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Sample records for aerobic respiratory growth

  1. Assessment of Aerobic and Respiratory Growth in the Lactobacillus casei Group

    PubMed Central

    Zotta, Teresa; Ricciardi, Annamaria; Ianniello, Rocco G.; Parente, Eugenio; Reale, Anna; Rossi, Franca; Iacumin, Lucilla; Comi, Giuseppe; Coppola, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    One hundred eighty four strains belonging to the species Lactobacillus casei, L. paracasei and L. rhamnosus were screened for their ability to grow under aerobic conditions, in media containing heme and menaquinone and/or compounds generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), in order to identify respiratory and oxygen-tolerant phenotypes. Most strains were able to cope with aerobic conditions and for many strains aerobic growth and heme or heme/menaquinone supplementation increased biomass production compared to anaerobic cultivation. Only four L. casei strains showed a catalase-like activity under anaerobic, aerobic and respiratory conditions and were able to survive in presence of H2O2 (1 mM). Almost all L. casei and L. paracasei strains tolerated menadione (0.2 mM) and most tolerated pyrogallol (50 mM), while L. rhamnosus was usually resistant only to the latter compound. This is the first study in which an extensive screening of oxygen and oxidative stress tolerance of members of the L. casei group has been carried out. Results allowed the selection of strains showing the typical traits of aerobic and respiratory metabolism (increased pH and biomass under aerobic or respiratory conditions) and unique oxidative stress response properties. Aerobic growth and respiration may confer technological and physiological advantages in the L. casei group and oxygen-tolerant phenotypes could be exploited in several food industry applications. PMID:24918811

  2. Mathematical model for the aerobic growth of saccharomyces cerevisiae with a saturated respiratory capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Barford, J.P.; Hall, R.J.

    1981-08-01

    A mathematical model for the aerobic growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in both batch and continuous culture is described. It was based on the experimental observation that the respiratory capacity of this organism may become saturated and exhibit a maximum specific oxygen uptake rate after suitable adaptation. This experimental observation led to the possibility that transport into and out of the mitochondrion was of major importance in the overall metabolism of S. cerevisiae and was subject to long-term adaptation. Consistent with this observation a distributed model was proposed which, as its basis, assumed the control of respiration and fermentation to be the result of saturation of respiration without any specific repression or inhibition of the uptake rates of other substrates. No other regulation of fermentation and respiration was assumed. The model provided a suitable structure allowing precise quantification of the changes in rate and stoichiometry of energy production. The model clearly indicated that growth under the wide range of experimental conditions reported could not be predicted using constant values for the maximum specific respiratory rate or constant values of Yatp (g biomass/mol ATP) and PO ratio of (mol ATP/atom oxygen). The causes of the variation in the respiratory rate were not determined and it was concluded that a more detailed analysis (reported subsequently) was required. The variation of Y atp and PO ratio with specific growth rate implied that the efficiency of ATP generation or ATP utilization decreased with increasing specific growth rate. It was concluded that it was not possible to quantify the individual effect of Yatp and PO ratio until independent means for their reliable estimation is available. (Refs. 84).

  3. Media for the aerobic growth of campylobacter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of agar and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) concentration on aerobic growth of Campylobacter in a fumarate-pyruvate medium was examined. The broth medium was supplemented with 0.0 to 0.2% agar and inoculated with 106 CFU/ml of Campylobacter coli 33559, Campylobacter fetus 27349, Campylobacter...

  4. cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidases, aerobic respiratory enzymes, impact the anaerobic life of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Masakaze; Toyofuku, Masanori; Miyano, Tomoki; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2014-11-01

    For bacteria, many studies have focused on the role of respiratory enzymes in energy conservation; however, their effect on cell behavior is poorly understood. Pseudomonas aeruginosa can perform both aerobic respiration and denitrification. Previous studies demonstrated that cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidases that support aerobic respiration are more highly expressed in P. aeruginosa under anoxic conditions than are other aerobic respiratory enzymes. However, little is known about their role under such conditions. In this study, it was shown that cbb3 oxidases of P. aeruginosa PAO1 alter anaerobic growth, the denitrification process, and cell morphology under anoxic conditions. Furthermore, biofilm formation was promoted by the cbb3 oxidases under anoxic conditions. cbb3 oxidases led to the accumulation of nitric oxide (NO), which is produced during denitrification. Cell elongation induced by NO accumulation was reported to be required for robust biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1 under anoxic conditions. Our data show that cbb3 oxidases promote cell elongation by inducing NO accumulation during the denitrification process, which further leads to robust biofilms. Our findings show that cbb3 oxidases, which have been well studied as aerobic respiratory enzymes, are also involved in denitrification and influence the lifestyle of P. aeruginosa PAO1 under anoxic conditions.

  5. Aerobic growth at nanomolar oxygen concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Stolper, Daniel A.; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Canfield, Donald E.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular oxygen (O2) is the second most abundant gas in the Earth’s atmosphere, but in many natural environments, its concentration is reduced to low or even undetectable levels. Although low-oxygen-adapted organisms define the ecology of low-oxygen environments, their capabilities are not fully known. These capabilities also provide a framework for reconstructing a critical period in the history of life, because low, but not negligible, atmospheric oxygen levels could have persisted before the “Great Oxidation” of the Earth’s surface about 2.3 to 2.4 billion years ago. Here, we show that Escherichia coli K-12, chosen for its well-understood biochemistry, rapid growth rate, and low-oxygen-affinity terminal oxidase, grows at oxygen levels of ≤ 3 nM, two to three orders of magnitude lower than previously observed for aerobes. Our study expands both the environmental range and temporal history of aerobic organisms. PMID:20974919

  6. Anthropometric and Cardio-Respiratory Indices and Aerobic Capacity of Male and Female Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czajkowska, Anna; Mazurek, Krzysztof; Lutoslawska, Grazyna; Zmijewski, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    Study aim: To assess the relations between anthropometric and cardio-respiratory indices, and aerobic capacity of students, differing in the level of physical activity, under resting and exercise conditions. Material and methods: A group of 87 male and 75 female students volunteered to participate in the study. Their physical activity was…

  7. Growth of Campylobacter Incubated Aerobically in Media Supplemented with Peptones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth of Campylobacter cultures incubated aerobically in media supplemented with peptones was studied, and additional experiments were conducted to compare growth of the bacteria in media supplemented with peptones to growth in media supplemented with fumarate-pyruvate-minerals-vitamins (FPMV). A b...

  8. Constant growth rate can be supported by decreasing energy flux and increasing aerobic glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Nikolai; Budnik, Bogdan A; Schwab, David; Airoldi, Edoardo M; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Fermenting glucose in the presence of enough oxygen to support respiration, known as aerobic glycolysis, is believed to maximize growth rate. We observed increasing aerobic glycolysis during exponential growth, suggesting additional physiological roles for aerobic glycolysis. We investigated such roles in yeast batch cultures by quantifying O2 consumption, CO2 production, amino acids, mRNAs, proteins, posttranslational modifications, and stress sensitivity in the course of nine doublings at constant rate. During this course, the cells support a constant biomass-production rate with decreasing rates of respiration and ATP production but also decrease their stress resistance. As the respiration rate decreases, so do the levels of enzymes catalyzing rate-determining reactions of the tricarboxylic-acid cycle (providing NADH for respiration) and of mitochondrial folate-mediated NADPH production (required for oxidative defense). The findings demonstrate that exponential growth can represent not a single metabolic/physiological state but a continuum of changing states and that aerobic glycolysis can reduce the energy demands associated with respiratory metabolism and stress survival.

  9. Supramolecular organization of bacterial aerobic respiratory chains: From cells and back.

    PubMed

    Melo, Ana M P; Teixeira, Miguel

    2016-03-01

    Aerobic respiratory chains from all life kingdoms are composed by several complexes that have been deeply characterized in their isolated form. These membranous complexes link the oxidation of reducing substrates to the reduction of molecular oxygen, in a process that conserves energy by ion translocation between both sides of the mitochondrial or prokaryotic cytoplasmatic membranes. In recent years there has been increasing evidence that those complexes are organized as supramolecular structures, the so-called supercomplexes and respirasomes, being available for eukaryotes strong data namely obtained by electron microscopy and single particle analysis. A parallel study has been developed for prokaryotes, based on blue native gels and mass spectrometry analysis, showing that in these more simple unicellular organisms such supercomplexes also exist, involving not only typical aerobic-respiration associated complexes, but also anaerobic-linked enzymes. After a short overview of the data on eukaryotic supercomplexes, we will analyse comprehensively the different types of prokaryotic aerobic respiratory supercomplexes that have been thus far suggested, in both bacteria and archaea. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Prof Conrad Mullineaux. PMID:26546715

  10. Synergistic mechanism for tetrandrine on fluconazole against Candida albicans through the mitochondrial aerobic respiratory metabolism pathway.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui; Xie, Si Ming; Li, Shui Xiu; Song, Yan Jun; Lv, Xia Lin; Zhang, Hong

    2014-07-01

    We found that tetrandrine (TET) can reverse the resistance of Candida albicans to fluconazole (FLC) and that this interaction is associated with the inhibition of drug efflux pumps. Mitochondrial aerobic respiration, which plays a major role in C. albicans metabolism, is the primary source of ATP for cellular processes, including the activation of efflux pumps. However, it was unclear if TET exerts its synergistic action against C. albicans via its impact on the mitochondrial aerobic respiratory metabolism. To investigate this mechanism, we examined the impact of FLC in the presence or absence of TET on two C. albicans strains obtained from a single parental source (FLC-sensitive strain CA-1 and FLC-resistant strain CA-16). We analysed key measures of energy generation and conversion, including the activity of respiration chain complexes I and III (CI and CIII), ATP synthase (CV) activity, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and studied intracellular ATP levels and the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), which has a critical impact on energy transport. Mitochondrial morphology was observed by confocal microscopy. Our functional analyses revealed that, compared with strains treated only with FLC, TET+FLC increased the ATP levels and decreased ΔΨm in CA-1, but decreased ATP levels and increased ΔΨm in CA-16 (P<0.05). Additionally, CI, CIII and CV activity decreased by 23-48%. The production of ROS increased by two- to threefold and mitochondrial morphology was altered in both strains. Our data suggested that TET impacted mitochondrial aerobic respiratory metabolism by influencing the generation and transport of ATP, reducing the utilization of ATP, and resulting in the inhibition of drug efflux pump activity. This activity contributed to the synergistic action of TET on FLC against C. albicans. PMID:24790082

  11. Aerobic and anaerobic growth of Paracoccus denitrificans on methanol.

    PubMed

    Bamforth, C W; Quayle, J R

    1978-10-01

    1. The dye-linked methanol dehydrogenase from Paracoccus denitrificans grown aerobically on methanol has been purified and its properties compared with similar enzymes from other bacteria. It was shown to be specific and to have high affinity for primary alcohols and formaldehyde as substrate, ammonia was the best activator and the enzyme could be linked to reduction of phenazine methosulphate. 2. Paracoccus denitrificans could be grown anaerobically on methanol, using nitrate or nitrite as electron acceptor. The methanol dehydrogenase synthesized under these conditions could not be differentiated from the aerobically-synthesized enzyme. 3. Activities of methanol dehydrogenase, formaldehyde dehydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase, nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase were measured under aerobic and anaerobic growth conditions. 4. Difference spectra of reduced and oxidized cytochromes in membrane and supernatant fractions of methanol-grown P. denitrificans were measured. 5. From the results of the spectral and enzymatic analyses it has been suggested that anaerobic growth on methanol/nitrate is made possible by reduction of nitrate to nitrite using electrons derived from the pyridine nucleotide-linked dehydrogenations of formaldehyde and formate, the nitrite so produced then functioning as electron acceptor for methanol dehydrogenase via cytochrome c and nitrite reductase. PMID:718372

  12. C4-Dicarboxylate Utilization in Aerobic and Anaerobic Growth.

    PubMed

    Unden, Gottfried; Strecker, Alexander; Kleefeld, Alexandra; Kim, Ok Bin

    2016-06-01

    C4-dicarboxylates and the C4-dicarboxylic amino acid l-aspartate support aerobic and anaerobic growth of Escherichia coli and related bacteria. In aerobic growth, succinate, fumarate, D- and L-malate, L-aspartate, and L-tartrate are metabolized by the citric acid cycle and associated reactions. Because of the interruption of the citric acid cycle under anaerobic conditions, anaerobic metabolism of C4-dicarboxylates depends on fumarate reduction to succinate (fumarate respiration). In some related bacteria (e.g., Klebsiella), utilization of C4-dicarboxylates, such as tartrate, is independent of fumarate respiration and uses a Na+-dependent membrane-bound oxaloacetate decarboxylase. Uptake of the C4-dicarboxylates into the bacteria (and anaerobic export of succinate) is achieved under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by different sets of secondary transporters. Expression of the genes for C4-dicarboxylate metabolism is induced in the presence of external C4-dicarboxylates by the membrane-bound DcuS-DcuR two-component system. Noncommon C4-dicarboxylates like l-tartrate or D-malate are perceived by cytoplasmic one-component sensors/transcriptional regulators. This article describes the pathways of aerobic and anaerobic C4-dicarboxylate metabolism and their regulation. The citric acid cycle, fumarate respiration, and fumarate reductase are covered in other articles and discussed here only in the context of C4-dicarboxylate metabolism. Recent aspects of C4-dicarboxylate metabolism like transport, sensing, and regulation will be treated in more detail. This article is an updated version of an article published in 2004 in EcoSal Plus. The update includes new literature, but, in particular, the sections on the metabolism of noncommon C4-dicarboxylates and their regulation, on the DcuS-DcuR regulatory system, and on succinate production by engineered E. coli are largely revised or new.

  13. C4-Dicarboxylate Utilization in Aerobic and Anaerobic Growth.

    PubMed

    Unden, Gottfried; Strecker, Alexander; Kleefeld, Alexandra; Kim, Ok Bin

    2016-06-01

    C4-dicarboxylates and the C4-dicarboxylic amino acid l-aspartate support aerobic and anaerobic growth of Escherichia coli and related bacteria. In aerobic growth, succinate, fumarate, D- and L-malate, L-aspartate, and L-tartrate are metabolized by the citric acid cycle and associated reactions. Because of the interruption of the citric acid cycle under anaerobic conditions, anaerobic metabolism of C4-dicarboxylates depends on fumarate reduction to succinate (fumarate respiration). In some related bacteria (e.g., Klebsiella), utilization of C4-dicarboxylates, such as tartrate, is independent of fumarate respiration and uses a Na+-dependent membrane-bound oxaloacetate decarboxylase. Uptake of the C4-dicarboxylates into the bacteria (and anaerobic export of succinate) is achieved under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by different sets of secondary transporters. Expression of the genes for C4-dicarboxylate metabolism is induced in the presence of external C4-dicarboxylates by the membrane-bound DcuS-DcuR two-component system. Noncommon C4-dicarboxylates like l-tartrate or D-malate are perceived by cytoplasmic one-component sensors/transcriptional regulators. This article describes the pathways of aerobic and anaerobic C4-dicarboxylate metabolism and their regulation. The citric acid cycle, fumarate respiration, and fumarate reductase are covered in other articles and discussed here only in the context of C4-dicarboxylate metabolism. Recent aspects of C4-dicarboxylate metabolism like transport, sensing, and regulation will be treated in more detail. This article is an updated version of an article published in 2004 in EcoSal Plus. The update includes new literature, but, in particular, the sections on the metabolism of noncommon C4-dicarboxylates and their regulation, on the DcuS-DcuR regulatory system, and on succinate production by engineered E. coli are largely revised or new. PMID:27415771

  14. Effect of intensive aerobic exercise on respiratory capacity and walking ability with chronic stroke patients: a randomized controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Dae-Hyouk; Son, Young-Lan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of intensive aerobic exercise on respiratory capacity and walking ability in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=6) or a control group (n=6). Patients in the experimental group received intensive aerobic exercise for 30 minutes and traditional physical therapy once a day, five days a week, for four weeks. The control group received aerobic exercise for 30 minutes and traditional physical therapy for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, for four weeks. [Results] After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements in the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, 10-meter walking test, and six-minute walking test over the baseline results. The comparison of the two groups after the intervention revealed that the experimental group showed more significant improvements in the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, and six-minute walking test. There was no significant difference in saturation pulse oximetry oxygen and 10-meter walking test between the groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that intensive aerobic exercise has a positive effect on respiratory capacity and walking endurance in patients with chronic stroke. PMID:27630438

  15. Effect of intensive aerobic exercise on respiratory capacity and walking ability with chronic stroke patients: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Bang, Dae-Hyouk; Son, Young-Lan

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of intensive aerobic exercise on respiratory capacity and walking ability in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=6) or a control group (n=6). Patients in the experimental group received intensive aerobic exercise for 30 minutes and traditional physical therapy once a day, five days a week, for four weeks. The control group received aerobic exercise for 30 minutes and traditional physical therapy for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, for four weeks. [Results] After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements in the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, 10-meter walking test, and six-minute walking test over the baseline results. The comparison of the two groups after the intervention revealed that the experimental group showed more significant improvements in the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, and six-minute walking test. There was no significant difference in saturation pulse oximetry oxygen and 10-meter walking test between the groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that intensive aerobic exercise has a positive effect on respiratory capacity and walking endurance in patients with chronic stroke.

  16. Effect of intensive aerobic exercise on respiratory capacity and walking ability with chronic stroke patients: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Bang, Dae-Hyouk; Son, Young-Lan

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of intensive aerobic exercise on respiratory capacity and walking ability in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=6) or a control group (n=6). Patients in the experimental group received intensive aerobic exercise for 30 minutes and traditional physical therapy once a day, five days a week, for four weeks. The control group received aerobic exercise for 30 minutes and traditional physical therapy for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, for four weeks. [Results] After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements in the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, 10-meter walking test, and six-minute walking test over the baseline results. The comparison of the two groups after the intervention revealed that the experimental group showed more significant improvements in the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, and six-minute walking test. There was no significant difference in saturation pulse oximetry oxygen and 10-meter walking test between the groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that intensive aerobic exercise has a positive effect on respiratory capacity and walking endurance in patients with chronic stroke. PMID:27630438

  17. Effect of intensive aerobic exercise on respiratory capacity and walking ability with chronic stroke patients: a randomized controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Dae-Hyouk; Son, Young-Lan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of intensive aerobic exercise on respiratory capacity and walking ability in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=6) or a control group (n=6). Patients in the experimental group received intensive aerobic exercise for 30 minutes and traditional physical therapy once a day, five days a week, for four weeks. The control group received aerobic exercise for 30 minutes and traditional physical therapy for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, for four weeks. [Results] After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements in the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, 10-meter walking test, and six-minute walking test over the baseline results. The comparison of the two groups after the intervention revealed that the experimental group showed more significant improvements in the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, and six-minute walking test. There was no significant difference in saturation pulse oximetry oxygen and 10-meter walking test between the groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that intensive aerobic exercise has a positive effect on respiratory capacity and walking endurance in patients with chronic stroke.

  18. Respiration and respiratory enzyme activity in aerobic and anaerobic cultures of the marine denitrifying bacterium, Pseudomonas perfectomarinus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packard, T. T.; Garfield, P. C.; Martinez, R.

    1983-03-01

    Oxygen consumption, nitrate reduction, respiratory electron transport activity, and nitrate reductase activity were measured in aerobic and anaerobic cultures of the marine bacterium, Pseudomonas perfectomarinus. The respiratory electron transport activity was closely correlated with oxygen consumption ( r = 0.98) in aerobic cultures and nearly as well correlated with nitrate reductase activity ( r = 0.91) and nitrate reduction ( r = 0.85) in anaerobic cultures. It was also well correlated with biomass in both aerobic ( r = 0.99) and anaerobic ( r = 0.94) cultures supporting the use of tetrazolium reduction as an index of living biomass. Time courses of nitrate and nitrate in the anaerobic cultures demonstrated that at nitrate concentrations above 1 mM, denitrification proceeds stepwise. Time courses of pH in anaerobic cultures revealed a rise from 7 to 8.5 during nitrite reduction indicating net proton utilization. This proton utilization is predicted by the stoichiometry of denitrification. Although the experiments were not under 'simulated in situ' conditions, the results are relevant to studies of denitrification, to bacterial ATP production, and to the respiratory activity of marine plankton in the ocean.

  19. Aerobic fitness in patients with fibrositis. A controlled study of respiratory gas exchange and 133-xenon clearance from exercising muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, R.M.; Clark, S.R.; Goldberg, L.; Nelson, D.; Bonafede, R.P.; Porter, J.; Specht, D.

    1989-04-01

    Aerobic fitness was evaluated in 25 women with fibrositis, by having them exercise to volitional exhaustion on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Compared with published standards, greater than 80% of the fibrositis patients were not physically fit, as assessed by maximal oxygen uptake. Compared with matched sedentary controls, fibrositis patients accurately perceived their level of exertion in relation to oxygen consumption and attained a similar level of lactic acidosis, as assessed by their respiratory quotient and ventilatory threshold. Exercising muscle blood flow was estimated by 133-xenon clearance in a subgroup of 16 fibrositis patients and compared with that in 16 matched sedentary controls; the fibrositis patients exhibited reduced 133-xenon clearance. These results indicate a need to include aerobic fitness as a matched variable in future controlled studies of fibrositis and suggest that the detraining phenomenon may be of relevance to the etiopathogenesis of the disease.

  20. Increased biomass yield of Lactococcus lactis during energetically limited growth and respiratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Koebmann, Brian; Blank, Lars Mathias; Solem, Christian; Petranovic, Dina; Nielsen, Lars K; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2008-05-01

    Lactococcus lactis is known to be capable of respiration under aerobic conditions in the presence of haemin. In the present study the effect of respiration on ATP production during growth on different sugars was examined. With glucose as the sole carbon source, respiratory conditions in L. lactis MG1363 resulted in only a minor increase, 21%, in biomass yield. Since ATP production through substrate-level phosphorylation was essentially identical with and without respiration, the increased biomass yield was a result of energy-saving under respiratory conditions estimated to be 0.4 mol of ATP/mol of glucose. With maltose as the energy source, the increase in biomass yield amounted to 51% compared with an aerobic culture that lacked haemin. This higher ATP yield was obtained by redirecting pyruvate metabolism from lactate to acetate production, and from savings through respiration. However, even after subtracting these contributions, approx. 0.3 mol of ATP/mol of glucose remained unaccounted for. A similar response to respiratory conditions (0.2 mol of ATP/mol of glucose) was observed in a mutant that had a decreased glucose uptake rate during growth on glucose caused by disruption of the PTS(mannose) (glucose/mannose-specific phosphotransferase system). Amino acid catabolism could be excluded as the source of the additional ATP. Since mutants without a functional H+-ATPase produced less ATP under sugar starvation and respiratory conditions, the additional ATP yield appears to come partly from energy saved on proton pumping through the H+-ATPase due to respiration and partly from a reversed function of the H+-ATPase towards oxidative phosphorylation. These results may contribute to the design and implementation of carbon-efficient high-cell-density cultures of this industrially important species of bacterium.

  1. The effect of aerobic exercise and starvation on growth performance and postprandial metabolic response in juvenile southern catfish (Silurus meridionalis).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Ming; Liu, Li; Yuan, Jian-Ming; Xiao, Yuan-Yuan; Fu, Shi-Jian; Zhang, Yao-Guang

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the effects of aerobic exercise and starvation on growth performance, postprandial metabolic response and their interaction in a sedentary fish species, either satiation-fed or starved juvenile southern catfish (Silurus meridionalis) were exercised at 25 °C under three water velocities, i.e., nearly still water (control), 1 body length (bl) s(-1) and 2 bl s(-1), for eight weeks. Then, the feed intake (FI), food conversion efficiency (FCE), specific growth rate (SGR), morphological parameters, resting ṀO2 (ṀO2rest) and postprandial ṀO2 responses of the experimental fish were measured. Exercise at a low velocity (1 bl s(-1)) showed no effect on any growth performance parameter, whereas exercise at a high velocity (2 bl s(-1)) exhibited higher FI but similar SGR due to the extra energy expenditure from swimming and consequent decreased FCE. Starvation led to a significant body mass loss, whereas the effect intensified in both exercise groups. Exercise resulted in improved cardio-respiratory capacity, as indicated by increased gill and heart indexes, whereas it exhibited no effect on resting and postprandial metabolism in S. meridionalis. The starved fish displayed significantly larger heart, gill and digestive tract indexes compared with the feeding fish, suggesting selective maintenance of cardio-respiratory and digestive function in this fish species during starvation. However, starved fish still exhibited impaired digestive performance, as evidenced by the prolonged duration and low postprandial metabolic increase, and this effect was further exacerbated in both the 1 and 2 bl s(-1) exercise groups. These data suggest the following: (1) aerobic exercise produced no improvement in growth performance but may have led to the impairment of growth under insufficient food conditions; (2) the mass of different organs and tissues responded differently to aerobic exercise and starvation due to the different physiological roles they play; and (3

  2. The effect of aerobic exercise and starvation on growth performance and postprandial metabolic response in juvenile southern catfish (Silurus meridionalis).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Ming; Liu, Li; Yuan, Jian-Ming; Xiao, Yuan-Yuan; Fu, Shi-Jian; Zhang, Yao-Guang

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the effects of aerobic exercise and starvation on growth performance, postprandial metabolic response and their interaction in a sedentary fish species, either satiation-fed or starved juvenile southern catfish (Silurus meridionalis) were exercised at 25 °C under three water velocities, i.e., nearly still water (control), 1 body length (bl) s(-1) and 2 bl s(-1), for eight weeks. Then, the feed intake (FI), food conversion efficiency (FCE), specific growth rate (SGR), morphological parameters, resting ṀO2 (ṀO2rest) and postprandial ṀO2 responses of the experimental fish were measured. Exercise at a low velocity (1 bl s(-1)) showed no effect on any growth performance parameter, whereas exercise at a high velocity (2 bl s(-1)) exhibited higher FI but similar SGR due to the extra energy expenditure from swimming and consequent decreased FCE. Starvation led to a significant body mass loss, whereas the effect intensified in both exercise groups. Exercise resulted in improved cardio-respiratory capacity, as indicated by increased gill and heart indexes, whereas it exhibited no effect on resting and postprandial metabolism in S. meridionalis. The starved fish displayed significantly larger heart, gill and digestive tract indexes compared with the feeding fish, suggesting selective maintenance of cardio-respiratory and digestive function in this fish species during starvation. However, starved fish still exhibited impaired digestive performance, as evidenced by the prolonged duration and low postprandial metabolic increase, and this effect was further exacerbated in both the 1 and 2 bl s(-1) exercise groups. These data suggest the following: (1) aerobic exercise produced no improvement in growth performance but may have led to the impairment of growth under insufficient food conditions; (2) the mass of different organs and tissues responded differently to aerobic exercise and starvation due to the different physiological roles they play; and (3

  3. A comparative meta-analysis of maximal aerobic metabolism of vertebrates: implications for respiratory and cardiovascular limits to gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Stanley S; Hancock, Thomas V; Hedrick, Michael S

    2013-02-01

    Maximal aerobic metabolic rates (MMR) in vertebrates are supported by increased conductive and diffusive fluxes of O(2) from the environment to the mitochondria necessitating concomitant increases in CO(2) efflux. A question that has received much attention has been which step, respiratory or cardiovascular, provides the principal rate limitation to gas flux at MMR? Limitation analyses have principally focused on O(2) fluxes, though the excess capacity of the lung for O(2) ventilation and diffusion remains unexplained except as a safety factor. Analyses of MMR normally rely upon allometry and temperature to define these factors, but cannot account for much of the variation and often have narrow phylogenetic breadth. The unique aspect of our comparative approach was to use an interclass meta-analysis to examine cardio-respiratory variables during the increase from resting metabolic rate to MMR among vertebrates from fish to mammals, independent of allometry and phylogeny. Common patterns at MMR indicate universal principles governing O(2) and CO(2) transport in vertebrate cardiovascular and respiratory systems, despite the varied modes of activities (swimming, running, flying), different cardio-respiratory architecture, and vastly different rates of metabolism (endothermy vs. ectothermy). Our meta-analysis supports previous studies indicating a cardiovascular limit to maximal O(2) transport and also implicates a respiratory system limit to maximal CO(2) efflux, especially in ectotherms. Thus, natural selection would operate on the respiratory system to enhance maximal CO(2) excretion and the cardiovascular system to enhance maximal O(2) uptake. This provides a possible evolutionary explanation for the conundrum of why the respiratory system appears functionally over-designed from an O(2) perspective, a unique insight from previous work focused solely on O(2) fluxes. The results suggest a common gas transport blueprint, or Bauplan, in the vertebrate clade. PMID

  4. A comparative meta-analysis of maximal aerobic metabolism of vertebrates: implications for respiratory and cardiovascular limits to gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Stanley S; Hancock, Thomas V; Hedrick, Michael S

    2013-02-01

    Maximal aerobic metabolic rates (MMR) in vertebrates are supported by increased conductive and diffusive fluxes of O(2) from the environment to the mitochondria necessitating concomitant increases in CO(2) efflux. A question that has received much attention has been which step, respiratory or cardiovascular, provides the principal rate limitation to gas flux at MMR? Limitation analyses have principally focused on O(2) fluxes, though the excess capacity of the lung for O(2) ventilation and diffusion remains unexplained except as a safety factor. Analyses of MMR normally rely upon allometry and temperature to define these factors, but cannot account for much of the variation and often have narrow phylogenetic breadth. The unique aspect of our comparative approach was to use an interclass meta-analysis to examine cardio-respiratory variables during the increase from resting metabolic rate to MMR among vertebrates from fish to mammals, independent of allometry and phylogeny. Common patterns at MMR indicate universal principles governing O(2) and CO(2) transport in vertebrate cardiovascular and respiratory systems, despite the varied modes of activities (swimming, running, flying), different cardio-respiratory architecture, and vastly different rates of metabolism (endothermy vs. ectothermy). Our meta-analysis supports previous studies indicating a cardiovascular limit to maximal O(2) transport and also implicates a respiratory system limit to maximal CO(2) efflux, especially in ectotherms. Thus, natural selection would operate on the respiratory system to enhance maximal CO(2) excretion and the cardiovascular system to enhance maximal O(2) uptake. This provides a possible evolutionary explanation for the conundrum of why the respiratory system appears functionally over-designed from an O(2) perspective, a unique insight from previous work focused solely on O(2) fluxes. The results suggest a common gas transport blueprint, or Bauplan, in the vertebrate clade.

  5. The Twin Arginine Translocation System Is Essential for Aerobic Growth and Full Virulence of Burkholderia thailandensis

    PubMed Central

    Wagley, Sariqa; Hemsley, Claudia; Thomas, Rachael; Moule, Madeleine G.; Vanaporn, Muthita; Andreae, Clio; Robinson, Matthew; Goldman, Stan; Wren, Brendan W.; Butler, Clive S.

    2014-01-01

    The twin arginine translocation (Tat) system in bacteria is responsible for transporting folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane, and in some bacteria, Tat-exported substrates have been linked to virulence. We report here that the Tat machinery is present in Burkholderia pseudomallei, B. mallei, and B. thailandensis, and we show that the system is essential for aerobic but not anaerobic growth. Switching off of the Tat system in B. thailandensis grown anaerobically resulted in filamentous bacteria, and bacteria showed increased sensitivity to some β-lactam antibiotics. In Galleria mellonella and zebrafish infection models, the Tat conditional mutant was attenuated. The aerobic growth-restricted phenotype indicates that Tat substrates may play a functional role in oxygen-dependent energy conservation. In other bacteria, aerobic growth restriction in Tat mutants has been attributed to the inability to translocate PetA, the Rieske iron-sulfur protein which forms part of the quinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase complex. Here, we show that PetA is not responsible for aerobic growth restriction in B. thailandensis. However, we have identified an operon encoding 2 proteins of unknown function (BTH_I2176 and BTH_I2175) that play a role in aerobic growth restriction, and we present evidence that BTH_I2176 is Tat translocated. PMID:24214943

  6. Disentangling respiratory acclimation and adaptation to growth temperature by Eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Jörg; Turnbull, Tarryn L; Adams, Mark A

    2012-07-01

    Respiratory acclimation to growth temperature differs between species, but underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that respiratory acclimation of CO(2) release is a consequence of growth regulation such that growth rates of young foliage of Eucalyptus spp. are similar at contrasting growth temperatures. Further, we tested whether such a response is affected by adaptation of Eucalyptus to different thermal environments via growth at different altitudes in the Australian Alps. • We employed calorimetric methods to relate rates of CO(2) release (mainly from substrate oxidation) and rates of O(2) reduction to conservation of energy. Temperature responses of these processes provided insight into mechanisms that control energy conservation and expenditure, and helped define 'instantaneous enthalpic growth capacity' (CapG). • CapG increased with altitude, but was counteracted by other factors in species adapted to highland habitats. The acclimation response was partly driven by changes in respiratory capacity (CapR(CO2)), and partly by more pronounced dynamic responses of CO(2) release (δ(R(CO2))) to measurement temperature. We observed enhanced temperature sensitivity of O(2) reduction (E(o)(R(O2))) at higher altitudes. • Adaptation to growth temperature included differences in respiration and growth capacities, but there was little evidence that Eucalyptus species vary in metabolic flexibility.

  7. The Multicenter Aerobic Iron Respiratory Chain of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Functions as an Ensemble with a Single Macroscopic Rate Constant*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ting-Feng; Painter, Richard G.; Ban, Bhupal; Blake, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Electron transfer reactions among three prominent colored proteins in intact cells of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans were monitored using an integrating cavity absorption meter that permitted the acquisition of accurate absorbance data in suspensions of cells that scattered light. The concentrations of proteins in the periplasmic space were estimated to be 350 and 25 mg/ml for rusticyanin and cytochrome c, respectively; cytochrome a was present as one molecule for every 91 nm2 in the cytoplasmic membrane. All three proteins were rapidly reduced to the same relative extent when suspensions of live bacteria were mixed with different concentrations of ferrous ions at pH 1.5. The subsequent molecular oxygen-dependent oxidation of the multicenter respiratory chain occurred with a single macroscopic rate constant, regardless of the proteins' in vitro redox potentials or their putative positions in the aerobic iron respiratory chain. The crowded electron transport proteins in the periplasm of the organism constituted an electron conductive medium where the network of protein interactions functioned in a concerted fashion as a single ensemble with a standard reduction potential of 650 mV. The appearance of product ferric ions was correlated with the reduction levels of the periplasmic electron transfer proteins; the limiting first-order catalytic rate constant for aerobic respiration on iron was 7,400 s−1. The ability to conduct direct spectrophotometric studies under noninvasive physiological conditions represents a new and powerful approach to examine the extent and rates of biological events in situ without disrupting the complexity of the live cellular environment. PMID:26041781

  8. The Multicenter Aerobic Iron Respiratory Chain of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Functions as an Ensemble with a Single Macroscopic Rate Constant.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting-Feng; Painter, Richard G; Ban, Bhupal; Blake, Robert C

    2015-07-24

    Electron transfer reactions among three prominent colored proteins in intact cells of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans were monitored using an integrating cavity absorption meter that permitted the acquisition of accurate absorbance data in suspensions of cells that scattered light. The concentrations of proteins in the periplasmic space were estimated to be 350 and 25 mg/ml for rusticyanin and cytochrome c, respectively; cytochrome a was present as one molecule for every 91 nm(2) in the cytoplasmic membrane. All three proteins were rapidly reduced to the same relative extent when suspensions of live bacteria were mixed with different concentrations of ferrous ions at pH 1.5. The subsequent molecular oxygen-dependent oxidation of the multicenter respiratory chain occurred with a single macroscopic rate constant, regardless of the proteins' in vitro redox potentials or their putative positions in the aerobic iron respiratory chain. The crowded electron transport proteins in the periplasm of the organism constituted an electron conductive medium where the network of protein interactions functioned in a concerted fashion as a single ensemble with a standard reduction potential of 650 mV. The appearance of product ferric ions was correlated with the reduction levels of the periplasmic electron transfer proteins; the limiting first-order catalytic rate constant for aerobic respiration on iron was 7,400 s(-1). The ability to conduct direct spectrophotometric studies under noninvasive physiological conditions represents a new and powerful approach to examine the extent and rates of biological events in situ without disrupting the complexity of the live cellular environment.

  9. Growth of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria by aerobic hydrogen oxidation.

    PubMed

    Koch, Hanna; Galushko, Alexander; Albertsen, Mads; Schintlmeister, Arno; Gruber-Dorninger, Christiane; Lücker, Sebastian; Pelletier, Eric; Le Paslier, Denis; Spieck, Eva; Richter, Andreas; Nielsen, Per H; Wagner, Michael; Daims, Holger

    2014-08-29

    The bacterial oxidation of nitrite to nitrate is a key process of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria are considered a highly specialized functional group, which depends on the supply of nitrite from other microorganisms and whose distribution strictly correlates with nitrification in the environment and in wastewater treatment plants. On the basis of genomics, physiological experiments, and single-cell analyses, we show that Nitrospira moscoviensis, which represents a widely distributed lineage of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, has the genetic inventory to utilize hydrogen (H2) as an alternative energy source for aerobic respiration and grows on H2 without nitrite. CO2 fixation occurred with H2 as the sole electron donor. Our results demonstrate a chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria outside the nitrogen cycle, suggesting greater ecological flexibility than previously assumed.

  10. Aerobic growth of campylobacter in media supplemented with C3-monocarboxylates and C4-dicarboxylates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to examine aerobic growth of Campylobacter spp. in media supplemented with C4-dicarboxylates (fumarate, succinate, or malate) and C3-monocarboxylates (pyruvate or lactate). Basal broth media composed of tryptose, yeast extract, and a mineral-vitamin solution was supplement...

  11. Enhancing Aerobic Growth of Campylobacter in Media Supplemented with Organic Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of agar and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) concentration on aerobic growth of Campylobacter in was determined. A fumarate-pyruvate medium was supplemented with 0.0 to 0.2% agar and inoculated with Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter fetus, or Campylobacter jejuni. Portions of the inoculated me...

  12. Effect of bicarbonate concentration on aerobic growth of campylobacter in a fumarate-pyruvate medium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) concentration on aerobic growth of Campylobacter in a fumarate-pyruvate medium. Fumarate-pyruvate broth medium was supplemented with 0.00 to 0.10% NaHCO3 and inoculated with Campylobacter coli 33559, Campyloba...

  13. Respiratory activity and growth of human skin derma fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Papa, F; Scacco, S; Vergari, R; Bucaria, V; Dioguardi, D; Papa, S

    1998-09-01

    A study has been made on the speed of growth and respiratory activity of fibroblast cultures from control derma, cheloid (hypertrophic) scar and stabilized scar taken from human skin. The speed of growth and the efficiency of plaque formation of fibroblasts from cheloid scar were greater in comparison with those of fibroblasts from stabilized scar and were stimulated by the addition to the culture medium of the exudate from post-traumatic ulcer. Measurement of the contents of cytochromes showed a decrease in the content of cytochromes b562 and c + c1 in the fibroblast culture from both cheloid and stabilized scar as compared to the fibroblast culture from control derma. Cytochrome aa3 content did not show significant difference among the three types of fibroblast cultures. The respiratory activities supported by pyruvate plus malate, succinate or ascorbate plus N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine did not show, however, significant difference among the three fibroblast cultures. These observations show that the speed of growth of skin fibroblasts does not depend on the overall respiratory capacity. The exudate stimulated the activity of cytochrome c oxidase in fibroblasts from control derma, and cheloid scar. This effect and the accompanying stimulation of fibroblast growth might be correlated with the balance of oxygen free radicals.

  14. Role of phosphate solubilizing bacteria on rock phosphate solubility and growth of aerobic rice.

    PubMed

    Panhwar, Q A; Radziah, O; Zaharah, A R; Sariah, M; Razi, I Mohd

    2011-09-01

    Use of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) as inoculants has concurrently increased phosphorous uptake in plants and improved yields in several crop species. The ability of PSB to improve growth of aerobic rice (Oryza sativa L.) through enhanced phosphorus (P) uptake from Christmas island rock phosphate (RP) was studied in glasshouse experiments. Two isolated PSB strains; Bacillus spp. PSB9 and PSB16, were evaluated with RP treatments at 0, 30 and 60 kg ha(-1). Surface sterilized seeds of aerobic rice were planted in plastic pots containing 3 kg soil and the effect of treatments incorporated at planting were observed over 60 days of growth. The isolated PSB strains (PSB9 and PSB16) solubilized significantly high amounts of P (20.05-24.08 mg kg(-1)) compared to non-inoculated (19-23.10 mg kg(-1)) treatments. Significantly higher P solubilization (24.08 mg kg(-1)) and plant P uptake (5.31 mg plant(-1)) was observed with the PSB16 strain at the highest P level of 60 kg ha(-1). The higher amounts of soluble P in the soil solution increased P uptake in plants and resulted in higher plant biomass (21.48 g plant(-1)). PSB strains also increased plant height (80 cm) and improved root morphology in aerobic rice. The results showed that inoculation of aerobic rice with PSB improved phosphate solubilizing activity of incorporated RP.

  15. Respiratory physiology of the Oniscidea: aerobic capacity and the significance of pleopodal lungs.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jonathan C; Ting, Kevin

    2006-10-01

    The radiation of the terrestrial isopods (sub-order Oniscidea) has been accompanied by evolution of pleopodal lungs in the sections Tylida and Crinocheta. To understand the significance of such lungs for aerobic respiration, comparative studies were conducted using 6 species. Ligia occidentalis, lacking lungs, behaved as a metabolic conformer in reduced PO(2), and showed decreased V(.-)O(2) in low humidity and following dehydration. In species possessing lungs, metabolism was insensitive to dehydration. However, lung development did not show a clear relationship to metabolic regulation: Porcellio dilatatus was a metabolic conformer while Tylos punctatus and Armadillidium vulgare were efficient regulators. The metabolic conformers did not accumulate lactate during moderate hypoxia (10% O(2)), indicating that reduced V(.-)O(2) is not compensated with anaerobic glycolysis. In contrast, Alloniscus perconvexus, a littoral species with limited metabolic regulation, showed the largest lactate accumulation during hypoxia and also possessed the highest tissue LDH activity. It is hypothesized that these are adaptations to periodic hypoxia in sand burrows and the high metabolic cost of burrowing. Differences in lactate accumulation during immersion were curious, with the largest increases occurring in L. occidentalis and A. perconvexus that tolerate prolonged immersion in seawater. Possible functions of this lactate accumulation may include modulation of hemocyanin oxygen affinity. PMID:16875858

  16. Manipulating Respiratory Levels in Escherichia coli for Aerobic Formation of Reduced Chemical Products

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiangfeng; Sanchez, Ailen; Bennett, George N.; San, Ka-Yiu

    2011-01-01

    Optimizing the productivity of bioengineered strains requires balancing ATP generation and carbon atom conservation through fine-tuning cell respiration and metabolism. Traditional approaches manipulate cell respiration by altering air feeding, which are technically difficult especially in large bioreactors. An approach based on genetic regulation may better serve this purpose. With excess oxygen supply to the culture, we efficiently manipulated Escherichia coli cell respiration by adding different amount of coenzyme Q1 to strains lacking the ubiCA genes, which encode two critical enzymes for ubiquinone synthesis. As a proof-of-concept, the metabolic effect of the ubiCA gene knockout and coenzyme Q1 supplementation were characterized, and the metabolic profiles of the experimental strains showed clear correlations with coenzyme Q1 concentrations. Further proof-of-principle experiments were performed to illustrate that the approach can be used to optimize cell respiration for the production of chemicals of interest such as ethanol. This study showed that controlled respiration through genetic manipulation can be exploited to allow much larger operating windows for reduced product formation even under fully aerobic conditions. PMID:22001430

  17. Breakage and growth towards a stable aerobic granule size during the treatment of wastewater.

    PubMed

    Verawaty, Marieska; Tait, Stephan; Pijuan, Maite; Yuan, Zhiguo; Bond, Philip L

    2013-09-15

    To better understand granule growth and breakage processes in aerobic granular sludge systems, the particle size of aerobic granules was tracked over 50 days of wastewater treatment within four sequencing batch reactors fed with abattoir wastewater. These experiments tested a novel hypothesis stating that granules equilibrate to a certain stable granule size (the critical size) which is determined by the influence of process conditions on the relative rates of granule growth and granule breakage or attrition. For granules that are larger than the critical size, granule breakage and attrition outweighs granule growth, and causes an overall reduction in granule size. For granules at the critical size, the overall growth and size reduction processes are balanced, and granule size is stable. For granules that are smaller than the critical size, granule growth outweighs granule breakage and attrition, and causes an overall increase in granule size. The experimental reactors were seeded with mature granules that were either small, medium, or large sized, these having respective median granule sizes of 425 μm, 900 μm and 1125 μm. An additional reactor was seeded with a mixture of the sized granules to represent the original source of the granular sludge. The experimental results were analysed together with results of a previous granule formation study that used mixed seeding of granules and floccular sludge. The analysis supported the critical size hypothesis and showed that granules in the reactors did equilibrate towards a common critical size of around 600-800 μm. Accordingly, it is expected that aerobic granular reactors at steady-state operation are likely to have granule size distributions around a characteristic critical size. Additionally, the results support that maintaining a quantity of granules above a particular size is important for granule formation during start-up and for process stability of aerobic granule systems. Hence, biomass washout needs to be

  18. Inactivation of Mg chelatase during transition from anaerobic to aerobic growth in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Willows, Robert D; Lake, Vanessa; Roberts, Thomas Hugh; Beale, Samuel I

    2003-06-01

    The facultative photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus can adapt from an anaerobic photosynthetic mode of growth to aerobic heterotrophic metabolism. As this adaptation occurs, the cells must rapidly halt bacteriochlorophyll synthesis to prevent phototoxic tetrapyrroles from accumulating, while still allowing heme synthesis to continue. A likely control point is Mg chelatase, the enzyme that diverts protoporphyrin IX from heme biosynthesis toward the bacteriochlorophyll biosynthetic pathway by inserting Mg(2+) to form Mg-protoporphyrin IX. Mg chelatase is composed of three subunits that are encoded by the bchI, bchD, and bchH genes in R. capsulatus. We report that BchH is the rate-limiting component of Mg chelatase activity in cell extracts. BchH binds protoporphyrin IX, and BchH that has been expressed and purified from Escherichia coli is red in color due to the bound protoporphyrin IX. Recombinant BchH is rapidly inactivated by light in the presence of O(2), and the inactivation results in the formation of a covalent adduct between the protein and the bound protoporphyrin IX. When photosynthetically growing R. capsulatus cells are transferred to aerobic conditions, Mg chelatase is rapidly inactivated, and BchH is the component that is most rapidly inactivated in vivo when cells are exposed to aerobic conditions. The light- and O(2)-stimulated inactivation of BchH could account for the rapid inactivation of Mg chelatase in vivo and provide a mechanism for inhibiting the synthesis of bacteriochlorophyll during adaptation of photosynthetically grown cells to aerobic conditions while still allowing heme synthesis to occur for aerobic respiration.

  19. By reducing hexokinase 2, resveratrol induces apoptosis in HCC cells addicted to aerobic glycolysis and inhibits tumor growth in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yujing; He, Lei; Chen, Kan; Li, Jingjing; Li, Sainan; Liu, Tong; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Wang, Jianrong; Lu, Wenxia; Zhou, Yuqing; Yin, Qin; Abudumijiti, Huerxidan; Chen, Rongxia; Zhang, Rong; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Zheng; Zhu, Rong; Yang, Jing; Wang, Chengfen; Zhang, Huawei; Zhou, Yingqun; Xu, Ling; Guo, Chuanyong

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells exhibit an altered metabolic phenotype known as the aerobic glycolysis. The expression of HK2 changes the metabolic phenotype of cells to support cancerous growth. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of resveratrol on HK2 expression and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell glycolysis. Aerobic glycolysis was observed in four HCC cell lines compared to the normal hepatic cells. Resveratrol sensitized aerobic glycolytic HCC cells to apoptosis, and this effect was attenuated by glycolytic inhibitors. The induction of mitochondrial apoptosis was associated with the decrease of HK2 expression by resveratrol in HCC cells. In addition, resveratrol enhanced sorafenib induced cell growth inhibition in aerobic glycolytic HCC cells. Combination treatment with both reagents inhibited the growth and promoted apoptosis of HCC-bearing mice. The reduction of HK2 by resveratrol provides a new dimension to clinical HCC therapies aimed at preventing disease progression. PMID:25938543

  20. The effect of aerobic exercise training on growth performance, digestive enzyme activities and postprandial metabolic response in juvenile qingbo (Spinibarbus sinensis).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Ming; Yu, Li-Juan; Wang, Chuan; Zeng, Ling-Qing; Cao, Zhen-Dong; Fu, Shi-Jian; Zhang, Yao-Guang

    2013-09-01

    Continual swimming exercise usually promotes growth in fish at a moderate water velocity. We hypothesized that the improvement in growth in exercise-trained fish may be accompanied by increases in digestive enzyme activity, respiratory capacity and, hence, postprandial metabolism. Juvenile qingbo fish (Spinibarbus sinensis) were subjected to aerobic training for 8weeks at a water velocity of control (3cms(-1)), 1, 2 and 4 body length (bl)s(-1) at a constant temperature of 25°C. The feed intake (FI), food conversion rate (FCR), specific growth rate (SGR), whole-body composition, trypsin and lipase activities, maximal oxygen consumption (M˙O2max) and postprandial M˙O2 response were measured at the end of the training period. Aerobic exercise training induced a significant increase in FI compared with the control group, while the FCR of the 4bls(-1) group was significantly lower than for the other three groups (P<0.05). The 1 and 2bls(-1) groups showed a significantly higher SGR over the control group (P<0.05). The whole-body fat and protein contents were significantly altered after aerobic exercise training (P<0.05). Furthermore, aerobic exercise training elevated the activity of both trypsin and lipase in the hepatopancreas and intestinal tract of juvenile S. sinensis. The M˙O2max of the 4bls(-1) training group was significantly higher than for the control group. The resting M˙O2 (M˙O2rest) and peak postprandial M˙O2 (M˙O2peak) in the three training groups were significantly higher than in the control group (P<0.05). Time to M˙O2peak was significantly shorter in the 1, 2 and 4bls(-1) training groups compared with the control group, while exercise training showed no effect on SDA (specific dynamic action) duration, factorial metabolic scope, energy expended on SDA and the SDA coefficient when compared to the control group. These data suggest that (1) the optimum water velocity for the growth of juvenile S. sinensis occurred at approximately 2.4bls(-1); (2

  1. Dynamic Modeling of Aerobic Growth of Shewanella oneidensis. Predicting Triauxic Growth, Flux Distributions and Energy Requirement for Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Hyun-Seob; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Konopka, Allan; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2013-01-01

    A model-based analysis is conducted to investigate metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 strain in aerobic batch culture, which exhibits an intriguing growth pattern by sequentially consuming substrate (i.e., lactate) and by-products (i.e., pyruvate and acetate). A general protocol is presented for developing a detailed network-based dynamic model for S. oneidensis based on the Lumped Hybrid Cybernetic Model (LHCM) framework. The L-HCM, although developed from only limited data, is shown to accurately reproduce exacting dynamic metabolic shifts, and provide reasonable estimates of energy requirement for growth. Flux distributions in S. oneidensis predicted by the L-HCM compare very favorably with 13C-metabolic flux analysis results reported in the literature. Predictive accuracy is enhanced by incorporating measurements of only a few intracellular fluxes, in addition to extracellular metabolites. The L-HCM developed here for S. oneidensis is consequently a promising tool for the analysis of intracellular flux distribution and metabolic engineering.

  2. Physiological activities associated with biofilm growth in attached and suspended growth bioreactors under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Naz, Iffat; Seher, Shama; Perveen, Irum; Saroj, Devendra P; Ahmed, Safia

    2015-01-01

    This research work evaluated the biofilm succession on stone media and compared the biochemical changes of sludge in attached and suspended biological reactors operated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Stones incubated (30±2°C) with activated sludge showed a constant increase in biofilm weight up to the fifth and seventh week time under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively, where after reduction (>80%) the most probable number index of pathogen indicators on ninth week was recorded. Reduction in parameters such as biological oxygen demand (BOD) (47.7%), chemical oxygen demand (COD, 41%), nitrites (60.2%), nitrates (105.5%) and phosphates (58.9%) and increase in dissolved oxygen (176.5%) of sludge were higher in aerobic attached growth reactors as compared with other settings. While, considerable reductions in these values were also observed (BOD, 53.8%; COD, 2.8%; nitrites, 28.6%; nitrates, 31.7%; phosphates, 41.4%) in the suspended growth system under anaerobic conditions. However, higher sulphate removal was observed in suspended (40.9% and 54.9%) as compared with biofilm reactors (28.2% and 29.3%). Six weeks biofilm on the stone media showed maximum physiological activities; thus, the operational conditions should be controlled to keep the biofilm structure similar to six-week-old biofilm, and can be used in fixed biofilm reactors for wastewater treatment.

  3. Modeling of yeast Brettanomyces bruxellensis growth at different acetic acid concentrations under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Yahara, Garcia Alvarado; Javier, Mendez Ancona; Tulio, Mata Jimenez Marco; Javier, Gómez Rodriguez; Guadalupe, Aguilar Uscanga Maria

    2007-11-01

    Glucose utilization by Brettanomyces bruxellensis at different acetic acid concentrations under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was investigated. The presence of the organic acid disturbs the growth and fermentative activity of the yeast when its concentration exceeds 2 g l(-1). A mathematical model is proposed for the kinetic behavior analysis of yeast growing in batch culture. A Matlab algorithm was used for estimation of model parameters, whose confidence intervals were also calculated at a 0.95 probability level using a t-Student distribution for f degrees of freedom. The model successfully simulated the batch kinetics observed at different concentrations of acetic acid under both oxygen conditions.

  4. Growth of respiratory syncytial virus in mink lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yeolekar, L R; Damle, R G; Basu, A; Rao, B L

    2002-12-01

    Mink lung epithelial cells (Mv-1-Lu) were tested for their ability to support the growth and serial passage of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in vitro. Indian isolates of RSV induced distinctive cytopathic effect with typical rounding of cells followed by detachment with more than 50 per cent cells showing bright fluorescence using anti-RSV monoclonal antibodies in immunofluorescence test. Serial passage of RSV was possible in Mv-1-Lu cells without loss of sensitivity of the cells for virus growth. Titration of cell associated virus and virus released in the supernatant indicated that 60 per cent of the virus was released in the supernatant, and 40 per cent remained cell associated. Transmission electron microscopic studies of negatively stained RSV particles and ultra-thin sections of RSV infected Mv-1-Lu cells showed roughly spherical particles with club shaped projections, budding from the cytoplasmic membrane. These results indicate that Mv-1-Lu cell line is suitable for the growth and propagation of RSV.

  5. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor therapy for recurrent respiratory papillomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Sidman, James D.

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor pathway has been implicated in various tumors, including human papillomavirus (HPV) lesions such as recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP). Due to the presence of epidermal growth factor receptors in RRP, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors have been utilized as adjuvant therapy. This case series examines the response to EGFR inhibitors in RRP. Four patients with life-threatening RRP were treated with EGFR inhibitors. Operative frequency and anatomical Derkay scores were calculated prior to, and following EGFR inhibitor treatment via retrospective chart review. The anatomical Derkay score decreased for all four patients after initiation of EGFR inhibitor therapy. In one patient, the operative frequency increased after switching to an intravenous inhibitor after loss of control with an oral inhibitor. In the other patients there was a greater than 20% decrease in operative frequency in one and a more than doubling in the time between procedures in two.  This study suggests that EGFR inhibitors are a potential adjuvant therapy in RRP and deserve further study in a larger number of patients. PMID:24795806

  6. Growth characteristics of freeze-tolerant baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae AFY in aerobic batch culture.

    PubMed

    Ji, Meng; Miao, Yelian; Chen, Jie Yu; You, Yebing; Liu, Feilong; Xu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae AFY is a novel baker's yeast strain with strong freeze-tolerance, and can be used for frozen-dough processing. The present study armed to clarify the growth characteristics of the yeast AFY. Aerobic batch culture experiments of yeast AFY were carried out using media with various initial glucose concentrations, and the culture process was analyzed kinetically. The growth of the yeast AFY exhibited a diauxic pattern with the first growth stage consuming glucose and the second growth stage consuming ethanol. The cell yield decreased with increasing initial glucose concentration in the first growth stage, and also decreased with increasing initial ethanol concentration in the second growth stage. In the initial glucose concentration range of 5.0-40.0 g/L, the simultaneous equations of Monod equation, Luedeking-Piret equation and pseudo-Luedeking-Piret equation could be used to describe the concentrations of cell, ethanol and glucose in either of the two exponential growth phases. At the initial glucose concentrations of 5.0, 10.0 and 40.0 g/L, the first exponential growth phase had a maximal specific cell growth rate of 0.52, 0.98 and 0.99 h(-1), while the second exponential growth phase had a maximal specific cell growth rate of 0.11, 0.06 and 0.07 h(-1), respectively. It was indicated that the efficiency of the yeast production could be improved by reducing the ethanol production in the first growth stage. PMID:27186467

  7. Aerobic growth of Anoxybacillus pushchinoensis K1(T): emended descriptions of A. pushchinoensis and the genus Anoxybacillus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena; Cleland, David; Tang, Jane

    2003-01-01

    In this work, corrections are made to the descriptions of the species Anoxybacillus pushchinoensis corrig. and the genus ANOXYBACILLUS: Experiments to determine the relationship of A. pushchinoensis K1(T) to oxygen showed that it was capable of aerobic growth, but preferred to grow anaerobically. During aerobic growth, the redox indicator resazurin was reduced as a result of hydrogen gas production. The facultatively anaerobic nature of K1(T) was ascertained by cultivation in aerobic liquid medium, where growth began at the bottom of the tube. The anaerobic nature of K1(T) was also indicated by a negative catalase reaction. This work is submitted to correct the description of the species A. pushchinoensis from obligate anaerobe to aerotolerant anaerobe and to emend the description of the genus Anoxybacillus from obligate anaerobes or facultative anaerobes to aerotolerant anaerobes or facultative anaerobes.

  8. Adaptation of aerobic, ethene-assimilating Mycobacterium strains to vinyl chloride as a growth substrate.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yang Oh; Mattes, Timothy E

    2008-07-01

    Contamination of drinking water source zones by vinyl chloride (VC), a known human carcinogen and common groundwater contaminant, poses a public health risk. Bioremediation applications involving aerobic, VC-assimilating bacteria could be useful in alleviating environmental VC cancer risk, but their evolution and activity in the environment are poorly understood. In this study, adaptation of ethene-assimilating Mycobacterium strains JS622, JS623, JS624, and JS625 to VC as a growth substrate was investigated to test the hypothesis that VC-assimilating bacteria arise from naturally occurring ethene-assimilating bacteria. VC consumption in the absence of microbial growth was initially observed in cultures grown in both ethene and 1/10-strength trypticase soy agar + 1% (w/v) glucose. After extended incubations (55-476 days), all strains commenced growth-coupled VC consumption patterns. VC-adapted cultures grown on 20 mM acetate subsequently retained their ability to assimilate VC. Three independent purity check methods (streak plates, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and repetitive extragenic palindromic polymerase chain reaction) verified culture purity prior to and following VC adaptation. Overall, our results suggest that ethene-assimilating mycobacteria have a widespread ability to adapt to VC as a growth substrate.

  9. Aerobic Degradation of Trichloroethylene by Co-Metabolism Using Phenol and Gasoline as Growth Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Li, Bing; Wang, Cui-Ping; Fan, Jun-Zhao; Sun, Hong-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a common groundwater contaminant of toxic and carcinogenic concern. Aerobic co-metabolic processes are the predominant pathways for TCE complete degradation. In this study, Pseudomonas fluorescens was studied as the active microorganism to degrade TCE under aerobic condition by co-metabolic degradation using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates. Operating conditions influencing TCE degradation efficiency were optimized. TCE co-metabolic degradation rate reached the maximum of 80% under the optimized conditions of degradation time of 3 days, initial OD600 of microorganism culture of 0.14 (1.26 × 107 cell/mL), initial phenol concentration of 100 mg/L, initial TCE concentration of 0.1 mg/L, pH of 6.0, and salinity of 0.1%. The modified transformation capacity and transformation yield were 20 μg (TCE)/mg (biomass) and 5.1 μg (TCE)/mg (phenol), respectively. Addition of nutrient broth promoted TCE degradation with phenol as growth substrate. It was revealed that catechol 1,2-dioxygenase played an important role in TCE co-metabolism. The dechlorination of TCE was complete, and less chlorinated products were not detected at the end of the experiment. TCE could also be co-metabolized in the presence of gasoline; however, the degradation rate was not high (28%). When phenol was introduced into the system of TCE and gasoline, TCE and gasoline could be removed at substantial rates (up to 59% and 69%, respectively). This study provides a promising approach for the removal of combined pollution of TCE and gasoline. PMID:24857922

  10. Aerobic degradation of trichloroethylene by co-metabolism using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Bing; Wang, Cui-Ping; Fan, Jun-Zhao; Sun, Hong-Wen

    2014-05-22

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a common groundwater contaminant of toxic and carcinogenic concern. Aerobic co-metabolic processes are the predominant pathways for TCE complete degradation. In this study, Pseudomonas fluorescens was studied as the active microorganism to degrade TCE under aerobic condition by co-metabolic degradation using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates. Operating conditions influencing TCE degradation efficiency were optimized. TCE co-metabolic degradation rate reached the maximum of 80% under the optimized conditions of degradation time of 3 days, initial OD600 of microorganism culture of 0.14 (1.26×10⁷ cell/mL), initial phenol concentration of 100 mg/L, initial TCE concentration of 0.1 mg/L, pH of 6.0, and salinity of 0.1%. The modified transformation capacity and transformation yield were 20 μg (TCE)/mg (biomass) and 5.1 μg (TCE)/mg (phenol), respectively. Addition of nutrient broth promoted TCE degradation with phenol as growth substrate. It was revealed that catechol 1,2-dioxygenase played an important role in TCE co-metabolism. The dechlorination of TCE was complete, and less chlorinated products were not detected at the end of the experiment. TCE could also be co-metabolized in the presence of gasoline; however, the degradation rate was not high (28%). When phenol was introduced into the system of TCE and gasoline, TCE and gasoline could be removed at substantial rates (up to 59% and 69%, respectively). This study provides a promising approach for the removal of combined pollution of TCE and gasoline.

  11. Purple Sulfur Bacteria Control the Growth of Aerobic Heterotrophic Bacterioplankton in a Meromictic Salt Lake

    PubMed Central

    Overmann, J.; Beatty, J. T.; Hall, K. J.

    1996-01-01

    In meromictic Mahoney Lake, British Columbia, Canada, the heterotrophic bacterial production in the mixolimnion exceeded concomitant primary production by a factor of 7. Bacterial growth rates were correlated neither to primary production nor to the amount of chlorophyll a. Both results indicate an uncoupling of bacteria and phytoplankton. In the chemocline of the lake, an extremely dense population of the purple sulfur bacterium Amoebobacter purpureus is present year round. We investigated whether anoxygenic phototrophs are significant for the growth of aerobic bacterioplankton in the overlaying water. Bacterial growth rates in the mixolimnion were limited by inorganic phosphorus or nitrogen most of the time, and the biomass of heterotrophic bacteria did not increase until, in autumn, 86% of the cells of A. purpureus appeared in the mixolimnion because of their reduced buoyant density. The increase in heterotrophic bacterial biomass, soluble phosphorus concentrations below the detection limit, and an extraordinarily high activity of alkaline phosphatase in the mixolimnion indicate a rapid liberation of organically bound phosphorus from A. purpureus cells accompanied by a simultaneous incorporation into heterotrophic bacterioplankton. High concentrations of allochthonously derived dissolved organic carbon (mean, 60 mg of C(middot)liter(sup-1)) were measured in the lake water. In Mahoney Lake, liberation of phosphorus from upwelling purple sulfur bacteria and degradation of allochthonous dissolved organic carbon as an additional carbon source render heterotrophic bacterial production largely independent of the photosynthesis of phytoplankton. A recycling of inorganic nutrients via phototrophic bacteria also appears to be relevant in other lakes with anoxic bottom waters. PMID:16535399

  12. Constitutive expression of Campylobacter jejuni truncated hemoglobin CtrHb improves the growth of Escherichia coli cell under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiang-Ke; Xiong, Wei; Xu, Li; Li, Jia; Zhao, Xiu-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria hemoglobin could bind to the oxygen, transfer it from the intracellular microenvironment to the respiration process and sustain the energy for the metabolism and reproduction of cells. Heterologous expression of bacteria hemoglobin gene could improve the capacity of the host on oxygen-capturing and allow it to grow even under microaerophilic condition. To develop a system based on hemoglobin to help bacteria cells overcome the oxygen shortage in fermentation, in this study, Campylobacter jejuni truncated hemoglobin (CtrHb) gene was synthesized and expressed under the control of constitutive expression promoters P2 and P(SPO1-II) in Escherichia coli. As showed by the growth curves of the two recombinants P2-CtrHb and P(SPO1-II)-CtrHb, constitutive expression of CtrHb improved cell growth under aerobic shaking-flasks, anaerobic capped-bottles and bioreactor conditions. According to the NMR analysis, this improvement might come from the expression of hemoglobin which could boost the metabolism of cells by supplying more oxygen to the respiratory chain processes. Through semi-quantitative RT-PCR and CO differential spectrum assays, we further discussed the connection between the growth patterns of the recombinants, the expression level of CtrHb and oxygen binding capacity of CtrHb in cells. Based on the growth patterns of these recombinants in bioreactor, a possible choice on different type of recombinants under specific fermentation conditions was also suggested in this study.

  13. Constitutive expression of Campylobacter jejuni truncated hemoglobin CtrHb improves the growth of Escherichia coli cell under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiang-Ke; Xiong, Wei; Xu, Li; Li, Jia; Zhao, Xiu-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria hemoglobin could bind to the oxygen, transfer it from the intracellular microenvironment to the respiration process and sustain the energy for the metabolism and reproduction of cells. Heterologous expression of bacteria hemoglobin gene could improve the capacity of the host on oxygen-capturing and allow it to grow even under microaerophilic condition. To develop a system based on hemoglobin to help bacteria cells overcome the oxygen shortage in fermentation, in this study, Campylobacter jejuni truncated hemoglobin (CtrHb) gene was synthesized and expressed under the control of constitutive expression promoters P2 and P(SPO1-II) in Escherichia coli. As showed by the growth curves of the two recombinants P2-CtrHb and P(SPO1-II)-CtrHb, constitutive expression of CtrHb improved cell growth under aerobic shaking-flasks, anaerobic capped-bottles and bioreactor conditions. According to the NMR analysis, this improvement might come from the expression of hemoglobin which could boost the metabolism of cells by supplying more oxygen to the respiratory chain processes. Through semi-quantitative RT-PCR and CO differential spectrum assays, we further discussed the connection between the growth patterns of the recombinants, the expression level of CtrHb and oxygen binding capacity of CtrHb in cells. Based on the growth patterns of these recombinants in bioreactor, a possible choice on different type of recombinants under specific fermentation conditions was also suggested in this study. PMID:26047918

  14. Growth kinetics and stable carbon isotope fractionation during aerobic degradation of cis-1,2-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride.

    PubMed

    Tiehm, Andreas; Schmidt, Kathrin R; Pfeifer, Brigitte; Heidinger, Michael; Ertl, Siegmund

    2008-05-01

    Assessing changes in the isotopic signature of contaminants is a promising new tool to monitor microbial degradation processes. In this study, chloroethene degradation was proven by depletion of chloroethenes, formation of chloride, increase in protein content and stable carbon isotope fractionation. Aerobic degradation of vinyl chloride (VC) was found to proceed metabolically, with degradation rates of 0.48 and 0.29 d(-1); and growth yields of 9.7 and 6.4 g of protein/mol of VC at room and groundwater temperature, respectively. Cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE) was degraded cometabolically under aerobic conditions when VC was provided as growth substrate. Aerobic degradation was associated with significant stable carbon isotope fractionation, with enrichment factors ranging from -5.4+/-0.4 per thousand for metabolic degradation of VC to -9.8+/-1.7 per thousand for cometabolic degradation of cDCE. Thus, it was demonstrated that stable carbon isotope fractionation is suitable for assessing aerobic chloroethene degradation, which can contribute significantly to site remediation.

  15. Effects of aerobic exercise on ectopic lipids in patients with growth hormone deficiency before and after growth hormone replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Christ, Emanuel R.; Egger, Andrea; Allemann, Sabin; Buehler, Tania; Kreis, Roland; Boesch, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone replacement therapy (GHRT) increases exercise capacity and insulin resistance while it decreases fat mass in growth hormone-deficient patients (GHD). Ectopic lipids (intramyocellular (IMCL) and intrahepatocellular lipids (IHCL) are related to insulin resistance. The effect of GHRT on ectopic lipids is unknown. It is hypothesized that exercise-induced utilization of ectopic lipids is significantly decreased in GHD patients and normalized by GHRT. GHD (4 females, 6 males) and age/gender/waist-matched control subjects (CS) were studied. VO2max was assessed on a treadmill and insulin sensitivity determined by a two-step hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp. Visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) fat were quantified by MR-imaging. IHCL and IMCL were measured before and after a 2 h exercise at 50–60% of VO2max using MR-spectroscopy (∆IMCL, ∆IHCL). Identical investigations were performed after 6 months of GHRT. VO2max was similar in GHD and CS and significantly increased after GHRT; GHRT significantly decreased SAT and VAT. 2 h-exercise resulted in a decrease in IMCL (significant in CS and GHRT) and a significant increase in IHCL in CS and GHD pre and post GHRT. GHRT didn’t significantly impact on ∆IMCL and ∆IHCL. We conclude that aerobic exercise affects ectopic lipids in patients and controls. GHRT increases exercise capacity without influencing ectopic lipids. PMID:26792091

  16. [Impacts of root-zone hypoxia stress on muskmelon growth, its root respiratory metabolism, and antioxidative enzyme activities].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Ling; Li, Tian-Lai; Sun, Zhou-Ping; Chen, Ya-Dong

    2010-06-01

    By using aeroponics culture system, this paper studied the impacts of root-zone hypoxia (10% O2 and 5% O2) stress on the plant growth, root respiratory metabolism, and antioxidative enzyme activities of muskmelon at its fruit development stage. Root-zone hypoxia stress inhibited the plant growth of muskmelon, resulting in the decrease of plant height, root length, and fresh and dry biomass. Comparing with the control (21% O2), hypoxia stress reduced the root respiration rate and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity significantly, and the impact of 5% O2 stress was more serious than that of 10% O2 stress. Under hypoxic conditions, the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) activities and the malondialdehyde (MDA) content were significantly higher than the control. The increment of antioxidative enzyme activities under 10% O2 stress was significantly higher than that under 5% O2 stress, while the MDA content was higher under 5% O2 stress than under 10% O2 stress, suggesting that when the root-zone oxygen concentration was below 10%, the aerobic respiration of muskmelon at its fruit development stage was obviously inhibited while the anaerobic respiration was accelerated, and the root antioxidative enzymes induced defense reaction. With the increasing duration of hypoxic stress, the lipid peroxidation would be aggravated, resulting in the damages on muskmelon roots, inhibition of plant growth, and decrease of fruit yield and quality. PMID:20873618

  17. [Impacts of root-zone hypoxia stress on muskmelon growth, its root respiratory metabolism, and antioxidative enzyme activities].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Ling; Li, Tian-Lai; Sun, Zhou-Ping; Chen, Ya-Dong

    2010-06-01

    By using aeroponics culture system, this paper studied the impacts of root-zone hypoxia (10% O2 and 5% O2) stress on the plant growth, root respiratory metabolism, and antioxidative enzyme activities of muskmelon at its fruit development stage. Root-zone hypoxia stress inhibited the plant growth of muskmelon, resulting in the decrease of plant height, root length, and fresh and dry biomass. Comparing with the control (21% O2), hypoxia stress reduced the root respiration rate and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity significantly, and the impact of 5% O2 stress was more serious than that of 10% O2 stress. Under hypoxic conditions, the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) activities and the malondialdehyde (MDA) content were significantly higher than the control. The increment of antioxidative enzyme activities under 10% O2 stress was significantly higher than that under 5% O2 stress, while the MDA content was higher under 5% O2 stress than under 10% O2 stress, suggesting that when the root-zone oxygen concentration was below 10%, the aerobic respiration of muskmelon at its fruit development stage was obviously inhibited while the anaerobic respiration was accelerated, and the root antioxidative enzymes induced defense reaction. With the increasing duration of hypoxic stress, the lipid peroxidation would be aggravated, resulting in the damages on muskmelon roots, inhibition of plant growth, and decrease of fruit yield and quality.

  18. The aerobic respiratory chain of the acidophilic archaeon Ferroplasma acidiphilum: A membrane-bound complex oxidizing ferrous iron.

    PubMed

    Castelle, Cindy J; Roger, Magali; Bauzan, Marielle; Brugna, Myriam; Lignon, Sabrina; Nimtz, Manfred; Golyshina, Olga V; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Guiral, Marianne

    2015-08-01

    The extremely acidophilic archaeon Ferroplasma acidiphilum is found in iron-rich biomining environments and is an important micro-organism in naturally occurring microbial communities in acid mine drainage. F. acidiphilum is an iron oxidizer that belongs to the order Thermoplasmatales (Euryarchaeota), which harbors the most extremely acidophilic micro-organisms known so far. At present, little is known about the nature or the structural and functional organization of the proteins in F. acidiphilum that impact the iron biogeochemical cycle. We combine here biochemical and biophysical techniques such as enzyme purification, activity measurements, proteomics and spectroscopy to characterize the iron oxidation pathway(s) in F. acidiphilum. We isolated two respiratory membrane protein complexes: a 850 kDa complex containing an aa3-type cytochrome oxidase and a blue copper protein, which directly oxidizes ferrous iron and reduces molecular oxygen, and a 150 kDa cytochrome ba complex likely composed of a di-heme cytochrome and a Rieske protein. We tentatively propose that both of these complexes are involved in iron oxidation respiratory chains, functioning in the so-called uphill and downhill electron flow pathways, consistent with autotrophic life. The cytochrome ba complex could possibly play a role in regenerating reducing equivalents by a reverse ('uphill') electron flow. This study constitutes the first detailed biochemical investigation of the metalloproteins that are potentially directly involved in iron-mediated energy conservation in a member of the acidophilic archaea of the genus Ferroplasma.

