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Sample records for aerobic soil bacterium

  1. Interaction of Cadmium With the Aerobic Bacterium Pseudomonas Mendocina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, P. J.; Haack, E. A.; Maurice, P. A.

    2006-05-01

    The fate of toxic metals in the environment can be heavily influenced by interaction with bacteria in the vadose zone. This research focuses on the interactions of cadmium with the strict aerobe Pseudomonas mendocina. P. mendocina is a gram-negative bacterium that has shown potential in the bioremediation of recalcitrant organic compounds. Cadmium is a common environmental contaminant of wide-spread ecological consequence. In batch experiments P. mendocina shows typical bacterial growth curves, with an initial lag phase followed by an exponential phase and a stationary to death phase; concomitant with growth was an increase in pH from initial values of 7 to final values at 96 hours of 8.8. Cd both delays the onset of the exponential phase and decreases the maximum population size, as quantified by optical density and microscopic cell counts (DAPI). The total amount of Cd removed from solution increases over time, as does the amount of Cd removed from solution normalized per bacterial cell. Images obtained with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the production of a cadmium, phosphorus, and iron containing precipitate that was similar in form and composition to precipitates formed abiotically at elevated pH. However, by late stationary phase, the precipitate had been re-dissolved, perhaps by biotic processes in order to obtain Fe. Stressed conditions are suggested by TEM images showing the formation of pili, or nanowires, when 20ppm Cd was present and a marked decrease in exopolysaccharide and biofilm material in comparison to control cells (no cadmium added).

  2. Aerobic Reduction of Arsenate by a Bacterium Isolated From Activated Sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozai, N.; Ohnuki, T.; Hanada, S.; Nakamura, K.; Francis, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    Microlunatus phosphovorus strain NM-1 is a polyphosphate-accumulating bacterium isolated from activated sludge. This bacterium takes up a large amount of polyphosphate under aerobic conditions and release phosphate ions by hydrolysis of polyphosphate to orthophosphate under anaerobic conditions to derive energy for taking up substrates. To understand the nature of this strain, especially, influence of potential contaminants in sewage and wastewater on growth, we have been investigating behavior of this bacterium in media containing arsenic. The present paper mainly reports reduction of arsenate by this bacterium under aerobic conditions. The strain NM-1 (JCM 9379) was aerobically cultured at 30 °C in a nutrient medium containing 2.5 g/l peptone, 0.5 g/l glucose, 1.5 g/l yeast extract, and arsenic [Na2HAsO4 (As(V)) or Na3AsO3 (As(III))] at concentrations between 0 and 50 mM. The cells collected from arsenic-free media were dispersed in buffer solutions containing 2mM HEPES, 10mM NaCl, prescribed concentrations of As(V), and 0-0.2 percent glucose. Then, this cell suspension was kept at 20 °C under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. The speciation of arsenic was carried out by ion chromatography and ICP-MS. The growth of the strain under aerobic conditions was enhanced by the addition of As(V) at the concentration between 1 and 10 mM. The maximum optical density of the culture in the medium containing 5mM As(V) was 1.4 times greater than that of the control culture. Below the As(V) concentration of 10mM, most of the As(V) was reduced to As(III). The growth of the strain under anaerobic conditions has not been observed so far. The cells in the buffer solutions reduced As(V) under aerobic condition. The reduction was enhanced by the addition of glucose. However, the cell did not reduce As(V) under anaerobic conditions. The strain NM-1 showed high resistance to As(V) and As(III). The maximum optical density of the culture grown in a medium containing 50 mM As(V) was only

  3. Aerobic degradation of mercaptosuccinate by the gram-negative bacterium Variovorax paradoxus strain B4.

    PubMed

    Carbajal-Rodríguez, Irma; Stöveken, Nadine; Satola, Barbara; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Variovorax paradoxus strain B4 was isolated from soil under mesophilic and aerobic conditions to elucidate the so far unknown catabolism of mercaptosuccinate (MS). During growth with MS this strain released significant amounts of sulfate into the medium. Tn5::mob-induced mutagenesis was successfully employed and yielded nine independent mutants incapable of using MS as a carbon source. In six of these mutants, Tn5::mob insertions were mapped in a putative gene encoding a molybdenum (Mo) cofactor biosynthesis protein (moeA). In two further mutants the Tn5::mob insertion was mapped in the gene coding for a putative molybdopterin (MPT) oxidoreductase. In contrast to the wild type, these eight mutants also showed no growth on taurine. In another mutant a gene putatively encoding a 3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (paaH2) was disrupted by transposon insertion. Upon subcellular fractionation of wild-type cells cultivated with MS as sole carbon and sulfur source, MPT oxidoreductase activity was detected in only the cytoplasmic fraction. Cells grown with succinate, taurine, or gluconate as a sole carbon source exhibited no activity or much lower activity. MPT oxidoreductase activity in the cytoplasmic fraction of the Tn5::mob-induced mutant Icr6 was 3-fold lower in comparison to the wild type. Therefore, a new pathway for MS catabolism in V. paradoxus strain B4 is proposed: (i) MPT oxidoreductase catalyzes the conversion of MS first into sulfinosuccinate (a putative organo-sulfur compound composed of succinate and a sulfino group) and then into sulfosuccinate by successive transfer of oxygen atoms, (ii) sulfosuccinate is cleaved into oxaloacetate and sulfite, and (iii) sulfite is oxidized to sulfate.

  4. Anaerobic and aerobic degradation of pyridine by a newly isolated denitrifying bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, S K; Lee, G M; Yoon, J H; Park, Y H; Bae, H S; Lee, S T

    1997-01-01

    New denitrifying bacteria that could degrade pyridine under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions were isolated from industrial wastewater. The successful enrichment and isolation of these strains required selenite as a trace element. These isolates appeared to be closely related to Azoarcus species according to the results of 16S rRNA sequence analysis. An isolated strain, pF6, metabolized pyridine through the same pathway under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Since pyridine induced NAD-linked glutarate-dialdehyde dehydrogenase and isocitratase activities, it is likely that the mechanism of pyridine degradation in strain pF6 involves N-C-2 ring cleavage. Strain pF6 could degrade pyridine in the presence of nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide as electron acceptors. In a batch culture with 6 mM nitrate, degradation of pyridine and denitrification were not sensitively affected by the redox potential, which gradually decreased from 150 to -200 mV. In a batch culture with the nitrate concentration higher than 6 mM, nitrite transiently accumulated during denitrification significantly inhibited cell growth and pyridine degradation. Growth yield on pyridine decreased slightly under denitrifying conditions from that under aerobic conditions. Furthermore, when the pyridine concentration used was above 12 mM, the specific growth rate under denitrifying conditions was higher than that under aerobic conditions. Considering these characteristics, a newly isolated denitrifying bacterium, strain pF6, has advantages over strictly aerobic bacteria in field applications. PMID:9212408

  5. Dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides by an Aerobic Bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Maurice, P.

    2004-12-13

    This project investigated the effects of an aerobic Pseudomonas mendocina bacterium on the dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides. The research is important because metals and radionuclides that adsorb to Fe(III)(hydr)oxides could potentially be remobilized by dissolving bacteria. We showed that P. mendocina is capable of dissolving Fe-bearing minerals by a variety of mechanisms, including production of siderophores, pH changes, and formation of reductants. The production of siderophores by P. mendocina was quantified under a variety of growth conditions. Finally, we demonstrated that microbial siderophores may adsorb to and enhance dissolution of clay minerals.

  6. Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, a halophilic bacterium producing acetone, butanol, and ethanol under aerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Hamid; Azarbaijani, Reza; Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Abolhassan; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Hosseini Salekdeh, Ghasem; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2016-01-01

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, which was isolated from Aran-Bidgol Lake (Iran), has the ability to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) as well as acetic and butyric acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This result is the first report of ABE production with a wild microorganism from a family other than Clostridia and also the first halophilic species shown to produce butanol under aerobic cultivation. The cultivation of Nesterenkonia sp. strain F under anaerobic conditions with 50 g/l of glucose for 72 h resulted in the production of 105 mg/l of butanol, 122 mg/l of acetone, 0.2 g/l of acetic acid, and 2.5 g/l of butyric acid. Furthermore, the strain was cultivated on media with different glucose concentrations (20, 50, and 80 g/l) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Through fermentation with a 50 g/l initial glucose concentration under aerobic conditions, 66 mg/l of butanol, 125 mg/l of acetone, 291 mg/l of ethanol, 5.9 g/l of acetic acid, and 1.2 g/l of butyric acid were produced. The enzymes pertaining to the fermentation pathway in the strain were compared with the enzymes of Clostridium spp., and the metabolic pathway of fermentation used by Nesterenkonia sp. strain F was investigated. PMID:26725518

  7. Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, a halophilic bacterium producing acetone, butanol, and ethanol under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Hamid; Azarbaijani, Reza; Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Abolhassan; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2016-01-04

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, which was isolated from Aran-Bidgol Lake (Iran), has the ability to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) as well as acetic and butyric acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This result is the first report of ABE production with a wild microorganism from a family other than Clostridia and also the first halophilic species shown to produce butanol under aerobic cultivation. The cultivation of Nesterenkonia sp. strain F under anaerobic conditions with 50 g/l of glucose for 72 h resulted in the production of 105 mg/l of butanol, 122 mg/l of acetone, 0.2 g/l of acetic acid, and 2.5 g/l of butyric acid. Furthermore, the strain was cultivated on media with different glucose concentrations (20, 50, and 80 g/l) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Through fermentation with a 50 g/l initial glucose concentration under aerobic conditions, 66 mg/l of butanol, 125 mg/l of acetone, 291 mg/l of ethanol, 5.9 g/l of acetic acid, and 1.2 g/l of butyric acid were produced. The enzymes pertaining to the fermentation pathway in the strain were compared with the enzymes of Clostridium spp., and the metabolic pathway of fermentation used by Nesterenkonia sp. strain F was investigated.

  8. Characterization of a halotolerant-psychroloterant bacterium from dry valley Antarctic soil.

    PubMed

    Miller, K J; Leschine, S B; Huguenin, R L

    1983-01-01

    The saline soils of the ice free dry valleys of Victoria Land, Antarctica may provide the closest analog on Earth to Martian conditions. We have initiated a study aimed at examining microbial adaptations to the harsh environment of these dry valley soils. In this report we describe the characterization of one bacterium, strain A4a, isolated from Taylor Valley soil. Strain A4a was an obligately aerobic, orange-pigmented, Gram-positive coccus that grew over wide ranges of both temperature (0 degrees C-40 degrees C) and sodium chloride concentration (0-2.0M). The optimal temperature for growth at all NaCl concentrations was 25 degrees C. Phospholipid composition and guanine plus cytosine content of the DNA of the isolate indicate a close relation to the genus Planococcus.

  9. Aerobic and anaerobic biosynthesis of nano-selenium for remediation of mercury contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaonan; Zhang, Daoyong; Pan, Xiangliang; Lee, Duu-Jong; Al-Misned, Fahad A; Mortuza, M Golam; Gadd, Geoffrey Michael

    2017-03-01

    Selenium (Se) nanoparticles are often synthesized by anaerobes. However, anaerobic bacteria cannot be directly applied for bioremediation of contaminated top soil which is generally aerobic. In this study, a selenite-reducing bacterium, Citrobacter freundii Y9, demonstrated high selenite reducing power and produced elemental nano-selenium nanoparticles (nano-Se(0)) under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The biogenic nano-Se(0) converted 45.8-57.1% and 39.1-48.6% of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) in the contaminated soil to insoluble mercuric selenide (HgSe) under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively. Addition of sodium dodecyl sulfonate enhanced Hg(0) remediation, probably owing to the release of intracellular nano-Se(0) from the bacterial cells for Hg fixation. The reaction product after remediation was identified as non-reactive HgSe that was formed by amalgamation of nano-Se(0) and Hg(0). Biosynthesis of nano-Se(0) both aerobically and anaerobically therefore provides a versatile and cost-effective remediation approach for Hg(0)-contaminated surface and subsurface soils, where the redox potential often changes dramatically.

  10. [Population development characteristics of rice crop cultivated on aerobic soil with mulching].

    PubMed

    Sheng, Haijun; Shen, Qirong; Feng, Ke

    2004-01-01

    Field experiments were carried out to study the population development characteristics of rice crop cultivated both on aerobic and waterlogged soil conditions. The results showed that the whole growth duration of rice growing on aerobic soil was one week longer than that on waterlogged soil. Shorter and narrower leaves and smaller LAI of rice population were found on aerobic soil than on waterlogged soil, which resulted in a decreased photosynthesis, smaller amount and lighter weight of rice grains on aerobic soil, compared with those on waterlogged soil. Among the aerobic treatments, more tillers, lower percentage of filled grains and shorter duration of grain forming were found on soils covered with plastic film than on soils covered with semi-decomposed straw or without mulching. The rice grain yield was decreased in the order of waterlogged soil > aerobic soil covered with plastic film > aerobic soil covered with semi-decomposed straw > aerobic soil without mulching.

  11. Aerobic and microaerophilic actinomycetes of typical agropeat and peat soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenova, G. M.; Gryadunova, A. A.; Pozdnyakov, A. I.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.

    2008-02-01

    A high number (from tens of thousands to millions of CFU/g of soil) of actinomycetes and a high diversity of genera were found in typical peat and agropeat soils. Agricultural use increases the number and diversity of the actinomycete complexes of the peat soils. In the peat soils, the actinomycete complex is represented by eight genera: Streptomyces, Micromonospora, Streptosporangium, Actinomadura, Microbispora, Saccharopolyspora, Saccharomonospora, and Microtetraspora. A considerable share of sporangial forms in the actinomycete complex of the peat soils not characteristic of the zonal soils was revealed. The number of actinomycetes that develop under aerobic conditions is smaller by 10-100 times than that of aerobic forms in the peat soils. Among the soil actinomycetes of the genera Streptomyces, Micromonospora, Streptosporangium, Actinomadura, Microbispora, and Microtetraspora, the microaerophilic forms were found; among the Saccharopolyspora and Saccharomonospora, no microaerophilic representatives were revealed.

  12. A new intra-aerobic metabolism in the nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidizing bacterium Candidatus 'Methylomirabilis oxyfera'.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming L; Ettwig, Katharina F; Jetten, Mike S M; Strous, Marc; Keltjens, Jan T; van Niftrik, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Biological methane oxidation proceeds either through aerobic or anaerobic pathways. The newly discovered bacterium Candidatus 'Methylomirabilis oxyfera' challenges this dichotomy. This bacterium performs anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification, but does so in a peculiar way. Instead of scavenging oxygen from the environment, like the aerobic methanotrophs, or driving methane oxidation by reverse methanogenesis, like the methanogenic archaea in sulfate-reducing systems, it produces its own supply of oxygen by metabolizing nitrite via nitric oxide into oxygen and dinitrogen gas. The intracellularly produced oxygen is then used for the oxidation of methane by the classical aerobic methane oxidation pathway involving methane mono-oxygenase. The present mini-review summarizes the current knowledge about this process and the micro-organism responsible for it.

  13. Genome reduction in an abundant and ubiquitous soil bacterium 'Candidatus Udaeobacter copiosus'.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Tess E; Handley, Kim M; Carini, Paul; Gilbert, Jack A; Fierer, Noah

    2016-10-31

    Although bacteria within the Verrucomicrobia phylum are pervasive in soils around the world, they are under-represented in both isolate collections and genomic databases. Here, we describe a single verrucomicrobial group within the class Spartobacteria that is not closely related to any previously described taxa. We examined more than 1,000 soils and found this spartobacterial phylotype to be ubiquitous and consistently one of the most abundant soil bacterial phylotypes, particularly in grasslands, where it was typically the most abundant. We reconstructed a nearly complete genome of this phylotype from a soil metagenome for which we propose the provisional name 'Candidatus Udaeobacter copiosus'. The Ca. U. copiosus genome is unusually small for a cosmopolitan soil bacterium, estimated by one measure to be only 2.81 Mbp, compared to the predicted effective mean genome size of 4.74 Mbp for soil bacteria. Metabolic reconstruction suggests that Ca. U. copiosus is an aerobic heterotroph with numerous putative amino acid and vitamin auxotrophies. The large population size, relatively small genome and multiple putative auxotrophies characteristic of Ca. U. copiosus suggest that it may be undergoing streamlining selection to minimize cellular architecture, a phenomenon previously thought to be restricted to aquatic bacteria. Although many soil bacteria need relatively large, complex genomes to be successful in soil, Ca. U. copiosus appears to use an alternative strategy, sacrificing metabolic versatility for efficiency to become dominant in the soil environment.

  14. Metabolism of 2-methylpropene (isobutylene) by the aerobic bacterium Mycobacterium sp. strain ELW1.

    PubMed

    Kottegoda, Samanthi; Waligora, Elizabeth; Hyman, Michael

    2015-03-01

    An aerobic bacterium (Mycobacterium sp. strain ELW1) that utilizes 2-methylpropene (isobutylene) as a sole source of carbon and energy was isolated and characterized. Strain ELW1 grew on 2-methylpropene (growth rate = 0.05 h(-1)) with a yield of 0.38 mg (dry weight) mg 2-methylpropene(-1). Strain ELW1 also grew more slowly on both cis- and trans-2-butene but did not grow on any other C2 to C5 straight-chain, branched, or chlorinated alkenes tested. Resting 2-methylpropene-grown cells consumed ethene, propene, and 1-butene without a lag phase. Epoxyethane accumulated as the only detected product of ethene oxidation. Both alkene consumption and epoxyethane production were fully inhibited in cells exposed to 1-octyne, suggesting that alkene oxidation is initiated by an alkyne-sensitive, epoxide-generating monooxygenase. Kinetic analyses indicated that 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane is rapidly consumed during 2-methylpropene degradation, while 2-methyl-2-propen-1-ol is not a significant metabolite of 2-methylpropene catabolism. Degradation of 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane by 2-methylpropene-grown cells led to the accumulation and further degradation of 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate, two sequential metabolites previously identified in the aerobic microbial metabolism of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). Growth of strain ELW1 on 2-methylpropene, 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane, 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol, and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate was fully inhibited when cobalt ions were omitted from the growth medium, while growth on 3-hydroxybutyrate and other substrates was unaffected by the absence of added cobalt ions. Our results suggest that, like aerobic MTBE- and TBA-metabolizing bacteria, strain ELW1 utilizes a cobalt/cobalamin-dependent mutase to transform 2-hydroxyisobutyrate. Our results have been interpreted in terms of their impact on our understanding of the microbial metabolism of alkenes and ether oxygenates.

  15. Metabolism of 2-Methylpropene (Isobutylene) by the Aerobic Bacterium Mycobacterium sp. Strain ELW1

    PubMed Central

    Kottegoda, Samanthi; Waligora, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    An aerobic bacterium (Mycobacterium sp. strain ELW1) that utilizes 2-methylpropene (isobutylene) as a sole source of carbon and energy was isolated and characterized. Strain ELW1 grew on 2-methylpropene (growth rate = 0.05 h−1) with a yield of 0.38 mg (dry weight) mg 2-methylpropene−1. Strain ELW1 also grew more slowly on both cis- and trans-2-butene but did not grow on any other C2 to C5 straight-chain, branched, or chlorinated alkenes tested. Resting 2-methylpropene-grown cells consumed ethene, propene, and 1-butene without a lag phase. Epoxyethane accumulated as the only detected product of ethene oxidation. Both alkene consumption and epoxyethane production were fully inhibited in cells exposed to 1-octyne, suggesting that alkene oxidation is initiated by an alkyne-sensitive, epoxide-generating monooxygenase. Kinetic analyses indicated that 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane is rapidly consumed during 2-methylpropene degradation, while 2-methyl-2-propen-1-ol is not a significant metabolite of 2-methylpropene catabolism. Degradation of 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane by 2-methylpropene-grown cells led to the accumulation and further degradation of 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate, two sequential metabolites previously identified in the aerobic microbial metabolism of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). Growth of strain ELW1 on 2-methylpropene, 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane, 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol, and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate was fully inhibited when cobalt ions were omitted from the growth medium, while growth on 3-hydroxybutyrate and other substrates was unaffected by the absence of added cobalt ions. Our results suggest that, like aerobic MTBE- and TBA-metabolizing bacteria, strain ELW1 utilizes a cobalt/cobalamin-dependent mutase to transform 2-hydroxyisobutyrate. Our results have been interpreted in terms of their impact on our understanding of the microbial metabolism of alkenes and ether oxygenates. PMID:25576605

  16. Aerobic and anaerobic degradation of a range of alkyl sulfides by a denitrifying marine bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Visscher, P.T.; Taylor, B.F.

    1993-01-01

    A pure culture of a bacterium was obtained from a marine microbial mat by using an anoxic medium containing dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and nitrate. The isolate grew aerobically or anaerobically as a denitrifier on alkyl sulfides, including DMS, dimethyl disulfide, diethyl sulfide (DES), ethyl methyl sulfide, dipropyl sulfide, dibutyl sulfide, and dibutyl disulfide. Cells grown on an alkyl sulfide or disulfide also oxidized the corresponding thiols, namely, methanethiol, ethanethiol, propanethiol, or butanethiol. Alkyl sulfides were metabolized by induced or derepressed cells with oxygen, nitrate, or nitrite as electron acceptor. Cells grown on DMS immediately metabolized DMS, but there was a lag before DES was consumed; with DES-grown cells, DES was immediately used but DMS was used only after a lag. Chloramphenicol prevented the eventual use of DES by DMS-grown cells and DMS use by DES-grown cells, respectively, indicating separate enzymes for the metabolism of methyl and ethyl groups. Growth was rapid on formate, acetate, propionate, and butyrate but slow on methanol. The organism also grew chemolithotrophically on thiosulfate with a decrease in pH; growth required carbonate in the medium. Growth on sulfide was also carbonate dependent but slow. The isolate was identified as a Thiobacillus sp. and designated strain ASN-1. It may have utility for removing alkyl sulfides, and also nitrate, nitrite, and sulfide, from wastewaters.

  17. Characterization of giant spheroplasts generated from the aerobic anoxygenic photosynthetic marine bacterium Roseobacter litoralis.

    PubMed

    Nojiri, Akane; Ogita, Shinjiro; Isogai, Yasuhiro; Nishida, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    We generated and characterized giant spheroplasts from the aerobic anoxygenic photosynthetic marine bacterium Roseobacter litoralis. The giant spheroplasts contained vacuole-like structures within the cells, mainly consisting of a single membrane. The in vivo absorption spectrum of the giant spheroplasts did not have peaks typically observed for bacteriochlorophyll a. The culture media pH decreased during the growth of the giant spheroplasts. The change in the pH profile for cells grown under light was no different from that for cells grown in the dark. These results showed that the R. litoralis giant spheroplasts formed lost their photosynthetic apparatus in culture. Most of the giant spheroplasts returned to their original size, likely via filamentous cells. The culture media pH increased during the growth of the filamentous cells. Some filamentous cells had septum-like structures. In such filamentous cells, DNA was separated. Initially, the color of the separated cells was white. Two weeks later, the cells changed to red in the dark, and the in vivo absorption spectrum of the cells had peaks typically observed for bacteriochlorophyll a. Our findings strongly suggest that the giant spheroplasts of R. litoralis can control the genetic information, return to their original cell size, and regain their original functions.

  18. Biodegradation of bisphenol A and other bisphenols by a gram-negative aerobic bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Lobos, J.H.; Leib, T.K. ); Tahmun Su )

    1992-06-01

    A novel bacterium designated strain MV1 was isolated from a sludge enrichmet takes from the wastewater treatment plant at a plastics manufacturing facility and shown to degrade 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)propane (4,4[prime]-isopropylidenediphenol or bisphenol A). Strain MV1 is a gram-negative, aerobic bacillus that grows on bisphenol A as a sole source of carbon and energy. Total carbon analysis for bisphenol A degradation demonstrated that 60% of the carbon was mineralized to CO[sub 2], 20% was associated with the bacterial cells, and 20% was converted to soluble organic compounds. Metabolic intermediates detected in the culture medium during growth on bisphenol A were identified as 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, 4-hydroxyacetophenone, 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1-propanol, and 2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1,2-propanediol. Most of the bisphenol A degraded by strain MV1 is cleaved in some way to form 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and 4-hydroxyacetophenone, which are subsequently mineralized or assimilated into cell carbon. In addition, about 20% of the bisphenol A is hydroxylated to form 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1-propanol, which is slowly biotransformed to 2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1,2-propanediol. Cells that were grown on bisphenol A degraded a variety of bisphenol alkanes, hydroxylated benzoic acids, and hydroxylated acetophenones during resting-cell assays. Transmission electron microscopy of cells grown on bisphenol A revealed lipid storage granules and intracytoplasmic membranes.

  19. Nitroglycerin degradation mediated by soil organic carbon under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Geneviève; Martel, Richard; Bamba, Abraham N'Valoua; Blais, Jean-François; Ampleman, Guy; Thiboutot, Sonia

    2014-10-01

    The presence of nitroglycerin (NG) has been reported in shallow soils and pore water of several military training ranges. In this context, NG concentrations can be reduced through various natural attenuation processes, but these have not been thoroughly documented. This study aimed at investigating the role of soil organic matter (SOM) in the natural attenuation of NG, under aerobic conditions typical of shallow soils. The role of SOM in NG degradation has already been documented under anoxic conditions, and was attributed to SOM-mediated electron transfer involving different reducing agents. However, unsaturated soils are usually well-oxygenated, and it was not clear whether SOM could participate in NG degradation under these conditions. Our results from batch- and column-type experiments clearly demonstrate that in presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) leached from a natural soil, partial NG degradation can be achieved. In presence of particulate organic matter (POM) from the same soil, complete NG degradation was achieved. Furthermore, POM caused rapid sorption of NG, which should result in NG retention in the organic matter-rich shallow horizons of the soil profile, thus promoting degradation. Based on degradation products, the reaction pathway appears to be reductive, in spite of the aerobic conditions. The relatively rapid reaction rates suggest that this process could significantly participate in the natural attenuation of NG, both on military training ranges and in contaminated soil at production facilities.

  20. Anaerobic arsenite oxidation by an autotrophic arsenite-oxidizing bacterium from an arsenic-contaminated paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Wuxian; Liu, Bingbing; He, Jian; Shen, Qirong; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2015-05-19

    Microbe-mediated arsenic (As) redox reactions play an important role in the biogeochemical cycling of As. Reduction of arsenate [As(V)] generally leads to As mobilization in paddy soils and increased As availability to rice plants, whereas oxidation of arsenite [As(III)] results in As immobilization. A novel chemoautotrophic As(III)-oxidizing bacterium, designated strain SY, was isolated from an As-contaminated paddy soil. The isolate was able to derive energy from the oxidation of As(III) to As(V) under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions using O2 or NO3(-) as the respective electron acceptor. Inoculation of the washed SY cells into a flooded soil greatly enhanced As(III) oxidation to As(V) both in the solution and adsorbed phases of the soil. Strain SY is phylogenetically closely related to Paracoccus niistensis with a 16S rRNA gene similarity of 96.79%. The isolate contains both the denitrification and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase gene clusters, underscoring its ability to denitrify and to fix CO2 while coupled to As(III) oxidation. Deletion of the aioA gene encoding the As(III) oxidase subunit A abolished the As(III) oxidation ability of strain SY and led to increased sensitivity to As(III), suggesting that As(III) oxidation is a detoxification mechanism in this bacterium under aerobic and heterotrophic growth conditions. Analysis of the aioA gene clone library revealed that the majority of the As(III)-oxidizing bacteria in the soil were closely related to the genera Paracoccus of α-Proteobacteria. Our results provide direct evidence for As(III) oxidation by Paracoccus species and suggest that these species may play an important role in As(III) oxidation in paddy soils under both aerobic and denitrifying conditions.

  1. Asticcacaulis benevestitus sp. nov., a psychrotolerant, dimorphic, prosthecate bacterium from tundra wetland soil.

    PubMed

    Vasilyeva, Lina V; Omelchenko, Marina V; Berestovskaya, Yulia Y; Lysenko, Anatolii M; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer; Dedysh, Svetlana N; Zavarzin, George A

    2006-09-01

    A Gram-negative, aerobic, heterotrophic, non-pigmented, dimorphic prosthecate bacterium was isolated from tundra wetland soil and designated strain Z-0023(T). Cells of this strain had a dimorphic life cycle and developed a non-adhesive stalk at a site not coincident with the centre of the cell pole, a characteristic typical of representatives of the genus Asticcacaulis. A highly distinctive feature of cells of strain Z-0023(T) was the presence of a conical, bell-shaped sheath when grown at low temperature. This prosthecate bacterium was a psychrotolerant, moderately acidophilic organism capable of growth between 4 and 28 degrees Celsius (optimum 15-20 degrees Celsius) and between pH 4.5 and 8.0 (optimum 5.6-6.0). The major phospholipid fatty acid was 18 : 1omega7c and the major phospholipids were phosphatidylglycerols. The G+C content of the DNA was 60.4 mol%. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain Z-0023(T) was most closely related to Asticcacaulis biprosthecium (98 % similarity), Asticcacaulis taihuensis (98 %) and Asticcacaulis excentricus (95 %). However, low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness to these organisms and a number of distinctive features of the tundra wetland isolate indicated that it represented a novel species of the genus Asticcacaulis, for which the name Asticcacaulis benevestitus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Z-0023(T) (=DSM 16100(T)=ATCC BAA-896(T)).

  2. Extreme furfural tolerance of a soil bacterium Enterobacter cloacae GGT036.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun Young; Gong, Gyeongtaek; Park, Hong-Sil; Um, Youngsoon; Sim, Sang Jun; Woo, Han Min

    2015-01-10

    Detoxification process of cellular inhibitors including furfural is essential for production of bio-based chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. Here we isolated an extreme furfural-tolerant bacterium Enterobacter cloacae GGT036 from soil sample collected in Mt. Gwanak, Republic of Korea. Among isolated bacteria, only E. cloacae GGT036 showed cell growth with 35 mM furfural under aerobic culture. Compared to the maximal half inhibitory concentration (IC50) of well-known industrial strains Escherichia coli (24.9 mM furfural) and Corynebacterium glutamicum (10 mM furfural) based on the cell density, IC50 of E. cloacae GGT036 (47.7 mM) was significantly higher after 24 h, compared to E. coli and C. glutamicum. Since bacterial cell growth was exponentially inhibited depending on linearly increased furfural concentrations in the medium, we concluded that E. cloacae GGT036 is an extreme furfural-tolerant bacterium. Recently, the complete genome sequence of E. cloacae GGT036 was announced and this could provide an insight for engineering of E. cloacae GGT036 itself or other industrially relevant bacteria.

  3. Soil-Bacterium Compatibility Model as a Decision-Making Tool for Soil Bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Horemans, Benjamin; Breugelmans, Philip; Saeys, Wouter; Springael, Dirk

    2017-02-07

    Bioremediation of organic pollutant contaminated soil involving bioaugmentation with dedicated bacteria specialized in degrading the pollutant is suggested as a green and economically sound alternative to physico-chemical treatment. However, intrinsic soil characteristics impact the success of bioaugmentation. The feasibility of using partial least-squares regression (PLSR) to predict the success of bioaugmentation in contaminated soil based on the intrinsic physico-chemical soil characteristics and, hence, to improve the success of bioaugmentation, was examined. As a proof of principle, PLSR was used to build soil-bacterium compatibility models to predict the bioaugmentation success of the phenanthrene-degrading Novosphingobium sp. LH128. The survival and biodegradation activity of strain LH128 were measured in 20 soils and correlated with the soil characteristics. PLSR was able to predict the strain's survival using 12 variables or less while the PAH-degrading activity of strain LH128 in soils that show survival was predicted using 9 variables. A three-step approach using the developed soil-bacterium compatibility models is proposed as a decision making tool and first estimation to select compatible soils and organisms and increase the chance of success of bioaugmentation.

  4. Aerobic Degradation of N-Methyl-4-Nitroaniline (MNA) by Pseudomonas sp. Strain FK357 Isolated from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fazlurrahman; Vyas, Bhawna; Pal, Deepika; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    N-Methyl-4-nitroaniline (MNA) is used as an additive to lower the melting temperature of energetic materials in the synthesis of insensitive explosives. Although the biotransformation of MNA under anaerobic condition has been reported, its aerobic microbial degradation has not been documented yet. A soil microcosms study showed the efficient aerobic degradation of MNA by the inhabitant soil microorganisms. An aerobic bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. strain FK357, able to utilize MNA as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source, was isolated from soil microcosms. HPLC and GC-MS analysis of the samples obtained from growth and resting cell studies showed the formation of 4-nitroaniline (4-NA), 4-aminophenol (4-AP), and 1, 2, 4-benzenetriol (BT) as major metabolic intermediates in the MNA degradation pathway. Enzymatic assay carried out on cell-free lysates of MNA grown cells confirmed N-demethylation reaction is the first step of MNA degradation with the formation of 4-NA and formaldehyde products. Flavin-dependent transformation of 4-NA to 4-AP in cell extracts demonstrated that the second step of MNA degradation is a monooxygenation. Furthermore, conversion of 4-AP to BT by MNA grown cells indicates the involvement of oxidative deamination (release of NH2 substituent) reaction in third step of MNA degradation. Subsequent degradation of BT occurs by the action of benzenetriol 1, 2-dioxygenase as reported for the degradation of 4-nitrophenol. This is the first report on aerobic degradation of MNA by a single bacterium along with elucidation of metabolic pathway. PMID:24116023

  5. Characteristics of a Novel Aerobic Denitrifying Bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae Strain HNR.

    PubMed

    Guo, Long-Jie; Zhao, Bin; An, Qiang; Tian, Meng

    2016-03-01

    A novel aerobic denitrifier strain HNR, isolated from activated sludge, was identified as Enterobacter cloacae by16S rRNA sequencing analysis. Glucose was considered as the most favorable C-source for strain HNR. The logistic equation well described the bacterial growth, yielding a maximum growth rate (μmax) of 0.283 h(-1) with an initial NO3 (-)-N concentration of 110 mg/L. Almost all NO3 (-)-N was removed aerobically within 30 h with an average removal rate of 4.58 mg N L(-1) h(-1). Nitrogen balance analysis revealed that proximately 70.8 % of NO3 (-)-N was removed as gas products and only 20.7 % was transformed into biomass. GC-MS result indicates that N2 was the end product of aerobic denitrification. The enzyme activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, which are related to the process of aerobic denitrification, were 0.0688 and 0.0054 U/mg protein, respectively. Thus, the aerobic denitrification of reducing NO3 (-) to N2 by strain HNR was demonstrated. The optimal conditions for nitrate removal were C/N ratio 13, pH value 8, shaking speed 127 rpm and temperature 30 °C. These findings show that E. cloacae strain HNR has a potential application on wastewater treatment to achieve nitrate removal under aerobic conditions.

  6. Aerobic biomineralization of alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane in contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Bachmann, A.; de Bruin, W.; Jumelet, J.C.; Rijnaarts, H.H.; Zehnder, A.J.

    1988-02-01

    The factors identified to be important for the aerobic biodegradation of alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane (alpha-HCH) in a soil slurry are temperature, auxiliary carbon source, substrate concentration, and soil inhomogeneities. Temperatures in the range of 20 to 30/sup 0/C were determined to be most favorable for biodegradation of alpha-HCH. No alpha-HCH biodegradation was detected at temperatures below 4/sup 0/C and above 40/sup 0/C. The addition of auxiliary organic carbon compounds showed repressive effects on alpha-HCH biomineralization. Increased oxygen partial pressures reduced the repressive effects of added auxiliary organic carbon compounds. A linear relationship between alpha-HCH concentration and its conversion rate was found in a Lineweaver-Burk plot. Inhomogeneities such as clumping of alpha-HCH significantly affected its biodegradation. Inhomogeneity as an influence on biodegradation has not drawn sufficient attention in the past, even though it certainly has affected both laboratory studies and the application of biotechnological methods to clean up contaminated sites. On the basis of metabolites detected during degradation experiments, the initial steps of aerobic alpha-HCH bioconversion in a soil slurry are proposed.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Ensifer adhaerens M78, a Mineral-Weathering Bacterium Isolated from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanli; Chen, Wei; He, Linyan; Wang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Ensifer adhaerens M78, a bacterium isolated from soil, can weather potash feldspar and release Fe, Si, and Al from rock under nutrient-poor conditions. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain M78, which may facilitate a better understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in mineral weathering by the bacterium. PMID:27609930

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Ensifer adhaerens M78, a Mineral-Weathering Bacterium Isolated from Soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanli; Chen, Wei; He, Linyan; Wang, Qi; Sheng, Xia-Fang

    2016-09-08

    Ensifer adhaerens M78, a bacterium isolated from soil, can weather potash feldspar and release Fe, Si, and Al from rock under nutrient-poor conditions. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain M78, which may facilitate a better understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in mineral weathering by the bacterium.

  9. A novel heterotrophic nitrifying and aerobic denitrifying bacterium, Zobellella taiwanensis DN-7, can remove high-strength ammonium.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yu; Wang, Yangqing; Liu, Hongjie; Xi, Chuanwu; Song, Liyan

    2016-05-01

    A novel heterotrophic bacterium capable of heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification was isolated from ammonium contaminated landfill leachate and physiochemical and phylogenetically identified as Zobellella taiwanensis DN-7. DN-7 converted nitrate, nitrate, and ammonium to N2 as the primary end product. Single factor experiments suggested that the optimal conditions for ammonium removal were trisodium citrate as carbon source, C/N ratio 8, pH 8.0-10.0, salinity less than 3 %, temperature 30 °C, and rotation speed more than 150 rpm. Specifically, DN-7 could remove 1000.0 and 2000.0 mg/L NH4 (+)-N completely within 96 and 216 h, with maximum removal rates of 19.6 and 17.3 mg L(-1) h(-1), respectively. These results demonstrated that DN-7 is a promising candidate for application of high-strength ammonium wastewater treatments.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas hussainii Strain MB3, a Denitrifying Aerobic Bacterium Isolated from the Rhizospheric Region of Mangrove Trees in the Andaman Islands, India.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Shubham K; Saxena, Rituja; Mittal, Parul; Gupta, Ankit; Sharma, Vineet K

    2017-02-02

    The genome sequence of Pseudomonas hussainii MB3, isolated from the rhizospheric region of mangroves in the Andaman Islands, is comprised of 3,644,788 bp and 3,159 protein coding genes. Draft genome analysis indicates that MB3 is an aerobic bacterium capable of performing assimilatory sulfate reduction, dissimilatory nitrate reduction, and denitrification.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas hussainii Strain MB3, a Denitrifying Aerobic Bacterium Isolated from the Rhizospheric Region of Mangrove Trees in the Andaman Islands, India

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Shubham K.; Saxena, Rituja; Mittal, Parul; Gupta, Ankit

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genome sequence of Pseudomonas hussainii MB3, isolated from the rhizospheric region of mangroves in the Andaman Islands, is comprised of 3,644,788 bp and 3,159 protein coding genes. Draft genome analysis indicates that MB3 is an aerobic bacterium capable of performing assimilatory sulfate reduction, dissimilatory nitrate reduction, and denitrification. PMID:28153890

  12. Flavobacterium arsenitoxidans sp. nov., an arsenite-oxidizing bacterium from Thai soil.

    PubMed

    Khianngam, Saowapar; Akaracharanya, Ancharida; Lee, Jung-Sook; Lee, Keun Chul; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Tanasupawat, Somboon

    2014-12-01

    An arsenite-oxidizing bacterium, strain S2-3H(T), was isolated from arsenic-contaminated soil sample collected from Dantchaeng district, Suphanburi province, Thailand and was characterized based on polyphasic taxonomic study. The strain was observed to be a Gram-stain negative, aerobic, yellow pigmented, non-spore forming and rod-shaped bacterium. Major menaquinone was MK-6. Iso-C15:0, iso-C15:0 3OH, C16:1 ω7c/C16:1 ω6c, C16:0, iso-C17:0 3OH, and C16:0 3OH were the predominant cellular fatty acids. The polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, unidentified phospholipids and unidentified aminophospholipids. The DNA G+C content was 37.0 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA sequence showed that strain S2-3H(T) is affiliated to the genus Flavobacterium, and is closely related to F. defluvii KCTC 12612(T) (97.0 %) and F. johnsoniae NBRC 14942(T) (97.0 %). The strain S2-3H(T) could be clearly distinguished from the related Flavobacterium species by its physiological and biochemical characteristics as well as its phylogenetic position and DNA-DNA relatedness. Therefore, the strain represents a novel species of the genus Flavobacterium, for which the name Flavobacterium arsenitoxidans sp. nov. (type strain S2-3H(T) = KCTC 22507(T) = NBRC 109607(T) = PCU 331(T) = TISTR 2238(T)) is proposed.

  13. Variovorax ginsengisoli sp. nov., a denitrifying bacterium isolated from soil of a ginseng field.

    PubMed

    Im, Wan-Taek; Liu, Qing-Mei; Lee, Kang-Jin; Kim, Se-Young; Lee, Sung-Taik; Yi, Tae-Hoo

    2010-07-01

    A Gram-negative, aerobic or facultatively anaerobic, non-spore-forming, motile, rod-shaped bacterium (strain Gsoil 3165(T)) was isolated from soil of a ginseng field in Pocheon, South Korea. Its taxonomic position was determined by using a polyphasic approach. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain Gsoil 3165(T) was shown to belong to the family Comamonadaceae, class Betaproteobacteria, and was related most closely to the type strains of Variovorax boronicumulans (98.9 % similarity), Variovorax paradoxus (98.3 %), Variovorax soli (98.2 %) and Variovorax dokdonensis (96.6 %). Levels of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between strain Gsoil 3165(T) and the type strains of other species in the family Comamonadaceae were less than 97.0 %. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain Gsoil 3165(T) was 66 mol%. Phenotypic and chemotaxonomic data (Q-8 as the major ubiquinone; C(16 : 0) and C(17 : 0) cyclo as major fatty acids) supported the affiliation of strain Gsoil 3165(T) to the genus Variovorax. The results of physiological and biochemical tests allowed the genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strain Gsoil 3165(T) from recognized Variovorax species. Gsoil 3165(T) is therefore considered to represent a novel species of the genus Variovorax, for which the name Variovorax ginsengisoli sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Gsoil 3165(T) (=KCTC 12583(T) =LMG 23392(T)).

  14. Aerobic biodegradation of propylene glycol by soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Giuseppe; Cavalca, Lucia; Letizia Colarieti, M; Scelza, Rosalia; Scotti, Riccardo; Rao, Maria A; Andreoni, Vincenza; Ciccazzo, Sonia; Greco, Guido

    2013-09-01

    Propylene glycol (PG) is a main component of aircraft deicing fluids and its extensive use in Northern airports is a source of soil and groundwater contamination. Bacterial consortia able to grow on PG as sole carbon and energy source were selected from soil samples taken along the runways of Oslo Airport Gardermoen site (Norway). DGGE analysis of enrichment cultures showed that PG-degrading populations were mainly composed by Pseudomonas species, although Bacteroidetes were found, as well. Nineteen bacterial strains, able to grow on PG as sole carbon and energy source, were isolated and identified as different Pseudomonas species. Maximum specific growth rate of mixed cultures in the absence of nutrient limitation was 0.014 h(-1) at 4 °C. Substrate C:N:P molar ratios calculated on the basis of measured growth yields are in good agreement with the suggested values for biostimulation reported in literature. Therefore, the addition of nutrients is suggested as a suitable technique to sustain PG aerobic degradation at the maximum rate by autochthonous microorganisms of unsaturated soil profile.

  15. Aerobic degradation and photolysis of tylosin in water and soil.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dingfei; Coats, Joel R

    2007-05-01

    Veterinary antibiotics enter the environment through the application of organic fertilizers to cropland. In this study, the aerobic degradation of tylosin, a widely used antibiotic in the production of livestock and poultry, was conducted in water and in soil in an effort to further investigate its environmental fate. Tylosin is a macrolide antibiotic, which consists of four factors (A, B, C, D). Water and soil were sampled at selected times and analyzed for tylosin and its degradation products by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), with product identification confirmed by HPLC-mass spectrometry. Tylosin A is degraded with a half-life of 200 d in the light in water, and the total loss of tylosin A in the dark is 6% of the initial spiked amount during the experimental period. Tylosin C and D are relatively stable except in ultrapure water in the light. Slight increases of tylosin B after two months and formation of two photoreaction isomers of tylosin A were observed under exposure to light. However, tylosin probably would degrade faster if the experimental containers did not prevent ultraviolet transmission. In soil, tylosin A has a dissipation half-life of 7 d, and tylosin D is slightly more stable, with a dissipation half-life of 8 d in unsterilized and sterilized soil. Sorption and abiotic degradation are the major factors influencing the loss of tylosin in the environment, and no biotic degradation was observed at the test concentration either in pond water or in an agronomic soil, as determined by comparing dissipation profiles in sterilized and unsterilized conditions.

  16. Carbonate biomineralization induced by soil bacterium Bacillus megaterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Bin; Hu, Qiaona; Chen, Jun; Ji, Junfeng; Teng, H. Henry

    2006-11-01

    Biogenic carbonates spawned from microbial activities are common occurrences in soils. Here, we investigate the carbonate biomineralization mediated by the bacterium Bacillus megaterium, a dominant strain separated from a loess profile in China. Upon completing bacterial cultivation, the ensuring products are centrifuged, and the resultant supernatant and the concentrated bacterial sludge as well as the un-separated culture are added separately into a Ca-CO 3 containing solution for crystallization experiments. Results of XRD and SEM analysis indicate that calcite is the dominant mineral phase formed when the bacteria are present. When the supernatant alone is used, however, a significant portion of vaterite is also precipitated. Experimental results further reveal that the bacteria have a strong tendency to colonize the center area of the calcite {1 0 1¯ 4} faces. Observed crystal morphology suggests that the bacterial colony may promote the growth normal to each individual {1 0 1¯ 4} face of calcite when the cell concentration is high, but may retard it or even cause dissolution of the immediate substrate surfaces when the concentration is low. SEM images taken at earlier stages of the crystallization experiments demonstrate the nucleation of calcite on the bacterial cell walls but do not show obvious morphological changes on the nanometer- to submicron-sized nuclei. δ 13C measurements unveil that the crystals grown in the presence of bacteria are further enriched in the heavy carbon isotope, implying that the bacterial metabolism may not be the carbon sources for the mineralization. Based upon these findings, we propose a mechanism for the B. megaterium mediated calcite mineralization and conclude that the whole process involves epi- and inter-cellular growth in the local microenvironments whose conditions may be controlled by cell sequestration and proton pumping during bacterial respiration.

  17. Simultaneous heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification by the marine origin bacterium Pseudomonas sp. ADN-42.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ruofei; Liu, Tianqi; Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti; Huang, Jianyu; Wang, Aijie

    2015-02-01

    Recent research has highlighted the existence of some bacteria that are capable of performing heterotrophic nitrification and have a phenomenal ability to denitrify their nitrification products under aerobic conditions. A high-salinity-tolerant strain ADN-42 was isolated from Hymeniacidon perleve and found to display high heterotrophic ammonium removal capability. This strain was identified as Pseudomonas sp. via 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Gene cloning and sequencing analysis indicated that the bacterial genome contains N2O reductase function (nosZ) gene. NH3-N removal rate of ADN-42 was very high. And the highest removal rate was 6.52 mg/L · h in the presence of 40 g/L NaCl. Under the condition of pure oxygen (DO >8 mg/L), NH3-N removal efficiency was 56.9 %. Moreover, 38.4 % of oxygen remained in the upper gas space during 72 h without greenhouse gas N2O production. Keeping continuous and low level of dissolved oxygen (DO <3 mg/L) was helpful for better denitrification performance. All these results indicated that the strain has heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification abilities, which guarantee future application in wastewater treatment.

  18. Complete genome of Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. limoneus KCTC 1717 (=KCCM 11405), a soil bacterium producing validamycin and diverse secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Heon; Choe, Hanna; Bae, Kyung Sook; Park, Doo-Sang; Nasir, Arshan; Kim, Kyung Mo

    2016-02-10

    Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. limoneus is a Gram-positive, aerobic, aerial mycelial, spore-forming bacterium that was first isolated from a soil sample in Akashi City, Hyogo Prefecture, Japan. We here report the complete genome of S. hygroscopicus subsp. limoneus KCTC 1717 (=KCCM 11405=IFO 12704=ATCC 21432), which consists of 10,537,932 bp (G+C content of 71.96%) with two linear chromosomes, 8983 protein-coding genes, 67 tRNAs and 6 rRNA operons. Genes related to biosynthesis of validamycin, valienamine and diverse secondary metabolites were detected in this genome. Genomic data is thus expected to considerably improve our understanding of how industrially important aminocyclitols are biosynthesized by microbial cells.

  19. Effect of tannic acid on the transcriptome of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tannins are plant-produced organic compounds that are found in soils, are able to sequester iron, and have antimicrobial properties. We studied the effect of tannic acid on the molecular physiology of the soil-inhabiting biocontrol bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (formerly Pseudomonas fluoresce...

  20. Melatonin production in an aerobic photosynthetic bacterium: an evolutionarily early association with darkness.

    PubMed

    Tilden, A R; Becker, M A; Amma, L L; Arciniega, J; McGaw, A K

    1997-03-01

    Melatonin was measured in a species of aerobic photosynthetic bacteria, Erythrobacter longus, grown in either constant light or constant dark. A radioimmunoassay was used to quantify melatonin levels and thin-layer chromatography to confirm the identity of melatonin immunoactivity. Melatonin levels were significantly higher (nearly 2.3-fold) in the dark-grown than in the light-grown samples. Also, the homogenates of the dark-grown bacteria retained melatonin-producing enzymatic activity, whereas the light-grown homogenates did not; melatonin levels extracted from the dark-grown homogenates increased with increasing extraction time, reaching as high as 29.2 ng.mg-1 protein at 120 min. Removal of membrane fragments from homogenates did not influence melatonin levels in light-grown homogenate, but this procedure increased melatonin levels in dark-grown homogenate, indicating that at least some of the enzymes in the pathway of melatonin production are not membrane-bound. This study is the second to demonstrate the presence of melatonin at the prokaryotic level, supporting the evidence that melatonin appeared very early in evolution. Its function in prokaryotes has not been determined, but may relate to its antioxidative actions.

  1. Aerobic-heterotrophic nitrogen removal through nitrate reduction and ammonium assimilation by marine bacterium Vibrio sp. Y1-5.

    PubMed

    Li, Yating; Wang, Yanru; Fu, Lin; Gao, Yizhan; Zhao, Haixia; Zhou, Weizhi

    2017-04-01

    An aerobic marine bacterium Vibrio sp. Y1-5 was screened to achieve efficient nitrate and ammonium removal simultaneously and fix nitrogen in cells without N loss. Approximately 98.0% of nitrate (100mg/L) was removed in 48h through assimilatory nitrate reduction and nitrate reductase was detected in the cytoplasm. Instead of nitrification, the strain assimilated ammonium directly, and it could tolerate as high as 1600mg/L ammonium concentration while removing 844.6mg/L. In addition, ammonium assimilation occurred preferentially in the medium containing nitrate and ammonium with a total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency of 80.4%. The results of nitrogen balance and Fourier infrared spectra illustrated that the removed nitrogen was all transformed to protein or stored as organic nitrogen substances in cells and no N was lost in the process. Toxicological studies with the brine shrimp species Artemia naupliia indicated that Vibrio sp. Y1-5 can be applied in aquatic ecosystems safely.

  2. Aerobic and anoxic growth and nitrate removal capacity of a marine denitrifying bacterium isolated from a recirculation aquaculture system.

    PubMed

    Borges, Maria-Teresa; Sousa, André; De Marco, Paolo; Matos, Ana; Hönigová, Petra; Castro, Paula M L

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial biofilters used in marine recirculation aquaculture systems need improvements to enhance nitrogen removal efficiency. Relatively little is known about biofilter autochthonous population structure and function. The present study was aimed at isolating and characterizing an autochthonous denitrifying bacterium from a marine biofilter installed at a recirculation aquaculture system. Colonization of four different media in a marine fish farm was followed by isolation of various denitrifying strains and molecular classification of the most promising one, strain T2, as a novel member of the Pseudomonas fluorescens cluster. This strain exhibits high metabolic versatility regarding N and C source utilization and environmental conditions for growth. It removed nitrate through aerobic assimilatory metabolism at a specific rate of 116.2 mg NO(3)-N g dw(-1) h(-1). Dissimilatory NO(3)-N removal was observed under oxic conditions at a limited rate, where transient NO(2)-N formed represented 22% (0.17 mg L(-1)) of the maximum transient NO(2)-N observed under anoxic conditions. Dissimilatory NO(3)-N removal under anoxic conditions occurred at a specific rate of 53.5 mg NO(3)-N g dw(-1) h(-1). The isolated denitrifying strain was able to colonize different materials, such as granular activated carbon (GAC), Filtralite and Bioflow plastic rings, which allow the development of a prototype bioreactor for strain characterization under dynamic conditions and mimicking fish-farm operating conditions.

  3. Engineering mediator-based electroactivity in the obligate aerobic bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Simone; Nies, Salome; Wierckx, Nick; Blank, Lars M.; Rosenbaum, Miriam A.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida strains are being developed as microbial production hosts for production of a range of amphiphilic and hydrophobic biochemicals. P. putida's obligate aerobic growth thereby can be an economical and technical challenge because it requires constant rigorous aeration and often causes reactor foaming. Here, we engineered a strain of P. putida KT2440 that can produce phenazine redox-mediators from Pseudomonas aeruginosa to allow partial redox balancing with an electrode under oxygen-limited conditions. P. aeruginosa is known to employ its phenazine-type redox mediators for electron exchange with an anode in bioelectrochemical systems (BES). We transferred the seven core phenazine biosynthesis genes phzA-G and the two specific genes phzM and phzS required for pyocyanin synthesis from P. aeruginosa on two inducible plasmids into P. putida KT2440. The best clone, P. putida pPhz, produced 45 mg/L pyocyanin over 25 h of growth, which was visible as blue color formation and is comparable to the pyocyanin production of P. aeruginosa. This new strain was then characterized under different oxygen-limited conditions with electrochemical redox control and changes in central energy metabolism were evaluated in comparison to the unmodified P. putida KT2440. In the new strain, phenazine synthesis with supernatant concentrations up to 33 μg/mL correlated linearly with the ability to discharge electrons to an anode, whereby phenazine-1-carboxylic acid served as the dominating redox mediator. P. putida pPhz sustained strongly oxygen-limited metabolism for up to 2 weeks at up to 12 μA/cm2 anodic current density. Together, this work lays a foundation for future oxygen-limited biocatalysis with P. putida strains. PMID:25914687

  4. Halomonas huangheensis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from a saline-alkali soil.

    PubMed

    Miao, Chaohua; Jia, Fangfang; Wan, Yusong; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Min; Jin, Wujun

    2014-03-01

    A novel, Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped, non-motile and moderately halophilic bacterium, designated strain BJGMM-B45(T), was isolated from a saline-alkali soil collected from Shandong Province, China. Growth of strain BJGMM-B45(T) occurred at 10-45 °C (optimum, 30 °C) and pH 5.0-12.0 (optimum, pH 7.0) on Luria-Bertani agar medium with 1-20 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 7-10 %). The predominant respiratory quinone was Q-9. The major cellular fatty acids (>5 %) were C18 : 1ω7c, C16 : 0, C19 : 0 cyclo ω8c, summed feature 3, C12 : 0 3-OH and C12 : 0. The genomic DNA G+C content was 57.5 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain BJGMM-B45(T) belonged to the genus Halomonas in the class Gammaproteobacteria. The closest relatives were Halomonas cupida DSM 4740(T) (98.2 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) and Halomonas denitrificans M29(T) (97.8 %). Levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain BJGMM-B45(T) and Halomonas cupida CGMCC 1.2312(T) and Halomonas denitrificans DSM 18045(T) were 57.0 and 58.9 %, respectively. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic features, strain BJGMM-B45(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Halomonas, for which the name Halomonas huangheensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BJGMM-B45(T) ( = ACCC 05850(T) = KCTC 32409(T)).

  5. Genome sequence of the aerobic bacterium Bacillus sp. strain FJAT-13831.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guohong; Liu, Bo; Lin, Naiquan; Tang, Weiqi; Tang, Jianyang; Lin, Yingzhi

    2012-12-01

    Bacillus sp. strain FJAT-13831 was isolated from the no. 1 pit soil of Emperor Qin's Terracotta Warriors in Xi'an City, People's Republic of China. The isolate showed a close relationship to the Bacillus cereus group. The draft genome sequence of Bacillus sp. FJAT-13831 was 4,425,198 bp in size and consisted of 5,567 genes (protein-coding sequences [CDS]) with an average length of 782 bp and a G+C value of 36.36%.

  6. Genome Sequence of the Aerobic Bacterium Bacillus sp. Strain FJAT-13831

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guohong; Lin, Naiquan; Tang, Weiqi; Tang, Jianyang; Lin, Yingzhi

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus sp. strain FJAT-13831 was isolated from the no. 1 pit soil of Emperor Qin's Terracotta Warriors in Xi'an City, People's Republic of China. The isolate showed a close relationship to the Bacillus cereus group. The draft genome sequence of Bacillus sp. FJAT-13831 was 4,425,198 bp in size and consisted of 5,567 genes (protein-coding sequences [CDS]) with an average length of 782 bp and a G+C value of 36.36%. PMID:23144388

  7. Bacillus coreaensis sp. nov.: a xylan-hydrolyzing bacterium isolated from the soil of Jeju Island, Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Chi, Won-Jae; Youn, Young Sang; Park, Jae-Seon; Hong, Soon-Kwang

    2015-07-01

    A xylan-degrading bacterium, designated as MS5(T) strain, was isolated from soil collected from the Jeju Island, Republic of Korea. Strain MS5(T) was Gram-stain-positive, aerobic, and motile by polar flagellum. The major fatty acids identified in this bacterium were iso-C15:0 (32.3%), C16:0 (27.3%), and anteiso-C15:0 (10.2%). A similarity search based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that the strain belongs to the class Bacilli and shared the highest similarity with the type strains Bacillus beringensis BR035(T) (98.7%) and Bacillus korlensis ZLC-26(T) (98.6%) which form a coherent cluster in a neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree. The DNA G+C content of strain MS5(T) was 43.0 mol%. The major menaquinone was MK-7 and the diagnostic diamino acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan was meso-diaminopimelic acid. The DNADNA relatedness values between strain MS5(T) and two closely related species, B. beringensis BR035(T) and B. korlensis ZLC-26(T), were less than 70%. DNA-DNA relatedness analysis and 16S rRNA sequence similarity, as well as phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics suggest that the strain MS5(T) constitutes a novel Bacillus species, for which the name Bacillus coreaensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MS5(T) (=DSM25506(T) =KCTC13895(T)).

  8. Tumebacillus permanentifrigoris gen. nov., sp. nov., an aerobic, spore-forming bacterium isolated from Canadian high Arctic permafrost.

    PubMed

    Steven, Blaire; Chen, Min Qun; Greer, Charles W; Whyte, Lyle G; Niederberger, Thomas D

    2008-06-01

    A Gram-positive, aerobic, rod-shaped bacterium (strain Eur1 9.5(T)) was isolated from a 9-m-deep permafrost sample from the Canadian high Arctic. Strain Eur1 9.5(T) could not be cultivated in liquid medium and grew over the temperature range 5-37 degrees C; no growth was observed at 42 degrees C and only slow growth was observed at 5 degrees C following 1 month of incubation. Eur1 9.5(T) grew over the pH range 5.5-8.9 and tolerated NaCl concentrations of 0-0.5 % (w/v). Eur1 9.5(T) grew heterotrophically on complex carbon substrates and chemolithoautotrophically on inorganic sulfur compounds, as demonstrated by growth on sodium thiosulfate and sulfite as sole electron donors. Eur1 9.5(T) contained iso-C(15 : 0) as the major cellular fatty acid and menaquinone 7 (MK-7) as the major respiratory quinone. The cell-wall peptidoglycan was of type A1gamma. The DNA G+C content was 53.1 mol%. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain Eur1 9.5(T) was only distantly related (

  9. Isolation and characterization of medically important aerobic actinomycetes in soil of iran (2006 - 2007).

    PubMed

    Aghamirian, Mohammad Reza; Ghiasian, Seyed Amir

    2009-01-01

    The aerobic actinomycetes are a large group of soil-inhabiting bacteria that occur worldwide. Some of them are the main cause of two important diseases, nocardiosis and actinomycetoma. To identify the prevalence and geographic distribution of aerobic actinomycetes in soil of Qazvin province, a study was carried out during 2006-2007. In this study, the incidence and diversity of medically important aerobic actinomycetes was determined in 300 soil samples of different parts of Qazvin. The suspensions of superficial soil samples were prepared by adding of normal saline, streptomycin and chloramphenicol and the supernatants were cultured on brain-heart infusion agar and Sabouraud's dextrose agar contain cycloheximide. The isolated microorganisms were examined by Gram and acid-fast stains and were identified biochemically and morphologically. Of 96 aerobic actinomycetes isolates identified, Actinomadura madurae and Streptomyces somaliensis were the most frequently isolated species each representing 19.8% of isolates, followed by Nocardia asteroides (15.6%), N. otitidiscaviarum (9.4%), N. brasiliensis (7.3%), A. peletieri, S. griseus, and Nocardia spp. (each 5.2%), and N. transvalensis, Nocardiopsis dassonvillei, Actinomadura spp. and Streptomyces spp. (each 3.1%). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on epidemiological investigation of medically important aerobic actinomycetes in soil samples from Iran. In recent years, mycetoma and nocardiosis have been increasingly reported in Iran. The results showed that medically important actinomycetes occur in the environment of Iran and soil could be potential source of actinomycotic infections.

  10. Effect of Tannic Acid on the Transcriptome of the Soil Bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chee Kent; Penesyan, Anahit; Hassan, Karl A.

    2013-01-01

    Tannins are a diverse group of plant-produced, polyphenolic compounds with metal-chelating and antimicrobial properties that are prevalent in many soils. Using transcriptomics, we determined that tannic acid, a form of hydrolysable tannin, broadly affects the expression of genes involved in iron and zinc homeostases, sulfur metabolism, biofilm formation, motility, and secondary metabolite biosynthesis in the soil- and rhizosphere-inhabiting bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5. PMID:23435890

  11. AEROBIC SOIL MICROCOSMS FOR LONG-TERM BIODEGRADATION OF HYDROCARBON VAPORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aims of this research project included the development of laboratory protocols for the preparation of aerobic soil microcosms using aseptic field soil samples, and for the gas chromatographic analysis of hydrocarbon vapor biodegradation based on vapor samples obtained from th...

  12. Siderophore cooperation of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens in soil.

    PubMed

    Luján, Adela M; Gómez, Pedro; Buckling, Angus

    2015-02-01

    While social interactions play an important role for the evolution of bacterial siderophore production in vitro, the extent to which siderophore production is a social trait in natural populations is less clear. Here, we demonstrate that siderophores act as public goods in a natural physical environment of Pseudomonas fluorescens: soil-based compost. We show that monocultures of siderophore producers grow better than non-producers in soil, but non-producers can exploit others' siderophores, as shown by non-producers' ability to invade populations of producers when rare. Despite this rare advantage, non-producers were unable to outcompete producers, suggesting that producers and non-producers may stably coexist in soil. Such coexistence is predicted to arise from the spatial structure associated with soil, and this is supported by increased fitness of non-producers when grown in a shaken soil-water mix. Our results suggest that both producers and non-producers should be observed in soil, as has been observed in marine environments and in clinical populations.

  13. Sequential anaerobic-aerobic degradation of indigenous PCBs in a contaminated soil matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K.T.; Reeves, M.E.; Evans, B.S.; Dudley, C.A.

    1994-12-31

    Many industrial locations, including the US Department of Energy`s, have identified needs for treatment of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) wastes and remediation of PCB-contaminated sites. Biodegradation of PCBs is a potentially effective technology for the treatment of PCB-contaminated soils and sludges; however, a practicable remediation technology has not yet been demonstrated. A biological treatment technology is likely to consist of an anaerobic fermentation step in which PCB dechlorination takes place producing PCBs with fewer chlorines. These products are then more susceptible to aerobic mineralization. In laboratory experiments, soil slurry bioreactors inoculated with microorganisms extracted from PCB-contaminated sediments from the Hudson River and Woods Pond have been used to obtain anaerobic dechlorination of PCBs in soil slurry reactors. The anaerobic dechlorination was followed by qualitative estimation of the effect of aerobic fermentation of the dechlorination products based on literature data. The sequential anaerobic-(simulated) aerobic treatment constituted an improvement compared anaerobic treatment alone.

  14. Microbial Transformation of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene in Aerobic Soil Columns

    PubMed Central

    Bruns-Nagel, D.; Breitung, J.; von Low, E.; Steinbach, K.; Gorontzy, T.; Kahl, M.; Blotevogel, K.; Gemsa, D.

    1996-01-01

    2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT)-contaminated soil material of a former TNT production plant was percolated aerobically in soil columns. Nineteen days of percolation with a potassium phosphate buffer supplemented with glucose or glucose plus ammonium sulfate caused an over 90% decline in the amount of extractable nitroaromatics in soils containing 70 to 2,100 mg of TNT per kg (dry weight). In the percolation solution, a complete elimination of TNT was achieved. Mutagenicity and soil toxicity were significantly reduced by the percolation process. 4-N-Acetylamino-2-amino-6-nitrotoluene was generated in soil and percolation fluid as a labile TNT metabolite. PMID:16535369

  15. Differential Isotopic Fractionation during Cr(VI) Reduction by an Aquifer-Derived Bacterium under Aerobic versus Denitrifying Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Han, R.; Qin, L.; Brown, S. T.; Christensen, J. N.; Beller, H. R.

    2012-01-27

    We studied Cr isotopic fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain RCH2. Finally, despite the fact that strain RCH2 reduces Cr(VI) cometabolically under both aerobic and denitrifying conditions and at similar specific rates, fractionation was markedly different under these two conditions (ε was ~2‰ aerobically and ~0.4‰ under denitrifying conditions).

  16. Regulation of Polyhydroxybutyrate Synthesis in the Soil Bacterium Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens

    PubMed Central

    Quelas, J. I.; Mesa, S.; Mongiardini, E. J.; Jendrossek, D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a carbon and energy reserve polymer in various prokaryotic species. We determined that, when grown with mannitol as the sole carbon source, Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens produces a homopolymer composed only of 3-hydroxybutyrate units (PHB). Conditions of oxygen limitation (such as microoxia, oxic stationary phase, and bacteroids inside legume nodules) were permissive for the synthesis of PHB, which was observed as cytoplasmic granules. To study the regulation of PHB synthesis, we generated mutations in the regulator gene phaR and the phasin genes phaP1 and phaP4. Under permissive conditions, mutation of phaR impaired PHB accumulation, and a phaP1 phaP4 double mutant produced more PHB than the wild type, which was accumulated in a single, large cytoplasmic granule. Moreover, PhaR negatively regulated the expression of phaP1 and phaP4 as well as the expression of phaA1 and phaA2 (encoding a 3-ketoacyl coenzyme A [CoA] thiolases), phaC1 and phaC2 (encoding PHB synthases), and fixK2 (encoding a cyclic AMP receptor protein [CRP]/fumarate and nitrate reductase regulator [FNR]-type transcription factor of genes for microoxic lifestyle). In addition to the depressed PHB cycling, phaR mutants accumulated more extracellular polysaccharides and promoted higher plant shoot dry weight and competitiveness for nodulation than the wild type, in contrast to the phaC1 mutant strain, which is defective in PHB synthesis. These results suggest that phaR not only regulates PHB granule formation by controlling the expression of phasins and biosynthetic enzymes but also acts as a global regulator of excess carbon allocation and symbiosis by controlling fixK2. IMPORTANCE In this work, we investigated the regulation of polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis in the soybean-nodulating bacterium Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens and its influence in bacterial free-living and symbiotic lifestyles. We uncovered a new interplay between the synthesis of this carbon reserve

  17. Regulation of Polyhydroxybutyrate Synthesis in the Soil Bacterium Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens.

    PubMed

    Quelas, J I; Mesa, S; Mongiardini, E J; Jendrossek, D; Lodeiro, A R

    2016-07-15

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a carbon and energy reserve polymer in various prokaryotic species. We determined that, when grown with mannitol as the sole carbon source, Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens produces a homopolymer composed only of 3-hydroxybutyrate units (PHB). Conditions of oxygen limitation (such as microoxia, oxic stationary phase, and bacteroids inside legume nodules) were permissive for the synthesis of PHB, which was observed as cytoplasmic granules. To study the regulation of PHB synthesis, we generated mutations in the regulator gene phaR and the phasin genes phaP1 and phaP4 Under permissive conditions, mutation of phaR impaired PHB accumulation, and a phaP1 phaP4 double mutant produced more PHB than the wild type, which was accumulated in a single, large cytoplasmic granule. Moreover, PhaR negatively regulated the expression of phaP1 and phaP4 as well as the expression of phaA1 and phaA2 (encoding a 3-ketoacyl coenzyme A [CoA] thiolases), phaC1 and phaC2 (encoding PHB synthases), and fixK2 (encoding a cyclic AMP receptor protein [CRP]/fumarate and nitrate reductase regulator [FNR]-type transcription factor of genes for microoxic lifestyle). In addition to the depressed PHB cycling, phaR mutants accumulated more extracellular polysaccharides and promoted higher plant shoot dry weight and competitiveness for nodulation than the wild type, in contrast to the phaC1 mutant strain, which is defective in PHB synthesis. These results suggest that phaR not only regulates PHB granule formation by controlling the expression of phasins and biosynthetic enzymes but also acts as a global regulator of excess carbon allocation and symbiosis by controlling fixK2 IMPORTANCE: In this work, we investigated the regulation of polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis in the soybean-nodulating bacterium Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens and its influence in bacterial free-living and symbiotic lifestyles. We uncovered a new interplay between the synthesis of this carbon reserve polymer

  18. Dyella thiooxydans sp. nov., a facultatively chemolithotrophic, thiosulfate-oxidizing bacterium isolated from rhizosphere soil of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Anandham, Rangasamy; Kwon, Soon-Wo; Indira Gandhi, Pandiyan; Kim, Soo-Jin; Weon, Hang-Yeon; Kim, Yi-Seul; Sa, Tong-Min; Kim, Yong-Ki; Jee, Hyeong-Jin

    2011-02-01

    A Gram-negative, aerobic, motile, rod-shaped, thiosulfate-oxidizing bacterium, designated ATSB10(T), was isolated from rhizosphere soil of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain ATSB10(T) was closely related to members of the genera Dyella (96.4-98.1 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) and Luteibacter (96.4-97.0 %) and Fulvimonas soli LMG 19981(T) (96.7 %) and Frateuria aurantia IFO 3245(T) (97.8 %). The predominant fatty acids were iso-C(16 : 0), iso-C(17 : 1)ω9c and iso-C(15 : 0). The major quinone was Q-8. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 66.0 mol%. The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidyldimethylethanolamine, an unknown phospholipid, unknown aminophospholipids and an unknown aminolipid. On the basis of phenotypic properties, phylogenetic distinctiveness and DNA-DNA relatedness, strain ATSB10(T) represents a novel species in the genus Dyella, for which the name Dyella thiooxydans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is ATSB10(T) (=KACC 12756(T) =LMG 24673(T)).

  19. Pseudomonas linyingensis sp. nov.: a novel bacterium isolated from wheat soil subjected to long-term herbicides application.

    PubMed

    He, Wei-Hong; Wang, Ya-Nan; Du, Xun; Zhou, Yang; Jia, Bin; Bian, Jiang; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Chen, Guo-Can

    2012-11-01

    A strain of genus Pseudomonas, LYBRD3-7(T) was isolated from long-term sulfonylurea herbicides applied wheat-field soil in Linying located in Henan province of China. This strain is a strictly aerobic and Gram-negative short rod-shaped bacterium with single flagellum. Phylogenetic evaluation based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis placed this isolate as a member of Pseudomonas, and most closely to Pseudomonas tuomuerensis CGMCC 1.1365(T) (97.1 %) and P. alcaligenes IAM12411(T) (97.1 %). Morphological characters and chemotaxonomic data confirmed the affiliation of strain LYBRD3-7(T) to the genus Pseudomonas. The results of phylogenetic analysis, physiological and biochemical studies, and DNA-DNA hybridization allowed the differentiation of genotype and phenotype between strain LYBRD3-7(T) and the phylogenetic closest species with valid names. The name proposed for the new species is Pseudomonas linyingensis sp. nov. The type strain is LYBRD3-7(T) (=CGMCC 1.10701(T ) =LMG 25967(T)).

  20. Bacillus dabaoshanensis sp. nov., a Cr(VI)-tolerant bacterium isolated from heavy-metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaowen; Wang, Yueqiang; Liu, Jing; Chang, Ming; Zhao, Yong; Zhou, Shungui; Zhuang, Li

    2015-05-01

    A Cr(VI)-tolerant, Gram-staining-positive, rod-shaped, endospore-forming and facultative anaerobic bacterium, designated as GSS04(T), was isolated from a heavy-metal-contaminated soil. Strain GSS04(T) was Cr(VI)-tolerant with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 600 mg l(-1) and was capable of reducing Cr(VI) under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Growth occurred with presence of 0-3 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 1 %), at pH 5.5-10.0 (optimum pH 7.0) and 15-50 °C (optimum 30-37 °C). The main respiratory quinone was MK-7 and the major fatty acids were anteiso-C15:0 and iso-C15:0. The DNA G+C content was 41.1 mol%. The predominant polar lipid was diphosphatidylglycerol. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, the closest phylogenetic relative was Bacillus shackletonii DSM 18868(T) (97.6 %). The DNA-DNA hybridization between GSS04(T) and its closest relatives revealed low relatedness (<70 %). The results of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic analyses clearly indicated that strain GSS04(T) represents a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus dabaoshanensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is GSS04(T) (=CCTCC AB 2013260(T) = KCTC 33191(T)).

  1. Genome Sequence of "Pedosphaera parvula" Ellin514, an Aerobic Verrucomicrobial Isolate from Pasture Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Kant, Ravi; Van Passel, Mark W.J.; Palva, Airi; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, A; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Chertkov, Olga; Larimer, Frank W; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; De Vos, Willem M.; Janssen, Peter H.; Smidt, Hauke

    2011-01-01

    Pedosphaera parvula Ellin514 is an aerobically grown verrucomicrobial isolate from pasture soil. In contrast to the high abundance of members of Verrucomicrobia subdivision 3 based on molecular surveys in terrestrial environments, Ellin514 is one of the few cultured representatives of this group.

  2. Bacillus lehensis sp. nov., an alkalitolerant bacterium isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, A; Bhardwaj, M; Satyanarayana, T; Khurana, M; Mayilraj, S; Jain, R K

    2007-02-01

    A Gram-positive, endospore-forming, alkalitolerant bacterial strain, designated MLB2T, was isolated from soil from Leh, India, and was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. The strain exhibited phenotypic properties that included chemotaxonomic characteristics consistent with its classification in the genus Bacillus. Growth was observed at pH 7.0-11.0, but not at pH 6.0. The DNA G+C content was 41.4 mol%. The highest level of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity was with Bacillus oshimensis JCM 12663T (98.8 %). However, DNA-DNA hybridization experiments indicated low levels of genomic relatedness with the type strains of B. oshimensis (62 %), Bacillus patagoniensis (55 %), Bacillus clausii (51 %) and Bacillus gibsonii (34 %), the species with which strain MLB2T formed a coherent cluster (based on the results of the phylogenetic analysis). On the basis of the phenotypic characteristics and genotypic distinctiveness of strain MLB2T, it should be classified within a novel species of Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus lehensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MLB2T (=MTCC 7633T=JCM 13820T).

