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Sample records for aerobic radiation response

  1. Aerobic response to exercise of the fastest land crab.

    PubMed

    Full, R J; Herreid, C F

    1983-04-01

    To view the aerobic response to exercise, the ghost crab Ocypode guadichaudii was run in a treadmill respirometer at three velocities (0.13, 0.19, and 0.28 km/h) while oxygen consumption (VO2) was monitored. A steady-state VO2 that increased linearly with velocity was attained. VO2 transient periods at the beginning and end of exercise were extremely rapid with half times from 50 to 150 s. The magnitude of oxygen deficit and debt were small and both showed increases with an increase in velocity. Oxygen debt was measured at each velocity after 4-, 10-, and 20-min exercise bouts. No change in the magnitude of oxygen debt was observed with respect to exercise duration. Maximal VO2 was 11.9 times the average resting VO2. Oxygen uptake kinetics have shown only very sluggish and reduced rates in five other more sedentary crab species previously tested. The aerobic response pattern observed in the present study is more comparable to that of exercising mammals and highly aerobic ectothermic vertebrates. This suggests that the ghost crab meets the energy demand of sustained exercise by aerobic ATP production in contrast to many other crab species.

  2. Radiation-induced changes in nucleoid halo diameteres of aerobic and hypoxic SF-126 human brain tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Basu, H.S.; Hu, L.; Feuerstein, B.G.; Deen, D.F.

    1995-02-01

    Nucleoid halo diameters were measured to assay changes in DNA supercoiling in human brain tumor cell line SF-126 after irradiation under aerobic or hypoxic conditions. In unirradiated aerobic cells, a typical propidium iodide titration curve showed that with increasing concentrations of propodium iodide, the halo diameter increased and then decreased with the unwinding and subsequent rewinding of DNA supercoils. In irradiated cells, the rewinding of DNA supercoils was inhibited, resulting in an increased halo diameter, in a radiation dose-dependent manner. To produce equal increases in halo diameter required about a threefold higher radiation dose in hypoxic cells than in aerobic cells. Quantitatively similiar differences in the radiation sensitivities of hypoxic and aerobic cells were demonstrated by a colony-forming efficiency assay. These findings suggest that the nucleoid halo assay may be used as a rapid measure of the inherent radiation sensitivity of human tumors. 22 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Active Female Maximal and Anaerobic Threshold Cardiorespiratory Responses to Six Different Water Aerobics Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antunes, Amanda H.; Alberton, Cristine L.; Finatto, Paula; Pinto, Stephanie S.; Cadore, Eduardo L.; Zaffari, Paula; Kruel, Luiz F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Maximal tests conducted on land are not suitable for the prescription of aquatic exercises, which makes it difficult to optimize the intensity of water aerobics classes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the maximal and anaerobic threshold cardiorespiratory responses to 6 water aerobics exercises. Volunteers performed 3 of the…

  4. Oxidative stress, radiation-adaptive responses, and aging.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yuri

    2004-09-01

    Organisms living in an aerobic environment were forced to evolve effective cellular strategies to detoxify reactive oxygen species. Besides diverse antioxidant enzymes and compounds, DNA repair enzymes, and disassembly systems, which remove damaged proteins, regulation systems that control transcription, translation, and activation have also been developed. The adaptive responses, especially those to radiation, are defensive regulation mechanisms by which oxidative stress (conditioning irradiation) elicits a response against damage because of subsequent stress (challenging irradiation). Although many researchers have investigated these molecular mechanisms, they remain obscure because of their complex signaling pathways and the involvement of various proteins. This article reviews the factors concerned with radiation-adaptive response, the signaling pathways activated by conditioning irradiation, and the effects of aging on radiation-adaptive response. The proteomics approach is also introduced, which is a useful method for studying stress response in cells.

  5. Change in energy expenditure and physical activity in response to aerobic and resistance exercise programs.

    PubMed

    Drenowatz, Clemens; Grieve, George L; DeMello, Madison M

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is considered an important component of a healthy lifestyle but there remains controversy on effects of exercise on non-exercise physical activity (PA). The present study examined the prospective association of aerobic and resistance exercise with total daily energy expenditure and PA in previously sedentary, young men. Nine men (27.0 ± 3.3 years) completed two 16-week exercise programs (3 exercise sessions per week) of aerobic and resistance exercise separated by a minimum of 6 weeks in random order. Energy expenditure and PA were measured with the SenseWear Mini Armband prior to each intervention as well as during week 1, week 8 and week 16 of the aerobic and resistance exercise program. Body composition was measured via dual x-ray absorptiometry. Body composition did not change in response to either exercise intervention. Total daily energy expenditure on exercise days increased by 443 ± 126 kcal/d and 239 ± 152 kcal/d for aerobic and resistance exercise, respectively (p < 0.01). Non-exercise moderate-to-vigorous PA, however, decreased on aerobic exercise days (-148 ± 161 kcal/d; p = 0.03). There was no change in total daily energy expenditure and PA on non-exercise days with aerobic exercise while resistance exercise was associated with an increase in moderate-to-vigorous PA during non-exercise days (216 ± 178 kcal/d, p = 0.01). Results of the present study suggest a compensatory reduction in PA in response to aerobic exercise. Resistance exercise, on the other hand, appears to facilitate non-exercise PA, particularly on non-exercise days, which may lead to more sustainable adaptations in response to an exercise program.

  6. Aerobic fitness in women and responses to lower body negative pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Mary Anne Bassett; Mathes, Karen L.; Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe

    1987-01-01

    The role of tolerance to orthostatic stress in the maintenance of high aerobic fitness in women was investigated by examining the responses of heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, Heather index of contractility, arterial pressure, peripheral resistance, change in calf circumference, and thoracic impedance of healthy female subjects to lower body negative pressure (LBNP) applied for 5 min at -50 mm Hg or until a subject became presyncopal. The testing protocol involved a stepwise reduction in pressure and consisted of two parts: an LBNP test in supine position followed by a treadmill test to peak aerobic capacity. Women were found to exhibit the same response pattern to LBNP as was previously reported by Convertino et al. (1984) for men. The results do not support the hypothesis that orthostatic tolerance in women is inversely related to aerobic fitness, as demonstrated by a finding that the peak aerobic capacity of subjects who became presyncopal did not differ from the peak of the tolerant subjects, and that hemodynamic responses to LBNPL were not a function of aerobic capacity.

  7. Cardiac autonomic responses at onset of exercise: effects of aerobic fitness.

    PubMed

    D'Agosto, T; Peçanha, T; Bartels, R; Moreira, D N; Silva, L P; Nóbrega, A C L; Lima, J R P

    2014-09-01

    Analyzes of cardiac autonomic responses at the initial transient of exercise have been used for the investigation of the cardiovascular health. We evaluated the influence of aerobic fitness on HR and HRV responses at the onset of exercise. 25 male subjects (22.3±2.4 years) were divided into 2 groups: 'low aerobic fitness' (36.2±2.6ml.kg(-1).min(-1); n=10) and 'high aerobic fitness' (46.4±5.0ml.kg(-1).min(-1); n=15). The experimental session consisted of assessing the beat-to-beat HR at rest and during submaximal exercise. The autonomic responses at the onset of exercise were calculated by fitting the HR and HRV (rMSSD-index) curves during the initial 300s of exercise into a first-order exponential equation. The time constant of HR and of the rMSSD index (τonHR and τonrMSSD) were calculated for analysis. We observed lower values of τonrMSSD in the high aerobic fitness group compared to the low aerobic fitness group (26.8±5s vs. 38.0±18s, respectively; p=0.02). The τonHR (42.0±15 vs. 49.3±26s, p=0.38) for the groups showed no difference. Aerobic fitness partially influenced the autonomic responses during exercise, since individuals with higher fitness showed faster decreases in beat-to-beat HRV at the onset of exercise.

  8. Effect of beetroot juice supplementation on aerobic response during swimming.

    PubMed

    Pinna, Marco; Roberto, Silvana; Milia, Raffaele; Marongiu, Elisabetta; Olla, Sergio; Loi, Andrea; Migliaccio, Gian Mario; Padulo, Johnny; Orlandi, Carmine; Tocco, Filippo; Concu, Alberto; Crisafulli, Antonio

    2014-01-29

    The beneficial effects of beetroot juice supplementation (BJS) have been tested during cycling, walking, and running. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether BJS can also improve performance in swimmers. Fourteen moderately trained male master swimmers were recruited and underwent two incremental swimming tests randomly assigned in a pool during which workload, oxygen uptake (VO₂), carbon dioxide production (VCO₂), pulmonary ventilation (VE), and aerobic energy cost (AEC) of swimming were measured. One was a control swimming test (CSW) and the other a swimming test after six days of BJS (0.5 l/day organic beetroot juice containing about 5.5 mmol of NO₃⁻). Results show that workload at anaerobic threshold was significantly increased by BJS as compared to the CSW test (6.3 ± 1 and 6.7 ± 1.1 kg during the CSW and the BJS test respectively). Moreover, AEC was significantly reduced during the BJS test (1.9 ± 0.5 during the SW test vs. 1.7 ± 0.3 kcal·kg⁻¹1·h⁻¹ during the BJS test). The other variables lacked a statistically significant effect with BJS. The present investigation provides evidence that BJS positively affects performance of swimmers as it reduces the AEC and increases the workload at anaerobic threshold.

  9. Effect of Beetroot Juice Supplementation on Aerobic Response during Swimming

    PubMed Central

    Pinna, Marco; Roberto, Silvana; Milia, Raffaele; Marongiu, Elisabetta; Olla, Sergio; Loi, Andrea; Migliaccio, Gian Mario; Padulo, Johnny; Orlandi, Carmine; Tocco, Filippo; Concu, Alberto; Crisafulli, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The beneficial effects of beetroot juice supplementation (BJS) have been tested during cycling, walking, and running. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether BJS can also improve performance in swimmers. Fourteen moderately trained male master swimmers were recruited and underwent two incremental swimming tests randomly assigned in a pool during which workload, oxygen uptake (VO2), carbon dioxide production (VCO2), pulmonary ventilation (VE), and aerobic energy cost (AEC) of swimming were measured. One was a control swimming test (CSW) and the other a swimming test after six days of BJS (0.5l/day organic beetroot juice containing about 5.5 mmol of NO3−). Results show that workload at anaerobic threshold was significantly increased by BJS as compared to the CSW test (6.3 ± 1 and 6.7 ± 1.1 kg during the CSW and the BJS test respectively). Moreover, AEC was significantly reduced during the BJS test (1.9 ± 0.5 during the SW test vs. 1.7 ± 0.3 kcal·kg−1·h−1 during the BJS test). The other variables lacked a statistically significant effect with BJS. The present investigation provides evidence that BJS positively affects performance of swimmers as it reduces the AEC and increases the workload at anaerobic threshold. PMID:24481133

  10. Method of enhancing radiation response of radiation detection materials

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven D.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a method of increasing radiation response of a radiation detection material for a given radiation signal by first pressurizing the radiation detection material. Pressurization may be accomplished by any means including mechanical and/or hydraulic. In this application, the term "pressure" includes fluid pressure and/or mechanical stress.

  11. EFFECTS OF AEROBIC CONDITIONING ON CARDIOVASCULAR SYMPATHETIC RESPONSE TO AND RECOVERY FROM CHALLENGE

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, M; Alex, C; Shapiro, PA; McKinley, PS; Brondolo, EN; Myers, MM; Choi, CJ; Lopez-Pintado, S; Sloan, RP

    2013-01-01

    Objective Exercise has widely-documented cardioprotective effects but the mechanisms behind these effects are still poorly understood. Here, we test the hypothesis that aerobic training lowers cardiovascular sympathetic responses to and speeds recovery from challenge. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled trial contrasting aerobic versus strength training on indices of cardiac (pre-ejection period, PEP) and vascular (low-frequency blood pressure variability, LF-BPV) sympathetic responses to and recovery from psychological and orthostatic challenge in 149 young, healthy and sedentary adults. Results Aerobic and strength training did not alter PEP or LF-BPV reactivity to or recovery from challenge. Conclusions These findings, from a large randomized controlled trial using an intent-to-treat design, show that moderate aerobic exercise training has no effect on PEP and LF BPV reactivity to or recovery from psychological or orthostatic challenge. In healthy young adults, the cardioprotective effects of exercise training are unlikely to be mediated by changes in sympathetic activity. PMID:23889039

  12. Aerobic exercise reduces neuronal responses in food reward brain regions.

    PubMed

    Evero, Nero; Hackett, Laura C; Clark, Robert D; Phelan, Suzanne; Hagobian, Todd A

    2012-05-01

    Acute exercise suppresses ad libitum energy intake, but little is known about the effects of exercise on food reward brain regions. After an overnight fast, 30 (17 men, 13 women), healthy, habitually active (age = 22.2 ± 0.7 yr, body mass index = 23.6 ± 0.4 kg/m(2), Vo(2peak) = 44.2 ± 1.5 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) individuals completed 60 min of exercise on a cycle ergometer or 60 min of rest (no-exercise) in a counterbalanced, crossover fashion. After each condition, blood oxygen level-dependent responses to high-energy food, low-energy food, and control visual cues, were measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging. Exercise, compared with no-exercise, significantly (P < 0.005) reduced the neuronal response to food (high and low food) cues vs. control cues in the insula (-0.37 ± 0.13 vs. +0.07 ± 0.18%), putamen (-0.39 ± 0.10 vs. -0.10 ± 0.09%), and rolandic operculum (-0.37 ± 0.17 vs. 0.17 ± 0.12%). Exercise alone significantly (P < 0.005) reduced the neuronal response to high food vs. control and low food vs. control cues in the inferior orbitofrontal cortex (-0.94 ± 0.33%), insula (-0.37 ± 0.13%), and putamen (-0.41 ± 0.10%). No-exercise alone significantly (P < 0.005) reduced the neuronal response to high vs. control and low vs. control cues in the middle (-0.47 ± 0.15%) and inferior occipital gyrus (-1.00 ± 0.23%). Exercise reduced neuronal responses in brain regions consistent with reduced pleasure of food, reduced incentive motivation to eat, and reduced anticipation and consumption of food. Reduced neuronal response in these food reward brain regions after exercise is in line with the paradigm that acute exercise suppresses subsequent energy intake.

  13. Genetic Influences on Physiological and Subjective Responses to an Aerobic Exercise Session among Sedentary Adults

    PubMed Central

    Karoly, Hollis C.; Stevens, Courtney J.; Magnan, Renee E.; Harlaar, Nicole; Hutchison, Kent E.; Bryan, Angela D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether genetic variants suggested by the literature to be associated with physiology and fitness phenotypes predicted differential physiological and subjective responses to a bout of aerobic exercise among inactive but otherwise healthy adults. Method. Participants completed a 30-minute submaximal aerobic exercise session. Measures of physiological and subjective responding were taken before, during, and after exercise. 14 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that have been previously associated with various exercise phenotypes were tested for associations with physiological and subjective response to exercise phenotypes. Results. We found that two SNPs in the FTO gene (rs8044769 and rs3751812) were related to positive affect change during exercise. Two SNPs in the CREB1 gene (rs2253206 and 2360969) were related to change in temperature during exercise and with maximal oxygen capacity (VO2 max). The SLIT2 SNP rs1379659 and the FAM5C SNP rs1935881 were associated with norepinephrine change during exercise. Finally, the OPRM1 SNP rs1799971 was related to changes in norepinephrine, lactate, and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) during exercise. Conclusion. Genetic factors influence both physiological and subjective responses to exercise. A better understanding of genetic factors underlying physiological and subjective responses to aerobic exercise has implications for development and potential tailoring of exercise interventions. PMID:22899923

  14. The use of ozone, ozone plus UV radiation, and aerobic microorganisms in the purification of some agro-industrial wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Benitez, F Javier; Acero, Juan L; Gonzalez, Teresa; Garcia, Juan

    2002-08-01

    The oxidation of the pollutant organic matter present in wastewaters generated during different stages in the black table-olive industry was investigated by using ozone alone or combined with UV radiation; by using aerobic microorganisms; and finally, by aerobic degradation of the previously ozonated wastewaters. In the ozonation processes, the removal of substrate (COD) and aromatic compounds, the decreases in BOD5 and pH, and the ozone consumed in the reaction were evaluated. A kinetic study was conducted that led to the evaluation of the stoichiometric ratio for the chemical reaction, as well as the rate constants for the substrate reduction and ozone disappearance. In the single aerobic degradation treatment, the evolution of substrate and biomass was monitored during the process, and a kinetic study was performed by applying the Contois model to the experimental data, giving the specific biokinetic constant, the cell yield coefficient, and the rate constant for the microorganism death phase. Finally, a combined process was performed, consisting in the aerobic degradation of pre-ozonated wastewaters, and the effect of such chemical pretreatment on the substrate removal and kinetic parameters of the later biological stage is discussed.

  15. Hemodynamic responses are reduced with aerobic compared with resistance blood flow restriction exercise.

    PubMed

    May, Anthony K; Brandner, Christopher R; Warmington, Stuart A

    2017-02-01

    The hemodynamics of light-load exercise with an applied blood-flow restriction (BFR) have not been extensively compared between light-intensity, BFR, and high-intensity forms of both resistance and aerobic exercise in the same participant population. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to use a randomized crossover design to examine the hemodynamic responses to resistance and aerobic BFR exercise in comparison with a common high-intensity and light-intensity non-BFR exercise. On separate occasions participants completed a leg-press (resistance) or treadmill (aerobic) trial. Each trial comprised a light-intensity bout (LI) followed by a light-intensity bout with BFR (80% resting systolic blood pressure (LI+BFR)), then a high-intensity bout (HI). To characterize the hemodynamic response, measures of cardiac output, stroke volume, heart rate and blood pressure were taken at baseline and exercise for each bout. Exercising hemodynamics for leg-press LI+BFR most often resembled those for HI and were greater than LI (e.g. for systolic blood pressure LI+BFR = 152 ± 3 mmHg; HI = 153 ± 3; LI = 143 ± 3 P < 0.05). However, exercising hemodynamics for treadmill LI+BFR most often resembled those for LI and were lower than HI (e.g. for systolic pressure LI+BFR = 124 ± 2 mmHg; LI = 123 ± 2; HI = 140 ± 3 P < 0.05). In conclusion, the hemodynamic response for light aerobic (walking) BFR exercise suggests this mode of BFR exercise may be preferential for chronic use to develop muscle size and strength, and other health benefits in certain clinical populations that are contraindicated to heavy-load resistance exercise.

  16. Trace metal pyritization variability in response to mangrove soil aerobic and anaerobic oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Machado, W; Borrelli, N L; Ferreira, T O; Marques, A G B; Osterrieth, M; Guizan, C

    2014-02-15

    The degree of iron pyritization (DOP) and degree of trace metal pyritization (DTMP) were evaluated in mangrove soil profiles from an estuarine area located in Rio de Janeiro (SE Brazil). The soil pH was negatively correlated with redox potential (Eh) and positively correlated with DOP and DTMP of some elements (Mn, Cu and Pb), suggesting that pyrite oxidation generated acidity and can affect the importance of pyrite as a trace metal-binding phase, mainly in response to spatial variability in tidal flooding. Besides these aerobic oxidation effects, results from a sequential extraction analyses of reactive phases evidenced that Mn oxidized phase consumption in reaction with pyrite can be also important to determine the pyritization of trace elements. Cumulative effects of these aerobic and anaerobic oxidation processes were evidenced as factors affecting the capacity of mangrove soils to act as a sink for trace metals through pyritization processes.

  17. Aerobic Fitness and Response Variability in Preadolescent Children Performing a Cognitive Control Task

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chien-Ting; Pontifex, Matthew B.; Raine, Lauren B.; Chaddock, Laura; Voss, Michelle W.; Kramer, Arthur F.; Hillman, Charles H.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the relationship between aerobic fitness and cognitive variability in preadolescent children. METHOD Forty-eight preadolescent children (25 males, 23 females, mean age = 10.1 years) were grouped into higher- and lower-fit groups according to their performance on a test of aerobic capacity (VO2max). Cognitive function was measured via behavioral responses to a modified flanker task. The distribution in reaction time was calculated within each participant to assess intra-individual variability of performance. Specifically, the standard deviation and coefficient variation of reaction time were used to represent cognitive variability. RESULTS Preadolescent children, regardless of fitness, exhibited longer reaction time, increased response variability, and decreased response accuracy to incongruent compared to congruent trials. Further, higher-fit children were less variable in their response time and more accurate in their responses across conditions of the flanker task, while no group differences were observed for response speed. CONCLUSION These findings suggest that fitness is associated with better cognitive performance during a task that varies cognitive control demands, and extends this area of research to suggest that intra-individual variability may be a useful measure to examine the relationship between fitness and cognition during preadolescence. PMID:21443340

  18. Cardiovascular Fitness and Energy Expenditure Response during a Combined Aerobic and Circuit Weight Training Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Benito, Pedro J.; Alvarez-Sánchez, María; Díaz, Víctor; Morencos, Esther; Peinado, Ana B.; Cupeiro, Rocio

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The present study describes the oxygen uptake and total energy expenditure (including both aerobic and anaerobic contribution) response during three different circuit weight training (CWT) protocols of equivalent duration composed of free weight exercises, machine exercises, and a combination of free weight exercises intercalating aerobic exercise. Design Controlled, randomized crossover designs. Methods Subjects completed in a randomized order three circuit weight training protocols of the same duration (3 sets of 8 exercises, 45min 15s) and intensity (70% of 15 repetitions maximum). The circuit protocols were composed of free weight exercises, machine exercises, or a combination of free weight exercises with aerobic exercise. Oxygen consumption and lactate concentration were measured throughout the circuit to estimate aerobic and anaerobic energy expenditure respectively. Results Energy expenditure is higher in the combined exercise protocol (29.9±3.6 ml/kg/min), compared with Freeweight (24.2±2.8ml/kg/min) and Machine (20.4±2.9ml/kg/min). The combined exercise protocol produced the highest total energy expenditure but the lowest lactate concentration and perceived exertion. The anaerobic contribution to total energy expenditure was higher in the machine and free weight protocols compared with the combined exercise protocol (6.2%, 4.6% and 2.3% respectively). Conclusions In the proposed protocols, the combined exercise protocol results in the highest oxygen consumption. Total energy expenditure is related to the type of exercise included in the circuit. Anaerobic contributions to total energy expenditure during circuit weight training may be modest, but lack of their estimation may underestimate total energy expenditure. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01116856 PMID:27832062

  19. Rats selectively bred for differences in aerobic capacity have similar hypertensive responses to chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Amanda L; Andrade, Mary Ann; Herrera-Rosales, Myrna; Britton, Steven L; Koch, Lauren G; Toney, Glenn M

    2013-08-01

    Exposure to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is an animal model that mimics the repetitive bouts of hypoxemia experienced by humans with sleep apnea. Rats exposed to CIH develop hypertension that depends on the activation of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). Since obesity and metabolic syndrome have been linked to neurogenic hypertension and sleep apnea, and because sleep apnea can adversely affect aerobic exercise capacity, we tested the hypothesis that rats bred for selection of low aerobic capacity running (LCR) would have a greater hypertensive response to CIH than rats bred for high aerobic capacity running (HCR). Blockade of ganglionic transmission was performed to compare the contribution of SNA to the maintenance of resting mean arterial pressure (MAP). Next, hypertensive responses to 7 days of CIH were compared across LCR and HCR rats (14-16 mo old). Finally, the contribution of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) to the maintenance of SNA and hypertension after CIH was determined and compared across groups. Although LCR rats were less active and had greater body weights than HCR rats, resting MAP, the contribution of ongoing SNA to the maintenance of MAP, and hypertensive responses to CIH were similar between groups. Contrary to our hypothesis, chemical inhibition of the PVN with muscimol (1 mmol/100 nl) caused a larger fall of MAP in HCR rats than in LCR rats. We conclude that LCR rats do not have resting hypertension or an exaggerated hypertensive response to CIH. Interestingly, the maintenance of CIH hypertension in LCR rats compared with HCR rats appears less reliant on ongoing PVN neuronal activity.

  20. Responses to LBNP in men with varying profiles of strength and aerobic capacity: Implications for flight crews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.; Mathes, Karen L.; Lasley, Mary L.; Tomaselli, Clare Marie; Frey, Mary Anne Bassett; Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe

    1993-01-01

    Hemodynamic and hormonal responses to lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) were examined in 24 healthy men to test the hypothesis that responsiveness of reflex control of blood pressure during orthostatic stress is associated with strength and/or aerobic capacity. Subjects underwent treadmill tests to determine peak oxygen uptake (peak VO2) and isokinetic dynamo meter tests to determine leg strength. Based on predetermined criteria, the subjects were classified into one of four fitness profiles of six subjects each matched for age, height, and weight: (1) low strength/low aerobic fitness; (2) low strength/high aerobic fitness; (3) high strength/low aerobic fitness; and (4) high strength/high aerobic fitness. Following 90 min of 6 degree head-down tilt (HDT), each subject underwent graded LBNP through -50 mmHg or presyncope, with maximal duration 15 min. All groups exhibited typical hemodynamic, hormonal, and fluid shift responses during LBNP, with no intergroup differences except for catecholamines. Seven subjects, distributed among the four fitness profiles, became presyncopal. Subjects who showed greatest reduction in mean arterial pressure (MAP) during LBNP had greater elevations in vasopressin and lesser increases in heart rate and peripheral resistance. Peak VO2 nor leg strength were correlated with fall in MAP or with syncopal episodes. We conclude that neither aerobic nor strength fitness characteristics are good predictors of responses to LBNP stress.

  1. Costimulation endows immunotherapeutic CD8 T cells with IL-36-responsiveness during aerobic glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Tsurutani, Naomi; Mittal, Payal; St Rose, Marie-Clare; Ngoi, Soo Mun; Svedova, Julia; Treadway, Forrest B.; Laubenbacher, Reinhard; Suárez-Ramírez, Jenny E.; Cauley, Linda S.; Adler, Adam J.; Vella, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    CD134 and CD137 primed CD8 T cells mount powerful effector responses upon recall, but even without recall these dual costimulated T cells respond to signal 3 cytokines like IL-12. We searched for alternative signal 3 receptor pathways and found the IL-1 family member IL-36R. While IL-36 alone did not stimulate effector CD8 T cells, in combination with IL-12, or more surprisingly IL-2, induced striking and rapid TCR-independent IFN-γ synthesis. To understand how signal 3 responses functioned in dual costimulated T cells we showed that IL-2 induced IL-36R gene expression in a JAK/STAT dependent manner. These data help delineate a sequential stimulation process where IL-2 conditioning must precede IL-36 for IFN-γ synthesis. Importantly, this responsive state was transient, and functioned only in effector T cells capable of aerobic glycolysis. Specifically, as the effector T cells metabolized glucose and consumed O2, they also retained potential to respond through IL-36R. This suggests that T cells use innate receptor pathways like the IL-36R-axis when programmed for aerobic glycolysis. To explore a function for IL-36R in vivo we showed that dual costimulation therapy reduced B16 melanoma tumor growth while increasing IL-36R gene expression. In sum, cytokine therapy to eliminate tumors may target effector T cells, even outside of TCR specificity, as long as the effectors are in the correct metabolic state. PMID:26573834

  2. Hemodynamic and hormonal responses to lower body negative pressure in men with varying profiles of strength and aerobic power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Mathes, K. L.; Lasley, M. L.; Tomaselli, C. M.; Frey, M. A.; Hoffler, G. W.

    1993-01-01

    Hemodynamic, cardiac, and hormonal responses to lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) were examined in 24 healthy men to test the hypothesis that responsiveness of reflex control of blood pressure during orthostatic challenge is associated with interactions between strength and aerobic power. Subjects underwent treadmill tests to determine peak oxygen uptake (VO2max) and isokinetic dynamometer tests to determine knee extensor strength. Based on predetermined criteria, subjects were classified into one of four fitness profiles of six subjects each, matched for age, height, and body mass: (a) low strength/average aerobic fitness, (b) low strength/high aerobic fitness, (c) high strength/average aerobic fitness, and (d) high strength/high aerobic fitness. Following 90 min of 0.11 rad (6 degrees) head-down tilt (HDT), each subject underwent graded LBNP to -6.7 kPa or presyncope, with maximal duration 15 min, while hemodynamic, cardiac, and hormonal responses were measured. All groups exhibited typical hemodynamic, hormonal, and fluid shift responses during LBNP, with no intergroup differences between high and low strength characteristics. Subjects with high aerobic power exhibited greater (P < 0.05) stroke volume and lower (P < 0.05) heart rate, vascular peripheral resistance, and mean arterial pressure during rest, HDT, and LBNP. Seven subjects, distributed among the four fitness profiles, became presyncopal. These subjects showed greatest reduction in mean arterial pressure during LBNP, had greater elevations in vasopressin, and lesser increases in heart rate and peripheral resistance. Neither VO2max nor leg strength were associated with fall in arterial pressure or with syncopal episodes. We conclude that interactions between aerobic and strength fitness characteristics do not influence responses to LBNP challenge.

  3. Responses of trace elements to aerobic maximal exercise in elite sportsmen.

    PubMed

    Otag, Aynur; Hazar, Muhsin; Otag, Ilhan; Gürkan, Alper Cenk; Okan, Ilyas

    2014-02-21

    Trace elements are chemical elements needed in minute quantities for the proper growth, development, and physiology of the organism. In biochemistry, a trace element is also referred to as a micronutrient. Trace elements, such as nickel, cadmium, aluminum, silver, chromium, molybdenum, germanium, tin, titanium, tungsten, scandium, are found naturally in the environment and human exposure derives from a variety of sources, including air, drinking water and food. The Purpose of this study was investigated the effect of aerobic maximal intensity endurance exercise on serum trace elements as well-trained individuals of 28 wrestlers (age (year) 19.64±1.13, weight (Kg) 70.07 ± 15.69, height (cm) 176.97 ± 6.69) during and after a 2000 meter Ergometer test protocol was used to perform aerobic (75 %) maximal endurance exercise. Trace element serum levels were analyzed from blood samples taken before, immediately after and one hour after the exercise. While an increase was detected in Chromium (Cr), Nickel (Ni), Molybdenum (Mo) and Titanium (Ti) serum levels immediately after the exercise, a decrease was detected in Aluminum (Al), Scandium (Sc) and Tungsten (W) serum levels. Except for aluminum, the trace elements we worked on showed statistically meaningful responses (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001). According to the responses of trace elements to the exercise showed us the selection and application of the convenient sport is important not only in terms of sportsman performance but also in terms of future healthy life plans and clinically.

  4. A randomized 9-month study of blood pressure and body fat responses to aerobic training versus combined aerobic and resistance training in older men.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Nelson; Mendes, Romeu; Abrantes, Catarina; Sampaio, Jaime; Oliveira, José

    2013-08-01

    This randomized study evaluated the impact of different exercise training modalities on blood pressure and body fat responses in apparently healthy older men. Forty-eight elderly men (aged 65-75 years) were randomly assigned to an aerobic training group (ATG, n=15), a combined aerobic and resistance training group (CTG, n=16), or a control group (n=17). Both exercise training programs were moderate-to-vigorous intensity, three days/week for 9-months. Strength, aerobic endurance, body fat and blood pressure were measured on five different occasions. The data were analyzed using a mixed-model ANOVA, and the independence between systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and group was tested. A significant main effect of group (p<0.001) was observed in strength and aerobic endurance, with higher performance observed in the CTG. A significant main effect of group (p<0.001) and time (p=0.029) was observed in body fat percentage, with a 2.3% decrease in CTG. A significant main effect of time was observed in SBP (p=0.005) and in DBP (p=0.011) for both ATG and CTG. Mean decreases in SBP and DBP, respectively, were 15 and 6 mmHg for ATG and 24 and 12 mmHg for CTG. There was a significant association for SBP (p=0.008) and DBP (p=0.005) in the CTG, with significant individual BP profile modifications. Both exercise-training programs reduce resting blood pressure. However, only the combined exercise training was effective at reducing body fat percentage; consequently, there were larger changes in blood pressure, which result in a significant reduction in hypertensive subjects.

  5. Circulating inflammatory miRNA signature in response to different doses of aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    de Gonzalo-Calvo, David; Dávalos, Alberto; Montero, Ana; García-González, Ángela; Tyshkovska, Iryna; González-Medina, Antonio; Soares, Sara M A; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Casas-Agustench, Patricia; Rabadán, Manuel; Díaz-Martínez, Ángel E; Úbeda, Natalia; Iglesias-Gutiérrez, Eduardo

    2015-07-15

    While moderate acute exercise has been associated with strong anti-inflammatory mechanisms, strenuous exercise has been linked to deleterious inflammatory perturbations. It is therefore fundamental to elucidate the mechanisms that regulate the exercise-induced inflammatory cascade. Information on novel regulators such as circulating inflammatory microRNAs (c-inflammamiRs) is incomplete. In this study, we evaluated the response of a panel of c-inflammamiRs to different doses of acute aerobic exercise. We first studied the exercise-induced inflammatory cascade in serum samples of nine active middle-aged males immediately before and after (0 h, 24 h, 72 h) 10-km, half-marathon, and marathon races. Next, we analyzed the circulating profile of 106 specific c-inflammamiRs immediately before) and after (0 h, 24 h) 10-km (low inflammatory response) and marathon (high inflammatory response) races. Analysis of classical inflammatory parameters revealed a dose-dependent effect of aerobic exercise on systemic inflammation, with higher levels detected after marathon. We observed an increase in miR-150-5p immediately after the 10-km race. Levels of 12 c-inflammamiRs were increased immediately after the marathon (let-7d-3p, let-7f-2-3p, miR-125b-5p, miR-132-3p, miR-143-3p, miR-148a-3p, miR-223-3p, miR-223-5p, miR-29a-3p, miR-34a-5p, miR-424-3p, and miR-424-5p). c-inflammamiRs returned to basal levels after 24 h. Correlation and in silico analyses supported a close association between the observed c-inflammamiR pattern and regulation of the inflammatory process. In conclusion, we found that different doses of acute aerobic exercise induced a distinct and specific c-inflammamiR response, which may be associated with control of the exercise-induced inflammatory cascade. Our findings point to c-inflammamiRs as potential biomarkers of exercise-induced inflammation, and hence, exercise dose.

  6. Combined radiation-protective and radiation-sensitizing agents. II. Radiosensitivity of hypoxic or aerobic Chinese hamster fibroblasts in the presence of cysteamine and misonidazole: implications for the oxygen effect (with Appendix on calculation of dose-modifying factors. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, C.J.; Howell, R.L.

    1981-08-01

    Experiments have been done to test whether a hypoxic cell radiosensitizing agent (misonidazole) can be combined with a radioprotecting agent (cysteamine) to equalize partially the radiation response of hypoxic and aerobic mammalian cells in tissue culture. The results indicate that cysteamine will protect against the radiosensitization of a hypoxic cell sensitizing drug (2.5 mM misonidazole) at much lower concentration than it will protect against the radiosensitization of oxygen (350 ..mu..M). Thus the addition of a radiation-protective drug tends to cancel the drug benefit of the radiosensitizer and therefore increases the differential response of hypoxic and aerobic cells rather than equalizing this response. The data suggest that even in situations where tumor tissue absorbs far less radioprotective drug than normal tissue (e.g., WR 2721), one might expect difficulties with the simultaneous administration of radiosensitizing and radioprotecting drugs.

  7. Effects of aerobic exercise in early evening on the following nocturnal sleep and its haemodynamic response.

    PubMed

    Miura, Akira; Myouken, Shizuka; Yamada, Masako; Fujihara, Chizuko; Miura, Kouhei; Kashima, Hideaki; Eguchi, Kouhei; Endo, Masako Y; Koga, Shunsaku; Fukuba, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    We determined effect of aerobic exercise in early evening on the quality, quantity, and haemodynamic response of subsequent nocturnal sleep in the home. Ten healthy young participants performed two protocols, with/without cycle ergometer exercise (60 min at 50% heart rate reserve) in early evening. Blood pressure (BP) (Holter) and physical activity (accelerometer) were measured from late afternoon of day 1 until noon of next day (day 2). Additionally, at bedtime participants were equipped with a small device worn on the wrist that identified sleep stage. There were no substantial differences in objective indices of sleep between two protocols (total sleep time: 438 ± 76 vs. 457 ± 64 min; P > 0.10). BP during nocturnal sleep tended to be lowered by prior exercise (MAP: 71 ± 5 vs. 68 ± 6 mmHg; P = 0.08). Aerobic exercise in early evening apparently has no acute effect on sleep per se, but seems to have a residual effect on haemodynamics, i.e. prolongation of post-exercise hypotension.

  8. Electroencephalographic responses to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    GARCIA, J; BUCHWALD, N A; BACH-Y-RITA, G; FEDER, B H; KOELLING, R A

    1963-04-19

    Electroencephalographic recordings made from chronically implanted cortical electrodes indicate that ionizing radiation has an immediate effect upon brain wave patterns. X-rays delivered at the rate of 0.2 roentgen per second produce an arousal effect resembling that which occurs as a result of stimulation through peripheral receptor systems.

  9. The radiative heating response to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maycock, Amanda

    2016-04-01

    The structure and magnitude of radiative heating rates in the atmosphere can change markedly in response to climate forcings; diagnosing the causes of these changes can aid in understanding parts of the large-scale circulation response to climate change. This study separates the relative drivers of projected changes in longwave and shortwave radiative heating rates over the 21st century into contributions from radiatively active gases, such as carbon dioxide, ozone and water vapour, and from changes in atmospheric and surface temperatures. Results are shown using novel radiative diagnostics applied to timeslice experiments from the UM-UKCA chemistry-climate model; these online estimates are compared to offline radiative transfer calculations. Line-by-line calculations showing spectrally-resolved changes in heating rates due to different gases will also be presented.

  10. Responses of Trace Elements to Aerobic Maximal Exercise in Elite Sportsmen

    PubMed Central

    OTAĞ, Aynur; HAZAR, Muhsin; OTAĞ, İlhan; Gürkan, Alper Cenk; Okan, İlyas

    2014-01-01

    Trace elements are chemical elements needed in minute quantities for the proper growth, development, and physiology of the organism. In biochemistry, a trace element is also referred to as a micronutrient. Trace elements, such as nickel, cadmium, aluminum, silver, chromium, molybdenum, germanium, tin, titanium, tungsten, scandium, are found naturally in the environment and human exposure derives from a variety of sources, including air, drinking water and food. The Purpose of this study was investigated the effect of aerobic maximal intensity endurance exercise on serum trace elements as well-trained individuals of 28 wrestlers (age (year) 19.64±1.13, weight (Kg) 70.07 ± 15.69, height (cm) 176.97 ± 6.69) during and after a 2000 meter Ergometer test protocol was used to perform aerobic (75 %) maximal endurance exercise. Trace element serum levels were analyzed from blood samples taken before, immediately after and one hour after the exercise. While an increase was detected in Chromium (Cr), Nickel (Ni), Molybdenum (Mo) and Titanium (Ti) serum levels immediately after the exercise, a decrease was detected in Aluminum (Al), Scandium (Sc) and Tungsten (W) serum levels. Except for aluminum, the trace elements we worked on showed statistically meaningful responses (P<0.05 and P<0.001). According to the responses of trace elements to the exercise showed us the selection and application of the convenient sport is important not only in terms of sportsman performance but also in terms of future healthy life plans and clinically. PMID:24762350

  11. The rate of training response to aerobic exercise affects brain function of rats.

    PubMed

    Marton, Orsolya; Koltai, Erika; Takeda, Masaki; Mimura, Tatsuya; Pajk, Melitta; Abraham, Dora; Koch, Lauren Gerard; Britton, Steven L; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Boldogh, Istvan; Radak, Zsolt

    2016-10-01

    There is an increasing volume of data connecting capacity to respond to exercise training with quality of life and aging. In this study, we used a rat model in which animals were selectively bred for low and high gain in running distance to test t whether genetic segregation for trainability is associated with brain function and signaling processes in the hippocampus. Rats selected for low response (LRT) and high response training (HRT) were randomly divided into control or exercise group that trained five times a week for 30 min per day for three months at 70% VO2max. All four groups had similar running distance before training. With training, HRT rats showed significantly greater increases in VO2max and running distance than LRT rats (p < 0.05). On the reverse Morris Maze test HRT-trained rats outperformed HRT control ones. Significant difference was noted between LRT and HRT groups in redox milieu as assessed by levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), carbonylation of proteins, nNOS and S-nitroso-cysteine. Moreover the silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), ratio of phospho and total cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB), and apoptotic index, also showed significant differences between LRT and HRT groups. These findings suggest that aerobic training responses are not localized to skeletal muscle, but differently involve signaling processes in the brain of LRT and HRT rats.

  12. Effect of a 12-week aerobic training program on perceptual and affective responses in obese women

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Luís Alberto Garcia; Ferreira, Sandro dos Santos; Freitas, Rosemari Queiroz; Henrique de Souza, Carlos; Garcia, Erick Doner Santos de Abreu; Gregorio da Silva, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to observe the effect of self-selected intensity or imposed intensity during aerobic training on perceptual and affective responses in obese women. [Subjects] The study included 26 obese women aged 30–60 years. [Methods] The subjects were randomly divided into two groups, with 13 subjects in each group: self-selected intensity and imposed intensity (10% above ventilatory threshold) groups. All subjects completed an intervention program that lasted 12 weeks, with three exercise sessions a week. The rating of perceived exertion and affective responses (Feeling Scale and Felt Arousal Scale) were monitored in the first, sixth, and twelfth weeks. [Results] Significant differences were observed between groups in heart rate and rating of perceived exertion. The affective responses during exercise were more negative in the imposed intensity group. [Conclusion] Use of a self-selected exercise intensity can promote smaller negative affective responses during exercise and provide a sufficient stimulus for improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness. PMID:26311958

  13. Menstrual cycle phase effects free testosterone responses to prolonged aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Lane, A R; O'Leary, C B; Hackney, A C

    2015-09-01

    Research has shown that total testosterone (tT) levels in women increase acutely during a prolonged bout of aerobic exercise. Few studies, however, have considered the impact of the menstrual cycle phase on this response or have looked at the biologically active free testosterone (fT) form responses. Therefore, this study examined the fT concentration response independently and as a percentage (fT%) of tT to prolonged aerobic exercise during phases of the menstrual cycle with low estrogen-progesterone (L-EP; i.e., follicular phase) and high estrogen-progesterone (H-EP; i.e., luteal phase). Ten healthy, recreationally trained, eumennorrheic women (X ± SD: age = 20 ± 2 y, mass = 58.7 ± 8.3 kg, body fat = 22.3 ± 4.9 %, VO(2max) = 50.7 ± 9.0 ml/kg/min) participated in a laboratory based study and completed a 60-minute treadmill run during the L-EP and H-EP menstrual phases at ~70% of VO(2max). Blood was drawn prior to (PRE), immediately after (POST) and following 30 minutes of recovery (30POST) with each 60-minute run. During H-EP, there was a significant increase in fT concentrations from PRE to POST (p < 0.01) while in L-EP fT levels were unchanged; which resulted in fT being significantly higher at H-EP POST versus L-EP POST (p < 0.03). Area-under-the-curve (AUC) responses were calculated, for fT the total AUC was greater in H-EP than L-EP (p < 0.04). There was no significant interaction of fT% between phases and exercise sampling time. There was, however, a main effect for exercise where fT% POST was a greater proportion of tT than at PRE (p < 0.01). In summary, hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle impact fT response to a prolonged aerobic exercise bout; specifically, there being higher levels under H-EP conditions. This suggests more biologically active T is available during exercise in this phase. This response may be a function of the higher core temperatures found with H-EP causing greater sex hormone binding protein release of T, or could

  14. Radiation-induced genomic instability: radiation quality and dose response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Leslie E.; Nagar, Shruti; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instability is a term used to describe a phenomenon that results in the accumulation of multiple changes required to convert a stable genome of a normal cell to an unstable genome characteristic of a tumor. There has been considerable recent debate concerning the importance of genomic instability in human cancer and its temporal occurrence in the carcinogenic process. Radiation is capable of inducing genomic instability in mammalian cells and instability is thought to be the driving force responsible for radiation carcinogenesis. Genomic instability is characterized by a large collection of diverse endpoints that include large-scale chromosomal rearrangements and aberrations, amplification of genetic material, aneuploidy, micronucleus formation, microsatellite instability, and gene mutation. The capacity of radiation to induce genomic instability depends to a large extent on radiation quality or linear energy transfer (LET) and dose. There appears to be a low dose threshold effect with low LET, beyond which no additional genomic instability is induced. Low doses of both high and low LET radiation are capable of inducing this phenomenon. This report reviews data concerning dose rate effects of high and low LET radiation and their capacity to induce genomic instability assayed by chromosomal aberrations, delayed lethal mutations, micronuclei and apoptosis.

  15. Aerobic exercise does not compromise muscle hypertrophy response to short-term resistance training.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Tommy R; Fernandez-Gonzalo, Rodrigo; Gustafsson, Thomas; Tesch, Per A

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that chronic aerobic and resistance exercise (AE+RE) would elicit greater muscle hypertrophy than resistance exercise only (RE). Ten men (25 ± 4 yr) performed 5 wk unilateral knee extensor AE+RE. The opposing limb was subjected to RE. AE completed 6 hr prior to RE consisted of ~45 min one-legged cycle ergometry. RE comprised 4 × 7 maximal concentric-eccentric knee extensions. Various indexes of in vivo knee extensor function were measured before and after training. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessed m. quadricep femoris (QF) cross-sectional area (CSA), volume, and signal intensity (SI). Biopsies obtained from m. vastus lateralis determined fiber CSA, enzyme levels, and gene expression of myostatin, atrogin-1, MuRF-1, PGC-1α, and VEGF. Increases (P < 0.05) in isometric strength and peak power, respectively, were comparable in AE+RE (9 and 29%) and RE (11 and 24%). AE+RE showed greater increase (14%; P < 0.05) in QF volume than RE (8%). Muscle fiber CSA increased 17% after AE+RE (P < 0.05) and 9% after RE (P > 0.05). QF SI increased (12%; P < 0.05) after AE+RE, but not RE. Neither AE+RE nor RE showed altered mRNA levels. Citrate synthase activity increased (P < 0.05) after AE+RE. The results suggest that the increased aerobic capacity shown with AE+RE was accompanied by a more robust increase in muscle size compared with RE. Although this response was not carried over to greater improvement in muscle function, it remains that intense AE can be executed prior to RE without compromising performance outcome.

  16. Pain Response after Maximal Aerobic Exercise in Adolescents across Weight Status

    PubMed Central

    Stolzman, Stacy; Danduran, Michael; Hunter, Sandra K; Bement, Marie Hoeger

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pain reports are greater with increasing weight status, and exercise can reduce pain perception. It is unknown however, whether exercise can relieve pain in adolescents of varying weight status. The purpose of this study was to determine if adolescents across weight status report pain relief following high intensity aerobic exercise (exercise-induced hypoalgesia [EIH]). Methods 62 adolescents (15.1±1.8 years, 29 males) participated in three sessions: 1) Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) before and after quiet rest, clinical pain (McGill Pain Questionnaire), and physical activity levels (self-report and ActiSleep Plus Monitors) were measured; 2) PPTs were measured with a computerized algometer at the 4th finger nailbed, middle deltoid muscle, and quadriceps muscle before and after maximal oxygen uptake test (VO2 max Bruce Treadmill Protocol); and 3) Body composition was measured with Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results All adolescents met criteria for VO2 max. Based on body mass index z-score, adolescents were categorized as normal weight (n=33) or overweight/obese (n=29). PPTs increased following exercise (EIH) and were unchanged with quiet rest (trial × session: p=0.02). EIH was similar across the 3 sites and between normal weight and overweight/obese adolescents. Physical activity and clinical pain were not correlated with EIH. Overweight/obese adolescents had similar absolute VO2 max (L·min-1) but lower relative VO2 max (ml·kg-1·min-1) compared with normal weight adolescents. When adolescents were categorized using FitnessGram standards as unfit (n=15) and fit (n=46), the EIH response was similar between fitness levels. Conclusion This study is the first to establish that adolescents experience EIH in both overweight and normal weight youth. EIH after high intensity aerobic exercise was robust in adolescents regardless of weight status and not influenced by physical fitness. PMID:25856681

  17. Aerobic fitness influences cerebral oxygenation response to maximal exercise in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Oussaidene, Kahina; Prieur, Fabrice; Tagougui, Semah; Abaidia, Abdelbasset; Matran, Regis; Mucci, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The study examined whether the aerobic fitness level modifies the cerebral oxygenation response to incremental ramp exercise, and more specifically the decline in cerebral oxygenation from heavy exercise up to maximal intensities. 11 untrained (VO2max 47.3±4.0 mL min(-1) kg(-1)) and 13 endurance-trained (VO2max 61.2±8.0 mL min(-1) kg(-1)) healthy men performed a maximal ramp cycle exercise. Left prefrontal cortex oxygenation (ΔHbO2) was monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy. A cerebral oxygenation threshold decline (ThCOx) during exercise was determined. ThCox occurred in all subjects but for higher VO2 (mL min(-1) kg(-1)) in endurance-trained than in untrained subjects (P<0.01). At submaximal exercise intensity corresponding to ThCOx, ΔHbO2 was higher in endurance-trained than in untrained subjects (P<0.05). VO2 at ThCox was related to VO2 at respiratory compensation point (n=24, r=0.93, P<0.001) and to VO2max (n=24, r=0.92, P<0.001). These findings indicate that above the respiratory compensation point the prefrontal O2 demand exceeds the supply in untrained and in endurance-trained subjects. In addition, the occurrence of ThCOx was delayed to higher absolute exercise intensities in endurance-trained in relation with their higher VO2max than untrained men. These results demonstrated that aerobic fitness influences cerebral oxygenation during exercise.

  18. Oxidative stress and inflammation response following aerobic exercise: role of ethnicity.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, M J; Goldfarb, A; Garten, R S; Vervaecke, L

    2014-09-01

    African-Americans are at a significantly greater risk for developing several diseases and conditions. These conditions often have underlying oxidative stress mechanisms. Therefore the purpose of this investigation was to ascertain the post-exercise oxidative response to a single bout of aerobic exercise in African-American and Caucasian college-age females. A total of 10 African-American and 10 Caucasian females completed the study. Each subject had her VO2 max measured while exercising on a treadmill. A week later, each subject returned to the laboratory and performed a 30-min run at 70% of her VO2max. Blood samples were taken immediately prior to and following exercise for analysis. Lipid hydroperoxides, protein carbonyls, malondialdehyde, xanthine oxidase, glutathione in the reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) forms, TNFα and interleukin 6 were measured from blood taken before and after exercise. Significance was set at p≤0.05 a priori. Xanthine oxidase was the only measure that did not significantly increase following exercise. All other markers showed a significant elevation in response to the exercise bout with no difference between groups except that the Caucasian group had significantly higher malondialdehyde post-exercise compared to the African-American group. This cohort of college-age African-American and Caucasian females showed little difference in their response to a single 30-min run at 70% of their max in the markers of oxidative stress within the blood.

  19. Genomic Response to Selection for Predatory Behavior in a Mammalian Model of Adaptive Radiation.

    PubMed

    Konczal, Mateusz; Koteja, Paweł; Orlowska-Feuer, Patrycja; Radwan, Jacek; Sadowska, Edyta T; Babik, Wiesław

    2016-09-01

    If genetic architectures of various quantitative traits are similar, as studies on model organisms suggest, comparable selection pressures should produce similar molecular patterns for various traits. To test this prediction, we used a laboratory model of vertebrate adaptive radiation to investigate the genetic basis of the response to selection for predatory behavior and compare it with evolution of aerobic capacity reported in an earlier work. After 13 generations of selection, the proportion of bank voles (Myodes [=Clethrionomys] glareolus) showing predatory behavior was five times higher in selected lines than in controls. We analyzed the hippocampus and liver transcriptomes and found repeatable changes in allele frequencies and gene expression. Genes with the largest differences between predatory and control lines are associated with hunger, aggression, biological rhythms, and functioning of the nervous system. Evolution of predatory behavior could be meaningfully compared with evolution of high aerobic capacity, because the experiments and analyses were performed in the same methodological framework. The number of genes that changed expression was much smaller in predatory lines, and allele frequencies changed repeatably in predatory but not in aerobic lines. This suggests that more variants of smaller effects underlie variation in aerobic performance, whereas fewer variants of larger effects underlie variation in predatory behavior. Our results thus contradict the view that comparable selection pressures for different quantitative traits produce similar molecular patterns. Therefore, to gain knowledge about molecular-level response to selection for complex traits, we need to investigate not only multiple replicate populations but also multiple quantitative traits.

  20. Radiation-induced gene responses

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Oryhon, J.

    1996-12-31

    In the process of identifying genes that are differentially regulated in cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), we identified a transcript that was repressed following the exposure of cells to a combination of UV and salicylate, a known inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Sequencing this band determined that it has identify to lactate dehydrogenase, and Northern blots confirmed the initial expression pattern. Analysis of the sequence of the LDH 5` region established the presence of NF-kappaB, Sp1, and two Ap-2 elements; two partial AP- 1; one partial RE, and two halves of E-UV elements were also found. Electromobility shift assays were then performed for the AP-1, NF- kappaB, and E-UV elements. These experiments revealed that binding to NF-kappaB was induced by UV but repressed with salicylic acid; UV did not affect AP-1 binding, but salicylic acid inhibited it alone or following UV exposure; and E-UV binding was repressed by UV, and salicylic acid had little effect. Since the binding of no single element correlated with the expression pattern of LDH, it is likely that multiple elements govern UV/salicylate-mediated expression.

  1. Radiation triggering immune response and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hekim, Nezih; Cetin, Zafer; Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Cort, Aysegul; Saygili, Eyup Ilker

    2015-11-28

    Radiation therapy (RT) is a well-established but still under optimization branch of Cancer Therapy (CT). RT uses electromagnetic waves or charged particles in order to kill malignant cells, by accumulating the energy onto these cells. The issue at stake for RT, as well as for any other Cancer Therapy technique, is always to kill only cancer cells, without affecting the surrounding healthy ones. This perspective of CT is usually described under the terms "specificity" and "selectivity". Specificity and selectivity are the ideal goal, but the ideal is never entirely achieved. Thus, in addition to killing healthy cells, changes and effects are observed in the immune system after irradiation. In this review, we mainly focus on the effects of ionizing radiation on the immune system and its components like bone marrow. Additionally, we are interested in the effects and benefits of low-dose ionizing radiation on the hematopoiesis and immune response. Low dose radiation has been shown to induce biological responses like inflammatory responses, innate immune system activation and DNA repair (adaptive response). This review reveals the fact that there are many unanswered questions regarding the role of radiation as either an immune-activating (low dose) or immunosuppressive (high dose) agent.

  2. Effects of active recovery on autonomic and haemodynamic responses after aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Soares, Antonio H G; Oliveira, Tiago P; Cavalcante, Bruno R; Farah, Breno Q; Lima, Aluísio H R A; Cucato, Gabriel G; Cardoso, Crivaldo G; Ritti-Dias, Raphael M

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of active recovery on autonomic and haemodynamic responses after exercise in healthy adults. Nineteen healthy young male individuals underwent two experimental sessions: exercise with active recovery (AR) and exercise with passive recovery (PR). The exercise sessions comprised three phases: warm-up (5 min), exercise phase (cycle ergometer, 30 min, intensity between 60 and 70% of the heart rate reserve) and recovery (5 min). In the AR, the subjects remained cycling in the recovery phase at intensity between 30% and 35% of heart rate reserve, while in the PR, the subjects stopped the exercise after finishing the exercise phase. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured before and over the 30 min after the interventions. There were no differences for systolic and diastolic blood pressures, heart rate and rate pressure product between active and passive recovery sessions. Also, all heart rate variability parameters changed similarly after exercise with passive or active recovery sessions. In summary, exercise with active recovery does not affect the autonomic and haemodynamic responses after moderate-intensity aerobic exercise in healthy young male individuals.

  3. A redox-responsive transcription factor is critical for pathogenesis and aerobic growth of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Whiteley, Aaron T; Ruhland, Brittany R; Edrozo, Mauna B; Reniere, Michelle L

    2017-02-13

    Bacterial pathogens have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to sense and adapt to redox stress in nature and within the host. However, deciphering the redox environment encountered by intracellular pathogens in the mammalian cytosol is challenging and remains poorly understood. In this study, we assessed the contributions of the two redox-responsive, Spx-family transcriptional regulators to the virulence of Listeria monocytogenes, a Gram-positive facultative intracellular pathogen. Spx-family proteins are highly conserved in Firmicutes and L. monocytogenes encodes two paralogues, spxA1 and spxA2 Here, we demonstrated that spxA1, but not spxA2, was required for the oxidative stress response and pathogenesis. SpxA1 function appeared to be conserved with the Bacillus subtilis homologue and resistance to oxidative stress required the canonical CXXC redox-sensing motif. Remarkably, spxA1 was essential for aerobic growth, demonstrating that L. monocytogenes SpxA1 likely regulates a distinct set of genes. Although the ΔspxA1 mutant did not grow in the presence of oxygen in the laboratory, it was able to replicate in macrophages and colonize the spleens, but not the livers, of infected mice. These data suggest that the redox state of bacteria during infection differs significantly from bacteria growing in vitro Further, the host cell cytosol may resemble an anaerobic environment with tissue-specific variations in redox stress and oxygen concentration.

  4. Role of thiols in cellular response to radiation and drugs. Symposium: thiols

    SciTech Connect

    Biaglow, J.E.; Varnes, M.E.; Clark, E.P.; Epp, E.R.

    1983-09-01

    Cellular nonprotein thiols (NPSH) consist of glutathione (GSH) and other low molecular weight species such as cysteine, cysteamine, and coenzyme. A GSH is usually less than the total cellular NPSH, and with thiol reactive agents, such as diethyl maleate (DEM), its rate of depletion is in part dependent upon the cellular capacity for its resynthesis. If resynthesis is blocked by buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine(BSO), the NPSH, including GSH, is depleted more rapidly, Cellular thiol depletion by diamide, N-ethylmaleimide, and BSO may render oxygenated cells more sensitive to radiation. These cells may or may not show a reduction in the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER). Human A549 lung carcinoma cells depleted of their NPSH either by prolonged culture or by BSO treatment do not show a reduced OER but do show increased aerobic responses to radiation. Other nitrocompounds, such as misonidazole, are activated under hypoxic conditions to radical intermediates. When cellular thiols are depleted peroxide is formed. Under hypoxic conditions thiols are depleted because metabolically reduced intermediates react with GSH instead of oxygen. Thiol depletion, under hypoxic conditions, may be the reason that misonidazole and other nitrocompounds show an extra enhancement ratio with hypoxic cells. Thiol depletion by DEM or BSO alters the radiation response of hypoxic cells to misonidazole. In conclusion, we propose an altered thiol model which includes a mechanism for thiol involvement in the aerobic radiation response of cells.

  5. Nonlinear response matrix methods for radiative transfer. [Radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.F. Jr.; Lewis, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    A nonlinear response matrix formalism is presented for the solution of time-dependent radiative transfer problems. The essential feature of the method is that within each computational cell the temperature is calculated in response to the incoming photons from all frequency groups. Thus the updating of the temperature distribution is placed within the iterative solution of the spaceangle transport problem, instead of being placed outside of it. The method is formulated for both grey and multifrequency problems and applied in slab geometry. The method is compared to the more conventional source iteration technique. 7 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  6. Vaccination response following aerobic exercise: can a brisk walk enhance antibody response to pneumococcal and influenza vaccinations?

    PubMed

    Long, Joanna E; Ring, Christopher; Drayson, Mark; Bosch, Jos; Campbell, John P; Bhabra, Jagraj; Browne, David; Dawson, Joel; Harding, Sarah; Lau, Jamie; Burns, Victoria E

    2012-05-01

    High intensity acute exercise at the time of vaccination has been shown to enhance the subsequent antibody response. This study examines whether an acute moderate intensity aerobic intervention prior to vaccination can enhance antibody response to pneumonia and half dose influenza vaccination. Sixty young (age (SD)=22.0 (6.1) years) and 60 older (age (SD)=57.5 (6.5) years) adults attended the laboratory on two separate occasions. At the first session, baseline antibody titres were determined, before participants completed either a brisk walk around campus at >55% of their age-predicted heart rate maximum, or a resting control condition, for 45 min. After the intervention, all participants received a full-dose pneumococcal vaccination and a half-dose influenza vaccination. Four weeks later, participants returned for a follow up blood sample. Multivariate ANOVA revealed an increase in total antibody titres against the influenza vaccine (F((12,106))=25.76, p<.001, η(2)=.75) and both the IgM (F((12,106))=17.10, p<.001, η(2)=.66) and IgG (F((12,106))=25.76, p<.001, η(2)=.75) antibody titres against the pneumococcal vaccine. However, there were no significant Time×Group interactions (p's all >.15), indicating that a 45 min brisk walk prior to vaccination did not affect antibody response to either the influenza or pneumonia vaccine. The results suggest that higher intensity exercise is necessary to augment antibody response to vaccination.

  7. Neutron responsive self-powered radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald P.; Cannon, Collins P.

    1978-01-01

    An improved neutron responsive self-powered radiation detector is disclosed in which the neutron absorptive central emitter has a substantially neutron transmissive conductor collector sheath spaced about the emitter and the space between the emitter and collector sheath is evacuated.

  8. Metabolic response of different high-intensity aerobic interval exercise protocols.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Luc E; Kozlowski, Karl F; DeVinney-Boymel, Lee; Hambridge, Caitlin

    2012-10-01

    Although high-intensity sprint interval training (SIT) employing the Wingate protocol results in significant physiological adaptations, it is conducted at supramaximal intensity and is potentially unsafe for sedentary middle-aged adults. We therefore evaluated the metabolic and cardiovascular response in healthy young individuals performing 4 high-intensity (~90% VO2max) aerobic interval training (HIT) protocols with similar total work output but different work-to-rest ratio. Eight young physically active subjects participated in 5 different bouts of exercise over a 3-week period. Protocol 1 consisted of 20-minute continuous exercise at approximately 70% of VO2max, whereas protocols 2-5 were interval based with a work-active rest duration (in seconds) of 30/30, 60/30, 90/30, and 60/60, respectively. Each interval protocol resulted in approximately 10 minutes of exercise at a workload corresponding to approximately 90% VO2max, but differed in the total rest duration. The 90/30 HIT protocol resulted in the highest VO2, HR, rating of perceived exertion, and blood lactate, whereas the 30/30 protocol resulted in the lowest of these parameters. The total caloric energy expenditure was lowest in the 90/30 and 60/30 protocols (~150 kcal), whereas the other 3 protocols did not differ (~195 kcal) from one another. The immediate postexercise blood pressure response was similar across all the protocols. These finding indicate that HIT performed at approximately 90% of VO2max is no more physiologically taxing than is steady-state exercise conducted at 70% VO2max, but the response during HIT is influenced by the work-to-rest ratio. This interval protocol may be used as an alternative approach to steady-state exercise training but with less time commitment.

  9. Adverse cardiometabolic response to aerobic exercise training: Should this be a concern?

    PubMed Central

    Leifer, Eric S.; Church, Timothy S.; Earnest, Conrad P.; Fleg, Jerome L.; Hakkinen, Keijo; Karavirta, Laura; Kraus, William E.; Mikus, Catherine; Resnick, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    .36) for SBP. Conclusion Compared to control subjects, exercise subjects were not at an increased risk for meeting the AC thresholds for SBP, FI, TG, or HDL-C and significantly fewer exercise subjects met AC thresholds for FI, and HDL. Exercise subjects also had significantly more favorable mean changes in FI, TG, and HDL-C than control subjects. These findings do not support the concept that aerobic exercise training increases the risk of adverse changes in CV risk factors. and that, with respect to group responses PMID:26258860

  10. How to regulate the acute physiological response to "aerobic" high-intensity interval exercise.

    PubMed

    Tschakert, Gerhard; Kroepfl, Julia; Mueller, Alexander; Moser, Othmar; Groeschl, Werner; Hofmann, Peter

    2015-03-01

    The acute physiological processes during "aerobic" high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) and their regulation are inadequately studied. The main goal of this study was to investigate the acute metabolic and cardiorespiratory response to long and short HIIE compared to continuous exercise (CE) as well as its regulation and predictability. Six healthy well-trained sport students (5 males, 1 female; age: 25.7 ± 3.1 years; height: 1.80 ± 0.04 m; weight: 76.7 ± 6.4 kg; VO2max: 4.33 ± 0.7 l·min(-1)) performed a maximal incremental exercise test (IET) and subsequently three different exercise sessions matched for mean load (Pmean) and exercise duration (28 min): 1) long HIIE with submaximal peak workloads (Ppeak = power output at 95 % of maximum heart rate), peak workload durations (tpeak) of 4 min, and recovery durations (trec) of 3 min, 2) short HIIE with Ppeak according to the maximum power output (Pmax) from IET, tpeak of 20 s, and individually calculated trec (26.7 ± 13.4 s), and 3) CE with a target workload (Ptarget) equating to Pmean of HIIE. In short HIIE, mean lactate (Lamean) (5.22 ± 1.41 mmol·l(-1)), peak La (7.14 ± 2.48 mmol·l(-1)), and peak heart rate (HRpeak) (181.00 ± 6.66 b·min(-1)) were significantly lower compared to long HIIE (Lamean: 9.83 ± 2.78 mmol·l(-1); Lapeak: 12.37 ± 4.17 mmol·l(-1), HRpeak: 187.67 ± 5.72 b·min(-1)). No significant differences in any parameters were found between short HIIE and CE despite considerably higher peak workloads in short HIIE. The acute metabolic and peak cardiorespiratory demand during "aerobic" short HIIE was significantly lower compared to long HIIE and regulable via Pmean. Consequently, short HIIE allows a consciously aimed triggering of specific and desired or required acute physiological responses. Key pointsHigh-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) with short peak workload durations (tpeak) induce a lower acute metabolic and peak cardiorespiratory response compared to intervals with long tpeak

  11. Radiation, Inflammation, and Immune Responses in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Multhoff, Gabriele; Radons, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has emerged as one of the hallmarks of cancer. Inflammation also plays a pivotal role in modulating radiation responsiveness of tumors. As discussed in this review, ionizing radiation (IR) leads to activation of several transcription factors modulating the expression of numerous mediators in tumor cells and cells of the microenvironment promoting cancer development. Novel therapeutic approaches thus aim to interfere with the activity or expression of these factors, either in single-agent or combinatorial treatment or as supplements of the existing therapeutic concepts. Among them, NF-κB, STAT-3, and HIF-1 play a crucial role in radiation-induced inflammatory responses embedded in a complex inflammatory network. A great variety of classical or novel drugs including nutraceuticals such as plant phytochemicals have the capacity to interfere with the inflammatory network in cancer and are considered as putative radiosensitizers. Thus, targeting the inflammatory signaling pathways induced by IR offers the opportunity to improve the clinical outcome of radiation therapy by enhancing radiosensitivity and decreasing putative metabolic effects. Since inflammation and sex steroids also impact tumorigenesis, a therapeutic approach targeting glucocorticoid receptors and radiation-induced production of tumorigenic factors might be effective in sensitizing certain tumors to IR. PMID:22675673

  12. The role of thiols in cellular response to radiation and drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Biaglow, J.E.; Varnes, M.E.; Clark, E.P.; Epp, E.R.

    1983-09-01

    Cellular nonprotein thiols (NPSH) consist of glutathione (GSH) and other low molecular weight species such as cysteine, cysteamine, and coenzyme A. GSH is usually less than the total cellular NPSH, and with thiol reactive agents, such as diethyl maleate (DEM), its rate of depletion is in part dependent upon the cellular capacity for its resynthesis. If resynthesis is blocked by buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine(BSO), the NPSH, including GSH, is depleted more rapidly, Cellular thiol depletion by diamide, N-ethylmaleimide, and BSO may render oxygenated cells more sensitive to radiation. These cells may or may not show a reduction in the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER). Human A549 lung carcinoma cells depleted of their NPSH either by prolonged culture or by BSO treatment do not show a reduced OER but do show increased aerobic responses to radiation. Some nitroheterocyclic radiosensitizing drugs also deplete cellular thiols under aerobic conditions. Such reactivity may be the reason that they show anomalous radiation sensitization (i.e., better than predicted on the basis of electron affinity). Other nitrocompounds, such as misonidazole, are activated under hypoxic conditions to radical intermediates. When cellular thiols are depleted peroxide is formed. Under hypoxic conditions thiols are depleted because metabolically reduced intermediates react with GSH instead of oxygen. Thiol depletion, under hypoxic conditions, may be the reason that misonidazole and other nitrocompounds show an extra enhancement ratio with hypoxic cells. Thiol depletion by DEM or BSO alters the radiation response of hypoxic cells to misonidazole.

