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Sample records for aerobic soil conditions

  1. Nitroglycerin degradation mediated by soil organic carbon under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Geneviève; Martel, Richard; Bamba, Abraham N'Valoua; Blais, Jean-François; Ampleman, Guy; Thiboutot, Sonia

    2014-10-01

    The presence of nitroglycerin (NG) has been reported in shallow soils and pore water of several military training ranges. In this context, NG concentrations can be reduced through various natural attenuation processes, but these have not been thoroughly documented. This study aimed at investigating the role of soil organic matter (SOM) in the natural attenuation of NG, under aerobic conditions typical of shallow soils. The role of SOM in NG degradation has already been documented under anoxic conditions, and was attributed to SOM-mediated electron transfer involving different reducing agents. However, unsaturated soils are usually well-oxygenated, and it was not clear whether SOM could participate in NG degradation under these conditions. Our results from batch- and column-type experiments clearly demonstrate that in presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) leached from a natural soil, partial NG degradation can be achieved. In presence of particulate organic matter (POM) from the same soil, complete NG degradation was achieved. Furthermore, POM caused rapid sorption of NG, which should result in NG retention in the organic matter-rich shallow horizons of the soil profile, thus promoting degradation. Based on degradation products, the reaction pathway appears to be reductive, in spite of the aerobic conditions. The relatively rapid reaction rates suggest that this process could significantly participate in the natural attenuation of NG, both on military training ranges and in contaminated soil at production facilities. PMID:25086776

  2. Aerobic Conditioning Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Neil R.

    1980-01-01

    An aerobic exercise class that focuses on the conditioning of the cardiovascular and muscular systems is presented. Students complete data cards on heart rate, pulse, and exercises to be completed during the forty minute course. (CJ)

  3. Diversity of methanotrophs in Zoige wetland soils under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Yun, Juanli; Ma, Anzhou; Li, Yaoming; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Wang, Yanfen; Zhang, Hongxun

    2010-01-01

    Zoige wetland is one of the most important methane emission centers in China. The oxidation of methane in the wetland affects global warming, soil ecology and atmospheric chemistry. Despite their global significance, microorganisms that consume methane in Zoige wetland remain poorly characterized. In this study, we investigated methanotrophs diversity in soil samples from both anaerobic site and aerobic site in Zoige wetland using pmoA gene as a molecular marker. The cloning library was constructed according to the pmoA sequences detected. Four clusters of methanotrophs were detected. The phylogenetic tree showed that all four clusters detected were affiliated to type I methanotrophs. Two novel clusters (cluster 1, cluster 2) were found to relate to none of the recognized genera of methanotrophs. These clusters have no cultured representatives and reveal an ecological adaptation of particular uncultured methanotrophs in Zoige wetland. Two clusters were belonging to Methylobacter and Methylococcus separately. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis gel bands pattern retrieved from these two samples revealed that the community compositions of anaerobic soil and aerobic soil were different from each other while anaerobic soil showed a higher metanotrophs diversity. Real-time PCR assays of the two samples demonstrated that aerobic soil sample in Zoige wetland was 1.5 times as much copy numbers as anaerobic soil. These data illustrated that methanotrophs are a group of microorganisms influence the methane consumption in Zoige wetland. PMID:21179963

  4. Using a tank flow model with PEARL to measure the variation in pesticide persistence between anaerobic and aerobic soil conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Real, Joaquin; Seiterle-Winn, Natalie; Frances, Felix

    2013-04-01

    Pesticide leaching is very sensitive to the transformation rate (Boesten and Linden, 1991). The values of the transformation rates of the pesticides differ between aerobic and anaerobic soil conditions. The main objective is to determine if there is a significant variation in pesticide persistence between aerobic and anaerobic soil conditions. An auxiliary hydrological model is used with the PEARL model (Leistra et al, 2001). The auxiliary model determines the degree of saturation of the soil at each time step. The value of the degradation rate for a given pesticide in the PEARL model varies depending on the time periods with saturated or unsaturated soil conditions. The proposed auxiliary model has been conceptualized as a static tank flow model based on the actual evapotranspiration of the crop plants. It is based on the RIBAV model (Garcia-Arias et al. 2012) used for the modeling of riparian vegetation zonation. The tank represents a soil column which also includes the superficial root layer. The lower capacity limit of this tank is the permanent wilting moisture of the soil. The upper capacity limit represents the saturated condition of the soil. The tanks input flows are precipitation and irrigation. In contrast, output flows are the actual evapotranspiration and the discharge of the tank. The most relevant model parameters are the soil retention curves, the crop parameters (specially related to root depths and crop coefficients) and the daily meteorological data (such as precipitation and potential evapotranspiration). The main output of the auxiliary model is the relative soil moisture, which determines if the PEARL model should use the transformation rate value for aerobic or for anaerobic conditions. In order to prove the applicability of the model, it was tested with various pesticides, which cover a wide range of transformation rates. The results show that the auxiliary tank model is able to determine the partition of the pesticides degrading in both

  5. Nitrite-driven nitrous oxide production under aerobic soil conditions: Kinetics and biochemical controls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrite (NO2-) can accumulate during nitrification in soil following fertilizer application. While the role of NO2- as a substrate regulating nitrous oxide (N2O) production is recognized, kinetic data are not available that allow for estimating N2O production or soil-to-atmosphere fluxes as a functi...

  6. Nitrite-Driven Nitrous Oxide Production Under Aerobic Soil Conditions: Kinetics and Biochemical Controls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrite (NO2-) can accumulate during nitrification in soil following fertilizer application. While the role of NO2- as a substrate regulating nitrous oxide (N2O) production is recognized, kinetic data are not available that allow for estimating N2O production or soil-to-atmosphere fluxes as a functi...

  7. Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons at Low Temperature under Aerobic and Nitrate-Reducing Conditions in Enrichment Cultures from Northern Soils

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Mikael; Sodersten, Erik; Yu, Zhongtang; Dalhammar, Gunnel; Mohn, William W.

    2003-01-01

    The potential for biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at low temperature and under anaerobic conditions is not well understood, but such biodegradation would be very useful for remediation of polluted sites. Biodegradation of a mixture of 11 different PAHs with two to five aromatic rings, each at a concentration of 10 μg/ml, was studied in enrichment cultures inoculated with samples of four northern soils. Under aerobic conditions, low temperature severely limited PAH biodegradation. After 90 days, aerobic cultures at 20°C removed 52 to 88% of the PAHs. The most extensive PAH degradation under aerobic conditions at 7°C, 53% removal, occurred in a culture from creosote-contaminated soil. Low temperature did not substantially limit PAH biodegradation under nitrate-reducing conditions. Under nitrate-reducing conditions, naphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, fluorene, and phenanthrene were degraded. The most extensive PAH degradation under nitrate-reducing conditions at 7°C, 39% removal, occurred in a culture from fuel-contaminated Arctic soil. In separate transfer cultures from the above Arctic soil, incubated anaerobically at 7°C, removal of 2-methylnaphthalene and fluorene was stoichiometrically coupled to nitrate removal. Ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis suggested that enrichment resulted in a few predominant bacterial populations, including members of the genera Acidovorax, Bordetella, Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas, and Variovorax. Predominant populations from different soils often included phylotypes with nearly identical partial 16S rRNA gene sequences (i.e., same genus) but never included phylotypes with identical ribosomal intergenic spacers (i.e., different species or subspecies). The composition of the enriched communities appeared to be more affected by presence of oxygen, than by temperature or source of the inoculum. PMID:12514005

  8. The determination of the real nano-scale sizes of bacteria in chernozem during microbial succession by means of hatching of a soil in aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbacheva, M.

    2012-04-01

    M.A. Gorbacheva,L.M. Polyanskaya The Faculty of Soil Science, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, GSP-1, Moscow,119991,Russia In recent years there's been particular attention paid to the smallest life's forms- bacteria which size can be measured in nanometer. These are the forms of bacteria with diameter of 5-200 nm. Theoretical calculations based on the content of the minimum number of DNA, enzyme, lipids in and ribosome in cells indicates impossibility of existence of a living cells within diameter less than 300 nm. It is theoretically possible for a living cell to exist within possible diameter of approximately 140 nm. Using a fluorescence microscope there's been indicated in a number of samples from lakes, rivers, soil, snow and rain water that 200 nm is the smallest diameter of a living cell. Supposingly, such a small size of bacteria in soil is determined by natural conditions which limit their development by nutritious substances and stress-factors. Rejuvenescence of nanobacteria under unfavourable natural conditions and stress-factors is studied in laboratory environment. The object of the current study has become the samples of typical arable chernozem of the Central Chernozem State Biosphere Reserve in Kursk. The detailed morphological description of the soil profile and its basic analytical characteristics are widely represented in scientific publications. The soil is characterized by a high carbon content which makes up 3,96% ,3,8% , and 2,9% for the upper layers of the A horizon, and 0,79% for the layer of the B horizon. A microbial succession was studied under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by means of experiments with microcosms in upper A horizons and B horizon of a chernozem. The final aim is to identify the cells size of bacteria in aerobic and anaerobic soil conditions in chernozem during the microbial succession, by dampening and application of chitin by means of «cascade filtration» method. The study of the microcosms is important for

  9. Aerobic and microaerophilic actinomycetes of typical agropeat and peat soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenova, G. M.; Gryadunova, A. A.; Pozdnyakov, A. I.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.

    2008-02-01

    A high number (from tens of thousands to millions of CFU/g of soil) of actinomycetes and a high diversity of genera were found in typical peat and agropeat soils. Agricultural use increases the number and diversity of the actinomycete complexes of the peat soils. In the peat soils, the actinomycete complex is represented by eight genera: Streptomyces, Micromonospora, Streptosporangium, Actinomadura, Microbispora, Saccharopolyspora, Saccharomonospora, and Microtetraspora. A considerable share of sporangial forms in the actinomycete complex of the peat soils not characteristic of the zonal soils was revealed. The number of actinomycetes that develop under aerobic conditions is smaller by 10-100 times than that of aerobic forms in the peat soils. Among the soil actinomycetes of the genera Streptomyces, Micromonospora, Streptosporangium, Actinomadura, Microbispora, and Microtetraspora, the microaerophilic forms were found; among the Saccharopolyspora and Saccharomonospora, no microaerophilic representatives were revealed.

  10. The transformation of hexabromocyclododecane in aerobic and anaerobic soils and aquatic sediments.

    PubMed

    Davis, J W; Gonsior, S; Marty, G; Ariano, J

    2005-03-01

    The biological transformation of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), a brominated fire retardant commonly used in a variety of consumer goods, was investigated in aerobic and anaerobic soils and freshwater sediments. Soil, river water, and aquatic sediments were collected from several locations in the United States and transformation of HBCD was evaluated in the correspondingly composed microcosms based on the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) Test Guidelines 307 (Aerobic and Anaerobic Transformation in Soil) or 308 (Aerobic and Anaerobic Transformation in Aquatic Sediment Systems). Soil and sediment reaction mixtures, prepared under either aerobic or anoxic conditions, were dosed with HBCD at a concentration ranging from approximately 10 to 80 ng/g dry weight. The soils and sediments were then placed at 20 degrees C for approximately 4 months and the concentration of HBCD in the microcosms was determined at selected time intervals utilizing high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). HBCD loss was observed in both the aerobic and anaerobic soils and sediments although the rates were appreciable faster under anoxic conditions. Biologically mediated transformation processes (i.e., biotransformation) accelerated the rate of loss of HBCD when compared to the biologically inhibited (i.e., autoclaved) soils and sediments. Biotransformation half-lives for HBCD were determined to be 63 and 6.9 days in the aerobic and anaerobic soils, respectively, while biotransformation half-lives for HBCD in the two river systems ranged from 11 to 32 days and 1.1 to 1.5 days under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. Brominated degradation products were not detected in any of the soils or sediments during the course of the study. PMID:15766961

  11. Conditioning and Aerobics for Older Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Joyce

    1980-01-01

    A class designed for the maintenance and gradual improvement of senior citizens' physical fitness includes relaxation training, flexibility and stretching exercises, interval training activities (designed as a link between less strenuous exercise and more strenuous activities), and aerobic exercises. (CJ)

  12. Spectroscopic characterization of organic matter of a soil and vinasse mixture during aerobic or anaerobic incubation

    SciTech Connect

    Doelsch, Emmanuel Masion, Armand; Cazevieille, Patrick

    2009-06-15

    Mineralization potentials are often used to classify organic wastes. These methods involve measuring CO{sub 2} production during batch experiments, so variations in chemical compounds are not addressed. Moreover, the physicochemical conditions are not monitored during the reactions. The present study was designed to address these deficiencies. Incubations of a mixture of soil and waste (vinasse at 20% dry matter from a fermentation industry) were conducted in aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and liquid samples obtained by centrifugation were collected at 2 h, 1 d and 28 d. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) patterns highlighted that: there was a 'soil effect' which increased organic matter (OM) degradation in all conditions compared to vinasse incubated alone; and OM degradation was faster under aerobic conditions since 500 mg kg{sup -1} of C remained after aerobic incubation, as compared to 4000 mg kg{sup -1} at the end of the anaerobic incubation period. No changes were detected by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) between 2 h and 1 d incubation. At 28 days incubation, the FTIR signal of the aerobic samples was deeply modified, thus confirming the high OM degradation. Under anaerobic conditions, the main polysaccharide contributions ({nu}(C-O)) disappeared at 1000 and 1200 cm{sup -1}, as also confirmed by the {sup 13}C NMR findings. Under aerobic incubation, a 50% decrease in the polysaccharide proportion was observed. Under anaerobic conditions, significant chemical modifications of the organic fraction were detected, namely formation of low molecular weight organic acids.

  13. Aerobic degradation and photolysis of tylosin in water and soil.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dingfei; Coats, Joel R

    2007-05-01

    Veterinary antibiotics enter the environment through the application of organic fertilizers to cropland. In this study, the aerobic degradation of tylosin, a widely used antibiotic in the production of livestock and poultry, was conducted in water and in soil in an effort to further investigate its environmental fate. Tylosin is a macrolide antibiotic, which consists of four factors (A, B, C, D). Water and soil were sampled at selected times and analyzed for tylosin and its degradation products by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), with product identification confirmed by HPLC-mass spectrometry. Tylosin A is degraded with a half-life of 200 d in the light in water, and the total loss of tylosin A in the dark is 6% of the initial spiked amount during the experimental period. Tylosin C and D are relatively stable except in ultrapure water in the light. Slight increases of tylosin B after two months and formation of two photoreaction isomers of tylosin A were observed under exposure to light. However, tylosin probably would degrade faster if the experimental containers did not prevent ultraviolet transmission. In soil, tylosin A has a dissipation half-life of 7 d, and tylosin D is slightly more stable, with a dissipation half-life of 8 d in unsterilized and sterilized soil. Sorption and abiotic degradation are the major factors influencing the loss of tylosin in the environment, and no biotic degradation was observed at the test concentration either in pond water or in an agronomic soil, as determined by comparing dissipation profiles in sterilized and unsterilized conditions. PMID:17521133

  14. Plutonium uptake by common soil aerobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Seth; Rugglero, Christy; Hersman, Larry; Neu, Mary

    2000-07-01

    Radionuclide contamination in soils and groundwater poses a risk to both human and environmental health. The DOE has identified 12 sites with significant U contamination in the soils and ground water, and 10 sites with Pu contamination.1 It is important to study the interactions of common soil microbes with these radionuclides both to understand the environmental fate of these contaminants and to evaluate the potential of biological techniques to remediate contaminated soils and water.

  15. An obligately aerobic soil bacterium activates fermentative hydrogen production to survive reductive stress during hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Berney, Michael; Greening, Chris; Conrad, Ralf; Jacobs, William R.; Cook, Gregory M.

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen availability is a major factor and evolutionary force determining the metabolic strategy of bacteria colonizing an environmental niche. In the soil, conditions can switch rapidly between oxia and anoxia, forcing soil bacteria to remodel their energy metabolism accordingly. Mycobacterium is a dominant genus in the soil, and all its species are obligate aerobes. Here we show that an obligate aerobe, the soil actinomycete Mycobacterium smegmatis, adopts an anaerobe-type strategy by activating fermentative hydrogen production to adapt to hypoxia. This process is controlled by the two-component system DosR-DosS/DosT, an oxygen and redox sensor that is well conserved in mycobacteria. We show that DosR tightly regulates the two [NiFe]-hydrogenases: Hyd3 (MSMEG_3931-3928) and Hyd2 (MSMEG_2719-2718). Using genetic manipulation and high-sensitivity GC, we demonstrate that Hyd3 facilitates the evolution of H2 when oxygen is depleted. Combined activity of Hyd2 and Hyd3 was necessary to maintain an optimal NAD+/NADH ratio and enhanced adaptation to and survival of hypoxia. We demonstrate that fermentatively-produced hydrogen can be recycled when fumarate or oxygen become available, suggesting Mycobacterium smegmatis can switch between fermentation, anaerobic respiration, and aerobic respiration. Hydrogen metabolism enables this obligate aerobe to rapidly meet its energetic needs when switching between microoxic and anoxic conditions and provides a competitive advantage in low oxygen environments. PMID:25049411

  16. An obligately aerobic soil bacterium activates fermentative hydrogen production to survive reductive stress during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Berney, Michael; Greening, Chris; Conrad, Ralf; Jacobs, William R; Cook, Gregory M

    2014-08-01

    Oxygen availability is a major factor and evolutionary force determining the metabolic strategy of bacteria colonizing an environmental niche. In the soil, conditions can switch rapidly between oxia and anoxia, forcing soil bacteria to remodel their energy metabolism accordingly. Mycobacterium is a dominant genus in the soil, and all its species are obligate aerobes. Here we show that an obligate aerobe, the soil actinomycete Mycobacterium smegmatis, adopts an anaerobe-type strategy by activating fermentative hydrogen production to adapt to hypoxia. This process is controlled by the two-component system DosR-DosS/DosT, an oxygen and redox sensor that is well conserved in mycobacteria. We show that DosR tightly regulates the two [NiFe]-hydrogenases: Hyd3 (MSMEG_3931-3928) and Hyd2 (MSMEG_2719-2718). Using genetic manipulation and high-sensitivity GC, we demonstrate that Hyd3 facilitates the evolution of H2 when oxygen is depleted. Combined activity of Hyd2 and Hyd3 was necessary to maintain an optimal NAD(+)/NADH ratio and enhanced adaptation to and survival of hypoxia. We demonstrate that fermentatively-produced hydrogen can be recycled when fumarate or oxygen become available, suggesting Mycobacterium smegmatis can switch between fermentation, anaerobic respiration, and aerobic respiration. Hydrogen metabolism enables this obligate aerobe to rapidly meet its energetic needs when switching between microoxic and anoxic conditions and provides a competitive advantage in low oxygen environments. PMID:25049411

  17. Decomposition Dynamics and Changes in Chemical Composition of Wheat Straw Residue under Anaerobic and Aerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hongjian; Chen, Xi; Wei, Junling; Zhang, Yajie; Zhang, Ligan; Chang, Jiang; Thompson, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Soil aeration is a crucial factor that regulates crop residue decomposition, and the chemical composition of decomposing crop residues may change the forms and availability of soil nutrients, such as N and P. However, to date, differences in the chemical composition of crop straw residues after incorporation into soil and during its decomposition under anaerobic vs. aerobic conditions have not been well documented. The objective of the present study was to assess changes in the C-containing functional groups of wheat straw residue during its decomposition in anaerobic and aerobic environments. A 12-month incubation experiment was carried out to investigate the temporal variations of mass, carbon, and nitrogen loss, as well as changes in the chemical composition of wheat (Triticum aestivum L) straw residues under anaerobic and aerobic conditions by measuring C-containing functional groups using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The residual mass, carbon content, and nitrogen content of the straw residue sharply declined during the initial 3 months, and then slowly decreased during the last incubation period from 3 to 12 months. The decomposition rate constant (k) for mass loss under aerobic conditions (0.022 d-1) was higher than that under anaerobic conditions (0.014 d-1). The residual mass percentage of cellulose and hemicellulose in the wheat straw gradually declined, whereas that of lignin gradually increased during the entire 12-month incubation period. The NMR spectra of C-containing functional groups in the decomposing straw under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions were similar at the beginning of the incubation as well as at 1 month, 6 months, and 12 months. The main alterations in C-containing functional groups during the decomposition of wheat straw were a decrease in the relative abundances of O-alkyl C and an increase in the relative abundances of alkyl C, aromatic C and COO/N-C = O functional groups. The NMR signals of alkyl C

  18. Decomposition Dynamics and Changes in Chemical Composition of Wheat Straw Residue under Anaerobic and Aerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hongjian; Chen, Xi; Wei, Junling; Zhang, Yajie; Zhang, Ligan; Chang, Jiang; Thompson, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Soil aeration is a crucial factor that regulates crop residue decomposition, and the chemical composition of decomposing crop residues may change the forms and availability of soil nutrients, such as N and P. However, to date, differences in the chemical composition of crop straw residues after incorporation into soil and during its decomposition under anaerobic vs. aerobic conditions have not been well documented. The objective of the present study was to assess changes in the C-containing functional groups of wheat straw residue during its decomposition in anaerobic and aerobic environments. A 12-month incubation experiment was carried out to investigate the temporal variations of mass, carbon, and nitrogen loss, as well as changes in the chemical composition of wheat (Triticum aestivum L) straw residues under anaerobic and aerobic conditions by measuring C-containing functional groups using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The residual mass, carbon content, and nitrogen content of the straw residue sharply declined during the initial 3 months, and then slowly decreased during the last incubation period from 3 to 12 months. The decomposition rate constant (k) for mass loss under aerobic conditions (0.022 d-1) was higher than that under anaerobic conditions (0.014 d-1). The residual mass percentage of cellulose and hemicellulose in the wheat straw gradually declined, whereas that of lignin gradually increased during the entire 12-month incubation period. The NMR spectra of C-containing functional groups in the decomposing straw under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions were similar at the beginning of the incubation as well as at 1 month, 6 months, and 12 months. The main alterations in C-containing functional groups during the decomposition of wheat straw were a decrease in the relative abundances of O-alkyl C and an increase in the relative abundances of alkyl C, aromatic C and COO/N-C = O functional groups. The NMR signals of alkyl C

  19. Development of microorganisms in the chernozem under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyanskaya, L. M.; Gorbacheva, M. A.; Milanovskii, E. Yu.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.

    2010-03-01

    A microbial succession was studied under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by means of experiments with microcosms in different horizons of a chernozem. It was revealed that, under aerobic conditions, all the microorganisms grow irrespective of the soil horizon; fungi and bacteria grow at the first succession stages, and actinomycetes grow at the last stages. It was shown that, in the case of a simulated anaerobiosis commonly used to study anaerobic populations of bacteria, the mycelium of micromycetes grows in the upper part of the chernozem’s A horizon. Under anaerobic conditions, the peak of the mycelium development is shifted from the 3rd to 7th days (typical for aerobic conditions) to the 7th to 15th days of incubation. The level of mycelium length’s stabilization under aerobic and anaerobic conditions also differs: it is higher or lower than the initial one, respectively. Under anaerobic conditions, the growth of fungal mycelium, bacteria, and actinomycetes in the lower part of the A horizon and in the B horizon is extremely weak. There was not any observed growth of actinomycetes in all the chernozem’s horizons under anaerobic conditions.

  20. Soil and sediment bacteria capable of aerobic nitrate respiration.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, J P; Hsaio, Y H; Spiro, S; Richardson, D J

    1995-01-01

    Several laboratory strains of gram-negative bacteria are known to be able to respire nitrate in the presence of oxygen, although the physiological advantage gained from this process is not entirely clear. The contribution that aerobic nitrate respiration makes to the environmental nitrogen cycle has not been studied. As a first step in addressing this question, a strategy which allows for the isolation of organisms capable of reducing nitrate to nitrite following aerobic growth has been developed. Twenty-nine such strains have been isolated from three soils and a freshwater sediment and shown to comprise members of three genera (Pseudomonas, Aeromonas, and Moraxella). All of these strains expressed a nitrate reductase with an active site located in the periplasmic compartment. Twenty-two of the strains showed significant rates of nitrate respiration in the presence of oxygen when assayed with physiological electron donors. Also isolated was one member of the gram-positive genus Arthrobacter, which was likewise able to respire nitrate in the presence of oxygen but appeared to express a different type of nitrate reductase. In the four environments studied, culturable bacteria capable of aerobic nitrate respiration were isolated in significant numbers (10(4) to 10(7) per g of soil or sediment) and in three cases were as abundant as, or more abundant than, culturable bacteria capable of denitrification. Thus, it seems likely that the corespiration of nitrate and oxygen may indeed make a significant contribution to the flux of nitrate to nitrite in the environment. PMID:7487017

  1. Aerobic biotransformation of polyfluoroalkyl phosphate esters (PAPs) in soil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Liu, Jinxia

    2016-05-01

    Microbial transformation of polyfluoroalkyl phosphate esters (PAPs) into perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) has recently been confirmed to occur in activated sludge and soil. However, there lacks quantitative information about the half-lives of the PAPs and their significance as the precursors to PFCAs. In the present study, the biotransformation of 6:2 and 8:2 diPAP in aerobic soil was investigated in semi-dynamics reactors using improved sample preparation methods. To develop an efficient extraction method for PAPs, six different extraction solvents were compared, and the phenomenon of solvent-enhanced hydrolysis was investigated. It was found that adding acetic acid could enhance the recoveries of the diPAPs and inhibit undesirable hydrolysis during solvent extraction of soil. However 6:2 and 8:2 monoPAPs, which are the first breakdown products from diPAPs, were found to be unstable in the six solvents tested and quickly hydrolyzed to form fluorotelomer alcohols. Therefore reliable measurement of the monoPAPs from a live soil was not achievable. The apparent DT50 values of 6:2 diPAP and 8:2 diPAP biotransformation were estimated to be 12 and > 1000 days, respectively, using a double first-order in parallel model. At the end of incubation of day 112, the major degradation products of 6:2 diPAP were 5:3 fluorotelomer carboxylic acid (5:3 acid, 9.3% by mole), perfluoropentanoic acid (PFPeA, 6.4%) and perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA, 6.0%). The primary product of 8:2 diPAP was perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, 2.1%). The approximately linear relationship between the half-lives of eleven polyfluoroalkyl and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs, including 6:2 and 8:2 diPAPs) that biotransform in aerobic soils and their molecular weights suggested that the molecular weight is a good indicator of the general stability of low-molecular-weight PFAS-based compounds in aerobic soils. PMID:26849529

  2. Decomposition of organic waste products under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, P.M.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to determine the kinetics of C and N mineralization under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. These parameters were then used to verify the simulation model, DECOMPOSITION, for the anaerobic system. Incubation experiments were conducted to compare the aerobic and anaerobic decomposition of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), a substrate with a low C:N ratio. Under anaerobic conditions the net mineralization of N occurred more rapidly than that under aerobic conditions. However, the rate of C mineralization as measured by CO{sub 2} evolution was much lower. For the anaerobic decomposition of alfalfa, C mineralization was best described as the sum of the CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} evolved plus the water soluble organic C formed. The kinetics of C mineralization, as determined by this approach, were used to successfully predict the rate and amount of N mineralization from alfalfa undergoing anaerobic decomposition. The decomposition of paper mill sludge, a high C:N ratio substrate, was also evaluated.

  3. Kinetics of aerobic and anaerobic biomineralization of atrazine in surface and subsurface agricultural soils in Ohio.

    PubMed

    Tuovinen, Olli H; Deshmukh, Vaidehi; Özkaya, Bestamin; Radosevich, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess atrazine mineralization in surface and subsurface samples retrieved from vertical cores of agricultural soils from two farm sites in Ohio. The Defiance site (NW-Ohio) was on soybean-corn rotation and Piketon (S-Ohio) was on continuous corn cultivation. Both sites had a history of atrazine application for at least a couple of decades. The clay fraction increased at the Defiance site and the organic matter and total N content decreased with depth at both sites. Mineralization of atrazine was assessed by measurement of (14)CO2 during incubation of soil samples with [U-ring-(14)C]-atrazine. Abiotic mineralization was negligible in all soil samples. Aerobic mineralization rate constants declined and the corresponding half-lives increased with depth at the Defiance site. Anaerobic mineralization (supplemented with nitrate) was mostly below the detection at the Defiance site. In Piketon samples, the kinetic parameters of aerobic and anaerobic biomineralization of atrazine displayed considerable scatter among replicate cores and duplicate biometers. In general, this study concludes that data especially for anaerobic biomineralization of atrazine can be more variable as compared to aerobic conditions and cannot be extrapolated from one agricultural site to another. PMID:26273756

  4. Summary report on the aerobic degradation of diesel fuel and the degradation of toluene under aerobic, denitrifying and sulfate reducing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Coyne, P.; Smith, G.

    1995-08-15

    This report contains a number of studies that were performed to better understand the technology of the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. Topics of investigation include the following: diesel fuel degradation by Rhodococcus erythropolis; BTEX degradation by soil isolates; aerobic degradation of diesel fuel-respirometry; aerobic degradation of diesel fuel-shake culture; aerobic toluene degradation by A3; effect of HEPES, B1, and myo-inositol addition on the growth of A3; aerobic and anaerobic toluene degradation by contaminated soils; denitrifying bacteria MPNs; sulfate-reducing bacteria MPNs; and aerobic, DNB and SRB enrichments.

  5. Parallel pathways of ethoxylated alcohol biodegradation under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Zembrzuska, Joanna; Budnik, Irena; Lukaszewski, Zenon

    2016-07-01

    Non-ionic surfactants (NS) are a major component of the surfactant flux discharged into surface water, and alcohol ethoxylates (AE) are the major component of this flux. Therefore, biodegradation pathways of AE deserve more thorough investigation. The aim of this work was to investigate the stages of biodegradation of homogeneous oxyethylated dodecanol C12E9 having 9 oxyethylene subunits, under aerobic conditions. Enterobacter strain Z3 bacteria were chosen as biodegrading organisms under conditions with C12E9 as the sole source of organic carbon. Bacterial consortia of river water were used in a parallel test as an inoculum for comparison. The LC-MS technique was used to identify the products of biodegradation. Liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate was selected for the isolation of C12E9 and metabolites from the biodegradation broth. The LC-MS/MS technique operating in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode was used for quantitative determination of C12E9, C12E8, C12E7 and C12E6. Apart from the substrate, the homologues C12E8, C12E7 and C12E6, being metabolites of C12E9 biodegradation by shortening of the oxyethylene chain, as well as intermediate metabolites having a carboxyl end group in the oxyethylene chain (C12E8COOH, C12E7COOH, C12E6COOH and C12E5COOH), were identified. Poly(ethylene glycols) (E) having 9, 8 and 7 oxyethylene subunits were also identified, indicating parallel central fission of C12E9 and its metabolites. Similar results were obtained with river water as inoculum. It is concluded that AE, under aerobic conditions, are biodegraded via two parallel pathways: by central fission with the formation of PEG, and by Ω-oxidation of the oxyethylene chain with the formation of carboxylated AE and subsequent shortening of the oxyethylene chain by a single unit. PMID:27037882

  6. Soil Conditioning Index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soils are a critical natural resource for the future development and sustainability of humankind. Natural resource assessment tools are often used to evaluate the effects of management on soil properties and processes to ensure the sustainable use of our limited soils resources. The Soil Conditioni...

  7. [Research advances in aerobic denitrifiers].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Cai, Zu-cong; Zhong, Wen-hui; Wang, Guo-xiang

    2007-11-01

    This paper reviewed the varieties and characteristics of aerobic denitrifiers, their action mechanisms, and the factors affecting aerobic denitrification. Aerobic denitrifiers mainly include Pseudomonas, Alcaligenes, Paracoccus and Bacillus, which are either aerobic or facultative aerobic, and heterotrophic. They can denitrify under aerobic conditions, with the main product being N2O. They can also convert NH4+ -N to gas product. The nitrate reductase which catalyzes the denitrification is periplasmic nitrate reductase rather than membrane-bound nitrate reductase. Dissolved oxygen concentration and C/N ratio are the main factors affecting aerobic denitrification. The main methods for screening aerobic denitrifiers, such as intermittent aeration and selected culture, were also introduced. The research advances in the application of aerobic denitrifiers in aquaculture, waste water processing, and bio-degradation of organic pollutants, as well as the contributions of aerobic denitrifiers to soil nitrogen emission were summarized. PMID:18260473

  8. Iron plaque formed under aerobic conditions efficiently immobilizes arsenic in Lupinus albus L roots.

    PubMed

    Fresno, Teresa; Peñalosa, Jesús M; Santner, Jakob; Puschenreiter, Markus; Prohaska, Thomas; Moreno-Jiménez, Eduardo

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic is a non-threshold carcinogenic metalloid. Thus, human exposure should be minimised, e.g. by chemically stabilizing As in soil. Since iron is a potential As immobiliser, it was investigated whether root iron plaque, formed under aerobic conditions, affects As uptake, metabolism and distribution in Lupinus albus plants. White lupin plants were cultivated in a continuously aerated hydroponic culture containing Fe/EDDHA or FeSO4 and exposed to arsenate (5 or 20 μM). Only FeSO4 induced surficial iron plaque in roots. LA-ICP-MS analysis accomplished on root sections corroborated the association of As to this surficial Fe. Additionally, As(V) was the predominant species in FeSO4-treated roots, suggesting less efficient As uptake in the presence of iron plaque. Fe/EDDHA-exposed roots neither showed such surficial FeAs co-localisation nor As(V) accumulation; in contrast As(III) was the predominant species in root tissue. Furthermore, FeSO4-treated plants showed reduced shoot-to-root As ratios, which were >10-fold lower compared to Fe/EDDHA treatment. Our results highlight the role of an iron plaque formed in roots of white lupin under aerobic conditions on As immobilisation. These findings, to our knowledge, have not been addressed before for this plant and have potential implications on soil remediation (phytostabilisation) and food security (minimising As in crops). PMID:27263113

  9. A rapid in situ respiration test for measuring aerobic biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in soil.

    PubMed

    Hinchee, R E; Ong, S K

    1992-10-01

    An in situ test method to measure the aerobic biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in contaminated soil is presented. The test method provides an initial assessment of bioventing as a remediation technology for hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. The in situ respiration test consists of ventilating the contaminated soil of the unsaturated zone with air and periodically monitoring the depletion of oxygen (O2) and production of carbon dioxide (CO2) over time after the air is turned off. The test is simple to implement and generally takes about four to five days to complete. The test was applied at eight hydrocarbon-contaminated sites of different geological and climatic conditions. These sites were contaminated with petroleum products or petroleum fuels, except for two sites where the contaminants were primarily polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Oxygen utilization rates for the eight sites ranged from 0.02 to 0.99 percent O2/hour. Estimated biodegradation rates ranged from 0.4 to 19 mg/kg of soil/day. These rates were similar to the biodegradation rates obtained from field and pilot studies using mass balance methods. Estimated biodegradation rates based on O2 utilization were generally more reliable (especially for alkaline soils) than rates based on CO2 production. CO2 produced from microbial respiration was probably converted to carbonate under alkaline conditions. PMID:1418936

  10. Pyrosequence analysis of bacterial communities in aerobic bioreactors treating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Stephen D.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Two aerobic, lab-scale, slurry-phase bioreactors were used to examine the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in contaminated soil and the associated bacterial communities. The two bioreactors were operated under semi-continuous (draw-and-fill) conditions at a residence time of 35 days, but one was fed weekly and the other monthly. Most of the quantified PAHs, including high-molecular-weight compounds, were removed to a greater extent in the weekly-fed bioreactor, which achieved total PAH removal of 76%. Molecular analyses, including pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, revealed significant shifts in the soil bacterial communities after introduction to the bioreactors and differences in the abundance and types of bacteria in each of the bioreactors. The weekly-fed bioreactor displayed a more stable bacterial community with gradual changes over time, whereas the monthly-fed bioreactor community was less consistent and may have been more strongly influenced by the influx of untreated soil during feeding. Phylogenetic groups containing known PAH-degrading bacteria previously identified through stable-isotope probing of the untreated soil were differentially affected by bioreactor conditions. Sequences from members of the Acidovorax and Sphingomonas genera, as well as the uncultivated ‘‘Pyrene Group 2’’ were abundant in the bioreactors. However, the relative abundances of sequences from the Pseudomonas, Sphingobium, and Pseudoxanthomonas genera, as well as from a group of unclassified anthracene degraders, were much lower in the bioreactors compared to the untreated soil. PMID:21369833

  11. Stereoselective fate kinetics of chiral neonicotinoid insecticide paichongding in aerobic soils.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiuguo; Wang, Wei; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Jianbo; Shen, Jiajun; Li, Zhong; Ye, Qingfu

    2015-11-01

    Man-made chemicals such as pesticides, when released into the soil environment, are transformed into extractable residue (ER), bound residue (BR), or mineralized. These processes all play a pivotal role in the risk assessment for the use of man-made chemicals. In this study, BR, ER, and mineralization of a novel chiral pesticide, paichongding (IPP), 1-((6-chloropyridin-3-yl)methyl)-7-methyl-8-nitro-5-propoxy-1,2,3,5,6,7-hexahydro-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine, were investigated in different soils under aerobic conditions. Significant specificity was observed for diastereoisomers of IPP in the formation of BR or mineralization in neutral and alkaline soils. In contrast, no significant difference was found between enantiomers. The overall mineralization was less than 8% of the applied radioactivity and was related to soil pH. Our findings suggest that the environmental fate of chiral pesticides may be influenced by many factors such as soil properties (e.g. pH). More comprehensive and individualized risk assessments should be carried out for individual stereoisomers of a chiral product. PMID:26070081

  12. Effects of three feedback conditions on aerobic swim speeds

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Pedro; Llana, Salvador; Brizuela, Gabriel; Encarnación, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to develop an underwater chronometer capable to provide feedback while the athlete is swimming, as well as being a control tool for the coach, and (b) to analyse its feedback effect on swim pace control compared with feedback provided by the coach and with no feedback, in 25 m and 50 m swimming pools. 30 male swimmers of national level volunteer to participate. Each swimmer swam 3 x 200 m at aerobic speed (AS) and 3 x 200 m just under the anaerobic threshold speed (AnS), each swam repetition with a different feedback condition: chronometer, coach and without feedback. Results (a) validate the chronometer system developed and (b) show that swimmers pace control is affected by the type of feedback provided, the swim speed elected and the size of the swimming pool. Key points Providing concurrent feedback to swimmers improves theis swimming pace control. It is more important to provide feedback to control swim pace when the swimming pool is 50m long. Technological development as this chronometer system, could offload coach work, so coach can focus its time and attention on other performance aspects or other swimmers. Technological developments are more accepted by coaches when they don’t interfere on swimmers execution, that is, whet it is not necessary to implement the swimmer with cables and apparatus. PMID:24150553

  13. AEROBIC SOIL MICROCOSMS FOR LONG-TERM BIODEGRADATION OF HYDROCARBON VAPORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aims of this research project included the development of laboratory protocols for the preparation of aerobic soil microcosms using aseptic field soil samples, and for the gas chromatographic analysis of hydrocarbon vapor biodegradation based on vapor samples obtained from th...

  14. Sequential anaerobic-aerobic degradation of indigenous PCBs in a contaminated soil matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K.T.; Reeves, M.E.; Evans, B.S.; Dudley, C.A.

    1994-12-31

    Many industrial locations, including the US Department of Energy`s, have identified needs for treatment of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) wastes and remediation of PCB-contaminated sites. Biodegradation of PCBs is a potentially effective technology for the treatment of PCB-contaminated soils and sludges; however, a practicable remediation technology has not yet been demonstrated. A biological treatment technology is likely to consist of an anaerobic fermentation step in which PCB dechlorination takes place producing PCBs with fewer chlorines. These products are then more susceptible to aerobic mineralization. In laboratory experiments, soil slurry bioreactors inoculated with microorganisms extracted from PCB-contaminated sediments from the Hudson River and Woods Pond have been used to obtain anaerobic dechlorination of PCBs in soil slurry reactors. The anaerobic dechlorination was followed by qualitative estimation of the effect of aerobic fermentation of the dechlorination products based on literature data. The sequential anaerobic-(simulated) aerobic treatment constituted an improvement compared anaerobic treatment alone.

  15. Biochar increases plant available water in a sandy soil under an aerobic rice cropping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo Carvalho, M. T.; de Holanda Nunes Maia, A.; Madari, B. E.; Bastiaans, L.; van Oort, P. A. J.; Heinemann, A. B.; Soler da Silva, M. A.; Petter, F. A.; Meinke, H.

    2014-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the impact of biochar rate (0, 8, 16 and 32 t ha-1) on the water retention capacity (WRC) of a sandy Dystric Plinthosol. The applied biochar was a by-product of slow pyrolysis (∼450 °C) of eucalyptus wood, milled to pass through a 2000 μm sieve that resulted in a material with an intrinsic porosity ≤10 μm and a specific surface area of ∼3.2 m2 g-1. The biochar was incorporated into the top 15 cm of the soil under an aerobic rice system. Our study focused on both the effects on WRC and rice yields at 2 and 3 years after application. Undisturbed soil samples were collected from 16 plots in two soil layers (5-10 and 15-20 cm). Soil water retention curves were modelled using a nonlinear mixed model which appropriately accounts for uncertainties inherent of spatial variability and repeated measurements taken within a specific soil sample. We found an increase in plant available water in the upper soil layer proportional to the rate of biochar, with about 0.8% for each t ha-1 of biochar amendment at 2 and 3 years after application. The impact of biochar on soil WRC was most likely related to an increase in overall porosity of the sandy soil, which was evident from an increase in saturated soil moisture and macro porosity with 0.5% and 1.6% for each t ha-1 of biochar applied, respectively. The increment in soil WRC did not translate into an increase in rice yield, essentially because in both seasons the amount of rainfall during critical period for rice production exceeded 650 mm. The use of biochar as a soil amendment can be a worthy strategy to guarantee yield stability under water limited conditions. Our findings raise the importance of assessing the feasibility of very high application rates of biochar and the inclusion of a detailed analysis of its physical and chemical properties as part of future investigations.

  16. Effect of the process conditions of aerobic bioconversion on the characteristics of biologically processed brown coals

    SciTech Connect

    I.P. Ivanov

    2007-04-15

    The effect of the laboratory and pilot process conditions of the aerobic bioconversion of brown coals on the elemental composition and technical characteristics of the organic matter of the resulting biologically processed coals is reported.

  17. Bioremediation of coal contaminated soil under sulfate-reducing condition.

    PubMed

    Kuwano, Y; Shimizu, Y

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the biodegradation of coal-derived hydrocarbons, especially high molecular weight (HMW) components, under anaerobic conditions. For this purpose biodegradation experiments were performed, using specifically designed soil column bioreactors. For the experiment, coal-contaminated soil was prepared, which contains high molecular weight hydrocarbons at high concentration (approx. 55.5 mgC g-drysoil(-1)). The experiment was carried out in two different conditions: sulfate reducing (SR) condition (SO4(2-) = 10 mmol l(-1) in the liquid medium) and control condition (SO4(2-)<0.5 mmol l(-1)). Although no degradation was observed under the control condition, the resin fraction decreased to half (from 6,541 to 3,386 mgC g-soil(-1)) under SR condition, with the concomitant increase of two PAHs (phenanthrene and fluoranthene, 9 and 2.5 times, respectively). From these results, we could conclude that high molecular hydrocarbons were biodegradable and transformed to low molecular weight PAHs under the sulfate-reducing condition. Since these PAHs are known to be biologically degraded under aerobic condition, a serial combination of anaerobic (sulfate reducing) and then aerobic bioremediations could be effective and useful for the soil pollution by petroleum and/or coal derived hydrocarbons. PMID:16457179

  18. Improved RDX detoxification with starch addition using a novel nitrogen-fixing aerobic microbial consortium from soil contaminated with explosives.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Imran; Yang, Jihoon; Yoo, Byungun; Park, Joonhong

    2015-04-28

    In this work, we developed and characterized a novel nitrogen-fixing aerobic microbial consortium for the complete detoxification of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). Aerobic RDX biodegradation coupled with microbial growth and nitrogen fixation activity were effectively stimulated by the co-addition of starch and RDX under nitrogen limiting conditions. In the starch-stimulated nitrogen-fixing RDX degradative consortium, the RDX degradation activity was correlated with the xplA and nifH gene copy numbers, suggesting the involvement of nitrogen fixing populations in RDX biodegradation. Formate, nitrite, nitrate, and ammonia were detected as aerobic RDX degradation intermediates without the accumulation of any nitroso-derivatives or NDAB (4-nitro-2,4-diazabutanal), indicating nearly complete mineralization. Pyrosequencing targeting the bacterial 16S rRNA genes revealed that the Rhizobium, Rhizobacter and Terrimonas population increased as the RDX degradation activity increased, suggesting their involvement in the degradation process. These findings imply that the nitrogen-fixing aerobic RDX degrading consortium is a valuable microbial resource for improving the detoxification of RDX-contaminated soil or groundwater, especially when combined with rhizoremediation. PMID:25661171

  19. Chemotactic Motility of Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 under Aerobic and Denitrification Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; Rivilla, Rafael; Martín, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The sequence of the genome of Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 has shown the presence of multiple traits relevant for rhizosphere colonization and plant growth promotion. Among these traits are denitrification and chemotactic motility. Besides aerobic growth, F113 is able to grow anaerobically using nitrate and nitrite as final electron acceptors. F113 is able to perform swimming motility under aerobic conditions and under anaerobic conditions when nitrate is used as the electron acceptor. However, nitrite can not support swimming motility. Regulation of swimming motility is similar under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, since mutants that are hypermotile under aerobic conditions, such as gacS, sadB, kinB, algU and wspR, are also hypermotile under anaerobic conditions. However, chemotactic behavior is different under aerobic and denitrification conditions. Unlike most pseudomonads, the F113 genome encode three complete chemotaxis systems, Che1, Che2 and Che3. Mutations in each of the cheA genes of the three Che systems has shown that the three systems are functional and independent. Mutation of the cheA1 gene completely abolished swimming motility both under aerobic and denitrification conditions. Mutation of the cheA2 gene, showed only a decrease in swimming motility under both conditions, indicating that this system is not essential for chemotactic motility but is necessary for optimal motility. Mutation of the cheA3 gene abolished motility under denitrification conditions but only produced a decrease in motility under aerobic conditions. The three Che systems proved to be implicated in competitive rhizosphere colonization, being the cheA1 mutant the most affected. PMID:26161531

  20. Genome Sequence of "Pedosphaera parvula" Ellin514, an Aerobic Verrucomicrobial Isolate from Pasture Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Kant, Ravi; Van Passel, Mark W.J.; Palva, Airi; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, A; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Chertkov, Olga; Larimer, Frank W; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; De Vos, Willem M.; Janssen, Peter H.; Smidt, Hauke

    2011-01-01

    Pedosphaera parvula Ellin514 is an aerobically grown verrucomicrobial isolate from pasture soil. In contrast to the high abundance of members of Verrucomicrobia subdivision 3 based on molecular surveys in terrestrial environments, Ellin514 is one of the few cultured representatives of this group.

  1. Aerobic Degradation of N-Methyl-4-Nitroaniline (MNA) by Pseudomonas sp. Strain FK357 Isolated from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fazlurrahman; Vyas, Bhawna; Pal, Deepika; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    N-Methyl-4-nitroaniline (MNA) is used as an additive to lower the melting temperature of energetic materials in the synthesis of insensitive explosives. Although the biotransformation of MNA under anaerobic condition has been reported, its aerobic microbial degradation has not been documented yet. A soil microcosms study showed the efficient aerobic degradation of MNA by the inhabitant soil microorganisms. An aerobic bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. strain FK357, able to utilize MNA as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source, was isolated from soil microcosms. HPLC and GC-MS analysis of the samples obtained from growth and resting cell studies showed the formation of 4-nitroaniline (4-NA), 4-aminophenol (4-AP), and 1, 2, 4-benzenetriol (BT) as major metabolic intermediates in the MNA degradation pathway. Enzymatic assay carried out on cell-free lysates of MNA grown cells confirmed N-demethylation reaction is the first step of MNA degradation with the formation of 4-NA and formaldehyde products. Flavin-dependent transformation of 4-NA to 4-AP in cell extracts demonstrated that the second step of MNA degradation is a monooxygenation. Furthermore, conversion of 4-AP to BT by MNA grown cells indicates the involvement of oxidative deamination (release of NH2 substituent) reaction in third step of MNA degradation. Subsequent degradation of BT occurs by the action of benzenetriol 1, 2-dioxygenase as reported for the degradation of 4-nitrophenol. This is the first report on aerobic degradation of MNA by a single bacterium along with elucidation of metabolic pathway. PMID:24116023

  2. Field assessment of semi-aerobic condition and the methane correction factor for the semi-aerobic landfills provided by IPCC guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Sangjae; Nam, Anwoo; Yi, Seung-Muk; Kim, Jae Young

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} + CO{sub 2}% are proposed as indices to evaluate semi-aerobic landfills. • A landfill which CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} > 1.0 is difficult to be categorized as semi-aerobic landfill. • Field conditions should be carefully investigated to determine landfill types. • The MCF default value for semi-aerobic landfills underestimates the methane emissions. - Abstract: According to IPCC guidelines, a semi-aerobic landfill site produces one-half of the amount of CH{sub 4} produced by an equally-sized anaerobic landfill site. Therefore categorizing the landfill type is important on greenhouse gas inventories. In order to assess semi-aerobic condition in the sites and the MCF value for semi-aerobic landfill, landfill gas has been measured from vent pipes in five semi-aerobically designed landfills in South Korea. All of the five sites satisfied requirements of semi-aerobic landfills in 2006 IPCC guidelines. However, the ends of leachate collection pipes which are main entrance of air in the semi-aerobic landfill were closed in all five sites. The CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} ratio in landfill gas, indicator of aerobic and anaerobic decomposition, ranged from 1.08 to 1.46 which is higher than the values (0.3–1.0) reported for semi-aerobic landfill sites and is rather close to those (1.0–2.0) for anaerobic landfill sites. The low CH{sub 4} + CO{sub 2}% in landfill gas implied air intrusion into the landfill. However, there was no evidence that air intrusion has caused by semi-aerobic design and operation. Therefore, the landfills investigated in this study are difficult to be classified as semi-aerobic landfills. Also MCF of 0.5 may significantly underestimate methane emissions compared to other researches. According to the carbon mass balance analyses, the higher MCF needs to be proposed for semi-aerobic landfills. Consequently, methane emission estimate should be based on field evaluation for the semi-aerobically designed landfills.

  3. Nitrogen availability and indirect measurements of greenhouse gas emissions from aerobic and anaerobic biowaste digestates applied to agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Rigby, H; Smith, S R

    2013-12-01

    Recycling biowaste digestates on agricultural land diverts biodegradable waste from landfill disposal and represents a sustainable source of nutrients and organic matter (OM) to improve soil for crop production. However, the dynamics of nitrogen (N) release from these organic N sources must be determined to optimise their fertiliser value and management. This laboratory incubation experiment examined the effects of digestate type (aerobic and anaerobic), waste type (industrial, agricultural and municipal solid waste or sewage sludge) and soil type (sandy loam, sandy silt loam and silty clay) on N availability in digestate-amended soils and also quantified the extent and significance of the immobilisation of N within the soil microbial biomass, as a possible regulatory mechanism of N release. The digestate types examined included: dewatered, anaerobically digested biosolids (DMAD); dewatered, anaerobic mesophilic digestate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (DMADMSW); liquid, anaerobic co-digestate of food and animal slurry (LcoMAD) and liquid, thermophilic aerobic digestate of food waste (LTAD). Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) was included as a reference treatment for mineral N. After 48 days, the final, maximum net recoveries of mineral N relative to the total N (TN) addition in the different digestates and unamended control treatments were in the decreasing order: LcoMAD, 68%; LTAD, 37%, DMAD, 20%; and DMADMSW, 11%. A transient increase in microbial biomass N (MBN) was observed with LTAD application, indicating greater microbial activity in amended soil and reflecting the lower stability of this OM source, compared to the other, anaerobic digestate types, which showed no consistent effects on MBN compared to the control. Thus, the overall net release of digestate N in different soil types was not regulated by N transfer into the soil microbial biomass, but was determined primarily by digestate properties and the capacity of the soil type to process and

  4. Degradation of municipal solid waste in simulated landfill bioreactors under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Slezak, Radoslaw; Krzystek, Liliana; Ledakowicz, Stanislaw

    2015-09-01

    In this study the municipal solid waste degradation processes in simulated landfill bioreactors under aerobic and anaerobic conditions is investigated. The effect of waste aeration on the dynamics of the aerobic degradation processes in lysimeters as well as during anaerobic processes after completion of aeration is presented. The results are compared with the anaerobic degradation process to determine the stabilization stage of waste in both experimental modes. The experiments in aerobic lysimeters were carried out at small aeration rate (4.41⋅10(-3)lmin(-1)kg(-1)) and for two recirculation rates (24.9 and 1.58lm(-3)d(-1)). The change of leachate and formed gases composition showed that the application of even a small aeration rate favored the degradation of organic matter. The amount of CO2 and CH4 released from anaerobic lysimeter was about 5 times lower than that from the aerobic lysimeters. Better stabilization of the waste was obtained in the aerobic lysimeter with small recirculation, from which the amount of CO2 produced was larger by about 19% in comparison with that from the aerobic lysimeter with large leachate recirculation. PMID:26119011

  5. Spatial distribution of hydroxylamine and its role in aerobic N2O formation in a Norway spruce forest soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Weymann, D.; Gottselig, N.; Wiekenkamp, I.; Vereecken, H.; Brueggemann, N.

    2014-12-01

    positively correlated with C and N as well as NO3- content in the Ah layer. Mn content was the most important factor for HA recovery at the specific extraction conditions. Further studies should focus on the effects of soil organic matter, Mn content, and pH on the production of N2O from HA under aerobic conditions.

  6. Nitrous oxide production by Alcaligenes faecalis under transient and dynamic aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Otte, S.; Grobben, N.G.; Robertson, L.A.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Kuenen, J.G.

    1996-07-01

    Nitrous oxide production contributes to both greenhouse effect and ozone depletion in the stratosphere. A significant part of the global N2O emission can be attributed to microbial processes, especially nitrification and denitrification, used in biological wastewater treatment systems. This study looks at the efficiency of denitrification and the enzymes involved, with the emphasis on N2O production during the transient phase from aerobic to anaerobic conditions and vice versa. The effect of repetitive changing aerobic-anaerobic conditions on N2O was also studied. Alcaligenes faecalis was used as the model denitrofing organism. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Enhanced performance of denitrifying sulfide removal process under micro-aerobic condition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuan; Ren, Nanqi; Wang, Aijie; Liu, Lihong; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2010-07-15

    The denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process with bio-granules comprising both heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrifiers can simultaneously convert nitrate, sulfide and acetate into di-nitrogen gas, elementary sulfur and carbon dioxide, respectively, at high loading rates. This study determines the reaction rate of sulfide oxidized into sulfur, as well as the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, would be enhanced under a micro-aerobic condition. The presence of limited oxygen mitigated the inhibition effects of sulfide on denitrifier activities, and enhanced the performance of DSR granules. The advantages and disadvantages of applying the micro-aerobic condition to the DSR process are discussed. PMID:20233637

  8. Optimum conditions for aerobic thermophilic pretreatment of municipal sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Cheunbarn, T.; Pagilla, K.R.

    1998-07-01

    Lab scale experiments were conducted to determine optimum sludge residence time (SRT) and temperature of aerobic thermophilic pretreatment (ATP) of mixed (thickened waste activated and primary) sludge to achieve maximum pathogen destruction and best process performance. 4L lab scale ATP reactors were operated at SRT of 0.6, 1.0, and 1.5 days, and at temperature of 55, 58, 62 and 65 C. ATP at temperature {ge} 62 C and SRT {ge} 0.6 days reduced the feed sludge fecal coliform density by at least 4-logs from 10{sup 7} MPN/g total solids to < 10{sup 4} MPN/g total solids. Salmonella in the feed sludge was reduced to < 1 MPN/g total solids from 2 to 18 MPN/4 g total solids by ATP at temperature {ge} 55 C and SRT {ge} 0.6 days. ATP was able to increase sludge volatile acids concentration by 100--200% over the feed sludge volatile acid concentration, and reduce the supernatant COD from 20,000--22,000 mg/L in the feed to 13,000--17,000 mg/L in ATP reactor sludge. Volatile solids destruction by ATP was increased from 25% to 40% when SRT was increased from 0.6 days to 1.5 days, and only 5% increase in volatile solids destruction was seen at each SRT of 0.6, 1.0, and 1.5 days when ATP temperature was increased from 55 to 65 C.

  9. Differential Isotopic Fractionation during Cr(VI) Reduction by an Aquifer-Derived Bacterium under Aerobic versus Denitrifying Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ruyang; Qin, Liping; Brown, Shaun T.; Christensen, John N.

    2012-01-01

    We studied Cr isotopic fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain RCH2. Despite the fact that strain RCH2 reduces Cr(VI) cometabolically under both aerobic and denitrifying conditions and at similar specific rates, fractionation was markedly different under these two conditions (ε was ∼2‰ aerobically and ∼0.4‰ under denitrifying conditions). PMID:22286991

  10. Differential Isotopic Fractionation during Cr(VI) Reduction by an Aquifer-Derived Bacterium under Aerobic versus Denitrifying Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Han, R.; Qin, L.; Brown, S. T.; Christensen, J. N.; Beller, H. R.

    2012-01-27

    We studied Cr isotopic fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain RCH2. Finally, despite the fact that strain RCH2 reduces Cr(VI) cometabolically under both aerobic and denitrifying conditions and at similar specific rates, fractionation was markedly different under these two conditions (ε was ~2‰ aerobically and ~0.4‰ under denitrifying conditions).

  11. Isolation of microorganisms capable of degrading isoquinoline under aerobic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Aislabie, J.; Rothenburger, S.; Atlas, R.M. )

    1989-12-01

    Isoquinoline-degrading microbial cultures were isolated from oil- and creosote-contaminated soils. The establishment of initial enrichment cultures required the use of emulsified isoquinoline. Once growth on isoquinoline was established, isoquinoline emulsification was no longer required for utilization of isoquinoline as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen by these cultures. An isoquinoline-degrading Acinetobacter strain was isolated from one of the enrichment cultures. The degradation of isoquinoline was accompanied by the accumulation of a red cell-associated pigment and of 1-hydroxyisoquinoline, which was further degraded to unknown intermediary ring-cleavage products and carbon dioxide.

  12. Detoxification of furfural in Corynebacterium glutamicum under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Yota; Hori, Yoshimi; Kudou, Motonori; Ishii, Jun; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-10-01

    The toxic fermentation inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates raise serious problems for the microbial production of fuels and chemicals. Furfural is considered to be one of the most toxic compounds among these inhibitors. Here, we describe the detoxification of furfural in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032 under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Under aerobic culture conditions, furfuryl alcohol and 2-furoic acid were produced as detoxification products of furfural. The ratio of the products varied depending on the initial furfural concentration. Neither furfuryl alcohol nor 2-furoic acid showed any toxic effect on cell growth, and both compounds were determined to be the end products of furfural degradation. Interestingly, unlike under aerobic conditions, most of the furfural was converted to furfuryl alcohol under anaerobic conditions, without affecting the glucose consumption rate. Both the NADH/NAD(+) and NADPH/NADP(+) ratio decreased in the accordance with furfural concentration under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. These results indicate the presence of a single or multiple endogenous enzymes with broad and high affinity for furfural and co-factors in C. glutamicum ATCC13032. PMID:25112225

  13. Characterization of methanotrophic bacterial populations in natural and agricultural aerobic soils of the European Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchenko, Irina; Sukhacheva, Marina; Kizilova, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric methane contributes to about 20% of the total radiative forcing by long-lived greenhouse gases, and microbial methane oxidation in upland soils is the only biological sink of methane. Microbial methane oxidation in aerated upland soils is estimated as 15 - 45 Tg yr-1 or 3-9% of the annual sink. Therefore there is need of extensive research to characterize methanotrophic activity in various ecosystems for possible application to reduce atmospheric methane fluxes and to minimize global climate change. The vast majority of known aerobic methanotrophs belongs to the Proteobacteria and placed in the families Methylococcaceae in the Gammaproteobacteria, and Methylocystaceae and Beijerinckiaceae in the Alphaproteobacteria. Known exceptions include the phylum Verrucomicrobia and uncultured methanotrophs such as Candidatus 'Methylomirabilis oxyfera' affiliated with the 'NC10' phylum. Plenty of studies of aerobic methane oxidation and key players of the process have been performed on various types of soils, and it was found that Methylocystis spp and uncultivated methanotrophs are abundant in upland soils. Two of the uncultured groups are upland soil cluster alphaproteobacteria (USCa) and gammaproteobacteria (USCg), as revealed by cultivation-independent surveys of pmoA diversity. Russia is extremely rich in soil types due to its vast territories, and most of these soils have never been investigated from the aspect of methanotrophy. This study addresses methane oxidation activity and diversity of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria in eight types of natural aerobic soils, four of which also had been under agricultural use. Methane fluxes have been measured by in situ static chamber method and methane oxidation rates in soil samples - by radioisotope tracer (14CH4) technique. Changes in methanotroph diversity and abundance were assessed by cloning and Sanger sequencing, and quantitative real-time PCR of pmoA genes. Methanotrophic population of unmanaged soils turned

  14. Aerobic biogenesis of selenium nanospheres by Bacillus cereus isolated from coalmine soil

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Microorganisms that are exposed to pollutants in the environment, such as metals/metalloids, have a remarkable ability to fight the metal stress by various mechanisms. These metal-microbe interactions have already found an important role in biotechnological applications. It is only recently that microorganisms have been explored as potential biofactories for synthesis of metal/metalloid nanoparticles. Biosynthesis of selenium (Se0) nanospheres in aerobic conditions by a bacterial strain isolated from the coalmine soil is reported in the present study. Results The strain CM100B, identified as Bacillus cereus by morphological, biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequencing [GenBank:GU551935.1] was studied for its ability to generate selenium nanoparticles (SNs) by transformation of toxic selenite (SeO32-) anions into red elemental selenium (Se0) under aerobic conditions. Also, the ability of the strain to tolerate high levels of toxic selenite ions was studied by challenging the microbe with different concentrations of sodium selenite (0.5 mM-10 mM). ESEM, AFM and SEM studies revealed the spherical Se0 nanospheres adhering to bacterial biomass as well as present as free particles. The TEM microscopy showed the accumulation of spherical nanostructures as intracellular and extracellular deposits. The deposits were identified as element selenium by EDX analysis. This is also indicated by the red coloration of the culture broth that starts within 2-3 h of exposure to selenite oxyions. Selenium nanoparticles (SNs) were further characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, TEM and zeta potential measurement. The size of nanospheres was in the range of 150-200 nm with high negative charge of -46.86 mV. Conclusions This bacterial isolate has the potential to be used as a bionanofactory for the synthesis of stable, nearly monodisperse Se0 nanoparticles as well as for detoxification of the toxic selenite anions in the environment. A hypothetical mechanism for the biogenesis

  15. Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, a halophilic bacterium producing acetone, butanol, and ethanol under aerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Hamid; Azarbaijani, Reza; Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Abolhassan; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Hosseini Salekdeh, Ghasem; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2016-01-01

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, which was isolated from Aran-Bidgol Lake (Iran), has the ability to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) as well as acetic and butyric acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This result is the first report of ABE production with a wild microorganism from a family other than Clostridia and also the first halophilic species shown to produce butanol under aerobic cultivation. The cultivation of Nesterenkonia sp. strain F under anaerobic conditions with 50 g/l of glucose for 72 h resulted in the production of 105 mg/l of butanol, 122 mg/l of acetone, 0.2 g/l of acetic acid, and 2.5 g/l of butyric acid. Furthermore, the strain was cultivated on media with different glucose concentrations (20, 50, and 80 g/l) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Through fermentation with a 50 g/l initial glucose concentration under aerobic conditions, 66 mg/l of butanol, 125 mg/l of acetone, 291 mg/l of ethanol, 5.9 g/l of acetic acid, and 1.2 g/l of butyric acid were produced. The enzymes pertaining to the fermentation pathway in the strain were compared with the enzymes of Clostridium spp., and the metabolic pathway of fermentation used by Nesterenkonia sp. strain F was investigated. PMID:26725518

  16. Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, a halophilic bacterium producing acetone, butanol, and ethanol under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Hamid; Azarbaijani, Reza; Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Abolhassan; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2016-01-01

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, which was isolated from Aran-Bidgol Lake (Iran), has the ability to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) as well as acetic and butyric acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This result is the first report of ABE production with a wild microorganism from a family other than Clostridia and also the first halophilic species shown to produce butanol under aerobic cultivation. The cultivation of Nesterenkonia sp. strain F under anaerobic conditions with 50 g/l of glucose for 72 h resulted in the production of 105 mg/l of butanol, 122 mg/l of acetone, 0.2 g/l of acetic acid, and 2.5 g/l of butyric acid. Furthermore, the strain was cultivated on media with different glucose concentrations (20, 50, and 80 g/l) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Through fermentation with a 50 g/l initial glucose concentration under aerobic conditions, 66 mg/l of butanol, 125 mg/l of acetone, 291 mg/l of ethanol, 5.9 g/l of acetic acid, and 1.2 g/l of butyric acid were produced. The enzymes pertaining to the fermentation pathway in the strain were compared with the enzymes of Clostridium spp., and the metabolic pathway of fermentation used by Nesterenkonia sp. strain F was investigated. PMID:26725518

  17. Nitrogen availability and indirect measurements of greenhouse gas emissions from aerobic and anaerobic biowaste digestates applied to agricultural soils

    SciTech Connect

    Rigby, H.; Smith, S.R.

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Nitrogen release in digestate-amended soil depends on the digestate type. • Overall N release is modulated by digestate mineral and mineralisable N contents. • Microbial immobilisation does not influence overall release of digestate N in soil. • Digestate physical properties and soil type interact to affect overall N recovery. • High labile C inputs in digestate may promote denitrification in fine-textured soil. - Abstract: Recycling biowaste digestates on agricultural land diverts biodegradable waste from landfill disposal and represents a sustainable source of nutrients and organic matter (OM) to improve soil for crop production. However, the dynamics of nitrogen (N) release from these organic N sources must be determined to optimise their fertiliser value and management. This laboratory incubation experiment examined the effects of digestate type (aerobic and anaerobic), waste type (industrial, agricultural and municipal solid waste or sewage sludge) and soil type (sandy loam, sandy silt loam and silty clay) on N availability in digestate-amended soils and also quantified the extent and significance of the immobilisation of N within the soil microbial biomass, as a possible regulatory mechanism of N release. The digestate types examined included: dewatered, anaerobically digested biosolids (DMAD); dewatered, anaerobic mesophilic digestate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (DMADMSW); liquid, anaerobic co-digestate of food and animal slurry (LcoMAD) and liquid, thermophilic aerobic digestate of food waste (LTAD). Ammonium chloride (NH{sub 4}Cl) was included as a reference treatment for mineral N. After 48 days, the final, maximum net recoveries of mineral N relative to the total N (TN) addition in the different digestates and unamended control treatments were in the decreasing order: LcoMAD, 68%; LTAD, 37%, DMAD, 20%; and DMADMSW, 11%. A transient increase in microbial biomass N (MBN) was observed with LTAD application

  18. Comparison of sludge digestion under aerobic and anaerobic conditions with a focus on the degradation of proteins at mesophilic temperature.

    PubMed

    Shao, Liming; Wang, Tianfeng; Li, Tianshui; Lü, Fan; He, Pinjing

    2013-07-01

    Aerobic and anaerobic digestion are popular methods for the treatment of waste activated sludge. However, the differences in degradation of sludge during aerobic and anaerobic digestion remain unclear. In this study, the sludge degradation during aerobic and anaerobic digestion was investigated at mesophilic temperature, focused on protein based on the degradation efficiency and degree of humification. The duration of aerobic and anaerobic digestion was about 90 days. The final degradation efficiency of volatile solid was 66.1 ± 1.6% and 66.4 ± 2.4% under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The final degradation efficiency of protein was 67.5 ± 1.4% and 65.1 ± 2.6% under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The degradation models of volatile solids were consistent with those of protein under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The solubility of protein under aerobic digestion was greater than that under anaerobic digestion. Moreover, the humification index of dissolved organic matter of aerobic digestion was greater than that during anaerobic digestion. PMID:23685650

  19. Influence of bovine lactoferrin on the growth of selected probiotic bacteria under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Wen; Ku, Yu-We; Chu, Fang-Yi

    2014-10-01

    Bovine lactoferrin (bLf) is a natural glycoprotein, and it shows broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. However, reports on the influences of bLf on probiotic bacteria have been mixed. We examined the effects of apo-bLf (between 0.25 and 128 mg/mL) on both aerobic and anaerobic cultures of probiotics. We found that bLf had similar effects on the growth of probiotics under aerobic or anaerobic conditions, and that it actively and significantly (at concentrations of >0.25 mg/mL) retarded the growth rate of Bifidobacterium bifidum (ATCC 29521), B. longum (ATCC 15707), B. lactis (BCRC 17394), B. infantis (ATCC 15697), Lactobacillus reuteri (ATCC 23272), L. rhamnosus (ATCC 53103), and L. coryniformis (ATCC 25602) in a dose-dependent manner. Otherwise, minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were 128 or >128 mg/mL against B. bifidum, B. longum, B. lactis, L. reuteri, and L. rhamnosus (ATCC 53103). With regard to MICs, bLf showed at least four-fold lower inhibitory effect on probiotics than on pathogens. Intriguingly, bLf (>0.25 mg/mL) significantly enhanced the growth of Rhamnosus (ATCC 7469) and L. acidophilus (BCRC 14065) by approximately 40-200 %, during their late periods of growth. Supernatants produced from aerobic but not anaerobic cultures of L. acidophilus reduced the growth of Escherichia coli by about 20 %. Thus, bLf displayed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the growth of most probiotic strains under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions. An antibacterial supernatant prepared from the aerobic cultures may have significant practical use. PMID:24916115

  20. 24 CFR 3285.201 - Soil conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Soil conditions. 3285.201 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Site Preparation § 3285.201 Soil conditions. To help prevent settling or sagging, the foundation must be constructed on firm, undisturbed soil or...

  1. 24 CFR 3285.201 - Soil conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Soil conditions. 3285.201 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Site Preparation § 3285.201 Soil conditions. To help prevent settling or sagging, the foundation must be constructed on firm, undisturbed soil or...

  2. 24 CFR 3285.201 - Soil conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Soil conditions. 3285.201 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Site Preparation § 3285.201 Soil conditions. To help prevent settling or sagging, the foundation must be constructed on firm, undisturbed soil or...

  3. 24 CFR 3285.201 - Soil conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Soil conditions. 3285.201 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Site Preparation § 3285.201 Soil conditions. To help prevent settling or sagging, the foundation must be constructed on firm, undisturbed soil or...

  4. 24 CFR 3285.201 - Soil conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Soil conditions. 3285.201 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Site Preparation § 3285.201 Soil conditions. To help prevent settling or sagging, the foundation must be constructed on firm, undisturbed soil or...