  3. Strain IMB-1, a novel bacterium for the removal of methyl bromide in fumigated agricultural soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Connell, Hancock T.L.; Costello, A.M.; Lidstrom, M.E.; Oremland, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    A facultatively methylotrophic bacterium, strain IMB-1, that has been isolated from agricultural soil grows on methyl bromide (MeBr), methyl iodide, methyl chloride, and methylated amines, as well as on glucose, pyruvate, or acetate. Phylogenetic analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence indicates that strain IMB-1 classes in the alpha subgroup of the class Proteobacteria and is closely related to members of the genus Rhizobium. The ability of strain IMB-1 to oxidize MeBr to CO2 is constitutive in cells regardless of the growth substrate. Addition of cell suspensions of strain IMB-1 to soils greatly accelerates the oxidation of MeBr, as does pretreatment of soils with low concentrations of methyl iodide. These results suggest that soil treatment strategies can be devised whereby bacteria can effectively consume MeBr during field fumigations, which would diminish or eliminate the outward flux of MeBr to the atmosphere.

  4. Spectroscopic characterization of organic matter of a soil and vinasse mixture during aerobic or anaerobic incubation

    SciTech Connect

    Doelsch, Emmanuel Masion, Armand; Cazevieille, Patrick

    2009-06-15

    Mineralization potentials are often used to classify organic wastes. These methods involve measuring CO{sub 2} production during batch experiments, so variations in chemical compounds are not addressed. Moreover, the physicochemical conditions are not monitored during the reactions. The present study was designed to address these deficiencies. Incubations of a mixture of soil and waste (vinasse at 20% dry matter from a fermentation industry) were conducted in aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and liquid samples obtained by centrifugation were collected at 2 h, 1 d and 28 d. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) patterns highlighted that: there was a 'soil effect' which increased organic matter (OM) degradation in all conditions compared to vinasse incubated alone; and OM degradation was faster under aerobic conditions since 500 mg kg{sup -1} of C remained after aerobic incubation, as compared to 4000 mg kg{sup -1} at the end of the anaerobic incubation period. No changes were detected by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) between 2 h and 1 d incubation. At 28 days incubation, the FTIR signal of the aerobic samples was deeply modified, thus confirming the high OM degradation. Under anaerobic conditions, the main polysaccharide contributions ({nu}(C-O)) disappeared at 1000 and 1200 cm{sup -1}, as also confirmed by the {sup 13}C NMR findings. Under aerobic incubation, a 50% decrease in the polysaccharide proportion was observed. Under anaerobic conditions, significant chemical modifications of the organic fraction were detected, namely formation of low molecular weight organic acids.

  5. Biodegradation of Guanidinium Ion in Aerobic Soil Samples

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    Frederick. Maryland 21701 The manufacture of several munitions, polymeric resins , flame retardants, and pharmaceuticals utilizes guanidine salts as... Melamines and Guanidines. J Sci Soil Manure Jpn 15:569-574 Lees H, Quastel JH (1947) Biochemistry of Nitrification in Soil. III. Nitrification of Various

  6. Anoxybacillus kamchatkensis sp. nov., a novel thermophilic facultative aerobic bacterium with a broad pH optimum from the Geyser valley, Kamchatka.

    PubMed

    Kevbrin, Vadim V; Zengler, Karsten; Lysenko, Anatolii M; Wiegel, Juergen

    2005-10-01

    A facultative aerobic, moderately thermophilic, spore forming bacterium, strain JW/VK-KG4 was isolated from an enrichment culture obtained from the Geyser valley, a geo-thermally heated environment located in the Kamchatka peninsula (Far East region of Russia). The cells were rod shaped, motile, peritrichous flagellated stained Gram positive and had a Gram positive type cell wall. Aerobically, the strain utilized a range of carbohydrates including glucose, fructose, trehalose, proteinuous substrates, and pectin as well. Anaerobically, only carbohydrates are utilized. When growing on carbohydrates, the strain required yeast extract and vitamin B(12). Anaerobically, glucose was fermented to lactate as main product and acetate, formate, ethanol as minor products. Aerobically, even in well-aerated cultures (agitated at 500 rpm), glucose oxidation was incomplete and lactate and acetate were found in culture supernatants as by-products. Optimal growth of the isolate was observed at pH(25 C) 6.8-8.5 and 60 degrees C. The doubling times on glucose at optimal growth conditions were 34 min (aerobically) and 40 min (anaerobically). The G+C content was 42.3 mol% as determined by T(m) assay. Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene indicated an affiliation of strain JW/VK-KG4 with Anoxybacillus species. Based on its morphology, physiology, phylogenetic relationship and its low DNA-DNA homology with validly published species of Anoxybacillus, it is proposed that strain JW/VK-KG4 represents a new species in the genus Anoxybacillus as A. kamchatkensis sp. nov. The type strain for the novel species is JW/VK-KG4(T) (=DSM 14988, =ATCC BAA-549). The GenBank accession number for the 16S rDNA sequence is AF510985.

  7. The Soil Bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus Bath Interacts with Human Dendritic Cells to Modulate Immune Function

    PubMed Central

    Indrelid, Stine; Kleiveland, Charlotte; Holst, René; Jacobsen, Morten; Lea, Tor

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has increased in Western countries during the course of the twentieth century, and is evolving to be a global disease. Recently we showed that a bacterial meal of a non-commensal, non-pathogenic methanotrophic soil bacterium, Methylococcus capsulatus Bath prevents experimentally induced colitis in a murine model of IBD. The mechanism behind the effect has this far not been identified. Here, for the first time we show that M. capsulatus, a soil bacterium adheres specifically to human dendritic cells, influencing DC maturation, cytokine production, and subsequent T cell activation, proliferation and differentiation. We characterize the immune modulatory properties of M. capsulatus and compare its immunological properties to those of another Gram-negative gammaproteobacterium, the commensal Escherichia coli K12, and the immune modulatory Gram-positive probiotic bacterium, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in vitro. M. capsulatus induces intermediate phenotypic and functional DC maturation. In a mixed lymphocyte reaction M. capsulatus-primed monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) enhance T cell expression of CD25, the γ-chain of the high affinity IL-2 receptor, supports cell proliferation, and induce a T cell cytokine profile different from both E. coli K12 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. M. capsulatus Bath thus interacts specifically with MoDC, affecting MoDC maturation, cytokine profile, and subsequent MoDC directed T cell polarization. PMID:28293233

  8. Biodegradation of Cry1Ab protein from Bt transgenic rice in aerobic and flooded paddy soils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyan; Ye, Qingfu; Gan, Jay; Wu, Licheng

    2007-03-07

    Degradation of Cry1Ab protein from Bt transgenic rice was examined under both aerobic and flooded conditions in five paddy soils and in aqueous solutions. The hydrolysis rate of Cry1Ab protein in aqueous solutions was correlated inversely with the solution pH in the range of 4.0 to 8.0, and positively with the initial concentration of Cry1Ab protein. Rapid degradation of Cry1Ab protein occurred in paddy soils under aerobic conditions, with half-lives ranging from 19.6 to 41.3 d. The degradation was mostly biotic and not related to any specific soil property. Degradation of the Cry1Ab protein was significantly prolonged under flooded conditions compared with aerobic conditions, with half-lives extended to 45.9 to 141 d. These results suggest that the toxin protein, when introduced into a paddy field upon harvest, will probably undergo rapid removal after the field is drained and exposed to aerobic conditions.

  9. Trace metal pyritization variability in response to mangrove soil aerobic and anaerobic oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Machado, W; Borrelli, N L; Ferreira, T O; Marques, A G B; Osterrieth, M; Guizan, C

    2014-02-15

    The degree of iron pyritization (DOP) and degree of trace metal pyritization (DTMP) were evaluated in mangrove soil profiles from an estuarine area located in Rio de Janeiro (SE Brazil). The soil pH was negatively correlated with redox potential (Eh) and positively correlated with DOP and DTMP of some elements (Mn, Cu and Pb), suggesting that pyrite oxidation generated acidity and can affect the importance of pyrite as a trace metal-binding phase, mainly in response to spatial variability in tidal flooding. Besides these aerobic oxidation effects, results from a sequential extraction analyses of reactive phases evidenced that Mn oxidized phase consumption in reaction with pyrite can be also important to determine the pyritization of trace elements. Cumulative effects of these aerobic and anaerobic oxidation processes were evidenced as factors affecting the capacity of mangrove soils to act as a sink for trace metals through pyritization processes.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Nocardioides luteus Strain BAFB, an Alkane-Degrading Bacterium Isolated from JP-7-Polluted Soil

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lisa M.; Gunasekera, Thusitha S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nocardioides luteus strain BAFB is a Gram-positive bacterium that efficiently degrades C8 to C11 alkanes aerobically. The draft genome of N. luteus BAFB is 5.76 Mb in size, with 5,358 coding sequences and 69.9% G+C content. The genes responsible for alkane degradation are present in this strain. PMID:28126947

  11. Landscape Changes Influence the Occurrence of the Melioidosis Bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei in Soil in Northern Australia

    PubMed Central

    Kaestli, Mirjam; Mayo, Mark; Harrington, Glenda; Ward, Linda; Watt, Felicity; Hill, Jason V.; Cheng, Allen C.; Currie, Bart J.

    2009-01-01

    Background The soil-dwelling saprophyte bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is the cause of melioidosis, a severe disease of humans and animals in southeast Asia and northern Australia. Despite the detection of B. pseudomallei in various soil and water samples from endemic areas, the environmental habitat of B. pseudomallei remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a large survey in the Darwin area in tropical Australia and screened 809 soil samples for the presence of these bacteria. B. pseudomallei were detected by using a recently developed and validated protocol involving soil DNA extraction and real-time PCR targeting the B. pseudomallei–specific Type III Secretion System TTS1 gene cluster. Statistical analyses such as multivariable cluster logistic regression and principal component analysis were performed to assess the association of B. pseudomallei with environmental factors. The combination of factors describing the habitat of B. pseudomallei differed between undisturbed sites and environmentally manipulated areas. At undisturbed sites, the occurrence of B. pseudomallei was found to be significantly associated with areas rich in grasses, whereas at environmentally disturbed sites, B. pseudomallei was associated with the presence of livestock animals, lower soil pH and different combinations of soil texture and colour. Conclusions/Significance This study contributes to the elucidation of environmental factors influencing the occurrence of B. pseudomallei and raises concerns that B. pseudomallei may spread due to changes in land use. PMID:19156200

  12. Bioremediation of hexavalent chromium (VI) by a soil-borne bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae B2-DHA.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Aminur; Nahar, Noor; Nawani, Neelu N; Jass, Jana; Hossain, Khaled; Saud, Zahangir Alam; Saha, Ananda K; Ghosh, Sibdas; Olsson, Björn; Mandal, Abul

    2015-01-01

    Chromium and chromium containing compounds are discharged into the nature as waste from anthropogenic activities, such as industries, agriculture, forest farming, mining and metallurgy. Continued disposal of these compounds to the environment leads to development of various lethal diseases in both humans and animals. In this paper, we report a soil borne bacterium, B2-DHA that can be used as a vehicle to effectively remove chromium from the contaminated sources. B2-DHA is resistant to chromium with a MIC value of 1000 µg mL(-1) potassium chromate. The bacterium has been identified as a Gram negative, Enterobacter cloacae based on biochemical characteristics and 16S rRNA gene analysis. TOF-SIMS and ICP-MS analyses confirmed intracellular accumulation of chromium and thus its removal from the contaminated liquid medium. Chromium accumulation in cells was 320 µg/g of cells dry biomass after 120-h exposure, and thus it reduced the chromium concentration in the liquid medium by as much as 81%. Environmental scanning electron micrograph revealed the effect of metals on cellular morphology of the isolates. Altogether, our results indicate that B2-DHA has the potential to reduce chromium significantly to safe levels from the contaminated environments and suggest the potential use of this bacterium in reducing human exposure to chromium, hence avoiding poisoning.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus licheniformis Strain GB2, a Hydrocarbon-Degrading and Plant Growth-Promoting Soil Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Van Hamme, Jonathan; Bottos, Eric; Thijs, Sofie; Balseiro-Romero, Maria; Monterroso, Carmela; Kidd, Petra Suzan; Rineau, Francois; Weyens, Nele; Sillen, Wouter

    2016-01-01

    We report the 4.39 Mb draft genome of Bacillus licheniformis GB2, a hydrocarbonoclastic Gram-positive bacterium of the family Bacillaceae, isolated from diesel-contaminated soil at the Ford Motor Company site in Genk, Belgium. Strain GB2 is an effective plant-growth promoter useful for diesel fuel remediation applications based on plant-bacterium associations. PMID:27340073

  14. Two engineered approaches for treatment of explosives contaminated soils using both aerobic and anaerobic consortia

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, S.D.; Fredrickson, H.; Hill, D.O.; Zappi, M.; Stryker, R.; Eng, S.; Harlow, J.

    1996-12-31

    The Naval Weapons Station Yorktown, Yorktown, Virginia (WPNSTA Yorktown) has contaminated soils from past handling, loading, and packing activities involving explosive compounds. Bench scale experiments were undertaken to examine the effectiveness of biological treatment. The experiments were conducted in two different reactor configurations: bioslurry (continuous mixing) and biocell (intermittent mixing). Treatments examined the effects of different cometabolites, bioaugmentation, surfactant enhanced desorption and both aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

  15. Kinetics of aerobic and anaerobic biomineralization of atrazine in surface and subsurface agricultural soils in Ohio.

    PubMed

    Tuovinen, Olli H; Deshmukh, Vaidehi; Özkaya, Bestamin; Radosevich, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess atrazine mineralization in surface and subsurface samples retrieved from vertical cores of agricultural soils from two farm sites in Ohio. The Defiance site (NW-Ohio) was on soybean-corn rotation and Piketon (S-Ohio) was on continuous corn cultivation. Both sites had a history of atrazine application for at least a couple of decades. The clay fraction increased at the Defiance site and the organic matter and total N content decreased with depth at both sites. Mineralization of atrazine was assessed by measurement of (14)CO2 during incubation of soil samples with [U-ring-(14)C]-atrazine. Abiotic mineralization was negligible in all soil samples. Aerobic mineralization rate constants declined and the corresponding half-lives increased with depth at the Defiance site. Anaerobic mineralization (supplemented with nitrate) was mostly below the detection at the Defiance site. In Piketon samples, the kinetic parameters of aerobic and anaerobic biomineralization of atrazine displayed considerable scatter among replicate cores and duplicate biometers. In general, this study concludes that data especially for anaerobic biomineralization of atrazine can be more variable as compared to aerobic conditions and cannot be extrapolated from one agricultural site to another.

  16. Characterization of methanotrophic bacterial populations in natural and agricultural aerobic soils of the European Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchenko, Irina; Sukhacheva, Marina; Kizilova, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric methane contributes to about 20% of the total radiative forcing by long-lived greenhouse gases, and microbial methane oxidation in upland soils is the only biological sink of methane. Microbial methane oxidation in aerated upland soils is estimated as 15 - 45 Tg yr-1 or 3-9% of the annual sink. Therefore there is need of extensive research to characterize methanotrophic activity in various ecosystems for possible application to reduce atmospheric methane fluxes and to minimize global climate change. The vast majority of known aerobic methanotrophs belongs to the Proteobacteria and placed in the families Methylococcaceae in the Gammaproteobacteria, and Methylocystaceae and Beijerinckiaceae in the Alphaproteobacteria. Known exceptions include the phylum Verrucomicrobia and uncultured methanotrophs such as Candidatus 'Methylomirabilis oxyfera' affiliated with the 'NC10' phylum. Plenty of studies of aerobic methane oxidation and key players of the process have been performed on various types of soils, and it was found that Methylocystis spp and uncultivated methanotrophs are abundant in upland soils. Two of the uncultured groups are upland soil cluster alphaproteobacteria (USCa) and gammaproteobacteria (USCg), as revealed by cultivation-independent surveys of pmoA diversity. Russia is extremely rich in soil types due to its vast territories, and most of these soils have never been investigated from the aspect of methanotrophy. This study addresses methane oxidation activity and diversity of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria in eight types of natural aerobic soils, four of which also had been under agricultural use. Methane fluxes have been measured by in situ static chamber method and methane oxidation rates in soil samples - by radioisotope tracer (14CH4) technique. Changes in methanotroph diversity and abundance were assessed by cloning and Sanger sequencing, and quantitative real-time PCR of pmoA genes. Methanotrophic population of unmanaged soils turned

  17. Complete genome of Nitrosospira briensis C-128, an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium from agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Rice, Marlen C; Norton, Jeanette M; Valois, Frederica; Bollmann, Annette; Bottomley, Peter J; Klotz, Martin G; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J; Suwa, Yuichi; Stein, Lisa Y; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis; Woyke, Tanja; Shapiro, Nicole; Goodwin, Lynne A; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Kyrpides, Nikos; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Nitrosospira briensis C-128 is an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium isolated from an acid agricultural soil. N. briensis C-128 was sequenced with PacBio RS technologies at the DOE-Joint Genome Institute through their Community Science Program (2010). The high-quality finished genome contains one chromosome of 3.21 Mb and no plasmids. We identified 3073 gene models, 3018 of which are protein coding. The two-way average nucleotide identity between the chromosomes of Nitrosospira multiformis ATCC 25196 and Nitrosospira briensis C-128 was found to be 77.2 %. Multiple copies of modules encoding chemolithotrophic metabolism were identified in their genomic context. The gene inventory supports chemolithotrophic metabolism with implications for function in soil environments.

  18. Huanghella arctica gen. nov., sp. nov., a bacterium of the family Cytophagaceae isolated from Arctic tundra soil.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fan; Xiao, Mengchen; Chen, Lu; Kan, Wenjing; Peng, Fang; Dai, Jun; Chang, Xulu; Li, Wenxin; Fang, Chengxiang

    2013-02-01

    A novel, strictly aerobic, red-pigmented, gram-reaction-negative bacterium, designated strain R9-9(T), was isolated from tundra soil collected near Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard Archipelago, Norway (78° N). The novel strain was subjected to a taxonomic study using a polyphasic approach. It grew optimally at 20-22 °C and at pH 7.0. Flexirubin-type pigments were absent. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain R9-9(T) represents a distinct phyletic line that reflects a novel generic status within the family Cytophagaceae. The novel strain showed relatively low 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities (<88.0 %) to members of established genera. Strain R9-9(T) contained summed feature 3 (C(16 : 1)ω7c and/or C(16 : 1)ω6c), iso-C(17 : 0) 3-OH, iso-C(15 : 0) and C(16 : 1)ω5c as its major cellular fatty acids, phosphatidylethanolamine as its main polar lipid, and MK-7 as its major respiratory quinone. The genomic DNA G+C content was 56.1 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, strain R9-9(T) is considered to represent a novel species in a new genus in the family Cytophagaceae, for which the name Huanghella arctica gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is R9-9(T) ( = CCTCC AB 2010418(T) = NRRL B-59750(T)).

  19. Bacillus methylotrophicus sp. nov., a methanol-utilizing, plant-growth-promoting bacterium isolated from rice rhizosphere soil.

    PubMed

    Madhaiyan, Munusamy; Poonguzhali, Selvaraj; Kwon, Soon-Wo; Sa, Tong-Min

    2010-10-01

    A Gram-positive bacterium, designated strain CBMB205(T), was isolated from the rhizosphere soil of traditionally cultivated, field-grown rice. Cells were strictly aerobic, motile, rod-shaped and formed endospores. The best growth was achieved at 30°C and pH 7.0 in ammonium mineral salts (AMS) medium containing 600 mM methanol. A comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence-based phylogenetic analysis placed strain CBMB205(T) in a clade with the species Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus vallismortis, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus atrophaeus, Bacillus mojavensis and Bacillus licheniformis and revealed pairwise similarities ranging from 98.2 to 99.2 %. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments revealed a low level (<36 %) of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain CBMB205(T) and its closest relatives. The major components of the fatty acid profile were C₁₅:₀ anteiso, C₁₅:₀ iso, C₁₆:₀ iso and C₁₇:₀ anteiso. The diagnostic diamino acid of the cell wall was meso-diaminopimelic acid. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 45.0 mol%. The lipids present in strain CBMB205(T) were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, a minor amount of phosphatidylcholine and two unknown phospholipids. The predominant respiratory quinone was MK-7. Studies of DNA-DNA relatedness, morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomic analyses and phylogenetic data based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing enabled strain CBMB205(T) to be described as representing a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus methylotrophicus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CBMB205(T) (=KACC 13105(T)=NCCB 100236(T)).

  20. Flavobacterium ginsenosidimutans sp. nov., a bacterium with ginsenoside converting activity isolated from soil of a ginseng field.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jung-Eun; Kim, Se-Young; Im, Wan-Taek; Yi, Tae-Hoo

    2011-06-01

    A Gram-negative, aerobic, non-motile, non-spore-forming, yellow-pigmented, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain THG 01(T), was isolated from the soil of a ginseng field in Pocheon province, South Korea, and its taxonomic position was investigated by using a polyphasic approach. Strain THG 01(T) grew well at 25-37 °C and pH 6.0-7.5 in the absence of NaCl on nutrient agar. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity data, strain THG 01(T) was shown to belong to the family Flavobacteriaceae and was related to Flavobacterium anhuiense D3(T) (97.5 % similarity), Flavobacterium johnsoniae UW101(T) (96.8 %) and Flavobacterium denitrificans ED5(T) (96.7 %). 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities between the novel strain and members of other recognized species within the family Flavobacteriaceae were less than 96.7 %. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain THG 01(T) was 32.1 mol%. Phenotypic and chemotaxonomic data (major menaquinone was MK-6 and major fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0), iso-C(15 : 0) 3-OH and C(16 : 1)ω7c and/or C(16 : 1)ω6c ) supported the affiliation of strain THG 01(T) to the genus Flavobacterium. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments showed that DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain THG 01(T) and its closest phylogenetic neighbours were below 11 %. The results of physiological and biochemical tests enabled strain THG 01(T) to be differentiated genotypically and phenotypically from recognized species of the genus Flavobacterium. The isolate therefore represents a novel species, for which the name Flavobacterium ginsenosidimutans sp. nov. is proposed, with THG 01(T) ( = KACC 14525(T) = JCM 16720(T)) as the type strain.

  1. Effects of Soil and Water Content on Methyl Bromide Oxidation by the Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea†

    PubMed Central

    Duddleston, Khrystyne N.; Bottomley, Peter J.; Porter, Angela; Arp, Daniel J.

    2000-01-01

    Little information exists on the potential of NH3-oxidizing bacteria to cooxidize halogenated hydrocarbons in soil. A study was conducted to examine the cooxidation of methyl bromide (MeBr) by an NH3-oxidizing bacterium, Nitrosomonas europaea, under soil conditions. Soil and its water content modified the availability of NH4+ and MeBr and influenced the relative rates of substrate (NH3) and cosubstrate (MeBr) oxidations. These observations highlight the complexity associated with characterizing soil cooxidative activities when soil and water interact to differentially affect substrate and cosubstrate availabilities. PMID:10831449

  2. Genome Sequence of Chthoniobacter flavus Ellin428, an aerobic heterotrophic soil bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Kant, Ravi; Van Passel, Mark W.J.; Palva, Airi; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, A; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Larimer, Frank W; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; De Vos, Willem M.; Janssen, Peter H.; Smidt, Hauke

    2011-01-01

    Chthoniobacter flavusis Ellin428 is the first isolate from subdivision 2 of the bacterial phylum Verrucomicrobia. C. flavusis Ellin428 can metabolize many of the saccharide components of plant biomass but does not grow with amino acids or organic acids other than pyruvate.

  3. Determination of phenanthrene bioavailability by using a self-dying reporter bacterium: test with model solids and soil.

    PubMed

    Shin, Doyun; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2012-02-20

    The present study was conducted to investigate the performance and feasibility of a self-dying reporter bacterium to visualize and quantify phenanthrene bioavailability in soil. The self-dying reporter bacterium was designed to die on the initiation of phenanthrene biodegradation. The viability of the reporter bacterium was determined by a fluorescence live/dead cell staining method and visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopic observation. Phenanthrene was spiked into four types of model solids and a sandy loam. The bioavailability of phenanthrene to the reporter bacterium was remarkably declined with the hydrophobicity of the model solids: essentially no phenanthrene was biodegraded in the presence of 9-nm pores and about 35.8% of initial phenanthrene was biodegraded without pores. Decrease in bioavailability was not evident in the nonporous hydrophilic bead, but a small decrease was observed in the porous hydrophilic bead at 1000 mg/kg of phenanthrene. The fluorescence intensity was commensurate with the extent of phenanthrene biodegradation by the reporter bacterium at the concentration range from 50 to 500 mg/kg. Such a quantitative relationship was also confirmed with a sandy loam spiked up to 1000 mg/kg of phenanthrene. This reporter bacterium may be a useful means to determine phenanthrene bioavailability in soil.

  4. The methanogenic redox cofactor F420 is widely synthesized by aerobic soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ney, Blair; Ahmed, F Hafna; Carere, Carlo R; Biswas, Ambarish; Warden, Andrew C; Morales, Sergio E; Pandey, Gunjan; Watt, Stephen J; Oakeshott, John G; Taylor, Matthew C; Stott, Matthew B; Jackson, Colin J; Greening, Chris

    2017-01-01

    F420 is a low-potential redox cofactor that mediates the transformations of a wide range of complex organic compounds. Considered one of the rarest cofactors in biology, F420 is best known for its role in methanogenesis and has only been chemically identified in two phyla to date, the Euryarchaeota and Actinobacteria. In this work, we show that this cofactor is more widely distributed than previously reported. We detected the genes encoding all five known F420 biosynthesis enzymes (cofC, cofD, cofE, cofG and cofH) in at least 653 bacterial and 173 archaeal species, including members of the dominant soil phyla Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi and Firmicutes. Metagenome datamining validated that these genes were disproportionately abundant in aerated soils compared with other ecosystems. We confirmed through high-performance liquid chromatography analysis that aerobically grown stationary-phase cultures of three bacterial species, Paracoccus denitrificans, Oligotropha carboxidovorans and Thermomicrobium roseum, synthesized F420, with oligoglutamate sidechains of different lengths. To understand the evolution of F420 biosynthesis, we also analyzed the distribution, phylogeny and genetic organization of the cof genes. Our data suggest that although the Fo precursor to F420 originated in methanogens, F420 itself was first synthesized in an ancestral actinobacterium. F420 biosynthesis genes were then disseminated horizontally to archaea and other bacteria. Together, our findings suggest that the cofactor is more significant in aerobic bacterial metabolism and soil ecosystem composition than previously thought. The cofactor may confer several competitive advantages for aerobic soil bacteria by mediating their central metabolic processes and broadening the range of organic compounds they can synthesize, detoxify and mineralize.

  5. Acquisition of Fe from Natural Organic Matter by an Aerobic Pseudomonas Bacterium: Siderophores and Cellular Fe Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, K.; Dehner, C.; Dubois, J.; Maurice, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    Aerobic microorganisms have evolved various strategies to acquire nutrient Fe, including release of Fe-chelating siderophores. The potential importance of siderophores in Fe acquisition from natural organic matter (NOM) (reverse osmosis, RO; and XAD-8 samples with naturally associated Fe) was investigated using a wild type strain (WT) of aerobic Pseudomonas mendocina that produces siderophore(s) and an engineered mutant that cannot. Microbial growth under Fe-limited batch conditions was monitored via optical density, and a β-galactosidase biosensor assay was used to quantify cellular Fe status. Both WT and mutant strains acquired Fe from NOM. Fe ‘stress’ in the presence of the RO sample decreased with increasing [Fe] (as determined by different [DOC]s) and was consistently less for the WT. For both WT and mutant, maximum growth in the presence of RO sample increased as: 1 mgC/L (0.2μM Fe) < 100 mgC/L (20μM Fe) < 10 mgC/L (2μM Fe). Comparison of XAD-8 and RO samples ([DOC] varied to give 2μM [Fe]total for each), showed that although there were no apparent differences in internal Fe status, growth was better on the XAD-8 sample. Chelex treatment to partially remove metals associated with the RO sample increased Fe stress but did not substantially affect growth. Results demonstrated that: (1) siderophores are useful but not necessary for Fe acquisition from NOM by P. mendocina and (2) NOM may have complex effects on microbial growth, related not just to Fe content but potentially to the presence of other (trace)metals such as Al and/or to effects on biofilm development.

  6. Application of DNA adductomics to soil bacterium Sphingobium sp. strain KK22

    PubMed Central

    Kanaly, Robert A; Micheletto, Ruggero; Matsuda, Tomonari; Utsuno, Youko; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Hamamura, Natsuko

    2015-01-01

    Toward the development of ecotoxicology methods to investigate microbial markers of impacts of hydrocarbon processing activities, DNA adductomic analyses were conducted on a sphingomonad soil bacterium. From growing cells that were exposed or unexposed to acrolein, a commonly used biocide in hydraulic fracturing processes, DNA was extracted, digested to 2′-deoxynucleosides and analyzed by liquid chromatography-positive ionization electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry in selected reaction monitoring mode transmitting the [M + H]+ > [M + H − 116]+ transition over 100 transitions. Overall data shown as DNA adductome maps revealed numerous putative DNA adducts under both conditions with some occurring specifically for each condition. Adductomic analyses of triplicate samples indicated that elevated levels of some targeted putative adducts occurred in exposed cells. Two exposure-specific adducts were identified in exposed cells as 3-(2′-deoxyribosyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-6-hydroxy-(and 8-hydroxy-)pyrimido[1,2-a]- purine-(3H)-one (6- and 8-hydroxy-PdG) following synthesis of authentic standards of these compounds and subsequent analyses. A time course experiment showed that 6- and 8-hydroxy-PdG were detected in bacterial DNA within 30 min of acrolein exposure but were not detected in unexposed cells. This work demonstrated the first application of DNA adductomics to examine DNA damage in a bacterium and sets a foundation for future work. PMID:26305056

  7. Genome Sequence of Nitrosomonas communis Strain Nm2, a Mesophilic Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium Isolated from Mediterranean Soil

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowski, Jessica A.; Kits, K. Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of Nitrosomonas communis strain Nm2, a mesophilic betaproteobacterial ammonia oxidizer isolated from Mediterranean soils in Corfu, Greece, is reported here. This is the first genome to describe a cluster 8 Nitrosomonas species and represents an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium commonly found in terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:26769932

  8. Magnesium insertion by magnesium chelatase in the biosynthesis of zinc bacteriochlorophyll a in an aerobic acidophilic bacterium Acidiphilium rubrum.

    PubMed

    Masuda, T; Inoue, K; Masuda, M; Nagayama, M; Tamaki, A; Ohta, H; Shimada, H; Takamiya, K

    1999-11-19

    To elucidate the mechanism for formation of zinc-containing bacteriochlorophyll a in the photosynthetic bacterium Acidiphilium rubrum, we isolated homologs of magnesium chelatase subunits (bchI, -D, and -H). A. rubrum bchI and -H were encoded by single genes located on the clusters bchP-orf168-bchI-bchD-orf320-crtI and bchF-N-B-H-L as in Rhodobacter capsulatus, respectively. The deduced sequences of A. rubrum bchI, -D, and -H had overall identities of 59. 8, 40.5, and 50.7% to those from Rba. capsulatus, respectively. When these genes were introduced into bchI, bchD, and bchH mutants of Rba. capsulatus for functional complementation, all mutants were complemented with concomitant synthesis of bacteriochlorophyll a. Analyses of bacteriochlorophyll intermediates showed that A. rubrum cells accumulate magnesium protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester without detectable accumulation of zinc protoporphyrin IX or its monomethyl ester. These results indicate that a single set of magnesium chelatase homologs in A. rubrum catalyzes the insertion of only Mg(2+) into protoporphyrin IX to yield magnesium protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester. Consequently, it is most likely that zinc-containing bacteriochlorophyll a is formed by a substitution of Zn(2+) for Mg(2+) at a step in the bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis after formation of magnesium protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester.

  9. Systems biology defines the biological significance of redox-active proteins during cellulose degradation in an aerobic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jeffrey G; Crouch, Lucy; Labourel, Aurore; Forsberg, Zarah; Bukhman, Yury V; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Gilbert, Harry J; Keating, David H

    2014-10-08

    Microbial depolymerization of plant cell walls contributes to global carbon balance and is a critical component of renewable energy. The genomes of lignocellulose degrading microorganisms encode diverse classes of carbohydrate modifying enzymes, although currently there is a paucity of knowledge on the role of these proteins in vivo. We report the comprehensive analysis of the cellulose degradation system in the saprophytic bacterium Cellvibrio japonicus. Gene expression profiling of C. japonicus demonstrated that three of the 12 predicted β-1,4 endoglucanases (cel5A, cel5B, and cel45A) and the sole predicted cellobiohydrolase (cel6A) showed elevated expression during growth on cellulose. Targeted gene disruptions of all 13 predicted cellulase genes showed that only cel5B and cel6A were required for optimal growth on cellulose. Our analysis also identified three additional genes required for cellulose degradation: lpmo10B encodes a lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMO), while cbp2D and cbp2E encode proteins containing carbohydrate binding modules and predicted cytochrome domains for electron transfer. CjLPMO10B oxidized cellulose and Cbp2D demonstrated spectral properties consistent with redox function. Collectively, this report provides insight into the biological role of LPMOs and redox proteins in cellulose utilization and suggests that C. japonicus utilizes a combination of hydrolytic and oxidative cleavage mechanisms to degrade cellulose.

  10. Ammonium removal at low temperature by a newly isolated heterotrophic nitrifying and aerobic denitrifying bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens wsw-1001.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shumei; Sha, Changqing; Jiang, Wei; Li, Weiguang; Zhang, Duoying; Li, Jing; Meng, Liqiang; Piao, Yongjian

    2015-01-01

    A heterotrophic nitrifier wsw-1001 was isolated from Songhua River and identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens. Ammonium removal by the strain at low temperature was investigated. The effect of initial ammonium concentration (from 5 to 1000 mg/L) and culture temperature (from 4°C to 30°C) on ammonium removal efficiency was studied. Biodegradation product, [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], N2, N2O and intercellular N were monitored. The results indicated that the strain had potential for water and wastewater treatment. Ammonium could be removed by the strain at low temperature. Ammonium removal efficiency increased with temperature from 4°C to 20°C and decreased with ammonium concentration from 5 to 1000 mg/L. The strain exhibited a capability of heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification using [Formula: see text] as the sole nitrogen source at 8°C. [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] were reduced by the strain. Nitrogen balance analysis in the presence of 39.7 mg/L [Formula: see text] indicated that 71.2% [Formula: see text] was removed by converting to N2 (46.3%) and assimilating as biomass (42.5%). Substances such as [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and N2O were detected at very low concentrations. Ammonium mono-oxygenase, hydroxylamine oxidase, nitrite reductase and nitrate reductase activity were measured. The ammonium removal pathway of the strain was speculated to be [Formula: see text].

  11. Non-stereoselective transformation of the chiral insecticide cycloxaprid in aerobic soil.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; He, Yupeng; Yang, Yatian; Huang, Lei; Zhang, Hanxue; Ye, Qingfu; Wang, Haiyan

    2017-02-01

    Cycloxaprid (CYC) is one of the most effective neonicotinoid insecticides and is proposed to be a replacement of imidacloprid that has caused concerns over non-targeted resistance and ecological toxicity worldwide. The present study was performed with the (14)C-labeled racemic CYC and its two enantiomers in aerobic soil. Racemic CYC and the enantiomers 1S2R-CYC and 1R2S-CYC underwent non-stereoselective degradation in the three soils tested. During the incubation period, CYC was transformed into three achiral degradation products which displayed varying degradation kinetics dependent upon soil properties. The soil properties were found to significantly influence the CYC metabolite profiles. The fastest degradation occurred in loamy soil, whereas the slowest reactions occurred in acidic clay soil. The primary transformation of CYC included cleavage of the oxabridged seven-member ring and CN between chloropyridinylmethyl and imidazalidine ring, carboxylation of the alkene group, and hydroxylation of imidazolidine ring. The results shed light on understanding of CYC degradation and provided useful information for applications and environmental assessments of chiral pesticides.

  12. Variovorax guangxiensis sp. nov., an aerobic, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase producing bacterium isolated from banana rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun-lian; Yuan, Mei; Wang, Xu-ming; Qiu, Tian-lei; Li, Ji-wei; Liu, Hong-can; Li, Xiu-ai; Chen, Jian; Sun, Jian-guang

    2015-01-01

    A 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase producing bacterium, designated GXGD002(T), was isolated from the rhizosphere of banana plants cultivated in Guangxi province, China. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain GXGD002(T) is a member of the genus Variovorax. High levels of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity are found between strain GXGD002(T) and Variovorax paradoxus DSM 30034(T) (99.4 %), Variovorax ginsengisoli KCTC 12583(T) (99.1 %), Variovorax boronicumulans KCTC 22010(T) (99.0 %), Variovorax soli DSM18216(T) (98.7 %), Variovorax defluvii DSM 27259(T) (98.1 %) and Variovorax dokdonensis KCTC 12544(T) (97.4 %) respectively. However, the DNA-DNA hybridization values between strain GXGD002(T) and its closely related species V. paradoxus DSM 30034(T), V. ginsengisoli KCTC 12583(T) and V. boronicumulans KCTC 22010(T) were found to be 40.7, 30.9 and 23.7 %, respectively. The DNA G + C content of strain GXGD002(T) was found to be 67.8 mol%. The major fatty acids of strain GXGD002(T) are C16:0 (20.3 %), C10:0 3OH (18.4 %), C17:0 cyclo (18.9 %), C18:1w7c (12.3 %) and summed feature 3 (13.9 %). The predominant respiratory quinone was identified as ubiquinone-8 (Q-8) and the major polar lipids as phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol. The results of polyphasic taxonomic study including physiological and biochemical tests, whole-cell SDS-PAGE profiles and chemotaxonomic analysis allowed a clear differentiation of strain GXGD002(T) from the other species in the genus Variovorax. Based on these results, a new species, Variovorax guangxiensis, is proposed. The type strain is GXGD002(T) (=DSM 27352(T) = ACCC 05911(T)).

  13. Rhizobium hidalgonense sp. nov., a nodule endophytic bacterium of Phaseolus vulgaris in acid soil.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Yan, Hui; Liu, Li Xue; Chen, Wen Feng; Zhang, Xiao Xia; Verástegui-Valdés, Myrthala M; Wang, En Tao; Han, Xiao Zeng

    2017-01-01

    One Gram-negative, aerobic, motile, rod-shaped bacterium, designated as FH14(T), was isolated from nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris grown in Hidalgo State of Mexico. Results based upon 16S rRNA gene (≥99.8 % similarities to known species), concatenated sequence (recA, atpD and glnII) analysis of three housekeeping genes (≤93.4 % similarities to known species) and average nucleotide identity (ANI) values of genome sequence (ranged from 87.6 to 90.0 % to related species) indicated the distinct position of strain FH14(T) within the genus Rhizobium. In analyses of symbiotic genes, only nitrogen fixation gene nifH was amplified that had nucleotide sequence identical to those of the bean-nodulating strains in R. phaseoli and R. vallis, while nodulation gene nodC gene was not amplified. The failure of nodulation to its original host P. vulgaris and other legumes evidenced the loss of its nodulation capability. Strain FH14(T) contained summed feature 8 (C18:1 ω6c/C18:1 ω7c, 59.96 %), C16:0 (10.6 %) and summed feature 2 (C12:0 aldehyde/unknown 10.928, 10.24 %) as the major components of cellular fatty acids. Failure to utilize alaninamide, and utilizing L-alanine, L-asparagine and γ-amino butyric acid as carbon source, distinguished the strain FH14(T) from the type strains for the related species. The genome size and DNA G+C content of FH14(T) were 6.94 Mbp and 60.8 mol %, respectively. Based on those results, a novel specie in Rhizobium, named Rhizobium hidalgonense sp. nov., was proposed, with FH14(T) (=HAMBI 3636(T) = LMG 29288(T)) as the type strain.

  14. Pseudomonas sagittaria sp. nov., a siderophore-producing bacterium isolated from oil-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Yao; Hameed, Asif; Liu, You-Cheng; Hsu, Yi-Han; Lai, Wei-An; Chen, Wen-Ming; Shen, Fo-Ting; Young, Chiu-Chung

    2013-07-01

    An aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped bacterium with a single polar flagellum, designated CC-OPY-1(T), was isolated from an oil-contaminated site in Taiwan. CC-OPY-1(T) produces siderophores, and can grow at temperatures of 25-37 °C and pH 5.0-9.0 and tolerate <5 % (w/v) NaCl. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of CC-OPY-1(T) showed high pairwise sequence similarity to Pseudomonas alcaligenes BCRC 11893(T) (97.1 %), Pseudomonas. alcaliphila DSM 17744(T) (97.1 %), Pseudomonas tuomuerensis JCM 14085(T) (97.1 %), Pseudomonas toyotomiensis JCM 15604(T) (96.9 %) and lower sequence similarity to remaining species of the genus Pseudomonas. The phylogenetic trees reconstructed based on gyrB and rpoB gene sequences supported the classification of CC-OPY-1(T) as a novel member of the genus Pseudomonas. The predominant quinone system of strain CC-OPY-1T was ubiquinone (Q-9) and the DNA G+C content was 68.4 ± 0.3 mol%. The major fatty acids were C12 : 0, C16 : 0, C17 : 0 cyclo and summed features 3 and 8 consisting of C16 : 1ω7c/C16 : 1ω6c and C18 : 1ω7c/C18 : 1ω6c, respectively. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), phosphatidylcholine (PC) and two unknown phospholipids (PL1-2). Due to distinct phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic features, CC-OPY-1(T) is proposed to represent a novel species within the genus Pseudomonas for which the name Pseudomonas sagittaria sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CC-OPY-1(T) ( = BCRC 80399(T) = JCM 18195(T)).

  15. Rufibacter glacialis sp. nov., a psychrotolerant bacterium isolated from glacier soil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Liu, Hong-Can; Zhang, Jian-Li; Zhou, Yu-Guang; Xin, Yu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, red-pigmented bacterium (MDT1-10-3T) was isolated from Midui glacier in Tibet, China. Cells were aerobic and psychrotolerant (growth occurred at 4-25 °C). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that it was a member of the genus Rufibacter, with Rufibacter immobilis MCC P1T (96.7 % similarity) as its closest phylogenetic relative. MK-7 was the predominant respiratory menaquinone. The major cellular fatty acids were summed feature 4 (iso-C17 : 1 I and/or anteiso-C17 : 1 B), summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω6c and/or C16 : 1ω7c), C17 : 1ω6c, iso-C16 : 0, iso-C15 : 0 and C16 : 1ω5c. The predominant polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, two unidentified aminophospholipids, one glycolipid and four unidentified lipids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 49 mol%. On the basis of the phenotypic characteristics and phylogenetic analysis, strain MDT1-10-3T represents a novel species of the genus Rufibacter, for which the name Rufibacter glacialis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MDT1-10-3T ( = CGMCC 1.9789T = NBRC 109705T).

  16. Biofuel components change the ecology of bacterial volatile petroleum hydrocarbon degradation in aerobic sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Elazhari-Ali, Abdulmagid; Singh, Arvind K; Davenport, Russell J; Head, Ian M; Werner, David

    2013-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the biodegradation of volatile petroleum hydrocarbons (VPHs) in aerobic sandy soil is affected by the blending with 10 percent ethanol (E10) or 20 percent biodiesel (B20). When inorganic nutrients were scarce, competition between biofuel and VPH degraders temporarily slowed monoaromatic hydrocarbon degradation. Ethanol had a bigger impact than biodiesel, reflecting the relative ease of ethanol compared to methyl ester biodegradation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of bacterial 16S rRNA genes revealed that each fuel mixture selected for a distinct bacterial community, each dominated by Pseudomonas spp. Despite lasting impacts on soil bacterial ecology, the overall effects on VHP biodegradation were minor, and average biomass yields were comparable between fuel types, ranging from 0.40 ± 0.16 to 0.51 ± 0.22 g of biomass carbon per gram of fuel carbon degraded. Inorganic nutrient availability had a greater impact on petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation than fuel composition.

  17. Augmenting iron accumulation in cassava by the beneficial soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis (GBO3)

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Mônica A.; Medeiros, Flavio H. V.; Carvalho, Samuel P.; Guilherme, Luiz R. G.; Teixeira, William D.; Zhang, Huiming; Paré, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta), a major staple food in the developing world, provides a basic carbohydrate diet for over half a billion people living in the tropics. Despite the iron abundance in most soils, cassava provides insufficient iron for humans as the edible roots contain 3–12 times less iron than other traditional food crops such as wheat, maize, and rice. With the recent identification that the beneficial soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis (strain GB03) activates iron acquisition machinery to increase metal ion assimilation in Arabidopsis, the question arises as to whether this plant-growth promoting rhizobacterium also augments iron assimilation to increase endogenous iron levels in cassava. Biochemical analyses reveal that shoot-propagated cassava with GB03-inoculation exhibit elevated iron accumulation after 140 days of plant growth as determined by X-ray microanalysis and total foliar iron analysis. Growth promotion and increased photosynthetic efficiency were also observed for greenhouse-grown plants with GB03-exposure. These results demonstrate the potential of microbes to increase iron accumulation in an important agricultural crop and is consistent with idea that microbial signaling can regulate plant photosynthesis. PMID:26300897

  18. A barrier to homologous recombination between sympatric strains of the cooperative soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Wielgoss, Sébastien; Didelot, Xavier; Chaudhuri, Roy R; Liu, Xuan; Weedall, Gareth D; Velicer, Gregory J; Vos, Michiel

    2016-01-01

    The bacterium Myxococcus xanthus glides through soil in search of prey microbes, but when food sources run out, cells cooperatively construct and sporulate within multicellular fruiting bodies. M. xanthus strains isolated from a 16 × 16-cm-scale patch of soil were previously shown to have diversified into many distinct compatibility types that are distinguished by the failure of swarming colonies to merge upon encounter. We sequenced the genomes of 22 isolates from this population belonging to the two most frequently occurring multilocus sequence type (MLST) clades to trace patterns of incipient genomic divergence, specifically related to social divergence. Although homologous recombination occurs frequently within the two MLST clades, we find an almost complete absence of recombination events between them. As the two clades are very closely related and live in sympatry, either ecological or genetic barriers must reduce genetic exchange between them. We find that the rate of change in the accessory genome is greater than the rate of amino-acid substitution in the core genome. We identify a large genomic tract that consistently differs between isolates that do not freely merge and therefore is a candidate region for harbouring gene(s) responsible for self/non-self discrimination. PMID:27046334

  19. Decolourization of 4-Chloro-2-Nitrophenol by a Soil Bacterium, Bacillus subtilis RKJ 700

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pankaj Kumar

    2012-01-01

    A 4-Chloro-2-nitrophenol (4C2NP) decolourizing strain RKJ 700 was isolated from soil collected from a pesticide contaminated site of India and identified as Bacillus subtilis on the basis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Bacillus subtilis RKJ 700 decolourized 4C2NP up to concentration of 1.5 mM in the presence of additional carbon source. The degradation pathway of 4C2NP was studied and 4-chloro-2-aminophenol, 4-chloro-2-acetaminophenol and 5-chloro-2-methylbenzoxazole (5C2MBZ) were identified as metabolites by high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Resting cell studies showed that Bacillus subtilis RKJ 700 depleted 4C2NP completely with stoichiometric formation of 5C2MBZ. This is the first report of (i) the degradation of 4C2NP at high concentration (1.5 mM) and, (ii) the formation of 5C2MBZ by a soil bacterium. PMID:23251673

  20. Pyrosequence analysis of bacterial communities in aerobic bioreactors treating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Singleton, David R; Richardson, Stephen D; Aitken, Michael D

    2011-11-01

    Two aerobic, lab-scale, slurry-phase bioreactors were used to examine the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in contaminated soil and the associated bacterial communities. The two bioreactors were operated under semi-continuous (draw-and-fill) conditions at a residence time of 35 days, but one was fed weekly and the other monthly. Most of the quantified PAHs, including high-molecular-weight compounds, were removed to a greater extent in the weekly-fed bioreactor, which achieved total PAH removal of 76%. Molecular analyses, including pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, revealed significant shifts in the soil bacterial communities after introduction to the bioreactors and differences in the abundance and types of bacteria in each of the bioreactors. The weekly-fed bioreactor displayed a more stable bacterial community with gradual changes over time, whereas the monthly-fed bioreactor community was less consistent and may have been more strongly influenced by the influx of untreated soil during feeding. Phylogenetic groups containing known PAH-degrading bacteria previously identified through stable-isotope probing of the untreated soil were differentially affected by bioreactor conditions. Sequences from members of the Acidovorax and Sphingomonas genera, as well as the uncultivated "Pyrene Group 2" were abundant in the bioreactors. However, the relative abundances of sequences from the Pseudomonas, Sphingobium, and Pseudoxanthomonas genera, as well as from a group of unclassified anthracene degraders, were much lower in the bioreactors compared to the untreated soil.

  1. Pyrosequence analysis of bacterial communities in aerobic bioreactors treating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Stephen D.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Two aerobic, lab-scale, slurry-phase bioreactors were used to examine the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in contaminated soil and the associated bacterial communities. The two bioreactors were operated under semi-continuous (draw-and-fill) conditions at a residence time of 35 days, but one was fed weekly and the other monthly. Most of the quantified PAHs, including high-molecular-weight compounds, were removed to a greater extent in the weekly-fed bioreactor, which achieved total PAH removal of 76%. Molecular analyses, including pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, revealed significant shifts in the soil bacterial communities after introduction to the bioreactors and differences in the abundance and types of bacteria in each of the bioreactors. The weekly-fed bioreactor displayed a more stable bacterial community with gradual changes over time, whereas the monthly-fed bioreactor community was less consistent and may have been more strongly influenced by the influx of untreated soil during feeding. Phylogenetic groups containing known PAH-degrading bacteria previously identified through stable-isotope probing of the untreated soil were differentially affected by bioreactor conditions. Sequences from members of the Acidovorax and Sphingomonas genera, as well as the uncultivated ‘‘Pyrene Group 2’’ were abundant in the bioreactors. However, the relative abundances of sequences from the Pseudomonas, Sphingobium, and Pseudoxanthomonas genera, as well as from a group of unclassified anthracene degraders, were much lower in the bioreactors compared to the untreated soil. PMID:21369833

  2. Stereoselective fate kinetics of chiral neonicotinoid insecticide paichongding in aerobic soils.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiuguo; Wang, Wei; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Jianbo; Shen, Jiajun; Li, Zhong; Ye, Qingfu

    2015-11-01

    Man-made chemicals such as pesticides, when released into the soil environment, are transformed into extractable residue (ER), bound residue (BR), or mineralized. These processes all play a pivotal role in the risk assessment for the use of man-made chemicals. In this study, BR, ER, and mineralization of a novel chiral pesticide, paichongding (IPP), 1-((6-chloropyridin-3-yl)methyl)-7-methyl-8-nitro-5-propoxy-1,2,3,5,6,7-hexahydro-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine, were investigated in different soils under aerobic conditions. Significant specificity was observed for diastereoisomers of IPP in the formation of BR or mineralization in neutral and alkaline soils. In contrast, no significant difference was found between enantiomers. The overall mineralization was less than 8% of the applied radioactivity and was related to soil pH. Our findings suggest that the environmental fate of chiral pesticides may be influenced by many factors such as soil properties (e.g. pH). More comprehensive and individualized risk assessments should be carried out for individual stereoisomers of a chiral product.

  3. A rapid in situ respiration test for measuring aerobic biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchee, R.E.; Ong, S.K. )

    1992-10-01

    A in situ test method to measure the aerobic biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in contaminated soil is presented. The test method provides an initial assessment of bioventing as a remediation technology for hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. The in situ respiration test consists of ventilating the contaminated soil of the unsaturated zone with air and periodically monitoring the depletion of oxygen (O[sub 2]) and production of carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) over time after the air is turned off. The test is simple to implement and generally takes about four to five days to complete. The test was applied at eight hydrocarbon-contaminated sites of different geological and climatic conditions. These sites were contaminated with petroleum products or petroleum fuels, except for two sites where the contaminants were primarily polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Oxygen utilization rates for the eight sites ranged from 0.02 to 0.99 percent O[sub 2]/hour. Estimated biodegradation rates ranged from 0.4 to 19 mg/kg of soil/day. These rates were similar to the biodegradation rates obtained from field and pilot studies using mass balance methods. Estimated biodegradation rates based on O[sub 2] utilization were generally more reliable (especially for alkaline soils) than rates based on CO[sub 2] production, CO[sub 2] produced from microbial respiration was probably converted to carbonate under alkaline conditions. 14 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. A rapid in situ respiration test for measuring aerobic biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in soil.

    PubMed

    Hinchee, R E; Ong, S K

    1992-10-01

    An in situ test method to measure the aerobic biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in contaminated soil is presented. The test method provides an initial assessment of bioventing as a remediation technology for hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. The in situ respiration test consists of ventilating the contaminated soil of the unsaturated zone with air and periodically monitoring the depletion of oxygen (O2) and production of carbon dioxide (CO2) over time after the air is turned off. The test is simple to implement and generally takes about four to five days to complete. The test was applied at eight hydrocarbon-contaminated sites of different geological and climatic conditions. These sites were contaminated with petroleum products or petroleum fuels, except for two sites where the contaminants were primarily polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Oxygen utilization rates for the eight sites ranged from 0.02 to 0.99 percent O2/hour. Estimated biodegradation rates ranged from 0.4 to 19 mg/kg of soil/day. These rates were similar to the biodegradation rates obtained from field and pilot studies using mass balance methods. Estimated biodegradation rates based on O2 utilization were generally more reliable (especially for alkaline soils) than rates based on CO2 production. CO2 produced from microbial respiration was probably converted to carbonate under alkaline conditions.

  5. Evaluation of Arthrobacter aurescens Strain TC1 as Bioaugmentation Bacterium in Soils Contaminated with the Herbicidal Substance Terbuthylazine

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Vera P.; Moreira-Santos, Matilde; Mateus, Carla; Teixeira, Tânia; Ribeiro, Rui; Viegas, Cristina A.

    2015-01-01

    In the last years the chloro-s-triazine active substance terbuthylazine has been increasingly used as an herbicide and may leave residues in the environment which can be of concern. The present study aimed at developing a bioaugmentation tool based on the soil bacterium Arthrobacter aurescens strain TC1 for the remediation of terbuthylazine contaminated soils and at examining its efficacy for both soil and aquatic compartments. First, the feasibility of growing the bioaugmentation bacterium inocula on simple sole nitrogen sources (ammonium and nitrate) instead of atrazine, while still maintaining its efficiency to biodegrade terbuthylazine was shown. In sequence, the successful and quick (3 days) bioremediation efficacy of ammonium-grown A. aurescens TC1 cells was proven in a natural soil freshly spiked or four-months aged with commercial terbuthylazine at a dose 10× higher than the recommended in corn cultivation, to mimic spill situations. Ecotoxicity assessment of the soil eluates towards a freshwater microalga supported the effectiveness of the bioaugmentation tool. Obtained results highlight the potential to decontaminate soil while minimizing terbuthylazine from reaching aquatic compartments via the soil-water pathway. The usefulness of this bioaugmentation tool to provide rapid environment decontamination is particularly relevant in the event of accidental high herbicide contamination. Its limitations and advantages are discussed. PMID:26662024

  6. Evaluation of Arthrobacter aurescens Strain TC1 as Bioaugmentation Bacterium in Soils Contaminated with the Herbicidal Substance Terbuthylazine.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vera P; Moreira-Santos, Matilde; Mateus, Carla; Teixeira, Tânia; Ribeiro, Rui; Viegas, Cristina A

    2015-01-01

    In the last years the chloro-s-triazine active substance terbuthylazine has been increasingly used as an herbicide and may leave residues in the environment which can be of concern. The present study aimed at developing a bioaugmentation tool based on the soil bacterium Arthrobacter aurescens strain TC1 for the remediation of terbuthylazine contaminated soils and at examining its efficacy for both soil and aquatic compartments. First, the feasibility of growing the bioaugmentation bacterium inocula on simple sole nitrogen sources (ammonium and nitrate) instead of atrazine, while still maintaining its efficiency to biodegrade terbuthylazine was shown. In sequence, the successful and quick (3 days) bioremediation efficacy of ammonium-grown A. aurescens TC1 cells was proven in a natural soil freshly spiked or four-months aged with commercial terbuthylazine at a dose 10× higher than the recommended in corn cultivation, to mimic spill situations. Ecotoxicity assessment of the soil eluates towards a freshwater microalga supported the effectiveness of the bioaugmentation tool. Obtained results highlight the potential to decontaminate soil while minimizing terbuthylazine from reaching aquatic compartments via the soil-water pathway. The usefulness of this bioaugmentation tool to provide rapid environment decontamination is particularly relevant in the event of accidental high herbicide contamination. Its limitations and advantages are discussed.

  7. Biochar increases plant available water in a sandy soil under an aerobic rice cropping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo Carvalho, M. T.; de Holanda Nunes Maia, A.; Madari, B. E.; Bastiaans, L.; van Oort, P. A. J.; Heinemann, A. B.; Soler da Silva, M. A.; Petter, F. A.; Meinke, H.

    2014-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the impact of biochar rate (0, 8, 16 and 32 t ha-1) on the water retention capacity (WRC) of a sandy Dystric Plinthosol. The applied biochar was a by-product of slow pyrolysis (∼450 °C) of eucalyptus wood, milled to pass through a 2000 μm sieve that resulted in a material with an intrinsic porosity ≤10 μm and a specific surface area of ∼3.2 m2 g-1. The biochar was incorporated into the top 15 cm of the soil under an aerobic rice system. Our study focused on both the effects on WRC and rice yields at 2 and 3 years after application. Undisturbed soil samples were collected from 16 plots in two soil layers (5-10 and 15-20 cm). Soil water retention curves were modelled using a nonlinear mixed model which appropriately accounts for uncertainties inherent of spatial variability and repeated measurements taken within a specific soil sample. We found an increase in plant available water in the upper soil layer proportional to the rate of biochar, with about 0.8% for each t ha-1 of biochar amendment at 2 and 3 years after application. The impact of biochar on soil WRC was most likely related to an increase in overall porosity of the sandy soil, which was evident from an increase in saturated soil moisture and macro porosity with 0.5% and 1.6% for each t ha-1 of biochar applied, respectively. The increment in soil WRC did not translate into an increase in rice yield, essentially because in both seasons the amount of rainfall during critical period for rice production exceeded 650 mm. The use of biochar as a soil amendment can be a worthy strategy to guarantee yield stability under water limited conditions. Our findings raise the importance of assessing the feasibility of very high application rates of biochar and the inclusion of a detailed analysis of its physical and chemical properties as part of future investigations.

  8. The Growth of Steroidobacter agariperforans sp. nov., a Novel Agar-Degrading Bacterium Isolated from Soil, is Enhanced by the Diffusible Metabolites Produced by Bacteria Belonging to Rhizobiales

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Masao; Hosoda, Akifumi; Ogura, Kenjiro; Ikenaga, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    An agar-degrading bacterium was isolated from soil collected in a vegetable cropping field. The growth of this isolate was enhanced by supplying culture supernatants of bacteria belonging to the order Rhizobiales. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated the novel bacterium, strain KA5–BT, belonged to the genus Steroidobacter in Gammaproteobacteria, but differed from its closest relative, Steroidobacter denitrificans FST, at the species level with 96.5% similarity. Strain KA5–BT was strictly aerobic, Gram-negative, non-motile, non-spore forming, and had a straight to slightly curved rod shape. Cytochrome oxidase and catalase activities were positive. The strain grew on media containing culture supernatants in a temperature range of 15–37°C and between pH 4.5 and 9.0, with optimal growth occurring at 30°C and pH 6.0–8.0. No growth occurred at 10 or 42°C or at NaCl concentrations more than 3% (w/v). The main cellular fatty acids were iso–C15:0, C16:1ω7c, and iso–C17:1ω9c. The main quinone was ubiquinone-8 and DNA G+C content was 62.9 mol%. In contrast, strain FST was motile, did not grow on the agar plate, and its dominant cellular fatty acids were C15:0 and C17:1ω8c. Based on its phylogenetic and phenotypic properties, strain KA5–BT (JCM 18477T = KCTC 32107T) represents a novel species in genus Steroidobacter, for which the name Steroidobacter agariperforans sp. nov. is proposed. PMID:24621511

  9. Fungicide dissipation and impact on metolachlor aerobic soil degradation and soil microbial dynamics.

    PubMed

    White, Paul M; Potter, Thomas L; Culbreath, Albert K

    2010-02-15

    Pesticides are typically applied as mixtures and or sequentially to soil and plants during crop production. A common scenario is herbicide application at planting followed by sequential fungicide applications post-emergence. Fungicides depending on their spectrum of activity may alter and impact soil microbial communities. Thus there is a potential to impact soil processes responsible for herbicide degradation. This may change herbicide efficacy and environmental fate characteristics. Our study objective was to determine the effects of 4 peanut fungicides, chlorothalonil (2,4,5,6-tetrachloro-1,3-benzenedicarbonitrile), tebuconazole (alpha-[2-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]-alpha-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-ethanol), flutriafol (alpha-(2-fluorophenyl)-alpha-(4-fluorophenyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-ethanol), and cyproconazole (alpha-(4-chlorophenyl)-alpha-(1-cyclopropylethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-ethanol) on the dissipation kinetics of the herbicide, metolachlor (2-chloro-N-(6-ethyl-o-tolyl)-N-[(1RS)-2-methoxy-1-methylethyl]acetamide), and on the soil microbial community. This was done through laboratory incubation of field treated soil. Chlorothalonil significantly reduced metolachlor soil dissipation as compared to the non-treated control or soil treated with the other fungicides. Metolachlor DT(50) was 99 days for chlorothalonil-treated soil and 56, 45, 53, and 46 days for control, tebuconazole, flutriafol, and cyproconazole-treated soils, respectively. Significant reductions in predominant metolachlor metabolites, metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid (MESA) and metolachlor oxanilic acid (MOA), produced by oxidation of glutathione-metolachlor conjugates were also observed in chlorothalonil-treated soil. This suggested that the fungicide impacted soil glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity. Fungicide DT(50) was 27-80 days but impacts on the soil microbial community as indicated by lipid biomarker analysis were minimal. Overall study results indicated that

  10. Complete genome sequence of Nitrosospira multiformis, an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium from the soil environment

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, Jeanette M.; Klotz, Martin G; Stein, Lisa Y; Arp, D J; Bottomley, Peter J; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Larimer, Frank W; Shin, M; Starkenburg, Shawn R

    2008-01-01

    The complete genome of the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium, Nitrosospira multiformis (ATCC 25196T), consists of a circular chromosome and three small plasmids totaling 3,234,309 bp and encoding 2827 putative proteins. Of these, 2026 proteins have predicted functions and 801 are without conserved functional domains, yet 747 of these have similarity to other predicted proteins in databases. Gene homologs from Nitrosomonas europaea and N. eutropha were the best match for 42% of the predicted genes in N. multiformis. The genome contains three nearly identical copies of amo and hao gene clusters as large repeats. Distinguishing features compared to N. europaea include: the presence of gene clusters encoding urease and hydrogenase, a RuBisCO-encoding operon of distinctive structure and phylogeny, and a relatively small complement of genes related to Fe acquisition. Systems for synthesis of a pyoverdine-like siderophore and for acyl-homoserine lactone were unique to N. multiformis among the sequenced AOB genomes. Gene clusters encoding proteins associated with outer membrane and cell envelope functions including transporters, porins, exopolysaccharide synthesis, capsule formation and protein sorting/export were abundant. Numerous sensory transduction and response regulator gene systems directed towards sensing of the extracellular environment are described. Gene clusters for glycogen, polyphosphate and cyanophycin storage and utilization were identified providing mechanisms for meeting energy requirements under substrate-limited conditions. The genome of N. multiformis encodes the core pathways for chemolithoautotrophy along with adaptations for surface growth and survival in soil environments.

  11. Sequential production of amylolytic and lipolytic enzymes by bacterium strain isolated from petroleum contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Nayara Bezerra; de Souza, Ranyere Lucena; de Castro, Heizir F; Zanin, Gisella M; Lima, Alvaro Silva; Soares, Cleide M F

    2008-07-01

    Amylases and lipases are highly demanded industrial enzymes in various sectors such as food, pharmaceuticals, textiles, and detergents. Amylases are of ubiquitous occurrence and hold the maximum market share of enzyme sales. Lipases are the most versatile biocatalyst and bring about a range of bioconversion reactions such as hydrolysis, inter-esterification, esterification, alcoholysis, acidolysis, and aminolysis. The objective of this work was to study the feasibility for amylolitic and lipolytic production using a bacterium strain isolated from petroleum contaminated soil in the same submerged fermentation. This was a sequential process based on starch and vegetable oils feedstocks. Run were performed in batchwise using 2% starch supplemented with suitable nutrients and different vegetable oils as a lipase inducers. Fermentation conditions were pH 5.0; 30 degrees C, and stirred speed (200 rpm). Maxima activities for amyloglucosidase and lipase were, respectively, 0.18 and 1,150 U/ml. These results showed a promising methodology to obtain both enzymes using industrial waste resources containing vegetable oils.

  12. Random walk patterns of a soil bacterium in open and confined environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theves, M.; Taktikos, J.; Zaburdaev, V.; Stark, H.; Beta, C.

    2015-01-01

    We used microfluidic tools and high-speed time-lapse microscopy to record trajectories of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida in a confined environment with cells swimming in close proximity to a glass-liquid interface. While the general swimming pattern is preserved, when compared to swimming in the bulk fluid, our results show that cells in the presence of two solid boundaries display more frequent reversals in swimming direction and swim faster. Additionally, we observe that run segments are no longer straight and that cells swim on circular trajectories, which can be attributed to the hydrodynamic wall effect. Using the experimentally observed parameters together with a recently presented analytic model for a run-reverse random walker, we obtained additional insight on how the spreading behavior of a cell population is affected under confinement. While on short time scales, the mean square displacement of confined swimmers grows faster as compared to the bulk fluid case, our model predicts that for large times the situation reverses due to the strong increase in effective rotational diffusion.

  13. Arthrobacter nitrophenolicus sp. nov. a new 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol degrading bacterium isolated from contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Arora, Pankaj Kumar; Jain, Rakesh Kumar

    2013-02-01

    Strain SJCon(T), a 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol (2C4NP) degrading bacterium, was isolated from soil collected from a pesticide-contaminated site in Punjab, India. The strain, which stained Gram positive, displayed a rod-coccus life cycle, and possessed a type A3α peptidoglycan (L-Lys-L-Ala3), MK-9(H2) as the major menaquinone, anteiso-C15 and iso-C15:0 as the major cellular fatty acids, and diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol and a glycolipid as the major polar lipids, showed morphological and chemotaxonomic properties consistent with those reported for members of the genus Arthrobacter. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain SJCon(T) confirmed that it was a member of this genus with Arthrobacter globiformis DSM 20124(T) being the closest relative (sequence similarity of 97 %). The DNA G + C content of strain SJCon(T) was 69 ± 1 mol% and DNA homology with A. globiformis DSM 20124(T) was 45 %, suggesting that strain SJCon(T) represented a novel species of the genus Arthrobacter, which we have named Arthrobacter nitrophenolicus sp. nov The type strain is SJCon(T) (=MTCC 10104(T) =DSM 23165(T)).

  14. Brevibacillus ginsengisoli sp. nov., a denitrifying bacterium isolated from soil of a ginseng field.

    PubMed

    Baek, Sang-Hoon; Im, Wan-Taek; Oh, Hyun Woo; Lee, Jung-Sook; Oh, Hee-Mock; Lee, Sung-Taik

    2006-11-01

    A Gram-positive, rod-shaped, spore-forming bacterium, Gsoil 3088T, was isolated from soil from a ginseng field in Pocheon Province in South Korea and characterized in order to determine its taxonomic position. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain Gsoil 3088T was shown to belong to the family Paenibacillaceae, being related to Brevibacillus centrosporus (96.6%), Brevibacillus borstelensis (96.3%), Brevibacillus parabrevis (96.1%), Brevibacillus formosus (96.1%), Brevibacillus brevis (96.1%) and Brevibacillus laterosporus (96.0%). The phylogenetic distances from other validly described species within the genus Brevibacillus were greater than 4.0% (i.e. there was less than 96.0% similarity). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 52.1 mol%. Phenotypic and chemotaxonomic data (major menaquinone, MK-7; fatty acid profile, iso-C15:0, iso-C14:0 and anteiso-C15:0) supported the affiliation of strain Gsoil 3088T to the genus Brevibacillus. The results of physiological and biochemical tests allowed strain Gsoil 3088T to be distinguished genotypically and phenotypically from Brevibacillus species with validly published names. Strain Gsoil 3088T, therefore, represents a novel species of the genus Brevibacillus, for which the name Brevibacillus ginsengisoli sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Gsoil 3088T (=KCTC 13938T=LMG 23403T).

  15. Variovorax boronicumulans sp. nov., a boron-accumulating bacterium isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Hiroki; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Yoon, Jaewoo; Yokota, Akira; Fujiwara, Toru

    2008-01-01

    A non-spore-forming, Gram-negative, motile, rod-shaped, boron-accumulating bacterium isolated from soil was characterized by polyphasic taxonomy. The strain, designated BAM-48(T), was positive for catalase and oxidase activities and grew at 4-37 degrees C, 0-1% NaCl and pH 5-9. Comparative analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence demonstrated that the novel isolate BAM-48(T) was closely related to Variovorax paradoxus IAM 12373(T) (99.3% sequence similarity), Variovorax soli GH9-3(T) (98.3%) and Variovorax dokdonensis DS-43(T) (97.0%). DNA-DNA hybridization values between strain BAM-48(T) and V. paradoxus NBRC 15149(T), V. soli KACC 11579(T) and V. dokdonensis KCTC 12544(T) were only 49.1, 25.4 and 24.6%, respectively. The major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone 8 (Q-8). The DNA G+C content was 71.2 mol%. Strain BAM-48(T) contained C(16:0) (36.1%), C(16:1)omega7c (21.4%) and C(17:0) cyclo (19.0%) as the major fatty acids. Based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, strain BAM-48(T) should be classified as a member of a novel species in the genus Variovorax, for which the name Variovorax boronicumulans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BAM-48(T) (=NBRC 103145(T) =KCTC 22010(T)).

  16. A comparative genomic analysis of the alkalitolerant soil bacterium Bacillus lehensis G1.

    PubMed

    Noor, Yusuf Muhammad; Samsulrizal, Nurul Hidayah; Jema'on, Noor Azah; Low, Kheng Oon; Ramli, Aizi Nor Mazila; Alias, Noor Izawati; Damis, Siti Intan Rosdianah; Fuzi, Siti Fatimah Zaharah Mohd; Isa, Mohd Noor Mat; Murad, Abdul Munir Abdul; Raih, Mohd Firdaus Mohd; Bakar, Farah Diba Abu; Najimudin, Nazalan; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Illias, Rosli Md

    2014-07-25

    Bacillus lehensis G1 is a Gram-positive, moderately alkalitolerant bacterium isolated from soil samples. B. lehensis produces cyclodextrin glucanotransferase (CGTase), an enzyme that has enabled the extensive use of cyclodextrin in foodstuffs, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals. The genome sequence of B. lehensis G1 consists of a single circular 3.99 Mb chromosome containing 4017 protein-coding sequences (CDSs), of which 2818 (70.15%) have assigned biological roles, 936 (23.30%) have conserved domains with unknown functions, and 263 (6.55%) have no match with any protein database. Bacillus clausii KSM-K16 was established as the closest relative to B. lehensis G1 based on gene content similarity and 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis. A total of 2820 proteins from B. lehensis G1 were found to have orthologues in B. clausii, including sodium-proton antiporters, transport proteins, and proteins involved in ATP synthesis. A comparative analysis of these proteins and those in B. clausii and other alkaliphilic Bacillus species was carried out to investigate their contributions towards the alkalitolerance of the microorganism. The similarities and differences in alkalitolerance-related genes among alkalitolerant/alkaliphilic Bacillus species highlight the complex mechanism of pH homeostasis. The B. lehensis G1 genome was also mined for proteins and enzymes with potential viability for industrial and commercial purposes.

  17. Effect of passivator on Cu form transformation in pig manure aerobic composting and application in soil.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Ming; Lu, Peng-Zhen; Chen, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Hui; Fu, Jie

    2015-10-01

    A sequential extraction approach was used to evaluate the effects of various combinations of passivators (sepiolite, phosphate rock, and coal fly ash) on the concentration and speciation of Cu in swine manure aerobic compost along with soil to which the compost had been applied. The results indicate that the various passivators altered the bound forms of Cu in pig manure and soil; the concentrations of exchangeable and Fe-Mn-bound Cu decreased, whereas the residual Cu concentration increased, indicating that Cu transformed to low-availability forms after the passivator treatments. The concentrations of the carbonate-bound and organic-bound Cu varied widely. Among all treatments, the treatment of the control + straw + sepiolite + coal fly ash (2.5 %) + phosphate rock (5.0 %) resulted in the most efficient passivation of Cu; the percentage of residual Cu reached 3.91-21.14 %, obviously surpassing the percentage for the control without passivation. The treatment of the control + straw + sepiolite + phosphate rock (2.5 %) resulted in the lowest residual Cu fraction (0.85 %) among passivator treatments. These results show that the addition of suitable combinations of passivators to the composting process reduced the availability of Cu and the risk of Cu pollution during the application of composted pig manure to soil. Passivation also decreased the Cu content of Apium graveolens.

  18. Remediation of explosive-polluted soil in slurry phase by aerobic biostimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Baoping; Shen, Mengyue; Aslam, Hina; Wu, Feng

    2013-06-01

    There is a great volume of polluted soil by 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) manufacturing wastewater containing dozen of nitrocompounds in China. In this study, biostimulation was used for remediating the explosive-polluted soil in aerobic bioslurry by monitoring the removal of total organic carbon (TOC). The results showed that the pulp density had almost no effect on TOC removal; whereas the acetone addition evidently improved remediation efficiency of the polluted soil by intrinsic microorganism, and the TOC removal increased from 25% to 38.4% when dose of acetone increased from 0% to 4% (v/v). The maximum TOC removal of 49.1% was achieved through further adjusting pH at 9.0 and temperature at 30 °C. The second order reaction fits well removal dynamics of TOC under the optimum conditions. With the average conditions, liquid phase TOC decreased from 3404 to 3144 mg/L and solid phase TOC dropped from 1022 to 104 mg/L, leading to toxicity decline by 35%; the optimum condition witnessed 48.9% of TOC removal from 4500 to 2300 mg/L in liquid phase, causing toxicity drop by 62%.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of the Efficient Bioflocculant-Producing Bacterium Paenibacillus sp. Strain A9

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-liang; Hu, Xiao-min

    2013-01-01

    Paenibacillus sp. strain A9 is an important bioflocculant-producing bacterium, isolated from a soil sample, and is pale pink-pigmented, aerobic, and Gram-positive. Here, we report the draft genome sequence and the initial findings from a preliminary analysis of strain A9, which is a novel species of Paenibacillus. PMID:23618713

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of the Efficient Bioflocculant-Producing Bacterium Paenibacillus sp. Strain A9.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin-Hui; Liu, Jin-Liang; Hu, Xiao-Min

    2013-04-25

    Paenibacillus sp. strain A9 is an important bioflocculant-producing bacterium, isolated from a soil sample, and is pale pink-pigmented, aerobic, and Gram-positive. Here, we report the draft genome sequence and the initial findings from a preliminary analysis of strain A9, which is a novel species of Paenibacillus.

  1. Does S-Metolachlor Affect the Performance of Pseudomonas sp. Strain ADP as Bioaugmentation Bacterium for Atrazine-Contaminated Soils?