  13. The AGT Gene M235T Polymorphism and Response of Power-Related Variables to Aerobic Training

    PubMed Central

    Aleksandra, Zarębska; Zbigniew, Jastrzębski; Waldemar, Moska; Agata, Leońska-Duniec; Mariusz, Kaczmarczyk; Marek, Sawczuk; Agnieszka, Maciejewska-Skrendo; Piotr, Żmijewski; Krzysztof, Ficek; Grzegorz, Trybek; Ewelina, Lulińska-Kuklik; Semenova, Ekaterina A.; Ahmetov, Ildus I.; Paweł, Cięszczyk

    2016-01-01

    The C allele of the M235T (rs699) polymorphism of the AGT gene correlates with higher levels of angiotensin II and has been associated with power and strength sport performance. The aim of the study was to investigate whether or not selected power-related variables and their response to a 12-week program of aerobic dance training are modulated by the AGT M235T genotype in healthy participants. Two hundred and one Polish Caucasian women aged 21 ± 1 years met the inclusion criteria and were included in the study. All women completed a 12-week program of low and high impact aerobics. Wingate peak power and total work capacity, 5 m, 10 m, and 30 m running times and jump height and jump power were determined before and after the training programme. All power-related variables improved significantly in response to aerobic dance training. We found a significant association between the M235T polymorphism and jump-based variables (squat jump (SJ) height, p = 0.005; SJ power, p = 0.015; countermovement jump height, p = 0.025; average of 10 countermovement jumps with arm swing (ACMJ) height, p = 0.001; ACMJ power, p = 0.035). Specifically, greater improvements were observed in the C allele carriers in comparison with TT homozygotes. In conclusion, aerobic dance, one of the most commonly practiced adult fitness activities in the world, provides sufficient training stimuli for augmenting the explosive strength necessary to increase vertical jump performance. The AGT gene M235T polymorphism seems to be not only a candidate gene variant for power/strength related phenotypes, but also a genetic marker for predicting response to training. Key points Aerobic dance provides sufficient training stimuli for the improvement of explosive power. The AGT gene M235T polymorphism is associated with individual variation in the change of power-related phenotypes in response to aerobic dance training. The C allele carriers of the AGT gene M235T polymorphism show greater improvements of jump

  14. The human salivary proteome is radiation responsive.

    PubMed

    Moore, Heather D; Ivey, Richard G; Voytovich, Uliana J; Lin, Chenwei; Stirewalt, Derek L; Pogosova-Agadjanyan, Era L; Paulovich, Amanda G

    2014-05-01

    In the event of a nuclear incident in a heavily populated area, the surge in demand for medical evaluation will likely overwhelm our emergency care system, compromising our ability to care for victims with life-threatening injuries or exposures. Therefore, there exists a need for a rapidly deployable biological assay for radiation exposure that can be performed in the field by individuals with little to no medical training. Saliva is an attractive biofluid for this purpose, due to the relative ease of its collection and the wide array of biomolecules it contains. To determine whether the human salivary proteome is responsive to ionizing radiation exposure, we characterized the abundances of salivary proteins in humans before and after total body irradiation. Using an assay panel targeting 90 analytes (growth factors, chemokines and cytokines), we identified proteins that were significantly radiation responsive in human saliva. The responses of three proteins (monocyte chemo-attractant protein 1, interleukin 8 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1) were confirmed using independent immunoassay platforms and then verified and further characterized in 130 saliva samples from a completely independent set of 38 patients undergoing total body irradiation. The results demonstrate the potential for detecting radiation exposure based on analysis of human saliva.

  15. The Human Salivary Proteome is Radiation Responsive

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Heather D.; Ivey, Richard G.; Voytovich, Uliana J.; Lin, Chenwei; Stirewalt, Derek L.; Pogosova-Agadjanyan, Era L.; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2014-01-01

    In the event of a nuclear incident in a heavily populated area, the surge in demand for medical evaluation will likely overwhelm our emergency care system, compromising our ability to care for victims with life-threatening injuries or exposures. Therefore, there exists a need for a rapidly deployable biological assay for radiation exposure that can be performed in the field by individuals with little to no medical training. Saliva is an attractive biofluid for this purpose, due to the relative ease of its collection and the wide array of biomolecules it contains. To determine whether the human salivary proteome is responsive to ionizing radiation exposure, we characterized the abundances of salivary proteins in humans before and after total body irradiation. Using an assay panel targeting 90 analytes (growth factors, chemokines and cytokines), we identified proteins that were significantly radiation responsive in human saliva. The responses of three proteins (monocyte chemo-attractant protein 1, interleukin 8 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1) were confirmed using independent immunoassay platforms and then verified and further characterized in 130 saliva samples from a completely independent set of 38 patients undergoing total body irradiation. The results demonstrate the potential for detecting radiation exposure based on analysis of human saliva. PMID:24720749

  16. Plasma cell-free mitochondrial DNA declines in response to prolonged moderate aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Shockett, Penny E; Khanal, Januka; Sitaula, Alina; Oglesby, Christopher; Meachum, William A; Castracane, V Daniel; Kraemer, Robert R

    2016-01-01

    Increased plasma cell-free mitochondrial DNA (cf-mDNA), a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) produced by cellular injury, contributes to neutrophil activation/inflammation in trauma patients and arises in cancer and autoimmunity. To further understand relationships between cf-mDNA released by tissue injury, inflammation, and health benefits of exercise, we examined cf-mDNA response to prolonged moderate aerobic exercise. Seven healthy moderately trained young men (age = 22.4 ± 1.2) completed a treadmill exercise trial for 90 min at 60% VO2 max and a resting control trial. Blood was sampled immediately prior to exercise (0 min = baseline), during (+18, +54 min), immediately after (+90 min), and after recovery (R40). Plasma was analyzed for cf-mDNA, IL-6, and lactate. A significant difference in cf-mDNA response was observed between exercise and control trials, with cf-mDNA levels reduced during exercise at +54 and +90 (with or without plasma volume shift correction). Declines in cf-mDNA were accompanied by increased lactate and followed by an increase in IL-6, suggesting a temporal association with muscle stress and inflammatory processes. Our novel finding of cf-mDNA decline with prolonged moderate treadmill exercise provides evidence for increased clearance from or reduced release of cf-mDNA into the blood with prolonged exercise. These studies contrast with previous investigations involving exhaustive short-term treadmill exercise, in which no change in cf-mDNA levels were reported, and contribute to our understanding of differences between exercise- and trauma-induced inflammation. We propose that transient declines in cf-mDNA may induce health benefits, by reducing systemic inflammation.

  17. Activation of molecular oxygen by infrared laser radiation in pigment-free aerobic systems.

    PubMed

    Krasnovsky, A A; Drozdova, N N; Ivanov, A V; Ambartsumian, R V

    2003-09-01

    With the goal of mimicking the mechanisms of the biological effects of low energy laser irradiation, we have shown that infrared low intensity laser radiation causes oxygenation of the chemical traps of singlet oxygen dissolved in organic media and water saturated by air at normal atmospheric pressure. The photooxygenation rate was directly proportional to the oxygen concentration and strongly inhibited by the singlet oxygen quenchers. The maximum of the photooxygenation action spectrum coincided with the maximum of the oxygen absorption band at 1270 nm. The data provide unambiguous evidence that photooxygenation is determined by the reactive singlet (1)Delta(g )state formed as a result of direct laser excitation of molecular oxygen. Hence, activation of oxygen caused by its direct photoexcitation may occur in natural systems.

  18. Plant response to solar ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, M. M.

    1981-01-01

    Plant reactions and mechanisms of reaction to solar UV radiation are reviewed, along with characteristics of plants which enhance UV tolerance. Wavelength regions to which proteins are particularly sensitive are examined and the possibility of synergistic effects from photoreactions to multiple wavelengths is considered, along with available evidence of nonadditive plant spectral responses to UV radiation. Decreases in atmospheric ozone content are explored in terms of UV wavelengths which would increase with the ozone decreases, particularly for UV-B, which depresses photosynthesis and would increase 1% with a 16% reduction of stratospheric ozone. Higher elevations are projected to display effects of increased UV incident flux first, and global distributions of UV increases due to atmospheric inhomogeneity and water surface clarity are examined. Finally, the response of plant nucleic acids, DNA, chlorophyll to enhanced UV are described, along with repair, avoidance, and optical mechanisms which aid plant survival

  19. Pediatric CT and radiation: our responsibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frush, Donald P.

    2009-02-01

    In order to discuss the cost-benefit ratio of CT examinations in children, one must be familiar with the reasons why CT can provide a high collective or individual dose. The reasons include increasing CT use as well as lack of attention to dose reduction strategies. While those have been substantial efforts for dose reduction, additional work is necessary to prevent unnecessary radiation exposure. This responsibility is shared between science and medicine, industry, regulatory agencies, and patients as well.

  20. Satellite cell activation induced by aerobic muscle adaptation in response to endurance exercise in humans and rodents.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Phablo; Mendes, Sávio Victor Diógenes; Ceccatto, Vânia Marilande; Hirabara, Sandro Massao

    2017-02-01

    Although the requirement of satellite cells activation and expansion following injury, mechanical load or growth stimulus provoked by resistance exercise has been well established, their function in response to aerobic exercise adaptation remains unclear. A clear relationship between satellite cell expansion in fiber-type specific myosin heavy chain and aerobic performance has been related, independent of myonuclear accretion or muscle growth. However, the trigger for this activation process is not fully understood yet and it seems to be a multi-faceted and well-orchestrated process. Emerging in vitro studies suggest a role for metabolic pathways and oxygen availability for satellite cell activation, modulating the self-renewal potential and cell fate control. The goal of this review is to describe and discuss the current knowledge about the satellite cell activation and expansion in response to aerobic exercise adaptation in human and rodent models. Additionally, findings about the in vitro metabolic control, which seems be involved in the satellite cell activation and cell fate control, are presented and discussed.

  1. Diminished forearm vasomotor response to central hypervolemic loading in aerobically fit individuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, X.; Gallagher, K. M.; SMith, S. A.; Bryant, K. H.; Raven, P. B.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance (FVR) during central hypervolemic loading was less sensitive in exercise trained high fit individuals (HF) compared to untrained average fit individuals (AF). Eight AF (age: 24 +/- 1 yr and weight: 78.9 +/- 1.7 kg) and eight HF (22 +/- 1 yr 79.5 +/- 2.4 kg) voluntarily participated in the investigation. Maximal aerobic power (determined on a treadmill), plasma volume and blood volume (Evans blue dilution method) were significantly greater in the HF than AF (60.8 +/- 0.7 vs. 41.2 +/- 1.9 ml.kg-1.min-1, 3.96 +/- 0.17 vs 3.36 +/- 0.08 1, and 6.33 +/- 0.23 vs 5.28 +/- 0.13 1). Baseline heart rate (HR), central venous pressure (CVP), mean arterial pressure (MAP, measured by an intraradial catheter or a Finapres finger cuff), forearm blood flow (FBF, plethysmography), and FVR, calculated from the ratio (MAP-CVP)/FBF, were not different between the HF and the AF. Lower body negative pressure (LBNP, -5, -10, -15, and -20 torr) and passive leg elevation (LE, 50 cm) combined with lower body positive pressure (LBPP, +5, +10, and +20 torr) were utilized to elicit central hypovolemia and hypervolemia, respectively. Range of CVP (from LBNP to LE+LBPP) was similar in the AF (from -3.9 to +1.9 mm Hg) and HF (from -4.0 to +2.2 mm Hg). However, FVR/CVP was significantly less in the HF (-1.8 +/- 0.1 unit.mm Hg-1) than AF (-34 +/- 0.1 unit.mm Hg-1). The FVR decrease in response to increase in CVP was significantly diminished in the HF (-1.46 +/- 0.45 unit.mm Hg-1) compared to the AF (-4.40 +/- 0.97 unit.mm Hg-1), and during LBNP induced unloading the FVR/CVP of the HF (-2.01 +/- 0.49 unit.mm Hg-1) was less (P < 0.08) than the AF (-3.28 +/- 0.69 unit.mm Hg-1). We concluded that the cardiopulmonary baroreceptor mediated FVR reflex response was significantly less sensitive to changes in CVP in individuals who practice exercise training.

  2. Affective Responses to an Aerobic Dance Class: The Impact of Perceived Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholomew, John B.; Miller, Bridget M.

    2002-01-01

    Tested the mastery hypothesis as an explanation for the affective benefits of acute exercise. Undergraduate women from a self-selected aerobic dance class rated their exercise performance following class. Affect questionnaires were completed before and at 5 and 20 minutes after the class. Results showed an overall improvement in affect following…

  3. Sweat lactate response between males with high and low aerobic fitness.

    PubMed

    Green, J M; Pritchett, R C; Crews, T R; McLester, J R; Tucker, D C

    2004-01-01

    Sweat lactate indirectly reflects eccrine gland metabolism. However the potential influence of aerobic fitness on sweat lactate is not well-understood. Six males with high aerobic fitness [peak oxygen consumption ( VO(2)peak): 61.6 (2.5) ml.kg(-1).min(-1)] and seven males with low aerobic fitness [ VO(2)peak: 41.8 (6.4) ml.kg(-1).min(-1)] completed a maximal exertion cycling trial followed on a different day by 60 min of cycling (60 rev.min(-1)) in a 30 degrees C wet bulb globe temperature environment. Intensity was individualized at 90% of the ventilatory threshold ( V(E)/ VO(2) increase with no concurrent V(E)/ VCO(2) increase). Sweat samples were collected from the lumbar region every 10 min and analyzed for lactate concentration. Sweat rate (SR) was significantly greater ( p<0.05) for subjects with a high [1445 (254) ml.h(-1)] versus a low [1056 (261) ml.h(-1)] fitness level. Also, estimated total lactate excretion (SRxmean sweat lactate concentration) was marginally greater ( p=0.2) in highly fit males. However, repeated measures ANOVA showed no significant differences ( p>0.05) between groups for sweat lactate concentration at any time point. Current results show highly fit (vs. low fitness level) males have a greater sweat rate which is consistent with previous literature. However aerobic fitness and subsequent variations in SR do not appear to influence sweat lactate concentrations in males.

  4. Aerobic fitness does not modulate protein metabolism in response to increased exercise: a controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: This study examined how a sudden increase in exercise energy expenditure affected whole body protein turnover and nitrogen balance in people of differing aerobic fitness. We hypothesized that whole-body protein turnover would be attenuated, and nitrogen balance would be preserved, in aerobi...

  5. A Pilot Study of Women’s Affective Responses to Common and Uncommon Forms of Aerobic Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Courtney J.; Smith, Jane Ellen; Bryan, Angela D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the extent to which participants exposed to an uncommon versus common exercise stimulus would result in more favourable affect at post task. Design Experimental design. Participants, (N = 120) American women aged 18–45 years, were randomly assigned to complete 30-minutes of either the uncommon (HOOP; n = 58) or common (WALK; n = 62) exercise stimulus. Main Outcome Measures Self-reported affect and intentions for future exercise were measured before and after the 30-minute exercise bout. Results Analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) were run to compare post-task affect across the HOOP and WALK conditions. At post-task, participants assigned to HOOP reported more positively valenced affect, higher ratings of positive activated affect, lower ratings of negative deactivated affect, and stronger intentions for future aerobic exercise compared to participants assigned to WALK. Conclusions Participants who completed an uncommon bout of aerobic exercise (HOOP) reported more favourable affect post-exercise, as well as stronger intentions for future exercise, compared to participants who completed a common bout of aerobic exercise (WALK). Future work using a longitudinal design is needed to understand the relationships between familiarity with an exercise stimulus, affective responses to exercise, motivation for future exercise behaviour, and exercise maintenance over time. PMID:26394246

  6. The electrical response of plants under radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Mohammad; Xi, Wenze; Feng, David J. Y.; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2014-05-01

    Plant electricity was discovered about 100 years ago. Until recent two decades, researchers started to notice that the electricity play a key role for plant's communications and defense. Recently, we have demonstrated a wound-generated electrical signal, up to a few hundred mV, can be produced and propagate through the whole plant. As plants defense reactions the wound signal will activate genes and induce subsequent molecular biology responses. In this study, we further investigate the electrical response of plants when they are under nuclear radiation. We discovered nuclear radiation could produce internal voltage gradient in living trees, resulting in measureable voltage and current signals. The results was measured by attaching one of electrodes to a lower branch, close to the roots and attaching the other one to an upper branch. During irradiating, trees were set up at 1-meter far from a NIST-certified 241AmBe neutron source (30 mCi). It will produce a neutron field of about 13 mrem/h, corresponding to an actual absorbed dose of ~ 1 mrad/h by assuming the tissue is primarily water content. Once the radioactive source is pulled up from a shielded container below the tree, the system potential starts to drop and in about 6-7 hours it drops down to -220mV, eventually stabilizing at around -250mV after 10 hours of radiation. We have further observed plant electricity changes caused by x-ray, gamma-ray, and beta-ray radiations. After the sources were removed, the terminal voltage recovered and eventually returned to the original value.

  7. The Dose Response Relationship for Radiation Carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Eric

    2008-03-01

    Recent surveys show that the collective population radiation dose from medical procedures in the U.S. has increased by 750% in the past two decades. It would be impossible to imagine the practice of medicine today without diagnostic and therapeutic radiology, but nevertheless the widespread and rapidly increasing use of a modality which is a known human carcinogen is a cause for concern. To assess the magnitude of the problem it is necessary to establish the shape of the dose response relationship for radiation carcinogenesis. Information on radiation carcinogenesis comes from the A-bomb survivors, from occupationally exposed individuals and from radiotherapy patients. The A-bomb survivor data indicates a linear relationship between dose and the risk of solid cancers up to a dose of about 2.5 Sv. The lowest dose at which there is a significant excess cancer risk is debatable, but it would appear to be between 40 and 100 mSv. Data from the occupation exposure of nuclear workers shows an excess cancer risk at an average dose of 19.4 mSv. At the other end of the dose scale, data on second cancers in radiotherapy patients indicates that cancer risk does not continue to rise as a linear function of dose, but tends towards a plateau of 40 to 60 Gy, delivered in a fractionated regime. These data can be used to estimate the impact of diagnostic radiology at the low dose end of the dose response relationship, and the impact of new radiotherapy modalities at the high end of the dose response relationship. In the case of diagnostic radiology about 90% of the collective population dose comes from procedures (principally CT scans) which involve doses at which there is credible evidence of an excess cancer incidence. While the risk to the individual is small and justified in a symptomatic patient, the same is not true of some screening procedures is asymptomatic individuals, and in any case the huge number of procedures must add up to a potential public health problem. In the

  8. Precipitation Response to Regional Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, D. T.; Voulgarakis, A.; Faluvegi, G.; Milly, G.

    2012-01-01

    Precipitation shifts can have large impacts on human society and ecosystems. Many aspects of how inhomogeneous radiative forcings influence precipitation remain unclear, however. Here we investigate regional precipitation responses to various forcings imposed in different latitude bands in a climate model. We find that several regions show strong, significant responses to most forcings, but that the magnitude and even the sign depends upon the forcing location and type. Aerosol and ozone forcings typically induce larger responses than equivalent carbon dioxide (CO2) forcing, and the influence of remote forcings often outweighs that of local forcings. Consistent with this, ozone and especially aerosols contribute greatly to precipitation changes over the Sahel and South and East Asia in historical simulations, and inclusion of aerosols greatly increases the agreement with observed trends in these areas, which cannot be attributed to either greenhouse gases or natural forcings. Estimates of precipitation responses derived from multiplying our Regional Precipitation Potentials (RPP; the response per unit forcing relationships) by historical forcings typically capture the actual response in full transient climate simulations fairly well, suggesting that these relationships may provide useful metrics. The strong sensitivity to aerosol and ozone forcing suggests that although some air quality improvements may unmask greenhouse gas-induced warming, they have large benefits for reducing regional disruption of the hydrologic cycle.

  9. Effects of oxygen on intrinsic radiation sensitivity: A test of the relationship between aerobic and hypoxic linear-quadratic (LQ) model parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, David J.; Stewart, Robert D.; Semenenko, Vladimir A.

    2006-09-15

    The poor treatment prognosis for tumors with high levels of hypoxia is usually attributed to the decreased sensitivity of hypoxic cells to ionizing radiation. Mechanistic considerations suggest that linear quadratic (LQ) survival model radiosensitivity parameters for hypoxic (H) and aerobic (A) cells are related by {alpha}{sub H}={alpha}{sub A}/oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) and ({alpha}/{beta}){sub H}=OER({alpha}/{beta}){sub A}. The OER parameter may be interpreted as the ratio of the dose to the hypoxic cells to the dose to the aerobic cells required to produce the same number of DSBs per cell. The validity of these expressions is tested against survival data for mammalian cells irradiated in vitro with low- and high-LET radiation. Estimates of hypoxic and aerobic radiosensitivity parameters are derived from independent and simultaneous least-squares fits to the survival data. An external bootstrap procedure is used to test whether independent fits to the survival data give significantly better predictions than simultaneous fits to the aerobic and hypoxic data. For low-LET radiation, estimates of the OER derived from the in vitro data are between 2.3 and 3.3 for extreme levels of hypoxia. The estimated range for the OER is similar to the oxygen enhancement ratios reported in the literature for the initial yield of DSBs. The half-time for sublethal damage repair was found to be independent of oxygen concentration. Analysis of patient survival data for cervix cancer suggests an average OER less than or equal to 1.5, which corresponds to a pO{sub 2} of 5 mm Hg (0.66%) in the in vitro experiments. Because the OER derived from the cervix cancer data is averaged over cells at all oxygen levels, cells irradiated in vivo under extreme levels of hypoxia (<0.5 mm Hg) may have an OER substantially higher than 1.5. The reported analyses of in vitro data, as well as mechanistic considerations, provide strong support for the expressions relating hypoxic and aerobic

  10. Effect of aerobic fitness on capillary blood volume and diffusing membrane capacity responses to exercise

    PubMed Central

    Tedjasaputra, Vincent; Bouwsema, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Endurance trained athletes exhibit enhanced cardiovascular function compared to non‐athletes, although it is considered that exercise training does not enhance lung structure and function.An increased pulmonary capillary blood volume at rest is associated with a higher V˙O2 max .In the present study, we compared the diffusion capacity, pulmonary capillary blood volume and diffusing membrane capacity responses to exercise in endurance‐trained males compared to non‐trained males.Exercise diffusion capacity was greater in athletes, secondary to an increased membrane diffusing capacity, and not pulmonary capillary blood volume.Endurance‐trained athletes appear to have differences within the pulmonary membrane that facilitate the increased O2 demand needed for high‐level exercise. Abstract Endurance‐trained athletes exhibit enhanced cardiovascular function compared to non‐athletes, allthough it is generally accepted that exercise training does not enhance lung structure and function. Recent work has shown that an increased resting pulmonary capillary blood volume (V C) is associated with a higher maximum oxygen consumption (V˙O2 max ), although there have been no studies to date examining how aerobic fitness affects the V C response to exercise. Based on previous work, we hypothesized that endurance‐trained athletes will have greater V C compared to non‐athletes during cycling exercise. Fifteen endurance‐trained athletes (HI: V˙O2 max 64.6 ± 1.8 ml kg−1 min−1) and 14 non‐endurance trained males (LO: V˙O2 max 45.0 ± 1.2 ml kg−1 min−1) were matched for age and height. Haemoglobin‐corrected diffusion capacity (DLCO), V C and diffusing membrane capacity (D M) were determined using the Roughton and Forster (1957) multiple fraction of inspired O2 (FIO2)‐DLCO method at baseline and during incremental cycle exercise up to 90% of peak O2 consumption. During exercise, both groups exhibited increases in DLCO, D M and V C

  11. Radiation response issues for infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalma, Arne H.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers describe the most important radiation response issues for infrared detectors. In general, the two key degradation mechanisms in infrared detectors are the noise produced by exposure to a flux of ionizing particles (e.g.; trapped electronics and protons, debris gammas and electrons, radioactive decay of neutron-activated materials) and permanent damage produced by exposure to total dose. Total-dose-induced damage is most often the result of charge trapping in insulators or at interfaces. Exposure to short pulses of ionization (e.g.; prompt x rays or gammas, delayed gammas) will cause detector upset. However, this upset is not important to a sensor unless the recovery time is too long. A few detector technologies are vulnerable to neutron-induced displacement damage, but fortunately most are not. Researchers compare the responses of the new technologies with those of the mainstream technologies of PV HgCdTe and IBC Si:As. One important reason for this comparison is to note where some of the newer technologies have the potential to provide significantly improved radiation hardness compared with that of the mainstream technologies, and thus to provide greater motivation for the pursuit of these technologies.

  12. STRUCTURAL RESPONSE TO INTENSE ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    EXPLODING WIRES, *GLASS, *DAMAGE, ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION , ENERGY CONVERSION, ENERGY CONVERSION, ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION , ELECTROMAGNETIC ... RADIATION , PLASTICS, PLASMAS(PHYSICS), STRESSES, THERMAL STRESSES, INSTRUMENTATION, ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE, ELECTRIC DISCHARGES, THERMOCOUPLES, MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS, MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS.

  13. The effect of aerobic exercise and starvation on growth performance and postprandial metabolic response in juvenile southern catfish (Silurus meridionalis).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Ming; Liu, Li; Yuan, Jian-Ming; Xiao, Yuan-Yuan; Fu, Shi-Jian; Zhang, Yao-Guang

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the effects of aerobic exercise and starvation on growth performance, postprandial metabolic response and their interaction in a sedentary fish species, either satiation-fed or starved juvenile southern catfish (Silurus meridionalis) were exercised at 25 °C under three water velocities, i.e., nearly still water (control), 1 body length (bl) s(-1) and 2 bl s(-1), for eight weeks. Then, the feed intake (FI), food conversion efficiency (FCE), specific growth rate (SGR), morphological parameters, resting ṀO2 (ṀO2rest) and postprandial ṀO2 responses of the experimental fish were measured. Exercise at a low velocity (1 bl s(-1)) showed no effect on any growth performance parameter, whereas exercise at a high velocity (2 bl s(-1)) exhibited higher FI but similar SGR due to the extra energy expenditure from swimming and consequent decreased FCE. Starvation led to a significant body mass loss, whereas the effect intensified in both exercise groups. Exercise resulted in improved cardio-respiratory capacity, as indicated by increased gill and heart indexes, whereas it exhibited no effect on resting and postprandial metabolism in S. meridionalis. The starved fish displayed significantly larger heart, gill and digestive tract indexes compared with the feeding fish, suggesting selective maintenance of cardio-respiratory and digestive function in this fish species during starvation. However, starved fish still exhibited impaired digestive performance, as evidenced by the prolonged duration and low postprandial metabolic increase, and this effect was further exacerbated in both the 1 and 2 bl s(-1) exercise groups. These data suggest the following: (1) aerobic exercise produced no improvement in growth performance but may have led to the impairment of growth under insufficient food conditions; (2) the mass of different organs and tissues responded differently to aerobic exercise and starvation due to the different physiological roles they play; and (3

  14. Acute blood pressure response in hypertensive elderly women immediately after water aerobics exercise: A crossover study.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Raphael Martins; Vilaça-Alves, José; Noleto, Marcelo Vasconcelos; Silva, Juliana Sá; Costa, Andressa Moura; Silva, Christoffer Novais Farias; Póvoa, Thaís Inácio Rolim; Lehnen, Alexandre Machado

    2017-01-01

    Water aerobics exercise is widely recommended for elderly people. However, little is known about the acute effects on hemodynamic variables. Thus, we assessed the effects of a water aerobic session on blood pressure in hypertensive elderly women. Fifty hypertensive elderly women aged 67.8 ± 4.1 years, 1.5 ± 0.6 m high and BMI 28.6 ± 3.9 kg/m(2), participated in a crossover clinical trial. The experiment consisted of a 45-minute water aerobics session (70%-75% HRmax adjusted for the aquatic environment) (ES) and a control session (no exercise for 45 minutes) (CS). Heart rate was monitored using a heart rate monitor and systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) measurements were taken using a semi-automatic monitor before and immediately after the sessions, and at 10, 20 and 30 minutes thereafter. It was using a generalized estimating equation (GEE) with Bonferroni's post-hoc test (p < 0.05). At the end of the experimental session, ES showed a rise in SBP of 17.4 mmHg (14.3%, p < 0.001) and DBP of 5.4 mmHg (7.8%, p < 0.001) compared to CS. At 10 minutes after exercise, BP declined in ES by a greater magnitude than in CS (SBP 7.5 mmHg, 6.2%, p = 0.005 and DBP 3.8 mmHg, 5.5%, p = 0.013). At 20 minutes after exercise and thereafter, SBP and DBP were similar in both ES and CS. In conclusion, BP returned to control levels within 10-20 minutes remaining unchanged until 30 minutes after exercise, and post-exercise hypotension was not observed. Besides, BP changed after exercise was a safe rise of small magnitude for hypertensive people.

  15. Atypical radiation response of SCID cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawapun, Nisa

    Murine SCID (severe combined immune deficiency) cells are well known for their defect in DNA double-strand break repair and in variable(diversity)joining [V(D)J] recombination due to a mutation in a catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs). As a consequence, scid cells are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation. The present study showed that asynchronous populations of scid cells were about two-fold more sensitive than Balb/c with respect to cell killing and the defect in scid cells was corrected by complementation with human chromosome 8. Analysis of the survival of synchronized populations as a function of the cell cycle revealed that while scid cells were hypersensitive in all cell cycle phases compared to wild-type cells, this hypersensitivity is even more pronounced in G1 phase. The hypersensitivity reduced as the cells progressed into S phase suggested that homologous recombination repair plays a role. The results imply that there are at least two pathways for the repair of DSB DNA, consistent with a model previously proposed by others. The scid cells were also more sensitive to UVC light (254 nm) killing as compared to wild type cells by clonogenic survival. Using a host cell reactivation (HCR) assay to study the nucleotide excision repair (NER) which is the major repair pathway for UV-photoproducts, the results showed that NER in scid cells was not as efficient as CB- 17. This suggests that DNA-PK is involved in NER as well as non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) DSB repair which is responsible for ionizing radiation sensitivity in scid cells. Repair in scid cells was not totally absent as shown by low dose rate sparing of cell killing after exposure to 137Cs γ-rays at dose rate of 0.6 cGy/h, 1.36 cGy/h, 6 cGy/h as compared to high dose rate at 171 cGy/min, although this phenomenon could be explained partly by proliferation. However, for radiation induced transformation, no significant dose rate effect was seen. A plot of transformation

  16. Aging and aerobic fitness affect the contribution of noradrenergic sympathetic nerves to the rapid cutaneous vasodilator response to local heating.

    PubMed

    Tew, Garry A; Saxton, John M; Klonizakis, Markos; Moss, James; Ruddock, Alan D; Hodges, Gary J

    2011-05-01

    Sedentary aging results in a diminished rapid cutaneous vasodilator response to local heating. We investigated whether this diminished response was due to altered contributions of noradrenergic sympathetic nerves by assessing 1) the age-related decline and 2) the effect of aerobic fitness. Using laser-Doppler flowmetry, we measured skin blood flow (SkBF) in young (24 ± 1 yr) and older (64 ± 1 yr) endurance-trained and sedentary men (n = 7 per group) at baseline and during 35 min of local skin heating to 42°C at 1) untreated forearm sites, 2) forearm sites treated with bretylium tosylate (BT), which prevents neurotransmitter release from noradrenergic sympathetic nerves, and 3) forearm sites treated with yohimbine + propranolol (YP), which antagonizes α- and β-adrenergic receptors. SkBF was converted to cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC = SkBF/mean arterial pressure) and normalized to maximal CVC (%CVC(max)) achieved by skin heating to 44°C. Pharmacological agents were administered using microdialysis. In the young trained group, the rapid vasodilator response was reduced at BT and YP sites (P < 0.05); by contrast, in the young sedentary and older trained groups, YP had no effect (P > 0.05), but BT did (P > 0.05). Neither BT nor YP affected the rapid vasodilator response in the older sedentary group (P > 0.05). These data suggest that the age-related reduction in the rapid vasodilator response is due to an impairment of sympathetic-dependent mechanisms, which can be partly attenuated with habitual aerobic exercise. Rapid vasodilation involves noradrenergic neurotransmitters in young trained men and nonadrenergic sympathetic cotransmitters (e.g., neuropeptide Y) in young sedentary and older trained men, possibly as a compensatory mechanism. Finally, in older sedentary men, the rapid vasodilation appears not to involve the sympathetic system.

  17. Does aerobic exercise affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal hormonal response in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Genc, Aysun; Tur, Birkan Sonel; Aytur, Yesim Kurtais; Oztuna, Derya; Erdogan, Murat Faik

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in the etiopathogenesis of fibromyalgia is not clear. This study aimed to analyze the effects of a 6-week aerobic exercise program on the HPA axis in patients with fibromyalgia and to investigate the effects of this program on the disease symptoms, patients’ fitness, disability, and quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty fibromyalgia patients were randomized to Group 1 (stretching and flexibility exercises at home for 6 weeks) and Group 2 (aerobic exercise three times a week and the same at-home exercises as Group 1 for 6 weeks). Serum levels of cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, and growth hormone were analyzed at baseline and at the end of, and 1 hr after an exercise stress test. [Results] Group 2 showed better improvement in morning stiffness duration and pain. Growth hormone levels significantly increased after intervention and cortisol levels significantly decreased at time-time interaction in both groups. No significant differences in adrenocorticotropic hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 were found. [Conclusion] The results of this study seem to support the hypothesis that there is a dysregulation of the HPA axis in patients with FM, and that a six-week exercise program can influence symptoms and affect the HPA axis hormones. PMID:26311959

  18. Radiometric and Radiation Response of Visible FPAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbs, John

    2007-01-01

    The readout integrated circuit (ROIC) used in these devices was originally developed for use in space based infrared systems operating at deep cryogenic temperatures and was selected because of its proven tolerance to total ionizing radiation? The detectors are a 128 x 128 array of 60 pm x 60 pm pixel elements that have been anti-reflection (AR) coated to improve the response at very short wavelengths. These visible focal plane arrays were operated at -40 C (233 K). Two focal planes were characterized using cobalt-60 radiation to produce ionizing total dose damage in the VFPAs. Both operational and performance data were obtained as functions of total dose. The first device tested showed no appreciable change in responsivity or noise up to 300 krad(Si). However, at the next dose level of 600 krad(Si), the readout was non-operational due to failure in the digital circuitry. The second device was characterized to a total dose of 750 krad(Si) with no observed change in responsivity. An increase dark current was observed in both devices, and in the second device, the dark current caused an increase in noise at low irradiance at 400 krad(Si) and above. The increase in dark current was somewhat un-expected for visible PIN detectors. The median dark current increased more than two orders of magnitude at 300 krad(Si) for the first device and a factor of 350 at 750 krad(Si) for pixels near the edge for the second device. The dark current was found to be a strong function of detector bias, with pixels near the edge of the array showing a greater increase in dark current with bias than those near the center. Since the optical response was not a function of bias, it is hypothesized that the dark current is a surface effect and that the variation in dark current with location is due to a variation in pixel bias, caused by a voltage drop across the pixel common lead. As the total dose increased, the dark current and the voltage drop increased

  19. Running economy, not aerobic fitness, independently alters thermoregulatory responses during treadmill running

    PubMed Central

    Smoljanić, Jovana; Morris, Nathan B.; Dervis, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    We sought to determine the independent influence of running economy (RE) and aerobic fitness [maximum oxygen consumption (V̇o2max)] on thermoregulatory responses during treadmill running by conducting two studies. In study 1, seven high (HI-FIT: 61 ± 5 ml O2·kg−1·min−1) and seven low (LO-FIT: 45 ± 4 ml O2·kg−1·min−1) V̇o2max males matched for physical characteristics and RE (HI-FIT: 200 ± 21; LO-FIT: 200 ± 18 ml O2·kg−1·km−1) ran for 60 min at 1) 60%V̇o2max and 2) a fixed metabolic heat production (Hprod) of 640 W. In study 2, seven high (HI-ECO: 189 ± 15.3 ml O2·kg−1·km−1) and seven low (LO-ECO: 222 ± 10 ml O2·kg−1·km−1) RE males matched for physical characteristics and V̇o2max (HI-ECO: 60 ± 3; LO-ECO: 61 ± 7 ml O2·kg−1·min−1) ran for 60 min at a fixed 1) speed of 10.5 km/h and 2) Hprod of 640 W. Environmental conditions were 25.4 ± 0.8°C, 37 ± 12% RH. In study 1, at Hprod of 640 W, similar changes in esophageal temperature (ΔTes; HI-FIT: 0.63 ± 0.20; LO-FIT: 0.63 ± 0.22°C; P = 0.986) and whole body sweat losses (WBSL; HI-FIT: 498 ± 66; LO-FIT: 497 ± 149 g; P = 0.984) occurred despite different relative intensities (HI-FIT: 55 ± 6; LO-FIT: 39 ± 2% V̇o2max; P < 0.001). At 60% V̇o2max, ΔTes (P = 0.029) and WBSL (P = 0.003) were greater in HI-FIT (1.14 ± 0.32°C; 858 ± 130 g) compared with LO-FIT (0.73 ± 0.34°C; 609 ± 123 g), as was Hprod (HI-FIT: 12.6 ± 0.9; LO-FIT: 9.4 ± 1.0 W/kg; P < 0.001) and the evaporative heat balance requirement (Ereq; HI-FIT: 691 ± 74; LO-FIT: 523 ± 65 W; P < 0.001). Similar sweating onset ΔTes and thermosensitivities occurred between V̇o2max groups. In study 2, at 10.5 km/h, ΔTes (1.16 ± 0.31 vs. 0.78 ± 0.28°C; P = 0.017) and WBSL (835 ± 73 vs. 667 ± 139 g; P = 0.015) were greater in LO-ECO, as was Hprod (13.5 ± 0.6 vs. 11.3 ± 0.8 W/kg; P < 0.001) and Ereq (741 ± 89 vs. 532 ± 130 W; P = 0.007). At Hprod of 640 W, ΔTes (P = 0.910) and WBSL (P = 0.710) were

  20. Running economy, not aerobic fitness, independently alters thermoregulatory responses during treadmill running.

    PubMed

    Smoljanić, Jovana; Morris, Nathan B; Dervis, Sheila; Jay, Ollie

    2014-12-15

    We sought to determine the independent influence of running economy (RE) and aerobic fitness [maximum oxygen consumption (V̇O 2max)] on thermoregulatory responses during treadmill running by conducting two studies. In study 1, seven high (HI-FIT: 61 ± 5 ml O2 · kg(-1) · min(-1)) and seven low (LO-FIT: 45 ± 4 ml O2 · kg(-1) · min(-1)) V̇O 2max males matched for physical characteristics and RE (HI-FIT: 200 ± 21; LO-FIT: 200 ± 18 ml O2 · kg(-1) · km(-1)) ran for 60 min at 1) 60%V̇O 2max and 2) a fixed metabolic heat production (Hprod) of 640 W. In study 2, seven high (HI-ECO: 189 ± 15.3 ml O2 · kg(-1) · km(-1)) and seven low (LO-ECO: 222 ± 10 ml O2 · kg(-1) · km(-1)) RE males matched for physical characteristics and V̇O 2max (HI-ECO: 60 ± 3; LO-ECO: 61 ± 7 ml O2 · kg(-1) · min(-1)) ran for 60 min at a fixed 1) speed of 10.5 km/h and 2) Hprod of 640 W. Environmental conditions were 25.4 ± 0.8°C, 37 ± 12% RH. In study 1, at Hprod of 640 W, similar changes in esophageal temperature (ΔTes; HI-FIT: 0.63 ± 0.20; LO-FIT: 0.63 ± 0.22°C; P = 0.986) and whole body sweat losses (WBSL; HI-FIT: 498 ± 66; LO-FIT: 497 ± 149 g; P = 0.984) occurred despite different relative intensities (HI-FIT: 55 ± 6; LO-FIT: 39 ± 2% V̇O 2max; P < 0.001). At 60% V̇O 2max, ΔTes (P = 0.029) and WBSL (P = 0.003) were greater in HI-FIT (1.14 ± 0.32°C; 858 ± 130 g) compared with LO-FIT (0.73 ± 0.34°C; 609 ± 123 g), as was Hprod (HI-FIT: 12.6 ± 0.9; LO-FIT: 9.4 ± 1.0 W/kg; P < 0.001) and the evaporative heat balance requirement (Ereq; HI-FIT: 691 ± 74; LO-FIT: 523 ± 65 W; P < 0.001). Similar sweating onset ΔTes and thermosensitivities occurred between V̇O 2max groups. In study 2, at 10.5 km/h, ΔTes (1.16 ± 0.31 vs. 0.78 ± 0.28°C; P = 0.017) and WBSL (835 ± 73 vs. 667 ± 139 g; P = 0.015) were greater in LO-ECO, as was Hprod (13.5 ± 0.6 vs. 11.3 ± 0.8 W/kg; P < 0.001) and Ereq (741 ± 89 vs. 532 ± 130 W; P = 0.007). At Hprod of 640 W, ΔTes (P = 0

  1. Exercise Responses to Gravity-Independent Flywheel Aerobic and Resistance Training

    PubMed Central

    Owerkowicz, Tomasz; Cotter, Joshua A.; Haddad, Fadia; Yu, Alvin M.; Camilon, Marinelle L.; Hoang, Theresa; Jimenez, Daniel; Kreitenberg, Arthur; Tesch, Per A.; Caiozzo, Vincent J.; Adams, Gregory R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although a number of exercise systems have been developed to mitigate the physiological deconditioning that occurs in microgravity, few have the capacity to positively impact multiple physiological systems and still meet the volume/mass requirements needed for missions beyond low earth orbit. The purpose of this study was to test the gravity-independent Multi-Mode Exercise Device (M-MED) for both resistance (RE) and aerobic (AE) training stimuli. Methods Eight men and nine women (mean age 22.0±0.4 years) completed five weeks of training on the M-MED: RE 4×7 squats two days a week, and AE 4×4-min rowing bouts at ~90% VO2max three days a week. Pre- and post-training data collection included an aerobic capacity test, MR imaging, strength testing, and vastus lateralis muscle biopsy. Results VO2max increased 8%, 3RM strength 18%, and quadriceps femoris cross-sectional area (CSA) 10%. Knee extensor strength increased at all isokinetic speeds tested. Subjects also demonstrated improved resistance to fatigue in knee extension. At the cellular and molecular level, the biopsy revealed increases in mixed myofiber CSA (13%), citrate synthase activity (26%), total RNA concentration (24%), IGF-I mRNA (77%), Type IIa Myosin Heavy Chain (MHC) mRNA (8%), and concomitant decrease in Type IIx MHC mRNA (−23%). None of the changes were gender-specific. Discussion Both the functional outcomes and biomarker changes indicate that a very low volume of M-MED exercise results in robust adaptation in the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems. The M-MED has the potential to provide a wide range of countermeasure exercises and should be considered for testing in ground-based spaceflight simulation. PMID:26802373

  2. A single bout of high-intensity aerobic exercise facilitates response to paired associative stimulation and promotes sequence-specific implicit motor learning

    PubMed Central

    Mang, Cameron S.; Snow, Nicholas J.; Campbell, Kristin L.; Ross, Colin J. D.

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the impact of a single bout of high-intensity aerobic exercise on 1) long-term potentiation (LTP)-like neuroplasticity via response to paired associative stimulation (PAS) and 2) the temporal and spatial components of sequence-specific implicit motor learning. Additionally, relationships between exercise-induced increases in systemic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and response to PAS and motor learning were evaluated. Sixteen young healthy participants completed six experimental sessions, including the following: 1) rest followed by PAS; 2) aerobic exercise followed by PAS; 3) rest followed by practice of a continuous tracking (CT) task and 4) a no-exercise 24-h retention test; and 5) aerobic exercise followed by CT task practice and 6) a no-exercise 24-h retention test. The CT task included an embedded repeated sequence allowing for evaluation of sequence-specific implicit learning. Slope of motor-evoked potential recruitment curves generated with transcranial magnetic stimulation showed larger increases when PAS was preceded by aerobic exercise (59.8% increase) compared with rest (14.2% increase, P = 0.02). Time lag of CT task performance on the repeated sequence improved under the aerobic exercise condition from early (−100.8 ms) to late practice (−75.2 ms, P < 0.001) and was maintained at retention (−79.2 ms, P = 0.004) but did not change under the rest condition (P > 0.16). Systemic BDNF increased on average by 3.4-fold following aerobic exercise (P = 0.003), but the changes did not relate to neurophysiological or behavioral measures (P > 0.42). These results indicate that a single bout of high-intensity aerobic exercise can prime LTP-like neuroplasticity and promote sequence-specific implicit motor learning. PMID:25257866

  3. A single bout of high-intensity aerobic exercise facilitates response to paired associative stimulation and promotes sequence-specific implicit motor learning.

    PubMed

    Mang, Cameron S; Snow, Nicholas J; Campbell, Kristin L; Ross, Colin J D; Boyd, Lara A

    2014-12-01

    The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the impact of a single bout of high-intensity aerobic exercise on 1) long-term potentiation (LTP)-like neuroplasticity via response to paired associative stimulation (PAS) and 2) the temporal and spatial components of sequence-specific implicit motor learning. Additionally, relationships between exercise-induced increases in systemic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and response to PAS and motor learning were evaluated. Sixteen young healthy participants completed six experimental sessions, including the following: 1) rest followed by PAS; 2) aerobic exercise followed by PAS; 3) rest followed by practice of a continuous tracking (CT) task and 4) a no-exercise 24-h retention test; and 5) aerobic exercise followed by CT task practice and 6) a no-exercise 24-h retention test. The CT task included an embedded repeated sequence allowing for evaluation of sequence-specific implicit learning. Slope of motor-evoked potential recruitment curves generated with transcranial magnetic stimulation showed larger increases when PAS was preceded by aerobic exercise (59.8% increase) compared with rest (14.2% increase, P = 0.02). Time lag of CT task performance on the repeated sequence improved under the aerobic exercise condition from early (-100.8 ms) to late practice (-75.2 ms, P < 0.001) and was maintained at retention (-79.2 ms, P = 0.004) but did not change under the rest condition (P > 0.16). Systemic BDNF increased on average by 3.4-fold following aerobic exercise (P = 0.003), but the changes did not relate to neurophysiological or behavioral measures (P > 0.42). These results indicate that a single bout of high-intensity aerobic exercise can prime LTP-like neuroplasticity and promote sequence-specific implicit motor learning.

  4. ULTRAVIOLET PROTECTIVE COMPOUNDS AS A RESPONSE TO ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Life on Earth has evolved adaptations to many environmental stresses over the epochs. One consistent stress has been exposure to ultraviolet radiation. In response to UVR organisms have adapted myriad responses; behavioral, morphological and physiological. Behaviorally, some orga...

  5. Insulin-resistant subjects have normal angiogenic response to aerobic exercise training in skeletal muscle, but not in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Walton, R Grace; Finlin, Brian S; Mula, Jyothi; Long, Douglas E; Zhu, Beibei; Fry, Christopher S; Westgate, Philip M; Lee, Jonah D; Bennett, Tamara; Kern, Philip A; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2015-06-01

    Reduced vessel density in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle is associated with obesity and may result in decreased perfusion, decreased oxygen consumption, and insulin resistance. In the presence of VEGFA, Angiopoietin-2 (Angpt2) and Angiopoietin-1 (Angpt1) are central determinants of angiogenesis, with greater Angpt2:Angpt1 ratios promoting angiogenesis. In skeletal muscle, exercise training stimulates angiogenesis and modulates transcription of VEGFA, Angpt1, and Angpt2. However, it remains unknown whether exercise training stimulates vessel growth in human adipose tissue, and it remains unknown whether adipose angiogenesis is mediated by angiopoietin signaling. We sought to determine whether insulin-resistant subjects would display an impaired angiogenic response to aerobic exercise training. Insulin-sensitive (IS, N = 12) and insulin-resistant (IR, N = 14) subjects had subcutaneous adipose and muscle (vastus lateralis) biopsies before and after 12 weeks of cycle ergometer training. In both tissues, we measured vessels and expression of pro-angiogenic genes. Exercise training did not increase insulin sensitivity in IR Subjects. In skeletal muscle, training resulted in increased vessels/muscle fiber and increased Angpt2:Angpt1 ratio in both IR and IS subjects. However, in adipose, exercise training only induced angiogenesis in IS subjects, likely due to chronic suppression of VEGFA expression in IR subjects. These results indicate that skeletal muscle of IR subjects exhibits a normal angiogenic response to exercise training. However, the same training regimen is insufficient to induce angiogenesis in adipose tissue of IR subjects, which may help to explain why we did not observe improved insulin sensitivity following aerobic training.

  6. The effects of periodized concurrent and aerobic training on oxidative stress parameters, endothelial function and immune response in sedentary male individuals of middle age.

    PubMed

    Schaun, Maximiliano Isoppo; Dipp, Thiago; Rossato, Juliane da Silva; Wilhelm, Eurico Nestor; Pinto, Ronei; Rech, Anderson; Plentz, Rodrigo Della Méa; Homem de Bittencourt, Paulo I; Reischak-Oliveira, Alvaro

    2011-10-01

    The vascular endothelium plays a key role in arterial wall homeostasis by preventing atherosclerotic plaque formation. A primary causal factor of endothelial dysfunction is the reactive oxygen species. Aerobic exercise is ascribed as an important adjuvant therapy in endothelium-dependent cardiovascular disease. However, little is known about the effects of concurrent (aerobic + strength) training on that. For a comparison of the effects of aerobic and concurrent physical training on endothelial function, oxidative stress parameters and the immunoinflammatory activity of monocytes/macrophages, 20 adult male volunteers of middle age were divided into a concurrent training (CT) programme group and an aerobic training group. The glutathione disulphide to glutathione ratio (GSSG/GSH) and plasma lipoperoxide (LPO) levels, as well as flow-mediated dilation (FMD), monocyte/macrophage functional activity (zymosan phagocytosis), body lipid profiles, aerobic capacity (maximal oxygen uptake) and strength parameters (one-repetition maximum test), were measured before and after the exercise training programmes. The CT exhibited reduced acute effects of exercise on the GSSG/GSH ratio, plasma LPO levels and zymosan phagocytosis. The CT also displayed improved lipid profiles, glycaemic control, maximal oxygen uptake and one-repetition maximum test values. In both the aerobic training and the CT, training improved the acute responses to exercise, as inferred from a decrease in the GSSG/GSH ratios. The aerobic sessions did not alter basal levels of plasma LPO or macrophage phagocytic activity but improved FMD values as well as lipid profiles and glycaemic control. In summary, both training programmes improve systemic redox status and antioxidant defences. However, the aerobic training was more efficient in improving FMD in the individuals studied.

  7. Vitamin E Analogs as Radiation Response Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pankaj K.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    The potentially life-threatening effects of total body ionizing radiation exposure have been known for more than a century. Despite considerable advances in our understanding of the effects of radiation over the past six decades, efforts to identify effective radiation countermeasures for use in case of a radiological/nuclear emergency have been largely unsuccessful. Vitamin E is known to have antioxidant properties capable of scavenging free radicals, which have critical roles in radiation injuries. Tocopherols and tocotrienols, vitamin E analogs together known as tocols, have shown promise as radioprotectors. Although the pivotal mechanisms of action of tocols have long been thought to be their antioxidant properties and free radical scavenging activities, other alternative mechanisms have been proposed to drive their activity as radioprotectors. Here we provide a brief overview of the effects of ionizing radiation, the mechanistic mediators of radiation-induced damage, and the need for radiation countermeasures. We further outline the role for, efficacy of, and mechanisms of action of tocols as radioprotectors, and we compare and contrast their efficacy and mode of action with that of another well-studied chemical radioprotector, amifostine. PMID:26366184

  8. Aerobic Lineage of the Oxidative Stress Response Protein Rubrerythrin Emerged in an Ancient Microaerobic, (Hyper)Thermophilic Environment.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Juan P; Quatrini, Raquel; Holmes, David S

    2016-01-01

    Rubrerythrins (RBRs) are non-heme di-iron proteins belonging to the ferritin-like superfamily. They are involved in oxidative stress defense as peroxide scavengers in a wide range of organisms. The vast majority of RBRs, including classical forms of this protein, contain a C-terminal rubredoxin-like domain involved in electron transport that is used during catalysis in anaerobic conditions. Rubredoxin is an ancient and large protein family of short length (<100 residues) that contains a Fe-S center involved in electron transfer. However, functional forms of the enzyme lacking the rubredoxin-like domain have been reported (e.g., sulerythrin and ferriperoxin). In this study, phylogenomic evidence is presented that suggests that a complete lineage of rubrerythrins, lacking the rubredoxin-like domain, arose in an ancient microaerobic and (hyper)thermophilic environments in the ancestors of the Archaea Thermoproteales and Sulfolobales. This lineage (termed the "aerobic-type" lineage) subsequently evolved to become adapted to environments with progressively lower temperatures and higher oxygen concentrations via the acquisition of two co-localized genes, termed DUF3501 and RFO, encoding a conserved protein of unknown function and a predicted Fe-S oxidoreductase, respectively. Proposed Horizontal Gene Transfer events from these archaeal ancestors to Bacteria expanded the opportunities for further evolution of this RBR including adaption to lower temperatures. The second lineage (termed the cyanobacterial lineage) is proposed to have evolved in cyanobacterial ancestors, maybe in direct response to the production of oxygen via oxygenic photosynthesis during the Great Oxygen Event (GOE). It is hypothesized that both lineages of RBR emerged in a largely anaerobic world with "whiffs" of oxygen and that their subsequent independent evolutionary trajectories allowed microorganisms to transition from this anaerobic world to an aerobic one.

  9. Aerobic Lineage of the Oxidative Stress Response Protein Rubrerythrin Emerged in an Ancient Microaerobic, (Hyper)Thermophilic Environment

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas, Juan P.; Quatrini, Raquel; Holmes, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Rubrerythrins (RBRs) are non-heme di-iron proteins belonging to the ferritin-like superfamily. They are involved in oxidative stress defense as peroxide scavengers in a wide range of organisms. The vast majority of RBRs, including classical forms of this protein, contain a C-terminal rubredoxin-like domain involved in electron transport that is used during catalysis in anaerobic conditions. Rubredoxin is an ancient and large protein family of short length (<100 residues) that contains a Fe-S center involved in electron transfer. However, functional forms of the enzyme lacking the rubredoxin-like domain have been reported (e.g., sulerythrin and ferriperoxin). In this study, phylogenomic evidence is presented that suggests that a complete lineage of rubrerythrins, lacking the rubredoxin-like domain, arose in an ancient microaerobic and (hyper)thermophilic environments in the ancestors of the Archaea Thermoproteales and Sulfolobales. This lineage (termed the “aerobic-type” lineage) subsequently evolved to become adapted to environments with progressively lower temperatures and higher oxygen concentrations via the acquisition of two co-localized genes, termed DUF3501 and RFO, encoding a conserved protein of unknown function and a predicted Fe-S oxidoreductase, respectively. Proposed Horizontal Gene Transfer events from these archaeal ancestors to Bacteria expanded the opportunities for further evolution of this RBR including adaption to lower temperatures. The second lineage (termed the cyanobacterial lineage) is proposed to have evolved in cyanobacterial ancestors, maybe in direct response to the production of oxygen via oxygenic photosynthesis during the Great Oxygen Event (GOE). It is hypothesized that both lineages of RBR emerged in a largely anaerobic world with “whiffs” of oxygen and that their subsequent independent evolutionary trajectories allowed microorganisms to transition from this anaerobic world to an aerobic one. PMID:27917155

  10. Tissue Radiation Response with Maximum Tsallis Entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Sotolongo-Grau, O.; Rodriguez-Perez, D.; Antoranz, J. C.; Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar

    2010-10-08

    The expression of survival factors for radiation damaged cells is currently based on probabilistic assumptions and experimentally fitted for each tumor, radiation, and conditions. Here, we show how the simplest of these radiobiological models can be derived from the maximum entropy principle of the classical Boltzmann-Gibbs expression. We extend this derivation using the Tsallis entropy and a cutoff hypothesis, motivated by clinical observations. The obtained expression shows a remarkable agreement with the experimental data found in the literature.

  11. Tissue radiation response with maximum Tsallis entropy.

    PubMed

    Sotolongo-Grau, O; Rodríguez-Pérez, D; Antoranz, J C; Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar

    2010-10-08

    The expression of survival factors for radiation damaged cells is currently based on probabilistic assumptions and experimentally fitted for each tumor, radiation, and conditions. Here, we show how the simplest of these radiobiological models can be derived from the maximum entropy principle of the classical Boltzmann-Gibbs expression. We extend this derivation using the Tsallis entropy and a cutoff hypothesis, motivated by clinical observations. The obtained expression shows a remarkable agreement with the experimental data found in the literature.

  12. Radiation responses of human bladder cancer assessed in vitro or as xenografts in immune-deprived mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tannock, I.; Choo, B.; Buick, R.

    1984-10-01

    The response to radiation of cells derived from transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the human bladder has been studied. In vitro radiation survival curves for two established cell lines, RT-4 and MGH-U1, and for a cell line HB-10 derived recently from biopsy of a metastatic lymph node were characterized by values of D/sub 0/ and anti n in the range of 1.1-1.5 Gy and 2-7 respectively. The oxygen enhancement ratio of HB-10 cells was 2.8. Xenografts derived from the line HB-10 were irradiated in vivo under both aerobic and hypoxic conditions and cell survival was assessed in agar. Both aerobic and hypoxic survival curves were similar to that obtained for irradiation of hypoxic HB-10 cells in culture. Another tumor line, HB-15, derived from a cystoscopic biopsy of primary TCC, was maintained by transplantation of xenografts. Regrowth curves for HB-15 xenografts after radiation doses of 10 or 20 Gy were parallel to the growth curve for untreated controls but with volume reduced by factors of about 5 and 20 respectively. Cells derived from TCC of the human bladder exhibit parameters of radiation survival similar to those of other mammalian cells, and that xenografts derived from such cells contain a high proportion of hypoxic cells.

  13. Biological Bases for Radiation Adaptive Responses in the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Bobby R.; Lin, Yong; Wilder, Julie; Belinsky, Steven

    2015-03-01

    Our main research objective was to determine the biological bases for low-dose, radiation-induced adaptive responses in the lung and use the knowledge gained to produce an improved risk model for radiation-induced lung cancer that accounts for activated natural protection, genetic influences, and the role of epigenetic regulation (epiregulation). Currently, low-dose radiation risk assessment is based on the linear-no-threshold hypothesis which now is known to be unsupported by a large volume of data.

  14. Application of response surface methodology (RSM) for optimization of semi-aerobic landfill leachate treatment using ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Amr, Salem S.; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Bashir, Mohammed J. K.

    2014-09-01

    The removal efficiencies for chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammoniacal nitrogen (NH3-N), and color, as well as ozone consumption (OC) from the Malaysian semi-aerobic landfill stabilized leachate using ozone reactor, were investigated. Central composite design with response surface methodology was applied to evaluate the interaction and relationship between operating variables (i.e., ozone dosage, COD concentration, and reaction time) and to develop the optimum operating condition. Based on statistical analysis, Quadratic models for the four responses (COD, NH3-N, color, and OC) proved to be significant with very low probability values (<0.0001). The obtained optimum conditions were 70 g/m3 ozone, 250 mg/l COD, and 60 min reaction time. The results obtained by the predicted model were 26.7, 7.1, and 92 % removal for COD, NH3-N, and color, respectively, with 9.42 (kgO3/kg COD) OC. The predicted results fitted well with the results of the laboratory experiment.

  15. Aerobic fitness and sympatho-adrenal response to short-term psycho-emotional stress under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Wittels, P; Rosenmayr, G; Bischof, B; Hartter, E; Haber, P

    1994-01-01

    A possible relationship between aerobic fitness (AF), measured by maximal cycle ergometry (CE) and sympatho-adrenal response to acute, short lasting psycho-emotional stress was investigated by monitoring heart rate (fc) and excretion of catecholamines. The activation of the sympatho-adrenal system was characterised by the noradrenaline: adrenaline ratio. A group of 11 healthy men [22.8 (SD 2.52) years] lived under identical environmental conditions; their mean maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) was 47.1 (SD 3.9) ml.min-1.kg-1. After the physiological and psychological laboratory tests had been completed the fc of the subjects was monitored continuously during the "guerilla slide" and "parachute jump by night", two emotionally stressful military tasks. Maximal fc (fc, max) attained during these events was 84.5% and 83% of fc, max during CE (fc, max, CE), respectively. A significant relationship (r = -0.92, P < 0.0002) between fc, max reached during the stressful tasks and VO2max was found only for the guerilla slide, which was preceded by physical strain, sleep deprivation and energy deficit. One subject with some prior experience in parachuting showed the lowest fc response and the lowest sympatho-adrenal activation in both events, independent of the degree of AF. In conclusion, AF was found to influence the sympatho-adrenal and fc response to acute, short-lasting emotional stress when the stressful event was aggravated by preceding physical strain, the magnitude of the stress response depending largely on individual experience and effective mechanisms for coping with specific stimuli.

  16. Radiation Induced Immune Response in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    trials of antibodies to TIP-1 in patients receiving radiotherapy for radiation. Publications, Abstracts, and Presentations none Inventions...therapy. Because radiotherapy is a primary mode of treatment of both localized prostate cancer and metastatic prostate cancer. These antigens are...antigens that are specifically over- expressed in cancer resulting in too few molecular targets and small percentages of patients who can be treated

  17. Surface energy budget responses to radiative forcing at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Nathaniel B.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Cox, Christopher J.; Noone, David; Persson, P. Ola G.; Steffen, Konrad

    2017-02-01

    Greenland Ice Sheet surface temperatures are controlled by an exchange of energy at the surface, which includes radiative, turbulent, and ground heat fluxes. Data collected by multiple projects are leveraged to calculate all surface energy budget (SEB) terms at Summit, Greenland, for the full annual cycle from July 2013 to June 2014 and extend to longer periods for the radiative and turbulent SEB terms. Radiative fluxes are measured directly by a suite of broadband radiometers. Turbulent sensible heat flux is estimated via the bulk aerodynamic and eddy correlation methods, and the turbulent latent heat flux is calculated via a two-level approach using measurements at 10 and 2 m. The subsurface heat flux is calculated using a string of thermistors buried in the snow pack. Extensive quality-control data processing produced a data set in which all terms of the SEB are present 75 % of the full annual cycle, despite the harsh conditions. By including a storage term for a near-surface layer, the SEB is balanced in this data set to within the aggregated uncertainties for the individual terms. November and August case studies illustrate that surface radiative forcing is driven by synoptically forced cloud characteristics, especially by low-level, liquid-bearing clouds. The annual cycle and seasonal diurnal cycles of all SEB components indicate that the non-radiative terms are anticorrelated to changes in the total radiative flux and are hence responding to cloud radiative forcing. Generally, the non-radiative SEB terms and the upwelling longwave radiation component compensate for changes in downwelling radiation, although exact partitioning of energy in the response terms varies with season and near-surface characteristics such as stability and moisture availability. Substantial surface warming from low-level clouds typically leads to a change from a very stable to a weakly stable near-surface regime with no solar radiation or from a weakly stable to neutral

  18. Aerobic Tennis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Michael J.; Ahlschwede, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Increasing the aerobic nature of tennis drills in the physical education class may be necessary if tennis is to remain a part of the public school curriculum. This article gives two examples of drills that can be modified by teachers to increase activity level. (IAH)

  19. Influence of fitness on the integrated neuroendocrine response to aerobic exercise until exhaustion.

    PubMed

    de Diego Acosta, A M; García, J C; Fernández-Pastor, V J; Perán, S; Ruiz, M; Guirado, F

    2001-12-01

    A group of trained and sedentary men performed an incremental graded exercise-test to exhaustion in order to assess the organic response of the two main stress-activated systems: the sympathetic nervous system with its endocrine component (the adrenal medulla), and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Maximal plasma concentrations of ACTH, cortisol and endogenous opioids (beta-endorphins) were obtained at the end of the exercise-test in the trained group. Thus ACTH increased from basal value of 21.25 +/- 2.5 pg/ml to 88.78 +/- 11.8 pg/ml at the end of the exercise (p<0.01); cortisol, from 16.56 microg/dl +/- 4.94 microg/dl to 23.80 +/- 4.57 microg/dl in min 15 of the recovery period (p<0.001); and beta-endorphin from 21.80 +/- 8.33 pmol/ml to 64.36 +/- 9.8 pmol/ml in min 3 of the recovery period (p<0.05). Catecholamine levels were increased from initial values at the end of the effort test in both control and trained groups. Control subjects exhibited a higher responsiveness compared to trained and showed superior intrinsic stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system. These results reveal a different response according to fitness in a physical stress situation.

  20. [Mechanism of cytogenetic adaptive response induced by low dose radiation].

    PubMed

    Cai, L; Liu, S

    1990-11-01

    Cytogenetic observation on human lymphocytes indicated that pre-exposure of 10, 50 and 75 mGy X-rays could induced the adaptive response. Experimental results with different temperature treatment showed that the adaptive response induced by low dose radiation could be enhanced by 41 degrees C and 43 degrees C, but inhibited by 4 degrees C in addition the treatment by 41 degrees C for one hour could also cause the adaptive response as did low dose radiation. Results showed that adaptive response induced by low dose radiation (10 or 50 mGy X-rays) could be eliminated by the protein synthesis inhibitor, implying that the adaptive response is related with the metabolism of cells, especially with the production of certain protective proteins.

  1. The Dose Window for Radiation-Induced Protective Adaptive Responses

    PubMed Central

    Mitchel, Ronald E. J.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive responses to low doses of low LET radiation occur in all organisms thus far examined, from single cell lower eukaryotes to mammals. These responses reduce the deleterious consequences of DNA damaging events, including radiation-induced or spontaneous cancer and non-cancer diseases in mice. The adaptive response in mammalian cells and mammals operates within a certain window that can be defined by upper and lower dose thresholds, typically between about 1 and 100 mGy for a single low dose rate exposure. However, these thresholds for protection are not a fixed function of total dose, but also vary with dose rate, additional radiation or non-radiation stressors, tissue type and p53 functional status. Exposures above the upper threshold are generally detrimental, while exposures below the lower threshold may or may not increase either cancer or non-cancer disease risk. PMID:20585438

  2. Radiation response of SNOS nonvolatile transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWhorter, P. J.; Miller, S. L.; Dellin, T. A.

    1986-12-01

    Data loss and permanent damage resulting from the irradiation of SNOS (polySilicon-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon) nonvolatile memory transistors fabricated with current SNLA EEPROM processing are examined. It is shown that these transistors can retain data for ten years after a 500 krad irradiation, and can be programmed and function properly following a 1300 Mrad irradiation. A new model is presented which yields a simple analytical solution that accurately predicts the radiation induced threshold voltage shifts of SNOS transistors for a wide range of initial threshold voltages and total doses.

  3. Radiation response of SNOS nonvolatile transistors

    SciTech Connect

    McWhorter, P.J.; Miller, S.L.; Dellin, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Data loss and permanent damage resulting from the irradiation of SNOS (polySilicon-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon) nonvolatile memory transistors fabricated with current SNLA EEPROM processing are examined. It is shown that these transistors can retain data for ten years after a 500 krad irradiation, and can be programmed and function properly following a 1300 Mrad irradiation. A new model is presented which yields a simple analytical solution that accurately predicts the radiation induced threshold voltage shifts of SNOS transistors for a wide range of initial threshold voltages and total doses. 10 refs.

  4. A transient elevated irisin blood concentration in response to prolonged, moderate aerobic exercise in young men and women.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, R R; Shockett, P; Webb, N D; Shah, U; Castracane, V D

    2014-02-01

    Irisin, a newly discovered, PGC-1α dependent myokine, has recently been shown to increase in circulation in response to sprint exercise. This study examined the effect of prolonged exercise on irisin concentrations in young men (n=7) as well as in young women (n=5) during different stages of the menstrual cycle. Seven young men completed 90 min of treadmill exercise at 60% of VO2max and a resting control trial. Five women completed the same exercise protocol in two different trials: during the early follicular phase and mid-luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Blood samples were collected and analyzed for irisin concentrations immediately before exercise, at 54 and 90 min of exercise, and at 20 min of recovery (R20). Findings revealed that by 54 min of a 90 min treadmill exercise protocol at 60% of VO2max, irisin concentrations significantly increased 20.4% in young men and 20.3% as well as 24.6% in young women during the early follicular and mid-luteal phases of the menstrual cycle, respectively. However, by 90 min of exercise as well as R20, irisin concentrations were no longer elevated. Stage of the menstrual cycle did not affect responses in young women. Findings indicate that prolonged aerobic exercise produces a transient increase in irisin concentrations during the first hour of exercise for both genders and suggest that this form of moderate exercise may be helpful in improving fat metabolism.

  5. Modeling Clinical Radiation Responses in the IMRT Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, J. L.; Murray, D.; Stewart, R. D.; Phillips, M. H.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the critical issues of radiobiological models, particularly as they apply to clinical radiation therapy. Developing models of radiation responses has a long history that continues to the present time. Many different models have been proposed, but in the field of radiation oncology, the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has had the most impact on the design of treatment protocols. Questions have been raised as to the value of the LQ model given that the biological assumption underlying it has been challenged by molecular analyses of cell and tissue responses to radiation. There are also questions as to use of the LQ model for hypofractionation, especially for high dose treatments using a single fraction. While the LQ model might over-estimate the effects of large radiation dose fractions, there is insufficient information to fully justify the adoption of alternative models. However, there is increasing evidence in the literature that non-targeted and other indirect effects of radiation sometimes produce substantial deviations from LQ-like dose-response curves. As preclinical and clinical hypofractionation studies accumulate, new or refined dose-response models that incorporate high-dose/fraction non-targeted and indirect effects may be required, but for now the LQ model remains a simple, useful tool to guide the design of treatment protocols.

  6. A systematic review on the effect of acute aerobic exercise on arterial stiffness reveals a differential response in the upper and lower arterial segments.

    PubMed

    Mutter, Andrew F; Cooke, Alexandra B; Saleh, Olivier; Gomez, Yessica-Haydee; Daskalopoulou, Stella S

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to provide insight into the controversy that still abounds as to the impact of acute aerobic exercise on immediate changes in arterial stiffness. Electronic databases were searched to identify articles assessing the effects of acute aerobic exercise on parameters of arterial stiffness. Eligible studies included arterial stiffness measurements before and after acute aerobic exercise in healthy human subjects. Forty-three studies were included. The effect of acute aerobic exercise on arterial stiffness was found to be dependent on the anatomical segment assessed, and on the timing of the measurement post-exercise. Arterial stiffness of the central and upper body peripheral arterial segments was found to be increased relative to resting values immediately post-exercise (0-5 min), whereas, thereafter (>5 min), decreased to a level at or below resting values. In the lower limbs, proximal to the primary working muscles, arterial stiffness decreased immediately post-exercise (0-5 min), which persisted into the recovery period post-exercise (>5 min). This systematic review reveals a differential response to acute exercise in the lower and upper/central arterial segments in healthy adult subjects. We further showed that the effect of acute aerobic exercise on arterial stiffness is dependent on the timing of the measurements post-exercise. Therefore, when assessing the overall impact of exercise on arterial stiffness, it is important to consider the arterial segment being analyzed and measurement time point, as failure to contextualize the measurement can lead to conflicting results and misleading clinical inferences.

  7. Anomalous response of superconducting titanium nitride resonators to terahertz radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bueno, J. Baselmans, J. J. A; Coumou, P. C. J. J.; Zheng, G.; Visser, P. J. de; Klapwijk, T. M.; Driessen, E. F. C.; Doyle, S.

