising on a treadmill. A week later, each subject returned to the laboratory and performed a 30-min run at 70% of her VO2max. Blood samples were taken immediately prior to and following exercise for analysis. Lipid hydroperoxides, protein carbonyls, malondialdehyde, xanthine oxidase, glutathione in the reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) forms, TNFα and interleukin 6 were measured from blood taken before and after exercise. Significance was set at p≤0.05 a priori. Xanthine oxidase was the only measure that did not significantly increase following exercise. All other markers showed a significant elevation in response to the exercise bout with no difference between groups except that the Caucasian group had significantly higher malondialdehyde post-exercise compared to the African-American group. This cohort of college-age African-American and Caucasian females showed little difference in their response to a single 30-min run at 70% of their max in the markers of oxidative stress within the blood.

  15. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea use the most energy-efficient aerobic pathway for CO2 fixation

    PubMed Central

    Könneke, Martin; Schubert, Daniel M.; Brown, Philip C.; Hügler, Michael; Standfest, Sonja; Schwander, Thomas; Schada von Borzyskowski, Lennart; Erb, Tobias J.; Stahl, David A.; Berg, Ivan A.

    2014-01-01

    Archaea of the phylum Thaumarchaeota are among the most abundant prokaryotes on Earth and are widely distributed in marine, terrestrial, and geothermal environments. All studied Thaumarchaeota couple the oxidation of ammonia at extremely low concentrations with carbon fixation. As the predominant nitrifiers in the ocean and in various soils, ammonia-oxidizing archaea contribute significantly to the global nitrogen and carbon cycles. Here we provide biochemical evidence that thaumarchaeal ammonia oxidizers assimilate inorganic carbon via a modified version of the autotrophic hydroxypropionate/hydroxybutyrate cycle of Crenarchaeota that is far more energy efficient than any other aerobic autotrophic pathway. The identified genes of this cycle were found in the genomes of all sequenced representatives of the phylum Thaumarchaeota, indicating the environmental significance of this efficient CO2-fixation pathway. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of proteins of this pathway suggests that the hydroxypropionate/hydroxybutyrate cycle emerged independently in Crenarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota, thus supporting the hypothesis of an early evolutionary separation of both archaeal phyla. We conclude that high efficiency of anabolism exemplified by this autotrophic cycle perfectly suits the lifestyle of ammonia-oxidizing archaea, which thrive at a constantly low energy supply, thus offering a biochemical explanation for their ecological success in nutrient-limited environments. PMID:24843170

  16. Water-Gas Shift and Methane Reactivity on Reducible Perovskite-Type Oxides.

    PubMed

    Thalinger, Ramona; Opitz, Alexander K; Kogler, Sandra; Heggen, Marc; Stroppa, Daniel; Schmidmair, Daniela; Tappert, Ralf; Fleig, Jürgen; Klötzer, Bernhard; Penner, Simon

    2015-05-28

    Comparative (electro)catalytic, structural, and spectroscopic studies in hydrogen electro-oxidation, the (inverse) water-gas shift reaction, and methane conversion on two representative mixed ionic-electronic conducting perovskite-type materials La0.6Sr0.4FeO3-δ (LSF) and SrTi0.7Fe0.3O3-δ (STF) were performed with the aim of eventually correlating (electro)catalytic activity and associated structural changes and to highlight intrinsic reactivity characteristics as a function of the reduction state. Starting from a strongly prereduced (vacancy-rich) initial state, only (inverse) water-gas shift activity has been observed on both materials beyond ca. 450 °C but no catalytic methane reforming or methane decomposition reactivity up to 600 °C. In contrast, when starting from the fully oxidized state, total methane oxidation to CO2 was observed on both materials. The catalytic performance of both perovskite-type oxides is thus strongly dependent on the degree/depth of reduction, on the associated reactivity of the remaining lattice oxygen, and on the reduction-induced oxygen vacancies. The latter are clearly more reactive toward water on LSF, and this higher reactivity is linked to the superior electrocatalytic performance of LSF in hydrogen oxidation. Combined electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman measurements in turn also revealed altered surface and bulk structures and reactivities.

  17. Water-Gas Shift and Methane Reactivity on Reducible Perovskite-Type Oxides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Comparative (electro)catalytic, structural, and spectroscopic studies in hydrogen electro-oxidation, the (inverse) water-gas shift reaction, and methane conversion on two representative mixed ionic–electronic conducting perovskite-type materials La0.6Sr0.4FeO3−δ (LSF) and SrTi0.7Fe0.3O3−δ (STF) were performed with the aim of eventually correlating (electro)catalytic activity and associated structural changes and to highlight intrinsic reactivity characteristics as a function of the reduction state. Starting from a strongly prereduced (vacancy-rich) initial state, only (inverse) water-gas shift activity has been observed on both materials beyond ca. 450 °C but no catalytic methane reforming or methane decomposition reactivity up to 600 °C. In contrast, when starting from the fully oxidized state, total methane oxidation to CO2 was observed on both materials. The catalytic performance of both perovskite-type oxides is thus strongly dependent on the degree/depth of reduction, on the associated reactivity of the remaining lattice oxygen, and on the reduction-induced oxygen vacancies. The latter are clearly more reactive toward water on LSF, and this higher reactivity is linked to the superior electrocatalytic performance of LSF in hydrogen oxidation. Combined electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman measurements in turn also revealed altered surface and bulk structures and reactivities. PMID:26045733

  18. Metabolic reprogramming during neuronal differentiation from aerobic glycolysis to neuronal oxidative phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xinde; Boyer, Leah; Jin, Mingji; Mertens, Jerome; Kim, Yongsung; Ma, Li; Ma, Li; Hamm, Michael; Gage, Fred H; Hunter, Tony

    2016-01-01

    How metabolism is reprogrammed during neuronal differentiation is unknown. We found that the loss of hexokinase (HK2) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDHA) expression, together with a switch in pyruvate kinase gene splicing from PKM2 to PKM1, marks the transition from aerobic glycolysis in neural progenitor cells (NPC) to neuronal oxidative phosphorylation. The protein levels of c-MYC and N-MYC, transcriptional activators of the HK2 and LDHA genes, decrease dramatically. Constitutive expression of HK2 and LDHA during differentiation leads to neuronal cell death, indicating that the shut-off aerobic glycolysis is essential for neuronal survival. The metabolic regulators PGC-1α and ERRγ increase significantly upon neuronal differentiation to sustain the transcription of metabolic and mitochondrial genes, whose levels are unchanged compared to NPCs, revealing distinct transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes in the proliferation and post-mitotic differentiation states. Mitochondrial mass increases proportionally with neuronal mass growth, indicating an unknown mechanism linking mitochondrial biogenesis to cell size. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13374.001 PMID:27282387

  19. Disruption of extended defects in solid oxide fuel cell anodes for methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Morales, Juan Carlos; Canales-Vázquez, Jesús; Savaniu, Cristian; Marrero-López, David; Zhou, Wuzong; Irvine, John T S

    2006-02-02

    Point defects largely govern the electrochemical properties of oxides: at low defect concentrations, conductivity increases with concentration; however, at higher concentrations, defect-defect interactions start to dominate. Thus, in searching for electrochemically active materials for fuel cell anodes, high defect concentration is generally avoided. Here we describe an oxide anode formed from lanthanum-substituted strontium titanate (La-SrTiO3) in which we control the oxygen stoichiometry in order to break down the extended defect intergrowth regions and create phases with considerable disordered oxygen defects. We substitute Ti in these phases with Ga and Mn to induce redox activity and allow more flexible coordination. The material demonstrates impressive fuel cell performance using wet hydrogen at 950 degrees C. It is also important for fuel cell technology to achieve efficient electrode operation with different hydrocarbon fuels, although such fuels are more demanding than pure hydrogen. The best anode materials to date--Ni-YSZ (yttria-stabilized zirconia) cermets--suffer some disadvantages related to low tolerance to sulphur, carbon build-up when using hydrocarbon fuels (though device modifications and lower temperature operation can avoid this) and volume instability on redox cycling. Our anode material is very active for methane oxidation at high temperatures, with open circuit voltages in excess of 1.2 V. The materials design concept that we use here could lead to devices that enable more-efficient energy extraction from fossil fuels and carbon-neutral fuels.

  20. Depth-related coupling relation between methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOBs) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRBs) in a marine sediment core from the Dongsha region, the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Ming; Fu, Shao-Ying; Zhu, Qing; Xiao, Xi; Yuan, Jian-Ping; Peng, Juan; Wu, Chou-Fei; Wang, Jiang-Hai

    2014-12-01

    The vertical distributions of methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOBs) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRBs) in the marine sediment core of DH-CL14 from the Dongsha region, the South China Sea, were investigated. To enumerate MOBs and SRBs, their specific genes of pmoA and apsA were quantified by a culture-independent molecular biological technique, real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The result shows that the pmoA gene copies per gram of sediments reached the maximum of 1,118,679 at the depth of 140-160 cm. Overall considering the detection precision, sample amount, measurement cost, and sensitivity to the seepage of methane from the oil/gas reservoirs or gas hydrates, we suggest that the depth of 140-160 cm may be the optimal sampling position for the marine microbial exploration of oils, gases, and gas hydrates in the Dongsha region. The data of the pmoA and apsA gene copies exhibit an evident coupling relation between MOBs and SRBs as illustrated in their vertical distributions in this sediment core, which may well be interpreted by a high sulfate concentration inhibiting methane production and further leading to the reduction of MOBs. In comparison with the numbers of the pmoA and apsA copies at the same sediment depth, we find out that there were two methane-oxidizing mechanisms of aerobic and anaerobic oxidation in this sediment core, i.e., the aerobic oxidation with free oxygen dominantly occurred above the depth of 210-230 cm, while the anaerobic oxidation with the other electron acceptors such as sulfates and manganese-iron oxides happened below the depth of 210-230 cm.

  1. Competitive interactions between methane- and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria modulate carbon and nitrogen cycling in paddy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Huang, R.; Wang, B. Z.; Bodelier, P. L. E.; Jia, Z. J.

    2014-06-01

    Pure culture studies have demonstrated that methanotrophs and ammonia oxidizers can both carry out the oxidation of methane and ammonia. However, the expected interactions resulting from these similarities are poorly understood, especially in complex, natural environments. Using DNA-based stable isotope probing and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA and functional genes, we report on biogeochemical and molecular evidence for growth stimulation of methanotrophic communities by ammonium fertilization, and that methane modulates nitrogen cycling by competitive inhibition of nitrifying communities in a rice paddy soil. Pairwise comparison between microcosms amended with CH4, CH4+Urea, and Urea indicated that urea fertilization stimulated methane oxidation activity 6-fold during a 19-day incubation period, while ammonia oxidation activity was significantly suppressed in the presence of CH4. Pyrosequencing of the total 16S rRNA genes revealed that urea amendment resulted in rapid growth of Methylosarcina-like MOB, and nitrifying communities appeared to be partially inhibited by methane. High-throughput sequencing of the 13C-labeled DNA further revealed that methane amendment resulted in clear growth of Methylosarcina-related MOB while methane plus urea led to an equal increase in Methylosarcina and Methylobacter-related type Ia MOB, indicating the differential growth requirements of representatives of these genera. An increase in 13C assimilation by microorganisms related to methanol oxidizers clearly indicated carbon transfer from methane oxidation to other soil microbes, which was enhanced by urea addition. The active growth of type Ia methanotrops was significantly stimulated by urea amendment, and the pronounced growth of methanol-oxidizing bacteria occurred in CH4-treated microcosms only upon urea amendment. Methane addition partially inhibited the growth of Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas in urea-amended microcosms, as well as growth of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. These

  2. The role of molecular hydrogen and methane oxidation in the water vapour budget of the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Texier, H.; Solomon, S.; Garcia, R. R.

    1988-01-01

    The detailed photochemistry of methane oxidation has been studied in a coupled chemical/dynamical model of the middle atmosphere. The photochemistry of formaldehyde plays an important role in determining the production of water vapor from methane oxidation. At high latitudes, the production and transport of molecular hydrogen is particularly important in determining the water vapor distribution. It is shown that the ratio of the methane vertical gradient to the water vapor vertical gradient at any particular latitude should not be expected to be precisely 2, due both to photochemical and dynamical effects. Modeled H2O profiles are compared with measurements from the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) experiment at various latitudes. Molecular hydrogen is shown to be responsible for the formation of a secondary maximum displayed by the model water vapor profiles in high latitude summer, a feature also found in the LIMS data.

  3. Growth of Anaerobic Methane-Oxidizing Archaea and Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in a High-Pressure Membrane Capsule Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Gieteling, Jarno; Widjaja-Greefkes, H. C. Aura; Plugge, Caroline M.; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Lens, Piet N. L.; Meulepas, Roel J. W.