  19. Efficacy and safety of aztreonam-clindamycin versus tobramycin-clindamycin in the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections caused by aerobic gram-negative bacilli.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, J R; Ramírez-Ronda, C H; Nevárez, M

    1985-01-01

    A total of 80 patients were randomized to receive either aztreonam or tobramycin for the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections caused by gram-negative bacilli; all these patients received clindamycin concomitantly. A total of 53 patients were randomized to receive aztreonam-clindamycin; of these, 46 were clinically evaluable and 39 were bacteriologically evaluable. Of the 46 clinically evaluable patients, 41 were considered cured, 3 failed to be cured, and 2 died during the study period of unrelated causes. Of the 39 bacteriologically evaluable patients, 36 were considered cured, and 3 failed to be cured. There were 26 clinically evaluable patients in the group randomized to receive tobramycin-clindamycin. Of them, 22 patients were considered cured, 3 failed to be cured, and 1 died of unrelated causes during the study period. There were 18 bacteriologically evaluable patients in the tobramycin-clindamycin group; 17 were cured, and 1 failed to be cured. The most common pathogens isolated from the patients were Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All of the isolated organisms were susceptible to both tested antibiotics, except for a strain of Pseudomonas cepacia resistant to both tested antimicrobial agents and a strain of Enterobacter aerogenes and one of P. aeruginosa that were resistant to aztreonam. Very few adverse reactions related to the antibiotics were seen. These effects, when present, were transient and comparable in both studied groups, except for renal-function tests, which were altered in 7.7% of the patients randomized to receive tobramycin-clindamycin and in none of the patients randomized to receive aztreonam-clindamycin. Aztreonam-clindamycin is safe and effective for the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections caused by aerobic gram-negative bacilli when the organisms are susceptible. PMID:4039118

  20. Growth dynamics of specific spoilage organisms and associated spoilage biomarkers in chicken breast stored aerobically

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was performed to identify and quantify selected volatile spoilage biomarkers in a headspace over chicken breast using solid phase microextraction (SPME) combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-flame ionization detectors (GC-MS/FID). The chicken breast samples were aerobically s...

  1. Effect of algae growth on aerobic granulation and nutrients removal from synthetic wastewater by using sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenli; Li, Bing; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Zhenya; Lei, Zhongfang; Lu, Baowang; Zhou, Beibei

    2015-03-01

    The effect of algae growth on aerobic granulation and nutrients removal was studied in two identical sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). Sunlight exposure promoted the growth of algae in the SBR (Rs), forming an algal-bacterial symbiosis in aerobic granules. Compared to the control SBR (Rc), Rs had a slower granulation process with granules of loose structure and smaller particle size. Moreover, the specific oxygen uptake rate was significantly decreased for the granules from Rs with secretion of 25.7% and 22.5% less proteins and polysaccharides respectively in the extracellular polymeric substances. Although little impact was observed on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, algal-bacterial symbiosis deteriorated N and P removals, about 40.7-45.4% of total N and 44% of total P in Rs in contrast to 52.9-58.3% of TN and 90% of TP in Rc, respectively. In addition, the growth of algae altered the microbial community in Rs, especially unfavorable for Nitrospiraceae and Nitrosomonadaceae.

  2. [NiFe]-hydrogenase is essential for cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 aerobic growth in the dark

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, Edith; Checchetto, Vanessa; Franchin, Cinzia; Bergantino, Elisabetta; Berto, Paola; Szabò, Ildikò; Giacometti, Giorgio M.; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Costantini, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has a bidirectional [NiFe]-hydrogenase (Hox hydrogenase) which reversibly reduces protons to H2. This enzyme is composed of a hydrogenase domain and a diaphorase moiety, which is distinctly homologous to the NADH input module of mitochondrial respiratory Complex I. Hox hydrogenase physiological function is still unclear, since it is not required for Synechocystis fitness under standard growth conditions. We analyzed the phenotype under prolonged darkness of three Synechocystis knock-out strains, lacking either Hox hydrogenase (ΔHoxE-H) or one of the proteins responsible for the assembly of its NiFe active site (ΔHypA1 and ΔHypB1). We found that Hox hydrogenase is required for Synechocystis growth under this condition, regardless of the functional status of its catalytic site, suggesting an additional role beside hydrogen metabolism. Moreover, quantitative proteomic analyses revealed that the expression levels of several subunits of the respiratory NADPH/plastoquinone oxidoreductase (NDH-1) are reduced when Synechocystis is grown in the dark. Our findings suggest that the Hox hydrogenase could contribute to electron transport regulation when both photosynthetic and respiratory pathways are down-regulated, and provide a possible explanation for the close evolutionary relationship between mitochondrial respiratory Complex I and cyanobacterial [NiFe]-hydrogenases. PMID:26215212

  3. Reduced expression of cytochrome oxidases largely explains cAMP inhibition of aerobic growth in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jianhua; Meng, Qiu; Fu, Huihui; Gao, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of bacterial growth under aerobic conditions by elevated levels of cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP), first revealed more than 50 years ago, was attributed to accumulation of toxic methylglyoxal (MG). Here, we report a Crp-dependent mechanism rather than MG accumulation that accounts for the phenotype in Shewanella oneidensis, an emerging research model for the bacterial physiology. We show that a similar phenotype can be obtained by removing CpdA, a cAMP phosphodiesterase that appears more effective than its Escherichia coli counterpart. Although production of heme c and cytochromes c is correlated well with cAMP levels, neither is sufficient for the retarded growth. Quantities of overall cytochromes c increased substantially in the presence of elevated cAMP, a phenomenon resembling cells respiring on non-oxygen electron acceptors. In contrast, transcription of Crp-dependent genes encoding both cytochromes bd and cbb3 oxidases is substantially repressed under the same condition. Overall, our results suggest that cAMP of elevated levels drives cells into a low-energetic status, under which aerobic respiration is inhibited. PMID:27076065

  4. Reduced expression of cytochrome oxidases largely explains cAMP inhibition of aerobic growth in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jianhua; Meng, Qiu; Fu, Huihui; Gao, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of bacterial growth under aerobic conditions by elevated levels of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), first revealed more than 50 years ago, was attributed to accumulation of toxic methylglyoxal (MG). Here, we report a Crp-dependent mechanism rather than MG accumulation that accounts for the phenotype in Shewanella oneidensis, an emerging research model for the bacterial physiology. We show that a similar phenotype can be obtained by removing CpdA, a cAMP phosphodiesterase that appears more effective than its Escherichia coli counterpart. Although production of heme c and cytochromes c is correlated well with cAMP levels, neither is sufficient for the retarded growth. Quantities of overall cytochromes c increased substantially in the presence of elevated cAMP, a phenomenon resembling cells respiring on non-oxygen electron acceptors. In contrast, transcription of Crp-dependent genes encoding both cytochromes bd and cbb3 oxidases is substantially repressed under the same condition. Overall, our results suggest that cAMP of elevated levels drives cells into a low-energetic status, under which aerobic respiration is inhibited. PMID:27076065

  5. Aerobic biodegradation of cis-1,2-dichloroethene as sole carbon source: Stable carbon isotope fractionation and growth characteristics.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Kathrin R; Augenstein, Tobias; Heidinger, Michael; Ertl, Siegmund; Tiehm, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE) is a compound of concern at many chloroethene-contaminated sites, since it tends to accumulate during reductive dechlorination of the higher chlorinated ethenes. Stable carbon isotope fractionation during aerobic cDCE biodegradation was observed in groundwater microcosms under varying incubation conditions (room temperature/groundwater temperature; with/without inorganic nutrients), and resulted in an average stable carbon isotope enrichment factor of -15.2+/-0.5 per thousand. A new enrichment culture, obtained from groundwater microcosms, degraded cDCE concentrations up to 100mgL(-1), was active at temperatures between 4 and 23 degrees C, had a pH optimum of approximately 7, and could withstand prolonged periods (250d) of starvation. Microbial growth during degradation of cDCE as sole carbon and energy source was demonstrated by protein formation in mineral medium not containing any known auxiliary substrate. The obtained growth yield was 12.5+/-1.9g of proteinMol(-1) of cDCE, with a doubling time of 53+/-2h at 23 degrees C. Aerobic degradation of cDCE as sole carbon and energy source appears to be a promising biological process for site remediation.

  6. Differential sensitivities of the growth of Escherichia coli to acrylate under aerobic and anaerobic conditions and its effect on product formation.

    PubMed

    Arya, Ajay S; Lee, Sarah A; Eiteman, Mark A

    2013-11-01

    The effect of acrylate on the growth of Escherichia coli was determined under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in glucose-defined medium. Growth occurred with up to 35 mM acrylate under aerobic conditions but ceased at 5 mM acrylate under anaerobic conditions. This differential sensitivity can be attributed to inhibition of pyruvate formate lyase and/or pflB gene repression, as this enzyme is necessary for anaerobic growth of E. coli. The effect of acrylate on end-product distribution was also determined by growing E. coli first aerobically, then switching to anaerobic conditions. In the absence of acrylate, E. coli generated the typical distribution of mixed-acid products, with about 12 % of pyruvate being metabolically converted to lactate. In contrast, in the presence of 5 mM acrylate, E. coli converted 83 % of pyruvate to lactate, consistent with a reduction in pyruvate formate lyase activity.

  7. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B 531K allele carriers sustain a higher respiratory quotient after aerobic exercise, but β3-adrenoceptor 64R allele does not affect lipolysis: a human model.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gómez, Eduardo; Ríos-Martínez, Martín Efrén; Castro-Rodríguez, Elena Margarita; Del-Toro-Equíhua, Mario; Ramírez-Flores, Mario; Delgado-Enciso, Ivan; Pérez-Huitimea, Ana Lilia; Baltazar-Rodríguez, Luz Margarita; Velasco-Pineda, Gilberto; Muñiz-Murguía, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase IB (CPT1B) and adrenoceptor beta-3 (ADRB3) are critical regulators of fat metabolism. CPT1B transports free acyl groups into mitochondria for oxidation, and ADRB3 triggers lipolysis in adipocytes, and their respective polymorphisms E531K and W64R have been identified as indicators of obesity in population studies. It is therefore important to understand the effects of these mutations on ADRB3 and CPT1B function in adipose and skeletal muscle tissue, respectively. This study aimed to analyze the rate of lipolysis of plasma indicators (glycerol, free fatty acids, and beta hydroxybutyrate) and fat oxidation (through the non-protein respiratory quotient). These parameters were measured in 37 participants during 30 min of aerobic exercise at approximately 62% of maximal oxygen uptake, followed by 30 min of recovery. During recovery, mean respiratory quotient values were higher in K allele carriers than in non-carriers, indicating low post-exercise fatty acid oxidation rates. No significant differences in lipolysis or lipid oxidation were observed between R and W allele carriers of ADRB3 at any time during the aerobic load. The substitution of glutamic acid at position 531 by lysine in the CPT1B protein decreases the mitochondrial beta-oxidation pathway, which increases the non-protein respiratory quotient value during recovery from exercise. This may contribute to weight gain or reduced weight-loss following exercise. PMID:24905907

  8. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1B 531K Allele Carriers Sustain a Higher Respiratory Quotient after Aerobic Exercise, but β3-Adrenoceptor 64R Allele Does Not Affect Lipolysis: A Human Model

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Gómez, Eduardo; Ríos-Martínez, Martín Efrén; Castro-Rodríguez, Elena Margarita; Del-Toro-Equíhua, Mario; Ramírez-Flores, Mario; Delgado-Enciso, Ivan; Pérez-Huitimea, Ana Lilia; Baltazar-Rodríguez, Luz Margarita; Velasco-Pineda, Gilberto; Muñiz-Murguía, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase IB (CPT1B) and adrenoceptor beta-3 (ADRB3) are critical regulators of fat metabolism. CPT1B transports free acyl groups into mitochondria for oxidation, and ADRB3 triggers lipolysis in adipocytes, and their respective polymorphisms E531K and W64R have been identified as indicators of obesity in population studies. It is therefore important to understand the effects of these mutations on ADRB3 and CPT1B function in adipose and skeletal muscle tissue, respectively. This study aimed to analyze the rate of lipolysis of plasma indicators (glycerol, free fatty acids, and beta hydroxybutyrate) and fat oxidation (through the non-protein respiratory quotient). These parameters were measured in 37 participants during 30 min of aerobic exercise at approximately 62% of maximal oxygen uptake, followed by 30 min of recovery. During recovery, mean respiratory quotient values were higher in K allele carriers than in non-carriers, indicating low post-exercise fatty acid oxidation rates. No significant differences in lipolysis or lipid oxidation were observed between R and W allele carriers of ADRB3 at any time during the aerobic load. The substitution of glutamic acid at position 531 by lysine in the CPT1B protein decreases the mitochondrial beta-oxidation pathway, which increases the non-protein respiratory quotient value during recovery from exercise. This may contribute to weight gain or reduced weight-loss following exercise. PMID:24905907

  9. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B 531K allele carriers sustain a higher respiratory quotient after aerobic exercise, but β3-adrenoceptor 64R allele does not affect lipolysis: a human model.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gómez, Eduardo; Ríos-Martínez, Martín Efrén; Castro-Rodríguez, Elena Margarita; Del-Toro-Equíhua, Mario; Ramírez-Flores, Mario; Delgado-Enciso, Ivan; Pérez-Huitimea, Ana Lilia; Baltazar-Rodríguez, Luz Margarita; Velasco-Pineda, Gilberto; Muñiz-Murguía, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase IB (CPT1B) and adrenoceptor beta-3 (ADRB3) are critical regulators of fat metabolism. CPT1B transports free acyl groups into mitochondria for oxidation, and ADRB3 triggers lipolysis in adipocytes, and their respective polymorphisms E531K and W64R have been identified as indicators of obesity in population studies. It is therefore important to understand the effects of these mutations on ADRB3 and CPT1B function in adipose and skeletal muscle tissue, respectively. This study aimed to analyze the rate of lipolysis of plasma indicators (glycerol, free fatty acids, and beta hydroxybutyrate) and fat oxidation (through the non-protein respiratory quotient). These parameters were measured in 37 participants during 30 min of aerobic exercise at approximately 62% of maximal oxygen uptake, followed by 30 min of recovery. During recovery, mean respiratory quotient values were higher in K allele carriers than in non-carriers, indicating low post-exercise fatty acid oxidation rates. No significant differences in lipolysis or lipid oxidation were observed between R and W allele carriers of ADRB3 at any time during the aerobic load. The substitution of glutamic acid at position 531 by lysine in the CPT1B protein decreases the mitochondrial beta-oxidation pathway, which increases the non-protein respiratory quotient value during recovery from exercise. This may contribute to weight gain or reduced weight-loss following exercise.

  10. The preferential growth of branched GDGT source microorganisms under aerobic conditions in peat revealed by stable isotope probing experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huguet, Arnaud; Meador, Travis B.; Laggoun-Défarge, Fatima; Könneke, Martin; Derenne, Sylvie; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (brGDGTs) membrane lipids are widely distributed in aquatic and terrestrial environments and are being increasingly used as temperature proxies. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the microorganisms that produce these lipids, which are found in especially high abundance in the anaerobic horizons of peat bogs. We initiated stable isotope probing incubations of peat samples from a Sphagnum-dominated peatland (Jura Mountains, France) to measure the incorporation of (D)-D2O and 13C-labeled dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into brGDGTs, and thus gauge the activity, growth, and turnover times of their source organisms. Peat samples were collected from two adjacent sites with contrasting humidity levels (hereafter called "fen" and "bog" sites). For each site, samples from the surficial aerobic layer (acrotelm) and deeper anaerobic layer (catotelm) were collected and were incubated under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions for the acrotelm samples and only anaerobic conditions for the catotelm. The incubations were performed at 12 ° C, consistent with the mean summer air temperature at the sampling site. After two months of incubation, there was no incorporation of 13C label in brGDGTs for samples incubated under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions, showing that brGDGT-producing bacteria are heterotrophic microorganisms, as previously observed in organo-mineral soils (Weijers et al., 2011). Similarly, little to no deuterium incorporation was observed for brGDGTs isolated from anaerobically-incubated deep samples. In contrast, in the aerobic incubations of acrotelm samples from bog and fen, the weighted average δD of brGDGT core lipids (CLs) increased by up to 3332‰ and 933‰ after two months, respectively, indicating that fresh brGDGT CLs were biosynthesized at the peat surface. D incorporation into brGDGT CLs converted to production rates ranging from 30-106 ng cm-3y-1 in the aerobic acrotelm from bog and fen

  11. The preferential growth of branched GDGT source microorganisms under aerobic conditions in peat revealed by stable isotope probing experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huguet, Arnaud; Meador, Travis B.; Laggoun-Défarge, Fatima; Könneke, Martin; Derenne, Sylvie; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (brGDGTs) membrane lipids are widely distributed in aquatic and terrestrial environments and are being increasingly used as temperature proxies. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the microorganisms that produce these lipids, which are found in especially high abundance in the anaerobic horizons of peat bogs. We initiated stable isotope probing incubations of peat samples from a Sphagnum-dominated peatland (Jura Mountains, France) to measure the incorporation of (D)-D2O and 13C-labeled dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into brGDGTs, and thus gauge the activity, growth, and turnover times of their source organisms. Peat samples were collected from two adjacent sites with contrasting humidity levels (hereafter called "fen" and "bog" sites). For each site, samples from the surficial aerobic layer (acrotelm) and deeper anaerobic layer (catotelm) were collected and were incubated under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions for the acrotelm samples and only anaerobic conditions for the catotelm. The incubations were performed at 12 ° C, consistent with the mean summer air temperature at the sampling site. After two months of incubation, there was no incorporation of 13C label in brGDGTs for samples incubated under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions, showing that brGDGT-producing bacteria are heterotrophic microorganisms, as previously observed in organo-mineral soils (Weijers et al., 2011). Similarly, little to no deuterium incorporation was observed for brGDGTs isolated from anaerobically-incubated deep samples. In contrast, in the aerobic incubations of acrotelm samples from bog and fen, the weighted average δD of brGDGT core lipids (CLs) increased by up to 3332‰ and 933‰ after two months, respectively, indicating that fresh brGDGT CLs were biosynthesized at the peat surface. D incorporation into brGDGT CLs converted to production rates ranging from 30-106 ng cm‑3y‑1 in the aerobic acrotelm from bog and

  12. Respiratory papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Alagusundaramoorthy, Sayee Sundar; Agrawal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Papillomas are known to occur in the lower respiratory tract. They are however, rare compared to their occurrence in the upper respiratory tract. These are generally exophytic tumors in the more proximal upper airways however cases with more distal location with an inverted growth pattern have also been described in the literature. These can be solitary or multiple and multifocality associated with multiple papillomas in the upper respiratory/aerodigestive tract. The four major types of respiratory papillomas are (1) Recurrent respiratory papillomas, (2) solitary squamous papillomas, (3) solitary glandular papillomas, (4) mixed papillomas. We review the incidence, etiopathology, diagnosis, and possible treatment modalities and algorithms for these respiratory papillomas.

  13. Respiratory papillomas.

    PubMed

    Alagusundaramoorthy, Sayee Sundar; Agrawal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Papillomas are known to occur in the lower respiratory tract. They are however, rare compared to their occurrence in the upper respiratory tract. These are generally exophytic tumors in the more proximal upper airways however cases with more distal location with an inverted growth pattern have also been described in the literature. These can be solitary or multiple and multifocality associated with multiple papillomas in the upper respiratory/aerodigestive tract. The four major types of respiratory papillomas are (1) Recurrent respiratory papillomas, (2) solitary squamous papillomas, (3) solitary glandular papillomas, (4) mixed papillomas. We review the incidence, etiopathology, diagnosis, and possible treatment modalities and algorithms for these respiratory papillomas.

  14. Respiratory papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Alagusundaramoorthy, Sayee Sundar; Agrawal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Papillomas are known to occur in the lower respiratory tract. They are however, rare compared to their occurrence in the upper respiratory tract. These are generally exophytic tumors in the more proximal upper airways however cases with more distal location with an inverted growth pattern have also been described in the literature. These can be solitary or multiple and multifocality associated with multiple papillomas in the upper respiratory/aerodigestive tract. The four major types of respiratory papillomas are (1) Recurrent respiratory papillomas, (2) solitary squamous papillomas, (3) solitary glandular papillomas, (4) mixed papillomas. We review the incidence, etiopathology, diagnosis, and possible treatment modalities and algorithms for these respiratory papillomas. PMID:27625447

  15. Birth Weight, Intrauterine Growth Retardation and Fetal Susceptibility to Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ladinig, Andrea; Foxcroft, George; Ashley, Carolyn; Lunney, Joan K.; Plastow, Graham; Harding, John C. S.

    2014-01-01

    The severity of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome was compared in pregnant gilts originating from high and low birth weight litters. One-hundred and eleven pregnant gilts experimentally infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus on gestation day 85 (±1) were necropsied along with their fetuses 21 days later. Ovulation rates and litter size did not differ between groups, but fetuses from low birth weight gilts were shorter, lighter and demonstrated evidence of asymmetric growth with large brain:organ weight ratios (i.e. brain sparing). The number of intrauterine growth retarded fetuses, defined by brain:organ weight ratios greater than 1 standard deviation from the mean, was significantly greater in low, compared to high, birth weight gilts. Although γδ T cells significantly decreased over time in high compared to low birth weight gilts, viral load in serum and tissues, gilt serum cytokine levels, and litter outcome, including the percent dead fetuses per litter, did not differ by birth weight group. Thus, this study provided no substantive evidence that the severity of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome is affected by dam birth weight. However, intrauterine growth retarded fetuses had lower viral loads in both fetal thymus and in endometrium adjacent to the umbilical stump. Crown rump length did not significantly differ between fetuses that survived and those that died at least one week prior to termination. Taken together, this study clearly demonstrates that birth weight is a transgenerational trait in pigs, and provides evidence that larger fetuses are more susceptible to transplacental PRRSv infection. PMID:25275491

  16. Does the aerobic capacity of fish muscle change with growth rates?

    PubMed

    Pelletier, D; Guderley, H; Dutil, J D

    1993-08-01

    To ascertain whether growth rate modifies the oxidative capacity of fish white muscle, we examined the effects of individual growth rate on the activities of four mitochondrial enzymes in white muscle of the fast growing Atlantic cod,Gadus morhua. Growth rates were individually monitored in cod held at three acclimation temperatures during experiments repeated in four seasons. The size dependence of citrate synthase (CS), cytochrome C oxidase (CCO) and β-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase (HOAD) activities was established using wild cod ranging from 115 to 17,350 g. Given their negative allometry, CS and CCO activities in the experimental cod were corrected to those expected for a 1.2 kg animal. HOAD activities did not change with size. The specific activities of CCO and CS were positively correlated with growth rate. However, for both enzymes, season explained more of the variability than growth rate or temperature. Season was the only factor to significantly affect the activity of HOAD, while temperature and season interacted to determine glutamate dehydrogenase activity. CS activity was positively correlated with the initial condition of the cod, which differed among the seasons. The other enzymes did not show this relationship. The independent changes of these enzymes suggest that mitochondria undergo qualitative modifications with changes in growth rate, season and size. Although growth rate and the activities of CCO and CS are positively correlated, the activity of the mitochondrial enzymes is more affected by size, physical condition and season. PMID:24202687

  17. ISG15 Is Upregulated in Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection and Reduces Virus Growth through Protein ISGylation

    PubMed Central

    González-Sanz, Rubén; Mata, Manuel; Bermejo-Martín, Jesús; Álvarez, Amparo; Cortijo, Julio; Melero, José A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), for which neither a vaccine nor an effective therapeutic treatment is currently available, is the leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infections in children. Interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) is a ubiquitin-like protein that is highly increased during viral infections and has been reported to have an antiviral or a proviral activity, depending on the virus. Previous studies from our laboratory demonstrated strong ISG15 upregulation during RSV infection in vitro. In this study, an in-depth analysis of the role of ISG15 in RSV infection is presented. ISG15 overexpression and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-silencing experiments, along with ISG15 knockout (ISG15−/−) cells, revealed an anti-RSV effect of the molecule. Conjugation inhibition assays demonstrated that ISG15 exerts its antiviral activity via protein ISGylation. This antiviral activity requires high levels of ISG15 to be present in the cells before RSV infection. Finally, ISG15 is also upregulated in human respiratory pseudostratified epithelia and in nasopharyngeal washes from infants infected with RSV, pointing to a possible antiviral role of the molecule in vivo. These results advance our understanding of the innate immune response elicited by RSV and open new possibilities to control infections by the virus. IMPORTANCE At present, no vaccine or effective treatment for human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is available. This study shows that interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) lowers RSV growth through protein ISGylation. In addition, ISG15 accumulation highly correlates with the RSV load in nasopharyngeal washes from children, indicating that ISG15 may also have an antiviral role in vivo. These results improve our understanding of the innate immune response to RSV and identify ISG15 as a potential target for virus control. PMID:26763998

  18. Identification and Quantification of Volatile Chemical Spoilage Indexes Associated with Bacterial Growth Dynamics in Aerobically Stored Chicken.

    PubMed

    Mikš-Krajnik, Marta; Yoon, Yong-Jin; Ukuku, Dike O; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2016-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as chemical spoilage indexes (CSIs) of raw chicken breast stored aerobically at 4, 10, and 21 °C were identified and quantified using solid phase microextraction (SPME) combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The growth dynamics of total viable count (TVC), psychrotrophs, Pseudomonas spp., lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Brochothrix thermosphacta and H2 S producing bacteria were characterized based on maximum growth rates (μmax ), maximal microbial concentration (Nmax ) and at the moment of microbial shelf life (Svalues ), calculated from Gompertz-fitted growth curves. Pseudomonas spp. was predominant species, while B. thermosphacta was characterized by the highest μmax . The microbiological and sensory shelf lives were estimated based on TVC, Pseudomonas spp., and B. thermosphacta counts and sensory evaluation, respectively. Among 27 VOCs identified by GC-MS in spoiled chicken samples, ethanol (EtOH), 1-butanol-3-methyl (1But-3M), and acetic acid (C2 ) achieved the highest Pearson's correlation coefficients of 0.66, 0.61, and 0.59, respectively, with TVC, regardless of storage temperature. Partial least squares (PLS) regression revealed that the synthesis of 1But-3M and C2 was most likely induced by the metabolic activity of B. thermosphacta and LAB, while EtOH was attributed to Pseudomonas spp. The increase in concentration of selected volatile spoilage markers (EtOH, 1But-3M, and C2 ) in the headspace over spoiled chicken breast was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05) with TVC growth. These findings highlight the possibility of analyzing the combination of 3 selected spoilage markers: EtOH, 1But-3M, and C2 as rapid evaluation for poultry quality testing using SPME-GC-MS.

  19. Identification and Quantification of Volatile Chemical Spoilage Indexes Associated with Bacterial Growth Dynamics in Aerobically Stored Chicken.

    PubMed

    Mikš-Krajnik, Marta; Yoon, Yong-Jin; Ukuku, Dike O; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2016-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as chemical spoilage indexes (CSIs) of raw chicken breast stored aerobically at 4, 10, and 21 °C were identified and quantified using solid phase microextraction (SPME) combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The growth dynamics of total viable count (TVC), psychrotrophs, Pseudomonas spp., lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Brochothrix thermosphacta and H2 S producing bacteria were characterized based on maximum growth rates (μmax ), maximal microbial concentration (Nmax ) and at the moment of microbial shelf life (Svalues ), calculated from Gompertz-fitted growth curves. Pseudomonas spp. was predominant species, while B. thermosphacta was characterized by the highest μmax . The microbiological and sensory shelf lives were estimated based on TVC, Pseudomonas spp., and B. thermosphacta counts and sensory evaluation, respectively. Among 27 VOCs identified by GC-MS in spoiled chicken samples, ethanol (EtOH), 1-butanol-3-methyl (1But-3M), and acetic acid (C2 ) achieved the highest Pearson's correlation coefficients of 0.66, 0.61, and 0.59, respectively, with TVC, regardless of storage temperature. Partial least squares (PLS) regression revealed that the synthesis of 1But-3M and C2 was most likely induced by the metabolic activity of B. thermosphacta and LAB, while EtOH was attributed to Pseudomonas spp. The increase in concentration of selected volatile spoilage markers (EtOH, 1But-3M, and C2 ) in the headspace over spoiled chicken breast was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05) with TVC growth. These findings highlight the possibility of analyzing the combination of 3 selected spoilage markers: EtOH, 1But-3M, and C2 as rapid evaluation for poultry quality testing using SPME-GC-MS. PMID:27332555

  20. Two cases of rickets presenting with poor growth, hypotonia, and respiratory problems.

    PubMed

    Wouters, E; Wojciechowski, M; de Vries, E

    2015-06-01

    Rickets is a rare disease in developed countries. In children, it is a disease which affects growing bone. Depending on the severity, it can present with a wide variety of symptoms. Because it is such a rare disease in developed countries, symptoms suggesting rickets are often not easily recognized. This can cause a delay in diagnosing and treating rickets. Often unnecessary and sometimes invasive investigations are performed. First leading clues to rickets on physical examination are poor growth, especially length, thickening of wrists, bow legs, and craniotabes. At further examination, special attention should be paid to osteopenia and cupping and fraying at the metaphyses on X-rays. Laboratory results suggestive for rickets are elevated alkaline phosphatase and disturbances in calcium and phosphate homeostasis. In this report, we present two cases presenting with poor growth, severe pain, and respiratory problems secondary to calcipenic rickets.

  1. A TatABC-Type Tat Translocase Is Required for Unimpaired Aerobic Growth of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032

    PubMed Central

    Oertel, Dan; Schmitz, Sabrina; Freudl, Roland

    2015-01-01

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) system transports folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria and the thylakoid membrane of plant chloroplasts. Escherichia coli and other Gram-negative bacteria possess a TatABC-type Tat translocase in which each of the three inner membrane proteins TatA, TatB, and TatC performs a mechanistically distinct function. In contrast, low-GC Gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus subtilis, use a TatAC-type minimal Tat translocase in which the TatB function is carried out by a bifunctional TatA. In high-GC Gram-positive Actinobacteria, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Corynebacterium glutamicum, tatA, tatB, and tatC genes can be identified, suggesting that these organisms, just like E. coli, might use TatABC-type Tat translocases as well. However, since contrary to this view a previous study has suggested that C. glutamicum might in fact use a TatAC translocase with TatB only playing a minor role, we reexamined the requirement of TatB for Tat-dependent protein translocation in this microorganism. Under aerobic conditions, the misassembly of the Rieske iron-sulfur protein QcrA was identified as a major reason for the severe growth defect of Tat-defective C. glutamicum mutant strains. Furthermore, our results clearly show that TatB, besides TatA and TatC, is strictly required for unimpaired aerobic growth. In addition, TatB was also found to be essential for the secretion of a heterologous Tat-dependent model protein into the C. glutamicum culture supernatant. Together with our finding that expression of the C. glutamicum TatB in an E. coli ΔtatB mutant strain resulted in the formation of an active Tat translocase, our results clearly indicate that a TatABC translocase is used as the physiologically relevant functional unit for Tat-dependent protein translocation in C. glutamicum and, most likely, also in other TatB-containing Actinobacteria. PMID:25837592

  2. Improved growth and clinical, nutritional, and respiratory changes in response to nutritional therapy in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, R; Cooksley, W G; Cooke, W D

    1980-09-01

    To investigate the role of nutritional factors in growth and in the clinical, nurtitional, and respiratory status in cystic fibrosis, we studied 12 problem CF patients from six months before to six months after a period of supplemental parenteral nutrition. During the initial six months' observation period on appropriate conventional therapy, the patients (aged 0.5 to 11 years) had inadequate growth and weight gain, a total of 21 active pulmonary infections, and, despite dietary supplements, inadequate ad libitum nutrient intakes. After nutritional therapy, providing a balanced consistent hypercaloric intake for 21 days, catch-up weight gain occurred by one month and continued at six months; catch-up in linear growth was observed by three months and continued at six months. In addition, significantly fewer pulmonary infections were observed in the six months' post-therapy (n = 3), sustained and significant improvements were noted in clinical score and plumonary function, and there was a marked improvement in well-being and ad libitum nutrient intake. We conclude that adequate nutritional support can favorably affect growth, clinical status, and the course of chronic pulmonary disease in problem cases of CF. PMID:6774070

  3. Improved growth and clinical, nutritional, and respiratory changes in response to nutritional therapy in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, R; Cooksley, W G; Cooke, W D

    1980-09-01

    To investigate the role of nutritional factors in growth and in the clinical, nurtitional, and respiratory status in cystic fibrosis, we studied 12 problem CF patients from six months before to six months after a period of supplemental parenteral nutrition. During the initial six months' observation period on appropriate conventional therapy, the patients (aged 0.5 to 11 years) had inadequate growth and weight gain, a total of 21 active pulmonary infections, and, despite dietary supplements, inadequate ad libitum nutrient intakes. After nutritional therapy, providing a balanced consistent hypercaloric intake for 21 days, catch-up weight gain occurred by one month and continued at six months; catch-up in linear growth was observed by three months and continued at six months. In addition, significantly fewer pulmonary infections were observed in the six months' post-therapy (n = 3), sustained and significant improvements were noted in clinical score and plumonary function, and there was a marked improvement in well-being and ad libitum nutrient intake. We conclude that adequate nutritional support can favorably affect growth, clinical status, and the course of chronic pulmonary disease in problem cases of CF.

  4. Proline biosynthesis augments tumor cell growth and aerobic glycolysis: involvement of pyridine nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Hancock, Chad N.; Fischer, Joseph W.; Harman, Meredith; Phang, James M.

    2015-01-01

    The metabolism of the nonessential amino acid proline contributes to tumor metabolic reprogramming. Previously we showed that MYC increases proline biosynthesis (PB) from glutamine. Here we show MYC increases the expression of the enzymes in PB at both protein and mRNA levels. Blockade of PB decreases tumor cell growth and energy production. Addition of Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) or proline reverses the effects of P5C synthase knockdown but not P5C reductases knockdown. Importantly, the reversal effect of proline was blocked by concomitant proline dehydrogenase/oxidase (PRODH/POX) knockdown. These findings suggest that the important regulatory contribution of PB to tumor growth derives from metabolic cycling between proline and P5C rather than product proline or intermediate P5C. We further document the critical role of PB in maintaining pyridine nucleotide levels by connecting the proline cycle to glycolysis and to the oxidative arm of the pentose phosphate pathway. These findings establish a novel function of PB in tumorigenesis, linking the reprogramming of glucose, glutamine and pyridine nucleotides, and may provide a novel target for antitumor therapy. PMID:26598224

  5. The antimalarial drug primaquine targets Fe-S cluster proteins and yeast respiratory growth.

    PubMed

    Lalève, Anaïs; Vallières, Cindy; Golinelli-Cohen, Marie-Pierre; Bouton, Cécile; Song, Zehua; Pawlik, Grzegorz; Tindall, Sarah M; Avery, Simon V; Clain, Jérôme; Meunier, Brigitte

    2016-04-01

    Malaria is a major health burden in tropical and subtropical countries. The antimalarial drug primaquine is extremely useful for killing the transmissible gametocyte forms of Plasmodium falciparum and the hepatic quiescent forms of P. vivax. Yet its mechanism of action is still poorly understood. In this study, we used the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model to help uncover the mode of action of primaquine. We found that the growth inhibitory effect of primaquine was restricted to cells that relied on respiratory function to proliferate and that deletion of SOD2 encoding the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase severely increased its effect, which can be countered by the overexpression of AIM32 and MCR1 encoding mitochondrial enzymes involved in the response to oxidative stress. This indicated that ROS produced by respiratory activity had a key role in primaquine-induced growth defect. We observed that Δsod2 cells treated with primaquine displayed a severely decreased activity of aconitase that contains a Fe-S cluster notoriously sensitive to oxidative damage. We also showed that in vitro exposure to primaquine impaired the activity of purified aconitase and accelerated the turnover of the Fe-S cluster of the essential protein Rli1. It is suggested that ROS-labile Fe-S groups are the primary targets of primaquine. Aconitase activity is known to be essential at certain life-cycle stages of the malaria parasite. Thus primaquine-induced damage of its labile Fe-S cluster - and of other ROS-sensitive enzymes - could inhibit parasite development. PMID:26629948

  6. Oxygen supply in disposable shake-flasks: prediction of oxygen transfer rate, oxygen saturation and maximum cell concentration during aerobic growth.

    PubMed

    Schiefelbein, Sarah; Fröhlich, Alexander; John, Gernot T; Beutler, Falco; Wittmann, Christoph; Becker, Judith

    2013-08-01

    Dissolved oxygen plays an essential role in aerobic cultivation especially due to its low solubility. Under unfavorable conditions of mixing and vessel geometry it can become limiting. This, however, is difficult to predict and thus the right choice for an optimal experimental set-up is challenging. To overcome this, we developed a method which allows a robust prediction of the dissolved oxygen concentration during aerobic growth. This integrates newly established mathematical correlations for the determination of the volumetric gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient (kLa) in disposable shake-flasks from the filling volume, the vessel size and the agitation speed. Tested for the industrial production organism Corynebacterium glutamicum, this enabled a reliable design of culture conditions and allowed to predict the maximum possible cell concentration without oxygen limitation.

  7. Oxygen supply in disposable shake-flasks: prediction of oxygen transfer rate, oxygen saturation and maximum cell concentration during aerobic growth.

    PubMed

    Schiefelbein, Sarah; Fröhlich, Alexander; John, Gernot T; Beutler, Falco; Wittmann, Christoph; Becker, Judith

    2013-08-01

    Dissolved oxygen plays an essential role in aerobic cultivation especially due to its low solubility. Under unfavorable conditions of mixing and vessel geometry it can become limiting. This, however, is difficult to predict and thus the right choice for an optimal experimental set-up is challenging. To overcome this, we developed a method which allows a robust prediction of the dissolved oxygen concentration during aerobic growth. This integrates newly established mathematical correlations for the determination of the volumetric gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient (kLa) in disposable shake-flasks from the filling volume, the vessel size and the agitation speed. Tested for the industrial production organism Corynebacterium glutamicum, this enabled a reliable design of culture conditions and allowed to predict the maximum possible cell concentration without oxygen limitation. PMID:23592306

  8. Bacterial Metabolism in the Host Environment: Pathogen Growth and Nutrient Assimilation in the Mammalian Upper Respiratory Tract.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Sandra K

    2015-06-01

    Pathogens evolve in specific host niches and microenvironments that provide the physical and nutritional requirements conducive to their growth. In addition to using the host as a source of food, bacterial pathogens must avoid the immune response to their presence. The mammalian upper respiratory tract is a site that is exposed to the external environment, and is readily colonized by bacteria that live as resident flora or as pathogens. These bacteria can remain localized, descend to the lower respiratory tract, or traverse the epithelium to disseminate throughout the body. By virtue of their successful colonization of the respiratory epithelium, these bacteria obtain the nutrients needed for growth, either directly from host resources or from other microbes. This chapter describes the upper respiratory tract environment, including its tissue and mucosal structure, prokaryotic biota, and biochemical composition that would support microbial life. Neisseria meningitidis and the Bordetella species are discussed as examples of bacteria that have no known external reservoirs but have evolved to obligately colonize the mammalian upper respiratory tract. PMID:26185081

  9. Entorhinal volume, aerobic fitness, and recognition memory in healthy young adults: A voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Whiteman, Andrew S; Young, Daniel E; Budson, Andrew E; Stern, Chantal E; Schon, Karin

    2016-02-01

    Converging evidence supports the hypothesis effects of aerobic exercise and environmental enrichment are beneficial for cognition, in particular for hippocampus-supported learning and memory. Recent work in humans suggests that exercise training induces changes in hippocampal volume, but it is not known if aerobic exercise and fitness also impact the entorhinal cortex. In animal models, aerobic exercise increases expression of growth factors, including brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). This exercise-enhanced expression of growth hormones may boost synaptic plasticity, and neuronal survival and differentiation, potentially supporting function and structure in brain areas including but not limited to the hippocampus. Here, using voxel based morphometry and a standard graded treadmill test to determine cardio-respiratory fitness (Bruce protocol; ·VO2 max), we examined if entorhinal and hippocampal volumes were associated with cardio-respiratory fitness in healthy young adults (N=33). In addition, we examined if volumes were modulated by recognition memory performance and by serum BDNF, a putative marker of synaptic plasticity. Our results show a positive association between volume in right entorhinal cortex and cardio-respiratory fitness. In addition, average gray matter volume in the entorhinal cortex, bilaterally, was positively associated with memory performance. These data extend prior work on the cerebral effects of aerobic exercise and fitness to the entorhinal cortex in healthy young adults thus providing compelling evidence for a relationship between aerobic fitness and structure of the medial temporal lobe memory system.

  10. Growth and energy metabolism in aerobic fed-batch cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Simulation and model verification

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, H.T.B.; Larsson, G.; Enfors, S.O.

    1998-11-20

    Some yeast species are classified as being glucose sensitive, which means that they may produce ethanol also under aerobic conditions when the sugar concentration is high. A kinetic model of overflow metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used for simulation of aerobic fed-batch cultivations. An inhibitory effect of ethanol on the maximum respiration of the yeast was observed in the experiments and included in the model. The model predicts respiration, biomass, and ethanol formation and the subsequent ethanol consumption, and was experimentally validated in fed-batch cultivations. Oscillating sugar feed with resulting oscillating carbon dioxide production did not influence the maximum respiration rate, which indicates that the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is not involved as a bottleneck causing aerobic ethanol formation.

  11. Seedling Growth, Mitochondrial Characteristics, and Alternative Respiratory Capacity of Corn Genotypes Differing in Cold Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Cecil R.; Martin, Barry A.; Reding, Linda; Cerwick, Sharon

    1990-01-01

    Four maize (Zea mays L.) inbreds representing genetic differences in seedling cold tolerance were used to determine the effect of growth temperatures on dry weight accumulation and mitochondrial properties, especially the alternative oxidase capacity. Seedlings were grown in darkness at 30°C (constant), 14°C (constant), and 15°C for 16 hours and 8°C for 8 hours. Inbreds B73 and B49 were characterized as cold tolerant while G50 and G84 were cold sensitive. Shoot growth rate of cold-sensitive inbreds in the lower temperatures was slower relative to the tolerant inbreds. Mesocotyl tissue was particularly sensitive to low temperatures during growth after germination. There were no significant differences in relative rates of mitochondrial respiration in the cold-tolerant compared to cold-sensitive inbreds measured at 25°C. Mitochondria from all seedlings grown at all temperatures had the ability to phosphorylate as indicated by the observation of respiratory control. This result indicated that differences in low temperature growth were probably not related to mitochondrial function at low temperatures. Alternative oxidase capacity was higher in mitochondria from seedlings of all inbreds grown at 14°C compared to 30°C. Capacities in seedlings of 14°C-grown B73 and G50 were higher than in B49 and G84. Capacities in seedlings grown for 16 hours at 15°C and 8 hours at 8°C were similar to those from 14°C-grown except in G50 which was lower and similar to those grown at 30°C. Mesocotyl tissue was the most responsive tissue to low growth temperature. Coleoptile plus leaf tissue responded similarly but contained lower capacities. Antibody probing of western blots of mitochondrial proteins confirmed that differences in alternative oxidase capacities were due to differences in levels of the alternative oxidase protein. Male sterile lines of B73 were also grown under the three different temperature regimes. These lines grew equally as well as the normal B73 at all

  12. Sudden cold temperature delays plant carbon transport and shifts allocation from growth to respiratory demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthel, M.; Cieraad, E.; Zakharova, A.; Hunt, J. E.

    2014-03-01

    Since substrates for respiration are supplied mainly by recent photo-assimilates, there is a strong but time-lagged link between short-term above- and belowground carbon (C) cycling. However, regulation of this coupling by environmental variables is poorly understood. Whereas recent studies focussed on the effect of drought and shading on the link between above- and belowground short-term C cycling, the effect of temperature remains unclear. We used a 13CO2 pulse-chase labelling experiment to investigate the effect of a sudden temperature change from 25 to 10 °C on the short-term coupling between assimilatory C uptake and respiratory loss. The study was done in the laboratory using two-month-old perennial rye-grass plants (Lolium perenne L.). After label application, the δ13C signal of respired shoot and root samples was analysed at regular time intervals using laser spectroscopy. In addition, δ13C was analysed in bulk root and shoot samples. Cold temperature (10 °C) reduced the short-term coupling between shoot and roots by delaying belowground transfer of recent assimilates and its subsequent respiratory use, as indicated by the δ13C signal of root respiration (δ13CRR). That is, the time lag from the actual shoot labelling to the first appearance of the label in 13CRR was about 1.5 times longer under cold temperature. Moreover, analysis of bulk shoot and root material revealed that plants at cold temperature invest relatively more carbon into respiration compared to growth or storage. While the whole plant C turnover increased under cold temperature, the turnover time of the labile C pool decreased, probably because less 13C is used for growth and/or storage. That is, (almost) all recent C remained in the labile pool serving respiration under these conditions. Overall, our results highlight the importance of temperature as a driver of C transport and relative C allocation within the plant-soil system.

  13. Influence of mechanical disintegration on the microbial growth of aerobic sludge biomass: A comparative study of ultrasonic and shear gap homogenizers by oxygen uptake measurements.

    PubMed

    Divyalakshmi, P; Murugan, D; Sivarajan, M; Saravanan, P; Lajapathi Rai, C

    2015-11-01

    Wastewater treatment plant incorporates physical, chemical and biological processes to treat and remove the contaminants. The main drawback of conventional activated sludge process is the huge production of excess sludge, which is an unavoidable byproduct. The treatment and disposal of excess sludge costs about 60% of the total operating cost. The ideal way to reduce excess sludge production during wastewater treatment is by preventing biomass formation within the aerobic treatment train rather than post treatment of the generated sludge. In the present investigation two different mechanical devices namely, Ultrasonic and Shear Gap homogenizers have been employed to disintegrate the aerobic biomass. This study is intended to restrict the multiplication of microbial biomass and at the same time degrade the organics present in wastewater by increasing the oxidative capacity of microorganisms. The disintegrability on biomass was determined by biochemical methods. Degree of inactivation provides the information on inability of microorganisms to consume oxygen upon disruption. The soluble COD quantifies the extent of release of intra cellular compounds. The participation of disintegrated microorganism in wastewater treatment process was carried out in two identical respirometeric reactors. The results show that Ultrasonic homogenizer is very effective in the disruption of microorganisms leading to a maximum microbial growth reduction of 27%. On the other hand, Shear gap homogenizer does not favor the sludge growth reduction rather it facilitates the growth. This study also shows that for better microbial growth reduction, floc size reduction alone is not sufficient but also microbial disruption is essential.

  14. Aerobic exercise training increases circulating insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 concentration, but does not attenuate the reduction in circulating insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 after a high-fat meal.

    PubMed

    Prior, Steven J; Jenkins, Nathan T; Brandauer, Josef; Weiss, Edward P; Hagberg, James M

    2012-03-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) has metabolic effects throughout the body, and its expression is regulated in part by insulin. Circulating IGFBP-1 predicts development of cardiometabolic diseases in longitudinal studies, and low IGFBP-1 concentrations are associated with insulin resistance and consumption of a high-fat diet. Because of the favorable metabolic effects of regular aerobic exercise, we hypothesized that aerobic exercise training would increase plasma IGFBP-1 concentrations and attenuate the reduction in IGFBP-1 after a high-fat meal. Ten overweight (body mass index = 28.7 ± 0.9 kg/m(2)), older (61 ± 2 years) men and women underwent high-fat feeding and oral glucose tolerance tests at baseline and after 6 months of aerobic exercise training. In response to aerobic exercise training, subjects increased cardiorespiratory fitness by 13% (P < .05) and insulin sensitivity index by 28% (P < .05). Basal plasma concentrations of IGFBP-1 increased by 41% after aerobic exercise training (P < .05). The insulin response to an oral glucose tolerance test was a significant predictor of fasting plasma IGFBP-1 concentrations at baseline and after exercise training (P = .02). In response to the high-fat meal at baseline, plasma IGFBP-1 concentrations decreased by 58% (P < .001); a 61% decrease to similar postprandial concentrations was observed after exercise training (P < .001). Plasma insulin response to the high-fat meal was inversely associated with postprandial IGFBP-1 concentrations at baseline and after exercise training (P = .06 and P < .05, respectively). Although aerobic exercise training did not attenuate the response to a high-fat meal, the increase in IGFBP-1 concentrations after exercise training may be one mechanism by which exercise reduces risk for cardiometabolic diseases in older adults.

  15. Aerobic growth of campylobacter in media supplemented with a-ketoglutaric, lactic, and/or fumaric acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to examine the ability of Campylobacter spp. to grow aerobically in media supplemented with selected organic acids. Basal broth media composed of tryptose, yeast extract, and a mineral-vitamin solution was supplemented with a-ketoglutaric, lactic, and/or fumaric acids. The fina...

  16. Monitoring of growth and physiological activities of biofilm during succession on polystyrene from activated sludge under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Naz, Iffat; Batool, Syeda Ain-ul; Ali, Naeem; Khatoon, Nazia; Atiq, Niama; Hameed, Abdul; Ahmed, Safia

    2013-08-01

    The present research work monitored the successive biofilm development and its catabolic role in the degradation of polystyrene (PS). PS material was artificially colonized with biofilm by incubating it with activated sludge under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Biofilm formation was monitored by gravimetric weight analysis, spectrophotometric absorbance technique, heterotrophic plate count, and scanning electron microscopy under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The wet weight (1.59 and 1.17 g) and dry weight (0.41 and 0.08 g) of a biofilm showed a significant constant increase under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively, from first till 9 weeks of incubation. Plate count of the selected bacteria (Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Shigella dysenteriae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) considerably declined (90-99 %) in the biofilm after seventh and fifth weeks of incubation under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively, indicating a positive shift from pathogenic to beneficial microbial community. While most probable number index of fecal coliforms and E. coli in the sludge showed more reduction (98 and 99 %) under aerobic as compare to anaerobic conditions (86 and 91 %) after 9 weeks of biofilm formation on PS cubes. Correspondingly, the decreasing levels of chemical oxygen demand and biochemical oxygen demand (up to 73 %) showed signs of sludge digestion. Scanning electron microscope coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope revealed nature of PS media containing high carbon content. However, biofilm development proved to be involved in the biochemical transformation of the PS medium as indicated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  17. Protein phosphorylation in mitochondria --a study on fermentative and respiratory growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ohlmeier, Steffen; Hiltunen, J Kalervo; Bergmann, Ulrich

    2010-09-01

    Phosphorylation as a posttranslational protein modification is a common subject of proteomic studies, but phosphorylation in mitochondria is still poorly investigated. The study presented here applied 2-DE to characterize phosphorylation in the yeast mitochondrial proteome and identified 59 spots corresponding to 34 phosphorylated mitochondrial or mitochondria-associated proteins. Most of these proteins presented putative substrates of mitogen-activated protein and target of rapamycin kinases, cAMP-dependent protein kinase, cyclin-dependent kinases and Snf1p suggesting them as key players in the phosphorylation of mitochondrial or mitochondria-associated proteins. The dynamic behaviour of the phosphoproteome under a major metabolic change, the shift from fermentation to respiration (diauxic shift), was further studied. Eight proteins (Ald4p, Eft1p/2p, Eno1p, Eno2p, Om14p, Pda1p, Qcr2p, Sdh1p) had growth dependent changes in their phosphorylation, indicating a role of phosphorylation-dependent regulation of translation, metabolic pathways (e.g. glucose fermentation, tricarboxylic acid cycle, pyruvate dehydrogenase and its bypass) and respiratory chain.

  18. Putative respiratory chain of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Meuric, Vincent; Rouillon, Astrid; Chandad, Fatiha; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine

    2010-05-01

    The electron transfer chain in Porphyromonas gingivalis, or periodontopathogens, has not yet been characterized. P. gingivalis, a strict anaerobic bacteria and the second colonizer of the oral cavity, is considered to be a major causal agent involved in periodontal diseases. Primary colonizers create a favorable environment for P. gingivalis growth by decreasing oxygen pressure. Oxygen does not appear to be the final electron acceptor of the respiratory chain. Fumarate and cytochrome b have been implicated as major components of the respiratory activity. However, the P. gingivalis genome shows many other enzymes that could be implicated in aerobic or nitrite respiration. Using bioinformatic tools and literature studies of respiratory pathways, the ATP synthesis mechanism from the sodium cycle and nutrients metabolism, the putative respirasome of P. gingivalis has been proposed.

  19. Growth of Campylobacter incubated aerobically in fumarate-pyruvate media or media supplemented with dairy, meat, or soy extracts and peptones.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Arthur

    2016-09-01

    The ability of Campylobacter to grow aerobically in media supplemented with fumarate-pyruvate or with dairy, meat, or soy extracts or peptones was examined. Optical densities (OD) of Campylobacter cultured in basal media, media supplemented with fumarate-pyruvate or with 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, or 7.5% beef extract was measured. Growth was also compared in media supplemented with other extracts or peptones. Finally, cfu/mL of Campylobacter recovered from basal media or media supplemented with fumarate-pyruvate, casamino acids, beef extract, soytone, or beef extract and soytone was determined. Results indicated that OD of cultures grown in media supplemented with fumarate-pyruvate or with 5.0 or 7.5% beef extract were higher than OD of isolates grown in basal media or media supplemented with lower concentrations of beef extract. Highest OD were produced by isolates grown in media supplemented with beef extract, peptone from meat, polypeptone, proteose peptone, or soytone. Also, more cfu/mL were recovered from media with fumarate-pyruvate, beef extract, soytone, or beef extract-soytone than from basal media or media with casamino acids. Findings indicate that media supplemented with organic acids, vitamins, and minerals and media supplemented with extracts or peptones containing these metabolites can support aerobic growth of Campylobacter. PMID:27217355

  20. Growth of Campylobacter incubated aerobically in fumarate-pyruvate media or media supplemented with dairy, meat, or soy extracts and peptones.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Arthur

    2016-09-01

    The ability of Campylobacter to grow aerobically in media supplemented with fumarate-pyruvate or with dairy, meat, or soy extracts or peptones was examined. Optical densities (OD) of Campylobacter cultured in basal media, media supplemented with fumarate-pyruvate or with 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, or 7.5% beef extract was measured. Growth was also compared in media supplemented with other extracts or peptones. Finally, cfu/mL of Campylobacter recovered from basal media or media supplemented with fumarate-pyruvate, casamino acids, beef extract, soytone, or beef extract and soytone was determined. Results indicated that OD of cultures grown in media supplemented with fumarate-pyruvate or with 5.0 or 7.5% beef extract were higher than OD of isolates grown in basal media or media supplemented with lower concentrations of beef extract. Highest OD were produced by isolates grown in media supplemented with beef extract, peptone from meat, polypeptone, proteose peptone, or soytone. Also, more cfu/mL were recovered from media with fumarate-pyruvate, beef extract, soytone, or beef extract-soytone than from basal media or media with casamino acids. Findings indicate that media supplemented with organic acids, vitamins, and minerals and media supplemented with extracts or peptones containing these metabolites can support aerobic growth of Campylobacter.

  1. High-throughput RNA sequencing profiles and transcriptional evidence of aerobic respiratory enzymes in sporulating oocysts and sporozoites of Eimeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, Makoto; Hatta, Takeshi; Miyoshi, Takeharu; Anisuzzaman; Sasai, Kazumi; Shimura, Kameo; Isobe, Takashi; Kita, Kiyoshi; Tsuji, Naotoshi

    2013-08-01

    Seven species of Eimeria are responsible for coccidiosis in chickens. Eimeria tenella is one of the most pathogenic parasites since it is associated with high mortality and great economic impact. The life cycle of the parasite includes development in the environment and in the intestinal tract. We conducted RNA sequencing using a next generation sequencer to obtain transcriptome information from the sporulating oocysts, and sporozoites. We collected 2.8 million 75 bp reads of a short-tag sequence, and 25,880 contigs were generated by the Oases assembler. A Blastx search of GenBank databases revealed that 7780 contigs (30.1%) had significant homology with deposited sequence data (E-value <1e-6); among these contigs, 6051 contigs were similar to those of Toxoplasma gondii while only 513 contigs (6.6%) were similar to those of E. tenella. After an orthological analysis conducted with the UniProt database of T. gondii, 6661 contigs were distributed within the categories of cellular components (1528 gene categories), biological processes (861 gene categories), and molecular functions (241 gene categories). The significantly matched contigs contained high numbers of enzymes associated with glycolysis, TCA, and the pentose-phosphate pathway. Most of the enzymes, measured by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, were up-regulated in sporulating stage. These results suggest that the intracellular carbohydrate amylopectin could be used as an energy source for ATP production including glycolysis and the pentose-phosphate pathway, which generates NADPH and pentoses. Our data also suggest that Eimeria might possess a partial or similar pathway to the TCA cycle essential for aerobic respiration. Furthermore, the newly annotated and non-annotated contigs might contain E. tenella-specific or novel sequences. PMID:23770269

  2. Evaluation of the tolerance of acetic acid and 2-furaldehyde on the growth of Pichia stipitis and its respiratory deficient.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Muñiz, B; Rasgado-Mellado, J; Solis-Pacheco, J; Nolasco-Hipólito, C; Domínguez-González, J M; Aguilar-Uscanga, M G

    2014-10-01

    The use of lignocellulosic residues for ethanol production is limited by toxic compounds in fermenting yeasts present in diluted acid hydrolysates like acetic acid and 2-furaldehyde. The respiratory deficient phenotype gives the cell the ability to resist several toxic compounds. So the aim of this work was to evaluate the tolerance to toxic compounds present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates like acetic acid and 2-furaldehyde in Pichia stipitis and its respiratory deficient strains. The respiratory deficient phenotype was induced by exposure to chemical agents such as acriflavine, acrylamide and rhodamine; 23 strains were obtained. The selection criterion was based on increasing specific ethanol yield (g ethanol g(-1) biomass) with acetic acid and furaldehyde tolerance. The screening showed that P. stipitis NRRL Y-7124 ACL 2-1RD (lacking cytochrome c), obtained using acrylamide, presented the highest specific ethanol production rate (1.82 g g(-1 )h(-1)). Meanwhile, the ACF8-3RD strain showed the highest acetic acid tolerance (7.80 g L(-1)) and the RHO2-3RD strain was able to tolerate up to 1.5 g L(-1) 2-furaldehyde with a growth and ethanol production inhibition of 23 and 22 %, respectively. The use of respiratory deficient yeast phenotype is a strategy for ethanol production improvement in a medium with toxic compounds such as hydrolysed sugarcane bagasse amongst others.

  3. Development of a predictive model for the growth kinetics of aerobic microbial population on pomegranate marinated chicken breast fillets under isothermal and dynamic temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Lytou, Anastasia; Panagou, Efstathios Z; Nychas, George-John E

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was the development of a model to describe the growth kinetics of aerobic microbial population of chicken breast fillets marinated in pomegranate juice under isothermal and dynamic temperature conditions. Moreover, the effect of pomegranate juice on the extension of the shelf life of the product was investigated. Samples (10 g) of chicken breast fillets were immersed in marinades containing pomegranate juice for 3 h at 4 °C following storage under aerobic conditions at 4, 10, and 15 °C for 10 days. Total Viable Counts (TVC), Pseudomonas spp and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were enumerated, in parallel with sensory assessment (odor and overall appearance) of marinated and non-marinated samples. The Baranyi model was fitted to the growth data of TVC to calculate the maximum specific growth rate (μmax) that was further modeled as a function of temperature using a square root-type model. The validation of the model was conducted under dynamic temperature conditions based on two fluctuating temperature scenarios with periodic changes from 6 to 13 °C. The shelf life was determined both mathematically and with sensory assessment and its temperature dependence was modeled by an Arrhenius type equation. Results showed that the μmax of TVC of marinated samples was significantly lower compared to control samples regardless temperature, while under dynamic temperature conditions the model satisfactorily predicted the growth of TVC in both control and marinated samples. The shelf-life of marinated samples was significantly extended compared to the control (5 days extension at 4 °C). The calculated activation energies (Ea), 82 and 52 kJ/mol for control and marinated samples, respectively, indicated higher temperature dependence of the shelf life of control samples compared to marinated ones. The present results indicated that pomegranate juice could be used as an alternative ingredient in marinades to prolong the shelf life of chicken.

  4. Respiratory syncytial virus infection enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm growth through dysregulation of nutritional immunity.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Matthew R; Lashua, Lauren P; Fischer, Douglas K; Flitter, Becca A; Eichinger, Katherine M; Durbin, Joan E; Sarkar, Saumendra N; Coyne, Carolyn B; Empey, Kerry M; Bomberger, Jennifer M

    2016-02-01

    Clinical observations link respiratory virus infection and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in chronic lung disease, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The development of P. aeruginosa into highly antibiotic-resistant biofilm communities promotes airway colonization and accounts for disease progression in patients. Although clinical studies show a strong correlation between CF patients' acquisition of chronic P. aeruginosa infections and respiratory virus infection, little is known about the mechanism by which chronic P. aeruginosa infections are initiated in the host. Using a coculture model to study the formation of bacterial biofilm formation associated with the airway epithelium, we show that respiratory viral infections and the induction of antiviral interferons promote robust secondary P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. We report that the induction of antiviral IFN signaling in response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection induces bacterial biofilm formation through a mechanism of dysregulated iron homeostasis of the airway epithelium. Moreover, increased apical release of the host iron-binding protein transferrin during RSV infection promotes P. aeruginosa biofilm development in vitro and in vivo. Thus, nutritional immunity pathways that are disrupted during respiratory viral infection create an environment that favors secondary bacterial infection and may provide previously unidentified targets to combat bacterial biofilm formation.

  5. Respiratory syncytial virus infection enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm growth through dysregulation of nutritional immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hendricks, Matthew R.; Lashua, Lauren P.; Fischer, Douglas K.; Flitter, Becca A.; Eichinger, Katherine M.; Durbin, Joan E.; Sarkar, Saumendra N.; Coyne, Carolyn B.; Empey, Kerry M.; Bomberger, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical observations link respiratory virus infection and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in chronic lung disease, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The development of P. aeruginosa into highly antibiotic-resistant biofilm communities promotes airway colonization and accounts for disease progression in patients. Although clinical studies show a strong correlation between CF patients’ acquisition of chronic P. aeruginosa infections and respiratory virus infection, little is known about the mechanism by which chronic P. aeruginosa infections are initiated in the host. Using a coculture model to study the formation of bacterial biofilm formation associated with the airway epithelium, we show that respiratory viral infections and the induction of antiviral interferons promote robust secondary P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. We report that the induction of antiviral IFN signaling in response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection induces bacterial biofilm formation through a mechanism of dysregulated iron homeostasis of the airway epithelium. Moreover, increased apical release of the host iron-binding protein transferrin during RSV infection promotes P. aeruginosa biofilm development in vitro and in vivo. Thus, nutritional immunity pathways that are disrupted during respiratory viral infection create an environment that favors secondary bacterial infection and may provide previously unidentified targets to combat bacterial biofilm formation. PMID:26729873

  6. Prediction of Maximum Aerobic Power in Untrained Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolgener, Forrest A.

    1978-01-01

    The author presents an equation for predicting maximum aerobic power in untrained females from values of percent body fat, weight, and submaximal values of heart rate, respiratory quotient, and expired gas. (MJB)

  7. A heme oxygenase isoform is essential for aerobic growth in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803: modes of differential operation of two isoforms/enzymes to adapt to low oxygen environments in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Rina; Goto, Takeaki; Fujita, Yuichi

    2011-10-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the oxygen-dependent cleavage of heme to produce biliverdin IXα in phycobilin biosynthesis. In the genome of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 there are two genes, ho1 (sll1184) and ho2 (sll1875), encoding HO isoforms. Reverse transcription-PCR indicated that ho1 is constitutively expressed, and ho2 is induced under micro-oxic conditions. A mutant lacking ho1 (Δho1) failed to grow under aerobic conditions while it did grow at a significantly slower rate than the wild type under anaerobic (micro-oxic) conditions. When micro-oxically grown Δho1 was incubated under aerobic conditions, the cells underwent chlorosis with a significant decrease in phycocyanin accompanied by anomalous accumulation of protoporphyrin IX. These results suggested that HO1 is essential for aerobic growth as the sole HO and is dispensable under micro-oxic conditions. A mutant lacking ho2 (Δho2) grew under both aerobic and micro-oxic conditions like the wild type at low light intensity (50 μmol(photon) m⁻² s⁻¹). At higher light intensity (120 μmol(photon) m⁻² s⁻¹) the Δho2 mutant showed significant growth retardation under micro-oxic conditions. It is suggested that HO2 operates as a dominant HO under high light and micro-oxic environments and acts as an accessory HO at low light intensity. Constitutive expression of HO2 in a neutral site of the chromosome restored aerobic growth of Δho1, suggesting that HO2 has an activity high enough to substitute for HO1 under aerobic conditions. The differential operation of two isoforms/enzymes in cyanobacterial tetrapyrrole biosynthesis to adapt to low oxygen environments is discussed, including three other reactions.

  8. A single amino acid in the F2 subunit of respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein alters growth and fusogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Schickli, Jeanne H.; Tang, Roderick S.

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe lower respiratory tract infection in children, especially in infants less than 1 year of age. There are currently no licensed vaccines against RSV. rA2ΔM2-2 is a promising live-attenuated vaccine candidate that is currently being evaluated in the clinic. Attenuation of rA2ΔM2-2 is achieved by a single deletion of the M2-2 gene, which disrupts the balance between viral transcription and replication. Whilst performing a manufacturing feasibility study in a serum-free adapted Vero cell line, differences in growth kinetics and cytopathic effect (CPE) were identified between two rA2ΔM2-2 vaccine candidates. Comparative sequence analysis identified four amino acid differences between the two vaccine viruses. Recombinant rA2ΔM2-2 viruses carrying each of the four amino acid differences identified a K66E mutation in the F2 fragment of the fusion (F) protein as the cause of the growth and CPE differences. Syncytium-formation experiments with RSV F protein carrying mutations at aa 66 suggested that a change in charge at this residue within the F2 fragment can have a significant impact on fusion. PMID:24092758

  9. A standardized randomized 6-month aerobic exercise-training down-regulated pro-inflammatory genes, but up-regulated anti-inflammatory, neuron survival and axon growth-related genes.

    PubMed

    Iyalomhe, Osigbemhe; Chen, Yuanxiu; Allard, Joanne; Ntekim, Oyonumo; Johnson, Sheree; Bond, Vernon; Goerlitz, David; Li, James; Obisesan, Thomas O

    2015-09-01

    There is considerable support for the view that aerobic exercise may confer cognitive benefits to mild cognitively impaired elderly persons. However, the biological mechanisms mediating these effects are not entirely clear. As a preliminary step towards informing this gap in knowledge, we enrolled older adults confirmed to have mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in a 6-month exercise program. Male and female subjects were randomized into a 6-month program of either aerobic or stretch (control) exercise. Data collected from the first 10 completers, aerobic exercise (n=5) or stretch (control) exercise (n=5), were used to determine intervention-induced changes in the global gene expression profiles of the aerobic and stretch groups. Using microarray, we identified genes with altered expression (relative to baseline values) in response to the 6-month exercise intervention. Genes whose expression were altered by at least two-fold, and met the p-value cutoff of 0.01 were inputted into the Ingenuity Pathway Knowledge Base Library to generate gene-interaction networks. After a 6-month aerobic exercise-training, genes promoting inflammation became down-regulated, whereas genes having anti-inflammatory properties and those modulating immune function or promoting neuron survival and axon growth, became up-regulated (all fold change≥±2.0, p<0.01). These changes were not observed in the stretch group. Importantly, the differences in the expression profiles correlated with significant improvement in maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) in the aerobic program as opposed to the stretch group. We conclude that three distinct cellular pathways may collectively influence the training effects of aerobic exercise in MCI subjects. We plan to confirm these effects using rt-PCR and correlate such changes with the cognitive phenotype.

  10. A Standardized Randomized 6-Month Aerobic Exercise-Training Down-regulated Pro-inflammatory Genes, but Up-regulated Anti-inflammatory, Neuron Survival and Axon Growth-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Iyalomhe, Osigbemhe; Chen, Yuanxiu; Allard, Joanne; Ntekim, Oyonumo; Johnson, Sheree; Bond, Vernon; Goerlitz, David; Li, James; Obisesan, Thomas O.

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable support for the view that aerobic exercise may confer cognitive benefits to mild cognitively impaired elderly persons. However, the biological mechanisms mediating these effects are not entirely clear. As a preliminary step towards informing this gap in knowledge, we enrolled older adults confirmed to have mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in a 6-month exercise program. Male and female subjects were randomized into a 6-month program of either aerobic or stretch (control) exercise. Data collected from the first 10 completers, aerobic exercise (n=5) or stretch (control) exercise (n=5), were used to determine intervention-induced changes in the global gene expression profiles of the aerobic and stretch groups. Using microarray, we identified genes with altered expression (relative to baseline values) in response to the 6-month exercise intervention. Genes whose expression were altered by at least two-fold, and met the p-value cutoff of 0.01 were inputted into the Ingenuity Pathway Knowledge Base library to generate gene-interaction networks. After a 6-month aerobic exercise-training, genes promoting inflammation became down-regulated, whereas genes having anti-inflammatory properties and those modulating immune function or promoting neuron survival and axon growth, became up-regulated (all fold change ≥ ± 2.0, p < 0.01). These changes were not observed in the stretch group. Importantly, the differences in the expression profiles correlated with significant improvement in maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) in the aerobic program as opposed to the stretch group. We conclude that three distinct cellular pathways may collectively influence the training effects of aerobic exercise in MCI subjects. We plan to confirm these effects using rt-PCR and correlate such changes with the cognitive phenotype. PMID:25981742

  11. Thermodynamics of Microbial Growth Coupled to Metabolism of Glucose, Ethanol, Short-Chain Organic Acids, and Hydrogen ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Roden, Eric E.; Jin, Qusheng

    2011-01-01

    A literature compilation demonstrated a linear relationship between microbial growth yield and the free energy of aerobic and anaerobic (respiratory and/or fermentative) metabolism of glucose, ethanol, formate, acetate, lactate, propionate, butyrate, and H2. This relationship provides a means to estimate growth yields for modeling microbial redox metabolism in soil and sedimentary environments. PMID:21216913

  12. Transcriptome profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during a transition from fermentative to glycerol-based respiratory growth reveals extensive metabolic and structural remodeling.

    PubMed

    Roberts, George G; Hudson, Alan P

    2006-08-01

    Transcriptome analyses using a wild-type strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were performed to assess the overall pattern of gene expression during the transition from glucose-based fermentative to glycerol-based respiratory growth. These experiments revealed a complex suite of metabolic and structural changes associated with the adaptation process. Alterations in gene expression leading to remodeling of various membrane transport systems and the cortical actin cytoskeleton were observed. Transition to respiratory growth was accompanied by alterations in transcript patterns demonstrating not only a general stress response, as seen in earlier studies, but also the oxidative and osmotic stress responses. In some contrast to earlier studies, these experiments identified modulation of expression for many genes specifying transcription factors during the transition to glycerol-based growth. Importantly and unexpectedly, an ordered series of changes was seen in transcript levels from genes encoding components of the TFIID, SAGA (Spt-Ada-Gcn5-Acetyltransferase), and SLIK (Saga LIKe) complexes and all three RNA polymerases, suggesting a modulation of structure for the basal transcriptional machinery during adaptation to respiratory growth. In concert with data given in earlier studies, the results presented here highlight important aspects of metabolic and other adaptations to respiratory growth in yeast that are common to utilization of multiple carbon sources. Importantly, they also identify aspects specific to adaptation of this organism to growth on glycerol as sole carbon source. PMID:16741729

  13. Yeast mitochondria import ATP through the calcium-dependent ATP-Mg/Pi carrier Sal1p, and are ATP consumers during aerobic growth in glucose.

    PubMed

    Traba, Javier; Froschauer, Elisabeth Maria; Wiesenberger, Gerlinde; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Del Arco, Araceli

    2008-08-01

    Sal1p, a novel Ca2+-dependent ATP-Mg/Pi carrier, is essential in yeast lacking all adenine nucleotide translocases. By targeting luciferase to the mitochondrial matrix to monitor mitochondrial ATP levels, we show in isolated mitochondria that both ATP-Mg and free ADP are taken up by Sal1p with a K(m) of 0.20 +/- 0.03 mM and 0.28 +/- 0.06 mM respectively. Nucleotide transport along Sal1p is strictly Ca2+ dependent. Ca2+ increases the V(max) with a S(0.5) of 15 muM, and no changes in the K(m) for ATP-Mg. Glucose sensing in yeast generates Ca2+ transients involving Ca2+ influx from the external medium. We find that carbon-deprived cells respond to glucose with an immediate increase in mitochondrial ATP levels which is not observed in the presence of EGTA or in Sal1p-deficient cells. Moreover, we now report that during normal aerobic growth on glucose, yeast mitochondria import ATP from the cytosol and hydrolyse it through H+-ATP synthase. We identify two pathways for ATP uptake in mitochondria, the ADP/ATP carriers and Sal1p. Thus, during exponential growth on glucose, mitochondria are ATP consumers, as those from cells growing in anaerobic conditions or deprived of mitochondrial DNA which depend on cytosolic ATP and mitochondrial ATPase working in reverse to generate a mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, the results show that growth on glucose requires ATP hydrolysis in mitochondria and recruits Sal1p as a Ca2+-dependent mechanism to import ATP-Mg from the cytosol. Whether this mechanism is used under similar settings in higher eukaryotes is an open question.

  14. TEMPERATURE ACTIVATION OF CERTAIN RESPIRATORY ENZYMES OF STENOTHERMOPHILIC BACTERIA

    PubMed Central

    Gaughran, Eugene R. L.