    2014-11-10

    We present an experimental study of kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) fabricated of atomic layer deposited TiN films and characterized at radiation frequencies of 350 GHz. The responsivity to radiation is measured and found to increase with the increase in radiation powers, opposite to what is expected from theory and observed for hybrid niobium titanium nitride/aluminium (NbTiN/Al) and all-aluminium (all-Al) KIDs. The noise is found to be independent of the level of the radiation power. The noise equivalent power improves with higher radiation powers, also opposite to what is observed and well understood for hybrid NbTiN/Al and all-Al KIDs. We suggest that an inhomogeneous state of these disordered superconductors should be used to explain these observations.

  8. The dielectric response to the magnetic field of electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Shouvik; Mukhopadhyay, Sourabh; Datta, Prasanta Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Light–matter interaction in transparent dielectrics is revisited, including the magnetic force on bound charges in the Lorentz oscillator model. The parameter ranges of incident radiation and the medium on which the magnetic field of the electromagnetic radiation will have a significant effect are traced using Floquet theory. The analysis reveals that the threshold intensity for a significant response of the magnetic field of the radiation at the second harmonic of the incident radiation can be reduced to {10}12 {{W}}{{cm}}-2 for off resonant and even lower for resonant interaction. This phenomenon has already been observed indirectly in experiments [1, 2]. Induced magnetizing current due to the magnetic force is shown to originate from a modified dielectric response, which may be useful in future magneto-optic devices, solar energy harvesting, and studying the ultrafast dynamics in doped dielectrics.

  9. Aerobic energy cost and sensation responses during submaximal running exercise--positive effects of wearing compression tights.

    PubMed

    Bringard, A; Perrey, S; Belluye, N

    2006-05-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of wearing compression compared to classic elastic tights and conventional shorts (control trial) on oxygen cost and sensation responses during submaximal running exercise. In part I, aerobic energy cost was evaluated in six trained runners at 10, 12, 14, and 16 km x h(-1). In part II, the increase in energy cost over time (i. e., slow component expressed as difference in VO2 values between min 2 and end-exercise) was determined in six trained runners at a constant running pace corresponding to 80% of maximal VO2 for 15 min duration. All tests were performed on a 200-m indoor track with equivalent thermal stress conditions. VO2 was determined with a portable metabolic system (Cosmed K4b2, Rome, Italy) during all testing sessions. Runners were asked their ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and perceptions for clothing sweating, comfort, and whole thermal sensations following each trial. Results showed in part I a significant lower energy cost only at 12 km x h(-1) by wearing compression and elastic tights compared to conventional shorts. During part II, wearing compression tights decreased significantly VO2 slow component by 26 and 36% compared to elastic tights and conventional shorts, respectively. There were no differences in sweating and comfort sensations, RPE, and for whole thermal sensation between clothing conditions in parts I and II. Wearing compression tights during running exercise may enhance overall circulation and decrease muscle oscillation to promote a lower energy expenditure at a given prolonged submaximal speed.

  10. Initial Molecular-Level Response to Artificial Selection for Increased Aerobic Metabolism Occurs Primarily through Changes in Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Konczal, Mateusz; Babik, Wiesław; Radwan, Jacek; Sadowska, Edyta T; Koteja, Paweł

    2015-06-01

    Experimental evolution combined with genome or transcriptome resequencing (Evolve and Resequence) represents a promising approach for advancing our understanding of the genetic basis of adaptation. Here, we applied this strategy to investigate the effect of selection on a complex trait in lines derived from a natural population of a small mammal. We analyzed the liver and heart transcriptomes of bank voles (Myodes [=Clethrionomys] glareolus) that had been selected for increased aerobic metabolism. The organs were sampled from 13th generation voles; at that point, the voles from four replicate selected lines had 48% higher maximum rates of oxygen consumption than those from four control lines. At the molecular level, the response to selection was primarily observed in gene expression: Over 300 genes were found to be differentially expressed between the selected and control lines and the transcriptome-wide pattern of expression distinguished selected lines from controls. No evidence for selection-driven changes of allele frequencies at coding sites was found: No single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) changed frequency more than expected under drift alone and frequency changes aggregated over all SNPs did not separate selected and control lines. Nevertheless, among genes which showed highest differentiation in allele frequencies between selected and control lines we identified, using information about gene functions and the biology of the selected phenotype, plausible targets of selection; these genes, together with those identified in expression analysis, have been prioritized for further studies. Because our selection lines were derived from a natural population, the amount and the spectrum of variation available for selection probably closely approximated that typically found in populations of small mammals. Therefore, our results are relevant to the understanding of the molecular basis of complex adaptations occurring in natural vertebrate populations.

  11. Cellular response to modulated radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge Mackonis, E.; Suchowerska, N.; Zhang, M.; Ebert, M.; McKenzie, D. R.; Jackson, M.

    2007-09-01

    Cell survival following exposure to spatially modulated beams, as created by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), is investigated. In vitro experiments were performed using malignant melanoma cells (MM576) exposed to a therapeutic megavoltage photon beam. We compared cell survival in modulated fields with cell survival in uniform control fields. Three different spatial modulations of the field were used: a control 'uniform' field in which all cells in a flask were uniformly exposed; a 'quarter' field in which 25% of cells at one end of the flask were exposed and a 'striped' field in which 25% of cells were exposed in three parallel stripes. The cell survival in both the shielded and unshielded regions of the modulated fields, as determined by a clonogenic assay, were compared to the cell survival in the uniform field. We have distinguished three ways in which cell survival is influenced by the fate of neighbouring cells. The first of these (type I effect) is the previously reported classical Bystander effect, where cell survival is reduced when communicating with irradiated cells. We find two new types of Bystander effect. The type II effect is an observed increase in cell survival when nearby cells receive a lethal dose. The type III effect is an increase in the survival of cells receiving a high dose of radiation, when nearby cells receive a low dose. These observations of the Bystander effects emphasize the need for improved radiobiological models, which include communicated effects and account for the effects of modulated dose distribution.

  12. Mechanisms of radiation-induced gene responses

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.

    1996-10-01

    In the process of identifying genes differentially expressed in cells exposed ultraviolet radiation, we have identified a transcript having a 26-bp region that is highly conserved in a variety of species including Bacillus circulans, yeast, pumpkin, Drosophila, mouse, and man. When the 5` region (flanking region or UTR) of a gene, the sequence is predominantly in +/+ orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand; while in the coding region and the 3` region (UTR), the sequence is most frequently in the +/-orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand. In two genes, the element is split into two parts; however, in most cases, it is found only once but with a minimum of 11 consecutive nucleotides precisely depicting the original sequence. The element is found in a large number of different genes with diverse functions (from human ras p21 to B. circulans chitonase). Gel shift assays demonstrated the presence of a protein in HeLa cell extracts that binds to the sense and antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers, as well as to the double- stranded oligonucleotide. When double-stranded oligomer was used, the size shift demonstrated as additional protein-oligomer complex larger than the one bound to either sense or antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers alone. It is speculated either that this element binds to protein(s) important in maintaining DNA is a single-stranded orientation for transcription or, alternatively that this element is important in the transcription-coupled DNA repair process.

  13. Mouse brain responses to charged particle radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Gregory; Nelson, Gregory; Chang, Polly; Favre, Cecile; Fike, John; Mao, Xiao-Wen; Obenaus, Andre; Pecaut, Michael; Vlkolinsky, Roman; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Spigelman, Igor; Stampanoni, Marco

    CHANGES IN DISEASE LATENCY AND HOMEOSTASIS: 1) APP23 transgenic mice exhibit many of the pathological features of Alzheimer's Disease, and the disease progression is continuous over several months. Electrophysiological measurements have shown that disease-related decreases in synaptic efficacy occur earlier in irradiated APP23 animals. 2) Using vascular polymer cast technology combined with micro-tomographic imaging, microvasculature changes following irradiation have been detected and are consistent with loss of vessels and an increased spacing between them. The time course of vessel changes to control and irradiated animals is being constructed. 3) In order to assess the ability of the brain to respond to external environmental shocks and restore orderly normal function (homeostasis), we apply a controlled septic shock by treating animals with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We find that in irradiated animals, the patterns of electrophysiological changes associated with reactions to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are complex and unlike those of either LPS or irradiation alone. They further suggest that the brain continues to remodel for up to 6 months following radiation. This is consistent with the idea that irradiation may potentiate the risks from late secondary insults.

  14. Long period grating response to gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sporea, Dan; Stǎncalie, Andrei; Neguţ, Daniel; Delepine-Lesoille, Sylvie; Lablonde, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    We report the evaluation of one long period grating (LPG) and one fiber Bragg grating (FBG) under gamma irradiation. The LPG was produced by the melting-drawing method based on CO2 laser assisted by a micro-flame and was engraved in a commercial single mode fiber SMF28 from Corning, grating length 25 mm, grating pitch of 720 μm. After the manufacturing of the grating, the fiber was re-coated with Acrylate and the grating was inserted into special ceramic case transparent to gamma radiation. The FBG is commercialized by Technica SA, and it is written in SMF-28 optical fiber (λ= 1546 nm; grating length of 12 mm; reflectivity > 80 %; bandwidth - BW @3 dB < 0.3 nm; side lobe suppress ratio - SLSR >15 dB; Acrylate recoating). By on-line monitoring of the LPG wavelength deep with an optical fiber interrogator during the irradiation exposure and pauses, both the irradiation induced shift (maximum 1.45 nm) and the recovery (in the range of 200 pm) phenomena were observed. Temperature sensitivity of the LPS was not affected by gamma irradiation.

  15. Effect of Aerobic Priming on the Response of Echinochloa crus-pavonis to Anaerobic Stress (Protein Synthesis and Phosphorylation).

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, F.; Lin, J. J.; Fox, T. C.; Mujer, C. V.; Rumpho, M. E.; Kennedy, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Echinochloa species differ in their ability to germinate and grow in the absence of oxygen. Seeds of Echinochloa crus-pavonis (H.B.K.) Schult do not germinate under anoxia but remain viable for extended periods (at least 30 d) when incubated in an anaerobic environment. E. crus-pavonis can be induced to germinate and grow in an anaerobic environment if the seeds are first subjected to a short (1-18 h) exposure to aerobic conditions (aerobic priming). Changes in polypeptide patterns (constitutive and de novo synthesized) and protein phosphorylation induced by aerobic priming were investigated. In the absence of aerobic priming protein degradation was not evident under anaerobic conditions, although synthesis of a 20-kD polypeptide was induced. During aerobic priming, however, synthesis of 37- and 55-kD polypeptides was induced and persisted upon return of the seeds to anoxia. Furthermore, phosphorylation of two 18-kD polypeptides was observed only in those seeds that were labeled with 32PO4 during the aerobic priming period. Subsequent chasing in an anaerobic environment resulted in a decrease in phosphorylation of these polypeptides. Likewise, phosphorylation of the 18-kD polypeptides was not observed if the seeds were labeled in an anaerobic atmosphere. These results suggest that the regulated induction of the 20-, 37-, and 55- kD polypeptides may be important for anaerobic germination and growth of E. crus-pavonis and that the specific phosphorylation of the 18-kD polypeptides may be a factor in regulating this induction. PMID:12232272

  16. Calcineurin-NFAT Signaling and Neurotrophins Control Transformation of Myosin Heavy Chain Isoforms in Rat Soleus Muscle in Response to Aerobic Treadmill Training

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenfeng; Chen, Gan; Li, Fanling; Tang, Changfa; Yin, Dazhong

    2014-01-01

    This study elucidated the role of CaN-NFAT signaling and neurotrophins on the transformation of myosin heavy chain isoforms in the rat soleus muscle fiber following aerobic exercise training. To do so, we examined the content and distribution of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms in the rat soleus muscle fiber, the activity of CaN and expression of NFATc1 in these fibers, and changes in the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neutrophin-3 (NT-3) in the soleus and striatum following high-and medium-intensity aerobic treadmill training. Specific pathogen-free 2 month old male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into three groups: Control group (Con, n = 8), moderate-intensity aerobic exercise group (M-Ex, n = 8) and high-intensity aerobic exercise group (H-Ex, n = 8). We used ATPase staining to identify the muscle fiber type I and II, SDS-PAGE to separate and analyze the isoforms MyHCI, MyHCIIA, MyHCIIB and MyHCIIx, and performed western blots to determine the expression of NFATc1, NGF, BDNF and NT-3. CaN activity was measured using a colorimetric assay. In the soleus muscle, 8 weeks of moderate-intensity exercise can induce transformation of MyHC IIA and MyHC IIB to MyHC IIX and MyHC I (p < 0.01), while high-intensity treadmill exercise can induce transform MyHC IIx to MyHC IIB, MyHC IIA and MyHC I (p < 0.01). In comparison to the control group, CaN activity and NFATcl protein level were significantly increased in both the M-Ex and H-Ex groups (p < 0.05, p < 0.01), with a more pronounced upregulation in the M-Ex group (p < 0.05). Eight weeks of moderate- and high-intensity aerobic exercise induced the expression of NGF, BDNF and NT-3 in the soleus muscle and the striatum (p < 0.01), with the most significant increase in the H-Ex group (p < 0.01). In the rat soleus muscle, (1) CaN–NFATcl signaling contributes to the conversion of MyHC I isoform in response to moderate-intensity exercise; (2) Neurotrophins

  17. Initial human response to nuclear radiation. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Anno, G.H.; Brode, H.L.; Washton-Brown, R.

    1982-04-01

    This report documents the results of the first phase of an investigation into the nuclear effects on military troop performance. Both signs and symptoms associated with radiation sickness were examined to develop models of human response to radiation as a function of dose, time and symptom severity. Data on the early symptomatic effects of radiation exposure were gathered from some 150 books, articles and monographs. The analysis of this data focused on human data collected from the victims of nuclear accidents and therapy patients. Data from the survivors of the Japanese atomic bombs were excluded because of data imprecision and questions raised about the accuracy of reported exposure levels. A hypothetical exposed population was divided of reported groups based on the sensitivity of individuals to radiation: hyper-, hypo-, and normsensitives. The population was also classified by the severity of their symptoms; unaffected and mildly, moderately and severely affected. Using this data, relationships for the onset time and duration of acute symptoms after a given radiation dose were developed. Conceptual models were then derived for (1) individual response as a function of dose, time after exposure, and severity of symptoms, (2) population response (percentage affected in various degrees), and (3) links between individual and population responses.

  18. A Bayesian Semiparametric Model for Radiation Dose-Response Estimation.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Kyoji; Misumi, Munechika; Cologne, John B; Cullings, Harry M

    2016-06-01

    In evaluating the risk of exposure to health hazards, characterizing the dose-response relationship and estimating acceptable exposure levels are the primary goals. In analyses of health risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation, while there is a clear agreement that moderate to high radiation doses cause harmful effects in humans, little has been known about the possible biological effects at low doses, for example, below 0.1 Gy, which is the dose range relevant to most radiation exposures of concern today. A conventional approach to radiation dose-response estimation based on simple parametric forms, such as the linear nonthreshold model, can be misleading in evaluating the risk and, in particular, its uncertainty at low doses. As an alternative approach, we consider a Bayesian semiparametric model that has a connected piece-wise-linear dose-response function with prior distributions having an autoregressive structure among the random slope coefficients defined over closely spaced dose categories. With a simulation study and application to analysis of cancer incidence data among Japanese atomic bomb survivors, we show that this approach can produce smooth and flexible dose-response estimation while reasonably handling the risk uncertainty at low doses and elsewhere. With relatively few assumptions and modeling options to be made by the analyst, the method can be particularly useful in assessing risks associated with low-dose radiation exposures.

  19. Radiation Dose-Response Relationships and Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-07-05

    The notion of a dose-response relationship was probably invented shortly after the discovery of poisons, the invention of alcoholic beverages, and the bringing of fire into a confined space in the forgotten depths of ancient prehistory. The amount of poison or medicine ingested can easily be observed to affect the behavior, health, or sickness outcome. Threshold effects, such as death, could be easily understood for intoxicants, medicine, and poisons. As Paracelsus (1493-1541), the 'father' of modern toxicology said, 'It is the dose that makes the poison.' Perhaps less obvious is the fact that implicit in such dose-response relationships is also the notion of dose rate. Usually, the dose is administered fairly acutely, in a single injection, pill, or swallow; a few puffs on a pipe; or a meal of eating or drinking. The same amount of intoxicants, medicine, or poisons administered over a week or month might have little or no observable effect. Thus, before the discovery of ionizing radiation in the late 19th century, toxicology ('the science of poisons') and pharmacology had deeply ingrained notions of dose-response relationships. This chapter demonstrates that the notion of a dose-response relationship for ionizing radiation is hopelessly simplistic from a scientific standpoint. While useful from a policy or regulatory standpoint, dose-response relationships cannot possibly convey enough information to describe the problem from a quantitative view of radiation biology, nor can they address societal values. Three sections of this chapter address the concepts, observations, and theories that contribute to the scientific input to the practice of managing risks from exposure to ionizing radiation. The presentation begins with irradiation regimes, followed by responses to high and low doses of ionizing radiation, and a discussion of how all of this can inform radiation risk management. The knowledge that is really needed for prediction of individual risk is presented

  20. The effect of crank rate strategy on peak aerobic power and peak physiological responses during arm crank ergometry.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul M; Doherty, Mike; Price, Michael J

    2007-04-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine whether the use of an imposed or freely chosen crank rate would influence submaximal and peak physiological responses during arm crank ergometry. Fifteen physically active men participated in the study. Their mean age, height, and body mass were 25.9 (s = 6.2) years, 1.80 (s = 0.10) m, and 78.4 (s = 6.1) kg, respectively. The participants performed two incremental peak oxygen consumption (VO(2peak)) tests using an electronically braked ergometer. One test was performed using an imposed crank rate of 80 rev x min(-1), whereas in the other the participants used spontaneously chosen crank rates. The order in which the tests were performed was randomized, and they were separated by at least 2 days. Respiratory data were collected using an on-line gas analysis system, and fingertip capillary blood samples ( approximately 20 microl) were collected for the determination of blood lactate concentration. Heart rate was also recorded throughout the tests. Time to exhaustion was measured and peak aerobic power calculated. Submaximal data were analysed using separate two-way repeated-measures analyses of variance, while differences in peak values were analysed using separate paired t-tests. Variations in spontaneously chosen crank rate were assessed using a one-way analysis of variance with repeated measures. Agreement between the crank rate strategies for the assessment of peak values was examined by calculating intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) and 95% limits of agreement (95% LoA). While considerable between-participant variations in spontaneously chosen crank rate were observed, the mean value was not different (P > 0.05) from the imposed crank rate of 80 rev x min(-1) at any point. No differences (P > 0.05) were observed for submaximal data between crank strategies. Furthermore, mean peak minute power [158 (s = 20) vs. 158 (s = 18) W], time to exhaustion [739 (s = 118) vs. 727 (s = 111) s], and VO(2peak)[3.09 (s = 0

  1. Radiation-induced immune responses: mechanisms and therapeutic perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hoibin; Bok, Seoyeon; Hong, Beom-Ju; Choi, Hyung-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Recent advancement in the radiotherapy technology has allowed conformal delivery of high doses of ionizing radiation precisely to the tumors while sparing large volume of the normal tissues, which have led to better clinical responses. Despite this technological advancement many advanced tumors often recur and they do so within the previously irradiated regions. How could tumors recur after receiving such high ablative doses of radiation? In this review, we outlined how radiation can elicit anti-tumor responses by introducing some of the cytokines that can be induced by ionizing radiation. We then discuss how tumor hypoxia, a major limiting factor responsible for failure of radiotherapy, may also negatively impact the anti-tumor responses. In addition, we highlight how there may be other populations of immune cells including regulatory T cells (Tregs), myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) that can be recruited to tumors interfering with the anti-tumor immunity. Finally, the impact of irradiation on tumor hypoxia and the immune responses according to different radiotherapy regimen is also delineated. It is indeed an exciting time to see that radiotherapy is being combined with immunotherapy in the clinic and we hope that this review can add an excitement to the field. PMID:27722125

  2. Regional climate response to solar-radiation management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricke, Katharine L.; Morgan, M. Granger; Allen, Myles R.

    2010-08-01

    Concerns about the slow pace of climate mitigation have led to renewed dialogue about solar-radiation management, which could be achieved by adding reflecting aerosols to the stratosphere. Modelling studies suggest that solar-radiation management could produce stabilized global temperatures and reduced global precipitation. Here we present an analysis of regional differences in a climate modified by solar-radiation management, using a large-ensemble modelling experiment that examines the impacts of 54 scenarios for global temperature stabilization. Our results confirm that solar-radiation management would generally lead to less extreme temperature and precipitation anomalies, compared with unmitigated greenhouse gas emissions. However, they also illustrate that it is physically not feasible to stabilize global precipitation and temperature simultaneously as long as atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations continue to rise. Over time, simulated temperature and precipitation in large regions such as China and India vary significantly with different trajectories for solar-radiation management, and they diverge from historical baselines in different directions. Hence, it may not be possible to stabilize the climate in all regions simultaneously using solar-radiation management. Regional diversity in the response to different levels of solar-radiation management could make consensus about the optimal level of geoengineering difficult, if not impossible, to achieve.

  3. Growth Differentiation Factor-15 (GDF-15) is a potential marker of radiation response and radiation sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sándor, Nikolett; Schilling-Tóth, Boglárka; Kis, Enikő; Benedek, Anett; Lumniczky, Katalin; Sáfrány, Géza; Hegyesi, Hargita

    2015-11-01

    We have investigated the importance of GDF-15 (secreted cytokine belonging to the TGF-β superfamily) in low and high dose radiation-induced cellular responses. A telomerase immortalized human fibroblast cell line (F11hT) was used in the experiments. A lentiviral system encoding small hairpin RNAs (shRNA) was used to establish GDF-15 silenced cells. Secreted GDF-15 levels were measured in culture medium by ELISA. Cell cycle analysis was performed by flow cytometry. The experiments demonstrated that in irradiated human fibroblasts GDF-15 expression increased with dose starting from 100mGy. Elevated GDF-15 expression was not detected in bystander cells. The potential role of GDF-15 in radiation response was investigated by silencing GDF-15 in immortalized human fibroblasts with five different shRNA encoded in lentiviral vectors. Cell lines with considerably reduced GDF-15 levels presented increased radiation sensitivity, while a cell line with elevated GDF-15 was more radiation resistant than wild type cells. We have investigated how the reduced GDF-15 levels alter the response of several known radiation inducible genes. In F11hT-shGDF-15 cells the basal expression level of CDKN1A was unaltered relative to F11hT cells, while GADD45A and TGF-β1 mRNA levels were slightly higher, and TP53INP1 was considerably reduced. The radiation-induced expression of TP53INP1 was lower in the silenced than in wild type fibroblast cells. Cell cycle analysis indicated that radiation-induced early G2/M arrest was abrogated in GDF-15 silenced cells. Moreover, radiation-induced bystander effect was less pronounced in GDF-15 silenced fibroblasts. In conclusion, the results suggest that GDF-15 works as a radiation inducible radiation resistance increasing factor in normal human fibroblast cells, acts by regulating the radiation-induced transcription of several genes and might serve as a radiation-induced early biomarker in exposed cells.

  4. The response of survey meters to pulsed radiation fields

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, R.C.; Ipe, N.E.

    1987-11-01

    The response of most survey meters to steady radiation fields is fairly well known and documented. However, hardly any data is available in the literature regarding the response of these instruments to pulsed radiation. Pulsed radiation fields are encountered, e.g., in the vicinity of linear electron accelerators or klystrons. An instrument that ordinarily responds well to the average dose rate spread out evenly in time may not be able to cope with such a high dose rate. Instruments which have long dead times such as Geiger Mueller and proportional counters tend to become saturated in such fields and only count repetition rate. Ionization chambers are less influenced, however, they must be operated with adequate voltage to overcome recombination losses. Scintillation survey meters may become non-linear at higher dose rates for pulsed radiation because the photomultiplier cannot handle the instantaneous currents that are required. Because of the need to test the response of different radiation detection instruments to pulsed fields, a pulsed x-ray facility has been built (I/sub p/87). A brief description of this facility is given along with tests of several different instruments. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Mutagenesis during plant responses to UVB radiation.

    PubMed

    Holá, M; Vágnerová, R; Angelis, K J

    2015-08-01

    We tested an idea that induced mutagenesis due to unrepaired DNA lesions, here the UV photoproducts, underlies the impact of UVB irradiation on plant phenotype. For this purpose we used protonemal culture of the moss Physcomitrella patens with 50% of apical cells, which mimics actively growing tissue, the most vulnerable stage for the induction of mutations. We measured the UVB mutation rate of various moss lines with defects in DNA repair (pplig4, ppku70, pprad50, ppmre11), and in selected clones resistant to 2-Fluoroadenine, which were mutated in the adenosine phosphotrasferase gene (APT), we analysed induced mutations by sequencing. In parallel we followed DNA break repair and removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers with a half-life τ = 4 h 14 min determined by comet assay combined with UV dimer specific T4 endonuclease V. We show that UVB induces massive, sequence specific, error-prone bypass repair that is responsible for a high mutation rate owing to relatively slow, though error-free, removal of photoproducts by nucleotide excision repair (NER).

  6. Radiation Response of Emerging High Gain, Low Noise Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Heidi N.; Farr, William H; Zhu, David Q.

    2007-01-01

    Data illustrating the radiation response of emerging high gain, low noise detectors are presented. Ionizing dose testing of silicon internal discrete avalanche photodiodes, and 51-MeV proton testing of InGaAs/InAlAs avalanche photodiodes operated in Geiger mode are discussed.

  7. Radiation-induced augmentation of the immune response

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.E.; Lefkovits, I.; Troup, G.M.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation-induced augmentation of the immune response has been shown to occur both in vivo and in vitro. Evidence is presented to implicate injury to an extremely radiosensitive T cell in the expression of this phenomenon. Experiments are outlined which could be employed to support or reflect this hypothesis.

  8. Body fat loss and compensatory mechanisms in response to different doses of aerobic exercise--a randomized controlled trial in overweight sedentary males.

    PubMed

    Rosenkilde, Mads; Auerbach, Pernille; Reichkendler, Michala Holm; Ploug, Thorkil; Stallknecht, Bente Merete; Sjödin, Anders

    2012-09-15

    The amount of weight loss induced by exercise is often disappointing. A diet-induced negative energy balance triggers compensatory mechanisms, e.g., lower metabolic rate and increased appetite. However, knowledge about potential compensatory mechanisms triggered by increased aerobic exercise is limited. A randomized controlled trial was performed in healthy, sedentary, moderately overweight young men to examine the effects of increasing doses of aerobic exercise on body composition, accumulated energy balance, and the degree of compensation. Eighteen participants were randomized to a continuous sedentary control group, 21 to a moderate-exercise (MOD; 300 kcal/day), and 22 to a high-exercise (HIGH; 600 kcal/day) group for 13 wk, corresponding to ∼30 and 60 min of daily aerobic exercise, respectively. Body weight (MOD: -3.6 kg, P < 0.001; HIGH: -2.7 kg, P = 0.01) and fat mass (MOD: -4.0 kg, P < 0.001 and HIGH: -3.8 kg, P < 0.001) decreased similarly in both exercise groups. Although the exercise-induced energy expenditure in HIGH was twice that of MOD, the resulting accumulated energy balance, calculated from changes in body composition, was not different (MOD: -39.6 Mcal, HIGH: -34.3 Mcal, not significant). Energy balance was 83% more negative than expected in MOD, while it was 20% less negative than expected in HIGH. No statistically significant changes were found in energy intake or nonexercise physical activity that could explain the different compensatory responses associated with 30 vs. 60 min of daily aerobic exercise. In conclusion, a similar body fat loss was obtained regardless of exercise dose. A moderate dose of exercise induced a markedly greater than expected negative energy balance, while a higher dose induced a small but quantifiable degree of compensation.

  9. Association of pentraxin 3 with insulin resistance and glucose response following maximal aerobic exercise in obese and normal-mass individuals.

    PubMed

    Slusher, Aaron L; Huang, Chun-Jung

    2016-07-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3), a cardioprotective protein, has recently been shown to be associated with improved insulin resistance (IR) and glucose metabolism. Therefore, the primary purpose of this study was to examine whether or not increased plasma PTX3 following maximal aerobic exercise would differ between obese and normal-mass subjects, and its association with the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and glucose response. Twenty-five untrained obese (n = 13 [6 males and 7 females]) and normal-mass (n = 12 [5 males and 7 females]) subjects performed an acute bout of maximal aerobic exercise to assess maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max). At baseline, plasma PTX3 concentrations are decreased in obese compared with normal-mass subjects and are negatively associated with plasma insulin and HOMA-IR values. In response to maximal exercise, plasma PTX3 responses were similar in obese and normal-mass subjects while the intensity of plasma PTX3 response as indicated by area under the curve analysis (AUCi) was not associated with HOMA-IR or glucose AUCi. However, PTX3 AUCi was positively associated with cardiorespiratory fitness levels (relative VO2max). These findings suggest that PTX3 could serve as a biomarker for both metabolic health, as well as a measurement to monitor the effectiveness of exercise interventions in obesity.

  10. Proteomic Analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi Response to Ionizing Radiation Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Helaine Graziele Santos; Grynberg, Priscila; Bitar, Mainá; Pires, Simone da Fonseca; Hilário, Heron Oliveira; Macedo, Andrea Mara; Machado, Carlos Renato; de Andrade, Hélida Monteiro; Franco, Glória Regina

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is extremely resistant to ionizing radiation, enduring up to 1.5 kGy of gamma rays. Ionizing radiation can damage the DNA molecule both directly, resulting in double-strand breaks, and indirectly, as a consequence of reactive oxygen species production. After a dose of 500 Gy of gamma rays, the parasite genome is fragmented, but the chromosomal bands are restored within 48 hours. Under such conditions, cell growth arrests for up to 120 hours and the parasites resume normal growth after this period. To better understand the parasite response to ionizing radiation, we analyzed the proteome of irradiated (4, 24, and 96 hours after irradiation) and non-irradiated T. cruzi using two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry for protein identification. A total of 543 spots were found to be differentially expressed, from which 215 were identified. These identified protein spots represent different isoforms of only 53 proteins. We observed a tendency for overexpression of proteins with molecular weights below predicted, indicating that these may be processed, yielding shorter polypeptides. The presence of shorter protein isoforms after irradiation suggests the occurrence of post-translational modifications and/or processing in response to gamma radiation stress. Our results also indicate that active translation is essential for the recovery of parasites from ionizing radiation damage. This study therefore reveals the peculiar response of T. cruzi to ionizing radiation, raising questions about how this organism can change its protein expression to survive such a harmful stress. PMID:24842666

  11. Changes in structure, activity and metabolism of aerobic granules as a microbial response to high phenol loading.

    PubMed

    Jiang, H-L; Tay, J-H; Tay, S T-L

    2004-02-01

    Four column-type sequential aerobic sludge blanket reactors were fed with phenol as the sole carbon and energy source and operated at loading rates of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 kg phenol m(-3) day(-1). The results indicated that phenol loading exerted a profound influence on the structure, activity and metabolism of the aerobic granules. Compact granules with good settling ability were maintained at loadings up to 2.0 kg phenol m(-3) day(-1), and structurally weakened granules with enhanced production of extracellular polymers and proteins and significantly lower hydrophobicities were observed at the highest loading of 2.5 kg phenol m(-3) day(-1). Specific oxygen uptake rate, catechol 2,3-dioxygenase (C23O) and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (C12O) activities peaked at a loading of 2.0 kg phenol m(-3) day(-1), and declined thereafter. Granules degraded phenol completely in all four reactors, mainly through the meta cleavage pathway as C23O activities were significantly higher than C12O activities. At the highest loading applied, the anabolism and catabolism of microorganisms were regulated such that phenol degradation proceeded exclusively via the meta pathway, apparently to produce more energy for overstimulation of protein production against phenol toxicity. This work contributes to a better understanding of the ability of aerobic granules to handle high-strength industrial wastewaters containing chemicals that are normally inhibitory to microbial growth.

  12. The effect of aerobic exercise training on growth performance, digestive enzyme activities and postprandial metabolic response in juvenile qingbo (Spinibarbus sinensis).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Ming; Yu, Li-Juan; Wang, Chuan; Zeng, Ling-Qing; Cao, Zhen-Dong; Fu, Shi-Jian; Zhang, Yao-Guang

    2013-09-01

    Continual swimming exercise usually promotes growth in fish at a moderate water velocity. We hypothesized that the improvement in growth in exercise-trained fish may be accompanied by increases in digestive enzyme activity, respiratory capacity and, hence, postprandial metabolism. Juvenile qingbo fish (Spinibarbus sinensis) were subjected to aerobic training for 8weeks at a water velocity of control (3cms(-1)), 1, 2 and 4 body length (bl)s(-1) at a constant temperature of 25°C. The feed intake (FI), food conversion rate (FCR), specific growth rate (SGR), whole-body composition, trypsin and lipase activities, maximal oxygen consumption (M˙O2max) and postprandial M˙O2 response were measured at the end of the training period. Aerobic exercise training induced a significant increase in FI compared with the control group, while the FCR of the 4bls(-1) group was significantly lower than for the other three groups (P<0.05). The 1 and 2bls(-1) groups showed a significantly higher SGR over the control group (P<0.05). The whole-body fat and protein contents were significantly altered after aerobic exercise training (P<0.05). Furthermore, aerobic exercise training elevated the activity of both trypsin and lipase in the hepatopancreas and intestinal tract of juvenile S. sinensis. The M˙O2max of the 4bls(-1) training group was significantly higher than for the control group. The resting M˙O2 (M˙O2rest) and peak postprandial M˙O2 (M˙O2peak) in the three training groups were significantly higher than in the control group (P<0.05). Time to M˙O2peak was significantly shorter in the 1, 2 and 4bls(-1) training groups compared with the control group, while exercise training showed no effect on SDA (specific dynamic action) duration, factorial metabolic scope, energy expended on SDA and the SDA coefficient when compared to the control group. These data suggest that (1) the optimum water velocity for the growth of juvenile S. sinensis occurred at approximately 2.4bls(-1); (2

  13. Radioadaptive response for protection against radiation-induced teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Ryuji; Ootsuyama, Akira; Norimura, Toshiyuki

    2005-03-01

    To clarify the characteristics of the radioadaptive response in mice, we compared the incidence of radiation-induced malformations in ICR mice. Pregnant ICR mice were exposed to a priming dose of 2 cGy (667 muGy/min) on day 9.5 of gestation and to a challenging dose of 2 Gy (1.04 Gy/min) 4 h later and were killed on day 18.5 of gestation. The incidence of malformations and prenatal death and fetal body weights were studied. The incidence of external malformations was significantly lower (by approximately 10%) in the primed (2 cGy + 2 Gy) mice compared to the unprimed (2 Gy alone) mice. However, there were no differences in the incidence of prenatal death or the skeletal malformations or the body weights between primed and unprimed mice. These results suggest that primary conditioning with low doses of radiation suppresses radiation-induced teratogenesis.

  14. New Modeling Approaches to Investigate Cell Signaling in Radiation Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ponomarev, Artem L.

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation damages individual cells and tissues leading to harmful biological effects. Among many radiation-induced lesions, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) are considered the key precursors of most early and late effects [1] leading to direct mutation or aberrant signal transduction processes. In response to damage, a flow of information is communicated to cells not directly hit by the radiation through signal transduction pathways [2]. Non-targeted effects (NTE), which includes bystander effects and genomic instability in the progeny of irradiated cells and tissues, may be particularly important for space radiation risk assessment [1], because astronauts are exposed to a low fluence of heavy ions and only a small fraction of cells are traversed by an ion. NTE may also have important consequences clinical radiotherapy [3]. In the recent years, new simulation tools and modeling approaches have become available to study the tissue response to radiation. The simulation of signal transduction pathways require many elements such as detailed track structure calculations, a tissue or cell culture model, knowledge of biochemical pathways and Brownian Dynamics (BD) propagators of the signaling molecules in their micro-environment. Recently, the Monte-Carlo simulation code of radiation track structure RITRACKS was used for micro and nano-dosimetry calculations [4]. RITRACKS will be used to calculate the fraction of cells traversed by an ion and delta-rays and the energy deposited in cells in a tissue model. RITRACKS also simulates the formation of chemical species by the radiolysis of water [5], notably the .OH radical. This molecule is implicated in DNA damage and in the activation of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF), a signaling molecule involved in NTE. BD algorithms for a particle near a membrane comprising receptors were also developed and will be used to simulate trajectories of signaling molecules in the micro-environment and characterize autocrine

  15. A Computational Model of Cellular Response to Modulated Radiation Fields

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, Stephen J.; Butterworth, Karl T.; McGarry, Conor K.; Trainor, Colman; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To develop a model to describe the response of cell populations to spatially modulated radiation exposures of relevance to advanced radiotherapies. Materials and Methods: A Monte Carlo model of cellular radiation response was developed. This model incorporated damage from both direct radiation and intercellular communication including bystander signaling. The predictions of this model were compared to previously measured survival curves for a normal human fibroblast line (AGO1522) and prostate tumor cells (DU145) exposed to spatially modulated fields. Results: The model was found to be able to accurately reproduce cell survival both in populations which were directly exposed to radiation and those which were outside the primary treatment field. The model predicts that the bystander effect makes a significant contribution to cell killing even in uniformly irradiated cells. The bystander effect contribution varies strongly with dose, falling from a high of 80% at low doses to 25% and 50% at 4 Gy for AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This was verified using the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine to inhibit the bystander effect in cells exposed to different doses, which showed significantly larger reductions in cell killing at lower doses. Conclusions: The model presented in this work accurately reproduces cell survival following modulated radiation exposures, both in and out of the primary treatment field, by incorporating a bystander component. In addition, the model suggests that the bystander effect is responsible for a significant portion of cell killing in uniformly irradiated cells, 50% and 70% at doses of 2 Gy in AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This description is a significant departure from accepted radiobiological models and may have a significant impact on optimization of treatment planning approaches if proven to be applicable in vivo.

  16. Mammalian Stem Cells Reprogramming in Response to Terahertz Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sona; Phipps, M. Lisa; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Rasmussen, Kim Ø.; Bishop, Alan R.; Rosen, Evan D.; Martinez, Jennifer S.; Chen, Hou-Tong; Rodriguez, George; Alexandrov, Boian S.; Usheva, Anny

    2010-01-01

    We report that extended exposure to broad-spectrum terahertz radiation results in specific changes in cellular functions that are closely related to DNA-directed gene transcription. Our gene chip survey of gene expression shows that whereas 89% of the protein coding genes in mouse stem cells do not respond to the applied terahertz radiation, certain genes are activated, while other are repressed. RT-PCR experiments with selected gene probes corresponding to transcripts in the three groups of genes detail the gene specific effect. The response was not only gene specific but also irradiation conditions dependent. Our findings suggest that the applied terahertz irradiation accelerates cell differentiation toward adipose phenotype by activating the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG). Finally, our molecular dynamics computer simulations indicate that the local breathing dynamics of the PPARG promoter DNA coincides with the gene specific response to the THz radiation. We propose that THz radiation is a potential tool for cellular reprogramming. PMID:21209821

  17. Dynamic Response of Model Lipid Membranes to Ultrasonic Radiation Force

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Martin Loynaz; Oralkan, Ömer; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Maduke, Merritt C.

    2013-01-01

    Low-intensity ultrasound can modulate action potential firing in neurons in vitro and in vivo. It has been suggested that this effect is mediated by mechanical interactions of ultrasound with neural cell membranes. We investigated whether these proposed interactions could be reproduced for further study in a synthetic lipid bilayer system. We measured the response of protein-free model membranes to low-intensity ultrasound using electrophysiology and laser Doppler vibrometry. We find that ultrasonic radiation force causes oscillation and displacement of lipid membranes, resulting in small (<1%) changes in membrane area and capacitance. Under voltage-clamp, the changes in capacitance manifest as capacitive currents with an exponentially decaying sinusoidal time course. The membrane oscillation can be modeled as a fluid dynamic response to a step change in pressure caused by ultrasonic radiation force, which disrupts the balance of forces between bilayer tension and hydrostatic pressure. We also investigated the origin of the radiation force acting on the bilayer. Part of the radiation force results from the reflection of the ultrasound from the solution/air interface above the bilayer (an effect that is specific to our experimental configuration) but part appears to reflect a direct interaction of ultrasound with the bilayer, related to either acoustic streaming or scattering of sound by the bilayer. Based on these results, we conclude that synthetic lipid bilayers can be used to study the effects of ultrasound on cell membranes and membrane proteins. PMID:24194863

  18. MicroRNAs in skin response to UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Syed, Deeba N; Khan, Mohammad Imran; Shabbir, Maria; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2013-09-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, an ubiquitous environmental carcinogen, is classified depending on the wavelength, into three regions; short-wave UVC (200-280 nm), mid-wave UVB (280-320 nm), and long-wave UVA (320- 400 nm). The human skin, constantly exposed to UV radiation, particularly the UVB and UVA components, is vulnerable to its various deleterious effects such as erythema, photoaging, immunosuppression and cancer. To counteract these and for the maintenance of genomic integrity, cells have developed several protective mechanisms including DNA repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The network of damage sensors, signal transducers, mediators, and various effector proteins is regulated through changes in gene expression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a group of small non-coding RNAs, act as posttranscriptional regulators through binding to complementary sequences in the 3´-untranslated region of their target genes, resulting in either translational repression or target degradation. Recent studies show that miRNAs add an additional layer of complexity to the intricately controlled cellular responses to UV radiation. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the role of miRNAs in the regulation of the human skin response upon exposure to UV radiation.

  19. Exercise- and methylcholine-induced sweating responses in older and younger men: effect of heat acclimation and aerobic fitness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Y.; Havenith, George; Kenney, W. Larry; Loomis, Joseph L.; Buskirk, Elsworth R.

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of aging and aerobic fitness on exercise- and methylcholine-induced sweating responses during heat acclimation. Five younger [Y group - age: 23+/-1 (SEM) years; maximal oxygen consumption (V.O2max): 47+/-3 ml.kg-1.min-1], four highly fit older (HO group - 63+/-3 years; 48+/-4 ml.kg-1.min-1) and five normally fit older men (NO group - 67+/-3 years; 30+/-1 ml.kg-1.min-1) who were matched for height, body mass and percentage fat, were heat acclimated by daily cycle exercise ( 35% V.O2max for 90 min) in a hot (43°C, 30% RH) environment for 8 days. The heat acclimation regimen increased performance time, lowered final rectal temperature (Tre) and percentage maximal heart rate (%HRmax), improved thermal comfort and decreased sweat sodium concentration similarly in all groups. Although total body sweating rates (M.sw) during acclimation were significantly greater in the Y and HO groups than in the NO group (P<0.01) (because of the lower absolute workload in the NO group), the M.sw did not change in all groups with the acclimation sessions. Neither were local sweating rates (m.sw) on chest, back, forearm and thigh changed in all groups by the acclimation. The HO group presented greater forearm m.sw (30-90 min) values and the Y group had greater back and thigh m.sw (early in exercise) values, compared to the other groups (P<0.001). In a methylcholine injection test on days immediately before and after the acclimation, the order of sweat output per gland (SGO) on chest, back and thigh was Y>HO>NO, and on the forearm Y=HO>NO. No group differences were observed for activated sweat gland density at any site. The SGO at the respective sites increased in the post-acclimation test regardless of group (P<0.01), but on the thigh the magnitude of the increase was lower in the NO (P<0.02) and HO (P=0.07) groups than in the Y group. These findings suggest that heat tolerance and the improvement with acclimation are little

  20. 10 CFR 35.2024 - Records of authority and responsibilities for radiation protection programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of authority and responsibilities for radiation... MATERIAL Records § 35.2024 Records of authority and responsibilities for radiation protection programs. (a... of the Radiation Safety Officer as required by § 35.24(e), and a signed copy of each Radiation...

  1. 10 CFR 35.2024 - Records of authority and responsibilities for radiation protection programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Records of authority and responsibilities for radiation... MATERIAL Records § 35.2024 Records of authority and responsibilities for radiation protection programs. (a... of the Radiation Safety Officer as required by § 35.24(e), and a signed copy of each Radiation...

  2. 10 CFR 35.2024 - Records of authority and responsibilities for radiation protection programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Records of authority and responsibilities for radiation... MATERIAL Records § 35.2024 Records of authority and responsibilities for radiation protection programs. (a... of the Radiation Safety Officer as required by § 35.24(e), and a signed copy of each Radiation...

  3. 10 CFR 35.2024 - Records of authority and responsibilities for radiation protection programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Records of authority and responsibilities for radiation... MATERIAL Records § 35.2024 Records of authority and responsibilities for radiation protection programs. (a... of the Radiation Safety Officer as required by § 35.24(e), and a signed copy of each Radiation...

  4. 10 CFR 35.2024 - Records of authority and responsibilities for radiation protection programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Records of authority and responsibilities for radiation... MATERIAL Records § 35.2024 Records of authority and responsibilities for radiation protection programs. (a... of the Radiation Safety Officer as required by § 35.24(e), and a signed copy of each Radiation...

  5. Distinctive molecular responses to ultraviolet radiation between keratinocytes and melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoyun; Kim, Arianna; Nakatani, Masashi; Shen, Yao; Liu, Liang

    2017-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the major risk factor for skin carcinogenesis. To gain new insights into the molecular pathways mediating UVR effects in the skin, we performed comprehensive transcriptomic analyses to identify shared and distinctive molecular responses to UVR between human keratinocytes and melanocytes. Keratinocytes and melanocytes were irradiated with varying doses of UVB (10, 20 and 30 mJ/cm2) then analysed by RNA-Seq at different time points post-UVB radiation (4, 24 and 72 h). Under basal conditions, keratinocytes and melanocytes expressed similar number of genes, although they each expressed a distinctive subset of genes pertaining to their specific cellular identity. Upon UVB radiation, keratinocytes displayed a clear pattern of time- and dose-dependent changes in gene expression that was different from melanocytes. The early UVB-responsive gene set (4 h post-UVR) differed significantly from delayed UVB-responsive gene sets (24 and 72 h). We also identified multiple novel UVB signature genes including PRSS23, SERPINH1, LCE3D and CNFN, which were conserved between melanocyte and keratinocyte lines from different individuals. Taken together, our findings elucidated both common and distinctive molecular features between melanocytes and keratinocytes and uncovered novel UVB signature genes that might be utilized to predict UVB photobiological effects on the skin. PMID:27119462

  6. Radiative Forcing and Climate Response: From Paleoclimate to Future Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, K.; Cao, L.

    2011-12-01

    The concept of radiative forcing was introduced to allow comparison of climate effects of different greenhouse gases. In the classic view, radiative forcing is applied to the climate system and the climate responds to this forcing, approaching some equilibrium temperature change that is the product of the radiative forcing times the 'climate sensitivity' to radiative forcing. However, this classic view is oversimplified in several respects. Climate forcing and response often cannot be clearly separated. When carbon dioxide is added to the atmosphere, within days, the increased absorption of longwave radiation begins to warm the interior of the troposphere, affecting various tropospheric properties. Especially in the case of aerosols, it has been found that considering rapid tropospheric adjustment gives a better predictor of "equilibrium" climate change than does the classic definition of radiative forcing. Biogeochemistry also provides additional feedbacks on the climate system. It is generally thought that biogeochemistry helps diminish climate sensitivity to a carbon dioxide emission, since carbon dioxide tends to stimulate carbon dioxide uptake by land plants and the ocean. However, there is potential to destabilize carbon locked up in permafrost and at least some possibility to destabilize methane in continental shelf sediments. Furthermore, wetlands may provide a significant methane feedback. These and other possible biogeochemical feedbacks have the potential to greatly increase the sensitivity of the climate system to carbon dioxide emissions. As time scales extend out to millennia, the large ice sheets can begin to play an important role. In addition to affecting atmospheric flows by their sheer bulk, ice sheets tend to reflect a lot of energy to space. If carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere long enough, there is potential to melt back the large ice sheets, which would add additional warming to the climate system. It is likely that these millennial

  7. Correlation between bone mineral density and serum trace elements in response to supervised aerobic training in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Alghadir, Ahmad H; Gabr, Sami A; Al-Eisa, Einas S; Alghadir, Muaz H

    2016-01-01

    Background Life style and physical activity play a pivotal role in prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. The mechanism for better bone metabolism and improvement of physical disorders is not clear yet. Trace minerals such as Ca, Mn, Cu, and Zn are essential precursors for most vital biological process, especially those of bone health. Objective The main target of this study was evaluating the effective role of supervised aerobic exercise for 1 hour/day, 3 days/week for 12 weeks in the functions of trace elements in bone health through measuring bone mineral density (BMD), osteoporosis (T-score), bone markers, and trace element concentrations in healthy subjects aged 30–60 years with age average of 41.2±4.9. Methods A total of 100 healthy subjects (47 males, 53 females; age range 30–60 years) were recruited for this study. Based on dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scan analysis, the participants were classified into three groups: normal (n=30), osteopenic (n=40), and osteoporotic (n=30). Following, 12 weeks of moderate aerobic exercise, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), BMD, T-score, and trace elements such as Ca, Mn, Cu, and Zn were assessed at baseline and post-intervention. Results Significant improvement in serum BAP level, T-score, and BMD were observed in all participants following 12 weeks of moderate exercise. Participants with osteopenia and osteoporosis showed significant increase in serum Ca and Mn, along with decrease in serum Cu and Zn levels following 12 weeks of aerobic training. In control group, the improvements in serum trace elements and body mass index were significantly linked with the enhancement in the levels of BAP, BMD hip, and BMD spine. These results supported the preventive effects of moderate exercise in healthy subjects against osteoporosis. In both sexes, the changes in serum trace elements significantly correlated (P<0.05) with the improvement in BAP, BMD hip, BMD spine, and body mass index in all groups

  8. The skin: its structure and response to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Hopewell, J W

    1990-04-01

    The response of the skin to ionizing radiation has important implications both for the treatment of malignant disease by radiation and for radiological protection. The structural organization of human skin is described and compared with that of the pig, with which it shows many similarities, in order that the response of the skin to ionizing radiation may be more fully understood. Acute radiation damage to the skin is primarily a consequence of changes in the epidermis; the timing of the peak of the reaction is related to the kinetic organization of this layer. The rate of development of damage is independent of the radiation dose, since this is related to the natural rate of loss of cells from the basal layer of the epidermis. Recovery of the epidermis occurs as a result of the proliferation of surviving clonogenic basal cells from within the irradiated area. The presence of clonogenic cells in the canal of the hair follicle is important, particularly after non-uniform irradiation from intermediate energy beta-emitters. The migration of viable cells from the edges of the irradiated site is also significant when small areas of skin are irradiated. Late damage to the skin is primarily a function of radiation effects on the vasculature; this produces a wave of dermal atrophy after 16-26 weeks. Dermal necrosis develops at this time after high doses. A second phase of dermal thinning is seen to develop after greater than 52 weeks, and this later phase of damage is associated with the appearance of telangiectasia. Highly localized irradiation of the skin, either to a specific layer (as may result from exposure to very low energy beta-emitters) or after exposure to small highly radioactive particles, 'hot particles', produces gross effects that become visibly manifest within 2 weeks of exposure. These changes result from the direct killing of the cells of the skin in interphase after doses greater than 100 Gy. Dose-effect curves have been established for the majority of

  9. Photoacoustic monitoring of tumor and normal tissue response to radiation

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Laurie J.; Seshadri, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a recognized characteristic of tumors that influences efficacy of radiotherapy (RT). Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a relatively new imaging technique that exploits the optical characteristics of hemoglobin to provide information on tissue oxygenation. In the present study, PAI based measures of tumor oxygen saturation (%sO2) were compared to oxygen-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of longitudinal relaxation rate (R1 = 1/T1) and ex-vivo histology in patient derived xenograft (PDX) models of head and neck cancer. PAI was utilized to assess early changes (24 h) in %sO2 following RT and chemoRT (CRT) and to assess changes in salivary gland hemodynamics following radiation. A significant increase in tumor %sO2 and R1 was observed following oxygen inhalation. Good spatial correlation was observed between PAI, MRI and histology. An early increase in %sO2 after RT and CRT detected by PAI was associated with significant tumor growth inhibition. Twenty four hours after RT, PAI also detected loss of hemodynamic response to gustatory stimulation in murine salivary gland tissue suggestive of radiation-induced vascular damage. Our observations illustrate the utility of PAI in detecting tumor and normal tissue hemodynamic response to radiation in head and neck cancers. PMID:26883660

  10. Protective role of the RpoE (σE) and Cpx envelope stress responses against gentamicin killing of nongrowing Escherichia coli incubated under aerobic, phosphate starvation conditions.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Patrice L

    2014-08-01

    The viability of Escherichia coli starved of nitrogen (N) or phosphorus (P) decreased by up to seven orders of magnitude during prolonged incubation under aerobic conditions when exposed to high levels of the antibiotic gentamicin, whereas viability of cells starved of carbon (C) was barely affected. However, the initial rate of killing was lower for P-starved cells than for N-starved cells. The transient resistance of P-starved cells was partially dependent upon the expression of the phosphate (Pho) and Cpx responses. Constitutive activity of the Cpx and RpoE (σ(E)) envelope stress regulons increased the resistance of P- and N-starved cells. The level of expression of the RpoE regulon was fourfold higher in P-starved cells than in N-starved cell at the time gentamicin was added. Gentamicin killing of nongrowing cells may thus require ongoing aerobic glucose metabolism and faulty synthesis of structural membrane proteins. However, membrane protein damage induced by gentamicin can be eliminated or repaired by RpoE- and Cpx-dependent mechanisms pre-emptively induced in P-starved cells, which reveals a novel mechanism of resistance to gentamicin that is active in certain circumstances.

  11. New insights into the cellular response to radiation using microbeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkard, Melvyn; Prise, Kevin; Schettino, Giuseppe; Shao, Chunlin; Gilchrist, Stuart; Vojnovic, Boris

    2005-04-01

    Micro-irradiation techniques continue to be highly relevant to a number of radiobiological studies, due to their ability to deliver precise doses of radiation to selected individual cells (or sub-cellular targets) in vitro. The Gray cancer institute (GCI) ion microbeam uses a 1 μm diameter bore glass capillary to vertically collimate protons, or helium ions accelerated by a 4 MV Van de Graaff. Using 3He2+ ions, 99% of cells are targeted with an accuracy of ±2 μm, and with a particle counting accuracy >99%. Using automated cell finding and irradiation procedures, up to 10,000 cells per hour can be individually irradiated. Microbeams are now being used to study a number of novel 'non-targeted' responses that do not follow the standard radiation model based on direct DNA damage and are now known to occur when living cells and tissues are irradiated. One such response is the so-called 'bystander effect' where unirradiated cells are damaged through signalling pathways initiated by a nearby irradiated cell. This effect predominates at low doses and profoundly challenges our understanding of environmental radiation risk. Furthermore, we now have evidence that simple molecules (such as nitric oxide) are involved in the signalling process, such that it may be possible to chemically influence the bystander response. If so, then this could eventually lead to improvements in the treatment of cancer by radiotherapy. Other studies have shown that the bystander effect is induced with equal effectiveness if either the nucleus or the cytoplasm of a cell is targeted.

  12. Observed ozone response to variations in solar ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gille, J. C.; Smythe, C. M.; Heath, D. F.

    1984-01-01

    During the winter of 1979, the solar ultraviolet irradiance varied with a period of 13.5 days and an amplitude of 1 percent. The zonal mean ozone values in the tropics varied with the solar irradiance, with an amplitude of 0.25 to 0.60 percent. This observation agrees with earlier calculations, although the response may be overestimated. These results imply changes in ozone at an altitude of 48 kilometers of up to 12 percent over an 11-year solar cycle. Interpretation of ozone changes in the upper stratosphere will require measurements of solar ultraviolet radiation at wavelengths near 200 nanometers.

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi Gene Expression in Response to Gamma Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Grynberg, Priscila; Passos-Silva, Danielle Gomes; Mourão, Marina de Moraes; Hirata Jr, Roberto; Macedo, Andrea Mara; Machado, Carlos Renato; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Franco, Glória Regina

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is an organism highly resistant to ionizing radiation. Following a dose of 500 Gy of gamma radiation, the fragmented genomic DNA is gradually reconstructed and the pattern of chromosomal bands is restored in less than 48 hours. Cell growth arrests after irradiation but, while DNA is completely fragmented, RNA maintains its integrity. In this work we compared the transcriptional profiles of irradiated and non-irradiated epimastigotes at different time points after irradiation using microarray. In total, 273 genes were differentially expressed; from these, 160 were up-regulated and 113 down-regulated. We found that genes with predicted functions are the most prevalent in the down-regulated gene category. Translation and protein metabolic processes, as well as generation of precursor of metabolites and energy pathways were affected. In contrast, the up-regulated category was mainly composed of obsolete sequences (which included some genes of the kinetoplast DNA), genes coding for hypothetical proteins, and Retrotransposon Hot Spot genes. Finally, the tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1, a gene involved in double-strand DNA break repair process, was up-regulated. Our study demonstrated the peculiar response to ionizing radiation, raising questions about how this organism changes its gene expression to manage such a harmful stress. PMID:22247781

  14. Air pollution and climate response to aerosol direct radiative ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Decadal hemispheric Weather Research and Forecast-Community Multiscale Air Quality simulations from 1990 to 2010 were conducted to examine the meteorology and air quality responses to the aerosol direct radiative effects. The model's performance for the simulation of hourly surface temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and direction was evaluated through comparison with observations from NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Integrated Surface Data. The inclusion of aerosol direct radiative effects improves the model's ability to reproduce the trend in daytime temperature range which over the past two decades was increasing in eastern China but decreasing in eastern U.S. and Europe. Trends and spatial and diurnal variations of the surface-level gaseous and particle concentrations to the aerosol direct effect were analyzed. The inclusion of aerosol direct radiative effects was found to increase the surface-level concentrations of SO2, NO2, O3, SO42−, NO3−, and particulate matter 2.5 in eastern China, eastern U.S., and Europe by 1.5–2.1%, 1–1.5%, 0.1–0.3%, 1.6–2.3%, 3.5–10.0%, and 2.2–3.2%, respectively, on average over the entire 21 year period. However, greater impacts are noted during polluted days with increases of 7.6–10.6%, 6.2–6.7%, 2.0–3.0%, 7.8–9.5%, 11.1–18.6%, and 7.2–10.1%, respectively. Due to the aerosol direct radiative effects, stabilizing of the atmosphere associated with reduced planetary boundary layer height a

  15. AKT1 G205T genotype influences obesity-related metabolic phenotypes and their responses to aerobic exercise training in older Caucasians.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Jennifer A; Witkowski, Sarah; Ludlow, Andrew T; Roth, Stephen M; Hagberg, James M

    2011-03-01

    As part of the insulin signalling pathway, Akt influences growth and metabolism. The AKT1 gene G205T (rs1130214) polymorphism has potential functional effects. Thus, we determined whether the G205T polymorphism influences metabolic variables and their responses to aerobic exercise training. Following dietary stabilization, healthy, sedentary, 50- to 75-year-old Caucasian men (n = 51) and women (n = 58) underwent 6 months of aerobic exercise training. Before and after completing the intervention, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to measure percentage body fat, computed tomography to measure visceral and subcutaneous fat, and oral glucose tolerance testing to measure glucose total area under the curve (AUC), insulin AUC and insulin sensitivity. Taqman assay was used to determine AKT1 G205T genotypes. At baseline, men with the GG genotype (n = 29) had lower maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) values (P = 0.026) and higher percentage body fat (P = 0.046), subcutaneous fat (P = 0.021) and insulin AUC (P = 0.003) values than T allele carriers (n = 22). Despite their rather disadvantageous starting values, men with the GG genotype seemed to respond to exercise training more robustly than men with the T allele, highlighted by significantly greater fold change improvements in insulin AUC (P = 0.012) and glucose AUC (P = 0.035). Although the GG group also significantly improved VO2 max with training, the change in VO2 max was not as great as that of the T allele carriers (P = 0.037). In contrast, after accounting for hormone replacement therapy use, none of the variables differed in the women at baseline. As a result of exercise training, women with the T allele (n = 20) had greater fold change improvements in fasting glucose (P = 0.011), glucose AUC (P = 0.017) and insulin sensitivity (P = 0.044) than GG genotype women (n = 38). Our results suggest that the AKT1 G205T polymorphism influences metabolic variables and their responses to aerobic exercise training in

  16. Proteomic responses of sea urchin embryos to stressful ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Adams, N L; Campanale, J P; Foltz, K R

    2012-11-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR, 290-400 nm) penetrates into seawater and can harm shallow-dwelling and planktonic marine organisms. Studies dating back to the 1930s revealed that echinoids, especially sea urchin embryos, are powerful models for deciphering the effects of UVR on embryonic development and how embryos defend themselves against UV-induced damage. In addition to providing a large number of synchronously developing embryos amenable to cellular, biochemical, molecular, and single-cell analyses, the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, also offers an annotated genome. Together, these aspects allow for the in-depth study of molecular and biochemical signatures of UVR stress. Here, we review the effects of UVR on embryonic development, focusing on the early-cleavage stages, and begin to integrate data regarding single-protein responses with comprehensive proteomic assessments. Proteomic studies reveal changes in levels of post-translational modifications to proteins that respond to UVR, and identify proteins that can then be interrogated as putative targets or components of stress-response pathways. These responsive proteins are distributed among systems upon which targeted studies can now begin to be mapped. Post-transcriptional and translational controls may provide early embryos with a rapid, fine-tuned response to stress during early stages, especially during pre-blastula stages that rely primarily on maternally derived defenses rather than on responses through zygotic gene transcription.

  17. Current Trends in Gamma Radiation Detection for Radiological Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, S., Guss, P., Maurer, R.

    2011-09-01

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies. In recent years, since the establishment of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office by the Department of Homeland Security, a tremendous amount of progress has been made in detection materials (scintillators, semiconductors), imaging techniques (Compton imaging, use of active masking and hybrid imaging), data acquisition systems with digital signal processing, field programmable gate arrays and embedded isotopic analysis software (viz. gamma detector response and analysis software [GADRAS]1), fast template matching, and data fusion (merging radiological data with geo-referenced maps, digital imagery to provide better situational awareness). In this stride to progress, a significant amount of interdisciplinary research and development has taken place–techniques and spin-offs from medical science (such as x-ray radiography and tomography), materials engineering (systematic planned studies on scintillators to optimize several qualities of a good scintillator, nanoparticle applications, quantum dots, and photonic crystals, just to name a few). No trend analysis of radiation detection systems would be complete without mentioning the unprecedented strategic position taken by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime transportation–the so-called second line of defense.

  18. Current trends in gamma radiation detection for radiological emergency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Guss, Paul; Maurer, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies. In recent years, since the establishment of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office by the Department of Homeland Security, a tremendous amount of progress has been made in detection materials (scintillators, semiconductors), imaging techniques (Compton imaging, use of active masking and hybrid imaging), data acquisition systems with digital signal processing, field programmable gate arrays and embedded isotopic analysis software (viz. gamma detector response and analysis software [GADRAS]1), fast template matching, and data fusion (merging radiological data with geo-referenced maps, digital imagery to provide better situational awareness). In this stride to progress, a significant amount of inter-disciplinary research and development has taken place-techniques and spin-offs from medical science (such as x-ray radiography and tomography), materials engineering (systematic planned studies on scintillators to optimize several qualities of a good scintillator, nanoparticle applications, quantum dots, and photonic crystals, just to name a few). No trend analysis of radiation detection systems would be complete without mentioning the unprecedented strategic position taken by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime transportation-the so-called second line of defense.

  19. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Combined with Aerobic Exercise to Optimize Analgesic Responses in Fibromyalgia: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mendonca, Mariana E.; Simis, Marcel; Grecco, Luanda C.; Battistella, Linamara R.; Baptista, Abrahão F.; Fregni, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome that is associated with maladaptive plasticity in neural central circuits. One of the neural circuits that are involved in pain in fibromyalgia is the primary motor cortex. We tested a combination intervention that aimed to modulate the motor system: transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the primary motor cortex (M1) and aerobic exercise (AE). In this phase II, sham-controlled randomized clinical trial, 45 subjects were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: tDCS + AE, AE only, and tDCS only. The following outcomes were assessed: intensity of pain, level of anxiety, quality of life, mood, pressure pain threshold, and cortical plasticity, as indexed by transcranial magnetic stimulation. There was a significant effect for the group-time interaction for intensity of pain, demonstrating that tDCS/AE was superior to AE [F(13, 364) = 2.25, p = 0.007] and tDCS [F(13, 364) = 2.33, p = 0.0056] alone. Post-hoc adjusted analysis showed a difference between tDCS/AE and tDCS group after the first week of stimulation and after 1 month intervention period (p = 0.02 and p = 0.03, respectively). Further, after treatment there was a significant difference between groups in anxiety and mood levels. The combination treatment effected the greatest response. The three groups had no differences regarding responses in motor cortex plasticity, as assessed by TMS. The combination of tDCS with aerobic exercise is superior compared with each individual intervention (cohen's d effect sizes > 0.55). The combination intervention had a significant effect on pain, anxiety and mood. Based on the similar effects on cortical plasticity outcomes, the combination intervention might have affected other neural circuits, such as those that control the affective-emotional aspects of pain. Trial registration: (www.ClinicalTrials.gov), identifier NTC02358902. PMID:27014012

  20. 10 CFR 35.24 - Authority and responsibilities for the radiation protection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Authority and responsibilities for the radiation... MATERIAL General Administrative Requirements § 35.24 Authority and responsibilities for the radiation protection program. (a) In addition to the radiation protection program requirements of § 20.1101 of...

  1. 10 CFR 35.24 - Authority and responsibilities for the radiation protection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Authority and responsibilities for the radiation... MATERIAL General Administrative Requirements § 35.24 Authority and responsibilities for the radiation protection program. (a) In addition to the radiation protection program requirements of § 20.1101 of...

  2. 10 CFR 35.24 - Authority and responsibilities for the radiation protection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Authority and responsibilities for the radiation... MATERIAL General Administrative Requirements § 35.24 Authority and responsibilities for the radiation protection program. (a) In addition to the radiation protection program requirements of § 20.1101 of...

  3. 10 CFR 35.24 - Authority and responsibilities for the radiation protection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Authority and responsibilities for the radiation... MATERIAL General Administrative Requirements § 35.24 Authority and responsibilities for the radiation protection program. (a) In addition to the radiation protection program requirements of § 20.1101 of...

  4. 10 CFR 35.24 - Authority and responsibilities for the radiation protection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Authority and responsibilities for the radiation... MATERIAL General Administrative Requirements § 35.24 Authority and responsibilities for the radiation protection program. (a) In addition to the radiation protection program requirements of § 20.1101 of...

  5. Teaching Aerobic Fitness Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Allan N.; Ratliffe, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to teach aerobic fitness concepts to elementary students. Some of the K-2 activities include location, size, and purpose of the heart and lungs; the exercise pulse; respiration rate; and activities to measure aerobic endurance. Some of the 3-6 activities include: definition of aerobic endurance; heart disease risk factors;…

  6. Climate Response of Direct Radiative Forcing of Anthropogenic Black Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Serena H.; Seinfeld,John H.

    2008-01-01

    The equilibrium climate effect of direct radiative forcing of anthropogenic black carbon (BC) is examined by 100-year simulations in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model II-prime coupled to a mixed-layer ocean model. Anthropogenic BC is predicted to raise globally and annually averaged equilibrium surface air temperature by 0.20 K if BC is assumed to be externally mixed. The predicted increase is significantly greater in the Northern Hemisphere (0.29 K) than in the Southern Hemisphere (0.11 K). If BC is assumed to be internally mixed with the present day level of sulfate aerosol, the predicted annual mean surface temperature increase rises to 0.37 K globally, 0.54 K for the Northern Hemisphere, and 0.20 K for the Southern Hemisphere. The climate sensitivity of BC direct radiative forcing is calculated to be 0.6 K W (sup -1) square meters, which is about 70% of that of CO2, independent of the assumption of BC mixing state. The largest surface temperature response occurs over the northern high latitudes during winter and early spring. In the tropics and midlatitudes, the largest temperature increase is predicted to occur in the upper troposphere. Direct radiative forcing of anthropogenic BC is also predicted to lead to a change of precipitation patterns in the tropics; precipitation is predicted to increase between 0 and 20 N and decrease between 0 and 20 S, shifting the intertropical convergence zone northward. If BC is assumed to be internally mixed with sulfate instead of externally mixed, the change in precipitation pattern is enhanced. The change in precipitation pattern is not predicted to alter the global burden of BC significantly because the change occurs predominantly in regions removed from BC sources.