  5. Reductive dechlorination of Tri- and tetrachloroethylenes depends on transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Kästner, M

    1991-01-01

    Aerobic enrichment cultures from contaminated groundwaters dechlorinated trichloroethylene (TCE) (14.6 mg/liter; 111 mumol/liter) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) (16.2 mg/liter; 98 mumol/liter) reductively within 4 days after the transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions. The transformation products were equimolar amounts of cis-1,2-dichloroethylene and traces of 1,1-dichloroethylene. No other chlorinated product and no methane were detected. The change was accompanied by the release of sulfide, which caused a decrease in the redox potential from 0 to -150 mV. In sterile control experiments, sulfide led to the abiotic formation of traces of 1,1-dichloroethylene without cis-1,2-dichloroethylene production. The reductive dechlorination of PCE via TCE depended on these specific transition conditions after consumption of the electron acceptor oxygen or nitrate. Repeated feeding of TCE or PCE to cultures after the change to anaerobic conditions yielded no further dechlorination. Only aerobic subcultures with an air/liquid ratio of 1:4 maintained dechlorination activities; anaerobic subcultures showed no transformation. Bacteria from noncontaminated sites showed no reduction under the same conditions. PMID:1892393

  6. Reductive dechlorination of Tri- and tetrachloroethylenes depends on transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kästner, M

    1991-07-01

    Aerobic enrichment cultures from contaminated groundwaters dechlorinated trichloroethylene (TCE) (14.6 mg/liter; 111 mumol/liter) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) (16.2 mg/liter; 98 mumol/liter) reductively within 4 days after the transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions. The transformation products were equimolar amounts of cis-1,2-dichloroethylene and traces of 1,1-dichloroethylene. No other chlorinated product and no methane were detected. The change was accompanied by the release of sulfide, which caused a decrease in the redox potential from 0 to -150 mV. In sterile control experiments, sulfide led to the abiotic formation of traces of 1,1-dichloroethylene without cis-1,2-dichloroethylene production. The reductive dechlorination of PCE via TCE depended on these specific transition conditions after consumption of the electron acceptor oxygen or nitrate. Repeated feeding of TCE or PCE to cultures after the change to anaerobic conditions yielded no further dechlorination. Only aerobic subcultures with an air/liquid ratio of 1:4 maintained dechlorination activities; anaerobic subcultures showed no transformation. Bacteria from noncontaminated sites showed no reduction under the same conditions. PMID:1892393

  7. P450-catalyzed asymmetric cyclopropanation of electron-deficient olefins under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Renata, Hans; Wang, Z Jane; Kitto, Rebekah Z; Arnold, Frances H

    2014-10-01

    A variant of P450 from Bacillus megaterium five mutations away from wild type is a highly active catalyst for cyclopropanation of a variety of acrylamide and acrylate olefins with ethyl diazoacetate (EDA). The very high rate of reaction enabled by histidine ligation allowed the reaction to be conducted under aerobic conditions. The promiscuity of this catalyst for a variety of substrates containing amides has enabled synthesis of a small library of precursors to levomilnacipran derivatives. PMID:25221671

  8. P450-catalyzed asymmetric cyclopropanation of electron-deficient olefins under aerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Renata, Hans; Wang, Z. Jane; Kitto, Rebekah Z.

    2014-01-01

    A variant of P450 from Bacillus megaterium five mutations away from wild type is a highly active catalyst for cyclopropanation of a variety of acrylamide and acrylate olefins with ethyl diazoacetate (EDA). The very high rate of reaction enabled by histidine ligation allowed the reaction to be conducted under aerobic conditions. The promiscuity of this catalyst for a variety of substrates containing amides has enabled synthesis of a small library of precursors to levomilnacipran derivatives. PMID:25221671

  9. Aerobic metabolism of diclosulam on U.S. and South American soils.

    PubMed

    Yoder, R N; Huskin, M A; Kennard, L M; Zabik, J M

    2000-09-01

    Degradation of the sulfonanilide herbicide diclosulam was studied on nine soils from three countries to determine the rates and products of aerobic metabolism. Diclosulam was applied to four agricultural soils from the United States, three from Argentina, and two from Brazil at a rate of 0.1 ppm, equivalent to approximately twice the maximum field application rate of 52 g of active ingredient/ha. U.S. and Brazilian soils were incubated in the dark at 25 degrees C at 75% 0.3 bar moisture; Argentinean soils were incubated in the dark at 20 degrees C and 45% moisture holding capacity. Samples were analyzed up to one year after treatment. Two-compartment DT(50) and DT(90) values averaged 28 +/- 12 and 190 +/- 91 days, respectively. Three soil metabolites reached levels of >10% of applied in at least one soil and were identified as the 5-hydroxy analogue of diclosulam (5-OH-diclosulam), aminosulfonyl triazolopyrimidine (ASTP), and the 8-chloro-5-hydroxy analogue of diclosulam (8-Cl-diclosulam). The terminal products of diclosulam soil metabolism were mineralization to CO(2) and bound soil residues. Apparent sorption coefficients (K(d)) were determined on a subset of samples by extraction with a 0. 01 M CaCl(2) solution followed by an acidified acetone extraction. Initial sorption coefficients were similar to those obtained in a batch equilibrium study and averaged 1.1 L/kg for the six soils tested. K(d) coefficients for the metabolites, when available, tended to be slightly lower than that for diclosulam. Sorptivity of diclosulam and degradates increased with time. PMID:10995360

  10. Binary Interactions of Antagonistic Bacteria with Candida albicans Under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Benadé, Eliska; Stone, Wendy; Mouton, Marnel; Postma, Ferdinand; Wilsenach, Jac; Botha, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    We used both aerobic and anaerobic liquid co-cultures, prepared with Luria Bertani broth, to study the effect of bacteria on the survival of Candida albicans in the external environment, away from an animal host. The bacteria were represented by Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium, Enterobacter, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Kluyvera ascorbata and Serratia marcescens. Under aerobic conditions, the yeast's growth was inhibited in the presence of bacterial growth; however, under anaerobic conditions, yeast and bacterial growth in co-cultures was similar to that observed for pure cultures. Subsequent assays revealed that the majority of bacterial strains aerobically produced extracellular hydrolytic enzymes capable of yeast cell wall hydrolysis, including chitinases and mannan-degrading enzymes. In contrast, except for the A. hydrophila strain, these enzymes were not detected in anaerobic bacterial cultures, nor was the antimicrobial compound prodigiosin found in anaerobic cultures of S. marcescens. When we suspended C. albicans cells in crude extracellular enzyme preparations from K. pneumoniae and S. marcescens, we detected no negative effect on yeast viability. However, we found that these preparations enhance the toxicity of prodigiosin towards the yeast, especially in combination with mannan-degrading enzymes. Analyses of the chitin and mannan content of yeast cell walls revealed that less chitin was produced under anaerobic than aerobic conditions; however, the levels of mannan, known for its low permeability, remained the same. The latter phenomenon, as well as reduced production of the bacterial enzymes and prodigiosin, may contribute to anaerobic growth and survival of C. albicans in the presence of bacteria. PMID:26566932

  11. Aerobic capacity in wild satin bowerbirds: repeatability and effects of age, sex and condition.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Mark A; Savard, Jean-Francois; Siani, Jennifer; Coleman, Seth W; Keagy, Jason; Borgia, Gerald

    2011-10-01

    Individual variation in aerobic capacity has been extensively studied, especially with respect to condition, maturity or pathogen infection, and to gain insights into mechanistic foundations of performance. However, its relationship to mate competition is less well understood, particularly for animals in natural habitats. We examined aerobic capacity [maximum rate of O2 consumption (VO2,max) in forced exercise] in wild satin bowerbirds, an Australian passerine with a non-resource based mating system and strong intermale sexual competition. We tested for repeatability of mass and VO2,max, differences among age and sex classes, and effects of several condition indices. In adult males, we examined interactions between aerobic performance and bower ownership (required for male mating success). There was significant repeatability of mass and VO2,max within and between years, but between-year repeatability was lower than within-year repeatability. VO2,max varied with an overall scaling to mass(0.791), but most variance in VO2,max was not explained by mass. Indicators of condition (tarsus and wing length asymmetry, the ratio of tarsus length to mass) were not correlated to VO2,max. Ectoparasite counts were weakly correlated to VO2,max across all age-sex classes but not within any class. Adult males, the cohort with the most intense levels of mating competition, had higher VO2,max than juvenile birds or adult females. However, there was no difference between the VO2,max of bower-owning males and that of males not known to hold bowers. Thus one major factor determining male reproductive success was not correlated to aerobic performance. PMID:21900466

  12. The preferential growth of branched GDGT source microorganisms under aerobic conditions in peat revealed by stable isotope probing experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huguet, Arnaud; Meador, Travis B.; Laggoun-Défarge, Fatima; Könneke, Martin; Derenne, Sylvie; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (brGDGTs) membrane lipids are widely distributed in aquatic and terrestrial environments and are being increasingly used as temperature proxies. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the microorganisms that produce these lipids, which are found in especially high abundance in the anaerobic horizons of peat bogs. We initiated stable isotope probing incubations of peat samples from a Sphagnum-dominated peatland (Jura Mountains, France) to measure the incorporation of (D)-D2O and 13C-labeled dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into brGDGTs, and thus gauge the activity, growth, and turnover times of their source organisms. Peat samples were collected from two adjacent sites with contrasting humidity levels (hereafter called "fen" and "bog" sites). For each site, samples from the surficial aerobic layer (acrotelm) and deeper anaerobic layer (catotelm) were collected and were incubated under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions for the acrotelm samples and only anaerobic conditions for the catotelm. The incubations were performed at 12 ° C, consistent with the mean summer air temperature at the sampling site. After two months of incubation, there was no incorporation of 13C label in brGDGTs for samples incubated under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions, showing that brGDGT-producing bacteria are heterotrophic microorganisms, as previously observed in organo-mineral soils (Weijers et al., 2011). Similarly, little to no deuterium incorporation was observed for brGDGTs isolated from anaerobically-incubated deep samples. In contrast, in the aerobic incubations of acrotelm samples from bog and fen, the weighted average δD of brGDGT core lipids (CLs) increased by up to 3332‰ and 933‰ after two months, respectively, indicating that fresh brGDGT CLs were biosynthesized at the peat surface. D incorporation into brGDGT CLs converted to production rates ranging from 30-106 ng cm‑3y‑1 in the aerobic acrotelm from bog and

  13. Biochar increases plant-available water in a sandy loam soil under an aerobic rice crop system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo Carvalho, M. T.; de Holanda Nunes Maia, A.; Madari, B. E.; Bastiaans, L.; van Oort, P. A. J.; Heinemann, A. B.; Soler da Silva, M. A.; Petter, F. A.; Marimon, B. H., Jr.; Meinke, H.

    2014-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the impact of biochar rate (0, 8, 16 and 32 Mg ha-1) on the water retention capacity (WRC) of a sandy loam Dystric Plinthosol. The applied biochar was a by-product of slow pyrolysis (∼450 °C) of eucalyptus wood, milled to pass through a 2000 μm sieve that resulted in a material with an intrinsic porosity ≤10 μm and a specific surface area of ∼3.2 m2 g-1. The biochar was incorporated into the top 15 cm of the soil under an aerobic rice system. Our study focused on both the effects on WRC and rice yields 2 and 3 years after its application. Undisturbed soil samples were collected from 16 plots in two soil layers (5-10 and 15-20 cm). Soil water retention curves were modelled using a nonlinear mixed model which appropriately accounts for uncertainties inherent of spatial variability and repeated measurements taken within a specific soil sample. We found an increase in plant-available water in the upper soil layer proportional to the rate of biochar, with about 0.8% for each Mg ha-1 biochar amendment 2 and 3 years after its application. The impact of biochar on soil WRC was most likely related to an effect in overall porosity of the sandy loam soil, which was evident from an increase in saturated soil moisture and macro porosity with 0.5 and 1.6% for each Mg ha-1 of biochar applied, respectively. The increment in soil WRC did not translate into an increase in rice yield, essentially because in both seasons the amount of rainfall during the critical period for rice production exceeded 650 mm. The use of biochar as a soil amendment can be a worthy strategy to guarantee yield stability under short-term water-limited conditions. Our findings raise the importance of assessing the feasibility of very high application rates of biochar and the inclusion of a detailed analysis of its physical and chemical properties as part of future investigations.

  14. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Enteric Gram Negative Facultative Anaerobe Bacilli in Aerobic versus Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Amachawadi, Raghavendra G.; Renter, David G.; Volkova, Victoriya V.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial treatments result in the host’s enteric bacteria being exposed to the antimicrobials. Pharmacodynamic models can describe how this exposure affects the enteric bacteria and their antimicrobial resistance. The models utilize measurements of bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility traditionally obtained in vitro in aerobic conditions. However, in vivo enteric bacteria are exposed to antimicrobials in anaerobic conditions of the lower intestine. Some of enteric bacteria of food animals are potential foodborne pathogens, e.g., Gram-negative bacilli Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. These are facultative anaerobes; their physiology and growth rates change in anaerobic conditions. We hypothesized that their antimicrobial susceptibility also changes, and evaluated differences in the susceptibility in aerobic vs. anaerobic conditions of generic E. coli and Salmonella enterica of diverse serovars isolated from cattle feces. Susceptibility of an isolate was evaluated as its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measured by E-Test® following 24 hours of adaptation to the conditions on Mueller-Hinton agar, and on a more complex tryptic soy agar with 5% sheep blood (BAP) media. We considered all major antimicrobial drug classes used in the U.S. to treat cattle: β-lactams (specifically, ampicillin and ceftriaxone E-Test®), aminoglycosides (gentamicin and kanamycin), fluoroquinolones (enrofloxacin), classical macrolides (erythromycin), azalides (azithromycin), sulfanomides (sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim), and tetracyclines (tetracycline). Statistical analyses were conducted for the isolates (n≥30) interpreted as susceptible to the antimicrobials based on the clinical breakpoint interpretation for human infection. Bacterial susceptibility to every antimicrobial tested was statistically significantly different in anaerobic vs. aerobic conditions on both media, except for no difference in susceptibility to ceftriaxone on BAP agar. A satellite experiment

  15. Kinetics and thermodynamics of biodegradation of hydrolyzed polyacrylamide under anaerobic and aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lanmei; Bao, Mutai; Yan, Miao; Lu, Jinren

    2016-09-01

    Kinetics and thermodynamics of hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) biodegradation in anaerobic and aerobic activated sludge biochemical treatment systems were explored to determine the maximum rate and feasibility of HPAM biodegradation. The optimal nutrient proportions for HPAM biodegradation were determined to be 0.08g·L(-1) C6H12O6, 1.00g·L(-1) NH4Cl, 0.36g·L(-1) NaH2PO4 and 3.00g·L(-1) K2HPO4 using response surface methodology (RSM). Based on the kinetics, the maximum HPAM biodegradation rates were 16.43385mg·L(-1)·d(-1) and 2.463mg·L(-1)·d(-1) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The activation energy (Ea) of the aerobic biodegradation was 48.9897kJ·mol(-1). Entropy changes (ΔS) of biochemical treatment system decreased from 216.21J·K(-1) to 2.39J·K(-1). Thermodynamic windows of opportunity for HPAM biodegradation were drawn. And it demonstrated HPAM was biodegraded into acetic acid and CO2 under laboratory conditions. Growth-process equations for functional bacteria anaerobically grown on polyacrylic acid were constructed and it confirmed electron equivalence between substrate and product. PMID:27235971

  16. Aerobic thermophilic treatment of sewage sludge at pilot plant scale. 1. Operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Ponti, C; Sonnleitner, B; Fiechter, A

    1995-01-15

    The aerobic thermophilic treatment process of sewage sludge was studied at different bioreactor scales in a pilot plant installation. Since, for a satisfactory sludge disinfection, the Swiss legislation requires minimal incubation times of all volume elements, the bioreactors were operated in repetitive batch mode (draw and fill). Different retention times and frequencies of the volume changes were applied in order to prove the capability of the particular operation modes in assuring high degradative potential. The main enzymatic activity involved during the aerobic treatment was proteolysis: the RQ values ranged between 0.8 and 0.9 depending on the applied operating conditions. Although not in a linear manner, the efficiency of the microflora decreased as the bioreactor scale increased, when this increase corresponded with a reduction of the specific power input. The sludge oxidation rates can be tuned by some process operating conditions such as the volume change frequency, the changed volume quantities and the retention times. It was possible to improve the microbial degradative efficiency by an increased frequency of the changes, while the mean retention time influenced in particular the ultimate product quality, described as residual organic matter content of the sludge. The microflora present was also satisfactorily active at mean hydraulic retention times of less than 10 h. The organic matter concentration of the inlet sewage sludge plays an important role: it influences the aerobic degradation process positively. PMID:7765808

  17. An evaluation of aerobic and anaerobic composting of banana peels treated with different inoculums for soil nutrient replenishment.

    PubMed

    Kalemelawa, Frank; Nishihara, Eiji; Endo, Tsuneyoshi; Ahmad, Zahoor; Yeasmin, Rumana; Tenywa, Moses M; Yamamoto, Sadahiro

    2012-12-01

    This study sought to evaluate the efficacy of aerobic and anaerobic composting of inoculated banana peels, and assess the agronomic value of banana peel-based compost. Changes in the chemical composition under aerobic and anaerobic conditions were examined for four formulations of banana peel-based wastes over a period of 12 weeks. The formulations i.e. plain banana peel (B), and a mixture with either cow dung (BC), poultry litter (BP) or earthworm (BE) were separately composted under aerobic and anaerobic conditions under laboratory conditions. Inoculation with either cow dung or poultry litter significantly facilitated mineralization in the order: BP>BC>B. The rate of decomposition was significantly faster under aerobic than in anaerobic composting conditions. The final composts contained high K (>100 g kg(-1)) and TN (>2%), indicating high potential as a source of K and N fertilizer. PMID:22608289

  18. Selenite reduction by the obligate aerobic bacterium Comamonas testosteroni S44 isolated from a metal-contaminated soil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element in most organisms but has to be carefully handled since there is a thin line between beneficial and toxic concentrations. Many bacteria have the ability to reduce selenite (Se(IV)) and (or) selenate (Se(VI)) to red elemental selenium that is less toxic. Results A strictly aerobic bacterium, Comamonas testosteroni S44, previously isolated from metal(loid)-contaminated soil in southern China, reduced Se(IV) to red selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) with sizes ranging from 100 to 200 nm. Both energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX or EDS) and EDS Elemental Mapping showed no element Se and SeNPs were produced inside cells whereas Se(IV) was reduced to red-colored selenium in the cytoplasmic fraction in presence of NADPH. Tungstate inhibited Se(VI) but not Se(IV) reduction, indicating the Se(IV)-reducing determinant does not contain molybdenum as co-factor. Strain S44 was resistant to multiple heavy and transition metal(loid)s such as Se(IV), As(III), Cu(II), and Cd(II) with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 100 mM, 20 mM, 4 mM, and 0.5 mM, respectively. Disruption of iscR encoding a transcriptional regulator negatively impacted cellular growth and subsequent resistance to multiple heavy metal(loid)s. Conclusions C. testosteroni S44 could be very useful for bioremediation in heavy metal(loid) polluted soils due to the ability to both reduce toxic Se(VI) and Se(IV) to non-toxic Se (0) under aerobic conditions and to tolerate multiple heavy and transition metals. IscR appears to be an activator to regulate genes involved in resistance to heavy or transition metal(loid)s but not for genes responsible for Se(IV) reduction. PMID:25098921

  19. Laboratory degradation rates of 11 pyrethroids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Brian N; Lam, Chung; Moore, Sean; Jones, Russell L

    2013-05-22

    Degradation of 11 pyrethroids was measured over approximately 100 days in three sediment/water systems under aerobic and anaerobic conditions at 25 °C in the dark. The three California sediments represented a range of textures and organic matter. Test compounds were bifenthrin, cypermethrin, ζ-cypermethrin, cyfluthrin, β-cyfluthrin, deltamethrin, esfenvalerate, fenpropathrin, γ-cyhalothrin, λ-cyhalothrin, and permethrin. A non-standard design was employed to keep conditions essentially the same for all compounds. The test compounds were applied as two test mixtures (six active ingredients per mixture, with bifenthrin common to both) at approximately 50 μg of test compound/kg of sediment (dry weight). Extracts of sediment/water were cleaned up by solid-phase extraction, concentrated, and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (except deltamethrin) against matrix-matched standards, with cyfluthrin-d6 as an internal standard. Deltamethrin was analyzed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry using deltamethrin-phenoxy-(13)C6 as an internal standard. Similar degradation rates of bifenthrin and for related isomeric compounds (e.g., cyfluthrin and β-cyfluthrin) were generally measured in both mixtures for each sediment. First-order half-lives under aerobic conditions ranged from 2.9 to greater than 200 days, with a median value of 18 days. Under anaerobic conditions, the range was from 20 to greater than 200 days, with a median value of 70 days. PMID:23641910

  20. Insight into the mechanism of carbon steel corrosion under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    El Mendili, Y; Abdelouas, A; Bardeau, J-F

    2013-06-21

    We particularly focused our study on identifying the corrosion products formed at 30 °C on carbon steel under aerobic and anaerobic conditions and on following their evolution with time due to enhanced microbial activity under environmental and geological conditions. The nature and structural properties of corrosion products were investigated by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy. Structural characterisation clearly showed the formation of iron oxides (magnetite and maghemite) under aerobic conditions. Under anaerobic conditions, the first corrosion product formed on the steel surface was nanocrystalline mackinawite, which was then followed by a fast transformation process into the pyrrhotite phase, and the Raman spectrum of monoclinic pyrrhotite was proposed for the first time. Finally, this study also shows that in the context of geological disposal of radioactive waste, the corrosion of carbon steel containers in anoxic and sulphidogenic environments sustained by sulphate-reducing bacteria may not be a problem notably due to the formation of a passive layer on the steel surface. PMID:23652337

  1. EVALUATION AND TESTING OF A PROTOCOL TO DETERMINE THE AEROBIC DEGRADATION POTENTIAL OF HAZARDOUS WASTE CONSTITUENTS IN SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Agriculture is currently testing a protocol for determine the "Aerobic Degradation Potential of Hazardous Organic Constituents in Soil" to ensure its reliability, accuracy, cost effectivenes...

  2. Transformation of (14)C-pyrimidynyloxybenzoic herbicide ZJ0273 in aerobic soils.

    PubMed

    Haiyan, Wang; Zhiyang, Yu; Ling, Yue; Ailiang, Han; Yanfei, Zhang; Juying, Li; Qingfu, Ye; Zhengmin, Yang; Long, Lu

    2010-04-15

    A soil metabolism study of propyl 4-(2-(4,6-dimethoxypyrimidin-2-yloxy)benzylamino)benzoate (ZJ0273), a novel broad-spectrum herbicide, was carried out using (14)C labeled on two different rings, i.e., [pyrimidine-4,6-(14)C] ZJ0273 and [benzyl-U-(14)C] ZJ0273. Ultralow liquid scintillation counting and LC-MS/MS were used to identify the degradation intermediates and quantify their dynamics in aerobic soils. Four aromatic intermediates, 4-(2-(4,6-dimethoxypyrimidin-2-yloxy)benzylamino)benzoic acid (M1), 4-(2-(4,6-dimethoxypyrimidin-2-yloxy)benzamido)benzoic acid (M2), 2-(4,6-dimethoxypyrimidin-2-yloxy)benzoic acid (M3), and 4,6-dimethoxypyrimidin-2-ol (M4), were identified and their identity was further confirmed against authentic standards. Analysis of metabolites suggested two degradation pathways: (1) Upon loss of the propyl group, M1 was produced via hydrolysis of propyl 4-(2-(4,6-dimethoxypyrimidin-2-yloxy)benzylamino)benzoate after which the C-N bond between rings A and B was cleaved by oxidation and biochemical degradation to yield M3, which was further converted into M4 and finally mineralized to CO(2); and (2) the first step was the same as in pathway 1, but M1 first underwent a carbonylation to form M2. The C-N bond between rings A and B of M2 was cleaved by hydrolysis to yield M3. Dynamic changes in the four metabolites in aerobic soils were also investigated by HPLC coupled analysis of radioactivity of isolated peaks. After a 100-day incubation, 1.7-9.7% of applied (14)C was found as M1, 0.3-1.1% as M2, 14.5-20.9% as M3, and 3.7-6.7% as M4 in the soils, and pH appeared to be the most influential soil property affecting the formation and dissipation of these metabolites. PMID:20189632

  3. Fungicide Dissipation and Impact on Metolachlor Aerobic Soil Degradation and Soil Microbial Dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pesticides are typically applied as mixtures and or sequentially to soil during crop production. A common scenario is herbicide application at planting followed by sequential fungicide applications post-emergence. Fungicides depending on their spectrum of activity may alter and impact soil microbial...

  4. Deficient activation by a human cell strain leads to mitomycin resistance under aerobic but not hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Marshall, R S; Paterson, M C; Rauth, A M

    1989-03-01

    Two non-transformed human skin fibroblast strains, GM38 and 3437T, were found to be more sensitive to the bioreductive alkylating agents mitomycin C (MMC) and porfiromycin (PM) under hypoxic compared to aerobic conditions. One of these strains, 3437T, was 6-7 times more resistant to these agents under aerobic exposure conditions, but was identical in sensitivity to the normal strain, GM38, under hypoxic conditions. Aerobic 3437T cells demonstrated no increased resistance to cisplatin compared to the normal strain, arguing against enhanced ability to repair DNA interstrand cross-links as the underlying explanation for the mitomycin resistance. The aerobic resistance of 3437T was not altered by dicumarol, an inhibitor of the enzyme DT-diaphorase which is believed to be involved in aerobic activation of MMC and PM. Dicumarol did increase the resistance of GM38, but not to the same level of resistance demonstrated by 3437T. These results suggest that the aerobic MMC and PM resistance of 3437T may arise, in part, from a deficiency in DT-diaphorase activity. The identical sensitivities under hypoxic conditions indicate that drug activation pathways operative in the absence of oxygen are similar in both the normal and 3437T cells. PMID:2467684

  5. Deficient activation by a human cell strain leads to mitomycin resistance under aerobic but not hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, R. S.; Paterson, M. C.; Rauth, A. M.

    1989-01-01

    Two non-transformed human skin fibroblast strains, GM38 and 3437T, were found to be more sensitive to the bioreductive alkylating agents mitomycin C (MMC) and porfiromycin (PM) under hypoxic compared to aerobic conditions. One of these strains, 3437T, was 6-7 times more resistant to these agents under aerobic exposure conditions, but was identical in sensitivity to the normal strain, GM38, under hypoxic conditions. Aerobic 3437T cells demonstrated no increased resistance to cisplatin compared to the normal strain, arguing against enhanced ability to repair DNA interstrand cross-links as the underlying explanation for the mitomycin resistance. The aerobic resistance of 3437T was not altered by dicumarol, an inhibitor of the enzyme DT-diaphorase which is believed to be involved in aerobic activation of MMC and PM. Dicumarol did increase the resistance of GM38, but not to the same level of resistance demonstrated by 3437T. These results suggest that the aerobic MMC and PM resistance of 3437T may arise, in part, from a deficiency in DT-diaphorase activity. The identical sensitivities under hypoxic conditions indicate that drug activation pathways operative in the absence of oxygen are similar in both the normal and 3437T cells. PMID:2467684

  6. Antibacterial Action of Nitric Oxide-Releasing Chitosan Oligosaccharides against Pseudomonas aeruginosa under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Reighard, Katelyn P.

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan oligosaccharides were modified with N-diazeniumdiolates to yield biocompatible nitric oxide (NO) donor scaffolds. The minimum bactericidal concentrations and MICs of the NO donors against Pseudomonas aeruginosa were compared under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Differential antibacterial activities were primarily the result of NO scavenging by oxygen under aerobic environments and not changes in bacterial physiology. Bacterial killing was also tested against nonmucoid and mucoid biofilms and compared to that of tobramycin. Smaller NO payloads were required to eradicate P. aeruginosa biofilms under anaerobic versus aerobic conditions. Under oxygen-free environments, the NO treatment was 10-fold more effective at killing biofilms than tobramycin. These results demonstrate the potential utility of NO-releasing chitosan oligosaccharides under both aerobic and anaerobic environments. PMID:26239983

  7. Comparison of the transport and deposition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huixin; Zeng, Hongbo; Ulrich, Ania C.; Liu, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Laboratory-scale columns were employed to study the effect of oxygen and ionic strength on the transport of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 in porous media. In anaerobic experiments, cells were grown and transport experiments were conducted in a well-controlled anaerobic chamber. Cell surface electrokinetic potentials were measured and surface elemental composition was analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Transport experimental results showed reduced travel distance of PAO1 with increased ionic strength under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, consistent with calculated Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. The deposition rates of PAO1 were significantly higher in aerobic than in anaerobic condition at higher ionic strength (10 and 100 mM), although the electrokinetic potentials were similar throughout the tested ionic strength (1, 10, and 100 mM). No difference in PAO1 deposition rate was observed at 1 mM. XPS analysis showed that variation in cell surface composition due to different growth conditions played a primary role in determining the different deposition behaviors.

  8. Effect of passivator on Cu form transformation in pig manure aerobic composting and application in soil.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Ming; Lu, Peng-Zhen; Chen, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Hui; Fu, Jie

    2015-10-01

    A sequential extraction approach was used to evaluate the effects of various combinations of passivators (sepiolite, phosphate rock, and coal fly ash) on the concentration and speciation of Cu in swine manure aerobic compost along with soil to which the compost had been applied. The results indicate that the various passivators altered the bound forms of Cu in pig manure and soil; the concentrations of exchangeable and Fe-Mn-bound Cu decreased, whereas the residual Cu concentration increased, indicating that Cu transformed to low-availability forms after the passivator treatments. The concentrations of the carbonate-bound and organic-bound Cu varied widely. Among all treatments, the treatment of the control + straw + sepiolite + coal fly ash (2.5 %) + phosphate rock (5.0 %) resulted in the most efficient passivation of Cu; the percentage of residual Cu reached 3.91-21.14 %, obviously surpassing the percentage for the control without passivation. The treatment of the control + straw + sepiolite + phosphate rock (2.5 %) resulted in the lowest residual Cu fraction (0.85 %) among passivator treatments. These results show that the addition of suitable combinations of passivators to the composting process reduced the availability of Cu and the risk of Cu pollution during the application of composted pig manure to soil. Passivation also decreased the Cu content of Apium graveolens. PMID:25982987

  9. Changes in Soil Minerology Reduce Phosphorus Mobility During Anoxic Soil Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, S. K.; Geohring, L. D.; Richards, B. K.; Walter, M.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2008-05-01

    soil incubation showed higher P sorption than aerobic soil due to reduced iron (Fe+2) - P mineral formation. Some of the readily available P in the soil solution tended to co-precipitate quickly with Fe, Al, Ca, and Mn, but it also resulted in the formation of earthy masses of vivianite [Fe2+3(PO4)2 . 8 H20], thus almost completely immobilizing P. These findings suggest that where conditions in the landscape are saturated, but remain stagnant for extended time periods, P additions may not necessarily enhance leaching once hydrological transport resumes. The temporal nature of P mobilization processes combined with rapid (i.e., preferential flow) hydrological transport appears to have a more important role in controlling P transport through the landscape.

  10. Soil carbon sequestration estimated with the soil conditioning index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid and reliable assessments of the potential of different agricultural management systems to sequester soil organic carbon are needed to promote conservation and help mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. The soil conditioning index (SCI) is a relatively simple model to parameterize and is currentl...

  11. Examining the effect of altered redox conditions on deep soil organic matter stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, C.; Kellman, L. M.; Ziegler, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Since subsoil horizons contribute significantly to terrestrial carbon (C) budgets, understanding the influence of disturbances such as forest harvesting on subsoil C stability is critical. Clearcut harvesting leads to changes in the soil physico-chemical environment, including altering redox conditions arising from changes in soil hydrology that increase soil saturation, soil temperature, and pH. These physico-chemical changes have the potential to alter the adsorption of soil organic matter (SOM) to minerals, particularly at depth where SOM is primarily associated with mineral phases. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of differing redox states (aerobic vs. anaerobic) and temperature upon SOM stability of forested soils representative of the Acadian Forest Region of Eastern North America. Composite soil samples through depth (0-10, 10-20, 20-35, and 35-50 cm) from a mature red spruce forest (110 years) were incubated under optimum (aerobic) or saturated (anaerobic) conditions for 1 or 4 months at two temperatures (5 and 15 C). Following incubation, soil leachate was analyzed for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and UV-vis absorbance in order to determine soil C losses and its optical character. Specific UV-vis absorbance SUVA (254 nm) and spectral slope ratios were calculated in order to assess the composition of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). Preliminary results from the 1 month incubation indicate that under anaerobic conditions, all depths released DOC with a higher SUVA than under aerobic conditions, with the largest change observed in the 0-10 cm depth increment. Soil incubated at 5 C produced leachate with significantly less DOC and with a lower absorbance compared to 15 C under both redox conditions. These results suggest that both temperature and redox state are important in determining the aromaticity of DOC released from soils. Spectral slope ratios revealed that a greater proportion of CDOM of lower molecular weight

  12. Aerobic carboxydotrophy under extremely haloalkaline conditions in Alkalispirillum/Alkalilimnicola strains isolated from soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Tourova, Tatjana P; Kovaleva, Olga L; Kuenen, J Gijs; Muyzer, Gerard

    2010-03-01

    Aerobic enrichments from soda lake sediments with CO as the only substrate resulted in the isolation of five bacterial strains capable of autotrophic growth with CO at extremely high pH and salinity. The strains belonged to the Alkalispirillum/Alkalilimnicola cluster in the Gammaproteobacteria, where the ability to oxidize CO, but not growth with CO, has been demonstrated previously. The growth with CO was possible only at an oxygen concentration below 5 % and CO concentration below 20 % in the gas phase. The isolates were also capable of growth with formate but not with H(2). The carboxydotrophic growth occurred within a narrow pH range from 8 to 10.5 (optimum at 9.5) and a broad salt concentration from 0.3 to 3.5 M total Na(+) (optimum at 1.0 M). Cells grown on CO had high respiration activity with CO and formate, while the cells grown on formate actively oxidized formate alone. In CO-grown cells, CO-dehydrogenase (CODH) activity was detectable both in soluble and membrane fractions, while the NAD-independent formate dehydrogenase (FDH) resided solely in membranes. The results of total protein profiling and the failure to detect CODH with conventional primers for the coxL gene indicated that the CO-oxidizing enzyme in haloalkaliphilic isolates might differ from the classical aerobic CODH complex. A single cbbL gene encoding the RuBisCO large subunit was detected in all strains, suggesting the presence of the Calvin cycle of inorganic carbon fixation. Overall, these results demonstrated the possibility of aerobic carboxydotrophy under extremely haloalkaline conditions. PMID:19959573

  13. America's Soil and Water: Condition and Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1981

    A review of conditions and trends regarding soil and water resources of rural nonfederal lands of the United States is presented in this publication. Maps, charts, and graphs illustrate the data collected on various aspects of soil and water use and practice. Topic areas considered include: (1) land use patterns; (2) classes of land; (3)…

  14. Measuring Soil Nitrogen Mineralization under Field Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land application of animal manure is known to alter rates of nitrogen (N) mineralization in soils, but quantitative information concerning intensity and duration of these effects has been difficult to obtain under field conditions. We estimated net effects of manure on N mineralization in soils unde...

  15. Micrometeorological conditions under different soil frost depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemoto, M.; Hirota, T.; Iwata, Y.; Suzuki, S.; Hasegawa, S.

    2007-12-01

    Eastern Hokkaido, where is one of the largest agricultural production regions in Japan, is characterized by low air temperature and relatively thin snow covers resulting in soil frost over the winter. However, the soil frost depth has been significantly decreasing since late 1980's due to an insulation from the cold air by a thick snow cover developing in early winter. In the current study, soil water movement, soil temperature, and surface heat balance under different soil frost conditions were monitored to obtain a knowledge of changes in micrometeorological condition of the agricultural production systems in the Eastern Hokkaido associated with the decreasing soil frost depth in the region. A paired soil plot experiment was conducted from Nov. 2005 to May 2006, where the frost depth was artificially enhanced by removing snow for 24 days in the retreatment plot and the natural condition was maintained in the control plot. The soil in the experimental field was classified as Andisol with much porosity and high drainability. In each plot, water content and soil temperature were measured by TDR and thermocouple, respectively. The maximum soil-frost depth in the treatment and control plots resulted in 43.8 and 13.6ċm, respectively. Changes in snow water equivalent volume SWE) and snow depth were manually recorded. The difference of SWE just before melting snow was same. The day of snow disappearing was 18th April 2006 for both plots. The control plot with a thin frozen layer allowed infiltration of snow melt water, and water content at the lower subsoil increased accordance in snowmelting, whereas a thick frozen layer in the treatment plot impeded the infiltration resulting in waterlogging being observed on the soil surface. These differences in profile of water content and in developing soil frost depth results in more delay in increasing soil temperature at the deeper depth. At the surface, however, the difference in soil temperature was quickly disappeared, and

  16. Ethanol production with Saccharomyces cerevisiae under aerobic conditions at different potassium concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Wuempelmann, M.; Kjaergaard, L.; Joergensen, B.B.

    1984-01-01

    The specific ethanol productivity with Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown aerobicly in a chemostat was found to be highly dependent on the ratio of intracellular to extracellular potassium concentration through variations in the energy consumption used for maintenance of the concentration gradient of potassium across the cell membrane. The specific ethanol productivity progressively rose from 0 to 20 mmol h/sup -1/g/sup -1/ cell dry matter at a growth rate of 0.17 h/sup -1/ when the ratio of intracellular to extracellular potassium concentration was increased from 10 to 80. The ethanol production under potassium limited growth conditions was caused neither by a reduction in the specific respiratory activity nor by variations in the potassium content in cell dry matter. Results which strongly suggest that ethanol production under potassium limited growth conditions is brought about by changes in the ratio of pyruvate oxidase to pyruvate decarboxylase activity through changes in the intracellular pyruvate concentration are presented.

  17. Biodegradation of Free Phytol by Bacterial Communities Isolated from Marine Sediments under Aerobic and Denitrifying Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rontani, Jean-François; Bonin, Patricia C.; Volkman, John K.

    1999-01-01

    Biodegradation of (E)-phytol [3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadec-2(E)-en-1-ol] by two bacterial communities isolated from recent marine sediments under aerobic and denitrifying conditions was studied at 20°C. This isoprenoid alcohol is metabolized efficiently by these two bacterial communities via 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecan-2-one and (E)-phytenic acid. The first step in both aerobic and anaerobic bacterial degradation of (E)-phytol involves the transient production of (E)-phytenal, which in turn can be abiotically converted to 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecan-2-one. Most of the isoprenoid metabolites identified in vitro could be detected in a fresh sediment core collected at the same site as the sediments used for the incubations. Since (E)-phytenal is less sensitive to abiotic degradation at the temperature of the sediments (15°C), the major part of (E)-phytol appeared to be biodegraded in situ via (E)-phytenic acid. (Z)- and (E)-phytenic acids are present in particularly large quantities in the upper section of the core, and their concentrations quickly decrease with depth in the core. This degradation (which takes place without significant production of phytanic acid) is attributed to the involvement of alternating β-decarboxymethylation and β-oxidation reaction sequences induced by denitrifiers. Despite the low nitrate concentration of marine sediments, denitrifying bacteria seem to play a significant role in the mineralization of (E)-phytol. PMID:10584007

  18. Aerobic moving bed biofilm reactor treating thermomechanical pulping whitewater under thermophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Jahren, Sigrun J; Rintala, Jukka A; Odegaard, Hallvard

    2002-02-01

    The continuously operated laboratory scale Kaldnes moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) was used for thermophilic (55 degrees C) aerobic treatment of TMP whitewater. In the MBBR, the biomass is grown on carrier elements that move along with the water in the reactor. Inoculation with mesophilic activated sludge gave 60-65% SCOD removal from the first day onwards. During the 107 days of experiment, the 60-65% SCOD removals were achieved at organic loading rates of 2.5-3.5 kg SCODm(-3) d(-1), the highest loading rates applied during the run and HRT of 13-22h. Carbohydrates, which contributed to 50-60% of the influent SCOD. were removed by 90-95%, while less than 15% of the lignin-like material (30-35% of SCODin) was removed. The sludge yield was 0.23g VSSg SCOD(-1)removed. The results show that the aerobic biofilm process can be successfully operated under thermophilic conditions. PMID:11848344

  19. Effects of environmental conditions on aerobic degradation of a commercial naphthenic acid.

    PubMed

    Kinley, Ciera M; Gaspari, Daniel P; McQueen, Andrew D; Rodgers, John H; Castle, James W; Friesen, Vanessa; Haakensen, Monique

    2016-10-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are problematic constituents in energy-derived waters, and aerobic degradation may provide a strategy for mitigating risks to aquatic organisms. The overall objective of this study was to determine the influence of concentrations of N (as ammonia) and P (as phosphate), and DO, as well as pH and temperatures on degradation of a commercial NA in bench-scale reactors. Commercial NAs provided replicable compounds necessary to compare influences of environmental conditions on degradation. NAs were quantified using high performance liquid chromatography. Microbial diversity and relative abundance were measured in treatments as explanatory parameters for potential effects of environmental conditions on microbial populations to support analytically measured NA degradation. Environmental conditions that positively influenced degradation rates of Fluka NAs included nutrients (C:N 10:1-500:1, C:P 100:1-5000:1), DO (4.76-8.43 mg L(-1)), pH (6-8), and temperature (5-25 °C). Approximately 50% removal of 61 ± 8 mg L(-1) was achieved in less than 2 d after NA introduction, achieving the method detection limit (5 mg L(-1)) by day 6 of the experiment in treatments with a C:N:P ratio of 100:10:1, DO > 8 mg L(-1), pH ∼8-9, and temperatures >23 °C. Microbial diversity was lowest in lower temperature treatments (6-16 °C), which may have resulted in observed slower NA degradation. Based on results from this study, when macro- and micronutrients were available, DO, pH, and temperature (within environmentally relevant ranges) influenced rates of aerobic degradation of Fluka NAs. This study could serve as a model for systematically evaluating environmental factors that influence NA degradation in field scenarios. PMID:27459161

  20. Rate of aerobic nitrogen transformations in six acid climax forest soils and the effect of phosphorus and CaCO3

    SciTech Connect

    Sahrawat, K.L.; Keeney, D.R.; Adams, S.S.

    1985-09-01

    Nitrogen transformations (mineralization, nitrification, and nitrous oxide production) were evaluated in acid forest floor soils collected from six climax forest sites on Blackhawk Island, Wisconsin. Soils' acidity (CaCl2) ranged from pH 3.9 to 5.1, and organic matter concentrations varied from 2.4 to 59.0 percent. The samples were incubated aerobically for 4 weeks at 30C under field moist conditions. Treatments were: control; 100 mg P (as KH2PO4) kg soil; CaCO3; and P with CaCO3. Nitrification of mineralized N ranged from nearly complete in the SM Alfisol to almost non-existent in the Histosol. Addition of P had little effect on ammonification or nitrification. Liming, however, greatly enhanced ammonification on nonnitrifying or slowly nitrifying soils and both ammonification and nitrification in nitrifying soils. Adding P and lime together did not affect N transformations compared to liming alone. Nitrous oxide emission rates in the soils were related to nitrification. From 0.03 to 0.3 percent of the NH4-N nitrified was released as N2O-N. Phosphorus addition had little effect but liming increased N2O emission rates in soil where nitrification was also enhanced.

  1. Microbial transformation of 8:2 fluorotelomer acrylate and methacrylate in aerobic soils.

    PubMed

    Royer, Laurel A; Lee, Linda S; Russell, Mark H; Nies, Loring F; Turco, Ronald F

    2015-06-01

    Biotransformation of fluorotelomer (FT) compounds, such as 8:2 FT alcohol (FTOH) is now recognized to be a source of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) as well as other perfluoroalkyl acids. In this study, microbially mediated hydrolysis of FT industrial intermediates 8:2 FT acrylate (8:2 FTAC) and 8:2 FT methacrylate (8:2 FTMAC) was evaluated in aerobic soils for up to 105d. At designated times, triplicate microcosms were sacrificed by sampling the headspace for volatile FTOHs followed by sequential extraction of soil for the parent monomers as well as transient and terminal degradation products. Both FTAC and FTMAC were hydrolyzed at the ester linkage as evidenced by 8:2 FTOH production. 8:2 FTAC and FTMAC degraded rapidly with half-lives ⩽5d and 15d, respectively. Maximum 8:2 FTOH levels were 6-13mol% within 3-6d. Consistent with the known biotransformation pathway of 8:2 FTOH, FT carboxylic acids and perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids were subsequently generated including up to 10.3mol% of PFOA (105d). A total mass balance (parent plus metabolites) of 50-75mol% was observed on the last sampling day. 7:2 sFTOH, a direct precursor to PFOA, unexpectedly increased throughout the incubation period. The likely, but unconfirmed, concomitant production of acrylic acids was proposed as altering expected degradation patterns. Biotransformation of 8:2 FTAC, 8:2 FTMAC, and previously reported 8:2 FT-stearate for the same soils revealed the effect of the non-fluorinated terminus group linked to the FT chain on the electronic differences that affect microbially-mediated ester cleavage rates. PMID:25449186

  2. Silicification-induced cell aggregation for the sustainable production of H2 under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Zhao, Xiaohong; Zhu, Genxing; Shao, Changyu; Li, Yaling; Ma, Weimin; Xu, Xurong; Tang, Ruikang

    2015-10-01

    Photobiological hydrogen production is of great importance because of its promise for generating clean renewable energy. In nature, green algae cannot produce hydrogen as a result of the extreme sensitivity of hydrogenase to oxygen. However, we find that silicification-induced green algae aggregates can achieve sustainable photobiological hydrogen production even under natural aerobic conditions. The core-shell structure of the green algae aggregates creates a balance between photosynthetic electron generation and hydrogenase activity, thus allowing the production of hydrogen. This finding provides a viable pathway for the solar-driven splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen to develop green energy alternatives by using rationally designed cell-material complexes. PMID:26302695

  3. Biodegradation of phenols in a sandstone aquifer under aerobic conditions and mixed nitrate and iron reducing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broholm, Mette M.; Arvin, Erik

    2000-08-01

    Ammonia liquor with very high concentrations of phenol and alkylated phenols is known to have leaked into the subsurface at a former coal carbonization plant in the UK, giving high concentrations of ammonium in the groundwater. In spite of this, no significant concentrations of phenols were found in the groundwater. The potential for biodegradation of the phenols in the sandstone aquifer at the site has been investigated in laboratory microcosms under aerobic (oxygen amended) and mixed nitrate and iron reducing (nitrate enriched and unamended) anaerobic conditions, at a range of concentrations (low: ˜5 mg l -1, high: ˜60 mg l -1, and very high: ˜600 mg l -1) and in the presence of other organic coal-tar compounds (mono- and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (BTEXs and PAHs) and heterocyclic compounds (NSOs)) and ammonia liquor. Sandstone cores and groundwater for the microcosms were collected from within the anaerobic ammonium plume at the field site. Fast and complete degradation of phenol, o- and p-cresol, 2,5- and 3,4-xylenol with no or very short initial lag-phases was observed under aerobic conditions at low concentrations. 2,6- and 3,5-Xylenol were degraded more slowly and 3,5-xylenol degradation was only just complete after about 1 year. The maximum rates of total phenols degradation in duplicate aerobic microcosms were 1.06 and 1.76 mg l -1 day -1. The degradation of phenols in nitrate enriched and unamended anaerobic microcosms was similar. Fast and complete biodegradation of phenol, cresols, 3,4-xylenol and 3,5-xylenol was observed after short lag-phases in the anaerobic microcosms. 2,5-xylenol was partially degraded after a longer lag-phase and 2,6-xylenol persisted throughout the 3 month long experiments. The maximum rates of total phenols degradation in duplicate nitrate enriched and unamended anaerobic microcosms were 0.30-0.38 and 0.29-0.31 mg l -1 day -1, respectively. The highest phenols concentrations in the anaerobic microcosms apparently required

  4. Effect of particulate organic substrate on aerobic granulation and operating conditions of sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jamile; Weissbrodt, David Gregory; Manguin, Vincent; da Costa, Rejane Helena Ribeiro; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Derlon, Nicolas

    2015-11-15

    The formation and application of aerobic granules for the treatment of real wastewaters still remains challenging. The high fraction of particulate organic matter (XS) present in real wastewaters can affect the granulation process. The present study aims at understanding to what extent the presence of XS affects the granule formation and the quality of the treated effluent. A second objective was to evaluate how the operating conditions of an aerobic granular sludge (AGS) reactor must be adapted to overcome the effects of the presence of XS. Two reactors fed with synthetic wastewaters were operated in absence (R1) or presence (R2) of starch as proxy for XS. Different operating conditions were evaluated. Our results indicated that the presence of XS in the wastewater reduces the kinetic of granule formation. After 52 d of operation, the fraction of granules reached only 21% in R2, while in R1 this fraction was of 54%. The granules grown in presence of XS had irregular and filamentous outgrowths in the surface, which affected the settleability of the biomass and therefore the quality of the effluent. An extension of the anaerobic phase in R2 led to the formation of more compact granules with a better settling ability. A high fraction of granules was obtained in both reactors after an increase of the selection pressure for fast-settling biomass, but the quality of the effluent remained low. Operating the reactors in a simultaneous fill-and-draw mode at a low selection pressure for fast-settling biomass showed to be beneficial for substrate removal efficiency and for suppressing filamentous overgrowth. Average removal efficiencies for total COD, soluble COD, ammonium, and phosphate were 87 ± 4%, 95 ± 1%, 92 ± 10%, and 87 ± 12% for R1, and 72 ± 12%, 86 ± 5%, 71 ± 12%, and 77 ± 11% for R2, respectively. Overall our study demonstrates that the operating conditions of AGS reactors must be adapted according to the wastewater composition. When treating effluents that

  5. Cr(VI) reduction under aerobic and denitrifying conditions by an aquifer-derived Pseudomonad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, H. R.; Han, R.; Geller, J. T.

    2009-12-01

    Chromium contamination of groundwater is widespread within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. For example, at DOE’s Hanford 100 Area in Washington state, the volume of Cr-contaminated groundwater is estimated to be 1.5 billion gallons. Bioremediation (in situ reductive immobilization) studies involving injection of a lactate-containing polymer have been conducted in the Hanford 100H area, where we have observed sequential use of the dissolved electron acceptors present in groundwater, namely, oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate. As part of an effort to explore Cr(VI) reduction under relevant electron-accepting conditions and with relevant bacteria, we have conducted studies with strain RCH2, a denitrifying bacterium similar to Pseudomonas stutzeri that was isolated from the Hanford 100H aquifer. Cell suspension studies with lactate demonstrated that Cr(VI) reduction could occur under either denitrifying or aerobic conditions (at comparable rates), and that reduction was much more rapid when the terminal electron acceptor (i.e., nitrate or O2) was present. It appears that, under both aerobic and denitrifying conditions, the chromate reductase gene(s) are not inducible by Cr; this conclusion is based on the fact that these cell suspension studies were conducted with cells grown in the absence of Cr and resuspended in a buffer that included chloramphenicol, which inhibits protein synthesis. As our studies indicate that anaerobic Cr(VI) reduction by strain RCH2 is much more rapid in the presence of nitrate (i.e., during denitrification) than in its absence, we explored molecular methods that could readily assess in situ denitrification. Specifically, we investigated whether the gene and transcript copy number of diagnostic denitrification genes (nirS and narG) in groundwater could be used to estimate in situ denitrification rates. Continuous culture (chemostat) studies showed strong correlations (r2 values > 0.93) between denitrification rate and either nirS or nar

  6. Can hydromorphic conditions accelerate soil development?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringer, Marianna; Kiss, Klaudia; Horváth-Szabó, Kata; Réka Balázs, Brigitta; Németh, Tibor; Sipos, Péter; Szabó, Máté; Jakab, Gergely; Madarász, Balázs; Szalai, Zoltán

    2016-04-01

    The formation and development of waterlogged (hydromorphic) soils are primarily determined by long-term water saturation. The presence of water in the profile can result increasing speed of soil forming processes including the accumulation of organic matter or other components and mineralogical transformations. Original papers refer more than hundreds of years for this kinds of mineral transformations. We suppose that this process could be more rapid. This study focuses on the mineralogical investigation of a sandy meadow soil (calcic, gleyic Phaeozem ferric, arenic) located in a swampy area in Central Hungary. The starting time of the soil formation is a well documented fact: the parent material deposited during an extremely heavy flood event in the 1960s. Therefore, the studied soil profile is the result of the last half century. Our aim was to explore the degree of mineral phase alteration via soil formation during a half-century under hydromorphic conditions. Routine laboratory measurements (selective dissolution methods for the determination of amorphous and crystalline Fe, and Mn content, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy measurements for elemental composition determination, X-ray powder diffraction for mineralogical composition, and particle sizing by laser diffraction) were implemented. Morphological and chemical study of carbonate and iron nodules was carried out by electron microprobe. Simple chemical tests (eg. Fe2+ indication by dipiridil test) and morphological observations were performed on the field. Redox potential (Eh) and pH were measured in 20 cm and 40 cm depths by field monitoring station during the vegetation period. Results show that well developed horizons have emerged during fifty years in the studied soil profile. The most intense mineralogical transformations developed in the zone of the heaviest redox oscillation. Soil formation under hydromorphic conditions proceeds at higher speeds contrariwise to the century time scale reported in

  7. Plutonium Oxidation State Distribution under Aerobic and Anaerobic Subsurface Conditions for Metal-Reducing Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, D. T.; Swanson, J.; Khaing, H.; Deo, R.; Rittmann, B.

    2009-12-01

    The fate and potential mobility of plutonium in the subsurface is receiving increased attention as the DOE looks to cleanup the many legacy nuclear waste sites and associated subsurface contamination. Plutonium is the near-surface contaminant of concern at several DOE sites and continues to be the contaminant of concern for the permanent disposal of nuclear waste. The mobility of plutonium is highly dependent on its redox distribution at its contamination source and along its potential migration pathways. This redox distribution is often controlled, especially in the near-surface where organic/inorganic contaminants often coexist, by the direct and indirect effects of microbial activity. The redox distribution of plutonium in the presence of facultative metal reducing bacteria (specifically Shewanella and Geobacter species) was established in a concurrent experimental and modeling study under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Pu(VI), although relatively soluble under oxidizing conditions at near-neutral pH, does not persist under a wide range of the oxic and anoxic conditions investigated in microbiologically active systems. Pu(V) complexes, which exhibit high chemical toxicity towards microorganisms, are relatively stable under oxic conditions but are reduced by metal reducing bacteria under anaerobic conditions. These facultative metal-reducing bacteria led to the rapid reduction of higher valent plutonium to form Pu(III/IV) species depending on nature of the starting plutonium species and chelating agents present in solution. Redox cycling of these lower oxidation states is likely a critical step in the formation of pseudo colloids that may lead to long-range subsurface transport. The CCBATCH biogeochemical model is used to explain the redox mechanisms and final speciation of the plutonium oxidation state distributions observed. These results for microbiologically active systems are interpreted in the context of their importance in defining the overall migration

  8. Impact of ArcA loss in Shewanella oneidensis revealed by comparative proteomics under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Jie; Wei, Buyun; Lipton, Mary S.; Gao, Haichun

    2012-06-01

    Shewanella inhabit a wide variety of niches in nature and can utilize a broad spectrum of electron acceptors under anaerobic conditions. How they modulate their gene expression to adapt is poorly understood. ArcA, homologue of a global regulator controlling hundreds of genes involved in aerobic and anaerobic respiration in E. coli, was shown to be important in aerobiosis/anaerobiosis of S. oneidensis as well. Loss of ArcA, in addition to altering transcription of many genes, resulted in impaired growth under aerobic condition, which was not observed in E. coli. To further characterize the impact of ArcA loss on gene expression on the level of proteome under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, liquid-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (LC-MS) based proteomic approach was employed. Results show that ArcA loss led to globally altered gene expression, generally consistent with that observed with transcripts. Comparison of transcriptomic and proteomic data permitted identification of 17 high-confidence ArcA targets. Moreover, our data indicate that ArcA is required for regulation of cytochrome c proteins, and the menaquinone level may play a role in regulating ArcA as in E. coli. Proteomic-data-guided growth assay revealed that the aerobic growth defect of ArcA mutant is presumably due to impaired peptide utilization.

  9. Electrolysis of trichloromethylated organic compounds under aerobic conditions catalyzed by the B12 model complex for ester and amide formation.

    PubMed

    Shimakoshi, Hisashi; Luo, Zhongli; Inaba, Takuya; Hisaeda, Yoshio

    2016-06-21

    The electrolysis of benzotrichloride at -0.9 V vs. Ag/AgCl in the presence of the B12 model complex, heptamethyl cobyrinate perchlorate, in ethanol under aerobic conditions using an undivided cell equipped with a platinum mesh cathode and a zinc plate anode produced ethylbenzoate in 56% yield with 92% selectivity. The corresponding esters were obtained when the electrolysis was carried out in various alcohols such as methanol, n-propanol, and i-propanol. Benzoyl chloride was detected by GC-MS during the electrolysis as an intermediate for the ester formation. When the electrolysis was carried out under anaerobic conditions, partially dechlorinated products, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloro-1,2-diphenylethane and 1,2-dichlorostilibenes (E and Z forms), were obtained instead of an ester. ESR spin-trapping experiments using 5,5,-dimethylpyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) revealed that the corresponding oxygen-centered radical and carbon-centered radical were steadily generated during the electrolyses under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. Applications of the aerobic electrolysis to various organic halides, such as substituted benzotrichlorides, are described. Furthermore, the formation of amides with moderate yields by the aerobic electrolysis of benzotrichloride catalyzed by the B12 model complex in the presence of amines in acetonitrile is reported. PMID:27071703

  10. Combined anaerobic-aerobic treatment of landfill leachates under mesophilic, submesophilic and psychrophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnyi, S; Gladchenko, M; Epov, A

    2003-01-01

    As a first step of treatment of landfill leachates (total COD--1,430-3,810 mg/l, total nitrogen 90-162 mg/l), a performance of laboratory UASB reactors has been investigated under mesophilic (30 degrees C), sub-mesophilic (20 degrees C) and psychrophilic (10 degrees C) conditions. Under hydraulic retention times (HRT) of around 7 h, when the average organic loading rates (OLR) were around 5 g COD/l/day, the total COD removal accounted for 81% (on the average) with the effluent concentrations close to anaerobic biodegradability limit (0.25 g COD/l) for mesophilic and sub-mesophilic regimes. The psychrophilic treatment conducted under the average HRT of 8 h and the average OLR of 4.22 g COD/l/day showed a total COD removal of 47% producing the effluents (0.75 g COD/l) more suitable for subsequent biological nitrogen removal. All three anaerobic regimes used for leachate treatment were quite efficient for elimination of heavy metals (Fe, Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd) by concomitant precipitation in the form of insoluble sulphides inside the sludge bed. The application of aerobic/anoxic biofilter as a sole polishing step for psychrophilic anaerobic effluents was acceptable for elimination of biodegradable COD and nitrogen approaching the current standards for direct discharge of treated wastewater. PMID:14640233

  11. Efficient production and secretion of pyruvate from Halomonas sp. KM-1 under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kawata, Yoshikazu; Nishimura, Taku; Matsushita, Isao; Tsubota, Jun

    2016-03-01

    The alkaliphilic, halophilic bacterium Halomonas sp. KM-1 can utilize both hexose and pentose sugars for the intracellular storage of bioplastic poly-(R)-3-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB) under aerobic conditions. In this study, we investigated the effects of the sodium nitrate concentration on PHB accumulation in the KM-1 strain. Unexpectedly, we observed the secretion of pyruvate, a central intermediate in carbon- and energy-metabolism processes in all organisms; therefore, pyruvate is widely used as a starting material in the industrial biosynthesis of pharmaceuticals and is employed for the production of crop-protection agents, polymers, cosmetics, and food additives. We then further analyzed pyruvate productivity following changes in culture temperature and the buffer concentration. In 48-h batch-cultivation experiments, we found that wild-type Halomonas sp. KM-1 secreted 63.3 g/L pyruvate at a rate of 1.32 g/(L·h), comparable to the results of former studies using mutant and recombinant microorganisms. Thus, these data provided important insights into the production of pyruvate using this novel strain. PMID:26989057

  12. Removal of estrogens in municipal wastewater treatment under aerobic and anaerobic conditions: consequences for plant optimization.

    PubMed

    Joss, Adriano; Andersen, Henrik; Ternes, Thomas; Richle, Philip R; Siegrist, Hansruedi

    2004-06-01

    The removal of estrogens (estrone E1, estradiol E2, and ethinylestradiol EE2) was studied in various municipal wastewater treatment processes equipped for nutrient removal. A biological degradation model is formulated, and kinetic parameters are evaluated with batch experiments under various redox conditions. The resulting model calculations are then compared with sampling campaigns performed on differenttypes of full-scale plant: conventional activated-sludge treatment, a membrane bioreactor, and a fixed-bed reactor. The results show a > 90% removal of all estrogens in the activated sludge processes. (Due to the analytical quantification limit and low influent concentrations, however, this removal efficiency represents only an observable minimum.) The removal efficiencies of 77% and > or = 90% for E1 and E2, respectively, in the fixed-bed reactor represent a good performance in view of the short hydraulic retention time of 35 min. The first-order removal-rate constant in batch experiments observed for E2 varied from 150 to 950 d(-1) for a 1 gSS L(-1) sludge suspension. The removal efficiency of E1 and EE2 clearly depends on the redox conditions, the maximum removal rate occurring under aerobic conditions when E1 was reduced to E2. Sampling campaigns on full-scale plants indicate that the kinetic values identified in batch experiments (without substrate addition) for the natural estrogens may overestimate the actual removal rates. Although this paper does not give direct experimental evidence, it seems that the substrate present in the raw influent competitively inhibits the degradation of E1 and E2. These compounds are therefore removed mainly in activated sludge compartments with low substrate loading. Theoretical evaluation leads us to expect that diffusive mass transfer inside the floc (but not across the laminar boundary layer) appreciably influences the observed degradation rates of E1 and E2, but not of EE2. PMID:15224734

  13. Effects of redox conditions on the adsorption of dissolved organic matter to soil minerals and differently aged paddy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauerwein, Meike; Hanke, Alexander; Kaiser, Klaus; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2010-05-01

    Effects of redox conditions on the adsorption of dissolved organic matter to soil minerals and differently aged paddy soils Meike Sauerwein1, Alexander Hanke2, Klaus Kaiser3, Karsten Kalbitz2 1) Dept. of Soil Ecology, Bayreuth Centre of Ecology and Environmental Research (BayCEER), University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth, Germany, meike.sauerwein@gmail.com 2) Institute of ecosystem dynamics and biodiversity, University of Amsterdam, 1018 WV, Netherlands, a.hanke@uva.nl, k.kalbitz@uva.nl 3) Soil Sciences, Martin Luther University Halle, 06099 Halle, Germany, klaus.kaiser@landw.uni-halle.de Current knowledge on dissolved organic matter (DOM) in soils is based mainly on observations and experiments in aerobic environments. Adsorption to soil minerals is an important mechanism of DOM retention and stabilization against microbial decay under oxic conditions. Under anoxic conditions where hydrous iron oxides, the potential main adsorbents of DOM, possibly dissolve, the importance of adsorption seems questionable. Therefore, we studied the adsorption of DOM to selected soil minerals and to mineral soils under oxic and anoxic conditions. In detail, we tested the following hypotheses: 1. Minerals and soils adsorb less DOM under anoxic conditions than under oxic ones. 2. The reduced adsorption under anoxic conditions is result of the smaller adsorption to hydrous Fe oxides whereas adsorption to clay minerals and Al hydroxides is not sensitive to changes in redox conditions 3. DOM adsorption will increase with the number of redox cycles, thus time of soil formation, due to increasing contents of poorly crystalline Fe oxides. This will, however, cause a stronger sensitivity to redox changes as poor crystalline Fe oxides are more reactive. 4. Aromatic compounds, being preferentially adsorbed under oxic conditions, will be less strongly adsorbed under anoxic conditions. We chose paddy soils as models because their periodically and regular exposure to changing redox cycles, with

  14. Dissolved organic matter removal during coal slag additive soil aquifer treatment for secondary effluent recharging: Contribution of aerobic biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Liangliang; Li, Siliang; Noguera, Daniel R; Qin, Kena; Jiang, Junqiu; Zhao, Qingliang; Kong, Xiangjuan; Cui, Fuyi

    2015-06-01

    Recycling wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent at low cost via the soil aquifer treatment (SAT), which has been considered as a renewable approach in regenerating potable and non-potable water, is welcome in arid and semi-arid regions throughout the world. In this study, the effect of a coal slag additive on the bulk removal of the dissolved organic matter (DOM) in WWTP effluent during SAT operation was explored via the matrix configurations of both coal slag layer and natural soil layer. Azide inhibition and XAD-resins fractionation experiments indicated that the appropriate configuration designing of an upper soil layer (25 cm) and a mixture of soil/coal slag underneath would enhance the removal efficiency of adsorption and anaerobic biodegradation to the same level as that of aerobic biodegradation (31.7% vs 32.2%), while it was only 29.4% compared with the aerobic biodegradation during traditional 50 cm soil column operation. The added coal slag would preferentially adsorb the hydrophobic DOM, and those adsorbed organics could be partially biodegraded by the biomass within the SAT systems. Compared with the relatively lower dissolved organic carbon (DOC), ultraviolet light adsorption at 254 nm (UV-254) and trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) removal rate of the original soil column (42.0%, 32.9%, and 28.0%, respectively), SSL2 and SSL4 columns would enhance the bulk removal efficiency to more than 60%. Moreover, a coal slag additive in the SAT columns could decline the aromatic components (fulvic-like organics and tryptophan-like proteins) significantly. PMID:25845997

  15. Comparative studies on heavy metal uptake by plants from anaerobically and aerobically digested sludge-amended soil

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, K.T.

    1983-01-01

    A study was undertaken to compare and contrast the effects of cropland application of varying quantities of anaerobically and aerobically digested sludge from a municipal wastewater treatment plant, on the uptake of certain heavy metals such as Zn, Cd, Cu, Ni, and Pb by six different types of plants (bean, tomato, carrot, cucumber, cantaloupe and sweet corn) grown on the sludge-applied soil and the accumulation of these metals in the sludge-amended soil. The main aspects of the study were the evaluation of 1) the extent of bioconcentration of heavy metals by the different kinds of plants, and 2) the availability of the metals from soil to plants, following sludge application. Field investigations involving plot-scale gardening were conducted using the two types of sludge, at application rates of 0, 2.2, 4.4, 8.8, 17.6 and 70.4 tons/acre. At application rates of 17.6 and 70.4 tons/acre, delays in germination of seeds were observed in some instances, with no apparent adverse effects on the plant's later stages of life and the yield produced. The uptake of heavy metals from sludge-amended soil by plants did not increase in direct proportion to the increase in rate of sludge application and plant species differ considerably in their uptake of heavy metals from soil which received the same amount of sludge. In general, plants grown on anaerobically digested sludge-applied soil showed higher uptake of heavy metals than those grown on aerobically digested sludge. Among the plants investigated, sweet corn was identified to be the low accumulator of heavy metals in the edible part of the plant.

  16. Ecology of the Microbial Community Removing Phosphate from Wastewater under Continuously Aerobic Conditions in a Sequencing Batch Reactor▿

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Johwan; Schroeder, Sarah; Beer, Michael; McIlroy, Simon; Bayly, Ronald C.; May, John W.; Vasiliadis, George; Seviour, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    All activated sludge systems for removing phosphate microbiologically are configured so the biomass is cycled continuously through alternating anaerobic and aerobic zones. This paper describes a novel aerobic process capable of decreasing the amount of phosphate from 10 to 12 mg P liter−1 to less than 0.1 mg P liter−1 (when expressed as phosphorus) over an extended period from two wastewaters with low chemical oxygen demand. One wastewater was synthetic, and the other was a clarified effluent from a conventional activated sludge system. Unlike anaerobic/aerobic enhanced biological phosphate removal (EBPR) processes where the organic substrates and the phosphate are supplied simultaneously to the biomass under anaerobic conditions, in this aerobic process, the addition of acetate, which begins the feed stage, is temporally separated from the addition of phosphate, which begins the famine stage. Conditions for establishing this process in a sequencing batch reactor are detailed, together with a description of the changes in poly-β-hydroxyalkanoate (PHA) and poly(P) levels in the biomass occurring under the feed and famine regimes, which closely resemble those reported in anaerobic/aerobic EBPR processes. Profiles obtained with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis were very similar for communities fed both wastewaters, and once established, these communities remained stable over prolonged periods of time. 16S rRNA-based clone libraries generated from the two communities were also very similar. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)/microautoradiography and histochemical staining revealed that “Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis” bacteria were the dominant poly(P)-accumulating organisms (PAO) in both communities, with the phenotype expected for PAO. FISH also identified large numbers of betaproteobacterial Dechloromonas and alphaproteobacterial tetrad-forming organisms related to Defluviicoccus in both communities, but while these organisms assimilated

  17. Physiological activities associated with biofilm growth in attached and suspended growth bioreactors under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Naz, Iffat; Seher, Shama; Perveen, Irum; Saroj, Devendra P; Ahmed, Safia

    2015-01-01

    This research work evaluated the biofilm succession on stone media and compared the biochemical changes of sludge in attached and suspended biological reactors operated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Stones incubated (30±2°C) with activated sludge showed a constant increase in biofilm weight up to the fifth and seventh week time under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively, where after reduction (>80%) the most probable number index of pathogen indicators on ninth week was recorded. Reduction in parameters such as biological oxygen demand (BOD) (47.7%), chemical oxygen demand (COD, 41%), nitrites (60.2%), nitrates (105.5%) and phosphates (58.9%) and increase in dissolved oxygen (176.5%) of sludge were higher in aerobic attached growth reactors as compared with other settings. While, considerable reductions in these values were also observed (BOD, 53.8%; COD, 2.8%; nitrites, 28.6%; nitrates, 31.7%; phosphates, 41.4%) in the suspended growth system under anaerobic conditions. However, higher sulphate removal was observed in suspended (40.9% and 54.9%) as compared with biofilm reactors (28.2% and 29.3%). Six weeks biofilm on the stone media showed maximum physiological activities; thus, the operational conditions should be controlled to keep the biofilm structure similar to six-week-old biofilm, and can be used in fixed biofilm reactors for wastewater treatment. PMID:25609155

  18. Modeling the influence of varying hydraulic conditions on aerobic respiration and denitrification in the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauth, N.; Schmidt, C.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    Exchange of water and solutes across the stream-sediment interface is an important control for biogeochemical transformations in the hyporheic zone (HZ) with measurable impacts on nutrient cycling and solute attenuation in fluvial systems. Here we investigate the interplay between turbulent stream flow and HZ flow under various hydraulic conditions applied to two cases: a) three-dimensional generic pool-riffle sequences with different morphological properties, and b) a real mid-stream gravel-bar. Stream flow is simulated by the open source computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software OpenFOAM which provides the hydraulic head distribution at the streambed. It is sequentially coupled to the top of the groundwater model code MIN3P, simulating flow, solute transport, aerobic respiration (AR) and denitrification (DN) in the HZ. Flow in the HZ is directly influenced by the hydraulic head distribution at the streambed surface and the ambient groundwater flow. Three reactive transport scenarios are considered: 1) stream water as the primary source of dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrate (NO3) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), 2) upwelling groundwater as an additionally source of NO3, and 3) upwelling groundwater as an additional source of DO in various concentrations. Results show an increase in hyporheic exchange flow for increasing stream discharge with a concurrent decrease in residence time. The fraction of circulating stream water through the HZ is in the range of 1x10-5 to 1x10-6 per unit stream length, decreasing with increasing discharge. Ambient groundwater flow in both the up- and downwelling direction diminishes significantly the hyporheic exchange flow and extent. Biogeochemical processes in the HZ are strongly controlled by ambient groundwater flow, even more so than by changes in stream discharge. AR and DN efficiencies of the HZ are significantly reduced by up- and downwelling groundwater and are positively correlated with median residence times. AR occurs in

  19. Chromium isotopic fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by Bacillus sp. under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fen; Ma, Teng; Zhou, Lian; Hu, Zhifang; Shi, Liu

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the fractionation of chromium isotopes during chromium reduction by Bacillus sp. under aerobic condition, variable carbon source (glucose) concentration (0, 0.1, 1, 2.5 and 10mM), and incubation temperatures (4, 15, 25 and 37°C). The results revealed that the δ(53)Cr values in the residual Cr(VI) increased with the degree of Cr reduction, and followed a Rayleigh fractionation model. The addition of glucose only slightly affected cell-specific Cr(VI) reduction rates (cSRR). However, the value of ε (2.00±0.21‰) in the experiments with different concentrations of glucose (0.1, 1, 2.5 and 10mM) was smaller than that from the experiment without glucose (3.74±0.16‰). The results indicated that the cell-specific reduction rate is not the sole control on the degree of isotopic fractionation, and different metabolic pathways would result in differing degrees of Cr isotopic fractionation. The cSRR decreased with decreasing temperature, showing that the values of ε were 7.62±0.36‰, 4.59±0.28‰, 3.09±0.16‰ and 1.99±0.23‰ at temperatures of 4, 15, 25 and 37°C, respectively. It shown that increasing cSRR linked to decreasing fractionations has been associated with increasing temperatures. Overall, our results revealed that temperature is a primary factor affecting Cr isotopic fractionation under microbial actions. PMID:25777078

  20. A Model of the Cardiorespiratory Response to Aerobic Exercise in Healthy and Heart Failure Conditions.

    PubMed

    Fresiello, Libera; Meyns, Bart; Di Molfetta, Arianna; Ferrari, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    The physiological response to physical exercise is now recognized as an important tool which can aid the diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. This is due to the fact that several mechanisms are needed to accommodate a higher cardiac output and a higher oxygen delivery to tissues. The aim of the present work is to provide a fully closed loop cardiorespiratory simulator reproducing the main physiological mechanisms which arise during aerobic exercise. The simulator also provides a representation of the impairments of these mechanisms in heart failure condition and their effect on limiting exercise capacity. The simulator consists of a cardiovascular model including the left and right heart, pulmonary and systemic circulations. This latter is split into exercising and non-exercising regions and is controlled by the baroreflex and metabolic mechanisms. In addition, the simulator includes a respiratory model reproducing the gas exchange in lungs and tissues, the ventilation control and the effects of its mechanics on the cardiovascular system. The simulator was tested and compared to the data in the literature at three different workloads whilst cycling (25, 49 and 73 watts). The results show that the simulator is able to reproduce the response to exercise in terms of: heart rate (from 67 to 134 bpm), cardiac output (from 5.3 to 10.2 l/min), leg blood flow (from 0.7 to 3.0 l/min), peripheral resistance (from 0.9 to 0.5 mmHg/(cm(3)/s)), central arteriovenous oxygen difference (from 4.5 to 10.8 ml/dl) and ventilation (6.1-25.5 l/min). The simulator was further adapted to reproduce the main impairments observed in heart failure condition, such as reduced sensitivity of baroreflex and metabolic controls, lower perfusion to the exercising regions (from 0.6 to 1.4 l/min) and hyperventilation (from 9.2 to 40.2 l/min). The simulator we developed is a useful tool for the description of the basic physiological mechanisms operating during exercise. It can reproduce

  1. A Model of the Cardiorespiratory Response to Aerobic Exercise in Healthy and Heart Failure Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fresiello, Libera; Meyns, Bart; Di Molfetta, Arianna; Ferrari, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    The physiological response to physical exercise is now recognized as an important tool which can aid the diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. This is due to the fact that several mechanisms are needed to accommodate a higher cardiac output and a higher oxygen delivery to tissues. The aim of the present work is to provide a fully closed loop cardiorespiratory simulator reproducing the main physiological mechanisms which arise during aerobic exercise. The simulator also provides a representation of the impairments of these mechanisms in heart failure condition and their effect on limiting exercise capacity. The simulator consists of a cardiovascular model including the left and right heart, pulmonary and systemic circulations. This latter is split into exercising and non-exercising regions and is controlled by the baroreflex and metabolic mechanisms. In addition, the simulator includes a respiratory model reproducing the gas exchange in lungs and tissues, the ventilation control and the effects of its mechanics on the cardiovascular system. The simulator was tested and compared to the data in the literature at three different workloads whilst cycling (25, 49 and 73 watts). The results show that the simulator is able to reproduce the response to exercise in terms of: heart rate (from 67 to 134 bpm), cardiac output (from 5.3 to 10.2 l/min), leg blood flow (from 0.7 to 3.0 l/min), peripheral resistance (from 0.9 to 0.5 mmHg/(cm3/s)), central arteriovenous oxygen difference (from 4.5 to 10.8 ml/dl) and ventilation (6.1–25.5 l/min). The simulator was further adapted to reproduce the main impairments observed in heart failure condition, such as reduced sensitivity of baroreflex and metabolic controls, lower perfusion to the exercising regions (from 0.6 to 1.4 l/min) and hyperventilation (from 9.2 to 40.2 l/min). The simulator we developed is a useful tool for the description of the basic physiological mechanisms operating during exercise. It can reproduce

  2. BIODEGRADATION KINETICS AND TOXICITY OF VEGETABLE OIL TRIACYLGLYCEROLS UNDER AEROBIC CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aerobic biodegradation of five triacylglycerols (TAGs), three liquids [triolein (OOO), trilinolein (LLL), and trilinolenin (LnLnLn)] and two solids [tripalmitin (PPP) and tristearin (SSS)] was studied in water. Respirometry tests were designed and conducted to determine the b...