    1949-01-01

    The results of this study of the effect of temperature on the respiratory mechanism of five stenothermophilic bacteria may be summarized as follows:— 1. The respiratory mechanism and its various components of the stenothermophilic bacteria were found to function at temperatures below the minimum temperature for growth of these organisms. In every case the rates of the individual reactions involved in the respiratory chain increased exponentially with temperature until the temperature at which inactivation became apparent was reached. 2. The mean activation energies, calculated from the "best" value for the slope of the straight lines resulting from a plot of log rate against the reciprocal of the absolute temperature were: Dehydrogenases: 28,000 to 28,500 calories per gram molecule. Glucose, fructose, galactose, mannose, xylose, arabinose, maltose, lactose, sucrose, glycine, β-alanine, monosodium glutamate, (asparagine). 19,500 to 20,500 calories per gram molecule. Ethyl alcohol, succinate, pyruvate, lactate, acetate. 19,500 to 20,500 calories per gram molecule. Ethyl alcohol, succinate, pyruvate, lactate, acetate. 15,000 calories per gram molecule. Formate. Cytochrome oxidase and cytochrome b and c (substrate: p-phenylenediamine): 16,800 calories per gram molecule. Cytochrome oxidase and cytochrome c (substrate: hydroquinone): 20,200 calories per gram molecule. Catalase: 4,100 calories per gram molecule. Complete aerobic respiratory system (plus added glucose): 29,500 calories per gram molecule. 3. The identity of the energies of activation of the respiratory system and its enzymic components at temperatures above and below the minimum temperature for growth of the stenothermophilic bacteria was demonstrated. 4. An attempt has been made to indicate a relationship between the nature of the substrate and the activation energy by grouping substrates on the basis of common µ values obtained for their dehydrogenation by resting cell preparations of

  15. Diet supplementation of Pediococcus pentosaceus in cobia (Rachycentron canadum) enhances growth rate, respiratory burst and resistance against photobacteriosis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Chen-Fu; Hu, Hung-Hsi; Huang, Jian-Bin; Fang, Han-Chun; Kai, Yu-Hsuan; Wu, Yu-Chi; Chi, Shau-Chi

    2013-10-01

    Cobia (Rachycentron canadum) is an economically important fish species for aquaculture in tropical and sub-tropical areas. Cobia aquaculture industry has severely damaged due to photobacteriosis caused by Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida (Pdp), especially in Taiwan. Antibiotics and vaccines have been applied to control Pdp infection, but the efficacy has been inconsistent. One species of lactic acid bacteria, Pediococcus pentosaceus strain 4012 (LAB 4012), was isolated from the intestine of adult cobia, and its culture supernatant can effectively inhibit Pdp growth in vitro. The acidic pH derived from metabolic acids in LAB culture supernatant was demonstrated to be an important factor for the suppression. After a 2-week feeding of LAB 4012, the growth rate of the fed cobia was 12% higher than that of the non-fed group, and the relative percentage of survival (RPS) of the fed cobia was found to be 74.4 in Pdp immersion challenge. In addition, the respiratory burst (RB) of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) in the LAB 4012-fed group was significantly higher than that of the non-fed group. Although feeding LAB 4012 did not improve specific antibody response in cobia after immunization with Pdp vaccine, it still significantly raised the survival rate by 22% over that of the non-fed group after Pdp immersion challenge. Judging by the quick induction of high protection against Pdp infection and promotion of growth in larvae, LAB 4012 was considered to be a viable probiotic for cobia aquaculture.

  16. Growth, photosynthetic and respiratory responses to sub-lethal copper concentrations in Scenedesmus incrassatulus (Chlorophyceae).

    PubMed

    Perales-Vela, Hugo Virgilio; González-Moreno, Sergio; Montes-Horcasitas, Carmen; Cañizares-Villanueva, Rosa Olivia

    2007-05-01

    In the present paper we investigated the effects of sub-lethal concentrations of Cu2+ in the growth and metabolism of Scenedesmus incrassatulus. We found that the effect of Cu2+ on growth, photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls and carotenoids) and metabolism do not follow the same pattern. Photosynthesis was more sensitive than respiration. The analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence transient shows that the effect of sub-lethal Cu2+ concentration in vivo, causes a reduction of the active PSII reaction centers and the primary charge separation, decreasing the quantum yield of PSII, the electron transport rate and the photosynthetic O2 evolution. The order of sensitivity found was: Growth>photosynthetic pigments content=photosynthetic O2 evolution>photosynthetic electron transport>respiration. The uncoupled relationship between growth and metabolism is discussed.

  17. Growth, photosynthetic and respiratory responses to sub-lethal copper concentrations in Scenedesmus incrassatulus (Chlorophyceae).

    PubMed

    Perales-Vela, Hugo Virgilio; González-Moreno, Sergio; Montes-Horcasitas, Carmen; Cañizares-Villanueva, Rosa Olivia

    2007-05-01

    In the present paper we investigated the effects of sub-lethal concentrations of Cu2+ in the growth and metabolism of Scenedesmus incrassatulus. We found that the effect of Cu2+ on growth, photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls and carotenoids) and metabolism do not follow the same pattern. Photosynthesis was more sensitive than respiration. The analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence transient shows that the effect of sub-lethal Cu2+ concentration in vivo, causes a reduction of the active PSII reaction centers and the primary charge separation, decreasing the quantum yield of PSII, the electron transport rate and the photosynthetic O2 evolution. The order of sensitivity found was: Growth>photosynthetic pigments content=photosynthetic O2 evolution>photosynthetic electron transport>respiration. The uncoupled relationship between growth and metabolism is discussed. PMID:17267014

  18. Treatment of agro based industrial wastewater in sequencing batch reactor: performance evaluation and growth kinetics of aerobic biomass.

    PubMed

    Lim, J X; Vadivelu, V M

    2014-12-15

    A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) with a working volume of 8 L and an exchange ratio of 25% was used to enrich biomass for the treatment of the anaerobically treated low pH palm oil mill effluent (POME). The influent concentration was stepwise increased from 5000 ± 500 mg COD/L to 11,500 ± 500 mg COD/L. The performance of the reactor was monitored at different organic loading rates (OLRs). It was found that approximately 90% of the COD content of the POME wastewater was successfully removed regardless of the OLR applied to the SBR. Cycle studies of the SBR show that the oxygen uptake by the biomass while there is no COD reduction may be due to the oxidation of the storage product by the biomass. Further, the growth kinetic parameters of the biomass were determined in batch experiments using respirometer. The maximum specific growth rate (μmax) was estimated to be 1.143 day(-1) while the half saturation constant (Ks) with respect to COD was determined to be 0.429 g COD/L. The decay coefficient (bD) and biomass yield (Y) were found to be 0.131 day(-1) and 0.272 mg biomass/mg COD consumed, respectively.

  19. Contributions of Respiratory and Photosynthetic Pathways during Growth of a Facultative Photoautotrophic Cyanobacterium, Aphanocapsa 6714 1

    PubMed Central

    Der-Vartanian, Maurice; Joset-Espardellier, Francoise; Astier, Chantal

    1981-01-01

    Comparison of the growth parameters and photosynthetic capacities of cells of Aphanocapsa 6714 under various growth conditions led to the following conclusions: (a), no enzymic regulation of CO2/glucose assimilation takes place in this strain; (b), functioning of photodependent phosphorylating pathways turns off oxidative ATP synthesis; (c), no efficient regulation of pigment synthesis exists in these cells; (d), most modulations of photosynthetic activities probably occur through structural modifications of the photosynthetic membranes (a small proportion of the pigments might appear as a nonintegrated pool in the cell and be sensitive to synthesis regulation); and (e), photosystem II activity would be dependent on light intensity in a discontinuous way, the consequence of this property being the appearance of two successive exponential phases during phototrophic growth in adequate light conditions. PMID:16662036

  20. Predicting the aerobic growth of Y. enterocolitica O:3 at different pH-values, temperatures and L-lactate concentrations using conductance measurements.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, C W; Borch, E

    1994-05-01

    The effect of the inoculum level and growth conditions on conductance response was studied for Yersinia enterocolitica O:3. The Gompertz equation, y = A+C exp (-exp(-B(time(-)-M))) was used in the fitting of conductance response curves. Inoculum levels between 3 and 7 log cfu/ml did not affect the B or C parameters. The M parameter was affected; the lower the inoculum level, the higher the M value. Conductance response was attained at 7.5 log cfu Y. enterocolitica/ml skim milk-SPYE medium used. Polynomial models for log B and log C were developed for Y. enterocolitica O:3 describing the effect of temperature (7-23 degrees C), pH (5.4-6.5) and L-lactate (0-1.2%), and combinations thereof, under aerobic conditions. Conductance response was attained in all combinations of L-lactate concentrations, pH levels and temperatures. The conductance rate (B.C/e) was of the same magnitude at 23 degrees C, pH 5.4 and 1.2% L-lactate as at 7 degrees C, pH 6.5 and 0% L-lactate. A high correlation was found between the conductance rates predicted from conductance polynomial models and rates predicted from an absorbance model taken from the literature. A large number of combinations of factors affecting the growth/activity of bacteria could be studied simultaneously, due to the large instrumental capacity of the Malthus 2000.

  1. Membrane-bound respiratory of Spirillum itersonii.

    PubMed Central

    Dailey, H A

    1976-01-01

    The membrane-bound respiratory system of the gram-negative bacterium Spirillum itersonii was investigated. It contains cytochromes b (558), c (550), and o (558) and beta-dihydro-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and succinate oxidase activities under all growth conditions. It is also capable of producing D-lactate and alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenases when grown with lactate or glycerol as sole carbon source. Membrane-bound malate dehydrogenase was not detectable under any conditions, although there is high activity of soluble nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide: malate dehydrogenase. When grown with oxygen as the sole terminal electron acceptor, approximately 60% of the total b-type cytochrome is present as cytochrome o, whereas only 40% is present as cytochrome o in cells grown with nitrate in the presence of oxygen. Both NADH and succinate oxidase are inhibited by azide, cyanide, antimycin A, and 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxidase at low concentrations. The ability of these inhibitors to completely inhibit oxidase activity at low concentrations and their effects upon the aerobic steady-state reduction levels of b- and c-type cytochromes as well as the aerobic steady-state reduction levels obtained with NADH, succinate, and ascorbate-dichlorophenolindophenol suggest that presence of an unbranched respiratory chain in S. itersonii with the order ubiquinone leads to b leads to c leads to c leads to oxygen. PMID:182674

  2. Increased plant productivity and decreased microbial respiratory C loss by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria under elevated CO2

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Ming; Bell, Colin; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Pendall, Elise

    2015-01-01

    Increased plant productivity and decreased microbial respiratory C loss can potentially mitigate increasing atmospheric CO2, but we currently lack effective means to achieve these goals. Soil microbes may play critical roles in mediating plant productivity and soil C/N dynamics under future climate scenarios of elevated CO2 (eCO2) through optimizing functioning of the root-soil interface. By using a labeling technique with 13C and 15N, we examined the effects of plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens on C and N cycling in the rhizosphere of a common grass species under eCO2. These microbial inoculants were shown to increase plant productivity. Although strong competition for N between the plant and soil microbes was observed, the plant can increase its capacity to store more biomass C per unit of N under P. fluorescens addition. Unlike eCO2 effects, P. fluorescens inoculants did not change mass-specific microbial respiration and accelerate soil decomposition related to N cycling, suggesting these microbial inoculants mitigated positive feedbacks of soil microbial decomposition to eCO2. The potential to mitigate climate change by optimizing soil microbial functioning by plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens is a prospect for ecosystem management. PMID:25784647

  3. Increased plant productivity and decreased microbial respiratory C loss by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria under elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Ming; Bell, Colin; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Pendall, Elise

    2015-03-01

    Increased plant productivity and decreased microbial respiratory C loss can potentially mitigate increasing atmospheric CO2, but we currently lack effective means to achieve these goals. Soil microbes may play critical roles in mediating plant productivity and soil C/N dynamics under future climate scenarios of elevated CO2 (eCO2) through optimizing functioning of the root-soil interface. By using a labeling technique with 13C and 15N, we examined the effects of plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens on C and N cycling in the rhizosphere of a common grass species under eCO2. These microbial inoculants were shown to increase plant productivity. Although strong competition for N between the plant and soil microbes was observed, the plant can increase its capacity to store more biomass C per unit of N under P. fluorescens addition. Unlike eCO2 effects, P. fluorescens inoculants did not change mass-specific microbial respiration and accelerate soil decomposition related to N cycling, suggesting these microbial inoculants mitigated positive feedbacks of soil microbial decomposition to eCO2. The potential to mitigate climate change by optimizing soil microbial functioning by plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens is a prospect for ecosystem management.

  4. Increased plant productivity and decreased microbial respiratory C loss by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria under elevated CO₂.

    PubMed

    Nie, Ming; Bell, Colin; Wallenstein, Matthew D; Pendall, Elise

    2015-03-18

    Increased plant productivity and decreased microbial respiratory C loss can potentially mitigate increasing atmospheric CO₂, but we currently lack effective means to achieve these goals. Soil microbes may play critical roles in mediating plant productivity and soil C/N dynamics under future climate scenarios of elevated CO₂ (eCO₂) through optimizing functioning of the root-soil interface. By using a labeling technique with (13)C and (15)N, we examined the effects of plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens on C and N cycling in the rhizosphere of a common grass species under eCO₂. These microbial inoculants were shown to increase plant productivity. Although strong competition for N between the plant and soil microbes was observed, the plant can increase its capacity to store more biomass C per unit of N under P. fluorescens addition. Unlike eCO₂ effects, P. fluorescens inoculants did not change mass-specific microbial respiration and accelerate soil decomposition related to N cycling, suggesting these microbial inoculants mitigated positive feedbacks of soil microbial decomposition to eCO₂. The potential to mitigate climate change by optimizing soil microbial functioning by plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens is a prospect for ecosystem management.

  5. Analysis of Escherichia coli mutants with a linear respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Steinsiek, Sonja; Stagge, Stefan; Bettenbrock, Katja

    2014-01-01

    The respiratory chain of E. coli is branched to allow the cells' flexibility to deal with changing environmental conditions. It consists of the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductases NADH dehydrogenase I and II, as well as of three terminal oxidases. They differ with respect to energetic efficiency (proton translocation) and their affinity to the different quinone/quinol species and oxygen. In order to analyze the advantages of the branched electron transport chain over a linear one and to assess how usage of the different terminal oxidases determines growth behavior at varying oxygen concentrations, a set of isogenic mutant strains was created, which lack NADH dehydrogenase I as well as two of the terminal oxidases, resulting in strains with a linear respiratory chain. These strains were analyzed in glucose-limited chemostat experiments with defined oxygen supply, adjusting aerobic, anaerobic and different microaerobic conditions. In contrast to the wild-type strain MG1655, the mutant strains produced acetate even under aerobic conditions. Strain TBE032, lacking NADH dehydrogenase I and expressing cytochrome bd-II as sole terminal oxidase, showed the highest acetate formation rate under aerobic conditions. This supports the idea that cytochrome bd-II terminal oxidase is not able to catalyze the efficient oxidation of the quinol pool at higher oxygen conditions, but is functioning mainly under limiting oxygen conditions. Phosphorylation of ArcA, the regulator of the two-component system ArcBA, besides Fnr the main transcription factor for the response towards different oxygen concentrations, was studied. Its phosphorylation pattern was changed in the mutant strains. Dephosphorylation and therefore inactivation of ArcA started at lower aerobiosis levels than in the wild-type strain. Notably, not only the micro- and aerobic metabolism was affected by the mutations, but also the anaerobic metabolism, where the respiratory chain should not be important. PMID:24475268

  6. Computational comparison of mediated current generation capacity of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in photosynthetic and respiratory growth modes.

    PubMed

    Mao, Longfei; Verwoerd, Wynand S

    2014-11-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii possesses many potential advantages to be exploited as a biocatalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for electricity generation. In the present study, we performed computational studies based on flux balance analysis (FBA) to probe the maximum potential of C. reinhardtii for current output and identify the metabolic mechanisms supporting a high current generation in three different cultivation conditions, i.e., heterotrophic, photoautotrophic and mixotrophic growth. The results showed that flux balance limitations allow the highest current output for C. reinhardtii in the mixotrophic growth mode (2.368 A/gDW), followed by heterotrophic growth (1.141 A/gDW) and photoautotrophic growth the lowest (0.7035 A/gDW). The significantly higher mediated electron transfer (MET) rate in the mixotrophic mode is in complete contrast to previous findings for a photosynthetic cyanobacterium, and was attributed to the fact that for C. reinhardtii the photophosphorylation improved the efficiency of converting the acetate into biomass and NADH production. Overall, the cytosolic NADH-dependent current production was mainly associated with five reactions in both mixotrophic and photoautotrophic nutritional modes, whereas four reactions participated in the heterotrophic mode. The mixotrophic and photoautotrophic metabolisms were alike and shared the same set of reactions for maximizing current production, whereas in the heterotrophic mode, the current production was additionally contributed by the metabolic activities in the two organelles: glyoxysome and chloroplast. In conclusion, C. reinhardtii has a potential to be exploited in MFCs of MET mode to produce a high current output. PMID:24875305

  7. Root respiratory costs of ion uptake, root growth, and root maintenance in wetland plants: efficiency and strategy of O2 use for adaptation to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takatoshi; Nakamura, Motoka

    2016-11-01

    Oxygen use in roots is an important aspect of wetland plant ecophysiology, and it depends on the respiratory costs of three major processes: ion uptake, root growth, and root maintenance. However, O2 allocation in wetland plants has received little attention. This study aimed to determine the O2 allocation and specific respiratory cost of each process under hypoxic conditions, to better understand the strategy and efficiency of O2 use in wetland plants. The root respiration rate, nitrogen uptake, and root growth in three Carex species with different growth rates were examined under hypoxic conditions using different N sources, and the respiratory costs of ion uptake, root growth, and root maintenance were statistically estimated. All species exhibited low specific costs and low ratios of O2 allocation for root growth (2.0 ± 0.4 mmol O2 g(-1) and 15.2 ± 2.7 %, respectively). The specific cost of ion uptake was 20-30 % lower in fast-growing species than in slow-growing species. As plant growth rate increased, the O2 allocation ratio for ion uptake increased, and that for root maintenance decreased. The cost was higher when NO3 (-) was fed, than when NH4 (+) was fed, although the pattern of O2 allocation ratios for three processes was similar for NO3 (-) and NH4 (+). Our results indicate that wetland plants primarily employ an O2 use strategy of minimising the respiratory costs of root growth, and fast-growing plants specifically use O2 to maximise ion uptake. These findings provide new insights into ecophysiological behaviours of roots in adaptation to hypoxia.

  8. Thermoperiodic growth control by gibberellin does not involve changes in photosynthetic or respiratory capacities in pea.

    PubMed

    Stavang, Jon Anders; Pettersen, Rolf Inge; Wendell, Micael; Solhaug, Knut Asbjørn; Junttila, Olavi; Moe, Roar; Olsen, Jorunn E

    2010-02-01

    Active gibberellin (GA(1)) is an important mediator of thermoperiodic growth in pea. Plants grown under lower day than night temperature (negative DIF) elongate less and have reduced levels of GA(1) compared with plants grown at higher day than night temperature (positive DIF). By comparing the wild type (WT) and the elongated DELLA mutant la cry(s), this study has examined the effect of impaired GA signalling on thermoperiodic growth, photosynthesis, and respiration in pea. In the WT a negative DIF treatment reduced stem mass ratio and increased both root mass ratio and leaf mass ratio (dry weight of specific tissue related to total plant dry weight). Leaf, root and stem mass ratios of la cry(s) were not affected by DIF. Under negative DIF, specific leaf area (projected leaf area per unit leaf dry mass), biomass, and chlorophyll content of WT and la cry(s) plants were reduced. Young, expanding leaves of plants grown under negative DIF had reduced leaf area-based photosynthetic capacity. However, the highest photosynthetic electron transport rate was found in fully expanded leaves of WT plants grown under negative DIF. Negative DIF increased night respiration and was similar for both genotypes. It is concluded that GA signalling is not a major determinant of leaf area-based photosynthesis or respiration and that reduced dry weight of plants grown under negative DIF is caused by a GA-mediated reduction of photosynthetic stem and leaf tissue, reduced photosynthesis of young, expanding leaves, and reduced growth caused by low temperature in the photoperiod.

  9. Overexpression of GRIM-19, a mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I protein, suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Dexia; Zhao, Lijing; Du, Yanwei; He, Ping; Zou, Yabin; Yang, Luoluo; Sun, Liankun; Wang, Hebin; Xu, Deqi; Meng, Xiangwei; Sun, Xun

    2014-01-01

    GRIM-19 has been demonstrated as an important regulator for the normal tissue development. Recently, more evidences regarded GRIM-19 as the new tumor suppressor. However, the possible mechanisms underlying GRIM-19 suppressing cancer growth are unclear. In the present study, Paired hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and adjacent non-tumor liver tissues were obtained from 54 patients who underwent primary surgical HCC tissue resection. GRIM-19 protein expression in HCC tissues was performed by immunohistochemistry. Cells were transfected by lentiviruses plasmid expressing GRIM-19. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses were performed to confirm the expression of GRIM-19 mRNA or protein. Cell proliferation was assessed by MTT and FCM analyses. Mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis were respectively determined by using fluorescence microscopy and FCM analyses. AKT1, pAKT1, cyclinD1, CDK4, PCNA, Bax, Bcl-2, cleaved caspase-9, cleaved caspase-3, and cytochrome C were detected by Western blot and immunofluorescence. GRIM-19 protein expression was markedly lower in HCC than in paired adjacent non-tumor liver tissues. GRIM-19 overexpression in HCC cells significantly induced cell cycle arrest and enhanced apoptosis. We also found that AKT1 expression and phosphorylation were regulated by the expression of GRIM-19. Collectively, our study demonstrated that GRIM-19 overexpression suppressed HCC growth and downregulated AKT1 expression, suggesting that GRIM-19 might play a crucial role in hepatocarcinogenesis through negatively regulating the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. PMID:25550785

  10. Teaching Aerobic Fitness Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Allan N.; Ratliffe, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to teach aerobic fitness concepts to elementary students. Some of the K-2 activities include location, size, and purpose of the heart and lungs; the exercise pulse; respiration rate; and activities to measure aerobic endurance. Some of the 3-6 activities include: definition of aerobic endurance; heart disease risk factors;…

  11. Influence of Growth Temperature on Respiratory Characteristics of Mitochondria from Callus-Forming Potato Tuber Discs

    PubMed Central

    Hemrika-Wagner, Anneke M.; Kreuk, Koos C. M.; van der Plas, Linus H. W.

    1982-01-01

    The uninhibited respiration of mitochondria, isolated from potato tuber discs (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Bintje) incubated on a callus-inducing medium at 28°C, is higher than that of mitochondria from tissue incubated at 8°C. This respiration is composed of a CN-sensitive and a CN-resistant part. The capacity of the CN-resistant alternative oxidase pathway is larger in mitochondria from 28°C tissue than in mitochondria from 8°C tissue (35% and 8% of uninhibited respiration, respectively). The alternative pathway is operative both in mitochondria from 28°C tissue and 8°C tissue. The observed difference in uninhibited respiration, is not only caused by lower values of respiration via the alternative pathway in mitochondria from 8°C tissue, but also by lower values of respiration via the cytochrome pathway. A positive correlation has been demonstrated between the incubation temperature (ranging from 4-37°C) and the relative capacity of respiration via alternative pathway in the mitochondria. Induction of alternative pathway is not directly correlated with growth (in terms of increase in fresh weight) of the potato tuber discs. PMID:16662541

  12. Formation of tellurium nanocrystals during anaerobic growth of bacteria that use Te oxyanions as respiratory electron acceptors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baesman, S.M.; Bullen, T.D.; Dewald, J.; Zhang, Dongxiao; Curran, S.; Islam, F.S.; Beveridge, T.J.; Oremland, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    Certain toxic elements support the metabolism of diverse prokaryotes by serving as respiratory electron acceptors for growth. Here, we demonstrate that two anaerobes previously shown to be capable of respiring oxyanions of selenium also achieve growth by reduction of either tellurate [Te(VI)] or tellurite [Te(IV)] to elemental tellurium [Te(0)]. This reduction achieves a sizeable stable-Te-isotopic fractionation (isotopic enrichment factor [??] = -0.4 to -1.0 per ml per atomic mass unit) and results in the formation of unique crystalline Te(0) nanoarchitectures as end products. The Te(0) crystals occur internally within but mainly externally from the cells, and each microorganism forms a distinctly different structure. Those formed by Bacillus selenitireducens initially are nanorods (???10-nm diameter by 200-nm length), which cluster together, forming larger (???1,000-nm) rosettes composed of numerous individual shards (???100-nm width by 1,000-nm length). In contrast, Sulfurospirillium barnesii forms extremely small, irregularly shaped nanospheres (diameter < 50 nm) that coalesce into larger composite aggregates. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction indicate that both biominerals are composed entirely of Te and are crystalline, while Raman spectroscopy confirms that they are in the elemental state. These Te biominerals have specific spectral signatures (UV-visible light, Raman) that also provide clues to their internal structures. The use of microorganisms to generate Te nanomaterials may be an alternative for bench-scale syntheses. Additionally, they may also generate products with unique properties unattainable by conventional physical/chemical methods. Copyright ?? 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Formation of Tellurium Nanocrystals during Anaerobic Growth of Bacteria That Use Te Oxyanions as Respiratory Electron Acceptors▿

    PubMed Central

    Baesman, Shaun M.; Bullen, Thomas D.; Dewald, James; Zhang, Donghui; Curran, Seamus; Islam, Farhana S.; Beveridge, Terry J.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2007-01-01

    Certain toxic elements support the metabolism of diverse prokaryotes by serving as respiratory electron acceptors for growth. Here, we demonstrate that two anaerobes previously shown to be capable of respiring oxyanions of selenium also achieve growth by reduction of either tellurate [Te(VI)] or tellurite [Te(IV)] to elemental tellurium [Te(0)]. This reduction achieves a sizeable stable-Te-isotopic fractionation (isotopic enrichment factor [ɛ] = −0.4 to −1.0 per ml per atomic mass unit) and results in the formation of unique crystalline Te(0) nanoarchitectures as end products. The Te(0) crystals occur internally within but mainly externally from the cells, and each microorganism forms a distinctly different structure. Those formed by Bacillus selenitireducens initially are nanorods (∼10-nm diameter by 200-nm length), which cluster together, forming larger (∼1,000-nm) rosettes composed of numerous individual shards (∼100-nm width by 1,000-nm length). In contrast, Sulfurospirillum barnesii forms extremely small, irregularly shaped nanospheres (diameter < 50 nm) that coalesce into larger composite aggregates. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction indicate that both biominerals are composed entirely of Te and are crystalline, while Raman spectroscopy confirms that they are in the elemental state. These Te biominerals have specific spectral signatures (UV-visible light, Raman) that also provide clues to their internal structures. The use of microorganisms to generate Te nanomaterials may be an alternative for bench-scale syntheses. Additionally, they may also generate products with unique properties unattainable by conventional physical/chemical methods. PMID:17277198

  14. Effects of hydraulic retention time on aerobic granulation and granule growth kinetics at steady state with a fast start-up strategy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Rui; Liu, Wen-Tso; Tay, Joo-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    A hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4, 6, and 8 h was employed, respectively, in three reactors to study the effects of HRT on granulation with a newly developed fast granulation strategy, i.e., a strategy by combining strong hydraulic selection pressure with high organic loading rate (OLR). Granules with clear boundary appeared within 24 h after reactor start-up and all reactors reached a pseudo steady state after 6-day operation. A 4-h HRT resulted in a relatively higher increasing rate in terms of granule size during granule development period, i.e., 208 μm day(-1), and the bigger granule size and the higher sludge volume index at the pseudo steady state. For HRT of 6 or 8 h, no obvious difference was observed. However, it was found that HRT influenced sludge retention time (SRT) and kinetics significantly. A HRT changing from 4 to 8 h led to an increased SRT from 3 to 21 days, a decreased observed specific biomass growth rate (μ obs) and an decreased observed biomass yield (Y obs) of stable granules from 0.37 to 0.062 days(-1), and 0.177 to 0.055 g MLVSS g(-1) COD, respectively. Both μ obs and Y obs had a linear relationship with the reciprocal of HRT. In addition, the great difference of microbial community between seed sludge, sludge retained in the reactors, and sludge washed out indicated a strong microbial selection for fast granulation within 24 h. However, during the granule development period from day 1 to 6, no more microbial selection was observed except an adjustment of microbial community. Little influence of HRT on microbial population in granular sludge indicated a minor role of HRT played for granulation with the fast start-up strategy adopted in this study. The results demonstrated that hydraulic selection pressure for granulation was mainly from short settling time, which led to strong microbial selection during the granulation period. Meanwhile, although HRT did not affect granulation with the fast start-up strategy, it played an

  15. Aerobic Growth of Escherichia coli Is Reduced, and ATP Synthesis Is Selectively Inhibited when Five C-terminal Residues Are Deleted from the ϵ Subunit of ATP Synthase.

    PubMed

    Shah, Naman B; Duncan, Thomas M

    2015-08-21

    F-type ATP synthases are rotary nanomotor enzymes involved in cellular energy metabolism in eukaryotes and eubacteria. The ATP synthase from Gram-positive and -negative model bacteria can be autoinhibited by the C-terminal domain of its ϵ subunit (ϵCTD), but the importance of ϵ inhibition in vivo is unclear. Functional rotation is thought to be blocked by insertion of the latter half of the ϵCTD into the central cavity of the catalytic complex (F1). In the inhibited state of the Escherichia coli enzyme, the final segment of ϵCTD is deeply buried but has few specific interactions with other subunits. This region of the ϵCTD is variable or absent in other bacteria that exhibit strong ϵ-inhibition in vitro. Here, genetically deleting the last five residues of the ϵCTD (ϵΔ5) caused a greater defect in respiratory growth than did the complete absence of the ϵCTD. Isolated membranes with ϵΔ5 generated proton-motive force by respiration as effectively as with wild-type ϵ but showed a nearly 3-fold decrease in ATP synthesis rate. In contrast, the ϵΔ5 truncation did not change the intrinsic rate of ATP hydrolysis with membranes. Further, the ϵΔ5 subunit retained high affinity for isolated F1 but reduced the maximal inhibition of F1-ATPase by ϵ from >90% to ∼20%. The results suggest that the ϵCTD has distinct regulatory interactions with F1 when rotary catalysis operates in opposite directions for the hydrolysis or synthesis of ATP.

  16. Aerobic microbial enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Torsvik, T.; Gilje, E.; Sunde, E.

    1995-12-31

    In aerobic MEOR, the ability of oil-degrading bacteria to mobilize oil is used to increase oil recovery. In this process, oxygen and mineral nutrients are injected into the oil reservoir in order to stimulate growth of aerobic oil-degrading bacteria in the reservoir. Experiments carried out in a model sandstone with stock tank oil and bacteria isolated from offshore wells showed that residual oil saturation was lowered from 27% to 3%. The process was time dependent, not pore volume dependent. During MEOR flooding, the relative permeability of water was lowered. Oxygen and active bacteria were needed for the process to take place. Maximum efficiency was reached at low oxygen concentrations, approximately 1 mg O{sub 2}/liter.

  17. Aerobic training in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Nsenga, A L; Shephard, R J; Ahmaidi, S; Ahmadi, S

    2013-06-01

    Rehabilitation is a major goal for children with cerebral palsy, although the potential to enhance cardio-respiratory fitness in such individuals remains unclear. This study thus compared current cardio-respiratory status between children with cerebral palsy and able-bodied children, and examined the ability to enhance the cardio-respiratory fitness of children with cerebral palsy by cycle ergometer training. 10 children with cerebral palsy (Gross Motor Function Classification System levels I and II) participated in thrice-weekly 30 min cycle ergometer training sessions for 8 weeks (mean age: 14.2±1.9 yrs). 10 additional subjects with cerebral palsy (mean age: 14.2±1.8 yrs) and 10 able-bodied subjects (mean age: 14.1±2.1 yrs) served as controls, undertaking no training. All subjects undertook a progressive cycle ergometer test of cardio-respiratory fitness at the beginning and end of the 8-week period. Cardio-respiratory parameters [oxygen intake V˙O2), ventilation V ˙ E) and heart rate (HR)] during testing were measured by Cosmed K4 b gas analyzer. The children with cerebral palsy who engaged in aerobic training improved their peak oxygen consumption, heart rate and ventilation significantly (p<0.05) and they also showed a non-significant trend to increased peak power output. In conclusion, children with cerebral palsy can benefit significantly from cardio-respiratory training, and such training should be included in rehabilitation programs.

  18. Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can' ...

  19. Respiratory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The general anatomy and function of the human respiratory system is summarized. Breathing movements, control of breathing, lung volumes and capacities, mechanical relations, and factors relevant to respiratory support and equipment design are discussed.

  20. Aerobic Conditioning Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Neil R.

    1980-01-01

    An aerobic exercise class that focuses on the conditioning of the cardiovascular and muscular systems is presented. Students complete data cards on heart rate, pulse, and exercises to be completed during the forty minute course. (CJ)

  1. Mitochondrial localization of fission yeast manganese superoxide dismutase is required for its lysine acetylation and for cellular stress resistance and respiratory growth

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hidekazu; Shirai, Atsuko; Matsuyama, Akihisa; Yoshida, Minoru

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Fission yeast manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is acetylated. {yields} The mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) is required for the acetylation of MnSOD. {yields} The MTS is not crucial for MnSOD activity, but is important for respiratory growth. {yields} Posttranslational regulation of MnSOD differs between budding and fission yeast. -- Abstract: Manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is localized in the mitochondria and is important for oxidative stress resistance. Although transcriptional regulation of MnSOD has been relatively well studied, much less is known about the protein's posttranslational regulation. In budding yeast, MnSOD is activated after mitochondrial import by manganese ion incorporation. Here we characterize posttranslational modification of MnSOD in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Fission yeast MnSOD is acetylated at the 25th lysine residue. This acetylation was diminished by deletion of N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence, suggesting that MnSOD is acetylated after import into mitochondria. Mitochondrial localization of MnSOD is not essential for the enzyme activity, but is crucial for oxidative stress resistance and growth under respiratory conditions of fission yeast. These results suggest that, unlike the situation in budding yeast, S. pombe MnSOD is already active even before mitochondrial localization; nonetheless, mitochondrial localization is critical to allow the cell to cope with reactive oxygen species generated inside or outside of mitochondria.

  2. Regulation of oxidative phosphorylation: the flexible respiratory network of Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Van Spanning, R J; de Boer, A P; Reijnders, W N; De Gier, J W; Delorme, C O; Stouthamer, A H; Westerhoff, H V; Harms, N; van der Oost, J

    1995-10-01

    Paracoccus denitrificans is a facultative anaerobic bacterium that has the capacity to adjust its metabolic infrastructure, quantitatively and/or qualitatively, to the prevailing growth condition. In this bacterium the relative activity of distinct catabolic pathways is subject to a hierarchical control. In the presence of oxygen the aerobic respiration, the most efficient way of electron transfer-linked phosphorylation, has priority. At high oxygen tensions P. denitrificans synthesizes an oxidase with a relatively low affinity for oxygen, whereas under oxygen limitation a high-affinity oxidase appears specifically induced. During anaerobiosis, the pathways with lower free energy-transducing efficiency are induced. In the presence of nitrate, the expression of a number of dehydrogenases ensures the continuation of oxidative phosphorylation via denitrification. After identification of the structural components that are involved in both the aerobic and the anaerobic respiratory networks of P. denitrificans, the intriguing next challenge is to get insight in its regulation. Two transcription regulators have recently been demonstrated to be involved in the expression of a number of aerobic and/or anaerobic respiratory complexes in P. denitrificans. Understanding of the regulation machinery is beginning to emerge and promises much excitement in discovery. PMID:8718455

  3. The roles of CymA in support of the respiratory flexibility of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Marritt, Sophie; McMillan, Duncan G.; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Richardson, David J.; Jeuken, Lars J.; Butt, Julea N.

    2012-12-01

    Shewanella species are isolated from the oxic/anoxic regions of seawater and aquatic sediments where redox conditions fluctuate in time and space. Colonization of these environments is by virtue of flexible respiratory chains, many of which are notable for the ability to reduce extracellular substrates including the Fe(III) and Mn(IV) contained in oxide and phyllosilicate minerals. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 serves as a model organism to consider the biochemical basis of this flexibility. In the present paper, we summarize the various systems that serve to branch the respiratory chain of S. oneidensis MR-1 in order that electrons from quinol oxidation can be delivered the various terminal electron acceptors able to support aerobic and anaerobic growth. This serves to highlight several unanswered questions relating to the regulation of respiratory electron transport in Shewanella and the central role(s) of the tetrahaem-containing quinol dehydrogenase CymA in that process.

  4. Summary report on the aerobic degradation of diesel fuel and the degradation of toluene under aerobic, denitrifying and sulfate reducing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Coyne, P.; Smith, G.

    1995-08-15

    This report contains a number of studies that were performed to better understand the technology of the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. Topics of investigation include the following: diesel fuel degradation by Rhodococcus erythropolis; BTEX degradation by soil isolates; aerobic degradation of diesel fuel-respirometry; aerobic degradation of diesel fuel-shake culture; aerobic toluene degradation by A3; effect of HEPES, B1, and myo-inositol addition on the growth of A3; aerobic and anaerobic toluene degradation by contaminated soils; denitrifying bacteria MPNs; sulfate-reducing bacteria MPNs; and aerobic, DNB and SRB enrichments.

  5. Dance--Aerobic and Anaerobic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlette

    1984-01-01

    This article defines and explains aerobic exercise and its effects on the cardiovascular system. Various studies on dancers are cited indicating that dance is an anaerobic activity with some small degree of aerobic benefit. (DF)

  6. [Population development characteristics of rice crop cultivated on aerobic soil with mulching].

    PubMed

    Sheng, Haijun; Shen, Qirong; Feng, Ke

    2004-01-01

    Field experiments were carried out to study the population development characteristics of rice crop cultivated both on aerobic and waterlogged soil conditions. The results showed that the whole growth duration of rice growing on aerobic soil was one week longer than that on waterlogged soil. Shorter and narrower leaves and smaller LAI of rice population were found on aerobic soil than on waterlogged soil, which resulted in a decreased photosynthesis, smaller amount and lighter weight of rice grains on aerobic soil, compared with those on waterlogged soil. Among the aerobic treatments, more tillers, lower percentage of filled grains and shorter duration of grain forming were found on soils covered with plastic film than on soils covered with semi-decomposed straw or without mulching. The rice grain yield was decreased in the order of waterlogged soil > aerobic soil covered with plastic film > aerobic soil covered with semi-decomposed straw > aerobic soil without mulching.

  7. Toxic and inhibitory effects of trichloroethylene aerobic co-metabolism on phenol-grown aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Tay, JooHwa

    2015-04-01

    Aerobic granule, a form of microbial aggregate, exhibits good potential in degrading toxic and recalcitrant substances. In this study, the inhibitory and toxic effects of trichloroethylene (TCE), a model compound for aerobic co-metabolism, on phenol-grown aerobic granules were systematically studied, using respiratory activities after exposure to TCE as indicators. High TCE concentration did not exert positive or negative effects on the subsequent endogenous respiration rate or phenol dependent specific oxygen utilization rate (SOUR), indicating the absence of solvent stress and induction effect on phenol-hydroxylase. Phenol-grown aerobic granules exhibited a unique response to TCE transformation product toxicity, that small amount of TCE transformation enhanced the subsequent phenol SOUR. Granules that had transformed between 1.3 and 3.7 mg TCE gSS(-1) showed at most 53% increase in the subsequent phenol SOUR, and only when the transformation exceeded 6.6 mg TCE gSS(-1) did the SOUR dropped below that of the control. This enhancing effect was found to sustain throughout several phenol dosages, and TCE transformation below the toxicity threshold also lessened the granules' sensitivity to higher phenol concentration. The unique toxic effect was possibly caused by the granule's compact structure as a protection barrier against the diffusive transformation product(s) of TCE co-metabolism.

  8. Differential sensitivity of aerobic gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms to 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) leads to dissimilar growth and TNT transformation: Results of soil and pure culture studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, M.E.; Manning, J.F. Jr.

    1996-07-30

    The effects of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) on indigenous soil populations and pure bacterial cultures were examined. The number of colony-forming units (CFU) appearing when TNT-contaminated soil was spread on 0.3% molasses plates decreased by 50% when the agar was amended with 67 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1}, whereas a 99% reduction was observed when uncontaminated soil was plated. Furthermore, TNT-contaminated soil harbored a greater number of organisms able to grow on plates amended with greater than 10 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1}. The percentage of gram-positive isolates was markedly less in TNT-contaminated soil (7%; 2 of 30) than in uncontaminated soil (61%; 20 of 33). Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas corrugate, Pseudomonasfluorescens and Alcaligenes xylosoxidans made up the majority of the gram-negative isolates from TNT-contaminated soil. Gram-positive isolates from both soils demonstrated marked growth inhibition when greater than 8-16 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1} was present in the culture media. Most pure cultures of known aerobic gram-negative organisms readily degraded TNT and evidenced net consumption of reduced metabolites. However, pure cultures of aerobic gram-positive bacteria were sensitive to relatively low concentrations of TNT as indicated by the 50% reduction in growth and TNT transformation which was observed at approximately 10 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1}. Most non-sporeforming gram-positive organisms incubated in molasses media amended with 80 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1} or greater became unculturable, whereas all strains tested remained culturable when incubated in mineral media amended with 98 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1}, indicating that TNT sensitivity is likely linked to cell growth. These results indicate that gram-negative organisms are most likely responsible for any TNT transformation in contaminated soil, due to their relative insensitivity to high TNT concentrations and their ability to transform TNT.

  9. Thermosensitive respiratory deficiency in yeast associated with specific effects on particulate cytochrome oxidase.

    PubMed

    Bex, F; Sels, A A

    1977-01-01

    A mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, unable to grow at the expense of non fermentable carbon sources at 37 degrees C, has been selected; at 25 degrees C the mutant strain behaves like the parental wild strain. Evaluations of respiration rates during aerobic growth at restrictive temperature on one hand, enzymatic and/or spectral evaluations of the individual components of the respiratory chain on the other hand show that the respiratory deficiency is specifically correlated with a reduced level of cytochrome oxidase. The decrease of enzyme activity is the direct consequence of a lowering of hemoprotein (a,a3) concentration. Temperature-activity relationship of cytochrome oxidase elaborated at the permissive temperature by the mutant strain is modified as far as the particulate enzyme is concerned, but no difference is observed after partial solubilization of the enzyme by non ionic surfactant. Genetic analysis shows that the mutant phenotype results from a nuclear gene mutation.

  10. Sweat Rates During Continuous and Interval Aerobic Exercise: Implications for NASA Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Jeffrey W.; Scott, Jessica; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic deconditioning is one of the effects spaceflight. Impaired crewmember performance due to loss of aerobic conditioning is one of the risks identified for mitigation by the NASA Human Research Program. Missions longer than 8 days will involve exercise countermeasures including those aimed at preventing the loss of aerobic capacity. The NASA Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) will be NASA's centerpiece architecture for human space exploration beyond low Earth orbit. Aerobic exercise within the small habitable volume of the MPCV is expected to challenge the ability of the environmental control systems, especially in terms of moisture control. Exercising humans contribute moisture to the environment by increased respiratory rate (exhaling air at 100% humidity) and sweat. Current acceptable values are based on theoretical models that rely on an "average" crew member working continuously at 75% of their aerobic capacity (Human Systems Integration Requirements Document). Evidence suggests that high intensity interval exercise for much shorter durations are equally effective or better in building and maintaining aerobic capacity. This investigation will examine sweat and respiratory rates for operationally relevant continuous and interval aerobic exercise protocols using a variety of different individuals. The results will directly inform what types of aerobic exercise countermeasures will be feasible to prescribe for crewmembers aboard the MPCV.

  11. Evaluation of Enhanced Condensational Growth (ECG) for Controlled Respiratory Drug Delivery in a Mouth-Throat and Upper Tracheobronchial Model

    PubMed Central

    Hindle, Michael; Longest, P. Worth

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of enhanced condensational growth (ECG), as a novel inhalation drug delivery method, on nano-aerosol deposition in a mouth-throat (MT) and upper tracheobronchial (TB) model using in vitro experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Methods Separate streams of nebulized nano-aerosols and saturated humidified air (39°C—ECG; 25°C—control) were combined as they were introduced into a realistic MT-TB geometry. Aerosol deposition was determined in the MT, generations G0–G2 (trachea—lobar bronchi) and G3–G5 and compared to CFD simulations. Results Using ECG conditions, deposition of 560 and 900 nm aerosols was low in the MT region of the MT-TB model. Aerosol drug deposition in the G0–G2 and G3–G5 regions increased due to enhanced condensational growth compared to control. CFD-predicted depositions were generally in good agreement with the experimental values. Conclusions The ECG platform appears to offer an effective method of delivering nano-aerosols through the extrathoracic region, with minimal deposition, to the tracheobronchial airways and beyond. Aerosol deposition is then facilitated as enhanced condensational growth increases particle size. Future studies will investigate the effects of physio-chemical drug properties and realistic inhalation profiles on ECG growth characteristics. PMID:20454837

  12. Mutations to PB2 and NP Proteins of an Avian Influenza Virus Combine To Confer Efficient Growth in Primary Human Respiratory Cells

    PubMed Central

    Danzy, Shamika; Studdard, Lydia R.; Manicassamy, Balaji; Solorzano, Alicia; Marshall, Nicolle; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Steel, John

    2014-01-01

    mutation rate that supports their zoonotic potential. Understanding of the adaptation of avian viruses to mammals strengthens public health efforts aimed at controlling influenza. In particular, it is critical to know how readily and through mutation to which functional components avian influenza viruses gain the ability to grow efficiently in humans. Our data show that as few as three mutations, in the PB2 and NP proteins, support robust growth of a low-pathogenic, H1N1 duck isolate in primary human respiratory cells. PMID:25210184

  13. Controlling Legionella and Pseudomonas aeruginosa re-growth in therapeutic spas: implementation of physical disinfection treatments, including UV/ultrafiltration, in a respiratory hydrotherapy system.

    PubMed

    Leoni, E; Sanna, T; Zanetti, F; Dallolio, L

    2015-12-01

    The study aimed to assess the efficacy of an integrated water safety plan (WSP) in controlling Legionella re-growth in a respiratory hydrotherapy system located in a spa centre, supplied with sulphurous water, which was initially colonized by Legionella pneumophila. Heterotrophic plate counts, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella spp. were detected in water samples taken 6-monthly from the hydrotherapy equipment (main circuit, entry to benches, final outlets). On the basis of the results obtained by the continuous monitoring and the changes in conditions, the original WSP, including physical treatments of water and waterlines, environmental surveillance and microbiological monitoring, was integrated introducing a UV/ultrafiltration system. The integrated treatment applied to the sulphurous water (microfiltration/UV irradiation/ultrafiltration), waterlines (superheated stream) and distal outlets (descaling/disinfection of nebulizers and nasal irrigators), ensured the removal of Legionella spp. and P. aeruginosa and a satisfactory microbiological quality over time. The environmental surveillance was successful in evaluating the hazard and identifying the most suitable preventive strategies to avoid Legionella re-growth. Ultrafiltration is a technology to take into account in the control of microbial contamination of therapeutic spas, since it does not modify the chemical composition of the water, thus allowing it to retain its therapeutic properties. PMID:26608761

  14. Controlling Legionella and Pseudomonas aeruginosa re-growth in therapeutic spas: implementation of physical disinfection treatments, including UV/ultrafiltration, in a respiratory hydrotherapy system.

    PubMed

    Leoni, E; Sanna, T; Zanetti, F; Dallolio, L

    2015-12-01

    The study aimed to assess the efficacy of an integrated water safety plan (WSP) in controlling Legionella re-growth in a respiratory hydrotherapy system located in a spa centre, supplied with sulphurous water, which was initially colonized by Legionella pneumophila. Heterotrophic plate counts, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella spp. were detected in water samples taken 6-monthly from the hydrotherapy equipment (main circuit, entry to benches, final outlets). On the basis of the results obtained by the continuous monitoring and the changes in conditions, the original WSP, including physical treatments of water and waterlines, environmental surveillance and microbiological monitoring, was integrated introducing a UV/ultrafiltration system. The integrated treatment applied to the sulphurous water (microfiltration/UV irradiation/ultrafiltration), waterlines (superheated stream) and distal outlets (descaling/disinfection of nebulizers and nasal irrigators), ensured the removal of Legionella spp. and P. aeruginosa and a satisfactory microbiological quality over time. The environmental surveillance was successful in evaluating the hazard and identifying the most suitable preventive strategies to avoid Legionella re-growth. Ultrafiltration is a technology to take into account in the control of microbial contamination of therapeutic spas, since it does not modify the chemical composition of the water, thus allowing it to retain its therapeutic properties.

  15. Characteristics of aerobic granulation at mesophilic temperatures in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fenghao; Park, Seyong; Kim, Moonil

    2014-01-01

    Compact and structurally stable aerobic granules were developed in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) at mesophilic temperatures (35°C). The morphological, biological and chemical characteristics of the aerobic granulation were investigated and a theoretical granulation mechanism was proposed according to the results of the investigation. The mature aerobic granules had compact structure, small size (mean diameter of 0.24 mm), excellent settleability and diverse microbial structures, and were effective for the removal of organics and nitrification. The growth kinetics demonstrated that the biomass growth depended on coexistence and interactions between heterotrophs and autotrophs in the granules. The functions of heterotrophs and autotrophs created a compact and secure layer on the outside of the granules, protecting the inside sludge containing environmentally sensitive and slow growing microorganisms. The mechanism and the reactor performance may promise feasibility and efficiency for treating industry effluents at mesophilic temperatures using aerobic granulation. PMID:24211486

  16. [Effect of oxygen on the growth, respiratory rate and morphology of Candida utilis cells in periodic and continuous cultures].

    PubMed

    Vorob'eva, G S; Filonenko, N N

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study how the concentration of oxygen dissolved in the cultural broth influenced the respiration and morphology of the yeast Candida utilis in batch and continuous cultures. Highly effective respiration was registered in cells growing for a certain period of time at low oxygen concentrations limiting the growth; the respiration was characterized by low values of the Michaelis constant kc and the critical concentration of dissolved oxygen Ccr. When passing from the low oxygen concentration to a high one, the character of cellular respiration changed abruptly in the cells whose growth was limited with oxygen for a long time. The morphology of the culture limited with oxygen was characterized by an increase in the percentage of elongated forms in the population. The respiration of the cells cultivated at high oxygen concentrations, when their growth was either non-limited or limited by glucose, was distinguished by high Ccr values and slow respiration rates at small oxygen concentrations while the dependence of the respiration rate on the concentration of oxygen had an about S-shaped character.

  17. Respiratory acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... obesity, which restricts how much the lungs can expand Obstructive sleep apnea Chronic respiratory acidosis occurs over ... Tests that may be done include: Arterial blood gas , which measures oxygen and carbon dioxide levels in ...

  18. Cellular hallmarks reveal restricted aerobic metabolism at thermal limits

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Aitana; Busso, Coralie; Gönczy, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    All organisms live within a given thermal range, but little is known about the mechanisms setting the limits of this range. We uncovered cellular features exhibiting signature changes at thermal limits in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. These included changes in embryo size and shape, which were also observed in Caenorhabditis briggsae, indicating evolutionary conservation. We hypothesized that such changes could reflect restricted aerobic capacity at thermal limits. Accordingly, we uncovered that relative respiration in C. elegans embryos decreases at the thermal limits as compared to within the thermal range. Furthermore, by compromising components of the respiratory chain, we demonstrated that the reliance on aerobic metabolism is reduced at thermal limits. Moreover, embryos thus compromised exhibited signature changes in size and shape already within the thermal range. We conclude that restricted aerobic metabolism at the thermal limits contributes to setting the thermal range in a metazoan organism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04810.001 PMID:25929283

  19. Cellular hallmarks reveal restricted aerobic metabolism at thermal limits.

    PubMed

    Neves, Aitana; Busso, Coralie; Gönczy, Pierre

    2015-05-01

    All organisms live within a given thermal range, but little is known about the mechanisms setting the limits of this range. We uncovered cellular features exhibiting signature changes at thermal limits in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. These included changes in embryo size and shape, which were also observed in Caenorhabditis briggsae, indicating evolutionary conservation. We hypothesized that such changes could reflect restricted aerobic capacity at thermal limits. Accordingly, we uncovered that relative respiration in C. elegans embryos decreases at the thermal limits as compared to within the thermal range. Furthermore, by compromising components of the respiratory chain, we demonstrated that the reliance on aerobic metabolism is reduced at thermal limits. Moreover, embryos thus compromised exhibited signature changes in size and shape already within the thermal range. We conclude that restricted aerobic metabolism at the thermal limits contributes to setting the thermal range in a metazoan organism.

  20. Tumor suppressor WWOX moderates the mitochondrial respiratory complex.

    PubMed

    Choo, Amanda; O'Keefe, Louise V; Lee, Cheng Shoou; Gregory, Stephen L; Shaukat, Zeeshan; Colella, Alexander; Lee, Kristie; Denton, Donna; Richards, Robert I

    2015-12-01

    Fragile site FRA16D exhibits DNA instability in cancer, resulting in diminished levels of protein from the WWOX gene that spans it. WWOX suppresses tumor growth by an undefined mechanism. WWOX participates in pathways involving aerobic metabolism and reactive oxygen species. WWOX comprises two WW domains as well as a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase enzyme. Herein is described an in vivo genetic analysis in Drosophila melanogaster to identify functional interactions between WWOX and metabolic pathways. Altered WWOX levels modulate variable cellular outgrowths caused by genetic deficiencies of components of the mitochondrial respiratory complexes. This modulation requires the enzyme active site of WWOX, and the defective respiratory complex-induced cellular outgrowths are mediated by reactive oxygen species, dependent upon the Akt pathway and sensitive to levels of autophagy and hypoxia-inducible factor. WWOX is known to contribute to homeostasis by regulating the balance between oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis. Reduction of WWOX levels results in diminished ability to respond to metabolic perturbation of normal cell growth. Thus, the ability of WWOX to facilitate escape from mitochondrial damage-induced glycolysis (Warburg effect) is, therefore, a plausible mechanism for its tumor suppressor activity.

  1. Response of aerobic rice to Piriformospora indica.

    PubMed

    Das, Joy; Ramesh, K V; Maithri, U; Mutangana, D; Suresh, C K

    2014-03-01

    Rice cultivation under aerobic condition not only saves water but also opens up a splendid scope for effective application of beneficial root symbionts in rice crop unlike conventional puddled rice cultivation where water logged condition acts as constraint for easy proliferation of various beneficial soil microorganisms like arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Keeping these in view, an in silico investigation were carried out to explore the interaction of hydrogen phosphate with phosphate transporter protein (PTP) from P. indica. This was followed by greenhouse investigation to study the response of aerobic rice to Glomusfasciculatum, a conventional P biofertilizer and P. indica, an alternative to AM fungi. Computational studies using ClustalW tool revealed several conserved motifs between the phosphate transporters from Piriformospora indica and 8 other Glomus species. The 3D model of PTP from P. indica resembling "Mayan temple" was successfully docked onto hydrogen phosphate, indicating the affinity of this protein for inorganic phosphorus. Greenhouse studies revealed inoculation of aerobic rice either with P. indica, G. fasciculatum or both significantly enhanced the plant growth, biomass and yield with higher NPK, chlorophyll and sugar compared to uninoculated ones, P. indica inoculated plants being superior. A significantly enhanced activity of acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase were noticed in the rhizosphere soil of rice plants inoculated either with P. indica, G. fasciculatum or both, contributing to higher P uptake. Further, inoculation of aerobic rice plants with P. indica proved to be a better choice as a potential biofertilizer over mycorrhiza. PMID:24669667

  2. The respiratory chain provides salt stress tolerance by maintaining a low NADH/NAD+ ratio in Zymomonas mobilis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takeshi; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Watakabe, Satoshi; Song, Wonjoon; Aikawa, Shizuho; Furukawa, Kensuke

    2015-12-01

    The respiratory chain of ethanol-producing Zymomonas mobilis shows an unusual physiological property in that it is not involved in energy conservation, even though this organism has a complete electron transport system. We reported previously that respiratory-deficient mutants (RDMs) of Z. mobilis exhibit higher growth rates and enhanced ethanol productivity under aerobic and high-temperature conditions. Here, we demonstrated that the salt tolerance of RDM strains was drastically decreased compared with the wild-type strain. We found that the NADH/NAD+ ratio was maintained at low levels in both the wild-type and the RDM strains under non-stress conditions. However, the ratio substantially increased in the RDM strains in response to salt stress. Complementation of the deficient respiratory-chain genes in the RDM strains resulted in a decrease in the NADH/NAD+ ratio and an increase in the growth rate. In contrast, expression of malate dehydrogenase, activity of which increases the supply of NADH, in the RDM strains led to an increased NADH/NAD+ ratio and resulted in poor growth. Taken together, these results suggest that the respiratory chain of Z. mobilis functions to maintain a low NADH/NAD+ ratio when the cells are exposed to environmental stresses, such as salinity. PMID:26432557

  3. Aerobic secondary utilization of a non-growth and inhibitory substrate 2,4,6-trichlorophenol by Sphingopyxis chilensis S37 and sphingopyxis-like strain S32.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Carlos; Godoy, Félix; Becerra, José; Barra, Ricardo; Martínez, Miguel

    2003-08-01

    This paper reports 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (246TCP) degradation by Sphingopyxis chilensis S37 and Sphingopyxis chilensis-like strain S32, which were unable to use 246TCP as the sole carbon and energy source. In R2A broth, the strains degraded 246TCP up to 0.5 mM. Results with mixtures of different 246TCP and glucose concentrations in mineral salt media demonstrated dependence on glucose to allow bacterial growth and degradation of 246TCP. Strain S32 degraded halophenol up to 0.2 mM when 5.33 mM glucose was simultaneously added, while strain S37 degraded the compound up to 0.1 mM when 1.33 mM glucose was added. These 246TCP concentrations were lethal for inocula in absence of glucose. Stoichiometric releases of chloride and analysis by HPLC, GC-ECD and GC-MS indicated 246TCP mineralisation by both strains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of bacteria able to mineralize a chlorophenol as a non-growth and inhibitory substrate. The concept of secondary utilization instead of cometabolism is proposed for this activity. PMID:12948056

  4. Aerobic secondary utilization of a non-growth and inhibitory substrate 2,4,6-trichlorophenol by Sphingopyxis chilensis S37 and sphingopyxis-like strain S32.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Carlos; Godoy, Félix; Becerra, José; Barra, Ricardo; Martínez, Miguel

    2003-08-01

    This paper reports 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (246TCP) degradation by Sphingopyxis chilensis S37 and Sphingopyxis chilensis-like strain S32, which were unable to use 246TCP as the sole carbon and energy source. In R2A broth, the strains degraded 246TCP up to 0.5 mM. Results with mixtures of different 246TCP and glucose concentrations in mineral salt media demonstrated dependence on glucose to allow bacterial growth and degradation of 246TCP. Strain S32 degraded halophenol up to 0.2 mM when 5.33 mM glucose was simultaneously added, while strain S37 degraded the compound up to 0.1 mM when 1.33 mM glucose was added. These 246TCP concentrations were lethal for inocula in absence of glucose. Stoichiometric releases of chloride and analysis by HPLC, GC-ECD and GC-MS indicated 246TCP mineralisation by both strains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of bacteria able to mineralize a chlorophenol as a non-growth and inhibitory substrate. The concept of secondary utilization instead of cometabolism is proposed for this activity.

  5. Characterization of Respiratory Drug Delivery with Enhanced Condensational Growth using an Individual Path Model of the Entire Tracheobronchial Airways

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Geng; Longest, Philip Worth; Su, Guoguang; Hindle, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the delivery of inhaled pharmaceutical aerosols using an enhanced condensational growth (ECG) approach in an airway model extending from the oral cavity to the end of the tracheobronchial (TB) region. The geometry consisted of an elliptical mouth-throat (MT) model, the upper TB airways extending to bifurcation B3, and a subsequent individual path model entering the right lower lobe of the lung. Submicrometer monodisperse aerosols with diameters of 560 and 900 nm were delivered to the mouth inlet under control (25 °C with subsaturated air) or ECG (39 or 42 °C with saturated air) conditions. Flow fields and droplet characteristics were simulated using a computational fluid dynamics model that was previously demonstrated to accurately predict aerosol size growth and deposition. Results indicated that both the control and ECG delivery cases produced very little deposition in the MT and upper TB model (approximately 1%). Under ECG delivery conditions, large size increases of the aerosol droplets were observed resulting in mass median aerodynamic diameters of 2.4–3.3 μm exiting B5. This increase in aerosol size produced an order of magnitude increase in aerosol deposition within the TB airways compared with the controls, with TB deposition efficiencies of approximately 32–46% for ECG conditions. Estimates of downstream pulmonary deposition indicted near full lung retention of the aerosol during ECG delivery. Furthermore, targeting the region of TB deposition by controlling the inlet temperature conditions and initial aerosol size also appeared possible. PMID:21152983

  6. Characterization of respiratory drug delivery with enhanced condensational growth using an individual path model of the entire tracheobronchial airways.

    PubMed

    Tian, Geng; Longest, Philip Worth; Su, Guoguang; Hindle, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the delivery of inhaled pharmaceutical aerosols using an enhanced condensational growth (ECG) approach in an airway model extending from the oral cavity to the end of the tracheobronchial (TB) region. The geometry consisted of an elliptical mouth-throat (MT) model, the upper TB airways extending to bifurcation B3, and a subsequent individual path model entering the right lower lobe of the lung. Submicrometer monodisperse aerosols with diameters of 560 and 900 nm were delivered to the mouth inlet under control (25 °C with subsaturated air) or ECG (39 or 42 °C with saturated air) conditions. Flow fields and droplet characteristics were simulated using a computational fluid dynamics model that was previously demonstrated to accurately predict aerosol size growth and deposition. Results indicated that both the control and ECG delivery cases produced very little deposition in the MT and upper TB model (approximately 1%). Under ECG delivery conditions, large size increases of the aerosol droplets were observed resulting in mass median aerodynamic diameters of 2.4-3.3 μm exiting B5. This increase in aerosol size produced an order of magnitude increase in aerosol deposition within the TB airways compared with the controls, with TB deposition efficiencies of approximately 32-46% for ECG conditions. Estimates of downstream pulmonary deposition indicted near full lung retention of the aerosol during ECG delivery. Furthermore, targeting the region of TB deposition by controlling the inlet temperature conditions and initial aerosol size also appeared possible. PMID:21152983

  7. Effects of AOX1a deficiency on plant growth, gene expression of respiratory components and metabolic profile under low-nitrogen stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Chihiro K; Hachiya, Takushi; Takahara, Kentaro; Kawai-Yamada, Maki; Uchimiya, Hirofumi; Uesono, Yukifumi; Terashima, Ichiro; Noguchi, Ko

    2010-05-01

    Expression of alternative oxidase (AOX) and cyanide (CN)-resistant respiration are often highly enhanced in plants exposed to low-nitrogen (N) stress. Here, we examined the effects of AOX deficiency on plant growth, gene expression of respiratory components and metabolic profiles under low-N stress, using an aox1a knockout transgenic line (aox1a) of Arabidopsis thaliana. We exposed wild-type (WT) and aox1a plants to low-N stress for 7 d and analyzed their shoots and roots. In WT plants, the AOX1a mRNA levels and AOX capacity increased in proportion to low-N stress. Expression of the genes of the components for non-phosphorylating pathways and antioxidant enzymes was enhanced, but differences between WT and aox1a plants were small. Metabolome analyses revealed that AOX deficiency altered the levels of certain metabolites, such as sugars and sugar phosphates, in the shoots under low-N stress. However, the carbon (C)/N ratios and carbohydrate levels in aox1a plants were similar to those in the WT under low-N stress. Our results indicated that the N-limited stress induced AOX expression in A. thaliana plants, but the induced AOX may not play essential roles under stress due to low-N alone, and the C/N balance under low-N stress may be tightly regulated by systems other than AOX.

  8. Effect of vaccination with a modified live porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus vaccine on growth performance in fattening pigs under field conditions

    PubMed Central

    LYOO, Kwang-Soo; CHOI, Jong-Young; HAHN, Tae-Wook; PARK, Kun Taek; KIM, Hye Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has caused significant economic losses to the global swine industry. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a commercial PRRSV modified live virus (MLV) vaccine in conventionally reared growing/finishing pigs. Four barns were designated for groups A, B, C and D in the growing-to-finishing site. All pigs of the A barn were vaccinated with a commercial PRRSV MLV vaccine, whereas pigs of the B, C or D barn as control groups were unvaccinated. Twenty pigs randomly selected and tagged from each barn were serially bled at 0, 20, 40 and 60 day-post-vaccination, and tested for serological response with a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Body weights were measured to calculate the average-daily-weight gain (ADG). Serological assays indicated that the seropositivity of the PRRSV-vaccinated group was higher than that of the unvaccinated groups at 40 day-post-vaccination. ADG of group A was significantly higher than that of groups B and C, and the mean weights of groups A, B, C and D were 0.82 ± 0.017, 0.76 ± 0.016, 0.74 ± 0.019 and 0.81 ± 0.018 kg, respectively. In conclusion, the present study reports the serological responses and growth performance parameters by the PRRSV MLV vaccine in growing/finishing pigs under field conditions. PMID:27264966

  9. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    DOEpatents

    Hudgins, Mark P; Bessette, Bernard J; March, John C; McComb, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention includes a system of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  10. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    DOEpatents

    Hudgins, Mark P; Bessette, Bernard J; March, John; McComb, Scott T.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  11. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, M.P.; Bessette, B.J.; March, J.; McComb, S.T.

    2000-02-15

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120 F and 140 F in steady state.

  12. Aerobic microbial mineralization of dichloroethene as sole carbon substrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2000-01-01

    Microorganisms indigenous to the bed sediments of a black- water stream utilized 1,2-dichloroethene (1,2-DCE) as a sole carbon substrate for aerobic metabolism. Although no evidence of growth was observed in the minimal salts culture media used in this study, efficient aerobic microbial mineralization of 1,2-DCE as sole carbon substrate was maintained through three sequential transfers (107 final dilution) of the original environmental innoculum. These results indicate that 1,2-DCE can be utilized as a primary substrate to support microbial metabolism under aerobic conditions.Microorganisms indigenous to the bed sediments of a black-water stream utilized 1,2-dichloroethene (1,2-DCE) as a sole carbon substrate for aerobic metabolism. Although no evidence of growth was observed in the minimal salts culture media used in this study, efficient aerobic microbial mineralization of 1,2-DCE as sole carbon substrate was maintained through three sequential transfers (107 final dilution) of the original environmental innoculum. These results indicate that 1,2-DCE can be utilized as a primary substrate to support microbial metabolism under aerobic conditions.

  13. Enhanced aerobic nitrifying granulation by static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Hua; Diao, Mu-He; Yang, Ying; Shi, Yi-Jing; Gao, Ming-Ming; Wang, Shu-Guang

    2012-04-01

    One of the main challenging issues for aerobic nitrifying granules in treating high strength ammonia wastewater is the long granulation time required for activated sludge to transform into aerobic granules. The present study provides a novel strategy for enhancing aerobic nitrifying granulation by applying an intensity of 48.0mT static magnetic field. The element analysis showed that the applied magnetic field could promote the accumulation of iron compounds in the sludge. And then the aggregation of iron decreased the full granulation time from 41 to 25days by enhancing the setting properties of granules and stimulating the secretion of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Long-term, cycle experiments and fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) analysis proved that an intensity of 48.0mT magnetic field could enhance the activities and growth of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). These findings suggest that magnetic field is helpful and reliable for accelerating the aerobic nitrifying granulation.

  14. Low-Impact Aerobics: Better than Traditional Aerobic Dance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koszuta, Laurie Einstein

    1986-01-01

    A form of dance exercise called low-impact aerobics is being touted as a misery-free form of aerobic dance. Because this activity is relatively new, the exact kinds and frequencies of injuries are not known and the fitness benefits have not been examined. (MT)

  15. Aerobic exercise attenuates pulmonary inflammation induced by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Olivo, Clarice R; Miyaji, Eliane N; Oliveira, Maria Leonor S; Almeida, Francine M; Lourenço, Juliana D; Abreu, Rodrigo M; Arantes, Petra M M; Lopes, Fernanda Dtqs; Martins, Milton A

    2014-11-01

    Aerobic exercise has been recognized as a stimulator of the immune system, but its effect on bacterial infection has not been extensively evaluated. We studied whether moderate aerobic exercise training prior to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection influences pulmonary inflammatory responses. BALB/c mice were divided into four groups: Sedentary Untreated (sedentary without infection); Sedentary Infected (sedentary with infection); Trained Untreated (aerobic training without infection); and Trained Infected (aerobic training with infection). Animals underwent aerobic training for 4 wk, and 72 h after last exercise training, animals received a challenge with S. pneumoniae and were evaluated either 12 h or 10 days after instillation. In acute phase, Sedentary Infected group had an increase in respiratory system resistance and elastance; number of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL); polymorphonuclear cells in lung parenchyma; and levels of keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin (IL)-1β (IL-1β) in lung homogenates. Exercise training significantly attenuated the increase in all of these parameters and induced an increase in expression of antioxidant enzymes (CuZnSOD and MnSOD) in lungs. Trained Infected mice had a significant decrease in the number of colony-forming units of pneumococci in the lungs compared with Sedentary Infected animals. Ten days after infection, Trained Infected group exhibited lower numbers of macrophages in BAL, polymorphonuclear cells in lung parenchyma and IL-6 in lung homogenates compared with Sedentary Infected group. Our results suggest a protective effect of moderate exercise training against respiratory infection with S. pneumoniae. This effect is most likely secondary to an effect of exercise on oxidant-antioxidant balance.

  16. Respiratory Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Living > Living With Lung Disease > Respiratory Home Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources Immunizations Pollution Nutrition ... Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at home can contribute to improved ...

  17. Aerobic Fitness and School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkle, J. Scott

    1997-01-01

    Provides school counselors with information on aerobic exercise (specifically running) and the psychological, behavioral, and physical benefits children obtained by participating in fitness programs. Recommends collaboration between school counselors and physical education teachers and gives a preliminary discussion of aerobic running and its…

  18. Aerobic Fitness and School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkle, J. Scott

    1992-01-01

    Provides school counselors with information regarding aerobic exercise (specifically running), and the psychological, behavioral, and physical benefits children obtain by participating in fitness programs. Presents methods of collaboration between school counselors and physical education teachers. Offers preliminary discussion of aerobic running…

  19. Exercise, Animal Aerobics, and Interpretation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Valerie

    1996-01-01

    Describes an aerobic activity set to music for children that mimics animal movements. Example exercises include walking like a penguin or jumping like a cricket. Stresses basic aerobic principles and designing the program at the level of children's motor skills. Benefits include reaching people who normally don't visit nature centers, and bridging…

  20. The cytochrome bd-I respiratory oxidase augments survival of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli during infection

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Mark; Achard, Maud E. S.; Idris, Adi; Totsika, Makrina; Phan, Minh-Duy; Peters, Kate M.; Sarkar, Sohinee; Ribeiro, Cláudia A.; Holyoake, Louise V.; Ladakis, Dimitrios; Ulett, Glen C.; Sweet, Matthew J.; Poole, Robert K.; McEwan, Alastair G.; Schembri, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a toxic free radical produced by neutrophils and macrophages in response to infection. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) induces a variety of defence mechanisms in response to NO, including direct NO detoxification (Hmp, NorVW, NrfA), iron-sulphur cluster repair (YtfE), and the expression of the NO-tolerant cytochrome bd-I respiratory oxidase (CydAB). The current study quantifies the relative contribution of these systems to UPEC growth and survival during infection. Loss of the flavohemoglobin Hmp and cytochrome bd-I elicit the greatest sensitivity to NO-mediated growth inhibition, whereas all but the periplasmic nitrite reductase NrfA provide protection against neutrophil killing and promote survival within activated macrophages. Intriguingly, the cytochrome bd-I respiratory oxidase was the only system that augmented UPEC survival in a mouse model after 2 days, suggesting that maintaining aerobic respiration under conditions of nitrosative stress is a key factor for host colonisation. These findings suggest that while UPEC have acquired a host of specialized mechanisms to evade nitrosative stresses, the cytochrome bd-I respiratory oxidase is the main contributor to NO tolerance and host colonisation under microaerobic conditions. This respiratory complex is therefore of major importance for the accumulation of high bacterial loads during infection of the urinary tract. PMID:27767067

  1. The aerobic activity of metronidazole against anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dione, Niokhor; Khelaifia, Saber; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Raoult, Didier

    2015-05-01

    Recently, the aerobic growth of strictly anaerobic bacteria was demonstrated using antioxidants. Metronidazole is frequently used to treat infections caused by anaerobic bacteria; however, to date its antibacterial activity was only tested in anaerobic conditions. Here we aerobically tested using antioxidants the in vitro activities of metronidazole, gentamicin, doxycycline and imipenem against 10 common anaerobic and aerobic bacteria. In vitro susceptibility testing was performed by the disk diffusion method, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by Etest. Aerobic culture of the bacteria was performed at 37°C using Schaedler agar medium supplemented with 1mg/mL ascorbic acid and 0.1mg/mL glutathione; the pH was adjusted to 7.2 by 10M KOH. Growth of anaerobic bacteria cultured aerobically using antioxidants was inhibited by metronidazole after 72h of incubation at 37°C, with a mean inhibition diameter of 37.76mm and an MIC of 1μg/mL; however, strains remained non-sensitive to gentamicin. No growth inhibition of aerobic bacteria was observed after 24h of incubation at 37°C with metronidazole; however, inhibition was observed with doxycycline and imipenem used as controls. These results indicate that bacterial sensitivity to metronidazole is not related to the oxygen tension but is a result of the sensitivity of the micro-organism. In future, both culture and antibiotic susceptibility testing of strictly anaerobic bacteria will be performed in an aerobic atmosphere using antioxidants in clinical microbiology laboratories.