  7. Arctic stratospheric sulphur injections: radiative forcings and cloud responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, U.; Gasparini, B.; Miriam, K.; Kravitz, B.; Rasch, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Observations and climate projections show a high sensitivity of the Arctic climate to the increase in greenhouse gas emissions, known as the polar amplification. This study evaluates the options of counteracting the rising polar temperatures by stratospheric sulphur injections in the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes.10 Mt of sulphur dioxide are emitted in a point emission source setup centred at the 100 hPa pressure level over Svalbard island (80°N,15°E). We perform simulations with the general circulation models ECHAM5, ECHAM6, and GISS ModelE. We study pulsed emission simulations that differ among themselves by the injection starting date (March-September), injection length (1, 30, or 90 day emission period), and the vertical resolution of the model (for ECHAM6). We find injections in April to be the most efficient in terms of the shortwave radiative forcing at the top-of-the atmosphere over the Arctic region. The distribution of sulphate aerosol spreads out beyond the injection region, with a significant share reaching the Southern Hemisphere. Results from ModelE show high latitude injections could counteract the spring and summer temperature increase due to higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Preliminary results with a more realistic description of clouds in ECHAM-HAM reveal a complex pattern of responses, most notably: a decrease in Northern Hemisphere cirrus clouds strengthening the effect of stratospheric aerosols in ECHAM5 a decrease in low-level clouds over the Arctic increasing the incoming solar radiation and causing a net positive radiative balance cirrus clouds are resilient to stratospheric sulphur injections in the absence of sulphate warming

  8. Climate response to abrupt cessation of solar radiation management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCusker, K. E.; Armour, K.; Bitz, C. M.; Battisti, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    Solar radiation management (SRM) as a means to reduce or cancel the effects of increased greenhouse gases may be regarded as effective to the extent that it broadly reduces warming and other related changes. Studies that have previously modeled SRM have focused on spatial inhomogeneities in the climate response, assuming that SRM is continued indefinitely and global climate is stabilized. In this study, we focus on the possible situation in which SRM is terminated (e.g. due to lack of funding, international governmental disorganization, technical failure, or unanticipated negative consequences) while greenhouse gases have continued rising. We use a global climate model (GCM) with a prescribed stratospheric sulfate burden that counteracts the Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 (RCP8.5) - wherein the radiative forcing reaches 8.5 W/m2 above the preindustrial by 2100 - to show that upon termination of the sulfate burden, abrupt and sustained warming occurs that is well outside familiar 20th century bounds, especially on land. The GCM utilized has a climate sensitivity of 3.2 degrees Celsius, yet in reality climate sensitivity is unknown, its probability density distribution exhibiting a long tail at the high end of sensitivity. Using SRM to stabilize climate while greenhouse gases continue to rise has the effect of obscuring how the climate would respond to the additional gases given the opportunity - climate sensitivity would be masked. We use a simple upwelling-diffusion energy balance model to span the range of the observationally-constrained climate sensitivities to investigate the range of global mean rate of temperature rise following SRM termination, in addition to its sensitivity to termination year and background emissions scenario. We show that in fact, the distribution of temperature trends following termination could be far broader than those simulated by the GCM. These inherent dangers suggest that solar radiation management should only be

  9. Glutathione-mediated antioxidant response and aerobic metabolism: two crucial factors involved in determining the multi-drug resistance of high-risk neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Colla, Renata; Izzotti, Alberto; De Ciucis, Chiara; Fenoglio, Daniela; Ravera, Silvia; Speciale, Andrea; Ricciarelli, Roberta; Furfaro, Anna Lisa; Pulliero, Alessandra; Passalacqua, Mario; Traverso, Nicola; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Domenicotti, Cinzia; Marengo, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, a paediatric malignant tumor, is initially sensitive to etoposide, a drug to which many patients develop chemoresistance. In order to investigate the molecular mechanisms responsible for etoposide chemoresistance, HTLA-230, a human MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cell line, was chronically treated with etoposide at a concentration that in vitro mimics the clinically-used dose. The selected cells (HTLA-Chr) acquire multi-drug resistance (MDR), becoming less sensitive than parental cells to high doses of etoposide or doxorubicin. MDR is due to several mechanisms that together contribute to maintaining non-toxic levels of H2O2. In fact, HTLA-Chr cells, while having an efficient aerobic metabolism, are also characterized by an up-regulation of catalase activity and higher levels of reduced glutathione (GSH), a thiol antioxidant compound. The combination of such mechanisms contributes to prevent membrane lipoperoxidation and cell death. Treatment of HTLA-Chr cells with L-Buthionine-sulfoximine, an inhibitor of GSH biosynthesis, markedly reduces their tumorigenic potential that is instead enhanced by the exposure to N-Acetylcysteine, able to promote GSH synthesis. Collectively, these results demonstrate that GSH and GSH-related responses play a crucial role in the acquisition of MDR and suggest that GSH level monitoring is an efficient strategy to early identify the onset of drug resistance and to control the patient's response to therapy. PMID:27683112

  10. Human pigmentation genes and their response to solar UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Sturm, R A

    1998-11-09

    Identification and characterisation of the genes involved in melanin pigment formation, together with the study of how their action is influenced by exposure to UV radiation, is providing a molecular understanding of the process of skin photoprotection through tanning. The mechanisms underlying this change in epidermal melanin involve both a transcriptional response of the pigmentation genes and post-translational control of the melanin biosynthetic pathway. UV rays are known to interact with numerous molecules within cells, and among these the photochemical reactions involving lipids and DNA are implicated in modulating melanogenesis. The combination of DNA damage, the formation of diacylglycerol, and the action of the melanocyte stimulating hormone receptor are all likely to be involved in UV-induced tanning.

  11. Target voltage response in reaction to laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkins, Richard M.

    1988-12-01

    The five microsecond, 15 joule, pulsed CO2 Laser was used to irradiate polished 2024 aluminum targets. The target voltage response (TVR) was measured with respect to the incident laser radiation and showed a pulse width on the order of 30 nanoseconds. The voltage was measured at values from 22 to 140 volts with resistances varying from one ohm to two mega-ohms. The TVR was correlated to the emission and blow-off of electrons from the target surface and the possible ignition of a Laser Supported Detonation wave. The TVR, laser pulse, and flash associated with target surface breakdown were time correlated and shown to happen within the first 170 nanoseconds of the five microsecond laser pulse. Currents up to 500 amps were observed when the resistance to ground was reduced to less than 1 ohm. Also, the magnitude of the TVR was shown to be a function of background gas pressure.

  12. Ultraviolet laser beam monitor using radiation responsive crystals

    DOEpatents

    McCann, Michael P.; Chen, Chung H.

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus and method for monitoring an ultraviolet laser beam includes disposing in the path of an ultraviolet laser beam a substantially transparent crystal that will produce a color pattern in response to ultraviolet radiation. The crystal is exposed to the ultraviolet laser beam and a color pattern is produced within the crystal corresponding to the laser beam intensity distribution therein. The crystal is then exposed to visible light, and the color pattern is observed by means of the visible light to determine the characteristics of the laser beam that passed through crystal. In this manner, a perpendicular cross sectional intensity profile and a longitudinal intensity profile of the ultraviolet laser beam may be determined. The observation of the color pattern may be made with forward or back scattered light and may be made with the naked eye or with optical systems such as microscopes and television cameras.

  13. Rapid Enzymatic Response to Compensate UV Radiation in Copepods

    PubMed Central

    Souza, María Sol; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Hylander, Samuel; Modenutti, Beatriz; Balseiro, Esteban

    2012-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) causes physical damage to DNA, carboxylation of proteins and peroxidation of lipids in copepod crustaceans, ubiquitous and abundant secondary producers in most aquatic ecosystems. Copepod adaptations for long duration exposures include changes in behaviour, changes in pigmentation and ultimately changes in morphology. Adaptations to short-term exposures are little studied. Here we show that short-duration exposure to UVR causes the freshwater calanoid copepod, Eudiaptomus gracilis, to rapidly activate production of enzymes that prevent widespread collateral peroxidation (glutathione S-transferase, GST), that regulate apoptosis cell death (Caspase-3, Casp-3), and that facilitate neurotransmissions (cholinesterase-ChE). None of these enzyme systems is alone sufficient, but they act in concert to reduce the stress level of the organism. The interplay among enzymatic responses provides useful information on how organisms respond to environmental stressors acting on short time scales. PMID:22384136

  14. Abnormal lymphocyte response to ultraviolet radiation in multiple skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Munch-Petersen, B.; Frentz, G.; Squire, B.; Wallevik, K.; Horn, C.C.; Reymann, F.; Faber, M. )

    1985-06-01

    The lymphocyte response to ultraviolet radiation (254 nm) was investigated by two different methods in 29 unselected patients with multiple epidermal cancer. The ultraviolet-induced DNA synthesis was determined as the increase in incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine in irradiated cells compared with non-irradiated cells after incubation for 2 h. The ultraviolet tolerance was measured as the ultraviolet dose necessary for 50% reduction in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. Patients with both squamous cell differentiated tumours and basal cell carcinomas had very high ultraviolet-induced DNA synthesis values. The ultraviolet tolerance in patient lymphocytes was considerably lower than in control lymphocytes with the lowest values occurring in patients with clinical sun intolerance. These investigations may be of predictive value in skin carcinogenesis.

  15. Responsive behavior of regenerated cellulose in hydrolysis under microwave radiation.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jinping; Na, Haining; She, Zhen; Wang, Jinggang; Xue, Wenwen; Zhu, Jin

    2014-09-01

    This work studied the responsive behavior of regenerated cellulose (RC) in hydrolysis under microwave radiation. Four types of RC with different crystallinity (Cr) and degree of polymerization (DP) are produced to evaluate the reactivity of RC by step-by-step hydrolysis. Results show Cr is the key factor to affect the reactivity of RCs. With hydrolysis of amorphous region and the formation of recrystallization, the Cr of RC reaches a high value and thus weakens the reactivity. As a result, the increment of cellulose conversion and sugar yield gradually reduces. Decrease of the DP of RC is helpful to increase the speed at the onset of hydrolysis and produce high sugar yield. But, there is no direct influence with the reactivity of RC to prolong the time of pretreatment. This research provides an accurate understanding to guide the RC preparation for sugar formation with relative high efficiency under mild reaction conditions.

  16. Oligodendroglial response to ionizing radiation: Dose and dose-rate response

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.P.

    1991-12-01

    An in vitro system using neuroglia from neonatal rat brain was developed to examine the morphologic, immunocytochemical and biochemical response of oligodendroglia to ionizing radiation. Following acute {gamma}-irradiation at day-in-culture (DIC) 8, oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 14 were 55% to 65% of control values after 2 Gy, and 29% to 36% after 5 Gy. Counts increased to near-normal levels at DIC 21 in the 2 Gy group and to 75% of normal in the 5 Gy group. Myelin basic protein levels (MBP) at DIC 14 were 60% of control values after 2 Gy, and 40% after 5 Gy. At DIC 21, MBP after 2 Gy was 45% greater than that observed at DIC 14, but MBP, as a fraction of age-matched control values, dropped from 60% to 50%. Following 5 Gy, absolute MBP changed little between DIC 14 and DIC 21, but decreased from 40% to 25% of control cultures. The response to split-dose irradiation indicated that nearly all sublethal damage in the oligodendrocyte population (and its precursors) was repaired within 3 h to 4 h. A new compartmental cell model for radiation response in vitro of the oligodendrocyte population is proposed and examined in relation to the potential reaction to radiation injury in the brain.

  17. Stratospheric Response to Intraseasonal Changes in Incoming Solar Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfinkel, Chaim; silverman, vered; harnik, nili; Erlich, caryn

    2016-04-01

    Superposed epoch analysis of meteorological reanalysis data is used to demonstrate a significant connection between intraseasonal solar variability and temperatures in the stratosphere. Decreasing solar flux leads to a cooling of the tropical upper stratosphere above 7hPa, while increasing solar flux leads to a warming of the tropical upper stratosphere above 7hPa, after a lag of approximately six to ten days. Late winter (February-March) Arctic stratospheric temperatures also change in response to changing incoming solar flux in a manner consistent with that seen on the 11 year timescale: ten to thirty days after the start of decreasing solar flux, the polar cap warms during the easterly phase of the Quasi-Biennal Oscillation. In contrast, cooling is present after decreasing solar flux during the westerly phase of the Quasi-Biennal Oscillation (though it is less robust than the warming during the easterly phase). The estimated composite mean changes in Northern Hemisphere upper stratospheric (~ 5hPa) polar temperatures exceed 8K, and are potentially a source of intraseasonal predictability for the surface. These changes in polar temperature are consistent with the changes in wave driving entering the stratosphere. Garfinkel, C.I., V. Silverman, N. Harnik, C. Erlich, Y. Riz (2015), Stratospheric Response to Intraseasonal Changes in Incoming Solar Radiation, J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 120, 7648-7660. doi: 10.1002/2015JD023244.

  18. Response of aerobic granular sludge to the long-term presence to nanosilver in sequencing batch reactors: reactor performance, sludge property, microbial activity and community.

    PubMed

    Quan, Xiangchun; Cen, Yan; Lu, Fang; Gu, Lingyun; Ma, Jingyun

    2015-02-15

    The increasing use of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) raises concerns about their potential toxic effects on the environment. Granular shape sludge is a special type of microbial aggregate. The response of aerobic granular sludge (AGS) to the long-term presence of Ag NPs has not been well studied. In this study, AGS was exposed to 5 and 50mg/L Ag NPs in sequence batch reactors (SBRs) for 69 days, and its response was evaluated based on the sludge properties, microbial activity and community, and reactor performance. The results showed that Ag NPs caused inhibition to microbial activities of AGS from Day 35. At the end of 69 days of Ag NPs exposure, the microbial activity of AGS was significantly inhibited in terms of inhibitions of the ammonia oxidizing rate (33.0%), respiration rate (17.7% and 45.6%) and denitrification rate (6.8%), as well as decreases in the ammonia mono-oxygenase and nitrate reductase activities. During the long-term exposure, the AGS maintained its granular shape and large granule size (approximately 900 μm); the microbial community of AGS slightly changed, but the dominant microbial population remained. Overall, the AGS tolerated the toxicity of Ag NPs well, but a long-term exposure may produce chronic toxicity to the AGS, which is concerning.

  19. The Radiation Dose-Response of the Human Spinal Cord

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheiss, Timothy E.

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To characterize the radiation dose-response of the human spinal cord. Methods and Materials: Because no single institution has sufficient data to establish a dose-response function for the human spinal cord, published reports were combined. Requisite data were dose and fractionation, number of patients at risk, number of myelopathy cases, and survival experience of the population. Eight data points for cervical myelopathy were obtained from five reports. Using maximum likelihood estimation correcting for the survival experience of the population, estimates were obtained for the median tolerance dose, slope parameter, and {alpha}/{beta} ratio in a logistic dose-response function. An adequate fit to thoracic data was not possible. Hyperbaric oxygen treatments involving the cervical cord were also analyzed. Results: The estimate of the median tolerance dose (cervical cord) was 69.4 Gy (95% confidence interval, 66.4-72.6). The {alpha}/{beta} = 0.87 Gy. At 45 Gy, the (extrapolated) probability of myelopathy is 0.03%; and at 50 Gy, 0.2%. The dose for a 5% myelopathy rate is 59.3 Gy. Graphical analysis indicates that the sensitivity of the thoracic cord is less than that of the cervical cord. There appears to be a sensitizing effect from hyperbaric oxygen treatment. Conclusions: The estimate of {alpha}/{beta} is smaller than usually quoted, but values this small were found in some studies. Using {alpha}/{beta} = 0.87 Gy, one would expect a considerable advantage by decreasing the dose/fraction to less than 2 Gy. These results were obtained from only single fractions/day and should not be applied uncritically to hyperfractionation.

  20. ULTRAVIOLET PROTECTIVE PIGMENTS AND DNA DIMER INDUCTION AS RESPONSES TO ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Life on Earth has evolved adaptations to many environmental stresses over the epochs. One consistent stress has been exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The most basic effect of UV radiation on biological systems is damage to DNA. In response to UV radiation organisms have ad...

  1. SU-E-J-274: Responses of Medulloblastoma Cells to Radiation Dosimetric Parameters in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J; Park, J; Rogalla, S; Contag, C; Woo, D; Lee, D; Park, H; Suh, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate radiation responses of the medulloblastoma cell line Daoy in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), quantitative variations to variable radiation dosimetic parameters were tracked by bioluminescent images (BLIs). Methods: The luciferase and green fluorescent protein positive Daoy cells were cultured on dishes. The medulloblastoma cells irradiated to different dose rate, interval of fractionated doses, field margin and misalignment, and dose uniformity in IMRT were monitored using bioluminescent images. The cultured cells were placed into a dedicated acrylic phantom to deliver intensity-modulated fluences and calculate accurate predicted dose distribution. The radiation with dose rate from 0.5 Gy/min to 15 Gy/min was irradiated by adjusting monitor unit per minute and source-to-surface distances. The intervals of fractionated dose delivery were changed considering the repair time of double strand breaks (DSB) revealed by straining of gamma-H2AX.The effect of non-uniform doses on the cells were visualized by registering dose distributions and BLIs. The viability according to dosimetric parameters was correlated with bioluminescent intensities for cross-check of radiation responses. Results: The DSB and cell responses due to the first fractionated dose delivery significantly affected final tumor control rather than other parameters. The missing tumor volumes due to the smaller field margin than the tumor periphery or field misalignment caused relapse of cell responses on BLIs. The dose rate and gradient had effect on initial responses but could not bring out the distinguishable killing effect on cancer cells. Conclusion: Visualized and quantified bioluminescent images were useful to correlate the dose distributions with spatial radiation effects on cells. This would derive the effective combination of dose delivery parameters and fractionation. Radiation responses in particular IMRT configuration could be reflected to image based-dose re-optimization.

  2. Land dominates the regional response to CO2 direct radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Tiffany A.; Voigt, Aiko

    2016-11-01

    In Atmospheric General Circulation Models (AGCMs) direct radiative forcing (increased CO2 with fixed sea surface temperature) is an imperfect concept because land temperatures are not fixed. Here the response to direct radiative forcing is decomposed into increased CO2 over ocean and land using an AGCM with spatially dependent CO2. The land versus ocean response is mostly linear. Consistent with previous work, ocean direct radiative forcing decreases ocean-averaged outgoing longwave radiation, precipitation, and tropical circulation intensity; however, it cannot explain the regional response to direct radiative forcing. Increased CO2 over land dominates the regional response via energy input over land, e.g., over deserts where there is no cloud and water vapor masking and a Rossby wave teleconnection. This mechanism operates across a range of climate perturbations, including decreased CO2. Previous AGCM decompositions involving direct radiative forcing and indirect sea surface temperature warming must be reinterpreted to include the importance of increased CO2 over land.

  3. Radiation response of SiC-based fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, G.E.; Jones, R.H.; Kohyama, Akira; Snead, L.L.

    1998-03-01

    The radiation response of a base-line carbide composite (SiC/SiC) made with Nicalon{trademark} CG fiber reinforcement was presented for a broad range of dose and irradiation temperatures. Strength loss in this composite and a similar composite made with Tyranno{trademark} fiber was related to shrinkage and a predicted mass loss in the Nicalon CG or Tyranno fibers. In Table 1, measured relative density and length changes ({Delta}p/p{sub o} and {Delta}L/L{sub o}, respectively) for coated and uncoated fibers irradiated at high doses and temperatures (43 dpa-SiC at 1000 C and 80 dpa-SiC at 800 C) are given. Also given are the relative mass loss changes {Delta}m/m{sub o}, calculated from {Delta}p/p{sub o} and {Delta}L/L{sub o} by the expression {Delta}m/m{sub o} = 3 {Delta}L/L{sub o} + {Delta}p/p{sub o}.

  4. Unraveling the drivers of the storm time radiation belt response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpua, E. K. J.; Hietala, H.; Turner, D. L.; Koskinen, H. E. J.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Reeves, G. D.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Spence, H. E.

    2015-05-01

    We present a new framework to study the time evolution and dynamics of the outer Van Allen belt electron fluxes. The framework is entirely based on the large-scale solar wind storm drivers and their substructures. The Van Allen Probe observations, revealing the electron flux behavior throughout the outer belt, are combined with continuous, long-term (over 1.5 solar cycles) geosynchronous orbit data set from GOES and solar wind measurements A superposed epoch analysis, where we normalize the timescales for each substructure (sheath, ejecta, and interface region) allows us to avoid smearing effects and to distinguish the electron flux evolution during various driver structures. We show that the radiation belt response is not random: The electron flux variations are determined by the combined effect of the structured solar wind driver and prestorm electron flux levels. In particular, we find that loss mechanisms dominate during stream interface regions, coronal mass ejection (CME) ejecta, and sheaths while enhancements occur during fast streams trailing the stream interface or the CME.

  5. All Three Endogenous Quinone Species of Escherichia coli Are Involved in Controlling the Activity of the Aerobic/Anaerobic Response Regulator ArcA

    PubMed Central

    van Beilen, Johan W. A.; Hellingwerf, Klaas J.

    2016-01-01

    The enteron Escherichia coli is equipped with a branched electron transfer chain that mediates chemiosmotic electron transfer, that drives ATP synthesis. The components of this electron transfer chain couple the oxidation of available electron donors from cellular metabolism (e.g., NADH, succinate, lactate, formate, etc.) to the reduction of electron acceptors like oxygen, nitrate, fumarate, di-methyl-sulfoxide, etc. Three different quinones, i.e., ubiquinone, demethyl-menaquinone and menaquinone, couple the transfer of electrons between the dehydrogenases and reductases/oxidases that constitute this electron transfer chain, whereas, the two-component regulation system ArcB/A regulates gene expression, to allow the organism to adapt itself to the ambient conditions of available electron donors and acceptors. Here, we report that E. coli can grow and adjust well to transitions in the availability of oxygen, with any of the three quinones as its single quinone. In all three ‘single-quinone’ E. coli strains transitions in the activity of ArcB are observed, as evidenced by changes in the level of phosphorylation of the response regulator ArcA, upon depletion/readmission of oxygen. These results lead us to conclude that all quinol species of E. coli can reduce (i.e., activate) the sensor ArcB and all three quinones oxidize (i.e., de-activate) it. These results also confirm our earlier conclusion that demethyl-menaquinone can function in aerobic respiration. PMID:27656164

  6. Do we have predictors of therapy responsiveness for a multimodal therapy concept and aerobic training in breast cancer survivors with chronic cancer-related fatigue?

    PubMed

    Kröz, M; Reif, M; Zerm, R; Winter, K; Schad, F; Gutenbrunner, C; Girke, M; Bartsch, C

    2015-09-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a burdensome symptom for breast cancer (BC) patients. In this pilot study, we tested several questionnaires as predictors for treatment responsiveness, along with the implementation of a multimodal therapy concept consisting of sleep, psycho-education, eurythmy, painting therapy and standard aerobic training. At the Community Hospital Havelhöhe and the Hannover Medical School, 31 BC patients suffering from CRF could be evaluated in a 10-week intervention study. CRF was assessed by the Cancer Fatigue Scale (CFS-D). Further questionnaires were the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the autonomic regulation scale, Self-Regulation Scale (SRS), the Internal Coherence Scale (ICS) and the European Organization of Research and Treatment Health-Related Quality of Life Core Questionnaire scale. We estimated the regression coefficients of all scales on CFS-D by simple and multiple linear regression analyses and compared regression slopes and variances between the different questionnaires on CFS-D at the end of treatment. We found a significant impact of SRS and ICS at baseline on CFS-D at the end of the intervention [absolute standardised multiple regression coefficient values ranging from 0.319 (SRS) to 0.269 (ICS)] but not for the other questionnaires. In conclusion, this study supports the hypothesis that the SRS or ICS measuring adaptive capacities could be more appropriate as outcome predictors than classical questionnaire measures in complex interventions studies.

  7. Improving the simultaneous removal of chemical oxygen demand and terephthalic acid in a cross-flow aerobic sludge reactor by using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dong-Xue; Tian, Yu; Chen, Zhao-Bo; Ge, Hui; Cui, Yu-Bo; Ran, Chun-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    Central composite design and response surface methodology (RSM) were implemented to optimize the operational parameters for a cross-flow aerobic sludge reactor (CFASR) in remedying mixed printing and dyeing wastewater (MPDW). The individual and interactive effects of three variables, hydraulic retention time (HRT), pH and sludge loading rate (SLR), on chemical oxygen demand (COD) and terephthalic acid (TA) removal rates were evaluated. For HRT of 15.3-19.8 hours, pH of 7.2-8.1 and SLR of 0.4-0.6 kg chemical oxygen demand (COD) per kg mixed liquor suspended solids per day, COD and TA removal rates of the CFASR exceeded 85% and 90%, respectively. The check experiment revealed that the effluent from the optimized CFASR was stable below the limitation of 100 mg COD/L and the TA concentration decreased by 6.0% compared to the usual CFASR. The results verified that the RSM was useful for optimizing the operation parameters of the CFASR in remedying MPDW.

  8. Cytokine and chemokine responses after exposure to ionizing radiation: Implications for the astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laiakis, Evagelia C.; Baulch, Janet E.; Morgan, William F.

    For individuals traveling in space, exposure to space radiation is unavoidable. Since adequate shielding against radiation exposure is not practical, other strategies for protecting the astronauts must be developed. Radiation is also an important therapeutic and diagnostic tool, and evidence from the clinical and experimental settings now shows a firm connection between radiation exposure and changes in cytokine and chemokine levels. These small proteins can be pro- or anti-inflammatory in nature and the balance between those two effects can be altered easily because of exogenous stresses such as radiation. The challenge to identify a common perpetrator, however, lies in the fact that the cytokines that are produced vary based on radiation dose, type of radiation, and the cell types that are exposed. Based on current knowledge, special treatments have successfully been designed by implementing administration of proteins, antibodies, and drugs that counteract some of the harmful effects of radiation. Although these treatments show promising results in animal studies, it has been difficult to transfer those practices to the human situation. Further understanding of the mechanisms by which cytokines are triggered through radiation exposure and how those proteins interact with one another may permit the generation of novel strategies for radiation protection from the damaging effects of radiation. Here, we review evidence for the connection between cytokines and the radiation response and speculate on strategies by which modulating cytokine responses may protect astronauts against the detrimental effects of ionizing radiations.

  9. WWOX loss activates aerobic glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Abu-Remaileh, Muhannad; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells undergo reprogramming of glucose metabolism to limit energy production to glycolysis-a state known as "aerobic glycolysis." Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1α) is a transcription factor that regulates many genes responsible for this switch. As discussed here, new data suggest that the tumor suppressor WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) modulates HIF1α, thereby regulating this metabolic state.

  10. WWOX loss activates aerobic glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Remaileh, Muhannad; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells undergo reprogramming of glucose metabolism to limit energy production to glycolysis—a state known as “aerobic glycolysis.” Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1α) is a transcription factor that regulates many genes responsible for this switch. As discussed here, new data suggest that the tumor suppressor WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) modulates HIF1α, thereby regulating this metabolic state. PMID:27308416

  11. Effect of plasma donation and blood donation on aerobic and anaerobic responses in exhaustive, severe-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Hill, David W; Vingren, Jakob L; Burdette, Samantha D

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the immediate and delayed effects of plasma donation and blood donation on responses in exhaustive, severe-intensity exercise. Nineteen young men and women performed exhaustive cycle ergometer tests at ∼3.3 W·kg(-1) before and then 2 h, 2 days, and 7 days after withdrawal of either 8-10 mL·kg(-1) (∼700 mL) of plasma (n = 10) or 1 unit (450 mL) of whole blood (n = 9). Time to exhaustion was significantly (p < 0.05) decreased after the removal of plasma (-11% after 2 h) and after the removal of blood (-19% after 2 h and -7% after 2 days). Maximal oxygen uptake (.VO(2max)) was not affected by plasma donation, but .VO(2max) was reduced following blood withdrawal (-15% after 2 h, -10% after 2 days, and -7% after 7 days) presumably because of effects on blood volume, total haemoglobin content, and haemoglobin concentration. The kinetics of the oxygen uptake (.VO2) response was not affected by either intervention. Two measures of anaerobic capacity, postexercise blood lactate concentration, and maximal accumulated oxygen deficit were reduced (-14%, -15%, respectively) 2 h after plasma donation, but neither was affected by blood donation. Removal of plasma and removal of blood have different effects on blood constituency, on the .VO2 response, and on performance. Plasma donation appears to affect exercise performance because of reduced anaerobic capacity, whereas blood donation affects performance because of lowered .VO(2max).

  12. The radiation response of mesoporous nanocrystalline zirconia thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzini, Ayelén M.; Alurralde, Martin A.; Giménez, Gustavo; Luca, Vittorio

    2016-12-01

    The next generation of nuclear systems will require materials capable of withstanding hostile chemical, physical and radiation environments over long time-frames. Aside from its chemical and physical stability, crystalline zirconia is one of the most radiation tolerant materials known. Here we report the first ever study of the radiation response of nanocrystalline and mesoporous zirconia and Ce3+-stabilized nanocrystalline zirconia (Ce0.1Zr0.9O2) thin films supported on silicon wafers. Zirconia films prepared using the block copolymer Brij-58 as the template had a thickness of around 60-80 nm. In the absence of a stabilizing trivalent cation they consisted of monoclinic and tetragonal zirconia nanocrystals with diameters in the range 8-10 nm. Films stabilized with Ce3+ contained only the tetragonal phase. The thin films were irradiated with iodine ions of energies of 70 MeV and 132 keV at low fluences (1013 - 1014 cm-2) corresponding to doses of 0.002 and 1.73 dpa respectively, and at 180 keV and high fluences (2 × 1016 cm-2) corresponding to 82.4 dpa. The influence of heavy ion irradiation on the nanocrystalline structure was monitored through Rietveld analysis of grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) patterns recorded at angles close to the critical angle to ensure minimum contribution to the diffraction pattern from the substrate. Irradiation of the mesoporous nanocrystalline zirconia thin films with 70 MeV iodine ions, for which electronic energy loss is dominant, resulted in slight changes in phase composition and virtually no change in crystallographic parameters as determined by Rietveld analysis. Iodine ion bombardment in the nuclear energy loss regime (132-180 keV) at low fluences did not provoke significant changes in phase composition or crystallographic parameters. However, at 180 keV and high fluences the monoclinic phase was totally eliminated from the GIXRD pattern of films prepared at both 350 and 500 °C implying either a monoclinic

  13. Responses to the low-level-radiation controversy

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P.

    1981-10-07

    Some data sets dealing with the hazards of low-level radiation are discussed. It is concluded that none of these reports, individually or collectively, changes appreciably or even significantly the evaluations of possible low-level radiation effects that have been made by several authoritative national and international groups. (ACR)

  14. Preoperative Single-Fraction Partial Breast Radiation Therapy: A Novel Phase 1, Dose-Escalation Protocol With Radiation Response Biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Janet K.; Blitzblau, Rachel C.; Yoo, Sua; Geradts, Joseph; Chang, Zheng; Baker, Jay A.; Georgiade, Gregory S.; Chen, Wei; Siamakpour-Reihani, Sharareh; Wang, Chunhao; Broadwater, Gloria; Groth, Jeff; Palta, Manisha; Dewhirst, Mark; Barry, William T.; Duffy, Eileen A.; and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Women with biologically favorable early-stage breast cancer are increasingly treated with accelerated partial breast radiation (PBI). However, treatment-related morbidities have been linked to the large postoperative treatment volumes required for external beam PBI. Relative to external beam delivery, alternative PBI techniques require equipment that is not universally available. To address these issues, we designed a phase 1 trial utilizing widely available technology to 1) evaluate the safety of a single radiation treatment delivered preoperatively to the small-volume, intact breast tumor and 2) identify imaging and genomic markers of radiation response. Methods and Materials: Women aged ≥55 years with clinically node-negative, estrogen receptor–positive, and/or progesterone receptor–positive HER2−, T1 invasive carcinomas, or low- to intermediate-grade in situ disease ≤2 cm were enrolled (n=32). Intensity modulated radiation therapy was used to deliver 15 Gy (n=8), 18 Gy (n=8), or 21 Gy (n=16) to the tumor with a 1.5-cm margin. Lumpectomy was performed within 10 days. Paired pre- and postradiation magnetic resonance images and patient tumor samples were analyzed. Results: No dose-limiting toxicity was observed. At a median follow-up of 23 months, there have been no recurrences. Physician-rated cosmetic outcomes were good/excellent, and chronic toxicities were grade 1 to 2 (fibrosis, hyperpigmentation) in patients receiving preoperative radiation only. Evidence of dose-dependent changes in vascular permeability, cell density, and expression of genes regulating immunity and cell death were seen in response to radiation. Conclusions: Preoperative single-dose radiation therapy to intact breast tumors is well tolerated. Radiation response is marked by early indicators of cell death in this biologically favorable patient cohort. This study represents a first step toward a novel partial breast radiation approach. Preoperative radiation should

  15. Effects of a heart rate-based recovery period on hormonal, neuromuscular, and aerobic performance responses during 7 weeks of strength training in men.

    PubMed

    Piirainen, Jarmo M; Tanskanen, Minna; Nissilä, Juuso; Kaarela, Juha; Väärälä, Ari; Sippola, Niina; Linnamo, Vesa

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare hormonal, neuromuscular, and aerobic performance changes between a constant 2-minute interset recovery time and an interset recovery time based on individual heart rate (HR) responses during a 7-week (3 sessions per week, 3 × 10 repetition maximum [RM]) hypertrophic strength training period. The HR-dependent recovery time was determined with a Polar FT80 HR monitor, whereas the control groups used constant 2-minute periods between sets. From 24 male subjects who were divided in 2 equal groups, 21 completed the study (FT80, n = 12; CONTROL, n = 9). Serum blood samples analyzed for testosterone (TES) and cortisol (COR) were taken before and after the 7-week training period at rest. Concentric knee extension 1RM was measured before, after 4 weeks, and at the end of the training period. Concentric knee extension and knee flexion 10RM, central activation ratio (CAR), and maxVO2 were measured before and after the training. Serum TES concentrations were significantly higher after the training period in FT80 (p < 0.001), whereas no significant changes were observed in the CONTROL. Serum COR and maxVO2 were unchanged in both groups. In FT80 (p < 0.001), the increase in 10RM was higher (p < 0.05) than in CONTROL (p < 0.001). Central activation ratio increased in both groups, with the significant increase observed in FT80 (p < 0.05). The higher TES responses, 10RM, and CAR development in FT80 suggest that an HR-based recovery period system of the FT80 may be more efficient in this type of hypertrophic strength training (3 × 10RM). The protocol in this study may be considered as a metabolic training cycle that coaches and trainers can use within a longer periodized training program.

  16. Influence of inorganic and organic nutrients on aerobic biodegradation and on the adaptation response of subsurface microbial communities

    SciTech Connect

    Swindoll, C.M.; Aelion, C.M.; Pfaender, F.K.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of inorganic and organic amendments on the mineralization of ethylene dibromide, rho-nitrophenol, phenol, and toluene was examined in subsurface soil samples from a pristine aquifer near Lula, Oklahoma. The responses indicate that the metabolic abilities and nutrient requirements of ground water microorganisms vary substantially within an aquifer. In some samples, additions of inorganic nutrients resulted in a more rapid adaptation to the test substrate and a higher rate of metabolism, indicating that metabolism may have been limited by these nutrients. In other samples from the same aquifer layer, inorganic amendments had little or no influence on mineralization. In general, the addition of multiple inorganic nutrients resulted in a greater enhancement of degradation than did the addition of single substances. Additions of alternate carbon sources, such as glucose or amino acids, inhibited the mineralization of the xenobiotic substrates. This inhibition appears to be the result of the preferential utilization of the more easily degradable carbon amendments.

  17. Hippocampal structure, metabolism, and inflammatory response after a 6-week intense aerobic exercise in healthy young adults: a controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Gerd; Herbsleb, Marco; de la Cruz, Feliberto; Schumann, Andy; Brünner, Franziska; Schachtzabel, Claudia; Gussew, Alexander; Puta, Christian; Smesny, Stefan; Gabriel, Holger W; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Bär, Karl-Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Interventional studies suggest that changes in physical fitness affect brain function and structure. We studied the influence of high intensity physical exercise on hippocampal volume and metabolism in 17 young healthy male adults during a 6-week exercise program compared with matched controls. We further aimed to relate these changes to hypothesized changes in exercised-induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). We show profound improvement of physical fitness in most subjects and a positive correlation between the degree of fitness improvement and increased BDNF levels. We unexpectedly observed an average volume decrease of about 2%, which was restricted to right hippocampal subfields CA2/3, subiculum, and dentate gyrus and which correlated with fitness improvement and increased BDNF levels negatively. This result indicates that mainly those subjects who did not benefit from the exercise program show decreased hippocampal volume, reduced BDNF levels, and increased TNF-α concentrations. While spectroscopy results do not indicate any neuronal loss (unchanged N-acetylaspartate levels) decreased glutamate-glutamine levels were observed in the right anterior hippocampus in the exercise group only. Responder characteristics need to be studied in more detail. Our results point to an important role of the inflammatory response after exercise on changes in hippocampal structure.

  18. Appetite, appetite hormone and energy intake responses to two consecutive days of aerobic exercise in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Jessica A; King, James A; McFarlane, Ewan; Baker, Luke; Bradley, Chloe; Crouch, Nicole; Hill, David; Stensel, David J

    2015-09-01

    Single bouts of exercise do not cause compensatory changes in appetite, food intake or appetite regulatory hormones on the day that exercise is performed. It remains possible that such changes occur over an extended period or in response to a higher level of energy expenditure. This study sought to test this possibility by examining appetite, food intake and appetite regulatory hormones (acylated ghrelin, total peptide-YY, leptin and insulin) over two days, with acute bouts of exercise performed on each morning. Within a controlled laboratory setting, 15 healthy males completed two, 2-day long (09:00-16:00) experimental trials (exercise and control) in a randomised order. On the exercise trial participants performed 60 min of continuous moderate-high intensity treadmill running (day one: 70.1 ± 2.5% VO2peak, day two: 70.0 ± 3.2% VO2max (mean ± SD)) at the beginning of days one and two. Across each day appetite perceptions were assessed using visual analogue scales and appetite regulatory hormones were measured from venous blood samples. Ad libitum energy and macronutrient intakes were determined from meals provided two and six hours into each day and from a snack bag provided in-between trial days. Exercise elicited a high level of energy expenditure (total = 7566 ± 635 kJ across the two days) but did not produce compensatory changes in appetite or energy intake over two days (control: 29,217 ± 4006 kJ; exercise: 28,532 ± 3899 kJ, P > 0.050). Two-way repeated measures ANOVA did not reveal any main effects for acylated ghrelin or leptin (all P > 0.050). However a significant main effect of trial (P = 0.029) for PYY indicated higher concentrations on the exercise vs. control trial. These findings suggest that across a two day period, high volume exercise does not stimulate compensatory appetite regulatory changes.

  19. Emesis in Ferrets Following Exposure to Different Types of Radiation: A Dose-Response Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    SR92-34 Emesis in Ferrets Following Exposure to Different Types of Radiation: N A Dose -Response Study L51 BERNARD M. RABIN, Ph.D., WALTER A. HUNT...fission neutrons (1500-2000 following exposure to different types o" radiation: a dose -response cGy), Young (13) reported that increasing the propor...order to establish the dose -response relationships monkey, but did not produce an increase in the total for emesis following exposure to different types

  20. The Inhibitory Effects of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation in IgE-Mediated Allergic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seon Young; Yang, Kwang Hee; Kim, Cha Soon; Lee, In Kyung; Kim, Ji Young

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has different biological effects according to dose and dose rate. In particular, the biological effect of low-dose radiation is unclear. Low-dose whole-body gamma irradiation activates immune responses in several ways. However, the effects and mechanism of low-dose radiation on allergic responses remain poorly understood. Previously, we reported that low-dose ionizing radiation inhibits mediator release in IgE-mediated RBL-2H3 mast cell activation. In this study, to have any physiological relevance, we investigated whether low-dose radiation inhibits allergic responses in activated human mast cells (HMC-1(5C6) and LAD2 cells), mouse models of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and the late-phase cutaneous response. High-dose radiation induced cell death, but low-dose ionizing radiation of <0.5 Gy did not induce mast cell death. Low-dose ionizing radiation that did not induce cell death significantly suppressed mediator release from human mast cells (HMC-1(5C6) and LAD2 cells) that were activated by antigen-antibody reaction. To determine the inhibitory mechanism of mediator released by low-dose ionizing radiation, we examined the phosphorylation of intracellular signaling molecules such as Lyn, Syk, phospholipase Cγ, and protein kinase C, as well as the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). The phosphorylation of signaling molecules and [Ca2+]i following stimulation of FcεRI receptors was inhibited by low dose ionizing radiation. In agreement with its in vitro effect, ionizing radiation also significantly inhibited inflammatory cells infiltration, cytokine mRNA expression (TNF-α, IL-4, IL-13), and symptoms of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction and the late-phase cutaneous response in anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-sensitized mice. These results indicate that ionizing radiation inhibits both mast cell-mediated immediate- and delayed-type allergic reactions in vivo and in vitro. PMID:26317642

  1. Contribution of radiation-induced, nitric oxide-mediated bystander effect to radiation-induced adaptive response.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, H.; Ohnishi, T.

    There has been a recent upsurge of interest in radiation-induced adaptive response and bystander effect which are specific modes in stress response to low-dose low-dose rate radiation Recently we found that the accumulation of inducible nitric oxide NO synthase iNOS in wt p53 cells was induced by chronic irradiation with gamma rays followed by acute irradiation with X-rays but not by each one resulting in an increase in nitrite concentrations of medium It is suggested that the accumulation of iNOS may be due to the depression of acute irradiation-induced p53 functions by pre-chronic irradiation In addition we found that the radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells against acute irradiation with X-rays was reduced after chronic irradiation with gamma rays This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells was nearly completely suppressed by the addition of NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO to the medium This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells is just radiation-induced adaptive response suggesting that NO-mediated bystander effect may considerably contribute to adaptive response induced by radiation

  2. Functional genomics screening utilizing mutant mouse embryonic stem cells identifies novel radiation-response genes.

    PubMed

    Loesch, Kimberly; Galaviz, Stacy; Hamoui, Zaher; Clanton, Ryan; Akabani, Gamal; Deveau, Michael; DeJesus, Michael; Ioerger, Thomas; Sacchettini, James C; Wallis, Deeann

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the genetic determinants of radiation response is crucial to optimizing and individualizing radiotherapy for cancer patients. In order to identify genes that are involved in enhanced sensitivity or resistance to radiation, a library of stable mutant murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs), each with a defined mutation, was screened for cell viability and gene expression in response to radiation exposure. We focused on a cancer-relevant subset of over 500 mutant ESC lines. We identified 13 genes; 7 genes that have been previously implicated in radiation response and 6 other genes that have never been implicated in radiation response. After screening, proteomic analysis showed enrichment for genes involved in cellular component disassembly (e.g. Dstn and Pex14) and regulation of growth (e.g. Adnp2, Epc1, and Ing4). Overall, the best targets with the highest potential for sensitizing cancer cells to radiation were Dstn and Map2k6, and the best targets for enhancing resistance to radiation were Iqgap and Vcan. Hence, we provide compelling evidence that screening mutant ESCs is a powerful approach to identify genes that alter radiation response. Ultimately, this knowledge can be used to define genetic variants or therapeutic targets that will enhance clinical therapy.

  3. Gamma response study of radiation sensitive MOSFETs for their use as gamma radiation sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Saurabh; Aggarwal, Bharti; Singh, Arvind; Kumar, A. Vinod; Topkar, Anita

    2016-05-01

    Continuous monitoring of gamma dose is important in various fields like radiation therapy, space-related research, nuclear energy programs and high energy physics experiment facilities. The present work is focused on utilization of radiation-sensitive Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs) to monitor gamma radiation doses. Static characterization of these detectors was performed to check their expected current-voltage relationship. Threshold voltage and transconductance per unit gate to source voltage (K factor) were calculated from the experimental data. The detector was exposed to gamma radiation in both, with and without gate bias voltage conditions, and change in threshold voltage was monitored at different gamma doses. The experimental data was fitted to obtain equation for dependence of threshold voltage on gamma dose. More than ten times increase in sensitivity was observed in biased condition (+3 V) compared to the unbiased case.

  4. Radiation effects on livestock: physiological effects, dose response

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, M.C.

    1985-06-01

    Farm livestock show no measurable effects from being exposed to ionizing radiation unless the level is greatly in excess of the natural background radiation. Possible sources of ionizing radiation which might affect livestock or contribute to radioactivity in the food chain to humans are reactor accidents, fuel reprocessing plant accidents and thermonuclear explosions. Most data on ionizing radiation effects on livestock are from whole body gamma doses near the LD 50/60 level. However, grazing livestock would be subjected to added beta exposure from ingested and skin retained radioactive particles. Results of attempts to simulate exposure of the Hereford cattle at Alamogardo, NM show that cattle are more sensitive to ingested fallout radiation than other species. Poultry LD 50/60 for gamma exposure is about twice the level for mammals, and swine appear to have the most efficient repair system being able to withstand the most chronic gamma exposure. Productivity of most livestock surviving an LD 50/60 exposure is temporarily reduced and longterm effects are small. Livestock are good screeners against undesirables in our diet and with the exception of radiosotopes of iodine in milk, very little fission product radioactivity would be expected to be transferred through the food chain in livestock products for humans. Feeding of stored feed or moving livestock to uncontaminated pastures would be the best protective action to follow. 29 references.

  5. Mifepristone improves chemo-radiation response in glioblastoma xenografts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We have investigated the ability of Mifepristone, an anti-progestin and anti-glucocorticoid drug, to modulate the antitumor effect of current standard clinical treatment in glioblastoma xenografts. Methods The effect of radiation alone or combined with Mifepristone and Temozolamide was evaluated on tumor growth in glioblastoma xenografts, both in terms of preferentially triggering tumor cell death and inhibiting angiogenesis. Tumor size was measured once a week using a caliper and tumor metabolic-activity was carried out by molecular imaging using a microPET/CT scanner. The effect of Mifepristone on the expression of angiogenic factors after concomitant radio-chemotherapy was determined using a quantitative real-time PCR analysis of VEGF gene expression. Results The analysis of the data shows a significant antitumoral effect by the simultaneous administration of radiation-Mifepristone-Temozolamide in comparison with radiation alone or radiation-Temozolamide. Conclusion Our results suggest that Mifepristone could improve the efficacy of chemo-radiotherapy in Glioblastoma. The addition of Mifepristone to standard radiation-Temozolamide therapy represents a potential approach as a chemo-radio-sensitizer in treating GBMs, which have very limited treatment options. PMID:23530939

  6. Radiation-induced nonlinear optical response of quartz fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaksin, O. A.

    2006-10-01

    The intensity of radiation-induced luminescence and transient optical losses in KU-1 (Russia) and K-3 (Japan) quartz glass optical tibers irradiated in a fast pulsed fission reactor (a pulse duration of 80 μs and a neutron flux up to 7 × 1016 cm 2 s 2) has been measured in the visible range. The intensity of the fast luminescence component nonlinearly depends on the neutron flux. The luminescence intensity and the transient optical losses depend on the probe light intensity. Suppression of radiation-induced luminescence is observed at wavelengths that are longer or shorter than the probe light wavelength. Light probing leads to an increase in transient optical losses and a more rapid recovery of transparency. A model of two photon fluxes is proposed to analyze the relationship of the effects of suppression of radiation-induced luminescence and the increase in optical losses upon light probing. The effect of suppression of radiation-induced luminescence can be used to control the optical properties of fibers in radiation fields.

  7. Cellular Senescence, Radiation Damage to Mitochondria, and the Compensatory Response in Ripening Pear Fruits 1

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Roger J.; Yu, Ida K.; Ku, Lily L.; Fisher, L. Karl; Dehgan, Nancy

    1968-01-01

    A compensatory response, viz. in vivo recovery from radiation damage to mitochondria, occurs in preclimacteric pear fruits (Pyrus communis L.) treated with ionizing radiation. The compensatory response is absent or markedly impaired in senescent fruits irradiated at or near the climacteric peak. Senescent cells failed to recover from harmful effects of radiation on: 1) mitochondrial yield, 2) in vivo incorporation of amino acids into mitochondrial protein, and 3) mitochondrial respiratory control and ADP/O. A diminished response to “split-dose” irradiation and a delayed rate of recovery confirmed the degeneracy and loss of compensatory power with cell age. A loss of restorative activity, especially in mitochondria that supply the cell with essential energy, may underlie the more obvious signs of cumulative stress that accompany cellular senescence. Use of ionizing radiation as an investigative tool and the molecular implications of radiation damage, recovery, and cellular senescence are discussed. PMID:16656887

  8. What Is Aerobic Dancing?

    MedlinePlus

    ... aerobics can reach up to six times the force of gravity, which is transmitted to each of the 26 bones in the foot. Because of the many side-to-side motions, shoes need an arch design that will compensate ...

  9. Response of radiation belt simulations to different radial diffusion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, A.; Shprits, Y.; Subbotin, D.; Kellerman, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    Resonant interactions between Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves and relativistic electrons may violate the third adiabatic invariant of motion, which produces radial diffusion in the electron radiation belts. This process plays an important role in the formation and structure of the outer electron radiation belt and is important for electron acceleration and losses in that region. Two parameterizations of the resonant wave-particle interaction of electrons with ULF waves in the magnetosphere by Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2012] are evaluated using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) diffusion code to estimate their relative effect on the radiation belt simulation. The period of investigation includes quiet time and storm time geomagnetic activity and is compared to data based on satellite observations. Our calculations take into account wave-particle interactions represented by radial diffusion transport, local acceleration, losses due to pitch-angle diffusion, and mixed diffusion. We show that the results of the 3D diffusion simulations depend on the assumed parametrization of waves. The differences between the simulations and potential missing physical mechanisms are discussed. References Brautigam, D. H., and J. M. Albert (2000), Radial diffusion analysis of outer radiation belt electrons during the October 9, 1990, magnetic storm, J. Geophys. Res., 105(A1), 291-309, doi:10.1029/1999JA900344 Ozeke, L. G., I. R. Mann, K. R. Murphy, I. J. Rae, D. K. Milling, S. R. Elkington, A. A. Chan, and H. J. Singer (2012), ULF wave derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, J. Geophys. Res., 117, A04222, doi:10.1029/2011JA017463.

  10. Second Solid Cancers After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review of the Epidemiologic Studies of the Radiation Dose-Response Relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Gilbert, Ethel; Curtis, Rochelle; Inskip, Peter; Kleinerman, Ruth; Morton, Lindsay; Rajaraman, Preetha; Little, Mark P.

    2013-06-01

    Rapid innovations in radiation therapy techniques have resulted in an urgent need for risk projection models for second cancer risks from high-dose radiation exposure, because direct observation of the late effects of newer treatments will require patient follow-up for a decade or more. However, the patterns of cancer risk after fractionated high-dose radiation are much less well understood than those after lower-dose exposures (0.1-5 Gy). In particular, there is uncertainty about the shape of the dose-response curve at high doses and about the magnitude of the second cancer risk per unit dose. We reviewed the available evidence from epidemiologic studies of second solid cancers in organs that received high-dose exposure (>5 Gy) from radiation therapy where dose-response curves were estimated from individual organ-specific doses. We included 28 eligible studies with 3434 second cancer patients across 11 second solid cancers. Overall, there was little evidence that the dose-response curve was nonlinear in the direction of a downturn in risk, even at organ doses of ≥60 Gy. Thyroid cancer was the only exception, with evidence of a downturn after 20 Gy. Generally the excess relative risk per Gray, taking account of age and sex, was 5 to 10 times lower than the risk from acute exposures of <2 Gy among the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. However, the magnitude of the reduction in risk varied according to the second cancer. The results of our review provide insights into radiation carcinogenesis from fractionated high-dose exposures and are generally consistent with current theoretical models. The results can be used to refine the development of second solid cancer risk projection models for novel radiation therapy techniques.

  11. Novel radiation response genes identified in gene-trapped MCF10A mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Malone, Jennifer; Ullrich, Robert

    2007-02-01

    We have used a gene-trapping strategy to screen human mammary epithelial cells for radiation response genes. Relative mRNA expression levels of five candidate genes in MCF10A cells were analyzed, both with and without exposure to radiation. In all five cases, the trapped genes were significantly down-regulated after radiation treatment. Sequence analysis of the fusion transcripts identified the trapped genes: (1) the human androgen receptor, (2) the uncharacterized DREV1 gene, which has known homology to DNA methyltransferases, (3) the human creatine kinase gene, (4) the human eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 beta 2, and (5) the human ribosomal protein L27. All five genes were down-regulated significantly after treatment with varying doses of ionizing radiation (0.10 to 4.0 Gy) and at varying times (2-30 h after treatment). The genes were also analyzed in human fibroblast and lymphoblastoid cell lines to determine whether the radiation response being observed was cell-type specific. The results verified that the observed radiation response was not a cell-type-specific phenomenon, suggesting that the genes play essential roles in the radiation damage control pathways. This study demonstrates the potential of the gene-trap approach for the identification and functional analysis of novel radiation response genes.

  12. Study of the circadian rhythm in radiation response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gamma-Radiation is often used for the treatment of solid tumors. It induces DNA double-stranded breaks that lead to cell cycle arrest or apoptosis of tumor cells. However, such treatment could also damage normal host tissues that need cell proliferation for function. We have reported previously that...

  13. Response of two-phase droplets to intense electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F.; Maloney, Daniel J.; Lawson, William F.; Casleton, Kent H.

    1993-01-01

    The behavior of two-phase droplets subjected to high intensity radiation pulses is studied. Droplets are highly absorbing solids in weakly absorbing liquid medium. The objective of the study was to define heating thresholds required for causing explosive boiling and secondary atomization of the fuel droplet. The results point to mechanisms for energy storage and transport in two-phase systems.

  14. Response of Human Prostate Tissue to Hypofractionated Ionizing Radiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    Institute, Aspen CO. American Brachytherapy Society Seattle Prostate Fellowship Research Program: Grants: In Preparation: Sroka TC and Cress... Plus HGF) for 18 hours prior to irradiation. Residual DNA damage was detected 48 hours post radiation by quantifying the percentage of nuclei

  15. Factors modifying the response of large animals to low-intensity radiation exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, N. P.; Still, E. T.

    1972-01-01

    In assessing the biological response to space radiation, two of the most important modifying factors are dose protraction and dose distribution to the body. Studies are reported in which sheep and swine were used to compare the hematology and lethality response resulting from radiation exposure encountered in a variety of forms, including acute (high dose-rate), chronic (low dose-rate), combinations of acute and chronic, and whether received as a continuous or as fractionated exposure. While sheep and swine are basically similar in response to acute radiation, their sensitivity to chronic irradiation is markedly different. Sheep remain relatively sensitive as the radiation exposure is protracted while swine are more resistant and capable of surviving extremely large doses of chronic irradiation. This response to chronic irradiation correlated well with changes in radiosensitivity and recovery following an acute, sublethal exposure.

  16. Response of asymmetric carbon nanotube network devices to sub-terahertz and terahertz radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gayduchenko, I. E-mail: gefedorov@mail.ru; Kardakova, A.; Voronov, B.; Finkel, M.; Fedorov, G. E-mail: gefedorov@mail.ru; Jiménez, D.; Morozov, S.; Presniakov, M.; Goltsman, G.

    2015-11-21

    Demand for efficient terahertz radiation detectors resulted in intensive study of the asymmetric carbon nanostructures as a possible solution for that problem. It was maintained that photothermoelectric effect under certain conditions results in strong response of such devices to terahertz radiation even at room temperature. In this work, we investigate different mechanisms underlying the response of asymmetric carbon nanotube (CNT) based devices to sub-terahertz and terahertz radiation. Our structures are formed with CNT networks instead of individual CNTs so that effects probed are more generic and not caused by peculiarities of an individual nanoscale object. We conclude that the DC voltage response observed in our structures is not only thermal in origin. So called diode-type response caused by asymmetry of the device IV characteristic turns out to be dominant at room temperature. Quantitative analysis provides further routes for the optimization of the device configuration, which may result in appearance of novel terahertz radiation detectors.

  17. The molecular and physiological responses of Physcomitrella patens to ultraviolet-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Luise; Rizzini, Luca; Stracke, Ralf; Ulm, Roman; Rensing, Stefan A

    2010-07-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation present in sunlight is an important trigger of photomorphogenic acclimation and stress responses in sessile land plants. Although numerous moss species grow in unshaded habitats, our understanding of their UV-B responses is very limited. The genome of the model moss Physcomitrella patens, which grows in sun-exposed open areas, encodes signaling and metabolic components that are implicated in the UV-B response in flowering plants. In this study, we describe the response of P. patens to UV-B radiation at the morphological and molecular levels. We find that P. patens is more capable of surviving UV-B stress than Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and describe the differential expression of approximately 400 moss genes in response to UV-B radiation. A comparative analysis of the UV-B response in P. patens and Arabidopsis reveals both distinct and conserved pathways.

  18. Material Response of One-Dimensional, Steady-State Transpiration Cooling in Radiative and Convective Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubota, Hirotoshi

    1975-01-01

    A simplified analytical solution for thermal response of a transpiration-cooled porous heat-shield material in an intense radiative-convective heating environment is presented. Essential features of this approach are "two-flux method" for radiative transfer process and "two-temperature" assumption for solid and gas temperatures. Incident radiative-convective heatings are specified as boundary conditions. Sample results are shown using porous silica with CO2 transpiration and some parameters quantitatively show the effect on this transpiration cooling system. Summarized maps for mass injection rate, porosity and blowing correction factor for radiation are obtained in order to realize such a cooling system.

  19. Effects Ala54Thr polymorphism of FABP2 on obesity index and biochemical variable in response to a aerobic exercise training

    PubMed Central

    Han, Tae Kyung

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether or not the FABP2 gene polymorphism modulated obesity indices, hemodynamic factor, blood lipid factor, and insulin resistance markers through 12-week aerobic exercise training in abdominal obesity group of Korean mid-life women. A total of 243 abdominally obese subjects of Korean mid-life women voluntarily participated in aerobic exercise training program for 12 weeks. Polymerase Chain Reaction with Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay was used to assess the FABP2 genotype of the participants (117 of AA homozygotes, 100 of AT heterozygotes, 26 of TT homozygotes). Prior to the participation of the exercise training program, baseline obesity indices, hemodynamic factor, blood lipid factor, and insulin resistance markers were measured. All the measurements were replicated following the 12-week aerobic exercise training program, and then the following results were found. After 12-week aerobic exercise training program, wild type (Ala54Ala) and mutant type (Ala54Thr+Thr54Thr) significantly decreased weight (P > .001), BMI (P > .001), %bf (P > .001), waist circumference (P > .001), WHR (P > .001), muscle mass (wild type p < .022; mutant type P > .001), RHR (P > .001), viseceral adipose area (wild type p < .005; mutant type P > .001), subcutaneous area (P > .001), insulin (wild type p < .005; mutant type P > .001) and significantly increased VO2max (P > .001). And wild type significantly decresed NEFA (P > .05), glucose (P > .05), OGTT 120min glucose (P > .05) and significantly increased HDLC (p > .005). Mutant type significantly decreased SBP (P > .001), DBP (P > .01), TC (P > .01), LPL (P > .05), LDL (P > .001), HOMA index (P > .01). The result of the present study represents that regular aerobic exercise training may beneficially prevent obesity index, blood pressure, blood lipids and insulin resistance markers independent of FABP Ala54Thr wild type and mutant type. PMID:25566432

  20. Response-driven Imaging Biomarkers for Predicting Radiation Necrosis of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Nazem-Zadeh, Mohammad-Reza; Chapman, Christopher H.; Chenevert, Thomas; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Tsien, Christina I.; Cao, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Radiation necrosis is an uncommon but severe adverse effect of brain radiation therapy. Current predictive models based on radiation dose have limited accuracy. We aimed to identify early individual response biomarkers based upon diffusion tensor (DT) imaging and incorporated them into a response model for prediction of radiation necrosis. Methods and Materials Twenty-nine patients with glioblastoma received six weeks of intensity modulated radiation therapy (RT) and concurrent temozolamide. Patients underwent DT-MRI scans before treatment, at three weeks during RT, and one, three, and six months after RT. Cases with radiation necrosis were classified based on generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) of whole brain and DT index early changes in the corpus callosum and its substructures. Significant covariates were used to develop normal tissue complication probability models using binary logistic regression. Results Seven patients developed radiation necrosis. Percentage changes of radial diffusivity (RD) in the splenium at three weeks during RT and at six months after RT differed significantly between the patients with and without necrosis (p=0.05 and p=0.01). Percentage change of RD at three weeks during RT in the 30 Gy dose-volume of the splenium and brain gEUD combined yielded the best-fit logistic regression model. Conclusions Our findings indicate that early individual response during the course of RT, assessed by radial diffusivity, has the potential to aid in predicting delayed radiation necrosis, which could provide guidance in dose-escalation trials. PMID:24778364

  1. Effect of dexamethasone on the cytotoxic and enzymatic response of cultured endothelial cells to radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, T.T.; Rubin, D.B.; Drab, E.A.

    1985-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine (1) whether glucocorticoids directly protected endothelial cells (EC) from radiation and (2) if angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity, known to be increased by glucocorticoid, played a role in the EC response to radiation. Confluent monolayers of EC cultured from bovine aorta EC were treated with dexamethasone (10/sup -6/ M); after irradiation (5.0 Gy, /sup 60/Co ..gamma..) ACE and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities, DNA and protein contents, and nuclei number were measured. Combined dexamethasone treatment and radiation increased cellular ACE activity at a time when neither agent alone had an effect (24-hr dexamethasone exposure before 5 Gy and assayed 24 hr after 5 Gy). This interaction between radiation and dexamethasone treatment suggests that the glucocorticoid modifies the cell's response to injury. Although this interaction does not ameliorate radiation cytotoxicity, maintenance of ACE levels in injured vessels by hormones may have physiological significance in the hemodynamics of irradiated tissues.

  2. Development, Verification and Validation of Enclosure Radiation Capabilities in the CHarring Ablator Response (CHAR) Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Giovanni; Droba, Justin C.; Oliver, Brandon; Amar, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    With the recent development of multi-dimensional thermal protection system (TPS) material response codes including the capabilities to account for radiative heating is a requirement. This paper presents the recent efforts to implement such capabilities in the CHarring Ablator Response (CHAR) code developed at NASA's Johnson Space Center. This work also describes the different numerical methods implemented in the code to compute view factors for radiation problems involving multiple surfaces. Furthermore, verification and validation of the code's radiation capabilities are demonstrated by comparing solutions to analytical results, to other codes, and to radiant test data.

  3. Channel catfish response to ultraviolet-B radiation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ewing, M.S.; Blazer, V.S.; Fabacher, D.L.; Little, E.E.; Kocan, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    Fingerling channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus exposed to simulated ultraviolet-B radiation at an average daily dose of 2.9 J/cm2 were quite sensitive to the radiation. After a 24-h exposure, thinning of the most dorsal epidermis frequently was accompanied by edema. Compared with epidermis of unexposed fish, mucous cells in exposed fish were less superficial and club cells were less numerous both dorsally and high on the lateral surface of the body. Sunburn cells with pyknotic nuclei were evident in the epidermis of exposed fish. Among fish exposed for 48 h, focal necrosis and sloughing of the outer epidermal layer were widespread. A methanol-extractable skin substance that is associated with resistance to sunburn in other fish species was not detected in channel catfish.

  4. Growth and applicability of radiation-responsive silica nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettge, Martin

    manganese oxide (LiMn2O4), for use as positive materials, retain their unique texture after 30 cycles, as verified by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Some accelerated capacity fade is however observed and attributed to chemical dissolution of the oxide material. Frequency-dependent impedances of textured oxide films are lower than those for planar films. These findings suggest that thin film texturing can indeed enhance some of the material's electrochemical performance characteristics and can be applied to a wide range of materials through use of appropriate nanostructured templates. In summary, this dissertation outlines physical and chemical factors leading to the formation of free-standing and uniquely stranded nanowires. It also provides an outlook on how ion-induced nanowire bending and alignment could be exploited. Key technological advantages of the developed process are refractory nanowire growth at low substrate temperatures and the ability to form radiation-responsive nanowire arrays without the use of lithography or templates.

  5. Redox response of actinide materials to highly ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, Cameron L.; Lang, Maik; Pray, John M.; Zhang, Fuxiang; Popov, Dmitry; Park, Changyong; Trautmann, Christina; Bender, Markus; Severin, Daniel; Skuratov, Vladimir A.; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2015-01-01

    Energetic radiation can cause dramatic changes in the physical and chemical properties of actinide materials, degrading their performance in fission-based energy systems. As advanced nuclear fuels and wasteforms are developed, fundamental understanding of the processes controlling radiation damage accumulation is necessary. Here we report oxidation state reduction of actinide and analogue elements caused by high-energy, heavy ion irradiation and demonstrate coupling of this redox behaviour with structural modifications. ThO2, in which thorium is stable only in a tetravalent state, exhibits damage accumulation processes distinct from those of multivalent cation compounds CeO2 (Ce3+ and Ce4+) and UO3 (U4+, U5+ and U6+). The radiation tolerance of these materials depends on the efficiency of this redox reaction, such that damage can be inhibited by altering grain size and cation valence variability. Thus, the redox behaviour of actinide materials is important for the design of nuclear fuels and the prediction of their performance.

  6. Redox response of actinide materials to highly ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Cameron L; Lang, Maik; Pray, John M; Zhang, Fuxiang; Popov, Dmitry; Park, Changyong; Trautmann, Christina; Bender, Markus; Severin, Daniel; Skuratov, Vladimir A; Ewing, Rodney C

    2015-01-27

    Energetic radiation can cause dramatic changes in the physical and chemical properties of actinide materials, degrading their performance in fission-based energy systems. As advanced nuclear fuels and wasteforms are developed, fundamental understanding of the processes controlling radiation damage accumulation is necessary. Here we report oxidation state reduction of actinide and analogue elements caused by high-energy, heavy ion irradiation and demonstrate coupling of this redox behaviour with structural modifications. ThO2, in which thorium is stable only in a tetravalent state, exhibits damage accumulation processes distinct from those of multivalent cation compounds CeO2 (Ce(3+) and Ce(4+)) and UO3 (U(4+), U(5+) and U(6+)). The radiation tolerance of these materials depends on the efficiency of this redox reaction, such that damage can be inhibited by altering grain size and cation valence variability. Thus, the redox behaviour of actinide materials is important for the design of nuclear fuels and the prediction of their performance.

  7. p53 aerobics: the major tumor suppressor fuels your workout.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Jan-Philipp; Gu, Wei

    2006-07-01

    In addition to its role as the central regulator of the cellular stress response, p53 can regulate aerobic respiration via the novel transcriptional target SCO2, a critical regulator of the cytochrome c oxidase complex (Matoba et al., 2006). Loss of p53 results in decreased oxygen consumption and aerobic respiration and promotes a switch to glycolysis, thereby reducing endurance during physical exercise.

  8. The Acute Effect of Aerobic Exercise on Measures of Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fort, Inza L.; And Others

    The immediate response of stress to aerobic exercise was measured by utilizing the Palmar Sweat Index (PSI) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Forty subjects (20 male and 20 female) from the ages of 18-30 sustained a single bout of aerobic activity for 30 minutes at 60 percent of their maximum heart rate. Pre-treatment procedures…

  9. FAS Death Receptor: A Breast Cancer Subtype-Specific Radiation Response Biomarker and Potential Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Janet K.; Siamakpour-Reihani, Sharareh; Lee, Chen-Ting; Zhou, Ying; Chen, Wei; Geradts, Joseph; Fels, Diane R.; Hoang, Peter; Ashcraft, Kathleen A.; Groth, Jeff; Kung, Hsiu-Ni; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Chi, Jen-Tsan A.

    2015-01-01

    Although a standardized approach to radiotherapy has been used to treat breast cancer, regardless of subtype (e.g., luminal, basal), recent clinical data suggest that radiation response may vary significantly among subtypes. We hypothesized that this clinical variability may be due, in part, to differences in cellular radiation response. In this study, we utilized RNA samples for microarray analysis from two sources: 1. Paired pre- and postirradiation breast tumor tissue from 32 early-stage breast cancer patients treated in our unique preoperative radiation Phase I trial; and 2. Sixteen biologically diverse breast tumor cell lines exposed to 0 and 5 Gy irradiation. The transcriptome response to radiation exposure was derived by comparing gene expression in samples before and after irradiation. Genes with the highest coefficient of variation were selected for further evaluation and validated at the RNA and protein level. Gene editing and agonistic antibody treatment were performed to assess the impact of gene modulation on radiation response. Gene expression in our cohort of luminal breast cancer patients was distinctly different before and after irradiation. Further, two distinct patterns of gene expression were observed in our biologically diverse group of breast cancer cell lines pre- versus postirradiation. Cell lines that showed significant change after irradiation were largely luminal subtype, while gene expression in the basal and HER2+ cell lines was minimally impacted. The 100 genes with the most significant response to radiation in patients were identified and analyzed for differential patterns of expression in the radiation-responsive versus nonresponsive cell lines. Fourteen genes were identified as significant, including FAS, a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family known to play a critical role in programed cell death. Modulation of FAS in breast cancer cell lines altered radiation response phenotype and enhanced radiation sensitivity in

  10. Genome-wide microarray analysis of human fibroblasts in response to γ radiation and the radiation-induced bystander effect.

    PubMed

    Kalanxhi, Erta; Dahle, Jostein

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects have been studied extensively due to their potential implications for cancer therapy and radiation protection; however, a complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms remains to be elucidated. In this study, we monitored transcriptional responses to γ radiation in irradiated and bystander fibroblasts simultaneously employing a genome-wide microarray approach to determine factors that may be modulated in the generation or propagation of the bystander effect. For the microarray data we employed analysis at both the single-gene and gene-set level to place the findings in a biological context. Unirradiated bystander fibroblasts that were recipients of growth medium harvested from irradiated cultures 2 h after exposure to 2 Gy displayed transient enrichment in gene sets belonging to ribosome, oxidative phosphorylation and neurodegenerative disease pathways associated with mitochondrial dysfunctions. The response to direct irradiation was characterized by induction of signaling and apoptosis genes and the gradual formation of a cellular immune response. A set of 14 genes, many of which were regulated by p53, were found to be induced early after irradiation (prior to medium transfer) and may be important in the generation or propagation of the bystander effect.

  11. Organic Matter Responses to Radiation under Lunar Conditions.

    PubMed

    Matthewman, Richard; Crawford, Ian A; Jones, Adrian P; Joy, Katherine H; Sephton, Mark A

    2016-11-01

    Large bodies, such as the Moon, that have remained relatively unaltered for long periods of time have the potential to preserve a record of organic chemical processes from early in the history of the Solar System. A record of volatiles and impactors may be preserved in buried lunar regolith layers that have been capped by protective lava flows. Of particular interest is the possible preservation of prebiotic organic materials delivered by ejected fragments of other bodies, including those originating from the surface of early Earth. Lava flow layers would shield the underlying regolith and any carbon-bearing materials within them from most of the effects of space weathering, but the encapsulated organic materials would still be subject to irradiation before they were buried by regolith formation and capped with lava. We have performed a study to simulate the effects of solar radiation on a variety of organic materials mixed with lunar and meteorite analog substrates. A fluence of ∼3 × 10(13) protons cm(-2) at 4-13 MeV, intended to be representative of solar energetic particles, has little detectable effect on low-molecular-weight (≤C30) hydrocarbon structures that can be used to indicate biological activity (biomarkers) or the high-molecular-weight hydrocarbon polymer poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene), and has little apparent effect on a selection of amino acids (≤C9). Inevitably, more lengthy durations of exposure to solar energetic particles may have more deleterious effects, and rapid burial and encapsulation will always be more favorable to organic preservation. Our data indicate that biomarker compounds that may be used to infer biological activity on their parent planet can be relatively resistant to the effects of radiation and may have a high preservation potential in paleoregolith layers on the Moon. Key Words: Radiation-Moon-Regolith-Amino acids-Biomarkers. Astrobiology 16, 900-912.