  3. Effects of Aerobic and Microaerobic Conditions on Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing (Anammox) Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Strous, M.; Van Gerven, E.; Kuenen, J. G.; Jetten, M.

    1997-01-01

    The anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) process is a promising novel option for removing nitrogen from wastewater. In this study it was shown that the Anammox process was inhibited reversibly by the presence of oxygen. Furthermore, aerobic nitrifiers were shown not to play an important role in the Anammox process. PMID:16535633

  4. EFFECTS OF AEROBIC CONDITIONING ON CARDIOVASCULAR SYMPATHETIC RESPONSE TO AND RECOVERY FROM CHALLENGE

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, M; Alex, C; Shapiro, PA; McKinley, PS; Brondolo, EN; Myers, MM; Choi, CJ; Lopez-Pintado, S; Sloan, RP

    2013-01-01

    Objective Exercise has widely-documented cardioprotective effects but the mechanisms behind these effects are still poorly understood. Here, we test the hypothesis that aerobic training lowers cardiovascular sympathetic responses to and speeds recovery from challenge. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled trial contrasting aerobic versus strength training on indices of cardiac (pre-ejection period, PEP) and vascular (low-frequency blood pressure variability, LF-BPV) sympathetic responses to and recovery from psychological and orthostatic challenge in 149 young, healthy and sedentary adults. Results Aerobic and strength training did not alter PEP or LF-BPV reactivity to or recovery from challenge. Conclusions These findings, from a large randomized controlled trial using an intent-to-treat design, show that moderate aerobic exercise training has no effect on PEP and LF BPV reactivity to or recovery from psychological or orthostatic challenge. In healthy young adults, the cardioprotective effects of exercise training are unlikely to be mediated by changes in sympathetic activity. PMID:23889039

  5. Aerobic rice mechanization: techniques for crop establishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusairy, K. M.; Ayob, H.; Chan, C. S.; Fauzi, M. I. Mohamed; Mohamad Fakhrul, Z. O.; Shahril Shah, G. S. M.; Azlan, O.; Rasad, M. A.; Hashim, A. M.; Arshad, Z.; E, E. Ibrahim; Saifulizan, M. N.

    2015-12-01

    Rice being the staple food crops, hundreds of land races in it makes the diversity of rice crops. Aerobic rice production was introduced which requires much less water input to safeguard and sustain the rice production and conserve water due to decreasing water resources, climatic changes and competition from urban and industrial users. Mechanization system plays an important role for the success of aerobic rice cultivation. All farming activities for aerobic rice production are run on aerobic soil conditions. Row seeder mechanization system is developed to replace conventional seeding technique on the aerobic rice field. It is targeted for small and the large scale aerobic rice farmers. The aero - seeder machine is used for the small scale aerobic rice field, while the accord - seeder is used for the large scale aerobic rice field. The use of this mechanization machine can eliminate the tedious and inaccurate seeding operations reduce labour costs and increases work rate. The machine is easy to operate and it can increase crop establishment rate. It reduce missing hill, increasing planting and crop with high yield can be produce. This machine is designed for low costs maintenance and it is easy to dismantle and assemble during maintenance and it is safe to be used.

  6. Quantification of aerobic biodegradation and volatilization rates of gasoline hydrocarbons near the water table under natural attenuation conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lahvis, M.A.; Baehr, A.L.; Baker, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    Aerobic biodegradation and volatilization near the water table constitute a coupled pathway that contributes significantly to the natural attenuation of hydrocarbons at gasoline spill sites. Rates of hydrocarbon biodegradation and volatilization were quantified by analyzing vapor transport in the unsaturated zone at a gasoline spill site in Beaufort, South Carolina. Aerobic biodegradation rates decreased with distance above the water table, ranging from 0.20 to 1.5g m-3 d-1 for toluene, from 0.24 to 0.38 g m-3 d-1 for xylene, from 0.09 to 0.24 g m-3 d-1 for cyclohexene, from 0.05 to 0.22 g m-3 d-1 for ethylbenzene, and from 0.02 to 0.08 g m-3 d-1 for benzene. Rates were highest in the capillary zone, where 68% of the total hydrocarbon mass that volatilized from the water table was estimated to have been biodegraded. Hydrocarbons were nearly completely degraded within 1 m above the water table. This large loss underscores the importance of aerobic biodegradation in limiting the transport of hydrocarbon vapors in the unsaturated zone and implies that vapor-plume migration to basements and other points of contact may only be significant if a source of free product is present. Furthermore, because transport of the hydrocarbon in the unsaturated zone can be limited relative to that of oxygen and carbon dioxide, soil, gas surveys conducted at hydrocarbon-spill sites would benefit by the inclusion of oxygen- and carbon-dioxide-gas concentration measurements. Aerobic degradation kinetics in the unsaturated zone were approximately first-order. First-order rate constants near the water table were highest for cyctohexene (0.21-0.65 d-1) and nearly equivalent for ethylbenzene (0.11-20.31 d-1), xylenes (0.10-0.31 d-1), toluene (0.09-0.30 d-1), and benzene (0.07,0.31 d-1). Hydrocarbon mass loss rates at the water table resulting from the coupled aerobic biodegradation and volatilization process were determined by extrapolating gas transport rates through the capillary zone. Mass

  7. Biodegradation of explosives mixture in soil under different water-content conditions.

    PubMed

    Sagi-Ben Moshe, S; Dahan, O; Weisbrod, N; Bernstein, A; Adar, E; Ronen, Z

    2012-02-15

    Soil redox potential plays a key role in the rates and pathways of explosives degradation, and is highly influenced by water content and microbial activity. Soil redox potential can vary significantly both temporally and spatially in micro-sites. In this study, when soil water content increased, the redox potential decreased, and there was significant enhancement in the biodegradation of a mixture of three explosives. Whereas TNT degradation occurred under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, RDX and HMX degradation occurred only when water content conditions resulted in a prolonged period of negative redox potential. Moreover, under unsaturated conditions, which are more representative of real environmental conditions, the low redox potential, even when measured for temporary periods, was sufficient to facilitate anaerobic degradation. Our results clearly indicate a negative influence of TNT on the biodegradation of RDX and HMX, but this effect was less pronounced than that found in previous slurry batch experiments: this can be explained by a masking effect of the soil in the canisters. Fully or partially saturated soils can promote the existence of micro-niches that differ considerably in their explosives concentration, microbial community and redox conditions. PMID:22226717

  8. Cu-Catalyzed Consecutive Hydroxylation and Aerobic Oxidative Cycloetherification under Microwave Conditions: Entry to 2-Arylbenzofuran-3-carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tianlong; Zhang, Ensheng; Wang, Dejian; Wang, Yan; Zou, Yong

    2015-05-01

    A convenient one-pot synthesis of 2-arylbenzofuran-3-carboxylic acids from (E)-2-(2-bromophenyl)-3-phenylacrylic acids via Cu-catalyzed consecutive hydroxylation and aerobic oxidative cycloetherification under microwave conditions has been developed. This protocol employed the reagent combination of Cu(OAc)2, 1,10-phen, and KOH in DMSO/H2O (1:1), all of which are cost-effective, readily available, and easily removable from the reaction mixture. Utilizing this synthetic protocol, various 2-arylbenzofuran-3-carboxylic acids as well as the natural product moracin M have been synthesized in satisfactory yields under mild conditions. PMID:25836742

  9. Molecular characterization of a microbial consortium involved in methane oxidation coupled to denitrification under micro-aerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingjing; Sun, Faqian; Wang, Liang; Ju, Xi; Wu, Weixiang; Chen, Yingxu

    2014-01-01

    Methane can be used as an alternative carbon source in biological denitrification because it is nontoxic, widely available and relatively inexpensive. A microbial consortium involved in methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (MOD) was enriched with nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors under micro-aerobic conditions. The 16S rRNA gene combined with pmoA phylogeny of methanotrophs and nirK phylogeny of denitrifiers were analysed to reveal the dominant microbial populations and functional microorganisms. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction results showed high numbers of methanotrophs and denitrifiers in the enriched consortium. The 16S rRNA gene clone library revealed that Methylococcaceae and Methylophilaceae were the dominant populations in the MOD ecosystem. Phylogenetic analyses of pmoA gene clone libraries indicated that all methanotrophs belonged to Methylococcaceae, a type I methanotroph employing the ribulose monophosphate pathway for methane oxidation. Methylotrophic denitrifiers of the Methylophilaceae that can utilize organic intermediates (i.e. formaldehyde, citrate and acetate) released from the methanotrophs played a vital role in aerobic denitrification. This study is the first report to confirm micro-aerobic denitrification and to make phylogenetic and functional assignments for some members of the microbial assemblages involved in MOD. PMID:24245852

  10. Respiratory Response of Roots to Heterogeneous Soil Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Individual plant roots are frequently exposed to wide ranges of soil conditions. For example, in summer, soil temperatures near the soil surface may vary from 10-20 C at night to over 40 C during the day, while soil moisture may vary from saturation following a heavy rain to almost completely dry i...

  11. Transport of gadolinium- and arsenic-based pharmaceuticals in saturated soil under various redox conditions.

    PubMed

    Menahem, Adi; Dror, Ishai; Berkowitz, Brian

    2016-02-01

    The release of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) to the soil-water environment necessitates understanding of PPCP transport behavior under conditions that account for dynamic flow and varying redox states. This study investigates the transport of two organometallic PPCPs, Gd-DTPA and roxarsone (arsenic compound) and their metal salts (Gd(NO3)3, AsNaO2); Gd-DTPA is used widely as a contrasting agent for MRI, while roxarsone is applied extensively as a food additive in the broiler poultry industry. Here, we present column experiments using sand and Mediterranean red sandy clay soil, performed under several redox conditions. The metal salts were almost completely immobile. In contrast, transport of Gd-DTPA and roxarsone was affected by the soil type. Roxarsone was also affected by the different redox conditions, showing delayed breakthrough curves as the redox potential became more negative due to biological activity (chemically-strong reducing conditions did not affect the transport). Mechanisms that include adsorptive retardation for aerobic and nitrate-reducing conditions, and non-adsorptive retardation for iron-reducing, sulfate-reducing and biologically-strong reducing conditions, are suggested to explain the roxarsone behavior. Gd-DTPA is found to be a stable complex, with potential for high mobility in groundwater systems, whereas roxarsone transport through groundwater systems is affected by redox environments, demonstrating high mobility under aerobic and nitrate-reducing conditions and delayed transport under iron-reducing, sulfate-reducing and biologically-strong reducing conditions. PMID:26408978

  12. Bacterially Induced Dolomite Formation in the Presence of Sulfate Ions under Aerobic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Roman, M.; McKenzie, J. A.; Vasconcelos, C.; Rivadeneyra, M.

    2005-12-01

    The origin of dolomite remains a long-standing enigma in sedimentary geology because, although thermodynamically favorable, precipitation of dolomite from modern seawater does not occur. Experiments conducted at elevated temperatures (200 oC) indicated that the presence of small concentrations of sulfate ions inhibits the transformation of calcite to dolomite [1]. Indeed, sulfate ions appeared to inhibit dolomite formation above 2 mM concentration (versus 28 mM in modern seawater). Recently, culture experiments have demonstrated that sulfate-reducing bacteria mediate the precipitation of dolomite at Earth surface conditions in the presence of sustained sulfate ion concentrations [2,3]. Additionally, in a number of modern hypersaline environments, dolomite forms from solutions with high sulfate ion concentrations (2 to 70 times seawater). These observations suggest that the experimentally observed sulfate-ion inhibition [1] may not apply to all ancient dolomite formation. Here, we report aerobic culture experiments conducted at low temperatures (25 and 35 oC) and variable sulfate ion concentrations (0, 0.5, 1 and 2 x seawater values) using moderately halophilic bacteria, Halomonas meridiana. After an incubation period of 15 days, experiments at 35 oC with variable sulfate ion concentrations (0, 0.5 x and seawater values) contained crystals of Ca-dolomite and stochiometric dolomite. The experiment at 35 oC with 2 x seawater sulfate ion concentration produced dolomite crystals after 20 days of incubation. In a parallel set of experiments at 25 oC, precipitation of dolomite was observed after 25 days of incubation in cultures with variable sulfate ion concentrations (0, 0.5 x and seawater values). In the culture with 2 x seawater sulfate ion concentration, dolomite crystals were observed after 30 days. Our study demonstrates that halophilic bacteria (or heterotrophic microorganisms), which do not require sulfate ions for metabolism, can mediate dolomite precipitation

  13. Lignin decomposition and microbial community in paddy soils: effects of alternating redox conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerli, Chiara; Liu, Qin; Hanke, Alexander; Kaiser, Klaus; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2013-04-01

    Paddy soils are characterised by interchanging cycles of anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Such fluctuations cause continuous changes in soil solution chemistry as well as in the composition and physiological responses of the microbial community. Temporary deficiency in oxygen creates conditions favourable to facultative or obligates anaerobic bacteria, while aerobic communities can thrive in the period of water absence. These alterations can strongly affect soil processes, in particular organic matter (OM) accumulation and mineralization. In submerged soils, lignin generally constitutes a major portion of the total OM because of hampered degradation under anoxic conditions. The alternating redox cycles resulting from paddy soil management might promote both degradation and preservation of lignin, affecting the overall composition and reactivity of total and dissolved OM. We sampled soils subjected to cycles of anoxic (rice growing period) and oxic (harvest and growth of other crops) conditions since 700 and 2000 years. We incubated suspended Ap material, sampled from the two paddy plus two corresponding non-paddy control soils under oxic and anoxic condition, for 3 months, interrupted by a short period of three weeks (from day 21 to day 43) with reversed redox conditions. At each sampling time (day 2, 21, 42, 63, 84), we determined lignin-derived phenols (by CuO oxidation) as well as phospholipids fatty acids contents and composition. We aimed to highlight changes in lignin decomposition as related to the potential rapid changes in microbial community composition. Since the studied paddy soils had a long history of wet rice cultivation, the microbial community should be well adapted to interchanging oxic and anoxic cycles, therefore fully expressing its activity at both conditions. In non-paddy soil changes in redox conditions caused modification of quantity and composition of the microbial community. On the contrary, in well-established paddy soils the microbial

  14. Construction of CoA-dependent 1-butanol synthetic pathway functions under aerobic conditions in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Naoya; Vangnai, Alisa S; Pongtharangkul, Thunyarat; Tajima, Takahisa; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Kato, Junichi

    2015-06-20

    1-Butanol is an important industrial platform chemical and an advanced biofuel. While various groups have attempted to construct synthetic pathways for 1-butanol production, efforts to construct a pathway that functions under aerobic conditions have met with limited success. Here, we constructed a CoA-dependent 1-butanol synthetic pathway that functions under aerobic conditions in Escherichia coli, by expanding the previously reported (R)-1,3-butanediol synthetic pathway. The pathway consists of phaA (acetyltransferase) and phaB (NADPH-dependent acetoacetyl-CoA reductase) from Ralstonia eutropha, phaJ ((R)-specific enoyl-CoA hydratase) from Aeromonas caviae, ter (trans-enoyl-CoA reductase) from Treponema denticola, bld (butylraldehyde dehydrogenase) from Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum, and inherent alcohol dehydrogenase(s) from E. coli. To evaluate the potential of this pathway for 1-butanol production, culture conditions, including volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (kLa) and pH were optimized in a mini-jar fermenter. Under optimal conditions, 1-butanol was produced at a concentration of up to 8.60gL(-1) after 46h of fed-batch cultivation. PMID:25865277

  15. Aerobic biotransformation of N-nitrosodimethylamine and N-nitrodimethylamine in methane and benzene amended soil columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidhaas, Jennifer; Dupont, R. Ryan

    2013-07-01

    Aerobic biotransformation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), an emerging contaminant of concern, and its structural analog N-nitrodimethylamine (DMN), was evaluated in benzene and methane amended groundwater passed through laboratory scale soil columns. Competitive inhibition models were used to model the kinetics for NDMA and DMN cometabolism accounting for the concurrent degradation of the growth and cometabolic substrates. Transformation capacities for NDMA and DMN with benzene (13 and 23 μg (mg cells)- 1) and methane (0.14 and 8.4 μg (mg cells)- 1) grown cultures, respectively are comparable to those presented in the literature, as were first order endogenous decay rates estimated to be 2.1 × 10- 2 ± 1.7 × 10- 3 d- 1 and 6.5 × 10- 1 ± 7.1 × 10- 1 d- 1 for the methane and benzene amended cultures, respectively. These studies highlight possible attenuation mechanisms and rates for NDMA and DMN biotransformation in aerobic aquifers undergoing active remediation, natural attenuation or managed aquifer recharge with treated wastewater (i.e., reclaimed water).

  16. Whole-Genome Transcriptional Analysis of Chemolithoautotrophic Thiosulfate Oxidation by Thiobacillus denitrificans Under Aerobic vs. Denitrifying Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, H R; Letain, T E; Chakicherla, A; Kane, S R; Legler, T C; Coleman, M A

    2006-04-22

    Thiobacillus denitrificans is one of the few known obligate chemolithoautotrophic bacteria capable of energetically coupling thiosulfate oxidation to denitrification as well as aerobic respiration. As very little is known about the differential expression of genes associated with ke chemolithoautotrophic functions (such as sulfur-compound oxidation and CO2 fixation) under aerobic versus denitrifying conditions, we conducted whole-genome, cDNA microarray studies to explore this topic systematically. The microarrays identified 277 genes (approximately ten percent of the genome) as differentially expressed using Robust Multi-array Average statistical analysis and a 2-fold cutoff. Genes upregulated (ca. 6- to 150-fold) under aerobic conditions included a cluster of genes associated with iron acquisition (e.g., siderophore-related genes), a cluster of cytochrome cbb3 oxidase genes, cbbL and cbbS (encoding the large and small subunits of form I ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, or RubisCO), and multiple molecular chaperone genes. Genes upregulated (ca. 4- to 95-fold) under denitrifying conditions included nar, nir, and nor genes (associated respectively with nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and nitric oxide reductase, which catalyze successive steps of denitrification), cbbM (encoding form II RubisCO), and genes involved with sulfur-compound oxidation (including two physically separated but highly similar copies of sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase and of dsrC, associated with dissimilatory sulfite reductase). Among genes associated with denitrification, relative expression levels (i.e., degree of upregulation with nitrate) tended to decrease in the order nar > nir > nor > nos. Reverse transcription, quantitative PCR analysis was used to validate these trends.

  17. A laboratory study of the bioremediation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene-contaminated soil using aerobic/anoxic soil slurry reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathy, R.; Manning, J.; Kulpa, C. F.; Environmental Research; Univ. of Notre Dame

    1998-01-01

    The successful operation of an aerobic/anoxic laboratory-scale soil slurry reactor showed that soil contaminated with 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-l,3,5-trinitro-l,3,5-triazine (RDX) could be treated in batches or semicontinuously. Batch treatment resulted in the transformation of TNT. Semicontinuous treatment resulted in complete degradation of TNT. In addition to removing TNT, the slurry reactor also removed contaminants such as trinitrobenzene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, RDX, and octahydro-l,3,5,7-tetranitro-l,3,5,7-tetraazocine (HMX). Radiolabeled TNT incubated with reactor biomass showed that 23% of [{sup 14}C]TNT was mineralized, 27% was converted to biomass, and 8% was adsorbed onto the soil. The rest of the [{sup 14}C]TNT was accounted for as metabolites, including a ring cleavage product identified as 2,3-butanediol. Increasing the frequency of soil addition from once to two or three times weekly did not affect the TNT removal rates. The soil slurry reactor also maintained the bacterial population fairly well, needing only 0.3% molasses as a cosubstrate.

  18. Investigating the effects of anaerobic and aerobic post-treatment on quality and stability of organic fraction of municipal solid waste as soil amendment.

    PubMed

    Abdullahi, Y A; Akunna, J C; White, N A; Hallett, P D; Wheatley, R

    2008-12-01

    The use of OFMSW for biogas and compost production is considered as a sustainable strategy in saving valuable landfill space while producing valuable product for soil application. This study examines the effects of anaerobic and aerobic post-treatment of OFMSW on the stability of anaerobic digestate and compost and soil quality using seed germination tests. Anaerobic digestion of OFMSW was carried out for fifteen days after which the residual anaerobic digestate was subjected to aerobic post-treatment for seventy days. Seed germination tests showed that fresh feedstock and digestates collected during anaerobic digestion and during the early stages of aerobic post-treatment were phytotoxic. However, phytotoxic effects were not observed in soils amended with the fully stabilised anaerobic digestate compost, ADC. It was also found that seed germination increases with dilution and incubation time, suggesting that lower soil application rates and longer lag periods between soil application of ADC and planting can reduce the amount of biodegradable organics in the ADC, thus enhancing the benefits of ADC as soil amendment. PMID:18511266

  19. Interaction between phosphorus removal and hybrid granular sludge formation under low hydraulic selection pressure at alternating anaerobic/aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Lang, Longqi; Wan, Junfeng; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Jie; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The hybrid granular sludge (HGS) formation and its performances on phosphorus removal were investigated in a sequencing batch airlift reactor. Under conditions of low superficial air velocity (SAV = 0.68 cm s(-1)) and relatively long settling time (15-30 min), aerobic granules appeared and coexisted with bio-flocs after 120 days operation. At the stable phase, 54% of total suspended solid (m/m) was granular sludge with the two typical sizes (D(mean) = 1.77 ± 0.33 and 0.89 ± 0.11 mm) in the reactor, where the settling velocity was 98.7 ± 12.4 and 37.8 ± 0.9 m h(-1) for the big and small granules. With progressive extension of anaerobic time from 15 to 60 min before aerobic condition per cycle during the whole experiment, the HGS system can be maintained at a high total phosphorus removal efficiency (ca. 99%) since Day-270. The phosphorus content (wt %) in biomass was respectively 9.54 ± 0.29, 7.60 ± 0.48 and 6.15 ± 0.59 for the big granules, small granules and flocs. PMID:25921951

  20. Atrazine mineralization potential of alluvial-aquifer sediments under aerobic conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, P.B.; Chapelle, F.H.; Jagucki, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    Microorganisms in aerobic incubations of alluvialaquifer sediment mineralized 9-14% of added [U-14C]-D-glucose in 24 h, compared with 17 m). Although first-order rate constants for 14CO2 production from the atrazine ethyl-2 carbon were low (<4.5 ?? 10-5-5.4 ?? 10-4 day-1), they may be significant in the time frame of groundwater flow. Laboratory-measured rate constants were similar to field-estimated rate constants [(3.2 ??1.4) ?? 10-4 day-1] required to mineralize the atrazine ethyl carbon in groundwater prior to its discharge into an adjacent river. These results are consistent with the occurrence of detectable levels of deethylatrazine, but not atrazine, in groundwater from monitoring wells at the river.

  1. Formation of aerobic granular sludge under adverse conditions: low DO and high ammonia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng-Hua; Zhang, Xiao-Hu; Lv, Lu; Wang, Qing; Jiang, Qipei

    2013-04-01

    In this study, two adverse environments: low dissolved oxygen (DO) and high ammonia concentration, were employed to investigate the morphology, interspecies quorum sensing, extracellular polymers (EPS) characterization and microbial communities in the formation of aerobic granular sludge. Results showed that low DO could promote filamentous bacterial outgrowth. Under high ammonia concentration aerobic granular sludge (AGS) could still be cultivated, although it was looser and lighter than the control group. During the early stage of the AGS cultivation process, Al-2 activity reached a peak value in all three reactors, and ultrasonic pre-treatment was not beneficial to the release of Al-2. During AGS formation, the production of polysaccharide exhibited increases from 12.2% to 40.3%, 49.6%, and 29.3%. And PS in R2 was the highest as the result of sludge bulking. PS/PN was 1.5 to approximately 8 in the three reactors. Three-dimensional EEM fuorescence spectroscopy variation indicated the change of protein in EPS, and the highest intensity of Peak T1 was obtained. The location shift of Peak T1 was not obvious, and Peaks A, C, and T2 shifted toward longer wavelengths (red shift) of 5 to approximately 60 nm, or shorter wavelengths (blue shift) of 10 to approximately 25 nm on the emission scale and/or excitation scale in all three reactors. This provided spectral information on the chemical structure changes. Bacteria in R3 had the highest species diversity, and all bacteria in beta-Proteobacteria were identified as genus Thauera, which suggested that simultaneous nitrification and denitrification occurred in R3. The filamentous bacteria in seed sludge and R2 were species-richer. There was a low abundance of filamentous bacteria in R1 and R3, which contributed to the granule structure stability. PMID:24620612

  2. Fate of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) in Saturated Soil Under Various Redox Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dror, I.; Menahem, A.; Berkowitz, B.

    2014-12-01

    The growing use of PPCPs results in their increasing release to the aquatic environment. Consequently, understanding the fate of PPCPs under environmentally relevant conditions that account for dynamic flow and varying redox states is critical. In this study, the transport of two organometallic PPCPs, Gd-DTPA and Roxarsone (As complex) and their metal salts (Gd(NO3)3, AsNaO2), is investigated. The former is used widely as a contrasting agent for MRI, while the latter is applied extensively as a food additive in the broiler poultry industry. Both of these compounds are excreted from the body, almost unchanged chemically. Gadolinium complexes are not fully eliminated in wastewater treatment and can reach groundwater via irrigation with treated wastewater; Roxarsone can enter groundwater via leaching from manure used as fertilizer. Studies have shown that the transport of PPCPs in groundwater is affected by environmental conditions such as redox states, pH, and soil type. For this study, column experiments using sand or Mediterranean red sandy clay soil were performed under several redox conditions: aerobic, nitrate-reducing, iron-reducing, sulfate-reducing, methanogenic, and very strongly chemical reducing. Batch experiments to determine adsorption isotherms were also performed for the complexes and metal salts. We found that Gd-DTPA transport was affected by the soil type and was not affected by the redox conditions. In contrast, Roxarsone transport was affected mainly by the different redox conditions, showing delayed breakthrough curves as the conditions became more biologically reduced (strong chemical reducing conditions did not affect the transport). We also observed that the metal salts show essentially no transport while the organic complexes display much faster breakthrough. The results suggest that transport of these PPCPs through soil and groundwater is determined by the redox conditions, as well as by soil type and the form of the applied metal (as salt

  3. Aerobic Bioremediation of PAH Contaminated Soil Results in Increased Genotoxicity and Developmental Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chibwe, Leah; Geier, Mitra C; Nakamura, Jun; Tanguay, Robert L; Aitken, Michael D; Simonich, Staci L Massey

    2015-12-01

    The formation of more polar and toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) transformation products is one of the concerns associated with the bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soils. Soil contaminated with coal tar (prebioremediation) from a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site was treated in a laboratory scale bioreactor (postbioremediation) and extracted using pressurized liquid extraction. The soil extracts were fractionated, based on polarity, and analyzed for 88 PAHs (unsubstituted, oxygenated, nitrated, and heterocyclic PAHs). The PAH concentrations in the soil tested, postbioremediation, were lower than their regulatory maximum allowable concentrations (MACs), with the exception of the higher molecular weight PAHs (BaA, BkF, BbF, BaP, and IcdP), most of which did not undergo significant biodegradation. The soil extract fractions were tested for genotoxicity using the DT40 chicken lymphocyte bioassay and developmental toxicity using the embryonic zebrafish (Danio rerio) bioassay. A statistically significant increase in genotoxicity was measured in the unfractionated soil extract, as well as in four polar soil extract fractions, postbioremediation (p < 0.05). In addition, a statistically significant increase in developmental toxicity was measured in one polar soil extract fraction, postbioremediation (p < 0.05). A series of morphological abnormalities, including peculiar caudal fin malformations and hyperpigmentation in the tail, were measured in several soil extract fractions in embryonic zebrafish, both pre- and postbioremediation. The increased toxicity measured postbioremediation is not likely due to the 88 PAHs measured in this study (including quinones), because most were not present in the toxic polar fractions and/or because their concentrations did not increase postbioremediation. However, the increased toxicity measured postbioremediation is likely due to hydroxylated and carboxylated transformation products of the 3- and 4-ring PAHs (PHE, 1

  4. Adhesion, Biofilm Formation, and Genomic Features of Campylobacter jejuni Bf, an Atypical Strain Able to Grow under Aerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bronnec, Vicky; Turoňová, Hana; Bouju, Agnès; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Rodrigues, Ramila; Demnerova, Katerina; Tresse, Odile; Haddad, Nabila; Zagorec, Monique

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial enteritis in Europe. Human campylobacteriosis cases are frequently associated to the consumption of contaminated poultry meat. To survive under environmental conditions encountered along the food chain, i.e., from poultry digestive tract its natural reservoir to the consumer's plate, this pathogen has developed adaptation mechanisms. Among those, biofilm lifestyle has been suggested as a strategy to survive in the food environment and under atmospheric conditions. Recently, the clinical isolate C. jejuni Bf has been shown to survive and grow under aerobic conditions, a property that may help this strain to better survive along the food chain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adhesion capacity of C. jejuni Bf and its ability to develop a biofilm. C. jejuni Bf can adhere to abiotic surfaces and to human epithelial cells, and can develop biofilm under both microaerobiosis and aerobiosis. These two conditions have no influence on this strain, unlike results obtained with the reference strain C. jejuni 81-176, which harbors only planktonic cells under aerobic conditions. Compared to 81-176, the biofilm of C. jejuni Bf is more homogenous and cell motility at the bottom of biofilm was not modified whatever the atmosphere used. C. jejuni Bf whole genome sequence did not reveal any gene unique to this strain, suggesting that its unusual property does not result from acquisition of new genetic material. Nevertheless some genetic particularities seem to be shared only between Bf and few others strains. Among the main features of C. jejuni Bf genome we noticed (i) a complete type VI secretion system important in pathogenicity and environmental adaptation; (ii) a mutation in the oorD gene involved in oxygen metabolism; and (iii) the presence of an uncommon insertion of a 72 amino acid coding sequence upstream from dnaK, which is involved in stress resistance. Therefore, the atypical behavior of this strain under

  5. Adhesion, Biofilm Formation, and Genomic Features of Campylobacter jejuni Bf, an Atypical Strain Able to Grow under Aerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bronnec, Vicky; Turoňová, Hana; Bouju, Agnès; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Rodrigues, Ramila; Demnerova, Katerina; Tresse, Odile; Haddad, Nabila; Zagorec, Monique

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial enteritis in Europe. Human campylobacteriosis cases are frequently associated to the consumption of contaminated poultry meat. To survive under environmental conditions encountered along the food chain, i.e., from poultry digestive tract its natural reservoir to the consumer’s plate, this pathogen has developed adaptation mechanisms. Among those, biofilm lifestyle has been suggested as a strategy to survive in the food environment and under atmospheric conditions. Recently, the clinical isolate C. jejuni Bf has been shown to survive and grow under aerobic conditions, a property that may help this strain to better survive along the food chain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adhesion capacity of C. jejuni Bf and its ability to develop a biofilm. C. jejuni Bf can adhere to abiotic surfaces and to human epithelial cells, and can develop biofilm under both microaerobiosis and aerobiosis. These two conditions have no influence on this strain, unlike results obtained with the reference strain C. jejuni 81-176, which harbors only planktonic cells under aerobic conditions. Compared to 81-176, the biofilm of C. jejuni Bf is more homogenous and cell motility at the bottom of biofilm was not modified whatever the atmosphere used. C. jejuni Bf whole genome sequence did not reveal any gene unique to this strain, suggesting that its unusual property does not result from acquisition of new genetic material. Nevertheless some genetic particularities seem to be shared only between Bf and few others strains. Among the main features of C. jejuni Bf genome we noticed (i) a complete type VI secretion system important in pathogenicity and environmental adaptation; (ii) a mutation in the oorD gene involved in oxygen metabolism; and (iii) the presence of an uncommon insertion of a 72 amino acid coding sequence upstream from dnaK, which is involved in stress resistance. Therefore, the atypical behavior of this strain under

  6. Short-Term Reducing Conditions Decreases Soil Aggregation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Upland soils in Midwestern US are often ponded during the spring for days or weeks and may undergo reducing state. Short-term reducing conditions change the chemistry of the soil and that may affect soil aggregation. The objective of this paper was to determine how changes in the redox status of the...

  7. QuadraPure-Supported Palladium Nanocatalysts for Microwave-Promoted Suzuki Cross-Coupling Reaction under Aerobic Condition

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Poh Lee; Juan, Joon Ching; Yarmo, Mohd Ambar; Yusop, Rahimi M.

    2014-01-01

    Cross-linked resin-captured palladium (XL-QPPd) was readily prepared by simple physical adsorption onto the high loading QuadraPure macroporous resin and a subsequent reduction process. To enhance the mechanical stability, entrapped palladium nanocatalysts were cross-linked with succinyl chloride. Both transmission electron microscopy images and X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the palladium nanoparticles were well dispersed with diameters ranging in 4–10 nm. The catalyst performed good catalytic activity in microwave-promoted Suzuki cross-coupling reactions in water under aerobic condition with mild condition by using various aryl halides and phenylboronic acid. In addition, the catalyst showed an excellent recyclability without significant loss of catalytic activity. PMID:25054185

  8. Interaction of Cr(VI) reduction and denitrification by strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa PCN-2 under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    He, Da; Zheng, Maosheng; Ma, Tao; Li, Can; Ni, Jinren

    2015-06-01

    Inhibition of efficient denitrification in presence of toxic heavy metals is one of the current problems encountered in municipal wastewater treatment plants. This paper presents how to remove hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and nitrate simultaneously by the novel strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa PCN-2 under aerobic conditions. The capability of strain PCN-2 for Cr(VI) and nitrate reduction was confirmed by PCR analysis of gene ChrR, napA, nirS, cnorB, nosZ, while Cr(VI) reduction was proved via an initial single-electron transfer through Cr(V) detection using electron paramagnetic resonance. Experimental results demonstrated that Cr(VI) and nitrate reduction by strain PCN-2 was much faster at pH 8-9 and higher initial cell concentration. However, increasing Cr(VI) concentration would inhibit aerobic denitrification process and result in an significant delay of nitrate reduction or N2O accumulation, which was attributed to competition between three electron acceptors, i.e., Cr(VI), O2 and nitrate in the electron transport chain. PMID:25795449

  9. Diastereoselective metabolism of a novel cis-nitromethylene neonicotinoid paichongding in aerobic soils.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiuguo; Zhang, Jianbo; Xu, Xiaoyong; Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Wei; Ye, Qingfu; Li, Zhong

    2013-09-17

    Many pesticides are chiral but used as racemic mixtures, even though their stereoisomers are often degraded stereoselectively in soils. Evaluation of degradation of chiral compounds is mostly focused on the enantioselectivity rather than diastereoselectivity/epimer preferences. In this study, we explored the diastereoselective transformation of paichongding (IPP), a novel chiral neonicotinoid with broad-spectrum insecticidal activity, to several degradation intermediates in different soils. (14)C-Labeling coupled with LC-MS/MS and high resolution MS were used to track residues of IPP and identify major transformation metabolites. The stereoisomers of IPP known as 5R, 7R-IPP (RR-IPP), 5S, 7S-IPP (SS-IPP), 5S, 7R-IPP (SR-IPP), and 5R, 7S-IPP (RS-IPP) showed diastereoselective/epimer-selective persistence in all soils except an acidic clay soil. Moreover, IPP was transformed to a range of degradation intermediates (M1-M6), which also showed significant diastereoselective and soil preferential formation. Depropylation, nitrosylation, denitration, demethylation, dehydroxylation, and ketonization contributed to IPP transformation. The diastereoselective degradation of the parent compound and formation of incomplete intermediates implies that diastereomers/epimers should be regarded as different chemicals. The approach of coupling (14)C and MS may be used as an effective tool to understand the environmental processes and risks of other man-made chiral compounds. PMID:23924365

  10. Influence of soil conditioning on ground deformation during longitudinal tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Mingjing; Yin, Zhen-Yu

    2014-03-01

    Soil conditioning is often adopted to facilitate EPB shield tunneling. However, the resulting improvement of soil fluidity and the reduction of friction forces will also raise the ground deformation problem. This paper aims to investigate the influence of soil conditioning on the ground deformation during longitudinal tunneling. DEM is employed for this study due to its advantages in analyzing large deformations and discontinuous processes. Soil conditioning is modeled by reducing the interparticle friction of soils in a specific zone around the cutterhead of the tunnel. The tunnel advance with different soil-conditioning treatments is thus modeled. Comparisons are carried out on the ground deformation, i.e. ground surface settlement, vertical and horizontal displacements. The influence of soil conditioning on the ground deformation is clarified, and is associated with the fluidity from poor to favorite, and the mechanical properties from dilative to contractive are associated with the increase of soil conditioning. The results are helpful to determine the conditioned soils and control ground deformation for real constructions.

  11. Transcript profiles in cortical cells of maize primary root during ethylene-induced lysigenous aerenchyma formation under aerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Yamauchi, Takaki; Rajhi, Imene; Nishizawa, Naoko K.; Nakazono, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Internal aeration is important for plants to survive during periods of waterlogging, and the ability to form aerenchyma contributes by creating a continuous gas space between the shoots and the roots. Roots of maize (Zea mays) react to prolonged waterlogging by forming aerenchyma in root cortical cells by programmed cell death (PCD) in response to ethylene. The aim of this study was to understand the molecular mechanisms of ethylene-induced aerenchyma formation by identifying genes that are either up- or downregulated by ethylene treatment in maize root cortical cells. Methods Three-day-old maize seedlings were treated with ethylene for several hours under aerobic conditions. Cortical cells were isolated from the primary roots using laser microdissection (LM), and transcript profiles with and without ethylene treatment were compared by microarray. In addition, the effect on ethylene-induced aerenchyma formation of diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases, was examined in order to assess the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Key Results A total of 223 genes were identified whose transcript levels were significantly increased or decreased by ethylene treatment in root cortical cells under aerobic conditions. Subsequent tissue-specific quantitative reverse-transcription PCR analyses revealed that ethylene increased the transcript levels of genes related to ethylene signalling in all of the root tissues examined (stelar cells, cortical cells and outer cell layers), whereas it increased the transcript levels of genes related to cell wall modification and proteolysis specifically in the cortical cells. DPI treatment inhibited the ethylene-induced aerenchyma formation and suppressed expression of some cell wall modification-related genes. Conclusions Several genes related to cell wall modification and proteolysis are specifically up- or downregulated in cortical cells during lysigenous aerenchyma formation under aerobic

  12. Phosphorus Release to Floodwater from Calcareous Surface Soils and Their Corresponding Subsurface Soils under Anaerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Jayarathne, P D K D; Kumaragamage, D; Indraratne, S; Flaten, D; Goltz, D

    2016-07-01

    Enhanced phosphorus (P) release from soils to overlying water under flooded, anaerobic conditions has been well documented for noncalcareous and surface soils, but little information is available for calcareous and subsurface soils. We compared the magnitude of P released from 12 calcareous surface soils and corresponding subsurface soils to overlying water under flooded, anaerobic conditions and examined the reasons for the differences. Surface (0-15 cm) and subsurface (15-30 cm) soils were packed into vessels and flooded for 8 wk. Soil redox potential and concentrations of dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) and total dissolved Ca, Mg, Fe, and Mn in floodwater and pore water were measured weekly. Soil test P was significantly smaller in subsurface soils than in corresponding surface soils; thus, the P release to floodwater from subsurface soils was significantly less than from corresponding surface soils. Under anaerobic conditions, floodwater DRP concentration significantly increased in >80% of calcareous surface soils and in about 40% of subsurface soils. The increase in floodwater DRP concentration was 2- to 17-fold in surface soils but only 4- to 7-fold in subsurface soils. With time of flooding, molar ratios of Ca/P and Mg/P in floodwater increased, whereas Fe/P and Mn/P decreased, suggesting that resorption and/or reprecipitation of P took place involving Fe and Mn. Results indicate that P release to floodwater under anaerobic conditions was enhanced in most calcareous soils. Surface and subsurface calcareous soils in general behaved similarly in releasing P under flooded, anaerobic conditions, with concentrations released mainly governed by initial soil P concentrations. PMID:27380087

  13. Microbiological Degradation of Malodorous Substances of Swine Waste under Aerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bourque, Denis; Bisaillon, Jean-Guy; Beaudet, Réjean; Sylvestre, M.; Ishaque, Muhammad; Morin, André

    1987-01-01

    Phenol, p-cresol, and volatile fatty acids (VFA; acetic, propionic, isobutyric, butyric, isovaleric, and valeric acids) were used as odor indicators of swine waste. Aeration of the waste allowed the indigenous microorganisms to grow and degrade these malodorous substances. The time required for degradation of these substances varied according to the waste used, and it was not necessarily related to their concentrations. Using a minimal medium which contained one of the malodorous compounds as sole carbon source, we have selected from swine waste microorganisms that can grow in the medium. The majority of these microorganisms were able to degrade the same substrate when inoculated in sterilized swine waste but with an efficiency varying from one strain to the other. None of these strains was able to degrade all malodorous substances studied. Within 6 days of incubation these selected strains degraded the following: Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, phenol and all VFA; Alcaligenes faecalis, p-cresol and all VFA; Corynebacterium glutamicum and Micrococcus sp., phenol, p-cresol, and acetic and propionic acids; Arthrobacter flavescens, all VFA. On a laboratory scale, the massive inoculation of swine waste with C. glutamicum or Micrococcus sp. accelerated degradation of the malodorous substances. However, this effect was not observed with all of the various swine wastes tested. These results suggest that an efficient deodorization process of various swine wastes could be developed at the farm level based on the aerobic indigenous microflora of each waste. PMID:16347254

  14. Effect of deficiencies in DNA repair on the toxicity of mitomycin C and porfiromycin to CHO cells under aerobic and hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Hughes, C S; Irvin, C G; Rockwell, S

    1991-02-01

    A wild type Chinese hamster cell line (AA8) and three repair-deficient sublines of AA8 (EM9, UV4, and UV5) were used to study the nature of the cytotoxic lesions produced by the bioreductive alkylating agents mitomycin C and porfiromycin under aerobic and hypoxic conditions. The sensitivities of the repair-deficient sublines to the drugs varied markedly: EM9 was similar to AA8, whereas UV4 was exquisitely sensitive and UV5 was of intermediate sensitivity. Moreover, both the relative toxicities of the two drugs and the relative toxicities of each drug under aerobic and hypoxic conditions varied for the different cell lines. These data suggest that there are differences in the spectra of toxic lesions produced by mitomycin and porfiromycin and that there are differences in the lesions produced by these drugs under aerobic and hypoxic conditions. PMID:1899798

  15. Arsenic distribution and speciation near rice roots influenced by iron plaques and redox conditions of the soil matrix.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Noriko; Ohkura, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Yoshio; Maejima, Yuji; Arao, Tomohito

    2014-01-01

    Elevated arsenic (As) concentrations in rice and the soil solution result from changes in soil redox conditions, influenced by the water management practices during rice cultivation. Microscale changes in redox conditions from rhizosphere to soil matrix affect the As speciation and Fe plaque deposition. In order to focus on the rhizosphere environment, we observed microscale distribution and speciation of As around the rhizosphere of paddy rice with X-ray fluorescence mapping and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. When the soil matrix was anaerobic during rice growth, Fe-plaque did not cover the entire root, and As(III) was the dominant arsenic species in the soil matrix and rhizosphere. Draining before harvest led the conditions to shift to aerobic. Oxidation of As(III) to As(V) occurred faster in the Fe-plaque than the soil matrix. Arsenic was scavenged by iron mottles originating from Fe-plaque around the roots. The ratio of As(V) to As(III) decreased toward the outer-rim of the subsurface Fe mottles where the soil matrix was not completely aerated. These results provide direct evidence that speciation of As near rice roots depends on spatial and temporal redox variations in the soil matrix. PMID:24384039

  16. Requirement of ArcA for redox regulation in Escherichia coli under microaerobic but not anaerobic or aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Alexeeva, Svetlana; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; Teixeira de Mattos, M Joost

    2003-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the two-component regulatory ArcAB system functions as a major control system for the regulation of expression of genes encoding enzymes involved in both aerobic and anaerobic catabolic pathways. Previously, we have described the physiological response of wild-type E. coli to changes in oxygen availability through the complete range from anaerobiosis to full aerobiosis (S. Alexeeva, B. de Kort, G. Sawers, K. J. Hellingwerf, and M. J. Teixeira de Mattos, J. Bacteriol. 182:4934-4940, 2000, and S. Alexeeva, K. J. Hellingwerf, and M. J. Teixeira de Mattos, J. Bacteriol. 184:1402-1406, 2002). Here, we address the question of the contribution of the ArcAB-dependent transcriptional regulation to this response. Wild-type E. coli and a mutant lacking the ArcA regulator were grown in glucose-limited chemostat cultures at controlled levels of oxygen availability ranging from full aerobiosis to complete anaerobiosis. A flux analysis of the distribution of catabolic fluxes over parallel pathways was carried out, and the intracellular redox state (as reflected by the NADH/NAD ratio) was monitored for all steady states. Deletion of ArcA neither significantly altered the in vivo activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and pyruvate formate lyase nor significantly affected catabolism under fully aerobic and fully anaerobic conditions. In contrast, profound effects of the absence of ArcA were seen under conditions of oxygen-restricted growth: increased respiration, an altered electron flux distribution over the cytochrome o- and d-terminal oxidases, and a significant change in the intracellular redox state were observed. Thus, the ArcA regulator was found to exert major control on flux distribution, and it is concluded that the ArcAB system should be considered a microaerobic redox regulator. PMID:12486057

  17. Enzyme activities of aerobic lignocellulolytic bacteria isolated from wet tropical forest soils.

    PubMed

    Woo, Hannah L; Hazen, Terry C; Simmons, Blake A; DeAngelis, Kristen M

    2014-02-01

    Lignocellulolytic bacteria have promised to be a fruitful source of new enzymes for next-generation lignocellulosic biofuel production. Puerto Rican tropical forest soils were targeted because the resident microbes decompose biomass quickly and to near-completion. Isolates were initially screened based on growth on cellulose or lignin in minimal media. 75 Isolates were further tested for the following lignocellulolytic enzyme activities: phenol oxidase, peroxidase, β-d-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, β-xylopyranosidase, chitinase, CMCase, and xylanase. Cellulose-derived isolates possessed elevated β-d-glucosidase, CMCase, and cellobiohydrolase activity but depressed phenol oxidase and peroxidase activity, while the contrary was true of lignin isolates, suggesting that these bacteria are specialized to subsist on cellulose or lignin. Cellobiohydrolase and phenol oxidase activity rates could classify lignin and cellulose isolates with 61% accuracy, which demonstrates the utility of model degradation assays. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, all isolates belonged to phyla dominant in the Puerto Rican soils, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria, suggesting that many dominant taxa are capable of the rapid lignocellulose degradation characteristic of these soils. The isolated genera Aquitalea, Bacillus, Burkholderia, Cupriavidus, Gordonia, and Paenibacillus represent rarely or never before studied lignolytic or cellulolytic species and were undetected by metagenomic analysis of the soils. The study revealed a relationship between phylogeny and lignocellulose-degrading potential, supported by Kruskal-Wallis statistics which showed that enzyme activities of cultivated phyla and genera were different enough to be considered representatives of distinct populations. This can better inform future experiments and enzyme discovery efforts. PMID:24238986

  18. Sequential anaerobic-aerobic biodegradation of 2,3,7,8-TCDD contaminated soil in the presence of CMC-coated nZVI and surfactant.

    PubMed

    Binh, Nguyen Duy; Imsapsangworn, Chaiyaporn; Kim Oanh, Nguyen Thi; Parkpian, Preeda; Karstensen, Kare; Giao, Pham Huy; DeLaune, Ronald D

    2016-01-01

    Enriched microorganisms in sediment collected from a dioxin-contaminated site in Vietnam (Bien Hoa airbase) were used for examining the effectiveness in biological treatment of 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in soil. Four bio-treatments were investigated using a sequential anaerobic (17 weeks) followed by an aerobic (6 weeks) incubation. The maximum removal efficiency was approximately 60% even at an extremely low pH (approx. 3.6) condition. Surfactant Tween-80 was added to enhance the bioavailability of dioxin in two treatments, but it appeared to biostimulate methanogens rather than dechlorinators. As a result, methane production was the highest while the dioxin removal efficiency was the lowest, as compared with the other bio-treatments. Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) coated on nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) surface used in two treatments could prevent the direct contact between bacterial cell surface and nZVI which prevented cell death and lysis, hence enhancing dioxin removal. The presence of CMC--_nZVI in bio-treatments gradually released H2 required for microbiological processes, but the amount used in the experiments were likely too high to maintain optimum H2 levels for biostimulating dechlorinators rather than methanogens. PMID:26179214

  19. Characteristics of the soil-like substrates produced with a novel technique combining aerobic fermentation and earthworm treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Wenli; He, Wenting; Li, Leyuan; Liu, Hong

    2012-12-01

    The soil-like substrate (SLS) technique is key for improving the closure of bioregenerative life support system (BLSS) by recycling the inedible biomass of higher plants. In this study, a novel SLS technique (NSLST) was proposed: aerobic fermentations at 35 °C for 1 day, then 60 °C for 6 days, finally 30 °C for 3 days, followed by earthworm treatment for 70 days. Comparing with the original SLS technique (OSLST), its process cycle was 13 days shorter, and the dry weight loss rate (81.1%) was improved by 24.77%. The cellulose and lignin degradation rates were 96.6% and 94.6%. The concentrations of available N, P and K in mature SLS were respectively 776.1 mg/L, 348.0 mg/L and 7943.0 mg/L. Low CH4 and NH3 production was observed, but no accumulation. According to the seed germination test, the SLSs were feasible for plant growth. This investigation will provide a preliminary foundation for BLSS design.

  20. Assessment of functional and genetic diversity of aerobic endospore forming Bacilli from rhizospheric soil of Phyllanthus amarus L.

    PubMed

    Kadyan, Sangeeta; Panghal, Manju; Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Khushboo; Yadav, Jaya Parkash

    2013-09-01

    Fifty two aerobic and endospore forming Bacilli (AEFB) strains were recovered from rhizospheric soil of Phyllanthus amarus. Morphological, biochemical and molecular characterization by 16S rDNA gene sequencing has shown that these bacterial strains belong to six different genera of AEFB i.e. Bacillus, Brevibacillus, Lysinibacillus, Paenibacillus, Terribacillus and Jeotgalibacillus. Analysis of their PGP activities has shown that 92.30 % strains produced indole acetic acid hormone, 86.53 % of the strains solubilized Phosphate and 44.23 % strains produced siderophore. Chitinase production activity was shown by 42.30 % of the strains and 21.15 % of the strains produced 1-amino cyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase. 46.15 % of isolates have shown antagonistic activity against common fungal pathogen of the plant i.e. Corynespora cassiicola. Among all of the isolated strains B. Cereus JP44SK22 and JP44SK42 have shown all of the six plant growth promoting traits tested. B. megaterium strains (JP44SK18 and JP44SK35), Lysinibacillus sphaericus strains (JP44SK3 and JP44SK4) and Brevibacillus laterosporus strain JP44SK51 have also shown multiple PGP activities except ACC deaminase production activity. In the present study bacterial strain belonging to genera Jeotgalibacillus sp. JP44SK37 has been reported first time as a member of rhizospheric soil habitat and has also shown PGP activities. It can be concluded that Rhizosphere of P. amarus has harboured a good diversity of AEFB bacterial strains having a lot of biofertilizing and biocontrol abilities. PMID:23526192

  1. TBA biodegradation in surface-water sediments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Landmeyer, J.E.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2002-01-01

    The potential for [U-14C] TBA biodegradation was examined in laboratory microcosms under a range of terminal electron accepting conditions. TBA mineralization to CO2 was substantial in surface-water sediments under oxic, denitrifying, or Mn(IV)-reducing conditions and statistically significant but low under SO4-reducing conditions. Thus, anaerobic TBA biodegradation may be a significant natural attenuation mechanism for TBA in the environment, and stimulation of in situ TBA bioremediation by addition of suitable terminal electron acceptors may be feasible. No degradation of [U-14C] TBA was observed under methanogenic or Fe(III)-reducing conditions.

  2. Intracellular Accumulation of Glycine in Polyphosphate-Accumulating Organisms in Activated Sludge, a Novel Storage Mechanism under Dynamic Anaerobic-Aerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hien Thi Thu; Kristiansen, Rikke; Vestergaard, Mette; Wimmer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic anaerobic-aerobic feast-famine conditions are applied to wastewater treatment plants to select polyphosphate-accumulating organisms to carry out enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Acetate is a well-known substrate to stimulate this process, and here we show that different amino acids also are suitable substrates, with glycine as the most promising. 13C-labeled glycine and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were applied to investigate uptake and potential storage products when activated sludge was fed with glycine under anaerobic conditions. Glycine was consumed by the biomass, and the majority was stored intracellularly as free glycine and fermentation products. Subsequently, in the aerobic phase without addition of external substrate, the stored glycine was consumed. The uptake of glycine and oxidation of intracellular metabolites took place along with a release and uptake of orthophosphate, respectively. Fluorescence in situ hybridization combined with microautoradiography using 3H-labeled glycine revealed uncultured actinobacterial Tetrasphaera as a dominant glycine consumer. Experiments with Tetrasphaera elongata as representative of uncultured Tetrasphaera showed that under anaerobic conditions it was able to take up labeled glycine and accumulate this and other labeled metabolites to an intracellular concentration of approximately 4 mM. All components were consumed under subsequent aerobic conditions. Intracellular accumulation of amino acids seems to be a novel storage strategy for polyphosphate-accumulating bacteria under dynamic anaerobic-aerobic feast-famine conditions. PMID:25956769

  3. Intracellular Accumulation of Glycine in Polyphosphate-Accumulating Organisms in Activated Sludge, a Novel Storage Mechanism under Dynamic Anaerobic-Aerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hien Thi Thu; Kristiansen, Rikke; Vestergaard, Mette; Wimmer, Reinhard; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2015-07-01

    Dynamic anaerobic-aerobic feast-famine conditions are applied to wastewater treatment plants to select polyphosphate-accumulating organisms to carry out enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Acetate is a well-known substrate to stimulate this process, and here we show that different amino acids also are suitable substrates, with glycine as the most promising. (13)C-labeled glycine and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were applied to investigate uptake and potential storage products when activated sludge was fed with glycine under anaerobic conditions. Glycine was consumed by the biomass, and the majority was stored intracellularly as free glycine and fermentation products. Subsequently, in the aerobic phase without addition of external substrate, the stored glycine was consumed. The uptake of glycine and oxidation of intracellular metabolites took place along with a release and uptake of orthophosphate, respectively. Fluorescence in situ hybridization combined with microautoradiography using (3)H-labeled glycine revealed uncultured actinobacterial Tetrasphaera as a dominant glycine consumer. Experiments with Tetrasphaera elongata as representative of uncultured Tetrasphaera showed that under anaerobic conditions it was able to take up labeled glycine and accumulate this and other labeled metabolites to an intracellular concentration of approximately 4 mM. All components were consumed under subsequent aerobic conditions. Intracellular accumulation of amino acids seems to be a novel storage strategy for polyphosphate-accumulating bacteria under dynamic anaerobic-aerobic feast-famine conditions. PMID:25956769

  4. Volatile chemical spoilage indexes of raw Atlantic salmon (salmo salar)stored under aerobic condition in relation to microbiological and sensory shelf lives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this investigation was to identify and quantify the volatile chemical spoilage indexes (CSIs) for raw Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fillets stored under aerobic storage conditions at 4, 10 and 21 degrees C in relation to the determined microbial and sensory shelf lives. The volatile o...

  5. Model based evaluation of a contaminant plume development under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in 2D bench-scale tank experiments.

    PubMed

    Ballarini, E; Beyer, C; Bauer, R D; Griebler, C; Bauer, S

    2014-06-01

    The influence of transverse mixing on competitive aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation of a hydrocarbon plume was investigated using a two-dimensional, bench-scale flow-through laboratory tank experiment. In the first part of the experiment aerobic degradation of increasing toluene concentrations was carried out by the aerobic strain Pseudomonas putida F1. Successively, ethylbenzene (injected as a mixture of unlabeled and fully deuterium-labeled isotopologues) substituted toluene; nitrate was added as additional electron acceptor and the anaerobic denitrifying strain Aromatoleum aromaticum EbN1 was inoculated to study competitive degradation under aerobic /anaerobic conditions. The spatial distribution of anaerobic degradation was resolved by measurements of compound-specific stable isotope fractionation induced by the anaerobic strain as well as compound concentrations. A fully transient numerical reactive transport model was employed and calibrated using measurements of electron donors, acceptors and isotope fractionation. The aerobic phases of the experiment were successfully reproduced using a double Monod kinetic growth model and assuming an initial homogeneous distribution of P. putida F1. Investigation of the competitive degradation phase shows that the observed isotopic pattern cannot be explained by transverse mixing driven biodegradation only, but also depends on the inoculation process of the anaerobic strain. Transient concentrations of electron acceptors and donors are well reproduced by the model, showing its ability to simulate transient competitive biodegradation. PMID:24122285

  6. Effect of Water Logging Conditions on Solubility of Soil Nutrients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The wide use of herbicides, fungicides, fertilizers, and soil amendments affect the rhizosphere biochemistry and ecology. Soils in the Midwest of the US tend to be saturated in the early spring when snow and ice melt, and frequent rain occurs. Saturated conditions also occur after heavy rainfall eve...

  7. Development of a Hydraulic-driven Soil Penetrometer for Measuring Soil Compaction in Field Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekin, Yucel; Okursoy, Rasim

    Soil compaction is an important physical limiting factor for root emergence and the growth of plants. Therefore it is essential to control soil compaction, which is normally caused by heavy traffic in fields during the growing season. Soil compaction in fields is usually measured by using standard soil cone penetrometers, which can be of several different types according to their design. Most of the time, especially in heavy soil conditions, measuring soil compaction with a standard hand penetrometer produces measurement errors if the cone of the penetrometer cannot be pushed into the soil at a standard rate. Obtaining data with hand penetrometers is also difficult and takes a long time and effort. For this reason, a three-point hitch-mounted and hydraulic-driven soil cone penetrometer has been designed in order to reduce time and effort and to reduce possible measurement errors in the sampling of soil compaction data for research purposes. The hydraulic penetrometer is mounted on the three-point hitch and a hydraulic piston pushes the standard penetrometer cone into the soil at a constant speed. Forces acting on the cone base are recorded with a computer-based 16-bit data acquisition system composed of a load cell, a portable computer, signal amplification and necessary control software for the sampling. As a conclusion, the designed and constructed three-point hitch-mounted hydraulic-driven standard soil cone penetrometer provides with quick and very accurate measurements about soil compaction in clay soil in heavy conditions.

  8. Influence of pH on bile sensitivity amongst various strains of Listeria monocytogenes under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    White, Sally J.; McClung, Daniel M.; Wilson, Jessica G.; Roberts, Brandy N.

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a dangerous bacterium that causes the food-borne disease listeriosis and accounts for nearly 20 % of food-borne deaths. This organism can survive the body's natural defences within the digestive tract, including acidic conditions and bile. Although the bile response has been analysed, limited information is available concerning the ability of L. monocytogenes to resist bile under anaerobic conditions, especially at acidic pH, which mimics conditions within the duodenum. Additionally, it is not known how the bile response varies between serotypes. In this study, the survival of strains representing six serotypes was analysed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions following exposure to bile. Exposure to bile salts at acidic pH increased toxicity of bile, resulting in a significant reduction in survival for all strains tested. However, following this initial reduction, no significant reduction was observed for an additional 2 h except for strain 10403S (P = 0.002). Anaerobic cultivation increased bile resistance, but a significant increase was only observed in virulent strains when exposed to bile at pH 5.5. Exposure to pH 3.0 prior to bile decreased viability amongst avirulent strains in bile in acidic conditions; oxygen availability did not influence viability. Together, the data suggested that being able to sense and respond to oxygen availability may influence the expression of stress response mechanisms, and this response may correspond to disease outcome. Further research is needed on additional strains to determine how L. monocytogenes senses and responds to oxygen and how this varies between invasive and non-invasive strains. PMID:26307079

  9. Influence of pH on bile sensitivity amongst various strains of Listeria monocytogenes under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    White, Sally J; McClung, Daniel M; Wilson, Jessica G; Roberts, Brandy N; Donaldson, Janet R

    2015-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a dangerous bacterium that causes the food-borne disease listeriosis and accounts for nearly 20% of food-borne deaths. This organism can survive the body's natural defences within the digestive tract, including acidic conditions and bile. Although the bile response has been analysed, limited information is available concerning the ability of L. monocytogenes to resist bile under anaerobic conditions, especially at acidic pH, which mimics conditions within the duodenum. Additionally, it is not known how the bile response varies between serotypes. In this study, the survival of strains representing six serotypes was analysed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions following exposure to bile. Exposure to bile salts at acidic pH increased toxicity of bile, resulting in a significant reduction in survival for all strains tested. However, following this initial reduction, no significant reduction was observed for an additional 2 h except for strain 10403S (P = 0.002). Anaerobic cultivation increased bile resistance, but a significant increase was only observed in virulent strains when exposed to bile at pH 5.5. Exposure to pH 3.0 prior to bile decreased viability amongst avirulent strains in bile in acidic conditions; oxygen availability did not influence viability. Together, the data suggested that being able to sense and respond to oxygen availability may influence the expression of stress response mechanisms, and this response may correspond to disease outcome. Further research is needed on additional strains to determine how L. monocytogenes senses and responds to oxygen and how this varies between invasive and non-invasive strains. PMID:26307079

  10. Simultaneous phosphorus uptake and denitrification by EBPR-r biofilm under aerobic conditions: effect of dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pan Yu; Ginige, Maneesha P; Kaksonen, Anna H; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf; Sutton, David C; Cheng, Ka Yu

    2015-01-01

    A biofilm process, termed enhanced biological phosphorus removal and recovery (EBPR-r), was recently developed as a post-denitrification approach to facilitate phosphorus (P) recovery from wastewater. Although simultaneous P uptake and denitrification was achieved despite substantial intrusion of dissolved oxygen (DO >6 mg/L), to what extent DO affects the process was unclear. Hence, in this study a series of batch experiments was conducted to assess the activity of the biofilm under various DO concentrations. The biofilm was first allowed to store acetate (as internal storage) under anaerobic conditions, and was then subjected to various conditions for P uptake (DO: 0-8 mg/L; nitrate: 10 mg-N/L; phosphate: 8 mg-P/L). The results suggest that even at a saturating DO concentration (8 mg/L), the biofilm could take up P and denitrify efficiently (0.70 mmol e(-)/g total solids*h). However, such aerobic denitrification activity was reduced when the biofilm structure was physically disturbed, suggesting that this phenomenon was a consequence of the presence of oxygen gradient across the biofilm. We conclude that when a biofilm system is used, EBPR-r can be effectively operated as a post-denitrification process, even when oxygen intrusion occurs. PMID:26398030

  11. Conditional independence mapping of DIGE data reveals PDIA3 protein species as key nodes associated with muscle aerobic capacity

    PubMed Central

    Burniston, Jatin G.; Kenyani, Jenna; Gray, Donna; Guadagnin, Eleonora; Jarman, Ian H.; Cobley, James N.; Cuthbertson, Daniel J.; Chen, Yi-Wen; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Lisboa, Paulo J.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    Profiling of protein species is important because gene polymorphisms, splice variations and post-translational modifications may combine and give rise to multiple protein species that have different effects on cellular function. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis is one of the most robust methods for differential analysis of protein species, but bioinformatic interrogation is challenging because the consequences of changes in the abundance of individual protein species on cell function are unknown and cannot be predicted. We conducted DIGE of soleus muscle from male and female rats artificially selected as either high- or low-capacity runners (HCR and LCR, respectively). In total 696 protein species were resolved and LC–MS/MS identified proteins in 337 spots. Forty protein species were differentially (P < 0.05, FDR < 10%) expressed between HCR and LCR and conditional independence mapping found distinct networks within these data, which brought insight beyond that achieved by functional annotation. Protein disulphide isomerase A3 emerged as a key node segregating with differences in aerobic capacity and unsupervised bibliometric analysis highlighted further links to signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, which were confirmed by western blotting. Thus, conditional independence mapping is a useful technique for interrogating DIGE data that is capable of highlighting latent features. PMID:24769234

  12. Aerobic biodegradation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) by Bacillus cereus isolated from contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Mercimek, H Aysun; Dincer, Sadık; Guzeldag, Gulcihan; Ozsavli, Aysenur; Matyar, Fatih

    2013-10-01

    In this study, biological degradation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) which is very highly toxic environmentally and an explosive in nitroaromatic character was researched in minimal medium by Bacillus cereus isolated from North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) TNT-contaminated soils. In contrast to most previous studies, the capability of this bacteria to transform in liquid medium containing TNT was investigated. During degradation, treatment of TNT was followed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and achievement of degradation was calculated as percentage. At an initial concentration of 50 and 75 mg L(-1), TNT was degraded respectively 68 % and 77 % in 96 h. It transformed into 2,4-dinitrotoluene and 4-aminodinitrotoluene derivates, which could be detected as intermediate metabolites by using thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. Release of nitrite and nitrate ions were searched by spectrophotometric analyses. Depending upon Meisenheimer complex, while nitrite production was observed, nitrate was detected in none of the cultures. Results of our study propose which environmental pollutant can be removed by using microorganisms that are indigenous to the contaminated site. PMID:23715804

  13. Ethanol production with saccharomyces cerevisiae under aerobic conditions at different potassium concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Wiimpelmann, M.; Joergensen, B.; Kjaergaard, L.

    1984-04-01

    The specific ethanol productivity with Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown in a chemostat was found to be highly dependent on the ratio of intracellular to extracellular potassium concentration through variations in the energy consumption used for maintenance of the concentration gradient of potassium across the cell membrane. The specific ethanol productivity progressively rose from 0 to 20 mmol h/sup -1/ g/sup -1/ cell dry matter at a growth rate of 0.17 h/sup -1/ when the ratio of intracellular to extracellular potassium concentration was increased from 10 to 80. The ethanol production under potassium limited growth conditions was caused neither by a reduction in the specific respiratory activity nor by variations in the potassium content in cell dry matter. Results which strongly suggest that ethanol production under potassium limited growth conditions is brought about by changes in the ratio of pyruvate oxidase to pyruvate decarboxylase activity through changes in the intracellular pyruvate concentration are presented.