    2014-01-01

    Communities of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) grow slowly, which limits the ability to perform physiological studies. High methane partial pressure was previously successfully applied to stimulate growth, but it is not clear how different ANME subtypes and associated SRB are affected by it. Here, we report on the growth of ANME-SRB in a membrane capsule bioreactor inoculated with Eckernförde Bay sediment that combines high-pressure incubation (10.1 MPa methane) and thorough mixing (100 rpm) with complete cell retention by a 0.2-μm-pore-size membrane. The results were compared to previously obtained data from an ambient-pressure (0.101 MPa methane) bioreactor inoculated with the same sediment. The rates of oxidation of labeled methane were not higher at 10.1 MPa, likely because measurements were done at ambient pressure. The subtype ANME-2a/b was abundant in both reactors, but subtype ANME-2c was enriched only at 10.1 MPa. SRB at 10.1 MPa mainly belonged to the SEEP-SRB2 and Eel-1 groups and the Desulfuromonadales and not to the typically found SEEP-SRB1 group. The increase of ANME-2a/b occurred in parallel with the increase of SEEP-SRB2, which was previously found to be associated only with ANME-2c. Our results imply that the syntrophic association is flexible and that methane pressure and sulfide concentration influence the growth of different ANME-SRB consortia. We also studied the effect of elevated methane pressure on methane production and oxidation by a mixture of methanogenic and sulfate-reducing sludge. Here, methane oxidation rates decreased and were not coupled to sulfide production, indicating trace methane oxidation during net methanogenesis and not anaerobic methane oxidation, even at a high methane partial pressure. PMID:25501484

  4. Aerobic and Anaerobic Thiosulfate Oxidation by a Cold-Adapted, Subglacial Chemoautotroph

    PubMed Central

    Harrold, Zoë R.; Skidmore, Mark L.; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Desch, Libby; Amada, Kirina; van Gelder, Will; Glover, Kevin; Roden, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    Geochemical data indicate that protons released during pyrite (FeS2) oxidation are important drivers of mineral weathering in oxic and anoxic zones of many aquatic environments, including those beneath glaciers. Oxidation of FeS2 under oxic, circumneutral conditions proceeds through the metastable intermediate thiosulfate (S2O32−), which represents an electron donor capable of supporting microbial metabolism. Subglacial meltwaters sampled from Robertson Glacier (RG), Canada, over a seasonal melt cycle revealed concentrations of S2O32− that were typically below the limit of detection, despite the presence of available pyrite and concentrations of the FeS2 oxidation product sulfate (SO42−) several orders of magnitude higher than those of S2O32−. Here we report on the physiological and genomic characterization of the chemolithoautotrophic facultative anaerobe Thiobacillus sp. strain RG5 isolated from the subglacial environment at RG. The RG5 genome encodes genes involved with pathways for the complete oxidation of S2O32−, CO2 fixation, and aerobic and anaerobic respiration with nitrite or nitrate. Growth experiments indicated that the energy required to synthesize a cell under oxygen- or nitrate-reducing conditions with S2O32− as the electron donor was lower at 5.1°C than 14.4°C, indicating that this organism is cold adapted. RG sediment-associated transcripts of soxB, which encodes a component of the S2O32−-oxidizing complex, were closely affiliated with soxB from RG5. Collectively, these results suggest an active sulfur cycle in the subglacial environment at RG mediated in part by populations closely affiliated with RG5. The consumption of S2O32− by RG5-like populations may accelerate abiotic FeS2 oxidation, thereby enhancing mineral weathering in the subglacial environment. PMID:26712544

  5. Aerobic and Anaerobic Thiosulfate Oxidation by a Cold-Adapted, Subglacial Chemoautotroph.

    PubMed

    Harrold, Zoë R; Skidmore, Mark L; Hamilton, Trinity L; Desch, Libby; Amada, Kirina; van Gelder, Will; Glover, Kevin; Roden, Eric E; Boyd, Eric S

    2015-12-28

    Geochemical data indicate that protons released during pyrite (FeS2) oxidation are important drivers of mineral weathering in oxic and anoxic zones of many aquatic environments, including those beneath glaciers. Oxidation of FeS2 under oxic, circumneutral conditions proceeds through the metastable intermediate thiosulfate (S2O3 (2-)), which represents an electron donor capable of supporting microbial metabolism. Subglacial meltwaters sampled from Robertson Glacier (RG), Canada, over a seasonal melt cycle revealed concentrations of S2O3 (2-) that were typically below the limit of detection, despite the presence of available pyrite and concentrations of the FeS2 oxidation product sulfate (SO4 (2-)) several orders of magnitude higher than those of S2O3 (2-). Here we report on the physiological and genomic characterization of the chemolithoautotrophic facultative anaerobe Thiobacillus sp. strain RG5 isolated from the subglacial environment at RG. The RG5 genome encodes genes involved with pathways for the complete oxidation of S2O3 (2-), CO2 fixation, and aerobic and anaerobic respiration with nitrite or nitrate. Growth experiments indicated that the energy required to synthesize a cell under oxygen- or nitrate-reducing conditions with S2O3 (2-) as the electron donor was lower at 5.1°C than 14.4°C, indicating that this organism is cold adapted. RG sediment-associated transcripts of soxB, which encodes a component of the S2O3 (2-)-oxidizing complex, were closely affiliated with soxB from RG5. Collectively, these results suggest an active sulfur cycle in the subglacial environment at RG mediated in part by populations closely affiliated with RG5. The consumption of S2O3 (2-) by RG5-like populations may accelerate abiotic FeS2 oxidation, thereby enhancing mineral weathering in the subglacial environment.

  6. A template-free solvent-mediated synthesis of high surface area boron nitride nanosheets for aerobic oxidative desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peiwen; Zhu, Wenshuai; Chao, Yanhong; Zhang, Jinshui; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhu, Huiyuan; Li, Changfeng; Chen, Zhigang; Li, Huaming; Dai, Sheng

    2016-01-04

    Hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets (h-BNNs) with rather high specific surface area (SSA) are important two-dimensional layer-structured materials. Here, a solvent-mediated synthesis of h-BNNs revealed a template-free lattice plane control strategy that induced high SSA nanoporous structured h-BNNs with outstanding aerobic oxidative desulfurization performance.

  7. Contemporary and projected biogenic fluxes of methane and nitrous oxide in North American terrestrial ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The importance of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) in determining global climate change has been increasingly recognized, but terrestrial CH4 and N2O budgets and the underlying mechanisms remain far from certain. Accurate estimation of terrestrial CH4 and N2O budgets would be a critical step fo...

  8. Learning the Fundamentals of Kinetics and Reaction Engineering with the Catalytic Oxidation of Methane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cybulskis, Viktor J.; Smeltz, Andrew D.; Zvinevich, Yury; Gounder, Rajamani; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding catalytic chemistry, collecting and interpreting kinetic data, and operating chemical reactors are critical skills for chemical engineers. This laboratory experiment provides students with a hands-on supplement to a course in chemical kinetics and reaction engineering. The oxidation of methane with a palladium catalyst supported on…

  9. Mitigation of methane and nitrous oxide emissions from animal operations: A review of manure management options

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review analyzes published data on manure management practices used to mitigate methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from animal operations. This is the second in a series of reports commissioned by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations to evaluate mitigation pra...

  10. Multiple archaeal groups mediate methane oxidation in anoxic cold seep sediments.

    PubMed

    Orphan, Victoria J; House, Christopher H; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; McKeegan, Kevin D; DeLong, Edward F

    2002-05-28

    No microorganism capable of anaerobic growth on methane as the sole carbon source has yet been cultivated. Consequently, information about these microbes has been inferred from geochemical and microbiological observations of field samples. Stable isotope analysis of lipid biomarkers and rRNA gene surveys have implicated specific microbes in the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Here we use combined fluorescent in situ hybridization and secondary ion mass spectrometry analyses, to identify anaerobic methanotrophs in marine methane-seep sediments. The results provide direct evidence for the involvement of at least two distinct archaeal groups (ANME-1 and ANME-2) in AOM at methane seeps. Although both archaeal groups often occurred in direct physical association with bacteria, they also were observed as monospecific aggregations and as single cells. The ANME-1 archaeal group more frequently existed in monospecific aggregations or as single filaments, apparently without a bacterial partner. Bacteria associated with both archaeal groups included, but were not limited to, close relatives of Desulfosarcina species. Isotopic analyses suggest that monospecific archaeal cells and cell aggregates were active in anaerobic methanotrophy, as were multispecies consortia. In total, the data indicate that the microbial species and biotic interactions mediating anaerobic methanotrophy are diverse and complex. The data also clearly show that highly structured ANME-2/Desulfosarcina consortia are not the sole entities responsible for AOM at marine methane seeps. Other microbial groups, including ANME-1 archaea, are capable of anaerobic methane consumption either as single cells, in monospecific aggregates, or in multispecies consortia.

  11. Oxidative stability of pork emulsion containing tomato products and pink guava pulp during refrigerated aerobic storage.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Serlene; Chatli, Manish K; Biswas, Ashim K; Sahoo, Jhari

    2014-11-01

    Lipid oxidation-induced quality problems can be minimized with the use of natural antioxidants. Antioxidant potential of tomato puree (10 %; T-1), tomato pulp (12.5 %; T-2), lyophilized tomato peel (6 %; T-3), and pink guava pulp (10 %; T-4) was evaluated in raw pork emulsion during refrigerated storage for 9 days under aerobic packaging. The lycopene and β-carotene content varied in pork emulsion as T-3 > T-1 > T-2 > T-4 and decreased (P < 0.05) during storage. The surface redness (a* value) increased (P < 0.05) with the incorporation of tomato products and pink guava pulp. Furthermore, metmyoglobin formation and lipid oxidation were lower (P < 0.05) in tomato- and guava-treated emulsions than in control. Overall, incorporation of tomato products and pink guava pulp improved the visual colour and odour scores of raw pork emulsion. These results indicated that tomato products and guava pulp can be utilized as sources of natural antioxidants in raw pork products to minimize lipid oxidation, off-odour development, and surface discolouration.

  12. Microsensor Measurements of Sulfate Reduction and Sulfide Oxidation in Compact Microbial Communities of Aerobic Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Kühl, Michael; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    1992-01-01

    The microzonation of O2 respiration, H2S oxidation, and SO42- reduction in aerobic trickling-filter biofilms was studied by measuring concentration profiles at high spatial resolution (25 to 100 μm) with microsensors for O2, S2-, and pH. Specific reaction rates were calculated from measured concentration profiles by using a simple one-dimensional diffusion reaction model. The importance of electron acceptor and electron donor availability for the microzonation of respiratory processes and their reaction rates was investigated. Oxygen respiration was found in the upper 0.2 to 0.4 mm of the biofilm, whereas sulfate reduction occurred in deeper, anoxic parts of the biofilm. Sulfate reduction accounted for up to 50% of the total mineralization of organic carbon in the biofilms. All H2S produced from sulfate reduction was reoxidized by O2 in a narrow reaction zone, and no H2S escaped to the overlying water. Turnover times of H2S and O2 in the reaction zone were only a few seconds owing to rapid bacterial H2S oxidation. Anaerobic H2S oxidation with NO3- could be induced by addition of nitrate to the medium. Total sulfate reduction rates increased when the availability of SO42- or organic substrate increased as a result of deepening of the sulfate reduction zone or an increase in the sulfate reduction intensity, respectively. PMID:16348687

  13. Emissions of methane and nitrous oxide from outdoor-stored broiler litter using tunable-diode laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wit, William Harrison

    Handling and storage of a variety of types of agricultural wastes results in the formation and release of nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) gases to the atmosphere. These gases contribute to climate change through the greenhouse effect. Few studies have examined evolution of these gases from stored poultry litter in North America. Although N 2O is a by-product of nitrification, it is largely produced as an intermediate product of denitrification and is produced most intensely when both aerobic and anaerobic conditions are present. CH4 emissions, however, are typically associated with anaerobic reactions. Outdoor storage of broiler litter provides an excellent media for which both aerobic and anaerobic zones can coexist, particularly when the litter is of varying ages from multiple broiler flocks (cycles). It provides a large amount of nitrogen for bacterial nitrification/denitrification processes as well as Carbon to support anaerobic bacterial fermentation. The objective of the study was to quantify N 2O and CH4 emissions for broiler litter stored in an uncovered, outdoor bunker by conducting small-scale dynamic flux chamber studies and full-scale field experiments. The field experiments used a modified micrometeorological mass balance approach to monitor emissions from stored broiler litter in a three-walled concrete bunker. Atmospheric concentrations of N2O and CH4 were measured using tunable-diode laser spectroscopy. Field experiments over the course of approximately four months yielded average emission rates of 14+/-17mug m-2 s -1 and 84+/-61 mug m-2 s-1 for N2O and CH4 respectively that agreed well with the trends of emission rates observed in the dynamic flux chamber experiments. The primary drivers of emissions of both CH4 and N2O appeared to be temperature and moisture content while organic carbon and organic nitrogen (loss on ignition, nitrate concentrations) contents were also important factors.

  14. Inhibition of methane consumption in forest soils by monoterpenes

    SciTech Connect

    Amaral, J.A.; Knowles, R.

    1998-04-01

    Selected monoterpenes were tested for their ability to inhibit atmospheric methane consumption by three forest soils from different vegetation types and by the cultured methanotrophic strain, Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. Subsurface soil from coniferous (Pinus banksiana), deciduous (Populus tremuloides), and mixed hardwood (Tsuga canadensis and Prunus pensylvanica) stands was used under field-moist and slurry conditions. Most of the hydrocarbon monoterpenes tested significantly inhibited methane consumption by soils at environmentally relevant levels, with ({minus})-{alpha}-pinene being the most effective. With the exception of {beta}-myrcene, monoterpenes also strongly inhibited methane oxidation by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. Carbon dioxide production was stimulated in all of the soils by the monoterpenes tested. In one case, methane production was stimulated by ({minus})-{alpha}-pinene in an intact, aerobic core. Oxide and alcohol monoterpenoids stimulated methane production. Thus, monoterpenes appear to be potentially important regulators of methane consumption and carbon metabolism in forest soils.

  15. Cu-catalyzed aerobic oxidative three-component coupling route to N-sulfonyl amidines via an ynamine intermediate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinho; Stahl, Shannon S

    2015-02-20

    Cu-catalyzed aerobic oxidative three-component coupling of a terminal alkyne, secondary amine, and sulfonamide enables efficient synthesis of amidines. The use of Cu(OTf)2 (5 mol %) produces amidines selectively without Glaser-Hay alkyne homocoupling products. Preliminary studies suggest that the reaction pathway involves initial oxidative coupling of the terminal alkyne with the secondary amine, followed by hydroamidation of the ynamine intermediate with the sulfonamide.