  12. Response of nickel surface to pulsed fusion plasma radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Niranjan, Ram Rout, R. K. Srivastava, R. Gupta, Satish C.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Patel, N. N.; Alex, P.

    2014-04-24

    Nickel based alloys are being projected as suitable materials for some components of the next generation fusion reactor because of compatible thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. Pure nickel material is tested here for possibility of similar application purpose. Nickel samples (> 99.5 % purity) are exposed here to plasma radiations produced due to D-D fusion reaction inside an 11.5 kJ plasma focus device. The changes in the physical properties of the nickel surface at microscopic level which in turn change the mechanical properties are analyzed using scanning electron microscope, optical microscope, glancing incident X-ray diffractometer and Vicker's hardness gauge. The results are reported here.

  13. Response of nickel surface to pulsed fusion plasma radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R. K.; Srivastava, R.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Patel, N. N.; Alex, P.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2014-04-01

    Nickel based alloys are being projected as suitable materials for some components of the next generation fusion reactor because of compatible thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. Pure nickel material is tested here for possibility of similar application purpose. Nickel samples (> 99.5 % purity) are exposed here to plasma radiations produced due to D-D fusion reaction inside an 11.5 kJ plasma focus device. The changes in the physical properties of the nickel surface at microscopic level which in turn change the mechanical properties are analyzed using scanning electron microscope, optical microscope, glancing incident X-ray diffractometer and Vicker's hardness gauge. The results are reported here.

  14. Assessment of tumor response to radiation and vascular targeting therapy in mice using quantitative ultrasound spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    El Kaffas, Ahmed; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Falou, Omar; Tran, William Tyler; Czarnota, Gregory J.; Zhou, Stephanie; Fernandes, Jason; Giles, Anoja; Hashim, Amr

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: It is now recognized that the tumor vasculature is in part responsible for regulating tumor responses to radiation therapy. However, the extent to which radiation-based vascular damage contributes to tumor cell death remains unknown. In this work, quantitative ultrasound spectroscopy (QUS) methods were used to investigate the acute responses of tumors to radiation-based vascular treatments. Methods: Tumor xenografts (MDA-MB-231) were treated with single radiation doses of 2 or 8 Gy alone, or in combination with pharmacological agents that modulate vascular radiosensitivity. The midband fit, the slope, and the 0-MHz intercept QUS parameters were obtained from a linear-regression fit to the averaged power spectrum of frequency-dependent ultrasound backscatter and were used to quantify acute tumor responses following treatment administration. Power spectrums were extracted from raw volumetric radio-frequency ultrasound data obtained before and 24 h following treatment administration. These parameters have previously been correlated to tumor cell death. Staining using in situ end labeling, carbonic anhydrase 9 and cluster of differentiation 31 of tumor sections were used to assess cell death, oxygenation, and vasculature distributions, respectively. Results: Results indicate a significant midband fit QUS parameter increases of 3.2 ± 0.3 dBr and 5.4 ± 0.5 dBr for tumors treated with 2 and 8 Gy radiation combined with the antiangiogenic agent Sunitinib, respectively. In contrast, tumors treated with radiation alone demonstrated a significant midband fit increase of 4.4 ± 0.3 dBr at 8 Gy only. Preadministration of basic fibroblast growth factor, an endothelial radioprotector, acted to minimize tumor response following single large doses of radiation. Immunohistochemical analysis was in general agreement with QUS findings; an R{sup 2} of 0.9 was observed when quantified cell death was correlated with changes in midband fit. Conclusions: Results from QUS

  15. Metformin: A Novel Biological Modifier of Tumor Response to Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Koritzinsky, Marianne

    2015-10-01

    Over the last decade, evidence has emerged to support a role for the antidiabetic drug metformin in the prevention and treatment of cancer. In particular, recent studies demonstrate that metformin enhances tumor response to radiation in experimental models, and retrospective analyses have shown that diabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy have improved outcomes if they take metformin to control their diabetes. Metformin may therefore be of utility for nondiabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. The purpose of this review is to examine the data pertaining to an interaction between metformin and radiation, highlighting the essential steps needed to advance our current knowledge. There is also a focus on key biomarkers that should accompany prospective clinical trials in which metformin is being examined as a modifying agent with radiation therapy. Existing evidence supports that the mechanism underlying the ability of metformin to enhance radiation response is multifaceted, and includes direct radiosensitization as well as a reduction in tumor stem cell fraction, proliferation, and tumor hypoxia. Interestingly, metformin may enhance radiation response specifically in certain genetic backgrounds, such as in cells with loss of the tumor suppressors p53 and LKB1, giving rise to a therapeutic ratio and potential predictive biomarkers.

  16. Response-driven imaging biomarkers for predicting radiation necrosis of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazem Zadeh, Mohammad-Reza; Chapman, Christopher H.; Chenevert, Thomas; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Tsien, Christina I.; Cao, Yue

    2014-05-01

    Radiation necrosis is an uncommon but severe adverse effect of brain radiation therapy (RT). Current predictive models based on radiation dose have limited accuracy. We aimed to identify early individual response biomarkers based upon diffusion tensor (DT) imaging and incorporated them into a response model for prediction of radiation necrosis. Twenty-nine patients with glioblastoma received six weeks of intensity modulated RT and concurrent temozolomide. Patients underwent DT-MRI scans before treatment, at three weeks during RT, and one, three, and six months after RT. Cases with radiation necrosis were classified based on generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) of whole brain and DT index early changes in the corpus callosum and its substructures. Significant covariates were used to develop normal tissue complication probability models using binary logistic regression. Seven patients developed radiation necrosis. Percentage changes of radial diffusivity (RD) in the splenium at three weeks during RT and at six months after RT differed significantly between the patients with and without necrosis (p = 0.05 and p = 0.01). Percentage change of RD at three weeks during RT in the 30 Gy dose-volume of the splenium and brain gEUD combined yielded the best-fit logistic regression model. Our findings indicate that early individual response during the course of RT, assessed by radial diffusivity, has the potential to aid the prediction of delayed radiation necrosis, which could provide guidance in dose-escalation trials.

  17. Linear response theory for annealing of radiation damage in semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litovchenko, Vitaly

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical study of the radiation/annealing response of MOS ICs is described. Although many experiments have been performed in this field, no comprehensive theory dealing with radiation/annealing response has been proposed. Many attempts have been made to apply linear response theory, but no theoretical foundation has been presented. The linear response theory outlined here is capable of describing a broad area of radiation/annealing response phenomena in MOS ICs, in particular, both simultaneous irradiation and annealing, as well as short- and long-term annealing, including the case when annealing is nearing completion. For the first time, a simple procedure is devised to determine the response function from experimental radiation/annealing data. In addition, this procedure enables us to study the effect of variable temperature and dose rate, effects which are of interest in spaceflight. In the past, the shift in threshold potential due to radiation/annealing has usually been assumed to depend on one variable: the time lapse between an impulse dose and the time of observation. While such a suggestion of uniformity in time is certainly true for a broad range of radiation annealing phenomena, it may not hold for some ranges of the variables of interest (temperature, dose rate, etc.). A response function is projected which is dependent on two variables: the time of observation and the time of the impulse dose. This dependence on two variables allows us to extend the theory to the treatment of a variable dose rate. Finally, the linear theory is generalized to the case in which the response is nonlinear with impulse dose, but is proportional to some impulse function of dose. A method to determine both the impulse and response functions is presented.

  18. The atmospheric radiation response to solar-particle-events.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, K; Sauer, H H

    2003-01-01

    High-energy solar particles, produced in association with solar flares and coronal mass ejections, occasionally bombard the earth's atmosphere. resulting in radiation intensities additional to the background cosmic radiation. Access of these particles to the earth's vicinity during times of geomagnetic disturbances are not adequately described by using static geomagnetic field models. These solar fluxes are also often distributed non uniformly in space, so that fluxes measured by satellites obtained at great distances from the earth and which sample large volumes of space around the earth cannot be used to predict fluxes locally at the earth's surface. We present here a method which uses the ground-level neutron monitor counting rates as adjoint sources of the flux in the atmosphere immediately above them to obtain solar-particle effective dose rates as a function of position over the earth's surface. We have applied this approach to the large September 29-30, 1989 ground-level event (designated GLE 42) to obtain the magnitude and distribution of the solar-particle effective dose rate from an atypically large event. The results of these calculations clearly show the effect of the softer particle spectra associated with solar particle events, as compared with galactic cosmic rays, results in a greater sensitivity to the geomagnetic field, and, unlike cosmic rays, the near-absence of a "knee" near 60 degrees geomagnetic latitude.

  19. Modulation of Radiation Response by the Tetrahydrobiopterin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Rupak; Cheema, Amrita K.; Boca, Simina M.; Krager, Kimberly J.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is an integral component of our lives due to highly prevalent sources such as medical, environmental, and/or accidental. Thus, understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation toxicity develops is crucial to address acute and chronic health problems that occur following IR exposure. Immediate formation of IR-induced free radicals as well as their persistent effects on metabolism through subsequent alterations in redox mediated inter- and intracellular processes are globally accepted as significant contributors to early and late effects of IR exposure. This includes but is not limited to cytotoxicity, genomic instability, fibrosis and inflammation. Damage to the critical biomolecules leading to detrimental long-term alterations in metabolic redox homeostasis following IR exposure has been the focus of various independent investigations over last several decades. The growth of the “omics” technologies during the past decade has enabled integration of “data from traditional radiobiology research”, with data from metabolomics studies. This review will focus on the role of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an understudied redox-sensitive metabolite, plays in the pathogenesis of post-irradiation normal tissue injury as well as how the metabolomic readout of BH4 metabolism fits in the overall picture of disrupted oxidative metabolism following IR exposure. PMID:26785338

  20. New PTB Setup for the Absolute Calibration of the Spectral Responsivity of Radiation Thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anhalt, K.; Zelenjuk, A.; Taubert, D. R.; Keawprasert, T.; Hartmann, J.

    2009-02-01

    The paper describes the new experimental setup assembled at the PTB for the absolute spectral responsivity measurement of radiation thermometers. The concept of this setup is to measure the relative spectral responsivity of the radiation thermometer using the conventional monochromator-based spectral comparator facility also used for the calibration of filter radiometers. The absolute spectral responsivity is subsequently measured at one wavelength, supplied by the radiation of a diode laser, using the new setup. The radiation of the diode laser is guided with an optical fiber into an integrating sphere source that is equipped with an aperture of absolutely known area. The spectral radiance of this integrating sphere source is determined via the spectral irradiance measured by a trap detector with an absolutely calibrated spectral responsivity traceable to the primary detector standard of the PTB, the cryogenic radiometer. First results of the spectral responsivity calibration of the radiation thermometer LP3 are presented, and a provisional uncertainty budget of the absolute spectral responsivity is given.

  1. A review of progress towards understanding the transient global mean surface temperature response to radiative perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimori, Masakazu; Watanabe, Masahiro; Shiogama, Hideo; Oka, Akira; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Ohgaito, Rumi; Kamae, Youichi

    2016-12-01

    The correct understanding of the transient response to external radiative perturbation is important for the interpretation of observed climate change, the prediction of near-future climate change, and committed warming under climate stabilization scenarios, as well as the estimation of equilibrium climate sensitivity based on observation data. It has been known for some time that the radiative damping rate per unit of global mean surface temperature increase varies with time, and this inconstancy affects the transient response. Knowledge of the equilibrium response alone is insufficient, but understanding the transient response of the global mean surface temperature has made rapid progress. The recent progress accompanies the relatively new concept of the efficacies of ocean heat uptake and forcing. The ocean heat uptake efficacy associates the temperature response induced by ocean heat uptake with equilibrium temperature response, and the efficacy of forcing compares the temperature response caused by non-CO2 forcing with that by CO2 forcing.

  2. Gene expression profiling in response to ultraviolet radiation in maize genotypes with varying flavonoid content.

    PubMed

    Casati, Paula; Walbot, Virginia

    2003-08-01

    Microarray hybridization was used to assess acclimation responses to four UV regimes by near isogenic maize (Zea mays) lines varying in flavonoid content. We found that 355 of the 2,500 cDNAs tested were regulated by UV radiation in at least one genotype. Among these, 232 transcripts are assigned putative functions, whereas 123 encode unknown proteins. UV-B increased expression of stress response and ribosomal protein genes, whereas photosynthesis-associated genes were down-regulated; lines lacking UV-absorbing pigments had more dramatic responses than did lines with these pigments, confirming the shielding role of these compounds. Sunlight filtered to remove UV-B or UV-B plus UV-A resulted in significant expression changes in many genes not previously associated with UV responses. Some pathways regulated by UV radiation are shared with defense, salt, and oxidative stresses; however, UV-B radiation can activate additional pathways not shared with other stresses.

  3. Radiation-induced bystander effect and adaptive response in mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, H.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Waldren, C. A.; Hei, T. K.

    2004-01-01

    Two conflicting phenomena, bystander effect and adaptive response, are important in determining the biological responses at low doses of radiation and have the potential to impact the shape of the dose-response relationship. Using the Columbia University charged-particle microbeam and the highly sensitive AL cell mutagenic assay, we show here that non-irradiated cells acquire mutagenesis through direct contact with cells whose nuclei have been traversed with a single alpha particle each. Pretreatment of cells with a low dose of X-rays four hours before alpha particle irradiation significantly decreased this bystander mutagenic response. Results from the present study address some of the fundamental issues regarding both the actual target and radiation dose effect and can contribute to our current understanding in radiation risk assessment. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ultraviolet radiation augments epidermal beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase response

    SciTech Connect

    Iizuka, H.; Kajita, S.; Ohkawara, A.

    1985-05-01

    Pig skin was irradiated in vivo with fluorescent sunlamp tubes (peak emission at 305 nm). A significant increase in epidermal beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase response was observed as early as 12 h following 1-2 minimum erythema doses (MEDs) UVB exposure, which lasted at least 48 h. The augmentation of adenylate cyclase response was relatively specific to the beta-adrenergic system and there was no significant difference in either adenosine- or histamine-adenylate cyclase response of epidermis. The increased beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase response was less marked at higher doses of UVB exposure (5 MEDs); in the latter condition, a significant reduction in adenosine- or histamine-adenylate cyclase response was observed. There was no significant difference in either low- or high-Km cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activity between control and UVB-treated skin at 1-2 MEDs. These data indicate that the epidermal adenylate cyclase responses are affected in vivo by UVB irradiation, which might be a significant regulatory mechanism of epidermal cyclic AMP systems.

  5. Organic Matter Responses to Radiation under Lunar Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthewman, Richard; Crawford, Ian A.; Jones, Adrian P.; Joy, Katherine H.; Sephton, Mark A.

    2016-11-01

    Large bodies, such as the Moon, that have remained relatively unaltered for long periods of time have the potential to preserve a record of organic chemical processes from early in the history of the Solar System. A record of volatiles and impactors may be preserved in buried lunar regolith layers that have been capped by protective lava flows. Of particular interest is the possible preservation of prebiotic organic materials delivered by ejected fragments of other bodies, including those originating from the surface of early Earth. Lava flow layers would shield the underlying regolith and any carbon-bearing materials within them from most of the effects of space weathering, but the encapsulated organic materials would still be subject to irradiation before they were buried by regolith formation and capped with lava. We have performed a study to simulate the effects of solar radiation on a variety of organic materials mixed with lunar and meteorite analog substrates. A fluence of ˜3 × 1013 protons cm-2 at 4-13 MeV, intended to be representative of solar energetic particles, has little detectable effect on low-molecular-weight (≤C30) hydrocarbon structures that can be used to indicate biological activity (biomarkers) or the high-molecular-weight hydrocarbon polymer poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene), and has little apparent effect on a selection of amino acids (≤C9). Inevitably, more lengthy durations of exposure to solar energetic particles may have more deleterious effects, and rapid burial and encapsulation will always be more favorable to organic preservation. Our data indicate that biomarker compounds that may be used to infer biological activity on their parent planet can be relatively resistant to the effects of radiation and may have a high preservation potential in paleoregolith layers on the Moon.

  6. Organic Matter Responses to Radiation under Lunar Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Matthewman, Richard; Crawford, Ian A.; Jones, Adrian P.; Joy, Katherine H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Large bodies, such as the Moon, that have remained relatively unaltered for long periods of time have the potential to preserve a record of organic chemical processes from early in the history of the Solar System. A record of volatiles and impactors may be preserved in buried lunar regolith layers that have been capped by protective lava flows. Of particular interest is the possible preservation of prebiotic organic materials delivered by ejected fragments of other bodies, including those originating from the surface of early Earth. Lava flow layers would shield the underlying regolith and any carbon-bearing materials within them from most of the effects of space weathering, but the encapsulated organic materials would still be subject to irradiation before they were buried by regolith formation and capped with lava. We have performed a study to simulate the effects of solar radiation on a variety of organic materials mixed with lunar and meteorite analog substrates. A fluence of ∼3 × 1013 protons cm−2 at 4–13 MeV, intended to be representative of solar energetic particles, has little detectable effect on low-molecular-weight (≤C30) hydrocarbon structures that can be used to indicate biological activity (biomarkers) or the high-molecular-weight hydrocarbon polymer poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene), and has little apparent effect on a selection of amino acids (≤C9). Inevitably, more lengthy durations of exposure to solar energetic particles may have more deleterious effects, and rapid burial and encapsulation will always be more favorable to organic preservation. Our data indicate that biomarker compounds that may be used to infer biological activity on their parent planet can be relatively resistant to the effects of radiation and may have a high preservation potential in paleoregolith layers on the Moon. Key Words: Radiation—Moon—Regolith—Amino acids—Biomarkers. Astrobiology 16, 900–912. PMID:27870583

  7. Response of intracerebral human glioblastoma xenografts to multifraction radiation exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, Tomoko; Faddegon, Bruce A.; Hu, Lily J.; Bollen, Andrew W.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Deen, Dennis F. . E-mail: ddeen@itsa.ucsf.edu

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: We investigated the effects of fractionated radiation treatments on the life spans of athymic rats bearing intracerebral brain tumors. Methods and Materials: U-251 MG or U-87 MG human glioblastoma cells were implanted into the brains of athymic rats, and the resulting tumors were irradiated once daily with various doses of ionizing radiation for 5 consecutive days or for 10 days with a 2-day break after Day 5. Results: Five daily doses of 1 and 1.5 Gy, and 10 doses of 0.75 and 1 Gy, cured some U-251 MG tumors. However, five daily doses of 0.5 Gy increased the survival time of animals bearing U-251 MG tumors 5 days without curing any animals of their tumors. Ten doses of 0.3 Gy given over 2 weeks extended the lifespan of the host animals 9 days without curing any animals. For U-87 MG tumors, 5 daily doses of 3 Gy produced an increased lifespan of 8 days without curing any animals, and 10 doses of 1 Gy prolonged lifespan 5.5 days without curing any animals. The differences in extension of life span between the 5- and 10-fraction protocols were minor for either tumor type. Conclusion: The finding that the U-251 MG tumors are more sensitive than U-87 MG tumors, despite the fact that U-251 MG tumors contain many more hypoxic cells than U-87 MG tumors, suggests the intrinsic cellular radiosensitivities of these cell lines are more important than hypoxia in determining their in vivo radiosensitivities.

  8. Initial radiative perturbations and their responses in the Adem thermodynamic model

    SciTech Connect

    Garduno, R.; Adem, J.

    1994-09-01

    Recent computations are carried out with the Adem thermodynamic model to determine the initial radiative perturbations due to the following forcing: atmospheric CO[sub 2] doubling and [+-]1% solar constant increase. The initial radiative perturbation is the increase of the net radiation at the tropopause, or the top of the modeled atmospheric layer, and is computed as the difference between the top net radiation with the forcing before the climate reacts (before the temperatures change and without any feedback) and without the forcing. In each case, the corresponding surface temperature response to the forcing, namely, the equilibrium temperature increase due to the radiative perturbation, is also computed. The feedback parameter, which is independent of the forcing, is defined as the ratio of these two results. These numerical experiments are alternatively made with and without climate feedbacks. The feedback parameter agrees with those of Tricot (1986).

  9. Dance--Aerobic and Anaerobic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlette

    1984-01-01

    This article defines and explains aerobic exercise and its effects on the cardiovascular system. Various studies on dancers are cited indicating that dance is an anaerobic activity with some small degree of aerobic benefit. (DF)

  10. Development and Verification of Enclosure Radiation Capabilities in the CHarring Ablator Response (CHAR) Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Giovanni; Droba, Justin C.; Oliver, Brandon; Amar, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    With the recent development of multi-dimensional thermal protection system (TPS) material response codes, the capability to account for surface-to-surface radiation exchange in complex geometries is critical. This paper presents recent efforts to implement such capabilities in the CHarring Ablator Response (CHAR) code developed at NASA's Johnson Space Center. This work also describes the different numerical methods implemented in the code to compute geometric view factors for radiation problems involving multiple surfaces. Verification of the code's radiation capabilities and results of a code-to-code comparison are presented. Finally, a demonstration case of a two-dimensional ablating cavity with enclosure radiation accounting for a changing geometry is shown.

  11. Raman spectroscopy identifies radiation response in human non-small cell lung cancer xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, Samantha J.; Isabelle, Martin; Devorkin, Lindsay; Smazynski, Julian; Beckham, Wayne; Brolo, Alexandre G.; Lum, Julian J.; Jirasek, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    External beam radiation therapy is a standard form of treatment for numerous cancers. Despite this, there are no approved methods to account for patient specific radiation sensitivity. In this report, Raman spectroscopy (RS) was used to identify radiation-induced biochemical changes in human non-small cell lung cancer xenografts. Chemometric analysis revealed unique radiation-related Raman signatures that were specific to nucleic acid, lipid, protein and carbohydrate spectral features. Among these changes was a dramatic shift in the accumulation of glycogen spectral bands for doses of 5 or 15 Gy when compared to unirradiated tumours. When spatial mapping was applied in this analysis there was considerable variability as we found substantial intra- and inter-tumour heterogeneity in the distribution of glycogen and other RS spectral features. Collectively, these data provide unique insight into the biochemical response of tumours, irradiated in vivo, and demonstrate the utility of RS for detecting distinct radiobiological responses in human tumour xenografts.

  12. Diet-induced obesity modulates epigenetic responses to ionizing radiation in mice.

    PubMed

    Vares, Guillaume; Wang, Bing; Ishii-Ohba, Hiroko; Nenoi, Mitsuru; Nakajima, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Both exposure to ionizing radiation and obesity have been associated with various pathologies including cancer. There is a crucial need in better understanding the interactions between ionizing radiation effects (especially at low doses) and other risk factors, such as obesity. In order to evaluate radiation responses in obese animals, C3H and C57BL/6J mice fed a control normal fat or a high fat (HF) diet were exposed to fractionated doses of X-rays (0.75 Gy ×4). Bone marrow micronucleus assays did not suggest a modulation of radiation-induced genotoxicity by HF diet. Using MSP, we observed that the promoters of p16 and Dapk genes were methylated in the livers of C57BL/6J mice fed a HF diet (irradiated and non-irradiated); Mgmt promoter was methylated in irradiated and/or HF diet-fed mice. In addition, methylation PCR arrays identified Ep300 and Socs1 (whose promoters exhibited higher methylation levels in non-irradiated HF diet-fed mice) as potential targets for further studies. We then compared microRNA regulations after radiation exposure in the livers of C57BL/6J mice fed a normal or an HF diet, using microRNA arrays. Interestingly, radiation-triggered microRNA regulations observed in normal mice were not observed in obese mice. miR-466e was upregulated in non-irradiated obese mice. In vitro free fatty acid (palmitic acid, oleic acid) administration sensitized AML12 mouse liver cells to ionizing radiation, but the inhibition of miR-466e counteracted this radio-sensitization, suggesting that the modulation of radiation responses by diet-induced obesity might involve miR-466e expression. All together, our results suggested the existence of dietary effects on radiation responses (especially epigenetic regulations) in mice, possibly in relationship with obesity-induced chronic oxidative stress.

  13. Differences in leucocyte-endothelium interactions between normal and adenocarcinoma bearing tissues in response to radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, N. Z.; Ross, B. A.; Gulledge, C.; Klitzman, B.; Dodge, R.; Dewhirst, M. W.

    1994-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that the interaction between leucocytes and endothelial cells in tumour tissues is greatly diminished compared with normal tissues under several induced inflammatory conditions. Radiation has been reported to cause release of inflammatory mediators and to promote neutrophil adhesions to cultured endothelial monolayers. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that radiation would cause increased leucocyte rolling and adhesion in both tumour and normal tissues. We examined these two parameters in response to 6 Gy of gamma-radiation in mammary adenocarcinomas implanted into rat skinfold window chambers as well as normal (i.e. non-tumour-bearing) preparations. Leucocyte rolling and adhesion were measured in terms of flux of rolling leucocytes (F(rolling)) and density of adhering leucocytes (D(adhering)) in microvessels. F(rolling) and D(adhering) were measured in two groups of preparations: irradiated and control. In normal preparations, F(rolling) and D(adhering) were both increased significantly by radiation. In contrast, in adenocarcinoma-bearing preparations, F(rolling) and D(adhering) were either unchanged (in the tumour centre) or reduced (in tumour periphery and the normal tissue surrounding the tumour) by radiation. Radiation did not cause changes in haemodynamics in these preparations, thus the observed changes in leucocyte rolling and adhesion could not be accounted for by haemodynamic factors. These results indicate that: (1) in normal preparations, radiation could cause inflammation as manifested by increased leucocyte rolling and adhesion; and (2) in tumour-bearing preparations, radiation caused changes in the vascular surface properties such that they became less adhesive to leucocytes. Such differences in radiation response may have important implications for radiation therapy and provide new insights into the unique features of tumours. Images Figure 2 PMID:8180019

  14. Implementation of Aerobic Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (AAHPERD).

    This information is intended for health professionals interested in implementing aerobic exercise programs in public schools, institutions of higher learning, and business and industry workplaces. The papers are divided into three general sections. The introductory section presents a basis for adhering to a health fitness lifestyle, using…

  15. Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yurkov, Vladimir V.; Beatty, J. Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are a relatively recently discovered bacterial group. Although taxonomically and phylogenetically heterogeneous, these bacteria share the following distinguishing features: the presence of bacteriochlorophyll a incorporated into reaction center and light-harvesting complexes, low levels of the photosynthetic unit in cells, an abundance of carotenoids, a strong inhibition by light of bacteriochlorophyll synthesis, and the inability to grow photosynthetically under anaerobic conditions. Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are classified in two marine (Erythrobacter and Roseobacter) and six freshwater (Acidiphilium, Erythromicrobium, Erythromonas, Porphyrobacter, Roseococcus, and Sandaracinobacter) genera, which phylogenetically belong to the α-1, α-3, and α-4 subclasses of the class Proteobacteria. Despite this phylogenetic information, the evolution and ancestry of their photosynthetic properties are unclear. We discuss several current proposals for the evolutionary origin of aerobic phototrophic bacteria. The closest phylogenetic relatives of aerobic phototrophic bacteria include facultatively anaerobic purple nonsulfur phototrophic bacteria. Since these two bacterial groups share many properties, yet have significant differences, we compare and contrast their physiology, with an emphasis on morphology and photosynthetic and other metabolic processes. PMID:9729607

  16. Cell Cycle Regulation and Apoptotic Responses of the Embryonic Chick Retina by Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Layer, Paul G.; Frohns, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) exerts deleterious effects on the developing brain, since proliferative neuronal progenitor cells are highly sensitive to IR-induced DNA damage. Assuming a radiation response that is comparable to mammals, the chick embryo would represent a lower vertebrate model system that allows analysis of the mechanisms underlying this sensitivity, thereby contributing to the reduction, refinement and replacement of animal experiments. Thus, this study aimed to elucidate the radiation response of the embryonic chick retina in three selected embryonic stages. Our studies reveal a lack in the radiation-induced activation of a G1/S checkpoint, but rapid abrogation of G2/M progression after IR in retinal progenitors throughout development. Unlike cell cycle control, radiation-induced apoptosis (RIA) showed strong variations between its extent, dose dependency and temporal occurrence. Whereas the general sensitivity towards RIA declined with ongoing differentiation, its dose dependency constantly increased with age. For all embryonic stages RIA occurred during comparable periods after irradiation, but in older animals its maximum shifted towards earlier post-irradiation time points. In summary, our results are in good agreement with data from the developing rodent retina, strengthening the suitability of the chick embryo for the analysis of the radiation response in the developing central nervous system. PMID:27163610

  17. Net radiative forcing responses to regional CO and NMVOC reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, M. M.; Schwarzkopf, M. D.; Adelman, Z.; Naik, V.; West, J.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that short-lived pollutants and their precursors be considered in near-term climate mitigation strategies, in addition to national air quality programs, but their associated forcings vary based on the region of emissions. Here we quantify the net radiative forcing (RF) impacts of regional anthropogenic carbon monoxide (CO) and non-methane volatile organic compound (NMVOC) emissions due to changes in the tropospheric concentrations of ozone (O3), methane (CH4), and aerosols (carbonaceous and sulfate), to inform future coordinated actions addressing air quality and climate forcing. We present the RF from CO and NMVOC emission reductions from 10 regions (North America, South America, Europe, Former Soviet Union, Southern Africa, India, East Asia, Southeast Asia, Australia and New Zealand, and Middle East and Northern Africa). The global chemical transport model MOZART-4 is used to simulate tropospheric concentration changes, using the IPCC AR5 Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 (RCP 8.5) emissions inventory for 2005 and global meteorology from the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, version 5 (GEOS-5) for the years 2004-2005. We utilize the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory standalone radiative transfer model to calculate the stratospheric-adjusted net RF for each regional CO and NMVOC reduction, relative to the base. We find that global annual net RF per unit change in emissions ranges from -0.115 to -0.131 mW m-2 / Tg CO for CO reductions, and -0.0035 to -0.436 mW m-2 / Tg C for NMVOC reductions, with the regions in the tropics providing the greatest improvements (Middle East, Southeast Asia, and India CO reductions, and Middle East, Africa, and India NMVOC reductions). The net RF distributions for the CO and NMVOC reductions show widespread cooling across the northern and southern hemispheres corresponding to the patterns of O3 and CH4 decreases, and localized positive and negative net RFs due to increases and decreases in

  18. Aerobic Dance in Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiles, Barbara Ann; Moore, Suzanne

    1981-01-01

    Aerobic dance offers a challenging workout in a social atmosphere. Though some physical education instructors tend to exclude dance units from the curriculum, most could teach aerobic dance if they had a basic knowledge of aerobic routines. The outline for a unit to be used in the class is presented. (JN)

  19. Response of two-phase droplets to intense electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F.; Maloney, Daniel J.; Lawson, William F.; Casleton, Kent H.

    1993-01-01

    The response of two-phase droplets to intense radiant heating is studied to determine the incident power that is required for causing explosive boiling in the liquid phase. The droplets studied consist of strongly absorbing coal particles dispersed in a weakly absorbing water medium. Experiments are performed by confining droplets (radii of 37, 55, and 80 microns) electrodynamically and irradiating them from two sides with pulsed laser beams. Emphasis is placed on the transition region from accelerated droplet vaporization to droplet superheating and explosive boiling. The time scale observed for explosive boiling is more than 2 orders of magnitude longer than published values for pure liquids. The delayed response is the result of energy transfer limitations between the absorbing solid phase and the surrounding liquid.

  20. Ultra-Lightweight Mirror Manufacturing and Radiation Response Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    1 1.2.1-1 Classical Lightweight Mirrors vs Ultra Lightweight Frit-Bonded Mirrors ..... ................... 21.2.2-1 Corning Glass Works Mirror...95 APPENDIX D D-1 - D-4 Irradiatton Response Tests . . . . ............ 103 vi RC-00348 LIST OF TABLES Table Title Page 1.2.3-1 Classical ...comparing classical lightweight mirror 4000 Current Thnolog designr * to the advanced ultra light- ’ 3000-a. weight designs The upper curve repre- i 200

  1. {sub p}53-Dependent Adaptive Responses in Human Cells Exposed to Space Radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Su Xiaoming; Suzuki, Hiromi; Omori, Katsunori; Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko; Shimazu, Toru; Ishioka, Noriaki; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: It has been reported that priming irradiation or conditioning irradiation with a low dose of X-rays in the range of 0.02-0.1 Gy induces a p53-dependent adaptive response in mammalian cells. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of space radiations on the adaptive response. Methods and Materials: Two human lymphoblastoid cell lines were used; one cell line bears a wild-type p53 (wtp53) gene, and another cell line bears a mutated p53 (mp53) gene. The cells were frozen during transportation on the space shuttle and while in orbit in the International Space Station freezer for 133 days between November 15, 2008 and March 29, 2009. After the frozen samples were returned to Earth, the cells were cultured for 6 h and then exposed to a challenging X-ray-irradiation (2 Gy). Cellular sensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored using dye-exclusion assays, Hoechst33342 staining assays, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In cells exposed to space radiations, adaptive responses such as the induction of radioresistance and the depression of radiation-induced apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in wtp53 cells but not in mp53 cells. Conclusion: These results have confirmed the hypothesis that p53-dependent adaptive responses are apparently induced by space radiations within a specific range of low doses. The cells exhibited this effect owing to space radiations exposure, even though the doses in space were very low.

  2. Transient Genome-Wide Transcriptional Response to Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation In Vivo in Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, Susanne R.; Rocke, David M.; Dai Jian; Schwietert, Chad W.; Santana, Alison; Stern, Robin L.; Lehmann, Joerg; Hartmann Siantar, Christine L.; Goldberg, Zelanna

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The in vivo effects of low-dose low linear energy transfer ionizing radiation on healthy human skin are largely unknown. Using a patient-based tissue acquisition protocol, we have performed a series of genomic analyses on the temporal dynamics over a 24-hour period to determine the radiation response after a single exposure of 10 cGy. Methods and Materials: RNA from each patient tissue sample was hybridized to an Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 array. Data analysis was performed on selected gene groups and pathways. Results: Nineteen gene groups and seven gene pathways that had been shown to be radiation responsive were analyzed. Of these, nine gene groups showed significant transient transcriptional changes in the human tissue samples, which returned to baseline by 24 hours postexposure. Conclusions: Low doses of ionizing radiation on full-thickness human skin produce a definable temporal response out to 24 hours postexposure. Genes involved in DNA and tissue remodeling, cell cycle transition, and inflammation show statistically significant changes in expression, despite variability between patients. These data serve as a reference for the temporal dynamics of ionizing radiation response following low-dose exposure in healthy full-thickness human skin.

  3. Solar ultraviolet radiation is necessary to enhance grapevine fruit ripening transcriptional and phenolic responses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ultraviolet (UV) radiation modulates secondary metabolism in the skin of Vitis vinifera L. berries, which affects the final composition of both grapes and wines. The expression of several phenylpropanoid biosynthesis-related genes is regulated by UV radiation in grape berries. However, the complete portion of transcriptome and ripening processes influenced by solar UV radiation in grapes remains unknown. Results Whole genome arrays were used to identify the berry skin transcriptome modulated by the UV radiation received naturally in a mid-altitude Tempranillo vineyard. UV radiation-blocking and transmitting filters were used to generate the experimental conditions. The expression of 121 genes was significantly altered by solar UV radiation. Functional enrichment analysis of altered transcripts mainly pointed out that secondary metabolism-related transcripts were induced by UV radiation including VvFLS1, VvGT5 and VvGT6 flavonol biosynthetic genes and monoterpenoid biosynthetic genes. Berry skin phenolic composition was also analysed to search for correlation with gene expression changes and UV-increased flavonols accumulation was the most evident impact. Among regulatory genes, novel UV radiation-responsive transcription factors including VvMYB24 and three bHLH, together with known grapevine UV-responsive genes such as VvMYBF1, were identified. A transcriptomic meta-analysis revealed that genes up-regulated by UV radiation in the berry skin were also enriched in homologs of Arabidopsis UVR8 UV-B photoreceptor-dependent UV-B -responsive genes. Indeed, a search of the grapevine reference genomic sequence identified UV-B signalling pathway homologs and among them, VvHY5-1, VvHY5-2 and VvRUP were up-regulated by UV radiation in the berry skin. Conclusions Results suggest that the UV-B radiation-specific signalling pathway is activated in the skin of grapes grown at mid-altitudes. The biosynthesis and accumulation of secondary metabolites, which are

  4. Vertical migration and motility responses in three marine phytoplankton species exposed to solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Richter, Peter R; Häder, Donat-P; Gonçalves, Rodrigo J; Marcoval, M Alejandra; Villafañe, Virginia E; Helbling, E Walter

    2007-01-01

    Diurnal vertical migration in the water column and the impact of solar radiation on motility were investigated in three marine phytoplankton species: Tetraselmis suecica, Dunaliella salina and Gymnodinium chlorophorum. Cells were exposed to solar radiation either in ultraviolet radiation (UVR, 280-400 nm) transparent Plexiglas tubes (45 cm length, 10 cm diameter) or in quartz tubes under three radiation treatments: PAB (280-700 nm), PA (320-700 nm) and P (400-700 nm). The three species displayed different behavior after exposure to solar radiation. Tetraselmis suecica was insensitive to UVR and under high solar radiation levels, cells accumulated preferentially near the surface. Exposure experiments did not indicate any significant changes in swimming speed nor in the percentage of motile cells after 5 h of exposure. On the other hand, D. salina was sensitive to UV-B displaying a significant decrease in swimming speed and percentage of motile cells after 2-3 h of exposure. Moreover, D. salina cells migrated deep in the water column when irradiance was high. The response of G. chlorophorum was in between that of the other two species tested, with a slight (but significant) decrease in swimming speed and percentage of motile cells in all radiation treatments after 5 h of exposure. While G. chlorophorum cells were more or less homogenously distributed in the water column, a slight (but significant) avoidance response to high radiation was observed at local noon, with cells migrating deep in the water column. Our data clearly indicate that these sub-lethal effects of solar radiation are species-specific and they might have important implications for the aquatic ecosystem.

  5. Cellular response to low dose radiation: Role of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Balajee, A.S.; Meador, J.A.; Su, Y.

    2011-03-24

    It is increasingly realized that human exposure either to an acute low dose or multiple chronic low doses of low LET radiation has the potential to cause different types of cancer. Therefore, the central theme of research for DOE and NASA is focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms and pathways responsible for the cellular response to low dose radiation which would not only improve the accuracy of estimating health risks but also help in the development of predictive assays for low dose radiation risks associated with tissue degeneration and cancer. The working hypothesis for this proposal is that the cellular mechanisms in terms of DNA damage signaling, repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation are different for low and high doses of low LET radiation and that the mode of action of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases (PIKK: ATM, ATR and DNA-PK) determines the dose dependent cellular responses. The hypothesis will be tested at two levels: (I) Evaluation of the role of ATM, ATR and DNA-PK in cellular response to low and high doses of low LET radiation in simple in vitro human cell systems and (II) Determination of radiation responses in complex cell microenvironments such as human EpiDerm tissue constructs. Cellular responses to low and high doses of low LET radiation will be assessed from the view points of DNA damage signaling, DNA double strand break repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation by analyzing the activities (i.e. post-translational modifications and kinetics of protein-protein interactions) of the key target proteins for PI-3 kinase like kinases both at the intra-cellular and molecular levels. The proteins chosen for this proposal are placed under three categories: (I) sensors/initiators include ATM ser1981, ATR, 53BP1, gamma-H2AX, MDC1, MRE11, Rad50 and Nbs1; (II) signal transducers include Chk1, Chk2, FANCD2 and SMC1; and (III) effectors include p53, CDC25A and CDC25C. The primary goal of this proposal is to elucidate the

  6. Photothermoelectric response in asymmetric carbon nanotube devices exposed to sub-terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, G.; Kardakova, A.; Gayduchenko, I.; Charayev, I.; Voronov, B. M.; Finkel, M.; Klapwijk, T. M.; Morozov, S.; Presniakov, M.; Bobrinetskiy, I.; Ibragimov, R.; Goltsman, G.

    2013-10-01

    We report on the voltage response of carbon nanotube devices to sub-terahertz (THz) radiation. The devices contain carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which are over their length partially suspended and partially Van der Waals bonded to a SiO2 substrate, causing a difference in thermal contact. We observe a DC voltage upon exposure to 140 GHz radiation. Based on the observed gate voltage and power dependence, at different temperatures, we argue that the observed signal is both thermal and photovoltaic. The room temperature responsivity in the microwave to THz range exceeds that of CNT based devices reported before.

  7. Transient quantum coherent response to a partially coherent radiation field.

    PubMed

    Sadeq, Zaheen S; Brumer, Paul

    2014-02-21

    The response of an arbitrary closed quantum system to a partially coherent electric field is investigated, with a focus on the transient coherences in the system. As a model we examine, both perturbatively and numerically, the coherences induced in a three level V system. Both rapid turn-on and pulsed turn-on effects are investigated. The effect of a long and incoherent pulse is also considered, demonstrating that during the pulse the system shows a coherent response which reduces after the pulse is over. Both the pulsed scenario and the thermally broadened CW case approach a mixed state in the long time limit, with rates dictated by the adjacent level spacings and the coherence time of the light, and via a mechanism that is distinctly different from traditional decoherence. These two excitation scenarios are also explored for a minimal "toy" model of the electronic levels in pigment protein complex PC645 by both a collisionally broadened CW laser and by a noisy pulse, where unexpectedly long transient coherence times are observed and explained. The significance of environmentally induced decoherence is noted.

  8. Visible hyperspectral imaging evaluating the cutaneous response to ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilias, Michail A.; Häggblad, Erik; Anderson, Chris; Salerud, E. Göran

    2007-02-01

    In vivo diagnostics of skin diseases as well as understanding of the skin biology constitute a field demanding characterization of physiological and anatomical parameters. Biomedical optics has been successfully used, to qualitatively and quantitatively estimate the microcirculatory conditions of superficial skin. Capillaroscopy, laser Doppler techniques and spectroscopy, all elucidate different aspects of microcirculation, e.g. capillary anatomy and distribution, tissue perfusion and hemoglobin oxygenation. We demonstrate the use of a diffuse reflectance hyperspectral imaging system for spatial and temporal characterization of tissue oxygenation, important to skin viability. The system comprises: light source, liquid crystal tunable filter, camera objective, CCD camera, and the decomposition of the spectral signature into relative amounts of oxy- and deoxygenized hemoglobin as well as melanin in every pixel resulting in tissue chromophore images. To validate the system, we used a phototesting model, creating a graded inflammatory response of a known geometry, in order to evaluate the ability to register spatially resolved reflectance spectra. The obtained results demonstrate the possibility to describe the UV inflammatory response by calculating the change in tissue oxygen level, intimately connected to a tissue's metabolism. Preliminary results on the estimation of melanin content are also presented.

  9. Transient quantum coherent response to a partially coherent radiation field

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeq, Zaheen S.; Brumer, Paul

    2014-02-21

    The response of an arbitrary closed quantum system to a partially coherent electric field is investigated, with a focus on the transient coherences in the system. As a model we examine, both perturbatively and numerically, the coherences induced in a three level V system. Both rapid turn-on and pulsed turn-on effects are investigated. The effect of a long and incoherent pulse is also considered, demonstrating that during the pulse the system shows a coherent response which reduces after the pulse is over. Both the pulsed scenario and the thermally broadened CW case approach a mixed state in the long time limit, with rates dictated by the adjacent level spacings and the coherence time of the light, and via a mechanism that is distinctly different from traditional decoherence. These two excitation scenarios are also explored for a minimal “toy” model of the electronic levels in pigment protein complex PC645 by both a collisionally broadened CW laser and by a noisy pulse, where unexpectedly long transient coherence times are observed and explained. The significance of environmentally induced decoherence is noted.

  10. Epidermal Homeostasis and Radiation Responses in a Multiscale Tissue Modeling Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shaowen; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2013-01-01

    The surface of skin is lined with several thin layers of epithelial cells that are maintained throughout life time by a small population of stem cells. High dose radiation exposures could injure and deplete the underlying proliferative cells and induce cutaneous radiation syndrome. In this work we propose a multiscale computational model for skin epidermal dynamics that links phenomena occurring at the subcellular, cellular, and tissue levels of organization, to simulate the experimental data of the radiation response of swine epidermis, which is closely similar to human epidermis. Incorporating experimentally measured histological and cell kinetic parameters, we obtain results of population kinetics and proliferation indexes comparable to observations in unirradiated and acutely irradiated swine experiments. At the sub-cellular level, several recently published Wnt signaling controlled cell-cycle models are applied and the roles of key components and parameters are analyzed. Based on our simulation results, we demonstrate that a moderate increase of proliferation rate for the survival proliferative cells is sufficient to fully repopulate the area denuded by high dose radiation, as long as the integrity of underlying basement membrane is maintained. Our work highlights the importance of considering proliferation kinetics as well as the spatial organization of tissues when conducting in vivo investigations of radiation responses. This integrated model allow us to test the validity of several basic biological rules at the cellular level and sub-cellular mechanisms by qualitatively comparing simulation results with published research, and enhance our understanding of the pathophysiological effects of ionizing radiation on skin.

  11. Cyctotoxicities of mitomycin C and x rays to aerobic and hypoxic cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Rockwell, S.

    1982-01-01

    Aerobic and hypoxic EMT6 mouse mammary tumor cells in exponential growth in vitro were used to study cell survival after treatment with radiation (250k V X rays) and mitomycin C in various combinations. The cytotoxicities of the two agents were found to be additive as judged by comparing dose-response curves for each agent alone with survival curves after combination therapy and by isobologram analysis. The cytotoxicities resulting from combination treatments were found to be independent of the sequence of the treatments or the interval between treatments.

  12. Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low dose/low LET radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Munira A Kadhim

    2010-03-05

    To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e., less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these “non-targeted” responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander responses in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/H and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition on two non-targeted radiation responses in these models; the bystander effect and genomic instability, which we believe are closely related. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to doses approaching a single electron traversal. Using conventional X-ray and γ-ray sources, novel dish separation and targeted irradiation approaches, we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various bystander conditions at doses down to a few electron tracks. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for bystander targeted studies. Mechanistic studies of instability and the bystander response in different cell lineages will focus initially on the role of cytokines which have been shown to be involved in bystander signaling and the initiation of instability. These studies also aim

  13. Molecular responses of radiation-induced liver damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Xiao, Lei; Ainiwaer, Aimudula; Wang, Yunlian; Wu, Ge; Mao, Rui; Yang, Ying; Bao, Yongxing

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular responses involved in radiation‑induced liver damage (RILD). Sprague‑Dawley rats (6‑weeks‑old) were irradiated once at a dose of 20 Gy to the right upper quadrant of the abdomen. The rats were then sacrificed 3 days and 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after irradiation and rats, which were not exposed to irradiation were used as controls. Weight measurements and blood was obtained from the rats and liver tissues were collected for histological and apoptotic analysis. Immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT‑qPCR) and western blot analysis were performed to measure the expression levels of mRNAs and proteins, respectively. The serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase were increased significantly in the RILD rats. Histological investigation revealed the proliferation of collagen and the formation of fibrotic tissue 12 weeks after irradiation. Apoptotic cells were observed predominantly 2 and 4 weeks after irradiation. The immunohistochemistry, RT‑qPCR and western blot analysis all revealed the same pattern of changes in the expression levels of the molecules assessed. The expression levels of transforming growth factor‑β1 (TGF‑β1), nuclear factor (NF)‑κB65, mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 3 (Smad3) and Smad7 and connective tissue growth factor were increased during the recovery period following irradiation up to 12 weeks. The expression levels of tumor necrosis factor‑α, Smad7 and Smad4 were only increased during the early phase (first 4 weeks) of recovery following irradiation. In the RILD rat model, the molecular responses indicated that the TGF‑β1/Smads and NF‑κB65 signaling pathways are involved in the mechanism of RILD recovery.

  14. Radiation response of the monkey kidney following contralateral nephrectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, M.E.C.; Stephens, L.C.; Gray, K.N.

    1994-09-30

    The long-term functional and morphologic responses of the hypertrophied monkey kidney after unilateral nephrectomy to fractionated irradiation were assessed. The right kidney of 13 adult female rhesus monkeys was removed. Twelve weeks after unilateral nephrectomy (UN) the remaining kidney received fractionated doses of {gamma}-rays ranging from 35.2 Gy/16 fractions (F) up to 44 Gy/20 F. Glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow, blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, and hematocrit values were measured up to 107 weeks postirradiation (PI). The monkeys were killed and the remaining kidneys were removed 107 weeks PI or earlier when end-stage renal failure was exhibited. Glomeruli were scored for the presence/absence of several pathologic features including increased intercapillary eosinophilic material (ICE), ecstatic capillaries, and thrombi. The relative proportion of renal cortex occupied by glomeruli, interstitium, normal tubules or abnormal tubules was determined using a Chalkley point grid. These quantal dose response data were analyzed using a logistic regression model. Irradiation of the remaining kidney in UN monkeys resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in renal function and anemia. Glomerular dysfunction preceded tubular dysfunction. Animals receiving 44 Gy all manifested progressive clinical renal failure. Conversely, those receiving {le} 39.6 Gy showed stable, albeit impaired, renal function for the duration of the observation period of 107 weeks. Morphologically, the incidence of ICE, ecstatic glomerular capillaries, thrombi, and periglomerular fibrosis was significantly dose-related (p < 0.005). A significant (p < 0.001) dose-related increase in the relative proportion of renal cortex occupied by abnormal tubules was indicative of tubular injury. A highly significant (p < 0.001) dose-dependent increase in the proportion of abnormal to normal tubules was also seen. 27 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Pathophysiological Responses in Rat and Mouse Models of Radiation-Induced Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lianhong; Yang, Jianhua; Li, Guoqian; Li, Yi; Wu, Rong; Cheng, Jinping; Tang, Yamei

    2017-03-01

    The brain is the major dose-limiting organ in patients undergoing radiotherapy for assorted conditions. Radiation-induced brain injury is common and mainly occurs in patients receiving radiotherapy for malignant head and neck tumors, arteriovenous malformations, or lung cancer-derived brain metastases. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms of radiation-induced brain injury are largely unknown. Although many treatment strategies are employed for affected individuals, the effects remain suboptimal. Accordingly, animal models are extremely important for elucidating pathogenic radiation-associated mechanisms and for developing more efficacious therapies. So far, models employing various animal species with different radiation dosages and fractions have been introduced to investigate the prevention, mechanisms, early detection, and management of radiation-induced brain injury. However, these models all have limitations, and none are widely accepted. This review summarizes the animal models currently set forth for studies of radiation-induced brain injury, especially rat and mouse, as well as radiation dosages, dose fractionation, and secondary pathophysiological responses.

  16. Hormetic Response to Low-Dose Radiation: Focus on the Immune System and Its Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jiuwei; Yang, Guozi; Pan, Zhenyu; Zhao, Yuguang; Liang, Xinyue; Li, Wei; Cai, Lu

    2017-01-01

    The interrelationship between ionizing radiation and the immune system is complex, multifactorial, and dependent on radiation dose/quality and immune cell type. High-dose radiation usually results in immune suppression. On the contrary, low-dose radiation (LDR) modulates a variety of immune responses that have exhibited the properties of immune hormesis. Although the underlying molecular mechanism is not fully understood yet, LDR has been used clinically for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and malignant tumors. These advancements in preclinical and clinical studies suggest that LDR-mediated immune modulation is a well-orchestrated phenomenon with clinical potential. We summarize recent developments in the understanding of LDR-mediated immune modulation, with an emphasis on its potential clinical applications. PMID:28134809

  17. Hormetic Response to Low-Dose Radiation: Focus on the Immune System and Its Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jiuwei; Yang, Guozi; Pan, Zhenyu; Zhao, Yuguang; Liang, Xinyue; Li, Wei; Cai, Lu

    2017-01-27

    The interrelationship between ionizing radiation and the immune system is complex, multifactorial, and dependent on radiation dose/quality and immune cell type. High-dose radiation usually results in immune suppression. On the contrary, low-dose radiation (LDR) modulates a variety of immune responses that have exhibited the properties of immune hormesis. Although the underlying molecular mechanism is not fully understood yet, LDR has been used clinically for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and malignant tumors. These advancements in preclinical and clinical studies suggest that LDR-mediated immune modulation is a well-orchestrated phenomenon with clinical potential. We summarize recent developments in the understanding of LDR-mediated immune modulation, with an emphasis on its potential clinical applications.

  18. The many interactions between the innate immune system and the response to radiation.

    PubMed

    Candéias, Serge M; Testard, Isabelle

    2015-11-28

    The role of the immune system in the protection of the organism against biological aggressions is long established and well-studied. A new role emerged more recently in the protection from - and the response to - physical trauma such as exposure to ionizing radiation. A pre-existing inflammation, induced by administration of an inflammatory cytokine or of a Toll-like receptor agonist, is indeed able to mitigate the toxic effects of acute radiation exposure. Conversely, it appears that the innate immune system can be activated during the course of the cellular response to radiation. Activation of different sensors and pattern recognition receptors by intra-cellular molecules such as HMGB1 or DNA released in the extra-cellular milieu or in the cytosol by irradiated cells induces the production of inflammatory and anti-viral cytokines. In addition, in human monocytes and macrophages, the expression of inflammatory cytokine genes can be directly induced by p53- and ATM-dependent mechanisms. This last finding establishes a direct link between radiation-induced DNA damage response and radiation-induced inflammation.

  19. Regulation of early and delayed radiation responses in rat small intestine by capsaicin-sensitive nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junru; Zheng Huaien; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Ou Xuemei; Hauer-Jensen, Martin . E-mail: mhjensen@life.uams.edu

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Mast cells protect against the early manifestations of intestinal radiation toxicity, but promote chronic intestinal wall fibrosis. Intestinal sensory nerves are closely associated with mast cells, both anatomically and functionally, and serve an important role in the regulation of mucosal homeostasis. This study examined the effect of sensory nerve ablation on the intestinal radiation response in an established rat model. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent sensory nerve ablation with capsaicin or sham ablation. Two weeks later, a localized segment of ileum was X-irradiated or sham irradiated. Structural, cellular, and molecular changes were examined 2 weeks (early injury) and 26 weeks (chronic injury) after irradiation. The mast cell dependence of the effect of sensory nerve ablation on intestinal radiation injury was assessed using c-kit mutant (Ws/Ws) mast cell-deficient rats. Results: Capsaicin treatment caused a baseline reduction in mucosal mast cell density, crypt cell proliferation, and expression of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, two neuropeptides released by sensory neurons. Sensory nerve ablation strikingly exacerbated early intestinal radiation toxicity (loss of mucosal surface area, inflammation, intestinal wall thickening), but attenuated the development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis (collagen I accumulation and transforming growth factor {beta} immunoreactivity). In mast cell-deficient rats, capsaicin treatment exacerbated postradiation epithelial injury (loss of mucosal surface area), but none of the other aspects of radiation injury were affected by capsaicin treatment. Conclusions: Ablation of capsaicin-sensitive enteric neurons exacerbates early intestinal radiation toxicity, but attenuates development of chronic fibroproliferative changes. The effect of capsaicin treatment on the intestinal radiation response is partly mast cell dependent.

  20. The different radiation response and radiation-induced bystander effects in colorectal carcinoma cells differing in p53 status.

    PubMed

    Widel, Maria; Lalik, Anna; Krzywon, Aleksandra; Poleszczuk, Jan; Fujarewicz, Krzysztof; Rzeszowska-Wolny, Joanna

    2015-08-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect, appearing as different biological changes in cells that are not directly exposed to ionizing radiation but are under the influence of molecular signals secreted by irradiated neighbors, have recently attracted considerable interest due to their possible implication for radiotherapy. However, various cells present diverse radiosensitivity and bystander responses that depend, inter alia, on genetic status including TP53, the gene controlling the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. Here we compared the ionizing radiation and bystander responses of human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 cells with wild type or knockout TP53 using a transwell co-culture system. The viability of exposed to X-rays (0-8 Gy) and bystander cells of both lines showed a roughly comparable decline with increasing dose. The frequency of micronuclei was also comparable at lower doses but at higher increased considerably, especially in bystander TP53-/- cells. Moreover, the TP53-/- cells showed a significantly elevated frequency of apoptosis, while TP53+/+ counterparts expressed high level of senescence. The cross-matched experiments where irradiated cells of one line were co-cultured with non-irradiated cells of opposite line show that both cell lines were also able to induce bystander effects in their counterparts, however different endpoints revealed with different strength. Potential mediators of bystander effects, IL-6 and IL-8, were also generated differently in both lines. The knockout cells secreted IL-6 at lower doses whereas wild type cells only at higher doses. Secretion of IL-8 by TP53-/- control cells was many times lower than that by TP53+/+ but increased significantly after irradiation. Transcription of the NFκBIA was induced in irradiated TP53+/+ mainly, but in bystanders a higher level was observed in TP53-/- cells, suggesting that TP53 is required for induction of NFκB pathway after irradiation but another mechanism of activation must operate in

  1. Response of the alanine/ESR dosimeter to radiation from an Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy source.

    PubMed

    Anton, M; Hackel, T; Zink, K; von Voigts-Rhetz, P; Selbach, H-J

    2015-01-07

    The response of the alanine dosimeter to radiation from an Ir-192 source with respect to the absorbed dose to water, relative to Co-60 radiation, was determined experimentally as well as by Monte Carlo simulations. The experimental and Monte Carlo results for the response agree well within the limits of uncertainty. The relative response decreases with an increasing distance between the measurement volume and the source from approximately 98% at a 1 cm distance to 96% at 5 cm. The present data are more accurate, but agree well with data published by Schaeken et al (2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 6625-34). The decrease of the relative response with an increasing distance that had already been observed by these authors is confirmed. In the appendix, the properties of the alanine dosimeter with respect to volume and sensitivity corrections are investigated. The inhomogeneous distribution of the detection probability that was taken into account for the analysis was determined experimentally.

  2. Simulations of hybrid system varying solar radiation and microturbine response time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Ribaya, Yolanda; Álvarez, Eduardo; Paredes Sánchez, José Pablo; Xiberta Bernat, Jorge

    2015-07-01

    Hybrid power systems, such as combinations of renewable power sources with intermittent power production and non-renewable power sources, theoretically increase the reliability and thus integration of renewable sources in the electrical system. However, a recent increase in the number of hybrid installations has sparked interest in the effects of their connection to the grid, especially in remote areas. This paper analyses a photovoltaic-gas microturbine hybrid system dimensioned to be installed in La Paz (Mexico).The research presented in this paper studies and quantifies the effects on the total electric power produced, varying both the solar radiation and the gas microturbine response time. The gas microturbine and the photovoltaic panels are modelled using Matlab/Simulink software, obtaining a platform where different tests to simulate real conditions have been executed. They consist of diverse ramps of irradiance that replicate solar radiation variations, and different microturbine response times reproduced by the time constants of a first order transfer function that models the microturbine dynamic response. The results obtained show that when radiation varies quickly it does not produce significant differences in the power guarantee or the microturbine gas consumption, to any microturbine response time. However, these two parameters are highly variable with smooth radiance variations. The maximum total power variation decreases greatly as the radiation variation gets lower. In addition, by decreasing the microturbine response time, it is possible to appreciably increase the power guarantee although the maximum power variation and gas consumption increase. Only in cases of low radiation variation is there no appreciable difference in the maximum power variation obtained by the different turbine response times.

  3. Role of Interleukin-6 in the Radiation Response of Liver Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Miao-Fen; Hsieh, Ching-Chuan; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Lai, Chia-Hsuan

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of interleukin (IL)-6 in biological sequelae and tumor regrowth after irradiation for hepatic malignancy, which are critical for the clinical radiation response of liver tumors. Methods and Materials: The Hepa 1-6 murine hepatocellular cancer cell line was used to examine the radiation response by clonogenic assays and tumor growth delay in vivo. After irradiation in a single dose of 6 Gy in vitro or 15 Gy in vivo, biological changes including cell death and tumor regrowth were examined by experimental manipulation of IL-6 signaling. The effects of blocking IL-6 were assessed by cells preincubated in the presence of IL-6-neutralizing antibody for 24 hours or stably transfected with IL-6-silencing vectors. The correlations among tumor responses, IL-6 levels, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) recruitment were examined using animal experiments. Results: Interleukin-6 expression was positively linked to irradiation and radiation resistance, as demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo experiments. Interleukin-6-silencing vectors induced more tumor inhibition and DNA damage after irradiation. When subjects were irradiated with a sublethal dose, the regrowth of irradiated tumors significantly correlated with IL-6 levels and MDSC recruitment in vivo. Furthermore, blocking of IL-6 could overcome irradiation-induced MDSC recruitment and tumor regrowth after treatment. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that IL-6 is important in determining the radiation response of liver tumor cells. Irradiation-induced IL-6 and the subsequent recruitment of MDSC could be responsible for tumor regrowth. Therefore, treatment with concurrent IL-6 inhibition could be a potential therapeutic strategy for increasing the radiation response of tumors.

  4. Simulations of hybrid system varying solar radiation and microturbine response time

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández Ribaya, Yolanda Álvarez, Eduardo; Paredes Sánchez, José Pablo; Xiberta Bernat, Jorge

    2015-07-15

    Hybrid power systems, such as combinations of renewable power sources with intermittent power production and non-renewable power sources, theoretically increase the reliability and thus integration of renewable sources in the electrical system. However, a recent increase in the number of hybrid installations has sparked interest in the effects of their connection to the grid, especially in remote areas. This paper analyses a photovoltaic-gas microturbine hybrid system dimensioned to be installed in La Paz (Mexico).The research presented in this paper studies and quantifies the effects on the total electric power produced, varying both the solar radiation and the gas microturbine response time. The gas microturbine and the photovoltaic panels are modelled using Matlab/Simulink software, obtaining a platform where different tests to simulate real conditions have been executed. They consist of diverse ramps of irradiance that replicate solar radiation variations, and different microturbine response times reproduced by the time constants of a first order transfer function that models the microturbine dynamic response. The results obtained show that when radiation varies quickly it does not produce significant differences in the power guarantee or the microturbine gas consumption, to any microturbine response time. However, these two parameters are highly variable with smooth radiance variations. The maximum total power variation decreases greatly as the radiation variation gets lower. In addition, by decreasing the microturbine response time, it is possible to appreciably increase the power guarantee although the maximum power variation and gas consumption increase. Only in cases of low radiation variation is there no appreciable difference in the maximum power variation obtained by the different turbine response times.

  5. 7th International Workshop on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, David J.

    2009-07-21

    The extended abstracts that follow present a summary of the Proceedings of the 7th International Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at Columbia University’s Kellogg Center in New York City on March 15–17, 2006. These International Workshops on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response have been held regularly since 1993 (1–5). Since the first workshop, there has been a rapid growth (see Fig. 1) in the number of centers developing microbeams for radiobiological research, and worldwide there are currently about 30 microbeams in operation or under development. Single-cell/single-particle microbeam systems can deliver beams of different ionizing radiations with a spatial resolution of a few micrometers down to a few tenths of a micrometer. Microbeams can be used to addressquestions relating to the effects of low doses of radiation (a single radiation track traversing a cell or group of cells), to probe subcellular targets (e.g. nucleus or cytoplasm), and to address questions regarding the propagation of information about DNA damage (for example, the radiation-induced bystander effect). Much of the recent research using microbeams has been to study low-dose effects and ‘‘non-targeted’’ responses such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. This Workshop provided a forum to assess the current state of microbeam technology and current biological applications and to discuss future directions for development, both technological and biological. Over 100 participants reviewed the current state of microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments in the fields of both physics and biology.

  6. GROWTH RESPONSE OF SYMBODINIUM SPP. TO COMBINED TEMPERATURE AND UV RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rogers, J.E. and D. Marcovich. In press. Growth Response of a Coral Symbiont, Symbiodinium sp., to Combined Temperature and UV Radiation Exposure (Abstract). To be presented at the ASLO 2004 Summer Meeting: The Changing Landscapes of Oceans and Freshwater, 13-18 June 2004, Savann...

  7. Aging-Dependent Changes in the Radiation Response of the Adult Rat Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, Matthew K. Forbes, M. Elizabeth; Robbins, Mike E.; Riddle, David R.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of aging on the radiation response in the adult rat brain. Methods and Materials: Male rats 8, 18, or 28 months of age received a single 10-Gy dose of whole-brain irradiation (WBI). The hippocampal dentate gyrus was analyzed 1 and 10 weeks later for sensitive neurobiologic markers associated with radiation-induced damage: changes in density of proliferating cells, immature neurons, total microglia, and activated microglia. Results: A significant decrease in basal levels of proliferating cells and immature neurons and increased microglial activation occurred with normal aging. The WBI induced a transient increase in proliferation that was greater in older animals. This proliferation response did not increase the number of immature neurons, which decreased after WBI in young rats, but not in old rats. Total microglial numbers decreased after WBI at all ages, but microglial activation increased markedly, particularly in older animals. Conclusions: Age is an important factor to consider when investigating the radiation response of the brain. In contrast to young adults, older rats show no sustained decrease in number of immature neurons after WBI, but have a greater inflammatory response. The latter may have an enhanced role in the development of radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction in older individuals.

  8. The role of constitutive and inducible processes in the response of human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    The inherent radiation sensitivity of the cells within a tumor is thought to contribute to the success or failure of radiation therapy. In vitro studies have shown that radiation sensitivity differences in squamous cell carcinoma cell lines reflect alterations in DNA repair. These alterations result from constitutive changes in chromosome organization, not radiation-inducible processes. While inducible responses may play some role in the radiation response of tumor cells, there is no evidence for their involvement in inherent tumor cell radiosensitivity differences or in the success or failure of radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinomas.

  9. The role of constitutive and inducible processes in the response of human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.L.

    1993-06-01

    The inherent radiation sensitivity of the cells within a tumor is thought to contribute to the success or failure of radiation therapy. In vitro studies have shown that radiation sensitivity differences in squamous cell carcinoma cell lines reflect alterations in DNA repair. These alterations result from constitutive changes in chromosome organization, not radiation-inducible processes. While inducible responses may play some role in the radiation response of tumor cells, there is no evidence for their involvement in inherent tumor cell radiosensitivity differences or in the success or failure of radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinomas.

  10. Altered radiation responses of breast cancer cells resistant to hormonal therapy.

    PubMed

    Luzhna, Lidiya; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2015-01-30

    Endocrine therapy agents (the selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulators such as tamoxifen or the selective ER down-regulators such as ICI 182,780) are key treatment regimens for hormone receptor-positive breast cancers. While these drugs are very effective in controlling ER-positive breast cancer, many tumors that initially respond well to treatment often acquire drug resistance, which is a major clinical problem. In clinical practice, hormonal therapy agents are commonly used in combination or sequence with radiation therapy. Tamoxifen treatment and radiotherapy improve both local tumor control and patient survival. However, tamoxifen treatment may render cancer cells less responsive to radiation therapy. Only a handful of data exist on the effects of radiation on cells resistant to hormonal therapy agents. These scarce data show that cells that were resistant to tamoxifen were also resistant to radiation. Yet, the existence and mechanisms of cross-resistance to endocrine therapy and radiation therapy need to be established. Here, we for the first time examined and compared radiation responses of MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF-7/S0.5) and two antiestrogen resistant cell lines derived from MCF-7/S0.5: the tamoxifen resistant MCF-7/TAMR-1 and ICI 182,780 resistant MCF-7/182R-6 cell lines. Specifically, we analyzed the radiation-induced changes in the expression of genes involved in DNA damage, apoptosis, and cell cycle regulation. We found that the tamoxifen-resistant cell line in contrast to the parental and ICI 182,780-resistant cell lines displayed a significantly less radiation-induced decrease in the expression of genes involved in DNA repair. Furthermore, we show that MCF-7/TAMR-1 and MCF-7/182R-6 cells were less susceptible to radiation-induced apoptosis as compared to the parental line. These data indicate that tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells have a reduced sensitivity to radiation treatment. The current study may therefore serve as a

  11. Apoptosis and Ki-67 as predictive factors for response to radiation therapy in feline nasal lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    FU, Dah-Renn; KATO, Daiki; ENDO, Yoshifumi; KADOSAWA, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Nasal lymphoma is the most common nasal tumor in cats and is generally a solitary and radiosensitive tumor. We retrospectively evaluated the response to radiation and survival time in relation to apoptosis and Ki-67 indices in feline nasal lymphomas treated with radiation therapy. The apoptotic and Ki-67 indices were evaluated with TUNEL and immunohistochemical staining in 30 biopsy tissues that were taken before any treatment. These two indices were compared, and differences between different treatment response groups were analyzed. The correlation between the median survival times (MST) and the indices was estimated using the Kaplan Meier method, and statistical differences between survival curves were analyzed using a log-rank method. With regard to apoptotic index, a statistical difference was observed between the samples taken from cats with complete response and stable disease (1.22% vs. 0.45%; P=0.045). The Ki-67 index in cats with both complete response and partial response was significantly higher than in cats with stable disease (44.4% and 39.6% vs. 16.3%; P<0.001 and P=0.008, respectively). The cats with a high level of apoptosis (>0.9%) nasal lymphoma were not significantly prolonged MSTs (P=0.202), however, high Ki-67-positive (>40%) cats experienced a statistically significant relationship with longer survival time (P=0.015). Our results indicate that spontaneous apoptotic and Ki-67 indices are strong predictors for response to radiation therapy in feline nasal lymphomas. PMID:27086717

  12. Genetic Background Modulates lncRNA-Coordinated Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Tang, Jonathan; Huang, Yurong; Nguyen, David H.; ...