  2. Sweat Rates During Continuous and Interval Aerobic Exercise: Implications for NASA Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Jeffrey W.; Scott, Jessica; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic deconditioning is one of the effects spaceflight. Impaired crewmember performance due to loss of aerobic conditioning is one of the risks identified for mitigation by the NASA Human Research Program. Missions longer than 8 days will involve exercise countermeasures including those aimed at preventing the loss of aerobic capacity. The NASA Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) will be NASA's centerpiece architecture for human space exploration beyond low Earth orbit. Aerobic exercise within the small habitable volume of the MPCV is expected to challenge the ability of the Air Revitalization System, especially in terms of moisture and temperature control. Exercising humans contribute moisture to the environment by increased respiratory rate (exhaling air saturated with moisture) and sweat. Current acceptable values are based on theoretical models that rely on an "average" crew member working continuously at 75% of their aerobic capacity (Human Systems Integration Requirements Document). Evidence suggests that high intensity interval exercise for much shorter durations are equally effective or better in building and maintaining aerobic capacity. This investigation will examine metabolic moisture and heat production for operationally relevant continuous and interval aerobic exercise protocols. The results will directly inform what types of aerobic exercise countermeasures will be feasible to prescribe for crewmembers aboard the MPCV.

  3. [Heterotrophic Nitrification and Aerobic Denitrification of the Hypothermia Aerobic Denitrification Bacterium: Arthrobacter arilaitensis].

    PubMed

    He, Teng-xia; Ni, Jiu-pai; Li, Zhen-lun; Sun, Quan; Ye Qing; Xu, Yi

    2016-03-15

    High concentrations of ammonium, nitrate and nitrite nitrogen were employed to clarify the abilities of heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification of Arthrobacter arilaitensis strain Y-10. Meanwhile, by means of inoculating the strain suspension into the mixed ammonium and nitrate, ammonium and nitrite nitrogen simulated wastewater, we studied the simultaneous nitrification and denitrification ability of Arthrobacter arilaitensis strain Y-10. In addition, cell optical density was assayed in each nitrogen removal process to analyze the relationship of cell growth and nitrogen removal efficiency. The results showed that the hypothermia denitrification strain Arthrobacter arilaitensis Y-10 exhibited high nitrogen removal efficiency during heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification. The ammonium, nitrate and nitrite removal rates were 65.0%, 100% and 61.2% respectively when strain Y-10 was cultivated for 4 d at 15°C with initial ammonium, nitrate and nitrite nitrogen concentrations of 208.43 mg · L⁻¹, 201.16 mg · L⁻¹ and 194.33 mg · L⁻¹ and initial pH of 7.2. Nitrite nitrogen could only be accumulated in the medium containing nitrate nitrogen during heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification process. Additionally, the ammonium nitrogen was mainly removed in the inorganic nitrogen mixed synthetic wastewater. In short, Arthrobacter arilaitensis Y-10 could conduct nitrification and denitrification effectively under aerobic condition and the ammonium nitrogen removal rate was more than 80.0% in the inorganic nitrogen mixed synthetic wastewater. PMID:27337904

  4. Respiratory Distress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The University of Miami School of Medicine asked the Research Triangle Institute for assistance in improvising the negative pressure technique to relieve respiratory distress in infants. Marshall Space Flight Center and Johnson Space Center engineers adapted this idea to the lower-body negative-pressure system seals used during the Skylab missions. Some 20,000 babies succumb to respiratory distress in the U.S. each year, a condition in which lungs progressively lose their ability to oxygenate blood. Both positive and negative pressure techniques have been used - the first to force air into lungs, the second to keep infant's lungs expanded. Negative pressure around chest helps the baby expand his lungs and maintain proper volume of air. If doctors can keep the infant alive for four days, the missing substance in the lungs will usually form in sufficient quantity to permit normal breathing. The Skylab chamber and its leakproof seals were adapted for medical use.

  5. Virus growth and antibody responses following respiratory tract infection of ferrets and mice with WT and P/V mutants of the paramyxovirus Simian Virus 5

    PubMed Central

    Capraro, Gerald A.; Johnson, John B.; Kock, Nancy D.; Parks, Griffith D.

    2008-01-01

    P/V gene substitutions convert the non-cytopathic paramyxovirus Simian Virus 5 (SV5), which is a poor inducer of host cell responses in human tissue culture cells, into a mutant (P/V-CPI–) that induces high levels of apoptosis, interferon (IFN)-beta, and proinflammatory cytokines. However, the effect of SV5-P/V gene mutations on virus growth and adaptive immune responses in animals has not been determined. Here, we used two distinct animal model systems to test the hypothesis that SV5-P/V mutants which are more potent activators of innate responses in tissue culture will also elicit higher antiviral antibody responses. In mouse cells, in vitro studies identified a panel of SV5-P/V mutants that ranged in their ability to limit IFN responses. Intranasal infection of mice with these WT and P/V mutant viruses elicited equivalent anti-SV5 IgG responses at all doses tested, and viral titers recovered from the respiratory tract were indistinguishable. In primary cultures of ferret lung fibroblasts, WT rSV5 and P/V-CPI– viruses had phenotypes similar to those established in human cell lines, including differential induction of IFN secretion, IFN signaling and apoptosis. Intranasal infection of ferrets with a low dose of WT rSV5 elicited ~500 fold higher anti-SV5 serum IgG responses compared to the P/V-CPI– mutant, and this correlated with overall higher viral titers for the WT virus in tracheal tissues. There was a dose-dependent increase in antibody response to infection of ferrets with P/V-CPI–, but not with WT rSV5. Together our data indicate that WT rSV5 and P/V mutants can elicit distinct innate and adaptive immunity phenotypes in the ferret animal model system, but not in the mouse system. We present a model for the effect of P/V gene substitutions on SV5 growth and immune responses in vivo. PMID:18456301

  6. Increased Acid Stability of the Hemagglutinin Protein Enhances H5N1 Influenza Virus Growth in the Upper Respiratory Tract but Is Insufficient for Transmission in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Zaraket, Hassan; Bridges, Olga A.; Duan, Susu; Baranovich, Tatiana; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Reed, Mark L.; Salomon, Rachelle; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus entry is mediated by the acidic-pH-induced activation of hemagglutinin (HA) protein. Here, we investigated how a decrease in the HA activation pH (an increase in acid stability) influences the properties of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus in mammalian hosts. We generated isogenic A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1) (VN1203) viruses containing either wild-type HA protein (activation pH 6.0) or an HA2-K58I point mutation (K to I at position 58) (activation pH 5.5). The VN1203-HA2-K58I virus had replication kinetics similar to those of wild-type VN1203 in MDCK and normal human bronchial epithelial cells and yet had reduced growth in human alveolar A549 cells, which were found to have a higher endosomal pH than MDCK cells. Wild-type and HA2-K58I viruses promoted similar levels of morbidity and mortality in C57BL/6J mice and ferrets, and neither virus transmitted efficiently to naive contact cage-mate ferrets. The acid-stabilizing HA2-K58I mutation, which diminishes H5N1 replication and transmission in ducks, increased the virus load in the ferret nasal cavity early during infection while simultaneously reducing the virus load in the lungs. Overall, a single, acid-stabilizing mutation was found to enhance the growth of an H5N1 influenza virus in the mammalian upper respiratory tract, and yet it was insufficient to enable contact transmission in ferrets in the absence of additional mutations that confer α(2,6) receptor binding specificity and remove a critical N-linked glycosylation site. The information provided here on the contribution of HA acid stability to H5N1 influenza virus fitness and transmissibility in mammals in the background of a non-laboratory-adapted virus provides essential information for the surveillance and assessment of the pandemic potential of currently circulating H5N1 viruses. PMID:23824818

  7. Characterization of aerobic ethanol productions in a computerized auxostat

    SciTech Connect

    Fraleigh, S.P.

    1989-01-01

    For many valuable bioproducts high productivity is associated with rapid growth. However, most continuous microbial cultures become unstable when the dilution rate is fixed near the value for maximum growth rate. The auxostat culture technique employs feedback control of a nutrient or metabolite to stabilize the biomass at its maximum potential growth rate. An auxostat device is therefore ideal for study of bioprocesses involving the overproduction of primary metabolites such as ethanol. Oxidoreductive transformations involving ethanol are utilized by Saccharomyces yeasts when normal respiration cannot satisfy energy needs. When rapid growth or other stress creates oxidoreductive conditions in aerobic Saccharomyces cultures, very high specific ethanol formation rates are established and biomass yield drops to levels more typical of anaerobic fermentation. Although the physiology is favorable, the potential for large-scale aerobic ethanol processes to compete with traditional anaerobic fermentations has not previously been assessed. In this study, a fully computerized auxostat device was constructed and used to characterize the specific and volumetric aerobic ethanol productivity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To divert substrate away from biomass and into product formation, aerobic cultures were stressed with variations of ionic balance (via extreme K{sup +} and H{sup +} setpoints) in the auxostat device. During growth with limiting K{sup +} concentrations, the goal of very low biomass yield was attained but the rate of ethanol production was poor. However, with excess K{sup +} the volumetric productivity reached 6.1 g/I,-h, a value that is comparable to optimized, continuous anaerobic cultures.

  8. Aerobic and anaerobic cellulase production by Cellulomonas uda.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Henrik Vestergaard; Willink, Fillip Wolfgang; Ingvorsen, Kjeld

    2016-10-01

    Cellulomonas uda (DSM 20108/ATCC 21399) is one of the few described cellulolytic facultative anaerobes. Based on these characteristics, we initiated a physiological study of C. uda with the aim to exploit it for cellulase production in simple bioreactors with no or sporadic aeration. Growth, cellulase activity and fermentation product formation were evaluated in different media under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and in experiments where C. uda was exposed to alternating aerobic/anaerobic growth conditions. Here we show that C. uda behaves as a true facultative anaerobe when cultivated on soluble substrates such as glucose and cellobiose, but for reasons unknown cellulase activity is only induced under aerobic conditions on insoluble cellulosic substrates and not under anaerobic conditions. These findings enhance knowledge on the limited number of described facultative cellulolytic anaerobes, and in addition it greatly limits the utility of C. uda as an 'easy to handle' cellulase producer with low aeration demands.

  9. Aerobic and anaerobic cellulase production by Cellulomonas uda.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Henrik Vestergaard; Willink, Fillip Wolfgang; Ingvorsen, Kjeld

    2016-10-01

    Cellulomonas uda (DSM 20108/ATCC 21399) is one of the few described cellulolytic facultative anaerobes. Based on these characteristics, we initiated a physiological study of C. uda with the aim to exploit it for cellulase production in simple bioreactors with no or sporadic aeration. Growth, cellulase activity and fermentation product formation were evaluated in different media under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and in experiments where C. uda was exposed to alternating aerobic/anaerobic growth conditions. Here we show that C. uda behaves as a true facultative anaerobe when cultivated on soluble substrates such as glucose and cellobiose, but for reasons unknown cellulase activity is only induced under aerobic conditions on insoluble cellulosic substrates and not under anaerobic conditions. These findings enhance knowledge on the limited number of described facultative cellulolytic anaerobes, and in addition it greatly limits the utility of C. uda as an 'easy to handle' cellulase producer with low aeration demands. PMID:27154570

  10. The Ability of Instructors to Organize Aerobic Dance Exercise Into Effective Cardiovascular Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claremont, Alan D.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The ability of five aerobics instructors to combine music and exercise movements into effective low, medium, and high levels of cardiovascular intensity was evaluated by measuring respiratory gas exchange and heart rate for twelve subjects. Results underscore the need for instructor training guidelines. (Author/MT)

  11. Quantifying factors limiting aerobic degradation during aerobic bioreactor landfilling.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Ramin; Mostafid, M Erfan; Han, Byunghyun; Imhoff, Paul T; Chiu, Pei; Augenstein, Don; Kayhanian, Masoud; Tchobanoglous, George

    2010-08-15

    A bioreactor landfill cell at Yolo County, California was operated aerobically for six months to quantify the extent of aerobic degradation and mechanisms limiting aerobic activity during air injection and liquid addition. The portion of the solid waste degraded anaerobically was estimated and tracked through time. From an analysis of in situ aerobic respiration and gas tracer data, it was found that a large fraction of the gas-filled pore space was in immobile zones where it was difficult to maintain aerobic conditions, even at relatively moderate landfill cell-average moisture contents of 33-36%. Even with the intentional injection of air, anaerobic activity was never less than 13%, and sometimes exceeded 65%. Analyses of gas tracer and respiration data were used to quantify rates of respiration and rates of mass transfer to immobile gas zones. The similarity of these rates indicated that waste degradation was influenced significantly by rates of oxygen transfer to immobile gas zones, which comprised 32-92% of the gas-filled pore space. Gas tracer tests might be useful for estimating the size of the mobile/immobile gas zones, rates of mass transfer between these regions, and the difficulty of degrading waste aerobically in particular waste bodies. PMID:20704218

  12. Upper limb aerobic training improves aerobic fitness and all-out performance of America's Cup grinders.

    PubMed

    Adami, Paolo Emilio; Delussu, Anna Sofia; Rodio, Angelo; Squeo, Maria Rosaria; Corsi, Loretta; Quattrini, Filippo Maria; Fattorini, Luigi; Bernardi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    This research on "America's Cup" grinders investigated the effects of a specific eight-week long-arm cranking ergometer (ACE) training on upper body (UB) aerobic fitness (ventilatory threshold - Tvent, respiratory compensation point- RCP, -oxygen uptake peak - VO₂peak) and high intensity working capacity. The training consisted of sessions carried out for 20-30 mins, three times per week, at an intensity between the UB-Tvent and UB-RCP, and replaced part of a typical lower limb aerobic training whilst maintaining the usual weekly schedule of callisthenics, resistance training and sailing. Seven sailors, including four grinders and three mastmen (age 30 ± 5.5 years, height 1.9 ± 0.04 m, body mass 102 ± 3.6 kg), were evaluated through both an ACE cardiopulmonary maximal exercise test (CPET) and an ACE all-out up to exhaustion exercise test, before and after the ACE training. UB aerobic fitness improved significantly: UB-VO₂peak increased from 4.29 ± 0.442 to 4.52 ± 0.522 l·min(-1) (6.4 ± 3.66%), VO₂ at UB-Tvent from 2.42 ± 0.282 to 2.97 ± 0.328 l·min(-1) (22.8 ± 5.09%) and VO₂ at UB-RCP from 3.25 ± 0.402 to 3.75 ± 0.352 l·min(-1) (16.1 ± 10.83%). Peak power at the ACE CPET increased from 351 ± 27.5 to 387 ± 33.5 W (10.5 ± 6.93%). The all-out test total mechanical work increased from 28.9 ± 2.35 to 40.1 ± 3.76 kJ (72.1 ± 4.67%). In conclusion, a high intensity aerobic ACE training can be effective in improving grinding performance by increasing UB aerobic fitness and all-out working capacity. PMID:25357134

  13. Structural organization of the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Genova, Maria Luisa; Bianchi, Cristina; Lenaz, Giorgio

    2003-03-01

    Two models exist of the mitochondrial respiratory chain: the model of a random organization of the individual respiratory enzyme complexes and that of a super-complex assembly formed by stable association between the individual complexes. Recently Schägger, using digitonin solubilization and Blue Native PAGE produced new evidence of preferential associations, in particular a Complex I monomer with a Complex III dimer, and suggested a model of the respiratory chain (the respirasome) based on direct electron channelling between complexes. Discrimination between the two models is amenable to kinetic testing using flux control analysis. Experimental evidence obtained in beef heart SMP, according to the extension of the Metabolic Control Theory for pathways with metabolic channelling, showed that enzyme associations involving Complex I and Complex III take place in the respiratory chain while Complex IV seems to be randomly distributed, with cytochrome c behaving as a mobile component. Flux control analysis at anyone of the respiratory complexes involved in aerobic succinate oxidation indicated that Complex II and III are not functionally associated in a stable supercomplex. A critical appraisal of the solid-state model of the mitochondrial respiratory chain requires its reconciliation with previous biophysical and kinetic evidence that CoQ behaves as a homogeneous diffusible pool between all reducing enzyme and all oxidizing enzymes: the hypothesis can be advanced that both models (CoQ pool and supercomplexes) are true, by postulating that supercomplexes physiologically exist in equilibrium with isolated complexes depending on metabolic conditions of the cell.

  14. Resistance to adriamycin cytotoxicity among respiratory-deficient mutants in yeast.

    PubMed

    Hixon, S C; Ocak, A; Thomas, J E; Daugherty, J P

    1980-03-01

    Saccharomyces cell uptake of Adriamycin and the ensuing cytotoxic response were found to be dependent upon the ionic strength of the medium used for drug treatment. A given concentration of Adriamycin which inhibited growth in complete medium ws found to be significantly cytotoxic when administered in water. Many survivors after Adriamycin treatment in water were found to be respiratory-deficient petite mutants containing mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid mutations. Petite mutants arising after Adriamycin treatment were not induced but selected from the preexisting population of spontaneously derived petite mutants (normal frequency, 2%) due to an increased resistance of these mutants to killing by Adriamycin as compared with normal respiratory-sufficient cells. The responses to Adriamycin in mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid respiratory-deficient mutants (rho-, rho degrees, mit-) with different impaired mitochondrial functions was studied. All were similarly more resistant to killing by Adriamycin than wild-type cells. The common deficiency shared by these mutants, i.e., nonfunctioning electron transport, may play a role in protecting these mutants from Adriamycin cytotoxicity. In addition, normal cells grown on glycerol, requiring aerobic respiration for carbon source utilization were more susceptible to killing by Adriamycin than cells grown on glucose. These studies suggest that a mitochndrial function in yeast may interact with Adriamycin to potentiate a cell cytotoxic mechanism of the drug.

  15. Virulence factors enhance Citrobacter rodentium expansion through aerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Christopher A; Miller, Brittany M; Rivera-Chávez, Fabian; Velazquez, Eric M; Byndloss, Mariana X; Chávez-Arroyo, Alfredo; Lokken, Kristen L; Tsolis, Renée M; Winter, Sebastian E; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2016-09-16

    Citrobacter rodentium uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to induce colonic crypt hyperplasia in mice, thereby gaining an edge during its competition with the gut microbiota through an unknown mechanism. Here, we show that by triggering colonic crypt hyperplasia, the C. rodentium T3SS induced an excessive expansion of undifferentiated Ki67-positive epithelial cells, which increased oxygenation of the mucosal surface and drove an aerobic C. rodentium expansion in the colon. Treatment of mice with the γ-secretase inhibitor dibenzazepine to diminish Notch-driven colonic crypt hyperplasia curtailed the fitness advantage conferred by aerobic respiration during C. rodentium infection. We conclude that C. rodentium uses its T3SS to induce histopathological lesions that generate an intestinal microenvironment in which growth of the pathogen is fueled by aerobic respiration. PMID:27634526

  16. Aerobic Activity in Prevention & Symptom Control of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Semanik, Pamela; Chang, Rowland W.; Dunlop, Dorothy D.

    2014-01-01

    Almost 27 million US adults suffer from some form of osteoarthritis (OA). An epidemic of arthritis-associated disability is expected in the US over the next 2 decades, largely fueled by the aging population and the tremendous growth in the prevalence of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Regular physical activity (PA), particularly strengthening and aerobic activity, can reduce pain and improve function and health status among patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis. The focus of this review is to examine the impact of aerobic activity on OA progression and symptom control. In general, both strengthening and aerobic exercise are associated with improvements in pain, perceived physical function, and performance measures for those with lower limb OA; although comparisons of strengthening versus aerobic exercise on these outcomes is unusual. Structural disease progression in persons with established OA has been directly evaluated by a limited number of PA clinical trials in knee OA, but these protocols focused on strength training exclusively. In healthy subjects, it appears that overall PA is beneficial, rather than detrimental, to knee joint health. Possibly the most important reason for engaging in PA is to prevent obesity, which has independently been associated with many serious chronic diseases, including OA incidence and progression. More research is needed to determine the optimal types and dosing of aerobic conditioning. PMID:22632701

  17. Aerobic activity in prevention and symptom control of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Semanik, Pamela A; Chang, Rowland W; Dunlop, Dorothy D

    2012-05-01

    Almost 27 million adults in the United States experience some form of osteoarthritis (OA). An epidemic of arthritis-associated disability is expected in the United States during the next 2 decades, largely fueled by the aging population and the tremendous growth in the prevalence of knee OA. Regular physical activity (PA), particularly strengthening and aerobic activity, can reduce pain and improve function and health status among patients with knee and hip OA. The focus of this review is on the impact of aerobic activity on the progression and symptom control of OA. In general, both strengthening and aerobic exercise are associated with improvements in pain, perceived physical function, and performance measures for persons with lower limb OA, although comparisons of strengthening versus aerobic exercise on these outcomes are unusual. Structural disease progression in persons with established OA has been directly evaluated by a limited number of PA clinical trials for persons with knee OA, but these protocols focused on strength training exclusively. In healthy subjects, it appears that overall PA is beneficial, rather than detrimental, to knee joint health. Possibly the most important reason for engaging in PA is to prevent obesity, which independently has been associated with many serious chronic diseases, including the incidence and progression of OA. More research is needed to determine the optimal types and dosing of aerobic conditioning.

  18. Aerobic exercise augments muscle transcriptome profile of resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Tommy R; Fernandez-Gonzalo, Rodrigo; Tesch, Per A; Rullman, Eric; Gustafsson, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Recent reports suggest that aerobic exercise may boost the hypertrophic response to short-term resistance training. This study explored the effects of an acute aerobic exercise bout on the transcriptional response to subsequent resistance exercise. Ten moderately trained men performed ∼45 min cycling on one leg followed by 4 × 7 maximal knee extensions for each leg, 15 min later. Thus, one limb performed aerobic and resistance exercise (AE + RE) while the opposing leg did resistance exercise only (RE). Biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of each leg 3 h after the resistance exercise bout. Using DNA microarray, we analyzed differences [≥1.5-fold, false discovery rate (FDR) ≤10%] in gene expression profiles for the two modes of exercise. There were 176 genes up (127)- or downregulated (49) by AE + RE compared with RE. Among the most significant differentially expressed genes were established markers for muscle growth and oxidative capacity, novel cytokines, transcription factors, and micro-RNAs (miRNAs). The most enriched functional categories were those linked to carbohydrate metabolism and transcriptional regulation. Upstream analysis revealed that vascular endothelial growth factor, cAMP-response element-binding protein, Tet methylcytosine dioxygenase, and mammalian target of rapamycin were regulators highly activated by AE + RE, whereas JnK, NF-κβ, MAPK, and several miRNAs were inhibited. Thus, aerobic exercise alters the skeletal muscle transcriptional signature of resistance exercise to initiate important gene programs promoting both myofiber growth and improved oxidative capacity. These results provide novel insight into human muscle adaptations to diverse exercise modes and offer the very first genomic basis explaining how aerobic exercise may augment, rather than compromise, muscle growth induced by resistance exercise. PMID:27101291

  19. Aerobic exercise augments muscle transcriptome profile of resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Tommy R; Fernandez-Gonzalo, Rodrigo; Tesch, Per A; Rullman, Eric; Gustafsson, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Recent reports suggest that aerobic exercise may boost the hypertrophic response to short-term resistance training. This study explored the effects of an acute aerobic exercise bout on the transcriptional response to subsequent resistance exercise. Ten moderately trained men performed ∼45 min cycling on one leg followed by 4 × 7 maximal knee extensions for each leg, 15 min later. Thus, one limb performed aerobic and resistance exercise (AE + RE) while the opposing leg did resistance exercise only (RE). Biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of each leg 3 h after the resistance exercise bout. Using DNA microarray, we analyzed differences [≥1.5-fold, false discovery rate (FDR) ≤10%] in gene expression profiles for the two modes of exercise. There were 176 genes up (127)- or downregulated (49) by AE + RE compared with RE. Among the most significant differentially expressed genes were established markers for muscle growth and oxidative capacity, novel cytokines, transcription factors, and micro-RNAs (miRNAs). The most enriched functional categories were those linked to carbohydrate metabolism and transcriptional regulation. Upstream analysis revealed that vascular endothelial growth factor, cAMP-response element-binding protein, Tet methylcytosine dioxygenase, and mammalian target of rapamycin were regulators highly activated by AE + RE, whereas JnK, NF-κβ, MAPK, and several miRNAs were inhibited. Thus, aerobic exercise alters the skeletal muscle transcriptional signature of resistance exercise to initiate important gene programs promoting both myofiber growth and improved oxidative capacity. These results provide novel insight into human muscle adaptations to diverse exercise modes and offer the very first genomic basis explaining how aerobic exercise may augment, rather than compromise, muscle growth induced by resistance exercise.

  20. Die aerobe Glykolyse der Tumorzelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Friedhelm

    1981-01-01

    A high aerobic glycolysis (aerobic lactate production) is the most significant feature of the energy metabolism of rapidly growing tumor cells. Several mechanisms, which may be different in different cell lines, seem to be involved in this characteristic of energy metabolism of the tumor cell. Changes in the cell membrane leading to increased uptake and utilization of glucose, a high level of fetal types of isoenzymes, a decreased number of mitochondria and a reduced capacity to metabolize pyruvate are some factors which must be taken into consideration. It is not possible to favour one of them at the present time.

  1. Evidence for a Key Role of Cytochrome bo3 Oxidase in Respiratory Energy Metabolism of Gluconobacter oxydans

    PubMed Central

    Richhardt, Janine; Luchterhand, Bettina; Büchs, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    The obligatory aerobic acetic acid bacterium Gluconobacter oxydans oxidizes a variety of substrates in the periplasm by membrane-bound dehydrogenases, which transfer the reducing equivalents to ubiquinone. Two quinol oxidases, cytochrome bo3 and cytochrome bd, then catalyze transfer of the electrons from ubiquinol to molecular oxygen. In this study, mutants lacking either of these terminal oxidases were characterized. Deletion of the cydAB genes for cytochrome bd had no obvious influence on growth, whereas the lack of the cyoBACD genes for cytochrome bo3 severely reduced the growth rate and the cell yield. Using a respiration activity monitoring system and adjusting different levels of oxygen availability, hints of a low-oxygen affinity of cytochrome bd oxidase were obtained, which were supported by measurements of oxygen consumption in a respirometer. The H+/O ratio of the ΔcyoBACD mutant with mannitol as the substrate was 0.56 ± 0.11 and more than 50% lower than that of the reference strain (1.26 ± 0.06) and the ΔcydAB mutant (1.31 ± 0.16), indicating that cytochrome bo3 oxidase is the main component for proton extrusion via the respiratory chain. Plasmid-based overexpression of cyoBACD led to increased growth rates and growth yields, both in the wild type and the ΔcyoBACD mutant, suggesting that cytochrome bo3 might be a rate-limiting factor of the respiratory chain. PMID:23852873

  2. [New argentine consensus of respiratory rehabilitation 2008].

    PubMed

    Sívori, Martín; Almeida, Marta; Benzo, Roberto; Boim, Clarisa; Brassesco, Marisa; Callejas, Osvaldo; Capparelli, Ignacio; Conti, Ernesto; Díaz, Mariano; Draghi, Jorge; Franco, Javier; Gando, Sebastián; Giuliano, Germán; Guida, Roxana; Jolly, Enrique; Pessolano, Fernando; Rabinovich, Roberto; Ratto, Patricia; Rhodius, Edgardo; Saadia, Marcela; Salvado, Alejandro; Sobrino, Edgardo; Victorio, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory rehabilitation (RR) is a multidisciplinary program of care for patients with chronic respiratory impairment, individually tailored, designed to optimize physical and social performance and patient autonomy. It is particularly indicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with exercise intolerance. The objectives of respiratory rehabilitation are: reduction in symptoms and exercise intolerance, improvement of health-related quality of life, and reduction of health costs. A group of neumonologists, nutritionists and physical therapists performed a systematic review of the evidence in RR to update previous local guidelines. Inclusion and exclusion criteria, guidelines for initial evaluation and follow up and resources needed are defined. Training characteristics are recommended regarding frequency of the visits, intensity, progression and duration of the exercise training. Aerobic training was recommended for lower limb (1A), upper limb (1B). Strength training must be added (1B). Respiratory muscle training and other physiotherapy techniques were recommended only for specific patients (1C). In addition recommendations have been made for educational objectives of the program including smoking cessation, nutritional and psychological support. The positive impact of RR on reductions of health care costs and reductions on hospitalizations (Evidence A) and mortality (Evidence B) were analized. Respiratory rehabilitation is a key component in the modern treatment of COPD patients. This consensus statement was prepared based on the most recent scientific evidence and adjusted to the local environment with the aim of being implemented nationally. PMID:18786894

  3. The Transition from Aerobic to Anaerobic Metabolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, James S.; McLellan, Thomas H.

    1980-01-01

    The transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism is discussed. More research is needed on different kinds of athletes and athletic activities and how they may affect aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms. (CJ)

  4. Characterization and aerobic biodegradation of selected monoterpenes

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, G.; Pavlostathis, S.G.; Li, J.; Purdue, E.M.

    1996-12-31

    Monoterpenes are biogenic chemicals and occur in abundance in nature. Large-scale industrial use of these chemicals has recently been initiated in an attempt to replace halogenated solvents and chlorofluorocarbons which have been implicated in the stratospheric depletion of ozone. This study examined four hydrocarbon monoterpenes (d-limonene, {alpha}-pinene, {gamma}-terpinene, and terpinolene) and four alcohols (arbanol, linalool, plinol, and {alpha}-terpineol). Water solubility, vapor pressure, and octanol/water partition coefficients were estimated. Aerobic biodegradability tests were conducted in batch reactors by utilizing forest soil extract and enriched cultures as inoculum. The hydrophobic nature and high volatility of the hydrocarbons restricted the investigation to relatively low aqueous concentrations. Each monoterpene was analyzed with a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector after extraction from the aqueous phase with isooctane. Terpene mineralization was tested by monitoring liquid-phase carbon, CO{sub 2} production and biomass growth. All four hydrocarbons and two alcohols readily degraded under aerobic conditions. Plinol resisted degradation in assays using inocula from diverse sources, while arbanol degraded very slowly. The intrinsic biokinetics coefficients for the degradation of d-limonene and {alpha}-terpineol were estimated by using cultures enriched with the respective monoterpenes. Monoterpene biodegradation followed Monod kinetics.

  5. Adaptation of Aerobically Growing Pseudomonas aeruginosa to Copper Starvation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Frangipani, Emanuela; Slaveykova, Vera I.; Reimmann, Cornelia; Haas, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    Restricted bioavailability of copper in certain environments can interfere with cellular respiration because copper is an essential cofactor of most terminal oxidases. The global response of the metabolically versatile bacterium and opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa to copper limitation was assessed under aerobic conditions. Expression of cioAB (encoding an alternative, copper-independent, cyanide-resistant ubiquinol oxidase) was upregulated, whereas numerous iron uptake functions (including the siderophores pyoverdine and pyochelin) were expressed at reduced levels, presumably reflecting a lower demand for iron by respiratory enzymes. Wild-type P. aeruginosa was able to grow aerobically in a defined glucose medium depleted of copper, whereas a cioAB mutant did not grow. Thus, P. aeruginosa relies on the CioAB enzyme to cope with severe copper deprivation. A quadruple cyo cco1 cco2 cox mutant, which was deleted for all known heme-copper terminal oxidases of P. aeruginosa, grew aerobically, albeit more slowly than did the wild type, indicating that the CioAB enzyme is capable of energy conservation. However, the expression of a cioA′-′lacZ fusion was less dependent on the copper status in the quadruple mutant than in the wild type, suggesting that copper availability might affect cioAB expression indirectly, via the function of the heme-copper oxidases. PMID:18708503

  6. Adaptation of aerobically growing Pseudomonas aeruginosa to copper starvation.

    PubMed

    Frangipani, Emanuela; Slaveykova, Vera I; Reimmann, Cornelia; Haas, Dieter

    2008-10-01

    Restricted bioavailability of copper in certain environments can interfere with cellular respiration because copper is an essential cofactor of most terminal oxidases. The global response of the metabolically versatile bacterium and opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa to copper limitation was assessed under aerobic conditions. Expression of cioAB (encoding an alternative, copper-independent, cyanide-resistant ubiquinol oxidase) was upregulated, whereas numerous iron uptake functions (including the siderophores pyoverdine and pyochelin) were expressed at reduced levels, presumably reflecting a lower demand for iron by respiratory enzymes. Wild-type P. aeruginosa was able to grow aerobically in a defined glucose medium depleted of copper, whereas a cioAB mutant did not grow. Thus, P. aeruginosa relies on the CioAB enzyme to cope with severe copper deprivation. A quadruple cyo cco1 cco2 cox mutant, which was deleted for all known heme-copper terminal oxidases of P. aeruginosa, grew aerobically, albeit more slowly than did the wild type, indicating that the CioAB enzyme is capable of energy conservation. However, the expression of a cioA'-'lacZ fusion was less dependent on the copper status in the quadruple mutant than in the wild type, suggesting that copper availability might affect cioAB expression indirectly, via the function of the heme-copper oxidases. PMID:18708503

  7. Membrane thickening aerobic digestion processes.

    PubMed

    Woo, Bryen

    2014-01-01

    Sludge management accounts for approximately 60% of the total wastewater treatment plant expenditure and laws for sludge disposal are becoming increasingly stringent, therefore much consideration is required when designing a solids handling process. A membrane thickening aerobic digestion process integrates a controlled aerobic digestion process with pre-thickening waste activated sludge using membrane technology. This process typically features an anoxic tank, an aerated membrane thickener operating in loop with a first-stage digester followed by second-stage digestion. Membrane thickening aerobic digestion processes can handle sludge from any liquid treatment process and is best for facilities obligated to meet low total phosphorus and nitrogen discharge limits. Membrane thickening aerobic digestion processes offer many advantages including: producing a reusable quality permeate with minimal levels of total phosphorus and nitrogen that can be recycled to the head works of a plant, protecting the performance of a biological nutrient removal liquid treatment process without requiring chemical addition, providing reliable thickening up to 4% solids concentration without the use of polymers or attention to decanting, increasing sludge storage capacities in existing tanks, minimizing the footprint of new tanks, reducing disposal costs, and providing Class B stabilization.

  8. Arthritis and Aerobic Exercise: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ike, Robert W.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Arthritic patients who regularly do aerobic exercise make significant gains in aerobic and functional status, and in subjective areas like pain tolerance and mood. Still, they are often advised to curtail physical activity. Guidelines are presented for physicians prescribing aerobic exercise. An exercise tolerance test is recommended. (SM)

  9. Evaluation of cardiorespiratory fitness and respiratory muscle function in the obese population.

    PubMed

    Arena, Ross; Cahalin, Lawrence P

    2014-01-01

    Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is one of the most important health metrics in apparently healthy individuals, those at increased risk for cardiovascular (CV) disease and virtually all patient populations. In addition to CRF, a host of other variables obtained from aerobic exercise testing provides clinically valuable information. Individuals classified as obese (i.e. a body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2)) have varying degrees of CV, pulmonary and skeletal muscle dysfunction that impact CRF and other key aerobic exercise testing variables. Moreover, there is now evidence indicating inspiratory and expiratory respiratory muscle function, even in the absence of interstitial lung disease, is potentially compromised as a result of obesity. When obesity-induced respiratory muscle dysfunction is present, it has the potential to contribute to the limitations in CRF. The current review will discuss aerobic exercise testing and the assessment of respiratory muscle function in the obese population.

  10. Degradation of TCE using sequential anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapatwala, Kirit D.; Babu, G. R. V.; Baresi, Larry; Trunzo, Richard M.

    1995-01-01

    Bacteria capable of degrading trichloroethylene (TCE) were isolated from contaminated wastewaters and soil sites. The aerobic cultures were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (four species) and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The optimal conditions for the growth of aerobic cultures were determined. The minimal inhibitory concentration values of TCE for Pseudomonas sps. were also determined. The aerobic cells were immobilized in calcium alginate in the form of beads. Degradation of TCE by the anaerobic and dichloroethylene (DCE) by aerobic cultures was studied using dual reactors - anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor. The minimal mineral salt (MMS) medium saturated with TCE was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the anaerobic reactor. The MMS medium saturated with DCE and supplemented with xylenes and toluene (3 ppm each) was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the fluidized air-uplift-type reactor containing the immobilized aerobic cells. The concentrations of TCE and DCE and the metabolites formed during their degradation by the anaerobic and aerobic cultures were monitored by GC. The preliminary study suggests that the anaerobic and aerobic cultures of our isolates can degrade TCE and DCE.

  11. Degradation of TCE using sequential anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapatwala, Kirit D.; Babu, G. R. V.; Baresi, Larry; Trunzo, Richard M.

    1995-03-01

    Bacteria capable of degrading trichloroethylene (TCE) were isolated from contaminated wastewaters and soil sites. The aerobic cultures were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (four species) and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The optimal conditions for the growth of aerobic cultures were determined. The minimal inhibitory concentration values of TCE for Pseudomonas sps. were also determined. The aerobic cells were immobilized in calcium alginate in the form of beads. Degradation of TCE by the anaerobic and dichloroethylene (DCE) by aerobic cultures was studied using dual reactors - anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor. The minimal mineral salt (MMS) medium saturated with TCE was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the anaerobic reactor. The MMS medium saturated with DCE and supplemented with xylenes and toluene (3 ppm each) was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the fluidized air-uplift-type reactor containing the immobilized aerobic cells. The concentrations of TCE and DCE and the metabolites formed during their degradation by the anaerobic and aerobic cultures were monitored by GC. The preliminary study suggests that the anaerobic and aerobic cultures of our isolates can degrade TCE and DCE.

  12. The Strictly Aerobic Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica Tolerates Loss of a Mitochondrial DNA-Packaging Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bakkaiova, Jana; Arata, Kosuke; Matsunobu, Miki; Ono, Bungo; Aoki, Tomoyo; Lajdova, Dana; Nebohacova, Martina; Nosek, Jozef; Miyakawa, Isamu

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is highly compacted into DNA-protein structures termed mitochondrial nucleoids (mt-nucleoids). The key mt-nucleoid components responsible for mtDNA condensation are HMG box-containing proteins such as mammalian mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and Abf2p of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To gain insight into the function and organization of mt-nucleoids in strictly aerobic organisms, we initiated studies of these DNA-protein structures in Yarrowia lipolytica. We identified a principal component of mt-nucleoids in this yeast and termed it YlMhb1p (Y. lipolytica mitochondrial HMG box-containing protein 1). YlMhb1p contains two putative HMG boxes contributing both to DNA binding and to its ability to compact mtDNA in vitro. Phenotypic analysis of a Δmhb1 strain lacking YlMhb1p resulted in three interesting findings. First, although the mutant exhibits clear differences in mt-nucleoids accompanied by a large decrease in the mtDNA copy number and the number of mtDNA-derived transcripts, its respiratory characteristics and growth under most of the conditions tested are indistinguishable from those of the wild-type strain. Second, our results indicate that a potential imbalance between subunits of the respiratory chain encoded separately by nuclear DNA and mtDNA is prevented at a (post)translational level. Third, we found that mtDNA in the Δmhb1 strain is more prone to mutations, indicating that mtHMG box-containing proteins protect the mitochondrial genome against mutagenic events. PMID:24972935

  13. Transcriptional responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to shift from respiratory and respirofermentative to fully fermentative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rintala, Eija; Jouhten, Paula; Toivari, Mervi; Wiebe, Marilyn G; Maaheimo, Hannu; Penttilä, Merja; Ruohonen, Laura

    2011-01-01

    In industrial fermentations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transient changes in oxygen concentration commonly occur and it is important to understand the behavior of cells during these changes. Glucose-limited chemostat cultivations were used to study the time-dependent effect of sudden oxygen depletion on the transcriptome of S. cerevisiae cells initially in fully aerobic or oxygen-limited conditions. The overall responses to anaerobic conditions of cells initially in different conditions were very similar. Independent of initial culture conditions, transient downregulation of genes related to growth and cell proliferation, mitochondrial translation and protein import, and sulphate assimilation was seen. In addition, transient or permanent upregulation of genes related to protein degradation, and phosphate and amino acid uptake was observed in all cultures. However, only in the initially oxygen-limited cultures was a transient upregulation of genes related to fatty acid oxidation, peroxisomal biogenesis, oxidative phosphorylation, TCA cycle, response to oxidative stress, and pentose phosphate pathway observed. Furthermore, from the initially oxygen-limited conditions, a rapid response around the metabolites of upper glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway was seen, while from the initially fully aerobic conditions, a slower response around the pathways for utilization of respiratory carbon sources was observed.

  14. Aerobic Glycolysis in Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Esen, Emel; Long, Fanxin

    2014-01-01

    Osteoblasts, the chief bone-making cells in the body, are a focus of osteoporosis research. Although teriparatite, a synthetic fragment of the human parathyroid hormone (PTH), has been an effective bone anabolic drug, there remains a clinical need for additional therapeutics that safely stimulates osteoblast number and function. Work in the past several decades has provided unprecedented clarity about the roles of growth factors and transcription factors in regulating osteoblast differentiation and activity, but whether these factors may regulate cellular metabolism to influence cell fate and function has been largely unexplored. The past few years have witnessed a resurgence of interest in the cellular metabolism of osteoblasts, with the hope that elucidation of their metabolic profile may open new avenues for developing bone anabolic agents. Here we review the current understanding about glucose metabolism in osteoblasts. PMID:25200872

  15. Systematic genomic analysis reveals the complementary aerobic and anaerobic respiration capacities of the human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Ravcheev, Dmitry A; Thiele, Ines

    2014-01-01

    Because of the specific anatomical and physiological properties of the human intestine, a specific oxygen gradient builds up within this organ that influences the intestinal microbiota. The intestinal microbiome has been intensively studied in recent years, and certain respiratory substrates used by gut inhabiting microbes have been shown to play a crucial role in human health. Unfortunately, a systematic analysis has not been previously performed to determine the respiratory capabilities of human gut microbes (HGM). Here, we analyzed the distribution of aerobic and anaerobic respiratory reductases in 254 HGM genomes. In addition to the annotation of known enzymes, we also predicted a novel microaerobic reductase and novel thiosulfate reductase. Based on this comprehensive assessment of respiratory reductases in the HGM, we proposed a number of exchange pathways among different bacteria involved in the reduction of various nitrogen oxides. The results significantly expanded our knowledge of HGM metabolism and interactions in bacterial communities.

  16. Systematic genomic analysis reveals the complementary aerobic and anaerobic respiration capacities of the human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Ravcheev, Dmitry A; Thiele, Ines

    2014-01-01

    Because of the specific anatomical and physiological properties of the human intestine, a specific oxygen gradient builds up within this organ that influences the intestinal microbiota. The intestinal microbiome has been intensively studied in recent years, and certain respiratory substrates used by gut inhabiting microbes have been shown to play a crucial role in human health. Unfortunately, a systematic analysis has not been previously performed to determine the respiratory capabilities of human gut microbes (HGM). Here, we analyzed the distribution of aerobic and anaerobic respiratory reductases in 254 HGM genomes. In addition to the annotation of known enzymes, we also predicted a novel microaerobic reductase and novel thiosulfate reductase. Based on this comprehensive assessment of respiratory reductases in the HGM, we proposed a number of exchange pathways among different bacteria involved in the reduction of various nitrogen oxides. The results significantly expanded our knowledge of HGM metabolism and interactions in bacterial communities. PMID:25538694

  17. Effects of Aerobic Exercise on Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Laura D.; Frank, Laura L.; Foster-Schubert, Karen; Green, Pattie S.; Wilkinson, Charles W.; McTiernan, Anne; Plymate, Stephen R.; Fishel, Mark A.; Stennis Watson, G.; Cholerton, Brenna A.; Duncan, Glen E.; Mehta, Pankaj D.; Craft, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effects of aerobic exercise on cognition and other biomarkers associated with Alzheimer disease pathology for older adults with mild cognitive impairment, and assess the role of sex as a predictor of response. Design Six-month, randomized, controlled, clinical trial. Setting Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System clinical research unit. Participants Thirty-three adults (17 women) with amnestic mild cognitive impairment ranging in age from 55 to 85 years (mean age,70 years). Intervention Participants were randomized either to a high-intensity aerobic exercise or stretching control group. The aerobic group exercised under the supervision of a fitness trainer at 75% to 85% of heart rate reserve for 45 to 60 min/d, 4 d/wk for 6 months. The control group carried out supervised stretching activities according to the same schedule but maintained their heart rate at or below 50% of their heart rate reserve. Before and after the study, glucometabolic and treadmill tests were performed and fat distribution was assessed using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. At baseline, month 3, and month 6, blood was collected for assay and cognitive tests were administered. Main Outcome Measures Performance measures on Symbol-Digit Modalities, Verbal Fluency, Stroop, Trails B, Task Switching, Story Recall, and List Learning. Fasting plasma levels of insulin, cortisol, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, insulinlike growth factor-I, and β-amyloids 40 and 42. Results Six months of high-intensity aerobic exercise had sex-specific effects on cognition, glucose metabolism, and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and trophic activity despite comparable gains in cardiorespiratory fitness and body fat reduction. For women, aerobic exercise improved performance on multiple tests of executive function, increased glucose disposal during the metabolic clamp, and reduced fasting plasma levels of insulin, cortisol, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. For men

  18. In situ aerobic cometabolism of chlorinated solvents: a review.

    PubMed

    Frascari, Dario; Zanaroli, Giulio; Danko, Anthony S

    2015-01-01

    The possible approaches for in situ aerobic cometabolism of aquifers and vadose zones contaminated by chlorinated solvents are critically evaluated. Bioaugmentation of resting-cells previously grown in a fermenter and in-well addition of oxygen and growth substrate appear to be the most promising approaches for aquifer bioremediation. Other solutions involving the sparging of air lead to satisfactory pollutant removals, but must be integrated by the extraction and subsequent treatment of vapors to avoid the dispersion of volatile chlorinated solvents in the atmosphere. Cometabolic bioventing is the only possible approach for the aerobic cometabolic bioremediation of the vadose zone. The examined studies indicate that in situ aerobic cometabolism leads to the biodegradation of a wide range of chlorinated solvents within remediation times that vary between 1 and 17 months. Numerous studies include a simulation of the experimental field data. The modeling of the process attained a high reliability, and represents a crucial tool for the elaboration of field data obtained in pilot tests and for the design of the full-scale systems. Further research is needed to attain higher concentrations of chlorinated solvent degrading microbes and more reliable cost estimates. Lastly, a procedure for the design of full-scale in situ aerobic cometabolic bioremediation processes is proposed.

  19. In situ aerobic cometabolism of chlorinated solvents: a review.

    PubMed

    Frascari, Dario; Zanaroli, Giulio; Danko, Anthony S

    2015-01-01

    The possible approaches for in situ aerobic cometabolism of aquifers and vadose zones contaminated by chlorinated solvents are critically evaluated. Bioaugmentation of resting-cells previously grown in a fermenter and in-well addition of oxygen and growth substrate appear to be the most promising approaches for aquifer bioremediation. Other solutions involving the sparging of air lead to satisfactory pollutant removals, but must be integrated by the extraction and subsequent treatment of vapors to avoid the dispersion of volatile chlorinated solvents in the atmosphere. Cometabolic bioventing is the only possible approach for the aerobic cometabolic bioremediation of the vadose zone. The examined studies indicate that in situ aerobic cometabolism leads to the biodegradation of a wide range of chlorinated solvents within remediation times that vary between 1 and 17 months. Numerous studies include a simulation of the experimental field data. The modeling of the process attained a high reliability, and represents a crucial tool for the elaboration of field data obtained in pilot tests and for the design of the full-scale systems. Further research is needed to attain higher concentrations of chlorinated solvent degrading microbes and more reliable cost estimates. Lastly, a procedure for the design of full-scale in situ aerobic cometabolic bioremediation processes is proposed. PMID:25306537

  20. Contrasting short-term antibiotic effects on respiration and bacterial growth compromises the validity of the selective respiratory inhibition technique to distinguish fungi and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rousk, Johannes; Demoling, Louise Aldén; Bååth, Erland

    2009-07-01

    The selective inhibition (SI) technique has been widely used to resolve fungal and bacterial biomass. By studying bacterial growth (leucine/thymidine incorporation) and respiration simultaneously, this study demonstrates that the inhibitors the SI technique is based on do not efficiently or specifically resolve fungal and bacterial contributions to respiration. At concentrations that completely inhibited bacterial growth, the bactericide streptomycin had no influence on the SI technique's respiration measurement, and complete inhibition of bacterial growth using oxytetracycline resulted in marginal respiration reductions. The fungicides captan and benomyl severely inhibited non-target bacterial growth. Cycloheximide did not reduce bacterial growth at moderate concentrations, but the cycloheximide respiration reduction was no higher in a soil with more fungal biomass, casting doubt on its ability to discriminate fungal respiration contribution. Conclusions regarding bacteria and fungi based on the SI technique using these inhibitors are thus compromised. The inhibition of glucose-activated respiration by the bactericide bronopol appeared to correlate with bacterial growth inhibition, however. Bronopol, combined with growth-based techniques, could aid development of a new framework to resolve decomposer ecology in soil.

  1. Respiratory scleroma: a clinicopathologic and ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Sedano, H O; Carlos, R; Koutlas, I G

    1996-06-01

    Respiratory scleroma (rhinoscleroma) is a chronic granulomatous infection produced by Klebsiella rhinoscleromatis, a gram-negative aerobic coccobacillus. This disease is endemic to Africa, Central and South America, South Central and Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and China. Sporadic cases have been reported in the United States, especially in persons who migrated from the aforementioned areas. The majority of cases affect the nose, but extension to the soft and hard palate, upper lip, and maxillary sinuses also is frequent. This study comprises 11 patients (6 females and 5 males) with respiratory scleroma identified over a 6-year period in Guatemala. Their ages ranged from 16 to 60 years. Light microscopy showed a dense plasmacytic infiltrate, Mikulicz histiocytes, and Russell bodies within the plasma cells. Ultrastructural study revealed Mikulicz histiocytes, cytoplasmic vacuoles containing bacilli, and so-called A and B granules. We favor the term respiratory scleroma for this lesion because it affects not only the nose but also the upper and lower respiratory tracts as well as the mouth. PMID:8784898

  2. L-Carnosine Affects the Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a Metabolism-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Stephanie P.; Bill, Roslyn M.; Hipkiss, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    The dipeptide L-carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) has been described as enigmatic: it inhibits growth of cancer cells but delays senescence in cultured human fibroblasts and extends the lifespan of male fruit flies. In an attempt to understand these observations, the effects of L-carnosine on the model eukaryote, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, were examined on account of its unique metabolic properties; S. cerevisiae can respire aerobically, but like some tumor cells, it can also exhibit a metabolism in which aerobic respiration is down regulated. L-Carnosine exhibited both inhibitory and stimulatory effects on yeast cells, dependent upon the carbon source in the growth medium. When yeast cells were not reliant on oxidative phosphorylation for energy generation (e.g. when grown on a fermentable carbon source such as 2% glucose), 10–30 mM L-carnosine slowed growth rates in a dose-dependent manner and increased cell death by up to 17%. In contrast, in media containing a non-fermentable carbon source in which yeast are dependent on aerobic respiration (e.g. 2% glycerol), L-carnosine did not provoke cell death. This latter observation was confirmed in the respiratory yeast, Pichia pastoris. Moreover, when deletion strains in the yeast nutrient-sensing pathway were treated with L-carnosine, the cells showed resistance to its inhibitory effects. These findings suggest that L-carnosine affects cells in a metabolism-dependent manner and provide a rationale for its effects on different cell types. PMID:22984600

  3. L-carnosine affects the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a metabolism-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Stephanie P; Bill, Roslyn M; Hipkiss, Alan R

    2012-01-01

    The dipeptide L-carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) has been described as enigmatic: it inhibits growth of cancer cells but delays senescence in cultured human fibroblasts and extends the lifespan of male fruit flies. In an attempt to understand these observations, the effects of L-carnosine on the model eukaryote, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, were examined on account of its unique metabolic properties; S. cerevisiae can respire aerobically, but like some tumor cells, it can also exhibit a metabolism in which aerobic respiration is down regulated. L-Carnosine exhibited both inhibitory and stimulatory effects on yeast cells, dependent upon the carbon source in the growth medium. When yeast cells were not reliant on oxidative phosphorylation for energy generation (e.g. when grown on a fermentable carbon source such as 2% glucose), 10-30 mM L-carnosine slowed growth rates in a dose-dependent manner and increased cell death by up to 17%. In contrast, in media containing a non-fermentable carbon source in which yeast are dependent on aerobic respiration (e.g. 2% glycerol), L-carnosine did not provoke cell death. This latter observation was confirmed in the respiratory yeast, Pichia pastoris. Moreover, when deletion strains in the yeast nutrient-sensing pathway were treated with L-carnosine, the cells showed resistance to its inhibitory effects. These findings suggest that L-carnosine affects cells in a metabolism-dependent manner and provide a rationale for its effects on different cell types.

  4. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... Neonatal RDS occurs in infants whose lungs have not yet fully ... disease is mainly caused by a lack of a slippery substance in ...

  5. Avian respiratory system disorders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    Diagnosing and treating respiratory diseases in avian species requires a basic knowledge about the anatomy and physiology of this system in birds. Differences between mammalian and avian respiratory system function, diagnosis, and treatment are highlighted.

  6. MSFC Respiratory Protection Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    CoVan, James P.

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the Marshall Space Flight Center Respiratory Protection program is provided in this poster display. Respiratory protection personnel, building, facilities, equipment, customers, maintenance and operational activities, and Dynatech fit testing details are described and illustrated.

  7. Interaction between serum BDNF and aerobic fitness predicts recognition memory in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Whiteman, Andrew S; Young, Daniel E; He, Xuemei; Chen, Tai C; Wagenaar, Robert C; Stern, Chantal E; Schon, Karin

    2014-02-01

    Convergent evidence from human and non-human animal studies suggests aerobic exercise and increased aerobic capacity may be beneficial for brain health and cognition. It is thought growth factors may mediate this putative relationship, particularly by augmenting plasticity mechanisms in the hippocampus, a brain region critical for learning and memory. Among these factors, glucocorticoids, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hormones that have considerable and diverse physiological importance, are thought to effect normal and exercise-induced hippocampal plasticity. Despite these predictions, relatively few published human studies have tested hypotheses that relate exercise and fitness to the hippocampus, and none have considered the potential links to all of these hormonal components. Here we present cross-sectional data from a study of recognition memory; serum BDNF, cortisol, IGF-1, and VEGF levels; and aerobic capacity in healthy young adults. We measured circulating levels of these hormones together with performance on a recognition memory task, and a standard graded treadmill test of aerobic fitness. Regression analyses demonstrated BDNF and aerobic fitness predict recognition memory in an interactive manner. In addition, IGF-1 was positively associated with aerobic fitness, but not with recognition memory. Our results may suggest an exercise adaptation-related change in the BDNF dose-response curve that relates to hippocampal memory.

  8. The effect of chronic exposure to high palmitic acid concentrations on the aerobic metabolism of human endothelial EA.hy926 cells.

    PubMed

    Broniarek, Izabela; Koziel, Agnieszka; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2016-09-01

    A chronic elevation of circulating free fatty acids (FFAs) is associated with diseases like obesity or diabetes and can lead to lipotoxicity. The goals of this study were to assess the influence of chronic exposure to high palmitic acid (PAL) levels on mitochondrial respiratory functions in endothelial cells and isolated mitochondria. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EA.hy926 line) were grown for 6 days in a medium containing either 100 or 150 μM PAL. Growth at high PAL concentrations induced a considerable increase in fatty acid-supplied respiration and a reduction of mitochondrial respiration during carbohydrate and glutamine oxidation. High PAL levels elevated intracellular and mitochondrial superoxide generation; increased inflammation marker, acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenase, uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), and superoxide dismutase 2 expression; and decreased hexokinase I and pyruvate dehydrogenase expression. No change in aerobic respiration capacity was observed, while fermentation was decreased. In mitochondria isolated from high PAL-treated cells, an increase in the oxidation of palmitoylcarnitine, a decrease in the oxidation of pyruvate, and an increase in UCP2 activity were observed. Our results demonstrate that exposure to high PAL levels induces a shift in endothelial aerobic metabolism toward the oxidation of fatty acids. Increased levels of PAL caused impairment and uncoupling of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system. Our data indicate that FFAs significantly affect endothelial oxidative metabolism, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, and cell viability and, thus, might contribute to endothelial and vascular dysfunction. PMID:27417103

  9. Methods to determine aerobic endurance.

    PubMed

    Bosquet, Laurent; Léger, Luc; Legros, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Physiological testing of elite athletes requires the correct identification and assessment of sports-specific underlying factors. It is now recognised that performance in long-distance events is determined by maximal oxygen uptake (V(2 max)), energy cost of exercise and the maximal fractional utilisation of V(2 max) in any realised performance or as a corollary a set percentage of V(2 max) that could be endured as long as possible. This later ability is defined as endurance, and more precisely aerobic endurance, since V(2 max) sets the upper limit of aerobic pathway. It should be distinguished from endurance ability or endurance performance, which are synonymous with performance in long-distance events. The present review examines methods available in the literature to assess aerobic endurance. They are numerous and can be classified into two categories, namely direct and indirect methods. Direct methods bring together all indices that allow either a complete or a partial representation of the power-duration relationship, while indirect methods revolve around the determination of the so-called anaerobic threshold (AT). With regard to direct methods, performance in a series of tests provides a more complete and presumably more valid description of the power-duration relationship than performance in a single test, even if both approaches are well correlated with each other. However, the question remains open to determine which systems model should be employed among the several available in the literature, and how to use them in the prescription of training intensities. As for indirect methods, there is quantitative accumulation of data supporting the utilisation of the AT to assess aerobic endurance and to prescribe training intensities. However, it appears that: there is no unique intensity corresponding to the AT, since criteria available in the literature provide inconsistent results; and the non-invasive determination of the AT using ventilatory and heart rate

  10. Effects of Exercise Rehab on Male Asthmatic Patients: Aerobic Verses Rebound Training

    PubMed Central

    Zolaktaf, Vahid; Ghasemi, Gholam A; Sadeghi, Morteza

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are some auspicious records on applying aerobic exercise for asthmatic patients. Recently, it is suggested that rebound exercise might even increase the gains. This study was designed to compare the effects of rebound therapy to aerobic training in male asthmatic patients. Methods: Sample included 37 male asthmatic patients (20-40 years) from the same respiratory clinic. After signing the informed consent, subjects volunteered to take part in control, rebound, or aerobic groups. There was no change in the routine medical treatment of patients. Supervised exercise programs continued for 8 weeks, consisting of two sessions of 45 to 60 minutes per week. Criteria measures were assessed pre- and post exercise program. Peak exercise capacity (VO2peak) was estimated by modified Bruce protocol, Forced vital capacity (FVC), Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and FEV1% were measured by spirometer. Data were analyzed by repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: Significant interactions were observed for all 4 criteria measures (P < 0.01), meaning that both the exercise programs were effective in improving FVC, FEV1, FEV1%, and VO2peak. Rebound exercise produced more improvement in FEV1, FEV1%, and VO2peak. Conclusions: Regular exercise strengthens the respiratory muscles and improves the cellular respiration. At the same time, it improves the muscular, respiratory, and cardio-vascular systems. Effects of rebound exercise seem to be promising. Findings suggest that rebound exercise is a useful complementary means for asthmatic male patients. PMID:23717762

  11. Kinetics of aerobic cometabolic biodegradation of chlorinated and brominated aliphatic hydrocarbons: A review.

    PubMed

    Jesus, João; Frascari, Dario; Pozdniakova, Tatiana; Danko, Anthony S

    2016-05-15

    This review analyses kinetic studies of aerobic cometabolism (AC) of halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) from 2001-2015 in order to (i) compare the different kinetic models proposed, (ii) analyse the estimated model parameters with a focus on novel HAHs and the identification of general trends, and (iii) identify further research needs. The results of this analysis show that aerobic cometabolism can degrade a wide range of HAHs, including HAHs that were not previously tested such as chlorinated propanes, highly chlorinated ethanes and brominated methanes and ethanes. The degree of chlorine mineralization was very high for the chlorinated HAHs. Bromine mineralization was not determined for studies with brominated aliphatics. The examined research period led to the identification of novel growth substrates of potentially high interest. Decreasing performance of aerobic cometabolism were found with increasing chlorination, indicating the high potential of aerobic cometabolism in the presence of medium- and low-halogenated HAHs. Further research is needed for the AC of brominated aliphatic hydrocarbons, the potential for biofilm aerobic cometabolism processes, HAH-HAH mutual inhibition and the identification of the enzymes responsible for each aerobic cometabolism process. Lastly, some indications for a possible standardization of future kinetic studies of HAH aerobic cometabolism are provided.

  12. Influence of an aniline supplement on the stability of aerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yajie; Jiang, Yixin; Su, Haijia

    2015-10-01

    In order to evaluate the stability of aerobic granules in a toxic environment, this study discussed the influence of an aniline supplement on the properties and microbial community of aerobic granules. In the early stages of sequencing batch reactor (SBR) operation, an aniline supplement slightly affected the properties of the aerobic granules (strength, growth rate, SVI and so on). This effect was thereafter removed because of a change in the microbial community and the structure of aerobic granules: with the present of aniline, microbes with biodegradation ability appeared and gathered in the aerobic granules and the aerobic granules densified and settled faster as their SVI decreased to 35 mL/g and settling velocity increased to 41.56 m/h. When a synthetic waste water containing acetate as carbon source was used as influent, aniline (10-500 mg/L) could be degraded in 6 h, at a rate as high as 37.5 mg aniline/(L·h), with a removal rate in excess of 90%, while the effluent COD fell below 100 mg/L from the initial about 2000 mg/L. The aerobic granules cultured by acetate were compact, stable and resistant to aniline.

  13. Kinetics of aerobic cometabolic biodegradation of chlorinated and brominated aliphatic hydrocarbons: A review.

    PubMed

    Jesus, João; Frascari, Dario; Pozdniakova, Tatiana; Danko, Anthony S

    2016-05-15

    This review analyses kinetic studies of aerobic cometabolism (AC) of halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) from 2001-2015 in order to (i) compare the different kinetic models proposed, (ii) analyse the estimated model parameters with a focus on novel HAHs and the identification of general trends, and (iii) identify further research needs. The results of this analysis show that aerobic cometabolism can degrade a wide range of HAHs, including HAHs that were not previously tested such as chlorinated propanes, highly chlorinated ethanes and brominated methanes and ethanes. The degree of chlorine mineralization was very high for the chlorinated HAHs. Bromine mineralization was not determined for studies with brominated aliphatics. The examined research period led to the identification of novel growth substrates of potentially high interest. Decreasing performance of aerobic cometabolism were found with increasing chlorination, indicating the high potential of aerobic cometabolism in the presence of medium- and low-halogenated HAHs. Further research is needed for the AC of brominated aliphatic hydrocarbons, the potential for biofilm aerobic cometabolism processes, HAH-HAH mutual inhibition and the identification of the enzymes responsible for each aerobic cometabolism process. Lastly, some indications for a possible standardization of future kinetic studies of HAH aerobic cometabolism are provided. PMID:26874310

  14. Arsenic as an energy source for microbial growth. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.

    2009-12-01

    Arsenic, although known for millenia to be a potent poison, can also constitute the basis for energy metabolism by a number of Bacteria and Archaea. Hence, the oxyanion arsenate [As(V)] can serve as a respiratory electron acceptor for the growth of anaerobes, resulting in the accumulation of arsenite [As(III)]. Conversely, As(III) can serve as an electron donor for the growth of aerobic and anaerobic (e.g., nitrate-respiring) chemoautotrophs, as well as photoautotrophs that grow via anoxygenic photosynthesis. Collectively, these microbes carry out these redox reactions between the +3 and +5 oxidation states that have profound importance for the mobility of As in the environment, and perhaps for the pattern of microbial evolution on Earth. I will focus upon the occurrence of these microbes in extreme environments that are rich in naturally-occurring arsenic.

  15. Aerobic granular processes: Current research trends.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quanguo; Hu, Jianjun; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-06-01

    Aerobic granules are large biological aggregates with compact interiors that can be used in efficient wastewater treatment. This mini-review presents new researches on the development of aerobic granular processes, extended treatments for complicated pollutants, granulation mechanisms and enhancements of granule stability in long-term operation or storage, and the reuse of waste biomass as renewable resources. A discussion on the challenges of, and prospects for, the commercialization of aerobic granular process is provided. PMID:26873285

  16. Thermal acclimation is not necessary to maintain a wide thermal breadth of aerobic scope in the common killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus).

    PubMed

    Healy, Timothy M; Schulte, Patricia M

    2012-01-01

    Loss of aerobic scope at high and low temperatures is a physiological mechanism proposed to limit the thermal performance and tolerance of organisms, a theory known as oxygen- and capacity-limited thermal tolerance (OCLTT). Eurythermal organisms maintain aerobic scope over wide ranges of temperatures, but it is unknown whether acclimation is necessary to maintain this breadth. The objective of this study was to examine changes in aerobic scope in Fundulus heteroclitus, a eurythermal fish, after acclimation and acute exposure to temperatures from 5° to 33°C. The range of temperatures over which aerobic scope was nonzero was similar in acclimated and acutely exposed fish, suggesting that acclimation has modest effects on the thermal breadth of aerobic scope. However, in acclimated fish, there was a clear optimum temperature range for aerobic scope between 25° and 30°C, whereas aerobic scope was relatively constant across the entire temperature range with acute temperature exposure. Therefore, the primary effect of acclimation was to increase aerobic scope between 25° and 30°C, which paradoxically resulted in a narrower temperature range of optimal performance in acclimated fish compared to acutely exposed fish. There was only weak evidence for correlations between the thermal optimum of aerobic scope and the thermal optimum of measures of performance (specific growth rate and gonadosomatic index), and indicators of anaerobic metabolism (lactate accumulation and lactate dehydrogenase activity) only increased at high temperatures. Together these data fit many, but not all, of the predictions made by OCLTT.

  17. Euglena gracilis rhodoquinone:ubiquinone ratio and mitochondrial proteome differ under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeister, Meike; van der Klei, Anita; Rotte, Carmen; van Grinsven, Koen W A; van Hellemond, Jaap J; Henze, Katrin; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Martin, William

    2004-05-21

    Euglena gracilis cells grown under aerobic and anaerobic conditions were compared for their whole cell rhodoquinone and ubiquinone content and for major protein spots contained in isolated mitochondria as assayed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry sequencing. Anaerobically grown cells had higher rhodoquinone levels than aerobically grown cells in agreement with earlier findings indicating the need for fumarate reductase activity in anaerobic wax ester fermentation in Euglena. Microsequencing revealed components of complex III and complex IV of the respiratory chain and the E1beta subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase to be present in mitochondria of aerobically grown cells but lacking in mitochondria from anaerobically grown cells. No proteins were identified as specific to mitochondria from anaerobically grown cells. cDNAs for the E1alpha, E2, and E3 subunits of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase were cloned and shown to be differentially expressed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Their expression patterns differed from that of mitochondrial pyruvate:NADP(+) oxidoreductase, the N-terminal domain of which is pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, an enzyme otherwise typical of hydrogenosomes, hydrogen-producing forms of mitochondria found among anaerobic protists. The Euglena mitochondrion is thus a long sought intermediate that unites biochemical properties of aerobic and anaerobic mitochondria and hydrogenosomes because it contains both pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and rhodoquinone typical of hydrogenosomes and anaerobic mitochondria as well as pyruvate dehydrogenase and ubiquinone typical of aerobic mitochondria. Our data show that under aerobic conditions Euglena mitochondria are prepared for anaerobic function and furthermore suggest that the ancestor of mitochondria was a facultative anaerobe, segments of whose physiology have been preserved in the Euglena lineage.

  18. Lower limb loading in step aerobic dance.

    PubMed

    Wu, H-W; Hsieh, H-M; Chang, Y-W; Wang, L-H

    2012-11-01

    Participation in aerobic dance is associated with a number of lower extremity injuries, and abnormal joint loading seems to be a factor in these. However, information on joint loading is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate the kinetics of the lower extremity in step aerobic dance and to compare the differences of high-impact and low-impact step aerobic dance in 4 aerobic movements (mambo, kick, L step and leg curl). 18 subjects were recruited for this study. High-impact aerobic dance requires a significantly greater range of motion, joint force and joint moment than low-impact step aerobic dance. The peak joint forces and moments in high-impact step aerobic dance were found to be 1.4 times higher than in low-impact step aerobic dance. Understanding the nature of joint loading may help choreographers develop dance combinations that are less injury-prone. Furthermore, increased knowledge about joint loading may be helpful in lowering the risk of injuries in aerobic dance instructors and students.

  19. Metabolic reprogramming towards aerobic glycolysis correlates with greater proliferative ability and resistance to metabolic inhibition in CD8 versus CD4 T cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yilin; Rathmell, Jeffrey C; Macintyre, Andrew N

    2014-01-01

    T lymphocytes (T cells) undergo metabolic reprogramming after activation to provide energy and biosynthetic materials for growth, proliferation and differentiation. Distinct T cell subsets, however, adopt metabolic programs specific to support their needs. As CD4 T cells coordinate adaptive immune responses while CD8 T cells become cytotoxic effectors, we compared activation-induced proliferation and metabolic reprogramming of these subsets. Resting CD4 and CD8 T cells were metabolically similar and used a predominantly oxidative metabolism. Following activation CD8 T cells proliferated more rapidly. Stimulation led both CD4 and CD8 T cells to sharply increase glucose metabolism and adopt aerobic glycolysis as a primary metabolic program. Activated CD4 T cells, however, remained more oxidative and had greater maximal respiratory capacity than activated CD8 T cells. CD4 T cells were also associated with greater levels of ROS and increased mitochondrial content, irrespective of the activation context. CD8 cells were better able, however, to oxidize glutamine as an alternative fuel source. The more glycolytic metabolism of activated CD8 T cells correlated with increased capacity for growth and proliferation, along with reduced sensitivity of cell growth to metabolic inhibition. These specific metabolic programs may promote greater growth and proliferation of CD8 T cells and enhance survival in diverse nutrient conditions.

  20. Characteristics of a Novel Aerobic Denitrifying Bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae Strain HNR.

    PubMed

    Guo, Long-Jie; Zhao, Bin; An, Qiang; Tian, Meng

    2016-03-01

    A novel aerobic denitrifier strain HNR, isolated from activated sludge, was identified as Enterobacter cloacae by16S rRNA sequencing analysis. Glucose was considered as the most favorable C-source for strain HNR. The logistic equation well described the bacterial growth, yielding a maximum growth rate (μmax) of 0.283 h(-1) with an initial NO3 (-)-N concentration of 110 mg/L. Almost all NO3 (-)-N was removed aerobically within 30 h with an average removal rate of 4.58 mg N L(-1) h(-1). Nitrogen balance analysis revealed that proximately 70.8 % of NO3 (-)-N was removed as gas products and only 20.7 % was transformed into biomass. GC-MS result indicates that N2 was the end product of aerobic denitrification. The enzyme activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, which are related to the process of aerobic denitrification, were 0.0688 and 0.0054 U/mg protein, respectively. Thus, the aerobic denitrification of reducing NO3 (-) to N2 by strain HNR was demonstrated. The optimal conditions for nitrate removal were C/N ratio 13, pH value 8, shaking speed 127 rpm and temperature 30 °C. These findings show that E. cloacae strain HNR has a potential application on wastewater treatment to achieve nitrate removal under aerobic conditions.

  1. Characterisation of the aerobic bacterial flora of boid snakes: application of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Plenz, Bastian; Schmidt, Volker; Grosse-Herrenthey, Anke; Krüger, Monika; Pees, Michael

    2015-03-14

    The aim of this study was to identify aerobic bacterial isolates from the respiratory tract of boids with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). From 47 boid snakes, swabs from the oral cavity, tracheal wash samples and, in cases in which postmortem examination was performed, pulmonary tissue samples were taken. Each snake was classified as having inflammation of the respiratory tract and/or oral cavity, or without evidence of inflammation based on combination of clinical, cytological and histopathological findings. Samples collected from the respiratory tract and oral cavity were inoculated onto routine media and bacteria were cultured aerobically. All morphologically distinct individual colonies obtained were analysed using MALDI-TOF MS. Unidentified isolates detected in more than three snakes were selected for further 16S rDNA PCR and sequencing. Among all examined isolates (n=243), 49 per cent (n=119) could be sufficiently speciated using MALDI-TOF MS. Molecular biology revealed several bacterial species that have not been previously described in reptiles. With an average of 6.3 different isolates from the respiratory tract and/or oral cavity, boids with inflammatory disease harboured significantly more bacterial species than boids without inflammatory disease (average 2.8 isolates).

  2. Mycobacterial Aerosols and Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Environmental opportunistic mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium avium, M. terrae, and the new species M. immunogenum, have been implicated in outbreaks of hypersensitivity pneumonitis or respiratory problems in a wide variety of settings. One common feature of the outbreaks has been exposure to aerosols. Aerosols have been generated from metalworking fluid during machining and grinding operations as well as from indoor swimming pools, hot tubs, and water-damaged buildings. Environmental opportunistic mycobacteria are present in drinking water, resistant to disinfection, able to provoke inflammatory reactions, and readily aerosolized. In all outbreaks, the water sources of the aerosols were disinfected. Disinfection may select for the predominance and growth of mycobacteria. Therefore, mycobacteria may be responsible, in part, for many outbreaks of hypersensitivity pneumonitis and other respiratory problems in the workplace and home. PMID:12890314

  3. The YJR127C/ZMS1 gene product is involved in glycerol-based respiratory growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lin; Roberts, George G; Oszust, Cynthia; Hudson, Alan P

    2005-10-01

    A putative yeast mitochondrial upstream activating sequence (UAS) was used in a one-hybrid screening procedure that identified the YJR127C ORF on chromosome X. This gene was previously designated ZMS1 and is listed as a transcription factor on the SGD website. Real time RT-PCR assays showed that expression of YJR127C/ZMS1 was glucose-repressible, and a deletion mutant for the gene showed a growth defect on glycerol-based but not on glucose- or ethanol-based medium. Real time RT-PCR analyses identified severely attenuated transcript levels from GUT1 and GUT2 to be the source of that growth defect, the products of GUT1 and GUT2 are required for glycerol utilization. mRNA levels from a large group of mitochondria- and respiration-related nuclear genes also were shown to be attenuated in the deletion mutant. Importantly, transcript levels from the mitochondrial OLI1 gene, which has an associated organellar UAS, were attenuated in the DeltaYJR127C mutant during glycerol-based growth, but those from COX3 (OXI2), which lacks an associated mitochondrial UAS, were not. Transcriptome analysis of the glycerol-grown deletion mutant showed that genes in several metabolic and other categories are affected by loss of this gene product, including protein transport, signal transduction, and others. Thus, the product of YJR127C/ZMS1 is involved in transcriptional control for genes in both cellular genetic compartments, many of which specify products required for glycerol-based growth, respiration, and other functions.