  14. Mathematic modeling for optimum conditions on aflatoxin B₁degradation by the aerobic bacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Qing; Zhai, Cuiping; Guan, Bin; Li, Chunjuan; Shan, Shihua; Yu, Jiujiang

    2012-11-01

    Response surface methodology was employed to optimize the degradation conditions of AFB₁ by Rhodococcus erythropolis in liquid culture. The most important factors that influence the degradation, as identified by a two-level Plackett-Burman design with six variables, were temperature, pH, liquid volume, inoculum size, agitation speed and incubation time. Central composite design (CCD) and response surface analysis were used to further investigate the interactions between these variables and to optimize the degradation efficiency of R. erythropolis based on a second-order model. The results demonstrated that the optimal parameters were: temperature, 23.2 °C; pH, 7.17; liquid volume, 24.6 mL in 100-mL flask; inoculum size, 10%; agitation speed, 180 rpm; and incubation time, 81.9 h. Under these conditions, the degradation efficiency of R. erythropolis could reach 95.8% in liquid culture, which was increased by about three times as compared to non-optimized conditions. The result by mathematic modeling has great potential for aflatoxin removal in industrial fermentation such as in food processing and ethanol production. PMID:23202311

  15. Mathematic Modeling for Optimum Conditions on Aflatoxin B1 Degradation by the Aerobic Bacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Qing; Zhai, Cuiping; Guan, Bin; Li, Chunjuan; Shan, Shihua; Yu, Jiujiang

    2012-01-01

    Response surface methodology was employed to optimize the degradation conditions of AFB1 by Rhodococcus erythropolis in liquid culture. The most important factors that influence the degradation, as identified by a two-level Plackett-Burman design with six variables, were temperature, pH, liquid volume, inoculum size, agitation speed and incubation time. Central composite design (CCD) and response surface analysis were used to further investigate the interactions between these variables and to optimize the degradation efficiency of R. erythropolis based on a second-order model. The results demonstrated that the optimal parameters were: temperature, 23.2 °C; pH, 7.17; liquid volume, 24.6 mL in 100-mL flask; inoculum size, 10%; agitation speed, 180 rpm; and incubation time, 81.9 h. Under these conditions, the degradation efficiency of R. erythropolis could reach 95.8% in liquid culture, which was increased by about three times as compared to non-optimized conditions. The result by mathematic modeling has great potential for aflatoxin removal in industrial fermentation such as in food processing and ethanol production. PMID:23202311

  16. Response of aerobic rice to Piriformospora indica.

    PubMed

    Das, Joy; Ramesh, K V; Maithri, U; Mutangana, D; Suresh, C K

    2014-03-01

    Rice cultivation under aerobic condition not only saves water but also opens up a splendid scope for effective application of beneficial root symbionts in rice crop unlike conventional puddled rice cultivation where water logged condition acts as constraint for easy proliferation of various beneficial soil microorganisms like arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Keeping these in view, an in silico investigation were carried out to explore the interaction of hydrogen phosphate with phosphate transporter protein (PTP) from P. indica. This was followed by greenhouse investigation to study the response of aerobic rice to Glomusfasciculatum, a conventional P biofertilizer and P. indica, an alternative to AM fungi. Computational studies using ClustalW tool revealed several conserved motifs between the phosphate transporters from Piriformospora indica and 8 other Glomus species. The 3D model of PTP from P. indica resembling "Mayan temple" was successfully docked onto hydrogen phosphate, indicating the affinity of this protein for inorganic phosphorus. Greenhouse studies revealed inoculation of aerobic rice either with P. indica, G. fasciculatum or both significantly enhanced the plant growth, biomass and yield with higher NPK, chlorophyll and sugar compared to uninoculated ones, P. indica inoculated plants being superior. A significantly enhanced activity of acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase were noticed in the rhizosphere soil of rice plants inoculated either with P. indica, G. fasciculatum or both, contributing to higher P uptake. Further, inoculation of aerobic rice plants with P. indica proved to be a better choice as a potential biofertilizer over mycorrhiza. PMID:24669667

  17. The impact of soil preparation on the soil erosion rates under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaledi Darvishan, A.; Homayounfar, V.; Sadeghi, S. H. R.

    2015-03-01

    The use of laboratory methods in soil erosion studies causes soil disturbance, preparation and placement in experimental plots and has been recently considered more and more because of many advantages. However, different stages of soil removal, transfer, preparation and placement in laboratory plots cause significant changes in soil structure and subsequently, the results of runoff, sediment concentration and soil loss. Knowing the rate of changes in sediment concentration and soil loss variables with respect to the soil preparation for laboratory studies is therefore inevitable to generalize the laboratory results to field conditions. However, there has been less attention to evaluate the effects of soil preparation on sediment variables. The present study was therefore conducted to compare sediment concentration and soil loss in natural and prepared soil. To achieve the study purposes, 18 field 1 m × 1 m-plots were adopted in an 18% gradient slope with sandy-clay-loam soil in the Kojour watershed, Northern Iran. Three rainfall intensities of 40, 60 and 80 mm h-1 were simulated on both prepared and natural soil treatments with three replications. The sediment concentration and soil loss at five three-minute intervals after time-to-runoff were then measured. The results showed the significant (p ≤ 0.01) increasing effects of soil preparation on the average sediment concentration and soil loss. The increasing rates of runoff coefficient, sediment concentration and soil loss due to the study soil preparation method for laboratory soil erosion plots, were 179, 183 and 1050% (2.79, 2.83 and 11.50 times), respectively.

  18. Coenzyme B12 can be produced by engineered Escherichia coli under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yeounjoo; Ashok, Somasundar; Ainala, Satish Kumar; Sankaranarayanan, Mugesh; Chun, Ah Yeong; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Park, Sunghoon

    2014-12-01

    Coenzyme B12 (Vitamin B12 ) is one of the most complex biomolecules and an essential cofactor required for the catalytic activity of many enzymes. Pseudomonas denitrificans synthesizes coenzyme B12 in an oxygen-dependent manner using a pathway encoded by more than 25 genes that are located in six different operons. Escherichia coli, a robust and suitable host for metabolic engineering was used to produce coenzyme B12 . These genes were cloned into three compatible plasmids and expressed heterologously in E. coli BL21 (DE3). Real-time PCR, SDS-PAGE analysis and bioassay showed that the recombinant E. coli expressed the coenzyme B12 synthetic genes and successfully produced coenzyme B12 . However, according to the quantitative determination by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, the amount of coenzyme B12 produced by the recombinant E. coli (0.21 ± 0.02 μg/g cdw) was approximately 13-fold lower than that by P. denitrificans (2.75 ± 0.22 μg/g cdw). Optimization of the culture conditions to improve the production of coenzyme B12 by the recombinant E. coli was successful, and the highest titer (0.65 ± 0.03 μg/g cdw) of coenzyme B12 was obtained. Interestingly, although the synthesis of coenzyme B12 in P. denitrificans is strictly oxygen-dependent, the recombinant E. coli could produce coenzyme B12 under anaerobic conditions. PMID:25146562

  19. Rhodobacter sphaeroides mutants which accumulate 5-aminolevulinic acid under aerobic and dark conditions.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, S; Watanabe, K; Tanaka, T; Miyachi, N; Hotta, Y; Murooka, Y

    1999-01-01

    The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides accumulates 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), which is a precursor in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, under light illumination and upon addition of levulinic acid as an inhibitor of ALA dehydratase. To generate an industrial strain which produces ALA in the absence of light, we sequentially mutated R. sphaeroides CR-286 using N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NTG). The mutant strains were screened by cultivating in the absence of light and assayed for ALA by the Ehrlich reaction in a 96-well microtiter plate. The mutant strain CR-386, derived from R. sphaeroides CR-286, was selected as a mutant that exhibited significant ALA accumulation. While CR-286 required light illumination for ALA production, CR-386 was able to accumulate 1.5 mM ALA in the presence of 50 mM glucose, 60 mM glycine, 15 mM levulinic acid and 1.0% (w/v) yeast extract under conditions of agitation in the absence of light. The mutant strain CR-450, derived from strain CR-386, was selected further as a mutant that exhibited significant ALA accumulation but no accumulation of aminoacetone, analogue of ALA. CR-450 accumulated 3.8 mM ALA under the same conditions. In the presence of 50 mM glucose, 60 mM glycine, 5 mM levulinic acid and 1.0% (w/v) yeast extract, the mutant strain CR-520, derived from strain CR-450, and strain CR-606, derived from strain CR-520, accumulated 8.1 mM and 11.2 mM ALA, respectively. In batch fermentation, the strain CR-606 accumulated 20 mM ALA over 18 h after the addition of glycine, levulinic acid, glucose and yeast extract. PMID:16232557

  20. Molecular analysis of the biomass of a fluidized bed reactor treating synthetic vinasse at anaerobic and micro-aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Elisa; Lopes, Alexandre; Fdz-Polanco, María; Stams, Alfons J M; García-Encina, Pedro A

    2012-03-01

    The microbial communities (Bacteria and Archaea) established in an anaerobic fluidized bed reactor used to treat synthetic vinasse (betaine, glucose, acetate, propionate, and butyrate) were characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and phylogenetic analysis. This study was focused on the competitive and syntrophic interactions between the different microbial groups at varying influent substrate to sulfate ratios of 8, 4, and 2 and anaerobic or micro-aerobic conditions. Acetogens detected along the anaerobic phases at substrate to sulfate ratios of 8 and 4 seemed to be mainly involved in the fermentation of glucose and betaine, but they were substituted by other sugar or betaine degraders after oxygen application. Typical fatty acid degraders that grow in syntrophy with methanogens were not detected during the entire reactor run. Likely, sugar and betaine degraders outnumbered them in the DGGE analysis. The detected sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) belonged to the hydrogen-utilizing Desulfovibrio. The introduction of oxygen led to the formation of elemental sulfur (S(0)) and probably other sulfur compounds by sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (γ-Proteobacteria). It is likely that the sulfur intermediates produced from sulfide oxidation were used by SRB and other microorganisms as electron acceptors, as was supported by the detection of the sulfur respiring Wolinella succinogenes. Within the Archaea population, members of Methanomethylovorans and Methanosaeta were detected throughout the entire reactor operation. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens mainly belonging to the genus Methanobacterium were detected at the highest substrate to sulfate ratio but rapidly disappeared by increasing the sulfate concentration. PMID:21861082

  1. Laboratory Study of Chemical Speciation of Mercury in Lake Sediment and Water under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Regnell, Olof; Tunlid, Anders

    1991-01-01

    Chemical speciation and partitioning of radiolabeled HgCl2 were studied in model aquatic systems consisting of undisturbed eutrophic lake sediment and water in plastic cylinders. The cylinders were either gradually made anaerobic by a gentle flow of N2-CO2 or kept aerobic by air flow. The proportion of methylated 203Hg was significantly higher, in both water and sediment, in the anaerobic systems than in the aerobic systems. The composition and total concentration of fatty acids originating from bacterial phospholipids, as well as the concentration of vitamin B12, including related cobalamins, were similar in sediments from the anaerobic and aerobic systems. Bacterial cell numbers were, on average, 3.6 times higher in the anaerobic water columns than in the aerobic ones. Volatilization of 203Hg occurred in all systems except in an autoclaved control and was of similar magnitudes in the anaerobic and aerobic systems. Incorporation of 203Hg into the sediment was significantly faster in the aerobic systems than in the anaerobic systems. These results suggest that episodes of anoxia in bottom waters and sediment cause an increase in net mercury methylation and, hence, an increase in bioavailable mercury. PMID:16348444

  2. Molecular insight into activated sludge producing polyhydroxyalkanoates under aerobic-anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Slawomir; Pokoj, Tomasz; Klimiuk, Ewa

    2008-08-01

    One of the options enabling more economic production of polyhydroxyalkanoates compared to pure cultures is the application of mixed cultures. The use of a microbial community in a sequencing batch reactor has a few advantages: a simple process control, no necessity for sterile processing, and possibilities of using cheap substrates as a source of carbon. Nevertheless, while cultivation methods to achieve high PHAs biomass concentration and high productivity in wild and recombinant strains are defined, knowledge about the cultivation strategy for PHAs production by mixed culture and species composition of bacterial communities is still very limited. The main object of this study was to characterize on the molecular level the composition and activity of PHAs producing microorganism in activated sludge cultivated under oxygen limitation conditions. PHAs producers were detected using a PCR technique and the created PHA synthase gene library was analyzed by DNA sequencing. The obtained results indicate that PHAs-producers belonged to Pseudomonas sp., and possessed genes coding for mcl-PHA synthase. The kinetics of mcl-PHA synthase expression was relatively estimated using real-time PCR technology at several timepoints. Performed quantitative and qualitative analysis of total bacterial activity showed that there were differences in total activity during the process but differential expression of various groups of microorganisms examined by using DGGE was not observed. PMID:18418634

  3. Effect of operating conditions in soil aquifer treatment on the removals of pharmaceuticals and personal care products.

    PubMed

    He, Kai; Echigo, Shinya; Itoh, Sadahiko

    2016-09-15

    Soil aquifer treatment (SAT) is an alternative advanced treatment for wastewater reclamation, and it has the potential to control micropollutants including pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). However, the relationship of operating conditions in SAT and removals of micropollutants was not clear. In this study, the effects of operating conditions on the removals of PPCPs were evaluated by using lab-scale columns and plant pilot-scale reactors under different operating conditions. Firstly, weathered granite soil (WGS), standard sand (SAND) and Toyoura standard sand (TS) have different soil characteristics such as total organic carbon (TOC) and cation exchange capacity (CEC). In the columns with these packing materials, the removals of carboxylic analgesics and antilipidemics were effective regardless packing materials. The removals of antibiotics were more effective in WGS than in TS and SAND, indicating high TOC and CEC enhance the sorption in SAT. Secondly, with the extension of hydraulic retention time (HRT), the removals of sulfamethoxazole, acetaminophen, crotamiton, and antipyrine were improved in WGS columns, and adaptable biodegradation for moderately removable PPCPs was formed. Thirdly, the removal efficiencies of sulfamethoxazole and crotamiton were higher in the WGS column under vadose condition than in the WGS column under saturated condition, because of aerobic condition in WGS column under vadose condition. Though long HRT and vadose condition had positive influence on the removals of several PPCPs such as sulfamethoxazole, WGS column with an HRT of 7days under saturated condition removed most PPCPs. PMID:27213846

  4. Extension of laboratory-measured soil spectra to field conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, E. R.; Baumgardner, M. F.; Weismiller, R. A.; Biehl, L. L.; Robinson, B. F.

    1982-01-01

    Spectral responses of two glaciated soils, Chalmers silty clay loam and Fincastle silt loam, formed under prairie grass and forest vegetation, respectively, were measured in the laboratory under controlled moisture equilibria using an Exotech Model 20C spectroradiometer to obtain spectral data in the laboratory under artificial illumination. The same spectroradiometer was used outdoors under solar illumination to obtain spectral response from dry and moistened field plots with and without corn residue cover, representing the two different soils. Results indicate that laboratory-measured spectra of moist soil are directly proportional to the spectral response of that same field-measured moist bare soil over the 0.52 micrometer to 1.75 micrometer wavelength range. The magnitudes of difference in spectral response between identically treated Chalmers and Fincastle soils are greatest in the 0.6 micrometers to 0.8 micrometer transition region between the visible and near infrared, regardless of field condition or laboratory preparation studied.

  5. Microbial destruction of chitin in soils under different moisture conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroslavtsev, A. M.; Manucharova, N. A.; Stepanov, A. L.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.; Sudnitsyn, I. I.

    2009-07-01

    The most favorable moisture conditions for the microbial destruction of chitin in soils are close to the total water capacity. The water content has the most pronounced effect on chitin destruction in soils in comparison with other studied substrates. It was found using gas-chromatographic and luminescent-microscopic methods that the maximum specific activity of the respiration of the chitinolytic community was at a rather low redox potential with the soil moisture close to the total water capacity. The range of moisture values under which the most intense microbial transformation of chitin occurred was wider in clayey and clay loamy soils as compared with sandy ones. The increase was observed due to the contribution of mycelial bacteria and actinomycetes in the chitinolytic complex as the soil moisture increased.

  6. Optimization of operation conditions for the startup of aerobic granular sludge reactors biologically removing carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous.

    PubMed

    Lochmatter, Samuel; Holliger, Christof

    2014-08-01

    The transformation of conventional flocculent sludge to aerobic granular sludge (AGS) biologically removing carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus (COD, N, P) is still a main challenge in startup of AGS sequencing batch reactors (AGS-SBRs). On the one hand a rapid granulation is desired, on the other hand good biological nutrient removal capacities have to be maintained. So far, several operation parameters have been studied separately, which makes it difficult to compare their impacts. We investigated seven operation parameters in parallel by applying a Plackett-Burman experimental design approach with the aim to propose an optimized startup strategy. Five out of the seven tested parameters had a significant impact on the startup duration. The conditions identified to allow a rapid startup of AGS-SBRs with good nutrient removal performances were (i) alternation of high and low dissolved oxygen phases during aeration, (ii) a settling strategy avoiding too high biomass washout during the first weeks of reactor operation, (iii) adaptation of the contaminant load in the early stage of the startup in order to ensure that all soluble COD was consumed before the beginning of the aeration phase, (iv) a temperature of 20 °C, and (v) a neutral pH. Under such conditions, it took less than 30 days to produce granular sludge with high removal performances for COD, N, and P. A control run using this optimized startup strategy produced again AGS with good nutrient removal performances within four weeks and the system was stable during the additional operation period of more than 50 days. PMID:24784454

  7. Osmium(0) nanoclusters stabilized by zeolite framework; highly active catalyst in the aerobic oxidation of alcohols under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Zahmakiran, Mehmet; Akbayrak, Serdar; Kodaira, Tetsuya; Ozkar, Saim

    2010-08-28

    Osmium(0) nanoclusters stabilized by zeolite-Y framework were reproducibly prepared by a simple two step procedure involving the incorporation of osmium(III) cations into the zeolite matrix by ion-exchange, followed by their reduction within the cavities of zeolite with sodium borohydride in aqueous solution all at room temperature. The composition and morphology of osmium(0) nanoclusters stabilized by zeolite framework, as well as the integrity and crystallinity of the host material were investigated by using ICP-OES, XRD, XPS, SEM, TEM, HRTEM, TEM/EDX, mid-IR, far-IR spectroscopies, and N(2)-adsorption/desorption technique. The results of the multiprong analysis reveal the formation of osmium(0) nanoclusters within the cavities of zeolite-Y without causing alteration in the framework lattice, formation of mesopores, or loss in the crystallinity of the host material. More importantly, far-IR studies showed that after the reduction of Os(3+) cations by sodium borohydride the Na(+) cations reoccupy their authentic cation sites restoring the integrity of zeolite-Y. The catalytic activity of osmium(0) nanoclusters stabilized by zeolite framework was tested in the aerobic oxidation of activated, unactivated and heteroatom containing alcohols to carbonyl compounds and was found to provide high activity and selectivity even under mild conditions (80 degrees C and 1 atm O(2) or air). Moreover, they were found to be stable enough to be isolated and bottled as solid material, which can be reused as active catalyst under the identical conditions of the first run. PMID:20614055

  8. Spectroscopic studies of the effect of aerobic conditions on the chemical characteristics of humic acid in landfill leachate and its implication for the environment.

    PubMed

    Xiaoli, Chai; Yongxia, Hao; Guixiang, Liu; Xin, Zhao; Youcai, Zhao

    2013-05-01

    Humic acids (HAs) that extracted from leachates from semi-aerobic and anaerobic landfills test field at different stabilization times were characterized by elemental composition, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and Carbon-13 Cross-Polarization Magic-Angle-Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((13)C CP/MAS NMR). The higher sulfur (S) content of HA in the anaerobic landfill leachate after a short stabilization time showed that the S released from the organic matter degradation was more easily stabilized under anaerobic conditions, which indicate that HA from anaerobic landfill leachate was more chemically reactive and played a more important role in mobilizing heavy metal, especially mercury, at early landfill stabilization times. However, the S content of HA from the semi-aerobic landfill increased over time, suggesting that more S was stabilized in HA as the landfill stabilization time was extended. The analytical results for the FTIR and NMR showed that the HA from the anaerobic landfill contained more aromatic groups, while HA from the semi-aerobic landfill had more oxygen-containing groups. The aromatic components of the HA from both the anaerobic and semi-aerobic landfills increased over time, suggesting that the maturity and humification degree of HA increased during the stabilization process. PMID:23461837

  9. Evaluating soil organic C sequestration in the Cotton Belt with the soil conditioning index (SCI)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simulation models that are sensitive to management, edaphic factors, and climate could provide insightful probes of how land owners and producers might be able to sequester soil organic C and engage in emerging carbon markets. We used the soil conditioning index (SCI) embedded in the RUSLE2 model t...

  10. Calibration of the soil conditioning index (SCI) to soil organic carbon in the southeastern USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prediction of soil organic C sequestration with adoption of various conservation agricultural management approaches is needed to meet the emerging market for environmental services provided by agricultural land stewardship. The soil conditioning index (SCI) is a relatively simple model used by the ...

  11. Soil conditioning index (SCI) and soil organic carbon in the Midwest and southeastern USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calibration of the soil conditioning index (SCI) to a diversity of field studies with known changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) would improve the usefulness of the SCI by the USDA–Natural Resources Conservation Service to assess the environmental services provided by agricultural land stewardship. ...

  12. Investigation of oxidative phosphorylation in continuous cultures. A non-equilibrium thermodynamic approach to energy transduction for Escherichia coli in aerobic condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafuri, Mohazabeh; Nosrati, Mohsen; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2015-03-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in living cells is very important. Different researches have shown that in terms of mathematical modeling, the domain of these investigations is essentially restricted. Recently the thermodynamic models have been suggested for calculation of the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation process and rate of energy loss in animal cells using chemiosmotic theory and non-equilibrium thermodynamics equations. In our previous work, we developed a mathematical model for mitochondria of animal cells. In this research, according to similarities between oxidative phosphorylation process in microorganisms and animal cells, Golfar's model was developed to predict the non-equilibrium thermodynamic behavior of the oxidative phosphorylation process for bacteria in aerobic condition. With this model the rate of energy loss, P/O ratio, and efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation were calculated for Escherichia coli in aerobic condition. The results then were compared with experimental data given by other authors. The thermodynamic model had an acceptable agreement with the experimental data.

  13. Differential Label-free Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Cultured under Aerobic and Suboxic Conditions by Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Ruihua; Elias, Dwayne A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Shen, Yufeng; McIntosh, Martin; Wang, Pei; Goddard, Carrie D.; Callister, Stephen J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-04-01

    We describe the application of liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC/MS) without the use of stable isotope labeling for differential quantitative proteomics analysis of whole cell lysates of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cultured under aerobic and sub-oxic conditions. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to initially identify peptide sequences, and LC coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LC-FTICR) was used to confirm these identifications, as well as measure relative peptide abundances. 2343 peptides, covering 668 proteins were identified with high confidence and quantified. Among these proteins, a subset of 56 changed significantly using statistical approaches such as SAM, while another subset of 56 that were annotated as performing housekeeping functions remained essentially unchanged in relative abundance. Numerous proteins involved in anaerobic energy metabolism exhibited up to a 10-fold increase in relative abundance when S. oneidensis is transitioned from aerobic to sub-oxic conditions.

  14. Effects of changing redox conditions on the dynamics of dissolved organic matter and CO2 in paddy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanke, Alexander; Cao, Zhi Hong; Liu, Qin; Muhr, Jan; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2010-05-01

    The current knowledge about dissolved organic matter (DOM) dynamics in soils and its dependence on different C pools based mainly on observations and experiments in aerobic environments. We have only a limited understanding about the effects of changing redox conditions on production and composition of DOM although this fraction of soil organic matter is important for greenhouse gas emission and carbon storage in soils. In many ecosystems temporal and spatial changes of oxic and anoxic conditions are evident and might even increase in future. It is assumed that changing redox conditions are the key drivers of DOM dynamics in such ecosystems. More detailed we tested the following hypotheses: Anoxic conditions result in relative DOM accumulation due to less mineralization of already produced DOM Close relationship between DOM production and CO2 emission 14C signature of CO2 enables the identification of different C pools degraded at oxic and anoxic conditions We chose paddy soils as a model ecosystem because these soils are anoxic during the rice growing period and oxic during harvest and growth of other crops. Furthermore, paddy soils have oxic and anoxic horizons. Soils of a unique chronosequence of paddy soil evolution (50 to 2000 years, China) were studied in direct comparison to non-paddy soils of the same age. In these soils, exposed to different redox conditions over defined periods of times, the dynamics of DOM, CO2, 14C of the CO2 and other redox sensitive elements were followed in laboratory experiments. In the latter redox conditions were changed every 3 weeks from oxic to anoxic and vice versa. Besides analysis of the composition of the soil solution and the gas phase we determined differences in C pools being respired at oxic and anoxic conditions by 14C AMS of the CO2. The measured redox potentials of -50 mV to 250mV at anoxic conditions and 350 mV to 550 mV at oxic conditions were in the expected range and proofed the appropriate setting of the chosen

  15. Water content and matric potential of soil under different soil frost conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, S.; Iwata, Y.; Hiirota, T.; Hasegawa, S.; Arima, J.

    2006-12-01

    Eastern Hokkaido, where is one of the largest agricultural production regions in Japan, is characterized by low air temperature and relatively thin snow covers resulting in soil frost over the winter. However, the soil frost depth has been significantly decreasing since late 1980's due to an insulation from the cold air by a thick snow cover developing in early winter. In the current study, soil water movement under different soil frost conditions were monitored to obtain a knowledge of changes in hydraulic-regime of the agricultural production systems in the Eastern Hokkaido associated with the decreasing soil frost depth in the region. A paired soil plot experiment was conducted from Nov. 2005 to May 2006, where the frost depth was artificially enhanced by removing snow in the treatment plot and the natural condition was maintained in the control plot. The soil in the experimental field was classified as Andisol with much porosity and high drainability. In each plot, water content and matric potential were measured by TDR and thermally-insulated tensiometer, respectively. Changes in snow water equivalent volume (SWE) and soil-frost depth were manually recorded. The maximum soil-frost depth in the treatment and control plots resulted in 47 and 19 cm, respectively. In both plots, soil water content and matric potential in underlying unfrozen soil decreased with the progress of freezing front, and the direction of soil water flow between 90 and 100 cm changed from downward to upward after the onset of the soil freezing. It is of note that the matric potential at 90 cm in the treatment plot decreased down to -480 cm, while the matric potential at the same depth in the control plot was -200 cm at minimum. When the underlying unfrozen soil was most driest the soil water volume stored in a depth interval from 50 to 100 cm for the treatment and control plots was 189 and 212 mm, respectively. Further, the magnitude of upward hydraulic gradient between 90 and 100 cm in the

  16. Unification of soil feedback patterns under different evaporation conditions to improve soil differentiation over flat area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shanxin; Zhu, A.-Xing; Meng, Lingkui; Burt, James E.; Du, Fei; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Guiming

    2016-07-01

    Detailed and accurate information on the spatial variation of soil types and soil properties are critical components of environmental research and hydrological modeling. Early studies introduced a soil feedback pattern as a promising environmental covariate to predict spatial variation over low-relief areas. However, in practice, local evaporation can have a significant influence on these patterns, making them incomparable at different locations. This study aims to solve this problem by examining the concept of transforming the dynamic patterns of soil feedback from the original time-related space to a new evaporation-related space. A study area in northeastern Illinois with large low-relief farmland was selected to examine the effectiveness of this idea. Images from MODIS in Terra for every April-May period over 12 years (2000-2011) were used to extract the soil feedback patterns. Compared to the original time-related space, the results indicate that the patterns in the new evaporation-related space tend to be more stable and more easily captured from multiple rain events regardless of local evaporation conditions. Random samples selected for soil subgroups from the SSURGO soil map show that patterns in the new space reveal a difference between different soil types. And these differences in patterns are closely related to the difference in the soil structure of the surface layer.

  17. RWEQ - Wind erosion predictions for variable soil roughness conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oro, Laura A.; Colazo, Juan C.; Buschiazzo, Daniel E.

    2016-03-01

    The soil surface roughness is a main factor in all wind erosion prediction models, including the Revised Wind Erosion Equation (RWEQ). The objective of this study was to test the erodibility of two typical soils of the semiarid Argentinean Pampas under three different tillage conditions (compared to a flat surface) at three wind velocities using a wind tunnel and to evaluate the performance of the RWEQ model. Results showed that all rough surfaces were less eroded by wind than a flat surface (FS) in both soils and all wind velocities. An exception was LB (lister-bedder) in the Haplustoll that showed similar erosion than FS. Wind erosion increased rapidly above 16.5 m s-1 wind velocity in all tillage conditions. The relative wind erosion (RE) calculated with the RWEQ (K‧ factor) fitted well with measured RE, except for K‧ < 0.1 (rougher surface) where the measured RE were much higher than the predicted. More than 70% of RE variability was explained by the oriented roughness (Kr) in both soils. The aforementioned indicates that Kr can be used instead of K‧ (a value that contains both, Kr and the random roughness - Crr factors) to predict wind erosion with RWEQ in the studied soils. Absolute wind erosion amounts predicted with RWEQ fitted well with measured data only for DT, mainly at low wind velocity. For the other tillage tools, the model did not apply well as it underestimated the erosion for the rougher soil surface condition (LB) and overestimated it for the less rough surface (DH).

  18. Temperature sensitivity of extracellular enzyme kinetics in subtropical wetland soils under different nutrient and water level conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, S.; Inglett, K.; Inglett, P.

    2012-12-01

    Microbial extracellular enzymes play an important role in the initial steps of soil organic matter decomposition and are involved in regulating nutrient cycle processes. Moreover, with the recent concern of climate change, microbial extracellular enzymes may affect the functioning (C losses, C sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions, vegetation changes) of different ecosystems. Hence, it is imperative to understand the biogeochemical processes that may be climate change sensitive. Here, we have measured the Michaelis Menten Kinetics [maximal rate of velocity (Vmax) and half-saturation constant (Km)] of 6 enzymes involved in soil organic matter decomposition (phosphatase, phosphodiesterase, β-D-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, leucine aminopeptidase, N-Acetyl-β-D glucosaminidase) in different nutrient(P) concentration both aerobically and anaerobically in Everglade water conservation area 2A (F1, F4-slough and U3-slough). Temperature sensitivity of different enzymes is assessed within soil of different P concentrations. We hypothesized that the temperature sensitivity of the enzyme changes with the biogeochemical conditions including water level and nutrient condition. Furthermore, we have tested specific hypothesis that higher P concentration will initiate more C demand for microbes leading to higher Vmax value for carbon processing enzymes in high P site. We found temperature sensitivity of all enzymes for Vmax and Km under both aerobic and anaerobic condition ranges from 0.6 to 3.2 for Vmax and 0.5 to 2.5 for Km. Q10 values of Km for glucosidase indicate more temperature sensitivity under anaerobic condition. Under aerobic condition higher temperature showed significant effect on Vmax for bisphosphatase between high P and low P site. Decreasing P concentration from F1 site to U3-S site had showed significant effect in all temperature on carbon processing enzyme. This suggests that in high P site, microbes will use more carbon-processing enzyme to get more carbon

  19. Biodegradation of a Light NAPL under Varying Soil Environmental Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, B. K.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.; Kleingeld, P. J.

    2009-12-01

    To see the impact of different soil environmental conditions on LNAPL biodegradation, a series of batch, microcosm, column and 2-D tank experiments under controlled conditions have been planned. Microcosms along with batch experiments have been designed for five different moisture contents ranging from residual to saturated, and under varying temperature condition. The batches are being used for two saturated soils containing toluene. For the unsaturated cases, fifteen microcosms are designed to mimic natural conditions more closely. The microcosms consist of a transparent outer column and an air permeable, but watertight, inner tube comprised of toluene phobic material. The space between the outer column and the inner porous tube is filled with a soil having a particular moisture content with a known amount of toluene. The inner porous tube is filled with air at atmospheric pressure, providing sufficient oxygen for the degradation of considered light NAPL. A special sampling mechanism has been fabricated to enable airtight soil sampling. Four columns have been designed for studying the impact of water table fluctuation on the LNAPL fate and transport in variably-saturated soil. Water table in two columns will be static and remaining two will be subjected to a fluctuation. Finally a 2-D tank setup, made of a steel box and a glass cover, has been refurbished for bioremediation process of LNAPL from start to finish. The main body is constructed of one piece of 1.5 mm thick stainless steel formed into a box with inner dimensions of 200cm-long x 94cm-high x 4cm-deep. The front cover is made of glass wall having 19-mm thickness. The soil is going to be packed between the two walls. The groundwater will be flowing horizontally from left to right and the water table level in the tank will be controlled by two end chambers. The chambers are separated from the soil by a fine meshed stainless steel sheet. The spatial and the temporal distributions of the LNAPL and its

  20. Simulating the effect of aerobic biodegradation on soil vapor intrusion into buildings: influence of degradation rate, source concentration, and depth.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Lilian D V; Johnson, Paul C

    2006-04-01

    Steady-state vapor intrusion scenarios involving aerobically biodegradable chemicals are studied using a three-dimensional multicomponent numerical model. In these scenarios, sources of aerobically biodegradable chemical vapors are placed at depths of 1-14 m beneath a 10 m x 10 m basement or slab-on-grade construction building, and the simultaneous transport and reaction of hydrocarbon and oxygen vapors are simulated. The results are presented as Johnson and Ettinger attenuation factors alpha (predicted indoor air hydrocarbon concentration/source vapor concentration), and normalized contour plots of hydrocarbon and oxygen concentrations. In addition to varying the vapor source depth, the effects of source concentration (2-200 mg chemical/L vapor) and oxygen-limited first-order reaction rates (0.018-1.8 h(-1)) are studied. Hydrocarbon inputs were specific to benzene, although the relevant properties are similar to those for a range of hydrocarbons of interest. Overall, the results suggest that aerobic biodegradation could play a significant role in reducing vapor intrusion into buildings (decreased alpha-values) relative to the no-biodegradation case, with the significance of aerobic biodegradation increasing with increasing vapor source depth, decreasing vapor source concentration, and increasing first-order biodegradation rate. In contrast to the no-biodegradation case, differences in foundation construction can be significant in some settings. The significance of aerobic biodegradation is directly related to the extent to which oxygen is capable of migrating beneath the foundation. For example, in the case of a basement scenario with a 200 mg/L vapor source located at 3 m bgs, oxygen is consumed before it can migrate beneath the foundation, so the attenuation factors for simulations with and without aerobic biodegradation are similar for all first-order rates studied. For the case of a 2 mg/L vapor source located at 8 m bgs, the oxygen is widely distributed

  1. Soil Properties, Nutrient Dynamics, and Soil Enzyme Activities Associated with Garlic Stalk Decomposition under Various Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xu; Cheng, Zhihui; Meng, Huanwen

    2012-01-01

    The garlic stalk is a byproduct of garlic production and normally abandoned or burned, both of which cause environmental pollution. It is therefore appropriate to determine the conditions of efficient decomposition, and equally appropriate to determine the impact of this decomposition on soil properties. In this study, the soil properties, enzyme activities and nutrient dynamics associated with the decomposition of garlic stalk at different temperatures, concentrations and durations were investigated. Stalk decomposition significantly increased the values of soil pH and electrical conductivity. In addition, total nitrogen and organic carbon concentration were significantly increased by decomposing stalks at 40°C, with a 5∶100 ratio and for 10 or 60 days. The highest activities of sucrase, urease and alkaline phosphatase in soil were detected when stalk decomposition was performed at the lowest temperature (10°C), highest concentration (5∶100), and shortest duration (10 or 20 days). The evidence presented here suggests that garlic stalk decomposition improves the quality of soil by altering the value of soil pH and electrical conductivity and by changing nutrient dynamics and soil enzyme activity, compared to the soil decomposition without garlic stalks. PMID:23226411

  2. Aerobic and Anaerobic Respiration in Profiles of Polesie Lubelskie Peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szafranek-Nakonieczna, Anna; Stêpniewska, Zofia

    2014-04-01

    Soil respiration is a very important factor influencing carbon deposition in peat and reflecting the intensity of soil organic matter decomposition, root respiration, and the ease of transporting gases to the surface. Carbon dioxide release from three different peat soil profiles (0-80 cm) of the Polesie Lubelskie Region (Eastern Poland) was analyzed under laboratory conditions. Peat samples were incubated at 5, 10, and 20°C in aerobic and anaerobic environments, and their CO2-evolution was analyzed up to 14 days. The respiration activity was found to be in the range of 0.013-0.497 g CO2 kg-1 DW d-1. The respiratory quotient was estimated to be in the range of 0.51-1.51, and the difference in respiration rates over 10°C ranged between 4.15 and 8.72 in aerobic and from 1.15 to 6.53 in anaerobic conditions. A strong influence of temperature, depth, the degree of peat decomposition, pH, and nitrate content on respiration activity was found. Lack of oxygen at low temperature caused higher respiration activity than under aerobic conditions. These results should be taken into account when the management of Polish peatlands is considered in the context of climate and carbon storage, and physicochemical properties of soil in relation to soil respiration activity are considered.

  3. Soil microbial respiration from various microhabitats in Arctic landscape: impact of soil type, environmental conditions and soil age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasi, Christina; Jokinen, Simo; Marushchak, Maija; Trubnikova, Tatiana; Hämäläinen, Kai; Oinonen, Markku; Martikainen, Pertti

    2014-05-01

    methods applied. It seems that the lower decomposability of peat is largely outweighed by higher C stocks at field conditions. Surprisingly, the bare surfaces (peat circles) with 3500 years old C at the surface exhibited about the largest soil microbial respiration rates among all sites as shown by both methods. This is likely due to the immature status of the peat which was during the bulk of its developmental time protected by permafrost, together with high C-densities. The observation is particularly relevant for decomposition of deeper peat at the permafrost-active layer interface in the large vegetated peat plateaus, where soil material similar to the bare surfaces can be found. The results suggest that the chemical nature and high age of the soil SOC in deep peat does not solely guarantee for resistance to decay. Thus, the study highlights risks for potential re-mobilization of C in deep peat soils following thawing. Soil microbial respiration rates need to be better known when predicting the overall carbon sink/source character of tundra ecosystems in a warming climate. Biasi C., Jokinen S., Marushchak M., Hämäläinen K., Trubnikova T., Oinonen M., Martikainen P. (2013). Microbial respiration in Arctic upland and peat soils as source of CO2. Ecosystems. DOI: 10.1007/s10021-013-9710-z.

  4. Recovery of Nickel and Cobalt from Laterite Tailings by Reductive Dissolution under Aerobic Conditions Using Acidithiobacillus Species.

    PubMed

    Marrero, J; Coto, O; Goldmann, S; Graupner, T; Schippers, A

    2015-06-01

    Biomining of sulfidic ores has been applied for almost five decades. However, the bioprocessing of oxide ores such as laterites lags commercially behind. Recently, the Ferredox process was proposed to treat limonitic laterite ores by means of anaerobic reductive dissolution (AnRD), which was found to be more effective than aerobic bioleaching by fungi and other bacteria. We show here that the ferric iron reduction mediated by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans can be applied to an aerobic reductive dissolution (AeRD) of nickel laterite tailings. AeRD using a consortium of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans extracted similar amounts of nickel (53-57%) and cobalt (55-60%) in only 7 days as AnRD using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The economic and environmental advantages of AeRD for processing of laterite tailings comprise no requirement for an anoxic atmosphere, 1.8-fold less acid consumption than for AnRD, as well as nickel and cobalt recovered in a ferrous-based pregnant leach solution (PLS), facilitating the subsequent metal recovery. In addition, an aerobic acid regeneration stage is proposed. Therefore, AeRD process development can be considered as environmentally friendly for treating laterites with low operational costs and as an attractive alternative to AnRD. PMID:25923144

  5. Carbon black retention in saturated natural soils: Effects of flow conditions, soil surface roughness and soil organic matter.

    PubMed

    Lohwacharin, J; Takizawa, S; Punyapalakul, P

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated factors affecting the transport, retention, and re-entrainment of carbon black nanoparticles (nCBs) in two saturated natural soils under different flow conditions and input concentrations using the two-site transport model and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Soil organic matter (SOM) was found to create unfavorable conditions for the retention. Despite an increased flow velocity, the relative stability of the estimated maximum retention capacity in soils may suggest that flow-induced shear stress forces were insufficient to detach nCB. The KPFM observation revealed that nCBs were retained at the grain boundary and on surface roughness, which brought about substantial discrepancy between theoretically-derived attachment efficiency factors and the ones obtained by the experiments using the two-site transport model. Thus, decreasing ionic strength and increasing solution pH caused re-entrainment of only a small fraction of retained nCB in the soil columns. PMID:26057475

  6. Soil moisture under contrasted atmospheric conditions in Eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azorin-Molina, César; Cerdà, Artemi; Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.

    2014-05-01

    , Intraannual changes, Atmospheric parameters, Eastern Spain Acknowledgements The research projects GL2008-02879/BTE, LEDDRA 243857 and RECARE FP7 project 603498 supported this research. References: Azorin-Molina, C., Connell, B.H., Baena-Calatrava, R. 2009. Sea-breeze convergence zones from AVHRR over the Iberian Mediterranean Area and the Isle of Mallorca, Spain. Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology 48 (10), 2069-2085. Azorin-Molina, C., Vicente-Serrano, S. M., Cerdà, A. 2013. Soil moisture changes in two experimental sites in Eastern Spain. Irrigation versus rainfed orchards under organic farming. EGU, Geophysical Research Abstracts, EGU2013-13286. Bodí, M.B., Mataix-Solera, J., Doerr, S.H. & Cerdà, A. 2011. The wettability of ash from burned vegetation and its relationship to Mediterranean plant species type, burn severity and total organic carbon content. Geoderma, 160, 599-607. 10.1016/j.geoderma.2010.11.009 Cerdà, A. 1995. Soil moisture regime under simulated rainfall in a three years abandoned field in Southeast Spain. Physics and Chemistry of The Earth, 20 (3-4), 271-279. Cerdà, A. 1999. Seasonal and spatial variations in infiltration rates in badland surfaces under Mediterranean climatic conditions. Water Resources Research, 35 (1) 319-328. Cerdà, A. 2002. The effect of season and parent material on water erosion on highly eroded soils in eastern Spain. Journal of Arid Environments, 52, 319-337. García-Fayos, P. García-Ventoso, B. Cerdà, A. 2000. Limitations to Plant establishment on eroded slopes in Southeastern Spain. Journal of Vegetation Science, 11- 77- 86. Ghafoor, A., Murtaza, G., Rehman, M. Z., Saifullah Sabir, M. 2012. Reclamation and salt leaching efficiency for tile drained saline-sodic soil using marginal quality water for irrigating rice and wheat crops. Land Degradation & Development, 23: 1 -9. DOI 10.1002/ldr.1033 Johnston, C. R., Vance, G. F., Ganjegunte, G. K. 2013. Soil properties changes following irrigation with coalbed natural

  7. Evaluation of antibiotic mobility in soil associated with swine-slurry soil amendment under cropping conditions.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, C; Flores, C; Caixach, J; Mita, L; Piña, B; Comas, J; Bayona, J M

    2014-11-01

    Interest in identifying pools of antibacterial-resistance genes has grown over the last decade, with veterinary antibiotics (VAs) receiving particular attention. In this paper, a mesoscale study aimed at evaluating the vertical transport of common VAs-namely, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, sulfonamides, and lincosamides in agricultural soil subjected to drip irrigation-was performed under greenhouse conditions. Accordingly, leachates of cropped and uncropped soil, amended with swine-slurry leading to 19-38 μg kg(-1) (dry mass) antibiotics in the soil, were analyzed over the course of the productive cycle of a lettuce (42 days) with three sampling campaigns (N = 24). High lincomycin (LCM) concentrations (30-39 μg L(-1)) were detected in the leachates collected from the swine-slurry-amended soil. The highest LCM mass recovered in the leachates (30.1 ± 1.63 %) was obtained from cropped experimental units. In addition, the LCM leaching constant and its leaching potential as obtained from the first-order model were higher in the leachates from the cropped experimental units. Lower concentrations of sulfadimethoxine were also detected in leachates and in soil. Enrofloxacin and oxytetracycline occurred only in soil, which is consistent with high soil interaction. PMID:24938815

  8. Experiments using new initial soil moisture conditions and soil map in the Eta model over La Plata Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Moira E.; Tomasella, Javier; Rodriguez, Daniel A.; Chou, Sin Chan

    2013-08-01

    An effort towards a more accurate representation of soil moisture and its impact on the modeling of weather systems is presented. Sensitivity tests of precipitation to soil type and soil moisture changes are carried out using the atmospheric Eta model for the numerical simulation of the development of a mesoscale convective system over northern Argentina. Modified initial soil moisture conditions were obtained from a hydrological balance model developed and running operationally at INPE. A new soil map was elaborated using the available soil profile information from Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay, and Argentina and depicts 18 different soil types. Results indicate that more accurate initial soil moisture conditions and incorporating a new soil map with hydraulic parameters, more representative of South American soils, improve daily total precipitation forecasts both in quantitative and spatial representations.

  9. Soil moisture under contrasted atmospheric conditions in Eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azorin-Molina, César; Cerdà, Artemi; Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.

    2014-05-01

    , Intraannual changes, Atmospheric parameters, Eastern Spain Acknowledgements The research projects GL2008-02879/BTE, LEDDRA 243857 and RECARE FP7 project 603498 supported this research. References: Azorin-Molina, C., Connell, B.H., Baena-Calatrava, R. 2009. Sea-breeze convergence zones from AVHRR over the Iberian Mediterranean Area and the Isle of Mallorca, Spain. Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology 48 (10), 2069-2085. Azorin-Molina, C., Vicente-Serrano, S. M., Cerdà, A. 2013. Soil moisture changes in two experimental sites in Eastern Spain. Irrigation versus rainfed orchards under organic farming. EGU, Geophysical Research Abstracts, EGU2013-13286. Bodí, M.B., Mataix-Solera, J., Doerr, S.H. & Cerdà, A. 2011. The wettability of ash from burned vegetation and its relationship to Mediterranean plant species type, burn severity and total organic carbon content. Geoderma, 160, 599-607. 10.1016/j.geoderma.2010.11.009 Cerdà, A. 1995. Soil moisture regime under simulated rainfall in a three years abandoned field in Southeast Spain. Physics and Chemistry of The Earth, 20 (3-4), 271-279. Cerdà, A. 1999. Seasonal and spatial variations in infiltration rates in badland surfaces under Mediterranean climatic conditions. Water Resources Research, 35 (1) 319-328. Cerdà, A. 2002. The effect of season and parent material on water erosion on highly eroded soils in eastern Spain. Journal of Arid Environments, 52, 319-337. García-Fayos, P. García-Ventoso, B. Cerdà, A. 2000. Limitations to Plant establishment on eroded slopes in Southeastern Spain. Journal of Vegetation Science, 11- 77- 86. Ghafoor, A., Murtaza, G., Rehman, M. Z., Saifullah Sabir, M. 2012. Reclamation and salt leaching efficiency for tile drained saline-sodic soil using marginal quality water for irrigating rice and wheat crops. Land Degradation & Development, 23: 1 -9. DOI 10.1002/ldr.1033 Johnston, C. R., Vance, G. F., Ganjegunte, G. K. 2013. Soil properties changes following irrigation with coalbed natural

  10. Three Gorges Reservoir Area: soil erosion under natural condition vs. soil erosion under current land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönbrodt, Sarah; Behrens, Thorsten; Scholten, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Apparently, the current most prominent human-induced example for large scale environmental impact is the Three Gorges Dam in China. The flooding alongside the Yangtze River, and its tributaries results in a vast loss of settlement and farmland area with productive, fertile valley soils. Due to the associated high land use dynamic on uphill-sites, the soil resources are underlying high land use pressure. Within our study, the soil erosion under natural conditions is compared to the soil erosion under current land use after the impoundment. Both were modeled using the empirical Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) which is able to predict long-term annual soil loss with limited data. The database consists of digital terrain data (45 m resolution DEM, erosive slope length based on Monte-Carlo-Aggregation according to Behrens et al. (2008)), field investigations of recent erosion forms, and literature studies. The natural disposition to soil erosion was calculated considering the USLE factors R, S, and K. The soil erosion under current land use was calculated taking into account all USLE factors. The study area is the catchment of the Xiangxi River in the Three Gorges Reservoir area. Within the Xiangxi Catchment (3,200 km²) the highly dynamic backwater area (580 km²), and two micro-scale study sites (Xiangjiaba with 2.8 km², and Quyuan with 88 km²) are considered more detailed as they are directly affected by the river impoundment. Central features of the Xiangxi Catchment are the subtropical monsoon climate, an extremely steep sloping relief (mean slope angle 39°, SD 22.8°) artificially fractured by farmland terraces, and a high soil erodibility (mean K factor 0.37, SD 0.13). On the catchment scale the natural disposition to soil erosion makes up to mean 518.0 t ha-1 a-1. The maximum potential soil loss of 1,730.1 t ha-1 a-1 under natural conditions is reached in the Quyuan site (mean 635.8 t ha-1 a-1) within the backwater area (mean 582.9 t ha-1 a-1). In the

  11. Assessing Soil Organic C Sequestration with the Soil Conditioning Index in the Southeastern USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil organic C sequestration can be a significant driver of how conservation management systems are adopted by producers and promoted by government agencies. Simulation of various tillage, crop rotation, and cover cropping conditions across the cotton growing region of the southeastern USA would al...

  12. Estimating soil organic carbon sequestration throughout the Cotton Belt with the soil conditioning index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil organic C sequestration can be a significant driver of how conservation management systems are adopted by producers and promoted by government agencies. Simulation of various tillage, crop rotation, and cover cropping conditions across the cotton growing region of the southeastern USA would al...

  13. Laboratory investigation of boundary condition impacts on nitrate anion exclusion in an unsaturated soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transient unsaturated horizontal column experiments were conducted with a loam soil, under variable boundary conditions, to obtain added insight on anion exclusion processes that impact nitrate transport in soil. The boundary conditions evaluated were column inlet soil water content, initial soil w...

  14. Activated sludge mass reduction and biodegradability of the endogenous residues by digestion under different aerobic to anaerobic conditions: Comparison and modeling.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, C G; Fall, C; Olguín, M T

    2016-03-01

    This study was performed to identify suitable conditions for the in-situ reduction of excess sludge production by intercalated digesters in recycle-activated sludge (RAS) flow. The objective was to compare and model biological sludge mass reduction and the biodegradation of endogenous residues (XP) by digestion under hypoxic, aerobic, anaerobic, and five intermittent-aeration conditions. A mathematical model based on the heterotrophic endogenous decay constant (bH) and including the biodegradation of XP was used to fit the long-term data from the digesters to identify and estimate the parameters. Both the bH constant (0.02-0.05 d(-1)) and the endogenous residue biodegradation constant (bP, 0.001-0.004 d(-1)) were determined across the different mediums. The digesters with intermittent aeration cycles of 12 h-12 h and 5 min-3 h (ON/OFF) were the fastest, compared to the aerobic reactor. The study provides a basis for rating RAS-digester volumes to avoid the accumulation of XP in aeration tanks. PMID:26720137

  15. Gas-geochemical condition and ecological functions of urban soils in areas with gas generating grounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozharova, Nadezhda; Lebed-Sharlevich, Iana; Kulachkova, Svetlana

    2014-05-01

    important ecological functions of such soils, is initiated. Due to high rate of this process (25-30 ng*g-1*h-1) accumulation of methane in the profile does not observed, its content in soil averages 2-5 ppm. Methane emission from soils is low (0.01-0.03 mg*m-2*h-1) or there is a weak consumption of atmospheric CH4, whereby its concentration in the air corresponds to the average content of this gas. Active methane oxidation and decomposition of organic matter under aerobic conditions result to intensive formation of carbon dioxide and, thus, increase its emission (600 mg*m-2*h-1), concentration in soils (0.2-0.9%) and in atmosphere (up to 0.5%). Fixed concentration of CO2 in the air is dangerous for human health. Thus, presence of gas generating grounds with high content of organic matter leads to methane formation, causing its intensive emission to atmosphere. At upper layers of soils and grounds bacterial oxidation of methane occurs and results in complete CH4 utilization. During this process significant amounts of carbon dioxide are released and accumulated in the atmosphere up to concentration dangerous for people. Carbon dioxide emission increases current level of this gas in the urban atmosphere.

  16. Degradation of TCE using sequential anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapatwala, Kirit D.; Babu, G. R. V.; Baresi, Larry; Trunzo, Richard M.

    1995-01-01

    Bacteria capable of degrading trichloroethylene (TCE) were isolated from contaminated wastewaters and soil sites. The aerobic cultures were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (four species) and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The optimal conditions for the growth of aerobic cultures were determined. The minimal inhibitory concentration values of TCE for Pseudomonas sps. were also determined. The aerobic cells were immobilized in calcium alginate in the form of beads. Degradation of TCE by the anaerobic and dichloroethylene (DCE) by aerobic cultures was studied using dual reactors - anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor. The minimal mineral salt (MMS) medium saturated with TCE was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the anaerobic reactor. The MMS medium saturated with DCE and supplemented with xylenes and toluene (3 ppm each) was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the fluidized air-uplift-type reactor containing the immobilized aerobic cells. The concentrations of TCE and DCE and the metabolites formed during their degradation by the anaerobic and aerobic cultures were monitored by GC. The preliminary study suggests that the anaerobic and aerobic cultures of our isolates can degrade TCE and DCE.

  17. Survival of a microbial soil community under Martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. A.; Noernberg, P.; Merrison, J.; Lomstein, B. Aa.; Finster, K. W.

    2003-04-01

    Because of the similarities between Earth and Mars early history the hypothesis was forwarded that Mars is a site where extraterrestrial life might have and/or may still occur(red). Sample-return missions are planned by NASA and ESA to test this hypothesis. The enormous economic costs and the logistic challenges of these missions make earth-based model facilities inevitable. The Mars simulation system at University of Aarhus, Denmark allows microbiological experiments under Mars analogue conditions. Thus detailed studies on the effect of Mars environmental conditions on the survival and the activity of a natural microbial soil community were carried out. Changes in the soil community were determined with a suite of different approaches: 1) total microbial respiration activity was investigated with 14C-glucose, 2) the physiological profile was investigated by the EcoLog-system, 3) colony forming units were determined by plate counts and 4) the microbial diversity on the molecular level was accessed with Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis. The simulation experiments showed that a part of the bacterial community survived Martian conditions corresponding to 9 Sol. These and future simulation experiments will contribute to our understanding of the possibility for extraterrestrial and terrestrial life on Mars.

  18. Tools to support maintenance strategies under soft soil conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, J. W. M.; van Meerten, J. J.; Woning, M. P.; Eijbersen, M. J.; Huber, M.

    2015-11-01

    Costs for maintenance of infrastructure in municipalities with soft soil underground conditions, are estimated to be almost 40 % higher than in others. As a result, these municipalities meet financial problems that cause overdue maintenance. In some cases municipalities are even afraid to be unable to offer a minimum service level in future. In common, traditional practice, roads and sewerage systems have been constructed in trenches that consist of sandy material that replaces the upper meters of the soft soil. Under influence of its weight, this causes accelerated settlements of the construction. A number of alternative constructions have been developed, e.g. using light-weight materials to limit settlement velocity. In order to limit future maintenance costs, improvement of maintenance strategies is desired. Tools have been and will be developed to support municipalities in improving their maintenance strategies and save money by doing that. A model (BALANS) that weighs the attractiveness of alternative solutions under different soil, environmental and economic circumstances, will be presented.

  19. Pore-scale insights to the rate of organic carbon degradation and biofilm formation under variable hydro-biogeochemical conditions in soils and sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Yan, Z.; Liu, Y.; Li, M.; Bailey, V. L.

    2015-12-01

    Biogeochemical processes that control microbial growth, organic carbon degradation, and CO2 production and migration are fundamentally occur at the pore scale. In this presentation, we will describe our recent results of a pore-scale simulation research to investigate: 1) how moisture content and distribution affects oxygen delivery, organic carbon availability, and microbial activities that regulate the rate of organic carbon degradation and CO2 production in aerobic systems; and 2) how pore-scale reactive transport processes affect local microbial growth, biofilm formation, and overall rate of microbial reactions in anoxic systems. The results revealed that there is an optimal moisture content for aerobic bacterial respiration and CO2 production. When moisture is below the optimal value, organic carbon availability limits its degradation due to diffusion and osmotic stress to bacterial reactivity; and when moisture is above the optimal value, oxygen delivery limits microbial respiration. The optimal moisture condition is, however, a function of soil texture and physical heterogeneity, bioavailable soil organic carbon, and microbial community function. In anoxic and saturated system, simulation results show that biofilm preferentially forms in concave areas around sand particles and macro aggregates where cross-directional fluxes of organic carbon and electron acceptors (e.g., nitrate) favor microbial growth and attachment. The results provide important insights to the establishment of constitutive relationships between the macroscopic rates of soil organic carbon degradation and moisture content, and to the development of biogeochemical reactive transport models that incorporate biofilm structures and physio-chemical heterogeneity in soils and sediments.

  20. Characterization of Apollo Bulk Soil Samples Under Simulated Lunar Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Pieters, C. M.; Thomas, I.; Bowles, N. E.; Greenhagen, B. T.

    2013-12-01

    Remote observations provide key insights into the composition and evolution of planetary surfaces. A fundamentally important component to any remote compositional analysis of planetary surfaces is laboratory measurements of well-characterized samples measured under the appropriate environmental conditions. The vacuum environment of airless bodies like the Moon creates a steep thermal gradient in the upper hundreds of microns of regolith. Lab studies of particulate rocks and minerals as well as selected lunar soils under vacuum and lunar-like conditions have identified significant effects of this thermal gradient on thermal infrared (TIR) spectral measurements [e.g. Logan et al. 1973, Salisbury and Walter 1989, Thomas et al. 2012, Donaldson Hanna et al. 2012]. Such lab studies demonstrate the high sensitivity of TIR emissivity spectra to environmental conditions under which they are measured. To best understand the effects of the near surface-environment of the Moon, a consortium of four institutions with the capabilities of characterizing lunar samples was created. The goal of the Thermal Infrared Emission Studies of Lunar Surface Compositions Consortium (TIRES-LSCC) is to characterize Apollo bulk soil samples with a range of compositions and maturities in simulated lunar conditions to provide better context for the spectral effects due to varying compositions and soil maturity as well as for the interpretation of data obtained by the LRO Diviner Lunar Radiometer and future lunar and airless body thermal emission spectrometers. An initial set of thermal infrared emissivity measurements of the bulk lunar soil samples will be made in three of the laboratories included in the TIRES-LSCC: the Asteroid and Lunar Environment Chamber (ALEC) in RELAB at Brown University, the Simulated Lunar Environment chamber in the Planetary Spectroscopy Facility (PSF) at the University of Oxford, and the Simulated Airless Body Emission Laboratory (SABEL) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  1. Effect of local soil conditions on site amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.C.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Johnson, J.J.

    1983-02-18

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is developing a complete fully coupled analysis procedure (including methods and computer codes) for estimating the risk of an earthquake-induced radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. The analysis procedure is based upon a state-of-the-art evaluation of the current seismic analysis and design process and explicitly accounts for uncertainties inherent in such a process. In Phase I, the seismic input, the soil-structure interaction, dynamic response of structures and subsystems, and fragility were developed and combined using a probabilistic computational procedure. Demonstration calculations were completed for the Zion nuclear power plant. In Phase II, presently ongoing, additional models, improvements to existing models, and improvements to the probabilistic computational assessment of Zion have been developed. Local site amplification has significant effect on structural response and is a major source of uncertainty. As part of the final Zion analysis in Phase II, an assessment of the local site effect at the Zion site was made using new time histories modified for the Zion soil conditions. In this paper, we briefly describe the approach used to correct the seismic hazard curve and time histories developed in Phase I for local site effects and discuss in some detail the results of our efforts to validate the approach. The principle step in the approach was the use of an equivalent linear iterative technique assuming vertically incident waves to correct a set of time histories appropriate for a rock outcrop for the local soil column. For the Zion soil column this led to large correction factors.

  2. Development of a predictive model for the growth kinetics of aerobic microbial population on pomegranate marinated chicken breast fillets under isothermal and dynamic temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Lytou, Anastasia; Panagou, Efstathios Z; Nychas, George-John E

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was the development of a model to describe the growth kinetics of aerobic microbial population of chicken breast fillets marinated in pomegranate juice under isothermal and dynamic temperature conditions. Moreover, the effect of pomegranate juice on the extension of the shelf life of the product was investigated. Samples (10 g) of chicken breast fillets were immersed in marinades containing pomegranate juice for 3 h at 4 °C following storage under aerobic conditions at 4, 10, and 15 °C for 10 days. Total Viable Counts (TVC), Pseudomonas spp and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were enumerated, in parallel with sensory assessment (odor and overall appearance) of marinated and non-marinated samples. The Baranyi model was fitted to the growth data of TVC to calculate the maximum specific growth rate (μmax) that was further modeled as a function of temperature using a square root-type model. The validation of the model was conducted under dynamic temperature conditions based on two fluctuating temperature scenarios with periodic changes from 6 to 13 °C. The shelf life was determined both mathematically and with sensory assessment and its temperature dependence was modeled by an Arrhenius type equation. Results showed that the μmax of TVC of marinated samples was significantly lower compared to control samples regardless temperature, while under dynamic temperature conditions the model satisfactorily predicted the growth of TVC in both control and marinated samples. The shelf-life of marinated samples was significantly extended compared to the control (5 days extension at 4 °C). The calculated activation energies (Ea), 82 and 52 kJ/mol for control and marinated samples, respectively, indicated higher temperature dependence of the shelf life of control samples compared to marinated ones. The present results indicated that pomegranate juice could be used as an alternative ingredient in marinades to prolong the shelf life of chicken. PMID:26742613

  3. Soil organic carbon of European forest soils: current stock and projections under climate change conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caddeo, Antonio; Marras, Serena; Spano, Donatella; Sirca, Costantino

    2016-04-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) represents the largest terrestrial carbon pool, and it is subjected to climate change impacts. In Europe, a limited number of studies makes a wide-scale comparison of SOC stock and changes under climate change conditions, and most of them are related to agricultural soils. In this work, the SOC stock of the forested areas of Europe (obtained from the CORINE 2006 Land Use Map) was assessed at 1 km resolution using the agro-ecosystem SOC model CENTURY. The results of the model were compared with independent observational datasets (i.e. LUCAS Topsoil Survey Database). In addition, climate simulations (RCPs 4.5 and 8.5) using the CMCC (Euro-Mediterranean Centre on Climate Change) and the CORDEX dataset were used to estimate the SOC changes of these areas under climate change conditions.

  4. Effects of soil oxygen conditions and soil pH on remediation of DDT-contaminated soil by laccase from white rot fungi.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuechun; Yi, Xiaoyun

    2010-04-01

    High residues of DDT in agricultural soils are of concern because they present serious threats to food security and human health. This article focuses on remediation of DDT-contaminated soil using laccase under different soil oxygen and soil pH conditions. The laboratory experiment results showed significant effects of soil oxygen conditions and soil pH on remediation of DDT-contaminated soil by laccase at the end of a 25-d incubation period. This study found the positive correlation between the concentration of oxygen in soil and the degradation of DDT by laccase. The residue of DDTs in soil under the atmosphere of oxygen decreased by 28.1% compared with the atmosphere of nitrogen at the end of the incubation with laccase. A similar pattern was observed in the remediation of DDT-contaminated soil by laccase under different flooding conditions, the higher the concentrations of oxygen in soil, the lower the residues of four DDT components and DDTs in soils. The residue of DDTs in the nonflooding soil declined by 16.7% compared to the flooded soil at the end of the incubation. The residues of DDTs in soils treated with laccase were lower in the pH range 2.5-4.5. PMID:20617049

  5. A dual-porous, biophysical void structure model of soil for the understanding of the conditions causing nitrous oxide emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, G. Peter; Maurizio Laudone, G.; Whalle, W. Richard; Bird, Nigel; Gregory, Andrew; Cardenas, Laura; Misselbrook, Tom

    2010-05-01

    periodic boundary conditions, and with a critical percolation path with the correct percolation characteristics and void volume of the macro-porosity of the soil. • A solid phase between the pores of the large unit cell, with the correct volume of the fraction of larger soil aggregates (larger 1 mm). • All the remaining pores of the large unit cell, which are not part of the critical percolation path, filled with smaller unit cells, which account for the micro-porosity of the soil sample. We describe the construction of a model that closely matches the following characteristics of a specific example of typical arable soil, taken from the Warren field of the Rothamsted experimental farm at Woburn, although the model can be used for a wide range of soils: (i) macroporosity and microporosity as measured by the water retention curve, (ii) the shape of the water retention characteristic under a wide range of tensions, (iii) the soil texture, and (iv) the extent of irreducible water content. Process model We will describe the insertion of Michaelis-Menten kinetics and Crank-Nicholson diffusion equations into the precisely scaled model, building on previous diffusion modelling (Laudone, G. M. et al, Chem.Eng.Sci., 2008). Comparison with experiment A comparison with experimental results sheds light on (i) the positional relationships of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria relative to the critical percolation path, (ii) the relationship between the critical percolation path and the preferential / critical flow path (Figure 4), (iii) the extent of ignorance about the reaction kinetics of some of the fundamental processes occurring, (iv) the soil conditions that cause nitrous oxide emission, and (v) the effect of soil compaction on the emission. Acknowledgement This presentation is a summary of the some of the work of the BBSRC funded U.K. soil research consortium "Soil Programme for Quality and Resilience" (BB/E001793/1 and others), of which Matthews is principal investigator.

  6. The effect of environmental conditions and soil physicochemistry on phosphate stabilisation of Pb in shooting range soils.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Peter; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi

    2016-04-01

    The stabilisation of Pb in the soil by phosphate is influenced by environmental conditions and physicochemical properties of the soils to which it is applied. Stabilisation of Pb by phosphate was examined in four soils under different environmental conditions. The effect of soil moisture and temperature on stabilisation of Pb by phosphate was examined by measurement of water extractable and bioaccessible Pb, sequential fractionation and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The addition of humic acid, ammonium nitrate and chloride was also examined for inhibition or improvement of Pb stability with phosphate treatment. The effect of moisture level varied between soils. In soil MB and DA a soil moisture level of 50% water holding capacity was sufficient to maximise stabilisation of Pb, but in soil TV and PE reduction in bioaccessible Pb was inhibited at this moisture level. Providing moisture at twice the soil water holding capacity did not enhance the effect of phosphate on Pb stabilisation. The difference of Pb stability as a result of incubating phosphate treated soils at 18 °C and 37 °C was relatively small. However wet-dry cycles decreased the effectiveness of phosphate treatment. The reduction in bioaccessible Pb obtained was between 20 and 40% with the most optimal treatment conditions. The reduction in water extractable Pb by phosphate was substantial regardless of incubation conditions and the effect of different temperature and soil moisture regimes was not significant. Selective sequential extraction showed phosphate treatment converted Pb in fraction 1 (exchangeable, acid and water soluble) to fraction 2 (reducible). There were small difference in fraction 4 (residual) Pb and fraction 1 as a result of treatment conditions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of stabilised PE soil revealed small differences in Pb speciation under varying soil moisture and temperature treatments. The addition of humic acid and chloride produced the greatest effect on Pb speciation in

  7. Selective simplification and reinforcement of microbial community in autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion to enhancing stabilization process of sewage sludge by conditioning with ferric nitrate.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ningben; Shou, Zongqi; Yuan, Haiping; Lou, Ziyang; Zhu, Nanwen

    2016-03-01

    The effect of ferric nitrate on microbial community and enhancement of stabilization process for sewage sludge was investigated in autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion. The disinhibition of volatile fatty acids (VFA) was obtained with alteration of individual VFA concentration order. Bacterial taxonomic identification by 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing found the dominant phylum Proteobacteria in non-dosing group was converted to phylum Firmicutes in dosing group after ferric nitrate added and simplification of bacteria phylotypes was achieved. The preponderant Tepidiphilus sp. vanished, and Symbiobacterium sp. and Tepidimicrobium sp. were the most advantageous phylotypes with conditioning of ferric nitrate. Consequently, biodegradable substances in dissolved organic matters increased, which contributed to the favorable environment for microbial metabolism and resulted in acceleration of sludge stabilization. Ultimately, higher stabilization level was achieved as ratio of soluble chemical oxygen demand to total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) decreased while TCOD reduced as well in dosing group comparing to non-dosing group. PMID:26773954

  8. Can the soil conditioning index predict soil organic carbon sequestration with conservation agricultural systems in the South?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soil conditioning index (SCI) is a relatively simple model used by NRCS to predict changes in soil organic C. It is based on three important conditions: (1) organic material (OM), (2) field operations (FO), and (3) erosion (ER). Our objective was to develop quantitative relationships between (...

  9. Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yurkov, Vladimir V.; Beatty, J. Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are a relatively recently discovered bacterial group. Although taxonomically and phylogenetically heterogeneous, these bacteria share the following distinguishing features: the presence of bacteriochlorophyll a incorporated into reaction center and light-harvesting complexes, low levels of the photosynthetic unit in cells, an abundance of carotenoids, a strong inhibition by light of bacteriochlorophyll synthesis, and the inability to grow photosynthetically under anaerobic conditions. Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are classified in two marine (Erythrobacter and Roseobacter) and six freshwater (Acidiphilium, Erythromicrobium, Erythromonas, Porphyrobacter, Roseococcus, and Sandaracinobacter) genera, which phylogenetically belong to the α-1, α-3, and α-4 subclasses of the class Proteobacteria. Despite this phylogenetic information, the evolution and ancestry of their photosynthetic properties are unclear. We discuss several current proposals for the evolutionary origin of aerobic phototrophic bacteria. The closest phylogenetic relatives of aerobic phototrophic bacteria include facultatively anaerobic purple nonsulfur phototrophic bacteria. Since these two bacterial groups share many properties, yet have significant differences, we compare and contrast their physiology, with an emphasis on morphology and photosynthetic and other metabolic processes. PMID:9729607

  10. Arsenopyrite weathering under conditions of simulated calcareous soil.

    PubMed

    Lara, René H; Velázquez, Leticia J; Vazquez-Arenas, Jorge; Mallet, Martine; Dossot, Manuel; Labastida, Israel; Sosa-Rodríguez, Fabiola S; Espinosa-Cristóbal, León F; Escobedo-Bretado, Miguel A; Cruz, Roel

    2016-02-01

    Mining activities release arsenopyrite into calcareous soils where it undergoes weathering generating toxic compounds. The research evaluates the environmental impacts of these processes under semi-alkaline carbonated conditions. Electrochemical (cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, EIS), spectroscopic (Raman, XPS), and microscopic (SEM, AFM, TEM) techniques are combined along with chemical analyses of leachates collected from simulated arsenopyrite weathering to comprehensively examine the interfacial mechanisms. Early oxidation stages enhance mineral reactivity through the formation of surface sulfur phases (e.g., S n (2-)/S(0)) with semiconductor properties, leading to oscillatory mineral reactivity. Subsequent steps entail the generation of intermediate siderite (FeCO3)-like, followed by the formation of low-compact mass sub-micro ferric oxyhydroxides (α, γ-FeOOH) with adsorbed arsenic (mainly As(III), and lower amounts of As(V)). In addition, weathering reactions can be influenced by accessible arsenic resulting in the formation of a symplesite (Fe3(AsO4)3)-like compound which is dependent on the amount of accessible arsenic in the system. It is proposed that arsenic release occurs via diffusion across secondary α, γ-FeOOH structures during arsenopyrite weathering. We suggest weathering mechanisms of arsenopyrite in calcareous soil and environmental implications based on experimental data. PMID:26498805

  11. INACTIVATION OF ENTERIC PATHOGENS DURING AEROBIC DIGESTION OF WASTEWATER SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of aerobic and anaerobic digestion on enteric viruses, enteric bacteria, total aerobic bacteria, and intestinal parasites were studied under laboratory and field conditions. Under laboratory conditions, the temperature of the sludge digestion was the major factor infl...

  12. SCREENING COTTON VARIETIES FOR TOLERANCE TO WATERLOGGED SOIL CONDITIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton is adapted to an arid climate and well drained soils. Waterlogged soils are considered to be one of the major problems for cotton producers world wide. This problem is amplified on heavy clay soils, and furrow irrigation makes the potential for waterlogging even greater. To investigate the r...

  13. Wireless sensor network for monitoring soil moisture and weather conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A wireless sensor network (WSN) was developed and deployed in three fields to monitor soil water status and collect weather data for irrigation scheduling. The WSN consists of soil-water sensors, weather sensors, wireless data loggers, and a wireless modem. Soil-water sensors were installed at three...

  14. Healthy soil as a necessary condition of human life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, M. S.; Dorodnykh, Yu. L.; Marchenko, A. I.

    2010-07-01

    The extent of soil degradation and soil pathology in Russia is discussed. The concept of a federal target program “National System of the Chemical and Biological Security of the Russian Federation (2009-2013)” is examined. A definition is given to healthy soil of agrocenoses and its main functional characteristic—ecological stability (including balanced biodiversity, self-cleaning capacity, and suppressive activity of the phytopedocenosis). Urgent applied scientific problems of regional soil sanitation are formulated. Criteria and modern methods of ecological monitoring and assessment of soil quality and health are considered. A systems approach to sanitation of soils infected by highly harmful phytopathogens—the causative agents of root rots of cereal crops—is demonstrated using the induction of soil suppressiveness as an example.