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as key regulators of diverse cell functions and processes. However, the relevance of lncRNAs in the cell and tissue response to ionizing radiation has not yet been characterized. Here we used microarray profiling to determine lncRNA and mRNA expression in mammary glands of BALB/c and SPRET/EiJ mice after low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) exposure. We found that unirradiated mammary tissues of these strains differed significantly in baseline expressions of 290 lncRNAs. LDIR exposure (10 cGy) induced a significant change in the expression of many lncRNAs. The vast majority of lncRNAs identified to be differentially expressed aftermore » LDIR in either BALB/c or SPRET/EiJ had a significantly correlated expression pattern with at least one LDIR responsive mRNA. Functional analysis revealed that the response to LDIR in BALB/c mice is highly dynamic with enrichment for genes involved in tissue injury, inflammatory responses, and mammary gland development at 2, 4, and 8 weeks after LDIR, respectively. Our study demonstrates that genetic background strongly influences the expression of lncRNAs and their response to radiation and that lncRNAs may coordinate the tissue response to LDIR exposure via regulation of coding mRNAs.« less

  13. Technical Note: Response measurement for select radiation detectors in magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, M.; Fallone, B. G.; Rathee, S.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dose response to applied magnetic fields for ion chambers and solid state detectors has been investigated previously for the anticipated use in linear accelerator–magnetic resonance devices. In this investigation, the authors present the measured response of selected radiation detectors when the magnetic field is applied in the same direction as the radiation beam, i.e., a longitudinal magnetic field, to verify previous simulation only data. Methods: The dose response of a PR06C ion chamber, PTW60003 diamond detector, and IBA PFD diode detector is measured in a longitudinal magnetic field. The detectors are irradiated with buildup caps and their long axes either parallel or perpendicular to the incident photon beam. In each case, the magnetic field dose response is reported as the ratio of detector signals with to that without an applied longitudinal magnetic field. The magnetic field dose response for each unique orientation as a function of magnetic field strength was then compared to the previous simulation only studies. Results: The measured dose response of each detector in longitudinal magnetic fields shows no discernable response up to near 0.21 T. This result was expected and matches the previously published simulation only results, showing no appreciable dose response with magnetic field. Conclusions: Low field longitudinal magnetic fields have been shown to have little or no effect on the dose response of the detectors investigated and further lend credibility to previous simulation only studies.

  14. "A Vegetarian vs. Conventional Hypocaloric Diet: The Effect on Physical Fitness in Response to Aerobic Exercise in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes." A Parallel Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Veleba, Jiri; Matoulek, Martin; Hill, Martin; Pelikanova, Terezie; Kahleova, Hana

    2016-10-26

    It has been shown that it is possible to modify macronutrient oxidation, physical fitness and resting energy expenditure (REE) by changes in diet composition. Furthermore, mitochondrial oxidation can be significantly increased by a diet with a low glycemic index. The purpose of our trial was to compare the effects of a vegetarian (V) and conventional diet (C) with the same caloric restriction (-500 kcal/day) on physical fitness and REE after 12 weeks of diet plus aerobic exercise in 74 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). An open, parallel, randomized study design was used. All meals were provided for the whole study duration. An individualized exercise program was prescribed to the participants and was conducted under supervision. Physical fitness was measured by spiroergometry and indirect calorimetry was performed at the start and after 12 weeks Repeated-measures ANOVA (Analysis of variance) models with between-subject (group) and within-subject (time) factors and interactions were used for evaluation of the relationships between continuous variables and factors. Maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) increased by 12% in vegetarian group (V) (F = 13.1, p < 0.001, partial η² = 0.171), whereas no significant change was observed in C (F = 0.7, p = 0.667; group × time F = 9.3, p = 0.004, partial η² = 0.209). Maximal performance (Watt max) increased by 21% in V (F = 8.3, p < 0.001, partial η² = 0.192), whereas it did not change in C (F = 1.0, p = 0.334; group × time F = 4.2, p = 0.048, partial η² = 0.116). Our results indicate that V leads more effectively to improvement in physical fitness than C after aerobic exercise program.

  15. Radiation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  16. Identification of gene-based responses in human blood cells exposed to alpha particle radiation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The threat of a terrorist-precipitated nuclear event places humans at danger for radiological exposures. Isotopes which emit alpha (α)-particle radiation pose the highest risk. Currently, gene expression signatures are being developed for radiation biodosimetry and triage with respect to ionizing photon radiation. This study was designed to determine if similar gene expression profiles are obtained after exposures involving α-particles. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used to identify sensitive and robust gene-based biomarkers of α-particle radiation exposure. Cells were isolated from healthy individuals and were irradiated at doses ranging from 0-1.5 Gy. Microarray technology was employed to identify transcripts that were differentially expressed relative to unirradiated cells 24 hours post-exposure. Statistical analysis identified modulated genes at each of the individual doses. Results Twenty-nine genes were common to all doses with expression levels ranging from 2-10 fold relative to control treatment group. This subset of genes was further assessed in independent complete white blood cell (WBC) populations exposed to either α-particles or X-rays using quantitative real-time PCR. This 29 gene panel was responsive in the α-particle exposed WBCs and was shown to exhibit differential fold-changes compared to X-irradiated cells, though no α-particle specific transcripts were identified. Conclusion Current gene panels for photon radiation may also be applicable for use in α-particle radiation biodosimetry. PMID:25017500

  17. Enhancement of Radiation Response in Osteosarcoma and Rhabomyosarcoma Cell Lines by Histone Deacetylase Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Blattmann, Claudia; Oertel, Susanne; Ehemann, Volker

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) can enhance the sensitivity of cells to photon radiation treatment (XRT) by altering numerous molecular pathways. We investigated the effect of pan-HDACIs such as suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) on radiation response in two osteosarcoma (OS) and two rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival, cell cycle analysis, and apoptosis were examined in OS (KHOS-24OS, SAOS2) and RMS (A-204, RD) cell lines treated with HDACI and HDACI plus XRT, respectively. Protein expression was investigated via immunoblot analysis, and cell cycle analysis and measurement of apoptosis were performed using flow cytometry. Results: SAHA induced an inhibition of cell proliferation and clonogenic survival in OS and RMS cell lines and led to a significant radiosensitization of all tumor cell lines. Other HDACI such as M344 and valproate showed similar effects as investigated in one OS cell line. Furthermore, SAHA significantly increased radiation-induced apoptosis in the OS cell lines, whereas in the RMS cell lines radiation-induced apoptosis was insignificant with and without SAHA. In all investigated sarcoma cell lines, SAHA attenuated radiation-induced DNA repair protein expression (Rad51, Ku80). Conclusion: Our results show that HDACIs enhance radiation action in OS and RMS cell lines. Inhibition of DNA repair, as well as increased apoptosis induction after exposure to HDACIs, can be mechanisms of radiosensitization by HDACIs.

  18. Sensitometry of the response of a new radiochromic film dosimeter to gamma radiation and electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, W. L.; Yun-Dong, Chen; Soares, C. G.; Miller, A.; Van Dyk, G.; Lewis, D. F.

    1991-04-01

    A new radiation-sensitive imaging material, called GafChromic™ Dosimetry Media, offers advances in high-dose radiation dosimetry and high-resolution radiography for gamma radiation and electrons. The potential uses in radiation processing, radiation sterilization of medical devices, population control of insects by irradiation, food irradiation, blood irradiation for organ-transplant immuno-suppression, clinical radiography, and industrial radiography have led to the present sensitometric study over the breadth of the wide dynamic range of this new routine detector and imaging material, namely, absorbed doses from 10 Gy to 5 × 10 4 Gy. The thin-coated film is colorless before irradiation, and registers a deep-blue image upon irradiation, with two absorption bands at about 650 nm (major band) and 600 nm (minor band). The response to electrons, in terms of increase in absorbance per unit absorbed dose, is the same as that to gamma radiation within the estimated uncertainty of the measurements (± 5%, 95% confidence level). The spatial resolving power is > 1200 lines/mm. After the first 24 hours, the image is stable over many months (within ± 5% in absorbance), however, the system should be irradiated and analyzed at approximately the temperatures used during calibration, because of temperature dependence during irradiation and readout, and temperatures greater than 55°C should be avoided.

  19. Near-UV radiation acts as a beneficial factor for physiological responses in cucumber plants.

    PubMed

    Mitani-Sano, Makiko; Tezuka, Takafumi

    2013-11-05

    Effects of near-UV radiation on the growth and physiological activity of cucumber plants were investigated morphologically, physiologically and biochemically using 3-week-old seedlings grown under polyvinyl chloride films featuring transmission either above 290 nm or above 400 nm in growth chambers. The hypocotyl length and leaf area of cucumber seedlings were reduced but the thickness of leaves was enhanced by near-UV radiation, due to increased upper/lower epidermis thickness, palisade parenchyma thickness and volume of palisade parenchyma cells. Photosynthetic and respiratory activities were also promoted by near-UV radiation, associated with general enhancement of physiological/biochemical responses. Particularly, metabolic activities in the photosynthetic system of chloroplasts and the respiratory system of mitochondria were analyzed under the conditions of visible light with and without near-UV radiation. For example, the activities of NAD(P)-dependent enzymes such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH) in chloroplasts and isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) in mitochondria were elevated, along with levels of pyridine nucleotides (nicotinamide coenzymes) [NAD(H) and NADP(H)] and activity of NAD kinase (NADP forming enzyme). Taken together, these data suggest that promotion of cucumber plant growth by near-UV radiation involves activation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism in plants. The findings of this research showed that near-UV radiation reaching the Earth's surface is a beneficial factor for plant growth.

  20. Late radiation responses in man: current evaluation from results from Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    PubMed

    Schull, W J

    1983-01-01

    Among the late effects of exposure to the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, none looms larger than radiation related malignancies. Indeed, the late effects of A-bomb radiation on mortality appear to be limited to an increase in malignant tumors. At present, it can be shown that cancers of the breast, colon, esophagus, lungs, stomach, thyroid, and urinary tract as well as leukemia and multiple myeloma increase in frequency with an increase in exposure. No significant relationship to radiation can as yet be established for malignant lymphoma, nor cancers of the rectum, pancreas or uterus. Radiation induced malignancies other than leukemia seem to develop proportionally to the natural cancer rate for the attained age. For specific age-at-death intervals, both relative and absolute risks tend to be higher for those of younger age at the time of bombing. Other late effects include radiation-related lenticular opacities, disturbances of growth among those survivors still growing at the time of exposure, and mental retardation and small head sizes among the in utero exposed. Chromosomal abnormalities too are more frequently encountered in the peripheral leukocytes of survivors, and this increase is functionally related to their exposure. Some uncertainty continues to surround both the quantity and quality of the radiation released by these two nuclear devices, particularly the Hiroshima bomb. A recent reassessment suggests that the gamma radiation estimates which have been used in the past may be too low at some distances and the neutron radiation estimates too high at all distances; moreover, the energies of the neutrons released now appear "softer" than previously conjectured. These uncertainties are not sufficiently large, however, to compromise the reality of the increased frequency of malignancy, but make estimates of the dose response, particularly in terms of gamma and neutron exposures, tentative.

  1. Late radiation responses in man: Current evaluation from results from Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schull, William J.

    Among the late effects of exposure to the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, none looms larger than radiation related malignancies. Indeed, the late effects of A-bomb radiation on mortality appear to be limited to an increase in malignant tumors. At present, it can be shown that cancers of the breast, colon, esophagus, lungs, stomach, thyroid, and urinary tract as well as leukemia and multiple myeloma increase in frequency with an increase in exposure. No significant relationship to radiation can as yet be established for malignant lymphoma, nor cancers of the rectum, pancreas or uterus. Radiation induced malignancies other than leukemia seem to develop proportionally to the natural cancer rate for the attained age. For specific age-at-death intervals, both relative and absolute risks tend to be higher for those of younger age at the time of bombing. Other late effects include radiation-related lenticular opacities, disturbances of growth among those survivors still growing at the time of exposure, and mental retardation and small head sizes among the in utero exposed. Chromosomal abnormalities too are more frequently encountered in the peripheral leucocytes of survivors, and this increase is functionally related to their exposure. Some uncertainty continues to surround both the quantity and quality of the radiation released by these two nuclear devices, particularly the Hiroshima bomb. A recent reassessment suggests that the gamma radiation estimates which have been used in the past may be too low at some distances and the neutron radiation estimates too high at all distances; moreover, the energies of the neutrons released now appear ``softer'' than previously conjectured. These uncertainties not sufficiently large, however, to compromise the reality of the increased frequency of malignancy, but make estimates of the dose response, particularly in terms of gamma and neutron exposures, tentative.

  2. TP53inp1 Gene Is Implicated in Early Radiation Response in Human Fibroblast Cells.

    PubMed

    Sándor, Nikolett; Schilling-Tóth, Boglárka; Kis, Enikő; Fodor, Lili; Mucsányi, Fruzsina; Sáfrány, Géza; Hegyesi, Hargita

    2015-10-23

    Tumor protein 53-induced nuclear protein-1 (TP53inp1) is expressed by activation via p53 and p73. The purpose of our study was to investigate the role of TP53inp1 in response of fibroblasts to ionizing radiation. γ-Ray radiation dose-dependently induces the expression of TP53inp1 in human immortalized fibroblast (F11hT) cells. Stable silencing of TP53inp1 was done via lentiviral transfection of shRNA in F11hT cells. After irradiation the clonogenic survival of TP53inp1 knockdown (F11hT-shTP) cells was compared to cells transfected with non-targeting (NT) shRNA. Radiation-induced senescence was measured by SA-β-Gal staining and autophagy was detected by Acridine Orange dye and microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3 (LC3B) immunostaining. The expression of TP53inp1, GDF-15, and CDKN1A and alterations in radiation induced mitochondrial DNA deletions were evaluated by qPCR. TP53inp1 was required for radiation (IR) induced maximal elevation of CDKN1A and GDF-15 expressions. Mitochondrial DNA deletions were increased and autophagy was deregulated following irradiation in the absence of TP53inp1. Finally, we showed that silencing of TP53inp1 enhances the radiation sensitivity of fibroblast cells. These data suggest functional roles for TP53inp1 in radiation-induced autophagy and survival. Taken together, we suppose that silencing of TP53inp1 leads radiation induced autophagy impairment and induces accumulation of damaged mitochondria in primary human fibroblasts.

  3. Dual functions of autophagy in the response of breast tumor cells to radiation

    PubMed Central

    Bristol, Molly L.; Di, Xu; Beckman, Matthew J.; Wilson, Eden N.; Henderson, Scott C.; Maiti, Aparna; Fan, Zhen; Gewirtz, David A.

    2012-01-01

    In MCF-7 breast tumor cells, ionizing radiation promoted autophagy that was cytoprotective; pharmacological or genetic interference with autophagy induced by radiation resulted in growth suppression and/or cell killing (primarily by apoptosis). The hormonally active form of vitamin D, 1,25D3, also promoted autophagy in irradiated MCF-7 cells, sensitized the cells to radiation and suppressed the proliferative recovery that occurs after radiation alone. 1,25D3 enhanced radiosensitivity and promoted autophagy in MCF-7 cells that overexpress Her-2/neu as well as in p53 mutant Hs578t breast tumor cells. In contrast, 1,25D3 failed to alter radiosensitivity or promote autophagy in the BT474 breast tumor cell line with low-level expression of the vitamin D receptor. Enhancement of MCF-7 cell sensitivity to radiation by 1,25D3 was not attenuated by a genetic block to autophagy due largely to the promotion of apoptosis via the collateral suppression of protective autophagy. However, MCF-7 cells were protected from the combination of 1,25D3 with radiation using a concentration of chloroquine that produced minimal sensitization to radiation alone. The current studies are consistent with the premise that while autophagy mediates a cytoprotective function in irradiated breast tumor cells, promotion of autophagy can also confer radiosensitivity by vitamin D (1,25D3). As both cytoprotective and cytotoxic autophagy can apparently be expressed in the same experimental system in response to radiation, this type of model could be utilized to distinguish biochemical, molecular and/or functional differences in these dual functions of autophagy. PMID:22498493

  4. Quantitative radiation dose-response relationships for normal tissues in man - I. Gustatory tissues response during photon and neutron radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mossman, K.L.

    1982-08-01

    Quantitative radiation dose-response curves for normal gustatory tissue in man were studied. Taste function, expressed as taste loss, was evaluated in 84 patients who were given either photon or neutron radiotherapy for tumors in the head and neck region. Patients were treated to average tumor doses of 6600 cGy (photon) or 2200 cGy intervals for photon patients and 320-cGy intervals for neutron patients during radiotherapy. The dose-response curves for photons and neutrons were analyzed by fitting a four-parameter logistic equation to the data. Photon and neutron curves differed principally in their relative position along the dose axis. Comparison of the dose-response curves were made by determination of RBE. At 320 cGy, the lowest neutron dose at which taste measurements were made, RBE = 5.7. If this RBE is correct, then the therapeutic gain factor may be equal to or less than 1, indicating no biological advantage in using neutrons over photons for this normal tissue. These studies suggest measurements of taste function and evaluation of dose-response relationships may also be useful in quantitatively evaluating the efficacy of chemical modifiers of radiation response such as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers and radioprotectors.

  5. Oxidative Stress and Autophagy Responses of Osteocytes Exposed to Spaceflight-like Radiation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tahimic, Candice; Rael, Victoria E.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2015-01-01

    Weightlessness and radiation, two of the unique elements of the space environment, causes a profound decrement in bone mass that mimics aging. This bone loss is thought to result from increased activity of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and functional changes in bone-forming osteoblasts, cells that give rise to mature osteocytes. Our current understanding of the signaling factors and mechanisms underlying bone loss is incomplete. However, it is known that oxidative stress, characterized by the excess production of free radicals, is elevated during radiation exposure. The goals of this study is to examine the response of osteocytes to spaceflight-like radiation and to identify signaling processes that may be targeted to mitigate bone loss in scenarios of space exploration, earth-based radiotherapy and accidental radiation exposure. We hypothesize that (1) oxidative stress, as induced by radiation, decreases osteocyte survival and increases pro-osteoclastogenic signals and that (2) autophagy is one of the key cellular defenses against oxidative stress. Autophagy is the process by which cellular components including organelles and proteins are broken down and recycled. To test our hypothesis, we exposed the osteocyte-like cell line, MLO-Y4, to 0.5, 1, and 2 Gy of simulated space radiation (Iron-56 radiation at 600 MeV/n) and assessed cell numbers, cell growth-associated molecules as well as markers of autophagy and oxidative stress at various time points post-irradiation. We observed a reduction in cell numbers in the groups exposed to 1 and 2 Gy of Iron-56 radiation. Collectively, flow cytometry and gene expression analysis revealed that radiation caused a shift in cell cycle distribution consistent with growth arrest. Compared to sham-treatment, 2 Gy of Iron-56 increased FoxO3, SOD1, and RANKL gene expression yet unexpectedly decreased LC3B-II protein levels at 4 and 24 hours post-IR. Taken together, these findings suggest that simulated space radiation invoke

  6. In silico nanodosimetry: new insights into nontargeted biological responses to radiation.

    PubMed

    Kuncic, Zdenka; Byrne, Hilary L; McNamara, Aimee L; Guatelli, Susanna; Domanova, Westa; Incerti, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    The long-held view that radiation-induced biological damage must be initiated in the cell nucleus, either on or near DNA itself, is being confronted by mounting evidence to suggest otherwise. While the efficacy of cell death may be determined by radiation damage to nuclear DNA, a plethora of less deterministic biological responses has been observed when DNA is not targeted. These so-called nontargeted responses cannot be understood in the framework of DNA-centric radiobiological models; what is needed are new physically motivated models that address the damage-sensing signalling pathways triggered by the production of reactive free radicals. To this end, we have conducted a series of in silico experiments aimed at elucidating the underlying physical processes responsible for nontargeted biological responses to radiation. Our simulation studies implement new results on very low-energy electromagnetic interactions in liquid water (applicable down to nanoscales) and we also consider a realistic simulation of extranuclear microbeam irradiation of a cell. Our results support the idea that organelles with important functional roles, such as mitochondria and lysosomes, as well as membranes, are viable targets for ionizations and excitations, and their chemical composition and density are critical to determining the free radical yield and ensuing biological responses.

  7. Near-linear response of mean monsoon strength to a broad range of radiative forcings.

    PubMed

    Boos, William R; Storelvmo, Trude

    2016-02-09

    Theoretical models have been used to argue that seasonal mean monsoons will shift abruptly and discontinuously from wet to dry stable states as their radiative forcings pass a critical threshold, sometimes referred to as a "tipping point." Further support for a strongly nonlinear response of monsoons to radiative forcings is found in the seasonal onset of the South Asian summer monsoon, which is abrupt compared with the annual cycle of insolation. Here it is shown that the seasonal mean strength of monsoons instead exhibits a nearly linear dependence on a wide range of radiative forcings. First, a previous theory that predicted a discontinuous, threshold response is shown to omit a dominant stabilizing term in the equations of motion; a corrected theory predicts a continuous and nearly linear response of seasonal mean monsoon strength to forcings. A comprehensive global climate model is then used to show that the seasonal mean South Asian monsoon exhibits a near-linear dependence on a wide range of isolated greenhouse gas, aerosol, and surface albedo forcings. This model reproduces the observed abrupt seasonal onset of the South Asian monsoon but produces a near-linear response of the mean monsoon by changing the duration of the summer circulation and the latitude of that circulation's ascent branch. Thus, neither a physically correct theoretical model nor a comprehensive climate model support the idea that seasonal mean monsoons will undergo abrupt, nonlinear shifts in response to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations, aerosol emissions, or land surface albedo.

  8. In Silico Nanodosimetry: New Insights into Nontargeted Biological Responses to Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Kuncic, Zdenka; Byrne, Hilary L.; McNamara, Aimee L.; Guatelli, Susanna; Domanova, Westa; Incerti, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    The long-held view that radiation-induced biological damage must be initiated in the cell nucleus, either on or near DNA itself, is being confronted by mounting evidence to suggest otherwise. While the efficacy of cell death may be determined by radiation damage to nuclear DNA, a plethora of less deterministic biological responses has been observed when DNA is not targeted. These so-called nontargeted responses cannot be understood in the framework of DNA-centric radiobiological models; what is needed are new physically motivated models that address the damage-sensing signalling pathways triggered by the production of reactive free radicals. To this end, we have conducted a series of in silico experiments aimed at elucidating the underlying physical processes responsible for nontargeted biological responses to radiation. Our simulation studies implement new results on very low-energy electromagnetic interactions in liquid water (applicable down to nanoscales) and we also consider a realistic simulation of extranuclear microbeam irradiation of a cell. Our results support the idea that organelles with important functional roles, such as mitochondria and lysosomes, as well as membranes, are viable targets for ionizations and excitations, and their chemical composition and density are critical to determining the free radical yield and ensuing biological responses. PMID:22701142

  9. Cyclic nucleotide responses and radiation-induced mitotic delay in Physarum polycephalum

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, J.W.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1984-02-01

    The response of the plasmodial levels of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in Physarum polycephalum to several putative phosphodiesterase inhibitors and to ionizing radiation has been measured. Isobutylmethylxanthine (2 mM) induces a rapid transient threefold elevation of cyclic AMP alone, with maximum response in about 10 min and return to the base line in about 30 min. Theophylline (2 mM) induces a rapid, sustained twofold elevation of cyclic GMP only. Caffeine (2mM) and Ro-20-1724 (18 ..mu..M) both elicit a rapid transient rise in cyclic AMP, resembling the isobutylmethylxanthine response, and a slow transient elevation of the cyclic GMP level. Of particular interest is the rapid threefold transient elevation of the cyclic AMP, but not of the cyclic GMP, level by ..gamma.. radiation.

  10. Impact of Mixing State on Anthropogenic Aerosol Radiative Forcing and Associated Climate Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramov, A.; Shin, H. J.; Wang, C.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols affect Earth's radiation balance directly by scattering and absorbing solar radiation and, indirectly, by changing the microphysical structure, lifetime and spatial extent of clouds. The aerosol mixing state to a large extent determines not only their optical properties (direct effect) but also their ability to serve as cloud condensation nuclei or ice nuclei (indirect effect). Results from previous research have highlighted the importance of the aerosol mixing assumptions in radiative forcing estimates in model simulations. Here we take a step further to analyze the differences in associated climate responses, using a multimodal, size- and mixing-dependent aerosol model (MARC) incorporated within the Community Earth System Model (CESM). The new model allows for a detailed representation of aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interactions by including an improved treatment of aerosol mixing state and composition. First, we estimate and compare the magnitudes of direct and indirect forcing of anthropogenic aerosols under different mixing assumptions. We then carry out several century-long fully-coupled climate simulations designed to isolate the climate responses to direct and indirect forcings under the same aerosol mixing assumptions. In our analysis, we specifically focus on the following three climate response components: 1) cloud distribution and coverage; 2) precipitation amount and distribution; and 3) changes in circulation patterns.

  11. Nonlinear vs. bolometric radiation response and phonon thermal conductance in graphene-superconductor junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Vora, Heli; Nielsen, Bent; Du, Xu

    2014-02-21

    Graphene is a promising candidate for building fast and ultra-sensitive bolometric detectors due to its weak electron-phonon coupling and low heat capacity. In order to realize a practical graphene-based bolometer, several important issues, including the nature of radiation response, coupling efficiency to the radiation and the thermal conductance need to be carefully studied. Addressing these issues, we present graphene-superconductor junctions as a viable option to achieve efficient and sensitive bolometers, with the superconductor contacts serving as hot electron barriers. For a graphene-superconductor device with highly transparent interfaces, the resistance readout in the presence of radio frequency radiation is dominated by non-linear response. On the other hand, a graphene-superconductor tunnel device shows dominantly bolometric response to radiation. For graphene devices fabricated on SiO{sub 2} substrates, we confirm recent theoretical predictions of T{sup 2} temperature dependence of phonon thermal conductance in the presence of disorder in the graphene channel at low temperatures.

  12. A Finite-Element Method Model of Soft Tissue Response to Impulsive Acoustic Radiation Force

    PubMed Central

    Palmeri, Mark L.; Sharma, Amy C.; Bouchard, Richard R.; Nightingale, Roger W.; Nightingale, Kathryn R

    2010-01-01

    Several groups are studying acoustic radiation force and its ability to image the mechanical properties of tissue. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is one modality using standard diagnostic ultrasound scanners to generate localized, impulsive, acoustic radiation forces in tissue. The dynamic response of tissue is measured via conventional ultrasonic speckle-tracking methods and provides information about the mechanical properties of tissue. A finite-element method (FEM) model has been developed that simulates the dynamic response of tissues, with and without spherical inclusions, to an impulsive acoustic radiation force excitation from a linear array transducer. These FEM models were validated with calibrated phantoms. Shear wave speed, and therefore elasticity, dictates tissue relaxation following ARFI excitation, but Poisson’s ratio and density do not significantly alter tissue relaxation rates. Increased acoustic attenuation in tissue increases the relative amount of tissue displacement in the near field compared with the focal depth, but relaxation rates are not altered. Applications of this model include improving image quality, and distilling material and structural information from tissue’s dynamic response to ARFI excitation. Future work on these models includes incorporation of viscous material properties and modeling the ultrasonic tracking of displaced scatterers. PMID:16382621

  13. Nonlinear vs. bolometric radiation response and phonon thermal conductance in graphene-superconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, Heli; Nielsen, Bent; Du, Xu

    2014-02-01

    Graphene is a promising candidate for building fast and ultra-sensitive bolometric detectors due to its weak electron-phonon coupling and low heat capacity. In order to realize a practical graphene-based bolometer, several important issues, including the nature of radiation response, coupling efficiency to the radiation and the thermal conductance need to be carefully studied. Addressing these issues, we present graphene-superconductor junctions as a viable option to achieve efficient and sensitive bolometers, with the superconductor contacts serving as hot electron barriers. For a graphene-superconductor device with highly transparent interfaces, the resistance readout in the presence of radio frequency radiation is dominated by non-linear response. On the other hand, a graphene-superconductor tunnel device shows dominantly bolometric response to radiation. For graphene devices fabricated on SiO2 substrates, we confirm recent theoretical predictions of T2 temperature dependence of phonon thermal conductance in the presence of disorder in the graphene channel at low temperatures.

  14. The physiologic response of domestic animals to ionizing radiation: a review.

    PubMed

    von Zallinger, C; Tempel, K

    1998-01-01

    With respect to clinical signs of the radiation syndromes, some remarkable species variations exist. For example the marked delayed reaction of the acute hematologic response in cows. An unusually high sensitivity of the central nervous system is found in burros, which is probably caused by acute vascular and/or metabolic changes in the brain. The species-specific number of intestinal crypt and hemopoietic stem cells may explain the early survival differences among species after high doses of irradiation. Mortality due to acute radiation syndromes is lowest in chickens. Regarding late effects, various neoplasms are typical in dogs, and cattle more commonly develop cataracts.

  15. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, Mark P; Bessette, Bernard J; March, John; McComb, Scott T.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  16. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, Mark P; Bessette, Bernard J; March, John C; McComb, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention includes a system of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  17. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, M.P.; Bessette, B.J.; March, J.; McComb, S.T.

    2000-02-15

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120 F and 140 F in steady state.

  18. Cellular Pathways in Response to Ionizing Radiation and Their Targetability for Tumor Radiosensitization

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Patrick; Hartmann, Linda; Wenz, Frederik; Herskind, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    During the last few decades, improvements in the planning and application of radiotherapy in combination with surgery and chemotherapy resulted in increased survival rates of tumor patients. However, the success of radiotherapy is impaired by two reasons: firstly, the radioresistance of tumor cells and, secondly, the radiation-induced damage of normal tissue cells located in the field of ionizing radiation. These limitations demand the development of drugs for either radiosensitization of tumor cells or radioprotection of normal tissue cells. In order to identify potential targets, a detailed understanding of the cellular pathways involved in radiation response is an absolute requirement. This review describes the most important pathways of radioresponse and several key target proteins for radiosensitization. PMID:26784176

  19. Cellular Pathways in Response to Ionizing Radiation and Their Targetability for Tumor Radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Maier, Patrick; Hartmann, Linda; Wenz, Frederik; Herskind, Carsten

    2016-01-14

    During the last few decades, improvements in the planning and application of radiotherapy in combination with surgery and chemotherapy resulted in increased survival rates of tumor patients. However, the success of radiotherapy is impaired by two reasons: firstly, the radioresistance of tumor cells and, secondly, the radiation-induced damage of normal tissue cells located in the field of ionizing radiation. These limitations demand the development of drugs for either radiosensitization of tumor cells or radioprotection of normal tissue cells. In order to identify potential targets, a detailed understanding of the cellular pathways involved in radiation response is an absolute requirement. This review describes the most important pathways of radioresponse and several key target proteins for radiosensitization.

  20. Cell proliferation kinetics and radiation response in 9L tumor spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Sweigert, S.E.

    1984-05-01

    Cell kinetic parameters, including population doubling-time, cell cycle time, and growth fraction, were measured in 9L gliosarcoma spheroids. These parameters were studied as the spheroids grew from 50 ..mu..m to over 900 ..mu..m in diameter. Experiments relating the cell kinetic parameters to the radiation response of 9L spheroids were also carried out. The major findings were that the average cell cycle time (T/sub c/), is considerably longer in large spheroids than in exponentially-growing monolayers, the radiosensitivity of noncycling (but still viable) cells in spheroids is not significantly different from that of cycling spheroid cells, and the radiation-induced division delay is approximately twice as long in spheroid cells as in monolayer cells given equal radiation doses. The cell loss factor for spheroids of various sizes was calculated, by using the measured kinetic parameters in the basic equations for growth of a cell population. 157 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  1. Optical Verification of Microbubble Response to Acoustic Radiation Force in Large Vessels with In Vivo Results

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiying; Wang, Claudia Y.; Unnikrishnan, Sunil; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Hossack, John A.; Mauldin, F. William

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To optically verify the dynamic behaviors of adherent microbubbles in large blood vessel environments in response to a new ultrasound technique using modulated acoustic radiation force. Materials and Methods Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) flow channels coated with streptavidin were used in targeted groups to mimic large blood vessels. The custom modulated acoustic radiation force beam sequence was programmed on a Verasonics research scanner. In vitro experiments were performed by injecting a biotinylated lipid-perfluorobutane microbubble dispersion through flow channels. The dynamic response of adherent microbubbles was detected acoustically and simultaneously visualized using a video camera connected to a microscope. In vivo verification was performed in a large abdominal blood vessel of a murine model for inflammation with injection of biotinylated microbubbles conjugated with P-selectin antibody. Results Aggregates of adherent microbubbles were observed optically under the influence of acoustic radiation force. Large microbubble aggregates were observed solely in control groups without targeted adhesion. Additionally, the dispersion of microbubble aggregates were demonstrated to lead to a transient acoustic signal enhancement in control groups (a new phenomenon we refer to as “control peak”). In agreement with in vitro results, the “control peak” phenomenon was observed in vivo in a murine model. Conclusions This study provides the first optical observation of microbubble binding dynamics in large blood vessel environments with application of a modulated acoustic radiation force beam sequence. With targeted adhesion, secondary radiation forces were unable to produce large aggregates of adherent microbubbles. Additionally, the new phenomenon called “control peak” was observed both in vitro and in vivo in a murine model for the first time. The findings in this study provide us with a better understanding of microbubble behaviors in large blood

  2. Intricate Macrophage-Colorectal Cancer Cell Communication in Response to Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Ana T.; Pinto, Marta L.; Velho, Sérgia; Pinto, Marta T.; Cardoso, Ana P.; Figueira, Rita; Monteiro, Armanda; Marques, Margarida; Seruca, Raquel; Barbosa, Mário A.; Mareel, Marc; Oliveira, Maria J.; Rocha, Sónia

    2016-01-01

    Both cancer and tumour-associated host cells are exposed to ionizing radiation when a tumour is subjected to radiotherapy. Macrophages frequently constitute the most abundant tumour-associated immune population, playing a role in tumour progression and response to therapy. The present work aimed to evaluate the importance of macrophage-cancer cell communication in the cellular response to radiation. To address this question, we established monocultures and indirect co-cultures of human monocyte-derived macrophages with RKO or SW1463 colorectal cancer cells, which exhibit higher and lower radiation sensitivity, respectively. Mono- and co-cultures were then irradiated with 5 cumulative doses, in a similar fractionated scheme to that used during cancer patients’ treatment (2 Gy/fraction/day). Our results demonstrated that macrophages sensitize RKO to radiation-induced apoptosis, while protecting SW1463 cells. Additionally, the co-culture with macrophages increased the mRNA expression of metabolism- and survival-related genes more in SW1463 than in RKO. The presence of macrophages also upregulated glucose transporter 1 expression in irradiated SW1463, but not in RKO cells. In addition, the influence of cancer cells on the expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory macrophage markers, upon radiation exposure, was also evaluated. In the presence of RKO or SW1463, irradiated macrophages exhibit higher levels of pro-inflammatory TNF, IL6, CCL2 and CCR7, and of anti-inflammatory CCL18. However, RKO cells induce an increase of macrophage pro-inflammatory IL1B, while SW1463 cells promote higher pro-inflammatory CXCL8 and CD80, and also anti-inflammatory VCAN and IL10 levels. Thus, our data demonstrated that macrophages and cancer cells mutually influence their response to radiation. Notably, conditioned medium from irradiated co-cultures increased non-irradiated RKO cell migration and invasion and did not impact on angiogenesis in a chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane

  3. Response of five tropical plant species to natural solar ultraviolet-B radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Searles, P.S.; Caldwell, M.M. ); Winter, K. )

    1994-06-01

    The tropical latitudes currently receive high solar ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B, 280-320 nm) even without ozone depletion. Thus, the influence of natural, present-day UV-B irradiance was examined for three native rainforest tree species and two economically important species on Barro Colorado Island, Panama (9[degrees] N). Solar UV-B radiation conditions were obtained using a UV-B excluding plastic film or a near-ambient UV-B transmitting film over potted plants in a small clearing. Significant differences were often exhibited as increased foliar UV-B absorbing compounds, increased leaf mass pre area, and reduced leaf blade length for plants receiving solar UV-B radiation. Plant height was typically reduced under solar UV-B, but some variation among species in response was seen. Biomass and photosystem II function were generally unaffected. The results provide evidence that tropical vegetation responds to the present level of Solar UV-B radiation. This suggests even a small increase in UV-B radiation with ozone depletion may have biological implications.

  4. The Rapid Response Radiation Survey (R3S) Mission Using the HISat Conformal Satellite Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Nathanael

    2015-01-01

    The Rapid Response Radiation Survey (R3S) experiment, designed as a quick turnaround mission to make radiation measurements in LEO, will fly as a hosted payload in partnership with NovaWurks using their Hyper-integrated Satlet (HiSat) architecture. The need for the mission arises as the Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionization Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) model moves from a research effort into an operational radiation assessment tool. The data collected by R3S, in addition to the complementary data from a NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) atmospheric balloon mission entitled Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaDX), will validate exposure prediction capabilities of NAIRAS. This paper discusses the development of the R3S experiment as made possible by use of the HiSat architecture. The system design and operational modes of the experiment are described, as well as the experiment interfaces to the HiSat satellite via the user defined adapter (UDA) provided by NovaWurks. This paper outlines the steps taken by the project to execute the R3S mission in the 4 months of design, build, and test. Finally, description of the engineering process is provided, including the use of facilitated rapid/concurrent engineering sessions, the associated documentation, and the review process employed.

  5. SU-E-QI-12: Morphometry Based Measurements of the Structural Response to Whole Brain Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fuentes, D; Castillo, R; Castillo, E; Guerrero, T

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Although state of the art radiation therapy techniques for treating intracranial malignancies have eliminated acute brain injury, cognitive impairment occurs in 50–90% of patients who survive >6mo post irradiation. Quantitative characterization of therapy response is needed to facilitate therapeutic strategies to minimize radiation induced cognitive impairment [1]. Deformation based morphometry techniques [2, 3] are presented as a quantitative imaging biomarker of therapy response in patients receiving whole brain radiation for treating medulloblastoma. Methods: Post-irradiation magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data sets were retrospectively analyzed in N=15 patients, >60 MR image datasets. As seen in Fig 1(a), volume changes at multiple time points post-irradiation were quantitatively measured in the cerebrum and ventricles with respect to pre-irradiation MRI. A high resolution image Template, was registered to the pre-irradiation MRI of each patient to create a brain atlas for the cerebrum, cerebellum, and ventricles. Skull stripped images for each patient were registered to the initial pre-treatment scan. Average volume changes in the labeled regions were measured using the determinant of the displacement field Jacobian. Results: Longitudinal measurements, Fig 1(b-c), show a negative correlation p=.06, of the cerebral volume change with the time interval from irradiation. A corresponding positive correlation, p=.01, between ventricular volume change and time interval from irradiation is seen. One sample t-test for correlations were computed using a Spearman method. An average decrease in cerebral volume, p=.08, and increase in ventricular volume, p<.001, was observed. The radiation dose was seen directly proportional to the induced volume changes in the cerebrum, r=−.44, p<.001, Fig 1(d). Conclusion: Results indicate that morphometric monitoring of brain tissue volume changes may potentially be used to quantitatively assess toxicity and response to

  6. Enhancement of ionizing radiation response by histamine in vitro and in vivo in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Martinel Lamas, Diego J; Cortina, Jorge E; Ventura, Clara; Sterle, Helena A; Valli, Eduardo; Balestrasse, Karina B; Blanco, Horacio; Cremaschi, Graciela A; Rivera, Elena S; Medina, Vanina A

    2015-01-01

    The radioprotective potential of histamine on healthy tissue has been previously demonstrated. The aims of this work were to investigate the combinatorial effect of histamine or its receptor ligands and gamma radiation in vitro on the radiobiological response of 2 breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7), to explore the potential molecular mechanisms of the radiosensitizing action and to evaluate the histamine-induced radiosensitization in vivo in a triple negative breast cancer model. Results indicate that histamine significantly increased the radiosensitivity of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. This effect was mimicked by the H1R agonist 2-(3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)histamine and the H4R agonists (Clobenpropit and VUF8430) in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells, respectively. Histamine and its agonists enhanced radiation-induced oxidative DNA damage, DNA double-strand breaks, apoptosis and senescence. These effects were associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species, which correlated with the inhibition of catalase, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities in MDA-MB-231 cells. Histamine was able also to potentiate in vivo the anti-tumoral effect of radiation, increasing the exponential tumor doubling time. We conclude that histamine increased radiation response of breast cancer cells, suggesting that it could be used as a potential adjuvant to enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy.

  7. Cardiovascular imaging with computed tomography: responsible steps to balancing diagnostic yield and radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Halliburton, Sandra S; Schoenhagen, Paul

    2010-05-01

    Cardiovascular computed tomography (CT) is at the center of the risk-benefit debate about ionizing radiation exposure to the public from medical procedures. Although the risk has been sensationalized, the cardiovascular CT community has responded to the scrutiny by increasing efforts to ensure the responsible use of this young technology. Efforts to date have primarily included the development of appropriateness criteria and the implementation of dose-lowering techniques. Still needed is the development of standards that incorporate radiation exposure optimization into scan protocol selection. Such standards must consider applied radiation in the context of the clinical indication as well as the characteristics of the patient and provide guidance with regard to specific parameter settings. This editorial viewpoint demonstrates the need for comprehensive, individualized review of the clinical scenario before performing a cardiovascular CT, as well as the need for standards. If cardiovascular CT is the appropriate test and scan parameters are optimized with respect to radiation exposure, benefit should necessarily outweigh potential risk. However, efforts to promote responsible cardiovascular CT imaging must continue to ensure this is true for every patient.

  8. Plant Responses to Increased UV-B Radiation: A Research Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DAntoni, H. L.; Skiles, J. W.; Armstrong, R.; Coughlan, J.; Daleo, G.; Mayoral, A.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Ozone decrease implies more ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation reaching the surface of the Earth. Increased UV-B radiation triggers responses by living organisms. Despite the large potential impacts on vegetation, little is known about UV-B effects on terrestrial ecosystems. Long-term ecological studies are needed to quantify the effects of increased UV radiation on terrestrial ecosystems, asses the risks, and produce reliable data for prediction. Screening pigments are part of one of the protective mechanism in plants. Higher concentrations of screening pigments in leaves may be interpreted as a response to increased UV radiation. If the screening effect is not sufficient, important molecules will be disturbed by incoming radiation. Thus, genetics, photosynthesis, growth, plant and leaf shape and size, and pollen grains may be affected. This will have an impact on ecosystem dynamics, structure and productivity. It is necessary to monitor selected terrestrial ecosystems to permit detection and interpretation of changes attributable to global climate change and depleted ozone shield. The objectives of this project are: (1) To identify and measure indicators of the effects of increased solar UV-B radiation on terrestrial plants; (2) to select indicators with the greatest responses to UV-B exposure; (3) to test, adapt or create ecosystem models that use the information gathered by this project for prediction and to enhance our understanding of the effects of increased UV-B radiation on terrestrial ecosystems. As a first step to achieve these objectives we propose a three-year study of forest and steppe vegetation on the North slope of the Brooks Range (within the Arctic circle, in Alaska), in the Saguaro National Monument (near Tucson, Arizona) and in the forests and steppes of Patagonia (Argentina). We selected (1) vegetation north of the Polar Circle because at 70N there is 8% risk of plant damage due to increased UV-B radiation; (2) the foothills of Catalina Mountains

  9. Paf15 expression correlates with rectal cancer prognosis, cell proliferation and radiation response

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Rong; Zhu, Kun; Dang, Chengxue; Lan, Ke; Wang, Haonan; Yuan, Dawei; Chen, Wei; Meltzer, Stephen J.; Li, Kang

    2016-01-01

    Paf15, which participates in DNA repair, is overexpressed in numerous solid tumors. Blocking of Paf15 inhibits the growth of many types of cancer cells; while simultaneously enhancing cellular sensitivity to UV radiation. However, its expression and function in rectal cancer (RC) remain unknown. The current study was undertaken to assess the association of Paf15 expression with RC prognosis, as well as to explore the participation of Paf15 in the response of RC cells to irradiation. Increased Paf15 expression was observed in RC tissues and associated with pTNM stage and poor survival. In vitro, Paf15 induced increased RC cell proliferation while accelerating cell cycle progression, inhibiting cell death, and protecting against gamma radiation-induced DNA damage in RC cells. In conclusion, increased Paf15 expression is associated with increased RC proliferation, decreased patient survival, and a worse radiotherapeutic response. PMID:27246972

  10. Role of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Variant (EGFRvIII) in Radiation Response of Human Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-01

    when activated by ligand and when activated by ionizing radiation . Unlike HER2, which is constitutively active when over-expressed, over-expression...in response to single dose ionizing radiation over a range of doses for either cell line, nor were there differences in the radiation response...fractionated radiation . N 2 Gy x 0 2Gyx3 LL o C l MCF10A -pLXSN MCF10A -vIIl 3. Effect of inhibition of constitutive activation of EGFRvII[ and HER2 in

  11. Study on the response of thermoluminescent dosemeters to synchrotron radiation: experimental method and Monte Carlo calculations.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, A K; Chatterjee, S; Palani Selvam, T; Dhabekar, B S

    2010-07-01

    In the present study, the energy dependence of response of some popular thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) have been investigated such as LiF:Mg,Ti, LiF:Mg,Cu,P and CaSO(4):Dy to synchrotron radiation in the energy range of 10-34 keV. The study utilised experimental, Monte Carlo and analytical methods. The Monte Carlo calculations were based on the EGSnrc and FLUKA codes. The calculated energy response of all the TLDs using the EGSnrc and FLUKA codes shows excellent agreement with each other. The analytically calculated response shows good agreement with the Monte Carlo calculated response in the low-energy region. In the case of CaSO(4):Dy, the Monte Carlo-calculated energy response is smaller by a factor of 3 at all energies in comparison with the experimental response when polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) (75 % by wt) is included in the Monte Carlo calculations. When PTFE is ignored in the Monte Carlo calculations, the difference between the calculated and experimental response decreases (both responses are comparable >25 keV). For the LiF-based TLDs, the Monte Carlo-based response shows reasonable agreement with the experimental response.

  12. Exercise, Animal Aerobics, and Interpretation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Valerie

    1996-01-01

    Describes an aerobic activity set to music for children that mimics animal movements. Example exercises include walking like a penguin or jumping like a cricket. Stresses basic aerobic principles and designing the program at the level of children's motor skills. Benefits include reaching people who normally don't visit nature centers, and bridging…

  13. Nonlinear response of the quantum Hall system to a strong electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avetissian, H. K.; Mkrtchian, G. F.

    2016-12-01

    We study nonlinear response of a quantum Hall system in semiconductor-hetero-structures via third harmonic generation process and nonlinear Faraday effect. We demonstrate that Faraday rotation angle and third harmonic radiation intensity have a characteristic Hall plateaus feature. These nonlinear effects remain robust against the significant broadening of Landau levels. We predict realization of an experiment through the observation of the third harmonic signal and Faraday rotation angle, which are within the experimental feasibility.

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of Nonlinearity in Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-12

    Goldberg, Z. (2007) Transient genome -wide transcriptional response to low-dose ionizing radiation in-vivo in humans , International Journal of...and protocols. The cRNA was hybridized to the Full details are given in Rocke (31) and Rocke et al. (32), but in Human Genome U 133 Plus 2.0 arrays...Science) using CDS combined database ( Celera Discovery System v. KBMS3.2.20040119), containing 1,416,555 sequences . Searches were performed without

  15. Induction and Concurrent Taxanes Enhance Both the Pulmonary Metabolic Radiation Response and the Radiation Pneumonitis Response in Patients With Esophagus Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    McCurdy, Matthew; McAleer, Mary Frances; Wei Wei; Ezhil, Muthuveni; Johnson, Valen; Khan, Meena; Baker, Jamie; Luo Dershan; Ajani, Jaffer; Guerrero, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: The primary aim of this study was to assess pulmonary radiation toxicity quantitatively in patients who received thoracic radiotherapy combined with induction and/or concurrent chemotherapy with or without taxanes for esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study subjects were 139 patients treated at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center for esophageal cancer and who had undergone [{sup 18}F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography between November 1, 2003 and December 15, 2007 for disease restaging after chemoradiotherapy. The patients were grouped into those who had not received taxanes (Group 1), those who had received induction or concurrent taxanes (Group 2), and those who had received both induction and concurrent taxanes (Group 3). Clinical pulmonary toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. Linear regression was applied to the fluorodeoxyglucose uptake vs. radiation dose to determine the pulmonary metabolic radiation response (PMRR) for each case. The clinical toxicity scores and PMRR among the groups were evaluated for significance differences. Results: The crude rate of pneumonitis symptoms was 46%, 62%, and 74% for Group 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The analysis of variance test of log(PMRR) by treatment was significant (p = .0046). Group 3 had a 61% greater PMRR compared with Group 1 (p = .002). Group 2 had a 38% greater PMRR compared with Group 1 (p = .015). Finally, Group 3 had a 17% greater PMRR compared with Group 2 (p = .31). A PMRR enhancement ratio of 1.60 (95% confidence interval, 1.19-2.14) was observed for Group 3 vs. Group 1. Conclusion: Patients given induction and concurrent taxane chemotherapy had a significantly greater PMRR and clinical pneumonitis symptoms compared with the patients whose chemotherapy regimen did not include taxanes.

  16. In vivo 31P NMR Study of the Metabolism of Murine Mammary 16/C Adenocarcinoma and Its Response to Chemotherapy, X-Radiation, and Hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evanochko, W. T.; Ng, T. C.; Lilly, M. B.; Lawson, A. J.; Corbett, T. H.; Durant, J. R.; Glickson, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    31P NMR spectroscopy with surface coils has been used to monitor, in vivo, the phosphate metabolism of subcutaneously implanted mammary 16/C adenocarcinoma in C3H/He mice. This model tumor was studied during untreated tumor growth and after treatment with adriamycin, hyperthermia, and x-radiation. The mammary 16/C tumor exhibited a Gompertzian growth pattern. Levels of high-energy phosphate metabolites--phosphocreatine and ATP--decreased with increases in tumor mass. There was a concomitant increase in the level of Pi and a decrease in the apparent pH of the tumor. These spectral changes appear to reflect changes in tumor vascularization that accompany tumor growth, the tumor becoming progressively more hypoxic. Partial response of this tumor to chemotherapy with adriamycin was reflected in a small but measurable increase in the phosphocreatine resonance, a decrease in Pi, and a return of the intratumor pH to neutral. Hyperthermia resulted in progressive conversion of the 31P NMR spectrum to that of a dead tumor (high levels of Pi, small levels of residual sugar phosphates and pyridine dinucleotides, and acidic pH). X-irradiation (14.0 Gy) led to disappearance of the phosphocreatine peak within 15 min of treatment. Subsequently, this resonance grew back beyond its pretreatment level. As the tumor receded, its spectrum reflected the characteristics of aerobically metabolizing tissue (high levels of phosphocreatine and ATP and low levels of Pi and sugar phosphates).

  17. Evolutionary Influences of Plastic Behavioral Responses Upon Environmental Challenges in an Adaptive Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Susan A.; Wund, Matthew A.; Baker, John A.

    2015-01-01

    At the end of the 19th century, the suggestion was made by several scientists, including J. M. Baldwin, that behavioral responses to environmental change could both rescue populations from extinction (Baldwin Effect) and influence the course of subsequent evolution. Here we provide the historical and theoretical background for this argument and offer evidence of the importance of these ideas for understanding how animals (and other organisms that exhibit behavior) will respond to the rapid environmental changes caused by human activity. We offer examples from long-term research on the evolution of behavioral and other phenotypes in the adaptive radiation of the threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus), a radiation in which it is possible to infer ancestral patterns of behavioral plasticity relative to the post-glacial freshwater radiation in northwestern North America, and to use patterns of parallelism and contemporary evolution to understand adaptive causes of responses to environmental modification. Our work offers insights into the complexity of cognitive responses to environmental change, and into the importance of examining multiple aspects of the phenotype simultaneously, if we are to understand how behavioral shifts contribute to the persistence of populations and to subsequent evolution. We conclude by discussing the origins of apparent novelties induced by environmental shifts, and the importance of accounting for geographic variation within species if we are to accurately anticipate the effects of anthropogenic environmental modification on the persistence and evolution of animals. PMID:26163679

  18. Angiogenesis and radiation response modulation after vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jing; Huang Shyhmin; Armstrong, Eric A.; Fowler, John F.; Harari, Paul M. . E-mail: harari@humonc.wisc.edu

    2005-08-01

    The formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) represents a critical factor in the malignant growth of solid tumors and metastases. Vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor VEGFR2 represent central molecular targets for antiangiogenic intervention, because of their integral involvement in endothelial cell proliferation and migration. In the current study, we investigated in vitro and in vivo effects of receptor blockade on various aspects of the angiogenic process using monoclonal antibodies against VEGFR2 (cp1C11, which is human specific, and DC101, which is mouse specific). Molecular blockade of VEGFR2 inhibited several critical steps involved in angiogenesis. VEGFR2 blockade in endothelial cells attenuated cellular proliferation, reduced cellular migration, and disrupted cellular differentiation and resultant formation of capillary-like networks. Further, VEGFR2 blockade significantly reduced the growth response of human squamous cell carcinoma xenografts in athymic mice. The growth-inhibitory effect of VEGFR2 blockade in tumor xenografts seems to reflect antiangiogenic influence as demonstrated by vascular growth inhibition in an in vivo angiogenesis assay incorporating tumor-bearing Matrigel plugs. Further, administration of VEGFR2-blocking antibodies in endothelial cell cultures, and in mouse xenograft models, increased their response to ionizing radiation, indicating an interactive cytotoxic effect of VEGFR2 blockade with radiation. These data suggest that molecular inhibition of VEGFR2 alone, and in combination with radiation, can enhance tumor response through molecular targeting of tumor vasculature.

  19. Evolutionary Influences of Plastic Behavioral Responses Upon Environmental Challenges in an Adaptive Radiation.

    PubMed

    Foster, Susan A; Wund, Matthew A; Baker, John A

    2015-09-01

    At the end of the 19th century, the suggestion was made by several scientists, including J. M. Baldwin, that behavioral responses to environmental change could both rescue populations from extinction (Baldwin Effect) and influence the course of subsequent evolution. Here we provide the historical and theoretical background for this argument and offer evidence of the importance of these ideas for understanding how animals (and other organisms that exhibit behavior) will respond to the rapid environmental changes caused by human activity. We offer examples from long-term research on the evolution of behavioral and other phenotypes in the adaptive radiation of the threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus), a radiation in which it is possible to infer ancestral patterns of behavioral plasticity relative to the post-glacial freshwater radiation in northwestern North America, and to use patterns of parallelism and contemporary evolution to understand adaptive causes of responses to environmental modification. Our work offers insights into the complexity of cognitive responses to environmental change, and into the importance of examining multiple aspects of the phenotype simultaneously, if we are to understand how behavioral shifts contribute to the persistence of populations and to subsequent evolution. We conclude by discussing the origins of apparent novelties induced by environmental shifts, and the importance of accounting for geographic variation within species if we are to accurately anticipate the effects of anthropogenic environmental modification on the persistence and evolution of animals.

  20. HIF-1α regulates the response of primary sarcomas to radiation therapy through a cell autonomous mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Minsi; Qiu, Qiong; Li, Zhizhong; Sachdeva, Mohit; Min, Hooney; Cardona, Diana M.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Han, Tracy; Ma, Yan; Luo, Lixia; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Lui, Ki; Nichols, Amanda G.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Kastan, Michael B.; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Kirsch, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a major cause of radiation resistance, which may predispose to local recurrence after radiation therapy (RT). While hypoxia increases tumor cell survival after RT because there is less oxygen to oxidize damaged DNA, whether signaling pathways triggered by hypoxia contribute to radiation resistance is poorly understood. For example, intratumoral hypoxia can increase hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α), which may regulate pathways that contribute to radiation sensitization or radiation resistance. To clarify the role of HIF-1α in regulating tumor response to radiation therapy, we generated a novel genetically engineered mouse model of soft tissue sarcoma with an intact or deleted HIF-1α. Deletion of HIF-1α sensitized primary sarcomas to RT in vivo. Moreover, cell lines derived from primary sarcomas lacking HIF-1α, or in which HIF-1α was knocked down, had decreased clonogenic survival in vitro, demonstrating that HIF-1α can promote radiation resistance in a cell autonomous manner. In HIF-1α intact and deleted sarcoma cells, radiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), DNA damage repair, and activation of autophagy were similar. However, sarcoma cells lacking HIF-1α had impaired mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolic response after radiation which might contribute to radiation resistance. These results show that HIF-1α promotes radiation resistance in a cell autonomous manner. PMID:25973951

  1. Examining the Responses of Radiation Use Efficiency to C02: A New Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    Radiation use efficiency (RUE) has been a key parameter for developing simpler models of crop growth and yield. A great deal of effort has gone into measuring RUE in the field and in verifying its validity for predicting crop growth. However, a lack of data on responses of RUE to elevated C02 has resulted in the use of empirical relations that may lead to overestimates of crop yield to C02 enrichment. A new approach relating RUE to canopy quantum yield is presented that offers a more theoretical basis for estimating RUE responses to elevated C02.

  2. Genetic background of enhanced radioresistance in an anhydrobiotic insect: transcriptional response to ionizing radiations and desiccation.

    PubMed

    Ryabova, Alina; Mukae, Kyosuke; Cherkasov, Alexander; Cornette, Richard; Shagimardanova, Elena; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Okuda, Takashi; Kikawada, Takahiro; Gusev, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    It is assumed that resistance to ionizing radiation, as well as cross-resistance to other abiotic stresses, is a side effect of the evolutionary-based adaptation of anhydrobiotic animals to dehydration stress. Larvae of Polypedilum vanderplanki can withstand prolonged desiccation as well as high doses of ionizing radiation exposure. For a further understanding of the mechanisms of cross-tolerance to both types of stress exposure, we profiled genome-wide mRNA expression patterns using microarray techniques on the chironomid larvae collected at different stages of desiccation and after exposure to two types of ionizing radiation-70 Gy of high-linear energy transfer (LET) ions ((4)He) and the same dose of low-LET radiation (gamma rays). In expression profiles, a wide transcriptional response to desiccation stress that much exceeded the amount of up-regulated transcripts to irradiation exposure was observed. An extensive group of coincidently up-regulated overlapped transcripts in response to desiccation and ionizing radiation was found. Among this, overlapped set of transcripts was indicated anhydrobiosis-related genes: antioxidants, late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, and heat-shock proteins. The most overexpressed group was that of protein-L-isoaspartate/D-aspartate O-methyltransferase (PIMT), while probes, corresponding to LEA proteins, were the most represented. Performed functional analysis showed strongly enriched gene ontology terms associated with protein methylation. In addition, active processes of DNA repair were detected. We assume that the cross-tolerance of the sleeping chironomid to both desiccation and irradiation exposure comes from a complex mechanism of adaptation to anhydrobiosis.

  3. Response of Two Plant Species to Two Ultraviolet-B Radiation Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Daniel L.; Skiles, J. W.; Peterson, David (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The depleted stratospheric ozone layer has been directly linked to increased levels of ultraviolet radiation at the earth's surface. It is important to understand what effect this will have on plants. We tested the hypothesis that in response to increased UV-B radiation (280-320 man), soybean (Glycine max Merrill) and alfalfa (Mercado Saliva L.) would produce higher concentrations of flavonoids than plants screened from UV-B. Soybean and alfalfa plants were grown successively in a growth chamber that provided UV-B radiation intensities 45% above summer field levels. A wooden frame was used to suspend mylar-D film over one group of plants and mono-acetate film over another group. Mylar is opaque in the 280-316 nm range, and acetate absorbs most radiation from 280-290 nm and then reduces intensities in the 290-320 nm range by roughly 15%. Leaf chlorophyll concentration was determined with a Minolta SPAD-502 chlorophyll meter; the BRAD meter was calibrated with N,N- extractions. Flavonoids were extracted with an acidified methanol/water solution. Soybean grown under the acetate treatment showed 26% smaller internodal lengths and higher concentrations of flavonoids compared to plants grown under mylar. Significant results for alfalfa included 22% greater leaf flavonoid concentration under acetate, 14% greater leaf chlorophyll concentration under mylar, and 32% greater above-ground biomass under mylar. We found that increased UV-B radiation leads to increased production of UV-B absorbing compounds (i.e. flavonoids) in soybean and alfalfa leaves. This suggests that a protective mechanism in these plants is triggered by UV-B. In response, flavonoids are produced that absorb UV-B, and consequently decrease potentially damaging effects to the plants. In addition, we hypothesize that this flavonoid protection mechanism saturates at certain UV-B intensities.

  4. Energetic response of Chlorella vulgaris to alpha radiation and PCB stress

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    This research project has evaluated the bioenergetic response of the green alga Chlorella vulgaris following acute exposure to either the physical stress of radiation or the chemical stress of PCBs. After exposure, changes in survival or growth, adenylate pools (ATP, ADP, and AMP), CO/sub 2/ fixation and oxygen evolution and uptake were measured. By employing anaerobic conditions, or the electron transport inhibitor DCMU or dark conditions separately and in specific combinations, this study evaluated the response of three separate algal ATP producing mechanisms (respiration, total and cyclic photophosphorylation) to alpha radiation or PCB. The use of the adenylate energy charge ratio as an indicator of stress was also evaluated. The results of the radiation experiments indicated that alpha particle exposure between 25 to 275 rads caused a one-hour latent demand for ATP due to radioinduced DNA repair. In order to compensate for this ATP demand, nonessential utilization of ATP was decreased by slowing the rate of carbon fixation. The results also suggest that use of radiation as a tool to study algal physiology. The data obtained from the PCB experiments again showed each phosphorylation mechanism to be insensitive to 10, 100 and 200 ppm Aroclor 1254 exposures. Data suggest, however, that PCBs caused an increased photosynthetic rate, and total adenylate pool with decreased growth. The use of the adenylate energy charge ratio as a stress indicator was assessed. Because this ratio did not fluctuate at doses of radiation or PCBs that caused reduced survival and growth rates, this study concluded that for Chlorella the adenylate energy charge ration was a poor indicator of sublethal stress.

  5. Radiative Forcing and Temperature Response to Changes in Urban Albedos and Associated CO2 Offsets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Surabi; Akbari, Hashem; Mahanama, Sarith; Sednev, Igor; Levinson, Ronnen

    2009-01-01

    The two main forcings that can counteract to some extent the positive forcings from greenhouse gases from pre-industrial times to present-day are the aerosol and related aerosol-cloud forcings, and the radiative response to changes in surface albedo. Here, we quantify the change in radiative forcing and surface temperature that may be obtained by increasing the albedos of roofs and pavements in urban areas in temperate and tropical regions of the globe. Using the catchment land surface model (the land model coupled to the GEOS-5 Atmospheric General Circulation Model), we quantify the response of the total outgoing (outgoing shortwave+longwave) radiation to urban albedo changes. Globally, the total outgoing radiation increased by 0.5 W/square m and temperature decreased by -0.008 K for an average 0.003 increase in albedo. For the U.S. the total outgoing total radiation increased by 2.3 W/square meter, and temperature decreased by approximately 0.03 K for an average 0.01 increase in albedo. These values are for the boreal summer (Tune-July-August). Based on these forcings, the expected emitted CO2 offset for a plausible 0.25 and 0.15 increase in albedos of roofs and pavements, respectively, for all global urban areas, was found to be approximately 57 Gt CO2 . A more meaningful evaluation of the impacts of urban albedo increases on climate and the expected CO2 offsets would require simulations which better characterizes urban surfaces and represents the full annual cycle.

  6. Marine bacterial isolates display diverse responses to UV-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Joux, F; Jeffrey, W H; Lebaron, P; Mitchell, D L

    1999-09-01

    The molecular and biological consequences of UV-B radiation were investigated by studying five species of marine bacteria and one enteric bacterium. Laboratory cultures were exposed to an artificial UV-B source and subjected to various post-UV irradiation treatments. Significant differences in survival subsequent to UV-B radiation were observed among the isolates, as measured by culturable counts. UV-B-induced DNA photodamage was investigated by using a highly specific radioimmunoassay to measure cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). The CPDs determined following UV-B exposure were comparable for all of the organisms except Sphingomonas sp. strain RB2256, a facultatively oligotrophic ultramicrobacterium. This organism exhibited little DNA damage and a high level of UV-B resistance. Physiological conditioning by growth phase and starvation did not change the UV-B sensitivity of marine bacteria. The rates of photoreactivation following exposure to UV-B were investigated by using different light sources (UV-A and cool white light). The rates of photoreactivation were greatest during UV-A exposure, although diverse responses were observed. The differences in sensitivity to UV-B radiation between strains were reduced after photoreactivation. The survival and CPD data obtained for Vibrio natriegens when we used two UV-B exposure periods interrupted by a repair period (photoreactivation plus dark repair) suggested that photoadaptation could occur. Our results revealed that there are wide variations in marine bacteria in their responses to UV radiation and subsequent repair strategies, suggesting that UV-B radiation may affect the microbial community structure in surface water.

  7. Marine Bacterial Isolates Display Diverse Responses to UV-B Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Joux, Fabien; Jeffrey, Wade H.; Lebaron, Philippe; Mitchell, David L.

    1999-01-01

    The molecular and biological consequences of UV-B radiation were investigated by studying five species of marine bacteria and one enteric bacterium. Laboratory cultures were exposed to an artificial UV-B source and subjected to various post-UV irradiation treatments. Significant differences in survival subsequent to UV-B radiation were observed among the isolates, as measured by culturable counts. UV-B-induced DNA photodamage was investigated by using a highly specific radioimmunoassay to measure cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). The CPDs determined following UV-B exposure were comparable for all of the organisms except Sphingomonas sp. strain RB2256, a facultatively oligotrophic ultramicrobacterium. This organism exhibited little DNA damage and a high level of UV-B resistance. Physiological conditioning by growth phase and starvation did not change the UV-B sensitivity of marine bacteria. The rates of photoreactivation following exposure to UV-B were investigated by using different light sources (UV-A and cool white light). The rates of photoreactivation were greatest during UV-A exposure, although diverse responses were observed. The differences in sensitivity to UV-B radiation between strains were reduced after photoreactivation. The survival and CPD data obtained for Vibrio natriegens when we used two UV-B exposure periods interrupted by a repair period (photoreactivation plus dark repair) suggested that photoadaptation could occur. Our results revealed that there are wide variations in marine bacteria in their responses to UV radiation and subsequent repair strategies, suggesting that UV-B radiation may affect the microbial community structure in surface water. PMID:10473381

  8. Pretreatment Growth Rate Predicts Radiation Response in Vestibular Schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Nina N.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Larvie, Mykol; Curtin, Hugh; Loeffler, Jay S.; McKenna, Michael J.; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Vestibular schwannomas (VS) are often followed without initial therapeutic intervention because many tumors do not grow and radiation therapy is associated with potential adverse effects. In an effort to determine whether maximizing initial surveillance predicts for later treatment response, the predictive value of preirradiation growth rate of VS on response to radiation therapy was assessed. Methods and Materials: Sixty-four patients with 65 VS were treated with single-fraction stereotactic radiation surgery or fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy. Pre- and postirradiation linear expansion rates were estimated using volumetric measurements on sequential magnetic resonance images (MRIs). In addition, postirradiation tumor volume change was classified as demonstrating shrinkage (ratio of volume on last follow-up MRI to MRI immediately preceding irradiation <80%), stability (ratio 80%-120%), or expansion (ratio >120%). The median pre- and postirradiation follow-up was 20.0 and 27.5 months, respectively. Seven tumors from neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) patients were excluded from statistical analyses. Results: In the 58 non-NF2 patients, there was a trend of correlation between pre- and postirradiation volume change rates (slope on linear regression, 0.29; P=.06). Tumors demonstrating postirradiation expansion had a median preirradiation growth rate of 89%/year, and those without postirradiation expansion had a median preirradiation growth rate of 41%/year (P=.02). As the preirradiation growth rate increased, the probability of postirradiation expansion also increased. Overall, 24.1% of tumors were stable, 53.4% experienced shrinkage, and 22.5% experienced expansion. Predictors of no postirradiation tumor expansion included no prior surgery (P=.01) and slower tumor growth rate (P=.02). The control of tumors in NF2 patients was only 43%. Conclusions: Radiation therapy is an effective treatment for VS, but tumors that grow quickly preirradiation may be

  9. Lack of evidence for low-LET radiation induced bystander response in normal human fibroblasts and colon carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marianne B. Sowa; Wilfried Goetz; Janet E. Baulch; Dinah N. Pyles; Jaroslaw Dziegielewski; Susannah Yovino; Andrew R. Snyder; Sonia M. de Toledo; Edouard I. Azzam; William F. Morgan

    2008-06-30

    Purpose: To investigate radiation induced bystander responses and to determine the role of gap junction intercellular communication and the radiation environment in propagating this response. Materials and Methods: We use medium transfer and targeted irradiation to examine radiation induced bystander effects in primary human fibroblast (AG1522) and human colon carcinoma (RKO36) cells. We examined the effect of variables such as gap junction intercellular communication, linear energy transfer (LET), and the role of the radiation environment in non-targeted responses. Endpoints included clonogenic survival, micronucleus formation and foci formation at histone 2AX over doses ranging from 10 to 100 cGy. Results: The results show no evidence of a low-LET radiation induced bystander response for the endpoints of clonogenic survival and induction of DNA damage. Nor do we see evidence of a high-LET, Fe ion radiation (1 GeV/n) induced bystander effect. However, direct comparison for 3.2 MeV α-particle exposures showed a statistically significant medium transfer bystander effect for this high-LET radiation. Conclusions: From our results, it is evident that there are many confounding factors influencing bystander responses as reported in the literature. Our observations reflect the inherent variability in biological systems and the difficulties in extrapolating from in vitro models to radiation risks in humans.