  16. Monocopper active site for partial methane oxidation in Cu-exchanged 8MR zeolites

    DOE PAGES

    Kulkarni, Ambarish R.; Zhao, Zhi -Jian; Siahrostami, Samira; ...

    2016-08-17

    Direct conversion of methane to methanol using oxygen is experiencing renewed interest owing to the availability of new natural gas resources. Copper-exchanged zeolites such as mordenite and ZSM-5 have shown encouraging results, and di- and tri-copper species have been suggested as active sites. Recently, small eight-membered ring (8MR) zeolites including SSZ-13, -16, and -39 have been shown to be active for methane oxidation, but the active sites and reaction mechanisms in these 8MR zeolites are not known. In this work, we use density functional theory (DFT) calculations to systematically evaluate monocopper species as active sites for the partial methane oxidationmore » reaction in Cu-exchanged SSZ-13. On the basis of kinetic and thermodynamic arguments, we suggest that [CuIIOH]+ species in the 8MR are responsible for the experimentally observed activity. Furthermore, our results successfully explain the available spectroscopic data and experimental observations including (i) the necessity of water for methanol extraction and (ii) the effect of Si/Al ratio on the catalyst activity. Monocopper species have not yet been suggested as an active site for the partial methane oxidation reaction, and our results suggest that [CuIIOH]+ active site may provide complementary routes for methane activation in zeolites in addition to the known [Cu–O–Cu]2+ and Cu3O3 motifs.« less

  17. A Bioinspired Catalytic Aerobic Oxidative C–H Functionalization of Primary Aliphatic Amines: Synthesis of 1,2-Disubstituted Benzimidazoles

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Khac Minh Huy; Largeron, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic oxidative C–H functionalization of primary aliphatic amines has been accomplished with a biomimetic cooperative catalytic system to furnish 1,2-disubstituted benzimidazoles that play an important role as drug discovery targets. This one-pot atom-economical multistep process, which proceeds under mild conditions, with ambient air and equimolar amounts of each coupling partner, constitutes a convenient environmentally friendly strategy to functionalize non-activated aliphatic amines that remain challenging substrates for non-enzymatic catalytic aerobic systems. PMID:26206475

  18. Anaerobic methane oxidation driven by microbial reduction of natural organic matter in a tropical wetland.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Edgardo I; Prieto-Davó, Alejandra; López-Lozano, Nguyen E; Hernández-Eligio, Alberto; Vega-Alvarado, Leticia; Juárez, Katy; García-González, Ana Sarahí; López, Mercedes G; Cervantes, Francisco J

    2017-03-24

    Wetlands constitute the main natural source of methane on Earth due to their high content of natural organic matter (NOM), but key drivers such as electron acceptors supporting methanotrophic activities in these habitats are poorly understood. We performed anoxic incubations using freshly collected sediment along with water samples harvested from a tropical wetland, amended with (13)C-methane (0.67 atm) to test the capacity of its microbial community to perform anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) linked to the reduction of the humic fraction of its NOM. Collected evidence demonstrates that electron-accepting functional groups (e.g. quinones) present in NOM fueled AOM by serving as terminal electron acceptor. Indeed, while sulfate reduction was the predominant process accounting for up to 42.5% of the AOM activities, microbial reduction of NOM concomitantly occurred. Furthermore, enrichment of wetland sediment with external NOM provided complementary electron-accepting capacity, which reduction accounted for ∼100 nmol (13)C-CH4 oxidized cm(-3) d(-1) Spectroscopic evidence showed that quinone moieties were heterogeneously distributed in the wetland sediment, and that their reduction occurred during the course of AOM. Moreover, an enrichment derived from wetland sediments performing AOM linked to NOM reduction stoichiometrically oxidized methane coupled to the reduction of the humic analogue, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate. Microbial populations potentially involved in AOM coupled to microbial reduction of NOM were dominated by divergent biota from putative AOM-associated archaea. We estimate that this microbial process could potentially contribute to the suppression of up to 114 Tg CH4 yr(-1) in coastal wetlands and more than 1,300 Tg yr(-1) considering the global wetland area.Importance Identifying key processes governing methane emissions from natural systems is of major importance considering the global warming effects triggered by this greenhouse gas. AOM coupled

  19. Analytical study of mechanisms for nitric oxide formation during combustion of methane in a jet-stirred combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jachimowski, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    The role of chemical kinetics in the formation of nitric oxide during the combustion of methane was examined analytically by means of a detailed chemical mechanism for the oxidation of methane, for the reaction between hydrocarbon fragments, and for the formation of nitric oxide. By comparing predicted nitric oxide levels with values reported in the literature from jet-stirred combuster experiments, it was determined that the nitric oxide levels observed in fuel-rich flames cannot be described by a mechanism in which the rate of nitric oxide formation is controlled solely by the kinetics of oxygen atom formation. A proposed mechanism for the formation of nitric oxide in methane-rich flames reproduces the observed levels. The oxidation of hydrogen cyanide appears to be an important factor in nitric oxide formation.

  20. Catalytic oxidation of trace levels of methane in oxygen in a tubular reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshay, M.; Caenepeel, C. L.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental investigation of catalytic oxidation of trace levels of methane in oxygen was conducted in a tubular reactor. Two noble metal solid catalysts were explored: a 1-percent platinum on gamma alumina and a 0.5-percent rhodium on gamma alumina. For each catalyst the activity was determined as a function of temperature, pressure, space velocity, and methane concentration. The rhodium catalyst was considerably more active than the platinum catalyst. For each catalyst mass transfer had a pronounced effect upon activity at low space velocity.

  1. Radioactive Fingerprinting of Microorganisms That Oxidize Atmospheric Methane in Different Soils

    PubMed Central

    Roslev, Peter; Iversen, Niels

    1999-01-01

    Microorganisms that oxidize atmospheric methane in soils were characterized by radioactive labelling with 14CH4 followed by analysis of radiolabelled phospholipid ester-linked fatty acids (14C-PLFAs). The radioactive fingerprinting technique was used to compare active methanotrophs in soil samples from Greenland, Denmark, the United States, and Brazil. The 14C-PLFA fingerprints indicated that closely related methanotrophic bacteria were responsible for the oxidation of atmospheric methane in the soils. Significant amounts of labelled PLFAs produced by the unknown soil methanotrophs coeluted with a group of fatty acids that included i17:0, a17:0, and 17:1ω8c (up to 9.0% of the total 14C-PLFAs). These PLFAs are not known to be significant constituents of methanotrophic bacteria. The major PLFAs of the soil methanotrophs (73.5 to 89.0% of the total PLFAs) coeluted with 18:1 and 18:0 fatty acids (e.g., 18:1ω9, 18:1ω7, and 18:0). The 14C-PLFAs fingerprints of the soil methanotrophs that oxidized atmospheric methane did not change after long-term methane enrichment at 170 ppm CH4. The 14C-PLFA fingerprints of the soil methanotrophs were different from the PLFA profiles of type I and type II methanotrophic bacteria described previously. Some similarity at the PLFA level was observed between the unknown soil methanotrophs and the PLFA phenotype of the type II methanotrophs. Methanotrophs in Arctic, temperate, and tropical regions assimilated between 20 and 54% of the atmospheric methane that was metabolized. The lowest relative assimilation (percent) was observed for methanotrophs in agricultural soil, whereas the highest assimilation was observed for methanotrophs in rain forest soil. The results suggest that methanotrophs with relatively high carbon conversion efficiencies and very similar PLFA compositions dominate atmospheric methane metabolism in different soils. The characteristics of the methane metabolism and the 14C-PLFA fingerprints excluded any significant

  2. Methane oxidation in a biofilter (Part 1): Development of a mathematical model for designing and optimization.

    PubMed

    Amodeo, Corrado; Masi, Salvatore; Van Hulle, Stijn W H; Zirpoli, Pierfrancesco; Mancini, Ignazio M; Caniani, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is the evaluation of the efficiency of such a biofilter, through the application of a mathematical model which describes the biological oxidation process. This mathematical model is able to predict the efficiency of the system under varying operating conditions. Literature data have been used in order to build the model. The factors that mostly affect the process and which actually regulate the entire process have been highlighted in this work. Specifically, it was found that temperature, flow and methane concentration are the most important parameters that influence the system. The results obtained from the mathematical model showed also that the biofilter system is simple to implement and manage and allows the achievement of high efficiency of methane oxidation. In the optimal conditions for temperature (between 20-30°C), residence time (between 0.7-0.8 h) and methane molar fraction (between 20-25%) the efficiency of methane oxidation could be around 50%.

  3. Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane Coupled to Nitrite Reduction by Halophilic Marine NC10 Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhanfei; Geng, Sha; Cai, Chaoyang; Liu, Shuai; Liu, Yan; Pan, Yawei; Lou, Liping; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to nitrite reduction is a novel AOM process that is mediated by denitrifying methanotrophs. To date, enrichments of these denitrifying methanotrophs have been confined to freshwater systems; however, the recent findings of 16S rRNA and pmoA gene sequences in marine sediments suggest a possible occurrence of AOM coupled to nitrite reduction in marine systems. In this research, a marine denitrifying methanotrophic culture was obtained after 20 months of enrichment. Activity testing and quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis were then conducted and showed that the methane oxidation activity and the number of NC10 bacteria increased correlatively during the enrichment period. 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicated that only bacteria in group A of the NC10 phylum were enriched and responsible for the resulting methane oxidation activity, although a diverse community of NC10 bacteria was harbored in the inoculum. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that NC10 bacteria were dominant in the enrichment culture after 20 months. The effect of salinity on the marine denitrifying methanotrophic culture was investigated, and the apparent optimal salinity was 20.5‰, which suggested that halophilic bacterial AOM coupled to nitrite reduction was obtained. Moreover, the apparent substrate affinity coefficients of the halophilic denitrifying methanotrophs were determined to be 9.8 ± 2.2 μM for methane and 8.7 ± 1.5 μM for nitrite. PMID:26048927

  4. Radioactive fingerprinting of microorganisms that oxidize atmospheric methane in different soils

    SciTech Connect

    Roslev, P.; Iversen, N.

    1999-09-01

    Microorganisms that oxidize atmospheric methane in soils were characterized by radioactive labeling with {sup 14}CH{sub 4} followed by analysis of radiolabelled phospholipid ester-linked fatty acids ({sup 14}C-PLFAs). The radioactive fingerprinting technique was used to compare active methanotrophs in soil samples from Greenland, Denmark, the United States, and Brazil. The {sup 14}C-PLFA fingerprints indicated that closely related methanotrophic bacteria were responsible for the oxidation of atmospheric methane in the soils. Significant amounts of labeled PLFAs produced by the unknown soil methanotrophs coeluted with a group of fatty acids that included i17:0, a17:0, and 17:1{omega}8c. These PLFAs are not known to be significant constituents of methanotrophic bacteria. The major PLFAs of the soil methanotrophs coeluted with 18:1 and 18:0 fatty acids. The {sup 14}C-PLFAs fingerprints of the soil methanotrophs that oxidized atmospheric methane did not change after long-term methane enrichment at 170 ppm CH{sub 4}. The {sup 14}C-PLFA fingerprints of the soil methanotrophs were different from the PLFA profiles of type 1 and type 2 methanotrophic bacteria described previously. Some similarity at the PLFA level was observed between the unknown soil methanotrophs and the PLFA phenotype of the type 2 methanotrophs.

  5. Radiative forcing of carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide: A significant revision of the methane radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etminan, M.; Myhre, G.; Highwood, E. J.; Shine, K. P.

    2016-12-01

    New calculations of the radiative forcing (RF) are presented for the three main well-mixed greenhouse gases, methane, nitrous oxide, and carbon dioxide. Methane's RF is particularly impacted because of the inclusion of the shortwave forcing; the 1750-2011 RF is about 25% higher (increasing from 0.48 W m-2 to 0.61 W m-2) compared to the value in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 2013 assessment; the 100 year global warming potential is 14% higher than the IPCC value. We present new simplified expressions to calculate RF. Unlike previous expressions used by IPCC, the new ones include the overlap between CO2 and N2O; for N2O forcing, the CO2 overlap can be as important as the CH4 overlap. The 1750-2011 CO2 RF is within 1% of IPCC's value but is about 10% higher when CO2 amounts reach 2000 ppm, a value projected to be possible under the extended RCP8.5 scenario.

  6. The Apparent Involvement of ANMEs in Mineral Dependent Methane Oxidation, as an Analog for Possible Martian Methanotrophy

    PubMed Central

    House, Christopher H.; Beal, Emily J.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2011-01-01

    On Earth, marine anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) can be driven by the microbial reduction of sulfate, iron, and manganese. Here, we have further characterized marine sediment incubations to determine if the mineral dependent methane oxidation involves similar microorganisms to those found for sulfate-dependent methane oxidation. Through FISH and FISH-SIMS analyses using 13C and 15N labeled substrates, we find that the most active cells during manganese dependent AOM are primarily mixed and mixed-cluster aggregates of archaea and bacteria. Overall, our control experiment using sulfate showed two active bacterial clusters, two active shell aggregates, one active mixed aggregate, and an active archaeal sarcina, the last of which appeared to take up methane in the absence of a closely-associated bacterial partner. A single example of a shell aggregate appeared to be active in the manganese incubation, along with three mixed aggregates and an archaeal sarcina. These results suggest that the microorganisms (e.g., ANME-2) found active in the manganese-dependent incubations are likely capable of sulfate-dependent AOM. Similar metabolic flexibility for Martian methanotrophs would mean that the same microbial groups could inhabit a diverse set of Martian mineralogical crustal environments. The recently discovered seasonal Martian plumes of methane outgassing could be coupled to the reduction of abundant surface sulfates and extensive metal oxides, providing a feasible metabolism for present and past Mars. In an optimistic scenario Martian methanotrophy consumes much of the periodic methane released supporting on the order of 10,000 microbial cells per cm2 of Martian surface. Alternatively, most of the methane released each year could be oxidized through an abiotic process requiring biological methane oxidation to be more limited. If under this scenario, 1% of this methane flux were oxidized by biology in surface soils or in subsurface aquifers (prior to release), a total

  7. Competitive interactions between methane- and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria modulate carbon and nitrogen cycling in paddy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Huang, R.; Wang, B. Z.; Bodelier, P. L. E.; Jia, Z. J.