  4. Decreasing Electron Flux through the Cytochrome and/or Alternative Respiratory Pathways Triggers Common and Distinct Cellular Responses Dependent on Growth Conditions1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Kristina; Yin, Guangkun; Duncan, Owen; Law, Simon R.; Kubiszewski-Jakubiak, Szymon; Kaur, Parwinder; Meyer, Etienne; Wang, Yan; Small, Catherine Colas des Francs; Giraud, Estelle; Narsai, Reena; Whelan, James

    2015-01-01

    Diverse signaling pathways are activated by perturbation of mitochondrial function under different growth conditions.Mitochondria have emerged as an important organelle for sensing and coping with stress in addition to being the sites of important metabolic pathways. Here, responses to moderate light and drought stress were examined in different Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant plants lacking a functional alternative oxidase (alternative oxidase1a [aox1a]), those with reduced cytochrome electron transport chain capacity (T3/T7 bacteriophage-type RNA polymerase, mitochondrial, and plastidial [rpoTmp]), and double mutants impaired in both pathways (aox1a:rpoTmp). Under conditions considered optimal for growth, transcriptomes of aox1a and rpoTmp were distinct. Under adverse growth conditions, however, transcriptome changes in aox1a and rpoTmp displayed a highly significant overlap and were indicative of a common mitochondrial stress response and down-regulation of photosynthesis. This suggests that the role of mitochondria to support photosynthesis is provided through either the alternative pathway or the cytochrome pathway, and when either pathway is inhibited, such as under environmental stress, a common, dramatic, and succinct mitochondrial signal is activated to alter energy metabolism in both organelles. aox1a:rpoTmp double mutants grown under optimal conditions showed dramatic reductions in biomass production compared with aox1a and rpoTmp and a transcriptome that was distinct from aox1a or rpoTmp. Transcript data indicating activation of mitochondrial biogenesis in aox1a:rpoTmp were supported by a proteomic analysis of over 200 proteins. Under optimal conditions, aox1a:rpoTmp plants seemed to switch on many of the typical mitochondrial stress regulators. Under adverse conditions, aox1a:rpoTmp turned off these responses and displayed a biotic stress response. Taken together, these results highlight the diverse signaling pathways activated by the

  5. Cardiovascular response to dynamic aerobic exercise: a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Magosso, E; Ursino, M

    2002-11-01

    An original mathematical model of the cardiovascular response to dynamic exercise is presented. It includes the pulsating heart, the pulmonary and systemic circulation, a separate description of the vascular bed in active tissues, the local metabolic vasodilation in these tissues and the mechanical effects of muscular contractions on venous return. Moreover, the model provides a description of the ventilatory response to exercise and various neural regulatory mechanisms working on cardiovascular parameters. These mechanisms embrace the so-called central command, the arterial baroreflex and the lung inflation reflex. All parameters in the model have been given in accordance with physiological data from the literature. In this work, the model has been used to simulate the steady-state value of the main cardiorespiratory quantities at different levels of aerobic exercise and the temporal pattern in the transient phase from rest to moderate exercise. Results suggest that, with suitable parameter values the model is able accurately to simulate the cardiorespiratory response in the overall range of aerobic exercise. This response is characterised by a moderate hypertension (10-30%) and by a conspicuous increase in systemic conductance (80-130%), heart rate (64-150%) and cardiac output (100-200%). The transient pattern exhibits three distinct phases (lasting approximately 5s, 15s and 2 min), that reflect the temporal heterogeneity of the mechanisms involved. The model may be useful to improve understanding of exercise physiology and as an educational tool to analyse the complexity of cardiovascular and respiratory regulation.

  6. Cardiovascular response to dynamic aerobic exercise: a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Magosso, E; Ursino, M

    2002-11-01

    An original mathematical model of the cardiovascular response to dynamic exercise is presented. It includes the pulsating heart, the pulmonary and systemic circulation, a separate description of the vascular bed in active tissues, the local metabolic vasodilation in these tissues and the mechanical effects of muscular contractions on venous return. Moreover, the model provides a description of the ventilatory response to exercise and various neural regulatory mechanisms working on cardiovascular parameters. These mechanisms embrace the so-called central command, the arterial baroreflex and the lung inflation reflex. All parameters in the model have been given in accordance with physiological data from the literature. In this work, the model has been used to simulate the steady-state value of the main cardiorespiratory quantities at different levels of aerobic exercise and the temporal pattern in the transient phase from rest to moderate exercise. Results suggest that, with suitable parameter values the model is able accurately to simulate the cardiorespiratory response in the overall range of aerobic exercise. This response is characterised by a moderate hypertension (10-30%) and by a conspicuous increase in systemic conductance (80-130%), heart rate (64-150%) and cardiac output (100-200%). The transient pattern exhibits three distinct phases (lasting approximately 5s, 15s and 2 min), that reflect the temporal heterogeneity of the mechanisms involved. The model may be useful to improve understanding of exercise physiology and as an educational tool to analyse the complexity of cardiovascular and respiratory regulation. PMID:12507317

  7. The efficacy of aerobic training in improving the inflammatory component of asthmatic children. Randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Lívia Barboza de; Britto, Murilo C A; Lucena-Silva, Norma; Gomes, Renan Garcia; Figueroa, José N

    2014-10-01

    Few studies have been conducted on the effects of aerobic exercise in children with asthma, particularly on the inflammatory component and functional outcomes. This study evaluated the effect of aerobic exercise on inflammation, functional capacity, respiratory muscle strength, quality of life and symptoms scores in asthmatic children. This was a 6-week randomized trial (NCT0192052) of 33 moderately asthmatic children (6-17 years). Patients were randomized aerobic training (exercise group; n = 14), while another group did not exercise (control; n = 19). Primary endpoint was evaluations serum cytokines (IL-17, IFN, TNF, IL-10, IL-6, IL-4 and IL-2) assessed by flow cytometry. The six-minute walk test, pulmonary function, quality of life and symptoms (asthma-free days) were secondary endpoint. The Mann-Whitney test was used to evaluate the independent variables and the Wilcoxon test for paired variables. The t-test was used for the remaining calculations. Significance was determined at 5%. Aerobic training failed to modify the inflammatory component. In the exercise group, an increase occurred in functional capacity (p < 0.01) and peak expiratory flow (p = 0.002), and maximal inspiratory (p = 0.005) and expiratory pressure (p < 0.01) improved. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in all the domains of the PAQLQ. The children who exercised had more asthma-free days than the controls (p = 0.012) and less sensation of dyspnea at the end of the study (p < 0.01). In conclusion, six weeks of aerobic exercise no changes in plasma cytokine patterns in asthmatic children and adolescents; however, an improvement was found in functional capacity, maximal respiratory pressure, quality of life and asthma-related symptoms. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT0192052.

  8. Aerobic rice mechanization: techniques for crop establishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusairy, K. M.; Ayob, H.; Chan, C. S.; Fauzi, M. I. Mohamed; Mohamad Fakhrul, Z. O.; Shahril Shah, G. S. M.; Azlan, O.; Rasad, M. A.; Hashim, A. M.; Arshad, Z.; E, E. Ibrahim; Saifulizan, M. N.

    2015-12-01

    Rice being the staple food crops, hundreds of land races in it makes the diversity of rice crops. Aerobic rice production was introduced which requires much less water input to safeguard and sustain the rice production and conserve water due to decreasing water resources, climatic changes and competition from urban and industrial users. Mechanization system plays an important role for the success of aerobic rice cultivation. All farming activities for aerobic rice production are run on aerobic soil conditions. Row seeder mechanization system is developed to replace conventional seeding technique on the aerobic rice field. It is targeted for small and the large scale aerobic rice farmers. The aero - seeder machine is used for the small scale aerobic rice field, while the accord - seeder is used for the large scale aerobic rice field. The use of this mechanization machine can eliminate the tedious and inaccurate seeding operations reduce labour costs and increases work rate. The machine is easy to operate and it can increase crop establishment rate. It reduce missing hill, increasing planting and crop with high yield can be produce. This machine is designed for low costs maintenance and it is easy to dismantle and assemble during maintenance and it is safe to be used.

  9. Aerobic Dancing--A Rhythmic Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Jacki

    Fitness programs now and in the future must offer built-in cardiovascular conditioning, variety, novelty, and change to meet the physical, mental, and emotional needs of our society. Aerobic dancing (dancing designed to train and strengthen the heart, lungs, and vascular system) is one of the first indoor group Aerobic exercise programs designed…

  10. Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy after Aerobic Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Adam R.; Harber, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Current dogma suggests aerobic exercise training has minimal effect on skeletal muscle size. We and others have demonstrated that aerobic exercise acutely and chronically alters protein metabolism and induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy. These findings promote an antithesis to the status quo by providing novel perspective on skeletal muscle mass regulation and insight into exercise-countermeasures for populations prone to muscle loss. PMID:24508740

  11. Filamentous bacteria existence in aerobic granular reactors.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, M; Val del Río, A; Campos, J L; Méndez, R; Mosquera-Corral, A

    2015-05-01

    Filamentous bacteria are associated to biomass settling problems in wastewater treatment plants. In systems based on aerobic granular biomass they have been proposed to contribute to the initial biomass aggregation process. However, their development on mature aerobic granular systems has not been sufficiently studied. In the present research work, filamentous bacteria were studied for the first time after long-term operation (up to 300 days) of aerobic granular systems. Chloroflexi and Sphaerotilus natans have been observed in a reactor fed with synthetic wastewater. These filamentous bacteria could only come from the inoculated sludge. Thiothrix and Chloroflexi bacteria were observed in aerobic granular biomass treating wastewater from a fish canning industry. Meganema perideroedes was detected in a reactor treating wastewater from a plant processing marine products. As a conclusion, the source of filamentous bacteria in these mature aerobic granular systems fed with industrial effluents was the incoming wastewater.

  12. The respiratory system.

    PubMed

    Zifko, U; Chen, R

    1996-10-01

    Neurological disorders frequently contribute to respiratory failure in critically ill patients. They may be the primary reason for the initiation of mechanical ventilation, or may develop later as a secondary complication. Disorders of the central nervous system leading to respiratory failure include metabolic encephalopathies, acute stroke, lesions of the motor cortex and brain-stem respiratory centres, and their descending pathways. Guillan-Barré syndrome, critical illness polyneuropathy and acute quadriplegic myopathy are the more common neuromuscular causes of respiratory failure. Clinical observations and pulmonary function tests are important in monitoring respiratory function. Respiratory electrophysiological studies are useful in the investigation and monitoring of respiratory failure. Transcortical and cervical magnetic stimulation can assess the central respiratory drive, and may be useful in determining the prognosis in ventilated patients, with cervical cord dysfunction. It is also helpful in the assessment of failure to wean, which is often caused by a combination of central and peripheral nervous system disorders. Phrenic nerve conduction studies and needle electromyography of the diaphragm and chest wall muscles are useful to characterize neuropathies and myopathies affecting the diaphragm. Repetitive phrenic nerve stimulation can assess neuromuscular transmission defects. It is important to identify patients at risk of respiratory failure. They should be carefully monitored and mechanical ventilation should be initiated before the development of severe hypoxaemia.

  13. The human respiratory gate

    PubMed Central

    Eckberg, Dwain L

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory activity phasically alters membrane potentials of preganglionic vagal and sympathetic motoneurones and continuously modulates their responsiveness to stimulatory inputs. The most obvious manifestation of this ‘respiratory gating’ is respiratory sinus arrhythmia, the rhythmic fluctuations of electrocardiographic R–R intervals observed in healthy resting humans. Phasic autonomic motoneurone firing, reflecting the throughput of the system, depends importantly on the intensity of stimulatory inputs, such that when levels of stimulation are low (as with high arterial pressure and sympathetic activity, or low arterial pressure and vagal activity), respiratory fluctuations of sympathetic or vagal firing are also low. The respiratory gate has a finite capacity, and high levels of stimulation override the ability of respiration to gate autonomic responsiveness. Autonomic throughput also depends importantly on other factors, including especially, the frequency of breathing, the rate at which the gate opens and closes. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia is small at rapid, and large at slow breathing rates. The strong correlation between systolic pressure and R–R intervals at respiratory frequencies reflects the influence of respiration on these two measures, rather than arterial baroreflex physiology. A wide range of evidence suggests that respiratory activity gates the timing of autonomic motoneurone firing, but does not influence its tonic level. I propose that the most enduring significance of respiratory gating is its use as a precisely controlled experimental tool to tease out and better understand otherwise inaccessible human autonomic neurophysiological mechanisms. PMID:12626671

  14. The human respiratory gate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, Dwain L.

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory activity phasically alters membrane potentials of preganglionic vagal and sympathetic motoneurones and continuously modulates their responsiveness to stimulatory inputs. The most obvious manifestation of this 'respiratory gating' is respiratory sinus arrhythmia, the rhythmic fluctuations of electrocardiographic R-R intervals observed in healthy resting humans. Phasic autonomic motoneurone firing, reflecting the throughput of the system, depends importantly on the intensity of stimulatory inputs, such that when levels of stimulation are low (as with high arterial pressure and sympathetic activity, or low arterial pressure and vagal activity), respiratory fluctuations of sympathetic or vagal firing are also low. The respiratory gate has a finite capacity, and high levels of stimulation override the ability of respiration to gate autonomic responsiveness. Autonomic throughput also depends importantly on other factors, including especially, the frequency of breathing, the rate at which the gate opens and closes. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia is small at rapid, and large at slow breathing rates. The strong correlation between systolic pressure and R-R intervals at respiratory frequencies reflects the influence of respiration on these two measures, rather than arterial baroreflex physiology. A wide range of evidence suggests that respiratory activity gates the timing of autonomic motoneurone firing, but does not influence its tonic level. I propose that the most enduring significance of respiratory gating is its use as a precisely controlled experimental tool to tease out and better understand otherwise inaccessible human autonomic neurophysiological mechanisms.

  15. [Aerobic microbial degradation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers].

    PubMed

    Ding, Juan; Zhou, Juan; Jiang, Wei-Ying; Gao, Shi-Xiang

    2008-11-01

    The biodegradation of 4, 4'-dibromodipheny ether (BDE15) and decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209) by white rot fungi under aerobic conditions was studied. Effects of non-ionic surfactant Tween 80 and beta-cyclodextrin as solubilizers on the apparent solubilities and biodegradation rates of BDE15 and BDE209 were also evaluated. The results showed that both BDE15 and BDE209 were efficiently degraded by white rot fungi. The degradation rates were 43.0% and 62.5% for BDE209 and BDE15, respectively, after 10 d incubation. The degradation of BDE209 was greatly enhanced by addition of Tween 80 (< or = 700 mg/L) and beta-cyclodextrin, which may own to their solubilization effects on BDE209. However, Tween 80 at a high concentration (900 mg/L) would restrain the fungal growth, thereby decrease the degradation of BDE209. Addition of Tween 80 and beta-cyclodextrin exhibited some negative effects on the degradation of BDE15, which may due to decreased concentration of free BDE15 in water solution resulted from inclusion function of Tween 80 micelles and beta-cyclodextrin cavity, although the apparent solubility of BDE15 was drastically increased by both of them. PMID:19186824

  16. Aerobic biodegradation of the chloroethenes: pathways, enzymes, ecology, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Mattes, Timothy E; Alexander, Anne K; Coleman, Nicholas V

    2010-07-01

    Extensive use and inadequate disposal of chloroethenes have led to prevalent groundwater contamination worldwide. The occurrence of the lesser chlorinated ethenes [i.e. vinyl chloride (VC) and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE)] in groundwater is primarily a consequence of incomplete anaerobic reductive dechlorination of the more highly chlorinated ethenes (tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene). VC and cDCE are toxic and VC is a known human carcinogen. Therefore, their presence in groundwater is undesirable. In situ cleanup of VC- and cDCE-contaminated groundwater via oxidation by aerobic microorganisms is an attractive and potentially cost-effective alternative to physical and chemical approaches. Of particular interest are aerobic bacteria that use VC or cDCE as growth substrates (known as the VC- and cDCE-assimilating bacteria). Bacteria that grow on VC are readily isolated from contaminated and uncontaminated environments, suggesting that they are widespread and influential in aerobic natural attenuation of VC. In contrast, only one cDCE-assimilating strain has been isolated, suggesting that their environmental occurrence is rare. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of the physiology, biodegradation pathways, genetics, ecology, and evolution of VC- and cDCE-assimilating bacteria. Techniques (e.g. PCR, proteomics, and compound-specific isotope analysis) that aim to determine the presence, numbers, and activity of these bacteria in the environment will also be discussed.

  17. Posttranscriptional Control of T Cell Effector Function by Aerobic Glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Curtis, Jonathan D.; Maggi, Leonard B.; Faubert, Brandon; Villarino, Alejandro V.; O’Sullivan, David; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; van der Windt, Gerritje J.W.; Blagih, Julianna; Qiu, Jing; Weber, Jason D.; Pearce, Edward J.; Jones, Russell G.; Pearce, Erika L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY A “switch” from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to aerobic glycolysis is a hallmark of T cell activation and is thought to be required to meet the metabolic demands of proliferation. However, why proliferating cells adopt this less efficient metabolism, especially in an oxygen-replete environment, remains incompletely understood. We show here that aerobic glycolysis is specifically required for effector function in T cells but that this pathway is not necessary for proliferation or survival. When activated T cells are provided with costimulation and growth factors but are blocked from engaging glycolysis, their ability to produce IFN-γ is markedly compromised. This defect is translational and is regulated by the binding of the glycolysis enzyme GAPDH to AU-rich elements within the 3′ UTR of IFN-γ mRNA. GAPDH, by engaging/disengaging glycolysis and through fluctuations in its expression, controls effector cytokine production. Thus, aerobic glycolysis is a metabolically regulated signaling mechanism needed to control cellular function. PMID:23746840

  18. Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waag, Andreas

    This chapter is devoted to the growth of ZnO. It starts with various techniques to grow bulk samples and presents in some detail the growth of epitaxial layers by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The last section is devoted to the growth of nanorods. Some properties of the resulting samples are also presented. If a comparison between GaN and ZnO is made, very often the huge variety of different growth techniques available to fabricate ZnO is said to be an advantage of this material system. Indeed, growth techniques range from low cost wet chemical growth at almost room temperature to high quality MOCVD growth at temperatures above 1, 000∘C. In most cases, there is a very strong tendency of c-axis oriented growth, with a much higher growth rate in c-direction as compared to other crystal directions. This often leads to columnar structures, even at relatively low temperatures. However, it is, in general, not straight forward to fabricate smooth ZnO thin films with flat surfaces. Another advantage of a potential ZnO technology is said to be the possibility to grow thin films homoepitaxially on ZnO substrates. ZnO substrates are mostly fabricated by vapor phase transport (VPT) or hydrothermal growth. These techniques are enabling high volume manufacturing at reasonable cost, at least in principle. The availability of homoepitaxial substrates should be beneficial to the development of ZnO technology and devices and is in contrast to the situation of GaN. However, even though a number of companies are developing ZnO substrates, only recently good quality substrates have been demonstrated. However, these substrates are not yet widely available. Still, the situation concerning ZnO substrates seems to be far from low-cost, high-volume production. The fabrication of dense, single crystal thin films is, in general, surprisingly difficult, even when ZnO is grown on a ZnO substrate. However

  19. Aerobic Microbial Respiration in Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvelage, Tim; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene M.; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Schunck, Harald; Loescher, Carolin; Desai, Dhwani K.; LaRoche, Julie; Schmitz-Streit, Ruth; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.

    2014-05-01

    In the oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) of the tropical oceans, sluggish ventilation combined with strong microbial respiration of sinking organic matter results in the depletion of oxygen (O2). When O2 concentrations drop below ~5 µmol/L, organic matter is generally assumed to be respired with nitrate, ultimately leading to the loss of fixed inorganic nitrogen via anammox and denitrification. However, direct measurements of microbial O2 consumption at low O2 levels are - apart from a single experiment conducted in the OMZ off Peru - so far lacking. At the same time, consistently observed active aerobic ammonium and nitrite oxidation at non-detectable O2 concentrations (<1 µmol/L) in all major OMZs, suggests aerobic microorganisms, likely including heterotrophs, to be well adapted to near-anoxic conditions. Consequently, microaerobic (≤5 µmol/L) remineralization of organic matter, and thus release of ammonium, in low- O2 environments might be significantly underestimated at present. Here we present extensive measurements of microbial O2 consumption in OMZ waters, combined with highly sensitive O2 (STOX) measurements and meta-omic functional gene analyses. Short-term incubation experiments with labelled O2 (18-18O2) carried out in the Namibian and Peruvian OMZ, revealed persistent aerobic microbial activity at depths with non-detectable concentrations of O2 (≤50 nmol/L). In accordance, examination of metagenomes and metatranscriptomes from Chilean and Peruvian OMZ waters identified genes encoding for terminal respiratory oxidases with high O2 affinities as well as their expression by diverse microbial communities. Oxygen consumption was particularly enhanced near the upper OMZ boundaries and could mostly (~80%) be assigned to heterotrophic microbial activity. Compared to previously identified anaerobic microbial processes, microaerobic organic matter respiration was the dominant remineralization pathway and source of ammonium (~90%) in the upper Namibian and

  20. Respiratory Care Therapist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of respiratory care therapist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 18 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general as well as those specific to the occupation of respiratory care therapist. The following…

  1. Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Palsy: Shannon's Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Respiratory Syncytial Virus KidsHealth > For Parents > Respiratory Syncytial Virus Print A ... often get it when older kids carry the virus home from school and pass it to ... often happen in epidemics that last from late fall through early spring. ...

  2. Alternative respiratory path capacity in plant mitochondria: effect of growth temperature, the electrochemical gradient, and assay pH. [Zea mays L. , Vigna radiata L. , Symplocarpus foetidus L. , Sauromatum guttatum Schott

    SciTech Connect

    Elthon, T.E.; Stewart, C.R.; McCoy, C.A.; Bonner, W.D. Jr.

    1986-02-01

    Influence of growth temperature on the capacity of the mitochondrial alternative pathway of electron transport was investigated using etiolated corn (Zea mays L.) seedlings. These seedlings were grown to comparable size in either a warm (30/sup 0/C) or a cold (13/sup 0/C) temperature regime, and then their respiration rates were measured as O/sub 2/ uptake at 25/sup 0/C. The capacity of the alternative pathway (KCN-insensitive O/sub 2/ uptake) was found essentially to double in shoots of cold-grown seedlings. When mitochondria were isolated from the shoots a greater potential for flow through the alternative path was observed in mitochondria from the cold-grown seedlings with all substrates used (an average increase of 84%). Using exogenous NADH as the substrate, the effect of the electrochemical gradient on measurable capacities of the cytochrome and alternative pathways was investigated in mitochondria from both etiolated seedlings and thermogenic spadices. In corn shoot and mung bean (Vigna radiata L.) hypocotyl mitochondria increased flow through the cytochrome chain in the absence of the electrochemical gradient was found not to influence the potential for flow through the alternative path. However, in mitochondria from skunk cabbage (Symplocarpus foetidus L.) and voodoo lily (Sauromatum gutatum Schott) spadices increased flow through the cytochrome chain in the absence of the gradient occurred at the expense of flow through the alternative pathway. This experiment also revealed that the potential for respiratory control is largely dependent upon the assay pH.

  3. Fit women are not able to use the whole aerobic capacity during aerobic dance.

    PubMed

    Edvardsen, Elisabeth; Ingjer, Frank; Bø, Kari

    2011-12-01

    Edvardsen, E, Ingjer, F, and Bø, K. Fit women are not able to use the whole aerobic capacity during aerobic dance. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3479-3485, 2011-This study compared the aerobic capacity during maximal aerobic dance and treadmill running in fit women. Thirteen well-trained female aerobic dance instructors aged 30 ± 8.17 years (mean ± SD) exercised to exhaustion by running on a treadmill for measurement of maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2)max) and peak heart rate (HRpeak). Additionally, all subjects performed aerobic dancing until exhaustion after a choreographed videotaped routine trying to reach the same HRpeak as during maximal running. The p value for statistical significance between running and aerobic dance was set to ≤0.05. The results (mean ± SD) showed a lower VO(2)max in aerobic dance (52.2 ± 4.02 ml·kg·min) compared with treadmill running (55.9 ± 5.03 ml·kg·min) (p = 0.0003). Further, the mean ± SD HRpeak was 182 ± 9.15 b·min in aerobic dance and 192 ± 9.62 b·min in treadmill running, giving no difference in oxygen pulse between the 2 exercise forms (p = 0.32). There was no difference in peak ventilation (aerobic dance: 108 ± 10.81 L·min vs. running: 113 ± 11.49 L·min). In conclusion, aerobic dance does not seem to be able to use the whole aerobic capacity as in running. For well endurance-trained women, this may result in a lower total workload at maximal intensities. Aerobic dance may therefore not be as suitable as running during maximal intensities in well-trained females.

  4. Nosocomial viral respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Graman, P S; Hall, C B

    1989-12-01

    Nosocomial infections with respiratory tract viruses, particularly influenza and respiratory syncytial viruses, account for the majority of serious nosocomial viral disease. Chronically ill, immunocompromised, elderly, and very young hosts are especially vulnerable to potentially life-threatening involvement of the lower respiratory tract. Effective preventive strategies are based upon early accurate viral diagnosis and an appreciation of the epidemiology and mechanisms of transmission for each viral agent. Influenza viruses spread via airborne dispersion of small particle aerosols, resulting in explosive outbreaks; control measures emphasize immunization and chemoprophylaxis of susceptible patients and personnel, and isolation of those already infected. Transmission of respiratory syncytial virus, in contrast, seems to require closer contact, with virus passed on hands, fomites, or in large droplets inoculated into the eyes and nose at close range. Strategies for control of nosocomial respiratory syncytial virus are designed to interrupt hand carriage and inoculation of virus onto mucous membranes.

  5. American Association for Respiratory Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... search AARC Respiratory Care Marketplace Search for respiratory companies and products to meet your needs through the all new AARC Respiratory Care Marketplace. Search with a Purpose Education Webcasts Online Courses CRCE Lookup AARC Store Shop ...

  6. Effects of etiologically defined respiratory infections on lung function and its growth in an area of low air pollution - spirometry in young children when illness-free

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, A.M.; Strope, G.L.; Helms, R.W.; LaVange, L.M.; Clyde, W.A. Jr.

    1981-03-01

    This longitudinal study was performed in a group of 3-12 year old children to document normal lung growth patterns as measured by spirometry. By clinical and laboratory parameters, these children were free of illness at the time of study and had been for the preceding 21 days. Spirometry was performed prospectively over a period of six years in 69 children (27 black females, 23 black males, 10 white females, and 9 white males) all from a day care center. Eight hundred fifteen spirometric tests were made on these children. Six spirometric parameters were measured: forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), peak expiratory flow (PEF), forced expiratory flow during the middle half of the FVC (FEF25-75%), and maximum expiratory flows after 50% and 75% of the FVC have been exhaled (Vmax50% and Vmax75%, respectively). There were significant differences between the regression lines (considering slope and intercept) for all six parameters when black females were compared to black males, white females to white males, black females to white females and black males to white males, except for Vmax75% for the comparison of black females to black males and white females to white males. These slopes and intercepts were similar to those reported by others for children of similar age and height. This study demonstrates that spirometry can be performed reliabley at an early age in a day care center population, that there are significant racial and sexual differences in spirometric volume and flow parameters and that the variability of these measurements is proportional to height rather than being a constant.

  7. Improved Aerobic Colony Count Technique for Hydrophobic Grid Membrane Filters

    PubMed Central

    Parrington, Lorna J.; Sharpe, Anthony N.; Peterkin, Pearl I.

    1993-01-01

    The AOAC International official action procedure for performing aerobic colony counts on hydrophobic grid membrane filters (HGMFs) uses Trypticase soy-fast green FCF agar (FGA) incubated for 48 h. Microbial growths are various shades of green on a pale green background, which can cause problems for automated as well as manual counting. HGMFs which had been incubated 24 or 48 h at 35°C on Trypticase soy agar were flooded underneath with 1 to 2 ml of 0.1% triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) solution by simply lifting one corner of the filter while it was still on the agar and adding the reagent. Microbial growths on HGMFs were counted after color had been allowed to develop for 15 min at room temperature. With representative foods, virtually all colonies stained pink to red. Automated electronic counts made by using the MI-100 HGMF Interpreter were easier and more reliable than control HGMF counts made by the AOAC International official action procedure. Manual counting was easier as well because of increased visibility of the microbial growths. Except in the case of dairy products, 24-h TTC counts did not differ significantly from 48-h FGA counts, whereas the FGA counts at 24 h were always significantly lower, indicating that for many food products the HGMF TTC flooding method permits aerobic colony counts to be made after 24 h. PMID:16349033

  8. Effects of aerobic training on exercise-related oxidative stress in mitochondrial myopathies.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Gabriele; Simoncini, Costanza; Lo Gerfo, Annalisa; Orsucci, Daniele; Ricci, Giulia; Mancuso, Michelangelo

    2012-12-01

    In mitochondrial myopathies with respiratory chain deficiency impairment of energy cell production may lead to in excess reactive oxygen species generation with consequent oxidative stress and cell damage. Aerobic training has been showed to increase muscle performance in patients with mitochondrial myopathies. Aim of this study has been to evaluate, in 7 patients (6 F e 1M, mean age 44.9 ± 12.1 years) affected by mitochondrial disease, concomitantly to lactate exercise curve, the occurrence of oxidative stress, as indicated by circulating levels of lipoperoxides, in rest condition and as effect of exercise, and also, to verify if an aerobic training program is able to modify, in these patients, ox-redox balance efficiency. At rest and before training blood level of lipoperoxides was 382.4 ± 37.8 AU, compared to controls (318.7 ± 63.8; P<0.05), this corresponding to a moderate oxidative stress degree according to the adopted scale. During incremental exercise blood level of lipoperoxides did not increase, but maintained significantly higher compared to controls. After an aerobic training of 10 weeks the blood level of lipoperoxides decreased by 13.7% at rest (P<0.01) and 10.4%, 8.6% and 8.5% respectively at the corresponding times during the exercise test (P=0.06). These data indicate that, in mitochondrial patients, oxidative stress occurs and that an aerobic training is useful in partially reverting this condition.

  9. Intrinsic aerobic capacity impacts susceptibility to acute high-fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Matthew Morris, E.; Jackman, Matthew R.; Johnson, Ginger C.; Liu, Tzu-Wen; Lopez, Jordan L.; Kearney, Monica L.; Fletcher, Justin A.; Meers, Grace M. E.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Stephen L.; Scott Rector, R.; Ibdah, Jamal A.; MacLean, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic capacity/fitness significantly impacts susceptibility for fatty liver and diabetes, but the mechanisms remain unknown. Herein, we utilized rats selectively bred for high (HCR) and low (LCR) intrinsic aerobic capacity to examine the mechanisms by which aerobic capacity impacts metabolic vulnerability for fatty liver following a 3-day high-fat diet (HFD). Indirect calorimetry assessment of energy metabolism combined with radiolabeled dietary food was employed to examine systemic metabolism in combination with ex vivo measurements of hepatic lipid oxidation. The LCR, but not HCR, displayed increased hepatic lipid accumulation in response to the HFD despite both groups increasing energy intake. However, LCR rats had a greater increase in energy intake and demonstrated greater daily weight gain and percent body fat due to HFD compared with HCR. Additionally, total energy expenditure was higher in the larger LCR. However, controlling for the difference in body weight, the LCR has lower resting energy expenditure compared with HCR. Importantly, respiratory quotient was significantly higher during the HFD in the LCR compared with HCR, suggesting reduced whole body lipid utilization in the LCR. This was confirmed by the observed lower whole body dietary fatty acid oxidation in LCR compared with HCR. Furthermore, LCR liver homogenate and isolated mitochondria showed lower complete fatty acid oxidation compared with HCR. We conclude that rats bred for low intrinsic aerobic capacity show greater susceptibility for dietary-induced hepatic steatosis, which is associated with a lower energy expenditure and reduced whole body and hepatic mitochondrial lipid oxidation. PMID:24961240

  10. Elevated CO2 enhances aerobic scope of a coral reef fish.

    PubMed

    Rummer, Jodie L; Stecyk, Jonathan A W; Couturier, Christine S; Watson, Sue-Ann; Nilsson, Göran E; Munday, Philip L

    2013-01-01

    The uptake of anthropogenic CO2 by the ocean has been suggested to impact marine ecosystems by decreasing the respiratory capacity of fish and other water breathers. We investigated the aerobic metabolic scope of the spiny damselfish, Acanthochromis polyacanthus, from the Great Barrier Reef, Australia when exposed for 17 days to CO2 conditions predicted for the end of the century (946 μatm CO2). Surprisingly, resting O2 consumption rates were significantly lower and maximal O2 consumption rates significantly higher in high-CO2-exposed fish compared with control fish (451 μatm CO2). Consequently, high-CO2-exposed fish exhibited an unexpected increase in absolute (38%) and factorial aerobic scopes (47%). Haematological and muscle water changes associated with exercise were not affected by CO2 treatment. Thus, contrary to predictions, our results suggest that elevated CO2 may enhance aerobic scope of some fish species. Long-term experiments are now required to assess the response to elevated CO2 further, because developmental and transgenerational effects can be dramatic in fish. Ultimately, understanding the variability among species regarding the effects of CO2 on aerobic scope will be critical in predicting the impacts of ocean acidification on marine communities and ecosystems.

  11. Training-induced changes in aerobic aptitudes of professional basketball players.

    PubMed

    Laplaud, D; Hug, F; Menier, R

    2004-02-01

    We investigated the effects of a training program on the aerobic aptitudes and the relevance of the instant of equality of pulmonary gas exchange (i. e., RER = 1.00) to assess these effects in professional basketball players. Eight athletes performed two incremental exercise tests on a cycloergometer separated by 4.7 +/- 0.7 months. Physiological variables recorded during these two tests (heart rate, oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide output, respiratory exchange ratio, power output) allowed to determine the first and second ventilatory thresholds and the instant of equality of pulmonary gas exchange. The training program induced significant variations of resting heart rate, oxygen uptake and power output measured for the instant of equality of pulmonary gas exchange. Moreover, the used fractions of heart rate, oxygen uptake and power reserves for the instant of equality of pulmonary gas exchange and the second ventilatory threshold increase significantly. Inversely, maximal oxygen uptake, maximal power reached and the used fractions of reserves for the first ventilatory threshold do not differ significantly. Professional basketball training is not focused on drills aiming to enhance both the aerobic power and aptitude, our results suggest that this training program induce the same physiological changes as a typical aerobic training. We also demonstrated that the instant of equality of pulmonary gas exchange is a powerful tool to quantify the changes in aerobic aptitudes during a sport season.

  12. Chemotactic Motility of Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 under Aerobic and Denitrification Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; Rivilla, Rafael; Martín, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The sequence of the genome of Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 has shown the presence of multiple traits relevant for rhizosphere colonization and plant growth promotion. Among these traits are denitrification and chemotactic motility. Besides aerobic growth, F113 is able to grow anaerobically using nitrate and nitrite as final electron acceptors. F113 is able to perform swimming motility under aerobic conditions and under anaerobic conditions when nitrate is used as the electron acceptor. However, nitrite can not support swimming motility. Regulation of swimming motility is similar under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, since mutants that are hypermotile under aerobic conditions, such as gacS, sadB, kinB, algU and wspR, are also hypermotile under anaerobic conditions. However, chemotactic behavior is different under aerobic and denitrification conditions. Unlike most pseudomonads, the F113 genome encode three complete chemotaxis systems, Che1, Che2 and Che3. Mutations in each of the cheA genes of the three Che systems has shown that the three systems are functional and independent. Mutation of the cheA1 gene completely abolished swimming motility both under aerobic and denitrification conditions. Mutation of the cheA2 gene, showed only a decrease in swimming motility under both conditions, indicating that this system is not essential for chemotactic motility but is necessary for optimal motility. Mutation of the cheA3 gene abolished motility under denitrification conditions but only produced a decrease in motility under aerobic conditions. The three Che systems proved to be implicated in competitive rhizosphere colonization, being the cheA1 mutant the most affected. PMID:26161531

  13. Structure of the Zymomonas mobilis respiratory chain: oxygen affinity of electron transport and the role of cytochrome c peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Balodite, Elina; Strazdina, Inese; Galinina, Nina; McLean, Samantha; Rutkis, Reinis; Poole, Robert K; Kalnenieks, Uldis

    2014-09-01

    The genome of the ethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis encodes a bd-type terminal oxidase, cytochrome bc1 complex and several c-type cytochromes, yet lacks sequences homologous to any of the known bacterial cytochrome c oxidase genes. Recently, it was suggested that a putative respiratory cytochrome c peroxidase, receiving electrons from the cytochrome bc1 complex via cytochrome c552, might function as a peroxidase and/or an alternative oxidase. The present study was designed to test this hypothesis, by construction of a cytochrome c peroxidase mutant (Zm6-perC), and comparison of its properties with those of a mutant defective in the cytochrome b subunit of the bc1 complex (Zm6-cytB). Disruption of the cytochrome c peroxidase gene (ZZ60192) caused a decrease of the membrane NADH peroxidase activity, impaired the resistance of growing culture to exogenous hydrogen peroxide and hampered aerobic growth. However, this mutation did not affect the activity or oxygen affinity of the respiratory chain, or the kinetics of cytochrome d reduction. Furthermore, the peroxide resistance and membrane NADH peroxidase activity of strain Zm6-cytB had not decreased, but both the oxygen affinity of electron transport and the kinetics of cytochrome d reduction were affected. It is therefore concluded that the cytochrome c peroxidase does not terminate the cytochrome bc1 branch of Z. mobilis, and that it is functioning as a quinol peroxidase.

  14. The Deletion of the Succinate Dehydrogenase Gene KlSDH1 in Kluyveromyces lactis Does Not Lead to Respiratory Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Saliola, Michele; Bartoccioni, Paola Chiara; De Maria, Ilaria; Lodi, Tiziana; Falcone, Claudio

    2004-01-01

    We have isolated a Kluyveromyces lactis mutant unable to grow on all respiratory carbon sources with the exception of lactate. Functional complementation of this mutant led to the isolation of KlSDH1, the gene encoding the flavoprotein subunit of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex, which is essential for the aerobic utilization of carbon sources. Despite the high sequence conservation of the SDH genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and K. lactis, they do not have the same relevance in the metabolism of the two yeasts. In fact, unlike SDH1, KlSDH1 was highly expressed under both fermentative and nonfermentative conditions. In addition to this, but in contrast with S. cerevisiae, K. lactis strains lacking KlSDH1 were still able to grow in the presence of lactate. In these mutants, oxygen consumption was one-eighth that of the wild type in the presence of lactate and was normal with glucose and ethanol, indicating that the respiratory chain was fully functional. Northern analysis suggested that alternative pathway(s), which involves pyruvate decarboxylase and the glyoxylate cycle, could overcome the absence of SDH and allow (i) lactate utilization and (ii) the accumulation of succinate instead of ethanol during growth on glucose. PMID:15189981

  15. Newborn Respiratory Distress.

    PubMed

    Hermansen, Christian L; Mahajan, Anand

    2015-12-01

    Newborn respiratory distress presents a diagnostic and management challenge. Newborns with respiratory distress commonly exhibit tachypnea with a respiratory rate of more than 60 respirations per minute. They may present with grunting, retractions, nasal flaring, and cyanosis. Common causes include transient tachypnea of the newborn, respiratory distress syndrome, meconium aspiration syndrome, pneumonia, sepsis, pneumothorax, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, and delayed transition. Congenital heart defects, airway malformations, and inborn errors of metabolism are less common etiologies. Clinicians should be familiar with updated neonatal resuscitation guidelines. Initial evaluation includes a detailed history and physical examination. The clinician should monitor vital signs and measure oxygen saturation with pulse oximetry, and blood gas measurement may be considered. Chest radiography is helpful in the diagnosis. Blood cultures, serial complete blood counts, and C-reactive protein measurement are useful for the evaluation of sepsis. Most neonates with respiratory distress can be treated with respiratory support and noninvasive methods. Oxygen can be provided via bag/mask, nasal cannula, oxygen hood, and nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Ventilator support may be used in more severe cases. Surfactant is increasingly used for respiratory distress syndrome. Using the INSURE technique, the newborn is intubated, given surfactant, and quickly extubated to nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Newborns should be screened for critical congenital heart defects via pulse oximetry after 24 hours but before hospital discharge. Neonatology consultation is recommended if the illness exceeds the clinician's expertise and comfort level or when the diagnosis is unclear in a critically ill newborn. PMID:26760414

  16. The Energetics of Aerobic versus Anaerobic Respiration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champion, Timothy D.; Schwenz, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    Background information, laboratory procedures, and a discussion of the results of an experiment designed to investigate the difference in energy gained from the aerobic and anaerobic oxidation of glucose are presented. Sample experimental and calculated data are included. (CW)

  17. Neuromodulation of Aerobic Exercise—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Heijnen, Saskia; Hommel, Bernhard; Kibele, Armin; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2016-01-01

    Running, and aerobic exercise in general, is a physical activity that increasingly many people engage in but that also has become popular as a topic for scientific research. Here we review the available studies investigating whether and to which degree aerobic exercise modulates hormones, amino acids, and neurotransmitters levels. In general, it seems that factors such as genes, gender, training status, and hormonal status need to be taken into account to gain a better understanding of the neuromodular underpinnings of aerobic exercise. More research using longitudinal studies and considering individual differences is necessary to determine actual benefits. We suggest that, in order to succeed, aerobic exercise programs should include optimal periodization, prevent overtraining and be tailored to interindividual differences, including neuro-developmental and genetically-based factors. PMID:26779053

  18. Neuromodulation of Aerobic Exercise-A Review.

    PubMed

    Heijnen, Saskia; Hommel, Bernhard; Kibele, Armin; Colzato, Lorenza S

    2015-01-01

    Running, and aerobic exercise in general, is a physical activity that increasingly many people engage in but that also has become popular as a topic for scientific research. Here we review the available studies investigating whether and to which degree aerobic exercise modulates hormones, amino acids, and neurotransmitters levels. In general, it seems that factors such as genes, gender, training status, and hormonal status need to be taken into account to gain a better understanding of the neuromodular underpinnings of aerobic exercise. More research using longitudinal studies and considering individual differences is necessary to determine actual benefits. We suggest that, in order to succeed, aerobic exercise programs should include optimal periodization, prevent overtraining and be tailored to interindividual differences, including neuro-developmental and genetically-based factors. PMID:26779053

  19. Conditioning and Aerobics for Older Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Joyce

    1980-01-01

    A class designed for the maintenance and gradual improvement of senior citizens' physical fitness includes relaxation training, flexibility and stretching exercises, interval training activities (designed as a link between less strenuous exercise and more strenuous activities), and aerobic exercises. (CJ)

  20. Pediatric Respiratory Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Richards, Amber M

    2016-02-01

    Respiratory emergencies are 1 of the most common reasons parents seek evaluation for the their children in the emergency department (ED) each year, and respiratory failure is the most common cause of cardiopulmonary arrest in pediatric patients. Whereas many respiratory illnesses are mild and self-limiting, others are life threatening and require prompt diagnosis and management. Therefore, it is imperative that emergency clinicians be able to promptly recognize and manage these illnesses. This article reviews ED diagnosis and management of foreign body aspiration, asthma exacerbation, epiglottitis, bronchiolitis, community-acquired pneumonia, and pertussis. PMID:26614243

  1. Comparison of fumerate-pyruvate media and beef extract media for aerobically culturing Campylobacter species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Media supplemented with fumarate, pyruvate, and a vitamin-mineral solution or with beef extract were compared for the ability to support aerobic growth of Campylobacter. Basal broth composed of tryptose, yeast extract, bicarbonate, and agar was supplemented with 30 mM fumarate, 100 mM pyruvate, and ...

  2. Exosomes from human mesenchymal stem cells conduct aerobic metabolism in term and preterm newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Panfoli, Isabella; Ravera, Silvia; Podestà, Marina; Cossu, Claudia; Santucci, Laura; Bartolucci, Martina; Bruschi, Maurizio; Calzia, Daniela; Sabatini, Federica; Bruschettini, Matteo; Ramenghi, Luca Antonio; Romantsik, Olga; Marimpietri, Danilo; Pistoia, Vito; Ghiggeri, Gianmarco; Frassoni, Francesco; Candiano, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    Exosomes are secreted nanovesicles that are able to transfer RNA and proteins to target cells. The emerging role of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) exosomes as promoters of aerobic ATP synthesis restoration in damaged cells, prompted us to assess whether they contain an extramitochondrial aerobic respiration capacity. Exosomes were isolated from culture medium of human MSCs from umbilical cord of ≥37-wk-old newborns or between 28- to 30-wk-old newborns (i.e.,term or preterm infants). Characterization of samples was conducted by cytofluorometry. Oxidative phosphorylation capacity was assessed by Western blot analysis, oximetry, and luminometric and fluorometric analyses. MSC exosomes express functional respiratory complexes I, IV, and V, consuming oxygen. ATP synthesis was only detectable in exosomes from term newborns, suggestive of a specific mechanism that is not completed at an early gestational age. Activities are outward facing and comparable to those detected in mitochondria isolated from term MSCs. MSC exosomes display an unsuspected aerobic respiratory ability independent of whole mitochondria. This may be relevant for their ability to rescue cell bioenergetics. The differential oxidative metabolism of pretermvs.term exosomes sheds new light on the preterm newborn's clinical vulnerability. A reduced ability to repair damaged tissue and an increased capability to cope with anoxic environment for preterm infants can be envisaged.-Panfoli, I., Ravera, S., Podestà, M., Cossu, C., Santucci, L., Bartolucci, M., Bruschi, M., Calzia, D., Sabatini, F., Bruschettini, M., Ramenghi, L. A., Romantsik, O., Marimpietri, D., Pistoia, V., Ghiggeri, G., Frassoni, F., Candiano, G. Exosomes from human mesenchymal stem cells conduct aerobic metabolism in term and preterm newborn infants.

  3. Probing the ArcA regulon under aerobic/ROS conditions in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is part of the oxidative burst encountered upon internalization of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) by phagocytic cells. It has previously been established that, the ArcAB two-component system plays a critical role in ROS resistance, but the genes regulated by the system remained undetermined to date. We therefore investigated the ArcA regulon in aerobically growing S. Typhimurium before and after exposure to H2O2 by querying gene expression and other physiological changes in wild type and ΔarcA strains. Results In the ΔarcA strain, expression of 292 genes showed direct or indirect regulation by ArcA in response to H2O2, of which 141were also regulated in aerobiosis, but in the opposite direction. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) of the expression data from WT and ΔarcA strains, revealed that, in response to H2O2 challenge in aerobically grown cells, ArcA down regulated multiple PEP-PTS and ABC transporters, while up regulating genes involved in glutathione and glycerolipid metabolism and nucleotide transport. Further biochemical analysis guided by GSEA results showed that deletion of arcA during aerobic growth lead to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production which was concomitant with an increased NADH/NAD+ ratio. In absence of ArcA under aerobic conditions, H2O2 exposure resulted in lower levels of glutathione reductase activity, leading to a decreased GSH (reduced glutathione)/GSSG (oxidized glutathione) ratio. Conclusion The ArcA regulon was defined in 2 conditions, aerobic growth and the combination of peroxide treatment and aerobic growth in S. Typhimurium. ArcA coordinates a response that involves multiple aspects of the carbon flux through central metabolism, which ultimately modulates the reducing potential of the cell. PMID:24044554

  4. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes mild, cold-like symptoms in adults and older healthy children. It can cause serious problems in ... tests can tell if your child has the virus. There is no specific treatment. You should give ...

  5. What Causes Respiratory Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... easily move oxygen into your blood and remove carbon dioxide from your blood (gas exchange). This can cause a low oxygen level or high carbon dioxide level, or both, in your blood. Respiratory failure ...

  6. Preconditioning with ethyl 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate augments aerobic respiration in rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Nimker, Charu; Singh, Deependra Pratap; Saraswat, Deepika; Bansal, Anju

    2016-01-01

    Muscle respiratory capacity decides the amount of exertion one’s skeletal muscle can undergo, and endurance exercise is believed to increase it. There are also certain preconditioning methods by which muscle respiratory and exercise performance can be enhanced. In this study, preconditioning with ethyl 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (EDHB), a prolyl hydroxylase domain enzyme inhibitor, has been investigated to determine its effect on aerobic metabolism and bioenergetics in skeletal muscle, thus facilitating boost in physical performance in a rat model. We observed that EDHB supplementation increases aerobic metabolism via upregulation of HIF-mediated GLUT1 and GLUT4, thus enhancing glucose uptake in muscles. There was also a twofold rise in the activity of enzymes of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and glycolysis, ie, hexokinase and phosphofructokinase. There was an increase in citrate synthase and succinate dehydrogenase activity, resulting in the rise in the levels of ATP due to enhanced Krebs cycle activity as substantiated by enhanced acetyl-CoA levels in EDHB-treated rats as compared to control group. Increased lactate dehydrogenase activity, reduced expression of monocarboxylate transporter 1, and increase in monocarboxylate transporter 4 suggest transport of lactate from muscle to blood. There was a concomitant decrease in plasma lactate, which might be due to enhanced transport of lactate from blood to the liver. This was further supported by the rise in liver pyruvate levels and liver glycogen levels in EDHB-supplemented rats as compared to control rats. These results suggest that EDHB supplementation leads to improved physical performance due to the escalation of aerobic respiration quotient, ie, enhanced muscle respiratory capacity. PMID:27800513

  7. Effect of temperature on oxygen stores during aerobic diving in the freshwater turtle Mauremys caspica leprosa.

    PubMed

    Fuster, J F; Pagés, T; Palacios, L

    1997-01-01

    Oxygen stores available for aerobic diving were studied in the freshwater turtle (Mauremys caspica leprosa) at three constant body temperatures (15 degrees, 25 degrees, and 35 degrees C) and during the thermal transient (30 degrees-15 degrees C) induced by immersion in cold water. The term "aerobic dive limit" has been defined as the maximal duration of the dive before lactate increases. This increase occurs when a critical PO2 value is reached, and it is well characterized at lung level by a sharp increase in the lung apnoeic respiratory quotient. Kinetic analysis of lung gas composition during forced dives at fixed body temperature shows that critical PO2 values rise with temperature and that the postventilatory PO2 at the beginning of a dive decreases, so that the two temperature-dependent factors lead to a significant decrease with temperature in the lung O2 stores available for aerobic diving. During dives with transient body cooling, a natural condition in M. caspica leprosa, temperature equilibration occurs fast enough to expand aerobic scope by bearing the critical PO2 to the same value obtained at a fixed temperature of 15 degrees C. These dives are characterized by reversed CO2 transport (from lung to tissues) and therefore by negative values of the lung respiratory quotient; a decrease in temperature increases CO2 capacitance of tissues, resulting in a fall in PCO2 at constant CO2 content. Because this does not occur in the gas phase, PCO2 difference can lead to diffusion in the direction opposite from normal. This pattern may favour lung-to-tissue O2 transfer, through the Bohr effect. Therefore, the aerobic dive limit is reduced at high temperature not only through a metabolic rate effect but also through a marked decrease in the available O2 stores; fast body cooling (30 degrees-15 degrees C) associated with immersion in cold water extends the O2 stores available for aerobic diving to a level similar to that of immersions at constant body temperatures

  8. Aerobic Excercise and Research Opportunities to Benefit Impaired Children. (Project AEROBIC). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho Univ., Moscow.

    The final report summarizes accomplishments of Project AEROBIC (Aerobic Exercise and Research Opportunities to Benefit Impaired Children), which provided a physical education exercise program for severely, profoundly, and multiply handicapped children aged 10-21. Activities are outlined for the 3 year period and include modification of exercise…

  9. A biochemical approach to study the role of the terminal oxidases in aerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Le Laz, Sébastien; Kpebe, Arlette; Bauzan, Marielle; Lignon, Sabrina; Rousset, Marc; Brugna, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    The genome of the facultative anaerobic γ-proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 encodes for three terminal oxidases: a bd-type quinol oxidase and two heme-copper oxidases, a A-type cytochrome c oxidase and a cbb 3-type oxidase. In this study, we used a biochemical approach and directly measured oxidase activities coupled to mass-spectrometry analysis to investigate the physiological role of the three terminal oxidases under aerobic and microaerobic conditions. Our data revealed that the cbb 3-type oxidase is the major terminal oxidase under aerobic conditions while both cbb 3-type and bd-type oxidases are involved in respiration at low-O2 tensions. On the contrary, the low O2-affinity A-type cytochrome c oxidase was not detected in our experimental conditions even under aerobic conditions and would therefore not be required for aerobic respiration in S. oneidensis MR-1. In addition, the deduced amino acid sequence suggests that the A-type cytochrome c oxidase is a ccaa 3-type oxidase since an uncommon extra-C terminal domain contains two c-type heme binding motifs. The particularity of the aerobic respiratory pathway and the physiological implication of the presence of a ccaa 3-type oxidase in S. oneidensis MR-1 are discussed.

  10. Aerobic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria: Environmental selection and diversification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, D.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria oxidize reduced inorganic compounds to sulfuric acid. Lithotrophic sulfur oxidizer use the energy obtained from oxidation for microbial growth. Heterotrophic sulfur oxidizers obtain energy from the oxidation of organic compounds. In sulfur-oxidizing mixotrophs energy are derived either from the oxidation of inorganic or organic compounds. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are usually located within the sulfide/oxygen interfaces of springs, sediments, soil microenvironments, and the hypolimnion. Colonization of the interface is necessary since sulfide auto-oxidizes and because both oxygen and sulfide are needed for growth. The environmental stresses associated with the colonization of these interfaces resulted in the evolution of morphologically diverse and unique aerobic sulfur oxidizers.

  11. Effect of different nitroheterocyclic compounds on aerobic, microaerophilic, and anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Hof, H; Ströder, J; Buisson, J P; Royer, R

    1986-01-01

    The antibacterial activities of different nitroheterocyclic compounds were assessed by an agar dilution method against aerobic, microaerophilic, and anaerobic bacteria. Nitronaphthofurans inhibited the multiplication of aerobic bacteria at low concentrations (MIC for 50% of strains tested [MIC50], 1 mg/liter). Under anaerobic growth conditions the MICs were found to be even lower. The rough, DNA repair-deficient mutants of Salmonella typhimurium were more susceptible, whereas nitroreductase-deficient strains were resistant. Microaerophilic campylobacter isolates could be divided into two groups, one of which was as susceptible as aerobic bacteria (MIC50, 1 mg/liter) and the other of which was more highly susceptible (MIC50, 0.015 mg/liter). All anaerobic bacteria tested were susceptible to nitronaphthofurans (MIC50, 0.125 mg/liter). Nitrothiazole exerted antibacterial activities similar to those of the nitronaphthofurans. Metronidazole, a nitroimidazole derivative, and nitrofurans were definitely less active. Nitrobenzofurans showed relatively high MICs. PMID:3800344

  12. Simulation of wastewater treatment by aerobic granules in a sequencing batch reactor based on cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Benzhai, Hai; Lei, Liu; Ge, Qin; Yuwan, Peng; Ping, Li; Qingxiang, Yang; Hailei, Wang

    2014-10-01

    In the present paper, aerobic granules were developed in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) using synthetic wastewater, and 81 % of granular rate was obtained after 15-day cultivation. Aerobic granules have a 96 % BOD removal to the wastewater, and the reactor harbors a mount of biomass including bacteria, fungi and protozoa. In view of the complexity of kinetic behaviors of sludge and biological mechanisms of the granular SBR, a cellular automata model was established to simulate the process of wastewater treatment. The results indicate that the model not only visualized the complex adsorption and degradation process of aerobic granules, but also well described the BOD removal of wastewater and microbial growth in the reactor. Thus, CA model is suitable for simulation of synthetic wastewater treatment. This is the first report about dynamical and visual simulation of treatment process of synthetic wastewater in a granular SBR.

  13. Resistance to aerobic exercise training causes metabolic dysfunction and reveals novel exercise-regulated signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Sarah J; Rivas, Donato A; Alves-Wagner, Ana B; Hirshman, Michael F; Gallagher, Iain J; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Atkins, Ryan; Greenhaff, Paul L; Qi, Nathan R; Gustafsson, Thomas; Fielding, Roger A; Timmons, James A; Britton, Steven L; Koch, Lauren G; Goodyear, Laurie J

    2013-08-01

    Low aerobic exercise capacity is a risk factor for diabetes and a strong predictor of mortality, yet some individuals are "exercise-resistant" and unable to improve exercise capacity through exercise training. To test the hypothesis that resistance to aerobic exercise training underlies metabolic disease risk, we used selective breeding for 15 generations to develop rat models of low and high aerobic response to training. Before exercise training, rats selected as low and high responders had similar exercise capacities. However, after 8 weeks of treadmill training, low responders failed to improve their exercise capacity, whereas high responders improved by 54%. Remarkably, low responders to aerobic training exhibited pronounced metabolic dysfunction characterized by insulin resistance and increased adiposity, demonstrating that the exercise-resistant phenotype segregates with disease risk. Low responders had impaired exercise-induced angiogenesis in muscle; however, mitochondrial capacity was intact and increased normally with exercise training, demonstrating that mitochondria are not limiting for aerobic adaptation or responsible for metabolic dysfunction in low responders. Low responders had increased stress/inflammatory signaling and altered transforming growth factor-β signaling, characterized by hyperphosphorylation of a novel exercise-regulated phosphorylation site on SMAD2. Using this powerful biological model system, we have discovered key pathways for low exercise training response that may represent novel targets for the treatment of metabolic disease.

  14. Aerobic Granules: Microbial Landscape and Architecture, Stages, and Practical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Holliger, Christof

    2014-01-01

    For the successful application of aerobic granules in wastewater treatment, granules containing an appropriate microbial assembly able to remove contaminants should be retained and propagated within the reactor. To manipulate and/or optimize this process, a good understanding of the formation and dynamic architecture of the granules is desirable. Models of granules often assume a spherical shape with an outer layer and an inner core, but limited information is available regarding the extent of deviations from such assumptions. We report on new imaging approaches to gain detailed insights into the structural characteristics of aerobic granules. Our approach stained all components of the granule to obtain a high quality contrast in the images; hence limitations due to thresholding in the image analysis were overcome. A three-dimensional reconstruction of the granular structure was obtained that revealed the mesoscopic impression of the cavernlike interior of the structure, showing channels and dead-end paths in detail. In “old” granules, large cavities allowed for the irrigation and growth of dense microbial colonies along the path of the channels. Hence, in some areas, paradoxically higher biomass content was observed in the inner part of the granule compared to the outer part. Microbial clusters “rooting” from the interior of the mature granule structure indicate that granules mainly grow via biomass outgrowth and not by aggregation of small particles. We identify and discuss phenomena contributing to the life cycle of aerobic granules. With our approach, volumetric tetrahedral grids are generated that may be used to validate complex models of granule formation. PMID:24657859

  15. Controlling the catalytic aerobic oxidation of phenols.

    PubMed

    Esguerra, Kenneth Virgel N; Fall, Yacoub; Petitjean, Laurène; Lumb, Jean-Philip

    2014-05-28

    The oxidation of phenols is the subject of extensive investigation, but there are few catalytic aerobic examples that are chemo- and regioselective. Here we describe conditions for the ortho-oxygenation or oxidative coupling of phenols under copper (Cu)-catalyzed aerobic conditions that give rise to ortho-quinones, biphenols or benzoxepines. We demonstrate that each product class can be accessed selectively by the appropriate choice of Cu(I) salt, amine ligand, desiccant and reaction temperature. In addition, we evaluate the effects of substituents on the phenol and demonstrate their influence on selectivity between ortho-oxygenation and oxidative coupling pathways. These results create an important precedent of catalyst control in the catalytic aerobic oxidation of phenols and set the stage for future development of catalytic systems and mechanistic investigations. PMID:24784319

  16. Drying and recovery of aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianjun; Zhang, Quanguo; Chen, Yu-You; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-10-01

    To dehydrate aerobic granules to bone-dry form was proposed as a promising option for long-term storage of aerobic granules. This study cultivated aerobic granules with high proteins/polysaccharide ratio and then dried these granules using seven protocols: drying at 37°C, 60°C, 4°C, under sunlight, in dark, in a flowing air stream or in concentrated acetone solutions. All dried granules experienced volume shrinkage of over 80% without major structural breakdown. After three recovery batches, although with loss of part of the volatile suspended solids, all dried granules were restored most of their original size and organic matter degradation capabilities. The strains that can survive over the drying and storage periods were also identified. Once the granules were dried, they can be stored over long period of time, with minimal impact yielded by the applied drying protocols. PMID:27392096

  17. Equine respiratory pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Foreman, J H

    1999-12-01

    Differentiation of diseases of the equine respiratory tract is based on history, clinical signs, auscultation, endoscopy, imaging, and sampling of airway exudate. Upper respiratory therapies include surgical correction of airway obstructions; flushing of localized abscesses (strangles), guttural pouch disease, or sinusitis; and oral or parenteral antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapy if deemed necessary. Pneumonia usually is treated with antimicrobials, anti-inflammatories, and bronchodilators. Pleural drainage is indicated if significant pleural effusion is present. The most commonly used therapies for early inflammatory and chronic allergic obstructive conditions include bronchodilators and anti-inflammatories. Acute respiratory distress, particularly acute pulmonary edema, is treated with diuretics (usually furosemide), intranasal oxygen, bronchodilators, corticosteroids, and alleviation of the underlying cause. Furosemide also had been used in North America as a race-day preventative for exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH), but recent data have shown that furosemide may be a performance-enhancing agent itself.

  18. Equine respiratory pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Foreman, J H

    1999-12-01

    Differentiation of diseases of the equine respiratory tract is based on history, clinical signs, auscultation, endoscopy, imaging, and sampling of airway exudate. Upper respiratory therapies include surgical correction of airway obstructions; flushing of localized abscesses (strangles), guttural pouch disease, or sinusitis; and oral or parenteral antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapy if deemed necessary. Pneumonia usually is treated with antimicrobials, anti-inflammatories, and bronchodilators. Pleural drainage is indicated if significant pleural effusion is present. The most commonly used therapies for early inflammatory and chronic allergic obstructive conditions include bronchodilators and anti-inflammatories. Acute respiratory distress, particularly acute pulmonary edema, is treated with diuretics (usually furosemide), intranasal oxygen, bronchodilators, corticosteroids, and alleviation of the underlying cause. Furosemide also had been used in North America as a race-day preventative for exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH), but recent data have shown that furosemide may be a performance-enhancing agent itself. PMID:10589473

  19. Evolution of Molybdenum Nitrogenase during the Transition from Anaerobic to Aerobic Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Eric S.; Costas, Amaya M. Garcia; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Mus, Florence

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Molybdenum nitrogenase (Nif), which catalyzes the reduction of dinitrogen to ammonium, has modulated the availability of fixed nitrogen in the biosphere since early in Earth's history. Phylogenetic evidence indicates that oxygen (O2)-sensitive Nif emerged in an anaerobic archaeon and later diversified into an aerobic bacterium. Aerobic bacteria that fix N2 have adapted a number of strategies to protect Nif from inactivation by O2, including spatial and temporal segregation of Nif from O2 and respiratory consumption of O2. Here we report the complement of Nif-encoding genes in 189 diazotrophic genomes. We show that the evolution of Nif during the transition from anaerobic to aerobic metabolism was accompanied by both gene recruitment and loss, resulting in a substantial increase in the number of nif genes. While the observed increase in the number of nif genes and their phylogenetic distribution are strongly correlated with adaptation to utilize O2 in metabolism, the increase is not correlated with any of the known O2 protection mechanisms. Rather, gene recruitment appears to have been in response to selective pressure to optimize Nif synthesis to meet fixed N demands associated with aerobic productivity and to more efficiently regulate Nif under oxic conditions that favor protein turnover. Consistent with this hypothesis, the transition of Nif from anoxic to oxic environments is associated with a shift from posttranslational regulation in anaerobes to transcriptional regulation in obligate aerobes and facultative anaerobes. Given that fixed nitrogen typically limits ecosystem productivity, our observations further underscore the dynamic interplay between the evolution of Earth's oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon biogeochemical cycles. IMPORTANCE Molybdenum nitrogenase (Nif), which catalyzes the reduction of dinitrogen to ammonium, has modulated the availability of fixed nitrogen in the biosphere since early in Earth's history. Nif emerged in an anaerobe and

  20. The regulation of respiratory resistance in exercising horses.

    PubMed

    Lafortuna, Claudio L; Saibene, Franco; Albertini, Mariangela; Clement, M Giovanna

    2003-10-01

    Horses display remarkable aerobic capabilities, attaining during muscular exercise a maximal rate of oxygen consumption about 30-fold higher than the resting value, and 2.5-fold higher than that of other mammals of similar body mass. Under these circumstances an enormous mechanical burden is expected to impinge on the equine respiratory pump and regulatory mechanisms aiming to minimize this load may play an important role in determining the adequacy of the respiratory system to the metabolic requirements. The behaviour of the respiratory system has been investigated in horses at rest and during treadmill locomotion at different velocities and gaits. During exercise hyperpnoea, horses exhibit a significant reduction in the lung viscous resistance not observed in other mammals, such as dogs and humans. Therefore, the exercise-dependent increase in the rate of mechanical work of breathing is lower in the horse than in other mammals. This increase in the equine airway patency during exercise appeared to be mainly determined by the pattern of laryngeal movements. In fact, during exercise, the laryngeal cross-sectional area, determined with a video-endoscopic imaging technique at the level of rima glottidis (CSArg), undergoes during inspiration an increase averaging up to over 4 times the resting expiratory values. Although a significant linear correlation was found between CSArg and minute ventilation (VE), the laryngeal activation contributes to increase lung conductance only when CSArg is narrower than the tracheal section. It appears therefore that in exercising horses pulmonary resistive features are finely controlled to reduce the mechanical load supported by the respiratory muscles and to counterbalance the increase in the ventilatory energetic requirements inherent in the remarkably enhanced aerobic performance observed in this species.

  1. Prevention of Aerobic Spoilage of Maize Silage by a Genetically Modified Killer Yeast, Kluyveromyces lactis, Defective in the Ability To Grow on Lactic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kitamoto, H. K.; Hasebe, A.; Ohmomo, S.; Suto, E. G.; Muraki, M.; Iimura, Y.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we propose a new process of adding a genetically modified killer yeast to improve the aerobic stability of silage. Previously constructed Kluyveromyces lactis killer strain PCK27, defective in growth on lactic acid due to disruption of the gene coding for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, a key enzyme for gluconeogenesis, inhibited the growth of Pichia anomala inoculated as an aerobic spoilage yeast and prevented a rise in pH in a model of silage fermentation. This suppressive effect of PCK27 was not only due to growth competition but also due to the killer protein produced. From these results, we concluded that strain PCK27 can be used as an additive to prolong the aerobic stability of maize silage. In the laboratory-scale experiment of maize silage, the addition of a killer yeast changed the yeast flora and significantly reduced aerobic spoilage. PMID:10508111

  2. Climate change in fish: effects of respiratory constraints on optimal life history and behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Rebecca E.; Jørgensen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The difference between maximum metabolic rate and standard metabolic rate is referred to as aerobic scope, and because it constrains performance it is suggested to constitute a key limiting process prescribing how fish may cope with or adapt to climate warming. We use an evolutionary bioenergetics model for Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) to predict optimal life histories and behaviours at different temperatures. The model assumes common trade-offs and predicts that optimal temperatures for growth and fitness lie below that for aerobic scope; aerobic scope is thus a poor predictor of fitness at high temperatures. Initially, warming expands aerobic scope, allowing for faster growth and increased reproduction. Beyond the optimal temperature for fitness, increased metabolic requirements intensify foraging and reduce survival; oxygen budgeting conflicts thus constrain successful completion of the life cycle. The model illustrates how physiological adaptations are part of a suite of traits that have coevolved. PMID:25673000

  3. Climate change in fish: effects of respiratory constraints on optimal life history and behaviour.

    PubMed

    Holt, Rebecca E; Jørgensen, Christian

    2015-02-01

    The difference between maximum metabolic rate and standard metabolic rate is referred to as aerobic scope, and because it constrains performance it is suggested to constitute a key limiting process prescribing how fish may cope with or adapt to climate warming. We use an evolutionary bioenergetics model for Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) to predict optimal life histories and behaviours at different temperatures. The model assumes common trade-offs and predicts that optimal temperatures for growth and fitness lie below that for aerobic scope; aerobic scope is thus a poor predictor of fitness at high temperatures. Initially, warming expands aerobic scope, allowing for faster growth and increased reproduction. Beyond the optimal temperature for fitness, increased metabolic requirements intensify foraging and reduce survival; oxygen budgeting conflicts thus constrain successful completion of the life cycle. The model illustrates how physiological adaptations are part of a suite of traits that have coevolved.

  4. Isolation and characterization of ubiquinol oxidase complexes from Paracoccus denitrificans cells cultured under various limiting growth conditions in the chemostat.

    PubMed

    Bosma, G; Braster, M; Stouthamer, A H; van Verseveld, H W

    1987-06-15

    To obtain more information about the composition of the respiratory chain under different growth conditions and about the regulation of electron-transfer to several oxidases and reductases, ubiquinol oxidase complexes were partially purified from membranes of Paracoccus denitrificans cells grown in carbon-source-limited aerobic, nitrate-limited anaerobic and oxygen-limited chemostat cultures. The isolated enzymes consisted of cytochromes bc1, c552 and aa3. In comparison with the aerobic ubiquinol oxidase complex, the oxygen- and nitrate-limited ones contained, respectively, less and far less of the cytochrome aa3 subunits and the anaerobic complex also contained lower amounts of cytochrome c552. In addition, extra haem-containing polypeptides were present with apparent Mr of 14,000, 30,000 and 45,000, the former one only in the anaerobic and the latter two in both the anaerobic and oxygen-limited preparations. This is the first report describing four different membrane-bound c-type cytochromes. The potentiometric and spectral characteristics of the redox components in membrane particles and isolated ubiquinol oxidase fractions were determined by combined potentiometric analysis and spectrum deconvolution. Membranes of nitrate- and oxygen-limited cells contained extra high-potential cytochrome b in comparison with the membranes of aerobically grown cells. No difference was detected between the three isolated ubiquinol oxidase complexes. Aberrances with already published values of redox potentials are discussed. PMID:3036512

  5. Neuroplasticity in respiratory motor control.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Gordon S; Johnson, Stephen M

    2003-01-01

    Although recent evidence demonstrates considerable neuroplasticity in the respiratory control system, a comprehensive conceptual framework is lacking. Our goals in this review are to define plasticity (and related neural properties) as it pertains to respiratory control and to discuss potential sites, mechanisms, and known categories of respiratory plasticity. Respiratory plasticity is defined as a persistent change in the neural control system based on prior experience. Plasticity may involve structural and/or functional alterations (most commonly both) and can arise from multiple cellular/synaptic mechanisms at different sites in the respiratory control system. Respiratory neuroplasticity is critically dependent on the establishment of necessary preconditions, the stimulus paradigm, the balance between opposing modulatory systems, age, gender, and genetics. Respiratory plasticity can be induced by hypoxia, hypercapnia, exercise, injury, stress, and pharmacological interventions or conditioning and occurs during development as well as in adults. Developmental plasticity is induced by experiences (e.g., altered respiratory gases) during sensitive developmental periods, thereby altering mature respiratory control. The same experience later in life has little or no effect. In adults, neuromodulation plays a prominent role in several forms of respiratory plasticity. For example, serotonergic modulation is thought to initiate and/or maintain respiratory plasticity following intermittent hypoxia, repeated hypercapnic exercise, spinal sensory denervation, spinal cord injury, and at least some conditioned reflexes. Considerable work is necessary before we fully appreciate the biological significance of respiratory plasticity, its underlying cellular/molecular and network mechanisms, and the potential to harness respiratory plasticity as a therapeutic tool. PMID:12486024

  6. ANAEROBIC AND AEROBIC TREATMENT OF CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biological degradation of 12 chlorinated aliphatic compounds (CACs) was assessed in bench-top reactors and in serum bottle tests. Three continuously mixed daily batch-fed reactor systems were evaluated: anaerobic, aerobic, and sequential-anaerobic-aerobic (sequential). Glucose,...

  7. [Stability control of aerobic granules using an innovative reactor].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Hua; Yang, Fan; Li, Sheng; Xie, Lei; Wang, Xiao-Chang

    2012-06-01

    Uncontrolled variation of diameter and density of aerobic granules frequently resulted in instability and thus brought about operation failure. An innovative reactor was therefore developed for the control of diameter and density of aerobic granules. There were two ways to select the sludge, one was the short settling time select the big and dense granules in the reactor, and the other was the hydro cyclone that washed out the big and compact granules preventing big and compact fourthly growth in the reactor. By these means, the diameter of granules could maintained in the range of 300-1 000 microm for a long time, consequently, the long term stability could be obtained. According to the kinetic analysis, it was found that the energy maintenance coefficient was 0.08-0.10, which was much higher than the conventional granular system (0.06), and the ratio of the COD used for maintenance to the influent was higher than the conventional one. Additionally, the removal efficiencies of COD and ammonia were 92% and 60%, respectively.

  8. On Aerobic Exercise and Behavioral and Neural Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Swain, Rodney A.; Berggren, Kiersten L.; Kerr, Abigail L.; Patel, Ami; Peplinski, Caitlin; Sikorski, Angela M.