  10. Application of Low Dose Radiation Adaptive Response to Control Aging-Related Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, Mohan

    2013-11-01

    Oxidative damage has been implicated in the pathogenesis of most aging-related diseases including neurodegenerative diseases. Antioxidant supplementation has been found to be ineffective in reducing such diseases, but increased endogenous production of antioxidants from the adaptive response due to physical and cognitive exercises (which increase oxidative metabolism and oxidative stress) has been effective in reducing some of the diseases. Low dose radiation (LDR), which increases oxidative stress and results in adaptive response of increased antioxidants, may provide an alternative method of controlling the aging-related diseases. We have studied the effect of LDR on the induction of adaptive response in rat brains and the effectiveness of the LDR in reducing the oxidative damage caused by subsequent high dose radiation. We have also investigated the effect of LDR on apomorphine-induced rotations in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) unilaterally-lesioned rat model of Parkinson?s disease (PD). LDR was observed to initiate an adaptive response in the brain, and reduce the oxidative damage from subsequent high dose radiation exposure, confirming the effectiveness of LDR adaptive response in reducing the oxidative damage from the free radicals due to high dose radiation. LDR resulted in a slight improvement in Tyrosine hydroxylase expression on the lesioned side of substantia nigra (indicative of its protective effect on the dopaminergic neurons), and reduced the behavioral symptoms in the 6-OHDA rat model of PD. Translation of this concept to humans, if found to be applicable, may be a possible approach for controlling the progression of PD and other neurodegenerative diseases. Since any translation of the concept to humans would be hindered by the currently prevalent carcinogenic concerns regarding LDR based on the linear no-threshold (LNT) model, we have also studied the justifications for the use of the LNT model. One of the shortcomings of the LNT model is that it

  11. Near-linear response of mean monsoon strength to a broad range of radiative forcings

    PubMed Central

    Boos, William R.; Storelvmo, Trude

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical models have been used to argue that seasonal mean monsoons will shift abruptly and discontinuously from wet to dry stable states as their radiative forcings pass a critical threshold, sometimes referred to as a “tipping point.” Further support for a strongly nonlinear response of monsoons to radiative forcings is found in the seasonal onset of the South Asian summer monsoon, which is abrupt compared with the annual cycle of insolation. Here it is shown that the seasonal mean strength of monsoons instead exhibits a nearly linear dependence on a wide range of radiative forcings. First, a previous theory that predicted a discontinuous, threshold response is shown to omit a dominant stabilizing term in the equations of motion; a corrected theory predicts a continuous and nearly linear response of seasonal mean monsoon strength to forcings. A comprehensive global climate model is then used to show that the seasonal mean South Asian monsoon exhibits a near-linear dependence on a wide range of isolated greenhouse gas, aerosol, and surface albedo forcings. This model reproduces the observed abrupt seasonal onset of the South Asian monsoon but produces a near-linear response of the mean monsoon by changing the duration of the summer circulation and the latitude of that circulation’s ascent branch. Thus, neither a physically correct theoretical model nor a comprehensive climate model support the idea that seasonal mean monsoons will undergo abrupt, nonlinear shifts in response to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations, aerosol emissions, or land surface albedo. PMID:26811462

  12. Space experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CELLRAD)": Hardware and biological system tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Dilruba, Shahana; Adrian, Astrid; Feles, Sebastian; Schmitz, Claudia; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Briganti, Luca; Franz, Markus; Segerer, Jürgen; Spitta, Luis F.; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Konda, Bikash; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Günther

    2015-11-01

    One factor contributing to the high uncertainty in radiation risk assessment for long-term space missions is the insufficient knowledge about possible interactions of radiation with other spaceflight environmental factors. Such factors, e.g. microgravity, have to be considered as possibly additive or even synergistic factors in cancerogenesis. Regarding the effects of microgravity on signal transduction, it cannot be excluded that microgravity alters the cellular response to cosmic radiation, which comprises a complex network of signaling pathways. The purpose of the experiment ;Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space; (CELLRAD, formerly CERASP) is to study the effects of combined exposure to microgravity, radiation and general space flight conditions on mammalian cells, in particular Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) cells that are stably transfected with different plasmids allowing monitoring of proliferation and the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway by means of fluorescent proteins. The cells will be seeded on ground in multiwell plate units (MPUs), transported to the ISS, and irradiated by an artificial radiation source after an adaptation period at 0 × g and 1 × g. After different incubation periods, the cells will be fixed by pumping a formaldehyde solution into the MPUs. Ground control samples will be treated in the same way. For implementation of CELLRAD in the Biolab on the International Space Station (ISS), tests of the hardware and the biological systems were performed. The sequence of different steps in MPU fabrication (cutting, drilling, cleaning, growth surface coating, and sterilization) was optimized in order to reach full biocompatibility. Different coatings of the foil used as growth surface revealed that coating with 0.1 mg/ml poly-D-lysine supports cell attachment better than collagen type I. The tests of prototype hardware (Science Model) proved its full functionality for automated medium change, irradiation and fixation of cells. Exposure of

  13. Space experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CellRad)": Hardware and biological system tests.

    PubMed

    Hellweg, Christine E; Dilruba, Shahana; Adrian, Astrid; Feles, Sebastian; Schmitz, Claudia; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Briganti, Luca; Franz, Markus; Segerer, Jürgen; Spitta, Luis F; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Konda, Bikash; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Günther

    2015-11-01

    One factor contributing to the high uncertainty in radiation risk assessment for long-term space missions is the insufficient knowledge about possible interactions of radiation with other spaceflight environmental factors. Such factors, e.g. microgravity, have to be considered as possibly additive or even synergistic factors in cancerogenesis. Regarding the effects of microgravity on signal transduction, it cannot be excluded that microgravity alters the cellular response to cosmic radiation, which comprises a complex network of signaling pathways. The purpose of the experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space" (CellRad, formerly CERASP) is to study the effects of combined exposure to microgravity, radiation and general space flight conditions on mammalian cells, in particular Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) cells that are stably transfected with different plasmids allowing monitoring of proliferation and the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway by means of fluorescent proteins. The cells will be seeded on ground in multiwell plate units (MPUs), transported to the ISS, and irradiated by an artificial radiation source after an adaptation period at 0 × g and 1 × g. After different incubation periods, the cells will be fixed by pumping a formaldehyde solution into the MPUs. Ground control samples will be treated in the same way. For implementation of CellRad in the Biolab on the International Space Station (ISS), tests of the hardware and the biological systems were performed. The sequence of different steps in MPU fabrication (cutting, drilling, cleaning, growth surface coating, and sterilization) was optimized in order to reach full biocompatibility. Different coatings of the foil used as growth surface revealed that coating with 0.1 mg/ml poly-D-lysine supports cell attachment better than collagen type I. The tests of prototype hardware (Science Model) proved its full functionality for automated medium change, irradiation and fixation of cells. Exposure of

  14. Terahertz Radiation: A Non-contact Tool for the Selective Stimulation of Biological Responses in Human Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    triggered by THz radiation has not been elucidated. In this study, we performed a global profiling of transcripts in human cells exposed to 2.52 THz... triggers specific intracellular canonical pathways that are not affected in the BH-exposed cells. This study implies that THz radiation may be a...complete view of the global transcriptional responses and the intracellular canonical pathways specifically triggered by THz radiation has not been

  15. Hepcidin-2 in mouse urine as a candidate radiation-responsive molecule.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Daisuke; Yoshioka, Susumu; Kawai, Hidehiko; Okazaki, Emi; Kiriyama, Keita; Izumi, Shunsuke; Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya; Kamiya, Kenji; Suzuki, Fumio

    2016-03-01

    We used high-performance liquid chromatography to separate urine obtained from whole-body gamma-irradiated mice (4 Gy) before analyzing each fraction with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify radiation-responsive molecules. We identified two candidates: hepcidin antimicrobial peptide 2 (hepcidin-2) and peptide fragments of kidney androgen-regulated protein (KAP). We observed that peak increases of hepcidin-2 in urine were delayed in a dose-dependent manner (1 Gy and above); however, the amount of KAP peptide fragments showed no correlation with radiation dose. In addition, an increase in hepcidin-2 after exposure to relatively low radiation doses (0.25 and 0.5 Gy, respectively) was biphasic (at 8-48 h and 120-168 h, respectively, after irradiation). The increase in hepcidin-2 paralleled an increase in hepcidin-2 gene (Hamp2) mRNA levels in the liver. These results suggest that radiation exposure directly or indirectly induces urinary excretion of hepcidin-2 at least in part by the upregulation of Hamp2 mRNA in the liver.

  16. In vitro investigations on the effect of dermal fibroblasts on keratinocyte responses to ultraviolet B radiation.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Tara L; Van Lonkhuyzen, Derek R; Dawson, Rebecca A; Kimlin, Michael G; Upton, Zee

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet radiation is closely linked to the development of skin cancers in humans. The ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation wavelength (280-320 nm), in particular, causes DNA damage in epidermal keratinocytes, which are linked to the generation of signature premalignant mutations. Interactions between dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes play a role in epidermal repair and regeneration after UVB-induced damage. To investigate these processes, established two and three-dimensional culture models were utilized to study the impact of fibroblast-keratinocyte crosstalk during the acute UVB response. Using a coculture system it was observed that fibroblasts enhanced keratinocyte survival and the repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) after UVB radiation exposure. These findings were also mirrored in irradiated human skin coculture models employed in this study. Fibroblast coculture was shown to play a role in the expression and activation of members of the apoptotic cascade, including caspase-3 and Bad. Interestingly, the expression and phosphorylation of p53, a key player in the regulation of keratinocyte cell fate postirradiation, was also shown to be influenced by fibroblast-produced factors. This study highlights the importance of synergistic interactions between fibroblasts and keratinocytes in maintaining a functional epidermis while promoting repair and regeneration following UVB radiation-induced damage.

  17. Separate and combined responses to water deficit and UV-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Bandurska, Hanna; Niedziela, Justyna; Chadzinikolau, Tamara

    2013-12-01

    Crops and other plants in natural conditions are routinely affected by several stresses acting simultaneously or in sequence. In areas affected by drought, plants may also be exposed to enhanced UV-B radiation (280-315nm). Each of these stress factors differently affects cellular metabolism. A common consequence of plant exposure to the separate action of water deficit and UV-B radiation is the enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) causing damage to proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and DNA. Despite this destructive activity, ROS also act as signalling molecules in cellular processes responsible for defence responses. Plants have evolved many physiological and biochemical mechanisms that avoid or tolerate the effects of stress factors. Water deficit avoidance leads to stomatal closure, stimulation of root growth, and accumulation of free proline and other osmolytes. Secondary metabolites (flavonols, flavones and anthocyanins) that accumulate in epidermal cells effectively screen UV-B irradiation and reduce its penetration to mesophyll tissue. The coordinated increased activity of the enzymatic antioxidant defence system such as up-regulation of superoxide dismutase, catalase, guaiacol peroxidase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase is an important mechanism of tolerance to water deficit and UV-B radiation. The accumulation of low molecular antioxidants (proline, glycine betaine, ascorbate and glutathione) can also contribute to tolerance to water deficit. Polyamines, tocopherol, carotenoids, alkaloids, flavonoids and other secondary metabolites participate in the removal of ROS under conditions of increased UV-B radiation. The combination of water deficit and UV-B radiation induces responses that can be antagonistic, additive or synergistic in comparison with the action of single stresses. UV-B radiation may enhance resistance to water deficit and vice versa. Hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide (NO), abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid, ethylene

  18. Effects of α-Particle Radiation on MicroRNA Responses in Human Cell-Lines

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Vinita; Howland, Matthew; Wilkins, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    A variety of alpha (α)-particle emitters are found ubiquitously in the environment, in commercial/therapeutic prod-ucts and are a potential threat in the form of a radiological dispersal device. Our understanding of the biological mechanisms and long-term health effects resulting from α-particle exposure is limited. Exposure to radiation induces modulations of gene networks, possibly through microRNAs (miRNAs), which could be targets for studying biological effects. In this study, changes in miRNA expression patterns after 0.5 Gy, 1.0 Gy and 1.5 Gy of α-particle radiation at a low dose-rate of exposure in three human cell-lines (A549, THP-1 and HFL) were investigated. The screening of 1,145 miRNAs across three human cell-lines resulted in unique, cell-specific responses with no overlap in miRNA expression observed in the three cell-lines. Prediction analysis suggests these α-particle induced miRNA mapped to target genes related to ribosomal assembly, lung carcinoma development, cell communication and keratin sulfate biosynthesis. Taken together, these results suggest that exposure to α-particle radiation results in cell-type specific responses in gene network regulatory processes. PMID:22481983

  19. Identification of Genes Responsive to Solar Simulated UV Radiation in Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, Hortensia; Lamana, Amalia; Mittelbrunn, María; Perez-Gala, Silvia; Gonzalez, Salvador; García-Diez, Amaro; Vega, Miguel; Sanchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation has profound effects on the skin and the systemic immune system. Several effects of UV radiation on Dendritic cells (DCs) functions have been described. However, gene expression changes induced by UV radiation in DCs have not been addressed before. In this report, we irradiated human monocyte-derived DCs with solar-simulated UVA/UVB and analyzed regulated genes on human whole genome arrays. Results were validated by RT-PCR and further analyzed by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA). Solar-simulated UV radiation up-regulated expression of genes involved in cellular stress and inflammation, and down-regulated genes involved in chemotaxis, vesicular transport and RNA processing. Twenty four genes were selected for comparison by RT-PCR with similarly treated human primary keratinocytes and human melanocytes. Several genes involved in the regulation of the immune response were differentially regulated in UVA/UVB irradiated human monocyte-derived DCs, such as protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type E (PTPRE), thrombospondin-1 (THBS1), inducible costimulator ligand (ICOSL), galectins, Src-like adapter protein (SLA), IL-10 and CCR7. These results indicate that UV-exposure triggers the regulation of a complex gene repertoire involved in human-DC–mediated immune responses. PMID:19707549

  20. Bystander and Adaptive Responses in Tissue Models exposed to Low Radiation Doses

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin M. Prise

    2007-01-02

    The overall goal is characterization of 3D tissue models that can be used for investigation of the mechanisms underlying radiation-induced bystander effect at low doses (20 cGy or less) of low LET ionizing radiation, using a unique focused soft X-ray microprobe that had been upgraded to provide a range of focused soft X-ray energies, some sufficient to penetrate 3D models (Ref DE-FG02-01ER63236). The proposed studies will include an examination of whether the passage of a single electron track can trigger bystander responses in the 3D tissue models and, if so, whether the response is altered by increased or decreased levels of oxidative stress. Our existing multi-photon/confocal in-depth microscopy techniques will be used to develop assays for damage induced within intact 3D tissue models. The working hypothesis is that organization of cells into tissues, particularly involving more than one cell type, alters expression of the radiation-induced bystander effect compared to that seen in isolated single cell types in monolayer.

  1. Achieving a stable time response in polymeric radiation sensors under charge injection by X-rays.

    PubMed

    Intaniwet, Akarin; Mills, Christopher A; Sellin, Paul J; Shkunov, Maxim; Keddie, Joseph L

    2010-06-01

    Existing inorganic materials for radiation sensors suffer from several drawbacks, including their inability to cover large curved areas, lack of tissue-equivalence, toxicity, and mechanical inflexibility. As an alternative to inorganics, poly(triarylamine) (PTAA) diodes have been evaluated for their suitability for detecting radiation via the direct creation of X-ray induced photocurrents. A single layer of PTAA is deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates, with top electrodes selected from Al, Au, Ni, and Pd. The choice of metal electrode has a pronounced effect on the performance of the device; there is a direct correlation between the diode rectification factor and the metal-PTAA barrier height. A diode with an Al contact shows the highest quality of rectifying junction, and it produces a high X-ray photocurrent (several nA) that is stable during continuous exposure to 50 kV Mo Kalpha X-radiation over long time scales, combined with a high signal-to-noise ratio with fast response times of less than 0.25 s. Diodes with a low band gap, 'Ohmic' contact, such as ITO/PTAA/Au, show a slow transient response. This result can be explained by the build-up of space charge at the metal-PTAA interface, caused by a high level of charge injection due to X-ray-induced carriers. These data provide new insights into the optimum selection of metals for Schottky contacts on organic materials, with wider applications in light sensors and photovoltaic devices.

  2. Glioblastoma stem cells: radiobiological response to ionising radiations of different qualities.

    PubMed

    Pecchia, I; Dini, V; Ricci-Vitiani, L; Biffoni, M; Balduzzi, M; Fratini, E; Belli, M; Campa, A; Esposito, G; Cirrone, G; Romano, F; Stancampiano, C; Pelacchi, F; Pallini, R; Tabocchini, M A

    2015-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant primary brain tumour, with very poor prognosis. The high recurrence rate and failure of conventional treatments are expected to be related to the presence of radio-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) inside the tumour mass. CSCs can both self-renew and differentiate into the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells. Recent evidence showed a higher effectiveness of C-ions and protons in inactivating CSCs, suggesting a potential advantage of Hadrontherapy compared with conventional radiotherapy for GBM treatment. To investigate the mechanisms involved in the molecular and cellular responses of CSCs to ionising radiations, two GBM stem cell (GSC) lines, named lines 1 and 83, which were derived from patients with different clinical outcomes and having different metabolic profiles (as shown by NMR spectroscopy), were irradiated with (137)Cs photons and with protons or C-ions of 62 MeV u(-1) in the dose range of 5-40 Gy. The biological effects investigated were: cell death, cell cycle progression, and DNA damage induction and repair. Preliminary results show a different response to ionising radiation between the two GSC lines for the different end points investigated. Further experiments are in progress to consolidate the data and to get more insights on the influence of radiation quality.

  3. Binding Dynamics of Targeted Microbubbles in Response to Modulated Acoustic Radiation Force

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiying; Hossack, John A; Klibanov, Alexander L; Mauldin, F William

    2014-01-01

    Detection of molecular targeted microbubbles plays a foundational role in ultrasound-based molecular imaging and targeted gene or drug delivery. In this paper, an empirical model describing the binding dynamics of targeted microbubbles in response to modulated acoustic radiation forces in large vessels is presented and experimentally verified using tissue-mimicking flow phantoms. Higher flow velocity and microbubble concentration led to faster detaching rates for specifically bound microbubbles (p < 0.001). Higher time-averaged acoustic radiation force intensity led to faster attaching rates and a higher saturation level of specifically bound microbubbles (p < 0.05). The level of residual microbubble signal in targeted experiments after cessation of radiation forces was the only response parameter that was reliably different between targeted and control experiments (p < 0.05). A related parameter, the ratio of residual-to-saturated microbubble signal (Rresid), is proposed as a measurement that is independent of absolute acoustic signal magnitude and therefore able to reliably detect targeted adhesion independently of control measurements (p < 0.01). These findings suggest the possibility of enhanced detection of specifically bound microbubbles in real-time, using relatively short imaging protocols (approximately 3 min), without waiting for free microbubble clearance. PMID:24374866

  4. Response of a hybrid pixel detector (MEDIPIX3) to different radiation sources for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumacero, E. Miguel; De Celis Alonso, B.; Martínez Hernández, M. I.; Vargas, G.; Moreno Barbosa, F.; Moreno Barbosa, E.

    2014-11-01

    The development in semiconductor CMOS technology has enabled the creation of sensitive detectors for a wide range of ionizing radiation. These devices are suitable for photon counting and can be used in imaging and tomography X-ray diagnostics. The Medipix[1] radiation detection system is a hybrid silicon pixel chip developed for particle tracking applications in High Energy Physics. Its exceptional features (high spatial and energy resolution, embedded ultra fast readout, different operation modes, etc.) make the Medipix an attractive device for applications in medical imaging. In this work the energy characterization of a third-generation Medipix chip (Medipix3) coupled to a silicon sensor is presented. We used different radiation sources (strontium 90, iron 55 and americium 241) to obtain the response curve of the hybrid detector as a function of energy. We also studied the contrast of the Medipix as a measure of pixel noise. Finally we studied the response to fluorescence X rays from different target materials (In, Pd and Cd) for the two data acquisition modes of the chip; single pixel mode and charge summing mode.

  5. Effect of a water soluble derivative of alpha-tocopherol on radiation response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Singh, R K; Verma, N C; Kagiya, V T

    2001-12-01

    The radioprotection conferred by a highly water soluble glucose derivative of alpha-tocopherol, namely, 2-(alpha-D-glucopyranosyl) methyl-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-6-ol (TMG) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied. Cells grown in standard YEPD-agar medium and irradiated in the presence of TMG showed a concentration dependent higher survival up to 10 mM of TMG in comparison to cells irradiated in distilled water. Treatment of TMG to cells given either before or immediately after irradiation but not during irradiation, had no effect on their radiation response. S. cerevisiae strain LP1383 (rad52) which is defective in recombination repair showed enhanced radioresistance only when subjected to irradiation in presence of TMG. Cells of rad52 strain grown in the medium containing TMG showed a radiation response similar to that of cells grown in the medium without TMG. The nature of TMG dependent enhanced radioresistance was studied by scoring the mutations in the strain D-7, which behaved like wild type strain in complete medium, at trp and ilv loci. Our study indicated that TMG confers radioresistance in S. cerevisiae possibly by two mechanisms viz. (i), by eliminating radiation induced reactive free radicals when the irradiation is carried out in the presence of TMG and (ii), by activating an error prone repair process involving RAD52 gene, when the cells are grown in the medium containing TMG.

  6. Response of a hybrid pixel detector (MEDIPIX3) to different radiation sources for medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chumacero, E. Miguel; De Celis Alonso, B.; Martínez Hernández, M. I.; Vargas, G.; Moreno Barbosa, E.; Moreno Barbosa, F.

    2014-11-07

    The development in semiconductor CMOS technology has enabled the creation of sensitive detectors for a wide range of ionizing radiation. These devices are suitable for photon counting and can be used in imaging and tomography X-ray diagnostics. The Medipix[1] radiation detection system is a hybrid silicon pixel chip developed for particle tracking applications in High Energy Physics. Its exceptional features (high spatial and energy resolution, embedded ultra fast readout, different operation modes, etc.) make the Medipix an attractive device for applications in medical imaging. In this work the energy characterization of a third-generation Medipix chip (Medipix3) coupled to a silicon sensor is presented. We used different radiation sources (strontium 90, iron 55 and americium 241) to obtain the response curve of the hybrid detector as a function of energy. We also studied the contrast of the Medipix as a measure of pixel noise. Finally we studied the response to fluorescence X rays from different target materials (In, Pd and Cd) for the two data acquisition modes of the chip; single pixel mode and charge summing mode.

  7. Ionizing Radiation-Induced Responses in Human Cells with Differing TP53 Status

    PubMed Central

    Mirzayans, Razmik; Andrais, Bonnie; Scott, April; Wang, Ying W.; Murray, David

    2013-01-01

    Ionizing radiation triggers diverse responses in human cells encompassing apoptosis, necrosis, stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS), autophagy, and endopolyploidy (e.g., multinucleation). Most of these responses result in loss of colony-forming ability in the clonogenic survival assay. However, not all modes of so-called clonogenic cell “death” are necessarily advantageous for therapeutic outcome in cancer radiotherapy. For example, the crosstalk between SIPS and autophagy is considered to influence the capacity of the tumor cells to maintain a prolonged state of growth inhibition that unfortunately can be succeeded by tumor regrowth and disease recurrence. Likewise, endopolyploid giant cells are able to segregate into near diploid descendants that continue mitotic activities. Herein we review the current knowledge on the roles that the p53 and p21WAF1 tumor suppressors play in determining the fate of human fibroblasts (normal and Li-Fraumeni syndrome) and solid tumor-derived cells after exposure to ionizing radiation. In addition, we discuss the important role of WIP1, a p53-regulated oncogene, in the temporal regulation of the DNA damage response and its contribution to p53 dynamics post-irradiation. This article highlights the complexity of the DNA damage response and provides an impetus for rethinking the nature of cancer cell resistance to therapeutic agents. PMID:24232458

  8. Morphological responses of crop and weed species of different growth forms to ultraviolet-B radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.W.; Flint, S.D.; Caldwell, M.M. )

    1990-10-01

    Recent evidence of a general, global decline of stratospheric ozone has heightened concern about possible ecological consequences of increases in solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B, 280-320 nm) radiation resulting from ozone depletion. The influence of UV-B radiation (280-320 nanometers) on the morphology of 12 common dicot and monocot crop or weed species was examined to determine whether any common responses could be found that might, in turn, be useful in predicting possible changes in competitive balance under solar UV-B enhancement. Under glasshouse conditions, UV-B exposure (simulating a 20% reduction in stratospheric ozone at Logan, Utah) was found to reduce leaf blade and internode lengths and increase leaf and axillary shoot production in several species. Overall, the directions of these trends were similar in the majority of species that exhibited a significant response. These morphological changes occurred without any significant reduction in total shoot dry matter production. There was no clear distinction in the response of crops and weeds, though monocots were found to be generally more responsive than dicots. Previous work in dense canopies has shown that the photomorphogenetic effects of UV-B alter leaf placement and thereby influence competition for light. Our results suggest that, under these conditions, changes in competitive balance resulting from increased UV-B might be expected more frequently when monocots are involved in mixtures, rather than mixtures of only dicots.

  9. Maximum in the Middle: Nonlinear Response of Microbial Plankton to Ultraviolet Radiation and Phosphorus

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Sánchez, Juan Manuel; Delgado-Molina, José Antonio; Bratbak, Gunnar; Bullejos, Francisco José; Villar-Argaiz, Manuel; Carrillo, Presentación

    2013-01-01

    The responses of heterotrophic microbial food webs (HMFW) to the joint action of abiotic stressors related to global change have been studied in an oligotrophic high-mountain lake. A 2×5 factorial design field experiment performed with large mesocosms for >2 months was used to quantify the dynamics of the entire HMFW (bacteria, heterotrophic nanoflagellates, ciliates, and viruses) after an experimental P-enrichment gradient which approximated or surpassed current atmospheric P pulses in the presence vs. absence of ultraviolet radiation. HMFW underwent a mid-term (<20 days) acute development following a noticeable unimodal response to P enrichment, which peaked at intermediate P-enrichment levels and, unexpectedly, was more accentuated under ultraviolet radiation. However, after depletion of dissolved inorganic P, the HMFW collapsed and was outcompeted by a low-diversity autotrophic compartment, which constrained the development of HMFW and caused a significant loss of functional biodiversity. The dynamics and relationships among variables, and the response patterns found, suggest the importance of biotic interactions (predation/parasitism and competition) in restricting HMFW development, in contrast to the role of abiotic factors as main drivers of autotrophic compartment. The response of HMFW may contribute to ecosystem resilience by favoring the maintenance of the peculiar paths of energy and nutrient-mobilization in these pristine ecosystems, which are vulnerable to threats by the joint action of abiotic stressors related to global change. PMID:23593178

  10. Tirapazamine: hypoxic cytotoxicity and interaction with radiation as assessed by the micronucleus assay.

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, T.; Shibamoto, Y.; Sasai, K.; Oya, N.; Murata, R.; Takagi, T.; Hiraoka, M.; Takahashi, M.; Abe, M.

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the cytotoxicity and the interaction with low-dose radiation (1-4Gy) of tirapazamine by the in vitro cytokinesis-block micronucleus (MN) assay. Murine SCCVII and human melanoma (G-361) cells were treated with tirapazamine under aerobic or hypoxic conditions for 1 h and the MN frequency was determined using cytochalasin-B. The cells were also treated with or without tirapazamine or KU-2285 (hypoxic cell sensitiser) under hypoxic conditions and irradiated with or without reaeration of the cell suspensions. A dose-dependent increase of MN frequency was observed by tirapazamine treatment and the hypoxic toxicity ratio was about 130 for SCCVII and 37 for G-361. The radiation dose-response curves of MN frequency suggested that the interaction of tirapazamine with irradiation appeared to be essentially additive in both cell lines. In contrast, the dose-response curve became steeper by KU-2285 treatment. Combined effects of tirapazamine and irradiation on the hypoxic cells were much higher than the radiation effect on aerobic cells at low doses, while the effects of KU-2285 did not exceed that of aerobic irradiation. In conclusion, tirapazamine appeared to be superior to hypoxic radiosensitisers at clinically relevant doses, not because of aerobic radiosensitisation but because of its potent hypoxic cytotoxicity additive to radiation effect. PMID:8763848

  11. NONO regulates the intra-S-phase checkpoint in response to UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Alfano, L; Costa, C; Caporaso, A; Altieri, A; Indovina, P; Macaluso, M; Giordano, A; Pentimalli, F

    2016-02-04

    The main risk factor for skin cancer is ultraviolet (UV) exposure, which causes DNA damage. Cells respond to UV-induced DNA damage by activating the intra-S-phase checkpoint, which prevents replication fork collapse, late origin firing and stabilizes fragile sites. Recently, the 54-kDa multifunctional protein NONO was found to be involved in the non-homologous end-joining DNA repair process and in poly ADP-ribose polymerase 1 activation. Interestingly, NONO is mutated in several tumour types and emerged as a crucial factor underlying both melanoma development and progression. Therefore, we set out to evaluate whether NONO could be involved in the DNA-damage response to UV radiations. We generated NONO-silenced HeLa cell clones and found that lack of NONO decreased cell growth rate. Then, we challenged NONO-silenced cells with exposure to UV radiations and found that NONO-silenced cells, compared with control cells, continued to synthesize DNA, failed to block new origin firing and impaired CHK1S345 phosphorylation showing a defective checkpoint activation. Consistently, NONO is present at the sites of UV-induced DNA damage where it localizes to RAD9 foci. To position NONO in the DNA-damage response cascade, we analysed the loading onto chromatin of various intra-S-phase checkpoint mediators and found that NONO favours the loading of topoisomerase II-binding protein 1 acting upstream of the ATM and Rad3-related kinase activity. Strikingly, re-expression of NONO, through an sh-resistant mRNA, rescued CHK1S345 phosphorylation in NONO-silenced cells. Interestingly, NONO silencing affected cell response to UV radiations also in a melanoma cell line. Overall, our data uncover a new role for NONO in mediating the cellular response to UV-induced DNA damage.

  12. Response of a forest ecotone to ionizing radiation. Progress report, October 15, 1979-October 14, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, P G; Sharitz, R R

    1980-07-01

    Compositional and structural characteristics of three forest types, including aspen dominated, maple-birch dominated, and an intervening ecotone, were studied before and after irradiation in northern Wisconsin. Irradiation occurred during the summer of 1972. By the summer of 1973 the density of viable tree seedlings at 10 m from the radiation source was substantially reduced in all three areas relative to the preirradiation densities of 1971. As of the summer of 1979, establishment of tree seedlings continued to be inhibited by the vigorous development of ground vegetation. In most respects, the ecotone has shown properties and responses to radiation intermediate to those observed in the aspen and maple-birch areas. The rate and compositional characteristics of succession in the ecotone relative to aspen and maple-birch forest types is presently under study.

  13. Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Daila S. Gridley, PhD

    2012-03-30

    FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Supported by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64345 Project ID: 0012965 Award Register#: ER64345 Project Manager: Noelle F. Metting, Sc.D. Phone: 301-903-8309 Division SC-23.2 noelle.metting@science.doe.gov Submitted March 2012 To: https://www.osti.gov/elink/241.3.jsp Title: Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation PI: Daila S. Gridley, Ph.D. Human low dose radiation data have been derived primarily from studies of space and airline flight personnel, nuclear plant workers and others exposed occupationally, as well as victims in the vicinity of atomic bomb explosions. The findings remain inconclusive due to population inconsistencies and complex interactions among total dose, dose rate, radiation quality and age at exposure. Thus, safe limits for low dose occupational irradiation are currently based on data obtained with doses far exceeding the levels expected for the general population and health risks have been largely extrapolated using the linear-nonthreshold dose-response model. The overall working hypothesis of the present study is that priming with low dose, low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation can ameliorate the response to acute high-dose radiation exposure. We also propose that the efficacy of low-dose induced protection will be dependent upon the form and regimen of the high-dose exposure: photons versus protons versus simulated solar particle event protons (sSPE). The emphasis has been on gene expression and function of CD4+ T helper (Th) lymphocytes harvested from spleens of whole-body irradiated C57BL/6 mice, a strain that provides the genetic background for many genetically engineered strains. Evaluations of the responses of other selected cells, tissues such as skin, and organs such as lung, liver and brain were also initiated (partially funded by other sources). The long-term goal is to provide information

  14. Effect of Pressure Gradients on Plate Response and Radiation in a Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader

    1997-01-01

    Using the model developed by the author for zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers, results are obtained for adverse and favorable pressure gradients. It is shown that when a flexible plate is located in an adverse pressure gradient area, it vibrates more than if it were in a favorable pressure gradient one. Therefore the noise generated by the plate in an adverse pressure gradient is much greater than that due to the plate in a favorable pressure gradient. The effects of Reynolds number and boundary layer thickness are also analyzed and found to have the same effect in both adverse and favorable pressure gradient cases. Increasing the Reynolds number is found to increase the loading on the plate and therefore acoustic radiation. An increase in boundary layer thickness is found to decrease the level of the high frequencies and therefore the response and radiation at these frequencies. The results are in good qualitative agreement with experimental measurements.

  15. Investigating Undergraduate Students' Science Literacy: Responses Related to Radiation and DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Impey, C.; Buxner, S.; Nieberding, M.; Romine, J.

    2015-11-01

    This study is part of a larger one investigating undergraduate students' science literacy. Over the past 25 years we have been investigating undergraduate students' basic science knowledge as well as beliefs and attitudes towards science and technology. Data has been collected from almost 12,000 students, mostly freshman and sophomore students and mostly non-STEM majors. This paper presents findings of two open ended questions that probe students' understanding of radiation and DNA. Each open ended question was coded using a scheme developed from existing literature and emergent themes. Analyses revealed that STEM students are better able to correctly describe radiation and had fewer misconceptions. Many students mentioned chemical characteristics and functions of DNA although a substantial number of students reported common misconceptions or trivial responses. Our results add to our existing work to help us understand how to better support students' learning in our undergraduate courses.

  16. A single aerobic exercise session accelerates movement execution but not central processing.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Kit B; Sage, Michael D; Staines, W Richard; Middleton, Laura E; McIlroy, William E

    2017-03-27

    Previous research has demonstrated that aerobic exercise has disparate effects on speed of processing and movement execution. In simple and choice reaction tasks, aerobic exercise appears to increase speed of movement execution while speed of processing is unaffected. In the flanker task, aerobic exercise has been shown to reduce response time on incongruent trials more than congruent trials, purportedly reflecting a selective influence on speed of processing related to cognitive control. However, it is unclear how changes in speed of processing and movement execution contribute to these exercise-induced changes in response time during the flanker task. This study examined how a single session of aerobic exercise influences speed of processing and movement execution during a flanker task using electromyography to partition response time into reaction time and movement time, respectively. Movement time decreased during aerobic exercise regardless of flanker congruence but returned to pre-exercise levels immediately after exercise. Reaction time during incongruent flanker trials decreased over time in both an aerobic exercise and non-exercise control condition indicating it was not specifically influenced by exercise. This disparate influence of aerobic exercise on movement time and reaction time indicates the importance of partitioning response time when examining the influence of aerobic exercise on speed of processing. The decrease in reaction time over time independent of aerobic exercise indicates that interpreting pre-to-post exercise changes in behavior requires caution.

  17. Mechanisms and biological importance of photon-induced bystander responses: do they have an impact on low-dose radiation responses.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Masanori; Maeda, Munetoshi

    2015-03-01

    Elucidating the biological effect of low linear energy transfer (LET), low-dose and/or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation is essential in ensuring radiation safety. Over the past two decades, non-targeted effects, which are not only a direct consequence of radiation-induced initial lesions produced in cellular DNA but also of intra- and inter-cellular communications involving both targeted and non-targeted cells, have been reported and are currently defining a new paradigm in radiation biology. These effects include radiation-induced adaptive response, low-dose hypersensitivity, genomic instability, and radiation-induced bystander response (RIBR). RIBR is generally defined as a cellular response that is induced in non-irradiated cells that receive bystander signals from directly irradiated cells. RIBR could thus play an important biological role in low-dose irradiation conditions. However, this suggestion was mainly based on findings obtained using high-LET charged-particle radiations. The human population (especially the Japanese, who are exposed to lower doses of radon than the world average) is more frequently exposed to low-LET photons (X-rays or γ-rays) than to high-LET charged-particle radiation on a daily basis. There are currently a growing number of reports describing a distinguishing feature between photon-induced bystander response and high-LET RIBR. In particular, photon-induced bystander response is strongly influenced by irradiation dose, the irradiated region of the targeted cells, and p53 status. The present review focuses on the photon-induced bystander response, and discusses its impact on the low-dose radiation effect.

  18. Mechanisms and biological importance of photon-induced bystander responses: do they have an impact on low-dose radiation responses

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Masanori; Maeda, Munetoshi

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the biological effect of low linear energy transfer (LET), low-dose and/or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation is essential in ensuring radiation safety. Over the past two decades, non-targeted effects, which are not only a direct consequence of radiation-induced initial lesions produced in cellular DNA but also of intra- and inter-cellular communications involving both targeted and non-targeted cells, have been reported and are currently defining a new paradigm in radiation biology. These effects include radiation-induced adaptive response, low-dose hypersensitivity, genomic instability, and radiation-induced bystander response (RIBR). RIBR is generally defined as a cellular response that is induced in non-irradiated cells that receive bystander signals from directly irradiated cells. RIBR could thus play an important biological role in low-dose irradiation conditions. However, this suggestion was mainly based on findings obtained using high-LET charged-particle radiations. The human population (especially the Japanese, who are exposed to lower doses of radon than the world average) is more frequently exposed to low-LET photons (X-rays or γ-rays) than to high-LET charged-particle radiation on a daily basis. There are currently a growing number of reports describing a distinguishing feature between photon-induced bystander response and high-LET RIBR. In particular, photon-induced bystander response is strongly influenced by irradiation dose, the irradiated region of the targeted cells, and p53 status. The present review focuses on the photon-induced bystander response, and discusses its impact on the low-dose radiation effect. PMID:25361549

  19. Fatiguing upper body aerobic exercise impairs balance.

    PubMed

    Douris, Peter C; Handrakis, John P; Gendy, Joseph; Salama, Mina; Kwon, Dae; Brooks, Richard; Salama, Nardine; Southard, Veronica

    2011-12-01

    Douris, PC, Handrakis, JP, Gendy, J, Salama, M, Kwon, D, Brooks, R, Salama, N, and Southard, V. Fatiguing upper body aerobic exercise impairs balance. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3299-3305, 2011-There are many studies that have examined the effects of selectively fatiguing lower extremity muscle groups with various protocols, and they have all shown to impair balance. There is limited research regarding the effect of fatiguing upper extremity exercise on balance. Muscle fiber-type recruitment patterns may be responsible for the difference between balance impairments because of fatiguing aerobic and anaerobic exercise. The purpose of our study was to investigate the effect that aerobic vs. anaerobic fatigue, upper vs. lower body fatigue will have on balance, and if so, which combination will affect balance to a greater degree. Fourteen healthy subjects, 7 men and 7 women (mean age 23.5 ± 1.7 years) took part in this study. Their mean body mass index was 23.6 ± 3.2. The study used a repeated-measures design. The effect on balance was documented after the 4 fatiguing conditions: aerobic lower body (ALB), aerobic upper body (AUB), anaerobic lower body, anaerobic upper body (WUB). The aerobic conditions used an incremental protocol performed to fatigue, and the anaerobic used the Wingate protocol. Balance was measured as a single-leg stance stability score using the Biodex Balance System. A stability score for each subject was recorded immediately after each of the 4 conditions. A repeated-measures analysis of variance with the pretest score as a covariate was used to analyze the effects of the 4 fatiguing conditions on balance. There were significant differences between the 4 conditions (p = 0.001). Post hoc analysis revealed that there were significant differences between the AUB, mean score 4.98 ± 1.83, and the WUB, mean score 4.09 ± 1.42 (p = 0.014) and between AUB and ALB mean scores 4.33 ± 1.40 (p = 0.029). Normative data for single-leg stability testing for

  20. Radiative forcing and temperature response to changes in urban albedos and associated CO2 offsets

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, Surabi; Akbari, Hashem; Mahanama, Sarith; Sednev, Igor; Levinson, Ronnen

    2010-02-12

    The two main forcings that can counteract to some extent the positive forcings from greenhouse gases from pre-industrial times to present-day are the aerosol and related aerosol-cloud forcings, and the radiative response to changes in surface albedo. Here, we quantify the change in radiative forcing and land surface temperature that may be obtained by increasing the albedos of roofs and pavements in urban areas in temperate and tropical regions of the globe by 0.1. Using the catchment land surface model (the land model coupled to the GEOS-5 Atmospheric General Circulation Model), we quantify the change in the total outgoing (outgoing shortwave+longwave) radiation and land surface temperature to a 0.1 increase in urban albedos for all global land areas. The global average increase in the total outgoing radiation was 0.5 Wm{sup -2}, and temperature decreased by {approx}0.008 K for an average 0.003 increase in surface albedo. These averages represent all global land areas where data were available from the land surface model used and are for the boreal summer (June-July-August). For the continental U.S. the total outgoing radiation increased by 2.3 Wm{sup -2}, and land surface temperature decreased by {approx}0.03 K for an average 0.01 increase in surface albedo. Based on these forcings, the expected emitted CO{sub 2} offset for a plausible 0.25 and 0.15 increase in albedos of roofs and pavements, respectively, for all global urban areas, was found to be {approx} 57 Gt CO{sub 2}. A more meaningful evaluation of the impacts of urban albedo increases on global climate and the expected CO{sub 2} offsets would require simulations which better characterizes urban surfaces and represents the full annual cycle.

  1. Responses of Crepis japonica induced by supplemental blue light and UV-A radiation.

    PubMed

    Constantino, L F da S; Nascimento, L B Dos S; Casanova, L M; Moreira, N Dos S; Menezes, E A; Esteves, R L; Costa, S S; Tavares, E S

    2017-02-15

    Crepis japonica (L.) D.C. (Asteraceae), a weed with antioxidant, antiallergenic, antiviral and antitumor properties displays both medicinal properties and nutritional value. This study aims to assess the effects of a supplementation of blue light and UV-A radiation on the growth, leaf anatomical structure and phenolic profile of the aerial parts of Crepis japonica. Plants were grown under two light treatments: W (control - white light), W + B (white light supplemented with blue light) and W + UV-A (white light supplemented with UV-A radiation). We recorded the length, width, and weight of fresh and dry leaves, the thickness of the epidermis and mesophyll, and stomata density. The phenolic profiles of the aqueous extracts of the aerial parts were analyzed by HPLC-DAD. There was an increase in the leaf size, stomatal density, and phenolic production, and a thickening of the mesophyll and epidermis. UV-A radiation increased the phenolic production more than blue light. Blue light and UV-A radiation both improved the production of caffeic acid by about 6 and 3 times, respectively, in comparison to control. This compound was first reported as a constituent of the extract from the aerial parts together with caftaric acid. UV-A also promoted the production of chlorogenic acid (about 1.5 times in comparison to the control). We observed that the morphological and chemical parameters of C. japonica are modified in response to blue light and UV-A radiation, which can be used as tools in the cultivation of this species in order to improve its medicinal properties and nutritional value.

  2. The Transient Circulation Response to Radiative Forcings and Sea Surface Warming

    SciTech Connect

    Staten, Paul; Reichler, Thomas; Lu, Jian

    2014-08-27

    Tropospheric circulation shifts have strong potential to impact surface climate. But the magnitude of these shifts in a changing climate, and the attending regional hydrological changes, are difficult to project. Part of this difficulty arises from our lack of understanding of the physical mechanisms behind the circulation shifts themselves. In order to better delineate circulation shifts and their respective causes, we decompose the circulation response into (1) the "direct" response to radiative forcings themselves, and (2) the "indirect" response to changing sea surface temperatures. Using ensembles of 90-day climate model simulations with immediate switch-on forcings, including perturbed greenhouse gas concentrations, stratospheric ozone concentrations, and sea surface temperatures, we document the direct and indirect transient responses of the zonal mean general circulation, and investigate the roles of previously proposed mechanisms in shifting the midlatitude jet. We find that both the direct and indirect wind responses often begin in the lower stratosphere. Changes in midlatitude eddies are ubiquitous and synchronous with the midlatitude zonal wind response. Shifts in the critical latitude of wave absorption on either flank of the jet are not indicted as primary factors for the poleward shifting jet, although we see some evidence for increasing equatorward wave reflection over the southern hemisphere in response to sea surface warming. Mechanisms for the northern hemisphere jet shift are less clear.

  3. Food collection and response to pheromones in an ant species exposed to electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Cammaerts, Marie-Claire; Rachidi, Zoheir; Bellens, François; De Doncker, Philippe

    2013-09-01

    We used the ant species Myrmica sabuleti as a model to study the impact of electromagnetic waves on social insects' response to their pheromones and their food collection. We quantified M. sabuleti workers' response to their trail, area marking and alarm pheromone under normal conditions. Then, we quantified the same responses while under the influence of electromagnetic waves. Under such an influence, ants followed trails for only short distances, no longer arrived at marked areas and no longer orientated themselves to a source of alarm pheromone. Also when exposed to electromagnetic waves, ants became unable to return to their nest and recruit congeners; therefore, the number of ants collecting food increases only slightly and slowly. After 180 h of exposure, their colonies deteriorated. Electromagnetic radiation obviously affects social insects' behavior and physiology.

  4. Low-dose total-body γ irradiation modulates immune response to acute proton radiation.

    PubMed

    Luo-Owen, Xian; Pecaut, Michael J; Rizvi, Asma; Gridley, Daila S

    2012-03-01

    Health risks due to exposure to low-dose/low-dose-rate radiation alone or when combined with acute irradiation are not yet clearly defined. This study quantified the effects of protracted exposure to low-dose/low-dose-rate γ rays with and without acute exposure to protons on the response of immune and other cell populations. C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with ⁵⁷Co (0.05 Gy at 0.025 cGy/h); subsets were subsequently exposed to high-dose/high-dose-rate proton radiation (250 MeV; 2 or 3 Gy at 0.5 Gy/min). Analyses were performed at 4 and 17 days postexposure. Spleen and thymus masses relative to body mass were decreased on day 4 after proton irradiation with or without pre-exposure to γ rays; by day 17, however, the decrease was attenuated by the priming dose. Proton dose-dependent decreases, either with or without pre-exposure to γ rays, occurred in white blood cell, lymphocyte and granulocyte counts in blood but not in spleen. A similar pattern was found for lymphocyte subpopulations, including CD3+ T, CD19+ B, CD4+ T, CD8+ T and NK1.1+ natural killer (NK) cells. Spontaneous DNA synthesis by leukocytes after proton irradiation was high in blood on day 4 and high in spleen on day 17; priming with γ radiation attenuated the effect of 3 Gy in both body compartments. Some differences were also noted among groups in erythrocyte and thrombocyte characteristics. Analysis of splenocytes activated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 antibodies showed changes in T-helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokines. Overall, the data demonstrate that pre-exposure of an intact mammal to low-dose/low-dose-rate γ rays can attenuate the response to acute exposure to proton radiation with respect to at least some cell populations.

  5. Radiation-quality dependent cellular response in mutation induction in normal human cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masao; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Uchihori, Yukio; Kitamura, Hisashi; Liu, Cui Hua

    2009-09-01

    We studied cellular responses in normal human fibroblasts induced with low-dose (rate) or low-fluence irradiations of different radiation types, such as gamma rays, neutrons and high linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions. The cells were pretreated with low-dose (rate) or low-fluence irradiations (approximately 1 mGy/7-8 h) of 137Cs gamma rays, 241Am-Be neutrons, helium, carbon and iron ions before irradiations with an X-ray challenging dose (1.5 Gy). Helium (LET = 2.3 keV/microm), carbon (LET = 13.3 keV/microm) and iron (LET = 200 keV/microm) ions were produced by the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), Japan. No difference in cell-killing effect, measured by a colony forming assay, was observed among the pretreatment with different radiation types. In mutation induction, which was detected in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) locus to measure 6-thioguanine resistant clones, there was no difference in mutation frequency induced by the X-ray challenging dose between unpretreated and gamma-ray pretreated cells. In the case of the pretreatment of heavy ions, X-ray-induced mutation was around 1.8 times higher in helium-ion pretreated and 4.0 times higher in carbon-ion pretreated cells than in unpretreated cells (X-ray challenging dose alone). However, the mutation frequency in cells pretreated with iron ions was the same level as either unpretreated or gamma-ray pretreated cells. In contrast, it was reduced at 0.15 times in cells pretreated with neutrons when compared to unpretreated cells. The results show that cellular responses caused by the influence of hprt mutation induced in cells pretreated with low-dose-rate or low-fluence irradiations of different radiation types were radiation-quality dependent manner.

  6. Simulated Space Radiation: Murine Skeletal Responses During Recovery and with Mechanical Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirazi-Fard, Yasaman; Zaragoza, Josergio; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Truong, Tiffany; Tahimic, Candice; Alwood, Joshua S.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Simulated space radiation at doses similar to those of solar particle events or a round-trip sojourn to Mars (1-2Gy) may cause skeletal tissue degradation and deplete stem/progenitor cell pools throughout the body. We hypothesized that simulated space radiation (SSR) causes late, time-dependent deficits in bone structure and bone cell function reflected by changes in gene expression in response to anabolic stimuli. We used a unique sequential dual ion exposure (proton and iron) for SSR to investigate time-dependence of responses in gene expression, cell function, and microarchitecture with respect to radiation and an anabolic stimulus of axial loading (AL). Male 16-wk C57BL6/J mice (n=120 total) were exposed to 0Gy (Sham, n=10), 56Fe (2Gy, positive control dose, n=10), or sequential ions for SSR (1Gy 1H/56Fe/1H, n=10) by total body irradiation (IR), and the tissues were harvested 2 or 6 mo. later. Further, to assess the response to anabolic stimuli, we subjected additional Sham-AL (n=15) and SSR-AL (n=15) groups to rest-inserted tibial axial loading (AL) starting at 1 and 5 months post-IR (-9N, 60 cycles/day, 3 days/wk, 4 wks). Exposure to 56Fe caused a significant reduction in cancellous bone volume fraction (BV/TV) compared to Sham (-34%) and SSR (-20%) in the proximal tibia metaphysis at 2-months post-IR; however BV/TV for SSR group was not different than Sham. Both 56Fe and SSR caused significant reduction in trabecular number (Tb.N) compared to Sham (-33% and -16%, respectively). Further, Tb.N for 56Fe (2Gy) was significantly lower than SSR (-21%). Ex vivo culture of marrow cells to assess growth and differentiation of osteoblast lineage cells 6 months post-IR showed that both 56Fe and SSR exposures significantly impaired colony formation compared to Sham (-66% and -54%, respectively), as well as nodule mineralization (-90% and -51%, respectively). Two-way analysis of variance showed that both mechanical loading and radiation reduced BV/TV, mechanical loading

  7. Simulated Space Radiation: Murine Skeletal Responses During Recovery and with Mechanical Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirazi-Fard, Yasaman; Zaragoza, Josergio; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Truong, Tiffany; Tahimic, Candice; Alwood, Joshua S.; Castillo, Alesha B.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Simulated space radiation at doses similar to those of solar particle events or a round-trip sojourn to Mars (1-2Gy) may cause skeletal tissue degradation and deplete stem/progenitor cell pools throughout the body. We hypothesized that simulated space radiation (SSR) causes late, time-dependent deficits in bone structure and bone cell function reflected by changes in gene expression in response to anabolic stimuli. We used a unique sequential dual ion exposure (proton and iron) for SSR to investigate time-dependence of responses in gene expression, cell function, and microarchitecture with respect to radiation and an anabolic stimulus of axial loading (AL). Male 16-wk C57BL6/J mice (n=120 total) were exposed to 0Gy (Sham, n=10), 56Fe (2Gy, positive control dose, n=10), or sequential ions for SSR (1Gy 1H/56Fe/1H, n=10) by total body irradiation (IR), and the tissues were harvested 2 or 6 mo. later. Further, to assess the response to anabolic stimuli, we subjected additional Sham-AL (n=15) and SSR-AL (n=15) groups to rest-inserted tibial axial loading (AL) starting at 1 and 5 months post-IR (-9N, 60 cycles/day, 3 days/wk, 4 wks). Exposure to 56Fe caused a significant reduction in cancellous bone volume fraction (BV/TV) compared to Sham (-34%) and SSR (-20%) in the proximal tibia metaphysis at 2-months post-IR; however BV/TV for SSR group was not different than Sham. Both 56Fe and SSR caused significant reduction in trabecular number (Tb.N) compared to Sham (-33% and -16%, respectively). Further, Tb.N for 56Fe (2Gy) was significantly lower than SSR (-21%). Ex vivo culture of marrow cells to assess growth and differentiation of osteoblast lineage cells 6 months post-IR showed that both 56Fe and SSR exposures significantly impaired colony formation compared to Sham (-66% and -54%, respectively), as well as nodule mineralization (-90% and -51%, respectively). Two-way analysis of variance showed that both mechanical loading and radiation reduced BV/TV, mechanical loading

  8. Exposures involving perturbations of the EM field have non-linear effects on radiation response and can alter the expression of radiation induced bystander effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin

    2012-07-01

    Our recent data suggest there is a physical component to the bystander signal induced by radiation exposure and that alternative medicine techniques such as Reiki and acupuncture or exposures to weak EM fields alter the response of cells to direct irradiation and either altered bystander signal production or altered the response of cells receiving bystander signals. Our proposed mechanism to explain these findings is that perturbation of electromagnetic (EM) fields is central to the induction of low radiation dose responses especially non-targeted bystander effects. In this presentation we review the alternative medicine data and other data sets from our laboratory which test our hypothesis that perturbation of bio-fields will modulate radiation response in the low dose region. The other data sets include exposure to MRI, shielding using lead and or Faraday cages, the use of physical barriers to bystander signal transmission and the use of membrane channel blockers. The data taken together strongly suggest that EM field perturbation can modulate low dose response and that in fact the EM field rather than the targeted deposition of ionizing energy in the DNA may be the key determinant of dose response in a cell or organism The results also lead us to suspect that at least when chemical transmission is blocked, bystander signals can be transmitted by other means. Our recent experiments suggest light signals and volatiles are not likely. We conclude that alternative medicine and other techniques involving electromagnetic perturbations can modify the response of cells to low doses of ionizing radiation and can induce bystander effects similar to those seen in medium transfer experiments. In addition to the obvious implications for mechanistic studies of low dose effects, this could perhaps provide a novel target to exploit in space radiation protection and in optimizing therapeutic gain during radiotherapy.

  9. Frequency response of a TeO{sub 2} slow shear wave acousto-optic cell exposed to radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Erteza, I.A.; Craft, D.C.; Stalker, K.T.; Taylor, E.W.; Kelley, M.A.; Sanchez, A.D.; Chapman, S.P.; Craig, D.M.; Kinsley, E.

    1994-12-31

    Radiation testing of photonic components is not new, however component level testing to date has not completely addressed quantities which are important to system behavior. One characteristic that is of particular importance for optical processing systems is the frequency response. In this paper, the authors present the results of the analysis of data from an experiment designed to provide a preliminary understanding of the effects of radiation on the frequency response of acousto-optic devices. The goal is to present possible physical mechanisms responsible for the radiation effects and to discuss the effects on signal processing functionality. The experiment discussed in this paper was designed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and performed by SNL and Phillips Laboratory (PL) personnel at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR). In the experiment, a TeO{sub 2} slow shear-wave acousto-optic cell was exposed to radiation from the WSMR linear accelerator. The TeO{sub 2} cell was placed in an experimental configuration which allowed swept frequency diffracted power measurements to be taken during radiation exposure and recovery. A series of exposures was performed. Each exposure consisted of between 1 to 800, 1 {mu}sec radiation pulses (yielding exposures of 2.25 kRad(Si) to 913 kRad(Si)), followed by recovery time. At low total and cumulative doses, the bandshape of the frequency response (i.e. diffracted power vs. frequency) remained almost identical during and after radiation. At the higher exposures, however, the amplitude and width of the frequency response changed as the radiation continued, but returned to the original shape slowly after the radiation stopped and recovery proceeded. It is interesting to note that the location of the Bragg degeneracy does not change significantly with radiation. In this paper, the authors discuss these effects, and they discuss the effect on the signal processing functionality.

  10. The Molecular and Physiological Responses of Physcomitrella patens to Ultraviolet-B Radiation1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Luise; Rizzini, Luca; Stracke, Ralf; Ulm, Roman; Rensing, Stefan A.

    2010-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation present in sunlight is an important trigger of photomorphogenic acclimation and stress responses in sessile land plants. Although numerous moss species grow in unshaded habitats, our understanding of their UV-B responses is very limited. The genome of the model moss Physcomitrella patens, which grows in sun-exposed open areas, encodes signaling and metabolic components that are implicated in the UV-B response in flowering plants. In this study, we describe the response of P. patens to UV-B radiation at the morphological and molecular levels. We find that P. patens is more capable of surviving UV-B stress than Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and describe the differential expression of approximately 400 moss genes in response to UV-B radiation. A comparative analysis of the UV-B response in P. patens and Arabidopsis reveals both distinct and conserved pathways. PMID:20427465

  11. Human responses to the threat of or exposure to ionizing radiation at Three Mile Island, Pennsylvania, and Goiania, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Collins, Daniel L

    2002-02-01

    The psychological stressors and their aftereffects associated with the Three Mile Island accident, the Goiania, Brazil, cesium-137 accident, and the Abadia, Brazil, storage location are summarized and compared. Cross-cultural comparisons of human responses to ionizing radiation are rare. A multidisciplinary methodological approach to examining the psychological responses to ionizing radiation is even more rare. The psychological, behavioral, neuroendocrine, and cardiovascular results are summarized for Three Mile Island, Goiania, and Abadia.

  12. Low intensity microwave radiation induced oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Megha, Kanu; Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar; Ahmed, Rafat; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade people have been constantly exposed to microwave radiation mainly from wireless communication devices used in day to day life. Therefore, the concerns over potential adverse effects of microwave radiation on human health are increasing. Until now no study has been proposed to investigate the underlying causes of genotoxic effects induced by low intensity microwave exposure. Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine the influence of low intensity microwave radiation on oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain. The study was carried out on 24 male Fischer 344 rats, randomly divided into four groups (n=6 in each group): group I consisted of sham exposed (control) rats, group II-IV consisted of rats exposed to microwave radiation at frequencies 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz, specific absorption rates (SARs) 0.59, 0.58 and 0.66 mW/kg, respectively in gigahertz transverse electromagnetic (GTEM) cell for 60 days (2h/day, 5 days/week). Rats were sacrificed and decapitated to isolate hippocampus at the end of the exposure duration. Low intensity microwave exposure resulted in a frequency dependent significant increase in oxidative stress markers viz. malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PCO) and catalase (CAT) in microwave exposed groups in comparison to sham exposed group (p<0.05). Whereas, levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were found significantly decreased in microwave exposed groups (p<0.05). A significant increase in levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ) was observed in microwave exposed animal (p<0.05). Furthermore, significant DNA damage was also observed in microwave exposed groups as compared to their corresponding values in sham exposed group (p<0.05). In conclusion, the present study suggests that low intensity microwave radiation induces oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in brain by exerting a frequency dependent effect

  13. Telomeres and Telomerase in the Radiation Response: Implications for Instability, Reprograming, and Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sishc, Brock J.; Nelson, Christopher B.; McKenna, Miles J.; Battaglia, Christine L. R.; Herndon, Andrea; Idate, Rupa; Liber, Howard L.; Bailey, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes comprised of tandem arrays of repetitive DNA sequence that serve to protect chromosomal termini from inappropriate degradation, as well as to prevent these natural DNA ends from being recognized as broken DNA (double-strand breaks) and triggering of inappropriate DNA damage responses. Preservation of telomere length requires telomerase, the specialized reverse transcriptase capable of maintaining telomere length via template-mediated addition of telomeric repeats onto the ends of newly synthesized chromosomes. Loss of either end-capping function or telomere length maintenance has been associated with genomic instability or senescence in a variety of settings; therefore, telomeres and telomerase have well-established connections to cancer and aging. It has long been recognized that oxidative stress promotes shortening of telomeres, and that telomerase activity is a radiation-inducible function. However, the effects of ionizing radiation (IR) exposure on telomeres per se are much less well understood and appreciated. To gain a deeper understanding of the roles, telomeres and telomerase play in the response of human cells to IRs of different qualities, we tracked changes in telomeric end-capping function, telomere length, and telomerase activity in panels of mammary epithelial and hematopoietic cell lines exposed to low linear energy transfer (LET) gamma(γ)-rays or high LET, high charge, high energy (HZE) particles, delivered either acutely or at low dose rates. In addition to demonstrating that dysfunctional telomeres contribute to IR-induced mutation frequencies and genome instability, we reveal non-canonical roles for telomerase, in that telomerase activity was required for IR-induced enrichment of mammary epithelial putative stem/progenitor cell populations, a finding also suggestive of cellular reprograming. Taken together, the results reported here establish the critical importance of telomeres and telomerase in the

  14. Radiation occupational health interventions offered to radiation workers in response to the complex catastrophic disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Terada, Hiroshi; Okuda, Kengo; Svendsen, Erik Robert; Kunugita, Naoki

    2015-05-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) 1 was severely damaged from the chain reaction of the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami on 11 March 2011, and the consequent meltdown and hydrogen gas explosions. This resulted in the worst nuclear accident since the Chernobyl accident of 1986. Just as in the case of Chernobyl, emergency workers were recruited to conduct a wide range of tasks, including disaster response, rescuing activities, NPP containment, and radiation decontamination. This paper describes the types and efficacy of the various occupational health interventions introduced to the Fukushima NPP radiation workers. Such interventions were implemented in order to prevent unnecessary radiation overexposure and associated adverse health effects and work injuries. Less than 1% of all emergency workers were exposed to external radiation of >100 mSv, and to date no deaths or health adversities from radiation have been reported for those workers. Several occupational health interventions were conducted, including setting of new regulatory exposure limits, improving workers' radiation dosimetry, administration of stable iodine, running an occupational health tracking system, and improving occupational medicine and preventative care. Those interventions were not only vital for preventing unnecessary radiation, but also for managing other general health issues such as mental health, heat illness and infectious diseases. Long-term administration of the aforementioned occupational health interventions is essential to ensure the ongoing support and care for these workers, who were put under one of the most severe occupational health risk conditions ever encountered.

  15. Radiation occupational health interventions offered to radiation workers in response to the complex catastrophic disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    PubMed Central

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Terada, Hiroshi; Okuda, Kengo; Svendsen, Erik Robert; Kunugita, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) 1 was severely damaged from the chain reaction of the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami on 11 March 2011, and the consequent meltdown and hydrogen gas explosions. This resulted in the worst nuclear accident since the Chernobyl accident of 1986. Just as in the case of Chernobyl, emergency workers were recruited to conduct a wide range of tasks, including disaster response, rescuing activities, NPP containment, and radiation decontamination. This paper describes the types and efficacy of the various occupational health interventions introduced to the Fukushima NPP radiation workers. Such interventions were implemented in order to prevent unnecessary radiation overexposure and associated adverse health effects and work injuries. Less than 1% of all emergency workers were exposed to external radiation of >100 mSv, and to date no deaths or health adversities from radiation have been reported for those workers. Several occupational health interventions were conducted, including setting of new regulatory exposure limits, improving workers' radiation dosimetry, administration of stable iodine, running an occupational health tracking system, and improving occupational medicine and preventative care. Those interventions were not only vital for preventing unnecessary radiation, but also for managing other general health issues such as mental health, heat illness and infectious diseases. Long-term administration of the aforementioned occupational health interventions is essential to ensure the ongoing support and care for these workers, who were put under one of the most severe occupational health risk conditions ever encountered. PMID:25413928

  16. Toxic and inhibitory effects of trichloroethylene aerobic co-metabolism on phenol-grown aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Tay, JooHwa

    2015-04-09

    Aerobic granule, a form of microbial aggregate, exhibits good potential in degrading toxic and recalcitrant substances. In this study, the inhibitory and toxic effects of trichloroethylene (TCE), a model compound for aerobic co-metabolism, on phenol-grown aerobic granules were systematically studied, using respiratory activities after exposure to TCE as indicators. High TCE concentration did not exert positive or negative effects on the subsequent endogenous respiration rate or phenol dependent specific oxygen utilization rate (SOUR), indicating the absence of solvent stress and induction effect on phenol-hydroxylase. Phenol-grown aerobic granules exhibited a unique response to TCE transformation product toxicity, that small amount of TCE transformation enhanced the subsequent phenol SOUR. Granules that had transformed between 1.3 and 3.7 mg TCE gSS(-1) showed at most 53% increase in the subsequent phenol SOUR, and only when the transformation exceeded 6.6 mg TCE gSS(-1) did the SOUR dropped below that of the control. This enhancing effect was found to sustain throughout several phenol dosages, and TCE transformation below the toxicity threshold also lessened the granules' sensitivity to higher phenol concentration. The unique toxic effect was possibly caused by the granule's compact structure as a protection barrier against the diffusive transformation product(s) of TCE co-metabolism.

  17. Divergences in the response to ultraviolet radiation between polar and non-polar ciliated protozoa: UV radiation effects in Euplotes.

    PubMed

    Di Giuseppe, Graziano; Cervia, Davide; Vallesi, Adriana

    2012-02-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation has detrimental effects on marine ecosystems, in particular in the polar regions where stratospheric ozone reduction causes higher levels of solar radiation. We analyzed two polar species of Euplotes, Euplotes focardii and Euplotes nobilii, for the sensitivity to UV radiation in comparison with two akin species from mid-latitude and tropical waters. Results showed that they face UV radiation much more efficiently than the non-polar species by adopting alternative strategies that most likely reflect different times of colonization of the polar waters. While E. focardii, which is endemic to the Antarctic, survives for longer exposed to UV radiation, E. nobilii, which inhabits both the Antarctic and Arctic, recovers faster from UV-induced damage.

  18. Response of different regional online coupled models to aerosol-radiation interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forkel, Renate; Balzarini, Alessandra; Brunner, Dominik; Baró, Rocio; Curci, Gabriele; Hirtl, Marcus; Honzak, Luka; Jiménez-Guerrero, Pedro; Jorba, Oriol; Pérez, Juan L.; Pirovano, Guido; San José, Roberto; Schröder, Wolfram; Tuccella, Paolo; Werhahn, Johannes; Wolke, Ralf; Žabkar, Rahela

    2016-04-01

    The importance of aerosol-meteorology interactions and their representation in online coupled regional atmospheric chemistry-meteorology models was investigated in COST Action ES1004 (EuMetChem, http://eumetchem.info/). Case study results from different models (COSMO-Muscat, COSMO-ART, and different configurations of WRF-Chem), which were applied for Europe as a coordinated exercise for the year 2010, are analyzed with respect to inter-model variability and the response of the different models to direct and indirect aerosol-radiation interactions. The main focus was on two episodes - the Russian heat wave and wildfires episode in July/August 2010 and a period in October 2010 with enhanced cloud cover and rain and including an of Saharan dust transport to Europe. Looking at physical plausibility the decrease in downward solar radiation and daytime temperature due to the direct aerosol effect is robust for all model configurations. The same holds for the pronounced decrease in cloud water content and increase in solar radiation for cloudy conditions and very low aerosol concentrations that was found for WRF-Chem when aerosol cloud interactions were considered. However, when the differences were tested for statistical significance no significant differences in mean solar radiation and mean temperature between the baseline case and the simulations including the direct and indirect effect from simulated aerosol concentrations were found over Europe for the October episode. Also for the fire episode differences between mean temperature and radiation from the simulations with and without the direct aerosol effect were not significant for the major part of the modelling domain. Only for the region with high fire emissions in Russia, the differences in mean solar radiation and temperature due to the direct effect were found to be significant during the second half of the fire episode - however only for a significance level of 0.1. The few observational data indicate that

  19. Response of the AMOC to reduced solar radiation - the modulating role of atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthers, Stefan; Raible, Christoph C.; Rozanov, Eugene; Stocker, Thomas F.

    2016-11-01

    The influence of reduced solar forcing (grand solar minimum or geoengineering scenarios like solar radiation management) on the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is assessed in an ensemble of atmosphere-ocean-chemistry-climate model simulations. Ensemble sensitivity simulations are performed with and without interactive chemistry. In both experiments the AMOC is intensified in the course of the solar radiation reduction, which is attributed to the thermal effect of the solar forcing: reduced sea surface temperatures and enhanced sea ice formation increase the density of the upper ocean in the North Atlantic and intensify the deepwater formation. Furthermore, a second, dynamical effect on the AMOC is identified driven by the stratospheric cooling in response to the reduced solar forcing. The cooling is strongest in the tropics and leads to a weakening of the northern polar vortex. By stratosphere-troposphere interactions, the stratospheric circulation anomalies induce a negative phase of the Arctic Oscillation in the troposphere which is found to weaken the AMOC through wind stress and heat flux anomalies in the North Atlantic. The dynamic mechanism is present in both ensemble experiments. In the experiment with interactive chemistry, however, it is strongly amplified by stratospheric ozone changes. In the coupled system, both effects counteract and weaken the response of the AMOC to the solar forcing reduction. Neglecting chemistry-climate interactions in model simulations may therefore lead to an overestimation of the AMOC response to solar forcing.

  20. Nuclear p16INK4a expression predicts enhanced radiation response in head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Dok, Rüveyda; Asbagh, Layka Abbasi; Van Limbergen, Evert Jan; Sablina, Anna; Nuyts, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry analysis of p16INK4a in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) tumor samples revealed that 28% of tumors showed nuclear/cytoplasmic p16INK4a localization, while 37% of tumors had cytoplasmic p16INK4a. Our previous study showed that p16INK4a inhibits the DNA repair response independently of its function in the cell cycle, suggesting that p16INK4a subcellular localization should be considered during stratification of HNSCC patients. Using p16INK4a mutants with different localization signals, we found that expression of nuclear p16INK4a, but not cytoplasmic p16INK4a impaired RAD51 foci formation, indicating that nuclear localization of p16INK4a is crucial for its function in DNA repair. We next investigated the role of p16INK4a subcellular localization in radiation response in a retrospective cohort of 261 HNSCC patients treated with chemoradiation. We found that only HNSCC patients expressing nuclear p16INK4a expression showed better outcome, locoregional control and disease free survival, after chemoradiation. In concordance with the patient data, only expression of nuclear p16INK4a increased radiosensitivity of HNSCC cells. These results implicate nuclear p16INK4a expression as a potent marker to predict radiation response of HNSCC patients and should be taken into account in intensification or de-escalation studies. PMID:27246975

  1. The influence of SV40 immortalization of human fibroblasts on p53-dependent radiation responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohli, M.; Jorgensen, T. J.

    1999-01-01

    The simian virus 40 large tumor antigen (SV40 Tag) has been ascribed many functions critical to viral propagation, including binding to the mammalian tumor suppressor p53. Recent studies have demonstrated that SV40-transformed murine cells have functional p53. The status of p53 in SV40-immortalized human cells, however, has not been characterized. We have found that in response to ionizing radiation, p53-dependent p21 transactivation activity is present, albeit reduced, in SV40-immortalized cells and that this activity can be further reduced with either dominant negative p53 expression or higher SV40 Tag expression. Furthermore, overexpression of p53 in SV40-immortalized ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) cells restores p53-dependent p21 induction to typical A-T levels. All SV40-immortalized cell lines exhibited an absence of G1 arrest. Moreover, all SV40-immortalized cell lines exhibited increased apoptosis relative to primary cells in response to ionizing radiation, suggesting that SV40 immortalization results in a unique phenotype with regard to DNA damage responses. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  2. Adaptive Response Against Spontaneous Neoplastic Transformation In Vitro Induced by Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    J. Leslie Redpath, Ph.D.