    2014-03-01

    Pure culture studies have demonstrated that methanotrophs and ammonia oxidizers can both carry out the oxidation of methane and ammonia. However, the expected interactions resulting from these similarities are poorly understood, especially in complex, natural environments. Using DNA-based stable isotope probing and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA and pmoA genes, we report on biogeochemical and molecular evidence for growth stimulation of methanotrophic communities by ammonium fertilization, and that methane modulates nitrogen cycling by competitive inhibition of nitrifying communities in a rice paddy soil. Pairwise comparison between microcosms amended with CH4, CH4+Urea, and Urea indicated that urea fertilization stimulated methane oxidation activity by 6-fold during a 19 day incubation period, while ammonia oxidation activity was significantly inhibited in the presence of CH4. Pyrosequencing of the total 16S rRNA genes revealed that urea amendment resulted in rapid growth of Methylosarcina-like type Ia MOB, and nitrifying communities appeared to be suppressed by methane. High-throughput sequencing of the 13C-labeled DNA further revealed that methane amendment resulted in clear growth of Methylosarcina-related MOB while methane plus urea led to equal increase in Methylosarcina and Methylobacter-related MOB, indicating the differential growth requirements of representatives of these genera. Strikingly, type Ib MOB did not respond to methane nor to urea. Increase in 13C-assimilation by microorganisms related to methanol oxidizers clearly indicated carbon transfer from methane oxidation to other soil microbes, which was enhanced by urea addition. The active growth of type Ia methanotrops was significantly stimulated by urea amendment, and the pronounced growth of methanol-oxidizing bacteria occurred in CH4-treated microcosms only upon urea amendment. Methane addition inhibited the growth of Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas in urea-amended microcosms, in addition of nitrite-oxidizing

  8. Carbon isotope fractionation by methane-oxidizing bacteria intropical rain forest soils

    SciTech Connect

    Teh, Yit Arn; Silver, Whendee L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Borglin,Sharon E.; Carlson, Charlotte M.

    2005-05-12

    Humid tropical forests have the potential to be significantsources or sinks of atmospheric methane (CH4), a radiatively importanttrace gas. Methane oxidation can consume a large fraction of the CH4produced in tropical soils, although controls on this process are poorlyunderstood. Using soil incubation experiments, we investigated theeffects of CH4 and oxygen (O2) concentrations on C isotope fractionationand CH4 oxidation in tropical rain forest soils. We also explored theeffects of these environmental variables on the isotope fractionationfactor for CH4 oxidation (alpha), which is widely used to evaluate therelative contributions of CH4 production and oxidation to the atmosphericCH4 pool. Methane oxidation was sensitive to CH4 at lower CH4concentrations (<850 ppmv) and insensitive to O2 concentrationsbetween 3 and 21 percent. Maximum rates of CH4 oxidation were between 8.2+- 1.2 and 11.3 +- 1.5 nmol CH4 hour-1 g dry soil-1. Measured values foralpha were sensitive to both CH4 oxidation rate and CH4 concentration.Alpha was inversely proportional to CH4 oxidation rate (r2 = 0.86, P<0.001) and positively correlated with CH4 concentration (r2 = 0.52, P<0.01). A multiple regression model that included CH4 oxidation rate,CH4 concentration, and the interaction of the two terms explained a highproportion of the variability in alpha (r2 = 0.94, P<0.0001). Thesedata suggest that it is possible to accurately determine alpha, allowingfor more precise estimates of CH4 oxidation by isotope massbalance.

  9. Direct methane solid oxide fuel cells based on catalytic partial oxidation enabling complete coking tolerance of Ni-based anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daehee; Myung, Jaeha; Tan, Jeiwan; Hyun, Sang-Hoon; Irvine, John T. S.; Kim, Joosun; Moon, Jooho

    2017-03-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) can oxidize diverse fuels by harnessing oxygen ions. Benefited by this feature, direct utilization of hydrocarbon fuels without external reformers allows for cost-effective realization of SOFC systems. Superior hydrocarbon reforming catalysts such as nickel are required for this application. However, carbon coking on nickel-based anodes and the low efficiency associated with hydrocarbon fueling relegate these systems to immature technologies. Herein, we present methane-fueled SOFCs operated under conditions of catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX). Utilizing CPOX eliminates carbon coking on Ni and facilitates the oxidation of methane. Ni-gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) anode-based cells exhibit exceptional power densities of 1.35 W cm-2 at 650 °C and 0.74 W cm-2 at 550 °C, with stable operation over 500 h, while the similarly prepared Ni-yttria stabilized zirconia anode-based cells exhibit a power density of 0.27 W cm-2 at 650 °C, showing gradual degradation. Chemical analyses suggest that combining GDC with the Ni anode prevents the oxidation of Ni due to the oxygen exchange ability of GDC. In addition, CPOX operation allows the usage of stainless steel current collectors. Our results demonstrate that high-performance SOFCs utilizing methane CPOX can be realized without deterioration of Ni-based anodes using cost-effective current collectors.

  10. Stereospecificity and physiology of co-oxidative production of chemicals by methanotrophic bacteria. [Methane monooxygenase:a2

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, R.L.; Hoefer, D.E.; Conrad, J.R.; Srivastava, V.J.; Akin, C.

    1991-01-01

    Methanotrophic bacteria can use methane as a sole source of carbon and energy. The enzyme responsible for the oxidation of methane in these organisms, methane monooxygenase, is also able to biotransform a number of substrates into industrially important chemicals. One such example is the oxidation of propylene to propylene oxide. Several strains of mesophilic and thermophilic methanotrophs have been tested for their ability to produce propylene oxide with formate, methanol, and methane as the co-oxidative substrates. Cultures in the late stationary phase were found to be more productive than exponentially growing cultures. Methane did not inhibit propylene epoxidation on low-density cultures; in fact, the yields of propylene oxide were greater when both methane and propylene were present than when only propylene was present. In higher-density cultures, however, methane did appear to inhibit oxidation of propylene. The effects of several culture parameters such as pH, temperature, and concentration of micronutrients on propylene oxide production ad steroespecificity were determined. Propylene oxide production was proportional to the amount of cell loading up to 14 g/L. Unwashed cells produced more propylene oxide than washed cells. The long- and short-term inhibitory effects of propylene oxide on the methanotrophic strains were also investigated. A tolerance of up to 1 M propylene oxide was observed, and the maximum inhibitory effect was seen within 30 minute. The steroespecificity for propylene oxide production and oxidation of 3-methylcyclohexene was determined for several strains. Methylosinus trichosporium (OB3b), particularly a cell-free extract of this strain, had the greatest steroespecificity. 13 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Copper(I)/ABNO-catalyzed aerobic alcohol oxidation: alleviating steric and electronic constraints of Cu/TEMPO catalyst systems.

    PubMed

    Steves, Janelle E; Stahl, Shannon S

    2013-10-23

    Cu/TEMPO catalyst systems promote efficient aerobic oxidation of sterically unhindered primary alcohols and electronically activated substrates, but they show reduced reactivity with aliphatic and secondary alcohols. Here, we report a catalyst system, consisting of ((MeO)bpy)Cu(I)(OTf) and ABNO ((MeO)bpy = 4,4'-dimethoxy-2,2'-bipyridine; ABNO = 9-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane N-oxyl), that mediates aerobic oxidation of all classes of alcohols, including primary and secondary allylic, benzylic, and aliphatic alcohols with nearly equal efficiency. The catalyst exhibits broad functional group compatibility, and most reactions are complete within 1 h at room temperature using ambient air as the source of oxidant.

  12. Development of Vanadium Phosphaate Catalysts for Methanol Production by Selective Oxidation of Methane.

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, R.L.

    1997-10-01

    This DOE sponsored study of methane partial oxidation was initiated at Amax Research and Development in Golden, CO in October of 1993. Shortly thereafter the management of Amax closed this R&D facility and the PI moved to the Colorado School of Mines. The project was begun again after contract transfer via a novation agreement. Experimental work began with testing of vandyl pyrophosphate (VPO), a well known alkane selective oxidation catalyst. It was found that VPO was not a selective catalyst for methane conversion yielding primarily CO. However, promotion of VPO with Fe, Cr, and other first row transition metals led to measurable yields for formaldehyde, as noted in the summary table. Catalyst characterization studies indicated that the role of promoters was to stabilize some of the vanadium in the V{sup 5+} oxidation state rather than the V{sup 4+} state formally expected for (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}.

  13. Predominant contribution of syntrophic acetate oxidation to thermophilic methane formation at high acetate concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hao, Li-Ping; Lü, Fan; He, Pin-Jing; Li, Lei; Shao, Li-Ming

    2011-01-15

    To quantify the contribution of syntrophic acetate oxidation to thermophilic anaerobic methanogenesis under the stressed condition induced by acidification, the methanogenic conversion process of 100 mmol/L acetate was monitored simultaneously by using isotopic tracing and selective inhibition techniques, supplemented with the analysis of unculturable microorganisms. Both quantitative methods demonstrated that, in the presence of aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens, a large percentage of methane (up to 89%) was initially derived from CO(2) reduction, indicating the predominant contribution of the syntrophic acetate oxidation pathway to acetate degradation at high acid concentrations. A temporal decrease of the fraction of hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis from more than 60% to less than 40% reflected the gradual prevalence of the aceticlastic methanogenesis pathway along with the reduction of acetate. This apparent discrimination of acetate methanization pathways highlighted the importance of the syntrophic acetate-oxidizing bacteria to initialize methanogenesis from high organic loadings.

  14. Release of ANP and fat oxidation in overweight persons during aerobic exercise in water.

    PubMed

    Fenzl, M; Schnizer, W; Aebli, N; Schlegel, C; Villiger, B; Disch, A; Gredig, J; Zaugg, T; Krebs, J

    2013-09-01

    Exercise in water compared to land-based exercise (LE) results in a higher release of natriuretic peptides, which are involved in the regulation of exercise-induced adipose tissue lipolysis. The present study was performed to compare the release of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and free fatty acids (FFA) during prolonged aerobic water-based exercise (WE) with the release after an identical LE. 14 untrained overweight subjects performed 2 steady state workload tests on the same ergometer in water and on land. Before and after exercise, venous blood samples were collected for measuring ANP, FFA, epinephrine, norepinephrine, insulin and glucose. The respiratory exchange ratio (RER) was determined for fat oxidation.The exercises resulted in a significant increase in ANP in LE (61%) and in WE (177%), and FFA increased about 3-fold in LE and WE with no significant difference between the groups. Epinephrine increased, while insulin decreased similarly in both groups. The RER values decreased during the exercises, but there was no significant difference between LE and WE. In conclusion, the higher ANP concentrations in WE had no additional effect on lipid mobilization, FFA release and fat oxidation. Moderate-intensity exercises in water offer no benefit regarding adipose tissue lipolysis in comparison to LE.

  15. Treatment of leather industry wastewater by aerobic biological and Fenton oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Tamal; Dasgupta, Dalia; Mandal, Subhasis; Datta, Siddhartha

    2010-08-15

    Degradation of leather industry wastewater by sole aerobic treatment incorporating Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, Fenton's reagents, and combined treatment was investigated in this study. The sole treatment by Fenton's oxidation involving the introduction of 6g FeSO(4) and 266 g H(2)O(2) in a liter of wastewater at pH of 3.5 and 30 degrees C for 30 min at batch conditions reduced COD, BOD(5), sulfide, total chromium and color up to 69%, 72%, 88%, 5%, 100% and T. ferrooxidans alone showed maximum reduction to an extent of 77, 80, 85, 52, 89, respectively, in 21 d treatment at pH 2.5, FeSO(4) 16 g/L and temperature of 30 degrees C. The combined treatment at batch conditions involving 30 min chemical treatment by Fenton's oxidation followed by 72 h biochemical treatment by T. ferrooxidans at batch conditions gave rise up to 93%, 98%, 72%, 62% and 100% removal efficiencies of COD, BOD, sulfide, chromium and color at pH of 2.5 and 30 degrees C. Decrease in photo absorption of the Fenton's reagent treated samples, as compared to the banks, at 280, 350 and 470 nm wave lengths was observed. This may be the key factor for stimulating the biodegradation by T. ferrooxidans.

  16. Onset of the aerobic nitrogen cycle during the Great Oxidation Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerkle, Aubrey L.; Poulton, Simon W.; Newton, Robert J.; Mettam, Colin; Claire, Mark W.; Bekker, Andrey; Junium, Christopher K.