    PubMed Central

    Viegas, Cristina A.; Costa, Catarina; André, Sandra; Viana, Paula; Ribeiro, Rui; Moreira-Santos, Matilde

    2012-01-01

    Atrazine (ATZ) and S-metolachlor (S-MET) are two herbicides widely used, often as mixtures. The present work examined whether the presence of S-MET affects the ATZ-biodegradation activity of the bioaugmentation bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP in a crop soil. S-MET concentrations were selected for their relevance in worst-case scenarios of soil contamination by a commercial formulation containing both herbicides. At concentrations representative of application of high doses of the formulation (up to 50 µg g−1 of soil, corresponding to a dose approximately 50× higher than the recommended field dose (RD)), the presence of pure S-MET significantly affected neither bacteria survival (∼107 initial viable cells g−1 of soil) nor its ATZ-mineralization activity. Consistently, biodegradation experiments, in larger soil microcosms spiked with 20× or 50×RD of the double formulation and inoculated with the bacterium, revealed ATZ to be rapidly (in up to 5 days) and extensively (>96%) removed from the soil. During the 5 days, concentration of S-MET decreased moderately to about 60% of the initial, both in inoculated and non-inoculated microcosms. Concomitantly, an accumulation of the two metabolites S-MET ethanesulfonic acid and S-MET oxanilic acid was found. Despite the dissipation of almost all the ATZ from the treated soils, the respective eluates were still highly toxic to an aquatic microalgae species, being as toxic as those from the untreated soil. We suggest that this high toxicity may be due to the S-MET and/or its metabolites remaining in the soil. PMID:22615921

  2. Aerobic De-Epoxydation of Trichothecene Mycotoxins by a Soil Bacterial Consortium Isolated Using In Situ Soil Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei-Jie; Yuan, Qing-Song; Zhang, You-Bing; Guo, Mao-Wei; Gong, An-Dong; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Wu, Ai-Bo; Huang, Tao; Qu, Bo; Li, He-Ping; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2016-01-01

    Globally, the trichothecene mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON) and nivalenol (NIV) are among the most widely distributed mycotoxins that contaminate small grain cereals. In this study, a bacterial consortium, PGC-3, with de-epoxydation activity was isolated from soil by an in situ soil enrichment method. Screening of 14 soil samples that were sprayed with DON revealed that 4 samples were able to biotransform DON into de-epoxydized DON (dE-DON). Among these, the PGC-3 consortium showed the highest and most stable activity to biotransform DON into dE-DON and NIV into dE-NIV. PGC-3 exhibited de-epoxydation activity at a wide range of pH (5–10) and temperatures (20–37 °C) values under aerobic conditions. Sequential subculturing with a continued exposure to DON substantially reduced the microbial population diversity of this consortium. Analyses of the 16S rDNA sequences indicated that PGC-3 comprised 10 bacterial genera. Among these, one species, Desulfitobacterium, showed a steady increase in relative abundance, from 0.03% to 1.55% (a 52-fold increase), as higher concentrations of DON were used in the subculture media, from 0 to 500 μg/mL. This study establishes the foundation to further develop bioactive agents that can detoxify trichothecene mycotoxins in cereals and enables for the characterization of detoxifying genes and their regulation. PMID:27669304

  3. Aerobic biodegradation of Azo dye by Bacillus cohnii MTCC 3616; an obligately alkaliphilic bacterium and toxicity evaluation of metabolites by different bioassay systems.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A S Arun; Rao, K V Bhaskara

    2013-08-01

    An obligate alkaliphilic bacterium Bacillus cohnii MTCC 3616 aerobically decolorized a textile azo dye Direct Red-22 (5,000 mg l⁻¹) with 95 % efficiency at 37 °C and pH 9 in 4 h under static conditions. The decolorization of Direct Red-22 (DR-22) was possible through a broad pH (7-11), temperature (10-45 °C), salinity (1-7 %), and dye concentration (5-10 g l⁻¹) range. Decolorization of dye was assessed by UV-vis spectrophotometer with reduction of peak intensity at 549 nm (λ(max)). Biodegradation of dye was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The FTIR spectrum revealed that B. cohnii specifically targeted azo bond (N=N) at 1,614.42 cm⁻¹ to break down Direct Red-22. Formation of metabolites with different retention times in HPLC analysis further confirmed the degradation of dye. The phytotoxicity test with 5,000 mg l⁻¹ of untreated dye showed 80 % germination inhibition in Vigna mungo, 70 % in Sorghum bicolor and 80 % in Vigna radiata. No germination inhibition was noticed in all three plants by DR-22 metabolites at 5,000 mg l⁻¹. Biotoxicity test with Artemia salina proved the lethality of the azo dye at LC₅₀ of 4 and 8 % for degraded metabolites by causing death of its nauplii compared to its less toxic-degraded metabolites. Bioaccumulation of dye was observed in the mid-gut of A. salina. The cytogenotoxicity assay on the meristematic root tip cells of Allium cepa further confirmed the cytotoxic nature of azo dye (DR-22) with decrease in mitotic index (0.5 % at 500 ppm) and increase in aberrant index (4.56 %) over 4-h exposure period. Genotoxic damages (lagging chromosome, metaphase cluster, chromosome bridges, and dye accumulation in cytoplasm) were noticed at different stages of cell cycle. The degraded metabolites had negligible cytotoxic and genotoxic effects.

  4. Bacillus shacheensis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from a saline-alkali soil.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zuchao; Qiu, Peng; Ye, Renyuan; Tian, Jiewei; Liu, Yang; Wang, Lei; Tang, Shu-Kun; Li, Wen-Jun; Tian, Yongqiang

    2014-01-01

    A moderately halophilic bacterium, strain HNA-14(T), was isolated from a saline-alkali soil sample collected in Shache County, Xinjiang Province. On the basis of the polyphasic taxonomic data, the isolate was considered to be a member of the genus Bacillus. The organism grew optimally at 30 °C and pH 8.0. It was moderately halophilic and its optimum growth occurred at 5-10% NaCl. The diamino acid found in the cell-wall peptidoglycan was meso-diaminopimelic acid and the predominant menaquinone was MK-7. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C15:0 and iso-C15:0 and the polar lipid profile consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol mannosides and two unknown phospholipids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 48.6 mol%. Strain HNA-14(T) exhibited a low 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 96% with its nearest neighbors [Bacillus clausii KSM-K16 (96.5%), Bacillus xiaoxiensis DSM 21943(T)(96.2%), Bacillus clausii DSM 8716(T) (96.1%), Bacillus patagoniensis PAT05(T) (96.1%), Bacillus lehensis MLB-2(T) (96.0%), Bacillus oshimensis K11(T) (95.9%) and Bacillus hunanensis DSM 23008(T) (95.8%)] and the phenotypic characteristics indicate that strain HNA-14(T) can be distinguished from them. Therefore, a novel species of the genus Bacillus, Bacillus shacheensis sp. nov. (type strain, HNA-14(T) = KCTC 33145 = DSM 26902) is proposed.

  5. Thermoactinomyces khenchelensis sp. nov., a filamentous bacterium isolated from soil sediment of a terrestrial hot spring.

    PubMed

    Mokrane, Salim; Bouras, Noureddine; Meklat, Atika; Lahoum, Abdelhadi; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Verheecke, Carol; Mathieu, Florence; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Sabaou, Nasserdine; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2016-02-01

    A novel thermophilic filamentous bacterium, designated strain T36(T), was isolated from soil sediment sample from a hot spring source collected in Khenchela province, Algeria. Strain T36(T) was identified as a member of the genus Thermoactinomyces by a polyphasic approach. Strain T36(T) was observed to form white aerial mycelium and non-coloured to pale yellow substrate mycelium, both producing endospores, sessile or borne by short sporophores. The optimum growth temperature and pH were found to be 37-55 °C and 7.0-9.0, respectively and the optimum NaCl concentration for growth was found to be 0-7 % (w/v). The diagnostic diamino acid in the cell wall peptidoglycan was identified as meso-diaminopimelic acid. The predominant menaquinone of strain T36(T) was identified as MK-7 (H0). The major fatty acids were found to be iso-C15:0 and iso-C17:0. The phospholipids detected were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol and phosphoglycolipid. The chemotaxonomic properties of strain T36(T) are consistent with those shared by members of the genus Thermoactinomyces. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the sequence similarities between strain T36(T) and Thermoactinomyces species with validly published names were less than 98 %. Based on the combined genotypic and phenotypic evidence, it is proposed that strain T36(T) should be classified as representative of a novel species, for which the name Thermoactinomyces khenchelensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is T36(T) (=DSM 45951(T) = CECT 8579(T)).

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Nitrosospira multiformis, an Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium from the Soil Environment▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Jeanette M.; Klotz, Martin G.; Stein, Lisa Y.; Arp, Daniel J.; Bottomley, Peter J.; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Hauser, Loren J.; Land, Miriam L.; Larimer, Frank W.; Shin, Maria W.; Starkenburg, Shawn R.

    2008-01-01

    The complete genome of the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium Nitrosospira multiformis (ATCC 25196T) consists of a circular chromosome and three small plasmids totaling 3,234,309 bp and encoding 2,827 putative proteins. Of the 2,827 putative proteins, 2,026 proteins have predicted functions and 801 are without conserved functional domains, yet 747 of these have similarity to other predicted proteins in databases. Gene homologs from Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrosomonas eutropha were the best match for 42% of the predicted genes in N. multiformis. The N. multiformis genome contains three nearly identical copies of amo and hao gene clusters as large repeats. The features of N. multiformis that distinguish it from N. europaea include the presence of gene clusters encoding urease and hydrogenase, a ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase-encoding operon of distinctive structure and phylogeny, and a relatively small complement of genes related to Fe acquisition. Systems for synthesis of a pyoverdine-like siderophore and for acyl-homoserine lactone were unique to N. multiformis among the sequenced genomes of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Gene clusters encoding proteins associated with outer membrane and cell envelope functions, including transporters, porins, exopolysaccharide synthesis, capsule formation, and protein sorting/export, were abundant. Numerous sensory transduction and response regulator gene systems directed toward sensing of the extracellular environment are described. Gene clusters for glycogen, polyphosphate, and cyanophycin storage and utilization were identified, providing mechanisms for meeting energy requirements under substrate-limited conditions. The genome of N. multiformis encodes the core pathways for chemolithoautotrophy along with adaptations for surface growth and survival in soil environments. PMID:18390676

  7. Geobacter soli sp. nov., a dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium isolated from forest soil.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shungui; Yang, Guiqin; Lu, Qin; Wu, Min

    2014-11-01

    A novel Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, designated GSS01(T), was isolated from a forest soil sample using a liquid medium containing acetate and ferrihydrite as electron donor and electron acceptor, respectively. Cells of strain GSS01(T) were strictly anaerobic, Gram-stain-negative, motile, non-spore-forming and slightly curved rod-shaped. Growth occurred at 16-40 °C and optimally at 30 °C. The DNA G+C content was 60.9 mol%. The major respiratory quinone was MK-8. The major fatty acids were C(16:0), C(18:0) and C(16:1)ω7c/C(16:1)ω6c. Strain GSS01(T) was able to grow with ferrihydrite, Fe(III) citrate, Mn(IV), sulfur, nitrate or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate, but not with fumarate, as sole electron acceptor when acetate was the sole electron donor. The isolate was able to utilize acetate, ethanol, glucose, lactate, butyrate, pyruvate, benzoate, benzaldehyde, m-cresol and phenol but not toluene, p-cresol, propionate, malate or succinate as sole electron donor when ferrihydrite was the sole electron acceptor. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain GSS01(T) was most closely related to Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA(T) (98.3% sequence similarity) and exhibited low similarities (94.9-91.8%) to the type strains of other species of the genus Geobacter. The DNA-DNA relatedness between strain GSS01(T) and G. sulfurreducens PCA(T) was 41.4 ± 1.1%. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, phenotypic characterization and physiological tests, strain GSS01(T) is believed to represent a novel species of the genus Geobacter, and the name Geobacter soli sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is GSS01(T) ( =KCTC 4545(T) =MCCC 1K00269(T)).

  8. Gracilibacillus boraciitolerans sp. nov., a highly boron-tolerant and moderately halotolerant bacterium isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Iftikhar; Yokota, Akira; Fujiwara, Toru

    2007-04-01

    A motile, Gram-positive, boron-tolerant and moderately halotolerant rod-shaped bacterium was isolated from a soil naturally high in boron minerals found in the Hisarcik area of Turkey. The novel isolate, designated T-16X(T), produced spherical or ellipsoidal endospores in a non-bulging or slightly swollen sporangium in a terminal position and survived in a medium containing up to 450 mM boron. Whereas it tolerated 11 % (w/v) NaCl, it also grew without NaCl or boron. The temperature range for growth was 16-37 degrees C (optimum 25-28 degrees C) and the pH range for growth was 6.0-10.0 (optimum pH 7.5-8.5). The DNA G+C content was 35.8 mol% and the major cellular fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0) and anteiso-C(15 : 0) at 18.2 and 45.7 % of the total fatty acids, respectively. MK-7 (90 %) was the predominant respiratory quinone system and meso-diaminopimelic acid was the predominant diamino acid of the cell-wall peptidoglycan. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that the novel strain is closely related to the type strains of Gracilibacillus orientalis (96.7 % similarity), G. halotolerans (95.5 %) and G. dipsosauri (95.4 %). However, the maximum DNA hybridization value for this strain with these closely related strains was less than 26.2 %. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence data and chemotaxonomic and physiological features, the organism T-16X(T) (=DSM 17256(T)=IAM 15263(T)=ATCC BAA-1190(T)) is proposed to be a member of the genus Gracilibacillus as the type strain of the novel species Gracilibacillus boraciitolerans sp. nov.

  9. Effect of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates on the growth of aerobic heterotrophic cultivable bacteria isolated from an agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Peinado, María del Mar; González-López, Jesús; Rodelas, Belén; Galera, Vanesa; Pozo, Clementina; Martínez-Toledo, María Victoria

    2008-08-01

    An enrichment culture technique was used to isolate soil bacteria capable of growing in the presence of two different concentrations of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) (10 and 500 microg ml(-1)). Nine bacterial strains, representatives of the major colony types of aerobic heterotrophic cultivable bacteria in the enriched samples, were isolated and subsequently identified by PCR-amplification and partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Amongst the isolates, strains LAS05 (Pseudomonas syringae), LAS06 (Staphylococcus epidermidis), LAS07 (Delftia tsuruhatensis), LAS08 (Staphylococcus epidermidis) and LAS09 (Enterobacter aerogenes), were able to grow in pure culture in dialysed soil media amended with LAS (50 microg ml(-1)). The three Gram-negative strains grew to higher cell numbers in the presence of 50 microg ml(-1) of LAS, compared to LAS-unamended dialysed soil medium, and were selected for further testing of their ability to use LAS as carbon source. However, HPLC analysis of culture supernatants showed that the three strains can tolerate but not degrade LAS when grown in pure cultures. A higher concentration of soluble phosphates was recorded in dialysed soil media amended with LAS (50 microg ml(-1)) compared to unamended control media, suggesting an effect of the surfactant that enhanced the bioavailability of P from soil. The presence of LAS at a concentration of 50 microg ml(-1) had an important impact on growth of selected aerobic heterotrophic soil bacteria, a deleterious effect which may be relevant for the normal function and evolution of agricultural soil.

  10. Soil acidity determines the effectiveness of an organic amendment and a native bacterium for increasing soil stabilisation in semiarid mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, L; Caravaca, F; Azcón, R; Roldán, A

    2009-01-01

    Unstable mine tailings are vulnerable to water and air erosion, so it is important to promote their surface stabilisation in order to avoid the spread of heavy metals. In a greenhouse experiment, we assessed the effect of the addition of Aspergillus niger-treated sugar beet waste and inoculation with a native bacterium, Bacillus cereus, on the stabilisation of soil aggregates of two acidic, semiarid mine tailings, with different acidity degree, during watering and drying periods. Organic amendment raised the pH of both the moderately and highly acidic tailings, whereas the bacterial inoculation increased this parameter in the former. Only the amendment addition increased soil water-soluble carbon in both tailings compared with their controls, under either watering or drying conditions. Both the amendment and B. cereus enhanced water-soluble carbohydrates. Both treatments increased dehydrogenase activity and aggregate stability, particularly in the moderately acidic tailing under drying conditions. After soil drying, aggregate stability was increased by the amendment (about 66% higher than the control soil) and by the bacterium (about 45% higher than the control soil) in the moderately acidic tailing. The effectiveness of these treatments as structure-stabilisation methods for degraded, semiarid mine ecosystems appears to be restricted to tailings of moderate acidity.

  11. Effects of Soil pH on the Biodegradation of Chlorpyrifos and Isolation of a Chlorpyrifos-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brajesh K.; Walker, Allan; Morgan, J. Alun W.; Wright, Denis J.

    2003-01-01

    We examined the role of microorganisms in the degradation of the organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos in soils from the United Kingdom and Australia. The kinetics of degradation in five United Kingdom soils varying in pH from 4.7 to 8.4 suggested that dissipation of chlorpyrifos was mediated by the cometabolic activities of the soil microorganisms. Repeated application of chlorpyrifos to these soils did not result in the development of a microbial population with an enhanced ability to degrade the pesticide. A robust bacterial population that utilized chlorpyrifos as a source of carbon was detected in an Australian soil. The enhanced ability to degrade chlorpyrifos in the Australian soil was successfully transferred to the five United Kingdom soils. Only soils with a pH of ≥6.7 were able to maintain this degrading ability 90 days after inoculation. Transfer and proliferation of degrading microorganisms from the Australian soil to the United Kingdom soils was monitored by molecular fingerprinting of bacterial 16S rRNA genes by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Two bands were found to be associated with enhanced degradation of chlorpyrifos. Band 1 had sequence similarity to enterics and their relatives, while band 2 had sequence similarity to strains of Pseudomonas. Liquid enrichment culture using the Australian soil as the source of the inoculum led to the isolation of a chlorpyrifos-degrading bacterium. This strain had a 16S rRNA gene with a sequence identical to that of band 1 in the DGGE profile of the Australian soil. DNA probing indicated that genes similar to known organophosphate-degrading (opd) genes were present in the United Kingdom soils. However, no DNA hybridization signal was detected for the Australian soil or the isolated degrader. This indicates that unrelated genes were present in both the Australian soil and the chlorpyrifos-degrading isolate. These results are consistent with our observations that degradation of

  12. Addition of microbially-treated sugar beet residue and a native bacterium increases structural stability in heavy metal-contaminated Mediterranean soils.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, L; Caravaca, F; Azcón, R; Kohler, J; Roldán, A

    2009-10-15

    A mesocosm experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of the addition of Aspergillus niger-treated sugar beet waste, in the presence of rock phosphate, and inoculation with a native, metal-tolerant bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis, on the stabilisation of soil aggregates of two mine tailings, with differing pH values, from a semiarid Mediterranean area and on the stimulation of growth of Piptatherum miliaceum. Bacterium combined with organic amendment enhanced structural stability (38% in acidic soil and 106% in neutral soil compared with their corresponding controls). Only the organic amendment increased pH, electrical conductivity, water-soluble C, water-soluble carbohydrates and plant growth, in both soils. While in neutral soil both organic amendment and bacterium increased dehydrogenase activity, only organic amendment had a significant effect in acidic soil. This study demonstrates that the use of P. miliaceum in combination with organic amendment and bacterium is a suitable tool for the stabilisation of the soil structure of degraded mine tailings, although its effectiveness is dependent on soil pH.

  13. Anoxybacillus sp. Strain UARK-01, a New Thermophilic Soil Bacterium with Hyperthermostable Alkaline Laccase Activity.

    PubMed

    Al-Kahem Al-Balawi, Thamir H; Wood, Adam L; Solis, Alexis; Cooper, Ted; Barabote, Ravi D

    2017-04-08

    We describe the isolation and characteristics of a novel thermophilic bacterium from soil. The organism is a member of the Anoxybacillus genus based on phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. The 16S rRNA of the organism shares >99% sequence identity with those of two species, Anoxybacillus rupiensis and A. geothermalis. We named this isolate as Anoxybacillus sp. strain UARK-01. UARK-01 grows optimally in the presence of oxygen at 55 °C and pH 8. It grew excellently in the presence of lignin as the sole carbon source. Culture supernatant from UARK-01 grown on lignin was rich in laccase activity. The laccase activity was optimal at 90 °C and pH 9, and there was comparable activity at 80 and 100 °C. The crude laccase decolorized approximately 75% of Congo Red in 7 h under optimal conditions. A single laccase gene was identified from the draft genome sequence of Anoxybacillus sp. UARK-01. The UARK-01 laccase (Anox_Lacc) was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli and was partially purified. The partially purified Anox_Lacc decolorized approximately 1.64+/0.21 nanomoles of Congo Red per microgram protein in 30 min at 90 °C and pH 9. Anox_Lacc is a member of the multicopper polyphenol oxidoreductase laccase family (pfam02578 Cu-oxidase_4) and has novel characteristics. Multiple sequence analysis of Anox_Lacc with six homologs from the family revealed four conserved copper ligands and several new residues that are fully conserved. Anox_Lacc is enriched in leucine, glutamine, and lysine, and it contains fewer alanine, arginine, glycine, and serine residues. Skewed amino acid composition of Anox_Lacc likely contributes to the exceptional thermochemical properties of the laccase activity from UARK-01. Both lignin utilization and production of hyperthermostable alkaline laccase are new findings in the Anoxybacillus genus.

  14. Anoxybacillus calidus sp. nov., a thermophilic bacterium isolated from soil near a thermal power plant.

    PubMed

    Cihan, Arzu Coleri; Cokmus, Cumhur; Koc, Melih; Ozcan, Birgul

    2014-01-01

    A novel thermophilic, Gram-stain-positive, facultatively anaerobic, endospore-forming, motile, rod-shaped bacterium, strain C161ab(T), was isolated from a soil sample collected near Kizildere, Saraykoy-Buharkent power plant in Denizli. The isolate could grow at temperatures between 35 and 70 °C (optimum 55 °C), at pH 6.5-9.0 (optimum pH 8.0-8.5) and with 0-2.5 % NaCl (optimum 0.5 %, w/v). The strain formed cream-coloured, circular colonies and tolerated up to 70 mM boron. Its DNA G+C content was 37.8 mol%. The peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid. Strain C161ab(T) contained menaquinones MK-7 (96 %) and MK-6 (4 %). The major cellular fatty acids were iso-branched fatty acids: iso-C15 : 0 (52.2 %) and iso-C17 : 0 (28.0 %,) with small amounts of C16 : 0 (7.4 %). Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene revealed 94.6-96.8 % sequence similarity with all recognized species of the genus Anoxybacillus. Strain C161ab(T) showed the greatest sequence similarity to Anoxybacillus rupiensis DSM 17127(T) and Anoxybacillus voinovskiensis DSM 17075(T), both had 96.8 % similarity to strain C161ab(T), as well as to Anoxybacillus caldiproteolyticus DSM 15730(T) (96.6 %). DNA-DNA hybridization revealed low levels of relatedness with the closest relatives of strain C161ab(T), A. rupiensis (21.2 %) and A. voinovskiensis (16.5 %). On the basis of the results obtained from phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, genomic fingerprinting, phylogenetic and hybridization analyses, the isolate is proposed to represent a novel species, Anoxybacillus calidus sp. nov. (type strain C161ab(T) = DSM 25520(T) = NCIMB 14851(T)).

  15. Arsenic dissolution from Japanese paddy soil by a dissimilatory arsenate-reducing bacterium Geobacter sp. OR-1.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Toshihiko; Yamaguchi, Noriko; Makino, Tomoyuki; Sakurai, Kazuhiro; Kimura, Kenta; Kudo, Keitaro; Homma, Eri; Dong, Dian Tao; Amachi, Seigo

    2013-06-18

    Dissimilatory As(V) (arsenate)-reducing bacteria may play an important role in arsenic release from anoxic sediments in the form of As(III) (arsenite). Although respiratory arsenate reductase genes (arrA) closely related to Geobacter species have been frequently detected in arsenic-rich sediments, it is still unclear whether they directly participate in arsenic release, mainly due to lack of pure cultures capable of arsenate reduction. In this study, we isolated a novel dissimilatory arsenate-reducing bacterium, strain OR-1, from Japanese paddy soil, and found that it was phylogenetically closely related to Geobacter pelophilus. OR-1 also utilized soluble Fe(III), ferrihydrite, nitrate, and fumarate as electron acceptors. OR-1 catalyzed dissolution of arsenic from arsenate-adsorbed ferrihydrite, while Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 did not. Furthermore, inoculation of washed cells of OR-1 into sterilized paddy soil successfully restored arsenic release. Arsenic K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis revealed that strain OR-1 reduced arsenate directly on the soil solid phase. Analysis of putative ArrA sequences from paddy soils suggested that Geobacter-related bacteria, including those closely related to OR-1, play an important role in arsenic release from paddy soils. Our results provide direct evidence for arsenic dissolution by Geobacter species and support the hypothesis that Geobacter species play a significant role in reduction and mobilization of arsenic in flooded soils and anoxic sediments.

  16. Effect of selected environmental factors on degradation and mineralization of biaryl compounds by the bacterium Ralstonia pickettii in soil and compost.

    PubMed

    Hundt, K; Wagner, M; Becher, D; Hammer, E; Schauer, F

    1998-04-01

    By varying selected environmental factors, the degradation and mineralization of biaryl compounds by the bacterium Ralstonia pickettii in soil and compost were investigated. An optimized soil moisture and enhanced bioavailability by using the nonionic surfactant Tween 80 were of great importance for the degradation rates of biaryl compounds like biphenyl and 4-chlorobiphenyl by cells of Ralstonia picketti SBUG 290 inoculated into soil. Additionally, degradation of these compounds by the investigated strain in soil was strongly dependent upon the medium of precultivation. Also the influence of temperature and soil pH-value was tested. In contrast to the used soil, the autochthonous flora of the compost seemed to have a higher physiological activity. All investigated compounds (biphenyl, 4-chlorobiphenyl and dibenzofuran) were degraded quickly in compost. Inoculation with the investigated bacterium did not enhance the degradation rates significantly.

  17. Aerobic biogenesis of selenium nanospheres by Bacillus cereus isolated from coalmine soil

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Microorganisms that are exposed to pollutants in the environment, such as metals/metalloids, have a remarkable ability to fight the metal stress by various mechanisms. These metal-microbe interactions have already found an important role in biotechnological applications. It is only recently that microorganisms have been explored as potential biofactories for synthesis of metal/metalloid nanoparticles. Biosynthesis of selenium (Se0) nanospheres in aerobic conditions by a bacterial strain isolated from the coalmine soil is reported in the present study. Results The strain CM100B, identified as Bacillus cereus by morphological, biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequencing [GenBank:GU551935.1] was studied for its ability to generate selenium nanoparticles (SNs) by transformation of toxic selenite (SeO32-) anions into red elemental selenium (Se0) under aerobic conditions. Also, the ability of the strain to tolerate high levels of toxic selenite ions was studied by challenging the microbe with different concentrations of sodium selenite (0.5 mM-10 mM). ESEM, AFM and SEM studies revealed the spherical Se0 nanospheres adhering to bacterial biomass as well as present as free particles. The TEM microscopy showed the accumulation of spherical nanostructures as intracellular and extracellular deposits. The deposits were identified as element selenium by EDX analysis. This is also indicated by the red coloration of the culture broth that starts within 2-3 h of exposure to selenite oxyions. Selenium nanoparticles (SNs) were further characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, TEM and zeta potential measurement. The size of nanospheres was in the range of 150-200 nm with high negative charge of -46.86 mV. Conclusions This bacterial isolate has the potential to be used as a bionanofactory for the synthesis of stable, nearly monodisperse Se0 nanoparticles as well as for detoxification of the toxic selenite anions in the environment. A hypothetical mechanism for the biogenesis

  18. Sphingobium cupriresistens sp. nov., a copper-resistant bacterium isolated from copper mine soil, and emended description of the genus Sphingobium.

    PubMed

    Li, Liqiong; Liu, Hongliang; Shi, Zunji; Wang, Gejiao

    2013-02-01

    A gram-negative, aerobic, copper-resistant bacterium, designated strain CU4(T), was isolated from copper mine soil in Daye, China. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed highest similarity to Sphingobium rhizovicinum CC-FH12-1(T) (98.4 %), followed by Sphingobium francense Sp+(T) (97.2 %), Sphingobium japonicum UT26(T) (97.1 %), Sphingobium abikonense NBRC 16140(T) (97.0 %), Sphingobium xenophagum DSM 6383(T) (96.9 %) and Sphingobium yanoikuyae DSM 7462(T) (95.5 %). The major fatty acids (>5 %) were summed feature 7 (C(18 : 1)ω7c, C(18 : 1)ω9t and/or C(18 : 1)ω12t), summed feature 4 (C(16 : 1)ω7c and/or iso-C(15 : 0) 2-OH), C(16 : 0) and C(14 : 0) 2-OH, and the predominant quinone was ubiquinone Q-10. Spermidine was the major polyamine component. The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, sphingoglycolipid, phosphatidyldimethylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain CU4(T) was 64.9 mol%. Comparison of DNA-DNA hybridization, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics between strain CU4(T) and phylogenetically related strains revealed that the new isolate represents a novel species of the genus Sphingobium, for which the name Sphingobium cupriresistens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CU4(T) ( = KCTC 23865(T) = CCTCC AB 2011146(T)). An emended description of the genus Sphingobium is also proposed.

  19. Effects of randomly methylated-beta-cyclodextrins (RAMEB) on the bioavailability and aerobic biodegradation of polychlorinated biphenyls in three pristine soils spiked with a transformer oil.

    PubMed

    Fava, F; Ciccotosto, V F

    2002-03-01

    The low bioavailability of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in soils often results in their slow and partial aerobic biodegradation. The process can be enhanced by supplementing soils with cyclodextrins. However, pure cyclodextrins are expensive and we have therefore explored the use of a less costly technical grade mixture of randomly methylated-beta-cyclodextrins (RAMEB). RAMEB was tested at 0, 1, 3 and 5% (w/w) in the aerobic bioremediation and detoxification of a loamy-, a humic- and a sandy-soil, each artificially contaminated with a PCB-containing transformer oil (added PCBs: about 450 or 700 mg/kg), inoculated with an exogenous aerobic PCB-biodegrading bacterial co-culture and treated in slurry- and solid-phase laboratory conditions. Significant depletions of the spiked PCBs were observed in all microcosms of the three soils after 90 days of treatment; however, interesting yields of PCB dechlorination and detectable decreases of the original soil ecotoxicity were observed in the slurry-phase microcosms. RAMEB generally enhanced PCB-metabolism with effects which were dependent on the concentration at which it was applied, the physical-chemical nature of the amended soil, and the soil treatment conditions employed. RAMEB, which was slowly metabolized by soil microorganisms, enhanced the presence of PCBs and PCB-cometabolizing bacteria in the soil-water phase, suggesting that RAMEB enhances aerobic biodegradation of PCBs by increasing pollutant bioavailability in soil microcosms.

  20. Complete remediation of PCE contaminated unsaturated soils by sequential anaerobic-aerobic bioventing.

    PubMed

    Mihopoulos, P G; Suidan, M T; Sayles, G D

    2001-01-01

    Bioventing principles have been applied to completely dechlorinate tetrachloroethylene vapors in the unsaturated zone in a sequential anaerobic-aerobic pattern. The aerobic step yields trans-DCE and VC as PCE reductive dechlorination byproducts, while TCE and cis-DCE are observed as intermediates. The aerobic step results in rapid oxidation of the VC and trans-DCE to carbon dioxide. Hydrogen was delivered in the gas phase as a reducing agent for the anaerobic step at levels of 1%, and oxygen at 4.2% was used as an electron acceptor in the aerobic step. PCE and VC half lives in the anaerobic and aerobic steps respectively, where less than 10 min.

  1. Mineralization and kinetics of Reactive Brilliant Red X-3B by a combined anaerobic-aerobic bioprocess inoculated with the coculture of fungus and bacterium.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shengnan; Ma, Fang; Sun, Tieheng; Li, Ang; Zhou, Jiti; Qu, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    Mineralization of Reactive Brilliant Red X-3B by a combined anaerobic-aerobic process which was inoculated with the co-culture of Penicillium sp. QQ and Exiguobacterium sp. TL was studied. The optimal conditions of decolorization were investigated by response surface methodology as follows: 132.67 g/L of strain QQ wet spores, 1.09 g/L of strain TL wet cells, 2.25 g/L of glucose, 2.10 g/L of yeast extract, the initial dye concentration of 235.14 mg/L, pH 6.5, and 33 °C. The maximal decolorization rate was about 96 % within 12 h under the above conditions. According to the Haldane kinetic equation, the maximal specific decolorization rate was 89.629 mg/g˙h. It was suggested that in the anaerobic-aerobic combined process, decolorization occurred in the anaerobic unit and chemical oxygen demand (COD) was mainly removed in the aerobic one. Inoculation of fungus QQ in the anaerobic unit was important for mineralization of X-3B. Besides, the divided anaerobic-aerobic process showed better performance of COD removal than the integrated one. It was suggested that the combined anaerobic-aerobic process which was inoculated with co-culture was potentially useful for the field application.

  2. Nitrogen availability and indirect measurements of greenhouse gas emissions from aerobic and anaerobic biowaste digestates applied to agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Rigby, H; Smith, S R

    2013-12-01

    Recycling biowaste digestates on agricultural land diverts biodegradable waste from landfill disposal and represents a sustainable source of nutrients and organic matter (OM) to improve soil for crop production. However, the dynamics of nitrogen (N) release from these organic N sources must be determined to optimise their fertiliser value and management. This laboratory incubation experiment examined the effects of digestate type (aerobic and anaerobic), waste type (industrial, agricultural and municipal solid waste or sewage sludge) and soil type (sandy loam, sandy silt loam and silty clay) on N availability in digestate-amended soils and also quantified the extent and significance of the immobilisation of N within the soil microbial biomass, as a possible regulatory mechanism of N release. The digestate types examined included: dewatered, anaerobically digested biosolids (DMAD); dewatered, anaerobic mesophilic digestate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (DMADMSW); liquid, anaerobic co-digestate of food and animal slurry (LcoMAD) and liquid, thermophilic aerobic digestate of food waste (LTAD). Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) was included as a reference treatment for mineral N. After 48 days, the final, maximum net recoveries of mineral N relative to the total N (TN) addition in the different digestates and unamended control treatments were in the decreasing order: LcoMAD, 68%; LTAD, 37%, DMAD, 20%; and DMADMSW, 11%. A transient increase in microbial biomass N (MBN) was observed with LTAD application, indicating greater microbial activity in amended soil and reflecting the lower stability of this OM source, compared to the other, anaerobic digestate types, which showed no consistent effects on MBN compared to the control. Thus, the overall net release of digestate N in different soil types was not regulated by N transfer into the soil microbial biomass, but was determined primarily by digestate properties and the capacity of the soil type to process and

  3. Ozone oxidation and aerobic biodegradation with spent mushroom compost for detoxification and benzo(a)pyrene removal from contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Russo, Lara; Rizzo, Luigi; Belgiorno, Vincenzo

    2012-05-01

    The combination of ozonation and spent mushroom compost (SMC)-mediated aerobic biological treatment was investigated in the removal of benzo(a)pyrene from contaminated soil. The performances of the process alone and combined were evaluated in terms of benzo(a)pyrene removal efficiency, mineralization efficiency (as total organic carbon removal), and soil residual toxicity (phytotoxicity to Lepidium Sativum and toxicity to Vibrio fischeri). In spite of the removal efficiency (35%) obtained by SMC-mediated biological process as a stand-alone treatment, the combined process showed a benzo(a)pyrene concentration reduction higher than 75%; the best removal (82%) was observed after 10 min pre-ozonation treatment. In particular, ozonation improved the biodegradability of the contaminant, as confirmed by the increase of CO(2) production (close to 70% compared to the control), mineralization (greater than 60%) and bacterial density (which increased by two orders of magnitude). Moreover, according to phytotoxicity tests on L. Sativum, the aerobic biological process of pre-ozonated soil decreased toxicity. According to the results achieved in the present study, ozonation pre-treatment showed an high potential to overcome the limitation of bioremediation of recalcitrant compound, but it should be carefully operated in order to maximize PAH removal efficiency as well as to minimize soil residual toxicity which can result from the formation of the oxidation intermediates.

  4. Comparative studies on heavy metal uptake by plants from anaerobically and aerobically digested sludge-amended soil

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, K.T.

    1983-01-01

    A study was undertaken to compare and contrast the effects of cropland application of varying quantities of anaerobically and aerobically digested sludge from a municipal wastewater treatment plant, on the uptake of certain heavy metals such as Zn, Cd, Cu, Ni, and Pb by six different types of plants (bean, tomato, carrot, cucumber, cantaloupe and sweet corn) grown on the sludge-applied soil and the accumulation of these metals in the sludge-amended soil. The main aspects of the study were the evaluation of 1) the extent of bioconcentration of heavy metals by the different kinds of plants, and 2) the availability of the metals from soil to plants, following sludge application. Field investigations involving plot-scale gardening were conducted using the two types of sludge, at application rates of 0, 2.2, 4.4, 8.8, 17.6 and 70.4 tons/acre. At application rates of 17.6 and 70.4 tons/acre, delays in germination of seeds were observed in some instances, with no apparent adverse effects on the plant's later stages of life and the yield produced. The uptake of heavy metals from sludge-amended soil by plants did not increase in direct proportion to the increase in rate of sludge application and plant species differ considerably in their uptake of heavy metals from soil which received the same amount of sludge. In general, plants grown on anaerobically digested sludge-applied soil showed higher uptake of heavy metals than those grown on aerobically digested sludge. Among the plants investigated, sweet corn was identified to be the low accumulator of heavy metals in the edible part of the plant.

  5. Dissolved organic matter removal during coal slag additive soil aquifer treatment for secondary effluent recharging: Contribution of aerobic biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Liangliang; Li, Siliang; Noguera, Daniel R; Qin, Kena; Jiang, Junqiu; Zhao, Qingliang; Kong, Xiangjuan; Cui, Fuyi

    2015-06-01

    Recycling wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent at low cost via the soil aquifer treatment (SAT), which has been considered as a renewable approach in regenerating potable and non-potable water, is welcome in arid and semi-arid regions throughout the world. In this study, the effect of a coal slag additive on the bulk removal of the dissolved organic matter (DOM) in WWTP effluent during SAT operation was explored via the matrix configurations of both coal slag layer and natural soil layer. Azide inhibition and XAD-resins fractionation experiments indicated that the appropriate configuration designing of an upper soil layer (25 cm) and a mixture of soil/coal slag underneath would enhance the removal efficiency of adsorption and anaerobic biodegradation to the same level as that of aerobic biodegradation (31.7% vs 32.2%), while it was only 29.4% compared with the aerobic biodegradation during traditional 50 cm soil column operation. The added coal slag would preferentially adsorb the hydrophobic DOM, and those adsorbed organics could be partially biodegraded by the biomass within the SAT systems. Compared with the relatively lower dissolved organic carbon (DOC), ultraviolet light adsorption at 254 nm (UV-254) and trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) removal rate of the original soil column (42.0%, 32.9%, and 28.0%, respectively), SSL2 and SSL4 columns would enhance the bulk removal efficiency to more than 60%. Moreover, a coal slag additive in the SAT columns could decline the aromatic components (fulvic-like organics and tryptophan-like proteins) significantly.

  6. A toxaphene-degrading bacterium related to Enterobacter cloacae, strain D1 isolated from aged contaminated soil in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Lacayo-Romero, Martha; Quillaguamán, Jorge; van Bavel, Bert; Mattiasson, Bo

    2005-09-01

    Enterobacter sp. strain D1 is a facultative anaerobic, Gram-negative heterotrophic bacterium isolated from toxaphene-contaminated soil. This organism was identified and characterized through phylogenetic and taxonomic studies. Based on 16S rDNA analysis, the strain D1 was clustered closely with the species Enterobacter cloacae subsp. dissolvens (LMG 2683) and E. cloacae (ATCC 13047T). Strain D1 resembled these E. cloacae strains with respect to various biochemical and nutritional characteristics, but also exhibited differences. Moreover, strain D1 is able to grow and survive with toxaphene supplied in the medium in the range 3-96 mg/L. Amongst the chemical components of toxaphene, octachlorocamphenes, nonachlorobornanes and decachlorobornanes were seen to be rapidly metabolized, although levels of hexachlorocamphenes and heptachlorobornanes were found to be slowly degraded, and subsequently accumulated during the last stage of the cultivation.

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus pumilus PDSLzg-1, a Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Isolated from Oil-Contaminated Soil in China

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Kun; Li, Hongna; Li, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus pumilus strain PDSLzg-1, an efficient hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium, was isolated from oil-contaminated soil. Here, we present the complete sequence of its circular chromosome and circular plasmid. The genomic information is essential for the study of degradation of oil by B. pumilus PDSLzg-1. PMID:27795249

  8. An integrated anaerobic/aerobic bioprocess for the remediation of chlorinated phenol-contaminated soil and groundwater.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, George A; Rose, Peter D

    2006-07-01

    An investigation of biodegradation of chlorinated phenol in an anaerobic/aerobic bioprocess environment was made. The reactor configuration used consisted of linked anaerobic and aerobic reactors, which served as a model for a proposed bioremediation strategy. The proposed strategy was studied in two reactors before linkage. In the anaerobic compartment, the transformation of the model contaminant, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), to lesser-chlorinated metabolites was shown to occur during reductive dechlorination under sulfate-reducing conditions. The consortium was also shown to desorb and mobilize 2,4,6-TCP in soils. This was followed, in the aerobic compartment, by biodegradation of the pollutant and metabolites, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol, and phenol, by immobilized white-rot fungi. The integrated process achieved elimination of the compound by more than 99% through fungal degradation of metabolites produced in the dechlorination stage. pH correction to the anaerobic reactor was found to be necessary because acidic effluent from the fungal reactor inhibited sulfate reduction and dechlorination.

  9. Nitrogen availability and indirect measurements of greenhouse gas emissions from aerobic and anaerobic biowaste digestates applied to agricultural soils

    SciTech Connect

    Rigby, H.; Smith, S.R.

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Nitrogen release in digestate-amended soil depends on the digestate type. • Overall N release is modulated by digestate mineral and mineralisable N contents. • Microbial immobilisation does not influence overall release of digestate N in soil. • Digestate physical properties and soil type interact to affect overall N recovery. • High labile C inputs in digestate may promote denitrification in fine-textured soil. - Abstract: Recycling biowaste digestates on agricultural land diverts biodegradable waste from landfill disposal and represents a sustainable source of nutrients and organic matter (OM) to improve soil for crop production. However, the dynamics of nitrogen (N) release from these organic N sources must be determined to optimise their fertiliser value and management. This laboratory incubation experiment examined the effects of digestate type (aerobic and anaerobic), waste type (industrial, agricultural and municipal solid waste or sewage sludge) and soil type (sandy loam, sandy silt loam and silty clay) on N availability in digestate-amended soils and also quantified the extent and significance of the immobilisation of N within the soil microbial biomass, as a possible regulatory mechanism of N release. The digestate types examined included: dewatered, anaerobically digested biosolids (DMAD); dewatered, anaerobic mesophilic digestate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (DMADMSW); liquid, anaerobic co-digestate of food and animal slurry (LcoMAD) and liquid, thermophilic aerobic digestate of food waste (LTAD). Ammonium chloride (NH{sub 4}Cl) was included as a reference treatment for mineral N. After 48 days, the final, maximum net recoveries of mineral N relative to the total N (TN) addition in the different digestates and unamended control treatments were in the decreasing order: LcoMAD, 68%; LTAD, 37%, DMAD, 20%; and DMADMSW, 11%. A transient increase in microbial biomass N (MBN) was observed with LTAD application

  10. The effects of Lactobacillus buchneri with or without a homolactic bacterium on the fermentation and aerobic stability of corn silages made at different locations.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, R J; Kung, L

    2010-04-01

    Whole-plant corn (31 to 39% dry matter) from several locations was chopped, treated with nothing (U), Lactobacillus buchneri 40788 (4 x 10(5) cfu/g; LB), or L. buchneri (4 x 10(5) cfu/g) and Pediococcus pentosaceus (1 x 10(5) cfu/g; LBPP), and packed into quadruplicate 20-L silos to determine their effects on silage fermentation and aerobic stability after 120 d of storage. The experiment was a randomized complete block design with main effects of treatment (T), block (location; L), and T x L interaction. Dry matter recovery was different among locations but unaffected by T. The population of lactic acid bacteria was greater in LB and LBPP than in U, and the opposite was true regarding the population of yeasts. Numbers of L. buchneri (colony-forming unit equivalents), determined by a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, were higher in 4 of 5 locations for LB and LBPP compared with U (T x L interaction) with an average 6.70 log cfu/g for LB and LBPP versus 4.87 log cfu/g for U. Silages inoculated with LB and LBPP had higher silage pH and higher concentrations of acetic acid and 1,2 propanediol but lower concentrations of ethanol and water-soluble carbohydrates; there was a T x L interaction for all these variables. Aerobic stability was improved by LB and LBPP (mean of 136 h) compared with U (44 h), but there was an interaction between T x L. In general, locations with the highest population of L. buchneri had the largest increases in acetic acid and, consequently, the greatest improvements in aerobic stability. The addition of L. buchneri 40788 alone or with P. pentosaceus resulted in similar effects on silage fermentation and aerobic stability, but the effects were variable among locations, suggesting that unidentified factors; for example, in the field or on the forage crop, may alter the effectiveness of microbial inoculation.

  11. Isolation and characterization of an active mannanase-producing anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium tertium KT-5A, from lotus soil.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, N; Tokiwa, Y

    1998-03-01

    Of 10 strains of mannanase-producing anaerobic bacteria isolated from soils and methanogenic sludges, Clostridium tertium KT-5A, which was isolated from lotus soil, produced high amounts of extracellular beta-1,4-mannanase. The isolate was an aerotolerant anaerobe without quinon systems; the cell growth cultivated with no addition of reducing agents was also stable. High yields of mannanase were obtained by inducing enzyme production with galactomannan guar gum and beef extract/peptone as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. Fermentation end products on galactomannan fermentation were formate, acetate, lactate, butyrate, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. The extracellular mannanase displayed high activity on galactomannans of locust bean gum galactose/mannose (G/M) ratio 1:4 and spino gum (G/M 1:3), but weak activity on guar gum galactomannan (G/M 1:2) and konjac glucomannan. As far as is known, this is the first report on the isolation of an active mannanase-producing anaerobic bacterium from natural environments.

  12. Anaerobic and aerobic degradation of cyanophycin by the denitrifying bacterium Pseudomonas alcaligenes strain DIP1 and role of three other coisolates in a mixed bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Sallam, Ahmed; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2008-06-01

    Four bacterial strains were isolated from a cyanophycin granule polypeptide (CGP)-degrading anaerobic consortium, identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and assigned to species of the genera Pseudomonas, Enterococcus, Clostridium, and Paenibacillus. The consortium member responsible for CGP degradation was assigned as Pseudomonas alcaligenes strain DIP1. The growth of and CGP degradation by strain DIP1 under anaerobic conditions were enhanced but not dependent on the presence of nitrate as an electron acceptor. CGP was hydrolyzed to its constituting beta-Asp-Arg dipeptides, which were then completely utilized within 25 and 4 days under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively. The end products of CGP degradation by strain DIP1 were alanine, succinate, and ornithine as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. The facultative anaerobic Enterococcus casseliflavus strain ELS3 and the strictly anaerobic Clostridium sulfidogenes strain SGB2 were coisolates and utilized the beta-linked isodipeptides from the common pool available to the mixed consortium, while the fourth isolate, Paenibacillus odorifer strain PNF4, did not play a direct role in the biodegradation of CGP. Several syntrophic interactions affecting CGP degradation, such as substrate utilization, the reduction of electron acceptors, and aeration, were elucidated. This study demonstrates the first investigation of CGP degradation under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions by one bacterial strain, with regard to the physiological role of other bacteria in a mixed consortium.

  13. 9,10-Phenanthrenedione biodegradation by a soil bacterium and identification of transformation products by LC/ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Kanaly, Robert A; Hamamura, Natsuko

    2013-09-01

    Transformation of 9,10-phenanthrenedione, a cytotoxic derivative of phenanthrene, was shown to occur by a soil bacterium belonging to the genus Sphingobium. Phenanthrene-grown cells of this strain were exposed to 50mgL(-1) 9,10-phenanthrenedione in liquid cultures, extracted, and extracts were analyzed by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in negative ionization mode. Full scan analyses of exposed cells over the range from m/z 50 to m/z 500 were compared to abiotic and biotic controls. Product and precursor ion scan mode analyses indicated that at least three aromatic ring-cleavage transformation products of 9,10-phenanthrenedione were present and structures for these products, corresponding to [M-H](-)=271, [M-H](-)=241, and [M-H](-)=339 were proposed to be 4-(1-hydroxy-3,4-dioxo-2-naphthyl)-2-oxo-but-3-enoic acid, 2,2'-diphenic acid and 2-[(6-carboxy-2,3-dihydroxy-phenyl)-hydroxy-methyl]-5-oxo-hex-3-enedioic acid. The identity of 2,2'-diphenic acid was confirmed by comparison to an authentic standard and when the strain was exposed to 50mgL(-1) 2,2'-diphenic acid in separate assays, a transformation product with a similar mass spectrum as 9,10-phenanthrenedione-derived [M-H](-)=339 was revealed. Based upon these results, pathways for the transformation of 9,10-phenanthrenedione by strain KK22 were proposed. Strain KK22 appeared unable to use 9,10-phenanthrenedione as a growth substrate under these conditions. This is the first report of potential biotransformation pathways of 9,10-phenanthrenedione by a bacterium.

  14. Biochar increases plant-available water in a sandy loam soil under an aerobic rice crop system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo Carvalho, M. T.; de Holanda Nunes Maia, A.; Madari, B. E.; Bastiaans, L.; van Oort, P. A. J.; Heinemann, A. B.; Soler da Silva, M. A.; Petter, F. A.; Marimon, B. H., Jr.; Meinke, H.

    2014-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the impact of biochar rate (0, 8, 16 and 32 Mg ha-1) on the water retention capacity (WRC) of a sandy loam Dystric Plinthosol. The applied biochar was a by-product of slow pyrolysis (∼450 °C) of eucalyptus wood, milled to pass through a 2000 μm sieve that resulted in a material with an intrinsic porosity ≤10 μm and a specific surface area of ∼3.2 m2 g-1. The biochar was incorporated into the top 15 cm of the soil under an aerobic rice system. Our study focused on both the effects on WRC and rice yields 2 and 3 years after its application. Undisturbed soil samples were collected from 16 plots in two soil layers (5-10 and 15-20 cm). Soil water retention curves were modelled using a nonlinear mixed model which appropriately accounts for uncertainties inherent of spatial variability and repeated measurements taken within a specific soil sample. We found an increase in plant-available water in the upper soil layer proportional to the rate of biochar, with about 0.8% for each Mg ha-1 biochar amendment 2 and 3 years after its application. The impact of biochar on soil WRC was most likely related to an effect in overall porosity of the sandy loam soil, which was evident from an increase in saturated soil moisture and macro porosity with 0.5 and 1.6% for each Mg ha-1 of biochar applied, respectively. The increment in soil WRC did not translate into an increase in rice yield, essentially because in both seasons the amount of rainfall during the critical period for rice production exceeded 650 mm. The use of biochar as a soil amendment can be a worthy strategy to guarantee yield stability under short-term water-limited conditions. Our findings raise the importance of assessing the feasibility of very high application rates of biochar and the inclusion of a detailed analysis of its physical and chemical properties as part of future investigations.

  15. A marine inducible prophage vB_CibM-P1 isolated from the aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Citromicrobium bathyomarinum JL354

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiang; Zhang, Rui; Xu, Yongle; , Richard Allen White, III; Wang, Yu; Luo, Tingwei; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2014-11-01

    A prophage vB_CibM-P1 was induced by mitomycin C from the epipelagic strain Citromicrobium bathyomarinum JL354, a member of the alpha-IV subcluster of marine aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (AAPB). The induced bacteriophage vB_CibM-P1 had Myoviridae-like morphology and polyhedral heads (approximately capsid 60-100 nm) with tail fibers. The vB_CibM-P1 genome is ~38 kb in size, with 66.0% GC content. The genome contains 58 proposed open reading frames that are involved in integration, DNA packaging, morphogenesis and bacterial lysis. VB_CibM-P1 is a temperate phage that can be directly induced in hosts. In response to mitomycin C induction, virus-like particles can increase to 7 × 109 per ml, while host cells decrease an order of magnitude. The vB_CibM-P1 bacteriophage is the first inducible prophage from AAPB.

  16. Potential use of a self-dying reporter bacterium to determine the bioavailability of aged phenanthrene in soil: comparison with physicochemical measures.

    PubMed

    Shin, Doyun; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2014-01-30

    The potential bioavailability of phenanthrene aged in soil was determined by using a self-dying reporter bacterium, and the results were compared to two physicochemical measures, Tenax TA(®) bead-assisted desorption, and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPCD) extraction. The reporter bacterium, capable of degrading phenanthrene as a sole carbon and energy source, was genetically reconstructed to die when it degrades phenanthrene. Therefore, population change of the reporter cells can be viewed as the quantification of bioavailable phenanthrene. When Ottawa sand was used as an aging matrix, the amounts of bioavailable phenanthrene (i.e. little gradual decrease) were similar, regardless of aging time, and consistent between the reporter bacterium and the two physicochemical measures. However, decrease in bioavailable phenanthrene with aging was readily evident in sandy loam with organic matter of 11.5%, with all three measures. More importantly, when the reporter bacterium was used, a rapid and significant decrease in the bioavailable fraction from 1.00 to 0.0431 was observed. The extent of decrease in bioavailable fraction was less than 40% in the two physicochemical measures, but was nearly 100% in the reporter bacterium, during the first 3 months of aging. Our results suggest that the phenanthrene fraction available to bacterial degradation, and probably the fraction that really manifests toxicity, may be much smaller than the fractions predicted with the physicochemical measures.

  17. Kinetics of quinoline biodegradation, sorption and desorption in a clay-coated model soil containing a quinoline-degrading bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, J. F.; Brockman, F. J.; Szecsody, J. E.; Streile, G. P.

    1992-01-01

    Kinetics of quinoline biodegradation, sorption and desorption in a clay-coated model soil containing a quinoline-degrading bacterium. Studies were initiated to compare the kinetics of quinoline sorption/desorption and biodegradation in order to predict the relative importance of abiotic and biotic processes in the transport of quinoline in columns containing a model soil. Initial biodegradation studies were conducted in a 1-cm-long column containing a quinoline-degrading bacterium (10 9 colony-forming units g -1 porous medium) attached to 100- to 150-μm-diameter glass beads that did not sorb quinoline. At a 155-nmol mL -1 quinoline influent concentration, the maximum consumption rate was 104.7 nmol quinoline min -1 cm -3 pore volume. In contrast, the maximum consumption rate of the first metabolite ( 2-hydroxyquinoline) was 24.8 nmol mL -1 cm -3 pore volume. In a second experiment, bacteria were mixed with a model soil, consisting of montmorillonite bound to alumina particles (75- to 180-μm diameter). In a 1-cm-long column of the model soil, the quinoline consumption rate at a 155-nmol mL -1 quinoline influent concentration was similar to that obtained in the glass-bead column, showing that the clay does not substantially affect quinoline biodegradation at equilibrium conditions. In a third series of experiments, sorption to the model soil was examined in the absence of microorganisms. The observed desorption rate coefficient for quinoline averaged 1.1·10 -3 s -1, which was one to three orders of magnitude smaller than was observed for 45Ca. The slow ion exchange of quinoline on the clay surface is controlled by a site-specific quinoline/montmorillonite interaction and not a larger-scale physical step (i.e. interparticle diffusion). Equilibrium first-order forward (sorption) and reverse (desorption) mass fluxes were 1160 nmol cm -1 cm -3 pore volume with a 155-nmol mL -1 quinoline influent concentration. The initial quinoline mass flux to the clay was estimated

  18. Burkholderia jiangsuensis sp. nov., a methyl parathion degrading bacterium, isolated from methyl parathion contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu-Yun; Li, Chun-Xiu; Luo, Xiao-Jing; Lai, Qi-Liang; Xu, Jian-He

    2014-09-01

    A methyl parathion (MP) degrading bacterial strain, designated MP-1(T), was isolated from a waste land where pesticides were formerly manufactured in Jiangsu province, China. Polyphasic taxonomic studies showed that MP-1(T) is a Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped and motile bacterium. The bacterium could grow at salinities of 0-1 % (w/v) and temperatures of 15-40 °C. Strain MP-1(T) could reduce nitrate to nitrite, utilize d-glucose and l-arabinose, but not produce indole, or hydrolyse gelatin. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences demonstrated that MP-1(T) belongs to the genus Burkholderia, showing highest sequence similarity to Burkholderia grimmiae DSM 25160(T) (98.5 %), and similar strains including Burkholderia zhejiangensis OP-1(T) (98.2 %), Burkholderia choica LMG 22940(T) (97.5 %), Burkholderia glathei DSM 50014(T) (97.4 %), Burkholderia terrestris LMG 22937(T) (97.2 %) and Burkholderia telluris LMG 22936(T) (97.0 %). In addition, the gyrB and recA gene segments of strain MP-1(T) exhibited less than 89.0 % and 95.1 % similarities with the most highly-related type strains indicated above. The G+C content of strain MP-1(T) was 62.6 mol%. The major isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone Q-8. The predominant polar lipids comprised phosphatidyl ethanolamine, phosphatidyl glycerol, aminolipid and phospholipid. The principal fatty acids in strain MP-1(T) were C18 : 1ω7c/C18 : 1ω6c (23.3 %), C16 : 0 (16.8 %), cyclo-C17 : 0 (15.0 %), C16 : 1ω7c/C16 : 1ω6 (8.5 %), cyclo-C19 : 0ω8c (8.1 %), C16 : 1 iso I/C14 : 0 3-OH (5.7 %), C16 : 0 3-OH (5.6 %) and C16 : 02-OH (5.1 %). The DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain MP-1(T) and the three type strains (B. grimmiae DSM 25160(T), B. zhejiangensis OP-1(T) and B. glathei DSM 50014(T)) ranged from 24.6 % to 37.4 %. In accordance with phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, strain MP-1(T) represents a novel

  19. Mercury Reduction and Methyl Mercury Degradation by the Soil Bacterium Xanthobacter autotrophicus Py2

    PubMed Central

    Petrus, Amanda K.; Rutner, Colin; Liu, Songnian; Wang, Yingjiao

    2015-01-01

    Two previously uncharacterized potential broad-spectrum mercury (Hg) resistance operons (mer) are present on the chromosome of the soil Alphaproteobacteria Xanthobacter autotrophicus Py2. These operons, mer1 and mer2, contain two features which are commonly found in mer operons in the genomes of soil and marine Alphaproteobacteria, but are not present in previously characterized mer operons: a gene for the mercuric reductase (MerA) that encodes an alkylmercury lyase domain typical of those found on the MerB protein, and the presence of an additional gene, which we are calling merK, with homology to glutathione reductase. Here, we demonstrate that Py2 is resistant to 0.2 μM inorganic mercury [Hg(II)] and 0.05 μM methylmercury (MeHg). Py2 is capable of converting MeHg and Hg(II) to elemental mercury [Hg(0)], and reduction of Hg(II) is induced by incubation in sub toxic concentrations of Hg(II). Transcription of the merA genes increased with Hg(II) treatment, and in both operons merK resides on the same polycistronic mRNA as merA. We propose the use of Py2 as a model system for studying the contribution of mer to Hg mobility in soil and marine ecosystems. PMID:26341208

  20. Aerobic biotransformation of N-nitrosodimethylamine and N-nitrodimethylamine in methane and benzene amended soil columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidhaas, Jennifer; Dupont, R. Ryan

    2013-07-01

    Aerobic biotransformation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), an emerging contaminant of concern, and its structural analog N-nitrodimethylamine (DMN), was evaluated in benzene and methane amended groundwater passed through laboratory scale soil columns. Competitive inhibition models were used to model the kinetics for NDMA and DMN cometabolism accounting for the concurrent degradation of the growth and cometabolic substrates. Transformation capacities for NDMA and DMN with benzene (13 and 23 μg (mg cells)- 1) and methane (0.14 and 8.4 μg (mg cells)- 1) grown cultures, respectively are comparable to those presented in the literature, as were first order endogenous decay rates estimated to be 2.1 × 10- 2 ± 1.7 × 10- 3 d- 1 and 6.5 × 10- 1 ± 7.1 × 10- 1 d- 1 for the methane and benzene amended cultures, respectively. These studies highlight possible attenuation mechanisms and rates for NDMA and DMN biotransformation in aerobic aquifers undergoing active remediation, natural attenuation or managed aquifer recharge with treated wastewater (i.e., reclaimed water).

  1. Aerobic biotransformation of N-nitrosodimethylamine and N-nitrodimethylamine in methane and benzene amended soil columns.

    PubMed

    Weidhaas, Jennifer; Dupont, R Ryan

    2013-07-01

    Aerobic biotransformation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), an emerging contaminant of concern, and its structural analog N-nitrodimethylamine (DMN), was evaluated in benzene and methane amended groundwater passed through laboratory scale soil columns. Competitive inhibition models were used to model the kinetics for NDMA and DMN cometabolism accounting for the concurrent degradation of the growth and cometabolic substrates. Transformation capacities for NDMA and DMN with benzene (13 and 23μg (mgcells)(-1)) and methane (0.14 and 8.4μg (mgcells)(-1)) grown cultures, respectively are comparable to those presented in the literature, as were first order endogenous decay rates estimated to be 2.1×10(-2)±1.7×10(-3)d(-1) and 6.5×10(-1)±7.1×10(-1)d(-1) for the methane and benzene amended cultures, respectively. These studies highlight possible attenuation mechanisms and rates for NDMA and DMN biotransformation in aerobic aquifers undergoing active remediation, natural attenuation or managed aquifer recharge with treated wastewater (i.e., reclaimed water).

  2. Cloning, expression and biochemical characterization of a β-carbonic anhydrase from the soil bacterium Enterobacter sp. B13.

    PubMed

    Eminoğlu, Ayşenur; Vullo, Daniela; Aşık, Aycan; Çolak, Dilşat Nigar; Supuran, Claudiu T; Çanakçı, Sabriye; Osman Beldüz, Ali

    2016-12-01

    A recombinant carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) from the soil-dwelling bacterium Enterobacter sp. B13 was cloned and purified by Co(2+) affinity chromatography. Bioinformatic analysis showed that the new enzyme (denominated here B13-CA) belongs to the β-class CAs and to possess 95% homology with the ortholog enzyme from Escherichia coli encoded by the can gene, whereas its sequence homology with the other such enzyme from E. coli (encoded by the cynT gene) was of 33%. B13-CA was characterized kinetically as a catalyst for carbon dioxide hydration to bicarbonate and protons. The enzyme shows a significant catalytic activity, with the following kinetic parameters at 20 °C and pH of 8.3: kcat of 4.8 × 10(5) s(-1) and kcat/Km of 5.6 × 10(7) M(-1) × s(-1). This activity was potently inhibited by acetazolamide which showed a KI of 78.9 nM. Although only this compound was investigated for the moment as B13-CA inhibitor, further studies may reveal new classes of inhibitors/activators of this enzyme which may show biomedical or environmental applications, considering the posssible role of this enzyme in CaCO3 biomineralization processes.

  3. Methylocystis rosea sp. nov., a novel methanotrophic bacterium from Arctic wetland soil, Svalbard, Norway (78 degrees N).

    PubMed

    Wartiainen, Ingvild; Hestnes, Anne Grethe; McDonald, Ian R; Svenning, Mette M

    2006-03-01

    A Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-motile, non-spore-forming, pink-pigmented bacterium, SV97T, was isolated from a wetland soil near Ny-Alesund, Svalbard Islands, Norway (78 degrees N). On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain SV97T was shown to belong to the Alphaproteobacteria and was highly related to a number of non-characterized Methylocystis strains with GenBank accession nos AJ458507 and AJ458502 (100 %) and AF177299, AJ458510, AJ458467, AJ458471, AJ431384, AJ458475, AJ458484, AJ458501 and AJ458466 (99 %). The most closely related type strains were Methylocystis parvus OBBP(T) (97.2 %) and Methylocystis echinoides IMET 10491T (97%). The closest related recognized species within the genus Methylosinus was Methylosinus sporium NCIMB 11126T (96.0% similarity). Chemotaxonomic and phenotypic data (C(18:1)omega8 as the major fatty acid, non-motile, no rosette formation) supported the affiliation of strain SV97T to the genus Methylocystis. The results of DNA-DNA hybridization and physiological and biochemical tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strain SV97(T) from the two recognized Methylocystis species. Strain SV97T therefore represents a novel species, for which the name Methylocystis rosea sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain SV97T (= DSM 17261T = ATCC BAA-1196T).

  4. Nitrogen-removal efficiency of a novel aerobic denitrifying bacterium, Pseudomonas stutzeri strain ZF31, isolated from a drinking-water reservoir.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tinglin; Guo, Lin; Zhang, Haihan; Su, Junfeng; Wen, Gang; Zhang, Kai

    2015-11-01

    An aerobic denitrifier, identified as Pseudomonas stutzeri strain ZF31, was isolated from the Zhoucun drinking-water reservoir. Strain ZF31 removed 97% of nitrate nitrogen after 16h, without nitrite accumulation. Sequence amplification indicated the presence of the denitrification genes napA, nirS, norB, and nosZ. Nitrogen balance analysis revealed that approximately 75% of the initial nitrogen was removed as gas products. Response surface methodology (RSM) experiments showed that maximum removal of total nitrogen (TN) occurred at pH 8.23, a C/N ratio of 6.68, temperature of 27.72°C, and with shaking at 54.15rpm. The TN removal rate at low C/N ratio (i.e., 3) and low temperature (i.e., 10°C) was 73.30% and 60.08%, respectively. These results suggest that strain ZF31 has potential applications for the bioremediation of slightly polluted drinking-water reservoirs.

  5. Enterobacter arachidis sp. nov., a plant-growth-promoting diazotrophic bacterium isolated from rhizosphere soil of groundnut.

    PubMed

    Madhaiyan, Munusamy; Poonguzhali, Selvaraj; Lee, Jung-Sook; Saravanan, Venkatakrishnan Sivaraj; Lee, Keun-Chul; Santhanakrishnan, Palani

    2010-07-01

    A methylotrophic nitrogen-fixing bacterial strain, Ah-143(T), isolated from the rhizosphere soil of field-grown groundnut was analysed by a polyphasic taxonomic approach. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis combined with rpoB gene sequence analysis allocated strain Ah-143(T) to the family Enterobacteriaceae, with Enterobacter radicincitans and Enterobacter cowanii as the closest relatives. The strain is Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming, aerobic and motile, having straight rod-shaped cells with a DNA G+C content of approximately 53.2 mol%. The strain utilizes methanol as a carbon source and the mxaF gene was closely related to the mxaF gene of members of the genus Methylobacterium. The fatty acid profile consisted of C(16 : 0), C(17 : 0) cyclo, C(18 : 1)omega7c, summed feature 2 (iso-C(16 : 1) I and/or C(14 : 0) 3-OH) and summed feature 3 (iso-C(15 : 0) 2-OH and/or C(16 : 1)omega7c) as the major components. DNA-DNA relatedness of strain Ah-143(T) with its close relatives was less than 20 %. On the basis of the phylogenetic analyses, DNA-DNA hybridization data, and unique physiological and biochemical characteristics, it is proposed that the strain represents a novel species of the genus Enterobacter and should be named Enterobacter arachidis sp. nov. The type strain is Ah-143(T) (=NCIMB 14469(T) =KCTC 22375(T)).

  6. Pandoraea thiooxydans sp. nov., a facultatively chemolithotrophic, thiosulfate-oxidizing bacterium isolated from rhizosphere soils of sesame (Sesamum indicum L.).

    PubMed

    Anandham, Rangasamy; Indiragandhi, Pandiyan; Kwon, Soon Wo; Sa, Tong Min; Jeon, Che Ok; Kim, Yong Ki; Jee, Hyeong Jin

    2010-01-01

    A facultatively chemolithoautotrophic, thiosulfate-oxidizing, Gram-negative, aerobic, motile, rod-shaped bacterial strain, designated ATSB16(T), was isolated from rhizosphere soils of sesame (Sesamum indicum L.). 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis demonstrated that this strain was closely related to Pandoraea pnomenusa LMG 18087(T) (96.7 % similarity), P. pulmonicola LMG 18016(T) (96.5 %), P. apista LMG 16407(T) (96.2 %), P. norimbergensis LMG 18379(T) (96.1 %) and P. sputorum LMG 18819(T) (96.0 %). Strain ATSB16(T) shared 96.0-96.4 % sequence similarity with four unnamed genomospecies of Pandoraea. The major cellular fatty acids of the strain ATSB16(T) were C(17 : 0) cyclo (33.0 %) and C(16 : 0) (30.6 %). Q-8 was the predominant respiratory quinone. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylmethylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and two unidentified aminophospholipids. Hydroxyputrescine and putrescine were the predominant polyamines. The genomic DNA G+C content of the strain was 64.0 mol%. On the basis of the results obtained from this study, strain ATSB16(T) represents a novel species of the genus Pandoraea, for which the name Pandoraea thiooxydans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is ATSB16(T) (=KACC 12757(T) =LMG 24779(T)).

  7. Isolation and identification of hexazinone-degrading bacterium from sugarcane-cultivated soil in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Ngigi, Anastasiah; Getenga, Zachary; Boga, Hamadi; Ndalut, Paul

    2014-03-01

    The s-triazine herbicide hexazinone [3-cyclohexyl-6-dimethylamino-1-methyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione], is widely used in agriculture for weed control. Laboratory biodegradation experiments for hexazinone in liquid cultures were carried out using sugarcane-cultivated soils in Kenya. Liquid culture experiments with hexazinone as the only carbon source led to the isolation of a bacterial strain capable of its degradation. Through morphological, biochemical and molecular characterization by 16S rRNA, the isolate was identified as Enterobacter cloacae. The isolate degraded hexazinone up to 27.3% of the initially applied concentration of 40 μg mL(-1) after 37 days of incubation in a liquid culture medium. The study reports the degradation of hexazinone and characterization of the isolated bacterial strain.

  8. Paenibacillus tibetensis sp. nov., a psychrophilic bacterium isolated from alpine swamp meadow soil.

    PubMed

    Han, Li-Li; He, Ji-Zheng; Zheng, Yuan-Ming; Zeng, Jun; Zhang, Li-Mei

    2015-05-01

    A novel psychrophilic strain, SSB001(T), was isolated from an alpine swamp meadow soil in Tibet, China, and identified as a representative of a novel phylogenetic subclade in the genus Paenibacillus , with Paenibacillus antarcticus (96.2%), Paenibacillus macquariensis (96.53%) and Paenibacillus glacialis (96.2%) as the most closely related species on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses. The strain was distinguished from defined species of the genus Paenibacillus by further study of rpoB gene sequences, phenotypic characterization, cellular fatty acid composition, quinones, polar lipids and meso-diaminopimelic acid in the peptidoglycan. Based upon these results, we propose the strain as a representative of a novel species named Paenibacillus tibetensis sp. nov., with SSB001(T) ( =ACCC 19728(T) =DSM 29321(T)) as the type strain. The DNA G+C content (mol%) of strain SSB001(T) was 40.18 mol% (HPLC).

  9. Nitrite-Driven Nitrous Oxide Production Under Aerobic Soil Conditions: Kinetics and Biochemical Controls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrite (NO2-) can accumulate during nitrification in soil following fertilizer application. While the role of NO2- as a substrate regulating nitrous oxide (N2O) production is recognized, kinetic data are not available that allow for estimating N2O production or soil-to-atmosphere fluxes as a functi...

  10. Complete genome sequence of the phenanthrene-degrading soil bacterium Delftia acidovorans Cs1-4

    SciTech Connect

    Shetty, Ameesha R.; de Gannes, Vidya; Obi, Chioma C.; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Samuel; Peters, Linda; Mikhailova, Natalia; Teshima, Hazuki; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren J.; Kyrpides, Nikos; Ivanova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Denef, Vincent J.; Woyke, Tanya; Hickey, William J.

    2015-08-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants and microbial biodegradation is an important means of remediation of PAH-contaminated soil. Delftia acidovorans Cs1-4 (formerly Delftia sp. Cs1-4) was isolated by using phenanthrene as the sole carbon source from PAH contaminated soil in Wisconsin. Its full genome sequence was determined to gain insights into a mechanisms underlying biodegradation of PAH. Three genomic libraries were constructed and sequenced: an Illumina GAii shotgun library (916,416,493 reads), a 454 Titanium standard library (770,171 reads) and one paired-end 454 library (average insert size of 8 kb, 508,092 reads). The initial assembly contained 40 contigs in two scaffolds. The 454 Titanium standard data and the 454 paired end data were assembled together and the consensus sequences were computationally shredded into 2 kb overlapping shreds. Illumina sequencing data was assembled, and the consensus sequence was computationally shredded into 1.5 kb overlapping shreds. Gaps between contigs were closed by editing in Consed, by PCR and by Bubble PCR primer walks. A total of 182 additional reactions were needed to close gaps and to raise the quality of the finished sequence. The final assembly is based on 253.3 Mb of 454 draft data (averaging 38.4 X coverage) and 590.2 Mb of Illumina draft data (averaging 89.4 X coverage). The genome of strain Cs1-4 consists of a single circular chromosome of 6,685,842 bp (66.7 %G+C) containing 6,028 predicted genes; 5,931 of these genes were protein-encoding and 4,425 gene products were assigned to a putative function. Genes encoding phenanthrene degradation were localized to a 232 kb genomic island (termed the phn island), which contained near its 3’ end a bacteriophage P4-like integrase, an enzyme often associated with chromosomal integration of mobile genetic elements. Other biodegradation pathways reconstructed from the genome sequence included: benzoate (by the acetyl-CoA pathway

  11. Complete genome sequence of the phenanthrene-degrading soil bacterium Delftia acidovorans Cs1-4

    DOE PAGES

    Shetty, Ameesha R.; de Gannes, Vidya; Obi, Chioma C.; ...