    2003-11-10

    The goal of this project was to establish a dose response curve for radiation-induced neoplastic transformation of HeLa x skin fibroblast human hybrid cells in vitro under experimental conditions were an adaptive response, if it were induced, would have an opportunity to be expressed. During the first two years of the grant an exhaustive series of experiments were performed and the resulting data were reported at the 2000 Annual Meeting of the Radiation Research Society and then Subsequently published. The data showed that an adaptive response against spontaneous neoplastic transformation was seen up to doses of 10cGy of Cs-137 gamma rays. At dose of 30, 50 and 100 cGy the transformation frequencies were above background. This indicated that for this system, under the specific experimental conditions used, there was a threshold of somewhere between 10 and 30 cGy. The results also indicated some unexpected, though very interesting, correlations with relative risk estimates made from human epidemiologic studies.

  3. Gene Expression Profile Analysis as a Prognostic Indicator of Normal Tissue Response to Simulated Space Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Story, Michael; Stivers, David N.

    2004-01-01

    This project was funded as a pilot project to determine the feasibility of using gene expression profiles to characterize the response of human cells to exposure to particulate radiations such as those encountered in the spaceflight environment. We proposed to use microarray technology to examine the gene expression patterns of a bank of well-characterized human fibroblast cell cultures. These fibroblast cultures were derived from breast or head and neck cancer patients who exhibited normal, minimal, or severe normal tissue reactions following low LET radiation exposure via radiotherapy. Furthermore, determination of SF2 values from fibroblasts cultured from these individuals were predictive of risk for severe late reactions. We hypothesized that by determining the expression of thousands of genes we could identify gene expression patterns that reflect how normal tissues respond to high Z and energy (HZE) particles, that is, that there are molecular signatures for HZE exposures. We also hypothesized that individuals who are intrinsically radiosensitive may elicit a unique response. Because this was funded as a pilot project we focused our initial studies on logistics and appropriate experimental design, and then to test our hypothesis that there is a unique molecular response to specific particles, in this case C and Fe, for primary human skin fibroblasts.

  4. Ionizing Radiation-Induced Responses: Where Free Radical Chemistry Meets Redox Biology and Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The biological effects of ionizing radiation (IR) from environmental, medical, and man-made sources, as well as from space exploration are of broad health concern. During the last 40 years it has become evident that, in addition to short-lived free radical-mediated events initiated within microseconds of exposure and generally thought to dissipate within milliseconds, IR-induced production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species as well as changes in redox signaling linked to disruption of metabolic processes persist long after radiation exposure. Furthermore, persistent IR-induced increases in the metabolic production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species appear to significantly contribute to the delayed effects of IR exposure, including induction of adaptive responses at low doses as well as carcinogenesis, fibrosis, inflammation, genomic instability, and acceleration of the onset of degenerative tissue injury processes associated with aging. The ability to identify the specific metabolic mechanisms and dose–response relationships that contribute to adaptive responses as well as persistent IR-induced injury processes holds great promise for identifying novel strategies to mitigate the deleterious effects of IR exposure as well as for gathering mechanistic information critical for risk assessment. This Forum contains original and review articles authored by experts in the field of radiobiology focusing on novel mechanisms involving redox biology and metabolism that significantly contribute to the persistent biological effects seen following IR exposure. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1407–1409. PMID:24354361

  5. Humoral immune response of mice injected with tocopherol after exposure to X-radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, R.M.; Petrella, M.

    1987-01-01

    Serum haemagglutination (HA) titers have been determined for irradiated and non-irradiated mice responding to injection of two different concentrations of sheep red blood cells (SRBC) 24 to 48 hours after irradiation and immediate intraperitoneal injection of 2.5 mg DL alpha-tocopherol, the emulsifying vehicle, or saline. Mice maintained on tocopherol-deficient diets for 8 weeks post-weaning and those on regular diets exhibited increased IgG titers during peak response when injected with vitamin E. This partially alleviated the radiation-depression of the primary immune response induced by the smaller SRBC injection. This stimulatory effect was most significant in mice maintained on vitamin E-deficient diets. The HA titers of irradiated and non-irradiated mice maintained on normal rations were determined following a 10-fold increase in the SRBC inoculation. Antibody titer was greater following injection of the higher concentration of SRBC but post-irradiation injection of tocopherol immediately or 24 hours after irradiation did not enhance immune response. At the higher SRBC concentration maximum observed HA titers decreased with increasing dose of radiation; however, tocopherol had no significant dose-reducing effect. Tocopherol toxicity as manifested by depressed HA titers was observed occasionally in non-irradiated mice challenged with the higher concentration of SRBC.

  6. Acute Immune-Inflammatory Responses to a Single Bout of Aerobic Exercise in Smokers; The Effect of Smoking History and Status

    PubMed Central

    Kastelein, Tegan Emma; Duffield, Rob; Marino, Frank E.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the acute immune and inflammatory responses to exercise in smokers compared to non-smokers, and further, the effect of smoking history on these immune-inflammatory responses. Fifty-four recreationally active males who were either smokers (SM; n = 27) or non-smokers (NS; n = 27) were allocated into either young (YSM, YNS) or middle-aged groups (MSM, MNS) based on smoking status. Participants were matched for fitness and smoking habits and following familiarization and baseline testing, undertook an exercise protocol that involved 40 min of cycle ergometry at 50% of VO2peak. Venous blood was obtained pre- and post- (0 min, 1, and 4 h) exercise to measure circulating leukocytes and inflammatory markers interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, IL-1ra, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Compared to MNS, MSM showed elevated basal concentrations of MCP-1, which were increased with a longer smoking history (P < 0.05). In response to exercise, YSM demonstrated an amplified IL-6 response from immediately- to 1 h-post compared to YNS. Furthermore, IL-1ra in YSM was elevated above that of YNS across all time points (P < 0.05). The MSM group had higher IL-1β at baseline when compared to YSM, although IL-1ra was greater for YSM at baseline (P < 0.05). Finally, the post-exercise leukocyte response was greater in MSM compared to YSM and non-smokers (P < 0.05). In conclusion, smoker’s exhibit elevated MCP-1 and IL-1β that seem to be evident with a longer smoking history (~15 years). Furthermore, the differences in exercise-induced inflammatory responses noted in YSM may be indicative tobacco smoke exposure priming circulating leukocytes to amplify inflammatory responses. PMID:26779179

  7. Near-LTE linear response calculations with a collisional-radiative model for He-like Al ions. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    More, R.; Kato, T.

    1998-04-06

    We investigate non-equilibrium atomic kinetics using a collisional- radiative model modified to include line absorption. Steady-state emission is calculated for He-like aluminum immersed in a specified radiation field having fixed deviations from a Planck spectrum. The calculated net emission is presented as a NLTE response matrix. In agreement with a rigorous general rule of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, the linear response is symmetric. We compute the response matrix for 1% and {+-} 50% changes in the photon temperature and find linear response over a surprisingly large range.

  8. Near-LTE linear response calculations with a collisional-radiative model for He-like Al ions

    SciTech Connect

    More, R.M.; Kato, T.

    1998-01-06

    We investigate the non-equilibrium atomic kinetics using a collisional-radiative (CR) model modified to include line absorption. Steady-state emission is calculated for He-like aluminum ions immersed in a specified radiation field having fixed deviations from a Planck spectrum. The net emission is interpreted in terms of NLTE population changes. The calculation provides an NLTE response matrix, and in agreement with a general relation of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, the response matrix is symmetric. We compute the response matrix for 1% and 50% changes in the photon temperature and find linear response over a surprisingly large range.

  9. Disentangling leaf area and environmental effects on the response of the net ecosystem CO2 exchange to diffuse radiation

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Hammerle, Albin; Haslwanter, Alois; Bahn, Michael; Tappeiner, Ulrike; Cernusca, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    There is an ongoing discussion about why the net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) of some ecosystems is less sensitive to diffuse radiation than others and about the role other environmental factors play in determining the response of NEE to diffuse radiation. Using a six-year data set from a temperate mountain grassland in Austria we show that differences between ecosystems may be reconciled based on their green area index (GAI; square meter green plant area per square meter ground area) - the sensitivity to diffuse radiation increasing with GAI. Our data suggest diffuse radiation to have a negligible influence on NEE below a GAI of 2 m2 m−2. Changes in air/soil temperature and air humidity concurrent with the fraction of diffuse radiation were found to amplify the sensitivity of the investigated temperate mountain grassland ecosystem to diffuse radiation. PMID:24347740

  10. Optimization of radiation treatment of ginger ( Zingiber officinale) rhizomes using response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nketsia-Tabiri, Josephine

    1998-06-01

    The effects of pre-irradiation storage time (7-21 days), radiation dose (0-75 Gy) and post-irradiation storage time (2-20 weeks) on sprouting, wrinkling and weight loss of ginger was investigated using a central composite rotatable design. Predictive models developed for all three responses were highly significant. Weight loss and wrinkling decreased as pre-irradiation storage time increased. Dose and post-irradiation storage time had significant interactive effects on weight loss and sprouting. Processing conditions for achieving minimal sprouting resulted in maximum weight loss and wrinkling.

  11. Radiative forcing and climate response to projected 21st century aerosol decreases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westervelt, D. M.; Horowitz, L. W.; Naik, V.; Golaz, J.-C.; Mauzerall, D. L.

    2015-11-01

    It is widely expected that global emissions of atmospheric aerosols and their precursors will decrease strongly throughout the remainder of the 21st century, due to emission reduction policies enacted to protect human health. For instance, global emissions of aerosols and their precursors are projected to decrease by as much as 80 % by the year 2100, according to the four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios. The removal of aerosols will cause unintended climate consequences, including an unmasking of global warming from long-lived greenhouse gases. We use the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Coupled Climate Model version 3 (GFDL CM3) to simulate future climate over the 21st century with and without the aerosol emission changes projected by each of the RCPs in order to isolate the radiative forcing and climate response resulting from the aerosol reductions. We find that the projected global radiative forcing and climate response due to aerosol decreases do not vary significantly across the four RCPs by 2100, although there is some mid-century variation, especially in cloud droplet effective radius, that closely follows the RCP emissions and energy consumption projections. Up to 1 W m-2 of radiative forcing may be unmasked globally from 2005 to 2100 due to reductions in aerosol and precursor emissions, leading to average global temperature increases up to 1 K and global precipitation rate increases up to 0.09 mm day-1. However, when using a version of CM3 with reduced present-day aerosol radiative forcing (-1.0 W m-2), the global temperature increase for RCP8.5 is about 0.5 K, with similar magnitude decreases in other climate response parameters as well. Regionally and locally, climate impacts can be much larger than the global mean, with a 2.1 K warming projected over China, Japan, and Korea due to the reduced aerosol emissions in RCP8.5, as well as nearly a 0.2 mm day-1 precipitation increase, a 7 g m-2 LWP decrease, and a 2 μm increase in

  12. Effect of radiation damping on the spectral response of plasmonic components.

    PubMed

    Kats, Mikhail A; Yu, Nanfang; Genevet, Patrice; Gaburro, Zeno; Capasso, Federico

    2011-10-24

    We explore the relationship between the near-field enhancement, absorption, and scattering spectra of localized plasmonic elements. A simple oscillator model including both internal and radiative damping is developed, and is shown to accurately capture the near- and far-field spectral features of linear optical antennas, including their phase response. At wavelengths away from the interband transitions of the metal, we expect the absorption of a plasmonic element to be red-shifted relative to the scattering, and the near-field to be red-shifted relative to both.

  13. Inter-Individual Variability in Human Response to Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rocke, David

    2016-08-01

    In order to investigate inter-individual variability in response to low-dose ionizing radiation, we are working with three models, 1) in-vivo irradiated human skin, for which we have a realistic model, but with few subjects, all from a previous project, 2) ex-vivo irradiated human skin, for which we also have a realistic model, though with the limitations involved in keeping skin pieces alive in media, and 3) MatTek EpiDermFT skin plugs, which provides a more realistic model than cell lines, which is more controllable than human samples.

  14. Genome Wide Evaluation of Normal Human Tissue in Response to Controlled, In vivo Low-Dose Low LET Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Pathways and Mechanisms Final Report, September 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Rocke, David M.

    2013-09-09

    During course of this project, we have worked in several areas relevant to low-dose ionizing radiation. Using gene expression to measure biological response, we have examined the response of human skin exposed in-vivo to radation, human skin exposed ex-vivo to radiation, and a human-skin model exposed to radiation. We have learned a great deal about the biological response of human skin to low-dose ionizing radiation.

  15. Responses of selected neutron monitors to cosmic radiation at aviation altitudes.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Hiroshi; Yajima, Kazuaki; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Takada, Masashi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2009-06-01

    Cosmic radiation exposure of aircraft crew, which is generally evaluated by numerical simulations, should be verified by measurements. From the perspective of radiological protection, the most contributing radiation component at aviation altitude is neutrons. Measurements of cosmic neutrons, however, are difficult in a civilian aircraft because of the limitations of space and electricity; a small, battery-operated dosimeter is required whereas larger-size instruments are generally used to detect neutrons with a broad range of energy. We thus examined the applicability of relatively new transportable neutron monitors for use in an aircraft. They are (1) a conventional rem meter with a polyethylene moderator (NCN1), (2) an extended energy-range rem meter with a tungsten-powder mixed moderator (WENDI-II), and (3) a recoil-proton scintillation rem meter (PRESCILA). These monitors were installed onto the racks of a business jet aircraft that flew two times near Japan. Observed data were compared to model calculations using a PHITS-based Analytical Radiation Model in the Atmosphere (PARMA). Excellent agreement between measured and calculated values was found for the WENDI-II. The NCN1 showed approximately half of predicted values, which were lower than those expected from its response function. The observations made with PRESCILA showed much higher than expected values; which is attributable to the presence of cosmic-ray protons and muons. These results indicate that careful attention must be paid to the dosimetric properties of a detector employed for verification of cosmic neutron dose.

  16. The role of radiation transport in the thermal response of semitransparent materials to localized laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, Jeffrey; Shestakov, Aleksei; Stolken, James; Vignes, Ryan

    2011-03-09

    Lasers are widely used to modify the internal structure of semitransparent materials for a wide variety of applications, including waveguide fabrication and laser glass damage healing. The gray diffusion approximation used in past models to describe radiation cooling is not adequate for these materials, particularly near the heated surface layer. In this paper we describe a computational model based upon solving the radiation transport equation in 1D by the Pn method with ~500 photon energy bands, and by multi-group radiationdiffusion in 2D with fourteen photon energy bands. The model accounts for the temperature-dependent absorption of infrared laser light and subsequent redistribution of the deposited heat by both radiation and conductive transport. We present representative results for fused silica irradiated with 2–12 W of 4.6 or 10.6 µm laser light for 5–10 s pulse durations in a 1 mm spot, which is small compared to the diameter and thickness of the silica slab. Furthermore, we show that, unlike the case for bulk heating, in localized infrared laser heatingradiation transport plays only a very small role in the thermal response of silica.

  17. Response of biological uv dosimeters to the simulated extraterrestrial uv radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérces, A.; Rontó, G.; Kerékgyártó, T.; Kovács, G.; Lammer, H.

    In the Laboratory polycrystalline uracil thin layer and bacteriophage T7 detectors have been developed for UV dosimetry on the EarthSs surface. Exponential response of the uracil polycrystal has been detected both by absorption spectroscopy and measurements of the refractive index under the influence of terrestrial solar radiation or using UV-C sources. In UV biological dosimetry the UV dose scale is additive starting at a value of zero according to the definition of CIE (Technical Report TC-6-18). The biological dose can be defined by a measured end-effect. In our dosimeters (phage T7 and uracil dosimeter) exposed to natural (terrestrial) UV radiation the proportion of pyrimidin photoproducts among the total photoproducts is smaller than 0.1 and the linear correlation between the biological and physical dose is higher than 0.9. According to the experimental data this linear relationship is often not valid. We observed that UV radiation did not only induce dimerisation but shorter wavelengths caused monomerisation of pyrimidin dimers. Performing the irradiation in oxygen free environment and using a Deuterium lamp as UV source, we could increase monomerisation against dimerisation thus the DNA-based dosimetrySs additivity rule is not fulfilled in these conditions. In this study we will demonstrate those non-linear experiments which constitute the basis of our biological experiments on the International Space Station.

  18. 'Fukusensor:' a genetically engineered plant for reporting DNA damage in response to gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yanhui; Allen, Sara; Millwood, Reginald J; Stewart, C Neal

    2014-12-01

    Transgenic plants can be designed to be 'phytosensors' for detection of environmental contaminants and pathogens. In this study, we describe the design and testing of a radiation phytosensor in the form of green fluorescence protein (GFP)-transgenic Arabidopsis plant utilizing a DNA repair deficiency mutant background as a host. Mutant lines of Arabidopsis AtATM (At3g48190), which are hypersensitive to gamma irradiation, were used to generate stable GFP transgenic plants in which a gfp gene was under the control of a strong constitutive CaMV 35S promoter. Mutant and nonmutant genetic background transgenic plants were treated with 0, 1, 5, 10 and 100 Gy radiation doses, respectively, using a Co-60 source. After 1 week, the GFP expression levels were drastically reduced in young leaves of mutant background plants (treated by 10 and 100 Gy), whereas there were scant visible differences in the fluorescence of the nonmutant background plants. These early results indicate that transgenic plants could serve in a relevant sensor system to report radiation dose and the biological effects to organisms in response to radionuclide contamination.

  19. Low-dose radiation modifies skin response to acute gamma-rays and protons.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiao Wen; Pecaut, Michael J; Cao, Jeffrey D; Moldovan, Maria; Gridley, Daila S

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to obtain pilot data on the effects of protracted low-dose/low-dose-rate (LDR) γ-rays on the skin, both with and without acute gamma or proton irradiation (IR). Six groups of C57BL/6 mice were examined: a) 0 Gy control, b) LDR, c) Gamma, d) LDR+Gamma, e) Proton, and f) LDR+Proton. LDR radiation was delivered to a total dose of 0.01 Gy (0.03 cGy/h), whereas the Gamma and Proton groups received 2 Gy (0.9 Gy/min and 1.0 Gy/min, respectively). Assays were performed 56 days after exposure. Skin samples from all irradiated groups had activated caspase-3, indicative of apoptosis. The significant (p<0.05) increases in immunoreactivity in the Gamma and Proton groups were not present when LDR pre-exposure was included. However, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assay for DNA fragmentation and histological examination of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections revealed no significant differences among groups, regardless of radiation regimen. The data demonstrate that caspase-3 activation initially triggered by both forms of acute radiation was greatly elevated in the skin nearly two months after whole-body exposure. In addition, LDR γ-ray priming ameliorated this response.

  20. An imaging-based tumour growth and treatment response model: Investigating the effect of tumour oxygenation on radiation therapy response

    PubMed Central

    Jeraj, Robert

    2010-01-01

    A multiscale tumour simulation model employing cell-line-specific biological parameters and functional information derived from pre-therapy PET/CT imaging data was developed to investigate effects of different oxygenation levels on the response to radiation therapy. For each tumour voxel, stochastic simulations were performed to model cellular growth and therapeutic response. Model parameters were fitted to published preclinical experiments of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Using the obtained parameters, the model was applied to a human HNSCC case to investigate effects of different uniform and non-uniform oxygenation levels and results were compared for treatment efficacy. Simulations of the preclinical studies showed excellent agreement with published data and underlined the model’s ability to quantitatively reproduce tumour behaviour within experimental uncertainties. When using a simplified transformation to derive non-uniform oxygenation levels from molecular imaging data, simulations of the clinical case showed heterogeneous tumour response and variability in radioresistance with decreasing oxygen levels. Once clinically validated, this model could be used to transform patient-specific data into voxel-based biological objectives for treatment planning and to investigate biologically optimized dose prescriptions. PMID:18677042

  1. Application of linear response theory to experimental data of simultaneous radiation and annealing response of a CMOS device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litovchenko, V.

    1988-01-01

    Results from the application of linear response theory are compared to experimental data from simultaneous radiation and annealing response of a CMOS device. In particular, a method is applied which was developed earlier to determine the characteristic time, t(0), as well as the parameters A and C in the 1n(t) dependence of the linear response function R(t) = -C + A1n(1-t/t(0)). The method is based on a study of the linear response for t being much less than t(0), when R(t) can be expanded in a power series of t: R(t) = R(0) + R'(0)t + 1/2R''(0)t-squared + 1/3R'''(0)t-cubed + ..., where R'(0) and R''(0) are, respectively, the first and second derivatives of R with respect to t. To find the linear response, R(t-t') is substituted in the form of this power series equation into a general equation for the shift of the threshold potential. To test the method, irradiation experiments were conducted on RCA 10(6) rad-hard CMOS IC's. A dose rate of approximately 130 rads/min was used. An IC was irradiated with Co-60 gamma rays for several hours, taking measurements of the threshold potential for one n-channel and one p-channel transistor every ten minutes. For the p-channel transistor, t(0) was found to be approximately 110 min and for the n-channel, t(0) was approximately 70 min. For the p-channel, the theoretical curve deviates from the experimental points only after 70 min; for the n-channel, the deviation takes place after 45 min. Additional findings are discussed and the application of the method to pure annealing is described.

  2. Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A. J.; Manohar, C. F.; Nelson, D. O.; Furtado, M. R.; Bhattacharya, M. S.; Marchetti, F.; Coleman, M.A.

    2011-04-18

    We investigated the low dose dependency of the transcriptional response of human cells to characterize the shape and biological functions associated with the dose response curve and to identify common and conserved functions of low dose expressed genes across cells and tissues. Human lymphoblastoid (HL) cells from two unrelated individuals were exposed to graded doses of radiation spanning the range of 1-10 cGy were analyzed by transcriptome profiling, qPCR and bioinformatics, in comparison to sham irradiated samples. A set of {approx}80 genes showed consistent responses in both cell lines; these genes were associated with homeostasis mechanisms (e.g., membrane signaling, molecule transport), subcellular locations (e.g., Golgi, and endoplasmic reticulum), and involved diverse signal transduction pathways. The majority of radiation-modulated genes had plateau-like responses across 1-10 cGy, some with suggestive evidence that transcription was modulated at doses below 1 cGy. MYC, FOS and TP53 were the major network nodes of the low-dose response in HL cells. Comparison our low dose expression findings in HL cells with those of prior studies in mouse brain after whole body exposure, in human keratinocyte cultures, and in endothelial cells cultures, indicates that certain components of the low dose radiation response are broadly conserved across cell types and tissues, independent of proliferation status.

  3. Radiation response of industrial materials: Dose-rate and morphology implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berejka, Anthony J.

    2007-08-01

    Industrial uses of ionizing radiation mostly rely upon high current, high dose-rate (100 kGy/s) electron beam (EB) accelerators. To a lesser extent, industry uses low dose-rate (2.8 × 10-3 kGy/s) radioactive Cobalt-60 as a gamma source, generally for some rather specific purposes, as medical device sterilization and the treatment of food and foodstuffs. There are nearly nine times as many (∼1400) high current EB units in commercial operation than gamma sources (∼160). However, gamma sources can be easily scaled-down so that much research on materials effects is conducted using gamma radiation. Likewise, laboratories are more likely to have very low beam current and consequently low dose-rate accelerators such as Van de Graaff generators and linear accelerators. With the advent of very high current EB accelerators, X-ray processing has become an industrially viable option. With X-rays from high power sources, dose-rates can be modulated based upon accelerator power and the attenuation of the X-ray by the distance of the material from the X-ray target. Dose and dose-rate dependence has been found to be of consequence in several commercial applications which can employ the use of ionizing radiation. The combination of dose and dose-rate dependence of the polymerization and crosslinking of wood impregnants and of fiber composite matrix materials can yield more economically viable results which have promising commercial potential. Monomer and oligomer structure also play an important role in attaining these desirable results. The influence of morphology is shown on the radiation response of olefin polymers, such as ethylene, propylene and isobutylene polymers and their copolymers. Both controlled morphology and controlled dose-rate have commercial consequences. These are also impacted both by the adroit selection of materials and through the possible use of X-ray processing.

  4. Micro RNA responses to chronic or acute exposures to low dose ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, M. Ahmad; Omaruddin, Romaica A.; Kreger, Bridget; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Azzam, Edouard I.

    2014-01-01

    Human health risks of exposure to low dose ionizing radiation remain ambiguous and are the subject of intense debate. A wide variety of biological effects are induced after cellular exposure to ionizing radiation, but the underlying molecular mechanism(s) remain to be completely understood. We hypothesized that low dose c-radiation-induced effects are controlled by the modulation of micro RNA (miRNA) that participate in the control of gene expression at the posttranscriptional level and are involved in many cellular processes. We monitored the expression of several miRNA in human cells exposed to acute or chronic low doses of 10 cGy or a moderate dose of 400 cGy of 137Cs γ-rays. Dose, dose rate and time dependent differences in the relative expression of several miRNA were investigated. The expression patterns of many miRNA differed after exposure to either chronic or acute 10 cGy. The expression of miRNA let-7e, a negative regulator of RAS oncogene, and the c-MYC miRNA cluster were upregulated after 10 cGy chronic dose but were downregulated after 3 h of acute 10 cGy. The miR-21 was upregulated in chronic or acute low dose and moderate dose treated cells and its target genes hPDCD4, hPTEN, hSPRY2, and hTPM1 were found to be downregulated. These findings provide evidence that low dose and dose rate c-irradiation dictate the modulation of miRNA, which can result in a differential cellular response than occurs at high doses. This information will contribute to understanding the risks to human health after exposure to low dose radiation. PMID:22367372

  5. {sup 18}-F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography Evaluation of Early Metabolic Response During Radiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Julie K.; Lin, Lillie L.; Siegel, Barry A.; Miller, Tom R.; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To document changes in cervical tumor {sup 18}-F-fluorodeoxyglocose (FDG) uptake during radiation therapy and to correlate those changes with post-treatment tumor response and survival outcome. Methods and Materials: A total of 36 patients with Stage Ib1 to IIIb cervical cancer were enrolled in an institutional protocol examining the use of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for brachytherapy treatment planning. As part of this study, FDG-PET or PET/computed tomograpy (CT) images were obtained before, during, and after the completion of radiation therapy. Tumor metabolic responses were assessed qualitatively and semi-quantitatively by measurement of the maximal standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}). Results: Post-treatment FDG-PET images were obtained for 36 patients in this study. Of the patients, 29 patients had a complete metabolic response on the post-treatment PET, 4 had a partial metabolic response, and 3 had new sites of FDG uptake. Six patients had a complete metabolic response observed during radiation therapy, 26 had a partial metabolic response and 4 had stable or increased tumor metabolic activity. For patients with complete metabolic response during radiation therapy, median time to complete response was 29.5 days (range, 18-43 days). The mean cervical tumor SUV{sub max} decreased from 11.2 (SD, 6.3; range, 2.1-38.0) pretreatment to 2.4 (SD, 2.7; range, 0-8.8) mid treatment, and 0.5 (SD, 1.7; range, 0-8.3) post-treatment. Conclusions: During radiation therapy for cervical cancer, FDG-PET can be used to monitor treatment response. Complete metabolic response during radiation therapy was observed for a subset of patients. Recommendations regarding the optimal timing of FDG-PET during treatment for cervical cancer will require further systematic study.

  6. Modeling Dose-response at Low Dose: A Systems Biology Approach for Ionization Radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuchao; Ricci, Paolo F

    2010-03-18

    For ionization radiation (IR) induced cancer, a linear non-threshold (LNT) model at very low doses is the default used by a number of national and international organizations and in regulatory law. This default denies any positive benefit from any level of exposure. However, experimental observations and theoretical biology have found that both linear and J-shaped IR dose-response curves can exist at those very low doses. We develop low dose J-shaped dose-response, based on systems biology, and thus justify its use regarding exposure to IR. This approach incorporates detailed, molecular and cellular descriptions of biological/toxicological mechanisms to develop a dose-response model through a set of nonlinear, differential equations describing the signaling pathways and biochemical mechanisms of cell cycle checkpoint, apoptosis, and tumor incidence due to IR. This approach yields a J-shaped dose response curve while showing where LNT behaviors are likely to occur. The results confirm the hypothesis of the J-shaped dose response curve: the main reason is that, at low-doses of IR, cells stimulate protective systems through a longer cell arrest time per unit of IR dose. We suggest that the policy implications of this approach are an increasingly correct way to deal with precautionary measures in public health.

  7. The role of MOF in the ionizing radiation response is conserved in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Bhadra, Manika P; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Pushpavallipvalli, Sreerangam N C V L; Sarkar, Arpita; Bag, Indira; Krishnan, Anita; Lucchesi, John C; Kumar, Rakesh; Yang, Qin; Pandita, Raj K; Singh, Mayank; Bhadra, Utpal; Eissenberg, Joel C; Pandita, Tej K

    2012-02-01

    In Drosophila, males absent on the first (MOF) acetylates histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16ac). This acetylation mark is highly enriched on the male X chromosome and is required for dosage compensation in Drosophila but not utilized for such in mammals. Recently, we and others reported that mammalian MOF, through H4K16ac, has a critical role at multiple stages in the DNA damage response (DDR) and double-strand break repair pathways. The goal of this study was to test whether mof is similarly required for the response to ionizing radiation (IR) in Drosophila. We report that Drosophila mof mutations in males and females, as well as mof knockdown in SL-2 cells, reduce post-irradiation survival. MOF depletion in SL-2 cells also results in an elevated frequency of metaphases with chromosomal aberrations, suggesting that MOF is involved in DDR. Mutation in Drosophila mof also results in a defective mitotic checkpoint, enhanced apoptosis, and a defective p53 response post-irradiation. In addition, IR exposure enhanced H4K16ac levels in Drosophila as it also does in mammals. These results are the first to demonstrate a requirement for MOF in the whole animal IR response and suggest that the role of MOF in the response to IR is conserved between Drosophila and mammals.

  8. The role of MOF in the ionizing radiation response is conserved in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Bhadra, Manika P.; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Pushpavallipvalli, Sreerangam NCVL; Sarkar, Arpita; Bag, Indira; Krishnan, Anita; Lucchesi, John C.; Kumar, Rakesh; Yang, Qin; Pandita, Raj K.; Singh, Mayank; Bhadra, Utpal; Eissenberg, Joel C.; Pandita, Tej K.

    2014-01-01

    In Drosophila, males absent on the first (MOF) acetylates histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16ac). This acetylation mark is highly enriched on the male X chromosome and is required for dosage compensation in Drosophila but not utilized for such in mammals. Recently, we and others reported that mammalian MOF, through H4K16ac, has a critical role at multiple stages in the DNA damage response (DDR) and double-strand break repair pathways. The goal of this study was to test whether mof is similarly required for the response to ionizing radiation (IR) in Drosophila. We report that Drosophila mof mutations in males and females, as well as mof knockdown in SL-2 cells, reduce post-irradiation survival. MOF depletion in SL-2 cells also results in an elevated frequency of metaphases with chromosomal aberrations, suggesting that MOF is involved in DDR. Mutation in Drosophila mof also results in a defective mitotic checkpoint, enhanced apoptosis, and a defective p53 response post-irradiation. In addition, IR exposure enhanced H4K16ac levels in Drosophila as it also does in mammals. These results are the first to demonstrate a requirement for MOF in the whole animal IR response and suggest that the role of MOF in the response to IR is conserved between Drosophila and mammals. PMID:22072291

  9. A paracrine signal mediates the cell transformation response to low dose gamma radiation in JB6 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Thomas J.; Siegel, Robert W.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Chrisler, William B.; Lei, Xingye C.; Colburn, Nancy H.

    2005-05-01

    Radiation at low doses (? 50 cGy) can enhance or reduce tumor incidence in the mouse skin multistage model of carcinogenesis, depending on the timing of radiation exposure relative to chemical initiator. Here we have used JB6 mouse epidermal cells, an in vitro model of late stage tumor promotion, to evaluate the effects of low dose gamma radiation on cell transformation response. JB6 cells were isolated from the DNA-dependent Protein Kinase (DNA-PK) deficient Balb/c mouse that exhibits an unusually sensitive mammary tumor response to ionizing radiation. Exposure of JB6 cells to low dose (2-20 cGy) gamma radiation increased cell transformation response in a dose- and cell density-dependent fashion. JB6 cells were transfected with a membrane targeted enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP-membrane) and used as bystander cells in a co-culture model. Co-culture of 10 cGy irradiated JB6 cells with na?ve EYFP-membrane cells resulted in a significant increase in EYFP-expressing colonies, relative to co-cultures of sham exposed P+ cells/na?ve EYFP-membrane cells. In contrast, low dose gamma radiation (20 cGy) reduced tumor promoter (epidermal growth factor; 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate)-induced transformation response and cell survival in a clonogenic assay to a comparable extent (40%). Our results demonstrate different selective pressures depending on whether low dose radiation modulated the cell transformation response of irradiated or bystander cells, or whether irradiation occurred in conjunction with tumor promoter treatment. The co-culture system developed here is a promising model to define positive and negative selective pressures induced by low dose radiation in a DNA damage repair deficient context that are relevant to carcinogenesis responses.

  10. X-ray transport and radiation response assessment (XTRRA) experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, Jr., C. G.; Yeoman, M. F.; ...

    2016-08-10

    Our team has developed an experimental platform to evaluate the x-ray-generated stress and impulse in materials. Experimental activities include x-ray source development, design of the sample mounting hardware and sensors interfaced to the NIF’s diagnostics insertion system, and system integration into the facility. This paper focuses on the X-ray Transport and Radiation Response Assessment (XTRRA) test cassettes built for these experiments. The test cassette is designed to position six samples at three predetermined distances from the source, each known to within ±1% accuracy. Built in calorimeters give in situ measurements of the x-ray environment along the sample lines of sight.more » We discuss the measured accuracy of sample responses, as well as planned modifications to the XTRRA cassette.« less

  11. X-ray transport and radiation response assessment (XTRRA) experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, Jr., C. G.; Yeoman, M. F.; Fisher, J. H.; Seiler, S. W.; Hinshelwood, D.; Compton, S.; Holdener, F. R.; Kemp, G. E.; Newlander, C. D.; Gilliam, R. P.; Froula, N.; Lilly, M.; Davis, J. F.; Lerch, MAJ. A.; Blue, B. E.

    2016-08-10

    Our team has developed an experimental platform to evaluate the x-ray-generated stress and impulse in materials. Experimental activities include x-ray source development, design of the sample mounting hardware and sensors interfaced to the NIF’s diagnostics insertion system, and system integration into the facility. This paper focuses on the X-ray Transport and Radiation Response Assessment (XTRRA) test cassettes built for these experiments. The test cassette is designed to position six samples at three predetermined distances from the source, each known to within ±1% accuracy. Built in calorimeters give in situ measurements of the x-ray environment along the sample lines of sight. We discuss the measured accuracy of sample responses, as well as planned modifications to the XTRRA cassette.

  12. Response of air-filled ion chambers to high-intensity radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.; Brown, D.

    1993-06-01

    Ion chambers are one of the most popular types of detectors used for beam loss-monitor systems. To provide a foundation for the development of future loss-monitor systems, and to fully characterize the ion chambers in use at LAMPF, we have studied the response of air-filled cylindrical ion chambers to high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulses. The most intense pulses were about 180 rad in 250 ns (the equivalent steady-state dose rate was about 700 Mrad/h). We filled our chambers with nitrogen gas at 760 Torr and air at 600 Torr. The ion chambers were driven into extreme nonlinear response. We hope these data will be used to design loss-monitor systems based on air-filled ion chambers, thus eliminating the need for gas-flow systems and/or airtight ion chambers.

  13. Response of air-filled ion chambers to high-intensity radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.; Brown, D.

    1993-01-01

    Ion chambers are one of the most popular types of detectors used for beam loss-monitor systems. To provide a foundation for the development of future loss-monitor systems, and to fully characterize the ion chambers in use at LAMPF, we have studied the response of air-filled cylindrical ion chambers to high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulses. The most intense pulses were about 180 rad in 250 ns (the equivalent steady-state dose rate was about 700 Mrad/h). We filled our chambers with nitrogen gas at 760 Torr and air at 600 Torr. The ion chambers were driven into extreme nonlinear response. We hope these data will be used to design loss-monitor systems based on air-filled ion chambers, thus eliminating the need for gas-flow systems and/or airtight ion chambers.

  14. Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gao, Fei; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Wang, Zhiguo; Prange, Micah P.; Wu, Dangxin

    2014-12-01

    This Final Report presents work carried out at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled “Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators” (Project number: PL10-Scin-theor-PD2Jf) and led by Drs. Fei Gao and Sebastien N. Kerisit. This project was divided into four tasks: 1) Electronic response functions (ab initio data model) 2) Electron-hole yield, variance, and spatial distribution 3) Ab initio calculations of information carrier properties 4) Transport of electron-hole pairs and scintillation efficiency Detailed information on the results obtained in each of the four tasks is provided in this Final Report. Furthermore, published peer-reviewed articles based on the work carried under this project are included in Appendix. This work was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D/NA-22), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  15. Validation of functional imaging as a biomarker for radiation treatment response.

    PubMed

    Jentsch, C; Beuthien-Baumann, B; Troost, E G C; Shakirin, G

    2015-07-01

    Major advances in radiotherapy techniques, increasing knowledge of tumour biology and the ability to translate these advances into new therapeutic approaches are important goals towards more individualized cancer treatment. With the development of non-invasive functional and molecular imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET)-CT scanning and MRI, there is now a need to evaluate potential new biomarkers for tumour response prediction, for treatment individualization is not only based on morphological criteria but also on biological tumour characteristics. The goal of individualization of radiotherapy is to improve treatment outcome and potentially reduce chronic treatment toxicity. This review gives an overview of the molecular and functional imaging modalities of tumour hypoxia and tumour cell metabolism, proliferation and perfusion as predictive biomarkers for radiation treatment response in head and neck tumours and in lung tumours. The current status of knowledge on integration of PET/CT/MRI into treatment management and bioimage-guided adaptive radiotherapy are discussed.

  16. The response of a silicon diode designed for use as a detector for direct solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macome, M. A.; Mlatho, J. S. P.; McPherson, M.

    2007-11-01

    A low-cost direct solar radiation detector (DSRD) has been designed, characterized and calibrated. The detector was made of a simple silicon diode and then characterized with respect to spectral response, polar response and environmental stability. It was calibrated by using an Eppley normal incidence pyrheliometer (NIP) mounted on an Eppley power driven sun tracker (ST) whose axis is parallel to the Earth's axis of rotation. The DSRD and the NIP were mounted together on the ST. The results indicate that the DSRD follows the NIP very closely and can therefore be used in its place. The correlation between the DSRD and the NIP data is good with a correlation factor close to unity and a root mean square value close to zero.

  17. Lighting considerations in controlled environments for nonphotosynthetic plant responses to blue and ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, M. M.; Flint, S. D.

    1994-01-01

    This essay will consider both physical and photobiological aspects of controlled environment lighting in the spectral region beginning in the blue and taken to the normal limit of the solar spectrum in the ultraviolet. The primary emphasis is directed to questions of plant response to sunlight. Measurement and computations used in radiation dosimetry in this part of the spectrum are also briefly treated. Because of interest in the ozone depletion problem, there has been some activity in plant UV-B research and there are several recent reviews available. Some aspects of growth chamber lighting as it relates to UV-B research were covered earlier. Apart from work related to the blue/UV-A receptor, less attention has been given to UV-A responses.

  18. X-ray transport and radiation response assessment (XTRRA) experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, C. G.; Yeoman, M. F.; Fisher, J. H.; Seiler, S. W.; Hinshelwood, D.; Compton, S.; Holdener, F. R.; Kemp, G. E.; Newlander, C. D.; Gilliam, R. P.; Froula, N.; Lilly, M.; Davis, J. F.; Lerch, MAJ. A.; Blue, B. E.

    2016-11-01

    Our team has developed an experimental platform to evaluate the x-ray-generated stress and impulse in materials. Experimental activities include x-ray source development, design of the sample mounting hardware and sensors interfaced to the National Ignition Facility's diagnostics insertion system, and system integration into the facility. This paper focuses on the X-ray Transport and Radiation Response Assessment (XTRRA) test cassettes built for these experiments. The test cassette is designed to position six samples at three predetermined distances from the source, each known to within ±1% accuracy. Built-in calorimeters give in situ measurements of the x-ray environment along the sample lines of sight. The measured accuracy of sample responses as well as planned modifications to the XTRRA cassette is discussed.

  19. Identifying Loss Mechanisms Responsible for the Rapid Depletion of Outer Radiation Belt Electron Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. C.; Onsager, T. G.; O'Brien, T.; Fraser, B. J.

    2004-12-01

    Since the discovery of earth's radiation belts researchers have sought to explain and predict the changing relativistic electron flux levels in the outer belt. This goal has proved a perplexing challenge because, surprisingly, flux levels do not always rise as energy input from the solar wind increases during active periods such as geomagnetic storms [Reeves et al., 2003;O'Brien et al., 2001]. The erratic response of the radiation belt electrons to geomagnetic activity suggests that flux levels are set by a teetering struggle between acceleration and loss. Thus, to predict flux variations, both processes must be understood. Some acceleration mechanisms have been proposed and tested resulting in incremental progress, but still little is known about how relativistic electrons are removed from the magnetosphere. We investigate how relativistic electrons are lost from the outer radiation belt using a superposed epoch analysis of electron flux decrease events identified in multi-satellite data [Onsager et al., 2002; Green et al., 2004]. More specifically, we test three mechanisms proposed to explain the flux reductions: adiabatic motion in response to a changing magnetic field topology, drift out the magnetopause boundary, and scattering into the atmosphere. The superposed study shows that the magnetic field becomes temporarily stretched at dusk suggesting that adiabatic electron motion might contribute to the initial flux reduction; however, the electron flux does not recover when the magnetic field recovers, indicating that true loss from the magnetosphere occurs. Magnetopause encounters should similarly affect both high energy protons and electrons; however, no concurrent reduction of proton flux is observed implying that this mechanism is not active. Low altitude observations show increased electron flux in the loss cone suggesting that scattering to the atmosphere is the cause the flux depletions. We investigate possible causes of the increased scattering including

  20. Cyclic-radiation response of murine fibrosarcoma cells grown as pulmonary nodules

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J.; Hunter, N.

    1982-10-01

    The radiation age response of murine fibrosarcoma (FSa) cells grown as pulmonary nodules in C/sub 3/Hf/Kam mice was determined. FSa cells were irradiated in vivo either with 10 Gy as 14 day-old lung tumors (i.e., artificial macrometastases) prior to cell separation or with 5 Gy as single cells trapped in the lungs of recipient mice (i.e., artificial micrometastases) following cell separation and synchronization by centrifugal elutriation. Flow microfluorometry (FMF) was used to determine cell-cycle parameters and the relative synchrony of the separated populations, as well as the percent contamination of normal diploid cells in each of the tumor cell populations. Tumor populations containing up to 90% G/sub 1/, 60% S-, and 75% G/sub 2/+M-phase tumor cells were obtained. Cell clonogenicity, determined using a lung colony assay, ranged from 0.7 to 6% for control FSa cells from the various elutriator fractions. The radiation sensitivity of these separated cell populations varied by a factor of 6, regardless of whether the cells were irradiated as artificial micro or macro-metastases. In each experiment, tumor populations most enriched in s-phase cells exhibited the greatest radiation sensitivity. To confirm that these populations were highly enriched in S-phase cells and to demonstrate that they were more radiosensitive than FSa cells in other parts of the cell cycle, the elutriated tumor populations were exposed to either suicide labeling by high specific activity tritiated thymidine or hydroxyurea. The resultant age response curves were qualitatively similar to those obtained following irradiation and reflected the S-phase sensitivity of FSa cells to these agents.

  1. The radiative response of the lower troposphere to moisture intrusions into the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Erik; Devasthale, Abhay; Tjernström, Michael; Ekman, Annica M. L.; L'Ecuyer, Tristan

    2016-04-01

    Water vapour (WV) transport into the Arctic occurs on daily to seasonal time scales and affects the Arctic atmosphere and surface energy balance in a number of ways. Extreme transport events, hereafter referred to as WV intrusions (WVI), account for a significant fraction of the total transport of water vapour into the Arctic. Considering their overall impact on the total moisture transport, WVIs are expected to strongly influence the radiative properties of the lower troposphere. Being a potent greenhouse gas, WV has a warming effect on the surface via its longwave forcing. As a result, WVIs have potential to warm the sea-ice surface and depending on their strength and degree of persistence, precondition accelerated melting of sea ice in subsequent months following the intrusion WVIs also affect the prevalent thermodynamical characteristics of the lowermost troposphere such as the presence of temperature and humidity inversions. They can further modulate cloud formation processes by changing the local thermodynamics. Characterizing the response of the lower troposphere to WVIs is therefore important, mainly to improve our understanding of the processes, affecting, air-sea-ice interactions. In this context, the aim of the present study is to provide observationally based insights into how the lower troposphere radiatively responds to WVIs, defined as events that exceed 90-percentile value of the poleward meridional moisture flux across 70° N. Using the combined lidar and radar (CloudSat+CALIPSO) data from the A-Train constellation of satellites from 2006 through 2010 together with data from AMSR-E, AIRS and MODIS, we examine the dominant circulation patterns that favour WVI and the surface response to WVI. We further quantify changes in cloudiness and cloud radiative effects during WVI.

  2. Modeling the response of thermoluminescence detectors exposed to low- and high-LET radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Olko, Pawel; Bilski, Pawel; Budzanowski, Maciej; Waligórski, Michael Patrick Russell; Reitz, Guenther

    2002-12-01

    Lithium fluoride thermoluminescence (TL) detectors, with different Li composition (Li-6 and Li-7) and various activators (LiF:Mg,Ti, LiF:Mg,Cu,P), are widely used for dosimetry in space. The primary radiation field in space is composed of fast electrons, protons and heavy charged particles (HCP). By its interaction with the structures of the spacecraft, this field may be modified inside the crew cabin. Therefore, calibration of TL detectors against a dose of gamma-rays is not sufficient for relating the TL readout to absorbed dose or to quantities relevant in radiation protection, without suitable correction. We introduce and calculate the detection efficiency, eta, relative to gamma-ray dose, of lithium fluoride detectors after proton and heavy charged particle (HCP) irradiation. We calculate eta for MCP-N (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) and for MTS-N (LiF:Mg,Ti) using microdosimetric models. The microdosimetric distributions used in these models (for HCP of charges between Z=1 to Z=8 and in the energy range between 0.3 MeV/amu and 20 MeV/amu) are calculated using an analytical model, based on the results of Monte Carlo simulated charged particle tracks using the MOCA-14 code. The ratio etaMCP-N/etaMTS-N for protons of stopping power (in water) below 10 keV/microm lies in the range between 0.65 and 1.0 and for HCP with Z>1--between 0.3 and 0.6. The stopping power of the particle is found not to be a unique parameter to scale the response of TL detectors. The combination of response of LiF:Mg,Cu,P and LiF:Mg,Cu,P detectors can be more suitable for a dose correction in space radiation fields.

  3. Thermoluminescence response of K2YF5:Tb3+ crystals to photon radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Faria, L O; Lo, D; Kui, H W; Khaidukov, N M; Nogueira, M S

    2004-01-01

    This investigation has been performed to test the feasibility of using K2YF5:Tb3+ crystals as thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD). K2YF5 single crystals doped with 0.2, 10.0 and 50.0 at.% of trivalent optically active Tb3+ ions as well as K2TbF5 and undoped K2YF5 crystals have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Polished crystal platelets with thickness of about 1 mm have been irradiated with X and gamma rays in order to study thermoluminescent (TL) sensitivity as well as dose and energy response in terms of the Tb3+ concentration in K2YF5. Within this concentration series, K2YF5 crystals doped with 10.0 at.% Tb3+ have been found to have maximum TL response due to a broad asymmetric TL glow peak at 269 degrees C with good linearity of dose response and reproducibility of dose measurements. After deconvolution, the main dosimetric peak has been revealed to be composed of two individual peaks, both with linear TL response behaviour, centered at 210 and 269 degrees C. As it has been proved, the linear TL signal coefficient for K2Y0.9Tb0.1F5 is almost 10 times greater than that for commercial TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti), irradiated with a 137Cs gamma radiation source at the same conditions. The reported results indicate that K2YF5 crystals doped with Tb3+ have potential as promising materials for radiation dosemeters.

  4. Responses of human embryonic stem cells and their differentiated progeny to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Ying; Zhang, Ningzhe; Ellerby, Lisa M.; Davalos, Albert R.; Zeng, Xianmin; Campisi, Judith; Desprez, Pierre-Yves

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer hESCs and their progeny, NSCs and neurons, were exposed to ionizing radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upon irradiation, most hESCs died within 5-7 h. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surviving NSCs underwent senescence and displayed features of astrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surviving NSCs did not display the secretory phenotype expressed by pure astrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study is to better understand the stress-responses of hESCs and their progeny. -- Abstract: Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) hold promise for the treatment of many human pathologies. For example, hESCs and the neuronal stem cells (NSCs) and neurons derived from them have significant potential as transplantation therapies for a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Two concerns about the use of hESCs and their differentiated derivatives are their ability to function and their ability to resist neoplastic transformation in response to stresses that inevitably arise during their preparation for transplantation. To begin to understand how these cells handle genotoxic stress, we examined the responses of hESCs and derived NSCs and neurons to ionizing radiation (IR). Undifferentiated hESCs were extremely sensitive to IR, with nearly all the cells undergoing cell death within 5-7 h. NSCs and neurons were substantially more resistant to IR, with neurons showing the most resistant. Of interest, NSCs that survived IR underwent cellular senescence and acquired astrocytic characteristics. Unlike IR-treated astrocytes, however, the NSC-derived astrocytic cells that survived IR did not display the typical pro-inflammatory, pro-carcinogenic senescence-associated secretory phenotype. These findings suggest distinct genotoxic stress-responses of hESCs and derived NSC and neuronal populations, and suggest that damaged NSCs, while failing to function, may not cause local inflammation.

  5. Response of the Water Cycle of West Africa and Atlantic to Radiative Forcing by Saharan Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Sud, Yogesh C.; Walker, Gregory L.

    2010-01-01

    The responses of the atmospheric water cycle and climate of West Africa and the Atlantic to radiative forcing of Saharan dust are studied using the NASA finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM), coupled to a mixed layer ocean. We find evidence in support of the "elevated heat pump" (EHP) mechanism that underlines the responses of the atmospheric water cycle to dust forcing as follow. During the boreal summer, as a result of large-scale atmospheric feed back triggered by absorbing dust aerosols, rainfall and cloudiness are enhanced over the West Africa/Easter Atlantic ITCZ, and suppressed over the West Atlantic and Caribbean. region. Shortwave radiation absorption by dust warms the atmosphere and cools the surface, while long wave has the opposite response. The elevated dust layer warms the air over Nest Africa and the eastern Atlantic. The condensation heating associated with the induced deep convection drives and maintains an anomalous large-scale east-west overturning circulation with rising motion over West Africa/eastern Atlantic, and sinking motion over the Caribbean region. The response also includes a strengthening of the West African monsoon, manifested in northward shift of the West Africa precipitation over land, increased low-level westerlies flow over West Africa at the southern edge of the dust layer, and a near surface energy fluxes, resulting in cooling of the Nest African land and the eastern Atlantic, and a warming in the West Atlantic and Caribbean. The EHP effect is most effective for moderate to highly absorbing dusts, and becomes minimized for reflecting dust with single scattering albedo at 0.95 or higher.

  6. A "Bony" Proposition: Pathways Mediating Responses to Simulated Weightlessness and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tahimic, Candice; Globus, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that weightlessness and radiation, two elements of the spaceflight environment, can lead to detrimental changes in human musculoskeletal tissue, including bone loss and muscle atrophy. This bone loss is thought to be brought about by the increased activity of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and functional changes in bone-forming osteoblasts, cells that give rise to mature osteocytes. My current area of research focuses on understanding the mechanistic basis for the responses of bone to the spaceflight environment using earth-based animal and cellular models. The overarching goal is to identify molecular targets to prevent bone loss in space exploration and earth-based scenarios of radiotherapy, accidental radiation exposure and reduced mobility. In this talk, I will highlight two signaling pathways that potentially play a role in the response of bone to spaceflight-like conditions. Firstly, I will discuss the role of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) signaling as it pertains to the recovery of bone from simulated weightlessness (rodent hindlimb unloading model). Secondly, I will share recent findings from our study that aims to understand the emerging role of autophagy in maintaining the balance between bone formation and resorption (bone homeostasis) as well as normal skeletal structure.

  7. Stimuli responsive deswelling of radiation synthesized collagen hydrogel in simulated physiological environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangmei; Xu, Ling; Wei, Shicheng; Zhai, Maolin; Li, Jiuqiang

    2013-08-01

    Collagen hydrogels were prepared via radiation crosslinking. The simulated physiological environmental effects related to their biomedical applications on the volume phase transition of collagen hydrogel were studied, that is stimuli response to ions, temperature, and pH. The deswelling behavior of collagen hydrogel depends on the salt concentration, temperature, pH, and the hydrogel preparation procedure. Meanwhile, hydrogel structure related to the volume phase transition was investigated by FTIR, fluorescence spectrum, and HR-MAS NMR. Deswelling in salt solution caused little change on collagen conformation, and a denser network led to more significant tyrosine-derived fluorescence quenching. Hydrogen bonding between hydrated water and collagen polypeptide chain was dissociated and the activity of hydrophobic side chain increased, inducing a higher extent of contraction with the increasing of salt concentration. Moreover, salt solution treatments weakened the electrostatic interactions, side chains interactions, and hydrogen bonding of collagen hydrogel, which reduced the thermal stability of collagen hydrogel. Comparing with cell-free collagen hydrogel contraction, fibroblasts did not aggravate contraction of collagen hydrogel significantly. This study elucidated the deswelling mechanism of radiation crosslinked collagen hydrogel in simulated physiological environment and provides strategies for controlling the stimuli response of collagen hydrogel in biomedical application.

  8. Shipwreck rates reveal Caribbean tropical cyclone response to past radiative forcing

    PubMed Central

    Trouet, Valerie; Harley, Grant L.; Domínguez-Delmás, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Assessing the impact of future climate change on North Atlantic tropical cyclone (TC) activity is of crucial societal importance, but the limited quantity and quality of observational records interferes with the skill of future TC projections. In particular, North Atlantic TC response to radiative forcing is poorly understood and creates the dominant source of uncertainty for twenty-first-century projections. Here, we study TC variability in the Caribbean during the Maunder Minimum (MM; 1645–1715 CE), a period defined by the most severe reduction in solar irradiance in documented history (1610–present). For this purpose, we combine a documentary time series of Spanish shipwrecks in the Caribbean (1495–1825 CE) with a tree-growth suppression chronology from the Florida Keys (1707–2009 CE). We find a 75% reduction in decadal-scale Caribbean TC activity during the MM, which suggests modulation of the influence of reduced solar irradiance by the cumulative effect of cool North Atlantic sea surface temperatures, El Niño–like conditions, and a negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation. Our results emphasize the need to enhance our understanding of the response of these oceanic and atmospheric circulation patterns to radiative forcing and climate change to improve the skill of future TC projections. PMID:26951648

  9. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the ionizing radiation response by ATM and p53

    PubMed Central

    Venkata Narayanan, Ishwarya; Paulsen, Michelle T.; Bedi, Karan; Berg, Nathan; Ljungman, Emily A.; Francia, Sofia; Veloso, Artur; Magnuson, Brian; di Fagagna, Fabrizio d’Adda; Wilson, Thomas E.; Ljungman, Mats

    2017-01-01

    In response to ionizing radiation (IR), cells activate a DNA damage response (DDR) pathway to re-program gene expression. Previous studies using total cellular RNA analyses have shown that the stress kinase ATM and the transcription factor p53 are integral components required for induction of IR-induced gene expression. These studies did not distinguish between changes in RNA synthesis and RNA turnover and did not address the role of enhancer elements in DDR-mediated transcriptional regulation. To determine the contribution of synthesis and degradation of RNA and monitor the activity of enhancer elements following exposure to IR, we used the recently developed Bru-seq, BruChase-seq and BruUV-seq techniques. Our results show that ATM and p53 regulate both RNA synthesis and stability as well as enhancer element activity following exposure to IR. Importantly, many genes in the p53-signaling pathway were coordinately up-regulated by both increased synthesis and RNA stability while down-regulated genes were suppressed either by reduced synthesis or stability. Our study is the first of its kind that independently assessed the effects of ionizing radiation on transcription and post-transcriptional regulation in normal human cells. PMID:28256581

  10. Modification of the radiation response of the mouse kidney by misonidazole and WR-2721

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.V.; Denekamp, J.

    1983-11-01

    The radiation response of the mouse kidney has been assayed after a range of x ray doses given with or without the nitroimidazole misonidazole or the aminothiol WR-2721. Sensitization and protection of the kidney were investigated by comparing the x ray dose needed to achieve a particular level of injury in the presence or absence of the drug. Two functional assays and kidney weight at sacrifice were used to obtain dose response curves. Urine output and /sup 51/Chromium EDTA excretion were used as functional assays at 25 and 49 weeks after irradiation. They demonstrated no radio-sensitization by misonidazole with 1, 2 or 5 fractions of x rays. Significant radioprotection was seen when 400 mg kg /sup 1/WR-2721 was given before single x ray doses (PF = 1.34). Similar radioprotection was observed when renal weight at 1 year after irradiation was used as the third assay of damage. These results confirm that the kidney responds as a well-oxygenated normal tissue with only a small protection being afforded against radiation injury by WR-2721.

  11. Shipwreck rates reveal Caribbean tropical cyclone response to past radiative forcing.

    PubMed

    Trouet, Valerie; Harley, Grant L; Domínguez-Delmás, Marta

    2016-03-22

    Assessing the impact of future climate change on North Atlantic tropical cyclone (TC) activity is of crucial societal importance, but the limited quantity and quality of observational records interferes with the skill of future TC projections. In particular, North Atlantic TC response to radiative forcing is poorly understood and creates the dominant source of uncertainty for twenty-first-century projections. Here, we study TC variability in the Caribbean during the Maunder Minimum (MM; 1645-1715 CE), a period defined by the most severe reduction in solar irradiance in documented history (1610-present). For this purpose, we combine a documentary time series of Spanish shipwrecks in the Caribbean (1495-1825 CE) with a tree-growth suppression chronology from the Florida Keys (1707-2009 CE). We find a 75% reduction in decadal-scale Caribbean TC activity during the MM, which suggests modulation of the influence of reduced solar irradiance by the cumulative effect of cool North Atlantic sea surface temperatures, El Niño-like conditions, and a negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation. Our results emphasize the need to enhance our understanding of the response of these oceanic and atmospheric circulation patterns to radiative forcing and climate change to improve the skill of future TC projections.

  12. Shipwreck rates reveal Caribbean tropical cyclone response to past radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trouet, Valerie; Harley, Grant L.; Domínguez-Delmás, Marta

    2016-03-01

    Assessing the impact of future climate change on North Atlantic tropical cyclone (TC) activity is of crucial societal importance, but the limited quantity and quality of observational records interferes with the skill of future TC projections. In particular, North Atlantic TC response to radiative forcing is poorly understood and creates the dominant source of uncertainty for twenty-first-century projections. Here, we study TC variability in the Caribbean during the Maunder Minimum (MM; 1645-1715 CE), a period defined by the most severe reduction in solar irradiance in documented history (1610-present). For this purpose, we combine a documentary time series of Spanish shipwrecks in the Caribbean (1495-1825 CE) with a tree-growth suppression chronology from the Florida Keys (1707-2009 CE). We find a 75% reduction in decadal-scale Caribbean TC activity during the MM, which suggests modulation of the influence of reduced solar irradiance by the cumulative effect of cool North Atlantic sea surface temperatures, El Niño-like conditions, and a negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation. Our results emphasize the need to enhance our understanding of the response of these oceanic and atmospheric circulation patterns to radiative forcing and climate change to improve the skill of future TC projections.

  13. Offsetting features of climate responses to anthropogenic sulfate and black carbon direct radiative forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocko, I.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2012-12-01

    The two most prominent anthropogenic aerosols—sulfate and black carbon—affect Earth's radiation budget in opposing ways. Here we examine how these aerosols independently impact the climate, by simulating climate responses from pre-industrial times (1860) to present-day (2000) for isolated sulfate and black carbon direct radiative forcings. The NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory CM2.1 global climate model is employed with prescribed distributions of externally mixed aerosols. We find that sulfate and black carbon induce opposite effects for a myriad of climate variables. Sulfate (black carbon) is generally cooling (warming), shifts the ITCZ southward (northward), reduces (enhances) the SH Hadley Cell, enhances (reduces) the NH Hadley Cell, and increases (decreases) total sea ice volume. Individually, sulfate and black carbon affect Hadley Cell circulation more than long-lived greenhouse gases, but the net aerosol effect is a weakened response due to opposite behaviors somewhat canceling out the individual effects. Because anthropogenic aerosols are a critical contributor to Earth's climate conditions, this study has implications for future climate changes as well.

  14. Regional Climate Response to Volcanic Radiative Forcing in Middle East and North Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenchikov, G.; Dogar, M.

    2012-04-01

    We have tested the regional climate sensitivity in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) to radiation perturbations caused by the large explosive equatorial volcanic eruptions of the second part of 20th century, El Chichon and Pinatubo occurred, respectively, in 1982 and 1991. The observations and reanalysis data show that the surface volcanic cooling in the MENA region is two-three times larger than the global mean response to volcanic forcing. The Red Sea surface temperature appears to be also very sensitive to the external radiative impact. E.g., the sea surface cooling, associated with the 1991 Pinatubo eruption, caused deep water mixing and coral bleaching for a few years. To better quantify these effects we use the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory global High Resolution Atmospheric Model (HIRAM) to conduct simulations of both the El Chichon and Pinatubo impacts with the effectively 25-km grid spacing. We find that the circulation changes associated with the positive phase of the arctic oscillation amplified the winter temperature anomalies in 1982-1984 and 1991-1993. The dynamic response to volcanic cooling also is characterized by the southward shift of the inter-tropical convergence zone in summer and associated impact on the precipitation patterns. Thus, these results suggest that the climate regime in the MENA region is highly sensitive to external forcing. This is important for better understanding of the climate variability and change in this region.

  15. Short-term responses of unicellular planktonic eukaryotes to increases in temperature and UVB radiation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Small size eukaryotes play a fundamental role in the functioning of coastal ecosystems, however, the way in which these micro-organisms respond to combined effects of water temperature, UVB radiations (UVBR) and nutrient availability is still poorly investigated. Results We coupled molecular tools (18S rRNA gene sequencing and fingerprinting) with microscope-based identification and counting to experimentally investigate the short-term responses of small eukaryotes (<6 μm; from a coastal Mediterranean lagoon) to a warming treatment (+3°C) and UVB radiation increases (+20%) at two different nutrient levels. Interestingly, the increase in temperature resulted in higher pigmented eukaryotes abundances and in community structure changes clearly illustrated by molecular analyses. For most of the phylogenetic groups, some rearrangements occurred at the OTUs level even when their relative proportion (microscope counting) did not change significantly. Temperature explained almost 20% of the total variance of the small eukaryote community structure (while UVB explained only 8.4%). However, complex cumulative effects were detected. Some antagonistic or non additive effects were detected between temperature and nutrients, especially for Dinophyceae and Cryptophyceae. Conclusions This multifactorial experiment highlights the potential impacts, over short time scales, of changing environmental factors on the structure of various functional groups like small primary producers, parasites and saprotrophs which, in response, can modify energy flow in the planktonic food webs. PMID:22966751

  16. Lack of evidence for low-LET radiation induced bystander response in normal human fibroblasts and colon carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sowa, Marianne B.; Goetz, Wilfried; Baulch, Janet E.; Pyles, Dinah N.; Dziegielewski, J.; Yovino, Susannah; Snyder, Andrew R.; de Toledo, S. M.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Morgan, William F.

    2010-02-01

    The conventional paradigm in radiation biology has been that DNA is the primary target for energy deposition following exposure to ionizing radiation. However, studies focusing on the non-target effects of radiation, i.e. effects occurring in cells not directly exposed to radiation, imply that the target of exposure is larger than what has traditionally been assumed and could have significant implications for radiation health risks. We have conducted an extensive study of the low-LET bystander effect including multiple cell lines and endpoints and various radiation sources and exposure scenarios. In no instance do we see evidence of a low-LET induced bystander effect. However, direct comparison for alpha particle exposure showed a statistically significant media transfer bystander effect for high-LET but not for low-LET radiation. From our results it is evident that there are many confounding factors mitigating bystander responses as reported in the literature and for the cell lines we studied that there is a LET dependence for the observed responses. Our observations reflect the inherent variability in biological systems and the difficulties in extrapolating from in vitro models to radiation risks in humans.

  17. Transcription profile of DNA damage response genes at G₀ lymphocytes exposed to gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Saini, Divyalakshmi; Shelke, Shridevi; Mani Vannan, A; Toprani, Sneh; Jain, Vinay; Das, Birajalaxmi; Seshadri, M

    2012-05-01

    Ionizing radiation induces a plethora of DNA damages in human cells which may alter the level of mRNA expression. We have analyzed mRNA expression profile of DNA damage response genes involved in G(0)/G(1) check point pathway in whole blood to assess their radio-adaptive response, if any, to gamma radiation. Blood samples were collected from twenty-five random, normal, and healthy male donors with written informed consent and irradiated at doses between 0.1 and 2.0 Gy (0.7 Gy/min). DNA strand breaks were studied using comet assay, whereas DNA double-strand breaks were visualized using γH2AX as a biomarker. Dose response if any, at transcriptional level was studied for all these dose groups at 1 and 5-h post-irradiation. Adaptive response at transcriptional level was studied at three different priming doses (0.1, 0.3, and 0.6 Gy) separately followed by a challenging dose of 2.0 Gy after 4 h. For both the experiments, total RNA was isolated from PBMCs obtained from irradiated whole blood and reverse transcribed to cDNA. The level of mRNA expression of ATM, ATR, GADD45A, CDKN1A, P53, CDK2, MDM2, and Cyclin E was studied using real-time quantitative PCR. A significant dose-dependant increase in the percentage of DNA damage in tail was observed using comet assay. Similarly, increased number of foci was observed at γH2AX with increasing dose. At transcriptional level, a significant dose-dependent up-regulation at GADD45A, CDKN1A, and P53 genes up to 1.0 Gy was observed at 5-h post-irradiation (P ≤ 0.05). Radio-adaptive response at mRNA expression level was observed at CDK2, Cyclin E, and P53, whereas ATM, ATR, GADD45A, MDM2, ATM, and ATR have not shown any radio-adaptive changes in the expression profile. DNA damage response genes involved in G(0)/G(1) checkpoint pathway has important implications in terms of radiosensitivity in vivo and changes in the transcriptional profile might throw some new insights to understand the mechanism of adaptive response.

  18. Thin film AlSb carrier transport properties and room temperature radiation response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Erin Ivey

    Theoretical predictions for AlSb material properties have not been realized using bulk growth methods. This research was motivated by advances in molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) growth technology to produce high-quality thin-film AlSb for the purpose of evaluating transport properties and suitability for radiation detection. Simulations using MCNP5 were performed to benchmark an existing silicon surface barrier detector and to predict ideal AlSb detector behavior, with the finding that AlSb should have improved detection efficiency due to the larger atomic number of Sb compared with Si. GaSb diodes were fabricated by both homoepitaxial MBE and ion implantation methods in order to determine the effect on the radiation detection performance. It was found that the radiation response for the MBE grown GaSb diodes was very uniform, whereas the ion-implanted GaSb diodes exhibited highly variable spectral behavior. Two sets of AlSb heterostructures were fabricated by MBE methods; one for a Hall doping study and the other for a radiation response study. The samples were characterized for material quality using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Nomarski imaging, atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), I-V curve analysis, and Hall effect measurements. The Hall study samples were grown on semi-insulating (SI) GaAs substrates and contained a thin GaAs layer on top to protect the AlSb from oxygen. Doping for the AlSb layer was achieved using GaTe and Be for n- and p-type conductivity, respectively, with intended doping densities ranging from 1015 to 1017 cm -3. Results for net carrier concentration ranged 2x10 9 to 1x1017 cm-3, 60 to 3000 cm 2/Vs for mobility, and 2 to 106 Ω-cm for resistivity, with the undoped AlSb samples presenting the best values. The radiation detector samples were designed to be PIN diodes, with undoped AlSb sandwiched between n-type GaAs substrate and p-type GaSb as a conductive oxygen-protective layer. Energy spectra were measured

  19. Nonlinear polarization response of a gaseous medium in the regime of atom stabilization in a strong radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkova, E. A.; Popov, A. M.; Tikhonova, O. V.

    2013-03-01

    The nonlinear polarization response of a quantum system modeling a silver atom in the field of high-intensity radiation in the IR and UV spectral ranges has been studied by direct numerical integration of a nonstationary Schrödinger equation. The domains of applicability of perturbation theory and polarization expansion in powers of the field intensity are determined. The contribution of excited atoms and electrons in a continuum to the atomic polarization response at the field frequency, which arises due to the radiation-induced excitation and photoionization processes, is analyzed. Features of the nonlinear response to an external field under conditions of atom stabilization are considered.

  20. Gene Expression Profiling in Response to Ultraviolet Radiation in Maize Genotypes with Varying Flavonoid Content1[w

    PubMed Central

    Casati, Paula; Walbot, Virginia

    2003-01-01

    Microarray hybridization was used to assess acclimation responses to four UV regimes by near isogenic maize (Zea mays) lines varying in flavonoid content. We found that 355 of the 2,500 cDNAs tested were regulated by UV radiation in at least one genotype. Among these, 232 transcripts are assigned putative functions, whereas 123 encode unknown proteins. UV-B increased expression of stress response and ribosomal protein genes, whereas photosynthesis-associated genes were down-regulated; lines lacking UV-absorbing pigments had more dramatic responses than did lines with these pigments, confirming the shielding role of these compounds. Sunlight filtered to remove UV-B or UV-B plus UV-A resulted in significant expression changes in many genes not previously associated with UV responses. Some pathways regulated by UV radiation are shared with defense, salt, and oxidative stresses; however, UV-B radiation can activate additional pathways not shared with other stresses. PMID:12913132