  15. Isolation of high-salinity-tolerant bacterial strains, Enterobacter sp., Serratia sp., Yersinia sp., for nitrification and aerobic denitrification under cyanogenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Mpongwana, N; Ntwampe, S K O; Mekuto, L; Akinpelu, E A; Dyantyi, S; Mpentshu, Y

    2016-01-01

    Cyanides (CN(-)) and soluble salts could potentially inhibit biological processes in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), such as nitrification and denitrification. Cyanide in wastewater can alter metabolic functions of microbial populations in WWTPs, thus significantly inhibiting nitrifier and denitrifier metabolic processes, rendering the water treatment processes ineffective. In this study, bacterial isolates that are tolerant to high salinity conditions, which are capable of nitrification and aerobic denitrification under cyanogenic conditions, were isolated from a poultry slaughterhouse effluent. Three of the bacterial isolates were found to be able to oxidise NH(4)-N in the presence of 65.91 mg/L of free cyanide (CN(-)) under saline conditions, i.e. 4.5% (w/v) NaCl. The isolates I, H and G, were identified as Enterobacter sp., Yersinia sp. and Serratia sp., respectively. Results showed that 81% (I), 71% (G) and 75% (H) of 400 mg/L NH(4)-N was biodegraded (nitrification) within 72 h, with the rates of biodegradation being suitably described by first order reactions, with rate constants being: 4.19 h(-1) (I), 4.21 h(-1) (H) and 3.79 h(-1) (G), respectively, with correlation coefficients ranging between 0.82 and 0.89. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rates were 38% (I), 42% (H) and 48% (G), over a period of 168 h with COD reduction being highest at near neutral pH. PMID:27148718

  16. The effect of salinization and freshening events in coastal aquifers on nutrient characteristics as deduced from column experiments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russak, A.; Sivan, O.; Herut, B.; Lazar, B.; Yechieli, Y.

    2015-10-01

    This study experimentally quantified the effect of seawater intrusion (salinization) and freshening events in coastal aquifers on nutrient (N, P and DSi) dynamics across the fresh-saline groundwater interface. Laboratory column experiments were conducted under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in order to simulate the processes occurring in the fresh-saline interface. They were performed with aquifer sediments, simulating the natural conditions during alterations of natural fresh groundwater to seawater and vice versa. The salinization and freshening experiments showed that NH4+ and PO43- and DSi were affected mainly by ion exchange processes while microbial activity controlled the nitrogen species NO3- and NO2-. Due to the cation exchange, salinization generated enrichment (above the expected conservative behavior) of NH4+, up to 80 μmol L-1 (an order of magnitude higher than in seawater or fresh groundwater). Under anaerobic conditions NO3- was removed by denitrification, as demonstrated by the decrease in NO3- concentrations, the increase in NO2- concentrations, and the increase in δ15N by 15-25‰. Clear evidence was shown for anion exchange of PO43-, which competes with HCO3- and boron on adsorption sites. DSi seems to take part in the exchange process, similar to PO43-.

  17. Effect of soil conditions on solar pond performance

    SciTech Connect

    Leboeuf, C.M.; Johnson, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    A recent effort to design a one-acre solar pond at the US Air Force Academy brought up several research issues pertaining to solar pond performance prediction. This report addresses those issues. Interactions of the pond with the soil below it have historically been estimated using very simplistic techniques that tend to ignore soil composition, moisture content, and the coupled heat and moisture transport phenomena. This study examines the models of soil thermal conductivity and heat and mass transport in soils under imposed temperature gradients to assess the potential applicability of these models to solar pond modeling. In addition, a computer simulation code is developed that incorporates the soil thermal conductivity model. Using the code, a parametric analysis was performed illustrating the impact of this property on pond behavior and the importance of experimental model verification for the range of soil temperatures experienced in solar ponds. Implications of the combined heat and moisture movement theory on solar pond performance are presented.

  18. Predicting soil organic carbon sequestration in crop production systems of the southeastern USA with EPIC and the soil conditioning index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Conditioning Index (SCI), administered by the USDA-Natural Resource Conservation Service, predicts a positive or negative trend in soil organic carbon (SOC) based on knowledge of field operations, erosion loss, and organic matter inputs, but has not been adequately calibrated against long-t...

  19. Investigation of Soil Conditioning Index Values for Southern High Plains Agroecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA-NRCS) has proposed the Soil Conditioning Index (SCI) to predict the consequences of management actions on the state of soil organic carbon (SOC), a soil quality indicator. The SCI predicts qualitative changes i...

  20. Kinetic Distribution of 14C-Metsulfuron-methyl Residues in Paddy Soils under Different Moisture Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice paddy soils undergo several cycles of drying and wetting during a growing season. A laboratory study was conducted to determine the effect of soil moisture conditions on the distribution and kinetics of extractable and bound residues of 14C-metsulfuron-methyl in six Chinese paddy soils during 8...

  1. The Impact of Organic Amendments on Soil Properties Under Mediterranean Climatic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso Gonzalez, Paloma; Francisco Martinez Murillo, Juan; Damian Ruiz Sinoga, Jose

    2014-05-01

    Soil erosion and unsustainable land uses produce adverse effect on SOC content. Soil management techniques and corrections can be applied for soil recovery, especially, with afforestation purposes. This study presents the short term effects of the application of different treatments and amendments on soil properties for soils included in several sets of closed plots located in the experimental area of Pinarillo (Nerja, Spain). The analysed soil properties were: pH, EC, Organic Carbon, total Nitrogen and total Carbon. In order to verify possible differences, we applied the test of Mann-Whitney U in corroboration with the previous homogeneity test of variance. The result of each strategy set compared to the initial condition shows at least one significant modification in the analysed soil properties. Electrical conductivity was the most changeable soil property respect to the initial condition. Similarly, organic carbon content and total organic carbon remained quite similar. However, when all of the strategy sets are compared among them, total carbon was the most significantly changeable property. Mulching, polymers and urban residue seem to highly modify the soil initial conditions. Although soil physic-chemical parameters generally used to evaluate soil quality change very slowly. The analysed soil properties shows significant differences between dry and wet season. This fact, could be indicating the effect of certain seasonality as it is usual in Mediterranean condition.

  2. MALDI-TOF MS Imaging evidences spatial differences in the degradation of solid polycaprolactone diol in water under aerobic and denitrifying conditions.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Daniel; Ginebreda, Antoni; Pérez, Sandra; Quero, Carmen; Barceló, Damià

    2016-10-01

    Degradation of solid polymers in the aquatic environment encompasses a variety of biotic and abiotic processes giving rise to heterogeneous patterns across the surface of the material, which cannot be investigated using conventional Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) that only renders an "average" picture of the sample. In that context, MALDI-TOF MS Imaging (MALDI MSI) provides a rapid and efficient tool to study 2D spatial changes occurred in the chemical composition of the polymer surface. Commercial polycaprolactone diol (average molecular weight of 1250Da) was selected as test material because it had been previously known to be amenable to biological degradation. The test oligomer probe was incubated under aerobic and denitrifying conditions using synthetic water and denitrifying mixed liquor obtained from a wastewater treatment plant respectively. After ca. seven days of exposure the mass spectra obtained by MALDI MSI showed the occurrence of chemical modifications in the sample surface. Observed heterogeneity across the probe's surface indicated significant degradation and suggested the contribution of biotic processes. The results were investigated using different image processing tools. Major changes on the oligomer surface were observed when exposed to denitrifying conditions. PMID:27213667

  3. Degredation of [{sup 14}C]-propargite in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Comezoglu, S.N.; Ly, V.T.; Wu, J.

    1996-10-01

    The degradation of {sup 14}C-labeled propargite in soil was investigated in three different test conditions, namely, aerobic soil, anaerobic soil, aerobic aquatic, and anaerobic aquatic. All studies were conducted at {approximately}25{degrees}C in the dark with treatment rates of either 5 ppm or 6 ppm and were conducted for a period of one year except the anaerobic soil and aerobic aquatic study which were conducted for two months and one month, respectively. The apparent T{sub 1/2} values observed were {approximately}38 days, {approximately}47 days, {approximately}67 days and {approximately}64 days for aerobic aquatic, anaerobic aquatic, aerobic soil and anaerobic soil studies, respectively. The soil and test systems were extracted with organic solvent followed by radiocounting and chromatographic analysis. Major metabolites were isolated and identified by co-chromatography as well as mass spectrometry (GC/MS and/or LC/MS). A number of products were detected which included p-tertiary butylphenoxy cyclohexanol (TBPC), 2-[4-(2-hydroxycyclohexoxy) phenyl]-2,2-dimethyl acetic acid (TBPC-acid), p-tertiarybutyl phenol (PTBP), and 2-(p-tertiarybutyl phenoxy) cyclohexanol sulfuric acid as the identified major products. The averaged overall recoveries for the test substance in all studies were excellent (>90%). Data indicated that the propargite degraded at a moderate rate in hydrosoils either aerobically or anaerobically while in terrestrial soil, the degradation was slowed down after several months of incubation.

  4. A colonizing species has high fitness on soils with an exotic species legacy when conditioning effects are mitigated

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant interaction with soil can create feedbacks that influence intraspecific and interspecific performance. These feedbacks can either be short term, within-season soil conditioning called priority effects or longer-term influences called soil legacies. Soil conditioning and soil legacies can preve...

  5. Microbial aerobic and anaerobic degradation of acrylamide in sludge and water under environmental conditions--case study in a sand and gravel quarry.

    PubMed

    Guezennec, A G; Michel, C; Ozturk, S; Togola, A; Guzzo, J; Desroche, N

    2015-05-01

    Polyacrylamides (PAMs) are used in sand and gravel quarries as water purification flocculants for recycling process water in a recycling loop system where the flocculants remove fine particles in the form of sludge. The PAM-based flocculants, however, contain residual amounts of acrylamide (AMD) that did not react during the polymerization process. This acrylamide is released into the environment when the sludge is discharged into a settling basin. Here, we explore the microbial diversity and the potential for AMD biodegradation in water and sludge samples collected in a quarry site submitted to low AMD concentrations. The microbial diversity, analyzed by culture-dependent methods and the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis approach, reveals the presence of Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, and Actinobacteria, among which some species are known to have an AMD biodegradation activity. Results also show that the two main parts of the water recycling loop-the washing process and the settling basin-display significantly different bacterial profiles. The exposure time with residual AMD could, thus, be one of the parameters that lead to a selection of specific bacterial species. AMD degradation experiments with 0.5 g L(-1) AMD showed a high potential for biodegradation in all parts of the washing process, except the make-up water. The AMD biodegradation potential in samples collected from the washing process and settling basin was also analyzed taking into account on-site conditions: low (12 °C) and high (25 °C) temperatures reflecting the winter and summer seasons, and AMD concentrations of 50 μg L(-1). Batch tests showed rapid (as little as 18 h) AMD biodegradation under aerobic and anaerobic conditions at both the winter and summer temperatures, although there was a greater lag time before activity started with the AMD biodegradation at 12 °C. This study, thus, demonstrates that bacteria present in sludge and water samples exert an in situ and rapid

  6. Black locust--successful invader of a wide range of soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Vítková, Michaela; Tonika, Jaroslav; Müllerová, Jana

    2015-02-01

    Black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia, BL), a species native to North America, has successfully invaded many types of habitats over the world. This study provides an overall assessment of BL soil conditions to determine the range of physical-chemical soil properties it can tolerate. 511 BL stands (for the soil types) and 33 permanent plots (for the soil chemistry) were studied in the Czech Republic. Relationships among different environmental variables (physical-chemical soil properties, vegetation characteristics and habitat conditions) were investigated and variables with the highest effect on species composition were detected. The results were compared with data in the literature for other parts of the secondary and native distributions of this species. This assessment showed that BL is able to tolerate extremely diverse soil physical-chemical conditions, from extremely acid to strongly alkaline, and from medium to highly base saturated soils with a gradient of different subsurface stoniness. Soil nitrate, N mineralization and nitrification rates also varied considerably and the concentrations of exchangeable phosphorus and ammonium were consistently low. N mineralization rate, incubated inorganic nitrogen and nitrates were positively correlated with base saturation and cation exchange capacity. The most common soil types were young soils (Cambisols, Leptosols, Arenosols, and coarsely textured Fluvisols). BL seems to be limited by water supply and soil aeration and prefers well aerated and drained soils, and tolerates desiccation but avoids compact soils and areas where the soils are frequently waterlogged. On steep slopes, BL was less vigorous, stunted and less competitive. By contrast, the tallest BL trees were found on sandy soils in a flat landscape. Number and share of nitrophytes in the herb layer were positively related to basic bedrock, soil reaction and N-NO3/N ratio. Soil reaction was determined as the most important environmental characteristic

  7. Optimizing Soil Hydraulic Parameters in RZWQM2 Under Fallow Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective estimation of soil hydraulic parameters is essential for predicting soil water dynamics and related biochemical processes in agricultural systems. However, high uncertainties in estimated parameter values limit a model’s skill for prediction and application. In this study, a global search ...

  8. Greenhouse gas emissions from soil under changing environmental conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This manuscript is the Guest Editors’ Introduction to a special issue on greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture. The papers were assembled following presentation at EuroSoil 2012. Exchange of greenhouse gases between soils and the atmosphere is a natural consequence of several ecosystem process...

  9. [Morphology of soil iron oxides and its correlation with soil-forming process and forming conditions in a karst mountain].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Zhu, Zhang-Xiong; Fu, Wa-Li; Wen, Zhi-Lin

    2012-06-01

    The quantity and morphology of iron oxides are indicators of soil forming-process and forming conditions. In order to analyze the connection between soil iron oxides and soil forming conditions and degenerative process of karst ecosystem, we have chosen 14 soil profiles on the top and middle section of Jinfo Mountain, a typical karst slope in Chongqing, China. Morphology and contents of soil iron oxides were studied by using chemical selective extraction techniques. We draw conclusions: 1) total iron (Fe(t)) is mainly controlled by parent material and lithology. Significant difference of Fe(t) content exists between soils in Top Mountain (51.49 g x kg(-1), mean value from 5 profiles) and soils at the middle sector of North Slope (86.29 g x kg(-1), mean value of 9 profiles); 2) the results show low concentration of F(d) (29.16 g x kg(-1)) and low ratio of Fe(d) to Fe(t)(35.40%) in soil clay under conditions of high elevation and low temperature on Top Mountain. In contrast, the results indicate advanced weathering and soil-forming process at middle slope sites due to high temperature; this is supported by high mean values of Fe(d) (43.92 g x kg(-1)) and ratio of Fe(d)/Fe(t) in clay (60.41%); 3) long humid climatic setting and large numbers of soil organic matter on top of the mountain result in high activation degrees (F(o)/Fe(d)) and high complexation degrees (Fe(p)/Fe(d)); mean values of them are 73.51%, 17.21% respectively, which are higher than that of soils at middle slope sites (13.06%, 0.41%); 4) after degradation or deforestation of secondary forestland (pines massoniana among bushes) at middle section of the hillslope, soil free iron oxides (Fe(d)) and total iron oxides (Fe(t)) decrease as well as soil organic carbon and clay, because of progressively increasing of soil erosion. Average contents of Fe(t) and Fe(d) in clay from 2 shrub profiles are 98.25 g x kg(-1), 50.81 g x kg(-1) respectively. However, the four tillage soils we have studied reveal lower

  10. A standardized soil quality index for diverse field conditions.

    PubMed

    de Paul Obade, Vincent; Lal, Rattan

    2016-01-15

    Understanding the nexus between soil quality and productivity is constrained by data artifacts, compounded by limitations of the existing models. Here, we explore the potential of 4 regression methods (i.e., Reduced Regression (RR), SIMPLS, Principal Component Regression (PCR), and Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR)), to synthesize 10 soil physical and chemical properties acquired from 3 major management practices and different soil layers, into an unbiased soil quality index (SQI) capable of evaluating soil functions (e.g., biomass production). The data was acquired from privately owned fields within the state of Ohio, USA, at the following land use and management sites: natural vegetation (NV) or woodlands, conventional till (CT), and no-till (NT). The soils were sampled at similar landscape positions (i.e., summit) at depth intervals of 0-10, 10-20, 20-40 and 40-60 cm, and analyzed for bulk density (ρb), carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio, soil organic C (SOC), total N (TN), available water capacity (AWC), pH and electrical conductivity (EC). Preliminary analyses revealed the PLSR method as the most robust. The PLSR Variable Importance of Projection (VIP) was calculated, transformed into the SQI score and compared with yield data. SOC, ρb, C/N and EC were identified as the major variables influencing soil quality status. The data shows that the quality of Pewamo silty clay loam (Pw) soil was higher than Crosby Celina loams (CtA), Kibbie fine sandy loam (kbA), Glynwood silt loam (GWA) and Crosby silt loam (CrA), respectively. In 2012, the mean SQI was 42.9%, with corn and soybean yields of 7 and 2Mg/ha. The R(2) of SQI versus yield was 0.74 for corn (Zea mays L.), and 0.89 for soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.). Future studies will investigate techniques for mapping this SQI. PMID:26410717

  11. Nitrogen mineralization, immobilization, and nitrification following urea fertilization of a forest soil under field and laboratory conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.; Edwards, N.T.; Todd, D.E.

    1980-05-01

    Following a 200-kg urea-N/ha fertilization in a loblolly pine stand (Pinus taeda), soil mineral N levels (almost entirely NH/sub 4//sup +/) declined from 200 ppM 20 days after fertilization to < 10 ppM within 161 days. Similar patterns had been previously observed following urea fertilization in a Douglas-fir stand. After the decline in soil mineral N, 20% (40 ppM) of fertilizer N was mineralized within 4 weeks of aerobic incubation in the laboratory at 25/sup 0/C. Nitrogen mineralization in control soils did not occur after 7 weeks incubation.

  12. Adherence to abiotic surface induces SOS response in Escherichia coli K-12 strains under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Costa, Suelen B; Campos, Ana Carolina C; Pereira, Ana Claudia M; de Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luiza; Júnior, Raphael Hirata; Rosa, Ana Cláudia P; Asad, Lídia M B O

    2014-09-01

    During the colonization of surfaces, Escherichia coli bacteria often encounter DNA-damaging agents and these agents can induce several defence mechanisms. Base excision repair (BER) is dedicated to the repair of oxidative DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by chemical and physical agents or by metabolism. In this work, we have evaluated whether the interaction with an abiotic surface by mutants derived from E. coli K-12 deficient in some enzymes that are part of BER causes DNA damage and associated filamentation. Moreover, we studied the role of endonuclease V (nfi gene; 1506 mutant strain) in biofilm formation. Endonuclease V is an enzyme that is involved in DNA repair of nitrosative lesions. We verified that endonuclease V is involved in biofilm formation. Our results showed more filamentation in the xthA mutant (BW9091) and triple xthA nfo nth mutant (BW535) than in the wild-type strain (AB1157). By contrast, the mutant nfi did not present filamentation in biofilm, although its wild-type strain (1466) showed rare filaments in biofilm. The filamentation of bacterial cells attaching to a surface was a consequence of SOS induction measured by the SOS chromotest. However, biofilm formation depended on the ability of the bacteria to induce the SOS response since the mutant lexA Ind(-) did not induce the SOS response and did not form any biofilm. Oxygen tension was an important factor for the interaction of the BER mutants, since these mutants exhibited decreased quantitative adherence under anaerobic conditions. However, our results showed that the presence or absence of oxygen did not affect the viability of BW9091 and BW535 strains. The nfi mutant and its wild-type did not exhibit decreased biofilm formation under anaerobic conditions. Scanning electron microscopy was also performed on the E. coli K-12 strains that had adhered to the glass, and we observed the presence of a structure similar to an extracellular matrix that depended on the

  13. SUBSURFACE SOIL CONDITIONS BENEATH AND NEAR BUILDINGS AND THE POTENTIAL EFFECTS ON SOIL VAPOR INTRUSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Migration of volatile chemicals from the subsurface into overlying buildings is called vapor intrusion. Volatile organic chemicals in contaminated soils or groundwater can emit vapors that may migrate through subsurface soils and enter indoor air spaces of overlying buildings. T...

  14. Effect of Several Environmental Conditions on the “Thermal Death Rate” of Endospores of Aerobic, Thermophilic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yokoya, Fumio; York, George K.

    1965-01-01

    The composition of the recovery medium affected the apparent heat resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus when the pH of the medium was 7.0 but not when the pH was 6.5. The rate of thermal death at 110 C was exponential. Deviations from exponential rates of thermal death during the initial phases of heating at 96 C were observed with endospores of B. coagulans under different conditions of sporulation. Additionally, the apparent heat resistance was influenced by the composition of the media used for sporulation and recovery and by the composition of the suspending menstruum. The presence of 0.001 m sorbic acid in the suspending menstruum at pH 7.0 and the temperature of incubation of the cultures after heating did not affect the apparent heat resistance of B. coagulans. Several explanations are discussed for the observed deviations from exponential thermal death rates and the effect of the environment on the apparent heat resistance of B. coagulans. PMID:5866047

  15. Hydrogen photoproduction by nutrient-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells immobilized within thin alginate films under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kosourov, Sergey N; Seibert, Michael

    2009-01-01

    A new technique for immobilizing H2-photoproducing green algae within a thin (<400 microm) alginate film has been developed. Alginate films with entrapped sulfur/phosphorus-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, strain cc124, cells demonstrate (a) higher cell density (up to 2,000 microg Chl mL(-1) of matrix), (b) kinetics of H2 photoproduction similar to sulfur-deprived suspension cultures, (c) higher specific rates (up to 12.5 micromol mg(-1) Chl h(-1)) of H2 evolution, (d) light conversion efficiencies to H2 of over 1% and (e) unexpectedly high resistance of the H2-photoproducing system to inactivation by atmospheric O2. The algal cells, entrapped in alginate and then placed in vials containing 21% O2 in the headspace, evolved up to 67% of the H2 gas produced under anaerobic conditions. The results indicate that the lower susceptibility of the immobilized algal H2-producing system to inactivation by O2 depends on two factors: (a) the presence of acetate in the medium, which supports higher rates of respiration and (b) the capability of the alginate polymer itself to effectively separate the entrapped cells from O2 in the liquid and headspace and restrict O2 diffusion into the matrix. The strategy presented for immobilizing algal cells within thin polymeric matrices shows the potential for scale-up and possible future applications. PMID:18823051

  16. Mobility of spiromesifen in packed soil columns under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Mate, Ch Jamkhokai; Mukherjee, Irani; Das, Shaon Kumar

    2014-11-01

    On percolating water equivalent to 1,156 mm of rainfall, spiromesifen formulation did not leach out of 25-cm long columns, and 62.7 % of this was recovered in 5-10-cm soil depth. In columns treated with the analytical grade, 52.40 % of the recovered spiromesifen was confined to 0-5-cm soil depth, with 0.04 % in leachate fraction, suggesting high adsorption in soil. Results revealed that percolating 400 mL of water, residues of enol metabolite of spiromesifen was detected up to 20-25-cm soil layer, with 23.50 % residues of spiromesifen in this layer and 1.73 % in the leachate fraction indicating that metabolite is more mobile as compared to the parent compound. Results suggested a significant reduction in leaching losses of enol metabolite in amended soil columns with 5 % nano clay, farmyard manure (FYM), and vermicompost. No enol spiromesifen was recovered in the leachate in columns amended with nano clay, vermicompost, and FYM; however, 85.30, 70.5, and 65.40 %, respectively, was recovered from 0-5 cm-soil depth of column after percolating water equivalent to 1,156 mm of rainfall. Spiromesifen formulation is less mobile in sandy loam soil than analytical grade spiromesifen. The metabolite, enol spiromesifen, is relatively more mobile than the parent compound and may leach into groundwater. The study suggested that amendments were very effective in reducing the downward mobility of enol metabolite in soil column. Further, it resulted in greater retention of enol metabolite in the amendment application zone. PMID:25060860

  17. Biotoxicity of Mars soils: 1. Dry deposition of analog soils on microbial colonies and survival under Martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, Doug W.

    2012-11-01

    Six Mars analog soils were created to simulate a range of potentially biotoxic geochemistries relevant to the survival of terrestrial microorganisms on Mars, and included basalt-only (non-toxic control), salt, acidic, alkaline, aeolian, and perchlorate rich geochemistries. Experiments were designed to simulate the dry-deposition of Mars soils onto spacecraft surfaces during an active descent landing scenario with propellant engines. Six eubacteria were initially tested for tolerance to desiccation, and the spore-former Bacillus subtilis HA101 and non-spore former Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 were identified to be strongly resistant (HA101) and moderately resistant (29212) to desiccation at 24 °C. Furthermore, tests with B. subtilis and E. faecalis demonstrated that at least 1 mm of Mars analog soil was required to fully attenuate the biocidal effects of a simulated Mars-normal equatorial UV flux. Biotoxicity experiments were conducted under simulated Martian conditions of 6.9 mbar, -10 °C, CO2-enriched anoxic atmosphere, and a simulated equatorial solar spectrum (200-1100 nm) with an optical depth of 0.1. For B. subtilis, the six analog soils were found, in general, to be of low biotoxicity with only the high salt and acidic soils exhibiting the capacity to inactivate a moderate number of spores (<1 log reductions) exposed 7 days to the soils under simulated Martian conditions. In contrast, the overall response of E. faecalis to the analog soils was more dramatic with between two and three orders of magnitude reductions in viable cells for most soils, and between six and seven orders of magnitude reductions observed for the high-salt soil. Results suggest that Mars soils are likely not to be overtly biotoxic to terrestrial microorganisms, and suggest that the soil geochemistries on Mars will not preclude the habitability of the Martian surface.

  18. Hydrogen Photoproduction by Nutrient-Deprived Chalamydomonas reinhardtii Cells Immobilized Within Thin Alginate Films Under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kosourov, S. N.; Seibert, M.

    2009-01-01

    A new technique for immobilizing H{sub 2}-photoproducing green algae within a thin (<400 {micro}m) alginate film has been developed. Alginate films with entrapped sulfur/phosphorus-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, strain cc124, cells demonstrate (a) higher cell density (up to 2,000 {micro}g Chl mL{sup -1} of matrix), (b) kinetics of H{sub 2} photoproduction similar to sulfur-deprived suspension cultures, (c) higher specific rates (up to 12.5 {micro}mol mg{sup -1} Chl h{sup -1}) of H{sub 2} evolution, (d) light conversion efficiencies to H{sub 2} of over 1% and (e) unexpectedly high resistance of the H{sub 2}-photoproducing system to inactivation by atmospheric O{sub 2}. The algal cells, entrapped in alginate and then placed in vials containing 21% O{sub 2} in the headspace, evolved up to 67% of the H{sub 2} gas produced under anaerobic conditions. The results indicate that the lower susceptibility of the immobilized algal H{sub 2}-producing system to inactivation by O{sub 2} depends on two factors: (a) the presence of acetate in the medium, which supports higher rates of respiration and (b) the capability of the alginate polymer itself to effectively separate the entrapped cells from O{sub 2} in the liquid and headspace and restrict O{sub 2} diffusion into the matrix. The strategy presented for immobilizing algal cells within thin polymeric matrices shows the potential for scale-up and possible future applications.

  19. Optimization of operation conditions for the mitigation of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from aerobic nitrifying granular sludge system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Ting; Wang, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Ming-Yu; Gao, Ming-Ming; Wang, Shu-Guang

    2016-05-01

    The optimization of operation parameters is a key consideration to minimize nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions in biological nitrogen removal processes. So far, different parameters have only been investigated individually, making it difficult to compare their specific effects and combined influences. In this study, we applied the Plackett-Burman (PB) multifactorial experimental design and response surface methodology (RSM) analysis to find the optimized condition for the mitigation of N2O release in a nitrifying granular sludge system. Seven parameters (temperature, pH, feeding strategy, C/N ratio, aeration rate, Cu(2+) concentration, and aeration mode) were tested in parallel. Five of them (other than chemical oxygen demand/nitrogen (C/N) ratio and Cu(2+) concentration) were selected as influential factors. Since the type of feeding strategies and aeration modes cannot be quantified, continuous feed strategy and anoxic/oxic aeration mode were applied for the following study. Influences of temperature, pH, and aeration rate on N2O emissions were tested with RSM analysis to further investigate the mutual interactions among the parameters and to identify the optimal values that would minimize N2O release. Results showed the minimum emission value could be obtained under the temperature of 22.3 °C, pH of 7.1 and aeration rate of 0.20 m(3)/h. Predicted results were then verified by subsequent validation experiments. The estimated N2O emission value of each design by RSM was also observed in good relationships with experimental result. PMID:26841778

  20. Effects of agricultural practices of three crops on the soil communities under Mediterranean conditions: field evaluation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitão, Sara; José Cerejeira, Maria; Abreu, Manuela; Sousa, José Paulo

    2014-05-01

    Sustainable agricultural production relies on soil communities as the main actors in key soil processes necessary to maintain sustainable soil functioning. Soil biodiversity influences soil physical and chemical characteristics and thus the sustainability of crop and agro-ecosystems functioning. Agricultural practices (e.g.: soil tillage, pesticides and fertilizer applications, irrigation) may affects negatively or positively soil biodiversity and abundances by modifying the relationships between organisms in the soil ecosystem. The present study aimed to study the influence of agricultural practices of three crops (potato, onion and maize) under Mediterranean climate conditions on soil macro- and mesofauna during their entire crop cycles. Effects on soil communities were assessed at a higher tier of environmental risk assessment comprising field testing of indigenous edaphic communities in a selected study-site located in a major agriculture region of Central Portugal, Ribatejo e Oeste, neighbouring protected wetlands. A reference site near the agricultural field site was selected as a Control site to compare the terrestrial communities' composition and variation along the crop cycle. The field soil and Control site soil are sandy loam soils. Crops irrigation was performed by center-pivot (automated sprinkler that rotates in a half a circle area) and by sprinklers. Soil macro- and mesofauna were collected at both sites (field and Control) using two methodologies through pitfall trapping and soil sampling. The community of soil macro- and mesofauna of the three crops field varied versus control site along the crops cycles. Main differences were due to arachnids, coleopterans, ants and adult Diptera presence and abundance. The feeding activity of soil fauna between control site and crop areas varied only for potato and onion crops vs. control site but not among crops. Concentration of pesticides residues in soil did not cause apparent negative effects on the soil

  1. Conditional dependence of evaporative fraction on surface and root-zone soil moisture and its application to soil moisture retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, D.; Akuraju, V.

    2013-12-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) or evapotranspiration (ET) estimates from space have been gaining growing attention as an input to retrieve root-zone soil moisture. The rationale behind the approach is that i) there exists a strong causal link between the evapotranspiration and the vegetation canopy temperature and ii) under water-limited conditions soil water available for transpiration controls the evaporative fraction (EF) or the actual evapotranspiration (AET) to potential evapotranspiration (PET) ratio of vegetated surfaces. In this work, we examine the relationship between EF and surface to root-zone soil moisture content collected from two study sites (wheat and pasture fields) at the Dookie research farm site in Victoria, Australia. EF estimated from the eddy covariance system is compared with soil moisture content under various ranges of soil depths (5 depths from surface to 120 cm), net radiation, soil wetness and biomass. In both wheat and pasture fields, EF is highly correlated with surface (0-8 cm) soil moisture when the soil surface is bare-to-lightly vegetated, but the correlation decreases as vegetation grows or as the net radiation decreases. On the other hand, EF shows strong correlation with root-zone soil moisture during the growing seasons of the fields. Under similar ranges of soil moisture and net radiation, EF can have different ranges depending on the vegetation height and density. These results indicate the importance of biophysical parameters and processes in estimating surface and root-zone soil moisture contents using surface energy flux. We propose an exponential and a spherical model to fit EF versus soil moisture and show how their uncertainty changes with biophysical parameters.

  2. Modelling agricultural suitability along soil transects under current conditions and improved scenario of soil factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd-Elmabod, Sameh K.; Jordán, Antonio; Fleskens, Luuk; van der Ploeg, Martine; Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam; Anaya-Romero, María; van der Salm, Renée J.; De la Rosa, Diego

    2015-04-01

    Agricultural land suitability analysis and improvement of soils by addressing major limitations may be a strategy for climate change adaptation. This study aims to investigate the influence of topography and variability of soil factors on the suitability of 12 annual, semiannual and perennial Mediterranean crops in the province of Seville (southern Spain). In order to represent the variability in elevation, lithology and soil, two latitudinal and longitudinal (S-N and W-E) soil transects (TA and TB) were considered including 63 representative points at regular 4 km intervals. These points were represented by 41 soil profiles from the SDBm soil database -Seville. Almagra model, a component of the agro-ecological decision support system MicroLEIS, was used to assess soil suitability. Results were grouped into five soil suitability classes: S1-optimum, S2-high, S3-moderate, S4-marginal and S5-not suitable. Each class was divided in subclasses according to the main soil limiting factors: depth (p), texture (t), drainage (d), carbonate content (c), salinity (s), sodium saturation (a), and the degree of development of the soil profile (g). This research also aimed to maximize soil potential by improving limiting factors d, c, s and a after soil restoration. Therefore, management techniques were also considered as possible scenarios in this study. The results of the evaluation showed that soil suitability ranged between S1 and S5p - S5s along of the transects. In the northern extreme of transect TA, high content of gravels and coarse texture are limiting factors (soils are classified as S4t) In contrast, the limiting factor in the eastern extreme of transect TB is the shallow useful depth (S5p subclass). The absence of calcium carbonate becomes a limiting factor in some parts of TA. In contrast, the excessive content of calcium carbonate appeared to be a limiting factor for crops in some intermediate points of TB transect. For both transects, soil salinity is the main

  3. Aerobic Fitness for the Moderately Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Dan

    1981-01-01

    Intended for physical education teachers, the booklet offers ideas for incorporating aerobic conditioning into programs for moderately mentally retarded students. An explanation of aerobic fitness and its benefits is followed by information on initiating a fitness program with evaluation of height, weight, body fat, resting heart rate, and…

  4. Aerobic Dancing--A Rhythmic Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Jacki

    Fitness programs now and in the future must offer built-in cardiovascular conditioning, variety, novelty, and change to meet the physical, mental, and emotional needs of our society. Aerobic dancing (dancing designed to train and strengthen the heart, lungs, and vascular system) is one of the first indoor group Aerobic exercise programs designed…

  5. Release of Pharmaceuticals under Reducing Conditions in a Wastewater-Irrigated Mexican Soil.

    PubMed

    Dalkmann, Philipp; Dresemann, Tim-Fabian; Siebe, Christina; Mansfeldt, Tim; Amelung, Wulf; Siemens, Jan

    2014-11-01

    Wastewater irrigation is often performed by flood irrigation, leading to changes in redox potential (Eh) of irrigated soils. In addition to soil organic matter, Fe-(hydr)oxides are important sorbents for pollutants, and biotransformation of pollutants can be accelerated under reducing conditions. Here, the influence of reducing conditions on the release of sorbed pharmaceuticals from soil and their potential accelerated dissipation was investigated in a microcosm study. Samples of a soil from the Mezquital Valley (Mexico) irrigated for 85 yr with untreated wastewater were incubated under oxidizing (Eh of 500 ± 20 mV), weakly reducing (Eh of 100 ± 20 mV), and moderately reducing (Eh of -100 ± 20 mV) soil conditions for 30 to 31 d. The concentrations of nine pharmaceuticals (bezafibrate, carbamazepine, ciprofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, enrofloxacin, clarithromycin, diclofenac, and naproxen) were extracted via solid-phase extraction from soil slurries and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Low Eh did not lead to a release of formerly sorbed pharmaceuticals from the wastewater irrigated soil. High pH values (>8) of the examined soil resulting from denitrification under reducing conditions prevented the dissolution of Fe-(hydr)oxides and, hence, the potential release of pharmaceuticals. A trend of decreasing concentrations of sulfamethoxazole and bezafibrate with time under moderately reducing conditions supports previous findings of a transformation of these compounds under anaerobic conditions. PMID:25602209

  6. Soil, water, and vegetation conditions in south Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Gausman, H. W.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J.; Everitt, J. H.; Gerbermann, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Software development for a computer-aided crop and soil survey system is nearing completion. Computer-aided variety classification accuracies using LANDSAT-1 MSS data for a 600 hectare citrus farm were 83% for Redblush grapefruit and 91% for oranges. These accuracies indicate that there is good potential for computer-aided inventories of grapefruit and orange citrus orchards with LANDSAT-type MSS data. Mean digital values of clouds differed statistically from those for crop, soil, and water entities, and those for cloud shadows were enough lower than sunlit crop and soil to be distinguishable. The standard errors of estimate for the calibration of computer compatible tape coordinate system (pixel and record) to earth coordinate system (longitude and latitude) for 6 LANDSAT scenes ranged from 0.72 to 1.50 pixels and from 0.58 to 1.75 records.

  7. Organic phosphorus fractions in organically amended paddy soils in continuously and intermittently flooded conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Changming; Yang, Linzhang; Jianhua, Lee

    2006-01-01

    Soil organic phosphorus (SOP) can greatly contribute to plant-available P and P nutrition. The study was conducted to determine the effects of organic amendments on organic P fractions and microbiological activities in paddy soils. Samples were collected at the Changshu Agro-ecological Experiment Station in Tahu Lake Basin, China, from an experiment that has been performed from 1999 to 2004, on a paddy soil (Gleysols). Treatments consisted of swine manure (SM), wheat straw (WS), swine manure plus wheat straw (SM + WS), and a control (chemical fertilization alone). Organic amendments markedly increased soil total organic phosphorus (TOP) and total organic carbon (TOC), especially in continuously flooded conditions. Based on the fractionation of SOP, organic amendments significantly increased soil labile organic phosphorus (LOP), moderately labile organic phosphorus (MLOP), and moderately stable organic phosphorus (MSOP) compared with the control. For SM and SM + WS treatments, LOP in continuously flooded soils decreased by 30.1 and 36.4%, respectively, compared to intermittently flooded soils. In organically amended soils, continuous flooding showed significantly lower microbial biomass phosphorus (MBP) and alkaline phosphatase activities (APA) than intermittent flooding. In intermittently flooded conditions, incorporating organic amendments into soil resulted in greater P uptake and biomass yield of rice than the control. In the intermittently flooded soils, APA (P < 0.05) and MBP (P < 0.01) were significantly and positively related to TOP, LOP, MLOP, and MSOP, whereas in continuously flooded soils, there was a significant (P < 0.05) negative relationship between MBP, TOP, and MSOP. Based on soil organic P fractions and soil enzymatic and microbiological activities, continuous flooding applied to paddy soils should be avoided, especially when swine manure is incorporated into paddy soil. PMID:16738400

  8. Soil, water, and vegetation conditions in south Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Gausman, H. W.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J.; Everitt, J. H.; Gerbermann, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The best wavelengths in the 0.4 to 2.5 micron interval were determined for detecting lead toxicity and ozone damage, distinguishing succulent from woody species, and detecting silverleaf sunflower. A perpendicular vegetation index, a measure of the distance from the soil background line, in MSS 5 and MSS 7 data space, of pixels containing vegetation was developed and tested as an indicator of vegetation development and crop vigor. A table lookup procedure was devised that permits rapid identification of soil background and green biomass or phenological development in LANDSAT scenes without the need for training data.

  9. Soil water balance in an unsaturated pyroclastic slope for evaluation of soil hydraulic behaviour and boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirone, Marianna; Papa, Raffaele; Nicotera, Marco Valerio; Urciuoli, Gianfranco

    2015-09-01

    Flowslides in granular soils pose a major threat to life and the environment. Their initiation in unsaturated soils is regulated by rainfall infiltration which reduces the matric suction and hence shear strength. Analysis of such phenomena is of strategic importance especially when it aims to mitigate landslide risk by means of early warning systems (EWSs). In this framework, physically-based models need to reproduce the hydro-mechanical behaviour of the slopes through numerical analyses, whose main uncertainty concerns the hydraulic conditions at the boundaries of the studied domain and hydraulic conductivity functions of unsaturated soils. Hence consummate knowledge of both these factors is absolutely necessary for efficient predictions. In this paper hydraulic boundary conditions and hydraulic conductivity functions are investigated at the scale of the slope through an application of soil water balance based on in-situ monitoring at the test site of Monteforte Irpino (southern Italy). Meteorological data, matric suction and soil water content measurements were collected over four years at the test site. The soil water balance was analysed on a seasonal time scale with regard to the whole pyroclastic cover resting on the steep limestone substratum. Infiltration and runoff are estimated, interaction between the soil cover and the substratum is investigated, and the hydraulic conductivity functions operative at the site scale are defined.

  10. [Dynamics of soil microbial biomass and dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen under flooded condition].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shaojun; Peng, Peiqin; Rong, Xiangmin; Liu, Qiang; Tang, Qi

    2006-11-01

    With reddish yellow soil (RYS) and alluvial purple soil (APS), the two typical paddy soils in the Dongting Lake floodplain of China as test soils, an incubation test was conducted at 25 degrees C to study the dynamic changes of soil microbial biomass and dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen under flooded condition. Three treatments were installed, i.e., control (CK), ammonium sulfate (N), and rice straw powder plus ammonium sulfate (S-N). The results showed that during incubation, soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC), soil microbial biomass nitrogen (SMBN), soil dissolved organic carbon (SDOC), and soil dissolved organic nitrogen (SDON) reached their maximum initially, decreased thereafter, and tended to be stable. After amending the substrates to the two soils, the averages of SMBC to soil total carbon, SMBN to soil total nitrogen, SDOC to soil total carbon, and SDON to soil total nitrogen were 2% - 3%, 2% - 3%, 1% or so, and 5% - 6%, respectively. In the two soils, the peak values of SMBC in treatment N and those of SMBN, SDOC and SDON in treatment S-N were the highest, while those of SMBC in treatments N and S-N had no significant difference. The peak values of SMBN, SDOC and SDON in RYS were significantly different between treatments N and S-N, while no significant difference was observed between the peak values of SMBN and SDOC in APS, because the fertility of RYS was lower than that of APS. In the first 7 days of incubation, SMBC/SMBN ratio was < 10, while after 14 days of incubation, this ratio was higher in treatment N than in treatment S-N at the same time in the same soil. The SDOC/SDON ratio in all treatments was the highest at the 3rd d, and the lowest at the 28th d of incubation. PMID:17269325

  11. Estimating steady-state evaporation rates from bare soils under conditions of high water table

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ripple, C.D.; Rubin, J.; Van Hylckama, T. E. A.

    1970-01-01

    A procedure that combines meteorological and soil equations of water transfer makes it possible to estimate approximately the steady-state evaporation from bare soils under conditions of high water table. Field data required include soil-water retention curves, water table depth and a record of air temperature, air humidity and wind velocity at one elevation. The procedure takes into account the relevant atmospheric factors and the soil's capability to conduct 'water in liquid and vapor forms. It neglects the effects of thermal transfer (except in the vapor case) and of salt accumulation. Homogeneous as well as layered soils can be treated. Results obtained with the method demonstrate how the soil evaporation rates·depend on potential evaporation, water table depth, vapor transfer and certain soil parameters.

  12. Improved Prediction of Quasi-Global Vegetation Conditions Using Remotely-Sensed Surface Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolten, John; Crow, Wade

    2012-01-01

    The added value of satellite-based surface soil moisture retrievals for agricultural drought monitoring is assessed by calculating the lagged rank correlation between remotely-sensed vegetation indices (VI) and soil moisture estimates obtained both before and after the assimilation of surface soil moisture retrievals derived from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) into a soil water balance model. Higher soil moisture/VI lag correlations imply an enhanced ability to predict future vegetation conditions using estimates of current soil moisture. Results demonstrate that the assimilation of AMSR-E surface soil moisture retrievals substantially improve the performance of a global drought monitoring system - particularly in sparsely-instrumented areas of the world where high-quality rainfall observations are unavailable.

  13. Soil structure, colloids, and chemical transport as affected by short-term reducing conditions: a laboratory study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Upland soils in the Midwestern US often undergo reducing conditions when soils are temporally flooded during the spring and remain water saturated for days or weeks. Short-term reducing conditions change the chemistry of the soil and may affect soil structure and solution chemical transport. The eff...

  14. Volatile chemical spoilage indexes of raw Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) stored under aerobic condition in relation to microbiological and sensory shelf lives.

    PubMed

    Mikš-Krajnik, Marta; Yoon, Yong-Jin; Ukuku, Dike O; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to identify and quantify the volatile chemical spoilage indexes (CSIs) for raw Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fillets stored under aerobic storage conditions at 4, 10 and 21 °C in relation to microbial and sensory shelf lives. The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were analyzed with SPME-GC-MS technique. Through multivariate chemometric method, hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and Pearson's correlations, the CSIs: trimethylamine (TMA), ethanol (EtOH), 3-methyl-1-butanol (3Met-1But), acetoin and acetic acid (C2) were selected from the group of 28 detected VOCs. At the moment of microbiological shelf life established at total viable count (TVC) of 7.0 log CFU/g, the CSIs achieved levels of 11.5, 38.3, 0.3, 24.0 and 90.7 μg/g of salmon for TMA, EtOH, 3M-1But, acetoin and C2, respectively. Pseudomonas spp. was found as major specific spoilage organism (SSOs), suitable for shelf life prediction using modified Gompertz model at the cut-off level of 6.5 log CFU/g. H2S producing bacteria and Brochothrix thermosphacta were considered as important spoilage microorganisms; however, they were not suitable for shelf life estimation. Partial least square (PLS) regression revealed possible associations between microorganisms and synthetized VOCs, showing correlations between Pseudomonas spp. and 3Met-1But and aldehydes synthesis, lactic acid bacteria were linked with EtOH, C2 and esters, and B. thermosphacta with acetoin formation. PMID:26678146

  15. The effect of aerobic conditions on the complexation ability between mercury and humic acid from landfill leachate and its implication for the environment.

    PubMed

    Chai, Xiaoli; Hao, Yongxia; Liu, Guixiang; Li, Zhonggen; Zhao, Youcai

    2013-07-01

    Three-dimensional excitation emission matrix (3DEEM) fluorescence spectroscopy was employed to investigate the structure and characteristics of humic acid (HA) from landfills at different stabilization processes. The results show that the HA in anaerobic landfill leachate stabilized more rapidly than that in semi-aerobic landfill leachate. There were strong interactions between HA and Hg, the S content as well as the oxygen-containing ligands of the HA played a key role in the complexation with mercury. The higher complexation capacity (CL) and stability constant (logK) of HA from anaerobic landfill leachate implies that it is important to strengthen the control of mercury transportation in anaerobic landfills during the early stabilization process. The logK and CL of HA from semi-aerobic landfill leachate increased with the landfill time indicate that control of leachate Hg contamination in the latter stage is of great significance in semi-aerobic landfills. PMID:23523228

  16. Degradation of 4,5-dichloroguaiacol by soil microorganisms.

    PubMed

    González, B; Brezny, R; Herrera, M; Joyce, T W

    1995-09-01

    No microorganisms could be isolated from chemostats or from a soil column fed with 4,5-dichloroguaiacol as the only carbon source. If guaiacol was added to chemostats with 4,5-dichloroguaiacol, either soil microbial consortia or guaiacol-degrading bacteria could dechlorinate the 4,5-dichloroguaiacol provided it was <0.2MM. A microbial consortium from farm soil removed 4,5-dichloroguaiacol under aerobic or anoxic conditions, with or without chlorolignin. Dichlorocatechol was the only 4,5-dichloroguaiacol-derived metabolite detected. In aerobic incubations, 4,5-dichlorocatechol was further degraded whereas under anoxic conditions it accumulated. PMID:24414909

  17. Load dissipation by corn residue on tilled soil in laboratory and field-wheeling conditions.

    PubMed

    Reichert, José M; Brandt, André A; Rodrigues, Miriam F; Reinert, Dalvan J; Braida, João A

    2016-06-01

    Crop residues may partially dissipate applied loads and reduce soil compaction. We evaluated the effect of corn residue on energy-applied dissipation during wheeling. The experiment consisted of a preliminary laboratory test and a confirmatory field test on a Paleaudalf soil. In the laboratory, an adapted Proctor test was performed with three energy levels, with and without corn residue. Field treatments consisted of three 5.1 Mg tractor wheeling intensities (0, 2, and 6), with and without 12 Mg ha(-1) corn residue on the soil surface. Corn residue on the soil surface reduced soil bulk density in the adapted Proctor test. By applying energy of 52.6 kN m m(-3) , soil dissipated 2.98% of applied energy, whereas with 175.4 kN m m(-3) a dissipation of 8.60% was obtained. This result confirms the hypothesis that surface mulch absorbs part of the compaction effort. Residue effects on soil compaction observed in the adapted Proctor test was not replicated under subsoiled soil field conditions, because of differences in applied pressure and soil conditions (structure, moisture and volume confinement). Nevertheless, this negative result does not mean that straw has no effect in the field. Such effects should be measured via stress transmission and compared to soil load-bearing capacity, rather than on bulk deformations. Wheeling by heavy tractor on subsoiled soil increased compaction, independently of surface residue. Two wheelings produced a significantly increase, but six wheelings did not further increase compaction. Reduced traffic intensity on recently tilled soil is necessary to minimize soil compaction, since traffic intensity show a greater effect than surface mulch on soil protection from excessive compaction. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:26304050

  18. Soil transport parameters of potassium under a tropical saline soil condition using STANMOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzanye da Silva Santos, Rafaelly; Honorio de Miranda, Jarbas; Previatello da Silva, Livia

    2015-04-01

    Environmental responsibility and concerning about the final destination of solutes in soil, so more studies allow a better understanding about the solutes behaviour in soil. Potassium is a macronutrient that is required in high concentrations, been an extremely important nutrient for all agricultural crops. It plays essential roles in physiological processes vital for plant growth, from protein synthesis to maintenance of plant water balance, and is available to plants dissolved in soil water while exchangeable K is loosely held on the exchange sites on the surface of clay particles. K will tend to be adsorbed onto the surface of negatively charged soil particles. Potassium uptake is vital for plant growth but in saline soils sodium competes with potassium for uptake across the plasma membrane of plant cells. This can result in high Na+:K+ ratios that reduce plant growth and eventually become toxic. This study aimed to obtain soil transport parameters of potassium in saline soil, such as: pore water velocity in soil (v), retardation factor (R), dispersivity (λ) and dispersion coefficient (D), in a disturbed sandy soil with different concentrations of potassium chlorate solution (KCl), which is one of the most common form of potassium fertilizer. The experiment was carried out using soil samples collected in a depth of 0 to 20 cm, applying potassium chlorate solution containing 28.6, 100, 200 and 500 mg L-1 of K. To obtain transport parameters, the data were adjusted with the software STANMOD. At low concentrations, interaction between potassium and soil occur more efficiently. It was observed that only the breakthrough curve prepared with solution of 500 mg L-1 reached the applied concentration, and the solution of 28.6 mg L-1 overestimated the parameters values. The STANMOD proved to be efficient in obtaining potassium transport parameters; KCl solution to be applied should be greater than 500 mg L-1; solutions with low concentrations tend to overestimate

  19. Characterization and aerobic biodegradation of selected monoterpenes

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, G.; Pavlostathis, S.G.; Li, J.; Purdue, E.M.

    1996-12-31

    Monoterpenes are biogenic chemicals and occur in abundance in nature. Large-scale industrial use of these chemicals has recently been initiated in an attempt to replace halogenated solvents and chlorofluorocarbons which have been implicated in the stratospheric depletion of ozone. This study examined four hydrocarbon monoterpenes (d-limonene, {alpha}-pinene, {gamma}-terpinene, and terpinolene) and four alcohols (arbanol, linalool, plinol, and {alpha}-terpineol). Water solubility, vapor pressure, and octanol/water partition coefficients were estimated. Aerobic biodegradability tests were conducted in batch reactors by utilizing forest soil extract and enriched cultures as inoculum. The hydrophobic nature and high volatility of the hydrocarbons restricted the investigation to relatively low aqueous concentrations. Each monoterpene was analyzed with a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector after extraction from the aqueous phase with isooctane. Terpene mineralization was tested by monitoring liquid-phase carbon, CO{sub 2} production and biomass growth. All four hydrocarbons and two alcohols readily degraded under aerobic conditions. Plinol resisted degradation in assays using inocula from diverse sources, while arbanol degraded very slowly. The intrinsic biokinetics coefficients for the degradation of d-limonene and {alpha}-terpineol were estimated by using cultures enriched with the respective monoterpenes. Monoterpene biodegradation followed Monod kinetics.

  20. Differential sensitivity of aerobic gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms to 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) leads to dissimilar growth and TNT transformation: Results of soil and pure culture studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, M.E.; Manning, J.F. Jr.

    1996-07-30

    The effects of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) on indigenous soil populations and pure bacterial cultures were examined. The number of colony-forming units (CFU) appearing when TNT-contaminated soil was spread on 0.3% molasses plates decreased by 50% when the agar was amended with 67 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1}, whereas a 99% reduction was observed when uncontaminated soil was plated. Furthermore, TNT-contaminated soil harbored a greater number of organisms able to grow on plates amended with greater than 10 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1}. The percentage of gram-positive isolates was markedly less in TNT-contaminated soil (7%; 2 of 30) than in uncontaminated soil (61%; 20 of 33). Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas corrugate, Pseudomonasfluorescens and Alcaligenes xylosoxidans made up the majority of the gram-negative isolates from TNT-contaminated soil. Gram-positive isolates from both soils demonstrated marked growth inhibition when greater than 8-16 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1} was present in the culture media. Most pure cultures of known aerobic gram-negative organisms readily degraded TNT and evidenced net consumption of reduced metabolites. However, pure cultures of aerobic gram-positive bacteria were sensitive to relatively low concentrations of TNT as indicated by the 50% reduction in growth and TNT transformation which was observed at approximately 10 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1}. Most non-sporeforming gram-positive organisms incubated in molasses media amended with 80 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1} or greater became unculturable, whereas all strains tested remained culturable when incubated in mineral media amended with 98 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1}, indicating that TNT sensitivity is likely linked to cell growth. These results indicate that gram-negative organisms are most likely responsible for any TNT transformation in contaminated soil, due to their relative insensitivity to high TNT concentrations and their ability to transform TNT.

  1. Forest soil respiration rate and delta13C is regulated by recent above ground weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Ekblad, Alf; Boström, Björn; Holm, Anders; Comstedt, Daniel

    2005-03-01

    Soil respiration, a key component of the global carbon cycle, is a major source of uncertainty when estimating terrestrial carbon budgets at ecosystem and higher levels. Rates of soil and root respiration are assumed to be dependent on soil temperature and soil moisture yet these factors often barely explain half the seasonal variation in soil respiration. We here found that soil moisture (range 16.5-27.6% of dry weight) and soil temperature (range 8-17.5 degrees C) together explained 55% of the variance (cross-validated explained variance; Q2) in soil respiration rate (range 1.0-3.4 micromol C m(-2) s(-1)) in a Norway spruce (Picea abies) forest. We hypothesised that this was due to that the two components of soil respiration, root respiration and decomposition, are governed by different factors. We therefore applied PLS (partial least squares regression) multivariate modelling in which we, together with below ground temperature and soil moisture, used the recent above ground air temperature and air humidity (vapour pressure deficit, VPD) conditions as x-variables. We found that air temperature and VPD data collected 1-4 days before respiration measurements explained 86% of the seasonal variation in the rate of soil respiration. The addition of soil moisture and soil temperature to the PLS-models increased the Q2 to 93%. delta13C analysis of soil respiration supported the hypotheses that there was a fast flux of photosynthates to root respiration and a dependence on recent above ground weather conditions. Taken together, our results suggest that shoot activities the preceding 1-6 days influence, to a large degree, the rate of root and soil respiration. We propose this above ground influence on soil respiration to be proportionally largest in the middle of the growing season and in situations when there is large day-to-day shifts in the above ground weather conditions. During such conditions soil temperature may not exert the major control on root respiration. PMID

  2. Stress, deformation and micromorphological aspects of soil freezing under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetchick, Elizabeth

    In this thesis, frost heave is viewed as a process resulting from the interactions between thermodynamic conditions, soil environment controls such as texture, stress/deformation conditions and soil microstructure. A series of laboratory experiments was devised to investigate the links between these aspects. Because a limited number of studies exist on the development of internal stresses and strains in freezing soil, the work focussed on obtaining rheological data using conventional soil strain gauges and prototype stress transducers. A fine-grained unstructured silt was placed in a column (30 cm diameter by 100 cm length) and subjected to freezing and freeze-thaw cycles from the top down, lasting up to three months. Heat and water flows, as well as stresses and strains were monitored. The frozen soil was sectioned at the end of four of the experiments to examine the soil fabrics that had developed. From the experimental results, schematic stress and strain curves are proposed. For a single freeze cycle, compressive normal and tensile normal stresses were recorded simultaneously by the measuring devices within the freezing soil profile. Ice lens inception took place when the stress field changed, a condition which occurred either at the frost front level or at the base of the growing ice lens. Negative and positive strains reflected the different stress states that were sustained below and above the freezing front. Negative strains or soil consolidation took place as stresses increased before the passage of the frost line. Negligible soil strains were recorded as maximum soil consolidation was attained, before soil expansion. Distinct positive strain patterns indicating secondary and continuing heave, were recorded simultaneously throughout a thickness of soil, over a range of temperatures. Ice lens growth mostly took place as secondary frost heave, but continuing heave was measured, and the temperature conditions for both types of heave were determined. During

  3. Teaching Aerobic Fitness Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Allan N.; Ratliffe, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to teach aerobic fitness concepts to elementary students. Some of the K-2 activities include location, size, and purpose of the heart and lungs; the exercise pulse; respiration rate; and activities to measure aerobic endurance. Some of the 3-6 activities include: definition of aerobic endurance; heart disease risk factors;…

  4. Degradation of the Herbicide Metolachlor in Drummer Soil Under Different Redox Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the role of microorganisms and effect of soil environmental conditions on herbicide fate is critical for stewardship of herbicide use in cropping systems. As compared to the modernized perceptions of soil redox status, diminutive progress has been made in characterizing the impact of a...

  5. Antecedent conditions influence soil respiration differences in shrub and grass patches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying the response of soil respiration to past environmental conditions is critical for predicting how future climate and vegetation change will impact ecosystem carbon balance. Increased shrub dominance in semiarid grasslands has potentially large effects on soil carbon cycling. The goal of t...

  6. Leaf area index determination of wheat indicating heterogeneous soil conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, K.; Eitzinger, J.; Rischbeck, P.; Schneider, W.; Suppan, F.; Weihs, P.

    2006-09-01

    The objective of this study, which is part of the project "crop drought stress monitoring by remote sensing" (DROSMON), is to assess the potential of hyperspectral imagery to determine drought stress of crops due to heterogeneous soil composition by estimating the leaf area index (LAI). LAI, which characterizes the actual status of the crops and therefore the potential yield, may be seen as the most important parameter indicating medium term drought stress. As a result of former river meanders, the soils in the Marchfeld region are interrupted by bands of lighter soil. The higher content of sand in the bands leads to a lower water storage capacity and consequently to a decrease in plant growth. An airborne HyMap image was acquired in June 2005 during anthesis stage of wheat. Inversion of a radiative transfer model by means of a look-up-table (LUT) approach was performed to retrieve LAI and other canopy parameters from wheat canopy reflectance. Additionally, the LAI was estimated by establishing empirical relationships between LAI and spectral indices (MSAVI, TVI and MTVI2). Both ways of LAI estimation showed a reasonable correlation to final yield measurements obtained one month after the image data acquisition. However, there was a slightly better agreement of model inversion results. The results suggest the applicability of hyperspectral imagery to map potential drought risk of (wheat) fields.

  7. Uranium partitioning under acidic conditions in a sandy soil aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.H. |; Serkiz, S.M.; Johnson, L.M.

    1995-07-01

    The partitioning of uranium in an aquifer down gradient of two large mixed waste sites was examined with respect to the solution and soil chemistry (e.g., pH redox potential and contaminant concentration) and aqueous-phase chemical speciation. This involved generation of field-derived, batch sorption, and reactive mineral surface sorption data. Field-derived distribution coefficients for uranium at these waste sites were found to vary between 0.40 and 15,000. Based on thermodynamic speciation modeling and a comparison of field and laboratory data, gibbsite is a potential reactive mineral surface present in modified soils at the sites. Uranium partitioning data are presented from field samples and laboratory studies of background soil and the mineral surface gibbsite. Mechanistic and empirical sorption models fit to the field-derived uranium partitioning data show an improvement of over two orders of magnitude, as measured by the normalized sum of errors squared, when compared with the single K{sub d} model used in previous risk work. Models fit to batch sorption data provided a better fit of sorbed uranium than do models fit to the field-derived data.

  8. Breaking The Enzymatic Latch: Do Anaerobic Conditions Constrain Decomposition In Humid Tropical Forest Soil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S. J.; Silver, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    Anaerobic conditions have been proposed to impose a "latch" on soil organic matter decomposition by inhibiting the activity of extracellular enzymes that catalyze the transformation of organic polymers into monomers for microbial assimilation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that anaerobiosis inhibits soil hydrolytic enzyme activity in a humid tropical forest ecosystem in Puerto Rico. We sampled surface and sub-surface soil from each of 59 plots (n = 118) stratified across distinct topographical zones (ridges, slopes, and valleys) known to vary in soil oxygen (O2) concentrations, and measured the potential activity of five hydrolytic enzymes that decompose carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) substrates. We measured reduced iron (Fe (II)) concentrations in soil extractions to provide a spatially and temporally integrated index of anaerobic microbial activity, since iron oxides constitute the dominant anaerobic terminal electron acceptor in this ecosystem. Surprisingly, we observed positive relationships between Fe (II) concentrations and the activity of all enzymes that we assayed. Linear mixed effects models that included Fe (II) concentration, topographic position, and their interaction explained between 30 to 70 % of the variance of enzyme activity of β-1,4-glucosidase, β-cellobiohydrolase, β-xylosidase, N-acetylglucosaminidase, and acid phosphatase. Soils from ridges and slopes contained between 10 and 800 μg Fe (II) g-1 soil, and exhibited consistently positive relationships (p < 0.0001) between Fe (II) and enzyme activity. Valley soils did not display significant relationships between enzyme activity and Fe (II), although they displayed variation in soil Fe (II) concentrations similar to ridges and slopes. Overall, valleys exhibited lower enzyme activity and lower Fe (II) concentrations than ridges or slopes, possibly related to decreased root biomass and soil C. Our data provide no indication that anaerobiosis suppresses soil enzyme activity, but

  9. Influence of soil conditions on dissolved organic matter leached from forest and wetland soils: a controlled growth chamber study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Ah; Nguyen, Hang Vo-Minh; Oh, Hae Sung; Hur, Jin; Choi, Jung Hyun

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of various soil conditions, including drying-rewetting, nitrogen deposition, and temperature rise, on the quantities and the composition of dissolved organic matter leached from forest and wetland soils. A set of forest and wetland soils with and without the nitrogen deposition were incubated in the growth chambers under three different temperatures. The moisture contents were kept constant, except for two-week drying intervals. Comparisons between the original and the treated samples revealed that drying-rewetting was a crucial environmental factor driving changes in the amount of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The DOC was also notably increased by the nitrogen deposition to the dry forest soil and was affected by the temperature of the dry wetland soil. A parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis identified three sub-fractions of the fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) from the fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), and their compositions depended on drying-rewetting. The data as a whole, including the DOC and PARAFAC components and other optical indices, were possibly explained by the two main variables, which were closely related with the PARAFAC components and DOC based on principal component analysis (PCA). Our results suggested that the DOC and PARAFAC component information could provide a comprehensive interpretation of the changes in the soil-leached DOM in response to the different environmental conditions. PMID:26561321

  10. An analysis of the dissipation of pharmaceuticals under thirteen different soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Kodešová, Radka; Kočárek, Martin; Klement, Aleš; Golovko, Oksana; Koba, Olga; Fér, Miroslav; Nikodem, Antonín; Vondráčková, Lenka; Jakšík, Ondřej; Grabic, Roman

    2016-02-15

    The presence of human and veterinary pharmaceuticals in the environment is recognized as a potential threat. Pharmaceuticals have the potential to contaminate soils and consequently surface and groundwater. Knowledge of contaminant behavior (e.g., sorption onto soil particles and degradation) is essential when assessing contaminant migration in the soil and groundwater environment. We evaluated the dissipation half-lives of 7 pharmaceuticals in 13 soils. The data were evaluated relative to the soil properties and the Freundlich sorption coefficients reported in our previous study. Of the tested pharmaceuticals, carbamazepine had the greatest persistence (which was mostly stable), followed by clarithromycin, trimethoprim, metoprolol, clindamycin, sulfamethoxazole and atenolol. Pharmaceutical persistence in soils was mostly dependent on the soil-type conditions. In general, lower average dissipation half-lives and variability (i.e., trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, clindamycin, metoprolol and atenolol) were found in soils of better quality (well-developed structure, high nutrition content etc.), and thus, probably better microbial conditions (i.e., Chernozems), than in lower quality soil (Cambisols). The impact of the compound sorption affinity onto soil particles on their dissipation rate was mostly negligible. Although there was a positive correlation between compound dissipation half-life and Freundlich sorption coefficient for clindamycin (R=0.604, p<0.05) and sulfamethoxazole (R=0.822, p<0.01), the half-life of sulfamethoxazole also decreased under better soil-type conditions. Based on the calculated dissipation and sorption data, carbamazepine would be expected to have the greatest potential to migrate in the soil water environment, followed by sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim and metoprolol. The transport of clindamycin, clarithromycin and atenolol through the vadose zone seems less probable. PMID:26657382

  11. Changes in mineral soil biogeochemical cycling and environmental conditions following tree harvest in the Northeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vario, C.; Friedland, A.

    2012-12-01

    In the northeastern United States, reductions in carbon dioxide emissions have been attempted by using local wood as a renewable alternative to oil. Although woody biomass products are readily available, recent findings suggest that forest disturbance may cause release of carbon from the deeper mineral soil. Worldwide, deep soils sequester more than half of soil carbon, making it critical in the global carbon cycle; however, most studies on the effect of harvesting have focused on the organic soil horizon. Our research aimed to uncover changes in biogeochemistry and environmental conditions in deeper, mineral soil after clear cutting forests. We quantified post-harvest mineral soil carbon pools through a regional study. We utilized stands of different ages to measure the recovery of soil carbon over time since harvest. Stands included in this study were cut approximately 5, 12, 25, 50, or 120 ybp, in order to identify changes in soil carbon over time since harvest. We sampled harvested stands in six research or protected forests across New York, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Vermont. Soil samples were collected to a depth of 60 cm below the surface of the mineral soil using a gas-powered augur and 9.5 cm diameter drill bit. Soil samples were analyzed at Dartmouth College. In order to understand specific changes in mineral soil carbon dynamics following harvest, measurements of carbon fluxes, such as soil respiration and DOC transport were conducted at five different-aged stands at Bartlett Experimental Forest, NH. While parameters that may influence carbon storage—such as pH, clay content, tree cover and elevation— did not vary across the different-aged stands in each forest, carbon pools did vary over time. We found changes in carbon pools in at least three experimental forests across the northeast. At Bartlett Experimental Forest, we found a gradual decline in mineral soil carbon storage from between 85-87 Mg ha-1 in 120 year old and primary forest stands

  12. Soil, Water, and Vegetation Conditions in South Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Gausman, H. W.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Reflectance differences between the dead leaves of six crops (corn, cotton, sorghum, sugar cane, citrus, and avocado) and the respective bare soils where the dead leaves were lying on the ground were determined from laboratory spectrophotometric measurements over the 0.5- to 2.5 micron wavelength interval. The largest differences were in the near infrared waveband 0.75- to 1.35 microns. Leaf area index was predicted from plant height, percent ground cover, and plant population for irrigated and nonirrigated grain sorghum fields for the 1975 growing season.

  13. Sensitivity of Polygonum aviculare Seeds to Light as Affected by Soil Moisture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Batlla, Diego; Nicoletta, Marcelo; Benech-Arnold, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims It has been hypothesized that soil moisture conditions could affect the dormancy status of buried weed seeds, and, consequently, their sensitivity to light stimuli. In this study, an investigation is made of the effect of different soil moisture conditions during cold-induced dormancy loss on changes in the sensitivity of Polygonum aviculare seeds to light. Methods Seeds buried in pots were stored under different constant and fluctuating soil moisture environments at dormancy-releasing temperatures. Seeds were exhumed at regular intervals during storage and were exposed to different light treatments. Changes in the germination response of seeds to light treatments during storage under the different moisture environments were compared in order to determine the effect of soil moisture on the sensitivity to light of P. aviculare seeds. Key Results Seed acquisition of low-fluence responses during dormancy release was not affected by either soil moisture fluctuations or different constant soil moisture contents. On the contrary, different soil moisture environments affected seed acquisition of very low fluence responses and the capacity of seeds to germinate in the dark. Conclusions The results indicate that under field conditions, the sensitivity to light of buried weed seeds could be affected by the soil moisture environment experienced during the dormancy release season, and this could affect their emergence pattern. PMID:17430979

  14. Bioactivity of Several Herbicides on the Nanogram Level Under Different Soil Moisture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Jung, S C; Kuk, Y I; Senseman, S A; Ahn, H G; Seong, C N; Lee, D J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a double-tube centrifuge method was employed to determine the effects of soil moisture on the bioactivity of cafenstrole, pretilachlor, benfuresate, oxyfluorfen and simetryn. In general, the available herbicide concentration in soil solution (ACSS) showed little change as soil moisture increased for herbicides. The total available herbicide in soil solution (TASS) typically increased as soil moisture increased for all herbicides. The relationship between TASS and % growth rate based on dry weight showed strong linear relationships for both cafenstrole and pretilachlor, with r2 values of 0.95 and 0.84, respectively. Increasing TASS values were consistent with increasing herbicide water solubility, with the exception of the ionizable herbicide simetryn. Plant absorption and % growth rate exhibited a strong linear relationship with TASS. According to the results suggested that TASS was a better predictor of herbicidal bioactivity than ACSS for all herbicides under unsaturated soil moisture conditions. PMID:26328425

  15. Transformation of diphenylarsinic acid in agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Maejima, Yuji; Arao, Tomohito; Baba, Koji

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the transformation and fate of diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) during incubation in two types of soils (Entisol and Andisol) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Under anaerobic conditions only, DPAA was transformed into methyldiphenylarsine oxide by methylation. Under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, DPAA was degraded to phenylarsonic acid by dephenylation, and phenylarsonic acid was subsequently methylated to form methylphenylarsinic acid and dimethylphenylarsine oxide. The degradation of DPAA in the Andisol was less extensive than in the Entisol. In autoclaved soil under anaerobic conditions, DPAA underwent little degradation during the 24-wk incubation. In unautoclaved soils, the concentration of DPAA in soil clearly decreased after 24 wk of incubation, indicating that DPAA degradation was driven by microbial activity. PMID:21488495

  16. Penman-Monteith Evapotranspiration under Soil Moisture Limiting Conditions across California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdy, A. J.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions soil moisture often limits the flux of water to meet the atmospheric evapotranspiration (ET) demand. Potentially drier conditions and more variable precipitation and snow in California create a need to better understand how this reservoir limits ET across the state. The upcoming Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission's surface and root zone soil moisture data will provide additional information to force observation based ET models at spatial scales ranging from 3-36 km2. To support application of SMAP data to ET modeling we investigate the role of soil moisture within the Penman-Monteith representation at FLUXNET and agricultural sites across California. We present findings on actual ET under soil moisture limiting conditions that do not violate assumptions within this modeling framework.

  17. Reclaimed wastewater: impact on soil-plant system under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Pereira, B F F; He, Z L; Silva, M S; Herpin, U; Nogueira, S F; Montes, C R; Melfi, A J

    2011-08-15

    This study investigated the ionic speciation of reclaimed urban wastewater (RWW), and the impact of increasing RWW irrigation rates on soil properties and plant nutrition under field conditions. Most RWW elements (>66%) are readily available as NH(4)(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), K(+), SO(4)(2-), Cl(-), H(3)BO(3), Mn(2+) and Zn(2+), but in imbalanced proportion for plant nutrition. Lead, Cd, Cr and Al in RWW are mostly bounded with DOM or OH(-).(.)Irrigation with RWW decreased soil acidity, which is beneficial to the acidic tropical soil. Although RWW irrigation builds exchangeable Na(+) up, the excessive Na(+) was leached out of the soil profile after a rainy summer season (>400 mm). Benefits of the disposal of RWW to the soil under tropical conditions were discussed, however, the over irrigation with RWW (>100% of crop evapotranspiration) led to a nutritional imbalance, accumulating S and leading to a plant deficiency of P and K. PMID:21616587

  18. The dissipation of hexazinone in tropical soils under semi-controlled field conditions in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Lalah, Joseph O; Muendo, Bonface M; Getenga, Zachary M

    2009-09-01

    The dissipation of hexazinone (Velpar) in two tropical soil types in Kenya was studied under field and semi-controlled conditions for a period of 84 days. The dissipation was found to be very rapid and this could be attributed to adverse weather conditions including high initial rainfall as well as to low soil-organic-matter content, volatilization, surface run-off and biodegradation. The DT(50) values of dissipation obtained by first order kinetics were 20 days and 21.3 days in clay and loam soil types, respectively. The influence of bargasse compost (1000 microg/g dry soil) was also studied and was found to enhance dissipation to some extent, giving DT(50) values of 18 days and 18.3 days in clay and loam soil types, respectively. PMID:20183079

  19. Soil layer condensation peak as a response to soil water properties under Sudanese climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, S.; Motelica-Heino, M.; Ozier-Lafontaine, H.