    2015-08-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants and microbial biodegradation is an important means of remediation of PAH-contaminated soil. Delftia acidovorans Cs1-4 (formerly Delftia sp. Cs1-4) was isolated by using phenanthrene as the sole carbon source from PAH contaminated soil in Wisconsin. Its full genome sequence was determined to gain insights into a mechanisms underlying biodegradation of PAH. Three genomic libraries were constructed and sequenced: an Illumina GAii shotgun library (916,416,493 reads), a 454 Titanium standard library (770,171 reads) and one paired-end 454 library (average insert size of 8 kb, 508,092 reads). The initial assembly contained 40 contigs inmore » two scaffolds. The 454 Titanium standard data and the 454 paired end data were assembled together and the consensus sequences were computationally shredded into 2 kb overlapping shreds. Illumina sequencing data was assembled, and the consensus sequence was computationally shredded into 1.5 kb overlapping shreds. Gaps between contigs were closed by editing in Consed, by PCR and by Bubble PCR primer walks. A total of 182 additional reactions were needed to close gaps and to raise the quality of the finished sequence. The final assembly is based on 253.3 Mb of 454 draft data (averaging 38.4 X coverage) and 590.2 Mb of Illumina draft data (averaging 89.4 X coverage). The genome of strain Cs1-4 consists of a single circular chromosome of 6,685,842 bp (66.7 %G+C) containing 6,028 predicted genes; 5,931 of these genes were protein-encoding and 4,425 gene products were assigned to a putative function. Genes encoding phenanthrene degradation were localized to a 232 kb genomic island (termed the phn island), which contained near its 3’ end a bacteriophage P4-like integrase, an enzyme often associated with chromosomal integration of mobile genetic elements. Other biodegradation pathways reconstructed from the genome sequence included: benzoate (by the acetyl

  12. Aerobic Bioremediation of PAH Contaminated Soil Results in Increased Genotoxicity and Developmental Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Chibwe, Leah; Geier, Mitra C.; Nakamura, Jun; Tanguay, Robert L.; Aitken, Michael D.; Simonich, Staci L. Massey

    2015-01-01

    The formation of more polar and toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) transformation products is one of the concerns associated with the bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soils. Soil contaminated with coal tar (pre-bioremediation) from a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site was treated in a laboratory scale bioreactor (post-bioremediation) and extracted using pressurized liquid extraction. The soil extracts were fractionated, based on polarity, and analyzed for 88 PAHs (unsubstituted, oxygenated, nitrated, and heterocyclic PAHs). The PAH concentrations in the soil tested, post-bioremediation, were lower than their regulatory maximum allowable concentrations (MACs), with the exception of the higher molecular weight PAHs (BaA, BkF, BbF, BaP, and IcdP), most of which did not undergo significant biodegradation. The soil extract fractions were tested for genotoxicity using the DT40 chicken lymphocyte bioassay and developmental to xicity using the embryonic zebrafish (Danio rerio) bioassay. A statistically significant increase in genotoxicity was measured in the unfractionated soil extract, as well as in four polar soil extract fractions, post-bioremediation (p < 0.05). In addition, a statistically significant increase in developmental toxicity was measured in one polar soil extract fraction, post-bioremediation (p < 0.05). A series of morphological abnormalities, including peculiar caudal fin malformations and hyperpigmentation in the tail, were measured in several soil extract fractions in embryonic zebrafish, both pre- and post-bioremediation. The increased toxicity measured post-bioremediation is not likely due to the 88 PAHs measured in this study (including quinones), because most were not present in the toxic polar fractions and/or because their concentrations did not increase post-bioremediation. However, the increased toxicity measured post-bioremediation is likely due to hydroxylated and carboxylated transformation products of the 3- and 4-ring PAHs

  13. Genome sequence of the chemoheterotrophic soil bacterium Saccharomonospora cyanea type strain (NA-134(T)).

    PubMed

    Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P; Lu, Megan; Huntemann, Marcel; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Pitluck, Sam; Goodwin, Lynne A; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Pötter, Gabriele; Land, Miriam; Ivanova, Natalia; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2013-10-16

    Saccharomonospora cyanea Runmao et al. 1988 is a member of the genus Saccharomonospora in the family Pseudonocardiaceae that is moderately well characterized at the genome level thus far. Members of the genus Saccharomonospora are of interest because they originate from diverse habitats, such as soil, leaf litter, manure, compost, surface of peat, moist, over-heated grain, and ocean sediment, where they probably play a role in the primary degradation of plant material by attacking hemicellulose. Species of the genus Saccharomonospora are usually Gram-positive, non-acid fast, and are classified among the actinomycetes. S. cyanea is characterized by a dark blue (= cyan blue) aerial mycelium. After S. viridis, S. azurea, and S. marina, S. cyanea is only the fourth member in the genus for which a completely sequenced (non-contiguous finished draft status) type strain genome will be published. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the draft genome sequence, and annotation. The 5,408,301 bp long chromosome with its 5,139 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE funded Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2010 at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

  14. Genome sequence of the chemoheterotrophic soil bacterium Saccharomonospora cyanea type strain (NA-134T)

    PubMed Central

    Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P.; Lu, Megan; Huntemann, Marcel; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Pitluck, Sam; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Pötter, Gabriele; Land, Miriam; Ivanova, Natalia; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomonospora cyanea Runmao et al. 1988 is a member of the genus Saccharomonospora in the family Pseudonocardiaceae that is moderately well characterized at the genome level thus far. Members of the genus Saccharomonospora are of interest because they originate from diverse habitats, such as soil, leaf litter, manure, compost, surface of peat, moist, over-heated grain, and ocean sediment, where they probably play a role in the primary degradation of plant material by attacking hemicellulose. Species of the genus Saccharomonospora are usually Gram-positive, non-acid fast, and are classified among the actinomycetes. S. cyanea is characterized by a dark blue (= cyan blue) aerial mycelium. After S. viridis, S. azurea, and S. marina, S. cyanea is only the fourth member in the genus for which a completely sequenced (non-contiguous finished draft status) type strain genome will be published. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the draft genome sequence, and annotation. The 5,408,301 bp long chromosome with its 5,139 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE funded Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2010 at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI). PMID:24501643

  15. Genome sequence of the chemoheterotrophic soil bacterium Saccharomonospora cyanea type strain (NA-134(T))

    SciTech Connect

    Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P.; Lu, Megan; Huntemann, Marcel; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Pitluck, Sam; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Potter, Gabriele; Land, Miriam L; Ivanova, N; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomonospora cyanea Runmao et al. 1988 is a member of the genus Saccharomonospora in the family Pseudonocardiaceae that is moderately well characterized at the genome level thus far. Members of the genus Saccharomonospora are of interest because they originate from diverse habitats, such as soil, leaf litter, manure, compost, surface of peat, moist, over-heated grain, and ocean sediment, where they probably play a role in the primary degradation of plant material by attacking hemicellulose. Species of the genus Saccharomonospora are usually Gram-positive, non-acid fast, and are classified among the actinomycetes. S. cyanea is characterized by a dark blue (= cyan blue) aerial mycelium. After S. viridis, S. azurea, and S. marina, S. cyanea is only the fourth member in the genus for which a completely sequenced (non-contiguous finished draft status) type strain genome will be published. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the draft genome sequence, and annotation. The 5,408,301 bp long chromosome with its 5,139 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE funded Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2010 at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

  16. Thermalkalibacillus uzonensis gen. nov. sp. nov, a novel aerobic alkali-tolerant thermophilic bacterium isolated from a hot spring in Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weidong; Weber, Carolyn; Zhang, Chuanlun L; Romanek, Christopher S; King, Gary M; Mills, Gary; Sokolova, Tatyana; Wiegel, Juergen

    2006-08-01

    A novel thermophilic, alkali-tolerant, and CO-tolerant strain JW/WZ-YB58(T) was isolated from green mat samples obtained from the Zarvarzin II hot spring in the Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka (Far East Russia). Cells were Gram-type and Gram stain-positive, strictly aerobic, 0.7-0.8 mum in width and 5.5-12 mum in length and produced terminal spherical spores of 1.2-1.6 mum in diameter with the mother cell swelling around 2 mum in diameter (drumstick-type morphology). Cells grew optimally at pH(25 degrees C) 8.2-8.4 and temperature 50-52 degrees C and tolerated maximally 6% (w/v) NaCl. They were strict heterotrophs and could not use either CO or CO(2 )(both with or without H(2)) as sole carbon source, but tolerated up to 90% (v/v) CO in the headspace. The isolate grew on various complex substrates such as yeast extract, on carbohydrates, and organic acids, which included starch, D: -galactose, D: -mannose, glutamate, fumarate and acetate. Catalase reaction was negative. The membrane polar lipids were dominated by branched saturated fatty acids, which included iso-15:0 (24.5%), anteiso-15:0 (18.3%), iso-16:0 (9.9%), iso-17:0 (17.5%) and anteiso-17:0 (9.7%) as major constituents. The DNA G+C content of the strain is 45 mol%. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain JW/WZ-YB58(T) is distantly (<93% similarity) related to members of Bacillaceae. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence, physiological and phenotypic characteristics, the isolate JW/WZ-YB58(T) (ATCC BAA-1258; DSM 17740) is proposed to be the type strain for the type species of the new taxa within the family Bacillaceae, Thermalkalibacillus uzoniensis gen. nov. sp. nov. The Genbank accession number for the 16S rRNA gene sequence is DQ221694.

  17. Bacillus rhizosphaerae sp. nov., an novel diazotrophic bacterium isolated from sugarcane rhizosphere soil.

    PubMed

    Madhaiyan, Munusamy; Poonguzhali, Selvaraj; Lee, Jung-Sook; Lee, Keun-Chul; Hari, Kuppusamy

    2011-10-01

    A Gram-positive, non-pigmented, rod-shaped, diazotrophic bacterial strain, designated SC-N012(T), was isolated from rhizosphere soil of sugarcane and was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. The strain exhibited phenotypic properties that included chemotaxonomic characteristics consistent with its classification in the genus Bacillus. Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene of SC-N012(T) revealed the closest match (98.9% pair wise similarity) with Bacillus clausii DSM 8716(T). However, DNA-DNA hybridization experiments indicated low levels of genomic relatedness (32%) with this strain. The major components of the fatty acid profile are iso-C(15:0), anteiso-C(15:0), iso-C(17:0) and anteiso-C(17:0). The diagnostic cell-wall diamino acid was meso-diaminopimelic acid. The G+C content of the genomic DNA is 43.0 mol%. The lipids present in strain SC-N012(T) are diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol and two unknown phospholipids. Their predominant respiratory quinone was MK-7. Studies of DNA-DNA relatedness, morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomic analyses and phylogenetic data based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing allowed strain SC-N012(T) to be described as members of novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus rhizosphaerae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SC-N012(T) (=DSM 21911(T) = NCCB 100267(T)).

  18. Heterologous expression and characterization of choline oxidase from the soil bacterium Arthrobacter nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Ribitsch, D; Karl, W; Wehrschütz-Sigl, E; Tutz, S; Remler, P; Weber, H J; Gruber, K; Stehr, R; Bessler, C; Hoven, N; Sauter, K; Maurer, K H; Schwab, H

    2009-01-01

    In the course of a microbial screening of soil samples for new oxidases, different enrichment strategies were carried out. With choline as the only carbon source, a microorganism was isolated and identified as Arthrobacter nicotianae. From this strain, a gene coding for a choline oxidase was isolated from chromosomal DNA. This gene named codA was cloned in Escherichia coli BL21-Gold and the protein (An_CodA) heterologously overexpressed as a soluble intracellular protein of 59.1 kDa. Basic biochemical characterization of purified protein revealed a pH optimum of 7.4 and activity over a broad temperature range (15-70 degrees C). Specific activities were determined toward choline chloride (4.70 +/- 0.12 U/mg) and the synthetic analogs bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-dimethylammonium chloride (0.05 +/- 0.45 x 10(-2) U/mg) and tris-(2-hydroxyethyl)-methylammonium methylsulfate (0.01 +/- 0.12 x 10(-2) U/mg). With increasing number of oxidizable groups, a significant decrease in activity was noted. Determination of kinetic parameters in atmorspheric oxygen resulted in K (M) = 1.51 +/- 0.09 mM and V (max) = 42.73 +/- 0.42 mU/min for choline chloride and K (M) = 4.77 +/- 0.76 mM and V (max) = 48.40 +/- 2.88 mU/min for the reaction intermediate betaine aldehyde respectively. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of the products formed during the enzyme reaction with choline chloride showed that in vitro the intermediate betaine aldehyde exists also free in solution.

  19. Spirosoma montaniterrae sp. nov., an ultraviolet and gamma radiation-resistant bacterium isolated from mountain soil.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Jin; Kang, Myung-Suk; Joo, Eun Sun; Kim, Myung Kyum; Im, Wan-Taek; Jung, Hee-Young; Srinivasan, Sathiyaraj

    2015-07-01

    A Gram-negative, yellow-pigmented, long-rod shaped bacterial strain designated DY10(T) was isolated from a soil sample collected at Mt. Deogyusan, Jeonbuk province, South Korea. Optimum growth observed at 30°C and pH 7. No growth was observed above 1% (w/v) NaCl. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that strain DY10(T) belonged to the genus Spirosoma and was distantly related to Spirosoma arcticum R2-35(T) (91.0%), Spirosoma lingual DSM 74(T) (90.8%), Spirosoma endophyticum EX36(T) (90.7%), Spirosoma panaciterrae DSM 21099(T) (90.5%), Spirosoma rigui WPCB118(T) (90.2%), Spirosoma spitsbergense DSM 19989(T) (89.8%), Spirosoma luteum DSM 19990(T) (89.6%), Spirosoma oryzae RHs22(T) (89.6%), and Spirosoma radiotolerans DG5A(T) (89.1%). Strain DY10(T) showed resistance to gamma and ultraviolet radiation. The chemotaxonomic characteristics of strain DY10(T) were consistent with those of the genus Spirosoma, with the quinone system with MK-7 as the predominant menaquinone, iso-C15:0, C16:1 ω5c, and summed feature3 (C16:1 ω7c/C16:1 ω6c), and phosphatidylethanolamine as the major polar lipid. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 53.0 mol%. Differential phenotypic properties with the closely related type strains clearly distinguished strain DY10(T) from previously described members of the genus Spirosoma and represents a novel species in this genus, for which the name Spirosoma montaniterrae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is DY10(T) (=KCTC 23999(T) =KEMB 9004-162(T) =JCM 18492(T)).

  20. Archaea produce lower yields of N2 O than bacteria during aerobic ammonia oxidation in soil.

    PubMed

    Hink, Linda; Nicol, Graeme W; Prosser, James I

    2016-03-11

    Nitrogen fertilisation of agricultural soil contributes significantly to emissions of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2 O), which is generated during denitrification and, in oxic soils, mainly by ammonia oxidisers. Although laboratory cultures of ammonia oxidising bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) produce N2 O, their relative activities in soil are unknown. This work tested the hypothesis that AOB dominate ammonia oxidation and N2 O production under conditions of high inorganic ammonia (NH3 ) input, but result mainly from the activity of AOA when NH3 is derived from mineralisation. 1-octyne, a recently discovered inhibitor of AOB, was used to distinguish N2 O production resulting from archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidation in soil microcosms, and specifically inhibited AOB growth, activity and N2 O production. In unamended soils, ammonia oxidation and N2 O production were lower and resulted mainly from ammonia oxidation by AOA. The AOA N2 O yield relative to nitrite produced was half that of AOB, likely due to additional enzymatic mechanisms in the latter, but ammonia oxidation and N2 O production were directly linked in all treatments. Relative contributions of AOA and AOB to N2 O production, therefore, reflect their respective contributions to ammonia oxidation. These results suggest potential mitigation strategies for N2 O emissions from fertilised agricultural soils.

  1. Sphingobium barthaii sp. nov., a high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium isolated from cattle pasture soil.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Allyn H; Kunihiro, Marie; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Nogi, Yuichi; Kanaly, Robert A

    2015-09-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, yellow, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain KK22(T), was isolated from a microbial consortium that grew on diesel fuel originally recovered from cattle pasture soil. Strain KK22(T) has been studied for its ability to biotransform high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence phylogeny, strain KK22(T) was affiliated with the genus Sphingobium in the phylum Proteobacteria and was most closely related to Sphingobium fuliginis TKP(T) (99.8%) and less closely related to Sphingobium quisquiliarum P25(T) (97.5%). Results of DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) revealed relatedness values between strain KK22(T) and strain TKP(T) and between strain KK22(T) and strain P25(T) of 21 ± 4% (reciprocal hybridization, 27 ± 2%) and 15 ± 2% (reciprocal hybridization, 17 ± 1%), respectively. Chemotaxonomic analyses of strain KK22(T) showed that the major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone Q-10, that the polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidyl-N-methylethylethanolamine and sphingoglycolipid, and that C18 : 1ω7c and C14 : 0 2-OH were the main fatty acid and hydroxylated fatty acids, respectively. This strain was unable to reduce nitrate and the genomic DNA G+C content was 64.7 mol%. Based upon the results of the DDH analyses, the fact that strain KK22(T) was motile, and its biochemical and physiological characteristics, strain KK22(T) could be separated from recognized species of the genus Sphingobium. We conclude that strain KK22(T) represents a novel species of this genus for which the name Sphingobium barthaii sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is KK22(T) ( = DSM 29313(T) = JCM 30309(T)).

  2. Decoding how a soil bacterium extracts building blocks and metabolic energy from ligninolysis provides road map for lignin valorization

    PubMed Central

    Varman, Arul M.; He, Lian; Follenfant, Rhiannon; Wu, Weihua; Wemmer, Sarah; Wrobel, Steven A.; Tang, Yinjie J.; Singh, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Sphingobium sp. SYK-6 is a soil bacterium boasting a well-studied ligninolytic pathway and the potential for development into a microbial chassis for lignin valorization. An improved understanding of its metabolism will help researchers in the engineering of SYK-6 for the production of value-added chemicals through lignin valorization. We used 13C-fingerprinting, 13C metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA), and RNA-sequencing differential expression analysis to uncover the following metabolic traits: (i) SYK-6 prefers alkaline conditions, making it an efficient host for the consolidated bioprocessing of lignin, and it also lacks the ability to metabolize sugars or organic acids; (ii) the CO2 release (i.e., carbon loss) from the ligninolysis-based metabolism of SYK-6 is significantly greater than the CO2 release from the sugar-based metabolism of Escherichia coli; (iii) the vanillin catabolic pathway (which is the converging point of majority of the lignin catabolic pathways) is coupled with the tetrahydrofolate-dependent C1 pathway that is essential for the biosynthesis of serine, histidine, and methionine; (iv) catabolic end products of lignin (pyruvate and oxaloacetate) must enter the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle first and then use phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase to initiate gluconeogenesis; and (v) 13C-MFA together with RNA-sequencing differential expression analysis establishes the vanillin catabolic pathway as the major contributor of NAD(P)H synthesis. Therefore, the vanillin catabolic pathway is essential for SYK-6 to obtain sufficient reducing equivalents for its healthy growth; cosubstrate experiments support this finding. This unique energy feature of SYK-6 is particularly interesting because most heterotrophs rely on the transhydrogenase, the TCA cycle, and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway to obtain NADPH. PMID:27634497

  3. Chimaereicella boritolerans sp. nov., a boron-tolerant and alkaliphilic bacterium of the family Flavobacteriaceae isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Iftikhar; Yokota, Akira; Fujiwara, Toru

    2007-05-01

    A non-motile, Gram-negative, boron-tolerant and alkaliphilic bacterium was isolated from soil of the Hisarcik area in the Kutahya Province of Turkey that was naturally high in boron minerals. The novel isolate, designated T-22(T), formed rod-shaped cells, was catalase- and oxidase-positive and tolerated up to 300 mM boron. The strain also survived on agar medium containing up to 3 % (w/v) NaCl. The pH range for growth of this strain was 6.5-10.0 (optimum pH 8.0-9.0) and the temperature range was 16-37 degrees C (optimum 28-30 degrees C). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed a clear affiliation with the genus Chimaereicella, with 97.4 % sequence similarity to Chimaereicella alkaliphila AC-74(T), which was the highest similarity among cultivated bacteria. The DNA-DNA relatedness with C. alkaliphila AC-74(T) was 28.3 %. The major respiratory quinone system was MK-7 and the predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0), iso-C(17 : 1)omega9c, iso-C(17 : 0) 3-OH and summed feature 3 (iso-C(15 : 0) 2-OH and/or iso-C(16 : 1)omega7c). The DNA G+C content was 42.5 mol%. Based on the phylogenetic analysis and physiological, chemotaxonomic and genetic data, we concluded that strain T-22(T) should be classified in the genus Chimaereicella, and we propose the name Chimaereicella boritolerans sp. nov. for this novel species. The type strain is strain T-22(T) (=DSM 17298(T)=NBRC 101277(T)=ATCC BAA-1189(T)).

  4. Decoding how a soil bacterium extracts building blocks and metabolic energy from ligninolysis provides road map for lignin valorization.

    PubMed

    Varman, Arul M; He, Lian; Follenfant, Rhiannon; Wu, Weihua; Wemmer, Sarah; Wrobel, Steven A; Tang, Yinjie J; Singh, Seema

    2016-10-04

    Sphingobium sp. SYK-6 is a soil bacterium boasting a well-studied ligninolytic pathway and the potential for development into a microbial chassis for lignin valorization. An improved understanding of its metabolism will help researchers in the engineering of SYK-6 for the production of value-added chemicals through lignin valorization. We used (13)C-fingerprinting, (13)C metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA), and RNA-sequencing differential expression analysis to uncover the following metabolic traits: (i) SYK-6 prefers alkaline conditions, making it an efficient host for the consolidated bioprocessing of lignin, and it also lacks the ability to metabolize sugars or organic acids; (ii) the CO2 release (i.e., carbon loss) from the ligninolysis-based metabolism of SYK-6 is significantly greater than the CO2 release from the sugar-based metabolism of Escherichia coli; (iii) the vanillin catabolic pathway (which is the converging point of majority of the lignin catabolic pathways) is coupled with the tetrahydrofolate-dependent C1 pathway that is essential for the biosynthesis of serine, histidine, and methionine; (iv) catabolic end products of lignin (pyruvate and oxaloacetate) must enter the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle first and then use phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase to initiate gluconeogenesis; and (v) (13)C-MFA together with RNA-sequencing differential expression analysis establishes the vanillin catabolic pathway as the major contributor of NAD(P)H synthesis. Therefore, the vanillin catabolic pathway is essential for SYK-6 to obtain sufficient reducing equivalents for its healthy growth; cosubstrate experiments support this finding. This unique energy feature of SYK-6 is particularly interesting because most heterotrophs rely on the transhydrogenase, the TCA cycle, and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway to obtain NADPH.

  5. Purification, characterization, gene cloning and nucleotide sequencing of D: -stereospecific amino acid amidase from soil bacterium: Delftia acidovorans.

    PubMed

    Hongpattarakere, Tipparat; Komeda, Hidenobu; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2005-12-01

    The D-amino acid amidase-producing bacterium was isolated from soil samples using an enrichment culture technique in medium broth containing D-phenylalanine amide as a sole source of nitrogen. The strain exhibiting the strongest activity was identified as Delftia acidovorans strain 16. This strain produced intracellular D-amino acid amidase constitutively. The enzyme was purified about 380-fold to homogeneity and its molecular mass was estimated to be about 50 kDa, on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The enzyme was active preferentially toward D-amino acid amides rather than their L-counterparts. It exhibited strong amino acid amidase activity toward aromatic amino acid amides including D-phenylalanine amide, D-tryptophan amide and D-tyrosine amide, yet it was not specifically active toward low-molecular-weight D-amino acid amides such as D-alanine amide, L-alanine amide and L-serine amide. Moreover, it was not specifically active toward oligopeptides. The enzyme showed maximum activity at 40 degrees C and pH 8.5 and appeared to be very stable, with 92.5% remaining activity after the reaction was performed at 45 degrees C for 30 min. However, it was mostly inactivated in the presence of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride or Cd2+, Ag+, Zn2+, Hg2+ and As3+ . The NH2 terminal and internal amino acid sequences of the enzyme were determined; and the gene was cloned and sequenced. The enzyme gene damA encodes a 466-amino-acid protein (molecular mass 49,860.46 Da); and the deduced amino acid sequence exhibits homology to the D-amino acid amidase from Variovorax paradoxus (67.9% identity), the amidotransferase A subunit from Burkholderia fungorum (50% identity) and other enantioselective amidases.

  6. Cellulosibacter alkalithermophilus gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic alkalithermophilic, cellulolytic-xylanolytic bacterium isolated from soil of a coconut garden.

    PubMed

    Watthanalamloet, Amornrat; Tachaapaikoon, Chakrit; Lee, Yun Sik; Kosugi, Akihiko; Mori, Yutaka; Tanasupawat, Somboon; Kyu, Khin Lay; Ratanakhanokchai, Khanok

    2012-10-01

    An obligately anaerobic, cellulolytic-xylanolytic bacterium, designated strain A6(T), was isolated from soil of a coconut garden in the Bangkuntien district of Bangkok, Thailand. The strain was Gram-stain positive, catalase-negative, endospore-forming, motile and rod-shaped with a cell size of 0.2-0.3×2.0-3.0 µm. Optimal growth of strain A6(T) occurred at pH(55 °C) 9.5, 55 °C. Strain A6(T) fermented various carbohydrates, and the end products from the fermentation of cellobiose were acetate, ethanol, propionate and a small amount of butyrate. The major cellular fatty acids were iso-C(14:0) 3-OH, iso-C(15:0), iso-C(16:0) and C(16:0). The cell-wall peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid. No respiratory quinones were detected. The DNA G+C content was 30.0 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the strain represented a new phyletic sublineage within the family Clostridiaceae, with <93.0% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to recognized species of this family. On the basis of phenotypic, genotypic and physiological evidence, strain A6(T) represents a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Cellulosibacter alkalithermophilus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is A6(T) ( = TISTR 1915(T) = KCTC 5874(T)).

  7. Oligoflexus tunisiensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a Gram-negative, aerobic, filamentous bacterium of a novel proteobacterial lineage, and description of Oligoflexaceae fam. nov., Oligoflexales ord. nov. and Oligoflexia classis nov.

    PubMed Central

    Nakai, Ryosuke; Nishijima, Miyuki; Tazato, Nozomi; Handa, Yutaka; Karray, Fatma; Sayadi, Sami; Isoda, Hiroko

    2014-01-01

    A phylogenetically novel proteobacterium, strain Shr3T, was isolated from sand gravels collected from the eastern margin of the Sahara Desert. The isolation strategy targeted bacteria filterable through 0.2-µm-pore-size filters. Strain Shr3T was determined to be a Gram-negative, aerobic, non-motile, filamentous bacterium. Oxidase and catalase reactions were positive. Strain Shr3T showed growth on R2A medium, but poor or no growth on nutrient agar, trypticase soy agar and standard method agar. The major isoprenoid quinone was menaquinone-7. The dominant cellular fatty acids detected were C16 : 1ω5c and C16 : 0, and the primary hydroxy acid present was C12 : 0 3-OH. The DNA G+C content was 54.0 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain Shr3T was affiliated with an uncultivated lineage of the phylum Proteobacteria; the nearest known type strain, with 83 % sequence similarity, was Desulfomicrobium orale DSM 12838T in the class Deltaproteobacteria. The isolate and closely related environmental clones formed a novel class-level clade in the phylum Proteobacteria with high bootstrap support (96–99 %). Based on these results, the novel class Oligoflexia classis nov. in the phylum Proteobacteria and the novel genus and species Oligoflexus tunisiensis gen. nov., sp. nov. are proposed for strain Shr3T, the first cultivated representative of the Oligoflexia. The type strain of Oligoflexus tunisiensis is Shr3T ( = JCM 16864T = NCIMB 14846T). We also propose the subordinate taxa Oligoflexales ord. nov. and Oligoflexaceae fam. nov. in the class Oligoflexia. PMID:25013226

  8. An endophytic bacterium Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Sasm3-enhanced phytoremediation of nitrate-cadmium compound polluted soil by intercropping Sedum alfredii with oilseed rape.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bao; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Guiqing; Xu, Xiaomeng; Pan, Fengshan; Zhang, Jie; Tian, Shengke; Feng, Ying; Yang, Xiaoe

    2015-11-01

    Intensive agricultural system with high input of fertilizer results in high agricultural output. However, excessive fertilization in intensive agricultural system has great potential to cause nitrate and heavy metal accumulation in soil, which is adverse to human health. The main objective of the present study was to observe the effects of intercropping and inoculation of endophytic bacterium Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Sasm3 on phytoremediation of combined contaminated soil in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.). The results showed that with Sasm3 inoculation, the biomass of rape was increased by 10-20% for shoot, 64% for root, and 23-29% for seeds while the nitrate accumulation in rape was decreased by 14% in root and by 12% in shoot. The cadmium concentration in rape increased significantly with mono-inoculating treatment, whereas it decreased significantly after intercropping treatment. By denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and real-time quantitative PCR analysis, the diversity of bacterial community and the number of nirS and nirK gene copies increased significantly with inoculation or/and intercropping treatment. In conclusion, the endophytic bacterium Sasm3-inoculated intercropping system not only improved the efficiency of clearing cadmium from soil without obstructing crop production, but also improved the quality of crop.

  9. Characteristics of the soil-like substrates produced with a novel technique combining aerobic fermentation and earthworm treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Wenli; He, Wenting; Li, Leyuan; Liu, Hong

    2012-12-01

    The soil-like substrate (SLS) technique is key for improving the closure of bioregenerative life support system (BLSS) by recycling the inedible biomass of higher plants. In this study, a novel SLS technique (NSLST) was proposed: aerobic fermentations at 35 °C for 1 day, then 60 °C for 6 days, finally 30 °C for 3 days, followed by earthworm treatment for 70 days. Comparing with the original SLS technique (OSLST), its process cycle was 13 days shorter, and the dry weight loss rate (81.1%) was improved by 24.77%. The cellulose and lignin degradation rates were 96.6% and 94.6%. The concentrations of available N, P and K in mature SLS were respectively 776.1 mg/L, 348.0 mg/L and 7943.0 mg/L. Low CH4 and NH3 production was observed, but no accumulation. According to the seed germination test, the SLSs were feasible for plant growth. This investigation will provide a preliminary foundation for BLSS design.

  10. Assessment of functional and genetic diversity of aerobic endospore forming Bacilli from rhizospheric soil of Phyllanthus amarus L.

    PubMed

    Kadyan, Sangeeta; Panghal, Manju; Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Khushboo; Yadav, Jaya Parkash

    2013-09-01

    Fifty two aerobic and endospore forming Bacilli (AEFB) strains were recovered from rhizospheric soil of Phyllanthus amarus. Morphological, biochemical and molecular characterization by 16S rDNA gene sequencing has shown that these bacterial strains belong to six different genera of AEFB i.e. Bacillus, Brevibacillus, Lysinibacillus, Paenibacillus, Terribacillus and Jeotgalibacillus. Analysis of their PGP activities has shown that 92.30 % strains produced indole acetic acid hormone, 86.53 % of the strains solubilized Phosphate and 44.23 % strains produced siderophore. Chitinase production activity was shown by 42.30 % of the strains and 21.15 % of the strains produced 1-amino cyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase. 46.15 % of isolates have shown antagonistic activity against common fungal pathogen of the plant i.e. Corynespora cassiicola. Among all of the isolated strains B. Cereus JP44SK22 and JP44SK42 have shown all of the six plant growth promoting traits tested. B. megaterium strains (JP44SK18 and JP44SK35), Lysinibacillus sphaericus strains (JP44SK3 and JP44SK4) and Brevibacillus laterosporus strain JP44SK51 have also shown multiple PGP activities except ACC deaminase production activity. In the present study bacterial strain belonging to genera Jeotgalibacillus sp. JP44SK37 has been reported first time as a member of rhizospheric soil habitat and has also shown PGP activities. It can be concluded that Rhizosphere of P. amarus has harboured a good diversity of AEFB bacterial strains having a lot of biofertilizing and biocontrol abilities.

  11. Aminivibrio pyruvatiphilus gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic, amino-acid-degrading bacterium from soil of a Japanese rice field.

    PubMed

    Honda, Takuya; Fujita, Takashi; Tonouchi, Akio

    2013-10-01

    A novel anaerobic bacterium that could ferment amino acids and organic acids was isolated from an anaerobic, propionate-oxidizing enrichment culture originating from soil of a rice field in Japan. Cells of the isolate, designated strain 4F6E(T), were Gram-staining-negative, oxidase- and catalase-negative, non-spore-forming, vibrio-shaped, motile rods (0.8×2.0-2.5 µm) with two or three lateral flagella. Growth occurred at 20-42 °C (optimum at 37-40 °C), at pH 6.4-8.4 (optimum at pH 7.3) and at 0-1.5 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum at 0-0.5 %). Good growth occurred on glycine, serine, cysteine, pyruvate and citrate, whereas poor growth was observed on threonine, glutamine, L-malate, α-ketoglutarate, peptone and Casamino acids. In co-culture with the hydrogen-utilizing methanogen Methanobacterium formicicum JCM 10132(T), strain 4F6E(T) oxidized alanine, valine, leucine, isoleucine, methionine, aspartate, glutamate, histidine, asparagine and fumarate. Yeast extract was required for growth. The G+C content of genomic DNA was 61.9 mol%. A phylogenetic analysis based on comparison of the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that the type strains of Fretibacterium fastidiosum, Aminobacterium colombiense and Aminobacterium mobile, members of the family Synergistaceae, were the closest relatives of strain 4F6E(T), with low sequence similarities (89.3, 89.5 and 86.2 %, respectively). Strain 4F6E(T) contained iso-C13 : 0 (24.43 %), iso-C15 : 0 (16.47 %) and C19 : 1ω11c/C19 : 1ω9c (16.32 %) as the major fatty acids, which differed from those of F. fastidiosum, Aminobacterium colombiense and Aminobacterium mobile. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic differences between strain 4F6E(T) and the type strains of F. fastidiosum and Aminobacterium species, we propose that strain 4F6E(T) represents a novel genus and species, Aminivibrio pyruvatiphilus gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of Aminivibrio pyruvatiphilus is strain 4F6E(T) (

  12. The determination of the real nano-scale sizes of bacteria in chernozem during microbial succession by means of hatching of a soil in aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbacheva, M.

    2012-04-01

    M.A. Gorbacheva,L.M. Polyanskaya The Faculty of Soil Science, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, GSP-1, Moscow,119991,Russia In recent years there's been particular attention paid to the smallest life's forms- bacteria which size can be measured in nanometer. These are the forms of bacteria with diameter of 5-200 nm. Theoretical calculations based on the content of the minimum number of DNA, enzyme, lipids in and ribosome in cells indicates impossibility of existence of a living cells within diameter less than 300 nm. It is theoretically possible for a living cell to exist within possible diameter of approximately 140 nm. Using a fluorescence microscope there's been indicated in a number of samples from lakes, rivers, soil, snow and rain water that 200 nm is the smallest diameter of a living cell. Supposingly, such a small size of bacteria in soil is determined by natural conditions which limit their development by nutritious substances and stress-factors. Rejuvenescence of nanobacteria under unfavourable natural conditions and stress-factors is studied in laboratory environment. The object of the current study has become the samples of typical arable chernozem of the Central Chernozem State Biosphere Reserve in Kursk. The detailed morphological description of the soil profile and its basic analytical characteristics are widely represented in scientific publications. The soil is characterized by a high carbon content which makes up 3,96% ,3,8% , and 2,9% for the upper layers of the A horizon, and 0,79% for the layer of the B horizon. A microbial succession was studied under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by means of experiments with microcosms in upper A horizons and B horizon of a chernozem. The final aim is to identify the cells size of bacteria in aerobic and anaerobic soil conditions in chernozem during the microbial succession, by dampening and application of chitin by means of «cascade filtration» method. The study of the microcosms is important for

  13. An evaluation of aerobic and anaerobic composting of banana peels treated with different inoculums for soil nutrient replenishment.

    PubMed

    Kalemelawa, Frank; Nishihara, Eiji; Endo, Tsuneyoshi; Ahmad, Zahoor; Yeasmin, Rumana; Tenywa, Moses M; Yamamoto, Sadahiro

    2012-12-01

    This study sought to evaluate the efficacy of aerobic and anaerobic composting of inoculated banana peels, and assess the agronomic value of banana peel-based compost. Changes in the chemical composition under aerobic and anaerobic conditions were examined for four formulations of banana peel-based wastes over a period of 12 weeks. The formulations i.e. plain banana peel (B), and a mixture with either cow dung (BC), poultry litter (BP) or earthworm (BE) were separately composted under aerobic and anaerobic conditions under laboratory conditions. Inoculation with either cow dung or poultry litter significantly facilitated mineralization in the order: BP>BC>B. The rate of decomposition was significantly faster under aerobic than in anaerobic composting conditions. The final composts contained high K (>100 g kg(-1)) and TN (>2%), indicating high potential as a source of K and N fertilizer.

  14. A consolidated analysis of the physiologic and molecular responses induced under acid stress in the legume-symbiont model-soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Draghi, W O; Del Papa, M F; Hellweg, C; Watt, S A; Watt, T F; Barsch, A; Lozano, M J; Lagares, A; Salas, M E; López, J L; Albicoro, F J; Nilsson, J F; Torres Tejerizo, G A; Luna, M F; Pistorio, M; Boiardi, J L; Pühler, A; Weidner, S; Niehaus, K; Lagares, A

    2016-07-11

    Abiotic stresses in general and extracellular acidity in particular disturb and limit nitrogen-fixing symbioses between rhizobia and their host legumes. Except for valuable molecular-biological studies on different rhizobia, no consolidated models have been formulated to describe the central physiologic changes that occur in acid-stressed bacteria. We present here an integrated analysis entailing the main cultural, metabolic, and molecular responses of the model bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti growing under controlled acid stress in a chemostat. A stepwise extracellular acidification of the culture medium had indicated that S. meliloti stopped growing at ca. pH 6.0-6.1. Under such stress the rhizobia increased the O2 consumption per cell by more than 5-fold. This phenotype, together with an increase in the transcripts for several membrane cytochromes, entails a higher aerobic-respiration rate in the acid-stressed rhizobia. Multivariate analysis of global metabolome data served to unequivocally correlate specific-metabolite profiles with the extracellular pH, showing that at low pH the pentose-phosphate pathway exhibited increases in several transcripts, enzymes, and metabolites. Further analyses should be focused on the time course of the observed changes, its associated intracellular signaling, and on the comparison with the changes that operate during the sub lethal acid-adaptive response (ATR) in rhizobia.

  15. A consolidated analysis of the physiologic and molecular responses induced under acid stress in the legume-symbiont model-soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Draghi, W. O.; Del Papa, M. F.; Hellweg, C.; Watt, S. A.; Watt, T. F.; Barsch, A.; Lozano, M. J.; Lagares, A.; Salas, M. E.; López, J. L.; Albicoro, F. J.; Nilsson, J. F.; Torres Tejerizo, G. A.; Luna, M. F.; Pistorio, M.; Boiardi, J. L.; Pühler, A.; Weidner, S.; Niehaus, K.; Lagares, A.

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses in general and extracellular acidity in particular disturb and limit nitrogen-fixing symbioses between rhizobia and their host legumes. Except for valuable molecular-biological studies on different rhizobia, no consolidated models have been formulated to describe the central physiologic changes that occur in acid-stressed bacteria. We present here an integrated analysis entailing the main cultural, metabolic, and molecular responses of the model bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti growing under controlled acid stress in a chemostat. A stepwise extracellular acidification of the culture medium had indicated that S. meliloti stopped growing at ca. pH 6.0–6.1. Under such stress the rhizobia increased the O2 consumption per cell by more than 5-fold. This phenotype, together with an increase in the transcripts for several membrane cytochromes, entails a higher aerobic-respiration rate in the acid-stressed rhizobia. Multivariate analysis of global metabolome data served to unequivocally correlate specific-metabolite profiles with the extracellular pH, showing that at low pH the pentose-phosphate pathway exhibited increases in several transcripts, enzymes, and metabolites. Further analyses should be focused on the time course of the observed changes, its associated intracellular signaling, and on the comparison with the changes that operate during the sub lethal acid-adaptive response (ATR) in rhizobia. PMID:27404346

  16. Decoding how a soil bacterium extracts building blocks and metabolic energy from ligninolysis provides road map for lignin valorization (Towards Lignin valorization: How a soil bacterium extracts building blocks and metabolic energy from "Lignolysis")

    SciTech Connect

    Varman, Arul M.; He, Lian; Follenfant, Rhiannon; Wu, Weihua; Wemmer, Sarah; Wrobel, Steven A.; Tang, Yinjie J.; Singh, Seema

    2016-09-15

    Lignin is a major resources for the production of next generation renewable aromatics. Sphingobium sp. SYK-6 is a bacterium that has been well-studied for the breakdown of lignin-derived compounds. There has been a lot of interest in SYK-6 lignolytic activity and many recent works have focused on understanding the unique catabolic pathway it possesses for the degradation of lignin derived monomers and oligomers. Furthermore, there has been no prior effort in understanding the central fluxome based on lignin derived substrates into value-added chemicals.

  17. Decoding how a soil bacterium extracts building blocks and metabolic energy from ligninolysis provides road map for lignin valorization (Towards Lignin valorization: How a soil bacterium extracts building blocks and metabolic energy from "Lignolysis")

    DOE PAGES

    Varman, Arul M.; He, Lian; Follenfant, Rhiannon; ...

    2016-09-15

    Lignin is a major resources for the production of next generation renewable aromatics. Sphingobium sp. SYK-6 is a bacterium that has been well-studied for the breakdown of lignin-derived compounds. There has been a lot of interest in SYK-6 lignolytic activity and many recent works have focused on understanding the unique catabolic pathway it possesses for the degradation of lignin derived monomers and oligomers. Furthermore, there has been no prior effort in understanding the central fluxome based on lignin derived substrates into value-added chemicals.

  18. Spatial and temporal variations in pentachlorophenol dissipation at the aerobic--anaerobic interfaces of flooded paddy soils.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiajiang; Xu, Yan; Brookes, Philip C; He, Yan; Xu, Jianming

    2013-07-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) dissipation occurs naturally in flooded soils and although dissipation half-lives vary between soil profiles at the millimeter-scale the reason is poorly understood. Vertical variations of PCP dissipation were investigated in three typical Chinese paddy soils; Soil 1 (Umbraqualf), Soil 2 (Plinthudult) and Soil 3 (Tropudult). The soil depth was divided into a surface and a deep layer based upon different PCP dissipations in the surface layer of 40-93, 42-88 and 16-100% for Soils 1-3 respectively. In the deep layer, PCP was greatly dissipated in Soil 2, but much less in Soil 1 and Soil 3. Correlation analysis indicated that SO4(2-) and Fe(III) were negatively related to PCP dissipation. SO4(2-) and Cl(-) were highly mobile in the flooded soil profiles. Fe(III) reduction increased with increasing soil depth, and was inhibited by high SO4(2-) concentrations.

  19. Geobacillus debilis sp. nov., a novel obligately thermophilic bacterium isolated from a cool soil environment, and reassignment of Bacillus pallidus to Geobacillus pallidus comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Banat, Ibrahim M; Marchant, Roger; Rahman, Thahira J

    2004-11-01

    Several aerobic, motile, rod-shaped, thermophilic, spore-forming Geobacillus bacteria predominantly giving a Gram-positive staining reaction were isolated from a cool soil environment in Northern Ireland and taxonomically investigated. Two isolates, F10 and Tf(T), showed low 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to recognized members of the genus Geobacillus. Phylogenetic tree investigation using neighbour-joining, maximum-likelihood and parsimony methods indicated that strains F10 and Tf(T) represent a single novel species, for which the name Geobacillus debilis sp. nov. is proposed, with type strain Tf(T) (=DSM 16016(T)=NCIMB 13995(T)) and which belongs to a subgroup of the genus Geobacillus comprising Geobacillus toebii and Geobacillus caldoxylosilyticus. However, G. debilis showed closest affinities to Bacillus pallidus, which we propose should become Geobacillus pallidus comb. nov.

  20. Spectroscopic characterization of the uptake of essential and xenobiotic metal cations in cells of the soil bacterium Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Kamnev, A A; Renou-Gonnord, M F; Antonyuk, L P; Colina, M; Chernyshev, A V; Frolov, I; Ignatov, V V

    1997-01-01

    The results of flame (FAAS) or graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric (GFAAS) analyses are presented and discussed on the accumulation of essential metals (Mg, Ca, Mn and Fe contained in the cultivation medium) and traces of each one of the conventionally xenobiotic elements from the group V, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn or Pb, added to the medium in concentrations (0.2 mM) which do not essentially suppress growth of the bacterial culture, in cells of the plant root-associated nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azospirillum brasilense. Along with the essential cations assimilated by the bacterium, Zn and Cu were found to effectively accumulate in the biomass from the environment. The uptake of Co and Ni was significantly less pronounced, whereas Pb and V appeared to be present in cells in much lower concentrations than in the cultivation medium evidently showing no tendency to be assimilated by azospirilla. The effect of the above xenobiotics on the uptake level of the four essential elements provided evidence that they may compete for the formation of biologically active complexes with substances of both intracellular and extracellular localization. The analytical data obtained are compared with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of intact vacuum-dried bacterial cells grown in a standard medium and under the conditions of an increased metal uptake.

  1. Fate and metabolism of tetrabromobisphenol A in soil slurries without and with the amendment with the alkylphenol degrading bacterium Sphingomonas sp. strain TTNP3.

    PubMed

    Li, Fangjie; Wang, Jiajia; Nastold, Peter; Jiang, Bingqi; Sun, Feifei; Zenker, Armin; Kolvenbach, Boris Alexander; Ji, Rong; François-Xavier Corvini, Philippe

    2014-10-01

    Transformation of ring-(14)C-labelled tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA) was studied in an oxic soil slurry with and without amendment with Sphingomonas sp. strain TTNP3, a bacterium degrading bisphenol-A. TBBPA degradation was accompanied by mineralization and formation of metabolites and bound-residues. The biotransformation was stimulated in the slurry bio-augmented with strain TTNP3, via a mechanism of metabolic compensation, although this strain did not grow on TBBPA. In the absence and presence of strain TTNP3, six and nine metabolites, respectively, were identified. The initial O-methylation metabolite (TBBPA-monomethyl ether) and hydroxytribromobisphenol-A were detected only when strain TTNP3 was present. Four primary metabolic pathways of TBBPA in the slurries are proposed: oxidative skeletal rearrangements, O-methylation, ipso-substitution, and reductive debromination. Our study provides for the first time the information about the complex metabolism of TBBPA in oxic soil and suggests that type II ipso-substitution could play a significant role in the fate of alkylphenol derivatives in the environment.

  2. Simulating the effect of aerobic biodegradation on soil vapor intrusion into buildings: influence of degradation rate, source concentration, and depth.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Lilian D V; Johnson, Paul C

    2006-04-01

    Steady-state vapor intrusion scenarios involving aerobically biodegradable chemicals are studied using a three-dimensional multicomponent numerical model. In these scenarios, sources of aerobically biodegradable chemical vapors are placed at depths of 1-14 m beneath a 10 m x 10 m basement or slab-on-grade construction building, and the simultaneous transport and reaction of hydrocarbon and oxygen vapors are simulated. The results are presented as Johnson and Ettinger attenuation factors alpha (predicted indoor air hydrocarbon concentration/source vapor concentration), and normalized contour plots of hydrocarbon and oxygen concentrations. In addition to varying the vapor source depth, the effects of source concentration (2-200 mg chemical/L vapor) and oxygen-limited first-order reaction rates (0.018-1.8 h(-1)) are studied. Hydrocarbon inputs were specific to benzene, although the relevant properties are similar to those for a range of hydrocarbons of interest. Overall, the results suggest that aerobic biodegradation could play a significant role in reducing vapor intrusion into buildings (decreased alpha-values) relative to the no-biodegradation case, with the significance of aerobic biodegradation increasing with increasing vapor source depth, decreasing vapor source concentration, and increasing first-order biodegradation rate. In contrast to the no-biodegradation case, differences in foundation construction can be significant in some settings. The significance of aerobic biodegradation is directly related to the extent to which oxygen is capable of migrating beneath the foundation. For example, in the case of a basement scenario with a 200 mg/L vapor source located at 3 m bgs, oxygen is consumed before it can migrate beneath the foundation, so the attenuation factors for simulations with and without aerobic biodegradation are similar for all first-order rates studied. For the case of a 2 mg/L vapor source located at 8 m bgs, the oxygen is widely distributed

  3. Isolation of an endosulfan-degrading bacterium from a coffee farm soil: persistence and inhibitory effect on its biological functions.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Jean Manuel; Casas, Jaime; Romero, Esperanza

    2011-12-15

    Endosulfan is a lypophilic persistent organic pollutant (POP) that has caused widespread concern due to its persistence in the environment, toxicity and bioaccumulation in living organisms. The aim of this study is to isolate endosulfan-degrading bacteria taken from five coffee farms historically exposed to this insecticide which could be used in future remediation strategies. The biodegradation capability of the isolated strain as well as endosulfan's impact on some of the strain's biological functions was studied. Endosulfan and its metabolites were analyzed using TLC and GC-MS. The isolated strain, capable of growing in a liquid culture treated with this insecticide as the sole sulfur source rather than a carbon source, was selected for further study. The isolated bacterium is Gram-negative, having the morphological and biochemical characteristics of Azotobacter sp. The remaining concentrations after 6 days, using 2 and 10 mg l(-1) of endosulfan, were 57.6 and 72.3% respectively, and the degradation constants were 0.12 d(-1) and 0.26 d(-1). Four metabolites were detected, one of which was identified as endosulfan ether. Endosulfan reduced nitrogenase activity but had no impact on indole 3-acetic acid production. Thus, these results suggest that this strain has the potential to act as a biocatalyst in endosulfan degradation.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Microbacterium oleivorans Strain A9, a Bacterium Isolated from Chernobyl Radionuclide-Contaminated Soil.

    PubMed

    Ortet, Philippe; Gallois, Nicolas; Piette, Laurie; Long, Justine; Berthomieu, Catherine; Armengaud, Jean; Barakat, Mohamed; Chapon, Virginie

    2017-04-06

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Microbacterium oleivorans strain A9, a uranium-tolerant actinobacterium which has been isolated from radionuclide-contaminated soil from the Chernobyl exclusion zone. It is composed of 22 contigs totaling 2,954,335 bp and contains 2,813 coding DNA sequences, one cluster of rRNA genes, and 45 tRNA genes.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Microbacterium oleivorans Strain A9, a Bacterium Isolated from Chernobyl Radionuclide-Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Gallois, Nicolas; Piette, Laurie; Long, Justine; Berthomieu, Catherine; Armengaud, Jean; Barakat, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Microbacterium oleivorans strain A9, a uranium-tolerant actinobacterium which has been isolated from radionuclide-contaminated soil from the Chernobyl exclusion zone. It is composed of 22 contigs totaling 2,954,335 bp and contains 2,813 coding DNA sequences, one cluster of rRNA genes, and 45 tRNA genes. PMID:28385837

  6. Quantitative assessment of the toxic effects of heavy metals on 1,2-dichloroethane biodegradation in co-contaminated soil under aerobic condition.

    PubMed

    Olaniran, Ademola Olufolahan; Balgobind, Adhika; Pillay, Balakrishna

    2011-10-01

    1,2-Dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) is one of the most hazardous pollutant of soil and groundwater, and is produced in excess of 5.44×10⁹ kg annually. Owing to their toxicity, persistence and potential for bioaccumulation, there is a growing interest in technologies for their removal. Heavy metals are known to be toxic to soil microorganisms at high concentrations and can hinder the biodegradation of organic contaminants. In this study, the inhibitory effect of heavy metals, namely; arsenic, cadmium, mercury and lead, on the aerobic biodegradation of 1,2-DCA by autochthonous microorganisms was evaluated in soil microcosm setting. The presence of heavy metals was observed to have a negative impact on the biodegradation of 1,2-DCA in both soil samples tested, with the toxic effect being more pronounced in loam soil, than in clay soil. Generally, 75 ppm As³⁺, 840 ppm Hg²⁺, and 420 ppm Pb²⁺ resulted in 34.24%, 40.64%, and 45.94% increase in the half live (t½) of 1,2-DCA, respectively, in loam soil, while concentrations above 127.5 ppm Cd²⁺, 840 ppm Hg²⁺ and 420 ppm of Pb²⁺ and less than 75 ppm As³⁺ was required to cause a >10% increase in the t½ of 1,2-DCA in clay soil. A dose-dependent relationship between degradation rate constant (k₁) of 1,2-DCA and metal ion concentrations was observed for all the heavy metals tested, except for Hg²⁺. This study demonstrated that different heavy metals have different impacts on the degree of 1,2-DCA degradation. Results also suggest that the degree of inhibition is metal specific and is also dependent on several factors including; soil type, pH, moisture content and available nutrients.

  7. A Sequential Statistical Approach towards an Optimized Production of a Broad Spectrum Bacteriocin Substance from a Soil Bacterium Bacillus sp. YAS 1 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Embaby, Amira M.; Heshmat, Yasmin; Hussein, Ahmed; Marey, Heba S.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriocins, ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides, display potential applications in agriculture, medicine, and industry. The present study highlights integral statistical optimization and partial characterization of a bacteriocin substance from a soil bacterium taxonomically affiliated as Bacillus sp. YAS 1 after biochemical and molecular identifications. A sequential statistical approach (Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken) was employed to optimize bacteriocin (BAC YAS 1) production. Using optimal levels of three key determinants (yeast extract (0.48% (w/v), incubation time (62 hrs), and agitation speed (207 rpm)) in peptone yeast beef based production medium resulted in 1.6-fold enhancement in BAC YAS 1 level (470 AU/mL arbitrary units against Erwinia amylovora). BAC YAS 1 showed activity over a wide range of pH (1–13) and temperature (45–80°C). A wide spectrum antimicrobial activity of BAC YAS 1 against the human pathogens (Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Campylobacter jejuni, Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterococcus sp., Proteus sp., Klebsiella sp., and Salmonella typhimurium), the plant pathogen (E. amylovora), and the food spoiler (Listeria innocua) was demonstrated. On top and above, BAC YAS 1 showed no antimicrobial activity towards lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus bulgaricus, L. casei, L. lactis, and L. reuteri). Promising characteristics of BAC YAS 1 prompt its commercialization for efficient utilization in several industries. PMID:25614886

  8. A sequential statistical approach towards an optimized production of a broad spectrum bacteriocin substance from a soil bacterium Bacillus sp. YAS 1 strain.

    PubMed

    Embaby, Amira M; Heshmat, Yasmin; Hussein, Ahmed; Marey, Heba S

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriocins, ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides, display potential applications in agriculture, medicine, and industry. The present study highlights integral statistical optimization and partial characterization of a bacteriocin substance from a soil bacterium taxonomically affiliated as Bacillus sp. YAS 1 after biochemical and molecular identifications. A sequential statistical approach (Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken) was employed to optimize bacteriocin (BAC YAS 1) production. Using optimal levels of three key determinants (yeast extract (0.48% (w/v), incubation time (62 hrs), and agitation speed (207 rpm)) in peptone yeast beef based production medium resulted in 1.6-fold enhancement in BAC YAS 1 level (470 AU/mL arbitrary units against Erwinia amylovora). BAC YAS 1 showed activity over a wide range of pH (1-13) and temperature (45-80 °C). A wide spectrum antimicrobial activity of BAC YAS 1 against the human pathogens (Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Campylobacter jejuni, Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterococcus sp., Proteus sp., Klebsiella sp., and Salmonella typhimurium), the plant pathogen (E. amylovora), and the food spoiler (Listeria innocua) was demonstrated. On top and above, BAC YAS 1 showed no antimicrobial activity towards lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus bulgaricus, L. casei, L. lactis, and L. reuteri). Promising characteristics of BAC YAS 1 prompt its commercialization for efficient utilization in several industries.

  9. Methylobacter tundripaludum sp. nov., a methane-oxidizing bacterium from Arctic wetland soil on the Svalbard islands, Norway (78 degrees N).

    PubMed

    Wartiainen, Ingvild; Hestnes, Anne Grethe; McDonald, Ian R; Svenning, Mette M

    2006-01-01

    A Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-motile, non-spore forming bacterium (SV96T) was isolated from wetland soil near Ny-Alesund, Svalbard. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain SV96T was shown to belong to the Gammaproteobacteria, related to Methylobacter psychrophilus Z-0021T (99.1 %), Methylobacter luteus ATCC 49878T (97.3 %), Methylobacter marinus A45T (97.0 %) and Methylobacter whittenburyi ATCC 51738T (95.8 %); the closest related species within the genus Methylomicrobium with a validly published name was Methylomicrobium album ATCC 33003T (95.0 %). Chemotaxonomic data (including the major fatty acids: 16 : 1omega8, 16 : 1omega7 and 16 : 1omega5t) supported the affiliation of strain SV96T to the genus Methylobacter. The results of DNA-DNA hybridization, physiological and biochemical tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strain SV96T from the four Methylobacter species mentioned above. Strain SV96T therefore represents a novel species, for which the name Methylobacter tundripaludum sp. nov. is proposed (type strain SV96T = DSM 17260T = ATCC BAA-1195T).

  10. Taxonomic characterisation of Proteus terrae sp. nov., a N2O-producing, nitrate-ammonifying soil bacterium.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Undine; Augustin, Jürgen; Spröer, Cathrin; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Schumann, Peter; Ulrich, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    In the context of studying the influence of N-fertilization on N2 and N2O flux rates in relation to the soil bacterial community composition in fen peat grassland, a group of bacterial strains was isolated that performed dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium and concomitantly produced N2O. The amount of nitrous oxide produced was influenced by the C/N ratio of the medium. The potential to generate nitrous oxide was increased by higher availability of nitrate-N. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA and the rpoB gene sequences demonstrated that the investigated isolates belong to the genus Proteus, showing high similarity with the respective type strains of Proteus vulgaris and Proteus penneri. DNA-DNA hybridization studies revealed differences at the species level. These differences were substantiated by MALDI-TOF MS analysis and several distinct physiological characteristics. On the basis of these results, it was concluded that the soil isolates represent a novel species for which the name Proteus terrae sp. nov. (type strain N5/687(T) =DSM 29910(T) =LMG 28659(T)) is proposed.

  11. Alicyclobacillus pohliae sp. nov., a thermophilic, endospore-forming bacterium isolated from geothermal soil of the north-west slope of Mount Melbourne (Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Imperio, Tatiana; Viti, Carlo; Marri, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Gram-positive, rod-shaped, endospore-forming, thermophilic bacteria were isolated from a geothermal soil collected on the north-west slope of Mount Melbourne in Antarctica. They grew aerobically at 42-60 degrees C (optimum 55 degrees C) and at pH 4.5-7.5 (optimum pH 5.5). Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that these isolates were related most closely to the type strain of Alicyclobacillus pomorum (91% similarity). Growth occurred in the presence of ferrous iron at micromolar concentrations and acid was produced from various sugars. Iso-branched fatty acids C(15:0) (45.56%) and C(17:0) (35.81%) were the most abundant cellular fatty acids. The DNA G+C content was 55.1 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics, it is concluded that these strains represent a novel species of the genus Alicyclobacillus, for which the name Alicyclobacillus pohliae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MP4(T) (=CIP 109385(T) =NCIMB 14276(T)).

  12. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence and contextual data of the filamentous soil bacterium Ktedonobacter racemifer type strain (SOSP1-21T)

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yun-Juan; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chertkov, Olga; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Copeland, A; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Mavromatis, K; Liolios, Konstantinos; Brettin, Thomas S; Fiebig, Anne; Rohde, Manfred; Abt, Birte; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2011-01-01

    Ktedonobacter racemifer corrig. Cavaletti et al. 2007 is the type species of the genus Ktedo- nobacter, which in turn is the type genus of the family Ktedonobacteraceae, the type family of the order Ktedonobacterales within the class Ktedonobacteria in the phylum Chloroflexi . Although K. racemifer shares some morphological features with the actinobacteria, it is of special interest because it was the first cultivated representative of a deep branching unclassi- fied lineage of otherwise uncultivated environmental phylotypes tentatively located within the phylum Chloroflexi . The aerobic, filamentous, non-motile, spore-forming Gram-positive heterotroph was isolated from soil in Italy. The 13,661,586 bp long non-contiguous finished genome consists of ten contigs and is the first reported genome sequence from a member of the class Ktedonobacteria. With its 11,453 protein-coding and 87 RNA genes, it is the largest prokaryotic genome reported so far. It comprises a large number of over-represented COGs, particularly genes associated with transposons, causing the genetic redundancy within the genome being considerably larger than expected by chance. This work is a part of the Ge- nomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  13. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence and contextual data of the filamentous soil bacterium Ktedonobacter racemifer type strain (SOSP1-21T)

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yun-juan; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chertkov, Olga; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Nolan, Matt; Copeland, Alex; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Ovchinikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Liolios, Konstantinos; Brettin, Thomas; Fiebig, Anne; Rohde, Manfred; Abt, Birte; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2011-01-01

    Ktedonobacter racemifer corrig. Cavaletti et al. 2007 is the type species of the genus Ktedonobacter, which in turn is the type genus of the family Ktedonobacteraceae, the type family of the order Ktedonobacterales within the class Ktedonobacteria in the phylum ‘Chloroflexi’. Although K. racemifer shares some morphological features with the actinobacteria, it is of special interest because it was the first cultivated representative of a deep branching unclassified lineage of otherwise uncultivated environmental phylotypes tentatively located within the phylum ‘Chloroflexi’. The aerobic, filamentous, non-motile, spore-forming Gram-positive heterotroph was isolated from soil in Italy. The 13,661,586 bp long non-contiguous finished genome consists of ten contigs and is the first reported genome sequence from a member of the class Ktedonobacteria. With its 11,453 protein-coding and 87 RNA genes, it is the largest prokaryotic genome reported so far. It comprises a large number of over-represented COGs, particularly genes associated with transposons, causing the genetic redundancy within the genome being considerably larger than expected by chance. This work is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:22180814

  14. Biological consequences of ancient gene acquisition and duplication in the large genome soil bacterium, ""solibacter usitatus"" strain Ellin6076

    SciTech Connect

    Challacombe, Jean F; Eichorst, Stephanie A; Xie, Gary; Kuske, Cheryl R; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial genome sizes range from ca. 0.5 to 10Mb and are influenced by gene duplication, horizontal gene transfer, gene loss and other evolutionary processes. Sequenced genomes of strains in the phylum Acidobacteria revealed that 'Solibacter usistatus' strain Ellin6076 harbors a 9.9 Mb genome. This large genome appears to have arisen by horizontal gene transfer via ancient bacteriophage and plasmid-mediated transduction, as well as widespread small-scale gene duplications. This has resulted in an increased number of paralogs that are potentially ecologically important (ecoparalogs). Low amino acid sequence identities among functional group members and lack of conserved gene order and orientation in the regions containing similar groups of paralogs suggest that most of the paralogs were not the result of recent duplication events. The genome sizes of cultured subdivision 1 and 3 strains in the phylum Acidobacteria were estimated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to determine the prevalence of the large genome trait within the phylum. Members of subdivision 1 were estimated to have smaller genome sizes ranging from ca. 2.0 to 4.8 Mb, whereas members of subdivision 3 had slightly larger genomes, from ca. 5.8 to 9.9 Mb. It is hypothesized that the large genome of strain Ellin6076 encodes traits that provide a selective metabolic, defensive and regulatory advantage in the variable soil environment.

  15. Aerobic Tennis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Michael J.; Ahlschwede, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Increasing the aerobic nature of tennis drills in the physical education class may be necessary if tennis is to remain a part of the public school curriculum. This article gives two examples of drills that can be modified by teachers to increase activity level. (IAH)

  16. Rhizobium flavum sp. nov., a triazophos-degrading bacterium isolated from soil under the long-term application of triazophos.

    PubMed

    Gu, Tao; Sun, Li Na; Zhang, Jun; Sui, Xin Hua; Li, Shun Peng

    2014-06-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, pale yellow, rod-shaped bacterial strain, YW14(T), was isolated from soil and its taxonomic position was investigated by a polyphasic study. Strain YW14(T) did not form nodules on three different legumes, and the nodD and nifH genes were not detected by PCR. Strain YW14(T) contained Q-10 as the predominant ubiquinone. The major cellular fatty acid was C(18 : 1)ω7c. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and seven housekeeping gene sequences (recA, atpD, glnII, gyrB, rpoB, dnaK and thrC) showed that strain YW14(T) belonged to the genus Rhizobium. Strain YW14(T) showed 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 93.4-97.3% to the type strains of recognized species of the genus Rhizobium. DNA-DNA relatedness between strain YW14(T) and the type strains of Rhizobium sullae IS123(T) and Rhizobium yanglingense CCBAU 71623(T) was 19.6-25.7%, indicating that strain YW14(T) was distinct from them genetically. Strain YW14(T) could also be differentiated from these phylogenetically related species of the genus Rhizobium by various phenotypic properties. On the basis of phenotypic properties, phylogenetic distinctiveness and genetic data, strain YW14(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium flavum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YW14(T) ( = KACC 17222(T) = CCTCC AB2013042(T)).

  17. Nitrososphaera viennensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an aerobic and mesophilic, ammonia-oxidizing archaeon from soil and a member of the archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota

    PubMed Central

    Stieglmeier, Michaela; Klingl, Andreas; Alves, Ricardo J. E.; Rittmann, Simon K.-M. R.; Melcher, Michael; Leisch, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    A mesophilic, neutrophilic and aerobic, ammonia-oxidizing archaeon, strain EN76T, was isolated from garden soil in Vienna (Austria). Cells were irregular cocci with a diameter of 0.6–0.9 µm and possessed archaella and archaeal pili as cell appendages. Electron microscopy also indicated clearly discernible areas of high and low electron density, as well as tubule-like structures. Strain EN76T had an S-layer with p3 symmetry, so far only reported for members of the Sulfolobales. Crenarchaeol was the major core lipid. The organism gained energy by oxidizing ammonia to nitrite aerobically, thereby fixing CO2, but growth depended on the addition of small amounts of organic acids. The optimal growth temperature was 42 °C and the optimal pH was 7.5, with ammonium and pyruvate concentrations of 2.6 and 1 mM, respectively. The genome of strain EN76T had a DNA G+C content of 52.7 mol%. Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA genes showed that strain EN76T is affiliated with the recently proposed phylum Thaumarchaeota, sharing 85 % 16S rRNA gene sequence identity with the closest cultivated relative ‘Candidatus Nitrosopumilus maritimus’ SCM1, a marine ammonia-oxidizing archaeon, and a maximum of 81 % 16S rRNA gene sequence identity with members of the phyla Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota and any of the other recently proposed phyla (e.g. ‘Korarchaeota’ and ‘Aigarchaeota’). We propose the name Nitrososphaera viennensis gen. nov., sp. nov. to accommodate strain EN76T. The type strain of Nitrososphaera viennensis is strain EN76T ( = DSM 26422T = JMC 19564T). Additionally, we propose the family Nitrososphaeraceae fam. nov., the order Nitrososphaerales ord. nov. and the class Nitrososphaeria classis nov. PMID:24907263

  18. Nitrososphaera viennensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an aerobic and mesophilic, ammonia-oxidizing archaeon from soil and a member of the archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota.

    PubMed

    Stieglmeier, Michaela; Klingl, Andreas; Alves, Ricardo J E; Rittmann, Simon K-M R; Melcher, Michael; Leisch, Nikolaus; Schleper, Christa

    2014-08-01

    A mesophilic, neutrophilic and aerobic, ammonia-oxidizing archaeon, strain EN76(T), was isolated from garden soil in Vienna (Austria). Cells were irregular cocci with a diameter of 0.6-0.9 µm and possessed archaella and archaeal pili as cell appendages. Electron microscopy also indicated clearly discernible areas of high and low electron density, as well as tubule-like structures. Strain EN76(T) had an S-layer with p3 symmetry, so far only reported for members of the Sulfolobales. Crenarchaeol was the major core lipid. The organism gained energy by oxidizing ammonia to nitrite aerobically, thereby fixing CO2, but growth depended on the addition of small amounts of organic acids. The optimal growth temperature was 42 °C and the optimal pH was 7.5, with ammonium and pyruvate concentrations of 2.6 and 1 mM, respectively. The genome of strain EN76(T) had a DNA G+C content of 52.7 mol%. Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA genes showed that strain EN76(T) is affiliated with the recently proposed phylum Thaumarchaeota, sharing 85% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity with the closest cultivated relative 'Candidatus Nitrosopumilus maritimus' SCM1, a marine ammonia-oxidizing archaeon, and a maximum of 81% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity with members of the phyla Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota and any of the other recently proposed phyla (e.g. 'Korarchaeota' and 'Aigarchaeota'). We propose the name Nitrososphaera viennensis gen. nov., sp. nov. to accommodate strain EN76(T). The type strain of Nitrososphaera viennensis is strain EN76(T) ( = DSM 26422(T) = JMC 19564(T)). Additionally, we propose the family Nitrososphaeraceae fam. nov., the order Nitrososphaerales ord. nov. and the class Nitrososphaeria classis nov.

  19. Bacillus lindianensis sp. nov., a novel alkaliphilic and moderately halotolerant bacterium isolated from saline and alkaline soils.

    PubMed

    Dou, Guiming; Liu, Hongcan; He, Wei; Ma, Yuchao

    2016-01-01

    Two alkaliphilic and halotolerant Gram-stain positive, rod-shaped and endospore-forming bacteria, designated strains 12-3(T) and 12-4, were isolated from saline and alkaline soils collected in Lindian county, Heilongjiang province, China. Both strains were observed to grow well at a wide range of temperature and pH values, 10-45 °C and pH 8-12, with optimal growth at 37 °C and pH 9.0, respectively. Growth of the two strains was found to occur at total salt concentrations of 0-12 % (w/v), with an optimum at 4 % (w/v). The G+C contents of the genomic DNA of strains 12-3(T) and 12-4 were determined to be 42.7 and 42.4 mol%, respectively, and the major cellular fatty acids were identified as anteiso-C15:0 and anteiso-C17:0. In isolate 12-3(T), meso-diaminopimelic acid was found to be the diagnostic diamino acid of the cell wall peptidoglycan; diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol were identified as the major cellular polar lipids; and menaquinone-7 was identified as the predominant isoprenoid quinone. Strains 12-3(T) and 12-4 share very close 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (99.74 %) and their DNA-DNA relatedness was 95.3 ± 0.63 %, meaning that the two strains can be considered to belong to the same species. 16S rRNA gene sequence-based phylogenetic analysis revealed strains 12-3(T) and 12-4 exhibit high similarities to Bacillus pseudofirmus DSM 8715(T) (98.7 %), Bacillus marmarensis DSM 21297(T) (97.2 %) and Bacillus nanhaiisediminis CGMCC 1.10116(T) (97.1 and 97.0 %, respectively). DNA-DNA hybridization values between isolate 12-3(T) and the type strains of closely related Bacillus species were below 30 %. On the basis of the polyphasic evidence presented, strains 12-3(T) and 12-4 are considered to represent a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus lindianensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 12-3(T) (DSM 26864(T) = CGMCC 1.12717(T)).

  20. Arachidicoccus rhizosphaerae gen. nov., sp. nov., a plant-growth-promoting bacterium in the family Chitinophagaceae isolated from rhizosphere soil.

    PubMed

    Madhaiyan, Munusamy; Poonguzhali, Selvaraj; Senthilkumar, Murugaiyan; Pragatheswari, Dhandapani; Lee, Jung-Sook; Lee, Keun-Chul

    2015-02-01

    Three novel bacterial strains, designated Vu-144(T), Vu-7 and Vu-35, were isolated on minimal medium from rhizosphere soil of field-grown cowpea and subjected to a taxonomic study using a polyphasic approach. Cells of the strains were Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming, coccoid rods, and formed non-pigmented colonies. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain Vu-144(T) was affiliated with an uncultivated lineage of the phylum Bacteroidetes. Its closest phylogenetic neighbour was the recently described species Niastella populi, a member of the family Chitinophagaceae, with just 90.7 % sequence similarity to the type strain. The only isoprenoid quinone detected was menaquinone 7 (MK-7). The fatty acid profiles showed large amounts of iso-C15 : 0, iso-C17 : 0 3-OH and iso-C15 : 1 G and minor amounts of summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or iso-C15 : 0 2-OH), C16 : 0 and other fatty acids, allowing the differentiation of the strains from other genera. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of the three strains ranged from 43.1 to 44.3 mol%. In addition to phosphatidylethanolamine, the major polar lipids were three unidentified aminophospholipids (APL1-APL3), two unidentified phospholipids (PL1, PL2) and three unidentified lipids (UL1-UL3). Biochemical test patterns also differed from those of Niastella populi and members of other genera. All three isolates showed plant-growth-promoting properties, e.g. the ability to produce indole-3-acetic acid and NH3 and to solubilize phosphate, utilized 1-aminocyclopropane 1-carboxylate (ACC) as a sole source of nitrogen and possessed the ACC deaminase enzyme. The novel isolates readily colonized roots and stimulated growth of tomato and cowpea under glasshouse conditions. Inoculated plants showed a 45-60 % increase in dry matter weight with respect to uninoculated controls. On the basis of the evidence from our polyphasic study, isolate Vu-144(T) represents a novel genus and species in

  1. Bacillus mesophilus sp. nov., an alginate-degrading bacterium isolated from a soil sample collected from an abandoned marine solar saltern.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan-Xia; Liu, Guo-Hong; Liu, Bo; Chen, Guan-Jun; Du, Zong-Jun

    2016-07-01

    A novel Gram-stain positive, endospore-forming bacterium, designated SA4(T), was isolated from a soil sample collected from an abandoned marine solar saltern at Wendeng, Shandong Province, PR China. Cells were observed to be rod shaped, alginase positive, catalase positive and motile. The strain was found to grow at temperatures ranging from 15 to 40 °C (optimum 35 °C), and pH 5.0-11.0 (optimum pH 8.0) with 0-7.0 % (w/v) NaCl concentration (optimum NaCl 3.0 %). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain SA4(T) belongs to the genus Bacillus and exhibits 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities of 96.6, 96.5, 96.3 and 96.2 % with Bacillus horikoshii DSM 8719(T), Bacillus acidicola 105-2(T), Bacillus shackletonii LMG 18435(T) and Bacillus pocheonensis Gsoil 420(T), respectively. The menaquinone was identified as MK-7 and the major polar lipids were identified as diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. The major fatty acids detected were anteiso-C15:0 (22.3 %), iso-C15:0 (22.6 %), iso-C16:0 (14.8 %) and iso-C14:0 (14.7 %). The DNA G+C content was determined to be 42.4 mol %. Phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic properties clearly indicated that isolate SA4(T) represents a novel species within the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus mesophius sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SA4(T) (=DSM 101000(T)=CCTCC AB 2015209(T)).

  2. Isolation and Characterization of Burkholderia rinojensis sp. nov., a Non-Burkholderia cepacia Complex Soil Bacterium with Insecticidal and Miticidal Activities

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Lorena E.; Koivunen, Marja; Yang, April; Flor-Weiler, Lina; Marrone, Pamela G.

    2013-01-01

    Isolate A396, a bacterium isolated from a Japanese soil sample demonstrated strong insecticidal and miticidal activities in laboratory bioassays. The isolate was characterized through biochemical methods, fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis, sequencing of 16S rRNA, multilocus sequence typing and analysis, and DNA-DNA hybridization. FAME analysis matched A396 to Burkholderia cenocepacia, but this result was not confirmed by 16S rRNA or DNA-DNA hybridization. 16S rRNA sequencing indicated closest matches with B. glumae and B. plantarii. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments with B. plantarii, B. glumae, B. multivorans, and B. cenocepacia confirmed the low genetic similarity (11.5 to 37.4%) with known members of the genus. PCR-based screening showed that A396 lacks markers associated with members of the B. cepacia complex. Bioassay results indicated two mechanisms of action: through ingestion and contact. The isolate effectively controlled beet armyworms (Spodoptera exigua; BAW) and two-spotted spider mites (Tetranychus urticae; TSSM). In diet overlay bioassays with BAW, 1% to 4% (vol/vol) dilution of the whole-cell broth caused 97% to 100% mortality 4 days postexposure, and leaf disc treatment bioassays attained 75% ± 22% mortality 3 days postexposure. Contact bioassays led to 50% larval mortality, as well as discoloration, stunting, and failure to molt. TSSM mortality reached 93% in treated leaf discs. Activity was maintained in cell-free supernatants and after heat treatment (60°C for 2 h), indicating that a secondary metabolite or excreted thermostable enzyme might be responsible for the activity. Based on these results, we describe the novel species Burkholderia rinojensis, a good candidate for the development of a biocontrol product against insect and mite pests. PMID:24096416

  3. Characterization of a novel extremely alkalophilic bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Souza, K. A.; Deal, P. H.

    1977-01-01

    A new alkalophilic bacterium, isolated from a natural spring of high pH is characterized. It is a Gram-positive, non-sporulating, motile rod requiring aerobic and alkaline conditions for growth. The characteristics of this organism resemble those of the coryneform group of bacteria; however, there are no accepted genera within this group with which this organism can be closely matched. Therefore, a new genus may be warranted.

  4. Taxonomic characterization of the cellulose-degrading bacterium NCIB 10462

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, C.; Ringleberg, D.; Scott, T.C.; Phelps, T.