    2017-02-01

    The rise of oxygen on the early Earth (about 2.4 billion years ago) caused a reorganization of marine nutrient cycles, including that of nitrogen, which is important for controlling global primary productivity. However, current geochemical records lack the temporal resolution to address the nature and timing of the biogeochemical response to oxygenation directly. Here we couple records of ocean redox chemistry with nitrogen isotope (15N/14N) values from approximately 2.31-billion-year-old shales of the Rooihoogte and Timeball Hill formations in South Africa, deposited during the early stages of the first rise in atmospheric oxygen on the Earth (the Great Oxidation Event). Our data fill a gap of about 400 million years in the temporal 15N/14N record and provide evidence for the emergence of a pervasive aerobic marine nitrogen cycle. The interpretation of our nitrogen isotope data in the context of iron speciation and carbon isotope data suggests biogeochemical cycling across a dynamic redox boundary, with primary productivity fuelled by chemoautotrophic production and a nitrogen cycle dominated by nitrogen loss processes using newly available marine oxidants. This chemostratigraphic trend constrains the onset of widespread nitrate availability associated with ocean oxygenation. The rise of marine nitrate could have allowed for the rapid diversification and proliferation of nitrate-using cyanobacteria and, potentially, eukaryotic phytoplankton.

  17. Onset of the aerobic nitrogen cycle during the Great Oxidation Event.

    PubMed

    Zerkle, Aubrey L; Poulton, Simon W; Newton, Robert J; Mettam, Colin; Claire, Mark W; Bekker, Andrey; Junium, Christopher K

    2017-02-23

    The rise of oxygen on the early Earth (about 2.4 billion years ago) caused a reorganization of marine nutrient cycles, including that of nitrogen, which is important for controlling global primary productivity. However, current geochemical records lack the temporal resolution to address the nature and timing of the biogeochemical response to oxygenation directly. Here we couple records of ocean redox chemistry with nitrogen isotope ((15)N/(14)N) values from approximately 2.31-billion-year-old shales of the Rooihoogte and Timeball Hill formations in South Africa, deposited during the early stages of the first rise in atmospheric oxygen on the Earth (the Great Oxidation Event). Our data fill a gap of about 400 million years in the temporal (15)N/(14)N record and provide evidence for the emergence of a pervasive aerobic marine nitrogen cycle. The interpretation of our nitrogen isotope data in the context of iron speciation and carbon isotope data suggests biogeochemical cycling across a dynamic redox boundary, with primary productivity fuelled by chemoautotrophic production and a nitrogen cycle dominated by nitrogen loss processes using newly available marine oxidants. This chemostratigraphic trend constrains the onset of widespread nitrate availability associated with ocean oxygenation. The rise of marine nitrate could have allowed for the rapid diversification and proliferation of nitrate-using cyanobacteria and, potentially, eukaryotic phytoplankton.

  18. Development of vanadium-phosphate catalysts for methanol production by selective oxidation of methane

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    The United States has vast natural gas reserves which could contribute significantly to our energy security if economical technologies for conversion to liquid fuels and chemicals were developed. Many of these reserves are small scale or in remote locations and of little value unless they can be transported to consumers. Transportation is economically performed via pipeline, but this route is usually unavailable in remote locations. Another option is to convert the methane in the gas to liquid hydrocarbons, such as methanol, which can easily and economically be transported by truck. Therefore, the conversion of methane to liquid hydrocarbons has the potential to decrease our dependence upon oil imports by opening new markets for natural gas and increasing its use in the transportation and chemical sectors of the economy. In this project, we are attempting to develop, and explore new catalysts capable of direct oxidation of methane to methanol. The specific objectives of this work are discussed.

  19. Potential methane production and oxidation in soil reclamation covers of an oil sands mining site in Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pum, Lisa; Reichenauer, Thomas; Germida, Jim

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenic activities create a number of significant greenhouse gases and thus potentially contribute to global warming. Methane production is significant in some agricultural production systems and from wetlands. In soil, methane can be oxidised by methanotrophic bacteria. However, little is known about methane production and oxidation in oil sand reclamation covers. The purpose of this study was to investigate methane production and oxidation potential of tailing sands and six different reclamation layers of oil sands mining sites in Alberta, Canada. Methane production and oxidation potential were investigated in laboratory scale microcosms through continuous headspace analysis using gas chromatography. Samples from a reclamation layer were collected at the Canadian Natural Resources Limited (CNRL) reclamation site at depths of 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm and 20-40 cm in October 2014. In addition, tailing sands provided by Suncor Energy Inc. and soil from a CNRL wetland were studied for methane production. Samples were dried, crushed and sieved to 4 mm, packed into serum bottle microcosms and monitored for eight weeks. Methane production potential was assessed by providing an anoxic environment and by adjusting the samples to a moisture holding capacity of 100 %. Methane oxidation potential was examined by an initial application of 2 vol % methane to the microcosms and by adjusting the samples to a moisture holding capacity of 50 %. Microcosm headspace gas was analysed for methane, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide and oxygen. All experiments were carried out in triplicates, including controls. SF6 and Helium were used as internal standards to detect potential leaks. Our results show differences for methane production potential between the soil depths, tailing sands and wetlands. Moreover, there were differences in the methane oxidation potential of substrate from the three depths investigated and between the reclamation layers. In conclusion, the present study shows that

  20. Subtropical freshwater storages: a major source of nitrous oxide and methane?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, Katrin; Grinham, Alistair; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2013-04-01

    Studies of greenhouse gas cycling in subtropical water bodies, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere, are very limited. This represents an important gap in our understanding of global emissions as the higher temperatures experienced in the subtropics will likely accelerate greenhouse gas production and consumption. Critical to understanding the net impact of these accelerated rates are detailed studies of representative systems within this region. In this paper we present a model artificial freshwater storage: Gold Creek Dam in South East Queensland, Australia. Freshwater storages are commonplace for drinking water and irrigation purposes in Australia as unpredictable rainfall patterns make river and ground water sources unreliable. Over 85 % of Australian rivers are modified with weirs and dams providing permanent inundation of previously terrestrial environments. The higher temperatures experienced at these latitudes drive thermal stratification of these systems as well as rapidly deoxygenate bottom waters. High organic matter availability in the sediment zone as well as the anoxic overlying water provide ideal conditions for reduced products (including methane and ammonia) from microbial processing to be formed and diffuse into bottom waters. A mid-water metalimnion is generally associated with large gradients in dissolved oxygen availability and reduced metabolites undergo oxidation prior to their emission from water surface. An intensive field study was undertaken to improve understanding of production and transformation rates of methane and nitrous oxide from the sediments, through the water column and to the atmosphere. Sediment nutrient (ammonia, nitrite/nitrate and filterable reactive phosphorus) and greenhouse gas (methane and nitrous oxide) porewater samples were collected at selected sites. To determine the magnitude of the benthic sediment contribution of methane and nitrous oxide to the water column sediment incubations were conducted in the

  1. Quantitative analysis of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments: A modeling perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnier, P.; Dale, A. W.; Arndt, S.; LaRowe, D. E.; Mogollón, J.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2011-05-01

    Recent developments in the quantitative modeling of methane dynamics and anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments are critically reviewed. The first part of the review begins with a comparison of alternative kinetic models for AOM. The roles of bioenergetic limitations, intermediate compounds and biomass growth are highlighted. Next, the key transport mechanisms in multi-phase sedimentary environments affecting AOM and methane fluxes are briefly treated, while attention is also given to additional controls on methane and sulfate turnover, including organic matter mineralization, sulfur cycling and methane phase transitions. In the second part of the review, the structure, forcing functions and parameterization of published models of AOM in sediments are analyzed. The six-orders-of-magnitude range in rate constants reported for the widely used bimolecular rate law for AOM emphasizes the limited transferability of this simple kinetic model and, hence, the need for more comprehensive descriptions of the AOM reaction system. The derivation and implementation of more complete reaction models, however, are limited by the availability of observational data. In this context, we attempt to rank the relative benefits of potential experimental measurements that should help to better constrain AOM models. The last part of the review presents a compilation of reported depth-integrated AOM rates (ΣAOM). These rates reveal the extreme variability of ΣAOM in marine sediments. The model results are further used to derive quantitative relationships between ΣAOM and the magnitude of externally impressed fluid flow, as well as between ΣAOM and the depth of the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ). This review contributes to an improved understanding of the global significance of the AOM process, and helps identify outstanding questions and future directions in the modeling of methane cycling and AOM in marine sediments.

  2. Mechanisms and controlling characteristics of the catalytic oxidation of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, Kamil; Simmons, Gary W.; Herman, Richard G.; Park, Kenneth T.; Hess, James S.; Hunsicker, Robert A.

    1999-07-01

    Methane dissociation and oxygen activation have been found to be structure sensitive on different single crystal palladium surfaces. Geometrically restricted surfaces on Pd single crystal and polycrystalline surfaces using tetrachloroethylene and pentamethylcyclopentasiloxane have been formed and compared with surface structures formed using dichloromethane and chlorine. The adsorption and activation of O{sub 2}, CO, and H{sub 2}O on clean Pd surfaces and those containing the surface ensembles have also been investigated. To interpret high-resolution angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectra (HR AR-XPS), a new self-modeling method of resolving HR-XPS spectra was developed and applied to the experimental spectra. The effects of electron-accepting Cl, O{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O adsobated on Cs/MoS{sub 2} were determined.

  3. Differential methane oxidation activity and microbial community composition at cold seeps in the Arctic off western Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gründger, Friederike; Svenning, Mette M.; Niemann, Helge; Silyakova, Anna; Serov, Pavel; Li Hong, Wei; Wegener, Gunter; Panieri, Giuliana; Carroll, JoLynn

    2016-04-01

    Most models considering climate change related bottom water warming suggest that gas hydrates may become destabilized, leading to the mobilization of methane into seabed and water column ecosystems, and, eventually, into the atmosphere. However, the capacity of methanotrophic microbes retaining methane in sediments and the hydrosphere is not well constrained. Here, we investigate the microbial utilization of methane in sediments and the water column, focusing on cold seeps discovered at the arctic continental margin of western Svalbard. We measured ex situ rates of methane oxidation and sulfate reduction in two active gas flare sites with different geological settings at the Vestnesa Ridge (1204 m water depth) and within a pingolike feature area southwest off Svalbard (PLF; 380 m water depth). Our results show contrarily situations at our two sampling sites: At Vestnesa Ridge we find high methane oxidation rates with values up to 2055 nmol cm-3 d-1 at the sediment surface where the sediments are oversaturated with methane. Whereas, methane concentration and oxidation rates are low in the overlying water column (2 pmol cm-3 d-1). In contrast, at the sediment surface at PLF methane concentration and oxidation rates are considerably lower (up to 1.8 nmol cm-3 d-1). While the overlying bottom water contains high concentration of methane and shows oxidation rates with values of up to 3.8 nmol cm-3 d-1. The data on methane oxidation and sulfate reduction activity are compared to the sediment geochemistry and to data from metagenomic analysis identifying the methanotrophic community composition. These results provide unique insight into the dynamic responses of the seabed biological filter at cold seeps in the Arctic off western Svalbard. This study is part of the Centre for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Environment and Climate and was supported by the Research Council of Norway through its Centres of Excellence funding scheme grant No. 223259.

  4. Anaerobic oxidation of methane alters sediment records of sulfur, iron and phosphorus in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, Matthias; Kraal, Peter; Jilbert, Tom; Sulu-Gambari, Fatimah; Sapart, Célia J.; Röckmann, Thomas; Slomp, Caroline P.

    2016-09-01

    The surface sediments in the Black Sea are underlain by extensive deposits of iron (Fe)-oxide-rich lake sediments that were deposited prior to the inflow of marine Mediterranean Sea waters ca. 9000 years ago. The subsequent downward diffusion of marine sulfate into the methane-bearing lake sediments has led to a multitude of diagenetic reactions in the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ), including anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate. While the sedimentary cycles of sulfur (S), methane and Fe in the SMTZ have been extensively studied, relatively little is known about the diagenetic alterations of the sediment record occurring below the SMTZ.Here we combine detailed geochemical analyses of the sediment and porewater with multicomponent diagenetic modeling to study the diagenetic alterations below the SMTZ at two sites in the western Black Sea. We focus on the dynamics of Fe, S and phosphorus (P), and demonstrate that diagenesis has strongly overprinted the sedimentary burial records of these elements. In line with previous studies in the Black Sea, we show that sulfate-mediated AOM substantially enhances the downward diffusive flux of sulfide into the deep limnic deposits. During this downward sulfidization, Fe oxides, Fe carbonates and Fe phosphates (e.g., vivianite) are converted to sulfide phases, leading to an enrichment in solid-phase S and the release of phosphate to the porewater. Below the sulfidization front, high concentrations of dissolved ferrous Fe (Fe2+) lead to sequestration of downward-diffusing phosphate as authigenic vivianite, resulting in a transient accumulation of total P directly below the sulfidization front.Our model results further demonstrate that downward-migrating sulfide becomes partly re-oxidized to sulfate due to reactions with oxidized Fe minerals, fueling a cryptic S cycle and thus stimulating slow rates of sulfate-driven AOM ( ˜ 1-100 pmol cm-3 d-1) in the sulfate-depleted limnic deposits. However, this process is

  5. Quantification of atmospheric methane oxidation in glacier forefields: Initial survey results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauer, Philipp A.; Schroth, Martin H.; Pinto, Eric A.; Zeyer, Josef