    2012-04-01

    The soil apparent density is strongly dependent on their physico-chemical properties. It can be negatively impacted by human activities such as soil work or animal pasture or natural salinity influenced by irrigation.. In contrast it can be improved for different depths by agricultural practices. A « condensation peak » defined as an increase in the apparent density was found for the heterogeneous soils of Niger for several profiles of 5 soil classes and for a very shallow depth (10 cm maximum) with a very variable extreme depth (from 35 to 150 cm) associated with extreme density values (from 1.45 to 2). The depth of this peak, for soils neither saline nor vertic, varies inversely with the proportion of soil fine elements (silts+clays). However it corresponds to an average value of useful water (AWC) of 100mm (CV=24.4%). In sodic and alkaline soils this peak can be observed at shallow depths (from 53 to 61cm with a CV from 15 to 40%), thus for much lower AWC values (from 74 to 87cm with a CV from 26 to 47%). It can be found either below or above an impermeable horizon of a maximal density of 2.. This peak is likely to be associated with a multi-annual alternance of humectation-dessication at this depth. Its occurrence is based on an interplay of intrinsic physical and hydric soil properties but also on extrisnic parameters sch as the pluviometry, the location at the scale of the watershed and the micromodelling.

  20. Effect of soil surface conditions on runoff velocity and sediment mean aggregate diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    César Ramos, Júlio; Bertol, Ildegardis; Paz González, Antonio; de Souza Werner, Romeu; Marioti, Juliana; Henrique Bandeira, Douglas; Andrighetti Leolatto, Lidiane

    2013-04-01

    Soil cover and soil management are the factors that most influence soil erosion by water, because they directly affect soil surface roughness and surface cover. The main effect of soil cover by crop residues consists in dissipation of kinetic energy of raindrops and also partly kinetic energy of runoff, so that the soil disaggregation is considerably reduced but, in addition, soil cover captures detached soil particles, retains water on its surface and decreases runoff volume and velocity. In turn, soil surface roughness, influences soil surface water storage and infiltration and also runoff volume and velocity, sediment retention and subsequently water and sediment losses. Based on the above rationale, we performed a field experiment to assess the influence of soil cover and soil surface roughness on decay of runoff velocity as well as on mean diameter of transported sediments (D50 index). The following treatments were evaluated: SRR) residues of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) on a smooth soil surfcace, SRV) residues of common vetch (Vicia sativa) on a smooth soil surface, SSR) scarification after cultivation of Italian ryegrass resulting in a rough surface, SSV) scarification after cultivation of common vetch resulting in a rough surface, and SBS) scarified bare soil with high roughness as a control. The field experiments was performed on an Inceptisol in South Brazil under simulated rainfall conditions during 2012. Experimental plots were 11 m long and 3.5 m wide with an area of 38.5 m2. Six successive simulated rainfall tests were applied using a rotating-boom rain simulator. During each test, rain intensity was 60 mmhr-1, whereas rain duration was 90 minutes. Runoff velocity showed no significant differences between cultivated treatments. However, when compared to bare soil treatment, SBS (0.178 m s-1) and irrespective of the presence of surface crop residues or scarification operations, cultivated soil treatments significantly reduced runoff velocity

  1. Sensitivity of soil moisture initialization for decadal predictions under different regional climatic conditions in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodayar, S.; Sehlinger, A.; Feldmann, H.; Kottmeier, C.

    2015-12-01

    The impact of soil initialization is investigated through perturbation simulations with the regional climate model COSMO-CLM. The focus of the investigation is to assess the sensitivity of simulated extreme periods, dry and wet, to soil moisture initialization in different climatic regions over Europe and to establish the necessary spin up time within the framework of decadal predictions for these regions. Sensitivity experiments consisted of a reference simulation from 1968 to 1999 and 5 simulations from 1972 to 1983. The Effective Drought Index (EDI) is used to select and quantify drought status in the reference run to establish the simulation time period for the sensitivity experiments. Different soil initialization procedures are investigated. The sensitivity of the decadal predictions to soil moisture initial conditions is investigated through the analysis of water cycle components' (WCC) variability. In an episodic time scale the local effects of soil moisture on the boundary-layer and the propagated effects on the large-scale dynamics are analysed. The results show: (a) COSMO-CLM reproduces the observed features of the drought index. (b) Soil moisture initialization exerts a relevant impact on WCC, e.g., precipitation distribution and intensity. (c) Regional characteristics strongly impact the response of the WCC. Precipitation and evapotranspiration deviations are larger for humid regions. (d) The initial soil conditions (wet/dry), the regional characteristics (humid/dry) and the annual period (wet/dry) play a key role in the time that soil needs to restore quasi-equilibrium and the impact on the atmospheric conditions. Humid areas, and for all regions, a humid initialization, exhibit shorter spin up times, also soil reacts more sensitive when initialised during dry periods. (e) The initial soil perturbation may markedly modify atmospheric pressure field, wind circulation systems and atmospheric water vapour distribution affecting atmospheric stability

  2. Delayed formation of zero-valent selenium nanoparticles by Bacillus mycoides SeITE01 as a consequence of selenite reduction under aerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Selenite (SeO32−) oxyanion shows severe toxicity to biota. Different bacterial strains exist that are capable of reducing SeO32− to non-toxic elemental selenium (Se0), with the formation of Se nanoparticles (SeNPs). These SeNPs might be exploited for technological applications due to their physico-chemical and biological characteristics. The present paper discusses the reduction of selenite to SeNPs by a strain of Bacillus sp., SeITE01, isolated from the rhizosphere of the Se-hyperaccumulator legume Astragalus bisulcatus. Results Use of 16S rRNA and GyrB gene sequence analysis positioned SeITE01 phylogenetically close to B. mycoides. On agarized medium, this strain showed rhizoid growth whilst, in liquid cultures, it was capable of reducing 0.5 and 2.0 mM SeO32− within 12 and 24 hours, respectively. The resultant Se0 aggregated to form nanoparticles and the amount of Se0 measured was equivalent to the amount of selenium originally added as selenite to the growth medium. A delay of more than 24 hours was observed between the depletion of SeO32 and the detection of SeNPs. Nearly spherical-shaped SeNPs were mostly found in the extracellular environment whilst rarely in the cytoplasmic compartment. Size of SeNPs ranged from 50 to 400 nm in diameter, with dimensions greatly influenced by the incubation times. Different SeITE01 protein fractions were assayed for SeO32− reductase capability, revealing that enzymatic activity was mainly associated with the membrane fraction. Reduction of SeO32− was also detected in the supernatant of bacterial cultures upon NADH addition. Conclusions The selenite reducing bacterial strain SeITE01 was attributed to the species Bacillus mycoides on the basis of phenotypic and molecular traits. Under aerobic conditions, the formation of SeNPs were observed both extracellularly or intracellullarly. Possible mechanisms of Se0 precipitation and SeNPs assembly are suggested. SeO32− is proposed to be enzimatically reduced to

  3. Influence of food colorant and initial COD concentration on the efficiencies of micro-aerobic sequencing batch reactor (micro-aerobic SBR) for casein recovery under non-sterile condition by Lactobacillus casei TISTR 1500.

    PubMed

    Seesuriyachan, Phisit; Chaiyaso, Thanongsak; Sasaki, Ken; Techapun, Charin

    2009-09-01

    The acid biocoagulants produced from non-sterile lactic acid fermentation by Lactobacillus casei TISTR 1500 were used to settle colloidal protein, mainly casein, at the isoelectric point in dairy effluent prior to secondary treatment. High concentration of azo dye (Ponceau 4R) in the dairy wastewater and the stress of starvation decreased the efficiencies of the micro-aerobic SBR. Consequently, low casein recovery obtained and organic removal suffered a decline. The number of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) also declined from log 7.4 to log 5.30 in the system fed with 400 mg L(-1) of the dye containing wastewater. The recovery of the system, however, showed that 25,000 mg COD L(-1) influent with 200 mg L(-1) of the dye maintained the growth of LAB in the range of log 7.74-8.12, with lactic and acetic production (2597 and 197 mg L(-1)) and 83% protein removal. The results in this study suggested that the inhibitory effects were compensated with high organic content feeding. PMID:19423333

  4. River basin soil-vegetation condition assessment applying mathematic simulation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Natalia; Trifonova, Tatiana; Shirkin, Leonid

    2013-04-01

    Meticulous attention paid nowadays to the problem of vegetation cover productivity changes is connected also to climate global transformation. At the same time ecosystems anthropogenic transformation, basically connected to the changes of land use structure and human impact on soil fertility, is developing to a great extent independently from climatic processes and can seriously influence vegetation cover productivity not only at the local and regional levels but also globally. Analysis results of land use structure and soil cover condition influence on river basin ecosystems productive potential is presented in the research. The analysis is carried out applying integrated characteristics of ecosystems functioning, space images processing results and mathematic simulation methods. The possibility of making permanent functional simulator defining connection between macroparameters of "phytocenosis-soil" system condition on the basis of basin approach is shown. Ecosystems of river catchment basins of various degrees located in European part of Russia were chosen as research objects. For the integrated assessment of ecosystems soil and vegetation conditions the following characteristics have been applied: 1. Soil-productional potential, characterizing the ability of natural and natural-anthropogenic ecosystem in certain soil-bioclimatic conditions for long term reproduction. This indicator allows for specific phytomass characteristics and ecosystem produce, humus content in soil and bioclimatic parameters. 2. Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) has been applied as an efficient, remotely defined, monitoring indicator characterizing spatio-temporal unsteadiness of soil-productional potential. To design mathematic simulator functional simulation methods and principles on the basis of regression, correlation and factor analysis have been applied in the research. Coefficients values defining in the designed static model of phytoproductivity distribution has been

  5. Influences of solution chemical conditions on mobilization of TNT from contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Dante, D.A.; Tiller, C.L.; Pennell, K.D.

    1996-12-31

    2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and its byproducts are common contaminants on US military installations. Many potential remediation processes are in part limited by the transfer of TNT from the contaminated soil into the aqueous phase. The purpose of this research is to assess the release of TNT from contaminated soil under varying solution chemical conditions. In particular, influences of pH, aquatic natural organic matter, and addition of two surfactants is investigated. Uncontaminated soil was collected from a near-surface site at the Alabama Army Ammunition Plant and was artificially contaminated with TNT prior to the mobilization experiments. Results for the pH experiments show that more TNT is mobilized at neutral pH conditions than at low pH conditions. The presence of dissolved organic matter enhances the release of TNT from soil, but not by a large amount. Surfactant addition has the most significant effect on TNT mobilization.

  6. Soil, water, and vegetation conditions in south Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Gausman, H. W.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J.; Everitt, J. H.; Gerbermann, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Field spectral measurements and laboratory densitometric measurements showed that tree canopy reflectance differences among the Marrs, Redblush, and Valencia varieties in the visible spectral region were due to their different leaf chlorophyll concentrations. Field measurements of visible light reflectance were directly related to the tonal responses on infrared color photos of the varietal tree canopies. Consequently, densitometric measurements of the foliage on the infrared color transparency with red-filtered light successfully discriminated among the three varieties. Reflectance measurements with a field spectroradiometer on nine dates the growing season of two wheat varieties, Milam and Penjamo, documented their spectra over the 0.45 to 2.50 micron wavelength interval associated with plant cover and physiological development. An image analyzer system was used to optically planimeter the percentage of soil background, vegetation and shadow in the vertical photographs taken within the FOV of the spectroradiometer on each measurement date.

  7. Assessment of possibilities and conditions of irrigation in Hungary by digital soil map products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laborczi, Annamária; Bakacsi, Zsófia; Takács, Katalin; Szatmári, Gábor; Szabó, József; Pásztor, László

    2016-04-01

    Sustaining proper soil moisture is essentially important in agricultural management. However, irrigation can be really worth only, if we lay sufficient emphasis on soil conservation. Nationwide planning of irrigation can be taken place, if we have spatially exhaustive maps and recommendations for the different areas. Soil moisture in the pores originate from 'above' (precipitation), or from 'beneath' (from groundwater by capillary lift). The level of groundwater depends on topography, climatic conditions and water regime of the nearby river. The thickness of capillary zone is basicly related to the physical and water management properties of the soil. Accordingly the capillary rise of sandy soils - with very high infiltration rate and very poor water retaining capacity - are far smaller than in the case of clay soils - with very poor infiltration rate and high water retaining capacity. Applying irrigation water can be considered as a reinforcement from 'above', and it affects the salinity and sodicity as well as the soil structure, nutrient supply and soil formation. We defined the possibilities of irrigation according to the average salt content of the soil profile. The nationwide mapping of soil salinity was based on legacy soil profile data, and it was carried out by regression kriging. This method allows that environmental factors with exhaustive spatial extension, such as climatic-, vegetation-, topographic-, soil- and geologic layers can be taken into consideration to the spatial extension of the reference data. According to soil salinity content categories, the areas were delineated as 1. to be irrigated, 2. to be irrigated conditionally, 3. not to be irrigated. The conditions of irrigation was determined by the comparison of the 'actual' and the 'critical' depth of the water table. Since, if the water rises above the critical level, undesirable processes, such as salinization and alkalinization can be developed. The critical depth of the water table was

  8. Soil erosion and effluent particle size distribution under different initial conditions and rock fragment coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jomaa, S.; Barry, D. A.; Brovelli, A.; Heng, B. C. P.; Sander, G. C.; Parlange, J.-Y.

    2012-04-01

    It is well known that the presence of rock fragments on the soil surface and the soil's initial characteristics (moisture content, surface roughness, bulk density, etc.) are key factors influencing soil erosion dynamics and sediment delivery. In addition, the interaction of these factors increases the complexity of soil erosion patterns and makes predictions more difficult. The aim of this study was (i) to investigate the effect of soil initial conditions and rock fragment coverage on soil erosion yields and effluent particle size distribution and (ii) to evaluate to what extent the rock fragment coverage controls this relationship. Three laboratory flume experiments with constant precipitation rate of 74 mm/h on a loamy soil parcel with a 2% slope were performed. Experiments with duration of 2 h were conducted using the 6-m × 2-m EPFL erosion flume. During each experiment two conditions were considered, a bare soil and a rock fragment-protected (with 40% coverage) soil. The initial soil surface state was varied between the three experiments, from a freshly re-ploughed and almost dry condition to a compacted soil with a well-developed shield layer and high moisture content. Experiments were designed so that rain splash was the primary driver of soil erosion. Results showed that the amount of eroded mass was highly controlled by the initial soil conditions and whether the steady-state equilibrium was un-, partially- or fully- developed during the previous event. Additionally, results revealed that sediment yields and particle size composition in the initial part of an erosion event are more sensitive to the erosion history than the long-time behaviour. This latter appears to be mainly controlled by rainfall intensity. If steady-state was achieved for a previous event, then the next event consistently produced concentrations for each size class that peaked rapidly, and then declined gradually to steady-state equilibrium. If steady state was not obtained, then

  9. Soil genotoxicity induced by successive applications of chlorothalonil under greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiangxiang; Cui, Ning; Zhou, Wei; Khorram, Mahdi Safaei; Wang, Donghong; Yu, Yunlong

    2014-05-01

    Greenhouse production of vegetables has been developed rapidly in China. High temperature and humidity inside the greenhouse make this environment more suitable for fast reproduction of fungal diseases. Fungicides are among the chemicals used extensively in the greenhouse to prevent crops from invasive infections by phytopathogens; however, little is known about the accumulation of fungicides in soil and their effect on soil quality under greenhouse conditions. In the present study, the accumulation of the fungicide chlorothalonil (CT) and its toxic metabolite hydroxy-chlorothalonil (HCT) in soil as well as their related soil genotoxicity under greenhouse conditions was investigated. The results indicated that both CT and HCT accumulated in soil with repeated applications of CT, and the accumulation level was strongly correlated to application dosage and its frequency. In addition, soil genotoxicity, which was measured by Vicia faba, also increased with the accumulation of CT and HCT, and the main contributor to this phenomenon was CT rather than HCT. The data demonstrated that successive applications of fungicides may result in their accumulation in soil and thus a decline in soil quality. PMID:24478244

  10. Field dissipation of oxyfluorfen in onion and its dynamics in soil under Indian tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Janaki, P; Sathya Priya, R; Chinnusamy, C

    2013-01-01

    Oxyfluorfen, a diphenyl-ether herbicide is being used to control annual and perennial broad-leaved weeds and sedges in a variety of field crops including onion. The present study was aimed to investigate the dynamics and field persistence of oxyfluorfen in onion plant, bulb and soil under Indian tropical conditions. Application of four rates of oxyfluorfen viz., 200, 250, 300 and 400 g AI ha(-1) as pre-emergence gave good weed control in field experiment with onion. The oxyfluorfen residue dissipated faster in plant than in soil respectively, with a mean half-life of 6.1 and 11.2 days. Dissipation followed first-order kinetics. In laboratory column leaching experiments, 17 percent of the applied oxyfluorfen was recovered from the soil and indicates its solubility in water and mobility in sandy clay loam soil was low. A sorption study revealed that the adsorption of oxyfluorfen to the soil was highly influenced by the soil organic carbon with the Koc value of 5450. The study concludes that the dissipation of oxyfluorfen in soil and onion was dependent on the physico-chemical properties of the soil and environmental conditions. PMID:23998306

  11. Proliferation of diversified clostridial species during biological soil disinfestation incorporated with plant biomass under various conditions.

    PubMed

    Mowlick, Subrata; Takehara, Toshiaki; Kaku, Nobuo; Ueki, Katsuji; Ueki, Atsuko

    2013-09-01

    Biological soil disinfestation (BSD) involves the anaerobic decomposition of plant biomass by microbial communities leading to control of plant pathogens. We analyzed bacterial communities in soil of a model experiment of BSD, as affected by biomass incorporation under various conditions, to find out the major anaerobic bacterial groups which emerged after BSD treatments. The soil was treated with Brassica juncea plants, wheat bran, or Avena strigosa plants, irrigated at 20 or 30 % moisture content and incubated at 25-30 °C for 17 days. The population of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. spinaciae incorporated at the start of the experiment declined markedly for some BSD conditions and rather high concentrations of acetate and butyrate were detected from these BSD-treated soils. The polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis based on the V3 region of 16S rRNA gene sequences from the soil DNA revealed that bacterial profiles greatly changed according to the treatment conditions. Based on the clone library analysis, phylogenetically diverse clostridial species appeared exceedingly dominant in the bacterial community of BSD soil incorporated with Brassica plants or wheat bran, in which the pathogen was suppressed completely. Species in the class Clostridia such as Clostridium saccharobutylicum, Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium xylanovorans, Oxobacter pfennigii, Clostridium pasteurianum, Clostridium sufflavum, Clostridium cylindrosporum, etc. were commonly recognized as closely related species of the dominant clone groups from these soil samples. PMID:23132344

  12. Bacterial diversity of soil aggregates of different sizes in various land use conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Ekaterina; Azida, Thakahova; Olga, Kutovaya

    2014-05-01

    The patterns of soil microbiome structure may be a universal and very sensitive indicator of soil quality (soil "health") used for optimization and biologization of agricultural systems. The understanding of how microbial diversity influenses, and is influenced by, the environment can only be attained by analyses at scales relevant to those at which processes influencing microbial diversity actually operate. The basic structural and functional unit of the soil is a soil aggregate, which is actually a microcosm of the associative co-existing groups of microorganisms that form characteristic ecological food chains. It is known that many important microbial processes occur in spatially segregated microenvironments in soil leading to a microscale biogeography. The Metagenomic library of typical chernozem in conditions of different land use systems was created. Total genomic DNA was extracted from 0.5 g of the frozen soil after mechanical destruction. Sample preparation and sequencing was performed on a GS Junior ("Roche»", Switzerland) according to manufacturer's recommendations, using the universal primers to the variable regions V4 gene 16S - rRNA - F515 (GTGCCAGCMGCCGCGGTAA) and R806 (GGACT-ACVSGGGTATCTAAT). It is shown that the system of land use is a stronger determinant of the taxonomic composition of the soil microbial community, rather than the size of the structural units. In soil samples from different land use systems the presence of accessory components was revealed. They may be used as indicators of processes of soil recovery, soil degradation or soil exhaustion processes occuring in the agroecosystems. The comparative analysis of microbial communities of chernozem aggregates investigated demonstrates the statistically valuable differences in the amount of bacterial phyla and Archean domain content as well as the species richness in aggregates of various size fractions. The occurrence of specific components in the taxonomic structure of micro-and macro

  13. Molybdenum isotope fractionation in soils: Influence of redox conditions, organic matter, and atmospheric inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, C.; Pett-Ridge, J. C.; Opfergelt, S.; Guicharnaud, R. A.; Halliday, A. N.; Burton, K. W.

    2015-08-01

    Molybdenum isotope fractionation accompanying soil development is studied across three pedogenic gradients encompassing a range of controlling factors. These factors include variable redox conditions, organic matter content, Fe and Mn oxy(hydr)oxide content, mineral composition, degree of weathering, pH, type and amount of atmospheric inputs, age, climate, and underlying rock type. Soil profiles from the island of Maui (Hawaii) along a precipitation gradient ranging from 850 to 5050 mm mean annual precipitation show a decrease in average soil δ98Mo from -0.04 ± 0.11‰ at the driest, most oxic site, which is indistinguishable from the basalt parent material (-0.09 ± 0.08‰), to -0.33 ± 0.10‰ at the wettest, most reducing site. A suite of 6 Icelandic soils display a broad trend with heavier δ98Mo values (up to +1.50 ± 0.09‰) in soil horizons that are more weathered and have higher organic matter content. Selective extractions of Mo from different soil components indicate that the association with organic matter and silicate or Ti-oxide residue dominates retention of Mo in these soils, with adsorption on Fe and Mn oxy(hydr)oxides playing a lesser role. Across all basaltic soils, δ98Mo values are lighter in soils that exhibit the most net Mo loss relative to the parent material, and δ98Mo values are heavier in soils that exhibit net Mo gains. A well-drained regolith profile in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico developed on quartz diorite shows heavier δ98Mo values than the parent material (up to +0.71 ± 0.10‰ with an integrated profile average of +0.28 ± 0.10‰) in soil and shallower saprolite, despite overall moderate loss of 28% of Mo relative to the bedrock. However, the deeper saprolite is unfractionated from bedrock (-0.01 ± 0.10‰, quartz diorite bedrock) indicating that rock weathering dissolution processes and secondary clay formation do not fractionate Mo isotopes. Our data suggest that the Mo mass balance and isotope composition of

  14. The effect of solvent-conditioning on soil organic matter sorption affinity for diuron and phenanthrene.

    PubMed

    Ahangar, Ahmad Gholamalizadeh; Smernik, Ronald J; Kookana, Rai S; Chittleborough, David J

    2009-08-01

    The effect of solvent-conditioning on the sorption of diuron and phenanthrene was investigated. The organic carbon-normalized sorption coefficients (K(OC)) for diuron and phenanthrene (determined from single initial concentrations of 0.8mgL(-1) and 1.5mgL(-1), respectively) were consistently higher following solvent-conditioning of a whole soil with five organic solvents (acetonitrile, acetone, methanol, chloroform and dichloromethane). The relative increase in K(OC) was inversely related to the polarity of the conditioning solvent (i.e. greater increases in K(OC) were observed for the least polar solvents: chloroform and dichloromethane). The effect of solvent-conditioning on the sorption properties of the same soil that had been lipid-extracted using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) was also investigated. Since lipid extraction involves treatment with a non-polar solvent (95:5 dichloromethane:methanol) one may have expected no further increase in K(OC) on solvent-conditioning. On the contrary, the lipid-extracted soil exhibited very similar increases in K(OC) as the whole soil. This demonstrated that lipid removal and solvent-conditioning, which both increased K(OC) for this soil, are quite separate phenomena. PMID:19435638

  15. Influence of green waste compost on azimsulfuron dissipation and soil functions under oxic and anoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    García-Jaramillo, M; Cox, L; Hermosín, M C; Cerli, C; Kalbitz, K

    2016-04-15

    Concerns have been raised over the sustainability of intensive rice cultivation, where the use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides has been associated with numerous environmental problems. The objective of this study was to test the effect of the herbicide azimsulfuron on important soil functions as affected by amendment with a byproduct of the olive oil industry. Soil was collected from a Mediterranean rice field. Part of it was amended with alperujo compost (AC). Amended and unamended soils were incubated for 43days in presence or not of azimsulfuron, under anoxic-flooded (AF) and oxic-unflooded (OU) conditions. We monitored the dissipation of the herbicide azimsulfuron, C mineralization, soil microbial biomass (SMB) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content and its nature. Under AF conditions, the application of compost produced an increase in the dissipation of the herbicide (up to 12.4%). It was related with the higher DOC content, 4 times higher than under OU conditions. Though increases in carbon turnover (under AF and OU conditions) and reduction of SMBC after herbicide application (only under AF conditions) were observed, the differences were not statistically significant. The application of this organic amendment is presented as an efficient management strategy to increase C turnover in agricultural soils and reduce some of the negative effects derived from the application of azimsulfuron under flooded conditions. PMID:26849340

  16. Modeling Soil Sodicity Problems under Dryland and Irrigated Conditions: Case Studies in Argentina and Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-Sentís, Ildefonso

    2014-05-01

    Salt-affected soils, both saline and sodic, my develop both under dryland and irrigated conditions, affecting negatively the physical and chemical soil properties, the crop production and the animal and human health.Among the development processes of salt-affected soils, the processes of sodification have been generally received less attention and is less understood than the development of saline soils. Although in both of them, hydrological processes are involved in their development, in the case of sodic soils we have to consider some additional chemical and physicochemical reactions, making more difficult their modeling and prediction. In this contribution we present two case studies: one related to the development of sodic soils in the lowlands of the Argentina Pampas, under dryland conditions and sub-humid temperate climate, with pastures for cattle production; the other deals with the development of sodic soils in the Colombia Cauca Valley, under irrigated conditions and tropical sub-humid climate, in lands used for sugarcane cropping dedicated to sugar and ethanol production. In both cases the development of sodicity in the surface soil is mainly related to the effects of the composition and level of groundwater, affected in the case of Argentina Pampas by the off-site changes in dryland use and management in the upper zones and by the drainage conditions in the lowlands, and in the case of the Cauca Valley, by the on-site irrigation and drainage management in lands with sugarcane. There is shown how the model SALSODIMAR, developed by the main author, based on the balance of water and soluble componentes of both the irrigation water and groundwater under different water and land management conditions, may be adapted for the diagnosis and prediction of both problems, and for the selection of alternatives for their management and amelioration.

  17. Contributions of groundwater conditions to soil and water salinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Ramsis B.; Otto, Claus J.; Fitzpatrick, Robert W.

    Salinization is the process whereby the concentration of dissolved salts in water and soil is increased due to natural or human-induced processes. Water is lost through one or any combination of four main mechanisms: evaporation, evapotranspiration, hydrolysis, and leakage between aquifers. Salinity increases from catchment divides to the valley floors and in the direction of groundwater flow. Salinization is explained by two main chemical models developed by the authors: weathering and deposition. These models are in agreement with the weathering and depositional geological processes that have formed soils and overburden in the catchments. Five soil-change processes in arid and semi-arid climates are associated with waterlogging and water. In all represented cases, groundwater is the main geological agent for transmitting, accumulating, and discharging salt. At a small catchment scale in South and Western Australia, water is lost through evapotranspiration and hydrolysis. Saline groundwater flows along the beds of the streams and is accumulated in paleochannels, which act as a salt repository, and finally discharges in lakes, where most of the saline groundwater is concentrated. In the hummocky terrains of the Northern Great Plains Region, Canada and USA, the localized recharge and discharge scenarios cause salinization to occur mainly in depressions, in conjunction with the formation of saline soils and seepages. On a regional scale within closed basins, this process can create playas or saline lakes. In the continental aquifers of the rift basins of Sudan, salinity increases along the groundwater flow path and forms a saline zone at the distal end. The saline zone in each rift forms a closed ridge, which coincides with the closed trough of the groundwater-level map. The saline body or bodies were formed by evaporation coupled with alkaline-earth carbonate precipitation and dissolution of capillary salts. Résumé La salinisation est le processus par lequel la

  18. Effectiveness of the soil conditioning index to predict soil organic carbon sequestration in the southeastern USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid and reliable assessment of the potential of various agricultural management systems to sequester soil organic C is needed to promote conservation and help mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. A growing database is emerging from detailed field experiments on how conservation agricultural systems...

  19. Soil microbial communties and enzyme activities in soils during historically extreme drought conditions in the USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Southern High Plains region of Texas experienced a significant reduction in 2011 crop production due a record drought as it experienced the hottest summer since 1911 (> 48 days of temperatures above 37.7oC and only 37.8 mm precipitation). Soil microbial communities and their associated enzymatic...

  20. Sensing technologies to measure metabolic activities in soil and assess its health conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cesare, Fabrizio; Macagnano, Antonella

    2013-04-01

    Soil is a complex ecosystem comprised of several and mutually interacting components, both abiotic (organo-mineral associations) and biotic (microbial and pedofaunal populations and plants), where a single parameter depends on other factors and affects the same and other factors, so that a network of influences among organisms coexists with the reciprocal actions between organisms and their environment. Therefore, it is difficult to undoubtedly determine what is the cause and what the effect within relationships between factors and processes. Soil is commonly studied through the evaluation and measurement of single parameters (e.g. the content of soil organic matter (SOM), microbial biomass, enzyme activities, pH, etc.), events (e.g. soil erosion, compaction, etc.) and processes (e.g. soil respiration, carbon fluxes, nitrification/denitrification, etc.), often carried out in laboratory conditions in order to limit the number of factors acting within the ecosystem under study, but missing the information about the global soil environment that way. In the last decade, several scientists have proposed and suggested the need for a holistic approach to soil ecosystems in different contexts. Recently, we have applied a sensing system developed in the last decades and capable of analysing complex mixtures of gases and volatiles (odours or aromas) in atmospheres, namely called electronic nose (EN). Typically, ENs are devices consisting of an array of differentially and partially specific, despite selective, sensors upon diverse coatings of sensitive films, i.e. interacting with single analytes of the same chemical class, despite not highly specific for a single substance, only, but showing also lower extent of cross-selectivity towards compounds of other chemical classes. ENs can be used in the classifications of odours by processing the collected responses of all sensors in the array through pattern recognition analyses, in order to obtain a chemical fingerprint

  1. No-tillage lessens soil CO2 emissions the most under arid and sandy soil conditions: results from a meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, Khatab; Chivenge, Pauline; Ciais, Philippe; Chaplot, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    The management of agroecosystems plays a crucial role in the global carbon cycle with soil tillage leading to known organic carbon redistributions within soils and changes in soil CO2 emissions. Yet, discrepancies exist on the impact of tillage on soil CO2 emissions and on the main soil and environmental controls. A meta-analysis was conducted using 46 peer-reviewed publications totaling 174 paired observations comparing CO2 emissions over entire seasons or years from tilled and untilled soils across different climates, crop types and soil conditions with the objective of quantifying tillage impact on CO2 emissions and assessing the main controls. On average, tilled soils emitted 21 % more CO2 than untilled soils, which corresponded to a significant difference at P<0.05. The difference increased to 29 % in sandy soils from arid climates with low soil organic carbon content (SOCC < 1 %) and low soil moisture, but tillage had no impact on CO2 fluxes in clayey soils with high background SOCC (> 3 %). Finally, nitrogen fertilization and crop residue management had little effect on the CO2 responses of soils to no-tillage. These results suggest no-tillage is an effective mitigation measure of carbon dioxide losses from dry land soils. They emphasize the importance of including information on soil factors such as texture, aggregate stability and organic carbon content in global models of the carbon cycle.

  2. Rates of Root and Organism Growth, Soil Conditions, and Temporal and Spatial Development of the Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    WATT, MICHELLE; SILK, WENDY K.; PASSIOURA, JOHN B.

    2006-01-01

    • Background Roots growing in soil encounter physical, chemical and biological environments that influence their rhizospheres and affect plant growth. Exudates from roots can stimulate or inhibit soil organisms that may release nutrients, infect the root, or modify plant growth via signals. These rhizosphere processes are poorly understood in field conditions. • Scope and Aims We characterize roots and their rhizospheres and rates of growth in units of distance and time so that interactions with soil organisms can be better understood in field conditions. We review: (1) distances between components of the soil, including dead roots remnant from previous plants, and the distances between new roots, their rhizospheres and soil components; (2) characteristic times (distance2/diffusivity) for solutes to travel distances between roots and responsive soil organisms; (3) rates of movement and growth of soil organisms; (4) rates of extension of roots, and how these relate to the rates of anatomical and biochemical ageing of root tissues and the development of the rhizosphere within the soil profile; and (5) numbers of micro-organisms in the rhizosphere and the dependence on the site of attachment to the growing tip. We consider temporal and spatial variation within the rhizosphere to understand the distribution of bacteria and fungi on roots in hard, unploughed soil, and the activities of organisms in the overlapping rhizospheres of living and dead roots clustered in gaps in most field soils. • Conclusions Rhizosphere distances, characteristic times for solute diffusion, and rates of root and organism growth must be considered to understand rhizosphere development. Many values used in our analysis were estimates. The paucity of reliable data underlines the rudimentary state of our knowledge of root–organism interactions in the field. PMID:16551700

  3. Occurrence and Fate of Trace Contaminants during Aerobic and Anaerobic Sludge Digestion and Dewatering.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Paula; Kleywegt, Sonya; Payne, Michael; Svoboda, M Lewina; Lee, Hing-Biu; Reiner, Eric; Kolic, Terry; Metcalfe, Chris; Smyth, Shirley Anne

    2015-07-01

    Digestion of municipal wastewater biosolids is a necessary prerequisite to their beneficial use in land application, in order to protect public health and the receiving environment. In this study, 13 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), 11 musks, and 17 polybrominated diphenyl ethers were analyzed in 84 samples including primary sludge, waste activated sludge, digested biosolids, dewatered biosolids, and dewatering centrate or filtrate collected from five wastewater treatment plants with aerobic or anaerobic digestion. Aerobic digestion processes were sampled during both warm and cold temperatures to analyze seasonal differences. Among the studied compounds, triclosan, triclocarban, galaxolide, and BDE-209 were the substances most frequently detected under different treatment processes at levels up to 30,000 ng/g dry weight. Comparing aerobic and anaerobic digestion, it was observed that the levels of certain PPCPs and musks were significantly higher in anaerobically digested biosolids, relative to the residues from aerobic digestion. Therefore, aerobic digestion has the potential advantage of reducing levels of PPCPs and musks. On the other hand, anaerobic digestion has the advantage of recovering energy from the biosolids in the form of combustible gases while retaining the nutrient and soil conditioning value of this resource. PMID:26437100

  4. IT-based soil quality evaluation for agroecologically smart land-use planning in RF conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasenev, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Activated in the first decades of XXI century global climate, economy and farming changes sharply actualized novel IT-based approaches in soil quality evaluation to address modern agricultural issues with agroecologically smart land-use planning. Despite global projected climate changes will affect a general decline of crop yields (IPCC 2014), RF boreal and subboreal regions will benefit from predicted and already particularly verified temperature warming and increased precipitation (Valentini, Vasenev, 2015) due to essential increasing of growing season length and mild climate conditions favorable for most prospective crops and best available agrotechnologies. However, the essential spatial heterogeneity is mutual feature for most natural and man-changed soils at the Central European region of Russia which is one of the biggest «food baskets» in RF. In these conditions potentially favorable climate circumstances will increase not only soil fertility and workability features but also their dynamics and spatial variability that determine crucial issues of IT-based soil quality evaluation systems development and agroecologically smart farming planning. Developed and verified within the LAMP project (RF Governmental projects #11.G34.31.0079 and #14.120.14.4266) regionally adapted DSS (ACORD-R - RF #2012612944) gives effective informational and methodological support for smart farming agroecological optimization in global climate and farming changes challenges. Information basis for agroecologically smart land-use planning consists of crops and agrotechnologies requirements, regional and local systems of agroecological zoning, local landscape and soil cover patterns, land quality and degradation risk assessments, current and previous farming practices results, agroclimatic predictions and production agroecological models, environmental limitations and planned profitability, fertilizing efficiency DSS ACORD-R. Smart land-use practice refers to sustainable balance

  5. The mathematical simulation of the temperature fields of building envelopes under permanent frozen soil conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, M. V.; Babuta, M. N.; Kuznetsova, U. N.; Safonova, E. V.; Minaeva, O. M.

    2016-04-01

    The physical-mathematical model of the thermal state of the aired technical underground taking into account the air exchange and design features of construction under permanent frozen soil conditions has been suggested. The computational scheme of the temperature fields prediction of building envelopes of projected buildings and soil under and nearby buildings has been developed. The numerical simulation of the temperature fields of building envelopes changes was conducted during a year. The results of the numerical simulation showed that the heat coming from the technical undergrounds and through the walls does not influence the temperature field of the soil neither under a building nor at a distance from it.

  6. Activity and stability of a complex bacterial soil community under simulated Martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Aviaja Anna; Merrison, Jonathan; Nørnberg, Per; Aagaard Lomstein, Bente; Finster, Kai

    2005-04-01

    A simulation experiment with a complex bacterial soil community in a Mars simulation chamber was performed to determine the effect of Martian conditions on community activity, stability and survival. At three different depths in the soil core short-term effects of Martian conditions with and without ultraviolet (UV) exposure corresponding to 8 Martian Sol were compared. Community metabolic activities and functional diversity, measured as glucose respiration and versatility in substrate utilization, respectively, decreased after UV exposure, whereas they remained unaffected by Martian conditions without UV exposure. In contrast, the numbers of culturable bacteria and the genetic diversity were unaffected by the simulated Martian conditions both with and without UV exposure. The genetic diversity of the soil community and of the colonies grown on agar plates were evaluated by denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) on DNA extracts. Desiccation of the soil prior to experimentation affected the functional diversity by decreasing the versatility in substrate utilization. The natural dominance of endospores and Gram-positive bacteria in the investigated Mars-analogue soil may explain the limited effect of the Mars incubations on the survival and community structure. Our results suggest that UV radiation and desiccation are major selecting factors on bacterial functional diversity in terrestrial bacterial communities incubated under simulated Martian conditions. Furthermore, these results suggest that forward contamination of Mars is a matter of great concern in future space missions.

  7. [Optimizing remediation conditions of non-thermal plasma for DDTs heavily contaminated soil].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-Hong; Luo, Yong-Ming; Teng, Ying; Liu, Wu-Xing; Pan, Cheng; Li, Zhen-Gao; Huang, Yu-Juan

    2013-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out in a non-thermal reactor to remove DDTs in heavily contaminated soil by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The study aims to investigate the effects of soil properties (including soil particle size and soil water content) and equipment working parameters (e. g. the plasma power, the processing time and discharge atmosphere) on the removal of DDTs from soil. The results showed that DDTs in soil were significantly degraded by the non-thermal plasma produced by dielectric barrier discharge. Removal rate of DDTs increased with increasing processing time. The removal efficiency of DDTs ranged from 95.3% to 99.9% in 20 minutes. The optimum conditions were as follows: 1 kW of the plasma power, 20 minutes of processing time in air discharge atmosphere, 0-0.9 mm soil particle size and 4.5% -10.5% of soil moisture content. The results also showed that o,p'-DDE might be the intermediate dechlorination and dehydrogenation product of the o,p'-DDT after the oxidization. PMID:23487955

  8. Agricultural machineries wheeling and soil qualities mapping in climatic changes conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergonzoli, S.; Servadio, P.

    2012-04-01

    and on control areas, a software GIS was used. Results shown the highest level of soil compaction caused by the traffic of WTN in term of CI and SS. In fact, increment ratio respect to the control measured after the tractors pass were: CI = 0.65 and 0.14 for WTN and for WTEL respectively; SS = 0.65 and 0.46 for WTN and WTEL respectively. Comparing the two different tires, significant differences were found particularly in the surface layers (0-0.20 m depth): mean values of CI and SS were higher for WTN (0.47 and 1.60 respectively) respect to WTEL. Track area covered by the two treatments respect to the whole field (16.32 ha) were: 0.025 for treatment WTN (0.27 m tires width) having an operative work width of 24 m ; 0.075 for treatment WTEL (0.85 m tires width) having an operative work width of 14 m. Results of this study highlighted that, in these field conditions (clay soil, water content over field capacity), tractor pass with very narrow tires caused a soil compaction level too high up to be impossible to traffic into the field. To operate at these soil water content conditions a tractors fitted with low aspect ratio and low inflation pressure tires is necessary. With lower soil water content, narrow tires allow carrying out fertilization into the inter-row avoiding crop trampling and compacting less percentage of field area respect to the a tractor equipped with large tires. Key words: Tractor, Soil trafficability, Soil compaction, Tires, GPS, GIS. Acknowledgements This work was carried out under the auspices of the special project "Sceneries of adaptation of the Italian agriculture to the climatic changes" (AGROSCENARI) of the Agricultural Research Council, and Italian Ministry of the Agricultural and Forestry Politics.

  9. Seedling mycorrhizal type and soil chemistry are related to canopy condition of Eucalyptus gomphocephala.

    PubMed

    Ishaq, Lily; Barber, Paul A; Hardy, Giles E St J; Calver, Michael; Dell, Bernard

    2013-07-01

    The health of Eucalyptus gomphocephala is declining within its natural range in south-western Australia. In a pilot study to assess whether changes in mycorrhizal fungi and soil chemistry might be associated with E. gomphocephala decline, we set up a containerized bioassay experiment with E. gomphocephala as the trap plant using intact soil cores collected from 12 sites with E. gomphocephala canopy condition ranging from healthy to declining. Adjacent soil samples were collected for chemical analysis. The type of mycorrhiza (arbuscular or ectomycorrhizal) formed in containerized seedlings predicted the canopy condition of E. gomphocephala at the sites where the cores were taken. Ectomycorrhizal fungi colonization was higher in seedling roots in soil taken from sites with healthy canopies, whereas colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi dominated in roots in soil taken from sites with declining canopies. Furthermore, several soil chemical properties predicted canopy condition and the type of mycorrhizal fungi colonizing roots. These preliminary findings suggest that large-scale studies should be undertaken in the field to quantify those ectomycorrhiza (ECM) fungi sensitive to E. gomphocephala canopy decline and whether particular ECM fungi are bioindicators of ecosystem health. PMID:23314749

  10. Natural infection of the soil-borne fungus Rosellinia necatrix with novel mycoviruses under greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Yaegashi, Hajime; Kanematsu, Satoko

    2016-07-01

    Fungi are an important component of the soil ecosystem. Mycoviruses have numerous potential impacts on soil fungi, including phytopathogenic fungal species. However, the diversity and ecology of mycoviruses in soil fungi is largely unexplored. Our previous work has shown that the soil-borne phytopathogenic fungus Rosellinia necatrix was infected with several novel mycoviruses after growing for 2-3 years in an apple orchard. In this study, we investigated whether natural infection of R. necatrix with mycoviruses occurs under limited conditions. Virus-free R. necatrix isolates were grown in a small bucket containing soil samples for a short time (1.5-4.5 months) under greenhouse conditions. Screening of dsRNA mycoviruses among 365 retrieved isolates showed that four, including 6-31, 6-33, 6-35, and 7-11, harbored virus-like dsRNAs. Molecular characterization of the dsRNAs revealed that three retrieved isolates, 6-31, 6-33, and 6-35 were infected with a novel endornavirus and isolate 7-11 is infected with a novel partitivirus belonging to the genus Alphapartitivirus. These novel mycoviruses had no overt biological impact on R. necatrix. Overall, this study indicates that natural infections of R. necatrix with new mycoviruses can occur under experimental soil conditions. PMID:26555164

  11. Soil Texture and Cultivar Effects on Rice (Oryza sativa, L.) Grain Yield, Yield Components and Water Productivity in Three Water Regimes

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Fugen; Soriano, Junel; Tabien, Rodante E.; Chen, Kun

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of water regime/soil condition (continuous flooding, saturated, and aerobic), cultivar (‘Cocodrie’ and ‘Rondo’), and soil texture (clay and sandy loam) on rice grain yield, yield components and water productivity using a greenhouse trial. Rice grain yield was significantly affected by soil texture and the interaction between water regime and cultivar. Significantly higher yield was obtained in continuous flooding than in aerobic and saturated soil conditions but the latter treatments were comparable to each other. For Rondo, its grain yield has decreased with soil water regimes in the order of continuous flooding, saturated and aerobic treatments. The rice grain yield in clay soil was 46% higher than in sandy loam soil averaged across cultivar and water regime. Compared to aerobic condition, saturated and continuous flooding treatments had greater panicle numbers. In addition, panicle number in clay soil was 25% higher than in sandy loam soil. The spikelet number of Cocodrie was 29% greater than that of Rondo, indicating that rice cultivar had greater effect on spikelet number than soil type and water management. Water productivity was significantly affected by the interaction of water regime and cultivar. Compared to sandy loam soil, clay soil was 25% higher in water productivity. Our results indicated that cultivar selection and soil texture are important factors in deciding what water management option to practice. PMID:26978525

  12. Optimal Thermolysis Conditions for Soil Carbon Storage on Plant Residue Burning: Modeling the Trade-Off between Thermal Decomposition and Subsequent Biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Kajiura, Masako; Wagai, Rota; Hayashi, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    Field burning of plant biomass is a widespread practice that provides charred materials to soils. Its impact on soil C sequestration remains unclear due to the heterogeneity of burning products and difficulty in monitoring the material's biodegradation in fields. Basic information is needed on the relationship between burning conditions and the resulting quantity/quality of residue-derived C altered by thermal decomposition and biodegradation. In this study, we thermolyzed residues (rice straw and husk) at different temperatures (200-600°C) under two oxygen availability conditions and measured thermal mass loss, C compositional change by solid-state C NMR spectroscopy, and biodegradability of the thermally altered residues by laboratory aerobic incubation. A trade-off existed between thermal and microbial decomposition: when burned at higher temperatures, residues experience a greater mass loss but become more recalcitrant via carbonization. When an empirical model accounting for the observed trade-off was projected over 10 to 10 yr, we identified the threshold temperature range (330-400°C) above and below which remaining residue C is strongly reduced. This temperature range corresponded to the major loss of O-alkyl C and increase in aromatic C. The O/C molar ratios of the resultant residues decreased to 0.2 to 0.4, comparable to those of chars in fire-prone field soils reported previously. Although the negative impacts of biomass burning need to be accounted for, the observed relationship may help to assess the long-term fate of burning-derived C and to enhance soil C sequestration. PMID:25602338

  13. Experimental Investigation of Soil and Atmospheric Conditions on the Momentum, Mass, and Thermal Boundary Layers Above the Land Atmosphere Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautz, A.; Smits, K. M.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Schulte, P.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the impacts of soil conditions (i.e. soil type, saturation) and atmospheric forcings (i.e. velocity, temperature, relative humidity) on the momentum, mass, and temperature boundary layers. The atmospheric conditions tested represent those typically found in semi-arid and arid climates and the soil conditions simulate the three stages of evaporation. The data generated will help identify the importance of different soil conditions and atmospheric forcings with respect to land-atmospheric interactions which will have direct implications on future numerical studies investigating the effects of turbulent air flow on evaporation. The experimental datasets generated for this study were performed using a unique climate controlled closed-circuit wind tunnel/porous media facility located at the Center for Experimental Study of Subsurface Environmental Processes (CESEP) at the Colorado School of Mines. The test apparatus consisting of a 7.3 m long porous media tank and wind tunnel, were outfitted with a sensor network to carefully measure wind velocity, air and soil temperature, relative humidity, soil moisture, and soil air pressure. Boundary layer measurements were made between the heights of 2 and 500 mm above the soil tank under constant conditions (i.e. wind velocity, temperature, relative humidity). The soil conditions (e.g. soil type, soil moisture) were varied between datasets to analyze their impact on the boundary layers. Experimental results show that the momentum boundary layer is very sensitive to the applied atmospheric conditions and soil conditions to a much less extent. Increases in velocity above porous media leads to momentum boundary layer thinning and closely reflect classical flat plate theory. The mass and thermal boundary layers are directly dependent on both atmospheric and soil conditions. Air pressure within the soil is independent of atmospheric temperature and relative humidity - wind velocity and soil

  14. IT-based soil quality evaluation for agroecologically smart land-use planning in RF conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasenev, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Activated in the first decades of XXI century global climate, economy and farming changes sharply actualized novel IT-based approaches in soil quality evaluation to address modern agricultural issues with agroecologically smart land-use planning. Despite global projected climate changes will affect a general decline of crop yields (IPCC 2014), RF boreal and subboreal regions will benefit from predicted and already particularly verified temperature warming and increased precipitation (Valentini, Vasenev, 2015) due to essential increasing of growing season length and mild climate conditions favorable for most prospective crops and best available agrotechnologies. However, the essential spatial heterogeneity is mutual feature for most natural and man-changed soils at the Central European region of Russia which is one of the biggest «food baskets» in RF. In these conditions potentially favorable climate circumstances will increase not only soil fertility and workability features but also their dynamics and spatial variability that determine crucial issues of IT-based soil quality evaluation systems development and agroecologically smart farming planning. Developed and verified within the LAMP project (RF Governmental projects #11.G34.31.0079 and #14.120.14.4266) regionally adapted DSS (ACORD-R - RF #2012612944) gives effective informational and methodological support for smart farming agroecological optimization in global climate and farming changes challenges. Information basis for agroecologically smart land-use planning consists of crops and agrotechnologies requirements, regional and local systems of agroecological zoning, local landscape and soil cover patterns, land quality and degradation risk assessments, current and previous farming practices results, agroclimatic predictions and production agroecological models, environmental limitations and planned profitability, fertilizing efficiency DSS ACORD-R. Smart land-use practice refers to sustainable balance

  15. How do soil physical conditions for crop growth vary over time under established contrasting tillage regimes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallett, Paul; Stobart, Ron; Valentine, Tracy; George, Timothy; Morris, Nathan; Newton, Adrian; McKenzie, Blair

    2014-05-01

    When plant breeders develop modern cereal varieties for the sustainable intensification of agriculture, insufficient thought is given to the impact of tillage on soil physical conditions for crop production. In earlier work, we demonstrated that barley varieties that perform best in ploughed soil (the approach traditionally used for breeding trials) were not the same as those performing best under shallow non-inversion or zero-tillage. We also found that the Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) associated with improved phosphorus uptake, and hence useful for marker assisted breeding, were not robust between different tillage regimes. The impact of the soil environment had greater impact than the genetics in GxE interactions. It is obvious that soil tillage should be considered when breeding the next generation of crops. Tillage may also have important impacts on carbon storage, but we found that despite greater soil carbon at shallow depths under non-inversion tillage, the carbon stored throughout the soil profile was not affected by tillage. Studies on soil tillage impacts to crop productivity and soil quality are often performed in one season, on single sites that have had insufficient time to develop. Our current research explores multiple sites, on different soils, with temporal measurements of soil physical conditions under contrasting tillage regimes. We use the oldest established contemporary tillage experiments in the United Kingdom, with all sites sharing ploughed and shallow (7cm) non-inversion tillage treatments. In eastern Scotland (Mid Pilmore), the site also has zero tillage and deep ploughing (40 cm) treatments, and was established 11 years ago. In east England there are two sites, both also having a deep non-inversion tillage treatment, and they were established 6 (New Farm Systems) and 8 (STAR) years ago. We measure a range of crop and soil properties at sowing, one month after sowing and post-harvest, including rapid lab based assays that allow high

  16. Green synthesis of Pd/CuO nanoparticles by Theobroma cacao L. seeds extract and their catalytic performance for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol and phosphine-free Heck coupling reaction under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Nasrollahzadeh, Mahmoud; Sajadi, S Mohammad; Rostami-Vartooni, Akbar; Bagherzadeh, Mojtaba

    2015-06-15

    We report the green synthesis of palladium/CuO nanoparticles (Pd/CuO NPs) using Theobroma cacao L. seeds extract and their catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol and Heck coupling reaction under aerobic conditions. The catalyst was characterized using the powder XRD, TEM, EDS, UV-vis and FT-IR. This method has the advantages of high yields, elimination of surfactant, ligand and homogeneous catalysts, simple methodology and easy work up. The catalyst can be recovered from the reaction mixture and reused several times without any significant loss of catalytic activity. PMID:25721860

  17. [Leaching Remediation of Copper and Lead Contaminated Lou Soil by Saponin Under Different Conditions].

    PubMed

    Deng, Hong-xia; Yang, Ya-li; Li, Zhen; Xu, Yan; Li, Rong-hua; Meng, Zhao-fu; Yang, Ya-ti

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate the leaching remediation effect of the eco-friendly biosurfactant saponin for Cu and Pb in contaminated Lou soil, batch tests method was used to study the leaching effect of saponin solution on single Cu, Pb contaminated Lou soil and mixed Cu and Pb contaminated Lou soil under different conditions such as reaction time, mass concentration of saponin, pH, concentration of background electrolyte and leaching times. The results showed that the maximum leaching removal effect of Cu and Pb in contaminated Lou soil was achieved by complexation of the heavy metals with saponin micelle, when the mass concentration of saponin solution was 50 g x L(-1), pH was 5.0, the reaction time was 240 min, and there was no background electrolyte. In single and mixed contaminated Lou soil, the leaching percentages of Cu were 29.02% and 25.09% after a single leaching with 50 g x L(-1) saponin under optimal condition, while the single leaching percentages of Pb were 31.56% and 28.03%, respectively. The result indicated the removal efficiency of Pb was more significant than that of Cu. After 4 times of leaching, the cumulative leaching percentages of Cu reached 58.92% and 53.11%, while the cumulative leaching percentages of Pb reached 77.69% and 65.32% for single and mixed contaminated Lou soil, respectively. The fractionation results of heavy metals in soil before and after a single leaching showed that the contents of adsorbed and exchangeable Cu and Pb increased in the contaminated soil, while the carbonate-bound, organic bound and sulfide residual Cu and Pb in the contaminated Lou soil could be effectively removed by saponin. PMID:26164925

  18. Effects of climatic conditions and soil properties on Cabernet Sauvignon berry growth and anthocyanin profiles.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guo; He, Yan-Nan; Yue, Tai-Xin; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Zhen-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Climatic conditions and soil type have significant influence on grape ripening and wine quality. The reported study was conducted in two "Cabernet Sauvignon (Vitis vinifera L.V)" vineyards located in Xinjiang, a semiarid wine-producing region of China during two vintages (2011 and 2012). The results indicate that soil and climate affected berry growth and anthocyanin profiles. These two localities were within a distance of 5 km from each other and had soils of different physical and chemical composition. For each vineyard, the differences of anthocyanin concentrations, and parameters concerning berry growth and composition between the two years could be explained by different climatic conditions. Soil effect was studied by investigation of differences in berry composition and anthocyanin profiles between the two vineyards in the same year, which could be explained mainly by the different soil properties, vine water and nitrogen status. Specifically, the soils with less water and organic matter produced looser clusters, heavier berry skins and higher TSS, which contributed to the excellent performance of grapes. Compared with 2011, the increases in anthocyanin concentrations for each vineyard in 2012 could be attributed to smaller number of extreme temperature (>35 °C) days and rainfall, lower vine water status and N level. The explanation for higher anthocyanin concentrations in grape skins from the soils with less water and organic matter could be the vine status differences, lighter berry weight and heavier skin weight at harvest. In particular, grapes from the soils with less water and organic matter had higher levels of 3'5'-substituded, O-methylated and acylated anthocyanins, which represented a positive characteristic conferring more stable pigmentation to the corresponding wine in the future. The present work clarifies the effects of climate and soil on berry growth and anthocyanin profiles, thus providing guidance for production of high-quality wine grapes

  19. Selenium and sulfur relationships in alfalfa and soil under field conditions, San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Severson, R.C.; Gough, L.P.

    1992-01-01

    Relationships between total Se and S or soluble SeO4 and SO4 in soils and tissue concentrations in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), under field conditions in the San Joaquin Valley of California, suggest that the rate of accumulation of Se in alfalfa may be reduced in areas where high Se and S concentrations in soils were measured. These data suggest that the balance between carbonate and sulfate minerals in soil may have a greater influence on uptake of Se by alfalfa than does the balance of SeO4 and SO4 in soil solution. Soil and alfalfa were sampled from areas representing a wide range in soil Se and S concentrations. Specific sampling locations were selected based on a previous study of Se, S, and other elements where 721 soil samples were collected to map landscape variability and distribution of elements. Six multiple-linear regression equations were developed between total and/or soluble soil chemical constituents and tissue concentrations of Se in alfalfa. We chose a regression model that accounted for 72% of the variability in alfalfa Se concentrations based on an association of elements in soil (total C, S, Se, and Sr) determined by factor analysis. To prepare a map showing the spatial distribution of estimated alfalfa Se concentrations, the model was applied to the data from the previously collected 721 soil samples. Estimated alfalfa Se concentrations in most of the study area were within a range that is predicted to produce alfalfa with neither Se deficiency nor toxicity when consumed by livestock. A few small areas are predicted to produce alfalfa that potentially would not meet minimum dietary needs of livestock.

  20. Evaporation from soils subjected to natural boundary conditions at the land-atmospheric interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, K.; Illngasekare, T.; Ngo, V.; Cihan, A.

    2012-04-01

    Bare soil evaporation is a key process for water exchange between the land and the atmosphere and an important component of the water balance in semiarid and arid regions. However, there is no agreement on the best methodology to determine evaporation under different boundary conditions at the land surface. This becomes critical in developing models that couples land to the atmosphere. Because it is difficult to measure evaporation from soil, with the exception of using lysimeters, numerous formulations have been proposed to establish a relationship between the rate of evaporation and soil moisture and/or soil temperature and thermal properties. Different formulations vary in how they partition available energy. A need exists to systematically compare existing methods to experimental data under highly controlled conditions not achievable in the field. The goal of this work is to perform controlled experiments under transient conditions of soil moisture, temperature and wind at the land/atmospheric interface to test different conceptual and mathematical formulations for the soil surface boundary conditions to develop appropriate numerical models to be used in simulations. In this study, to better understand the coupled water-vapor-heat flow processes in the shallow subsurface near the land surface, we modified a previously developed theory by Smits et al. [2011] that allows non-equilibrium liquid/gas phase change with gas phase vapor diffusion to better account for dry soil conditions. The model did not implement fitting parameters such as a vapor enhancement factor that is commonly introduced into the vapor diffusion coefficient as an arbitrary multiplication factor. In order to experimentally test the numerical formulations/code, we performed a two-dimensional physical model experiment under varying boundary conditions using test sand for which the hydraulic and thermal properties were well characterized. Precision data under well-controlled transient heat and

  1. Characterization of the temporal dynamics of soil CO2 and N gas production (NO, N2O, N2) under varying environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Brüggemann, Nicolas; Zheng, Xunhua

    2010-05-01

    The characterization of environmental drivers of soil N gas losses remains largely uncertain, since our ability to measure and follow temporal dynamics of N2 production via denitrification as well simultaneous gaseous losses of NO, N2O and CO2 is still limited. To overcome this problem we further developed the gas flow soil core technique (e.g Butterbach-Bahl et al., 2002; Dannenmann et al., 2008) in such a way that simultaneous measurements of gaseous losses of CO2, NO, N2O and N2 can be done. Since measurements of N2 production with this technique requires the establishment of an N2 free atmosphere, i.e. exchange of the soil atmosphere with a N2-free gas mixture, we also investigated different pre-incubation conditions (temperature, O2 content) to minimize the effect of the atmosphere exchange process on the target parameters N gas production and fluxes. Finally we tested our experimental setup and determined the dynamic of CO2 and N gas production for varying environmental conditions (temperature, nitrate content, C availability) and for agricultural soils with different properties (SOC, texture, pH). For this we followed N and C gas fluxes over a period of up to three weeks and supplemented these measurements with observation of changes in soil microbial biomass and concentrations of dissolved organic and inorganic nitrogen. This allowed us to establish full nitrogen balances and to trace the sources for N gas production, i.e. changes in inorganic and organic N pools. Our experiments e.g. show that following a switch from aerobic to anaerobic soil incubation conditions, N2O as well as NO production can outweigh N2 production in the first few hours, whereas CO2 production remains largely unaffected. After approx. 1-2 day N2 production peaked, whereas production of N2O and NO as well as CO2 was already starting to decline. Depending on incubation conditions and investigated soils, N2O and NO production ceased after 5-10 days, whereas N2 production continued

  2. [Research advances in denitrogenation characteristics of aerobic denitrifiers].

    PubMed

    Liang, Shu-Cheng; Zhao, Min; Lu, Lei; Zhao, Li-Yan

    2010-06-01

    The discovery of aerobic denitrifiers is the enrichment and breakthrough of traditional denitrification theory. Owing to their unique superiority in denitrogenation, aerobic denitrifiers have become a hotspot in the study of bio-denitrogenation of waste water. Under aerobic conditions, the aerobic denitrifiers can utilize organic carbon sources for their growth, and produce N2 from nitrate and nitrite. Most of the denitrifiers can also proceed with heterotrophic nitrification simultaneously, transforming NH4(+)-N to gaseous nitrogen. In this paper, the denitrogenation characteristics and action mechanisms of some isolated aerobic denitrifiers were discussed from the aspects of electron theory and denitrifying enzyme system. The effects of the environmental factors DO, carbon sources, and C/N on the denitrogenation process of aerobic denitrifiers were analyzed, and the screening methods as well as the present and potential applications of aerobic denitrifiers in wastewater treatment were described and discussed. PMID:20873638

  3. Management of aerobic vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Tempera, Gianna; Furneri, Pio Maria

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic vaginitis is a new nonclassifiable pathology that is neither specific vaginitis nor bacterial vaginosis. The diversity of this microbiological peculiarity could also explain several therapeutic failures when patients were treated for infections identified as bacterial vaginosis. The diagnosis 'aerobic vaginitis' is essentially based on microscopic examinations using a phase-contrast microscope (at ×400 magnification). The therapeutic choice for 'aerobic vaginitis' should take into consideration an antibiotic characterized by an intrinsic activity against the majority of bacteria of fecal origin, bactericidal effect and poor/absent interference with the vaginal microbiota. Regarding the therapy for aerobic vaginitis when antimicrobial agents are prescribed, not only the antimicrobial spectrum but also the presumed ecological disturbance on the anaerobic and aerobic vaginal and rectal microbiota should be taken into a consideration. Because of their very low impact on the vaginal microbiota, kanamycin or quinolones are to be considered a good choice for therapy. PMID:21051843

  4. Prediction of soil and ground water contamination with fungicides of different classes according to soil and climate conditions in Ukrain and other European countries.

    PubMed

    Vavrinevych, O; Antonenko, A; Omelchuk, S; Korshun, M; Bardov, V

    2015-05-01

    It was established that most of tested pesticides are moderately and low persistent in soil and climatic conditions of Ukraine, but more stable in Western and Northern Europe countries due to peculiarities of their climate type and soil characteristics. In addition, it was determined that all studied fungicides pertain to non- and low mobile compound (except moderately mobile pyrimethanil). Recommendations on application of studied fungicides in soil and climatic conditions of Ukraine and other European countries were given. PMID:26042452

  5. Microhabitat Effects on N2O Emissions from Floodplain Soils under Controlled Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley, Martin; Lehmann, Moritz; Niklaus, Pascal; Frey, Beat; Kuhn, Thomas; Luster, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    Semi-terrestrial soils such as floodplain soils are considered to be potential hotspots of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. The quantitative assessment of N2O release from these hot spots under field conditions, and of the microbial pathways that underlie net N2O production (ammonium oxidation, nitrifier-denitrification, and denitrification) is challenging in the environment because of the high spatial and temporal variability. The production and consumption of N2O appears to be linked to the presence or absence of micro-niches, providing specific conditions that may be favorable to either of the microbial pathways that produce or consume N2O. The availability of oxygen, reactive organic carbon, and dissolved nitrogen substrates likely play key roles with regards to the net production of N2O. Previous field studies demonstrated, for example, that flooding can trigger "hot moments" of enhanced N2O emission through a close coupling of niches with high and low oxygen availabilities. Such microhabitat effects likely depend on soil aggregate formation, plant soil interactions in the rhizosphere and the degradation of organic matter accumulations. In order to assess how these factors can modulate N2O production and consumption under simulated flooding/drying conditions, we have set up a mesocosm experiment with model soils comprising various mixtures of N-rich floodplain soil aggregates (4000 - 250 µm representing large aggregates, or <250 µm representing small aggregates) and inert matrix material (glass beads of 150 - 250 µm size, or quartz sand of 2000 - 3200 µm size, respectively). Soils containing the different aggregate size groups were either planted with willow (Salix viminalis L.), mixed with leaf litter or left untreated. At several time points before, during and after a simulated flood event, we measure the net efflux rate of N2O. In addition, soil water content, redox potential as well as carbon and nitrogen substrate availability are monitored. In order to

  6. Soil texture and climatc conditions for biocrust growth limitation: a meta analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Thomas; Subbotina, Mariia

    2015-04-01

    Along with afforestation, attempts have been made to combat desertification by managing soil crusts, and is has been reported that recovery rates of biocrusts are dependent on many factors, including the type, severity, and extent of disturbance; structure of the vascular plant community; conditions of adjoining substrates; availability of inoculation material; and climate during and after disturbance (Belnap & Eldridge 2001). Because biological soil crusts are known to be more stable on and to prefer fine substrates (Belnap 2001), the question arises as to how successful crust management practices can be applied to coarser soil. In previous studies we observed similar crust biomasses on finer soils under arid and on coarser soils under temperate conditions. We hypothesized that the higher water holding capacity of finer substrates would favor crust development, and that the amount of silt and clay in the substrate that is required for enhanced crust development would vary with changes in climatic conditions. In a global meta study, climatic and soil texture threshold values promoting BSC growth were derived. While examining literature sources, it became evident that the amount of studies to be incorporated into this meta analysis was reversely related to the amount of common environmental parameters they share. We selected annual mean precipitaion, mean temperature and the amount of silt and clay as driving variables for crust growth. Response variable was the "relative crust biomass", which was computed per literature source as the ratio between each individual crust biomass value of the given study to the study maximum value reported. We distinguished lichen, green algal, cyanobacterial and moss crusts. To quantify threshold conditions at which crust biomass responded to differences in texture and climate, we (I) determined correlations between bioclimatic variables, (II) calculated linear models to determine the effect of typical climatic variables with soil

  7. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Cations in an Unsaturated Fractured Soil Under Transient Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Joseph

    2015-01-31

    Rainfall experiments were conducted using intact soil cores and an instrumented soil pedon to examine the effect of physical heterogeneity and rainfall characteristics on the mobilization of colloids, organic matter, cesium, and strontium in a fractured soil. To measure the spatial variability of infiltration of colloids and contaminants, samples were collected through a 19-port grid placed below the soil core in laboratory study and in 27 samplers at multiple depths in the soil pedon in the field study. Cesium and strontium were applied to the soil cores and the soil pedon prior to mobilization experiments. Rainwater solutions of multiple ionic strengths and organic matter concentrations were applied to the soil cores and soil pedon to mobilize in situ colloids, cesium, and strontium. The mobilization of colloids and metal cations occurred through preferential flow paths in the soil cores. Compared to steady rainfall, greater amounts of colloids were mobilized during rainfall interrupted by pauses, which indicates that the supply of colloids to be mobilized was replenished during the pauses. A maximum in the amount of mobilized colloids were mobilized during a rainfall following a pause of 2.5 d. Pauses of shorter or longer duration resulted in less colloid mobilization. Freeze-thaw cycles, a transient condition in winter, enhanced colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated transport of cesium and strontium in the soil cores. The exchange of solutes between the soil matrix and macropores caused a hysteretic mobilization of colloids, cesium, and strontium during changes in ionic strength. Colloid-facilitated mobilization of cesium and strontium was important at low ionic strength in fractures where slow flow allowed greater exchange of flow between the fractures and the surrounding matrix. The release of cesium and strontium by cation exchange occurred at high ionic strength in fractures where there is a little exchange of pore water with the surrounding matrix

  8. Biological space experiments for the simulation of Martian conditions: UV radiation and Martian soil analogues.

    PubMed

    Rettberg, P; Rabbow, E; Panitz, C; Horneck, G

    2004-01-01

    The survivability of resistant terrestrial microbes, bacterial spores of Bacillus subtilis, was investigated in the BIOPAN facility of the European Space Agency onboard of Russian Earth-orbiting FOTON satellites (BIOPAN I -III missions). The spores were exposed to different subsets of the extreme environmental parameters in space (vacuum, extraterrestrial solar UV, shielding by protecting materials like artificial meteorites). The results of the three space experiments confirmed the deleterious effects of extraterrestrial solar UV radiation which, in contrast to the UV radiation reaching the surface of the Earth, also contains the very energy-rich, short wavelength UVB and UVC radiation. Thin layers of clay, rock or meteorite material were shown to be only successful in UV-shielding, if they are in direct contact with the spores. On Mars the UV radiation climate is similar to that of the early Earth before the development of a protective ozone layer in the atmosphere by the appearance of the first aerobic photosynthetic bacteria. The interference of Martian soil components and the intense and nearly unfiltered Martian solar UV radiation with spores of B. subtilis will be tested with a new BIOPAN experiment, MARSTOX. Different types of Mars soil analogues will be used to determine on one hand their potential toxicity alone or in combination with solar UV (phototoxicity) and on the other hand their UV protection capability. Two sets of samples will be placed under different cut-off filters used to simulate the UV radiation climate of Mars and Earth. After exposure in space the survival of and mutation induction in the spores will be analyzed at the DLR, together with parallel samples from the corresponding ground control experiment performed in the laboratory. This experiment will provide new insights into the principal limits of life and its adaptation to environmental extremes on Earth or other planets which and will also have implications for the potential for the

  9. Biological space experiments for the simulation of Martian conditions: UV radiation and Martian soil analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettberg, P.; Rabbow, E.; Panitz, C.; Horneck, G.