    1994-06-01

    The gram negative cellulase-producing bacterium NCIB 10462 has been previously named Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. or var. cellulosa. Since there is renewed interest in cellulose-degrading bacteria for use in bioconversion of cellulose to chemical feed stocks and fuels, we re-examined the characteristics of this microorganism to determine its proper taxonomic characterization and to further define it`s true metabolic potential. Metabolic and physical characterization of NCIB 10462 revealed that this was an alkalophilic, non-fermentative, gram negative, oxidase positive, motile, cellulose-degrading bacterium. The aerobic substrate utilization profile of this bacterium was found to have few characteristics consistent with a classification of P. fluorescens with a very low probability match with the genus Sphingomonas. Total lipid analysis did not reveal that any sphingolipid bases are produced by this bacterium. NCIB 10462 was found to grow best aerobically but also grows well in complex media under reducing conditions. NCIB 10462 grew slowly under full anaerobic conditions on complex media but growth on cellulosic media was found only under aerobic conditions. Total fatty acid analysis (MIDI) of NCIB 10462 failed to group this bacterium with a known pseudomonas species. However, fatty acid analysis of the bacteria when grown at temperatures below 37{degrees}C suggest that the organism is a pseudomonad. Since a predominant characteristic of this bacterium is it`s ability to degrade cellulose, we suggest it be called Pseudomonas cellulosa.

  5. Chania multitudinisentens gen. nov., sp. nov., an N-acyl-homoserine-lactone-producing bacterium in the family Enterobacteriaceae isolated from landfill site soil.

    PubMed

    Ee, Robson; Madhaiyan, Munusamy; Ji, Lianghui; Lim, Yan-Lue; Nor, Nuruddin Muhammad; Tee, Kok-Keng; Chen, Jian-Woon; Yin, Wai-Fong

    2016-06-01

    Phylogenetic and taxonomic characterization was performed for bacterium RB-25T, which was isolated from a soil sample collected in a former municipal landfill site in Puchong, Malaysia. Growth occurred at 20-37 °C at pH 5-8 but not in the presence of 9 % (w/v) NaCl or higher. The principal fatty acids were C16:0, C18:1ω7c and summed feature 3 (C16:1ω7c and/or iso-C15:0 2-OH). Ubiquinone-8 was the only isoprenoid quinone detected. Polar lipid analysis revealed the presence of phospholipid, phosphoaminolipid, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and one unidentified aminolipid. DNA G+C content was 50.9 mol% phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain RB-25T formed a distinct lineage within the family Enterobacteriaceae of the class Gammaproteobacteria. It exhibited a low level of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with its phylogenetic neighbours Pantoea rwandensis LMG 26275T (96.6 %), Rahnella aquatilis CIP 78.65T (96.5 %), Pectobacterium betavasculorum ATCC 43762T (96.4 %), Pantoea rodasii LMG 26273T (96.3 %), Gibbsiella dentisursi NUM 1720T (96.3 %) and Serratia glossinae C1T (96.2 %). Multilocus sequence analyses based on fusA, pyrG, rplB, rpoB and sucA sequences showed a clear distinction of strain RB-25T from the most closely related genera. Isolate RB-25T could also be distinguished from members of these genera by a combination of the DNA G+C content, respiratory quinone system, fatty acid profile, polar lipid composition and other phenotypic features. Strain RB-25T represents a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Chaniamultitudinisentens gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is RB-25T (=DSM 28811T=LMG 28304T).

  6. Aerobic and heterotrophic nitrogen removal by Enterobacter cloacae CF-S27 with efficient utilization of hydroxylamine.

    PubMed

    Padhi, Soumesh Kumar; Tripathy, Swetaleena; Mohanty, Sriprakash; Maiti, Nikhil Kumar

    2017-05-01

    Heterotrophic bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae CF-S27 exhibited simultaneous nitrification and aerobic denitrification in presence of high concentration of hydroxylamine. With the initial nitrogen concentration of 100mgL(-1)h(-1), ammonium, nitrate and nitrite removal efficiencies were 81%, 99.9% and 92.8%, while the corresponding maximum removal rates reached as high as 11.6, 15.1 and 11.2mgL(-1)h(-1) respectively. Quantitative amplification by real time PCR and enzyme assay demonstrated that hydroxylamine reductase gene (hao) is actively involved in hetrotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification process of Enterobacter cloacae CF-S27. PCR primers were designed targeting amplification of hao gene from diversified environmental soil DNA. The strain Enterobacter cloacae CF-S27 significantly maintained the undetectable amount of dissolved nitrogen throughout 60days of zero water exchange fish culture experiment in domestic wastewater.

  7. Novel cellulose-binding domains, NodB homologues and conserved modular architecture in xylanases from the aerobic soil bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa and Cellvibrio mixtus.

    PubMed Central

    Millward-Sadler, S J; Davidson, K; Hazlewood, G P; Black, G W; Gilbert, H J; Clarke, J H

    1995-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that selective pressure has led to the retention of cellulose-binding domains (CBDs) by hemicellulase enzymes from aerobic bacteria, four new xylanase (xyn) genes from two cellulolytic soil bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa and Cellvibrio mixtus, have been isolated and sequenced. Pseudomonas genes xynE and xynF encoded modular xylanases (XYLE and XYLF) with predicted M(r) values of 68,600 and 65000 respectively. XYLE contained a glycosyl hydrolase family 11 catalytic domain at its N-terminus, followed by three other domains; the second of these exhibited sequence identity with NodB from rhizobia. The C-terminal domain (40 residues) exhibited significant sequence identity with a non-catalytic domain of previously unknown function, conserved in all the cellulases and one of the hemicellulases previously characterized from the pseudomonad, and was shown to function as a CBD when fused to the reporter protein glutathione-S-transferase. XYLF contained a C-terminal glycosyl hydrolase family 10 catalytic domain and a novel CBD at its N-terminus. C. mixtus genes xynA and xynB exhibited substantial sequence identity with xynE and xynF respectively, and encoded modular xylanases with the same molecular architecture and, by inference, the same functional properties. In the absence of extensive cross-hybridization between other multiple cel (cellulase) and xyn genes from P. fluorescens subsp. cellulosa and genomic DNA from C. mixtus, similarity between the two pairs of xylanases may indicate a recent transfer of genes between the two bacteria. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:7492333

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Ochrobactrum pseudogrignonense Strain CDB2, a Highly Efficient Arsenate-Resistant Soil Bacterium from Arsenic-Contaminated Cattle Dip Sites.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yiren; Yu, Xuefei; Zhang, Ren

    2013-04-18

    We report the 4.97-Mb draft genome sequence of a highly efficient arsenate-resistant bacterium, Ochrobactrum sp. strain CDB2. It contains a novel arsenic resistance (ars) operon (arsR-arsC1-ACR3-arsC2-arsH-mfs) and two non-operon-associated ars genes, arsC3 and arsB. The genome information will aid in the understanding of the arsenic resistance mechanism of this and other bacterial species.

  9. Differential sensitivity of aerobic gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms to 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) leads to dissimilar growth and TNT transformation: Results of soil and pure culture studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, M.E.; Manning, J.F. Jr.

    1996-07-30

    The effects of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) on indigenous soil populations and pure bacterial cultures were examined. The number of colony-forming units (CFU) appearing when TNT-contaminated soil was spread on 0.3% molasses plates decreased by 50% when the agar was amended with 67 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1}, whereas a 99% reduction was observed when uncontaminated soil was plated. Furthermore, TNT-contaminated soil harbored a greater number of organisms able to grow on plates amended with greater than 10 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1}. The percentage of gram-positive isolates was markedly less in TNT-contaminated soil (7%; 2 of 30) than in uncontaminated soil (61%; 20 of 33). Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas corrugate, Pseudomonasfluorescens and Alcaligenes xylosoxidans made up the majority of the gram-negative isolates from TNT-contaminated soil. Gram-positive isolates from both soils demonstrated marked growth inhibition when greater than 8-16 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1} was present in the culture media. Most pure cultures of known aerobic gram-negative organisms readily degraded TNT and evidenced net consumption of reduced metabolites. However, pure cultures of aerobic gram-positive bacteria were sensitive to relatively low concentrations of TNT as indicated by the 50% reduction in growth and TNT transformation which was observed at approximately 10 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1}. Most non-sporeforming gram-positive organisms incubated in molasses media amended with 80 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1} or greater became unculturable, whereas all strains tested remained culturable when incubated in mineral media amended with 98 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1}, indicating that TNT sensitivity is likely linked to cell growth. These results indicate that gram-negative organisms are most likely responsible for any TNT transformation in contaminated soil, due to their relative insensitivity to high TNT concentrations and their ability to transform TNT.

  10. Aerobic rice mechanization: techniques for crop establishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusairy, K. M.; Ayob, H.; Chan, C. S.; Fauzi, M. I. Mohamed; Mohamad Fakhrul, Z. O.; Shahril Shah, G. S. M.; Azlan, O.; Rasad, M. A.; Hashim, A. M.; Arshad, Z.; E, E. Ibrahim; Saifulizan, M. N.

    2015-12-01

    Rice being the staple food crops, hundreds of land races in it makes the diversity of rice crops. Aerobic rice production was introduced which requires much less water input to safeguard and sustain the rice production and conserve water due to decreasing water resources, climatic changes and competition from urban and industrial users. Mechanization system plays an important role for the success of aerobic rice cultivation. All farming activities for aerobic rice production are run on aerobic soil conditions. Row seeder mechanization system is developed to replace conventional seeding technique on the aerobic rice field. It is targeted for small and the large scale aerobic rice farmers. The aero - seeder machine is used for the small scale aerobic rice field, while the accord - seeder is used for the large scale aerobic rice field. The use of this mechanization machine can eliminate the tedious and inaccurate seeding operations reduce labour costs and increases work rate. The machine is easy to operate and it can increase crop establishment rate. It reduce missing hill, increasing planting and crop with high yield can be produce. This machine is designed for low costs maintenance and it is easy to dismantle and assemble during maintenance and it is safe to be used.

  11. Influence of Soil Components on the Biodegradation of Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and o-, m-, and p-Xylenes by the Newly Isolated Bacterium Pseudoxanthomonas spadix BD-a59 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Myeong; Le, Ngoc Thuan; Chung, Bok Sil; Park, Jin Ho; Bae, Jin-Woo; Madsen, Eugene L.; Jeon, Che Ok

    2008-01-01

    A bacterium designated strain BD-a59, able to degrade all six benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and o-, m-, and p-xylene (BTEX) compounds, was isolated by plating gasoline-contaminated sediment from a gasoline station in Geoje, Republic of Korea, without enrichment, on minimal salts basal (MSB) agar containing 0.01% yeast extract, with BTEX as the sole carbon and energy source. Taxonomic analyses showed that the isolate belonged to Pseudoxanthomonas spadix, and until now, the genus Pseudoxanthomonas has not included any known BTEX degraders. The BTEX biodegradation rate was very low in MSB broth, but adding a small amount of yeast extract greatly enhanced the biodegradation. Interestingly, degradation occurred very quickly in slurry systems amended with sterile soil solids but not with aqueous soil extract. Moreover, if soil was combusted first to remove organic matter, the enhancement effect on BTEX biodegradation was lost, indicating that some components of insoluble organic compounds are nutritionally beneficial for BTEX degradation. Reverse transcriptase PCR-based analysis of field-fixed mRNA revealed expression of the tmoA gene, whose sequence was closely related to that carried by strain BD-a59. This study suggests that strain BD-a59 has the potential to assist in BTEX biodegradation at contaminated sites. PMID:18835999

  12. Influence of triethyl phosphate on phosphatase activity in shooting range soil: Isolation of a zinc-resistant bacterium with an acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Story, Sandra; Brigmon, Robin L

    2017-03-01

    Phosphatase-mediated hydrolysis of organic phosphate may be a viable means of stabilizing heavy metals via precipitation as a metal phosphate in bioremediation applications. We investigated the effect of triethyl phosphate (TEP) on soil microbial-phosphatase activity in a heavy-metal contaminated soil. Gaseous TEP has been used at subsurface sites for bioremediation of organic contaminants but not applied in heavy-metal contaminated areas. Little is known about how TEP affects microbial activity in soils and it is postulated that TEP can serve as a phosphate source in nutrient-poor groundwater and soil/sediments. Over a 3-week period, TEP amendment to microcosms containing heavy-metal contaminated soil resulted in increased activity of soil acid-phosphatase and repression of alkaline phosphatase, indicating a stimulatory effect on the microbial population. A soil-free enrichment of microorganisms adapted to heavy-metal and acidic conditions was derived from the TEP-amended soil microcosms using TEP as the sole phosphate source and the selected microbial consortium maintained a high acid-phosphatase activity with repression of alkaline phosphatase. Addition of 5mM zinc to soil-free microcosms had little effect on acid phosphatase but inhibited alkaline phosphatase. One bacterial member from the consortium, identified as Burkholderia cepacia sp., expressed an acid-phosphatase activity uninhibited by high concentrations of zinc and produced a soluble, indigo pigment under phosphate limitation. The pigment was produced in a phosphate-free medium and was not produced in the presence of TEP or phosphate ion, indicative of purple acid-phosphatase types that are pressed by bioavailable phosphate. These results demonstrate that TEP amendment was bioavailable and increased overall phosphatase activity in both soil and soil-free microcosms supporting the possibility of positive outcomes in bioremediation applications.

  13. Teaching Aerobic Fitness Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Allan N.; Ratliffe, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to teach aerobic fitness concepts to elementary students. Some of the K-2 activities include location, size, and purpose of the heart and lungs; the exercise pulse; respiration rate; and activities to measure aerobic endurance. Some of the 3-6 activities include: definition of aerobic endurance; heart disease risk factors;…

  14. Isolation and characterization of comprehensive polychlorinated biphenyl degrading bacterium, Enterobacter sp. LY402.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ling-Yun; Zheng, Ai-Ping; Xu, Li; Huang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Qing; Yang, Feng-Lin

    2008-05-01

    A Gram-negative bacterium, named LY402, was isolated from contaminated soil. 16S rDNA sequencing and measurement of the physiological and biochemical characteristics identified it as belonging to the genus Enterobacter. Degradation experiments showed that LY402 had the ability to aerobically transform 79 of the 91 major congeners of Aroclor 1242, 1254, and 1260. However, more interestingly, the strain readily degraded certain highly chlorinated and recalcitrant polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Almost all the tri- and tetra-chlorobiphenyls (CBs), except for 3,4,3',4'-CB, were degraded in 3 days, whereas 73% of 3,4,3',4'-, 92% of the penta-, 76% of the hexa-, and 37% of the hepta-CBs were transformed after 6 days. In addition, among 12 octa-CBs, 2,2',3,3',5,5',6,6- CB was obviously degraded, and 2,2',3,3',4,5,6,6'- and 2,2',3,3',4,5,5',6'-CB were slightly transformed. In a metabolite analysis, mono- and di-chlorobenzoic acids (CBAs) were identified, and parts of them were also transformed by strain LY402. Analysis of PCB degradation indicated that strain LY402 could effectively degrade PCB congeners with chlorine substitutions in both ortho- and para-positions. Consequently, this is the first report of an Enterobacteria that can efficiently degrade both low and highly chlorinated PCBs under aerobic conditions.

  15. Summary report on the aerobic degradation of diesel fuel and the degradation of toluene under aerobic, denitrifying and sulfate reducing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Coyne, P.; Smith, G.

    1995-08-15

    This report contains a number of studies that were performed to better understand the technology of the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. Topics of investigation include the following: diesel fuel degradation by Rhodococcus erythropolis; BTEX degradation by soil isolates; aerobic degradation of diesel fuel-respirometry; aerobic degradation of diesel fuel-shake culture; aerobic toluene degradation by A3; effect of HEPES, B1, and myo-inositol addition on the growth of A3; aerobic and anaerobic toluene degradation by contaminated soils; denitrifying bacteria MPNs; sulfate-reducing bacteria MPNs; and aerobic, DNB and SRB enrichments.

  16. Use of exogenous specialized bacteria in the biological detoxification of a dump site-polychlorobiphenyl-contaminated soil in slurry phase conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Fava, F.; Bertin, L. . Dept. of Applied Chemistry and Material Science)

    1999-07-20

    The possibility of biologically detoxifying a contaminated soil from an Italian dump site containing about 1500 mg/kg (in dry soil) of polychlorinated biphenyls was studied in the laboratory in this work. The soil, which contained indigenous aerobic bacteria capable of growing on biphenyl or on monochlorobenzoic acids at concentration of about 300 CFU per g of air-dried soil, was amended with inorganic nutrients, saturated with water and treated in aerobic 3-L batch slurry reactors (soil suspension at 20% w/v). Either Pseudomonas sp. CPE1 strain, capable of cometabolizing low-chlorinated biphenyls into chlorobenzoic acids, or a bacterial coculture capable of aerobically dechlorinating polychlorobiphenyls constituted by this bacterium and the two chlorobenzoic acid degrading bacteria Pseudomonas sp. CPE2 strain and Alcaligenes sp. CPE3 strain, were used as inocula, in the absence and in the presence of biphenyl (4 g/kg of air dried soil). Significant soil polychlorobiphenyl depletions were observed in all the reactors after 119 days of treatment. The soil inoculation with the sole CPE1 was found to slightly enhance the polychlorobiphenyl depletions (about 20%) and the soil detoxification; the effect was higher in the presence of biphenyl.

  17. Novel Glucose-1-Phosphatase with High Phytase Activity and Unusual Metal Ion Activation from Soil Bacterium Pantoea sp. Strain 3.5.1.

    PubMed

    Suleimanova, Aliya D; Beinhauer, Astrid; Valeeva, Liia R; Chastukhina, Inna B; Balaban, Nelly P; Shakirov, Eugene V; Greiner, Ralf; Sharipova, Margarita R

    2015-10-01

    Phosphorus is an important macronutrient, but its availability in soil is limited. Many soil microorganisms improve the bioavailability of phosphate by releasing it from various organic compounds, including phytate. To investigate the diversity of phytate-hydrolyzing bacteria in soil, we sampled soils of various ecological habitats, including forest, private homesteads, large agricultural complexes, and urban landscapes. Bacterial isolate Pantoea sp. strain 3.5.1 with the highest level of phytase activity was isolated from forest soil and investigated further. The Pantoea sp. 3.5.1 agpP gene encoding a novel glucose-1-phosphatase with high phytase activity was identified, and the corresponding protein was purified to apparent homogeneity, sequenced by mass spectroscopy, and biochemically characterized. The AgpP enzyme exhibits maximum activity and stability at pH 4.5 and at 37°C. The enzyme belongs to a group of histidine acid phosphatases and has the lowest Km values toward phytate, glucose-6-phosphate, and glucose-1-phosphate. Unexpectedly, stimulation of enzymatic activity by several divalent metal ions was observed for the AgpP enzyme. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and high-performance ion chromatography (HPIC) analyses of phytate hydrolysis products identify dl-myo-inositol 1,2,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate as the final product of the reaction, indicating that the Pantoea sp. AgpP glucose-1-phosphatase can be classified as a 3-phytase. The identification of the Pantoea sp. AgpP phytase and its unusual regulation by metal ions highlight the remarkable diversity of phosphorus metabolism regulation in soil bacteria. Furthermore, our data indicate that natural forest soils harbor rich reservoirs of novel phytate-hydrolyzing enzymes with unique biochemical features.

  18. Novel Glucose-1-Phosphatase with High Phytase Activity and Unusual Metal Ion Activation from Soil Bacterium Pantoea sp. Strain 3.5.1

    PubMed Central

    Suleimanova, Aliya D.; Beinhauer, Astrid; Valeeva, Liia R.; Chastukhina, Inna B.; Balaban, Nelly P.; Greiner, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorus is an important macronutrient, but its availability in soil is limited. Many soil microorganisms improve the bioavailability of phosphate by releasing it from various organic compounds, including phytate. To investigate the diversity of phytate-hydrolyzing bacteria in soil, we sampled soils of various ecological habitats, including forest, private homesteads, large agricultural complexes, and urban landscapes. Bacterial isolate Pantoea sp. strain 3.5.1 with the highest level of phytase activity was isolated from forest soil and investigated further. The Pantoea sp. 3.5.1 agpP gene encoding a novel glucose-1-phosphatase with high phytase activity was identified, and the corresponding protein was purified to apparent homogeneity, sequenced by mass spectroscopy, and biochemically characterized. The AgpP enzyme exhibits maximum activity and stability at pH 4.5 and at 37°C. The enzyme belongs to a group of histidine acid phosphatases and has the lowest Km values toward phytate, glucose-6-phosphate, and glucose-1-phosphate. Unexpectedly, stimulation of enzymatic activity by several divalent metal ions was observed for the AgpP enzyme. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and high-performance ion chromatography (HPIC) analyses of phytate hydrolysis products identify dl-myo-inositol 1,2,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate as the final product of the reaction, indicating that the Pantoea sp. AgpP glucose-1-phosphatase can be classified as a 3-phytase. The identification of the Pantoea sp. AgpP phytase and its unusual regulation by metal ions highlight the remarkable diversity of phosphorus metabolism regulation in soil bacteria. Furthermore, our data indicate that natural forest soils harbor rich reservoirs of novel phytate-hydrolyzing enzymes with unique biochemical features. PMID:26209662

  19. Effects of 2,4-Dichlorophenol, a Metabolite of a Genetically Engineered Bacterium, and 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetate on Some Microorganism-Mediated Ecological Processes in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Short, K. A.; Doyle, J. D.; King, R. J.; Seidler, R. J.; Stotzky, G.; Olsen, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    A genetically engineered microorganism, Pseudomonas putida PPO301(pRO103), and the plasmidless parent strain, PPO301, were added at approximately 107 CFU/g of soil amended with 500 ppm of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (2,4-D) (500 μg/g). The degradation of 2,4-D and the accumulation of a single metabolite, identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometry as 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), occurred only in soil inoculated with PPO301(pRO103), wherein 2,4-DCP accumulated to >70 ppm for 5 weeks and the concentration of 2,4-D was reduced to <100 ppm. Coincident with the accumulation of 2,4-DCP was a >400-fold decline in the numbers of fungal propagules and a marked reduction in the rate of CO2 evolution, whereas 2,4-D did not depress either fungal propagules or respiration of the soil microbiota. 2,4-DCP did not appear to depress the numbers of total heterotrophic, sporeforming, or chitin-utilizing bacteria. In vitro and in situ assays conducted with 2,4-DCP and fungal isolates from the soil demonstrated that 2,4-DCP was toxic to fungal propagules at concentrations below those detected in the soil. PMID:16348408

  20. Anaerobic growth of a "strict aerobe" (Bacillus subtilis).

    PubMed

    Nakano, M M; Zuber, P

    1998-01-01

    There was a long-held belief that the gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis is a strict aerobe. But recent studies have shown that B. subtilis will grow anaerobically, either by using nitrate or nitrite as a terminal electron acceptor, or by fermentation. How B. subtilis alters its metabolic activity according to the availability of oxygen and alternative electron acceptors is but one focus of study. A two-component signal transduction system composed of a sensor kinase, ResE, and a response regulator, ResD, occupies an early stage in the regulatory pathway governing anaerobic respiration. One of the essential roles of ResD and ResE in anaerobic gene regulation is induction of fnr transcription upon oxygen limitation. FNR is a transcriptional activator for anaerobically induced genes, including those for respiratory nitrate reductase, narGHJI.B. subtilis has two distinct nitrate reductases, one for the assimilation of nitrate nitrogen and the other for nitrate respiration. In contrast, one nitrite reductase functions both in nitrite nitrogen assimilation and nitrite respiration. Unlike many anaerobes, which use pyruvate formate lyase, B. subtilis can carry out fermentation in the absence of external electron acceptors wherein pyruvate dehydrogenase is utilized to metabolize pyruvate.

  1. Isolation and Characterization of a Chlorinated-Pyridinol-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Y.; Racke, K. D.; Bollag, J.

    1997-01-01

    The isolation of a pure culture of bacteria able to use 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) as a sole source of carbon and energy under aerobic conditions was achieved for the first time. The bacterium was identified as a Pseudomonas sp. and designated ATCC 700113. [2,6-(sup14)C]TCP degradation yielded (sup14)CO(inf2), chloride, and unidentified polar metabolites. PMID:16535719

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia cenocepacia Strain CEIB S5-2, a Methyl Parathion- and p-Nitrophenol-Degrading Bacterium, Isolated from Agricultural Soils in Morelos, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Ocampo, Fernando; Fernández López, Maikel Gilberto; Lozano-Aguirre Beltrán, Luis Fernando; Popoca-Ursino, Elida Carolina; Ortiz-Hernández, M. Laura; Sánchez-Salinas, Enrique; Ramos Quintana, Fernando; Villalobos-López, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen that belongs to Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC). Burkholderia cenocepacia strain CEIB S5-2 was isolated from agricultural soils in Morelos, Mexico, and previously has shown its abilities for bioremediation. In this study, we report the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia cenocepacia strain CEIB S5-2. PMID:27125479

  3. Development of an engineered soil bacterium enabling to convert both insoluble inorganic and organic phosphate into plant available phosphate and its use as a biofertilizer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lili; Du, Wenya; Luo, Wenyu; Su, Yi; Hui, Jiejie; Ma, Shengwu

    2015-05-01

    Phosphorus (P) is one of the most important nutrient elements for plant growth and metabolism. We previously isolated a P-solubilizing bacterium 9320-SD with the ability to utilize inorganic P and convert it into plant-available P. The present study aims to enhance the P-solubilizing capacity of 9320-SD, as our long-term goal is to develop a more effective P-solubilizing bacterial strain for use as a biofertilizer. In this end, we introduced a bacterial phytase encoding gene into 9320-SD. One randomly selected transformant, SDLiuTP02, was examined for recombinant protein expression and phytase activity, and assessed for its ability to promote plant growth. Our results indicate that SDLiuTP02 is capable of expressing high levels of phytase activity. Importantly, corn seedlings treated with the SDLiuTP02 cell culture exhibited increased rates of photosynthesis, transpiration, and stomatal conductance as well as increased growth rate under laboratory conditions and increased growth rate in pot assays compared to seedlings treated with cell cultures of the parental strain 9320-SD. Field experiments further indicated that application of SDLiuTP02 promoted a greater growth rate in young cucumber plant and a higher foliar chlorophyll level in chop suey greens when compared to 9320-SD treated controls. These results indicate that SDLiuTP02 has the potential to be a more effective P biofertilizer to increase agricultural productivity.

  4. Genome Sequence of Azotobacter vinelandii, an Obligate Aerobe Specialized To Support Diverse Anaerobic Metabolic Processes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Setubal, João C.; dos Santos, Patricia; Goldman, Barry S.; Ertesvåg, Helga; Espin, Guadelupe; Rubio, Luis M.; Valla, Svein; Almeida, Nalvo F.; Balasubramanian, Divya; Cromes, Lindsey; Curatti, Leonardo; Du, Zijin; Godsy, Eric; Goodner, Brad; Hellner-Burris, Kaitlyn; Hernandez, José A.; Houmiel, Katherine; Imperial, Juan; Kennedy, Christina; Larson, Timothy J.; Latreille, Phil; Ligon, Lauren S.; Lu, Jing; Mærk, Mali; Miller, Nancy M.; Norton, Stacie; O'Carroll, Ina P.; Paulsen, Ian; Raulfs, Estella C.; Roemer, Rebecca; Rosser, James; Segura, Daniel; Slater, Steve; Stricklin, Shawn L.; Studholme, David J.; Sun, Jian; Viana, Carlos J.; Wallin, Erik; Wang, Baomin; Wheeler, Cathy; Zhu, Huijun; Dean, Dennis R.; Dixon, Ray; Wood, Derek

    2009-01-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii is a soil bacterium related to the Pseudomonas genus that fixes nitrogen under aerobic conditions while simultaneously protecting nitrogenase from oxygen damage. In response to carbon availability, this organism undergoes a simple differentiation process to form cysts that are resistant to drought and other physical and chemical agents. Here we report the complete genome sequence of A. vinelandii DJ, which has a single circular genome of 5,365,318 bp. In order to reconcile an obligate aerobic lifestyle with exquisitely oxygen-sensitive processes, A. vinelandii is specialized in terms of its complement of respiratory proteins. It is able to produce alginate, a polymer that further protects the organism from excess exogenous oxygen, and it has multiple duplications of alginate modification genes, which may alter alginate composition in response to oxygen availability. The genome analysis identified the chromosomal locations of the genes coding for the three known oxygen-sensitive nitrogenases, as well as genes coding for other oxygen-sensitive enzymes, such as carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase. These findings offer new prospects for the wider application of A. vinelandii as a host for the production and characterization of oxygen-sensitive proteins. PMID:19429624

  5. Detection and quantification of a mycorrhization helper bacterium and a mycorrhizal fungus in plant-soil microcosms at different levels of complexity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Host plant roots, mycorrhizal mycelium and microbes are important and potentially interacting factors shaping the performance of mycorrhization helper bacteria (MHB). We investigated the impact of a soil microbial community on the interaction between the extraradical mycelium of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Piloderma croceum and the MHB Streptomyces sp. AcH 505 in both the presence and the absence of pedunculate oak microcuttings. Results Specific primers were designed to target the internal transcribed spacer of the rDNA and an intergenic region between two protein encoding genes of P. croceum and the intergenic region between the gyrA and gyrB genes of AcH 505. These primers were used to perform real-time PCR with DNA extracted from soil samples. With a sensitivity of 10 genome copies and a linear range of 6 orders of magnitude, these real-time PCR assays enabled the quantification of purified DNA from P. croceum and AcH 505, respectively. In soil microcosms, the fungal PCR signal was not affected by AcH 505 in the absence of the host plant. However, the fungal signal became weaker in the presence of the plant. This decrease was only observed in microbial filtrate amended microcosms. In contrast, the PCR signal of AcH 505 increased in the presence of P. croceum. The increase was not significant in sterile microcosms that contained plant roots. Conclusions Real-time quantitative PCR assays provide a method for directly detecting and quantifying MHB and mycorrhizal fungi in plant microcosms. Our study indicates that the presence of microorganisms and plant roots can both affect the nature of MHB-fungus interactions, and that mycorrhizal fungi may enhance MHB growth. PMID:24025151

  6. Fully Automatic Determination of Soil Bacterium Numbers, Cell Volumes, and Frequencies of Dividing Cells by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bloem, J.; Veninga, M.; Shepherd, J.

    1995-01-01

    We describe a fully automatic image analysis system capable of measuring cell numbers, volumes, lengths, and widths of bacteria in soil smears. The system also determines the number of cells in agglomerates and thus provides the frequency of dividing cells (FDC). Images are acquired from a confocal laser scanning microscope. The grey images are smoothed by convolution and by morphological erosion and dilation to remove noise. The background is equalized by flooding holes in the image and is then subtracted by two top hat transforms. Finally, the grey image is sharpened by delineation, and all particles above a fixed threshold are detected. The number of cells in each detected particle is determined by counting the number of local grey-level maxima in the particle. Thus, up to 1,500 cells in 10 fields of view in a soil smear are analyzed in 30 min without human intervention. Automatic counts of cell numbers and FDC were similar to visual counts in field samples. In microcosms, automatic measurements showed significant increases in cell numbers, FDC, mean cell volume, and length-to-width ratio after amendment of the soil. Volumes of fluorescent microspheres were measured with good approximation, but the absolute values obtained were strongly affected by the settings of the detector sensitivity. Independent measurements of bacterial cell numbers and volumes by image analysis and of cell carbon by a total organic carbon analyzer yielded an average specific carbon content of 200 fg of C (mu)m(sup-3), which indicates that our volume estimates are reasonable. PMID:16534976

  7. Sequencing Bands of Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis Fingerprints for Characterization and Microscale Distribution of Soil Bacterium Populations Responding to Mercury Spiking

    PubMed Central

    Ranjard, Lionel; Brothier, Elisabeth; Nazaret, Sylvie

    2000-01-01

    Two major emerging bands (a 350-bp band and a 650-bp band) within the RISA (ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis) profile of a soil bacterial community spiked with Hg(II) were selected for further identification of the populations involved in the response of the community to the added metal. The bands were cut out from polyacrylamide gels, cloned, characterized by restriction analysis, and sequenced for phylogenetic affiliation of dominant clones. The sequences were the intergenic spacer between the rrs and rrl genes and the first 130 nucleotides of the rrl gene. Comparison of sequences derived from the 350-bp band to The GenBank database permitted us to identify the bacteria as being mostly close relatives to low G+C firmicutes (Clostridium-like genera), while the 650-bp band permitted us to identify the bacteria as being mostly close relatives to β-proteobacteria (Ralstonia-like genera). Oligonucleotide probes specific for the identified dominant bacteria were designed and hybridized with the RISA profiles derived from the control and spiked communities. These studies confirmed the contribution of these populations to the community response to the metal. Hybridization of the RISA profiles from subcommunities (bacterial pools associated with different soil microenvironments) also permitted to characterize the distribution and the dynamics of these populations at a microscale level following mercury spiking. PMID:11097911

  8. High-quality draft genome sequence of Enterobacter sp. Bisph2, a glyphosate-degrading bacterium isolated from a sandy soil of Biskra, Algeria.

    PubMed

    Benslama, Ouided; Boulahrouf, Abderrahmane

    2016-06-01

    Enterobacter sp. strain Bisph2 was isolated from a sandy soil from Biskra, Algeria and exhibits glyphosate-degrading activity. Multilocus sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA, rpoB, hsp60, gyrB and dnaJ genes demonstrated that Bisph2 might be a member of a new species of the genus Enterobacter. Genomic sequencing of Bisph2 was used to better clarify the relationships among Enterobacter species. Annotation and analysis of the genome sequence showed that the 5.535.656 bp genome of Enterobacter sp. Bisph2 consists in one chromosome and no detectable plasmid, has a 53.19% GC content and 78% of genes were assigned a putative function. The genome contains four prophages of which 3 regions are intact and no CRISPER was detected. The nucleotide sequence of this genome was deposited into DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession JXAF00000000.

  9. Flavobacterium panaciterrae sp. nov., a β-glucosidase producing bacterium with ginsenoside-converting activity isolated from the soil of a ginseng field.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yan; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Hoang, Van-An; Young Jung, Sun; Nguyen, Ngoc-Lan; Woo Min, Jin; Wang, Chao; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2014-01-01

    The GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ accession number for the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain DCY69(T) is JX233806. A Gram-reaction-negative, oxidase- and catalase-positive, non-gliding motile strain, designated strain DCY69(T), was isolated from the soil of a ginseng field in the Republic of Korea. Colonies of strain DCY69(T) were circular, 0.5-1.5 mm diameter, yellow, and convex on an R2A agar plate after 2 days. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain DCY69(T) belonged to the genus Flavobacterium with 90.5-98.3% gene sequence similarity. The major predominant quinone was MK-6. The major cellular fatty acids were iso-C15:0, iso-C17:0 3-OH, iso-C15:0 3-OH and summed feature 3 (containing C16:1ω7c and/or C16:1ω6c). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, one unidentified aminolipid and unidentified polar lipids (L1, L2). The genomic DNA G+C content of strain DCY69(T) was 35.0mol%. The strain DCY69(T) transformed ginsenoside Rb1 into Rd and F2. Based on the polyphasic taxonomic data, strain DCY69(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Flavobacterium, for which the name Flavobacterium panaciterrae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is DCY69(T)(= KCTC 32392(T) = JCM 19161(T)), isolated from the soil of a ginseng field in the Republic of Korea.

  10. Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a diazotrophic bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Kanvinde, L.; Sastry, G.R.K. )

    1990-07-01

    This is the first report that Agrobacterium tumefaciens can fix nitrogen in a free-living condition as shown by its abilities to grown on nitrogen-free medium, reduce acetylene to ethylene, and incorporate {sup 15}N supplied as {sup 15}N{sub 2}. As with most other well-characterized diazotrophic bacteria, the presence of NH{sub 4}{sup +} in the medium and aerobic conditions repress nitrogen fixation by A. tumefaciens. The system requires molybdenum. No evidence for nodulation was found with pea, peanut, or soybean plants. Further understanding of the nitrogen-fixing ability of this bacterium, which has always been considered a pathogen, should cast new light on the evolution of a pathogenic versus symbiotic relationship.

  11. Toxicity of fungal-generated silver nanoparticles to soil-inhabiting Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a rhizospheric bacterium responsible for plant protection and bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Indarchand R; Anderson, Anne J; Rai, Mahendra

    2015-04-09

    Silver nanoparticles have attracted considerable attention due to their beneficial properties. But toxicity issues associated with them are also rising. The reports in the past suggested health hazards of silver nanoparticles at the cellular, molecular, or whole organismal level in eukaryotes. Whereas, there is also need to examine the exposure effects of silver nanoparticle to the microbes, which are beneficial to humans as well as environment. The available literature suggests the harmful effects of physically and chemically synthesised silver nanoparticles. The toxicity of biogenically synthesized nanoparticles has been less studied than physically and chemically synthesised nanoparticles. Hence, there is a greater need to study the toxic effects of biologically synthesised silver nanoparticles in general and mycosynthesized nanoparticles in particular. In the present study, attempts have been made to assess the risk associated with the exposure of mycosynthesized silver nanoparticles on a beneficial soil microbe Pseudomonas putida. KT2440. The study demonstrates mycosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and their characterisation by UV-vis spectrophotometry, FTIR, X-ray diffraction, nanosight LM20--a particle size distribution analyzer and TEM. Silver nanoparticles obtained herein were found to exert the hazardous effect at the concentration of 0.4 μg/ml, which warrants further detailed investigations concerning toxicity.

  12. Genome Sequence of a Strain of the Human Pathogenic Bacterium Pseudomonas alcaligenes That Caused Bloodstream Infection.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masato; Suzuki, Satowa; Matsui, Mari; Hiraki, Yoichi; Kawano, Fumio; Shibayama, Keigo

    2013-10-31

    Pseudomonas alcaligenes, a Gram-negative aerobic bacterium, is a rare opportunistic human pathogen. Here, we report the whole-genome sequence of P. alcaligenes strain MRY13-0052, which was isolated from a bloodstream infection in a medical institution in Japan and is resistant to antimicrobial agents, including broad-spectrum cephalosporins and monobactams.

  13. The Genome of the Fungal-Interactive Soil Bacterium Burkholderia terrae BS001—A Plethora of Outstanding Interactive Capabilities Unveiled

    PubMed Central

    Haq, Irshad Ul; Graupner, Katharina; Nazir, Rashid; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia terrae strain BS001, obtained as an inhabitant of the mycosphere of Laccaria proxima (a close relative of Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten), actively interacts with Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten. We here summarize the remarkable ecological behavior of B. terrae BS001 in the mycosphere and add key data to this. Moreover, we extensively analyze the approximately 11.5-Mb five-replicon genome of B. terrae BS001 and highlight its remarkable features. Seventy-nine regions of genomic plasticity (RGP), that is, 16.48% of the total genome size, were found. One 70.42-kb RGP, RGP76, revealed a typical conjugal element structure, including a full type 4 secretion system. Comparative analyses across 24 related Burkholderia genomes revealed that 95.66% of the total BS001 genome belongs to the variable part, whereas the remaining 4.34% constitutes the core genome. Genes for biofilm formation and several secretion systems, under which a type 3 secretion system (T3SS), were found, which is consistent with the hypothesis that T3SSs play a role in the interaction with Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten. The high number of predicted metabolic pathways and membrane transporters suggested that strain BS001 can take up and utilize a range of sugars, amino acids and organic acids. In particular, a unique glycerol uptake system was found. The BS001 genome further contains genetic systems for the degradation of complex organic compounds. Moreover, gene clusters encoding nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) and hybrid polyketide synthases/NRPS were found, highlighting the potential role of secondary metabolites in the ecology of strain BS001. The patchwork of genetic features observed in the genome is consistent with the notion that 1) horizontal gene transfer is a main driver of B. terrae BS001 adaptation and 2) the organism is very flexible in its ecological behavior in soil. PMID:24923325

  14. What Is Aerobic Dancing?

    MedlinePlus

    ... aerobics can reach up to six times the force of gravity, which is transmitted to each of the 26 bones in the foot. Because of the many side-to-side motions, shoes need an arch design that will compensate ...

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain RB, a Bacterium Capable of Synthesizing Cadmium Selenide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ayano, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Masashi; Soda, Satoshi; Ike, Michihiko

    2014-05-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RB is a bacterium capable of synthesizing cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles and was isolated from a soil sample. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa strain RB. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a draft genome of a CdSe-synthesizing bacterium.

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of the Versatile Alkane-Degrading Bacterium Aquabacterium sp. Strain NJ1.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Hisako; Shiwa, Yuh; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Zylstra, Gerben J

    2014-12-04

    The draft genome sequence of a soil bacterium, Aquabacterium sp. strain NJ1, capable of utilizing both liquid and solid alkanes, was deciphered. This is the first report of an Aquabacterium genome sequence.

  17. Melghiribacillus thermohalophilus gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel filamentous, endospore-forming, thermophilic and halophilic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Addou, Nariman Ammara; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Hacene, Hocine; Fauque, Guy; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2015-04-01

    A novel filamentous, endospore-forming, thermophilic and moderately halophilic bacterium designated strain Nari2A(T) was isolated from soil collected from an Algerian salt lake, Chott Melghir. The novel isolate was Gram-staining-positive, aerobic, catalase-negative and oxidase-positive. Optimum growth occurred at 50-55 °C, 7-10% (w/v) NaCl and pH 7-8. The strain exhibited 95.4, 95.4 and 95.2% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Thalassobacillus devorans G19.1(T), Sediminibacillus halophilus EN8d(T) and Virgibacillus kekensis YIM-kkny16(T), respectively. The major menaquinone was MK-7. The polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, three unknown phosphoglycolipids and two unknown phospholipids. The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0) and iso-C(17 : 0). The DNA G+C content was 41.9 mol%. Based on the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, strain Nari2A(T) is considered to represent a novel species of a new genus in the family Bacillaceae , order Bacillales , for which the name Melghiribacillus thermohalophilus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Melghiribacillus thermohalophilus is Nari2A(T) ( = DSM 25894(T) = CCUG 62543(T)).

  18. Dance--Aerobic and Anaerobic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlette

    1984-01-01

    This article defines and explains aerobic exercise and its effects on the cardiovascular system. Various studies on dancers are cited indicating that dance is an anaerobic activity with some small degree of aerobic benefit. (DF)

  19. Implementation of Aerobic Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (AAHPERD).

    This information is intended for health professionals interested in implementing aerobic exercise programs in public schools, institutions of higher learning, and business and industry workplaces. The papers are divided into three general sections. The introductory section presents a basis for adhering to a health fitness lifestyle, using…

  20. Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yurkov, Vladimir V.; Beatty, J. Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are a relatively recently discovered bacterial group. Although taxonomically and phylogenetically heterogeneous, these bacteria share the following distinguishing features: the presence of bacteriochlorophyll a incorporated into reaction center and light-harvesting complexes, low levels of the photosynthetic unit in cells, an abundance of carotenoids, a strong inhibition by light of bacteriochlorophyll synthesis, and the inability to grow photosynthetically under anaerobic conditions. Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are classified in two marine (Erythrobacter and Roseobacter) and six freshwater (Acidiphilium, Erythromicrobium, Erythromonas, Porphyrobacter, Roseococcus, and Sandaracinobacter) genera, which phylogenetically belong to the α-1, α-3, and α-4 subclasses of the class Proteobacteria. Despite this phylogenetic information, the evolution and ancestry of their photosynthetic properties are unclear. We discuss several current proposals for the evolutionary origin of aerobic phototrophic bacteria. The closest phylogenetic relatives of aerobic phototrophic bacteria include facultatively anaerobic purple nonsulfur phototrophic bacteria. Since these two bacterial groups share many properties, yet have significant differences, we compare and contrast their physiology, with an emphasis on morphology and photosynthetic and other metabolic processes. PMID:9729607

  1. Aerobic Dance in Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiles, Barbara Ann; Moore, Suzanne

    1981-01-01

    Aerobic dance offers a challenging workout in a social atmosphere. Though some physical education instructors tend to exclude dance units from the curriculum, most could teach aerobic dance if they had a basic knowledge of aerobic routines. The outline for a unit to be used in the class is presented. (JN)

  2. [Isolation and identification of electrochemically active microorganism from micro-aerobic environment].

    PubMed

    Wu, Song; Xiao, Yong; Zheng, Zhi-Yong; Zheng, Yue; Yang, Zhao-Hui; Zhao, Feng

    2014-10-01

    Extracellular electron transfer of electrochemically active microorganism plays vital role in biogeochemical cycling of metals and carbon and in biosynthesis of bioenergy. Compared to anaerobic anode, micro-aerobic anode captures more energy from microbial fuel cell. However, most of previous researches focused on functioning bacteria in anaerobic anode, functioning bacteria in micro-aerobic anode was rarely studied. Herein, we used the traditional aerobic screening technology to isolate functioning bacteria from a micro-aerobic anode. Three pure cultures Aeromonas sp. WS-XY2, Citrobacter sp. WS-XY3 and Bacterium strain WS-XY4 were obtained. WS-XY2 and WS-XY3 were belonged to Proteobacteria, whereas WS-XY4 was possibly a new species. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry analysis demonstrated all of them showed the electrochemical activity by direct extracellular electron transfer, and micro-aerobic anode could select bacteria that have similar electrochemical activity to proliferate on the anode. We further conclude that functioning bacteria in micro-aerobic anode are more efficient than that of anaerobic anode may be the reason that micro-aerobic anode has better performance than anaerobic anode. Therefore, a thorough study of functioning bacteria in micro-aerobic anode will significantly promote the energy recovery from microbial fuel cell.

  3. Bacillus mesophilum sp. nov., strain IITR-54T, a novel 4-chlorobiphenyl dechlorinating bacterium.

    PubMed

    Manickam, Natesan; Singh, Nitin Kumar; Bajaj, Abhay; Kumar, Rajendran Mathan; Kaur, Gurwinder; Kaur, Navjot; Bala, Monu; Kumar, Anand; Mayilraj, Shanmugam

    2014-07-01

    The taxonomic position of a Gram-positive, endospore-forming bacterium isolated from soil sample collected from an industrial site was analyzed by a polyphasic approach. The strain designated as IITR-54T matched most of the phenotypic and chemical characteristics of the genus Bacillus and represents a novel species. It was found to biodegrade 4-chlorobiphenyl through dechlorination and was isolated through enrichment procedure from an aged polychlorinated biphenyl-contaminated soil. Both resting cell assay and growth under aerobic liquid conditions using 4-chlorobiphenyl as sole source of carbon along with 0.01% yeast extract, formation of chloride ions was measured. 16S rRNA (1,489 bases) nucleotide sequence of isolated strain was compared with those of closely related Bacillus type strains and confirmed that the strain belongs to the genus Bacillus. Strain IITR-54T differs from all other species of Bacillus by at least 2.1% at the 16S rRNA level, and the moderately related species are Bacillus oceanisediminis (97.9%) followed by Bacillus infantis (97.7%), Bacillus firmus (97.4%), Bacillus drentensis (97.3%), Bacillus circulans (97.2%), Bacillus soli (97.1%), Bacillus horneckiae (97.1%), Bacillus pocheonensis (97.1%) and Bacillus bataviensis (97.1%), respectively. The cell wall peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid and the major isoprenoid quinone was MK-7. Major fatty acids are iso-C15:0 (32.4%) and anteiso-C15:0 (27.4%). Predominant polar lipids are diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. The results of physiological and biochemical tests allowed the genotypic and phenotypic distinctiveness of strain IITR-54T with its phylogenetic relatives and suggest that the strain IITR-54T should be recognized as a novel species, for which the name Bacillus mesophilum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is IITR-54T (=MTCC 11060T=JCM 19208T).

  4. Strategies of aerobic microbial Fe acquisition from Fe-bearing montmorillonite clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Keshia M.; DuBois, Jennifer L.; Maurice, Patricia A.

    2013-09-01

    This research investigated strategies used by the common aerobic soil bacterium Pseudomonas mendocina to acquire Fe associated with Fe(III)-bearing montmorillonite (MMT) clay. Given the known importance of Fe(III)-chelating siderophores, Fe-limited batch experiments were conducted using a wild-type (WT) strain that produces siderophores and a ΔpmhA mutant with a siderophore(-) phenotype. Growth measurements were coupled with a transcriptional biosensor assay that monitors the siderophore biosynthesis gene pmhA, measurements of cells' reducing ability, and quantification of exopolymeric substance (EPS) production. WT cells actively grow when MMT is the sole Fe source, but sorption to MMT may decrease the concentration of dissolved Fe-siderophore complex accessible to cells. Cells also obtain Fe by reducing MMT-associated Fe(III), but because P. mendocina lacks a secreted/diffusible reductant, direct physical contact is required. Dual strategies for Fe acquisition—a reducing mechanism that requires contact and that is likely facilitated by biofilm production and a siderophore related mechanism that does not require contact—provide flexibility to address the environmental Fe challenge.

  5. Biological removal of nitrate and ammonium under aerobic atmosphere by Paracoccus versutus LYM.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhuang; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Jiti; Chen, Mingxiang; Wang, Xiaojun

    2013-11-01

    The bacterium isolated from sea sludge Paracoccus versutus LYM was characterized with the ability of aerobic denitrification. Strain LYM performs perfect activity in aerobically converting over 95% NO3(-)-N (approximate 400mg L(-1)) to gaseous products via nitrite with maximum reduction rate 33 mg NO3(-)-N L(-1) h(-1). Besides characteristic of aerobic denitrification, strain LYM was confirmed in terms of the ability to be heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification (HNAD) with few accumulations of intermediates. After the nitrogen balance and enzyme assays, the putative nitrogen pathway of HNAD could be NH4(+) → NH2OH → NO2(-)→ NO3(-), then NO3(-) was denitrified to gaseous products via nitrite. N2 was sole denitrification product without any detection of N2O by gas chromatography. Strain LYM could also simultaneously remove ammonium and additional nitrate. Meanwhile, the accumulated nitrite had inhibitory effect on ammonium reduction rate.

  6. Biodegradation of Asphalt Cement-20 by Aerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pendrys, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Seven gram-negative, aerobic bacteria were isolated from a mixed culture enriched for asphalt-degrading bacteria. The predominant genera of these isolates were Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Alcaligenes, Flavimonas, and Flavobacterium. The mixed culture preferentially degraded the saturate and naphthene aromatic fractions of asphalt cement-20. A residue remained on the surface which was resistant to biodegradation and protected the underlying asphalt from biodegradation. The most potent asphalt-degrading bacterium, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus NAV2, excretes an emulsifier which is capable of emulsifying the saturate and naphthene aromatic fractions of asphalt cement-20. This emulsifier is not denatured by phenol. PMID:16347928

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas frederiksbergensis SI8, a Psychrotrophic Aromatic-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lisa M.; Striebich, Richard C.; Mueller, Susan S.; Gunasekera, Thusitha S.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas frederiksbergensis strain SI8 is a psychrotrophic bacterium capable of efficient aerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons. The draft genome of P. frederiksbergensis SI8 is 6.57 Mb in size, with 5,904 coding sequences and 60.5% G+C content. The isopropylbenzene (cumene) degradation pathway is predicted to be present in P. frederiksbergensis SI8. PMID:26184950

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Agarivorans albus Strain MKT 106T, an Agarolytic Marine Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Yasuike, Motoshige; Nakamura, Yoji; Kai, Wataru; Fujiwara, Atushi; Fukui, Youhei; Satomi, Masataka; Sano, Motohiko

    2013-07-18

    Agarivorans albus is a Gram-negative, strictly aerobic, and agar-hydrolyzing marine bacterium. We present the draft genome sequence of the A. albus strain MKT 106(T), which is composed of 67 contigs (>500 bp) totaling 4,734,285 bp and containing 4,397 coding DNA sequences (CDSs), four rRNAs, and 64 tRNA sequences.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Gordonia sihwensis Strain 9, a Branched Alkane-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lisa M.; Gunasekera, Thusitha S.; Striebich, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Gordonia sihwensis strain 9 is a Gram-positive bacterium capable of efficient aerobic degradation of branched and normal alkanes. The draft genome of G. sihwensis S9 is 4.16 Mb in size, with 3,686 coding sequences and 68.1% G+C content. Alkane monooxygenase and P-450 cytochrome genes required for alkane degradation are predicted in G. sihwensis S9. PMID:27340079

  10. Aerobic biodegradation of selected monoterpenes.

    PubMed

    Misra, G; Pavlostathis, S G; Perdue, E M; Araujo, R

    1996-07-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to assess the biotransformation potential of four hydrocarbon monoterpenes (d-limonene, alpha-pinene, gamma-terpinene, and terpinolene) and four alcohols (arbanol, linalool, plinol, and alpha-terpineol) under aerobic conditions at 23 degrees C. Both forest-soil extract and enriched cultures were used as inocula for the biodegradation experiments conducted first without, then with prior microbial acclimation to the monoterpenes tested. All four hydrocarbons and two alcohols were readily degraded. The increase in biomass and headspace CO2 concentrations paralleled the depletion of monoterpenes, thus confirming that terpene disappearance was the result of biodegradation accompanied by microbial growth and mineralization. Plinol resisted degradation in assays using inocula from diverse sources, while arbanol degraded very slowly. A significant fraction of d-limonene-derived carbon was accounted for as non-extractable, dissolved organic carbon, whereas terpineol exhibited a much higher degree of utilization. The rate and extent of monoterpene biodegradation were not significantly affected by the presence of dissolved natural organic matter.

  11. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, Mark P; Bessette, Bernard J; March, John; McComb, Scott T.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  12. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, Mark P; Bessette, Bernard J; March, John C; McComb, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention includes a system of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  13. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, M.P.; Bessette, B.J.; March, J.; McComb, S.T.

    2000-02-15

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120 F and 140 F in steady state.

  14. Anaerobic Degradation of Cyanuric Acid, Cysteine, and Atrazine by a Facultative Anaerobic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Jessee, J. A.; Benoit, R. E.; Hendricks, A. C.; Allen, G. C.; Neal, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    A facultative anaerobic bacterium that rapidly degrades cyanuric acid (CA) was isolated from the sediment of a stream that received industrial wastewater effluent. CA decomposition was measured throughout the growth cycle by using a high-performance liquid chromatography assay, and the concomitant production of ammonia was also measured. The bacterium used CA or cysteine as a major, if not the sole, carbon and energy source under anaerobic, but not aerobic, conditions in a defined medium. The cell yield was greatly enhanced by the simultaneous presence of cysteine and CA in the medium. Cysteine was preferentially used rather than CA early in the growth cycle, but all of the CA was used without an apparent lag after the cysteine was metabolized. Atrazine was also degraded by this bacterium under anaerobic conditions in a defined medium. PMID:16346187

  15. Single Bacterium Detection Using Sers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Baikova, T. V.; Alushin, M. V.; Svistunova, T. S.; Minaeva, S. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Saraeva, I. N.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    This work is devoted to the study of a single Staphylococcus aureus bacterium detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and resonant Raman spectroscopy (RS). It was shown that SERS allows increasing sensitivity of predominantly low frequency lines connected with the vibrations of Amide, Proteins and DNA. At the same time the lines of carotenoids inherent to this kind of bacterium are well-detected due to the resonance Raman scattering mechanism. The reproducibility and stability of Raman spectra strongly depend on the characteristics of nanostructured substrate, and molecular structure and size of the tested biological object.

  16. Naphthalecin, a novel antibiotic produced by the anaerobic bacterium, Sporotalea colonica sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Ezaki, Masami; Muramatsu, Hideyuki; Takase, Shigehiro; Hashimoto, Michizane; Nagai, Koji

    2008-04-01

    A novel antibiotic naphthalecin was purified and isolated from the cells of an anaerobic bacterium isolated from a soil sample. This antibiotic contained a naphthalene moiety, so named as naphthalecin, and showed antibacterial activity against gram positive species. The producing strain, an obligate anaerobe, was identified as a new species of the genus Sporotalea. Identification of the bacterium, cultivation, purification, structure determination, and antibacterial activity are shown.

  17. Exercise, Animal Aerobics, and Interpretation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Valerie

    1996-01-01

    Describes an aerobic activity set to music for children that mimics animal movements. Example exercises include walking like a penguin or jumping like a cricket. Stresses basic aerobic principles and designing the program at the level of children's motor skills. Benefits include reaching people who normally don't visit nature centers, and bridging…

  18. Keratinase production and biodegradation of whole chicken feather keratin by a newly isolated bacterium under submerged fermentation.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Dipak K; Das, Arpan; Thatoi, Hrudayanath; Mondal, Keshab C; Mohapatra, Pradeep K Das

    2012-07-01

    A new feather-degrading bacterium PKD 5 was isolated from feather dumping soil and identified as Bacillus weihenstephanensis based on morphological and physiochemical characteristics as well as 16S rRNA gene analysis. Extracellular keratinase was produced during submerged aerobic cultivation in a medium containing chicken feather as sole carbon and energy source and supplemented with salt solutions (NaCl 5.0, MgSO₄ 1.0, K₂HPO₄ 1.0, (NH₄)₂SO₄, 2.0 g/l). The optimal conditions for keratinase production include initial pH of 7.0, inoculum size of 2% (v/v), and cultivation at 40 °C. The maximum keratinase production and keratinolytic activity of PKD 5 was achieved after 7 days of fermentation under shaking condition (120 rpm). The enzyme has found application in developing cost-effective feather by-products for feeds and fertilizers. The manuscript first time describes B. weihenstephanensis PKD 5-mediated keratinase production under submerged fermentation and whole chicken feather biodegradation.

  19. Methylobacillus rhizosphaerae sp. nov., a novel plant-associated methylotrophic bacterium isolated from rhizosphere of red pepper.

    PubMed

    Madhaiyan, M; Poonguzhali, S; Senthilkumar, M; Pragatheswari, D; Lee, K-C; Lee, J-S

    2013-03-01

    A novel plant-associated obligate methylotrophic bacterium, designated strain Ca-68(T), was isolated from the rhizosphere soil of field-grown red pepper from India. The isolates are strictly aerobic, Gram negative, motile rods multiplying by binary fission and formaldehyde is assimilated via the ribulose monophosphate pathway. A comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence-based phylogenetic analysis placed the strain in a clade with the species Methylobacillus flagellatus, Methylobacillus glycogens and Methylobacillus pratensis, with which it showed pairwise similarity of 97.8, 97.4 and 96.2 %, respectively. The major fatty acids are C(16:0), C(10:0) 3OH and C(16:1) ω7c. The G+C content of the genomic DNA is 59.7 mol%. The major ubiquinone is Q-8. Dominant phospholipids are phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and DNA-DNA relatedness (14-19 %) with type strains of the genus Methylobacillus, the novel isolate was classified as a new species of this genus and named Methylobacillus rhizosphaerae Ca-68(T) (=KCTC 22383(T) = NCIMB 14472(T)).

  20. Modeling of vapor intrusion from hydrocarbon-contaminated sources accounting for aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verginelli, Iason; Baciocchi, Renato

    2011-11-01

    A one-dimensional steady state vapor intrusion model including both anaerobic and oxygen-limited aerobic biodegradation was developed. The aerobic and anaerobic layer thickness are calculated by stoichiometrically coupling the reactive transport of vapors with oxygen transport and consumption. The model accounts for the different oxygen demand in the subsurface required to sustain the aerobic biodegradation of the compound(s) of concern and for the baseline soil oxygen respiration. In the case of anaerobic reaction under methanogenic conditions, the model accounts for the generation of methane which leads to a further oxygen demand, due to methane oxidation, in the aerobic zone. The model was solved analytically and applied, using representative parameter ranges and values, to identify under which site conditions the attenuation of hydrocarbons migrating into indoor environments is likely to be significant. Simulations were performed assuming a soil contaminated by toluene only, by a BTEX mixture, by Fresh Gasoline and by Weathered Gasoline. The obtained results have shown that for several site conditions oxygen concentration below the building is sufficient to sustain aerobic biodegradation. For these scenarios the aerobic biodegradation is the primary mechanism of attenuation, i.e. anaerobic contribution is negligible and a model accounting just for aerobic biodegradation can be used. On the contrary, in all cases where oxygen is not sufficient to sustain aerobic biodegradation alone (e.g. highly contaminated sources), anaerobic biodegradation can significantly contribute to the overall attenuation depending on the site specific conditions.

  1. Modeling of vapor intrusion from hydrocarbon-contaminated sources accounting for aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Verginelli, Iason; Baciocchi, Renato

    2011-11-01

    A one-dimensional steady state vapor intrusion model including both anaerobic and oxygen-limited aerobic biodegradation was developed. The aerobic and anaerobic layer thickness are calculated by stoichiometrically coupling the reactive transport of vapors with oxygen transport and consumption. The model accounts for the different oxygen demand in the subsurface required to sustain the aerobic biodegradation of the compound(s) of concern and for the baseline soil oxygen respiration. In the case of anaerobic reaction under methanogenic conditions, the model accounts for the generation of methane which leads to a further oxygen demand, due to methane oxidation, in the aerobic zone. The model was solved analytically and applied, using representative parameter ranges and values, to identify under which site conditions the attenuation of hydrocarbons migrating into indoor environments is likely to be significant. Simulations were performed assuming a soil contaminated by toluene only, by a BTEX mixture, by Fresh Gasoline and by Weathered Gasoline. The obtained results have shown that for several site conditions oxygen concentration below the building is sufficient to sustain aerobic biodegradation. For these scenarios the aerobic biodegradation is the primary mechanism of attenuation, i.e. anaerobic contribution is negligible and a model accounting just for aerobic biodegradation can be used. On the contrary, in all cases where oxygen is not sufficient to sustain aerobic biodegradation alone (e.g. highly contaminated sources), anaerobic biodegradation can significantly contribute to the overall attenuation depending on the site specific conditions.

  2. Cyclobacterium halophilum sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from a coastal-marine wetland.

    PubMed

    Shahinpei, Azadeh; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Sepahy, Abbas Akhavan; Schumann, Peter; Ventosa, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, slightly halophilic bacterium, designated strain GASx41(T), was isolated from soil of the coastal-marine wetland Gomishan in Iran. Cells of strain GASx41(T) were curved, ring-like or horseshoe-shaped rods and non-motile. Strain GASx41(T) was strictly aerobic, and catalase- and oxidase-positive. The strain was able to grow at NaCl concentrations of 1-10% (w/v), with optimum growth occurring at 2.5-3% (w/v) NaCl. The optimum temperature and pH for growth were 25-30 °C and pH 7.5-8.0. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain GASx41(T) was shown to belong to the genus Cyclobacterium within the phylum Bacteroidetes and showed closest phylogenetic similarity to 'Cyclobacterium jeungdonense' HMD3055 (98.0%). The DNA G+C content of strain GASx41(T) was 48.1 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids of strain GASx41(T) were iso-C15 : 0, summed feature 4 (iso-C15 : 0 2-OH and/or C16 : 1ω7c), anteiso-C15 : 0 2-OH, anteiso-C15 : 0 and iso-C17 : 0 3-OH, and its polar lipid pattern consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine and 12 unknown lipids. The only quinone present was menaquinone 7 (MK-7). All these features confirmed the placement of isolate GASx41(T) within the genus Cyclobacterium. On the basis of evidence from this study, a novel species of the genus Cyclobacterium, Cyclobacterium halophilum sp. nov., is proposed, with strain GASx41(T) ( = IBRC-M 10761(T) = CECT 8341(T)) as the type strain.

  3. Savagea faecisuis gen. nov., sp. nov., a tylosin- and tetracycline-resistant bacterium isolated from a swine-manure storage pit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A polyphasic taxonomic study using morphological, biochemical, chemotaxonomic and molecular methods was performed on three strains of an unknown Gram-positive staining, nonspore-forming, motile aerobic rod-shaped bacterium resistant to tetracycline and tylosin isolated from a swine-manure storage pi...

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Aeribacillus pallidus Strain 8m3, a Thermophilic Hydrocarbon-Oxidizing Bacterium Isolated from the Dagang Oil Field (China)

    PubMed Central

    Poltaraus, Andrey B.; Sokolova, Diyana S.; Grouzdev, Denis S.; Ivanov, Timophey M.; Malakho, Sophia G.; Korshunova, Alena V.; Rozanov, Aleksey S.; Tourova, Tatiyana P.

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of Aeribacillus pallidus strain 8m3, a thermophilic aerobic oil-oxidizing bacterium isolated from production water from the Dagang high-temperature oil field, China, is presented here. The genome is annotated to provide insights into the genomic and phenotypic diversity of the genus Aeribacillus. PMID:27284131

  5. Nitrogen Redox Metabolism of a Heterotrophic, Nitrifying-Denitrifying Alcaligenes sp. from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Castignetti, Domenic; Hollocher, Thomas C.

    1982-01-01

    Metabolic characteristics of a heterotrophic, nitrifier-denitrifier Alcaligenes sp. isolated from soil were further characterized. Pyruvic oxime and hydroxylamine were oxidized to nitrite aerobically by nitrification-adapted cells with specific activities (Vmax) of 0.066 and 0.003 μmol of N × min−1 × mg of protein−1, respectively, at 22°C. Km values were 15 and 42 μM for pyruvic oxime and hydroxylamine, respectively. The greater pyruvic oxime oxidation activity relative to hydroxylamine oxidation activity indicates that pyruvic oxime was a specific substrate and was not oxidized appreciably via its hydrolysis product, hydroxylamine. When grown as a denitrifier on nitrate, the bacterium could not aerobically oxidize pyruvic oxime or hydroxylamine to nitrite. However, hydroxylamine was converted to nearly equimolar amounts of ammonium ion and nitrous oxide, and the nature of this reaction is discussed. Cells grown as heterotrophic nitrifiers on pyruvic oxime contained two enzymes of denitrification, nitrate reductase and nitric oxide reductase. The nitrate reductase was the dissimilatory type, as evidenced by its extreme sensitivity to inhibition by azide and by its ability to be reversibly inhibited by oxygen. Cells grown aerobically on organic carbon sources other than pyruvic oxime contained none of the denitrifying enzymes surveyed but were able to oxidize pyruvic oxime to nitrite and reduce hydroxylamine to ammonium ion. PMID:16346117

  6. Unique features revealed by the genome sequence of Acinetobacter sp. ADP1, a versatile and naturally transformation competent bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Barbe, Valérie; Vallenet, David; Fonknechten, Nuria; Kreimeyer, Annett; Oztas, Sophie; Labarre, Laurent; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Robert, Catherine; Duprat, Simone; Wincker, Patrick; Ornston, L. Nicholas; Weissenbach, Jean; Marlière, Philippe; Cohen, Georges N.; Médigue, Claudine

    2004-01-01

    Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1 is a nutritionally versatile soil bacterium closely related to representatives of the well-characterized Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida. Unlike these bacteria, the Acinetobacter ADP1 is highly competent for natural transformation which affords extraordinary convenience for genetic manipulation. The circular chromosome of the Acinetobacter ADP1, presented here, encodes 3325 predicted coding sequences, of which 60% have been classified based on sequence similarity to other documented proteins. The close evolutionary proximity of Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas species, as judged by the sequences of their 16S RNA genes and by the highest level of bidirectional best hits, contrasts with the extensive divergence in the GC content of their DNA (40 versus 62%). The chromosomes also differ significantly in size, with the Acinetobacter ADP1 chromosome <60% of the length of the Pseudomonas counterparts. Genome analysis of the Acinetobacter ADP1 revealed genes for metabolic pathways involved in utilization of a large variety of compounds. Almost all of these genes, with orthologs that are scattered in other species, are located in five major ‘islands of catabolic diversity’, now an apparent ‘archipelago of catabolic diversity’, within one-quarter of the overall genome. Acinetobacter ADP1 displays many features of other aerobic soil bacteria with metabolism oriented toward the degradation of organic compounds found in their natural habitat. A distinguishing feature of this genome is the absence of a gene corresponding to pyruvate kinase, the enzyme that generally catalyzes the terminal step in conversion of carbohydrates to pyruvate for respiration by the citric acid cycle. This finding supports the view that the cycle itself is centrally geared to the catabolic capabilities of this exceptionally versatile organism. PMID:15514110

  7. Root morphology, hydraulic conductivity and plant water relations of high-yielding rice grown under aerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Yoichiro; Okami, Midori

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Increasing physical water scarcity is a major constraint for irrigated rice (Oryza sativa) production. ‘Aerobic rice culture’ aims to maximize yield per unit water input by growing plants in aerobic soil without flooding or puddling. The objective was to determine (a) the effect of water management on root morphology and hydraulic conductance, and (b) their roles in plant–water relationships and stomatal conductance in aerobic culture. Methods Root system development, stomatal conductance (gs) and leaf water potential (Ψleaf) were monitored in a high-yielding rice cultivar (‘Takanari’) under flooded and aerobic conditions at two soil moisture levels [nearly saturated (> –10 kPa) and mildly dry (> –30 kPa)] over 2 years. In an ancillary pot experiment, whole-plant hydraulic conductivity (soil-leaf hydraulic conductance; Kpa) was measured under flooded and aerobic conditions. Key Results Adventitious root emergence and lateral root proliferation were restricted even under nearly saturated conditions, resulting in a 72–85 % reduction in total root length under aerobic culture conditions. Because of their reduced rooting size, plants grown under aerobic conditions tended to have lower Kpa than plants grown under flooded conditions. Ψleaf was always significantly lower in aerobic culture than in flooded culture, while gs was unchanged when the soil moisture was at around field capacity. gs was inevitably reduced when the soil water potential at 20-cm depth reached –20 kPa. Conclusions Unstable performance of rice in water-saving cultivations is often associated with reduction in Ψleaf. Ψleaf may reduce even if Kpa is not significantly changed, but the lower Ψleaf would certainly occur in case Kpa reduces as a result of lower water-uptake capacity under aerobic conditions. Rice performance in aerobic culture might be improved through genetic manipulation that promotes lateral root branching and rhizogenesis as well as deep

  8. Influence of Environmental Factors on Feammox Activity in Soil Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    The oxidation of ammonium (NH4+) under iron reducing conditions, referred to as Feammox, has been described in recent years by several investigators. The environmental characteristics in which the Feammox process occurs need to be understood in order to determine its contribution to the nitrogen cycle. In this study, a total of 66 locations were selected covering 4 different types of soils/sediments: wetland soils (W), river sediments (R), forest soils (F), and paddy soils (P) from several locations in central New Jersey, at Tims Branch at Savannah River in South Carolina, both in the Unities States, and at several locations in the Guangdong province in China. Though soil chemical analyses, serial culturing experiments, analysis of microbial communities, and using a canonical correspondence analysis, the occurrence of the Feammox reaction and the presence of Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6, which plays a key role in the Feammox process(1), were found in 17 samples. Analyses showed that the soil pH, as well as its Fe(III) and NH4+ content were the most important factors controlling the distribution of these Feammox microorganisms. Based on the results, soils in the subtropical forests and soils that are near agricultural areas could be Feammox hotspot. Under the conditions that favor the presence and activity of Feammox microorganisms and their oxidation of NH4+, denitrification bacteria were also active. However, the presence of nitrous oxide (N2O) reducers was limited under these conditions, implying that at locations where the Feammox process is active, conditions are favoring a higher ratio of N2O: N2 as the nitrogen (N) end products. Incubations of soils where the presence of Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 was detected, were conducted for 120 days under two different DO levels (DO < 0.02 mg/L and DO = 0.8~1.0 mg/L) showing comparable amounts of NH4+ oxidation. In the incubations with DO < 0.02 mg/L, the proportion of Acidimicrobiaceae bacteria increased and

  9. Characterization and aerobic biodegradation of selected monoterpenes

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, G.; Pavlostathis, S.G.; Li, J.; Purdue, E.M.

    1996-12-31

    Monoterpenes are biogenic chemicals and occur in abundance in nature. Large-scale industrial use of these chemicals has recently been initiated in an attempt to replace halogenated solvents and chlorofluorocarbons which have been implicated in the stratospheric depletion of ozone. This study examined four hydrocarbon monoterpenes (d-limonene, {alpha}-pinene, {gamma}-terpinene, and terpinolene) and four alcohols (arbanol, linalool, plinol, and {alpha}-terpineol). Water solubility, vapor pressure, and octanol/water partition coefficients were estimated. Aerobic biodegradability tests were conducted in batch reactors by utilizing forest soil extract and enriched cultures as inoculum. The hydrophobic nature and high volatility of the hydrocarbons restricted the investigation to relatively low aqueous concentrations. Each monoterpene was analyzed with a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector after extraction from the aqueous phase with isooctane. Terpene mineralization was tested by monitoring liquid-phase carbon, CO{sub 2} production and biomass growth. All four hydrocarbons and two alcohols readily degraded under aerobic conditions. Plinol resisted degradation in assays using inocula from diverse sources, while arbanol degraded very slowly. The intrinsic biokinetics coefficients for the degradation of d-limonene and {alpha}-terpineol were estimated by using cultures enriched with the respective monoterpenes. Monoterpene biodegradation followed Monod kinetics.

  10. The fate of a nitrobenzene-degrading bacterium in pharmaceutical wastewater treatment sludge.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yuan; Yang, Juan; Chen, Shaoyi

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the fate of a nitrobenzene-degrading bacterium, Klebsiella oxytoca NBA-1, which was isolated from a pharmaceutical wastewater treatment facility. The 90-day survivability of strain NBA-1 after exposure to sludge under anaerobic and aerobic conditions was investigated. The bacterium was inoculated into sludge amended with glucose and p-chloronitrobenzene (p-CNB) to compare the bacterial community variations between the modified sludge and nitrobenzene amendment. The results showed that glucose had no obvious effect on nitrobenzene biodegradation in the co-metabolism process, regardless of the presence/absence of oxygen. When p-CNB was added under anaerobic conditions, the biodegradation rate of nitrobenzene remained unchanged although p-CNB inhibited the production of aniline. The diversity of the microbial community increased and NBA-1 continued to be one of the dominant strains. Under aerobic conditions, the degradation rate of both nitrobenzene and p-CNB was only 20% of that under anaerobic conditions. p-CNB had a toxic effect on the microorganisms in the sludge so that most of the DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) bands, including that of NBA-1, began to disappear under aerobic conditions after 90days of exposure. These data show that the bacterial community was stable under anaerobic conditions and the microorganisms, including NBA-1, were more resistant to the adverse environment.

  11. Biology of Moderately Halophilic Aerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ventosa, Antonio; Nieto, Joaquín J.; Oren, Aharon

    1998-01-01

    The moderately halophilic heterotrophic aerobic bacteria form a diverse group of microorganisms. The property of halophilism is widespread within the bacterial domain. Bacterial halophiles are abundant in environments such as salt lakes, saline soils, and salted food products. Most species keep their intracellular ionic concentrations at low levels while synthesizing or accumulating organic solutes to provide osmotic equilibrium of the cytoplasm with the surrounding medium. Complex mechanisms of adjustment of the intracellular environments and the properties of the cytoplasmic membrane enable rapid adaptation to changes in the salt concentration of the environment. Approaches to the study of genetic processes have recently been developed for several moderate halophiles, opening the way toward an understanding of haloadaptation at the molecular level. The new information obtained is also expected to contribute to the development of novel biotechnological uses for these organisms. PMID:9618450

  12. Aerobic Microbial Degradation of Glucoisosaccharinic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Strand, S. E.; Dykes, J.; Chiang, V.

    1984-01-01

    α-Glucoisosaccharinic acid (GISA), a major by-product of kraft paper manufacture, was synthesized from lactose and used as the carbon source for microbial media. Ten strains of aerobic bacteria capable of growth on GISA were isolated from kraft pulp mill environments. The highest growth yields were obtained with Ancylobacter spp. at pH 7.2 to 9.5. GISA was completely degraded by cultures of an Ancylobacter isolate. Ancylobacter cell suspensions consumed oxygen and produced carbon dioxide in response to GISA addition. A total of 22 laboratory strains of bacteria were tested, and none was capable of growth on GISA. GISA-degrading isolates were not found in forest soils. Images PMID:16346467

  13. Degradation of TCE using sequential anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapatwala, Kirit D.; Babu, G. R. V.; Baresi, Larry; Trunzo, Richard M.