    2010-05-01

    The oxidation of CH4 by methanotrophic bacteria is the only known terrestrial sink for atmospheric CH4. Aerobic methanotrophs are active in soils and sediments under various environmental conditions. However, little is known about the activity and abundance of methanotrophs in pioneering ecosystems and their role in succession. In alpine environments, receding glaciers pose a unique opportunity to investigate soil development and ecosystem succession. In an initial survey during summer and autumn 2009 we probed several locations in the forefields of four glaciers in the Swiss Alps to quantify the turnover of atmospheric methane in recently exposed soils. Three glacier forefields (the Stein, Steinlimi and Tiefen) are situated on siliceous bedrock, while one (the Griessen) is situated on calcareous bedrock. We sampled soil air from different depths to generate CH4 concentration profiles for qualitative analysis. At selected locations we applied surface Gas Push-Pull Tests (GPPT) to estimate first-order rate coefficients of CH4 oxidation. The test consists of a controlled injection of the reactants CH4 and O2 and the tracer Ar into and out of the soil at the same location. A top-closed steel cylinder previously emplaced in the soil encloses the injected gas mixture to ensure sufficient reaction times. Rate coefficients can be derived from differences of reactant and tracer breakthrough curves. In one GPPT we employed 13C-CH4 and measured the evolution of δ13C of extracted CO2. To confirm rate coefficients obtained by GPPTs we estimated effective soil diffusivity from soil core samples and fitted a diffusion-consumption model to our profile data. A qualitative analysis of the concentration profiles showed little activity in the forefields on siliceous bedrock, with only one out of fifteen locations exhibiting substantially lower CH4 concentrations in the soil compared to the atmosphere. The surface GPPTs with conventional CH4 at the active location were not sensitive

  6. Catalytic Reaction Synthesis for the Partial Oxidation of Methane to Formaldehyde.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas-Galindo, Maria-Guadalupe

    Catalytic reaction synthesis for the partial oxidation of methane to formaldehyde has been studied by combining microkinetic analysis with molecular orbital calculations. This strategy is used to establish microscopic correlations between the structure and composition of the active site and the kinetic parameters of the reaction mechanism. Using atom clusters to represent the active site of transition metal oxide catalysts, the relationship was probed between coordination number, oxidation state, and ionization potential of the active cation and the reaction steps of methane activation and surface reactions leading to formaldehyde formation. The analysis suggests that in transition metal oxide catalysts, the d-band orbitals of the metal cation should be empty, since otherwise CO_2 formation from CO oxidation will be excessive. Furthermore, the transition metal oxide d-band must be located at sufficiently low energy that it may accept electrons during methane activation. Oxygen O- species, representing vacancies in the 2p cluster band, will favor methane activation. However, clusters with fully occupied 2p bands (O^ {2-}^ecies) will favor formaldehyde production. Such inferences illustrate how experimental and theoretical information already incorporated into an existing microkinetic model for the reaction over V _2O_5 and MoO _3 catalysts can be extended to describe the reaction over new materials in the search for more active and selective catalysts. Using parameters estimated from the molecular orbital calculations, microkinetic reaction simulations were also shown to be useful to identify reactor operating conditions that may favor the production of formaldehyde. The simulation can be used to identify key experiments necessary to test the performance of postulated catalytic materials. The economic evaluation of the process design sets important target goals for methane conversion and formaldehyde selectivity that a catalytic material must satisfy to create a new

  7. Techno-economic evaluation of the application of ozone-oxidation in a full-scale aerobic digestion plant.

    PubMed

    Chiavola, Agostina; D'Amato, Emilio; Gori, Riccardo; Lubello, Claudio; Sirini, Piero

    2013-04-01

    This paper deals with the application of the ozone-oxidation in a full scale aerobic sludge digester. Ozonation was applied continuously to a fraction of the biological sludge extracted from the digestion unit; the ozonated sludge was then recirculated to the same digester. Three different ozone flow rates were tested (60,500 and 670g O3 h(-1)) and their effects evaluated in terms of variation of the total and soluble fractions of COD, nitrogen and phosphorous, of total and volatile suspended solids concentrations and Sludge Volume Index in the aerobic digestion unit. During the 7-month operation of the ozonation process, it was observed an appreciable improvement of the aerobic digestion efficiency (up to about 20% under the optimal conditions) and of the sludge settleability properties. These results determined an average reduction of about 60% in the biological sludge extracted from the plant and delivered to final disposal. A thorough economic analysis showed that this reduction allowed to achieve a significant cost saving for the plant with respect to the previous years operated without ozonation. Furthermore, it was determined the threshold disposal cost above which implementation of the ozone oxidation in the aerobic digestion units of similar WWTPs becomes economically convenient (about 60€t(-1) of sludge).

  8. Mechanically-biologically treated municipal solid waste as a support medium for microbial methane oxidation to mitigate landfill greenhouse emissions.

    PubMed

    Einola, Juha-Kalle M; Karhu, A Elina; Rintala, Jukka A

    2008-01-01

    The residual fraction of mechanically-biologically treated municipal solid waste (MBT residual) was studied in the laboratory to evaluate its suitability and environmental compatibility as a support medium in methane (CH(4)) oxidative biocovers for the mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions from landfills. Two MBT residuals with 5 and 12 months total (aerobic) biological stabilisation times were used in the study. MBT residual appeared to be a favourable medium for CH(4) oxidation as indicated by its area-based CH(4) oxidation rates (12.2-82.3 g CH(4) m(-2) d(-1) at 2-25 degrees C; determined in CH(4)-sparged columns). The CH(4) oxidation potential (determined in batch assays) of the MBT residuals increased during the 124 d column experiment, from <1.6 to a maximum of 104 microg CH(4) g(dw)(-1) h(-1) (dw=dry weight) at 5 degrees C and 578 microg CH(4) g(dw)(-1) h(-1) at 23 degrees C. Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) production in MBT residual (<15 microg N(2)O kg(dw)(-1) d(-1) in the CH(4) oxidative columns) was at the lower end of the range of N(2)O emissions reported for landfills and non-landfill soils, and insignificant as a greenhouse gas source. Also, anaerobic gas production (25.6 l kg(dw)(-1) during 217 d) in batch assays was low, indicating biological stability of the MBT residual. The electrical conductivities (140-250 mS m(-1)), as well as the concentrations of zinc (3.0 mg l(-1)), copper (0.5 mg l(-1)), arsenic (0.3 mg l(-1)), nickel (0.1 mg l(-1)) and lead (0.1 mg l(-1)) in MBT residual eluates from a leaching test (EN-12457-4) with a liquid/solid (L/S) ratio of 10:1, suggest a potential for leachate pollutant emissions which should be considered in plans to utilise MBT residual. In conclusion, the laboratory experiments suggest that MBT residual can be utilised as a support medium for CH(4) oxidation, even at low temperatures, to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from landfills.

  9. Study of the Direct Oxidation of Methane in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, A Q

    2002-02-08

    significant simplification of the system, resulting in lower cost and higher system efficiency. To date, despite several recently published works, there is not a clear demonstration of the possibility to operate SOFCs directly on natural gas. The actual reactions that happen at the fuel cell anode are still not well understood. In this one-year project, we explored the possibility of direct methane oxidation in SOFCs.

  10. Anaerobic oxidation of methane by sulfate in hypersaline groundwater of the Dead Sea aquifer

    PubMed Central

    Avrahamov, N; Antler, G; Yechieli, Y; Gavrieli, I; Joye, S B; Saxton, M; Turchyn, A V; Sivan, O

    2014-01-01

    Geochemical and microbial evidence points to anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) likely coupled with bacterial sulfate reduction in the hypersaline groundwater of the Dead Sea (DS) alluvial aquifer. Groundwater was sampled from nine boreholes drilled along the Arugot alluvial fan next to the DS. The groundwater samples were highly saline (up to 6300 mm chlorine), anoxic, and contained methane. A mass balance calculation demonstrates that the very low δ13CDIC in this groundwater is due to anaerobic methane oxidation. Sulfate depletion coincident with isotope enrichment of sulfur and oxygen isotopes in the sulfate suggests that sulfate reduction is associated with this AOM. DNA extraction and 16S amplicon sequencing were used to explore the microbial community present and were found to be microbial composition indicative of bacterial sulfate reducers associated with anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) driving AOM. The net sulfate reduction seems to be primarily controlled by the salinity and the available methane and is substantially lower as salinity increases (2.5 mm sulfate removal at 3000 mm chlorine but only 0.5 mm sulfate removal at 6300 mm chlorine). Low overall sulfur isotope fractionation observed (34ε = 17 ± 3.5‰) hints at high rates of sulfate reduction, as has been previously suggested for sulfate reduction coupled with methane oxidation. The new results demonstrate the presence of sulfate-driven AOM in terrestrial hypersaline systems and expand our understanding of how microbial life is sustained under the challenging conditions of an extremely hypersaline environment. PMID:25039851

  11. Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation by microbial methane oxidation: Improved determination

    SciTech Connect

    Mahieu, Koenraad . E-mail: Koenraad.Mahieu@Ugent.be; Visscher, Alex De; Vanrolleghem, Peter A.; Cleemput, Oswald Van

    2006-07-01

    Isotope fractionation is a promising tool for quantifying methane oxidation in landfill cover soils. For good quantification an accurate determination of the isotope fractionation factor ({alpha}) of methane oxidation based on independent batch experiments with soil samples from the landfill cover is required. Most studies so far used data analysis methods based on approximations of the Rayleigh model to determine {alpha}. In this study, the two most common approximations were tested, the simplified Rayleigh approach and the Coleman method. To do this, the original model of Rayleigh was described in measurable variables, methane concentration and isotopic abundances, and fitted to batch oxidation data by means of a weighted non-linear errors-in-variables regression technique. The results of this technique were used as a benchmark to which the results of the two conventional approximations were compared. Three types of batch data were used: simulated data, data obtained from the literature, and data obtained from new batch experiments conducted in our laboratory. The Coleman approximation was shown to be acceptable but not recommended for carbon fractionation (error on {alpha} - 1 up to 5%) and unacceptable for hydrogen fractionation (error up to 20%). The difference between the simplified Rayleigh approach and the exact Rayleigh model is much smaller for both carbon and hydrogen fractionation (error on {alpha} - 1 < 0.05%). There is also a small difference when errors in both variables (methane concentration and isotope abundance) are accounted for instead of assuming an error-free independent variable. By means of theoretical calculations general criteria, not limited to methane, {sup 13}C, or D, were developed for the validity of the simplified Rayleigh approach when using labelled compounds.

  12. Diversity and methane oxidation of active epibiotic methanotrophs on live Shinkaia crosnieri

    PubMed Central

    Watsuji, Tomo-o; Yamamoto, Asami; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Ueda, Kenji; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Takai, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Shinkaia crosnieri is a galatheid crab that predominantly dwells in deep-sea hydrothermal systems in the Okinawa Trough, Japan. In this study, the phylogenetic diversity of active methanotrophs in the epibiotic microbial community on the setae of S. crosnieri was characterized by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of a functional gene (pmoA) encoding a subunit of particulate methane monooxygenase. Phylogenetic analysis of pmoA transcript sequences revealed that the active epibiotic methanotrophs on S. crosnieri setae consisted of gammaproteobacterial type Ia and Ib methanotrophs. The effect of different RNA stabilization procedures on the abundance of pmoA and 16S rRNA transcripts in the epibiotic community was estimated by quantitative RT-PCR. Our novel RNA fixation method performed immediately after sampling effectively preserved cellular RNA assemblages, particularly labile mRNA populations, including pmoA mRNA. Methane consumption in live S. crosnieri was also estimated by continuous-flow incubation under atmospheric and in situ hydrostatic pressures, and provided a clear evidence of methane oxidation activity of the epibiotic microbial community, which was not significantly affected by hydrostatic pressure. Our study revealed the significant ecological function and nutritional contribution of epibiotic methanotrophs to the predominant S. crosnieri populations in the Okinawa Trough deep-sea hydrothermal systems. In conclusion, our study gave clear facts about diversity and methane oxidation of active methanotrophs in the epibiotic community associated with invertebrates. PMID:24401859

  13. Species and temperature measurements of methane oxidation in a nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharge

    PubMed Central

    Lefkowitz, Joseph K; Guo, Peng; Rousso, Aric; Ju, Yiguang

    2015-01-01

    Speciation and temperature measurements of methane oxidation during a nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharge in a low-temperature flow reactor have been performed. Measurements of temperature and formaldehyde during a burst of pulses were made on a time-dependent basis using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, and measurements of all other major stable species were made downstream of a continuously pulsed discharge using gas chromatography. The major species for a stoichiometric methane/oxygen/helium mixture with 75% dilution are H2O, CO, CO2, H2, CH2O, CH3OH, C2H6, C2H4 and C2H2. A modelling tool to simulate homogeneous plasma combustion kinetics is assembled by combining the ZDPlasKin and CHEMKIN codes. In addition, a kinetic model for plasma-assisted combustion (HP-Mech/plasma) of methane, oxygen and helium mixtures has been assembled to simulate the measurements. Predictions can accurately capture reactant consumption as well as production of the major product species. However, significant disagreement is found for minor species, particularly CH2O and CH3OH. Further analysis revealed that the plasma-activated low-temperature oxidation pathways, particularly those involving CH3O2 radical reactions and methane reactions with O(1D), are responsible for this disagreement. PMID:26170433

  14. Mdodeling a nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation process: parameters identification and model evaluation.

    PubMed

    He, Zhanfei; Cai, Chen; Geng, Sha; Lou, Liping; Xu, Xiangyang; Zheng, Ping; Hu, Baolan

    2013-11-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) is a recently discovered process that is intermediated by n-damo bacteria that oxidize methane with nitrite to generate nitrogen gas. In this work, a kinetic model based on Monod type kinetics and diffusion-reaction model was developed to describe the bioprocess. Some key kinetic parameters needed in the model were obtained from a series of batch activity tests and a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) operation over 100 days. The growth rate, decay rate, methane affinity constant, nitrite affinity constant and inhibition constant were 0.0277±0.0022 d(-1), 0.00216±0.00010 d(-1), 0.092±0.005 mmol L(-1), 0.91±0.09 mmol L(-1) and 4.1±0.5 mmol L(-1) for n-damo bacteria at 30 °C, respectively. The results showed that the model could simulate actual performance of the SBR in the first 76 days, that methane was not a limiting factor at atmospheric pressure for its high affinity, and that the optimum nitrite concentration was 1.92 mmol L(-1).