    2004-01-01

    The survivability of resistant terrestrial microbes, bacterial spores of Bacillus subtilis, was investigated in the BIOPAN facility of the European Space Agency onboard of Russian Earth-orbiting FOTON satellites (BIOPAN I -III missions). The spores were exposed to different subsets of the extreme environmental parameters in space (vacuum, extraterrestrial solar UV, shielding by protecting materials like artificial meteorites). The results of the three space experiments confirmed the deleterious effects of extraterrestrial solar UV radiation which, in contrast to the UV radiation reaching the surface of the Earth, also contains the very energy-rich, short wavelength UVB and UVC radiation. Thin layers of clay, rock or meteorite material were shown to be only successful in UV-shielding, if they are in direct contact with the spores. On Mars the UV radiation climate is similar to that of the early Earth before the development of a protective ozone layer in the atmosphere by the appearance of the first aerobic photosynthetic bacteria. The interference of Martian soil components and the intense and nearly unfiltered Martian solar UV radiation with spores of B. subtilis will be tested with a new BIOPAN experiment, MARSTOX. Different types of Mars soil analogues will be used to determine on one hand their potential toxicity alone or in combination with solar UV (phototoxicity) and on the other hand their UV protection capability. Two sets of samples will be placed under different cut-off filters used to simulate the UV radiation climate of Mars and Earth. After exposure in space the survival of and mutation induction in the spores will be analyzed at the DLR, together with parallel samples from the corresponding ground control experiment performed in the laboratory. This experiment will provide new insights into the principal limits of life and its adaptation to environmental extremes on Earth or other planets which and will also have implications for the potential for the

  10. Land agroecological quality assessment in conditions of high spatial soil cover variability at the Pereslavskoye Opolye.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morev, Dmitriy; Vasenev, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    The essential spatial variability is mutual feature for most natural and man-changed soils at the Central region of European territory of Russia. The original spatial heterogeneity of forest soils has been further complicated by a specific land-use history and human impacts. For demand-driven land-use planning and decision making the quantitative analysis and agroecological interpretation of representative soil cover spatial variability is an important and challenging task that receives increasing attention from private companies, governmental and environmental bodies. Pereslavskoye Opolye is traditionally actively used in agriculture due to dominated high-quality cultivated soddy-podzoluvisols which are relatively reached in organic matter (especially for conditions of the North part at the European territory of Russia). However, the soil cover patterns are often very complicated even within the field that significantly influences on crop yield variability and have to be considered in farming system development and land agroecological quality evaluation. The detailed investigations of soil regimes and mapping of the winter rye yield have been carried in conditions of two representative fields with slopes sharply contrasted both in aspects and degrees. Rye biological productivity and weed infestation have been measured in elementary plots of 0.25 m2 with the following analysis the quality of the yield. In the same plot soil temperature and moisture have been measured by portable devices. Soil sampling was provided from three upper layers by drilling. The results of ray yield detailed mapping shown high differences both in average values and within-field variability on different slopes. In case of low-gradient slope (field 1) there is variability of ray yield from 39.4 to 44.8 dt/ha. In case of expressed slope (field 2) the same species of winter rye grown with the same technology has essentially lower yield and within-field variability from 20 to 29.6 dt/ha. The

  11. Chromium Release from a COPR-Contaminated Soil at Varying Water Content and Redox Conditions.

    PubMed

    Matern, Katrin; Mansfeldt, Tim

    2016-07-01

    Many soils in the region of Kanpur, North India, are heavily affected by the leather industry and its upstream supplier sector, as indicated by elevated chromium (Cr) contents. Under reducing conditions-for instance, at water saturation after monsoon rain or flood irrigation-the dynamic and species distribution of Cr may be affected due to changes in redox potential (E). In this study, the influence of E on the speciation and release of Cr from a contaminated agricultural soil was investigated. A soil sample that was affected by hyperalkaline leachate from chromite ore processing residue, was taken and packed in soil columns, and subjected to a saturation-drainage-saturation cycle. After initial water saturation, the E dropped slowly to minimum values of around ‒100 mV (calculated to pH 7), while E was controlled by CrO/CrO(s), or CrO/(Fe,Cr)OOH redox couples. Soil drainage resulted in a quick return to oxidizing conditions; i.e., E > 300 mV. The Cr species distribution and release showed a clear trend with E. At the beginning of the experiment, under oxidizing and weakly reducing conditions (E range from >100 to 300 mV), Cr(VI) was released in particular. However, under moderately reducing conditions (E range from 100 to -100 mV), Cr was gradually immobilized and irreversible sequestered via reductive precipitation. The results presented in this study provide an improved understanding of the mobility of Cr(VI) in contaminated soils at varying water contents, which is essential for the evaluation of environmental risks in this region. PMID:27380074

  12. Assessing the evolution of soil moisture and vegetation conditions during the 2012 United States flash drought

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examines the evolution of several model-based and satellite-derived drought metrics sensitive to soil moisture and vegetation conditions during the extreme flash drought event that impacted major agricultural areas across the central U.S. during 2012. Standardized anomalies from the remo...

  13. Transport and fate of microorganisms in soils with preferential flow under different solution chemistry conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    [1] Laboratory and numerical studies were conducted to investigate the transport and fate of Escherichia coli D21g and coliphage f174 in saturated soils with preferential flow under different solution ionic strength (IS'='1, 5, 20, and 100 mM) conditions. Preferential flow systems were created by em...

  14. Bacillus spp. from rainforest soil promote plant growth under limited nitrogen conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of PGPR (Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria) isolated from rainforest on different plants under limited nitrogen conditions. Methods and Results: Bacterial isolates from a Peruvian rainforest soil were screened for plant growth promoting effects...

  15. NATIONAL RESULTS FROM THE 2011 NATIONAL WETLAND CONDITION ASSESSMENT (NWCA) SOILS ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2011, US Environmental Protection Agency conducted the first National Wetland Condition Assessment (NWCA). Field crews conducted one-day surveys of over 1000 wetlands across the contiguous United States. For every wetland sampled, soils were collected by layer (i.e., horizon)...

  16. Exploring transport dynamics of "new" and "old" tracers under varying hydrologic conditions in structured soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Joshua; Callaghan, Michael; Mikulic, Danijela; Cey, Edwin

    2016-04-01

    Fine-grained, structured soils are prone to preferential flow along macropores that can enhance vertical migration of surface applied contaminants ("new" solutes) due to water bypassing the soil matrix. This same bypass phenomenon can also inhibit the flushing of in situ salt or other contaminants ("old" solutes), thereby hampering reclamation of previously impacted soils. In all cases, mass exchange between the soil matrix and macropores is a significant control on water and solute movement in the soil profile. The dynamics of these mass exchange processes and the associated transport of both new and old tracers were studied in field- and core-scale experiments on low permeability, macroporous soils. A multi-year investigation of new (DFBA) and old (Cl) tracer transport was completed on two 20 x 20 m test plots within a tile-drained field. Irrigation water was applied to one test plot, while the second plot served as an unirrigated control. Detailed monitoring, including wells, lysimeters, tensiometers, soil cores, tile drains, and electrical resistivity tomography, revealed a comprehensive picture of the hydraulic system response and distribution of chemical tracers over multiple field seasons. A large difference in solute transport within and between seasons was attributed to temporally varying hydrologic (water table and soil moisture) conditions, despite similar total volumes of water application. Time-varying soil hydraulic properties and soil macropore saturation were believed to play a major role, and were explored in more detail with large, intact soil monolith experiments. Two paired-core infiltration experiments were completed using the same volumes of irrigation water, but different irrigation rates and durations. The migration of new (Br, I, and dye) and old (Cl) tracers was monitored throughout the experiments, and the final tracer distribution was characterized by destructive sampling at the conclusion of irrigation. The spatial and temporal

  17. Growth of Methanogens on a Mars Soil Simulant Under Simulated Martian Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, Timothy A.; Bekkum, Curtis R.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2004-06-01

    Due to the hostile conditions at the surface, any life forms existing on Mars today would most likely inhabit a subsurface environment where conditions are potentially wetter and warmer, but organic compounds may be lacking and light energy for photosynthesis would be absent. Methanogens, members of the domain Archaea, are microorganisms from planet Earth that can grow under these relatively extreme conditions. We have demonstrated that certain methanogenic species can indeed grow on a Mars soil simulant, JSC Mars-1, with limited amounts of water, under conditions approaching a possible subsurface environment on Mars.

  18. Electrokinetic remediation of a Cu-Zn contaminated red soil by controlling the voltage and conditioning catholyte pH.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dong-Mei; Deng, Chang-Fen; Cang, Long; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2005-10-01

    Electrokinetics is an innovative technique for treating heavy metals contaminated soil, especially low pH soils such as the Chinese red soil (Udic Ferrisols). In this paper, a Cu-Zn contaminated red soil is treated by electrokinetics. When the Cu-Zn contaminated red soil was treated without control of catholyte pH during the electrokinetic treatment, the soil pH in the soil sections near cathode after the experiment was high above 6, which resulted in accumulation of large amounts of Cu and Zn in the soil sections with such high pH values. Compared to soil Cu, soil Zn was more efficiently removed from the soil by a controlled electrokinetic method. Application of lactic acid as catholyte pH conditioning solution caused an efficient removal of Cu and Zn from the soil. Increasing the electrolyte strength (salt concentration) of the conditioning solution further increased Cu removal, but did not cause a significant improvement for soil Zn. Soil Cu and Zn fractions after the electrokinetic treatments were analyzed using sequential extraction method, which indicated that Cu and Zn precipitation in the soil section closest to the cathode in the treatments without catholyte pH control limited their removal from the soil column. When the catholyte pH was controlled by lactic acid and CaCl(2), the soil Cu and Zn removal percentage after 554 h running reached 63% and 65%, respectively. Moreover, both the residual soil Cu and Zn concentrations were lower than 100 mg kg(-1), which is adequate and meets the requirement of the Chinese soil environmental quality standards. PMID:16202805

  19. Hydration and diffusion dynamics shape microbial community composition and function in soil aggregates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, D.; Ebrahimi, A.

    2014-12-01

    Natural variations in soil hydration conditions (rainfall, evaporation, root water uptake) affect gas and nutrient diffusion and soil microbial community composition and function. The conditions in soil aggregates are of particular interest due to limitations to oxygen diffusion into the core often containing organic carbon (as aggregation agent). The constantly varying soil hydration conditions affect the spatial extent of anoxic conditions in aggregates and thus the sized and self-organization of aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities. We developed an artificial soil aggregate composed of 3-D angular pore network combined with individual based models of motile microbial cells that grow, move, intercept nutrients and are inhibited by presence or absence of oxygen. The hydration conditions in the model aggregate affect community size, spatial segregation, and growth rates. The opposing diffusion directions of oxygen and carbon were essential to maintenance of aerobic and anaerobic communities within an aggregate (anaerobes become extinct when carbon sources are external). Cohabited soil aggregates promoted onset of anaerobic conditions by oxygen consumption by peripheral aerobes. Model predictions of CO2 and N2O production rates were in good agreement with experimental data. Results illustrate how aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities are activated by certain hydration conditions that enhance either nitrogen losses or decomposition of organic matter both contributing to GHG emissions.

  20. Global Evaporation Estimates from SMAP Passive Microwave Soil Moisture Retrievals Using Conditional Sampling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vreugdenhil, M.; Entekhabi, D.; Konings, A. G.; Salvucci, G.; Hogan, P.

    2015-12-01

    Evaporation links the water, energy and carbon cycles over land yet even its climatology on global scale is not observed. Tower-based flux measurements are sparse and do not cover diverse biomes and climates. In the last decades, many strategies to derive evaporation based on remote sensing measurements have been developed. However, these methods are dependent on a variety of assumptions and auxiliary data, making them more prone to error propagation. A more data-driven method was developed by Salvucci (2001), who found that under statistical stationary conditions the expected change in soil moisture storage is zero when conditioned to a certain storage for a certain time interval. Consequently, using the water balance, precipitation conditionally averaged to the soil moisture storage is equal to the total loss: evaporation and drainage. Using only soil moisture and precipitation data as model inputs reduces the sources of uncertainty. In this presentation we provide the first estimates of global evaporation from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive mission by applying the conditional sampling method to passive microwave soil moisture time series and in situ precipitation data. The obtained evaporation estimates show a good correspondence to measured evaporation from eddy correlation towers over selected field sites. Subsequently, a simple approach is developed to directly estimate evaporation from SMAP soil moisture data. This approach enables the investigation of dynamics in evaporation during the dry-down after storms. The timing of the transition between the different stages of evaporation is assessed for different climates especially the transition from stage 1 to stage 2 evaporation; atmosphere limited evaporation to soil limited evaporation respectively. Investigations into the dynamics of unstressed evaporation and transpiration and the transition from stage 1 to stage 2 evaporation increases our understanding of water stress and soil desiccation. It also

  1. Observing soil water dynamics under two field conditions by a novel sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, W.; Sun, Y.; Schulze Lammers, P.; Schumann, H.; Berg, A.; Shi, C.; Wang, C.

    2011-10-01

    SummarySufficiently available soil water is a basic requirement in agricultural production. Monitoring soil water dynamics (SWD) in the root zone is an optimal approach for managing a crop's growth. This study presents a novel sensor system that simultaneously measures volumetric soil water content (VSWC), apparent electrical conductivity (EC a) and soil temperature at two different soil depths (shallow: 16 cm; deep: 36 cm). For testing its feasibility in the field, two prototypes were installed, one in bare soil and the other in a sugar beet ( Beta vulgaris L.) field in the summer of 2010. Following a sequence of rainfall events randomly distributed over the experimental period, we observed distinct responses from the sensors at each monitored depth in both field conditions. In addition to the multi-parameter measurements, the novel sensor design includes a series of technical advantages such as solar-powered operation, wireless communication, and being relatively easy to install/remove. Thus, the developed wireless sensor system is promising for networked applications in precision farming.

  2. Persistence of cyfluthrin in three Malaysian agricultural soils under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee-Yin, Choo; Ismaill, B S; Salmijah, S; Halimah, M

    2013-09-01

    The influence of temperature, moisture and organic matter on the persistence of cyfluthrin was determined using three types of Malaysian soils, namely clay, clay loam and sandy clay loam obtained from a tomato farm in Cameron Highlands, Pahang. The persistence of cyfluthrin was observed in the laboratory at two temperature levels of 25 and 35 degreeC and field water capacity of 30 and 80%. Treated soil samples were incubated in a growth chamber for 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 21 and 28 days. The results from the incubation studies showed that temperature and organic matter content significantly reduced the half-life (t1/2) values of cyfluthrin in the three soil types, but moisture content had very little effect. It was observed that cyfluthrin persisted longer at lower temperature and moisture content and higher organic matter content in all the three soil types. The present study demonstrated that under the tropical conditions of Malaysia, cyfluthrin dissipated rapidly in soils compared to its dissipation in soils of temperate regions, evidently due to high temperature. PMID:24558812

  3. Daytime and nighttime groundwater contributions to soils with different surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xuguang; Ma, Xiaoyi; Shi, Wenjuan

    2015-12-01

    Contributions of groundwater to the soil-water balance play an important role in areas with shallow water tables. The characteristics of daytime and nighttime water flux using non-weighing lysimeters were studied from June to September 2012 and 2013 in the extremely arid Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region in northwestern China. The study consisted of nine treatments: three surface conditions, bare soil and cotton plants, each with water tables at depths of 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 m; and plastic mulch with a water table at 1.5 m but with three percentages of open areas (POAs) in the plastic. The groundwater supply coefficient (SC) and the groundwater contribution (GC) generally varied with surface conditions. Both SC and GC decreased in the bare-soil and cotton treatments with increasing depth of the groundwater. Both SC and GC increased in the plastic-mulch treatment with increasing POA. Average nighttime GCs in the bare-soil treatments in July and August (the midsummer months) were 50.8-60.8 and 53.2-65.3 %, respectively, of the total daily contributions. Average nighttime GCs in the cotton treatments in July and August were 51.4-60.2 and 51.5-58.1 %, respectively, of the total daily contributions. The average GCs in June and September, however, were lower at night than during the daytime. Soil temperature may thus play a more important role than air temperature in the upflow of groundwater.

  4. Synoptic conditions related to soil moisture-atmosphere interactions and unorganized convection in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Trent W.; Quiring, Steven M.; Frauenfeld, Oliver W.; Rapp, Anita D.

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric modification by anomalously dry or wet soils can both enhance and suppress convective activity. However, the local-scale and mesoscale feedback governing soil moisture-precipitation coupling are embedded within the larger synoptic-scale environment. Despite their importance, synoptic-scale atmospheric conditions are rarely considered in studies examining soil moisture-atmosphere interactions. We combine self-organizing maps of 500 hPa geopotential height, spatial synoptic classification, and Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model air mass trajectories to determine if the synoptic-scale environment affects the ability of the land surface to force unorganized convection in Oklahoma. We identify several synoptic patterns that significantly impact the frequency of unorganized convection. Synoptic patterns characterized by midlevel troughs over the Southern Great Plains are less frequently associated with unorganized convective events. These patterns exhibit cool air advection in the midlevel and lower level of the atmosphere and are linked to suppression of convective activity. The synoptic patterns characterized by 500 hPa ridging over the study region are more frequently associated with unorganized convective events. These patterns likely result in increased net radiation, vapor pressure deficit, and more homogenously dry soils. Unorganized convective events that occur during these synoptic conditions initiate preferentially over dry soils. We present evidence that the synoptic-scale environment can influence whether and how the land surface has an impact on convection.

  5. Microbial inoculants and organic amendment improves plant establishment and soil rehabilitation under semiarid conditions.

    PubMed

    Mengual, Carmen; Schoebitz, Mauricio; Azcón, Rosario; Roldán, Antonio

    2014-02-15

    The re-establishment of autochthonous shrub species is an essential strategy for recovering degraded soils under semiarid Mediterranean conditions. A field assay was carried out to determine the combined effects of the inoculation with native rhizobacteria (Bacillus megaterium, Enterobacter sp, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus sp) and the addition of composted sugar beet (SB) residue on physicochemical soil properties and Lavandula dentata L. establishment. One year after planting, Bacillus sp. and B. megaterium + SB were the most effective treatments for increasing shoot dry biomass (by 5-fold with respect to control) and Enterobacter sp + SB was the most effective treatments for increasing dry root biomass. All the treatments evaluated significantly increased the foliar nutrient content (NPK) compared to control values (except B. thuringiensis + SB). The organic amendment had significantly increased available phosphorus content in rhizosphere soil by 29% respect to the control. Enterobacter sp combined with sugar beet residue improved total N content in soil (by 46% respect to the control) as well as microbiological and biochemical properties. The selection of the most efficient rhizobacteria strains and their combined effect with organic residue seems to be a critical point that drives the effectiveness of using these biotechnological tools for the revegetation and rehabilitation of degraded soils under semiarid conditions. PMID:24463051

  6. Antimony retention and release from drained and waterlogged shooting range soil under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Hockmann, Kerstin; Tandy, Susan; Lenz, Markus; Reiser, René; Conesa, Héctor M; Keller, Martin; Studer, Björn; Schulin, Rainer

    2015-09-01

    Many soils polluted by antimony (Sb) are subject to fluctuating waterlogging conditions; yet, little is known about how these affect the mobility of this toxic element under field conditions. Here, we compared Sb leaching from a calcareous shooting range soil under drained and waterlogged conditions using four large outdoor lysimeters. After monitoring the leachate samples taken at bi-weekly intervals for >1.5 years under drained conditions, two of the lysimeters were subjected to waterlogging with a water table fluctuating according to natural rainfall water infiltration. Antimony leachate concentrations under drained conditions showed a strong seasonal fluctuation between 110 μg L(-1) in summer and <40 μg L(-1) in winter, which closely correlated with fluctuations in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations. With the development of anaerobic conditions upon waterlogging, Sb in leachate decreased to 2-5 μg L(-1) Sb and remained stable at this level. Antimony speciation measurements in soil solution indicated that this decrease in Sb(V) concentrations was attributable to the reduction of Sb(V) to Sb(III) and the stronger sorption affinity of the latter to iron (Fe) (hydr)oxide phases. Our results demonstrate the importance of considering seasonal and waterlogging effects in the assessment of the risks from Sb-contaminated sites. PMID:25592464

  7. Leaching of Glyphosate and Aminomethylphosphonic Acid through Silty Clay Soil Columns under Outdoor Conditions.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Marco; Cecchi, Stefano; Zanchi, Camillo A; Orlandini, Simone

    2015-09-01

    Glyphosate [-(phosphono-methyl)-glycine] is the main herbicide used in the Chianti vineyards. Considering the pollution risk of the water table and that the vineyard tile drain may deliver this pollutant into nearby streams, the objective of the present study was to estimate the leaching losses of glyphosate under natural rainfall conditions in a silty clay soil in the Chianti area. The leaching of glyphosate and its metabolite (aminomethylphosphonic acid [AMPA]) through soils was studied in 1-m-deep soil columns under outdoor conditions over a 3-yr period. Glyphosate was detected in the leachates for up to 26 d after treatments at concentrations ranging between 0.5 and 13.5 μg L. The final peak (0.28 μg L) appeared in the leachates approximately 319 d after the first annual treatment. Aminomethylphosphonic acid first appeared (21.3 μg L) in the soil leachate 6.8 d after the first annual treatment. Aminomethylphosphonic acid detection frequency and measured concentration in the leachates were more than that observed for the glyphosate. Aminomethylphosphonic acid was detected in 20% of the soil leachates at concentrations ranging from 1 to 24.9 μg L. No extractable glyphosate was detected in the soil profile. However, the AMPA content in the lowest layer ranged from 13.4 to 21.1 mg kg, and on the surface layer, it ranged from 86.7 to 94 mg kg. Overall, these results indicate that both glyphosate and AMPA leaching through a 1-m soil column may be potential groundwater contaminants. PMID:26436283

  8. The effect of cultivation practices on soil - atmosphere carbon cycle under arid climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifschitz, David; Sternberg, Marcelo; Bonfil, David; Ben-Dor, Eyal; Eshel, Gil

    2010-05-01

    The soil - atmosphere carbon cycle was studied under arid climate conditions, in relation to crop management. Management included different tillage (Conventional vs. No Tillage, CT vs. NT respectively) and fertilization (nitrogen and phosphorus application vs. unfertilized) practices, in a continuous (winter) wheat field, for two growing seasons (2007-08 and 2008-09). The NT practice was characterized by higher CO2 effluxes than the CT during the growing season. In turn, the CT practice had higher pCO2 throughout the soil profile to a depth of 2m. This could be explained partially by a physical crust formation due to raindrop impact, emerging on the bare soil, mostly in the CT practice. The crust serves as a barrier for gas exchange (soil aeration) and in addition, also reduces rainfall infiltration, and all together harms the growing potential (the NT practice yielded higher plant biomass). Fertilization application had no apparent effect on the CO2 effluxes or the pCO2, but had a significant effect on the yield of the plant biomass. The NT practice had also higher amounts of soil organic Carbon, (SOC) mainly in the surface layer, and soil inorganic Carbon (SIC) to a depth of 2m. This is attributed to straw mulch application for the former and better gas and water conductivity (that initiates carbonate dissolution - precipitation cycles) for the latter, which is a much more dominant factor in arid area soils. The stable carbon isotope analysis (δ13C) values for the total Carbon (TC), SOC and SIC results show that the NT practice generates higher amounts of pedogenic carbonates also, and in general is clearly superior over CT in almost every aspect in the soil - atmosphere C cycle.

  9. Scale effect on runoff and soil loss control using rice straw mulch under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, S. H. R.; Gholami, L.; Sharifi, E.; Khaledi Darvishan, A.; Homaee, M.

    2015-01-01

    Amendments can control the runoff and soil loss by protecting the soil surface. However, scale effects on runoff and soil loss control have not been considered yet. The present study has been formulated to determine the efficiency of two plot sizes of 6 and 0.25 m2 covered by 0.5 kg m-2 of straw mulch with regard to changing the time to runoff, runoff coefficient, sediment concentration and soil loss under laboratory conditions. The study used a sandy-loam soil taken from summer rangeland, Alborz Mountains, northern Iran, and was conducted under simulated rainfall intensities of 50 and 90 mm h-1 and in three replicates. The results of the study showed that the straw mulch had a more significant effect on reducing the runoff coefficient, sediment concentration and soil loss on a 0.25 m2 plot scale. The maximum effectiveness in time to runoff for both the scales was observed at a rainfall intensity of 90 mm h-1. The maximum increasing and decreasing rates in time to runoff and runoff coefficient were observed at a rainfall intensity of 90 mm h-1, with 367.92 and 96.71% for the 0.25 m2 plot and 110.10 and 15.08% for the 6 m2 plot. The maximum reduction in the runoff coefficient was in the 0.25 m2 plot for the two rainfall intensities of 50 and 90 mm h-1, with rates of -89.34 and -96.71%. The maximum change in soil loss at the intensities of both 50 and 90 mm h-1 occurred in the 0.25 m2 plot, with 100%, whereas in the 6 m2 plot, decreasing rates of soil loss for the intensities of both 50 and 90 mm h-1 were 46.74 and 63.24%, respectively.

  10. Scale effect on runoff and soil loss control using rice straw mulch under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, S. H. R.; Gholami, L.; Sharifi Moghadam, E.; Khaledi Darvishan, A.

    2014-10-01

    Amendments can control the runoff and soil loss by protecting soil surface. However, scale effects on runoff and soil loss control has not been considered yet. The present study has been formulated to determine the efficiency of two plot sizes of 6 and 0.25 m2 covered by straw mulch with rate of 0.5 kg m-2 in changing the time to runoff, runoff coefficient, sediment concentration and soil loss under laboratory conditions. The study has been conducted for a sandy-loam soil taken from summer rangeland, Alborz Mountains, Northern Iran under simulated rainfall intensities of 50 and 90 mm h-1 and in 3 replicates. The results of the study showed that the straw mulch had more significant effect in in reducing runoff coefficient, sediment concentration and soil loss at 0.25 m2 plot scale. The maximum effectiveness in time to runoff for both the scales, observed in rainfall intensity of 90 mm h-1. The maximum increasing and decreasing rates in time to runoff and runoff coefficient observed in the rainfall intensity of 90 mm h-1 with the amounts of 367.92 and 96.71% for 0.25 m2 plot and the amounts of 110.10 and 15.08% for 6 m2 plot respectively. The maximum change of soil loss in both the intensities of 50 and 90 mm h-1 occurred at 0.25 m2 plot with the amount of 100% whereas at 6 m2 plot, decreasing rates of soil loss for in both the intensities of 50 and 90 mm h-1 were 46.74 and 63.24%, respectively.

  11. Teaching Aerobic Lifestyles: New Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrick, G. Ken; Iammarino, Nicholas K.

    1982-01-01

    New approaches to teaching aerobic life-styles in secondary schools are suggested, focusing on three components: (1) the psychological benefits of aerobic activity; (2) alternative aerobic programs at nonschool locations; and (3) the development of an aerobics curriculum to help maintain an active life-style after graduation. (JN)

  12. Biopiles and biofilters combined for soil cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, J.; Sansregret, J.L.; Cyr, B.

    1994-06-01

    Bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils can be completed using a combination of biopile and biofiltration technologies. Target contaminants, such as gasoline, jet fuel, diesel fuel and other petroleum-derived products are removed from the soil by biodegradation and volatilization in the biopile. Air emissions from the biopile containing volatile hydrocarbons are treated subsequently in a biofilter, where the pollutants are degraded and mineralized by heterotrophic aerobic microorganisms. In the biopile process, contaminated soil is excavated and stockpiled in a treatment area. Remediation of the soil relies on microbial degradation and volatilization of hydrocarbons under controlled treatment conditions.

  13. Compartmental modeling of PAH transport in soil column experiments under variably-saturated flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, F.; Sericano, J. L.; Wade, T. L.; Mohanty, B. P.

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge about the mobilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from PAH-laden soils or sediments is important to understand their bioavailability, and ultimately assess the environmental risk of PAH transport from surface soils into the groundwater. The transport and kinetics of three PAH from a spiked soil layer (2-3 cm soil depth), Phenanthrene-d10 (1900 ng/g), Naphthalene-d8 (1500 ng/g), and Pyrene-d10 (1800 ng/g), were investigated by performing a series of 8 rainfall events during 25 days in two large, replicate soil columns (length: 35 cm; diameter: 14.5 cm; 1 Pore Volume [PV]=2.29 L) under variably-saturated flow conditions. The water-methanol displacing solutions were at volumetric fractions of 0.3 and 0.6 during day 1 (E1) through E8 and E12-E22, respectively. Soil matric potential (h) was monitored at 5-cm and 20-cm depth and volumetric water content (θ) at 12.5-cm and 27.5-cm depth. Soil solution was sampled at 5 cm- (n=46) and 27.5-cm depth (n=46), and the effluent at the bottom of the column (n=163). HYDRUS-1D was used for inverse modeling of h and θ data and to predict θ at specific times and soil depth increments. First-order kinetics, compartmental models describing the transfer of PAH from the soil compartment to the soil solution compartment (desorption) and vice versa (sorption), were used to estimate mass transfer rates (φs, sorption; φd, desorption; φe, elimination), PAH mass in each compartment, and partition coefficients (Kd). Phenanthrene breakthrough curve could be interpreted through a two-parameter, two-compartment model corresponding to the common two-site sorption model, whose parameter estimates (and 95% confidence intervals) were φd=2.72 (2.31, 3.19) PV-1 and φe=4.67 (3.82, 5.7 ) PV-1. Naphthalene breakthrough curve followed a simple one-compartment elimination model, φe=2.0 (1.9, 2.1) PV-1, and that of Pyrene a three-parameter, two-compartment model, φs=0.0454 (0.00853, 0.0603) PV-1, φd=0.165 (0.0319, 0.855) PV

  14. Measurements of heat fluxes and soil moisture patterns in the field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanda, M.; Snehota, M.; Haase, T.; Wild, J.

    2011-12-01

    New combined thermal and soil moisture unit coded TMS2 is presented. It is a prototype designed on good experience with TMS1. The device combines three thermometers for use approximately at -10, 0 and +15 cm relative to soil surface when installed vertically. Soil moisture measurement is performed based on time domain transmission (TDT) principle for the full range of soil moisture. Presented new version incorporates lifetime power supply for approximately 5 year operation and life time permanent data storage (0.5 mil logs) if values are acquired every 10 minutes. Lifetime operation log accompanies lifetime data storage with lockable data blocks. Data are retrieved by contact portable pocket collector. Both vertical/surface or buriable/subsurface installation is possible thanks to additional communication interface on demand. Original model TMS1, proved durability in harsh outdoor environment with good functioning in wet conditions withstanding mechanical destruction. Extended testing in the sandstone area of the National Park Bohemian Switzerland, Czech Republic is performed since 2009 by the Institute of Botany of the ASCR. Results of long-term measurement at hundreds of localities are successfully used for i) evaluation of species-specific environmental requirements (for different species of plants, bryophytes and fungi) and ii) extrapolation of microclimatic conditions over large areas of rugged sandstone relief with assistance of accurate, LiDAR based, digital terrain model. TMS1 units are also applied for continuous measurement of temperature and moisture of coarse woody debris, which serves as an important substrate for establishment and growth of seedlings and is thus crucial for natural regeneration of many forest ecosystems. The TMS1 sensors have been tested and calibrated in soil laboratories of Czech Technical University in Prague for three soil materials: arenic cambisol, podzol and quartz sand, showing good linearity and minor influence of the

  15. Volatilization modeling of two herbicides from soil in a wind tunnel experiment under varying humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Martina; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2012-11-20

    Volatilization of pesticides from the bare soil surface is drastically reduced when the soil is under dry conditions (i.e., water content lower than the permanent wilting point). This effect is caused by the hydrated mineral surfaces that become available as additional sorption sites under dry conditions. However, established volatilization models do not explicitly consider the hydrated mineral surfaces as an independent sorption compartment and cannot correctly cover the moisture effect on volatilization. Here we integrated the existing mechanistic understanding of sorption of organic compounds to mineral surfaces and its dependence on the hydration status into a simple volatilization model. The resulting model was tested with reported experimental data for two herbicides from a wind tunnel experiment under various well-defined humidity conditions. The required equilibrium sorption coefficients of triallate and trifluralin to the mineral surfaces, K(min/air), at 60% relative humidity were fitted to experimental data and extrapolated to other humidity conditions. The model captures the general trend of the volatilization in different humidity scenarios. The results reveal that it is essential to have high quality input data for K(min/air), the available specific surface area (SSA), the penetration depth of the applied pesticide solution, and the humidity conditions in the soil. The model approach presented here in combination with an improved description of the humidity conditions under dry conditions can be integrated into existing volatilization models that already work well for humid conditions but still lack the mechanistically based description of the volatilization process under dry conditions. PMID:23130847

  16. Microhabitat Effects on N2O Emissions from Floodplain Soils under Controlled Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley, Martin; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Niklaus, Pascal A.; Kuhn, Thomas; Luster, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Semi-terrestrial soils such as floodplain soils are considered to be potential hotspots of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. The quantitative assessment of N2O release from these hotspots under field conditions, and of the microbial pathways that underlie net N2O production (ammonium oxidation, nitrifier-denitrification, and denitrification) is challenging because of their high spatial and temporal variability. The production and consumption of N2O appears to be linked to the presence or absence of micro-niches, providing specific conditions that may be favorable to either of the relevant microbial pathways. Flood events have been shown to trigger moments of enhanced N2O emission through a close coupling of niches with high and low oxygen availabilities. This coupling might be modulated by microhabitat effects related to soil aggregate formation, root soil interactions and the degradation of organic matter accumulations. In order to assess how these factors can modulate N2O production and consumption under simulated flooding/drying conditions, we have set up a mesocosm experiment with N-rich floodplain soils comprising different combinations of soil aggregate size classes and inert matrix material. These model soils were either planted with basket willow (Salix viminalis L.), mixed with leaf litter, or left untreated. Throughout a simulated flood event, we repeatedly measured the net N2O production rate. In addition, soil water content, redox potential, as well as C and N substrate availability were monitored. In order to gain insight into the sources of, and biogeochemical controls on N2O production, we also measured the bulk δ15N signature of the produced N2O, as well as its intramolecular 15N site preference (SP). In this presentation we focus on a period of enhanced N2O emission during the drying phase after 48 hrs of flooding. We will discuss the observed emission patterns in the context of possible treatment effects. Soils with large aggregates showed a

  17. Testing of Icy-Soil Sample Delivery in Simulated Martian Conditions (Animation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation

    This movie clip shows testing under simulated Mars conditions on Earth in preparation for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander using its robotic arm for delivering a sample to the doors of a laboratory oven.

    The icy soil used in the testing flowed easily from the scoop during all tests at Martian temperatures. On Mars, icy soil has stuck to the scoop, a surprise that may be related to composition of the soil at the landing site.

    This testing was done at Honeybee Robotics Spacecraft Mechanisms Corp., New York, which supplied the Phoenix scoop.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASAaE(TM)s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. Interactions with soils conditioned by different vegetation: a potential explanation of bromus tectorum L. invasion into salt-deserts?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasion by Bromus tectorum L. may condition the soil and increase nutrient availability. We hypothesized that nutrient poor soils of the arid Honey Lake Valley of northeastern California U.S.A., similar in physical and chemical properties, but conditioned by either B. tectorum, Krascheninniko...

  19. Interactions with soils conditioned by different vegetation: A potential explanation of Bromus tectorum L. invasion into salt-deserts?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasion by Bromus tectorum L. may condition the soil and increase nutrient availability. We hypothesized that nutrient poor soils of the arid Honey Lake Valley of northeastern California U.S.A., similar in physical and chemical properties, but conditioned by either B. tectorum, Krascheninniko...

  20. Atrazine degradation by fungal co-culture enzyme extracts under different soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Chan-Cupul, Wilberth; Heredia-Abarca, Gabriela; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Refugio

    2016-05-01

    This investigation was undertaken to determine the atrazine degradation by fungal enzyme extracts (FEEs) in a clay-loam soil microcosm contaminated at field application rate (5 μg g(-1)) and to study the influence of different soil microcosm conditions, including the effect of soil sterilization, water holding capacity, soil pH and type of FEEs used in atrazine degradation through a 2(4) factorial experimental design. The Trametes maxima-Paecilomyces carneus co-culture extract contained more laccase activity and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) content (laccase = 18956.0 U mg protein(-1), H2O2 = 6.2 mg L(-1)) than the T. maxima monoculture extract (laccase = 12866.7 U mg protein(-1), H2O2 = 4.0 mg L(-1)). Both extracts were able to degrade atrazine at 100%; however, the T. maxima monoculture extract (0.32 h) achieved a lower half-degradation time than its co-culture with P. carneus (1.2 h). The FEE type (p = 0.03) and soil pH (p = 0.01) significantly affected atrazine degradation. The best degradation rate was achieved by the T. maxima monoculture extract in an acid soil (pH = 4.86). This study demonstrated that both the monoculture extracts of the native strain T. maxima and its co-culture with P. carneus can efficiently and quickly degrade atrazine in clay-loam soils. PMID:26830051

  1. [Influences of humic acids on the dissimilatory iron reduction of red soil in anaerobic condition].

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-na; Li, Zhong-pei; Che, Yu-ping

    2009-01-01

    Iron oxide is abundant in red soil. Reduction and oxidation of iron oxide are important biogeochemical processes. In this paper, we reported the effects of humic acid on dissimilatory iron reduction (DISSIR) in red soil by adding glucose or humic acid (HA), under an anaerobic condition. Results indicated that DISSIR is weak for the red soil with a low content of organic matter, Glucose that act as electron donators promoted the process of DISSIR in red soil. HA added to soil solely didn't accelerate the DISSIR since it couldn't provide electron donators to microbe. However, adding of both glucose and HA promoted the DISSIR at the beginning of the incubation but then inhibited the process, which maybe caused by the effects of precipitation and adsorption of red soil. Concentrations of HA strongly affected the DISSIR, HA at low concentrations(0.20 and 0.02 g/kg) had weak effects, while HA at a high concentration (2.00 g/kg) promoted the process at the beginning and then inhibited it. HA extracted from different materials had distinct effects on the DISSIR. HA from Weathering coal of Datong in Shanxi Province (HAs), lignite of Gongxian in Henan Province (HAh) and Dianchi Lake sediment in Kunming of Yunnan Province (HAk) all promoted the DISSIR at the beginning of the incubation. However, at the end of incubation, HAk with a low aromaticity still promoted the process, while HAs and HAh with a higher aromaticity weakened the DISSIR. This may be due to the increase in adsorption of soil with the aromaticity of HA. PMID:19353884

  2. Benefits and limitations of pig slurry to reclaim bare mine soils under Mediterranean semiarid conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zornoza, Raúl; Faz, Ángel; Acosta, Jose A.; Kabas, Sebla; Martínez-Martínez, Silvia; Ángeles Muñoz, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the effects of pig slurry application on reclamation of mine soils from Cartagena-La Unión Mining District (SE Spain) were investigated in a field experiment. Exchangeable metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn), total organic carbon, total nitrogen, soluble carbon, microbial biomass and three enzyme activities were periodically monitored during 67 days. In addition, one year after the application of the pig slurry, soil and developed vegetation was sampled. Results showed that only exchangeable Cd and Zn significantly decreased in the amended plots, mainly for Cd, with decreases of 98%. The rest of metals and chemical properties did not change with time after application of amendments, showing values not significantly different than those present before pig slurry application. Soluble carbon, microbial biomass carbon and the enzyme activities increased after the application of pig slurry. However, after various days these parameters started a decreasing trend until reaching values similar to the control from approximately day 25. Thus, mainly precipitation as phosphate from the waste was very effective for Cd immobilization. No increments were observed in soil organic carbon because the organic carbon applied with the slurry was too low to be significantly detected. Nonetheless, pig slurry is a good fertilizer owing to the high quantity of nutrients provided, needed to promote the development of vegetation. One year after application, a native vegetation cover (25-30%) was reached by spontaneous colonization. Triggered plant growth by the effect of amendment improved soil conditions, particularly by the help of the medium created by their rhizosphere systems. Increments in soil organic carbon and total nitrogen, and decreases in the exchangeable metals fraction concentration were observed in rhizospheric soils when compared to the bare soils. This improvement in soil quality mediated by vegetation was more efficient than the direct effect of the amendment. In

  3. Water dynamics and groundwater contributions in a young mountain soil under different meteorological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negm, Amro; Falocchi, Marco; Barontini, Stefano; Ranzi, Roberto; Bacchi, Baldassare

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater contribution to the soil-water content and to the evapotranspiration is a major uncertainty to assess the water balance. Particularly in mountain environments, where the soil and the depth of the water table are shallow, both percolation and water rise from the water table can happen. Aiming at better understanding these processes at the local scale, a micrometeorological station, equipped with both traditional sensors, an eddy covariance (EC) apparatus with a 20Hz sonic anemometer and infrared CO2 and H2O gas analyser, and four multiplexed TDR probes, was installed at Cividate Camuno (Oglio river basin, Central Italian Alps, Italy, 274ma.s.l.), in a mountain environment with complex topography and Alpine sublitoranean climate. The young, anthropised, soil upper layers are about 40cm deep and mainly covered by alfalfa (Medicago sativa), wild carrot (Daucus carota) and yarrow (Achillea millefolium). Field and laboratory tests were performed to characterise the soil hydraulic properties. Particularly the soil-water retention relationships were measured by means of a low- and a high-pressure Richards' apparatus, and the hydraulic conductivity at saturation of each soil layer was estimated by 2-dimensional, axis-symmetrical, inverse modelling of field infiltration tests from single ring infiltrometer. The measurements were performed during Summer 2012 and Summer 2013. The groundwater exchange was numerically estimated both in wet (Summer 2012) and in dry meteorlogical conditions (Summer 2013). Evapotranspiration was assessed by means of Penman-Monteith method, which was found to be in the range between EC-estimated fluxes and an indirect estimate based on the Bowen ratio correction for Summer 2012. The two seasons are meteorologically very different and it results also in the soil-water regime. During Summer 2012, the weather was relatively wet, the soil did not reach very small water contents, so that precipitation was able to percolate towards the

  4. A proposed aerobic granules size development scheme for aerobic granulation process.

    PubMed

    Dahalan, Farrah Aini; Abdullah, Norhayati; Yuzir, Ali; Olsson, Gustaf; Salmiati; Hamdzah, Myzairah; Din, Mohd Fadhil Mohd; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Khalil, Khalilah Abdul; Anuar, Aznah Nor; Noor, Zainura Zainon; Ujang, Zaini

    2015-04-01

    Aerobic granulation is increasingly used in wastewater treatment due to its unique physical properties and microbial functionalities. Granule size defines the physical properties of granules based on biomass accumulation. This study aims to determine the profile of size development under two physicochemical conditions. Two identical bioreactors namely Rnp and Rp were operated under non-phototrophic and phototrophic conditions, respectively. An illustrative scheme was developed to comprehend the mechanism of size development that delineates the granular size throughout the granulation. Observations on granules' size variation have shown that activated sludge revolutionised into the form of aerobic granules through the increase of biomass concentration in bioreactors which also determined the changes of granule size. Both reactors demonstrated that size transformed in a similar trend when tested with and without illumination. Thus, different types of aerobic granules may increase in size in the same way as recommended in the aerobic granule size development scheme. PMID:25661308

  5. Methanogenic archaea are globally ubiquitous in aerated soils and become active under wet anoxic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Roey; Claus, Peter; Conrad, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The prototypical representatives of the Euryarchaeota—the methanogens—are oxygen sensitive and are thought to occur only in highly reduced, anoxic environments. However, we found methanogens of the genera Methanosarcina and Methanocella to be present in many types of upland soils (including dryland soils) sampled globally. These methanogens could be readily activated by incubating the soils as slurry under anoxic conditions, as seen by rapid methane production within a few weeks, without any additional carbon source. Analysis of the archaeal 16S ribosomal RNA gene community profile in the incubated samples through terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and quantification through quantitative PCR indicated dominance of Methanosarcina, whose gene copy numbers also correlated with methane production rates. Analysis of the δ13C of the methane further supported this, as the dominant methanogenic pathway was in most cases aceticlastic, which Methanocella cannot perform. Sequences of the key methanogenic enzyme methyl coenzyme M reductase retrieved from the soil samples before incubation confirmed that Methanosarcina and Methanocella are the dominant methanogens, though some sequences of Methanobrevibacter and Methanobacterium were also detected. The global occurrence of only two active methanogenic archaea supports the hypothesis that these are autochthonous members of the upland soil biome and are well adapted to their environment. PMID:22071343

  6. Testing of the hydromechanical prediction model of soil erosion under the conditions of Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogichaishvili, G. P.; Kirvalidze, D. R.; Gorjomeladze, O. L.

    2014-09-01

    A hydromechanical model for predicting water (rain-induced) soil erosion was tested on the experimental plots of the Research Institute of Tea and Subtropical Crops in Zendidi village (the Ajara Autonomous Republic) and the Sabashvili Institute of Soil Science, Agrochemistry, and Melioration in Khevi and Kitskhi villages (Upper Imeretia, Western Georgia). A comparison of factual and predicted values of rain-induced erosion for the plots with permanent black fallow showed that the model overestimated the average annual soil loss for the yellow-brown strongly eroded soil in Zendidi village by 23.22 t/ha (133%). This value ranged in different years from 18 to 1052%. For the plots with corn, the predicted value of annual erosion was by 16.94 t/ha higher than the factual value (overestimation of 488%). A comparison of factual and predicted values of rainfall erosion for the plots under sprinkling irrigation also showed that the predicted soil loss was higher than the factual one by 4.14-30.40 t/ha for corn, 6.76-11.14 t/ha for winter wheat, and 15.75-24.12 t/ha for the plots with stubble of winter wheat and barley. Thus, the hydromechanical model for predicting water erosion inadequately describes it under the conditions of Western Georgia and has to be refined.

  7. Biotite weathering in podzolic soil under conditions of a model field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, T. A.; Tolpeshta, I. I.; Topunova, I. V.

    2010-10-01

    The biotite changes in the 1-5 μm fraction after its occurrence in the F, H, AE, and E horizons of a pale-podzolic soil for five years under conditions of a model field experiment were assessed by X-ray diffraction analysis. It was found that the main changes of the biotite in all the horizons included the degradational transformation of its crystal lattice to interstratified mica-vermiculite structures and vermiculite. The intensity of this process gradually decreased from the F horizon down the profile in parallel with the decrease in the amount of roots and the abundance and activity of microbiota. Chloritized structures were present among the products of the biotite weathering in the H, AE, and E horizons; the degree of chloritization gradually increased from the H horizon to the E horizon. The main identified products of the biotite weathering in the AE and E horizons formed during the 5 years of the model experiment were identified in the clay and fine-silt fractions from these horizons of the native pale-podzolic soils. Therefore, the vermiculite, soil chlorite, and mixed-layer illite-vermiculite minerals in the soils studied could be considered as products of the recent soil functioning. The obtained results and literature data showed that the weathering of biotite resulted in the formation of K- and Al-buffer systems.

  8. Engineering of a modular and synthetic phosphoketolase pathway for photosynthetic production of acetone from CO2 in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 under light and aerobic condition.

    PubMed

    Chwa, Jun-Won; Kim, Wook Jin; Sim, Sang Jun; Um, Youngsoon; Woo, Han Min

    2016-08-01

    Capture and conversion of CO2 to valuable chemicals is intended to answer global challenges on environmental issues, climate change and energy security. Engineered cyanobacteria have been enabled to produce industry-relevant chemicals from CO2 . However, the final products from cyanobacteria have often been mixed with fermented metabolites during dark fermentation. In this study, our engineering of Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 enabled continuous conversion of CO2 to volatile acetone as sole product. This process occurred during lighted, aerobic culture via both ATP-driven malonyl-CoA synthesis pathway and heterologous phosphoketolase (PHK)-phosphotransacetylase (Pta) pathway. Because of strong correlations between the metabolic pathways of acetate and acetone, supplying the acetyl-CoA directly from CO2 in the engineered strain, led to sole production of acetone (22.48 mg/L ± 1.00) without changing nutritional constraints, and without an anaerobic shift. Our engineered S. elongatus strains, designed for acetone production, could be modified to create biosolar cell factories for sustainable photosynthetic production of acetyl-CoA-derived biochemicals. PMID:26879003

  9. Specific microbial populations thrive under fluctuating redox conditions in tropical soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deangelis, K. M.; Silver, W. L.; Thompson, A.; Firestone, M. K.

    2008-12-01

    The highly weathered soils of upland humid tropical forests are characterized by rapidly fluctuating redox conditions, dominated by Fe-oxide mineralogy, and have relatively low sulfate availability. To assess how fluctuating redox conditions and accompanying biogeochemistry impact microbial community structure and function, we collected soil cores from the Luquillo LTER forest in Puerto Rico and incubated them for 32 days under one of three redox regimes: static oxic, static anoxic, and 4-day fluctuating redox. Over this time course we measured CO2, CH4, and N2O production, amorphous iron and Fe(II), and microbial community structure by high density microarray (PhyloChip) analysis. Static oxic, anoxic, and fluctuating redox soils all had statistically indistinguishable respiration rates over the course of the experiment. Fluctuating redox conditions permitted simultaneous methanogenesis, N2O production, and iron reduction, all accompanied by steady CO2 production. We analyzed the standing and active microbial community using the 16S ribosomal DNA and RNA biomarkers, identifying 2489 taxa in these soils. Ordination analysis showed significant separation between the active (RNA-based) and standing (DNA-based) communities, with much more variation in the active community compared to the standing community. Fluctuating redox conditions maintained a microbial community structure similar to that of the pre-incubation samples, while static anaerobic conditions had the most profound effect on the communities. Finally, there was considerable overlap between the taxa that were the most highly correlated with production of CH4 and Fe(II). Association of groups of taxa with specific biogeochemical processes begins to identify organisms potentially responsible for field biogeochemical processing.

  10. Soil application of Beauveria bassiana to control Ceratitis capitata in semi field conditions.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ali; Sermann, Helga; Lerche, Sandra; Büttner, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    The Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) is a highly polyphagous pest of economic importance cultures in Syria, as in many other parts of the world. The potential of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiona BALS (VUIL.) strain 412 against adults of Mediterranean fruit fly C. capitata was evaluated in semi field conditions during the summer. Soil (5-7 cm high) was filled into plastic container (27 cm x 32 cm). In one container 75 pupae, two days before emergency, were spread uniformly on the soil. Then the pupae were covered with soil (4-5 cm layer). After that, 30 ml suspension of fungal spores (4 x 10(8) spores/ml) was applied to the soil surface using a dash bottle. This corresponded to a spore density of 1.3 x 10(7) spores/cm2 on soil. Water and food (1:4 yeast, sucrose) were placed in the cages for the emerged flies. The semi-field evaluation of B. bassiana revealed a fly mortality of about 46% compared to 16% in the control. In addition 72% of dead flies were moulded in the treatment. These results indicated that the entomopathogenic fungus B. bassiana was pathogen against the adults of C. capitata not only in the laboratory condition but also under field condition. That means B. bassiana could decrease the offspring of C. capitata. Therefore B. bassiana could be an effective factor to control C. capitata in combination with other control methods, used in IPM program in the field. PMID:20222591

  11. Impact of soil moisture initial conditions on multi model summer predictions over mid-latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardilouze, Constantin; Prodhomme, Chloé; Batté, Lauriane; Déqué, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Land surface initial conditions have been recognized as a potential source of predictability at seasonal time scales. As an example, results from GLACE-2 (phase 2 of the Global Land-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment) highlighted the impact of spring soil moisture in summer near-surface air temperature prediction over Europe and Northern America with global long-range forecast systems (Koster et al., 2011, van den Hurk et al.,2012). Yet, few studies have explored such an influence over a sufficient hindcast period to produce a robust quantitative assessment. In the framework of the FP7-SPECS project, dedicated experiments have been carried out with June-August hindcasts from 5 distinct Atmosphere Ocean Global Climate Models initialized either by realistic or climatological soil moisture conditions on May 1st. Realistic initialization leads to an improved 2-meter temperature prediction skill over parts of Europe in the multi model, particularly the Balkans peninsula which had been identified as a hot spot of soil moisture-atmosphere coupling (Seneviratne et al. 2006) However no improvement was found over North-American Great Plains in spite of the high potential of this region. Further analyses suggest that this lack of skill stems from a common shortcoming of the models. All of them tend to overestimate the positive feedback between soil moisture, temperature and precipitation with respect to the observations. Hence, tackling model systematic biases over the US Southern Great Plains appears as a necessary prerequisite for summer predictability enhancement.

  12. Formation of diphenylthioarsinic acid from diphenylarsinic acid under anaerobic sulfate-reducing soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Hisatomi, Shihoko; Guan, Ling; Nakajima, Mami; Fujii, Kunihiko; Nonaka, Masanori; Harada, Naoki

    2013-11-15

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) is a toxic phenylarsenical compound often found around sites contaminated with phenylarsenic chemical warfare agents, diphenylcyanoarsine or diphenylchloroarsine, which were buried in soil after the World Wars. This research concerns the elucidation of the chemical structure of an arsenic metabolite transformed from DPAA under anaerobic sulfate-reducing soil conditions. In LC/ICP-MS analysis, the retention time of the metabolite was identical to that of a major phenylarsenical compound synthesized by chemical reaction of DPAA and hydrogen sulfide. Moreover the mass spectra for the two compounds measured using LC/TOF-MS were similar. Subsequent high resolution mass spectral analysis indicated that two major ions at m/z 261 and 279, observed on both mass spectra, were attributable to C12H10AsS and C12H12AsSO, respectively. These findings strongly suggest that the latter ion is the molecular-related ion ([M+H](+)) of diphenylthioarsinic acid (DPTA; (C6H5)2AsS(OH)) and the former ion is its dehydrated fragment. Thus, our results reveal that DPAA can be transformed to DPTA, as a major metabolite, under sulfate-reducing soil conditions. Moreover, formation of diphenyldithioarsinic acid and subsequent dimerization were predicted by the chemical reaction analysis of DPAA with hydrogen sulfide. This is the first report to elucidate the occurrence of DPAA-thionation in an anaerobic soil. PMID:24007995

  13. Aerobic decomposition of crop residues improves N availability and grain yield for three rice soils of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam: A screenhouse study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the Mekong Delta of Vietnam, rice (Oryza sativa, L.) is usually planted two to three times annually. Limited evidence elsewhere suggests that rice crop uptake of soil nitrogen (N) under such intensive cropping can be increased by replacing the customary anaerobic decomposition of crop residues wi...

  14. Effect of wetting-drying cycles and fire conditions on runoff and soil loss of a Mediterranean Pale Rendzina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lado, Marcos; Inbar, Assaf; Tenaw, Haim; Stenberg, Marcelo; Ben-Hur, Meni

    2013-04-01

    Wetting and drying cycles have been reported to have a positive effect on soil aggregation and improve the recovery of soil structure after a disturbance. Therefore, after wildfires, it is expected that drying periods between consecutive storms could modify runoff and soil loss patterns. At the same time, different fire conditions may coexist in a location during a wildfire, creating a mosaic of soils affected to different degrees. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of wetting-drying cycles and various fire conditions on infiltration rate, runoff and soil loss of a Mediterranean soil. Samples from a Pale Rendzina from Birya forest in Northern Israel were subjected to treatments representing some of the soil disturbances that may coexist after a wildfire: unburnt (UB-soil, i.e. not affected by fire); low-moderate severity direct fire (direct fire-DF soil) and; prolonged heating under moderate temperature without direct contact with the flames (oven heated-HT soil). Each soil was placed under a rainfall simulator and exposed to three 80-mm storms separated by drying periods of 72h. Significant differences were found between fire conditions in infiltration rate, runoff and soil loss. Runoff and soil loss were in the following order :HTsoil loss of the HT soil were a result of its higher structural stability, likely emerging from the thermal fusion of clay particles in the aggregates, and from changes in the soil solution that reduced clay dispersion. This was confirmed by data obtained from slaking and dispersion tests. Wetting and drying cycles did not have a positive effect on runoff or soil loss. Total runoff and soil loss from the UB soil remained relatively constant in the three rainstorms, while those of DF and HT soils increased significantly from one rainstorm to the next. Therefore, the differences between fire conditions became smaller as the number of

  15. About climate variabilitiy leading the hydric condition of the soil in the rainfed region of Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pántano, V. C.; Penalba, O. C.

    2013-05-01

    Extreme events of temperature and rainfall have a socio-economic impact in the rainfed agriculture production region in Argentina. The magnitude of the impact can be analyzed through the water balance which integrates the characteristics of the soil and climate conditions. Changes observed in climate variables during the last decades affected the components of the water balance. As a result, a displacement of the agriculture border towards the west was produced, improving the agricultural production of the region. The objective of this work is to analyze how the variability of rainfall and temperature leads the hydric condition of the soil, with special focus on extreme events. The hydric conditions of the soil (HC= Excess- Deficit) were estimated from the monthly water balance (Thornthwaite and Mather method, 1957), using monthly potential evapotranspiration (PET) and monthly accumulated rainfall (R) for 33 stations (period 1970-2006). Information of temperature and rainfall was provided by National Weather Service and the effective capacity of soil water was considered from Forte Lay and Spescha (2001). An agricultural extreme condition occurs when soil moisture and rainfall are inadequate or excessive for the development of the crops. In this study, we define an extreme event when the variable is less (greater) than its 20% and 10% (80% and 90%) percentile. In order to evaluate how sensitive is the HC to water and heat stress in the region, different conditional probabilities were evaluated. There is a weaker response of HC to extreme low PET while extreme low R leads high values of HC. However, this behavior is not always observed, especially in the western region where extreme high and low PET show a stronger influence over the HC. Finally, to analyze the temporal variability of extreme PET and R, leading hydric condition of the soil, the number of stations presenting extreme conditions was computed for each month. As an example, interesting results were

  16. Using NASA UAVSAR Datasets to Link Soil Moisture to Crop Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davitt, A. W. D.; McDonald, K. C.; Azarderakhsh, M.; Winter, J.

    2015-12-01

    California and The Central Valley are experiencing one of that region's worst, persistent droughts, which represents the continuation of a prolonged drought that started in the early 2000's. Due to the continued drought, many agricultural regions in The Central Valley have been experiencing water shortages, negatively impacting agricultural production and the socio-economics of the region. Due to these impacts, there has been an increased incentive to find new ways to conserve water for use in irrigation. Recent advances in remote sensing techniques provide the ability for end users to better understand field conditions so they may make more informed decisions on irrigation timing and amounts. However, a good understanding of soil moisture and its role in crop health and yield is lacking to support informed water management decisions. Though known to be important, a robust understanding of the role of the spatio-temporal patterns in soil moisture linked to crop health is lacking. Remote sensing platforms such as NASA's Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) provide the capacity to obtain within-field measurements to estimate within-field and field-to-field variability in soil moisture. UAVSAR radar images acquired from 2010 to 2014 for Yolo County, California are being examined to determine the suitability of high resolution (field scale) multi-temporal L-band radar backscatter imagery for soil moisture assessment and crop conditions through the growing season. By using such data and linking to in-situ meteorology measurements, modeling (MIMICS), and other remote sensing derived datasets (Sentinel, Landsat, MODIS, and TOPS-SIMS), an integrated monitoring system can potentially support the assessment of agricultural field conditions. This allows growers to optimize the use of limited water supplies through informed water management practices, potentially improving crop conditions and yield in a water stressed region.

  17. A Putative ABC Transporter Permease Is Necessary for Resistance to Acidified Nitrite and EDTA in Pseudomonas aeruginosa under Aerobic and Anaerobic Planktonic and Biofilm Conditions

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Cameron; Su, Shengchang; Panmanee, Warunya; Lau, Gee W.; Browne, Tristan; Cox, Kevin; Paul, Andrew T.; Ko, Seung-Hyun B.; Mortensen, Joel E.; Lam, Joseph S.; Muruve, Daniel A.; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an important airway pathogen of cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive disease patients. Multiply drug resistant PA is becoming increasing prevalent and new strategies are needed to combat such insidious organisms. We have previously shown that a mucoid, mucA22 mutant PA is exquisitely sensitive to acidified nitrite (A-NO2−, pH 6.5) at concentrations that are well tolerated in humans. Here, we used a transposon mutagenesis approach to identify PA mutants that are hypersensitive to A-NO2−. Among greater than 10,000 mutants screened, we focused on PA4455, in which the transposon was found to disrupt the production of a putative cytoplasmic membrane-spanning ABC transporter permease. The PA4455 mutant was not only highly sensitive to A-NO2−, but also the membrane perturbing agent, EDTA and the antibiotics doxycycline, tigecycline, colistin, and chloramphenicol, respectively. Treatment of bacteria with A-NO2− plus EDTA, however, had the most dramatic and synergistic effect, with virtually all bacteria killed by 10 mM A-NO2−, and EDTA (1 mM, aerobic, anaerobic). Most importantly, the PA4455 mutant was also sensitive to A-NO2− in biofilms. A-NO2− sensitivity and an anaerobic growth defect was also noted in two mutants (rmlC and wbpM) that are defective in B-band LPS synthesis, potentially indicating a membrane defect in the PA4455 mutant. Finally, this study describes a gene, PA4455, that when mutated, allows for dramatic sensitivity to the potential therapeutic agent, A-NO2− as well as EDTA. Furthermore, the synergy between the two compounds could offer future benefits against antibiotic resistant PA strains. PMID:27064218

  18. Conditional knockout of Mn-SOD targeted to type IIB skeletal muscle fibers increases oxidative stress and is sufficient to alter aerobic exercise capacity

    PubMed Central

    Lustgarten, Michael S.; Jang, Youngmok C.; Liu, Yuhong; Muller, Florian L.; Qi, Wenbo; Steinhelper, Mark; Brooks, Susan V.; Larkin, Lisa; Shimizu, Takahiko; Shirasawa, Takuji; McManus, Linda M.; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Richardson, Arlan

    2009-01-01

    In vitro studies of isolated skeletal muscle have shown that oxidative stress is limiting with respect to contractile function. Mitochondria are a potential source of muscle function-limiting oxidants. To test the hypothesis that skeletal muscle-specific mitochondrial oxidative stress is sufficient to limit muscle function, we bred mice expressing Cre recombinase driven by the promoter for the inhibitory subunit of troponin (TnIFast-iCre) with mice containing a floxed Sod2 (Sod2fl/fl) allele. Mn-SOD activity was reduced by 82% in glycolytic (mainly type II) muscle fiber homogenates from young TnIFastCreSod2fl/fl mice. Furthermore, Mn-SOD content was reduced by 70% only in type IIB muscle fibers. Aconitase activity was decreased by 56%, which suggests an increase in mitochondrial matrix superoxide. Mitochondrial superoxide release was elevated more than twofold by mitochondria isolated from glycolytic skeletal muscle in TnIFastCreSod2fl/fl mice. In contrast, the rate of mitochondrial H2O2 production was reduced by 33%, and only during respiration with complex II substrate. F2-isoprostanes were increased by 36% in tibialis anterior muscles isolated from TnIFastCreSod2fl/fl mice. Elevated glycolytic muscle-specific mitochondrial oxidative stress and damage in TnIFastCreSod2fl/fl mice were associated with a decreased ability of the extensor digitorum longus and gastrocnemius muscles to produce contractile force as a function of time, whereas force production by the soleus muscle was unaffected. TnIFastCreSod2fl/fl mice ran 55% less distance on a treadmill than wild-type mice. Collectively, these data suggest that elevated mitochondrial oxidative stress and damage in glycolytic muscle fibers are sufficient to reduce contractile muscle function and aerobic exercise capacity. PMID:19776389

  19. Adaptation of soil solarization to the integrated management of soilborne pests of tomato under humid conditions.

    PubMed

    Chellemi, D O; Olson, S M; Mitchell, D J; Secker, I; McSorley, R

    1997-03-01

    ABSTRACT Soil solarization was shown to be cost effective, compatible with other pest management tactics, readily integrated into standard production systems, and a valid alternative to preplant fumigation with methyl bromide under the tested conditions. Solarization using clear, photoselective, or gas-impermeable plastic was evaluated in combination with metham sodium, 1,3-dichloropropene + chloropicrin, methyl bromide + chloropicrin, pebulate, or cabbage residue. Strip solarization, applied to 20-cm-high, 0.9-m-wide beds, was conducted to achieve compatibility with standard production practices and resulted in soil temperatures 2 to 4 degrees C above those temperatures resulting when using conventional flatbed solarization. Soil temperatures were 1 to 2 degrees C higher at the edges of the raised beds, eliminating any border effects associated with solarization. Following a 40- to 55-day solarization period, the plastic was painted white and used as a production mulch for a subsequent tomato crop. The incidence of Southern blight and the density of Paratrichodorus minor and Criconemella spp. were lower (P < 0.05) in solarized plots. No differences (P < 0.05) in the incidence of Fusarium wilt and the density of nutsedge and Helicotylenchus spp. were observed between plots receiving solarization and plots fumigated with a mixture of methyl bromide + chloropicrin. The severity of root galling was lower (P < 0.05) when soil solarization was combined with 1,3-dichloropropene + chloropicrin (16.2 + 3.4 g/m(2)) and a gas-impermeable film. The incidence of bacterial wilt was not affected by soil treatments. Marketable yields in plots using various combinations of soil solarization and other tactics were similar (P < 0.05) to yields obtained in plots fumigated with methyl bromide + chloropicrin. The results were validated in several large scale field experiments conducted by commercial growers. PMID:18945167

  20. Effects of Temperature on Solute Transport Parameters in Differently-Textured Soils at Saturated Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, S.; Arihara, M.; Kawamoto, K.; Nishimura, T.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.

    2014-12-01

    Subsurface warming driven by global warming, urban heat islands, and increasing use of shallow geothermal heating and cooling systems such as the ground source heat pump, potentially causes changes in subsurface mass transport. Therefore, understanding temperature dependency of the solute transport characteristics is essential to accurately assess environmental risks due to increased subsurface temperature. In this study, one-dimensional solute transport experiments were conducted in soil columns under temperature control to investigate effects of temperature on solute transport parameters, such as solute dispersion and diffusion coefficients, hydraulic conductivity, and retardation factor. Toyoura sand, Kaolin clay, and intact loamy soils were used in the experiments. Intact loamy soils were taken during a deep well boring at the Arakawa Lowland in Saitama Prefecture, Japan. In the transport experiments, the core sample with 5-cm diameter and 4-cm height was first isotropically consolidated, whereafter 0.01M KCl solution was injected to the sample from the bottom. The concentrations of K+ and Cl- in the effluents were analyzed by an ion chromatograph to obtain solute breakthrough curves. The solute transport parameters were calculated from the breakthrough curves. The experiments were conducted under different temperature conditions (15, 25, and 40 oC). The retardation factor for the intact loamy soils decreased with increasing temperature, while water permeability increased due to reduced viscosity of water at higher temperature. Opposite, the effect of temperature on solute dispersivity for the intact loamy soils was insignificant. The effects of soil texture on the temperature dependency of the solute transport characteristics will be further investigated from comparison of results from differently-textured samples.

  1. Controlling the catalytic aerobic oxidation of phenols.

    PubMed

    Esguerra, Kenneth Virgel N; Fall, Yacoub; Petitjean, Laurène; Lumb, Jean-Philip

    2014-05-28

    The oxidation of phenols is the subject of extensive investigation, but there are few catalytic aerobic examples that are chemo- and regioselective. Here we describe conditions for the ortho-oxygenation or oxidative coupling of phenols under copper (Cu)-catalyzed aerobic conditions that give rise to ortho-quinones, biphenols or benzoxepines. We demonstrate that each product class can be accessed selectively by the appropriate choice of Cu(I) salt, amine ligand, desiccant and reaction temperature. In addition, we evaluate the effects of substituents on the phenol and demonstrate their influence on selectivity between ortho-oxygenation and oxidative coupling pathways. These results create an important precedent of catalyst control in the catalytic aerobic oxidation of phenols and set the stage for future development of catalytic systems and mechanistic investigations. PMID:24784319

  2. Effects of long-term continuous cropping on soil nematode community and soil condition associated with replant problem in strawberry habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingyue; Lewis, Edwin E.; Liu, Qizhi; Li, Heqin; Bai, Chunqi; Wang, Yuzhu

    2016-08-01

    Continuous cropping changes soil physiochemical parameters, enzymes and microorganism communities, causing “replant problem” in strawberry cultivation. We hypothesized that soil nematode community would reflect the changes in soil conditions caused by long-term continuous cropping, in ways that are consistent and predictable. To test this hypothesis, we studied the soil nematode communities and several soil parameters, including the concentration of soil phenolic acids, organic matter and nitrogen levels, in strawberry greenhouse under continuous-cropping for five different durations. Soil pH significantly decreased, and four phenolic acids, i.e., p-hydroxybenzoic acid, ferulic acid, cinnamic acid and p-coumaric acid, accumulated with time under continuous cropping. The four phenolic acids were highly toxic to Acrobeloides spp., the eudominant genus in non-continuous cropping, causing it to reduce to a resident genus after seven-years of continuous cropping. Decreased nematode diversity indicated loss of ecosystem stability and sustainability because of continuous-cropping practice. Moreover, the dominant decomposition pathway was altered from bacterial to fungal under continuous cropping. Our results suggest that along with the continuous-cropping time in strawberry habitat, the soil food web is disturbed, and the available plant nutrition as well as the general health of the soil deteriorates; these changes can be indicated by soil nematode community.

  3. Effects of long-term continuous cropping on soil nematode community and soil condition associated with replant problem in strawberry habitat

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xingyue; Lewis, Edwin E.; Liu, Qizhi; Li, Heqin; Bai, Chunqi; Wang, Yuzhu

    2016-01-01

    Continuous cropping changes soil physiochemical parameters, enzymes and microorganism communities, causing “replant problem” in strawberry cultivation. We hypothesized that soil nematode community would reflect the changes in soil conditions caused by long-term continuous cropping, in ways that are consistent and predictable. To test this hypothesis, we studied the soil nematode communities and several soil parameters, including the concentration of soil phenolic acids, organic matter and nitrogen levels, in strawberry greenhouse under continuous-cropping for five different durations. Soil pH significantly decreased, and four phenolic acids, i.e., p-hydroxybenzoic acid, ferulic acid, cinnamic acid and p-coumaric acid, accumulated with time under continuous cropping. The four phenolic acids were highly toxic to Acrobeloides spp., the eudominant genus in non-continuous cropping, causing it to reduce to a resident genus after seven-years of continuous cropping. Decreased nematode diversity indicated loss of ecosystem stability and sustainability because of continuous-cropping practice. Moreover, the dominant decomposition pathway was altered from bacterial to fungal under continuous cropping. Our results suggest that along with the continuous-cropping time in strawberry habitat, the soil food web is disturbed, and the available plant nutrition as well as the general health of the soil deteriorates; these changes can be indicated by soil nematode community. PMID:27506379

  4. Effects of long-term continuous cropping on soil nematode community and soil condition associated with replant problem in strawberry habitat.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingyue; Lewis, Edwin E; Liu, Qizhi; Li, Heqin; Bai, Chunqi; Wang, Yuzhu

    2016-01-01

    Continuous cropping changes soil physiochemical parameters, enzymes and microorganism communities, causing "replant problem" in strawberry cultivation. We hypothesized that soil nematode community would reflect the changes in soil conditions caused by long-term continuous cropping, in ways that are consistent and predictable. To test this hypothesis, we studied the soil nematode communities and several soil parameters, including the concentration of soil phenolic acids, organic matter and nitrogen levels, in strawberry greenhouse under continuous-cropping for five different durations. Soil pH significantly decreased, and four phenolic acids, i.e., p-hydroxybenzoic acid, ferulic acid, cinnamic acid and p-coumaric acid, accumulated with time under continuous cropping. The four phenolic acids were highly toxic to Acrobeloides spp., the eudominant genus in non-continuous cropping, causing it to reduce to a resident genus after seven-years of continuous cropping. Decreased nematode diversity indicated loss of ecosystem stability and sustainability because of continuous-cropping practice. Moreover, the dominant decomposition pathway was altered from bacterial to fungal under continuous cropping. Our results suggest that along with the continuous-cropping time in strawberry habitat, the soil food web is disturbed, and the available plant nutrition as well as the general health of the soil deteriorates; these changes can be indicated by soil nematode community. PMID:27506379

  5. Carbon and Nitrogen dynamics in forest soils depending on light conditions and tree species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselinovic, Bojana; Hager, Herbert

    2013-04-01

    Climate change mitigation actions under the Kyoto Protocol apply among other decreases of CO2-emissions and/or increases of carbon (C) stocks. As soils represent the second biggest C-reservoir on Earth, an exact estimation of the stocks and reliable knowledge on C-dynamics in forest soils is of high importance. Anyhow, here, the accurate GHG-accounting, emission reductions and increase in C stocks is hampered due to lack of reliable data and solid statistical methods for the factors which influence C-sequestration in and its release from these systems. In spite of good progress in the scientific research, these factors are numerous and diverse in their interactions. This work focuses on influence of the economically relevant tree species - Picea abies, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus spp. - and light conditions on forest floor and mineral soil C and N dynamics in forest soils. Spruce monocultures have been widely used management practices in central European forests during the past century. Such stands are in lower altitudes and on heavy and water logged soils unstable and prone to disturbances, especially to windthrows. We hypothesize that windthrow areas loose C & N and that the establishment of the previous nutrient stocks is, if at all, only possible to be reached over the longer periods of time. We research also how the increased OM depletion affects the change of C & N stocks in forest floor vs. mineral soil. Conversion of such secondary spruce monocultures to site adequate beech and oak forests may enable higher stocks allocated predominantly as stable organic carbon and as plant available nitrogen. For this purpose sites at 300-700 m altitude with planosols were chosen in the region of the Northern Alpine Foothills. A false chronosequence approach was used in order to evaluate the impacts of the tree species and change in light conditions on dynamic of C & N in the forest floor and mineral soil, over the period 0-100 (for oak 120 y.) years. The C- and N

  6. Mobilization and Release of colloidal Carbon from a Soil Column Under Redox Oscillation Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afsar, M. Z.; Jin, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM), the most mobile form of carbon (C), strongly influences the cycling, distribution and behavior of C in soil. In wetlands, the reductive dissolution of iron and manganese oxy-hydroxides releases large quantities of DOM into the soil solution. The objective of this study is to quantify the changes in aqueous organic carbon concentration in different sized fractions induced by reduction of iron and increase in pH. Twenty four cm long soil columns were prepared. Columns were run under oxic (as control) and anoxic conditions. Two platinum redox probes were inserted at 10 and 17 cm depths from the soil surface to monitor the redox status of the column. Anoxic and oxic conditions were maintained by flushing with either nitrogen or oxygen gas through the soil. No additional organic sources were added. After 35 days of anoxic environment, column leachate samples were separated by differential centrifugation into five colloidal sized fractions (<450 nm, <220 nm, <100 nm, <50 nm and <2.3 nm). Immediately after the 1st reduction half cycle, the leachate samples were collected inside the glove box and the soil columns were flushed with oxygen to prepare for 2nd reduction half cycle. After 1st reduction half cycle, the pH, ionic strength and aqueous (Fe2+) concentration of the column extracts were increased whereas the Eh value was decreased. The range of pH, Eh, ionic strength and concentration of Fe2+ was 6.38 to 6.91, -219 to -275 mV, 13.74 to 18.84 mM and 1.8 to 3.41 mg L-1, respectively. Following the anoxic incubation, the total desorbed C was increased up to 139 mg L-1. The distribution of C across the five particle size fractions was 3.68-11.73% (> 450 nm), 0.59-5.12% (450-220 nm), 0.45-4.91% (220-100 nm), 0.18-2.91% (100-50 nm), 15.48-35.23% (50 nm - 2.3 nm) and 49.15-63.94% (<2.3 nm). The preliminary results confirmed the release of more nanoparticulate (50-2.3 nm) and truly dissolved (<2.3 nm) organic matter from the anoxic soil column

  7. Comparison of four soil moisture sensor types under field conditions in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelbach, Heidi; Lehner, Irene; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2012-04-01

    SummaryMany environmental and hydrological applications require knowledge about soil moisture. Its measurement accuracy is known to depend on the sensor technique, which is sensitive to soil characteristics such as texture, temperature, bulk density and salinity. However, the calibration functions provided by instrument manufacturers are generally developed under laboratory conditions, and their accuracy for field applications is rarely investigated, in particular over long time periods and in comparison with other sensors types. In this paper, four side-by-side profile soil moisture measurements down to 110 cm using three low-cost sensors and one high-accuracy and high-cost time domain reflectometry (TDR) sensor are compared over a 2-year period at a clay loam site in Switzerland. The low-cost instruments include the (1) 10HS (Decagon Devices, United States), (2) CS616 (Campbell Scientific, United States), and (3) SISOMOP (SMG University of Karlsruhe, Germany) sensors, which are evaluated against the (4) TDR-based TRIME-IT/-EZ (IMKO GmbH, Germany) sensors. For the comparison, the calibration functions provided by the manufacturers are applied for each sensor type. The sensors are evaluated based on daily data regarding their representation of the volumetric water content (VWC) and its anomalies, as well as the respective temperature dependency of the measurements. Furthermore, for each sensor type the actual evapotranspiration is estimated using the soil water balance approach and compared with measurements from a weighing lysimeter. It is shown that the root mean square difference (RMSD) of VWC for the low-cost sensors compared to the TDR measurements are up to 0.3 m3/m3, with highest values in near-surface layers. However, the RMSD for the VWC anomalies are lower compared to those for absolute values. We conclude that under the studied conditions none of the evaluated low-cost sensors has a level of performance consistent with the respective manufacturer

  8. Nitrous oxide emissions in southern Poland from agricultural soils under various tillage conditions and from urban soils under strong anthropopression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkowski, M.; Bartyzel, J.; Zięba, D.; Ciaciek, K.; Nęcki, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of field measurements performed at: (i) the agricultural sites managed by Institute of Plant Acclimatization and Husbandry (ZDHAR) in Grodkowice (Malopolska, Poland), and (ii) the urban sites located in Kraków, Poland. For agricultural measurements, several sites have been selected for measurements of N2O emissions during two campaigns - in spring and autumn 2014. The investigated crops were chosen to represent the regional agriculture and included wheat, canola and maize under various tillage conditions, as well as an uncultivated grassland as a control site. For urban environment, measurement campaigns have been performed at the university's campus lawn and at a large urban meadow, both located in the centre of Kraków agglomeration. The sites were chosen to be representative of the urban green areas typical of Central Europe. The static chamber method was chosen to quantify soil-atmosphere N2O fluxes. Chamber enclosures have been performed every 3-5 days, depending on the conditions prevailing at the sites during the intermediate periods. From each enclosure, five 50-ml air samples have been collected for subsequent analysis of nitrous oxide concentrations. Well-established gas chromatography methods, with a precision of a single N2O measurement better than 0.5 ppb were employed. The measured concentrations were then used in a linear emission model to calculate N2O fluxes. Results of agricultural campaigns show large variability of N2O emissions, with maximum fluxes in the order of 120 ng N-N2O m-2 s-1, driven mainly by availability of nitrogen in soil and water. For fertilized sites, largest emissions values were observed several days after the rainfall events. Notable differences between sites under alternative tillage techniques have been observed. Observations at the urban sites revealed significant fluxes of N2O, with average daily values in some cases exceeding those observed at agricultural fields.