    1995-01-01

    Bacteria capable of degrading trichloroethylene (TCE) were isolated from contaminated wastewaters and soil sites. The aerobic cultures were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (four species) and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The optimal conditions for the growth of aerobic cultures were determined. The minimal inhibitory concentration values of TCE for Pseudomonas sps. were also determined. The aerobic cells were immobilized in calcium alginate in the form of beads. Degradation of TCE by the anaerobic and dichloroethylene (DCE) by aerobic cultures was studied using dual reactors - anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor. The minimal mineral salt (MMS) medium saturated with TCE was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the anaerobic reactor. The MMS medium saturated with DCE and supplemented with xylenes and toluene (3 ppm each) was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the fluidized air-uplift-type reactor containing the immobilized aerobic cells. The concentrations of TCE and DCE and the metabolites formed during their degradation by the anaerobic and aerobic cultures were monitored by GC. The preliminary study suggests that the anaerobic and aerobic cultures of our isolates can degrade TCE and DCE.

  14. Identification of opsA, a gene involved in solute stress mitigation and survival in soil, in the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium Novosphingobium sp. strain LH128.

    PubMed

    Fida, Tekle Tafese; Breugelmans, Philip; Lavigne, Rob; van der Meer, Jan Roelof; De Mot, René; Vaysse, Pierre-Joseph; Springael, Dirk

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify genes involved in solute and matric stress mitigation in the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading Novosphingobium sp. strain LH128. The genes were identified using plasposon mutagenesis and by selection of mutants that showed impaired growth in a medium containing 450 mM NaCl as a solute stress or 10% (wt/vol) polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000 as a matric stress. Eleven and 14 mutants showed growth impairment when exposed to solute and matric stresses, respectively. The disrupted sequences were mapped on a draft genome sequence of strain LH128, and the corresponding gene functions were predicted. None of them were shared between solute and matric stress-impacted mutants. One NaCl-affected mutant (i.e., NA7E1) with a disruption in a gene encoding a putative outer membrane protein (OpsA) was susceptible to lower NaCl concentrations than the other mutants. The growth of NA7E1 was impacted by other ions and nonionic solutes and by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), suggesting that opsA is involved in osmotic stress mitigation and/or outer membrane stability in strain LH128. NA7E1 was also the only mutant that showed reduced growth and less-efficient phenanthrene degradation in soil compared to the wild type. Moreover, the survival of NA7E1 in soil decreased significantly when the moisture content was decreased but was unaffected when soluble solutes from sandy soil were removed by washing. opsA appears to be important for the survival of strain LH128 in soil, especially in the case of reduced moisture content, probably by mitigating the effects of solute stress and retaining membrane stability.

  15. Complete genome sequence of Pandoraea thiooxydans DSM 25325(T), a thiosulfate-oxidizing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Yong, Delicia; Ee, Robson; Lim, Yan-Lue; Yu, Choo-Yee; Ang, Geik-Yong; How, Kah-Yan; Tee, Kok-Keng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2016-01-10

    Pandoraea thiooxydans DSM 25325(T) is a thiosulfate-oxidizing bacterium isolated from rhizosphere soils of a sesame plant. Here, we present the first complete genome of P. thiooxydans DSM 25325(T). Several genes involved in thiosulfate oxidation and biodegradation of aromatic compounds were identified.

  16. Complete genome sequence of oxalate-degrading bacterium Pandoraea vervacti DSM 23571(T).

    PubMed

    Ee, Robson; Yong, Delicia; Lim, Yan Lue; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2015-06-20

    Pandoraea vervacti DSM 23571(T) is an oxalate metabolizing bacterium isolated from an uncultivated field soil in Mugla, Turkey. Here, we present the first complete genome sequence of P. vervacti DSM 23571(T). A complete pathway for degradation of oxalate was revealed from the genome analysis. These data are important to path new opportunities for genetic engineering in the field of biotechnology.

  17. Bacterium induces cryptic meroterpenoid pathway in the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    König, Claudia C; Scherlach, Kirstin; Schroeckh, Volker; Horn, Fabian; Nietzsche, Sandor; Brakhage, Axel A; Hertweck, Christian

    2013-05-27

    Stimulating encounter: The intimate, physical interaction between the soil-derived bacterium Streptomyces rapamycinicus and the human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus led to the activation of an otherwise silent polyketide synthase (PKS) gene cluster coding for an unusual prenylated polyphenol (fumicycline A). The meroterpenoid pathway is regulated by a pathway-specific activator gene as well as by epigenetic factors.

  18. Die aerobe Glykolyse der Tumorzelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Friedhelm

    1981-01-01

    A high aerobic glycolysis (aerobic lactate production) is the most significant feature of the energy metabolism of rapidly growing tumor cells. Several mechanisms, which may be different in different cell lines, seem to be involved in this characteristic of energy metabolism of the tumor cell. Changes in the cell membrane leading to increased uptake and utilization of glucose, a high level of fetal types of isoenzymes, a decreased number of mitochondria and a reduced capacity to metabolize pyruvate are some factors which must be taken into consideration. It is not possible to favour one of them at the present time.

  19. "Bacillus hackensackii" sp. nov., a novel carbon dioxide sensitive bacterium isolated from blood culture.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tao; Heibler, Nueda; Tang, Y i-Wei

    2003-02-01

    An endospore-forming, gram-positive bacillus was isolated from a patient's blood culture. This bacillus did not grow in the presence of 5% carbon dioxide although it grew well in ambient air at 37 degrees C. Although the organism thus is an aerobic bacterium, its sensitivity to increased carbon dioxide concentration places it in a distinct category of gaseous atmospheric requirement: capnophobic. Based on its morphology, growth characteristics, biochemical reactions and a complete 16S rRNA gene nucleotide sequence analysis, this microorganism represents a novel Bacillus species. The clinical significance of this isolate is unknown. It is proposed that the bacterium be classified in the genus Bacillus as "Bacillus hackensackii".

  20. The medically important aerobic actinomycetes: epidemiology and microbiology.

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, M M; Brown, J M

    1994-01-01

    The aerobic actinomycetes are soil-inhabiting microorganisms that occur worldwide. In 1888, Nocard first recognized the pathogenic potential of this group of microorganisms. Since then, several aerobic actinomycetes have been a major source of interest for the commercial drug industry and have proved to be extremely useful microorganisms for producing novel antimicrobial agents. They have also been well known as potential veterinary pathogens affecting many different animal species. The medically important aerobic actinomycetes may cause significant morbidity and mortality, in particular in highly susceptible severely immunocompromised patients, including transplant recipients and patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. However, the diagnosis of these infections may be difficult, and effective antimicrobial therapy may be complicated by antimicrobial resistance. The taxonomy of these microorganisms has been problematic. In recent revisions of their classification, new pathogenic species have been recognized. The development of additional and more reliable diagnostic tests and of a standardized method for antimicrobial susceptibility testing and the application of molecular techniques for the diagnosis and subtyping of these microorganisms are needed to better diagnose and treat infected patients and to identify effective control measures for these unusual pathogens. We review the epidemiology and microbiology of the major medically important aerobic actinomycetes. Images PMID:7923055

  1. Study on EDTA-degrading bacterium Burkholderia cepacia YL-6 for bioaugmentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Chin; Chen, Szu-Lin; Fang, Hung-Yuan

    2005-11-01

    Bioaugmentation production of EDTA-degrading bacterium Burkholderia cepacia YL-6 was carried out in an aerobic fermentor. Three different carbon sources (ferric-ethylenediaminetetraacetate (Fe-EDTA), potassium acetate, and ethylamine) were used. The bacterium cultivated with Fe-EDTA and maintained in the growth phase could reach the maximum cell concentration on the 38th day. Whereas, the bacterium cultivated with potassium acetate and ethylamine reach the maximum cell concentration at the 76th and 100th hour. The viable-cell counts of the augmentation agents made by feeding Fe-EDTA, potassium acetate, and ethylamine were 8.2x10(10), 6.8x10(11), and 4.3x10(11) CFU/g agent, respectively. The EDTA-degradation time required for the afore-mentioned bioaugmentation agents made by feeding various carbon sources lay in the following order: ethylaminebacterium B. cepacia YL-6.

  2. The Transition from Aerobic to Anaerobic Metabolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, James S.; McLellan, Thomas H.

    1980-01-01

    The transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism is discussed. More research is needed on different kinds of athletes and athletic activities and how they may affect aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms. (CJ)

  3. Exoelectrogenic bacterium phylogenetically related to Citrobacter freundii, isolated from anodic biofilm of a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianjian; Zhu, Nengwu; Cao, Yanlan; Peng, Yue; Wu, Pingxiao; Dong, Wenhao

    2015-02-01

    An electrogenic bacterium, named Citrobacter freundii Z7, was isolated from the anodic biofilm of microbial fuel cell (MFC) inoculated with aerobic sewage sludge. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) analysis exhibited that the strain Z7 had relatively high electrochemical activity. When the strain Z7 was inoculated into MFC, the maximum power density can reach 204.5 mW/m(2) using citrate as electron donor. Series of substrates including glucose, glycerol, lactose, sucrose, and rhammose could be utilized to generate power. CV tests and the addition of anode solution as well as AQDS experiments indicated that the strain Z7 might transfer electrons indirectly via secreted mediators.

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of the Filamentous Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Barry, Kerrie; Chertkov, Olga; Dalin, Eileen; Han, Cliff; Hauser, Loren John; Honchak, Barbara M; Karbach, Lauren E; Land, Miriam L; Lapidus, Alla L.; Larimer, Frank W; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pitluck, Sam; Pierson, Beverly K

    2011-01-01

    Chloroflexus aurantiacus is a thermophilic filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic (FAP) bacterium, and can grow phototrophically under anaerobic conditions or chemotrophically under aerobic and dark conditions. According to 16S rRNA analysis, Chloroflexi species are the earliest branching bacteria capable of photosynthesis, and Cfl. aurantiacus has been long regarded as a key organism to resolve the obscurity of the origin and early evolution of photosynthesis. Cfl. aurantiacus contains a chimeric photosystem that comprises some characters of green sulfur bacteria and purple photosynthetic bacteria, and also has some unique electron transport proteins compared to other photosynthetic bacteria.

  5. Bacterial oxidation of methyl bromide in fumigated agricultural soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, L.G.; Connell, T.L.; Guidetti, J.R.; Oremland, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidation of [14C]methyl bromide ([14C]MeBr) to 14CO2 was measured in field experiments with soils collected from two strawberry plots fumigated with mixtures of MeBr and chloropicrin (CCI3NO2). Although these fumigants are considered potent biocides, we found that the highest rates of MeBr oxidation occurred 1 to 2 days after injection when the fields were tarped, rather than before or several days after injection. No oxidation of MeBr occurred in heat-killed soils, indicating that microbes were the causative agents of the oxidation. Degradation of MeBr by chemical and/or biological processes accounted for 20 to 50% of the loss of MeBr during fumigation, with evasion to the atmosphere inferred to comprise the remainder. In laboratory incubations, complete removal of [14C]MeBr occurred within a few days, with 47 to 67% of the added MeBr oxidized to 14CO2 and the remainder of counts associated with the solid phase. Chloropicrin inhibited the oxidation of MeBr, implying that use of this substance constrains the extent of microbial degradation of MeBr during fumigation. Oxidation was by direct bacterial attack of MeBr and not of methanol, a product of the chemical hydrolysis of MeBr. Neither nitrifying nor methane-oxidizing bacteria were sufficiently active in these soils to account for the observed oxidation of MeBr, nor could the microbial degradation of MeBr be linked to cooxidation with exogenously supplied electron donors. However, repeated addition of MeBr to live soils resulted in higher rates of its removal, suggesting that soil bacteria used MeBr as an electron donor for growth. To support this interpretation, we isolated a gram-negative, aerobic bacterium from these soils which grew with MeBr as a sole source of carbon and energy.

  6. A "MICROTUBULE" IN A BACTERIUM

    PubMed Central

    van Iterson, Woutera; Hoeniger, Judith F. M.; van Zanten, Eva Nijman

    1967-01-01

    A study of the anchorage of the flagella in swarmers of Proteus mirabilis led to the incidental observation of microtubules. These microtubules were found in thin sections and in whole mount preparations of cells from which most of the content had been released by osmotic shock before staining negatively with potassium phosphotungstate (PTA). The microtubules are in negatively stained preparations about 200 A wide, i.e. somewhat thicker than the flagella (approximately 130 A). They are thus somewhat thinner than most microtubules recorded for other cells. They are referred to as microtubules because of their smooth cylindrical wall, or cortex, surrounding a hollow core which is readily filled with PTA when stained negatively. Since this is probably the first time that such a structure is described inside a bacterium, we do not know for certain whether it represents a normal cell constituent or an abnormality, for instance of the type of "polysheaths" (16). PMID:10976198

  7. Arthritis and Aerobic Exercise: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ike, Robert W.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Arthritic patients who regularly do aerobic exercise make significant gains in aerobic and functional status, and in subjective areas like pain tolerance and mood. Still, they are often advised to curtail physical activity. Guidelines are presented for physicians prescribing aerobic exercise. An exercise tolerance test is recommended. (SM)

  8. Mathematic Modeling for Optimum Conditions on Aflatoxin B1 Degradation by the Aerobic Bacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Qing; Zhai, Cuiping; Guan, Bin; Li, Chunjuan; Shan, Shihua; Yu, Jiujiang

    2012-01-01

    Response surface methodology was employed to optimize the degradation conditions of AFB1 by Rhodococcus erythropolis in liquid culture. The most important factors that influence the degradation, as identified by a two-level Plackett-Burman design with six variables, were temperature, pH, liquid volume, inoculum size, agitation speed and incubation time. Central composite design (CCD) and response surface analysis were used to further investigate the interactions between these variables and to optimize the degradation efficiency of R. erythropolis based on a second-order model. The results demonstrated that the optimal parameters were: temperature, 23.2 °C; pH, 7.17; liquid volume, 24.6 mL in 100-mL flask; inoculum size, 10%; agitation speed, 180 rpm; and incubation time, 81.9 h. Under these conditions, the degradation efficiency of R. erythropolis could reach 95.8% in liquid culture, which was increased by about three times as compared to non-optimized conditions. The result by mathematic modeling has great potential for aflatoxin removal in industrial fermentation such as in food processing and ethanol production. PMID:23202311

  9. The Rate of Permafrost Carbon Release Under Aerobic and Anaerobic Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Vogel, J. G.; Schuur, E. A.; Inglett, K. S.

    2008-12-01

    One of the ecological consequences caused by increased temperature in northern ecosystems is permafrost thawing. When ice-rich permafrost thaws, the land surface may develop lakes but could also drain, depending on the soil ice content and topographic position. More than 50% of terrestrial soil carbon is stored in the permafrost region, which may be subjected to faster decomposition due to permafrost thaw. As a result of thaw effects on hydrology, soil organic matter from permafrost may be deposited in an oxic or an anoxic environment after permafrost thaw. We tested how the oxygen status and soil substrate quality affect CO2 and CH4 emissions from permafrost soil by conducting laboratory soil incubation experiment. We measured CO2 emissions from aerobic incubations, and CO2 and CH4 from anaerobic incubations. Soil C to N ratios and enzyme activities (glucosidase, phosphatase, and aminopeptidase) were also analyzed to compare the organic matter quality of permafrost soils from different sites. The mass of C lost after 108 days of aerobic soil incubation ranged 0.06-7.98 mg C gdw-1 for mineral soil layers and 2.21-18.56 mg C gdw-1 for organic soil layers. In the anaerobic incubations, C loss in the form of CO2 emissions was 0.04-4.87 mg C gdw-1 while CH4 emissions were 0.00-0.23 mg C gdw- 1. The total C loss was about 3 times lower for the anaerobic soil incubations compared to the aerobic incubations. The carbon loss from CO2 emissions in aerobic incubation showed a linear relationship with C:N (R2=0.58). Overall, rates of C loss were 4-57 times higher in organic soils than mineral soils, which indicated the importance of substrate quality in the decomposition of permafrost carbon. The initial soil enzyme activities were higher in organic soils as compared to mineral soils for all the enzymes tested. Aminopeptidase activity was linearly correlated with C to N ratio (R2=0.78) and both phosphatase and glucosidase were exponentially correlated with %C (R2

  10. Effects of permafrost thaw on carbon emissions under aerobic and anaerobic environments in the Great Hing'an Mountains, China.

    PubMed

    Song, Changchun; Wang, Xianwei; Miao, Yuqing; Wang, Jiaoyue; Mao, Rong; Song, Yanyu

    2014-07-15

    The carbon (C) pool of permafrost peatland is very important for the global C cycle. Little is known about how permafrost thaw could influence C emissions in the Great Hing'an Mountains of China. Through aerobic and anaerobic incubation experiments, we studied the effects of permafrost thaw on CH4 and CO2 emissions. The rates of CH4 and CO2 emissions were measured at -10, 0 and 10°C. Although there were still C emissions below 0°C, rates of CH4 and CO2 emissions significantly increased with permafrost thaw under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The C release under aerobic conditions was greater than under anaerobic conditions, suggesting that permafrost thaw and resulting soil environment change should be important influences on C emissions. However, CH4 stored in permafrost soils could affect accurate estimation of CH4 emissions from microbial degradation. Calculated Q10 values in the permafrost soils were significantly higher than values in active-layer soils under aerobic conditions. Our results highlight that permafrost soils have greater potential decomposability than soils of the active layer, and such carbon decomposition would be more responsive to the aerobic environment.

  11. Longimicrobium terrae gen. nov., sp. nov., an oligotrophic bacterium of the under-represented phylum Gemmatimonadetes isolated through a system of miniaturized diffusion chambers.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Javier; García-López, Marina; Bills, Gerald F; Genilloud, Olga

    2016-05-01

    A novel chemo-organoheterotroph bacterium, strain CB-286315T, was isolated from a Mediterranean forest soil sampled at the Sierra de Tejeda, Almijara and Alhama Natural Park, Spain, by using the diffusion sandwich system, a device with 384 miniature diffusion chambers. 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses identified the isolate as a member of the under-represented phylum Gemmatimonadetes, where 'Gemmatirosa kalamazoonensis' KBS708, Gemmatimonas aurantiaca T-27T and Gemmatimonas phototrophica AP64T were the closest relatives, with respective similarities of 84.4, 83.6 and 83.3 %. Strain CB-286315T was characterized as a Gram-negative, non-motile, short to long rod-shaped bacterium. Occasionally, some cells attained an unusual length, up to 35-40 μm. The strain showed positive responses for catalase and cytochrome-c oxidase and division by binary fission, and exhibited an aerobic metabolism, showing optimal growth under normal atmospheric conditions. Strain CB-286315T was also able to grow under micro-oxic atmospheres, but not under anoxic conditions. The strain is a slowly growing bacterium able to grow under low nutrient concentrations. Major fatty acids included iso-C17 : 1ω9c, summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or iso-C15 : 0 2-OH), C16 : 0 and iso-C17 : 0. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, two unidentified glycolipids and three phospholipids. The major isoprenoid quinone was MK-8 and the diagnostic diamino acid was meso-diaminopimelic acid. The DNA G+C content was 67.0 mol%. Based on a polyphasic taxonomic characterization, strain CB-286315T represents a novel genus and species, Longimicrobium terrae gen. nov., sp. nov., within the phylum Gemmatimonadetes. The type strain of Longimicrobium terrae is strain CB-286315T ( = DSM 29007T = CECT 8660T). In order to classify the novel taxon within the existing taxonomic framework, the family Longimicrobiaceae fam. nov., order

  12. A common soil flagellate (Cercomonas sp.) grows slowly when feeding on the bacterium Rhodococcus fascians in isolation, but does not discriminate against it in a mixed culture with Sphingopyxis witflariensis.

    PubMed

    Lekfeldt, Jonas Duus Stevens; Rønn, Regin

    2008-07-01

    Flagellates are very important predators on bacteria in soil. Because of their high growth rates, flagellate populations respond rapidly to changes in bacterial numbers. Previous results indicate that actinobacteria are generally less suitable than proteobacteria as food for flagellates. In this study, we investigated the growth of the flagellate Cercomonas sp. (ATCC 50334) on each of the two bacteria Sphingopyxis witflariensis (Alphaproteobacteria) and Rhodococcus fascians (actinobacteria) separately and in combination. The growth rate of the flagellate was lower and the lag phase was longer when fed with R. fascians than when fed with S. witflariensis. This supports our initial hypothesis that the actinobacterium is less suitable as food than the alphaproteobacterium. However, after longer periods of growth the peak abundance of flagellates was higher on R. fascians, indicating that the food quality of bacterial prey depends on the time perspective of the flagellate-bacterial interaction. There was no evidence that the flagellates selected against the actinobacterium when feeding in mixed cultures of the two bacteria. Experiments where flagellates were fed with washed bacterial cells or with bacteria growing with different substrate concentrations suggested that the low food quality of R. fascians is related both to the intrinsic cell properties and to the extracellular metabolites.

  13. Decolorizing and detoxifying textile wastewater, containing both soluble and insoluble dyes, in a full scale combined anaerobic/aerobic system.

    PubMed

    Frijters, C T M J; Vos, R H; Scheffer, G; Mulder, R

    2006-03-01

    The wastewater originating from the bleaching and dyeing processes in the textile factory Ten Cate Protect in Nijverdal (the Netherlands) was successfully treated in a sequential anaerobic/aerobic system. In the system, a combination of an anaerobic 70-m3 fluidized bed reactor and a 450-m3 aerobic basin with integrated tilted plate settlers, 80-95% of the color was removed. The color was largely removed in the preacidification basin and the anaerobic reactor. Color, deriving from both reactive as well as disperse, was anaerobically removed, indicating that these type of dyes were reduced to colorless products. Interestingly, the vat dyes, the anthraquinones and indigoids, which were thought to be removed mainly aerobically, were largely anaerobically decolorized. Apparently the anaerobic system is capable of effectively removing the color of both soluble as insoluble dyes. The treated effluent of the sequential anaerobic/aerobic treatment showed no toxicity towards the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fisheri (EC20 (95%) > 45%). Partially bypassing the anaerobic stage resulted in increased toxicity (EC20 (95%) of 9% and 14%) in the effluent of the aerobic treatment and caused significant decrease of color removal. The results of this study show a main contribution of anaerobic treatment in decolorizing and detoxifying the textile wastewater in the sequential anaerobic/aerobic system.

  14. Friedmanniella flava sp. nov., a soil actinomycete.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuefang; Zhang, Jianli; Zhang, Yabo; Xin, Yuhua; He, Hongju

    2013-05-01

    A novel actinomycete, strain W6(T), was isolated from a soil sample of Yunnan Province, China. The bacterium was aerobic, non-motile, non-spore-forming and Gram-stain-positive. Genetic, phenotypic and chemical properties of the isolate were studied. 16S rRNA gene sequence data suggested that the novel isolate belonged to the genus Friedmanniella and shared 98.6% sequence similarity with Friedmanniella antarctica DSM 11053(T) and Friedmanniella okinawensis DSM 21744(T), the most closely related species. The cell-wall peptidoglycan contained ll-diaminopimelic acid, and mycolic acids were absent. The main menaquinone was MK-9(H4) and the predominant fatty acids were anteiso-C15:0 and iso-C15:0. The phospholipid profile contained phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylcholine and diphosphatidylglycerol. The DNA G+C content of strain W6(T) was 72 mol%. Strain W6(T) showed 30.0% and 28.5% DNA-DNA relatedness, respectively, to F. antarctica DSM 11053(T) and F. okinawensis DSM 21744(T). The combined genotypic and phenotypic data showed that strain W6(T) should be assigned to the genus Friedmanniella as a representative of a novel species, for which the name Friedmanniella flava sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is W6(T) ( = CGMCC 4.6856(T) =JCM 17701(T)).

  15. Calcium precipitate induced aerobic granulation.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chunli; Lee, Duu-Jong; Yang, Xue; Wang, Yayi; Wang, Xingzu; Liu, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic granulation is a novel biotechnology for wastewater treatment. This study refined existing aerobic granulation mechanisms as a sequencing process including formation of calcium precipitate under alkaline pH to form inorganic cores, followed by bacterial attachment and growth on these cores to form the exopolysaccharide matrix. Mature granules comprised an inner core and a matrix layer and a rim layer with enriched microbial strains. The inorganic core was a mix of different crystals of calcium and phosphates. Functional strains including Sphingomonas sp., Paracoccus sp. Sinorhizobium americanum strain and Flavobacterium sp. attached onto the cores. These functional strains promote c-di-GMP production and the expression by Psl and Alg genes for exopolysaccharide production to enhance formation of mature granules.

  16. Aerobic microbial enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Torsvik, T.; Gilje, E.; Sunde, E.

    1995-12-31

    In aerobic MEOR, the ability of oil-degrading bacteria to mobilize oil is used to increase oil recovery. In this process, oxygen and mineral nutrients are injected into the oil reservoir in order to stimulate growth of aerobic oil-degrading bacteria in the reservoir. Experiments carried out in a model sandstone with stock tank oil and bacteria isolated from offshore wells showed that residual oil saturation was lowered from 27% to 3%. The process was time dependent, not pore volume dependent. During MEOR flooding, the relative permeability of water was lowered. Oxygen and active bacteria were needed for the process to take place. Maximum efficiency was reached at low oxygen concentrations, approximately 1 mg O{sub 2}/liter.

  17. WWOX loss activates aerobic glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Abu-Remaileh, Muhannad; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells undergo reprogramming of glucose metabolism to limit energy production to glycolysis-a state known as "aerobic glycolysis." Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1α) is a transcription factor that regulates many genes responsible for this switch. As discussed here, new data suggest that the tumor suppressor WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) modulates HIF1α, thereby regulating this metabolic state.

  18. WWOX loss activates aerobic glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Remaileh, Muhannad; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells undergo reprogramming of glucose metabolism to limit energy production to glycolysis—a state known as “aerobic glycolysis.” Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1α) is a transcription factor that regulates many genes responsible for this switch. As discussed here, new data suggest that the tumor suppressor WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) modulates HIF1α, thereby regulating this metabolic state. PMID:27308416

  19. Aerobic Metabolism of Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Mickelson, M. N.

    1967-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae cultures possess an aerobic pathway for glucose oxidation that is strongly inhibited by cyanide. The products of glucose oxidation by aerobically grown cells of S. agalactiae 50 are lactic and acetic acids, acetylmethylcarbinol, and carbon dioxide. Glucose degradation products by aerobically grown cells, as percentage of glucose carbon, were 52 to 61% lactic acid, 20 to 23% acetic acid, 5.5 to 6.5% acetylmethylcarbinol, and 14 to 16% carbon dioxide. There was no evidence for a pentose cycle or a tricarboxylic acid cycle. Crude cell-free extracts of S. agalactiae 50 possessed a strong reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH2) oxidase that is also cyanide-sensitive. Dialysis or ultrafiltration of the crude, cell-free extract resulted in loss of NADH2 oxidase activity. Oxidase activity was restored to the inactive extract by addition of the ultrafiltrate or by addition of menadione or K3Fe(CN)6. Noncytochrome iron-containing pigments were present in cell-free extracts of S. agalactiae. The possible participation of these pigments in the respiration of S. agalactiae is presently being studied. PMID:4291090

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Mun Su; Moritz, Brélan E.; Xie, Gary; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, E.; Tice, H.; Bruce, D.; Goodwin, L.; Chertkov, O.; Brettin, T.; Han, C.; Detter, C.; Pitluck, S.; Land, Miriam L.; Patel, Milind; Ou, Mark; Harbrucker, Roberta; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, K. T.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 and ferments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemicellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome sequence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed. PMID:22675583

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Gary; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Chertkov, Olga; Land, Miriam L

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer-ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi-cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome squence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, Mun Su; Moritz, Brelan E.; Xie, Gary; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Thomas S; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Pitluck, Sam; Land, Miriam L; Patel, Milind; Ou, Mark; Harbrucker, Roberta; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, Keelnathan T.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer- ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this spo- rogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attrac- tive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi- cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome se- quence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Mun Su; Moritz, Brélan E; Xie, Gary; Glavina Del Rio, T; Dalin, E; Tice, H; Bruce, D; Goodwin, L; Chertkov, O; Brettin, T; Han, C; Detter, C; Pitluck, S; Land, Miriam L; Patel, Milind; Ou, Mark; Harbrucker, Roberta; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2011-12-31

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 and ferments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemicellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome sequence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  4. Lysinibacillus alkaliphilus sp. nov., an extremely alkaliphilic bacterium, and emended description of genus Lysinibacillus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fei; Feng, Youzhi; Chen, Ruirui; Zhang, Jianwei; Lin, Xiangui

    2015-08-01

    A novel aerobic, alkaliphilic, Gram-staining-positive, endospore-forming bacterium, strain OMN17T, was isolated from a typical sandy loam soil under long-term OMN fertilization (half organic manure N plus half mineral N fertilizer) in northern China and was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. The best growth was achieved at 30 °C and pH 8-10 in medium containing 0.5% (w/v) NaCl. The cell-wall peptidoglycan of strain OMN17T was type A4α; (l-Lys-Gly-d-Asp) and the cell-wall sugars were ribose, traces of galactose and arabinose. The only respiratory quinone found in strain OMN17T was menaquinone 7 (MK-7). The major cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0 and anteiso-C15 : 0. The major polar lipids were found to be phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol. Phylogenetic analysis of strain OMN17T based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that the strain was most closely related to Lysinibacillus halotolerans (97.8%), Lysinibacillus sinduriensis (97.5%), Lysinibacillus chungkukjangi (97.4%) and Lysinibacillus xylanilyticus (97.0%). The DNA-DNA hybridization results indicated that this strain was distinct from other species of the genus Lysinibacillus, the degree of relatedness being 21.8 ± 0.2% with L. halotolerans, 45.6 ± 1.8% with L. sinduriensis, 33.7 ± 1.2% with L. chungkukjangi and 23.7 ± 0.7% with L. xylanilyticus. The DNA G+C content of strain OMN17T was 38.1 mol%. The phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genetic analyses identified strain OMN17T as a novel species of the genus Lysinibacillus, for which the name Lysinibacillus alkaliphilus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is OMN17T ( = DSM 28019T = CCTCC AB 2014073T). An emended description of the genus Lysinibacillus is also provided.

  5. A survey of culturable aerobic and anaerobic marine bacteria in de novo biofilm formation on natural substrates in St. Andrews Bay, Scotland.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, Lucy; Garcia-Melgares, Manuel; Gmerek, Tomasz; Huddleston, W Ryan; Palmer, Alexander; Robertson, Andrew; Shapiro, Sarah; Unkles, Shiela E

    2011-10-01

    This study reports a novel study of marine biofilm formation comprising aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Samples of quartz and feldspar, minerals commonly found on the earth, were suspended 5 m deep in the North Sea off the east coast of St. Andrews, Scotland for 5 weeks. The assemblage of organisms attached to these stones was cultivated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the laboratory. Bacteria isolated on Marine Agar 2216 were all Gram-negative and identified to genus level by sequencing the gene encoding 16S rRNA. Colwellia, Maribacter, Pseudoaltermonas and Shewanella were observed in aerobically-grown cultures while Vibrio was found to be present in both aerobic and anaerobic cultures. The obligate anaerobic bacterium Psychrilyobacter atlanticus, a recently defined genus, was identified as a close relative of isolates grown anaerobically. The results provide valuable information as to the main players that attach and form de novo biofilms on common minerals in sea water.

  6. Microbial community analysis of an aerobic nitrifying-denitrifying MBR treating ABS resin wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Tanong, Kulchaya; Xu, Jia; Shon, Hokyong

    2011-05-01

    A two-stage aerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR) system for treating acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) resin wastewater was carried out in this study to evaluate the system performance on nitrification. The results showed that nitrification of the aerobic MBR system was significant and the highest TKN removal of approximately 90% was obtained at hydraulic retention time (HRT) 18 h. In addition, the result of nitrogen mass balance revealed that the percentage of TN removal due to denitrification was in the range of 8.7-19.8%. Microbial community analysis based on 16s rDNA molecular approach indicated that the dominant ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) group in the system was a β-class ammonia oxidizer which was identified as uncultured sludge bacterium (AF234732). A heterotrophic aerobic denitrifier identified as Thauera mechernichensis was found in the system. The results indicated that a sole aerobic MBR system for simultaneous removals of carbon and nitrogen can be designed and operated for neglect with an anaerobic unit.

  7. A plant growth-promoting bacterium that decreases nickel toxicity in seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Burd, G.I.; Dixon, D.G.; Glick, B.R.

    1998-10-01

    A plant growth-promoting bacterium, Kluyvera ascorbata SUD165, that contained high levels of heavy metals was isolated from soil collected near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. The bacterium was resistant to the toxic effects of Ni{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and CrO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, produced a siderophore(s), and displayed 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase activity. Canola seeds inoculated with this bacterium and then grown under gnotobiotic conditions in the presence of high concentrations of nickel chloride were partially protected against nickel toxicity. In addition, protection by the bacterium against nickel toxicity was evident in pot experiments with canola and tomato seeds. The presence of K. ascorbata SUD165 had no measurable influence on the amount of nickel accumulated per milligram (dry weight) of either roots or shoots of canola plants. Therefore, the bacterial plant growth-promoting effect in the presence of nickel was probably not attributable to the reduction of nickel uptake by seedlings. Rather, it may reflect the ability of the bacterium to lower the level of stress ethylene induced by the nickel.

  8. Soil chromatographic movement of technetium-99 through selected Minnesota soils

    SciTech Connect

    Balogh, J.C.; Grigal, D.F.

    1980-11-01

    We monitored the movement of technetium-99 through 41 samples of Minnesota soils, using soil column layer chromatography (CLC), a modification of soil thin layer chromatography. Under the aerobic conditions of soil CLC, /sup 99/Tc occurs as the pertechnetate anion. Pertechnetate movement in the soils was characterized by the traditional R/sub f/ chromatographic parameter. Reduced R/sub f/ values were statistically related to elevated levels of soil organic matter. Complexation of /sup 99/Tc, related to soil organic matter, was weak. Elution patterns of /sup 99/Tc in the soil CLC columns were asymmetric, with pertechnetate retardation associated with both hydrodynamic dispersion and weak retention. Pertechnetate was less mobile than was Cl/sup -/ in selected soils by soil CLC.

  9. Lower limb loading in step aerobic dance.

    PubMed

    Wu, H-W; Hsieh, H-M; Chang, Y-W; Wang, L-H

    2012-11-01

    Participation in aerobic dance is associated with a number of lower extremity injuries, and abnormal joint loading seems to be a factor in these. However, information on joint loading is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate the kinetics of the lower extremity in step aerobic dance and to compare the differences of high-impact and low-impact step aerobic dance in 4 aerobic movements (mambo, kick, L step and leg curl). 18 subjects were recruited for this study. High-impact aerobic dance requires a significantly greater range of motion, joint force and joint moment than low-impact step aerobic dance. The peak joint forces and moments in high-impact step aerobic dance were found to be 1.4 times higher than in low-impact step aerobic dance. Understanding the nature of joint loading may help choreographers develop dance combinations that are less injury-prone. Furthermore, increased knowledge about joint loading may be helpful in lowering the risk of injuries in aerobic dance instructors and students.

  10. Monitoring operational and leachate characteristics of an aerobic simulated landfill bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Giannis, A; Makripodis, G; Simantiraki, F; Somara, M; Gidarakos, E

    2008-01-01

    Long-term biodegradation of MSW in an aerobic landfill bioreactor was monitored as a function of time during 510 days of operation. Operational characteristics such as air importation, temperature and leachate recirculation were monitored. The oxygen utilization rates and biodegradation of organic matter rates showed that aerobic biodegradation was feasible and appropriate to proceed in aerobic landfill bioreactor. Leachate analyses showed that the aerobic bioreactor could remove above 90% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and close to 100% of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) from leachate. Ammonium (NH4+), nitrate (NO3-) and sulphate (SO4(2-)) concentrations of leachate samples were regularly measured. Results suggest that nitrification and denitrification occurred simultaneously, and the increase in nitrate did not reach the levels predicted stoichiometrically, suggesting that other processes were occurring. Leachate recirculation reduced the concentrations of heavy metals because of the effect of the high pH of the leachate, causing heavy metals to be retained by processes such as sorption on MSW, carbonate precipitation, and hydroxide precipitation. Furthermore, the compost derived from the aerobic biodegradation of the organic matter of MSW may be considered as soil improvement in the agricultural plant production. Bio-essays indicated that the ecotoxicity of leachate from the aerobic bioreactor was not toxic at the end of the experiment. Finally, after 510 days of degradation, waste settlement reached 26% mainly due to the compost of the organic matter.

  11. Integrated Anaerobic-Aerobic Biodegradation of Multiple Contaminants Including Chlorinated Ethylenes, Benzene, Toluene, and Dichloromethane.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Miho; Zhang, Ming; Toyota, Koki

    2017-01-01

    Complete bioremediation of soils containing multiple volatile organic compounds (VOCs) remains a challenge. To explore the possibility of complete bioremediation through integrated anaerobic-aerobic biodegradation, laboratory feasibility tests followed by alternate anaerobic-aerobic and aerobic-anaerobic biodegradation tests were performed. Chlorinated ethylenes, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE), and vinyl chloride (VC), and dichloromethane (DCM) were used for anaerobic biodegradation, whereas benzene, toluene, and DCM were used for aerobic biodegradation tests. Microbial communities involved in the biodegradation tests were analyzed to characterize the major bacteria that may contribute to biodegradation. The results demonstrated that integrated anaerobic-aerobic biodegradation was capable of completely degrading the seven VOCs with initial concentration of each VOC less than 30 mg/L. Benzene and toluene were degraded within 8 days, and DCM was degraded within 20 to 27 days under aerobic conditions when initial oxygen concentrations in the headspaces of test bottles were set to 5.3% and 21.0%. Dehalococcoides sp., generally considered sensitive to oxygen, survived aerobic conditions for 28 days and was activated during the subsequent anaerobic biodegradation. However, degradation of cis-DCE was suppressed after oxygen exposure for more than 201 days, suggesting the loss of viability of Dehalococcoides sp., as they are the only known anaerobic bacteria that can completely biodegrade chlorinated ethylenes to ethylene. Anaerobic degradation of DCM following previous aerobic degradation was complete, and yet-unknown microbes may be involved in the process. The findings may provide a scientific and practical basis for the complete bioremediation of multiple contaminants in situ and a subject for further exploration.

  12. Treatment of phenolics, aromatic hydrocarbons, and cyanide-bearing wastewater in individual and combined anaerobic, aerobic, and anoxic bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Naresh K; Philip, Ligy

    2015-01-01

    Studies were conducted on a mixture of pollutants commonly found in coke oven wastewater (CWW) to evaluate the biodegradation of various pollutants under anaerobic, aerobic, and anoxic conditions. The removal of the pollutants was monitored during individual bioreactor operation and using a combination of bioreactors operating in anaerobic-aerobic-anoxic sequence. While studying the performance of individual reactors, it was observed that cyanide removal (83.3 %) was predominant in the aerobic bioreactor, while much of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) (69 %) was consumed in the anoxic bioreactor. With the addition of cyanide, the COD removal efficiency was affected in all the bioreactors, and several intermediates were detected. While treating synthetic CWW using the combined bioreactor system, the overall COD removal efficiency was 86.79 % at an OLR of 2.4 g COD/L/day and an HRT of 96 h. The removal efficiency of 3,5-xylenol and cyanide, with inlet concentration of 150 and 10 mg/L, was found to be 91.8 and 93.6 % respectively. It was found that the impact of xylenol on the performance of the bioreactors was less than cyanide toxicity. Molecular analysis using T-RFLP revealed the dominance of strictly aerobic, mesophilic proteobacterium, Bosea minatitlanensis, in the aerobic bioreactor. The anoxic bioreactor was dominant with Rhodococcus pyridinivorans, known for its remarkable aromatic decomposing activity, while an unclassified Myxococcales bacterium was identified as the predominant bacterial species in the anaerobic bioreactor.

  13. Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy after Aerobic Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Adam R.; Harber, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Current dogma suggests aerobic exercise training has minimal effect on skeletal muscle size. We and others have demonstrated that aerobic exercise acutely and chronically alters protein metabolism and induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy. These findings promote an antithesis to the status quo by providing novel perspective on skeletal muscle mass regulation and insight into exercise-countermeasures for populations prone to muscle loss. PMID:24508740

  14. Aerobic Fitness for the Moderately Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Dan

    1981-01-01

    Intended for physical education teachers, the booklet offers ideas for incorporating aerobic conditioning into programs for moderately mentally retarded students. An explanation of aerobic fitness and its benefits is followed by information on initiating a fitness program with evaluation of height, weight, body fat, resting heart rate, and…

  15. Aerobic Dancing--A Rhythmic Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Jacki

    Fitness programs now and in the future must offer built-in cardiovascular conditioning, variety, novelty, and change to meet the physical, mental, and emotional needs of our society. Aerobic dancing (dancing designed to train and strengthen the heart, lungs, and vascular system) is one of the first indoor group Aerobic exercise programs designed…

  16. Genome Sequence of the Facultative Anaerobic Arsenite-Oxidizing and Nitrate-Reducing Bacterium Acidovorax sp. Strain NO1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yinyan; Li, Hang; Rensing, Christopher; Zhao, Kai; Johnstone, Laurel

    2012-01-01

    Acidovorax sp. strain NO1, isolated from gold mine soil, was shown to be a facultative anaerobic arsenite-oxidizing and nitrate-reducing bacterium. The reported draft genome predicts the presence of genes involved in arsenic metabolism, nitrate reduction, phosphate transport, and multiple metal resistances and indicates putative horizontal gene transfer events. PMID:22374962

  17. Aerobic salivary bacteria in wild and captive Komodo dragons.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Joel M; Gillespie, Don; Sastrawan, Putra; Fredeking, Terry M; Stewart, George L

    2002-07-01

    During the months of November 1996, August 1997, and March 1998, saliva and plasma samples were collected for isolation of aerobic bacteria from 26 wild and 13 captive Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis). Twenty-eight Gram-negative and 29 Gram-positive species of bacteria were isolated from the saliva of the 39 Komodo dragons. A greater number of wild than captive dragons were positive for both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The average number of bacterial species within the saliva of wild dragons was 46% greater than for captive dragons. While Escherichia coli was the most common bacterium isolated from the saliva of wild dragons, this species was not present in captive dragons. The most common bacteria isolated from the saliva of captive dragons were Staphylococcus capitis and Staphylococcus capitis and Staphylococcus caseolyticus, neither of which were found in wild dragons. High mortality was seen among mice injected with saliva from wild dragons and the only bacterium isolated from the blood of dying mice was Pasteurella multocida. A competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed the presence of anti-Pasteurella antibody in the plasma of Komodo dragons. Four species of bacteria isolated from dragon saliva showed resistance to one or more of 16 antimicrobics tested. The wide variety of bacteria demonstrated in the saliva of the Komodo dragon in this study, at least one species of which was highly lethal in mice and 54 species of which are known pathogens, support the observation that wounds inflicted by this animal are often associated with sepsis and subsequent bacteremia in prey animals.

  18. Isolation and identification of Sphingomonas sp. that yields tert-octylphenol monoethoxylate under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Eriko; Yoshikawa, Hiromichi; Wakayama, Manabu; Tamura, Hiroto; Morita, Shiro; Tomita, Yoshifumi

    2005-07-01

    Topsoil samples were collected from eight golf courses in Yamaguchi Prefecture, Japan, and enrichment cultures were carried out with a basal-salt medium containing 0.2% 4-tert-octylphenol polyethoxylate (OPPEO) as sole carbon source. OPPEO-degrading activity was detected in one of the samples, from which a strain of OPPEO-degrading bacterium was isolated. The isolated bacterium grew on a nutritionally enriched medium (NE medium) containing 0.2% OPPEO as sole carbon source, and accumulated 4-tert-octylphenol diethoxylate (OP2EO) (63%), 4-tert-octylphenol triethoxylate (OP3EO) (14%), and 4-tert-octylphenol monoethoxylate (OP1EO) (2%) after 7 d cultivation under aerobic conditions. The addition of clay mineral (vermiculite) to the medium accelerated the degradation of OP2EO (40%) and OP3EO (4%) to OP1EO (23%). This is the first report about bacteria that can degrade OPPEO to OP1EO under aerobic conditions. The strain was identified as Sphingomonas macrogoltabidus, based on the homology of a 16S rDNA sequence.

  19. Inactivation of Mg chelatase during transition from anaerobic to aerobic growth in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Willows, Robert D; Lake, Vanessa; Roberts, Thomas Hugh; Beale, Samuel I

    2003-06-01

    The facultative photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus can adapt from an anaerobic photosynthetic mode of growth to aerobic heterotrophic metabolism. As this adaptation occurs, the cells must rapidly halt bacteriochlorophyll synthesis to prevent phototoxic tetrapyrroles from accumulating, while still allowing heme synthesis to continue. A likely control point is Mg chelatase, the enzyme that diverts protoporphyrin IX from heme biosynthesis toward the bacteriochlorophyll biosynthetic pathway by inserting Mg(2+) to form Mg-protoporphyrin IX. Mg chelatase is composed of three subunits that are encoded by the bchI, bchD, and bchH genes in R. capsulatus. We report that BchH is the rate-limiting component of Mg chelatase activity in cell extracts. BchH binds protoporphyrin IX, and BchH that has been expressed and purified from Escherichia coli is red in color due to the bound protoporphyrin IX. Recombinant BchH is rapidly inactivated by light in the presence of O(2), and the inactivation results in the formation of a covalent adduct between the protein and the bound protoporphyrin IX. When photosynthetically growing R. capsulatus cells are transferred to aerobic conditions, Mg chelatase is rapidly inactivated, and BchH is the component that is most rapidly inactivated in vivo when cells are exposed to aerobic conditions. The light- and O(2)-stimulated inactivation of BchH could account for the rapid inactivation of Mg chelatase in vivo and provide a mechanism for inhibiting the synthesis of bacteriochlorophyll during adaptation of photosynthetically grown cells to aerobic conditions while still allowing heme synthesis to occur for aerobic respiration.

  20. Description of Anaerobacterium chartisolvens gen. nov., sp. nov., an obligately anaerobic bacterium from Clostridium rRNA cluster III isolated from soil of a Japanese rice field, and reclassification of Bacteroides cellulosolvens Murray et al. 1984 as Pseudobacteroides cellulosolvens gen. nov., comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Horino, Haruka; Fujita, Takashi; Tonouchi, Akio

    2014-04-01

    An obligately anaerobic bacterial strain designated T-1-35(T) was isolated as a dominant cultivable cellulose-degrading bacterium from soil of a Japanese rice field as an anaerobic filter-paper degrader. Cells of strain T-1-35(T) stained Gram-positive and were non-spore-forming rods with rounded ends, 0.8-1.0×3.5-15.0 µm, and motile by means of two to four polar flagella. Cells of strain T-1-35(T) exhibited pleomorphism: in aged cultures (over 90 days of incubation), almost all cells were irregularly shaped. Although no spore formation was observed, cells tolerated high temperatures, up to 90 °C for 10 min. The temperature range for growth was 15-40 °C, with an optimum at 35 °C. The pH range for growth was 5.5-9.0, with an optimum at pH 8.0-8.5 (slightly alkaliphilic). Strain T-1-35(T) fermented some carbohydrates to produce ethanol and lactate as the major products. Major cellular fatty acids were iso-C16 : 0 and iso-C13 : 0 3-OH. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain T-1-35(T) belonged to Clostridium rRNA cluster III. The closest relative of strain T-1-35(T) was Bacteroides cellulosolvens WM2(T), with 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 93.4 %. Phenotypic, physiological and molecular genetic methods demonstrated that strain T-1-35(T) was distinct from its phylogenetic relatives (members of Clostridium rRNA cluster III) because it predominantly produced ethanol, iso-C13 : 0 3-OH was a major cellular fatty acid and it always exhibited pleomorphism. On the basis of the results of a polyphasic taxonomic study, strain T-1-35(T) is considered to represent a novel genus and species, Anaerobacterium chartisolvens gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of Anaerobacterium chartisolvens is T-1-35(T) ( = DSM 27016(T) = NBRC 109520(T)). In addition, from the results of our phylogenetic analysis and its phenotypic features, the species Bacteroides cellulosolvens Murray et al. 1984 is proposed to be reclassified

  1. Aerobic fitness testing: an update.

    PubMed

    Stevens, N; Sykes, K

    1996-12-01

    This study confirms that all three tests are reliable tools for the assessment of cardiorespiratory fitness and the prediction of aerobic capacity. While this particular study consisted of active, youthful subjects, subsequent studies at University College Chester have found similar findings with larger databases and a wider cross-section of subjects. The Astrand cycle test and Chester step test are submaximal tests with error margins of 5-15 per cent and therefore, not as precise as maximal testing. However, they still give a reasonably accurate reflection of an individual's fitness without the cost, time, effort and risk on the part of the subject. The bleep test is a low-cost maximal test designed for well-motivated, active individuals who are used to running to physical exhaustion. Used on other groups, results will not accurately reflect cardiorespiratory fitness values. While all three tests have inherent advantages and disadvantages, perhaps the most important factors are the knowledge and skills of the tester. Without a sound understanding of the physiological principles underlying these tests, and the ability to conduct an accurate assessment and evaluation of results in a knowledgeable and meaningful way, then the credibility of the tests and the results become suspect. However, used correctly, aerobic capacity tests can provide valuable baseline data about the fitness levels of individuals and data from which exercise programmes may be developed. The tests also enable fitness improvements to be monitored, help to motivate participants by establishing reasonable and achievable goals, assist in risk stratification and facilitate participants' education about the importance of physical fitness for work and for life. Since this study was completed, further tests have been repeated on 140 subjects of a wider age and ability range. This large database confirms the results found in this study.

  2. Aerobic glycolysis and lymphocyte transformation

    PubMed Central

    Hume, David A.; Radik, Judith L.; Ferber, Ernst; Weidemann, Maurice J.

    1978-01-01

    1. The role of enhanced aerobic glycolysis in the transformation of rat thymocytes by concanavalin A has been investigated. Concanavalin A addition doubled [U-14C]glucose uptake by rat thymocytes over 3h and caused an equivalent increased incorporation into protein, lipids and RNA. A disproportionately large percentage of the extra glucose taken up was converted into lactate, but concanavalin A also caused a specific increase in pyruvate oxidation, leading to an increase in the percentage contribution of glucose to the respiratory fuel. 2. Acetoacetate metabolism, which was not affected by concanavalin A, strongly suppressed pyruvate oxidation in the presence of [U-14C]glucose, but did not prevent the concanavalin A-induced stimulation of this process. Glucose uptake was not affected by acetoacetate in the presence or absence of concanavalin A, but in each case acetoacetate increased the percentage of glucose uptake accounted for by lactate production. 3. [3H]Thymidine incorporation into DNA in concanavalin A-treated thymocyte cultures was sensitive to the glucose concentration in the medium in a biphasic manner. Very low concentrations of glucose (25μm) stimulated DNA synthesis half-maximally, but maximum [3H]thymidine incorporation was observed only when the glucose concentration was raised to 1mm. Lactate addition did not alter the sensitivity of [3H]-thymidine uptake to glucose, but inosine blocked the effect of added glucose and strongly inhibited DNA synthesis. 4. It is suggested that the major function of enhanced aerobic glycolysis in transforming lymphocytes is to maintain higher steady-state amounts of glycolytic intermediates to act as precursors for macromolecule synthesis. PMID:310305

  3. Microbial enhancement of hydrazine degradation in soil and water

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, L.T.; Street, J.J.

    1987-09-01

    In an early study, the authors reported that hydrazine was rapidly degraded in Arredondo fine sand. By comparing the degradation results in sterile and nonsterile soils, it was concluded that biological degradation was responsible for about 20% of hydrazine disappearance from soils. They isolated a heterotrophic bacterium, Achromobacter sp., from the Arredondo soil and found that the organism had a high capacity to degrade hydrazine to the nontoxic product dinitrogen gas. In the present study, the authors attempted to enhance hydrazine degradation in water and soil samples by inoculating with a hydrazine-degrading bacterium, Achromobacter sp. Factors that influence hydrazine degradation in water and soil are discussed.

  4. Microbial Removal of Atmospheric Carbon Tetrachloride in Bulk Aerobic Soils▿

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Y.; Goodwin, K. D.; Happell, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) were removed by bulk aerobic soils from tropical, subtropical, and boreal environments. Removal was observed in all tested soil types, indicating that the process was widespread. The flux measured in field chamber experiments was 0.24 ± 0.10 nmol CCl4 (m2 day)−1 (average ± standard deviation [SD]; n = 282). Removal of CCl4 and removal of methane (CH4) were compared to explore whether the two processes were linked. Removal of both gases was halted in laboratory samples that were autoclaved, dry heated, or incubated in the presence of mercuric chloride (HgCl2). In marl soils, treatment with antibiotics such as tetracycline and streptomycin caused partial inhibition of CCl4 (50%) and CH4 (76%) removal, but removal was not affected in soils treated with nystatin or myxothiazol. These data indicated that bacteria contributed to the soil removal of CCl4 and that microeukaryotes may not have played a significant role. Amendments of methanol, acetate, and succinate to soil samples enhanced CCl4 removal by 59%, 293%, and 72%, respectively. Additions of a variety of inhibitors and substrates indicated that nitrification, methanogenesis, or biological reduction of nitrate, nitrous oxide, or sulfate (e.g., occurring in possible anoxic microzones) did not play a significant role in the removal of CCl4. Methyl fluoride inhibited removal of CH4 but not CCl4, indicating that CH4 and CCl4 removals were not directly linked. Furthermore, CCl4 removal was not affected in soils amended with copper sulfate or methane, supporting the results with MeF and suggesting that the observed CCl4 removal was not significantly mediated by methanotrophs. PMID:21724884

  5. Fit women are not able to use the whole aerobic capacity during aerobic dance.

    PubMed

    Edvardsen, Elisabeth; Ingjer, Frank; Bø, Kari

    2011-12-01

    Edvardsen, E, Ingjer, F, and Bø, K. Fit women are not able to use the whole aerobic capacity during aerobic dance. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3479-3485, 2011-This study compared the aerobic capacity during maximal aerobic dance and treadmill running in fit women. Thirteen well-trained female aerobic dance instructors aged 30 ± 8.17 years (mean ± SD) exercised to exhaustion by running on a treadmill for measurement of maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2)max) and peak heart rate (HRpeak). Additionally, all subjects performed aerobic dancing until exhaustion after a choreographed videotaped routine trying to reach the same HRpeak as during maximal running. The p value for statistical significance between running and aerobic dance was set to ≤0.05. The results (mean ± SD) showed a lower VO(2)max in aerobic dance (52.2 ± 4.02 ml·kg·min) compared with treadmill running (55.9 ± 5.03 ml·kg·min) (p = 0.0003). Further, the mean ± SD HRpeak was 182 ± 9.15 b·min in aerobic dance and 192 ± 9.62 b·min in treadmill running, giving no difference in oxygen pulse between the 2 exercise forms (p = 0.32). There was no difference in peak ventilation (aerobic dance: 108 ± 10.81 L·min vs. running: 113 ± 11.49 L·min). In conclusion, aerobic dance does not seem to be able to use the whole aerobic capacity as in running. For well endurance-trained women, this may result in a lower total workload at maximal intensities. Aerobic dance may therefore not be as suitable as running during maximal intensities in well-trained females.

  6. Spirosoma swuense sp. nov., isolated from wet soil.

    PubMed

    Joo, Eun Sun; Kim, Eun Bit; Jeon, Seon Hwa; Srinivasan, Sathiyaraj; Kim, Myung Kyum

    2017-04-01

    Strain JBM2-3T, a pale-yellow-coloured, aerobic, catalase-negative, oxidase-positive and Gram-stain-negative bacterium, was isolated from wet soil. The isolate grew aerobically at 25-30 °C (optimum 25 °C), pH 6.0-8.0 (optimum pH 7.0) and in the presence of 0-0.5 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 0 % NaCl). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain JBM2-3T belonged to the genus Spirosoma, with a sequence similarity of 96.2 % with Spirosoma panaciterrae Gsoil 1519T. The strain showed the typical chemotaxonomic characteristics of the genus Spirosoma, with the presence of menaquinone 7 as the respiratory quinone; the major fatty acids were summed feature 3 (composed of C16: 1ω6c/ω7c), C16: 1ω5c and iso-C15: 0. The DNA G+C content of strain JBM2-3T was 47.4 mol%. The polar lipid profile contained major amounts of phosphatidylethanolamine and aminophospholipids. On the basis of its phenotypic and genotypic properties, and phylogenetic distinctiveness, strain JBM2-3T should be classified as a representative of a novel species in the genus Spirosoma, for which the name Spirosoma swuense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JBM2-3T (=KCTC 52176T=JCM 31298T).

  7. Novel Waddlia Intracellular Bacterium in Artibeus intermedius Fruit Bats, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Morales, Cirani Obregón; Martínez, Leonardo Perea; Ceballos, Nidia Aréchiga; Rivero, Juan José Pérez; Díaz, Osvaldo López; Brayton, Kelly A.

    2015-01-01

    An intracellular bacterium was isolated from fruit bats (Artibeus intermedius) in Cocoyoc, Mexico. The bacterium caused severe lesions in the lungs and spleens of bats and intracytoplasmic vacuoles in cell cultures. Sequence analyses showed it is related to Waddlia spp. (order Chlamydiales). We propose to call this bacterium Waddlia cocoyoc. PMID:26583968

  8. Volatile dimethyl polonium produced by aerobic marine microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Bahrou, Andrew S; Ollivier, Patrick R L; Hanson, Thomas E; Tessier, Emmanuel; Amouroux, David; Church, Thomas M

    2012-10-16

    The production of volatile polonium (Po(v)), a naturally occurring radioactive element, by pure cultures of aerobic marine tellurite-resistant microorganisms was investigated. Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, a carotogenic yeast, and a Bacillus sp. strain, a Gram-positive bacterium, generated approximately one and 2 orders of magnitude, respectively, greater amounts of Po(v) compared to the other organisms tested. Gas chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (GC-ICP-MS) analysis identified dimethyl polonide (DMPo) as the predominant volatile Po compound in culture headspace of the yeast. This species assignment is based on the exact relation between GC retention times and boiling points of this and other Group VI B analogues (S, Se, and Te). The extent of the biotic Po(v) production correlates exponentially with elevated particulate Po (Po(p)): dissolved Po (Po(aq)) ratios in the cultures, consistent with efficient Po bioaccumulation. Further experimentation demonstrated that some abiotic Po(v) generation is possible. However, high-level Po(v) generation in these cultures is predominantly biotic.

  9. Hydrogen evolution by strictly aerobic hydrogen bacteria under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, M; Steinbüchel, A; Schlegel, H G

    1984-08-01

    When strains and mutants of the strictly aerobic hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium Alcaligenes eutrophus are grown heterotrophically on gluconate or fructose and are subsequently exposed to anaerobic conditions in the presence of the organic substrates, molecular hydrogen is evolved. Hydrogen evolution started immediately after the suspension was flushed with nitrogen, reached maximum rates of 70 to 100 mumol of H2 per h per g of protein, and continued with slowly decreasing rates for at least 18 h. The addition of oxygen to an H2-evolving culture, as well as the addition of nitrate to cells (which had formed the dissimilatory nitrate reductase system during the preceding growth), caused immediate cessation of hydrogen evolution. Formate is not the source of H2 evolution. The rates of H2 evolution with formate as the substrate were lower than those with gluconate. The formate hydrogenlyase system was not detectable in intact cells or crude cell extracts. Rather the cytoplasmic, NAD-reducing hydrogenase is involved by catalyzing the release of excessive reducing equivalents under anaerobic conditions in the absence of suitable electron acceptors. This conclusion is based on the following experimental results. H2 is formed only by cells which had synthesized the hydrogenases during growth. Mutants lacking the membrane-bound hydrogenase were still able to evolve H2. Mutants lacking the NAD-reducing or both hydrogenases were unable to evolve H2.

  10. The metabolic impact of extracellular nitrite on aerobic metabolism of Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Hartop, K R; Sullivan, M J; Giannopoulos, G; Gates, A J; Bond, P L; Yuan, Z; Clarke, T A; Rowley, G; Richardson, D J

    2017-02-07

    Nitrite, in equilibrium with free nitrous acid (FNA), can inhibit both aerobic and anaerobic growth of microbial communities through bactericidal activities that have considerable potential for control of microbial growth in a range of water systems. There has been much focus on the effect of nitrite/FNA on anaerobic metabolism and so, to enhance understanding of the metabolic impact of nitrite/FNA on aerobic metabolism, a study was undertaken with a model denitrifying bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans PD1222. Extracellular nitrite inhibits aerobic growth of P. denitrificans in a pH-dependent manner that is likely to be a result of both nitrite and free nitrous acid (pKa = 3.25) and subsequent reactive nitrogen oxides generated from the intracellular passage of FNA into P. denitrificans. Increased expression of a gene encoding a flavohemoglobin protein (Fhp) (Pden_1689) was observed in response to extracellular nitrite. Construction and analysis of a deletion mutant established Fhp to be involved in endowing nitrite/FNA resistance at high extracellular nitrite concentrations. Global transcriptional analysis confirmed nitrite-dependent expression of fhp and indicated that P. denitrificans expressed a number of stress response systems associated with protein, DNA and lipid repair. It is therefore suggested that nitrite causes a pH-dependent stress response that is due to the production of associated reactive nitrogen species, such as nitric oxide from the internalisation of FNA.

  11. Comparison of aerobic and photosynthetic Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Callister, Stephen J.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Zeng, Xiaohua; Roh, Jung Hyeob; Dominguez, Migual; Tavano, Christine; Monroe, Matthew E.; Kaplan, Samuel; Donohue, Timothy; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2006-07-05

    Proteomes from aerobic and photosynthetic grown Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 cell cultures were characterized using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in conjunction with an accurate mass and elution time (AMT) tag approach. Roughly 8000 high quality peptides were detected that represented 1,445 gene products and 34% of the predicted proteins. The identified proteins corresponded primarily to open reading frames (ORFs) contained within the two chromosomal elements of this bacterium, but a significant number were also observed from ORFs associated with 5 naturally occurring plasmids. Data mining of peptides revealed a number of proteins uniquely detected within the photosynthetic cell culture. Proteins observed in both aerobic respiratory and photosynthetic grown cultures were analyzed semi-quantitatively by comparing their estimated abundances to provide insights into bioenergetic models for aerobic respiration and photosynthesis. Additional emphasis was placed on gene products annotated as hypothetical to gain information as to their potential roles within these two growth conditions. Where possible, transcriptome data for R. sphaeroides obtained under the same culture conditions were compared with these results. This comparative study demonstrated the applicability of the AMT tag approach for high-throughput proteomic analyses of pathways associated with the photosynthetic lifestyle.

  12. Microflora in soils of desert regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, R. E.

    1970-01-01

    Desert soil samples, collected using aseptic techniques, are low in organic matter and cation exchange capacity. Aerobic and microaerophilic bacteria are most abundant, next are algae and molds. Chemical and physical properties are determined by standard procedures, including the Kjeldahl method and the use of Munsell soil color charts.

  13. The effects of aerobic training on children's creativity, self-perception, and aerobic power.

    PubMed

    Herman-Tofler, L R; Tuckman, B W

    1998-10-01

    The article examines whether participation in an aerobic exercise program (AE), as compared with a traditional physical education class (PE), significantly increased children's perceived athletic competence, physical appearance, social acceptance, behavioral conduct, and global self-worth; increased their figural creativity; and improved aerobic power as measured by an 800-meter run around a track. Further research on the effects of different types of AE is discussed, as well as the need for aerobic conditioning in the elementary school.

  14. Utilization of Phenylpropanoids by Newly Isolated Bacterium Pseudomonas sp. TRMK1.

    PubMed

    T R, Monisha; I, Mukram; B, Kirankumar; Reddy, Pooja V; Nayak, Anand S; Karegoudar, T B

    2017-01-25

    A bacterium Pseudomonas sp. TRMK1 capable of utilizing various phenylpropanoids was isolated from agro-industrial waste by enrichment culture technique. It is gram-negative, motile, aerobic, and able to utilize three different phenolic acids such as p-coumaric, ferulic, and caffeic acids at concentrations of 5, 10, and 15 mM in 18 h of incubation. The residual concentration of phenolic acids was analyzed by HPLC. The catabolic pathway of p-coumaric, ferulic, and caffeic acids is suggested based on the characterization of metabolic intermediates by GC, GC-HRMS, and different enzymatic assays. Further, Pseudomonas sp. TRMK1 utilizes a wide range of mixture of phenolic acids present in the synthetic effluent.

  15. Ultrastructure of the denitrifying methanotroph "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera," a novel polygon-shaped bacterium.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming L; van Teeseling, Muriel C F; Willems, Marieke J R; van Donselaar, Elly G; Klingl, Andreas; Rachel, Reinhard; Geerts, Willie J C; Jetten, Mike S M; Strous, Marc; van Niftrik, Laura

    2012-01-01

    "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera" is a newly discovered denitrifying methanotroph that is unrelated to previously known methanotrophs. This bacterium is a member of the NC10 phylum and couples methane oxidation to denitrification through a newly discovered intra-aerobic pathway. In the present study, we report the first ultrastructural study of "Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera" using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron tomography in combination with different sample preparation methods. We observed that "Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera" cells possess an atypical polygonal shape that is distinct from other bacterial shapes described so far. Also, an additional layer was observed as the outermost sheath, which might represent a (glyco)protein surface layer. Further, intracytoplasmic membranes, which are a common feature among proteobacterial methanotrophs, were never observed under the current growth conditions. Our results indicate that "Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera" is ultrastructurally distinct from other bacteria by its atypical cell shape and from the classical proteobacterial methanotrophs by its apparent lack of intracytoplasmic membranes.

  16. Dyadobacter arcticus sp. nov., isolated from Arctic soil.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lu; Jiang, Fan; Xiao, Mengchen; Dai, Jun; Kan, Wenjing; Fang, Chengxiang; Peng, Fang

    2013-05-01

    A psychrotolerant, Gram-negative, rod-shaped, yellow-pigmented bacterium, designated strain R-S7-29(T), was isolated from a soil sample collected from the Svalbard Archipelago in Norway (78° N). Cells were non-motile, aerobic, and catalase- and oxidase-positive. Growth occurred at 4-28 °C (optimum, 18 °C). A phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain R-S7-29(T) belongs to the genus Dyadobacter (family 'Flexibacteraceae') with sequence similarity to related members of the genus ranging from 95.2 to 96.7 %. The major fatty acids were C16 : 1ω5c, iso-C17 : 0 3-OH and summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c) and the predominant respiratory quinone was MK-7. The DNA G+C content of strain R-S7-29(T) was 50 mol%. On the basis of its phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic properties, strain R-S7-29(T) represents a novel species of the genus Dyadobacter, for which the name Dyadobacter arcticus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is R-S7-29(T) ( = CCTCC AB 2011022(T) = NRRL B-59659(T)).

  17. Conditioning and Aerobics for Older Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Joyce

    1980-01-01

    A class designed for the maintenance and gradual improvement of senior citizens' physical fitness includes relaxation training, flexibility and stretching exercises, interval training activities (designed as a link between less strenuous exercise and more strenuous activities), and aerobic exercises. (CJ)

  18. The rise of oxygen and aerobic biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Saito, Mak A

    2012-01-11

    Analysis of conserved protein folding domains across extant genomes by Kim et al. in this issue of Structure provides insights into the timing of some of the earliest aerobic metabolisms to arise on Earth.

  19. Neuromodulation of Aerobic Exercise—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Heijnen, Saskia; Hommel, Bernhard; Kibele, Armin; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2016-01-01

    Running, and aerobic exercise in general, is a physical activity that increasingly many people engage in but that also has become popular as a topic for scientific research. Here we review the available studies investigating whether and to which degree aerobic exercise modulates hormones, amino acids, and neurotransmitters levels. In general, it seems that factors such as genes, gender, training status, and hormonal status need to be taken into account to gain a better understanding of the neuromodular underpinnings of aerobic exercise. More research using longitudinal studies and considering individual differences is necessary to determine actual benefits. We suggest that, in order to succeed, aerobic exercise programs should include optimal periodization, prevent overtraining and be tailored to interindividual differences, including neuro-developmental and genetically-based factors. PMID:26779053

  20. The Energetics of Aerobic versus Anaerobic Respiration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champion, Timothy D.; Schwenz, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    Background information, laboratory procedures, and a discussion of the results of an experiment designed to investigate the difference in energy gained from the aerobic and anaerobic oxidation of glucose are presented. Sample experimental and calculated data are included. (CW)

  1. Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-27

    distribution is unlimited. Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report...2211 diamond nanocrystals, REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) ARO 8. PERFORMING...Room 254, Mail Code 8725 New York, NY 10027 -7922 ABSTRACT Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals Report Title We investigate

  2. Aerobic catabolism of bile acids.

    PubMed Central

    Leppik, R A; Park, R J; Smith, M G

    1982-01-01

    Seventy-eight stable cultures obtained by enrichment on media containing ox bile or a single bile acid were able to utilize one or more bile acids, as well as components of ox bile, as primary carbon sources for growth. All isolates were obligate aerobes, and most (70) were typical (48) or atypical (22) Pseudomonas strains, the remainder (8) being gram-positive actinomycetes. Of six Pseudomonas isolates selected for further study, five produced predominantly acidic catabolites after growth on glycocholic acid, but the sixth, Pseudomonas sp. ATCC 31752, accumulated as the principal product a neutral steroid catabolite. Optimum growth of Pseudomonas sp. ATCC 31752 on ox bile occurred at pH 7 to 8 and from 25 to 30 degrees C. No additional nutrients were required to sustain good growth, but growth was stimulated by the addition of ammonium sulfate and yeast extract. Good growth was obtained with a bile solids content of 40 g/liter in shaken flasks. A near-theoretical yield of neutral steroid catabolites, comprising a major (greater than 50%) and three minor products, was obtained from fermentor growth of ATCC 31752 in 6.7 g of ox bile solids per liter. The possible commercial exploitation of these findings to produce steroid drug intermediates for the pharmaceutical industry is discussed. PMID:7149711

  3. LOSS OF ORGANIC CHEMICALS IN SOIL: PURE COMPOUND TREATABILITY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comprehensive screening data on the treatability of 32 organic chemicals in soil were developed. Of the evaluated chemicals, 22 were phenolic compounds. Aerobic batch laboratory microcosm experiments were conducted using two soils: an acidic clay soil with <1% organic matter and ...

  4. Evidence of carbon fixation pathway in a bacterium from candidate phylum SBR1093 revealed with genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiping; Guo, Feng; Liu, Lili; Zhang, Tong

    2014-01-01

    Autotrophic CO2 fixation is the most important biotransformation process in the biosphere. Research focusing on the diversity and distribution of relevant autotrophs is significant to our comprehension of the biosphere. In this study, a draft genome of a bacterium from candidate phylum SBR1093 was reconstructed with the metagenome of an industrial activated sludge. Based on comparative genomics, this autotrophy may occur via a newly discovered carbon fixation path, the hydroxypropionate-hydroxybutyrate (HPHB) cycle, which was demonstrated in a previous work to be uniquely possessed by some genera from Archaea. This bacterium possesses all of the thirteen enzymes required for the HPHB cycle; these enzymes share 30∼50% identity with those in the autotrophic species of Archaea that undergo the HPHB cycle and 30∼80% identity with the corresponding enzymes of the mixotrophic species within Bradyrhizobiaceae. Thus, this bacterium might have an autotrophic growth mode in certain conditions. A phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene reveals that the phylotypes within candidate phylum SBR1093 are primarily clustered into 5 clades with a shallow branching pattern. This bacterium is clustered with phylotypes from organically contaminated environments, implying a demand for organics in heterotrophic metabolism. Considering the types of regulators, such as FnR, Fur, and ArsR, this bacterium might be a facultative aerobic mixotroph with potential multi-antibiotic and heavy metal resistances. This is the first report on Bacteria that may perform potential carbon fixation via the HPHB cycle, thus may expand our knowledge of the distribution and importance of the HPHB cycle in the biosphere.

  5. Evidence of Carbon Fixation Pathway in a Bacterium from Candidate Phylum SBR1093 Revealed with Genomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiping; Guo, Feng; Liu, Lili; Zhang, Tong

    2014-01-01

    Autotrophic CO2 fixation is the most important biotransformation process in the biosphere. Research focusing on the diversity and distribution of relevant autotrophs is significant to our comprehension of the biosphere. In this study, a draft genome of a bacterium from candidate phylum SBR1093 was reconstructed with the metagenome of an industrial activated sludge. Based on comparative genomics, this autotrophy may occur via a newly discovered carbon fixation path, the hydroxypropionate-hydroxybutyrate (HPHB) cycle, which was demonstrated in a previous work to be uniquely possessed by some genera from Archaea. This bacterium possesses all of the thirteen enzymes required for the HPHB cycle; these enzymes share 30∼50% identity with those in the autotrophic species of Archaea that undergo the HPHB cycle and 30∼80% identity with the corresponding enzymes of the mixotrophic species within Bradyrhizobiaceae. Thus, this bacterium might have an autotrophic growth mode in certain conditions. A phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene reveals that the phylotypes within candidate phylum SBR1093 are primarily clustered into 5 clades with a shallow branching pattern. This bacterium is clustered with phylotypes from organically contaminated environments, implying a demand for organics in heterotrophic metabolism. Considering the types of regulators, such as FnR, Fur, and ArsR, this bacterium might be a facultative aerobic mixotroph with potential multi-antibiotic and heavy metal resistances. This is the first report on Bacteria that may perform potential carbon fixation via the HPHB cycle, thus may expand our knowledge of the distribution and importance of the HPHB cycle in the biosphere. PMID:25310003

  6. Paradigms: examples from the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The history of advances in research on Xylella fastidiosa provides excellent examples of how paradigms both advance and limit our scientific understanding of plant pathogens and the plant diseases they cause. I describe this from a personal perspective, having been directly involved with many persons who made paradigm-changing discoveries, beginning with the discovery that a bacterium, not a virus, causes Pierce's disease of grape and other plant diseases in numerous plant species, including important crop and forest species.