  15. Influence of heavy metals on methane oxidation in tropical rice soils.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, S R; Bharati, K; Deepa, N; Rao, V R; Adhya, T K

    2000-11-01

    In a laboratory incubation study, the effect of select heavy metals on methane (CH4) oxidation in two rice soils was investigated under two moisture regimes. Heavy metals differed in their effect on CH4 oxidation in both soils under the two water regimes. Cr significantly inhibited CH4 oxidation in the alluvial soil at 60% moisture holding capacity, while Cu stimulated the process. On the contrary, Zn inhibited CH4 oxidation in both alluvial and laterite soils only under flooded conditions. Application of rice straw alleviated the inhibitory effect of heavy metals on CH4 oxidation and CO2 production. Inhibition of CH4 oxidation in the alluvial soil was related to the methanotrophic bacterial population in Cr- and Zn-amended alluvial soil.

  16. Permafrost Thaw Induces Methane Oxidation in Transitional Thaw Stages in a Subarctic Peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perryman, C. R.; Kashi, N. N.; Malhotra, A.; McCalley, C. K.; Varner, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    Rising temperatures in the subarctic are accelerating permafrost thaw and increasing methane (CH4) emissions from subarctic peatlands. Methanotrophs in these peatlands can consume/oxidize CH4, potentially mitigating CH4 emissions in these peatlands. Oxidation rates can exceed 90% of CH4 production in some settings, depending on O2 and CH4 availability and environmental conditions. Malhotra and Roulet identified 10 thaw stages in Stordalen Mire near Abisko, Sweden (68°21'N,18°49'E ) with variable vegetation, environmental conditions, and associated CH4 emissions. We investigated potential methane oxidation rates across these thaw stages. Peat cores were extracted from two depths at each stage and incubated in 350ml glass jars at in situ temperatures and CH4 concentrations. Headspace samples were collected from each incubation jar over a 48-hour period and analyzed for CH4 concentration using flame ionization detection gas chromatography (GC-FID). Oxidation rates ranged from <0.1 to 17 μg of CH4 per gram of dry biomass per day. Water table depth and pore water pH were the strongest environmental correlates of oxidation (sample size = 56, p < 0.001). The highest potential oxidation rates were observed in collapsing palsa sites and recently collapsed sedge-dominated open water sites near palsa mounds. Our results suggest that permafrost thaw induces high CH4 oxidation rates by creating conditions ideal for both methanogenic and methanotrophic microbial communities. Our results also reinforce the importance of incorporating transitional thaw stages in landscape level carbon budgets of thawing peatlands emphasized by Malhotra and Roulet. Forthcoming microbial analysis and stable isotope analysis will further elucidate the factors controlling methane oxidation rates at Stordalen Mire.

  17. Temperature response of methane oxidation and production potentials in peatland ecosystems across Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welti, Nina; Korrensalo, Aino; Kerttula, Johanna; Maljanen, Marja; Uljas, Salli; Lohila, Annalea; Laine, Anna; Vesala, Timo; Elliott, David; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina

    2016-04-01

    It has been suggested that the ecosystems located in the high latitudes are especially sensitive to warming. Therefore, we compared 14 peatland systems throughout Finland along a latitudinal gradient from 69°N to 61°N to examine the response of methane production and methane oxidation with warming climate. Peat samples were taken at the height of the growing season in 2015 from 0 - 10cm below the water table depth. The plant communities in sampling locations were described by estimating cover of each plant species and pH of water was measured. Upon return to the lab, we made two parallel treatments, under anoxic and oxic conditions in order to calculate the CH4 production and consumption potentials of the peat and used three temperatures, 4°C, 17.5°C, and 30°C to examine the temperature effect on the potentials. We hypothesized that there will be an observable response curve in CH4 production and oxidation relative to temperature with a greater response with increasing latitude. In general, increasing temperature increased the potential for CH4 production and oxidation, at some sites, the potential was highest at 17.5°C, indicating that there is an optimum temperature threshold for the in situ methane producing and oxidizing microbial communities. Above this threshold, the peat microbial communities are not able to cope with increasing temperature. This is especially noticeable for methane oxidation at sites above 62°N. As countries are being expected to adequately account for their greenhouse gas budgets with increasing temperature models, knowing where the temperature threshold exists is of critical importance.

  18. Improved enrichment culture technique for methane-oxidizing bacteria from marine ecosystems: the effect of adhesion material and gas composition.

    PubMed

    Vekeman, Bram; Dumolin, Charles; De Vos, Paul; Heylen, Kim

    2017-02-01

    Cultivation of microbial representatives of specific functional guilds from environmental samples depends largely on the suitability of the applied growth conditions. Especially the cultivation of marine methanotrophs has received little attention, resulting in only a limited number of ex situ cultures available. In this study we investigated the effect of adhesion material and headspace composition on the methane oxidation activity in methanotrophic enrichments obtained from marine sediment. Addition of sterilized natural sediment or alternatively the addition of acid-washed silicon dioxide significantly increased methane oxidation. This positive effect was attributed to bacterial adhesion on the particles via extracellular compounds, with a minimum amount of particles required for effect. As a result, the particles were immobilized, thus creating a stratified environment in which a limited diffusive gas gradients could build up and various microniches were formed. Such diffusive gas gradient might necessitate high headspace concentrations of CH4 and CO2 for sufficient concentrations to reach the methane-oxidizing bacteria in the enrichment culture technique. Therefore, high concentrations of methane and carbon dioxide, in addition to the addition of adhesion material, were tested and indeed further stimulated methane oxidation. Use of adhesion material in combination with high concentrations of methane and carbon dioxide might thus facilitate the cultivation and subsequent enrichment of environmentally important members of this functional guild. The exact mechanism of the observed positive effects on methane oxidation and the differential effect on methanotrophic diversity still needs to be explored.

  19. Remediation of a winery wastewater combining aerobic biological oxidation and electrochemical advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Francisca C; Boaventura, Rui A R; Brillas, Enric; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2015-05-15

    Apart from a high biodegradable fraction consisting of organic acids, sugars and alcohols, winery wastewaters exhibit a recalcitrant fraction containing high-molecular-weight compounds as polyphenols, tannins and lignins. In this context, a winery wastewater was firstly subjected to a biological oxidation to mineralize the biodegradable fraction and afterwards an electrochemical advanced oxidation process (EAOP) was applied in order to mineralize the refractory molecules or transform them into simpler ones that can be further biodegraded. The biological oxidation led to above 97% removals of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), but was inefficient on the degradation of a bioresistant fraction corresponding to 130 mg L(-1) of DOC, 380 mg O2 L(-1) of COD and 8.2 mg caffeic acid equivalent L(-1) of total dissolved polyphenols. Various EAOPs such as anodic oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (AO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF), UVA photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) and solar PEF (SPEF) were then applied to the recalcitrant effluent fraction using a 2.2 L lab-scale flow plant containing an electrochemical cell equipped with a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a carbon-PTFE air-diffusion cathode and coupled to a photoreactor with compound parabolic collectors (CPCs). The influence of initial Fe(2+) concentration and current density on the PEF process was evaluated. The relative oxidative ability of EAOPs increased in the order AO-H2O2 < EF < PEF ≤ SPEF. The SPEF process using an initial Fe(2+) concentration of 35 mg L(-1), current density of 25 mA cm(-2), pH of 2.8 and 25 °C reached removals of 86% on DOC and 68% on COD after 240 min, regarding the biologically treated effluent, along with energy consumptions of 45 kWh (kg DOC)(-1) and 5.1 kWh m(-3). After this coupled treatment, color, odor, COD, BOD5, NH4(+), NO3(-) and SO4(2-) parameters complied with the legislation targets and, in addition, a total

  20. Does dissolved organic carbon regulate biological methane oxidation in semiarid soils?

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Benjamin W; Selmants, Paul C; Hart, Stephen C

    2013-07-01

    In humid ecosystems, the rate of methane (CH4 ) oxidation by soil-dwelling methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) is controlled by soil texture and soil water holding capacity, both of which limit the diffusion of atmospheric CH4 into the soil. However, it remains unclear whether these same mechanisms control CH4 oxidation in more arid soils. This study was designed to measure the proximate controls of potential CH4 oxidation in semiarid soils during different seasons. Using a unique and well-constrained 3-million-year-old semiarid substrate age gradient, we were able to hold state factors constant while exploring the relationship between seasonal potential CH4 oxidation rates and soil texture, soil water holding capacity, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). We measured unexpectedly higher rates of potential CH4 oxidation in the wet season than the dry season. Although other studies have attributed low CH4 oxidation rates in dry soils to desiccation of MOB, we present several lines of evidence that this may be inaccurate. We found that soil DOC concentration explained CH4 oxidation rates better than soil physical factors that regulate the diffusion of CH4 from the atmosphere into the soil. We show evidence that MOB facultatively incorporated isotopically labeled glucose into their cells, and MOB utilized glucose in a pattern among our study sites that was similar to wet-season CH4 oxidation rates. This evidence suggests that DOC, which is utilized by MOB in other environments with varying effects on CH4 oxidation rates, may be an important regulator of CH4 oxidation rates in semiarid soils. Our collective understanding of the facultative use of DOC by MOB is still in its infancy, but our results suggest it may be an important factor controlling CH4 oxidation in soils from dry ecosystems.

  1. NATURAL EMISSIONS OF NON-METHANE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS, CARBON MONOXIDE, AND OXIDES OF NITROGEN FROM NORTH AMERICA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The magnitudes, distributions, controlling processes and uncertainties associated with North American natural emissions of oxidant precursors are reviewed. Natural emissions are repsonsible for a major portion of the compounds, including non-methane volatile organic compounds (N...

  2. Stable isotope tracing of anaerobic methane oxidation in the gassy sediments of Eckernfoerde Bay, German Baltic Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, C.S.; Albert, D.B.; Alperin, M.J.

    1999-07-01

    Methane concentrations in the pore waters of Eckernfoerde Bay in the German Baltic Sea generally reach gas bubble saturation values within the upper meter of the sediment column. The depth at which saturation occurs is controlled by a balance between rates of methane production, consumption (oxidation), and transport. The relative importance of anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) in controlling dissolved and gas bubble methane distributions in the bay's sediments is indirectly revealed through methane concentration versus depth profiles, depth variations in the stable C and H isotope composition of methane, and the C isotope composition of total dissolved inorganic carbon ({Sigma}CO{sub 2}). Direct radiotracer measurements indicate that AMO rates of over 15 mM/yr are focused at the base of the sulfate reduction zone. Diagenetic equations that describe the depth destructions of the {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}D values of methane reproduce isotopic shifts observed throughout the methane oxidation zone and are best fit with kinetic isotope fractionation factors of 1.012 {+-} 0.001 and 1.120 {plus{underscore}minus} 0.020 respectively.

  3. Methane oxidation and abundance of methane oxidizers in tropical agricultural soil (vertisol) in response to CuO and ZnO nanoparticles contamination.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Santosh Ranjan; Rajput, Parul; Kollah, Bharati; Chourasiya, Dipanti; Tiwari, Archana; Singh, Muneshwar; Rao, A Subba

    2014-06-01

    There is worldwide concern over the increase use of nanoparticles (NPs) and their ecotoxicological effect. It is not known if the annual production of tons of industrial nanoparticles (NPs) has the potential to impact terrestrial microbial communities, which are so necessary for ecosystem functioning. Here, we have examined the consequences of adding the NPs particularly the metal oxide (CuO, ZnO) on CH4 oxidation activity in vertisol and the abundance of heterotrophs, methane oxidizers, and ammonium oxidizers. Soil samples collected from the agricultural field located at Madhya Pradesh, India, were incubated with either CuO and ZnO NPs or ionic heavy metals (CuCl2, ZnCl2) separately at 0, 10, and 20 μg g(-1) soil. CH4 oxidation activity in the soil samples was estimated at 60 and 100 % moisture holding capacity (MHC) in order to link soil moisture regime with impact of NPs. NPs amended to soil were highly toxic for the microbial-mediated CH4 oxidation, compared with the ionic form. The trend of inhibition was Zn 20 > Zn 10 > Cu 20 > Cu 10. NPs delayed the lag phase of CH4 oxidation to a maximum of 4-fold and also decreased the apparent rate constant k up to 50 % over control. ANOVA and Pearson correlation analysis (α = 0.01) revealed significant impact of NPs on the CH4 oxidation activity and microbial abundance (p < 0.0001, and high F statistics). Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that PC1 (metal concentration) rendered 76.06 % of the total variance, while 18.17 % of variance accounted by second component (MHC). Biplot indicated negative impact of NPs on CH4 oxidation and microbial abundance. Our result also confirmed that higher soil moisture regime alleviates toxicity of NPs and opens new avenues of research to manage ecotoxicity and environmental hazard of NPs.

  4. Biomass burning sources of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and non-methane hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Atherton, C.S.

    1995-11-01

    Biomass burning is an important source of many key tropospheric species, including aerosols, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub {times}}=NO+NO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), methyl bromide (CH{sub 3}Br), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and other species. These emissions and their subsequent products act as pollutants and affect greenhouse warming of the atmosphere. One important by-product of biomass burning is tropospheric ozone, which is a pollutant that also absorbs infrared radiation. Ozone is formed when CO, CH{sub 4}, and NMHCs react in the presence of NO{sub {times}} and sunlight. Ozone concentrations in tropical regions (where the bulk of biomass burning occurs) may increase due to biomass burning. Additionally, biomass burning can increase the concentration of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), a key component of acid rain.