  9. Anaerobic and aerobic transformation of TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Kulpa, C.F.; Boopathy, R.; Manning, J.

    1996-12-31

    Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds have used pure cultures of aerobic microorganisms. In many cases, attempts to degrade nitroaromatics under aerobic conditions by pure cultures result in no mineralization and only superficial modifications of the structure. However, mixed culture systems properly operated result in the transformation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and in some cases mineralization of TNT occurs. In this paper, the mixed culture system is described with emphasis on intermediates and the characteristics of the aerobic microbial process including the necessity for a co-substrate. The possibility of removing TNT under aerobic/anoxic conditions is described in detail. Another option for the biodegradation of TNT and nitroaromatics is under anaerobic, sulfate reducing conditions. In this instance, the nitroaromatic compounds undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. TNT under sulfate reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene presumably by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of nitro groups from TNT is achieved by a series of reductive reactions with the formation of ammonia and toluene by Desulfovibrio sp. (B strain). These metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. The data supporting the anaerobic transformation of TNT under different growth condition are reviewed in this report.

  10. Chemical equilibria model of strontium-90 adsorption and transport in soil in response to dynamic alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Spalding, B P; Spalding, I R

    2001-01-15

    Strontium-90 is a major hazardous contaminant of radioactive wastewater and its processing sludges at many Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. In the past, such contaminated wastewater and sludge have been disposed in soil seepage pits, lagoons, or cribs often under highly perturbed alkaline conditions (pH > 12) where 90Sr solubility is low and its adsorption to surrounding soil is high. As natural weathering returns these soils to near-neutral or slightly acidic conditions, the adsorbed and precipitated calcium and magnesium phases, in which 90Sr is carried, change significantly in both nature and amounts. No comprehensive computational method has been formulated previously to quantitatively simulate the dynamics of 90Sr in the soil-groundwater environment under such dynamic and wide-ranging conditions. A computational code, the Hydrologic Utility Model for Demonstrating Integrated Nuclear Geochemical Environmental Responses (HUMDINGER), was composed to describe the changing equilibria of 90Sr in soil based on its causative chemical reactions including soil buffering, pH-dependent cation-exchange capacity, cation selectivity, and the precipitation/dissolution of calcium carbonate, calcium hydroxide, and magnesium hydroxide in response to leaching groundwater characteristics including pH, acid-neutralizing capacity, dissolved cations, and inorganic carbonate species. The code includes a simulation of one-dimensional transport of 90Sr through a soil column as a series of soil mixing cells where the equilibrium soluble output from one cell is applied to the next cell. Unamended soil leaching and highly alkaline soil treatments, including potassium hydroxide, sodium silicate, and sodium aluminate, were simulated and compared with experimental findings using large (10 kg) soil columns that were leached with 90Sr-contaminated groundwater after treatment. HUMDINGER's simulations were in good agreement with dynamic experimental observations of soil exchange capacity

  11. Roles of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Soil Abiotic Conditions in the Establishment of a Dry Grassland Community

    PubMed Central

    Knappová, Jana; Pánková, Hana; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    Background The importance of soil biota in the composition of mature plant communities is commonly acknowledged. In contrast, the role of soil biota in the early establishment of new plant communities and their relative importance for soil abiotic conditions are still poorly understood. Aims and Methods The aim of this study was to understand the effects of soil origin and soil fungal communities on the composition of a newly established dry grassland plant community. We used soil from two different origins (dry grassland and abandoned field) with different pH and nutrient and mineral content. Grassland microcosms were established by sowing seeds of 54 species of dry grassland plants into the studied soils. To suppress soil fungi, half of the pots were regularly treated with fungicide. In this way, we studied the independent and combined effects of soil origin and soil community on the establishment of dry grassland communities. Key Results The effect of suppressing the soil fungal community on the richness and composition of the plant communities was much stronger than the effect of soil origin. Contrary to our expectations, the effects of these two factors were largely additive, indicating the same degree of importance of soil fungal communities in the establishment of species-rich plant communities in the soils from both origins. The negative effect of suppressing soil fungi on species richness, however, occurred later in the soil from the abandoned field than in the soil from the grassland. This result likely occurred because the negative effects of the suppression of fungi in the field soil were caused mainly by changes in plant community composition and increased competition. In contrast, in the grassland soil, the absence of soil fungi was limiting for plants already at the early stages of their establishment, i.e., in the phases of germination and early recruitment. While fungicide affects not only arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi but also other biota, our data

  12. Arsenic mobility in soils contaminated with metallurgical wastes as a function of variable chemical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Payne, D. G.; Villalobos, M.; Ceniceros, A.; Lopez, J. L.; Gutierrez, M.

    2008-12-01

    Arsenic is a pervasive contaminant of natural aqueous systems, such as groundwater and soils, its sources being both natural and anthropogenic. The present investigation was performed on soils contaminated with residues from ore processing activities and revealed the presence of arsenate [As(V)] species with a very low mobility, through natural attenuation processes. The stability of this attenuation was investigated by varying two specific equilibrium chemical conditions: pH and presence of bicarbonate ions. One-unit changes in equilibrium pH generally caused small increases in As mobility, whereas the presence of bicarbonate ions considerably increased this mobility. The results were compared to thermodinamic simulations of equilibrium conditions using the total elemental composition of each individual soil, but excluding sorption reactions. Close matches between experimental data and simulations revealed the predominance of solubility-controlled As mobility via heavy-metal arsenate solid formation. Bicarbonate ions were found to be highly unsuitable for extraction of sorbed arsenate fractions due to indirect As release from solid arsenates, via heavy-metal carbonate precipitation processes.

  13. Successional stage of biological soil crusts: an accurate indicator of ecohydrological condition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, Jayne; Wilcox, Bradford P.; Van Scoyoc, Matthew V.; Phillips, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Biological soil crusts are a key component of many dryland ecosystems. Following disturbance, biological soil crusts will recover in stages. Recently, a simple classification of these stages has been developed, largely on the basis of external features of the crusts, which reflects their level of development (LOD). The classification system has six LOD classes, from low (1) to high (6). To determine whether the LOD of a crust is related to its ecohydrological function, we used rainfall simulation to evaluate differences in infiltration, runoff, and erosion among crusts in the various LODs, across a range of soil depths and with different wetting pre-treatments. We found large differences between the lowest and highest LODs, with runoff and erosion being greatest from the lowest LOD. Under dry antecedent conditions, about 50% of the water applied ran off the lowest LOD plots, whereas less than 10% ran off the plots of the two highest LODs. Similarly, sediment loss was 400 g m-2 from the lowest LOD and almost zero from the higher LODs. We scaled up the results from these simulations using the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model. Modelling results indicate that erosion increases dramatically as slope length and gradient increase, especially beyond the threshold values of 10 m for slope length and 10% for slope gradient. Our findings confirm that the LOD classification is a quick, easy, nondestructive, and accurate index of hydrological condition and should be incorporated in field and modelling assessments of ecosystem health.

  14. Plant nutrients do not covary with soil nutrients under changing climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wentao; Elser, James J.; Lü, Xiao-Tao; Wang, Zhengwen; Bai, Edith; Yan, Caifeng; Wang, Chao; Li, Mai-He; Zimmermann, Niklaus E.; Han, Xingguo; Xu, Zhuwen; Li, Hui; Wu, Yunna; Jiang, Yong

    2015-08-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) play vital roles in plant growth and development. Yet how climate regimes and soil fertility influence plant N and P stoichiometry is not well understood, especially in the belowground plant parts. Here we investigated plant aboveground and belowground N and P concentrations ([N] and [P]) and their stoichiometry in three dominant genera along a 2200 km long climatic gradient in northern China. Results showed that temperature explained more variation of [N] and [P] in C4 plants, whereas precipitation exerted a stronger influence on [N] and [P] in C3 plants. Both plant aboveground and belowground [N] and [P] increased with decreasing precipitation, and increasing temperatures yet were negatively correlated with soil [N] and [P]. Plant N:P ratios were unrelated with all climate and soil variables. Plant aboveground and belowground [N] followed an allometric scaling relationship, but the allocation of [P] was isometric. These results imply that internal processes stabilize plant N:P ratios and hence tissue N:P ratios may not be an effective parameter for predicting plant nutrient limitation. Our results also imply that past positive relationships between plant and nutrient stocks may be challenged under changing climatic conditions. While any modeling would need to be able to replicate currently observed relationships, it is conceivable that some relationships, such as those between temperature or rainfall and carbon:nutrient ratios, should be different under changing climatic conditions.

  15. Transport of bromide measured by soil coring, suction plates, and lysimeters under transient flow conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasteel, R.; Pütz, Th.; Vereecken, H.

    2003-04-01

    Lysimeter studies are one step within the registration procedure of pesticides. Flow and transport in these free-draining lysimeters do not reflect the field situation mainly because of the occurence of a zone of local saturation at the lower boundary (seepage face). The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of flow and transport behaviour of bromide detected with different measuring devices (lysimeters, suction plates, and soil coring) by comparing experimental results with numerical simulations in heterogeneous flow domains. We applied bromide as a small pulse to the bare soil surface (Orthic Luvisol) of the three devices and the displacement of bromide was regurlarly sampled for three years under natural wheather conditions. Based on the mean breakthrough curves we observe experimentally that lysimeters have a lower effective pore-water velocity and exhibit more solute spreading resulting in a larger dispersivity than the suction plates. This can be ascribed to the artefact of the lower boundary. We performed numerical transport simulations in 2-D heterogeneous flow fields (scaling approach) choosing appropriate boundary conditions for the various devices. The simulations allow to follow the temporal evolution of flow and transport processes in the various devices and to gain additional process understanding. We conclude that the model is essentially capable to reproduce the main experimental findings only if we account for the spatial correlation structure of the hydraulic properties, i.e. soil heterogeneity.

  16. Effect of anoxic vs. oxic conditions in soils on composition of mobile OM as revealed from comprehensive fluorescence analysis of soil effluents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, Andreas; Ritschel, Thomas; Totsche, Kai

    2014-05-01

    The fractionation of OM due to sorption of DOM on mineral surfaces has drawn much attention in soil science. This is mainly motivated by the implied stabilization of OM and the disposition of less affine organic molecules as mobile compounds within porous media, both processes significantly affecting the carbon cycling and that of OM-associated elements. In this study, we provide a time-resolved assessment of mobile OM in soil effluents on the basis of fluorescence excitation-emission-matrices (EEM). Our comprehensive fluorescence EEM analysis was based on a supervised parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) that permits the fixing of selected components. We estimated the protein content in soil effluent OM with a reference for microbially produced proteins from Bacillus subtilis. The soil effluent was obtained from soil columns filled with topsoil either from a floodplain site or a maize field. Except for the 1 mM NaCl influent, nothing was added to the soil columns. Under water-saturated conditions, the activity of autochthonous microbial communities induced anoxic conditions within the soil columns resulting in the microbial reduction of pedogenic Fe(III) oxides and subsequent discharge of mobile Fe2+ during percolation. Upon re-aeration of the soil effluent, Fe2+ re-oxidized and precipitated as organo-mineral ferrihydrite in the soil effluent. EEM from consecutively sampled effluent fractions pointed to a mainly invariant soil effluent OM composition, where fulvic acid-like components were predominant. However, the OM, which was associated with the effluent ferrihydrite, was enriched in proteins, which was confirmed by corresponding FTIR spectra. This suggests the preferential association of proteins with in situ-precipitated ferrihydrite, rendering proteins less mobile in soils, where precipitation and immobilization of ferrihydrite occurs. Consequently, one would assume lower protein concentrations in the soil effluent if ferrihydrite precipitation occurs within

  17. Biochar carbon sequestration and downward translocation in contrasting soils under field conditions in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal Singh, Bhupinder; Fang, Yunying; Boersma, Mark; Matta, Pushpinder; Van Zwieten, Lukas; Macdonald, Lynne

    2014-05-01

    Carbon (C) sequestration potential of biochar depends on its stability and stabilisation of native or added organic C in soil. However, the processes of biochar degradation, fate in soil organic matter pools, and downward translocation in the soil profile, and the influence of biochar on emissions or stabilisation of native organic C sources are poorly understood under field conditions. An Eucalyptus saligna green-waste biochar (δ13C -36.6o; total C 66.8%) produced by slow pyrolysis at 450° C was applied at 29.2 t ha-1 to 10-cm depth in circular (0.66-m diameter) micro-plots, encompassing three soils [Tenosol, Dermosol and Ferrosol (Australian Soil Classification); Arenosol, Planosol, Ferralsol (approximate WRB Classification] under contrasting pasture systems across New South Wales and Tasmania (Australia). The aims of this study were to (i) monitor the fate of biochar C in respired CO2 and quantify biochar stability and stabilisation under field conditions, (ii) determine the influence of biochar on native soil C emissions, and (iii) track downward migration of the surface (0-10 cm) applied biochar over a 1-year period. We also periodically monitored the impact of biochar on microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and aboveground biomass production. The soils were separated into light and heavy C fractions and the C recovery of applied biochar C was calculated at 0-8, 8-12, 12-20 and 20-30 cm depths. Biochar C mineralisation rates were generally higher, albeit fluctuated widely, in the first 3 to 4 months. Over the first 7 months, the proportion of added biochar C mineralised in soils ranged between 1.4 and 5.5% and followed the sequence: Tenosol < Dermosol < Ferrosol. The mean residence time (MRT) of biochar ranged from 29 and 70 years. These values of MRT should be treated as highly conservative values, as they mainly reflect the MRT of relatively labile C components in biochar. The cumulative CO2-C emission over the 7-month period from native soil and plant sources

  18. Sensitivity analyses of a colloid-facilitated contaminant transport model for unsaturated heterogeneous soil conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Périard, Yann; José Gumiere, Silvio; Rousseau, Alain N.; Caron, Jean

    2013-04-01

    effects and the one-at-a-time approach (O.A.T); and (ii), we applied Sobol's global sensitivity analysis method which is based on variance decompositions. Results illustrate that ψm (maximum sorption rate of mobile colloids), kdmc (solute desorption rate from mobile colloids), and Ks (saturated hydraulic conductivity) are the most sensitive parameters with respect to the contaminant travel time. The analyses indicate that this new module is able to simulate the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. However, validations under laboratory conditions are needed to confirm the occurrence of the colloid transport phenomenon and to understand model prediction under non-saturated soil conditions. Future work will involve monitoring of the colloidal transport phenomenon through soil column experiments. The anticipated outcome will provide valuable information on the understanding of the dominant mechanisms responsible for colloidal transports, colloid-facilitated contaminant transport and, also, the colloid detachment/deposition processes impacts on soil hydraulic properties. References: Šimůnek, J., C. He, L. Pang, & S. A. Bradford, Colloid-Facilitated Solute Transport in Variably Saturated Porous Media: Numerical Model and Experimental Verification, Vadose Zone Journal, 2006, 5, 1035-1047 Šimůnek, J., M. Šejna, & M. Th. van Genuchten, The C-Ride Module for HYDRUS (2D/3D) Simulating Two-Dimensional Colloid-Facilitated Solute Transport in Variably-Saturated Porous Media, Version 1.0, PC Progress, Prague, Czech Republic, 45 pp., 2012.

  19. Dance--Aerobic and Anaerobic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlette

    1984-01-01

    This article defines and explains aerobic exercise and its effects on the cardiovascular system. Various studies on dancers are cited indicating that dance is an anaerobic activity with some small degree of aerobic benefit. (DF)

  20. Comparing the ensemble and extended Kalman filters for in situ soil moisture assimilation with contrasting conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbairn, D.; Barbu, A. L.; Mahfouf, J.-F.; Calvet, J.-C.; Gelati, E.

    2015-12-01

    Two data assimilation (DA) methods are compared for their ability to produce an accurate soil moisture analysis using the Météo-France land surface model: (i) SEKF, a simplified extended Kalman filter, which uses a climatological background-error covariance, and (ii) EnSRF, the ensemble square root filter, which uses an ensemble background-error covariance and approximates random rainfall errors stochastically. In situ soil moisture observations at 5 cm depth are assimilated into the surface layer and 30 cm deep observations are used to evaluate the root-zone analysis on 12 sites in south-western France (SMOSMANIA network). These sites differ in terms of climate and soil texture. The two methods perform similarly and improve on the open loop. Both methods suffer from incorrect linear assumptions which are particularly degrading to the analysis during water-stressed conditions: the EnSRF by a dry bias and the SEKF by an over-sensitivity of the model Jacobian between the surface and the root-zone layers. These problems are less severe for the sites with wetter climates. A simple bias correction technique is tested on the EnSRF. Although this reduces the bias, it modifies the soil moisture fluxes and suppresses the ensemble spread, which degrades the analysis performance. However, the EnSRF flow-dependent background-error covariance evidently captures seasonal variability in the soil moisture errors and should exploit planned improvements in the model physics. Synthetic twin experiments demonstrate that when there is only a random component in the precipitation forcing errors, the correct stochastic representation of these errors enables the EnSRF to perform better than the SEKF. It might therefore be possible for the EnSRF to perform better than the SEKF with real data, if the rainfall uncertainty was accurately captured. However, the simple rainfall error model is not advantageous in our real experiments. More realistic rainfall error models are suggested.

  1. Seasonality of soil erosion under mediterranean conditions at the Alqueva Dam watershed.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Vera; Panagopoulos, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The Alqueva reservoir created the largest artificial lake of Western Europe in 2010. Since then, the region has faced challenges due to land-use changes that may increase the risk of erosion and shorten the lifetime of the reservoir, increasing the need to promote land management sustainability. This paper investigates the aspect of seasonality of soil erosion using a comprehensive methodology that integrates the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) approach, geographic information systems, geostatistics, and remote-sensing. An experimental agro-silvo pastoral area (typical land-use) was used for the RUSLE factors update. The study confirmed the effect of seasonality on soil erosion rates under Mediterranean conditions. The highest rainfall erosivity values occurred during the autumn season (433.6 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1)), when vegetation cover is reduced after the long dry season. As a result, the autumn season showed the highest predicted erosion (9.9 t ha(-1)), contributing 65 % of the total annual erosion. The predicted soil erosion for winter was low (1.1 t ha(-1)) despite the high rainfall erosivity during that season (196.6 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1)). The predicted annual soil loss was 15.1 t ha(-1), and the sediment amount delivery was 4,314 × 10(3) kg. Knowledge of seasonal variation would be essential to outline sustainable land management practices. This model will be integrated with World Overview of Conservation Approaches and Technologies methods to support decision-making in that watershed, and it will involve collaboration with both local people and governmental institutions. PMID:24794193

  2. Seasonality of Soil Erosion Under Mediterranean Conditions at the Alqueva Dam Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Vera; Panagopoulos, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The Alqueva reservoir created the largest artificial lake of Western Europe in 2010. Since then, the region has faced challenges due to land-use changes that may increase the risk of erosion and shorten the lifetime of the reservoir, increasing the need to promote land management sustainability. This paper investigates the aspect of seasonality of soil erosion using a comprehensive methodology that integrates the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) approach, geographic information systems, geostatistics, and remote-sensing. An experimental agro-silvo pastoral area (typical land-use) was used for the RUSLE factors update. The study confirmed the effect of seasonality on soil erosion rates under Mediterranean conditions. The highest rainfall erosivity values occurred during the autumn season (433.6 MJ mm ha-1 h-1), when vegetation cover is reduced after the long dry season. As a result, the autumn season showed the highest predicted erosion (9.9 t ha-1), contributing 65 % of the total annual erosion. The predicted soil erosion for winter was low (1.1 t ha-1) despite the high rainfall erosivity during that season (196.6 MJ mm ha-1 h-1). The predicted annual soil loss was 15.1 t ha-1, and the sediment amount delivery was 4,314 × 103 kg. Knowledge of seasonal variation would be essential to outline sustainable land management practices. This model will be integrated with World Overview of Conservation Approaches and Technologies methods to support decision-making in that watershed, and it will involve collaboration with both local people and governmental institutions.

  3. The impact of oscillating redox conditions: arsenic immobilisation in contaminated calcareous floodplain soils.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Christopher T; Couture, Raoul-Marie; Omoregie, Enoma O; Bardelli, Fabrizio; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Roman-Ross, Gabriela; Charlet, Laurent

    2013-07-01

    Arsenic contamination of floodplain soils is extensive and additional fresh arsenic inputs to the pedosphere from human activities are ongoing. We investigate the cumulative effects of repetitive soil redox cycles, which occur naturally during flooding and draining, on a calcareous fluvisol, the native microbial community and arsenic mobility following a simulated contamination event. We show through bioreactor experiments, spectroscopic techniques and modelling that repetitive redox cycling can decrease arsenic mobility during reducing conditions by up to 45%. Phylogenetic and functional analyses of the microbial community indicate that iron cycling is a key driver of observed changes to solution chemistry. We discuss probable mechanisms responsible for the arsenic immobilisation observed in-situ. The proposed mechanisms include, decreased heterotrophic iron reduction due to the depletion of labile particulate organic matter (POM), increases to the proportion of co-precipitated vs. aqueous or sorbed arsenic with α-FeOOH/Fe(OH)3 and potential precipitation of amorphous ferric arsenate. PMID:23587855

  4. Soil moisture variations in remotely sensed and reanalysis datasets during weak monsoon conditions over central India and central Myanmar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Sourabh; Kar, Sarat C.; Sharma, Anu Rani

    2016-03-01

    Variation of soil moisture during active and weak phases of summer monsoon JJAS (June, July, August, and September) is very important for sustenance of the crop and subsequent crop yield. As in situ observations of soil moisture are few or not available, researchers use data derived from remote sensing satellites or global reanalysis. This study documents the intercomparison of soil moisture from remotely sensed and reanalyses during dry spells within monsoon seasons in central India and central Myanmar. Soil moisture data from the European Space Agency (ESA)—Climate Change Initiative (CCI) has been treated as observed data and was compared against soil moisture data from the ECMWF reanalysis-Interim (ERA-I) and the climate forecast system reanalysis (CFSR) for the period of 2002-2011. The ESA soil moisture correlates rather well with observed gridded rainfall. The ESA data indicates that soil moisture increases over India from west to east and from north to south during monsoon season. The ERA-I overestimates the soil moisture over India, while the CFSR soil moisture agrees well with the remotely sensed observation (ESA). Over Myanmar, both the reanalysis overestimate soil moisture values and the ERA-I soil moisture does not show much variability from year to year. Day-to-day variations of soil moisture in central India and central Myanmar during weak monsoon conditions indicate that, because of the rainfall deficiency, the observed (ESA) and the CFSR soil moisture values are reduced up to 0.1 m3/m3 compared to climatological values of more than 0.35 m3/m3. This reduction is not seen in the ERA-I data. Therefore, soil moisture from the CFSR is closer to the ESA observed soil moisture than that from the ERA-I during weak phases of monsoon in the study region.

  5. Mathematic simulation of soil-vegetation condition and land use structure applying basin approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Natalia; Shirkin, Leonid; Krasnoshchekov, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    Ecosystems anthropogenic transformation is basically connected to the changes of land use structure and human impact on soil fertility. The Research objective is to simulate the stationary state of river basins ecosystems. Materials and Methods. Basin approach has been applied in the research. Small rivers basins of the Klyazma river have been chosen as our research objects. They are situated in the central part of the Russian plain. The analysis is carried out applying integrated characteristics of ecosystems functioning and mathematic simulation methods. To design mathematic simulator functional simulation methods and principles on the basis of regression, correlation and factor analysis have been applied in the research. Results. Mathematic simulation resulted in defining possible permanent conditions of "phytocenosis-soil" system in coordinates of phytomass, phytoproductivity, humus percentage in soil. Ecosystem productivity is determined not only by vegetation photosynthesis activity but also by the area ratio of forest and meadow phytocenosis. Local maximums attached to certain phytomass areas and humus content in soil have been defined on the basin phytoproductivity distribution diagram. We explain the local maximum by synergetic effect. It appears with the definite ratio of forest and meadow phytocenosis. In this case, utmost values of phytomass for the whole area are higher than just a sum of utmost values of phytomass for the forest and meadow phytocenosis. Efficient correlation of natural forest and meadow phytocenosis has been defined for the Klyazma river. Conclusion. Mathematic simulation methods assist in forecasting the ecosystem conditions under various changes of land use structure. Nowadays overgrowing of the abandoned agricultural lands is very actual for the Russian Federation. Simulation results demonstrate that natural ratio of forest and meadow phytocenosis for the area will restore during agricultural overgrowing.

  6. Soil Water Retention and Relative Permeability for Conditions from Oven-Dry to Full Saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.

    2011-11-04

    Common conceptual models for unsaturated flow often rely on the oversimplified representation of medium pores as a bundle of cylindrical capillaries and assume that the matric potential is attributed to the capillary force only. The adsorptive surface forces are ignored. It is often assumed that aqueous flow is negligible when a soil is near or at the residual water content. These models are successful at high and medium water contents but often give poor results at low water contents. These models do not apply to conditions at which the water content is less than the residual water content. We extend the lower bound of existing water-retention functions and conductivity models from residual water content to the oven-dry condition (i.e., zero water content) by defining a state-dependent, residual-water content for a soil drier than a critical value. Furthermore, a hydraulic conductivity model for smooth uniform spheres was modified by introducing a correction factor to describe the film flow-induced hydraulic conductivity for natural porous media. The total unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is the sum of those due to capillary and film flow. The extended retention and conductivity models were verified measurements. Results show that, when the soil is at high and intermediate water content, there is no difference between the un-extended and the extended models; when the soil is at low water content, the un-extended models overestimate the water content but underestimate the conductivity. The extended models match the retention and conductivity measurements well.

  7. Energy crop (Sida hermaphrodita) fertilization using digestate under marginal soil conditions: A dose-response experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabel, Moritz; Bueno Piaz Barbosa, Daniela; Horsch, David; Jablonowski, Nicolai David

    2014-05-01

    The global demand for energy security and the mitigation of climate change are the main drivers pushing energy-plant production in Germany. However, the cultivation of these plants can cause land use conflicts since agricultural soil is mostly used for plant production. A sustainable alternative to the conventional cultivation of food-based energy-crops is the cultivation of special adopted energy-plants on marginal lands. To further increase the sustainability of energy-plant cultivation systems the dependency on synthetic fertilizers needs to be reduced via closed nutrient loops. In the presented study the energy-plant Sida hermaphrodita (Malvaceae) will be used to evaluate the potential to grow this high potential energy-crop on a marginal sandy soil in combination with fertilization via digestate from biogas production. With this dose-response experiment we will further identify an optimum dose, which will be compared to equivalent doses of NPK-fertilizer. Further, lethal doses and deficiency doses will be observed. Two weeks old Sida seedlings were transplanted to 1L pots and fertilized with six doses of digestate (equivalent to a field application of 5, 10, 20, 40, 80, 160t/ha) and three equivalent doses of NPK-fertilizer. Control plants were left untreated. Sida plants will grow for 45 days under greenhouse conditions. We hypothesize that the nutrient status of the marginal soil can be increased and maintained by defined digestate applications, compared to control plants suffering of nutrient deficiency due to the low nutrient status in the marginal substrate. The dose of 40t/ha is expected to give a maximum biomass yield without causing toxicity symptoms. Results shall be used as basis for further experiments on the field scale in a field trial that was set up to investigate sustainable production systems for energy crop production under marginal soil conditions.

  8. CANOPY CONDUCTANCE OF PINUS TAEDA, LIQUIDAMBAR STYRACIFLUA AND QUERCUS PHELLOS UNDER VARYING ATMOSPHERIC AND SOIL WATER CONDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sap flow, and atmospheric and soil water data were collected in closed-top chambers under conditions of high soil water potential for saplings of Liquidambar styraciflua L., Quercus phellos L., and Pinus taeda L., three co-occurring species in the southeastern USA. Responses of c...

  9. Growing Opuntia (cactus) and Brassica species for the long-term remediation of selenium-contaminated soil under field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identifying alternative crops for planting in Se-containing agricultural soils of western central California will depend upon the plants’ ability to tolerate high salt and boron (B) conditions. Multi-year field studies were conducted on Se-laden soils with different cactus clones (Opuntia-ficus indi...

  10. Adsorption and degradation of five selected antibiotics in agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Pan, Min; Chu, L M

    2016-03-01

    Large quantities of antibiotics are being added to agricultural fields worldwide through the application of wastewater, manures and biosolids, resulting in antibiotic contamination and elevated environmental risks in terrestrial environments. Most studies on the environmental fate of antibiotics focus on aquatic environments or wastewater treatment plants. Little is known about the behavior of antibiotics at environmentally relevant concentrations in agricultural soil. In this study we evaluated the adsorption and degradation of five different antibiotics (tetracycline, sulfamethazine, norfloxacin, erythromycin, and chloramphenicol) in sterilized and non-sterilized agricultural soils under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Adsorption was highest for tetracycline (Kd, 1093 L/kg), while that for sulfamethazine was negligible (Kd, 1.365 L/kg). All five antibiotics were susceptible to microbial degradation under aerobic conditions, with half-lives ranging from 2.9 to 43.3 d in non-sterilized soil and 40.8 to 86.6 d in sterilized soil. Degradation occurred at a higher rate under aerobic conditions but was relatively persistent under anaerobic conditions. For all the antibiotics, a higher initial concentration was found to slow down degradation and prolong persistence in soil. The degradation behavior of the antibiotics varied in relation to their physicochemical properties as well as the microbial activities and aeration of the recipient soil. The poor adsorption and relative persistence of sulfamethazine under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions suggest that it may pose a higher risk to groundwater quality. An equation was proposed to predict the fate of antibiotics in soil under different field conditions, and assess their risks to the environment. PMID:26745292

  11. Effect of boundary conditions on measured water retention behavior within soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-torres, S.; Scheuermann, A.; Pedroso, D.; Li, L.

    2013-12-01

    The Soil Water Characteristic Curve (SWCC) is a practical representation of the behavior of soil water by relating the suction (difference between the air and water pressures to the moisture content (water saturation). The SWCC is characterized by a hysteresis loop, which is thought to be unique in that any drainage-imbibition cycle lies within a main hysteresis loop limited by two different curves for drainage and imbibition. This 'uniqueness' is the main argument for considering the SWCC as a material-intrinsic feature that characterizes the pore structure and its interaction with fluids. Models have been developed with the SWCC as input data to describe the evolution of the water saturation and the suction within soils. One example of these models is the widely used Richard's equation [1]. In this work we present a series of numerical simulations to evaluate the 'unique' nature of the SWCC. The simulations involves the use of the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) [2] within a regular soil, modelling the flow behavior of two immiscible fluids: wetting and non-wetting. The soil is packed within a cubic domain to resemble the experimental setups that are commonly used for measuring the SWCC[3]. The boundary conditions ensure that the non-wetting phase enters through one cubic face and the wetting phase enters trough the opposite phase, with no flow boundary conditions in the remaining 4 cubic faces. The SWCC known features are inspected including the presence of the common limit curves for different cycles involving varying limits for the suction. For this stage of simulations, the SWCC is indeed unique. Later, different boundary conditions are applied with the two fluids each injected from 3 opposing faces into the porous medium. The effect of this boundary condition change is a net flow direction, which is different from that in the previous case. A striking result is observed when both SWCC are compared and found to be noticeable different. Further analysis is

  12. Aerobic Dance in Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiles, Barbara Ann; Moore, Suzanne

    1981-01-01

    Aerobic dance offers a challenging workout in a social atmosphere. Though some physical education instructors tend to exclude dance units from the curriculum, most could teach aerobic dance if they had a basic knowledge of aerobic routines. The outline for a unit to be used in the class is presented. (JN)

  13. Managing for Improved Aerobic Stability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aerobic deterioration or spoilage of silage is the result of aerobic microorganisms metabolizing components of the silage using oxygen. In the almost 40 years over which these silage conferences have been held, we have come to recognize the typical pattern of aerobic microbial development by which s...

  14. The Land-use influence on soil GHG emission in condition of Moscow megalopolis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizirskaya, Maria; Epikhina, Anna; Vasenev, Ivan; Valentini, Riccardo

    2013-04-01

    he modern Global climate change problems are closely connected to greenhouses gases (GHG) balance in dominated landscapes. This problem is especially actual in case of sharply man-changed urban landscapes. Up to now not so many studies have deal with urbanization (functional zoning, land-use type, soil contamination etc.) effect on soils GHG emission spatial-temporal variability at the local and regional scale, although the global scale land-use changes and human impacts are reported to be the main factors behind soil CO2 emission. Moscow megalopolis (with population 12-16 million) is the biggest one not only for European territory of Russia but for Europe too. Our study has been done in representative urban landscapes with different land-use practices typical for Moscow: urban forest (widespread in the North of Moscow) and green lawns with different functional zoning (11 sites in total). Forest sites have been studied during 7 years and differ in mesorelief (small hill summit and two slopes). Green lawns vary in the functional use (residential, recreational and industrial) and level of human impact (normal and high). In each plot soil respiration was measured in field conditions using Li-6400-XT system. We separate autotrophic (root-derived) and heterotrophic (microbial-derived) soil respiration in the field using micro (1mm) and macro (1 cm) pore meshes. The measurements have been done weekly since June till October 2012 in 3 replicas per each plot. Additionally we analyze CH4 emission using the exposition chamber measurements method. The conducted research have shown high temporal and spatial variability of CO2 and CH4 fluxes due to functional zoning, slope, vegetation type, land-use practice, soil microclimate characteristics. The highest CO2 emission is typical for green lawns where the CO2 fluxes reached 3.3 µmol CO2m-2s-1, which is 2.5-3 times more than the one of the urban forest. Comparative analysis of the roots and microorganisms contribution in total

  15. Forms of mercury in Everglades agricultural soils

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, W.H.; Parkpian, P.; Gambrell, R.P.

    1995-12-31

    Seventeen surface soils from the Florida Everglades Agricultural Area were subjected to selective extraction for water soluble, amorphous iron oxide bound, organic, and residual mercury. Organic bound mercury was the major fraction and represented 51% of the total mercury for the 17 soils studied. Iron oxide bound mercury and water soluble mercury accounted for only 5 percent each of the total mercury. Eight weeks incubation of the soils under aerobic and anaerobic conditions showed little effect of aeration status on the transformations among the various chemical forms.

  16. Copper binding to soil fulvic and humic acids: NICA-Donnan modeling and conditional affinity spectra.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinling; Tan, Wenfeng; Xiong, Juan; Wang, Mingxia; Fang, Linchuan; Koopal, Luuk K

    2016-07-01

    Binding of Cu(II) to soil fulvic acid (JGFA), soil humic acids (JGHA, JLHA), and lignite-based humic acid (PAHA) was investigated through NICA-Donnan modeling and conditional affinity spectrum (CAS). It is to extend the knowledge of copper binding by soil humic substances (HS) both in respect of enlarging the database of metal ion binding to HS and obtaining a good insight into Cu binding to the functional groups of FA and HA by using the NICA-Donnan model to unravel the intrinsic and conditional affinity spectra. Results showed that Cu binding to HS increased with increasing pH and decreasing ionic strength. The amount of Cu bound to the HAs was larger than the amount bound to JGFA. Milne's generic parameters did not provide satisfactory predictions for the present soil HS samples, while material-specific NICA-Donnan model parameters described and predicted Cu binding to the HS well. Both the 'low' and 'high' concentration fitting procedures indicated a substantial bidentate structure of the Cu complexes with HS. By means of CAS underlying NICA isotherm, which was scarcely used, the nature of the binding at different solution conditions for a given sample and the differences in binding mode were illustrated. It was indicated that carboxylic group played an indispensable role in Cu binding to HS in that the carboxylic CAS had stronger conditional affinity than the phenolic distribution due to its large degree of proton dissociation. The fact was especially true for JGFA and JLHA which contain much larger amount of carboxylic groups, and the occupation of phenolic sites by Cu was negligible. Comparable amounts of carboxylic and phenolic groups on PAHA and JGHA, increased the occupation of phenolic type sites by Cu. The binding strength of PAHA-Cu and JGHA-Cu was stronger than that of JGFA-Cu and JLHA-Cu. The presence of phenolic groups increased the chance of forming more stable complexes, such as the salicylate-Cu or catechol-Cu type structures. PMID:27061366

  17. Plant cover, soil temperature, freeze, water stress, and evapotranspiration conditions. [south Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Nixon, P. R.; Gausman, H. W.; Namken, L. N.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Emissive and reflective data for 10 days, and IR data for 6 nights in south Texas scenes were analyzed after procedures were developed for removing cloud-affected data. HCMM radiometric temperatures were: within 2 C of dewpoint temperatures on nights when air temperature approached dewpoint temperatures; significantly correlated with variables important in evapotranspiration; and, related to freeze severity and planting depth soil temperatures. Vegetation greenness indexes calculated from visible and reflective IR bands of NOAA-6 to -9 meteorological satellites will be useful in the AgRISTARS program for seasonal crop development, crop condition, and drought applications.

  18. Measurements of Soil Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Two Maize Agroecosystems at Harvest under Different Tillage Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Giacomo, Gerosa; Angelo, Finco; Fabio, Boschetti; Stefano, Brenna; Riccardo, Marzuoli

    2014-01-01

    In this study a comparison of the soil CO2 fluxes emitted from two maize (Zea mays L.) fields with the same soil type was performed. Each field was treated with a different tillage technique: conventional tillage (30 cm depth ploughing) and no-tillage. Measurements were performed in the Po Valley (Italy) from September to October 2012, covering both pre- and postharvesting conditions, by means of two identical systems based on automatic static soil chambers. Main results show that no-tillage technique caused higher CO2 emissions than conventional tillage (on average 2.78 and 0.79 μmol CO2 m−2 s−1, resp.). This result is likely due to decomposition of the organic litter left on the ground of the no-tillage site and thus to an increased microbial and invertebrate respiration. On the other hand, fuel consumption of conventional tillage technique is greater than no-tillage consumptions. For these reasons this result cannot be taken as general. More investigations are needed to take into account all the emissions related to the field management cycle. PMID:25530990

  19. Nitrogen partitioning in oak leaves depends on species, provenance, climate conditions and soil type.

    PubMed

    Hu, B; Simon, J; Kuster, T M; Arend, M; Siegwolf, R; Rennenberg, H

    2013-01-01

    Climate-tolerant tree species and/or provenances have to be selected to ensure the high productivity of managed forests in Central Europe under the prognosticated climate changes. For this purpose, we studied the responses of saplings from three oak species (i.e. Quercus robur, Q. petraea and Q. pubescens) and provenances of different climatic origin (i.e. low or high rainfall, low or high temperature habitats) with regard to leaf nitrogen (N) composition as a measure of N nutrition. Saplings were grown in model ecosystems on either calcareous or acidic soil and subjected to one of four treatments (control, drought, air warming or a combination of drought and air warming). Across species, oak N metabolism responded to the influence of drought and/or air warming with an increase in leaf amino acid N concentration at the expense of structural N. Moreover, provenances or species from drier habitats were more tolerant to the climate conditions applied, as indicated by an increase in amino acid N (comparing species) or soluble protein N (comparing provenances within a species). Furthermore, amino acid N concentrations of oak leaves were significantly higher on calcareous compared to acidic soil. From these results, it can be concluded that seeds from provenances or species originating from drier habitats and - if available - from calcareous soil types may provide a superior seed source for future forest establishment. PMID:22934888

  20. Electrokinetic remediation of a Cu contaminated red soil by conditioning catholyte pH with different enhancing chemical reagents.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dong-Mei; Deng, Chang-Fen; Cang, Long

    2004-07-01

    The effect of enhancement reagents on the efficiency of electrokinetic remediation of Cu contaminated red soil is evaluated. The enhancement agents were a mix of organic acids, including lactic acid+NaOH, HAc-NaAc and HAc-NaAc+EDTA. The soil was prepared to an initial Cu concentration of 438 mgkg(-1) by incubating the soil with CuSO4 solution in a flooded condition for 1 month. Sequential extraction showed that Cu was partitioned in the soil as follows: 195 mgkg(-1) as water soluble and exchangeable, 71 mgkg(-1) as carbonate bound and 105 mgkg(-1) as Fe and Mn oxides. The results indicate that neutralizing the catholyte pH maintains a lower soil pH compared to that without electrokinetic treatment. The electric currents varied depending upon the conditioning solutions and increased with an increasing applied voltage potential. The electroosmotic flow rate changed significantly when different conditioning enhancing reagents were used. It was observed that lactic acid+NaOH treatments resulted in higher soil electric conductivities than HAc-NaAc and HAc-NaAc+EDTA treatments. Ultimately, enhancement by lactic acid+NaOH resulted in highest removal efficiency (81% Cu removal) from the red soil. The presence of EDTA did not enhance Cu removal efficiencies from the red soil, because EDTA complexed with Cu to form negatively charge complexes, which slowly migrated toward the anode chamber retarding Cu2+ transport towards the cathode. PMID:15172599

  1. Processes affecting the dissipation of the herbicide isoxaflutole and its diketonitrile metabolite in agricultural soils under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Papiernik, Sharon K; Yates, Scott R; Koskinen, William C; Barber, Brian

    2007-10-17

    Two-year field dissipation studies were conducted in three soil types in Minnesota to examine the processes affecting the dissipation of the herbicide isoxaflutole and its phytotoxic diketonitrile metabolite (DKN) under relatively cool, wet soil conditions. Plots of cuphea were treated with isoxaflutole and potassium bromide, a nonsorbed, nondegraded tracer. Replicate soil cores were collected six times during the growing season to a depth of 1 m, and the bromide or herbicide concentration was measured in each of five depth increments. The dissipation half-life (DT50) of isoxaflutole + DKN was 8-18 days in each soil. Bromide and herbicide concentrations were low at depths >40 cm throughout the study, and herbicide concentrations in soil 100 days after application were usually undetectable. Simulation modeling using Hydrus-1D for the loam soil suggested that plant uptake was an important mechanism of dissipation. PMID:17880161

  2. [Ammonia volatilization of slow release compound fertilizer in different soils water conditions].

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-feng; Wang, Zheng-yin; You, Yuan; Li, Jing-chao

    2010-08-01

    By using venting method incubation experiment, we studied the ammonia volatilization and kinetics characteristics of uncoated slowed release compound fertilizer (SRF) under different soil water conditions and the growth and nitrogen utilization efficiency of rice in pot experiment. Results indicated that the ammonia volatilization of SRF under waterflooding reached the peak ahead of 3-4 days compared to the moist treatment. The peak and accumulation of ammonia volatilization in the waterflooding treatments were higher than those under the moist condition. SRF could significantly reduce total ammonia volatilization compared to the common compound fertilizer (CCF), reduced by 50.6% and 22.8% in the moist treatment and reduced by 24.2% and 10.4% in the waterflooding treatment,but the loss of ammonia volatilization of SRF was higher significantly than that of the coated fertilizer (CRF). Ammonia volatilization increased with the increasing of fertilizer application. The dynamics of ammonia volatilization of SRF could be quantitatively described with three equations: the first order kinetics equation, Elovich equation and parabola equation. Compared to moist condition, the biomass of rice plant in SRF, CCF and SRF treatments increased by 67.86%, 78.25% and 48.75%, and nitrogen utilization efficiency increased by 57.73%, 80.70% and 12.06% under waterflooding condition, respectively. Comparing with CCF, nitrogen utilization efficiency in SRF treatment improved by 59.10% and 10.40% under two soil moisture conditions. SRF could reduce ammonia volatilization and improve biomass and nitrogen utilization efficiency. PMID:21090317

  3. Influence of Soil Moisture Conditions On The Flood Frequency Distribution: A Case Study With 10000 Years Synthetic Rainfall Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martina, M.; Todini, E.

    Soil moisture conditions within the catchment have a primary importance for the anal- ysis of flood risk but insufficiency of data or unavailability of measurements make them useless for operative purposes. Therefore classical simulation techniques to es- timate design flood can not consider the effects of the catchment initial soil moisture conditions. The aim of this work is to assess the influence of the soil conditions on water flow during flood event and especially on the flood frequency distribution. The proposed technique makes use of a stochastic point process, Neyman-Scott Rectan- gular Pulse, for generating a 10000 years rainfall series combined with a physically based rainfall-runoff model, TOPKAPI, for transforming rainfall into discharge and mean soil moisture conditions within the catchment. Finally the annual maximum floods have been extracted from the discharge series and their frequency distribution has been analyzed. The results have been compared with those from a traditional sim- ulation approach which uses a rainfall intensity-duration (IDF) relationship combined with the same rainfall-runoff TOPKAPI model but initialized by arbitrary soil mois- ture conditions. As it was expected the comparison shows that the influence of the soil conditions on flood frequency distribution is not negligible and gives reasonability to the methodology applied . The chosen study area is a North-Italian catchment where several years of hourly rainfall data series were available.

  4. Field lysimeters for the study of fate and transport of explosive chemicals in soils under variable environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, Gloria M.; Padilla, Ingrid; Pando, Miguel; Pérez, Diego D.

    2006-05-01

    Landmines and other buried explosive devices pose in an immense threat in many places of the world, requiring large efforts on detection and neutralization of these objects. Many of the available detection techniques require the presence of chemicals near the soil-atmospheric surface. The presence of explosive related chemicals (ERCs) near this surface and their relation to the location of landmines, however, depends on the source characteristics and on fate and transport processes that affect their movement in soils. Fate and transport processes of ERC is soils may be interrelated with each other and are influenced by chemical characteristics and interrelated soil and environmental factors. Accurate detection of ERCs near the soil surface must, therefore, take into the variability of ERC concentration distributions near the soil surface as affected by fate and transport processes controlled interrelated environmental factors. To effectively predict the concentration distributions of ERCs in soils and near soil surfaces, it is necessary to have good understanding of parameters values that control these processes. To address this need, field lysimeters have been designed and developed at the University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez .This paper presents the design of two field lysimeter used to study the fate and transport behavior of ERC in the field subjected to varying uncontrolled subtropical environmental conditions in two different soils. Both lysimeters incorporate pressure and concentration sampling ports, thermocouples, and a drainage system. Hydrus-2D was used to simulate soil moisture and drainage in the lysimeter for average environmental conditions in the study for the two soils used. The field lysimeters allow collection and monitoring of spatial and temporal ERC concentrations under variable, uncontrolled environmental conditions.

  5. Transport of simazine in unsaturated sandy soil and predictions of its leaching under hypothetical field conditions.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Francisco; Bachmann, Jaime; Muñoz, José F; Ortiz, Cristian; Tyler, Scott W; Alister, Claudio; Kogan, Marcelo

    2007-12-01

    The potential contamination of groundwater by herbicides is often controlled by processes in the vadose zone, through which herbicides travel before entering groundwater. In the vadose zone, both physical and chemical processes affect the fate and transport of herbicides, therefore it is important to represent these processes by mathematical models to predict contaminant movement. To simulate the movement of simazine, a herbicide commonly used in Chilean vineyards, batch and miscible displacement column experiments were performed on a disturbed sandy soil to quantify the primary parameters and processes of simazine transport. Chloride (Cl(-)) was used as a non-reactive tracer, and simazine as the reactive tracer. The Hydrus-1D model was used to estimate the parameters by inversion from the breakthrough curves of the columns and to evaluate the potential groundwater contamination in a sandy soil from the Casablanca Valley, Chile. The two-site, chemical non-equilibrium model was observed to best represent the experimental results of the miscible displacement experiments in laboratory soil columns. Predictions of transport under hypothetical field conditions using the same soil from the column experiments were made for 40 years by applying herbicide during the first 20 years, and then halting the application and considering different rates of groundwater recharge. For recharge rates smaller than 84 mm year(-1), the predicted concentration of simazine at a depth of 1 m is below the U.S. EPA's maximum contaminant levels (4 microg L(-1)). After eight years of application at a groundwater recharge rate of 180 mm year(-1) (approximately 50% of the annual rainfall), simazine was found to reach the groundwater (located at 1 m depth) at a higher concentration (more than 40 microg L(-1)) than the existing guidelines in the USA and Europe. PMID:17604874

  6. Analysis of soil water repellency under different eco-geomorphological conditions in Mediterranean environments (South of Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Donaire, Virginia; Gabarron-Galeote, Miguel A.; Martinez-Murillo, Juan F.; Ruiz-Sinoga, Jose D.

    2013-04-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) is a soil property that reduces its water affinity. Although it has been frequently related to wildfires, different studies in recent decades have shown that repellent soils are not rare, and they are widely spread around the world under various climatic, soil and vegetation conditions, on burned and unburned soils. The research described here was carried out in two Mediterranean rangelands containing similar Mediterranean tree and shrub species but differing in soil conditions. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of vegetal species, pH, soil organic matter (SOM), soil water content (SWC) and prescribed fire over SWR. In June 2011, two samples from the first 5 cm of soil, one up and one downslope from plants, were collected under the dominant species of the two study areas (Nerja -NE- and Almogía -AL-), in a north-facing hillslope . In NE the selected species were Pinus halepensis (Ph), Cistus clusii (Cc), Rosmarinus officinalis (Ro), Thymus vulgaris (Tv) and Stipa tenacissima (St). In addition samples were collected in bare soil (Bs, at least 1.5m far away from the nearest shrub), under burned shrubs (Bsc) and in burned bare soil (Bbs). A controlled fire was conducted in April 2011. In AL the selected species were Quercus suber (Qs), Cistus monspeliensis (Cm) and Cistus albidus (Ca). The results indicate: i) SWR is a common phenomenon in Mediterranean environments, in acid as well as in alkaline soils, but with a great variability in every study area depending on the vegetal species (Ro and Qs) were those more repellent to water; ii) OM seems to be a more influential factor over soil water repellency than acidity, which only was found a controlling factor for alkaline soils; iii climate and vegetation type, influencing SOM leading to hydrophobic conditions, are more key factors controlling SWR than bedrock characteristics; iv) SWC threshold for water repellency to be disappeared were not clearly stated independently of

  7. [Spatial variability of surface soil moisture content in depression area of karst region under moist and arid conditions].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiguang; Chen, Hongsong; Su, Yirong; Wu, Jinshui; Zhang, Wei

    2006-12-01

    By the methods of geostatistics, this paper studied the spatial structure and distribution pattern of surface soil (0 - 5 and 5 - 10 cm) moisture content in the depression area of karst region in northwest Guangxi under moist and arid conditions in the forepart of dry season. The results showed that in test area, surface soil moisture content had obvious spatial heterogeneity and anisotropy, presenting a significantly different plaque distribution pattern. Under moist condition, surface soil moisture content had a medium or stronger spatial relativity, with a range of about 33.15 and 15.75 m, respectively, and an obvious trend effect in 0 - 5 cm soil layer. Under arid condition, the spatial relativity was strong, and the spatial scale of resembling plaque had somewhat decrease, with the smallest range being 8.22 m. The moisture content under arid condition had a higher spatial variability, and thus, the sampling strategy should be based on the mean soil moisture content. The significant difference in the spatial variability and distribution pattern of surface soil moisture in test area was mainly due to the effects of physiognomy, soil mean moisture (precipitation), and topography. PMID:17330464

  8. Controls of soil hydraulic characteristics on modeling groundwater recharge under different climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tiejun; Franz, Trenton E.; Zlotnik, Vitaly A.

    2015-02-01

    To meet the challenge of estimating spatially varying groundwater recharge (GR), increasing attention has been given to the use of vadose zone models (VZMs). However, the application of this approach is usually constrained by the lack of field soil hydraulic characteristics (SHCs) required by VZMs. To tackle this issue, SHCs based on the van Genuchten or Brooks-Corey model are generally estimated by pedotransfer functions or taken from texture based class averages. With the increasing use of this method, it is important to elucidate the controls of SHCs on computing GR mostly due to the high nonlinearity of the models. In this study, it is hypothesized that the nonlinear controls of SHCs on computing GR would vary with climatic conditions. To test this hypothesis, a widely used VZM along with two SHCs datasets for sand and loamy sand is used to compute GR at four sites in the continental Unites States with a significant gradient of precipitation (P). The simulation results show that the distribution patterns of mean annual GR ratios (GR ‾ / P ‾ , where GR ‾ and P ‾ are mean annual GR and P, respectively) vary considerably across the sites, largely depending on soil texture and climatic conditions at each site. It is found that GR ‾ / P ‾ is mainly controlled by the shape factor n in the van Genuchten model and the nonlinear effect of n on GR ‾ / P ‾ varies with climatic conditions. Specifically, for both soil textures, the variability in GR ‾ / P ‾ is smallest at the Andrews Forest with the highest P ‾ (191.3 cm/year) and GR ‾ / P ‾ is least sensitive to n; whereas, the variability in GR ‾ / P ‾ at the Konza Prairie (P ‾ = 84.2 cm/year) is the largest and GR ‾ / P ‾ is most sensitive to n. With further decreasing P ‾ , the nonlinear effect of n weakens at the Barta Brothers (P ‾ = 57.3 cm/year) and Sevilleta (P ‾ = 20.3 cm/year), leading to smaller GR ‾ / P ‾ variability at those two sites than at the Konza Prairie. The

  9. Aerobic Exercise Program Reduces Anger Expression Among Overweight Children

    PubMed Central

    Tkacz, Joseph; Young-Hyman, Deborah; Boyle, Colleen A.; Davis, Catherine L.

    2009-01-01

    This study tested the effect of a structured aerobic exercise program on anger expression in healthy overweight children. Overweight, sedentary children were randomly assigned to an aerobic exercise program or a no-exercise control condition. All children completed the Pediatric Anger Expression Scale at baseline and posttest. Anger Out and Anger Expression scores were lower for the exercise condition at posttest. Fitness improvements contributed significantly to final models, and points earned for adherence correlated negatively with posttest Anger Out. An aerobic exercise program might be an effective strategy to reduce anger expression, including reduction of aggressive behavior, in overweight children. PMID:19168916

  10. Protective effect of Klebsiella bacteria on lawn grasses under conditions of soil salinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emtsev, V. T.; Sokolova, A. Ya.; Selitskaya, O. V.

    2010-07-01

    The protective effect of the inoculation of lawn grasses grown under conditions of soil salinization with bacteria of the Klebsiella genus ( K. planticola and K. pneumoniae) was demonstrated. It was found that K. pneumoniae improves the plant growth under conditions of a high concentration of sodium chloride. It was also shown that the inoculation of lawn grasses with these bacteria optimizes the morphophysiological parameters of the plants and increases the number of mitoses in the apical parts of the roots, which leads to a less significant decrease in the mitotic index under the impact of salinization. The capacity of K. planticola to penetrate into the plants may favor the activation of protective mechanisms improving the immunological status of the plants and, hence, their tolerance to salinization.

  11. Evaluation of Noah-LSM for soil hydrology parameters in the Indian summer monsoon conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, M. N.; Kumar, Manoj; Waghmare, R. T.; Dharmaraj, T.; Mahanty, N. C.

    2014-10-01

    The micrometeorological observations, collected over a station in Ranchi (23°45'N, 85°30'E) which is under the monsoon trough region of India, were used in the Noah-LSM (NCEP, OSU, Air Force and Office of Hydrology Land Surface Model) to investigate the model performance in wet (2009 and 2011) and dry (2010) conditions during the south-west summer monsoon season. With this analysis, it is seen that the Noah-LSM has simulated the diurnal cycle of heat fluxes (sensible and ground) reasonably. The simulated heat fluxes were compared with its direct measurements by sonic anemometer and soil heat flux plate. The net radiation and sensible heat flux are simulated well by the model, but the simulation of ground heat flux was found to be poor in both dry as well as wet conditions. The soil temperature simulations were also found to be poor in 0-5- and 5-10-cm layers compared to other deeper layers. The observations were also correlated with the Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) data. The correlation between the observations and ground heat flux was better in MERRA dataset than that of the Noah-LSM simulation.

  12. Analyzing Shallow Landslides and Rainfall Conditions in Taiwan: An Application of the Soil Water Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. W.; Saito, H.; Oguchi, T.

    2014-12-01

    Rainfall-induced landslides are significant natural hazards in Taiwan. This study analyzes 282 shallow landslides in Taiwan during 2006-2013 to identify the rainfall conditions responsible for landslides. We used the soil water index (SWI) which can represent the conceptual soil water contents as influenced by present and antecedent rainfall. SWI is used by the Japan Meteorological Agency to assess landslide hazards in Japan. Previous studies show that SWI can successfully predict the occurrence of landslides but only for Japan. Therefore, this study examines whether SWI can be also applied to Taiwan. We used the landslide data in 2006-2012 for analyses and those in 2013 for verification. The values of SWI before the rainfall events which triggered landslides were used as the indicator of the antecedent rainfall condition. We found that under different values of SWI before rainfall events, the rainfall conditions needed for triggering landslides, such as the rainfall intensity and duration, are different. Then we classified rainfall condition for triggering landslides into two types, short duration-high intensity (SH) and long duration-low intensity (LL), based on SWI and the principal component analysis. The SH type is associated with a rapid increase of SWI with short duration, and the LL type is with a gradual rise and subsequent constancy of SWI. Based on this result, we modeled the general trend of changes in SWI for the two types. We then verified the model by analyzing 19 landslides that occurred in 2013 with 14 SH types and five LL types. We also checked hourly changes in SWI for these 19 events and found that they all followed the general trend of the inferred SH and LL curves. Based on these results, it would be possible to predict a landslide of the SH or LL type, at an early stage of a rainfall event. Our results indicate that SWI is applicable to Taiwan in assessing regional landslide hazards.

  13. Effect of land abandonment on soil organic carbon fractions along a precipitation gradient in Mediterranean conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabarron-Galeote, Miguel A.; Trigalet, Sylvain; van Wesemael, Bas

    2015-04-01

    Land abandonment has been the main land use change in rural European Mediterranean areas over the last decades. The secondary succession process following land abandonment is strongly affected by precipitation, which in consequence determines the parallel change of soil organic carbon (SOC) and other soil properties. SOC is usually assumed to increase due to the intensification of plant residues inputs to soil, above as well below ground. However, SOC is composed of different fractions with contrasting resistance to decomposition that can have different responses to land abandonment. The objectives of this study are: i) to determine the net effect of land abandonment on the different soil organic carbon fractions; ii) to assess the relation between vegetation evolution and SOC fractions; iii) to establish the conditions with the greater potential to store stable SOC along a precipitation gradient. Three field sites with contrasting annual precipitation (GAU: 1080.5 mm yr-1- ALM: 650 mm yr-1- GER: 350 mm yr-1) were selected. On each site Fields abandoned in different periods, as verified on aerial photographs taken in 1956, 1977, 1984, 1998, 2001, 2004 and 2009, were selected using a chronosequence approach. The fractionation protocol implemented was based on the separation of different soil particle sizes, which are associated to SOC pools with different degree of stability. Samples of the first 10 cm of soil were added to a sodium-hexametaphosphate (HMP) solution (40 g L-1) and shaken horizontally for 1h (150 r.p.m.). The soil solution was then sieved consecutively through two meshes of 250 µm and 50 µm, obtaining the following fractions: i) >250 µm (coarse fraction), it contains coarse particles (coarse sand) and plant residues (particulate organic matter, POM), easily decomposable, that constitute the more labile SOC pool; ii) 50 - 250 µm (mid fraction), it contains fine sand, fine POM easily decomposable and stable microaggregates, that contains SOC

  14. [Effect of sulfur on the species of Fe and As under redox condition in paddy soil].

    PubMed

    Tang, Bing-Pei; Yang, Shi-Jie; Wang, Dai-Zhang; Rao, Wei; Zhang, Ya-Nan; Wang, Dan; Zhu, Yun-Ji

    2014-10-01

    Redox conditions of the polluted paddy soil with exogenous As were simulated by redox reaction apparatus after flowing N2 and O2 applied with different forms of inorganic sulfur(CK-S0, elemental sulfur-S1 and sulfate-S2). Results showed that redox potential (Eh) was about -100 - -200 mV and the pH 7.0-8.0 and the pe + pH 4-7 in soil solution when flowed N2, and Eh about 200 mV and the pH 6.5-7.5 and pe + pH 9-12 when continuously flowed O2. Concentrations of the dissolved Fe in soil solution were in 1.2-1.6 mg x L(-1) either flowed N2 or O2, and the order of Fe concentrations was AsS0 treatment > AsS1 treatment > AsS2 treatment. Amounts of soil Fe oxide by HCl extraction from different treatments were 5 g · kg(-1) lower than the original soil [(21.4 ± 0.3) g · kg(-1)] when flowed N2, and it was in favor of the transformation of crystal Fe into amorphous iron and Fe2+. Activity of Fe oxides from different treatments increased comparing to that of the original soil (46. 8%), and the order of activity of Fe oxides was AsS2 treatment (49.4%) < AsS1 treatment (60%). Fe2+ in solution and FeS were oxidized into Fe3+, and hydrolysis of Fe3+ was produced into Fe(OH)3 precipitation when flowed O2. It increased the contents of acid-soluble and crystal Fe oxide, and the order of activity of Fe oxides was AsS1 (41.2%) treatment > AsS2 (36.1%) treatment. Concentrations of As in soil solution were in the order of AsS0 [(1.13 ± 0.04) mg · L(-1)] > AsS1 [(0.89 ± 0.01) mg L(- 1)] > AsS2 [ (0.77 ± 0.04 )mg · L(-1)] when flowed N2 and was AsS1 [(0.77 ± 0.01) mg · L(-1)] > AsS0 [(0.20 ± 0.09 ) mg · L(-1)] > AsS2 [(0.09 ± 0.01) mg · L(-1)] when flowed O2. The proportions of arsenic fractions followed the order of the residual phases (34.9%-41.4%) ≈ specifically-sorbed (37.4%-39.5%) > well-crystallized hydrous oxides of Fe/Mn (23.3%-25.6%) > non-specifically sorbed (2.4%-3.3%) > amorphous hydrous oxides of Fe/Mn (0.5%-0.8%) when flowed N2, and was the residual phases (30

  15. SIMULATING SOIL ORGANIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN COTTON PRODUCTION SYSTEMS WITH EPIC AND THE SOIL CONDITIONING INDEX IN THE SOUTHEASTERN USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequestration of soil organic carbon (SOC) in the southeastern USA is perceived as occurring at a relatively low rate, because of the inherent low SOC content of most agricultural soils. However, recent field estimates of SOC sequestration in conservation management systems suggest that the sequest...

  16. An evaluation of models of bare soil evaporation formulated with different land surface boundary conditions and assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, Kathleen M.; Ngo, Viet V.; Cihan, Abdullah; Sakaki, Toshihiro; Illangasekare, Tissa H.

    2012-12-01

    Bare soil evaporation is a key process for water exchange between the land and the atmosphere and an important component of the water balance. However, there is no agreement on the best modeling methodology to determine evaporation under different atmospheric boundary conditions. Also, there is a lack of directly measured soil evaporation data for model validation to compare these methods to establish the validity of their mathematical formulations. Thus, a need exists to systematically compare evaporation estimates using existing methods to experimental observations. The goal of this work is to test different conceptual and mathematical formulations that are used to estimate evaporation from bare soils to critically investigate various formulations and surface boundary conditions. Such a comparison required the development of a numerical model that has the ability to incorporate these boundary conditions. For this model, we modified a previously developed theory that allows nonequilibrium liquid/gas phase change with gas phase vapor diffusion to better account for dry soil conditions. Precision data under well-controlled transient heat and wind boundary conditions were generated, and results from numerical simulations were compared with experimental data. Results demonstrate that the approaches based on different boundary conditions varied in their ability to capture different stages of evaporation. All approaches have benefits and limitations, and no one approach can be deemed most appropriate for every scenario. Comparisons of different formulations of the surface boundary condition validate the need for further research on heat and vapor transport processes in soil for better modeling accuracy.

  17. Factors controlling magnetism of reddish brown soil profiles from calcarenites in Southern Spain: Dust input or in-situ pedogenesis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingsong; Zhang, Chunxia; Torrent, José; Barrón, Vidal; Hu, Pengxiang; Jiang, Zhaoxia; Duan, Zongqi

    2016-05-01

    Under aerobic conditions, the A and B horizons of soils are magnetically enhanced due to neoformation of ferrimagnets through pedogenesis. This study systematically investigated soils developed on calcarenites of Neogene age in southern Spain to determine the dominant factors controlling the soil magnetism. Geochemical and clay mineral analyses indicate that aeolian dust significantly contribute to the A and B horizon material of the Spanish soil. Nevertheless, the magnetic enhancement of soils can be simply attributed to the pedogenically produced ferrimagnets in-situ. Therefore, the magnetism of Spanish soils is still linked to paleoclimatic variations regardless of the complexities of aeolian inputs from the Northwestern Africa.

  18. Vegetative survival of some wall and soil blue-green algae under stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Agrawal, S C

    2008-01-01

    Lyngbya major (a wall alga), survived throughout year, maximally to >80 % at atmospheric temperature (AT) of 17-36 degrees C and relative humidity (RH) 60-100 % in rainy and spring seasons, but the survival was 43-64 % in winter when AT decreased to 5 degrees C and RH was 65-98 %, and 15-23 % in summer when AT reached 48 degrees C and RH was 23-60 %. All soil algae (Lyngbya birgei, Aphanothece pallida, Gloeocapsa atrata, Oscillatoria subbrevis, O. animalis) survived >90 % in rainy season when soil moisture content (SMC) was 89-100 %. Lowering of SMC to a minimum of 55 % in spring and 39 % in winter led L. birgei, O. subbrevis and O. animalis to survive from 75, 66, and 65 %, respectively, in spring and 12, 14, and 20 % in winter, and A. pallida and G. atrata not at all in both seasons. All soil algae did not survive in summer when SMC was 12-30 %. Myxosarcina burmensis survived only in rainy and spring seasons when pond water temperature (PWT) was 19-25 degrees C and 18-26 degrees C, respectively, and not in winter and summer when PWT was 2-14 degrees C and 25-36 degrees C, respectively. L. major and A. pallida survived almost equally well under both submerged and air-exposed conditions for 15 d but less if submerged for more time than air-exposed on moist soil surface, while L. birgei, G. atrata, O. subbrevis, and O. animalis survived submergence in liquid medium better and longer than air-exposure on moist soil surface. Pond alga M. burmensis survived submergence better than air-exposure, true to its aquatic habitat. All algae survived less and died without forming any resistant cells when exposed to physical and physiological water stress (imposed by growing them on highly agarized media or in salinized liquid media), light stress (at 0, 2 and 10 micromol m(-2) s(-1) light intensity) or following UV shock (0.96-3.84 kJ/m(2)). A. pallida and G. atrata cells did not divide on 8 % agarized solid media, in > or =0.3 mol/L salinized liquid media, and in darkness. The

  19. Soil Water Content Sensor Response to Organic Matter Content under Laboratory Conditions.

    PubMed

    Fares, Ali; Awal, Ripendra; Bayabil, Haimanote K

    2016-01-01

    Studies show that the performance of soil water content monitoring (SWCM) sensors is affected by soil physical and chemical properties. However, the effect of organic matter on SWCM sensor responses remains less understood. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to (i) assess the effect of organic matter on the accuracy and precision of SWCM sensors using a commercially available soil water content monitoring sensor; and (ii) account for the organic matter effect on the sensor's accuracy. Sand columns with seven rates of oven-dried sawdust (2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, 10%, 12% and 18% v/v, used as an organic matter amendment), thoroughly mixed with quartz sand, and a control without sawdust were prepared by packing quartz sand in two-liter glass containers. Sand was purposely chosen because of the absence of any organic matter or salinity, and also because sand has a relatively low cation exchange capacity that will not interfere with the treatment effect of the current work. Sensor readings (raw counts) were monitored at seven water content levels (0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.08, 0.12, 0.18, 0.24, and 0.30 cm³ cm(-3)) by uniformly adding the corresponding volumes of deionized water in addition to the oven-dry one. Sensor readings were significantly (p < 0.05) affected by the organic matter level and water content. Sensor readings were strongly correlated with the organic matter level (R² = 0.92). In addition, the default calibration equation underestimated the water content readings at the lower water content range (<0.05 cm³ cm(-3)), while it overestimated the water content at the higher water conte