  7. Pneumonia caused by a previously undescribed bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Hopfer, R L; Mills, K; Fainstein, V; Fischer, H E; Luna, M P

    1982-01-01

    A new and as yet unidentified bacterium was isolated from the lung tissue of a cancer patient with bilateral pneumonia. Clinically, the pneumonia was consistent with legionellosis; the organism cultured from the lung grew only on the charcoal-yeast extract agar routinely used for Legionella isolation. Subsequent testing, however, showed the organism to be quite distinct from the known Legionella species in its biochemical, antigenic, and growth characteristics. Images PMID:7130363

  8. Secrets of Soil Survival Revealed by the Genome Sequence of Arthrobacter aurescens TC1

    PubMed Central

    Daugherty, Sean C; DeBoy, Robert T; Emerson, Joanne B; Shvartzbeyn, Alla; Radune, Diana; Vamathevan, Jessica; Riggs, Florenta; Grinberg, Viktoria; Khouri, Hoda; Wackett, Lawrence P; Nelson, Karen E; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    Arthrobacter sp. strains are among the most frequently isolated, indigenous, aerobic bacterial genera found in soils. Member of the genus are metabolically and ecologically diverse and have the ability to survive in environmentally harsh conditions for extended periods of time. The genome of Arthrobacter aurescens strain TC1, which was originally isolated from soil at an atrazine spill site, is composed of a single 4,597,686 basepair (bp) circular chromosome and two circular plasmids, pTC1 and pTC2, which are 408,237 bp and 300,725 bp, respectively. Over 66% of the 4,702 open reading frames (ORFs) present in the TC1 genome could be assigned a putative function, and 13.2% (623 genes) appear to be unique to this bacterium, suggesting niche specialization. The genome of TC1 is most similar to that of Tropheryma, Leifsonia, Streptomyces, and Corynebacterium glutamicum, and analyses suggest that A. aurescens TC1 has expanded its metabolic abilities by relying on the duplication of catabolic genes and by funneling metabolic intermediates generated by plasmid-borne genes to chromosomally encoded pathways. The data presented here suggest that Arthrobacter's environmental prevalence may be due to its ability to survive under stressful conditions induced by starvation, ionizing radiation, oxygen radicals, and toxic chemicals. PMID:17194220

  9. Decomposition Dynamics and Changes in Chemical Composition of Wheat Straw Residue under Anaerobic and Aerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hongjian; Chen, Xi; Wei, Junling; Zhang, Yajie; Zhang, Ligan; Chang, Jiang; Thompson, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Soil aeration is a crucial factor that regulates crop residue decomposition, and the chemical composition of decomposing crop residues may change the forms and availability of soil nutrients, such as N and P. However, to date, differences in the chemical composition of crop straw residues after incorporation into soil and during its decomposition under anaerobic vs. aerobic conditions have not been well documented. The objective of the present study was to assess changes in the C-containing functional groups of wheat straw residue during its decomposition in anaerobic and aerobic environments. A 12-month incubation experiment was carried out to investigate the temporal variations of mass, carbon, and nitrogen loss, as well as changes in the chemical composition of wheat (Triticum aestivum L) straw residues under anaerobic and aerobic conditions by measuring C-containing functional groups using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The residual mass, carbon content, and nitrogen content of the straw residue sharply declined during the initial 3 months, and then slowly decreased during the last incubation period from 3 to 12 months. The decomposition rate constant (k) for mass loss under aerobic conditions (0.022 d-1) was higher than that under anaerobic conditions (0.014 d-1). The residual mass percentage of cellulose and hemicellulose in the wheat straw gradually declined, whereas that of lignin gradually increased during the entire 12-month incubation period. The NMR spectra of C-containing functional groups in the decomposing straw under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions were similar at the beginning of the incubation as well as at 1 month, 6 months, and 12 months. The main alterations in C-containing functional groups during the decomposition of wheat straw were a decrease in the relative abundances of O-alkyl C and an increase in the relative abundances of alkyl C, aromatic C and COO/N-C = O functional groups. The NMR signals of alkyl C

  10. Decomposition Dynamics and Changes in Chemical Composition of Wheat Straw Residue under Anaerobic and Aerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hongjian; Chen, Xi; Wei, Junling; Zhang, Yajie; Zhang, Ligan; Chang, Jiang; Thompson, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Soil aeration is a crucial factor that regulates crop residue decomposition, and the chemical composition of decomposing crop residues may change the forms and availability of soil nutrients, such as N and P. However, to date, differences in the chemical composition of crop straw residues after incorporation into soil and during its decomposition under anaerobic vs. aerobic conditions have not been well documented. The objective of the present study was to assess changes in the C-containing functional groups of wheat straw residue during its decomposition in anaerobic and aerobic environments. A 12-month incubation experiment was carried out to investigate the temporal variations of mass, carbon, and nitrogen loss, as well as changes in the chemical composition of wheat (Triticum aestivum L) straw residues under anaerobic and aerobic conditions by measuring C-containing functional groups using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The residual mass, carbon content, and nitrogen content of the straw residue sharply declined during the initial 3 months, and then slowly decreased during the last incubation period from 3 to 12 months. The decomposition rate constant (k) for mass loss under aerobic conditions (0.022 d-1) was higher than that under anaerobic conditions (0.014 d-1). The residual mass percentage of cellulose and hemicellulose in the wheat straw gradually declined, whereas that of lignin gradually increased during the entire 12-month incubation period. The NMR spectra of C-containing functional groups in the decomposing straw under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions were similar at the beginning of the incubation as well as at 1 month, 6 months, and 12 months. The main alterations in C-containing functional groups during the decomposition of wheat straw were a decrease in the relative abundances of O-alkyl C and an increase in the relative abundances of alkyl C, aromatic C and COO/N-C = O functional groups. The NMR signals of alkyl C

  11. System-level approach to studying oxygen stress and acclimation of Shewanella oneidensis to growth under aerobic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beliaev, A.

    2008-12-01

    Systems-level approaches have been proven extremely useful in elucidating the mechanisms involved in stress response and acclimation of microorganisms to different environments. Recent studies of Shewanella oneidensis, a dissimilatory metal reducer catalyzing biogeochemical cycling of Fe and Mn, demonstrate that this facultatively aerobic bacterium is inhibited by high concentrations of oxygen. Physiological and genomic studies demonstrated that growth under aerobic conditions triggers autoaggregation of S. oneidensis leading to significant physiological and morphological changes which are consistent with biofilm mode of growth. Global transcriptome profiling of the aggregates revealed coordinated upregulation of various attachment and adhesion factors which is governed through coordinate regulation by the RpoS, SpoIIA, and Crp transcription factors. The aerobic aggregated cells also revealed increased expression of putative anaerobic electron transfer and homologs of metal reduction genes. The experimental evidence indicates that aggregate formation in S. oneidensis may serve as an alternative or an addition to biochemical detoxification to reduce the oxidative stress associated with production of reactive oxygen species during aerobic metabolism while facilitating the development of hypoxic conditions within the aggregate interior.

  12. Removal of arsenic from groundwater by using a native isolated arsenite-oxidizing bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, An-Chieh; Chu, Yu-Ju; Hsu, Fu-Lan; Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination of groundwater is a significant public health concern. In this study, the removal of arsenic from groundwater using biological processes was investigated. The efficiency of arsenite (As(III)) bacterial oxidation and subsequent arsenate (As(V)) removal from contaminated groundwater using bacterial biomass was examined. A novel As(III)-oxidizing bacterium (As7325) was isolated from the aquifer in the blackfoot disease (BFD) endemic area in Taiwan. As7325 oxidized 2300 μg/l As(III) using in situ As(III)-contaminated groundwater under aerobic conditions within 1 d. After the oxidation of As(III) to As(V), As(V) removal was further examined using As7325 cell pellets. The results showed that As(V) could be adsorbed efficiently by lyophilized As7325 cell pellets, the efficiency of which was related to lyophilized cell pellet concentration. Our study conducted the examination of an alternative technology for the removal of As(III) and As(V) from groundwater, indicating that the oxidation of As(III)-contaminated groundwater by native isolated bacterium, followed by As(V) removal using bacterial biomass is a potentially effective technology for the treatment of As(III)-contaminated groundwater.

  13. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis IL1403

    PubMed Central

    Bolotin, Alexander; Wincker, Patrick; Mauger, Stéphane; Jaillon, Olivier; Malarme, Karine; Weissenbach, Jean; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Sorokin, Alexei

    2001-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a nonpathogenic AT-rich gram-positive bacterium closely related to the genus Streptococcus and is the most commonly used cheese starter. It is also the best-characterized lactic acid bacterium. We sequenced the genome of the laboratory strain IL1403, using a novel two-step strategy that comprises diagnostic sequencing of the entire genome and a shotgun polishing step. The genome contains 2,365,589 base pairs and encodes 2310 proteins, including 293 protein-coding genes belonging to six prophages and 43 insertion sequence (IS) elements. Nonrandom distribution of IS elements indicates that the chromosome of the sequenced strain may be a product of recent recombination between two closely related genomes. A complete set of late competence genes is present, indicating the ability of L. lactis to undergo DNA transformation. Genomic sequence revealed new possibilities for fermentation pathways and for aerobic respiration. It also indicated a horizontal transfer of genetic information from Lactococcus to gram-negative enteric bacteria of Salmonella-Escherichia group. [The sequence data described in this paper has been submitted to the GenBank data library under accession no. AE005176.] PMID:11337471

  14. Alicyclobacillus vulcanalis sp. nov., a thermophilic, acidophilic bacterium isolated from Coso Hot Springs, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Simbahan, Jessica; Drijber, Rhae; Blum, Paul

    2004-09-01

    A thermo-acidophilic Gram-positive bacterium, strain CsHg2T, which grows aerobically at 35-65 degrees C (optimum 55 degrees C) and at pH 2.0-6.0 (optimum 4.0), was isolated from a geothermal pool located in Coso Hot Springs in the Mojave Desert, California, USA. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that this bacterium was most closely related to the type strains of Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius (97.8 % identity) and Alicyclobacillus sendaiensis (96.9 %), three Japanese strains denoted as UZ-1, KHA-31 and MIH 332 (96.1-96.5 %) and Alicyclobacillus genomic species FR-6 (96.3 %). Phenotypic characteristics including temperature and pH optima, G+C composition, acid production from a variety of carbon sources and sensitivity to different metal salts distinguished CsHg2T from A. acidocaldarius, A. sendaiensis and FR-6. The cell lipid membrane was composed mainly of omega-cyclohexyl fatty acid, consistent with membranes from other Alicyclobacillus species. Very low DNA-DNA hybridization values between CsHg2T and the type strains of Alicyclobacillus indicate that CsHg2T represents a distinct species. On the basis of these results, the name Alicyclobacillus vulcanalis sp. nov. is proposed for this organism. The type strain is CsHg2T (ATCC BAA-915T = DSM 16176T).

  15. Aerobic methanotrophic communities at the Red Sea brine-seawater interface

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Rehab Z.; Adel, Mustafa; Ouf, Amged; Sayed, Ahmed; Ghazy, Mohamed A.; Alam, Intikhab; Essack, Magbubah; Lafi, Feras F.; Bajic, Vladimir B.; El-Dorry, Hamza; Siam, Rania

    2014-01-01

    The central rift of the Red Sea contains 25 brine pools with different physicochemical conditions, dictating the diversity and abundance of the microbial community. Three of these pools, the Atlantis II, Kebrit and Discovery Deeps, are uniquely characterized by a high concentration of hydrocarbons. The brine-seawater interface, described as an anoxic-oxic (brine-seawater) boundary, is characterized by a high methane concentration, thus favoring aerobic methane oxidation. The current study analyzed the aerobic free–living methane-oxidizing bacterial communities that potentially contribute to methane oxidation at the brine-seawater interfaces of the three aforementioned brine pools, using metagenomic pyrosequencing, 16S rRNA pyrotags and pmoA library constructs. The sequencing of 16S rRNA pyrotags revealed that these interfaces are characterized by high microbial community diversity. Signatures of aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria were detected in the Atlantis II Interface (ATII-I) and the Kebrit Deep Upper (KB-U) and Lower (KB-L) brine-seawater interfaces. Through phylogenetic analysis of pmoA, we further demonstrated that the ATII-I aerobic methanotroph community is highly diverse. We propose four ATII-I pmoA clusters. Most importantly, cluster 2 groups with marine methane seep methanotrophs, and cluster 4 represent a unique lineage of an uncultured bacterium with divergent alkane monooxygenases. Moreover, non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) based on the ordination of putative enzymes involved in methane metabolism showed that the Kebrit interface layers were distinct from the ATII-I and DD-I brine-seawater interfaces. PMID:25295031

  16. Aerobic Excercise and Research Opportunities to Benefit Impaired Children. (Project AEROBIC). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho Univ., Moscow.

    The final report summarizes accomplishments of Project AEROBIC (Aerobic Exercise and Research Opportunities to Benefit Impaired Children), which provided a physical education exercise program for severely, profoundly, and multiply handicapped children aged 10-21. Activities are outlined for the 3 year period and include modification of exercise…

  17. Effect of long term anaerobic and intermittent anaerobic/aerobic starvation on aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Pijuan, Maite; Werner, Ursula; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2009-08-01

    The effect of long term anaerobic and intermittent anaerobic/aerobic starvation on the structure and activity of aerobic granules was studied. Aerobic granular sludge treating abattoir wastewater and achieving high levels of nutrient removal was subjected to 4-5 week starvation under anaerobic and intermittent anaerobic/aerobic conditions. Microscopic pictures of granules at the beginning of the starvation period presented a round and compact surface morphology with a much defined external perimeter. Under both starvation conditions, the morphology changed at the end of starvation with the external border of the granules surrounded by floppy materials. The loss of granular compactness was faster and more pronounced under anaerobic/aerobic starvation conditions. The release of Ca(2+) at the onset of anaerobic/aerobic starvation suggests a degradation of extracellular polymeric substances. The activity of ammonia oxidizing bacteria was reduced by 20 and 36% during anaerobic and intermittent anaerobic/aerobic starvation, respectively. When fresh wastewater was reintroduced, the granules recovered their initial morphology within 1 week of normal operation and the nutrient removal activity recovered fully in 3 weeks. The results show that both anaerobic and intermittent anaerobic/aerobic conditions are suitable for maintaining granule structure and activity during starvation.

  18. Aerobic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria: Environmental selection and diversification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, D.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria oxidize reduced inorganic compounds to sulfuric acid. Lithotrophic sulfur oxidizer use the energy obtained from oxidation for microbial growth. Heterotrophic sulfur oxidizers obtain energy from the oxidation of organic compounds. In sulfur-oxidizing mixotrophs energy are derived either from the oxidation of inorganic or organic compounds. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are usually located within the sulfide/oxygen interfaces of springs, sediments, soil microenvironments, and the hypolimnion. Colonization of the interface is necessary since sulfide auto-oxidizes and because both oxygen and sulfide are needed for growth. The environmental stresses associated with the colonization of these interfaces resulted in the evolution of morphologically diverse and unique aerobic sulfur oxidizers.

  19. Detection, diversity and expression of aerobic bacterial arsenite oxidase genes.

    PubMed

    Inskeep, William P; Macur, Richard E; Hamamura, Natsuko; Warelow, Thomas P; Ward, Seamus A; Santini, Joanne M

    2007-04-01

    The arsenic (As) drinking water crisis in south and south-east Asia has stimulated intense study of the microbial processes controlling the redox cycling of As in soil-water systems. Microbial oxidation of arsenite is a critical link in the global As cycle, and phylogenetically diverse arsenite-oxidizing microorganisms have been isolated from various aquatic and soil environments. However, despite progress characterizing the metabolism of As in various pure cultures, no functional gene approaches have been developed to determine the importance and distribution of arsenite-oxidizing genes in soil-water-sediment systems. Here we report for the first time the successful amplification of arsenite oxidase-like genes (aroA/asoA/aoxB) from a variety of soil-sediment and geothermal environments where arsenite is known to be oxidized. Prior to the current work, only 16 aroA/asoA/aoxB-like gene sequences were available in GenBank, most of these being putative assignments from homology searches of whole genomes. Although aroA/asoA/aoxB gene sequences are not highly conserved across disparate phyla, degenerate primers were used successfully to characterize over 160 diverse aroA-like sequences from 10 geographically isolated, arsenic-contaminated sites and from 13 arsenite-oxidizing organisms. The primer sets were also useful for confirming the expression of aroA-like genes in an arsenite-oxidizing organism and in geothermal environments where arsenite is oxidized to arsenate. The phylogenetic and ecological diversity of aroA-like sequences obtained from this study suggests that genes for aerobic arsenite oxidation are widely distributed in the bacterial domain, are widespread in soil-water systems containing As, and play a critical role in the biogeochemical cycling of As.

  20. Flavobacterium chungbukense sp. nov., isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae-Sung; Oh, Yong-Sik; Lee, Jae-Kwan; Park, A-Rum; Yoo, Jae-Soo; Rhee, Sung-Keun; Roh, Dong-Hyun

    2011-11-01

    A yellow-pigmented, Gram-staining-negative, non-motile, strictly aerobic and rod-shaped bacterium, designated CS100(T), was isolated from soil in Chungbuk, Korea. Phylogenetic analysis and comparative studies based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain CS100(T) belonged to the genus Flavobacterium in the family Flavobacteriaceae. Strain CS100(T) showed the highest sequence similarities to Flavobacterium glaciei JCM 13953(T) (97.6 %) and Flavobacterium johnsoniae KACC 11410(T) (97.1 %). Sequence similarity to other members of the genus Flavobacterium was 91.5-97.0 %. Growth occurred at 4-30 °C, at pH 5.0-9.0 and in the presence of 0-2 % (w/v) NaCl. Flexirubin-type pigments were produced. Menaquinone-6 (MK-6) was the major respiratory quinone and the major fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0) (17.3 %), summed feature 3 (comprising iso-C(15 : 0) 2-OH and/or C(16 : 1)ω7c, 15.5 %) and C(16 : 0) (11.8 %). The DNA G+C content was 36.4 mol%. Strain CS100(T) hydrolysed skimmed milk and gelatin, but not chitin or pectin, and showed oxidase and catalase activities. DNA-DNA relatedness was 3.0 % with F. glaciei JCM 13953(T) and 11.5 % with F. johnsoniae KACC 11410(T). On the basis of the evidence from this study, strain CS100(T) represents a novel species of the genus Flavobacterium, for which the name Flavobacterium chungbukense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CS100(T) ( = KACC 15048(T) = JCM 17386(T)).

  1. Flavobacterium vireti sp. nov., isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Singh, Hina; Du, Juan; Won, KyungHwa; Yang, Jung-Eun; Akter, Shahina; Kim, Ki-Young; Yi, Tae-Hoo

    2015-06-01

    A novel Gram-negative, aerobic, yellow-pigmented, non-motile and rod-shaped bacterium, designated as THG-SM1(T), was isolated from field soil collected from Suwon, South Korea. The strain was found to grow optimally at 28 °C, at pH 7.0 and in the absence of NaCl. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, strain THG-SM1(T) belongs to the genus Flavobacterium and is most closely related to Flavobacterium terrae KACC 11731(T), followed by Flavobacterium columnare KACC 11683(T) and Flavobacterium enshiense KCTC 23775(T). The DNA G+C content of the novel isolate was determined to be 38.5 mol%. In DNA-DNA hybridization tests, the DNA relatedness between strain THG-SM1(T) and its closest phylogenetic neighbour F. terrae was below 50 %. Flexirubin-type pigments were found to be present. The major polar lipid and isoprenoid quinone were phosphatidylethanolamine and menaquinone 6 (MK-6), respectively. The main cellular fatty acids were identified as iso-C15:1G, iso-C15:0 3OH, iso-C16:0 and iso-C15:0. The DNA-DNA hybridization result and differentiating chemotaxonomic and phenotypic characteristics showed that strain THG-SM1(T) represents a novel species of the genus Flavobacterium, for which the name Flavobacterium vireti sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is THG-SM1(T) (=KACC 18371(T) = CCTCC AB2014312(T)).

  2. Genomic analysis of Melioribacter roseus, facultatively anaerobic organotrophic bacterium representing a novel deep lineage within Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group.

    PubMed

    Kadnikov, Vitaly V; Mardanov, Andrey V; Podosokorskaya, Olga A; Gavrilov, Sergey N; Kublanov, Ilya V; Beletsky, Alexey V; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Ravin, Nikolai V

    2013-01-01

    Melioribacter roseus is a moderately thermophilic facultatively anaerobic organotrophic bacterium representing a novel deep branch within Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group. To better understand the metabolic capabilities and possible ecological functions of M. roseus and get insights into the evolutionary history of this bacterial lineage, we sequenced the genome of the type strain P3M-2(T). A total of 2838 open reading frames was predicted from its 3.30 Mb genome. The whole proteome analysis supported phylum-level classification of M. roseus since most of the predicted proteins had closest matches in Bacteriodetes, Proteobacteria, Chlorobi, Firmicutes and deeply-branching bacterium Caldithrix abyssi, rather than in one particular phylum. Consistent with the ability of the bacterium to grow on complex carbohydrates, the genome analysis revealed more than one hundred glycoside hydrolases, glycoside transferases, polysaccharide lyases and carbohydrate esterases. The reconstructed central metabolism revealed pathways enabling the fermentation of complex organic substrates, as well as their complete oxidation through aerobic and anaerobic respiration. Genes encoding the photosynthetic and nitrogen-fixation machinery of green sulfur bacteria, as well as key enzymes of autotrophic carbon fixation pathways, were not identified. The M. roseus genome supports its affiliation to a novel phylum Ignavibateriae, representing the first step on the evolutionary pathway from heterotrophic ancestors of Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group towards anaerobic photoautotrophic Chlorobi.

  3. Multiple lines of evidence to demonstrate vinyl chloride aerobic biodegradation in the vadose zone, and factors controlling rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, B. M.; Aravena, R.; Davis, G. B.; Furness, A. J.; Bastow, T. P.; Bouchard, D.

    2013-10-01

    A field-based investigation was conducted at a contaminated site where the vadose zone was contaminated with a range of chlorinated hydrocarbons. The investigation consisted of groundwater and multilevel soil-gas monitoring of a range of contaminants and gases, along with isotope measurements and microbiology studies. The investigation provided multiple lines of evidence that demonstrated aerobic biodegradation of vinyl chloride (VC) was occurring in the vadose zone (i) above the on-site source zone, and (ii) above the downgradient off-site groundwater plume location. Data from both the on-site and off-site locations were consistent in showing substantially greater (an order of magnitude greater) rates of VC removal from the aerobic vadose zone compared to more recalcitrant contaminants trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE). Soil gas VC isotope analysis showed substantial isotopic enrichment of VC (δ13C - 5.2 to - 10.9‰) compared to groundwater (δ13C - 39.5‰) at the on-site location. Soil gas CO2 isotope analysis at both locations showed that CO2 was highly isotopically depleted (δ13C - 28.8 to - 33.3‰), compared to soil gas CO2 data originating from natural sediment organic matter (δ13C = - 14.7 to - 21.3‰). The soil gas CO2 δ13C values were consistent with near-water table VC groundwater δ13C values (- 36.8 to - 39.5‰), suggesting CO2 originating from aerobic biodegradation of VC. Bacteria that had functional genes (ethene monooxygenase (etnC) and epoxyalkane transferase (etnE) involved in ethene metabolism and VC oxidation were more abundant at the source zone where oxygen co-existed with VC. The distribution of VC and oxygen vadose zone vapour plumes, together with long-term changes in soil gas CO2 concentrations and temperature, provided information to elucidate the factors controlling aerobic biodegradation of VC in the vadose zone. Based on the overlapping VC and oxygen vadose zone vapour plumes, aerobic vapour biodegradation

  4. Multiple lines of evidence to demonstrate vinyl chloride aerobic biodegradation in the vadose zone, and factors controlling rates.

    PubMed

    Patterson, B M; Aravena, R; Davis, G B; Furness, A J; Bastow, T P; Bouchard, D

    2013-10-01

    A field-based investigation was conducted at a contaminated site where the vadose zone was contaminated with a range of chlorinated hydrocarbons. The investigation consisted of groundwater and multilevel soil-gas monitoring of a range of contaminants and gases, along with isotope measurements and microbiology studies. The investigation provided multiple lines of evidence that demonstrated aerobic biodegradation of vinyl chloride (VC) was occurring in the vadose zone (i) above the on-site source zone, and (ii) above the downgradient off-site groundwater plume location. Data from both the on-site and off-site locations were consistent in showing substantially greater (an order of magnitude greater) rates of VC removal from the aerobic vadose zone compared to more recalcitrant contaminants trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE). Soil gas VC isotope analysis showed substantial isotopic enrichment of VC (δ¹³C -5.2 to -10.9‰) compared to groundwater (δ¹³C -39.5‰) at the on-site location. Soil gas CO₂ isotope analysis at both locations showed that CO₂ was highly isotopically depleted (δ¹³C -28.8 to -33.3‰), compared to soil gas CO₂ data originating from natural sediment organic matter (δ¹³C= -14.7 to -21.3‰). The soil gas CO2 δ¹³C values were consistent with near-water table VC groundwater δ¹³C values (-36.8 to -39.5‰), suggesting CO₂ originating from aerobic biodegradation of VC. Bacteria that had functional genes (ethene monooxygenase (etnC) and epoxyalkane transferase (etnE)) involved in ethene metabolism and VC oxidation were more abundant at the source zone where oxygen co-existed with VC. The distribution of VC and oxygen vadose zone vapour plumes, together with long-term changes in soil gas CO₂ concentrations and temperature, provided information to elucidate the factors controlling aerobic biodegradation of VC in the vadose zone. Based on the overlapping VC and oxygen vadose zone vapour plumes, aerobic vapour

  5. Therapeutic aspects of aerobic dance participation.

    PubMed

    Estivill, M

    1995-01-01

    An ethnographic analysis of aerobic dance exercise culture was conducted to determine the impact of the culture on the mind-body connection. After a review of the predominant theories on the relationship between vigorous exercise and elevated mood, aerobic dance participants' experiences are reported to illustrate how cognitive experience and self-esteem may be influenced. Interviews revealed that some participants achieved a pleasantly altered state of consciousness and respite from depression and stress. The relationship of the work ethic to achievement of participant satisfaction is underscored.

  6. Hydrodynamics and collective behavior of the tethered bacterium Thiovulum majus

    PubMed Central

    Petroff, Alexander; Libchaber, Albert

    2014-01-01

    The ecology and dynamics of many microbial systems, particularly in mats and soils, are shaped by how bacteria respond to evolving nutrient gradients and microenvironments. Here we show how the response of the sulfur-oxidizing bacterium Thiovulum majus to changing oxygen gradients causes cells to organize into large-scale fronts. To study this phenomenon, we develop a technique to isolate and enrich these bacteria from the environment. Using this enrichment culture, we observe the formation and dynamics of T. majus fronts in oxygen gradients. We show that these dynamics can be understood as occurring in two steps. First, chemotactic cells moving up the oxygen gradient form a front that propagates with constant velocity. We then show, through observation and mathematical analysis, that this front becomes unstable to changes in cell density. Random perturbations in cell density create oxygen gradients. The response of cells magnifies these gradients and leads to the formation of millimeter-scale fluid flows that actively pull oxygenated water through the front. We argue that this flow results from a nonlinear instability excited by stochastic fluctuations in the density of cells. Finally, we show that the dynamics by which these modes interact can be understood from the chemotactic response of cells. These results provide a mathematically tractable example of how collective phenomena in ecological systems can arise from the individual response of cells to a shared resource. PMID:24459183

  7. Hydrodynamics and collective behavior of the tethered bacterium Thiovulum majus.

    PubMed

    Petroff, Alexander; Libchaber, Albert

    2014-02-04

    The ecology and dynamics of many microbial systems, particularly in mats and soils, are shaped by how bacteria respond to evolving nutrient gradients and microenvironments. Here we show how the response of the sulfur-oxidizing bacterium Thiovulum majus to changing oxygen gradients causes cells to organize into large-scale fronts. To study this phenomenon, we develop a technique to isolate and enrich these bacteria from the environment. Using this enrichment culture, we observe the formation and dynamics of T. majus fronts in oxygen gradients. We show that these dynamics can be understood as occurring in two steps. First, chemotactic cells moving up the oxygen gradient form a front that propagates with constant velocity. We then show, through observation and mathematical analysis, that this front becomes unstable to changes in cell density. Random perturbations in cell density create oxygen gradients. The response of cells magnifies these gradients and leads to the formation of millimeter-scale fluid flows that actively pull oxygenated water through the front. We argue that this flow results from a nonlinear instability excited by stochastic fluctuations in the density of cells. Finally, we show that the dynamics by which these modes interact can be understood from the chemotactic response of cells. These results provide a mathematically tractable example of how collective phenomena in ecological systems can arise from the individual response of cells to a shared resource.

  8. Detection of Salmonella bacterium in drinking water using microring resonator.

    PubMed

    Bahadoran, Mahdi; Noorden, Ahmad Fakhrurrazi Ahmad; Mohajer, Faeze Sadat; Abd Mubin, Mohamad Helmi; Chaudhary, Kashif; Jalil, Muhammad Arif; Ali, Jalil; Yupapin, Preecha

    2016-01-01

    A new microring resonator system is proposed for the detection of the Salmonella bacterium in drinking water, which is made up of SiO2-TiO2 waveguide embedded inside thin film layer of the flagellin. The change in refractive index due to the binding of the Salmonella bacterium with flagellin layer causes a shift in the output signal wavelength and the variation in through and drop port's intensities, which leads to the detection of Salmonella bacterium in drinking water. The sensitivity of proposed sensor for detecting of Salmonella bacterium in water solution is 149 nm/RIU and the limit of detection is 7 × 10(-4)RIU.

  9. Application of Potential Phosphate-Solubilizing Bacteria and Organic Acids on Phosphate Solubilization from Phosphate Rock in Aerobic Rice

    PubMed Central

    Jusop, Shamshuddin; Naher, Umme Aminun; Othman, Radziah; Razi, Mohd Ismail

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted at Universiti Putra Malaysia to determine the effect of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) and organic acids (oxalic & malic) on phosphate (P) solubilization from phosphate rock (PR) and growth of aerobic rice. Four rates of each organic acid (0, 10, 20, and 30 mM), and PSB strain (Bacillus sp.) were applied to aerobic rice. Total bacterial populations, amount of P solubilization, P uptake, soil pH, and root morphology were determined. The results of the study showed significantly high P solubilization in PSB with organic acid treatments. Among the two organic acids, oxalic acid was found more effective compared to malic acid. Application of oxalic acid at 20 mM along with PSB16 significantly increased soluble soil P (28.39 mg kg−1), plant P uptake (0.78 P pot−1), and plant biomass (33.26 mg). Addition of organic acids with PSB and PR had no influence on soil pH during the planting period. A higher bacterial population was found in rhizosphere (8.78 log10 cfu g−1) compared to the nonrhizosphere and endosphere regions. The application of organic acids along with PSB enhanced soluble P in the soil solution, improved root growth, and increased plant biomass of aerobic rice seedlings without affecting soil pH. PMID:24288473

  10. Development of microorganisms in the chernozem under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyanskaya, L. M.; Gorbacheva, M. A.; Milanovskii, E. Yu.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.

    2010-03-01

    A microbial succession was studied under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by means of experiments with microcosms in different horizons of a chernozem. It was revealed that, under aerobic conditions, all the microorganisms grow irrespective of the soil horizon; fungi and bacteria grow at the first succession stages, and actinomycetes grow at the last stages. It was shown that, in the case of a simulated anaerobiosis commonly used to study anaerobic populations of bacteria, the mycelium of micromycetes grows in the upper part of the chernozem’s A horizon. Under anaerobic conditions, the peak of the mycelium development is shifted from the 3rd to 7th days (typical for aerobic conditions) to the 7th to 15th days of incubation. The level of mycelium length’s stabilization under aerobic and anaerobic conditions also differs: it is higher or lower than the initial one, respectively. Under anaerobic conditions, the growth of fungal mycelium, bacteria, and actinomycetes in the lower part of the A horizon and in the B horizon is extremely weak. There was not any observed growth of actinomycetes in all the chernozem’s horizons under anaerobic conditions.

  11. ANAEROBIC AND AEROBIC TREATMENT OF CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biological degradation of 12 chlorinated aliphatic compounds (CACs) was assessed in bench-top reactors and in serum bottle tests. Three continuously mixed daily batch-fed reactor systems were evaluated: anaerobic, aerobic, and sequential-anaerobic-aerobic (sequential). Glucose,...

  12. What Drives the Occurrence of the Melioidosis Bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei in Domestic Gardens?

    PubMed Central

    Kaestli, Mirjam; Harrington, Glenda; Mayo, Mark; Chatfield, Mark D.; Harrington, Ian; Hill, Audrey; Munksgaard, Niels; Gibb, Karen; Currie, Bart J.

    2015-01-01

    Melioidosis is an often fatal infectious disease affecting humans and animals in tropical regions and is caused by the saprophytic environmental bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. Domestic gardens are not only a common source of exposure to soil and thus to B. pseudomallei, but they also have been found to contain more B. pseudomallei than other environments. In this study we addressed whether anthropogenic manipulations common to gardens such as irrigation or fertilizers change the occurrence of B. pseudomallei. We conducted a soil microcosm experiment with a range of fertilizers and soil types as well as a longitudinal interventional study over three years on an experimental fertilized field site in an area naturally positive for B. pseudomallei. Irrigation was the only consistent treatment to increase B. pseudomallei occurrence over time. The effects of fertilizers upon these bacteria depended on soil texture, physicochemical soil properties and biotic factors. Nitrates and urea increased B. pseudomallei load in sand while phosphates had a positive effect in clay. The high buffering and cation exchange capacities of organic material found in a commercial potting mix led to a marked increase in soil salinity with no survival of B. pseudomallei after four weeks in the potting mix sampled. Imported grasses were also associated with B. pseudomallei occurrence in a multivariate model. With increasing population density in endemic areas these findings inform the identification of areas in the anthropogenic environment with increased risk of exposure to B. pseudomallei. PMID:25803046

  13. What drives the occurrence of the melioidosis bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei in domestic gardens?

    PubMed

    Kaestli, Mirjam; Harrington, Glenda; Mayo, Mark; Chatfield, Mark D; Harrington, Ian; Hill, Audrey; Munksgaard, Niels; Gibb, Karen; Currie, Bart J

    2015-03-01

    Melioidosis is an often fatal infectious disease affecting humans and animals in tropical regions and is caused by the saprophytic environmental bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. Domestic gardens are not only a common source of exposure to soil and thus to B. pseudomallei, but they also have been found to contain more B. pseudomallei than other environments. In this study we addressed whether anthropogenic manipulations common to gardens such as irrigation or fertilizers change the occurrence of B. pseudomallei. We conducted a soil microcosm experiment with a range of fertilizers and soil types as well as a longitudinal interventional study over three years on an experimental fertilized field site in an area naturally positive for B. pseudomallei. Irrigation was the only consistent treatment to increase B. pseudomallei occurrence over time. The effects of fertilizers upon these bacteria depended on soil texture, physicochemical soil properties and biotic factors. Nitrates and urea increased B. pseudomallei load in sand while phosphates had a positive effect in clay. The high buffering and cation exchange capacities of organic material found in a commercial potting mix led to a marked increase in soil salinity with no survival of B. pseudomallei after four weeks in the potting mix sampled. Imported grasses were also associated with B. pseudomallei occurrence in a multivariate model. With increasing population density in endemic areas these findings inform the identification of areas in the anthropogenic environment with increased risk of exposure to B. pseudomallei.

  14. Microbiology and potential applications of aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (AME-D) process: A review.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing; Wang, Qian; Yuan, Mengdong; Tan, Giin-Yu Amy; Sun, Faqian; Wang, Cheng; Wu, Weixiang; Lee, Po-Heng

    2016-03-01

    Aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (AME-D) is an important link between the global methane and nitrogen cycles. This mini-review updates discoveries regarding aerobic methanotrophs and denitrifiers, as a prelude to spotlight the microbial mechanism and the potential applications of AME-D. Until recently, AME-D was thought to be accomplished by a microbial consortium where denitrifying bacteria utilize carbon intermediates, which are excreted by aerobic methanotrophs, as energy and carbon sources. Potential carbon intermediates include methanol, citrate and acetate. This mini-review presents microbial thermodynamic estimations and postulates that methanol is the ideal electron donor for denitrification, and may serve as a trophic link between methanotrophic bacteria and denitrifiers. More excitingly, new discoveries have revealed that AME-D is not only confined to the conventional synergism between methanotrophic bacteria and denitrifiers. Specifically, an obligate aerobic methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomonas denitrificans FJG1, has been demonstrated to couple partial denitrification with methane oxidation, under hypoxia conditions, releasing nitrous oxide as a terminal product. This finding not only substantially advances the understanding of AME-D mechanism, but also implies an important but unknown role of aerobic methanotrophs in global climate change through their influence on both the methane and nitrogen cycles in ecosystems. Hence, further investigation on AME-D microbiology and mechanism is essential to better understand global climate issues and to develop niche biotechnological solutions. This mini-review also presents traditional microbial techniques, such as pure cultivation and stable isotope probing, and powerful microbial techniques, such as (meta-) genomics and (meta-) transcriptomics, for deciphering linked methane oxidation and denitrification. Although AME-D has immense potential for nitrogen removal from wastewater, drinking

  15. Anaerobic and aerobic transformation of TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Kulpa, C.F.; Boopathy, R.; Manning, J.

    1996-12-31

    Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds have used pure cultures of aerobic microorganisms. In many cases, attempts to degrade nitroaromatics under aerobic conditions by pure cultures result in no mineralization and only superficial modifications of the structure. However, mixed culture systems properly operated result in the transformation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and in some cases mineralization of TNT occurs. In this paper, the mixed culture system is described with emphasis on intermediates and the characteristics of the aerobic microbial process including the necessity for a co-substrate. The possibility of removing TNT under aerobic/anoxic conditions is described in detail. Another option for the biodegradation of TNT and nitroaromatics is under anaerobic, sulfate reducing conditions. In this instance, the nitroaromatic compounds undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. TNT under sulfate reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene presumably by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of nitro groups from TNT is achieved by a series of reductive reactions with the formation of ammonia and toluene by Desulfovibrio sp. (B strain). These metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. The data supporting the anaerobic transformation of TNT under different growth condition are reviewed in this report.

  16. Aerobic Exercise Prescription for Rheumatoid Arthritics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Blanche W.; Williams, Hilda L.

    The use of exercise as a general treatment for rheumatoid arthritics (RA) has included range of motion, muscular strength, water exercise and rest therapy while virtually ignoring possible benefits of aerobic exercise. The purposes of this project were to examine the guidelines for exercise prescription in relation to this special population and…

  17. Reflections on Psychotherapy and Aerobic Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Wade

    This document provides a series of reflections by a practicing psychologist on the uses of aerobic workouts in psychotherapy. Two case histories are cited to illustrate the contention that the mode of exercise, rather than simply its presence or absence, is the significant indicator of a patient's emotional well-being or psychopathology. The first…

  18. AEROBIC DENITRIFICATION: IMPLICATIONS FOR NITROGEN FATE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the Mississippi, as well as most nitrogen-degraded rivers and streams, NO3- is the dominant N species and therefore understanding its biogeochemical behavior is critical for accurate nitrogen fate modeling. To our knowledge this is the first work to report aerobic denitrificat...

  19. Aerobic exercise in fibromyalgia: a practical review.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Eric N; Blotman, Francis

    2010-07-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the current evidence to support guidelines for aerobic exercise (AE) and fibromyalgia (FM) in practice, and to outline specific research needs in these areas. Data sources consisted of a PubMed search, 2007 Cochrane Data Base Systematic review, 2008 Ottawa panel evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, as well as additional references found from the initial search. Study selection included randomized clinical trials that compared an aerobic-only exercise intervention (land or pool based) with an untreated control, a non-exercise intervention or other exercise programs in patients responding to the 1990 American College of Rheumatology criteria for FM. The following outcome data were obtained: pain, tender points, perceived improvement in FM symptoms such as the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire total score (FIQ), physical function, depression (e.g., Beck Depression Inventory, FIQ subscale for depression), fatigue and sleep were extracted from 19 clinical trials that considered the effects of aerobic-only exercise in FM patients. Data synthesis shows that there is moderate evidence of important benefit of aerobic-only exercise in FM on physical function and possibly on tender points and pain. It appears to be sufficient evidence to support the practice of AE as a part of the multidisciplinary management of FM. However, future studies must be more adequately sized, homogeneously assessed, and monitored for adherence, to draw definitive conclusions.

  20. Media for the aerobic growth of campylobacter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of agar and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) concentration on aerobic growth of Campylobacter in a fumarate-pyruvate medium was examined. The broth medium was supplemented with 0.0 to 0.2% agar and inoculated with 106 CFU/ml of Campylobacter coli 33559, Campylobacter fetus 27349, Campylobacter...

  1. Adolescents' Interest and Performances in Aerobic Fitness Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Xihe; Chen, Senlin; Parrott, James

    2014-01-01

    This study examined adolescents' interest in aerobic fitness testing and its relation to the test performances. Adolescents (N = 356) from three middle schools participated in the study. The participants took two aerobic fitness tests: the Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run (PACER) and One-Mile Run (1MR) with a two-day interval, and…

  2. Ventilation and Speech Characteristics during Submaximal Aerobic Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Susan E.; Hipp, Jenny; Alessio, Helaine

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined alterations in ventilation and speech characteristics as well as perceived dyspnea during submaximal aerobic exercise tasks. Method: Twelve healthy participants completed aerobic exercise-only and simultaneous speaking and aerobic exercise tasks at 50% and 75% of their maximum oxygen consumption (VO[subscript 2] max).…

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Kocuria rhizophila RF, a Radiation-Resistant Soil Isolate.

    PubMed

    Mehrabadi, Jalil Fallah; Mirzaie, Amir; Ahangar, Nahid; Rahimi, Arian; Rokni-Zadeh, Hassan

    2016-03-10

    Kocuria rhizophila RF, a soil isolate from Iran, is a radiation-resistant bacterium. Only a limited amount of genomic information for radiation-resistant bacteria is currently available. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this bacterium, providing knowledge to aid in the discovery of the genomic basis of its resistance to radiation.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Kocuria rhizophila RF, a Radiation-Resistant Soil Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabadi, Jalil Fallah; Mirzaie, Amir; Ahangar, Nahid; Rahimi, Arian

    2016-01-01

    Kocuria rhizophila RF, a soil isolate from Iran, is a radiation-resistant bacterium. Only a limited amount of genomic information for radiation-resistant bacteria is currently available. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this bacterium, providing knowledge to aid in the discovery of the genomic basis of its resistance to radiation. PMID:26966202

  5. Anaerobic Metabolism: Linkages to Trace Gases and Aerobic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megonigal, J. P.; Hines, M. E.; Visscher, P. T.

    2003-12-01

    Life evolved and flourished in the absence of molecular oxygen (O2). As the O2 content of the atmosphere rose to the present level of 21% beginning about two billion years ago, anaerobic metabolism was gradually supplanted by aerobic metabolism. Anaerobic environments have persisted on Earth despite the transformation to an oxidized state because of the combined influence of water and organic matter. Molecular oxygen diffuses about 104 times more slowly through water than air, and organic matter supports a large biotic O2 demand that consumes the supply faster than it is replaced by diffusion. Such conditions exist in wetlands, rivers, estuaries, coastal marine sediments, aquifers, anoxic water columns, sewage digesters, landfills, the intestinal tracts of animals, and the rumen of herbivores. Anaerobic microsites are also embedded in oxic environments such as upland soils and marine water columns. Appreciable rates of aerobic respiration are restricted to areas that are in direct contact with air or those inhabited by organisms that produce O2.Rising atmospheric O2 reduced the global area of anaerobic habitat, but enhanced the overall rate of anaerobic metabolism (at least on an area basis) by increasing the supply of electron donors and acceptors. Organic carbon production increased dramatically, as did oxidized forms of nitrogen, manganese, iron, sulfur, and many other elements. In contemporary anaerobic ecosystems, nearly all of the reducing power is derived from photosynthesis, and most of it eventually returns to O2, the most electronegative electron acceptor that is abundant. This photosynthetically driven redox gradient has been thoroughly exploited by aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms for metabolism. The same is true of hydrothermal vents (Tunnicliffe, 1992) and some deep subsurface environments ( Chapelle et al., 2002), where thermal energy is the ultimate source of the reducing power.Although anaerobic habitats are currently a small fraction of Earth

  6. [The new bacteriochlorophyll a-containing bacterium Roseinatronobacter monicus sp. nov. from the hypersaline soda Mono Lake (California, United States)].

    PubMed

    Boldareva, E N; Briantseva, I A; Tsapin, A; Nelson, K; Sorokin, D Iu; Turova, T P; Boĭchenko, V A; Stadnichuk, I N; Gorlenko, V M

    2007-01-01

    Two strains of pink-colored aerobic bacteriochlorophyll a-containing bacteria were isolated from aerobic (strain ROS 10) and anaerobic (strain ROS 35) zones of the water column of Mono Lake (California, United States). Cells of the bacteria were nonmotile oval gram-negative rods multiplying by binary fission by means of a constriction. No intracellular membranes were detected. Polyphosphates and poly-1-hydroxybutyric acid were the storage compounds. Pigments were represented by bacteriochlorophyll a and carotenoids of the spheroidene series. The strains were obligately aerobic, mesophilic (temperature optimum of 25-30 degrees C), alkaliphilic (pH optimum of 8.5-9.5), and halophilic (optimal NaCl concentration of 40-60 g/l). They were obligately heterotrophic and grew aerobically in the dark and in the light. Respiration was inhibited by light at wavelengths corresponding to the absorption of the cellular pigments. The substrate utilization spectra were strain-specific. In the course of organotrophic growth, the bacteria could oxidize thiosulfate to sulfate; sulfide and polysulfide could also be oxidized. The DNA G+C content was 59.4 mol % in strain ROS 10 and 59 mol % in strain ROS 35. In their phenotypic properties, the new strains were close but not identical to the alkaliphilic bacterium Roseinatronobacter thiooxidans. The distinctions in the nucleotide sequences of the 16S rRNA genes (2%) and low DNA-DNA hybridization level with Rna. thiooxidans (22-25%) allow the new strains to be assigned to a new species of the genus Roseinatronobacter, Roseinatronobacter monicus sp. nov.

  7. Climatic thresholds for pedogenic iron oxides under aerobic conditions: Processes and their significance in paleoclimate reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Xiaoyong; Ji, Junfeng; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José

    2016-10-01

    Iron oxides are widely distributed across the surface of the Earth as a result of the aerobic weathering of primary Fe-bearing minerals. Pedogenic iron oxides which consist mainly of hematite (Hm), goethite (Gt), maghemite (Mgh), are often concentrated synchronously in aerobic soils under low to moderate rainfall regimes. Magnetic susceptibility (χ) and redness, which respectively reflect the content of Mgh and Hm in soils, are considered reasonable pedogenic and climatic indicators in soil taxonomy and paleorainfall reconstruction. However, under high rainfall regimes, the grain growth of Mgh and transformation to Hm, combined with the prior formation of Gt under conditions of high relative humidity (RH), can result in magnetic reduction and dramatic yellowing of soils and sediments, which explains the existence of rainfall thresholds for Mgh and Hm at a large scale even before the pedogenic environment turns anaerobic. In order to capture the rainfall thresholds for Mgh and Hm occurring under aerobic conditions, we explored a tropical transect across a granitic region where the soil color turned from red to yellow under a wide rainfall range of 900-2200 mm/yr and a corresponding mean annual RH range of 77%-85%. We observed a lower rainfall threshold of ∼1500 mm/yr and a corresponding RH ∼80% for Mgh and Hm along this transect, as well as a higher rainfall threshold of ∼1700 mm/yr and a corresponding RH of ∼81% for Gt and total pedogenic iron oxides (citrate/bicarbonate/dithionite-extractable Fe, Fed). Cross-referencing with comparable studies in temperate and subtropical regions, we noted that the rainfall or RH thresholds for Fed and Hm or Mgh likewise increase with temperature. Moreover, the different thresholds for total and individual iron oxide phase indicates that a negative correlation between chemical weathering intensity and redness or χ in sediment sequences can occur under the prevalent climate regime just between their thresholds. Finally

  8. Aerobic exercise training in modulation of aerobic physical fitness and balance of burned patients.

    PubMed

    Ali, Zizi M Ibrahim; El-Refay, Basant H; Ali, Rania Reffat

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the impact of aerobic exercise on aerobic capacity, balance, and treadmill time in patients with thermal burn injury. [Subjects and Methods] Burned adult patients, aged 20-40 years (n=30), from both sexes, with second degree thermal burn injuries covering 20-40% of the total body surface area (TBSA), were enrolled in this trial for 3 months. Patients were randomly divided into; group A (n=15), which performed an aerobic exercise program 3 days/week for 60 min and participated in a traditional physical therapy program, and group B (n=15), which only participated in a traditional exercise program 3 days/week. Maximal aerobic capacity, treadmill time, and Berg balance scale were measured before and after the study. [Results] In both groups, the results revealed significant improvements after treatment in all measurements; however, the improvement in group A was superior to that in group B. [Conclusion] The results provide evidence that aerobic exercises for adults with healed burn injuries improve aerobic physical fitness and balance.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of the Suttonella ornithocola Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Waldman Ben-Asher, Hiba; Yerushalmi, Rebecca; Wachtel, Chaim; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT   We report here the draft genome sequence of the Suttonella ornithocola bacterium. To date, this bacterium, found in birds, passed only phylogenetic and phenotypic analyses. To our knowledge, this is the first publication of the Suttonella ornithocola genome sequence. The genetic profile provides a basis for further analysis of its infection pathways. PMID:28209820

  10. Aerobic degradation of BDE-209 by Enterococcus casseliflavus: Isolation, identification and cell changes during degradation process.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shaoyu; Yin, Hua; Chen, Shuona; Peng, Hui; Chang, Jingjing; Liu, Zehua; Dang, Zhi

    2016-05-05

    Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) is one of the most commonly used brominated flame retardants that have contaminated the environment worldwide. Microbial bioremediation has been considered as an effective technique to remove these sorts of persistent organic pollutants. Enterococcus casseliflavus, a gram-positive bacterium capable of aerobically transforming BDE-209, was isolated by our team from sediments in Guiyu, an e-waste dismantling area in Guangdong Province, China. To promote microbial bioremediation of BDE-209 and elucidate the mechanism behind its aerobic degradation, the effects of BDE-209 on the cell changes of E. casseliflavus were examined in this study. The experimental results demonstrated that the high cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) of E. casseliflavus made the bacteria absorb hydrophobic BDE-209 more easily. E. casseliflavus responded to BDE-209 stress, resulting in an increase in cell membrane permeability and accumulation of BDE-209 inside the cell. The differential expression of intracellular protein was analyzed through two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). More than 50 differentially expressed protein spots were reproducibly detected, including 25 up, and 25 down regulated after a 4 days exposure. Moreover, the apoptotic-like cell changes were observed during E. casseliflavus mediated degradation of BDE-209 by means of flow cytometry.

  11. Effects of hexavalent chromium on performance and microbial community of an aerobic granular sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zichao; Gao, Mengchun; She, Zonglian; Jin, Chunji; Zhao, Yangguo; Yang, Shiying; Guo, Liang; Wang, Sen

    2015-03-01

    The performance and microbial community of an aerobic granular sequencing batch reactor (GSBR) were investigated at different hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) concentrations. The COD and NH4 (+)-N removal efficiencies decreased with the increase in Cr(VI) concentration from 0 to 30 mg/L. The specific oxygen utilization rate (SOUR) decreased from 34.86 to 12.18 mg/(g mixed liquor suspended sludge (MLSS)·h) with the increase in Cr(VI) concentration from 0 to 30 mg/L. The specific ammonium oxidation rate (SAOR), specific nitrite oxidation rate (SNOR), and specific nitrate reduction rate (SNRR) decreased with the increase in Cr(VI) concentration, whereas the SNRR was always higher than the sum of SAOR and SNOR at 0-30 mg/L Cr(VI). The scanning electron micrographs (SEM) showed some undefined particles on the surface of filamentous bacteria that might be the chelation of chromium and macromolecular organics at 30 mg/L Cr(VI). The denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles revealed that some microorganisms adapting to high Cr(VI) concentration gradually became the predominant bacteria, while others without Cr(VI)-tolerance capacity tended to deplete or weaken. Some bacteria could tolerate the toxicity of high Cr(VI) concentration in the aerobic GSBR, such as Propionibacteriaceae bacterium, Ochrobactrum anthropi, and Micropruina glycogenica.

  12. Aerobic biodegradation of organic compounds in hydraulic fracturing fluids.

    PubMed

    Kekacs, Daniel; Drollette, Brian D; Brooker, Michael; Plata, Desiree L; Mouser, Paula J

    2015-07-01

    Little is known of the attenuation of chemical mixtures created for hydraulic fracturing within the natural environment. A synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluid was developed from disclosed industry formulas and produced for laboratory experiments using commercial additives in use by Marcellus shale field crews. The experiments employed an internationally accepted standard method (OECD 301A) to evaluate aerobic biodegradation potential of the fluid mixture by monitoring the removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from an aqueous solution by activated sludge and lake water microbial consortia for two substrate concentrations and four salinities. Microbial degradation removed from 57 % to more than 90 % of added DOC within 6.5 days, with higher removal efficiency at more dilute concentrations and little difference in overall removal extent between sludge and lake microbe treatments. The alcohols isopropanol and octanol were degraded to levels below detection limits while the solvent acetone accumulated in biological treatments through time. Salinity concentrations of 40 g/L or more completely inhibited degradation during the first 6.5 days of incubation with the synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluid even though communities were pre-acclimated to salt. Initially diverse microbial communities became dominated by 16S rRNA sequences affiliated with Pseudomonas and other Pseudomonadaceae after incubation with the synthetic fracturing fluid, taxa which may be involved in acetone production. These data expand our understanding of constraints on the biodegradation potential of organic compounds in hydraulic fracturing fluids under aerobic conditions in the event that they are accidentally released to surface waters and shallow soils.

  13. Aerobic microbial manufacture of nanoscale selenium: exploiting nature's bio-nanomineralization potential.

    PubMed

    Tejo Prakash, N; Sharma, Neetu; Prakash, Ranjana; Raina, Kuldeep K; Fellowes, Jonathan; Pearce, Carolyn I; Lloyd, Jonathan R; Pattrick, Richard A D

    2009-12-01

    The potential of the environment to yield organisms that can produce functional bionanominerals is demonstrated by selenium-tolerant, aerobic bacteria isolated from a seleniferous rhizosphere soil. An isolate, NS3, was identified as a Bacillus species (EU573774.1) based on morphological and 16S rRNA characterization. This strain reduced Se(IV) under aerobic conditions to produce amorphous alpha Se(0) nanospheres. A room-temperature washing treatment was then employed to remove the biomass and resulted in the production of clusters of hexagonal Se(0) nano-rods. The Se(0) nanominerals were analyzed using electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. This Bacillus isolate has the potential to be used both in the neutralizing of toxic Se(IV) anions in the environment and in the environmentally friendly manufacture of nanomaterials.

  14. Fatiguing upper body aerobic exercise impairs balance.

    PubMed

    Douris, Peter C; Handrakis, John P; Gendy, Joseph; Salama, Mina; Kwon, Dae; Brooks, Richard; Salama, Nardine; Southard, Veronica

    2011-12-01

    Douris, PC, Handrakis, JP, Gendy, J, Salama, M, Kwon, D, Brooks, R, Salama, N, and Southard, V. Fatiguing upper body aerobic exercise impairs balance. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3299-3305, 2011-There are many studies that have examined the effects of selectively fatiguing lower extremity muscle groups with various protocols, and they have all shown to impair balance. There is limited research regarding the effect of fatiguing upper extremity exercise on balance. Muscle fiber-type recruitment patterns may be responsible for the difference between balance impairments because of fatiguing aerobic and anaerobic exercise. The purpose of our study was to investigate the effect that aerobic vs. anaerobic fatigue, upper vs. lower body fatigue will have on balance, and if so, which combination will affect balance to a greater degree. Fourteen healthy subjects, 7 men and 7 women (mean age 23.5 ± 1.7 years) took part in this study. Their mean body mass index was 23.6 ± 3.2. The study used a repeated-measures design. The effect on balance was documented after the 4 fatiguing conditions: aerobic lower body (ALB), aerobic upper body (AUB), anaerobic lower body, anaerobic upper body (WUB). The aerobic conditions used an incremental protocol performed to fatigue, and the anaerobic used the Wingate protocol. Balance was measured as a single-leg stance stability score using the Biodex Balance System. A stability score for each subject was recorded immediately after each of the 4 conditions. A repeated-measures analysis of variance with the pretest score as a covariate was used to analyze the effects of the 4 fatiguing conditions on balance. There were significant differences between the 4 conditions (p = 0.001). Post hoc analysis revealed that there were significant differences between the AUB, mean score 4.98 ± 1.83, and the WUB, mean score 4.09 ± 1.42 (p = 0.014) and between AUB and ALB mean scores 4.33 ± 1.40 (p = 0.029). Normative data for single-leg stability testing for

  15. Evaluation of methyl fluoride and dimethyl ether as inhibitors of aerobic methane oxidation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Culbertson, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    Methyl fluoride (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) were effective inhibitors of aerobic methanotrophy in a variety of soils. MF and DME blocked consumption of CH4 as well as the oxidation of 14CH4 to 14CO2, but neither MF nor DME affected the oxidation of [14C]methanol or [14C]formate to 14CO2. Cooxidation of ethane and propane by methane-oxidizing soils was also inhibited by MF. Nitrification (ammonia oxidation) in soils was inhibited by both MF and DME. Production of N2O via nitrification was inhibited by MF; however, MF did not affect N2O production associated with denitrification. Methanogenesis was partially inhibited by MF but not by DME. Methane oxidation was ~100-fold more sensitive to MF than was methanogenesis, indicating that an optimum concentration could be employed to selectively block methanotrophy. MF inhibited methane oxidation by cell suspensions of Methylococcus capsulatus; however, DME was a much less effective inhibitor.

  16. Molecular and Cellular Fundamentals of Aerobic Cometabolism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    1 99 1 ) Butane Pseudomonas butane monooxygenase (Hamamura, et al . , butanovorars (BMO) 1 997) 2,4-Dichloro Alcaligenes eutrophus...Leadbetter and Foster, 1 960). These studies initially revealed that the methane-utilizing bacterium Pseudomonas (Methylomonas) methanica could not grow...enzyme is required for each insertion. Pseudomonas mendocina KR 1 toluene-4-monooxygenase (T4MO) produces p-cresol ; Pseudomonas picketii toluene

  17. Arthrobacter globiformis and its bacteriophage in soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.; Liu, K.-C.

    1974-01-01

    An attempt was made to correlate bacteriophages for Arthrobacter globiformis with soils containing that bacterium. The phages were not detected unless the soil was nutritionally amended (with glucose or sucrose) and incubated for several days. Phage was continuously produced after amendment without the addition of host Arthrobacter. These results indicate that the bacteriophage is present in a masked state and that the bacteria are present in an insensitive form which becomes sensitive after addition of nutrient.

  18. Paenibacillus shenyangensis sp. nov., a bioflocculant-producing species isolated from soil under a peach tree.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Binhui; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Jinliang; Fu, Lili; Yang, Chengcheng; Hu, Xiaomin

    2015-01-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, aerobic or facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped, non-motile, endospore-forming bacterium, strain A9(T), was isolated in 1996 from a soil sample collected under a peach tree in Qingnian Park in Shenyang, PR China, and its taxonomic position was investigated using a polyphasic approach. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the strain belonged to the genus Paenibacillus, and was most closely related to the type strain of Paenibacillus hunanensis with a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 96.7 % and a DNA-DNA relatedness value of 51.6 %. The major polar lipids of strain A9(T) were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. The predominant menaquinone was MK-7 and the major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C15 : 0, C16 : 0 and iso-C15 : 0. The DNA G+C content was 51.9 mol%. Based on these results, it is concluded that strain A9(T) represents a novel species of the genus Paenibacillus, for which the name Paenibacillus shenyangensis sp. nov. is proposed, with A9(T) ( = JCM 19307(T) = CGMCC 2040(T)) as the type strain.

  19. Bacillus taiwanensis sp. nov., isolated from a soil sample from Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Liu, Guo-Hong; Sengonca, Cetin; Schumann, Peter; Wang, Ming-Kuang; Xiao, Rong-Feng; Zheng, Xue-Fang; Chen, Zheng

    2015-07-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, rod-shaped, endospore-forming, aerobic bacterium (FJAT-14571(T)) was isolated from a soil sample in Taiwan. Strain FJAT-14571(T) grew at 20-40 °C (optimum 35 °C), pH 6-10 (optimum pH 8) and 0-2% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 0%). Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain FJAT-14571(T) was a member of the genus Bacillus and was most closely related to Bacillus oceanisediminis DSM 24771(T) (96.2%). DNA-DNA relatedness between strain FJAT-14571(T) and B. oceanisediminis DSM 24771(T) was low (32.0% ± 0.88%). The diagnostic diamino acid of the peptidoglycan of strain FJAT-14571(T) was meso-diaminopimelic acid and the predominant menaquinone was MK-7 (96.6%). The major cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0 (46.4%), anteiso-C15 : 0 (7.6%), iso-C17 : 0 (8.2%) and iso-C16 : 0 (10.0 %) and the DNA G+C content was 40.8 mol%. Phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic properties clearly indicated that strain FJAT-14571(T) represents a novel species within the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus taiwanensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is FJAT-14571(T) ( = DSM 27845(T) = CGMCC1.1 2698(T)).

  20. Ca2+-stabilized adhesin helps an Antarctic bacterium reach out and bind ice.

    PubMed

    Vance, Tyler D R; Olijve, Luuk L C; Campbell, Robert L; Voets, Ilja K; Davies, Peter L; Guo, Shuaiqi

    2014-07-04

    The large size of a 1.5-MDa ice-binding adhesin [MpAFP (Marinomonas primoryensis antifreeze protein)] from an Antarctic Gram-negative bacterium, M. primoryensis, is mainly due to its highly repetitive RII (Region II). MpAFP_RII contains roughly 120 tandem copies of an identical 104-residue repeat. We have previously determined that a single RII repeat folds as a Ca2+-dependent immunoglobulin-like domain. Here, we solved the crystal structure of RII tetra-tandemer (four tandem RII repeats) to a resolution of 1.8 Å. The RII tetra-tandemer reveals an extended (~190-Å × ~25-Å), rod-like structure with four RII-repeats aligned in series with each other. The inter-repeat regions of the RII tetra-tandemer are strengthened by Ca2+ bound to acidic residues. SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering) profiles indicate the RII tetra-tandemer is significantly rigidified upon Ca2+ binding, and that the protein's solution structure is in excellent agreement with its crystal structure. We hypothesize that >600 Ca2+ help rigidify the chain of ~120 104-residue repeats to form a ~0.6 μm rod-like structure in order to project the ice-binding domain of MpAFP away from the bacterial cell surface. The proposed extender role of RII can help the strictly aerobic, motile bacterium bind ice in the upper reaches of the Antarctic lake where oxygen and nutrients are most abundant. Ca2+-induced rigidity of tandem Ig-like repeats in large adhesins might be a general mechanism used by bacteria to bind to their substrates and help colonize specific niches.

  1. Osmoregulation in the Halophilic Bacterium Halomonas elongata: A Case Study for Integrative Systems Biology

    PubMed Central

    Knabe, Nicole; Siedler, Frank; Scheffer, Beatrix; Pflüger-Grau, Katharina; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Oesterhelt, Dieter; Marin-Sanguino, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Halophilic bacteria use a variety of osmoregulatory methods, such as the accumulation of one or more compatible solutes. The wide diversity of compounds that can act as compatible solute complicates the task of understanding the different strategies that halophilic bacteria use to cope with salt. This is specially challenging when attempting to go beyond the pathway that produces a certain compatible solute towards an understanding of how the metabolic network as a whole addresses the problem. Metabolic reconstruction based on genomic data together with Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) is a promising tool to gain insight into this problem. However, as more of these reconstructions become available, it becomes clear that processes predicted by genome annotation may not reflect the processes that are active in vivo. As a case in point, E. coli is unable to grow aerobically on citrate in spite of having all the necessary genes to do it. It has also been shown that the realization of this genetic potential into an actual capability to metabolize citrate is an extremely unlikely event under normal evolutionary conditions. Moreover, many marine bacteria seem to have the same pathways to metabolize glucose but each species uses a different one. In this work, a metabolic network inferred from genomic annotation of the halophilic bacterium Halomonas elongata and proteomic profiling experiments are used as a starting point to motivate targeted experiments in order to find out some of the defining features of the osmoregulatory strategies of this bacterium. This new information is then used to refine the network in order to describe the actual capabilities of H. elongata, rather than its genetic potential. PMID:28081159

  2. Ca2+-stabilized adhesin helps an Antarctic bacterium reach out and bind ice

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Tyler D. R.; Olijve, Luuk L. C.; Campbell, Robert L.; Voets, Ilja K.; Davies, Peter L.; Guo, Shuaiqi

    2014-01-01

    The large size of a 1.5-MDa ice-binding adhesin [MpAFP (Marinomonas primoryensis antifreeze protein)] from an Antarctic Gram-negative bacterium, M. primoryensis, is mainly due to its highly repetitive RII (Region II). MpAFP_RII contains roughly 120 tandem copies of an identical 104-residue repeat. We have previously determined that a single RII repeat folds as a Ca2+-dependent immunoglobulin-like domain. Here, we solved the crystal structure of RII tetra-tandemer (four tandem RII repeats) to a resolution of 1.8 Å. The RII tetra-tandemer reveals an extended (~190-Å × ~25-Å), rod-like structure with four RII-repeats aligned in series with each other. The inter-repeat regions of the RII tetra-tandemer are strengthened by Ca2+ bound to acidic residues. SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering) profiles indicate the RII tetra-tandemer is significantly rigidified upon Ca2+ binding, and that the protein's solution structure is in excellent agreement with its crystal structure. We hypothesize that >600 Ca2+ help rigidify the chain of ~120 104-residue repeats to form a ~0.6 μm rod-like structure in order to project the ice-binding domain of MpAFP away from the bacterial cell surface. The proposed extender role of RII can help the strictly aerobic, motile bacterium bind ice in the upper reaches of the Antarctic lake where oxygen and nutrients are most abundant. Ca2+-induced rigidity of tandem Ig-like repeats in large adhesins might be a general mechanism used by bacteria to bind to their substrates and help colonize specific niches. PMID:24892750

  3. Production of polyhydroxybutyrate by the marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum P5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jinling; Wei, Ying; Zhao, Yupeng; Pan, Guanghua; Wang, Guangce

    2012-07-01

    The effects of different NaCl concentrations, nitrogen sources, carbon sources, and carbon to nitrogen molar ratios on biomass accumulation and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) production were studied in batch cultures of the marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum P5 under aerobic-dark conditions. The results show that the accumulation of PHB in strain P5 is a growth-associated process. Strain P5 had maximum biomass and PHB accumulation at 2%-3% NaCl, suggesting that the bacterium can maintain growth and potentially produce PHB at natural seawater salinity. In the nitrogen source test, the maximum biomass accumulation (8.10±0.09 g/L) and PHB production (1.11±0.13 g/L and 14.62%±2.2 of the cell dry weight) were observed when peptone and ammonium chloride were used as the sole nitrogen source. NH{4/+}-N was better for PHB production than other nitrogen sources. In the carbon source test, the maximum biomass concentration (7.65±0.05 g/L) was obtained with malic acid as the sole carbon source, whereas the maximum yield of PHB (5.03±0.18 g/L and 66.93%±1.69% of the cell dry weight) was obtained with sodium pyruvate as the sole carbon source. In the carbon to nitrogen ratios test, sodium pyruvate and ammonium chloride were selected as the carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. The best carbon to nitrogen molar ratio for biomass accumulation (8.77±0.58 g/L) and PHB production (6.07±0.25 g/L and 69.25%±2.05% of the cell dry weight) was 25. The results provide valuable data on the production of PHB by R. sulfidophilum P5 and further studies are on-going for best cell growth and PHB yield.

  4. Aerobic and two-stage anaerobic-aerobic sludge digestion with pure oxygen and air aeration.

    PubMed

    Zupancic, Gregor D; Ros, Milenko

    2008-01-01

    The degradability of excess activated sludge from a wastewater treatment plant was studied. The objective was establishing the degree of degradation using either air or pure oxygen at different temperatures. Sludge treated with pure oxygen was degraded at temperatures from 22 degrees C to 50 degrees C while samples treated with air were degraded between 32 degrees C and 65 degrees C. Using air, sludge is efficiently degraded at 37 degrees C and at 50-55 degrees C. With oxygen, sludge was most effectively degraded at 38 degrees C or at 25-30 degrees C. Two-stage anaerobic-aerobic processes were studied. The first anaerobic stage was always operated for 5 days HRT, and the second stage involved aeration with pure oxygen and an HRT between 5 and 10 days. Under these conditions, there is 53.5% VSS removal and 55.4% COD degradation at 15 days HRT - 5 days anaerobic, 10 days aerobic. Sludge digested with pure oxygen at 25 degrees C in a batch reactor converted 48% of sludge total Kjeldahl nitrogen to nitrate. Addition of an aerobic stage with pure oxygen aeration to the anaerobic digestion enhances ammonium nitrogen removal. In a two-stage anaerobic-aerobic sludge digestion process within 8 days HRT of the aerobic stage, the removal of ammonium nitrogen was 85%.

  5. Nitrification and aerobic denitrification in anoxic-aerobic sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Alzate Marin, Juan C; Caravelli, Alejandro H; Zaritzky, Noemí E

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of achieving nitrogen (N) removal using a lab-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) exposed to anoxic/aerobic (AN/OX) phases, focusing to achieve aerobic denitrification. This process will minimize emissions of N2O greenhouse gas. The effects of different operating parameters on the reactor performance were studied: cycle duration, AN/OX ratio, pH, dissolved oxygen concentration (DOC), and organic load. The highest inorganic N removal (NiR), close to 70%, was obtained at pH=7.5, low organic load (440mgCOD/(Lday)) and high aeration given by 12h cycle, AN/OX ratio=0.5:1.0 and DOC higher than 4.0mgO2/L. Nitrification followed by high-rate aerobic denitrification took place during the aerobic phase. Aerobic denitrification could be attributed to Tetrad-forming organisms (TFOs) with phenotype of glycogen accumulating organisms using polyhydroxyalkanoate and/or glycogen storage. The proposed AN/OX system constitutes an eco-friendly N removal process providing N2 as the end product.

  6. Noncontiguous finished genome sequence and description of Virgibacillus massiliensis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from human gut

    PubMed Central

    Khelaifia, S.; Croce, O.; Lagier, J.-C.; Robert, C.; Couderc, C.; Di Pinto, F.; Davoust, B.; Djossou, F.; Raoult, D.; Fournier, P.-E.

    2015-01-01

    Strain Vm-5T was isolated from the stool specimen of a 10-year-old Amazonian boy. This bacterium is a Gram-positive, strictly aerobic rod, motile by a polar flagellum. Here we describe its phenotypic characteristics and complete genome sequence. The 4 353 177 bp long genome exhibits a G + C content of 36.87% and contains 4394 protein-coding and 125 predicted RNA genes. Phylogenetically and genetically, strain Vm-c is a member of the genus Virgibacillus but is distinct enough to be classified as a new species. We propose the creation of V. massiliensis sp. nov., whose type strain is strain Vm-5T (CSUR P971 = DSM 28587). PMID:26649181

  7. VAPOR PHASE TREATMENT OF PCE IN A SOIL COLUMN BY LAB-SCALE ANAEROBIC BIOVENTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial destruction of highly chlorinated organic compounds must be initiated by anaerobic followed by aerobic dechlorination. In-situ dechlorination of vadose zone soil contaminated with these compounds requires, among other factors, the establishment of highly reductive anaer...

  8. A New Screening Method for Methane in Soil Gas Using Existing Groundwater Monitoring Wells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methane in soil gas may have undesirable consequences. The soil gas may be able to form a flammable mixture with air and present an explosion hazard. Aerobic biodegradation of the methane in soil gas may consume oxygen that would otherwise be available for biodegradation of gasol...

  9. Generation of Perfluoroalkyl Acids from Aerobic Biotransformation of Quaternary Ammonium Polyfluoroalkyl Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Mejia-Avendaño, Sandra; Vo Duy, Sung; Sauvé, Sébastien; Liu, Jinxia

    2016-09-20

    The aerobic biotransformation over 180 days of two cationic quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) with perfluoroalkyl chains was determined in soil microcosms, and biotransformation pathways were proposed. This is the first time that polyfluoroalkyl cationic surfactants used in aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF) formulations were studied for their environmental fate. The biotransformation of perfluorooctaneamido quaternary ammonium salt (PFOAAmS) was characterized by a DT50 value (time necessary to consume half of the initial mass) of 142 days and significant generation of perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acid (PFOA) at a yield of 30 mol % by day 180. The biotransformation of perfluorooctane sulfonamide quaternary ammonium salt (PFOSAmS) was very slow with unobservable change of the spiked mass; yet the generation of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) at a yield of 0.3 mol % confirmed the biotransformation of PFOSAmS. Three novel biotransformation intermediates were identified for PFOAAmS and three products including perfluorooctane sulfonamide (FOSA) for PFOSAmS through high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) analysis and t-MS(2) fragmentation. The significantly slower PFOSAmS biotransformation is hypothesized to be due to its stronger sorption to soil owing to a longer perfluoroalkyl chain and a bulkier sulfonyl group, when compared to PFOAAmS. This study has demonstrated that despite overall high stability of QACs and their biocide nature, the ones with perfluoroalkyl chains can be substantially biotransformed into perfluoroalkyl acids in aerobic soil.

  10. Characterizations of intracellular arsenic in a bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe-Simon, F.; Yannone, S. M.; Tainer, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Life requires a key set of chemical elements to sustain growth. Yet, a growing body of literature suggests that microbes can alter their nutritional requirements based on the availability of these chemical elements. Under limiting conditions for one element microbes have been shown to utilize a variety of other elements to serve similar functions often (but not always) in similar molecular structures. Well-characterized elemental exchanges include manganese for iron, tungsten for molybdenum and sulfur for phosphorus or oxygen. These exchanges can be found in a wide variety of biomolecules ranging from protein to lipids and DNA. Recent evidence suggested that arsenic, as arsenate or As(V), was taken up and incorporated into the cellular material of the bacterium GFAJ-1. The evidence was interpreted to support As(V) acting in an analogous role to phosphate. We will therefore discuss our ongoing efforts to characterize intracellular arsenate and how it may partition among the cellular fractions of the microbial isolate GFAJ-1 when exposed to As(V) in the presence of various levels of phosphate. Under high As(V) conditions, cells express a dramatically different proteome than when grown given only phosphate. Ongoing studies on the diversity and potential role of proteins and metabolites produced in the presence of As(V) will be reported. These investigations promise to inform the role and additional metabolic potential for As in biology. Arsenic assimilation into biomolecules contributes to the expanding set of chemical elements utilized by microbes in unusual environmental niches.

  11. [Rhodobaculum claviforme gen. nov., sp. nov., a New Alkaliphilic Nonsulfur Purple Bacterium].

    PubMed

    Bryantseva, I A; Gaisin, V A; Gorlenko, V M

    2015-01-01

    Two alkaliphilic strains of nonsulfur purple bacteria (NPB), B7-4 and B8-2, were isolated from southeast Siberia moderately saline alkaline steppe lakes with pH values above 9.0. The isolates were motile, polymorphous cells (from short rods to long spindly cells) 2.0-3.2 x 9.6-20.0 μm. Intracellular membranes of vesicular type were mostly located at the cell periphery. The microorganisms contained bacteriochlorophyll a and carotenoids of the spheroidene and spirilloxanthin series. The photosynthetic apparatus was represented by LH2 and LH1 light-harvesting complexes. In the presence of organic compounds, the strains grew aerobically in the dark or anaerobically in the light. Capacity for photo- and chemoautotrophic growth was not detected. The cbbl gene encoding RuBisCO was not revealed. Optimal growth of both strains occurred at 2% NaCl (range from 0.5 to 4%), pH 8.0-8.8 (range from 7.5 to 9.7), and 25-35 degrees C. The DNA G+C content was 67.6-69.8 mol %. Pairwise comparison of the nucleotides of the 16S rRNA genes revealed that strains B7-4 and B8-2 belonged to the same species (99.9% homology) and were most closely related to the aerobic alkaliphilic bacteriochlorophyll a-containing anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium (APB) Roseibacula alcaliphilum De (95.2%) and to NPB strains Rhodobaca barguzinensis VKM B-2406(T) (94.2%) and Rbc. bogoriensis LBB1(T) (93.9%). The isolates were closely related to the NPB Rhodobacter veldkampii DSM 11550(T) (94.8%) and to aerobic bacteriochlorophyll a-containing bacteria Roseinatronobacter monicus ROS 35(T) and Roseicitreum antarcticul ZS2-28(T) (93.5 and 93.9%, respectively). New strains were described as a new NPB genus and species of the family Rhodobacteriaceae, Rhodobaculum claviforme gen. nov., sp. nov., with B7-4(T) (VKM B-2708, LMG 28126) as the type strain.

  12. [Genetic variability of the bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum (Burkholderiales: Burholderiaceae) in the banana-growing region of Uraba (Colombia)].

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Carolina; Rodríguez, Paola; Cotes, José Miguel; Marín, Mauricio

    2010-03-01

    The banana moko disease, caused by the bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum, is one of the most important phytopathological problems of the banana agribusiness in tropical countries. In Uraba and Magdalena (Colombia), the main exporting regions of banana in Colombia, this disease causes a destruction estimated in 16.5 ha/year. The bacterium presents an extremely high level of genetic variation that affects control measures. This is the first study of its variation in Colombia and was done with AFLP molecular markers on a population of 100 isolates from banana plants, soils and "weeds". The high level of genetic diversity, with Nei and Shannon indexes of h=0.32 and I=0.48, respectively, and the AMOVA, showed that this population is subestructured (Fst=0.66): the host is the main factor of differentiation. Even so, previous tests show that all varieties have pathogenicity on Musa.