  5. Deposition of biogenic iron minerals in a methane oxidizing microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Wrede, Christoph; Kokoschka, Sebastian; Dreier, Anne; Heller, Christina; Reitner, Joachim; Hoppert, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The syntrophic community between anaerobic methanotrophic archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria forms thick, black layers within multi-layered microbial mats in chimney-like carbonate concretions of methane seeps located in the Black Sea Crimean shelf. The microbial consortium conducts anaerobic oxidation of methane, which leads to the formation of mainly two biomineral by-products, calcium carbonates and iron sulfides, building up these chimneys. Iron sulfides are generated by the microbial reduction of oxidized sulfur compounds in the microbial mats. Here we show that sulfate reducing bacteria deposit biogenic iron sulfides extra- and intracellularly, the latter in magnetosome-like chains. These chains appear to be stable after cell lysis and tend to attach to cell debris within the microbial mat. The particles may be important nuclei for larger iron sulfide mineral aggregates.

  6. [Enhanced Resistance of Pea Plants to Oxidative: Stress Caused by Paraquat during Colonization by Aerobic Methylobacteria].

    PubMed

    Agafonova, N V; Doronina, N Y; Trotsenko, Yu A

    2016-01-01

    The influence of colonization of the pea (Pisum sativum L.) by aerobic methylobacteria of five different species (Methylophilus flavus Ship, Methylobacterium extorquens G10, Methylobacillus arboreus Iva, Methylopila musalis MUSA, Methylopila turkiensis Sidel) on plant resistance to paraquat-induced stresses has been studied. The normal conditions of pea colonization by methylobacteria were characterized by a decrease in the activity of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidases) and in the concentrations of endogenous H2O2, proline, and malonic dialdehyde, which is a product of lipid peroxidation and indicator of damage to plant cell membranes, and an increase in the activity of the photosynthetic apparatus (the content of chlorophylls a, b and carotenoids). In the presence of paraquat, the colonized plants had higher activities of antioxidant enzymes, stable photosynthetic indices, and a less intensive accumulation of the products of lipid peroxidation as compared to noncolonized plants. Thus, colonization by methylobacteria considerably increased the adaptive protection of pea plants to the paraquat-induced oxidative stress.

  7. Praseodymium incorporated AIPO-5 molecular sieves for aerobic oxidation of ethylbenzene.

    PubMed

    Sundaravel, B; Babu, C M; Palanisamy, B; Palanichamy, M; Shanthi, K; Murugesan, V

    2013-04-01

    PrAlPO-5 with (Al + P)/Pr ratios of 25, 50, 75 and 100 molecular sieves were successfully synthesized by hydrothermal method. These molecular sieves were characterised using XPS, TPD-NH3, ex-situ pyridine adsorbed IR, TPR, TGA, 27Al and 31P MAS-NMR and ESR studies. The incorporation of praseodymium in the framework of AlPO-5 was confirmed by XRD, DRS UV-vis and 27Al and 31P MAS-NMR analysis. ESR spectrum showed the presence of adsorbed oxygen. The nature and strength of acid sites were identified by ex-situ pyridine adsorbed IR and TPD-NH3. The BET surface area was found to be in the range of 238-272 m2 g(-1). The catalytic activity of the molecular sieves was tested for the liquid phase aerobic oxidation of ethylbenzene. Acetophenone was found to be the major product with more than 90% ethylbenzene conversion. ICP-OES analysis revealed the presence of praseodymium intact in the framework of AlPO-5 up to five cycles.

  8. Evaluating the relative contribution of methane oxidation to methane emissions from young floodplain soils under Alternative Irrigation Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierreux, Sofie; Verhoeven, Elizabeth; Akter, Masuda; Sleutel, Steven; Said-Pullicino, Daniel; Romani, Marco; Boeckx, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    rates were alike between CF and AWD fields, except at 52 DAS, when 5cm and 25cm depth CH4 oxidation capacities from CF soil slurries exceeded those under AWD. This could firstly be explained by higher observed soil solution CH4 concentrations of CF paddies, while in mid-season dissolved CH4 was nearly absent in case of AWD. We hypothesize that a larger methanotrophic biomass was present in the CF fields, explaining the higher CH4 oxidation potential, but this requires verification by qPCR. In addition, higher NH4+ concentrations were measured under CF, which as well might have favored methanotrophic activity. Ongoing analysis of stable isotope ratios (12C/13C) in both atmospheric and subsurface gas samples will complement the specific inhibitor-based CH4 oxidation estimates. Currently, the dataset assembled during this field experiment will be used to fine-tune the biogeochemical model 'rice DNDC' (DeNitrification-DeComposition) with specific attention to DNDC's capability to simulate CH4 oxidation and depth profiles . The model revision will take into account the seasonal and depth differentiated behavior of parameters relevant to the processes of CH4 oxidation, production and emission, and hence contribute to a more precise estimation of methane emissions under AIM.

  9. Methane catalytic combustion on Pd9/gamma-Al2O3 with different degrees of Pd oxidation.

    PubMed

    Czekaj, Izabela; Kacprzak, Katarzyna A; Mantzaras, John

    2013-01-01

    This research is focused on the analysis of adsorbed CH4 intermediates at oxidized Pd9 nanoparticles supported on gamma-alumina. From first-principle density functional theory (DFT) calculations, several configurations, charge transfer and electronic density of states have been analyzed in order to determine feasible paths for the oxidation process. Furthermore methane oxidation cycles have been investigated on Pd nanoparticles with different degrees of oxidation. In case of low oxidized Pd nanoparticles, activation of methane is observed, whereby hydrogen from methane is adsorbed at one oxygen atom. This reaction is exothermic. In a subsequent step, two water molecules desorb. Additionally, a very interesting structural effect becomes evident; Pd-carbide formation, which is also an exothermic reaction. Furthermore, oxidation of such carbidized Pd-nanoparticles leads to CO2 formation, which is an endothermic reaction. One important result is that the support is involved in the CO2 formation. A different mechanism of methane oxidation was discovered for highly oxidized Pd nanoparticles. When the Pd nanoparticle is more strongly exposed to oxidative conditions, adsorption of methane is also possible, but it leads to carbonic acid production at the interface between the Pd nanoparticles and support. This process is endothermic.

  10. On the relationship between methane production and oxidation by anaerobic methanotrophic communities from cold seeps of the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Orcutt, Beth; Samarkin, Vladimir; Boetius, Antje; Joye, Samantha

    2008-05-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in the marine subsurface is a significant sink for methane in the environment, yet our understanding of its regulation and dynamics is still incomplete. Relatively few groups of microorganisms consume methane in subsurface environments--namely the anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME clades 1, 2 and 3), which are phylogenetically related to methanogenic archaea. Anaerobic oxidation of methane presumably proceeds via a 'reversed' methanogenic pathway. The ANME are generally associated with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfate is the only documented final electron acceptor for AOM in marine sediments. Our comparative study explored the coupling of AOM with sulfate reduction (SR) and methane generation (MOG) in microbial communities from Gulf of Mexico cold seep sediments that were naturally enriched with methane and other hydrocarbons. These sediments harbour a variety of ANME clades and SRB. Following enrichment under an atmosphere of methane, AOM fuelled 50-100% of SR, even in sediment slurries containing petroleum-associated hydrocarbons and organic matter. In the presence of methane and sulfate, the investigated microbial communities produce methane at a small fraction ( approximately 10%) of the AOM rate. Anaerobic oxidation of methane, MOG and SR rates decreased significantly with decreasing concentration of methane, and in the presence of the SR inhibitor molybdate, but reacted differently to the MOG inhibitor 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES). The addition of acetate, a possible breakdown product of petroleum in situ and a potential intermediate in AOM/SR syntrophy, did not suppress AOM activity; rather acetate stimulated microbial activity in oily sediment slurries.

  11. Remote Sensing of Nitrous Oxide and Methane Using Emission Lines of a CO Overtone Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionin, A. A.; Klimachev, Yu. M.; Kozlov, A. Yu.; Kotkov, A. A.; Romanovskii, O. A.; Kharchenko, O. V.; Yakovlev, S. V.

    2014-05-01

    We have conducted laboratory experiments on remote sensing of methane in the 3.440 μm region and nitrous oxide in the 3.877 μm region, using emission lines of a CO overtone laser in the differential absorption method. We present the results of measurements of absorption and extinction of the emission lines from an CO overtone laser in the region of selected sensing wavelengths in mixtures with the analyte gases for different experimental configurations.

  12. Catalytic partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas over a ruthenium catalyst: the role of the oxidation state.

    PubMed

    Rabe, Stefan; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Vogel, Frédéric

    2007-03-28

    The catalytic partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas over ruthenium catalysts was investigated by thermogravimetry coupled with infrared spectroscopy (TGA-FTIR) and in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). It was found that the oxidation state of the catalyst influences the product formation. On oxidized ruthenium sites, carbon dioxide was formed. The reduced catalyst yielded carbon monoxide as a product. The influence of the temperature was also investigated. At temperatures below the ignition point of the reaction, the catalyst was in an oxidized state. At temperatures above the ignition point, the catalyst was reduced. This was also confirmed by the in situ XAS spectroscopy. The results indicate that both a direct reaction mechanism as well as a combustion-reforming mechanism can occur. The importance of knowing the oxidation state of the surface is discussed and a method to determine it under reaction conditions is presented.

  13. Vertical distribution of methane oxidation and methanotrophic response to elevated methane concentrations in stratified waters of the Arctic fjord Storfjorden (Svalbard, Norway)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mau, S.; Blees, J.; Helmke, E.; Niemann, H.; Damm, E.

    2013-10-01

    The bacterially mediated aerobic methane oxidation (MOx) is a key mechanism in controlling methane (CH4) emissions from the world's oceans to the atmosphere. In this study, we investigated MOx in the Arctic fjord Storfjorden (Svalbard) by applying a combination of radio-tracer-based incubation assays (3H-CH4 and 14C-CH4), stable C-CH4 isotope measurements, and molecular tools (16S rRNA gene Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting, pmoA- and mxaF gene analyses). Storfjorden is stratified in the summertime with melt water (MW) in the upper 60 m of the water column, Arctic water (ArW) between 60 and 100 m, and brine-enriched shelf water (BSW) down to 140 m. CH4 concentrations were supersaturated with respect to the atmospheric equilibrium (about 3-4 nM) throughout the water column, increasing from ∼20 nM at the surface to a maximum of 72 nM at 60 m and decreasing below. MOx rate measurements at near in situ CH4 concentrations (here measured with 3H-CH4 raising the ambient CH4 pool by <2 nM) showed a similar trend: low rates at the sea surface, increasing to a maximum of ∼2.3 nM day-1 at 60 m, followed by a decrease in the deeper ArW/BSW. In contrast, rate measurements with 14C-CH4 (incubations were spiked with ∼450 nM of 14C-CH4, providing an estimate of the CH4 oxidation at elevated concentration) showed comparably low turnover rates (<1 nM day-1) at 60 m, and peak rates were found in ArW/BSW at ∼100 m water depth, concomitant with increasing 13C values in the residual CH4 pool. Our results indicate that the MOx community in the surface MW is adapted to relatively low CH4 concentrations. In contrast, the activity of the deep-water MOx community is relatively low at the ambient, summertime CH4 concentrations but has the potential to increase rapidly in response to CH4 availability. A similar distinction between surface and deep-water MOx is also suggested by our molecular analyses. The DGGE banding patterns of 16S rRNA gene

  14. Landfill methane oxidation response to vegetation, fertilization, and liming

    SciTech Connect

    Hilger, H.A.; Wollum, A.G.; Barlaz, M.A.

    2000-02-01

    Landfills are the fourth largest global source and the largest US source (USDOE, 1997) of anthropogenic CH{sub 4} emissions. Since gram-for-gram, CH{sub 4} has 21 times the 100-yr global-warming potential of CO{sub 2} (USEPA, 1990). CH{sub 4} release into the atmosphere has important implications for global climate change. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of vegetation, N fertilizers, and lime addition on landfill CH{sub 4} oxidation. Columns filled with compacted sandy loam and sparged with synthetic landfill gas were used to simulate a landfill cover. Grass-topped and bare-soil columns reduced inlet CH{sub 4} by 47 and 37%, respectively, at peak uptake; but the rate for both treatments was about 18% at steady state. Nitrate and NH{sub 4} amendments induced a more rapid onset of CH{sub 4} oxidation relative to KCl controls. However, at steady state, NH{sub 4} inhibited CH{sub 4} oxidation in bare columns but not in grassed columns. Nitrate addition produced no inhibitory effects. Lime addition to the soil consistently enhanced CH{sub 4} oxidation. In all treatments, CH{sub 4} consumption increased to a peak value, then declined to a lower steady-state value; and all gassed columns developed a pH gradient. Neither nutrient depletion nor protozoan grazing could explain the decline from peak oxidation levels. Ammonium applied to grassed cover soil can cause transient reductions in CH{sub 4} uptake, but there is no evidence that the inhibition persists. The ability of vegetation to mitigate NH{sub 4} inhibition indicates that results from bare-soil tests may not always generalize to vegetated landfill caps.

  15. Breaking methane

    PubMed Central

    Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2015-01-01

    The most powerful oxidant found in nature is compound Q, an enzymatic intermediate that oxidizes methane. New spectroscopic data have resolved the long-running controversy about Q’s chemical structure. PMID:25607367

  16. Flexible bacterial strains that oxidize arsenite in anoxic or aerobic conditions and utilize hydrogen or acetate as alternative electron donors.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Freire, Lucía; Sun, Wenjie; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2012-02-01

    Arsenic is a carcinogenic compound widely distributed in the groundwater around the world. The fate of arsenic in groundwater depends on the activity of microorganisms either by oxidizing arsenite