    2012-01-01

    Aerobic exercise promotes rapid and profound alterations in the brain. Depending upon the pattern and duration of exercise, these changes in the brain may extend beyond traditional motor areas to regions and structures normally linked to learning, cognition, and emotion. Exercise-induced alterations may include changes in blood flow, hormone and growth factor release, receptor expression, angiogenesis, apoptosis, neurogenesis, and synaptogenesis. Together, we believe that these changes underlie elevations of mood and prompt the heightened behavioral plasticity commonly observed following adoption of a chronic exercise regimen. In the following paper, we will explore both the psychological and psychobiological literatures relating to exercise effects on brain in both human and non-human animals and will attempt to link plastic changes in these neural structures to modifications in learned behavior and emotional expression. In addition, we will explore the therapeutic potential of exercise given recent reports that aerobic exercise may serve as a neuroprotectant and can also slow cognitive decline during normal and pathological aging. PMID:24961267

  9. Aerobic biodegradation of 4-methylquinoline by a soil bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, S D; Pfaller, S L; Shann, J R; Warshawsky, D; Kinkle, B K; Vestal, J R

    1996-01-01

    Methylquinolines and related N-heterocyclic aromatic compounds are common contaminants associated with the use of hydrocarbons in both coal gasification and wood treatment processes. These compounds have been found in groundwater, and many are known mutagens. A stable, five-member bacterial consortium able to degrade 4-methylquinoline was established by selective enrichment using soil collected from an abandoned coal gasification site. The consortium was maintained for 5 years by serial transfer in a medium containing 4-methylquinoline. A gram-negative soil bacterium, strain Lep1, was isolated from the consortium and shown to utilize 4-methylquinoline as a source of carbon and energy during growth in liquid medium. A time course experiment demonstrated that both the isolate Lep1 and the consortium containing Lep1 were able to degrade 4-methylquinoline under aerobic conditions. Complete degradation of 4-methylquinoline by either strain Lep1 alone or the consortium was characterized by the production and eventual disappearance of 2-hydroxy-4-methylquinoline, followed by the appearance and persistence of a second metabolite tentatively identified as a hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin. Currently, there is no indication that 4-methylquinoline degradation proceeds differently in the consortium culture compared with Lep1 alone. This is the first report of 4-methylquinoline biodegradation under aerobic conditions. PMID:8702284

  10. Influence of Aeration and of Pantothenate on Growth Yields of Zymomonas mobilis

    PubMed Central

    Belaïch, Jean-Pierre; Senez, Jacques C.

    1965-01-01

    Belaïch, Jean-Pierre (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Marseille, France), and Jacques C. Senez. Influence of aeration and of pantothenate on growth yields of Zymomonas mobilis. J. Bacteriol. 89:1195–1200. 1965.—The growth yields and rates of Zymomonas mobilis were measured in aerobic and anaerobic cultures on glucose medium containing yeast extract, amino acids, or ammonium chloride as the nitrogen source. In the absence of yeast extract, pantothenate was required. The growth yield and rate of the cultures in synthetic (amino acids) or minimal (NH4Cl) medium supplemented with pantothenate corresponded only to about one-half the “normal” values obtained in the presence of yeast extract, suggesting a situation of energetically uncoupled growth. Attempts to restore normal growth by the addition of various compounds were unsuccessful. Aeration of the cultures resulted in a partial oxidation of ethyl alcohol to acetate, but did not modify the growth yield nor the division time. Both aerobic and anaerobic cells, however, contained cytochrome c and a cytochrome oxidase of the a2 type, which was completely inhibited by 10−4m cyanide. In anaerobically grown cells, an additional cytochrome of the b type was present. The absence of a Pasteur effect suggests that the transfer of electrons by the respiratory chain of Z. mobilis may not be coupled with oxidative phosphorylation. Aeration had no effect on the catalase content of the cells. As shown by C14-glucose incorporation, 2 to 3% of the glucose metabolized was assimilated by the cells in both synthetic and rich complex medium. No intracellular glycogen nor poly-β-hydroxybutyrate was accumulated when growth was limited by nitrogen or by phosphate in the presence of excess glucose. PMID:14292985

  11. Middle East respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Hui, David S; Perlman, Stanley

    2015-09-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a highly lethal respiratory disease caused by a novel single-stranded, positive-sense RNA betacoronavirus (MERS-CoV). Dromedary camels, hosts for MERS-CoV, are implicated in direct or indirect transmission to human beings, although the exact mode of transmission is unknown. The virus was first isolated from a patient who died from a severe respiratory illness in June, 2012, in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. As of May 31, 2015, 1180 laboratory-confirmed cases (483 deaths; 40% mortality) have been reported to WHO. Both community-acquired and hospital-acquired cases have been reported with little human-to-human transmission reported in the community. Although most cases of MERS have occurred in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, cases have been reported in Europe, the USA, and Asia in people who travelled from the Middle East or their contacts. Clinical features of MERS range from asymptomatic or mild disease to acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiorgan failure resulting in death, especially in individuals with underlying comorbidities. No specific drug treatment exists for MERS and infection prevention and control measures are crucial to prevent spread in health-care facilities. MERS-CoV continues to be an endemic, low-level public health threat. However, the virus could mutate to have increased interhuman transmissibility, increasing its pandemic potential.

  12. Textbook of respiratory medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.F.; Nadel, J.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents a clinical reference of respiratory medicine. It also details basic science aspects of pulmonary physiology and describes recently developed, sophisticated diagnostic tools and therapeutic methods. It also covers anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, and pathology; microbiologic, radiologic, nuclear medicine, and biopsy methods for diagnosis.

  13. Respiratory Diseases of Poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new Respiratory Diseases of Poultry CRIS will be established effective October 1, 2006. Initially, the disease agents to be studied will include Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale (ORT), Bordetella avium (BART) and Pasteurella multocida. The research will focus on development of more effective vacc...

  14. [Respiratory complications after transfusion].

    PubMed

    Bernasinski, M; Mertes, P-M; Carlier, M; Dupont, H; Girard, M; Gette, S; Just, B; Malinovsky, J-M

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory complications of blood transfusion have several possible causes. Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is often the first mentioned. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), better defined since the consensus conference of Toronto in 2004, is rarely mentioned. French incidence is low. Non-hemolytic febrile reactions, allergies, infections and pulmonary embolism are also reported. The objective of this work was to determine the statistical importance of the different respiratory complications of blood transfusion. This work was conducted retrospectively on transfusion accidents in six health centers in Champagne-Ardenne, reported to Hemovigilance between 2000 and 2009 and having respiratory symptoms. The analysis of data was conducted by an expert committee. Eighty-three cases of respiratory complications are found (316,864 blood products). We have counted 26 TACO, 12 TRALI (only 6 cases were identified in the original investigation of Hemovigilance), 18 non-hemolytic febrile reactions, 16 cases of allergies, 5 transfusions transmitted bacterial infections and 2 pulmonary embolisms. Six new TRALI were diagnosed previously labeled TACO for 2 of them, allergy and infection in 2 other cases and diagnosis considered unknown for the last 2. Our study found an incidence of TRALI 2 times higher than that reported previously. Interpretation of the data by a multidisciplinary committee amended 20% of diagnoses. This study shows the imperfections of our system for reporting accidents of blood transfusion when a single observer analyses the medical records.

  15. Middle East respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Hui, David S; Perlman, Stanley

    2015-09-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a highly lethal respiratory disease caused by a novel single-stranded, positive-sense RNA betacoronavirus (MERS-CoV). Dromedary camels, hosts for MERS-CoV, are implicated in direct or indirect transmission to human beings, although the exact mode of transmission is unknown. The virus was first isolated from a patient who died from a severe respiratory illness in June, 2012, in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. As of May 31, 2015, 1180 laboratory-confirmed cases (483 deaths; 40% mortality) have been reported to WHO. Both community-acquired and hospital-acquired cases have been reported with little human-to-human transmission reported in the community. Although most cases of MERS have occurred in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, cases have been reported in Europe, the USA, and Asia in people who travelled from the Middle East or their contacts. Clinical features of MERS range from asymptomatic or mild disease to acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiorgan failure resulting in death, especially in individuals with underlying comorbidities. No specific drug treatment exists for MERS and infection prevention and control measures are crucial to prevent spread in health-care facilities. MERS-CoV continues to be an endemic, low-level public health threat. However, the virus could mutate to have increased interhuman transmissibility, increasing its pandemic potential. PMID:26049252

  16. Respiratory Muscle Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Gransee, Heather M.; Mantilla, Carlos B.; Sieck, Gary C.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle plasticity is defined as the ability of a given muscle to alter its structural and functional properties in accordance with the environmental conditions imposed on it. As such, respiratory muscle is in a constant state of remodeling, and the basis of muscle’s plasticity is its ability to change protein expression and resultant protein balance in response to varying environmental conditions. Here, we will describe the changes of respiratory muscle imposed by extrinsic changes in mechanical load, activity, and innervation. Although there is a large body of literature on the structural and functional plasticity of respiratory muscles, we are only beginning to understand the molecular-scale protein changes that contribute to protein balance. We will give an overview of key mechanisms regulating protein synthesis and protein degradation, as well as the complex interactions between them. We suggest future application of a systems biology approach that would develop a mathematical model of protein balance and greatly improve treatments in a variety of clinical settings related to maintaining both muscle mass and optimal contractile function of respiratory muscles. PMID:23798306

  17. Respiratory Resistance In Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Michael J.

    1975-01-01

    Patients' respiratory problems may interfere with their talking in therapy sessions. Interventions by the therapist must be based on an understanding of the underlying dynamics which produced the respiratory problem. (Author)

  18. Respiratory failure in diabetic ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinov, Nikifor K; Rohrscheib, Mark; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Dorin, Richard I; Murata, Glen H; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory failure complicating the course of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a source of increased morbidity and mortality. Detection of respiratory failure in DKA requires focused clinical monitoring, careful interpretation of arterial blood gases, and investigation for conditions that can affect adversely the respiration. Conditions that compromise respiratory function caused by DKA can be detected at presentation but are usually more prevalent during treatment. These conditions include deficits of potassium, magnesium and phosphate and hydrostatic or non-hydrostatic pulmonary edema. Conditions not caused by DKA that can worsen respiratory function under the added stress of DKA include infections of the respiratory system, pre-existing respiratory or neuromuscular disease and miscellaneous other conditions. Prompt recognition and management of the conditions that can lead to respiratory failure in DKA may prevent respiratory failure and improve mortality from DKA. PMID:26240698

  19. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)

    MedlinePlus

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus; MERS-CoV; Novel coronavirus; nCoV ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS): Frequently Asked Questions and Answers. Updated ...

  20. Isolation of culturable aerobic bacteria and evidence of Kerstersia gyiorum from the blowhole of captive Yangtze finless porpoises.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaoling; McLaughlin, Richard William; Zhou, Junying; Hao, Yujiang; Zheng, Jinsong; Wang, Ding

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial respiratory illnesses are problematic in aquatic mammals such as the Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis; YFP), which is now at a critically endangered status. Yet little is known about the bacteria inhabiting the respiratory tract of YFPs. In this study, we preliminarily characterized the culturable aerobic bacteria from blow samples of captive YFPs. The bacterial diversity was assessed through cultivation by direct exhalation onto Columbia blood agar plates and identification of representative isolates through 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. In total, eleven bacterial species belonging to four phyla Proteobacteria (71 %), Firmicutes (25 %), Bacteroidetes (3 %) and Actinobacteria (1 %) were identified. Most of these isolates were opportunistic pathogens found in respiratory illnesses in humans and animals. We also reported the first case of Kerstersia gyiorum isolated from an animal. This work provides a preliminary assessment of the bacteria present in the respiratory tract of captive YFPs, which will be an important first step in elucidating the roles of normal microbiota in maintaining respiratory health of YFPs. This study also points out the necessity of future long-term monitoring of blowhole microorganisms in the YFPs and making emergency preparedness plans for respiratory tract infections. These measures can aid in assessing the pathogenic risk of the critically endangered YFP populations. PMID:27251558

  1. Impact of oxidative stress defense on bacterial survival and morphological change in Campylobacter jejuni under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Oh, Euna; McMullen, Lynn; Jeon, Byeonghwa

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni, a microaerophilic foodborne pathogen, inescapably faces high oxygen tension during its transmission to humans. Thus, the ability of C. jejuni to survive under oxygen-rich conditions may significantly impact C. jejuni viability in food and food safety as well. In this study, we investigated the impact of oxidative stress resistance on the survival of C. jejuni under aerobic conditions by examining three mutants defective in key antioxidant genes, including ahpC, katA, and sodB. All the three mutants exhibited growth reduction under aerobic conditions compared to the wild-type (WT), and the ahpC mutant showed the most significant growth defect. The CFU reduction in the mutants was recovered to the WT level by complementation. Higher levels of reactive oxygen species were accumulated in C. jejuni under aerobic conditions than microaerobic conditions, and supplementation of culture media with an antioxidant recovered the growth of C. jejuni. The levels of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation were significantly increased in the mutants compared to WT. Additionally, the mutants exhibited different morphological changes under aerobic conditions. The ahpC and katA mutants developed coccoid morphology by aeration, whereas the sodB mutant established elongated cellular morphology. Compared to microaerobic conditions, interestingly, aerobic culture conditions substantially induced the formation of coccoidal cells, and antioxidant treatment reduced the emergence of coccoid forms under aerobic conditions. The ATP concentrations and PMA-qPCR analysis supported that oxidative stress is a factor that induces the development of a viable-but-non-culturable state in C. jejuni. The findings in this study clearly demonstrated that oxidative stress resistance plays an important role in the survival and morphological changes of C. jejuni under aerobic conditions. PMID:25914692

  2. Aerobic Exercise Prescription for Rheumatoid Arthritics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Blanche W.; Williams, Hilda L.

    The use of exercise as a general treatment for rheumatoid arthritics (RA) has included range of motion, muscular strength, water exercise and rest therapy while virtually ignoring possible benefits of aerobic exercise. The purposes of this project were to examine the guidelines for exercise prescription in relation to this special population and…

  3. AEROBIC DENITRIFICATION: IMPLICATIONS FOR NITROGEN FATE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the Mississippi, as well as most nitrogen-degraded rivers and streams, NO3- is the dominant N species and therefore understanding its biogeochemical behavior is critical for accurate nitrogen fate modeling. To our knowledge this is the first work to report aerobic denitrificat...

  4. Reflections on Psychotherapy and Aerobic Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Wade

    This document provides a series of reflections by a practicing psychologist on the uses of aerobic workouts in psychotherapy. Two case histories are cited to illustrate the contention that the mode of exercise, rather than simply its presence or absence, is the significant indicator of a patient's emotional well-being or psychopathology. The first…

  5. A proposed aerobic granules size development scheme for aerobic granulation process.

    PubMed

    Dahalan, Farrah Aini; Abdullah, Norhayati; Yuzir, Ali; Olsson, Gustaf; Salmiati; Hamdzah, Myzairah; Din, Mohd Fadhil Mohd; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Khalil, Khalilah Abdul; Anuar, Aznah Nor; Noor, Zainura Zainon; Ujang, Zaini

    2015-04-01

    Aerobic granulation is increasingly used in wastewater treatment due to its unique physical properties and microbial functionalities. Granule size defines the physical properties of granules based on biomass accumulation. This study aims to determine the profile of size development under two physicochemical conditions. Two identical bioreactors namely Rnp and Rp were operated under non-phototrophic and phototrophic conditions, respectively. An illustrative scheme was developed to comprehend the mechanism of size development that delineates the granular size throughout the granulation. Observations on granules' size variation have shown that activated sludge revolutionised into the form of aerobic granules through the increase of biomass concentration in bioreactors which also determined the changes of granule size. Both reactors demonstrated that size transformed in a similar trend when tested with and without illumination. Thus, different types of aerobic granules may increase in size in the same way as recommended in the aerobic granule size development scheme.

  6. Ventilation and Speech Characteristics during Submaximal Aerobic Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Susan E.; Hipp, Jenny; Alessio, Helaine

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined alterations in ventilation and speech characteristics as well as perceived dyspnea during submaximal aerobic exercise tasks. Method: Twelve healthy participants completed aerobic exercise-only and simultaneous speaking and aerobic exercise tasks at 50% and 75% of their maximum oxygen consumption (VO[subscript 2] max).…

  7. Adolescents' Interest and Performances in Aerobic Fitness Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Xihe; Chen, Senlin; Parrott, James

    2014-01-01

    This study examined adolescents' interest in aerobic fitness testing and its relation to the test performances. Adolescents (N = 356) from three middle schools participated in the study. The participants took two aerobic fitness tests: the Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run (PACER) and One-Mile Run (1MR) with a two-day interval,…

  8. Aerobic exercise improves gastrointestinal motility in psychiatric inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Song, Bong Kil; Oh, Ji Sun; Woo, Seung Seok

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the benefit of aerobic exercise on colonic transit time (CTT) for psychiatric inpatients in a closed ward. METHODS: Sixty consecutive adult inpatients of the Somang Hospital Psychiatry Unit (Eumsung-gun, South Korea), without CTT-related diseases or drug therapies, were recruited for study from March to June of 2012. Upon enrollment, the patients were randomly assigned to partake in a 12-wk instructor-led group aerobic exercise program (exercise group; n = 30) or to maintain their ordinary daily activities (control group; n = 30). The exercise program was structured as 10 min warm-up (stretching), 40 min exercise, and 10 min cool-down (stretching) for three days each week. The exercise sessions consisted of walking only in week one and aerobics from weeks two to 12, with increasing intensity (50% heart rate reserve (HRR) for weeks one to four, 60% HRR for weeks five to eight, and 70% HRR for weeks nine to 12). CTT was measured before (baseline) and after (week 12) the exercise program, in duplicate (on days four and seven), using abdominal radiography and the multiple radio-opaque marker technique. Changes in the exercising patients’ CTT and weight-, cardiovascular- and fitness-related parameters were statistically assessed. RESULTS: The study dropout rate was 30.0%, with 23 patients in the exercise group and 19 patients in the control group completing the study. At week 12, the exercise group showed decreases in body weight (mean ± SE) baseline: 69.4 ± 2.8 vs study-end: 67.6 ± 2.7; P < 0.635) and body mass index (BMI) (25.2 ± 1.1 vs 24.9 ± 0.8; P < 0.810), but the extent of change was not significantly different from that experienced by the control group (body weight: 68.8 ± 4.0 vs 68.8 ± 3.9; BMI: 24.3 ± 1.1 vs 24.4 ± 1.2). However, the exercise group showed significant improvements in leg muscle strength (baseline: 41.7 ± 4.3 vs study-end: 64.1 ± 5.0; P < 0.001), cardio-respiratory endurance (120.5 ± 4.5 vs 105.4 ± 2.8; P < 0

  9. Limited Practice Respiratory Care Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Amy L.

    This 36-46 hour basic respiratory care course has been designed to enhance the skills of health professionals in providing limited respiratory care during those hours when a respiratory care practitioner is not available. Persons taking the course are assumed to have a basic knowledge of anatomy and physiology, administration of medications, and…

  10. The Terminal Oxidase Cytochrome bd Promotes Sulfide-resistant Bacterial Respiration and Growth.

    PubMed

    Forte, Elena; Borisov, Vitaliy B; Falabella, Micol; Colaço, Henrique G; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; Poole, Robert K; Vicente, João B; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) impairs mitochondrial respiration by potently inhibiting the heme-copper cytochrome c oxidase. Since many prokaryotes, including Escherichia (E.) coli, generate H2S and encounter high H2S levels particularly in the human gut, herein we tested whether bacteria can sustain sulfide-resistant O2-dependent respiration. E. coli has three respiratory oxidases, the cyanide-sensitive heme-copper bo3 enzyme and two bd oxidases much less sensitive to cyanide. Working on the isolated enzymes, we found that, whereas the bo3 oxidase is inhibited by sulfide with half-maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 = 1.1 ± 0.1 μM, under identical experimental conditions both bd oxidases are insensitive to sulfide up to 58 μM. In E. coli respiratory mutants, both O2-consumption and aerobic growth proved to be severely impaired by sulfide when respiration was sustained by the bo3 oxidase alone, but unaffected by ≤200 μM sulfide when either bd enzyme acted as the only terminal oxidase. Accordingly, wild-type E. coli showed sulfide-insensitive respiration and growth under conditions favouring the expression of bd oxidases. In all tested conditions, cyanide mimicked the functional effect of sulfide on bacterial respiration. We conclude that bd oxidases promote sulfide-resistant O2-consumption and growth in E. coli and possibly other bacteria. The impact of this discovery is discussed. PMID:27030302

  11. The Terminal Oxidase Cytochrome bd Promotes Sulfide-resistant Bacterial Respiration and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Forte, Elena; Borisov, Vitaliy B.; Falabella, Micol; Colaço, Henrique G.; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; Poole, Robert K.; Vicente, João B.; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) impairs mitochondrial respiration by potently inhibiting the heme-copper cytochrome c oxidase. Since many prokaryotes, including Escherichia (E.) coli, generate H2S and encounter high H2S levels particularly in the human gut, herein we tested whether bacteria can sustain sulfide-resistant O2-dependent respiration. E. coli has three respiratory oxidases, the cyanide-sensitive heme-copper bo3 enzyme and two bd oxidases much less sensitive to cyanide. Working on the isolated enzymes, we found that, whereas the bo3 oxidase is inhibited by sulfide with half-maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 = 1.1 ± 0.1 μM, under identical experimental conditions both bd oxidases are insensitive to sulfide up to 58 μM. In E. coli respiratory mutants, both O2-consumption and aerobic growth proved to be severely impaired by sulfide when respiration was sustained by the bo3 oxidase alone, but unaffected by ≤200 μM sulfide when either bd enzyme acted as the only terminal oxidase. Accordingly, wild-type E. coli showed sulfide-insensitive respiration and growth under conditions favouring the expression of bd oxidases. In all tested conditions, cyanide mimicked the functional effect of sulfide on bacterial respiration. We conclude that bd oxidases promote sulfide-resistant O2-consumption and growth in E. coli and possibly other bacteria. The impact of this discovery is discussed. PMID:27030302

  12. Aerobic and anaerobic oxidation of hydrogen by acidophilic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hedrich, Sabrina; Johnson, D Barrie

    2013-12-01

    While many prokaryotic species are known to use hydrogen as an electron donor to support their growth, this trait has only previously been reported for two acidophilic bacteria, Hydrogenobaculum acidophilum (in the presence of reduced sulfur) and Acidithiobacillus (At.) ferrooxidans. To test the hypothesis that hydrogen may be utilized more widely by acidophilic bacteria, 38 strains of acidophilic bacteria, including representatives of 20 designated and four proposed species, were screened for their abilities to grow via the dissimilatory oxidation of hydrogen. Growth was demonstrated in several species of acidophiles that also use other inorganic electron donors (ferrous iron and sulfur) but in none of the obligately heterotrophic species tested. Strains of At. ferrooxidans, At. ferridurans and At. caldus, grew chemolithotrophically on hydrogen, though those of At. thiooxidans and At. ferrivorans did not. Growth was also observed with Sulfobacillus acidophilus, Sb. benefaciens and Sb. thermosulfidooxidans, though not with other iron-oxidizing Firmicutes. Similarly, Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans grew on hydrogen, closely related acidophilic actinobacteria did not. Growth yields of At. ferrooxidans and At. ferridurans grown aerobically on hydrogen (c. 10(10)  cells mL(-1) ) were far greater than typically obtained using other electron donors. Several species also grew anaerobically by coupling hydrogen oxidation to the reduction of ferric iron.

  13. Mitochondrial Cristae Shape Determines Respiratory Chain Supercomplexes Assembly and Respiratory Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cogliati, Sara; Frezza, Christian; Soriano, Maria Eugenia; Varanita, Tatiana; Quintana-Cabrera, Ruben; Corrado, Mauro; Cipolat, Sara; Costa, Veronica; Casarin, Alberto; Gomes, Ligia C.; Perales-Clemente, Ester; Salviati, Leonardo; Fernandez-Silva, Patricio; Enriquez, Jose A.; Scorrano, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Summary Respiratory chain complexes assemble into functional quaternary structures called supercomplexes (RCS) within the folds of the inner mitochondrial membrane, or cristae. Here, we investigate the relationship between respiratory function and mitochondrial ultrastructure and provide evidence that cristae shape determines the assembly and stability of RCS and hence mitochondrial respiratory efficiency. Genetic and apoptotic manipulations of cristae structure affect assembly and activity of RCS in vitro and in vivo, independently of changes to mitochondrial protein synthesis or apoptotic outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. We demonstrate that, accordingly, the efficiency of mitochondria-dependent cell growth depends on cristae shape. Thus, RCS assembly emerges as a link between membrane morphology and function. PMID:24055366

  14. Climate change and respiratory disease: European Respiratory Society position statement.

    PubMed

    Ayres, J G; Forsberg, B; Annesi-Maesano, I; Dey, R; Ebi, K L; Helms, P J; Medina-Ramón, M; Windt, M; Forastiere, F

    2009-08-01

    Climate change will affect individuals with pre-existing respiratory disease, but the extent of the effect remains unclear. The present position statement was developed on behalf of the European Respiratory Society in order to identify areas of concern arising from climate change for individuals with respiratory disease, healthcare workers in the respiratory sector and policy makers. The statement was developed following a 2-day workshop held in Leuven (Belgium) in March 2008. Key areas of concern for the respiratory community arising from climate change are discussed and recommendations made to address gaps in knowledge. The most important recommendation was the development of more accurate predictive models for predicting the impact of climate change on respiratory health. Respiratory healthcare workers also have an advocatory role in persuading governments and the European Union to maintain awareness and appropriate actions with respect to climate change, and these areas are also discussed in the position statement.

  15. Climate change and respiratory disease: European Respiratory Society position statement.

    PubMed

    Ayres, J G; Forsberg, B; Annesi-Maesano, I; Dey, R; Ebi, K L; Helms, P J; Medina-Ramón, M; Windt, M; Forastiere, F

    2009-08-01

    Climate change will affect individuals with pre-existing respiratory disease, but the extent of the effect remains unclear. The present position statement was developed on behalf of the European Respiratory Society in order to identify areas of concern arising from climate change for individuals with respiratory disease, healthcare workers in the respiratory sector and policy makers. The statement was developed following a 2-day workshop held in Leuven (Belgium) in March 2008. Key areas of concern for the respiratory community arising from climate change are discussed and recommendations made to address gaps in knowledge. The most important recommendation was the development of more accurate predictive models for predicting the impact of climate change on respiratory health. Respiratory healthcare workers also have an advocatory role in persuading governments and the European Union to maintain awareness and appropriate actions with respect to climate change, and these areas are also discussed in the position statement. PMID:19251790

  16. Aerobic scope and cardiovascular oxygen transport is not compromised at high temperatures in the toad Rhinella marina.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Johannes; Andersen, Jonas L; Findsen, Anders; Pedersen, Pil B M; Hansen, Kasper; Ozolina, Karlina; Wang, Tobias

    2012-10-15

    Numerous recent studies convincingly correlate the upper thermal tolerance limit of aquatic ectothermic animals to reduced aerobic scope, and ascribe the decline in aerobic scope to failure of the cardiovascular system at high temperatures. In the present study we investigate whether this 'aerobic scope model' applies to an air-breathing and semi-terrestrial vertebrate Rhinella marina (formerly Bufo marinus). To quantify aerobic scope, we measured resting and maximal rate of oxygen consumption at temperatures ranging from 10 to 40°C. To include potential effects of acclimation, three groups of toads were acclimated chronically at 20, 25 and 30°C, respectively. The absolute difference between resting and maximal rate of oxygen consumption increased progressively with temperature and there was no significant decrease in aerobic scope, even at temperature immediately below the lethal limit (41-42°C). Haematological and cardiorespiratory variables were measured at rest and immediately after maximal activity at benign (30°C) and critically high (40°C) temperatures. Within this temperature interval, both resting and active heart rate increased, and there was no indication of respiratory failure, judged from high arterial oxygen saturation, P(O2) and [Hb(O2)]. With the exception of elevated resting metabolic rate for cold-acclimated toads, we found few differences in the thermal responses between acclimation groups with regard to the cardiometabolic parameters. In conclusion, we found no evidence for temperature-induced cardiorespiratory failure in R. marina, indicating that maintenance of aerobic scope and oxygen transport is unrelated to the upper thermal limit of this air-breathing semi-terrestrial vertebrate.

  17. Anoxic disturbance of the isolated respiratory network of neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Völker, A; Ballanyi, K; Richter, D W

    1995-01-01

    Tissue oxygen (PO2), K+ (aKe), pH (pHe) and Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e) were measured in the region of the ventral respiratory group (VRG) in the in vitro brainstem-spinal cord preparation of neonatal rats. During tissue anoxia, elicited by superfusion of N2-gassed solutions, an initial increase in the frequency of respiratory activity, lasting between 2 and 12 min, turned into a frequency depression. During anoxia periods of up to 60 min, respiratory activity persisted in solutions containing CO2/bicarbonate, whereas a complete blockade was observed after 15-25 min in N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid- (Hepes)-buffered salines. After such anoxic apnea, respiratory rhythmicity could be reactivated by superfusion of hypoxic, CO2/bicarbonate-buffered solutions. In both types of hypoxic solutions, aKe increased by maximally 1.5 mM, whereas an initial increase of pHe by up to 0.05 pH units turned, after 2-4 min, into an acidification which could exceed 0.5 pH units. In contrast, [Ca2+]e remained unaffected by anoxia. Addition of 2-5 mM cyanide (CN-) to oxygenated Hepes-buffered saline evoked an increase in PO2 in the VRG from 100 to more than 300 mmHg. The effects of CN- on respiratory activity, aKe and pHe were almost identical to those during anoxia. In oxygenated, CO2/bicarbonate-free solutions of different pH, however, an increase in pHe in the VRG led to a decrease in respiratory frequency, whereas a fall of pHe produced a frequency acceleration. A rise of aKe in the VRG by more than 2 mM as induced by superfusion of a 7 mM K+ solution led to a sustained increase of respiratory frequency. The results indicate that blockade of aerobic metabolism does not severely perturb K+ and Ca2+ homeostasis and that the biphasic response to anoxia is not directly related to the observed changes in PO2, aKe, pHe, or [Ca2+]e. In the respiratory network of neonatal mammals, CO2 might provide a stimulus for long-term maintenance of respiratory activity under oxygen depletion.

  18. Both foliar and residual applications of herbicides that inhibit amino acid biosynthesis induce alternative respiration and aerobic fermentation in pea roots.

    PubMed

    Armendáriz, O; Gil-Monreal, M; Zulet, A; Zabalza, A; Royuela, M

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this work was to ascertain whether there is a general pattern of carbon allocation and utilisation in plants following herbicide supply, independent of the site of application: sprayed on leaves or supplied to nutrient solution. The herbicides studied were the amino acid biosynthesis-inhibiting herbicides (ABIH): glyphosate, an inhibitor of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, and imazamox, an inhibitor of branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis. All treated plants showed impaired carbon metabolism; carbohydrate accumulation was detected in both leaves and roots of the treated plants. The accumulation in roots was due to lack of use of available sugars as growth was arrested, which elicited soluble carbohydrate accumulation in the leaves due to a decrease in sink strength. Under aerobic conditions, ethanol fermentative metabolism was enhanced in roots of the treated plants. This fermentative response was not related to a change in total respiration rates or cytochrome respiratory capacity, but an increase in alternative oxidase capacity was detected. Pyruvate accumulation was detected after most of the herbicide treatments. These results demonstrate that both ABIH induce the less-efficient, ATP-producing pathways, namely fermentation and alternative respiration, by increasing the key metabolite, pyruvate. The plant response was similar not only for the two ABIH but also after foliar or residual application.

  19. Ecology of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs in aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Koblížek, Michal

    2015-11-01

    Recognition of the environmental role of photoheterotrophic bacteria has been one of the main themes of aquatic microbiology over the last 15 years. Aside from cyanobacteria and proteorhodopsin-containing bacteria, aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria are the third most numerous group of phototrophic prokaryotes in the ocean. This functional group represents a diverse assembly of species which taxonomically belong to various subgroups of Alpha-, Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria. AAP bacteria are facultative photoheterotrophs which use bacteriochlorophyll-containing reaction centers to harvest light energy. The light-derived energy increases their bacterial growth efficiency, which provides a competitive advantage over heterotrophic species. Thanks to their enzymatic machinery AAP bacteria are active, rapidly growing organisms which contribute significantly to the recycling of organic matter. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge of the ecology of AAP bacteria in aquatic environments, implying their specific role in the microbial loop.

  20. Evaluation of respiratory pattern during respiratory-gated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dobashi, Suguru; Mori, Shinichiro

    2014-12-01

    The respiratory cycle is not strictly regular, and generally varies in amplitude and period from one cycle to the next. We evaluated the characteristics of respiratory patterns acquired during respiratory gating treatment in more than 300 patients. A total 331 patients treated with respiratory-gated carbon-ion beam therapy were selected from a group of patients with thoracic and abdominal conditions. Respiratory data were acquired for a total of 3,171 fractions using an external respiratory sensing monitor and evaluated for respiratory cycle, duty cycle, magnitude of baseline drift, and intrafractional/interfractional peak inhalation/exhalation positional variation. Results for the treated anatomical sites and patient positioning were compared. Mean ± SD respiratory cycle averaged over all patients was 4.1 ± 1.3 s. Mean ± SD duty cycle averaged over all patients was 36.5 ± 7.3 %. Two types of baseline drift were seen, the first decremental and the second incremental. For respiratory peak variation, the mean intrafractional variation in peak-inhalation position relative to the amplitude in the first respiratory cycle (15.5 ± 9.3 %) was significantly larger than that in exhalation (7.5 ± 4.6 %). Interfractional variations in inhalation (17.2 ± 18.5 %) were also significantly greater than those in exhalation (9.4 ± 10.0 %). Statistically significant differences were observed between patients in the supine position and those in the prone position in mean respiratory cycle, duty cycle, and intra-/interfractional variations. We quantified the characteristics of the respiratory curve based on a large number of respiratory data obtained during treatment. These results might be useful in improving the accuracy of respiratory-gated treatment.

  1. [Rapid diagnosis of respiratory infection].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Toru

    2012-08-01

    The identification of pathogens is very important for the diagnosis and treatment of respiratory infectious disease. Bacterial culture is a basic method to identify various pathogens, but it takes several days to get the final results. Many new methods for the rapid diagnosis of respiratory infection have been developed in recent years. This has changed the treatment of respiratory infection. Broad-spectrum antibiotics were often used to treat respiratory infection previously, but rapid diagnosis has changed the choice of antibiotics from broad-spectrum to specific ones. New methods of rapid diagnosis are very useful and powerful tools in the treatment of respiratory infection.

  2. Aerobic Fitness Linked to Cortical Brain Development in Adolescent Males: Preliminary Findings Suggest a Possible Role of BDNF Genotype.

    PubMed

    Herting, Megan M; Keenan, Madison F; Nagel, Bonnie J

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic exercise has been shown to impact brain structure and cognition in children and adults. Exercise-induced activation of a growth protein known as brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is thought to contribute to such relationships. To date, however, no study has examined how aerobic fitness relates to cortical brain structure during development and if BDNF genotype moderates these relationships. Using structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and FreeSurfer, the current study examined how aerobic fitness relates to volume, thickness, and surface area in 34 male adolescents, 15 to 18 years old. Moreover, we examined if the val66met BDNF genotype moderated these relationships. We hypothesized that aerobic fitness would relate to greater thickness and volumes in frontal, parietal, and motor regions, and that these relationships would be less robust in individuals carrying a Met allele, since this genotype leads to lower BDNF expression. We found that aerobic fitness positively related to right rostral middle frontal cortical volume in all adolescents. However, results also showed BDNF genotype moderated the relationship between aerobic fitness and bilateral medial precuneus surface area, with a positive relationship seen in individuals with the Val/Val allele, but no relationship detected in those adolescents carrying a Met allele. Lastly, using self-reported levels of aerobic activity, we found that higher-fit adolescents showed larger right medial pericalcarine, right cuneus and left precuneus surface areas as compared to their low-fit peers. Our findings suggest that aerobic fitness is linked to cortical brain development in male adolescents, and that more research is warranted to determine how an individual's genes may influence these relationships. PMID:27445764

  3. Aerobic Fitness Linked to Cortical Brain Development in Adolescent Males: Preliminary Findings Suggest a Possible Role of BDNF Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Herting, Megan M.; Keenan, Madison F.; Nagel, Bonnie J.

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic exercise has been shown to impact brain structure and cognition in children and adults. Exercise-induced activation of a growth protein known as brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is thought to contribute to such relationships. To date, however, no study has examined how aerobic fitness relates to cortical brain structure during development and if BDNF genotype moderates these relationships. Using structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and FreeSurfer, the current study examined how aerobic fitness relates to volume, thickness, and surface area in 34 male adolescents, 15 to 18 years old. Moreover, we examined if the val66met BDNF genotype moderated these relationships. We hypothesized that aerobic fitness would relate to greater thickness and volumes in frontal, parietal, and motor regions, and that these relationships would be less robust in individuals carrying a Met allele, since this genotype leads to lower BDNF expression. We found that aerobic fitness positively related to right rostral middle frontal cortical volume in all adolescents. However, results also showed BDNF genotype moderated the relationship between aerobic fitness and bilateral medial precuneus surface area, with a positive relationship seen in individuals with the Val/Val allele, but no relationship detected in those adolescents carrying a Met allele. Lastly, using self-reported levels of aerobic activity, we found that higher-fit adolescents showed larger right medial pericalcarine, right cuneus and left precuneus surface areas as compared to their low-fit peers. Our findings suggest that aerobic fitness is linked to cortical brain development in male adolescents, and that more research is warranted to determine how an individual’s genes may influence these relationships. PMID:27445764

  4. Oxygen-Dependent Control of Respiratory Nitrate Reduction in Mycelium of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Marco; Falke, Dörte; Pawlik, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Several members of the obligately aerobic genus Streptomyces are able to reduce nitrate, catalyzed by Nar-type respiratory nitrate reductases. A unique feature of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) compared with other streptomycetes is that it synthesizes three nonredundant Nar enzymes. In this study, we show that Nar2 is the main Nar enzyme active in mycelium and could characterize the conditions governing its synthesis. Nar2 was present at low levels in aerobically cultivated mycelium, but synthesis was induced when cultures were grown under oxygen limitation. Growth in the presence of high oxygen concentrations prevented the induction of Nar2 synthesis. Equally, an abrupt shift from aerobiosis to anaerobiosis did not result in the immediate induction of Nar2 synthesis. This suggests that the synthesis of Nar2 is induced during a hypoxic downshift, probably to allow maintenance of a proton gradient during the transition to anaerobiosis. Although no Nar2 could be detected in freshly harvested mature spores, synthesis of the enzyme could be induced after long-term (several days) incubation of these resting spores under anaerobic conditions. Induction of Nar2 synthesis in spores was linked to transcriptional control. Nar2 activity in whole mycelium was strictly dependent on the presence of a putative nitrate transporter, NarK2. The oxygen-dependent inhibition of nitrate reduction by Nar2 was mediated by NarK2-dependent nitrate:nitrite antiport. This antiport mechanism likely prevents the accumulation of toxic nitrite in the cytoplasm. A deletion of the narK2 gene had no effect on Nar1-dependent nitrate reduction in resting spores. Together, our results indicate redox-dependent transcriptional and posttranslational control of nitrate reduction by Nar2. PMID:25225271

  5. Remediation of polychlorinated biphenyl impacted sediment by concurrent bioaugmentation with anaerobic halorespiring and aerobic degrading bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Rayford B.; Fagervold, Sonja K.; May, Harold D.; Sowers, Kevin R.

    2013-01-01

    Bioremediation of sediments contaminated with commercial PCBs is potentially achievable by the sequential activity of anaerobic halorespiration to convert higher chlorinated congeners to less chlorinated congeners that are susceptible to aerobic respiratory degradation. The efficacy of bioaugmentation with anaerobic halorespiring “Dehalobium chlorocoercia” DF1 and aerobic Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 added concurrently with GAC as a delivery system was determined in 2-liter laboratory mesocosms containing weathered Aroclor-contaminated sediment from Baltimore Harbor, MD. The greatest effect was seen in the mesocosm bioaugmented with both DF1 and LB400 together, which resulted in an 80% decrease by mass of PCBs, from 8 mg/kg to less than 2 mg/kg after 120 days. There was no significant increase in lesser-chlorinated congeners, indicating that both anaerobic dechlorination by DF1 and aerobic degradation by LB400 occurred. In contrast, non-bioaugmented controls containing filtered culture supernatant showed only 25% decrease in total levels of PCBs after 365 days, which was likely due to biostimulation of the indigenous population by the medium. Direct colony counts and molecular analysis targeting a putative reductive dehalogenase gene of D. chlorocoercia, or the bphA gene of LB400 showed the presence of viable DF1 and LB400 in bioaugmented mesocosms after 365 days, indicating that both non-indigenous strains were sustainable within the indigenous microbial community. These results suggest that an in situ treatment employing the simultaneous application of anaerobic and aerobic microorganisms could be an effective, environmentally sustainable strategy to reduce PCBs levels in contaminated sediment. PMID:23463900

  6. Aerobic glycolysis tunes YAP/TAZ transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Enzo, Elena; Santinon, Giulia; Pocaterra, Arianna; Aragona, Mariaceleste; Bresolin, Silvia; Forcato, Mattia; Grifoni, Daniela; Pession, Annalisa; Zanconato, Francesca; Guzzo, Giulia; Bicciato, Silvio; Dupont, Sirio

    2015-01-01

    Increased glucose metabolism and reprogramming toward aerobic glycolysis are a hallmark of cancer cells, meeting their metabolic needs for sustained cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming is usually considered as a downstream consequence of tumor development and oncogene activation; growing evidence indicates, however, that metabolism on its turn can support oncogenic signaling to foster tumor malignancy. Here, we explored how glucose metabolism regulates gene transcription and found an unexpected link with YAP/TAZ, key transcription factors regulating organ growth, tumor cell proliferation and aggressiveness. When cells actively incorporate glucose and route it through glycolysis, YAP/TAZ are fully active; when glucose metabolism is blocked, or glycolysis is reduced, YAP/TAZ transcriptional activity is decreased. Accordingly, glycolysis is required to sustain YAP/TAZ pro-tumorigenic functions, and YAP/TAZ are required for the full deployment of glucose growth-promoting activity. Mechanistically we found that phosphofructokinase (PFK1), the enzyme regulating the first committed step of glycolysis, binds the YAP/TAZ transcriptional cofactors TEADs and promotes their functional and biochemical cooperation with YAP/TAZ. Strikingly, this regulation is conserved in Drosophila, where phosphofructokinase is required for tissue overgrowth promoted by Yki, the fly homologue of YAP. Moreover, gene expression regulated by glucose metabolism in breast cancer cells is strongly associated in a large dataset of primary human mammary tumors with YAP/TAZ activation and with the progression toward more advanced and malignant stages. These findings suggest that aerobic glycolysis endows cancer cells with particular metabolic properties and at the same time sustains transcription factors with potent pro-tumorigenic activities such as YAP/TAZ. PMID:25796446

  7. Mitochondrial aerobic respiration is activated during hair follicle stem cell differentiation, and its dysfunction retards hair regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan; Luo, Binping; Deng, Zhili; Wang, Ben; Liu, Fangfen; Li, Jinmao; Shi, Wei; Xie, Hongfu; Hu, Xingwang; Li, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Background. Emerging research revealed the essential role of mitochondria in regulating stem/progenitor cell differentiation of neural progenitor cells, mesenchymal stem cells and other stem cells through reactive oxygen species (ROS), Notch or other signaling pathway. Inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis results in hair loss upon injury. However, alteration of mitochondrial morphology and metabolic function during hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) differentiation and how they affect hair regeneration has not been elaborated upon. Methods. We compared the difference in mitochondrial morphology and activity between telogen bulge cells and anagen matrix cells. Expression levels of mitochondrial ROS and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) were measured to evaluate redox balance. In addition, the level of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) were estimated to present the change in energetic metabolism during differentiation. To explore the effect of the mitochondrial metabolism on regulating hair regeneration, hair growth was observed after application of a mitochondrial respiratory inhibitor upon hair plucking. Results. During HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria became elongated with more abundant organized cristae and showed higher activity in differentiated cells. SOD2 was enhanced for redox balance with relatively stable ROS levels in differentiated cells. PDK increased in HFSCs while differentiated cells showed enhanced PDH, indicating that respiration switched from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation during differentiation. Inhibiting mitochondrial respiration in differentiated hair follicle cells upon hair plucking repressed hair regeneration in vivo. Conclusions. Upon HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria are elongated with more abundant cristae and show higher activity, accompanying with activated aerobic respiration in differentiated cells for higher energy supply. Also, dysfunction of mitochondrial respiration delays hair

  8. Mitochondrial aerobic respiration is activated during hair follicle stem cell differentiation, and its dysfunction retards hair regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yan; Luo, Binping; Deng, Zhili; Wang, Ben; Liu, Fangfen; Li, Jinmao; Shi, Wei; Xie, Hongfu; Hu, Xingwang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Emerging research revealed the essential role of mitochondria in regulating stem/progenitor cell differentiation of neural progenitor cells, mesenchymal stem cells and other stem cells through reactive oxygen species (ROS), Notch or other signaling pathway. Inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis results in hair loss upon injury. However, alteration of mitochondrial morphology and metabolic function during hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) differentiation and how they affect hair regeneration has not been elaborated upon. Methods. We compared the difference in mitochondrial morphology and activity between telogen bulge cells and anagen matrix cells. Expression levels of mitochondrial ROS and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) were measured to evaluate redox balance. In addition, the level of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) were estimated to present the change in energetic metabolism during differentiation. To explore the effect of the mitochondrial metabolism on regulating hair regeneration, hair growth was observed after application of a mitochondrial respiratory inhibitor upon hair plucking. Results. During HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria became elongated with more abundant organized cristae and showed higher activity in differentiated cells. SOD2 was enhanced for redox balance with relatively stable ROS levels in differentiated cells. PDK increased in HFSCs while differentiated cells showed enhanced PDH, indicating that respiration switched from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation during differentiation. Inhibiting mitochondrial respiration in differentiated hair follicle cells upon hair plucking repressed hair regeneration in vivo. Conclusions. Upon HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria are elongated with more abundant cristae and show higher activity, accompanying with activated aerobic respiration in differentiated cells for higher energy supply. Also, dysfunction of mitochondrial respiration delays hair

  9. Respiratory fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotberg, James B.

    2011-02-01

    This article covers several aspects of respiratory fluid mechanics that have been actively investigated by our group over the years. For the most part, the topics involve two-phase flows in the respiratory system with applications to normal and diseased lungs, as well as therapeutic interventions. Specifically, the topics include liquid plug flow in airways and at airway bifurcations as it relates to surfactant, drug, gene, or stem cell delivery into the lung; liquid plug rupture and its damaging effects on underlying airway epithelial cells as well as a source of crackling sounds in the lung; airway closure from "capillary-elastic instabilities," as well as nonlinear stabilization from oscillatory core flow which we call the "oscillating butter knife;" liquid film, and surfactant dynamics in an oscillating alveolus and the steady streaming, and surfactant spreading on thin viscous films including our discovery of the Grotberg-Borgas-Gaver shock.

  10. Respiratory active mitochondrial supercomplexes.

    PubMed

    Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Peleato, Maria Luisa; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Enriquez, Jose Antonio

    2008-11-21

    The structural organization of the mitochondrial respiratory complexes as four big independently moving entities connected by the mobile carriers CoQ and cytochrome c has been challenged recently. Blue native gel electrophoresis reveals the presence of high-molecular-weight bands containing several respiratory complexes and suggesting an in vivo assembly status of these structures (respirasomes). However, no functional evidence of the activity of supercomplexes as true respirasomes has been provided yet. We have observed that (1) supercomplexes are not formed when one of their component complexes is absent; (2) there is a temporal gap between the formation of the individual complexes and that of the supercomplexes; (3) some putative respirasomes contain CoQ and cytochrome c; (4) isolated respirasomes can transfer electrons from NADH to O(2), that is, they respire. Therefore, we have demonstrated the existence of a functional respirasome and propose a structural organization model that accommodates these findings.

  11. Respiratory viruses and children.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Terho

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory viruses place a great disease burden especially on the youngest children in terms of high rates of infection, bacterial complications and hospitalizations. In developing countries, some viral infections are even associated with substantial mortality in children. The interaction between viruses and bacteria is probably much more common and clinically significant than previously understood. Respiratory viruses frequently initiate the cascade of events that ultimately leads to bacterial infection. Effective antiviral agents can substantially shorten the duration of the viral illness and prevent the development of bacterial complications. Viral vaccines have the potential to not only prevent the viral infection but also decrease the incidence of bacterial complications. At present, antivirals and vaccines are only available against influenza viruses, but new vaccines and antivirals against other viruses, especially for RSV, are being developed. PMID:27177731

  12. Respiratory viruses and children.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Terho

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory viruses place a great disease burden especially on the youngest children in terms of high rates of infection, bacterial complications and hospitalizations. In developing countries, some viral infections are even associated with substantial mortality in children. The interaction between viruses and bacteria is probably much more common and clinically significant than previously understood. Respiratory viruses frequently initiate the cascade of events that ultimately leads to bacterial infection. Effective antiviral agents can substantially shorten the duration of the viral illness and prevent the development of bacterial complications. Viral vaccines have the potential to not only prevent the viral infection but also decrease the incidence of bacterial complications. At present, antivirals and vaccines are only available against influenza viruses, but new vaccines and antivirals against other viruses, especially for RSV, are being developed.

  13. Lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Chang, Anne B; Chang, Christina C; O'Grady, K; Torzillo, P J

    2009-12-01

    Acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) are the major cause of morbidity and mortality in young children worldwide. ALRIs are important indicators of the health disparities that persist between Indigenous and non-Indigenous children in developed countries. Bronchiolitis and pneumonia account for the majority of the ALRI burden. The epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of these diseases in Indigenous children are discussed. In comparison with non-Indigenous children in developing countries they have higher rates of disease, more complications, and their management is influenced by several unique factors including the epidemiology of disease and, in some remote regions, constraints on hospital referral and access to highly trained staff. The prevention of repeat infections and the early detection and management of chronic lung disease is critical to the long-term respiratory and overall health of these children.

  14. Respiratory fluid mechanics.

    PubMed

    Grotberg, James B

    2011-02-01

    This article covers several aspects of respiratory fluid mechanics that have been actively investigated by our group over the years. For the most part, the topics involve two-phase flows in the respiratory system with applications to normal and diseased lungs, as well as therapeutic interventions. Specifically, the topics include liquid plug flow in airways and at airway bifurcations as it relates to surfactant, drug, gene, or stem cell delivery into the lung; liquid plug rupture and its damaging effects on underlying airway epithelial cells as well as a source of crackling sounds in the lung; airway closure from "capillary-elastic instabilities," as well as nonlinear stabilization from oscillatory core flow which we call the "oscillating butter knife;" liquid film, and surfactant dynamics in an oscillating alveolus and the steady streaming, and surfactant spreading on thin viscous films including our discovery of the Grotberg-Borgas-Gaver shock.

  15. Ocular Tropism of Respiratory Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Paul A.; Tumpey, Terrence M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Respiratory viruses (including adenovirus, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus, and rhinovirus) cause a broad spectrum of disease in humans, ranging from mild influenza-like symptoms to acute respiratory failure. While species D adenoviruses and subtype H7 influenza viruses are known to possess an ocular tropism, documented human ocular disease has been reported following infection with all principal respiratory viruses. In this review, we describe the anatomical proximity and cellular receptor distribution between ocular and respiratory tissues. All major respiratory viruses and their association with human ocular disease are discussed. Research utilizing in vitro and in vivo models to study the ability of respiratory viruses to use the eye as a portal of entry as well as a primary site of virus replication is highlighted. Identification of shared receptor-binding preferences, host responses, and laboratory modeling protocols among these viruses provides a needed bridge between clinical and laboratory studies of virus tropism. PMID:23471620

  16. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Hui, David S; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a newly recognized highly lethal respiratory disease caused by a novel single stranded, positive sense RNA betacoronavirus (MERS-CoV). Dromedary camels, host species for MERS-CoV are implicated in the direct or indirect transmission to humans, although the exact mode of transmission remains unknown. First isolated from a patient who died from a severe respiratory illness in June 2012 in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, as of 16 February 2015, 983 laboratory-confirmed cases of MERS-CoV (360 deaths; 36.6% mortality) were reported to the WHO. Cases have been acquired in both the community and hospitals with limited human-to-human transmission reported in the community. Whilst the majority of MERS cases have occurred in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, cases have been reported from Europe, USA and Asia in people who traveled from the Middle East or their contacts. Clinical features of MERS range from asymptomatic or mild disease to acute respiratory distress syndrome and multi-organ failure resulting in death, especially in individuals with underlying co-morbidities. There is no specific drug treatment for MERS and infection prevention and control measures are crucial to prevent spread of MERS-CoV in health care facilities. MERS-CoV continues to be an endemic,low level public health threat. However, the concern remains that the virus could mutate to exhibit increased interhuman transmissibility, increasing pandemic potential. Our seminar presents an overview of current knowledge and perspectives on the epidemiology, virology, mode of transmission, pathogen-host responses, clinical features, diagnosis and development of new drugs and vaccines. PMID:26049252

  17. Fatiguing upper body aerobic exercise impairs balance.

    PubMed

    Douris, Peter C; Handrakis, John P; Gendy, Joseph; Salama, Mina; Kwon, Dae; Brooks, Richard; Salama, Nardine; Southard, Veronica

    2011-12-01

    Douris, PC, Handrakis, JP, Gendy, J, Salama, M, Kwon, D, Brooks, R, Salama, N, and Southard, V. Fatiguing upper body aerobic exercise impairs balance. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3299-3305, 2011-There are many studies that have examined the effects of selectively fatiguing lower extremity muscle groups with various protocols, and they have all shown to impair balance. There is limited research regarding the effect of fatiguing upper extremity exercise on balance. Muscle fiber-type recruitment patterns may be responsible for the difference between balance impairments because of fatiguing aerobic and anaerobic exercise. The purpose of our study was to investigate the effect that aerobic vs. anaerobic fatigue, upper vs. lower body fatigue will have on balance, and if so, which combination will affect balance to a greater degree. Fourteen healthy subjects, 7 men and 7 women (mean age 23.5 ± 1.7 years) took part in this study. Their mean body mass index was 23.6 ± 3.2. The study used a repeated-measures design. The effect on balance was documented after the 4 fatiguing conditions: aerobic lower body (ALB), aerobic upper body (AUB), anaerobic lower body, anaerobic upper body (WUB). The aerobic conditions used an incremental protocol performed to fatigue, and the anaerobic used the Wingate protocol. Balance was measured as a single-leg stance stability score using the Biodex Balance System. A stability score for each subject was recorded immediately after each of the 4 conditions. A repeated-measures analysis of variance with the pretest score as a covariate was used to analyze the effects of the 4 fatiguing conditions on balance. There were significant differences between the 4 conditions (p = 0.001). Post hoc analysis revealed that there were significant differences between the AUB, mean score 4.98 ± 1.83, and the WUB, mean score 4.09 ± 1.42 (p = 0.014) and between AUB and ALB mean scores 4.33 ± 1.40 (p = 0.029). Normative data for single-leg stability testing for

  18. Nanotechnology in respiratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Omlor, Albert Joachim; Nguyen, Juliane; Bals, Robert; Dinh, Quoc Thai

    2015-05-29

    Like two sides of the same coin, nanotechnology can be both boon and bane for respiratory medicine. Nanomaterials open new ways in diagnostics and treatment of lung diseases. Nanoparticle based drug delivery systems can help against diseases such as lung cancer, tuberculosis, and pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, nanoparticles can be loaded with DNA and act as vectors for gene therapy in diseases like cystic fibrosis. Even lung diagnostics with computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) profits from new nanoparticle based contrast agents. However, the risks of nanotechnology also have to be taken into consideration as engineered nanomaterials resemble natural fine dusts and fibers, which are known to be harmful for the respiratory system in many cases. Recent studies have shown that nanoparticles in the respiratory tract can influence the immune system, can create oxidative stress and even cause genotoxicity. Another important aspect to assess the safety of nanotechnology based products is the absorption of nanoparticles. It was demonstrated that the amount of pulmonary nanoparticle uptake not only depends on physical and chemical nanoparticle characteristics but also on the health status of the organism. The huge diversity in nanotechnology could revolutionize medicine but makes safety assessment a challenging task.

  19. Central respiratory chemoreception.

    PubMed

    Guyenet, Patrice G; Stornetta, Ruth L; Bayliss, Douglas A

    2010-10-01

    By definition central respiratory chemoreceptors (CRCs) are cells that are sensitive to changes in brain PCO(2) or pH and contribute to the stimulation of breathing elicited by hypercapnia or metabolic acidosis. CO(2) most likely works by lowering pH. The pertinent proton receptors have not been identified and may be ion channels. CRCs are probably neurons but may also include acid-sensitive glia and vascular cells that communicate with neurons via paracrine mechanisms. Retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) neurons are the most completely characterized CRCs. Their high sensitivity to CO(2) in vivo presumably relies on their intrinsic acid sensitivity, excitatory inputs from the carotid bodies and brain regions such as raphe and hypothalamus, and facilitating influences from neighboring astrocytes. RTN neurons are necessary for the respiratory network to respond to CO(2) during the perinatal period and under anesthesia. In conscious adults, RTN neurons contribute to an unknown degree to the pH-dependent regulation of breathing rate, inspiratory, and expiratory activity. The abnormal prenatal development of RTN neurons probably contributes to the congenital central hypoventilation syndrome. Other CRCs presumably exist, but the supportive evidence is less complete. The proposed locations of these CRCs are the medullary raphe, the nucleus tractus solitarius, the ventrolateral medulla, the fastigial nucleus, and the hypothalamus. Several wake-promoting systems (serotonergic and catecholaminergic neurons, orexinergic neurons) are also putative CRCs. Their contribution to central respiratory chemoreception may be behavior dependent or vary according to the state of vigilance. PMID:20737591

  20. Gemmatimonas aurantiaca gen. nov., sp. nov., a gram-negative, aerobic, polyphosphate-accumulating micro-organism, the first cultured representative of the new bacterial phylum Gemmatimonadetes phyl. nov.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Hanada, Satoshi; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kim, Hongik; Kamagata, Yoichi; Nakamura, Kazunori

    2003-07-01

    A phylogenetically novel aerobic bacterium was isolated from an anaerobic-aerobic sequential batch reactor operated under enhanced biological phosphorus removal conditions for wastewater treatment. The isolation strategy used targeted slowly growing polyphosphate-accumulating bacteria by combining low-speed centrifugations and prolonged incubation on a low-nutrient medium. The isolate, designated strain T-27T, was a gram-negative, rod-shaped aerobe. Cells often appeared to divide by budding replication. Strain T-27T grew at 25-35 degrees C with an optimum growth temperature of 30 degrees C, whilst no growth was observed below 20 degrees C or above 37 degrees C within 20 days incubation. The pH range for growth was 6.5-9.5, with an optimum at pH 7.0. Strain T-27T was able to utilize a limited range of substrates, such as yeast extract, polypepton, succinate, acetate, gelatin and benzoate. Neisser staining was positive and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole-stained cells displayed a yellow fluorescence, indicative of polyphosphate inclusions. Menaquinone 9 was the major respiratory quinone. The cellular fatty acids of the strain were mainly composed of iso-C15:0, C16:1 and C14:0. The G + C content of the genomic DNA was 66 mol%. Comparative analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain T-27T belongs to candidate division BD (also called KS-B), a phylum-level lineage in the bacterial domain, to date comprised exclusively of environmental 16S rDNA clone sequences. Here, a new genus and species are proposed, Gemmatimonas aurantiaca (type strain T-27T=JCM 11422T=DSM 14586T) gen. nov., sp. nov., the first cultivated representative of the Gemmatimonadetes phyl. nov. Environmental sequence data indicate that this phylum is widespread in nature and has a phylogenetic breadth (19% 16S rDNA sequence divergence) that is greater than well-known phyla such as the Actinobacteria (18% divergence).

  1. Membrane biofouling mechanism in an aerobic granular reactor degrading 4-chlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Buitrón, Germán; Moreno-Andrade, Iván; Arellano-Badillo, Víctor M; Ramírez-Amaya, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    The membrane fouling of an aerobic granular reactor coupled with a submerged membrane in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was evaluated. The fouling analysis was performed by applying microscopy techniques to determine the morphology and structure of the fouling layer on a polyvinylidene fluoride membrane. It was found that the main cause of fouling was the polysaccharide adsorption on the membrane surface, followed by the growth of microorganisms to form a biofilm.

  2. Binary Interactions of Antagonistic Bacteria with Candida albicans Under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Benadé, Eliska; Stone, Wendy; Mouton, Marnel; Postma, Ferdinand; Wilsenach, Jac; Botha, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    We used both aerobic and anaerobic liquid co-cultures, prepared with Luria Bertani broth, to study the effect of bacteria on the survival of Candida albicans in the external environment, away from an animal host. The bacteria were represented by Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium, Enterobacter, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Kluyvera ascorbata and Serratia marcescens. Under aerobic conditions, the yeast's growth was inhibited in the presence of bacterial growth; however, under anaerobic conditions, yeast and bacterial growth in co-cultures was similar to that observed for pure cultures. Subsequent assays revealed that the majority of bacterial strains aerobically produced extracellular hydrolytic enzymes capable of yeast cell wall hydrolysis, including chitinases and mannan-degrading enzymes. In contrast, except for the A. hydrophila strain, these enzymes were not detected in anaerobic bacterial cultures, nor was the antimicrobial compound prodigiosin found in anaerobic cultures of S. marcescens. When we suspended C. albicans cells in crude extracellular enzyme preparations from K. pneumoniae and S. marcescens, we detected no negative effect on yeast viability. However, we found that these preparations enhance the toxicity of prodigiosin towards the yeast, especially in combination with mannan-degrading enzymes. Analyses of the chitin and mannan content of yeast cell walls revealed that less chitin was produced under anaerobic than aerobic conditions; however, the levels of mannan, known for its low permeability, remained the same. The latter phenomenon, as well as reduced production of the bacterial enzymes and prodigiosin, may contribute to anaerobic growth and survival of C. albicans in the presence of bacteria.

  3. Binary Interactions of Antagonistic Bacteria with Candida albicans Under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Benadé, Eliska; Stone, Wendy; Mouton, Marnel; Postma, Ferdinand; Wilsenach, Jac; Botha, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    We used both aerobic and anaerobic liquid co-cultures, prepared with Luria Bertani broth, to study the effect of bacteria on the survival of Candida albicans in the external environment, away from an animal host. The bacteria were represented by Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium, Enterobacter, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Kluyvera ascorbata and Serratia marcescens. Under aerobic conditions, the yeast's growth was inhibited in the presence of bacterial growth; however, under anaerobic conditions, yeast and bacterial growth in co-cultures was similar to that observed for pure cultures. Subsequent assays revealed that the majority of bacterial strains aerobically produced extracellular hydrolytic enzymes capable of yeast cell wall hydrolysis, including chitinases and mannan-degrading enzymes. In contrast, except for the A. hydrophila strain, these enzymes were not detected in anaerobic bacterial cultures, nor was the antimicrobial compound prodigiosin found in anaerobic cultures of S. marcescens. When we suspended C. albicans cells in crude extracellular enzyme preparations from K. pneumoniae and S. marcescens, we detected no negative effect on yeast viability. However, we found that these preparations enhance the toxicity of prodigiosin towards the yeast, especially in combination with mannan-degrading enzymes. Analyses of the chitin and mannan content of yeast cell walls revealed that less chitin was produced under anaerobic than aerobic conditions; however, the levels of mannan, known for its low permeability, remained the same. The latter phenomenon, as well as reduced production of the bacterial enzymes and prodigiosin, may contribute to anaerobic growth and survival of C. albicans in the presence of bacteria. PMID:26566932

  4. Membrane biofouling mechanism in an aerobic granular reactor degrading 4-chlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Buitrón, Germán; Moreno-Andrade, Iván; Arellano-Badillo, Víctor M; Ramírez-Amaya, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    The membrane fouling of an aerobic granular reactor coupled with a submerged membrane in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was evaluated. The fouling analysis was performed by applying microscopy techniques to determine the morphology and structure of the fouling layer on a polyvinylidene fluoride membrane. It was found that the main cause of fouling was the polysaccharide adsorption on the membrane surface, followed by the growth of microorganisms to form a biofilm. PMID:24759539

  5. Effect of chlorate, molybdate, and shikimic acid on Salmonella Typhimurium in aerobic and anaerobic cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two studies were conducted to examine the effects of shikimic acid (60 µg/mL) and(or) molybdate (1 mM) on the sensitivity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to sodium chlorate (5 mM) during anaerobic (90% N2:5% CO2:5% H2) or aerobic growth in brain heart infusion broth supplemented with 5 mM...

  6. Detoxification of furfural in Corynebacterium glutamicum under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Yota; Hori, Yoshimi; Kudou, Motonori; Ishii, Jun; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-10-01

    The toxic fermentation inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates raise serious problems for the microbial production of fuels and chemicals. Furfural is considered to be one of the most toxic compounds among these inhibitors. Here, we describe the detoxification of furfural in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032 under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Under aerobic culture conditions, furfuryl alcohol and 2-furoic acid were produced as detoxification products of furfural. The ratio of the products varied depending on the initial furfural concentration. Neither furfuryl alcohol nor 2-furoic acid showed any toxic effect on cell growth, and both compounds were determined to be the end products of furfural degradation. Interestingly, unlike under aerobic conditions, most of the furfural was converted to furfuryl alcohol under anaerobic conditions, without affecting the glucose consumption rate. Both the NADH/NAD(+) and NADPH/NADP(+) ratio decreased in the accordance with furfural concentration under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. These results indicate the presence of a single or multiple endogenous enzymes with broad and high affinity for furfural and co-factors in C. glutamicum ATCC13032.

  7. Kinetics of the biodegradation pathway of endosulfan in the aerobic and anaerobic environments.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Manoj K; Guha, Saumyen

    2013-09-01

    The enriched mixed culture aerobic and anaerobic bacteria from agricultural soils were used to study the degradation of endosulfan (ES) in aqueous and soil slurry environments. The extent of biodegradation was ∼95% in aqueous and ∼65% in soil slurry during 15 d in aerobic studies and, ∼80% in aqueous and ∼60% in soil slurry during 60 d in anaerobic studies. The pathways of aerobic and anaerobic degradation of ES were modeled using combination of Monod no growth model and first order kinetics. The rate of biodegradation of β-isomer was faster compared to α-isomer. Conversion of ES to endosulfan sulfate (ESS) and endosulfan diol (ESD) were the rate limiting steps in aerobic medium and, the hydrolysis of ES to ESD was the rate limiting step in anaerobic medium. The mass balance indicated further degradation of endosulfan ether (ESE) and endosulfan lactone (ESL), but no end-products were identified. In the soil slurries, the rates of degradation of sorbed contaminants were slower. As a result, net rate of degradation reduced, increasing the persistence of the compounds. The soil phase degradation rate of β-isomer was slowed down more compared with α-isomer, which was attributed to its higher partition coefficient on the soil.