  13. Gene function analysis in environmental isolates: The nif regulon of the strict iron oxidizing bacterium Leptospirillum ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Parro, Víctor; Moreno-Paz, Mercedes

    2003-01-01

    A random genomic library from an environmental isolate of the Gram-negative bacterium Leptospirillum ferrooxidans has been printed on a microarray. Gene expression analysis was carried out with total RNA extracted from L. ferrooxidans cultures in the presence or absence of ammonium as nitrogen source under aerobic conditions. Although practically nothing is known about the genome sequence of this bacterium, this approach allowed us the selection and sequencing of only those clones bearing genes that showed an altered expression pattern. By sequence comparison, we have identified most of the genes of nitrogen fixation regulon in L. ferrooxidans, like the nifHDKENX operon, encoding the structural components of Mo-Fe nitrogenase; nifSU-hesB-hscBA-fdx operon, for Fe-S cluster assembly; the amtB gene (ammonium transporter); modA (molybdenum ABC type transporter); some regulatory genes like ntrC, nifA (the specific activator of nif genes); or two glnB-like genes (encoding the PII regulatory protein). Our results show that shotgun DNA microarrays are very powerful tools to accomplish gene expression studies with environmental bacteria whose genome sequence is still unknown, avoiding the time and effort necessary for whole genome sequencing projects. PMID:12808145

  14. Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. phenolicus subsp. nov. a phenol-degrading, denitrifying bacterium isolated from a graywater bioprocessor.

    PubMed

    Rehfuss, Marc; Urban, James

    2005-07-01

    A Gram (-) coccobacillary bacterium, J(T), was isolated from a graywater bioprocessor. 16S rRNA and biochemical analysis has revealed strain J(T) closely resembles Alcaligenes faecalis ATCC 8750T and A. faecalis subsp. parafaecalis DSM 13975T, but is a distinct, previously uncharacterized isolate. Strain J(T), along with the type strain of A. faecalis and its previously described subspecies share the ability to aerobically degrade phenol. The degradation rates of phenol for strain J(T) and reference phenol degrading bacteria were determined by photometrically measuring the change in optical density when grown on 0.1% phenol as the sole carbon source, followed by addition of Gibb's reagent to measure depletion of substrate. The phenol degradation rates of strain J(T) was found to exceed that of the phenol hydroxylase group III bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes, with isolate J(T) exhibiting a doubling time of 4.5 h. The presence of the large subunit of the multicomponent phenol hydroxylase gene in strain J(T) was confirmed by PCR. The presence of the nirK nitrite reductase gene as demonstrated by PCR as well as results obtained from nitrite media indicated denitrification at least to N2O. Based on phenotypic, phylogenetic, fatty acid analysis and results from DNA DNA hybridization, we propose assigning a novel subspecies of Alcaligenes faecalis, to be named Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. phenolicus with the type strain J(T) (= DSM 16503) (= NRRL B-41076).

  15. Isolation and characterization of a bacterium capable of removing taste- and odor-causing 2-methylisoborneol from water.

    PubMed

    Lauderdale, Chance V; Aldrich, Henry C; Lindner, Angela S

    2004-11-01

    2-Methylisoborneol (MIB), a metabolite of blue-green algae, has been implicated in causing unpalatable drinking water throughout the world. Current non-biological water treatment technologies are ineffective in removing MIB from potable water or are cost-prohibitive, and biological applications may address these problems. We have isolated and characterized a bacterium derived from lake water and capable of aerobically degrading MIB. Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed that this strain is a spore-forming, flagellated bacterium that is bacilloid in shape, and 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis determined that it is most closely related to Bacillus fusiformis and Bacillus sphaericus, both members of the Bacillus sphaericus senso lato taxon. While the growth and oxidation potential of this strain was shown to be affected beyond certain MIB concentrations in the mg/l range, it was capable of depleting MIB at mg/l and ng/l concentrations and of removing MIB to concentrations yielding no observed odor.

  16. Two-stage process combines anaerobic and aerobic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kayhanian, M.; Lindenauer, K.; Hardy, S.; Tchobanoglous, G.

    1991-03-01

    The organic fraction of the material diverted from landfills has potential to be utilized as a raw material to be recycled, used for the production of compost, converted to energy in waste-to-energy facilities, or used for the production of other end products. Given the uncertainties concerning the future availability, production costs, and market prices for conventional fuels, any potential source of alternate energy and alternative energy technologies deserve serious consideration. Faced with an uncertain energy future, several European countries have already started using biomass and MSW as a source of energy. An innovative high-solids anaerobic digestion/aerobic composting process currently under investigation at the University of California, Davis is as an ideal candidate for processing a large fraction of the organic matter in MSW. The principal advantages of this innovative process which is described and discussed in this paper are: (1) the recovery of biogas that can be used as a fuel for the production of energy, and (2) the production of humus-like material that can be used as a high-quality soil amendment or as boiler fuel. The fact that a liquid waste stream that needs further treatment is not generated in this process is another significant advantage.

  17. Protons and pleomorphs: aerobic hydrogen production in Azotobacters.

    PubMed

    Noar, Jesse D; Bruno-Bárcena, José M

    2016-02-01

    As obligate aerobic soil organisms, the ability of Azotobacter species to fix nitrogen is unusual given that the nitrogenase complex requires a reduced cellular environment. Molecular hydrogen is an unavoidable byproduct of the reduction of dinitrogen; at least one molecule of H2 is produced for each molecule of N2 fixed. This could be considered a fault in nitrogenase efficiency, essentially a waste of energy and reducing equivalents. Wild-type Azotobacter captures this hydrogen and oxidizes it with its membrane-bound uptake hydrogenase complex. Strains lacking an active hydrogenase complex have been investigated for their hydrogen production capacities. What is the role of H2 in the energy metabolism of nitrogen-fixing Azotobacter? Is hydrogen production involved in Azotobacter species' protection from or tolerance to oxygen, or vice versa? What yields of hydrogen can be expected from hydrogen-evolving strains? Can the yield of hydrogen be controlled or increased by changing genetic, environmental, or physiological conditions? We will address these questions in the following mini-review.

  18. [Sulfa-drug wastewater treatment with anaerobic/aerobic process].

    PubMed

    Wu, L; Zhang, H; Zhu, H; Zhang, Z; Zhuang, Y; Dai, S

    2001-09-01

    Sulfa drug wastewater was treated with anaerobic/aerobic process. The removal ratios of TOC reached about 50% in anaerobic phase and about 70% in aerobic phase respectively, while volume loading rate of TOC was about 1.2 kg/(m3.d) in anaerobic phase and about 0.6 kg/(m3.d) in aerobic phase. Removal of TOC in anaerobic phase was attributed to the reduction of sulfate.

  19. [Cardiovascular protection and mechanisms of actions of aerobic exercise].

    PubMed

    Hou, Zuo-Xu; Zhang, Yuan; Gao, Feng

    2014-08-01

    It is well established that aerobic exercise exerts beneficial effect on cardiovascular system, but the underlying mechanisms are yet to be elucidated. Recent studies have shown that aerobic exercise ameliorates insulin resistance, inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction which play important roles in the development of cardiovascular disease. In this review, we discussed the underlying mechanisms of the cardioprotective role of aerobic exercise, especially the latest progress in this field.

  20. Bioremediation of munitions-contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Tuomi, E.; Coover, M.; Stroo, H.

    1994-12-31

    Military installations nationwide are required to cleanup soils contaminated with ordnance compounds, such as 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT), octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazocine (HMX), and 1,3,5-2,4,2-triazine (RDX), introduced into the environment during the manufacture, use, storage, and disposal of explosives. Numerous laboratory and field studies have confirmed the effectiveness of aerobic biological treatment (composting) for remediation of soils contaminated with these and related nitroaromatics. Composting involves the incubation of contaminated soils with organic amendments under thermophilic conditions (i.e., temperatures between 40 and 70 C). Recently, the remediation of soils contaminated with nitroaromatics has also been demonstrated under anaerobic treatment conditions in bench- and field-scale studies. These studies have involved the incubation of soils in closed reactors or flooded soil cells with obligate anaerobic bacteria. Presented in this paper are the results of parallel bench-scale anaerobic and aerobic treatability studies carried out to aid in the selection of a treatment remedy for nitroaromatic contaminated soils. Bench-scale composting reactors were established by adding organic substrates to each soil at a 70% loading (on a volume basis). To investigate the anaerobic treatment of ordnance compounds, the SIMPLOT proprietary process was evaluated using a consortium of anaerobic bacteria. This process effectively remediated soil contaminated with Dinoseb, a related nitroaromatic compound, when tested in a field demonstration of the technology.

  1. Bacillus gobiensis sp. nov., isolated from a soil sample.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Liu, Guo-Hong; Cetin, Sengonca; Schumann, Peter; Pan, Zhi-Zhen; Chen, Qian-Qian

    2016-01-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, rod-shaped, endospore-forming, aerobic bacterium designated FJAT-4402T, was isolated from the weed rhizosphere soil of the Gobi desert in the Xinjiang Autonomous Region in the north-west of China. Isolate FJAT-4402T grew at 15-40 °C (optimum 30 °C), pH 5-10 (optimum pH 7) and in 0-3 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 0 %). Phylogenetic analyses, based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, showed that isolate FJAT-4402T was a member of the genus Bacillus and was most closely related to Bacillus licheniformis DSM 13T (96.2 %). The isolate showed 33.3 % DNA-DNA relatedness to the closest reference isolate, B. licheniformis DSM 13T. The diagnostic diamino acid of the peptidoglycan of isolate FJAT-4402T was meso-diaminopimelic acid and the predominant isoprenoid quinone was MK-7. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C15 : 0 (28.5 %), iso-C15 : 0 (20.1 %), anteiso-C17 : 0 (14.3 %), iso-C16 : 0 (9.6 %), C16 : 0 (8.4 %), iso-C17 : 0 (6.2 %) and iso-C14 : 0 (4.7 %) and the DNA G+C content was 42.0 mol%. The phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic properties indicated that strain FJAT-4402T represents a novel species within the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus gobiensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is FJAT-4402T ( = DSM 29500T = CGMCC 1.12902T).

  2. Sphingomonas faucium sp. nov., isolated from canyon soil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongmei; Jin, Xin; Sun, Xuelian; Song, Yali; Feng, Liling; Wang, Gejiao; Li, Mingshun

    2016-08-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, strictly aerobic, non-motile, yellow, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain E62-3T, was isolated from soil of Enshi Grand Canyon, Hubei province, PR China. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain E62-3T was most closely related to Sphingomonas laterariae LNB2T. Strain E62-3T exhibited the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Sphingosinicella vermicomposti YC7378T (96.0 %), Sphingobium xanthum NL9T (95.8 %), Sphingobium boeckii 469T (95.7 %) and Sphingomonas laterariae LNB2T (95.5 %) within the family Sphingomonadaceae. The major fatty acids (>5 %) of strain E62-3T were C18 : 1ω7c, summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or iso-C15 : 0 2-OH), C16 : 0 and C14 : 0 2-OH. The predominant respiratory quinone and polyamine were ubiquinone Q-10 and homospermidine, respectively. The predominant polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine. The genomic DNA G+C content was 66.4 mol%. The genotypic, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic data revealed that the isolate represents a novel species of the genus Sphingomonas, for which the name Sphingomonas faucium sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is E62-3T (=KCTC 42834T=CCTCC AB 2015300T).

  3. Terrimonas arctica sp. nov., isolated from Arctic tundra soil.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fan; Qiu, Xia; Chang, Xulu; Qu, Zhihao; Ren, Lvzhi; Kan, Wenjing; Guo, Youhao; Fang, Chengxiang; Peng, Fang

    2014-11-01

    A novel, Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-motile and rod-shaped bacterium, designated R9-86(T), was isolated from tundra soil collected near Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard Archipelago, Norway (78° N). Growth occurred at 4-28 °C (optimum, 22-25 °C) and at pH 6.0-9.0 (optimum, pH 7.0). Flexirubin-type pigments were absent. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain R9-86(T) belonged to the genus Terrimonas in the family Chitinophagaceae. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities between strain R9-86(T) and the type strains of species of the genus Terrimonas with validly published names ranged from 93.7 to 95.0%. Strain R9-86(T) contained iso-C(15:1)-G (25.7%), iso-C(15:0) (24.5%), iso-C(17:0)-3OH (18.3%) and summed feature 3 (C(16:1)ω7c and/or C(16:1)ω6c, 8.7%) as its major cellular fatty acids; phosphatidylethanolamine and an unknown polar lipid as its main polar lipids, and MK-7 as its predominant respiratory quinone. The DNA G+C content was 48.4 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, strain R9-86(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Terrimonas, for which the name Terrimonas arctica sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is R9-86(T) ( =CCTCC AB 2011004(T) =NRRL B-59114(T)).

  4. Burkholderia jirisanensis sp. nov. isolated from forest soil.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seil; Gong, Gyeongtaek; Woo, Han Min; Kim, Yunje; Um, Youngsoon

    2015-12-23

    A Gram-negative, catalase-positive, mesophilic obligate aerobic bacterium designated as JRM2-1T was isolated from forest soil of Jirisan Mountain, Republic of Korea and its taxonomic position was investigated based on the polyphasic taxonomy. The cells of strain JRM2-1T were optimally grown in the range of pH 5.0-7.0 at 25°C. The strain JRM2-1T was susceptible to chloramphenicol, gentamicin, kanamycin, nalidixic acid, rifampicin, streptomycin, and tetracycline. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, the closest neighbor of strain JRM2-1T was Burkholderia terrae KMY02T (97.2%) and DNA-DNA hybridization value between JRM2-1T and Burkholderia terrae KCTC 12388T was 14.4%. On the basis of the phylogenetic analysis, strain JRM2-1T is clearly distinguished from other related Burkholderia species and is clustered with plant-associated Burkholderia species. The major cellular fatty acids were C16:0, cyclo-C17:0 and cyclo-C19:0 ω8c. The polar lipids profile of strain JRM2-1T consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylenthanolamine, several unidentified amino lipids and unidentified amino-phospholipid. Isoprenoid quinone of strain JRM2-1T was Q-8. The G+C content of strain JRM2-1T was 63.7 mol%. Low DNA-DNA hybridization value indicated that JRM2-1T does not belong to Burkholderia terrae KCTC 12388T.On the basis of polyphasic taxonomical investigation, strain JRM2-1T is considered to represent a novel species in the genus Burkholderia for which the name Burkholderia jirisanensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JRM2-1T (=AIM 0373T = KCTC 42072T =JCM 19985T).

  5. Pedobacter panacis sp. nov., isolated from Panax ginseng soil.

    PubMed

    Singh, Priyanka; Singh, Hina; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2017-02-01

    A novel strain, DCY108(T) was isolated from soil of a Panax ginseng field, Yeoncheon province (38°04'N 126°57'E), Republic of Korea. Strain DCY108(T) is Gram-negative, non-motile, non-flagellate, rod-shaped, and aerobic. The bacterium grows optimally at 25-30 °C, pH 6.5-7.0 and 1 % NaCl. Phylogenetically, strain DCY108(T) is closely related to Pedobacter jejuensis JCM 18824(T), Pedobacter aquatilis JCM 13454(T), Pedobacter kyungheensis LMG 26577(T) and the type strain of the genus Pedobacter heparinus DSM 2366(T). The DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain DCY108(T) and its close phylogenetic neighbors were below 30.0 %. The DNA G+C content of strain DCY108(T) was determined to be 45.1 mol%. The predominant quinone was menaquinone 7 (MK-7). The major polar lipids were identified as phosphatidylethanolamine and three unidentified aminolipids AL1, AL13 and AL17. Iso-C15:00, iso-C17:03OH and summed feature 3 (C16:1 ω7c/C16:1 ω6c) were identified as the major fatty acids present in strain DCY108(T). The results of physiological and biochemical tests allowed strain DCY108(T) to be differentiated phenotypically from other recognized species belonging to the genus Pedobacter. Therefore, it is suggested that the newly isolated organism represents a novel species, for which the name Pedobacter panacis sp. nov is proposed with the type strain designated as DCY108(T) (=CCTCCAB 2015196(T) = KCTC 42748(T)).

  6. Rufibacter roseus sp. nov., isolated from radiation-polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Dong; Gu, Mei-Ying; Zhu, Jing; Li, Shan-Hui; Zhang, Li-Juan; Xie, Yu-Qing; Shi, Yu-Hu; Wang, Wei; Li, Wen-Jun

    2015-05-01

    A rose, Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that was motile by gliding, and designated strain H359(T), was isolated from radiation-polluted soil (with high Cs(137)) from the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of PR China and subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic analysis. The isolate grew optimally at 30 °C and pH 7.0. It grew with NaCl up to 4% (w/v). 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain H359(T) belonged to the genus Rufibacter, a member of the family Cytophagaceae, with Rufibacter tibetensis CCTCC AB 208084(T) as its closest phylogenetic relative, having 96.1% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to the type strain. Strain H359(T) contained menaquinone-7 (MK-7) as the predominant menaquinone, and the major fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, summed feature 4 (iso-C17 : 1 I and/or anteiso-C17 : 1 B), summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c) and C16 : 1ω5c. The polar lipid profile had phosphatidylethanolamine as the major component. The DNA G+C content was 43.9 mol%. Based on phenotypic, genotypic and phylogenetic evidence, strain H359(T) represents a novel species of the genus Rufibacter, for which the name Rufibacter roseus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is H359(T) ( =CPCC 100615(T) =KCTC 42217(T)).

  7. Rhabdobacter roseus gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Ram Hari; Kim, Jaisoo

    2016-01-01

    An aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, oxidase- and catalase-positive, non-motile, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped, pink-pigmented bacterium, designated strain R49T, was isolated from soil. Flexirubin-type pigments were absent. Phylogenetic analysis based on its 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain R49T formed a lineage within the family Cytophagaceae of the phylum Bacteroidetes that was distinct from the most closely related genera Dyadobacter (91.98-93.85 % sequence similarity), Persicitalea (88.69 %) and Runella (84.79-85.81 %). The major isoprenoid quinone was menaquinone-7 (MK-7) and the major polar lipid was phosphatidylethanolamine. The major cellular fatty acids were summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c), iso-C15 : 0, C16 : 1ω5c, C16 : 0 and iso-C17 : 0 3-OH. The DNA G+C content of strain R49T was 53.9 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic, genotypic and phylogenetic analysis, strain R49T represents a novel species of a new genus in the family Cytophagaceae, for which the name Rhabdobacter roseus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Rhabdobacter roseus is R49T ( = KEMB 9005-318T = KACC 18395T = JCM 30685T).

  8. [Response of mineralization of dissolved organic carbon to soil moisture in paddy and upland soils in hilly red soil region].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang-Bi; Wang, Ai-Hua; Hu, Le-Ning; Huang, Yuan; Li, Yang; He, Xun-Yang; Su, Yi-Rong

    2014-03-01

    Typical paddy and upland soils were collected from a hilly subtropical red-soil region. 14C-labeled dissolved organic carbon (14C-DOC) was extracted from the paddy and upland soils incorporated with 14C-labeled straw after a 30-day (d) incubation period under simulated field conditions. A 100-d incubation experiment (25 degrees C) with the addition of 14C-DOC to paddy and upland soils was conducted to monitor the dynamics of 14C-DOC mineralization under different soil moisture conditions [45%, 60%, 75%, 90%, and 105% of the field water holding capacity (WHC)]. The results showed that after 100 days, 28.7%-61.4% of the labeled DOC in the two types of soils was mineralized to CO2. The mineralization rates of DOC in the paddy soils were significantly higher than in the upland soils under all soil moisture conditions, owing to the less complex composition of DOC in the paddy soils. The aerobic condition was beneficial for DOC mineralization in both soils, and the anaerobic condition was beneficial for DOC accumulation. The biodegradability and the proportion of the labile fraction of the added DOC increased with the increase of soil moisture (45% -90% WHC). Within 100 days, the labile DOC fraction accounted for 80.5%-91.1% (paddy soil) and 66.3%-72.4% (upland soil) of the cumulative mineralization of DOC, implying that the biodegradation rate of DOC was controlled by the percentage of labile DOC fraction.

  9. Biotransformation of phytosterols under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Dykstra, Christy M; Giles, Hamilton D; Banerjee, Sujit; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2014-07-01

    Phytosterols are plant-derived sterols present in pulp and paper wastewater and have been implicated in the endocrine disruption of aquatic species. Bioassays were performed to assess the effect of an additional carbon source and/or solubilizing agent on the aerobic biotransformation of a mixture of three common phytosterols (β-sitosterol, stigmasterol and campesterol). The aerobic biotransformation of the phytosterol mixture by a mixed culture developed from a pulp and paper wastewater treatment system was examined under three separate conditions: with phytosterols as the sole added carbon source, with phytosterols and dextrin as an additional carbon source, and with phytosterols added with ethanol as an additional carbon source and solubilizing agent. Significant phytosterol removal was not observed in assays set up with phytosterol powder, either with or without an additional carbon source. In contrast, all three phytosterols were aerobically degraded when added as a dissolved solution in ethanol. Thus, under the experimental conditions of this study, the bioavailability of phytosterols was limited without the presence of a solubilizing agent. The total phytosterol removal rate was linear for the first six days before re-spiking, with a rate of 0.47 mg/L-d (R(2) = 0.998). After the second spiking, the total phytosterol removal rate was linear for seven days, with a rate of 0.32 mg/L-d (R(2) = 0.968). Following the 7th day, the phytosterol removal rate markedly accelerated, suggesting two different mechanisms are involved in phytosterol biotransformation, more likely related to the production of enzyme(s) involved in phytosterol degradation, induced under different cell growth conditions. β-sitosterol was preferentially degraded, as compared to stigmasterol and campesterol, although all three phytosterols fell below detection limits by the 24th day of incubation.

  10. Aerobic Capacity and Postprandial Flow Mediated Dilation.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Kevin D; Miller, James J; Robinson, James H; Olive, Jennifer L

    The consumption of a high-fat meal induces transient vascular dysfunction. Aerobic exercise enhances vascular function in healthy individuals. Our purpose was to determine if different levels of aerobic capacity impact vascular function, as measured by flow mediated dilation, following a high-fat meal. Flow mediated dilation of the brachial artery was determined before, two- and four-hours postprandial a high-fat meal in young males classified as highly trained (n = 10; VO2max = 74.6 ± 5.2 ml·kg·min(-1)) or moderately active (n = 10; VO2max = 47.3 ± 7.1 ml·kg·min(-1)). Flow mediated dilation was reduced at two- (p < 0.001) and four-hours (p < 0.001) compared to baseline for both groups but was not different between groups at any time point (p = 0.108). Triglycerides and insulin increased at two- (p < 0.001) and four-hours (p < 0.05) in both groups. LDL-C was reduced at four-hours (p = 0.05) in highly trained subjects, and two- and four-hours (p ≤ 0.01) in moderately active subjects. HDL-C decreased at two- (p = 0.024) and four-hours (p = 0.014) in both groups. Glucose increased at two-hours postprandial for both groups (p = 0.003). Our results indicate that a high-fat meal results in reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in highly trained and moderately active individuals with no difference between groups. Thus, high aerobic capacity does not protect against transient reductions in vascular function after the ingestion of a single high-fat meal compared to individuals who are moderately active.

  11. Pangenome Evolution in the Marine Bacterium Alteromonas

    PubMed Central

    López-Pérez, Mario; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    We have examined a collection of the free-living marine bacterium Alteromonas genomes with cores diverging in average nucleotide identities ranging from 99.98% to 73.35%, i.e., from microbes that can be considered members of a natural clone (like in a clinical epidemiological outbreak) to borderline genus level. The genomes were largely syntenic allowing a precise delimitation of the core and flexible regions in each. The core was 1.4 Mb (ca. 30% of the typical strain genome size). Recombination rates along the core were high among strains belonging to the same species (37.7–83.7% of all nucleotide polymorphisms) but they decreased sharply between species (18.9–5.1%). Regarding the flexible genome, its main expansion occurred within the boundaries of the species, i.e., strains of the same species already have a large and diverse flexible genome. Flexible regions occupy mostly fixed genomic locations. Four large genomic islands are involved in the synthesis of strain-specific glycosydic receptors that we have called glycotypes. These genomic regions are exchanged by homologous recombination within and between species and there is evidence for their import from distant taxonomic units (other genera within the family). In addition, several hotspots for integration of gene cassettes by illegitimate recombination are distributed throughout the genome. They code for features that give each clone specific properties to interact with their ecological niche and must flow fast throughout the whole genus as they are found, with nearly identical sequences, in different species. Models for the generation of this genomic diversity involving phage predation are discussed. PMID:27189983

  12. Aurantibacter crassamenti gen. nov., sp. nov., a bacterium isolated from marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jaewoo; Kasai, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, strictly aerobic, orange-colored, rod-shaped, chemoheterotrophic bacterium, designated HG732(T), was isolated from marine sediment in Japan. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the novel marine strain was affiliated with the family Flavobacteriaceae of the phylum Bacteroidetes and that it shared the highest (94.1 %) sequence similarity with Kriegella aquimaris KMM 3665(T). The strain could be differentiated phenotypically from related members of the family Flavobacteriaceae. Major fatty acids of strain HG732(T) were iso-C15:1 G, iso-C15:0 and iso-C17:0 3-OH. The polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, three unidentidied aminolipids and two unidentified lipids. The DNA G+C content of the strain was determined to be 35.2 mol%, and the major respiratory quinone was identified as menaquinone 6 (MK-6). From the distinct phylogenetic position and combination of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, the strain is considered to represent a novel genus in the family Flavobacteriaceae, for which the name Aurantibacter crassamenti gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of A. crassamenti gen. nov., sp. nov. is HG732(T) (= KCTC 52207(T) = NBRC 112211(T)).

  13. Sphingomonas psychrolutea sp. nov., a psychrotolerant bacterium isolated from glacier ice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Liu, Hong-Can; Zhang, Jian-Li; Zhou, Yu-Guang; Xin, Yu-Hua

    2015-09-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, orange bacterium (strain MDB1-A(T)) was isolated from ice samples collected from Midui glacier in Tibet, south-west China. Cells were aerobic and psychrotolerant (growth occurred at 0-25 °C). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that it was a member of the genus Sphingomonas, with its closest relative being Sphingomonas glacialis C16y(T) (98.9% similarity). Q-10 was the predominant ubiquinone. C17 : 1ω6c and summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω6c and/or C18 : 1ω7c) were the major cellular fatty acids. The predominant polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingoglycolipid. The polyamines detected were sym-homospermidine, spermidine and spermine. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 63.6%. Based on data from this polyphasic analysis, strain MDB1-A(T) represents a novel species of the genus Sphingomonas, for which the name Sphingomonas psychrolutea sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MDB1-A(T) ( = CGMCC 1.10106(T) = NBRC 109639(T)).

  14. Bacillus seohaeanensis sp. nov., a halotolerant bacterium that contains L-lysine in its cell wall.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Chan; Lim, Jee-Min; Park, Dong-Jin; Jeon, Che Ok; Li, Wen-Jun; Kim, Chang-Jin

    2006-08-01

    A halotolerant, round-endospore-forming, aerobic, Gram-positive bacterium, designated BH724(T), was isolated from a solar saltern at Taean in Korea. Cells of this strain were rod-shaped and found to be non-motile. Strain BH724(T) grew at salinities of 0-10 % (w/v) NaCl with an optimum of 3 % (w/v) NaCl and at temperatures of 15-50 degrees C with an optimum of 40 degrees C. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain BH724(T) belonged to the genus Bacillus and that Bacillus aquimaris TF-12(T), Bacillus marisflavi TF-11(T) and Bacillus vietnamensis JCM 11124(T) were its closest neighbours, sharing 97.3, 97.2 and 97.0 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, respectively. The genomic DNA G+C content was 39 mol% and the predominant menaquinone was MK-7. Its major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C(15 : 0), iso-C(15 : 0), iso-C(16 : 0) and iso-C(14 : 0). The peptidoglycan type was A1alpha, linked directly through l-lysine. On the basis of morphological, chemotaxonomic, physiological and phylogenetic properties, strain BH724(T) represents a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus seohaeanensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BH724(T) (=KCTC 3913(T)=DSM 16464(T)).

  15. Lysinibacillus tabacifolii sp. nov., a novel endophytic bacterium isolated from Nicotiana tabacum leaves.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yan-Qing; He, Song-Tao; Li, Qing-Qing; Wang, Ming-Feng; Wang, Wen-Yuan; Zhe, Wei; Cao, Yong-Hong; Mo, Ming-He; Zhai, Yu-Long; Li, Wen-Jun

    2013-06-01

    A Gram-positive, catalase- and oxidase-positive, strictly aerobic, endospore-forming rod bacterium, designated K3514(T), was isolated from the leaves of Nicotiana tabacum. The strain was able to grow at temperatures of 8-40°C, pH 5.0-10.0 and NaCl concentrations of 0-7%. The predominant quinones (>30%) of this strain were MK-7(H2) and MK-7. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain K3514(T) was affiliated to the genus Lysinibacillus, with its closest relatives being Lysinibacillus mangiferihumi (98.3% sequence similarity), Lysinibacillus sphaericus (97.9% sequence similarity), Lysinibacillus fusiformis (97.4% sequence similarity), and Lysinibacillus xylanilyticus (97.3% sequence similarity). However, low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness values suggested that the isolate was distinct from the other closest Lysinibacillus species. Additionally, based on analysis of morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics, the isolate could be differentiated from the closest known relatives. Therefore, based on polyphasic taxonomic data, the novel isolate likely represents a novel species, for which the name Lysinibacillus tabacifolii sp. nov. and the type strain K3514(T) (=KCTC 33042(T) =CCTCC AB 2012050(T)) are proposed.

  16. Paenibacillus pinihumi sp. nov., a cellulolytic bacterium isolated from the rhizosphere of Pinus densiflora.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Chun; Lee, Kang Hyun; Kim, Mi Na; Kim, Eun-Mi; Rhee, Moon-Soo; Kwon, O-Yu; Shin, Kee-Sun

    2009-10-01

    A novel cellulolytic bacterium, strain S23(T), was isolated from the rhizosphere of the pine trees in Daejeon, Republic of Korea. This isolate was Gram-positive, strictly aerobic, rod-shaped, catalase-negative, oxidase-positive, motile by means of peritrichous flagella, and tested positive for alkaline phosphatase, esterase lipase, leucine arylamidase, alpha-galactosidase, and beta-galactosidase activities. The DNA G+C content was 49.5 mol%. The main cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C(15:0) (51.9%), iso-C(16:0) (14.7%), and iso-C(15:0) (13.2%). The major isoprenoid quinone was menaquinone 7 (MK-7). Diagnostic diamino acid in the cell-wall pepti-doglycan was meso-diaminopimelic acid. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that this strain clustered with Paenibacillus species. The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values between S23(T) and other Paenibacillus species were between 89.9% and 95.9%, and S23(T) was most closely related to Paenibacillus tarimensis SA-7-6(T). On the basis of phylogenetic and phenotypic properties of strain S23(T), the isolate is considered as a novel species belonging to the genus Paenibacillus. Therefore, the name, Paenibacillus pinihumi sp. nov., is proposed for the rhizosphere isolate; the type strain is S23(T) (=KCTC 13695(T) =KACC 14199(T) =JCM 16419(T)).

  17. Paenibacillus puernese sp. nov., a β-glucosidase-producing bacterium isolated from Pu'er tea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan-Dan; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Hoang, Van-An; Nguyen, Ngoc-Lan; Singh, Priyanka; Wang, Chao; Chun-Yang, Deok

    2016-04-01

    A Gram-staining-positive, endospore-forming, aerobic, rod-shaped bacterium, designated as DCY97(T), was isolated from ripened Pu'er tea and was identified by using a polyphasic approach. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that strain DCY97(T) was closely related to Paenibacillus dongdonensis KUDC0114(T) (98.0 %), Paenibacillus oceanisediminis L10(T) (97.7 %), and Paenibacillus barcinonensis BP-23(T) (97.2 %). The phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics of strain DCY97(T) matched with the characteristics of members belonging to the genus Paenibacillus. The major identified polar lipids included phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and diphosphatidylglycerol. The predominant quinone was MK-7. The major fatty acids were anteiso-C15:0 (35.1 %), anteiso-C16:0 (19.0 %), and iso-C16:0 (13.9 %). The peptidoglycan cell wall was composed of meso-diaminopimelic acids, alanine, and D-glutamic acid. The genomic DNA G + C content was determined to be 46.7 mol%. The DNA-DNA relatedness between strain DCY97(T) and Paenibacillus dongdonensis KCTC 33221(T), Paenibacillus oceanisediminis KACC 16023(T), Paenibacillus barcinonensis KCTC 13019(T) were 27, 19, and 10 %, respectively. Based on the genotypic, phenotypic, and chemotaxonomic characteristics, strain DCY97(T) is considered as a novel species of the genus Paenibacillus, for which the name Paenibacillus puernese sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is DCY97(T) (=KCTC 33596(T) = JCM 140369(T)).

  18. Pseudomonas glareae sp. nov., a marine sediment-derived bacterium with antagonistic activity.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Lyudmila A; Tanaka, Naoto; Svetashev, Vassilii I; Mikhailov, Valery V

    2015-06-01

    An aerobic, Gram-negative, motile, rod-shaped bacterium designated KMM 9500(T) was isolated from a sediment sample collected from the Sea of Japan seashore. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis affiliated strain KMM 9500(T) to the genus Pseudomonas as a distinct subline clustered with Pseudomonas marincola KMM 3042(T) and Pseudomonas segetis KCTC 12331(T) sharing the highest similarities of 98 and 97.9 %, respectively. Strain KMM 9500(T) was characterized by mainly possessing ubiquinone Q-9, and by the predominance of C18:1 ω7c, C16:1 ω7c, and C16:0 followed by C12:0 in its fatty acid profile. Polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, an unknown aminophospholipid, and unknown phospholipids. Strain KMM 9500(T) was found to inhibit growth of Gram-negative and Gram-positive indicatory microorganisms. Based on the phylogenetic analysis and distinctive phenotypic characteristics, strain 9500(T) is concluded to represent a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas glareae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the species is strain KMM 9500(T) (=NRIC 0939(T)).

  19. Enhanced reductive dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyl impacted sediment by bioaugmentation with a dehalorespiring bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Rayford B; May, Harold D; Sowers, Kevin R

    2011-01-01

    Anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of commercial PCBs such as Aroclor 1260 has a critical role of transforming highly chlorinated congeners to less chlorinated congeners that are then susceptible to aerobic degradation. The efficacy of bioaugmentation with the dehalorespiring bacterium “Dehalobium chlorocoercia” DF1 was tested in 2-liter laboratory mesocosms containing sediment contaminated with weathered Aroclor 1260 (1.3 ppm) from Baltimore Harbor, MD. Total penta- and higher chlorinated PCBs decreased by approximately 56% (by mass) in bioaugmented mesocosms after 120 days compared with no activity observed in unamended controls. Bioaugmentation with DF-1 enhanced the dechlorination of doubly flanked chlorines and stimulated the dechlorination of single flanked chlorines as a result of an apparent synergistic effect on the indigenous population. Addition of granulated activated carbon had a slight stimulatory effect indicating that anaerobic reductive dechlorination of PCBs at low concentrations was not inhibited by a high background of inorganic carbon that could affect bioavailability. The total number of dehalorespiring bacteria was reduced by approximately half after 60 days. However, a steady state level was maintained that was greater than the indigenous population of putative dehalorespiring bacteria in untreated sediments and DF1 was maintained within the indigenous population after 120 days. The results of this study demonstrate that bioaugmentation with dehalorespiring bacteria has a stimulatory effect on the dechlorination of weathered PCBs and supports the feasibility of using in situ bioaugmentation as an environmentally less invasive and lower cost alternate to dredging for treatment of PCB impacted sediments. PMID:21902247

  20. Chthonomonas calidirosea gen. nov., sp. nov., an aerobic, pigmented, thermophilic micro-organism of a novel bacterial class, Chthonomonadetes classis nov., of the newly described phylum Armatimonadetes originally designated candidate division OP10.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin C-Y; Dunfield, Peter F; Morgan, Xochitl C; Crowe, Michelle A; Houghton, Karen M; Vyssotski, Mikhail; Ryan, Jason L J; Lagutin, Kirill; McDonald, Ian R; Stott, Matthew B

    2011-10-01

    An aerobic, saccharolytic, obligately thermophilic, motile, non-spore-forming bacterium, strain T49(T), was isolated from geothermally heated soil at Hell's Gate, Tikitere, New Zealand. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, T49(T) is the first representative of a new class in the newly described phylum Armatimonadetes, formerly known as candidate division OP10. Cells of strain T49(T) stained Gram-negative and were catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. Cells possessed a highly corrugated outer membrane. The major fatty acids were 16 : 0, i17 : 0 and ai17 : 0. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 54.6 mol%. Strain T49(T) grew at 50-73 °C with an optimum temperature of 68 °C, and at pH 4.7-5.8 with an optimum growth pH of 5.3. A growth rate of 0.012 h(-1) was observed under optimal temperature and pH conditions. The primary respiratory quinone was MK-8. Optimal growth was achieved in the absence of NaCl, although growth was observed at NaCl concentrations as high as 2 % (w/v). Strain T49(T) was able to utilize mono- and disaccharides such as cellobiose, lactose, mannose and glucose, as well as branched or amorphous polysaccharides such as starch, CM-cellulose, xylan and glycogen, but not highly linear polysaccharides such as crystalline cellulose or cotton. On the basis of its phylogenetic position and phenotypic characteristics, we propose that strain T49(T) represents a novel bacterial genus and species within the new class Chthonomonadetes classis nov. of the phylum Armatimonadetes. The type strain of Chthonomonas calidirosea gen. nov., sp. nov. is T49(T) ( = DSM 23976(T) = ICMP 18418(T)).

  1. Screening and identification of aerobic denitrifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, K.; Deng, H. M.; Chen, Y. T.; Zhou, H. J.; Yan, G. X.

    2016-08-01

    With the standards of the effluent quality more stringent, it becomes a quite serious problem for municipalities and industries to remove nitrogen from wastewater. Bioremediation is a potential method for the removal of nitrogen and other pollutants because of its high efficiency and low cost. Seven predominant aerobic denitrifiers were screened and characterized from the activated sludge in the CAST unit. Some of these strains removed 87% nitrate nitrogen at least. Based on their phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics, the isolates were identified as the genera of Ralstonia, Achromobacter, Aeromonas and Enterobacter.

  2. Toxic and inhibitory effects of trichloroethylene aerobic co-metabolism on phenol-grown aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Tay, JooHwa

    2015-04-09

    Aerobic granule, a form of microbial aggregate, exhibits good potential in degrading toxic and recalcitrant substances. In this study, the inhibitory and toxic effects of trichloroethylene (TCE), a model compound for aerobic co-metabolism, on phenol-grown aerobic granules were systematically studied, using respiratory activities after exposure to TCE as indicators. High TCE concentration did not exert positive or negative effects on the subsequent endogenous respiration rate or phenol dependent specific oxygen utilization rate (SOUR), indicating the absence of solvent stress and induction effect on phenol-hydroxylase. Phenol-grown aerobic granules exhibited a unique response to TCE transformation product toxicity, that small amount of TCE transformation enhanced the subsequent phenol SOUR. Granules that had transformed between 1.3 and 3.7 mg TCE gSS(-1) showed at most 53% increase in the subsequent phenol SOUR, and only when the transformation exceeded 6.6 mg TCE gSS(-1) did the SOUR dropped below that of the control. This enhancing effect was found to sustain throughout several phenol dosages, and TCE transformation below the toxicity threshold also lessened the granules' sensitivity to higher phenol concentration. The unique toxic effect was possibly caused by the granule's compact structure as a protection barrier against the diffusive transformation product(s) of TCE co-metabolism.

  3. Effect of DDT, fauna and flooding on microsomal growth in soil.

    PubMed

    Tu, C M

    1981-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the effect of DDT, fauna and flooding on microbial growth in a sandy loam. Results indicated that soil microorganisms can tolerate the presence of DDT. Earthworms singly or in combination with springtails affected the average population of fungi in the DDT-untreated samples and of aerobic bacteria in the DDT-treated soils. Soil animals did not appear to have any effect on the populations of anaerobic bacteria. However, waterlogging brought about a decrease in aerobic bacteria and fungal populations, and an increase in anaerobic bacteria in both soils.

  4. Metabolism of 4-chloro-2-nitrophenol in a Gram-positive bacterium, Exiguobacterium sp. PMA

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chloronitrophenols (CNPs) are widely used in the synthesis of dyes, drugs and pesticides, and constitute a major group of environmental pollutants. 4-Chloro-2-nitrophenol (4C2NP) is an isomer of CNPs that has been detected in various industrial effluents. A number of physicochemical methods have been used for treatment of wastewater containing 4C2NP. These methods are not as effective as microbial degradation, however. Results A 4C2NP-degrading bacterium, Exiguobacterium sp. PMA, which uses 4C2NP as the sole carbon and energy source was isolated from a chemically-contaminated site in India. Exiguobacterium sp. PMA degraded 4C2NP with the release of stoichiometeric amounts of chloride and ammonium ions. The effects of different substrate concentrations and various inoculum sizes on degradation of 4C2NP were investigated. Exiguobacterium sp. PMA degraded 4C2NP up to a concentration of 0.6 mM. High performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry identified 4-chloro-2-aminophenol (4C2AP) and 2-aminophenol (2AP) as possible metabolites of the 4C2NP degradation pathway. The crude extract of 4C2NP-induced PMA cells contained enzymatic activity for 4C2NP reductase and 4C2AP dehalogenase, suggesting the involvement of these enzymes in the degradation of 4C2NP. Microcosm studies using sterile and non-sterile soils spiked with 4C2NP were carried out to monitor the bioremediation potential of Exiguobacterium sp. PMA. The bioremediation of 4C2NP by Exiguobacterium sp. PMA was faster in non-sterilized soil than sterilized soil. Conclusions Our studies indicate that Exiguobacterium sp. PMA may be useful for the bioremediation of 4C2NP-contaminated sites. This is the first report of (i) the formation of 2AP in the 4C2NP degradation pathway by any bacterium and (iii) the bioremediation of 4C2NP by any bacterium. PMID:23171039

  5. Aerobic treatment of wine-distillery wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Sales, D.; Valcarcel, M.J.; Perez, L.; de la Ossa, E.M.

    1987-01-01

    Waste from food-processing and allied industries is largely made up of organic compounds which can be metabolized by aerobic or anaerobic means. However, these wastes present a series of problems to biological depuration plants, such as the need for prior treatment to establish conditions suitable for the development of the microorganisms responsible for the process; and the long retention time of the biomass if acceptable effluents are to be obtained. Again, the seasonal nature of many of these industries makes for very heterogeneous waste. This means that treatment plant must be versatile and are subject to rapid successions of close-down and start-up interspersed with long intervals of inactivity. All these difficulties oblige the industries in the sector to adapt depurative technology to their particular needs. Wine distilleries fall into this general category. Their waste (called vinasses) is acidic, has a high organic content and varies widely according to the raw matter distilled: wine, lies, etc. This paper studies the start-up of digestors for aerobic treatment of vinasses and the establishment of optimum operating conditions for an adequate depurative performance.

  6. Acute effects of aerobic exercise promote learning.

    PubMed

    Perini, Renza; Bortoletto, Marta; Capogrosso, Michela; Fertonani, Anna; Miniussi, Carlo

    2016-05-05

    The benefits that physical exercise confers on cardiovascular health are well known, whereas the notion that physical exercise can also improve cognitive performance has only recently begun to be explored and has thus far yielded only controversial results. In the present study, we used a sample of young male subjects to test the effects that a single bout of aerobic exercise has on learning. Two tasks were run: the first was an orientation discrimination task involving the primary visual cortex, and the second was a simple thumb abduction motor task that relies on the primary motor cortex. Forty-four and forty volunteers participated in the first and second experiments, respectively. We found that a single bout of aerobic exercise can significantly facilitate learning mechanisms within visual and motor domains and that these positive effects can persist for at least 30 minutes following exercise. This finding suggests that physical activity, at least of moderate intensity, might promote brain plasticity. By combining physical activity-induced plasticity with specific cognitive training-induced plasticity, we favour a gradual up-regulation of a functional network due to a steady increase in synaptic strength, promoting associative Hebbian-like plasticity.

  7. Acinetobacter sp. strain Ths, a novel psychrotolerant and alkalitolerant bacterium that utilizes hydrocarbon.

    PubMed

    Yamahira, Keiko; Hirota, Kikue; Nakajima, Kenji; Morita, Naoki; Nodasaka, Yoshinobu; Yumoto, Isao

    2008-09-01

    A novel psychrotolerant, alkalitolerant bacterium, strain Ths, was isolated from a soil sample immersed in hot spring water containing hydrocarbons and grown on a chemically defined medium containing n-tetradecane as the sole carbon source. The isolate grew at 0 degrees C but not at temperatures higher than 45 degrees C; its optimum growth temperature was 27 degrees C. It grew in the pH range of 7-9. The strain utilized C(13)-C(30) n-alkane and fluorene at pH 9 and 4 degrees C. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the bacterium that utilizes a wide range of hydrocarbons at a high pH and a low temperature. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain Ths is closely related to genomic species 6 ATCC 17979 (99.1% similarity), genomic species BJ13/TU14 ATCC 17905 (97.8% similarity), genomic species 9 ATCC 9957 (97.6% similarity) belonging to the genus Acinetobacter and to Acinetobacter calcoaceticus JCM 6842(T) (97.5% similarity). DNA-DNA hybridization revealed that the isolate has 62, 25, 18 and 19% relatedness, respectively, to genomic species 6 ATCC 17979, genomic species BJ13/TU14 ATCC 17905, genomic species 9 ATCC 9957 and A. calcoaceticus, respectively.

  8. Presence of Bacterial Virulence Gene Homologues in the dibenzo-p-dioxins degrading bacterium Sphingomonas wittichii

    PubMed Central

    Saeb, Amr T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomonas wittichii, a close relative of the human pathogen Sphingomonas paucimobilis, is a microorganism of great interest to the bioremediation community for its ability of biodegradation to a large number of toxic polychlorinated dioxins. In the present study we investigated the presence of different virulence factors and genes in S. wittichii. We utilized phylogenetic, comparative genomics and bioinformatics analysis to investigate the potentiality of S. wittichii as a potential virulent pathogen. The 16SrDNA phylogenetic tree showed that the closest bacterial taxon to S. wittichii is Brucella followed by Helicobacter, Campylobacter, Pseudomonas then Legionella. Despite their close phylogenetic relationship, S. wittichii did not share any virulence factors with Helicobacter or Campylobacter. On the contrary, in spite of the phylogenetic divergence between S. wittichii and Pseudomonas spp., they shared many major virulence factors, such as, adherence, antiphagocytosis, Iron uptake, proteases and quorum sensing. S. wittichii contains several major virulence factors resembling Pseudomonas sp., Legionella sp., Brucella sp. and Bordetella sp. virulence factors. Similarity of virulence factors did not match phylogenetic relationships. These findings suggest horizontal gene transfer of virulence factors rather than sharing a common pathogenic ancestor. S. wittichii is a potential virulent bacterium. Another possibility is that reductive evolution process attenuated S. wittichii pathogenic capabilities. Thus plenty of care must be taken when using this bacterium in soil remediation purposes. PMID:28197061

  9. Texcoconibacillus texcoconensis gen. nov., sp. nov., alkalophilic and halotolerant bacteria isolated from soil of the former lake Texcoco (Mexico).

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Romero, Erick; Coutiño-Coutiño, María de los Angeles; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; López-Ramírez, María Patricia; Marsch, Rodolfo; Dendooven, Luc

    2013-09-01

    A novel Gram-positive, rod-shaped, spore-forming bacterium, designated 13CC(T) was isolated from soil of the former lake Texcoco. The strain was aerobic, catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. It grew at salinities of 0-26% (w/v) NaCl with an optimum at 9-16% (w/v) NaCl. The cells contain peptidoglycan type A1γ, A1γ' with glycine instead of l-alanine and three variations of peptidoglycan type A4γ. The only quinone detected was MK-7. The major fatty acid was anteiso-C(15:0). The polar lipids fraction consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and three different phospholipids. The DNA G+C content was 37.5 mol%. Maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain 13CC(T) was closely related to members of the genus Bacillus and shared 92.35% similarity with Bacillus agaradhaerens, 92.28% with Bacillus neizhouensis and 92.21% with Bacillus locisalis. It is proposed based on the phenotypic, genotypic and phylogenetic analyses that the novel isolate should be classified as a representative of a new genus and novel species, for which the name Texcoconibacillus texcoconensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Texcoconibacillus texcoconensis is 13CC(T) ( =JCM 17654(T) =DSM 24696(T)).

  10. Nitrogen Removal Characteristics of Pseudomonas putida Y-9 Capable of Heterotrophic Nitrification and Aerobic Denitrification at Low Temperature

    PubMed Central

    He, Tengxia; Ye, Qing; Chen, Yanli; Xie, Enyu; Zhang, Xue

    2017-01-01

    The cold-adapted bacterium Pseudomonas putida Y-9 was investigated and exhibited excellent capability for nitrogen removal at 15°C. The strain capable of heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification could efficiently remove ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite at an average removal rate of 2.85 mg, 1.60 mg, and 1.83 mg NL−1 h−1, respectively. Strain Y-9 performed nitrification in preference to denitrification when ammonium and nitrate or ammonium and nitrite coexisted in the solution. Meantime, the presence of nitrate had no effect on the ammonium removal rate of strain Y-9, and yet the presence of high concentration of nitrite would inhibit the cell growth and decrease the nitrification rate. The experimental results indicate that P. putida Y-9 has potential application for the treatment of wastewater containing high concentrations of ammonium along with its oxidation products at low temperature. PMID:28293626

  11. Predicting metal uptake by wetland plants under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    van der Welle, Marlies E W; Roelofs, Jan G M; Op Den Camp, Huub J M; Lamers, Leon P M

    2007-04-01

    Metal pollution can be a serious threat to ecosystems at a global scale. Although the bioavailability of potentially toxic metals is determined by many biotic and abiotic factors, including pH and redox potential, total metal concentrations in the soil are used widely to assess or predict toxicity. In the present study we tested the effect of desiccation of soils differing in acidification potential and total heavy metal contamination on the growth and metal uptake of three typical, common wetland species: Caltha palustris, Juncus effusus, and Rumex hydrolapathum. We found that plant growth in wet soils mainly was determined by nutrient availability, though in dry soils the combined effects of acidification and increased metal availability prevailed. Metal uptake under anaerobic conditions was best predicted by the acidification potential (sediment S/[Ca + Mg] ratio), not by total metal concentrations. We propose that this is related to radial oxygen loss by wetland plant roots, which leads to acidification of the rhizosphere. Under aerobic conditions, plant metal uptake was best predicted by the amount of CaCl2-extractable metals. We conclude that total metal concentrations are not suitable for predicting bioavailability and that the above diagnostic parameters will provide insight into biogeochemical processes involved in toxicity assessment and soil policy.

  12. Impact of glycerin and lignosulfonate on biodegradation of high explosives in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Jongho; Borden, Robert C.

    2016-11-01

    Soil microcosms were constructed and monitored to evaluate the impact of substrate addition and transient aerobic and anaerobic conditions on TNT, RDX and HMX biodegradation in grenade range soils. While TNT was rapidly biodegraded under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions with and without organic substrate, substantial biodegradation of RDX, HMX, and RDX daughter products was not observed under aerobic conditions. However, RDX and HMX were significantly biodegraded under anaerobic conditions, without accumulation of TNT or RDX daughter products (2-ADNT, 4-ADNT, MNX, DNX, and TNX). In separate microcosms containing grenade range soil, glycerin and lignosulfonate addition enhanced oxygen consumption, increasing the consumption rate > 200% compared to untreated soils. Mathematical model simulations indicate that oxygen consumption rates of 5 to 20 g/m3/d can be achieved with reasonable amendment loading rates. These results indicate that glycerin and lignosulfonate can be potentially used to stimulate RDX and HMX biodegradation by increasing oxygen consumption rates in soil.

  13. Aerobic Physical Activity and the Leadership of Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiser, Kari

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore if there was a connection between regular aerobic physical activity and the stress and energy levels of principals as they reported it. To begin the research, the current aerobic physical activity level of principals was discovered. Additionally, the energy and stress levels of the principals who do engage…

  14. The Effectiveness of Aerobic Exercise Instruction for Totally Blind Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponchillia, S. V.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A multifaceted method (involving verbal and hands-on training) was used to teach aerobic exercises to 3 totally blind women (ages 24-37). All three women demonstrated positive gains in their performance, physical fitness, and attitudes toward participating in future mainstream aerobic exercise classes. (DB)

  15. Aerobic Activity--Do Physical Education Programs Provide Enough?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGing, Eileen

    1989-01-01

    High school physical education curricula should concentrate less on sport skill development and competition, and more on health-related fitness and aerobic activity. Results are reported from a study of the type and amount of aerobic exercise provided in 29 high school physical education programs in a large metropolitan area. (IAH)

  16. Aerobic Digestion. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klopping, Paul H.

    This manual contains the textual material for a single-lesson unit on aerobic sludge digestion. Topic areas addressed include: (1) theory of aerobic digestion; (2) system components; (3) performance factors; (4) indicators of stable operation; and (5) operational problems and their solutions. A list of objectives, glossary of key terms, and…

  17. p53 aerobics: the major tumor suppressor fuels your workout.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Jan-Philipp; Gu, Wei

    2006-07-01

    In addition to its role as the central regulator of the cellular stress response, p53 can regulate aerobic respiration via the novel transcriptional target SCO2, a critical regulator of the cytochrome c oxidase complex (Matoba et al., 2006). Loss of p53 results in decreased oxygen consumption and aerobic respiration and promotes a switch to glycolysis, thereby reducing endurance during physical exercise.

  18. The Acute Effect of Aerobic Exercise on Measures of Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fort, Inza L.; And Others

    The immediate response of stress to aerobic exercise was measured by utilizing the Palmar Sweat Index (PSI) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Forty subjects (20 male and 20 female) from the ages of 18-30 sustained a single bout of aerobic activity for 30 minutes at 60 percent of their maximum heart rate. Pre-treatment procedures…

  19. High skin temperature and hypohydration impair aerobic performance.

    PubMed

    Sawka, Michael N; Cheuvront, Samuel N; Kenefick, Robert W

    2012-03-01

    This paper reviews the roles of hot skin (>35°C) and body water deficits (>2% body mass; hypohydration) in impairing submaximal aerobic performance. Hot skin is associated with high skin blood flow requirements and hypohydration is associated with reduced cardiac filling, both of which act to reduce aerobic reserve. In euhydrated subjects, hot skin alone (with a modest core temperature elevation) impairs submaximal aerobic performance. Conversely, aerobic performance is sustained with core temperatures >40°C if skin temperatures are cool-warm when euhydrated. No study has demonstrated that high core temperature (∼40°C) alone, without coexisting hot skin, will impair aerobic performance. In hypohydrated subjects, aerobic performance begins to be impaired when skin temperatures exceed 27°C, and even warmer skin exacerbates the aerobic performance impairment (-1.5% for each 1°C skin temperature). We conclude that hot skin (high skin blood flow requirements from narrow skin temperature to core temperature gradients), not high core temperature, is the 'primary' factor impairing aerobic exercise performance when euhydrated and that hypohydration exacerbates this effect.

  20. Aerobic Fitness Thresholds Associated with Fifth Grade Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittberg, Richard; Cottrell, Lesley A.; Davis, Catherine L.; Northrup, Karen L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Whereas effects of physical fitness and physical activity on cognitive function have been documented, little is known about how they are related. Purpose: This study assessed student aerobic fitness measured by FITNESSGRAM Mile times and/or Pacer circuits and whether the nature of the association between aerobic fitness and…

  1. Factors associated with low levels of aerobic fitness among adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Eliane Cristina de Andrade; Silva, Diego Augusto Santos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of low aerobic fitness levels and to analyze the association with sociodemographic factors, lifestyle and excess body fatness among adolescents of southern Brazil. Methods: The study included 879 adolescents aged 14-19 years the city of São José/SC, Brazil. The aerobic fitness was assessed by Canadian modified test of aerobic fitness. Sociodemographic variables (skin color, age, sex, study turn, economic level), sexual maturation and lifestyle (eating habits, screen time, physical activity, consumption of alcohol and tobacco) were assessed by a self-administered questionnaire. Excess body fatness was evaluated by sum of skinfolds triceps and subscapular. We used logistic regression to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Results: Prevalence of low aerobic fitness level was 87.5%. The girls who spent two hours or more in front screen, consumed less than one glass of milk by day, did not smoke and had an excess of body fatness had a higher chance of having lower levels of aerobic fitness. White boys with low physical activity had had a higher chance of having lower levels of aerobic fitness. Conclusions: Eight out of ten adolescents were with low fitness levels aerobic. Modifiable lifestyle factors were associated with low levels of aerobic fitness. Interventions that emphasize behavior change are needed. PMID:26743851

  2. The use of aerobic exercise training in improving aerobic capacity in individuals with stroke: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Marco YC; Eng, Janice J; Dawson, Andrew S; Gylfadóttir, Sif

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether aerobic exercise improves aerobic capacity in individuals with stroke. Design A systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Databases searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Physiotherapy Evidence Database were searched. Inclusion criteria Design: randomized controlled trials; Participants: individuals with stroke; Interventions: aerobic exercise training aimed at improving aerobic capacity; Outcomes Primary outcomes: aerobic capacity [peak oxygen consumption (VO2), peak workload); Secondary outcomes: walking velocity, walking endurance. Data Analysis The methodological quality was assessed by the PEDro scale. Meta-analyses were performed for all primary and secondary outcomes. Results Nine articles (seven RCTs) were identified. The exercise intensity ranged from 50% to 80% heart rate reserve. Exercise duration was 20–40 minutes for 3–5 days a week. The total number of subjects included in the studies was 480. All studies reported positive effects on aerobic capacity, regardless of the stage of stroke recovery. Meta-analysis revealed a significant homogeneous standardized effect size (SES) in favour of aerobic exercise to improve peak VO2 (SES, 0.42; 95%CI, 0.15 to 0.69; p=0.001) and peak workload (SES, 0.50; 95%CI, 0.26 to 0.73; p<0.001). There was also a significant homogeneous SES in favour of aerobic training to improve walking velocity (SES, 0.26; 95%CI, 0.05 to 0.48; p=0.008) and walking endurance (SES, 0.30; 95%CI, 0.06to 0.55; p=0.008). Conclusions There is good evidence that aerobic exercise is beneficial for improving aerobic capacity in people with mild and moderate stroke. Aerobic exercise should be an important component of stroke rehabilitation. PMID:16541930

  3. Iron plaque formed under aerobic conditions efficiently immobilizes arsenic in Lupinus albus L roots.

    PubMed

    Fresno, Teresa; Peñalosa, Jesús M; Santner, Jakob; Puschenreiter, Markus; Prohaska, Thomas; Moreno-Jiménez, Eduardo

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic is a non-threshold carcinogenic metalloid. Thus, human exposure should be minimised, e.g. by chemically stabilizing As in soil. Since iron is a potential As immobiliser, it was investigated whether root iron plaque, formed under aerobic conditions, affects As uptake, metabolism and distribution in Lupinus albus plants. White lupin plants were cultivated in a continuously aerated hydroponic culture containing Fe/EDDHA or FeSO4 and exposed to arsenate (5 or 20 μM). Only FeSO4 induced surficial iron plaque in roots. LA-ICP-MS analysis accomplished on root sections corroborated the association of As to this surficial Fe. Additionally, As(V) was the predominant species in FeSO4-treated roots, suggesting less efficient As uptake in the presence of iron plaque. Fe/EDDHA-exposed roots neither showed such surficial FeAs co-localisation nor As(V) accumulation; in contrast As(III) was the predominant species in root tissue. Furthermore, FeSO4-treated plants showed reduced shoot-to-root As ratios, which were >10-fold lower compared to Fe/EDDHA treatment. Our results highlight the role of an iron plaque formed in roots of white lupin under aerobic conditions on As immobilisation. These findings, to our knowledge, have not been addressed before for this plant and have potential implications on soil remediation (phytostabilisation) and food security (minimising As in crops).

  4. An outbreak in 1965 of severe respiratory illness caused by the Legionnaires' disease bacterium.

    PubMed

    Thacker, S B; Bennett, J V; Tsai, T F; Fraser, D W; McDade, J E; Shepard, C C; Williams, K H; Stuart, W H; Dull, H B; Eickhoff, T C

    1978-10-01

    In January 1977 an unsolved outbreak of infection at St. Elizabeth's Hospital (Washington, D.C.) that occurred in 1965 was linked with Legionnaires' disease. The link was made by fluorescent antibody testing with the bacterium isolated from tissues of persons with Legionnaires' disease in the 1976 outbreak in Philadelphia. In July and August 1965, an epidemic of severe respiratory disease characterized by abrupt onset of high fever, weakness, malaise, and nonproductive cough, frequently accompanied by radiographic evidence of pneumonia, affected at least 81 patients at St. Elizabeth's Hospital, a general psychiatric hospital. Fourteen (17%) of the affected patients died. Intensive epidemiologic and laboratory investigations in 1965 did not determine the etiology. The etiologic organism may have become airborne from sites of soil excavation.

  5. [Isolation and characteristic of a moderately halophilic bacterium accumulated ectoine as main compatible solute].

    PubMed

    He, Jian; Wang, Ting; Sun, Ji-Quan; Gu, Li-Feng; Li, Shun-Peng

    2005-12-01

    A moderately halophilic bacterium(designated strain I15) was isolated from lawn soil. Based on the analysis of 16S rDNA (GenBank accession number DQ010162), morphology, physiological and biochemical characteristics, strain I15 was identified as Virgibacillus marismortuii. This strain was capable of growing under 0% approximately 25% NaCl, and exhibited an optimum NaCl concentration of 10% and an optimum temperature of 30 degrees C and an optimum pH of 7.5 - 8.0 for its growth, respectively. Under hyperosmotic stress, strain 115 accumulated ectoine as the main compatible solute. Under 15% NaCl conditions the intracellar ectoine can reach to 1.608 mmol/(g x cdw), accounted for 89.6% of the total compatible solutes. The biosynthesis of ectoine was under the control of osmotic, and the accumulated ectoine synthesized intraceilularly can released under hypoosmotic shocks and resynthesis under hyperosmotic shock rapidly.

  6. Swimming patterns of a polarly flagellated bacterium in environments of increasing complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raatz, M.; Hintsche, M.; Bahrs, M.; Theves, M.; Beta, C.

    2015-07-01

    The natural habitat of many bacterial swimmers is dominated by interfaces and narrow interstitial spacings where they frequently interact with the fluid boundaries in their vicinity. To quantify these interactions, we investigated the swimming behavior of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida in a variety of confined environments. Using microfluidic techniques, we fabricated structured microchannels with different configurations of cylindrical obstacles. In these environments, we analyzed the swimming trajectories for different obstacle densities and arrangements. Although the overall swimming pattern remained similar to movement in the bulk fluid, we observed a change in the turning angle distribution that could be attributed to collisions with the cylindrical obstacles. Furthermore, a comparison of the mean run length of the bacteria to the mean free path of a billiard particle in the same geometry indicated that, inside a densely packed environment, the trajectories of the bacterial swimmers are efficiently guided along the open spacings.

  7. Muscle deoxygenation in aerobic and anaerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Nioka, S; Moser, D; Lech, G; Evengelisti, M; Verde, T; Chance, B; Kuno, S

    1998-01-01

    It has been generally accepted that the use of oxygen is a major contributor of ATP synthesis in endurance exercise but not in short sprints. In anaerobic exercise, muscle energy is thought to be initially supported by the PCr-ATP system followed by glycolysis, not through mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. However, in real exercise practice, we do not know how much of this notion is true when an athlete approaches his/her maximal capacity of aerobic and anaerobic exercise, such as during a graded VO2max test. This study investigates the use of oxygen in aerobic and anaerobic exercise by monitoring oxygen concentration of the vastus lateralis muscle at maximum intensity using Near Infra-red Spectroscopy (NIRS). We tested 14 sprinters from the University of Penn track team, whose competitive events are high jump, pole vault, 100 m, 200 m, 400 m, and 800 m. The Wingate anaerobic power test was performed on a cycle ergometer with 10% body weight resistance for 30 seconds. To compare oxygenation during aerobic exercise, a steady-state VO2max test with a cycle ergometer was used with 25 watt increments every 2 min. until exhaustion. Results showed that in the Wingate test, total power reached 774 +/- 86 watt, about 3 times greater than that in the VO2max test (270 +/- 43 watt). In the Wingate test, the deoxygenation reached approximately 80% of the established maximum value, while in the VO2max test resulted in approximately 36% deoxygenation. There was no delay in onset of deoxygenation in the Wingate test, while in the VO2max test, deoxygenation did not occur under low intensity work. The results indicate that oxygen was used from the beginning of sprint test, suggesting that the mitochondrial ATP synthesis was triggered after a surprisingly brief exercise duration. One explanation is that prior warm-up (unloaded exercise) was enough to provide the mitochondrial substrates; ADP and Pi to activate oxidative phosphorylation by the type II a and type I myocytes. In

  8. Integrated system for treating soil contaminated with wood treating wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Acheson, C.M.; Brenner, R.C.; Khodadoust, A.P.

    1995-10-01

    Approximately 20% of the hazardous waste sites undergoing bioremediation are contaminated with wood treating wastes, primarily compounds such as pentachlorophenol (PCP), creosote, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and other hydrocarbons. A process that combines soil washing with sequential anaerobic and aerobic biotreatment is being integrated to remediate soil contaminated with these wood treating wastes. By extracting the target compound from the soil, soil washing facilitates degradation by mobilizing the target compound and expanding the range of feasible remediation technologies. Additional flexibility is possible since soil washing can be conducted in an in-situ or ex-situ format. In this process, the wash solution is initially bioremediated in an anaerobic environment. Mineralization of the target compound is completed aerobically. Based on preliminary results, the integrated process could meet the target cleanup level for PCP in approximately 45% of the bioremediation sites. Process development began by independently evaluating soil washing and target compound degradation. PCP contaminated soils were the initial focus, but this work is currently being extended to include soils contaminated with both PCP and PAHs. In addition, based on promising results from the soil washing and degradation evaluations, these individual unit operations are being integrated to form a complete process to remediate soils contaminated with wood treating wastes. This complete process incorporates soil washing, soil wash solution recycling, and biodegradation of the target compounds and is outlined.

  9. Characterization of the hcnABC Gene Cluster Encoding Hydrogen Cyanide Synthase and Anaerobic Regulation by ANR in the Strictly Aerobic Biocontrol Agent Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0

    PubMed Central

    Laville, Jacques; Blumer, Caroline; Von Schroetter, Christine; Gaia, Valeria; Défago, Geneviève; Keel, Christoph; Haas, Dieter

    1998-01-01

    The secondary metabolite hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens from glycine, essentially under microaerophilic conditions. The genetic basis of HCN synthesis in P. fluorescens CHA0 was investigated. The contiguous structural genes hcnABC encoding HCN synthase were expressed from the T7 promoter in Escherichia coli, resulting in HCN production in this bacterium. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the hcnABC genes showed that each HCN synthase subunit was similar to known enzymes involved in hydrogen transfer, i.e., to formate dehydrogenase (for HcnA) or amino acid oxidases (for HcnB and HcnC). These similarities and the presence of flavin adenine dinucleotide- or NAD(P)-binding motifs in HcnB and HcnC suggest that HCN synthase may act as a dehydrogenase in the reaction leading from glycine to HCN and CO2. The hcnA promoter was mapped by primer extension; the −40 sequence (TTGGC … .ATCAA) resembled the consensus FNR (fumarate and nitrate reductase regulator) binding sequence (TTGAT … .ATCAA). The gene encoding the FNR-like protein ANR (anaerobic regulator) was cloned from P. fluorescens CHA0 and sequenced. ANR of strain CHA0 was most similar to ANR of P. aeruginosa and CydR of Azotobacter vinelandii. An anr mutant of P. fluorescens (CHA21) produced little HCN and was unable to express an hcnA-lacZ translational fusion, whereas in wild-type strain CHA0, microaerophilic conditions strongly favored the expression of the hcnA-lacZ fusion. Mutant CHA21 as well as an hcn deletion mutant were impaired in their capacity to suppress black root rot of tobacco, a disease caused by Thielaviopsis basicola, under gnotobiotic conditions. This effect was most pronounced in water-saturated artificial soil, where the anr mutant had lost about 30% of disease suppression ability, compared with wild-type strain CHA0. These results show that the anaerobic regulator ANR is required for cyanide synthesis in the strictly aerobic strain CHA0 and

  10. Characterization of the hcnABC gene cluster encoding hydrogen cyanide synthase and anaerobic regulation by ANR in the strictly aerobic biocontrol agent Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0.

    PubMed

    Laville, J; Blumer, C; Von Schroetter, C; Gaia, V; Défago, G; Keel, C; Haas, D

    1998-06-01

    The secondary metabolite hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens from glycine, essentially under microaerophilic conditions. The genetic basis of HCN synthesis in P. fluorescens CHA0 was investigated. The contiguous structural genes hcnABC encoding HCN synthase were expressed from the T7 promoter in Escherichia coli, resulting in HCN production in this bacterium. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the hcnABC genes showed that each HCN synthase subunit was similar to known enzymes involved in hydrogen transfer, i.e., to formate dehydrogenase (for HcnA) or amino acid oxidases (for HcnB and HcnC). These similarities and the presence of flavin adenine dinucleotide- or NAD(P)-binding motifs in HcnB and HcnC suggest that HCN synthase may act as a dehydrogenase in the reaction leading from glycine to HCN and CO2. The hcnA promoter was mapped by primer extension; the -40 sequence (TTGGC ... ATCAA) resembled the consensus FNR (fumarate and nitrate reductase regulator) binding sequence (TTGAT ... ATCAA). The gene encoding the FNR-like protein ANR (anaerobic regulator) was cloned from P. fluorescens CHA0 and sequenced. ANR of strain CHA0 was most similar to ANR of P. aeruginosa and CydR of Azotobacter vinelandii. An anr mutant of P. fluorescens (CHA21) produced little HCN and was unable to express an hcnA-lacZ translational fusion, whereas in wild-type strain CHA0, microaerophilic conditions strongly favored the expression of the hcnA-lacZ fusion. Mutant CHA21 as well as an hcn deletion mutant were impaired in their capacity to suppress black root rot of tobacco, a disease caused by Thielaviopsis basicola, under gnotobiotic conditions. This effect was most pronounced in water-saturated artificial soil, where the anr mutant had lost about 30% of disease suppression ability, compared with wild-type strain CHA0. These results show that the anaerobic regulator ANR is required for cyanide synthesis in the strictly aerobic strain CHA0 and suggest that ANR

  11. Genome sequence of Nitrosomonas sp. strain AL212, an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium sensitive to high levels of ammonia.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Yuichi; Yuichi, Suwa; Norton, Jeanette M; Bollmann, Annette; Klotz, Martin G; Stein, Lisa Y; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J; Arp, Daniel J; Goodwin, Lynne A; Chertkov, Olga; Held, Brittany; Bruce, David; Detter, J Chris; Detter, Janine C; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff S

    2011-09-01

    Nitrosomonas sp. strain AL212 is an obligate chemolithotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacterium (AOB) that was originally isolated in 1997 by Yuichi Suwa and colleagues. This organism belongs to Nitrosomonas cluster 6A, which is characterized by sensitivity to high ammonia concentrations, higher substrate affinity (lower K(m)), and lower maximum growth rates than strains in Nitrosomonas cluster 7, which includes Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrosomonas eutropha. Genome-informed studies of this ammonia-sensitive cohort of AOB are needed, as these bacteria are found in freshwater environments, drinking water supplies, wastewater treatment systems, and soils worldwide.

  12. Effectiveness of the modified progressive aerobic capacity endurance run test for assessing aerobic fitness in Hispanic children who are obese

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the progressive aerobic capacity endurance run (PACER) and a newly designed modified PACER (MPACER) for assessing aerobic fitness in Hispanic children who are obese. Thirty-nine (aged 7-12 years) children who were considered obese (= 95 ...

  13. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2012-01-01

    potential for transfer, and subsequent proliferation, on another solar body such as Mars and Europa. These organisms are more likely to escape planetary protection assays, which only take into account presence of spores. Hence, presences of extreme radiation-resistant Deinococcus in the cleanroom facility where spacecraft are assembled pose a serious risk for integrity of life-detection missions. The microorganism described herein was isolated from the surfaces of the cleanroom facility in which the Phoenix Lander was assembled. The isolated bacterial strain was subjected to a comprehensive polyphasic analysis to characterize its taxonomic position. This bacterium exhibits very low 16SrRNA similarity with any other environmental isolate reported to date. Both phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses clearly indicate that this isolate belongs to the genus Deinococcus and represents a novel species. The name Deinococcus phoenicis was proposed after the Phoenix spacecraft, which was undergoing assembly, testing, and launch operations in the spacecraft assembly facility at the time of isolation. D. phoenicis cells exhibited higher resistance to ionizing radiation (cobalt-60; 14 kGy) than the cells of the D. radiodurans (5 kGy). Thus, it is in the best interest of NASA to thoroughly characterize this organism, which will further assess in determining the potential for forward contamination. Upon the completion of genetic and physiological characteristics of D. phoenicis, it will be added to a planetary protection database to be able to further model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  14. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2013-01-01

    potential for transfer, and subsequent proliferation, on another solar body such as Mars and Europa. These organisms are more likely to escape planetary protection assays, which only take into account presence of spores. Hence, presences of extreme radiation-resistant Deinococcus in the cleanroom facility where spacecraft are assembled pose a serious risk for integrity of life-detection missions. The microorganism described herein was isolated from the surfaces of the cleanroom facility in which the Phoenix Lander was assembled. The isolated bacterial strain was subjected to a comprehensive polyphasic analysis to characterize its taxonomic position. This bacterium exhibits very low 16SrRNA similarity with any other environmental isolate reported to date. Both phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses clearly indicate that this isolate belongs to the genus Deinococcus and represents a novel species. The name Deinococcus phoenicis was proposed after the Phoenix spacecraft, which was undergoing assembly, testing, and launch operations in the spacecraft assembly facility at the time of isolation. D. phoenicis cells exhibited higher resistance to ionizing radiation (cobalt-60; 14 kGy) than the cells of the D. radiodurans (5 kGy). Thus, it is in the best interest of NASA to thoroughly characterize this organism, which will further assess in determining the potential for forward contamination. Upon the completion of genetic and physiological characteristics of D. phoenicis, it will be added to a planetary protection database to be able to further model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  15. Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Nirakar; Dipasquale, Laura; d’Ippolito, Giuliana; Panico, Antonio; Lens, Piet N. L.; Esposito, Giovanni; Fontana, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    As the only fuel that is not chemically bound to carbon, hydrogen has gained interest as an energy carrier to face the current environmental issues of greenhouse gas emissions and to substitute the depleting non-renewable reserves. In the last years, there has been a significant increase in the number of publications about the bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana that is responsible for production yields of H2 that are among the highest achievements reported in the literature. Here we present an extensive overview of the most recent studies on this hyperthermophilic bacterium together with a critical discussion of the potential of fermentative production by this bacterium. The review article is organized into sections focused on biochemical, microbiological and technical issues, including the effect of substrate, reactor type, gas sparging, temperature, pH, hydraulic retention time and organic loading parameters on rate and yield of gas production. PMID:26053393

  16. Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Nirakar; Dipasquale, Laura; d'Ippolito, Giuliana; Panico, Antonio; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni; Fontana, Angelo

    2015-06-04

    As the only fuel that is not chemically bound to carbon, hydrogen has gained interest as an energy carrier to face the current environmental issues of greenhouse gas emissions and to substitute the depleting non-renewable reserves. In the last years, there has been a significant increase in the number of publications about the bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana that is responsible for production yields of H2 that are among the highest