  8. Agricultural potential of anaerobically digested industrial orange waste with and without aerobic post-treatment.

    PubMed

    Kaparaju, Prasad; Rintala, Jukka; Oikari, Aimo

    2012-01-01

    The potential of anaerobically digested orange waste with (AAD) and without (AD) aerobic post-treatment for use in agriculture was evaluated through chemical analyses, short-term phytotoxicity and long-term plant assays. Chemical analyses showed that AD contained ammonia and organic acids, and aerobic post-treatment did not significantly remove these phytotoxins. The N:P2O5:K2O ratio in AD was 1:0.26:0.96 and aerobic post-treatment did not change the composition in AAD except for K2O (1:0.26:1.24). Heavy metal contents in AD and AAD were more or less the same and were below the upper limit recommended for non-sewage sludge application on agricultural soils. Short-term phytotoxicity tests showed that seed germination and root elongation of Chinese cabbage and ryegrass were severely inhibited at digestate concentrations of 60-100%. Germination index values were well below the score of 50% required to indicate the phytotoxic-free nature of compost. Long-term plant assays showed that AD and AAD, when supplemented with a base fertilizer, resulted in higher plant growth, and fresh weight and dry matter production than AD without base fertilizer. The results thus indicate that aerobic post-treatment did not have any significant beneficial effect on reducing phytotoxicity, and AD could be used as such on agricultural soils, especially with high P. PMID:22519091

  9. Henipavirus Pathogenesis in Human Respiratory Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Escaffre, Olivier; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Carmical, J. Russ; Prusak, Deborah; Prescott, Joseph; Feldmann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are deadly zoonotic viruses for which no vaccines or therapeutics are licensed for human use. Henipavirus infection causes severe respiratory illness and encephalitis. Although the exact route of transmission in human is unknown, epidemiological studies and in vivo studies suggest that the respiratory tract is important for virus replication. However, the target cells in the respiratory tract are unknown, as are the mechanisms by which henipaviruses can cause disease. In this study, we characterized henipavirus pathogenesis using primary cells derived from the human respiratory tract. The growth kinetics of NiV-Malaysia, NiV-Bangladesh, and HeV were determined in bronchial/tracheal epithelial cells (NHBE) and small airway epithelial cells (SAEC). In addition, host responses to infection were assessed by gene expression analysis and immunoassays. Viruses replicated efficiently in both cell types and induced large syncytia. The host response to henipavirus infection in NHBE and SAEC highlighted a difference in the inflammatory response between HeV and NiV strains as well as intrinsic differences in the ability to mount an inflammatory response between NHBE and SAEC. These responses were highest during HeV infection in SAEC, as characterized by the levels of key cytokines (interleukin 6 [IL-6], IL-8, IL-1α, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1], and colony-stimulating factors) responsible for immune cell recruitment. Finally, we identified virus strain-dependent variability in type I interferon antagonism in NHBE and SAEC: NiV-Malaysia counteracted this pathway more efficiently than NiV-Bangladesh and HeV. These results provide crucial new information in the understanding of henipavirus pathogenesis in the human respiratory tract at an early stage of infection. PMID:23302882

  10. The two-component system Bacillus respiratory response A and B (BrrA-BrrB) is a virulence factor regulator in Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Sara M; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2007-06-26

    Bacillus anthracis, a bioterrorism threat as well as an agricultural concern, has complex mechanisms for regulation of its major virulence factors. Genome searches identified the putative two-component system that we designated Bacillus anthracis respiratory response (Brr)A-BrrB. A brrA deletion strain was constructed, and real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were used to assess the effect of BrrA-BrrB on levels of virulence factors, the regulator atxA, and growth characteristics. When brrA was deleted, the genes for anthrax toxins (lethal factor, protective antigen, and edema factor) where expressed 4-6-log10-fold less than in the parent Sterne strain. The global regulator atxA was downregulated when compared to atxA in the Sterne strain. Thus, the BrrA-BrrB two-component system positively regulates B. anthracis toxin genes as well as the atxA regulator. Aerobic growth was not affected by the DeltabrrA mutation, but colonies showed differences in morphology, the mutant did not sporulate, and the strain lost the ability to synthesize cytochrome aa3. Gel-shift mobility assays demonstrated that BrrA bound to the promoters of genes for both protective antigen and cytochrome aa3, demonstrating that BrrA is a transcription factor. BrrA-BrrB has sequence similarity with the virulence regulator SrrA-SrrB in Staphylococcus aureus and the aerobic/anaerobic regulator, ResD-ResE, in B. subtilis, and appears to share regulatory mechanisms with ResD-ResE. PMID:17536838

  11. Respiratory System Disease.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Danielle M; Singh, Shipra

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory system involvement in cystic fibrosis is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene throughout the sinopulmonary tract result in recurrent infections with a variety of organisms including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and nontuberculous mycobacteria. Lung disease occurs earlier in life than once thought and ideal methods of monitoring lung function, decline, or improvement with therapy are debated. Treatment of sinopulmonary disease may include physiotherapy, mucus-modifying and antiinflammatory agents, antimicrobials, and surgery. In the new era of personalized medicine, CFTR correctors and potentiators may change the course of disease. PMID:27469180

  12. Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Naren N; Pine, Harold S; Underbrink, Michael P

    2012-06-01

    Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is a rare, benign disease with no known cure. RRP is caused by infection of the upper aerodigestive tract with the human papillomavirus (HPV). Passage through the birth canal is thought to be the initial transmission event, but infection may occur in utero. HPV vaccines have helped to provide protection from cervical cancer; however, their role in the prevention of RRP is undetermined. Clinical presentation of initial symptoms of RRP may be subtle. RRP course varies, and current management focuses on surgical debulking of papillomatous lesions with or without concurrent adjuvant therapy. PMID:22588043

  13. Aerobic Reduction of Arsenate by a Bacterium Isolated From Activated Sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozai, N.; Ohnuki, T.; Hanada, S.; Nakamura, K.; Francis, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    Microlunatus phosphovorus strain NM-1 is a polyphosphate-accumulating bacterium isolated from activated sludge. This bacterium takes up a large amount of polyphosphate under aerobic conditions and release phosphate ions by hydrolysis of polyphosphate to orthophosphate under anaerobic conditions to derive energy for taking up substrates. To understand the nature of this strain, especially, influence of potential contaminants in sewage and wastewater on growth, we have been investigating behavior of this bacterium in media containing arsenic. The present paper mainly reports reduction of arsenate by this bacterium under aerobic conditions. The strain NM-1 (JCM 9379) was aerobically cultured at 30 °C in a nutrient medium containing 2.5 g/l peptone, 0.5 g/l glucose, 1.5 g/l yeast extract, and arsenic [Na2HAsO4 (As(V)) or Na3AsO3 (As(III))] at concentrations between 0 and 50 mM. The cells collected from arsenic-free media were dispersed in buffer solutions containing 2mM HEPES, 10mM NaCl, prescribed concentrations of As(V), and 0-0.2 percent glucose. Then, this cell suspension was kept at 20 °C under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. The speciation of arsenic was carried out by ion chromatography and ICP-MS. The growth of the strain under aerobic conditions was enhanced by the addition of As(V) at the concentration between 1 and 10 mM. The maximum optical density of the culture in the medium containing 5mM As(V) was 1.4 times greater than that of the control culture. Below the As(V) concentration of 10mM, most of the As(V) was reduced to As(III). The growth of the strain under anaerobic conditions has not been observed so far. The cells in the buffer solutions reduced As(V) under aerobic condition. The reduction was enhanced by the addition of glucose. However, the cell did not reduce As(V) under anaerobic conditions. The strain NM-1 showed high resistance to As(V) and As(III). The maximum optical density of the culture grown in a medium containing 50 mM As(V) was only

  14. Transcriptomic and metabolomic profiling of Zymomonas mobilis during aerobic and anaerobic fermentations

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shihui; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Engle, Nancy L; Carroll, Sue L; Martin, S L.; Davison, Brian H; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Brown, Steven D

    2009-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 (ZM4) produces near theoretical yields of ethanol with high specific productivity and recombinant strains are able to ferment both C-5 and C-6 sugars. Z. mobilis performs best under anaerobic conditions, but is an aerotolerant organism. However, the genetic and physiological basis of ZM4's response to various stresses is understood poorly. In this study, transcriptomic and metabolomic profiles for ZM4 aerobic and anaerobic fermentations were elucidated by microarray analysis and by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses. In the absence of oxygen, ZM4 consumed glucose more rapidly, had a higher growth rate, and ethanol was the major end-product. Greater amounts of other end-products such as acetate, lactate, and acetoin were detected under aerobic conditions and at 26 h there was only 1.7% of the amount of ethanol present aerobically as there was anaerobically. In the early exponential growth phase, significant differences in gene expression were not observed between aerobic and anaerobic conditions via microarray analysis. HPLC and GC analyses revealed minor differences in extracellular metabolite profiles at the corresponding early exponential phase time point. Differences in extracellular metabolite profiles between conditions became greater as the fermentations progressed. GC-MS analysis of stationary phase intracellular metabolites indicated that ZM4 contained lower levels of amino acids such as alanine, valine and lysine, and other metabolites like lactate, ribitol, and 4-hydroxybutanoate under anaerobic conditions relative to aerobic conditions. Stationary phase microarray analysis revealed that 166 genes were significantly differentially expressed by more than two-fold. Transcripts for Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway genes (glk, zwf, pgl, pgk, and eno) and gene pdc, encoding a key enzyme leading to ethanol production, were at least 30-fold more

  15. Assessment of bacterial and structural dynamics in aerobic granular biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Weissbrodt, David G.; Neu, Thomas R.; Kuhlicke, Ute; Rappaz, Yoan; Holliger, Christof

    2013-01-01

    Aerobic granular sludge (AGS) is based on self-granulated flocs forming mobile biofilms with a gel-like consistence. Bacterial and structural dynamics from flocs to granules were followed in anaerobic-aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBR) fed with synthetic wastewater, namely a bubble column (BC-SBR) operated under wash-out conditions for fast granulation, and two stirred-tank enrichments of Accumulibacter (PAO-SBR) and Competibacter (GAO-SBR) operated at steady-state. In the BC-SBR, granules formed within 2 weeks by swelling of Zoogloea colonies around flocs, developing subsequently smooth zoogloeal biofilms. However, Zoogloea predominance (37–79%) led to deteriorated nutrient removal during the first months of reactor operation. Upon maturation, improved nitrification (80–100%), nitrogen removal (43–83%), and high but unstable dephosphatation (75–100%) were obtained. Proliferation of dense clusters of nitrifiers, Accumulibacter, and Competibacter from granule cores outwards resulted in heterogeneous bioaggregates, inside which only low abundance Zoogloea (<5%) were detected in biofilm interstices. The presence of different extracellular glycoconjugates detected by fluorescence lectin-binding analysis showed the complex nature of the intracellular matrix of these granules. In the PAO-SBR, granulation occurred within two months with abundant and active Accumulibacter populations (56 ± 10%) that were selected under full anaerobic uptake of volatile fatty acids and that aggregated as dense clusters within heterogeneous granules. Flocs self-granulated in the GAO-SBR after 480 days during a period of over-aeration caused by biofilm growth on the oxygen sensor. Granules were dominated by heterogeneous clusters of Competibacter (37 ± 11%). Zoogloea were never abundant in biomass of both PAO- and GAO-SBRs. This study showed that Zoogloea, Accumulibacter, and Competibacter affiliates can form granules, and that the granulation mechanisms rely on the dominant

  16. Intracellular azo decolorization is coupled with aerobic respiration by a Klebsiella oxytoca strain.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Xie, Tian; Hu, Jin-Mei; Wang, Shi; Li, Wen-Wei

    2015-03-01

    Reduction of azo dye methyl red coupled with aerobic respiration by growing cultures of Klebsiella oxytoca GS-4-08 was investigated. In liquid media containing dye and 0.6 % glucose in a mineral salts base, 100 mg l(-1) of the dye are completely removed in 3 h under shaking conditions. The dye cannot be aerobically decolorized by strain GS-4-08 without extra carbon sources, indicating a co-metabolism process. Higher initial dye concentration prolonged the lag phase of the cell growth, but final cell concentrations of each batches reached a same level with range from 6.3 to 7.6 mg l(-1) after the dye adaption period. This strain showed stronger dye tolerance and decolorization ability than many reported strains. Furthermore, a new intracellular oxygen-insensitive azoreductase was isolated from this strain, and the specific activity of enzyme was 0.846 and 0.633 U mg(-1) protein in the presence of NADH and NADPH, respectively. N,N dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine and anthranilic acid were stoichiometrically released from MR dye, indicating the breakage of azo bonds accounts for the intracellular decolorization. Combining the characteristics of azoreductase, the stoichiometry of EMP, and TCA cycle, the electron transfer chain theory of aerobic respiration, and the possible mechanism of aerobic respiration coupled with azo reduction by K. oxytoca GS-4-08 are proposed. This study is expected to provide a sound theoretical basis for the development of the K. oxytoca strain in aerobic process for azo dye containing wastewaters. PMID:25343980

  17. Impact of salinity on the aerobic metabolism of phosphate-accumulating organisms.

    PubMed

    Welles, L; Lopez-Vazquez, C M; Hooijmans, C M; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Brdjanovic, D

    2015-04-01

    The use of saline water in urban areas for non-potable purposes to cope with fresh water scarcity, intrusion of saline water, and disposal of industrial saline wastewater into the sewerage lead to elevated salinity levels in wastewaters. Consequently, saline wastewater is generated, which needs to be treated before its discharge into surface water bodies. The objective of this research was to study the effects of salinity on the aerobic metabolism of phosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO), which belong to the microbial populations responsible for enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) in activated sludge systems. In this study, the short-term impact (hours) of salinity (as NaCl) was assessed on the aerobic metabolism of a PAO culture, enriched in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). All aerobic PAO metabolic processes were drastically affected by elevated salinity concentrations. The aerobic maintenance energy requirement increased, when the salinity concentration rose up to a threshold concentration of 2 % salinity (on a W/V basis as NaCl), while above this concentration, the maintenance energy requirements seemed to decrease. All initial rates were affected by salinity, with the NH4- and PO4-uptake rates being the most sensitive. A salinity increase from 0 to 0.18 % caused a 25, 46, and 63 % inhibition of the O2, PO4, and NH4-uptake rates. The stoichiometric ratios of the aerobic conversions confirmed that growth was the process with the highest inhibition, followed by poly-P and glycogen formation. The study indicates that shock loads of 0.18 % salt, which corresponds to the use or intrusion of about 5 % seawater may severely affect the EBPR process already in wastewater treatment plants not exposed regularly to high salinity concentrations. PMID:25524698

  18. Impact of salinity on the aerobic metabolism of phosphate-accumulating organisms.

    PubMed

    Welles, L; Lopez-Vazquez, C M; Hooijmans, C M; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Brdjanovic, D

    2015-04-01

    The use of saline water in urban areas for non-potable purposes to cope with fresh water scarcity, intrusion of saline water, and disposal of industrial saline wastewater into the sewerage lead to elevated salinity levels in wastewaters. Consequently, saline wastewater is generated, which needs to be treated before its discharge into surface water bodies. The objective of this research was to study the effects of salinity on the aerobic metabolism of phosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO), which belong to the microbial populations responsible for enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) in activated sludge systems. In this study, the short-term impact (hours) of salinity (as NaCl) was assessed on the aerobic metabolism of a PAO culture, enriched in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). All aerobic PAO metabolic processes were drastically affected by elevated salinity concentrations. The aerobic maintenance energy requirement increased, when the salinity concentration rose up to a threshold concentration of 2 % salinity (on a W/V basis as NaCl), while above this concentration, the maintenance energy requirements seemed to decrease. All initial rates were affected by salinity, with the NH4- and PO4-uptake rates being the most sensitive. A salinity increase from 0 to 0.18 % caused a 25, 46, and 63 % inhibition of the O2, PO4, and NH4-uptake rates. The stoichiometric ratios of the aerobic conversions confirmed that growth was the process with the highest inhibition, followed by poly-P and glycogen formation. The study indicates that shock loads of 0.18 % salt, which corresponds to the use or intrusion of about 5 % seawater may severely affect the EBPR process already in wastewater treatment plants not exposed regularly to high salinity concentrations.

  19. Aerobic exercise improves cognition for older adults with glucose intolerance, a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Baker, Laura D; Frank, Laura L; Foster-Schubert, Karen; Green, Pattie S; Wilkinson, Charles W; McTiernan, Anne; Cholerton, Brenna A; Plymate, Stephen R; Fishel, Mark A; Watson, G Stennis; Duncan, Glen E; Mehta, Pankaj D; Craft, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    Impaired glucose regulation is a defining characteristic of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) pathology and has been linked to increased risk of cognitive impairment and dementia. Although the benefits of aerobic exercise for physical health are well-documented, exercise effects on cognition have not been examined for older adults with poor glucose regulation associated with prediabetes and early T2DM. Using a randomized controlled design, twenty-eight adults (57-83 y old) meeting 2-h tolerance test criteria for glucose intolerance completed 6 months of aerobic exercise or stretching, which served as the control. The primary cognitive outcomes included measures of executive function (Trails B, Task Switching, Stroop, Self-ordered Pointing Test, and Verbal Fluency). Other outcomes included memory performance (Story Recall, List Learning), measures of cardiorespiratory fitness obtained via maximal-graded exercise treadmill test, glucose disposal during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, body fat, and fasting plasma levels of insulin, cortisol, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, insulin-like growth factor-1, amyloid-β (Aβ40 and Aβ42). Six months of aerobic exercise improved executive function (MANCOVA, p=0.04), cardiorespiratory fitness (MANOVA, p=0.03), and insulin sensitivity (p=0.05). Across all subjects, 6-month changes in cardiorespiratory fitness and insulin sensitivity were positively correlated (p=0.01). For Aβ42, plasma levels tended to decrease for the aerobic group relative to controls (p=0.07). The results of our study using rigorous controlled methodology suggest a cognition-enhancing effect of aerobic exercise for older glucose intolerant adults. Although replication in a larger sample is needed, our findings potentially have important therapeutic implications for a growing number of adults at increased risk of cognitive decline.

  20. Aerobic exercise improves cognition for older adults with glucose intolerance, a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Baker, Laura D; Frank, Laura L; Foster-Schubert, Karen; Green, Pattie S; Wilkinson, Charles W; McTiernan, Anne; Cholerton, Brenna A; Plymate, Stephen R; Fishel, Mark A; Watson, G Stennis; Duncan, Glen E; Mehta, Pankaj D; Craft, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    Impaired glucose regulation is a defining characteristic of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) pathology and has been linked to increased risk of cognitive impairment and dementia. Although the benefits of aerobic exercise for physical health are well-documented, exercise effects on cognition have not been examined for older adults with poor glucose regulation associated with prediabetes and early T2DM. Using a randomized controlled design, twenty-eight adults (57-83 y old) meeting 2-h tolerance test criteria for glucose intolerance completed 6 months of aerobic exercise or stretching, which served as the control. The primary cognitive outcomes included measures of executive function (Trails B, Task Switching, Stroop, Self-ordered Pointing Test, and Verbal Fluency). Other outcomes included memory performance (Story Recall, List Learning), measures of cardiorespiratory fitness obtained via maximal-graded exercise treadmill test, glucose disposal during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, body fat, and fasting plasma levels of insulin, cortisol, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, insulin-like growth factor-1, amyloid-β (Aβ40 and Aβ42). Six months of aerobic exercise improved executive function (MANCOVA, p=0.04), cardiorespiratory fitness (MANOVA, p=0.03), and insulin sensitivity (p=0.05). Across all subjects, 6-month changes in cardiorespiratory fitness and insulin sensitivity were positively correlated (p=0.01). For Aβ42, plasma levels tended to decrease for the aerobic group relative to controls (p=0.07). The results of our study using rigorous controlled methodology suggest a cognition-enhancing effect of aerobic exercise for older glucose intolerant adults. Although replication in a larger sample is needed, our findings potentially have important therapeutic implications for a growing number of adults at increased risk of cognitive decline. PMID:20847403

  1. Mitochondria express enhanced quality as well as quantity in association with aerobic fitness across recreationally active individuals up to elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Robert A; Lundby, Carsten

    2013-02-01

    Changes in skeletal muscle respiratory capacity parallel that of aerobic fitness. It is unknown whether mitochondrial content, alone, can fully account for these differences in skeletal muscle respiratory capacity. The aim of the present study was to examine quantitative and qualitative mitochondrial characteristics across four different groups (n = 6 each), separated by cardiorespiratory fitness. High-resolution respirometry was performed on muscle samples to compare respiratory capacity and efficiency in active, well-trained, highly trained, and elite individuals. Maximal exercise capacity (ml O(2)·min(-1)·kg(-1)) differed across all groups, with mean ± SD values of 51 ± 4, 64 ± 5, 71 ± 2, and 77 ± 3, respectively. Mitochondrial content assessed by citrate synthase activity was higher in elite trained compared with active and well-trained (29 ± 7 vs. 16 ± 4 and 19 ± 4 nmol·min(-1)·mg wet wt(-1), respectively). When normalizing respiration to mitochondrial content, the respiratory capacities during maximal fatty acid oxidation (P = 0.003), maximal state 3 respiration (P = 0.021), and total electron transport system capacity (P = 0.008) improved with respect to maximal exercise capacity. The coupling efficiency of β-oxidation, however, expressed no difference across groups. These data demonstrate the quantitative and qualitative differences that exist in skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity and efficiency across individuals that differ in aerobic capacity. Mitochondrial-specific respiration capacities during β-oxidation, maximal oxidative phosphorylation, and electron transport system capacity all correspondingly improve with aerobic capacity, independent of mitochondrial content in human skeletal muscle.

  2. Respiratory Therapy and Respiratory Therapy Technician. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.

    This program guide identifies primary considerations in the organization, operation, and evaluation of respiratory therapy and respiratory therapy technician programs. An occupational description and program content are presented. The curriculum framework specifies the exact course title, course number, levels of instruction, major course content,…

  3. 10 CFR 850.28 - Respiratory protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Respiratory protection. (a) The responsible employer must establish a respiratory protection program that complies with the respiratory protection program requirements of 29 CFR 1910.134, Respiratory Protection... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Respiratory protection. 850.28 Section 850.28...

  4. 10 CFR 850.28 - Respiratory protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Respiratory protection. (a) The responsible employer must establish a respiratory protection program that complies with the respiratory protection program requirements of 29 CFR 1910.134, Respiratory Protection... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Respiratory protection. 850.28 Section 850.28...

  5. Augmentation of normal and glutamate-impaired neuronal respiratory capacity by exogenous alternative biofuels.

    PubMed

    Laird, Melissa D; Clerc, Pascaline; Polster, Brian M; Fiskum, Gary

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory capacity is critical for responding to changes in neuronal energy demand. One approach toward neuroprotection is the administration of alternative energy substrates ("biofuels") to overcome brain injury-induced inhibition of glucose-based aerobic energy metabolism. This study tested the hypothesis that exogenous pyruvate, lactate, β-hydroxybutyrate, and acetyl-L-carnitine each increase neuronal respiratory capacity in vitro either in the absence of or following transient excitotoxic glutamate receptor stimulation. Compared to the presence of 5 mM glucose alone, the addition of pyruvate, lactate, or β-hydroxybutyrate (1.0-10.0 mM) to either day in vitro (DIV) 14 or 7 rat cortical neurons resulted in significant, dose-dependent stimulation of respiratory capacity, measured by cell respirometry as the maximal O2 consumption rate in the presence of the respiratory uncoupler carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone. A 30-min exposure to 100 μM glutamate impaired respiratory capacity for DIV 14, but not DIV 7, neurons. Glutamate reduced the respiratory capacity for DIV 14 neurons with glucose alone by 25 % and also reduced respiratory capacity with glucose plus pyruvate, lactate, or β-hydroxybutyrate. However, respiratory capacity in glutamate-exposed neurons following pyruvate or β-hydroxybutyrate addition was still, at least, as high as that obtained with glucose alone in the absence of glutamate exposure. These results support the interpretation that previously observed neuroprotection by exogenous pyruvate, lactate, or β-hydroxybutyrate is at least partially mediated by their preservation of neuronal respiratory capacity. PMID:24323418

  6. Augmentation of Normal and Glutamate-Impaired Neuronal Respiratory Capacity by Exogenous Alternative Biofuels

    PubMed Central

    Laird, Melissa D.; Clerc, Pascaline; Polster, Brian M.; Fiskum, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory capacity is critical for responding to changes in neuronal energy demand. One approach toward neuroprotection is administration of alternative energy substrates (“biofuels”) to overcome brain injury-induced inhibition of glucose-based aerobic energy metabolism. This study tested the hypothesis that exogenous pyruvate, lactate, β-hydroxybutyrate, and acetyl-L-carnitine each increase neuronal respiratory capacity in vitro either in the absence of, or following transient excitotoxic glutamate receptor stimulation. Compared to the presence of 5 mM glucose alone, the addition of pyruvate, lactate, or β-hydroxybutyrate (1.0 – 10.0 mM) to either day in vitro (DIV) 14 or 7 rat cortical neurons resulted in significant, dose-dependent stimulation of respiratory capacity, measured by cell respirometry as the maximal O2 consumption rate in the presence of the respiratory uncoupler FCCP. A thirty minute exposure to 100 μM glutamate impaired respiratory capacity for DIV 14 but not DIV 7 neurons. Glutamate reduced the respiratory capacity for DIV 14 neurons with glucose alone by 25% and also reduced respiratory capacity with glucose plus pyruvate, lactate or β-hydroxybutyrate. However, respiratory capacity in glutamate-exposed neurons following pyruvate or β-hydroxybutyrate addition was still at least as high as that obtained with glucose alone in the absence of glutamate exposure. These results support the interpretation that previously observed neuroprotection by exogenous pyruvate, lactate, or β-hydroxybutyrate is at least partially mediated by their preservation of neuronal respiratory capacity. PMID:24323418

  7. [Sulfa-drug wastewater treatment with anaerobic/aerobic process].

    PubMed

    Wu, L; Zhang, H; Zhu, H; Zhang, Z; Zhuang, Y; Dai, S

    2001-09-01

    Sulfa drug wastewater was treated with anaerobic/aerobic process. The removal ratios of TOC reached about 50% in anaerobic phase and about 70% in aerobic phase respectively, while volume loading rate of TOC was about 1.2 kg/(m3.d) in anaerobic phase and about 0.6 kg/(m3.d) in aerobic phase. Removal of TOC in anaerobic phase was attributed to the reduction of sulfate.

  8. CLA supplementation and aerobic exercise lower blood triacylglycerol, but have no effect on peak oxygen uptake or cardiorespiratory fatigue thresholds.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Nathaniel D M; Buckner, Samuel L; Cochrane, Kristen C; Bergstrom, Haley C; Goldsmith, Jacob A; Weir, Joseph P; Housh, Terry J; Cramer, Joel T

    2014-09-01

    This study examined the effects of 6 weeks of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) supplementation and moderate aerobic exercise on peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak), the gas exchange threshold (GET), the respiratory compensation point (RCP), and serum concentrations of cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and glucose in humans. Thirty-four untrained to moderately trained men (mean ± SD; age = 21.5 ± 2.8 years; mass = 77.2 ± 9.5 kg) completed this double-blind, placebo controlled study and were randomly assigned to either a CLA (Clarinol A-80; n = 18) or placebo (PLA; sunflower oil; n = 16) group. Prior to and following 6 weeks of aerobic training (50% VO2 peak for 30 min, twice per week) and supplementation (5.63 g of total CLA isomers [of which 2.67 g was c9, t11 and 2.67 g was t10, c12] or 7.35 g high oleic sunflower oil per day), each participant completed an incremental cycle ergometer test to exhaustion to determine their [Formula: see text] peak, GET, and RCP and fasted blood draws were performed to measure serum concentrations of cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and glucose. Serum triacylglycerol concentrations were lower (p < 0.05) in the CLA than the PLA group. For VO2 peak and glucose, there were group × time interactions (p < 0.05), however, post hoc statistical tests did not reveal any differences (p > 0.05) between the CLA and PLA groups. GET and RCP increased (p < 0.05) from pre- to post-training for both the CLA and PLA groups. Overall, these data suggested that CLA and aerobic exercise may have synergistic, blood triacylglycerol lowering effects, although CLA may be ineffective for enhancing aerobic exercise performance in conjunction with a 6-week aerobic exercise training program in college-age men.

  9. Respiratory disease and cardiovascular morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Koskela, R; Mutanen, P; Sorsa, J; Klockars, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Work related dust exposure is a risk factor for acute and chronic respiratory irritation and inflammation. Exposure to dust and cigarette smoke predisposes to exogenous viral and bacterial infections of the respiratory tract. Respiratory infection can also act as a risk factor in the development of atherosclerotic and coronary artery disease. Aims: To investigate the association of dust exposure and respiratory diseases with ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and other cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Methods: The study comprised 6022 dust exposed (granite, foundry, cotton mill, iron foundry, metal product, and electrical) workers hired in 1940–76 and followed until the end of 1992. National mortality and morbidity registers and questionnaires were used. The statistical methods were person-year analysis and Cox regression. Results: Co-morbidity from cardiovascular and respiratory diseases ranged from 17% to 35%. In at least 60% of the co-morbidity cases a respiratory disease preceded a cardiovascular disease. Chronic bronchitis, pneumonia, and upper respiratory track infections predicted IHD in granite workers (rate ratio (RR) = 1.9; 95% CI 1.38 to 2.72), foundry workers (2.1; 1.48 to 2.93), and iron foundry workers (1.7; 1.16 to 2.35). Dust exposure was not a significant predictor of IHD or other CVD in any group. Dust exposure was related to respiratory morbidity. Thus, some respiratory diseases appeared to act as intermediate variables in the association of dust exposure with IHD. Conclusion: Dust exposure had only a small direct effect on IHD and other CVD. IHD morbidity was associated with preceding respiratory morbidity. A chronic infectious respiratory tract disease appeared to play an independent role in the development of IHD. PMID:16109822

  10. Implementing change in respiratory care.

    PubMed

    Stoller, James K

    2010-06-01

    Though people are generally averse to change, change and innovation are critically important in respiratory care to maintain scientific and clinical progress. This paper reviews the issue of change in respiratory care. I summarize several available models of organizational and personal change (ie, those of Kotter and of Silversin and Kornacki, and the Intentional Change Theory of Boyatzis), review the characteristics of change-avid respiratory therapy departments, offer an example of a change effort in respiratory care (implementation of respiratory care protocols) and then analyze this change effort as it took place at one institution, the Cleveland Clinic, using these models. Finally, I present the results of an analysis of change-avid respiratory therapy departments and offer some suggestions regarding change management for the profession and for individual respiratory care clinicians. Common features of theories of organizational change include developing a sense of urgency, overcoming resistance, developing a guiding coalition, and involving key stakeholders early. With the understanding that change efforts may seem unduly "clean" and orderly in retrospect, the models help explain the sustainable success of efforts to implement the Respiratory Therapy Consult Service at the Cleveland Clinic. By implication, these models offer value in planning change efforts prospectively. Further analysis of features of change-avid respiratory therapy departments indicates 11 highly desired features, of which four that especially characterize change-avid departments include: having an up-to-date leadership team; employee involvement in change; celebrating wins; and an overall sense of progressiveness in the department. This analysis suggests that understanding and embracing change is important. To anchor change in our profession, greater attention should be given to developing a pipeline of respiratory care clinicians who, by virtue of their advanced training, have the skills

  11. Impact of ArcA loss in Shewanella oneidensis revealed by comparative proteomics under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Jie; Wei, Buyun; Lipton, Mary S.; Gao, Haichun

    2012-06-01

    Shewanella inhabit a wide variety of niches in nature and can utilize a broad spectrum of electron acceptors under anaerobic conditions. How they modulate their gene expression to adapt is poorly understood. ArcA, homologue of a global regulator controlling hundreds of genes involved in aerobic and anaerobic respiration in E. coli, was shown to be important in aerobiosis/anaerobiosis of S. oneidensis as well. Loss of ArcA, in addition to altering transcription of many genes, resulted in impaired growth under aerobic condition, which was not observed in E. coli. To further characterize the impact of ArcA loss on gene expression on the level of proteome under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, liquid-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (LC-MS) based proteomic approach was employed. Results show that ArcA loss led to globally altered gene expression, generally consistent with that observed with transcripts. Comparison of transcriptomic and proteomic data permitted identification of 17 high-confidence ArcA targets. Moreover, our data indicate that ArcA is required for regulation of cytochrome c proteins, and the menaquinone level may play a role in regulating ArcA as in E. coli. Proteomic-data-guided growth assay revealed that the aerobic growth defect of ArcA mutant is presumably due to impaired peptide utilization.

  12. Skeletal myopathy in heart failure: effects of aerobic exercise training.

    PubMed

    Brum, P C; Bacurau, A V; Cunha, T F; Bechara, L R G; Moreira, J B N

    2014-04-01

    Reduced aerobic capacity, as measured by maximal oxygen uptake, is a hallmark in cardiovascular diseases and strongly predicts poor prognosis and higher mortality rates in heart failure patients. While exercise capacity is poorly correlated with cardiac function in this population, skeletal muscle abnormalities present a striking association with maximal oxygen uptake. This fact draws substantial attention to the clinical relevance of targeting skeletal myopathy in heart failure. Considering that skeletal muscle is highly responsive to aerobic exercise training, we addressed the benefits of aerobic exercise training to combat skeletal myopathy in heart failure, focusing on the mechanisms by which aerobic exercise training counteracts skeletal muscle atrophy.

  13. Aerobic Microbial Cometabolism of Benzothiophene and 3-Methylbenzothiophene

    PubMed Central

    Fedorak, Phillip M.; Grbić-Galić, Dunja

    1991-01-01

    A culture enriched by growth on 1-methylnaphthalene was used to study the aerobic biotransformations of benzothiophene and 3-methylbenzothiophene. Neither of the sulfur heterocyclic compounds would support growth, but they were transformed by the culture growing on 1-methylnaphthalene or glucose or peptone. Cometabolism of benzothiophene yielded benzothiophene-2,3-dione, whereas that of 3-methylbenzothiophene yielded 3-methylbenzothiophene sulfoxide and the corresponding sulfone. The identities of the dione and sulfone were verified by comparison with authentic standards. The identity of the sulfoxide was surmised from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography- Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results. Oxidation preferentially occurred at carbons 2 and 3 in benzothiophene, but when carbon 3 was substituted with a methyl group, as in 3-methylbenzothiophene, the sulfur atom was oxygenated. The predominant microorganism in the enrichment culture was a Pseudomonas strain, designated BT1, which mineralized aromatic but not aliphatic hydrocarbons. This isolate cometabolized benzothiophene and 3-methylbenzothiophene. There was no evidence that it could metabolize 3-methylbenzothiophene sulfone. When 3-methylbenzothiophene was added to Prudhoe Bay crude oil, the sulfur heterocycle was oxidized to its sulfoxide and sulfone by strain BT1 as it grew on the aromatic hydrocarbons in the crude oil. Benzothiophene-2,3-dione was found to be chemically unstable when incubated with Prudhoe Bay crude oil. Thus its formation from benzothiophene in the presence of crude oil could not be determined. PMID:16348471

  14. Aerobic biodegradation of propylene glycol by soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Giuseppe; Cavalca, Lucia; Letizia Colarieti, M; Scelza, Rosalia; Scotti, Riccardo; Rao, Maria A; Andreoni, Vincenza; Ciccazzo, Sonia; Greco, Guido

    2013-09-01

    Propylene glycol (PG) is a main component of aircraft deicing fluids and its extensive use in Northern airports is a source of soil and groundwater contamination. Bacterial consortia able to grow on PG as sole carbon and energy source were selected from soil samples taken along the runways of Oslo Airport Gardermoen site (Norway). DGGE analysis of enrichment cultures showed that PG-degrading populations were mainly composed by Pseudomonas species, although Bacteroidetes were found, as well. Nineteen bacterial strains, able to grow on PG as sole carbon and energy source, were isolated and identified as different Pseudomonas species. Maximum specific growth rate of mixed cultures in the absence of nutrient limitation was 0.014 h(-1) at 4 °C. Substrate C:N:P molar ratios calculated on the basis of measured growth yields are in good agreement with the suggested values for biostimulation reported in literature. Therefore, the addition of nutrients is suggested as a suitable technique to sustain PG aerobic degradation at the maximum rate by autochthonous microorganisms of unsaturated soil profile.

  15. Respiratory training as strategy to prevent cognitive decline in aging: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Leandro; Tanaka, Kátia; Santos-Galduróz, Ruth Ferreira; Galduróz, José Carlos Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Background Inadequate oxygenation may cause lesions and brain atrophy during aging. Studies show a positive association between pulmonary function and the cognitive performance of individuals from middle age on. Objective To investigate the effect of aerobic physical exercises and respiratory training on the blood oxygenation, pulmonary functions, and cognition of the elderly. Design This was a randomized and controlled trial with three parallel groups. A total of 195 community-dwelling elderly were assessed for eligibility; only n=102 were included and allocated into the three groups, but after 6 months, n=68 were analyzed in the final sample. Participants were randomized into a social interaction group (the control group), an aerobic exercise group (the “walking” group), or a respiratory training group (the “breathing” group). The main outcome measures were the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Wechsler Memory Scale, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, respiratory muscular strength, cirtometry (thoracic–abdominal circumference); oxygen saturation in arterial blood (SpO2), and hemogram. Results No differences were observed for any of the blood parameters. Aerobic exercise and respiratory training were effective in improving the pulmonary parameters. Better cognitive performance was observed for the breathing group as regards abstraction and mental flexibility. The walking group remained stable in the cognitive performance of most of the tests, except attention. The control group presented worst performance in mental manipulation of information, abstraction, mental flexibility, and attention. Conclusion Our results showed that both the walking and breathing groups presented improvement of pulmonary function. However, only the breathing group showed improved cognitive function (abstraction, mental flexibility). The improvement in cognitive functions cannot be explained by blood parameters, such as SpO2, erythrocytes, hemoglobin, and hematocrit. PMID:25848235

  16. Effect of aerobic exercises on stuttering

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Illays; Nawaz, Irum; Amjad, Imran

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Stuttering is one of the most common speech disorders in adolescents than adults. Stuttering results in depression, anxiety, behavioral problem, social isolation and communication problems in daily life. Our objective was to determine the effect of Aerobic Exercises (AE) on stuttering. Methods: A quasi trail was conducted at National Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (NIRM) from January to June 2015. Thirty patients were selected and placed in three different groups Experimental Group A, (EG = 10 patients, age between 7-14 years), Experimental Group B (EG =10 patients age between 15-28 years) and control group –group C, (CG = 10 patients, age between 7-28 years). Patient who stutter were included in this study and those with any other pathology or comorbidity of speech disorders were excluded. The assessment tool used was Real-Time analysis of speech fluency scale. Participants in all the groups received speech therapy while only the EG – A and B received aerobic exercises (AE) using treadmill and stationary bicycle along with the speech therapy. Pre-interventional and post interventional assessments were analyzed using the SPSS 21 in order to determine the significance of new treatment approach and the effectiveness of physical therapy on speech disorders. Results: All the groups showed significant treatment effects but both the EG groups (Group A, Group B) showed high improvement in the severity level of stuttering as compared to control group C. The results also showed that AE treated group B had significant difference in p-value (p=0.027) as compared to control group (p<0.05) while experimental group A had no significant difference (p > 0.05) between these groups. Conclusion: The eclectic approach of aerobic exercises with the traditional speech therapy provides proximal rehabilitation of stuttering. PMID:27648057

  17. Effect of aerobic exercises on stuttering

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Illays; Nawaz, Irum; Amjad, Imran

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Stuttering is one of the most common speech disorders in adolescents than adults. Stuttering results in depression, anxiety, behavioral problem, social isolation and communication problems in daily life. Our objective was to determine the effect of Aerobic Exercises (AE) on stuttering. Methods: A quasi trail was conducted at National Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (NIRM) from January to June 2015. Thirty patients were selected and placed in three different groups Experimental Group A, (EG = 10 patients, age between 7-14 years), Experimental Group B (EG =10 patients age between 15-28 years) and control group –group C, (CG = 10 patients, age between 7-28 years). Patient who stutter were included in this study and those with any other pathology or comorbidity of speech disorders were excluded. The assessment tool used was Real-Time analysis of speech fluency scale. Participants in all the groups received speech therapy while only the EG – A and B received aerobic exercises (AE) using treadmill and stationary bicycle along with the speech therapy. Pre-interventional and post interventional assessments were analyzed using the SPSS 21 in order to determine the significance of new treatment approach and the effectiveness of physical therapy on speech disorders. Results: All the groups showed significant treatment effects but both the EG groups (Group A, Group B) showed high improvement in the severity level of stuttering as compared to control group C. The results also showed that AE treated group B had significant difference in p-value (p=0.027) as compared to control group (p<0.05) while experimental group A had no significant difference (p > 0.05) between these groups. Conclusion: The eclectic approach of aerobic exercises with the traditional speech therapy provides proximal rehabilitation of stuttering.

  18. Involvement of Linear Plasmids in Aerobic Biodegradation of Vinyl Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    BRIGMON, ROBINL.

    2004-06-14

    Pseudomonas putida strain AJ and Ochrobactrum strain TD were isolated from hazardous waste sites based on their ability to use vinyl chloride (VC) as a sole source of carbon and energy under aerobic conditions. Strains AJ and TD also use ethene and ethylene oxide as growth substrates. Strain AJ contained a linear megaplasmid (approximately 260 kb) when grown on VC or ethene, but no circular plasmids. While growing on ethylene oxide, the size of the linear plasmid in strain AJ decreased to approximately 100 kb, although its ability to use VC as a substrate was retained. The linear plasmids in strain AJ were cured and its ability to consume VC, ethene, and ethylene oxide was lost following growth on a rich substrate (Luria-Bertani broth) through at least three transfers. Strain TD contained three linear plasmids, ranging in size from approximately 100 kb to 320 kb, when growing on VC or ethene. As with strain AJ, the linear plasmids in strain TD were cured following growth on Luria -Bertani broth and its ability to consume VC and ethene was lost. Further analysis of these linear plasmids may help reveal the pathway for VC biodegradation in strains AJ and TD and explain why this process occurs at many but not all sites where groundwater is contaminated with chloroethenes. Metabolism of VC and ethene by strains AJ and TD is initiated by an alkene monooxygenase. Their yields during growth on VC (0.15-0.20 mg total suspended solids per mg VC) are similar to the yields reported for other isolates i.e., Mycobacterium sp., Nocardioides sp., and Pseudomonas sp.

  19. Screening and identification of aerobic denitrifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, K.; Deng, H. M.; Chen, Y. T.; Zhou, H. J.; Yan, G. X.

    2016-08-01

    With the standards of the effluent quality more stringent, it becomes a quite serious problem for municipalities and industries to remove nitrogen from wastewater. Bioremediation is a potential method for the removal of nitrogen and other pollutants because of its high efficiency and low cost. Seven predominant aerobic denitrifiers were screened and characterized from the activated sludge in the CAST unit. Some of these strains removed 87% nitrate nitrogen at least. Based on their phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics, the isolates were identified as the genera of Ralstonia, Achromobacter, Aeromonas and Enterobacter.

  20. Respiratory diseases of global consequence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory diseases are one of the two major categories of poultry diseases that cause the most severe economic losses globally, both as enzootic diseases and as causes of epizootics. Some respiratory diseases are of such importance they are reportable to the World Organization for Animal Health (O...

  1. Respiratory diseases of global consequence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory diseases are one of the two major categories of poultry diseases that cause the most severe economic losses globally (the other being enteric disease). The economic impact of respiratory disease is both direct, from the production losses caused by primary disease and indirect from preve...

  2. Performance of aerobic granular sludge in a sequencing batch bioreactor for slaughterhouse wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yali; Kang, Xiaorong; Li, Xin; Yuan, Yixing

    2015-08-01

    Lab-scale experiment was conducted to investigate the formation and characteristics of aerobic granular sludge for biological nutrient removal of slaughterhouse wastewater. Experimental results showed that removal performances of chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia and phosphate were enhanced with sludge granulation, and their removal efficiencies reached 95.1%, 99.3% and 83.5%, respectively. The aerobic granular sludge was matured after 90days cultivation, and protein-like substances were the main components. Simultaneously, the mass ratio of proteins and polysaccharides (PN/PS) was enhanced to 2.5 from 1.7. The granules with particle sizes of 0.6-1.2 and 1.2-1.8mm, accounting for 69.6%, were benefit for the growth of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrate oxidizing bacteria (NOB), and corresponding specific oxygen demand rates (SOUR) of AOB and NOB were 31.4 and 23.3mgO2/gMLSSh, respectively.

  3. Phylogenetic and Kinetic Diversity of Aerobic Vinyl Chloride-Assimilating Bacteria from Contaminated Sites

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Nicholas V.; Mattes, Timothy E.; Gossett, James M.; Spain, Jim C.

    2002-01-01

    Aerobic bacteria that grow on vinyl chloride (VC) have been isolated previously, but their diversity and distribution are largely unknown. It is also unclear whether such bacteria contribute to the natural attenuation of VC at chlorinated-ethene-contaminated sites. We detected aerobic VC biodegradation in 23 of 37 microcosms and enrichments inoculated with samples from various sites. Twelve different bacteria (11 Mycobacterium strains and 1 Nocardioides strain) capable of growth on VC as the sole carbon source were isolated, and 5 representative strains were examined further. All the isolates grew on ethene in addition to VC and contained VC-inducible ethene monooxygenase activity. The Mycobacterium strains (JS60, JS61, JS616, and JS617) all had similar growth yields (5.4 to 6.6 g of protein/mol), maximum specific growth rates (0.17 to 0.23 day−1), and maximum specific substrate utilization rates (9 to 16 nmol/min/mg of protein) with VC. The Nocardioides strain (JS614) had a higher growth yield (10.3 g of protein/mol), growth rate (0.71 day−1), and substrate utilization rate (43 nmol/min/mg of protein) with VC but was much more sensitive to VC starvation. Half-velocity constant (Ks) values for VC were between 0.5 and 3.2 μM, while Ks values for oxygen ranged from 0.03 to 0.3 mg/liter. Our results indicate that aerobic VC-degrading microorganisms (predominantly Mycobacterium strains) are widely distributed at sites contaminated with chlorinated solvents and are likely to be responsible for the natural attenuation of VC. PMID:12450841

  4. Respiratory infections during air travel.

    PubMed

    Leder, K; Newman, D

    2005-01-01

    An increasing number of individuals undertake air travel annually. Issues regarding cabin air quality and the potential risks of transmission of respiratory infections during flight have been investigated and debated previously, but, with the advent of severe acute respiratory syndrome and influenza outbreaks, these issues have recently taken on heightened importance. Anecdotally, many people complain of respiratory symptoms following air travel. However, studies of ventilation systems and patient outcomes indicate the spread of pathogens during flight occurs rarely. In the present review, aspects of the aircraft cabin environment that affect the likelihood of transmission of respiratory pathogens on airplanes are outlined briefly and evidence for the occurrence of outbreaks of respiratory illness among airline passengers are reviewed.

  5. [Respiratory changes in deep diving].

    PubMed

    Segadal, K; Gulsvik, A; Nicolaysen, G

    1989-01-30

    Deep diving refers to saturation diving to a depth of more than 180 m (1.9 MPa ambient pressure). In the 1990s diving to 400 m may be necessary on the Norwegian continental shelf. The safety margins are narrow and at such depths the respiratory system is subject to great strain. Respiratory resistance increases and the dynamic lung volumes are reduced as the pressure increases due to enhanced gas density. Helium is used together with oxygen as breathing gas and the lower density partly normalises the dynamic lung volumes. The respiratory system imposes clear limitations on the intensity and duration of physical work during deep diving. We lack systematic studies of lung mechanics, gas exchange and respiratory regulation in the different phases of deep dives. Demonstration of possible chronic occupational respiratory diseases connected to diving is dependent on follow-up over a long time.

  6. Respiratory changes with deep diving.

    PubMed

    Segadal, K; Gulsvik, A; Nicolaysen, G

    1990-01-01

    Deep diving refers to saturation diving to a depth of more than 180 m (1.9 MPa ambient pressure). In the 1990s diving to 400 m may be necessary on the Norwegian continental shelf. The safety margins are narrow and the respiratory system is subject to great strain at such depths. The respiratory resistance increases and the dynamic lung volumes are reduced as the pressure increases due to enhanced gas density. Helium is used together with oxygen as breathing gas and its lower density partly normalises the dynamic lung volumes. The respiratory system puts clear limitations on intensity and duration of physical work in deep diving. Systematic studies of lung mechanics, gas exchange and respiratory regulation in the different phases of deep dives are lacking. Detection of occupational respiratory disorder following diving are dependent on long-term follow-up.

  7. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Estenssoro, Elisa; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an acute respiratory failure produced by an inflammatory edema secondary to increased lung capillary permeability. This causes alveolar flooding and subsequently deep hypoxemia, with intrapulmonary shunt as its most important underlying mechanism. Characteristically, this alteration is unresponsive to high FIO2 and only reverses with end-expiratory positive pressure (PEEP). Pulmonary infiltrates on CXR and CT are the hallmark, together with decreased lung compliance. ARDS always occurs within a week of exposition to a precipitating factor; most frequently pneumonia, shock, aspiration of gastric contents, sepsis, and trauma. In CT scan, the disease is frequently inhomogeneous, with gravitational infiltrates coexisting with normal-density areas and also with hyperaerated parenchyma. Mortality is high (30-60%) especially in ARDS associated with septic shock and neurocritical diseases. The cornerstone of therapy lies in the treatment of the underlying cause and in the use mechanical ventilation which, if inappropriately administered, can lead to ventilator-induced lung injury. Tidal volume = 6 ml/kg of ideal body weight to maintain an end-inspiratory (plateau) pressure = 30 cm H2O ("protective ventilation") is the only variable consistently associated with decreased mortality. Moderate-to-high PEEP levels are frequently required to treat hypoxemia, yet no specific level or titration strategy has improved outcomes. Recently, the use of early prone positioning in patients with PaO2/FIO2 = 150 was associated with increased survival. In severely hypoxemic patients, it may be necessary to use adjuvants of mechanical ventilation as recruitment maneuvers, pressure-controlled modes, neuromuscular blocking agents, and extracorporeal-membrane oxygenation. Fluid restriction appears beneficial. PMID:27576283

  8. Doping and respiratory system.

    PubMed

    Casali, L; Pinchi, G; Puxeddu, E

    2007-03-01

    Historically many different drugs have been used to enhance sporting performances. The magic elixir is still elusive and the drugs are still used despite the heavy adverse effects. The respiratory system is regularly involved in this research probably because of its central location in the body with several connections to the cardiovascular system. Moreover people are aware that O2 consumption and its delivery to mitochondria firstly depend on ventilation and on the respiratory exchanges. The second step consists in the tendency to increase V'O2 max and to prolong its availability with the aim of improving the endurance time and to relieve the fatigue. Many methods and substances had been used in order to gain an artificial success. Additional oxygen, autologous and homologous transfusion and erythropoietin, mainly the synthetic type, have been administered with the aim of increasing the amount of oxygen being delivered to the tissues. Some compounds like stimulants and caffeine are endowed of excitatory activity on the CNS and stimulate pulmonary ventilation. They did not prove to have any real activity in supporting the athletic performances. Beta-adrenergic drugs, particularly clenbuterol, when administered orally or parenterally develop a clear illicit activity on the myosin fibres and on the muscles as a whole. Salbutamol, terbutaline, salmeterol and formoterol are legally admitted when administrated by MDI in the treatment of asthma. The prevalence of asthma and bronchial hyperactivity is higher in athletes than amongst the general population. This implies that clear rules must be provided to set a correct diagnosis of asthma in the athletes and a correct therapy to align with the actual guidelines according to the same rights of the "other" asthmatic patients.

  9. Aerobic Stability and Effects of Yeasts during Deterioration of Non-fermented and Fermented Total Mixed Ration with Different Moisture Levels

    PubMed Central

    Hao, W.; Wang, H. L.; Ning, T. T.; Yang, F. Y.; Xu, C. C.

    2015-01-01

    The present experiment evaluated the influence of moisture level and anaerobic fermentation on aerobic stability of total mixed ration (TMR). The dynamic changes in chemical composition and microbial population that occur after air exposure were examined, and the species of yeast associated with the deterioration process were also identified in both non-fermented and fermented TMR to deepen the understanding of aerobic deterioration. The moisture levels of TMR in this experiment were adjusted to 400 g/kg (low moisture level, LML), 450 g/kg (medium moisture level, MML), and 500 g/kg (high moisture level, HML), and both non-fermented and 56-d-fermented TMR were subjected to air exposure to determine aerobic stability. Aerobic deterioration resulted in high losses of nutritional components and largely reduced dry matter digestibility. Non-fermented TMR deteriorated during 48 h of air exposure and the HML treatment was more aerobically unstable. On dry matter (DM) basis, yeast populations significantly increased from 107 to 1010 cfu/g during air exposure, and Candida ethanolica was the predominant species during deterioration in non-fermented TMR. Fermented TMR exhibited considerable resistance to aerobic deterioration. Spoilage was only observed in the HML treatment and its yeast population increased dramatically to 109 cfu/g DM when air exposure progressed to 30 d. Zygosaccharomyces bailii was the sole yeast species isolated when spoilage occurred. These results confirmed that non-fermented and fermented TMR with a HML are more prone to spoilage, and fermented TMR has considerable resistance to aerobic deterioration. Yeasts can trigger aerobic deterioration in both non-fermented and fermented TMR. C. ethanolica may be involved in the spoilage of non-fermented TMR and the vigorous growth of Z. bailii can initiate aerobic deterioration in fermented TMR. PMID:25925059

  10. Fate of aerobic bacterial granules with fungal contamination under different organic loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, An-jie; Zhang, Tong; Li, Xiao-yan

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic sludge granulation is an attractive new technology for biological wastewater treatment. However, the instability of aerobic granules caused by fungal growth is still one of the main problems encountered in granular bioreactors. In this study, laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the fate and transformation of aerobic granules under different organic loading conditions. Bacterial granules (2-3mm) in a poor condition with fungi-like black filamentous growth were seeded into two 1L batch reactors. After more than 100d of cultivation, the small seed granules in the two reactors had grown into two different types of large granules (>20mm) with different and unique morphological features. In reactor R1 with a high organic loading rate of 2.0g COD L(-1)d(-1), the black filaments mostly disappeared from the granules, and the dominance of rod-shaped bacteria was recovered. In contrast, at a low loading of 0.5g COD L(-1)d(-1) in reactor R2, the filaments eventually became dominant in the black fungal granules. The bacteria in R1 granules had a unique web-like structure with large pores of a few hundred microm in size, which would allow for effective substrate and oxygen transport into the interior of the granules. DNA-based molecular analysis indicated the evolution of the bacterial population in R1 and that of the eukaryal community in R2. The experimental results suggest that a high loading rate can be an effective means of helping to control fungal bloom, recover bacterial domination and restore the stability of aerobic granules that suffer from fungal contamination.

  11. Settling behaviour of aerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Nor Anuar, A; Ujang, Z; van Loosdrecht, M C M; de Kreuk, M K

    2007-01-01

    Aerobic granular sludge (AGS) technology has been extensively studied recently to improve sludge settling and behaviour in activated sludge systems. The main advantage is that aerobic granular sludge (AGS) can settle very fast in a reactor or clarifier because AGS is compact and has strong structure. It also has good settleability and a high capacity for biomass retention. Several experimental works have been conducted in this study to observe the settling behaviours of AGS. The study thus has two aims: (1) to compare the settling profile of AGS with other sludge flocs and (2) to observe the influence of mechanical mixing and design of the reactor to the settleability of AGS. The first experimental outcome shows that AGS settles after less than 5 min in a depth of 0.4 m compared to other sludge flocs (from sequencing batch reactor, conventional activated sludge and extended aeration) which takes more than 30 min. This study also shows that the turbulence from the mixing mechanism and shear in the reactor provides an insignificant effect on the AGS settling velocity.

  12. Acute effects of aerobic exercise promote learning

    PubMed Central

    Perini, Renza; Bortoletto, Marta; Capogrosso, Michela; Fertonani, Anna; Miniussi, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The benefits that physical exercise confers on cardiovascular health are well known, whereas the notion that physical exercise can also improve cognitive performance has only recently begun to be explored and has thus far yielded only controversial results. In the present study, we used a sample of young male subjects to test the effects that a single bout of aerobic exercise has on learning. Two tasks were run: the first was an orientation discrimination task involving the primary visual cortex, and the second was a simple thumb abduction motor task that relies on the primary motor cortex. Forty-four and forty volunteers participated in the first and second experiments, respectively. We found that a single bout of aerobic exercise can significantly facilitate learning mechanisms within visual and motor domains and that these positive effects can persist for at least 30 minutes following exercise. This finding suggests that physical activity, at least of moderate intensity, might promote brain plasticity. By combining physical activity–induced plasticity with specific cognitive training–induced plasticity, we favour a gradual up-regulation of a functional network due to a steady increase in synaptic strength, promoting associative Hebbian-like plasticity. PMID:27146330

  13. Lungs and Respiratory System

    MedlinePlus

    ... growth. Without oxygen, the body's cells would die. Carbon dioxide is the waste gas that is produced when ... also enabling the body to get rid of carbon dioxide in the air breathed out. Respiration is the ...

  14. Lungs and Respiratory System

    MedlinePlus

    ... called alveoli, where the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide actually takes place. Each lung houses about 300- ... growth. Without oxygen, the body's cells would die. Carbon dioxide is the waste gas produced when carbon is ...

  15. Aerobic training reverses airway inflammation and remodelling in an asthma murine model.

    PubMed

    Silva, R A; Vieira, R P; Duarte, A C S; Lopes, F D T Q S; Perini, A; Mauad, T; Martins, M A; Carvalho, C R F

    2010-05-01

    Aerobic training (AT) decreases dyspnoea and exercise-induced bronchospasm, and improves aerobic capacity and quality of life; however, the mechanisms for such benefits remain poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the AT effects in a chronic model of allergic lung inflammation in mice after the establishment of airway inflammation and remodelling. Mice were divided into the control group, AT group, ovalbumin (OVA) group or OVA+AT group and exposed to saline or OVA. AT was started on day 28 for 60 min five times per week for 4 weeks. Respiratory mechanics, specific immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG(1), collagen and elastic fibres deposition, smooth muscle thickness, epithelial mucus, and peribronchial density of eosinophils, CD3+ and CD4+, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, interferon-gamma, IL-2, IL-1ra, IL-10, nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB and Foxp3 were evaluated. The OVA group showed an increase in IgE and IgG(1), eosinophils, CD3+, CD4+, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, NF-kappaB, collagen and elastic, mucus synthesis, smooth muscle thickness and lung tissue resistance and elastance. The OVA+AT group demonstrated an increase of IgE and IgG(1), and reduction of eosinophils, CD3+, CD4+, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, NF-kappaB, airway remodelling, mucus synthesis, smooth muscle thickness and tissue resistance and elastance compared with the OVA group (p<0.05). The OVA+AT group also showed an increase in IL-10 and IL-1ra (p<0.05), independently of Foxp3. AT reversed airway inflammation and remodelling and T-helper cell 2 response, and improved respiratory mechanics. These results seem to occur due to an increase in the expression of IL-10 and IL-1ra and a decrease of NF-kappaB. PMID:19897558

  16. Dysrhythmias of the respiratory oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paydarfar, David; Buerkel, Daniel M.

    1995-03-01

    Breathing is regulated by a central neural oscillator that produces rhythmic output to the respiratory muscles. Pathological disturbances in rhythm (dysrhythmias) are observed in the breathing pattern of children and adults with neurological and cardiopulmonary diseases. The mechanisms responsible for genesis of respiratory dysrhythmias are poorly understood. The present studies take a novel approach to this problem. The basic postulate is that the rhythm of the respiratory oscillator can be altered by a variety of stimuli. When the oscillator recovers its rhythm after such perturbations, its phase may be reset relative to the original rhythm. The amount of phase resetting is dependent upon stimulus parameters and the level of respiratory drive. The long-range hypothesis is that respiratory dysrhythmias can be induced by stimuli that impinge upon or arise within the respiratory oscillator with certain combinations of strength and timing relative to the respiratory cycle. Animal studies were performed in anesthetized or decerebrate preparations. Neural respiratory rhythmicity is represented by phrenic nerve activity, allowing use of open-loop experimental conditions which avoid negative chemical feedback associated with changes in ventilation. In animal experiments, respiratory dysrhythmias can be induced by stimuli having specific combinations of strength and timing. Newborn animals readily exhibit spontaneous dysrhythmias which become more prominent at lower respiratory drives. In human subjects, swallowing was studied as a physiological perturbation of respiratory rhythm, causing a pattern of phase resetting that is characterized topologically as type 0. Computational studies of the Bonhoeffer-van der Pol (BvP) equations, whose qualitative behavior is representative of many excitable systems, supports a unified interpretation of these experimental findings. Rhythmicity is observed when the BvP model exhibits recurrent periods of excitation alternating with

  17. Adrenaline modulates on the respiratory network development.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Morimitsu; Arata, Akiko

    2010-01-01

    Adrenaline regulates respiratory network, however, adrenergic contribution to the developing respiratory center has not well studied. Adrenaline application on embryonic day 17 medulla-spinal cord block preparations abolished non-respiratory activity and enhanced respiratory frequency. Phentolamine application on neonatal brainstem-spinal cord preparations that produced stable neonatal respiration resulted in respiratory destabilization. In E19 rat, adrenaline switched from enhancement to depression of the respiratory rhythm. Adrenaline modulated GABAergic synaptic transmission to respiratory neurons in late developmental stage. These results suggest that the involvement of central adrenergic modulation on the respiratory network maturation.

  18. Aerobic Dance Exercise Programs: Maintaining Quality and Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Pamela J.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the effectiveness of Washington State University's aerobic dance program showed that participation in the program did not improve students' cardiovascular fitness. Aerobics instructors should be trained to use pulse rate and other principles of exercise physiology to make their work more effective. (PP)

  19. The Effectiveness of Aerobic Exercise Instruction for Totally Blind Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponchillia, S. V.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A multifaceted method (involving verbal and hands-on training) was used to teach aerobic exercises to 3 totally blind women (ages 24-37). All three women demonstrated positive gains in their performance, physical fitness, and attitudes toward participating in future mainstream aerobic exercise classes. (DB)

  20. [Value of aerobic rehabilitation in the management of fibromyalgia].

    PubMed

    Maquet, D; Croisier, J L; Demoulin, C; Faymonville, M; Crielaard, J M

    2006-02-01

    This study assesses the influence of a muscular aerobic revalidation program on the management of the fibromyalgia syndrome. After 3 months, benefits consisting of increased muscle performances associated with a reduction of pain and an improvement of quality of life were documented. This study confirms the value of aerobic muscle exercise in fibromyalgia patients. PMID:16566119

  1. Aerobic Fitness Thresholds Associated with Fifth Grade Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittberg, Richard; Cottrell, Lesley A.; Davis, Catherine L.; Northrup, Karen L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Whereas effects of physical fitness and physical activity on cognitive function have been documented, little is known about how they are related. Purpose: This study assessed student aerobic fitness measured by FITNESSGRAM Mile times and/or Pacer circuits and whether the nature of the association between aerobic fitness and…

  2. Factors associated with low levels of aerobic fitness among adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Eliane Cristina de Andrade; Silva, Diego Augusto Santos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of low aerobic fitness levels and to analyze the association with sociodemographic factors, lifestyle and excess body fatness among adolescents of southern Brazil. Methods: The study included 879 adolescents aged 14-19 years the city of São José/SC, Brazil. The aerobic fitness was assessed by Canadian modified test of aerobic fitness. Sociodemographic variables (skin color, age, sex, study turn, economic level), sexual maturation and lifestyle (eating habits, screen time, physical activity, consumption of alcohol and tobacco) were assessed by a self-administered questionnaire. Excess body fatness was evaluated by sum of skinfolds triceps and subscapular. We used logistic regression to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Results: Prevalence of low aerobic fitness level was 87.5%. The girls who spent two hours or more in front screen, consumed less than one glass of milk by day, did not smoke and had an excess of body fatness had a higher chance of having lower levels of aerobic fitness. White boys with low physical activity had had a higher chance of having lower levels of aerobic fitness. Conclusions: Eight out of ten adolescents were with low fitness levels aerobic. Modifiable lifestyle factors were associated with low levels of aerobic fitness. Interventions that emphasize behavior change are needed. PMID:26743851

  3. Aerobic Digestion. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klopping, Paul H.

    This manual contains the textual material for a single-lesson unit on aerobic sludge digestion. Topic areas addressed include: (1) theory of aerobic digestion; (2) system components; (3) performance factors; (4) indicators of stable operation; and (5) operational problems and their solutions. A list of objectives, glossary of key terms, and…

  4. The Acute Effect of Aerobic Exercise on Measures of Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fort, Inza L.; And Others

    The immediate response of stress to aerobic exercise was measured by utilizing the Palmar Sweat Index (PSI) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Forty subjects (20 male and 20 female) from the ages of 18-30 sustained a single bout of aerobic activity for 30 minutes at 60 percent of their maximum heart rate. Pre-treatment procedures…

  5. Stress and acute respiratory infection

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, N.M.; Douglas, R.M.; Ryan, P.

    1986-09-01

    To examine the relationship between stress and upper respiratory tract infection, 235 adults aged 14-57 years, from 94 families affiliated with three suburban family physicians in Adelaide, South Australia, participated in a six-month prospective study. High and low stress groups were identified by median splits of data collected from the Life Events Inventory, the Daily Hassles Scale, and the General Health Questionnaire, which were administered both before and during the six months of respiratory diary data collection. Using intra-study stress data, the high stress group experienced significantly more episodes (mean of 2.71 vs. 1.56, p less than 0.0005) and symptom days (mean of 29.43 vs. 15.42, p = 0.005) of respiratory illness. The two groups were almost identical with respect to age, sex, occupational status, smoking, passive smoking, exposure to air pollution, family size, and proneness to acute respiratory infection in childhood. In a multivariate model with total respiratory episodes as the dependent variable, 21% of the variance was explained, and two stress variables accounted for 9% of the explained variance. Significant, but less strong relationships were also identified between intra-study stress variables and clinically definite episodes and symptom days in both clinically definite and total respiratory episodes. Pre-study measures of stress emphasized chronic stresses and were less strongly related to measures of respiratory illness than those collected during the study. However, significantly more episodes (mean of 2.50 vs. 1.75, p less than 0.02) and symptom days (mean of 28.00 vs. 17.06, p less than 0.03) were experienced in the high stress group. In the multivariate analyses, pre-study stress remained significantly associated with total respiratory episodes nd symptom days in total and ''definite'' respiratory episodes.

  6. Heart rate during aerobics classes in women with different previous experience of aerobics.

    PubMed

    Laukkanen, R M; Kalaja, M K; Kalaja, S P; Holmala, E B; Paavolainen, L M; Tummavuori, M; Virtanen, P; Rusko, H K

    2001-01-01

    This study measured heart rate during floor and step aerobic classes at three intensity levels. A group of 20 female occasional exercisers [mean age 33 (SD 8) years, mean body mass index 21 (SD 2) kg.m-2 volunteered to participate in six aerobic classes (three floor classes, three step classes) and in a laboratory test as members of one of two groups according to their prestudy regular participation in aerobics classes. Subjects in group A had participated four or more times a week and those of group B less than twice a week. The characteristics of the groups were as follows: group A, n = 10, mean maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) 38.7 (SD 3.6) ml.kg-1.min-1, mean maximal heart rate (HRmax) 183 (SD 8) beats.min-1; group B, n = 10, VO2max 36.1 (SD 3.6) ml.kg-1.min-1, HRmax 178 (SD 7) beats.min-1. Each class consisted of a warm-up, a 20 min period of structured aerobic exercise (cardiophase) and a cool-down. The cardiophase was planned and guided as light, (rate of perceived exertion, RPE 11-12), moderate (RPE 13-14) or heavy (RPE 15-17) by an experienced instructor. The mean heart rates during the light classes were 72 (step) and 74 (floor) %HRmax in group A and 75 (step) and 79 (floor) %HRmax in group B; during the moderate classes, 84 (step) and 80 (floor) %HRmax in group A and 82 (step) and 83 (floor) %HRmax in group B, and during the heavy classes 89 (step and floor) %HRmax in group A and 88 (step) and 92 (floor) %HRmax in group B. Differences in heart rate and %HRmax were not statistically significant between the groups. However, differences in heart rate and %HRmax between the intensities (light vs moderate, moderate vs heavy and light vs heavy) were significant within both groups (all, P < 0.01). Based on the results, we conclude that intensity management during the aerobics classes was generally successful regardless of the participants' prior participation in aerobics. However, some individuals who were older and/or had less prior participation tended to

  7. Metabolism of 2-Methylpropene (Isobutylene) by the Aerobic Bacterium Mycobacterium sp. Strain ELW1

    PubMed Central

    Kottegoda, Samanthi; Waligora, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    An aerobic bacterium (Mycobacterium sp. strain ELW1) that utilizes 2-methylpropene (isobutylene) as a sole source of carbon and energy was isolated and characterized. Strain ELW1 grew on 2-methylpropene (growth rate = 0.05 h−1) with a yield of 0.38 mg (dry weight) mg 2-methylpropene−1. Strain ELW1 also grew more slowly on both cis- and trans-2-butene but did not grow on any other C2 to C5 straight-chain, branched, or chlorinated alkenes tested. Resting 2-methylpropene-grown cells consumed ethene, propene, and 1-butene without a lag phase. Epoxyethane accumulated as the only detected product of ethene oxidation. Both alkene consumption and epoxyethane production were fully inhibited in cells exposed to 1-octyne, suggesting that alkene oxidation is initiated by an alkyne-sensitive, epoxide-generating monooxygenase. Kinetic analyses indicated that 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane is rapidly consumed during 2-methylpropene degradation, while 2-methyl-2-propen-1-ol is not a significant metabolite of 2-methylpropene catabolism. Degradation of 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane by 2-methylpropene-grown cells led to the accumulation and further degradation of 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate, two sequential metabolites previously identified in the aerobic microbial metabolism of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). Growth of strain ELW1 on 2-methylpropene, 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane, 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol, and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate was fully inhibited when cobalt ions were omitted from the growth medium, while growth on 3-hydroxybutyrate and other substrates was unaffected by the absence of added cobalt ions. Our results suggest that, like aerobic MTBE- and TBA-metabolizing bacteria, strain ELW1 utilizes a cobalt/cobalamin-dependent mutase to transform 2-hydroxyisobutyrate. Our results have been interpreted in terms of their impact on our understanding of the microbial metabolism of alkenes and ether oxygenates. PMID:25576605

  8. Benzoate-induced stress enhances xylitol yield in aerobic fed-batch culture of Candida mogii TISTR 5892.

    PubMed

    Wannawilai, Siwaporn; Sirisansaneeyakul, Sarote; Chisti, Yusuf

    2015-01-20

    Production of the natural sweetener xylitol from xylose via the yeast Candida mogii TISTR 5892 was compared with and without the growth inhibitor sodium benzoate in the culture medium. Sodium benzoate proved to be an uncompetitive inhibitor in relatively poorly oxygenated shake flask aerobic cultures. In a better controlled aerobic environment of a bioreactor, the role of sodium benzoate could equally well be described as competitive, uncompetitive or noncompetitive inhibitor of growth. In intermittent fed-batch fermentations under highly aerobic conditions, the presence of sodium benzoate at 0.15gL(-1) clearly enhanced the xylitol titer relative to the control culture without the sodium benzoate. The final xylitol concentration and the average xylitol yield on xylose were nearly 50gL(-1) and 0.57gg(-1), respectively, in the presence of sodium benzoate. Both these values were substantially higher than reported for the same fermentation under microaerobic conditions. Therefore, a fed-batch aerobic fermentation in the presence of sodium benzoate is promising for xylitol production using C. mogii.

  9. Multiplex detection of respiratory pathogens

    DOEpatents

    McBride, Mary; Slezak, Thomas; Birch, James M.

    2012-07-31

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of respiratory pathogens (influenza A (including subtyping capability for H1, H3, H5 and H7 subtypes) influenza B, parainfluenza (type 2), respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from the respiratory pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  10. Auscultation of the respiratory system

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Malay; Madabhavi, Irappa; Niranjan, Narasimhalu; Dogra, Megha

    2015-01-01

    Auscultation of the lung is an important part of the respiratory examination and is helpful in diagnosing various respiratory disorders. Auscultation assesses airflow through the trachea-bronchial tree. It is important to distinguish normal respiratory sounds from abnormal ones for example crackles, wheezes, and pleural rub in order to make correct diagnosis. It is necessary to understand the underlying pathophysiology of various lung sounds generation for better understanding of disease processes. Bedside teaching should be strengthened in order to avoid erosion in this age old procedure in the era of technological explosion. PMID:26229557

  11. [Travel and chronic respiratory insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Bonnet, D; Marotel, C; Miltgen, J; N'Guyen, G; Cuguilliere, A; L'Her, P

    1997-01-01

    Changes in climate, altitude and lifestyle during travel confronts patients presenting chronic respiratory insufficiency with special problems. A major challenge is related to high altitude during air travel. To limit risks, a preflight examination is necessary to ascertain respiratory status. Patients requiring oxygen therapy must ensure availability both during the flight and at the destination. Patients with asthma or chronic bronchitis must bring along a sufficient supply of usual inhalers. All patients should carry a doctor's letter describing their condition and listing medications. Using these elementary precautions, patients with chronic respiratory insufficiency can safely enjoy sightseeing and outdoor leisure activities.

  12. Chthonomonas calidirosea gen. nov., sp. nov., an aerobic, pigmented, thermophilic micro-organism of a novel bacterial class, Chthonomonadetes classis nov., of the newly described phylum Armatimonadetes originally designated candidate division OP10.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin C-Y; Dunfield, Peter F; Morgan, Xochitl C; Crowe, Michelle A; Houghton, Karen M; Vyssotski, Mikhail; Ryan, Jason L J; Lagutin, Kirill; McDonald, Ian R; Stott, Matthew B

    2011-10-01

    An aerobic, saccharolytic, obligately thermophilic, motile, non-spore-forming bacterium, strain T49(T), was isolated from geothermally heated soil at Hell's Gate, Tikitere, New Zealand. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, T49(T) is the first representative of a new class in the newly described phylum Armatimonadetes, formerly known as candidate division OP10. Cells of strain T49(T) stained Gram-negative and were catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. Cells possessed a highly corrugated outer membrane. The major fatty acids were 16 : 0, i17 : 0 and ai17 : 0. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 54.6 mol%. Strain T49(T) grew at 50-73 °C with an optimum temperature of 68 °C, and at pH 4.7-5.8 with an optimum growth pH of 5.3. A growth rate of 0.012 h(-1) was observed under optimal temperature and pH conditions. The primary respiratory quinone was MK-8. Optimal growth was achieved in the absence of NaCl, although growth was observed at NaCl concentrations as high as 2 % (w/v). Strain T49(T) was able to utilize mono- and disaccharides such as cellobiose, lactose, mannose and glucose, as well as branched or amorphous polysaccharides such as starch, CM-cellulose, xylan and glycogen, but not highly linear polysaccharides such as crystalline cellulose or cotton. On the basis of its phylogenetic position and phenotypic characteristics, we propose that strain T49(T) represents a novel bacterial genus and species within the new class Chthonomonadetes classis nov. of the phylum Armatimonadetes. The type strain of Chthonomonas calidirosea gen. nov., sp. nov. is T49(T) ( = DSM 23976(T) = ICMP 18418(T)). PMID:21097641

  13. Chthonomonas calidirosea gen. nov., sp. nov., an aerobic, pigmented, thermophilic micro-organism of a novel bacterial class, Chthonomonadetes classis nov., of the newly described phylum Armatimonadetes originally designated candidate division OP10.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin C-Y; Dunfield, Peter F; Morgan, Xochitl C; Crowe, Michelle A; Houghton, Karen M; Vyssotski, Mikhail; Ryan, Jason L J; Lagutin, Kirill; McDonald, Ian R; Stott, Matthew B

    2011-10-01

    An aerobic, saccharolytic, obligately thermophilic, motile, non-spore-forming bacterium, strain T49(T), was isolated from geothermally heated soil at Hell's Gate, Tikitere, New Zealand. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, T49(T) is the first representative of a new class in the newly described phylum Armatimonadetes, formerly known as candidate division OP10. Cells of strain T49(T) stained Gram-negative and were catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. Cells possessed a highly corrugated outer membrane. The major fatty acids were 16 : 0, i17 : 0 and ai17 : 0. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 54.6 mol%. Strain T49(T) grew at 50-73 °C with an optimum temperature of 68 °C, and at pH 4.7-5.8 with an optimum growth pH of 5.3. A growth rate of 0.012 h(-1) was observed under optimal temperature and pH conditions. The primary respiratory quinone was MK-8. Optimal growth was achieved in the absence of NaCl, although growth was observed at NaCl concentrations as high as 2 % (w/v). Strain T49(T) was able to utilize mono- and disaccharides such as cellobiose, lactose, mannose and glucose, as well as branched or amorphous polysaccharides such as starch, CM-cellulose, xylan and glycogen, but not highly linear polysaccharides such as crystalline cellulose or cotton. On the basis of its phylogenetic position and phenotypic characteristics, we propose that strain T49(T) represents a novel bacterial genus and species within the new class Chthonomonadetes classis nov. of the phylum Armatimonadetes. The type strain of Chthonomonas calidirosea gen. nov., sp. nov. is T49(T) ( = DSM 23976(T) = ICMP 18418(T)).

  14. Does aerobic exercise affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal hormonal response in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Genc, Aysun; Tur, Birkan Sonel; Aytur, Yesim Kurtais; Oztuna, Derya; Erdogan, Murat Faik

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in the etiopathogenesis of fibromyalgia is not clear. This study aimed to analyze the effects of a 6-week aerobic exercise program on the HPA axis in patients with fibromyalgia and to investigate the effects of this program on the disease symptoms, patients’ fitness, disability, and quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty fibromyalgia patients were randomized to Group 1 (stretching and flexibility exercises at home for 6 weeks) and Group 2 (aerobic exercise three times a week and the same at-home exercises as Group 1 for 6 weeks). Serum levels of cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, and growth hormone were analyzed at baseline and at the end of, and 1 hr after an exercise stress test. [Results] Group 2 showed better improvement in morning stiffness duration and pain. Growth hormone levels significantly increased after intervention and cortisol levels significantly decreased at time-time interaction in both groups. No significant differences in adrenocorticotropic hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 were found. [Conclusion] The results of this study seem to support the hypothesis that there is a dysregulation of the HPA axis in patients with FM, and that a six-week exercise program can influence symptoms and affect the HPA axis hormones. PMID:26311959

  15. Effectiveness of the modified progressive aerobic capacity endurance run test for assessing aerobic fitness in Hispanic children who are obese

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the progressive aerobic capacity endurance run (PACER) and a newly designed modified PACER (MPACER) for assessing aerobic fitness in Hispanic children who are obese. Thirty-nine (aged 7-12 years) children who were considered obese (= 95 ...

  16. Aspirin Exacerbated Respiratory Disease.

    PubMed

    Fruth, Kai; Gosepath, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) has been defined as a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-triggered hypersensitivity, non-allergic bronchial asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) with nasal polyps. The underlying pathophysiology of AERD is not completely understood so far. An altered arachidonic acid metabolism and dysregulated enzyme activity are regarded to be causal. AERD is characterized by recalcitrant CRS with recurrent nasal polyps after sinus surgery, accompanied by difficult to treat bronchial asthma and adverse reaction after NSAID ingestion such as nasal blockage, itching, laryngospasm and severe asthma attacks. Affected individuals suffer from poor quality of life. Besides functional endoscopic sinus surgery, the application of topical and systemic steroids and symptomatic therapy, aspirin desensitization is the only causative treatment option. The diagnostic approach to AERD, the ideal desensitization protocol and especially the following daily maintenance dose is part of an ongoing debate. This article summarizes the current knowledge about the pathophysiology, focuses on modern diagnostic approaches of AERD and discusses various aspirin desensitization protocols with respect to efficacy as well as to undesirable side effects. PMID:27466843

  17. Respiratory Conditions Update: Asthma.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Timothy A

    2016-09-01

    Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by chronic airway inflammation and variable expiratory airflow limitation. Related clinical features include wheezing, dyspnea, chest tightness, and cough that worsens at night or in the early morning, and that varies over time and in intensity. A finding of variable expiratory airflow limitation on spirometry confirms the diagnosis. A forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity ratio less than the level predicted for the patient's age is suggestive of airflow limitation. Variability also must be confirmed. Updated guidelines recommend control-based management administered in a stepwise manner, with goals of achieving symptom control and minimizing the risks of exacerbations, future fixed airway limitation, and adverse effects of therapy. There is good evidence for the effectiveness of asthma education and self-management plans. Short-acting bronchodilators should be used as needed for symptom relief, with the addition of an inhaled corticosteroid early as maintenance therapy if symptoms are not well controlled. If asthma remains uncontrolled despite therapy, patients should be referred for more specialized treatment. Biomarkers, biologic drugs, and endoscopic treatments are being studied in the management of severe asthma, and ongoing research may determine which patients might benefit most from these emerging therapies. PMID:27576231

  18. [Effects of soil compaction stress on respiratory metabolism of cucumber root].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun-Xian; Sun, Yan; Han, Shou-Kun; Zhang, Hao

    2013-03-01

    A pot experiment with cucumber cultivar "Jingchun 4" was conducted to study the effects of soil compaction stress on the respiratory metabolism of cucumber root. Two treatments were installed, i.e. , soil bulk densities 1.20 and 1.55 g . cm-3. Under soil compaction stress, the activities of root pyruvate decarboxylase, alcohol dehydrogenase, and lactate dehydrogenase and the contents of root anaerobic respiration products alcohol, acetaldehyde, and lactate increased significantly, while the activities of the key enzymes involved in root aerobic respiration, including malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase, decreased significantly, root pyruvate and succinate contents had significant increase, whereas root malate content decreased significantly. All the results illustrated that under soil compaction stress, the aerobic respiration of cucumber root was inhibited, while its anaerobic respiration was promoted.

  19. An investigation of factors limiting aerobic capacity in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Carter, R; Riantawan, P; Banham, S W; Sturrock, R D

    1999-10-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) has been shown to produce exercise limitation and breathlessness. The purpose of this study was to investigate factors which may be responsible for limiting aerobic capacity in patients with AS. Twenty patients with no other cardio-respiratory disease performed integrative cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). The results were compared to 20 age and gender matched healthy controls. Variables that might influence exercise tolerance, including pulmonary function tests (body plethysmography), respiratory muscle strength (MIP, MEP) and endurance (Tlim), AS severity assessment including chest expansion (CE), thoracolumber movement (TL), wall tragus distance and peripheral muscle strength assessed by maximum voluntary contraction of the knee extensors (Qds), hand grip strength and lean body mass (LBM), were measured in the patients with AS and used as explanatory variables against the peak VO2 achieved during CPET. As subjects achieved a lower peak VO2 than controls (25.2 +/- 1.4 vs. 33.1 +/- 1.6 ml kg-1min-1, mean +/- SEM, P = 0.001). When compared with controls, ventilatory response (VE/VCO2) in AS was elevated (P = 0.01); however gas exchange indices, transcutaneous blood gases and breathing reserve were similar to controls. AS subjects developed a higher HR/VO2 response (P < 0.01) on exertion but without associated abnormalities in ECG, blood pressure response or anaerobic threshold. The AS group experienced a greater degree of leg fatigue (P < 0.01) than controls at peak exercise. Although the breathlessness scores (BS) were comparable to controls at peak exercise, the slopes of the relationship between BS and work rate (WR) [AS 0.054 (0.1), Controls 0.043 (0.06); P < 0.05] and BS and % predicted oxygen uptake [AS 0.084 (0.18), Controls 0.045 (0.06); P < 0.01] were steeper in the AS subjects. There was weak association between peak VO2 and vital capacity (r2% 12.0), MIP (11.8) but no association between Tlim, CE, Wall tragus distance

  20. The obligate respiratory supercomplex from Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kao, Wei-Chun; Kleinschroth, Thomas; Nitschke, Wolfgang; Baymann, Frauke; Neehaul, Yashvin; Hellwig, Petra; Richers, Sebastian; Vonck, Janet; Bott, Michael; Hunte, Carola

    2016-10-01

    Actinobacteria are closely linked to human life as industrial producers of bioactive molecules and as human pathogens. Respiratory cytochrome bcc complex and cytochrome aa3 oxidase are key components of their aerobic energy metabolism. They form a supercomplex in the actinobacterial species Corynebacterium glutamicum. With comprehensive bioinformatics and phylogenetic analysis we show that genes for cyt bcc-aa3 supercomplex are characteristic for Actinobacteria (Actinobacteria and Acidimicrobiia, except the anaerobic orders Actinomycetales and Bifidobacteriales). An obligatory supercomplex is likely, due to the lack of genes encoding alternative electron transfer partners such as mono-heme cyt c. Instead, subunit QcrC of bcc complex, here classified as short di-heme cyt c, will provide the exclusive electron transfer link between the complexes as in C. glutamicum. Purified to high homogeneity, the C. glutamicum bcc-aa3 supercomplex contained all subunits and cofactors as analyzed by SDS-PAGE, BN-PAGE, absorption and EPR spectroscopy. Highly uniform supercomplex particles in electron microscopy analysis support a distinct structural composition. The supercomplex possesses a dimeric stoichiometry with a ratio of a-type, b-type and c-type hemes close to 1:1:1. Redox titrations revealed a low potential bcc complex (Em(ISP)=+160mV, Em(bL)=-291mV, Em(bH)=-163mV, Em(cc)=+100mV) fined-tuned for oxidation of menaquinol and a mixed potential aa3 oxidase (Em(CuA)=+150mV, Em(a/a3)=+143/+317mV) mediating between low and high redox potential to accomplish dioxygen reduction. The generated molecular model supports a stable assembled supercomplex with defined architecture which permits energetically efficient coupling of menaquinol oxidation and dioxygen reduction in one supramolecular entity. PMID:27472998

  1. The obligate respiratory supercomplex from Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kao, Wei-Chun; Kleinschroth, Thomas; Nitschke, Wolfgang; Baymann, Frauke; Neehaul, Yashvin; Hellwig, Petra; Richers, Sebastian; Vonck, Janet; Bott, Michael; Hunte, Carola

    2016-10-01

    Actinobacteria are closely linked to human life as industrial producers of bioactive molecules and as human pathogens. Respiratory cytochrome bcc complex and cytochrome aa3 oxidase are key components of their aerobic energy metabolism. They form a supercomplex in the actinobacterial species Corynebacterium glutamicum. With comprehensive bioinformatics and phylogenetic analysis we show that genes for cyt bcc-aa3 supercomplex are characteristic for Actinobacteria (Actinobacteria and Acidimicrobiia, except the anaerobic orders Actinomycetales and Bifidobacteriales). An obligatory supercomplex is likely, due to the lack of genes encoding alternative electron transfer partners such as mono-heme cyt c. Instead, subunit QcrC of bcc complex, here classified as short di-heme cyt c, will provide the exclusive electron transfer link between the complexes as in C. glutamicum. Purified to high homogeneity, the C. glutamicum bcc-aa3 supercomplex contained all subunits and cofactors as analyzed by SDS-PAGE, BN-PAGE, absorption and EPR spectroscopy. Highly uniform supercomplex particles in electron microscopy analysis support a distinct structural composition. The supercomplex possesses a dimeric stoichiometry with a ratio of a-type, b-type and c-type hemes close to 1:1:1. Redox titrations revealed a low potential bcc complex (Em(ISP)=+160mV, Em(bL)=-291mV, Em(bH)=-163mV, Em(cc)=+100mV) fined-tuned for oxidation of menaquinol and a mixed potential aa3 oxidase (Em(CuA)=+150mV, Em(a/a3)=+143/+317mV) mediating between low and high redox potential to accomplish dioxygen reduction. The generated molecular model supports a stable assembled supercomplex with defined architecture which permits energetically efficient coupling of menaquinol oxidation and dioxygen reduction in one supramolecular entity.

  2. Biology of Moderately Halophilic Aerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ventosa, Antonio; Nieto, Joaquín J.; Oren, Aharon

    1998-01-01

    The moderately halophilic heterotrophic aerobic bacteria form a diverse group of microorganisms. The property of halophilism is widespread within the bacterial domain. Bacterial halophiles are abundant in environments such as salt lakes, saline soils, and salted food products. Most species keep their intracellular ionic concentrations at low levels while synthesizing or accumulating organic solutes to provide osmotic equilibrium of the cytoplasm with the surrounding medium. Complex mechanisms of adjustment of the intracellular environments and the properties of the cytoplasmic membrane enable rapid adaptation to changes in the salt concentration of the environment. Approaches to the study of genetic processes have recently been developed for several moderate halophiles, opening the way toward an understanding of haloadaptation at the molecular level. The new information obtained is also expected to contribute to the development of novel biotechnological uses for these organisms. PMID:9618450

  3. Brain aerobic glycolysis and motor adaptation learning

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Benjamin J.; Vaishnavi, Sanjeev Neil; Vlassenko, Andrei G.; Shimony, Joshua S.; Rutlin, Jerrel; Raichle, Marcus E.

    2016-01-01

    Ten percent to 15% of glucose used by the brain is metabolized nonoxidatively despite adequate tissue oxygenation, a process termed aerobic glycolysis (AG). Because of the known role of glycolysis in biosynthesis, we tested whether learning-induced synaptic plasticity would lead to regionally appropriate, learning-dependent changes in AG. Functional MRI (fMRI) before, during, and after performance of a visual–motor adaptation task demonstrated that left Brodmann area 44 (BA44) played a key role in adaptation, with learning-related changes to activity during the task and altered resting-state, functional connectivity after the task. PET scans before and after task performance indicated a sustained increase in AG in left BA 44 accompanied by decreased oxygen consumption. Intersubject variability in behavioral adaptation rate correlated strongly with changes in AG in this region, as well as functional connectivity, which is consistent with a role for AG in synaptic plasticity. PMID:27217563

  4. Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the aerobic oxidation of high-pressure, high-temperature nanodiamonds (5–50 nm dimensions) using a combination of carbon and oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption, wavelength-dependent X-ray photoelectron, and vibrational spectroscopies. Oxidation at 575 °C for 2 h eliminates graphitic carbon contamination (>98%) and produces nanocrystals with hydroxyl functionalized surfaces as well as a minor component (<5%) of carboxylic anhydrides. The low graphitic carbon content and the high crystallinity of HPHT are evident from Raman spectra acquired using visible wavelength excitation (λexcit = 633 nm) as well as carbon K-edge X-ray absorption spectra where the signature of a core–hole exciton is observed. Both spectroscopic features are similar to those of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond but differ significantly from the spectra of detonation nanodiamond. The importance of these findings to the functionalization of nanodiamond surfaces for biological labeling applications is discussed. PMID:25436035

  5. Respiratory Therapy Technology Program Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This publication contains statewide standards for the respiratory therapy technology program in Georgia. The standards are divided into 12 categories: Foundations (philosophy, purpose, goals, program objectives, availability, evaluation; Admissions (admission requirements, provisional admission requirements, recruitment, evaluation and planning);…

  6. How Is Respiratory Failure Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Once your doctor figures out what's causing your respiratory failure, he or she will plan how to treat that disease or condition. Treatments may include medicines, procedures, and other therapies. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: December 19, 2011 Twitter ...

  7. Employee guide to respiratory protection

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    This employee guide discusses use of respiratory protective equipment for particulates, gases, vapors, supplied air, and self-contained breathing apparatus. It also covers equipment selection medical factors, fitting criteria; care; and employee responsibilities. (PSB)

  8. Maximal strength training improves aerobic endurance performance.

    PubMed

    Hoff, J; Gran, A; Helgerud, J

    2002-10-01

    The aim of this experiment was to examine the effects of maximal strength training with emphasis on neural adaptations on strength- and endurance-performance for endurance trained athletes. Nineteen male cross-country skiers about 19.7 +/- 4.0 years of age and a maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2 max)) of 69.4 +/- 2.2 mL x kg(-1) x min(-1) were randomly assigned to a training group (n = 9) or a control group (n = 10). Strength training was performed, three times a week for 8 weeks, using a cable pulley simulating the movements in double poling in cross-country skiing, and consisted of three sets of six repetitions at a workload of 85% of one repetition maximum emphasizing maximal mobilization of force in the concentric movement. One repetition maximum improved significantly from 40.3 +/- 4.5 to 44.3 +/- 4.9 kg. Time to peak force (TPF) was reduced by 50 and 60% on two different submaximal workloads. Endurance performance measured as time to exhaustion (TTE) on a double poling ski ergometer at maximum aerobic velocity, improved from 6.49 to 10.18 min; 20.5% over the control group. Work economy changed significantly from 1.02 +/- 0.14 to 0.74 +/- 0.10 mL x kg(-0.67) x min(-1). Maximal strength training with emphasis on neural adaptations improves strength, particularly rate of force development, and improves aerobic endurance performance by improved work economy.

  9. Functional characterization of Yersinia pestis aerobic glycerol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Willias, Stephan P; Chauhan, Sadhana; Motin, Vladimir L

    2014-11-01

    Yersinia pestis biovar Orientalis isolates have lost the capacity to ferment glycerol. Herein we provide experimental validation that a 93 bp in-frame deletion within the glpD gene encoding the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase present in all biovar Orientalis strains is sufficient to disrupt aerobic glycerol fermentation. Furthermore, the inability to ferment glycerol is often insured by a variety of additional mutations within the glpFKX operon which prevents glycerol internalization and conversion to glycerol-3-phosphate. The physiological impact of functional glpFKX in the presence of dysfunctional glpD was assessed. Results demonstrate no change in growth kinetics at 26 °C and 37 °C. Mutants deficient in glpD displayed decreased intracellular accumulation of glycerol-3-phosphate, a characterized inhibitor of cAMP receptor protein (CRP) activation. Since CRP is rigorously involved in global regulation Y. pestis virulence, we tested a possible influence of a single glpD mutation on virulence. Nonetheless, subcutaneous and intranasal murine challenge was not impacted by glycerol metabolism. As quantified by crystal violet assay, biofilm formation of the glpD-deficient KIM6+ mutant was mildly repressed; whereas, chromosomal restoration of glpD in CO92 resulted in a significant increase in biofilm formation. PMID:25220241

  10. Aerobic cyanide degradation by bacterial isolates from cassava factory wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Sujatha; Dananjeyan, Balachandar; Krishnamurthy, Kumar; Benckiser, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains that utilize cyanide (CN) as a nitrogen source were isolated from cassava factory wastewater after enrichment in a liquid media containing sodium cyanide (1 mM) and glucose (0.2% w/v). The strains could tolerate and grow in cyanide concentrations of up to 5 mM. Increased cyanide levels in the media caused an extension of lag phase in the bacterial growth indicating that they need some period of acclimatisation. The rate of cyanide removal by the strains depends on the initial cyanide and glucose concentrations. When initial cyanide and glucose concentrations were increased up to 5 mM, cyanide removal rate increased up to 63 and 61 per cent by Bacillus pumilus and Pseudomonas putida. Metabolic products such as ammonia and formate were detected in culture supernatants, suggesting a direct hydrolytic pathway without an intermediate formamide. The study clearly demonstrates the potential of aerobic treatment with cyanide degrading bacteria for cyanide removal in cassava factory wastewaters. PMID:26413045

  11. Aerobic cyanide degradation by bacterial isolates from cassava factory wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Sujatha; Dananjeyan, Balachandar; Krishnamurthy, Kumar; Benckiser, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains that utilize cyanide (CN) as a nitrogen source were isolated from cassava factory wastewater after enrichment in a liquid media containing sodium cyanide (1 mM) and glucose (0.2% w/v). The strains could tolerate and grow in cyanide concentrations of up to 5 mM. Increased cyanide levels in the media caused an extension of lag phase in the bacterial growth indicating that they need some period of acclimatisation. The rate of cyanide removal by the strains depends on the initial cyanide and glucose concentrations. When initial cyanide and glucose concentrations were increased up to 5 mM, cyanide removal rate increased up to 63 and 61 per cent by Bacillus pumilus and Pseudomonas putida. Metabolic products such as ammonia and formate were detected in culture supernatants, suggesting a direct hydrolytic pathway without an intermediate formamide. The study clearly demonstrates the potential of aerobic treatment with cyanide degrading bacteria for cyanide removal in cassava factory wastewaters. PMID:26413045

  12. Reduction of aerobic acetate production by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, W R; Liao, J C

    1997-01-01

    Acetate excretion by Escherichia coli during aerobic growth on glucose is a major obstacle to enhanced recombinant protein production. We report here that the fraction of carbon flux through the anaplerotic pathways is one of the factors influencing acetate excretion. Flux analysis of E. coli central metabolic pathways predicts that increasing the fraction of carbon flux through the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PPC) pathway and the glyoxylate bypass reduces acetate production. We tested this prediction by overexpressing PPC and deregulating the glyoxylate bypass by using a fadR strain. Results show that the acetate yield by the fadR strain with PPC overexpression is decreased more than fourfold compared to the control, while the biomass yield is relatively unaffected. Apparently, the fraction of carbon flux through the anaplerotic pathways is one of the factors that influence acetate excretion. These results confirm the prediction of our flux analysis and further suggest that E. coli is not fully optimized for efficient utilization of glucose. PMID:9251207

  13. Aerobic cyanide degradation by bacterial isolates from cassava factory wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Sujatha; Dananjeyan, Balachandar; Krishnamurthy, Kumar; Benckiser, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains that utilize cyanide (CN) as a nitrogen source were isolated from cassava factory wastewater after enrichment in a liquid media containing sodium cyanide (1 mM) and glucose (0.2% w/v). The strains could tolerate and grow in cyanide concentrations of up to 5 mM. Increased cyanide levels in the media caused an extension of lag phase in the bacterial growth indicating that they need some period of acclimatisation. The rate of cyanide removal by the strains depends on the initial cyanide and glucose concentrations. When initial cyanide and glucose concentrations were increased up to 5 mM, cyanide removal rate increased up to 63 and 61 per cent by Bacillus pumilus and Pseudomonas putida. Metabolic products such as ammonia and formate were detected in culture supernatants, suggesting a direct hydrolytic pathway without an intermediate formamide. The study clearly demonstrates the potential of aerobic treatment with cyanide degrading bacteria for cyanide removal in cassava factory wastewaters.

  14. Respiratory Toxicity Biomarkers

    EPA Science Inventory

    The advancement in high throughput genomic, proteomic and metabolomic techniques have accelerated pace of lung biomarker discovery. A recent growth in the discovery of new lung toxicity/disease biomarkers have led to significant advances in our understanding of pathological proce...

  15. Aerobic versus Anaerobic Microbial Degradation of Clothianidin under Simulated California Rice Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Rebecca A; Tomco, Patrick L; Howard, Megan W; Schempp, Tabitha T; Stewart, Davis J; Stacey, Phillip M; Ball, David B; Tjeerdema, Ronald S

    2016-09-28

    Microbial degradation of clothianidin was characterized under aerobic and anaerobic California rice field conditions. Rate constants (k) and half-lives (DT50) were determined for aerobic and anaerobic microcosms, and an enrichment experiment was performed at various nutrient conditions and pesticide concentrations. Temperature effects on anaerobic degradation rates were determined at 22 ± 2 and 35 ± 2 °C. Microbial growth was assessed in the presence of various pesticide concentrations, and distinct colonies were isolated and identified. Slow aerobic degradation was observed, but anaerobic degradation occurred rapidly at both 25 and 35 °C. Transformation rates and DT50 values in flooded soil at 35 ± 2 °C (k = -7.16 × 10(-2) ± 3.08 × 10(-3) day(-1), DT50 = 9.7 days) were significantly faster than in 25 ± 2 °C microcosms (k= -2.45 × 10(-2) ± 1.59 × 10(-3) day(-1), DT50 = 28.3 days). At the field scale, biodegradation of clothianidin will vary with extent of oxygenation.

  16. Role of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in micropollutant removal from wastewater with aerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Margot, Jonas; Lochmatter, Samuel; Barry, D A; Holliger, Christof

    2016-01-01

    Nitrifying wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are more efficient than non-nitrifying WWTPs to remove several micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals and pesticides. This may be related to the activity of nitrifying organisms, such as ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOBs), which could possibly co-metabolically oxidize micropollutants with their ammonia monooxygenase (AMO). The role of AOBs in micropollutant removal was investigated with aerobic granular sludge (AGS), a promising technology for municipal WWTPs. Two identical laboratory-scale AGS sequencing batch reactors (AGS-SBRs) were operated with or without nitrification (inhibition of AMOs) to assess their potential for micropollutant removal. Of the 36 micropollutants studied at 1 μg l(-1) in synthetic wastewater, nine were over 80% removed, but 17 were eliminated by less than 20%. Five substances (bisphenol A, naproxen, irgarol, terbutryn and iohexol) were removed better in the reactor with nitrification, probably due to co-oxidation catalysed by AMOs. However, for the removal of all other micropollutants, AOBs did not seem to play a significant role. Many compounds were better removed in aerobic condition, suggesting that aerobic heterotrophic organisms were involved in the degradation. As the AGS-SBRs did not favour the growth of such organisms, their potential for micropollutant removal appeared to be lower than that of conventional nitrifying WWTPs. PMID:26877039

  17. Cardioprotective effects of early and late aerobic exercise training in experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Moreira-Gonçalves, Daniel; Ferreira, Rita; Fonseca, Hélder; Padrão, Ana Isabel; Moreno, Nuno; Silva, Ana Filipa; Vasques-Nóvoa, Francisco; Gonçalves, Nádia; Vieira, Sara; Santos, Mário; Amado, Francisco; Duarte, José Alberto; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F; Henriques-Coelho, Tiago

    2015-11-01

    Clinical studies suggest that aerobic exercise can exert beneficial effects in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We compared the impact of early or late aerobic exercise training on right ventricular function, remodeling and survival in experimental PAH. Male Wistar rats were submitted to normal cage activity (SED), exercise training in early (EarlyEX) and in late stage (LateEX) of PAH induced by monocrotaline (MCT, 60 mg/kg). Both exercise interventions resulted in improved cardiac function despite persistent right pressure-overload, increased exercise tolerance and survival, with greater benefits in EarlyEX+MCT. This was accompanied by improvements in the markers of cardiac remodeling (SERCA2a), neurohumoral activation (lower endothelin-1, brain natriuretic peptide and preserved vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA), metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative stress in both exercise interventions. EarlyEX+MCT provided additional improvements in fibrosis, tumor necrosis factor-alpha/interleukin-10 and brain natriuretic peptide mRNA, and beta/alpha myosin heavy chain protein expression. The present study demonstrates important cardioprotective effects of aerobic exercise in experimental PAH, with greater benefits obtained when exercise training is initiated at an early stage of the disease. PMID:26463598

  18. Cardioprotective effects of early and late aerobic exercise training in experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Moreira-Gonçalves, Daniel; Ferreira, Rita; Fonseca, Hélder; Padrão, Ana Isabel; Moreno, Nuno; Silva, Ana Filipa; Vasques-Nóvoa, Francisco; Gonçalves, Nádia; Vieira, Sara; Santos, Mário; Amado, Francisco; Duarte, José Alberto; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F; Henriques-Coelho, Tiago

    2015-11-01

    Clinical studies suggest that aerobic exercise can exert beneficial effects in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We compared the impact of early or late aerobic exercise training on right ventricular function, remodeling and survival in experimental PAH. Male Wistar rats were submitted to normal cage activity (SED), exercise training in early (EarlyEX) and in late stage (LateEX) of PAH induced by monocrotaline (MCT, 60 mg/kg). Both exercise interventions resulted in improved cardiac function despite persistent right pressure-overload, increased exercise tolerance and survival, with greater benefits in EarlyEX+MCT. This was accompanied by improvements in the markers of cardiac remodeling (SERCA2a), neurohumoral activation (lower endothelin-1, brain natriuretic peptide and preserved vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA), metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative stress in both exercise interventions. EarlyEX+MCT provided additional improvements in fibrosis, tumor necrosis factor-alpha/interleukin-10 and brain natriuretic peptide mRNA, and beta/alpha myosin heavy chain protein expression. The present study demonstrates important cardioprotective effects of aerobic exercise in experimental PAH, with greater benefits obtained when exercise training is initiated at an early stage of the disease.

  19. Mathematical modeling of the effects of aerobic and anaerobic chelate bioegradation on actinide speciation.

    SciTech Connect

    Banaszak, J.E.; VanBriesen, J.; Rittmann, B.E.; Reed, D.T.

    1998-03-19

    Biodegradation of natural and anthropogenic chelating agents directly and indirectly affects the speciation, and, hence, the mobility of actinides in subsurface environments. We combined mathematical modeling with laboratory experimentation to investigate the effects of aerobic and anaerobic chelate biodegradation on actinide [Np(IV/V), Pu(IV)] speciation. Under aerobic conditions, nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) biodegradation rates were strongly influenced by the actinide concentration. Actinide-chelate complexation reduced the relative abundance of available growth substrate in solution and actinide species present or released during chelate degradation were toxic to the organisms. Aerobic bio-utilization of the chelates as electron-donor substrates directly affected actinide speciation by releasing the radionuclides from complexed form into solution, where their fate was controlled by inorganic ligands in the system. Actinide speciation was also indirectly affected by pH changes caused by organic biodegradation. The two concurrent processes of organic biodegradation and actinide aqueous chemistry were accurately linked and described using CCBATCH, a computer model developed at Northwestern University to investigate the dynamics of coupled biological and chemical reactions in mixed waste subsurface environments. CCBATCH was then used to simulate the fate of Np during anaerobic citrate biodegradation. The modeling studies suggested that, under some conditions, chelate degradation can increase Np(IV) solubility due to carbonate complexation in closed aqueous systems.

  20. Aerobic versus Anaerobic Microbial Degradation of Clothianidin under Simulated California Rice Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Rebecca A; Tomco, Patrick L; Howard, Megan W; Schempp, Tabitha T; Stewart, Davis J; Stacey, Phillip M; Ball, David B; Tjeerdema, Ronald S

    2016-09-28

    Microbial degradation of clothianidin was characterized under aerobic and anaerobic California rice field conditions. Rate constants (k) and half-lives (DT50) were determined for aerobic and anaerobic microcosms, and an enrichment experiment was performed at various nutrient conditions and pesticide concentrations. Temperature effects on anaerobic degradation rates were determined at 22 ± 2 and 35 ± 2 °C. Microbial growth was assessed in the presence of various pesticide concentrations, and distinct colonies were isolated and identified. Slow aerobic degradation was observed, but anaerobic degradation occurred rapidly at both 25 and 35 °C. Transformation rates and DT50 values in flooded soil at 35 ± 2 °C (k = -7.16 × 10(-2) ± 3.08 × 10(-3) day(-1), DT50 = 9.7 days) were significantly faster than in 25 ± 2 °C microcosms (k= -2.45 × 10(-2) ± 1.59 × 10(-3) day(-1), DT50 = 28.3 days). At the field scale, biodegradation of clothianidin will vary with extent of oxygenation. PMID:27499061

  1. Biodegradation and kinetics of aerobic granules under high organic loading rates in sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Jiang, Wenju; Liang, David Tee; Tay, Joo Hwa

    2008-05-01

    Biodegradation, kinetics, and microbial diversity of aerobic granules were investigated under a high range of organic loading rate 6.0 to 12.0 kg chemical oxygen demand (COD) m(-3) day(-1) in a sequencing batch reactor. The selection and enriching of different bacterial species under different organic loading rates had an important effect on the characteristics and performance of the mature aerobic granules and caused the difference on granular biodegradation and kinetic behaviors. Good granular characteristics and performance were presented at steady state under various organic loading rates. Larger and denser aerobic granules were developed and stabilized at relatively higher organic loading rates with decreased bioactivity in terms of specific oxygen utilization rate and specific growth rate (muoverall) or solid retention time. The decrease of bioactivity was helpful to maintain granule stability under high organic loading rates and improve reactor operation. The corresponding biokinetic coefficients of endogenous decay rate (kd), observed yield (Yobs), and theoretical yield (Y) were measured and calculated in this study. As the increase of organic loading rate, a decreased net sludge production (Yobs) is associated with an increased solid retention time, while kd and Y changed insignificantly and can be regarded as constants under different organic loading rates.

  2. Effect of Aerobic Priming on the Response of Echinochloa crus-pavonis to Anaerobic Stress (Protein Synthesis and Phosphorylation).

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, F.; Lin, J. J.; Fox, T. C.; Mujer, C. V.; Rumpho, M. E.; Kennedy, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Echinochloa species differ in their ability to germinate and grow in the absence of oxygen. Seeds of Echinochloa crus-pavonis (H.B.K.) Schult do not germinate under anoxia but remain viable for extended periods (at least 30 d) when incubated in an anaerobic environment. E. crus-pavonis can be induced to germinate and grow in an anaerobic environment if the seeds are first subjected to a short (1-18 h) exposure to aerobic conditions (aerobic priming). Changes in polypeptide patterns (constitutive and de novo synthesized) and protein phosphorylation induced by aerobic priming were investigated. In the absence of aerobic priming protein degradation was not evident under anaerobic conditions, although synthesis of a 20-kD polypeptide was induced. During aerobic priming, however, synthesis of 37- and 55-kD polypeptides was induced and persisted upon return of the seeds to anoxia. Furthermore, phosphorylation of two 18-kD polypeptides was observed only in those seeds that were labeled with 32PO4 during the aerobic priming period. Subsequent chasing in an anaerobic environment resulted in a decrease in phosphorylation of these polypeptides. Likewise, phosphorylation of the 18-kD polypeptides was not observed if the seeds were labeled in an anaerobic atmosphere. These results suggest that the regulated induction of the 20-, 37-, and 55- kD polypeptides may be important for anaerobic germination and growth of E. crus-pavonis and that the specific phosphorylation of the 18-kD polypeptides may be a factor in regulating this induction. PMID:12232272

  3. Effect of Aerobic Priming on the Response of Echinochloa crus-pavonis to Anaerobic Stress (Protein Synthesis and Phosphorylation).

    PubMed

    Zhang, F.; Lin, J. J.; Fox, T. C.; Mujer, C. V.; Rumpho, M. E.; Kennedy, R. A.

    1994-08-01

    Echinochloa species differ in their ability to germinate and grow in the absence of oxygen. Seeds of Echinochloa crus-pavonis (H.B.K.) Schult do not germinate under anoxia but remain viable for extended periods (at least 30 d) when incubated in an anaerobic environment. E. crus-pavonis can be induced to germinate and grow in an anaerobic environment if the seeds are first subjected to a short (1-18 h) exposure to aerobic conditions (aerobic priming). Changes in polypeptide patterns (constitutive and de novo synthesized) and protein phosphorylation induced by aerobic priming were investigated. In the absence of aerobic priming protein degradation was not evident under anaerobic conditions, although synthesis of a 20-kD polypeptide was induced. During aerobic priming, however, synthesis of 37- and 55-kD polypeptides was induced and persisted upon return of the seeds to anoxia. Furthermore, phosphorylation of two 18-kD polypeptides was observed only in those seeds that were labeled with 32PO4 during the aerobic priming period. Subsequent chasing in an anaerobic environment resulted in a decrease in phosphorylation of these polypeptides. Likewise, phosphorylation of the 18-kD polypeptides was not observed if the seeds were labeled in an anaerobic atmosphere. These results suggest that the regulated induction of the 20-, 37-, and 55- kD polypeptides may be important for anaerobic germination and growth of E. crus-pavonis and that the specific phosphorylation of the 18-kD polypeptides may be a factor in regulating this induction.

  4. Climate Change and Respiratory Infections.

    PubMed

    Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Motahari, Hooman; Taghizadeh Khamesi, Mojdeh; Sharifi, Arash; Campos, Michael; Schraufnagel, Dean E

    2016-08-01

    The rate of global warming has accelerated over the past 50 years. Increasing surface temperature is melting glaciers and raising the sea level. More flooding, droughts, hurricanes, and heat waves are being reported. Accelerated changes in climate are already affecting human health, in part by altering the epidemiology of climate-sensitive pathogens. In particular, climate change may alter the incidence and severity of respiratory infections by affecting vectors and host immune responses. Certain respiratory infections, such as avian influenza and coccidioidomycosis, are occurring in locations previously unaffected, apparently because of global warming. Young children and older adults appear to be particularly vulnerable to rapid fluctuations in ambient temperature. For example, an increase in the incidence in childhood pneumonia in Australia has been associated with sharp temperature drops from one day to the next. Extreme weather events, such as heat waves, floods, major storms, drought, and wildfires, are also believed to change the incidence of respiratory infections. An outbreak of aspergillosis among Japanese survivors of the 2011 tsunami is one such well-documented example. Changes in temperature, precipitation, relative humidity, and air pollution influence viral activity and transmission. For example, in early 2000, an outbreak of Hantavirus respiratory disease was linked to a local increase in the rodent population, which in turn was attributed to a two- to threefold increase in rainfall before the outbreak. Climate-sensitive respiratory pathogens present challenges to respiratory health that may be far greater in the foreseeable future. PMID:27300144

  5. Surveillance for emerging respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Zumla, Alimuddin; Gautret, Philippe; Gray, Gregory C; Hui, David S; Al-Rabeeah, Abdullah A; Memish, Ziad A

    2014-10-01

    Several new viral respiratory tract infectious diseases with epidemic potential that threaten global health security have emerged in the past 15 years. In 2003, WHO issued a worldwide alert for an unknown emerging illness, later named severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The disease caused by a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV) rapidly spread worldwide, causing more than 8000 cases and 800 deaths in more than 30 countries with a substantial economic impact. Since then, we have witnessed the emergence of several other viral respiratory pathogens including influenza viruses (avian influenza H5N1, H7N9, and H10N8; variant influenza A H3N2 virus), human adenovirus-14, and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). In response, various surveillance systems have been developed to monitor the emergence of respiratory-tract infections. These include systems based on identification of syndromes, web-based systems, systems that gather health data from health facilities (such as emergency departments and family doctors), and systems that rely on self-reporting by patients. More effective national, regional, and international surveillance systems are required to enable rapid identification of emerging respiratory epidemics, diseases with epidemic potential, their specific microbial cause, origin, mode of acquisition, and transmission dynamics. PMID:25189347

  6. Climate Change and Respiratory Infections.

    PubMed

    Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Motahari, Hooman; Taghizadeh Khamesi, Mojdeh; Sharifi, Arash; Campos, Michael; Schraufnagel, Dean E

    2016-08-01

    The rate of global warming has accelerated over the past 50 years. Increasing surface temperature is melting glaciers and raising the sea level. More flooding, droughts, hurricanes, and heat waves are being reported. Accelerated changes in climate are already affecting human health, in part by altering the epidemiology of climate-sensitive pathogens. In particular, climate change may alter the incidence and severity of respiratory infections by affecting vectors and host immune responses. Certain respiratory infections, such as avian influenza and coccidioidomycosis, are occurring in locations previously unaffected, apparently because of global warming. Young children and older adults appear to be particularly vulnerable to rapid fluctuations in ambient temperature. For example, an increase in the incidence in childhood pneumonia in Australia has been associated with sharp temperature drops from one day to the next. Extreme weather events, such as heat waves, floods, major storms, drought, and wildfires, are also believed to change the incidence of respiratory infections. An outbreak of aspergillosis among Japanese survivors of the 2011 tsunami is one such well-documented example. Changes in temperature, precipitation, relative humidity, and air pollution influence viral activity and transmission. For example, in early 2000, an outbreak of Hantavirus respiratory disease was linked to a local increase in the rodent population, which in turn was attributed to a two- to threefold increase in rainfall before the outbreak. Climate-sensitive respiratory pathogens present challenges to respiratory health that may be far greater in the foreseeable future.

  7. A quasi-universal medium to break the aerobic/anaerobic bacterial culture dichotomy in clinical microbiology.

    PubMed

    Dione, N; Khelaifia, S; La Scola, B; Lagier, J C; Raoult, D

    2016-01-01

    In the mid-19th century, the dichotomy between aerobic and anaerobic bacteria was introduced. Nevertheless, the aerobic growth of strictly anaerobic bacterial species such as Ruminococcus gnavus and Fusobacterium necrophorum, in a culture medium containing antioxidants, was recently demonstrated. We tested aerobically the culture of 623 bacterial strains from 276 bacterial species including 82 strictly anaerobic, 154 facultative anaerobic, 31 aerobic and nine microaerophilic bacterial species as well as ten fungi. The basic culture medium was based on Schaedler agar supplemented with 1 g/L ascorbic acid and 0.1 g/L glutathione (R-medium). We successively optimized this media, adding 0.4 g/L uric acid, using separate autoclaving of the component, or adding haemin 0.1 g/L or α-ketoglutarate 2 g/L. In the basic medium, 237 bacterial species and ten fungal species grew but with no growth of 36 bacterial species, including 22 strict anaerobes. Adding uric acid allowed the growth of 14 further species including eight strict anaerobes, while separate autoclaving allowed the growth of all tested bacterial strains. To extend its potential use for fastidious bacteria, we added haemin for Haemophilus influenzae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae and Eikenella corrodens and α-ketoglutarate for Legionella pneumophila. This medium allowed the growth of all tested strains with the exception of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis. Testing primoculture and more fastidious species will constitute the main work to be done, but R-medium coupled with a rapid identification method (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry) will facilitate the anaerobic culture in clinical microbiology laboratories.

  8. Cardioprotective Properties of Aerobic and Resistance Training Against Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Barboza, C A; Souza, G I H; Oliveira, J C M F; Silva, L M; Mostarda, C T; Dourado, P M M; Oyama, L M; Lira, F S; Irigoyen, M C; Rodrigues, B

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the effects of aerobic and resistance exercise training on ventricular morphometry and function, physical capacity, autonomic function, as well as on ventricular inflammatory status in trained rats prior to myocardial infarction. Male Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: sedentary+Sham, sedentary+myocardial infarction, aerobic trained+myocardial infarction, and resistance trained+myocardial infarction. Sham and myocardial infarction were performed after training periods. In the days following the surgeries, evaluations were performed. Aerobic training prevents aerobic (to a greater extent) and resistance capacity impairments, ventricular dysfunction, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic disorders (vagal tonus decrease and sympathetic tonus increase) triggered by myocardial infarction. Resistance training was able to prevent negative changes to aerobic and resistance capacity (to a greater extent) but not to ventricular dysfunction, and it prevented cardiovascular sympathetic increments. Additionally, both types of training reduced left ventricle inflammatory cytokine concentration. Our results suggest that aerobic and, for the first time, dynamic resistance training were able to reduce sympathetic tonus to the heart and vessels, as well as preventing the increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations in the left ventricle of trained groups. These data emphasizes the positive effects of aerobic and dynamic resistance training on the prevention of the negative changes triggered by myocardial infarction.

  9. Mutagenicity of anaerobic fenitrothion metabolites after aerobic biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Taku; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Saeki, Ryo; Inoue, Takanobu

    2005-12-01

    Previous studies have revealed that the mutagenicity of fenitrothion increases during anaerobic biodegradation, suggesting that this insecticide's mutagenicity could effectively increase after it pollutes anaerobic environments such as lake sediments. To investigate possible changes to the mutagenicity of fenitrothion under aerobic conditions after it had already been increased by anaerobic biodegradation, batch incubation cultures were maintained under aerobic conditions. The mutagenicity, which had increased during anaerobic biodegradation, decreased under aerobic conditions with aerobic or facultative bacteria, but did not disappear completely in 22 days. In contrast, it did not change under aerobic conditions without bacteria or under continued anaerobic conditions. These observations suggest that the mutagenicity of anaerobically metabolized fenitrothion would not necessarily decrease after it arrives in an aerobic environment: this would depend on the presence of suitable bacteria. Therefore, fenitrothion-derived mutagenic compounds may pollute the water environment, including our drinking water sources, after accidental pollution of aerobic waters. Although amino-fenitrothion generated during anaerobic biodegradation of fenitrothion was the principal mutagen, non-trivial contributions of other, unidentified metabolites to the mutagenicity were also observed. PMID:16263383

  10. Comparison of aerobic and anaerobic biotreatment of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Borglin, Sharon E; Hazen, Terry C; Oldenburg, Curtis M; Zawislanski, Peter T

    2004-07-01

    To increase the operating lifetime of landfills and to lower leachate treatment costs, an increasing number of municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills are being managed as either aerobic or anaerobic bioreactors. Landfill gas composition, respiration rates, and subsidence were measured for 400 days in 200-L tanks filled with fresh waste materials to compare the relative effectiveness of the two treatments. Tanks were prepared to provide the following conditions: (1) air injection and leachate recirculation (aerobic), (2) leachate recirculation (anaerobic), and (3) no treatment (anaerobic). Respiration tests on the aerobic wet tank showed a steady decrease in oxygen consumption rates from 1.3 mol/day at 20 days to 0.1 mol/day at 400 days. Aerobic wet tanks produced, on average, 6 mol of carbon dioxide (CO2)/kg of MSW as compared with anaerobic wet tanks, which produced 2.2 mol methane/kg of MSW and 2.0 mol CO2/kg methane. Over the test period, the aerobic tanks settled on average 35%, anaerobic tanks settled 21.7%, and the no-treatment tank settled 7.5%, equivalent to overall mass loss in the corresponding reactors. Aerobic tanks reduced stabilization time and produced negligible odor compared with anaerobic tanks, possibly because of the 2 orders of magnitude lower leachate ammonia levels in the aerobic tank. Both treatment regimes provide the opportunity for disposal and remediation of liquid waste.

  11. Coordinated Metabolic Transitions During Drosophila Embryogenesis and the Onset of Aerobic Glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Tennessen, Jason M.; Bertagnolli, Nicolas M.; Evans, Janelle; Sieber, Matt H.; Cox, James; Thummel, Carl S.

    2014-01-01

    Rapidly proliferating cells such as cancer cells and embryonic stem cells rely on a specialized metabolic program known as aerobic glycolysis, which supports biomass production from carbohydrates. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster also utilizes aerobic glycolysis to support the rapid growth that occurs during larval development. Here we use singular value decomposition analysis of modENCODE RNA-seq data combined with GC-MS-based metabolomic analysis to analyze the changes in gene expression and metabolism that occur during Drosophila embryogenesis, spanning the onset of aerobic glycolysis. Unexpectedly, we find that the most common pattern of co-expressed genes in embryos includes the global switch to glycolytic gene expression that occurs midway through embryogenesis. In contrast to the canonical aerobic glycolytic pathway, however, which is accompanied by reduced mitochondrial oxidative metabolism, the expression of genes involved in the tricarboxylic cycle (TCA cycle) and the electron transport chain are also upregulated at this time. Mitochondrial activity, however, appears to be attenuated, as embryos exhibit a block in the TCA cycle that results in elevated levels of citrate, isocitrate, and α-ketoglutarate. We also find that genes involved in lipid breakdown and β-oxidation are upregulated prior to the transcriptional initiation of glycolysis, but are downregulated before the onset of larval development, revealing coordinated use of lipids and carbohydrates during development. These observations demonstrate the efficient use of nutrient stores to support embryonic development, define sequential metabolic transitions during this stage, and demonstrate striking similarities between the metabolic state of late-stage fly embryos and tumor cells. PMID:24622332

  12. Spatial memory is improved by aerobic and resistance exercise through divergent molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cassilhas, R C; Lee, K S; Fernandes, J; Oliveira, M G M; Tufik, S; Meeusen, R; de Mello, M T

    2012-01-27

    A growing body of scientific evidence indicates that exercise has a positive impact on human health, including neurological health. Aerobic exercise, which is supposed to enhance cardiovascular functions and metabolism, also induces neurotrophic factors that affect hippocampal neurons, thereby improving spatial learning and memory. Alternatively, little is known about the effect of resistance exercise on hippocampus-dependent memory, although this type of exercise is increasingly recommended to improve muscle strength and bone density and to prevent age-related disabilities. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of resistance training on spatial memory and the signaling pathways of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), comparing these effects with those of aerobic exercise. Adult male Wistar rats underwent 8 weeks of aerobic training on a treadmill (AERO group) or resistance training on a vertical ladder (RES group). Control and sham groups were also included. After the training period, both AERO and RES groups showed improved learning and spatial memory in a similar manner. However, both groups presented distinct signaling pathways. Although the AERO group showed increased level of IGF-1, BDNF, TrkB, and β-CaMKII (calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II) in the hippocampus, the RES group showed an induction of peripheral and hippocampal IGF-1 with concomitant activation of receptor for IGF-1 (IGF-1R) and AKT in the hippocampus. These distinct pathways culminated in an increase of synapsin 1 and synaptophysin expression in both groups. These findings demonstrated that both aerobic and resistance exercise can employ divergent molecular mechanisms but achieve similar results on learning and spatial memory.

  13. Anaerobic digestion of dairy cattle manure autoheated by aerobic pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Achkari-Begdouri, A.

    1989-01-01

    A novel way to heat anaerobic digesters was investigated. Dairy cattle manure was autoheated by an aerobic pretreatment process and then fed to the anaerobic digester. Important physical properties of the dairy cattle manure were determined. These included bulk density, specific heat, thermal conductivity and the rheological properties; consistency coefficient, behavior index and apparent viscosity. These parameters were used to calculate the overall heat transfer coefficients, and to estimate the heat losses from the aerobic reactor to the outside environment. The total energy balance of the aerobic treatment system was then established. An optimization study of the main parameters influencing the autoheating process showed that the total solids, the air flow rate and the stirring speed for operation of the aerobic pretreatment should be approximately 7%, 70 L/H and 1,400 rpm respectively. Temperatures as high as 65C were reached in 40 hours of aerobic treatment. At the above recommended levels of total solids, the air flow rate and the stirring speed, there was little difference in the energy requirements for heating the influent by aeration and heating the influent by a conventional heating system. In addition to the temperature increase, the aerobic pretreatment assisted in balancing the anaerobic digestion process and increased the methanogenesis of the dairy cattle manure. Despite the 8% decomposition of organic matter that occurred during the aerobic pretreatment process, methane production of the digester started with the aerobically heated manure was significantly higher (at least 20% higher) than of the digester started with conventionally heated manure. The aerobic system successfully autoheated the dairy cattle manure with an energy cost equal to that of conventionally heated influent.

  14. Interaction of Cadmium With the Aerobic Bacterium Pseudomonas Mendocina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, P. J.; Haack, E. A.; Maurice, P. A.

    2006-05-01

    The fate of toxic metals in the environment can be heavily influenced by interaction with bacteria in the vadose zone. This research focuses on the interactions of cadmium with the strict aerobe Pseudomonas mendocina. P. mendocina is a gram-negative bacterium that has shown potential in the bioremediation of recalcitrant organic compounds. Cadmium is a common environmental contaminant of wide-spread ecological consequence. In batch experiments P. mendocina shows typical bacterial growth curves, with an initial lag phase followed by an exponential phase and a stationary to death phase; concomitant with growth was an increase in pH from initial values of 7 to final values at 96 hours of 8.8. Cd both delays the onset of the exponential phase and decreases the maximum population size, as quantified by optical density and microscopic cell counts (DAPI). The total amount of Cd removed from solution increases over time, as does the amount of Cd removed from solution normalized per bacterial cell. Images obtained with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the production of a cadmium, phosphorus, and iron containing precipitate that was similar in form and composition to precipitates formed abiotically at elevated pH. However, by late stationary phase, the precipitate had been re-dissolved, perhaps by biotic processes in order to obtain Fe. Stressed conditions are suggested by TEM images showing the formation of pili, or nanowires, when 20ppm Cd was present and a marked decrease in exopolysaccharide and biofilm material in comparison to control cells (no cadmium added).

  15. [Neurophysiologic and respiratory changes during the practice of relaxation technics].

    PubMed

    Gallois, P

    1984-01-01

    A polygraphic study, of 40 minutes duration, among 10 subjects who practiced autogenic training (TA) and 10 subjects who practiced transcendental meditation (MT), compared to 10 control subjects, gave the following results: rarity of the number of sleeping episodes during relaxation, cardiac rhythm, significantly decreased in the TM group, increased stability of the E.D.G. during and after relaxation, respiratory rate decreased to a value of 33% of the initial rate, respiratory suspensions were frequent in the TM group, reaching a maximal duration of 50 seconds. The absence of compensatory hypercapnia and hyperpnea is an argument in favor of their central origin, lastly, the simple reaction time after relaxation is slightly decreased, whereas it is increased in the controls, this aerobic hypometabolic state, the stability of the autonomic nervous system and the maintenance of the vigilance, induced by deep relaxation, seems to be the opposite of the state which is induced by stress; therefore deep relaxation may play a role in a psycho-somatic approach to treating a variety of disease states.

  16. Autoflora in the upper respiratory tract of Apollo astronauts.

    PubMed

    Decelle, J G; Taylor, G R

    1976-11-01

    The typical microbial inhabitants of the oral and nasal cavities of Apollo astronauts were identified before space flight and generally found to be similar to those previously reported for healthy male adults. Additional analyses of samples collected immediately after return of the Apollo 13, 14, 15, and 16 crew members to earth were performed to evaluate the effects of space travel on the microbial bioburden of the upper respiratory tract. In-flight cross-contamination and buildup of pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus were noted, although significant increases in nonpathogenic species were absent. Other proposed alterations, such as dysbacteriosis (flooding of the mouth with a single species) and simplification of the autoflora, did not occur. Generally, the incidence and quantitation of each species after flight was within the preflight range, although the number of viable Haemophilus cells recovered from the mouth decreased significantly after space flight. Except for those minor alterations listed above, the aerobic and anaerobic bacterial components of the upper respiratory autoflora of Apollo astronauts was found to be stable after space flight of up to 295 h.

  17. Transcriptome dynamics during the transition from anaerobic photosynthesis to aerobic respiration in Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1.

    PubMed

    Arai, Hiroyuki; Roh, Jung Hyeob; Kaplan, Samuel

    2008-01-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 is a facultative photosynthetic anaerobe that grows by anoxygenic photosynthesis under anaerobic-light conditions. Changes in energy generation pathways under photosynthetic and aerobic respiratory conditions are primarily controlled by oxygen tensions. In this study, we performed time series microarray analyses to investigate transcriptome dynamics during the transition from anaerobic photosynthesis to aerobic respiration. Major changes in gene expression profiles occurred in the initial 15 min after the shift from anaerobic-light to aerobic-dark conditions, with changes continuing to occur up to 4 hours postshift. Those genes whose expression levels changed significantly during the time series were grouped into three major classes by clustering analysis. Class I contained genes, such as that for the aa3 cytochrome oxidase, whose expression levels increased after the shift. Class II contained genes, such as those for the photosynthetic apparatus and Calvin cycle enzymes, whose expression levels decreased after the shift. Class III contained genes whose expression levels temporarily increased during the time series. Many genes for metabolism and transport of carbohydrates or lipids were significantly induced early during the transition, suggesting that those endogenous compounds were initially utilized as carbon sources. Oxidation of those compounds might also be required for maintenance of redox homeostasis after exposure to oxygen. Genes for the repair of protein and sulfur groups and uptake of ferric iron were temporarily upregulated soon after the shift, suggesting they were involved in a response to oxidative stress. The flagellar-biosynthesis genes were expressed in a hierarchical manner at 15 to 60 min after the shift. Numerous transporters were induced at various time points, suggesting that the cellular composition went through significant changes during the transition from anaerobic photosynthesis to aerobic respiration

  18. Remodeled Respiration in ndufs4 with Low Phosphorylation Efficiency Suppresses Arabidopsis Germination and Growth and Alters Control of Metabolism at Night1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Etienne H.; Tomaz, Tiago; Carroll, Adam J.; Estavillo, Gonzalo; Delannoy, Etienne; Tanz, Sandra K.; Small, Ian D.; Pogson, Barry J.; Millar, A. Harvey

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory oxidative phosphorylation is a cornerstone of cellular metabolism in aerobic multicellular organisms. The efficiency of this process is generally assumed to be maximized, but the presence of dynamically regulated nonphosphorylating bypasses implies that plants can alter phosphorylation efficiency and can benefit from lowered energy generation during respiration under certain conditions. We characterized an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant, ndufs4 (for NADH dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] fragment S subunit 4), lacking complex I of the respiratory chain, which has constitutively lowered phosphorylation efficiency. Through analysis of the changes to mitochondrial function as well as whole cell transcripts and metabolites, we provide insights into how cellular metabolism flexibly adapts to reduced phosphorylation efficiency and why this state may benefit the plant by providing moderate stress tolerance. We show that removal of the single protein subunit NDUFS4 prevents assembly of complex I and removes its function from mitochondria without pleiotropic effects on other respiratory components. However, the lack of complex I promotes broad changes in the nuclear transcriptome governing growth and photosynthetic function. We observed increases in organic acid and amino acid pools in the mutant, especially at night, concomitant with alteration of the adenylate content. While germination is delayed, this can be rescued by application of gibberellic acid, and root growth assays of seedlings show enhanced tolerance to cold, mild salt, and osmotic stress. We discuss these observations in the light of recent data on the knockout of nonphosphorylating respiratory bypass enzymes that show opposite changes in metabolites and stress sensitivity. Our data suggest that the absence of complex I alters the adenylate control of cellular metabolism. PMID:19675153

  19. Evaluation of Biodegradability of Waste Before and After Aerobic Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchowska-Kisielewicz, Monika; Jędrczak, Andrzej; Sadecka, Zofia

    2014-12-01

    An important advantage of use of an aerobic biostabilization of waste prior to its disposal is that it intensifies the decomposition of the organic fraction of waste into the form which is easily assimilable for methanogenic microorganisms involved in anaerobic decomposition of waste in the landfill. In this article it is presented the influence of aerobic pre-treatment of waste as well as leachate recirculation on susceptibility to biodegradation of waste in anaerobic laboratory reactors. The research has shown that in the reactor with aerobically treated waste stabilized with recilculation conversion of the organic carbon into the methane is about 45% higher than in the reactor with untreated waste stabilized without recirculation.

  20. Considerations in prescribing preflight aerobic exercise for astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Mary Anne Bassett

    1987-01-01

    The physiological effects of prolonged exposure to weightlessness are discussed together with the effects of aerobic exercise on human characteristics affected by weightlessness. It is noted that, although early data on orthostatic intolerance after spaceflight led to a belief that a high level of aerobic fitness for astronauts was detrimental to orthostatic tolerance on return to earth, most of the data available today do not suport this contention. Aerobic fitness was found to be beneficial to cardiovascular function and to mental performance; therefore, it may be important in performing extravehicular activities during flight.

  1. Heritability of aerobic power of individuals in northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Alonso, L; Souza, Ec; Oliveira, Mv; do Nascimento, Lfe; Dantas, Pms

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic and environmental contribution to variation in aerobic power in monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins. The sample consisted of 20 MZ individuals (12 females and 8 males) and 16 DZ individuals (12 females and 4 males), aged from 8 to 26 years, residents in Natal, Rio Grande do Norte. The twins were assessed by a multistage fitness test. The rate of heritability found for aerobic power was 77%. Based on the results, the estimated heritability was largely responsible for the differences in aerobic power. This implies that such measures are under strong genetic influence.

  2. Role of the Zinc Uptake ABC Transporter of Moraxella catarrhalis in Persistence in the Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Brauer, Aimee L.; Kirkham, Charmaine; Johnson, Antoinette; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a human respiratory tract pathogen that causes otitis media in children and lower respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We have identified and characterized a zinc uptake ABC transporter that is present in all strains of M. catarrhalis tested. A mutant in which the znu gene cluster is knocked out shows markedly impaired growth compared to the wild type in medium that contains trace zinc; growth is restored to wild-type levels by supplementing medium with zinc but not with other divalent cations. Thermal-shift assays showed that the purified recombinant substrate binding protein ZnuA binds zinc but does not bind other divalent cations. Invasion assays with human respiratory epithelial cells demonstrated that the zinc ABC transporter of M. catarrhalis is critical for invasion of respiratory epithelial cells, an observation that is especially relevant because an intracellular reservoir of M. catarrhalis is present in the human respiratory tract and this reservoir is important for persistence. The znu knockout mutant showed marked impairment in its capacity to persist in the respiratory tract compared to the wild type in a mouse pulmonary clearance model. We conclude that the zinc uptake ABC transporter mediates uptake of zinc in environments with very low zinc concentrations and is critical for full virulence of M. catarrhalis in the respiratory tract in facilitating intracellular invasion of epithelial cells and persistence in the respiratory tract. PMID:23817618

  3. Dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides by an Aerobic Bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Maurice, P.

    2004-12-13

    This project investigated the effects of an aerobic Pseudomonas mendocina bacterium on the dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides. The research is important because metals and radionuclides that adsorb to Fe(III)(hydr)oxides could potentially be remobilized by dissolving bacteria. We showed that P. mendocina is capable of dissolving Fe-bearing minerals by a variety of mechanisms, including production of siderophores, pH changes, and formation of reductants. The production of siderophores by P. mendocina was quantified under a variety of growth conditions. Finally, we demonstrated that microbial siderophores may adsorb to and enhance dissolution of clay minerals.

  4. Anaerobic bacteria in upper respiratory tract and head and neck infections: microbiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2012-04-01

    Anaerobes are the predominant components of oropharyngeal mucous membranes bacterial flora, and are therefore a common cause of bacterial infections of endogenous origin of upper respiratory tract and head and neck. This review summarizes the aerobic and anaerobic microbiology and antimicrobials therapy of these infections. These include acute and chronic otitis media, mastoiditis and sinusitis, pharyngo-tonsillitis, peritonsillar, retropharyngeal and parapharyngeal abscesses, suppurative thyroiditis, cervical lymphadenitis, parotitis, siliadenitis, and deep neck infections including Lemierre Syndrome. The recovery from these infections depends on prompt and proper medical and when indicated also surgical management.

  5. Bacteriuria screening and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of aerobic bacteria by an electrochemical method.

    PubMed

    Strassburger, J; Tiller, F W

    1984-04-01

    A method is described for detecting significant bacteriuria and determination of minimal inhibition concentrations (MIC's) of aerobically growing bacteria by using electrochemical electrodes to measure changes of oxygen tensions in liquid nutrient media resulting from bacterial growth. Urine specimens (n = 577) were screened electrochemically, parallel investigations were performed by standard culture methods and by photometrical measurements. All the specimens showing significant bacteriuria in standard culture were selected within 3.5 h by the electrochemical technique. An oxygen index OI was introduced which quantitatively reflects changes in oxygen tension of nutrient media during growth. OI shows good agreement with extinction and light scattering indices, respectively. On the basis of OI as a parameter of inhibited and uninhibited growth a correlation between OI and MIC's of aerobically growing bacteria was found. The electrochemical method provides an useful aid for rapid, preliminary antimicrobial susceptibility testing and definite bacteriuria screening. The application of this method in bacteriological urine diagnostics significantly reduces laboratory work and costs, and can be recommended for the screening of urine specimens to exclude negative specimens from further processing.

  6. Aerobic deterioration stimulates outgrowth of spore-forming Paenibacillus in corn silage stored under oxygen-barrier or polyethylene films.

    PubMed

    Borreani, Giorgio; Dolci, Paola; Tabacco, Ernesto; Cocolin, Luca

    2013-08-01

    The occurrence of Bacillus and Paenibacillus spores in silage is of great concern to dairy producers because their spores can survive pasteurization and some strains are capable of subsequently germinating and growing under refrigerated conditions in pasteurized milk. The objectives of this study were to verify the role of aerobic deterioration of corn silage on the proliferation of Paenibacillus spores and to evaluate the efficacy of oxygen-barrier films used to cover silage during fermentation and storage to mitigate these undesirable bacterial outbreaks. The trial was carried out on whole-crop maize (Zea mays L.) inoculated with a mixture of Lactobacillus buchneri, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Enterococcus faecium. A standard polyethylene film and a polyethylene-polyamide film with an enhanced oxygen barrier were used to produce the silage bags for this experiment. The silos were stored indoors at ambient temperature (18 to 22°C) and opened after 110 d. The silage was sampled after 0, 2, 5, 7, 9, and 14 d of aerobic exposure to quantify the growth of endospore-forming bacteria during the exposure of silages to air. Paenibacillus macerans (gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic bacteria) was able to develop during the aerobic exposure of corn silage. This species was present in the herbage at harvesting, together with clostridial spores, and survived ensiling fermentation; it constituted more than 60% of the anaerobic spore formers at silage opening. During silage spoilage, the spore concentration of P. macerans increased to values greater than 7.0 log10 cfu/g of silage. The use of different plastic films to seal silages affected the growth of P. macerans and the number of spores during aerobic exposure of silages. These results indicate that the number of Paenibacillus spores could greatly increase in silage after exposure to air, and that oxygen-barrier films could help to reduce the potential for silage contamination of this important group of milk spoilage

  7. Probiotics in respiratory virus infections.

    PubMed

    Lehtoranta, L; Pitkäranta, A; Korpela, R

    2014-08-01

    Viral respiratory infections are the most common diseases in humans. A large range of etiologic agents challenge the development of efficient therapies. Research suggests that probiotics are able to decrease the risk or duration of respiratory infection symptoms. However, the antiviral mechanisms of probiotics are unclear. The purpose of this paper is to review the current knowledge on the effects of probiotics on respiratory virus infections and to provide insights on the possible antiviral mechanisms of probiotics. A PubMed and Scopus database search was performed up to January 2014 using appropriate search terms on probiotic and respiratory virus infections in cell models, in animal models, and in humans, and reviewed for their relevance. Altogether, thirty-three clinical trials were reviewed. The studies varied highly in study design, outcome measures, probiotics, dose, and matrices used. Twenty-eight trials reported that probiotics had beneficial effects in the outcome of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and five showed no clear benefit. Only eight studies reported investigating viral etiology from the respiratory tract, and one of these reported a significant decrease in viral load. Based on experimental studies, probiotics may exert antiviral effects directly in probiotic-virus interaction or via stimulation of the immune system. Although probiotics seem to be beneficial in respiratory illnesses, the role of probiotics on specific viruses has not been investigated sufficiently. Due to the lack of confirmatory studies and varied data available, more randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trials in different age populations investigating probiotic dose response, comparing probiotic strains/genera, and elucidating the antiviral effect mechanisms are necessary.

  8. Issues of Health, Appearance and Physical Activity in Aerobic Classes for Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Abundo, Michelle Lee

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore what appearance-focused messages were conveyed by aerobic instructors in aerobic classes for women. This qualitative research was influenced by the concept of wellness and how feminist pedagogy can be applied to promote individuals' well-being in aerobic classes. The practices of five aerobic instructors…

  9. Respiratory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Brown, L K

    1994-12-01

    The parkinsonian syndromes include idiopathic Parkinson's disease, parkinsonian syndromes secondary to several known causative agents, and parkinsonian syndromes associated with more widespread CNS lesions and extensive neurologic deficits. They constitute movement disorders with a similar constellation of symptoms: rigidity, tremor, bradykinesia, gait impairment, and postural instability. All of the parkinsonian syndromes are associated with excess morbidity and mortality from respiratory causes, and all can produce the pattern of pulmonary function impairment consistent with neuromuscular disease. In addition, the parkinsonian syndromes can produce upper airway obstruction and abnormalities of ventilatory control, both of which can be life-threatening in those with MSA. The medications used to treat these disorders can also produce respiratory disease. A syndrome of L-dopa-induced respiratory dysfunction has been described, which may be a heterogeneic disorder of choreiform movements of the respiratory muscles, rigidity-akinesis of the respiratory muscles, or abnormal central control of ventilation, all related to the drug. In addition, the ergot-derived dopamine agonists can cause pleural and pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:7867286

  10. [Respiratory infectious diseases in horses].

    PubMed

    Mayr, A

    1987-01-01

    Among all infectious diseases affecting horses, respiratory disease pose the greatest threat to horses kept in stables, horses used for breeding and race horses. Here a distinction should be made between the so-called monocausal infectious diseases (so-called Henle-Koch postulates) and multicausal infectious diseases which are the result of the synergistic interaction of different processes, that alone do not lead to disease. There is no clearcut distinction between the two groups. The most important monocausal respiratory infections of horses are caused by equine influenza virus (subtypes 1 and 2), equine rhinopneumonitis virus (equine herpes-virus type 1), equine arteritis virus and partially by Reoviruses. In addition, streptococcus equi (strangles, adenitis equorum, coryza contagiosa equorum) and mycobacteria tuberculosis can cause monocausal diseases. In multicausal infections, the first step usually is a virus infection. This is the basis for secondary infection by widespread, opportunistic agents such as bacteria, mycoplasms or fungi which lead to clinical disease. The method of choice for controlling monocausal respiratory infections of horses is prophylactic vaccination and chemotherapy. Measures to control multicausal infections include: vaccination with functional-synergistic combined vaccines; the use of herd-specific vaccines; medical stimulation of the non-specific part of immunity (immunmodulation, paramunization). Paramunization is a new concept in the prophylaxis and therapy of respiratory infections of horses and can be combined with prophylactic vaccination as well as with chemotherapy. In severe cases of respiratory disease paramunization can also be combined with corticosteroids.

  11. Respiratory infections unique to Asia.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Kenneth W; File, Thomas M

    2008-11-01

    Asia is a highly heterogeneous region with vastly different cultures, social constitutions and populations affected by a wide spectrum of respiratory diseases caused by tropical pathogens. Asian patients with community-acquired pneumonia differ from their Western counterparts in microbiological aetiology, in particular the prominence of Gram-negative organisms, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Burkholderia pseudomallei and Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, the differences in socioeconomic and health-care infrastructures limit the usefulness of Western management guidelines for pneumonia in Asia. The importance of emerging infectious diseases such as severe acute respiratory syndrome and avian influenza infection remain as close concerns for practising respirologists in Asia. Specific infections such as melioidosis, dengue haemorrhagic fever, scrub typhus, leptospirosis, salmonellosis, penicilliosis marneffei, malaria, amoebiasis, paragonimiasis, strongyloidiasis, gnathostomiasis, trinchinellosis, schistosomiasis and echinococcosis occur commonly in Asia and manifest with a prominent respiratory component. Pulmonary eosinophilia, endemic in parts of Asia, could occur with a wide range of tropical infections. Tropical eosinophilia is believed to be a hyper-sensitivity reaction to degenerating microfilariae trapped in the lungs. This article attempts to address the key respiratory issues in these respiratory infections unique to Asia and highlight the important diagnostic and management issues faced by practising respirologists.

  12. Mental Aerobics: Exercises for the Mind in Later Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paggi, Kay; Hayslip, Bert, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Reports observations of the use of mental aerobics with 48 adults whose median age was 70. Provides examples of the group puzzles and logic, math, and word problems used to enhance cognitive functioning and creative thinking. (SK)

  13. Saline storage of aerobic granules and subsequent reactivation.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chunli; Lee, Duu-Jong; Yang, Xue; Wang, Yayi; Lin, Lin

    2014-11-01

    Loss of structural stability and bioactivity during long-term storage and operation is primary challenge to field applications of aerobic granular processes. This study for the first time stored aerobic granules in 5%w/w NaCl solution at 4°C for 187d. The stored granules were then successfully reactivated and used for 85d in sequencing batch reactors (SBR) and continuous-flow reactors (CFR) at varying levels of chemical oxygen demand (COD). High-throughput sequencing results reveal that Thauera sp., Paracoccus sp., and Nitrosomonas sp. were the predominant in the stored aerobic granules, and Pseudoxanthomonas sp. accumulated during the reactivation process. Saline storage, in which cells are in an unculturable state by saline stress, is a promising storage process for aerobic granules. PMID:25270079

  14. The effects of wilting and storage temperatures on the fermentation quality and aerobic stability of stylo silage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qinghua; Zhang, Jianguo; Shi, Shangli; Sun, Qizhong

    2011-08-01

    In order to clarify the ensiling characteristics of stylo (Stylosanthes guianensis Swartz), the effects of wilting (no wilting, light wilting and heavy wilting) and storage temperatures (10°C, 20°C, 30°C and 40°C) on the fermentation quality and aerobic stability of stylo silage were investigated. Wilting had no significant influence on the contents of crude protein, ether extract and acid detergent fiber, and numbers of lactic acid bacteria, aerobic bacteria, yeasts and mold (P > 0.05). Heavy wilted material, wilted for 12 h, had higher neutral detergent fiber content and lower water-soluble carbohydrate content than unwilted and light wilted materials (P < 0.05). Wilting and storage temperatures had significant effects on pH value, acetic acid, butyric acid and NH(3) -N contents of stylo silage (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05). Wilting tended to reduce acetic acid and NH(3) -N contents and improve the fermentation quality of stylo silage. In all the silages, no wilting silage ensiled at 30°C had the highest butyric acid content (P < 0.05). High temperature of 40°C markedly restricted the growth of lactic acid bacteria and aerobic bacteria in silage, irrespective of wilting. The wilted silage or silage stored at low temperature had poor aerobic stability. PMID:21794013

  15. Short communication: Use of a mixture of sodium nitrite, sodium benzoate, and potassium sorbate in aerobically challenged silages.

    PubMed

    Knicky, Martin; Spörndly, Rolf

    2015-08-01

    Aerobic instability is still a common problem with many types of silages, particularly well-fermented silages. This study evaluated the effect of adding an additive mixture based on sodium nitrite, sodium benzoate, and potassium sorbate to a variety of crop materials on fermentation quality and aerobic stability of silages. Ensiling conditions were challenged by using a low packing density (104±4.3kg of dry matter/m(3)) of forage and allowing air ingression into silos (at 14 and 7 d before the end of the storage, for 8 h per event). Additive-treated silages were found to have significantly lower pH and reduced formation of ammonia-N, 2.3-butanediol, and ethanol compared with untreated control silages. Yeast growth was significantly reduced by additive treatment in comparison with untreated control silage. Consequently, additive-treated silages were considerably more aerobically stable (6.7 d) than untreated control silages (0.5 d). Overall, adding 5mL/kg of fresh crop of the additive based on sodium nitrite, sodium benzoate, and potassium sorbate reduced undesirable microorganisms in silages and thereby provided suitable ensiling conditions and prolonged aerobic stability, even under air-challenged laboratory ensiling conditions. PMID:26026758

  16. The global burden of respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Ferkol, Thomas; Schraufnagel, Dean

    2014-03-01

    The Forum of International Respiratory Societies has released a report entitled Respiratory Disease in the World: Realities of Today-Opportunities for Tomorrow. The report identifies five conditions that primarily contribute to the global burden of respiratory disease (asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute respiratory infections, tuberculosis, and lung cancer), and offers an action plan to prevent and treat those diseases. It describes the staggering magnitude of the global burden of lung disease: hundreds of millions of people suffer and four million people die prematurely from respiratory diseases each year. The situation is not hopeless, because most major respiratory illnesses are avoidable. Much of the disease burden can be mitigated by reducing exposure to indoor and outdoor air pollution, restraining tobacco use, and relieving urban overcrowding. Implementation of the strategies described in the Forum of International Respiratory Societies respiratory diseases report would have a profound effect on respiratory health, reduce economic costs, and enhance health equality in the world.

  17. Modeling the dynamics of fermentation and respiratory processes in a groundwater plume of phenolic contaminants interpreted from laboratory- to field-scale.

    PubMed

    Watson, Ian A; Oswald, Sascha E; Banwart, Steven A; Crouch, Roger S; Thornton, Steven F

    2005-11-15

    A biodegradation model with consecutive fermentation and respiration processes, developed from microcosm experiments and simulated mathematically with microbial growth kinetics, has been implemented into a field-scale reactive transport model of a groundwater plume of phenolic contaminants. Simulation of the anaerobic plume core with H2 and acetate as intermediate products of biodegradation allows the rates and parameter values forfermentation processes and individual respiratory terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPS) to be estimated using detailed, spatially discrete, hydrochemical field data. The modeling of field-scale plume development includes consideration of microbial acclimatization, substrate toxicity toward degradation, bioavailability of mineral oxides, and adsorption of biogenic Fe(ll) species in the aquifer, identified from complementary laboratory process studies. The results suggest that plume core processes, particularly fermentation and Fe(lll)-reduction, are more important for degradation than previously thought, possibly with a greater impact than plume fringe processes (aerobic respiration, denitrification, and SO4-reduction). The accumulation of acetate as a fermentation product within the plume contributes significantly to the mass balance for carbon. These results demonstrate the value of quantifying fermentation products within organic contaminant plumes and strongly suggest that the conceptual model selected for reactive processes plays a dominant role in the quantitative assessment of risk reduction by naturally occurring biodegradation processes.

  18. Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wolcott, Abraham; Schiros, Theanne; Trusheim, Matthew E.; Chen, Edward H.; Nordlund, Dennis; Diaz, Rosa E.; Gaaton, Ophir; Englund, Dirk; Owen, Jonathan S.

    2014-10-27

    Here we investigate the aerobic oxidation of high-pressure, high-temperature nanodiamonds (5–50 nm dimensions) using a combination of carbon and oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption, wavelength-dependent X-ray photoelectron, and vibrational spectroscopies. Oxidation at 575 °C for 2 h eliminates graphitic carbon contamination (>98%) and produces nanocrystals with hydroxyl functionalized surfaces as well as a minor component (<5%) of carboxylic anhydrides. The low graphitic carbon content and the high crystallinity of HPHT are evident from Raman spectra acquired using visible wavelength excitation (λexcit = 633 nm) as well as carbon K-edge X-ray absorption spectra where the signature of a core–hole exciton is observed. Both spectroscopic features are similar to those of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond but differ significantly from the spectra of detonation nanodiamond. Lastly, we discuss the importance of these findings to the functionalization of nanodiamond surfaces for biological labeling applications.

  19. Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals

    DOE PAGES

    Wolcott, Abraham; Schiros, Theanne; Trusheim, Matthew E.; Chen, Edward H.; Nordlund, Dennis; Diaz, Rosa E.; Gaaton, Ophir; Englund, Dirk; Owen, Jonathan S.

    2014-10-27

    Here we investigate the aerobic oxidation of high-pressure, high-temperature nanodiamonds (5–50 nm dimensions) using a combination of carbon and oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption, wavelength-dependent X-ray photoelectron, and vibrational spectroscopies. Oxidation at 575 °C for 2 h eliminates graphitic carbon contamination (>98%) and produces nanocrystals with hydroxyl functionalized surfaces as well as a minor component (<5%) of carboxylic anhydrides. The low graphitic carbon content and the high crystallinity of HPHT are evident from Raman spectra acquired using visible wavelength excitation (λexcit = 633 nm) as well as carbon K-edge X-ray absorption spectra where the signature of a core–hole exciton is observed.more » Both spectroscopic features are similar to those of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond but differ significantly from the spectra of detonation nanodiamond. Lastly, we discuss the importance of these findings to the functionalization of nanodiamond surfaces for biological labeling applications.« less

  20. Dancing the aerobics ''hearing loss'' choreography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Beatriz M.; Carvalho, Antonio P. O.; Gallagher, Sergio

    2002-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of gymnasiums' acoustic problems when used for aerobics exercises classes (and similar) with loud noise levels of amplified music. This type of gymnasium is usually a highly reverberant space, which is a consequence of a large volume surrounded by hard surfaces. A sample of five schools in Portugal was chosen for this survey. Noise levels in each room were measured using a precision sound level meter, and analyzed to calculate the standardized daily personal noise exposure levels (LEP,d). LEP,d values from 79 to 91 dB(A) were found to be typical values in this type of room, inducing a health risk for its occupants. The reverberation time (RT) values were also measured and compared with some European legal requirements (Portugal, France, and Belgium) for nearly similar situations. RT values (1 kHz) from 0.9 s to 2.8 s were found. These reverberation time values clearly differentiate between good and acoustically inadequate rooms. Some noise level and RT limits for this type of environment are given and suggestions for the improvement of the acoustical environment are shown. Significant reductions in reverberation time values and noise levels can be obtained by simple measures.